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1

Vibration therapy.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration training is a method for muscle strengthening that is increasingly used in a variety of clinical situations. Key descriptors of vibration devices include the frequency, the amplitude, and the direction of the vibration movement. In a typical vibration session, the user stands on the device in a static position or performs dynamic movements. Most authors hypothesize that vibrations stimulate muscle spindles and alpha-motoneurons, which initiate a muscle contraction. An immediate effect of a non-exhausting vibration session is an increase in muscle power. Most studies of the longer term use of vibration treatment in various disorders have pursued three therapeutic aims: increasing muscle strength, improving balance, and increasing bone mass. In a small pilot trial in children we noted improvements in standing function, lumbar spine bone mineral density, tibial bone mass, and calf muscle cross-sectional area. PMID:19740225

Rauch, Frank

2009-10-01

2

Whole-body vibration therapy for osteoporosis: state of the science.  

PubMed

Clinical guidelines for osteoporosis recommend dietary and pharmacologic interventions and weight-bearing exercise to prevent bone fractures. These interventions sometimes have low adherence and can cause adverse effects. A proposed alternative or adjunctive treatment is whole-body vibration therapy (WBV), in which energy produced by a forced oscillation is transferred to an individual from a mechanical vibration platform. Whole-body vibration platforms are not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for medical purposes. This review provides a broad overview of important issues related to WBV therapy for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Relying on key informants and a search of the gray and published literature from January 2000 to August 2011, the investigators found that the designs of WBV platforms and protocols for their use vary widely. The optimal target population for the therapy is not defined. Although WBV has some theoretical advantages, key informants have voiced several concerns, including uncertain safety and potential consumer confusion between low-intensity vibration platforms intended for osteoporosis therapy and high-intensity platforms intended for exercise. Finally, the scant literature did not establish whether WBV therapy leads to clinically important increases in bone mineral density or reduces risk for fracture. PMID:22084334

Wysocki, Andrea; Butler, Mary; Shamliyan, Tatyana; Kane, Robert L

2011-11-15

3

Whole body vibration therapy in fracture prevention among adults with chronic disease.  

PubMed

Due to various physical impairments, individuals with chronic diseases often live a sedentary lifestyle, which leads to physical de-conditioning. The associated muscle weakness, functional decline and bone loss also render these individuals highly susceptible to falls and fragility fractures. There is an urgent need to search for safe and effective intervention strategies to prevent fragility fractures by modifying the fall-related risk factors and enhancing bone health. Whole body vibration (WBV) therapy has gained popularity in rehabilitation in recent years. In this type of treatment, mechanical vibration is delivered to the body while the individual is standing on an oscillating platform. As mechanical loading is one of the most powerful stimuli to induce osteogenesis, it is proposed that the mechanical stress applied to the human skeleton in WBV therapy might be beneficial for enhancing bone mass. Additionally, the vibratory signals also constitute a form of sensory stimulation and can induce reflex muscle activation, which could potentially induce therapeutic effects on muscle strength and important sensorimotor functions such as postural control. Increasing research evidence suggests that WBV is effective in enhancing hip bone mineral density, muscle strength and balance ability in elderly patients, and could have potential for individuals with chronic diseases, who often cannot tolerate vigorous impact or resistance exercise training. This article aims to discuss the potential role of WBV therapy in the prevention of fragility fractures among people with chronic diseases. PMID:22474623

Pang, Marco Yc

2010-11-18

4

Effect of whole body vibration therapy on circulating serotonin levels in an ovariectomized rat model of osteoporosis  

PubMed Central

Objective(s): Studies have reported that whole body vibration (WBV) played a vital role in bone remodeling. Circulating serotonin is also involved in negative regulating bone mass in rodents and humans. However, both WBV and inhibition of serotonin biosynthesis may suppress receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of WBV therapy on the levels of serum serotonin in ovariectomized rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six-month-old female Sprague Dawley rats weighing 276.15±37.75 g were ovariectomized to induce osteoporosis, and another ten rats underwent sham operation to establish sham control (SHAM) group. After 3 months, ovariectomized rats were divided into three subgroups and then separately treated with WBV, Alendronate (ALN) and normal saline (OVX), SHAM group was given normal saline. After 6 weeks of treatment, rats were sacrificed. Serum serotonin, RANKL, bone turnover markers, and bone mineral density (BMD), bone strength were evaluated. Results: The serum serotonin level was significantly lower in WBV group than OVX and ALN groups (P<0.05 and P<0.001). RANKL levels significantly decreased in WBV and ALN groups compared to OVX group (P<0.001 for both). BMD and biomechanical parameters of femur significantly increased (P<0.05 for both) and bone turnover levels decreased (P<0.001 for both) in WBV group compared to OVX group. Conclusion: These data indicated that WBV enhanced the bone strength and BMD in ovariectomized rats most likely by reducing the levels of circulating serotonin. PMID:24592309

Wei, Qiu-Shi; Huang, Li; Chen, Xian-Hong; Wang, Hai-Bin; Sun, Wei-Shan; Huo., Shao-Chuan; Li, Zi-Qi; Deng, Wei-Min

2014-01-01

5

Whole body vibration and the snowmobile.  

PubMed

The whole body vibration from the seat and foot board was measured during ten years from 11 different snowmobiles to evaluate the exposure and the need for technical improvements. In a questionnaire more than half of the drivers had back pains but only a few of them considered the whole body vibration as a health hazard. However in the literature there is often comments on spinal injuries related to shock vibration. The frequency-weighted acceleration of snowmobile vibration was from 1 to 6.1 m/s2 and the risk evaluation using the ISO standard predicted the problems. Speed and the unevenness of the driving terrain caused vibration. The damping depends on the properties of the seat, terrain and speed limits. Also the driving posture is important. Especially on the snowmobile tracks the whole body vibration was high and according to modern knowledge more attention should be paid the technical properties of snowmobiles. PMID:7710588

Anttonen, H; Niskanen, J

1994-01-01

6

Body height change from motor vehicle vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seventeen (17) subjects were exposed to tri-axial vehicle whole-body vibration for approximately 3h, and measured hourly for body height. The control was the same environment, but no vibration. A broad band predominantly z-axis acceleration (1.6–10Hz), with a mean level of 0.885m\\/s2 at the seat, was generated by a semi-truck tractor driven on secondary roads. The dominant one-third octave band of

G. A Hampel; Wen-Ruey Chang

1999-01-01

7

Vibration Therapy in Management of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS)  

PubMed Central

Both athletic and nonathletic population when subjected to any unaccustomed or unfamiliar exercise will experience pain 24-72 hours postexercise. This exercise especially eccentric in nature caused primarily by muscle damage is known as delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). This damage is characterized by muscular pain, decreased muscle force production, reduce range of motion and discomfort experienced. DOMS is due to microscopic muscle fiber tears. The presence of DOMS increases risk of injury. A reduced range of motion may lead to the incapability to efficiently absorb the shock that affect physical activity. Alterations to mechanical motion may increase strain placed on soft tissue structures. Reduced force output may signal compensatory recruitment of muscles, thus leading to unaccustomed stress on musculature. Differences in strength ratios may also cause excessive strain on unaccustomed musculature. A range of interventions aimed at decreasing symptoms of DOMS have been proposed. Although voluminous research has been done in this regard, there is little consensus among the practitioners regarding the most effective way of treating DOMS. Mechanical oscillatory motion provided by vibration therapy. Vibration could represent an effective exercise intervention for enhancing neuromuscular performance in athletes. Vibration has shown effectiveness in flexibility and explosive power. Vibration can apply either local area or whole body vibration. Vibration therapy improves muscular strength, power development, kinesthetic awareness, decreased muscle sore, increased range of motion, and increased blood flow under the skin. VT was effective for reduction of DOMS and regaining full ROM. Application of whole body vibration therapy in postexercise demonstrates less pressure pain threshold, muscle soreness along with less reduction maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength and lower creatine kinase levels in the blood. PMID:25121012

Imtiyaz, Shagufta

2014-01-01

8

Vibration Therapy in Management of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS).  

PubMed

Both athletic and nonathletic population when subjected to any unaccustomed or unfamiliar exercise will experience pain 24-72 hours postexercise. This exercise especially eccentric in nature caused primarily by muscle damage is known as delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). This damage is characterized by muscular pain, decreased muscle force production, reduce range of motion and discomfort experienced. DOMS is due to microscopic muscle fiber tears. The presence of DOMS increases risk of injury. A reduced range of motion may lead to the incapability to efficiently absorb the shock that affect physical activity. Alterations to mechanical motion may increase strain placed on soft tissue structures. Reduced force output may signal compensatory recruitment of muscles, thus leading to unaccustomed stress on musculature. Differences in strength ratios may also cause excessive strain on unaccustomed musculature. A range of interventions aimed at decreasing symptoms of DOMS have been proposed. Although voluminous research has been done in this regard, there is little consensus among the practitioners regarding the most effective way of treating DOMS. Mechanical oscillatory motion provided by vibration therapy. Vibration could represent an effective exercise intervention for enhancing neuromuscular performance in athletes. Vibration has shown effectiveness in flexibility and explosive power. Vibration can apply either local area or whole body vibration. Vibration therapy improves muscular strength, power development, kinesthetic awareness, decreased muscle sore, increased range of motion, and increased blood flow under the skin. VT was effective for reduction of DOMS and regaining full ROM. Application of whole body vibration therapy in postexercise demonstrates less pressure pain threshold, muscle soreness along with less reduction maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength and lower creatine kinase levels in the blood. PMID:25121012

Veqar, Zubia; Imtiyaz, Shagufta

2014-06-01

9

Effect of whole body vibrations on sound localization I. Frissena  

E-print Network

Effect of whole body vibrations on sound localization I. Frissena and C. Guastavinob a IRCCyN, 1 the efficacy of sound spatialization. While effects of whole-body vibrations have been found to impair simple did we observe an effect of whole-body vibrations on localization performance. 1 Introduction Exposure

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

10

MEASUREMENT OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION EXPOSURE FROM GARBAGE TRUCKS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Japanese garbage truck drivers are exposed to mechanical whole-body vibration during their work. Some drivers have suffered from low back pain from this vibration. However, there is no evidence of a relationship between the whole-body vibration from the garbage trucks and low back pain or occupational disease, due to the lack of investigations. A field study was conducted in order

S. Maeda; M. Morioka

1998-01-01

11

Vibration Exposure and Biodynamic Responses during Whole-Body Vibration Training  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABERCROMBY, A. F. J., W. E. AMONETTE, C. S. LAYNE, B. K. MCFARLIN, M. R. HINMAN, and W. H. PALOSKI. Vibration Exposure and Biodynamic Responses during Whole-Body Vibration Training. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 39, No. 10, pp. 1794-1800, 2007. Purpose: Excessive, chronic whole-body vibration (WBV) has a number of negative side effects on the human body, including disorders of

ANDREW F. J. ABERCROMBY; WILLIAM E. AMONETTE; CHARLES S. LAYNE; BRIAN K. MCFARLIN; MARTHA R. HINMAN; WILLIAM H. PALOSKI

2007-01-01

12

Modeling of Spinal Column of Seated Human Body under Exposure to Whole-Body Vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

In vehicle systems occupational drivers might expose themselves to vibration for a long time. This may cause illness of the spinal column such as low back pain. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the influence of vibration to the spinal column. Thus the modeling of seated human body is conducted in order to evaluate the effect of whole-body vibration to

Gen Tamaoki; Takuya Yoshimura; Kaoru Kuriyama; Kazuma Nakai

2008-01-01

13

Hormonal responses to whole-body vibration in men  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute responses of blood hormone concentrations and neuromuscular performance following\\u000a whole-body vibration (WBV) treatment. Fourteen male subjects [mean (SD) age 25 (4.6)?years] were exposed to vertical sinusoidal\\u000a WBV, 10 times for 60?s, with 60?s rest between the vibration sets (a rest period lasting 6?min was allowed after 5 vibration\\u000a sets). Neuromuscular

Carmelo Bosco; M. Iacovelli; O. Tsarpela; M. Cardinale; M. Bonifazi; J. Tihanyi; M. Viru; A. De Lorenzo; A. Viru

2000-01-01

14

Whole-body vibration exposure: a comprehensive field study.  

PubMed

A comprehensive field study investigated whole-body vibration exposure levels experienced by the train operators of a large metropolitan subway system. The purposes of the study were to measure mechanical vibrations transmitted to the seated train operators, to calculate daily whole-body vibration exposure levels, and to compare these levels with maximum acceptable exposure levels recommended by the international standard on whole-body vibration (ISO 2631). The study also sought to identify factors that may influence mechanical vibrations transmitted to the operators and quantify their effects on the measured vibration levels. The study was carried out by dividing the subway system into subway lines, each line into southbound and northbound directions, and each direction into station-to-station observations. Triaxial measurements were made on all subway lines and for all car types used in the system. For each line, at least two round trips of data were collected. Time-weighted averages of the two sets of data were used for final presentation. A total of 48 round trips were made and more than 100 hours of vibration data was collected and analyzed. All phases of the study were carried out in accordance with the procedures outlined in ISO 2631. It was determined that 6 out of 20 subway lines had vibration levels higher than daily exposure limits recommended by ISO 2631. It was also determined that train speed was the most significant factor influencing vibration exposure levels. PMID:7825516

Ozkaya, N; Willems, B; Goldsheyder, D

1994-12-01

15

Evaluation of Whole-Body Vibration in Vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The vibration in 100 different vehicles has been measured, evaluated and assessed according to British Standard BS 6841 (1987) and International Standard ISO 2631 (1997). Vibration was measured in 14 categories of vehicle including cars, lift trucks, tractors, lorries, vans and buses. In each vehicle, the vibration was measured in five axes: vertical vibration beneath the seat, fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical vibration on the seat pan and fore-and-aft vibration at the backrest. The alternative methods of evaluating the vibration (use of different frequency weightings, different averaging methods, the inclusion of different axes, vibration dose values and equivalent r.m.s. acceleration) as defined in the standards have been compared. BS 6841 (1987) suggests that an equivalent acceleration magnitude is calculated using vibration measured at four locations around the seat (x -, y -, z -seat and x -backrest); ISO 2631 (1997) suggests that vibration is measured in the three translational axes only on the seat pan but only the axis with the most severe vibration is used to assess vibration severity. Assessments made using the procedure defined in ISO 2631 tend to underestimate any risks from exposure to whole-body vibration compared to an evaluation made using the guidelines specified in BS 6841; the measurements indicated that the 17 m/s1.75 “health guidance caution zone” in ISO 2631 was less likely to be exceeded than the 15 m/s1.75 “action level” in BS 6841. Consequently, ISO 2631 “allows” appreciably longer daily exposures to whole-body vibration than BS 6841.

PADDAN, G. S.; GRIFFIN, M. J.

2002-05-01

16

Vibration training for upper body: transmission of platform vibrations through cables.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the vibration transmission from a vibration platform through Vectran cables to the upper body and its relationship to induced muscular activation. Fifteen clinically healthy participants performed 3 different arm exercises-biceps curl, triceps curl, and lateral raise. Vibration transmission to the upper body was assessed over a wide range of accelerations (from 1.90 to 5.98 g) and frequencies (from 25 to 40 Hz). To assess the vibration transmission, 7 triaxial accelerometers were attached from the hand up to the head, and the root-mean-square of acceleration signal of each site-specific body point was calculated. Muscular activity of biceps brachii, triceps brachii, deltoid, and upper trapezius was recorded. The results showed a significant attenuation of the platform accelerations transmitted through the Vectran cables to the upper body. Handle vibration ranged between 27 and 44% of the acceleration delivered by the platform depending on platform vibration parameters (acceleration/frequency). Vibration increased the muscle activity of biceps brachii, triceps brachii, deltoid, and upper trapezius muscles significantly only during biceps curl exercises. No frequency or acceleration effect was found on the size of the muscle response. The results of the present study suggest that a cable-pulley resistance system on a vibration platform channels the vibration safely from the platform to the arms and induces additional muscle activation in some arm muscles when biceps curl exercises are performed. PMID:24077381

Tankisheva, Ekaterina; Boonen, Steven; Delecluse, Christophe; Druyts, Hans Lj; Verschueren, Sabine M P

2014-04-01

17

Effects of Whole Body Vibration Training on Body Composition in Adolescents with Down Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study aimed to determine the effect of 20 weeks of whole body vibration (WBV) on the body composition of adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Thirty adolescent with DS were divided into two groups: control and WBV. Whole body, upper and lower limbs body fat and lean body mass were measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)…

Gonzalez-Aguero, Alejandro; Matute-Llorente, Angel; Gomez-Cabello, Alba; Casajus, Jose A.; Vicente-Rodriguez, German

2013-01-01

18

Absorption of Energy during Whole-Body Vibration Exposure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Absorbed power,PAbs, during exposure to vertical and horizontal whole-body vibration in sitting posture was measured using 15 male and 15 female subjects. Different experimental conditions were applied, such as vibration level (0·25-1·4 m/s2), frequency (1·13-80 Hz), body weight (54-93 kg), relaxed and erect upper body posture. Results show thatPAbswas strongly related to frequency of the vibration peaking, within the range of 4-6 Hz and below 2·5 Hz for vertical and horizontal directions respectively.PAbsincreased with acceleration level and body weight. If risk assessment is based on the assumption that the amount ofPAbs, independence of the frequency of the vibration, indicates a hazard, then the frequency weighting procedure in ISO-standard 2631 can be questioned. The ISO weighting for horizontal vibration seems to underestimate the risk for frequencies within the range of about 1·5-3 Hz and overestimate them above about 5 Hz. For the vertical direction the frequency weighting overestimates the risk for frequencies above about 6 Hz. The results also indicate a need for differential guidelines for females and males. Many types of vehicle produce whole-body vibration with frequencies in the range where the highestPAbswas observed. Although not yet thoroughly evaluated,PAbsmay be a better quantity for risk assessment than acceleration as specified in ISO 2631, since it also takes into account the dynamic force applied to the human body.

Lundström, R.; Holmlund, P.

1998-08-01

19

Vibration and Its Effects on the Body  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To assess the effects of machine-induced vibration on workers and to determine effective precautions for vibration-induced trauma. Subjects and Methods: The study group consisted of 114 workers who were randomly selected: 50 rock drill workers and 64 truck heavy vehicle operators. Fifty-four office workers were designed as controls. The study and control groups were age-matched. All subjects were interviewed

Halim Issever; Cihan Aksoy; Hilmi Sabuncu; Ayse Karan

2003-01-01

20

Whole body vibration in sport: a critical review.  

PubMed

Whole body vibration training is a recent area of study in athletic conditioning, health and rehabilitation. This paper provides a review of the effectiveness of this type of training in sport. A search was conducted across several electronic databases and studies on effects of whole body vibration training on sport performance were reviewed. Thirteen articles were included in the final analysis. The following variables were considered: participants investigated (sex and age), characteristics of the vibration (frequency and amplitude), training (type of sport, exposure time and intensity, tests used, type of study, effects examined and results obtained). This review considers proposed neural mechanisms and identifies studies that have demonstrated the effectiveness of WBV in sports. It considers where WBV might act and suggests that vibration can be an effective training stimulus. Future studies should focus on evaluating the long-term effects of vibration training and identify optimum frequency and amplitude, improve strength and muscular performance. PMID:24998609

Costantino, C; Gimigliano, R; Olvirri, S; Gimigliano, F

2014-12-01

21

Measurement of Whole-Body Vibration Exposure from Garbage Trucks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Japanese garbage truck drivers are exposed to mechanical whole-body vibration during their work. Some drivers have suffered from low back pain from this vibration. However, there is no evidence of a relationship between the whole-body vibration from the garbage trucks and low back pain or occupational disease, due to the lack of investigations. A field study was conducted in order to characterize the health risks associated with garbage truck work. Three different types of truck were tested at different loadings and on different road surfaces, with the vibrations measured at the driver/seat interface (x,y, andz-axes). The vibrations were compared with the health risk guidance according to Annex B of ISO 2631-1 [1]. The findings of this study indicated that Japanese garbage truck drivers should not operate trucks for 2.5 h in a day, under current working conditions.

Maeda, S.; Morioka, M.

1998-08-01

22

Absorption of energy during vertical whole-body vibration exposure.  

PubMed

Absorbed power (PAbs) during exposure to vertical whole-body vibration in a sitting posture was measured on 15 male and 15 female subjects. Different experimental conditions were applied, such as vibration level (0.5-1.4 m s(-2)) and frequency (2-100 Hz), body weight (54-93 kg) and, relaxed and erected upper body positions. Results show that PAbs was strongly related to the frequency of the vibration, peaking within the range of 4-6 Hz. The peak was predominantly located in the lower end of this range for females and for the relaxed sitting position. PAbs increased with acceleration level and body weight. Almost a ten-fold increase in PAbs was observed at the critical frequency when the vibration exposure was raised from 0.5 to 1.4 m s(-2). If risk assessment is based on the assumption that the amount of PAbs, independent of the frequency of the vibration, indicates a hazard, then the ISO-standard 2631 under- and overestimates the risk at frequencies below and above about 6 Hz, respectively. The results also indicate a need for differentiated guidelines for females and males. Many types of vehicles produce whole-body vibration with frequencies which coincide with the range where the highest PAbs was observed. PAbs is a 'new' concept for measurement of whole-body vibration exposure. Although not yet thoroughly evaluated, this measure may be a better quantity for risk assessment than those specified in ISO 2631 since it also takes the dynamic force applied to the human body into account. PMID:9672085

Lundström, R; Holmlund, P; Lindberg, L

1998-04-01

23

Therapeutic impact of low amplitude high frequency whole body vibrations on the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse bone?  

PubMed Central

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by extremely brittle bone. Currently, bisphosphonate drugs allow a decrease of fracture by inhibiting bone resorption and increasing bone mass but with possible long term side effects. Whole body mechanical vibrations (WBV) treatment may offer a promising route to stimulate bone formation in OI patients as it has exhibited health benefits on both muscle and bone mass in human and animal models. The present study has investigated the effects of WBV (45 Hz, 0.3 g, 15 minutes/days, 5 days/week) in young OI (oim) and wild type female mice from 3 to 8 weeks of age. Vibration therapy resulted in a significant increase in the cortical bone area and cortical thickness in the femur and tibia diaphysis of both vibrated oim and wild type mice compared to sham controls. Trabecular bone was not affected by vibration in the wild type mice; vibrated oim mice, however, exhibited significantly higher trabecular bone volume fraction in the proximal tibia. Femoral stiffness and yield load in three point bending were greater in the vibrated wild type mice than in sham controls, most likely attributed to the increase in femur cortical cross sectional area observed in the ?CT morphology analyses. The vibrated oim mice showed a trend toward improved mechanical properties, but bending data had large standard deviations and there was no significant difference between vibrated and non-vibrated oim mice. No significant difference of the bone apposition was observed in the tibial metaphyseal trabecular bone for both the oim and wild type vibrated mice by histomorphometry analyses of calcein labels. At the mid diaphysis, the cortical bone apposition was not significantly influenced by the WBV treatment in both the endosteum and periosteum of the oim vibrated mice while a significant change is observed in the endosteum of the vibrated wild type mice. As only a weak impact in bone apposition between the vibrated and sham groups is observed in the histological sections, it is possible that WBV reduced bone resorption, resulting in a relative increase in cortical thickness. Whole body vibration appears as a potential effective and innocuous means for increasing bone formation and strength, which is particularly attractive for treating the growing skeleton of children suffering from brittle bone disease or low bone density pathologies without the long term disadvantages of current pharmacological therapies. PMID:23352925

Vanleene, Maximilien; Shefelbine, Sandra J.

2013-01-01

24

Therapeutic impact of low amplitude high frequency whole body vibrations on the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse bone.  

PubMed

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by extremely brittle bone. Currently, bisphosphonate drugs allow a decrease of fracture by inhibiting bone resorption and increasing bone mass but with possible long term side effects. Whole body mechanical vibrations (WBV) treatment may offer a promising route to stimulate bone formation in OI patients as it has exhibited health benefits on both muscle and bone mass in human and animal models. The present study has investigated the effects of WBV (45Hz, 0.3g, 15minutes/days, 5days/week) in young OI (oim) and wild type female mice from 3 to 8weeks of age. Vibration therapy resulted in a significant increase in the cortical bone area and cortical thickness in the femur and tibia diaphysis of both vibrated oim and wild type mice compared to sham controls. Trabecular bone was not affected by vibration in the wild type mice; vibrated oim mice, however, exhibited significantly higher trabecular bone volume fraction in the proximal tibia. Femoral stiffness and yield load in three point bending were greater in the vibrated wild type mice than in sham controls, most likely attributed to the increase in femur cortical cross sectional area observed in the ?CT morphology analyses. The vibrated oim mice showed a trend toward improved mechanical properties, but bending data had large standard deviations and there was no significant difference between vibrated and non-vibrated oim mice. No significant difference of the bone apposition was observed in the tibial metaphyseal trabecular bone for both the oim and wild type vibrated mice by histomorphometry analyses of calcein labels. At the mid diaphysis, the cortical bone apposition was not significantly influenced by the WBV treatment in both the endosteum and periosteum of the oim vibrated mice while a significant change is observed in the endosteum of the vibrated wild type mice. As only a weak impact in bone apposition between the vibrated and sham groups is observed in the histological sections, it is possible that WBV reduced bone resorption, resulting in a relative increase in cortical thickness. Whole body vibration appears as a potential effective and innocuous means for increasing bone formation and strength, which is particularly attractive for treating the growing skeleton of children suffering from brittle bone disease or low bone density pathologies without the long term disadvantages of current pharmacological therapies. PMID:23352925

Vanleene, Maximilien; Shefelbine, Sandra J

2013-04-01

25

Cognitive-Behavioral Body Image Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Randomly assigned 54 body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) subjects to cognitive behavior therapy or no treatment. BDD symptoms were significantly decreased in therapy subjects and the disorder was eliminated in 82 percent of cases at posttreatment and 77 percent at follow-up. Subjects' overall psychological symptoms and self-esteem also improved. (RJM)

Rosen, James C.; And Others

1995-01-01

26

Whole-body vibration exposure in sport: four relevant cases.  

PubMed

This study investigates the whole-body vibration exposure in kite surfing, alpine skiing, snowboarding and cycling. The vibration exposure was experimentally evaluated following the ISO 2631 guidelines. Results evidenced that the most critical axis is the vertical one. The weighted vibration levels are always larger than 2.5 m/s(2) and the vibration dose values are larger than 25 m/s(1.75). The exposure limit values of the EU directive are reached after 8-37 min depending on the sport. The vibration magnitude is influenced by the athletes' speed, by their skill level and sometimes by the equipment. The large vibration values suggest that the practice of sport activities may be a confounding factor in the aetiology of vibration-related diseases. Practitioner Summary: The vibration exposure in some sports is expected to be large, but has never been quantified in the literature. Results of experiments performed in cycling, alpine and water sports outlined vibration levels exceeding the EU standard limit values. PMID:25267689

Tarabini, Marco; Saggin, Bortolino; Scaccabarozzi, Diego

2014-09-30

27

Whole body vibration in cystic fibrosis - a pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: In cystic fibrosis (CF), bone mass deficits as well as a lack of muscle mass and force have been described. The bone mass deficits are thought to be at least in part secondary to the reduced muscle mass. Whole body vibration has recently been suggested as an effective technique to increase muscle force and power. The aim of this

J. Roth; M. Wust; R. Rawer; D. Schnabel; G. Armbrecht; G. Beller; I. Rembitzki; U. Wahn; D. Felsenberg; D. Staab

2008-01-01

28

Whole-body vibration transmitted to the framesaw operator.  

PubMed

At the moment there are more than 40 framesaws in use in Croatia, and many framesaw operators have a serious spine problem. Complex measurements have been carried out in order to determine the vibration level on the operator's seat. This paper reports and analyzes the measurement results of the whole-body vibration transmitted to a framesaw operator during an ordinary working day. Vibrations were measured at all operations performed during the normal framesaw working cycle. For all the measurements frequency spectra were obtained and the results graphically represented according to the ISO 2631-1-1986 recommendations. The weighted r.m.s. acceleration was also calculated and the duration of each single framesaw operation was measured. The energy-equivalent vibration level, corresponding to the total duration of exposure was calculated, too. The values so obtained were compared with the daily exposure limits according to the ISO 2631-1-1997. The measurement results showed that the framesaw operator, under the given measuring conditions, is exposed to a higher vibration level than the given daily exposure limits. Also, the energy-equivalent vibration level calculated according to the guidelines given in the new ISO 2631-1-1997 is higher than the limits recommended for an effective 4-h daily exposure. PMID:15627420

Goglia, V; Grbac, I

2005-01-01

29

Whole body vibration alters proprioception in the trunk  

E-print Network

wore a harness across their chest to which a weight was attached by a Kevlar cable via a load cell and a pulley. The load cell recorded the tension in the cable. A small preload (0.5 kg) was applied to maintain tension in the cable. A sudden... ahead of print). Pope MH, Hansson TH. Vibration of the spine and low back pain. Clin Orthop Relat Res 1992;279:49-59. Pope MH, Magnusson M, Wilder DG. Kappa Delta Award. Low back pain and whole body vibration. Clin Orthop 1998;354:241-8. Pope MH...

Li, Lu; Lamis, Farhana; Wilson, Sara E.

2008-01-01

30

Mind-body therapies for headache.  

PubMed

Headache is one of the most common and enigmatic problems encountered by family physicians. Headache is not a singular entity, and different pathologic mechanisms are involved in distinct types of headache. Most types of headache involve dysfunction of peripheral or central nociceptive mechanisms. Mind-body therapies such as biofeedback, cognitive behavior therapy, hypnosis, meditation, and relaxation training can affect neural substrates and have been shown to be effective treatments for various types of headache. Meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials show that the use of mind-body therapies, alone or in combination, significantly reduces symptoms of migraine, tension, and mixed-type headaches. Side effects generally are minimal and transient. PMID:18052018

Sierpina, Victor; Astin, John; Giordano, James

2007-11-15

31

Practical approach to measurement and evaluation of exposure to whole-body vibration in the workplace.  

PubMed

This article will present an overview of the history and current state-of-the-art of occupationally induced human whole-body vibration. A recommended step-by-step approach for recognizing, measuring, evaluating, and controlling whole-body vibration will be outlined. The fundamentals of vibration physics, potential vibration sources to which laborers may be exposed, and the propagation characteristics of vibration through the human body will be presented. Currently available national and international whole-body severity criteria and standards will be summarized, and the components constituting a vibration measurement instrumentation chain will be discussed in detail. PMID:8899917

Thalheimer, E

1996-02-01

32

Modeling of Spinal Column of Seated Human Body under Exposure to Whole-Body Vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In vehicle systems occupational drivers might expose themselves to vibration for a long time. This may cause illness of the spinal column such as low back pain. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the influence of vibration to the spinal column. Thus the modeling of seated human body is conducted in order to evaluate the effect of whole-body vibration to the spinal column. This model has the spinal column and the support structures such as the muscles of the back and the abdomen. The spinal column is made by the vertebrae and the intervertebral disks that are considered the rigid body and the rotational spring and damper respectively. The parameter of this model is decided by the literature and the body type of the subject with respect to the mass and the model structure. And stiffness and damping parameters are searched by fitting the model simulation results to the experimental measured data with respect to the vibration transmissibilities from the seat surface to the spinal column and the head and with respect to the driving-point apparent mass. In addition, the natural modes of the model compare with the result of experimental modal analysis. The influence of the abdomen and the muscles of the back are investigated by comparing three models with respect to above vibration characteristics. Three model are the proposed model, the model that has the spinal column and the model that has the muscles of the back in addition to the spinal column.

Tamaoki, Gen; Yoshimura, Takuya; Kuriyama, Kaoru; Nakai, Kazuma

33

Whole body vibration in mountain-rescue operations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In mountain-rescue operations injured people are generally exposed to vibrations and shocks that can be potential causes of physical conditions worsening. Such vibrations can derive both from patient's body manipulations (e.g. when it is being loaded and immobilized on a stretcher) and from forces coming from the transport devices and vehicles. Despite the general feeling that during this kind of operations the levels of transmitted vibrations to the injured can be quite large and potentially dangerous, there is practically no study in literature providing reliable parameters (i.e. measurements) to support or dismiss these beliefs. This paper reports the results of a measurement campaign carried-out in order to outline, identify and quantify the excitations a human body is exposed to, during typical transportation phases related to mountain-rescue operations. The work mainly presents and discusses the experimental setup with the aim of focusing on the problems related to this kind of measurements; the results of the experimental campaign carried-out for the measurement of the vibrations undergone by a human body during a simulated rescue operation are presented and discussed as well. Such simulation includes three phases of transportation: on a hand-held stretcher, on an ambulance and on a helicopter. The work is not intended to supply a complete characterization and analysis of vibrations transmission during any rescue operation but just to provide a preliminary overview and to define a measurement method that can be applied for a more comprehensive characterization. With such aims measurements were carried out in on-field situations stated as "typical" by rescue experts and data then analyzed both with standard procedures and algorithms (e.g. ISO 2631s weighting curves) and with the commonly used statistical indexes; in the analysis it is important to be aware that standardized measurement procedures and indexes, created to verify comfort or health-risks of workers, might not fit the case of a generic patient who experienced a serious mountain accident. The work includes also a laboratory activity mainly related to mechanical characterization of the stretcher used in the field tests. The most interesting result of the study is the comparison of the vibration levels in the various rescue phases that, even when using different indicators, shows that the most critical issue is due to hand transportation despite the bad judgment usually expressed for helicopter flight.

Alberti, E.; Chiappa, D.; Moschioni, G.; Saggin, B.; Tarabini, M.

2006-12-01

34

Emergence of stereotactic body radiation therapy.  

PubMed

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) evolved from the application of stereotactic radiosurgery, which is focused intracranial radiation. SBRT offers high doses of specific radiation with oligofractions (five or less) to a specified target, providing local control to circumscribed tumors while sparing surrounding normal tissue. Commonly treated cancers include tumors of the lung and liver. The challenge with SBRT is to account for organ motion and the achievement of precise targeting. SBRT uses three-dimensional radiation therapy planning, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, as well as image-guided organ motion and gating. SBRT is based on the premise of geometric avoidance, targeting the tumor with the goal of complete avoidance of the surrounding normal tissues and critical organs. An SBRT course of treatment ranges from one to five treatments (hypofractionated) and, therefore, differs from conventional radiation, which is usually a prolonged course ranging from two to six weeks of daily treatment. PMID:25542328

Behrend, Susan Weiss

2015-01-01

35

Effects of whole body vibration training on body composition in adolescents with Down syndrome.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to determine the effect of 20 weeks of whole body vibration (WBV) on the body composition of adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Thirty adolescent with DS were divided into two groups: control and WBV. Whole body, upper and lower limbs body fat and lean body mass were measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) before and after 20 weeks of WBV training. Repeated measures of ANOVA adjusting by height, weight and Tanner stage were used to analyze possible group by time interactions on body composition. The adjusted percentages of change in body composition were also compared between control and WBV groups. No group by time interactions were found for any variable, but the WBV group showed a higher reduction in body fat at the upper limbs (p<0.05), and a tendency toward higher percent increase in whole body lean body mass. Overall, a 20-week WBV training is not enough by itself for increasing lean body mass in adolescents with DS, but it might be helpful for improving body composition in this population. Its relationship with health and autonomy enhances the importance of these results. PMID:23474995

González-Agüero, Alejandro; Matute-Llorente, Angel; Gómez-Cabello, Alba; Casajús, José A; Vicente-Rodríguez, Germán

2013-05-01

36

Occupational exposure to whole body vibration-train drivers.  

PubMed

Whole body vibration exposure of the train drivers working for State Railway Lines is assessed by referring to ISO standard 2631 -1 and EU directive 2002/44/EC. The vibration measurements were done in the cabins of suburban and intercity train drivers. Suburban train driver performs his job usually in standing posture. Whereas intercity train driver works generally in seated (bending forward) posture and exposed to longer periods of continuous vibration, compared to suburban train drivers. The mean accelerations, a, along lateral, y, and vertical, z, directions measured on the driver seat (on the cabin floor) of the intercity (suburban) train were 1.4a (y) = 0.55 (0.28) m/s(2) and a (z) = 0.65 (0.23) m/s(2). Daily exposure action values suggested in EU directive are exceeded in case of intercity train drivers and their exposure falls within the health caution zone of ISO 2631-1. Intercity train drivers are therefore under the risk of having spinal disorders. A health surveillance plan requiring every five years the reassessment of the state of the spinal system of train drivers is suggested. As an early preventive measure, extended work day or more than one shift in a day is advised to be discouraged. PMID:19218752

Birlik, Gülin

2009-01-01

37

Multi-body Dynamics Modelling of Seated Human Body under Exposure to Whole-Body Vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

In vehicle systems occupational drivers might expose themselves to vibration for a long time. This may cause illness of the spine such as chronic lumbago or low back pain. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the influence of vibration to the spinal column and to make up appropriate guidelines or counter plans. In ISO2631-11) or ISO2631-52) assessment of vibration effects

Takuya YOSHIMURA; Kazuma NAKAI; Gen TAMAOKI

2005-01-01

38

Guidelines for Whole-Body Vibration Health Surveillance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is strong epidemiological evidence that occupational exposure to WBV is associated with an increased risk of low back pain (LBP), sciatic pain, and degenerative changes in the spinal system, including lumbar intervertebral disc disorders. A prototype health surveillance scheme for WBV is presented in this paper. Surveillance is the collection, analysis, and dissemination of data for the purpose of prevention. The aims are to assess health status and diagnose vibration-induced disorders at an early stage, to inform the workers on the potential risk associated with vibration exposure, to give preventive advice to employers and employees and to control whether preventive measures which have been taken, were successful. It is suggested that a pre-placement health examination should be offered to each worker who will be exposed to WBV so as to make the worker aware of the hazards, to obtain baseline health data, and to identify medical conditions that may increase the risk due to WBV. The case history should focus on personal history, work history, and leisure activities involving driving of vehicles. The personal medical history should detail back pain complaints, disorders in the spine, any injuries or surgery to the musculoskeletal system. A physical examination on the lower back should be performed on workers who have experienced LBP symptoms over the past 12 months. The preplacement examination should be followed by periodic health reassessment with a regular interval according to the legislation of the country. It is suggested that periodic medical examination should be made available at least every 2 years to all workers who are exposed to WBV. Any change in vibration exposure at the workplace should be reported by the employer. If an increase in vibration exposure or a change in health status have occurred, the medical re-examination should be offered at shorter intervals at the discretion of the attending physician. There should be a periodic medical examination, which includes recording any change in exposure to WBV. The findings for the individual should be compared with previous examinations. Group data should also be compiled periodically. Medical removal may be considered along with re-placement in working practices without exposure to WBV. This paper presents opinions on health surveillance for whole-body vibration developed within a working group of partners funded on a European Community Network (BIOMED2 concerted action BMH4-CT98-3251: Research network on detection and prevention of injuries due to occupational vibration exposures). The health surveillance protocol and the draft questionnaire with explanation comments are presented for wider consideration by the science community and others before being considered appropriate for implementation.

POPE, M.; MAGNUSSON, M.; LUNDSTRÖM, R.; HULSHOF, C.; VERBEEK, J.; BOVENZI, M.

2002-05-01

39

Stochastic many-body perturbation theory for anharmonic molecular vibrations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method for anharmonic vibrational zero-point energies and transition frequencies is developed, which combines the diagrammatic vibrational many-body perturbation theory based on the Dyson equation with Monte Carlo integration. The infinite sums of the diagrammatic and thus size-consistent first- and second-order anharmonic corrections to the energy and self-energy are expressed as sums of a few m- or 2m-dimensional integrals of wave functions and a potential energy surface (PES) (m is the vibrational degrees of freedom). Each of these integrals is computed as the integrand (including the value of the PES) divided by the value of a judiciously chosen weight function evaluated on demand at geometries distributed randomly but according to the weight function via the Metropolis algorithm. In this way, the method completely avoids cumbersome evaluation and storage of high-order force constants necessary in the original formulation of the vibrational perturbation theory; it furthermore allows even higher-order force constants essentially up to an infinite order to be taken into account in a scalable, memory-efficient algorithm. The diagrammatic contributions to the frequency-dependent self-energies that are stochastically evaluated at discrete frequencies can be reliably interpolated, allowing the self-consistent solutions to the Dyson equation to be obtained. This method, therefore, can compute directly and stochastically the transition frequencies of fundamentals and overtones as well as their relative intensities as pole strengths, without fixed-node errors that plague some QMC. It is shown that, for an identical PES, the new method reproduces the correct deterministic values of the energies and frequencies within a few cm-1 and pole strengths within a few thousandths. With the values of a PES evaluated on the fly at random geometries, the new method captures a noticeably greater proportion of anharmonic effects.

Hermes, Matthew R.; Hirata, So

2014-08-01

40

Stochastic many-body perturbation theory for anharmonic molecular vibrations.  

PubMed

A new quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method for anharmonic vibrational zero-point energies and transition frequencies is developed, which combines the diagrammatic vibrational many-body perturbation theory based on the Dyson equation with Monte Carlo integration. The infinite sums of the diagrammatic and thus size-consistent first- and second-order anharmonic corrections to the energy and self-energy are expressed as sums of a few m- or 2m-dimensional integrals of wave functions and a potential energy surface (PES) (m is the vibrational degrees of freedom). Each of these integrals is computed as the integrand (including the value of the PES) divided by the value of a judiciously chosen weight function evaluated on demand at geometries distributed randomly but according to the weight function via the Metropolis algorithm. In this way, the method completely avoids cumbersome evaluation and storage of high-order force constants necessary in the original formulation of the vibrational perturbation theory; it furthermore allows even higher-order force constants essentially up to an infinite order to be taken into account in a scalable, memory-efficient algorithm. The diagrammatic contributions to the frequency-dependent self-energies that are stochastically evaluated at discrete frequencies can be reliably interpolated, allowing the self-consistent solutions to the Dyson equation to be obtained. This method, therefore, can compute directly and stochastically the transition frequencies of fundamentals and overtones as well as their relative intensities as pole strengths, without fixed-node errors that plague some QMC. It is shown that, for an identical PES, the new method reproduces the correct deterministic values of the energies and frequencies within a few cm(-1) and pole strengths within a few thousandths. With the values of a PES evaluated on the fly at random geometries, the new method captures a noticeably greater proportion of anharmonic effects. PMID:25173003

Hermes, Matthew R; Hirata, So

2014-08-28

41

Hormonal responses to whole-body vibration in men.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute responses of blood hormone concentrations and neuromuscular performance following whole-body vibration (WBV) treatment. Fourteen male subjects [mean (SD) age 25 (4.6) years] were exposed to vertical sinusoidal WBV, 10 times for 60 s, with 60 s rest between the vibration sets (a rest period lasting 6 min was allowed after 5 vibration sets). Neuromuscular performance tests consisting of counter-movement jumps and maximal dynamic leg presses on a slide machine, performed with an extra load of 160% of the subjects body mass, and with both legs were administered before and immediately after the WBV treatment. The average velocity, acceleration, average force, and power were calculated and the root mean square electromyogram (EMGrms) were recorded from the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris muscles simultaneously during the leg-press measurement. Blood samples were also collected, and plasma concentrations of testosterone (T), growth hormone (GH) and cortisol (C) were measured. The results showed a significant increase in the plasma concentration of T and GH, whereas C levels decreased. An increase in the mechanical power output of the leg extensor muscles was observed together with a reduction in EMGrms activity. Neuromuscular efficiency improved, as indicated by the decrease in the ratio between EMGrms and power. Jumping performance, which was measured using the counter-movement jump test, was also enhanced. Thus, it can be argued that the biological mechanism produced by vibration is similar to the effect produced by explosive power training (jumping and bouncing). The enhancement of explosive power could have been induced by an increase in the synchronisation activity of the motor units, and/or improved co-ordination of the synergistic muscles and increased inhibition of the antagonists. These results suggest that WBV treatment leads to acute responses of hormonal profile and neuromuscular performance. It is therefore likely that the effect of WBV treatment elicited a biological adaptation that is connected to a neural potentiation effect, similar to those reported to occur following resistance and explosive power training. In conclusion, it is suggested that WBV influences proprioceptive feedback mechanisms and specific neural components, leading to an improvement of neuromuscular performance. Moreover, since the hormonal responses, characterised by an increase in T and GH concentration and a decrease in C concentration, and the increase in neuromuscular effectiveness were simultaneous but independent, it is speculated that the two phenomena might have common underlying mechanisms. PMID:10774867

Bosco, C; Iacovelli, M; Tsarpela, O; Cardinale, M; Bonifazi, M; Tihanyi, J; Viru, M; De Lorenzo, A; Viru, A

2000-04-01

42

Whole body vibration exercise for chronic low back pain: study protocol for a single-blind randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Low back pain affects approximately 80% of people at some stage in their lives. Exercise therapy is the most widely used nonsurgical intervention for low back pain in practice guidelines. Whole body vibration exercise is becoming increasingly popular for relieving musculoskeletal pain and improving health-related quality of life. However, the efficacy of whole body vibration exercise for low back pain is not without dispute. This study aims to estimate the effect of whole body vibration exercise for chronic low back pain. Methods/Design We will conduct a prospective, single-blind, randomized controlled trial of 120 patients with chronic low back pain. Patients will be randomly assigned into an intervention group and a control group. The intervention group will participate in whole body vibration exercise twice a week for 3 months. The control group will receive general exercise twice a week for 3 months. Primary outcome measures will be the visual analog scale for pain, the Oswestry Disability Index and adverse events. The secondary outcome measures will include muscle strength and endurance of spine, trunk proprioception, transversus abdominis activation capacity, and quality of life. We will conduct intention-to-treat analysis if any participants withdraw from the trial. Discussion Important features of this study include the randomization procedures, single-blind, large sample size, and a standardized protocol for whole body vibration in chronic low back pain. This study aims to determine whether whole body vibration exercise produces more beneficial effects than general exercise for chronic low back pain. Therefore, our results will be useful for patients with chronic low back pain as well as for medical staff and health-care decision makers. Trial registration Chinese Clinical Trial Registry: ChiCTR-TRC-13003708. PMID:24693945

2014-01-01

43

An overview of strategies to reduce whole-body vibration exposure on drivers: A systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) at the workplace cost a lot. These MSD, low back pain in particular, can be caused by exposure to whole body vibration (WBV). Preventive strategies to reduce vibration exposure may contribute to a decrease in MSD. Therefore the aim of this study was to explore which evidence-based preventive strategies reduce vibration exposure on drivers. A systematic literature

Ivo J. Tiemessen; Carel T. J. Hulshof; Monique H. W. Frings-Dresen

2007-01-01

44

A multiple scales approach to sound generation by vibrating bodies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The problem of determining the acoustic field in an inviscid, isentropic fluid generated by a solid body whose surface executes prescribed vibrations is formulated and solved as a multiple scales perturbation problem, using the Mach number M based on the maximum surface velocity as the perturbation parameter. Following the idea of multiple scales, new 'slow' spacial scales are introduced, which are defined as the usual physical spacial scale multiplied by powers of M. The governing nonlinear differential equations lead to a sequence of linear problems for the perturbation coefficient functions. However, it is shown that the higher order perturbation functions obtained in this manner will dominate the lower order solutions unless their dependence on the slow spacial scales is chosen in a certain manner. In particular, it is shown that the perturbation functions must satisfy an equation similar to Burgers' equation, with a slow spacial scale playing the role of the time-like variable. The method is illustrated by a simple one-dimenstional example, as well as by three different cases of a vibrating sphere. The results are compared with solutions obtained by purely numerical methods and some insights provided by the perturbation approach are discussed.

Geer, James F.; Pope, Dennis S.

1992-01-01

45

Signal Processing Methods for Removing the Effects of Whole Body Vibration upon Speech  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Humans may be exposed to whole-body vibration in environments where clear speech communications are crucial, particularly during the launch phases of space flight and in high-performance aircraft. Prior research has shown that high levels of vibration cause a decrease in speech intelligibility. However, the effects of whole-body vibration upon speech are not well understood, and no attempt has been made to restore speech distorted by whole-body vibration. In this paper, a model for speech under whole-body vibration is proposed and a method to remove its effect is described. The method described reduces the perceptual effects of vibration, yields higher ASR accuracy scores, and may significantly improve intelligibility. Possible applications include incorporation within communication systems to improve radio-communication systems in environments such a spaceflight, aviation, or off-road vehicle operations.

Bitner, Rachel M.; Begault, Durand R.

2014-01-01

46

[Stereotactic body radiation therapy: uncertainties and margins].  

PubMed

The principles governing stereotactic body radiation therapy are tight margins and large dose gradients around targets. Every step of treatment preparation and delivery must be evaluated before applying this technique in the clinic. Uncertainties remain in each of these steps: delineation, prescription with the biological equivalent dose, treatment planning, patient set-up taking into account movements, the machine accuracy. The calculation of margins to take into account uncertainties differs from conventional radiotherapy because of the delivery of few fractions and large dose gradients around the target. The quest of high accuracy is complicated by the difficulty to reach it and the lack of consensus regarding the prescription. Many schemes dose/number of fractions are described in clinical studies and there are differences in the way describing the delivered doses. While waiting for the ICRU report dedicated to this technique, it seems desirable to use the quantities proposed in ICRU Report 83 (IMRT) to report the dose distribution. PMID:25023588

Lacornerie, T; Marchesi, V; Reynaert, N

2014-01-01

47

Analysis of non-linear response of the human body to vertical whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

The human response to vibration is typically studied using linear estimators of the frequency response function, although different literature works evidenced the presence of non-linear effects in whole-body vibration response. This paper analyses the apparent mass of standing subjects using the conditioned response techniques in order to understand the causes of the non-linear behaviour. The conditioned apparent masses were derived considering models of increasing complexity. The multiple coherence function was used as a figure of merit for the comparison between the linear and the non-linear models. The apparent mass of eight male subjects was studied in six configurations (combinations of three vibration magnitudes and two postures). The contribution of the non-linear terms was negligible and was endorsed to the change of modal parameters during the test. Since the effect of the inter-subject variability was larger than that due to the increase in vibration magnitude, the biodynamic response should be more meaningfully modelled using a linear estimator with uncertainty rather than looking for a non-linear modelling. PMID:25105223

Tarabini, Marco; Solbiati, Stefano; Moschioni, Giovanni; Saggin, Bortolino; Scaccabarozzi, Diego

2014-01-01

48

Investigation of the transmission of fore and aft vibration through the human body  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding the behavior of human body under the influence of vibration is of great importance for the optimal motor vehicle system design. Therefore, great efforts are being done in order to discover as many information about the influence of vibration on human body as possible. So far the references show that the major scientific attention has been paid to vertical

Miroslav Demi?; Jovanka Luki?

2009-01-01

49

Modeling the Human Body\\/Seat System in a Vibration Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vibration environment is a common man-made artificial surrounding with which humans have a limited tolerance to cope due to their body dynamics. This research studied the dynamic characteristics of a seated human body\\/seat system in a vibration environment. The main result is a multi degrees of freedom lumped parameter model that synthesizes two basic dynamics: (i) global human dynamics,

Jacob Rosen; Mircea Arcan

2003-01-01

50

A CONTINUOUS MODEL FOR THE VERTICAL VIBRATION OF THE HUMAN BODY IN A STANDING POSITION  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is concerned with modelling the vertical vibration of the human body in a standing position. The human body is modelled as a column consisted of two uniform members with different properties. Solutions of the free vibration of the model are given and the effect of several distributions of the stiffnesses are considered. The modal mass, frequencies and axial

Tianjian Ji

51

EFFECT OF MAGNITUDE OF VERTICAL WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION ON ABSORBED POWER FOR THE SEATED HUMAN BODY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The power absorbed by 12 male subjects during exposure to vertical whole-body vibration at six magnitudes of random vibration (0·25, 0·5, 1·0, 1·5, 2·0 and 2·5 ms?2r.m.s.) has been measured in the laboratory. All subjects showed greatest absorbed power at about 5 Hz, but the frequency of this peak in the absorbed power reduced with increasing vibration magnitude. The total

N. J. Mansfield; M. J. Griffin

1998-01-01

52

Stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver metastases  

PubMed Central

Over the years, early diagnosis of metastatic disease has improved and the prevalence of oligometastatic patients is increasing. Liver is a most common site of progression from gastrointestinal, lung and breast cancer and in the setting of oligometastatic patients, surgical resection is associated with increased survival. Approximately 70-90% of liver metastases, however, are unresectable and an effective and safe alternative therapeutic option is necessary for these patients. The role of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was investigated in the treatment of oligometastatic patients with promising results, thanks to the ability of this procedure to deliver a conformal high dose of radiation to the target lesion and a minimal dose to surrounding critical tissues. This paper was performed to review the current literature and to provide the practice guidelines on the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy in the treatment of liver metastases. We performed a literature search using Medical Subject Heading terms “SBRT” and “liver metastases”, considering a period of ten years. PMID:24982767

Clerici, Elena; Comito, Tiziana

2014-01-01

53

[The effect of whole-body vibration: an unrecognized medical problem].  

PubMed

Exposure to whole-body vibration is a growing concern in industry, traffic and in other branches of the economy. This harmful physical factor endangers work efficiency and human health not only at work but also in everyday life, in public transportation and even at home. In spite of increasing exposure to vibrations, our medical practice does not pay adequate attention to the health effects of whole-body vibration. The paper deals with the basic characteristics of vibration (frequency, amplitude, velocity and acceleration), its adequate evaluation (effective or weighted average value, peak values, rating and weighting procedure of vibration measurement) and exposure (vibration direction, exposure time, transmission and dissipation). In industry and traffic, vibrations present complex oscillatory motions, characterized by a wide frequency spectrum, variable amplitude and acceleration, and different directions. To assess the harmful effects of vibration, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has proposed three standards for acceptable human exposure to whole-body vibration: fatigue-decreased proficiency boundary, exposure limit and reduced comfort boundary. Quantitative parameters of vibration for some vehicles, and for constructional, industrial and agricultural machinery are also given. The most pronounced long-term effect of whole-body vibration is damage to the spine. The spinal region most frequently affected is the lumbar part, where spinal deformation, lumbago and sciatica can develop. The possible cause of spinal damage could be mechanical overload and metabolic changes of the intervertebral disc. Other organ systems, such as peripheral and autonomic nervous, vestibular, vascular, digestive and female reproductive systems are also liable to become affected. Risk assessment of chronic health effects is based on the appropriate evaluation of whole-body vibration exposure and individual response. Health risk increases with the intensity and duration of vibration exposure. The concomitant factors are forced sitting posture and heavy physical work. Human response to whole-body vibration depends on factors promoting the development of degenerative changes such as constitution, previous spine disease and young age. The main problems in diagnosing whole-body vibration syndrome are differentiation of vibration induced disorders from age dependent changes of the spine and lack of a specific diagnostic method for assessing those changes. Therefore, only permanent medical surveillance can guarantee proper assessment of the damage induced by whole-body vibration. For vibration exposed workers preplacement and periodic examinations are recommended. Those should include a basic medical examination and an X-ray of the spine, or at least of its lumbar part. PMID:8311700

Bogadi-Sare, A

1993-09-01

54

Good Vibrations – Effects of Whole Body Vibration on Attention in Healthy Individuals and Individuals with ADHD  

PubMed Central

Objectives Most of the current treatment strategies of ADHD are associated with a number of disadvantages which strengthen the need for alternative or additional approaches for the treatment of ADHD. In this respect, Whole Body Vibration (WBV) might be interesting as it was found to have beneficial effects on a variety of physiological measures. The present study explored the effects of WBV on attention of healthy individuals and adults diagnosed with ADHD. Methods Eighty-three healthy individuals and seventeen adults diagnosed with ADHD participated in the study. WBV treatment was applied passively, while participants were sitting on a chair which was mounted on a vibrating platform. A repeated measure design was employed in order to explore potential effects of WBV treatment on attention within subjects. Attention (i.e. inhibitory control) was measured with a color-word interference paradigm. Results A period of two minutes of WBV treatment had significant beneficial effects of small to medium size on attention of both healthy individuals and adults with ADHD. The effect of WBV treatment on attention did not differ significantly between groups. Conclusions WBV was demonstrated to improve cognitive performance of healthy individuals as well as of individuals with ADHD. WBV treatment is relatively inexpensive and easy to apply and might therefore be of potential relevance for clinical use. The application of WBV treatment as a cognitive enhancement strategy and as a potential treatment of cognitive impairments is discussed. PMID:24587412

Fuermaier, Anselm B. M.; Tucha, Lara; Koerts, Janneke; van Heuvelen, Marieke J. G.; van der Zee, Eddy A.; Lange, Klaus W.; Tucha, Oliver

2014-01-01

55

Measurement of whole-body vibration in taxi drivers.  

PubMed

In a previous epidemiological study we reported that the prevalence (45.8%) of low-back pain (LBP) and the two-year incidence (25.9%) of LBP in 284 male taxi drivers in Japan was comparable with rates reported for other occupational drivers in which LBP frequently occurs. LBP was significantly related with the level of uncomfortable road vibrations, and, importantly, increased with total mileage. The aim of this study was to measure whole-body vibration (WBV) on the driver's seat pan of 12 taxis operating under actual working conditions. The results were evaluated according to the health guidelines in International Standard ISO 2631-1:1997. Finally, the relation between total mileage and WBV was investigated. The majority of the frequency-weighted r.m.s. accelerations of the taxis fell into the "potential health risks" zone, under ISO 2631-1:1997. It was clear that the taxi drivers were exposed to serious WBV magnitudes. Therefore, occupational health and safety management should be carried out to help prevent adverse health effects in taxi drivers. In particular, reduction of WBV in taxis and shortening of driving time to reduce duration of WBV exposure should be considered. Moreover, because many taxi drivers work 18 h every other day, the shortening of working hours and taking of rest breaks while working should be considered. Frequency-weighted r.m.s. accelerations of taxis had a tendency to decrease as total mileage increased. The relation between total mileage and WBV should be investigated by taking measurements on the floor and the back rest in addition to the seat pan. PMID:15090686

Funakoshi, Mitsuhiko; Taoda, Kazushi; Tsujimura, Hiroji; Nishiyama, Katsuo

2004-03-01

56

Using consumer electronic devices to estimate whole-body vibration exposure.  

PubMed

The cost and complexity of commercially available devices for measuring whole-body vibration is a barrier to the systematic collection of the information required to manage this hazard at workplaces. The potential for a consumer electronic device to be used to estimate whole-body vibration was assessed by use of an accelerometer calibrator, and by collecting 42 simultaneous pairs of measurements from a fifth-generation iPod Touch and one of two gold standard vibration measurement devices (Svantech SV111 [Svantech, Warsaw, Poland] or Brüel & Kjær 4447 [Brüel & Kjær Sound & Vibration Measurement A/S, Nærum, Denmark]) while driving light vehicles on a variety of different roadway surfaces. While sampling rate limitations make the accelerometer data collected from the iPod Touch unsuitable for frequency analysis, the vibration amplitudes recorded are sufficiently accurate (errors less than 0.1 m/s(2)) to assist workplaces manage whole-body vibration exposures. PMID:24498944

Wolfgang, Rebecca; Burgess-Limerick, Robin

2014-01-01

57

Complementary therapies for reducing body weight: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate and a plethora of complementary therapies are on offer claiming effectiveness for reducing body weight. The aim of this systematic review is to critically assess the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews of complementary therapies for reducing body weight. Literature searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, Amed,

M H Pittler; E Ernst

2005-01-01

58

Possible Mechanisms of Low Back Pain due to Whole-Body Vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The investigators describe their multifaceted approach to the study of the relationship between whole-body vibration and low back pain.In vitroexperiments, using percutaneous pin-mounted accelerometers have shown that the natural frequency is at 4·5 Hz. The frequency response was affected by posture, seating, and seat-back inclination. The response appears to be largely determined by the rocking of the pelvis. Electromyographic studies have shown that muscle fatigue occurs under whole body vibration. After whole body vibration exposure the muscle response to a sudden load has greater latency. Vehicle driving may be a reason for low back pain or herniated nucleus pulposus. Prolonged seating exposure, coupled with the whole body vibration should be reduced for those recovering from these problems. Vibration attenuating seats, and correct ergonomic layout of the cabs may reduce the risks of recurrence.

Pope, M. H.; Wilder, D. G.; Magnusson, M.

1998-08-01

59

Effect of whole-body vibration on bone properties in aging mice.  

PubMed

Recent studies suggest that whole-body vibration (WBV) can improve measures of bone health for certain clinical conditions and ages. In the elderly, there also is particular interest in assessing the ability of physical interventions such as WBV to improve coordination, strength, and movement speed, which help prevent falls and fractures and maintain ambulation for independent living. The current study evaluated the efficacy of WBV in an aging mouse model. Two levels of vibration--0.5 and 1.5g--were applied at 32Hz to CB57BL/6 male mice (n=9 each) beginning at age 18 months and continuing for 12 weeks, 30 min/day, in a novel pivoting vibration device. Previous reports indicate that bone parameters in these mice begin to decrease substantially at 18 months, equivalent to mid-fifties for humans. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and biomechanical assessments were made in the femur, radius, and lumbar vertebra to determine the effect of these WBV magnitudes and durations in the aging model. Sera also were collected for analysis of bone formation and breakdown markers. Mineralizing surface and cell counts were determined histologically. Bone volume in four regions of the femur did not change significantly, but there was a consistent shift toward higher mean density in the bone density spectrum (BDS), with the two vibration levels producing similar results. This new parameter represents an integral of the conventional density histogram. The amount of high density bone statistically improved in the head, neck, and diaphysis. Biomechanically, there was a trend toward greater stiffness in the 1.5 g group (p=0.139 vs. controls in the radius), and no change in strength. In the lumbar spine, no differences were seen due to vibration. Both vibration groups significantly reduced pyridinoline crosslinks, a collagen breakdown marker. They also significantly increased dynamic mineralization, MS/BS. Furthermore, osteoclasts were most numerous in the 1.5 g group (p? 0.05). These findings suggest that some benefits of WBV found in previous studies of young and mature rodent models may extend to an aging population. Density parameters indicated 0.5 g was more effective than 1.5 g. Serological markers, by contrast, favored 1.5 g, while biomechanically and histologically the results were mixed. Although the purported anabolic effect of WBV on bone homeostasis may depend on location and the parameter of interest, this emerging therapy at a minimum does not appear to compromise bone health by the measures studied here. PMID:20638490

Wenger, Karl H; Freeman, James D; Fulzele, Sadanand; Immel, David M; Powell, Brian D; Molitor, Patrick; Chao, Yuh J; Gao, Hong-Sheng; Elsalanty, Mohammed; Hamrick, Mark W; Isales, Carlos M; Yu, Jack C

2010-10-01

60

Lower limbs power and stiffness after whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

The interest in whole-body vibration (WBV) for the enhancement of neuromuscular performance has received considerable attention. However, scientific evidence supporting the optimal prescription of WBV settings is lacking. This study investigated the acute effect of WBV combining high frequency/high peak-to-peak displacement (HH) or low frequency/low peak-to-peak displacement (LL) vs. sham intervention (SHAM) on lower limb muscle power and stiffness. A total of 223 volunteers were randomly assigned to either the HH, LL or SHAM group. Countermovement jump (CMJ) height, maximal and average power, maximal and average lower limbs stiffness obtained during a hopping test were recorded before and after the respective intervention. After the intervention, the HH group showed an increase of 4.64% in CMJ height (p<0.001) whereas the values of both the LL and SHAM groups did not change. In addition, maximal and average power of the lower limbs were significantly increased in all groups (p<0.001; 10.89% and 12.82%, respectively) while no effect on lower limbs stiffness was observed. Our data show that high frequency combined with high peak-to-peak displacement is the most optimal WBV setting for CMJ height enhancement. Further investigation should be undertaken to ascertain the effectiveness of WBV on lower limbs stiffness. PMID:23143701

Colson, S S; Petit, P-D

2013-04-01

61

Prostate cancer and occupational whole-body vibration exposure.  

PubMed

Prostate cancer is common and its etiology largely unknown; therefore, it is important to explore all potential risk factors that are biologically plausible. Recent literature suggests a relationship between whole-body vibration (WBV) and prostate cancer risk. The aim of this study was to determine whether occupational WBV was a risk factor for prostate cancer. Existing data, collected on 447 incident cases and 532 population controls (or their proxies), in Montreal, Canada, were used to evaluate this question. Personal interviews collected detailed job descriptions for every job held, the tasks involved, and type of equipment used. For each job, experts assessed the intensity and daily duration of WBV exposure. Inter-rater agreement for WBV ratings was examined using the kappa statistic, with values that ranged from 0.83 to 0.94. Logistic regression models explored the relationship between WBV exposure and prostate cancer, using various combinations of intensity, daily duration, and years of exposure. Potential confounders were also examined. Occupations with WBV exposure demonstrated an increased statistically non-significant risk [odds ratio (OR) = 1.44, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.99-2.09]. The risk for transport equipment operation, a job with WBV exposure, was significantly elevated (OR = 1.90, 95% CI: 1.07-3.39). These results, together with those of an earlier study, suggest that workers in heavy equipment and transport equipment operation may have increased risk of prostate cancer. Further investigation is warranted. PMID:22539558

Nadalin, Victoria; Kreiger, Nancy; Parent, Marie-Elise; Salmoni, Alan; Sass-Kortsak, Andrea; Siemiatycki, Jack; Sloan, Margaret; Purdham, James

2012-10-01

62

Whole-body vibration and ergonomic study of US railroad locomotives  

Microsoft Academic Search

US locomotive operators have exposure to multi-axis whole-body vibration (WBV) and shocks while seated. This study assessed operator-related and ergonomic seating design factors that may have confounding or mitigating influence on WBV exposure and its effects. Vibration exposure was measured according to international guidelines (ISO 2631-1; 1997); ergonomic work place factors and vibration effects were studied with a cross-sectional survey

Eckardt Johanning; Paul Landsbergis; Siegfried Fischer; Eberhard Christ; Benno Göres; Raymond Luhrman

2006-01-01

63

Musculoskeletal disorders in dumper operators exposed to whole body vibration at Indian mines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dumper operators are exposed to whole body vibration (WBV) in the course of their work. The exposure to WBV in a coal mine in Central India was investigated through measurement of the magnitude of vibration and exposure time. The vibration magnitude along the dominant Z-axis ranged from 0.644 to 1.82 m\\/s in terms of root mean square acceleration. When evaluated in

B. B. Mandal; A. K. Srivastava

2010-01-01

64

Self-reported back pain in tractor drivers exposed to whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary A postal questionnaire on symptoms of ill health and exposure to whole-body vibration was completed by 577 workers (response rate 79%) who were employed in certain functions by two companies 11 years before. The relation between the occupational history of driving vibrating vehicles (mainly agricultural tractors) and back pain has been analyzed. The prevalence of reported back pain is

Hendriek C. Boshuizen; Paulien M. Bongers; Carel T. J. Hulshof

1990-01-01

65

Measurement of whole-body vibration exposure from speed control humps  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main objective of speed control humps is to introduce shocks and high vibration levels when a car passes over them if its speed is higher than the allowable limit. Hump geometry is a major factor in altering the level of these shocks and specifying the speed limit. However, there is no study of the relationship between whole body vibration

E. Khorshid; F. Alkalby; H. Kamal

2007-01-01

66

Therapeutic Effect of Whole Body Vibration on Chronic Knee Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate the effect on pain reduction and strengthening of the whole body vibration (WBV) in chronic knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Patients were randomly divided into two groups: the study group (WBV with home based exercise) and control group (home based exercise only). They performed exercise and training for 8 weeks. Eleven patients in each group completed the study. Pain intensity was measured with the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), functional scales were measured with Korean Western Ontario McMaster score (KWOMAC) and Lysholm Scoring Scale (LSS), quadriceps strength was measured with isokinetic torque and isometric torque and dynamic balance was measured with the Biodex Stability System. These measurements were performed before training, at 1 month after training and at 2 months after training. Results NRS was significantly decreased in each group, and change of pain intensity was significantly larger in the study group than in the control group after treatment. Functional improvements in KWOMAC and LSS were found in both groups, but no significant differences between the groups after treatment. Dynamic balance, isokinetic strength of right quadriceps and isometric strengths of both quadriceps muscles improved in both groups, but no significant differences between the groups after treatment. Isokinetic strength of left quadriceps did not improve in both groups after treatment. Conclusion In chronic knee OA patients, WBV reduced pain intensity and increased strength of the right quadriceps and dynamic balance performance. In comparison with the home based exercise program, WBV was superior only in pain reduction and similarly effective in strengthening of the quadriceps muscle and balance improvement. PMID:24020031

Park, Young Geun; Kwon, Bum Sun; Park, Jin-Woo; Cha, Dong Yeon; Nam, Ki Yeun; Sim, Kyoung Bo; Chang, Jihea

2013-01-01

67

Whole Body Vibration Training - Improving Balance Control and Muscle Endurance  

PubMed Central

Exercise combined with whole body vibration (WBV) is becoming increasingly popular, although additional effects of WBV in comparison to conventional exercises are still discussed controversially in literature. Heterogeneous findings are attributed to large differences in the training designs between WBV and “control” groups in regard to training volume, load and type. In order to separate the additional effects of WBV from the overall adaptations due to the intervention, in this study, a four-week WBV training setup was compared to a matched intervention program with identical training parameters in both training settings except for the exposure to WBV. In a repeated-measures matched-subject design, 38 participants were assigned to either the WBV group (VIB) or the equivalent training group (CON). Training duration, number of sets, rest periods and task-specific instructions were matched between the groups. Balance, jump height and local static muscle endurance were assessed before and after the training period. The statistical analysis revealed significant interaction effects of group×time for balance and local static muscle endurance (p<0.05). Hence, WBV caused an additional effect on balance control (pre vs. post VIB +13%, p<0.05 and CON +6%, p?=?0.33) and local static muscle endurance (pre vs. post VIB +36%, p<0.05 and CON +11%, p?=?0.49). The effect on jump height remained insignificant (pre vs. post VIB +3%, p?=?0.25 and CON ±0%, p?=?0.82). This study provides evidence for the additional effects of WBV above conventional exercise alone. As far as balance and muscle endurance of the lower leg are concerned, a training program that includes WBV can provide supplementary benefits in young and well-trained adults compared to an equivalent program that does not include WBV. PMID:24587114

Ritzmann, Ramona; Kramer, Andreas; Bernhardt, Sascha; Gollhofer, Albert

2014-01-01

68

Acute effects of stochastic resonance whole body vibration  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate the acute effects of stochastic resonance whole body vibration (SR-WBV) training to identify possible explanations for preventive effects against musculoskeletal disorders. METHODS: Twenty-three healthy, female students participated in this quasi-experimental pilot study. Acute physiological and psychological effects of SR-WBV training were examined using electromyography of descending trapezius (TD) muscle, heart rate variability (HRV), different skin parameters (temperature, redness and blood flow) and self-report questionnaires. All subjects conducted a sham SR-WBV training at a low intensity (2 Hz with noise level 0) and a verum SR-WBV training at a higher intensity (6 Hz with noise level 4). They were tested before, during and after the training. Conclusions were drawn on the basis of analysis of variance. RESULTS: Twenty-three healthy, female students participated in this study (age = 22.4 ± 2.1 years; body mass index = 21.6 ± 2.2 kg/m2). Muscular activity of the TD and energy expenditure rose during verum SR-WBV compared to baseline and sham SR-WBV (all P < 0.05). Muscular relaxation after verum SR-WBV was higher than at baseline and after sham SR-WBV (all P < 0.05). During verum SR-WBV the levels of HRV were similar to those observed during sham SR-WBV. The same applies for most of the skin characteristics, while microcirculation of the skin of the middle back was higher during verum compared to sham SR-WBV (P < 0.001). Skin redness showed significant changes over the three measurement points only in the middle back area (P = 0.022). There was a significant rise from baseline to verum SR-WBV (0.86 ± 0.25 perfusion units; P = 0.008). The self-reported chronic pain grade indicators of pain, stiffness, well-being, and muscle relaxation showed a mixed pattern across conditions. Muscle and joint stiffness (P = 0.018) and muscular relaxation did significantly change from baseline to different conditions of SR-WBV (P < 0.001). Moreover, muscle relaxation after verum SR-WBV was higher than after sham SR-WBV (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Verum SR-WBV stimulated musculoskeletal activity in young healthy individuals while cardiovascular activation was low. Training of musculoskeletal capacity and immediate increase in musculoskeletal relaxation are potential mediators of pain reduction in preventive trials. PMID:24147265

Elfering, Achim; Zahno, Jasmine; Taeymans, Jan; Blasimann, Angela; Radlinger, Lorenz

2013-01-01

69

The Effect of Whole Body Horizontal Vibration in Position Sense and Dynamic Stability of the Spine  

E-print Network

In many workplaces, workers are exposed to whole body vibration which involves multi-axis motion in fore-aft (x axis), lateral (y axis) and vertical (z axis) directions. In previous studies, our laboratory has found changes in biomechanical...

Lamis, Farhana

2008-06-09

70

Localised Muscle Tissue Oxygenation During Dynamic Exercise With Whole Body Vibration  

PubMed Central

Despite increasing use of whole body vibration during exercise an understanding of the exact role of vibration and the supporting physiological mechanisms is still limited. An important aspect of exercise analysis is the utilisation of oxygen, however, there have been limited studies considering tissue oxygenation parameters, particularly during dynamic whole body vibration (WBV) exercise. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of adding WBV during heel raise exercises and assessing changes in tissue oxygenation parameters of the lateral gastrocnemius using Near Infra Red Spectroscopy (NIRS). Twenty healthy subjects completed ten alternating sets of 15 heel raises (vibration vs. no vibration). Synchronous oxygenation and motion data were captured prior to exercise to determine baseline levels, for the duration of the exercise and 20 sec post exercise for the recovery period. Both vibration and no vibration conditions elicited a characteristic increase in deoxyhaemoglobin and decreases in oxyhaemoglobin, total haemoglobin, tissue oxygenation index and normalised tissue haemoglobin index which are indicative of local tissue hypoxia. However, the addition of vibration elicited significantly lower (p < 0. 001) depletions in oxyhaemoglobin, total haemoglobin, normalised tissue haemoglobin index but no significant differences in deoxyhaemoglobin. These findings suggest that addition of vibration to exercise does not increase the cost of the exercise for the lateral gastrocnemius muscle, but does decrease the reduction in local muscle oxygenation parameters, potentially resulting from increased blood flow to the calf or a vasospastic response in the feet. However, further studies are needed to establish the mechanisms underlying these findings. Key pointsWhole body vibration affects tissue oxygenation of the lateral gastrocnemius.The underlying mechanism could be either increased blood flow or a vasospastic response in the feet.The local metabolic cost of heel raise activity on the lateral gastrocnemius does not appear to be increased by whole body vibration. PMID:24149209

Robbins, Daniel; Elwell, Clare; Jimenez, Alfonso; Goss-Sampson, Mark

2012-01-01

71

Predicting discomfort from whole-body vertical vibration when sitting with an inclined backrest.  

PubMed

Current methods for evaluating seat vibration to predict vibration discomfort assume the same frequency weightings and axis multiplying factors can be used at the seat surface and the backrest irrespective of the backrest inclination. This experimental study investigated the discomfort arising from whole-body vertical vibration when sitting on a rigid seat with no backrest and with a backrest inclined at 0° (upright), 30°, 60°, and 90° (recumbent). Within each of these five postures, 12 subjects judged the discomfort caused by vertical sinusoidal whole-body vibration (at frequencies from 1 to 20 Hz at magnitudes from 0.2 to 2.0 m s(-2) r.m.s.) relative to the discomfort produced by a reference vibration (8 Hz at 0.4 m s(-2) r.m.s.). With 8-Hz vertical vibration, the subjects also judged vibration discomfort with each backrest condition relative to the vibration discomfort with no backrest. The locations in the body where discomfort was experienced were determined for each frequency at two vibration magnitudes. Equivalent comfort contours were determined for the five conditions of the backrest and show how discomfort depends on the frequency of vibration, the presence of the backrest, and the backrest inclination. At frequencies greater than about 8 Hz, the backrest increased vibration discomfort, especially when inclined to 30°, 60°, or 90°, and there was greater discomfort at the head or neck. At frequencies around 5 and 6.3 Hz there was less vibration discomfort when sitting with an inclined backrest. PMID:23190680

Basri, Bazil; Griffin, Michael J

2013-05-01

72

Stochastic Resonance Whole-Body Vibration, Musculoskeletal Symptoms, and Body Balance: A Worksite Training Study  

PubMed Central

Background Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training (SR-WBV) was tested to reduce work-related musculoskeletal complaints. Methods Participants were 54 white-collar employees of a Swiss organization. The controlled crossover design comprised two groups each given 4 weeks of exercise and no training during a second 4-week period. Outcome was daily musculoskeletal well-being, musculoskeletal pain, and surefootedness. In addition, participants performed a behavioral test on body balance prior to when SR-WBV started and after 4 weeks of SR-WBV. Results Across the 4-week training period, musculoskeletal well-being and surefootedness were significantly increased (p < 0.05), whereas musculoskeletal pain was significantly reduced only in those who reported low back pain during the last 4 weeks prior to the study (p < 0.05). Body balance was significantly increased by SR-WBV (p < 0.05). Conclusion SR-WBV seems to be an efficient option in primary prevention of musculoskeletal complaints and falls at work. PMID:24106645

Elfering, Achim; Arnold, Sibille; Schade, Volker; Burger, Christian; Radlinger, Lorenz

2013-01-01

73

Strength Increase after Whole-Body Vibration Compared with Resistance Training  

Microsoft Academic Search

DELECLUSE, C., M. ROELANTS, and S. VERSCHUEREN. Strength Increase after Whole-Body Vibration Compared with Resistance Training. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 35, No. 6, pp. 1033-1041, 2003. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate and to compare the effect of a 12-wk period of whole-body vibration training and resistance training on human knee-extensor strength. Methods: Sixty-seven untrained females

CHRISTOPHE DELECLUSE; MACHTELD ROELANTS; SABINE VERSCHUEREN

2003-01-01

74

Subjective response to seated fore-and-aft direction whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Subjective response to seated, fore-and-aft direction, whole-body vibration of the type experienced in automobiles was investigated. Fore-and-aft acceleration was measured at the seat guide of a small automobile when driving over two representative road surfaces, and was replicated in a laboratory setting using a whole-body vibration test rig and rigid seat. A single 15s section of each of the two

T. M. Hacaambwa; J. Giacomin

2007-01-01

75

Modeling of hard disk drives for vibration analysis using a flexible multi-body dynamics formulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a flexible multi-body dynamics formulation to analyze vibration of hard disk drives. The formulation is applied in analyzing vibration of VCM-actuators assembly and disks-spindle system. There are flexible components as well as rigid bodies in the system. Governing equations of motion of the VCM-actuators assembly and disks-spindle system are derived by using a Lagrangian formulation. Elastic deformations

Feng GAO; Fook Fah YAP; Ying YAN

2004-01-01

76

A MODAL ANALYSIS OF WHOLE-BODY VERTICAL VIBRATION, USING A FINITE ELEMENT MODEL OF THE HUMAN BODY  

Microsoft Academic Search

A two-dimensional model of human biomechanical responses to whole-body vibration has been developed, by using the finite element method. Beam, spring and mass elements were used to model the spine, viscera, head, pelvis and buttocks tissue in the mid-sagittal plane. The model was developed by comparison of the vibration mode shapes with those previously measured in the laboratory. At frequencies

S. Kitazaki; M. J. Griffin

1997-01-01

77

Nonlinear dual-axis biodynamic response of the semi-supine human body during longitudinal horizontal whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The resonance frequencies in frequency response functions of the human body (e.g. apparent mass and transmissibility) decrease with increasing vibration magnitude. This nonlinear biodynamic response is found with various sitting and standing postures requiring postural control. The present study measured the apparent mass of the body in a relaxed semi-supine posture with two types of longitudinal horizontal vibration (in the z-axis of the semi-supine body): (i) continuous random excitation (0.25-20 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 ms -2 rms); (ii) intermittent random excitation (0.25-20 Hz) alternately at 0.25 and 1.0 ms -2 rms. With continuous random vibration, the dominant primary resonance frequency in the median normalised apparent mass decreased from 3.7 to 2.4 Hz as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 1.0 ms -2 rms. A nonlinear response was apparent in both the horizontal ( z-axis) apparent mass and the vertical ( x-axis) cross-axis apparent mass. With intermittent random vibration, as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.25 to 1.0 ms -2 rms, the median resonance frequency of the apparent mass decreased from 3.2 to 2.5 Hz whereas, with continuous random vibration over the same range of magnitudes, the resonance frequency decreased from 3.4 to 2.4 Hz. The median change in the resonance frequency (between 0.25 and 1.0 ms -2 rms) was 0.6 Hz with the intermittent random vibration and 0.9 Hz with the continuous random vibration. With intermittent vibration, the resonance frequency was higher at the high magnitude and lower at the low magnitude than with continuous vibration at the same magnitudes. The responses were consistent with passive thixotropy being a primary cause of nonlinear biodynamic responses to whole-body vibration, although reflex activity of the muscles may also have an influence.

Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

2008-04-01

78

Body Awareness: a phenomenological inquiry into the common ground of mind-body therapies  

PubMed Central

Enhancing body awareness has been described as a key element or a mechanism of action for therapeutic approaches often categorized as mind-body approaches, such as yoga, TaiChi, Body-Oriented Psychotherapy, Body Awareness Therapy, mindfulness based therapies/meditation, Feldenkrais, Alexander Method, Breath Therapy and others with reported benefits for a variety of health conditions. To better understand the conceptualization of body awareness in mind-body therapies, leading practitioners and teaching faculty of these approaches were invited as well as their patients to participate in focus groups. The qualitative analysis of these focus groups with representative practitioners of body awareness practices, and the perspectives of their patients, elucidated the common ground of their understanding of body awareness. For them body awareness is an inseparable aspect of embodied self awareness realized in action and interaction with the environment and world. It is the awareness of embodiment as an innate tendency of our organism for emergent self-organization and wholeness. The process that patients undergo in these therapies was seen as a progression towards greater unity between body and self, very similar to the conceptualization of embodiment as dialectic of body and self described by some philosophers as being experienced in distinct developmental levels. PMID:21473781

2011-01-01

79

Does acute side-alternating vibration exercise enhance ballistic upper-body power?  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute vibration exercise, at 2 different frequencies, on upper body power output. Muscle activity (EMG) and upper-body peak power was measured in 12 healthy males during ballistic bench press throws at 30% of 1-repetition maximum on a Smith machine. Measures were made prior to, 30?s and 5?min after one of 3 conditions performed for 30?s in a press-up position: side-alternating vibration at 20?Hz, 26?Hz and no vibration. EMG was recorded in the anterior deltoid, triceps brachii and pectoralis major during ballistic bench press throws as well as during application of each condition. While peak power output was higher at 5?min post condition across all conditions, compared to baseline measures (P<0.05), only 20?Hz vibration resulted in a significant increase in peak power output (P<0.05) compared to no vibration. EMG was greater during both vibration conditions, compared to no vibration (P<0.001). However, this difference was not evident during bench press throws when no difference was seen in muscle activity between conditions. These findings suggest that 20?Hz vibration has an ergogenic effect on upper-body power that may be due to peripheral, rather than central, mediated mechanisms. PMID:24838267

Cochrane, D J; Black, M J; Barnes, M J

2014-11-01

80

Mind???Body Therapies for the Management of Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the evidence for mind-body therapies (eg, relaxation, meditation, imagery, cognitive-behavioral therapy) in the treatment of pain-related medical conditions and suggests direc- tions for future research in these areas. Based on evidence from ran- domized controlled trials and in many cases, systematic reviews of the literature, the following recommendations can be made: 1) multi- component mind-body approaches that

John A. Astin

2004-01-01

81

Neuromuscular response of the trunk to inertial based sudden perturbations following whole body vibration exposure.  

PubMed

The effects of whole body vibration exposure on the neuromuscular responses following inertial-based trunk perturbations were examined. Kinematic and surface EMG (sEMG) data were collected while subjects were securely seated on a robotic platform. Participants were either exposed to 10min of vibration or not, which was followed by sudden inertial trunk perturbations with and without timing and direction knowledge. Amplitude of sEMG was analyzed for data collected during the vibration protocol, whereas the onset of sEMG activity and lumbar spine angle were analyzed for the perturbation protocol. Data from the vibration protocol did not show a difference in amplitude of sEMG for participants exposed to vibration and those not. The perturbation protocol data showed that those not exposed to vibration had a 14% faster muscle onset, despite data showing no difference in fatigue level. PMID:25241645

MacIntyre, Danielle; Cort, Joel A

2014-12-01

82

Whole-body vibration exposure in subway cars and review of adverse health effects.  

PubMed

New York City Transit Authority subway operators have a high prevalence of back problems. To evaluate a possible dose-response relationship for whole-body vibration, we studied subway car vibrations measured and analyzed according to the International Standard Organization 2631 and Verein Deutscher Ingenieure 2057 standards. Vibration transducers in triaxial orientation were mounted in a disc pad directly on the subway operator's seat. The relatively high lateral and vertical accelerations, primarily the combined effects, may all contribute to the high rate of musculoskeletal complaints, especially of the lower back. Other factors aggravating whole-body vibrations include primitive ergonomic cab and seat design, forced body posture, high noise levels, and organizational work stress. PMID:1831231

Johanning, E; Wilder, D G; Landrigan, P J; Pope, M H

1991-05-01

83

Self-reported low back symptoms in urban bus drivers exposed to whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

The prevalence of self-reported low back symptoms was investigated by a postal questionnaire in a group of 234 urban bus drivers exposed to whole-body vibration and postural stress and in a control group of 125 maintenance workers employed at the same bus municipal company. The average vertical whole-body vibration magnitude measured on the seat pan of the buses was 0.4 m/s2. After controlling for potential confounders, the prevalence odds ratios for the bus drivers compared to the controls significantly exceeded 1 for several types of low back symptoms (leg pain, acute low back pain, low back pain). The occurrence of low back symptoms increased with increasing whole-body vibration exposure expressed in terms of total (lifetime) vibration dose (years m2/s4), equivalent vibration magnitude (m/s2), and duration of exposure (years of service). The highest prevalence of disc protrusion was found among the bus drivers with more severe whole-body vibration exposure. Frequent awkward postures at work were also related to some types of low back symptoms. It is concluded that bus driving is associated with an increased risk for low back troubles. This excess risk may be due to both whole-body vibration exposure and prolonged sitting in a constrained posture. The findings of this study also indicated that among the bus drivers low back symptoms occurred at whole-body vibration exposure levels that were lower than the health-based exposure limits proposed by the International Standard ISO 2631/1. PMID:1411756

Bovenzi, M; Zadini, A

1992-09-01

84

Nonlinear dual-axis biodynamic response of the semi-supine human body during vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nonlinear biodynamic responses are evident in many studies of the apparent masses of sitting and standing subjects in static postures that require muscle activity for postural control. In the present study, 12 male subjects adopted a relaxed semi-supine posture assumed to involve less muscle activity than during static sitting and standing. The supine subjects were exposed to two types of vertical vibration (in the x-axis of the semi-supine body): (i) continuous random vibration (0.25-20 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 m s -2 rms); (ii) intermittent random vibration (0.25-20 Hz) alternately at 0.25 and 1.0 m s -2 rms. With continuous random vibration, the dominant primary resonance frequency in the median normalised apparent mass decreased from 10.35 to 7.32 Hz as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 1.0 m s -2 rms. This nonlinear response was apparent in both the vertical ( x-axis) apparent mass and in the horizontal ( z-axis) cross-axis apparent mass. As the vibration magnitude increased from 0.25 to 1.0 m s -2 rms, the median resonance frequency of the apparent mass with intermittent random vibration decreased from 9.28 to 8.06 Hz whereas, over the same range of magnitudes with continuous random vibration, the resonance frequency decreased from 9.62 to 7.81 Hz. The median change in the resonance frequency (between 0.25 and 1.0 m s -2 rms) was 1.37 Hz with the intermittent random vibration and 1.71 with the continuous random vibration. With the intermittent vibration, the resonance frequency was higher at the high magnitude and lower at the low magnitude than with continuous vibration of the same magnitudes. The response was typical of thixotropy that may be a primary cause of the nonlinear biodynamic responses to whole-body vibration.

Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

2008-04-01

85

Whole-body vibration improves functional recovery in spinal cord injured rats.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a relatively novel form of exercise used to improve neuromuscular performance in healthy individuals. Its usefulness as a therapy for patients with neurological disorders, in particular spinal cord injury (SCI), has received little attention in clinical settings and, surprisingly, even less in animal SCI models. We performed severe compression SCI at a low-thoracic level in Wistar rats followed by daily WBV starting 7 (10 rats) or 14 (10 rats) days after injury (WBV7 and WBV14, respectively) and continued over a 12-week post-injury period. Rats with SCI but no WBV training (sham, 10 rats) and intact animals (10 rats) served as controls. Compared to sham-treated rats, WBV did not improve BBB score, plantar stepping, or ladder stepping during the 12-week period. Accordingly, WBV did not significantly alter plantar H-reflex, lesion volume, serotonergic input to the lumbar spinal cord, nor cholinergic or glutamatergic inputs to lumbar motoneurons at 12 weeks after SCI. However, compared to sham, WBV14, but not WBV7, significantly improved body weight support (rump-height index) during overground locomotion and overall recovery between 6-12 weeks and also restored the density of synaptic terminals in the lumbar spinal cord at 12 weeks. Most remarkably, WBV14 led to a significant improvement of bladder function at 6-12 weeks after injury. These findings provide the first evidence for functional benefits of WBV in an animal SCI model and warrant further preclinical investigations to determine mechanisms underpinning this noninvasive, inexpensive, and easily delivered potential rehabilitation therapy for SCI. PMID:23157611

Wirth, Felicitas; Schempf, Greta; Stein, Gregor; Wellmann, Katharina; Manthou, Marilena; Scholl, Carolin; Sidorenko, Malina; Semler, Oliver; Eisel, Leonie; Harrach, Rachida; Angelova, Srebrina; Jaminet, Patrick; Ankerne, Janina; Ashrafi, Mahak; Ozsoy, Ozlem; Ozsoy, Umut; Schubert, Harald; Abdulla, Diana; Dunlop, Sarah A; Angelov, Doychin N; Irintchev, Andrey; Schönau, Eckhard

2013-03-15

86

Torsional vibration analysis of a multi-body single cylinder internal combustion engine model  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a detailed multi-body numerical nonlinear dynamic model of a single cylinder internal combustion engine. The model comprises all rigid body inertial members, support bearings, joints, couplers, and connections between the various engine components, as well as means of vibration damping. The detailed model is parameterised, thus enabling virtual prototype testing of various engine designs, as well as

A. Boysal; H. Rahnejat

1997-01-01

87

Neurocognitive responses to a single session of static squats with whole body vibration.  

PubMed

Amonette, WE, Boyle, M, Psarakis, MB, Barker, J, Dupler, TL, and Ott, SD. Neurocognitive responses to a single session of static squats with whole body vibration. J Strength Cond Res 29(1): 96-100, 2015-The purpose of this study was to determine if the head accelerations using a common whole body vibration (WBV) exercise protocol acutely reduced neurocognition in healthy subjects. Second, we investigated differential responses to WBV plates with 2 different delivery mechanisms: vertical and rotational vibrations. Twelve healthy subjects (N = 12) volunteered and completed a baseline (BASE) neurocognitive assessment: the Immediate Postconcussion Assessment and Cognitive Test (ImPACT). Subjects then participated in 3 randomized exercise sessions separated by no more than 2 weeks. The exercise sessions consisted of five 2-minute sets of static hip-width stance squats, with the knees positioned at a 45° angle of flexion. The squats were performed with no vibration (control [CON]), with a vertically vibrating plate (vertical vibration [VV]), and with a rotational vibrating plate (rotational vibration [RV]) set to 30 Hz with 4 mm of peak-to-peak displacement. The ImPACT assessments were completed immediately after each exercise session and the composite score for 5 cognitive domains was analyzed: verbal memory, visual memory, visual motor speed, reaction time, and impulse control. Verbal memory scores were unaffected by exercise with or without vibration (p = 0.40). Likewise, visual memory was not different (p = 0.14) after CON, VV, or RV. Significant differences were detected for visual motor speed (p = 0.006); VV was elevated compared with BASE (p = 0.01). There were no significant differences (p = 0.26) in reaction time or impulse control (p = 0.16) after exercise with or without vibration. In healthy individuals, 10 minutes of 30 Hz, 4-mm peak-to-peak displacement vibration exposure with a 45° angle of knee flexion did not negatively affect neurocognition. PMID:25536489

Amonette, William E; Boyle, Mandy; Psarakis, Maria B; Barker, Jennifer; Dupler, Terry L; Ott, Summer D

2015-01-01

88

Nonlinear subjective and dynamic responses of seated subjects exposed to horizontal whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of the magnitude of fore-and-aft and lateral vibration on the subjective and mechanical responses of seated subjects has been investigated experimentally using simultaneous measurements of relative discomfort and apparent mass. Twelve male subjects were exposed to sinusoidal vibration at nine frequencies (between 1.6 and 10 Hz) at four magnitudes (in the range 0.125-1.0 m s -2 r.m.s.) in both horizontal directions (fore-and-aft and lateral). The method of magnitude estimation was used to estimate discomfort relative to that caused by a 4 Hz reference vibration in the same axis. The apparent mass was calculated from the acceleration and the applied force so as to quantify the mechanical response of the body. With each direction of excitation, the apparent mass was normalised by dividing it by the apparent mass obtained at 4 Hz, so that the mechanical responses could be compared with the subjective responses. The relative discomfort and the normalised apparent mass were similarly affected by the frequency and magnitude of vibration, with significant correlations between the relative discomfort and the normalised apparent mass. The results indicate that the discomfort caused by horizontal whole-body vibration is associated with the apparent mass in a frequency range where motion of the whole body is dominant. In this frequency range, the nonlinear subjective responses may be attributed, at least in part, to the nonlinear dynamic responses to horizontal whole-body vibration.

Subashi, G. H. M. J.; Nawayseh, N.; Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

2009-03-01

89

Varying whole body vibration amplitude differentially affects tendon and ligament structural and material properties  

PubMed Central

Whole Body Vibration (WBV) is becoming increasingly popular for helping to maintain bone mass and strengthening muscle. Vibration regimens optimized for bone maintenance often operate at hypogravity levels (<1 G) and regimens for muscle strengthening often employ hypergravity (>1 G) vibrations. The effect of vibratory loads on tendon and ligament properties is unclear though excessive vibrations may be injurious. Our objective was to evaluate how tendon gene expression and the mechanical/histological properties of tendon and ligament were affected in response to WBV in the following groups: no vibration, low vibration (0.3 G peak-to-peak), and high vibration (2 G peak-to-peak). Rats were vibrated for 20 min a day, 5 days a week, for 5 weeks. Upon sacrifice, the medial collateral ligament (MCL), patellar tendon (PT), and the Achilles Tendon (AT) were isolated with insertion sites intact. All tissues were tensile tested to determine structural and material properties or used for histology. Patellar tendon was also subjected to quantitative RT-PCR to evaluate expression of anabolic and catabolic genes. No differences in biomechanical data between the control and the low vibration groups were found. There was evidence of significant weakness in the MCL with high vibration, but no significant effect on the PT or AT. Histology of the MCL and PT showed a hypercellular tissue response and some fiber disorganization with high vibration. High vibration caused an increase in collagen expression and a trend for an increase in IGF-1 expression suggesting a potential anabolic response to prevent tendon overuse injury. PMID:23623311

Keller, Benjamin V.; Davis, Matthew L.; Thompson, William R.; Dahners, Laurence E.; Weinhold, Paul S.

2014-01-01

90

Benefits of whole body vibration training in patients hospitalised for COPD exacerbations - a randomized clinical trial  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with stable COPD show improvements in exercise capacity and muscular function after the application of whole body vibration. We aimed to evaluate whether this modality added to conventional physiotherapy in exacerbated hospitalised COPD patients would be safe and would improve exercise capacity and quality of life. Methods 49 hospitalised exacerbated COPD patients were randomized (1:1) to undergo physiotherapy alone or physiotherapy with the addition of whole body vibration. The primary endpoint was the between-group difference of the 6-minute walking test (day of discharge – day of admission). Secondary assessments included chair rising test, quality of life, and serum marker analysis. Results Whole body vibration did not cause procedure-related adverse events. Compared to physiotherapy alone, it led to significantly stronger improvements in 6-minute walking test (95.55?±?76.29 m vs. 6.13?±?81.65 m; p?=?0.007) and St. Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (-6.43?±?14.25 vs. 5.59?±?19.15, p?=?0.049). Whole body vibration increased the expression of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator receptor gamma coactivator-1-? and serum levels of irisin, while it decreased serum interleukin-8. Conclusion Whole body vibration during hospitalised exacerbations did not cause procedure-related adverse events and induced clinically significant benefits regarding exercise capacity and health-related quality of life that were associated with increased serum levels of irisin, a marker of muscle activity. Trial registration German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00005979. Registered 17 March 2014. PMID:24725369

2014-01-01

91

Low back and neck pain in locomotive engineers exposed to whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and excess risk of low back pain and neck pain in locomotive engineers, and to investigate the relationship of both with whole-body vibration exposure. A cross-sectional survey comparing locomotive engineers with other rail worker referents was conducted. Current vibration levels were measured, cumulative exposures calculated for engineers and referents, and low back and neck pain assessed by a self-completed questionnaire. Median vibration exposure in the z- (vertical) axis was 0.62 m/s(2). Engineers experienced more frequent low back and neck pain, odds ratios (ORs) of 1.77 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19-2.64) and 1.92 (95% CI: 1.22-3.02), respectively. The authors conclude that vibration close to the "action levels" of published standards contribute to low back and neck pain. Vibration levels need to be assessed conservatively and control measures introduced. PMID:24499248

McBride, David; Paulin, Sara; Herbison, G Peter; Waite, David; Bagheri, Nasser

2014-01-01

92

Fluid dynamic aspects of cardiovascular behavior during low-frequency whole-body vibration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The behavior of the cardiovascular system during low frequency whole-body vibration, such as encountered by astronauts during launch and reentry, is examined from a fluid mechanical viewpoint. The vibration characteristics of typical manned spacecraft and other vibration environments are discussed, and existing results from in vivo studies of the hemodynamic aspects of this problem are reviewed. Recent theoretical solutions to related fluid mechanical problems are then used in the interpretation of these results and in discussing areas of future work. The results are included of studies of the effects of vibration on the work done by the heart and on pulsatile flow in blood vessels. It is shown that important changes in pulse velocity, the instantaneous velocity profile, mass flow rate, and wall shear stress may occur in a pulsatile flow due to the presence of vibration. The significance of this in terms of changes in peripheral vascular resistance and possible damage to the endothelium of blood vessels is discussed.

Nerem, R. M.

1973-01-01

93

Effects of Whole Body Vibration Training on Muscle Strength and Sprint Performance in Sprint-trained Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT Despite the expanding use of Whole Body Vibration training among athletes, it is not known whether adding Whole Body Vibration training to the conventional training of sprint-trained athletes will improve speed-strength performance. Twenty experienced sprint-trained athletes (13 ?, 7 ?, 17-30 years old) were randomly assigned to a Whole Body Vibration group (N=10: 6 ? and 4 ?) or

Christophe Delecluse; Machteld Roelants; Rudi Diels

94

The effects of whole body vibration on balance, joint position sense and cutaneous sensation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole body vibration (WBV) may enhance muscular strength and power but little is known about its influence on sensory-motor\\u000a function. Vibration of a single muscle or tendon affects the afferent system in a manner that depends on amplitude and frequency.\\u000a WBV stimulates many muscle groups simultaneously and the frequencies and amplitudes used are different from many of the studies\\u000a on

Ross D. PollockSally ProvanFinbarr; Sally Provan; Finbarr C. Martin; Di J. Newham

95

[Whole body vibration (acceleration) training increases bone mineral density and serum levels of osteocalcin in elderly women].  

PubMed

Hip bone mineral density (BMD) and serum markers of bone turnover during drug (antiresorptic medicaments) and non-drug (acceleration training) therapy in elderly women suffering from postmenopausal osteoporosis has been investigated. The hip BMD measured in elderly women after a 24-week antiresorptic therapy (alendronate) and increased by 2.01%. 24-week acceleration training resulted in 1.56% benefit in hip BMD and also serum levels of osteocalcin (+50%, p < 0.05) significantly increased in postmenopausal women. We have determined that the osteogenic effect of acceleration training is mediated by stimulated bone formation. Our findings suggest that whole body vibration (acceleration) training may be a beneficial technique to prevent and treat osteoporosis. PMID:21033380

Kotel'nikov, G P; Piatin, V F; Bulgakova, S V; Shirolapov, I V

2010-01-01

96

Power absorbed during whole-body vertical vibration: Effects of sitting posture, backrest, and footrest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous studies have quantified the power absorbed in the seated human body during exposure to vibration but have not investigated the effects of body posture or the power absorbed at the back and the feet. This study investigated the effects of support for the feet and back and the magnitude of vibration on the power absorbed during whole-body vertical vibration. Twelve subjects were exposed to four magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25 m s -2 rms) of random vertical vibration (0.25-20 Hz) while sitting on a rigid seat in four postures (feet hanging, maximum thigh contact, average thigh contact, and minimum thigh contact) both with and without a rigid vertical backrest. Force and acceleration were measured at the seat, the feet, and the backrest to calculate the power absorbed at these three locations. At all three interfaces (seat, feet, and back) the absorbed power increased in proportion to the square of the magnitude of vibration, with most power absorbed from vibration at the seat. Supporting the back with the backrest decreased the power absorbed at the seat at low frequencies but increased the power absorbed at high frequencies. Supporting the feet with the footrest reduced the total absorbed power at the seat, with greater reductions with higher footrests. It is concluded that contact between the thighs and the seat increases the power absorbed at the seat whereas a backrest can either increase or decrease the power absorbed at the seat.

Nawayseh, Naser; Griffin, Michael J.

2010-07-01

97

Effect of Magnitude of Vertical Whole-Body Vibration on Absorbed Power for the Seated Human Body  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The power absorbed by 12 male subjects during exposure to vertical whole-body vibration at six magnitudes of random vibration (0·25, 0·5, 1·0, 1·5, 2·0 and 2·5 ms-2r.m.s.) has been measured in the laboratory. All subjects showed greatest absorbed power at about 5 Hz, but the frequency of this peak in the absorbed power reduced with increasing vibration magnitude. The total absorbed power increased approximately in proportion to the square of the acceleration magnitude: normalizing the absorbed power to the square of the r.m.s. vibration magnitude removed most of the differences, although the changes in resonance frequency were still evident. The frequency dependence of absorbed power at a constant magnitude of acceleration was approximated by a simple weighting having slopes of ±6 dB/octave either side of 5 Hz. Comparing the characteristics of this absorbed power weighting to standard frequency weightings showed substantial differences, especially at high frequencies. It is concluded that the differences from currently accepted frequency weightings are so great that the absorbed power is unlikely to yield good general predictions of the discomfort or risks of injury from whole-body vertical vibration.

Mansfield, N. J.; Griffin, M. J.

1998-08-01

98

Whole body vibration: unsupervised training or combined with a supervised multi-purpose exercise for fitness?  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to compare the effect of an unsupervised whole body vibration (WBV) training and two different supervised multi-purpose exercise programmes, with and without WBV, on body composition, functional fitness and self-reported well-being in middle-aged adults. Fifty-four healthy participants (age 48.6 ± 6.7 years) were randomly assigned to a vibration group (VG), a multi-purpose exercise group (MG) and a multi-purpose exercise with vibration group (VMG) and trained 3 days a week for 4 months. VG performed a standardised unsupervised WBV protocol, MG a supervised multi-purpose exercise and VMG a multi-purpose exercise including vibration. After training, drop out was significantly higher in VG group (P = 0.016) when compared to VMG group. In both MG and VMG, body composition, sit-up, push-up, sit and reach, agility test, hopping test and self-reported general health significantly improved (P < 0.05). No additive effects were generated by the vibration stimulus. Percentage of body fat and agility test in VG had a significant opposite trend compared to VMG group (P < 0.05). In summary, an unsupervised WBV training should not be chosen for training protocol. However, positive effects on physical fitness and the best results in adherence could be achieved integrating WBV practice into a multi-purpose exercise training. PMID:24479642

Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Meucci, Marco; Gallotta, Maria Chiara; Buzzachera, Cosme Franklim; Guidetti, Laura; Baldari, Carlo

2014-01-01

99

Exploring the Effects of Seated Whole Body Vibration Exposure on Repetitive Asymmetric Lifting Tasks.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT This study investigated changes in the physiological and behavioral responses to repetitive asymmetric lifting activity after exposure to whole body vibrations. Seventeen healthy volunteers repeatedly lifted a box (15% of lifter's capacity) positioned in front of them at ankle level to a location on their left side at waist level at the rate of 10 lifts/minute for a period of 60 minutes. Prior to lifting, participants were seated on a vibrating platform for 60 minutes; in one of the two sessions the platform did not vibrate. Overall, the physiological responses assessed using near-infrared spectroscopy signals for the erector spinae muscles decreased significantly over time during the seating and the lifting tasks (p < 0.001). During repetitive asymmetric lifting, behavioral changes included increases in peak forward bending motion, twisting moment and three-dimensional movement velocities of the spine. The lateral bending moment of the spine and the duration of each lift decreased significantly over the 60 minutes of repetitive lifting. With exposure to whole body vibration, participants twisted further (p = 0.046) and twisted faster (p = 0.025). These behavioral changes would suggest an increase in back injury risk when repetitive lifting tasks are preceded by whole body vibration exposure. PMID:25264920

Mehta, Jay P; Lavender, Steven A; Jagacinski, Richard J; Sommerich, Carolyn M

2014-09-29

100

Modular Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study pilot tested a newly developed modular cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) treatment manual for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). We tested feasibility, acceptability, and treatment outcome in a sample of 12 adults with primary BDD. Treatment was delivered in weekly individual sessions over 18 or 22 weeks. Standardized clinician ratings…

Wilhelm, Sabine; Phillips, Katharine A.; Fama, Jeanne M.; Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Steketee, Gail

2011-01-01

101

Stereotactic body radiation therapy: a novel treatment modality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) involves the delivery of a small number of ultra-high doses of radiation to a target volume using very advanced technology and has emerged as a novel treatment modality for cancer. The role of SBRT is most important at two cancer stages—in early primary cancer and in oligometastatic disease. This modality has been used in the

Achilles J. Fakiris; Eric L. Chang; Nina A. Mayr; Jian Z. Wang; Lech Papiez; Bin S. Teh; Ronald C. McGarry; Higinia R. Cardenes; Robert D. Timmerman; Simon S. Lo

2009-01-01

102

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Body Dysmorphic Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The onset of appearance-related concerns associated with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) typically occurs in adolescence, and these concerns are often severe enough to interfere with normal development and psychosocial functioning. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for adults with BDD. However, no treatment studies…

Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Markowitz, Sarah; Petronko, Michael R.; Taylor, Caitlin E.; Wilhelm, Sabine; Wilson, G. Terence

2010-01-01

103

Whole-Body Vibration Exposure Study in U.S. Railroad Locomotives—An Ergonomic Risk Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole-body vibration exposure of locomotive engineers and the vibration attenuation of seats in 22 U.S. locomotives (built between 1959 and 2000) was studied during normal revenue service and following international measurement guidelines. Triaxial vibration measurements (duration mean 155 min, range 84–383 min) on the seat and on the floor were compared. In addition to the basic vibration evaluation (aw rms),

Eckardt Johanning; Siegfried Fischer; Eberhard Christ; Benno Göres; Paul Landsbergis

2002-01-01

104

Improved protocols for vibrational spectroscopic analysis of body fluids.  

PubMed

The applications of vibrational spectroscopy to the examination of human blood serum are explored. Although FTIR spectra can be recorded in aqueous solutions at (gelatin) concentrations as low as 100 mg/L, the high-wavenumber region remains obscured by water absorption. Using Raman spectroscopy, high quality spectra of gelatine solutions as low as 10 mg/L can be achieved, also covering the high-wavenumber regions. In human serum, spectral profiles are weak and partially obscured by water features. Dried deposits are shown to be physically and chemically inhomogeneous resulting in reduced measurement reproducibility. Concentration of the serum using commercially available centrifugal filter devices results in an improvement in the spectral intensity and quality. Additionally, in Raman spectroscopy, reduced background and significantly enhanced signal collection is achievable by measurement in an inverted geometry. The improved protocols for spectroscopic measurement of human serum are applicable to a range of bodily fluids and should accelerate potential clinical applications. PMID:24132993

Bonnier, Franck; Petitjean, François; Baker, Matthew J; Byrne, Hugh J

2014-04-01

105

Vibration control of a manipulator tip on a flexible body  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Vibration control of a rigid manipulator tip on a main flexible uniform beam is examined. It is proposed to add a compensator between the manipulator and the beam to rotate and extend/retrieve the manipulator during the control period. The 2D station-keeping maneuvers within the linear range without gravity and damping are considered. The compensatory open-loop control law, which depends on the amplitudes of the beam's flexible deformations at the connection joint, is synthesized using linear quadratic regulator techniques. After introducing the compensatory control into the system, system control is still stable, and the tip coordinates of the manipulator can be made to closely follow the rigid beam motion, which is assumed to be a desired motion.

Xu, J.; Bainum, P. M.; Li, F.

1992-01-01

106

The acute effect of whole body vibration training on flexibility and explosive strength of young gymnasts.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effect of a single bout of whole body vibration (WBV) on flexibility and explosive strength of lower limbs in young artistic gymnasts. Thirty-two young competitive gymnasts volunteered to participate in this study, and were allocated to either the vibration group or traditional body weight training according to the vibration protocol. The vibration intervention consisted of a single bout of eccentric and concentric squatting movements on a vibration platform that was turned on (vibration group: VG n = 15), whereas the traditional body weight (no vibration) group performed the same training protocol with the WBV device turned off (NVG: n= 17). Flexibility (sit and reach test) and explosive strength tests [squat jump (SJ), counter movement jump (CMJ), and single leg squat (right leg (RL) and left leg (LL))] were performed initially (pre-test), immediately after the intervention (post-test 1), and 15 minutes after the end of the intervention programme (post-test 15). Four 2x3 ANOVAs were used to examine the interaction between group (VG vs NVG) and time (pre, post 1, and post 15) with respect to examined variables. The results revealed that a significant interaction between group and time was found with respect to SJ (p < 0.05). However, no significant interaction between group and time was found with respect to flexibility, CMJ, RL and LL after the end of the intervention programme (p > 0.05). Further, the percentage improvement of the VG was significantly greater in all examined variables compared to the NVG. This study concluded that WBV training improves flexibility and explosive strength of lower limbs in young trained artistic gymnasts and maintains the initial level of performance for at least 15 minutes after the WBV intervention programme. PMID:25177103

Dallas, G; Kirialanis, P; Mellos, V

2014-08-01

107

THE ACUTE EFFECT OF WHOLE BODY VIBRATION TRAINING ON FLEXIBILITY AND EXPLOSIVE STRENGTH OF YOUNG GYMNASTS  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effect of a single bout of whole body vibration (WBV) on flexibility and explosive strength of lower limbs in young artistic gymnasts. Thirty-two young competitive gymnasts volunteered to participate in this study, and were allocated to either the vibration group or traditional body weight training according to the vibration protocol. The vibration intervention consisted of a single bout of eccentric and concentric squatting movements on a vibration platform that was turned on (vibration group: VG n = 15), whereas the traditional body weight (no vibration) group performed the same training protocol with the WBV device turned off (NVG: n= 17). Flexibility (sit and reach test) and explosive strength tests [squat jump (SJ), counter movement jump (CMJ), and single leg squat (right leg (RL) and left leg (LL))] were performed initially (pre-test), immediately after the intervention (post-test 1), and 15 minutes after the end of the intervention programme (post-test 15). Four 2x3 ANOVAs were used to examine the interaction between group (VG vs NVG) and time (pre, post 1, and post 15) with respect to examined variables. The results revealed that a significant interaction between group and time was found with respect to SJ (p < 0.05). However, no significant interaction between group and time was found with respect to flexibility, CMJ, RL and LL after the end of the intervention programme (p > 0.05). Further, the percentage improvement of the VG was significantly greater in all examined variables compared to the NVG. This study concluded that WBV training improves flexibility and explosive strength of lower limbs in young trained artistic gymnasts and maintains the initial level of performance for at least 15 minutes after the WBV intervention programme. PMID:25177103

Kirialanis, P.; Mellos, V.

2014-01-01

108

Vibration Suppression of Car-Body Tilting Vehicle Using Air Springs with Antiroll Damper  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, air-spring-type tilting vehicles, which use air springs as the car-body tilt mechanism, have been employed, even in Shinkansen trains, to increase the operation speed on curved sections. On a test train running at a speed of about 300 km\\/h with the tilt mechanism, however, it was found that the car-body roll and lateral vibrations increased in compound

Katsuya Tanifuji; Mitsuru Saito; Hitoshi Soma; Takumi Ishii; Yasushi Kajitani

2009-01-01

109

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 {+-} 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10-40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

Ahmed, Kamran A. [Mayo Medical School, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Rose, Peter S. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Olivier, Kenneth R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Brinkmann, Debra H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Laack, Nadia N., E-mail: laack.nadia@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

2012-04-01

110

Reducing whole-body vibration and musculoskeletal injury with a new car seat design  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new car seat design, which allows the back part of the seat (BPS) to lower down while a protruded cushion supports the lumbar spine, was quantitatively tested to determine its effectiveness and potentials in reducing whole-body vibration (WBV) and musculoskeletal disorders in automobile drivers. Nine subjects were tested to drive with the seat in: 1) the conventional seating arrangement

M. Makhsous; R. Hendrix; Z. Crowther; E. Nam; F. Lin

2005-01-01

111

Whole-Body Vibration to Treat Low Back Pain: Fact or Fad?  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the current evidence base for whole-body vibration as a treatment for low back pain (LBP). Summary of key points: Whole-body vibration through occupational exposure has previously been recognized as an aetiological factor in LBP. Previous studies have identified whole-body vibration (WBV) as a cause of LBP in various sitting-based occupations that involve machinery and repetitive vibration. In the last decade, however, WBV has been advocated as a safe and effective treatment for LBP. Despite the growing popularity of WBV in clinical practice, this systematic review of the literature identified only two studies that investigated the effectiveness of WBV as a treatment option for LBP, and an assessment of the quality of these studies demonstrated several methodological problems that may have biased their findings. While there is emerging evidence for the effectiveness of WBV in treating some medical conditions, the evidence for WBV as a treatment for LBP remains equivocal. Recommendations: Based on the current body of evidence, routine use of WBV to treat LBP should be undertaken with caution. Further rigorous research designed to investigate the effectiveness of WBV as a safe and high-quality treatment for LBP is required. PMID:22210985

Perraton, Luke; Machotka, Zuzana

2011-01-01

112

A quantitative meta-analytic examination of whole-body vibration effects on human performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole-body vibration exerts a substantive influence in many work environments. The primary objective for this work was to quantify such effects by identifying those moderating variables that influence the degree to which performance is affected. To achieve this, a comprehensive meta-analysis was conducted, which synthesized the existing research evidence. A total of 224 papers and reports were identified and, from

G. E. Conway; J. L. Szalma; P. A. Hancock

2007-01-01

113

Whole-body vibration and health effects in the agricultural machinery drivers.  

PubMed

Recently farm mechanization has been widespread and developing rapidly, in particular riding farm machines are increasingly used in paddy fields in Japan. We have no information available on the actual situation regarding whole-body vibration on the seats of these farm machines from the standpoint of labour protection. Measurement and evaluation of whole-body vibration was performed on the seats of popular riding agricultural machineries. Whole-body vibration on the seats of combine harvesters and wheel tractors exceeded exposure limits and the fatigue-decreased proficiency boundary limit of 8 hr and also shortened the reduced comfort boundary limits of ISO 2631 (1985). Some combines, tractors and carieers had only less than one hour exposure duration as compared with the ISO 2631-1 standard (1997). On the other hand a questionnaire was also performed on the subject of agricultural machine operators. Any specific injury or other effects, i.e. low back injuries were not found among the group of operators as compared with those in non-operator farmers. It seems to be difficult to find out the health effects of whole-body vibration itself, because there may be a lot of causes, i.e. working posture, operating heavy materials, in farm working conditions. PMID:9583309

Futatsuka, M; Maeda, S; Inaoka, T; Nagano, M; Shono, M; Miyakita, T

1998-04-01

114

Effects of whole-body vibration training on sprint running kinematics and explosive strength performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 6 wk of whole body vibration (WBV) training on sprint running kine- matics and explosive strength performance. Twenty-four volun- teers (12 women and 12 men) participated in the study and were randomised (n = 12) into the experimental and control groups. The WBV group performed a 6-wk program (16-30

Giorgos Paradisis; Elias Zacharogiannis

2007-01-01

115

NEUROMOTOR RESPONSE TO WHOLE BODY VIBRATION TRANSMISSIBILITY IN THE HORIZONTAL DIRECTION AND ITS MATHEMATICAL MODEL  

E-print Network

NEUROMOTOR RESPONSE TO WHOLE BODY VIBRATION TRANSMISSIBILITY IN THE HORIZONTAL DIRECTION AND ITS MATHEMATICAL MODEL By Vinay Hanumanthareddygari Submitted to graduate degree program in Mechanical Engineering and the Graduate Faculty... of the University of Kansas School of Engineering in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science Committee: ______________________ Dr. Sara E. Wilson, Chairperson ______________________ Dr. Terry N. Faddis...

Hanumanthareddygari, Vinay

2010-09-02

116

Reducing whole-body vibration and musculoskeletal injury with a new car seat  

E-print Network

identified between WBV and low back pain (LBP) (Griff car seat design, which allows the back part of the seat (BPS) to lower down while a protruded cushion in reducing whole- body vibration (WBV) and musculoskeletal disorders in automobile drivers. Nine subjects

Makhsous, Mohsen

117

The effect of occupational whole-body vibration on standing balance: A systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adverse health effects from exposure to occupational whole-body vibration (WBV) are common among drivers. In particular some researchers consider that there is kinaesthetic and balance disturbance from WBV exposure in the workplace and this might be one of the aetiological factors responsible for occupational low back pain in drivers. The purpose of this study was to undertake a critical review

Ramakrishnan Mani; Stephan Milosavljevic; S. John Sullivan

2010-01-01

118

Two way assessment of other physical work demands while measuring the whole body vibration magnitude  

Microsoft Academic Search

Direct observation, instead of using self-administered questionnaires might give more reliable and specific information about physical work demands at the workplace. This information is of use in a population already at risk of developing low back pain (LBP) due to whole body vibration (WBV) exposure. The aims of this study are to assess the WBV exposure in an exposed population

Ivo J. H. Tiemessen; Carel T. J. Hulshof; Monique H. W. Frings-Dresen

2008-01-01

119

Whole body vibration and posture as risk factors for low back pain among forklift truck drivers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the risks from whole-body vibration and posture demands for low back pain (LBP) among forklift truck (forklift) drivers. Using a validated questionnaire, information about health history was obtained over a period of two weeks in face-to-face interviews. The forklift drivers were observed in respect of their sitting posture, including frequency with which different positions were adopted (bending, leaning and twisting) and postural analyses were conducted using the OWAS and RULA techniques. Forklift vibrations at the seat (exposure) were measured in the three orthogonal axes ( x-fore and aft, y-lateral and z-vertical) under actual working conditions according to the recommendations of ISO 2631-1. The results showed that LBP was more prevalent amongst forklift drivers than among non-drivers and driving postures in which the trunk is considerably twisted or bent forward associated with greatest risk. Furthermore, forklift drivers showed to be exposed to acceptable levels of vibration in the x- and y-directions (i.e., below the EU Physical Agents Directive on Vibration Exposure recommended action level—0.5 m/s 2), but not in the z-direction. There were indications that whole-body vibration acts associatively with other factors (not independently) to precipitate LBP.

Hoy, J.; Mubarak, N.; Nelson, S.; Sweerts de Landas, M.; Magnusson, M.; Okunribido, O.; Pope, M.

2005-06-01

120

Whole-body vibration during manual wheelchair propulsion with selected seat cushions and back supports.  

PubMed

Although the exposure to whole-body vibrations (WBV) has been shown to be detrimental to seated humans, the effects of wheelchairs and seating systems on the transmission of vibration to an individual have not been thoroughly examined. The purpose of this study was to determine if the selected wheelchair seat cushions and back supports minimize the transmission of vibrations. Thirty-two wheelchair users traversed an activities of daily living course three times using 16 randomly selected seating systems as well as their own. Vibrations were measured using triaxial accelerometers at the seat and participant's head. The weighted fore-to-aft (Tx), vertical (Tz), and resultant (Tr) transmissibility based on the vibrational-dose-value (VDV) were used to determine if differences existed among the four seat cushions and back supports. The obstacles that seem to have the largest effect on the transmission of WBV are the single event shocks and the repeated event shocks. Comparisons between the individuals own seating system and the tested seating systems suggest that the individuals are not using the most appropriate seating system in terms of the reduction of vibration transmission. PMID:14518796

DiGiovine, Carmen P; Cooper, Rory A; Fitzgerald, Shirley G; Boninger, Michael L; Wolf, Erik J; Guo, Songfeng

2003-09-01

121

Six-degree-of-freedom whole-body vibration exposure levels during routine skidder operations.  

PubMed

This research focuses on quantifying six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) whole-body vibration (WBV) exposure levels that occur in Northern Ontario skidders during routine field operating tasks. 6-DOF vibration running root-mean-square (RMS) acceleration levels at the operator/seat interface were determined for eight skidders while driving loaded, driving unloaded, picking up a load, dropping off a load and ploughing logs under field operating conditions. The acceleration data were weighted in accordance with ISO 2631-1:1997 and evaluated for both health and comfort outcomes. The mean running RMS weighted translational and rotational accelerations all exceeded 0.36 m/s(2) and 0.14 rad/s(2). The greatest average accelerations occurred while driving unloaded with this condition displaying translational vibration total values (VTV) that exceeded the upper limit of the ISO 2631-1:1997 health caution zone within an average of 2.3 h. Utilizing 6-DOF VTV, virtually all operating conditions would be designated as uncomfortable. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This study provides one of the most comprehensive reports on vibration exposures in seated vehicle operators. The results are geared towards ergonomists with discussions on health effects and measurement concerns, while providing the raw vibration exposure data that will be useful to vehicle, component and vibration sensor designers. PMID:20432089

Jack, R J; Oliver, M; Dickey, J P; Cation, S; Hayward, G; Lee-Shee, N

2010-05-01

122

Whole body vibration exposures in metropolitan bus drivers: A comparison of three seats  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using a repeated measures study design, three different seats were evaluated as 12 metropolitan bus drivers drove a standardized test route including city streets, old and new freeways, and a street segment containing 10 large speed humps. Three comparisons were made: (1) comparing seats made by different manufactures (Seats 1 and 2), (2) comparing seats with a standard foam (Seat 2) and silicone foam (Seat 3) seat pans, and (3) comparing WBV exposures based on individual factors such as seat pressure settings and body weight. Whole body vibration (WBV) exposures were measured using a tri-axial seat pan accelerometer and the attenuation capabilities of each seat were evaluated by comparing the vibrations measured at the floor and seat of the bus. There were significant WBV exposure differences between the various street types, which was shown across all seat types. The city street and older freeway segments had the highest WBV exposures with both segments producing WBV exposures slightly above the action limit for vibration dose value (VDV). Relative to Seat 2, Seat 1 performed better at attenuating impulsive and shock related WBV exposures; however, neither seat performed significantly better when average vibration ( A w) and VDV WBV exposures were compared. In addition, no performance differences were seen between the standard foam (Seat 2) and silicone foam (Seat 3) seat pans. Seat suspension stiffness (air pressure) was also examined, and the results indicated that the higher the seat air pressure the lower the A w, VDV, and static compressive dose ( S ed) vibration exposures. This study provided a unique opportunity to evaluate on-the-job whole body vibration exposures in a standardized, controlled setting.

Blood, R. P.; Ploger, J. D.; Yost, M. G.; Ching, R. P.; Johnson, P. W.

2010-01-01

123

Measurement of whole-body vibration exposure from speed control humps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main objective of speed control humps is to introduce shocks and high vibration levels when a car passes over them if its speed is higher than the allowable limit. Hump geometry is a major factor in altering the level of these shocks and specifying the speed limit. However, there is no study of the relationship between whole body vibration due to passing over a speed control hump and lower back pain or occupational diseases. In this study, an experimental investigation is conducted to evaluate health risks associated with different geometry speed control humps. Vibration levels and shocks are measured by a seat pad accelerometer placed under the driver's seat to evaluate hazard risks on the human body's lower back. The assessment is based on two standard methods of measuring whole body vibration: the British standard BS 6841 and the new ISO/DIS standard 2631-5. These methods are used to assess the effects of vehicle type, passenger location in the vehicle, vehicle speed, and speed control hump geometry. It was found that circular speed control humps currently installed on many public roads should be modified in order to eliminate hazards. Two newly designed speed humps were proved to be less hazardous than circular speed control humps.

Khorshid, E.; Alkalby, F.; Kamal, H.

2007-07-01

124

Spectral composition of a measuring signal during measurements of vibration rates of a moving body  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cybernetics diagnostics of machines and mechanisms using the spectral approach is discussed. The problem of establishing the accuracy of determination of the spectral composition is investigated. In systems with rectilinear or rotary movement, the vibrations appear in the form of movement rate vibrations, which are equivalent to frequency modulation of the signal, in proportion to the mean movement rate of the body. The case of a harmonic signal which reproduces and analyzes the characteristics of the frequency modulated signal is discussed. Mathematical models are developed to show the relationships of the parameters.

Daynauskas, I. A. I.; Slepov, N. N.

1973-01-01

125

Vibration and pressure wave therapy for calf strains: a proposed treatment  

PubMed Central

Summary Calf (lower leg) strains have a variety of treatment regimens with variable outcomes and return to activity (RTA) time frames. These injuries involve disruption of portions or the entire gastrocnemius-soleus myo-tendinous complex. Conservative treatment initially consists of rest, ice, compression, elevation (RICE). Immediately following calf injury, patients can utilize cryotherapy, massage, passive range of motion, and progressive exercise. In general, Grade I through Grade III calf strains can take up to 6 weeks before the athlete can return to training. It can also involve the loss of more than 50% of muscle integrity. Recently, vibration therapy and radial pressure waves have been utilized to treat muscular strains and other myo-tendinous injuries that involve trigger points. Studies have suggested vibration therapy with rehabilitation can increase muscle strength and flexibility in patients. Segmental vibration therapy (SVT) is treatment to a more focal area. Vibration therapy (VT) is applied directly to the area of injury. VT is a mechanical stimulus that is thought to stimulate the sensory receptors, as well as decrease inflammatory cells and receptors. Therefore, VT could be a valuable tool in treating athlete effectively and decreasing their recovery time. The purpose of this paper is to give the reader baseline knowledge of VT and propose a treatment protocol for calf strains using this technology along with radial pressure waves. PMID:23888287

Saxena, Amol; St. Louis, Marie; Fournier, Magali

2013-01-01

126

Whole-body vibration as potential intervention for people with low bone mineral density and osteoporosis: a review.  

PubMed

Low bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis are health concerns among older adults and individuals with physical, neurological, and/or mobility impairments. Detrimental changes in bone density and bone architecture occurring in these individuals may be due in part to the reduction/cessation of physical activity and the accompanying reduction of mechanical strain on bone. Changes in bone architecture predispose these individuals to fragility fractures during low-trauma events. Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been examined as an intervention for maintaining or improving bone mass among people with low BMD, because it may emulate the mechanical strains observed during normal daily activities. This article provides an overview of WBV including terminology, safety considerations, and a summary of the current literature; it is intended for rehabilitation healthcare providers considering WBV as a potential therapy for individuals with osteoporosis. PMID:19882487

Totosy de Zepetnek, Julia O; Giangregorio, Lora M; Craven, B Catharine

2009-01-01

127

On the significance of body mass and vibration magnitude for acceleration transmission of vibration through seats with horizontal suspensions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seats with horizontal suspensions can help to reduce detrimental effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on health, comfort and performance. Two seats were used to examine the effect of body mass and WBV-magnitude on the transmission of WBV from the seat base to the cushion. Both seats have suspension in the x-direction while Seat 2 has suspension also in the y-direction. Twelve subjects with a body mass ranging from 59.0 to 97.3 kg volunteered for the study. A set of anthropometric characteristics was acquired. Three magnitudes of WBV were used with a truck-like signal (Seat 1, 0.3-0.59 m s -2w d-weighted rms values at the seat base, x-direction) and a tractor-like signal (Seat 2, 0.55-1.09 m s -2w d-weighted rms values at the seat base, x-direction, 0.52-1.07 m s -2w d-weighted rms values, y-direction). The magnitude of WBV had a significant effect on the transmissibility characterized by SEAT-values. A significant influence of the body mass on SEAT-values was found for the y-direction only. Other anthropometric characteristics proved to be more important for the prediction of SEAT values by multiple regressions. There was no significant correlation of SEAT-values, x-direction, with the body mass. Other anthropometric characteristics enabled a satisfactory prediction of SEAT values also for x-direction in several cases. Tests with only two subjects of extreme body mass are not suited to obtain comparable and representative results required for a comparison of different seats with a suspension in the x-direction. The effect of the WBV-magnitude on the WBV-transmissibility should be considered with the design, testing and application of suspended seats.

Blüthner, Ralph; Hinz, Barbara; Menzel, Gerhard; Schust, Marianne; Seidel, Helmut

2006-12-01

128

On the Health Risk of the Lumbar Spine due to Whole-Body VIBRATION—THEORETICAL Approach, Experimental Data and Evaluation of Whole-Body Vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The guidance on the effects of vibration on health in standards for whole-body vibration (WBV) does not provide quantitative relationships between WBV and health risk. The paper aims at the elucidation of exposure-response relationships. An analysis of published data on the static and dynamic strength of vertebrae and bone, loaded with various frequencies under different conditions, provided the basis for a theoretical approach to evaluate repetitive loads on the lumbar spine (“internal loads”). The approach enabled the calculation of “equivalent”—with respect to cumulative fatigue failure—combinations of amplitudes and numbers of internal cyclic stress. In order to discover the relation between external peak accelerations at the seat and internal peak loads, biodynamic data of experiments (36 subjects, three somatotypes, two different postures—relaxed and bent forward; random WBV,aw, r.m.s. 1·4 ms-2, containing high transients) were used as input to a biomechanical model. Internal pressure changes were calculated using individual areas of vertebral endplates. The assessment of WBV was based on the quantitative relations between peak accelerations at the seat and pressures predicted for the disk L5/S1. For identical exposures clearly higher rates of pressure rise in the bent forward compared to the relaxed posture were predicted. The risk assessment for internal forces considered the combined internal static and dynamic loads, in relation to the predicted individual strength, and Miner's hypothesis. For exposure durations between 1 min and 8 h, energy equivalent vibration magnitudes (formula B.1, ISO 2631-1, 1997) and equivalent vibration magnitudes according to formula B.2 (time dependence over-energetic) were compared with equivalent combinations of upward peak accelerations and exposure durations according to predicted cumulative fatigue failures of lumbar vertebrae. Formula B.1 seems to underestimate the health risk caused by high magnitudes, formula B.2 is recommended for the evaluation of such conditions.

Seidel, H.; Blüthner, R.; Hinz, B.; Schust, M.

1998-08-01

129

Acute effects of whole-body vibration on trunk muscle functioning in young healthy adults.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to explore the immediate effects of different frequencies of whole-body vibration (WBV) on the performance of trunk muscles of healthy young adults. A group of 30 healthy subjects (15 men; 15 women; age, 26.8 ± 3.74 years; body mass index, 21.9 ± 1.802) participated in the study. Each subject received 3 sessions of vibration exercise with different exercise parameters with frequencies of 25 Hz and 40 Hz and sham stimulation in a random order on different days. Before and after each WBV exercise session, subjects were assessed for trunk muscle strength/endurance tests and trunk proprioception tests. There was a significant increase in trunk extensor strength (p ? 0.05) after low-frequency (25 Hz) WBV exercise, but high-frequency (40 Hz) vibration exercise had resulted in a significant decrease in trunk extensor endurance (p ? 0.05). Statistical gender difference (p = 0.04) was found for trunk extensor endurance with lower WBV training. No change was noted in the trunk proprioception with different frequencies of WBV. In conclusions, the immediate response of the body to WBV was different for low and high frequencies. Low-frequency vibration enhanced trunk extensor strength, but high-frequency vibration would decrease endurance of the trunk extensor muscles. Males are more sensitive than females in trunk extensor endurance for lower frequency WBV exposure. These results indicated that short-term WBV with low frequency was effective to improve trunk extensor strength in healthy adults, and that could be helpful for relevant activities of trunk extensor performing and preventing sport injury. PMID:24714536

Ye, Jiajia; Ng, Gabriel; Yuen, Kenneth

2014-10-01

130

Effects of whole body vibration on biogenic amines in rat brain.  

PubMed Central

The effects of whole body vibration on the concentrations of noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA), and serotonin (5-HT) in the whole brain and brain regions of rats were investigated. Compared with control rats, vibration with 20 Hz frequency decreased the brain concentration of NA only when the acceleration (intensity) was increased to 5.0 G (p less than 0.05). The concentration of DA in the whole brain was not affected by acceleration. When acceleration was kept at a constant 0.4 G level and rats were exposed for the same 240 minute period to 5, 20, or 30 Hz vibration, neither NA nor DA concentrations changed in the whole brain. Regional changes in the concentration of biogenic amines in the brain of rats exposed to vibration of 20 Hz and 5.0 G showed few significant differences. Thus NA significantly decreased only in the hypothalamus (p less than 0.01), although in the hippocampus the decrease was nearly significant (p less than 0.10). The concentration of 5-HT significantly increased in the hypothalamus and cerebellum (p less than 0.05). DA tended to increase in the cortex and decrease in the striatum (p less than 0.10). These experiments seem to indicate that NA in the whole brain and especially in the hypothalamus is a better indicator of vibration exposure than 5-HT, and that NA is affected by the intensity but not by the frequency of vibration. NA and 5-HT in the hypothalamus change in the opposite direction. DA concentrations in the brain are basically unaffected by vibration. PMID:3970872

Ariizumi, M; Okada, A

1985-01-01

131

Survey of Technical Preventative Measures to Reduce Whole-Body Vibration Effects when Designing Mobile Machinery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Engineering solutions to minimize the effects on operators of vibrating mobile machinery can be conveniently grouped into three areas: Reduction of vibration at source by improvement of the quality of terrain, careful selection of vehicle or machine, correct loading, proper maintenance, etc.Reduction of vibration transmission by incorporating suspension systems (tyres, vehicle suspensions, suspension cab and seat) between the operator and the source of vibration.Improvement of cab ergonomics and seat profiles to optimize operator posture. These paper reviews the different techniques and problems linked to categories (2) and (3). According to epidemiological studies, the main health risk with whole-body vibration exposure would appear to be lower back pain. When designing new mobile machinery, all factors which may contribute to back injury should be considered in order to reduce risk. For example, optimized seat suspension is useless if the suspension seat cannot be correctly and easily adjusted to the driver's weight or if the driver is forced to drive in a bent position to avoid his head striking the ceiling due to the spatial requirement of the suspension seat.

DONATI, P.

2002-05-01

132

Comparing the effects of 3 weeks of upper-body vibration training, vibration and stretching, and stretching alone on shoulder flexibility in college-aged men.  

PubMed

This study compared the effects of 3 weeks of upper-body vibration training, vibration and stretching, and stretching alone on shoulder flexibility in college-aged men. Twenty-one men were randomly assigned to vibration-stretching (VS; n = 8), vibration only (VO; n = 6), or stretching only (SO; n = 7) groups that trained 3 times per week for 3 weeks. All 3 groups performed 9 total sets of 30-second stretches. The VS group performed four 30-second upper-body vibration exercises and five 30-second upper-body stretching exercises. The VO group performed nine 30-second upper-body vibration exercises. The SO group performed nine 30-second upper-body stretching exercises. Shoulder flexion (SF), shoulder extension (SE), and shoulder transverse extension (STE) were assessed by a Leighton Flexometer and back scratch tests bilaterally (BSR, BSL) were measured via tape measure. A 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) evaluated groups at baseline and a 2-way repeated-measures ANOVA evaluated the interventions over time. At baseline, there were no group differences in age, height, or weight. There was a significant (p < 0.01) time main effect for each flexibility outcome variable (SF: +6.1%, +3.9%, +3.4%; SE: +8.9%, +13.5%, +26.9%; STE: +12.8%, +8.7%, +24.3%; BSR: +4.4 cm, +3.4 cm, +3.1 cm; BSL: +3.6 cm, +2.3 cm, +6.1 cm) for SO, VO, and VS, respectively. Shoulder extension was the only variable that showed a significant (p < 0.05) interaction effect for group by time. In conclusion, vibration training, alone or combined with stretching, is a viable alternative to a standard stretching routine when attempting to increase shoulder flexibility. Adding vibration training to a flexibility regimen may improve the likelihood of regularly performing flexibility sessions because of increased variety. PMID:23478479

Ferguson, Steven L; Kim, Eonho; Seo, Dong-Il; Bemben, Michael G

2013-12-01

133

[Spectrum analysis of stabilograms with special reference to changes following whole body vibration].  

PubMed

The location of the body's gravicenter in the horizontal plane was measured by means of a force platform. The 4 male subjects stood upright with eyes closed. Power-density spectra of the frontal and sagittal stabilograms were estimated. Repeated investigations made it possible to assess intraindividual variability and to evaluate significant interindividual differences. The power spectral density was not altered by a controlled sitting posture observed for 30 min. Low-frequency whole-body vibration with an exposure time of 30 min and a permissible level according to the "fatigue decreased proficiency boundary" (International Standard ISO 2631) induced a significant increase of the power spectral density below 0.25 Hz and a decrease above this frequency. The results indicate that the power density spectral analysis of stabilograms is a suitable method for evaluating a biological effect of vibration. PMID:614750

Seidel, H; Bräuer, D

1977-01-01

134

Multi-gate vibrating-body field effect transistor (VB-FETs)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on the design, fabrication and detailed characteristics of multi-gate vibrating-body field effect transistors (VB-FETs). Double-gate and four-gate VB-FETs with resonance frequencies of 2 MHz and 71 MHz, respectively, are successfully demonstrated. The VB-FETs exhibit built-in amplification (more than +30 dB improvement of signal detection compared with capacitive detection), low motional resistances (in the orders kOhms down to

Daniel Grogg; Marco Mazza; Dimitrios Tsamados; Adrian Mihai Ionescu

2008-01-01

135

ACUTE EFFECT OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION ON SPRINT AND JUMPING PERFORMANCE IN ELITE SKELETON ATHLETES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bullock, N, Martin, DT, Ross, A, Rosemond, CD, Jordan, MJ, and Marino, FE. Acute effect of whole-body vibration on sprint and jumping performance in elite skeleton athletes. J Strength Cond Res 22: 1371-1374, 2008—The winter sliding sport known as skeleton requires athletes to produce a maximal sprint followed by high speed sliding down a bobsled track. Athletes are required to

NICOLA BULLOCK; DAVID T. MARTIN; ANGUS ROSS; C. DOUG ROSEMOND; MATTHEW J. JORDAN; FRANK E. MARINO

2008-01-01

136

Study on Development of the Seated Human Body System Exposed to Vehicular Ride Vibration Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This paper tries to find an appropriate structure of human model, which can better represent the characteristics of the real\\u000a human body, using the apparent mass (APMS) and head transmissibility (STHT) in vertical vibrations. The model parameters were\\u000a identified through minimizing an error function comprising the measured and model response in terms of magnitude and phase\\u000a characteristics of APMS and

S. Rodean; M. Arghir

137

Whole body vibration and posture as risk factors for low back pain among forklift truck drivers  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the risks from whole-body vibration and posture demands for low back pain (LBP) among forklift truck (forklift) drivers. Using a validated questionnaire, information about health history was obtained over a period of two weeks in face-to-face interviews. The forklift drivers were observed in respect of their sitting posture, including frequency with which different

J. Hoy; N. Mubarak; S. Nelson; M. Sweerts de Landas; M. Magnusson; O. Okunribido; M. Pope

2005-01-01

138

Equal sensation curves for whole-body vibration expressed as a function of driving force  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous studies have shown that the seated human is most sensitive to whole-body vertical vibration at about 5 Hz. Similarly, the body shows an apparent mass resonance at about 5 Hz. Considering these similarities between the biomechanical and subjective responses, it was hypothesized that, at low frequencies, subjective ratings of whole-body vibration might be directly proportional to the driving force. Twelve male subjects participated in a laboratory experiment where subjects sat on a rigid seat mounted on a shaker. The magnitude of a test stimulus was adjusted such that the subjective intensity could be matched to a reference stimulus, using a modified Bruceton test protocol. The sinusoidal reference stimulus was 8-Hz vibration with a magnitude of 0.5 m/s2 rms (or 0.25 m/s2 rms for the 1-Hz test); the sinusoidal test stimuli had frequencies of 1, 2, 4, 16, and 32 Hz. Equal sensation contours in terms of seat acceleration showed data similar to those in the literature. Equal sensation contours in terms of force showed a nominally linear response at 1, 2, and 4 Hz, but an increasing sensitivity at higher frequencies. This is in agreement with a model derived from published subjective and objective fitted data. .

Mansfield, Neil J.; Maeda, Setsuo

2005-06-01

139

Modelling resonances of the standing body exposed to vertical whole-body vibration: Effects of posture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lumped parameter mathematical models representing anatomical parts of the human body have been developed to represent body motions associated with resonances of the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the human body standing in five different postures: 'upright', 'lordotic', 'anterior lean', 'knees bent', and 'knees more bent'. The inertial and geometric parameters of the models were determined from published anthropometric data. Stiffness and damping parameters were obtained by comparing model responses with experimental data obtained previously. The principal resonance of the vertical apparent mass, and the first peak in the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass, of the standing body in an upright posture (at 5-6 Hz) corresponded to vertical motion of the viscera in phase with the vertical motion of the entire body due to deformation of the tissues at the soles of the feet, with pitch motion of the pelvis out of phase with pitch motion of the upper body above the pelvis. Upward motion of the body was in phase with the forward pitch motion of the pelvis. Changing the posture of the upper body had minor effects on the mode associated with the principal resonances of the apparent mass and cross-axis apparent mass, but the mode changed significantly with bending of the legs. In legs-bent postures, the principal resonance (at about 3 Hz) was attributed to bending of the legs coupled with pitch motion of the pelvis in phase with pitch motion of the upper body. In this mode, extension of the legs was in phase with the forward pitch motion of the upper body and the upward vertical motion of the viscera.

Subashi, G. H. M. J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

2008-10-01

140

Influence of Combined Whole-Body Vibration Plus G-Loading on Visual Performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent engineering analyses of the integrated Ares-Orion stack show that vibration levels for Orion crews have the potential to be much higher than those experienced in Gemini, Apollo, and Shuttle vehicles. Of particular concern to the Constellation Program (CxP) is the 12 Hz thrust oscillation (TO) that the Ares-I rocket develops during the final 20 seconds preceding first-stage separation, at maximum G-loading. While the structural-dynamic mitigations being considered can assure that vibration due to TO is reduced to below the CxP crew health limit, it remains to be determined how far below this limit vibration must be reduced to enable effective crew performance during launch. Moreover, this "performance" vibration limit will inform the operations concepts (and crew-system interface designs) for this critical phase of flight. While Gemini and Apollo studies provide preliminary guidance, the data supporting the historical limits were obtained using less advanced interface technologies and very different operations concepts. In this study, supported by the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) Human Research Program, we investigated display readability-a fundamental prerequisite for any interaction with electronic crew-vehicle interfaces-while observers were subjected to 12 Hz vibration superimposed on the 3.8 G loading expected for the TO period of ascent. Two age-matched groups of participants (16 general population and 13 Crew Office) performed a numerical display reading task while undergoing sustained 3.8 G loading and whole-body vibration at 0, 0.15, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 g in the eyeballs in/out (x-axis) direction. The time-constrained reading task used an Orion-like display with 10- and 14-pt non-proportional sans-serif fonts, and was designed to emulate the visual acquisition and processing essential for crew system monitoring. Compared to the no-vibration baseline, we found no significant effect of vibration at 0.15 and 0.3 g on task error rates (ER) or response times (RT). Significant degradations in both ER and RT, however, were observed at 0.5 and 0.7 g for 10-pt, and at 0.7 g for 14-pt font displays. These objective performance measures were mirrored by participants' subjective ratings. Interestingly, we found that the impact of vibration on ER increased with distance from the center of the display, but only for vertical displacements. Furthermore, no significant ER or RT aftereffects were detected immediately following vibration, regardless of amplitude. Lastly, given that our reading task required no specialized spaceflight expertise, our finding that effects were not statistically distinct between our two groups is not surprising. The results from this empirical study provide initial guidance for evaluating the display readability trade-space between text-font size and vibration amplitude. However, the outcome of this work should be considered preliminary in nature for a number of reasons: 1. The single 12 Hz x-axis vibration employed was based on earlier load-cycle models of the induced TO environment at the end of Ares-I first stage flight. Recent analyses of TO mitigation designs suggest that significant concurrent off-axis vibration may also occur. 2. The shirtsleeve environment in which we tested fails to capture the full kinematic and dynamic complexity of the physical interface between crewmember and the still-to-bematured helmet-suit-seat designs, and the impact these will have for vibration transmission and consequent performance. 3. By examining performance in this reading and number processing task, we are only assessing readability, a first and necessary step that in itself does not directly address the performance of more sophisticated operational tasks such as vehicle-health monitoring or manual control of the vehicle.

Adelstein, Bernard D.; Beutter, Brent Robert; Kaiser, Mary K.; McCann, Robert S.; Stone, Leland S.; Anderson, Mark R.; Renema, Fritz; Paloski, William H.

2009-01-01

141

The Influence of Whole-Body Vibration on Creatine Kinase Activity and Jumping Performance in Young Basketball Players  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To quantify creatine kinase (CK) activity changes across time following an acute bout of whole-body vibration (WBV) and determine the association between changes in CK activity and jumping performance. Method: Twenty-six elite young basketball players were assigned to 3 groups: 36-Hz and 46-Hz vibration groups (G36 and G46, respectively)…

Fachina, Rafael; da Silva, Antônio; Falcão, William; Montagner, Paulo; Borin, João; Minozzo, Fábio; Falcão, Diego; Vancini, Rodrigo; Poston, Brach; de Lira, Claudio

2013-01-01

142

Whole-body vibration and ergonomic study of US railroad locomotives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

US locomotive operators have exposure to multi-axis whole-body vibration (WBV) and shocks while seated. This study assessed operator-related and ergonomic seating design factors that may have confounding or mitigating influence on WBV exposure and its effects. Vibration exposure was measured according to international guidelines (ISO 2631-1; 1997); ergonomic work place factors and vibration effects were studied with a cross-sectional survey instrument distributed to a randomly selected group of railroad engineers ( n=2546) and a control group; and during vehicle inspections. The survey response rate was 47% for the RR engineers ( n=1195) and 41% for the controls ( n=323). Results of the mean basic vibration measurements were for the x, y, z-direction and vector sum 0.14, 0.22, 0.28 and 0.49 m/s 2 respectively; almost all crest factors (CF), MTVV and VDV values were above the critical ratios given in ISO 2631-1. The prevalence of serious neck and lower back disorders among locomotive engineers was found to be nearly double that of the sedentary control group without such exposure. Railroad engineers rated their seats mostly unacceptable regarding different adjustment and comfort aspects (3.02-3.51; scale 1=excellent to 4=unacceptable), while the control group rated their chairs more favorably (1.96-3.44). Existing cab and seat design in locomotives can result in prolonged forced awkward spinal posture of the operator combined with WBV exposure. In a logistic regression analysis, time at work being bothered by vibration (h/day) was significantly associated with an increased risk of low back pain, shoulder and neck pain, and sciatic pain among railroad engineers. Customized vibration attenuation seats and improved cab design of the locomotive controls should be further investigated.

Johanning, Eckardt; Landsbergis, Paul; Fischer, Siegfried; Christ, Eberhard; Göres, Benno; Luhrman, Raymond

2006-12-01

143

Vibration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Man's reactions to vibration are emphasized rather than his reactions to the vibrational characteristics of vehicles. Vibrational effects studies include: performance effects reflected in tracking proficiency, reaction time, visual impairment, and other measures related to man's ability to control a system; physiological reactions; biodynamic responses; subjective reactions; and human tolerance limits. Technological refinements in shaker systems and improved experimental designs are used to validate the data.

Hornick, R. J.

1973-01-01

144

Image-Guidance for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

The term stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) describes a recently introduced external beam radiation paradigm by which small lesions outside the brain are treated under stereotactic conditions, in a single or few fractions of high-dose radiation delivery. Similar to the treatment planning and delivery process for cranial radiosurgery, the emphasis is on sparing of adjacent normal tissues through the creation of steep dose gradients. Thus, advanced methods for assuring an accurate relationship between the target volume position and radiation beam geometry, immediately prior to radiation delivery, must be implemented. Such methods can employ imaging techniques such as planar (e.g., x-ray) or volumetric (e.g., computed tomography [CT]) approaches and are commonly summarized under the general term image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). This review summarizes clinical experience with volumetric and ultrasound based image-guidance for SBRT. Additionally, challenges and potential limitations of pre-treatment image-guidance are presented and discussed.

Fuss, Martin [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States) and Cancer Therapy and Research Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)]. E-mail: fussm@ohsu.edu; Boda-Heggemann, Judit [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mannheim Medical Center, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Papanikolau, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Cancer Therapy and Research Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Salter, Bill J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

2007-07-01

145

Second-order many-body perturbation expansions of vibrational Dyson self-energies.  

PubMed

Second-order many-body perturbation theories for anharmonic vibrational frequencies and zero-point energies of molecules are formulated, implemented, and tested. They solve the vibrational Dyson equation self-consistently by taking into account the frequency dependence of the Dyson self-energy in the diagonal approximation, which is expanded in a diagrammatic perturbation series up to second order. Three reference wave functions, all of which are diagrammatically size consistent, are considered: the harmonic approximation and diagrammatic vibrational self-consistent field (XVSCF) methods with and without the first-order Dyson geometry correction, i.e., XVSCF[n] and XVSCF(n), where n refers to the truncation rank of the Taylor-series potential energy surface. The corresponding second-order perturbation theories, XVH2(n), XVMP2[n], and XVMP2(n), are shown to be rigorously diagrammatically size consistent for both total energies and transition frequencies, yield accurate results (typically within a few cm(-1) at n = 4 for water and formaldehyde) for both quantities even in the presence of Fermi resonance, and have access to fundamentals, overtones, and combinations as well as their relative intensities as residues of the vibrational Green's functions. They are implemented into simple algorithms that require only force constants and frequencies of the reference methods (with no basis sets, quadrature, or matrix diagonalization at any stage of the calculation). The rules for enumerating and algebraically interpreting energy and self-energy diagrams are elucidated in detail. PMID:23883014

Hermes, Matthew R; Hirata, So

2013-07-21

146

Second-order many-body perturbation expansions of vibrational Dyson self-energies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Second-order many-body perturbation theories for anharmonic vibrational frequencies and zero-point energies of molecules are formulated, implemented, and tested. They solve the vibrational Dyson equation self-consistently by taking into account the frequency dependence of the Dyson self-energy in the diagonal approximation, which is expanded in a diagrammatic perturbation series up to second order. Three reference wave functions, all of which are diagrammatically size consistent, are considered: the harmonic approximation and diagrammatic vibrational self-consistent field (XVSCF) methods with and without the first-order Dyson geometry correction, i.e., XVSCF[n] and XVSCF(n), where n refers to the truncation rank of the Taylor-series potential energy surface. The corresponding second-order perturbation theories, XVH2(n), XVMP2[n], and XVMP2(n), are shown to be rigorously diagrammatically size consistent for both total energies and transition frequencies, yield accurate results (typically within a few cm-1 at n = 4 for water and formaldehyde) for both quantities even in the presence of Fermi resonance, and have access to fundamentals, overtones, and combinations as well as their relative intensities as residues of the vibrational Green's functions. They are implemented into simple algorithms that require only force constants and frequencies of the reference methods (with no basis sets, quadrature, or matrix diagonalization at any stage of the calculation). The rules for enumerating and algebraically interpreting energy and self-energy diagrams are elucidated in detail.

Hermes, Matthew R.; Hirata, So

2013-07-01

147

Whole-body vibration transmissibility in supine humans: effects of board litter and neck collar.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration has been identified as a stressor to supine patients during medical transportation. The transmissibility between the input platform acceleration and the output acceleration of the head, sternum, pelvis, head-sternum, and pelvis-sternum of eight supine subjects were investigated. Vibration files were utilized in the fore-aft, lateral, and vertical directions. The power spectral density across the bandwidth of 0.5-20 Hz was approximately flat for each file. A comparison between a baseline rigid-support and a support with a long spinal board strapped to a litter has shown that the latter has considerable effects on the transmitted motion in all directions with a double magnification in the vertical direction around 5 Hz. The results also showed that the neck-collar has increased the relative head-sternum flexion-extension because of the input fore-aft vibration, but reduced the head-sternum extension-compression due to the input vertical vibration. PMID:24075288

Meusch, John; Rahmatalla, Salam

2014-05-01

148

A data correction method for surface measurement of vibration on the human body.  

PubMed

A data correction method to eliminate the effect of local tissue-accelerometer vibration from surface measurements of vibration over the spine has been developed and compared with previous direct measurements. A single degree-of-freedom linear model for the local tissue-accelerometer system in the vertical and the fore-and-aft axes is assumed. The natural frequency and the damping ratio of the local system are estimated so as to form a correction frequency function, using spectral analysis of the free vibration response of the local system caused by transient displacements of the accelerometer attached to the body surface. Accelerometers were attached to the skin over the spinous process of the vertebra L3 and on the abdominal wall. For four different masses and each site, correction frequency functions were computed. Seated subjects were then exposed to vertical random vibration (0.5-35 Hz) and acceleration transfer functions from the seat to each accelerometer were calculated. Different transfer functions were obtained with different additional masses but the differences were eliminated by the correction method so as to indicate the transfer functions to the spine and the viscera. For vertical responses, the correction method was effective at frequencies below the estimated natural frequencies of the local system. Fore-and-aft response over the spine did not require correction at frequencies below 35 Hz. PMID:7657688

Kitazaki, S; Griffin, M J

1995-07-01

149

Whole body vibration exposures in forklift operators: comparison of a mechanical and air suspension seat.  

PubMed

Using a repeated measures design, this study compared differences in whole body vibration (WBV) exposures when 12 forklift operators drove the same forklift with a mechanical suspension and an air suspension seat. A portable PDA-based WBV data acquisition system collected and analysed time-weighted and raw WBV data per ISO 2631-1 and 2631-5 WBV measurement standards. Tri-axial measurements of weighted vibration (A(w)), crest factor, vibration dose values, time-weighted average-peak, raw (+) peak, raw (-) peak and static compression dose (S(ed)) were compared between seats. There were significant differences in z-axis WBV exposures with the air suspension seat, yielding lower WBV exposures. In addition, there were differences between seats in how they attenuated WBV exposures based on the driver's weight. In the mechanical suspension seat, WBV exposures were weight-dependent, with lighter drivers having higher WBV exposures, whereas with the air suspension seat, the same trends were not as prevalent. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This study contributes to the understanding of how different seat suspensions can influence WBV transmission and how some components of vibration transmission are dependent on the weight of the driver. Additional systematic studies are needed to quantify how various factors can influence WBV exposures. PMID:20967660

Blood, Ryan P; Ploger, James D; Johnson, Peter W

2010-11-01

150

The effects of vibration therapy on muscle force loss following eccentrically induced muscle damage  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acute vibration therapy (VT) on performance recovery after a bout\\u000a of strenuous eccentric exercise. Eight healthy males completed 300 maximal eccentric contractions of the quadriceps of one\\u000a leg on an isokinetic dynamometer. Immediately after exercise and 12 and 24 h post-exercise, the subjects underwent either\\u000a VT or a control treatment

Matthew J. BarnesBlake; Blake G. Perry; Toby Mündel; Darryl J. Cochrane

151

Reducing whole-body vibration of vehicle drivers with a new sitting concept.  

PubMed

A new car seat design, which allows the back part of the seat (BPS) to lower down while a protruded cushion supports the lumbar spine, was quantitatively tested to determine its effectiveness in reducing whole-body vibration (WBV) in automobile drivers. Results on 12 drivers show that, by reducing contact between the seat and the ischial tuberosities (TTs), the new seating design reduced both contact pressure and amplitude of harmful vibrations transmitted through the body. Significant reduction of WBV, in terms of RMS and VDV, was found as large as 30% by this seating design (P < 0.05), especially at lumbar spine region. This reduction in WBV allows more sustained driving than permitted by conventional seating devices, by around 2 hours daily, before reaching harmful WBV levels. The new seating design also promotes improved posture by restoring normal spinal curvature. Such seating devices, implemented in cars, buses, large trucks, and other high-vibration vehicles, may effectively reduce the risk of musculoskeletal disorders among long term drivers. PMID:17271468

Lin, F; Crowther, Z; Makhsous, M

2004-01-01

152

Modal analysis of human body vibration model for Indian subjects under sitting posture.  

PubMed

Need and importance of modelling in human body vibration research studies are well established. The study of biodynamic responses of human beings can be classified into experimental and analytical methods. In the past few decades, plenty of mathematical models have been developed based on the diverse field measurements to describe the biodynamic responses of human beings. In this paper, a complete study on lumped parameter model derived from 50th percentile anthropometric data for a seated 54- kg Indian male subject without backrest support under free un-damped conditions has been carried out considering human body segments to be of ellipsoidal shape. Conventional lumped parameter modelling considers the human body as several rigid masses interconnected by springs and dampers. In this study, concept of mass of interconnecting springs has been incorporated and eigenvalues thus obtained are found to be closer to the values reported in the literature. Results obtained clearly establish decoupling of vertical and fore-and-aft oscillations. PMID:25323415

Singh, Ishbir; Nigam, S P; Saran, V H

2014-10-17

153

Effect of Seating on Exposures to Whole-Body Vibration in Vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The vibration isolation efficiency of seating has been evaluated in 100 work vehicles in 14 categories (cars, vans, lift trucks, lorries, tractors, buses, dumpers, excavators, helicopters, armoured vehicles, mobile cranes, grass rollers, mowers and milk floats). Seat isolation efficiency, expressed by the SEAT value, was determined for all seats (67 conventional seats and 33 suspension seats) from the vertical acceleration measured on the floors and on the seats of the vehicles.For most categories of vehicle, the average SEAT value was less than 100%, indicating that the average seat provided some attenuation of vibration. However, there were large variations in SEAT values between vehicles within categories. Two alternative vibration frequency weightings (Wb from BS 6841, 1987; Wk from ISO 2631, 1997) yielded SEAT values that differed by less than 6%. Overall, the SEAT values determined by two alternative methods (the ratio of r.m.s. values and the ratio of vibration dose values) differed by less than 4·5% when using weighting Wb, although larger differences may be expected in some situations. The median SEAT value for the suspension seats was 84·6%; the median SEAT value for the conventional seats was 86·9% (based on weighting Wb and the ratio of r.m.s. values).Predicted SEAT values were obtained assuming that each seat could be interchanged between vehicles without altering its transmissibility. The calculations suggest that 94% of the vehicles investigated might benefit from changing the current seat to a seat from one of the other vehicles investigated. Although the predictions are based on assumptions that will not always apply, it is concluded that the severity of whole-body vibration exposures in many work environments can be lessened by improvements to seating dynamics.

PADDAN, G. S.; GRIFFIN, M. J.

2002-05-01

154

Loading and Concurrent Synchronous Whole-Body Vibration Interaction Increases Oxygen Consumption During Resistance Exercise  

PubMed Central

Exercise is commonly used as an intervention to increase caloric output and positively affect body composition. A major challenge is the low compliance often seen when the prescribed exercise is associated with high levels of exertion. Whole-body vibration (WBV) may allow increased caloric output with reduced effort; however, there is limited information concerning the effect of WBV on oxygen consumption (VO2). Therefore, this study assessed the synergistic effects of resistance training and WBV on VO2. We examined VO2 at different loads (0%, 20%, and 40% body weight (BW)) and vibration intensities (No vibration (NV), 35HZ, 2-3mm (35L), 50Hz, 57mm (50H)) in ten men (26.5 ± 5.1 years). Data were collected during different stages (rest, six 30s sets of squatting, and recovery). Repeated measures ANOVA showed a stage x load x vibration interaction. Post hoc analysis revealed no differences during rest; however, a significant vibration x load interaction occurred during exercise. Both 35L and 50H produced greater VO2 than NV at a moderate load of 20%BW. Although 40%BW produced greater VO2 than 20%BW or 0%BW using NV, no significant difference in VO2 was seen among vibratory conditions at 40%BW. Moreover, no significant differences were seen between 50H and 35L at 20%BW and NV at 40%BW. During recovery there was a main effect for load. Post hoc analyses revealed that VO2 at 40%BW was significantly higher than 20%BW or 0%BW, and 20%BW produced higher VO2 than no load. Minute-by-minute analysis revealed a significant impact on VO2 due to load but not to vibratory condition. We conclude that the synergistic effect of WBV and active squatting with a moderate load is as effective at increasing VO2 as doubling the external load during squatting without WBV. Key Points Synchronous whole body vibration in conjunction with moderate external loading (app 20% BW) can increase oxygen consumption to the same extent as heavier loading (40% BW) during performance of the parallel squat. While the application of synchronous whole body vibration had no effect on recovery oxygen, under bot vibratory and non-vibratory conditions, the heavier the external load the greater the recovery oxygen consumption levels. Regardless of vibratory condition, during the squatting exercise bout 40% BW produced higher heart rates than 20%BW or 0% BW, and 20% BW produced higher heart rates than 0% BW. There were strong trends toward higher heart rates in both vibratory conditions (50 Hz, 5-6mm; 35 Hz, 2-3 mm) than in the non-vibratory condition regardless of external loading. PMID:24149154

Serravite, Daniel H.; Edwards, David; Edwards, Elizabeth S.; Gallo, Sara E.; Signorile, Joseph F.

2013-01-01

155

The Effects of Quadriceps Strength Following Static and Dynamic Whole Body Vibration Exercise.  

PubMed

Numerous studies have shown performance benefits from including whole-body vibration (WBV) whether as a training modality or an acute exercise protocol when utilized as a component of the resistance training program. Some studies have indicated that performing dynamic exercises as compared to static position exercises while exposed to WBV might be beneficial, however, evidence is lacking. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine if an acute bout of dynamic vs. static squats performed during WBV results in increases in quadriceps force production via dynamic isokinetic knee extension and flexion exercise. PMID:25268289

Bush, Jill A; Blog, Gabriel L; Kang, Jie; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Ratamess, Nicholas A

2014-09-29

156

Apparatus and method of inserting a microelectrode in body tissue or the like using vibration means  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An arrangement for and method of inserting a glass microelectrode having a tip in the micron range into body tissue is presented. The arrangement includes a microelectrode. The top of the microelectrode is attached to the diaphragm center of a first speaker. The microelectrode tip is brought into contact with the tissue by controlling a micromanipulator. Thereafter, an audio signal is applied to the speaker to cause the microelectrode to vibrate and thereby pierce the tissue surface without breaking the microelectrode tip. Thereafter, the tip is inserted into the tissue to the desired depth by operating the micromanipulator with the microelectrode in a vibratory or non-vibratory state.

Feldstein, C.; Crawford, D. W.; Kanabus, E. W. (inventors)

1979-01-01

157

Body Image: A Tripartite Model for Use in Dance\\/Movement Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author presents a theoretical, literature-based study of the body image concept. Conceptualizations of body image in philosophy, psychology, psychiatry, and dance\\/movement therapy are briefly reviewed. A tripartite model for the concept of body image is proposed in order to clarify the meaning of body image. The author differentiates body image into three interrelated aspects: image-properties, body-self, and body-memory. Image-properties

Päivi Pylvänäinen

2003-01-01

158

Does body mass index increase the risk of low back pain in a population exposed to whole body vibration?  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to determine whether body mass index (BMI) influences the risk of low back pain (LBP) in a population exposed to whole body vibration (WBV). For this a self-administered questionnaire was sent to 467 participants, driving occupational vehicles. Vibration measurements were performed according to ISO 2631-1 on a representative sample (n=30) of this population. For each participant, we calculated the current root mean square (r.m.s.) over an 8 h (A(8)) working day. The questionnaire response rate was 47% (n=221). We did not find a significant correlation between BMI and the onset of LBP in the last 7 days (r=0.07, p=0.34) nor for LBP in past 12 months (r=-0.30, p=0.63). No significant increased risk was found for the onset of LBP with the increase of BMI, neither for the last 7 days (OR 1.02; 95% CI: 0.93-1.23) nor for the past 12 months LBP (OR 0.98; 95% CI: 0.89-1.09). Introducing the interaction with WBV exposure in the logistic regression model, did not result a significant increased risk in the onset of LBP-7 days (OR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.92-1.01) nor in the onset of LBP 12 months (OR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.93-1.01) either. Occupational participants exposed to WBV, with a high BMI do not have an increased risk for the development of LBP. PMID:18206134

Noorloos, Daniëlle; Tersteeg, Linda; Tiemessen, Ivo J H; Hulshof, Carel T J; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

2008-11-01

159

Whole body vibration exposure in heavy earth moving machinery operators of metalliferrous mines.  

PubMed

As mining operations get mechanized, the rate of profit generation increases and so do the rate of occupational hazards. This study deals with one such hazard - occupational vibration. The present study was carried out to determine the whole body vibration (WBV) exposure of the heavy earth moving machinery (HEMM) operators in two types of metalliferous mines in India, when they were engaged in the mining activity. Cross-comparison was done of the vibration dose value (VDV) for HEMM operators as well as each type of mine. The VDV for the shovel operator in bauxite mine was observed to be 13.53 +/- 5.63 m/s(7/4) with 25% of the readings higher than the prescribed limit whereas in iron ore mine VDV for dumper operator was 10.81 +/- 3.44 m/s(7/4) with 14.62% readings on the higher side. Cross-comparison of the VDV values for bauxite and iron ore mines revealed that it was 9.57 +/- 4.93 and 8.21 +/- 5.12 m/s(7/4) with 21.28 and 14.95% of the readings on the higher side respectively. The Student's t test level was found to be insignificant for both type of mines, indicating that the WBV exposure is not dependent on the type of mine but is dependent on the working condition and type of HEMM in operation. PMID:17874194

Vanerkar, A P; Kulkarni, N P; Zade, P D; Kamavisdar, A S

2008-08-01

160

Time domain detection of shocks and impacts in whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

A method for detecting shocks and impacts in whole-body vibration time histories has been developed that is suitable for implementation as a computer algorithm. The procedure consists of comparing the magnitudes of a higher-order mean value and the impulsiveness calculated for successive time segments of the acceleration-time history. The indicators were the ratio of the 12th-order root mean value to the root mean square RMT/RMS, and the impulsiveness corresponding to a cumulative probability value of 0.97, I(0.97) (i.e., the magnitude of the positive and negative excursions exceeded 3% of the time divided by 2RMS). Both indicators have a value of 2.16 for random vibration with a Gaussian amplitude distribution, and deviate from this value when the motion possesses other characteristics. For seat motion in the Z-direction analyzed using frequency weighting W(b), and time segments of ~20 s, shocks and impacts could be identified when RMT/RMS ? 2.5, and I(0.97) ? 2.6. A subjective visual classification of 160 exposures to vibration recorded in a range of military vehicles operating under different conditions was performed by a jury of two observers. The subjective classification agreed with computer identification of shocks and impacts in 94% of the cases. PMID:20953070

Brammer, Anthony J; Roddan, George; Morrison, James B

2010-01-01

161

[Equipment and positioning technologies in stereotactic body radiation therapy].  

PubMed

Strereotactic body radiation therapy needs adapted or dedicated equipment to allow fulfilling the particular conditions of the stereotactic treatments: submillimetric accuracy during the treatment delivery, high doses for a reduced number of sessions. This kind of treatment can be either performed using delivery equipment conceived and dedicated to the technique, or performed on conventional machines adapted to meet the criteria. Contrary to intracranial treatments, the positioning of the target volume raises new difficulties, mainly due to the diversity of localization to treat and also due to inter- and intrafraction movements that can occur. To reduce these effects that could affect the irradiation accuracy, positioning or movement compensation, mostly due to respiration, tools have been developed. PMID:24837350

Marchesi, V; Dedieu, V; Lacornerie, T; Buchheit, I

2014-01-01

162

Characterization and calibration of piezoelectric polymers: In situ measurements of body vibrations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Piezoelectric polymers are known for their flexibility in applications, mainly due to their bending ability, robustness, and variable sensor geometry. It is an optimal material for minimal-invasive investigations in vibrational systems, e.g., for wood, where acoustical impedance matches particularly well. Many applications may be imagined, e.g., monitoring of buildings, vehicles, machinery, alarm systems, such that our investigations may have a large impact on technology. Longitudinal piezoelectricity converts mechanical vibrations normal to the polymer-film plane into an electrical signal, and the respective piezoelectric coefficient needs to be carefully determined in dependence on the relevant material parameters. In order to evaluate efficiency and durability for piezopolymers, we use polyvinylidene fluoride and measure the piezoelectric coefficient with respect to static pressure, amplitude of the dynamically applied force, and long-term stability. A known problem is the slow relaxation of the material towards equilibrium, if the external pressure changes; here, we demonstrate how to counter this problem with careful calibration. Since our focus is on acoustical measurements, we determine accurately the frequency response curve - for acoustics probably the most important characteristic. Eventually, we show that our piezopolymer transducers can be used as a calibrated acoustical sensors for body vibration measurements on a wooden musical instrument, where it is important to perform minimal-invasive measurements. A comparison with the simultaneously recorded airborne sound yields important insight of the mechanism of sound radiation in comparison with the sound propagating in the material. This is especially important for transient signals, where not only the long-living eigenmodes contribute to the sound radiation. Our analyses support that piezopolymer sensors can be employed as a general tool for the determination of the internal dynamics of vibrating systems.

Kappel, Marcel; Abel, Markus; Gerhard, Reimund

2011-07-01

163

All-terrain vehicle use in agriculture: exposure to whole body vibration and mechanical shock.  

PubMed

Whole body vibration (WBV) and mechanical shock were measured in 12 New Zealand farmers during their daily use of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs). As per the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) guidelines for WBV exposure, frequencies between 0 and 100Hz were recorded via a seat-pad tri-axial accelerometer during 20min of ATV use. The farmers were also surveyed to estimate seasonal variation in daily ATV usage as well as 7-day and 12-month prevalence of spinal pain. Frequency-weighted vibration exposure and total riding time were calculated to determine the daily vibration dose value (VDV). The daily VDV of 16.6m/s(1.75) was in excess of the 9.1m/s(1.75) action limit set by ISO guidelines suggesting an increased risk of low back injury from such exposure. However, the mean shock factor R, representing cumulative adverse health effects, was 0.31 indicating that these farmers were not exposed to excessive doses of mechanical shock. Extrapolation of daily VDV data to estimated seasonal variations of farmers in ATV riding time demonstrated that all participants would exceed the ISO recommended maximum permissible limits during the spring lambing season, as compared to lower exposures calculated for summer, autumn and winter. Low back pain was the most commonly reported complaint for both 7 day (50%) and 12 month prevalence (67%), followed by the neck (17% and 42%) and the upper back (17% and 25%) respectively. The results demonstrate high levels of vibration exposure within New Zealand farmers and practical recommendations are needed to reduce their exposure to WBV. PMID:19944407

Milosavljevic, Stephan; Bergman, Frida; Rehn, Borje; Carman, Allan B

2010-07-01

164

Automated fiducial marker planning for thoracic stereotactic body radiation therapy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stereotactic body-radiation therapy (SBRT) has gained acceptance in treating lung cancer. Localization of a thoracic lesion is challenging as tumors can move significantly with breathing. Some SBRT systems compensate for tumor motion with the intrafraction tracking of targets by two stereo fluoroscopy cameras. However, many lung tumors lack a fluoroscopic signature and cannot be directly tracked. Small radiopaque fiducial markers, acting as fluoroscopically visible surrogates, are instead implanted nearby. The spacing and configuration of the fiducial markers is important to the success of the therapy as SBRT systems impose constraints on the geometry of a fiducial-marker constellation. It is difficult even for experienced physicians mentally assess the validity of a constellation a priori. To address this challenge, we present the first automated planning system for bronchoscopic fiducial-marker placement. Fiducial-marker planning is posed as a constrained combinatoric optimization problem. Constraints include requiring access from a navigable airway, having sufficient separation in the fluoroscopic imaging planes to resolve each individual marker, and avoidance of major blood vessels. Automated fiducial-marker planning takes approximately fifteen seconds, fitting within the clinical workflow. The resulting locations are integrated into a virtual bronchoscopic planning system, which provides guidance to each location during the implantation procedure. To date, we have retrospectively planned over 50 targets for treatment, and have implanted markers according to the automated plan in one patient who then underwent SBRT treatment. To our knowledge, this approach is the first to address automated bronchoscopic fiducialmarker planning for SBRT.

Gibbs, Jason D.; Rai, Lav; Wibowo, Henky; Tsalyuk, Serge; Anderson, Eric D.

2012-02-01

165

Role of stereotactic body radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma  

PubMed Central

The integration of new technologies has raised an interest in liver tumor radiotherapy, with literature evolving to support its efficacy. These advances, particularly stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), have been critical in improving local control or potential cure in liver lesions not amenable to first-line surgical resection or radiofrequency ablation. Active investigation of SBRT, particularly for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), has recently started, yielding promising local control rates. In addition, data suggest a possibility that SBRT can be an alternative option for HCC unfit for other local therapies. However, information on optimal treatment indications, doses, and methods remains limited. In HCC, significant differences in patient characteristics and treatment availability exist by country. In addition, the prognosis of HCC is greatly influenced by underlying liver dysfunction and treatment itself in addition to tumor stage. Since they are closely linked to treatment approach, it is important to understand these differences in interpreting outcomes from various reports. Further studies are required to validate and maximize the efficacy of SBRT by a large, multi-institutional setting. PMID:24696597

Sanuki, Naoko; Takeda, Atsuya; Kunieda, Etsuo

2014-01-01

166

Stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer: Rational and reasonable.  

PubMed

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), a treatment procedure that uses large doses per fraction, is currently being used to treat prostate cancer with external radiation therapy in 4 to 5 treatments. Published series in the clinical use of SBRT in patients with localized prostate cancer demonstrate high efficacy within the available follow-up time periods. Rectal and sexual toxicity profiles have been favorable compared with other radiation techniques and surgery. Urinary toxicity profiles might be more comparable to those observed with brachytherapy, more pronounced in the acute setting. SBRT is technically more challenging, requiring precise geometric targeting with in-room image guidance. The use of large doses per fraction potentially provides unique biological effects on both tumor and normal tissues. Immunologic responses in normal tissues, local stromal microenvironment, and specific antigen-presenting cells induced by such high doses likely contribute to effective tumor kill. Ultimately, SBRT for prostate cancer offers significant logistical advantages, with increased convenience to patients and decreased overall cost to the health care delivery system. PMID:25413392

Kupelian, Patrick; Mehta, Niraj H; King, Chris; Steinberg, Michael; Finkelstein, Steven E; Fernandez, Eduardo

2014-10-18

167

Regorafenib-induced transverse myelopathy after stereotactic body radiation therapy.  

PubMed

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivers large doses of radiation with great accuracy, but is known to have deleterious effects on the vascular compartment of irradiated tissues. Combining SBRT with targeted anti-angiogenesis agents, while able to increase therapeutic efficacy, may unexpectedly precipitate vascular-based toxicities. In this report, we describe a patient with colon cancer who developed transverse myelopathy from regorafenib 2 years after receiving SBRT for three metastatic liver lesions. Regorafenib (Stivarga), formerly BAY 73-4506, (Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Montville, NJ) is a multiple receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor with anti-angiogenic effects used in metastatic colon cancer. Its most common side effects are fatigue, diarrhea and hypertension. However, severe neurologic toxicity has not been previously recognized. Here, we illustrate a case in which the patient developed hyperalgesia and radicular pain 2 weeks after starting regorafenib. Several studies report an increased neurological toxicity when angiogenesis inhibitors are given after radiation therapy, and we postulate that the angioinhibitory effects of regorafenib accelerated subclinical microvascular injury from SBRT. This unexpected toxicity may be clinically relevant when giving targeted angiogenesis inhibitors after SBRT. PMID:25436137

Tian, Sibo; Nissenblatt, Michael; Goyal, Sharad

2014-12-01

168

Typical whole body vibration exposure magnitudes encountered in the open pit mining industry.  

PubMed

According to recent research, a causal link has been established between occupational exposure to whole body vibration and an increased occurrence of low back pain. To aid in the further development of an in-house health and safety program for a large open pit mining facility interested in reducing back pain among its operators, whole body vibration magnitudes were characterized for a range of jobs. Specifically, thirty-five individual jobs from five different areas across the facility were evaluated for tri-axial acceleration levels during normal operating conditions. Tri-axial acceleration magnitudes were categorized into thirteen job groups. Job groups were ranked according to exposure and compared to the ISO 2631-1 standard for health risk assessment. Three of the thirteen job groups produced tri-axial acceleration magnitudes below the ISO 2631-1 low/moderate health caution limit for a twelve hour exposure. Six of the thirteen job groups produced exposures within the moderate health risk range. Four job groups were found to subject operators to WBV acceleration magnitudes above the moderate/high health caution limit. PMID:20037244

Howard, Bryan; Sesek, Richard; Bloswick, Don

2009-01-01

169

Loads on a spinal implant measured in vivo during whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

After spinal surgery, patients often want to know whether driving a car or using public transportation can be dangerous for their spine. In order to answer this question, a clinically proven vertebral body replacement (VBR) has been modified. Six load sensors and a telemetry unit were integrated into the inductively powered implant. The modified implant allows the measurement of six load components. Telemeterized devices were implanted in five patients; four of them agreed to exposure themselves to whole-body vibration. During the measurements, the patients sat on a driver seat fixed to a hexapod. They were exposed to random single-axis vibrations in X, Y, and Z directions as well as in multi-axis XYZ directions with frequencies between 0.3 and 30 Hz. Three intensity levels (unweighted root mean square values of 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 m/s(2)) were applied. Three postures were studied: sitting freely, using a vertical backrest, and a backrest declined by an angle of 25 degrees . The patients held their hands on their thighs. As expected, the maximum force on the VBR increased with increasing intensity and the number of axes. For the highest intensity level and multi-axis vibration, the maximum forces increased by 89% compared to sitting relaxed. Leaning at the backrest as well as lower intensity levels markedly decreased the implant loads. Driving a car or using public transportation systems-when the patient leans towards the backrest-leads to lower implant loads than walking, and can therefore be allowed already shortly after surgery. PMID:20186440

Rohlmann, Antonius; Hinz, Barbara; Blüthner, Ralph; Graichen, Friedmar; Bergmann, Georg

2010-07-01

170

Loads on a spinal implant measured in vivo during whole-body vibration  

PubMed Central

After spinal surgery, patients often want to know whether driving a car or using public transportation can be dangerous for their spine. In order to answer this question, a clinically proven vertebral body replacement (VBR) has been modified. Six load sensors and a telemetry unit were integrated into the inductively powered implant. The modified implant allows the measurement of six load components. Telemeterized devices were implanted in five patients; four of them agreed to exposure themselves to whole-body vibration. During the measurements, the patients sat on a driver seat fixed to a hexapod. They were exposed to random single-axis vibrations in X, Y, and Z directions as well as in multi-axis XYZ directions with frequencies between 0.3 and 30 Hz. Three intensity levels (unweighted root mean square values of 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 m/s2) were applied. Three postures were studied: sitting freely, using a vertical backrest, and a backrest declined by an angle of 25°. The patients held their hands on their thighs. As expected, the maximum force on the VBR increased with increasing intensity and the number of axes. For the highest intensity level and multi-axis vibration, the maximum forces increased by 89% compared to sitting relaxed. Leaning at the backrest as well as lower intensity levels markedly decreased the implant loads. Driving a car or using public transportation systems—when the patient leans towards the backrest—leads to lower implant loads than walking, and can therefore be allowed already shortly after surgery. PMID:20186440

Hinz, Barbara; Blüthner, Ralph; Graichen, Friedmar; Bergmann, Georg

2010-01-01

171

Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration improves postural control in health care professionals: a worksite randomized controlled trial.  

PubMed

Slip, trip, and fall injuries are frequent among health care workers. Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training was tested to improve postural control. Participants included 124 employees of a Swiss university hospital. The randomized controlled trial included an experimental group given 8 weeks of training and a control group with no intervention. In both groups, postural control was assessed as mediolateral sway on a force plate before and after the 8-week trial. Mediolateral sway was significantly decreased by stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training in the experimental group but not in the control group that received no training (p < .05). Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training is an option in the primary prevention of balance-related injury at work. PMID:24806038

Elfering, Achim; Schade, Volker; Stoecklin, Lukas; Baur, Simone; Burger, Christian; Radlinger, Lorenz

2014-05-01

172

Lift force acting on a cylindrical body in a fluid near the boundary of a cavity performing translational vibrations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The averaged lift force acting on a cylindrical body near the boundary of a cavity with a fluid performing translational vibrations was studied. Experiments were performed with variation the viscosity of the fluid, the size and relative density of the body, and vibration parameters were varied. The lift force was measured by the method of dynamic suspension of a body in a gravitational field in the case where the body performed inertial vibrations without touching the walls. It was found that the vibrations generated a repulsion force which held the heavy body over the bottom of the cavity, and the light body at a certain distance from the top wall. It was shown that the effect of the repulsion forces manifested itself at a distance comparable to the thickness of the Stokes layer and increased with approach to the wall. A description of the mechanism of generation of the lift force is given. It is shown that in the case of high dimensionless frequencies, the experimental and theoretical results are in agreement.

Ivanova, A. A.; Kozlov, V. G.; Shchipitsyn, V. D.

2014-09-01

173

Effect of phase on discomfort caused by vertical whole-body vibration and shock-Experimental investigation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An experimental study has investigated the effect of ``phase'' on the subjective responses of human subjects exposed to vertical whole-body vibration and shock. The stimuli were formed from two frequency components: 3 and 9 Hz for continuous vibrations and 3 and 12 Hz for shocks. The two frequency components, each having 1.0 ms-2 peak acceleration, were combined to form various waveforms. The effects of the vibration magnitude on the discomfort caused by the input stimuli were also investigated with both the continuous vibrations and the shocks. Various objective measurements of acceleration and force at the seat surface, the effects of different frequency weightings and second and fourth power evaluations were compared with judgments of the discomfort of the stimuli. It was found that a 6% to 12% increase in magnitude produced a statistically significant increase in discomfort with both the continuous vibrations and the shocks. Judgments of discomfort caused by changes in vibration magnitude were highly correlated with all of the objective measurements used in the study. The effects on discomfort of the phase between components in the continuous vibrations were not statistically significant, as predicted using evaluation methods with a power of 2. However, small changes in discomfort were correlated with the vibration dose value (VDV) of the Wb frequency-weighted acceleration. The effect of phase between frequency components within the shocks was statistically significant, although no objective measurement method used in the study was correlated with the subjective judgments.

Matsumoto, Yasunao; Griffin, Michael J.

2002-03-01

174

Effect of phase on discomfort caused by vertical whole-body vibration and shock--experimental investigation.  

PubMed

An experimental study has investigated the effect of "phase" on the subjective responses of human subjects exposed to vertical whole-body vibration and shock. The stimuli were formed from two frequency components: 3 and 9 Hz for continuous vibrations and 3 and 12 Hz for shocks. The two frequency components, each having 1.0 ms(-2) peak acceleration, were combined to form various waveforms. The effects of the vibration magnitude on the discomfort caused by the input stimuli were also investigated with both the continuous vibrations and the shocks. Various objective measurements of acceleration and force at the seat surface, the effects of different frequency weightings and second and fourth power evaluations were compared with judgments of the discomfort of the stimuli. It was found that a 6% to 12% increase in magnitude produced a statistically significant increase in discomfort with both the continuous vibrations and the shocks. Judgments of discomfort caused by changes in vibration magnitude were highly correlated with all of the objective measurements used in the study. The effects on discomfort of the phase between components in the continuous vibrations were not statistically significant, as predicted using evaluation methods with a power of 2. However, small changes in discomfort were correlated with the vibration dose value (VDV) of the Wb frequency-weighted acceleration. The effect of phase between frequency components within the shocks was statistically significant, although no objective measurement method used in the study was correlated with the subjective judgments. PMID:11931305

Matsumoto, Yasunao; Griffin, Michael J

2002-03-01

175

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of Cyberknife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its effect on survival in patients of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: This was a matched-pair study. From January 2008 to December 2009, 36 patients with 42 lesions of unresectable recurrent HCC were treated with SBRT. The median prescribed dose was 37 Gy (range, 25 to 48 Gy) in 4-5 fractions over 4-5 consecutive working days. Another 138 patients in the historical control group given other or no treatments were selected for matched analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 14 months for all patients and 20 months for those alive. The 1- and 2-year in-field failure-free rates were 87.6% and 75.1%, respectively. Out-field intrahepatic recurrence was the main cause of failure. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 64.0%, and median time to progression was 8.0 months. In the multivariable analysis of all 174 patients, SBRT (yes vs. no), tumor size ({<=}4 cm vs. >4 cm), recurrent stage (stage IIIB/IV vs. I) and Child-Pugh classification (A vs. B/C) were independent prognostic factors for OS. Matched-pair analysis revealed that patients undergoing SBRT had better OS (2-year OS of 72.6% vs. 42.1%, respectively, p = 0.013). Acute toxicities were mild and tolerable. Conclusion: SBRT is a safe and efficacious modality and appears to be well-tolerated at the dose fractionation we have used, and its use correlates with improved survival in this cohort of patients with recurrent unresectable HCC. Out-field recurrence is the major cause of failure. Further studies of combinations of SBRT and systemic therapies may be reasonable.

Huang, Wen-Yen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jen, Yee-Min, E-mail: yeeminjen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Meei-Shyuan [School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Li-Ping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cardinal Tien Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cardinal Tien Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chang-Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Ko, Kai-Hsiung [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Kuen-Tze; Lin, Jang-Chun; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Lin, Chun-Shu; Su, Yu-Fu; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Chang, Yao-Wen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2012-10-01

176

Long-term effects of 6-week whole-body vibration on balance recovery and activities of daily living in the postacute phase of stroke: a randomized, controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The long-term effects of 6-weeks whole-body vibration, as a novel method of somatosensory stimulation, on postural control and activities of daily living were compared with those of 6 weeks of exercise therapy on music of the same intensity in the postacute phase of stroke. METHODS: Fifty-three patients with moderate to severe functional disabilities were randomized within 6

I. J. W. van Nes; H. Latour; F. Schils; R. Meijer; A. van Kuijk; A. C. H. Geurts

2006-01-01

177

The role of whole body vibration, posture and manual materials handling as risk factors for low back pain in occupational drivers  

Microsoft Academic Search

It seems evident that occupational drivers have an increased risk of developing back pain. Not only are they exposed to whole body vibration (vibration), their work often includes exposure to several other risk factors for low back pain (LBP), particularly the seated posture (posture) and manual materials handling (MMH). Excessive demands on posture are likely to be aggravated by vibration

O. O. Okunribido; M. Magnusson; M. H. Pope

2008-01-01

178

Potency preservation following stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Erectile dysfunction after prostate radiation therapy remains an ongoing challenge and critical quality of life issue. Given the higher dose of radiation per fraction using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) there is concern that post-SBRT impotency would be higher than conventional radiation therapy approaches. This study sought to evaluate potency preservation and sexual function following SBRT for prostate cancer. Methods Between February 2008 and March 2011, 216 men with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated definitively with SBRT monotherapy at Georgetown University Hospital. Potency was defined as the ability to have an erection firm enough for intercourse with or without sexual aids while sexual activity was defined as the ability to have an erection firm enough for masturbation and foreplay. Patients who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) were excluded from this study. Ninety-seven hormone-naïve men were identified as being potent at the initiation of therapy and were included in this review. All patients were treated to 35–36.25 Gy in 5 fractions delivered with the CyberKnife Radiosurgical System (Accuray). Prostate specific antigen (PSA) and total testosterone levels were obtained pre-treatment, every 3 months for the first year and every 6 months for the subsequent year. Sexual function was assessed with the Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM), the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC)-26 and Utilization of Sexual Medication/Device questionnaires at baseline and all follow-up visits. Results Ninety-seven men (43 low-, 50 intermediate- and 4 high-risk) at a median age of 68 years (range, 48–82 years) received SBRT. The median pre-treatment PSA was 5.9 ng/ml and the minimum follow-up was 24 months. The median pre-treatment total serum testosterone level was 11.4 nmol/L (range, 4.4-27.9 nmol/L). The median baseline SHIM was 22 and 36% of patients utilized sexual aids prior to treatment. Although potency rates declined following treatment: 100% (baseline); 68% (6 months); 62% (12 months); 57% (18 months) and 54.4% (24 months), 78% of previously potent patients had erections sufficient for sexual activity at 24 months post-treatment. Overall sexual aid utilization increased from 36% at baseline to 49% at 24 months. Average EPIC sexual scores showed a slow decline over the first two years following treatment: 77.6 (baseline); 68.7 (6 months); 63.2 (12 months); 61.9 (18 months); 59.3 (24 months). All sexual functions including orgasm declined with time. Prior to treatment, 13.4% of men felt their sexual function was a moderate to big problem which increased to 26.7% two years post treatment. Post-treatment testosterone levels gradually decreased with a median value at two year follow-up of 10.7 nmol/L. However, the average EPIC hormonal scores did not illustrate a statistically significant difference two years post-treatment. Review of the radiation doses to the penile bulb in this study, a potential marker of post-treatment sexual function, revealed that the dose was relatively low and at these low doses the percentage of the penile bulb receiving 29.5 Gy did not correlate with the development of ED. Conclusions Men undergoing SBRT monotherapy for prostate cancer report sexual outcomes comparable to those reported for conventional radiation modalities within the first 24 months after treatment. Longer follow-up is required to confirm the durability of these findings. PMID:24180317

2013-01-01

179

Mind-Body Therapies: Evidence and Implications in Advanced Oncology Practice  

PubMed Central

The idea that thoughts and emotions influence health outcomes is an ancient concept that was initially abandoned by Western medicine researchers. Today, researchers are showing a renewed interest in the interactions of the mind and body and the role these interactions play in disease formation and recovery. Complementary and alternative interventions, such as mind-body therapies, are increasingly being used by cancer survivors for disease prevention, immune system enhancement, and symptom control. Traditional training has not been structured to provide advanced practitioners with an in-depth knowledge of the clinical applications of mind-body therapies. The aim of this article is to acquaint the reader with common mind-body modalities (meditation/mindfulness-based stress reduction, relaxation therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, hypnosis, biofeedback, music therapy, art therapy, support groups, and aromatherapy) and to examine important evidence in support of or against their clinical application. PMID:25031967

Mayden,, Kelley D.

2012-01-01

180

Safety and severity of accelerations delivered from whole body vibration exercise devices to standing adults  

PubMed Central

Objectives Whole Body Vibration (WBV) devices are used as a means to augment training, and their potential to treat a range of musculoskeletal diseases and injuries is now being considered. The goal of this work is to determine the degree to which acceleration delivered by WBV devices at the plantar surfaces of a standing human is transmitted through the axial and appendicular skeleton, and how this mechanical challenge corresponds to the safety Threshold Limit Values (TLV) established by the International Standards Organization ISO-2631. Design Non-blinded laboratory assessment of a range of WBV devices as it pertains to acceleration transmission to healthy volunteers. Methods Using skin and bite-bar mounted accelerometers, transmissibility to the tibia and cranium was determined in six healthy adults standing on a programmable WBV device as a function of frequency and intensity. Measures of transmissibility were then made from three distinct types of WBV platforms, which delivered a 50-fold range of peak-to-peak acceleration intensities (0.3 to 15.1g p-p; where 1g is earth’s gravitational field). Results For a given frequency, transmissibility was independent of intensity when below 1g. Transmissibility declined non-linearly with increasing frequency. Depending on the WBV device, vibration ranged from levels considered safe by ISO-2631 for up to eight hours each day (0.3gp-p @ 30Hz), to levels that were seven times higher than what is considered a safe threshold for even one minute of exposure each day (15.1g p-p @ 30Hz). Transmissibility to the cranium was markedly attenuated by the degree of flexion in the knees. Conclusions Vibration can have adverse effects on a number of physiologic systems. This work indicates that readily accessible WBV devices markedly exceed ISO guidelines for safety, and extreme caution must be practiced when considering their use. PMID:23453990

Muir, Jesse; Kiel, Douglas P.; Rubin, Clinton T.

2013-01-01

181

Assessment of the influence of whole body vibration on Cochlear function  

PubMed Central

Background Whole body vibration (WBV) is a potentially harmful consequence resulting from the dissipation of energy by industrial machineries. The result of WBV exposure on the auditory system remains unknown. The objective of the present research was to evaluate the influence of WBV on cochlear function, in particular outer hair cell function. It is hypothesized that WBV impairs cochlear function resulting in decreased Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission (DPOAE) levels (Ldp) in rabbits subjected to WBV. Methods Twelve rabbits were equally divided into vibration and control groups. Animals in vibration group were exposed to 1.0?ms-2 r.m.s vertical WBV at 4–8?Hz for 8?h/day during 5 consecutive days. Outer hair cell function was assessed by comparing repeated-measurements of DPOAE levels (Ldp) across a range of f2 frequencies in rabbits both exposed and unexposed to WBV. DPOAE level shifts (LSdp) were compared across ears, frequencies, groups, and times. Results No differences were seen over time in DPOAE levels in the non-exposed rabbits (p?=?0.082). Post-exposure Ldp in rabbits exposed to WBV were significantly increased at all test frequencies in both ears compared to baseline measures (p?=?0.021). The greatest increase in Ldp following exposure was seen at 5888.5?Hz (mean shift?=?13.25?dB). Post-exposure Ldp in rabbits exposed to WBV were not significantly different between the right and left ears (p?=?0.083). Conclusion WBV impairs cochlear function resulting in increased DPOAE responses in rabbits exposed to WBV. DPOAE level shifts occurred over a wide range of frequencies following prolonged WBV in rabbits. PMID:22720724

2012-01-01

182

Minimum health and safety requirements for workers exposed to hand-transmitted vibration and whole-body vibration in the European Union; a review.  

PubMed

In 2002, the Parliament and Commission of the European Community agreed "minimum health and safety requirements" for the exposure of workers to the risks arising from vibration. The Directive defines qualitative requirements and also quantitative requirements in the form of "exposure action values" and "exposure limit values". The quantitative guidance is based on, but appears to conflict with, the guidance in International Standards for hand-transmitted vibration (ISO 5349) and whole-body vibration (ISO 2631). There is a large internal inconsistency within the Directive for short duration exposures to whole-body vibration: the two alternative methods give very different values. It would appear prudent to base actions on the qualitative guidance (i.e. reducing risk to a minimum) and only refer to the quantitative guidance where there is no other reasonable basis for the identification of risk (i.e. similar exposures are not a suspected cause of injury). Health surveillance and other precautions will be appropriate wherever there is reason to suspect a risk and will not be restricted to conditions where the exposure action value is exceeded. PMID:15090658

Griffin, M J

2004-05-01

183

Minimum health and safety requirements for workers exposed to hand-transmitted vibration and whole-body vibration in the European Union; a review  

PubMed Central

In 2002, the Parliament and Commission of the European Community agreed "minimum health and safety requirements" for the exposure of workers to the risks arising from vibration. The Directive defines qualitative requirements and also quantitative requirements in the form of "exposure action values" and "exposure limit values". The quantitative guidance is based on, but appears to conflict with, the guidance in International Standards for hand-transmitted vibration (ISO 5349) and whole-body vibration (ISO 2631). There is a large internal inconsistency within the Directive for short duration exposures to whole-body vibration: the two alternative methods give very different values. It would appear prudent to base actions on the qualitative guidance (i.e. reducing risk to a minimum) and only refer to the quantitative guidance where there is no other reasonable basis for the identification of risk (i.e. similar exposures are not a suspected cause of injury). Health surveillance and other precautions will be appropriate wherever there is reason to suspect a risk and will not be restricted to conditions where the exposure action value is exceeded. PMID:15090658

Griffin, M

2004-01-01

184

Physiological response to whole-body vibration in athletes and sedentary subjects.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a new exercise method, with good acceptance among sedentary subjects. The metabolic response to WBV has not been well documented. Three groups of male subjects, inactive (SED), endurance (END) and strength trained (SPRINT) underwent a session of side-alternating WBV composed of three 3-min exercises (isometric half-squat, dynamic squat, dynamic squat with added load), and repeated at three frequencies (20, 26 and 32 Hz). VO(2), heart rate and Borg scale were monitored. Twenty-seven healthy young subjects (10 SED, 8 SPRINT and 9 END) were included. When expressed in % of their maximal value recorded in a treadmill test, both the peak oxygen consumption (VO(2)) and heart rate (HR) attained during WBV were greatest in the SED, compared to the other two groups (VO(2): 59.3 % in SED vs 50.8 % in SPRINT and 48.0 % in END, p<0.01; HR 82.7 % in SED vs 80.4 % in SPRINT and 72.4 % in END, p<0.05). In conclusions, the heart rate and metabolic response to WBV differs according to fitness level and type, exercise type and vibration frequency. In SED, WBV can elicit sufficient cardiovascular response to benefit overall fitness and thus be a potentially useful modality for the reduction of cardiovascular risk. PMID:25157652

Gojanovic, B; Feihl, F; Gremion, G; Waeber, B

2014-12-23

185

Acute Bone Marker Responses to Whole-Body Vibration and Resistance Exercise in Young Women  

PubMed Central

Whole-body vibration (WBV) augments the musculoskeletal effects of resistance exercise (RE). However, its acute effects on bone turnover markers (BTM) have not been determined. This study examined BTM responses to acute high intensity RE and high intensity RE with WBV (WBV+RE) in young women (n=10) taking oral contraceptives in a randomized, cross-over repeated measures design. WBV+RE exposed subjects to 5 one-minute bouts of vibration (20 Hz, 3.38 peak–peak displacement, separated by 1 minute of rest) prior to RE. Fasting blood samples were obtained before (Pre), immediately post WBV (PostVib), immediately post RE (IP), and 30 minutes post RE (P30). Bone ALP did not change at any time point. TRAP5b significantly (p<0.05) increased from the Pre to PostVib, then decreased from IP to P30 for both conditions. CTX significantly decreased (p<0.05) from Pre to PostVib and from Pre to P30 only for WBV+RE. WBV+RE showed a greater decrease in CTX than RE (-12.6 ± 4.7% vs. -1.13 ± 3.5%). In conclusion, WBV was associated with acute decreases in CTX levels not elicited with resistance exercise alone in young women. PMID:22902255

Sherk, Vanessa D.; Chrisman, Carmen; Smith, Jessica; Young, Kaelin C.; Singh, Harshvardhan; Bemben, Michael G.; Bemben, Debra A.

2014-01-01

186

Mathematical models for the apparent masses of standing subjects exposed to vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Linear lumped parameter models of the apparent masses of human subjects in standing positions when exposed to vertical whole-body vibration have been developed. Simple models with a single degree-of-freedom (d.o.f.) and with two (d.o.f.) were considered for practical use. Model parameters were optimised using both the mean apparent mass of 12 male subjects and the apparent masses of individual subjects measured in a previous study. The calculated responses of two (d.o.f.) models with a massless support structure showed best agreement with the measured apparent mass and phase, with errors less than 0.1 in the normalised apparent mass (i.e., corresponding to errors less than 10% of the static mass) and errors less than 5° in the phase for a normal standing posture. The model parameters obtained with the mean measured apparent masses of the 12 subjects were similar to the means of the 12 sets of parameters obtained when fitting to the individual apparent masses. It was found that the effects of vibration magnitude and postural changes on the measured apparent mass could be represented by changes to the stiffness and damping in the two (d.o.f.) models.

Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

2003-02-01

187

Changes in postural sway frequency and complexity in altered sensory environments following whole body vibrations.  

PubMed

Studies assessing whole body vibration (WBV) have produced largely positive effects, with some neutral, on postural control with frequencies between 25 and 40 Hz. However no conclusive evidence indicates that 25-40 Hz elicits the optimal beneficial effects. To address this issue, a larger range of vibration intensity (10-50 Hz at peak-to-peak amplitudes of 2 and 5mm) was employed while increasing the postural complexity (altered somatosensory and/or visual information) to assess acute effects of 4-min of WBV on postural control. Twelve healthy young adults underwent postural assessment at four time intervals (prior to, immediately following and 10 and 20 min post WBV). Findings revealed both postural sway frequency and sway complexity/regularity were affected by WBV. Baseline posture demonstrated increased sway frequency (p=.04) following WBV with no changes in sway complexity. When the support surface was altered, changes in both the frequency and complexity of sway were elicited (p=.027, .002, respectively). When both somatosensory and visual information were altered delayed improvements in postural control were elicited (p=.05 and .01, for frequency and complexity, respectively). Given the differential acute effects as a function of postural task complexity, future longitudinal studies could determine the overall training effect on sway frequency and complexity. PMID:22516837

Dickin, D Clark; McClain, Matthew A; Hubble, Ryan P; Doan, Jon B; Sessford, David

2012-10-01

188

Whole Body Vibration at Different Exposure Frequencies: Infrared Thermography and Physiological Effects  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of whole body vibration (WBV) on physiological parameters, cutaneous temperature, tactile sensitivity, and balance. Twenty-four healthy adults (25.3 ± 2.6 years) participated in four WBV sessions. They spent 15 minutes on a vibration platform in the vertical mode at four different frequencies (31, 35, 40, and 44?Hz) with 1?mm of amplitude. All variables were measured before and after WBV exposure. Pressure sensation in five anatomical regions and both feet was determined using Von Frey monofilaments. Postural sway was measured using a force plate. Cutaneous temperature was obtained with an infrared camera. WBV influences the discharge of the skin touch-pressure receptors, decreasing sensitivity at all measured frequencies and foot regions (P ? 0.05). Regarding balance, no differences were found after 20 minutes of WBV at frequencies of 31 and 35?Hz. At 40 and 44?Hz, participants showed higher anterior-posterior center of pressure (COP) velocity and length. The cutaneous temperature of the lower limbs decreased during and 10 minutes after WBV. WBV decreases touch-pressure sensitivity at all measured frequencies 10?min after exposure. This may be related to the impaired balance at higher frequencies since these variables have a role in maintaining postural stability. Vasoconstriction might explain the decreased lower limb temperature. PMID:25664338

Sonza, Anelise; Robinson, Caroline C.; Achaval, Matilde; Zaro, Milton A.

2015-01-01

189

Uncertainty in the evaluation of occupational exposure to whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Uncertainties associated with field assessments of daily exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) have been investigated in four categories of work vehicles (fork lift trucks, wheel loaders, garbage trucks, buses) in different working conditions. A total of 50 vehicles were included in the study. WBV exposures were measured in different field conditions in marble quarries, marble laboratories, dockyards, paper mills, transportation and public utilities: over 700 individual vibration measurements were analysed to quantify relevant uncertainty components due to changes in the operators' working methods, variations in the characteristics and conditions of the machines, changes in the characteristics of the travelling surface, uncertainty in the evaluation of exposure duration, and systematic errors due to measurement equipment. The methods used in the study to calculate measurement uncertainties are in accordance with the ISO publication "Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement". The study made it possible to isolate major sources of uncertainty in field assessment of daily exposures to WBV. The investigation revealed that, in all the field conditions, differences in the characteristics of the machines and/or in working cycles were the most relevant uncertainty components. The overall relative uncertainty p in WBV field assessment was in the range 14% < p<32%, whereas the relative uncertainty caused by transducer and measurement equipment in a correctly calibrated system is less than 4%.

Pinto, Iole; Stacchini, Nicola

2006-12-01

190

Preliminary results on the mobility after whole body vibration in immobilized children and adolescents.  

PubMed

The present article is a preliminary report on the effect of Whole Body Vibration (WBV) on the mobility in long-term immobilized children and adolescents. WBV was applied to 6 children and adolescents (diagnoses: osteogenesis imperfecta, N=4; cerebral palsy, N=1; dysraphic defect of the lumbar spine, N=1) over a time period of 6 months. WBV was applied by a vibrating platform constructed on a tilt-table. The treatment effect was measured by alternations of the tilt-angle of the table and with the "Brief assessment of motor function" (BAMF). All 6 individuals were characterized by an improved mobility, which was documented by an increased tilt-angle or an improved BAMF-score. The authors concluded WBV might be a promising approach to improve mobility in severely motor-impaired children and adolescents. Therefore, the Cologne Standing-and-Walking- Trainer powered by Galileo is a suitable therapeutic device to apply WBV in immobilized children and adolescents. PMID:17396011

Semler, O; Fricke, O; Vezyroglou, K; Stark, C; Schoenau, E

2007-01-01

191

Acute bone marker responses to whole-body vibration and resistance exercise in young women.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration (WBV) augments the musculoskeletal effects of resistance exercise (RE). However, its acute effects on bone turnover markers (BTM) have not been determined. This study examined BTM responses to acute high-intensity RE and high-intensity RE with WBV (WBV+RE) in young women (n=10) taking oral contraceptives in a randomized, crossover repeated measures design. WBV+RE exposed subjects to 5 one-minute bouts of vibration (20 Hz, 3.38 peak-peak displacement, separated by 1 min of rest) before RE. Fasting blood samples were obtained before (Pre), immediately after WBV (PostVib), immediately after RE (IP), and 30-min after RE (P30). Bone alkaline phosphatase did not change at any time point. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b significantly increased (p<0.05) from the Pre to PostVib, then decreased from IP to P30 for both conditions. C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) significantly decreased (p<0.05) from Pre to PostVib and from Pre to P30 only for WBV+RE. WBV+RE showed a greater decrease in CTX than RE (-12.6% ± 4.7% vs -1.13% ± 3.5%). In conclusion, WBV was associated with acute decreases in CTX levels not elicited with RE alone in young women. PMID:22902255

Sherk, Vanessa D; Chrisman, Carmen; Smith, Jessica; Young, Kaelin C; Singh, Harshvardhan; Bemben, Michael G; Bemben, Debra A

2013-01-01

192

The Effects of Whole Body Vibration on Mobility and Balance in Parkinson Disease: a Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Whole body vibration (WBV) is a contemporary treatment modality that holds promise as an exercise training method in health–compromised individuals. A growing number of studies on individuals with Parkinson Disease are examining whether WBV improves balance and functional mobility. However, interpreting WBV studies is challenging since there is variability in the manner in which WBV intervention is conducted. The primary goal of this systematic review was to investigate the effect of WBV on improving mobility and balance as measured by a battery of clinical tests, in patients with Parkinson disease. Studies based on WBV parameters were characterized and a systematic search of peer-reviewed literature in five major databases was conducted. Randomized-controlled trials investigating the effects of WBV in patients with a Parkinson diagnosis and no cognitive impairment were included. A total of six publications met the inclusion criteria. Overall, studies demonstrated mixed results in favor of WBV for improving balance or mobility. The majority of studies seem to suggest a favorable benefit following WBV for mobility and balance, but not when compared to other active intervention or placebo. There was variability in the manner in which WBV intervention was applied. Variations among the six studies included: duration of intervention and rest, follow-up period, type of control groups, frequency of vibration, number of treatment sessions and sex distribution of subjects. Future research is needed to investigate the effects of different types of equipment and treatment dosage in individuals with Parkinson disease. PMID:25031483

Sharififar, Sharareh; Coronado, Rogelio A.; Romero, Sergio; Azari, Hassan; Thigpen, Mary

2014-01-01

193

Inter-cycle variation in whole-body vibration exposures of operators driving track-type loader machines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Whole-body vibration (WBV) measurements are an important aspect of performing risk assessments for those exposed to vibration. A large array of variables affect the outcome of a vibration measurement and its extrapolation to a daily dose measure: e.g. variability in driving style, road surface roughness, loading. The variability in vibration emission is an inherent property for most vibrating environments and there is a risk that a vibration measurement might not be representative of the long-term exposures. It is important to acknowledge the variation inherent to WBV exposure to help understand how this variation will affect health risk assessments. A field investigation was conducted in order to characterise the variation of WBV magnitudes between work cycles of track-type loaders. Six different track-type loaders were measured at four different work sites. The vibrations were measured at the operators seat in three translational axes ( x-, y-, and z-axis) in accordance with ISO 2631-1 (1997). The findings indicate the worst axis of vibration for the track-type loaders was predominantly the fore-and-aft ( x-axis), for most operations. The most severe emission values were measured for machine C at site 2 (1.12 ms -2 rms) and machine D at site 2 (1.03 ms -2 rms). These machines would exceed the action value of the Physical Agents (Vibration) Directive within 2 h of exposure. All of the machines measured would exceed the exposure action value of the Directive within an 8 h working period. The lateral ( y-axis) produced the greatest amount of variability between work cycles (coefficient of variation up to 20%). It is concluded that the inherent variability between work cycles and tasks reinforces the requirement to perform a full task analysis prior to measuring WBV exposures to ensure that all tasks are measured and that adequate cycles are measured to obtain a reliable indication of the vibration emission.

Newell, Geraldine S.; Mansfield, Neil J.; Notini, Luca

2006-12-01

194

Distinct frequency dependent effects of whole-body vibration on non-fractured bone and fracture healing in mice.  

PubMed

Low-magnitude high-frequency vibration (LMHFV) provokes anabolic effects in non-fractured bone; however, in fracture healing, inconsistent results were reported and optimum vibration conditions remain unidentified. Here, we investigated frequency dependent effects of LMHFV on fracture healing. Twelve-week-old, female C57BL/6 mice received a femur osteotomy stabilized using an external fixator. The mice received whole-body vibrations (20?min/day) with 0.3g peak-to-peak acceleration and a frequency of either 35 or 45?Hz. After 10 and 21 days, the osteotomized femurs and intact bones (contra-lateral femurs, lumbar spine) were evaluated using bending-testing, µ-computed tomography, and histomorphometry. In non-fractured trabecular bone, vibration with 35?Hz significantly increased the relative amount of bone (+28%) and the trabecular number (+29%), whereas cortical bone was not influenced. LMHFV with 45?Hz failed to provoke anabolic effects in trabecular or cortical bone. Fracture healing was not significantly influenced by whole-body vibration with 35?Hz, whereas 45?Hz significantly reduced bone formation (-64%) and flexural rigidity (-34%) of the callus. Although the exact mechanisms remain open, our results suggest that small vibration setting changes could considerably influence LMHFV effects on bone formation in remodeling and repair, and even disrupt fracture healing, implicating caution when treating patients with impaired fracture healing. PMID:24729351

Wehrle, Esther; Wehner, Tim; Heilmann, Aline; Bindl, Ronny; Claes, Lutz; Jakob, Franz; Amling, Michael; Ignatius, Anita

2014-08-01

195

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the clinical application of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients with a focus on local efficacy and toxicity. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients with locally advanced and nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer who had been treated between 2004 and 2006. Follow-up duration ranged from 4 to 41 months (median, 14.5 months). A total dose of 40 Gy was delivered in 20 fractions using a conventional three-field technique, and then a single fraction of 14, 15, 16, or 17 Gy SBRT was administered as a boost without a break. Twenty-one patients received chemotherapy. Overall and local progression-free survival were calculated and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: One-year overall survival and local progression-free survival rates were 60.0% and 70.2%, respectively. One patient (3%) developed Grade 4 toxicity. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 response was found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that a SBRT boost provides a safe means of increasing radiation dose. Based on the results of this study, we recommend that a well controlled Phase II study be conducted on locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

Seo, Young Seok [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi-Sook, E-mail: mskim@kcch.re.k [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Sung Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Yang, Kwang Mo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Choi, Chul Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Han [CyberKnife Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin [Department of Internal Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Suk [Department of Pathology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hye Jin [Department of Hemato-Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, YoungHan [Department of Radiology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2009-12-01

196

Functional Genomics in the Study of Mind-Body Therapies  

PubMed Central

Background Mind-body therapies (MBTs) are used throughout the world in treatment, disease prevention, and health promotion. However, the mechanisms by which MBTs exert their positive effects are not well understood. Investigations into MBTs using functional genomics have revolutionized the understanding of MBT mechanisms and their effects on human physiology. Methods We searched the literature for the effects of MBTs on functional genomics determinants using MEDLINE, supplemented by a manual search of additional journals and a reference list review. Results We reviewed 15 trials that measured global or targeted transcriptomic, epigenomic, or proteomic changes in peripheral blood. Sample sizes ranged from small pilot studies (n=2) to large trials (n=500). While the reliability of individual genes from trial to trial was often inconsistent, genes related to inflammatory response, particularly those involved in the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) pathway, were consistently downregulated across most studies. Conclusion In general, existing trials focusing on gene expression changes brought about by MBTs have revealed intriguing connections to the immune system through the NF-?B cascade, to telomere maintenance, and to apoptotic regulation. However, these findings are limited to a small number of trials and relatively small sample sizes. More rigorous randomized controlled trials of healthy subjects and specific disease states are warranted. Future research should investigate functional genomics areas both upstream and downstream of MBT-related gene expression changes—from epigenomics to proteomics and metabolomics. PMID:25598735

Niles, Halsey; Mehta, Darshan H.; Corrigan, Alexandra A.; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Denninger, John W.

2014-01-01

197

Validity of self reported occupational exposures to hand transmitted and whole body vibration  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES—To assess the accuracy with which workers report their exposure to occupational sources of hand transmitted (HTV) and whole body vibration (WBV).?METHODS—179 Workers from various jobs involving exposure to HTV or WBV completed a self administered questionnaire about sources of occupational exposure to vibration in the past week. They were then observed at work over 1 hour, after which they completed a second questionnaire concerning their exposures during this observation period. The feasibility of reported sources of exposure during the past week was examined by questioning managers and by inspection of tools and machines in the workplace. The accuracy of reported sources and durations of exposure in the 1 hour period were assessed relative to what had been observed.?RESULTS—The feasibility of exposure in the previous week was confirmed for 97% of subjects who reported exposure to HTV, and for 93% of subjects who reported exposure to WBV. The individual sources of exposure reported were generally plausible, but occupational use of cars was substantially overreported, possibly because of confusion with their use in travel to and from work. The accuracy of exposures reported during the observation period was generally high, but some sources of HTV were confused—for example, nailing and stapling guns reported as riveting hammers, and hammer drills not distinguished from other sorts of drill. Workers overestimated their duration of exposure to HTV by a median factor of 2.5 (interquartile range (IQR) 1.6-5.9), but estimated durations of exposure were more accurate when the exposure was relatively continuous rather than for intermittent short periods. Reported durations of exposure to WBV were generally accurate (median ratio of reported to observed time 1.1, IQR 1.0-1.2).?CONCLUSIONS—Sources of recent occupational exposure to vibration seem to be reported with reasonable accuracy, but durations of exposure to HTV are systematically overestimated, particularly when the exposure is intermittent and for short periods. This raises the possibility that dose-response relations may have been biased in some of the studies on which exposure standards might be based, and that the levels in currently proposed standards may be too high. Future studies should pay attention to this source of error during data collection.???Keywords: vibration; exposure; assessment; validity PMID:10810109

Palmer, K.; Haward, B.; Griffin, M.; Bendall, H.; Coggon, D.

2000-01-01

198

Evaluation of Frequency Weighting (iso 2631-1) for Acute Effects of Whole-Body Vibration on Gastric Motility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) and the ISO 2631/1-1997 frequency weighting on gastric motility. The gastric motility was measured by electrogastrography (EGG) in nine healthy volunteers. Sinusoidal vertical vibration at a frequency of 4, 6·3, 8, 12, 16, 31·5, or 63 Hz was given to the subjects for 10 min. The magnitude of exposure at 4 Hz was 1·0m/s2 (r.m.s.). The magnitudes of the other frequencies gave the same frequency-weighted acceleration according to ISO 2631/1-1997. The pattern of the dominant frequency histogram (DFH) was changed to a broad distribution pattern by vibration exposure. Vibration exposure had the effect of significantly reducing the percentage of time for which the dominant component had a normal rhythm and increasing the percentage of time for which there was tachygastria (p<0·05). Vibration exposure generally reduced the mean percentage of time with the dominant frequency in normal rhythm component. There was a significant difference between the condition of no vibration and exposure to 4 and 6·3 Hz of vibration frequency (p<0·05). The frequency weighting curve given in ISO 2631/1-1997 was not adequate for use in evaluating the physiological effects of WBV exposure on gastric motility.

ISHITAKE, T.; MIYAZAKI, Y.; NOGUCHI, R.; ANDO, H.; MATOBA, T.

2002-05-01

199

Necessary research for standardization of subjective scaling of whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

Researches into the relationship between the physical quantity of vibration and the subjectively perceived quantity become important in designs for the vibration environment. Subjective experimental methods to obtain the relationship between the physical quantity of vibration and the subjectively perceived quantity are different depending on the design objectives which consider the human sense of vibration characteristic. In this review, the following are outlined: (i) fundamental methods for obtaining the design objectives for vibration environments; (ii) reported findings on the physical quantity of vibration environments and the human characteristics of sense vibration; and (iii) problems with and limits of the ISO 2631-1 standard, which defines the subjective response of the ride comfort in public transportation. Finally, the directions of research into the subjective experimental methods for obtaining design objectives in the vibration environment considering of the human characteristics of sense vibration are described. PMID:16100916

Maeda, Setsuo

2005-07-01

200

An investigation of three-body effects in intermolecular forces. III. Far infrared laser vibration-rotation-tunneling spectroscopy  

E-print Network

An investigation of three-body effects in intermolecular forces. III. Far infrared laser vibration.2 cm-`, com- pleting the high resolution far infrared measurements of the three lowest-lying Ar by high resolution microwave," far in- frared, l2 and near infraredi spectroscopy. In particular

Cohen, Ronald C.

201

Evaluation of an occupational health intervention programme on whole-body vibration in forklift truck drivers: a controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To evaluate process and outcome of a multifaceted occupational health intervention programme on whole-body vibration (WBV) in forklift truck drivers. Methods: An experimental pretest\\/post-test control group study design. The authors trained occupational health services ( OHS) in the experimental group in the use of the programme. OHS in the control group were asked to deliver care as usual. In

C. T. J. Hulshof; J. H. A. M. Verbeek; I. T. J. Braam; M. Bovenzi; F. J. H. van Dijk

2006-01-01

202

The Fate of Mrs Robinson: Criteria for Recognition of Whole-Body Vibration Injury as AN Occupational Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several recently published critical reviews conclude that there is strong epidemiological evidence for a relationship between occupational exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV), low back pain (LBP) and back disorders. Whether this exposure is only a modest or a substantial risk factor for the onset and recurrence of LBP is still a matter of debate. In spite of this controversy, four

C. T. J. Hulshof; G. van der Laan; I. T. J. Braam; J. H. A. M. Verbeek

2002-01-01

203

Low back pain in drivers: The relative role of whole-body vibration, posture and manual materials handling  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the relative role of whole-body vibration (WBV), posture and manual materials handling (MMH) as risk factors for low back pain (LBP). Using a validated questionnaire, information about health history, posture and MMH performed was obtained from 394 workers who drove vehicles as part of their job (according to seven predefined occupational groups) and

O. O. Okunribido; M. Magnusson; M. H. Pope

2006-01-01

204

Low back pain in drivers exposed to whole body vibration: analysis of a dose-response pattern  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Analysis of a dose-response pattern between exposure to whole body vibration (WBV) and low back pain (LBP) in a group of drivers. Methods: This study assessed individual factors, work- related risk factors, various LBP outcome measures and LBP disability in a group of drivers (n = 571) approached at baseline (T0), as well as the WBV magnitude of a

I J H Tiemessen; C T J Hulshof; M H W Frings-Dresen

2008-01-01

205

THE FATE OF MRS ROBINSON: CRITERIA FOR RECOGNITION OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION INJURY AS AN OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several recently published critical reviews conclude that there is strong epidemiological evidence for a relationship between occupational exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV), low back pain (LBP) and back disorders. Whether this exposure is only a modest or a substantial risk factor for the onset and recurrence of LBP is still a matter of debate. In spite of this controversy, four

C. T. J. HULSHOF; G. VAN DER LAAN; I. T. J. BRAAM; J. H. A. M. VERBEEK

2002-01-01

206

A randomized pilot study of stochastic vibration therapy in spinocerebellar ataxia.  

PubMed

Whole body vibration (WBV) is a biomechanical treatment used widely in professional sports and rehabilitation. We examined the effect of stochastic WBV on ataxia in spinocerebellar ataxia types 1, 2, 3, and 6 (SCA 1, 2, 3 and 6) in a single-center double-blind sham-controlled study. Stochastic WBV was applied on four sequent days, each treatment consisting of five stimulus trains of 60-s duration at a frequency of 6.5 Hz and 60-s resting time between stimuli (n?=?17). Patients allocated to the sham group received the same treatment with 1 Hz (n?=?15). All patients were rated at baseline and after the last treatment using clinical scores (SARA, SCAFI, and INAS). After treatment, we found significant improvements of gait, posture, and speed of speech in the verum group while limb kinetics and ataxia of speech did not respond. Stochastic WBV might act on proprioceptive mechanisms and could also stimulate non-cerebellar/compensatory mechanisms. But at present, the involved cellular mechanism and the presumed neuronal loops cannot be deciphered. Thus, future work is needed to understand the mechanisms of whole body vibration. Finally, the use of stochastic WBV could provide a supplementation to treat ataxia in SCA and can be combined with physiotherapeutical motor training. PMID:24197754

Kaut, O; Jacobi, H; Coch, C; Prochnicki, A; Minnerop, M; Klockgether, T; Wüllner, U

2014-04-01

207

To Compare the Effect of Vibration Therapy and Massage in Prevention of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS)  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To compare the effects of vibration therapy and massage in prevention of DOMS. Methods: Pre-test and Post-test Control-Group Design was used, 45 healthy female non athletic Subjects were recruited and randomly distributed to the three groups (15 subject in each group). After the subject’s initial status was measured experimental groups received vibration therapy (50 Hz vibration for five minutes) or massage therapy (15 minutes) intervention and control group received no treatment, just prior to the eccentric exercise. Subjects were undergoing the following measurements to evaluate the changes in the muscle condition: muscle soreness (pain perception), Range of Motion (ROM), Maximum Isometric Force (MIF), Repetition maximum (RM), Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and Cretain Kinase (CK) level. All the parameters except LDH, CK and 1RM were measured before, immediately post intervention, immediately post exercise, 24 hours post exercise, 48 hours post exercise and 72 hours post exercise. LDH, CK and 1 RM were measured before and 48 hours post exercise. Result: Muscle soreness was reported to be significantly less for experimental (vibration and massage) group (p=0.000) as compared to control group at 24, 48, and 72 hours of post-exercise. Experimental and control group did not show any significant difference in MIF immediate (p=0.2898), 24 hours (p=0.4173), 48 hours (p=0.752) and 72 hours (p=0.5297) of post-exercise. Range of motion demonstrated significant recovery in experimental groups in 48 hours (p=0.0016) and 72 hours (p=0.0463). Massage therapy showed significant recovery in 1RM (p=0.000) compared to control group and vibration therapy shows significantly less LDH level (p=0.000) 48 hours of post exercise compare to control group. CK at 48 hours of post exercise in vibration group (p=0.000) and massage group showed (p=0.002) significant difference as compared to control group. Conclusion: Vibration therapy and massage are equally effective in prevention of DOMS. Massage is effective in restoration of concentric strength (1 RM). Yet vibration therapy shows clinically early reduction of pain and is effective in decreasing the level of LDH in 48 hours post exercise periods. PMID:24596744

Imtiyaz, Shagufta; Veqar, Zubia; Shareef, M.Y.

2014-01-01

208

Whole-Body Vibration Training Effect on Physical Performance and Obesity in Mice  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to verify the beneficial effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training on exercise performance, physical fatigue and obesity in mice with obesity induced by a high-fat diet (HFD). Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into two groups: normal group (n=6), fed standard diet (control), and experimental group (n=18), fed a HFD. After 4-week induction, followed by 6-week WBV of 5 days per week, the 18 obese mice were divided into 3 groups (n=6 per group): HFD with sedentary control (HFD), HFD with WBV at relatively low-intensity (5.6 Hz, 0.13 g) (HFD+VL) or high-intensity (13 Hz, 0.68 g) (HFD+VH). A trend analysis revealed that WBV increased the grip strength in mice. WBV also dose-dependently decreased serum lactate, ammonia and CK levels and increased glucose level after the swimming test. WBV slightly decreased final body weight and dose-dependently decreased weights of epididymal, retroperitoneal and perirenal fat pads and fasting serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, CK, glucose, total cholesterol and triacylglycerol. Therefore, WBV could improve exercise performance and fatigue and prevent fat accumulation and obesity-associated biochemical alterations in obese mice. It may be an effective intervention for health promotion and prevention of HFD-induced obesity. PMID:25317067

Huang, Chi-Chang; Tseng, Tzu-Ling; Huang, Wen-Ching; Chung, Yi-Hsiu; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Wu, Jyh-Horng

2014-01-01

209

a Comparison of Standardized Methods for Predicting the Hazards of Whole-Body Vibration and Repeated Shocks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Methods of measuring, evaluating and assessing whole-body vibration and repeated shock are offered in ISO 2631 (1974, 1985), BS 6841 (1987), and ISO 2631 (1997). This paper presents a comparison of guidance on the health effects of vibration and repeated shock given in these standards. International Standard 2631 (1974,1985) offered a set of exposure limits. British Standard 6841 (1987) defines a measurement and evaluation procedure (based on frequency weightings and the vibration dose value, VDV), gives an action level that can be used to assess vibration severity, and mentions some appropriate actions (consideration of the fitness of exposed persons, design of safety precautions, regular health checks). International Standard 2631 (1997) is unclear in several important areas: which body postures and axes are to be assessed; whether evaluations of multi-axis vibration should be based on the “worst axis” or a combination of the frequency-weighted acceleration in all axes; why a new frequency weighting,Wk, is proposed for vertical vibration when it is almost within the error tolerance of an existing weighting,Wb; why a 1·4 multiplying factor is used to evaluate vibration with respect to health but not with respect to comfort; how to choose between different time-dependencies (overall r.m.s.,VDV, running r.m.s., and no-time-dependency); allowing use of either the maximum value of a running r.m.s. (i.e.,MTVV) or theVDV; allowing different averaging periods when calculating theMTVV; using the crest factor to choose between r.m.s. and either theVDVorMTVVmethods; defining two inconsistent criteria for deciding whether to use either theVDVorMTVVmethods; giving no guidance on howMTVVvalues should be assessed; including two very different “health guidance caution zones” (for interpreting r.m.s. andVDVmeasures); providing ambiguous wording for the health guidance caution zones. Very different conclusions can be reached according to what is measured, how the vibration is evaluated and how it is assessed according to ISO 2631 (197). However, even though it employs a slightly different frequency weighting for vertical vibration, and a 1·4 multiplying factor for horizontal vibration, ISO 2631 (1997) can be interpreted so as to provide evaluations similar to those made according to BS 6841 (1987). It is concluded that the recently revised International Standard for measuring, evaluating and assessing human exposures to vibration and shock will cause unnecessary confusion.

Griffin, M. J.

1998-08-01

210

[How Relevant are Diagnostics and Therapy in Body Image Disorder?].  

PubMed

Body image-related interventions become increasingly important in the treatment of anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Previous studies concerning body image disturbance conducted by means of diverse research methods focused on different components of body image - the perceptive, cognitive-emotional and the behavioral component. However, regarding the etiology, maintenance and treatment of body image disturbance in eating disorders, many questions remain unanswered. An integrative perspective on the different body image components within a theoretical framework as well as the development of specific body image-related interventions according to individual indications would be desirable. PMID:25594272

Vocks, Silja; Bauer, Anika

2015-01-01

211

Low-magnitude high-frequency loading via whole body vibration enhances bone-implant osseointegration in ovariectomized rats.  

PubMed

Osseointegration is vital to avoid long-time implants loosening after implantation surgery. This study investigated the effect of low-magnitude high-frequency (LMHF) loading via whole body vibration on bone-implant osseointegration in osteoporotic rats, and a comparison was made between LMHF vibration and alendronate on their effects. Thirty rats were ovariectomized to induce osteoporosis, and then treated with LMHF vibration (VIB) or alendronate (ALN) or a control treatment (OVX). Another 10 rats underwent sham operation to establish Sham control group. Prior to treatment, hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated titanium implants were inserted into proximal tibiae bilaterally. Both LMHF vibration and alendronate treatment lasted for 8 weeks. Histomorphometrical assess showed that both group VIB, ALN and Sham significantly increased bone-to-implant contact and peri-implant bone fraction (p?body vibration enhances bone-to-implant osseointegration in ovariectomized rats, but its effectiveness is weaker than alendronate. PMID:22058045

Chen, BaiLing; Li, YiQiang; Xie, DengHui; Yang, XiaoXi

2012-05-01

212

Apparent mass and cross-axis apparent mass of standing subjects during exposure to vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effects of posture and vibration magnitude on the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the standing human body during exposure to vertical vibration have been investigated. Twelve male subjects were exposed to random vertical vibration over the frequency range 2.0-20 Hz at three vibration magnitudes: 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 m s -2 rms. Subjects stood in five different postures: upright, lordotic, anterior lean, knees bent and knees more bent. The vertical acceleration at the floor and the forces in the vertical and fore-and-aft directions at the floor were used to obtain the apparent mass and the cross-axis apparent mass. The resonance frequency of the apparent mass was significantly reduced with knees bent and knees more bent postures, but there were only minor effects on the resonance frequency by changing the position of the upper body. Considerable cross-axis apparent mass, up to about 30% of the static mass of subjects, was found. The cross-axis apparent mass was influenced by all postural changes used in the study. In all postures the resonance frequencies of the apparent mass and the cross-axis apparent mass tended to decrease with increasing vibration magnitude. This nonlinear characteristic tended to be less clear in some postures in which subjects increased muscle tension.

Subashi, G. H. M. J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

2006-05-01

213

Acute effects of whole-body vibration on running gait in marathon runners.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a single bout of whole-body vibration (WBV) on running gait. The running kinematic of sixteen male marathon runners was assessed on a treadmill at iso-efficiency speed after 10 min of WBV and SHAM (i.e. no WBV) conditions. A high-speed camera (210 Hz) was used for the video analysis and heart rate (HR) was also monitored. The following parameters were investigated: step length (SL), flight time (FT), step frequency (SF), contact time (CT), HR and the internal work (WINT). Full-within one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the randomised crossover design indicated that when compared to SHAM conditions, WBV decreased the SL and the FT by ~4% (P < 0.0001) and ~7.2% (P < 0.001), respectively, and increased the SF ~4% (P < 0.0001) while the CT was not changed. This effect occurred during the first minute of running: the SL decreased ~3.5% (P < 0.001) and SF increased ~3.3% (P < 0.001). During the second minute the SL decreased ~1.2% (P = 0.017) and the SF increased ~1.1% (P = 0.02). From the third minute onwards, there was a return to the pre-vibration condition. The WINT was increased by ~4% (P < 0.0001) during the WBV condition. Ten minutes of WBV produced a significant alteration of the running kinematics during the first minutes post exposure. These results provide insights on the effects of WBV on the central components controlling muscle function. PMID:24576194

Padulo, Johnny; Filingeri, Davide; Chamari, Karim; Migliaccio, Gian Mario; Calcagno, Giuseppe; Bosco, Gerardo; Annino, Giuseppe; Tihanyi, Jozsef; Pizzolato, Fabio

2014-01-01

214

a Decade of Improvement in Whole-Body Vibration and Low Back Pain for Freight Container Tractor Drivers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The authors' study in 1983 revealed that the whole-body vibration of the tractor units of freight containers was most hazardous in the back-to-chest directions (x-axis). The allowable exposure time was considerably shorter than that for heavy duty trucks. The low back pain (LBP) among the drivers seemed to be due to the long working hours and the ergonomically unsound tractor design, as well as the vibration. A preventative measure was the introduction of a tractor cab suspended by an air spring instead of a steel spring. In 1992, a follow-up field study was conducted. A personal vibration exposure meter developed by us measured the whole-body vibration on eight tractors. Eighty-nine triplets matched with the age and the years of driving tractors answered a questionnaire evaluation of the ergonomics of their tractor units.The comparison of the newest steel suspension vehicles to the old ones produced by the same motor company revealed that in thex-axis the vibration level had decreased by as much as 4 to 9 dB. Some tractors showed an increase in vibration in the buttocks-to-head direction (z-axis). However, such adverse changes seemed not to affect evaluations according to the fatigue-decreased proficiency boundary (FDP) and the exposure limit (EL) recommended in ISO 2631-1978. The present models, regardless of the type of suspension, changed the direction of the most hazardous vibration from thex-axis to thez-axis. However, the effect of the air-suspension was not so remarkable as expected. Among 40% of drivers seemed to exceed the FDP boundary during a day.The questionnaire study showed an improvement in the ergonomic evaluation of the tractors. The air suspension models seemed to induce less LBP than the steel suspension models.

Nishiyama, K.; Taoda, K.; Kitahara, T.

1998-08-01

215

Evaluation of whole-body vibration exposure using a fourth power method and comparison with ISO 2631  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Vertical whole-body vibrations recorded at the driver-seat interface on skidders were analyzed by using a "fourth power" procedure for predicting the discomfort and the degradation in health caused by the motions. The root-mean-square acceleration and the crest factor of the vibrations were also evaluated for eight skidder vehicles by fixing the integration period at 1 minute. For motions with large crest factor values, a relationship was found for predicting the "fourth power" vibration parameters, such as the root-mean-quad acceleration and the Vibration Dose Value from the root-mean-square acceleration and the crest factor. That relationship was found to be in good general agreemnt with the experimental results, indicating that, for the same rms level, greater discomfort would be felt with increasing peak levels. With respect to the "fourth power" procedure, it was established that for vibration exposure on skidders, the ISO 2631 evaluation procedure would underestimate the vibration dose by up to three times for comfort and as much as seven times for health, depending on the creast factor value.

Boileau, P.-E.; Turcot, D.; Scory, H.

1989-02-01

216

SURVEY OF TECHNICAL PREVENTATIVE MEASURES TO REDUCE WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION EFFECTS WHEN DESIGNING MOBILE MACHINERY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Engineering solutions to minimize the effects on operators of vibrating mobile machinery can be conveniently grouped into three areas: •Reduction of vibration at source by improvement of the quality of terrain, careful selection of vehicle or machine, correct loading, proper maintenance, etc.•Reduction of vibration transmission by incorporating suspension systems (tyres, vehicle suspensions, suspension cab and seat) between the operator and

P. Donati

2002-01-01

217

Effect of Phase on Human Responses to Vertical Whole-Body Vibration and SHOCK—ANALYTICAL Investigation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of the “phase” on human responses to vertical whole-body vibration and shock has been investigated analytically using alternative methods of predicting subjective responses (using r.m.s., VDV and various frequency weightings). Two types of phase have been investigated: the effect of the relative phase between two frequency components in the input stimulus, and the phase response of the human body. Continuous vibrations and shocks, based on half-sine and one-and-a-half-sine accelerations, each of which had two frequency components, were used as input stimuli. For the continuous vibrations, an effect of relative phase was found for the vibration dose value (VDV) when the ratio between two frequency components was three: about 12% variation in the VDV of the unweighted acceleration was possible by changing the relative phase. The effect of the phase response of the body represented by frequency weightings was most significant when the frequencies of two sinusoidal components were about 3 and 9 Hz. With shocks, the effect of relative phase was observed for all stimuli used. The variation in the r.m.s. acceleration and in the VDV caused by variations in the relative phase varied between 3 and 100%, depending on the nature of stimulus and the frequency weighting. The phase of the frequency weightings had a different effect on the r.m.s. and the VDV.

MATSUMOTO, Y.; GRIFFIN, M. J.

2002-03-01

218

Adaptive Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Planning for Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of adaptive planning on lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Forty of 66 consecutive lung SBRT patients were selected for a retrospective adaptive planning study. CBCT images acquired at each fraction were used for treatment planning. Adaptive plans were created using the same planning parameters as the original CT-based plan, with the goal to achieve comparable comformality index (CI). For each patient, 2 cumulative plans, nonadaptive plan (P{sub NON}) and adaptive plan (P{sub ADP}), were generated and compared for the following organs-at-risks (OARs): cord, esophagus, chest wall, and the lungs. Dosimetric comparison was performed between P{sub NON} and P{sub ADP} for all 40 patients. Correlations were evaluated between changes in dosimetric metrics induced by adaptive planning and potential impacting factors, including tumor-to-OAR distances (d{sub T-OAR}), initial internal target volume (ITV{sub 1}), ITV change (?ITV), and effective ITV diameter change (?d{sub ITV}). Results: 34 (85%) patients showed ITV decrease and 6 (15%) patients showed ITV increase throughout the course of lung SBRT. Percentage ITV change ranged from ?59.6% to 13.0%, with a mean (±SD) of ?21.0% (±21.4%). On average of all patients, P{sub ADP} resulted in significantly (P=0 to .045) lower values for all dosimetric metrics. ?d{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} was found to correlate with changes in dose to 5 cc (?D5cc) of esophagus (r=0.61) and dose to 30 cc (?D30cc) of chest wall (r=0.81). Stronger correlations between ?d{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} and ?D30cc of chest wall were discovered for peripheral (r=0.81) and central (r=0.84) tumors, respectively. Conclusions: Dosimetric effects of adaptive lung SBRT planning depend upon target volume changes and tumor-to-OAR distances. Adaptive lung SBRT can potentially reduce dose to adjacent OARs if patients present large tumor volume shrinkage during the treatment.

Qin, Yujiao [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Zhang, Fan [Occupational and Environmental Safety Office, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yin, Fang-Fang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai, Jing, E-mail: jing.cai@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

2013-09-01

219

Changes in apparent body orientation and sensory localization induced by vibration of postural muscles - Vibratory myesthetic illusions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human experiments are carried out which support the observation of Goodwin (1973) and Goodwin et al. (1972) that vibration of skeletal muscles can elicit illusory limb motion. These experiments extend the class of possible myesthetic illusions by showing that vibration of the appropriate muscles can produce illusory body motion in nearly any desired direction. Such illusory changes in posture occur only when visual information about body orientation is absent; these changes in apparent posture are sometimes accompanied by a slow-phase nystagmus that compensates for the direction of apparent body motion. During illusory body motion a stationary target light that is fixated will appear to move with the body at the same apparent velocity. However, this pattern of apparent body motion and conjoint visual - defined as propriogyral illusion - is suppressed if the subject is in a fully illuminated environment providing cues about true body orientation. Persuasive evidence is thus provided for the contribution of both muscle afferent and touch-pressure information to the supraspinal mechanisms that determine apparent orientation on the basis of ongoing patterns of interoceptive and exteroceptive activity.

Lackner, J. R.; Levine, M. S.

1979-01-01

220

The Impact of Lateral Electron Disequilibrium on Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer.  

E-print Network

??Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) is an effective treatment option for patients with inoperable early-stage lung cancer. SBRT uses online image-guidance technology [e.g. cone-beam CT… (more)

Disher, Brandon

2013-01-01

221

Escape conditioning and low-frequency whole-body vibration - The effects of frequency, amplitude, and controls for noise and activation.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Seven experiments are reported on low-frequency whole-body vibration and rats' escape conditioning in a modified Skinner box. In the first three studies, conditioning was observed but was independent of frequency. In experiment four, the number of escape responses was directly related to vibration amplitude. Experiment five was a control for vibration noise and noise termination; experiments six and seven studied vibration-induced activation. Noise termination did not produce conditioning. In experiment six, subjects made more responses when responding led to termination than when it did not. In experiment seven, subjects preferred a bar which terminated vibration to one which did not.

Wike, E. L.; Wike, S. S.

1972-01-01

222

Whole-body vibration exposure study in U.S. railroad locomotives--an ergonomic risk assessment.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration exposure of locomotive engineers and the vibration attenuation of seats in 22 U.S. locomotives (built between 1959 and 2000) was studied during normal revenue service and following international measurement guidelines. Triaxial vibration measurements (duration mean 155 min, range 84-383 min) on the seat and on the floor were compared. In addition to the basic vibration evaluation (aw rms), the vector sum (av), the maximum transient vibration value (MTVV/aw), the vibration dose value (VDV/(aw T1/4)), and the vibration seat effective transmissibility factor (SEAT) were calculated. The power spectral densities are also reported. The mean basic vibration level (aw rms) was for the fore-aft axis x = 0.18 m/sec2, the lateral axis y = 0.28 m/sec2, and the vertical axis z = 0.32 m/sec2. The mean vector sum was 0.59 m/sec2 (range 0.27 to 1.44). The crest factors were generally at or above 9 in the horizontal and vertical axis. The mean MTVV/aw was 5.3 (x), 5.1 (y), and 4.8 (z), and the VDV/(aw T1/4) values ranged from 1.32 to 2.3 (x-axis), 1.33 to 1.7 (y-axis), and 1.38 to 1.86 (z-axis), generally indicating high levels of shocks. The mean seat transmissibility factor (SEAT) was 1.4 (x) and 1.2 (y) and 1 (z), demonstrating a general ineffectiveness of any of the seat suspension systems. In conclusion, these data indicate that locomotive rides are characterized by relatively high shock content (acceleration peaks) of the vibration signal in all directions. Locomotive vertical and lateral vibrations are similar, which appears to be characteristic for rail vehicles compared with many road/off-road vehicles. Tested locomotive cab seats currently in use (new or old) appear inadequate to reduce potentially harmful vibration and shocks transmitted to the seated operator, and older seats particularly lack basic ergonomic features regarding adjustability and postural support. PMID:12486777

Johanning, Eckardt; Fischer, Siegfried; Christ, Eberhard; Göres, Benno; Landsbergis, Paul

2002-01-01

223

The neurophysiologic basis of the mind-body connection in dance\\/movement therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a healing art, dance\\/movement therapy is founded on the premise of the mind and body as a gestalt in which change in one of these domains produces corollary change in the other. This paper attempts to validate the efficacy of dance\\/movement therapy within the context of the mind-body paradigm. It focuses on neurophysiological factors, employing theoretical and empirical evidence.

Cynthia F. Berrol

1992-01-01

224

Effects of combined female sex hormone replacement therapy on body fat percentage and distribution  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effectiveness of hormone replacement therapy for patients with cardiovascular disease and for postmenopausal women with\\u000a associated cardiovascular risks is currently under wide investigation. Among the cardiovascular risks are those related to\\u000a body fat percentage and distribution. The present study undertook to investigate the effects of combined hormone replacement\\u000a therapy on body fat percentage and distribution in postmenopausal women. Data

Tuncay Delibasi; Dilek Berker; Yusuf Aydin; Tevfik Pinar; Mustafa Ozbek

2006-01-01

225

Skeletal effects of whole-body vibration in adult and aged mice.  

PubMed

Low-amplitude, whole-body vibration (WBV) may be anabolic for bone. Animal studies of WBV have not evaluated skeletal effects in aged animals. We exposed 75 male BALB/c mice (7 month/young-adult; 22 month/aged) to 5 weeks of daily WBV (15 min/day, 5 day/wk; 90 Hz sine wave) at acceleration amplitudes of 0 (sham), 0.3, or 1.0 g. Whole-body bone mineral content (BMC) increased with time in 7 month (p < 0.001) but not 22 month (p = 0.34) mice, independent of WBV (p = 0.60). In 7 month mice, lower-leg BMC increased with time in 0.3 and 1.0 g groups (p < 0.005) but not in the sham group (p = 0.09), indicating a positive WBV effect. In 22 month mice, there were no changes with time in lower-leg BMC (p = 0.11). WBV did not affect tibial trabecular or cortical bone structure (by microCT), dynamic indices of trabecular or cortical bone formation, trabecular osteoclast surface, or the mass of the reproductive fat pad (p > 0.05). Each of these outcomes was diminished in 7 month versus 22 month animals (p < 0.05). In summary, 5 weeks of daily exposure to low-amplitude WBV had no skeletal effects in aged male mice. The potential of WBV to enhance bone mass in age-related osteoporosis is not supported in this preclinical study. PMID:19658155

Lynch, Michelle A; Brodt, Michael D; Silva, Matthew J

2010-02-01

226

Effect of Training with Whole Body Vibration on the Sitting Balance of Stroke Patients  

PubMed Central

[Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of task-oriented training with whole body vibration (WBV) on the sitting balance of stroke patients. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 stroke patients who were randomly divided into experimental (n1=15) and control (n2=15) groups. [Methods] Subjects in both groups received general training five times per week. Subjects in the experimental group practiced an additional task-oriented training program with WBV, which was performed for 15 minutes, five times per week, for four weeks. The center of pressure (COP) path length and average velocity were used to assess subjects static sitting balance, and the Modified Functional Reach Test (MFRT) was used to assess their dynamic sitting balance. The paired t-test was performed to test the significance of differences between before and after the intervention. The independent t-test was conducted to test the significance of differences between the groups. [Results] Following the intervention, the experimental group showed a significant change in MFRT. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that task-oriented training with WBV is feasible and efficacious for stroke patients. PMID:25276025

Choi, Sung-Jin; Shin, Won-Seob; Oh, Bok-Kyun; Shim, Jae-Kwang; Bang, Dae-Hyouk

2014-01-01

227

Two way assessment of other physical work demands while measuring the whole body vibration magnitude  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Direct observation, instead of using self-administered questionnaires might give more reliable and specific information about physical work demands at the workplace. This information is of use in a population already at risk of developing low back pain (LBP) due to whole body vibration (WBV) exposure. The aims of this study are to assess the WBV exposure in an exposed population and to assess other physical work demands in two ways, by direct observation and with the use of a self-administered questionnaire. We therefore assessed the WBV magnitude and 5 WBV-related physical work demands by using the PalmTrac system and a self-administered questionnaire in a group of drivers ( N=10). The main findings are 7 out of 10 drivers are exceeding the EU action value. About 50% of the drivers under-estimated the time 'bending', 60% the time 'walking+standing' and 60% over-estimated the time when 'lifting.' We concluded that 7 drivers from this group are at risk of developing LBP and substantial differences exists for the 5 physical work demands comparing the PalmTrac method with the questionnaire. Direct observational assessment in WBV measurements yields extra information. This is useful for preventive activities necessary as drivers are exceeding the EU action value.

Tiemessen, Ivo J. H.; Hulshof, Carel T. J.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

2008-03-01

228

Osteoporosis and Other Adverse Body Composition Changes during Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoporosis and other body composition changes are important complications of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer. Bilateral orchiectomy and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment decrease bone mineral density and increase fracture risk. Other factors including diet and lifestyle may contribute to bone loss in men with prostate cancer. Estrogens play an important role in male bone metabolism. Androgen deprivation therapy

Matthew R. Smith

2002-01-01

229

A new many-body potential energy surface for HCl clusters and its application to anharmonic spectroscopy and vibration-vibration energy transfer in the HCl trimer.  

PubMed

The hydrogen bond has been studied by chemists for nearly a century. Interest in this ubiquitous bond has led to several prototypical systems emerging to studying its behavior. Hydrogen chloride clusters stand as one such example. We present here a new many-body potential energy surface for (HCl)n constructed from one-, two-, and three-body interactions. The surface is constructed from previous highly accurate, semiempirical monomer and dimer surfaces, and a new high-level ab initio permutationally invariant full-dimensional three-body potential. The new three-body potential is based on fitting roughly 52,000 three-body energies computed using coupled cluster with single, doubles, perturbative triples, and explicit correlation and the augmented correlation consistent double-? basis set. The first application, described here, is to the ring HCl trimer, for which the many-body representation is exact. The new potential describes all known stationary points of the trimer as well its dissociation to either three monomers or a monomer and a dimer. The anharmonic vibrational energies are computed for the three H-Cl stretches, using explicit three-mode coupling calculations and local-monomer calculations with Hückel-type coupling. Both methods produce frequencies within 5 cm(-1) of experiment. A wavepacket calculation based on the Hückel model and full-dimensional classical calculation are performed to study the monomer H-Cl stretch vibration-vibration transfer process in the ring HCl trimer. Somewhat surprisingly, the results of the quantum and classical calculations are virtually identical, both exhibiting coherent beating of the excitation between the three monomers. Finally, this representation of the potential is used to study properties of larger clusters, namely to compute optimized geometries of the tetramer, pentamer, and hexamer and to perform explicit four-mode coupling calculations of the tetramer's anharmonic stretch frequencies. The optimized geometries are found to be in agreement with those of previous ab initio studies and the tetramer's anharmonic frequencies are computed within 11 cm(-1) of experiment. PMID:24444294

Mancini, John S; Bowman, Joel M

2014-09-01

230

Effect of a whole-body vibration training modifying the training frequency of workouts per week in active adults.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of whole-body vibration by varying the training frequency (2 or 3 sessions per week) on the development of strength, body composition, and mechanical power. Forty-one (32 men and 9 women) recreationally active subjects (21.4 ± 3.0 years old; 172.6 ± 10.9 cm; 70.9 ± 12.3 kg) took part in the study divided in 2 experimental groups (G2 = 2 sessions per week, G3 = 3 sessions per week) and a control group (CG). The frequency of vibration (50 Hz), amplitude (4 mm), time of work (60 seconds), and time of rest (60 seconds) were constant for G2 and G3 groups. Maximum isokinetic strength, body composition, and performance in vertical jumps were evaluated at the beginning and the end of the training cycle. A statistically significant increase of isokinetic strength was observed in G2 and G3 at angular velocities of 60, 180, and 270°·s. Total fat-free mass was statistically significantly increased in G2 (0.9 ± 1.0 kg) and G3 (1.5 ± 0.7 kg). In addition, statistically significant differences between G3 and CG (1.04 ± 1.7%) (p = 0.05) were found. There were no statistically significant changes in the total fat mass, fat percentage, bone mineral content, and bone mineral density in any of the groups. Both vibration training schedules produced statistically significant improvements in isokinetic strength. The vibration magnitude of the study presented an adaptation stimulus for muscle hypertrophy. The vibration training used in this study may be valid for athletes to develop both strength and hypertrophy of the lower limbs. PMID:24832971

Martínez-Pardo, Esmeraldo; Romero-Arenas, Salvador; Martínez-Ruiz, Enrique; Rubio-Arias, Jacobo A; Alcaraz, Pedro E

2014-11-01

231

Whole-Body Vibration and Rehabilitation of Chronic Diseases: A Review of the Literature  

PubMed Central

The objectives of the study were to review the current literature and findings on the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) as a training method on performance and its ability to aid in the rehabilitation of chronic diseases (neurological, musculoskeletal or metabolic conditions). Six electronic databases were searched. The combination of the search terminology used included WBV and several neurological, musculoskeletal and metabolic conditions. Twenty six papers were found to be relevant for this review and were included for critical evaluation with regards to sample characteristics, research intervention and methodology. Most studies were conducted on patients diagnosed with neurological conditions (n = 15) while less were performed on patients suffering from musculoskeletal (n = 7) or metabolic (n = 4) disorders. Comparisons were difficult to draw on because of the different pathologies and the differences in the methodology of each study. Some of the observed methodological flaws included limitations in relation to insufficient randomisation, lack of sample homogeneity (size, age variability) and poor blinding in most studies. No consensus could be reached as to whether WBV is more effective than other interventions or no intervention at all, while the additional effects that WBV may have in relation to other interventions could not be assumed. Nevertheless, chronic WBV training seems to only improve strength in neurological patients while balance and mobility improves only in patients suffering from musculoskeletal or metabolic but not from neurological conditions. Although WBV did not prove to be more effective compared to other training methods, it can be used, in some cases, as a less fatiguing and less time-consuming method to enhance physical capabilities. Future research should focus on the effectiveness of WBV in relation to no treatment at all, and to age. Key pointsChronic WBV training seems to only improve strength in neurological patients while balance and mobility improves only in patients suffering from musculoskeletal or metabolic conditions.WBV did not prove to be more effective than other interventions, while the positive effects of WBV in relation to no intervention at all could not be established.No consensus could be reached as to which vibration type is more effective.WBV training could be used as a safe, less fatiguing and less time-consuming type of exercise for patients with neurologic conditions instead of other more demanding interventions. PMID:24149191

Chanou, Konstantina; Gerodimos, Vassilis; Karatrantou, Konstantina; Jamurtas, Athanasios

2012-01-01

232

Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Body Image Exposure for Bulimia Nervosa: A Case Example  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for bulimia nervosa (BN). However, among patients with BN, symptom improvement is more pronounced for behavioral eating symptoms (i.e., bingeing and purging) than for body image disturbance, and the persistence of body image disturbance is associated with relapse. The need for more…

Delinsky, Sherrie S.; Wilson, G. Terence

2010-01-01

233

Body proportions before and during growth hormone therapy in children with chronic renal failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Growth retardation is a common problem in children with chronic renal failure (CRF). Few published data are available on whether the normalization of height in these children during growth hormone (GH) treatment is accompanied by proportional growth of the other parts of the body. In this study, body proportions before and during GH therapy were assessed in children with severe

Laura C. G. de Graaff; Paul G. H. Mulder; Anita C. S. Hokken-Koelega

2003-01-01

234

Embodiment and embedment: integrating dance\\/movement therapy, body psychotherapy, and ecopsychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a vision of an emergent ecosomatic psychology that integrates somatic psychology's theories and practices of embodiment with ecopsychology's insights about embedment. Branches within somatic psychology, dance\\/movement therapy, and body psychotherapy have honed therapeutic practices for embodying the self, engaging in embodied relationships, and opening up to possibilities of transpersonal experiences through the body and movement. Incorporating ecopsychology's

Cheryl Amelia Burns

2011-01-01

235

Embodiment and embedment: integrating dance\\/movement therapy, body psychotherapy, and ecopsychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a vision of an emergent ecosomatic psychology that integrates somatic psychology's theories and practices of embodiment with ecopsychology's insights about embedment. Branches within somatic psychology, dance\\/movement therapy, and body psychotherapy have honed therapeutic practices for embodying the self, engaging in embodied relationships, and opening up to possibilities of transpersonal experiences through the body and movement. Incorporating ecopsychology's

Cheryl Amelia Burns

2012-01-01

236

Effects of experimental exposure to high-frequency whole-body vertical vibration on the nervous system of animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

changes in the nervous system of dogs, rabbits, and cats exposed to the acute and chronic action of whole-body vertical vibration (50 Hz, 0.8 ram, 105 dB, 4 h) were studied. In the acute experiments extensive and universal circulatory disorders developed: regional angiospasms, cerebral edema, acute swelling of ganglionic cells, vasopareses, confluent diapedetic hemorrhages into the brain and viscera. These

A. S. Mel'kumova; V. V. Russkikh

1973-01-01

237

Reporting whole-body vibration intervention studies: recommendations of the International Society of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration (WBV) is receiving increasing interest as a therapeutic modality to improve neuromuscular performance or to increase bone mass or density. In order to help improve the quality of reports about WBV treatment studies, the International Society of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions (ISMNI) invited experts in the field to provide suggestions on how the intervention should be described in such reports. The recommendations are presented here. PMID:20811143

Rauch, F; Sievanen, H; Boonen, S; Cardinale, M; Degens, H; Felsenberg, D; Roth, J; Schoenau, E; Verschueren, S; Rittweger, J

2010-09-01

238

Whole-body vibration and low back pain: a systematic, critical review of the epidemiological literature 1992–1999  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: A previous extensive review of the literature including that from the middle of 1992 concluded that whole-body vibrations\\u000a may contribute to low back pain, but that the exposure-response relationship had not been clarified. We reviewed the literature\\u000a of the past 7?years to find out: (i) whether there is evidence in the recent epidemiological literature for a causal association\\u000a between

S. Lings; C. Leboeuf-Yde

2000-01-01

239

A DECADE OF IMPROVEMENT IN WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION AND LOW BACK PAIN FOR FREIGHT CONTAINER TRACTOR DRIVERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors' study in 1983 revealed that the whole-body vibration of the tractor units of freight containers was most hazardous in the back-to-chest directions (x-axis). The allowable exposure time was considerably shorter than that for heavy duty trucks. The low back pain (LBP) among the drivers seemed to be due to the long working hours and the ergonomically unsound tractor

K. Nishiyama; K. Taoda; T. Kitahara

1998-01-01

240

Predictors of whole-body vibration exposure experienced by highway transport truck operators.  

PubMed

Whole-body-vibration (WBV) exposure levels experienced by transport truck operators were investigated to determine whether operator's exposure exceeded the 1997 International Standards Organization (ISO) 2631-1 WBV guidelines. A second purpose of the study was to determine which truck characteristics predicted the levels of WBV exposures experienced. The predictor variables selected based on previous literature and our transportation consultant group included road condition, truck type, driver experience, truck mileage and seat type. Tests were conducted on four major highways with 5 min random samples taken every 30 min of travel at speeds greater than or equal to 80 km/h (i.e. highway driving). Results indicated operators were not on average at increased risk of adverse health effects from daily exposures when compared to the ISO WBV guidelines. Significant regression models predicting the frequency-weighted RMS accelerations for the x (F((5,97)) = 8.63, p < 0.01), y (F((5,97)) = 7.74, p < 0.01), z (F((5,61)) = 9.83, p < 0.01) axes and the vector sum of the orthogonal axes (F((5,61)) = 13.89, p < 0.01) were observed. Road condition was a significant predictor (p < 0.01) of the frequency-weighted RMS accelerations for all three axes and the vector sum of the axes, as was truck type (p < 0.01) for the z-axis and vector sum. Future research should explore the effects of seasonal driving, larger vehicle age differences, greater variety of seating and suspension systems and team driving situations. PMID:15513718

Cann, Adam P; Salmoni, Alan W; Eger, Tammy R

2004-10-22

241

Whole-body vibration in underground load-haul-dump vehicles.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibrations (WBV) were measured at the seatpan of load-haul-dump (LHD) vehicles of 3.5-, 5-, 6- and 8-yard capacity at two underground mines. Twenty-two sets of measurements were made involving 11 vehicles, 8 operators and 4 work locations. In each set frequency-weighted rms and peak accelerations were measured in the x, y and z directions, as defined by the ISO (1982), during mucking, driving full, dumping and driving empty. Significant differences in rms accelerations were found between vehicle sizes and between operational tasks (less than or equal to 0.05). The smallest (3.5 yd) vehicle produced the greatest accelerations in the x and z directions. Accelerations in the x and z directions were also greater when driving full and empty than when mucking and dumping. The highest frequency-weighted rms accelerations of 2.0 to 2.8 m/s-2 were recorded in the z (longitudinal) direction. Peak accelerations ranged from 1.2 to greater than or equal to 20 m/s2, resulting in crest-factor ratios in excess of six. The exposure periods for each task were used to calculate mean daily acceleration exposures (m/s2). Of the 22 sets of measurements, 20 exceeded the International Standards Organization (ISO) six-hour daily exposure limit in the z direction of acceleration, and 9 exceeded the six-hour daily exposure limits in all three directions. Acceleration exposure ratios calculated using resultant acceleration vectors as described in ISO (1982), were found to exceed the ISO exposure limit for health or safety in all 22 cases. One-third octave band frequency analysis of the weighted signals indicated that the dominant frequencies were usually 1.6 to 3.15 Hz, except when the vehicles were idling and higher frequencies predominated. PMID:2598904

Village, J; Morrison, J B; Leong, D K

1989-10-01

242

Effects of whole body vibration training on balance in adolescents with and without Down syndrome.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to determine whether a whole body vibration training program (WBV) is able to improve static standing balance in adolescents with and without Down syndrome (DS). Thirty adolescents with DS aged 11-20 years (DSG) and 27 adolescent, age/sex matched, without DS (CG) joined the study. Participants of each group were divided into two comparable groups, those who performed WVB (in DSG: VDSG; in CG: VCG) and those who did not perform WVB (in DSG: nVDSG; in CG: nVCG). Static-standing-balance under four conditions (C1: open-eyes/fixed-foot-support; C2: closed-eyes/fixed-foot-support; C3: open-eyes/compliant-foot-support; C4: closed-eyes/compliant-foot-support) was examine, before and after a 20-week WBV training program. For balance study, Postural-Parameters (PPs), based on center of pressure (COP) oscillations (anterior/posterior and medial/lateral COP excursion and COP mean velocity), and PPs ratios among the four conditions were calculated. After WBV training, no significant differences were found in any parameter in the VCG and nVCG and neither in the nVDSG, but there was a decrease of mean values in the analyzed PPs under C4, with significant differences in medial/lateral COP excursion and COP mean velocity, and a significant decrease in the ratio C4/C1 of the mean velocity in VDSG. Therefore, WBV training had positive effects in the balance of DS adolescents although only under specific conditions, with vision and somatosensory input altered. The positive results of this study are encouraging and open a wide field of research, looking for the most efficient program for this population. PMID:23872530

Villarroya, M Adoración; González-Agüero, Alejandro; Moros, Teresa; Gómez-Trullén, Eva; Casajús, José A

2013-10-01

243

EFFECTS OF WHOLE BODY VIBRATION ON STRENGTH AND JUMPING PERFORMANCE IN VOLLEYBALL AND BEACH VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS  

PubMed Central

The primary aim of this study was to examine the effects of 6-week strength training with whole body vibration (WBV) on leg strength and jumping performance in volleyball and beach volleyball players. Twenty-three sub-elite male volleyball (VB; n=12) and beach volleyball players (BVB; n=11) aged 21.2±3.0 years were divided into two groups and subjected to 6 weeks of strength training (three one-hour sessions per week): (I) 12 players (6 VB and 6 BVB players) underwent training with WBV (30-40 Hz, 1.7-2.5 mm, 3.0-5.7 g), and (II) 11 players (6 VB and 5 BVB players) underwent traditional strength training. Squat jump (SJ) and countermovement squat jump (CMJ) measurements by the Ergo Tester contact platform and maximum leg press test (1RM) were conducted. Three-factor (2 time x 2 WBV use x 2 discipline) analysis of variance for SJ, CMJ and 1RM revealed a significant time main effect (p<0.001), a WBV use effect (p<0.001) and a discipline effect (p<0.001). Significantly greater improvements in the SJ (p<0.001) and CMJ (p<0.001) and in 1RM (p<0.001) were found in the WBV training groups than in traditional training groups. Significant 3-way interaction effects (training, WBV use, discipline kind) were also found for SJ, CMJ and 1RM (p=0.001, p<0.001, p=0.001, respectively). It can be concluded that implementation of 6-week WBV training in routine practice in volleyball and beach volleyball players increases leg strength more and leads to greater improvement in jump performance than traditional strength training, but greater improvements can be expected in beach volleyball players than in volleyball players. PMID:25187676

Zmijewski, P.; Jimenez-Olmedo, J.M.; Jové-Tossi, M.A.; Martínez-Carbonell, A.; Suárez-Llorca, C.; Andreu-Cabrera, E.

2014-01-01

244

Low-back disorders in agricultural tractor drivers exposed to whole-body vibration and postural stress.  

PubMed

The occurrence of low-back pain (LBP) was investigated in a population of 1155 tractor drivers exposed to whole-body vibration (WBV) and postural stress (response rate 91.2%) and in a control group of 220 office workers (response rate 92.2%). The subjects were questioned about several types of low-back symptom (LBP, sciatic pain, acute LBP, transient and chronic LBP) and various work- and individual-related risk factors, by using a standardized questionnaire. Vibration measurements were performed on a representative sample of the vehicles driven by the tractor drivers in the last ten years. Vibration magnitude and duration of exposure were used to calculate a vibration dose for each tractor driver. Perceived postural load was assessed in terms of frequency and/or duration of awkward postures at work. The prevalence of LBP was found to be greater in the tractor drivers than in the controls. After controlling for potential confounders by logistic modelling, low-back disorders were found to be significantly associated with both vibration dose and postural load. Back accidents and age were also significant predictors for LBP. Quantitative regression analysis indicated that vibration exposure and postural load were independent contributors to the increased risk for LBP according to a multiplicative model. The exposure levels for WBV recently recommended by a proposal of European Directive on physical agents seem to be more adequate to prevent long-term health effects on the lower back than the exposure limits suggested by the International Standard ISO 2631/1. PMID:15676973

Bovenzi, M; Betta, A

1994-08-01

245

Immediate changes in temporomandibular joint opening and pain following vibration therapy: a feasibility pilot study  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the scientific and process feasibility in an effort to direct future larger trials. Methods: Scientific Feasibility: Twelve subjects were randomly allocated to an intervention and a control group. The intervention protocol consisted of intraoral vibration therapy on the muscles of mastication bilaterally for a period of 1 minute per muscle. Process Feasibility: Several feasibility outcomes were examined including recruitment and retention rates and consent. Results: Scientific Feasibility: Large effect sizes were generated for both mouth opening and VAS in favour of the intervention group. Process Feasibility: a recruitment ratio of 2.3 respondents to 1 participant was determined, along with a retention to loss ratio of 13:1 and a consent to loss ratio of 12:0. Conclusion: Scientific Feasibility: The scientific results should be interpreted with caution due to the small sample sizes employed. The study seems to support the scientific feasibility of a future larger single treatment trial. Process Feasibility: Recruitment and retention rates and ratios seem to support future studies. Utilizing the feasibility results of the current study to direct a future larger multiple treatment trial consistent with other comparable TMD studies however is limited.

Muir, Brad; Brown, Courtney; Brown, Tara; Tatlow, Dionne; Buhay, Jeremy

2014-01-01

246

Vibration Suppression of a Helicopter Fuselage by Pendulum Absorbers : Rigid-Body Blades with Aerodynamic Excitation Force  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Currently, some kinds of helicopters use pendulum absorbers in order to reduce vibrations. Present pendulum absorbers are designed based on the antiresonance concept used in the linear theory. However, since the vibration amplitudes of the pendulum are not small, it is considered that the nonlinearity has influence on the vibration characteristics. Therefore, the best suppression cannot be attained by using the linear theory. In a helicopter, periodic forces act on the blades due to the influences of the air thrust. These periodic forces act on the blades with the frequency which is the integer multiple of the rotational speed of the rotor. Our previous study proposed a 2-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) model composed of a rotor blade and a pendulum absorber. The blade was considered as a rigid body and it was excited by giving a sinusoidal deflection at its end. The present paper proposes a 3DOF model that is more similar to the real helicopter, since the freedom of the fuselage is added and the periodic forces are applied to the blade by aerodynamic force. The vibration is analyzed considering the nonlinear characteristics. The resonance curves of rotor blades with pendulum absorbers are obtained analytically and experimentally. It is clarified that the most efficient condition is obtained when the natural frequency of the pendulum is a little bit different from the frequency of the external force. Various unique nonlinear characteristics, such as bifurcations, are also shown.

Nagasaka, Imao; Ishida, Yukio; Koyama, Takayuki; Fujimatsu, Naoki

247

Low back pain in drivers: The relative role of whole-body vibration, posture and manual materials handling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the relative role of whole-body vibration (WBV), posture and manual materials handling (MMH) as risk factors for low back pain (LBP). Using a validated questionnaire, information about health history, posture and MMH performed was obtained from 394 workers who drove vehicles as part of their job (according to seven predefined occupational groups) and 59 who did not. The intention was to reflect a wide range of exposures with the lower end of the exposure spectrum defined as that of non-manual workers who do not drive as part of their job. Based on the questionnaire responses and direct measurements of vibration exposure, personal aggregate measures of exposure were computed for each of the respondents, i.e., total vibration dose (TVD), posture score (PS) and manual handling score (MHS). Odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) for back pain were obtained from logistics regression models and log-linear backward elimination analysis was performed. The findings showed that 'combined exposure' due to posture and one or both of vibration and MMH, rather than the individual exposure to one of the three factors (WBV, posture, MMH) is the main contributor of the increased prevalence of LBP.

Okunribido, O. O.; Magnusson, M.; Pope, M. H.

2006-12-01

248

The ISO standard: Guide for the evaluation of human exposure to whole-body vibration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The international guideline is discussed in terms of safety and human tolerance. Charts for equal subjective vibration intensity, subjective judgement of equal fatigue, and severe discomfort boundaries are included.

Vongierke, H. E.

1975-01-01

249

Descriptive analysis of combine cabin vibrations and their effect on the human body  

Microsoft Academic Search

All on- and off-road vehicles are exposed to vibrations caused by unevenness of road or soil profile, moving elements within the machine or implements. A higher prevalence of low back pain is found in drivers of off-road machinery than in other drivers. In this study, significantly higher levels of low-frequency vibrations are found in the cabin of a combine, driving

I. Hostens; H. Ramon

2003-01-01

250

[Intensity-modulated radiation therapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy for head and neck tumors: evidence-based medicine].  

PubMed

Over the last decade, there have been many technical advances in radiation therapy, such as the spread of intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, and the rise of stereotactic body radiation therapy. By allowing better dose-to-target conformation and thus better organs at risk-sparing, these techniques seem very promising, particularly in the field of head and neck tumors. The present work aims at analyzing the level of evidence and recommendation supporting the use of high-technology radiotherapy in head and neck neoplasms, by reviewing the available literature. PMID:25155467

Lapierre, A; Martin, F; Lapeyre, M

2014-10-01

251

Low-magnitude high-frequency loading, by whole-body vibration, accelerates early implant osseointegration in ovariectomized rats.  

PubMed

Osteoporosis deteriorates jaw bone quality and may compromise early implant osseointegration and early implant loading. The influence of low?magnitude, high?frequency (LMHF) vibration on peri?implant bone healing and implant integration in osteoporotic bones remains poorly understood. LMHF loading via whole?body vibration (WBV) for 8 weeks has previously been demonstrated to significantly enhance bone?to?implant contact, peri?implant bone fraction and implant mechanical properties in osteoporotic rats. In the present study, LMHF loading by WBV was performed in osteoporotic rats, with a loading duration of 4 weeks during the early stages of bone healing. The results indicated that 4?week LMHF loading by WBV partly reversed the negative effects of osteoporosis and accelerated early peri?implant osseointegration in ovariectomized rats. PMID:25270245

Liang, Yong-Qiang; Qi, Meng-Chun; Xu, Jiang; Xu, Juan; Liu, Hua-Wei; Dong, Wei; Li, Jin-Yuan; Hu, Min

2014-12-01

252

Low-magnitude high-frequency loading, by whole-body vibration, accelerates early implant osseointegration in ovariectomized rats  

PubMed Central

Osteoporosis deteriorates jaw bone quality and may compromise early implant osseointegration and early implant loading. The influence of low-magnitude, high-frequency (LMHF) vibration on peri-implant bone healing and implant integration in osteoporotic bones remains poorly understood. LMHF loading via whole-body vibration (WBV) for 8 weeks has previously been demonstrated to significantly enhance bone-to-implant contact, peri-implant bone fraction and implant mechanical properties in osteoporotic rats. In the present study, LMHF loading by WBV was performed in osteoporotic rats, with a loading duration of 4 weeks during the early stages of bone healing. The results indicated that 4-week LMHF loading by WBV partly reversed the negative effects of osteoporosis and accelerated early peri-implant osseointegration in ovariectomized rats. PMID:25270245

LIANG, YONG-QIANG; QI, MENG-CHUN; XU, JIANG; XU, JUAN; LIU, HUA-WEI; DONG, WEI; LI, JIN-YUAN; HU, MIN

2014-01-01

253

Benefits of whole-body vibration to people with COPD: a community-based efficacy trial  

PubMed Central

Background Benefits of community-based whole-body vibration (WBV) as a mode of exercise training for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have not been investigated. The low skill demand of WBV may enhance habitual sustainability to physical activity by people with COPD, provided efficacy of WBV can be established. The purpose of this trial was to compare a community-based WBV intervention with a sham WBV (SWBV) intervention and monitor exacerbations, exercise tolerance, and functional performance of the lower limbs of people with COPD. Methods Community-dwelling adults with a GOLD clinical diagnosis of COPD were recruited to the trial. This was a Phase II efficacy trial with crossover to sham intervention interspersed with two-week washout. Each six-week intervention consisted of two sessions per week of either WBV or SWBV. The interventions were completed in the home of each participant under supervision. The outcome measures were selected psychological (perceived dyspnoea) and physiological (heart rate and oxygen saturation) responses to exercise, simulated activities of daily living (timed-up-and got test and 5-chair stands test), and selected kinematic variables of gait across the 14-week trial. Results Sixteen adults with stable COPD were recruited to the trial. No exacerbations were reported during the WBV or SWBV interventions. After WBV, performance of activities of daily living (ADLs) and gait improved (p???0.05), while there was no change after SWBV (p?>?0.05). Despite five withdrawals during the washout period, a 100% compliance to each six-week intervention was noted. Conclusions Results showed that WBV did not exacerbate symptoms of COPD that can be associated with physical inactivity. The WBV intervention improved tests to simulate ADLs such as rising from a chair, turning, and walking gait with greater effect than a SWBV intervention. If a placebo effect was systemic to the WBV intervention, the effect was negligible. As a standalone community-based intervention, WBV was an efficacious mode of exercise training for people with stable COPD that did not negatively effect exercise tolerance or exacerbate the disease, while concurrently improving functional performance of the lower limbs. Trial registration Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000508875. PMID:24606997

2014-01-01

254

Combination of stereotactic ablative body radiation with targeted therapies.  

PubMed

Recent advances allow safe and effective delivery of ablative doses of radiation with stereotactic precision to tumours, resulting in very high levels of tumour control. Parallel advances in the understanding of tumour biology enable delivery of systemic drugs that selectively antagonise biological pathways in the tumour and surrounding microenvironment. Data is emerging that these treatments have synergistic effects that might further increase therapeutic efficacy, and they are therefore being increasingly used in combination, primarily in metastatic or recurrent disease. In this Review we summarise the biological rationale and clinical data for both sterotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and targeted therapies, and the emerging experience with combination of these treatments. We describe potential pathways of cooperation in both tumour and normal tissue between SABR and targeted drugs, and, because fatal toxicities have been reported, we outline clinical precautions. PMID:25186046

Zeng, Jing; Baik, Christina; Bhatia, Shailender; Mayr, Nina; Rengan, Ramesh

2014-09-01

255

Phase I feasibility trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy for primary hepatocellular carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is increasing in incidence and the majority of patients are not candidates for radical therapies.\\u000a Therefore, interest in minimally invasive therapies in growing.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A Phase I dose escalation trial was conducted at Indiana University to determine the feasibility and toxicity of stereotactic\\u000a body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary HCC. Eligible patients had Child-Turcotte-Pugh’s Class (CTP) A or

Higinia R. Cárdenes; Tracy R. Price; Susan M. Perkins; Mary Maluccio; P. Kwo; T. E. Breen; Mark A. Henderson; Tracey E. Schefter; Kathy Tudor; Jill Deluca; Peter A. S. Johnstone

2010-01-01

256

Effects of Whole Body Vibration and Resistance Training on Bone Mineral Density and Anthropometry in Obese Postmenopausal Women  

PubMed Central

Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of two exercise programs, whole body vibration and resistance training on bone mineral density (BMD) and anthropometry in obese postmenopausal women. Material and Methods. Eighty Egyptian obese postmenopausal women were enrolled in this study; their age ranged from 50 to 68 years. Their body mass index ranged (30–36?kg/m2). The exercise prescription consisted of whole body vibration (WBV) and resistance training. Bone mineral density (BMD) and anthropometrical parameters were measured at the beginning and at the end of the study. Changes from baseline to eight months in BMD and anthropometric parameters were investigated. Results. BMD at the greater trochanter, at ward's triangle, and at lumbar spine were significantly higher after physical training, using both WBV and resistive training. Moreover, both exercise programs were effective in BMI and waist to the hip ratio. Simple and multiple regression analyses showed significant associations between physical activity duration and BMD at all sites. The highest values of R2 were found for the models incorporating WBV plus BMI. Conclusion. The study suggests that both types of exercise modalities had a similar positive effect on BMD at all sites in obese postmenopausal women. Significant association was noted between physical activity and anthropometric variables and BMD measures at all sites. PMID:25136473

Zaki, Moushira Erfan

2014-01-01

257

EMG and Heart Rate Responses Decline within 5 Days of Daily Whole-Body Vibration Training with Squatting  

PubMed Central

In this study, we examined the acute effects of a 5-day daily whole-body vibration (WBV) training on electromyography (EMG) responses of the m. rectus femoris and m. gastrocnemius lateralis, heart rate (HR, continuously recorded), and blood lactate levels. The purpose of the study was to investigate the adaptation of muscle activity, heart rate and blood lactate levels during 5 days of daily training. Two groups of healthy male subjects performed either squat exercises with vibration at 20 Hz on a side alternating platform (SE+V, n?=?20, age ?=?31.9±7.5 yrs., height ?=?178.8±6.2 cm, body mass ?=?79.2±11.4 kg) or squat exercises alone (SE, n?=?21, age ?=?28.4±7.3 years, height ?=?178.9±7.4 cm, body mass ?=?77.2±9.7 kg). On training day 1, EMG amplitudes of the m. rectus femoris were significantly higher (P<0.05) during SE+V than during SE. However, this difference was no longer statistically significant on training days 3 and 5. The heart rate (HR) response was significantly higher (P<0.05) during SE+V than during SE on all training days, but showed a constant decline throughout the training days. On training day 1, blood lactate increased significantly more after SE+V than after SE (P<0.05). On the following training days, this difference became much smaller but remained significantly different. The specific physiological responses to WBV were largest on the initial training day and most of them declined during subsequent training days, showing a rapid neuromuscular and cardiovascular adaptation to the vibration stimulus. PMID:24905721

Rosenberger, André; Liphardt, Anna-Maria; Bargmann, Arne; Müller, Klaus; Beck, Luis; Mester, Joachim; Zange, Jochen

2014-01-01

258

The Effect of One-To-One Music Therapy On Attitudes, Behaviors, and Body Image Dissatisfaction for University Students with Body Image Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Body image, body dissatisfaction, and eating disorders are issues for which more and more people are seeking treatment. Children and adults alike are experiencing these problems in our society, and there are many aspects to body image problems and disordered eating that merit assistance. Research shows that recovery from eating disorders is possible with a variety of interventions, including therapy,

Rachel N. Dinkel

2010-01-01

259

Comparison of whole-body vibration exposures in buses: effects and interactions of bus and seat design.  

PubMed

Bus and seat design may be important for the drivers' whole-body vibration (WBV). WBV exposures in buses during actual operation were assessed. WBV attenuation performance between an air-suspension seat and a static pedestal seat in low-floor buses was compared; there were no differences in WBV attenuation between the seats. Air-suspension seat performance in a high-floor and low-floor bus was compared. Relative to the pedestal seat with its relatively static, limited travel seat suspension, the air-suspension seat with its dynamic, longer travel suspension provided little additional benefit. Relative to the measurement collected at the bus floor, the air-suspension seat amplified the WBV exposures in the high-floor bus. All WBV exposures were below European Union (EU) daily exposure action values. The EU Vibration Directive only allows the predominant axis of vibration exposure to be evaluated but a tri-axial vector sum exposure may be more representative of the actual health risks. PMID:25290555

Jonsson, Per M G; Rynell, Patrik W; Hagberg, Mats; Johnson, Peter W

2014-10-01

260

Clinical considerations for the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder with cognitive-behavioral therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although cognitive behavior therapy has been found to be very effective in the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), there still remain a number of challenges that clinicians face in the treatment of individuals with BDD. In this article, we discuss issues related to comorbid depression, suicidality, substance use disorders, personality disorders as well as the role of early life

Ulrike Buhlmann; Hannah E. Reese; Stefanie Renaud; Sabine Wilhelm

2008-01-01

261

Deconstructing the Mirror's Reflection: Narrative Therapy Groups for Women Dissatisfied with Their Body  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Women facing middle age and beyond are pressured by a cultural ideal of slimness. The authors review literature pertaining to the factors affecting the societal perceptions of body image and address relevant counseling interventions, specifically, group therapy based on narrative theory, that are aimed at this population.

Duba, Jill D.; Kindsvatter, Aaron; Priddy, Constance J.

2010-01-01

262

Descriptive analysis of combine cabin vibrations and their effect on the human body  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

All on- and off-road vehicles are exposed to vibrations caused by unevenness of road or soil profile, moving elements within the machine or implements. A higher prevalence of low back pain is found in drivers of off-road machinery than in other drivers. In this study, significantly higher levels of low-frequency vibrations are found in the cabin of a combine, driving at high speed (20 km/h) on a concrete surface, compared to driving slower on field road. Comfort values indicate that injury can result from long-term driving on the field as well as on a concrete road. As seats with suspension systems are the main transmission paths of vibration towards the spine of the driver, their vibration attenuating characteristics play an important role in comfort assessment. The resonant frequency of seats with passive suspension system, used in agricultural machinery, lies in the low-frequency range most excited in agricultural machinery. A seat with air suspension is found to attenuate better frequencies above 4 Hz and provide more comfort to the driver than a seat with a mechanical suspension.

Hostens, I.; Ramon, H.

2003-09-01

263

Prevalence and pattern of occupational exposure to whole body vibration in Great Britain: findings from a national survey  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES—To estimate the number of workers in Great Britain with significant occupational exposure to whole body vibration (WBV) and to identify the common sources of exposure and the occupations and industries where such exposures arise.?METHODS—A postal questionnaire was posted to a random community sample of 22 194 men and women of working age. Among other things, the questionnaire asked about exposure to WBV in the past week, including occupational and common non-occupational sources. Responses were assessed by occupation and industry, and national prevalence estimates were derived from census information. Estimates were also made of the average estimated daily personal dose of vibration (eVDV).?RESULTS—From the 12 907 responses it was estimated that 7.2 million men and 1.8 million women in Great Britain are exposed to WBV at work in a 1 week period if the occupational use of cars, vans, buses, trains, and motor cycles is included within the definition of exposure. The eVDV of >374 000 men and 9000 women was estimated to exceed a proposed British Standard action level of 15 ms-1.75. Occupations in which the estimated exposures most often exceeded 15 ms-1.75 included forklift truck and mechanical truck drivers, farm owners and managers, farm workers, and drivers of road goods vehicles. These occupations also contributed the largest estimated numbers of workers in Great Britain with such levels of exposure. The highest estimated median occupational eVDVs were found in forklift truck drivers, drivers of road goods vehicles, bus and coach drivers, and technical and wholesale sales representatives, among whom a greater contribution to total dose was received from occupational exposures than from non-occupational ones; but in many other occupations the reverse applied. The most common sources of occupational exposure to WBV are cars, vans, forklift trucks, lorries, tractors, buses, and loaders.?CONCLUSIONS—Exposure to whole body vibration is common, but only a small proportion of exposures exceed the action level proposed in British standards, and in many occupations, non-occupational sources are more important than those at work. The commonest occupational sources of WBV and occupations with particularly high exposures have been identified, providing a basis for targeting future control activities.???Keywords: whole body vibration; population; prevalence; exposure PMID:10810108

Palmer, K.; Griffin, M.; Bendall, H.; Pannett, B.; Coggon, D.

2000-01-01

264

Efficacy and feasibility of a combination of body awareness therapy and qigong in patients with fibromyalgia: a pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate the effects of body awareness therapy combined with qigong for patients with fibromyalgia. Design: A controlled randomized pilot study. Subjects: Thirty-six female patients with fibromyalgia were randomized to either qigong plus body awareness therapy (n = 19) or a control group (n = 17). Methods: The programme was conducted once a week over a period of 3

Kaisa Mannerkorpi; Maudh Arndorw

2004-01-01

265

Evaluation of a six-week whole-body vibration intervention on neuromuscular performance in older adults.  

PubMed

Perchthaler, D, Grau, S, and Hein, T. Evaluation of a 6-week whole-body vibration intervention on neuromuscular performance in older adults. J Strength Cond Res 29(1): 86-95, 2015-Research in the field of whole-body vibration (WBV) for the enhancement of neuromuscular performance is becoming increasingly popular. However, additional understanding of optimal WBV training protocols is still necessary to develop optimal and effective training and prevention concepts, especially for elderly people. The intention of this study was to evaluate a 6-week WBV intervention program based on optimal vibration loads adapted from the literature on lower-limb strength parameters and performance, as well as on perceived exertion according to a subjective rating. A total of 21 older adults were allocated randomly into either a WBV training or control group (CO). Before and after the intervention period, jump height was measured during a countermovement jump. In addition, isolated isokinetic maximal knee extension and flexion strength, mean power, and work were recorded using a motor-driven dynamometer. Borg's scale for rating of perceived exertion was used to evaluate the intensity of WBV exercises within each training session. After the intervention period, jump height increased by 18.55% (p < 0.001) in the WBV group, whereas values of the CO remained unchanged. There were no statistically significant differences in isokinetic maximal strength, mean power, or work values in knee extension or flexion (all p > 0.05). Finally, the subjective perceived exertion of the WBV exercises and respective training parameters ranged between moderate rating levels of 7 and 13 of Borg's scale. Our data show that WBV is a feasible and safe training program for elderly people to increase multijoint strength performance of the lower limbs during a countermovement jump. This could help to determine the potential of WBV programs in training of the elderly to prevent age-related reduction of neuromuscular performance. PMID:25028997

Perchthaler, Dennis; Grau, Stefan; Hein, Tobias

2015-01-01

266

Numerical assessment of fore-and-aft suspension performance to reduce whole-body vibration of wheel loader drivers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While driving off-road vehicles, operators are exposed to whole-body vibration acting in the fore-and-aft direction. Seat manufacturers supply products equipped with fore-and-aft suspension but only a few studies report on their performance. This work proposes a computational approach to design fore-and-aft suspensions for wheel loader seats. Field tests were conducted in a quarry to analyse the nature of vibration to which the driver was exposed. Typical input signals were recorded to be reproduced in the laboratory. Technical specifications are defined for the suspension. In order to evaluate the suspension vibration attenuation performance, a model of a sitting human body was developed and coupled to a seat model. The seat model combines the models of each suspension component. A linear two-degree-of-freedom model is used to describe the dynamic behaviour of the sitting driver. Model parameters are identified by fitting the computed apparent mass frequency response functions to the measured values. Model extensions are proposed to investigate postural effects involving variations in hands and feet positions and interaction of the driver's back with the backrest. Suspension design parameters are firstly optimized by computing the seat/man model response to sinusoidal acceleration. Four criteria including transmissibility, interaction force between the driver's back and the backrest and relative maximal displacement of the suspension are computed. A new suspension design with optimized features is proposed. Its performance is checked from calculations of the response of the seat/man model subjected to acceleration measured on the wheel loader during real work conditions. On the basis of the computed values of the SEAT factors, it is found possible to design a suspension that would increase the attenuation provided by the seat by a factor of two.

Fleury, Gérard; Mistrot, Pierre

2006-12-01

267

Occupational exposure to whole-body vibration: unfavourable effects due to the use of old earth-moving machinery in mine reclamation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long-term exposure to high levels of whole-body vibration (WBV) is associated with an increased risk of low back pain (LBP), particularly for the drivers of off-road vehicles. Based on the results of an extensive vibration survey carried out in the mine reclamation sites of the Geo-Mineral Park of Sardinia, this article analyses the effect produced by the use of old

Valentina Dentoni; Giorgio Massacci

2012-01-01

268

Psychophysical relationships characterizing human response to whole-body sinusoidal vertical vibration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental investigation determined that the psychophysical relationships between subjective discomfort evaluations to vibratory stimuli and subjective evaluations of the intensity of vibratory stimuli can be expressed in a linear fashion. Furthermore, significant differences were found to exist between discomfort and intensity subjective response for several but not all discrete frequencies investigated. The implication of these results is that ride quality criteria based upon subjective evaluation of vibration intensity should be applied cautiously in the development of criteria for human comfort.

Leatherwood, J. D.; Dempsey, T. K.

1976-01-01

269

The Metabolic Syndrome and Mind-Body Therapies: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

The metabolic syndrome, affecting a substantial and increasing percentage of the worldwide population, is comprised of a cluster of symptoms associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other chronic conditions. Mind-body modalities based on Eastern philosophy, such as yoga, tai chi, qigong, and meditation, have become increasingly popular worldwide. These complementary therapies have many reported benefits for improving symptoms and physiological measures associated with the metabolic syndrome. However, clinical trial data concerning the effectiveness of these practices on the syndrome as a whole have not been evaluated using a systematic and synthesizing approach. A systematic review was conducted to critically evaluate the data from clinical trials examining the efficacy of mind-body therapies as supportive care modalities for management of the metabolic syndrome. Three clinical trials addressing the use of mind-body therapies for management of the metabolic syndrome were identified. Findings from the studies reviewed support the potential clinical effectiveness of mind-body practices in improving indices of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:21773016

Anderson, Joel G.; Taylor, Ann Gill

2011-01-01

270

Cognitive-Behavioral Body-Image Therapy: Extended Evidence of the Efficacy of a Self-Directed Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scientific investigations support the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in the treatment of body dissatisfaction across a range of populations. Grant and Cash (1995) used CBT with 23 extremely body-dissatisfied women and found equivalent and successful outcomes for body-image CBT administered in group therapy versus a self-directed format with only modest therapist contact. The present study compared Grant and Cash's

Thomas F. Cash; Danielle M. Lavallee

1997-01-01

271

Microcirculation of skeletal muscle adapts differently to a resistive exercise intervention with and without superimposed whole-body vibrations.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration (WBV) training is commonly practiced and may enhance peripheral blood flow. Here, we investigated muscle morphology and acute microcirculatory responses before and after a 6-week resistive exercise training intervention without (RE) or with (RVE) simultaneous whole-body vibrations (20 Hz, 6 mm peak-to-peak amplitude) in 26 healthy men in a randomized, controlled parallel-design study. Total haemoglobin (tHb) and tissue oxygenation index (TOI) were measured in gastrocnemius muscle (GM) with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Whole-body oxygen consumption (VO2 ) was measured via spirometry, and skeletal muscle morphology was determined in soleus (SOL) muscle biopsies. Our data reveal that exercise-induced muscle deoxygenation both before and after 6 weeks training was similar in RE and RVE (P = 0·76), although VO2 was 20% higher in the RVE group (P<0·001). The RVE group showed a 14%-point increase in reactive hyperaemia (P = 0·007) and a 27% increase in blood volume (P<0·01) in GM after 6 weeks of training. The number of capillaries around fibres was increased by 15% after 6 weeks training in both groups (P<0·001) with no specific effect of superimposed WBV (P = 0·61). Neither of the training regimens induced fibre hypertrophy in SOL. The present findings suggest an increased blood volume and vasodilator response in GM as an adaptation to long-term RVE, which was not observed after RE alone. We conclude that RVE training enhances vasodilation of small arterioles and possibly capillaries. This effect might be advantageous for muscle thermoregulation and the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to exercising muscle and removal of carbon dioxide and metabolites. PMID:25041226

Beijer, Asa; Degens, Hans; Weber, Tobias; Rosenberger, André; Gehlert, Sebastian; Herrera, Frankyn; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias; Zange, Jochen; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rittweger, Jörn

2014-07-21

272

Stereotactic body radiation therapy: the report of AAPM Task Group 101.  

PubMed

Task Group 101 of the AAPM has prepared this report for medical physicists, clinicians, and therapists in order to outline the best practice guidelines for the external-beam radiation therapy technique referred to as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The task group report includes a review of the literature to identify reported clinical findings and expected outcomes for this treatment modality. Information is provided for establishing a SBRT program, including protocols, equipment, resources, and QA procedures. Additionally, suggestions for developing consistent documentation for prescribing, reporting, and recording SBRT treatment delivery is provided. PMID:20879569

Benedict, Stanley H; Yenice, Kamil M; Followill, David; Galvin, James M; Hinson, William; Kavanagh, Brian; Keall, Paul; Lovelock, Michael; Meeks, Sanford; Papiez, Lech; Purdie, Thomas; Sadagopan, Ramaswamy; Schell, Michael C; Salter, Bill; Schlesinger, David J; Shiu, Almon S; Solberg, Timothy; Song, Danny Y; Stieber, Volker; Timmerman, Robert; Tomé, Wolfgang A; Verellen, Dirk; Wang, Lu; Yin, Fang-Fang

2010-08-01

273

Addition of synchronous whole-body vibration to body mass resistive exercise causes little or no effects on muscle damage and inflammation.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to determine if a moderate intensity whole-body vibration (WBV) body mass resistive exercise session causes additional muscle damage, soreness, and inflammation compared with the same exercise session without vibration (NoV). Ten recreationally active male university students completed 2 separate 24-hour study periods incorporating an exercise session with WBV or NoV. Muscle torque was measured (at 0, 60, and 240°·s-1 angular velocities), soreness (10-point scale) in the upper (UE [triceps]) and lower (LE [quadriceps]) extremities, and muscle inflammation markers (interleukin [IL]-1?, IL-6, IL-10) were measured at 4 time points (preexercise, immediately postexercise, 4 hours post, and 24 hours post). Diet was controlled. Compared with NoV, WBV increased (p < 0.01) muscle soreness at 24 hours postexercise in both the UE (2.2 ± 1.7 vs. 0.6 ± 0.9) and LE (2.0 ± 1.5 vs. 0.7 ± 0.7). Muscle torque was decreased immediately postexercise (p < 0.05) in the UE and LE at 0°·s and in the UE at 240°·s, but there was no difference between exercise treatments. The exercise session caused significant but small increases in IL-1? and IL-6 but with no differences between exercise treatments. Interleukin-10 was increased with WBV (2.9 ± 2.0 to 3.6 ± 1.9 pg·ml-1; p < 0.03). These data suggest that the addition of WBV to exercise has little effect on muscle function and damage, soreness, or inflammation. PMID:23615482

Hazell, Tom J; Olver, T Dylan; Hamilton, Craig D; Lemon, Peter W R

2014-01-01

274

Reducing whole-body vibration and musculoskeletal injury with a new car seat design  

Microsoft Academic Search

significantly decreased 31.6% (p5 0.01) and 19.8% (p5 0.05), respectively, by using the WO-BPS posture. At the same time, vibration dose values significantly decreased along the z-axis of the lumbar spine and ITs by 43.0% (p5 0.05) and 34.5% (p5 0.01). This reduction in WBV allows more sustained driving than permitted by conventional seating devices, by several hours, before sustaining

M. MAKHSOUS; R. HENDRIX; Z. CROWTHERk; E. NAMyy; F. LINyz

2005-01-01

275

Developing, Maintaining, and Using a Body of Knowledge for the Massage Therapy Profession  

PubMed Central

Background: The diverse field of massage therapy has lacked a formal body of knowledge to serve as a practice and educational foundation and to guide future development. This deficit has hampered the growth of the profession and its acceptance and recognition by the medical and allied health care community. Purpose: To provide massage therapists, bodyworkers, physicians, educators, and associated allied health care professionals in the United States with a description of the purpose and development of the massage therapy body of knowledge (MTBOK) and recommendations for its future development and utilization. Methods: Professional groups in the massage therapy community came together and established a task force to develop a body of knowledge for the profession. Five groups became the stewards for this effort. A nationwide search produced a task force of eight volunteers from diverse areas of the profession charged with the responsibility of researching and developing the MTBOK document. Review of documents, curricula, state laws and regulations, certification exam content, interviews, and public comment resulted in the development of the MTBOK. During development multiple opportunities for comment and discussion by stakeholders (public) were provided in an effort to create a professional consensus. Results: The resulting MTBOK document establishes professional descriptions of the field; scope of practice; knowledge, skills, and abilities for entry-level massage therapists; and definitions for terminology to insure standardization, in order to provide a foundation for future discussion and growth. Conclusions: The MTBOK fulfills the goal for which it was developed, to serve as a foundation for the growth and development of the massage therapy profession as a whole. A living document, it should continue to evolve and grow with the profession. Maintenance and continued stewardship of this document by the massage therapy community is vital for continued professional progress. PMID:22016755

Sefton, JoEllen M.; Shea, Michael; Hines, Chip

2011-01-01

276

Vehicle design influences whole body vibration exposures: effect of the location of the front axle relative to the cab.  

PubMed

Using a repeated measure design, this study compared differences in whole body vibration (WBV) exposures among 13 drivers who drove a truck with the cab over the front axle (cab-over design) and a truck with the cab situated behind the front axle (non-cab-over design). The drivers drove both trucks over a standardized route that comprised three distinct segments: a freeway segment, a city street segment with stop-and-go driving (traffic lights), and a city street segment without traffic lights. A portable WBV data acquisition system collected tri-axial time-weighted and raw WBV data per ISO 2631-1 and 2631-5 standards. Simultaneous global positioning system (GPS) data were also collected to compare vehicle speeds. The GPS data indicated that there were no speed differences between the two vehicles. However, average and impulsive z-axis vibration levels were significantly higher for the cab-over design than for the non-cab-over design. In addition, significant WBV exposure differences between road types were found, with the freeway segments having the lowest exposures and the city street segments without traffic lights having the highest exposures. Vehicle type and the associated WBV exposures should be considered when purchasing vehicles to be used by full-time professional vehicle operators. PMID:21623531

Blood, Ryan P; Rynell, Patrik W; Johnson, Peter W

2011-06-01

277

Random Whole Body Vibration over 5 Weeks Leads to Effects Similar to Placebo: A Controlled Study in Parkinson's Disease  

PubMed Central

Background. Random whole body vibration (WBV) training leads to beneficial short-term effects in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the effect of WBV lasting several weeks is not clear. Objectives. The aim of this study was to assess a random WBV training over 5 weeks in PD. Methods. Twenty-one participants with PD were allocated to either an experimental or a placebo group matched by age, gender, and Hoehn&Yahr stage. The WBV training consisted of 5 series, 60?s each. In the placebo group, vibration was simulated. The primary outcome was the change of performance in Functional reach test (FRT), step-walk-turn task, biomechanical Gait Analysis, Timed up and go test (TUG), and one leg stance. Findings. In most of the parameters, there was no significant interaction of “time?group.” Both groups improved significantly in Gait parameters, TUG, and one leg stance. Only in the FRT [F(1,15) = 8.397; P < 0.05] and in the TUG [F(1,15) = 4.971; P < 0.05] the experimental group performed significantly better than the placebo group. Conclusions. Random WBV training over 5 weeks seems to be less effective than reported in previous studies performing short-term training. The slight improvements in the FRT and TUG are not clinically relevant. PMID:25371843

Gaßner, Heiko; Janzen, Annette; Schwirtz, Ansgar; Jansen, Petra

2014-01-01

278

Development of a Protocol for Epidemiologal Studies of Whole-Body Vibration and Musculoskeletal Disorders of the Lower Back  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It seems evident from a large number of studies that there is a positive relationship between exposure to whole body vibration (WBV) and the occurrence of low back pain. There are existing standards for evaluating the human exposure to WBV, which are based on other factors than the effect of musculoskeletal disorders. Several national and international standards also exist for evaluating human exposure to WBV. The exposure limit values or health guidance caution zones included in some of these standards are not or only to a limited extent based on systematic epidemiological investigations. It has not yet been possible to establish a clear exposure-response relationship. There are many confounding or contributing factors which influence the hazards to workers caused by exposure to WBV. Reliable methods for the detection and prevention of injury due to vibration exposure at work, alone or in combination with other risk factors, need to be implemented. The aim of this paper was to design a protocol and a questionnaire for conducting collaborative studies of WBV and musculoskeletal back disorders. The protocol will be tested in a pilot study before it will be used in multi-center studies.

Magnusson, M. L.; Pope, M. H.; Hulshof, C. T. J.; Bovenzi, M.

1998-08-01

279

A Comparative Evaluation of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) Versus Exercise Therapy (ET) for the Treatment of Body Image DisturbancePreliminary Findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) was compared to a combination of aerobic\\/anaerobic exercise therapy (ET) for the treatment of elevated levels of body image disturbance in college females. CBT consisted of a modification of the 1987 Butters and Cash procedure that was tailored for group intervention; ET consisted of weightlifting and aerobic dancing. Using a counterbalancing procedure, the same therapists conducted both

Erik Fisher; J. Kevin Thompson

1994-01-01

280

Whole body vibration exercise improves body balance and walking velocity in postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with alendronate: Galileo and Alendronate Intervention Trail (GAIT).  

PubMed

A randomized controlled trial was conducted to determine the effect of 6 months of whole body vibration (WBV) exercise on physical function in postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with alendronate. Fifty-two ambulatory postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (mean age: 74.2 years, range: 51-91 years) were randomly divided into two groups: an exercise group and a control group. A four-minute WBV exercise was performed two days per week only in the exercise group. No exercise was performed in the control group. All the women were treated with alendronate. After 6 months of the WBV exercise, the indices for flexibility, body balance, and walking velocity were significantly improved in the exercise group compared with the control group. The exercise was safe and well tolerated. The reductions in serum alkaline phosphatase and urinary cross-linked N-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen during the 6-month period were comparable between the two groups. The present study showed the benefit and safety of WBV exercise for improving physical function in postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with alendronate. PMID:22947545

Iwamoto, J; Sato, Y; Takeda, T; Matsumoto, H

2012-09-01

281

Myoelectric Response of Back Muscles to Vertical Random Whole-Body Vibration with Different Magnitudes at Different Postures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Back muscle forces contribute essentially to the whole-body vibration-induced spinal load. The electromyogram (EMG) can help to estimate these forces during whole-body vibration (WBV). Thirty-eight subjects were exposed to identical random low-frequency WBV (0·7, 1·0 and 1·4 m/s-2 r.m.s. weighted acceleration) at a relaxed, erect and bent forward postures. The acceleration of the seat and the force between the seat and the buttocks were measured. Six EMGs were derived from the right side of the m. trapezius pars descendens, m. ileocostalis lumborum pars thoracis, m. ileocostalis lumborum pars lumborum; m. longissimus thoracis pars thoracis, m. longissimus thoracis pars lumborum, and lumbar multifidus muscle. All data were filtered for anti-aliasing and sampled with 1000 Hz. Artefacts caused by the ECG in the EMG were identified and eliminated in the time domain using wavelets. The individually rectified and normalized EMGs were averaged across subjects. The EMGs without WBV exhibited characteristic patterns for the three postures examined. The coherence and transfer functions indicated characteristic myoelectric responses to random WBV with several effects of posture and WBV magnitude. A comprehensive set of transfer functions from the seat acceleration or the mean normalized input force to the mean processed EMG was presented.The results can be used for the development of more sophisticated models with a separate control of various back muscle groups. However, the EMG-force relationship under dynamic conditions needs to be examined in more detail before the results can be implemented. Since different reflex mechanisms depending on the frequency of WBV are linked with different types of active muscle fibres, various time delays between the EMG and muscle force may be necessary.

BLÜTHNER, R.; SEIDEL, H.; HINZ, B.

2002-05-01

282

Effects of combined whole-body vibration and resistance training on muscular strength and bone metabolism in postmenopausal women.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been shown to be osteogenic in animal models; however, its application in humans is not clear. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an 8-month program involving WBV plus resistance training on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone metabolism in older postmenopausal women. Fifty-five estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women were assigned to a resistance training group (R, n=22), a WBV plus resistance training group (WBVR, n=21), or a control group (CON, n=12). R and WBVR performed upper and lower body resistance exercises 3 days/week at 80% 1 Repetition Maximum (1RM). WBVR received vibration (30-40 Hz, 2-2.8 g) in three different positions preceding the resistance exercises. Daily calcium intake, bone markers (Bone alkaline phosphatase (Bone ALP); C-terminal telopeptide of Type I collagen (CTX), and BMD of the spine, dual femur, forearm, and total body (DXA) were measured at baseline and after the intervention. At baseline, there were no significant group differences in strength, BMD, or bone marker variables. After 8 months of R or WBVR, there were no significant group or time effects in Bone ALP, CTX, or total body, spine, left hip or right trochanter BMD. However, right total hip and right femoral neck BMD significantly (p<0.05) decreased in all groups. A group x time interaction (p<0.05) was detected at radius 33% BMD site, with CON slightly increasing, and WBVR slightly decreasing. R and WBVR significantly (p<0.05) increased 1RM strength for all exercises, while CON generally maintained strength. WBVR had significantly (p<0.05) greater percent increases in muscular strength than R at 4 months for lat pull down, seated row, hip abduction and hip adduction and at 8 months for lat pull down, hip abduction and hip adduction. Bone metabolism in postmenopausal women was not affected by resistance training either with or without WBV. In contrast, the addition of WBV augmented the positive effects of resistance training on muscular strength in these older women. PMID:20601282

Bemben, Debra A; Palmer, Ian J; Bemben, Michael G; Knehans, Allen W

2010-09-01

283

The development of an intervention programme to reduce whole-body vibration exposure at work induced by a change in behaviour: a study protocol  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Whole body vibration (WBV) exposure at work is common and studies found evidence that this exposure might cause low back pain (LBP). A recent review concluded there is a lack of evidence of effective strategies to reduce WBV exposure. Most research in this field is focussed on the technical implications, although changing behaviour towards WBV exposure might be promising

Ivo J. H. Tiemessen; Carel T. J. Hulshof; Monique H. W. Frings-Dresen

2007-01-01

284

City bus driving and low back pain: A study of the exposures to posture demands, manual materials handling and whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate worker exposure to posture demands, manual materials handling (MMH) and whole body vibration as risks for low back pain (LBP). Using validated questionnaire, information about driving experience, driving (sitting) posture MMH, and health history was obtained from 80 city bus drivers. Twelve drivers were observed during their service route driving (at least one

Olanrewaju O. Okunribido; Steven J. Shimbles; Marianne Magnusson; Malcolm Pope

2007-01-01

285

Neck pain combined with arm pain among professional drivers of forest machines and the association with whole-body vibration exposure  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate the existence of neck pain and arm pain among professional forest machine drivers and to find out if pain were related to their whole-body vibration (WBV) exposure. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to 529 forest machine drivers in northern Sweden and the response was 63%. Two pain groups were formed; 1) neck

B. Rehn; T. Nilsson; R. Lundström; M. Hagberg; L. Burström

2009-01-01

286

The European Vibration Directive  

Microsoft Academic Search

The European Union adopted a Directive in 2002 on minimum requirements for the health and safety of workers exposed to vibration. This is known as the Physical Agents (Vibration) Directive. It builds on existing general employers' duties to manage risks to health and safety, and introduces exposure action and limit values for both hand-arm vibration and whole-body vibration, setting minimum

Chris M. NELSON; Paul F. BRERETON

2005-01-01

287

Whole-body vibration training increases physical fitness measures without alteration of inflammatory markers in older adults.  

PubMed

This study investigated in older adults whether whole-body vibration (WBV) training results in significant increases of physical fitness measures without alterations in markers of inflammation. Sixteen volunteers completed a WBV programme 3 d.wk(-1) during 9 weeks. The programme consisted of lower and upper-body unloaded static and dynamic exercises. Training improved significantly several tests which evaluate physical fitness, such as 30-s chair stand, arm curl or chair sit and reach test. There was a significant increase in maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) between pre- and post-training conditions. Muscle power values, reached at 20, 40 and 60% MVIC, were also significantly greater after training. However, mRNA or protein levels for C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, interleukin-1?, tumour necrosis factor-? and interleukin-10 did not significantly differ from basal values. Our data confirm the usefulness of WBV training for counteracting the loss of muscle strength associated with sarcopenia in older adults and show that WBV training could be a safe training method which induces no inflammatory effects. PMID:24237186

Cristi, Carlos; Collado, Pilar S; Márquez, Sara; Garatachea, Nuria; Cuevas, María J

2014-01-01

288

Vibrational investigation of calcium-silicate cements for endodontics in simulated body fluids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Calcium-silicate MTA (Mineral Trioxide Aggregate) cements have been recently developed for oral and endodontic surgery. This study was aimed at investigating commercial (White ProRoot MTA, White and Grey MTA-Angelus) and experimental (wTC-Bi) accelerated calcium-silicate cements with regards to composition, hydration products and bioactivity upon incubation for 1-28 days at 37 °C, in Dulbecco's Phosphate Buffered Saline (DPBS). Deposits on the surface of the cements and the composition changes during incubation were investigated by micro-Raman and ATR/FT-IR spectroscopy, and pH measurements. Vibrational techniques disclosed significant differences in composition among the unhydrated cements, which significantly affected the bioactivity as well as pH, and hydration products of the cements. After one day in DPBS, all the cements were covered by a more or less homogeneous layer of B-type carbonated apatite. The experimental cement maintained a high bioactivity, only slightly lower than the other cements and appears a valid alternative to commercial cements, in view of its adequate setting time properties. The bioactivity represents an essential property to favour bone healing and makes the calcium-silicate cements the gold standard materials for root-apical endodontic surgery.

Taddei, Paola; Modena, Enrico; Tinti, Anna; Siboni, Francesco; Prati, Carlo; Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna

2011-05-01

289

Impact of antiretroviral therapy on growth, body composition and metabolism in pediatric HIV patients.  

PubMed

Highly active antiretroviral therapy improves survival and growth in children with HIV infection. However, its use can be associated with adverse changes in body composition and metabolism. Bone mineral density can be adversely affected in HIV-positive children due to nutritional compromise or certain antiretrovirals. HIV-associated lipodystrophy, consisting of redistribution of adipose tissue, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia, has also been described in children. Pediatric HIV patients may be at greater risk for these problems because of their longer potential lifetime exposure to these agents and because childhood is normally a period of rapid growth and tissue accretion. Healthcare providers for children with HIV infection must be aware of the potential complications associated with HIV antiretrovirals so that their antiviral efficacy can be balanced against their risk for side effects. In this review, we discuss the alterations in childhood growth and body composition that occur in HIV-infected children, and describe the impact of antiretroviral therapy on these outcomes. The problem of HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome in children is also discussed. Children with HIV should have their growth and body composition systematically monitored. Antiretroviral regimens should be tailored to optimize adherence and viral suppression while minimizing the potential for adverse side effects. PMID:20481647

Kim, Roy J; Rutstein, Richard M

2010-06-01

290

The relative importance of whole body vibration and occupational lifting as risk factors for low-back pain  

PubMed Central

Aims: To explore the impact of occupational exposure to whole body vibration (WBV) on low back pain (LBP) in the general population and to estimate the burden of LBP attributable to occupational WBV in comparison with that due to occupational lifting. Methods: A questionnaire including sections on WBV at work, LBP, and potential risk factors was mailed to a community sample of 22 194 men and women of working age. Sources and durations of exposure to occupational WBV were ascertained for the past week and personal vibration doses (eVDV) were estimated. Analysis was confined to subjects reporting exposures in the past week as typical of their work. Associations of LBP with eVDV, driving industrial vehicles, and occupational lifting were explored by logistic regression and attributable numbers were calculated. Results: Significant associations were found between daily lifting of weights greater than 10 kg at work and LBP, troublesome LBP (which made it difficult to put on hosiery), and sciatica (prevalence ratios 1.3 to 1.7); but the risk of these outcomes in both sexes varied little by eVDV and only weak associations were found with riding on industrial vehicles. Assuming causal associations, the numbers of cases of LBP in Britain attributable to occupational WBV were estimated to be 444 000 in men and 95 000 in women. This compared with an estimated 940 000 male cases and 370 000 female cases of LBP from occupational lifting. Conclusions: The burden of LBP in Britain from occupational exposure to WBV is smaller than that attributable to lifting at work. PMID:14504358

Palmer, K; Griffin, M; Syddall, H; Pannett, B; Cooper, C; Coggon, D

2003-01-01

291

An Updated Review of Epidemiologic Studies on the Relationship Between Exposure to Whole-Body Vibration and Low Back Pain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this paper is to update the information on the epidemiologic evidence of the adverse health effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on the spinal system by means of a review of the epidemiologic studies published between 1986 and 1996. In a systematic search of epidemiologic studies of low back pain (LBP) disorders and occupations with exposure to WBV, 37 articles were retrieved. The quality of each study was evaluated according to criteria concerning the assessment of vibration exposure, assessment of health effects, and methodology. The epidemiologic studies reaching an adequate score on each of the above mentioned criteria, were included in the final review. A meta-analysis was also conducted in order to combine the results of independent epidemiologic studies. After applying the selection criteria, 16 articles reporting the occurrence of LBP disorders in 19 WBV-exposed occupational groups, reached a sufficient score. The study design was cross-sectional for 13 occupational groups, longitudinal for 5 groups and of case-control type for one group. The main reasons for the exclusion of studies were insufficient quantitative information on WBV exposure and the lack of control groups. The findings of the selected studies and the results of the meta-analysis of both cross-sectional and cohort studies showed that occupational exposure to WBV is associated with an increased risk of LBP, sciatic pain, and degenerative changes in the spinal system, including lumbar intervertebral disc disorders. Owing to the cross-sectional design of the majority of the reviewed studies, this epidemiologic evidence is not sufficient to outline a clear exposure-response relationship between WBV exposure and LBP disorders. Upon comparing the epidemiological studies included in this review with those conducted before 1986, it is concluded that research design and the quality of exposure and health effect data in the field of WBV have improved in the last decade.

Bovenzi, M.; Hulshof, C. T. J.

1998-08-01

292

Rationale for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Oligometastatic Hormone-Naïve Prostate Cancer  

PubMed Central

Despite advances in treatment for metastatic prostate cancer, patients eventually progress to castrate-resistant disease and ultimately succumb to their cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard treatment for metastatic prostate cancer and has been shown to improve median time to progression and median survival time. Research suggests that castrate-resistant clones may be present early in the disease process prior to the initiation of ADT. These clones are not susceptible to ADT and may even flourish when androgen-responsive clones are depleted. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a safe and efficacious method of treating clinically localized prostate cancer and metastases. In patients with a limited number of metastatic sites, SBRT may have a role in eliminating castrate-resistant clones and possibly delaying progression to castrate-resistant disease. PMID:24350058

Bhattasali, Onita; Chen, Leonard N.; Tong, Michael; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T.; Krishnan, Pranay; Kalhorn, Christopher; Lynch, John H.; Suy, Simeng; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Dawson, Nancy A.; Collins, Sean P.

2013-01-01

293

A Pilot Study of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy as a Workshop Intervention for Body Dissatisfaction and Disordered Eating Attitudes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Body image dissatisfaction is a source of significant distress among non-eating-disordered women, but because it is subclinical it is generally not treated. It remains stable throughout adulthood, and has proven resistant to many prevention interventions. This study presents a pilot test of a practical alternative: a 1-day Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) workshop targeting body dissatisfaction and disordered eating attitudes.

Adria N. Pearson; Victoria M. Follette; Steven C. Hayes

294

4? Noncoplanar Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Centrally Located or Larger Lung Tumors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric improvements in stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with larger or central lung tumors using a highly noncoplanar 4? planning system. Methods and Materials: This study involved 12 patients with centrally located or larger lung tumors previously treated with 7- to 9-field static beam intensity modulated radiation therapy to 50 Gy. They were replanned using volumetric modulated arc therapy and 4? plans, in which a column generation method was used to optimize the beam orientation and the fluence map. Maximum doses to the heart, esophagus, trachea/bronchus, and spinal cord, as well as the 50% isodose volume, the lung volumes receiving 20, 10, and 5 Gy were minimized and compared against the clinical plans. A dose escalation study was performed to determine whether a higher prescription dose to the tumor would be achievable using 4? without violating dose limits set by the clinical plans. The deliverability of 4? plans was preliminarily tested. Results: Using 4? plans, the maximum heart, esophagus, trachea, bronchus and spinal cord doses were reduced by 32%, 72%, 37%, 44%, and 53% (P?.001), respectively, and R{sub 50} was reduced by more than 50%. Lung V{sub 20}, V{sub 10}, and V{sub 5} were reduced by 64%, 53%, and 32% (P?.001), respectively. The improved sparing of organs at risk was achieved while also improving planning target volume (PTV) coverage. The minimal PTV doses were increased by the 4? plans by 12% (P=.002). Consequently, escalated PTV doses of 68 to 70 Gy were achieved in all patients. Conclusions: We have shown that there is a large potential for plan quality improvement and dose escalation for patients with larger or centrally located lung tumors using noncoplanar beams with sufficient quality and quantity. Compared against the clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy and static intensity modulated radiation therapy plans, the 4? plans yielded significantly and consistently improved tumor coverage and critical organ sparing. Given the known challenges in central structure dose constraints in stereotactic body radiation therapy to the lung, 4? planning may increase efficacy and reduce toxicity.

Dong, Peng; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Long, Troy; Romeijn, Edwin [Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Low, Daniel A.; Kupelian, Patrick; Abraham, John; Yang, Yingli [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)

2013-07-01

295

Neoadjuvant Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT), Capecitabine, and Liver Transplantation for Unresectable Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

Hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a difficult malignancy to treat surgically given its anatomical location and its frequent association with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by liver transplantation in lymph node negative patients has been advanced by select liver transplant centers for treatment of patients with unresectable disease. This approach has most commonly used external beam radiotherapy combined with biliary brachytherapy and 5-FU based chemotherapy. Our center has recently embarked on a protocol utilizing stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) followed by capecitabine in lymph node negative patients until liver transplantation. We therefore retrospectively determined tolerability and pathologic response in this pilot study. Over a three year period 17 patients with unresectable hilar CCA were evaluated for treatment under this protocol. In all, 12 patients qualified for neoadjuvant therapy and were treated with SBRT (50–60 Gy, 3–5 fractions over two weeks). Following one week of rest, capecitabine was initiated at 1330 mg/m2/day and continued until liver transplantation. During neoadjuvant therapy, there were a total of 35 adverse events with cholangitis and palmar/plantar erythrodysesthesia being the most common. Capecitabine dose reductions were required on 5 occasions. Ultimately, 9 patients were listed for transplant and 6 patients received a liver transplant. Explant pathology of hilar tumors showed at least a partial treatment response in five patients with extensive tumor necrosis and fibrosis noted. Additionally, high apoptotic and low proliferative indices were measured on histological examination. Eleven transplant-related complications occurred, and one-year survival after transplant was 83%. In this pilot study, neoadjuvant therapy with SBRT, capecitabine, and liver transplantation for unresectable CCA demonstrated acceptable tolerability. Further studies will determine the overall future efficacy of this therapy. PMID:24115315

Welling, Theodore H.; Feng, Mary; Wan, Shanshan; Hwang, Sin Ye; Volk, Michael L.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Sonnenday, Christopher J.

2013-01-01

296

Predictors of whole-body vibration levels among urban taxi drivers.  

PubMed

To identify a set of important WBV predictors that could be used to develop a statistical instrument for exposure assessment in a large epidemiologic study, a total of 432 WBV measures were taken from a sample of 247 male drivers in Taipei City, Taiwan. In accordance with the ISO 2631-1 (1997) methods, we measured the frequency-weighted vertical acceleration (z-axis) over drivers' seat surface, under conditions representing different types of rides (vacant vs. short vs. long) assigned to random destinations. Mixed effect models were used to analyse the WBV data including repeated measures. For this group of urban taxi drivers regularly exposed to WBV of low intensity (mean = 0.31 ms( - 2), ranging from 0.17 to 0.55 ms( - 2) r.m.s.), our analyses indicated that average driving speed was the primary predictor (p < 0.0001). As average driving speed increased, measured vertical acceleration increased in a quadratic-linear manner (p < 0.0001). Other WBV predictors, after adjusting for the effects of other covariates, included automobile manufacturer (p = 0.02), engine size (p = 0.04), body weight (p = 0.002), age (p = 0.02), use of seat cushion (p = 0.03), and traffic period (p = 0.02). Our study suggests that a similar statistical approach could be employed in future studies to improve the quality and efficiency of WBV exposure assessment in professional drivers. PMID:12850932

Chen, J C; Chang, W R; Shih, T S; Chen, C J; Chang, W P; Dennerlein, J T; Ryan, L M; Christiani, D C

2003-09-15

297

Effects of real and sham whole-body mechanical vibration on spinal excitability at rest and during muscle contraction.  

PubMed

We examined the effects of whole-body mechanical vibration (WBV) on indices of motoneuronal excitability at rest and during muscle contraction in healthy humans. Real and sham WBV at 30?Hz had no effect on reflexes measured during muscle contraction. Real WBV at 30 and 50?Hz depressed the H-reflex ?45%. These depressions diminished across the five inter-bout rest intervals. The depression converted to 27% and 7% facilitation over the 15-min long recovery period following real WBV at 30 and 50?Hz, respectively. The depression, measured during the inter-bout rest, correlated r?=?0.48 (P?=?0.007) with the subsequent facilitation, measured during the follow-up. The depression produced by sham vs real WBV was significant but less (23%), recovered faster, and the facilitation was absent in the 15-min long follow-up period. WBV produced time-varying depression followed by facilitation of the H-reflex at rest. A lack of change in volitional wave suggests that WBV did not affect the efferent neural drive. PMID:24646403

Hortobágyi, T; Rider, P; DeVita, P

2014-12-01

298

Effect of stochastic resonance whole body vibration on functional performance in the frail elderly: A pilot study.  

PubMed

The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility and the effect size of a four-week stochastic resonance whole body vibration (SR-WBV) intervention on functional performance and strength in frail elderly individuals. Twenty-seven participants have been recruited and randomly distributed in an intervention group (IG) and a sham group (SG). Primary outcomes were feasibility objectives like recruitment, compliance and safety. Secondary outcomes were short physical performance battery (SPPB), isometric maximum voluntary contraction (IMVC) and isometric rate of force development (IRFD). The intervention was feasible and safe. Furthermore it showed significant effects (p=0.035) and medium effect size (0.43) within the IG in SPPB. SR-WBV training over four weeks with frail elderly individuals is a safe intervention method. The compliance was good and SR-WBV intervention seems to improve functional performance. Further research over a longer time frame for the strength measurements (IMVC and IRFD) is needed to detect potential intervention effects in the force measurements as well. Clinical Trial register: NTC01704976. PMID:25042993

Kessler, Jessica; Radlinger, Lorenz; Baur, Heiner; Rogan, Slavko

2014-01-01

299

Interruption or deferral of antiretroviral therapy reduces markers of bone turnover compared with continuous therapy: The SMART body composition substudy.  

PubMed

Bone mineral density (BMD) declines significantly in HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We compared the effects of intermittent versus continuous ART on markers of bone turnover in the Body Composition substudy of the Strategies for Management of AntiRetroviral Therapy (SMART) trial and determined whether early changes in markers predicted subsequent change in BMD. For 202 participants (median age 44 years, 17% female, 74% on ART) randomized to continuous or intermittent ART, plasma markers of inflammation and bone turnover were evaluated at baseline and months 4 and 12; BMD at the spine (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry [DXA] and computed tomography) and hip (DXA) was evaluated annually. Compared with the continuous ART group, mean bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (bALP), osteocalcin, procollagen type 1 N-terminal propeptide (P1NP), N-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type 1 collagen (NTX), and C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type 1 collagen (?CTX) decreased significantly in the intermittent ART group, whereas RANKL and the RANKL:osteoprotegerin (OPG) ratio increased (all p ? 0.002 at month 4 and month 12). Increases in bALP, osteocalcin, P1NP, NTX, and ?CTX at month 4 predicted decrease in hip BMD at month 12, whereas increases in RANKL and the RANKL:OPG ratio at month 4 predicted increase in hip and spine BMD at month 12. This study has shown that compared with continuous ART, interruption of ART results in a reduction in markers of bone turnover and increase in BMD at hip and spine, and that early changes in markers of bone turnover predict BMD changes at 12 months. PMID:23299909

Hoy, Jennifer; Grund, Birgit; Roediger, Mollie; Ensrud, Kristine E; Brar, Indira; Colebunders, Robert; Castro, Nathalie De; Johnson, Margaret; Sharma, Anjali; Carr, Andrew

2013-06-01

300

Whole body motion-detection tasks can yield much lower thresholds than direction-recognition tasks: implications for the role of vibration  

PubMed Central

Earlier spatial orientation studies used both motion-detection (e.g., did I move?) and direction-recognition (e.g., did I move left/right?) paradigms. The purpose of our study was to compare thresholds measured with motion-detection and direction-recognition tasks on a standard Moog motion platform to see whether a substantial fraction of the reported threshold variation might be explained by the use of different discrimination tasks in the presence of vibrations that vary with motion. Thresholds for the perception of yaw rotation about an earth-vertical axis and for interaural translation in an earth-horizontal plane were determined for four healthy subjects with standard detection and recognition paradigms. For yaw rotation two-interval detection thresholds were, on average, 56 times smaller than two-interval recognition thresholds, and for interaural translation two-interval detection thresholds were, on average, 31 times smaller than two-interval recognition thresholds. This substantive difference between recognition thresholds and detection thresholds is one of our primary findings. For motions near our measured detection threshold, we measured vibrations that matched previously established vibration thresholds. This suggests that vibrations contribute to whole body motion detection. We also recorded yaw rotation thresholds on a second motion device with lower vibration and found direction-recognition and motion-detection thresholds that were not significantly different from one another or from the direction-recognition thresholds recorded on our Moog platform. Taken together, these various findings show that yaw rotation recognition thresholds are relatively unaffected by vibration when moderate (up to ?0.08 m/s2) vibration cues are present. PMID:24068754

Chaudhuri, Shomesh E.; Karmali, Faisal

2013-01-01

301

Short-term effect of whole-body vibration training on balance, flexibility and lower limb explosive strength in elite rhythmic gymnasts.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine whether whole-body vibration (WBV) training results in short-term performance improvements in flexibility, strength and balance tests in comparison to an equivalent exercise program performed without vibration. Eleven elite rhythmic gymnasts completed a WBV trial, and a control, resistance training trial without vibration (NWBV). The vibration trial consisted of eccentric and concentric squatting exercises on a vibration platform that was turned on, whereas the NWBV involved the same training protocol with the platform turned off. Balance was assessed using the Rhythmic Weight Shift (RWS) based on the EquiTest Dynamic Posturography system; flexibility was measured using the sit & reach test, and lower limb explosive strength was evaluated using standard exercises (squat jump, counter movement jump, single leg squat). All measurements were performed before (pre) immediately after the training program (post 1), and 15 minutes after the end of the program (post 15). Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA was used with condition (WBV-NWBV) as the primary factor and time (pre, post 1, post 15) as the nested within subjects factor, followed by post-hoc pairwise comparison with Bonferroni corrections. Results confirmed the hypothesis of the superiority of WBV training, especially in the post 15 measurement, in all flexibility and strength measures, as well as in a number of balance tests. PMID:24055361

Despina, Tsopani; George, Dallas; George, Tsiganos; Sotiris, Papouliakos; Alessandra, Di Cagno; George, Korres; Maria, Riga; Stavros, Korres

2014-02-01

302

The effects of whole body vibration on bone mineral density for a person with a spinal cord injury: a case study.  

PubMed

Bone mineral density (BMD) loss is a medical concern for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Concerns related to osteoporosis have lead researchers to use various interventions to address BMD loss within this population. Whole body vibration (WBV) has been reported to improve BMD for postmenopausal women and suggested for SCI. The purpose of this case study was to identify the effects of WBV on BMD for an individual with SCI. There were three progressive phases (standing only, partial standing, and combined stand with vibration), each lasting 10 weeks. Using the least significant change calculation, significant positive changes in BMD were reported at the trunk (0.46 g/cm(2)) and spine (.093 g/cm(2)) for phase 3 only. Increases in leg lean tissue mass and reduction in total body fat were noted in all three phases. PMID:20147770

Davis, Ronald; Sanborn, Charlotte; Nichols, David; Bazett-Jones, David M; Dugan, Eric L

2010-01-01

303

An updated review of epidemiologic studies on the relationship between exposure to whole-body vibration and low back pain (1986–1997)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study is to update the information on the epidemiologic evidence of the adverse health effects of whole-body\\u000a vibration (WBV) on the spinal system by means of a review of the epidemiologic studies published between 1986 and 1997. In\\u000a a systematic search, using several databases, of epidemiologic studies of low back pain (LBP) disorders and occupations with

M. Bovenzi; C. T. J. Hulshof

1999-01-01

304

Pathological vertebral fracture after stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung metastases. Case report and literature review.  

PubMed Central

Background Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a radiation technique used in patients with oligometastatic lung disease. Lung and chest wall toxicities have been described in the patients but pathological vertebral fracture is an adverse effect no reported in patients treated with SBRT for lung metastases. Case presentation A 68-year-old woman with the diagnosis of a recurrence of a single lung metastatic nodule of urothelial carcinoma after third line of chemotherapy. The patient received a hypo-fractionated course of SBRT.A 3D-conformal multifield technique was used with six coplanar and one non-coplanar statics beams. A total dose of 48 Gy in three fractions over six days was prescribed to the 95% of the CTV. Ten months after the SBRT procedure, a CT scan showed complete response of the metastatic disease without signs of radiation pneumonitis. However, rib and vertebral bone toxicities were observed with the fracture-collapse of the 7th and 8th vertebral bodies and a fracture of the 7th and 8th left ribs. We report a unique case of pathological vertebral fracture appearing ten months after SBRT for an asymptomatic growing lung metastases of urothelial carcinoma. Conclusion Though SBRT allows for minimization of normal tissue exposure to high radiation doses SBRT tolerance for vertebral bone tissue has been poorly evaluated in patients with lung tumors. Oncologists should be alert to the potential risk of fatal bone toxicity caused by this novel treatment. We recommend BMD testing in all woman over 65 years old with clinical risk factors that could contribute to low BMD. If low BMD is demonstrated, we should carefully restrict the maximum radiation dose in the vertebral body in order to avoid intermediate or low radiation dose to the whole vertebral body. PMID:22455311

2012-01-01

305

[The labor of freight-container tractor drivers and low back pain. Correlation with whole-body vibration exposure].  

PubMed

In order to determine the causal factors of low back pain (LBP) which prevails among freight-container tractor drivers, vibration measurements of the seat of ten freight-container tractors and one heavy truck, a survey on the daily working hours of 240 tractor drivers for a month, and a time study of work on 28 person-days were conducted. Vibration measurement was made under routine conditions on paved public roads for 40 km under laden and unladen conditions. For the evaluation of vibration exposure, ISO 2631 was used. With the freight-container tractors, the mean vibration levels were high in X and Z directions, particularly in X direction. In the heavy truck, the vibration level was consistently higher in Z direction. According to the evaluation made by ISO 2631, the X component of the vibration was found to be serious. The magnitude of the vibration level was greatly influenced by the condition of the road surface with bridges tending to produce a high level of vibration. Vibration levels of the new model tractors were not necessarily always lower than that of the old models. It was estimated from the foregoing results and the time study that in more than 90% of the drivers the daily exposure time (i.e. driving hours) exceeded the allowable exposure time of fatigue-decreased proficiency boundary (FDP), and in about one-third of the drivers the allowable exposure time of exposure limit (EL) was exceeded. These results suggest that long exposure to severe vibration during work is one of the possible causal factors of LBP of freight-container drivers. PMID:2950261

Nakata, M; Nishiyama, K

1986-09-01

306

Predicting the health risks related to whole-body vibration and shock: a comparison of alternative assessment methods for high-acceleration events in vehicles.  

PubMed

In this paper, alternative assessment methods for whole-body vibration and shocks are compared by means of 70 vibration samples measured from 13 work vehicles, deliberately selected to represent periods containing shocks. Five methodologies (ISO 2631-1:1997, BS 6841:1987, ISO 2631-5:2004, DIN SPEC 45697:2012 and one specified by Gunston [2011], 'G-method') were applied to the vibration samples. In order to compare different evaluation metrics, limiting exposures were determined by calculating times to reach the upper limit thresholds given in the methods. Over 10-fold shorter times to exposure thresholds were obtained for the tri-axial VDV (BS 6841) than for the dominant r.m.s. (ISO 2631-1) when exposures were of high magnitude or contained substantial shocks. Under these exposure conditions, the sixth power approaches (ISO 2631-5, DIN SPEC, G-method) are more stringent than a fourth power VDV method. The r.m.s. method may lead to misleading outcomes especially if a lengthy measurement includes a small number of severe impacts. In conclusion, methodologies produce different evaluations of the vibration severity depending on the exposure characteristics, and the correct method must be selected. Practitioner Summary: Health risks related to whole-body vibration and high acceleration events may be predicted by means of several different methods. This study compares five such methods giving emphasis on their applicability in the presence of shocks. The results showed significant discrepancies between the risk assessments, especially for the most extreme exposures. PMID:25312024

Rantaharju, Taneli; Mansfield, Neil J; Ala-Hiiro, Jussi M; Gunston, Thomas P

2014-10-14

307

Evaluation of an occupational health intervention programme on whole?body vibration in forklift truck drivers: a controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Objectives To evaluate process and outcome of a multifaceted occupational health intervention programme on whole?body vibration (WBV) in forklift truck drivers. Methods An experimental pretest/post?test control group study design. The authors trained occupational health services (OHS) in the experimental group in the use of the programme. OHS in the control group were asked to deliver care as usual. In total, 15 OHS, 32 OHS professionals, 26 companies, and 260 forklift drivers were involved. Post?test measurements were carried out one year after the start of the programme. Results Baseline data before the start of the programme showed no difference between experimental and control group. Results of the outcome evaluation indicate a slight, although not statistically significant, reduction of WBV exposure in the experimental group (p?=?0.06). Process evaluation revealed a positive influence on company policy toward WBV, attitude and intended behaviour of forklift drivers, and a trend towards an increase in knowledge of OHS professionals and company managers. The number of observed control measures with a major impact (levelling of surface and reduction of speed) was rather low. In those cases where control measures had been taken, there was a significant reduction in WBV exposure. This limited effect of the programme might be caused by the short period of follow up and the dropout of participants. The feasibility and the usefulness of the programme within the OHS setting were rated good by the participants. Conclusions This programme to decrease WBV exposure was partially effective. Significant effects on intermediate objectives were observed. More research on the effectiveness of intervention in the field of WBV is needed. PMID:16551762

Hulshof, C T J; Verbeek, J H A M; Braam, I T J; Bovenzi, M; van Dijk, F J H

2006-01-01

308

Effect of a combination of whole-body vibration and low resistance jump training on neural adaptation.  

PubMed

This study investigated and compared the effects of an eight-week program of whole body vibration combined with counter-movement jumping (WBV + CMJ) or counter-movement jumping (CMJ) alone on players. Twenty-four men's volleyball players of league A or B were randomized to the WBV + CMJ or CMJ groups (n = 12 and 12; mean [SD] age of 21.4 [2.2] and 21.7 [2.2] y; height of 175.6 [4.6] and 177.6 [3.9] cm; and weight, 69.9 [12.8] and 70.5 [10.7] kg, respectively). The pre- and post-training values of the following measurements were compared: H-reflex, first volitional (V)-wave, rate of electromyography rise (RER) in the triceps surae and absolute rate of force development (RFD) in plantarflexion and vertical jump height. After training, the WBV + CMJ group exhibited increases in H reflexes (p = 0.029 and <0.001); V-wave (p < 0.001); RER (p = 0.003 and <0.001); jump height (p < 0.001); and RFD (p = 0.006 and <0.001). The post-training values of V wave (p = 0.006) and RFD at 0-50 (p = 0.009) and 0-200 ms (p = 0.008) in the WBV + CMJ group were greater than those in the CMJ group. This study shows that a combination of WBV and power exercise could impact neural adaptation and leads to greater fast force capacity than power exercise alone in male players. PMID:24650336

Wang, Hsing-Kuo; Un, Chi-Pang; Lin, Kwan-Hwa; Chang, En-Chung; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang; Su, Sheng-Chu

2014-01-01

309

Effect of whole-body vibration for 3 months on arterial stiffness in the middle-aged and elderly  

PubMed Central

Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a common problem of middle-aged and older adults. Increased arterial stiffness is a CVD risk factor. Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a simple and convenient exercise for middle-aged and older adults; however, there have been few studies investigating the effect of WBV on arterial stiffness. This study mainly investigated the effect of WBV on arterial stiffness in middle-aged and older adults. Methods A total of 38 (21 women and 17 men) middle-aged and elderly subjects (average age, 61.9 years) were randomly divided into the WBV group and the control group for a 3-month trial. The WBV group received an intervention of 30 Hz and 3.2 g WBV in a natural full standing posture at a sports center. The brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), a marker of systemic arterial stiffness, and blood pressure and heart rate were measured before and after the intervention. Results After 3 months, there were no significant changes in blood pressure or heart rate in both groups. However, the bilateral baPWV was significantly reduced in the WBV group (decreased by 0.65 m/second [P=0.014]; 0.63 m/second [P=0.041] in either side), but not in the control group. The comparison between the two groups was not statistically significant. Conclusion This study found that 3 months of WBV had a positive effect on arterial stiffness in middle-aged and older adults and could therefore be regarded as a supplementary exercise. Larger-scale studies are needed to confirm the effects of WBV in the future. PMID:24872684

Lai, Chung-Liang; Chen, Han-Yu; Tseng, Shiuan-Yu; Liao, Wan-Chun; Liu, Bing-Tang; Lee, Meng-Chih; Chen, Hsin-Shui

2014-01-01

310

The Fate of Mrs Robinson: Criteria for Recognition of Whole-Body Vibration Injury as AN Occupational Disease  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several recently published critical reviews conclude that there is strong epidemiological evidence for a relationship between occupational exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV), low back pain (LBP) and back disorders. Whether this exposure is only a modest or a substantial risk factor for the onset and recurrence of LBP is still a matter of debate. In spite of this controversy, four European Union countries have decided to recognize and compensate LBP and certain spinal disorders as an occupational disease. In this paper, we review the criteria currently in use for the recognition of this occupational disease. A search of the literature was performed; additional information was obtained in work visits to national occupational disease institutes in Germany, France and Belgium, in annual reports and national statistics on occupational diseases. Belgium was the first country to add WBV injury to the official list of occupational diseases (1978), followed by Germany (1993), the Netherlands (1997), and France (1999). The incidence of newly recognized cases in 1999 varied considerably: 763 in Belgium, 269 in France, 16 in Germany, and 10 reported cases in the Netherlands. The findings of this review indicate that significant differences exist in the established and applied diagnostic and exposure criteria in the four EU countries. This is illustrated by the case of Mrs Robinson, a 41-year-old forklift driver with LBP, who would probably get recognition and compensation in the Netherlands and Belgium but would be rejected in France and Germany. The development of uniform internationally accepted criteria is recommended, also from an epidemiological point of view, as many data are collected in the process of recognition of this occupational disease.

HULSHOF, C. T. J.; VAN DER LAAN, G.; BRAAM, I. T. J.; VERBEEK, J. H. A. M.

2002-05-01

311

Quality of Life After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Primary and Metastatic Liver Tumors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a high local control rate for primary and metastatic liver tumors. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of this treatment on the patient's quality of life. This is the first report of quality of life associated with liver SBRT. Methods and Materials: From October 2002 to March 2007, a total of 28 patients not suitable for other local treatments and with Karnofsky performance status of at least 80% were entered in a Phase I-II study of SBRT for liver tumors. Quality of life was a secondary end point. Two generic quality of life instruments were investigated, EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) and EuroQoL-Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-5D VAS), in addition to a disease-specific questionnaire, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ C-30). Points of measurement were directly before and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. Mean scores and SDs were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using paired-samples t-test and Student t-test. Results: The calculated EQ-5D index, EQ-5D VAS and QLQ C-30 global health status showed that mean quality of life of the patient group was not significantly influenced by treatment with SBRT; if anything, a tendency toward improvement was found. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy combines a high local control rate, by delivering a high dose per fraction, with no significant change in quality of life. Multicenter studies including larger numbers of patients are recommended and under development.

Mendez Romero, Alejandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: a.mendezromero@erasmusmc.nl; Wunderink, Wouter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Os, Rob M. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Brandwijk, Rene P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Verhoef, Cornelis; IJzermans, Jan N.M. [Department of Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

2008-04-01

312

4D VMAT, gated VMAT, and 3D VMAT for stereotactic body radiation therapy in lung  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Four-dimensional volumetric modulated arc therapy (4D VMAT) is a treatment strategy for lung cancers that aims to exploit relative target and tissue motion to improve organ at risk (OAR) sparing. The algorithm incorporates the entire patient respiratory cycle using 4D CT data into the optimization process. Resulting treatment plans synchronize the delivery of each beam aperture to a specific phase of target motion. Stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans for 4D VMAT, gated VMAT, and 3D VMAT were generated on three patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Tumour motion ranged from 1.4-3.4 cm. The dose and fractionation scheme was 48 Gy in four fractions. A B-spline transformation model registered the 4D CT images. 4D dose volume histograms (4D DVH) were calculated from total dose accumulated at the maximum exhalation. For the majority of OARs, gated VMAT achieved the most radiation sparing but treatment times were 77-148% longer than 3D VMAT. 4D VMAT plan qualities were comparable to gated VMAT, but treatment times were only 11-25% longer than 3D VMAT. 4D VMAT's improvement of healthy tissue sparing can allow for further dose escalation. Future study could potentially adapt 4D VMAT to irregular patient breathing patterns.

Chin, E.; Loewen, S. K.; Nichol, A.; Otto, K.

2013-02-01

313

The tolerance of gastrointestinal organs to stereotactic body radiation therapy: what do we know so far?  

PubMed Central

As stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for gastrointestinal (GI) gains popularity, there is a need to optimize doses and fractionation to minimize GI toxicity. GI organs that have classically developed radiation-induced toxicity include the liver & biliary system, small bowel, esophagus, and rectum. While the literature quantifies dose restrictions for these organs under standard fractionation, there is limited data regarding toxicity with the ablative dose schedules used in SBRT. We conducted a review of the literature to identify prospective and retrospective studies that detail GI toxicities when SBRT was employed. Based on the literature, the median SBRT dose for abdominal and thoracic tumors ranged from 24 to 60 Gy, at 5 to 25 Gy per fraction. The respective observed frequencies of grade 3 and 4 toxicities for the liver, biliary system, small bowel, and esophagus were variable among different studies. Typically, patients who suffered grade 3 and 4 toxicities were more likely to have had some form of systemic therapy as well. The effect of dose, fractionation, timing, and volume on GI toxicities has been described in the literature but more data is necessary to develop uniform treatment guidelines for SBRT. PMID:24982772

Thomas, Tarita O.; Hasan, Shaakir; Small, William; Herman, Joseph M.; Lock, Michael; Kim, Edward Y.; Mayr, Nina A.; Teh, Bin S.

2014-01-01

314

Changes in circulating angiogenic factors after an acute training bout before and after resistance training with or without whole-body-vibration training  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Both Resistance Exercise and Whole-Body-Vibration training are currently considered as countermeasures against microgravity-induced physiological deconditioning. Here we investigated the effects of whole-body vibration superimposed upon resistance exercise. Within this context, the present study focuses on changes in circulating angiogenic factors as indicators of skeletal muscle adaption. Methods: Twenty-six healthy male subjects (25.2 ± 4.2 yr) were included in this two-group parallel-designed study and randomly assigned to one of the training interventions: either resistance exercise (RE) or resistance vibration exercise (RVE). Participants trained 2-3 times per week for 6 weeks (completing 16 training sessions), where one session took 9 ± 1 min. Participants trained with weights on a guided barbell. The individual training load was set at 80% of their 1-Repetition-Maximum. Each training session consisted of three sets with 8 squats and 12 heel raises, following an incremental training design with regards to weight (RE and RVE) and vibration frequency (RVE only). The vibration frequency was increased from 20 Hz in the first week till 40 Hz during the last two weeks with 5-Hz weekly increments. At the first and 16 ^{th} training session, six blood samples (pre training and 2 min, 5 min, 15 min, 35 min and 75 min post training) were taken. Circulating levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Endostatin and Matrix Metalloproteinases -2 and -9 (MMPs) were determined in serum using Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assays. Results: MMP-2 levels increased by 7.0% (SE = 2.7%, P < 0.001) within two minutes after the exercise bout and then decreased to 5.7% below baseline (SE = 2.4%, P < 0.001) between 15 and 75 minutes post exercise. This response was comparable before and after the training programs (P = 0.70) and also between the two intervention groups (P = 0.42). Preliminary analyses indicate that a similar pattern applies to circulating MMP-9, VEGF and Endostatin levels. Conclusion: The present findings suggest 1) that resistance exercise, both with and without superimposed vibration, leads to a transient rise in circulating angiogenic factors, 2) which is not altered after a period of resistance exercise with or without vibration.

Beijer, Åsa; Degens, Hans; May, Francisca; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rittweger, Joern; Rosenberger, Andre

2012-07-01

315

Exemestane after tamoxifen as adjuvant hormonal therapy in postmenopausal women with breast cancer: effects on body composition and lipids  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent studies have shown that administering the aromatase inhibitor exemestane after 2–3 years of tamoxifen therapy significantly improves disease-free survival in postmenopausal women with primary breast cancer in comparison with standard 5-year tamoxifen treatment. Although many of the adverse effects associated with exemestane and tamoxifen have been analysed, there are no comparative data concerning body weight and body composition. The

G Francini; R Petrioli; A Montagnani; A Cadirni; S Campagna; E Francini; S Gonnelli

2006-01-01

316

Robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver-limited malignant tumors  

PubMed Central

Introduction Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is rapidly gaining favor as a new treatment modality for malignant liver tumors. Most of the studies have recruited patients with disseminated disease originating from the liver. This study focuses on disease limited to the liver. Aim To perform a retrospective analysis of all patients with liver tumors treated by robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy in a single center. Material and methods The study included 13 patients with 22 lesions. The inclusion criteria were: patients with 1–4 inoperable liver lesions and absence of any extrahepatic disease. All but 3 patients received 3 fractions delivered by the Cyberknife system of a total of 45 grey (Gy). The other 3 patients received 30 Gy. Results The median follow-up time was 10.8 months (range: 7–16). The median dose was 41.5 Gy (range: 30–45). One lesion regressed (8%). In 5 patients, the disease was locally stabilized (38%), and in 7 other patients progression occurred (54%). Twelve patients (92%) are still alive, and 1 patient (8%) died. In 1 patient a new cancer (leukemia) was diagnosed. Conclusions The SBRT is well tolerated and effective for local control of most liver malignant tumors. It appears that SBRT is best suited for those patients in whom systemic recurrence can be controlled by chemotherapy. Further studies are mandatory to elucidate these effects on tumors of varying histology and to elaborate upon criteria used to select patients who can benefit most from this treatment.

Sobocki, Jacek; P?dziwiatr, Katarzyna; Skrocki, Edward; Piotrkowicz, Norbert; Tyc-Szczepaniak, Dobromira; Korab-Chrzanowska, El?bieta; Hevelke, Piotr; Krasnod?bski, Maciej; Koszewski, Waldemar

2014-01-01

317

Earth moving machine whole-body vibration and the contribution of Sub-1Hz components to ISO 2631-1 metrics.  

PubMed

Exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) is an occupational hazard for operators of industrial vehicles, such as earth-moving machines. Quantification of WBV exposure in terms of impact on health forms one aspect of the Standard ISO 2631-1 (1997). Regarding assessment of risk to health, ISO 2631-1 (1997) states that if WBV components below 1 Hz are not ;relevant nor important' then they can be excluded from the assessment. In this paper the influence of sub-1 Hz components in WBV acquired from a sample of 46 earth moving machines is evaluated in terms of their contribution to ISO 2631-1 WBV exposure dose metrics: frequency weighted r.m.s. and the vibration dose value (VDV). For the majority of machines, a high proportion of the horizontal (x- and y-axis) WBV r.m.s. and VDV values was generated by sub-1 Hz vibration components; there was a much lower proportion of the vertical (z-axis) vibration generated by such components. PMID:19672014

Mansfield, Neil J; Newell, Geraldine S; Notini, Luca

2009-08-01

318

Body electrolytes in bronchopulmonary dysplasia and the effects of diuretic therapy.  

PubMed

Body electrolytes and their regulatory hormones were studied in preterm infants who suffered from bronchopulmonary dysplasia under two groups: those who were not treated with diuretics (Group II), and those who were treated with diuretics (Group III). The values were compared with a group of matched healthy controls (Group I). Lower serum Na levels, a need of higher Na intake, and higher urinary Na concentrations and urinary specific gravity were found in Group II infants. FeNa was normal and the urinary flow rate was lower than the controls. These data suggest an inability of these infants to dilute urine. Group III infants who were treated with diuretics showed higher serum Na levels and lower urinary specific gravity than Group II infants. These values, as well as water and Na intake/output ratios, were all similar to the control values. Serum aldosterone level was highest in Group II but did not reach significance. Intracellular K concentration was not different between the groups indicating an optimum total body K balance. A significant negative correlation between serum Na and aldosterone levels was found in Group II infants, which was not noted in the controls. Significant correlations were also found between FeNa and plasma aldosterone level in the BPD groups, unlike the controls. The control group of infants showed significant positive correlation between Na balance and serum Na levels. Our results suggest that inability to dilute urine appropriately might be the reason for the BPD patients to retain body water. Water restriction and diuretic therapy therefore are reasonable therapeutic approaches in such cases. PMID:7959995

Verma, R P; John, E; Fornell, L; Vidyasagar, D

1994-01-01

319

Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis  

PubMed Central

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal Dmax of <30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal Dmean, Dmax, D1cc, D4%, and V20 Gy compared with NS plans (all p ? 0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V95% (p = 0.01) and Dmean (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p < 0.001) and the spinal cord (p < 0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p < 0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p < 0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at risk, whereas for IMRT it is compromised target coverage. These findings suggest clinical situations where each technique may be most useful if DS constraints are to be employed. PMID:23540490

Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Tryggestad, Erik; Ford, Eric; Herman, Joseph M.

2014-01-01

320

Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis  

SciTech Connect

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p?0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at risk, whereas for IMRT it is compromised target coverage. These findings suggest clinical situations where each technique may be most useful if DS constraints are to be employed.

Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Herman, Joseph M., E-mail: jherma15@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)

2013-10-01

321

Whole-body vibration improves functional capacity and quality of life in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): a pilot study  

PubMed Central

Background Exercise intolerance is a common development in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). There is little data on the use of an isolated program using vibration platform training on functional capacity in these patients, which is an area that deserves investigation. Aim To investigate the effect of training on a vibrating platform (whole-body vibration [WBV]) on functional performance and quality of life of subjects with COPD. Methods A randomized controlled crossover pilot study with eleven subjects with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]% predicted =14.63±11.14; forced vital capacity [FVC]% predicted =48.84±15.21; FEV1/FVC =47.39±11.63) underwent a 12-week WBV training program. Participants were randomized into the intervention group (IG) undergoing three sessions per week for a total of 12 weeks and control group (CG) without intervention. We evaluated the 6-minute walk test (6MWT), distance walked (DW), duration of the walk (TW), and index of perceived exertion (IPE), quality of life using St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and developed a 12-week program of training on a vibrating platform. Results The mean age was 62.91±8.82 years old (72.7% male). The DW increased at the end of training with a difference between groups of 75 m; all domains of the SGRQ improved at the end of training. The effect size Cohen’s d ranged from small to large for all the measured results. Conclusion These preliminary results suggest that WBV may potentially be a safe and feasible way to improve functional capacity in the 6MWT of patients with COPD undergoing a training program on the vibrating platform as well as in all domains of the SGRQ quality of life. However, further studies with a larger number of patients are needed to establish the long-term effect on functional capacity and quality of life in these patients. PMID:25624756

Braz Júnior, Donato S; Dornelas de Andrade, Arméle; Teixeira, Andrei S; Cavalcanti, Cléssyo A; Morais, André B; Marinho, Patrícia EM

2015-01-01

322

A whole-body pharmacokinetic model for the early assessment of targeted radionuclide therapy agents  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Early assessment of targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) agent effectiveness based on its pharmacokinetic (PK) properties could provide a means to expedite agent development or rejection. A whole-body PK model was developed that not only simplifies the complex radiation dosimetry and physiology of TRT but also provides criteria for normal tissue and tumor PK parameters that achieve effective TRT while limiting toxicity. Because biologically effective dose (BED) may be more of a relevant quantity than absorbed dose for establishing tumor response relationships, the model was expanded to include BED. The model consisted of two coupled normal body compartments and one decoupled tumor compartment. Differential equations were used to develop an equation that predicted TRT efficacy. PK scenarios were created by pairing normal body influx and efflux parameters with a range of tumor influx and efflux parameters. Each PK scenario yielded a maximum delivered tumor absorbed dose that limited the whole body dose to 2 Gy. The dose rate and repair rate were used for BED. The relationships between the tumor influx-to-efflux ratio (k34:k 43), central compartment efflux-to-influx ratio (k12:k 21), central elimination (ke1), and tumor repair rate (mu), and tumor BED were investigated. The model was used to find the PK parameters for NM404 and FLT within a xenograft model. The TCC of both Compartment 1 and tumor were fit to the equations of the model using Levenberg-Marquardt. The parameter errors were propagated into dosimetry uncertainties. Sensitivity functions were derived for each PK parameter that described the change in TCC as a result of a change in the PK parameter value at each time. Cramer-Rao Lower Bounds (CRLB) theory was used to derive optimal sampling schedules based on the sensitivity of the derived PK parameters. The experimental and optimal sampling schedules were compared by running simulations that measured the precision and accuracy of the measured PK parameters. The TRT PK model that was developed has the capability of predicting effectiveness when PK parameters are known. This work also represents a step in the direction of establishing relative PK criteria of when the BED formalism is more applicable than absorbed dose for TRT.

Grudzinski, Joseph J.

323

Critical Appraisal of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Metastases to Abdominal Lymph Nodes  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: A planning study was performed comparing volumetric modulated arcs, RapidArc (RA), fixed beam IMRT (IM), and conformal radiotherapy (CRT) with multiple static fields or short conformal arcs in a series of patients treated with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for solitary or oligo-metastases from different tumors to abdominal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients were included in the study. Dose prescription was set to 45 Gy (mean dose to clinical target volume [CTV]) in six fractions of 7.5 Gy. Objectives for CTV and planning target volume (PTV) were as follows: Dose{sub min} >95%, Dose{sub max} <107%. For organs at risk the following objectives were used: Maximum dose to spine <18 Gy; V{sub 15Gy} <35% for both kidneys, V{sub 36Gy} <1% for duodenum, V{sub 36Gy} <3% for stomach and small bowel, V{sub 15Gy} <(total liver volume - 700 cm{sup 3}) for liver. Dose-volume histograms were evaluated to assess plan quality. Results: Planning objectives on CTV and PTV were achieved by all techniques. Use of RA improved PTV coverage (V{sub 95%} = 90.2% +- 5.2% for RA compared with 82.5% +- 9.6% and 84.5% +- 8.2% for CRT and IM, respectively). Most planning objectives for organs at risk were met by all techniques except for the duodenum, small bowel, and stomach, in which the CRT plans exceeded the dose/volume constraints in some patients. The MU/fraction values were as follows: 2186 +- 211 for RA, 2583 +- 699 for IM, and 1554 +- 153 for CRT. Effective treatment time resulted as follows: 3.7 +- 0.4 min for RA, 10.6 +- 1.2 min for IM, and 6.3 +- 0.5 min for CRT. Conclusions: Delivery of SBRT by RA showed improvements in conformal avoidance with respect to standard conformal irradiation. Delivery parameters confirmed logistical advantages of RA, particularly compared with IM.

Bignardi, Mario [Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Radiation Oncology, Rozzano (Italy); Cozzi, Luca, E-mail: lucozzi@iosi.c [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Medical Physics Unit, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Fogliata, Antonella [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Medical Physics Unit, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Lattuada, Paola; Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Piera; Urso, Gaetano; Vigorito, Sabrina; Scorsetti, Marta [Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Radiation Oncology, Rozzano (Italy)

2009-12-01

324

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Primary and Metastatic Liver Tumors1  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: The full potential of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), in the treatment of unresectable intrahepatic malignancies, has yet to be realized as our experience is still limited. Thus, we evaluated SBRT outcomes for primary and metastatic liver tumors, with the goal of identifying factors that may aid in optimization of therapy. METHODS: From 2005 to 2010, 62 patients with 106 primary and metastatic liver tumors were treated with SBRT to a median biologic effective dose (BED) of 100 Gy (42.6–180). The majority of patients received either three (47%) or five fractions (48%). Median gross tumor volume (GTV) was 8.8 cm3 (0.2–222.4). RESULTS: With a median follow-up of 18 months (0.46–46.8), freedom from local progression (FFLP) was observed in 97 of 106 treated tumors, with 1- and 2-year FFLP rates of 93% and 82%. Median overall survival (OS) for all patients was 25.2 months, with 1- and 2-year OS of 81% and 52%. Neither BED nor GTV significantly predicted for FFLP. Local failure was associated with a higher risk of death [hazard ratio (HR) = 5.1, P = .0007]. One Child-Pugh Class B patient developed radiation-induced liver disease. There were no other significant toxicities. CONCLUSIONS: SBRT provides excellent local control for both primary and metastatic liver lesions with minimal toxicity. Future studies should focus on appropriate selection of patients and on careful assessment of liver function to maximize both the safety and efficacy of treatment. PMID:23908687

Liu, Erqi; Stenmark, Matthew H; Schipper, Matthew J; Balter, James M; Kessler, Marc L; Caoili, Elaine M; Lee, Oliver E; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Lawrence, Theodore S; Feng, Mary

2013-01-01

325

Voxel-Based Dose Reconstruction for Total Body Irradiation With Helical TomoTherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We have developed a megavoltage CT (MVCT)-based dose reconstruction strategy for total body irradiation (TBI) with helical TomoTherapy (HT) using a deformable registration model to account for the patient's interfraction changes. The proposed technique serves as an efficient tool for delivered dose verification and, potentially, plan adaptation. Methods and Materials: Four patients with acute myelogenous leukemia treated with TBI using HT were selected for this study. The prescription was 12 Gy, 2 Gy/fraction, twice per day, given at least 6 h apart. The original plan achieved coverage of 80% of the clinical target volume (CTV) by the 12 Gy isodose surface. MVCTs were acquired prior to each treatment. Regions of interest were contoured on each MVCT. The dose for each fraction was calculated based on the MVCT using the HT planned adaptive station. B-spline deformable registration was conducted to establish voxel-to-voxel correspondence between the MVCT and the planning CT. The resultant deformation vector was employed to map the reconstructed dose from each fraction to the same point as the plan dose, and a voxel-to-voxel summed dose from all six fractions was obtained. The reconstructed dose distribution and its dosimetric parameters were compared with those of the original treatment plan. Results: While changes in CTV contours occurred in all patients, the reconstructed dose distribution showed that the dose-volume histogram for CTV coverage was close (<1.5%) to that of the original plan. For sensitive structures, the differences between the reconstructed and the planned doses were less than 3.0%. Conclusion: Voxel-based dose reconstruction strategy that takes into account interfraction anatomical changes using MVCTs is a powerful tool for treatment verification of the delivered doses. This proposed technique can also be applied to adaptive TBI therapy using HT.

Chao Ming, E-mail: mchao@uams.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-7199 (United States); Penagaricano, Jose; Yan Yulong; Moros, Eduardo G.; Corry, Peter; Ratanatharathorn, Vaneerat [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-7199 (United States)

2012-04-01

326

Metrics of whole-body vibration and exposure–response relationship for low back pain in professional drivers: a prospective cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between alternative measures of exposure to whole-body vibration\\u000a (WBV) and low back pain (LBP) in professional drivers.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The incidence of 12-month LBP, high pain intensity (numerical rating scale score > 5), and disability in the lower back (Roland\\u000a and Morris disability scale score ? 12) was investigated in a cohort of 537 drivers over

Massimo Bovenzi

2009-01-01

327

Seven Day Insertion Rest in Whole Body Vibration Improves Multi-Level Bone Quality in Tail Suspension Rats  

PubMed Central

Objective This study aimed to investigate the effects of low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration with rest days on bone quality at multiple levels. Methods Forty-nine three-month-old male Wistar rats were randomly divided into seven groups, namely, vibrational loading for X day followed by X day rest (VLXR, X?=?1, 3, 5, 7), vibrational loading every day (VLNR), tail suspension (SPD), and baseline control (BCL). One week after tail suspension, rats were loaded by vibrational loading (35 Hz, 0.25 g, 15 min/day) except SPD and BCL. Fluorescence markers were used in all rats. Eight weeks later, femora were harvested to investigate macromechanical properties, and micro-computed tomography scanning and fluorescence test were used to evaluate microarchitecture and bone growth rate. Atomic force microscopy analyses and nanoindentation test were used to analyze the nanostructure and mechanical properties of bone material, respectively. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy was used for quantitative chemical analyses. Results Microarchitecture, mineral apposition rate and bone formation rate and macromechanical properties were improved in VL7R. Grain size and roughness were significantly different among all groups. No statistical difference was found for the mechanical properties of the bone material, and the chemical composition of all groups was almost similar. Conclusions Low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration with rest days altered bone microarchitecture and macro-biomechanical properties, and VL7R was more efficacious in improving bone loss caused by mechanical disuse, which provided theoretical basis and explored the mechanisms of vibration for improving bone quality in clinics. PMID:24637608

Zhang, Rui; Gong, He; Zhu, Dong; Gao, Jiazi; Fang, Juan; Fan, Yubo

2014-01-01

328

Cyberknife Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Nonresectable Tumors of the Liver: Preliminary Results  

PubMed Central

Purpose. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as a treatment option for local tumor control of primary and secondary malignancies of the liver. We report on our updated experience with SBRT in patients with non-resectable tumors of the liver. Methods. Our first 17 consecutive patients (mean age 58.1 years) receiving SBRT for HCC (n = 6), IHC (n = 3), and LM (n = 8) are presented. Mean radiation dose was 34Gy delivered over 1–3 fractions. Results. Treated patients had a mean decrease in maximum pretreatment tumor diameter from 6.9 ± 4.6?cm to 5.0 ± 2.1?cm at three months after treatment (P < .05). The mean total tumor volume reduction was 44% at six months (P < .05). 82% of all patients (14/17) achieved local control with a median follow-up of 8 months. 100% of patients with HCC (n = 6) achieved local control. Patients with surgically placed fiducial markers had no complications related to marker placement. Conclusion. Our preliminary results showed that SBRT is a safe and effective local treatment modality in selected patients with liver malignancies with minimal adverse events. Further studies are needed to define its role in the management of these malignancies. PMID:20689733

Goyal, K.; Einstein, D.; Yao, M.; Kunos, C.; Barton, F.; Singh, D.; Siegel, C.; Stulberg, J.; Sanabria, J.

2010-01-01

329

Stereotactic body radiation therapy for abdominal oligometastases: a biological and clinical review  

PubMed Central

Advances in imaging and biological targeting have led to the development of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) as an alternative treatment of extracranial oligometastases. New radiobiological concepts, such as ceramide-induced endothelial apoptosis after hypofractionated high-dose SBRT, and the identification of patients with oligometastatic disease by microRNA expression may yet lead to further developments. Key factors in SBRT are delivery of a high dose per fraction, proper patient positioning, target localisation, and management of breathing–related motion. Our review addresses the radiation doses and schedules used to treat liver, abdominal lymph node (LN) and adrenal gland oligometastases and treatment outcomes. Reported local control (LC) rates for liver and abdominal LN oligometastases are high (median 2-year actuarial LC: 61 -100% for liver oligometastases; 4-year actuarial LC: 68% in a study of abdominal LN oligometastases). Early toxicity is low-to-moderate; late adverse effects are rare. SBRT of adrenal gland oligometastases shows promising results in the case of isolated lesions. In conclusion, properly conducted SBRT procedures are a safe and effective treatment option for abdominal oligometastases. PMID:22852764

2012-01-01

330

Whole body correction of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA by intracerebrospinal fluid gene therapy  

PubMed Central

For most lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) affecting the CNS, there is currently no cure. The BBB, which limits the bioavailability of drugs administered systemically, and the short half-life of lysosomal enzymes, hamper the development of effective therapies. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS IIIA) is an autosomic recessive LSD caused by a deficiency in sulfamidase, a sulfatase involved in the stepwise degradation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) heparan sulfate. Here, we demonstrate that intracerebrospinal fluid (intra-CSF) administration of serotype 9 adenoassociated viral vectors (AAV9s) encoding sulfamidase corrects both CNS and somatic pathology in MPS IIIA mice. Following vector administration, enzymatic activity increased throughout the brain and in serum, leading to whole body correction of GAG accumulation and lysosomal pathology, normalization of behavioral deficits, and prolonged survival. To test this strategy in a larger animal, we treated beagle dogs using intracisternal or intracerebroventricular delivery. Administration of sulfamidase-encoding AAV9 resulted in transgenic expression throughout the CNS and liver and increased sulfamidase activity in CSF. High-titer serum antibodies against AAV9 only partially blocked CSF-mediated gene transfer to the brains of dogs. Consistently, anti-AAV antibody titers were lower in CSF than in serum collected from healthy and MPS IIIA–affected children. These results support the clinical translation of this approach for the treatment of MPS IIIA and other LSDs with CNS involvement. PMID:23863627

Haurigot, Virginia; Marcó, Sara; Ribera, Albert; Garcia, Miguel; Ruzo, Albert; Villacampa, Pilar; Ayuso, Eduard; Añor, Sònia; Andaluz, Anna; Pineda, Mercedes; García-Fructuoso, Gemma; Molas, Maria; Maggioni, Luca; Muñoz, Sergio; Motas, Sandra; Ruberte, Jesús; Mingozzi, Federico; Pumarola, Martí; Bosch, Fatima

2013-01-01

331

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Youth with Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Current Status and Future Directions  

PubMed Central

SYNOPSIS Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), a distressing or impairing preoccupation with nonexistent or slight defect(s) in appearance, usually begins during early adolescence and appears to be common in youth. BDD is characterized by substantial impairment in psychosocial functioning and markedly high rates of suicidality. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) tailored to BDD’s unique features is the best tested and most promising psychosocial treatment for adults with BDD. CBT has been used for youth with BDD, but it has not been systematically developed for or tested in this age group, and there is a pressing need for this work to be done. This article focuses on CBT for BDD in adults and youth, possible adaptations for youth, and the need for treatment research in youth. We also discuss BDD’s prevalence, clinical features, how to diagnose BDD in youth, recommended pharmacotherapy for BDD (serotonin-reuptake inhibitors), and treatments that are not recommended (surgery and other cosmetic treatments). PMID:21440856

Phillips, Katharine A.; Rogers, Jamison

2011-01-01

332

A phase I trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver metastases  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver metastases. Methods and Materials: A multicenter Phase I clinical trial was conducted. Eligible patients had one to three liver metastases, tumor diameter <6 cm, and adequate liver function. The first cohort received 36 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in three fractions (F). Subsequent cohorts received higher doses up to a chosen maximum of 60 Gy/3F. At least 700 mL of normal liver had to receive a total dose <15 Gy. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) included acute Grade 3 liver or intestinal toxicity or any acute Grade 4 toxicity. The MTD was exceeded if 2/6 patients in a cohort experienced DLT. Results: Eighteen patients were enrolled (10 male, 8 female): median age, 55 years (range, 26-83 years); most common primary site, colorectal (6 patients); median aggregate gross tumor volume, 18 ml (range, 3-98 ml). Four patients had multiple tumors. No patient experienced a DLT, and dose was escalated to 60 Gy/3F without reaching MTD. Conclusions: Biologically potent doses of SBRT are well tolerated in patients with limited liver metastases. Results of this study form the basis for an ongoing Phase II SBRT study of 60 Gy over three fractions for liver metastases.

Schefter, Tracey E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)]. E-mail: Tracey.Schefter@uchsc.edu; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Timmerman, Robert D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas-Southwestern, Dallas, TX (United States); Cardenes, Higinia R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Baron, Anna [Department of Biostatics, University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

2005-08-01

333

Interinstitutional Variations in Planning for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess interinstitutional variations in planning for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer before the start of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) 0403 trial. Methods and Materials: Eleven institutions created virtual plans for four cases of solitary lung cancer. The created plans should satisfy the target definitions and the dose constraints for the JCOG 0403 protocol. Results: FOCUS/XiO (CMS) was used in six institutions, Eclipse (Varian) in 3, Cadplan (Varian) in one, and Pinnacle3 (Philips/ADAC) in one. Dose calculation algorithms of Clarkson with effective path length correction and superposition were used in FOCUS/XiO; pencil beam convolution with Batho power law correction was used in Eclipse and Cadplan; and collapsed cone convolution superposition was used in Pinnacle3. For the target volumes, the overall coefficient of variation was 16.6%, and the interinstitutional variations were not significant. For maximal dose, minimal dose, D95, and the homogeneity index of the planning target volume, the interinstitutional variations were significant. The dose calculation algorithm was a significant factor in these variations. No violation of the dose constraints for the protocol was observed. Conclusion: There can be notable interinstitutional variations in planning for SBRT, including both interobserver variations in the estimate of target volumes as well as dose calculation effects related to the use of different dose calculation algorithms.

Matsuo, Yukinori [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Takayama, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)]. E-mail: nag@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Kunieda, Etsuo [Department of Radiology, Keio University, Tokyo (Japan); Tateoka, Kunihiko [Radiation Oncology, Imaging and Diagnosis, Molecular and Organ Regulation, Sapporo Medical University, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Ishizuka, Naoki [Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Community Health and Medicine, Research Institute, International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Mizowaki, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Norihisa, Yoshiki [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Sakamoto, Masato [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Narita, Yuichiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Ishikura, Satoshi [Radiation Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

2007-06-01

334

City bus driving and low back pain: a study of the exposures to posture demands, manual materials handling and whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate worker exposure to posture demands, manual materials handling (MMH) and whole body vibration as risks for low back pain (LBP). Using validated questionnaire, information about driving experience, driving (sitting) posture MMH, and health history was obtained from 80 city bus drivers. Twelve drivers were observed during their service route driving (at least one complete round trip) and vibration measurements were obtained at the seat and according to the recommendations of ISO 2631 (1997), for three models of bus (a mini-bus, a single-decker bus, a double-decker bus). The results showed that city bus drivers spend about 60% of the daily work time actually driving, often with the torso straight or unsupported, perform occasional and light MMH, and experience discomforting shock/jerking vibration events. Transient and mild LBP (not likely to interfere with work or customary levels of activity) was found to be prevalent among the drivers and a need for ergonomic evaluation of the drivers' seat was suggested. PMID:17225292

Okunribido, Olanrewaju O; Shimbles, Steven J; Magnusson, Marianne; Pope, Malcolm

2007-01-01

335

Whole-body vibration experienced by haulage truck operators in surface mining operations: a comparison of various analysis methods utilized in the prediction of health risks.  

PubMed

Whole body vibration (WBV) was measured on eight surface haulage trucks in three size classes (35, 100, 150ton haul capacities). Vibration was measured at the seat/operator interface in accordance with the ISO 2631-1 standard during 1h of normal operation. Highest acceleration readings were observed in the z-axis (vertical). Estimated equivalent daily exposure values in the range of 0.44-0.82 ms(-2) were observed using the frequency-weighted r.m.s method and 8.7-16.4ms(-1.75) using the vibration dose value method. Assessment was carried out using ISO 2631-1 and 2631-5. Operators of surface haulage trucks are regularly exposed to WBV levels that exceed safety limits as dictated by the ISO 2631-1 standard. However, according to ISO 2631-5 the probability of an adverse health effect remains low. These findings confirm an apparent disagreement between the two analysis methods. PMID:20185120

Smets, Martin P H; Eger, Tammy R; Grenier, Sylvain G

2010-10-01

336

Back Disorder Intervention Strategies for Mass Transit Operators Exposed to Whole-Body VIBRATION—COMPARISON of Two Transit System Approaches and Practices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Occupational long-term whole-body vibration (WBV) has been recognized as a major risk factor for low back disorders, one of the most important reasons for medical impairment and early permanent disability among mass transit operators. Although no firm health and safety vibration exposure threshold limits have been established, the available data suggests that rail vehicle operators would probably fall under the proposed WBV “action levels” of the EU directive provisions for protection from physical hazards. This provision calls for technical, administrative and medical controls. This paper examines and compares the current conditions, provisions and plans of two major mass transit systems, the New Yorker MTA and the Munich MVV. The available data, information and publications (English/German) on working conditions, vibration exposure, epidemiology and intervention strategies (primary and secondary prevention) for rail bound mass transit workers were reviewed. Results strongly suggest that the MTA transit system has currently and in the near future no effective and meaningful controls in place to significantly reduce the WBV exposure of subway operators. It appears that the MVV system has more and better control measures in place to reduce harmful effects of WBV. Results of a scientific evaluation of a participatory, collaborative project in the MVV system suggest that the MVV may have developed a successful method of a “condition prevention” (Verhältnisprävention)—and “behavioral prevention” (Verhaltensprävention) intervention strategy, which appears beneficial for WBV exposed workers with existing low back pain. Long-term outcomes and benefits need to be assessed further.

Johanning, E.

1998-08-01

337

Acute changes in neuromuscular excitability after exhaustive whole body vibration exercise as compared to exhaustion by squatting exercise  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The effects of hard squatting exercise with (VbX+) and without (VbX)) vibration on neuromuscular function were tested in 19 healthy young volunteers. Before and after the exercise, three different tests were performed: maximum serial jumping for 30 s, electromyography during isometric knee extension at 70% of the maximum voluntary torque, and the quantitative analysis of the patellar tendon reflex.

Jorn Rittweger; Marcus Mutschelknauss; Dieter Felsenberg

2003-01-01

338

A new framework for evaluating potential risk of back disorders due to whole body vibration and repeated mechanical shock  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of studies have examined the potential relationship between exposure to occupational vibration and low back pain associated with operation of vehicles. Only a handful of studies, however, have attempted to differentiate between the relative contributions of the steady state and transient mechanical shock components (the latter also being known as ‘jarring and jolting’, ‘high acceleration event’, ‘multiple shocks’

Thomas Waters; Christin Rauche; Ash Genaidy; Tarek Rashed

2007-01-01

339

Whole body vibration improves osseointegration by up-regulating osteoblastic activity but down-regulating osteoblast-mediated osteoclastogenesis via ERK1/2 pathway.  

PubMed

Due to the reduction in bone mass and deterioration in bone microarchitecture, osteoporosis is an important risk factor for impairing implant osseointegration. Recently, low-magnitude, high-frequency (LMHF) vibration (LM: <1×g; HF: 20-90Hz) has been shown to exhibit anabolic, but anti-resorptive effects on skeletal homeostasis. Therefore, we hypothesized that LMHF loading, in terms of whole body vibration (WBV), may improve implant fixation under osteoporotic status. In the in vivo study, WBV treatment (magnitude: 0.3g, frequency: 40Hz, time: 30min/12h, 5days/week) was applied after hydroxyapatite-coated titanium implants were inserted in the bilateral tibiae of ovariectomized rats. The bone mass and the osteospecific gene expressions were measured at 12weeks post implantation. In the in vitro study, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying osteoblastic and osteoclastic activities were fully investigated using various experimental assays. Micro-CT examination showed that WBV could enhance osseointegration by improving microstructure parameters surrounding implants. WBV-regulated gene levels in favor of bone formation over resorption may be the reason for the favorable adaptive bone remolding on bone-implant surface. The in vitro study showed that vibration (magnitude: 0.3g, frequency: 40Hz, time: 30min/12h) up-regulated osteoblast differentiation, matrix synthesis and mineralization. However, mechanically regulated osteoclastic activity was mainly through the effect on osteoblastic cells producing osteoclastogenesis-associated key soluble factors, including RANKL and M-CSF. Osteoblasts were therefore the direct target cells during the mechanotransduction process. The ERK1/2 pathway was demonstrated to play an essential role in vibration-induced enhancement of bone formation and decreased bone resorption. Our data suggests that WBV was a helpful non-pharmacological intervention for improving osseointegration under osteoporosis. PMID:25304090

Zhou, Yi; Guan, Xiaoxu; Liu, Tie; Wang, Xinhua; Yu, Mengfei; Yang, Guoli; Wang, Huiming

2015-02-01

340

The effect of androgen deprivation therapy on body composition in men with prostate cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  The use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in the treatment of prostate cancer is associated with changes in body composition\\u000a including increased fat and decreased lean mass. Limited information exists regarding the rate and extent of these changes.\\u000a This systematic review was conducted to determine the effects of ADT on body composition in prostate cancer patients.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Literature searches were conducted

Farhana Haseen; Liam J. Murray; Chris R. Cardwell; Joe M. O’Sullivan; Marie M. Cantwell

2010-01-01

341

Stereotactic body radiation therapy for head and neck tumor: disease control and morbidity outcomes.  

PubMed

We evaluated the efficacy and safety of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for patients with head and neck tumors. From April 2005 through April 2008, 34 patients with head and neck tumors were treated with CyberKnife SBRT. Twenty-one of them had prior radiotherapy. Treatment sites were orbit (n = 7), cervical lymph nodes (n = 6), nasopharynx (n = 5), oropharynx (n = 4) and others (n = 12). The prescribed dose ranged from 19.5 to 42 Gy (median, 30 Gy) in 3-8 fractions for consecutive days. The target volume ranged from 0.7 to 78.1 cm(3) (median, 11.6 cm(3)). The median follow-up was 16 months. Treatment was well tolerated without significant acute complications in any cases. Complete response rate and partial response rate were 32.4% and 38.6%, respectively. The overall survival rates were 70.6% and 58.3% at 12 and 24 months, respectively. The overall survival was better in patients without prior radiotherapy within the previous 24 months or in case of smaller target volume. Six patients suffered severe late complications. All these patients had prior radiotherapy, and 2 of them developed massive hemorrhage in the pharynx and both died of this complication 5 and 28 months, respectively, after SBRT. Our preliminary results suggest that SBRT is an effective treatment modality for head and neck tumors. However, re-irradiation has significant risk of severe and even fatal late complications in the form of necrosis and hemorrhage in re-irradiated areas. PMID:21127390

Kodani, Naohiro; Yamazaki, Hideya; Tsubokura, Takuji; Shiomi, Hiroya; Kobayashi, Kana; Nishimura, Takuya; Aibe, Norihiro; Ikeno, Hiroyasu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

2011-01-01

342

Stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver tumours using flattening filter free beam: dosimetric and technical considerations  

PubMed Central

Purpose To report the initial institute experience in terms of dosimetric and technical aspects in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivered using flattening filter free (FFF) beam in patients with liver lesions. Methods and Materials From October 2010 to September 2011, 55 consecutive patients with 73 primary or metastatic hepatic lesions were treated with SBRT on TrueBeam using FFF beam and RapidArc technique. Clinical target volume (CTV) was defined on multi-phase CT scans, PET/CT, MRI, and 4D-CT. Dose prescription was 75 Gy in 3 fractions to planning target volume (PTV). Constraints for organs at risk were: 700 cc of liver free from the 15 Gy isodose, Dmax < 21 Gy for stomach and duodenum, Dmax < 30 Gy for heart, D0.1 cc < 18 Gy for spinal cord, V15 Gy < 35% for kidneys. The dose was downscaled in cases of not full achievement of dose constraints. Daily cone beam CT (CBCT) was performed. Results Forty-three patients with a single lesion, nine with two lesions and three with three lesions were treated with this protocol. Target and organs at risk objectives were met for all patients. Mean delivery time was 2.8 ± 1.0 min. Pre-treatment plan verification resulted in a Gamma Agreement Index of 98.6 ± 0.8%. Mean on-line co-registration shift of the daily CBCT to the simulation CT were: -0.08, 0.05 and -0.02 cm with standard deviations of 0.33, 0.39 and 0.55 cm in, vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions respectively. Conclusions SBRT for liver targets delivered by means of FFF resulted to be feasible with short beam on time. PMID:22296849

2012-01-01

343

Vertebral Compression Fracture (VCF) After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT): Analysis of Predictive Factors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) are increasingly observed after spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The aim of this study was to determine the risk of VCF after spine SBRT and identify clinical and dosimetric factors predictive for VCF. The analysis incorporated the recently described Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS) criteria. Methods and Materials: The primary endpoint of this study was the development of a de novo VCF (ie, new endplate fracture or collapse deformity) or fracture progression based on an existing fracture at the site of treatment after SBRT. We retrospectively scored 167 spinal segments in 90 patients treated with spine SBRT according to each of the 6 SINS criteria. We also evaluated the presence of paraspinal extension, prior radiation, various dosimetric parameters including dose per fraction ({>=}20 Gy vs <20 Gy), age, and histology. Results: The median follow-up was 7.4 months. We identified 19 fractures (11%): 12 de novo fractures (63%) and 7 cases of fracture progression (37%). The mean time to fracture after SBRT was 3.3 months (range, 0.5-21.6 months). The 1-year fracture-free probability was 87.3%. Multivariate analysis confirmed that alignment (P=.0003), lytic lesions (P=.007), lung (P=.03) and hepatocellular (P<.0001) primary histologies, and dose per fraction of 20 Gy or greater (P=.004) were significant predictors of VCF. Conclusions: The presence of kyphotic/scoliotic deformity and the presence of lytic tumor were the only predictive factors of VCF based on the original 6 SINS criteria. We also report that patients with lung and hepatocellular tumors and treatment with SBRT of 20 Gy or greater in a single fraction are at a higher risk of VCF.

Cunha, Marcelo V.R. [Division of Neurosurgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Division of Neurosurgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Al-Omair, Ameen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Atenafu, Eshetu G. [Department of Biostatistics, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Biostatistics, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Masucci, Giuseppina Laura; Letourneau, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Korol, Renee [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yu, Eugene [Department of Radiology and Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University Health Network, Mount Sinai Hospital and Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiology and Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University Health Network, Mount Sinai Hospital and Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Howard, Peter [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lochray, Fiona [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Costa, Leodante B. da [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Fehlings, Michael G. [Division of Neurosurgery and Spinal Program, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Division of Neurosurgery and Spinal Program, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2012-11-01

344

Dosimetric evaluation of simultaneous integrated boost during stereotactic body radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a promising way to treat locally advanced pancreatic cancer and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. A simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the region of vessel abutment or encasement during SBRT has the potential to downstage otherwise likely positive surgical margins. Despite the potential benefit of using SIB-SBRT, the ability to boost is limited by the local geometry of the organs at risk (OARs), such as stomach, duodenum, and bowel (SDB), relative to tumor. In this study, we have retrospectively replanned 20 patients with 25Gy prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) and 33~80Gy to the boost target volume (BTV) using an SIB technique for all patients. The number of plans and patients able to satisfy a set of clinically established constraints is analyzed. The ability to boost vessels (within the gross target volume [GTV]) is shown to correlate with the overlap volume (OLV), defined to be the overlap between the GTV + a 1(OLV1)- or 2(OLV2)-cm margin with the union of SDB. Integral dose, boost dose contrast (BDC), biologically effective BDC, tumor control probability for BTV, and normal tissue complication probabilities are used to analyze the dosimetric results. More than 65% of the cases can deliver a boost to 40Gy while satisfying all OAR constraints. An OLV2 of 100cm(3) is identified as the cutoff volume: for cases with OLV2 larger than 100cm(3), it is very unlikely the case could achieve 25Gy to the PTV while successfully meeting all the OAR constraints. PMID:25445989

Yang, Wensha; Reznik, Robert; Fraass, Benedick A; Nissen, Nicholas; Hendifar, Andrew; Wachsman, Ashley; Sandler, Howard; Tuli, Richard

2015-01-01

345

The efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy on huge hepatocellular carcinoma unsuitable for other local modalities  

PubMed Central

Background and aim To evaluate the safety and efficacy of Cyberknife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its effect on survival in patients with unresectable huge hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) unsuitable of other standard treatment option. Methods Between 2009 and 2011, 22 patients with unresectable huge HCC (?10 cm) were treated with SBRT. dose ranged from 26 Gy to 40 Gy in five fractions. Overall survival (OS) and disease-progression free survival (DPFS) were determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Tumor response and toxicities were also assessed. Results After a median follow-up of 11.5 month (range 2–46 months). The objective response rate was achieved in 86.3% (complete response (CR): 22.7% and partial response (PR): 63.6%). The 1-yr. local control rate was 55.56%. The 1-year OS was 50% and median survival was 11 months (range 2–46 months). In univariate analysis, Child-Pugh stage (p?=?0.0056) and SBRT dose (p?=?0.0017) were significant factors for survival. However, in multivariate analysis, SBRT dose (p?=?0.0072) was the most significant factor, while Child-Pugh stage of borderline significance. (p?=?0.0514). Acute toxicities were mild and well tolerated. Conclusion This study showed that SBRT can be delivered safely to huge HCC and achieved a substantial tumor regression and survival. The results suggest this technique should be considered a salvage treatment. However, local and regional recurrence remain the major cause of failure. Further studies of combination of SBRT and other treatment modalities may be reasonable. PMID:24885086

2014-01-01

346

Stereotactic body radiation therapy using the CyberKnife® system for patients with liver metastases  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of patients with liver metastases. Between August 2006 and July 2011, patients with 1–4 liver metastases were enrolled and treated with SBRT using the CyberKnife® system at Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital. The metastases were from different primary tumors, with a maximum tumor diameter of less than 6 cm. The primary endpoint was local control. Secondary endpoints were overall survival, progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, and adverse events. Fifty-seven patients with 80 lesions were treated with SBRT. The 1-year and 2-year local control rates were 94.4% and 89.7%, respectively. The difference in local control between patients who received adjuvant treatment before SBRT and those who did not reached statistical significance (P=0.049). The median overall survival for the entire cohort was 37.5 months. According to the primary tumor sites, the median overall survival was not reached. The 2-year overall survival rate was 72.2% in the favorable group (primary tumors originating from the colon, breast, or stomach, as well as sarcomas); however, in the unfavorable group (primary tumors originating from the pancreas, lung, ovary, gallbladder, uterus, hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as olfactory neuroblastoma), the median overall survival and 2-year overall survival rates were 37.5 months and 55.9%, respectively (P=0.0001). Grade 1–2 fatigue, nausea, and vomiting were the most common adverse events, and no grade 3 and higher adverse events were observed. With excellent local control in the absence of severe toxicity, SBRT provides an alternative for patients with 1–4 liver metastases who cannot undergo surgery or other treatments. PMID:24959080

Yuan, Zhi-Yong; Meng, Mao-Bin; Liu, Chun-Lei; Wang, Huan-Huan; Jiang, Chao; Song, Yong-Chun; Zhuang, Hong-Qing; Yang, Dong; Wang, Jing-Sheng; Wei, Wang; Li, Feng-Tong; Zhao, Lu-Jun; Wang, Ping

2014-01-01

347

Dosimetric effects of rotational offsets in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer  

SciTech Connect

To quantitatively evaluate dosimetric effects of rotational offsets in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Overall, 11 lung SBRT patients (8 female and 3 male; mean age: 75.0 years) with medially located tumors were included. Treatment plans with simulated rotational offsets of 1°, 3°, and 5° in roll, yaw, and pitch were generated and compared with the original plans. Both clockwise and counterclockwise rotations were investigated. The following dosimetric metrics were quantitatively evaluated: planning target volume coverage (PTV V{sub 100%}), max PTV dose (PTV D{sub max}), percentage prescription dose to 0.35 cc of cord (cord D{sub 0.35} {sub cc}), percentage prescription dose to 0.35 cc and 5 cc of esophagus (esophagus D{sub 0.35} {sub cc} and D{sub 5} {sub cc}), and volume of the lungs receiving at least 20 Gy (lung V{sub 20}). Statistical significance was tested using Wilcoxon signed rank test at the significance level of 0.05. Overall, small differences were found in all dosimetric matrices at all rotational offsets: 95.6% of differences were < 1% or < 1 Gy. Of all rotational offsets, largest change in PTV V{sub 100%}, PTV D{sub max}, cord D{sub 0.35} {sub cc}, esophagus D{sub 0.35} {sub cc}, esophagus D{sub 5} {sub cc}, and lung V{sub 20} was ? 8.36%, ? 6.06%, 11.96%, 8.66%, 6.02%, and ? 0.69%, respectively. No significant correlation was found between any dosimetric change and tumor-to-cord/esophagus distances (R{sup 2} range: 0 to 0.44). Larger dosimetric changes and intersubject variations were observed at larger rotational offsets. Small dosimetric differences were found owing to rotational offsets up to 5° in lung SBRT for medially located tumors. Larger intersubject variations were observed at larger rotational offsets.

Yang, Yun; Catalano, Suzanne; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yoo, David S.; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing, E-mail: jing.cai@duke.edu

2014-04-01

348

Low rate of thoracic toxicity in palliative paraspinal single-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy  

PubMed Central

Background There has been an increase in the utilization of single-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to treat thoracic structures, but there have been few reports describing toxicity outcomes with this treatment. Methods We evaluated 119 sites (114 patients) with no prior history of thoracic radiation were treated from 10/1/2003 to 10/27/2008 with single-fraction SBRT to thoracic structures. The median dose to the gross tumor volume was 2400 cGy (range 1800–2400 cGy), as was the median dose to the planning target volume (range 1600–2400 cGy). A detailed review of thoracic toxicities was performed to include pneumonitis or Grade 2 or higher esophageal and bronchial toxicity. In addition, we retrospectively contoured the esophagus and bronchus of 48 patients treated in 2004–2005, prior to the establishment of dose constraints to determine the range of doses that these structures received. Results Of the contoured patients, the median dose to the hottest 1 cc (D1cc) of the esophagus was 1250 cGy (range 158–2572 cGy). The median bronchial D1cc was 1101 cGy (range 260–2211 cGy). At a median follow-up of 11.6 months, there were seven Grade 2 or higher esophageal toxicities, including one Grade 3 and one Grade 4 toxicities. There were two bronchial toxicities, one Grade 2 and one Grade 3. There were no cases of pneumonitis. Conclusions High-dose single-fraction SBRT is well tolerated to the thoracic region, with most patients tolerating high doses to central structures without significant toxicity. PMID:19923027

Gomez, Daniel R.; Hunt, Margie A.; Jackson, Andrew; O’Meara, William P.; Bukanova, Elena N.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

2010-01-01

349

Modular cognitive-behavioral therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: a randomized controlled trial.  

PubMed

There are few effective treatments for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and a pressing need to develop such treatments. We examined the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of a manualized modular cognitive-behavioral therapy for BDD (CBT-BDD). CBT-BDD utilizes core elements relevant to all BDD patients (e.g., exposure, response prevention, perceptual retraining) and optional modules to address specific symptoms (e.g., surgery seeking). Thirty-six adults with BDD were randomized to 22 sessions of immediate individual CBT-BDD over 24 weeks (n=17) or to a 12-week waitlist (n=19). The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale Modified for BDD (BDD-YBOCS), Brown Assessment of Beliefs Scale, and Beck Depression Inventory-II were completed pretreatment, monthly, posttreatment, and at 3- and 6-month follow-up. The Sheehan Disability Scale and Client Satisfaction Inventory (CSI) were also administered. Response to treatment was defined as ?30% reduction in BDD-YBOCS total from baseline. By week 12, 50% of participants receiving immediate CBT-BDD achieved response versus 12% of waitlisted participants (p=0.026). By posttreatment, 81% of all participants (immediate CBT-BDD plus waitlisted patients subsequently treated with CBT-BDD) met responder criteria. While no significant group differences in BDD symptom reduction emerged by Week 12, by posttreatment CBT-BDD resulted in significant decreases in BDD-YBOCS total over time (d=2.1, p<0.0001), with gains maintained during follow-up. Depression, insight, and disability also significantly improved. Patient satisfaction was high, with a mean CSI score of 87.3% (SD=12.8%) at posttreatment. CBT-BDD appears to be a feasible, acceptable, and efficacious treatment that warrants more rigorous investigation. PMID:24680228

Wilhelm, Sabine; Phillips, Katharine A; Didie, Elizabeth; Buhlmann, Ulrike; Greenberg, Jennifer L; Fama, Jeanne M; Keshaviah, Aparna; Steketee, Gail

2014-05-01

350

A new framework for evaluating potential risk of back disorders due to whole body vibration and repeated mechanical shock.  

PubMed

A number of studies have examined the potential relationship between exposure to occupational vibration and low back pain associated with operation of vehicles. Only a handful of studies, however, have attempted to differentiate between the relative contributions of the steady state and transient mechanical shock components (the latter also being known as 'jarring and jolting', 'high acceleration event', 'multiple shocks' and 'impact') of the vibration exposure. The primary objective of this paper is to present a review of current studies that examine mechanical shock, present a case for the importance of evaluating both steady state and mechanical shock components and propose a new framework for evaluating the health effects due to occupational vibration exposure. A computerized bibliographical search of several databases was performed with special reference to the health effects of mechanical shock in relation to lower back disorders. Based on the analysis, eight experimental studies and nine epidemiological studies with relevance to exposure to 'mechanical shock' were identified. These studies suggested that rough vehicle rides are prevalent and that repeated exposure to mechanical shock may increase the risk of lower back pain. There is an urgent need for assessing the health effects of mechanical shocks in epidemiological studies. In particular, the new ISO 2631-5: International Organization for Standardization 2004 standard for shock exposure assessment should be evaluated with regard to musculoskeletal health effects. PMID:17536775

Waters, Thomas; Rauche, Christin; Genaidy, Ash; Rashed, Tarek

2007-03-01

351

Radioactive Body Burden Measurements in 131Iodine Therapy for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Effect of Recombinant Thyroid Stimulating Hormone in Whole Body 131Iodine Clearance  

PubMed Central

Protocols in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer, recommend adequate thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) stimulation for radioactive 131I administrations, both for imaging and subsequent ablations. Commonly followed method is to achieve this by endogenous TSH stimulation by withdrawal of thyroxine. Numerous studies worldwide have reported comparable results with recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rhTSH) intervention as conventional thyroxine hormone withdrawal. Radiation safety applications call for the need to understand radioactive 131I (RA131I) clearance pattern to estimate whole body doses when this new methodology is used in our institution. A study of radiation body burden estimation was undertaken in two groups of patients treated with RA131I; (a) one group of patients having thyroxine medication suspended for 5 weeks prior to therapy and (b) in the other group retaining thyroxine support with two rhTSH injections prior to therapy with RA131I. Sequential exposure rates at 1 m in the air were measured in these patients using a digital auto-ranging beta gamma survey instrument calibrated for measurement of exposure rates. The mean measured exposure rates at 1 m in ?Sv/h immediately after administration and at 24 h intervals until 3 days are used for calculating of effective ½ time of clearance of administered activity in both groups of patients, 81 patients in conventionally treated group (stop thyroxine) and 22 patients with rhTSH administration. The 131I activities ranged from 2.6 to 7.9 GBq. The mean administered 131I activities were 4.24 ± 0.95 GBq (n = 81) in “stop hormone” group and 5.11 ± 1.40 GBq (n = 22) in rhTSH group. The fall of radioactive body burden showed two clearance patterns within observed 72 h. Calculated T½eff values were 16.45 h (stop hormone group) 12.35 h (rhTSH group) for elapsed period of 48 h. Beyond 48 h post administration, clearance of RA131I takes place with T½eff> 20 h in both groups. Neck and stomach exposure rate measurements showed reduced uptakes in the neck for rhTSH patients compared with “stop thyroxine” group and results are comparable with other studies. Whole body clearance is faster for patients with rhTSH injection, resulting in less whole body absorbed doses, and dose to blood. These patients clear circulatory radioactivity faster, enabling them to be discharged sooner, thus reduce costs of the hospitalization. Reduction in background whole body count rate may improve the residual thyroid images in whole body scan. rhTSH provides TSH stimulation without withdrawal of thyroid hormone and hence can help patients to take up therapy without hormone deficient problems in the withdrawn period prior to RA131I therapy. This also will help in reducing the restriction time periods for patients to mix up with the general population and children. PMID:25191114

Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Al Saadi, Amal; Al Balushi, Naima

2014-01-01

352

A common variant in the adiponectin gene on weight loss and body composition under sibutramine therapy in obesity  

PubMed Central

In this study, we aimed to explore whether a common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs266729 (?11,377C > G), in the adiponectin C1Q and collagen domain containing (ADIPOQ) gene could influence weight reduction and fat change under sibutramine therapy in an obese population. There were 131 obese Taiwanese patients, including 44 in the placebo group and 87 in the sibutramine (10 mg daily) group. We assessed the measures of weight loss and body fat reduction at the end of the 12-week treatment period by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) models using gender, baseline weight, and baseline percent body fat as covariates. By comparing the placebo and sibutramine groups with ANCOVA, our data revealed a strong effect of sibutramine on percent body fat loss (1.9 ± 0.3 vs 4.6 ± 0.5%; P < 0.001) and on weight reduction (2.8 ± 2.0 vs 7.9 ± 1.6 kg; P < 0.001) for subjects with the CC genotype. On the contrary, sibutramine had no significant effect on percent body fat loss or on weight loss in the GG and GC individuals. The results suggest that the SNP rs266729 of the ADIPOQ gene may contribute to weight reduction and fat loss in response to sibutramine therapy in Taiwanese obese patients. PMID:22291493

Hsiao, Tun-Jen; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin; Huang, Shih-Yi; Lin, Eugene

2010-01-01

353

Spatial and dose–response analysis of fibrotic lung changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is becoming the standard of care for early stage nonoperable lung cancers. Accurate dose–response modeling is challenging for SBRT because of the decreased number of clinical toxicity events. As a surrogate for a clinical toxicity endpoint, studies have proposed to use radiographic changes in follow up computed tomography (CT) scans to evaluate lung SBRT normal tissue effects. The purpose of the current study was to use local fibrotic lung regions to spatially and dosimetrically evaluate lung changes in patients that underwent SBRT.Methods: Forty seven SBRT patients treated at our institution from 2003 to 2009 were used for the current study. Our patient cohort had a total of 148 follow up CT scans ranging from 3 to 48 months post-therapy. Post-treatment scans were binned into intervals of 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 months after the completion of treatment. Deformable image registration was used to align the follow up CT scans with the pretreatment CT and dose distribution. Areas of visible fibrotic changes were contoured. The centroid of each gross tumor volume (GTV) and contoured fibrosis volume was calculated and the fibrosis volume location and movement (magnitude and direction) relative to the GTV and 30 Gy isodose centroid were analyzed. To perform a dose–response analysis, each voxel in the fibrosis volume was sorted into 10 Gy dose bins and the average CT number value for each dose bin was calculated. Dose–response curves were generated by plotting the CT number as a function of dose bin and time posttherapy.Results: Both fibrosis and GTV centroids were concentrated in the upper third of the lung. The average radial movement of fibrosis centroids relative to the GTV centroids was 2.6 cm with movement greater than 5 cm occurring in 11% of patients. Evaluating dose–response curves revealed an overall trend of increasing CT number as a function of dose. The authors observed a CT number plateau at doses ranging from 30 to 50 Gy for the 3, 6, and 12 months posttherapy time points. There was no evident plateau for the dose–response curves generated using data from the 18, 24, 30, and 36 months posttherapy time points.Conclusions: Regions of local fibrotic lung changes in patients that underwent SBRT were evaluated spatially and dosimetrically. The authors found that the average fibrosis movement was 2.6 cm with movement greater than 5 cm possible. Evaluating dose–response curves revealed an overall trend of increasing CT number as a function of dose. Furthermore, our dose–response data also suggest that one of the possible explanations of the CT number plateau effect may be the time posttherapy of the acquired data. Understanding normal tissue dose–response is important for reducing toxicity after SBRT, especially in cases where larger tumors are treated. The methods presented in the current work build on prior quantitative studies and further enhance the understanding of normal lung dose–response after SBRT.

Vinogradskiy, Yevegeniy; Diot, Quentin; Kavanagh, Brian; Schefter, Tracey; Gaspar, Laurie; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

2013-08-15

354

Her Body Speaks: The Experience of Dance Therapy for Women Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative, phenomenological study explores the experiences of dance therapy for 5 women who had been sexually abused as children. Using in-depth, largely unstructured interviews, the women reflect on their dance therapy experiences: and on their perceptions of the role of these experiences in their psychological healing. (Contains 46…

Mills, Letty J.; Daniluk, Judith C.

2002-01-01

355

Growing into Her Body: Dance\\/Movement Therapy for Women with Eating Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a model of treating women with eating disorders through dance\\/movement therapy based on the methods of Blanche Evan. Evan's theoretical viewpoint and methods of treatment are described with specific applications to working with women with eating disorders. Finally, a summary of an individual dance therapy treatment of a 24 year old bulimic woman is presented, illustrating the

Anne M. Krantz

1999-01-01

356

Improved Irritative Voiding Symptoms 3 Years after Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer  

PubMed Central

Background: Irritative voiding symptoms are common in elderly men and following prostate radiotherapy. There is limited clinical data on the impact of hypofractionated treatment on irritative voiding symptoms. This study sought to evaluate urgency, frequency, and nocturia following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer. Methods: Patients treated with SBRT monotherapy for localized prostate cancer from August 2007 to July 2011 at Georgetown University Hospital were included in this study. Treatment was delivered using the CyberKnife® with doses of 35–36.25?Gy in five fractions. Patient-reported urinary symptoms were assessed using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) before treatment and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12?months post-treatment and every 6?months thereafter. Results: Two hundred four patients at a median age of 69?years received SBRT with a median follow-up of 4.8?years. Prior to treatment, 50.0% of patients reported moderate to severe lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and 17.7% felt that urinary frequency was a moderate to big problem. The mean prostate volume was 39?cc and 8% had prior procedures for benign prostatic hyperplasia. A mean baseline IPSS-irritative (IPSS-I) score of 4.8 significantly increased to 6.5 at 1?month (p?

Rana, Zaker; Cyr, Robyn A.; Chen, Leonard N.; Kim, Brian S.; Moures, Rudy A.; Yung, Thomas M.; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T.; Suy, Simeng; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H.; Collins, Sean P.

2014-01-01

357

Statistical analysis of target motion in gated lung stereotactic body radiation therapy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An external surrogate-based respiratory gating technique is a useful method to reduce target margins for the treatment of a moving lung tumor. The success of this technique relies on a good correlation between the motion of the external markers and the internal tumor as well as the repeatability of the respiratory motion. In gated lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), the treatment time for each fraction could exceed 30 min due to large fractional dose. Tumor motion may experience pattern changes such as baseline shift during such extended treatment time. The purpose of this study is to analyze tumor motion traces in actual treatment situations and to evaluate the effect of the target baseline shift in gated lung SBRT treatment. Real-time motion data for both the external markers and tumors from 51 lung SBRT treatments with Cyberknife Synchrony technology were analyzed in this study. The treatment time is typically greater than 30 min. The baseline shift was calculated with a rolling average window equivalent to ~20 s and subtracted from that at the beginning. The magnitude of the baseline shift and its relationship with treatment time were investigated. Phase gating simulation was retrospectively performed on 12 carefully selected treatments with respiratory amplitude larger than 5 mm and regular phases. A customized gating window was defined for each individual treatment. It was found that the baseline shifts are specific to each patient and each fraction. Statistical analysis revealed that more than 69% treatments exhibited increased baseline shifts with the lapse of treatment time. The magnitude of the baseline shift could reach 5.3 mm during a 30 min treatment. Gating simulation showed that tumor excursion was caused mainly by the uncertainties in phase gating simulation and baseline shift, the latter being the primary factor. With a 5 mm gating window, 2 out of 12 treatments in the study group showed significant tumor excursion. Baseline shifts alone could cause up to 20% of tumor excursion outside the gating window. It is concluded that baseline shifts may increase with the treatment time and are more likely to act as a time-dependent systematic error. For phase-based gated lung SBRT, a baseline shift may be one of the major sources of targeting error during treatment.

Zhao, Bo; Yang, Yong; Li, Tianfang; Li, Xiang; Heron, Dwight E.; Saiful Huq, M.

2011-03-01

358

Reproducibility of Tumor Motion Probability Distribution Function in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the reproducibility of tumor motion probability distribution function (PDF) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer using cine megavoltage (MV) images. Methods and Materials: Cine MV images of 20 patients acquired during three-dimensional conformal (6-11 beams) SBRT treatments were retrospectively analyzed to extract tumor motion trajectories. For each patient, tumor motion PDFs were generated per fraction (PDF{sub n}) using three selected 'usable' beams. Patients without at least three usable beams were excluded from the study. Fractional PDF reproducibility (R{sub n}) was calculated as the Dice similarity coefficient between PDF{sub n} to a 'ground-truth' PDF (PDF{sub g}), which was generated using the selected beams of all fractions. The mean of R{sub n}, labeled as R{sub m}, was calculated for each patient and correlated to the patient's mean tumor motion rang (A{sub m}). Change of R{sub m} during the course of SBRT treatments was also evaluated. Intra- and intersubject coefficient of variation (CV) of R{sub m} and A{sub m} were determined. Results: Thirteen patients had at least three usable beams and were analyzed. The mean of R{sub m} was 0.87 (range, 0.84-0.95). The mean of A{sub m} was 3.18 mm (range, 0.46-7.80 mm). R{sub m} was found to decrease as A{sub m} increases following an equation of R{sub m} = 0.17e{sup -0.9Am} + 0.84. R{sub m} also decreased slightly throughout the course of treatments. Intersubject CV of R{sub m} (0.05) was comparable to intrasubject CV of R{sub m} (range, 0.02-0.09); intersubject CV of A{sub m} (0.73) was significantly greater than intrasubject CV of A{sub m} (range, 0.09-0.24). Conclusions: Tumor motion PDF can be determined using cine MV images acquired during the treatments. The reproducibility of lung tumor motion PDF decreased exponentially as the tumor motion range increased and decreased slightly throughout the course of the treatments.

Zhang Fan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Hu Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre (Singapore)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre (Singapore); Kelsey, Chris R.; Yoo, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yin Fangfang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai Jing, E-mail: jing.cai@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

2012-11-01

359

Dose-Volume Metrics Associated With Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To identify dose-volume factors associated with radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 74 patients who underwent SBRT for primary lung cancer. The prescribed dose for SBRT was uniformly 48 Gy in four fractions at the isocenter. RP was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v.3. Symptomatic RP was defined as grade 2 or worse. Optimal cut-offs dividing the patient population into two subgroups based on the incidence of symptomatic RP were sought using the following dose-volume metrics: PTV volume (ml), mean lung dose (Gy), and V5, V10, V15, V20, V25, V30, V35, and V40 (%) of both lungs excluding the PTV. Results: With a median follow-up duration of 31.4 months, symptomatic RP was observed in 15 patients (20.3%), including 1 patient with grade 3. Optimal cut-offs for pulmonary dose-volume metrics were V25 and V20. These two factors were highly correlated with each other, and V25 was more significant. Symptomatic RP was observed in 14.8% of the patients with V25 <4.2%, and the rate was 46.2% in the remainder (p = 0.019). PTV volume was another significant factor. The symptomatic RP rate was significantly lower in the group with PTV <37.7 ml compared with the larger PTV group (11.1% vs. 34.5%, p = 0.020). The patients were divided into three subgroups (patients with PTV <37.7 ml; patients with, PTV {>=}37.7 ml and V25 <4.2%; and patients with PTV {>=}37.7 ml and V25 {>=}4.2%); the incidence of RP grade 2 or worse was 11.1%, 23.5%, and 50.0%, respectively (p = 0.013). Conclusions: Lung V25 and PTV volume were significant factors associated with RP after SBRT.

Matsuo, Yukinori, E-mail: ymatsuo@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Narabayashi, Masaru; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Ueki, Nami; Miyagi, Ken; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Mizowaki, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Division of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

2012-07-15

360

High-dose MVCT image guidance for stereotactic body radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a potent treatment for early stage primary and limited metastatic disease. Accurate tumor localization is essential to administer SBRT safely and effectively. Tomotherapy combines helical IMRT with onboard megavoltage CT (MVCT) imaging and is well suited for SBRT; however, MVCT results in reduced soft tissue contrast and increased image noise compared with kilovoltage CT. The goal of this work was to investigate the use of increased imaging doses on a clinical tomotherapy machine to improve image quality for SBRT image guidance. Methods: Two nonstandard, high-dose imaging modes were created on a tomotherapy machine by increasing the linear accelerator (LINAC) pulse rate from the nominal setting of 80 Hz, to 160 Hz and 300 Hz, respectively. Weighted CT dose indexes (wCTDIs) were measured for the standard, medium, and high-dose modes in a 30 cm solid water phantom using a calibrated A1SL ion chamber. Image quality was assessed from scans of a customized image quality phantom. Metrics evaluated include: contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs), high-contrast spatial resolution, image uniformity, and percent image noise. In addition, two patients receiving SBRT were localized using high-dose MVCT scans. Raw detector data collected after each scan were used to reconstruct standard-dose images for comparison. Results: MVCT scans acquired using a pitch of 1.0 resulted in wCTDI values of 2.2, 4.7, and 8.5 cGy for the standard, medium, and high-dose modes respectively. CNR values for both low and high-contrast materials were found to increase with the square root of dose. Axial high-contrast spatial resolution was comparable for all imaging modes at 0.5 lp/mm. Image uniformity was improved and percent noise decreased as the imaging dose increased. Similar improvements in image quality were observed in patient images, with decreases in image noise being the most notable. Conclusions: High-dose imaging modes are made possible on a clinical tomotherapy machine by increasing the LINAC pulse rate. Increasing the imaging dose results in increased CNRs; making it easier to distinguish the boundaries of low contrast objects. The imaging dose levels observed in this work are considered acceptable at our institution for SBRT treatments delivered in 3-5 fractions.

Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Chao, Edward; Lucas, Dan; Flynn, Ryan T.; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Accuray Inc., Madison, Wisconsin 53717 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

2012-08-15

361

Long-term sick leave and disability pensioning due to back disorders of tractor drivers exposed to whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

In a historical 11-year follow-up study, disability pensioning and the incidence of the first sick leave of 4 weeks or longer due to back disorders has been investigated in a group of drivers exposed to whole-body vibration (WBV), mainly of agricultural tractors. The reference group comprised workers not or only slightly exposed to WBV from the same and another company. The vibration exposure of the tractor drivers was roughly around the ISO-2631 fatigue-decreased proficiency limit. The incidence of a first long-term sick leave due to back disorders was 3 per 100 person-years in tractor drivers and 2 per 100 person-years in the entire reference group. However, the incidence was not substantially increased in tractor drivers when the referents comprised only those working at the same company, suggesting selection bias. The highest relative risk (ca. 3) was found for long-term sick leave due to intervertebral disc disorders and this risk seemed to increase with the received WBV dose. That especially the incidence of intervertebral disc disorders increased, agrees well with findings in other studies. Data on disability pensioning due to back disorders are too scarce to be conclusive, but a trend towards younger disablement in tractor drivers is evident. Exposure to WBV, together with twisted posture and prolonged sitting, are considered to be responsible for the increased incidences observed in tractor drivers. PMID:2139013

Boshuizen, H C; Hulshof, C T; Bongers, P M

1990-01-01

362

Dosimetric verification and clinical evaluation of a new commercially available Monte Carlo-based dose algorithm for application in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Modern cancer treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), have greatly increased the demand for more accurate treatment planning (structure definition, dose calculation, etc) and dose delivery. The ability to use fast and accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculations within a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) in the clinical setting is now becoming

Margarida Fragoso; Ning Wen; Sanath Kumar; Dezhi Liu; Samuel Ryu; Benjamin Movsas; Ajlouni Munther; Indrin J. Chetty

2010-01-01

363

Endurance training improves insulin sensitivity and body composition in prostate cancer patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy.  

PubMed

Insulin resistance and changes in body composition are side effects of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) given to prostate cancer patients. The present study investigated whether endurance training improves insulin sensitivity and body composition in ADT-treated prostate cancer patients. Nine men undergoing ADT for prostate cancer and ten healthy men with normal testosterone levels underwent 12 weeks of endurance training. Primary endpoints were insulin sensitivity (euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps with concomitant glucose-tracer infusion) and body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and magnetic resonance imaging). The secondary endpoint was systemic inflammation. Statistical analysis was carried out using two-way ANOVA. Endurance training increased VO2max (ml(O2)/min per kg) by 11 and 13% in the patients and controls respectively (P<0.0001). The patients and controls demonstrated an increase in peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity of 14 and 11% respectively (P<0.05), with no effect on hepatic insulin sensitivity (P=0.32). Muscle protein content of GLUT4 (SLC2A4) and total AKT (AKT1) was also increased in response to the training (P<0.05 and P<0.01 respectively). Body weight (P<0.0001) and whole-body fat mass (FM) (P<0.01) were reduced, while lean body mass (P=0.99) was unchanged. Additionally, reductions were observed in abdominal (P<0.01), subcutaneous (P<0.05), and visceral (P<0.01) FM amounts. The concentrations of plasma markers of systemic inflammation were unchanged in response to the training. No group × time interactions were observed, except for thigh intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) (P=0.01), reflecting a significant reduction in the amount of IMAT in the controls (P<0.05) not observed in the patients (P=0.64). In response to endurance training, ADT-treated prostate cancer patients exhibited improved insulin sensitivity and body composition to a similar degree as eugonadal men. PMID:23744766

Hvid, Thine; Winding, Kamilla; Rinnov, Anders; Dejgaard, Thomas; Thomsen, Carsten; Iversen, Peter; Brasso, Klaus; Mikines, Kari J; van Hall, Gerrit; Lindegaard, Birgitte; Solomon, Thomas P J; Pedersen, Bente K

2013-10-01

364

[Exposure to whole-body vibration of forklift truck operators in dockyards--actual exposure in Japan and evaluation by EN 13059].  

PubMed

Low-back disorders are well documented as occupational hazards among forklift truck operators. The potential risk factors that may lead to low-back pain include exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV). In Europe, test methods were developed to evaluate WBV in industrial trucks, and the European Standard which defines the methods has been published. We measured the vibrations of forklift trucks operated in the Hanshin harbour area adopting procedures based on the CEN test and report the evaluation results. If the WBV magnitudes of the ride on forklift trucks in the workplace were less than or comparable to those in the CEN test, the CEN test could be considered useful for the risk assessment of forklift truck operators exposed to WBV. In order to verify the applicability of the CEN test to the evaluation of WBV exposure in the field, we conducted measurements of the WBV of four forklift trucks for 19 d. The trucks had already been examined by the CEN test. The truck velocity, driver position (sitting or not), and gear lever position were also measured, and video footage was obtained for the study. The results indicate that the vertical WBV magnitudes of the four forklift trucks were below the CEN test values. No dominant WBV direction was observed on any of the measurement days. The Health value (obtained by combining the values determined from the vibration in orthogonal coordinates) was comparable to that from the CEN test for one truck. The values for the other three trucks were lower. The data obtained for three forklift trucks were analyzed in each operating condition. The vertical WBV magnitudes and Health values for the three trucks were below the CEN test values when the trucks were travelling forwards with a load. The WBV in the anterior-posterior direction had the largest adverse effect on the human body of the three orthogonal directions when the trucks were used for loading and unloading. The results suggest the CEN test can be applied to the evaluation of exposure to WBV from forklift trucks operating in the vicinity of the Hanshin harbour. It was observed that the anterior-posterior WBV is considerable, mostly through exposure occurring in the lifting mode. However, the CEN test is based on the travelling mode, and further WBV measurements under real working conditions with exact descriptions of detailed work situations and operating conditions are required. PMID:17062995

Tsujimura, Hiroji; Taoda, Kazushi; Nishiyama, Katsuo

2006-09-01

365

The Body Remembers: Dance\\/Movement Therapy with an Adult Survivor of Torture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Torture ruptures boundaries. It is one of the most intense forms of human rights abuse, occurring in the context of relationship, and with the intention to inflict pain on the body. Relationship to one's self, and to others, is often dramatically affected. Integral aspects of the healing process for survivors of torture are to restore relative safety in the body

AmberElizabethLynn Gray

2001-01-01

366

Dose as a function of liver volume and planning target volume in helical tomotherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy-based stereotactic body radiation therapy for hepatic metastasis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been shown to be an effective, well-tolerated treatment for local control of tumors metastatic to the liver. Multi-institutional Phase II trials are examining 60 Gy in 3 fractions delivered by linac-based, 3D-conformal IMRT. HiArt Helical TomoTherapy is a treatment unit that delivers co-planar helical IMRT that is capable of image-guided SBRT. We hypothesized that the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) delivered to a lesion by Helical TomoTherapy-based SBRT could be predicted based on the planning target volume (PTV) and liver volume. Methods and Materials: To test this, we performed inverse treatment planning and analyzed the dosimetry for multiple hypothetical liver gross tumor volumes (GTV) with conventional PTV expansions. Inverse planning was carried out to find the maximum tolerated SBRT dose up to 60 Gy to be delivered in 3 fractions based on the dose constraint that 700 cc of normal liver would receive less than 15 Gy. Results: Regression analysis indicated a linear relationship between the MTD, the PTV and the liver volume, supporting our hypothesis. A predictive equation was generated, which was found to have an accuracy of {+-}3 Gy. In addition, dose constraints based on proximity to other normal tissues were tested. Inverse planning for PTVs located at varying distances from the heart, small bowel, and spinal cord revealed a predictable decrease in the MTD as the PTV increased in size or approached normal organs. Conclusions: These data provide a framework for predicting the likely MTD for patients considered for Helical TomoTherapy liver SBRT.

Baisden, Joseph M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Reish, Andrew G. [Medical School, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Sheng Ke [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Larner, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO (United States); Read, Paul W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)]. E-mail: PWR3U@virginia.edu

2006-10-01

367

Mechanical Ventilation Weaning in Inclusion Body Myositis: Feasibility of Isokinetic Inspiratory Muscle Training as an Adjunct Therapy  

PubMed Central

Inclusion body myositis is a rare myopathy associated with a high rate of respiratory complications. This condition usually requires prolonged mechanical ventilation and prolonged intensive care stay. The unsuccessful weaning is mainly related to respiratory muscle weakness that does not promptly respond to immunosuppressive therapy. We are reporting a case of a patient in whom the use of an inspiratory muscle-training program which started after a two-week period of mechanical ventilation was associated with a successful weaning in one week and hospital discharge after 2 subsequent weeks. PMID:25147743

Campos, Josué Felipe; Daher, Leandro Possidente; Ventura, Alex; do Prado, Pollyana Zamborlini; Brasil, Daniele; Mendonça, Debora; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo

2014-01-01

368

Systematic measurements of whole-body dose distributions for various treatment machines and delivery techniques in radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Contemporary radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy, could increase the radiation-induced malignancies because of the increased beam-on time, i.e., number of monitor units needed to deliver the same dose to the target and the larger volume irradiated with low doses. In this study, whole-body dose distributions from typical radiotherapy patient plans using different treatment techniques and therapy machines were measured using the same measurement setup and irradiation intention. Methods: Individually calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure absorbed dose in an anthropomorphic phantom at 184 locations. The dose distributions from 6 MV beams were compared in terms of treatment technique (3D-conformal, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, volumetric modulated arc therapy, helical TomoTherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, hard wedges, and flattening filter-free radiotherapy) and therapy machine (Elekta, Siemens and Varian linear accelerators, Accuray CyberKnife and TomoTherapy). Results: Close to the target, the doses from intensity-modulated treatments (including flattening filter-free) were below the dose from a static treatment plan, whereas the CyberKnife showed a larger dose by a factor of two. Far away from the treatment field, the dose from intensity-modulated treatments showed an increase in dose from stray radiation of about 50% compared to the 3D-conformal treatment. For the flattening filter-free photon beams, the dose from stray radiation far away from the target was slightly lower than the dose from a static treatment. The CyberKnife irradiation and the treatment using hard wedges increased the dose from stray radiation by nearly a factor of three compared to the 3D-conformal treatment. Conclusions: This study showed that the dose outside of the treated volume is influenced by several sources. Therefore, when comparing different treatment techniques, the dose ratios vary with distance to the isocenter. The effective dose outside the treated volume of intensity-modulated treatments with or without flattening filter was 10%-30% larger when compared to 3D-conformal radiotherapy. This dose increase is much lower than the monitor unit scaled effective dose from a static treatment.

Haelg, Roger A.; Besserer, Juergen; Schneider, Uwe [Institute for Radiotherapy, Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland); Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Zurich 8057 (Switzerland) and Institute for Radiotherapy, Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland)

2012-12-15

369

Proton Arc Reduces Range Uncertainty Effects and Improves Conformality Compared With Photon Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To describe, in a setting of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the theoretical dosimetric advantages of proton arc stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in which the beam penumbra of a rotating beam is used to reduce the impact of range uncertainties. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with proton SBRT underwent repeat planning with photon volumetric modulated arc therapy (Photon-VMAT) and an in-house-developed arc planning approach for both proton passive scattering (Passive-Arc) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT-Arc). An arc was mimicked with a series of beams placed at 10° increments. Tumor and organ at risk doses were compared in the context of high- and low-dose regions, represented by volumes receiving >50% and <50% of the prescription dose, respectively. Results: In the high-dose region, conformality index values are 2.56, 1.91, 1.31, and 1.74, and homogeneity index values are 1.29, 1.22, 1.52, and 1.18, respectively, for 3 proton passive scattered beams, Passive-Arc, IMPT-Arc, and Photon-VMAT. Therefore, proton arc leads to a 30% reduction in the 95% isodose line volume to 3-beam proton plan, sparing surrounding organs, such as lung and chest wall. For chest wall, V30 is reduced from 21 cm{sup 3} (3 proton beams) to 11.5 cm{sup 3}, 12.9 cm{sup 3}, and 8.63 cm{sup 3} (P=.005) for Passive-Arc, IMPT-Arc, and Photon-VMAT, respectively. In the low-dose region, the mean lung dose and V20 of the ipsilateral lung are 5.01 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE]), 4.38 Gy(RBE), 4.91 Gy(RBE), and 5.99 Gy(RBE) and 9.5%, 7.5%, 9.0%, and 10.0%, respectively, for 3-beam, Passive-Arc, IMPT-Arc, and Photon-VMAT, respectively. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy with proton arc and Photon-VMAT generate significantly more conformal high-dose volumes than standard proton SBRT, without loss of coverage of the tumor and with significant sparing of nearby organs, such as chest wall. In addition, both proton arc approaches spare the healthy lung from low-dose radiation relative to photon VMAT. Our data suggest that IMPT-Arc should be developed for clinical use.

Seco, Joao, E-mail: jseco@partners.org [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gu, Guan; Marcelos, Tiago; Kooy, Hanne; Willers, Henning [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2013-09-01

370

Effect of hormone therapy on lean body mass, falls, and fractures: Six-year results from the Women’s Health Initiative Hormone Trials  

PubMed Central

Objective Loss of lean body mass with aging may contribute to falls and fractures. The objective of this analysis was to determine if taking postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT: estrogen plus progestogen therapy, EPT or estrogen therapy alone, ET) favorably affects age-related changes in lean body mass and if these changes partially account for decreased falls or fractures with HT. Methods Participants randomly assigned to either EPT (n=543) or control (n=471) and ET (n= 453) or control (n= 474) and receiving dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans to estimate body composition during the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) were evaluated. Falls and fracture occurrence were obtained by annual self-report. Fractures were confirmed by clinical chart review. Results At 6yrs post-randomization, lean body mass was not different between HT and control groups. Although lean body mass positively influenced BMD, independent of HT status, the preserved lean body mass observed in the HT arms in the first 3 years did not significantly contribute to models evaluating HT influence on falls and fractures between years 3 and 6. Women taking at least 80% of their medication in the HT arms demonstrated fewer falls compared to placebo; this difference was not attributable to change in lean body mass. Conclusions Despite early preservation of lean body mass with HT (3years), HT did not ameliorate long-term (6 years) loss in lean body mass with aging. PMID:20689466

Bea, Jennifer W.; Zhao, Qiuhong; Cauley, Jane A.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Bassford, Tamsen; Lewis, Cora E.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Tylavsky, Frances A.; Chen, Zhao

2010-01-01

371

Mild Increases in Body Temperature Could Improve Anticancer Therapy | Physical Sciences in Oncology  

Cancer.gov

One of the consistent characteristics of human solid tumors is that they exert a significant outward pressure that inhibits the ability of drugs to reach the inner recesses of the tumor. Most solid tumors are also hypoxic, that is, the oxygen concentration deep inside tumors is much lower than is normal in human tissues, and this hypoxia also works against many anticancer therapies.

372

Systematic measurements of whole-body imaging dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The full benefit of the increased precision of contemporary treatment techniques can only be exploited if the accuracy of the patient positioning is guaranteed. Therefore, more and more imaging modalities are used in the process of the patient setup in clinical routine of radiation therapy. The improved accuracy in patient positioning, however, results in additional dose contributions to the integral patient dose. To quantify this, absorbed dose measurements from typical imaging procedures involved in an image-guided radiation therapy treatment were measured in an anthropomorphic phantom for a complete course of treatment. The experimental setup, including the measurement positions in the phantom, was exactly the same as in a preceding study of radiotherapy stray dose measurements. This allows a direct combination of imaging dose distributions with the therapy dose distribution. Methods: Individually calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure absorbed dose in an anthropomorphic phantom at 184 locations. The dose distributions from imaging devices used with treatment machines from the manufacturers Accuray, Elekta, Siemens, and Varian and from computed tomography scanners from GE Healthcare were determined and the resulting effective dose was calculated. The list of investigated imaging techniques consisted of cone beam computed tomography (kilo- and megavoltage), megavoltage fan beam computed tomography, kilo- and megavoltage planar imaging, planning computed tomography with and without gating methods and planar scout views. Results: A conventional 3D planning CT resulted in an effective dose additional to the treatment stray dose of less than 1 mSv outside of the treated volume, whereas a 4D planning CT resulted in a 10 times larger dose. For a daily setup of the patient with two planar kilovoltage images or with a fan beam CT at the TomoTherapy unit, an additional effective dose outside of the treated volume of less than 0.4 mSv and 1.4 mSv was measured, respectively. Using kilovoltage or megavoltage radiation to obtain cone beam computed tomography scans led to an additional dose of 8-46 mSv. For treatment verification images performed once per week using double exposure technique, an additional effective dose of up to 18 mSv was measured. Conclusions: Daily setup imaging using kilovoltage planar images or TomoTherapy megavoltage fan beam CT imaging can be used as a standard procedure in clinical routine. Daily kilovoltage and megavoltage cone beam computed tomography setup imaging should be applied on an individual or indication based protocol. Depending on the imaging scheme applied, image-guided radiation therapy can be administered without increasing the dose outside of the treated volume compared to therapies without image guidance.

Haelg, Roger A.; Besserer, Juergen; Schneider, Uwe [Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Institute for Radiotherapy, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland); Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Zurich 8057 (Switzerland) and Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Institute for Radiotherapy, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland)

2012-12-15

373

Ewing sarcoma dissemination and response to T-cell therapy in mice assessed by whole-body magnetic resonance imaging  

PubMed Central

Background: Novel treatment strategies in Ewing sarcoma include targeted cellular therapies. Preclinical in vivo models are needed that reflect their activity against systemic (micro)metastatic disease. Methods: Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) was used to monitor the engraftment and dissemination of human Ewing sarcoma xenografts in mice. In this model, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of T cells redirected against the Ewing sarcoma-associated antigen GD2 by chimeric receptor engineering. Results: Of 18 mice receiving intravenous injections of VH-64 Ewing sarcoma cells, all developed disseminated tumour growth detectable by WB-MRI. All mice had lung tumours, and the majority had additional manifestations in the bone, soft tissues, and/or kidney. Sequential scans revealed in vivo growth of tumours. Diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background signal suppression effectively visualised Ewing sarcoma growth in extrapulmonary sites. Animals receiving GD2-targeted T-cell therapy had lower numbers of pulmonary tumours than controls, and the median volume of soft tissue tumours at first detection was lower, with a tumour growth delay over time. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance imaging reliably visualises disseminated Ewing sarcoma growth in mice. GD2-retargeted T cells can noticeably delay tumour growth and reduce pulmonary Ewing sarcoma manifestations in this aggressive disease model. PMID:23839490

Liebsch, L; Kailayangiri, S; Beck, L; Altvater, B; Koch, R; Dierkes, C; Hotfilder, M; Nagelmann, N; Faber, C; Kooijman, H; Ring, J; Vieth, V; Rossig, C

2013-01-01

374

Muscle function, physical performance and body composition changes in men with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy  

PubMed Central

Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common visceral malignancy in men with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) the preferred therapy to suppress testosterone production and hence tumor growth. Despite its effectiveness in lowering testosterone, ADT is associated with side effects including loss of muscle mass, diminished muscle strength, decrements in physical performance, earlier fatigue and declining quality of life. This review reports a survey of the literature with a focus on changes in muscle strength, physical function and body composition, due to short-term and long-term ADT. Studies in these areas are sparse, especially well-controlled, prospective randomized trials. Cross-sectional and longitudinal data (up to 2 years) for men with PCa treated with ADT as well as patients with PCa not receiving ADT and age-matched healthy men are presented when available. Based on limited longitudinal data, the adverse effects of ADT on muscle function, physical performance and body composition occur shortly after the onset of ADT and tend to persist and worsen over time. Exercise training is a safe and effective intervention for mitigating these changes and initial guidelines for exercise program design for men with PCa have been published by the American College of Sports Medicine. Disparities in study duration, types of studies and other patient-specific variables such as time since diagnosis, cancer stage and comorbidities may all affect an understanding of the influence of ADT on health, physical performance and mortality. PMID:22367184

Storer, Thomas W; Miciek, Renee; Travison, Thomas G

2012-01-01

375

The feasibility of whole body vibration in institutionalised elderly persons and its influence on muscle performance, balance and mobility: a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN62535013  

PubMed Central

Background Fatigue or lack of interest can reduce the feasibility of intensive physical exercise in nursing home residents. Low-volume exercise interventions with similar training effects might be an alternative. The aim of this randomised controlled trial was to investigate the feasibility of Whole Body Vibration (WBV) in institutionalised elderly, and its impact on functional capacity and muscle performance. Methods Twenty-four nursing home residents (15 female, 9 male; mean age 77.5 ± 11.0 years) were randomised (stratification for age, gender and ADL-category) to 6 weeks static WBV exercise (WBV+, N = 13) or control (only static exercise; N = 11). Outcome measures were exercise compliance, timed up-and-go, Tinetti-test, back scratch, chair sit-and-reach, handgrip strength and linear isokinetic leg extension. Results At baseline, WBV+ and control groups were similar for all outcome variables. Twenty-one participants completed the program and attended respectively 96% and 86% of the exercise sessions for the WBV+ and control groups. Training-induced changes in timed up-and-go and Tinetti-test were better for WBV+ compared to control (p = 0.029 for timed up-and-go, p = 0.001 and p = 0.002 for Tinetti body balance and total score respectively). In an alternative analysis (Worst Rank Score & Last Observation Carried Forward) the differences in change remained significant on the Tinetti body balance and total score. No other significant differences in change between both groups were observed. Conclusion In nursing home residents with limited functional dependency, six weeks static WBV exercise is feasible, and is beneficial for balance and mobility. The supplementary benefit of WBV on muscle performance compared to classic exercise remains to be explored further. PMID:16372905

Bautmans, Ivan; Van Hees, Ellen; Lemper, Jean-Claude; Mets, Tony

2005-01-01

376

The development of an intervention programme to reduce whole-body vibration exposure at work induced by a change in behaviour: a study protocol  

PubMed Central

Background Whole body vibration (WBV) exposure at work is common and studies found evidence that this exposure might cause low back pain (LBP). A recent review concluded there is a lack of evidence of effective strategies to reduce WBV exposure. Most research in this field is focussed on the technical implications, although changing behaviour towards WBV exposure might be promising as well. Therefore, we developed an intervention programme to reduce WBV exposure in a population of drivers with the emphasis on a change in behaviour of driver and employer. The hypothesis is that an effective reduction in WBV exposure, in time, will lead to a reduction in LBP as WBV exposure is a proxy for an increased risk of LBP. Methods/Design The intervention programme was developed specifically for the drivers of vibrating vehicles and their employers. The intervention programme will be based on the most important determinants of WBV exposure as track conditions, driving speed, quality of the seat, etc. By increasing knowledge and skills towards changing these determinants, the attitude, social influence and self-efficacy (ASE) of both drivers and employers will be affected having an effect on the level of exposure. We used the well-known ASE model to develop an intervention programme aiming at a change or the intention to change behaviour towards WBV exposure. The developed programme consists of: individual health surveillance, an information brochure, an informative presentation and a report of the performed field measurements. Discussion The study protocol described is advantageous as the intervention program actively tries to change behaviour towards WBV exposure. The near future will show if this intervention program is effective by showing a decrease in WBV exposure. PMID:18005400

Tiemessen, Ivo JH; Hulshof, Carel TJ; Frings-Dresen, Monique HW

2007-01-01

377

Changes in balance, functional performance and fall risk following whole body vibration training and vitamin D supplementation in institutionalized elderly women. A 6 month randomized controlled trial.  

PubMed

Falls in the elderly constitute a growing public health problem. This randomized controlled trial investigated the potential benefit of 6 months of whole body vibration (WBV) training and/or vitamin D supplementation on balance, functionality and estimated fall risk in institutionalized elderly women. A total of 113 women (mean age: 79.6) were randomly assigned to either a WBV or a no-training group, receiving either a conventional dose (880 IU/d) or a high dose (1600 IU/d) of vitamin D3. The WBV group performed exercises on a vibration platform 3×/week. Balance was evaluated by computerized posturography. Functionality was assessed by 10 m walk test, Timed up and Go (TUG) performance and endurance capacity (Shuttle Walk). Fall risk was determined with the Physiological Profile Assessment. Performance on the 10 m walk test and on TUG improved over time in all groups. For none of the parameters, high-dose vitamin D resulted in a better performance than conventional dosing. The improvements in the WBV group in endurance capacity, walking at preferred speed, and TUG were significantly larger than the changes with supplementation alone. No additional benefit of WBV training could be detected on fall risk and postural control, although sway velocity and maximal isometric knee extension strength improved only in the WBV group. This trial showed that a high-dose vitamin D supplementation is not more efficient than conventional dosing in improving functionality in institutionalized elderly. WBV training on top of vitamin D supplementation provided an added benefit with regard to walking, TUG performance, and endurance capacity. PMID:21256028

Bogaerts, An; Delecluse, Christophe; Boonen, Steven; Claessens, Albrecht L; Milisen, Koen; Verschueren, Sabine M P

2011-03-01

378

Adaptive Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Automated Daily Plan Reoptimization Prevents Dose Delivery Degradation Caused by Anatomy Deformations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate how dose distributions for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) can be improved by using automated, daily plan reoptimization to account for anatomy deformations, compared with setup corrections only. Methods and Materials: For 12 tumors, 3 strategies for dose delivery were simulated. In the first strategy, computed tomography scans made before each treatment fraction were used only for patient repositioning before dose delivery for correction of detected tumor setup errors. In adaptive second and third strategies, in addition to the isocenter shift, intensity modulated radiation therapy beam profiles were reoptimized or both intensity profiles and beam orientations were reoptimized, respectively. All optimizations were performed with a recently published algorithm for automated, multicriteria optimization of both beam profiles and beam angles. Results: In 6 of 12 cases, violations of organs at risk (ie, heart, stomach, kidney) constraints of 1 to 6 Gy in single fractions occurred in cases of tumor repositioning only. By using the adaptive strategies, these could be avoided (<1 Gy). For 1 case, this needed adaptation by slightly underdosing the planning target volume. For 2 cases with restricted tumor dose in the planning phase to avoid organ-at-risk constraint violations, fraction doses could be increased by 1 and 2 Gy because of more favorable anatomy. Daily reoptimization of both beam profiles and beam angles (third strategy) performed slightly better than reoptimization of profiles only, but the latter required only a few minutes of computation time, whereas full reoptimization took several hours. Conclusions: This simulation study demonstrated that replanning based on daily acquired computed tomography scans can improve liver stereotactic body radiation therapy dose delivery.

Leinders, Suzanne M. [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Méndez Romero, Alejandra [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Schaart, Dennis [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Seppenwoolde, Yvette, E-mail: y.seppenwoolde@erasmusmc.nl [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

2013-12-01

379

Stereotactic body radiation therapy of early-stage non-small-cell lung carcinoma: Phase I study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: A Phase I dose escalation study of stereotactic body radiation therapy to assess toxicity and local control rates for patients with medically inoperable Stage I lung cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients had non-small-cell lung carcinoma, Stage T1a or T1b N0, M0. Patients were immobilized in a stereotactic body frame and treated in escalating doses of radiotherapy beginning at 24 Gy total (3 x 8 Gy fractions) using 7-10 beams. Cohorts were dose escalated by 6.0 Gy total with appropriate observation periods. Results: The maximum tolerated dose was not achieved in the T1 stratum (maximum dose = 60 Gy), but within the T2 stratum, the maximum tolerated dose was realized at 72 Gy for tumors larger than 5 cm. Dose-limiting toxicity included predominantly bronchitis, pericardial effusion, hypoxia, and pneumonitis. Local failure occurred in 4/19 T1 and 6/28 T2 patients. Nine local failures occurred at doses {<=}16 Gy and only 1 at higher doses. Local failures occurred between 3 and 31 months from treatment. Within the T1 group, 5 patients had distant or regional recurrence as an isolated event, whereas 3 patients had both distant and regional recurrence. Within the T2 group, 2 patients had solitary regional recurrences, and the 4 patients who failed distantly also failed regionally. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy seems to be a safe, effective means of treating early-stage lung cancer in medically inoperable patients. Excellent local control was achieved at higher dose cohorts with apparent dose-limiting toxicities in patients with larger tumors.

McGarry, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States)]. E-mail: rmcgarry@iupui.edu; Papiez, Lech [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Williams, Mark [Pulmonary Division, Richard L. Roudebush VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Whitford, Tia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Timmerman, Robert D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX (United States)

2005-11-15

380