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1

Accelerometry-based study of body vibration dampening during whole-body vibration training  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of our study was to characterize the vibration delivered by a whole-body vibration (WBV) exercise platform and quantify the acceleration transmissibility through- out the body during different WBV exercises. Our accelerometry- based experimental setup, includes materials and methods for assessing vibration frequencies and corresponding magnitudes both at the side-alternating vibration platform and on multiple anatomic landmarks of the

Hugo Silva; Andre Lourenco; Rita Tomas; Vinson Lee; Scott Going

2011-01-01

2

Electrocorticogram During Whole Body Vibration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Studies in the conscious monkey have shown that during low frequency vibration (4.5-19.5 c/sec) rhythms at the vibration frequency appear intermittently in the ECoG. These rhythms are commonly dissociated between recordings from different but adjacent are...

A. N. Nicholson J. C. Guignard

1965-01-01

3

Whole-Body Vibration of Locomotive Engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibration of the seat and the body of a diesel locomotive and an electric locomotive were measured while driving on the railways of Eastern Finland. At the speed of 120 km\\/h for the diesel locomotive and 140 km\\/h for the electric locomotive (the greatest permissible speeds) the vibration of the seat was tangent to the “fatigue-decreased proficiency boundary” of the

Esko Sorainen; Esko Rytkönen

1999-01-01

4

Local metabolic rate during whole body vibration.  

PubMed

Whole body vibration (WBV) platforms are currently used for muscle training and rehabilitation. However, the effectiveness of WBV training remains elusive, since scientific studies vary largely in the vibration parameters used. The origin of this issue may be related to a lack in understanding of the training intensity that is imposed on individual muscles by WBV. Therefore, this study evaluates the training intensity in terms of metabolic rate of two lower-extremity muscles during WBV under different vibration parameters. Fourteen healthy male subjects were randomly exposed to 0 (control)-, 10-, 17-, and 28-Hz vibrations while standing upright on a vibration platform. A near-infrared spectrometer was used to determine the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles' metabolic rates during arterial occlusion. The metabolic rates during each vibration condition were significantly higher compared with control for both muscles (P < 0.05). Each increase in vibration frequency translated into a significantly higher metabolic rate than the previous lower frequency (P < 0.05) for both muscles. The current study showed that the local metabolic rate during WBV at 28 Hz was on average 5.4 times (GM) and 3.7 times (VL) of the control metabolic rate. The substantial changes in local metabolic rate indicate that WBV may represent a significant local training stimulus for particular leg muscles. PMID:23493356

Friesenbichler, Bernd; Nigg, Benno M; Dunn, Jeff F

2013-03-14

5

Stereotactic body radiation therapy.  

PubMed

Stereotactic body radiation therapy constitutes an emerging therapeutic paradigm. These treatments are unique relative to the large body of experience with conventional fractionated radiotherapy. On the basis of the treatment principles of intracranial stereotactic radiation combined with enhancements associated with immobilization and imaging, the role of extracranial treatment continues to evolve. However, most clinical reports on extracranial treatments suffer from short or incomplete follow-up, making final assessments of benefit and toxicity, particularly late toxicity, problematic. These techniques are centered on a very basic understanding of the use of ionizing radiation for the treatment of cancer. Nonetheless, they do require a unique and special understanding of radiobiologic and physics principles. It is hoped that using high-dose, single-fraction treatment or a few fractions of treatment, the therapeutic ratio is improved, thus potentially changing the way some cancers are treated. Ideally, all patients receiving such treatments would be enrolled in formal protocols. As data accrue and understanding of these techniques improve, it will be possible to better define the indications for stereotactic body radiation therapy. At that time, appropriate applications can be submitted for permanent billing codes that will describe a process of care that embraces this technology without vendor favoritism. This review summarizes the state of stereotactic body radiation in 2005. PMID:17411904

Potters, Louis; Timmerman, Robert; Larson, David

2005-08-01

6

Reducing whole body vibration in forklift drivers.  

PubMed

Forklift drivers in warehouses are often exposed to whole body vibration (WBV) during the total day. There is however an association between working as a forklift operator and the development of low back pain. In this study the exposure to WBV was measured in five forklift drivers who performed a standardised order picking task during 10 minutes. The effect of driving surface (uneven concrete vs. new flat concrete), driving speed (15 km/h vs. 8 km/h) and seat suspension (mechanical suspension vs. air suspension) was investigated. Improving the driving surface was the most effective preventive measure by reducing the whole body vibration with 39%, from 1.14 to 0.69 m/s2. Lowering the speed limit resulted in a reduction of WBV with 26% (1.05 vs. 0.78 m/s2). An air suspension seat was 22% more effective compared to mechanical suspension (1.02 vs. 0.80 m/s2). On uneven concrete an air suspension seat performed even better by reducing the WBV by 29% (1.33 vs. 0.95 m/s2). A combination of a new driving surface, limiting the maximum speed and the introduction of an air suspension seat reduced the whole body vibrations below the action limit of 0.5 m/s2 as mentioned in the European directive. None of the interventions were effective enough on their own. PMID:22317090

Motmans, R

2012-01-01

7

Whole-body vibration alters proprioception in the trunk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Occupational whole-body vibration has long been associated with low back injuries. However, the mechanism of these injuries is not well understood. In this paper, the effect of whole-body vibration on proprioception and dynamic stability was examined. Subjects exposed to 20min of vertical, seated, whole-body vibration were found to have a 1.58-fold increase in position-sense errors after vibration relative to controls

Lu Li; Farhana Lamis; Sara E. Wilson

2008-01-01

8

Whole body vibration and dynamic restraint.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to identify changes due to whole body vibration in peroneus longus (PL) activation following ankle inversion perturbation. Participants were 22 (age 22.1 +/- 1.8 yrs, ht 168.8 +/- 8.2 cm, mass 65.5 +/- 11.2 kg) physically active male and female students with no recent history of lower extremity injury. Measurements of PL electromechanical delay (EMD), reaction time, and muscle activation were collected from two groups (WBV and control) over 3 time intervals (pretreatment, posttreatment, and 30 min posttreatment). Two-way ANOVAs were used to compare groups over time for all dependent variables. No group x time interactions were detected (p < 0.05) for any of the dependent variables. Whole body vibration did not alter PL EMD, reaction time, peak EMG, or average EMG. The use of WBV for enhancing ankle dynamic stability was not supported by this study. However, more data are needed to determine if WBV is an effective intervention in other areas of injury prevention or rehabilitation. These data were not consistent with the hypothesis that WBV enhances muscle spindle sensitivity. PMID:17879889

Hopkins, T; Pak, J O; Robertshaw, A E; Feland, J B; Hunter, I; Gage, M

2007-09-18

9

Absorption of energy during vertical whole-body vibration exposure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Absorbed power (PAbs) during exposure to vertical whole-body vibration in a sitting posture was measured on 15 male and 15 female subjects. Different experimental conditions were applied, such as vibration level (0.5–1.4ms-2) and frequency (2–100Hz), body weight (54–93kg) and, relaxed and erected upper body positions. Results show that PAbs was strongly related to the frequency of the vibration, peaking within

Ronnie Lundström; Patrik Holmlund; Lennart Lindberg

1998-01-01

10

ABSORPTION OF ENERGY DURING WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION EXPOSURE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Absorbed power,PAbs, during exposure to vertical and horizontal whole-body vibration in sitting posture was measured using 15 male and 15 female subjects. Different experimental conditions were applied, such as vibration level (0·25–1·4 m\\/s2), frequency (1·13–80 Hz), body weight (54–93 kg), relaxed and erect upper body posture. Results show thatPAbswas strongly related to frequency of the vibration peaking, within the range

R. Lundstrom; P. Holmlund

1998-01-01

11

Vibration Exposure and Biodynamic Responses during Whole-Body Vibration Training  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABERCROMBY, A. F. J., W. E. AMONETTE, C. S. LAYNE, B. K. MCFARLIN, M. R. HINMAN, and W. H. PALOSKI. Vibration Exposure and Biodynamic Responses during Whole-Body Vibration Training. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 39, No. 10, pp. 1794-1800, 2007. Purpose: Excessive, chronic whole-body vibration (WBV) has a number of negative side effects on the human body, including disorders of

ANDREW F. J. ABERCROMBY; WILLIAM E. AMONETTE; CHARLES S. LAYNE; BRIAN K. MCFARLIN; MARTHA R. HINMAN; WILLIAM H. PALOSKI

2007-01-01

12

Whole-body vibration training: Metabolic cost of synchronous, side-alternating or no vibrations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole-body vibration training improves strength and can increase maximal oxygen consumption ([Vdot]O2max). No study has compared the metabolic demand of synchronous and side-alternating whole-body vibration. We measured [Vdot]O2 and heart rate during a typical synchronous or side-alternating whole-body vibration session in 10 young female sedentary participants. The 20-min session consisted of three sets of six 45-s exercises, with 15 s recovery

Boris Gojanovic; Yves Henchoz

2012-01-01

13

Whole-body vibration dosage alters leg blood flow  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of whole-body vibration dosage on leg blood flow was investigated. Nine healthy young adult males completed a set of 14 random vibration and non-vibration exercise bouts whilst squatting on a Galileo 900 plate. Six vibration frequencies ranging from 5 to 30 Hz (5 Hz increments) were used in combination with a 2.5 mm and 4.5 mm amplitude to

Noel Lythgo; Prisca Eser; Patricia de Groot; Mary Galea

2009-01-01

14

Subjective Reaction to Whole-Body Vibration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Ten male volunteers were utilized in a study of the perception of vibration. Four subjective reaction levels: perceptible, mildly annoying, extremely annoying, and alarming were established. The Boeing Human Vibration facility, modified since previous tes...

R. E. Chaney

1964-01-01

15

Psychophysical Assessment of Whole-Body Vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the methods of magnitude estimation and intensity matching, curves of equal subjective vibration intensity were constructed over the frequency range from 3.5 to 20 Hz. Twenty subjects made magnitude estimations of the intensity of vibration at 0.08, 0.16, 0.24, 0.40, 0.48, and 0.56 gz with vibration at 0.32 gz serving as a standard. These intensities were judged at each

Richard W. Shoenberger; C. Stanley Harris

1971-01-01

16

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Technological advancements in imaging and radiation planning and delivery have made it possible for cranial stereotactic radiosurgery\\u000a techniques to be applied to tumors outside of the brain. Although high-dose radiation therapy may be delivered in a single\\u000a fraction, referred to as extracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), more often, high-precision radiation is delivered in\\u000a more than one fraction, leading to the field

Laura A. Dawson

17

Hormonal responses to whole-body vibration in men  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute responses of blood hormone concentrations and neuromuscular performance following\\u000a whole-body vibration (WBV) treatment. Fourteen male subjects [mean (SD) age 25 (4.6)?years] were exposed to vertical sinusoidal\\u000a WBV, 10 times for 60?s, with 60?s rest between the vibration sets (a rest period lasting 6?min was allowed after 5 vibration\\u000a sets). Neuromuscular

Carmelo Bosco; M. Iacovelli; O. Tsarpela; M. Cardinale; M. Bonifazi; J. Tihanyi; M. Viru; A. De Lorenzo; A. Viru

2000-01-01

18

Evaluation of Whole-Body Vibration in Vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The vibration in 100 different vehicles has been measured, evaluated and assessed according to British Standard BS 6841 (1987) and International Standard ISO 2631 (1997). Vibration was measured in 14 categories of vehicle including cars, lift trucks, tractors, lorries, vans and buses. In each vehicle, the vibration was measured in five axes: vertical vibration beneath the seat, fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical vibration on the seat pan and fore-and-aft vibration at the backrest. The alternative methods of evaluating the vibration (use of different frequency weightings, different averaging methods, the inclusion of different axes, vibration dose values and equivalent r.m.s. acceleration) as defined in the standards have been compared. BS 6841 (1987) suggests that an equivalent acceleration magnitude is calculated using vibration measured at four locations around the seat (x -, y -, z -seat and x -backrest); ISO 2631 (1997) suggests that vibration is measured in the three translational axes only on the seat pan but only the axis with the most severe vibration is used to assess vibration severity. Assessments made using the procedure defined in ISO 2631 tend to underestimate any risks from exposure to whole-body vibration compared to an evaluation made using the guidelines specified in BS 6841; the measurements indicated that the 17 m/s1.75 ``health guidance caution zone'' in ISO 2631 was less likely to be exceeded than the 15 m/s1.75 ``action level'' in BS 6841. Consequently, ISO 2631 ``allows'' appreciably longer daily exposures to whole-body vibration than BS 6841. . All rights reserved.

Paddan, G. S.; Griffin, M. J.

2002-05-01

19

Biodynamics of the human body under whole-body vibration: Synthesis of the reported data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identification of most probable ranges of biodynamic responses of the human body exposed to whole-body vibration is essential for developing effective integrated human-machine system design tools, improved vibration mitigation devices and frequency-weighting for exposure assessment. The international standard, ISO-5982 (2001), defines such ranges for very limited conditions, namely for body seated without a back support and exposed to vertical vibration.

S. Rakheja; R. G. Dong; S. Patra; P.-É. Boileau; P. Marcotte; C. Warren

2010-01-01

20

Visual-Motor Performance During Whole-Body Vibration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Seven male employees of the Boeing Company were tested in the Company's human vibration facility to determine the effect of whole body vibration on visual-motor performance. Six controls: a large and a small knob; a horizontal and a vertical lever; and a ...

R. E. Chaney D. L. Parks

1964-01-01

21

The Subjective Magnitude of Whole-Body Vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two experiments have been performed to investigate the relation between the level of whole-body vertical a vibration and the degree of discomfort it produces. The first experiment, which employed botli magnitude estimation and magnitude production methods, suggested that the relation between discomfort, ? and vibration level, ?, could be adequately expressed in the form ?=k?. However, the value of n

L. C. FOTHEHGUL; M. J. GRIFEXN

1977-01-01

22

Individual Variability in Human Response to Whole-body Vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports an experiment to obtain an equal sensation contour for whole-body vibration using an entirely new, but demonstrably valid and reliable, paradigm. Instead of requiring subjects to equate variable vibration stimuli of different frequencies with a fixed standard stimulus, the paradigm employed a series of matching tasks with the standard stimulus being produced by the subject in the

D. J. OBORNE; D. A. HUMPHREYS

1976-01-01

23

Wireless Network for Measurement of Whole-Body Vibration  

PubMed Central

This article presents the development of a system integrated to a ZigBee network to measure whole-body vibration. The developed system allows distinguishing human vibrations of almost 400Hz in three axes with acceleration of almost 50g. The tests conducted in the study ensured the correct functioning of the system for the project's purpose.

Koenig, Diogo; Chiaramonte, Marilda S.; Balbinot, Alexandre

2008-01-01

24

Case study: use of vibration therapy in the treatment of diabetic peripheral small fiber neuropathy.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to describe a case of type II diabetic peripheral small fiber neuropathic pain treated with whole body vibration therapy after a failed trial of conventional drugs and interventional pain management. A 64-year-old male had chronic diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain in his both feet for about 2 years. The patient tried multiple pain medications and various interventional pain treatments without significant pain relief. After 4 weeks of vibration treatment, which targeted the feet the patient's pain level and gait patterns significantly improved. These findings illustrate the importance of considering whole body vibration as a complimentary treatment in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain. PMID:23561872

Hong, Junggi; Barnes, Meredith; Kessler, Nathan

2012-10-04

25

Whole-Body Vibration and Aircrew Performance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The effects of aircraft vibration on vision and manual control performance were studied. Twenty-eight experiments, 16 investigating effects on vision and 12 investigating effects on manual control performance are summarized.

M. J. Griffin R. W. Mcleod M. J. Moseley C. H. Lewis

1986-01-01

26

Whole-Body Vibration and Aircrew Performance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A program of experimental research concerned with the effects of aircraft vibration on vision and manual control performance has been completed. Twenty-eight experiments were conducted, 16 investigating effects on vision and 12 investigating effects on ma...

M. J. Griffin R. W. McLeod M. J. Moseley C. H. Lewis

1986-01-01

27

Vibration and Its Effects on the Body  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To assess the effects of machine-induced vibration on workers and to determine effective precautions for vibration-induced trauma. Subjects and Methods: The study group consisted of 114 workers who were randomly selected: 50 rock drill workers and 64 truck heavy vehicle operators. Fifty-four office workers were designed as controls. The study and control groups were age-matched. All subjects were interviewed

Halim Issever; Cihan Aksoy; Hilmi Sabuncu; Ayse Karan

2003-01-01

28

Effects of Whole Body Vibration Training on Body Composition in Adolescents with Down Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The present study aimed to determine the effect of 20 weeks of whole body vibration (WBV) on the body composition of adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Thirty adolescent with DS were divided into two groups: control and WBV. Whole body, upper and lower limbs body fat and lean body mass were measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)…

Gonzalez-Aguero, Alejandro; Matute-Llorente, Angel; Gomez-Cabello, Alba; Casajus, Jose A.; Vicente-Rodriguez, German

2013-01-01

29

Optimal Vibration Control of Vehicle Engine-Body System using Haar Functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this note a method of designing optimal vibration control based on Haar functions to control of bounce and pitch vibrations in engine-body vibration structure is presented. Utilizing properties of Haar functions, a computational method to find optimal vibration control for the engine-body system is developed. It is shown that the optimal state trajectories and optimal vibration control are calculated

Hamid Reza Karimi

2006-01-01

30

Whole body vibration exposure of surface coal mining machine operators  

SciTech Connect

Field measurements utilizing a seat pad accelerometer were made on 61 surface coal mining machines in order to quantify the vibration levels experienced by the operators. Those data were combined with information on the statistics of the operating times of those machines in order to compare the operator's vibration exposure to the criteria in ISO 2631, ''A Guide for the Evaluation of Human Exposure to Whole Body Vibration.'' The comparison showed that about half of all surface coal mining machine operators can be expected to be exposed to vibration exceeding the fatigue decreased proficiency criterion, whereas only 7% to 22% would be expected to experience vibration exceeding the exposure limit. Detailed exposure statistics are presented and the implications of the results are discussed.

Remmington, P.J.; Andersen, D.W.; Bartholomae, R.; Redmond, G.

1984-02-01

31

Therapeutic impact of low amplitude high frequency whole body vibrations on the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse bone?  

PubMed Central

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by extremely brittle bone. Currently, bisphosphonate drugs allow a decrease of fracture by inhibiting bone resorption and increasing bone mass but with possible long term side effects. Whole body mechanical vibrations (WBV) treatment may offer a promising route to stimulate bone formation in OI patients as it has exhibited health benefits on both muscle and bone mass in human and animal models. The present study has investigated the effects of WBV (45 Hz, 0.3 g, 15 minutes/days, 5 days/week) in young OI (oim) and wild type female mice from 3 to 8 weeks of age. Vibration therapy resulted in a significant increase in the cortical bone area and cortical thickness in the femur and tibia diaphysis of both vibrated oim and wild type mice compared to sham controls. Trabecular bone was not affected by vibration in the wild type mice; vibrated oim mice, however, exhibited significantly higher trabecular bone volume fraction in the proximal tibia. Femoral stiffness and yield load in three point bending were greater in the vibrated wild type mice than in sham controls, most likely attributed to the increase in femur cortical cross sectional area observed in the ?CT morphology analyses. The vibrated oim mice showed a trend toward improved mechanical properties, but bending data had large standard deviations and there was no significant difference between vibrated and non-vibrated oim mice. No significant difference of the bone apposition was observed in the tibial metaphyseal trabecular bone for both the oim and wild type vibrated mice by histomorphometry analyses of calcein labels. At the mid diaphysis, the cortical bone apposition was not significantly influenced by the WBV treatment in both the endosteum and periosteum of the oim vibrated mice while a significant change is observed in the endosteum of the vibrated wild type mice. As only a weak impact in bone apposition between the vibrated and sham groups is observed in the histological sections, it is possible that WBV reduced bone resorption, resulting in a relative increase in cortical thickness. Whole body vibration appears as a potential effective and innocuous means for increasing bone formation and strength, which is particularly attractive for treating the growing skeleton of children suffering from brittle bone disease or low bone density pathologies without the long term disadvantages of current pharmacological therapies.

Vanleene, Maximilien; Shefelbine, Sandra J.

2013-01-01

32

Therapeutic impact of low amplitude high frequency whole body vibrations on the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse bone.  

PubMed

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by extremely brittle bone. Currently, bisphosphonate drugs allow a decrease of fracture by inhibiting bone resorption and increasing bone mass but with possible long term side effects. Whole body mechanical vibrations (WBV) treatment may offer a promising route to stimulate bone formation in OI patients as it has exhibited health benefits on both muscle and bone mass in human and animal models. The present study has investigated the effects of WBV (45Hz, 0.3g, 15minutes/days, 5days/week) in young OI (oim) and wild type female mice from 3 to 8weeks of age. Vibration therapy resulted in a significant increase in the cortical bone area and cortical thickness in the femur and tibia diaphysis of both vibrated oim and wild type mice compared to sham controls. Trabecular bone was not affected by vibration in the wild type mice; vibrated oim mice, however, exhibited significantly higher trabecular bone volume fraction in the proximal tibia. Femoral stiffness and yield load in three point bending were greater in the vibrated wild type mice than in sham controls, most likely attributed to the increase in femur cortical cross sectional area observed in the ?CT morphology analyses. The vibrated oim mice showed a trend toward improved mechanical properties, but bending data had large standard deviations and there was no significant difference between vibrated and non-vibrated oim mice. No significant difference of the bone apposition was observed in the tibial metaphyseal trabecular bone for both the oim and wild type vibrated mice by histomorphometry analyses of calcein labels. At the mid diaphysis, the cortical bone apposition was not significantly influenced by the WBV treatment in both the endosteum and periosteum of the oim vibrated mice while a significant change is observed in the endosteum of the vibrated wild type mice. As only a weak impact in bone apposition between the vibrated and sham groups is observed in the histological sections, it is possible that WBV reduced bone resorption, resulting in a relative increase in cortical thickness. Whole body vibration appears as a potential effective and innocuous means for increasing bone formation and strength, which is particularly attractive for treating the growing skeleton of children suffering from brittle bone disease or low bone density pathologies without the long term disadvantages of current pharmacological therapies. PMID:23352925

Vanleene, Maximilien; Shefelbine, Sandra J

2013-01-22

33

Whole-body vibration and disorders of the spine  

Microsoft Academic Search

This cross-sectional study is based on interviews and medical examinations of 352 operators of earth-moving machines who had been exposed to whole-body vibrations for at least three years. In addition, available X-rays showing different parts of the spines of 251 machine operators who had been exposed to vibration for at least ten years were used for evaluation. One hundred and

H. Dupuis; G. Zerlett

1987-01-01

34

Oxygen Uptake in Whole-Body Vibration Exercise: Influence of Vibration Frequency, Amplitude, and External Load  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibration exercise (VbX) is a new type of physical training to increase muscle power. The present study was designed to assess the influence of whole-body VbX on metabolic power. Specific oxygen uptake (sVO2) was assessed, testing the hypotheses that sVO2 increases with the frequency of vibration (tested in 10 males) and with the amplitude (tested in 8 males), and that

J. Rittweger; J. Ehrig; K. Just; M. Mutschelknauss; K. A. Kirsch; D. Felsenberg

2002-01-01

35

Cognitive–Behavioral Body Image Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a distressing body image disorder that involves excessive preoccupation with physical appearance in a normal appearing person. Prior case reports of behavior therapy were encouraging, but no controlled evaluation of behavior therapy or any other type of treatment had been conducted. In the present study, 54 BDD subjects were randomly assigned to cognitive behavior therapy

James C. Rosen; Jeff Reiter; Pam Orosan

1995-01-01

36

Whole body vibration in cystic fibrosis - a pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: In cystic fibrosis (CF), bone mass deficits as well as a lack of muscle mass and force have been described. The bone mass deficits are thought to be at least in part secondary to the reduced muscle mass. Whole body vibration has recently been suggested as an effective technique to increase muscle force and power. The aim of this

J. Roth; M. Wust; R. Rawer; D. Schnabel; G. Armbrecht; G. Beller; I. Rembitzki; U. Wahn; D. Felsenberg; D. Staab

2008-01-01

37

On human response to prolonged repeated whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The experiment was aimed at investigating human response to different doses of whole-body vibration (WBV), at checking adaptation to repeated exposures, at further evaluating the frequency weighting, and at examining the effect of a distinct interruption of prolonged exposure. Eight male seated subjects were exposed for 3 h to sinusoidal WBV in the z-axis with the frequencies 4 Hz and

H. SEIDEL; R. BASTEK; D. BRÄUER; Ch. BUCHHOLZ; A. MEISTER; A.-M. METZ; R. ROTHE

1980-01-01

38

Small Vibrations Superimposed on a Prescribed Rigid Body Motion  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method for analysing flexible multibody systems in which the elastic deformations are small is presented. The motion is considered a gross non-linear rigid body motion with small linear vibrations superimposed on it. For periodic gross motion, this results in a system of rheo- linear differential equations for the deformations with periodic coefficients. The determination of the required equations with

A. L. SCHWAB; J. P. MEIJAARD

2002-01-01

39

Vibration therapy in multiple sclerosis: a pilot study exploring its effects on tone, muscle force, sensation and functional performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the effectiveness of whole body vibration (WBV) on tone, muscle force, sensation and functional performance in people with multiple sclerosis.Design: A randomized cross-over pilot study.Setting: Revive MS Support Therapy Centre. Glasgow, UK.Subjects: Sixteen people with multiple sclerosis were randomly allocated to one of two groups.Intervention: Group 1 received four weeks of whole body vibration plus exercise three

F. Schyns; L. Paul; K. Finlay; C. Ferguson; E. Noble

2009-01-01

40

Nonlinear torsional vibrations of rigid bodies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nonlinear dynamical models of a rigid body working under oscillatory conditions with damping, and fastened at a fixed point, e g., centre of mass, are discussed. Special stress is laid on isotropic models, invariant under so-called hyperrotations, i.e. rotations of the rotation vector. For the damping-free (purely oscillatory) case completely degenerate potentials are determined, and general solutions of equations of motion are discussed. These results can be helpful in designing instruments sensitive to inertial forces and their moments, e.g., sensors of angular acceleration in automatic control systems and navigation.

Slawianowski, J. J.

41

Power absorbed during whole-body vertical vibration: Effects of sitting posture, backrest, and footrest  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies have quantified the power absorbed in the seated human body during exposure to vibration but have not investigated the effects of body posture or the power absorbed at the back and the feet. This study investigated the effects of support for the feet and back and the magnitude of vibration on the power absorbed during whole-body vertical vibration.

Naser Nawayseh; Michael J. Griffin

2010-01-01

42

Cognitive)ehavioral body image therapy for body dysmorphic disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a distressing body image disorder that involves excessive pre- occupation with physical appearance in a normal appearing person. Prior case reports of behavior therapy were encouraging, but no controlled evaluation of behavior therapy or any other type of treatment had been conducted. In the present study, 54 BDD subjects were randomly assigned to cognitive behavior

James C. Rosen; Jeff Reiter; Pam Orosan

1995-01-01

43

Whole-body vibration and low-back pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review presents a critical evaluation of the literature on health effects in long-term occupational exposure to whole-body vibration. To assess the relative weight of each epidemiologic study, a scoring procedure has been used, according to the quality of exposure data, effect data, study design and methodology. The most frequently reported adverse effects are: low-back pain, early degeneration of the

Carel Hulshof; Brinio Veldhuijzen van Zanten

1987-01-01

44

Acute whole-body vibration elicits post-activation potentiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole-body vibration (WBV) leads to a rapid increase in intra-muscular temperature and enhances muscle power. The power-enhancing\\u000a effects by WBV can, at least in part, be explained by intra-muscular temperature. However, this does not exclude possible\\u000a neural effects of WBV occurring at the spinal level. The aim of this study was to examine if muscle twitch and patellar reflex\\u000a properties

Darryl J. Cochrane; Stephen R. Stannard; Elwyn C. Firth; Jörn Rittweger

2010-01-01

45

Modeling of Spinal Column of Seated Human Body under Exposure to Whole-Body Vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In vehicle systems occupational drivers might expose themselves to vibration for a long time. This may cause illness of the spinal column such as low back pain. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the influence of vibration to the spinal column. Thus the modeling of seated human body is conducted in order to evaluate the effect of whole-body vibration to the spinal column. This model has the spinal column and the support structures such as the muscles of the back and the abdomen. The spinal column is made by the vertebrae and the intervertebral disks that are considered the rigid body and the rotational spring and damper respectively. The parameter of this model is decided by the literature and the body type of the subject with respect to the mass and the model structure. And stiffness and damping parameters are searched by fitting the model simulation results to the experimental measured data with respect to the vibration transmissibilities from the seat surface to the spinal column and the head and with respect to the driving-point apparent mass. In addition, the natural modes of the model compare with the result of experimental modal analysis. The influence of the abdomen and the muscles of the back are investigated by comparing three models with respect to above vibration characteristics. Three model are the proposed model, the model that has the spinal column and the model that has the muscles of the back in addition to the spinal column.

Tamaoki, Gen; Yoshimura, Takuya; Kuriyama, Kaoru; Nakai, Kazuma

46

Cognitive-Behavioral Body Image Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Randomly assigned 54 body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) subjects to cognitive behavior therapy or no treatment. BDD symptoms were significantly decreased in therapy subjects and the disorder was eliminated in 82 percent of cases at posttreatment and 77 percent at follow-up. Subjects' overall psychological symptoms and self-esteem also improved. (RJM)|

Rosen, James C.; And Others

1995-01-01

47

Cognitive-Behavioral Body Image Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Randomly assigned 54 body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) subjects to cognitive behavior therapy or no treatment. BDD symptoms were significantly decreased in therapy subjects and the disorder was eliminated in 82 percent of cases at posttreatment and 77 percent at follow-up. Subjects' overall psychological symptoms and self-esteem also improved. (RJM)

Rosen, James C.; And Others

1995-01-01

48

Acute Effects of Whole-Body Vibration on Lower Body Flexibility and Strength  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a neuromuscular training method designed to improve muscle strength and mobility that has become an increasing popular mode of alternative training in European athletes. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of WBV training on flexibility, heart rate, and peak isokinetic torque. Methods: Twenty healthy adults (12 males, 8 females), untrained

Patricia A. Burns; Kristina S. Beekhuizen; Patrick L. Jacobs

2004-01-01

49

Guidelines for Whole-Body Vibration Health Surveillance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is strong epidemiological evidence that occupational exposure to WBV is associated with an increased risk of low back pain (LBP), sciatic pain, and degenerative changes in the spinal system, including lumbar intervertebral disc disorders. A prototype health surveillance scheme for WBV is presented in this paper. Surveillance is the collection, analysis, and dissemination of data for the purpose of prevention. The aims are to assess health status and diagnose vibration-induced disorders at an early stage, to inform the workers on the potential risk associated with vibration exposure, to give preventive advice to employers and employees and to control whether preventive measures which have been taken, were successful. It is suggested that a pre-placement health examination should be offered to each worker who will be exposed to WBV so as to make the worker aware of the hazards, to obtain baseline health data, and to identify medical conditions that may increase the risk due to WBV. The case history should focus on personal history, work history, and leisure activities involving driving of vehicles. The personal medical history should detail back pain complaints, disorders in the spine, any injuries or surgery to the musculoskeletal system. A physical examination on the lower back should be performed on workers who have experienced LBP symptoms over the past 12 months. The preplacement examination should be followed by periodic health reassessment with a regular interval according to the legislation of the country. It is suggested that periodic medical examination should be made available at least every 2 years to all workers who are exposed to WBV. Any change in vibration exposure at the workplace should be reported by the employer. If an increase in vibration exposure or a change in health status have occurred, the medical re-examination should be offered at shorter intervals at the discretion of the attending physician. There should be a periodic medical examination, which includes recording any change in exposure to WBV. The findings for the individual should be compared with previous examinations. Group data should also be compiled periodically. Medical removal may be considered along with re-placement in working practices without exposure to WBV. This paper presents opinions on health surveillance for whole-body vibration developed within a working group of partners funded on a European Community Network (BIOMED2 concerted action BMH4-CT98-3251: Research network on detection and prevention of injuries due to occupational vibration exposures). The health surveillance protocol and the draft questionnaire with explanation comments are presented for wider consideration by the science community and others before being considered appropriate for implementation. . All rights reserved.

Pope, M.; Magnusson, M.; Lundström, R.; Hulshof, C.; Verbeek, J.; Bovenzi, M.

2002-05-01

50

Magnitude-dependence of equivalent comfort contours for fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is currently assumed that the same frequency weightings, derived from studies of vibration discomfort, can be used to evaluate the severity of vibration at all vibration magnitudes from the threshold of vibration perception to the vibration magnitudes associated with risks to health. This experimental study determined equivalent comfort contours for the whole-body vibration of seated subjects over the frequency

Miyuki Morioka; Michael J. Griffin

2006-01-01

51

Vibrating body transistors: Enabling Fin-FET nano-electro-mechanical resonators  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports advances in the field of vibrating body transistors (VBTs) made on silicon-on-insulator substrates, compatible with CMOS. We review various vibrating transistor principles and present new results on scaled vibrating body FETs, resulting in resonant body Fin-FET architectures with two lateral air-gaps, showing resonance frequencies from 10MHz to 150MHz. These devices are expected to enable novel radio-frequency and

A. M. Ionescu

2010-01-01

52

Effects of whole body vibration training on body composition in adolescents with Down syndrome.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to determine the effect of 20 weeks of whole body vibration (WBV) on the body composition of adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Thirty adolescent with DS were divided into two groups: control and WBV. Whole body, upper and lower limbs body fat and lean body mass were measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) before and after 20 weeks of WBV training. Repeated measures of ANOVA adjusting by height, weight and Tanner stage were used to analyze possible group by time interactions on body composition. The adjusted percentages of change in body composition were also compared between control and WBV groups. No group by time interactions were found for any variable, but the WBV group showed a higher reduction in body fat at the upper limbs (p<0.05), and a tendency toward higher percent increase in whole body lean body mass. Overall, a 20-week WBV training is not enough by itself for increasing lean body mass in adolescents with DS, but it might be helpful for improving body composition in this population. Its relationship with health and autonomy enhances the importance of these results. PMID:23474995

González-Agüero, Alejandro; Matute-Llorente, Angel; Gómez-Cabello, Alba; Casajús, José A; Vicente-Rodríguez, Germán

2013-03-05

53

Whole-body vibration during manual wheelchair propulsion with selected seat cushions and back supports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the exposure to whole-body vibrations (WBV) has been shown to be detrimental to seated humans, the effects of wheelchairs and seating systems on the transmission of vibration to an individual have not been thoroughly examined. The purpose of this study was to determine if the selected wheelchair seat cushions and back supports minimize the transmission of vibrations. Thirty-two wheelchair

Carmen P. DiGiovine; Rory A. Cooper; Shirley G. Fitzgerald; Michael L. Boninger; Erik J. Wolf; Songfeng Guo

2003-01-01

54

Lumbar back muscle activity of helicopter pilots and whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several studies have attributed the prevalence of low back pain (LBP) in helicopter pilots mainly to poor posture in-flight and whole-body vibration, with the latter hypothesis particularly related to a cyclic response of the erector spine (ES) muscle to vibration. This work aims to determine if helicopter vibration and the pilot's normal posture during flight have significant effects on the

Carlos Gomes de Oliveira; David Martin Simpson; Jurandir Nadal

2001-01-01

55

An overview of strategies to reduce whole-body vibration exposure on drivers: A systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) at the workplace cost a lot. These MSD, low back pain in particular, can be caused by exposure to whole body vibration (WBV). Preventive strategies to reduce vibration exposure may contribute to a decrease in MSD. Therefore the aim of this study was to explore which evidence-based preventive strategies reduce vibration exposure on drivers. A systematic literature

Ivo J. Tiemessen; Carel T. J. Hulshof; Monique H. W. Frings-Dresen

2007-01-01

56

Body temperature of the parasitic wasp Pimpla turionellae (Hymenoptera) during host location by vibrational sounding  

Microsoft Academic Search

The pupal parasitoid Pimpla turionellae (L.) uses self-produced vibrations transmitted on the plant substrate, so-called vibrational sounding, to locate immobile concealed pupal hosts. The wasps are able to use vibrational sounding reliably over a broad range of ambient temperatures and even show an increased signal frequency and intensity at low temperatures. The present study investigates how control of body temperature

STEFAN KRODER; JÖRG SAMIETZ; ANTON STABENTHEINER; SILVIA DORN

2008-01-01

57

Mind-body therapies in integrative oncology.  

PubMed

There is growing interest in mind-body therapies as adjuncts to mainstream cancer treatment, and an increasing number of patients turn to these interventions for the control of emotional stress associated with cancer. Increased research funding has enabled many such interventions to be evaluated for their efficacy, including studies of mind-body interventions to reduce pain, anxiety, insomnia, anticipatory, and treatment-related nauseas, hot flashes, and improved mood. Mind-body treatments evaluated for their utility in oncology include relaxation therapies, biofeedback, meditation and hypnosis, yoga, art and music therapy, tai chi, and qigong. Although studies are not always methodologically sound and results mixed, a growing number of well-designed studies provide convincing evidence that mind-body techniques are beneficial adjuncts to cancer treatment. The evidence is sufficient to recommend further investigation and adoption of these techniques in mainstream oncology care. PMID:21116746

Elkins, Gary; Fisher, William; Johnson, Aimee

2010-12-01

58

EVALUATION OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION IN VEHICLES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vibration in 100 different vehicles has been measured, evaluated and assessed according to British Standard BS 6841 (1987) and International Standard ISO 2631 (1997). Vibration was measured in 14 categories of vehicle including cars, lift trucks, tractors, lorries, vans and buses. In each vehicle, the vibration was measured in five axes: vertical vibration beneath the seat, fore-and-aft, lateral and

G. S. PADDAN; M. J. GRIFFIN

2002-01-01

59

ON THE HEALTH RISK OF THE LUMBAR SPINE DUE TO WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION—THEORETICAL APPROACH, EXPERIMENTAL DATA AND EVALUATION OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

The guidance on the effects of vibration on health in standards for whole-body vibration (WBV) does not provide quantitative relationships between WBV and health risk. The paper aims at the elucidation of exposure–response relationships. An analysis of published data on the static and dynamic strength of vertebrae and bone, loaded with various frequencies under different conditions, provided the basis for

H. Seidel; R. Blüthner; B. Hinz; M. Schust

1998-01-01

60

Effect of whole body vibration applied on upper extremity muscles.  

PubMed

The acute residual effect of whole body vibration (WBV) on upper extremity muscles and testosterone secretion was studied. Eight highly (G1), nine moderately trained gymnasts (G2) and seven physically active persons (CG) were recruited for the investigation. The intervention occurred in push-up position with the elbow flexed at 90°. G1 and G2 received 30 s, 30 Hz and 6 mm amplitude vibration repeated five times. Subjects were tested before and after one and ten minutes intervention in push-up movement. Contact time (Tc), fly time (Tf), TF/Tc ratio and impulse was measured from the ground reaction force-time curves recorded during self-selected (SSRM) and full range of motion (FRM). Testosterone level in urine was also determined. Tf increased significantly in SSRM for G1 and decreased in SSRM and FRM for G2. Tf/Tc ratio in FRM and impulse in SSRM increased significantly for G1 only. No significant alteration in testosterone level was observed. We concluded that WBV is a reasonable training modality for influencing dynamic work of upper extremity muscle, but the reaction to WBV is training and individual dependent. It seems that WBV do not influence dynamic work through increased testosterone secretion because of the relatively low mass of the involved muscles. PMID:23232701

Gyulai, G; Rácz, L; Giminiani, R; Tihanyi, József

2013-03-01

61

Vertical vibration characteristics of seated human bodies and a biodynamic model with two degrees of freedom  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding the vibration characteristics of a seated human body is critical for evaluation and improvement of ride comfort\\u000a of various passenger vehicles. There have been very little publications about the vibration characteristics of a seated Chinese\\u000a human body. By using wide-band white noise excitations and a homemade seat sensor, vertical vibration tests were carried out\\u000a on 28 volunteers. Apparent masses

JiangHua Gao; ZhiChao Hou; Le He; QunSheng Xia

62

Haar Wavelet-based Robust Optimal Control for Vibration Reduction of Vehicle Engine–body System  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with the modeling and robust control of bounce and pitch vibration for the engine–body vibration structure\\u000a using Haar wavelets. The authors’ attention is focused on the development of the Haar wavelet-based robust optimal control\\u000a for vibration reduction of the engine–body system computationally that guarantees desired L\\u000a 2 gain performance. The properties of Haar wavelet are introduced and

H. R. Karimi; B. Lohmann

2007-01-01

63

A computational method to robust vibration control of vehicle engine-body system using Haar wavelets  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with the modelling of engine-body vibration structure to robust control of bounce and pitch vibrations using Haar wavelets. The authors' attention is focused on development of the Haar wavelet-based robust optimal control for vibration reduction of the engine-body system computationally that guarantee desired L2 gain performance. The Haar wavelet properties are introduced and utilized to find the

H. R. Karimi; B. Lohmann

2006-01-01

64

An acute bout of whole-body vibration on skeleton start and 30-m sprint performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maximal 30-m upright sprinting and bent over, skeleton push performance were examined in five female national team skeleton athletes before and 10 min after an acute bout of whole-body vibration or no vibration. The whole-body vibration was applied at a frequency of 45 Hz with 4-mm displacement for 3×1-min treatments separated by 1 min. All changes in 30-m sprint and

Nicola Bullock; David T. Martin; Angus Ross; Doug Rosemond; Matthew J. Jordan; Frank E. Marino

2009-01-01

65

Biodynamic response of the human body in the sitting position when subjected to vertical vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies of the location of those areas in which the sensation of vibration is perceived under whole body vertical vibration have underlined the predominance of the relative movement between thorax and pelvis. Experiments were designed to explore systematically the transmissibility between the pelvis and thorax. These were supplemented by measurements of mechanical impedance of the body and absorbed power.

P. M. Donati; C. Bonthoux

1983-01-01

66

Investigation of the transmission of fore and aft vibration through the human body  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding the behavior of human body under the influence of vibration is of great importance for the optimal motor vehicle system design. Therefore, great efforts are being done in order to discover as many information about the influence of vibration on human body as possible. So far the references show that the major scientific attention has been paid to vertical

Miroslav Demi?; Jovanka Luki?

2009-01-01

67

Modeling the Human Body\\/Seat System in a Vibration Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vibration environment is a common man-made artificial surrounding with which humans have a limited tolerance to cope due to their body dynamics. This research studied the dynamic characteristics of a seated human body\\/seat system in a vibration environment. The main result is a multi degrees of freedom lumped parameter model that synthesizes two basic dynamics: (i) global human dynamics,

Jacob Rosen; Mircea Arcan

2003-01-01

68

A CONTINUOUS MODEL FOR THE VERTICAL VIBRATION OF THE HUMAN BODY IN A STANDING POSITION  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is concerned with modelling the vertical vibration of the human body in a standing position. The human body is modelled as a column consisted of two uniform members with different properties. Solutions of the free vibration of the model are given and the effect of several distributions of the stiffnesses are considered. The modal mass, frequencies and axial

Tianjian Ji

69

Gastrocnemius Medialis and Vastus Lateralis Oxygenation during Whole-Body Vibration Exercise  

Microsoft Academic Search

CARDINALE, M., M. FERRARI, and V. QUARESIMA. Gastrocnemius Medialis and Vastus Lateralis Oxygenation during Whole- Body Vibration Exercise. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 39, No. 4, pp. 694-700, 2007. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different whole-body vibration (WBV) frequencies on oxygenation of vastus lateralis (VL) and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscles during static squatting

MARCO CARDINALE; MARCO FERRARI; VALENTINA QUARESIMA

2007-01-01

70

Acute whole-body vibration does not affect static jump performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Currently, whole-body vibration is being used to promote enhanced performance. Many coaches and athletes believe that it can acutely enhance explosive performance and power output. However, the scientific literature is unclear as to whether this enhancement occurs. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of whole-body vibration on static jump performance, including jump height, peak force,

Ashley Kavanaugh; Michael W. Ramsey; William A. Sands; G. Gregory Haff; Michael H. Stone

2011-01-01

71

Mind–Body Therapies in Integrative Oncology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  There is growing interest in mind–body therapies as adjuncts to mainstream cancer treatment, and an increasing number of patients\\u000a turn to these interventions for the control of emotional stress associated with cancer. Increased research funding has enabled\\u000a many such interventions to be evaluated for their efficacy, including studies of mind–body interventions to reduce pain, anxiety,\\u000a insomnia, anticipatory, and treatment-related

Gary Elkins; William Fisher; Aimee Johnson

2010-01-01

72

EFFECT OF MAGNITUDE OF VERTICAL WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION ON ABSORBED POWER FOR THE SEATED HUMAN BODY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The power absorbed by 12 male subjects during exposure to vertical whole-body vibration at six magnitudes of random vibration (0·25, 0·5, 1·0, 1·5, 2·0 and 2·5 ms?2r.m.s.) has been measured in the laboratory. All subjects showed greatest absorbed power at about 5 Hz, but the frequency of this peak in the absorbed power reduced with increasing vibration magnitude. The total

N. J. Mansfield; M. J. Griffin

1998-01-01

73

Effects of a short-term whole body vibration intervention on bone mass and structure in elderly people.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to clarify whether a short-term whole body vibration training has a beneficial effect on bone mass and structure in elderly men and women. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. METHODS: A total of 49 non-institutionalised elderly (20 men and 29 women) volunteered to participate in the study. Participants who met the inclusion criteria were randomly assigned to one of the study groups (whole body vibration or control). A total of 24 elderly trained squat positioned on a vibration platform 3 times per week for 11 weeks. Bone-related variables were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Two-way repeated measures one-way analysis of variance (group by time) was used to determine the effects of the intervention on the bone-related variables and also to determinate the changes within group throughout the intervention period. Analysis of covariance was used to test the differences between groups for bone-related variables in pre- and post-training assessments and in the percentage of change between groups. All analysis were carried out including age, height, subtotal lean mass and daily calcium intake as covariates. RESULTS: 11 weeks of whole body vibration training led to no changes in none of the bone mineral content and bone mineral density parameters measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry through the skeleton. At the tibia, total, trabecular and cortical volumetric bone mineral density decreased significantly in the whole body vibration group (all P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: A short-term whole body vibration therapy is not enough to cause any changes on bone mineral content or bone mineral density and it only produces a slight variation on bone structure among elderly people. PMID:23711620

Gómez-Cabello, Alba; González-Agüero, Alejandro; Morales, Silvia; Ara, Ignacio; Casajús, José A; Vicente-Rodríguez, Germán

2013-05-24

74

Neuromuscular fatigue induced by whole-body vibration exercise.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to examine the magnitude and the origin of neuromuscular fatigue induced by half-squat static whole-body vibration (WBV) exercise, and to compare it to a non-WBV condition. Nine healthy volunteers completed two fatiguing protocols (WBV and non-WBV, randomly presented) consisting of five 1-min bouts of static half-squat exercise with a load corresponding to 50 % of their individual body mass. Neuromuscular fatigue of knee and ankle muscles was investigated before and immediately after each fatiguing protocol. The main outcomes were maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque, voluntary activation, and doublet peak torque. Knee extensor MVC torque decreased significantly (P < 0.01) and to the same extent after WBV (-23 %) and non-WBV (-25 %), while knee flexor, plantar flexor, and dorsiflexor MVC torque was not affected by the treatments. Voluntary activation of knee extensor and plantar flexor muscles was unaffected by the two fatiguing protocols. Doublet peak torque decreased significantly and to a similar extent following WBV and non-WBV exercise, for both knee extensors (-25 %; P < 0.01) and plantar flexors (-7 %; P < 0.05). WBV exercise with additional load did not accentuate fatigue and did not change its causative factors compared to non-WBV half-squat resistive exercise in recreationally active subjects. PMID:23344670

Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Saugy, Jonas; Cardinale, Marco; Micallef, Jean-Paul; Place, Nicolas

2013-01-24

75

Effect of whole body vibration on stereotypy of young children with autism  

PubMed Central

The objective of this case was report on the effects of acute whole body vibration exposure on stereotyped behaviour of young children with autism. Four young boys (ages 4–5 years) diagnosed with autism participated. The children were participants in an early intensive behavioural intervention clinic and during downtimes stood on a whole body vibration platform with the machine turned off (control condition) and on (treatment condition) for three to four, 30 s periods (frequency=28 Hz; amplitude 0.97 mm). The outcome measure was frequency of stereotypic behaviour, which was evaluated for 5 min before and after standing on the vibration platform. The results revealed that whole body vibration was not able to uniformly decrease the rates of all types of stereotypy; that is, some stereotypy decreased while others were unchanged. Subjectively, the children enjoyed whole body vibration which was easy to integrate into the behavioural programme.

Bressel, Eadric; Gibbons, Mandi W; Samaha, Andrew

2011-01-01

76

Effects of whole body vibration training on postural control in older individuals: A 1 year randomized controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

This randomized controlled trial investigated the effects of a 12 month whole body vibration training program on postural control in healthy older adults. Two hundred and twenty people were randomly assigned to a whole body vibration group (n = 94), a fitness group (n = 60) or a control group (n = 66). Thewhole body vibration and fitness groups trained

An Bogaerts; Sabine Verschueren; Christophe Delecluse; Albrecht L. Claessens; Steven Boonen

2007-01-01

77

Lower limbs power and stiffness after whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

The interest in whole-body vibration (WBV) for the enhancement of neuromuscular performance has received considerable attention. However, scientific evidence supporting the optimal prescription of WBV settings is lacking. This study investigated the acute effect of WBV combining high frequency/high peak-to-peak displacement (HH) or low frequency/low peak-to-peak displacement (LL) vs. sham intervention (SHAM) on lower limb muscle power and stiffness. A total of 223 volunteers were randomly assigned to either the HH, LL or SHAM group. Countermovement jump (CMJ) height, maximal and average power, maximal and average lower limbs stiffness obtained during a hopping test were recorded before and after the respective intervention. After the intervention, the HH group showed an increase of 4.64% in CMJ height (p<0.001) whereas the values of both the LL and SHAM groups did not change. In addition, maximal and average power of the lower limbs were significantly increased in all groups (p<0.001; 10.89% and 12.82%, respectively) while no effect on lower limbs stiffness was observed. Our data show that high frequency combined with high peak-to-peak displacement is the most optimal WBV setting for CMJ height enhancement. Further investigation should be undertaken to ascertain the effectiveness of WBV on lower limbs stiffness. PMID:23143701

Colson, S S; Petit, P-D

2012-11-09

78

Musculoskeletal disorders in dumper operators exposed to whole body vibration at Indian mines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dumper operators are exposed to whole body vibration (WBV) in the course of their work. The exposure to WBV in a coal mine in Central India was investigated through measurement of the magnitude of vibration and exposure time. The vibration magnitude along the dominant Z-axis ranged from 0.644 to 1.82 m\\/s in terms of root mean square acceleration. When evaluated in

B. B. Mandal; A. K. Srivastava

2010-01-01

79

Electromyography Activity of Vastus Lateralis Muscle During Whole-Body Vibrations of Different Frequencies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to analyze electromyography (EMG) responses of vastus lateralis muscle to different whole-body vibration frequencies. For this purpose, 16 pro- fessional women volleyball players (age, 23.9 6 3.6 years; height, 182.5 6 11.1 cm; weight, 78.4 6 5.6 kg) voluntarily participated in the study. Vibration treatment was adminis- tered while standing on a vibrating platform

Marco Cardinale; Jon Lim

2003-01-01

80

Whole-body vibration and ergonomic study of US railroad locomotives  

Microsoft Academic Search

US locomotive operators have exposure to multi-axis whole-body vibration (WBV) and shocks while seated. This study assessed operator-related and ergonomic seating design factors that may have confounding or mitigating influence on WBV exposure and its effects. Vibration exposure was measured according to international guidelines (ISO 2631-1; 1997); ergonomic work place factors and vibration effects were studied with a cross-sectional survey

Eckardt Johanning; Paul Landsbergis; Siegfried Fischer; Eberhard Christ; Benno Göres; Raymond Luhrman

2006-01-01

81

Non-linear dual-axis biodynamic response to vertical whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seated human subjects have been exposed to vertical whole-body vibration so as to investigate the non-linearity in their biodynamic responses and quantify the response in directions other than the direction of excitation. Twelve males were exposed to random vertical vibration in the frequency range 0.25–25Hz at four vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25ms?2r.m.s.). The subjects sat in four sitting

N. Nawayseh; M. J Griffin

2003-01-01

82

The interaction of whole body vibration and noise on the cochlea  

Microsoft Academic Search

The structural and functional effects of separate and combined exposure to noise and whole body vibration were studied in 40 guinea pigs. The animals were divided into control (N=10) and study groups (N=30). The study group was subdivided into three sub-groups: noise (N), vibration (V) and noise and vibration (N&V). Apart from the control group, the other sub-groups were exposed

S Soliman; M El-Atreby; S Tawfik; E Holail; N Iskandar; A Abou-Setta

2003-01-01

83

Body sway and vibration perception thresholds in normal aging and in patients with polyneuropathy.  

PubMed Central

Body sway and vibration perception in the lower limbs were measured in 32 normal subjects and 25 patients with peripheral neuropathies; nerve conduction studies were also performed in the patients with neuropathies. Body sway was measured by means of force-plate posturography, and three methods were used to assess vibration perception: a neurothesiometer, a semiquantitative tuning fork, and the bone vibrator of a conventional audiometer. Body sway and vibration perception were increased in the patients with peripheral neuropathies and there was significant correlation between these measures.d These findings, together with the lack of correlation between sway and muscle strength, indicate that the main source of unsteadiness in these patients is the loss of proprioceptive information. Vibration perception and body sway did not correlate with the electrophysiological variables, indicating that these measures assess different aspects of peripheral nerve function. In all subjects there was close correlation between vibration perception as assessed by the neurothesiometer and the audiometer could be used to screen proprioceptive function in patients with balance disorders. In normal subjects age correlated with vibration perception (measured with the neurothesiometer and audiometer) and also with body sway standing on foam. This suggests that the increased body sway in elderly people may partly be due to redue proprioception in the lower limbs.

Bergin, P S; Bronstein, A M; Murray, N M; Sancovic, S; Zeppenfeld, D K

1995-01-01

84

Effects of display vibration and whole-body vibration on visual performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fifteen subjects performed a numeral reading task during (a) vibration of the display, (b) vibration of the subject, (c) simultaneous vibration of both subject and display. Sinusoidal motion at eleven frequencies (0·5 to 5·0 Hz) was presented at five acceleration magnitudes (1·0 to 2·5ms r.m.s.). Measures of reading time and reading error showed that for all except the highest frequencies,

M. J. MOSELEY; M. J. GREFFIN

1986-01-01

85

Validity of self reported occupational exposures to hand transmitted and whole body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVESTo assess the accuracy with which workers report their exposure to occupational sources of hand transmitted (HTV) and whole body vibration (WBV).METHODS179 Workers from various jobs involving exposure to HTV or WBV completed a self administered questionnaire about sources of occupational exposure to vibration in the past week. They were then observed at work over 1 hour, after which they

Keith T Palmer; Barbara Haward; Michael J Griffin; Holly Bendall; David Coggon

2000-01-01

86

The use of an Intensity Matching Technique to Evaluate Human Response to Whole-Body Vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous whole-body vibration intensity matching experiments have been reviewed and some of the different experimental methods and findings are discussed. An experiment has been conducted to investigate ‘ between ’ and ‘ within ’ subject variability in such experiments and to determine the effect of varying the frequency of the standard vibration against which other frequencies are matched. Although subjects

L. C. FOTHERGILL; M. J. GRIFFIN

1977-01-01

87

The Evaluation of Discomfort Produced by Multiple Frequency Whole-Body Vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The discomfort produced by multiple frequency whole-body vertical vibration has been studied in three expriments. Subjects were required to adjust the level of a 10 Hz sinusoidal vibration such that it produced a degree of discomfort equivalent to that caused by a variety of multiple frequency stimuli including motions containing predominant beats and up to four sinusoidal components. The levels

L. C. FOTHERGILL; M. J. GRIFFIN

1977-01-01

88

Self-reported back pain in tractor drivers exposed to whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary A postal questionnaire on symptoms of ill health and exposure to whole-body vibration was completed by 577 workers (response rate 79%) who were employed in certain functions by two companies 11 years before. The relation between the occupational history of driving vibrating vehicles (mainly agricultural tractors) and back pain has been analyzed. The prevalence of reported back pain is

Hendriek C. Boshuizen; Paulien M. Bongers; Carel T. J. Hulshof

1990-01-01

89

Electromagnetic vibration transducer using polyimide elastic body for implantable middle ear hearing aid  

Microsoft Academic Search

For use as an implantable middle ear hearing aid, vibration transducer should have small size, high-energy efficiency and suitable frequency bandwidth. In order to optimize the electromagnetic force for greatest efficiency, finite element analysis (FEA) simulation was preformed. Additionally, for the investigation of frequency characteristics of vibration transducer, four FEA models of polyimide elastic body were presented and simulation was

Ki-Chan Lee; Jin-Ho Cho; Sang-Heun Lee

2002-01-01

90

Predicting discomfort from whole-body vertical vibration when sitting with an inclined backrest.  

PubMed

Current methods for evaluating seat vibration to predict vibration discomfort assume the same frequency weightings and axis multiplying factors can be used at the seat surface and the backrest irrespective of the backrest inclination. This experimental study investigated the discomfort arising from whole-body vertical vibration when sitting on a rigid seat with no backrest and with a backrest inclined at 0° (upright), 30°, 60°, and 90° (recumbent). Within each of these five postures, 12 subjects judged the discomfort caused by vertical sinusoidal whole-body vibration (at frequencies from 1 to 20 Hz at magnitudes from 0.2 to 2.0 m s(-2) r.m.s.) relative to the discomfort produced by a reference vibration (8 Hz at 0.4 m s(-2) r.m.s.). With 8-Hz vertical vibration, the subjects also judged vibration discomfort with each backrest condition relative to the vibration discomfort with no backrest. The locations in the body where discomfort was experienced were determined for each frequency at two vibration magnitudes. Equivalent comfort contours were determined for the five conditions of the backrest and show how discomfort depends on the frequency of vibration, the presence of the backrest, and the backrest inclination. At frequencies greater than about 8 Hz, the backrest increased vibration discomfort, especially when inclined to 30°, 60°, or 90°, and there was greater discomfort at the head or neck. At frequencies around 5 and 6.3 Hz there was less vibration discomfort when sitting with an inclined backrest. PMID:23190680

Basri, Bazil; Griffin, Michael J

2012-11-26

91

Localised Muscle Tissue Oxygenation During Dynamic Exercise With Whole Body Vibration  

PubMed Central

Abstract Despite increasing use of whole body vibration during exercise an understanding of the exact role of vibration and the supporting physiological mechanisms is still limited. An important aspect of exercise analysis is the utilisation of oxygen, however, there have been limited studies considering tissue oxygenation parameters, particularly during dynamic whole body vibration (WBV) exercise. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of adding WBV during heel raise exercises and assessing changes in tissue oxygenation parameters of the lateral gastrocnemius using Near Infra Red Spectroscopy (NIRS). Twenty healthy subjects completed ten alternating sets of 15 heel raises (vibration vs. no vibration). Synchronous oxygenation and motion data were captured prior to exercise to determine baseline levels, for the duration of the exercise and 20 sec post exercise for the recovery period. Both vibration and no vibration conditions elicited a characteristic increase in deoxyhaemoglobin and decreases in oxyhaemoglobin, total haemoglobin, tissue oxygenation index and normalised tissue haemoglobin index which are indicative of local tissue hypoxia. However, the addition of vibration elicited significantly lower (p < 0. 001) depletions in oxyhaemoglobin, total haemoglobin, normalised tissue haemoglobin index but no significant differences in deoxyhaemoglobin. These findings suggest that addition of vibration to exercise does not increase the cost of the exercise for the lateral gastrocnemius muscle, but does decrease the reduction in local muscle oxygenation parameters, potentially resulting from increased blood flow to the calf or a vasospastic response in the feet. However, further studies are needed to establish the mechanisms underlying these findings. Key points Whole body vibration affects tissue oxygenation of the lateral gastrocnemius. The underlying mechanism could be either increased blood flow or a vasospastic response in the feet. The local metabolic cost of heel raise activity on the lateral gastrocnemius does not appear to be increased by whole body vibration.

Robbins, Daniel; Elwell, Clare; Jimenez, Alfonso; Goss-Sampson, Mark

2012-01-01

92

Acute effects of stochastic resonance whole body vibration  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate the acute effects of stochastic resonance whole body vibration (SR-WBV) training to identify possible explanations for preventive effects against musculoskeletal disorders. METHODS: Twenty-three healthy, female students participated in this quasi-experimental pilot study. Acute physiological and psychological effects of SR-WBV training were examined using electromyography of descending trapezius (TD) muscle, heart rate variability (HRV), different skin parameters (temperature, redness and blood flow) and self-report questionnaires. All subjects conducted a sham SR-WBV training at a low intensity (2 Hz with noise level 0) and a verum SR-WBV training at a higher intensity (6 Hz with noise level 4). They were tested before, during and after the training. Conclusions were drawn on the basis of analysis of variance. RESULTS: Twenty-three healthy, female students participated in this study (age = 22.4 ± 2.1 years; body mass index = 21.6 ± 2.2 kg/m2). Muscular activity of the TD and energy expenditure rose during verum SR-WBV compared to baseline and sham SR-WBV (all P < 0.05). Muscular relaxation after verum SR-WBV was higher than at baseline and after sham SR-WBV (all P < 0.05). During verum SR-WBV the levels of HRV were similar to those observed during sham SR-WBV. The same applies for most of the skin characteristics, while microcirculation of the skin of the middle back was higher during verum compared to sham SR-WBV (P < 0.001). Skin redness showed significant changes over the three measurement points only in the middle back area (P = 0.022). There was a significant rise from baseline to verum SR-WBV (0.86 ± 0.25 perfusion units; P = 0.008). The self-reported chronic pain grade indicators of pain, stiffness, well-being, and muscle relaxation showed a mixed pattern across conditions. Muscle and joint stiffness (P = 0.018) and muscular relaxation did significantly change from baseline to different conditions of SR-WBV (P < 0.001). Moreover, muscle relaxation after verum SR-WBV was higher than after sham SR-WBV (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Verum SR-WBV stimulated musculoskeletal activity in young healthy individuals while cardiovascular activation was low. Training of musculoskeletal capacity and immediate increase in musculoskeletal relaxation are potential mediators of pain reduction in preventive trials.

Elfering, Achim; Zahno, Jasmine; Taeymans, Jan; Blasimann, Angela; Radlinger, Lorenz

2013-01-01

93

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Fractionated Radiation Therapy Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The introduction of intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery in 1951 is widely attributed to Lars Leksell [1]. As initially developed, the method delivered a single dose of radiation to a target lesion, which was localized using the\\u000a principles of stereotaxy. Current treatment strategies in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are an extension of these\\u000a principles applied to extracranial sites. Techniques that allow

Gordon W. Wong; Rafael R. Mañon; Wolfgang Tomé; Minesh Mehta

94

Modeling of hard disk drives for vibration analysis using a flexible multi-body dynamics formulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a flexible multi-body dynamics formulation to analyze vibration of hard disk drives. The formulation is applied in analyzing vibration of VCM-actuators assembly and disks-spindle system. There are flexible components as well as rigid bodies in the system. Governing equations of motion of the VCM-actuators assembly and disks-spindle system are derived by using a Lagrangian formulation. Elastic deformations

Feng GAO; Fook Fah YAP; Ying YAN

2004-01-01

95

Whole-Body-Vibration–Induced Increase in Leg Muscle Activity During Different Squat Exercises  

Microsoft Academic Search

Roelants, M., S.M.P. Verschueren, C. Delecluse, O. Levin, and V. Stijnen. Whole-body-vibration-induced increase in leg muscle activity during different squat exercises. J. Strength Cond. Res. 20(1):124-129. 2006.—This study analyzed leg mus- cle activity during whole-body vibration (WBV) training. Sub- jects performed standard unloaded isometric exercises on a vi- brating platform (Power Plate): high squat (HS), low squat (LS), and 1-legged

Machteld Roelants; Sabine M. P. Verschueren; Christophe Delecluse; Oron Levin; Valère Stijnen

2006-01-01

96

Variation in Neuromuscular Responses during Acute Whole-Body Vibration Exercise  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABERCROMBY, A. F. J., W. E. AMONETTE, C. S. LAYNE, B. K. MCFARLIN, M. R. HINMAN, and W. H. PALOSKI. Variation in Neuromuscular Responses during Acute Whole-Body Vibration Exercise. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 39, No. 9, pp. 1642-1650, 2007. Purpose: Leg muscle strength and power are increased after whole-body vibration (WBV) exercise. These effects may result from increased neuromuscular

ANDREW F. J. ABERCROMBY; WILLIAM E. AMONETTE; CHARLES S. LAYNE; BRIAN K. MCFARLIN; MARTHA R. HINMAN; WILLIAM H. PALOSKI

2007-01-01

97

Acute Effects of Whole-Body Vibration on Muscle Activity, Strength, and Power  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cormie, P., R.S. Deane, N.T. Triplett, and J.M. McBride. Acute effects of whole-body vibration on muscle activ- ity, strength, and power. J. Strength Cond. Res. 20(2):257-261. 2006.—The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a single bout of whole-body vibration on isometric squat (IS) and countermovement jump (CMJ) performance. Nine moder- ately resistance-trained men were tested for

Prue Cormie; Russell S. Deane; N. Travis Triplett; Jeffrey M. McBride

2006-01-01

98

Whole-body vibration as a method of recovery for soccer players  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to determine whether superimposed whole-body vibration could improve the recovery-related effects of a traditional cool-down in high-level soccer players. Sixteen high-level junior soccer players performed a repeated-sprint ability test, after which they performed a traditional cool-down, with (experimental group) or without (control group) superimposed whole-body vibration. Functional recovery was measured through vertical jump height

Pedro J. Marin; Raúl Zarzuela; Fernando Zarzosa; Azael J. Herrero; Nuria Garatachea; Matthew R. Rhea; David García-López

2012-01-01

99

Whole-body vibration as a method of recovery for soccer players  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to determine whether superimposed whole-body vibration could improve the recovery-related effects of a traditional cool-down in high-level soccer players. Sixteen high-level junior soccer players performed a repeated-sprint ability test, after which they performed a traditional cool-down, with (experimental group) or without (control group) superimposed whole-body vibration. Functional recovery was measured through vertical jump height

Pedro J. Marin; Raúl Zarzuela; Fernando Zarzosa; Azael J. Herrero; Nuria Garatachea; Matthew R. Rhea; David García-López

2011-01-01

100

Strength Increase after Whole-Body Vibration Compared with Resistance Training  

Microsoft Academic Search

DELECLUSE, C., M. ROELANTS, and S. VERSCHUEREN. Strength Increase after Whole-Body Vibration Compared with Resistance Training. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 35, No. 6, pp. 1033-1041, 2003. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate and to compare the effect of a 12-wk period of whole-body vibration training and resistance training on human knee-extensor strength. Methods: Sixty-seven untrained females

CHRISTOPHE DELECLUSE; MACHTELD ROELANTS; SABINE VERSCHUEREN

2003-01-01

101

Nonlinear dual-axis biodynamic response of the semi-supine human body during longitudinal horizontal whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The resonance frequencies in frequency response functions of the human body (e.g. apparent mass and transmissibility) decrease with increasing vibration magnitude. This nonlinear biodynamic response is found with various sitting and standing postures requiring postural control. The present study measured the apparent mass of the body in a relaxed semi-supine posture with two types of longitudinal horizontal vibration (in the z-axis of the semi-supine body): (i) continuous random excitation (0.25 20 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 ms-2 rms); (ii) intermittent random excitation (0.25 20 Hz) alternately at 0.25 and 1.0 ms-2 rms. With continuous random vibration, the dominant primary resonance frequency in the median normalised apparent mass decreased from 3.7 to 2.4 Hz as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 1.0 ms-2 rms. A nonlinear response was apparent in both the horizontal (z-axis) apparent mass and the vertical (x-axis) cross-axis apparent mass. With intermittent random vibration, as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.25 to 1.0 ms-2 rms, the median resonance frequency of the apparent mass decreased from 3.2 to 2.5 Hz whereas, with continuous random vibration over the same range of magnitudes, the resonance frequency decreased from 3.4 to 2.4 Hz. The median change in the resonance frequency (between 0.25 and 1.0 ms-2 rms) was 0.6 Hz with the intermittent random vibration and 0.9 Hz with the continuous random vibration. With intermittent vibration, the resonance frequency was higher at the high magnitude and lower at the low magnitude than with continuous vibration at the same magnitudes. The responses were consistent with passive thixotropy being a primary cause of nonlinear biodynamic responses to whole-body vibration, although reflex activity of the muscles may also have an influence.

Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

2008-04-01

102

Apparent Mass and Absorbed Power during Exposure to Whole-Body Vibration and Repeated Shocks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Exposure to mechanical shocks might pose a greater health risk than exposure to continuous vibration. Previous studies have investigated subjective responses, muscle activity or transmission of vibration to the spine or head during shock. If there is a difference between biomechanic responses of the seated body to shocks when compared to continuous vibration, then this may indicate a more, or less, hazardous vibration waveform. This paper presents measurements of apparent mass and absorbed power during exposure to random vibration, repeated shocks and combinations of shocks and random vibration. Eleven male and 13 female subjects were exposed to 15 vibration conditions generated using an electro-dynamic shaker. Subjects were exposed to five 20 s acceleration waveforms with nominally identical power spectra (random vibration, equally spaced shocks, unequally spaced shocks, random combined with equally spaced shocks, random combined with unequally spaced shocks) at each of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m/s2r.m.s. The general shapes of the apparent mass or absorbed power curves were not affected by stimulus type, indicating that the biomechanical response of the body is fundamentally the same when exposed to shocks or random vibration. Two non-linear effects were observed: apparent mass resonance frequencies were slightly higher for exposure to shocks; apparent mass and absorbed power resonance frequencies decreased with increases in vibration magnitude for each stimulus type. It is concluded that the two non-linear mechanisms operate simultaneously: a stiffening effect during exposure to shocks and a softening effect as vibration magnitudes increase. Total absorbed powers were greatest for shock stimuli and least for random vibration.

Mansfield, N. J.; Holmlund, P.; Lundström, R.

2001-11-01

103

Stochastic Resonance Whole-Body Vibration, Musculoskeletal Symptoms, and Body Balance: A Worksite Training Study  

PubMed Central

Background Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training (SR-WBV) was tested to reduce work-related musculoskeletal complaints. Methods Participants were 54 white-collar employees of a Swiss organization. The controlled crossover design comprised two groups each given 4 weeks of exercise and no training during a second 4-week period. Outcome was daily musculoskeletal well-being, musculoskeletal pain, and surefootedness. In addition, participants performed a behavioral test on body balance prior to when SR-WBV started and after 4 weeks of SR-WBV. Results Across the 4-week training period, musculoskeletal well-being and surefootedness were significantly increased (p < 0.05), whereas musculoskeletal pain was significantly reduced only in those who reported low back pain during the last 4 weeks prior to the study (p < 0.05). Body balance was significantly increased by SR-WBV (p < 0.05). Conclusion SR-WBV seems to be an efficient option in primary prevention of musculoskeletal complaints and falls at work.

Elfering, Achim; Arnold, Sibille; Schade, Volker; Burger, Christian; Radlinger, Lorenz

2013-01-01

104

Effects of whole-body vibration exercise on the endocrine system of healthy men.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration is reported to increase muscle performance, bone mineral density and stimulate the secretion of lipolytic and protein anabolic hormones, such as GH and testosterone, that might be used for the treatment of obesity. To date, as no controlled trial has examined the effects of vibration exercise on the human endocrine system, we performed a randomized controlled study, to establish whether the circulating concentrations of glucose and hormones (insulin, glucagon, cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, GH, IGF-1, free and total testosterone) are affected by vibration in 10 healthy men [age 39 +/- 3, body mass index (BMI) of 23.5 +/- 0.5 kg/m2, mean +/- SEM]. Volunteers were studied on two occasions before and after standing for 25 min on a ground plate in the absence (control) or in the presence (vibration) of 30 Hz whole body vibration. Vibration slightly reduced plasma glucose (30 min: vibration 4.59 +/- 0.21, control 4.74 +/- 0.22 mM, p=0.049) and increased plasma norepinephrine concentrations (60 min: vibration 1.29 +/- 0.18, control 1.01 +/- 0.07 nM, p=0.038), but did not change the circulating concentrations of other hormones. These results demonstrate that vibration exercise transiently reduces plasma glucose, possibly by increasing glucose utilization by contracting muscles. Since hormonal responses, with the exception of norepinephrine, are not affected by acute vibration exposure, this type of exercise is not expected to reduce fat mass in obese subjects. PMID:15233550

Di Loreto, C; Ranchelli, A; Lucidi, P; Murdolo, G; Parlanti, N; De Cicco, A; Tsarpela, O; Annino, G; Bosco, C; Santeusanio, F; Bolli, G B; De Feo, P

2004-04-01

105

Whole-body vibration applied during upper body exercise improves performance.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration (WBV) training has exercisers perform static and dynamic resistance training exercises on a ground-based platform. Exposure to WBV exposure has demonstrated benefits and no effect on lower body strength, power, and performance. The aim of this study was to determine if WBV exposure (50 Hz, 2.51 mm) has any potentiating effects postexercise by measuring the kinematic variables of a set of upper body elbow-extensor exercise (70% one-repetition maximum [1RM]) to volitional exhaustion. Sixteen recreationally active students (12 male and 4 female) performed 3 different experimental conditions on separate days. Each condition had the subjects perform 1 set of elbow-extension exercise to fatigue with 1 of 3 WBV treatments: WBV simultaneously during the set (AE); 60 seconds after application of WBV for 30 seconds (RE); and no WBV (CTRL). Kinematic parameters of each repetition were monitored by linking a rotary encoder to the highest load plate. The mean velocity and acceleration throughout the set and perceived exertion were analyzed. A significant increase (p < 0.05) was observed in the mean velocity for the whole set in the AE condition vs. the CTRL condition. The mean acceleration was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the AE condition in comparison with RE (increased by 45.3%) and CTRL (increased by 50.4%) conditions. The positive effect induced by WBV on upper-limb performance is only achieved when the stimulus is applied during the exercise. However, WBV applied 60 seconds before upper body exercise results in no benefit. PMID:23085972

Marín, Pedro J; Herrero, Azael J; Milton, John G; Hazell, Tom J; García-López, David

2013-07-01

106

Nonlinear dual-axis biodynamic response of the semi-supine human body during vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nonlinear biodynamic responses are evident in many studies of the apparent masses of sitting and standing subjects in static postures that require muscle activity for postural control. In the present study, 12 male subjects adopted a relaxed semi-supine posture assumed to involve less muscle activity than during static sitting and standing. The supine subjects were exposed to two types of vertical vibration (in the x-axis of the semi-supine body): (i) continuous random vibration (0.25 20 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 m s-2 rms); (ii) intermittent random vibration (0.25 20 Hz) alternately at 0.25 and 1.0 m s-2 rms. With continuous random vibration, the dominant primary resonance frequency in the median normalised apparent mass decreased from 10.35 to 7.32 Hz as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 1.0 m s-2 rms. This nonlinear response was apparent in both the vertical (x-axis) apparent mass and in the horizontal (z-axis) cross-axis apparent mass. As the vibration magnitude increased from 0.25 to 1.0 m s-2 rms, the median resonance frequency of the apparent mass with intermittent random vibration decreased from 9.28 to 8.06 Hz whereas, over the same range of magnitudes with continuous random vibration, the resonance frequency decreased from 9.62 to 7.81 Hz. The median change in the resonance frequency (between 0.25 and 1.0 m s-2 rms) was 1.37 Hz with the intermittent random vibration and 1.71 with the continuous random vibration. With the intermittent vibration, the resonance frequency was higher at the high magnitude and lower at the low magnitude than with continuous vibration of the same magnitudes. The response was typical of thixotropy that may be a primary cause of the nonlinear biodynamic responses to whole-body vibration.

Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

2008-04-01

107

Biodynamic response of the human body in the sitting position when subjected to vertical vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous studies of the location of those areas in which the sensation of vibration is perceived under whole body vertical vibration have underlined the predominance of the relative movement between thorax and pelvis. Experiments were designed to explore systematically the transmissibility between the pelvis and thorax. These were supplemented by measurements of mechanical impedance of the body and absorbed power. To determine the body impedance, a procedure was developed to remove the effect of the load platform itself. Fifteen subjects were presented first with a swept sinusoidal vibration, and then with a broad band random vibration, to see how the wave form of the motion might affect the mechanical response of the body. The results obtained for the seat to thorax transmissibility suggest that within the range of vertical vibration investigated (1-10 Hz, 1.6 m/s2 r.m.s.) the human body in the sitting position can be modelled by a linear system with one or two degrees of freedom according to the subject. Data from the impedance function, which is a more complete description of the response of the body as a mechanical system, lead to systems with one further degree of freedom.

Donati, P. M.; Bonthoux, C.

1983-10-01

108

Body Awareness: a phenomenological inquiry into the common ground of mind-body therapies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Enhancing body awareness has been described as a key element or a mechanism of action for therapeutic approaches often categorized\\u000a as mind-body approaches, such as yoga, TaiChi, Body-Oriented Psychotherapy, Body Awareness Therapy, mindfulness based therapies\\/meditation,\\u000a Feldenkrais, Alexander Method, Breath Therapy and others with reported benefits for a variety of health conditions. To better\\u000a understand the conceptualization of body awareness in

Wolf E Mehling; Judith Wrubel; Jennifer J Daubenmier; Cynthia J Price; Catherine E Kerr; Theresa Silow; Viranjini Gopisetty; Anita L Stewart

2011-01-01

109

Nonlinear subjective and dynamic responses of seated subjects exposed to horizontal whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of the magnitude of fore-and-aft and lateral vibration on the subjective and mechanical responses of seated subjects has been investigated experimentally using simultaneous measurements of relative discomfort and apparent mass. Twelve male subjects were exposed to sinusoidal vibration at nine frequencies (between 1.6 and 10 Hz) at four magnitudes (in the range 0.125-1.0 m s-2 r.m.s.) in both horizontal directions (fore-and-aft and lateral). The method of magnitude estimation was used to estimate discomfort relative to that caused by a 4 Hz reference vibration in the same axis. The apparent mass was calculated from the acceleration and the applied force so as to quantify the mechanical response of the body. With each direction of excitation, the apparent mass was normalised by dividing it by the apparent mass obtained at 4 Hz, so that the mechanical responses could be compared with the subjective responses. The relative discomfort and the normalised apparent mass were similarly affected by the frequency and magnitude of vibration, with significant correlations between the relative discomfort and the normalised apparent mass. The results indicate that the discomfort caused by horizontal whole-body vibration is associated with the apparent mass in a frequency range where motion of the whole body is dominant. In this frequency range, the nonlinear subjective responses may be attributed, at least in part, to the nonlinear dynamic responses to horizontal whole-body vibration.

Subashi, G. H. M. J.; Nawayseh, N.; Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

2009-03-01

110

Varying whole body vibration amplitude differentially affects tendon and ligament structural and material properties.  

PubMed

Whole Body Vibration (WBV) is becoming increasingly popular for helping to maintain bone mass and strengthening muscle. Vibration regimens optimized for bone maintenance often operate at hypogravity levels (<1G) and regimens for muscle strengthening often employ hypergravity (>1G) vibrations. The effect of vibratory loads on tendon and ligament properties is unclear though excessive vibrations may be injurious. Our objective was to evaluate how tendon gene expression and the mechanical/histological properties of tendon and ligament were affected in response to WBV in the following groups: no vibration, low vibration (0.3G peak-to-peak), and high vibration (2G peak-to-peak). Rats were vibrated for 20 min a day, 5 days a week, for 5 weeks. Upon sacrifice, the medial collateral ligament (MCL), patellar tendon (PT), and the Achilles Tendon (AT) were isolated with insertion sites intact. All tissues were tensile tested to determine structural and material properties or used for histology. Patellar tendon was also subjected to quantitative RT-PCR to evaluate expression of anabolic and catabolic genes. No differences in biomechanical data between the control and the low vibration groups were found. There was evidence of significant weakness in the MCL with high vibration, but no significant effect on the PT or AT. Histology of the MCL and PT showed a hypercellular tissue response and some fiber disorganization with high vibration. High vibration caused an increase in collagen expression and a trend for an increase in IGF-1 expression suggesting a potential anabolic response to prevent tendon overuse injury. PMID:23623311

Keller, Benjamin V; Davis, Matthew L; Thompson, William R; Dahners, Laurence E; Weinhold, Paul S

2013-04-25

111

The effect of internal elastic vibrations on the motion of a rigid body  

Microsoft Academic Search

An analysis is presented of the motion of an absolutely rigid body that is linked to a linear elastic dissipative system with a finite number of degrees of freedom. An asymptotic solution is obtained for the forced elastic vibrations. It is shown that the effect of the internal degrees of freedom on the motion of the rigid body is equivalent

F. L. Chernousko

1979-01-01

112

Nonlinearity in apparent mass and transmissibility of the supine human body during vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Resonance frequencies evident in the apparent mass and the transmissibility of the human body decrease with increasing vibration magnitude, but the mechanisms responsible for this nonlinearity have not been established. This experiment was designed to explore the effects of body location on the nonlinearity of the body in supine postures. In a group of 12 male subjects, the apparent mass and transmissibility to the sternum, upper abdomen, and lower abdomen were measured in three postures (relaxed semi-supine, flat supine and constrained semi-supine) with vertical random vibration (0.25-20 Hz) at seven vibration magnitudes (nominally 0.0313, 0.0625, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 ms-2 rms). In all three postures, the apparent mass resonance frequencies and the primary peak frequencies in the transmissibilities to the upper and lower abdomen decreased with increases in vibration magnitude from 0.25 to 1.0 ms-2 rms. Nonlinearity generally apparent in transmissibility to the abdomen was less evident in transmissibility to the sternum and less evident in transmissibilities to the abdomen at vibration magnitudes less than 0.125 ms-2 rms. The nonlinearity was more apparent in the flat supine posture than in the semi-supine postures. The findings are consistent with the nonlinearity being associated with the response of soft tissues, more likely a consequence of passive thixotropy than muscle activity.

Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

2009-07-01

113

Musculoskeletal Response to Whole-Body Vibration During Fracture Healing in Intact and Ovariectomized Rats  

PubMed Central

This study investigated the effect of vibration on bone healing and muscle in intact and ovariectomized rats. Thirty ovariectomized (at 3 months of age) and 30 intact 5-month old female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent bilateral metaphyseal osteotomy of tibia. Five days later, half of the ovariectomized and of the intact rats were exposed to whole-body vertical vibration (90 Hz, 0.5 mm, 4 × g acceleration) for 15 min twice a day during 30 days. The other animals did not undergo vibration. After decapitation of rats, one tibia was used for computed tomographic, biomechanical, and histological analyses; the other was used for gene expression analyses of alkaline phosphatase (Alp), osteocalcin (Oc), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 1, and insulinlike growth factor 1. Serum Alp and Oc were measured. Mitochondrial activity, fiber area and distribution, and capillary densities were analyzed in M. gastrocnemius and M. longissimus. We found that vibration had no effect on body weight and food intake, but it improved cortical and callus densities (97 vs. 99%, 72 vs. 81%), trabecular structure (9 vs. 14 trabecular nodes), blood supply (1.7 vs. 2.1 capillaries/fiber), and oxidative metabolism (17 vs. 23 pmol O2/s/mg) in ovariectomized rats. Vibration generally increased muscle fiber size. Tibia biomechanical properties were diminished after vibration. Oc gene expression was higher in vibrated rats. Serum Alp was increased in ovariectomized rats. In ovariectomized rats, vibration resulted in an earlier bridging; in intact rats, callus bridging occurred later after vibration. The chosen vibration regimen (90 Hz, 0.5 mm, 4 × g acceleration, 15 min twice a day) was effective in improving musculoskeletal tissues in ovariectomized rats but was not optimal for fracture healing.

Stuermer, Ewa K.; Werner, Carsten; Wicke, Michael; Kolios, Leila; Sehmisch, Stephan; Tezval, Mohammad; Utesch, Clara; Mangal, Orzala; Zimmer, Sebastian; Dullin, Christian; Stuermer, Klaus M.

2010-01-01

114

Whole-body vibration in the skeleton: Development of a resonance-based testing device  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been demonstrated to have a strong influence on physiological systems, ranging from severely\\u000a destructive to potentially beneficial. Unfortutely, the study of WBV in a controlled manner is commonly constrained by space\\u000a and budgetary factors, particularly where vibration in the low frequency range is considered. In the work presented here,\\u000a a small, low-cost device for performing WBV

J. Chris Fritton; Clinton T. Rubin; Yi-Xian Qin; Kenneth J. McLeod

1997-01-01

115

The effects of random whole-body-vibration on motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well known that applying vibrations to men influences multiple physiological functions. The authors analysed post effects of whole-body-vibration (WBV) on motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Sixty-eight persons with PD were randomly subdivided into one experimental and one control group. Motor symptoms were assessed by the UPDRS (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale) motor score. A cross over design

S Turbanski; K Kessler; D Schmidtbleicher

2006-01-01

116

Back disorders in crane operators exposed to whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

In The Netherlands so far little research has been carried out to investigate the health effects of exposure to whole-body vibration at work. In a retrospective (10-year) follow-up study, the incidence of permanent work disabilities in crane operators exposed to vibration was compared to that of a control group. The emphasis in this presentation is on disablement because of back

Paulien M. Bongers; Hendriek C. Boshuizen; Carel T. J. Hulshof; Agaath P. Koemeester

1988-01-01

117

Whole-body vibration: Evaluation of emission and exposure levels arising from agricultural tractors  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study was conducted to quantify whole-body vibration (WBV) emission and estimated exposure levels found upon a range of modern, state-of-the-art agricultural tractors, when operated in controlled conditions (traversing ISO ride vibration test tracks and performing selected agricultural operations) and whilst performing identical tasks during ‘on-farm’ use. The potential consequences of operator WBV exposure limitations, as prescribed by the European

A. J. Scarlett; J. S. Price; R. M. Stayner

2007-01-01

118

Treatment of Chronic Lower Back Pain with Lumbar Extension and Whole-Body Vibration Exercise  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study Design. A randomized controlled trial with a 6-month follow-up period was conducted. Objective. To compare lumbar extension exercise and whole-body vibration exercise for chronic lower back pain. Summary of Background Data. Chronic lower back pain involves muscular as well as connective and neural systems. Different types of physiotherapy are applied for its treatment. Industrial vibration is regarded as a

A Randomized Controlled Trial; Jorn Rittweger; Karsten Just; Katja Kautzsch; Peter Reeg; Dieter Felsenberg

119

Triaxial forces at the seat and backrest during whole-body vertical vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

During exposure of seated subjects to vertical whole-body vibration, forces in the fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical directions at the seat and backrest have been measured. The responses at the seat have been compared with those measured previously on a seat without a backrest. Twelve male subjects were exposed to random vertical vibration in the frequency range 0.25–20Hz. The subjects sat

N. Nawayseh; M. J. Griffin

2004-01-01

120

Effect of a vibration exposure on muscular performance and body balance. Randomized cross-over study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary This randomized cross-over study was designed to investigate the effects of a 4-min vibration bout on muscle performance and body balance in young, healthy subjects. Sixteen volunteers (eight men, eight women, age 24-33 years) underwent both the 4-min vibration- and sham-interventions in a randomized order on different days. Six performance tests (stability platform, grip strength, isometric extension strength of

Saila Torvinen; Pekka Kannus; Harri Sievanen; Tero A. H. Jarvinen; Matti Pasanen; Saija Kontulainen; Teppo L. N. Jarvinen; Markku Jarvinen; Pekka Oja; Ilkka Vuori

2002-01-01

121

The effects of random whole-body-vibration on motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well known that applying vibrations to men influences multiple physiological functions. The authors analysed post effects of whole-body-vibration (WBV) on motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Sixty-eight persons with PD were randomly subdivided into one experimental and one control group. Motor symptoms were assessed by the UPDRS (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale) motor score. A cross-over design was

Christian T. Haas; Stephan Turbanski; Kirn Kessler; Dietmar Schmidtbleicher

122

EMG activity during whole body vibration: motion artifacts or stretch reflexes?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The validity of electromyographic (EMG) data recorded during whole body vibration (WBV) is controversial. Some authors ascribed\\u000a a major part of the EMG signal to vibration-induced motion artifacts while others have interpreted the EMG signals as muscular\\u000a activity caused at least partly by stretch reflexes. The aim of this study was to explore the origin of the EMG signal during

Ramona Ritzmann; Andreas Kramer; Markus Gruber; Albert Gollhofer; Wolfgang Taube

2010-01-01

123

On auditory evoked potentials and heart rate in man during whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Auditory evoked brain potentials and heart rate were recorded from three healthy male subjects during sinusoidal whole-body vibration exposure in the longitudinal (±az) direction (two intensities: I1=0.57 ms–2 r.m.s., I2=3.2 ms–2 r.m.s., frequency: 4 Hz) and under no-vibration control conditions according to a change-over design. All conditions were performed at a constant noise level. The part of vibration-synchronous activity contaminating

P. Ullsperger; H. Seidel

1980-01-01

124

Vibrations of a rigid body that is hinged-suspended in a fluid flow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Consideration is given to a rigid body that is suspended in a fluid flow by three hinge-connected rods. In general, it is assumed that the body can rotate about an axis coinciding with a rod to which the body is connected. The hinge axes are oriented in such a way that the system can be viewed (in different particular cases) as a physical pendulum oscillating along or across the flow, as a rigid body with a Hooke hinge, or as a rigid body with a fixed axis of rotation. The Lagrange method is used to obtain differential equations for the vibrations of the body under the effect of hydrodynamic forces. Attention is given to the vibrations of a circular cylinder transverse to the flow due to vortex forces.

Zolotenko, G. F.; Omelchak, S. S.

1985-09-01

125

Synchronous whole-body vibration increases V O 2 during and following acute exercise  

Microsoft Academic Search

Single bout whole-body vibration (WBV) exercise has been shown to produce small but significant increases in oxygen consumption\\u000a (VO2). How much more a complete whole-body exercise session (multiple dynamic exercises targeting both upper and lower body muscles)\\u000a can increase VO2 is unknown. The purpose of this study was to quantify VO2 during and for an extended time period (24 h) following

Tom J. HazellPeter; Peter W. R. Lemon

126

Whole-body vibration improves functional recovery in spinal cord injured rats.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a relatively novel form of exercise used to improve neuromuscular performance in healthy individuals. Its usefulness as a therapy for patients with neurological disorders, in particular spinal cord injury (SCI), has received little attention in clinical settings and, surprisingly, even less in animal SCI models. We performed severe compression SCI at a low-thoracic level in Wistar rats followed by daily WBV starting 7 (10 rats) or 14 (10 rats) days after injury (WBV7 and WBV14, respectively) and continued over a 12-week post-injury period. Rats with SCI but no WBV training (sham, 10 rats) and intact animals (10 rats) served as controls. Compared to sham-treated rats, WBV did not improve BBB score, plantar stepping, or ladder stepping during the 12-week period. Accordingly, WBV did not significantly alter plantar H-reflex, lesion volume, serotonergic input to the lumbar spinal cord, nor cholinergic or glutamatergic inputs to lumbar motoneurons at 12 weeks after SCI. However, compared to sham, WBV14, but not WBV7, significantly improved body weight support (rump-height index) during overground locomotion and overall recovery between 6-12 weeks and also restored the density of synaptic terminals in the lumbar spinal cord at 12 weeks. Most remarkably, WBV14 led to a significant improvement of bladder function at 6-12 weeks after injury. These findings provide the first evidence for functional benefits of WBV in an animal SCI model and warrant further preclinical investigations to determine mechanisms underpinning this noninvasive, inexpensive, and easily delivered potential rehabilitation therapy for SCI. PMID:23157611

Wirth, Felicitas; Schempf, Greta; Stein, Gregor; Wellmann, Katharina; Manthou, Marilena; Scholl, Carolin; Sidorenko, Malina; Semler, Oliver; Eisel, Leonie; Harrach, Rachida; Angelova, Srebrina; Jaminet, Patrick; Ankerne, Janina; Ashrafi, Mahak; Ozsoy, Ozlem; Ozsoy, Umut; Schubert, Harald; Abdulla, Diana; Dunlop, Sarah A; Angelov, Doychin N; Irintchev, Andrey; Schönau, Eckhard

2013-04-03

127

Stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver metastases.  

PubMed

Although resection is the standard of care for liver metastasis, 80-90% of patients are not resectable at diagnosis. Advances in combination chemotherapy, particularly with targeted agents, have increased tumour response and survival in patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer, but these techniques have limitations and may be associated with high recurrence rates. Some autopsy series have shown that as many as 40% of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have disease confined to the liver; aggressive local therapy may improve overall survival in such patients. Local control of liver metastases can also ease hepatic capsular pain to improve quality of life. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) offers an alternative, non-invasive approach to the treatment of liver metastasis through precisely targeted delivery of radiation to the tumours while minimising normal tissue toxicity. Early applications of SBRT to liver metastases have been promising with the reports of 2-year local control rates of 71-86% and other studies reporting 18-month local control rates of 71-93%. While these data establish the safety of SBRT for liver metastases, more rigorous phase II clinical studies are needed to fully evaluate long-term efficacy and toxicity results. In the interim, this review stresses that SBRT of liver must be performed cautiously given the challenges of organ motion and the low toxicity tolerance of the surrounding hepatic parenchyma. PMID:19773153

Dawood, Omar; Mahadevan, Anand; Goodman, Karyn A

2009-09-19

128

Biodynamic characteristics of upper limb reaching movements of the seated human under whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

Simulation of human movements is an essential component for proactive ergonomic analysis and biomechanical model development (Chaffin, 2001). Most studies on reach kinematics have described human movements in a static environment, however the models derived from these studies cannot be applied to the analysis of human reach movements in vibratory environments such as in-vehicle operations. This study analyzes three-dimensional joint kinematics of the upper extremity in reach movements performed in static and specific vibratory conditions and investigates vibration transmission to shoulder, elbow, and hand along the body path during pointing tasks. Thirteen seated subjects performed reach movements to five target directions distributed in their right hemisphere. The results show similarities in the characteristics of movement patterns and reach trajectories of upper body segments for static and dynamic environments. In addition, vibration transmission through upper body segments is affected by vibration frequency, direction, and location of the target to be reached. Similarities in the pattern of movement trajectories revealed by filtering vibration-induced oscillations indicate that coordination strategy may not be drastically different in static and vibratory environments. This finding may facilitate the development of active biodynamic models to predict human performance and behavior under whole body vibration exposure. PMID:22814094

Kim, Heon-Jeong; Martin, Bernard J

2012-07-06

129

Preliminary recognition of whole body vibration risk in private farmers' working environment.  

PubMed

The objective of the study was the preliminary recognition of whole body mechanical vibration risk among farmers in the rural work environment. The study covered 15 farms using cultivated land of the size of over 10 ha, carrying out mixed production (plant-animal), equipped with agricultural tractors, and a basic set of tractor-mounted agricultural machinery, with a partial contribution of self-propelled agricultural machines. The scope of the study covered the measurements of effective vibration RMS acceleration (equivalent, maximum, minimum, peak) frequency corrected on the seats of agricultural vehicles in the three spatial directions of vibration (X, Y, Z). These measurements were realized while performing various field and transport work activities during the period of the whole year. A analysis of the peak, maximum and minimum vibration accelerations confirms that in the agricultural occupational environment there occurs a considerable variation of the vibration values registered. This is also evidenced by high values of the Crest Factor, sometimes exceeding a score of 10. Analysis of the registered equivalent values of vibration acceleration (frequency corrected) from the hygienic aspect showed that vibration occurring on the seats may create risk for farmers' health while performing such work activities as: tending and raking of hay, fertilizers spreading, soil aggregation, grass mowing and cultivation. Analysis of the spatial distribution of the measured, frequency corrected vibration accelerations indicates that considerably the highest acceleration values occur in the vertical plane (direction-Z). Literature data clearly confirm an unfavourable effect of whole body vibration present in agricultural vehicles on discomfort and the occurrence of back pain in the operators, especially in the low back region (lumbar spine), as well as degenerative changes in the spine. PMID:18247468

Solecki, Leszek

2007-12-01

130

Ten-week Whole-body Vibration Training Improves Body Composition and Muscle Strength in Obese Women  

PubMed Central

This work explored the short-term effect of whole body vibration (WBV) training on anthropometry, body composition and muscular strength in obese women. Fifty obese women (age=46.8±7.81[SD]y; BMI=35.1±3.55kg/m2) were assigned to a ten-week WBV training period, two times a week (in each session, 14min vibration training, 5min rest; vibration amplitude 2.0-5.0mm, frequency 40-60Hz), with (n=18) or without (n=17) radiofrequency, or to a non-exercise control group (n=15). Subjects were instructed not to change their habitual lifestyle. Before and after the ten-week experimental period, anthropometric measurements, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and the leg press, leg curl and leg extension strength tests were carried out. All changes in the two groups of WBV training, with or without radiofrequency, were similar and these groups were combined in a single WBV intervention group. As compared to controls, subjects submitted to WBV training had significantly lower BMI, total body and trunk fat, sum of skinfolds and body circumferences. On the other hand, lower limb strength tests were increased in the WBV group. These preliminary results suggest that WBV training may improve body composition and muscular strength in obese women and may be a useful adjuvant to lifestyle prescriptions.

Milanese, Chiara; Piscitelli, Francesco; Zenti, Maria Grazia; Moghetti, Paolo; Sandri, Marco; Zancanaro, Carlo

2013-01-01

131

Vibrations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Low frequent vibrations may cause from disturbing up to damaging effects. There is no precise distinction between structure-borne sound and vibrations. However - depending on the frequency range - measurements and predictions require different techniques. In a wide frequency range, the generation, transmission and propagation of vibrations can be investigated similar to structure-borne sound (see Chap. 9).

Guggenberger, Johannes; Müller, Gerhard

132

Non-linear dual-axis biodynamic response to vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seated human subjects have been exposed to vertical whole-body vibration so as to investigate the non-linearity in their biodynamic responses and quantify the response in directions other than the direction of excitation. Twelve males were exposed to random vertical vibration in the frequency range 0.25-25Hz at four vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25ms-2r.m.s.). The subjects sat in four sitting postures having varying foot heights so as to produce differing thigh contact with the seat (feet hanging, feet supported with maximum thigh contact, feet supported with average thigh contact, and feet supported with minimum thigh contact). Forces were measured in the vertical, fore-and-aft, and lateral directions on the seat and in the vertical direction at the footrest. The characteristic non-linear response of the human body with reducing resonance frequency at increasing vibration magnitudes was seen in all postures, but to a lesser extent with minimum thigh contact. Appreciable forces in the fore-and-aft direction also showed non-linearity, while forces in the lateral direction were low and showed no consistent trend. Forces at the feet were non-linear with a multi-resonant behaviour and were affected by the position of the legs. The decreased non-linearity with the minimum thigh contact posture suggests the tissues of the buttocks affect the non-linearity of the body more than the tissues of the thighs. The forces in the fore-and-aft direction are consistent with the body moving in two directions when exposed to vertical vibration. The non-linear behaviour of the body, and the considerable forces in the fore-aft direction should be taken into account when optimizing vibration isolation devices.

Nawayseh, N.; Griffin, M. J.

2003-11-01

133

Whole-Body Vibration Exposure Study in U.S. Railroad Locomotives—An Ergonomic Risk Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole-body vibration exposure of locomotive engineers and the vibration attenuation of seats in 22 U.S. locomotives (built between 1959 and 2000) was studied during normal revenue service and following international measurement guidelines. Triaxial vibration measurements (duration mean 155 min, range 84–383 min) on the seat and on the floor were compared. In addition to the basic vibration evaluation (aw rms),

Eckardt Johanning; Siegfried Fischer; Eberhard Christ; Benno Göres; Paul Landsbergis

2002-01-01

134

EFFECT OF MUSCLE TENSION ON NONLINEARITIES IN THE APPARENT MASSES OF SEATED SUBJECTS EXPOSED TO VERTICAL WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

In subjects exposed to whole-body vibration, the cause of non-linear dynamic characteristics with changes in vibration magnitude is not understood. The effect of muscle tension on the non-linearity in apparent mass has been investigated in this study. Eight seated male subjects were exposed to random and sinusoidal vertical vibration at five magnitudes (0·35–1·4 m\\/s2 r.m.s.). The random vibration was presented

Y. Matsumoto; M. J. GRIFFIN

2002-01-01

135

Acute physiological effects of exhaustive whole-body vibration exercise in man  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Vibration exercise (VE) is a new neuromuscular training method which is applied in athletes as well as in prevention and therapy of osteoporosis. The present study explored the physiological mechanisms of fatigue by VE in 37 young healthy subjects. Exercise and cardiovascular data were compared to progressive bicycle ergometry until exhaustion. VE was performed in two sessions, with a

J. Rittweger; G. Beller; D. Felsenberg

2000-01-01

136

Magnitude-dependence of equivalent comfort contours for fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is currently assumed that the same frequency weightings, derived from studies of vibration discomfort, can be used to evaluate the severity of vibration at all vibration magnitudes from the threshold of vibration perception to the vibration magnitudes associated with risks to health. This experimental study determined equivalent comfort contours for the whole-body vibration of seated subjects over the frequency range 2 315 Hz in each of the three orthogonal axes (fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical). The contours were determined at vibration magnitudes from the threshold of perception to levels associated with severe discomfort and risks to health. At frequencies greater than 10 Hz, thresholds for the perception of vertical vibration were lower than thresholds for fore-and-aft and lateral vibration. At frequencies less than 4 Hz, thresholds for vertical vibration were higher than thresholds for fore-and-aft and lateral vibration. The rate of growth of sensation with increasing vibration magnitude was highly dependent on the frequency and axis of vibration. Consequently, the shapes of the equivalent comfort contours depended on vibration magnitude. At medium and high vibration magnitudes, the equivalent comfort contours were reasonably consistent with the frequency weightings for vibration discomfort in current standards (i.e. Wb and Wd). At low vibration magnitudes, the contours indicate that relative to lower frequencies the standards underestimate sensitivity at frequencies greater than about 30 Hz. The results imply that no single linear frequency weighting can provide accurate predictions of discomfort caused by a wide range of magnitudes of whole-body vibration.

Morioka, Miyuki; Griffin, Michael J.

2006-12-01

137

The apparent mass of the seated human exposed to single-axis and multi-axis whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most workplaces where workers are exposed to whole-body vibration involves simultaneous motion in the fore-and-aft (x-), lateral (y-) and vertical (z-) directions. Previous studies reporting the biomechanical response of people exposed to vibration have almost always used single-axis vibration stimuli. This paper reports a study where apparent masses of 15 subjects were measured whilst exposed to single-axis and tri-axial whole-body

Neil J. Mansfield; Setsuo Maeda

2007-01-01

138

Stereotactic body radiation therapy: a comprehensive review.  

PubMed

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a novel technique that takes advantage of the technologic advancements in image guidance and radiation dose delivery to direct ablative doses to tumors with acceptable toxicity that was not previously achievable with conventional techniques. SBRT requires a high degree of confidence in tumor location provided by high quality diagnostic and near real-time imaging studies for accurate treatment delivery and precise assessment of physiologic tumor motion. In addition, stringent dosimetric parameters must be applied, paying close attention to the spatial arrangement of functional subunits in the adjacent normal tissues, to optimize clinical outcomes. Phase I/II trials for tumors of the lung, liver, spine, pancreas, kidney, and prostate provide evidence that the potent doses delivered with SBRT may provide results that rival surgery while avoiding the typical morbidities associated with that invasive approach. Further clinical study in the form of multi-institutional Phase II trials is currently underway, and ultimately collaborative efforts on a national level to support Phase III trials will be necessary, to firmly establish SBRT as a comparable noninvasive alternative to surgery. PMID:18091059

Chang, Brian K; Timmerman, Robert D

2007-12-01

139

Stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer.  

PubMed

Lung cancer remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Because many patients with non-small cell lung cancer are elderly and have multiple comorbid conditions, many with potentially curable disease are unfit to undergo definitive surgical resection. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is increasingly being used to treat patients with medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. SBRT combines reproducible and accurate anatomic targeting with the delivery of a very high dose per fraction of radiation to a target. Planning and delivery of SBRT is a coordinated effort between the radiation oncology team and consulting services. Clinical outcomes, toxicity profiles, treatment delivery, and indications for SBRT are reviewed. Services currently billed during planning and treatment of SBRT are detailed. This article introduces to consulting specialists and subspecialists a new Current Procedural Terminology code that has been proposed to more accurately reflect work performed during SBRT by these consulting providers. This code is described, and its implications for patient care are discussed. PMID:23732589

Simone, Charles B; Wildt, Brian; Haas, Andrew R; Pope, Greg; Rengan, Ramesh; Hahn, Stephen M

2013-06-01

140

Complementary therapies for reducing body weight: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate and a plethora of complementary therapies are on offer claiming effectiveness for reducing body weight. The aim of this systematic review is to critically assess the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews of complementary therapies for reducing body weight. Literature searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, Amed,

M H Pittler; E Ernst

2005-01-01

141

Whole-body vibration and postural stress among operators of construction equipment: A literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Operators of construction equipment perform various duties at work that expose them to a variety of risk factors that may lead to health problems. A few of the health hazards among operators of construction equipment are: (a) whole-body vibration, (b) awkward postural requirements (including static sitting), (c) dust, (d) noise, (e) temperature extremes, and (f) shift work. It has

N. Kumar Kittusamy; Bryan Buchholz

2004-01-01

142

Whole-Body Vibration Assessment of the M1070 Heavy Equipment Transporter. Volume 1.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An evaluation of all new tactical vehicles and aircraft is required to assess potential whole-body vibration (WBV) health hazards to crewmembers. As requested by the U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency (USAEHA), a health hazard assessment (HHA) was per...

T. L. Simmons B. P. Butler N. M. Alem B. S. Erickson

1994-01-01

143

Strength-training with whole-body vibration in long-distance runners: a randomized trial.  

PubMed

A parallel group randomized trial was designed to analyze the impact of 6 weeks of strength training programs performed with or without whole-body vibration on muscular and endurance performance parameters in long-distance runners. 22 endurance runners were allocated into strength with whole-body vibration (n=8), without (n=8), and control (n=6) groups. Before and after the experimental period the subjects performed the following tests: a) maximum dynamic strength test, b) maximal incremental treadmill test, and c) time to exhaustion at velocity corresponding to maximal oxygen uptake. The fractions of the aerobic and anaerobic contribution in time to exhaustion test were also calculated. Both strength trained groups showed a similar increase in maximum dynamic strength (~18%). The aerobic contribution was enhanced for strength training group without whole-body vibration (~25%) after experimental period. No statistical differences were observed in any other variable. These results suggest that 6 weeks of strength training performed with or without whole-body vibration improve similarly the maximum dynamic strength in long-distance runners. In addition, both training modes studied had no deleterious effects on the traditional parameters of endurance performance, traditional strength training program results in increased aerobic contribution during high-intensity aerobic exercise. PMID:23559412

Bertuzzi, R; Pasqua, L A; Bueno, S; Damasceno, M V; Lima-Silva, A E; Bishop, D; Tricoli, V

2013-04-04

144

The effect of occupational whole-body vibration on standing balance: A systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adverse health effects from exposure to occupational whole-body vibration (WBV) are common among drivers. In particular some researchers consider that there is kinaesthetic and balance disturbance from WBV exposure in the workplace and this might be one of the aetiological factors responsible for occupational low back pain in drivers. The purpose of this study was to undertake a critical review

Ramakrishnan Mani; Stephan Milosavljevic; S. John Sullivan

2010-01-01

145

Comparing the effects of various whole-body vibration accelerations on counter-movement jump performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

While it seems that whole body vibration (WBV) might be an effective modality to enhance physical performance, the proper prescription of WBV for performance enhancement remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the imme- diate effect of various WBV accelerations on counter movement jump (CMJ) height, the duration of any effect, and differences between men and women.

David M. Bazett-Jones; Holmes W. Finch; Eric L. Dugan

146

Body Vibration of the Violin— What Can a Maker Expect to Control?  

Microsoft Academic Search

At low frequencies it is sensible to describe violin body vibration in terms of individual modes, and for a maker to seek to control these modes explicitly. At higher frequencies this ceases to be a realistic goal. The modes overlap in frequency and are very sensitive to small changes in the construction. The acoustical information useful to a maker then

J. Woodhouse

2002-01-01

147

Reducing whole-body vibration and musculoskeletal injury with a new car seat design  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new car seat design, which allows the back part of the seat (BPS) to lower down while a protruded cushion supports the lumbar spine, was quantitatively tested to determine its effectiveness and potentials in reducing whole-body vibration (WBV) and musculoskeletal disorders in automobile drivers. Nine subjects were tested to drive with the seat in: 1) the conventional seating arrangement

M. Makhsous; R. Hendrix; Z. Crowther; E. Nam; F. Lin

2005-01-01

148

The vibration of inclined backrests: perception and discomfort of vibration applied normal to the back in the x-axis of the body  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The vibration of backrests contributes to the discomfort of drivers and passengers. A frequency weighting exists for evaluating the vibration of vertical backrests but not for reclined backrests often used during travel. This experimental study was designed to determine how backrest inclination and the frequency of vibration influence perception thresholds and vibration discomfort when the vibration is applied normal to the back (i.e. fore-and-aft vibration when seated upright and vertical vibration when fully reclined). Twelve subjects experienced the vibration of a backrest (at each of the 11 preferred one-third octave centre frequencies in the range 2.5-25 Hz) at vibration magnitudes from the threshold of perception to 24 dB above threshold. Initially, absolute thresholds for the perception of vibration were determined with four backrest inclinations: 0° (upright), 30°, 60° and 90° (recumbent). The method of magnitude estimation was then used to obtain judgements of vibration discomfort with each of the four backrest angles. Finally, the relative discomfort between the four backrest angles, and the principal locations for feeling vibration discomfort in the body, were determined. With all backrest inclinations, absolute thresholds for the perception of vibration acceleration were dependent on the frequency of vibration. As the backrest inclination became more horizontal, the thresholds increased at frequencies between 4 and 8 Hz. For all backrest inclinations, the rate of growth of discomfort with increasing magnitude of vibration was independent of the frequency of vibration, so the frequency-dependence of discomfort was similar over the range of magnitudes investigated (0.04-0.6 m s-2 rms). With an upright backrest, the discomfort caused by vibration acceleration tended to be greatest at frequencies less than about 8 Hz. With inclined backrests (at 30°, 60°, and 90°), the equivalent comfort contours were broadly similar to each other, with greatest discomfort caused by acceleration around 10 or 12.5 Hz. At frequencies from 4 to 8 Hz, 30-40 percent greater magnitudes of vibration were required with the three inclined backrests to cause discomfort equivalent to that caused by the upright backrest. It is concluded that with an upright backrest the frequency weighting Wc used in current standards is appropriate for predicting the discomfort caused by fore-and-aft backrest vibration. With inclined and horizontal backrests, a weighting similar to frequency weighting Wb (used to predict discomfort caused by vertical seat vibration) appears more appropriate.

Basri, Bazil; Griffin, Michael J.

2011-08-01

149

Retrospective assessment of occupational exposure to whole-body vibration for a case-control study.  

PubMed

Occupational whole-body vibration is often studied as a risk factor for conditions that may arise soon after exposure, but only rarely have studies examined associations with conditions arising long after occupational exposure has ceased. We aimed to develop a method of constructing previous occupational whole-body vibration exposure metrics from self-reported data collected for a case-control study of Parkinson's disease. A detailed job history and exposure interview was administered to 808 residents of British Columbia, Canada (403 people with Parkinson's disease and 405 healthy controls). Participants were prompted to report exposure to whole-body vibrating equipment. We limited the data to exposure reports deemed to be above background exposures and used the whole-body vibration literature (typically reporting on seated vector sum measurements) to assign intensity (acceleration) values to each type of equipment reported. We created four metrics of exposure (duration of exposure, most intense equipment exposure, and two dose metrics combining duration and intensity) and examined their distributions and correlations. We tested the role of age and gender in predicting whole-body vibration exposure. Thirty-six percent of participants had at least one previous occupational exposure to whole-body vibrating equipment. Because less than half of participants reported exposure, all continuous metrics exhibited positively skewed distributions, although the distribution of most intense equipment exposure was more symmetrically distributed among the exposed. The arithmetic mean of duration of exposure among those exposed was 14.0 (standard deviation, SD: 14.2) work years, while the geometric mean was 6.8 (geometric SD, GSD: 4.5). The intensity of the most intense equipment exposure (among the exposed) had an arithmetic mean of 0.9 (SD: 0.3) m·s(-2) and a geometric mean of 0.8 (GSD: 1.4). Male gender and older age were both associated with exposure, although the effect of age was attenuated after adjustment for gender. The methods developed allowed us to create continuous metrics of whole-body vibration retrospectively, displaying useful variance for epidemiologic studies. PMID:22571854

Harris, M Anne; Cripton, Peter A; Teschke, Kay

2012-01-01

150

Vibrations of a cylindrical shell supporting an absolutely rigid body  

Microsoft Academic Search

The assumed method of investigation consists of finding the general exact solution of the equations of shell theory. We determine the integration constants from the boundary conditions, which are conditions of rigid clamping of the ends of the shells and specific boundary conditions of constant contact between the shells and the rigid body. Setting equal to zero the determinant consisting

R. P. Barsuk; A. V. Kovtun; V. S. Martynenko; S. G. Shpakova

1975-01-01

151

Small Vibrations Superimposed on a Prescribed Rigid Body Motion  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method for analysing flexible multibody systems in which theelastic deformations are small is presented. The motion isconsidered a gross non-linear rigid body motion with small linearvibrations superimposed on it. For periodic gross motion, thisresults in a system of rheolinear differential equations for thedeformations with periodic coefficients. The determination of therequired equations with a program for flexible multibody systemsis discussed

A. L. Schwab; J. P. Meijaard

2002-01-01

152

Whole body vibration and posture as risk factors for low back pain among forklift truck drivers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the risks from whole-body vibration and posture demands for low back pain (LBP) among forklift truck (forklift) drivers. Using a validated questionnaire, information about health history was obtained over a period of two weeks in face-to-face interviews. The forklift drivers were observed in respect of their sitting posture, including frequency with which different positions were adopted (bending, leaning and twisting) and postural analyses were conducted using the OWAS and RULA techniques. Forklift vibrations at the seat (exposure) were measured in the three orthogonal axes (x-fore and aft, y-lateral and z-vertical) under actual working conditions according to the recommendations of ISO 2631-1. The results showed that LBP was more prevalent amongst forklift drivers than among non-drivers and driving postures in which the trunk is considerably twisted or bent forward associated with greatest risk. Furthermore, forklift drivers showed to be exposed to acceptable levels of vibration in the x- and y-directions (i.e., below the EU Physical Agents Directive on Vibration Exposure recommended action level—0.5 m/s2), but not in the z-direction. There were indications that whole-body vibration acts associatively with other factors (not independently) to precipitate LBP.

Hoy, J.; Mubarak, N.; Nelson, S.; Sweerts de Landas, M.; Magnusson, M.; Okunribido, O.; Pope, M.

2005-06-01

153

Six-degree-of-freedom whole-body vibration exposure levels during routine skidder operations.  

PubMed

This research focuses on quantifying six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) whole-body vibration (WBV) exposure levels that occur in Northern Ontario skidders during routine field operating tasks. 6-DOF vibration running root-mean-square (RMS) acceleration levels at the operator/seat interface were determined for eight skidders while driving loaded, driving unloaded, picking up a load, dropping off a load and ploughing logs under field operating conditions. The acceleration data were weighted in accordance with ISO 2631-1:1997 and evaluated for both health and comfort outcomes. The mean running RMS weighted translational and rotational accelerations all exceeded 0.36 m/s(2) and 0.14 rad/s(2). The greatest average accelerations occurred while driving unloaded with this condition displaying translational vibration total values (VTV) that exceeded the upper limit of the ISO 2631-1:1997 health caution zone within an average of 2.3 h. Utilizing 6-DOF VTV, virtually all operating conditions would be designated as uncomfortable. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This study provides one of the most comprehensive reports on vibration exposures in seated vehicle operators. The results are geared towards ergonomists with discussions on health effects and measurement concerns, while providing the raw vibration exposure data that will be useful to vehicle, component and vibration sensor designers. PMID:20432089

Jack, R J; Oliver, M; Dickey, J P; Cation, S; Hayward, G; Lee-Shee, N

2010-05-01

154

Measurement of whole-body vibration exposure from speed control humps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main objective of speed control humps is to introduce shocks and high vibration levels when a car passes over them if its speed is higher than the allowable limit. Hump geometry is a major factor in altering the level of these shocks and specifying the speed limit. However, there is no study of the relationship between whole body vibration due to passing over a speed control hump and lower back pain or occupational diseases. In this study, an experimental investigation is conducted to evaluate health risks associated with different geometry speed control humps. Vibration levels and shocks are measured by a seat pad accelerometer placed under the driver's seat to evaluate hazard risks on the human body's lower back. The assessment is based on two standard methods of measuring whole body vibration: the British standard BS 6841 and the new ISO/DIS standard 2631-5. These methods are used to assess the effects of vehicle type, passenger location in the vehicle, vehicle speed, and speed control hump geometry. It was found that circular speed control humps currently installed on many public roads should be modified in order to eliminate hazards. Two newly designed speed humps were proved to be less hazardous than circular speed control humps.

Khorshid, E.; Alkalby, F.; Kamal, H.

2007-07-01

155

Triaxial forces at the seat and backrest during whole-body fore-and-aft vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical forces on a seat and a backrest have been investigated with 12 male subjects exposed to random fore-and-aft whole-body vibration (0.25–10Hz) at four vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25ms?2rms). Subjects sat in each of four sitting postures having varying foot heights, so as to produce differing thigh contact with the seat.The fore-and-aft forces on

Naser Nawayseh; Michael J. Griffin

2005-01-01

156

On the significance of body mass and vibration magnitude for acceleration transmission of vibration through seats with horizontal suspensions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seats with horizontal suspensions can help to reduce detrimental effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on health, comfort and performance. Two seats were used to examine the effect of body mass and WBV-magnitude on the transmission of WBV from the seat base to the cushion. Both seats have suspension in the x-direction while Seat 2 has suspension also in the y-direction. Twelve subjects with a body mass ranging from 59.0 to 97.3 kg volunteered for the study. A set of anthropometric characteristics was acquired. Three magnitudes of WBV were used with a truck-like signal (Seat 1, 0.3 0.59 m s-2wd-weighted rms values at the seat base, x-direction) and a tractor-like signal (Seat 2, 0.55 1.09 m s-2wd-weighted rms values at the seat base, x-direction, 0.52 1.07 m s-2wd-weighted rms values, y-direction). The magnitude of WBV had a significant effect on the transmissibility characterized by SEAT-values. A significant influence of the body mass on SEAT-values was found for the y-direction only. Other anthropometric characteristics proved to be more important for the prediction of SEAT values by multiple regressions. There was no significant correlation of SEAT-values, x-direction, with the body mass. Other anthropometric characteristics enabled a satisfactory prediction of SEAT values also for x-direction in several cases. Tests with only two subjects of extreme body mass are not suited to obtain comparable and representative results required for a comparison of different seats with a suspension in the x-direction. The effect of the WBV-magnitude on the WBV-transmissibility should be considered with the design, testing and application of suspended seats.

Blüthner, Ralph; Hinz, Barbara; Menzel, Gerhard; Schust, Marianne; Seidel, Helmut

2006-12-01

157

Application of finite-element models to predict forces acting on the lumbar spine during whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. To predict forces acting on the spine during whole-body vibration for a variety of boundary conditions – body mass, height and posture.Design. Representative anthropometric data and models for an upright, relaxed and bent forward sitting posture were used to derive model families with 30 variants of a finite-element model.Background. A given exposure to whole-body vibration can cause a variable

H Seidel; R Blüthner; B Hinz

2001-01-01

158

Theoretical relationship between vibration transmissibility and driving-point response functions of the human body  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The relationship between the vibration transmissibility and driving-point response functions (DPRFs) of the human body is important for understanding vibration exposures of the system and for developing valid models. This study identified their theoretical relationship and demonstrated that the sum of the DPRFs can be expressed as a linear combination of the transmissibility functions of the individual mass elements distributed throughout the system. The relationship is verified using several human vibration models. This study also clarified the requirements for reliably quantifying transmissibility values used as references for calibrating the system models. As an example application, this study used the developed theory to perform a preliminary analysis of the method for calibrating models using both vibration transmissibility and DPRFs. The results of the analysis show that the combined method can theoretically result in a unique and valid solution of the model parameters, at least for linear systems. However, the validation of the method itself does not guarantee the validation of the calibrated model, because the validation of the calibration also depends on the model structure and the reliability and appropriate representation of the reference functions. The basic theory developed in this study is also applicable to the vibration analyses of other structures.

Dong, Ren G.; Welcome, Daniel E.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

2013-11-01

159

Effect of voluntary periodic muscular activity on nonlinearity in the apparent mass of the seated human body during vertical random whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The principal resonance frequency in the driving-point impedance of the human body decreases with increasing vibration magnitude—a nonlinear response. An understanding of the nonlinearities may advance understanding of the mechanisms controlling body movement and improve anthropodynamic modelling of responses to vibration at various magnitudes. This study investigated the effects of vibration magnitude and voluntary periodic muscle activity on the apparent mass resonance frequency using vertical random vibration in the frequency range 0.5 20 Hz. Each of 14 subjects was exposed to 14 combinations of two vibration magnitudes (0.25 and 2.0 m s-2 root-mean square (rms)) in seven sitting conditions: two without voluntary periodic movement (A: upright; B: upper-body tensed), and five with voluntary periodic movement (C: back-abdomen bending; D: folding-stretching arms from back to front; E: stretching arms from rest to front; F: folding arms from elbow; G: deep breathing). Three conditions with voluntary periodic movement significantly reduced the difference in resonance frequency at the two vibration magnitudes compared with the difference in a static sitting condition. Without voluntary periodic movement (condition A: upright), the median apparent mass resonance frequency was 5.47 Hz at the low vibration magnitude and 4.39 Hz at the high vibration magnitude. With voluntary periodic movement (C: back-abdomen bending), the resonance frequency was 4.69 Hz at the low vibration magnitude and 4.59 Hz at the high vibration magnitude. It is concluded that back muscles, or other muscles or tissues in the upper body, influence biodynamic responses of the human body to vibration and that voluntary muscular activity or involuntary movement of these parts can alter their equivalent stiffness.

Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

2006-12-01

160

Body Awareness: a phenomenological inquiry into the common ground of mind-body therapies.  

PubMed

Enhancing body awareness has been described as a key element or a mechanism of action for therapeutic approaches often categorized as mind-body approaches, such as yoga, TaiChi, Body-Oriented Psychotherapy, Body Awareness Therapy, mindfulness based therapies/meditation, Feldenkrais, Alexander Method, Breath Therapy and others with reported benefits for a variety of health conditions. To better understand the conceptualization of body awareness in mind-body therapies, leading practitioners and teaching faculty of these approaches were invited as well as their patients to participate in focus groups. The qualitative analysis of these focus groups with representative practitioners of body awareness practices, and the perspectives of their patients, elucidated the common ground of their understanding of body awareness. For them body awareness is an inseparable aspect of embodied self awareness realized in action and interaction with the environment and world. It is the awareness of embodiment as an innate tendency of our organism for emergent self-organization and wholeness. The process that patients undergo in these therapies was seen as a progression towards greater unity between body and self, very similar to the conceptualization of embodiment as dialectic of body and self described by some philosophers as being experienced in distinct developmental levels. PMID:21473781

Mehling, Wolf E; Wrubel, Judith; Daubenmier, Jennifer J; Price, Cynthia J; Kerr, Catherine E; Silow, Theresa; Gopisetty, Viranjini; Stewart, Anita L

2011-04-07

161

Body Awareness: a phenomenological inquiry into the common ground of mind-body therapies  

PubMed Central

Enhancing body awareness has been described as a key element or a mechanism of action for therapeutic approaches often categorized as mind-body approaches, such as yoga, TaiChi, Body-Oriented Psychotherapy, Body Awareness Therapy, mindfulness based therapies/meditation, Feldenkrais, Alexander Method, Breath Therapy and others with reported benefits for a variety of health conditions. To better understand the conceptualization of body awareness in mind-body therapies, leading practitioners and teaching faculty of these approaches were invited as well as their patients to participate in focus groups. The qualitative analysis of these focus groups with representative practitioners of body awareness practices, and the perspectives of their patients, elucidated the common ground of their understanding of body awareness. For them body awareness is an inseparable aspect of embodied self awareness realized in action and interaction with the environment and world. It is the awareness of embodiment as an innate tendency of our organism for emergent self-organization and wholeness. The process that patients undergo in these therapies was seen as a progression towards greater unity between body and self, very similar to the conceptualization of embodiment as dialectic of body and self described by some philosophers as being experienced in distinct developmental levels.

2011-01-01

162

Effects of Aerobic Exercise and Whole Body Vibration on Glycaemia Control in Type 2 Diabetic Males  

PubMed Central

Purpose aerobic exercise has been identified as the main treatment for type 2 diabetic patients. Such an exercise, however, is usually repined by some of patients who suffer from lack of stamina. Therefore, whole body vibration has recently been introduced as a passive intervention. The present study aimed at comparing how aerobic exercise and whole body vibration affect glycaemia control in type 2 diabetic males. Methods Thirty diabetic males were divided into three groups, namely aerobic exercise (AE), whole body vibration (WBV), and control. Aerobic exercise schedule consisted of three walking sessions a week, each for 30-60 minutes and in 60-70% of maximum stock heartbeat. Vibration exercise was composed of 8-12-min stand-up and semi-squat positioning in frequency of 30 Hz and amplitude of 2 mm. Concentrations of fasting glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting glucose, and insulin were measured in the beginning of the trial, after the fourth week, and after the eighth week. Results After 8 weeks of exercise, no significant difference was detected in concentrations of fasting glycosylated hemoglobin and insulin between the groups (P=0.83, P=0.12). There were no significant differences in any of the variables between AE and WBV (P>0.05). But a more significant decrease in fasting glucose was observed in exercise groups (AE and WBV) compared with control group (P=0.02). Conclusion The present study showed that AE and WBV identically stimulate metabolic system. Thus, it can be concluded that type 2 diabetic patients lacking stamina for aerobic exercise can opt for vibration exercise as an effective substitute.

Behboudi, Lale; Azarbayjani, Mohammad-Ali; Aghaalinejad, Hamid; Salavati, Mahyar

2011-01-01

163

Effects of different amplitudes (high vs. low) of whole-body vibration training in active adults.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of two different amplitudes of whole-body vibrations on the development of strength, mechanical power of the lower limb, and body composition. Thirty-eight recreationally active participants took part in the study. Participants were divided in two experimental groups (low amplitude group [GL] = 2 mm; high amplitude group [GH] = 4 mm) and a control group. The experimental groups performed an incremental vibratory training, 2 days per week during 6 weeks. The frequency of vibration (50 Hz), time of work (60 seconds), and time of rest (60 seconds) were constant for GL and GH groups. All the participants were on the platform in a static semi-squat position. Maximum isokinetic strength, body composition, and performance in vertical jumps (squat and countermovement jumps) were evaluated at the beginning and at the end of the training cycle. A significant increase of isokinetic strength was observed in GL and GH at angular velocities of 60°.s(-1), 180°.s(-1) and 270°.s(-1). Total lean mass was significantly increased in GH (0.9 ± 1.0 kg). There were no significant changes in the total fat mass in any of the groups. Significant changes were not observed in different variables (height, peak power, and rate of force development) derived from the vertical jumps for any of the groups submitted to study. The vibration training, whatever the amplitude, produced significant improvements in isokinetic strength. However, high vibration amplitude training presents better adaptations for hypertrophy than the training with low vibration amplitude. In this sense, GH would be a better training if the practitioners want to develop both strength and hypertrophy of the lower limbs. PMID:23096064

Martínez-Pardo, Esmeraldo; Romero-Arenas, Salvador; Alcaraz, Pedro E

2013-07-01

164

Evaluation of lumbar vertebra injury risk to the seated human body when exposed to vertical vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of this research is to numerically determine the levels of vibration not to exceed accordingly to the corresponding dynamic stresses in the lumbar rachis when exposed to whole-body vibrations in order to identify the risk of adverse health effect to which professional heavy equipment drivers are particularly prone. A parametric finite element model of the lumbar rachis is generated in order to compute the modal parameters, the dynamic stresses and forces under harmonic excitations in a seated posture. The stress analysis reveals that the areas exposed to the highest fracture risk are the cancellous bone of the vertebral body as well as the vertebral endplate when vertical vibrations are transmitted from a seat to the lumbar spine of a driver. An injury risk factor has been developed in order to estimate the risk of adverse health effect arising from mechanical vibrations. It is shown that the injury risk factor increases with the age and consequently that the excitation amplitude must be limited to lower levels when age increases.

Ayari, H.; Thomas, M.; Doré, S.; Serrus, O.

2009-03-01

165

Whole body vibration compared to conventional physiotherapy in patients with gonarthrosis: a protocol for a randomized, controlled study  

PubMed Central

Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common degenerative arthropathy. Load-bearing joints such as knee and hip are more often affected than spine or hands. The prevalence of gonarthrosis is generally higher than that of coxarthrosis. Because no cure for OA exists, the main emphasis of therapy is analgesic treatment through either mobility or medication. Non-pharmacologic treatment is the first step, followed by the addition of analgesic medication, and ultimately by surgery. The goal of non-pharmacologic and non-invasive therapy is to improve neuromuscular function, which in turn both prevents formation of and delays progression of OA. A modification of conventional physiotherapy, whole body vibration has been successfully employed for several years. Since its introduction, this therapy is in wide use at our facility not only for gonarthrosis, but also coxarthrosis and other diseases leading to muscular imbalance. Methods/Design This study is a randomized, therapy-controlled trial in a primary care setting at a university hospital. Patients presenting to our outpatient clinic with initial symptoms of gonarthrosis will be assessed against inclusion and exclusion criteria. After patient consent, 6 weeks of treatment will ensue. During the six weeks of treatment, patients will receive one of two treatments, conventional physiotherapy or whole-body-vibration exercises of one hour three times a week. Follow-up examinations will be performed immediately after treatment and after another 6 and 20 weeks, for a total study duration of 6 months. 20 patients will be included in each therapy group. Outcome measurements will include objective analysis of motion and ambulation as well as examinations of balance and isokinetic force. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index and SF-12 scores, the patients' overall status, and clinical examinations of the affected joint will be carried out. Discussion As new physiotherapy techniques develop for the treatment of OA, it is important to investigate the effectiveness of competing strategies. With this study, not only patient-based scores, but also objective assessments will be used to quantify patient-derived benefits of therapy. Trial registration Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien (DRKS) DRKS00000415 Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01037972 EudraCT 2009-017617-29

2010-01-01

166

Non-linear dual-axis biodynamic response to fore-and-aft whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seated subjects have participated in two experiments with fore-and-aft whole-body vibration to investigate dynamic responses at the seat and footrest in the direction of vibration and in other directions. In the first experiment, 12 males were exposed to fore-and-aft random vibration (0.25–20Hz) at four magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25ms?2 rms) while sitting on a seat with no backrest in

N. Nawayseh; M. J. Griffin

2005-01-01

167

Whole-body vibration in underground load-haul-dump vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole-body vibrations (WBV) were measured at the seatpan of load-haul-dump (LHD) vehicles of 3.5-, 5-, 6- and 8-yard capacity at two underground mines. Twenty-two sets of measurements were made involving 11 vehicles, 8 operators and 4 work locations. In each set frequency-weighted rms and peak accelerations were measured in the x, y and z directions, as defined by the ISO

J. VILLAGE; J. B. MORRISON; D. K. N. LEONG

1989-01-01

168

DEFINITION OF A RANGE OF IDEALIZED VALUES TO CHARACTERIZE SEATED BODY BIODYNAMIC RESPONSE UNDER VERTICAL VIBRATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

While a considerable quantity of data has been published on driving-point mechanical impedance, apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility magnitude and phase characteristics of seated subjects under vertical whole-body vibration, significant variation is known to exist between various data sets. Such variations may be partly attributed to differences associated with the methodology, experimental conditions or subject population used by various investigators

P.-É. Boileau; X. Wu; S. Rakheja

1998-01-01

169

Study on Development of the Seated Human Body System Exposed to Vehicular Ride Vibration Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This paper tries to find an appropriate structure of human model, which can better represent the characteristics of the real\\u000a human body, using the apparent mass (APMS) and head transmissibility (STHT) in vertical vibrations. The model parameters were\\u000a identified through minimizing an error function comprising the measured and model response in terms of magnitude and phase\\u000a characteristics of APMS and

S. Rodean; M. Arghir

170

Body vibration and sound production in an insect ( Atta sexdens ) without specialized radiating structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.The leaf cutting antAtta sexdens stridulates using a file-and-scraper device (Markl 1968). The temporal and spectral characteristics of the cuticular vibration and airborne sound are fairly typical of the stridulatory sounds of insects that lack specialized radiating structures (Masters 1980). We used laser-Doppler vibrometry (LDV) to measure the velocity of different points on the ant's body during stridulation to determine

W. Mitch Masters; Jfirgen Tautz; N. H. Fletcher; Hubert Markl

1983-01-01

171

Effects of whole-body vibration in patients with multiple sclerosis: a pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine whether a whole-body vibration (mechanical oscillations) in comparison to a placebo administration leads to better postural control, mobility and balance in patients with multiple sclerosis.Design: Double-blind, randomized controlled trial.Setting: Outpatient clinic of a university department of physical medicine and rehabilitation.Subjects: Twelve multiple sclerosis patients with moderate disability (Kurtzke's Expanded Disability Status Scale 2.5-5) were allocated either to

Othmar Schuhfried; Christian Mittermaier; Tatjana Jovanovic; Karin Pieber; Tatjana Paternostro-Sluga

2005-01-01

172

Long-term effects of whole-body vibration: a critical survey of the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relevant literature on the long-term effects of whole-body vibration (wbv) was analyzed in order to obtain condensed information concerning a possibly higher health risk due to long-term exposure, the relationships between the quality of exposure (intensity, duration, frequency) and pathological effects, the significance of individual factors, conclusions for standard setting, and medical health care of workers exposed to wbv.

Helmut Seidel; Renate Heide

1986-01-01

173

POSSIBLE MECHANISMS OF LOW BACK PAIN DUE TO WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

The investigators describe their multifaceted approach to the study of the relationship between whole-body vibration and low back pain.In vitroexperiments, using percutaneous pin-mounted accelerometers have shown that the natural frequency is at 4·5 Hz. The frequency response was affected by posture, seating, and seat-back inclination. The response appears to be largely determined by the rocking of the pelvis. Electromyographic studies

M. H. Pope; D. G. Wilder; M. Magnusson

1998-01-01

174

Effects of random whole-body vibration on postural control in Parkinson's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated spontaneous effects of random whole-body vibration (rWBV) on postural control in Parkinsonian subjects. Effects were examined in biomechanical tests from a total of 52 patients divided equally into one experimental and one control group. Postural control was tested pre- and post-treatment in two standardized conditions (narrow standing and tandem standing). The intervention was based on rWBV (y: 3

Stephan Turbanski; Christian T. Haas; Dietmar Schmidtbleicher; Antje Friedrich; Petra Duisberg

2005-01-01

175

Oxygen uptake during whole-body vibration exercise: comparison with squatting as a slow voluntary movement  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   In this study we investigated metabolic power during whole-body vibration exercise (VbX) compared to mild resistance exercise.\\u000a Specific oxygen consumption (\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a ) and subjectively perceived exertion (rating of perceived exertion, RPE; Borg scale) were assessed in 12 young healthy subjects\\u000a (8 female and 4 male). The outcome parameters were assessed during the last minute of a 3-min exercise bout,

Jörn Rittweger; Hans Schiessl; Dieter Felsenberg

2001-01-01

176

On the Relationship between Whole-body Vibration Exposure and Spinal Health Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

A conceptual framework provides the possibility to identify factors determining the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on the spine and the internal stress-strain relationships. Epidemiological studies were critically evaluated with respect to their significance for the derivation of quantitative exposure-effect relationships. The approach of deriving such relationships from a comparison with self-generated accelerations during daily activities was considered as unsuited.

Helmut SEIDEL

2005-01-01

177

Effects of sinusoidal whole-body vibration on the lumbar spine: the stress-strain relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this experimental study was to estimate the strain in the lumbar spine due to whole-body vibration (WBV). Four male subjects were exposed to vertical sinusoidal WBV with frequencies ranging from 1 to 15 Hz at two intensities (I1 = 1.5 ms-2 rms; I2 = 3.0 ms-2 rms). The compressive forces acting on the disc L3-4 during the

Helmut Seidel; Ralph Bluethner; Barbara Hinz

1986-01-01

178

Effect of four-month vertical whole body vibration on performance and balance  

Microsoft Academic Search

TORVINEN, S., P. KANNUS, H. SIEVANEN, T. A. JARVINEN, M. PASANEN, S. KONTULAINEN, T. L. JARVINEN, M. JARVINEN, P. OJA, and I. VUORI. Effect of four-month vertical whole body vibration on performance and balance. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 34, No. 9, pp. 1523-1528, 2002. Purpose: This randomized controlled study was designed to investigate the effects of a 4-month whole

SAILA TORVINEN; PEKKA KANNUS; MATTI PASANEN; SAIJA KONTULAINEN; PEKKA OJA; ILKKA VUORI

2002-01-01

179

Effects of whole body vibration training on dynamic balance in healthy adult volunteers  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundMotor performance depends on the integration and utilisation of a range of different abilities, such as muscle strength, flexibility, and balance. Improving these abilities is thus important for improving motor performance. Training using whole body vibration (WBV) comprises one of these new methods.ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to clarify the effects of WBV training in comparison with conventional training

H Amano; K Nakata; T Mae; H Kohda; K Shimomura; M Satoh; K Shino; H Yoshikawa

2011-01-01

180

The rate of muscle temperature increase during acute whole-body vibration exercise  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared the rate of muscle temperature (T\\u000a m) increase during acute whole-body vibration (WBV), to that of stationary cycling and passive warm-up. Additionally we wanted\\u000a to determine if the purported increase in counter-movement jump and peak power cycling from acute WBV could be explained by\\u000a changes in muscle temperature. Eight active participants volunteered for the study, which involved

D. J. Cochrane; S. R. Stannard; A. J. Sargeant; J. Rittweger

2008-01-01

181

Whole-body vibration as potential intervention for people with low bone mineral density and osteoporosis: a review.  

PubMed

Low bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis are health concerns among older adults and individuals with physical, neurological, and/or mobility impairments. Detrimental changes in bone density and bone architecture occurring in these individuals may be due in part to the reduction/cessation of physical activity and the accompanying reduction of mechanical strain on bone. Changes in bone architecture predispose these individuals to fragility fractures during low-trauma events. Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been examined as an intervention for maintaining or improving bone mass among people with low BMD, because it may emulate the mechanical strains observed during normal daily activities. This article provides an overview of WBV including terminology, safety considerations, and a summary of the current literature; it is intended for rehabilitation healthcare providers considering WBV as a potential therapy for individuals with osteoporosis. PMID:19882487

Totosy de Zepetnek, Julia O; Giangregorio, Lora M; Craven, B Catharine

2009-01-01

182

Three-dimensional modeling of supine human and transport system under whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

The development of predictive computer human models in whole-body vibration has shown some success in predicting simple types of motion, mostly for seated positions and in the uniaxial vertical direction. The literature revealed only a handful of papers that tackled supine human modeling in response to vertical vibration. The objective of this work is to develop a predictive, multibody, three-dimensional human model to simulate the supine human and underlying transport system in response to multidirectional whole-body vibration. A three-dimensional dynamic model of a supine human and its underlying transport system is presented in this work to predict supine-human biodynamic response under three-dimensional input random whole-body vibration. The proposed supine-human model consists of three interconnected segments representing the head, torso-arms, and pelvis-legs. The segments are connected via rotational and translational joints that have spring-damper components simulating the three-dimensional muscles and tissuelike connecting elements in the three x, y, and z directions. Two types of transport systems are considered in this work, a rigid support and a long spinal board attached to a standard military litter. The contact surfaces between the supine human and the underlying transport system are modeled using spring-damper components. Eight healthy supine human subjects were tested under combined-axis vibration files with a magnitude of 0.5?m/s2 (rms) and a frequency content of 0.5-16?Hz. The data from seven subjects were used in parameter identification for the dynamic model using optimization schemes in the frequency domain that minimize the differences between the magnitude and phase of the predicted and experimental transmissibility. The predicted accelerations in the time and frequency domains were comparable to those gathered from experiments under different anthropometric, input vibration, and transport conditions under investigation. Based on the results, the proposed dynamic model has the potential to be used to provide motion data to drive a detailed finite element model of a supine human for further investigation of muscle forces and joint dynamics. The predicted kinematics of the supine human and transport system would also benefit patient safety planners and vibration suppression designers in their endeavors. PMID:23699722

Wang, Yang; Rahmatalla, Salam

2013-06-01

183

Equal sensation curves for whole-body vibration expressed as a function of driving force  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous studies have shown that the seated human is most sensitive to whole-body vertical vibration at about 5 Hz. Similarly, the body shows an apparent mass resonance at about 5 Hz. Considering these similarities between the biomechanical and subjective responses, it was hypothesized that, at low frequencies, subjective ratings of whole-body vibration might be directly proportional to the driving force. Twelve male subjects participated in a laboratory experiment where subjects sat on a rigid seat mounted on a shaker. The magnitude of a test stimulus was adjusted such that the subjective intensity could be matched to a reference stimulus, using a modified Bruceton test protocol. The sinusoidal reference stimulus was 8-Hz vibration with a magnitude of 0.5 m/s2 rms (or 0.25 m/s2 rms for the 1-Hz test); the sinusoidal test stimuli had frequencies of 1, 2, 4, 16, and 32 Hz. Equal sensation contours in terms of seat acceleration showed data similar to those in the literature. Equal sensation contours in terms of force showed a nominally linear response at 1, 2, and 4 Hz, but an increasing sensitivity at higher frequencies. This is in agreement with a model derived from published subjective and objective fitted data. .

Mansfield, Neil J.; Maeda, Setsuo

2005-06-01

184

A COMPARISON OF STANDARDIZED METHODS FOR PREDICTING THE HAZARDS OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION AND REPEATED SHOCKS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methods of measuring, evaluating and assessing whole-body vibration and repeated shock are offered in ISO 2631 (1974, 1985), BS 6841 (1987), and ISO 2631 (1997). This paper presents a comparison of guidance on the health effects of vibration and repeated shock given in these standards. International Standard 2631 (1974,1985) offered a set of exposure limits. British Standard 6841 (1987) defines

M. J. Griffin

1998-01-01

185

Power absorbed during whole-body fore-and-aft vibration: Effects of sitting posture, backrest, and footrest  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the discomfort or injury associated with whole-body vibration cannot be predicted directly from the power absorbed during exposure to vibration, the absorbed power may contribute to understanding of the biodynamics involved in such responses. From measurements of force and acceleration at the seat, the feet, and the backrest, the power absorbed at these three locations was calculated for subjects

Naser Nawayseh; Michael J. Griffin

2012-01-01

186

Whole-body vibration and ergonomic study of US railroad locomotives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

US locomotive operators have exposure to multi-axis whole-body vibration (WBV) and shocks while seated. This study assessed operator-related and ergonomic seating design factors that may have confounding or mitigating influence on WBV exposure and its effects. Vibration exposure was measured according to international guidelines (ISO 2631-1; 1997); ergonomic work place factors and vibration effects were studied with a cross-sectional survey instrument distributed to a randomly selected group of railroad engineers (n=2546) and a control group; and during vehicle inspections. The survey response rate was 47% for the RR engineers (n=1195) and 41% for the controls (n=323). Results of the mean basic vibration measurements were for the x, y, z-direction and vector sum 0.14, 0.22, 0.28 and 0.49 m/s2 respectively; almost all crest factors (CF), MTVV and VDV values were above the critical ratios given in ISO 2631-1. The prevalence of serious neck and lower back disorders among locomotive engineers was found to be nearly double that of the sedentary control group without such exposure. Railroad engineers rated their seats mostly unacceptable regarding different adjustment and comfort aspects (3.02 3.51; scale 1=excellent to 4=unacceptable), while the control group rated their chairs more favorably (1.96 3.44). Existing cab and seat design in locomotives can result in prolonged forced awkward spinal posture of the operator combined with WBV exposure. In a logistic regression analysis, time at work being bothered by vibration (h/day) was significantly associated with an increased risk of low back pain, shoulder and neck pain, and sciatic pain among railroad engineers. Customized vibration attenuation seats and improved cab design of the locomotive controls should be further investigated.

Johanning, Eckardt; Landsbergis, Paul; Fischer, Siegfried; Christ, Eberhard; Göres, Benno; Luhrman, Raymond

2006-12-01

187

Vibration and pressure wave therapy for calf strains: a proposed treatment  

PubMed Central

Summary Calf (lower leg) strains have a variety of treatment regimens with variable outcomes and return to activity (RTA) time frames. These injuries involve disruption of portions or the entire gastrocnemius-soleus myo-tendinous complex. Conservative treatment initially consists of rest, ice, compression, elevation (RICE). Immediately following calf injury, patients can utilize cryotherapy, massage, passive range of motion, and progressive exercise. In general, Grade I through Grade III calf strains can take up to 6 weeks before the athlete can return to training. It can also involve the loss of more than 50% of muscle integrity. Recently, vibration therapy and radial pressure waves have been utilized to treat muscular strains and other myo-tendinous injuries that involve trigger points. Studies have suggested vibration therapy with rehabilitation can increase muscle strength and flexibility in patients. Segmental vibration therapy (SVT) is treatment to a more focal area. Vibration therapy (VT) is applied directly to the area of injury. VT is a mechanical stimulus that is thought to stimulate the sensory receptors, as well as decrease inflammatory cells and receptors. Therefore, VT could be a valuable tool in treating athlete effectively and decreasing their recovery time. The purpose of this paper is to give the reader baseline knowledge of VT and propose a treatment protocol for calf strains using this technology along with radial pressure waves.

Saxena, Amol; St. Louis, Marie; Fournier, Magali

2013-01-01

188

Vibration and pressure wave therapy for calf strains: a proposed treatment.  

PubMed

Calf (lower leg) strains have a variety of treatment regimens with variable outcomes and return to activity (RTA) time frames. These injuries involve disruption of portions or the entire gastrocnemius-soleus myo-tendinous complex. Conservative treatment initially consists of rest, ice, compression, elevation (RICE). Immediately following calf injury, patients can utilize cryotherapy, massage, passive range of motion, and progressive exercise. In general, Grade I through Grade III calf strains can take up to 6 weeks before the athlete can return to training. It can also involve the loss of more than 50% of muscle integrity. Recently, vibration therapy and radial pressure waves have been utilized to treat muscular strains and other myo-tendinous injuries that involve trigger points. Studies have suggested vibration therapy with rehabilitation can increase muscle strength and flexibility in patients. Segmental vibration therapy (SVT) is treatment to a more focal area. Vibration therapy (VT) is applied directly to the area of injury. VT is a mechanical stimulus that is thought to stimulate the sensory receptors, as well as decrease inflammatory cells and receptors. Therefore, VT could be a valuable tool in treating athlete effectively and decreasing their recovery time. The purpose of this paper is to give the reader baseline knowledge of VT and propose a treatment protocol for calf strains using this technology along with radial pressure waves. PMID:23888287

Saxena, Amol; St Louis, Marie; Fournier, Magali

2013-07-09

189

Controlled whole body vibration to decrease fall risk and improve health-related quality of life of nursing home residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bruyere O, Wuidart M-A, Di Palma E, Goulay M, Ethgen O, Richy F, Reginster J-Y. Controlled whole body vibration to decrease fall risk and improve health-related quality of life of nursing home residents.

Olivier Bruyere; Marc-Antoine Wuidart; Elio Di Palma; Margaret Gourlay; Olivier Ethgen; Florent Richy; Jean-Yves Reginster

2005-01-01

190

Tri-axial forces at the seat and backrest during whole-body vertical vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During exposure of seated subjects to vertical whole-body vibration, forces in the fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical directions at the seat and backrest have been measured. The responses at the seat have been compared with those measured previously on a seat without a backrest. Twelve male subjects were exposed to random vertical vibration in the frequency range 0.25-20Hz. The subjects sat on a rigid seat with a rigid backrest and were exposed to a 16 different conditions: four vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25ms-2 r.m.s.) and four sitting postures (with varying thigh contact with the seat). Although the excitation was vertical, considerable dynamic forces were found in the fore-and-aft direction on both the seat and the backrest. In the vertical direction on the backrest, and in the lateral direction on the seat and the backrest, the forces were low. At both the seat and the backrest, forces in all directions showed a non-linear behaviour. The presence of the backrest modified the forces on the seat in both the vertical and fore-and-aft directions: in all four postures there was an increase in the resonance frequency of the apparent mass when using the backrest. The effect of the backrest on fore-and-aft forces on the seat depended on whether the feet were supported or not. The results show the importance of considering the backrest when studying the response of the human body to whole-body vertical vibration.

Nawayseh, N.; Griffin, M. J.

2004-10-01

191

Second-order many-body perturbation expansions of vibrational Dyson self-energies.  

PubMed

Second-order many-body perturbation theories for anharmonic vibrational frequencies and zero-point energies of molecules are formulated, implemented, and tested. They solve the vibrational Dyson equation self-consistently by taking into account the frequency dependence of the Dyson self-energy in the diagonal approximation, which is expanded in a diagrammatic perturbation series up to second order. Three reference wave functions, all of which are diagrammatically size consistent, are considered: the harmonic approximation and diagrammatic vibrational self-consistent field (XVSCF) methods with and without the first-order Dyson geometry correction, i.e., XVSCF[n] and XVSCF(n), where n refers to the truncation rank of the Taylor-series potential energy surface. The corresponding second-order perturbation theories, XVH2(n), XVMP2[n], and XVMP2(n), are shown to be rigorously diagrammatically size consistent for both total energies and transition frequencies, yield accurate results (typically within a few cm(-1) at n = 4 for water and formaldehyde) for both quantities even in the presence of Fermi resonance, and have access to fundamentals, overtones, and combinations as well as their relative intensities as residues of the vibrational Green's functions. They are implemented into simple algorithms that require only force constants and frequencies of the reference methods (with no basis sets, quadrature, or matrix diagonalization at any stage of the calculation). The rules for enumerating and algebraically interpreting energy and self-energy diagrams are elucidated in detail. PMID:23883014

Hermes, Matthew R; Hirata, So

2013-07-21

192

Second-order many-body perturbation expansions of vibrational Dyson self-energies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Second-order many-body perturbation theories for anharmonic vibrational frequencies and zero-point energies of molecules are formulated, implemented, and tested. They solve the vibrational Dyson equation self-consistently by taking into account the frequency dependence of the Dyson self-energy in the diagonal approximation, which is expanded in a diagrammatic perturbation series up to second order. Three reference wave functions, all of which are diagrammatically size consistent, are considered: the harmonic approximation and diagrammatic vibrational self-consistent field (XVSCF) methods with and without the first-order Dyson geometry correction, i.e., XVSCF[n] and XVSCF(n), where n refers to the truncation rank of the Taylor-series potential energy surface. The corresponding second-order perturbation theories, XVH2(n), XVMP2[n], and XVMP2(n), are shown to be rigorously diagrammatically size consistent for both total energies and transition frequencies, yield accurate results (typically within a few cm-1 at n = 4 for water and formaldehyde) for both quantities even in the presence of Fermi resonance, and have access to fundamentals, overtones, and combinations as well as their relative intensities as residues of the vibrational Green's functions. They are implemented into simple algorithms that require only force constants and frequencies of the reference methods (with no basis sets, quadrature, or matrix diagonalization at any stage of the calculation). The rules for enumerating and algebraically interpreting energy and self-energy diagrams are elucidated in detail.

Hermes, Matthew R.; Hirata, So

2013-07-01

193

Isolated and combined effects of prolonged exposures to noise and whole-body vibration on hearing, vision and strain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary This study was carried out in order: (1) to examine the effects of isolated and combined prolonged exposures to noise and whole-body vibration on hearing, vision and subjectively experienced strain, and (2) to check the combined effects with repeated exposures. Six male subjects were exposed twice to noise (N) at 92 dBA, whole-body vibration (V) in the Z-axis at

Helmut Seidel; Barbara Harazin; Kristina Pavlas; Christine Sroka; Jörg Richter; Ralph Bliithner; Udo Erdmann; Jan Grzesik; Barbara Hinz; Reinhard Rothe

1988-01-01

194

MYOELECTRIC RESPONSE OF BACK MUSCLES TO VERTICAL RANDOM WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION WITH DIFFERENT MAGNITUDES AT DIFFERENT POSTURES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Back muscle forces contribute essentially to the whole-body vibration-induced spinal load. The electromyogram (EMG) can help to estimate these forces during whole-body vibration (WBV). Thirty-eight subjects were exposed to identical random low-frequency WBV (0·7, 1·0 and 1·4 m\\/s-2 r.m.s. weighted acceleration) at a relaxed, erect and bent forward postures. The acceleration of the seat and the force between the seat

R. Blüthner; H. Seidel; B. Hinz

2002-01-01

195

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Gastrointestinal Malignancies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an emerging treatment for pancreas cancer and liver tumors. Early data suggest excellent control rates for locally advanced pancreas cancer. However, due to the close proximity of the duodenum and stomach, steps to effectively minimize toxicities must be taken through image guidance of treatments. SBRT for liver tumors has also shown high rates of local

A. Yuriko Minn; Albert C. Koong; Daniel T. Chang

2011-01-01

196

Implementation of CHIEF in MATLAB for prediction of sound radiated from arbitrarily shaped vibrating bodies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Boundary Element Method can be used to predict sound pressure levels radiated from an arbitrarily shaped vibrating body. Using the direct, indirect, and approximation formulation one can solve such an exterior acoustic problem. In this work, the direct formulation is chosen. The two major methods employed for implementation of this formulation are the Combined Helmholtz Integral Equation Formulation (CHIEF) and the Burton-Miller Method. It was decided that the CHIEF method would be the focus of this research. Using the CHIEF method as a guide, a computer simulation was developed that incorporates quadratic elements, calculates the sound pressure and sound power, is able to import surface velocities, and uses the program IDEAS as a preprocessor. This program was verified using theoretical models as well as experimental measurements conducted in the Western Michigan University Noise and Vibration Laboratory. This program was written in Matlab with the understanding that it can be processed on a personal computer.

Christensen, Mark; Naghshineh, Koorosh

2002-05-01

197

Effect of Seating on Exposures to Whole-Body Vibration in Vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The vibration isolation efficiency of seating has been evaluated in 100 work vehicles in 14 categories (cars, vans, lift trucks, lorries, tractors, buses, dumpers, excavators, helicopters, armoured vehicles, mobile cranes, grass rollers, mowers and milk floats). Seat isolation efficiency, expressed by the SEAT value, was determined for all seats (67 conventional seats and 33 suspension seats) from the vertical acceleration measured on the floors and on the seats of the vehicles. For most categories of vehicle, the average SEAT value was less than 100%, indicating that the average seat provided some attenuation of vibration. However, there were large variations in SEAT values between vehicles within categories. Two alternative vibration frequency weightings (Wb from BS 6841, 1987; Wk from ISO 2631, 1997) yielded SEAT values that differed by less than 6%. Overall, the SEAT values determined by two alternative methods (the ratio of r.m.s. values and the ratio of vibration dose values) differed by less than 4.5% when using weighting Wb, although larger differences may be expected in some situations. The median SEAT value for the suspension seats was 84.6% the median SEAT value for the conventional seats was 86.9% (based on weighting Wb and the ratio of r.m.s. values). Predicted SEAT values were obtained assuming that each seat could be interchanged between vehicles without altering its transmissibility. The calculations suggest that 94% of the vehicles investigated might benefit from changing the current seat to a seat from one of the other vehicles investigated. Although the predictions are based on assumptions that will not always apply, it is concluded that the severity of whole-body vibration exposures in many work environments can be lessened by improvements to seating dynamics. . All rights reserved.

Paddan, G. S.; Griffin, M. J.

2002-05-01

198

A model of the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the human body during vertical whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The apparent mass of the human body reflects gross movements caused by whole-body vibration and can be used to predict the influence of body dynamics on seat transmissibility. With vertical excitation, various models fit the measured vertical apparent mass of the human body, but experiments also show high fore-and-aft forces on the seat (the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass) that have

Naser Nawayseh; Michael J. Griffin

2009-01-01

199

Mind-Body Therapies and Osteoarthritis of the Knee  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis of the knee is a major cause of disability among adults worldwide. Important treatment options include nonpharmacologic therapies, and especially symptom management strategies in which patients take an active role. Among these, mind-body therapies may have particular promise for alleviating the distressful symptoms associated with osteoarthritis of the knee. However, systematic reviews are lacking. The objective of this paper is to review English-language articles describing clinical studies evaluating the effects of patient-driven mind-body therapies on symptoms of knee osteoarthritis. Eight studies, representing a total of 267 participants, met the inclusion criteria. Interventions included tai chi, qigong, and yoga. Collectively, these studies suggest that specific mind-body practices may help alleviate pain and enhance physical function in adults suffering from osteoarthritis of the knee. However, sample sizes are small, rigorous investigations are few, and the potential benefits of several mind-body therapies have not yet been systematically tested. Additional high-quality studies are needed to clarify the effects of specific mind-body therapies on standardized measures of pain, physical function, and related indices in persons with osteoarthritis of the knee, and to investigate possible underlying mechanisms.

Selfe, Terry Kit; Innes, Kim E.

2010-01-01

200

Loading and Concurrent Synchronous Whole-Body Vibration Interaction Increases Oxygen Consumption During Resistance Exercise  

PubMed Central

Exercise is commonly used as an intervention to increase caloric output and positively affect body composition. A major challenge is the low compliance often seen when the prescribed exercise is associated with high levels of exertion. Whole-body vibration (WBV) may allow increased caloric output with reduced effort; however, there is limited information concerning the effect of WBV on oxygen consumption (VO2). Therefore, this study assessed the synergistic effects of resistance training and WBV on VO2. We examined VO2 at different loads (0%, 20%, and 40% body weight (BW)) and vibration intensities (No vibration (NV), 35HZ, 2-3mm (35L), 50Hz, 57mm (50H)) in ten men (26.5 ± 5.1 years). Data were collected during different stages (rest, six 30s sets of squatting, and recovery). Repeated measures ANOVA showed a stage x load x vibration interaction. Post hoc analysis revealed no differences during rest; however, a significant vibration x load interaction occurred during exercise. Both 35L and 50H produced greater VO2 than NV at a moderate load of 20%BW. Although 40%BW produced greater VO2 than 20%BW or 0%BW using NV, no significant difference in VO2 was seen among vibratory conditions at 40%BW. Moreover, no significant differences were seen between 50H and 35L at 20%BW and NV at 40%BW. During recovery there was a main effect for load. Post hoc analyses revealed that VO2 at 40%BW was significantly higher than 20%BW or 0%BW, and 20%BW produced higher VO2 than no load. Minute-by-minute analysis revealed a significant impact on VO2 due to load but not to vibratory condition. We conclude that the synergistic effect of WBV and active squatting with a moderate load is as effective at increasing VO2 as doubling the external load during squatting without WBV. Key Points Synchronous whole body vibration in conjunction with moderate external loading (app 20% BW) can increase oxygen consumption to the same extent as heavier loading (40% BW) during performance of the parallel squat. While the application of synchronous whole body vibration had no effect on recovery oxygen, under bot vibratory and non-vibratory conditions, the heavier the external load the greater the recovery oxygen consumption levels. Regardless of vibratory condition, during the squatting exercise bout 40% BW produced higher heart rates than 20%BW or 0% BW, and 20% BW produced higher heart rates than 0% BW. There were strong trends toward higher heart rates in both vibratory conditions (50 Hz, 5-6mm; 35 Hz, 2-3 mm) than in the non-vibratory condition regardless of external loading.

Serravite, Daniel H.; Edwards, David; Edwards, Elizabeth S.; Gallo, Sara E.; Signorile, Joseph F.

2013-01-01

201

Study protocol: the effect of whole body vibration on acute unilateral unstable lateral ankle sprain- a biphasic randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Ankle sprains often result in ankle instability, which is most likely caused by damage to passive structures and neuromuscular impairment. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a neuromuscular training method improving those impaired neurologic parameters. The aim of this study is to compare the current gold standard functional treatment to functional treatment plus WBV in patients with acute unilateral unstable inversion ankle sprains. Methods/Design 60 patients, aged 18–40 years, presenting with an isolated, unilateral, acute unstable inversion ankle sprain will be included in this bicentric, biphasic, randomized controlled trial. Samples will be randomized by envelope drawing. All patients will be allowed early mobilization and pain-dependent weight bearing, limited functional immobilization by orthosis, PRICE, NSARDs as well as home and supervised physiotherapy. Supervised physical therapy will take place twice a week, for 30 minutes for a period of 6 weeks, following a standardized intervention protocol. During supervised physical therapy, the intervention group will perform exercises similar to those of the control group, on a side-alternating sinusoidal vibration platform. Two time-dependent primary outcome parameters will be assessed: short-term outcome after six weeks will be postural control quantified by the sway index; mid-term outcome after one year will be assessed by subjective instability, defined by the presence of giving-way attacks. Secondary outcome parameters include: return to pre-injury level of activities, residual pain, recurrence, objective instability, energy/coordination, Foot and Ankle Disability Index and EQ 5D. Discussion This is the first trial investigating the effects of WBV in patients with acute soft tissue injury. Inversion ankle sprains often result in ankle instability, which is most likely due to damage of neurological structures. Due to its unique, frequency dependent, influence on various neuromuscular parameters, WBV is a promising treatment method for patients with acute unstable inversion ankle sprains. Trial registration NCT01702597

2013-01-01

202

Assessment of whole body vibration levels of coal miners. Volume 1. Whole-body vibration exposure of surface-coal-mining machine operators. Open file report, November 1979-July 1984  

SciTech Connect

Field measurements utilizing a seat-pad accelerometer were made on 61 surface-coal-mining machines in order to quantify the vibration levels experienced by the operators. These data were combined with information on the statistics of the operating times of these machines in order to compare the operator's vibration exposure to the criteria of the International Standards Organization (ISO) Standard 2631, A Guide for the Evaluation of Human Exposure to Whole Body Vibration. The comparison showed that about one-half of all surface-coal-mining machine operators can be expected to be exposed to vibration exceeding the fatigue-decreased proficiency criterion, whereas only on the order of 15% would be expected to experience vibration exceeding the exposure limit. Detailed exposure statistics are presented and the implications of the results are discussed.

Remington, P.J.; Stahr, J.; Andersen, D.

1983-07-01

203

Assessment of whole-body vibration levels of coal miners. Volume 2. Whole-body vibration exposure of underground coal mining machine operators. Open File report, November 1979-July 1084  

SciTech Connect

Field measurements utilizing a seat-pad accelerometer were made on 25 underground-coal-mining machines in order to quantify the vibration levels experienced by the operators. These data were combined with information on the statistics of the operating times of these machines in order to compare the operator's vibration exposure to the criteria of the International Standards Organization (ISO) Standard 2631, A Guide for the Evaluation of Human Exposure to Whole Body Vibration. The comparison showed that about 30% to 40% of all underground-coal mining machine operators can be expected to be exposed to vibration exceeding the fatigue-decreased proficiency criterion, whereas only 10% to 15% would be expected to experience vibration exceeding the exposure limit. The primary sources of the exposure are shuttle cars and possibly scoop trams. Detailed exposure statistics are presented, and the implications of the results are discussed.

Remington, P.J.; Andersen, D.A.; Alakel, M.N.

1984-03-01

204

Myoelectric reactions to ultra-low frequency and low-frequency whole body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  5 healthy males were exposed to vertical sinusoidal whole body vibration (WBV) at 5 frequencies (F1=0.315 Hz, F2=0.63 Hz, F3=1.25 Hz, F4=2.5 Hz, F5=5.0 Hz) and 2 intensities (11=1.2 ms–2 rms, F1-F5; I2=2.0 ms–2 rms, F2–F5). Erector spinae EMGs were derived at the levels of the first thoracic (T1) and third lumbar (L3) spinous processes, rectified and synchronously averaged, as

Helmut Seidel

1988-01-01

205

Scaling in temporal occurrence of quasi-rigid-body vibration pulses due to macrofractures.  

PubMed

We subjected the time series of quasi-rigid-body vibration pulses (elastic emissions) from laboratory fracture carried out by a piezoelectric accelerometer on concrete and rock specimens under uniaxial compression to statistical analysis. In both cases, we find that the waiting-time distribution can be described by a scaling law extending over several orders of magnitude. This law is indistinguishable from a universal scaling law recently proposed for the waiting-time distributions of acoustic emissions in heterogeneous materials and earthquakes, suggesting its general validity for fracture processes independent of modes and magnitude scales. PMID:21230353

Niccolini, G; Schiavi, A; Tarizzo, P; Carpinteri, A; Lacidogna, G; Manuello, A

2010-10-22

206

Scaling in temporal occurrence of quasi-rigid-body vibration pulses due to macrofractures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We subjected the time series of quasi-rigid-body vibration pulses (elastic emissions) from laboratory fracture carried out by a piezoelectric accelerometer on concrete and rock specimens under uniaxial compression to statistical analysis. In both cases, we find that the waiting-time distribution can be described by a scaling law extending over several orders of magnitude. This law is indistinguishable from a universal scaling law recently proposed for the waiting-time distributions of acoustic emissions in heterogeneous materials and earthquakes, suggesting its general validity for fracture processes independent of modes and magnitude scales.

Niccolini, G.; Schiavi, A.; Tarizzo, P.; Carpinteri, A.; Lacidogna, G.; Manuello, A.

2010-10-01

207

Effect of whole-body vibration on BMD: a systematic review and meta-analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Our systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining whole-body vibration (WBV) effect\\u000a on bone mineral density (BMD) found significant but small improvements in hip areal BMD (aBMD) in postmenopausal women and\\u000a in tibia and spine volumetric BMD in children\\/adolescents, but not in other BMD measurements in postmenopausal women and young\\u000a adults.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Introduction  Animal experiments report anabolic bone changes

L. Slatkovska; S. M. H. Alibhai; J. Beyene; A. M. Cheung

2010-01-01

208

Whole body vibration exposure in heavy earth moving machinery operators of metalliferrous mines.  

PubMed

As mining operations get mechanized, the rate of profit generation increases and so do the rate of occupational hazards. This study deals with one such hazard - occupational vibration. The present study was carried out to determine the whole body vibration (WBV) exposure of the heavy earth moving machinery (HEMM) operators in two types of metalliferous mines in India, when they were engaged in the mining activity. Cross-comparison was done of the vibration dose value (VDV) for HEMM operators as well as each type of mine. The VDV for the shovel operator in bauxite mine was observed to be 13.53 +/- 5.63 m/s(7/4) with 25% of the readings higher than the prescribed limit whereas in iron ore mine VDV for dumper operator was 10.81 +/- 3.44 m/s(7/4) with 14.62% readings on the higher side. Cross-comparison of the VDV values for bauxite and iron ore mines revealed that it was 9.57 +/- 4.93 and 8.21 +/- 5.12 m/s(7/4) with 21.28 and 14.95% of the readings on the higher side respectively. The Student's t test level was found to be insignificant for both type of mines, indicating that the WBV exposure is not dependent on the type of mine but is dependent on the working condition and type of HEMM in operation. PMID:17874194

Vanerkar, A P; Kulkarni, N P; Zade, P D; Kamavisdar, A S

2007-09-15

209

The influence of whole body vibration on the plantarflexors during heel raise exercise.  

PubMed

Whole body vibration (WBV) during exercise offers potential to augment the effects of basic exercises. However, to date there is limited information on the basic physiological and biomechanical effects of WBV on skeletal muscles. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of WBV (40Hz, 1.9mm synchronous vertical displacement) on the myoelectrical activity of selected plantarflexors during heel raise exercise. 3D motion capture of the ankle, synchronised with sEMG of the lateral gastrocnemius and soleus, was obtained during repetitive heel raises carried out at 0.5Hz on 10 healthy male subjects (age 27±5 years, height 1.78±0.04m, weight 75.75±11.9kg). During both vibration and non vibration the soleus activation peaked earlier than that of the lateral gastrocnemius. The results indicate that WBV has no effect on the timing of exercise completion or the amplitude of the lateral gastrocnemius activity, however significant increases in amplitudes of the soleus muscle activity (77.5-90.4% MVC P<0.05). WBV had no significant effect on median frequencies of either muscle. The results indicate that the greatest effect of WBV during heel raise activity is in the soleus muscles during the early phases of heel raise. PMID:23261083

Robbins, D; Goss-Sampson, M

2012-12-21

210

Effect of whole-body vibration on neuromuscular performance and body composition for females 65 years and older: a randomized-controlled trial.  

PubMed

We examined whether the effect of multipurpose exercise can be enhanced by whole-body vibration (WBV). One hundred and fifty-one post-menopausal women (68.5 ± 3.1 years) were randomly assigned to three groups: (1) a training group (TG); (2) training including vibration (VTG); and (3) a wellness control group (CG). TG and VTG performed the same training program twice weekly (60 min), consisting of aerobic and strength exercises, with the only difference that leg strength exercises (15 min) were performed with (VTG) or without (TG) vibration. CG performed a low-intensity "wellness" program. At baseline and after 18 months, body composition was determined using dual-X-ray-absorptiometry. Maximum isometric strength was determined for the legs and the trunk region. Leg power was measured by countermovement jumps using a force-measuring plate. In the TG lean body mass, total body fat, and abdominal fat were favorably affected, but no additive effects were generated by the vibration stimulus. However, concerning muscle strength and power, there was a tendency in favor of the VTG. Only vibration training resulted in a significant increase of leg and trunk flexion strength compared with CG. In summary, WBV embedded in a multipurpose exercise program showed minor additive effects on body composition and neuromuscular performance. PMID:20500555

von Stengel, S; Kemmler, W; Engelke, K; Kalender, W A

2010-05-24

211

Controlled Whole Body Vibration to Decrease Fall Risk and Improve Health-Related Quality of Life of Nursing Home Residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT. Bruyere O, Wuidart M-A, Di Palma E, Goulay M, Ethgen O, Richy F, Reginster J-Y. Controlled whole body vibration to decrease fall risk and improve health-related qual- ity of life of nursing home,residents. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2005;86:303-7. Objective: To investigate the effects of whole body vibra-

Olivier Bruyere; Marc-Antoine Wuidart; Margaret Gourlay; Olivier Ethgen; Florent Richy; Jean-Yves Reginster

2005-01-01

212

Factors affecting perception thresholds of vertical whole-body vibration in recumbent subjects: Gender and age of subjects, and vibration duration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some factors that may affect human perception thresholds of the vertical whole-body vibrations were investigated in two laboratory experiments with recumbent subjects. In the first experiment, the effects of gender and age of subjects on perception were investigated with three groups of 12 subjects, i.e., young males, young females and old males. For continuous sinusoidal vibrations at 2, 4, 8, 16, 31.5 and 63 Hz, there were no significant differences in the perception thresholds between male and female subjects, while the thresholds of young subjects tended to be significantly lower than the thresholds of old subjects. In the second experiment, the effect of vibration duration was investigated by using sinusoidal vibrations, at the same frequencies as above, modulated by the Hanning windows with different lengths (i.e., 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 s) for 12 subjects. It was found that the peak acceleration at the threshold tended to decrease with increasing duration of vibration. The perception thresholds were also evaluated by the running root-mean-square (rms) acceleration and the fourth power acceleration method defined in the current standards. The differences in the threshold of the transient vibrations for different durations were less with the fourth power acceleration method. Additionally, the effect of the integration time on the threshold was investigated for the running rms acceleration and the fourth power acceleration. It was found that the integration time that yielded less differences in the threshold of vibrations for different durations depended on the frequency of vibration.

Matsumoto, Y.; Maeda, S.; Iwane, Y.; Iwata, Y.

2011-04-01

213

Characterization and calibration of piezoelectric polymers: in situ measurements of body vibrations.  

PubMed

Piezoelectric polymers are known for their flexibility in applications, mainly due to their bending ability, robustness, and variable sensor geometry. It is an optimal material for minimal-invasive investigations in vibrational systems, e.g., for wood, where acoustical impedance matches particularly well. Many applications may be imagined, e.g., monitoring of buildings, vehicles, machinery, alarm systems, such that our investigations may have a large impact on technology. Longitudinal piezoelectricity converts mechanical vibrations normal to the polymer-film plane into an electrical signal, and the respective piezoelectric coefficient needs to be carefully determined in dependence on the relevant material parameters. In order to evaluate efficiency and durability for piezopolymers, we use polyvinylidene fluoride and measure the piezoelectric coefficient with respect to static pressure, amplitude of the dynamically applied force, and long-term stability. A known problem is the slow relaxation of the material towards equilibrium, if the external pressure changes; here, we demonstrate how to counter this problem with careful calibration. Since our focus is on acoustical measurements, we determine accurately the frequency response curve--for acoustics probably the most important characteristic. Eventually, we show that our piezopolymer transducers can be used as a calibrated acoustical sensors for body vibration measurements on a wooden musical instrument, where it is important to perform minimal-invasive measurements. A comparison with the simultaneously recorded airborne sound yields important insight of the mechanism of sound radiation in comparison with the sound propagating in the material. This is especially important for transient signals, where not only the long-living eigenmodes contribute to the sound radiation. Our analyses support that piezopolymer sensors can be employed as a general tool for the determination of the internal dynamics of vibrating systems. PMID:21806230

Kappel, Marcel; Abel, Markus; Gerhard, Reimund

2011-07-01

214

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 {+-} 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10-40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

Ahmed, Kamran A. [Mayo Medical School, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Rose, Peter S. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Olivier, Kenneth R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Brinkmann, Debra H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Laack, Nadia N., E-mail: laack.nadia@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

2012-04-01

215

MOVEMENT OF THE UPPER-BODY OF SEATED SUBJECTS EXPOSED TO VERTICAL WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION AT THE PRINCIPAL RESONANCE FREQUENCY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dynamic responses of eight male subjects exposed to vertical whole-body vibration have been measured at eight locations of the body in three directions within the sagittal plane: in the vertical, fore-and-aft and pitch axes. The motions were measured on the body surface at the first, fifth and tenth thoracic vertebra (T1, T5, T10), at the first, third and fifth

Y. Matsumoto; M. J. Griffin

1998-01-01

216

Loads on a spinal implant measured in vivo during whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

After spinal surgery, patients often want to know whether driving a car or using public transportation can be dangerous for their spine. In order to answer this question, a clinically proven vertebral body replacement (VBR) has been modified. Six load sensors and a telemetry unit were integrated into the inductively powered implant. The modified implant allows the measurement of six load components. Telemeterized devices were implanted in five patients; four of them agreed to exposure themselves to whole-body vibration. During the measurements, the patients sat on a driver seat fixed to a hexapod. They were exposed to random single-axis vibrations in X, Y, and Z directions as well as in multi-axis XYZ directions with frequencies between 0.3 and 30 Hz. Three intensity levels (unweighted root mean square values of 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 m/s(2)) were applied. Three postures were studied: sitting freely, using a vertical backrest, and a backrest declined by an angle of 25 degrees . The patients held their hands on their thighs. As expected, the maximum force on the VBR increased with increasing intensity and the number of axes. For the highest intensity level and multi-axis vibration, the maximum forces increased by 89% compared to sitting relaxed. Leaning at the backrest as well as lower intensity levels markedly decreased the implant loads. Driving a car or using public transportation systems-when the patient leans towards the backrest-leads to lower implant loads than walking, and can therefore be allowed already shortly after surgery. PMID:20186440

Rohlmann, Antonius; Hinz, Barbara; Blüthner, Ralph; Graichen, Friedmar; Bergmann, Georg

2010-02-27

217

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Body Dysmorphic Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The onset of appearance-related concerns associated with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) typically occurs in adolescence, and these concerns are often severe enough to interfere with normal development and psychosocial functioning. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for adults with BDD. However, no treatment studies…

Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Markowitz, Sarah; Petronko, Michael R.; Taylor, Caitlin E.; Wilhelm, Sabine; Wilson, G. Terence

2010-01-01

218

Modular Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study pilot tested a newly developed modular cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) treatment manual for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). We tested feasibility, acceptability, and treatment outcome in a sample of 12 adults with primary BDD. Treatment was delivered in weekly individual sessions over 18 or 22 weeks. Standardized clinician ratings…

Wilhelm, Sabine; Phillips, Katharine A.; Fama, Jeanne M.; Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Steketee, Gail

2011-01-01

219

Modular Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study pilot tested a newly developed modular cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) treatment manual for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). We tested feasibility, acceptability, and treatment outcome in a sample of 12 adults with primary BDD. Treatment was delivered in weekly individual sessions over 18 or 22 weeks. Standardized clinician ratings…

Wilhelm, Sabine; Phillips, Katharine A.; Fama, Jeanne M.; Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Steketee, Gail

2011-01-01

220

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Body Dysmorphic Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The onset of appearance-related concerns associated with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) typically occurs in adolescence, and these concerns are often severe enough to interfere with normal development and psychosocial functioning. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for adults with BDD. However, no treatment studies…

Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Markowitz, Sarah; Petronko, Michael R.; Taylor, Caitlin E.; Wilhelm, Sabine; Wilson, G. Terence

2010-01-01

221

Stereotactic body radiation therapy: a novel treatment modality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) involves the delivery of a small number of ultra-high doses of radiation to a target volume using very advanced technology and has emerged as a novel treatment modality for cancer. The role of SBRT is most important at two cancer stages—in early primary cancer and in oligometastatic disease. This modality has been used in the

Achilles J. Fakiris; Eric L. Chang; Nina A. Mayr; Jian Z. Wang; Lech Papiez; Bin S. Teh; Ronald C. McGarry; Higinia R. Cardenes; Robert D. Timmerman; Simon S. Lo

2009-01-01

222

Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for limited hepatic metastases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of liver metastases. Methods and Materials: The records of 69 patients with 174 metastatic liver lesions treated with SBRT between April 2001 and October 2004 were reviewed. The most common primary tumors were colorectal (n = 20), breast (n = 16), pancreas (n

Alan W.. Katz; Madeleine Carey-Sampson; Ann G. Muhs; Michael T. Milano; Michael C. Schell; Paul Okunieff

2007-01-01

223

Image-Guidance for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The term stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) describes a recently introduced external beam radiation paradigm by which small lesions outside the brain are treated under stereotactic conditions, in a single or few fractions of high-dose radiation delivery. Similar to the treatment planning and delivery process for cranial radiosurgery, the emphasis is on sparing of adjacent normal tissues through the creation

Martin. Fuss; Judit Boda-Heggemann; Nikos Papanikolau; Bill J. Salter

2007-01-01

224

Effect of seat surface angle on forces at the seat surface during whole-body vertical vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twelve male subjects have been exposed to whole-body vertical random vibration so as to investigate the effect of seat surface angle, vibration magnitude and contact with a backrest on the ‘vertical apparent mass’ (calculated from forces normal to the seat surface and vertical acceleration) and ‘fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass’ (calculated from forces parallel to the seat surface and vertical acceleration).

Naser Nawayseh; Michael J. Griffin

2005-01-01

225

Numerical assessment of fore-and-aft suspension performance to reduce whole-body vibration of wheel loader drivers  

Microsoft Academic Search

While driving off-road vehicles, operators are exposed to whole-body vibration acting in the fore-and-aft direction. Seat manufacturers supply products equipped with fore-and-aft suspension but only a few studies report on their performance. This work proposes a computational approach to design fore-and-aft suspensions for wheel loader seats. Field tests were conducted in a quarry to analyse the nature of vibration to

Gérard Fleury; Pierre Mistrot

2006-01-01

226

The impact of self-reported exposure to whole-body-vibrations on the risk of disability pension among men: a 15 year prospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Whole-body-vibrations are often associated with adverse health effect but the long term effects are less known. This study investigates the association between occupational exposures to whole-body vibrations, and subsequent transition to disability pension. METHODS: A total of 4215 male employees were followed up for subsequent disability pension retirement. Exposure to whole-body-vibration was self-reported while new cases of disability pension

Finn Tüchsen; Helene Feveile; Karl B Christensen; Niklas Krause

2010-01-01

227

Effect of phase on discomfort caused by vertical whole-body vibration and shock-Experimental investigation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An experimental study has investigated the effect of ``phase'' on the subjective responses of human subjects exposed to vertical whole-body vibration and shock. The stimuli were formed from two frequency components: 3 and 9 Hz for continuous vibrations and 3 and 12 Hz for shocks. The two frequency components, each having 1.0 ms-2 peak acceleration, were combined to form various waveforms. The effects of the vibration magnitude on the discomfort caused by the input stimuli were also investigated with both the continuous vibrations and the shocks. Various objective measurements of acceleration and force at the seat surface, the effects of different frequency weightings and second and fourth power evaluations were compared with judgments of the discomfort of the stimuli. It was found that a 6% to 12% increase in magnitude produced a statistically significant increase in discomfort with both the continuous vibrations and the shocks. Judgments of discomfort caused by changes in vibration magnitude were highly correlated with all of the objective measurements used in the study. The effects on discomfort of the phase between components in the continuous vibrations were not statistically significant, as predicted using evaluation methods with a power of 2. However, small changes in discomfort were correlated with the vibration dose value (VDV) of the Wb frequency-weighted acceleration. The effect of phase between frequency components within the shocks was statistically significant, although no objective measurement method used in the study was correlated with the subjective judgments.

Matsumoto, Yasunao; Griffin, Michael J.

2002-03-01

228

A model analysis of internal loads, energetics, and effects of wobbling mass duringthe whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The internal loads, energetics, and the effects of wobbling mass during the whole-body vibration are studied in terms of analysis and comparison of two models: one is a system of four degrees-of-freedom with rigid and wobbling masses in both lower body and upper body (Model A), while the other one (Model B) is a system of three degrees-of-freedom with a

Z. Yue; J. Mester

2002-01-01

229

Analyses of biodynamic responses of seated occupants to uncorrelated fore-aft and vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The apparent mass and seat-to-head-transmissibility response functions of the seated human body were investigated under exposures to fore-aft (x), vertical (z), and combined fore-aft and vertical (x and z) axis whole-body vibration. The coupling effects of dual-axis vibration were investigated using two different frequency response function estimators based upon the cross- and auto-spectral densities of the response and excitation signals, denoted as H1 and Hv estimators, respectively. The experiments were performed to measure the biodynamic responses to single and uncorrelated dual-axis vibration, and to study the effects of hands support, back support and vibration magnitude on the body interactions with the seatpan and the backrest, characterized in terms of apparent masses and the vibration transmitted to the head. The data were acquired with 9 subjects exposed to two different magnitudes of vibration applied along the individual x- and z-axis (0.25 and 0.4 m/s2 rms), and along both the axis (0.28 and 0.4 m/s2 rms along each axis) in the 0.5-20 Hz frequency range. The two methods resulted in identical single-axis responses but considerably different dual-axis responses. The dual-axis responses derived from the Hv estimator revealed notable effects of dual-axis vibration, as they comprised both the direct and cross-axis responses observed under single axis vibration. Such effect, termed as the coupling effect, was not evident in the dual-axis responses derived using the commonly used H1 estimator. The results also revealed significant effects of hands and back support conditions on the coupling effects and the measured responses. The back support constrained the upper body movements and thus showed relatively weaker coupling compared to that observed in the responses without the back support. The effect of hand support was also pronounced under the fore-aft vibration. The results suggest that a better understanding of the seated human body responses to uncorrelated multi-axis whole-body vibration could be developed using the power-spectral-density based Hv estimator.

Mandapuram, Santosh; Rakheja, Subhash; Marcotte, Pierre; Boileau, Paul-Émile

2011-08-01

230

Body Weight, Body Fat Distribution, and Hormonal Replacement Therapy in Early Postmenopausal Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Body weight was measured, and body fat distribution was deter- mined by dual energy x-ray in early postmenopausal women given either oral calcium (500 mg\\/day; control group; n 5 12) or hormonal replacement therapy (HRT), a combination of estradiol valerate (2 mg\\/day for 21 days) with cyproterone acetate (1 mg\\/day in the last 10 days of the treatment cycle; n

M. Gambacciani; M. CIAPONI; B. CAPPAGLI; L. PIAGGESI; L. DE SIMONE; R. ORLANDI; A. R. GENAZZANI

1997-01-01

231

Influence of Sine, and Random, Whole-Body Vibration on Visual Acuity Einfluss Sinusfoermiger und Regelloser Ganzkoerperschwingungen Auf die Visuelle Informationsaufnahme.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The far, visual acuity of people subjected to vertical whole-body vibration (different vibration types and loads) was tested. A total of 110 subjects of both sexes, either exposed to sine vibration in the range from 2 to 18 cycles/sec or to random vibrati...

N. May

1979-01-01

232

Inter-cycle variation in whole-body vibration exposures of operators driving track-type loader machines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Whole-body vibration (WBV) measurements are an important aspect of performing risk assessments for those exposed to vibration. A large array of variables affect the outcome of a vibration measurement and its extrapolation to a daily dose measure: e.g. variability in driving style, road surface roughness, loading. The variability in vibration emission is an inherent property for most vibrating environments and there is a risk that a vibration measurement might not be representative of the long-term exposures. It is important to acknowledge the variation inherent to WBV exposure to help understand how this variation will affect health risk assessments. A field investigation was conducted in order to characterise the variation of WBV magnitudes between work cycles of track-type loaders. Six different track-type loaders were measured at four different work sites. The vibrations were measured at the operators seat in three translational axes (x-, y-, and z-axis) in accordance with ISO 2631-1 (1997). The findings indicate the worst axis of vibration for the track-type loaders was predominantly the fore-and-aft (x-axis), for most operations. The most severe emission values were measured for machine C at site 2 (1.12 ms-2 rms) and machine D at site 2 (1.03 ms-2 rms). These machines would exceed the action value of the Physical Agents (Vibration) Directive within 2 h of exposure. All of the machines measured would exceed the exposure action value of the Directive within an 8 h working period. The lateral (y-axis) produced the greatest amount of variability between work cycles (coefficient of variation up to 20%). It is concluded that the inherent variability between work cycles and tasks reinforces the requirement to perform a full task analysis prior to measuring WBV exposures to ensure that all tasks are measured and that adequate cycles are measured to obtain a reliable indication of the vibration emission.

Newell, Geraldine S.; Mansfield, Neil J.; Notini, Luca

2006-12-01

233

Effects of whole body vibration on motor unit recruitment and threshold  

PubMed Central

Whole body vibration (WBV) has been suggested to elicit reflex muscle contractions but this has never been verified. We recorded from 32 single motor units (MU) in the vastus lateralis of 7 healthy subjects (34 ± 15.4 yr) during five 1-min bouts of WBV (30 Hz, 3 mm peak to peak), and the vibration waveform was also recorded. Recruitment thresholds were recorded from 38 MUs before and after WBV. The phase angle distribution of all MUs during WBV was nonuniform (P < 0.001) and displayed a prominent peak phase angle of firing. There was a strong linear relationship (r = ?0.68, P < 0.001) between the change in recruitment threshold after WBV and average recruitment threshold; the lowest threshold MUs increased recruitment threshold (P = 0.008) while reductions were observed in the higher threshold units (P = 0.031). We investigated one possible cause of changed thresholds. Presynaptic inhibition in the soleus was measured in 8 healthy subjects (29 ± 4.6 yr). A total of 30 H-reflexes (stimulation intensity 30% Mmax) were recorded before and after WBV: 15 conditioned by prior stimulation (60 ms) of the antagonist and 15 unconditioned. There were no significant changes in the relationship between the conditioned and unconditioned responses. The consistent phase angle at which each MU fired during WBV indicates the presence of reflex muscle activity similar to the tonic vibration reflex. The varying response in high- and low-threshold MUs may be due to the different contributions of the mono- and polysynaptic pathways but not presynaptic inhibition.

Woledge, Roger C.; Martin, Finbarr C.; Newham, Di J.

2012-01-01

234

Assessment of the influence of whole body vibration on Cochlear function  

PubMed Central

Background Whole body vibration (WBV) is a potentially harmful consequence resulting from the dissipation of energy by industrial machineries. The result of WBV exposure on the auditory system remains unknown. The objective of the present research was to evaluate the influence of WBV on cochlear function, in particular outer hair cell function. It is hypothesized that WBV impairs cochlear function resulting in decreased Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission (DPOAE) levels (Ldp) in rabbits subjected to WBV. Methods Twelve rabbits were equally divided into vibration and control groups. Animals in vibration group were exposed to 1.0?ms-2 r.m.s vertical WBV at 4–8?Hz for 8?h/day during 5 consecutive days. Outer hair cell function was assessed by comparing repeated-measurements of DPOAE levels (Ldp) across a range of f2 frequencies in rabbits both exposed and unexposed to WBV. DPOAE level shifts (LSdp) were compared across ears, frequencies, groups, and times. Results No differences were seen over time in DPOAE levels in the non-exposed rabbits (p?=?0.082). Post-exposure Ldp in rabbits exposed to WBV were significantly increased at all test frequencies in both ears compared to baseline measures (p?=?0.021). The greatest increase in Ldp following exposure was seen at 5888.5?Hz (mean shift?=?13.25?dB). Post-exposure Ldp in rabbits exposed to WBV were not significantly different between the right and left ears (p?=?0.083). Conclusion WBV impairs cochlear function resulting in increased DPOAE responses in rabbits exposed to WBV. DPOAE level shifts occurred over a wide range of frequencies following prolonged WBV in rabbits.

2012-01-01

235

Effects of Posture and Vibration Magnitude on Apparent Mass and Pelvis Rotation during Exposure to Whole-Body Vertical Vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of variations in posture and vibration magnitude on apparent mass and seat-to-pelvis pitch transmissibility have been studied with vertical random vibration over the frequency range 1.0-20 Hz. Each of 12 subjects was exposed to 27 combinations of three vibration magnitudes (0.2, 1.0 and 2.0m/s2 r.m.s.) and nine sitting postures (``upright'', ``anterior lean'', ``posterior lean'', ``kyphotic'', ``back-on'', ``pelvis support'', ``inverted SIT-BAR'' (increased pressure beneath ischial tuberosities), ``bead cushion'' (decreased pressure beneath ischial tuberosities) and ``belt'' (wearing an elasticated belt)). Peaks in the apparent masses were observed at about 5 and 10 Hz, and in the seat-to-pelvis pitch transmissibilities at about 12 Hz. In all postures, the resonance frequencies in the apparent mass and transmissibility decreased with increased vibration magnitude, indicating a non-linear softening system. There were only small changes in apparent mass or transmissibility with posture, although peaks were lower for the apparent mass in the ``kyphotic'' posture and were lower for the transmissibility in the ``belt'' posture. The changes in apparent mass and transmissibility caused by changes in vibration magnitude were greater than the changes caused by variation in posture. . All rights reserved.

Mansfield, N. J.; Griffin, M. J.

2002-05-01

236

Mathematical models for the apparent masses of standing subjects exposed to vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Linear lumped parameter models of the apparent masses of human subjects in standing positions when exposed to vertical whole-body vibration have been developed. Simple models with a single degree-of-freedom (d.o.f.) and with two (d.o.f.) were considered for practical use. Model parameters were optimised using both the mean apparent mass of 12 male subjects and the apparent masses of individual subjects measured in a previous study. The calculated responses of two (d.o.f.) models with a massless support structure showed best agreement with the measured apparent mass and phase, with errors less than 0.1 in the normalised apparent mass (i.e., corresponding to errors less than 10% of the static mass) and errors less than 5° in the phase for a normal standing posture. The model parameters obtained with the mean measured apparent masses of the 12 subjects were similar to the means of the 12 sets of parameters obtained when fitting to the individual apparent masses. It was found that the effects of vibration magnitude and postural changes on the measured apparent mass could be represented by changes to the stiffness and damping in the two (d.o.f.) models.

Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

2003-02-01

237

Changes in postural sway frequency and complexity in altered sensory environments following whole body vibrations.  

PubMed

Studies assessing whole body vibration (WBV) have produced largely positive effects, with some neutral, on postural control with frequencies between 25 and 40 Hz. However no conclusive evidence indicates that 25-40 Hz elicits the optimal beneficial effects. To address this issue, a larger range of vibration intensity (10-50 Hz at peak-to-peak amplitudes of 2 and 5mm) was employed while increasing the postural complexity (altered somatosensory and/or visual information) to assess acute effects of 4-min of WBV on postural control. Twelve healthy young adults underwent postural assessment at four time intervals (prior to, immediately following and 10 and 20 min post WBV). Findings revealed both postural sway frequency and sway complexity/regularity were affected by WBV. Baseline posture demonstrated increased sway frequency (p=.04) following WBV with no changes in sway complexity. When the support surface was altered, changes in both the frequency and complexity of sway were elicited (p=.027, .002, respectively). When both somatosensory and visual information were altered delayed improvements in postural control were elicited (p=.05 and .01, for frequency and complexity, respectively). Given the differential acute effects as a function of postural task complexity, future longitudinal studies could determine the overall training effect on sway frequency and complexity. PMID:22516837

Dickin, D Clark; McClain, Matthew A; Hubble, Ryan P; Doan, Jon B; Sessford, David

2012-04-17

238

Human head-neck models in whole-body vibration: effect of posture.  

PubMed

This work presents passive and muscle-based models to predict the biodynamical response of the human head-neck under fore-aft and combined-axis whole-body vibration considering four head-neck postures: neutral, flexion, lateral flexion, and lateral rotation. The passive model consists of one link, a three-rotational-degrees-of-freedom joint, and traditional spring-mass-damper elements. The muscle-based model is similar to the passive model but has additional muscle components. The additional muscle component comprises spring-mass-damper elements to capture the effects of changes in displacement, velocity, acceleration, and jerk. Eleven male participants were tested under white-noise random vibration input signals at the seat level with a frequency range of 0.5-10Hz and magnitudes of 1.5m/s(2) RMS for the fore-aft condition and 1.0m/s(2) RMS in each direction for the combined-axis condition. The proposed models were able to reasonably predict the frequency content and acceleration of the head-neck for the postures under investigation, with the muscle-based model performing better. PMID:23290314

Wang, Yang; Rahmatalla, Salam

2013-01-03

239

Evaluation of Frequency Weighting (iso 2631-1) for Acute Effects of Whole-Body Vibration on Gastric Motility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) and the ISO 2631/1-1997 frequency weighting on gastric motility. The gastric motility was measured by electrogastrography (EGG) in nine healthy volunteers. Sinusoidal vertical vibration at a frequency of 4, 6.3, 8, 12, 16, 31.5, or 63 Hz was given to the subjects for 10 min. The magnitude of exposure at 4 Hz was 1.0m/s2 (r.m.s.). The magnitudes of the other frequencies gave the same frequency-weighted acceleration according to ISO 2631/1-1997. The pattern of the dominant frequency histogram (DFH) was changed to a broad distribution pattern by vibration exposure. Vibration exposure had the effect of significantly reducing the percentage of time for which the dominant component had a normal rhythm and increasing the percentage of time for which there was tachygastria (p<0.05). Vibration exposure generally reduced the mean percentage of time with the dominant frequency in normal rhythm component. There was a significant difference between the condition of no vibration and exposure to 4 and 6.3 Hz of vibration frequency (p<0.05). The frequency weighting curve given in ISO 2631/1-1997 was not adequate for use in evaluating the physiological effects of WBV exposure on gastric motility. . All rights reserved.

Ishitake, T.; Miyazaki, Y.; Noguchi, R.; Ando, H.; Matoba, T.

2002-05-01

240

Strength Training with Superimposed Whole Body Vibration Does Not Preferentially Modulate Cortical Plasticity  

PubMed Central

Paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to investigate 4?wks of leg strength training with and without whole body vibration (WBV) on corticospinal excitability and short-latency intracortical inhibition (SICI). Participants (n = 12) were randomly allocated to either a control or experimental (WBV) group. All participants completed 12 squat training sessions either with (WBV group) or without (control group) exposure to WBV (f = 35?Hz, A = 2.5?mm). There were significant (P < 0.05) increases in squat strength and corticospinal excitability and significant (P < 0.05) reductions in SICI for both groups following the 4?wk intervention. There were no differences detected between groups for any dependant variable (P > 0.05). It appears that WBV training does not augment the increase in strength or corticospinal excitability induced by strength training alone.

Weier, Ashleigh T.; Kidgell, Dawson J.

2012-01-01

241

Whole-body vibration effects on the muscle activity of upper and lower body muscles during the baseball swing in recreational baseball hitters  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on the muscle recruitment of selected upper and lower body muscles during the baseball swing. Participants were recreationally trained males (n = 16, 22 ± 2 years, 181.4 ± 7.4 cm, 84.7 ± 9.0 kg), with previous baseball experience. Subjects participated in three randomized sessions on separate days, consisting of three sets of five swings off

Gabriel F. “Cisco” Reyes; D. Clark Dickin; Nolan J. K. Crusat; Dennis G. Dolny

2011-01-01

242

Assessment of whole-body vibration levels of coal miners. Volume 3. Low-frequency vibration exposure and seat performance. Open File report, November 1979-April 1985  

SciTech Connect

The field data gathered as part of the measurements described in Volumes I and II were reanalyzed in the low frequency regime (.1 Hz to 1 Hz) where motion sickness normally occurs. These data were compared to the International Standard 2631 Addendum 2: Evaluation of exposure to whole-body Z-axis vertical vibration in the frequency range of 0.1 to 1.0 Hz. For both underground mining machines and surface-mining machines, the results showed that one would not expect motion sickness to be a severe problem. New field data were gathered on the vibration reduction performance of various seat designs found on surface-coal-mining machines. The vibration during normal operation was simultaneously measured on the seat using the standard seat-pad accelerometer packaged described in the previous two volumes, and on the floor of the machine at the base of the seat. Preliminary indications are that the so-called high performance seats used for operator vibration reduction do not offer significant improvement over conventional seats.

Remington, P.J.

1984-11-01

243

Effect of whole-body vibration exercise and muscle strengthening, balance, and walking exercises on walking ability in the elderly  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study was conducted to determine the beneficial effect of whole- body vibration (WBV) exercise in addition to muscle strengthening, balance, and walking exercises on the walking ability in the elderly. Sixty-seven elderly participants were divided into two groups; the WBV exercise plus routine exercises group (n=40) and the routine ex- ercises alone group (n=27). WBV exercise was performed

Kazuhiro Kawanabe; Akira Kawashima; Issei Sashimoto; Tsuyoshi Takeda; Yoshihiro Sato; Jun Iwamoto

2007-01-01

244

AN UPDATED REVIEW OF EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXPOSURE TO WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION AND LOW BACK PAIN  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this paper is to update the information on the epidemiologic evidence of the adverse health effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on the spinal system by means of a review of the epidemiologic studies published between 1986 and 1996. In a systematic search of epidemiologic studies of low back pain (LBP) disorders and occupations with exposure to WBV,

M. Bovenzi; C. T. J. Hulshof

1998-01-01

245

DEVELOPMENT OF A PROTOCOL FOR EPIDEMIOLOGAL STUDIES OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION AND MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS OF THE LOWER BACK  

Microsoft Academic Search

It seems evident from a large number of studies that there is a positive relationship between exposure to whole body vibration (WBV) and the occurrence of low back pain. There are existing standards for evaluating the human exposure to WBV, which are based on other factors than the effect of musculoskeletal disorders. Several national and international standards also exist for

M. L. Magnusson; M. H. Pope; C. T. J. Hulshof; M. Bovenzi

1998-01-01

246

Acute whole body vibration training increases vertical jump and flexibility performance in elite female field hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To quantify the acute effect of whole body vibration (WBV) training on arm countermovement vertical jump (ACMVJ), grip strength, and flexibility performance.Methods: Eighteen female elite field hockey players each completed three interventions of WBV, control, and cycling in a balanced random manner. WBV was performed on a Galileo machine (26 Hz) with six different exercises being performed. For the

D J Cochrane; S R Stannard

2005-01-01

247

Nonlinear subjective and biodynamic responses to continuous and transient whole-body vibration in the vertical direction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of the magnitude of continuous and transient whole-body vibration in the vertical direction on both subjective and biodynamic responses of human subjects has been investigated experimentally. Additionally, the relation between the subjective responses and the dynamic responses has also been studied. Twelve subjects were exposed to sinusoidal continuous vibrations at five frequencies (3.15 8.0 Hz) and at three magnitudes (0.5 2.0 m s-2 rms). They were also exposed to transient vibrations that were modulated one-and-half cycle sinusoidal waveforms at the same frequencies as the continuous vibrations and at three magnitudes corresponding to the magnitudes used for the continuous vibrations. Discomfort was measured by the method of magnitude estimation with reference stimuli having frequency components in the middle of the frequency range used in this study. The driving-point dynamic responses (the ratio between the force and the motion, i.e., acceleration and velocity, at the driving point) were also measured and divided by the responses to the reference stimuli used in the measurement of discomfort so as to allow the comparison of the dynamic responses with the discomfort responses. Both the discomfort estimates and the normalised driving-point dynamic responses were influenced by the stimuli magnitudes, especially with the continuous vibration. At 3.15 and 4.0 Hz, the discomfort estimates and the normalised mechanical impedance and apparent mass increased significantly with increases in vibration magnitude from 0.5 2.0 m s-2 rms. Magnitude estimates for discomfort were correlated with the normalised mechanical impedance and apparent mass in the frequency range investigated. For the transient vibrations, the discomfort estimates and the driving-point dynamic responses were interpreted as responses in frequency bands around the fundamental frequency of the input motion. The results indicate similar nonlinearities in discomfort and driving-point dynamic responses associated with the principal body response within the range 3.15 8 Hz. The nonlinearity in discomfort at these frequencies may be partially caused by the nonlinear dynamic response of the body and is sufficient to require consideration in methods of predicting discomfort caused by vertical whole-body vibration.

Matsumoto, Yasunao; Griffin, Michael J.

2005-11-01

248

Effects of muscular strength, exercise order, and acute whole-body vibration exposure on bat swing speed.  

PubMed

The purposes for this study were to investigate effects of acute whole-body vibration (WBV) exposure and exercise order on bat speed and to examine relationship between muscular strength and bat speed. All participants were recreationally trained men (n = 16; 22 ± 2 years; 181.4 ± 7.4 cm; 84.7 ± 9 kg), with previous baseball experience and were tested for 1 repetitive maximum (1RM) strength in squat and bench press. Subjects then participated in 4 randomized sessions on separate days, each consisting of 3 sets of 5 bat swings. Exercises (upper and lower body dynamic and static movements related to bat swing) with or without WBV exposure were performed after sets 1 and 2. Trials were as follows: no-exercise Control (CTRL), upper body followed by lower body exercises without WBV (Arm-Leg NOVIB), upper body followed by lower body exercises with WBV (Arm-Leg VIB), and lower body followed by upper body exercises with WBV (Leg-Arm VIB). Bat speed was recorded during each swing and averaged across sets. Statistical analyses were performed to assess differences across sets and trials. Linear regressions analyzed relationship between strength and bat speed. A significant relationship existed between bat speed and lower body strength (r = 0.406, p = 0.008) but not for upper body strength. The exercise order of Arm-Leg VIB significantly increased bat speed by 2.6% (p = 0.02). Performing identical order of exercises without vibration (Arm-Leg NOVIB) significantly decreased bat speed by 2% (p = 0.039). It was concluded that adding vibration exposure to total-body exercises can provide acute enhancements in bat speed. Additionally, leg strength was shown to influence bat speed suggesting that increasing leg strength may enhance bat speed. PMID:21088545

Reyes, G F Cisco; Dickin, D Clark; Dolny, Dennis G; Crusat, Nolan J K

2010-12-01

249

Biodynamic response of the seated human body to single-axis and dual-axis vibration: effect of backrest and non-linearity.  

PubMed

The biodynamic responses to the human body give an understanding of why human responses to vibration (changes in health, comfort, and performance) vary with the frequency and direction of vibration. Studies have shown that biodynamic responses also vary with the magnitude of vibration and that the backrests of seats influence the transmission of vibration to the seated human body. There has been little study of the nonlinearity in the biodynamic responses of the body to dual-axis excitation and no study of the influence of backrests during dual-axis excitation. This study investigated the apparent mass and cross-axis apparent mass of the human body exposed to random vibration (0.2 to 20 Hz) in all 15 possible combinations of four magnitudes (0, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 ms(-2) r.m.s.) of fore-and-aft vibration and the same four magnitudes of vertical vibration. Nonlinearity was evident, with the body softening with increasing magnitude of vibration when using a fixed magnitude of vibration in one direction and varying the magnitude of vibration in the other direction. The fore-and-aft apparent mass on the seat was greater without a backrest at the lower frequencies but greater with a backrest at the higher frequencies. The vertical apparent mass on the seat was decreased by the backrest at low frequencies. Cross-axis coupling was evident, with excitation in one axis producing a response in the other axis. It is concluded that the nonlinearity of the body evident during single-axis and multi-axis vibration, and the influence of backrests, should be taken into account when determining frequency weightings for predicting human responses to vibration and when optimising the dynamics of seating to minimise exposure to vibration. PMID:22146145

Qiu, Yi; Griffin, Michael J

2011-12-06

250

Long-term effects of 6-week whole-body vibration on balance recovery and activities of daily living in the postacute phase of stroke: a randomized, controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The long-term effects of 6-weeks whole-body vibration, as a novel method of somatosensory stimulation, on postural control and activities of daily living were compared with those of 6 weeks of exercise therapy on music of the same intensity in the postacute phase of stroke. METHODS: Fifty-three patients with moderate to severe functional disabilities were randomized within 6

I. J. W. van Nes; H. Latour; F. Schils; R. Meijer; A. van Kuijk; A. C. H. Geurts

2006-01-01

251

SURVEY OF TECHNICAL PREVENTATIVE MEASURES TO REDUCE WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION EFFECTS WHEN DESIGNING MOBILE MACHINERY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Engineering solutions to minimize the effects on operators of vibrating mobile machinery can be conveniently grouped into three areas: •Reduction of vibration at source by improvement of the quality of terrain, careful selection of vehicle or machine, correct loading, proper maintenance, etc.•Reduction of vibration transmission by incorporating suspension systems (tyres, vehicle suspensions, suspension cab and seat) between the operator and

P. Donati

2002-01-01

252

Apparent mass and cross-axis apparent mass of standing subjects during exposure to vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effects of posture and vibration magnitude on the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the standing human body during exposure to vertical vibration have been investigated. Twelve male subjects were exposed to random vertical vibration over the frequency range 2.0 20 Hz at three vibration magnitudes: 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 m s-2 rms. Subjects stood in five different postures: upright, lordotic, anterior lean, knees bent and knees more bent. The vertical acceleration at the floor and the forces in the vertical and fore-and-aft directions at the floor were used to obtain the apparent mass and the cross-axis apparent mass. The resonance frequency of the apparent mass was significantly reduced with knees bent and knees more bent postures, but there were only minor effects on the resonance frequency by changing the position of the upper body. Considerable cross-axis apparent mass, up to about 30% of the static mass of subjects, was found. The cross-axis apparent mass was influenced by all postural changes used in the study. In all postures the resonance frequencies of the apparent mass and the cross-axis apparent mass tended to decrease with increasing vibration magnitude. This nonlinear characteristic tended to be less clear in some postures in which subjects increased muscle tension.

Subashi, G. H. M. J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

2006-05-01

253

Power absorbed during whole-body fore-and-aft vibration: Effects of sitting posture, backrest, and footrest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although the discomfort or injury associated with whole-body vibration cannot be predicted directly from the power absorbed during exposure to vibration, the absorbed power may contribute to understanding of the biodynamics involved in such responses. From measurements of force and acceleration at the seat, the feet, and the backrest, the power absorbed at these three locations was calculated for subjects sitting in four postures (feet hanging, maximum thigh contact, average thigh contact, and minimum thigh contact) both with and without a rigid vertical backrest while exposed to four magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25 m s-2 rms) of random fore-and-aft vibration. The power absorbed by the body at the supporting seat surface when there was no backrest showed a peak around 1 Hz and another peak between 3 and 4 Hz. Supporting the back with the backrest decreased the power absorbed at the seat at low frequencies but increased the power absorbed at high frequencies. Foot support influenced both the magnitude and the frequency of the peaks in the absorbed power spectra as well as the total absorbed power. The measurements of absorbed power are consistent with backrests being beneficial during exposure to low frequency fore-and-aft vibration but detrimental with high frequency fore-and-aft vibration.

Nawayseh, Naser; Griffin, Michael J.

2012-01-01

254

Whole-Body Vibration and the Prevention and Treatment of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness  

PubMed Central

Abstract Context: Numerous recovery strategies have been used in an attempt to minimize the symptoms of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been suggested as a viable warm-up for athletes. However, scientific evidence to support the protective effects of WBV training (WBVT) on muscle damage is lacking. Objective: To investigate the acute effect of WBVT applied before eccentric exercise in the prevention of DOMS. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 32 healthy, untrained volunteers were randomly assigned to either the WBVT (n ?=? 15) or control (n ?=? 17) group. Intervention(s): Volunteers performed 6 sets of 10 maximal isokinetic (60°/s) eccentric contractions of the dominant-limb knee extensors on a dynamometer. In the WBVT group, the training was applied using a vibratory platform (35 Hz, 5 mm peak to peak) with 100° of knee flexion for 60 seconds before eccentric exercise. No vibration was applied in the control group. Main Outcome Measure(s): Muscle soreness, thigh circumference, and pressure pain threshold were recorded at baseline and at 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 14 days postexercise. Maximal voluntary isometric and isokinetic knee extensor strength were assessed at baseline, immediately after exercise, and at 1, 2, 7, and 14 days postexercise. Serum creatine kinase was measured at baseline and at 1, 2, and 7 days postexercise. Results: The WBVT group showed a reduction in DOMS symptoms in the form of less maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength loss, lower creatine kinase levels, and less pressure pain threshold and muscle soreness (P < .05) compared with the control group. However, no effect on thigh circumference was evident (P < .05). Conclusions: Administered before eccentric exercise, WBVT may reduce DOMS via muscle function improvement. Further investigation should be undertaken to ascertain the effectiveness of WBVT in attenuating DOMS in athletes.

Aminian-Far, Atefeh; Hadian, Mohammad-Reza; Olyaei, Gholamreza; Talebian, Saeed; Bakhtiary, Amir Hoshang

2011-01-01

255

Body awareness therapy: A new strategy for relief of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIM: To compare irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) pa- tients with apparently healthy persons and to evaluate body awareness therapy, which is a physiotherapeutic remedy focusing on normalising tensions in the body, for the treatment of IBS with the hypothesis that altered body tension is associated with the syndrome. METHODS: Twenty-one IBS patients received body awareness therapy two hours weekly for

EM Eriksson; IE Möller; RH Söderberg; HT Eriksson; GK Kurlberg

256

Comparison of the apparent masses and cross-axis apparent masses of seated humans exposed to single- and dual-axis whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Humans are exposed to whole-body vibration in many types of environment. In almost all cases, the vibration to which the human is exposed comprises multi-axis vibration, such that vibration occurs in all directions simultaneously. Despite the complex nature of vibration to which humans are exposed in the workplace, almost all laboratory studies investigating the biomechanical response of the person have been completed using single-axis simulators. This paper presents a study whereby 15 male subjects were exposed to single-axis whole-body vibration in the x-, y- and z-directions and dual-axis vibration in the xy-, xz-, and yz-directions using a 6 degree-of-freedom vibration simulator. All vibration magnitudes were 0.4 ms-2 rms in each axis. Acceleration and force was measured in the x-, y-, and z-direction during all trials. Subjects sat in two postures (‘back-on’ and ‘back-off’) on a flat rigid seat. Apparent masses measured using single-axis and dual-axis vibration stimuli showed comparable results; similarly, cross-axis apparent masses (i.e. the ratio of the force in one direction to the acceleration in another direction) were almost identical for the single- and dual-axis vibration stimuli. All results were in agreement with data previously published using single-axis vibration. In most cases, the peaks in the apparent mass and the cross-axis apparent mass occurred at a slightly lower frequency for the dual-axis vibration than for the single-axis vibration. It is hypothesised that this change is due to a nonlinear effect, analogous to that which occurs with increasing vibration magnitude for single-axis vibration.

Mansfield, Neil J.; Maeda, Setsuo

2006-12-01

257

Inference-Based Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder  

PubMed Central

Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a debilitating disorder characterized by an excessive pre-occupation with an imagined or very slight defect in one’s physical appearance. Despite the overall success of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in treating BDD, some people do not seem to benefit as much from this approach. Those with high overvalued ideation (OVI), for instance, have been shown to not respond well with CBT. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an inference-based therapy (IBT) in treating BDD. IBT is a cognitive intervention that was first developed for obsessive–compulsive disorder with high OVI, but whose focus on beliefs can also apply to a BDD population. IBT conceptualizes BDD obsessions (e.g., ‘I feel like my head is deformed’) as idiosyncratic inferences arrived at through inductive reasoning processes. Such primary inferences represent the starting point of obsessional doubt and the treatment focuses on addressing the faulty inferences that maintain the doubt. Thirteen BDD participants, of whom 10 completed, underwent a 20-week IBT for BDD. The participants improved significantly over the course of therapy, with large diminutions in BDD and depressive symptoms. OVI also decreased throughout therapy and was not found to be related to reduction in BDD symptoms. Although a controlled-trial comparing CBT with IBT is needed, it is proposed that IBT constitutes a promising treatment alternative for BDD especially in cases where OVI is high.

Taillon, Annie; O'Connor, Kieron; Dupuis, Gilles; Lavoie, Marc

2013-01-01

258

Inference-based therapy for body dysmorphic disorder.  

PubMed

Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a debilitating disorder characterized by an excessive pre-occupation with an imagined or very slight defect in one's physical appearance. Despite the overall success of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in treating BDD, some people do not seem to benefit as much from this approach. Those with high overvalued ideation (OVI), for instance, have been shown to not respond well with CBT. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an inference-based therapy (IBT) in treating BDD. IBT is a cognitive intervention that was first developed for obsessive-compulsive disorder with high OVI, but whose focus on beliefs can also apply to a BDD population. IBT conceptualizes BDD obsessions (e.g., 'I feel like my head is deformed') as idiosyncratic inferences arrived at through inductive reasoning processes. Such primary inferences represent the starting point of obsessional doubt and the treatment focuses on addressing the faulty inferences that maintain the doubt. Thirteen BDD participants, of whom 10 completed, underwent a 20-week IBT for BDD. The participants improved significantly over the course of therapy, with large diminutions in BDD and depressive symptoms. OVI also decreased throughout therapy and was not found to be related to reduction in BDD symptoms. Although a controlled-trial comparing CBT with IBT is needed, it is proposed that IBT constitutes a promising treatment alternative for BDD especially in cases where OVI is high. PMID:21793103

Taillon, Annie; O'Connor, Kieron; Dupuis, Gilles; Lavoie, Marc

2011-07-25

259

Stereotactic body radiation therapy for metastasis to the adrenal glands.  

PubMed

Many primary cancers can metastasize to the adrenal glands. Adrenalectomy via an open or laparoscopic approach is the current definitive treatment, but not all patients are eligible or wish to undergo surgery. There are only limited studies on the use of conventional radiation therapy for palliation of symptoms from adrenal metastasis. However, the advent of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) - also named stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for primary lung cancer, metastases to the lung, and metastases to the liver - have prompted some investigators to consider the use of SBRT for metastases to the adrenal glands. This review focuses on the emerging data on SBRT of metastasis to the adrenal glands, while also providing a brief discussion of the overall management of adrenal metastasis. PMID:23253226

Shiue, Kevin; Song, Andrew; Teh, Bin S; Ellis, Rodney J; Yao, Min; Mayr, Nina A; Huang, Zhibin; Sohn, Jason; Machtay, Mitchell; Lo, Simon S

2012-12-01

260

Review and Uses of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Oligometastases  

PubMed Central

In patients with proven distant metastases from solid tumors, it has been a notion that the condition is incurable, warranting palliative care only. The term “oligometastases” was coined to refer to isolated sites of metastasis, whereby the entire burden of disease can be recognized as a finite number of discrete lesions that can be potentially cured with local therapies. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a novel treatment modality in radiation oncology that delivers a very high dose of radiation to the tumor target with high precision using single or a small number of fractions. SBRT is the result of technological advances in patient and tumor immobilization, image guidance, and treatment planning and delivery. A number of studies, both retrospective and prospective, showed promising results in terms of local tumor control and, in a limited subset of patients, of survival. This article reviews the radiobiologic, technical, and clinical aspects of SBRT for various anatomical sites.

Alongi, Filippo; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ricardi, Umberto; Scorsetti, Marta

2012-01-01

261

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for adrenal metastases  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a \\u000a Purpose:\\u000a   To compare advanced treatment techniques with photons and protons as a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for adrenal\\u000a glands metastases.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and Methods:\\u000a   Planning computer tomographic (CT) scans of 10 patients were selected. A total dose of 45 Gy in 7.5 Gy fractions was prescribed.\\u000a Organs at risk (OAR) were liver and kidneys. Dose–volume metrics were defined to quantify

Marta Scorsetti; Pietro Mancosu; Piera Navarria; Angelo Tozzi; Simona Castiglioni; Elena Clerici; Giacomo Reggiori; Francesca Lobefalo; Antonella Fogliata; Luca Cozzi

2011-01-01

262

The impact of self-reported exposure to whole-body-vibrations on the risk of disability pension among men: a 15 year prospective study  

PubMed Central

Background Whole-body-vibrations are often associated with adverse health effect but the long term effects are less known. This study investigates the association between occupational exposures to whole-body vibrations, and subsequent transition to disability pension. Methods A total of 4215 male employees were followed up for subsequent disability pension retirement. Exposure to whole-body-vibration was self-reported while new cases of disability pension were retrieved from a national register. Results The hazard ratio (HR) for disability pension retirement among men exposed to whole-body-vibrations was 1.61 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-2.40) after adjustment for age, smoking habits, BMI, physical job demands and awkward work postures. In our model, with the available explanatory variables, 5.6% of the male disability pension cases were attributable to whole-body-vibrations. Conclusions Exposure to whole-body-vibrations predicts subsequent disability pension retirement. Continued reduction of whole-body-vibrations may reduce the number of new cases of disability pension.

2010-01-01

263

Computation of trunk muscle forces, spinal loads and stability in whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Whole-body vibration has been indicated as a risk factor in back disorders. Proper prevention and treatment management, however, requires a sound knowledge of associated muscle forces and loads on the spine. Previous trunk model studies have either neglected or over-simplified the trunk redundancy with time-varying unknown muscle forces. Trunk stability has neither been addressed. A novel iterative dynamic kinematics-driven approach was employed to evaluate muscle forces, spinal loads and system stability in a seated subject under a random vertical base excitation with ˜±1 g peak acceleration contents. This iterative approach satisfied equations of motion in all directions/levels while accounting for the nonlinear passive resistance of the ligamentous spine. The effect of posture, co-activity in abdominal muscles and changes in buttocks stiffness were also investigated. The computed vertical accelerations were in good agreement with measurements. The input base excitation, via inertial and muscle forces, substantially influenced spinal loads and system stability. The flexed posture in sitting increased the net moment, muscle forces and passive spinal loads while improving the trunk stability. Similarly, the introduction of low to moderate antagonistic coactivity in abdominal muscles increased the passive spinal loads and improved the spinal stability. A trade-off, hence, exists between lower muscle forces and spinal loads on one hand and more stable spine on the other. Base excitations with larger peak acceleration contents substantially increase muscle forces/spinal loads and, hence, the risk of injury.

Bazrgari, B.; Shirazi-Adl, A.; Kasra, M.

2008-12-01

264

The effects of whole-body vibration on muscle strength and power: a meta-analysis.  

PubMed

Exercise with whole-body vibration (WBV) is becoming popular as an alternative to conventional training or as supplementary training. However, despite increasing research efforts in this field, additive effects of WBV on muscle performance remain unclarified. In this review, we investigated the additive effects of long-term WBV on muscle strength and power. This meta-analysis was restricted to randomized controlled trials lasting for at least 5 weeks comparing exercise with and without WBV, or comparing only WBV exposure and control. Data from a total of 314 participants in 10 studies on knee extension muscle strength, and 249 participants in 7 studies on countermovement jump height were pooled using random-effect models. Meta-analysis showed significant additional effects of WBV on muscle strength (standardized mean difference [SMD]=0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.21-1.32; p=0.007) and countermovement jump (SMD=0.87, 95% CI=0.29-1.46; p=0.003). Based on these findings, we concluded that the use of WBV would lead to greater improvements in both knee extension muscle strength and countermovement jump than under identical conditions without WBV. PMID:23989260

Osawa, Y; Oguma, Y; Ishii, N

2013-09-01

265

Two way assessment of other physical work demands while measuring the whole body vibration magnitude  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Direct observation, instead of using self-administered questionnaires might give more reliable and specific information about physical work demands at the workplace. This information is of use in a population already at risk of developing low back pain (LBP) due to whole body vibration (WBV) exposure. The aims of this study are to assess the WBV exposure in an exposed population and to assess other physical work demands in two ways, by direct observation and with the use of a self-administered questionnaire. We therefore assessed the WBV magnitude and 5 WBV-related physical work demands by using the PalmTrac system and a self-administered questionnaire in a group of drivers (N=10). The main findings are 7 out of 10 drivers are exceeding the EU action value. About 50% of the drivers under-estimated the time ‘bending’, 60% the time ‘walking+standing’ and 60% over-estimated the time when ‘lifting.’ We concluded that 7 drivers from this group are at risk of developing LBP and substantial differences exists for the 5 physical work demands comparing the PalmTrac method with the questionnaire. Direct observational assessment in WBV measurements yields extra information. This is useful for preventive activities necessary as drivers are exceeding the EU action value.

Tiemessen, Ivo J. H.; Hulshof, Carel T. J.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

2008-03-01

266

Whole body vibration induces forepaw and hind paw behavioral sensitivity in the rat.  

PubMed

Whole body vibration (WBV) has been linked to neck and back pain, but the biomechanical and physiological mechanisms responsible for its development and maintenance are unknown. A rodent model of WBV was developed in which rats were exposed to different WBV paradigms, either daily for 7 consecutive days (repeated WBV) or two single exposures at Day 0 and 7 (intermittent WBV). Each WBV session lasted for 30?min and was imposed at a frequency of 15?Hz and RMS platform acceleration of 0.56?±?0.07?g. Changes in the withdrawal response of the forepaw and hind paw were measured, and were used to characterize the onset and maintenance of behavioral sensitivity. Accelerations and displacements of the rat and deformations in the cervical and lumbar spines were measured during WBV to provide mechanical context for the exposures. A decrease in withdrawal threshold was induced at 1 day after the first exposure in both the hind paw and forepaw. Repeated WBV exhibited a sustained reduction in withdrawal threshold in both paws and intermittent WBV induced a sustained response only in the forepaw. Cervical deformations were significantly elevated which may explain the more robust forepaw response. Findings suggest that a WBV exposure leads to behavioral sensitivity. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 31:1739-1744, 2013. PMID:23832376

Baig, Hassam A; Guarino, Benjamin B; Lipschutz, Daniel; Winkelstein, Beth A

2013-07-07

267

The effects of whole-body vibration in isolation or combined with strength training in female athletes.  

PubMed

The aims of this study were to assess the behavior of a vibrating platform under different conditions and to compare the effects of an 8-week periodized training program with whole-body vibration (WBV) alone or in combination with conventional strength training (ST). Vibrating frequencies, displacements, and peak accelerations were tested through a piezoelectric accelerometer under different conditions of load and subjects' position. Eighteen national-level female athletes were assigned to 1 of 3 different groups performing WBV, conventional ST, or a combination of the 2 (WBV + ST). Isometric maximal voluntary contraction, dynamic maximal concentric force, and vertical jump tests were performed before and after the conditioning program. Vibrating displacements and maximum accelerations measured on the device were not always consistent with their expected values calculated from the display and manufacturers' information (sinusoidal waveforms). The WBV alone or in combination with low-intensity resistance exercise did not seem to induce significant enhancements in force and power when compared with ST. It appears that WBV cannot substitute parts of ST loading in a cohort of young female athletes. However, vibration effects might be limited by the behavior of the commercial platforms as the one used in the study. More studies are needed to analyze the performances of devices and the effectiveness of protocols. PMID:22067255

Preatoni, Ezio; Colombo, Alessandro; Verga, Monica; Galvani, Christel; Faina, Marcello; Rodano, Renato; Preatoni, Ennio; Cardinale, Marco

2012-09-01

268

Acute effects of whole-body vibration on peak isometric torque, muscle twitch torque and voluntary muscle activation of the knee extensors: Acute effects of whole-body vibration on muscle  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this investigation was to compare the acute effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) with a static squat on resting muscle twitch torque, peak isometric torque and voluntary muscle activation of the knee extensors during an isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Twenty- four healthy, strength-trained males were recruited for this randomized, cross-over design investigation. The WBV treatment consisted of

M. Jordan; S. Norris; D. Smith; W. Herzog

2009-01-01

269

Whole-Body Vibration and Rehabilitation of Chronic Diseases: A Review of the Literature  

PubMed Central

The objectives of the study were to review the current literature and findings on the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) as a training method on performance and its ability to aid in the rehabilitation of chronic diseases (neurological, musculoskeletal or metabolic conditions). Six electronic databases were searched. The combination of the search terminology used included WBV and several neurological, musculoskeletal and metabolic conditions. Twenty six papers were found to be relevant for this review and were included for critical evaluation with regards to sample characteristics, research intervention and methodology. Most studies were conducted on patients diagnosed with neurological conditions (n = 15) while less were performed on patients suffering from musculoskeletal (n = 7) or metabolic (n = 4) disorders. Comparisons were difficult to draw on because of the different pathologies and the differences in the methodology of each study. Some of the observed methodological flaws included limitations in relation to insufficient randomisation, lack of sample homogeneity (size, age variability) and poor blinding in most studies. No consensus could be reached as to whether WBV is more effective than other interventions or no intervention at all, while the additional effects that WBV may have in relation to other interventions could not be assumed. Nevertheless, chronic WBV training seems to only improve strength in neurological patients while balance and mobility improves only in patients suffering from musculoskeletal or metabolic but not from neurological conditions. Although WBV did not prove to be more effective compared to other training methods, it can be used, in some cases, as a less fatiguing and less time-consuming method to enhance physical capabilities. Future research should focus on the effectiveness of WBV in relation to no treatment at all, and to age. Key pointsChronic WBV training seems to only improve strength in neurological patients while balance and mobility improves only in patients suffering from musculoskeletal or metabolic conditions.WBV did not prove to be more effective than other interventions, while the positive effects of WBV in relation to no intervention at all could not be established.No consensus could be reached as to which vibration type is more effective.WBV training could be used as a safe, less fatiguing and less time-consuming type of exercise for patients with neurologic conditions instead of other more demanding interventions.

Chanou, Konstantina; Gerodimos, Vassilis; Karatrantou, Konstantina; Jamurtas, Athanasios

2012-01-01

270

Chronic effects of whole-body vibration on jumping performance and body balance using different frequencies and amplitudes with identical acceleration load.  

PubMed

Previous studies on vibration training have all been based on protocols at different combinations of frequencies and amplitudes without controlling the loading intensity. OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the effect of an 8-week vibration training program, under identical acceleration loads with various frequencies and amplitudes, on jumping performance, muscle activation and body balance. DESIGN: Fifty young adults were randomly assigned to an high-frequency (32Hz, 1mm, and 4g), low-frequency (18Hz, 3mm, and 4g), or a control group. The high-frequency and low-frequency groups underwent 60s of squats exercise on the specific vibration platform three times a week, whereas the control group was trained without vibration. METHODS: A force platform was used to measure the center of pressure of a static single leg stance, and the heights and impulse of two consecutive countermovement jumps before and after intervention. The activation of the rectus femoris and biceps femoris were also measured synchronously by surface electromyography. RESULTS: The heights and impulse of both the first and second countermovement jumps were significantly increased and the area of center of pressure was significantly decreased after training in both the high-frequency and low-frequency groups (P<.05). Consequently, activation of the rectus femoris during the first countermovement jump was significantly lower than the pre-training value in the HF group but increased in the low-frequency group after training (P<.05). CONCLUSION: An 8-week identical acceleration vibration training regimen with various frequencies and amplitudes can significantly improve jumping performance and body balance, but the specific neuromuscular adaptation is possibly induced by different training settings. PMID:23523540

Chen, Chia-Hsiang; Liu, Chiang; Chuang, Long-Ren; Chung, Pao-Hung; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang

2013-03-21

271

Long-term sickness absence due to back disorders in crane operators exposed to whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary In a retrospective (10-year) follow-up study, the incidence of at least one spell of sickness absenteeism of 28 d or longer in crane operators exposed to whole-body vibration and a control group was investigated. In contrast to a previous study on permanent work disability in the same groups, no difference was observed in long-term sickness absenteeism because of lumbar

Paulien M. Bongers; Hendriek C. Boshuizen; Carel T. J. HulshoF; Agaath P. Koemeester

1988-01-01

272

The effects of 11 weeks whole body vibration training on jump height, contractile properties and activation of human knee extensors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether 11 weeks of whole body vibration (WBV) training applied in a way that is commonly seen in practice, i.e. without additional loads, would improve muscle activation and\\/or contractile properties of the knee extensor muscles and counter movement jump height in healthy subjects. Ten subjects belonging to the experimental group trained three

C. J. de Ruiter; S. M. van Raak; J. V. Schilperoort; A. P. Hollander; A. de Haan

2003-01-01

273

Whole-body vibration and low back pain: a systematic, critical review of the epidemiological literature 1992–1999  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: A previous extensive review of the literature including that from the middle of 1992 concluded that whole-body vibrations\\u000a may contribute to low back pain, but that the exposure-response relationship had not been clarified. We reviewed the literature\\u000a of the past 7?years to find out: (i) whether there is evidence in the recent epidemiological literature for a causal association\\u000a between

S. Lings; C. Leboeuf-Yde

2000-01-01

274

Short-term effects of whole-body vibration on postural control in unilateral chronic stroke patients: preliminary evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The short-term effects of whole-body vibration as a novel method of somatosensory stimulation on postural control were investigated in 23 chronic stroke patients. While standing on a commercial platform, patients received 30-Hz oscillations at 3 mm of amplitude in the frontal plane. Balance was assessed four times at 45-min intervals with a dual-plate force platform, while quietly standing with the

Ilse J. W. van Nes; Alexander C. H. Geurts; Henk T. Hendricks; Jacques Duysens

2004-01-01

275

Functional changes in cerebral and paraspinal muscle physiology of healthy women during exposure to whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of whole-body vibration on multiple tissues simultaneously in fourteen healthy women. On three separate days, participants were exposed to frequencies, 3, 4.5, or 6Hz (at 0.9gr.m.s acceleration in vertical direction) per day on a simulator for 16min. While sitting ‘with’ and ‘without’ backrest support, participants also performed handgrip contractions for

Rammohan V. Maikala; Yagesh N. Bhambhani

2008-01-01

276

Vehicle Design Influences Whole Body Vibration Exposures: Effect of the Location of the Front Axle Relative to the Cab  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a repeated measure design, this study compared differences in whole body vibration (WBV) exposures among 13 drivers who drove a truck with the cab over the front axle (cab-over design) and a truck with the cab situated behind the front axle (non-cab-over design). The drivers drove both trucks over a standardized route that comprised three distinct segments: a freeway

Ryan P. Blood; Patrik W. Rynell; Peter W. Johnson

2011-01-01

277

Non-linear dual-axis biodynamic response to fore-and-aft whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seated subjects have participated in two experiments with fore-and-aft whole-body vibration to investigate dynamic responses at the seat and footrest in the direction of vibration and in other directions. In the first experiment, 12 males were exposed to fore-and-aft random vibration (0.25 20 Hz) at four magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25 m s-2 rms) while sitting on a seat with no backrest in four postures with varying foot heights to produce differing thigh contact with the seat (feet hanging, feet supported with maximum thigh contact, feet supported with average thigh contact, and feet supported with minimum thigh contact). In the second experiment, six subjects were exposed to three vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625 m s-2 rms) in the average thigh contact posture, both with and without a rigid backrest. Forces were measured in the vertical, fore-and-aft, and lateral directions on the supporting seat surface (in the first experiment) and in the fore-and-aft and vertical directions at the footrest (in the second experiment). On the seat, there were three vibration modes in the fore-and-aft apparent mass on the seat at frequencies below 10 Hz in all postures (around 1 Hz, between 1 and 3 Hz, and between 3 and 5 Hz); large vertical forces were dependent on foot support while lateral forces were relatively small. At the feet, the fore-and-aft apparent mass showed a resonance between 3 and 5 Hz, which increased in frequency and magnitude when a backrest was used. The fore-and-aft vibration produced high vertical forces at the footrest. At frequencies below resonance, the backrest reduced vertical and fore-and-aft forces at the footrest. On the seat and the footrest, the forces showed a nonlinear characteristic that varied between postures. The presence of appreciable vertical forces indicate that during fore-and-aft excitation the body moved in two dimensions. It is concluded that forces in directions other than the direction of excitation should be taken into account when considering biodynamic responses to fore-and-aft whole-body vibration.

Nawayseh, N.; Griffin, M. J.

2005-04-01

278

On the Cardiovascular Effects of Whole-Body Vibration Part II. Lateral Effects: Statistical Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lateral vibrations of vessels generate relative lateral motions between red blood cells and plasma. These relative motions would cause additional transport of longitudinal momentum between different layers and therefore would increase the viscosity. Particularly for arterioles, which play the major role for the total peripheral resistance (TPR), the lateral vibration would destroy the cell-free plasma layer near the wall if

Z. Yue; H. Kleinöder; M. de Marées; U. Speicher; P. Wahl; J. Mester

2007-01-01

279

Body Image: A Tripartite Model for Use in Dance\\/Movement Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author presents a theoretical, literature-based study of the body image concept. Conceptualizations of body image in philosophy, psychology, psychiatry, and dance\\/movement therapy are briefly reviewed. A tripartite model for the concept of body image is proposed in order to clarify the meaning of body image. The author differentiates body image into three interrelated aspects: image-properties, body-self, and body-memory. Image-properties

Päivi Pylvänäinen

2003-01-01

280

Analysis of Whole-Body Vibration During Manual Wheelchair Propulsion: A Comparison of Seat Cushions and Back Supports for Individuals Without a Disability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole-body vibration exposure has been found to be detrimental to the health of humans owing to effects such as degraded comfort, disc degeneration, and lower back pain. The purpose of this study was to determine if selected seat cushions and back supports minimize the transmission of vibrations during manual wheelchair propulsion. Ten unimpaired participants traversed an activities of daily living

Carmen P. DiGiovine; Rory A. Cooper; Erik Wolf; Shirley G. Fitzgerald; Michael L. Boninger

2003-01-01

281

Modular Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder  

PubMed Central

This study pilot tested a newly developed modular cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) treatment manual for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). We tested feasibility, acceptability, and treatment outcome in a sample of 12 adults with primary BDD. Treatment was delivered in weekly individual sessions over 18 or 22 weeks. Standardized clinician ratings and self-report measures were used to assess BDD and related symptoms pre- and posttreatment and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. At posttreatment, BDD and related symptoms (e.g., mood) were significantly improved. Treatment gains were maintained at follow-up. A relatively low drop-out rate, high patient satisfaction ratings, and patient feedback indicated that the treatment was highly acceptable to patients. To our knowledge, this represents the first test of a broadly applicable, individual psychosocial treatment for BDD.

Wilhelm, Sabine; Phillips, Katharine A.; Fama, Jeanne M.; Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Steketee, Gail

2011-01-01

282

Modular cognitive-behavioral therapy for body dysmorphic disorder.  

PubMed

This study pilot tested a newly developed modular cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) treatment manual for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). We tested feasibility, acceptability, and treatment outcome in a sample of 12 adults with primary BDD. Treatment was delivered in weekly individual sessions over 18 or 22 weeks. Standardized clinician ratings and self-report measures were used to assess BDD and related symptoms pre- and posttreatment and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. At posttreatment, BDD and related symptoms (e.g., mood) were significantly improved. Treatment gains were maintained at follow-up. A relatively low drop-out rate, high patient satisfaction ratings, and patient feedback indicated that the treatment was highly acceptable to patients. To our knowledge, this represents the first test of a broadly applicable, individual psychosocial treatment for BDD. PMID:22035991

Wilhelm, Sabine; Phillips, Katharine A; Fama, Jeanne M; Greenberg, Jennifer L; Steketee, Gail

2011-05-01

283

Effects of resistance training with whole-body vibration on muscle fitness in untrained adults.  

PubMed

The effects of resistance training (RT) combined with whole-body vibration (WBV) on muscle fitness, particularly muscle hypertrophy and neuromuscular performance, are not well understood. We investigated the effects of WBV in healthy, untrained participants after a 13-week RT course by performing magnetic resonance imaging and by measuring maximal isometric (with electromyography) and isokinetic knee extension strengths, isometric lumbar extension torque, countermovement-jump, knee extension endurance, and sit-ups. Thirty-two individuals (22-49 years old) were randomly assigned to RT groups with (RT-WBV, n=16) or without WBV (RT, n=16). Following the RT course, significantly higher increases in the cross-sectional areas of m. psoas major (vs baseline values) and erector spinae muscle (vs the RT group) were observed in the RT-WBV group (+10.7%, P<0.05; +8.7%, P<0.05) compared with the RT group (+3.8%, P=0.045; 0.0%). Higher increases from baseline were also observed in maximal isometric force, concentric knee extension torque, countermovement-jump, and maximal isometric lumbar extension torque in RT-WBV (+63.5%; +76.7%, +15.0%, and +51.5%, respectively; P<0.05) than in those of RT (+25.6%, P=0.001; +17.8%, P=0.18; +11.3%, P=0.001; and +26.4%, P<0.001, respectively). The WBV-induced increases in muscle hypertrophy and isometric lumbar extension torque suggest a potential benefit of incorporating WBV into slow-velocity RT programs involving exercises of long duration. PMID:21812821

Osawa, Y; Oguma, Y

2011-08-03

284

Effects of whole body vibration training on balance in adolescents with and without Down syndrome.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to determine whether a whole body vibration training program (WBV) is able to improve static standing balance in adolescents with and without Down syndrome (DS). Thirty adolescents with DS aged 11-20 years (DSG) and 27 adolescent, age/sex matched, without DS (CG) joined the study. Participants of each group were divided into two comparable groups, those who performed WVB (in DSG: VDSG; in CG: VCG) and those who did not perform WVB (in DSG: nVDSG; in CG: nVCG). Static-standing-balance under four conditions (C1: openeyes/fixed-foot-support; C2: closed-eyes/fixed-foot-support; C3: openeyes/compliant-foot-support; C4: closed-eyes/compliant-foot-support) was examine, before and after a 20-week WBV training program. For balance study, Postural-Parameters (PPs), based on center of pressure (COP) oscillations (anterior/posterior and medial/lateral COP excursion and COP mean velocity), and PPs ratios among the four conditions were calculated. After WBV training, no significant differences were found in any parameter in the VCG and nVCG and neither in the nVDSG, but there was a decrease of mean values in the analyzed PPs under C4, with significant differences in medial/lateral COP excursion and COP mean velocity, and a significant decrease in the ratio C4/C1 of the mean velocity in VDSG. Therefore, WBV training had positive effects in the balance of DS adolescents although only under specific conditions, with vision and somatosensory input altered. The positive results of this study are encouraging and open a wide field of research, looking for the most efficient program for this population. PMID:23872530

Villarroya, M Adoración; González-Agüero, Alejandro; Moros, Teresa; Gómez-Trullén, Eva; Casajús, José A

2013-07-19

285

The Acute Effect of Whole Body Vibration on Repeated Shuttle-Running in Young Soccer Players.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on Repeated Sprint Ability (RSA). Seventeen male soccer players (16.71±0.47 y) performed three RSA tests (Randomized crossover study design). The second RSA test was done with WBV (RSA2) to assess the effect of WBV. The studied variables were: best time (BT), worst time (WT), total time (TT), the fatigue index (FI) of RSA, and post-test blood lactate (BLa). ANOVA with repeated measures showed no differences between RSA1 and RSA3, while there were significant differences in all variables studied. TT= [RSA2 0.93% and 1.68% lower than RSA1 and RSA3 respectively; p<0.05], BLa= [RSA2 16.97% and 14.73% greater than RSA1 and RSA3 respectively; p<0.001], WT= [RSA2 1.90% and 2.93% lower than RSA1 and RSA3 respectively; p<0.01], and FI = [RSA2 30.64% and 40.15% lower than RSA1 and RSA3 respectively; p<0.0001]. When comparing individual sprints, WBV showed a significant effect at the 5th sprint: RSA2 2.29 % and 2.95% lower than RSA1 and RSA3 respectively (p<0.005), while at the 6th sprint: RSA2 2.75% and 4.09% lower than RSA1 and RSA3 respectively; p<0.005. In conclusion, when applying WBV during the recovery periods of Repeated Sprint Ability efforts, most of the performance variables improved. PMID:23780902

Padulo, J; Di Giminiani, R; Ibba, G; Zarrouk, N; Moalla, W; Attene, G; M Migliaccio, G; Pizzolato, F; Bishop, D; Chamari, K

2013-06-18

286

The Effects of Whole-Body Vibration on the Cross-Transfer of Strength  

PubMed Central

This study investigated whether the use of superimposed whole-body vibration (WBV) during cross-education strength training would optimise strength transfer compared to conventional cross-education strength training. Twenty-one healthy, dominant right leg volunteers (21 ± 3 years) were allocated to a strength training (ST, m = 3, f = 4), a strength training with WBV (ST + V, m = 3, f = 4), or a control group (no training, m = 3, f = 4). Training groups performed 9 sessions over 3 weeks, involving unilateral squats for the right leg, with or without WBV (35?Hz; 2.5?mm amplitude). All groups underwent dynamic single leg maximum strength testing (1RM) and single and paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) prior to and following training. Strength increased in the trained limb for the ST (41%; ES = 1.14) and ST + V (55%; ES = 1.03) groups, which resulted in a 35% (ES = 0.99) strength transfer to the untrained left leg for the ST group and a 52% (ES = 0.97) strength transfer to the untrained leg for the ST + V group, when compared to the control group. No differences in strength transfer between training groups were observed (P = 0.15). For the untrained leg, no differences in the peak height of recruitment curves or SICI were observed between ST and ST + V groups (P = 1.00). Strength training with WBV does not appear to modulate the cross-transfer of strength to a greater magnitude when compared to conventional cross-education strength training.

Goodwill, Alicia M.; Kidgell, Dawson J.

2012-01-01

287

Quantitative evaluation of distortion in sketching under mono and dual axes whole body vibration.  

PubMed

Performance of sedentary activities such as reading and writing, in trains is known to be affected by the vibrations. An experimental study was therefore initiated to investigate the interference perceived in sketching task under low frequency random vibration in both mono and dual axes. Thirty healthy male subjects participated in the study. Random vibration stimuli were excited in various axes in frequency range of 1-20 Hz at magnitudes of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2 m/s(2). The task required the subjects to sketch the given geometric figures such as circle, rectangle and triangle under vibration environment in two subject postures (sketch pad on lap and on table). Three performance methods were used to measure the effect of vibration stimuli and posture. They consisted of two specifically designed objective methods for percentage distortion measurement and one subjective method using Borg CR10 scale. The results revealed that the percentage distortion and difficulty in sketching increased with an increase in vibration magnitude and was found to be higher for vibration in Y- and Z-axis. Similar trend was observed for percentage distortion and difficulty in sketching for dual axes also. The perceived difficulty and impairment in sketching performance was greater while sketching on lap for X-axis, while the effect was just the reverse for other axes. PMID:21697628

Bhiwapurkar, M K; Saran, V H; Harsha, S P

2011-06-21

288

Automated fiducial marker planning for thoracic stereotactic body radiation therapy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stereotactic body-radiation therapy (SBRT) has gained acceptance in treating lung cancer. Localization of a thoracic lesion is challenging as tumors can move significantly with breathing. Some SBRT systems compensate for tumor motion with the intrafraction tracking of targets by two stereo fluoroscopy cameras. However, many lung tumors lack a fluoroscopic signature and cannot be directly tracked. Small radiopaque fiducial markers, acting as fluoroscopically visible surrogates, are instead implanted nearby. The spacing and configuration of the fiducial markers is important to the success of the therapy as SBRT systems impose constraints on the geometry of a fiducial-marker constellation. It is difficult even for experienced physicians mentally assess the validity of a constellation a priori. To address this challenge, we present the first automated planning system for bronchoscopic fiducial-marker placement. Fiducial-marker planning is posed as a constrained combinatoric optimization problem. Constraints include requiring access from a navigable airway, having sufficient separation in the fluoroscopic imaging planes to resolve each individual marker, and avoidance of major blood vessels. Automated fiducial-marker planning takes approximately fifteen seconds, fitting within the clinical workflow. The resulting locations are integrated into a virtual bronchoscopic planning system, which provides guidance to each location during the implantation procedure. To date, we have retrospectively planned over 50 targets for treatment, and have implanted markers according to the automated plan in one patient who then underwent SBRT treatment. To our knowledge, this approach is the first to address automated bronchoscopic fiducialmarker planning for SBRT.

Gibbs, Jason D.; Rai, Lav; Wibowo, Henky; Tsalyuk, Serge; Anderson, Eric D.

2012-02-01

289

Stereotactic body radiation therapy: a novel treatment modality.  

PubMed

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) involves the delivery of a small number of ultra-high doses of radiation to a target volume using very advanced technology and has emerged as a novel treatment modality for cancer. The role of SBRT is most important at two cancer stages-in early primary cancer and in oligometastatic disease. This modality has been used in the treatment of early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer, prostate cancer, renal-cell carcinoma, and liver cancer, and in the treatment of oligometastases in the lung, liver, and spine. A large body of evidence on the use of SBRT for the treatment of primary and metastatic tumors in various sites has accumulated over the past 10-15 years, and efficacy and safety have been demonstrated. Several prospective clinical trials of SBRT for various sites have been conducted, and several other trials are currently being planned. The results of these clinical trials will better define the role of SBRT in cancer management. This article will review the radiobiologic, technical, and clinical aspects of SBRT. PMID:19997074

Lo, Simon S; Fakiris, Achilles J; Chang, Eric L; Mayr, Nina A; Wang, Jian Z; Papiez, Lech; Teh, Bin S; McGarry, Ronald C; Cardenes, Higinia R; Timmerman, Robert D

2009-12-08

290

Changes of cerebral vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-and somatostatin-like immunoreactivity induced by noise and whole-body vibration in the rat  

Microsoft Academic Search

To clarify the role of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and somatostatin, somatropin-release inhibiting factor, (SRIF) neurons in the response to organisms to noise or whole-body vibration stress, VIP and SRIF-like immunoreactivity were determined in various regions of the rat brain following exposure for 90 min to noise (broad band, 102 dB) or whole-body vibration (20 Hz, 4.0 g). Both noise

Hiroyuki Nakamura; Takashi Moroji; Hirofumi Nagase; Takao Okazawa; Akira Okada

1994-01-01

291

EFFECTIVENESS OF DIFFERENT POST ACTIVATION POTENTIATION PROTOCOLS WITH AND WITHOUT WHOLE BODY VIBRATION ON JUMPING PERFORMANCE IN COLLEGE ATHLETES.  

PubMed

This study examined the acute effects of different parallel squat post activation potentiation protocols with and without whole body vibration on jumping performance in college athletes. Fifteen males (20.3± 1.3 years, 179.50±5.3 cm, 81.0 ±10.8 kg) performed 3 repetitions of a countermovement jump and best drop jump after three conditions: (i) parallel squat with 80% 1 repetition maximum without vibration (NV-PS) (ii) parallel squat with 80% 1 repetition maximum on a whole body vibration platform (WBV-PS) (1.963 mm amplitude and 40 Hz) and (iii) control (C). Each condition was performed under both low (1 set of 3 repetitions) and high (3 sets of 3 repetitions) volume protocols that were followed by both 1 min and 4 min rest periods. Significant improvements were observed for the countermovement jump height (p=0.005) after 4 min of recovery and the low volume protocol (p=0.015) regardless of the condition. Additionally, for the WBV-PS condition, a significantly lower drop jump height was observed after 1 min (p=0.0022) following both low (p=0.022) and high volume (0.010) protocols. In conclusion 4 min of recovery was adequate for improving countermovement jump height after a low volume protocol regardless of the condition and restoring drop jump height performance after WBV-PS regardless of the protocol in male college athletes. PMID:23591951

Naclerio, Fernando; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Kang, Jie; Friedman, Paul; Ross, Ryan E

2013-04-15

292

Effect of seat surface angle on forces at the seat surface during whole-body vertical vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Twelve male subjects have been exposed to whole-body vertical random vibration so as to investigate the effect of seat surface angle, vibration magnitude and contact with a backrest on the ‘vertical apparent mass’ (calculated from forces normal to the seat surface and vertical acceleration) and ‘fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass’ (calculated from forces parallel to the seat surface and vertical acceleration). At each of four seat surface angles (0°, 5°, 10°, and 15°), the subjects were exposed to four vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25 m s-2 rms) in the frequency range 0.25 15 Hz. The ‘vertical apparent mass’ and ‘fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass’ on the seat surface suggested resonances in the vicinity of 5 and 4 Hz, respectively. At all seat angles, both with and without a backrest, the resonance frequency in the ‘vertical apparent mass’ was greater than the resonance frequency in the ‘fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass’. Within subjects, the two resonance frequencies were not correlated in any condition. Seat angles up to 15° had a negligible effect on the ‘vertical apparent mass’ but a considerable effect on the ‘fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass’ on the seat surface, where ‘cross-axis apparent mass’ increased with increasing seat angle. At all seat angles, increasing the vibration magnitude decreased the resonance frequency in both directions. The least significant decrease in resonance frequency with increasing vibration magnitude occurred in the ‘fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass’ at the maximum seat angle of 15°. At low frequencies, the backrest reduced the forces in both directions, with the reduction greatest in the ‘fore-and-aft’ direction. The ‘fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass’ at resonance was correlated with subject mass and subject stature.

Nawayseh, Naser; Griffin, Michael J.

2005-06-01

293

Stereotactic body radiation therapy for curative treatment of adrenal metastases.  

PubMed

The detection of oligometastatic adrenal metastases is increasing and there are limited data supporting the use of curative intent stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to treat patients with limited metastatic disease with adrenal involvement. Therefore, we utilized a prospectively maintained database of consecutive patients treated with SBRT for limited metastatic disease (?5 sites) to identify patients with adrenal metastases. Patients were either treated on a three-fraction dose escalation protocol or a ten fraction off-protocol regimen. Outcomes including treated-metastasis control (TMC), distant control (DC), and overall survival (OS) were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Ten patients with 13 adrenal metastases were identified for this case series. The median follow-up was 14.9 months. No patient experienced grade 3 toxicity. The most common grade 1-2 acute toxicities were fatigue (80%) and GI toxicity (40%). One patient experienced late grade 2 adrenal insufficiency. Overall, the 1-year TMC rate was 73%, DC was 30%, and OS was 90%. Three treated adrenal metastases progressed, all receiving the lowest BED10 (43.2?Gy), corresponding to 24?Gy in 3 fractions. After treatment of adrenal metastases with SBRT, the median time to salvage chemotherapy was 5.3 months (range 1.0-38.8 months) and 1-year freedom from salvage chemotherapy was 44%. These results suggest that SBRT to adrenal metastases was tolerated with low toxicity in limited metastatic patients and control rates are promising. This study supports the growing body of literature treating patients with adrenal metastases with SBRT. PMID:23369155

Rudra, Sonali; Malik, Renuka; Ranck, Mark C; Farrey, Karl; Golden, Daniel W; Hasselle, Michael D; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Salama, Joseph K

2013-01-25

294

Extracranial radiosurgery (stereotactic body radiation therapy) for oligometastases.  

PubMed

Extracranial radiosurgery, also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), is an increasingly used method of treatment of limited cancer metastases located in a variety of organs/sites including the spine, lungs, liver, and other areas in the abdomen and pelvis. The techniques used to perform SBRT were initially modeled after intracranial radiosurgery, although considerable evolution in technique and conduct has occurred for extracranial applications. Unlike intracranial radiosurgery, SBRT requires characterization and accounting for inherent organ movement including breathing motion. Potent dose hypofractionation schedules have been used with SBRT such that the treatment is generally both ablative and convenient. Because the treatment is severely damaging to tissues within and about the target, the volume of adjacent normal tissue must be strictly minimized to avoid toxic late effects. Outcomes in various sites show very high rates of local control with toxicity mostly related to tubular tissues like the airways and bowels. With proper conduct though, SBRT can be an extremely effective treatment option for oligometastases. PMID:16564443

Kavanagh, Brian D; McGarry, Ronald C; Timmerman, Robert D

2006-04-01

295

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) in Pancreatic Cancer: Is It Ready for Prime Time?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease with few effective treatment modalities. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a novel technique that takes advantage of the technologic advancements in image guidance and radiation dose delivery to direct ablative doses to tumors with acceptable toxicity that was not previously achievable with conventional techniques. Recent literature contains reports of stereotactic body radiation therapy

Bryan W Chang; Muhammad W Saif

2008-01-01

296

The Determination of Equal Comfort Zones for Whole-body Vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

On the assumption that equal ratings along a rating line indicate an equivalence of subjective sensation, equal sensation contours were obtained from 12 subjects who rated 75 vibration stimuli of 11 different frequencies. In a second experiment, the stimuli used in Experiment I were presented to 14 further subjects, who were required to ascribe semantic ‘ comfort ’ labels to

D. J. OBORNE; M. J. CLARKE

1974-01-01

297

EFFECT OF SEATING ON EXPOSURES TO WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION IN VEHICLES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vibration isolation efficiency of seating has been evaluated in 100 work vehicles in 14 categories (cars, vans, lift trucks, lorries, tractors, buses, dumpers, excavators, helicopters, armoured vehicles, mobile cranes, grass rollers, mowers and milk floats). Seat isolation efficiency, expressed by the SEAT value, was determined for all seats (67 conventional seats and 33 suspension seats) from the vertical acceleration

G. S. PADDAN; M. J. GRIFFIN

2002-01-01

298

Back pain and exposure to whole body vibration in helicopter pilots  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a questionnaire survey the prevalence of back pain in 163 helicopter pilots was compared to that in a control group of 297 non-flying air force officers who underwent the same pre-employment medical examination. Since pilots document their hours of flight in a personal flight log, an accurate estimate of the duration of exposure could be made. In addition, vibration

P. M. BONGERS; C. T. J. HULSHOF; L. DlJKSTRA; H. C. BOSHUIZEN; H. J. M. GROENHOUT; E. VALKEN

1990-01-01

299

Descriptive analysis of combine cabin vibrations and their effect on the human body  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

All on- and off-road vehicles are exposed to vibrations caused by unevenness of road or soil profile, moving elements within the machine or implements. A higher prevalence of low back pain is found in drivers of off-road machinery than in other drivers. In this study, significantly higher levels of low-frequency vibrations are found in the cabin of a combine, driving at high speed (20km/h) on a concrete surface, compared to driving slower on field road. Comfort values indicate that injury can result from long-term driving on the field as well as on a concrete road. As seats with suspension systems are the main transmission paths of vibration towards the spine of the driver, their vibration attenuating characteristics play an important role in comfort assessment. The resonant frequency of seats with passive suspension system, used in agricultural machinery, lies in the low-frequency range most excited in agricultural machinery. A seat with air suspension is found to attenuate better frequencies above 4Hz and provide more comfort to the driver than a seat with a mechanical suspension.

Hostens, I.; Ramon, H.

2003-09-01

300

Surface Vibration Modes in Monatomic Body-Centered Cubic Crystals: The (001) Surface.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Surface vibration modes for the (001) surface of monatomic bcc crystals are examined using a simple model which allows for full cubic anisotropy and which exactly fits the second-order elastic constants. For both the semi-infinite crystal and the crystal ...

V. Zoth

1973-01-01

301

A model of the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the human body during vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The apparent mass of the human body reflects gross movements caused by whole-body vibration and can be used to predict the influence of body dynamics on seat transmissibility. With vertical excitation, various models fit the measured vertical apparent mass of the human body, but experiments also show high fore-and-aft forces on the seat (the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass) that have not influenced current models. This paper defines a model that predicts the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the seated human body during vertical excitation. A three degree-of-freedom model with vertical, fore-and-aft and rotational (i.e. pitch) degrees of freedom has been developed with twelve model parameters (representing inertia, stiffness, damping, and geometry) optimised to the measured vertical apparent mass and the measured fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the body. The model provides close fits to the moduli and phases for both median data and the responses of 12 individual subjects. The optimum model parameters found by fitting to the median apparent mass of 12 subjects were similar to the medians of the same parameters found by fitting to the individual apparent masses of the same 12 subjects. The model suggests the seated human body undergoes fore-and-aft motion on a seat when exposed to vertical excitation, with the primary resonance frequency of the apparent mass arising from vertical motion of the body. According to the model, changes in the vertical, fore-and-aft, or rotational degree of freedom have an effect on the resonance in the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass.

Nawayseh, Naser; Griffin, Michael J.

2009-01-01

302

Measuring airborne components of seismic body vibrations in a Middle-Asian sand-dwelling Insectivora species, the piebald shrew (Diplomesodon pulchellum).  

PubMed

Self-produced seismic vibrations have been found for some subterranean rodents but have not been reported for any Insectivora species, although seismic sensitivity has been confirmed for blind sand-dwelling chrysochlorid golden moles. Studying the vocal behaviour of captive piebald shrews, Diplomesodon pulchellum, we documented vibrations, apparently generated by the whole-body wall muscles, from 11 (5 male, 6 female) of 19 animals, placed singly on a drum membrane. The airborne waves of the vibratory drumming were digitally recorded and then analysed spectrographically. The mean frequency of vibration was 160.5 Hz. This frequency matched the periodicity of the deep sinusoidal frequency modulation (159.4 Hz) found in loud screech calls of the same subjects. The body vibration was not related to thermoregulation, hunger-related depletion of energy resources or fear, as it was produced by well-fed, calm animals, at warm ambient temperatures. We hypothesize that in the solitary, nocturnal, digging desert piebald shrew, body vibrations may be used for seismic exploration of substrate density, to avoid energy-costly digging of packed sand for burrowing and foraging. At the same time, the piercing quality of screech calls due to the deep sinusoidal frequency modulation, matching the periodicity of body vibration, may be important for agonistic communication in this species. PMID:22837458

Volodin, Ilya A; Zaytseva, Alexandra S; Ilchenko, Olga G; Volodina, Elena V; Chebotareva, Anastasia L

2012-08-15

303

Determination of reference values of apparent mass responses of seated occupants of different body masses under vertical vibration with and without a back support  

Microsoft Academic Search

The biodynamic response of human body seated without a back support and exposed to vertical whole-body vibration have been standardized in ISO 5982 and DIN 45676 in terms of driving-point mechanical impedance and apparent mass. A comparison of ranges defined in two standards, however, reveal considerable differences in both the magnitude and phase. Greater differences are more evident for the

S. K. Patra; S. Rakheja; H. Nelisse; P.-É. Boileau; J. Boutin

2008-01-01

304

INDIVIDUAL OPTIMAL FREQUENCY IN WHOLE BODY VIBRATION: EFFECT OF PROTOCOL, JOINT ANGLE AND FATIGUING EXERCISE.  

PubMed

Recent studies have shown the importance of individualizing the vibration intervention in order to produce greater effects on the neuromuscular system in less time. The purpose of this study was to assess theindividualoptimalvibration frequency (O.V.F.)corresponding to the highestmuscle activation (RMSmax) duringvibrationat differentfrequencies, comparing different protocols. Twenty-nine university students underwent 3 Continuous (C) and 2 Random (R) different vibrating protocols, maintaining a squat position on a vibration platform. The C protocol lasted 50 seconds and involved the succession of ascending frequencies from 20 to 55 Hz, every 5 seconds. The same protocol was performed twice, having the knee angle at 120° (C) and 90° (C90), in order to assess the effect of joint angle, and after a fatiguing squatting exercise (CF) to evaluate the influence of fatigue on O.V.F. assessment. In therandomprotocols vibration time was 20 seconds with a 2-minute (R2) and a 4-minute (R4) pauses between tested frequencies. Muscle activation and O.V.F. values did not differ significantly in the C, R2 and R4 protocols. RMSmax was higher in C90 (p< 0.001) and in CF (p = 0.04) compared to the Cprotocol. Joint angle and fatiguing exercise had no effect on optimalvibration frequency. In conclusion, the shorter C protocol produced similar myoelectrical activity in the R2 and the R4 protocols and therefore could be equally valid in identifying the O.V.F. with considerable time efficiency. Knee joint angle and fatiguing exercise had an effect on sEMG response during vibration but did not affect significantly O.V.F. identification. PMID:23588483

Carlucci, Flaminia; Felici, Francesco; Piccinini, Alberto; Haxhi, Jonida; Sacchetti, Massimo

2013-04-12

305

Therapy Insight: body-shape changes and metabolic complications associated with HIV and highly active antiretroviral therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasingly effective therapies for HIV infection are now available. These treatments, referred to collectively as highly active antiretroviral therapy, comprise various combinations of anti-HIV drugs from different drug classes. Recently, a range of metabolic complications have emerged as important toxicities in treated patients. Complications present as abnormalities of body-fat mass distribution in association with an often significant dyslipidemia and glucose

Julian Falutz

2007-01-01

306

Variations in Neuromuscular Activity of Thigh Muscles During Whole-Body Vibration in Consideration of Different Biomechanical Variables  

PubMed Central

The intention of this study was to systematically analyze the impact of biomechanical variables in terms of different vibration frequencies, amplitudes and knee angles on quadriceps femoris and hamstring activity during exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV). 51 healthy men and women (age 55 ± 8 years) voluntary participated in the study and were randomly allocated to five different vibration-frequency groups. Each subject performed 9 static squat positions (3 amplitudes x 3 knee angles) on a side alternating vibration platform. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record the neuromuscular activity of the quadriceps femoris and hamstring muscles. Maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) were performed prior to the measurements to normalize the EMG signals. A three-way mixed ANOVA was performed to analyze the different effects of the biomechanical variables on muscle activity. Depending on the biomechanical variables, EMG muscle activity ranged between 18.2 and 74.1 % MVC in the quadriceps femoris and between 5.2 and 27. 3 % MVC in the hamstrings during WBV. The highest levels of muscle activation were found at high frequencies and large amplitudes. Especially in the quadriceps femoris muscle, a WBV frequency of 30 Hz led to a significant increase in muscle activity compared to the other tested frequencies. However, it seems that knee angle is only relevant for the quadriceps femoris muscle. The results of this study should give more information for developing individual training protocols for WBV treatment in different practical applications. Key Points WBV leads to a higher muscle activity of the quadriceps femoris than of the hamstrings. The maximum levels of muscle activity were significantly reached at high amplitude and high frequency. The knee angle only significantly affects the quadriceps femoris. Certain combinations of the biomechanical variables have similar effects on the level of muscle activity.

Perchthaler, Dennis; Horstmann, Thomas; Grau, Stefan

2013-01-01

307

Variations in neuromuscular activity of thigh muscles during whole-body vibration in consideration of different biomechanical variables.  

PubMed

The intention of this study was to systematically analyze the impact of biomechanical variables in terms of different vibration frequencies, amplitudes and knee angles on quadriceps femoris and hamstring activity during exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV). 51 healthy men and women (age 55 ± 8 years) voluntary participated in the study and were randomly allocated to five different vibration-frequency groups. Each subject performed 9 static squat positions (3 amplitudes x 3 knee angles) on a side alternating vibration platform. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record the neuromuscular activity of the quadriceps femoris and hamstring muscles. Maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) were performed prior to the measurements to normalize the EMG signals. A three-way mixed ANOVA was performed to analyze the different effects of the biomechanical variables on muscle activity. Depending on the biomechanical variables, EMG muscle activity ranged between 18.2 and 74.1 % MVC in the quadriceps femoris and between 5.2 and 27. 3 % MVC in the hamstrings during WBV. The highest levels of muscle activation were found at high frequencies and large amplitudes. Especially in the quadriceps femoris muscle, a WBV frequency of 30 Hz led to a significant increase in muscle activity compared to the other tested frequencies. However, it seems that knee angle is only relevant for the quadriceps femoris muscle. The results of this study should give more information for developing individual training protocols for WBV treatment in different practical applications. Key PointsWBV leads to a higher muscle activity of the quadriceps femoris than of the hamstrings.The maximum levels of muscle activity were significantly reached at high amplitude and high frequency.The knee angle only significantly affects the quadriceps femoris.Certain combinations of the biomechanical variables have similar effects on the level of muscle activity. PMID:24149149

Perchthaler, Dennis; Horstmann, Thomas; Grau, Stefan

2013-09-01

308

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Inoperable Early Stage Lung Cancer  

PubMed Central

Context Patients with early stage but medically inoperable lung cancer patients have a poor rate of primary tumor control (30-40%) and a high rate of mortality (3-year survival 20-35%) with current management. Objective To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy in a high risk population of patients with early stage but medically inoperable lung cancer. Design, Setting, and Patients Phase 2 North American multicenter study of patients with biopsy-proven peripheral T1-T2, N0, M0 non-small cell tumors less than 5 cm in diameter and medical conditions precluding surgical treatment. The prescription dose was 18 Gy per fraction times 3 fractions (54 Gy total) delivered in 1½-2 weeks. The study opened May 26, 2004, and closed October 13, 2006; data were analyzed through August 31, 2009. Main Outcome Measures The primary endpoint was primary tumor control with overall survival, disease free survival, adverse events, involved lobe, regional, and disseminated recurrence as secondary endpoints. Results A total of 59 patients accrued, of which 55 were evaluable (44 T1 and 11 T2 tumors) with a median follow-up of 34.4 months (range, 4.8 to 49.9 months). Only 1 patient had a primary tumor failure; the estimated 3-year primary tumor control rate was 97.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84.3%, 99.7%). Three patients had recurrence within the involved lobe; the 3-year primary tumor and involved lobe (local) control rate was 90.6% (95% CI, 76.0%, 96.5%). Two patients experienced regional failure; the local-regional control rate was 87.2% (95%CI, 71.0%, 94.7%). Eleven patients experienced disseminated recurrence; the 3-year rate of disseminated failure was 22.1% (95% CI, 12.3%, 37.8%). The rates of disease-free and overall survival at 3 years were 48.3% (95% CI, 34.4%, 60.8%) and 55.8% (95% CI, 41.6%, 67.9%), respectively. The median overall survival was 48.1 months (95% CI, 29.6% to not reached). Protocol specified treatment-related grade 3 adverse events were reported in 7 patients (12.7%; 95% CI, 9.6%, 15.8%); grade 4 events were reported in 2 patients (3.6%; 95%CI, 2.7%, 4.5%). No grade 5 adverse events were reported. Conclusion Patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer who received stereotactic body radiation therapy had a survival rate of 55.8% at 3 years, high rates of local tumor control, and moderate treatment-related morbidity.

Timmerman, Robert; Paulus, Rebecca; Galvin, James; Michalski, Jeffrey; Straube, William; Bradley, Jeffrey; Fakiris, Achilles; Bezjak, Andrea; Videtic, Gregory; Johnstone, David; Fowler, Jack; Gore, Elizabeth; Choy, Hak

2010-01-01

309

Numerical assessment of fore-and-aft suspension performance to reduce whole-body vibration of wheel loader drivers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While driving off-road vehicles, operators are exposed to whole-body vibration acting in the fore-and-aft direction. Seat manufacturers supply products equipped with fore-and-aft suspension but only a few studies report on their performance. This work proposes a computational approach to design fore-and-aft suspensions for wheel loader seats. Field tests were conducted in a quarry to analyse the nature of vibration to which the driver was exposed. Typical input signals were recorded to be reproduced in the laboratory. Technical specifications are defined for the suspension. In order to evaluate the suspension vibration attenuation performance, a model of a sitting human body was developed and coupled to a seat model. The seat model combines the models of each suspension component. A linear two-degree-of-freedom model is used to describe the dynamic behaviour of the sitting driver. Model parameters are identified by fitting the computed apparent mass frequency response functions to the measured values. Model extensions are proposed to investigate postural effects involving variations in hands and feet positions and interaction of the driver's back with the backrest. Suspension design parameters are firstly optimized by computing the seat/man model response to sinusoidal acceleration. Four criteria including transmissibility, interaction force between the driver's back and the backrest and relative maximal displacement of the suspension are computed. A new suspension design with optimized features is proposed. Its performance is checked from calculations of the response of the seat/man model subjected to acceleration measured on the wheel loader during real work conditions. On the basis of the computed values of the SEAT factors, it is found possible to design a suspension that would increase the attenuation provided by the seat by a factor of two.

Fleury, Gérard; Mistrot, Pierre

2006-12-01

310

Effects Related to Random Whole-Body Vibration and Posture on a Suspended Seatwith and Without Backrest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

WBV-exposures are often linked with forced postures as prolonged sitting, bent forward sitting, or sitting without a backrest. No quantitative data are available to describe the exposure-effect relationships for different conditions of seating, posture, and the biological variability of workers. Experiments and subsequent predictions of forces acting within the spine during WBV can help to improve the assessment of the health risk. An experimental study was performed with 39 male subjects sitting on a suspension seat with or with no backrest contact. They were exposed to random whole-body vibration with a weighted r.m.s. value of 0.6 m/s2 at a relaxed or a forward bending posture. A two-dimensional finite element model was used for the calculation of the internal spinal load. The model simulates the human response on a suspension driver seat. Individual exposure conditions were considered by including the transfer functions between the seat cushion and the seat base as well as between the backrest and the seat base for the calculation of the vibration input to the buttocks and to the back respectively. The average peak seat transmissibility was higher for the seat with the backrest, but the peak seat-to-head transmissibility was higher for the seat without the backrest for both postures. The peak transmissibilities between the accelerations at the seat base and the compressive forces at L5/S1 were highest for the seat without the backrest during the bending posture. Various biological effects can result from identical exposures combined with different backrest contact and postures. The backrest contact and posture conditions should not be neglected in the assessment of health risk caused by whole-body vibration. . All rights reserved.

Hinz, B.; Seidel, H.; Menzel, G.; Blüthner, R.

2002-05-01

311

Combined whole-body vibration, resistance exercise, and sustained vascular occlusion increases PGC-1? and VEGF mRNA abundances.  

PubMed

We previously reported that high load resistance exercise with superimposed whole-body vibration and sustained vascular occlusion (vibroX) markedly improves cycling endurance capacity, increases capillary-to-fibre ratio and skeletal muscle oxidative enzyme activity in untrained young women. These findings are intriguing, since increases in oxidative muscle phenotype and endurance capacity are typically induced by endurance but not heavy resistance exercise. Here, we tested the hypothesis that vibroX activates genes associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and angiogenesis. Eight healthy, recreationally resistance-trained young men performed either vibroX or resistance exercise (RES) in a randomised, cross-over design. Needle biopsies (M. vastus lateralis) were obtained at rest and 3 h post-exercise. Changes in relative gene expression levels were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR. After vibroX, vascular endothelial growth factor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? coactivator 1? mRNA abundances increased to 2- and 4.4-fold, respectively, but did not significantly change above resting values after RES. Other genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis were not affected by either exercise modality. While vibroX increased the expression of hexokinase II, xanthine dehydrogenase, and manganese superoxide dismutase mRNA, there were no changes in these transcripts after RES. This study demonstrates that high load resistance exercise with superimposed whole-body vibration and sustained vascular occlusion activates metabolic and angiogenic gene programs, which are usually activated after endurance but not resistance exercise. Thus, targeted modification of high load resistance exercise by vibration and vascular occlusion might represent a novel strategy to induce endurance-type muscle adaptations. PMID:23086295

Item, Flurin; Nocito, Antonio; Thöny, Sandra; Bächler, Thomas; Boutellier, Urs; Wenger, Roland H; Toigo, Marco

2012-10-20

312

Validation of Intra-Subject Variation in Biodynamic Responses of Seated Human Exposed to Whole-Body Vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many studies have been conducted to investigate the change in human response under various experimental conditions. Usually, these experiments were conducted using many subjects and the inter-subject variation was evaluated. However, the intra-subject variation in human response is also necessary for understanding the change in an individual's physical response to whole-body vibration (WBV). The aim of this study is to investigate the intra-subject variation in biodynamic responses (both apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility) of a seated human exposed to vertical whole-body vibration over time. In the experiments, nine male subjects were exposed to vertical random vibration (0.2-0.3 m/s2 in r.m.s.) in the 0-30Hz frequency range. The measurement variation was also evaluated, wherein the measurements were repeated five times without any change to form the “baseline” for each subject, and the intra-subject variations were evaluated by comparing their responses with these “baseline.” The intra-subject variation was examined from two different viewpoints: variation “within a day” and that “over several days.” To determine the intra-subject variation “within a day”, the five measurements were obtained at two-hour intervals on the same day. In the intra-subject variation “over several days”, the five measurements were obtained again, but at the same time of the day on five consecutive days. The results show that the intra-subject variations (both “within a day” and “over several days”) in biodynamic responses are larger than the “baseline.” However, when the variation “within a day” in biodynamic responses is compared to that “over several days,” no common trend is observed among subjects. Although the magnitude of intra-subject variation in biodynamic responses depends on each subject, both variations “within a day” and that “over several days” have a similar range of variation.

Park, Min Soo; Yoshimura, Takuya; Tamaoki, Gen

313

DOSE–RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION AND LUMBAR DISK DISEASE—A FIELD STUDY ON 388 DRIVERS OF DIFFERENT VEHICLES  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a longitudinal study, the dose–response relationships between long term occupational exposure to whole-body vibration and degenerative processes in the lumbar spine caused by the lumbar disks were examined. From 1990 to 1992, 388 vibration-exposed workers from different driving jobs were examined medically and by lumbar X-ray. For each individual, a history of all exposure conditions was recorded, and a

S. Schwarze; G. Notbohm; H. Dupuis; E. Hartung

1998-01-01

314

Effect of 6Month Whole Body Vibration Training on Hip Density, Muscle Strength, and Postural Control in Postmenopausal Women: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-frequency mechanical strain seems to stimulate bone strength in animals. In this random- ized controlled trial, hip BMD was measured in postmenopausal women after a 24-week whole body vibration (WBV) training program. Vibration training significantly increased BMD of the hip. These findings suggest that WBV training might be useful in the prevention of osteoporosis. Introduction: High-frequency mechanical strain has been

Sabine MP Verschueren; Machteld Roelants; Christophe Delecluse; Stephan Swinnen; Dirk Vanderschueren; Steven Boonen

2004-01-01

315

Description of the relation between the forces acting in the lumbar spine and whole-body vibrations by means of transfer functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The purpose of this study was to display the relationships between the forces transmitted in the spine and the accelerations of the vibrating seat.Background. Investigations reveal that exposure to whole-body vibration can induce degenerative changes in the lumbar spine. Elevated spinal forces are probably the crucial component in the pathogenesis of this disease.Design and methods. The spinal forces are

Martin Fritz

2000-01-01

316

Whole-body vibration experienced by haulage truck operators in surface mining operations: A comparison of various analysis methods utilized in the prediction of health risks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole body vibration (WBV) was measured on eight surface haulage trucks in three size classes (35, 100, 150ton haul capacities). Vibration was measured at the seat\\/operator interface in accordance with the ISO 2631-1 standard during 1h of normal operation. Highest acceleration readings were observed in the z-axis (vertical). Estimated equivalent daily exposure values in the range of 0.44–0.82 ms?2 were

Martin P. H. Smets; Tammy R. Eger; Sylvain G. Grenier

2010-01-01

317

Evaluation of reaction time performance and subjective workload during whole-body vibration exposure while seated in upright and twisted postures with and without armrests  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is little knowledge on performance during vibration exposure combined with occupational hazards such as bent or twisted postures. In addition, little information is available on the effective use of armrests during performance-related tasks. This paper investigates the influence of sitting in different working postures on the reaction time and perceived workload of subjects exposed to whole-body vibration. Twenty-one subjects

Geraldine S. Newell; Neil J. Mansfield

2008-01-01

318

A summary of current Bureau research into the effects of whole-body vibration and shock on operators of underground mobile equipment  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses current research by the U.S. Bureau of Mines on the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) and shock on underground mobile equipment operators. The highlights of a comprehensive literature review of WBV, shock, and seating are presented. Factors discussed include health and physiological effects, comfort, performance, and fatigue. Vibration data were collected from shuttle cars and ramcars at several underground coal mines in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Illinois. The data were formatted so that they could be used to drive the Bureau's motion platform, and to compare them with ANSI S3-1979, Guide for the Evaluation of Human Exposure to Whole-Body Vibration. Human subject testing in the Bureau's vibration research laboratory evaluated the effects of two different seat angles and of the presence or absence of vibration and of foam padding on heart rate, blood pressure, and subjective discomfort. Only vibration significantly increased heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressures. Vibration and a steel seat had a significant effect on subjective discomfort. The apparatus used for these tests and the experimental procedures are described in detail. Recommendations are made for additional research on the exposure of underground mining machine operators to WBV and shock.

Love, A.C.; Unger, R.L.; Bobick, T.G.; Fowkes, R.S.

1992-01-01

319

Should measurement of body composition influence therapy for obesity?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a review on assessment of obesity by measurement of body composition. It is recommended that cross-calibrations between methods are made and that cut-off levels for defining obesity are based on the association between body fat% and morbidity and mortality. The recommendation is made for assessment of obesity to measure body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference in

O. L. Svendsen

2003-01-01

320

Nuclear quantum many-body dynamics. From collective vibrations to heavy-ion collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A summary of recent researches on nuclear dynamics with realistic microscopic quantum approaches is presented. The Balian-Vénéroni variational principle is used to derive the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) equation describing the dynamics at the mean-field level, as well as an extension including small-amplitude quantum fluctuations which is equivalent to the time-dependent random-phase approximation (TDRPA). Such formalisms as well as their practical implementation in the nuclear physics framework with modern three-dimensional codes are discussed. Recent applications to nuclear dynamics, from collective vibrations to heavy-ion collisions are presented. Particular attention is devoted to the interplay between collective motions and internal degrees of freedom. For instance, the harmonic nature of collective vibrations is questioned. Nuclei are also known to exhibit superfluidity due to pairing residual interaction. Extensions of the theoretical approach to study such pairing vibrations are now available. Large amplitude collective motions are investigated in the framework of heavy-ion collisions leading, for instance, to the formation of a compound system. How fusion is affected by the internal structure of the collision partners, such as their deformation, is discussed. Other mechanisms in competition with fusion, and responsible for the formation of fragments which differ from the entrance channel (transfer reactions, deep-inelastic collisions, and quasi-fission) are investigated. Finally, studies of actinide collisions forming, during very short times of few zeptoseconds, the heaviest nuclear systems available on Earth, are presented.

Simenel, Cédric

2012-11-01

321

[Regulating effects of whole-body vibration on protein expression of p-GSK3? in bone marrow cells of ovariectomized osteoporosis rats].  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of whole-body vibration on Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway in bone marrow cells of ovariectomized osteoporosis rats. Thirty-six healthy 3-month old female Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into the following three groups by body weight: sham-operation (Sham), ovariectomized (OVX), and OVX whole-body vibration (WBV) groups. Ten weeks after ovariectomization, the rats of WBV group received vibration treatment (90 Hz, 15 min) twice per day. At the end of 8-week vibration, the whole-body bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition were detected by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in vivo. The protein expressions of ?-catenin and p-GSK3? in both bone marrow cells and bone marrow stromal cells were detected by Western blot. The results showed that, compared with OVX group, WBV group showed decreased fat mass and fat mass content, as well as increased lean body mass content. The BMD of the proximal tibia in WBV group was significantly higher than that in OVX group, however, there was no difference of BMD in whole-body and other positions between the two groups. The ?-catenin expression in bone marrow stromal cells showed no difference between OVX and WBV groups. The p-GSK3? expression of bone marrow cells was increased in WBV group compared with that in OVX group, whereas bone marrow stromal cells from two groups did not exhibit the difference of the p-GSK3? expression. These results suggest that whole body vibration can stimulate the protein expression of p-GSK3? in bone marrow cells of ovariectomized osteoporosis rats, which could improve the bone loss induced by ovariectomization. PMID:23598872

Wang, Yu-Han; Bu, Shu-Min; Wang, Jian-Hong

2013-04-25

322

Whole body vibration training improves leg blood flow and adiposity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

This study aimed at examined the effect of a 12-week whole body vibration (WBV) training program on leg blood flow and body composition in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Forty participants were randomly assigned to either a WBV training group (WBV; n = 20) or usual-care control group (CON; n = 20). Body composition [waist circumference, waist to hip ratio (WHR), weight, height, percentage of body fat and fat-free mass], heart rate, and blood flow [femoral artery diameter, maximum systolic velocity, maximum diastolic velocity (DV), time averaged mean, pulsatility index and resistance index (RI), mean velocity (V med), and peak blood velocities (PBV)] were assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks. There were significant increases in the blood flow (p = 0.046), V med (p = 0.050), and DV (p = 0.037) after WBV compared with CON. Within-group analysis showed significant differences in V med, PBV, and DV in the WBV group. Significant decreases after the intervention in weight (p < 0.001), waist circumference (p < 0.001), WHR (p < 0.05), and body fat (p < 0.05) were also found, with significant between-groups decreases in all these outcomes in the WBV group. Significant correlations existed between changes in percent body fat and blood flow [blood flow (-0.761), V med (-0.607), PBV (-0.677), and RI (0.0510)]. WBV training can be considered an effective means to increase leg blood flow and to reduce adiposity in patients with T2DM. PMID:23657766

Sañudo, Borja; Alfonso-Rosa, Rosa; Del Pozo-Cruz, Borja; Del Pozo-Cruz, Jesus; Galiano, Delfín; Figueroa, Arturo

2013-05-09

323

Skeletal site-specific effects of whole body vibration in mature rats: from deleterious to beneficial frequency-dependent effects.  

PubMed

Whole body vibration (WBV) is receiving increasing interest as an anti-osteoporotic prevention strategy. In this context, selective effects of different frequency and acceleration magnitude modalities on musculoskeletal responses need to be better defined. Our aim was to investigate the bone effects of different vibration frequencies at constant g level. Vertical WBV was delivered at 0.7 g (peak acceleration) and 8, 52 or 90 Hz sinusoidal vibration to mature male rats 10 min daily for 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Peak accelerations measured by skin or bone-mounted accelerometers at L2 vertebral and tibia crest levels revealed similar values between adjacent skin and bone sites. Local accelerations were greater at 8 Hz compared with 52 and 90 Hz and were greater in vertebra than tibia for all the frequencies tested. At 52 Hz, bone responses were mainly seen in L2 vertebral body and were characterized by trabecular reorganization and stimulated mineral apposition rate (MAR) without any bone volume alteration. At 90 Hz, axial and appendicular skeletons were affected as were the cortical and trabecular compartments. Cortical thickness increased in femur diaphysis (17%) along with decreased porosity; trabecular bone volume increased at distal femur metaphysis (23%) and even more at L2 vertebral body (32%), along with decreased SMI and increased trabecular connectivity. Trabecular thickness increased at the tibia proximal metaphysis. Bone cellular activities indicated a greater bone formation rate, which was more pronounced at vertebra (300%) than at long bone (33%). Active bone resorption surfaces were unaffected. At 8 Hz, however, hyperosteoidosis with reduced MAR along with increased resorption surfaces occurred in the tibia; hyperosteoidosis and trend towards decreased MAR was also seen in L2 vertebra. Trabecular bone mineral density was decreased at femur and tibia. Thus the most favorable regimen is 90 Hz, while deleterious effects were seen at 8 Hz. We concluded that the skeleton is frequency-scalable, thus highlighting the importance of WBV regimen conditions and suggesting that cautions are required for frequencies less than 10 Hz, at least in rats. PMID:23545229

Pasqualini, Marion; Lavet, Cédric; Elbadaoui, Mohamed; Vanden-Bossche, Arnaud; Laroche, Norbert; Gnyubkin, Vasily; Vico, Laurence

2013-03-29

324

Addition of synchronous whole-body vibration to body mass resistive exercise causes little or no effects on muscle damage and/or inflammation.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to determine if a moderate intensity whole-body vibration (WBV) body mass resistive exercise session causes additional muscle damage, soreness and inflammation compared to the same exercise session without vibration (NoV). Ten recreationally active male university students completed two separate 24 h study periods incorporating an exercise session with WBV or NoV. Muscle torque was measured (at 0, 60, and 240°·s angular velocities), soreness (10 point scale) in the upper [UE (triceps)] and lower [LE (quadriceps)] extremities, and muscle inflammation markers (interleukin 1?, 6, 10) were measured at 4 time points (pre-exercise, immediately post-exercise, 4 h post, and 24 h post). Diet was controlled. Compared to NoV, WBV increased (P<0.01) muscle soreness at 24 h post-exercise in both the UE (2.2±1.7 vs 0.6±0.9) and LE (2.0±1.5 vs 0.7±0.7). Muscle torque was decreased immediately post-exercise (P<0.05) in the UE and LE at 0°·s and in the UE at 240°·s, but there was no difference between exercise treatments. The exercise session caused significant but small increases in IL-1? and IL-6 but with no differences between exercise treatments. IL-10 was increased with WBV (2.9±2.0 to 3.6±1.9 pg·ml; P<0.03). These data suggest the addition of WBV to exercise has little effect on muscle function/damage, soreness, or inflammation. PMID:23615482

Hazell, Tom J; Olver, T Dylan; Hamilton, Craig D; Lemon, Peter W R

2013-04-23

325

EFFECTS OF 6-WEEK WHOLE BODY VIBRATION TRAINING ON THE REFLEX RESPONSE OF THE ANKLE MUSCLES: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL  

PubMed Central

Background: The ligament sprain of the lateral ankle is the most frequent injury that occurs when participating in sports. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a training method that has been recently introduced as a rehabilitative tool for treatment of athletes. It has been hypothesized that the transmission of mechanical oscillations from the vibrating platform may lead to physiological changes in muscle spindles, joint mechanoreceptors, as well as improve balance. Propose: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a 6?week WBV training program on the reflex response mechanism of the peroneus longus (PL), peroneus brevis (PB) and anterior tibialis (AT) muscles in ankle inversion at 30º from horizontal, in a static position. Methods: This study was a single?blinded and randomized controlled trial. Forty?four healthy, physically active participants were randomly split into two groups: the experimental group (n = 26) (the WBV training) and control group (n = 18). Reaction time (RT), maximum electromyographic (EMG) peak (peak EMG), time to the maximum peak EMG (peak EMG time) and reflex electrical activity of all the muscles were assessed before and after the WBV training through surface EMG. Results: After 6?weeks WBV training, there were no significant changes in the variables analysed for all the muscles involved. Conclusion: A 6?week WBV training does not improve the reflex response mechanism of the lateral stabilizing muscles of the ankle. Level of evidence: 1b

Rubio, Jacobo A.; Ramos, Domingo J.; Esteban, Paula; Mendizabal, Susana; Jimenez, Fernando

2013-01-01

326

The influence of a 5-wk whole body vibration on electrophysiological properties of rat hindlimb spinal motoneurons.  

PubMed

The study aimed at determining the influence of a whole body vibration (WBV) on electrophysiological properties of spinal motoneurons. The WBV training was performed on adult male Wistar rats, 5 days a week, for 5 wk, and each daily session consisted of four 30-s runs of vibration at 50 Hz. Motoneuron properties were investigated intracellularly during experiments on deeply anesthetized animals. The experimental group subjected to the WBV consisted of seven rats, and the control group of nine rats. The WBV treatment induced no significant changes in the passive membrane properties of motoneurons. However, the WBV-evoked adaptations in excitability and firing properties were observed, and they were limited to fast-type motoneurons. A significant decrease in rheobase current and a decrease in the minimum and the maximum currents required to evoke steady-state firing in motoneurons were revealed. These changes resulted in a leftward shift of the frequency-current relationship, combined with an increase in slope of this curve. The functional relevance of the described adaptive changes is the ability of fast motoneurons of rats subjected to the WBV to produce series of action potentials at higher frequencies in a response to the same intensity of activation. Previous studies proved that WBV induces changes in the contractile parameters predominantly of fast motor units (MUs). The data obtained in our experiment shed a new light to possible explanation of these results, suggesting that neuronal factors also play a substantial role in MU adaptation. PMID:23486208

Baczyk, M; Ha?uszka, A; Mrówczy?ski, W; Celichowski, J; Krutki, P

2013-03-13

327

Tri-axial forces at the seat and backrest during whole-body fore-and-aft vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical forces on a seat and a backrest have been investigated with 12 male subjects exposed to random fore-and-aft whole-body vibration (0.25-10 Hz) at four vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25 m s-2 rms). Subjects sat in each of four sitting postures having varying foot heights, so as to produce differing thigh contact with the seat. The fore-and-aft forces on the seat depended on whether the feet were supported on a footrest: peaks were found at two frequencies when the feet were not supported, compared to only one peak when the feet were supported. The fore-and-aft forces at the backrest were high, with their peak magnitudes correlated with subject mass. Vertical forces were high on the seat but not on the backrest. Lateral forces were relatively low on both the seat and the backrest. In all directions, forces on the seat and the backrest showed a nonlinear behaviour. In comparison with a previous study undertaken with no backrest, it was found that the backrest reduced forces on the seat at low frequencies (in the fore-and-aft and vertical directions) but increased these forces at high frequencies.

Nawayseh, Naser; Griffin, Michael J.

2005-03-01

328

Acute whole body vibration training increases vertical jump and flexibility performance in elite female field hockey players  

PubMed Central

Objective: To quantify the acute effect of whole body vibration (WBV) training on arm countermovement vertical jump (ACMVJ), grip strength, and flexibility performance. Methods: Eighteen female elite field hockey players each completed three interventions of WBV, control, and cycling in a balanced random manner. WBV was performed on a Galileo machine (26 Hz) with six different exercises being performed. For the control, the same six exercises were performed at 0 Hz, whilst cycling was performed at 50 W. Each intervention was 5 min in duration with ACMVJ, grip strength, and flexibility measurements being conducted pre and post intervention. Results: There was a positive interaction effect (interventionxpre-post) of enhanced ACMVJ (p<0.001) and flexibility (p<0.05) parameters following WBV; however no changes were observed after the control and cycling interventions. There was no interaction effect for grip strength following the three interventions. Conclusions: Acute WBV causes neural potentiation of the stretch reflex loop as shown by the improved ACMVJ and flexibility performance. Additionally, muscle groups less proportionally exposed to vibration do not exhibit physiological changes that potentiate muscular performance.

Cochrane, D; Stannard, S

2005-01-01

329

Vehicle design influences whole body vibration exposures: effect of the location of the front axle relative to the cab.  

PubMed

Using a repeated measure design, this study compared differences in whole body vibration (WBV) exposures among 13 drivers who drove a truck with the cab over the front axle (cab-over design) and a truck with the cab situated behind the front axle (non-cab-over design). The drivers drove both trucks over a standardized route that comprised three distinct segments: a freeway segment, a city street segment with stop-and-go driving (traffic lights), and a city street segment without traffic lights. A portable WBV data acquisition system collected tri-axial time-weighted and raw WBV data per ISO 2631-1 and 2631-5 standards. Simultaneous global positioning system (GPS) data were also collected to compare vehicle speeds. The GPS data indicated that there were no speed differences between the two vehicles. However, average and impulsive z-axis vibration levels were significantly higher for the cab-over design than for the non-cab-over design. In addition, significant WBV exposure differences between road types were found, with the freeway segments having the lowest exposures and the city street segments without traffic lights having the highest exposures. Vehicle type and the associated WBV exposures should be considered when purchasing vehicles to be used by full-time professional vehicle operators. PMID:21623531

Blood, Ryan P; Rynell, Patrik W; Johnson, Peter W

2011-06-01

330

Predictive discomfort of non-neutral head-neck postures in fore-aft whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

It seems obvious that human head-neck posture in whole-body vibration (WBV) contributes to discomfort and injury risk. While current mechanical measures such as transmissibility have shown good correlation with the subjective-reported discomfort, they showed difficulties in predicting discomfort for non-neutral postures. A new biomechanically based methodology is introduced in this work to predict discomfort due to non-neutral head-neck postures. Altogether, 10 seated subjects with four head-neck postures--neutral, head-up, head-down and head-to-side--were subjected to WBV in the fore-aft direction using discrete sinusoidal frequencies of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 Hz and their subjective responses were recorded using the Borg CR-10 scale. All vibrations were run at constant acceleration of 0.8 m/s² and 1.15 m/s². The results have shown that the subjective-reported discomfort increases with head-down and decreases with head-up and head-to-side postures. The proposed predictive discomfort has closely followed the reported discomfort measures for all postures and rides under investigation. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Many occupational studies have shown strong relevance between non-neutral postures, discomfort and injury risk in WBV. With advances in computer human modelling, the proposed predictive discomfort may provide efficient ways for developing reliable biodynamic models. It may also be used to assess discomfort and modify designs inside moving vehicles. PMID:21390956

Rahmatalla, Salam; Deshaw, Jonathan

2011-03-01

331

[Using music in work therapy complex in able-bodied patients with spinal injury].  

PubMed

The authors analyzed results of using music in work therapy rehabilitation complex in able-bodied patients with spinal injury. Efficiency of the therapy was demonstrated. Findings are that the patients demonstrate positive change in views, interests, desires, attitude to the personal condition and surroundings, tendency to overcome the disease, to realize compensatory resources of the body, more motivation to work--that serves as a good basis for further work rehabilitation of the patients. PMID:20734859

Gil'mutdinova, L T; Kha?bullina, Z R

2010-01-01

332

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage lung cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a new treatment modality for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer, and has been developed in the United States, the European Union, and Japan. We started a feasibility study of this therapy in July 1998, using a stereotactic body frame. The eligibility criteria for primary lung cancer were: 1) solitary tumor less than 4 cm (T1-3N0M); 2)

M. Hiraoka; Y. Matsuo; Y. Nagata

2007-01-01

333

Whole-body vibration training reduces arterial stiffness, blood pressure and sympathovagal balance in young overweight/obese women.  

PubMed

Obesity is associated with early cardiovascular dysfunction and reduced muscle strength. Whole-body vibration (WBV) training may improve arterial function and muscle strength. The effects of WBV training on arterial stiffness (brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity, baPWV), wave reflection (augmentation index, AIx), brachial systolic blood pressure (bSBP), aortic systolic blood pressure (aSBP), heart rate variability, and muscle strength (one-repetition maximum, 1RM) were examined in 10 young (21 ± 2 year) overweight/obese women (body mass index, BMI = 29.9 ± 0.8 kg m(-2)). Participants were randomized to a 6-week WBV training or non-exercising control (CON) period in a crossover design. WBV training (3 days × week) consisted of static and dynamic squats and calf raises with vibration intensity at 25-30 Hz and 1-2 mm amplitude (2.83-4.86 G). There were significant (P<0.05) decreases in baPWV (-0.9 ± 0.3 m s(-1)), AIx (-8.0 ± 2.2 %), bSBP (-5.3 ± 1.5 mm Hg), aSBP (-5.2 ± 2.1 mm Hg), low-frequency power (-0.13 ± 0.05 nu) and sympathovagal balance (LF/HF, -0.42 ± 0.16) after WBV training compared with CON. Significant (P<0.05) increases in high-frequency power (HF, 0.19 ± 0.04 nu) and leg extension 1RM (8.2 ± 2.3 kg) occurred after WBV training compared with CON. Six weeks of WBV training decreased systemic arterial stiffness and aSBP via improvements in wave reflection and sympathovagal balance in young overweight/obese normotensive women. WBV training may benefit arterial function and muscle strength in deconditioned individuals who cannot perform conventional exercise. PMID:22357522

Figueroa, Arturo; Gil, Ryan; Wong, Alexei; Hooshmand, Shirin; Park, Song Y; Vicil, Florence; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Marcos A

2012-02-23

334

Myoelectric Response of Back Muscles to Vertical Random Whole-Body Vibration with Different Magnitudes at Different Postures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Back muscle forces contribute essentially to the whole-body vibration-induced spinal load. The electromyogram (EMG) can help to estimate these forces during whole-body vibration (WBV). Thirty-eight subjects were exposed to identical random low-frequency WBV (0.7, 1.0 and 1.4 m/s-2 r.m.s. weighted acceleration) at a relaxed, erect and bent forward postures. The acceleration of the seat and the force between the seat and the buttocks were measured. Six EMGs were derived from the right side of the m. trapezius pars descendens, m. ileocostalis lumborum pars thoracis, m. ileocostalis lumborum pars lumborum; m. longissimus thoracis pars thoracis, m. longissimus thoracis pars lumborum, and lumbar multifidus muscle. All data were filtered for anti-aliasing and sampled with 1000 Hz. Artefacts caused by the ECG in the EMG were identified and eliminated in the time domain using wavelets. The individually rectified and normalized EMGs were averaged across subjects. The EMGs without WBV exhibited characteristic patterns for the three postures examined. The coherence and transfer functions indicated characteristic myoelectric responses to random WBV with several effects of posture and WBV magnitude. A comprehensive set of transfer functions from the seat acceleration or the mean normalized input force to the mean processed EMG was presented. The results can be used for the development of more sophisticated models with a separate control of various back muscle groups. However, the EMG-force relationship under dynamic conditions needs to be examined in more detail before the results can be implemented. Since different reflex mechanisms depending on the frequency of WBV are linked with different types of active muscle fibres, various time delays between the EMG and muscle force may be necessary. . All rights reserved.

Blüthner, R.; Seidel, H.; Hinz, B.

2002-05-01

335

Effect of Muscle Tension on Non-Linearities in the Apparent Masses of Seated Subjects Exposed to Vertical Whole-Body Vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In subjects exposed to whole-body vibration, the cause of non-linear dynamic characteristics with changes in vibration magnitude is not understood. The effect of muscle tension on the non-linearity in apparent mass has been investigated in this study. Eight seated male subjects were exposed to random and sinusoidal vertical vibration at five magnitudes (0.35-1.4 m/s2 r.m.s.). The random vibration was presented for 60 s over the frequency range 2.0-20 Hz; the sinusoidal vibration was presented for 10 s at five frequencies (3.15, 4.0, 5.0, 6.3 and 8.0 Hz). Three sitting conditions were adopted such that, in two conditions, muscle tension in the buttocks and the abdomen was controlled. It was assumed that, in these two conditions, involuntary changes in muscle tension would be minimized. The force and acceleration at the seat surface were used to obtain apparent masses of subjects. With both sinusoidal and random vibration, there was statistical support for the hypothesis that non-linear characteristics were less clear when muscle tension in the buttocks and the abdomen was controlled. With increases in the magnitude of random vibration from 0.35 to 1.4 m/s2 r.m.s., the apparent mass resonance frequency decreased from 5.25 to 4.25 Hz with normal muscle tension, from 5.0 to 4.38 Hz with the buttocks muscles tensed, and from 5.13 to 4.5 Hz with the abdominal muscles tensed. Involuntary changes in muscle tension during whole-body vibration may be partly responsible for non-linear biodynamic responses. . All rights reserved.

Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

2002-05-01

336

Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Body Image Exposure for Bulimia Nervosa: A Case Example  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for bulimia nervosa (BN). However, among patients with BN, symptom improvement is more pronounced for behavioral eating symptoms (i.e., bingeing and purging) than for body image disturbance, and the persistence of body image disturbance is associated with relapse. The need for more…

Delinsky, Sherrie S.; Wilson, G. Terence

2010-01-01

337

Patterns of Mind-Body Therapies in Adults with Common Neurological Conditions  

PubMed Central

Background Over 40% of adults with common neurological conditions use complementary and alternative medicine, and mind-body therapies are the most commonly used form. Our objective was to describe mind-body use in adults with common neurological conditions. Methods We compared mind-body use between adults with and without common neurological conditions (regular headaches, migraines, back pain with sciatica, strokes, dementia, seizures or memory loss) using the 2007 National Health Interview Survey of 23,393 sampled American adults. Results Adults with common neurological conditions used mind-body therapies more frequently than those without (24.5 vs. 16.6%, p < 0.0001); differences persisted after adjustment. Deep breathing exercises, meditation and yoga were used most frequently. Nearly 70% of the adults with common neurological conditions did not discuss their mind-body use with their health care provider. Those with neurological conditions used mind-body therapies more than those without these conditions because of provider recommendation (26 vs. 13%) or because conventional treatments were perceived ineffective (12 vs. 4%) or too costly (7 vs. 2%), respectively. Conclusions Mind-body therapies are used more frequently among adults with common neurological conditions, more often when conventional treatments were perceived ineffective. More research is warranted on the efficacy of mind-body use for common neurological conditions.

Erwin Wells, Rebecca; Phillips, Russell S.; McCarthy, Ellen P.

2011-01-01

338

a Body Mass Dependent Mechanical Impedance Model for Applications in Vibration Seat Testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A three degree-of-freedom model is proposed to predict the biodynamic responses of the seated human body of different masses. A baseline model is initially derived to satisfy both the mean apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility responses proposed in ISO/DIS 5982:2000 applicable for mean body mass of 75 kg. The validity of the resultant generic mass dependent model is verified by comparing the apparent mass and driving-point mechanical impedance responses computed for total body masses of 55, 75 and 90 kg with the range of idealized values proposed for body masses within the 49-93 kg range. Considering the lack of data that could be found to define the apparent mass/mechanical impedance of subjects with different body masses when applying the experimental conditions defined in ISO/DIS 5982:2000, an attempt is made to adapt the parameters of the base model to fit the measured apparent mass data applicable to groups of automobile occupants within different mass ranges. This is achieved through constrained parametric optimization which consists of minimizing the sum of squared errors between the computed response and the mean apparent mass data measured for automobile occupants within four mass groups: less than 60 kg, 60.5-70.5 kg, 70.5-80 kg and above 80 kg. The results show a reasonably good agreement between the model responses and the measured apparent mass data, particularly at frequencies below 10 Hz. The results suggest that the proposed mass dependent model can effectively predict the apparent mass responses of automobile occupants over a wide range of body masses and for two different postures: passenger (hands-in-lap) and driver (hands-on-steering wheel) postures. . All rights reserved.

Boileau, P.-É.; Rakheja, S.; Wu, X.

2002-05-01

339

Patterns of Mind-Body Therapies in Adults with Common Neurological Conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Over 40% of adults with common neurological conditions use complementary and alternative medicine, and mind-body therapies are the most commonly used form. Our objective was to describe mind-body use in adults with common neurological conditions. Methods: We compared mind-body use between adults with and without common neurological conditions (regular headaches, migraines, back pain with sciatica, strokes, dementia, seizures or

Rebecca Erwin Wells; Russell S. Phillips; Ellen P. McCarthy

2011-01-01

340

The feasibility of whole body vibration in institutionalised elderly persons and its influence on muscle performance, balance and mobility: a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN62535013  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Fatigue or lack of interest can reduce the feasibility of intensive physical exercise in nursing home residents. Low-volume exercise interventions with similar training effects might be an alternative. The aim of this randomised controlled trial was to investigate the feasibility of Whole Body Vibration (WBV) in institutionalised elderly, and its impact on functional capacity and muscle performance. METHODS: Twenty-four

Ivan Bautmans; Ellen Van Hees; Jean-Claude Lemper; Tony Mets

2005-01-01

341

THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SELF-ADMINISTERED QUESTIONNAIRE TO ASSESS EXPOSURES TO HAND-TRANSMITTED AND WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION AND THEIR HEALTH EFFECTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A large British survey is being conducted to identify sources of occupational exposure to hand-transmitted and whole-body vibration, and to estimate the approximate extent of such exposures and their health effects. The principal information on exposures and morbidity will be derived from responses to a postal questionnaire specially developed by the Medical Research Council and the Institute of Sound and

K. Palmer; D. Coggon; B. Pannett; M. Griffin

1998-01-01

342

A laboratory study to quantify the biomechanical responses to whole-body vibration: The influence on balance, reflex response, muscular activity and fatigue  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine the acute effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on the sensorimotor system and potentially on the stability of the spine, different biomechanical responses were tested before and after 60min of sitting, with and without vertical WBV, on four different days. Postures adopted while sitting and the simulated WBV exposure corresponded to large mining load haul dump (LHD) vehicles as

Brenda R. Santos; Christian Larivière; Alain Delisle; André Plamondon; Paul-Émile Boileau; Daniel Imbeau

2008-01-01

343

Dependence of the frequency spectrum of small amplitude vibrations superimposed on finite deformations of a nonlinear, cylindrical elastic body on residual stress  

Microsoft Academic Search

We model and analyze the response of nonlinear, residually stressed elastic bodies subjected to small amplitude vibrations superimposed upon large deformations. The problem derives from modeling the use of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging to interrogate atherosclerotic plaques in vivo in large arteries. The goal of this investigation is twofold: (i) introduce a modeling framework for residual stress that unlike traditional

Yuliya Gorb; Jay R. Walton

2010-01-01

344

BODY-ORIENTED THERAPY IN RECOVERY FROM CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE: AN EFFICACY STUDY  

PubMed Central

Context There has been little research on body therapy for women in sexual abuse recovery. This study examines body-oriented therapy—an approach focused on body awareness and involving the combination of bodywork and the emotional processing of psychotherapy. Objective To examine the efficacy and the perceived influence on abuse recovery of body-oriented therapy. Massage therapy served as a relative control condition to address the lack of touch-based comparisons in bodywork research. Design A 2-group, repeated measures design was employed, involving randomization to either body-oriented therapy or massage group, conducted in 8, hour-long sessions by 1 of 4 research clinicians. Statistical and qualitative analysis was employed to provide both empirical and experiential perspectives on the study process. Setting Participants were seen in treatment rooms of a university in the northwestern United States and in clinician’s private offices. Participants Twenty-four adult females in psychotherapy for child sexual abuse. Interventions Body-oriented therapy protocol was delivered in three stages, involving massage, body awareness exercises, and inner-body focusing process. Massage therapy protocol was stan- dardized. Both protocols were delivered over clothes. Main Outcome Measures The outcomes reflected 3 key con-structs—psychological well being, physical well-being, and body connection. Repeated measures included: Brief Symptom Inventory, Dissociative Experiences Scale, Crime-Related Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Scale, Medical Symptoms Checklist, Scale of Body Connection and Scale of Body Investment. Results were gathered at 6 time points: baseline, 2 times during intervention, post-intervention, and at 1 month and 3 months follow-up. To examine the experiential perspective of the study process, written questionnaires were administered before and after intervention and at 1 month and 3 months follow-up. Results Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated significant improvement on all outcome measures for both intervention groups, providing support for the efficacy of body therapy in recovery from childhood sexual abuse. There were no statistically significant differences between groups; however, qualitative analysis of open-ended questions about participant intervention experience revealed that the groups differed on perceived experience of the intervention and its influence on therapeutic recovery.

Price, Cynthia

2007-01-01

345

Methods for calculation of free vibrations of a cylindrical shell with attached rigid body  

Microsoft Academic Search

We consider a mechanical system consisting of a circular cylindrical shell and an absolutely rigid body attached to one of the ends of the shell. Using the principle of possible displacements, we construct a mathematical model for the equilibrium state of the considered system under loads of general form. Using this model, we formulate an eigenvalue boundary-value problem that describes

V. A. Trotsenko; Yu. V. Trotsenko

2004-01-01

346

Biological-based optimization and volumetric modulated arc therapy delivery for stereotactic body radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To describe biological-based optimization and Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation-based treatment planning for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in lung, liver, and prostate patients. Methods: Optimization strategies and VMAT planning parameters using a biological-based optimization MC planning system were analyzed for 24 SBRT patients. Patients received a median dose of 45 Gy [range, 34-54 Gy] for lung tumors in 1-5 fxs and a median dose of 52 Gy [range, 48-60 Gy] for liver tumors in 3-6 fxs. Prostate patients received a fractional dose of 10 Gy in 5 fxs. Biological-cost functions were used for plan optimization, and its dosimetric quality was evaluated using the conformity index (CI), the conformation number (CN), the ratio of the volume receiving 50% of the prescription dose over the planning target volume (Rx/PTV50). The quality and efficiency of the delivery were assessed according to measured quality assurance (QA) passing rates and delivery times. For each disease site, one patient was replanned using physical cost function and compared to the corresponding biological plan. Results: Median CI, CN, and Rx/PTV50 for all 24 patients were 1.13 (1.02-1.28), 0.79 (0.70-0.88), and 5.3 (3.1-10.8), respectively. The median delivery rate for all patients was 410 MU/min with a maximum possible rate of 480 MU/min (85%). Median QA passing rate was 96.7%, and it did not significantly vary with the tumor site. Conclusions: VMAT delivery of SBRT plans optimized using biological-motivated cost-functions result in highly conformal dose distributions. Plans offer shorter treatment-time benefits and provide efficient dose delivery without compromising the plan conformity for tumors in the prostate, lung, and liver, thereby improving patient comfort and clinical throughput. The short delivery times minimize the risk of patient setup and intrafraction motion errors often associated with long SBRT treatment delivery times.

Diot, Quentin; Kavanagh, Brian; Timmerman, Robert; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

2012-01-15

347

Critical Appraisal of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Metastases to Abdominal Lymph Nodes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: A planning study was performed comparing volumetric modulated arcs, RapidArc (RA), fixed beam IMRT (IM), and conformal radiotherapy (CRT) with multiple static fields or short conformal arcs in a series of patients treated with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for solitary or oligo-metastases from different tumors to abdominal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients were included in

Mario Bignardi; Luca Cozzi; Antonella Fogliata; Paola Lattuada; Pietro Mancosu; Piera Navarria; Gaetano Urso; Sabrina Vigorito; Marta Scorsetti

2009-01-01

348

Cognitive-behavioural therapy for body dysmorphic disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

The DSM-IV classification of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) refers to an individual's preoccu- pation with an 'imagined' defect in his or her appearance or markedly excessive concern with a slight physical anomaly (American Psychiatric Association, 1994). An Italian psychiatrist, Morselli, first used the term 'dysmorphophobia' in 1886, although it is now falling into disuse, probably because ICD-10 (World Health Organization,

David Veale

2001-01-01

349

Vibrations of a rigid body with a controlled frictional electromagnetic seismic damper: nonlinear model  

Microsoft Academic Search

A nonlinear mathematical model of a gravitational vibratory system with a controlled electromagnetic seismic damper is developed.\\u000a The dependence of the force of attraction of ferromagnetic bodies by the solenoid of the frictional device on the solenoid\\u000a current is established for a specific solenoid design. The analytic expression for this force is derived by the least-squares\\u000a method using a system

N. P. Plakhtienko; M. I. Mikhailova; A. T. Zabuga

2010-01-01

350

Effective seat-to-head transmissibility in whole-body vibration: Effects of posture and arm position  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seat-to-head transmissibility is a biomechanical measure that has been widely used for many decades to evaluate seat dynamics and human response to vibration. Traditionally, transmissibility has been used to correlate single-input or multiple-input with single-output motion; it has not been effectively used for multiple-input and multiple-output scenarios due to the complexity of dealing with the coupled motions caused by the cross-axis effect. This work presents a novel approach to use transmissibility effectively for single- and multiple-input and multiple-output whole-body vibrations. In this regard, the full transmissibility matrix is transformed into a single graph, such as those for single-input and single-output motions. Singular value decomposition and maximum distortion energy theory were used to achieve the latter goal. Seat-to-head transmissibility matrices for single-input/multiple-output in the fore-aft direction, single-input/multiple-output in the vertical direction, and multiple-input/multiple-output directions are investigated in this work. A total of ten subjects participated in this study. Discrete frequencies of 0.5-16 Hz were used for the fore-aft direction using supported and unsupported back postures. Random ride files from a dozer machine were used for the vertical and multiple-axis scenarios considering two arm postures: using the armrests or grasping the steering wheel. For single-input/multiple-output, the results showed that the proposed method was very effective in showing the frequencies where the transmissibility is mostly sensitive for the two sitting postures and two arm positions. For multiple-input/multiple-output, the results showed that the proposed effective transmissibility indicated higher values for the armrest-supported posture than for the steering-wheel-supported posture.

Rahmatalla, Salam; DeShaw, Jonathan

2011-12-01

351

Menopause, the metabolic syndrome, and mind-body therapies.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease risk rises sharply with menopause, likely due to the coincident increase in insulin resistance and related atherogenic changes that together comprise the metabolic or insulin resistance syndrome, a cluster of metabolic and hemodynamic abnormalities strongly implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular disease. A growing body of research suggests that traditional mind-body practices such as yoga, tai chi, and qigong may offer safe and cost-effective strategies for reducing insulin resistance syndrome-related risk factors for cardiovascular disease in older populations, including postmenopausal women. Current evidence suggests that these practices may reduce insulin resistance and related physiological risk factors for cardiovascular disease; improve mood, well-being, and sleep; decrease sympathetic activation; and enhance cardiovagal function. However, additional rigorous studies are needed to confirm existing findings and to examine long-term effects on cardiovascular health. PMID:18779682

Innes, Kim E; Selfe, Terry Kit; Taylor, Ann Gill

352

Acute effects of whole body vibration on directionality and reaction time latency of trunk muscles: the importance of rest and implications for spine stability.  

PubMed

Workplace exposure to whole body vibration (WBV) has been identified as one of the major physical risk factors encountered by the population. There are indications that, subsequent to a perturbation, impaired reflex response could allow for destabilization of the spine, possibly leading to injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate if WBV alters reflex response of trunk muscles and if the direction of perturbation (flexion or extension or lateral) and delay between exposure and perturbation influences the response. The results indicate that EMG latency was increased more in the vibration condition than in sitting without vibration. Significant effects with respect to directionality were observed in Erector Spinae muscles. The EMG latency reduced from the effect of perturbation after a 20s rest period. Even though the EMG latency did not fully return to its Pre-test state, the present results still show that recovery from the acute effects of WBV is possible with a rest period. PMID:23218963

Arora, Neha; Grenier, Sylvain G

2012-12-05

353

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: a review of its efficacy  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to review the efficacy of different methods of cognitive and/or behavioral therapies used to treat body dysmorphic disorder. We evaluated all case series, open studies, controlled trials, and meta-analyses of cognitive and/or behavioral treatment approaches to body dysmorphic disorder published up to July 2012, identified through a search in the PubMed/Medline, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Scopus databases. Our findings indicate that individual and group cognitive behavioral therapies are superior to waiting list for the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder. While the efficacy of cognitive therapy is supported by one controlled trial, utility of behavioral therapy is suggested by one open study and one controlled relapse prevention follow-up study. There is a pressing need to conduct head-to-head studies, with appropriate, active, control treatment groups, in order to examine further the efficacy of cognitive and/or behavioral therapies for body dysmorphic disorder.

Prazeres, Angelica M; Nascimento, Antonio L; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

2013-01-01

354

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: a review of its efficacy.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to review the efficacy of different methods of cognitive and/or behavioral therapies used to treat body dysmorphic disorder. We evaluated all case series, open studies, controlled trials, and meta-analyses of cognitive and/or behavioral treatment approaches to body dysmorphic disorder published up to July 2012, identified through a search in the PubMed/Medline, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Scopus databases. Our findings indicate that individual and group cognitive behavioral therapies are superior to waiting list for the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder. While the efficacy of cognitive therapy is supported by one controlled trial, utility of behavioral therapy is suggested by one open study and one controlled relapse prevention follow-up study. There is a pressing need to conduct head-to-head studies, with appropriate, active, control treatment groups, in order to examine further the efficacy of cognitive and/or behavioral therapies for body dysmorphic disorder. PMID:23467711

Prazeres, Angélica M; Nascimento, Antônio L; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

2013-02-28

355

Occupational exposure to whole-body vibration and Parkinson's disease: results from a population-based case-control study.  

PubMed

Mechanical stress producing head injury is associated with Parkinson's disease, suggesting that relations with other physical hazards such as whole-body vibration (WBV) should be tested. In this study, the authors evaluated the relation between occupational exposure to WBV and Parkinson's disease. A population-based case-control study with 403 cases and 405 controls was conducted in British Columbia, Canada, between 2001 and 2008. From detailed occupational histories and published measurements, metrics of occupational WBV exposure were constructed and tested for associations with Parkinson's disease using logistic regression and adjusting for age and sex first, and then also for smoking and history of head injury. While ever being occupationally exposed to WBV was inversely associated with Parkinson's disease (odds ratio = 0.67, 95% confidence interval: 0.48, 0.94), higher intensities had consistently elevated odds ratios, with a statistically significant effect being noted for intermediate intensities when exposures were restricted to the 10 years or more prior to diagnosis. Possible mechanisms of an inverse relation between low levels of WBV exposure and Parkinson's disease could include direct protective effects or correlation with other protective effects such as exercise. Higher intensities of WBV could result in micro-injury, leading to vascular or inflammatory pathology in susceptible neurons. PMID:22798480

Harris, M Anne; Marion, Stephen A; Spinelli, John J; Tsui, Joseph K C; Teschke, Kay

2012-07-12

356

Wavelet analysis of lumbar muscle oxygenation signals during whole-body vibration: implications for the development of localized muscle fatigue.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to assess the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on lumbar muscle oxygenation oscillations in healthy men based on the wavelet transform of near-infrared spectroscopy signals. Twelve healthy participants were exposed to WBV at frequencies of 3, 4.5 and 6 Hz while muscle oxygenation signal was monitored before, during and recovery from WBV. With spectral analysis based on wavelet transform of NIR signal, six frequency intervals were identified (I, 0.005-0.0095 Hz; II, 0.0095-0.02 Hz; III, 0.02-0.06 Hz; IV, 0.06-0.16 Hz; V, 0.16-0.40 Hz and VI, 0.40-2.0 Hz). It was found that the muscle oxygenation oscillations at 4.5 Hz in the frequency intervals I, II and III was lower during WBV compared with that of at 3 Hz. Present results demonstrated WBV at 4.5 Hz induced lower oscillatory activities than that of at 3 Hz. The lower oscillatory activities might indicate a decrease in the efficiency of oxygen supply to the oxygenated tissue and such mechanism might contribute to the development of local muscle fatigue. PMID:22210560

Li, Zengyong; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Guoqiang; Luo, Site; Liu, Feifei; Li, Jianping

2012-01-01

357

Whole-body vibration training increases muscle strength and mass in older women: a randomized-controlled trial.  

PubMed

To determine whether 10 weeks of whole-body vibration (WBV) training has a significant effect on strength, muscle mass, muscle power, and mobility in older women, 26 subjects were randomly assigned to a WBV training group (n=13; mean age 79 years) and a control (CON) group (n=13; mean age 76 years). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) increased 38.8% in the WBV group, without changes in the CON group. Electromyographic activity of the vastus medialis (VM), the vastus lateralis, and the biceps femoris (BF) did not change in either group. Thigh muscle cross-sectional area increased significantly after training in VM (8.7%) and BF (15.5%). Muscle power at 20%, 40%, and 60% MVIC decreased from pre-test to post-test in the CON group; however, WBV training prevented the decrease in the WBV group. Consequently, mobility, measured by the Timed Up and Go test, increased significantly after training (9.0%) only in the WBV group. Ten weeks of lower limb WBV training in older women produces a significant increase in muscle strength induced by thigh muscle hypertrophy, with no change in muscle power. The adaptations to WBV found in the present study may be of use in counteracting the loss of muscle strength and mobility associated with age-induced sarcopenia. PMID:19422657

Machado, A; García-López, D; González-Gallego, J; Garatachea, N

2009-04-20

358

Low-magnitude whole-body vibration does not enhance the anabolic skeletal effects of intermittent PTH in adult mice.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a low-magnitude mechanical stimulus that may be anabolic for bone, yet we recently found that WBV did not improve bone properties in adult mice. Because intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) enhances the anabolic effects of high-magnitude skeletal loading, we sought to determine the skeletal effects of WBV in combination with PTH. Seven-month-old male BALB/c mice were assigned to six groups (n = 13-14/group) based on magnitude of applied acceleration (0 or 0.3 G) and PTH dose (0, 10, or 40 µg/kg/day). Mice were exposed to WBV (0.3 G, 90 Hz, sine wave) or sham loading (0 G) for 15 min/day, 5 days/week for 8 weeks. Vehicle or hPTH (1-34) was administered prior to each WBV session. Whole-body bone mineral content increased by ~ 5% from 0 to 8 weeks in the 40 µg/kg PTH group only, independent of WBV loading. Similarly, PTH treatment increased tibial cortical bone volume by ~5% from 0 to 8 weeks, independent of WBV loading. Neither PTH nor WBV stimulated trabecular bone formation. Consistent with the cortical bone effect, tibias from the 40 µg/kg PTH group had significantly greater ultimate force and energy to failure than tibias in the 0 and 10 µg/kg PTH groups, independent of WBV treatment. In summary, 8 weeks of intermittent PTH treatment increased cortical bone volume and strength in adult male BALB/c mice. Daily exposure to low-magnitude WBV by itself did not improve skeletal properties and did not enhance the PTH effect. No WBV-PTH synergy was found in this preclinical study. PMID:21337386

Lynch, Michelle A; Brodt, Michael D; Stephens, Abby L; Civitelli, Roberto; Silva, Matthew J

2010-11-08

359

Frame-Based Immobilization and Targeting for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Frame-based stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), such as that conducted with Elekta’s Stereotactic Body Frame, can provide an extra measure of precision in the delivery of radiation to extracranial targets, and facilitates secure patient immobilization. In this paper, we review the steps involved in optimal use of an extra-cranial immobilization device for SBRT treatments. Our approach to using frame-based SBRT

Bryan C.. Murray; Kenneth Forster; Robert Timmerman

2007-01-01

360

Changes in body composition during post-menopausal hormone therapy: a 2 year prospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Post-menopausal hormone therapy (pHT) induces changes in both body composition and bone mineral density (BMD). METHODS: In 109 post-menopausal women beginning either tibolone 2.5 mg (n = 29), tibo- lone 1.25 mg (n = 42) or estradiol 2 mg plus norethisterone acetate 1 mg (E2 + NETA) (n = 38), we assessed body composition, total and regional BMD by

A. Arabi; P. Garnero; R. Porcher; C. Pelissier; C. L. Benhamou; C. Roux

2003-01-01

361

The Effect of One-To-One Music Therapy On Attitudes, Behaviors, and Body Image Dissatisfaction for University Students with Body Image Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Body image, body dissatisfaction, and eating disorders are issues for which more and more people are seeking treatment. Children and adults alike are experiencing these problems in our society, and there are many aspects to body image problems and disordered eating that merit assistance. Research shows that recovery from eating disorders is possible with a variety of interventions, including therapy,

Rachel N. Dinkel

2010-01-01

362

Phase I feasibility trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy for primary hepatocellular carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is increasing in incidence and the majority of patients are not candidates for radical therapies.\\u000a Therefore, interest in minimally invasive therapies in growing.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A Phase I dose escalation trial was conducted at Indiana University to determine the feasibility and toxicity of stereotactic\\u000a body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary HCC. Eligible patients had Child-Turcotte-Pugh’s Class (CTP) A or

Higinia R. Cárdenes; Tracy R. Price; Susan M. Perkins; Mary Maluccio; P. Kwo; T. E. Breen; Mark A. Henderson; Tracey E. Schefter; Kathy Tudor; Jill Deluca; Peter A. S. Johnstone

2010-01-01

363

A Comparison of Weight Control and Weight Control Plus Body Image Therapy for Obese Men and Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Participants were 65 obese men and women who were randomly assigned to either weight control or weight control plus cognitive–behavioral body image therapy. Both conditions showed clinically significant improvements in body image at posttreatment and 1-year follow-up. Adding body image therapy to weight control did not result in greater psychological improvements and did not result in better maintenance of body

Elena M. Ramirez; James C. Rosen

2001-01-01

364

An updated review of epidemiologic studies on the relationship between exposure to whole-body vibration and low back pain (1986–1997)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study is to update the information on the epidemiologic evidence of the adverse health effects of whole-body\\u000a vibration (WBV) on the spinal system by means of a review of the epidemiologic studies published between 1986 and 1997. In\\u000a a systematic search, using several databases, of epidemiologic studies of low back pain (LBP) disorders and occupations with

M. Bovenzi; C. T. J. Hulshof

1999-01-01

365

Long-term sick leave and disability pensioning due to back disorders of tractor drivers exposed to whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary In a historical 11-year follow-up study, disability pensioning and the incidence of the first sick leave of 4 weeks or longer due to back disorders has been investigated in a group of drivers exposed to whole-body vibration (WBV), mainly of agricultural tractors. The reference group comprised workers not or only slightly exposed to WBV from the same and another

Hendriek C. Boshuizen; Carel T. J. Hulshof; Paulien M. Bongers

1990-01-01

366

Short-term effects of whole-body vibration on maximal voluntary isometric knee extensor force and rate of force rise  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Whole-Body vibration (WBV) may lead to muscle contractions via reflex activation of the primary muscle spindle (Ia) fibres.\\u000a WBV has been reported to increase muscle power in the short term by improved muscle activation. The present study set out\\u000a to investigate the acute effects of a standard WBV training session on voluntary activation during maximal isometric force\\u000a production (MVC)

C. J. de Ruiter; R. M. van der Linden; M. J. A. van der Zijden; A. P. Hollander; A. de Haan

2003-01-01

367

Studies of combined effects of sinusoidal whole body vibrations and noise of varying bandwidths and intensities on TTS 2 in men  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study analyses the data from three laboratory experiments concerning the separate and combined effects on temporary threshold shifts in hearing (TTS2) of sinusoidal low-frequency (5 Hz — 2.12 m\\/s2 and 10 Hz —2.65 m\\/s2), whole body vibration (along the Z-axis), and continuous (white) noise with eight different bandwidths and intensity levels of 85 dB(A), 90 dB(A) and 98 dB(A).

Olavi Manninen

1983-01-01

368

Impact of Whole-Body Vibration Training Versus Fitness Training on Muscle Strength and Muscle Mass in Older Men: A 1Year Randomized Controlled Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. This randomized controlled study investigated the effects of 1-year whole-body vibration (WBV) training on isometric and explosive muscle strength and muscle mass in community-dwelling men older than 60 years. Methods. Muscle characteristics of the WBV group (n ¼31, 67.3 6 0.7 years) were compared with those of a fitness (FIT) group (n ¼ 30, 67.4 6 0.8 years) and

An Bogaerts; Christophe Delecluse; Albrecht L. Claessens; Walter Coudyzer; Steven Boonen; Sabine M. P. Verschueren

2007-01-01

369

Integrated adaptive feed-forward control of atmospheric turbulence excited rigid body motions and structural vibrations on a large transport aircraft  

Microsoft Academic Search

An adaptive feed-forward controller for simultaneous compensation of atmospheric turbulence excited rigid body motions and structural vibrations is designed. Proposed feed-forward control is intended as an add-on to current gust load alleviation systems. The objectives thereby are increased passenger comfort and handling qualities, as well as a more efficient reduction of dynamic wing loads. A steepest descent algorithm is applied

Andreas Wildschek; Rudolf Maier

2008-01-01

370

Deconstructing the Mirror's Reflection: Narrative Therapy Groups for Women Dissatisfied with Their Body  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Women facing middle age and beyond are pressured by a cultural ideal of slimness. The authors review literature pertaining to the factors affecting the societal perceptions of body image and address relevant counseling interventions, specifically, group therapy based on narrative theory, that are aimed at this population.|

Duba, Jill D.; Kindsvatter, Aaron; Priddy, Constance J.

2010-01-01

371

Adult Polyglucosan Body Disease (APBD): Anaplerotic diet therapy (Triheptanoin) and demonstration of defective methylation pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

APBD is a rare disorder most often affecting adults of Ashkenazi Jewish origin due to partial deficiency of the glycogen brancher enzyme (GBE). It is characterized by progressive involvement of both the central and peripheral nervous systems and deposition of amylopectin-like polyglucosan bodies. There have been no metabolic derangements that might suggest effective therapy nor have there been any clinical

Charles R. Roe; Teodoro Bottiglieri; Mary Wallace; Erland Arning; Alan Martin

2010-01-01

372

The Use of Gated and 4D CT Imaging in Planning for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The localization of treatment targets is of utmost importance for patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), where the dose per fraction is large. While both setup or respiration-induced motion components affect the localization of the treatment volume, the purpose of this work is to describe our management of the intrafraction localization uncertainty induced by normal respiration. At our institution,

Warren D. D’Souza; Daryl P. Nazareth; Bin Zhang; Chad Deyoung; Mohan Suntharalingam; Young Kwok; Cedric X. Yu; William F. Regine

2007-01-01

373

Lung Cancer: A Model for Implementing Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy into Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Primary and metastatic tumors to the lung have been principle targets for the noninvasive high-doseper- fraction treatment programs now officially called stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Highly focused treatment delivery to moving lung targets requires accurate assessment of tumor position throughout the respiratory cycle. Measures to account for this motion, either by tracking (chasing), gating, or inhibition (breath hold and

R. Timmerman; R. Abdulrahman; B. D. Kavanagh; J. L. Meyer

2007-01-01

374

Statistical analysis of target motion in gated lung stereotactic body radiation therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

An external surrogate-based respiratory gating technique is a useful method to reduce target margins for the treatment of a moving lung tumor. The success of this technique relies on a good correlation between the motion of the external markers and the internal tumor as well as the repeatability of the respiratory motion. In gated lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT),

Bo Zhao; Yong Yang; Tianfang Li; Xiang Li; Dwight E. Heron; M. Saiful Huq

2011-01-01

375

Quality of Life After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Primary and Metastatic Liver Tumors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a high local control rate for primary and metastatic liver tumors. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of this treatment on the patient's quality of life. This is the first report of quality of life associated with liver SBRT. Methods and Materials: From October 2002 to March 2007, a

Alejandra Méndez Romero; Wouter Wunderink; Rob M. van Os; Peter J. C. M. Nowak; Ben J. M. Heijmen; Joost J. Nuyttens; Rene P. Brandwijk; Cornelis Verhoef; Jan N. M. IJzermans; Peter C. Levendag

2008-01-01

376

The impact of respiratory motion and treatment technique on stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), which delivers a much higher fractional dose than conventional treatment in only a few fractions, is an effective treatment for liver metastases. For patients who are treated under free-breathing conditions, however, respiration-induced tumor motion in the liver is a concern. Limited clinical information is available related to the impact of tumor motion and treatment technique

Q. Jackie Wu; Danthai Thongphiew; Zhiheng Wang; Vira Chankong; Fang-Fang Yin

2008-01-01

377

A phase I trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver metastases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver metastases. Methods and Materials: A multicenter Phase I clinical trial was conducted. Eligible patients had one to three liver metastases, tumor diameter <6 cm, and adequate liver function. The first cohort received 36 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in three fractions (F).

Tracey E.. Schefter; Brian D. Kavanagh; Robert D. Timmerman; Higinia R. Cardenes; Anna Baron; Laurie E. Gaspar

2005-01-01

378

[The effect of whole-body vibration on the electrical activity and oxidative metabolism in different brain structures].  

PubMed

Chronic experiments on rabbits were performed to study the bioelectric activity, oxygen consumption and succinate dehydrogenase (DG) activity in different parts of the cortex and subcortex (mesencephalic reticular formation, lateral vestibular nucleus, thalamus posteroventrolateral nucleus), as well as the compound electric activity of the neck muscles, and rythm adoption. The phase character and different vibration sensitivity of the brain structures depending on the duration of vibration were revealed. At the initial phase, the following vibration effects were examined: reaction of activation on encephalogram, growing EMG and DG activity, increased oxygen consumption, and rythm adoption high frequency shifting. Prolonged vibration caused a vivid violation of the intracentral correlation between the cortex and subcortex. Correlation was also identified between electric activity and the brain structures' oxidation metabolism against the vibration dynamics levels. PMID:2628219

Minasian, S M; Baklavadzhian, O G; Saakian, S G

1989-01-01

379

Understanding the role of vibrations, exact exchange, and many-body van der Waals interactions in the cohesive properties of molecular crystals.  

PubMed

The development and application of computational methods for studying molecular crystals, particularly density-functional theory (DFT), is a large and ever-growing field, driven by their numerous applications. Here we expand on our recent study of the importance of many-body van der Waals interactions in molecular crystals [A. M. Reilly and A. Tkatchenko, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 1028 (2013)], with a larger database of 23 molecular crystals. Particular attention has been paid to the role of the vibrational contributions that are required to compare experiment sublimation enthalpies with calculated lattice energies, employing both phonon calculations and experimental heat-capacity data to provide harmonic and anharmonic estimates of the vibrational contributions. Exact exchange, which is rarely considered in DFT studies of molecular crystals, is shown to have a significant contribution to lattice energies, systematically improving agreement between theory and experiment. When the vibrational and exact-exchange contributions are coupled with a many-body approach to dispersion, DFT yields a mean absolute error (3.92 kJ/mol) within the coveted "chemical accuracy" target (4.2 kJ/mol). The role of many-body dispersion for structures has also been investigated for a subset of the database, showing good performance compared to X-ray and neutron diffraction crystal structures. The results show that the approach employed here can reach the demanding accuracy of crystal-structure prediction and organic material design with minimal empiricism. PMID:23862957

Reilly, Anthony M; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

2013-07-14

380

Effects of combining whole-body vibration with exercise on the consequences of detraining on muscle performance in untrained adults.  

PubMed

This study investigated whether whole-body vibration (WBV) coupled with low-velocity exercise (EX) for 13 weeks retains muscle performance gains after 5 weeks of subsequent detraining compared with the results of an identical EX program without WBV. Thirty-two untrained healthy adults (22-49 years of age) were randomly assigned to groups that performed EX with or without WBV (EX-WBV and EX, respectively; n = 16 per group). The following outcome variables were evaluated: countermovement jump height; maximal isometric, concentric, and eccentric knee extension strengths; local muscular endurance; and lumbar extension torque before, during, and after the 13-week training period, and after 5 weeks of detraining. Compared with the EX group, significantly higher increases in countermovement jump height and isometric and concentric knee extension strengths were detected in the EX-WBV group after the 13-week training period. However, detraining caused significant declines in these 3 muscle performance tests only in the EX-WBV group (-4.8, -10.2, and -17.2%, respectively), resulting in no significant differences between the test and control groups after the detraining period. After detraining, all examined variables showed significantly better performance compared with pretraining (p < 0.05) and did not significantly differ from midtraining (7 weeks) in both groups (p > 0.05). These results suggest that muscle strength in the lower extremities, particularly isometric and concentric contractions, and muscle power might be more susceptible to short-term detraining effects when exercise is combined with WBV. Thus, it is necessary to perform regular exercise to maximize the benefits of WBV on muscle strength and power during the early stages of training in previously untrained individuals. PMID:22739330

Osawa, Yusuke; Oguma, Yuko

2013-04-01

381

The Fate of Mrs Robinson: Criteria for Recognition of Whole-Body Vibration Injury as AN Occupational Disease  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several recently published critical reviews conclude that there is strong epidemiological evidence for a relationship between occupational exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV), low back pain (LBP) and back disorders. Whether this exposure is only a modest or a substantial risk factor for the onset and recurrence of LBP is still a matter of debate. In spite of this controversy, four European Union countries have decided to recognize and compensate LBP and certain spinal disorders as an occupational disease. In this paper, we review the criteria currently in use for the recognition of this occupational disease. A search of the literature was performed; additional information was obtained in work visits to national occupational disease institutes in Germany, France and Belgium, in annual reports and national statistics on occupational diseases. Belgium was the first country to add WBV injury to the official list of occupational diseases (1978), followed by Germany (1993), the Netherlands (1997), and France (1999). The incidence of newly recognized cases in 1999 varied considerably: 763 in Belgium, 269 in France, 16 in Germany, and 10 reported cases in the Netherlands. The findings of this review indicate that significant differences exist in the established and applied diagnostic and exposure criteria in the four EU countries. This is illustrated by the case of Mrs Robinson, a 41-year-old forklift driver with LBP, who would probably get recognition and compensation in the Netherlands and Belgium but would be rejected in France and Germany. The development of uniform internationally accepted criteria is recommended, also from an epidemiological point of view, as many data are collected in the process of recognition of this occupational disease. . All rights reserved.

Hulshof, C. T. J.; van der Laan, G.; Braam, I. T. J.; Verbeek, J. H. A. M.

2002-05-01

382

Efficacy and feasibility of a combination of body awareness therapy and qigong in patients with fibromyalgia: a pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate the effects of body awareness therapy combined with qigong for patients with fibromyalgia. Design: A controlled randomized pilot study. Subjects: Thirty-six female patients with fibromyalgia were randomized to either qigong plus body awareness therapy (n = 19) or a control group (n = 17). Methods: The programme was conducted once a week over a period of 3

Kaisa Mannerkorpi; Maudh Arndorw

2004-01-01

383

Control Group Design: Enhancing Rigor in Research of Mind-Body Therapies for Depression  

PubMed Central

Although a growing body of research suggests that mind-body therapies may be appropriate to integrate into the treatment of depression, studies consistently lack methodological sophistication particularly in the area of control groups. In order to better understand the relationship between control group selection and methodological rigor, we provide a brief review of the literature on control group design in yoga and tai chi studies for depression, and we discuss challenges we have faced in the design of control groups for our recent clinical trials of these mind-body complementary therapies for women with depression. To address the multiple challenges of research about mind-body therapies, we suggest that researchers should consider 4 key questions: whether the study design matches the research question; whether the control group addresses performance, expectation, and detection bias; whether the control group is ethical, feasible, and attractive; and whether the control group is designed to adequately control for nonspecific intervention effects. Based on these questions, we provide specific recommendations about control group design with the goal of minimizing bias and maximizing validity in future research.

Kinser, Patricia Anne; Robins, Jo Lynne

2013-01-01

384

Low-volume whole-body vibration lasting 3 or 6 months does not affect biomarkers in blood serum of rats.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration training (WBV) has been reported to improve both, bone strength and neuromuscular performance. Although changes in hormonal and immunological parameters following vibration exercises were reported, there are still few studies concerning the immune response with respect to different duration of WBV. In our study, we aimed to establish whether three and six months of specific, short-lasting WBV (four bouts lasting 30 s, 1 min rest intervals) influences blood cell counts as well as some immunological parameters in rats. Adult male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to two groups trained for three (WBV3mo) or six (WBV6mo) months and results were compared to the age matched control group (C). After the training period, red and white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, granulocytes, hemoglobin, and hematocrit, as well as interleukin-1b, interleukin-10, interleukin-6, and vascular endothelial growth factor levels were determined. No significant differences between WBV3mo, WBV6mo, and C groups in complete blood counts or in immunological parameters were found, indicating that the whole-body vibration training used in this study did not disturb the balance of examined indices, directly or indirectly involved in inflammatory processes. PMID:23232704

Pawlak, Matthias; Kaczmarek, D; Nowak, A; Krutki, P

2013-03-01

385

Cognitive-Behavioral Body-Image Therapy: Extended Evidence of the Efficacy of a Self-Directed Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scientific investigations support the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in the treatment of body dissatisfaction across a range of populations. Grant and Cash (1995) used CBT with 23 extremely body-dissatisfied women and found equivalent and successful outcomes for body-image CBT administered in group therapy versus a self-directed format with only modest therapist contact. The present study compared Grant and Cash's

Thomas F. Cash; Danielle M. Lavallee

1997-01-01

386

Stereotactic body radiation therapy: The report of AAPM Task Group 101  

SciTech Connect

Task Group 101 of the AAPM has prepared this report for medical physicists, clinicians, and therapists in order to outline the best practice guidelines for the external-beam radiation therapy technique referred to as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The task group report includes a review of the literature to identify reported clinical findings and expected outcomes for this treatment modality. Information is provided for establishing a SBRT program, including protocols, equipment, resources, and QA procedures. Additionally, suggestions for developing consistent documentation for prescribing, reporting, and recording SBRT treatment delivery is provided.

Benedict, Stanley H.; Yenice, Kamil M.; Followill, David [University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); and others

2010-08-15

387

Oligometastatic breast cancer treated with curative-intent stereotactic body radiation therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose Prospective pilot study to assess patient outcome after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for limited metastases\\u000a from breast cancer. Methods Forty patients with ?5 metastatic lesions received curative-intent SBRT, while 11 patients with >5 lesions, undergoing SBRT\\u000a to ?5 metastatic lesions, were treated with palliative-intent. Results Among those treated with curative-intent, 4-year actuarial outcomes were: overall survival of 59%,

Michael T. Milano; Hong Zhang; Su K. Metcalfe; Ann G. Muhs; Paul Okunieff

2009-01-01

388

Curative-intent stereotactic body radiation therapy for residual breast cancer liver metastasis after systemic chemotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Liver metastases from breast cancer are generally treated with systemic therapy such as chemotherapy or hormonotherapy. However,\\u000a local treatment options such as resection, radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and radiotherapy can also be considered to treat\\u000a oligometastases. We report the case of a 45-year-old female treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) after chemotherapy\\u000a against a solitary liver metastasis from primary breast cancer.

Naofumi KagaraYoshiaki; Yoshiaki Nakano; Ami Watanabe; Junichi Inatome; Hidetoshi Nakamura; Chiwan Kim; Katsuki Danno; Hirokazu Taniguchi; Toshiyuki Kanoh; Yutaka Kimura; Tadashi Ohnishi; Takeshi Tono; Takushi Monden; Shingi Imaoka; Kazufumi Kagawa

389

Incorporating Patient Breathing Variability into a Stochastic Model of Dose Deposition for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypo-fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) employs precisely-conforming high-level radiation dose delivery\\u000a to improve tumor control probabilities and sparing of healthy tissue. However, the delivery precision and conformity of SBRT\\u000a renders dose accumulation particularly susceptible to organ motion, and respiratory-induced motion in the abdomen may result\\u000a in significant displacement of lesion targets during the breathing cycle. Given the maturity of

Sarah E. Geneser; Robert M. Kirby; Brian Wang; Bill Salter; Sarang C. Joshi

2009-01-01

390

Effects of hormone replacement therapy and social stress on body fat distribution in surgically postmenopausal monkeys  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and social stress on body fat distribution in an animal model of women’s health, the female cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).DESIGN\\/SUBJECTS: Adult female cynomolgus monkeys were ovariectomized and fed an atherogenic diet for two years while housed in social groups of 3–8 monkeys each. Animals were then fed a lipid-lowering diet

JM Wallace; CA Shively; TB Clarkson

1999-01-01

391

Developing, Maintaining, and Using a Body of Knowledge for the Massage Therapy Profession  

PubMed Central

Background: The diverse field of massage therapy has lacked a formal body of knowledge to serve as a practice and educational foundation and to guide future development. This deficit has hampered the growth of the profession and its acceptance and recognition by the medical and allied health care community. Purpose: To provide massage therapists, bodyworkers, physicians, educators, and associated allied health care professionals in the United States with a description of the purpose and development of the massage therapy body of knowledge (MTBOK) and recommendations for its future development and utilization. Methods: Professional groups in the massage therapy community came together and established a task force to develop a body of knowledge for the profession. Five groups became the stewards for this effort. A nationwide search produced a task force of eight volunteers from diverse areas of the profession charged with the responsibility of researching and developing the MTBOK document. Review of documents, curricula, state laws and regulations, certification exam content, interviews, and public comment resulted in the development of the MTBOK. During development multiple opportunities for comment and discussion by stakeholders (public) were provided in an effort to create a professional consensus. Results: The resulting MTBOK document establishes professional descriptions of the field; scope of practice; knowledge, skills, and abilities for entry-level massage therapists; and definitions for terminology to insure standardization, in order to provide a foundation for future discussion and growth. Conclusions: The MTBOK fulfills the goal for which it was developed, to serve as a foundation for the growth and development of the massage therapy profession as a whole. A living document, it should continue to evolve and grow with the profession. Maintenance and continued stewardship of this document by the massage therapy community is vital for continued professional progress.

Sefton, JoEllen M.; Shea, Michael; Hines, Chip

2011-01-01

392

Bony metastases: assessing response to therapy with whole-body diffusion MRI  

PubMed Central

Abstract There are no universally accepted methods for assessing tumour response in skeletal sites with metastatic disease; response is assessed by a combination of imaging tests, serum and urine biochemical markers and symptoms assessments. Whole-body diffusion magnetic resonance imaging excels at bone marrow assessments at diagnosis and for therapy evaluations. It can potentially address unmet clinical and pharmaceutical needs for a reliable measure of tumour response. Signal intensity on high b-value images and apparent diffusion coefficient values can be related to underlying biophysical properties of skeletal metastases. Four patterns of change in response to therapy are described this review. Therapy response criteria need to be tested in prospective clinical studies that incorporate conventional measures of patient benefit.

Gogbashian, A.

2011-01-01

393

Whole-body dosimetry for targeted radionuclide therapy using spectral analysis.  

PubMed

The whole-body dose (WBD) is routinely calculated for targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT). The aim of this work was to investigate the feasibility of using spectral analysis (SA) for the automatic delineation of decay phases, and consequently, the calculation of the WBD given a whole-body (WB) time-activity curve (TAC). SA characterizes the TAC as an arbitrary sum of exponential functions determined by fitting the data with a non-negative least-squares (NNLS) algorithm. The cumulated activity (CA) is calculated analytically as the integral of the fitted curve while the number of phases describing the kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical and the half-lives of the phases can be determined from the spectrum. The uncertainty associated with the estimation of the WBD can be obtained using bootstrap techniques. SA was applied to WB TACs from (186)Re-HEDP and (131)I-mIBG therapies. The results were compared to results obtained using a semiempirical method and showed good agreement in the calculated WBDs. Bootstrapping with resampling on a subset of patients from the two therapies showed much larger coefficient-ofvariation (CV) for the (186)Re-HEDP TACs than for the (131)I-mIBG therapies. We concluded that SA provides a fast, accurate, and reproducible method to obtain WBDs and accurate estimates of the parameters describing the radiotracer kinetics. The method could be extended to other dosimetric applications. PMID:15778583

Divoli, Antigoni; Spinelli, Antonello; Chittenden, Sarah; Dearnaley, David; Flux, Glenn

2005-02-01

394

Whole-body vibration attenuates the increase in leg arterial stiffness and aortic systolic blood pressure during post-exercise muscle ischemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exercise with whole-body vibration (WBV) decreases brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), a marker of systemic arterial\\u000a stiffness. To examine the effect of WBV on arterial responses, 12 young men underwent three experimental trials: (1) no-exercise\\u000a control (CON), (2) static squat with WBV, and (3) static squat without WBV (no-WBV). Bilateral baPWV and femoral-ankle PWV\\u000a (faPWV), carotid-femoral PWV (cfPWV), augmentation index

Arturo Figueroa; Ryan Gil; Marcos A. Sanchez-Gonzalez

2011-01-01

395

Effects of whole body vibration on bone mineral density and falls: results of the randomized controlled ELVIS study with postmenopausal women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  We determined whether the effect of exercise on bone mineral density (BMD) and falls can be enhanced by whole body vibration\\u000a (WBV). In summary, the multi-purpose exercise training was effective to increase lumbar BMD but added WBV did not enhance\\u000a this effect. However, falls were lowest in the exercise program combined with WBV.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Introduction  WBV is a new approach to reduce

S. von Stengel; W. Kemmler; K. Engelke; W. A. Kalender

2011-01-01

396

Metrics of whole-body vibration and exposure–response relationship for low back pain in professional drivers: a prospective cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between alternative measures of exposure to whole-body vibration\\u000a (WBV) and low back pain (LBP) in professional drivers.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The incidence of 12-month LBP, high pain intensity (numerical rating scale score > 5), and disability in the lower back (Roland\\u000a and Morris disability scale score ? 12) was investigated in a cohort of 537 drivers over

Massimo Bovenzi

2009-01-01

397

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Patients With Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Thoracic Radiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides excellent local control with acceptable toxicity for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. However, the efficacy and safety of SBRT for patients previously given thoracic radiation therapy is not known. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed outcomes after SBRT for recurrent disease among patients previously given radiation therapy to the chest. Materials and Methods: A search of medical records for patients treated with SBRT to the thorax after prior fractionated radiation therapy to the chest at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center revealed 36 such cases. The median follow-up time after SBRT was 15 months. The endpoints analyzed were overall survival, local control, and the incidence and severity of treatment-related toxicity. Results: SBRT provided in-field local control for 92% of patients; at 2 years, the actuarial overall survival rate was 59%, and the actuarial progression-free survival rate was 26%, with the primary site of failure being intrathoracic relapse. Fifty percent of patients experienced worsening of dyspnea after SBRT, with 19% requiring oxygen supplementation; 30% of patients experienced chest wall pain and 8% Grade 3 esophagitis. No Grade 4 or 5 toxic effects were noted. Conclusions: SBRT can provide excellent in-field tumor control in patients who have received prior radiation therapy. Toxicity was significant but manageable. The high rate of intrathoracic failure indicates the need for further study to identify patients who would derive the most benefit from SBRT for this purpose.

Kelly, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Balter, Peter A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rebueno, Neal; Sharp, Hadley J.; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2010-12-01

398

Long-term effect of stereotactic body radiation therapy for primary hepatocellular carcinoma ineligible for local ablation therapy or surgical resection. Stereotactic radiotherapy for liver cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: We evaluated the long-term effect of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) ineligible for local therapy or surgery. METHODS: Forty-two HCC patients with tumors ? 100 cc and ineligible for local ablation therapy or surgical resection were treated with SBRT: 30-39 Gy with a prescription isodose range of 70-85% (median 80%) was delivered daily

Jung Hyun Kwon; Si Hyun Bae; Ji Yoon Kim; Byung Ock Choi; Hong Seok Jang; Jeong Won Jang; Jong Young Choi; Seung Kew Yoon; Kyu Won Chung

2010-01-01

399

Whole-body vibration experienced by haulage truck operators in surface mining operations: a comparison of various analysis methods utilized in the prediction of health risks.  

PubMed

Whole body vibration (WBV) was measured on eight surface haulage trucks in three size classes (35, 100, 150ton haul capacities). Vibration was measured at the seat/operator interface in accordance with the ISO 2631-1 standard during 1h of normal operation. Highest acceleration readings were observed in the z-axis (vertical). Estimated equivalent daily exposure values in the range of 0.44-0.82 ms(-2) were observed using the frequency-weighted r.m.s method and 8.7-16.4ms(-1.75) using the vibration dose value method. Assessment was carried out using ISO 2631-1 and 2631-5. Operators of surface haulage trucks are regularly exposed to WBV levels that exceed safety limits as dictated by the ISO 2631-1 standard. However, according to ISO 2631-5 the probability of an adverse health effect remains low. These findings confirm an apparent disagreement between the two analysis methods. PMID:20185120

Smets, Martin P H; Eger, Tammy R; Grenier, Sylvain G

2010-02-24

400

Vibrational modes and diffusion of self-interstitial atoms in body-centered-cubic transition metals: A tight-binding molecular-dynamics study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using a tight-binding molecular-dynamics method, we have calculated the formation energies, diffusivity, and localized vibrational frequencies of self-interstitial atoms (SIA’s) in body-centered-cubic (bcc) transition metals: vanadium, niobium, molybdenum, and tantalum. As a test of our methods, we compare to experiment for the perfect bcc phonon spectra and we compare to previous ab initio SIA formation energies. In addition, we present vibrational spectra calculated from molecular dynamics via the velocity autocorrelation method. For all of the systems studied, we find that the localized vibration frequency of a SIA dumbbell pair is roughly twice the frequency of the bcc phonon-density-of-states peak. We also find an Arrhenius temperature dependence for SIA hopping, with frequency prefactors ranging between the cutoff of the ideal bcc lattice and the highest frequencies of the SIA dumbbell. In all cases, we find that the energy barrier to SIA diffusion is approximately 0.1eV .

Finkenstadt, Daniel; Bernstein, N.; Feldman, J. L.; Mehl, M. J.; Papaconstantopoulos, D. A.

2006-11-01

401

Acute changes in neuromuscular excitability after exhaustive whole body vibration exercise as compared to exhaustion by squatting exercise  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The effects of hard squatting exercise with (VbX+) and without (VbX)) vibration on neuromuscular function were tested in 19 healthy young volunteers. Before and after the exercise, three different tests were performed: maximum serial jumping for 30 s, electromyography during isometric knee extension at 70% of the maximum voluntary torque, and the quantitative analysis of the patellar tendon reflex.

Jorn Rittweger; Marcus Mutschelknauss; Dieter Felsenberg

2003-01-01

402

Generalized Langevin theory for many-body problems in chemical dynamics: Gas-surface collisions, vibrational energy relaxation in solids, and recombination reactions in liquids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Model classical trajectory simulations of gas-solid inelastic collisions, vibrational energy relaxation of a diatom in a solid, and atomic recombination reactions in a liquid are presented. These simulations are first applications of the molecular timescale generalized Langevin equation (MTGLE) theory [S. A. Adelman, Adv, Chem. Phys. 44, 143 (1980)] for condensed phase energy transfer and chemical reaction processes. The main conclusions of these model studies are as follows: (i) The MTGLE theory often provides computationally practical methods for condensed phase chemical problems. These methods are applicable with equal ease to both solid and liquid state processes. (ii) The equivalent harmonic chain heatbath modeling for reducing many-body chemical problems to effective few-body problems often converges rapidly. This rapid convergence is found for both short (subpicosecond) timescale processes (gas-solid collisions) and long (nanosecond) timescale processes (vibrational energy relaxation). (iii) The simplest harmonic chain model (heatbath replaced by a single fictitious atom) is often found to yield a qualitatively correct description of heatbath influence on both solid and liquid state processes. (iv) The MTGLE parameters ?e0 (chemical system Einstein frequency) and ?2c1 (chemical system/heatbath coupling constant) are the quantities which often determine the gross magnitude of heatbath influence on condensed phase chemical processes. For both solid and liquid state processes ?e0 determines the effective vibrational frequencies (normal modes) of the chemical system and ?2c1 determines the gross efficiency of chemical system/heatbath energy transfer. For liquid state processes ?e0 also determines the frequency of oscillations in the solvent cage, and ?2c1 also determines rigidity of the solvent cage. (?2c1=0 means the cage is perfectly rigid).

Brooks, C. L.; Berkowitz, M.; Adelman, S. A.

1980-11-01

403

High-frequency and low-magnitude whole body vibration with rest days is more effective in improving skeletal micro-morphology and biomechanical properties in ovariectomised rodents.  

PubMed

We explored the optimal regime in preventing or treating bone loss, using ovariectomised rodents loaded by mechanical stimuli with rest days during the loading cycle. Eighty-four Sprague-Dawley rats, aged 6 months, were randomly divided into 7 groups after bilateral ovariectomy. Mechanical vibration with 1-day rest (ML1R), with 3-day rest (ML3R), with 5-day rest (ML5R), with 7-day rest (ML7R), daily loading (DL), comparing the ovariectomised group (OVX) with baseline (BCL) measurements. After a recovery of one week, all the rodents were loaded daily by whole body vibration at 35 Hz and 0.25 g for 15 minutes. Eight weeks later, a three-point bending test of the radius and micro-CT scanning of the femoral head were performed after animal sacrifice. Large improvements in biomechanical properties occurred in all the experimental groups for failure load, elastic modulus and deflection, while a significantly enhanced efficacy was detected in ML7R compared with daily loading (p<0.05). In micro-CT scanning, bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness, number and separation were improved by the regime in all experimental groups, while ML7R showed a significant improvement over daily loading (p<0.05). Early bone loss in human subjects may be improved by high-frequency and low-magnitude whole body vibration with rest days or daily stimuli. Mechanical stimulus with a 7-day rest was more effective in improving biomechanical properties and micro-morphology compared with daily loading. This may have clinical implications in relation to the prevention and treatment of hip fractures, and in postoperative management following hip arthroplasty. PMID:22344486

Ma, Renshi; Zhu, Dong; Gong, He; Gu, Guishan; Huang, Xu; Gao, Jia zi; Zhang, Xizheng

404

Imaging changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung and liver tumors.  

PubMed

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is gaining wide acceptance as a treatment modality for lung and liver tumors, and it is crucial to make an accurate evaluation of the local effects of ablative doses of radiation in terms of local tumor control and normal tissue reaction or damage. The very complex radiation dose distribution of SBRT, the use of a large number of non-opposing and noncoplanar beams, and the delivery of individual ablative doses of radiation may cause substantially different radiographic appearance on diagnostic imaging compared with conventional radiation therapy. Different patterns of radiographic changes have been observed in the lung and liver after SBRT. This article reviews the post-SBRT imaging changes in the lung and liver. Since computed tomography and PET are the most commonly used diagnostic imaging tools for monitoring lung tumor and computed tomography for liver tumors, this article will focus on the changes observed on those imaging modalities. PMID:21504327

Lo, Simon S; Teh, Bin S; Wang, Jian Z; Huang, Zhibin; Zook, Jennifer; Price, Tracy; Mayr, Nina A; Grecula, John C; Timmerman, Robert D; Cardenes, Higinia R

2011-04-01

405

Keeping the balance--an overview of mind-body therapies in pediatric oncology.  

PubMed

This overview aims to give a brief introduction for clinicians in the wide field of Mind-Body Therapies (MBTs), to summarize the current research status of MBTs in pediatric oncology and to mention challenges for future goals. Most used techniques (relaxation, hypnosis, yoga, massage, MBSR, eurythmy) will be described and efficacy will be discussed. MBTs are an enhancement of conventional medicine to motivate the patient to participate in his recovery. Most MBTs are of low risk and are accessible for patients and their families in nearly all stadium of cancer therapy. Positive results include increased self-confidence and a more optimistic view in coping with the illness. We encourage clinicians to be more aware of the promising field of MBTs and its use in pediatric oncology. PMID:23578913

Kanitz, Jenny Lena; Camus, Maria Eugenia Moneta; Seifert, Georg

2012-03-22

406

Thinking through the body: the conceptualization of yoga as therapy for individuals with eating disorders.  

PubMed

Yoga has historically been viewed as a discipline that increases self-awareness through body based practices, meditation, self-study, and the reading of philosophical texts. In the 21st century the mindfulness techniques of yoga have been adapted as an adjunct to the treatment of individuals with eating disorders. In an effort to understand the conceptualization of yoga as therapy for individuals with eating disorders, this article juxtaposes how mindfulness based yoga is regarded in three disciplines: sociology, neuroscience, and the "spiritual texts" of yoga. PMID:21181581

Douglass, Laura

407

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for youth with body dysmorphic disorder: current status and future directions.  

PubMed

Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) usually begins during early adolescence and appears to be common in youth. BDD is characterized by substantial impairment in psychosocial functioning and high rates of suicidality. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) tailored to BDD is the best tested and most promising psychosocial treatment for adults. CBT has been used for youth with BDD, but has not been systematically developed for or tested in youth. This article focuses on CBT for BDD in adults and youth; possible adaptations and the need for treatment research in youth; and prevalence, clinical features, diagnosis, recommended pharmacotherapy, and treatments that are not recommended. PMID:21440856

Phillips, Katharine A; Rogers, Jamison

2011-04-01

408

Electrodynamic vibrators  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present work describes current electrodynamic vibrators and vibration rigs for investigating materials, structural elements, machine parts, and certain biological objects subjected to vibrations and large accelerations. Methods of increasing the thrusting force and amplitude of oscillations in electrodynamic vibrators are discussed along with broadening of the frequency range. The characteristics of commercial vibrators are examined. Ways of preventing vibrations

M. D. Genkin; A. M. Rusakov; V. V. Iablonskii

1975-01-01

409

Dynamic and subjective responses of seated subjects exposed to simultaneous vertical and fore-and-aft whole-body vibration: The effect of the phase between the two single-axis components  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Subjective and dynamic responses of seated subjects exposed to simultaneous vertical and fore-and-aft sinusoidal whole-body vibration were investigated. The effect of the phase difference between the vertical and the fore-and-aft vibration on the responses was of a particular interest in this study. Fifteen subjects were exposed to dual-axis vibrations at six frequencies (2.5 8 Hz) and at eight phases between the two single-axis components (0 315°). The magnitude of vibration in each axis was constant at 0.7 m s-2 rms. Discomfort caused by vibration was measured by the method of magnitude estimation. The motion of the body were measured at the head and three locations along the spine with accelerometers attached to the body surface. The most significant effect of the phase between the two single-axis components on the discomfort was observed at 5 Hz: about 40% difference in the median discomfort estimate caused by changing the phase. The transmissibilities from vertical seat vibration to vertical motions of the spine varied from 0.5 to 2.0 by changing the phase between the two single-axis components at frequencies from 2.5 to 5 Hz. The effect of the phase observed in the dynamic response was not predicted by the superposition of the responses to each single-axis vibration. The discomfort caused by the dual-axis vibration tended to be correlated better with the combinations of the dynamic responses measured in the two axes than with the dynamic responses in a single axis.

Matsumoto, Yasunao; Ohdo, Katsutoshi; Saito, Tetsuro

2006-12-01

410

Frame-Based Immobilization and Targeting for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Frame-based stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), such as that conducted with Elekta's Stereotactic Body Frame, can provide an extra measure of precision in the delivery of radiation to extracranial targets, and facilitates secure patient immobilization. In this paper, we review the steps involved in optimal use of an extra-cranial immobilization device for SBRT treatments. Our approach to using frame-based SBRT consists of 4 steps: patient immobilization, tumor and organ motion control, treatment/planning correlation, and daily targeting with pretreatment quality assurance. Patient immobilization was achieved with the Vac-Loc bag, which uses styrofoam beads to conform to the patient's shape comfortably within the body frame. Organ and motion control was assessed under fluoroscopy and controlled via a frame-mounted abdominal pressure plate. The compression screw was tightened until the diaphragmatic excursion range was < 1 cm. Treatment planning was performed using the Philips Pinnacle 6.2b system. In this treatment process, a 20 to 30 noncoplanar beam arrangement was initially selected and an inverse beam weight optimization algorithm was applied. Those beams with low beam weights were removed, leaving a manageable number of beams for treatment delivery. After planning, daily targeting using computed tomography (CT) to verify x-, y-, and z-coordinates of the treatment isocenter were used as a measure of quality assurance. We found our daily setup variation typically averaged < 5 mm in all directions, which is comparable to other published studies on Stereotactic Body Frame. Treatment time ranged from 30 to 45 minutes. Results demonstrate that patients have experienced high rates of local control with acceptable rates of severe side effects-by virtue of the tightly constrained treatment fields. The body frame facilitated comfortable patient positioning and quality assurance checks of the tumor, in relation to another set of independent set of coordinates defined by the body frame fiducials. The ability to impose abdominal compression proved to be a simple way to reduce target and tissue motion. SBRT with Stereotactic Body Frame enables comfortable patient immobilization and facilitates repeated registering and re-registering of the patient to the frame. With the body frame, large-dose-per fraction treatment is possible for localized tumor deposits with the aim of attaining a more therapeutic result.

Murray, Bryan C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)]. E-mail: bryan.murray@utsouthwestern.edu; Forster, Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Timmerman, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

2007-07-01

411

Stereotactic body radiation therapy for reirradiation of localized adenocarcinoma of the pancreas  

PubMed Central

Background Local control rates are poor in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. We investigated the role of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for salvage or boost treatment after conventional doses of external beam radiation therapy. Methods All patients treated with SBRT for pancreatic adenocarcinoma at Georgetown University from June 2002 through July 2007 were examined. Eligible patients had prior external beam radiation therapy to the pancreas. Treatment parameters and clinical and radiographic follow-up were evaluated. Results Twenty-eight patients were identified who received SBRT after a median prior external beam radiotherapy dose of 50.4?Gy. The median patient age was 63?years old and the median follow-up was 5.9?months. Twelve of fourteen (85.7%) evaluable patients were free from local progression, with three partial responses and nine patients with stable disease. Toxicity consisted of one case of acute Grade II nausea/vomiting, and two cases of Grade III late GI toxicity. The median overall survival was 5.9?months, with 18% survival and 70% freedom from local progression at one year. Conclusions Hypofractionated SBRT reirradiation of localized pancreatic cancer is a well-tolerated treatment. Most patients are free from local progression, albeit with limited follow-up, but overall survival remains poor.

2012-01-01

412

Numerical Simulation of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy with Volume Model of Human Body  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of the HIFU therapy for the deeply placed cancer has been desired. On problem is the displacement of the focal point due to the inhomogeneity of human body. The objectives are to realize the appropriate phase control of an array transducer and to support the preoperative planning of HIFU therapy by the computational prediction of treatment regions. Our approach is to solve the mass and momentum equations for mixture with the equation of state of media. The heat equation with a heat source of a viscous dissipation is solved to estimate the ablation region of tissue. The ablation, i.e., the heat denaturation of protein, is modeled as a phase transition by the phase field model. The HIFU therapy with a bowl-shape array transducer for a liver cancer is simulated. As the result with a phase control, we obtain a clear focus which is closer to a target point than the focus without a phase control, when the ultrasound propagates through lib bones. In addition, the development of the ablation region is reproduced numerically.

Okita, Kohei; Sugiyama, Kazuyasu; Ono, Kenji; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

2010-03-01

413

Feasibility of implementing stereotactic body radiation therapy using a non-commercial volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment planning system for early stage lung cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nearly 25% of patients diagnosed with early-stage non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) are medically inoperable. For these patients, the radial stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), planned and delivered with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, offers the only curative option. However, IMRT-SBRT has three significant deficiencies: an elevated beam-on time (MU); a reduced MU-to-cGy coefficient; and a prolonged delivery time.

Yulin Song; Boris Mueller; Ceferino Obcemea; Borys Mychalczak

2011-01-01

414

Dose as a function of liver volume and planning target volume in helical tomotherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy–based stereotactic body radiation therapy for hepatic metastasis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been shown to be an effective, well-tolerated treatment for local control of tumors metastatic to the liver. Multi-institutional Phase II trials are examining 60 Gy in 3 fractions delivered by linac-based, 3D-conformal IMRT. HiArt Helical TomoTherapy is a treatment unit that delivers co-planar helical IMRT that is capable of image-guided SBRT. We hypothesized

Joseph M. Baisden; Andrew G. Reish; Ke Sheng; James M. Larner; Brian D. Kavanagh; Paul W.. Read

2006-01-01

415

The effect of whole body vibration on the H-reflex, the stretch reflex, and the short-latency response during hopping.  

PubMed

The effect of whole body vibration (WBV) on reflex responses is controversially discussed in the literature. In this study, three different modalities of reflex activation with increased motor complexity have been selected to clarify the effects of acute WBV on reflex activation: (1) the electrically evoked H-reflex, (2) the mechanically elicited stretch reflex, and (3) the short-latency response (SLR) during hopping. WBV-induced changes of the H-reflex, the stretch reflex, and the SLR during hopping were recorded in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles and were analyzed before, during (only the H-reflex), immediately after, 5 min and 10 min after WBV. The main findings were that (1) the H-reflexes were significantly reduced during and at least up to 5 min after WBV, (2) the stretch reflex amplitudes were also significantly reduced immediately after WBV but recovered to their initial amplitudes within 5 min, and (3) the SLR during hopping showed no vibration-induced modulation. With regard to the modalities with low motor complexities, the decreased H- and stretch reflex responses are assumed to point toward a reduced Ia afferent transmission during and after WBV. However, it is assumed that during hopping, the suppression of reflex sensitivity is compensated by facilitatory mechanisms in this complex motor task. PMID:23802287

Ritzmann, R; Kramer, A; Gollhofer, A; Taube, W

2013-06-01

416

Characterization of dose in stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung lesions via Monte Carlo calculation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy is a new form of treatment where hypofractionated (i.e., large dose fractions), conformal doses are delivered to small extracranial target volumes. This technique has proven to be especially effective for treating lung lesions. The inability of most commercially available algorithms/treatment planning systems to accurately account for electron transport in regions of heterogeneous electron density and tissue interfaces make prediction of accurate doses especially challenging for such regions. Monte Carlo which a model based calculation algorithm has proven to be extremely accurate for dose calculation in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous environment. This study attempts to accurately characterize the doses received by static targets located in the lung, as well as critical structures (contra and ipsi -lateral lung, major airways, esophagus and spinal cord) for the serial tomotherapeutic intensity-modulated delivery method used for stereotactic body radiation therapy at the Cancer Therapy and Research Center. PEREGRINERTM (v 1.6. NOMOS) Monte Carlo, doses were compared to the Finite Sized Pencil Beam/Effective Path Length predicted values from the CORVUS 5.0 planning system. The Monte Carlo based treatment planning system was first validated in both homogenous and inhomogeneous environments. 77 stereotactic body radiation therapy lung patients previously treated with doses calculated using the Finite Sized Pencil Beam/Effective Path Length, algorithm were then retrieved and recalculated with Monte Carlo. All 77 patients plans were also recalculated without inhomogeneity correction in an attempt to counteract the known overestimation of dose at the periphery of the target by EPL with increased attenuation. The critical structures were delineated in order to standardize the contouring. Both the ipsi-lateral and contra-lateral lungs were contoured. The major airways were contoured from the apex of the lungs (trachea) to 4 cm below the carina. Both the esophagus and spinal cord were contoured to roughly 1.5 cm above and below the lesion, well outside the treated serial tomotherapy slices. The plans were computed with planning target volume margins of 5 mm in the left, right, anterior and posterior direction and 10 mm in the superior and inferior direction. The spinal cord and esophagus had margins of 2 mm in all directions. The Finite Sized Pencil Beam/Effective Path Length dose calculation, over-predicts dose to target volumes located in lung. The doses to the esophagus, spinal cord and major airways seem to be in good agreement with doses predicted by Monte Carlo. Greater discrepancy is seen in the prediction of maximum doses in the lung. Calculations carried out with no inhomogeneity correction are in better agreement with Monte Carlo in most cases. Monte Carlo dose calculation may prove valuable in accurately assessing the delivered dose in Stereotactic body radiation therapy and may, thus, contribute to a more informed decision on the optimal dose and fractionation scheme.

Rassiah, Premavathy

417

Pathological vertebral fracture after stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung metastases. Case report and literature review.  

PubMed Central

Background Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a radiation technique used in patients with oligometastatic lung disease. Lung and chest wall toxicities have been described in the patients but pathological vertebral fracture is an adverse effect no reported in patients treated with SBRT for lung metastases. Case presentation A 68-year-old woman with the diagnosis of a recurrence of a single lung metastatic nodule of urothelial carcinoma after third line of chemotherapy. The patient received a hypo-fractionated course of SBRT.A 3D-conformal multifield technique was used with six coplanar and one non-coplanar statics beams. A total dose of 48 Gy in three fractions over six days was prescribed to the 95% of the CTV. Ten months after the SBRT procedure, a CT scan showed complete response of the metastatic disease without signs of radiation pneumonitis. However, rib and vertebral bone toxicities were observed with the fracture-collapse of the 7th and 8th vertebral bodies and a fracture of the 7th and 8th left ribs. We report a unique case of pathological vertebral fracture appearing ten months after SBRT for an asymptomatic growing lung metastases of urothelial carcinoma. Conclusion Though SBRT allows for minimization of normal tissue exposure to high radiation doses SBRT tolerance for vertebral bone tissue has been poorly evaluated in patients with lung tumors. Oncologists should be alert to the potential risk of fatal bone toxicity caused by this novel treatment. We recommend BMD testing in all woman over 65 years old with clinical risk factors that could contribute to low BMD. If low BMD is demonstrated, we should carefully restrict the maximum radiation dose in the vertebral body in order to avoid intermediate or low radiation dose to the whole vertebral body.

2012-01-01

418

Reference motion in deformable bodies under rigid body motion and vibration. Part II: evaluation of the coefficient of restitution for impacts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dynamic analysis of rigid body impacts is usually performed by using the coefficient of restitution as a measure of the mechanical energy lost in the process. The coefficient of restitution provides an algebraic equation that allows impulse-momentum balance equations to be solved. This paper reports a method for calculating the kinematic coefficient of restitution for the impact of deformable

J. L. Escalona; J. Valverde; J. Mayo; J. Domínguez

2003-01-01

419

Reference motion in deformable bodies under rigid body motion and vibration. Part II: evaluation of the coefficient of restitution for impacts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dynamic analysis of rigid body impacts is usually performed by using the coefficient of restitution as a measure of the mechanical energy lost in the process. The coefficient of restitution provides an algebraic equation that allows impulse–momentum balance equations to be solved. This paper reports a method for calculating the kinematic coefficient of restitution for the impact of deformable

J. L Escalona; J Valverde; J Mayo; J Dom??nguez

2003-01-01

420

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Youth with Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Current Status and Future Directions  

PubMed Central

SYNOPSIS Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), a distressing or impairing preoccupation with nonexistent or slight defect(s) in appearance, usually begins during early adolescence and appears to be common in youth. BDD is characterized by substantial impairment in psychosocial functioning and markedly high rates of suicidality. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) tailored to BDD’s unique features is the best tested and most promising psychosocial treatment for adults with BDD. CBT has been used for youth with BDD, but it has not been systematically developed for or tested in this age group, and there is a pressing need for this work to be done. This article focuses on CBT for BDD in adults and youth, possible adaptations for youth, and the need for treatment research in youth. We also discuss BDD’s prevalence, clinical features, how to diagnose BDD in youth, recommended pharmacotherapy for BDD (serotonin-reuptake inhibitors), and treatments that are not recommended (surgery and other cosmetic treatments).

Phillips, Katharine A.; Rogers, Jamison

2011-01-01

421

Pain management in children: developmental considerations and mind-body therapies.  

PubMed

One of the most challenging roles of medical providers serving children is to appropriately assess and treat their pain. Pain is one of the most misunderstood, underdiagnosed, and undertreated/ untreated medical problems, particularly in children. New JCAHO regulations regard pain as "the fifth vital sign" and require caregivers to regularly assess and address pain. This review focuses on the clinical assessment of pain, based on a developmental model and addresses common beliefs and myths that affect the management of pain in children. We provide a review of the pain literature that focuses on the integration of mind-body therapies into the management of procedure-related pain, headache, and recurrent abdominal pain in children. PMID:15813156

Gerik, Susan M

2005-03-01

422

Adult Polyglucosan Body Disease (APBD): Anaplerotic diet therapy (Triheptanoin) and demonstration of defective methylation pathways.  

PubMed

APBD is a rare disorder most often affecting adults of Ashkenazi Jewish origin due to partial deficiency of the glycogen brancher enzyme (GBE). It is characterized by progressive involvement of both the central and peripheral nervous systems and deposition of amylopectin-like polyglucosan bodies. There have been no metabolic derangements that might suggest effective therapy nor have there been any clinical improvements for control of its relentless progression. The APBD patients, in this study, experienced stabilization of disease progression, and limited functional improvement in most patients with dietary triheptanoin. Due to a plateau in clinical improvement, the reduced plasma creatinine and methionine levels prompted evaluation of other plasma methylation intermediates in this complex integrated pathway system: decreased S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) (p<0.002), increased S-adenosylhomocysteine (p<0.001), elevated creatine (p=0.001) and increased free choline (p<0.001). Plasma levels of homocysteine and guanidinoacetate were normal. Impaired metabolism of choline and creatine may relate to the progressive dysmyelination and progressive muscle weakness associated with APBD. The partial deficiency of GBE appears to produce a secondary energy deficit possibly related to inadequate reserves of normal glycogen for efficient degradation to free glucose. Dysfunctional regulation of glycogen synthase (GS) may result in continued synthesis and deposition of polyglucosan bodies. This investigation has demonstrated, for the first time, arrest of clinical deterioration with limited functional recovery with triheptanoin diet therapy and the existence of significant derangement of methylation pathways that, when corrected, may lead to even greater therapeutic benefits. PMID:20655781

Roe, Charles R; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Wallace, Mary; Arning, Erland; Martin, Alan

2010-07-06

423

Quality of Life After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Primary and Metastatic Liver Tumors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a high local control rate for primary and metastatic liver tumors. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of this treatment on the patient's quality of life. This is the first report of quality of life associated with liver SBRT. Methods and Materials: From October 2002 to March 2007, a total of 28 patients not suitable for other local treatments and with Karnofsky performance status of at least 80% were entered in a Phase I-II study of SBRT for liver tumors. Quality of life was a secondary end point. Two generic quality of life instruments were investigated, EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) and EuroQoL-Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-5D VAS), in addition to a disease-specific questionnaire, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ C-30). Points of measurement were directly before and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. Mean scores and SDs were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using paired-samples t-test and Student t-test. Results: The calculated EQ-5D index, EQ-5D VAS and QLQ C-30 global health status showed that mean quality of life of the patient group was not significantly influenced by treatment with SBRT; if anything, a tendency toward improvement was found. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy combines a high local control rate, by delivering a high dose per fraction, with no significant change in quality of life. Multicenter studies including larger numbers of patients are recommended and under development.

Mendez Romero, Alejandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: a.mendezromero@erasmusmc.nl; Wunderink, Wouter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Os, Rob M. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Brandwijk, Rene P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Verhoef, Cornelis; IJzermans, Jan N.M. [Department of Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

2008-04-01

424

Complementary and alternative medicine and mind-body therapies for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome in women.  

PubMed

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder, characterized by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain with constipation, diarrhea and/or an alternation of the two, and often bloating. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) consists of a group of medical treatments that are not commonly considered to be a part of traditional medicine. CAM is commonly used for difficult-to-treat chronic medical conditions. Many patients choose CAM because there are only a limited number of treatments available for IBS or because they would like to have a 'natural therapy'. Mind-body therapies for IBS have proven efficacy, but have not been well accepted by patients or practitioners for treatment. This article reviews the use of CAM and mind-body therapies in IBS, with a focus on probiotics, acupuncture, herbal medicines and psychological therapies. PMID:24161308

Magge, Suma S; Wolf, Jacqueline L

2013-11-01

425

4D VMAT, gated VMAT, and 3D VMAT for stereotactic body radiation therapy in lung  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Four-dimensional volumetric modulated arc therapy (4D VMAT) is a treatment strategy for lung cancers that aims to exploit relative target and tissue motion to improve organ at risk (OAR) sparing. The algorithm incorporates the entire patient respiratory cycle using 4D CT data into the optimization process. Resulting treatment plans synchronize the delivery of each beam aperture to a specific phase of target motion. Stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans for 4D VMAT, gated VMAT, and 3D VMAT were generated on three patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Tumour motion ranged from 1.4-3.4 cm. The dose and fractionation scheme was 48 Gy in four fractions. A B-spline transformation model registered the 4D CT images. 4D dose volume histograms (4D DVH) were calculated from total dose accumulated at the maximum exhalation. For the majority of OARs, gated VMAT achieved the most radiation sparing but treatment times were 77-148% longer than 3D VMAT. 4D VMAT plan qualities were comparable to gated VMAT, but treatment times were only 11-25% longer than 3D VMAT. 4D VMAT's improvement of healthy tissue sparing can allow for further dose escalation. Future study could potentially adapt 4D VMAT to irregular patient breathing patterns.

Chin, E.; Loewen, S. K.; Nichol, A.; Otto, K.

2013-02-01

426