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Sample records for bologna complete sample

  1. Humboldt Meets Bologna

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelsena, Svein

    2010-01-01

    The compatibility between the Humboldtian principles and the Bologna reform programme is essentially contested. The article traces debates on the Humboldtian university and the Bologna process and explores theoretical, methodological and normative aspects of these debates and the relations between the Bologna process and the Humboldtian ideals.…

  2. Sugaring marble in the Monumental Cemetery in Bologna (Italy): characterization of naturally and artificially weathered samples and first results of consolidation by hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassoni, Enrico; Franzoni, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    The so-called sugaring of marble is a very common degradation phenomenon, affecting both historical monuments and modern buildings, which is originated by environmental temperature fluctuations. Thermal cycles are indeed responsible for micro-cracks formation at the boundaries between calcite grains, so that marble is subjected to granular disintegration and can be reduced to a sugar-like powder of isolated calcite grains by just the pressure of a finger. Since no effective, compatible and durable treatment for sugaring marble consolidation is currently available, in this paper a novel consolidating treatment recently proposed for limestone, based on the formation of hydroxyapatite inside the stone, was investigated for weathered marble. To test the new treatment on suitably decayed marble samples, some naturally sugaring marbles from the Monumental Cemetery in Bologna (Italy, nineteenth century) were firstly characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) measurement. Then, artificially weathered samples were produced by heating fresh Carrara marble samples at 400 °C for 1 h. The effects of artificial weathering were characterized using the same techniques as above, and a very good agreement was found between microstructure and mechanical features of naturally and artificially weathered samples. Then, the hydroxyapatite-based treatment was tested on the so-obtained artificially weathered samples, and the treatment effects were characterized by UPV, MIP and SEM equipped with energy dispersive spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The hydroxyapatite-based treatment exhibited a remarkable ability of restoring marble cohesion and a good compatibility in terms of modifications in pore size distribution, which leads to regard this treatment as a very promising consolidant for weathered marble.

  3. A bunch of Bologna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padman, Rachel

    2009-08-01

    As your news story "Europe's education experiment" (June pp12-13) reported, the UK government may well view the country as now being compliant with the Bologna process, which aims to create a common European higher-education system. This is because the government persuaded the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) to agree that Bologna recognition should be based on learning outcomes, and then it established the (UK) Framework for Higher Education Qualifications, which purports to demonstrate this compliance. The argument is fundamentally that students in England can accomplish in four (short) years what in other systems requires five (long) ones.

  4. A Complete Sample of Supernova Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quimby, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, supernova surveys have drawn their samples by monitoring pre-selected lists of host galaxies. More recently, some surveys have made efforts to ignore host properties when selecting candidates, but because of limited resources they must usually add additional selection criteria, such as the color or light curve shape of the transient, in order to select the best targets for a specific study. Since 2004, we have conducted a search for supernovae that is designed to select targets irrespective of their host environment, and we have spectroscopic classifications for all of the new transients detected. Here we report on the host galaxies of first 72 supernovae detected by ROTSE-IIIb as part of the Texas Supernova Search and the ROTSE Supernova Verification Project. The supernova sample includes everything from perfectly normal Type Ia and Type II, to spectroscopically peculiar events, to several of the most luminous supernovae ever found. We compare multi-band photometry and spectroscopy of the host galaxy sample to the larger galaxy population. We cannot securely identify host galaxies brighter than -10 mag absolute for four of our discoveries, which suggests that these may be hostless, "tramp supernovae."

  5. Physical Science in Bologna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoni, Giorgio; Stojanovic, Ivana

    2013-03-01

    We provide a guide to Bologna, Italy, focusing particularly on sites of interest to physicists. Our first tour is in the city center; it begins in the Piazza Maggiore at the Palazzo d'Accursio, the Basilica di San Petronio, and the Archiginnasio (Old University) and then proceeds to the Two Towers and the Palazzo Poggi, which houses the Astronomical Observatory Museum and other important instrument and art collections; it concludes at the Physics Museum, Department of Physics and Astronomy. Our second tour again begins in the Piazza Maggiore but goes to sites beyond the city center where famous Bolognese physicists and other scientists were born, lived, and are buried. Finally, we point out important museums and other institutions on the outskirts of Bologna.

  6. Bologna with Student Eyes, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikkola, Anne, Ed.; Carapinha, Bruno, Ed.; Tuck, Colin, Ed.; MacSithigh, Daithi, Ed.; Aberg, Nina Gustaffson, Ed.; Brus, Sanja, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Bologna with Student Eyes" is a survey published by the National Unions of Students in Europe, based on questionnaires sent to national unions across the continent. The survey gives a broad overview of student union perspectives as to national implementations of Bologna Process Action Lines in the period 2005-2007. It addresses the topics of:…

  7. The Bologna Process in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballarino, Gabriele; Perotti, Loris

    2012-01-01

    Italy was among the promoters of the Bologna Process and the early adopters of the reform. If one looks at its impact on the formal structure of curricula and study programmes, the reform undertaken under the Bologna banner seems to have been one of the major educational reforms ever achieved in Italy. This article describes how the Bologna…

  8. A complete sample of long bright Swift gamma ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Salvaterra, Ruben; Campana, Sergio; Covino, Stefano; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Fugazza, Dino; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Melandri, Andrea; Nava, Lara; Sbarufatti, Boris; Vergani, Susanna

    2013-06-13

    Complete samples are the basis of any population study. To this end, we selected a complete subsample of Swift long bright gamma ray bursts (GRBs). The sample, made up of 58 bursts, was selected by considering bursts with favourable observing conditions for ground-based follow-up observations and with the 15-150 keV 1 s peak flux above a flux threshold of 2.6 photons cm(-2) s(-1). This sample has a redshift completeness level higher than 90 per cent. Using this complete sample, we investigate the properties of long GRBs and their evolution with cosmic time, focusing in particular on the GRB luminosity function, the prompt emission spectral-energy correlations and the nature of dark bursts. PMID:23630371

  9. Bologna with Student Eyes 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pall, Allan; Xhomaqi, Brikena; Bartolo, Daniela; Palomares, Fernando Miguel Galan; Kaiser, Florian; Charonis, George-Konstantinos; Ufert, Karina; Malnes, Magnus; Simola, Mari; Jasurek, Miroslav; Maljukov, Monika; Vuksanovic, Nevena; Cincyte, Rasa; Santa, Robert; Primozic, Rok; Moisander, Taina

    2012-01-01

    The Bologna Process is one of the largest endeavours ever undertaken aimed at reforming higher education continent-wide. It has created a framework of measures and policies aiming to foster greater compatibility and comparability of the national systems of higher education across Europe. Despite the impact reforms and change in higher education…

  10. Determination of gamma glutamyltransferase in completely haemolysed blood samples.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, H; Mørland, J

    1985-11-01

    A simple method for the determination of gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT) in completely haemolysed blood samples is described. Haemolysed blood was incubated in the presence of gamma glutamyl-p-nitroanilide and glycylglycine at 37 degrees C for 15 min, and the enzyme reaction was terminated by adding trichloroacetic acid. The pH in the supernatant was adjusted to 7.5 by using a buffer, and the amount of p-nitroaniline formed was measured spectrophotometrically. The correlation between this method and the GGT activity in serum as determined by the standard kinetic method was good, r = 0.982. The blood GGT activity (y) was related to the serum activity (x) as follows: y = 0.415x + 3.8. The effect of storage of blood at room temperature on the GGT activity was studied. The enzyme activity did not change during the first 12 days of storage. PMID:2866579

  11. Radio Galaxies in Cooling Cores: Insights from a Complete Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilek, J. A.; Owen, F. N.

    We have observed a new, complete, cooling-core sample with the VLA, in order to understand how the massive black hole in the central galaxy interacts with the local cluster plasma. We find that every cooling core is currently being energized by an active radio jet, which has probably been destabilized by its interaction with the cooling core. We argue that current models of cooling-core radio galaxies need to be improved before they can be used to determine the rate at which the jet is heating the cooling core. We also argue that the extended radio haloes we see in many cooling-core clusters need extended, in situ re-energization, which cannot be supplied solely by the central galaxy.

  12. The Baldwin effect in complete optically selected samples of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamorani, G.; Marano, B.; Mignoli, M.; Zitelli, V.; Boyle, B. J.

    1992-05-01

    The Baldwin relation is examined on the basis of the largest available data set of unbiased complete samples of optically selected quasars. Relations yielded by the least-squares fit of the equivalent width vs absolute magnitude are given. For both lines the slope of the correlation between the equivalent widths and the luminosities is very shallow. In particular, the slope for the C IV line is significantly different from the 'canonical' value for the slope of the Baldwin effect in quasars: EWC IV varies as L1550 exp -(0.3-0.4). The present slope for the C IV line is in agreement with that obtained by Kinney et al. (1990) in their study of the Baldwin effect which was chiefly based on IUE data. The present normalization is about a factor of 2 smaller than theirs. Possible selection effects which may have biased the normalization of the Kinney et al. result are suggested.

  13. 318-MHz variability of complete samples of extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, B.; Broderick, J. J.; Ledden, J. E.; Odell, S. L.; Condon, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    It is found by a low-frequency variability survey, involving two- and three-epoch, 318-MHz observations of extragalactic sources in samples complete to 3 Jy at 1400 MHz and 1 Jy at 5000 MHz, that steep-spectrum sources do not seem to vary while all flat-spectrum sources exhibit low-frequency variability greater than 8% over about 5 yr. It is also found that the flat-spectrum sources with inverted spectra show the largest fractional variations, and that there is a correlation between the incidence of low-frequency variability and the determination that a source is an optically violent variable. These statistical properties are consistent with models which invoke radio and optical emission relativistic beaming.

  14. Higher Education and the Bologna Transformations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senashenko, V.

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the Bologna transformations. The Bologna transformations represent a phenomenon that is strictly European, and they are supposed to result in solutions to a number of chiefly economic problems that confront the leading countries of Central Europe. The author discusses the positive and negative consequences of Russia's…

  15. Bologna with Student Eyes. 2007 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikkola, Anne, Ed.; Carapinha, Bruno, Ed.; Tuck, Colin, Ed.; Sithigh, Daithi Mac, Ed.; Aberg, Nina Gustafsson, Ed.; Brus, Sanja, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    For the third time, ESIB has carried out a survey on the implementation of the Bologna Process. The first survey was in 2003 and the second was in 2005. Between the first two surveys the methodology developed substantially and this survey builds on the principles of the 2005 "Bologna With Student Eyes" report. This new report portrays the…

  16. The Actual (Un)usefulness of the Bologna System in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin

    2016-01-01

    exam (3,06 vs 3,36) and theoretical methods of taking exam (3,01 vs 3,14). Average grades where no average grade, on any issue, does not reach grade 4 of Likert Scale, talks about real problems of education in medical field. Conclusion: In a relatively large sample (four generations of students) true benefit and progress of the Bologna system has not been proven, in comparison to the old system. Bologna system has eased the students in the administrative sense by introduction of computerization of faculties, but the old problems and old questions about the organization’s process and delivery have not been eliminated. PMID:27147795

  17. ATLASGAL - towards a complete sample of massive star forming clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, J. S.; Moore, T. J. T.; Csengeri, T.; Wyrowski, F.; Schuller, F.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.; Mottram, J. C.; Thompson, M. A.; Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, C. M.; Bronfman, L.; Pfalzner, S.; König, C.; Wienen, M.

    2014-09-01

    By matching infrared-selected, massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and compact H II regions in the Red MSX Source survey to massive clumps found in the submillimetre ATLASGAL (APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy) survey, we have identified ˜1000 embedded young massive stars between 280° < ℓ < 350° and 10° < ℓ < 60° with | b | < 1.5°. Combined with an existing sample of radio-selected methanol masers and compact H II regions, the result is a catalogue of ˜1700 massive stars embedded within ˜1300 clumps located across the inner Galaxy, containing three observationally distinct subsamples, methanol-maser, MYSO and H II-region associations, covering the most important tracers of massive star formation, thought to represent key stages of evolution. We find that massive star formation is strongly correlated with the regions of highest column density in spherical, centrally condensed clumps. We find no significant differences between the three samples in clump structure or the relative location of the embedded stars, which suggests that the structure of a clump is set before the onset of star formation, and changes little as the embedded object evolves towards the main sequence. There is a strong linear correlation between clump mass and bolometric luminosity, with the most massive stars forming in the most massive clumps. We find that the MYSO and H II-region subsamples are likely to cover a similar range of evolutionary stages and that the majority are near the end of their main accretion phase. We find few infrared-bright MYSOs associated with the most massive clumps, probably due to very short pre-main-sequence lifetimes in the most luminous sources.

  18. A Characterization of Deterministic Sampling Patterns for Low-Rank Matrix Completion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel-Alarcon, Daniel L.; Boston, Nigel; Nowak, Robert D.

    2016-06-01

    Low-rank matrix completion (LRMC) problems arise in a wide variety of applications. Previous theory mainly provides conditions for completion under missing-at-random samplings. An incomplete $d \\times N$ matrix is $\\textit{finitely completable}$ if there are at most finitely many rank-$r$ matrices that agree with all its observed entries. Finite completability is the tipping point in LRMC, as a few additional samples of a finitely completable matrix guarantee its $\\textit{unique}$ completability. The main contribution of this paper is a full characterization of finitely completable observation sets. We use this characterization to derive sufficient deterministic sampling conditions for unique completability. We also show that under uniform random sampling schemes, these conditions are satisfied with high probability if at least $\\mathscr{O}(\\max\\{r,\\log d \\})$ entries per column are observed.

  19. To What Extent Does Transnational Communication Drive Cross-National Policy Convergence? The Impact of the Bologna-Process on Domestic Higher Education Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voegtle, Eva M.; Knill, Christoph; Dobbins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates if transnational communication in the context of the Bologna Process (BP) has led to the convergence of higher education (HE) policies. The country sample includes both Bologna participants and non-participants, for which systematic knowledge about the implications of the BP is absent so far. We investigate study structures…

  20. 43 CFR Appendix B to Part 10 - Sample Notice of Inventory Completion

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sample Notice of Inventory Completion B Appendix B to Part 10 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Pt. 10, App. B Appendix B to Part 10—Sample Notice of Inventory Completion The following is an...

  1. 43 CFR Appendix B to Part 10 - Sample Notice of Inventory Completion

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Sample Notice of Inventory Completion B Appendix B to Part 10 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Pt. 10, App. B Appendix B to Part 10—Sample Notice of Inventory Completion The following is an example...

  2. The Bologna Process and the New Reforms of Russian Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davydov, Iu. S.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the different opinions of specialists on The Bologna Process. The Bologna Process was brought into being by society's transition to a new stage of development, in which education and knowledge are becoming the decisive engines of progress. With the aim of creating a unified educational space, the Bologna Process was begun in…

  3. The Bologna Process: Transforming European Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floud, Roderick

    2006-01-01

    This article describes and discusses the Bologna Process, an agreement among the education ministries and the universities and colleges of 45 European countries to create the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) by 2010. At the core of the agreement is the decision that all higher education institutions in Europe will adopt the three-tiered…

  4. Understanding the Bologna Process for Admissions Officers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxton, Mary; Johnson, Johnny Kent; Nathanson, Gloria; Paver, William; Watkins, Robert

    2009-01-01

    In Spring 2008, senior members of the international admission and credential evaluation community met to deliberate over the admission and placement of Bologna Compliant degree holders into U.S. graduate programs. This group comprised several individuals holding top leadership positions in NAFSA, AACRAO, and closely allied groups involved in…

  5. Bologna, the Netherlands and Information Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boekhorst, Albert K.; Mackenzie Owen, John S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the development of the department of Information Studies at the Universiteit van Amsterdam over the years and especially the impact of the Bologna Agreement on the content and educational form of the curriculum. It includes both outlines of the programmes as well as reflection on the educational methods. The accreditation…

  6. International Student Mobility and the Bologna Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teichler, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The Bologna Process is the newest of a chain of activities stimulated by supra-national actors since the 1950s to challenge national borders in higher education in Europe. Now, the ministers in charge of higher education of the individual European countries have agreed to promote a similar cycle-structure of study programmes and programmes based…

  7. The Implementation of the Bologna Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettunen, Juha; Kantola, Mauri

    2006-01-01

    This study identifies the responsibilities of the bodies and institutions involved in the implementation of the Bologna Process. They include the levels of Europe, nations, higher education institutions, departments, degree programmes, teachers and students. The future planning is analysed using the Balanced Scorecard approach designed for the…

  8. A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF BRIGHT SWIFT LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS. I. SAMPLE PRESENTATION, LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Salvaterra, R.; Campana, S.; Vergani, S. D.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Fugazza, D.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Melandri, A.; Sbarufatti, B.; Tagliaferri, G.; Nava, L.; Flores, H.; Piranomonte, S.

    2012-04-10

    We present a carefully selected sub-sample of Swift long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that is complete in redshift. The sample is constructed by considering only bursts with favorable observing conditions for ground-based follow-up searches, which are bright in the 15-150 keV Swift/BAT band, i.e., with 1-s peak photon fluxes in excess to 2.6 photons s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The sample is composed of 58 bursts, 52 of them with redshift for a completeness level of 90%, while another two have a redshift constraint, reaching a completeness level of 95%. For only three bursts we have no constraint on the redshift. The high level of redshift completeness allows us for the first time to constrain the GRB luminosity function and its evolution with cosmic times in an unbiased way. We find that strong evolution in luminosity ({delta}{sub l} = 2.3 {+-} 0.6) or in density ({delta}{sub d} = 1.7 {+-} 0.5) is required in order to account for the observations. The derived redshift distributions in the two scenarios are consistent with each other, in spite of their different intrinsic redshift distributions. This calls for other indicators to distinguish among different evolution models. Complete samples are at the base of any population studies. In future works we will use this unique sample of Swift bright GRBs to study the properties of the population of long GRBs.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Psychrobacter alimentarius PAMC 27889, a Psychrophile Isolated from an Antarctic Rock Sample.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaejin; Kwon, Miye; Yang, Jae Young; Woo, Jusun; Lee, Hong Kum; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Ok-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Psychrobacter alimentarius PAMC 27889, a Gram-negative, psychrophilic bacterium, was isolated from an Antarctic rock sample. Here, we report the complete genome of P. alimentarius PAMC 27889, which has the nonmevalonate methylerythritol phosphate pathway of terpenoid biosynthesis and a complete gene cluster for benzoate degradation. PMID:27445386

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Psychrobacter alimentarius PAMC 27889, a Psychrophile Isolated from an Antarctic Rock Sample

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaejin; Kwon, Miye; Yang, Jae Young; Woo, Jusun; Lee, Hong Kum; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Psychrobacter alimentarius PAMC 27889, a Gram-negative, psychrophilic bacterium, was isolated from an Antarctic rock sample. Here, we report the complete genome of P. alimentarius PAMC 27889, which has the nonmevalonate methylerythritol phosphate pathway of terpenoid biosynthesis and a complete gene cluster for benzoate degradation. PMID:27445386

  11. Approaches of using the beard testing method to obtain complete length distributions of the original samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fiber testing instruments such as HVI can rapidly measure fiber length by testing a tapered fiber beard of the sample. But these instruments that use the beard testing method only report a limited number of fiber length parameters instead of the complete length distribution that is important fo...

  12. Predictors of treatment completion in a sample of youth who have experienced physical or sexual trauma.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Robert A; Sink, Holli E; Ake, George S; Carmody, Karen Appleyard; Amaya-Jackson, Lisa M; Briggs, Ernestine C

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant advances in knowledge and availability of evidence-based models for child traumatic stress, many children simply do not complete treatment. There remain notable gaps in the services research literature about treatment completion among youth, particularly those who have experienced trauma and related sequelae. This study investigated the linkages among child physical and sexual trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology, and treatment completion utilizing a clinical sample drawn from a large database from community treatment centers across the United States specializing in childhood trauma. Results from regression analyses indicated that neither the experience of sexual nor physical trauma directly predicted successful treatment completion. The links between sexual trauma and treatment completion, however, were mediated by PTSD avoidance symptoms. Children and youth experiencing sexual trauma reported higher levels of avoidance symptoms that were, in turn, significantly associated with a lower likelihood of completing trauma-focused mental health treatment. Practice implications are discussed and include strategies for clinicians to intervene during pivotal points of treatment to improve rates of service utilization and treatment completion. PMID:24084895

  13. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes on bologna sausages by an antimicrobial film containing mustard extract or sinigrin.

    PubMed

    Lara-Lledó, Marta; Olaimat, Amin; Holley, Richard A

    2012-05-01

    The ability of Listeria (L.) monocytogenes to convert glucosinolates into antimicrobial isothiocyanates was investigated. Mustard glucosinolates in pure (sinigrin) or extract forms (sinigrin, oriental; sinalbin, yellow mustard) were used in broth media and in a polyvinyl polyethylene glycol graft copolymer (PPG) packaging film with bologna to examine their value as antimicrobial precursors for the control of L. monocytogenes viability and extension of bologna shelf-life at 4 °C. During broth tests with deodorized (myrosinase-inactivated) mustard extracts (10 d at 20 °C) or with purified sinigrin (21 d at 20 °C) L. monocytogenes was only inhibited when exogenous myrosinase was added. None the less, the organism was able to hydrolyze almost half the pure sinigrin by 21 d in tests without added enzyme. Reductions in sinigrin levels were measured by reversed-phase liquid chromatography, and in the absence of L. monocytogenes or added myrosinase the glucosinolate was stable. When pure sinigrin, oriental or yellow mustard extracts were incorporated in PPG films containing 3, 5 and 6% (w/w) of the corresponding glucosinolate and used to package bologna inoculated with 4 log CFU/g L. monocytogenes, the pathogen became undetectable in bologna packed with the oriental mustard extract at 52 d storage and remained undetectable at 70 d. The yellow mustard extract was less inhibitory and the pure sinigrin was not antimicrobial. L. monocytogenes numbers reached >7 log CFU/g in the film and untreated controls at 17 d storage. At 35 d storage, samples packed with control film contained sufficient numbers of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) (>7 log CFU/g) to be considered spoiled, whereas treatments containing mustard or sinigrin remained <7 log CFU/g LAB for ≤ 70 d. L. monocytogenes played a key role in exerting control over its own viability in bologna by hydrolysis of the glucosinolate in the oriental mustard film, but other antimicrobials in treatments may have contributed. PMID

  14. Social Issues in the Bologna Process: Who Benefits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyborg, Per

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses social issues in the Bologna process and who benefits from these social issues. The Bologna Declaration did not come out of the blue. It was preceded by the 1998 Sorbonne Declaration, which in turn built on the 1997 Lisbon Recognition Convention. Rather than discussing recognition of exams and degrees, the author takes the…

  15. The Bologna Process between Structural Convergence and Institutional Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkel, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    The merging of the Bologna and the Copenhagen processes into a single European education area appears appropriate, especially as general, vocational, adult and academic education are to be integrated in a future European Qualification Framework (EQF). This is the backdrop to the following description of the Bologna process, which was originally…

  16. Teacher Perceptions of Bologna Reforms in Armenian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakhanyan, Susanna; Van Veen, Klaas; Bergen, Theo

    2012-01-01

    The perceptions of the implementation of the Bologna reforms in Armenian higher education were examined in a questionnaire study with 279 university teachers, revealing how eight leading higher education institutions have adapted to the political directive to create alignment with the Bologna principles. The literature on educational change is…

  17. The Bologna Process: Perspectives and Implications for the Russian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telegina, Galina; Schwengel, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    This article draws on the discourses of educational policy in Europe to focus on the implications of the Bologna Process for higher education in Russia. The Bologna Process, as a multi-dimensional discourse involving a variety of social actors, reflects some of the complexities and contradictions of globalisation, in many local cases evoking…

  18. Aspired Convergence, Cherished Diversity: Dealing with the Contradictions of Bologna

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte, Johanna

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses the inherent tension in the Bologna process between the aim of convergence and the will to maintain the diversity of national higher education (HE) systems, as well as the decentralised and autonomous nature of national policy formulation on Bologna reforms. Starting from an analytical discussion of the concepts of…

  19. The Bologna Process: Inception, "Take Up" and Familiarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neave, Guy; Veiga, Amelia

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the value of the Bologna Process in placing the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) on a solid institutional footing. How far has Bologna contributed to firming up the views academia, management and students have of the EHEA? The article is based on a survey administered across four systems of higher education in 2008. It…

  20. The Bologna Accord: A Model of Cooperation and Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Ross H.; Dunn, John M.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the process of transformation of higher education in Europe in response to the 1999 Bologna Accord. The "action lines" of the Bologna Process are described with particular attention to their influence on higher education in other countries, including the United States. The changes in Europe and the "external dimension"…

  1. Re-Contextualization of the Bologna Process in Lithuania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leisyte, Liudvika; Zelvys, Rimantas; Zenkiene, Lina

    2015-01-01

    The paper explores the implementation of selected Bologna action lines in Lithuanian higher education institutions (HEIs). The study is carried out from an organizational perspective on national re-contextualization, drawing upon sociological institutionalism. The Bologna process is likely to be normatively accepted by institutions in the context…

  2. The Interpretation and Implementation of the Bologna Process in Serbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Despotovic, Miomir

    2011-01-01

    This paper neither attacks nor defends the Bologna Declaration; rather, it attempts a critical assessment of its implementation in Serbia. Review of the available data shows that the higher education system in Serbia is inefficient and in profound need of reform. Analysis of some of the reform processes shows that the Bologna Declaration as a…

  3. The Design, Implementation and Evaluation of a Pilot Scheme Adapted to the Bologna Goals at Tertiary Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Purificacion

    2009-01-01

    The Bologna Declaration attempts to reform the structure of the higher education system in forty-six European countries in a convergent way. By 2010, the European space for higher education should be completed. In the 2005-2006 academic year, the University of Murcia, Spain, started promoting initiatives to adapt individual modules and entire…

  4. Clustering on very small scales from a large, complete sample of confirmed quasar pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D.; Djorgovski, Stanislav G.; Graham, Matthew J.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Mahabal, Ashish A.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2016-06-01

    We present by far the largest sample of spectroscopically confirmed binaryquasars with proper transverse separations of 17.0 ≤ Rprop ≤ 36.6 h-1 kpc. Our sample, whichis an order-of-magnitude larger than previous samples, is selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging over an area corresponding to the SDSS 6th data release (DR6). Our quasars are targeted using a Kernel Density Estimation technique (KDE), and confirmed using long-slit spectroscopy on a range of facilities.Our most complete sub-sample of 44 binary quasars with g<20.85, extends across angular scales of 2.9" < Δθ < 6.3", and is targeted from a parent sample that would be equivalent to a full spectroscopic survey of nearly 300,000 quasars.We determine the projected correlation function of quasars (\\bar Wp) over proper transverse scales of 17.0 ≤ Rprop ≤ 36.6 h-1 kpc, and also in 4 bins of scale within this complete range.To investigate the redshift evolution of quasar clustering on small scales, we make the first self-consistent measurement of the projected quasar correlation function in 4 bins of redshift over 0.4 ≤ z ≤ 2.3.

  5. DEMINERALIZER BUILDING, TRA608. INSTALLATION OF SAMPLING AND OTHER INSTRUMENTS COMPLETES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DEMINERALIZER BUILDING, TRA-608. INSTALLATION OF SAMPLING AND OTHER INSTRUMENTS COMPLETES DEMINERALIZER UNITS ALONG NORTH WALL. CAMERA FACES EAST. CARD IN LOWER RIGHT WAS INSERTED BY INL PHOTOGRAPHER TO COVER AN OBSOLETE SECURITY RESTRICTION PRINTED ON THE ORIGINAL NEGATIVE. INL NEGATIVE NO. 3996A. Unknown Photographer, 12/28/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Redshift and Optical Properties for S Statistically Complete Sample of Poor Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledlow, Michael J.; Loken, Chris; Burns, Jack O.; Hill, John M.; White, Richard A.

    1996-08-01

    From the poor cluster catalog of White et al. (1996), we define a sample of 71 optically-selected poor galaxy clusters. The surface-density enhancement we require for our clusters falls between that of the loose associations of Turner & Gott [AJ, 91,204(1976)] and the Hickson compact groups [Hickson, ApJ, 255, 382(1982)]. We review the selection biases and determine the statistical completeness of the sample. For this sample, we report new velocity measurements made with the ARC 3.5-m Dual-Imaging spectrograph and the 2.3-m Steward Observatory MX fiber spectrograph. Combining our own measurements with those from the literature, we examine the velocity distributions, velocity dispersions, and ID velocity substructure for our poor cluster sample, and compare our results to other poor cluster samples. We find that approximately half of the sample may have significant ID velocity substructure. The optical morphology, large-scale environment, and velocity field of many of these clusters are indicative of young, dynamically evolving systems. In future papers, we will use this sample to derive the poor cluster x-ray luminosity function and gas mass function, and will examine the optical/x-ray properties of the clusters in more detail.

  7. Massively parallel sequencing of complete mitochondrial genomes from hair shaft samples.

    PubMed

    Parson, Walther; Huber, Gabriela; Moreno, Lilliana; Madel, Maria-Bernadette; Brandhagen, Michael D; Nagl, Simone; Xavier, Catarina; Eduardoff, Mayra; Callaghan, Thomas C; Irwin, Jodi A

    2015-03-01

    Though shed hairs are one of the most commonly encountered evidence types, they are among the most limited in terms of DNA quantity and quality. As a result, DNA testing has historically focused on the recovery of just about 600 base pairs of the mitochondrial DNA control region. Here, we describe our success in recovering complete mitochondrial genome (mtGenome) data (∼16,569bp) from single shed hairs. By employing massively parallel sequencing (MPS), we demonstrate that particular hair samples yield DNA sufficient in quantity and quality to produce 2-3kb mtGenome amplicons and that entire mtGenome data can be recovered from hair extracts even without PCR enrichment. Most importantly, we describe a small amplicon multiplex assay comprised of sixty-two primer sets that can be routinely applied to the compromised hair samples typically encountered in forensic casework. In all samples tested here, the MPS data recovered using any one of the three methods were consistent with the control Sanger sequence data developed from high quality known specimens. Given the recently demonstrated value of complete mtGenome data in terms of discrimination power among randomly sampled individuals, the possibility of recovering mtGenome data from the most compromised and limited evidentiary material is likely to vastly increase the utility of mtDNA testing for hair evidence. PMID:25438934

  8. Estimating Vertex Measures in Social Networks by Sampling Completions of RDS Trees

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Bilal; Dombrowski, Kirk; Curtis, Ric; Wendel, Travis

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for obtaining network properties from incomplete data sets. Problems associated with missing data represent well-known stumbling blocks in Social Network Analysis. The method of “estimating connectivity from spanning tree completions” (ECSTC) is specifically designed to address situations where only spanning tree(s) of a network are known, such as those obtained through respondent driven sampling (RDS). Using repeated random completions derived from degree information, this method forgoes the usual step of trying to obtain final edge or vertex rosters, and instead aims to estimate network-centric properties of vertices probabilistically from the spanning trees themselves. In this paper, we discuss the problem of missing data and describe the protocols of our completion method, and finally the results of an experiment where ECSTC was used to estimate graph dependent vertex properties from spanning trees sampled from a graph whose characteristics were known ahead of time. The results show that ECSTC methods hold more promise for obtaining network-centric properties of individuals from a limited set of data than researchers may have previously assumed. Such an approach represents a break with past strategies of working with missing data which have mainly sought means to complete the graph, rather than ECSTC's approach, which is to estimate network properties themselves without deciding on the final edge set. PMID:25838988

  9. Complete identification of the Parkes half-Jansky sample of GHz peaked spectrum radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, N.; Snellen, I. A. G.; Schilizzi, R. T.; Lehnert, M. D.; Bremer, M. N.

    2007-03-01

    Context: Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies are generally thought to be the young counterparts of classical extended radio sources. Statistically complete samples of GPS sources are vital for studying the early evolution of radio-loud AGN and the trigger of their nuclear activity. The "Parkes half-Jansky" sample of GPS radio galaxies is such a sample, representing the southern counterpart of the 1998 Stanghellini sample of bright GPS sources. Aims: As a first step of the investigation of the sample, the host galaxies need to be identified and their redshifts determined. Methods: Deep R-band VLT-FORS1 and ESO 3.6 m EFOSC II images and long slit spectra have been taken for the unidentified sources in the sample. Results: We have identified all twelve previously unknown host galaxies of the radio sources in the sample. Eleven have host galaxies in the range 21.0 < RC < 23.0, while one object, PKS J0210+0419, is identified in the near infrared with a galaxy with Ks = 18.3. The redshifts of 21 host galaxies have been determined in the range 0.474 < z < 1.539, bringing the total number of redshifts to 39 (80%). Analysis of the absolute magnitudes of the GPS host galaxies show that at z>1 they are on average a magnitude fainter than classical 3C radio galaxies, as found in earlier studies. However their restframe UV luminosities indicate that there is an extra light contribution from the AGN, or from a population of young stars. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile (ESO prog. ID No. 073.B-0289(B)) and the European Southern Observatory 3.6 m Telescope, La Silla, Chile (prog. ID No. 073.B-0289(A)). Appendices are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. VLA observations of a complete sample of extragalactic X-ray sources. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schild, R.; Zamorani, G.; Gioia, I. M.; Feigelson, E. D.; Maccacaro, T.

    1983-01-01

    A complete sample of 35 X-ray selected sources found with the Einstein Observatory has been observed with the Very Large Array at 6 cm to investigate the relationship between radio and X-ray emission in extragalactic objects. Detections include three active galactic nuclei (AGNs), two clusters or groups of galaxies, two individual galaxies, and two BL Lac objects. The frequency of radio emission in X-ray selected AGNs is compared with that of optically selected quasars using the integral radio-optical luminosity function. The result suggests that the probability for X-ray selected quasars to be radio sources is higher than for those optically selected. No obvious correlation is found in the sample between the richness of X-ray luminosity of the cluster and the presence of a galaxy with radio luminosity at 5 GHz larger than 10 to the 30th ergs/s/Hz.

  11. Impact of different visible light spectra on oxygen absorption and surface discoloration of bologna sausage.

    PubMed

    Böhner, Nadine; Rieblinger, Klaus

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of several visible light spectra in various intensities on the oxygen absorption and surface color of sliced bologna. Sausage samples were stored in a gastight model packaging system and illuminated at 5°C with six single-colored LEDs covering the main part of the visible light spectrum. The initial oxygen level was set at 0.5% in order to simulate common residual oxygen amounts in conventional packaging. The oxygen absorption and the discoloration measured as changes in CIE a*-value were dependent from the applied light intensity. The color stability of bologna was differently affected by light of various wavelengths. The results show that the use of suitable LEDs with specific spectra for display illumination can help to reduce the light induced deterioration of cured sausages in retail markets. PMID:27343458

  12. Cosmology from the KISO Ultraviolet Excess Survey: a Complete Sample of White Dwarfs and Quasars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Gerald William

    1994-01-01

    Spectral types for 356 of the 1,186 objects comprising the Kiso Ultraviolet Excess (KUV) Survey are reported. Observations of 277 KUV objects were made at the Michigan-Dartmouth -MIT Observatory on Kitt Peak, using both the 2.4 meter Hiltner and 1.3 meter McGraw-Hill telescopes. Interesting objects reported include: 70 subdwarfs, 33 DA, 6 DQ and 3 DB white dwarfs, and 95 QSO and emission line objects. A search through the literature has revealed the spectral identification of an additional 79 KUV objects. This brings the total identified to 1,115 (94%), including samples of 234 white dwarfs and 170 quasars. The V/Vmax technique (Schmidt 1968) was applied to the complete samples of white dwarfs and quasars to estimate the limiting magnitude of the KUV Survey and construct luminosity functions of these populations. The limiting magnitude was estimated to be 17.35 from the KUV white dwarfs and 17.81 from the KUV quasars. Theoretical white dwarf luminosity functions (WDLF) are used with the observational WDLF determined in this work to estimate the age of the Galactic disc at our galactocentric radius to be between 8.0 Gyr and 110 Gyr, with 9.0 Gyr being the best estimate. If 1.0 Gyr is chosen as the interval between the creation event and star formation in the Galactic disc (Winget et al. 1987), the age of the universe is then estimated to be 10.0 Gyr. The deeper KUV Survey has be used to analyze the completeness of the Palomar-Green (PG) Survey. If completeness is defined by the number of KUV objects located in the overlapping area of the surveys, and brighter than their PG field's limiting magnitude, compared to the number of these KUV objects actually detected by the PG, then an estimate of completeness based on spectral type for the PG is: 57% for quasars, 58% for white dwarfs and 53% for all objects. Limits on the selection function of the PG are calculated, and the PG is determined to be approximately 75% complete out to between 15.15 and 16.15 magnitude where

  13. CosmoBolognaLib: C++ libraries for cosmological calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marulli, F.; Veropalumbo, A.; Moresco, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present the CosmoBolognaLib, a large set of Open Source C++ numerical libraries for cosmological calculations. CosmoBolognaLib is a living project aimed at defining a common numerical environment for cosmological investigations of the large-scale structure of the Universe. In particular, one of the primary focuses of this software is to help in handling astronomical catalogues, both real and simulated, measuring one-point, two-point and three-point statistics in configuration space, and performing cosmological analyses. In this paper, we discuss the main features of this software, providing an overview of all the available C++ classes implemented up to now. Both the CosmoBolognaLib and their associated doxygen documentation can be freely downloaded at https://github.com/federicomarulli/CosmoBolognaLib. We provide also some examples to explain how these libraries can be included in either C++ or Python codes.

  14. Assessing effective care in normal labor: the Bologna score.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, B; Porter, R

    2001-06-01

    The intention of the "Bologna score" is to quantify, both in an individual labor and in a wider population, the extent to which labors have been managed as if they are normal as opposed to complicated. In this way it may be possible to assess both attitudes and practices within a maternity service toward the effective care of normal labor. A scoring system for normal labor was proposed at the World Health Organization (Regional Office for Europe) Task Force Meeting on Monitoring and Evaluation of Perinatal Care, held in Bologna in January 2000. This paper describes conceptual development of the scale. Recommendations for future evaluation of the Bologna score's validity and potential include field testing globally, comparison with the Apgar score, and evaluation of the relative weight contributed by each of the five measures comprising the Bologna score. PMID:11380378

  15. Hard-X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei in the INTEGRAL complete sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, M.; Bassani, L.; Malizia, A.; Stephen, J. B.; Bird, A. J.; Bazzano, A.; Ubertini, P.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we present the hard-X-ray spectral analysis of a complete sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by INTEGRAL/IBIS. In conjunction with IBIS spectra, we make use of Swift/BAT data, with the aim of cross-calibrating the two instruments, studying source variability and constraining some important spectral parameters. We find that flux variability is present in at least 14 per cent of the sample, while spectral variability is found only in one object. There is general good agreement between BAT and IBIS spectra, despite a systematic mismatch of about 22 per cent in normalization. When fitted with a simple power-law model, type 1 and type 2 sources appear to have very similar average photon indices, suggesting that they are powered by the same mechanism. As expected, we also find that a simple power law does not always describe the data sufficiently well, thus indicating a certain degree of spectral complexity, which can be ascribed to features like a high energy cut-off and/or a reflection component. Fixing the reflection to be 0, 1 or 2, we find that our sample covers quite a large range in photon indices as well as cut-off energies; however, the spread is due only to a small number of objects, while the majority of the AGNs lie within well-defined boundaries of photon index (1 ≤ Γ ≤ 2) and cut-off energy (30 ≤ Ecut ≤ 300 keV).

  16. The X-ray luminosity temperature relation of a complete sample of low mass galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, S.; Maughan, B. J.; Giles, P. A.; Vikhlinin, A.; Pacaud, F.; Burenin, R.; Hornstrup, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present Chandra observations of 23 galaxy groups and low-mass galaxy clusters at 0.03 < z < 0.15 with a median temperature of ˜2 KeV. The sample is a statistically complete flux-limited subset of the 400 deg2 survey. We investigated the scaling relation between X-ray luminosity (L) and temperature (T), taking selection biases fully into account. The logarithmic slope of the bolometric L - T relation was found to be 3.29 ± 0.33, consistent with values typically found for samples of more massive clusters. In combination with other recent studies of the L - T relation we show that there is no evidence for the slope, normalisation, or scatter of the L - T relation of galaxy groups being different than that of massive clusters. The exception to this is that in the special case of the most relaxed systems, the slope of the core-excised L - T relation appears to steepen from the self-similar value found for massive clusters to a steeper slope for the lower mass sample studied here. Thanks to our rigorous treatment of selection biases, these measurements provide a robust reference against which to compare predictions of models of the impact of feedback on the X-ray properties of galaxy groups.

  17. LoCuSS: completing a volume limited sample of massive clusters with XMM-Subaru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Ying

    2009-10-01

    An XMM/Subaru study of 12 clusters shows that Mgas is an excellent mass proxy, with its scatter less than 3+/-6%. However the X-ray to weak lensing mass ratio is morphology dependent, and sensitive to inclusion/exclusion of individual clusters. A complete volume limited sample of 54 clusters with high quality X-ray and weak-lensing data will deliver the definitive constraints on mass bias with respect to morphology that are essential for proper control of systematics in forthcoming X-ray cluster cosmology programs aiming to measure the dark energy equation of state parameter w, and for any program wishing to add a sharp, multi-wavelength focus to investigations of cluster physics. Archival XMM and/or Chandra data exist for 50/54 clusters; we therefore request totaling 110 net ks for 4 clusters.

  18. Consistent estimation of complete neuronal connectivity in large neuronal populations using sparse "shotgun" neuronal activity sampling.

    PubMed

    Mishchenko, Yuriy

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the properties of recently proposed "shotgun" sampling approach for the common inputs problem in the functional estimation of neuronal connectivity. We study the asymptotic correctness, the speed of convergence, and the data size requirements of such an approach. We show that the shotgun approach can be expected to allow the inference of complete connectivity matrix in large neuronal populations under some rather general conditions. However, we find that the posterior error of the shotgun connectivity estimator grows quickly with the size of unobserved neuronal populations, the square of average connectivity strength, and the square of observation sparseness. This implies that the shotgun connectivity estimation will require significantly larger amounts of neuronal activity data whenever the number of neurons in observed neuronal populations remains small. We present a numerical approach for solving the shotgun estimation problem in general settings and use it to demonstrate the shotgun connectivity inference in the examples of simulated synfire and weakly coupled cortical neuronal networks. PMID:27515518

  19. Emission-line properties of optically and radio-selected complete quasar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, J. A.; Wampler, E. Joseph; Gaskell, C. Martin

    1989-01-01

    Spectrophotometry of two complete samples of quasars, one obtained from the flat radio spectra of the objects and the other from their optical colors, is presented. It is confirmed that the equivalent widths of the major UV emission lines decrease with increasing continuum luminosity (the Baldwin effect) and that the (Ly-alpha + N V)/C IV and 1909 A/C IV intensity ratios are also luminosity-dependent by virtue of the C IV luminosity dependence. It is shown that the Mg II/C IV intensity ratio and possibly the strengths of the blue Fe II emission features and the FWHM of the 1909 A blend are luminosity-dependent. These results generally support the Mushotzky and Ferland (1984) interpretation of the Baldwin effect in terms of a weak inverse correlation between the continuum luminosity and ionization parameter.

  20. Old stellar populations. 5: Absorption feature indices for the complete LICK/IDS sample of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worthey, Guy; Faber, S. M.; Gonzalez, J. Jesus; Burstein, D.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-one optical absorption features, 11 of which have been previously defined, are automatically measured in a sample of 460 stars. Following Gorgas et al., the indices are summarized in fitting functions that give index strengths as functions of stellar temperature, gravity, and (Fe/H). This project was carried out with the purpose of predicting index strengths in the integrated light of stellar populations of different ages and metallicities, but the data should be valuable for stellar studies in the Galaxy as well. Several of the new indices appear to be promising indicators of metallicity for old stellar populations. A complete list of index data and atmospheric parameters is available in computer-readable form.

  1. A complete sample of massive MaxBCG clusters for scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming

    2013-10-01

    Great progress on galaxy clusters has been made in the last several years with SZ and optical surveys. Some new puzzles also emerged and one of them is the mismatch between the stacked Planck SZ fluxes and the model expectations for the MaxBCG clusters. While previous studies regarding this puzzle require the calibration of the true mass and the standard pressure template, we bypass the intermediate steps to directly compare the pressure content derived from the X-ray data with the SZ flux, for massive MaxBCG clusters. This proposal requests XMM data for 9 clusters to complete a sample of 38 most massive MaxBCG clusters observed with either XMM or Chandra. The results will shed light on the mismatch puzzle and constrain the important scaling relations like Y_X - N_200 and Y_X - Y_SZ.

  2. A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Soria, Roberto; Tennant, Allyn F.; Yukita, Mihoko

    2011-11-01

    One hundred seven ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) with 0.3-10.0 keV luminosities in excess of 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} are identified in a complete sample of 127 nearby galaxies. The sample includes all galaxies within 14.5 Mpc above the completeness limits of both the Uppsala Galaxy Catalogue and the Infrared Astronomical Satellite survey. The galaxy sample spans all Hubble types, a four-decade range in mass, 7.5 < log (M/M{sub sun}) < 11.4, and in star formation rate, 0.0002 < SFR(M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) {<=} 3.6. ULXs are detected in this sample at rates of one per 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, one per {approx}0.5 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} star formation rate, and one per 57 Mpc{sup 3} corresponding to a luminosity density of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3}. At these rates we estimate as many as 19 additional ULXs remain undetected in fainter dwarf galaxies within the survey volume. An estimated 14 objects, or 13%, of the 107 ULX candidates are expected to be background sources. The differential ULX luminosity function shows a power-law slope {alpha} {approx} -0.8 to -2.0 with an exponential cutoff at {approx}20 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} with precise values depending on the model and on whether the ULX luminosities are estimated from their observed numbers of counts or, for a subset of candidates, from their spectral shapes. Extrapolating the observed luminosity function predicts at most one very luminous ULX, L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1}, within a distance as small as 100 Mpc. The luminosity distribution of ULXs within the local universe cannot account for the recent claims of luminosities in excess of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1}, requiring a new population class to explain these extreme objects.

  3. Quantifying Next Generation Sequencing Sample Pre-Processing Bias in HIV-1 Complete Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Vrancken, Bram; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Baele, Guy; van Wijngaerden, Eric; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; van Laethem, Kristel; Lemey, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Genetic analyses play a central role in infectious disease research. Massively parallelized "mechanical cloning" and sequencing technologies were quickly adopted by HIV researchers in order to broaden the understanding of the clinical importance of minor drug-resistant variants. These efforts have, however, remained largely limited to small genomic regions. The growing need to monitor multiple genome regions for drug resistance testing, as well as the obvious benefit for studying evolutionary and epidemic processes makes complete genome sequencing an important goal in viral research. In addition, a major drawback for NGS applications to RNA viruses is the need for large quantities of input DNA. Here, we use a generic overlapping amplicon-based near full-genome amplification protocol to compare low-input enzymatic fragmentation (Nextera™) with conventional mechanical shearing for Roche 454 sequencing. We find that the fragmentation method has only a modest impact on the characterization of the population composition and that for reliable results, the variation introduced at all steps of the procedure--from nucleic acid extraction to sequencing--should be taken into account, a finding that is also relevant for NGS technologies that are now more commonly used. Furthermore, by applying our protocol to deep sequence a number of pre-therapy plasma and PBMC samples, we illustrate the potential benefits of a near complete genome sequencing approach in routine genotyping. PMID:26751471

  4. Quantifying Next Generation Sequencing Sample Pre-Processing Bias in HIV-1 Complete Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vrancken, Bram; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Baele, Guy; van Wijngaerden, Eric; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; van Laethem, Kristel; Lemey, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Genetic analyses play a central role in infectious disease research. Massively parallelized “mechanical cloning” and sequencing technologies were quickly adopted by HIV researchers in order to broaden the understanding of the clinical importance of minor drug-resistant variants. These efforts have, however, remained largely limited to small genomic regions. The growing need to monitor multiple genome regions for drug resistance testing, as well as the obvious benefit for studying evolutionary and epidemic processes makes complete genome sequencing an important goal in viral research. In addition, a major drawback for NGS applications to RNA viruses is the need for large quantities of input DNA. Here, we use a generic overlapping amplicon-based near full-genome amplification protocol to compare low-input enzymatic fragmentation (Nextera™) with conventional mechanical shearing for Roche 454 sequencing. We find that the fragmentation method has only a modest impact on the characterization of the population composition and that for reliable results, the variation introduced at all steps of the procedure—from nucleic acid extraction to sequencing—should be taken into account, a finding that is also relevant for NGS technologies that are now more commonly used. Furthermore, by applying our protocol to deep sequence a number of pre-therapy plasma and PBMC samples, we illustrate the potential benefits of a near complete genome sequencing approach in routine genotyping. PMID:26751471

  5. Social and Cultural Factors Affecting Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Use during Menopause in Sydney and Bologna

    PubMed Central

    van der Sluijs, Corinne; Lombardo, Flavia L.; Lesi, Grazia; Bensoussan, Alan; Cardini, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Background. Previous surveys found CAM use during menopause to be popular. This paper compares the results from two surveys (Sydney and Bologna) to examine factors that determine the extent and pattern of CAM use to alleviate menopausal symptoms. Methods. Women, aged 45–65 years, who were symptomatic when transitioning through menopause or asymptomatic but taking menopause-specific treatments, were recruited in Sydney (n=1,296) and Bologna (n=1,106) to complete the same voluntary, anonymous, and self-administered questionnaire. The results were reanalysed using stratified analyses to determine similarities and differences. Results. Demographics of the two cohorts differed significantly. CAM was more popular in Sydney. The most significant determinants of CAM use were the use of CAM for other conditions besides menopause and the severity of vasomotor symptoms. Occupational status was a determinant of CAM use amongst Bologna respondents only. In order to relieve symptoms, Australian and Italian women used different CAM modalities whose effectiveness was generally perceived as good. Conclusion. CAM use is popular amongst menopausal women from Sydney and Bologna. Differences in the patterns of CAM use seem to depend on CAM availability and on the educational level and professional status of users. The complex interaction between market, social, and cultural factors of CAM use seems to be more influential on women's choice of CAM than the available evidence of their effectiveness. PMID:24459531

  6. The optical-infrared colour distribution of a statistically complete sample of faint field spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menanteau, F.; Ellis, R. S.; Abraham, R. G.; Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.

    1999-10-01

    In hierarchical models, where spheroidal galaxies are primarily produced via a continuous merging of disc galaxies, the number of intrinsically red systems at faint limits will be substantially lower than in `traditional' models where the bulk of star formation was completed at high redshifts. In this paper we analyse the optical-near-infrared colour distribution of a large flux-limited sample of field spheroidal galaxies identified morphologically from archival Hubble Space Telescope data. The I_814-HK' colour distribution for a sample jointly limited at I_814<23mag and HK'<19.5mag is used to constrain their star formation history. We compare visual and automated methods for selecting spheroidals from our deep HST images and, in both cases, detect a significant deficit of intrinsically red spheroidals relative to the predictions of high-redshift monolithic-collapse models. However, the overall space density of spheroidals (irrespective of colour) is not substantially different from that seen locally. Spectral synthesis modelling of our results suggests that high-redshift spheroidals are dominated by evolved stellar populations polluted by some amount of subsidiary star formation. Despite its effect on the optical-infrared colour, this star formation probably makes only a modest contribution to the overall stellar mass. We briefly discuss the implications of our results in the context of earlier predictions based on models where spheroidals assemble hierarchically.

  7. Completion of a worldwide reference panel of samples for an ancestry informative Indel assay.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carla; Phillips, Christopher; Oldoni, Fabio; Amigo, Jorge; Fondevila, Manuel; Pereira, Rui; Carracedo, Ángel; Lareu, Maria Victoria

    2015-07-01

    The use of ancestry informative markers (AIMs) in forensic analysis is of considerable utility since ancestry inference can progress an investigation when no identification has been made of DNA from the crime-scene. Short-amplicon markers, including insertion deletion polymorphisms, are particularly useful in forensic analysis due to their mutational stability, capacity to amplify degraded samples and straightforward amplification technique. In this study we report the completion of H952 HGDP-CEPH panel genotyping with a set of 46 AIM-Indels. The study adds Central South Asian and Middle Eastern population data, allowing a comparison of patterns of variation in Eurasia for these markers, in order to enhance their use in forensic analyses, particularly when combined with sets of ancestry informative SNPs. Ancestry analysis using principal component analysis and Bayesian methods indicates that a proportion of classification error occurs with European-Middle East population comparisons, but the 46 AIM-Indels have the capability to differentiate six major population groups when European-Central South Asian comparisons are made. These findings have relevance for forensic ancestry analyses in countries where South Asians form much of the demographic profile, including the UK, USA and South Africa. A novel third allele detected in MID-548 was characterized - despite a low frequency in the HGDP-CEPH panel samples, it appears confined to Central South Asian populations, increasing the ability to differentiate this population group. The H952 data set was implemented in a new open access SPSmart frequency browser - forInDel: Forensic Indel browser. PMID:25840342

  8. MID- AND FAR-INFRARED PROPERTIES OF A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF LOCAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Kohei; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Terashima, Yuichi; Oyabu, Shinki; Gandhi, Poshak; Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuta, Keiko

    2012-07-20

    We investigate the mid- (MIR) to far-infrared (FIR) properties of a nearly complete sample of local active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected in the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) all-sky hard X-ray (14-195 keV) survey, based on the cross correlation with the AKARI infrared survey catalogs complemented by those with Infrared Astronomical Satellite and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. Out of 135 non-blazer AGNs in the Swift/BAT nine-month catalog, we obtain the MIR photometric data for 128 sources either in the 9, 12, 18, 22, and/or 25 {mu}m band. We find good correlation between their hard X-ray and MIR luminosities over three orders of magnitude (42 < log {lambda}L{sub {lambda}}(9, 18 {mu}m) < 45), which is tighter than that with the FIR luminosities at 90 {mu}m. This suggests that thermal emission from hot dusts irradiated by the AGN emission dominate the MIR fluxes. Both X-ray unabsorbed and absorbed AGNs follow the same correlation, implying isotropic infrared emission, as expected in clumpy dust tori rather than homogeneous ones. We find excess signals around 9 {mu}m in the averaged infrared spectral energy distribution from heavy obscured 'new type' AGNs with small scattering fractions in the X-ray spectra. This could be attributed to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission feature, suggesting that their host galaxies have strong starburst activities.

  9. X-ray spectra of a complete sample of extragalactic core-dominated radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunner, H.; Lamer, G.; Worrall, D. M.; Staubert, R.

    1994-01-01

    We present ROSAT soft X-ray spectra for the members of a complete sample of 13 core-dominated, flat radio spectrum sources. The sample comprises all radio sources from a flux-limited radio catalog (S(sub 5GHz) greater than 1 Jy; Kuehr et al. 1981) which are north of delta = 70 deg, at galactic latitudes b greater than 10 deg, and have a flat radio spectrum between 1.4 and 5 GHz (alpha(sub r) less than 0.5; f approximately nu(sup -alpha)). The sources have already undergone much study at radio and optical wavelengths and are classified in broad terms as quasars (8 sources) and BL Lac objects (5 sources). We find mean X-ray power-law energy indices of alpha(sub x) = 0.59 +/- 0.19 for the quasars and 1.36 +/- 0.27 for the BL Lac objects (68% confidence range for two parameters of interest as determined by a maximum likelihood method), supporting earlier Einstein Observatory results for heterogeneous samples of sources (Worrall & Wilkes 1990). A non-zero dispersion on alpha(sub x) is found for both the quasars and the BL Lac objects. When we incorporate published radio, mm, and optical measurements and compare the X-ray and broad-band spectral indices alpha(sub x), alpha(sub rx), alpha(sub mm,x), and alpha(sub ox), the most obvious difference between the quasar and BL Lac subsamples lies within the X-ray band. We have fitted the multi-wavelength data to inhomogeneous synchotron-self-Compton models and find that, for the BL Lac objects with steep X-ray spectra, synchotron emission can account for the radio to soft X-ray measurements, whereas the BL Lac objects with hard X-ray spectra and the quasars require significant Compton emission to model the spectral flattening indicated by alpha(sub x) less than alpha(sub ox).

  10. Framing the Salmonidae Family Phylogenetic Portrait: A More Complete Picture from Increased Taxon Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Crête-Lafrenière, Alexis; Weir, Laura K.; Bernatchez, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Considerable research efforts have focused on elucidating the systematic relationships among salmonid fishes; an understanding of these patterns of relatedness will inform conservation- and fisheries-related issues, as well as provide a framework for investigating evolutionary mechanisms in the group. However, uncertainties persist in current Salmonidae phylogenies due to biological and methodological factors, and a comprehensive phylogeny including most representatives of the family could provide insight into the causes of these difficulties. Here we increase taxon sampling by including nearly all described salmonid species (n = 63) to present a time-calibrated and more complete portrait of Salmonidae using a combination of molecular markers and analytical techniques. This strategy improved resolution by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio and helped discriminate methodological and systematic errors from sources of difficulty associated with biological processes. Our results highlight novel aspects of salmonid evolution. First, we call into question the widely-accepted evolutionary relationships among sub-families and suggest that Thymallinae, rather than Coregoninae, is the sister group to the remainder of Salmonidae. Second, we find that some groups in Salmonidae are older than previously thought and that the mitochondrial rate of molecular divergence varies markedly among genes and clades. We estimate the age of the family to be 59.1 MY (CI: 63.2-58.1 MY) old, which likely corresponds to the timing of whole genome duplication in salmonids. The average, albeit highly variable, mitochondrial rate of molecular divergence was estimated as ∼0.31%/MY (CI: 0.27–0.36%/MY). Finally, we suggest that some species require taxonomic revision, including two monotypic genera, Stenodus and Salvethymus. In addition, we resolve some relationships that have been notoriously difficult to discern and present a clearer picture of the evolution of the group. Our findings

  11. A Complete Sample of Hot Post-AGB Stars in Globular Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, W.; Moehler, S.; Napiwotzki, R.; Heber, U.; Sweigart, A.; Catelan, M.; Stecher, T.

    1999-01-01

    Ultraviolet images of globular clusters are often dominated by one or two "UV-bright" stars. The most luminous of these are believed to be post-AGB stars, which go through a luminous UV-bright phase as they leave the AGB and move rapidly across the HR diagram toward their final white dwarf state. During the two flights of the ASTRO observatory in 1990 and 1995, the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT, Stecher 1997, PASP, 109, 584) was used to obtained ultraviolet (1600 A) images of 14 globular clusters. These images provide a complete census of hot (> 8000 K) post-AGB stars in the observed globular clusters, because the 40' field of view of UIT is large enough to image the entire population of most Galactic globulars, and because the dominant cool star population is suppressed in ultraviolet images, allowing UV-bright stars to be detected into the cluster core. We have begun a program of optical and STIS ultraviolet spectroscopy to determine the fundamental stellar parameters (\\log L, T_eff, \\log g) of all the hot post-AGB candidates discovered on the UIT images. Among the goals of our program are to test theoretical post-AGB lifetimes across the HR diagram, and to estimate the mass of the currently forming white dwarfs in globular clusters. Two trends are already apparent in our survey. First, the UV-selected sample has removed a bias against the detection of the hottest post-AGB stars, and resulted in the discovery of five cluster post-AGB stars with Teff > 50,000 K. Second, most of the new discoveries have been lower luminosity (2.5 $<$\\log L $<$ 3.0) than expected for stars which leave the AGB during the thermally pulsating phase.

  12. THE ELM SURVEY. I. A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF EXTREMELY LOW-MASS WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Warren R.; Kilic, Mukremin; Kenyon, Scott J.; Prieto, Carlos Allende E-mail: mkilic@cfa.harvard.ed E-mail: callende@iac.e

    2010-11-10

    We analyze radial velocity observations of the 12 extremely low-mass (ELM), with {<=}0.25 M{sub sun}, white dwarfs (WDs) in the MMT Hypervelocity Star Survey. Eleven of the twelve WDs are binaries with orbital periods shorter than 14 hr; the one non-variable WD is possibly a pole-on system among our non-kinematically selected targets. Our sample is unique: it is complete in a well-defined range of apparent magnitude and color. The orbital mass functions imply that the unseen companions are most likely other WDs, although neutron star companions cannot be excluded. Six of the eleven systems with orbital solutions will merge within a Hubble time due to the loss of angular momentum through gravitational wave radiation. The quickest merger is J0923+3028, a g = 15.7 ELM WD binary with a 1.08 hr orbital period and a {<=}130 Myr merger time. The chance of a supernova Ia event among our ELM WDs is only 1%-7%, however. Three binary systems (J0755+4906, J1233+1602, and J2119-0018) have extreme mass ratios and will most likely form stable mass-transfer AM CVn systems. Two of these objects, SDSS J1233+1602 and J2119-0018, are the lowest surface gravity WDs ever found; both show Ca II absorption likely from accretion of circumbinary material. We predict that at least one of our WDs is an eclipsing detached double WD system, important for constraining helium core WD models.

  13. The Stripe 82 Massive Galaxy Project - II. Stellar mass completeness of spectroscopic galaxy samples from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leauthaud, Alexie; Bundy, Kevin; Saito, Shun; Tinker, Jeremy; Maraston, Claudia; Tojeiro, Rita; Huang, Song; Brownstein, Joel R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Thomas, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) has collected spectra for over one million galaxies at 0.15 < z < 0.7 over a volume of 15.3 Gpc3 (9376 deg2) - providing us an opportunity to study the most massive galaxy populations with vanishing sample variance. However, BOSS samples are selected via complex colour cuts that are optimized for cosmology studies, not galaxy science. In this paper, we supplement BOSS samples with photometric redshifts from the Stripe 82 Massive Galaxy Catalog and measure the total galaxy stellar mass function (SMF) at z ˜ 0.3 and z ˜ 0.55. With the total SMF in hand, we characterize the stellar mass completeness of BOSS samples. The high-redshift CMASS (constant mass) sample is significantly impacted by mass incompleteness and is 80 per cent complete at log 10(M*/M⊙) > 11.6 only in the narrow redshift range z = [0.51, 0.61]. The low-redshift LOWZ sample is 80 per cent complete at log 10(M*/M⊙) > 11.6 for z = [0.15, 0.43]. To construct mass complete samples at lower masses, spectroscopic samples need to be significantly supplemented by photometric redshifts. This work will enable future studies to better utilize the BOSS samples for galaxy-formation science.

  14. The Academy of Science of Bologna and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Bonomini, V; Campieri, C; Zuccoli, M

    1999-01-01

    The Academy of Science of Bologna, founded in 1711, played an important role in the development of medicine. Receiving the heritage of Malpighi's and Morgagni's researches, the academy encouraged nephrological studies, which produced articles published in its journal, the Commentarii. Since the Commentarii were widely distributed all over Europe, the nephrological research practiced in Bologna reached all the main academies of science, in a fruitful circulation of knowledge. The paper presents the nephrological contributions to the Commentarii in the 18th century, thus introducing physicians, like Domenico Galeazzi and Luigi Galvani, who were both professors at the University of Bologna and at the Academy of Science. In their work three main topics can be identified: uroscopy, anatomy of the kidney and renal pathologies. PMID:10213815

  15. Selective Acquiescence, Creative Commitment and Strategic Conformity: Situated National Policy Responses to Bologna

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sin, Cristina; Saunders, Murray

    2014-01-01

    The non-binding nature of the Bologna Declaration and loose policy-making and implementation through the open method of coordination (OMC) have led to varied national responses to the Bologna Process. The OMC has allowed countries room for manoeuvre to interpret Bologna policy and attach different degrees of importance to it. Looking at the…

  16. Normative Influence of the Bologna Process on French-Speaking African Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croche, Sarah; Charlier, Jean-Emile

    2012-01-01

    The Bologna Process experienced a rapidly growing and an unexpected level of support. The authors revisit the key moments of the strategic promotion of the Bologna model and address the issue of the advantages other countries from other continents might gain from lining up with versions of the Bologna model. During the first years, the Process…

  17. The Bologna Process and Its Impact on University-Level Chemical Education in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the Bologna Process, an effort by a consortium of nearly 50 European countries trying to standardize the higher education system in Europe. Starting from a nonbinding agreement (the 1999 Bologna Declaration), the Bologna Process involves a voluntary joint venture for the construction of a European higher education area…

  18. Impact of the Bologna Process on Turkish Higher Education: The Case of Izmir University of Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esen, Oguz; Gürleyen, Isik; Binatli, Ayla Ogus

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on Turkey's experience of the Bologna Process. Its main objective is to contribute to the literature on the impact of Bologna Process on national higher education systems regarding the issue of curricula development. It argues that the Bologna Process has fostered development of transparent and systematic curricula, which…

  19. Bologna Process between Prague and Berlin. Report to the Ministers of Education of the Signatory Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zgaga, Pavel

    In Bologna, Italy, in 1999 a declaration was signed that spelled out the beginnings of a common European Higher Education Area. At a summit in Prague, Czech Republic, in 2001, the idea initiated in Bologna was clearly endorsed. In the successive period from 2001 to 2003, awareness of the importance of the Bologna process and the real need for the…

  20. Complete Genome Sequences of Three African Foot-and-Mouth Disease Viruses from Clinical Samples Isolated in 2009 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Rosseel, Toon; Haegeman, Andy; Fana, Mpolokang Elliot; Seoke, Latoa; Hyera, Joseph; Matlho, George; Vandenbussche, Frank; De Clercq, Kris

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequences of three foot-and-mouth disease viruses (one virus of each serotype SAT1, SAT2 and O) were directly sequenced from RNA extracted from clinical bovine samples, demonstrating the feasibility of full-genome sequencing from strong positive samples taken from symptomatic animals. PMID:27151795

  1. Complete Genome Sequences of Three African Foot-and-Mouth Disease Viruses from Clinical Samples Isolated in 2009 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Van Borm, Steven; Rosseel, Toon; Haegeman, Andy; Fana, Mpolokang Elliot; Seoke, Latoa; Hyera, Joseph; Matlho, George; Vandenbussche, Frank; De Clercq, Kris

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequences of three foot-and-mouth disease viruses (one virus of each serotype SAT1, SAT2 and O) were directly sequenced from RNA extracted from clinical bovine samples, demonstrating the feasibility of full-genome sequencing from strong positive samples taken from symptomatic animals. PMID:27151795

  2. Student Assessment in Portugal: Academic Practice and Bologna Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sin, Cristina; Manatos, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates institutional policies and academic practices of student assessment in four Portuguese higher education institutions (HEIs) in the wake of European policy developments driven by the Bologna Process. Specifically, it examines the correspondence between European policy recommendations related to student assessment (promotion…

  3. Developing the European Researcher: "Extended" Professionality within the Bologna Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Since 2003, doctoral education has become a key feature within the remit of the Bologna Process. Perceived as a crucial link between the European Higher Education Area and the European Research Area, it is perceived as the cornerstone upon which will be built Europe's future world-class research excellence. Yet consideration of how European…

  4. The Bologna Process from a Latin American Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Jose Joaquin

    2009-01-01

    Although Latin America's geography, history, and languages might seem a suitable foundation for a Bologna-type process, the development of a common Latin American higher education and research area meets predictable difficulties.The reasons are to be found in the continent's historic and modern institutional patterns. Latin American governments…

  5. The Bologna Process, Globalisation and Engineering Education Developments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhomoibhi, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on the Bologna Process in the light of globalisation and examine how it affects curriculum and engineering education developments. Design/methodology/approach: The growing need for creative competitiveness and the striving for specific profiles of engineering qualifications that are of high quality…

  6. Problems of Russia's Entry into the Bologna Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobren'kova, Ekaterina Vladimirovna

    2008-01-01

    Accomplishing the tasks spelled out in the 1999 Bologna Declaration requires reforming the structures of higher education in the countries of Europe to bring them into closer harmony, while preserving fundamental values and traditions in education that have been formed in each country. The author discusses fundamental differences between the…

  7. Bologna Network: A New Sociopolitical Area in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croche, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    The project of the Bologna process to create a "European Higher Education Area" (EHEA) has established the necessary conditions for the emergence of a new sociopolitical space of higher education in Europe. This space has become a cooperation/competition area that changes the European and national balance of power: the relations the countries…

  8. Blueprint for Bologna: University of Prishtina and the European Union

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epp, Juanita Ross; Epp, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Countries hoping to demonstrate an adequate educational infrastructure need a national framework that meets Bologna requirements, a national accreditation agency which sets out the approved framework, and national accreditation processes by which individual institutions can be measured against the standards set by the national accreditation…

  9. The Bologna Process and the European Gain: Africa's Development Demise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawa, Lester Brian

    2008-01-01

    The Bologna process is a fundamental restructuring of higher education in Europe, of which the introduction of three cycles: bachelor's, master's and doctorate, in lieu of the traditional long program is the single most important feature. Its objectives are to increase the employability of European citizens and the competitiveness and…

  10. "Running the Gauntlet": The Bologna Process in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattheou, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    Greece has not been among the signatory countries that rushed enthusiastically into the implementation of the Bologna process; it has only gradually and grudgingly managed to adopt some of its provisions over the past decade. This paper sheds light on the forces and factors that have put obstacles in its way, including: (1) the epistemological…

  11. E-Assessment within the Bologna Paradigm: Evidence from Portugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrao, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The Bologna Declaration brought reforms into higher education that imply changes in teaching methods, didactic materials and textbooks, infrastructures and laboratories, etc. Statistics and mathematics are disciplines that traditionally have the worst success rates, particularly in non-mathematics core curricula courses. This research project,…

  12. Bologna--Realising Old or New Ideals of Quality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrano-Velarde, Kathia; Stensaker, Bjorn

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the meanings of quality in the Humboldtian university ideal and in the Bologna process, especially related to issues of institutional autonomy, academic freedom and the integration of teaching and research. The article gives an overview of current practices associated with quality and quality assurance in Germany and Norway.…

  13. Survey on the Implementation of the Bologna Process in Portugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veiga, Amelia; Amaral, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    For several years Portuguese higher education institutions have been waiting for the legislation framework necessary for the implementation of the Bologna process. Such legislation was passed quite recently (2006) and has resulted in an unexpected flood of proposals presented at very short notice by higher education institutions to the Ministry.…

  14. The Bologna Process and the Czech System of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pol, Milan

    2005-01-01

    The Czech system of education has been through several years of relatively intensive transformation efforts reflecting the international processes of transformation of higher education the Czech Republic joined. The most important external stimulus directing the transformation process is the so-called Bologna process. These complex and…

  15. The links between medical school of Bologna and Ionian Academy.

    PubMed

    Lascaratos, J; Marketos, S

    1989-01-01

    The Ionian Academy, on the British dominion island of Corfu (Kerkyra), was founded in 1824 and his Medical School functioned during two separate periods (1824-1828, 1844-1865). It was the first Greek University. Among the 15 professors of the Academy's Medical School, 12 studied at various Italian universities. In particular, three of them, G. Therianos, Professor of Comparative Anatomy and Experimental Physics, G. Grassetti, Professor of Physiology and S. Arvanitakis, Professor of Pathology and Hygiene, either studied or graduated at the Medical school of Bologna University. Another Bologna graduate, Rokkos Pylarios, was appointed to the chair of Professor in Surgery and Gynecology - though it is not known if he actually took up the position. It is concluded that the Medical School of Bologna, as a centre of original medical study, contributed significantly to the foundation and development of the Ionian Academy. Moreover, the Greek physicians who had studied either at the University of Bologna or at the Ionian Academy, contributed to the renaissance of neohellenic medicine during the 19th century. PMID:11640087

  16. Bologna Process Principles Integrated into Education System of Kazakhstan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nessipbayeva, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the fulfillment of the parameters of the Bologna Process in the education system of Kazakhstan. The author gives short review of higher education system of the Republic of Kazakhstan with necessary data. And the weaknesses of the system of higher education are identified. Moreover, implementing…

  17. Marcello Malpighi and his academic opponents in Bologna.

    PubMed

    Campieri, Claudio; Persici, Elisa; Stefoni, Sergio

    2004-01-01

    Marcello Malpighi was born in Crevalcore on March 10, 1628 and died in Rome on July 25, 1694. In Bologna he had among his opponents Giovanni Gerolamo Sbaraglia and Paoli Mini who prevented him being appointed to the chair of anatomy. This paper describes the reasons for this long term debate. PMID:15372430

  18. Region and edge-adaptive sampling and boundary completion for segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Dillard, Scott E; Prasad, Lakshman; Grazzini, Jacopo A

    2010-01-01

    Edge detection produces a set of points that are likely to lie on discontinuities between objects within an image. We consider faces of the Gabriel graph of these points, a sub-graph of the Delaunay triangulation. Features are extracted by merging these faces using size, shape and color cues. We measure regional properties of faces using a novel shape-dependant sampling method that overcomes undesirable sampling bias of the Delaunay triangles. Instead, sampling is biased so as to smooth regional statistics within the detected object boundaries, and this smoothing adapts to local geometric features of the shape such as curvature, thickness and straightness.

  19. Ukraine and the Bologna Process: A Case Study of the Impact of the Bologna Process on Ukrainian State Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovtun, Olena; Stick, Sheldon

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a case study exploring perceptions of selected administrators and instructors at a Ukrainian state institution regarding the effectiveness of the Bologna Process at their institution. Data were collected from focus group interviews with five volunteer instructors involved in the implementation process. The…

  20. Bologna Trends 2010: The Implementation of the Bologna Process and a Move towards a "New Global Regionalism"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Observatory on Borderless Higher Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The European University Association, whose members include European higher educations institutions across 46 countries, just published Trends 2010, the sixth in the Trends series, its flagship pan-European report. The principal aim of the 2010 report is to situate and analyse the implementation of the Bologna Process, an initiative to create a…

  1. Sampling Participants’ Experience in Laboratory Experiments: Complementary Challenges for More Complete Data Collection

    PubMed Central

    McAuliffe, Alan; McGann, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Speelman and McGann’s (2013) examination of the uncritical way in which the mean is often used in psychological research raises questions both about the average’s reliability and its validity. In the present paper, we argue that interrogating the validity of the mean involves, amongst other things, a better understanding of the person’s experiences, the meaning of their actions, at the time that the behavior of interest is carried out. Recently emerging approaches within Psychology and Cognitive Science have argued strongly that experience should play a more central role in our examination of behavioral data, but the relationship between experience and behavior remains very poorly understood. We outline some of the history of the science on this fraught relationship, as well as arguing that contemporary methods for studying experience fall into one of two categories. “Wide” approaches tend to incorporate naturalistic behavior settings, but sacrifice accuracy and reliability in behavioral measurement. “Narrow” approaches maintain controlled measurement of behavior, but involve too specific a sampling of experience, which obscures crucial temporal characteristics. We therefore argue for a novel, mid-range sampling technique, that extends Hurlburt’s descriptive experience sampling, and adapts it for the controlled setting of the laboratory. This controlled descriptive experience sampling may be an appropriate tool to help calibrate both the mean and the meaning of an experimental situation with one another. PMID:27242588

  2. Sample stability for complete blood cell count using the Sysmex XN haematological analyser

    PubMed Central

    Daves, Massimo; Zagler, Elmar M.; Cemin, Roberto; Gnech, Flora; Joos, Alexandra; Platzgummer, Stefan; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background Sample stability is a crucial aspect for the quality of results of a haematology laboratory. This study was conducted to investigate the reliability of haematological testing using Sysmex XN in samples stored for up to 24 h at different temperatures. Materials and methods Haematological tests were performed on whole blood samples collected from 16 ostensibly healthy outpatients immediately after collection and 3 h, 6 h or 24 h afterwards, with triple aliquots kept at room temperature, 4 °C or 37 °C. Results No meaningful bias was observed after 3 h under different storage conditions, except for red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and platelet count (impedance technique, PLT-I) at 37 °C. After 6 h, meaningful bias was observed for mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) at room temperature, red blood cell (RBC) count, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC), MCH, MCV and PLT-I at 4 °C, and RBC, RDW, MCHC, MCH and PLT-I at 37 °C. After 24 h, a meaningful bias was observed for MCHC, MCV, platelet count (fluorescent technique, PLT-F) and mean platelet volume (MPV) at room temperature, MCHC, MCV, PLT-I and MPV at 4 °C, and all parameters except RBC count and MPV at 37 °C. Discussion Great caution should be observed when analysing results of haematological tests conducted more than 3 h after sample collection. PMID:26057491

  3. Hard X-Rays from a Complete Sample of the Brightest Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, David B.

    2003-01-01

    We were awarded 70kS of XMM-Newton spacecraft time using the Epic pn camera to observe three ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIGs) in order to measure the spectral shape of their hard X-Ray emission, and to use this information to search for the presence of an highly obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN), and to separate out the contributions from a putative starburst. By observing three objects we hope to be able to better assess the role of AGN in the complete class of ULIGs and therefore to better constrain their contribution to the X-ray background. XMM-Newton was deemed to be better suited to our proposed measurements of ULIGs than the Chandra X-ray observatory due to its larger aperture and better sensitivity to hard (2-10 keV) X-rays.

  4. Minimally destructive sampling of type specimens of Pyropia (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) recovers complete plastid and mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Hughey, Jeffery R; Gabrielson, Paul W; Rohmer, Laurence; Tortolani, Jacquie; Silva, Mayra; Miller, Kathy Ann; Young, Joel D; Martell, Craig; Ruediger, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Plant species, including algae and fungi, are based on type specimens to which the name of a taxon is permanently attached. Applying a scientific name to any specimen therefore requires demonstrating correspondence between the type and that specimen. Traditionally, identifications are based on morpho-anatomical characters, but recently systematists are using DNA sequence data. These studies are flawed if the DNA is isolated from misidentified modern specimens. We propose a genome-based solution. Using 4 × 4 mm(2) of material from type specimens, we assembled 14 plastid and 15 mitochondrial genomes attributed to the red algae Pyropia perforata, Py. fucicola, and Py. kanakaensis. The chloroplast genomes were fairly conserved, but the mitochondrial genomes differed significantly among populations in content and length. Complete genomes are attainable from 19(th) and early 20(th) century type specimens; this validates the effort and cost of their curation as well as supports the practice of the type method. PMID:24894641

  5. The Quasar Fraction in Low-Frequency Selected Complete Samples and Implications for Unified Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willott, Chris J.; Rawlings, Steve; Blundell, Katherine M.; Lacy, Mark

    2000-01-01

    Low-frequency radio surveys are ideal for selecting orientation-independent samples of extragalactic sources because the sample members are selected by virtue of their isotropic steep-spectrum extended emission. We use the new 7C Redshift Survey along with the brighter 3CRR and 6C samples to investigate the fraction of objects with observed broad emission lines - the 'quasar fraction' - as a function of redshift and of radio and narrow emission line luminosity. We find that the quasar fraction is more strongly dependent upon luminosity (both narrow line and radio) than it is on redshift. Above a narrow [OII] emission line luminosity of log(base 10) (L(sub [OII])/W) approximately > 35 [or radio luminosity log(base 10) (L(sub 151)/ W/Hz.sr) approximately > 26.5], the quasar fraction is virtually independent of redshift and luminosity; this is consistent with a simple unified scheme with an obscuring torus with a half-opening angle theta(sub trans) approximately equal 53 deg. For objects with less luminous narrow lines, the quasar fraction is lower. We show that this is not due to the difficulty of detecting lower-luminosity broad emission lines in a less luminous, but otherwise similar, quasar population. We discuss evidence which supports at least two probable physical causes for the drop in quasar fraction at low luminosity: (i) a gradual decrease in theta(sub trans) and/or a gradual increase in the fraction of lightly-reddened (0 approximately < A(sub V) approximately < 5) lines-of-sight with decreasing quasar luminosity; and (ii) the emergence of a distinct second population of low luminosity radio sources which, like M8T, lack a well-fed quasar nucleus and may well lack a thick obscuring torus.

  6. Complete Analytical Data for Samples of Jurassic Igneous Rocks in the Bald Mountain Mining District, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents all petrographic, major oxide, and trace element data for a set of 109 samples collected during an investigation of Jurassic igneous rocks in the Bald Mountain mining district, Nevada. Igneous rocks in the district include the Bald Mountain stock, quartz-feldspar porphyry dikes, basaltic andesite dikes, aplite sills, and rare lamprophyre dikes. These rocks, although variably altered near intrusion-related mineral deposits, are fresh in many parts of the district. Igneous rocks in the district are hosted by Paleozoic sedimentary rocks.

  7. Linkage analysis of a completely ascertained sample of familial schizophrenics and bipolars from Palau, Micronesia.

    PubMed

    Klei, Lambertus; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Myles-Worsley, Marina; Galke, Brandi; Xie, Weiting; Tiobech, Josepha; Otto, Caleb; Roeder, Kathyrn; Devlin, Bernie; Byerley, William

    2005-08-01

    We report on linkage analysis of a completely ascertained population of familial psychosis derived from the oceanic nation of Palau. Palau, an archipelago of islands in the Southern Pacific, currently has a population of approximately 23,000 individuals. The peoples of Palau populated these islands recently in human history, approximately 2,000 years ago. As both historical and genetic evidence suggest, the population is far more homogeneous than most other populations undergoing genetic studies, and should therefore prove quite useful for mapping genetic variants having a meaningful impact on susceptibility to psychotic disorders. Moreover, for our study, essentially all on-island schizophrenics (150) and individuals with other psychotic disorders (25) participated. By analysis of narrow (only schizophrenia) and broad (all psychosis) diagnostic schemes, two-point linkage analyses suggest that two regions of the genome harbor genetic variants affecting liability in most families, 3q28 (LOD = 3.03) and 17q32.2 (LOD = 2.80). Results from individual pedigrees also support 2q37.2, 2p14, and 17p13 as potentially harboring important genetic variants. Most of these regions have been implicated in other genetic studies of psychosis in populations physically quite distant from this Oceanic population, although some (e.g., 3q28) appear to be novel results for schizophrenia linkage analyses. PMID:15915326

  8. H I detection survey of a complete magnitude-limited sample of dwarf irregular galaxies in the Virgo Cluster area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, G. Lyle; Glosson, John; Helou, George; Salpeter, E. E.; Sandage, A.

    1987-01-01

    New single-beam Arecibo H I observations of 298 late-type galaxies in the Virgo Cluster drawn mostly from the new catalog of Binggeli, Sandage, and Tammann (1985) are presented. Two hundred seventeen of these constitute a magnitude-limited 'complete sample' of such galaxies, types Sdm through Im and BCD. Sixty-one percent of this 'complete sample' was detected, greatly enhancing the store of redshifts and H I masses for such galaxies in the Virgo Cluster. For detected galaxies, heliocentric velocities, 50 percent profile widths, and single-beam fluxes are presented. For those that escaped detection, upper limits are computed to the flux appropriate to the redshift range (-600 to +3000 km/s).

  9. Effect of lauric acid and nisin-impregnated soy-based films on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes on turkey bologna.

    PubMed

    Dawson, P L; Carl, G D; Acton, J C; Han, I Y

    2002-05-01

    Research in development of antimicrobial packaging applications for further processed meats has become more common with recent outbreaks of contamination of these products. In this present study, lauric acid (8%, wt/wt) and 2.5% pure nisin (4%, wt/wt) were incorporated singly and together into thermally compacted soy films. Biocide-impregnated films were compared to control films containing no biocide for inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes in liquid medium and on turkey bologna surface. L. monocytogenes suspended in 1% peptone medium exposed to control films increased from 106 to 10(9) after 48 h exposure at 22 C. Films with nisin alone suppressed cell numbers 1 log cfu/mL after 2 h but cell numbers increased to 10(8) after 24 and 48 h at 22 C. Films containing lauric acid and nisin completely eliminated detectable cells from a 10(6) culture after 8 h of exposure to the liquid medium (22 C). Refrigerated bologna exposed to control films increased by 0.5 log from 10(6) after 21 d at 4 C. Nisin films reduced cell numbers on turkey bologna from 10(6) to 10(5) after 21 d, as did films containing nisin and lauric acid. Films with lauric acid alone reduced L. monocytogenes culture from 10(6) to < 102 after 48 h and by 1 log on turkey bologna after 21 d. PMID:12033424

  10. The augmented lagrange multipliers method for matrix completion from corrupted samplings with application to mixed Gaussian-impulse noise removal.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fan; Yang, Xiaomei; Zhou, Chenghu

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the problem of the restoration of images corrupted by mixed Gaussian-impulse noise. In recent years, low-rank matrix reconstruction has become a research hotspot in many scientific and engineering domains such as machine learning, image processing, computer vision and bioinformatics, which mainly involves the problem of matrix completion and robust principal component analysis, namely recovering a low-rank matrix from an incomplete but accurate sampling subset of its entries and from an observed data matrix with an unknown fraction of its entries being arbitrarily corrupted, respectively. Inspired by these ideas, we consider the problem of recovering a low-rank matrix from an incomplete sampling subset of its entries with an unknown fraction of the samplings contaminated by arbitrary errors, which is defined as the problem of matrix completion from corrupted samplings and modeled as a convex optimization problem that minimizes a combination of the nuclear norm and the l(1)-norm in this paper. Meanwhile, we put forward a novel and effective algorithm called augmented Lagrange multipliers to exactly solve the problem. For mixed Gaussian-impulse noise removal, we regard it as the problem of matrix completion from corrupted samplings, and restore the noisy image following an impulse-detecting procedure. Compared with some existing methods for mixed noise removal, the recovery quality performance of our method is dominant if images possess low-rank features such as geometrically regular textures and similar structured contents; especially when the density of impulse noise is relatively high and the variance of Gaussian noise is small, our method can outperform the traditional methods significantly not only in the simultaneous removal of Gaussian noise and impulse noise, and the restoration ability for a low-rank image matrix, but also in the preservation of textures and details in the image. PMID:25248103

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WISE data for radio-loud AGN complete samples (Gurkan+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurkan, G.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Jarvis, M. J.

    2014-11-01

    The 3CRR, 2Jy, 6CE and 7CE samples were chosen for our analysis. We used the revised subsample of the 3CR catalogue of radio sources (Bennett, 1962MNRAS.125...75B), which have flux densities greater than 10.9Jy at 178MHz (Laing, Riley & Longair, 1983MNRAS.204..151L, Cat. J/MNRAS.204.151). There are 172 sources with 0.0029complete radio sample chosen for our analysis is a subsample of the 2Jy objects, which has homogeneous spectroscopic observations (Wall & Peacock, 1985MNRAS.216..173W, Cat. J/MNRAS/216/173; Tadhunter et al. 1993MNRAS.263..999T). The complete sample was generated selecting radio objects with flux densities above 2Jy at 2.7GHz. Our subsample consists of 48 steep-spectrum sources (objects dominated by emission from the beamed relativistic jet and core components are excluded so that we minimize the contamination from non-thermal emission) with 0.05complete Chandra/XMM X-ray imaging. This sample has 10 LERGs, 20 NLRGs, 13 BLRGs and 5 quasars. The 6CE subsample is drawn from the 6C survey (Baldwin et al., 1985MNRAS.217..717B, Cat. VIII/18) and was designed to select objects fainter than 3C objects, in order to investigate the cosmic evolution of radio galaxies (Eales 1985MNRAS.217..149E; Eales et al. 1997MNRAS.291..593E). The flux density limit for the sample is 2<=S_151+<=3.93Jy. It has virtually complete spectroscopic redshift measurements as well as IR imaging . The 6CE sample has 58 sources including 19 LERGs, 28 HERGs and 9 quasars, whose redshift ranges between 0.105 and 3.395. The 7CE sample, drawn from the 7C survey (Visser et al., 1995A&AS..110..419V, Cat. J/A+AS/110/419), is a complete sample having flux densities greater than 0.5Jy at 151MHz (Willott et al., 1998MNRAS.300..625W, 2002MNRAS.335

  12. Soft X-Ray Observations of a Complete Sample of X-Ray--selected BL Lacertae Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Stocke, John T.; Wang, Q. Daniel; Morris, Simon L.

    1996-01-01

    We present the results of ROSAT PSPC observations of the X-ray selected BL Lacertae objects (XBLs) in the complete Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EM MS) sample. None of the objects is resolved in their respective PSPC images, but all are easily detected. All BL Lac objects in this sample are well-fitted by single power laws. Their X-ray spectra exhibit a variety of spectral slopes, with best-fit energy power-law spectral indices between α = 0.5-2.3. The PSPC spectra of this sample are slightly steeper than those typical of flat ratio-spectrum quasars. Because almost all of the individual PSPC spectral indices are equal to or slightly steeper than the overall optical to X-ray spectral indices for these same objects, we infer that BL Lac soft X-ray continua are dominated by steep-spectrum synchrotron radiation from a broad X-ray jet, rather than flat-spectrum inverse Compton radiation linked to the narrower radio/millimeter jet. The softness of the X-ray spectra of these XBLs revives the possibility proposed by Guilbert, Fabian, & McCray (1983) that BL Lac objects are lineless because the circumnuclear gas cannot be heated sufficiently to permit two stable gas phases, the cooler of which would comprise the broad emission-line clouds. Because unified schemes predict that hard self-Compton radiation is beamed only into a small solid angle in BL Lac objects, the steep-spectrum synchrotron tail controls the temperature of the circumnuclear gas at r ≤ 1018 cm and prevents broad-line cloud formation. We use these new ROSAT data to recalculate the X-ray luminosity function and cosmological evolution of the complete EMSS sample by determining accurate K-corrections for the sample and estimating the effects of variability and the possibility of incompleteness in the sample. Our analysis confirms that XBLs are evolving "negatively," opposite in sense to quasars, with Ve/Va = 0.331±0.060. The statistically significant difference between the values for

  13. Microbiological quality of fresh pasta dumplings sold in Bologna and the surrounding district.

    PubMed

    Trovatelli, L D; Schiesser, A; Massa, S; Cesaroni, D; Poda, G

    1988-08-01

    The microbiological quality of fresh pasta dumplings sold in Bologna and the surrounding district was evaluated. A total of 60 lots (300 subsamples) of fresh pasta dumplings, both 'home-made' and manufactured, were analysed for aerobic plate count (APC), coliforms (total and fecal), Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium perfringens and Salmonella spp. Thirty one of the 39 lots of 'home-made' pasta were found to exceed APC standards and six lots exceeded S. aureus standards. Five (24%) and six (29%) lots of the manufactured pasta were found to be unsatisfactory as regards APC standards and S. aureus standards respectively. The results obtained indicated that a high percentage of samples had a contamination of fecal origin. No Cl. perfringens or Salmonella spp. were found. PMID:2908612

  14. Mouse skin tumor initiation-promotion and complete carcinogenesis bioassays: mechanisms and biological activities of emission samples.

    PubMed Central

    Nesnow, S; Triplett, L L; Slaga, T J

    1983-01-01

    Extracts of soots obtained from various sources were applied to the skin of mice in an effort to identify carcinogens in these mixtures and to link these materials to the etiology of human cancer. Samples of coal chimney soot, coke oven materials, industrial carbon black, oil shale soot, and gasoline vehicle exhaust materials have been examined by this method. The studies reported here have been constructed to compare the carcinogenic and tumorigenic potency of extracts from various particulate emissions: coke ovens, diesel and gasoline vehicles and a roofing tar pot. Automobile emission samples were obtained by collecting the diluted and cooled exhaust on Teflon-coated glass fiber filters. Coke oven and roofing tar samples were particulate emission samples collected by impaction and filtration. The organic components associated with each of the particles were extracted with dichloromethane and dermally applied to SENCAR mice. All agents were applied as tumor initiators by using a five-dose protocol. Selected extracts were also applied as complete carcinogens and as tumor promotors. Statistical analyses of the resulting tumor data were performed by using nonlinear Poisson and probit models. The results from these experiments provide a suitable data base for comparative potency estimation of complex mixtures. PMID:6825618

  15. Access and completion of a Web-based treatment in a population-based sample of tornado-affected adolescents.

    PubMed

    Price, Matthew; Yuen, Erica K; Davidson, Tatiana M; Hubel, Grace; Ruggiero, Kenneth J

    2015-08-01

    Although Web-based treatments have significant potential to assess and treat difficult-to-reach populations, such as trauma-exposed adolescents, the extent that such treatments are accessed and used is unclear. The present study evaluated the proportion of adolescents who accessed and completed a Web-based treatment for postdisaster mental health symptoms. Correlates of access and completion were examined. A sample of 2,000 adolescents living in tornado-affected communities was assessed via structured telephone interview and invited to a Web-based treatment. The modular treatment addressed symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and alcohol and tobacco use. Participants were randomized to experimental or control conditions after accessing the site. Overall access for the intervention was 35.8%. Module completion for those who accessed ranged from 52.8% to 85.6%. Adolescents with parents who used the Internet to obtain health-related information were more likely to access the treatment. Adolescent males were less likely to access the treatment. Future work is needed to identify strategies to further increase the reach of Web-based treatments to provide clinical services in a postdisaster context. PMID:25622071

  16. Access and Completion of a Web-Based Treatment in a Population-Based Sample of Tornado-Affected Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Price, Matthew; Yuen, Erica; Davidson, Tatiana M.; Hubel, Grace; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Although web-based treatments have significant potential to assess and treat difficult to reach populations, such as trauma-exposed adolescents, the extent that such treatments are accessed and used is unclear. The present study evaluated the proportion of adolescents who accessed and completed a web-based treatment for post-disaster mental health symptoms. Correlates of access and completion were examined. A sample of 2,000 adolescents living in tornado-affected communities was assessed via structured telephone interview and invited to a web-based treatment. The modular treatment addressed symptoms of PTSD, depression, and alcohol and tobacco use. Participants were randomized to experimental or control conditions after accessing the site. Overall access for the intervention was 35.8%. Module completion for those who accessed ranged from 52.8% to 85.6%. Adolescents with parents who used the Internet to obtain health-related information were more likely to access the treatment. Adolescent males were less likely to access the treatment. Future work is needed to identify strategies to further increase the reach of web-based treatments to provide clinical services in a post-disaster context. PMID:25622071

  17. Setting Policy Agenda for the Social Dimension of the Bologna Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagci, Yasemin

    2014-01-01

    Since 1999, the Bologna Process has been suggesting a series of reforms relating to structural and normative aspects of higher education, one of which is the social dimension. The social dimension entered into the Bologna Process as an ambiguous action area in 2001 and has remained so in terms of its policy measures. Despite this ambiguity and…

  18. The Impact of the Bologna Reform on the Productivity of Swiss Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agasisti, Tommaso; Bolli, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The Bologna reform aims to enhance several dimensions of the universities' activities, by favouring mobility and mutual recognition of higher education degrees across Europe, with the objective to create a European Higher Education Area. The radical changes induced by the Bologna Process affect universities' productivity both directly…

  19. The Impact of the Bologna Process on Higher Education in Slovakia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laszlo, Bela

    2008-01-01

    "The Bologna process is named after the Bologna Declaration. The primary goal of the accord is the coordination and harmonization of the various European higher education systems without losing their colorful diversity and individual features, thereby making European higher education even more attractive for students and scholars all over the…

  20. Towards 2010 (and Then Beyond)--The Context of the Bologna Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birtwistle, Tim

    2009-01-01

    While 2010 was originally stated as being the end point for the creation of the European Higher Education Area through the Bologna Process, it is in fact a point along the way. The journey from Sorbonne (1998) to Bologna (1999) towards 2010 has seen an expansion of the number of signatory states (from 4 to 29 to 46) and a broadening of the…

  1. The Bologna Process Policy Implementation in Russia and Ukraine: Similarities and Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luchinskaya, Daria; Ovchynnikova, Olena

    2011-01-01

    The recent establishment of the European Higher Education Area and the ongoing monitoring carried out by the Bologna Follow-up Group raises the question: to what extent have the objectives of the Bologna Process been implemented in the varied higher education systems of the 47 signatory states, including the former Soviet Union states? This…

  2. Bologna at the Finish Line: An Account of Ten Years of European Higher Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartolo, Daniela; Bjerke, Christian Hemmestad; Blattler, Andrea; Deca, Ligia; Gielis, Inge; Karlsson, Solvi; Nielsen, Kristine Bak; Pall, Allan; Rytkonen, Petri; Santa, Robert; Szabo, Melinda

    2010-01-01

    The European Students' Union (ESU) has been writing about the student perspective on the Bologna Process since it get formally involved in it. Four editions of the students' independent stocktaking report "Bologna With Student Eyes" between 2003 and 2009 shed light on the perception of those stakeholders, which are probably mostly targeted on the…

  3. Mission Accomplished? Which Mission? The "Bologna Process"--A View from Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Rudder, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    This article does not follow the widespread assumption or even conviction that the Bologna process is the most important reform of higher education in Europe in modern times. Instead it analyses the Bologna process in the context of previous and ongoing programmes, measures and activities by European bodies and national governments aiming at…

  4. The Eagle and the Circle of Gold Stars: Does the Bologna Process Affect US Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookes, Marilyn; Huisman, Jeroen

    2009-01-01

    The Bologna Process is almost at its end and European policy-makers currently reflect on appropriate objectives and policies for the next decade. Given that the Bologna Process is generally seen as an example of unprecedented change in European higher education and that the major overarching objective of the Process was to increase the…

  5. Reflections on the Bologna Process: The Making of an Asia Pacific Higher Education Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Roger Y., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Brisbane Communiqué's goals and initiatives seem to follow the Bologna Process' normative path towards the creation of a common regional higher education space. However, comparing demography, socio-economics, student mobility, political economy framework and the initiatives undertaken by both the Brisbane Communiqué and the Bologna Process…

  6. Regional Higher Education Reform Initiatives in Africa: A Comparative Analysis with the Bologna Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woldegiorgis, Emnet Tadesse; Jonck, Petronella; Goujon, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Europe's Bologna Process has been identified as a pioneering approach in regional cooperation with respect to the area of higher education. To address the challenges of African higher education, policymakers are recommending regional cooperation that uses the Bologna Process as a model. Based on these recommendations, the African Union Commission…

  7. Managing the Bologna Process at the European Level: Institution and Actor Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazetic, Predrag

    2010-01-01

    This article analyses the work of the Bologna Follow Up Group as the main institution of the Bologna Process and the perceptions of the policy actors involved concerning the character of the process in terms of its functioning in contrast to similar multi-level multi-actor European processes, its modes of communication and consensus seeking, as…

  8. Rethinking Postgraduate Education in Europe: Bologna and Its Implications for Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wastl-Walter, Doris; Wintzer, Jeannine

    2012-01-01

    In the following article, we would first like to present the Bologna Process to create a European Higher Education Area and to show its importance as a framework for higher education in Europe and beyond. Second, we would like to raise questions about the consequences of the Bologna Process for postgraduate education especially for the…

  9. The Emergent European Educational Policies under Scrutiny: The Bologna Process from a Central European Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwiek, Marek

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the Bologna Process and the European Research Area are viewed as the two sides of the same coin: that of the redefinition of the missions of the institution of the university. The Bologna Process is viewed as relatively closed to global developments: as largely inward-looking, focused on European regional problems (and European…

  10. A Different View of the Bologna Process: The Case of Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagci, Yasemin

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, integration with the Western world has been a determining driver of higher education policies, as well as many other policy areas in Turkey. Becoming a signatory country of the Bologna Process in 2001 brought a new impulse to the higher education policies in this direction. The Bologna Process reforms…

  11. The Bologna Process for U.S. Eyes: Re-learning Higher Education in the Age of Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Clifford

    2009-01-01

    The title of this document is a deliberate play on the title of the biennial reports on the progress of Bologna produced by the European Students' Union, "Bologna With Student Eyes." It is a way of paying tribute to student involvement in the Bologna reforms, and marking a parallel student working participation in the state system "Tuning" study…

  12. A search at the millijansky level for milli-arcsecond cores in a complete sample of radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehrle, A. E.; Preston, R. A.; Meier, D. L.; Gorenstein, M. V.; Shapiro, I. I.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Rius, A.

    1984-01-01

    A complete sample of 26 extended radio galaxies was observed at 2.29 GHz with the Mark III VLBI system. The fringe spacing was about 3 milli-arcsec, and the detection limit was about 2 millijanskys. Half of the galaxies were found to possess milli-arcsec radio cores. In all but three sources, the nuclear flux density was less than 0.04 of the total flux density. Galaxies with high optical luminosity (less than -21.2) were more likely than less luminous galaxies to contain a detectable milliparcsec radio core (69 percent vs. 20 percent). For objects with arcsec cores, 80 percent were found to have a milli-arcsec core, even though the milli-arcsec object did not always contribute the greater part of the arcsec flux density.

  13. The Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey - Optical identifications for a complete sample of X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocke, J. T.; Liebert, J.; Gioia, I. M.; Maccacaro, T.; Griffiths, R. E.; Danziger, I. J.; Kunth, D.; Lub, J.

    1983-01-01

    It is suggested that virtually all the X-ray sources in the Einstein Observatory's Medium Sensitivity Survey flux range can be identified with objects visible on the POSS, on the basis of the complete identification of all sources north of -25 deg declination. There is no evidence for a significant population of 'blank field' X-ray sources at this flux level, and therefore no evidence for any new X-ray source class with very high L(x)/L(v). Most of the quasars detected in the present survey are spectroscopically similar to optical or radio-selected quasars. About 25 percent of the quasar sample, however, had reddish colors, and permitted lines dominated by a narrow-line component. These objects form a second sequence of active galactic nuclei, distinct in their optical properties from the broad line objects.

  14. Effect of jabuticaba peel extract on lipid oxidation, microbial stability and sensory properties of Bologna-type sausages during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Patrícia Leal; de Lima, Silvério Nepomuceno; Costa, Luciene Lacerda; de Oliveira, Cintia Cristina; Damasceno, Karina Aparecida; dos Santos, Bibiana Alves; Campagnol, Paulo Cezar Bastianello

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the lipid oxidation and the microbiological and sensory quality of Bologna-type sausages produced with the addition of jabuticaba peel extract (JPE). Instrumental parameters of color (L*, a* and b*), pH, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) values, microbiological profile, and sensory properties were determined during 35 days of storage. The addition of JPE had an effect on pH and protected the samples from color changes during storage. However, JPE had no positive effect on microbial stability during storage. Samples produced with 0.5, 0.75, and 1% JPE had significantly lower TBARS values (P<0.05) compared with the control group. The addition of up to 0.5% JPE did not affect sensory quality, but prevented the decrease of sensory acceptance during storage. Therefore, due to its antioxidant effect JPE can be used in Bologna-type sausages in order to improve the oxidative stability during the shelf life. PMID:26156583

  15. A Complete X-ray Selected Sample of Galaxy Clusters from the ROSAT North Ecliptic Pole Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullis, C. R.; Henry, J. P.; Gioia, I. M.

    1997-12-01

    We are using the ROSAT All-Sky Survey observations around the North Ecliptic Pole to construct a complete and unbiased sample of galaxy clusters in order to understand the nature of cluster evolution and determine implications for large scale structure models. Our database is unique in that it is both deep and contiguous. Here we give an update on the survey's progress and discuss a few particularly exciting results. Via optical follow-up, we have secured identifications for nearly 80% of the 465 X-ray sources in the survey area. The cluster sample now consists of 50 objects with redshifts approaching unity. Evidence for large scale structure exists at both low and high redshifts in the NEP survey. A low-z spike in the redshift distribution for NEP clusters is consistent with a previously known supercluster at 0.088. At the other extreme, we recently discovered a very distant cluster at z=0.813 which resembles a filament of galaxies. Such a massive, un-virialized cluster at high-z may be the vision quest of cosmic-web proponents. For this potential protocluster, we present a velocity dispersion analysis of its member galaxies from Keck II observations and a temperature measurement from ASCA data. We construct the cluster X-ray luminosity function at high redshifts, incorporating a rigorous treatment of our survey selection function, and compare it to previous work.

  16. Comparison of Quality of Bologna Sausage Manufactured by Electron Beam or X-Ray Irradiated Ground Pork

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mee-Hye

    2014-01-01

    Ground lean pork was irradiated by an electron beam or X-rays to compare the effects of two types of radiation generated by a linear accelerator on the quality of Bologna sausage as a model meat product. Raw ground lean pork was vacuum packaged at a thickness of 1.5 cm and irradiated at doses of 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 kGy by an electron beam (2.5 MeV) or X-rays (5 MeV). Solubility of myofibrillar proteins, bacterial counts, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) values were determined for raw meat samples. Bologna sausage was manufactured using the irradiated lean pork, and total bacterial counts, TBARS values, and quality properties (color differences, cooking yield, texture, and palatability) were determined. Irradiation increased the solubility of myofibrillar proteins in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05). Bacterial contamination of the raw meat was reduced as the absorbed dose increased, and the reduction was the same for both radiation types. Differences were observed only between irradiated and non-irradiated samples (p<0.05). X-ray irradiation may serve as an alternative to gamma irradiation and electron beam irradiation. PMID:26761284

  17. Near-infrared photometry and stellar populations of first-ranked galaxies in a complete sample of nearby Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuan, Trinx X.; Puschell, Jeffery J.

    1989-01-01

    Eighty-four brightest cluster members (BCMs) in the complete sample of high Galactic latitude nearby Abell clusters of Hoessel, Gunn, and Thuan (HGT) are investigated. The stellar populations in BCMs using near-infrared and optical-near-infrared colors are studied. Brighter BCMs have redder (J-K) and (V-K) colors, suggesting a metallicity increase in brighter galaxies. The larger dispersion of their colors implies that BCMs possess more heterogeneous stellar populations than their lower luminosity counterparts, the normal elliptical galaxies. Special attention is paid to BCMs associated with cooling flows. BCMs with larger accretion rates have bluer (V-K) colors due to ultraviolet excesses and are brighter in the visual wavelength region, but not in the infrared. It is suggested that part of the X-ray emitting cooling gas is converted into high- and intermediate-mass stars emitting in the blue and visible, but not in the infrared. The properties of BCMs as standard candles in the near-infrared are examined and compared with those in the optical.

  18. Coeval observations of a complete sample of flat-spectrum blazars with Effelsberg, IRAM 30m, and Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachen, Jörg Paul; Fuhrmann, Lars

    2015-08-01

    We present time-resolved broad-band spectra of a complete sample of blazars, selected by showing flat radio spectra up to 143 GHz, taken from observations with Planck, the Effelsberg 100m telescope, and the IRAM 30m telescope. Dedicated Effelsberg observations have been focused on times within two months around Planck single survey scans of each source, with a cadence of 2-4 weeks during the 4th and 5th Planck survey. The data are complemented with flux measurements from the F-GAMMA program (Fuhrmann et. al, 2007, AIPC 921, 249; Fuhrmann et al., 2014, MNRAS 441, 1899), and from other Effelsberg and IRAM monitoring programs, as far as available. Planck data are extracted employing methods used in the blind search for variable sky signals, which allow to estimate snap-shot source fluxes down to pointing period (i.e. hour scale) time resolution (Rachen et al., this conference). The program thus covers 15 frequencies between 2.4 to 857 GHz and is sensitive to variability time scales from hours over weeks up to one year, which is unprecedented in the history of blazar monitoring.

  19. X-ray spectral survey with XMM-Newton of a complete sample of nearby Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappi, M.; Panessa, F.; Bassani, L.; Dadina, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Comastri, A.; della Ceca, R.; Filippenko, A. V.; Gianotti, F.; Ho, L. C.; Malaguti, G.; Mulchaey, J. S.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Piconcelli, E.; Sargent, W. L. W.; Stephen, J.; Trifoglio, M.; Weaver, K. A.

    2006-02-01

    Results obtained from an X-ray spectral survey of nearby Seyfert galaxies using XMM-Newton are reported. The sample was optically selected, well defined, complete in B magnitude, and distance limited: it consists of the nearest (D ⪉22 Mpc) 27 Seyfert galaxies (9 of type 1, 18 of type 2) taken from the Ho et al. (1997a, ApJS, 112, 315) sample. This is one of the largest atlases of hard X-ray spectra of low-luminosity active galaxies ever assembled. All nuclear sources except two Seyfert 2s are detected between 2 and 10 keV, half for the first time ever, and average spectra are obtained for all of them. Nuclear luminosities reach values down to 1038 erg s-1. The shape of the distribution of X-ray parameters is affected by the presence of Compton-thick objects (⪆30% among type 2s). The latter have been identified either directly from their intense FeK line and flat X-ray spectra, or indirectly with flux diagnostic diagrams which use isotropic indicators. After taking into account these highly absorbed sources, we find that (i) the intrinsic X-ray spectral properties (i.e., spectral shapes and luminosities above 2 keV) are consistent between type 1 and type 2 Seyferts, as expected from "unified models"; (ii) Seyfert galaxies as a whole are distributed fairly continuously over the entire range of N_H, between 1020 and 1025 cm-2; and (iii) while Seyfert 1s tend to have lower NH and Seyfert 2s tend to have the highest, we find 30% and 10% exceptions, respectively. Overall the sample is of sufficient quality to well represent the average intrinsic X-ray spectral properties of nearby active galactic nuclei, including a proper estimate of the distribution of their absorbing columns. Finally, we conclude that, with the exception of a few cases, the present study agrees with predictions of unified models of Seyfert galaxies, and extends their validity down to very low luminosities.

  20. Deep WFPC2 and Ground-Based Imaging of a Complete Sample of 3C Quasars and Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridgway, Susan E.; Stockton, Alan

    1997-01-01

    We present the results of an HST and ground-based imaging study of a complete 3C sample of zeta approx. equal to 1 sources, comprising 5 quasars and 5 radio galaxies. We have observed all of the sample in essentially line-free bands at rest-frame 0.33 micrometers with WFPC2 and in rest-frame 1 micrometer images from the ground; we have also observed most of the sample in narrow-band filters centered on [O II]. We resolve continuum structure around all of our quasars in the high-resolution WFPC2 images, and in four of the five ground-based K' images. All of the quasars have some optical continuum structure that is aligned with the radio axis. In at least 3 of these cases, some of this optical structure is directly coincident with a portion of the radio structure, including optical counterparts to radio jets in 3C212 and 3C245 and an optical counterpart to a radio lobe in 3C2. These are most likely due to optical synchrotron radiation, and the radio and optical spectral indices in the northern lobe of 3C2 are consistent with this interpretation. The fact that we see a beamed optical synchotron component in the quasars but not in the radio galaxies complicates both the magnitude and the alignment comparisons. Nonetheless, the total optical and K' flux densities of the quasar hosts are consistent with those of the radio galaxies within the observed dispersion in our sample. The distributions of K' flux densities of both radio galaxies and quasar hosts exhibit similar mean and dispersion to that found for other radio galaxies at this redshift, and the average host galaxy luminosity is equivalent to, or a little fainter than, L*. The formal determination of the alignment in the optical and infrared in the two subsamples yields no significant difference between the radio galaxy and quasar subsamples, and the quasars 3C 196 and 3C 336 have aligned continuum and emission-line structure that is probably not due to beamed optical synchrotron emission. Very blue and/or edge

  1. The soft x-ray properties of a complete sample of optically selected quasars. 1: First results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laor, Ari; Fiore, Fabrizio; Elvis, Martin; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Mcdowell, Jonathan C.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) observations of 10 quasars. These objects are part of our ROSAT program to observe a complete sample of optically selected quasars. This sample includes all 23 quasars from the bright quasar survey with a redshift z less than or = 0.400 and a Galactic H I column density N(sup Gal sub H I) less than 1.9 x 10(exp 20)/sq cm. These selection criteria, combined with the high sensitivity and improved energy resolution of the PSPC, allow us to determine the soft (approximately 0.2-2 keV) X-ray spectra of quasars with about an order of magnitude higher precision compared with earlier soft X-ray observations. The following main results are obtained: Strong correlations are suggested between the soft X-ray spectral slope alpha(sub x) and the following emission line parameters: H beta Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM), L(sub O III), and the Fe II/H beta flux ratio. These correlations imply the following: (1) The quasar's environment is likely to be optically thin down to approximately 0.2 keV. (2) In most objects alpha(sub x) varies by less than approximately 10% on timescales shorter than a few years. (3) alpha(sub x) might be a useful absolute luminosity indicator in quasars. (4) The Galactic He I and H I column densities are well correlated. Most spectra are well characterized by a simple power law, with no evidence for either significant absorption excess or emission excess at low energies, to within approximately 30%. We find mean value of alpha(sub x) = -1.50 +/- 0.40, which is consistent with other ROSAT observations of quasars. However, this average is significantly steeper than suggested by earlier soft X-ray observations of the Einstein IPC. The 0.3 keV flux in our sample can be predicted to better than a factor of 2 once the 1.69 micrometer(s) flux is given. This implies that the X-ray variability power spectra of quasars flattens out between f approximately 10(exp -5) and f

  2. On the simultaneous analysis of several complete samples - The V/Vmax and Ve/Va variables, with applications to quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avni, Y.; Bahcall, J. N.

    1980-01-01

    Methods are derived for applying the V/Vmax variable when several complete samples are analyzed simultaneously. A new, related, variable, V(e)/V(a), which is superior to V/Vmax when sufficient observational data are available, is introduced. It is shown how statistically independent complete samples can be generated from partially overlapping samples such that each observed object appears only once in the analysis. These methods make it possible to combine the information from different complete samples, and to make an efficient use of all available data. Illustrative examples for quasars are given. It is shown how the generalized V/Vmax and V(e)/V(a) can be used to find the amount of cosmological evolution of quasars and its associated range of uncertainty.

  3. Vincenzo Neri and His Legacy in Paris and Bologna.

    PubMed

    Vanone, Federico; Lorusso, Lorenzo; Venturini, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Italian neurologist Vincenzo Neri was able to discover cinematography at the beginning of his career, when in 1908 he went to Paris to learn and improve his clinical background by following neurological cases at La Pitié with Joseph Babinski, who became his teacher and friend. While in Paris, Neri photographed and filmed several patients of famous neurologists, such as Babinski and Pierre Marie. His stills were published in several important French neurological journals and medical texts. He also collaborated with Georges Mendel, who helped Doyen film the first known surgical operation in the history of cinema. In 1910, when he came back to Bologna, he continued in his clinical activities and, for 50 years, slowly developed a huge archive of films, images, and prints of neurological, psychiatric, and orthopedic cases. This archive was extremely helpful to Neri, who especially needed to analyze neurological disorders and to differentiate them from functional conditions in order to understand clinical signs, rules, and mechanisms. PMID:26684423

  4. Small Sample Statistics for Incomplete Nonnormal Data: Extensions of Complete Data Formulae and a Monte Carlo Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savalei, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Incomplete nonnormal data are common occurrences in applied research. Although these 2 problems are often dealt with separately by methodologists, they often cooccur. Very little has been written about statistics appropriate for evaluating models with such data. This article extends several existing statistics for complete nonnormal data to…

  5. Skeletal evidence of tuberculosis in a modern identified human skeletal collection (Certosa cemetery, Bologna, Italy).

    PubMed

    Mariotti, Valentina; Zuppello, Micol; Pedrosi, Maria Elena; Bettuzzi, Matteo; Brancaccio, Rosa; Peccenini, Eva; Morigi, Maria Pia; Belcastro, Maria Giovanna

    2015-07-01

    The diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in osteoarcheological series relies on the identification of osseous lesions caused by the disease. The study of identified skeletal collections provides the opportunity to investigate the distribution of skeletal lesions in relation to this disease. The aim of this study was to examine the skeletal evidence for TB in late adolescent and adult individuals from the identified human collection of the Certosa cemetery of Bologna (Italy, 19th-20th c.). The sample group consists of 244 individuals (138 males, 106 females) ranging from 17 to 88 years of age. The sample was divided into three groups on the basis of the recorded cause of death: TB (N = 64), pulmonary non-TB (N = 29), and other diseases (N = 151). Skeletal lesions reported to be related to TB were analyzed. The vertebral lesions were classified into three types: enlarged foramina (EnF, vascular foramina with diameter of 3-5 mm), erosions (ER), and other foramina (OtF, cavities of various shapes > 3 mm). A CT scan analysis was also performed on vertebral bodies. Some lesions were seldom present in our sample (e.g., tuberculous arthritis). OtF (23.7%) and subperiosteal new bone formation on ribs (54.2%) are significantly more frequent in the TB group with respect to the other groups. The CT scan analysis showed that the vertebrae of individuals who have died of TB may have internal cavities in the absence of external lesions. These traits represent useful elements in the paleopathological diagnosis of TB. PMID:25727573

  6. Compilation of a complete sample of giant radio sources from a survey at 102.5 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butenko, A. V.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.

    2016-08-01

    A search for giant radio sources has been carried out using the PC102 catalog, which was compiled from a survey of the northern sky at 102.5 MHz. 117 extended sources were detected in an area with right ascensions 0h-4h and declinations from -17° to +82°. Half of these sources have linear sizes in the plane of the sky of more than 500 kpc. A catalog of giant radio sources that is complete for radio sources with redshifts less than 0.2 has been compiled.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Cryobacterium arcticum Strain PAMC 27867, Isolated from a Sedimentary Rock Sample in Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaejin; Cho, Ahnna; Yang, Jae Young; Woo, Jusun; Lee, Hong Kum; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Ok-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Cryobacterium arcticum PAMC 27867, a psychrotolerant, Gram-positive bacterium, was isolated from a sedimentary rock sample collected at Eureka Spurs in northern Victoria Land, Antarctica. Here, we report the genome sequence of C. arcticum PAMC 27867. PMID:27587812

  8. MOUSE SKIN TUMOR INITIATION-PROMOTION AND COMPLETE CARCINOGENESIS BIOASSAYS: MECHANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES OF EMISSION SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extracts of soots obtained from various sources were applied to the skin of mice in an effort to identify carcinogens in these mixtures and to link these materials to the etiology of human cancer. Samples of coal chimney soot, coke oven materials, industrial carbon black, oil sha...

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Cryobacterium arcticum Strain PAMC 27867, Isolated from a Sedimentary Rock Sample in Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaejin; Cho, Ahnna; Yang, Jae Young; Woo, Jusun; Lee, Hong Kum; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Cryobacterium arcticum PAMC 27867, a psychrotolerant, Gram-positive bacterium, was isolated from a sedimentary rock sample collected at Eureka Spurs in northern Victoria Land, Antarctica. Here, we report the genome sequence of C. arcticum PAMC 27867. PMID:27587812

  10. European Education Reform and Its Impact on Curriculum and Admissions: Implications of the Bologna Process on United States Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, Steven D.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the European-wide educational reform known as the Bologna Process in order to provide an understanding of the methodology that will be used by European countries to assess course credit hours as well as degree programs. The Bologna Process is culmination of years of educational reform within the European Union (EU) and more…

  11. The Bologna Club: What U.S. Higher Education Can Learn from a Decade of European Reconstruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Clifford

    2008-01-01

    This report examines the efforts of 46 European nations to harmonize (not "standardize") their higher education systems and indicates that the United States higher education system needs to adopt some of the features of the Bologna Process. Based on what can be learned from the Bologna Process, this report makes concrete suggestions for change…

  12. Sodium lactate, sodium diacetate and pediocin: effects and interactions on the thermal inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes on bologna

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects and interactions of temperature (56.3C-60C), sodium lactate (SL; 0-4.8%), sodium diacetate (SD; 0-0.25%) and pediocin (0-10,000 AU) on Listeria monocytogenes inoculated on bologna were studied and a predictive inactivation model was developed. Bologna was manufactured with different SL ...

  13. The Doctorate of the Bologna Process Third Cycle: Mapping the Dimensions and Impact of the European Higher Education Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Susan; Fazey, John; Gonzalez Geraldo, Jose Luis; Trevitt, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The European Union Bologna Process is a significant agent for internationalization of education. Acknowledging fiscal and political drivers, this article shows that Bologna inclusion of the doctoral degree offers potential for enhanced doctoral experience. Interest in transferability of doctoral education across national borders, standardization…

  14. With Bologna in Mind and the Sword in the Hand: The German Bachelor/Master Reform Reconsidered

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mause, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Since the late 1990s, many European countries have adapted their traditional one-cycle curriculum structure in higher education to the two-cycle structure employed in the Anglo-American world. In the large social science literature dealing with this reform phenomenon, the Bologna Process -- starting with the 1999 Declaration of Bologna -- is…

  15. ISETTA: Service Orientation in the "Bologna Process" of a Large University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vossen, Gottfried; Thies, Gunnar

    With the signing of the "Bologna Declaration" in June 1999 by 29 representatives of the European education ministries, a decision was made to introduce comparable educational structures among European universities based on a. Bachelor-Master system until the year 2010. The process itself, collectively known as the "Bologna process,"1 is now well-underway and has created both administrative as well as technical challenges. The ISETTA project at the University of Muenster in Germany aims at the development of an Integrated Student, Exam, Test, and Teaching Application that properly reflects the changes of the university's internal activities caused by the Bologna process. In this paper, we report on the specific requirements of the project, the approach that has been taken and the current status of ISETTA.

  16. Gamma-Ray and Parsec-Scale Jet Properties of a Complete Sample of Blazars from the MOJAVE Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lister, M.L.; Aller, M.; Aller, H.; Hovatta, T.; Kellermann, K. I.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Meyer, E. T.; Pushkarev, A. B.; Ros, E.; Ackermann, M.; McEnery, Julie E.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the Fermi LAT gamma-ray and 15 GHz VLBA radio properties of a joint gamma-ray- and radio-selected sample of AGNs obtained during the first 11 months of the Fermi mission (2008 Aug 4 - 2009 Jul 5). Our sample contains the brightest 173 AGNs in these bands above declination -300 during this period, and thus probes the full range of gamma-ray loudness (gamma-ray to radio band luminosity ratio) in the bright blazar population. The latter quantity spans at least four orders of magnitude, reflecting a wide range of spectral energy distribution (SED) parameters in the bright blazar population. The BL Lac objects, however, display a linear correlation of increasing gamma-ray loudness with synchrotron SED peak frequency, suggesting a universal SED shape for objects of this class. The synchrotron self-Compton model is favored for the gamma-ray emission in these BL Lacs over external seed photon models, since the latter predict a dependence of Compton dominance on Doppler factor that would destroy any observed synchrotron SED peak - gamma-ray loudness correlation. The high-synchrotron peaked (HSP) BL Lac objects are distinguished by lower than average radio core brightness temperatures, and none display large radio modulation indices or high linear core polarization levels. No equivalent trends are seen for the flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQ) in our sample. Given the association of such properties with relativistic beaming, we suggest that the HSP BL Lacs have generally lower Doppler factors than the lower-synchrotron peaked BL Lacs or FSRQs in our sample.

  17. Isolation of a complete circular virus genome sequence from an Alaskan black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) gastrointestinal tract sample.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanna, Zachary R.; Runckel, Charles; Fuchs, Jerome; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Mindell, David P.; Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Handel, Colleen M.; Dumbacher, John P.

    2015-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of a circular virus isolated from samples of an Alaskan black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) gastrointestinal tract. The genome is 2,152 bp in length and is most similar (30 to 44.5% amino acid identity) to the genome sequences of other single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) circular viruses belonging to the gemycircularvirus group.

  18. {gamma}-RAY AND PARSEC-SCALE JET PROPERTIES OF A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF BLAZARS FROM THE MOJAVE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, M. L.; Hovatta, T.; Aller, M.; Aller, H.; Kellermann, K. I.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Pushkarev, A. B.; Ros, E.; Ackermann, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Antolini, E.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D. E-mail: moritz.boeck@sternwarte.uni-erlangen.de

    2011-11-20

    We investigate the Fermi Large Area Telescope {gamma}-ray and 15 GHz Very Long Baseline Array radio properties of a joint {gamma}-ray and radio-selected sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) obtained during the first 11 months of the Fermi mission (2008 August 4-2009 July 5). Our sample contains the brightest 173 AGNs in these bands above declination -30 Degree-Sign during this period, and thus probes the full range of {gamma}-ray loudness ({gamma}-ray to radio band luminosity ratio) in the bright blazar population. The latter quantity spans at least 4 orders of magnitude, reflecting a wide range of spectral energy distribution (SED) parameters in the bright blazar population. The BL Lac objects, however, display a linear correlation of increasing {gamma}-ray loudness with synchrotron SED peak frequency, suggesting a universal SED shape for objects of this class. The synchrotron self-Compton model is favored for the {gamma}-ray emission in these BL Lac objects over external seed photon models, since the latter predict a dependence of Compton dominance on Doppler factor that would destroy any observed synchrotron SED-peak-{gamma}-ray-loudness correlation. The high-synchrotron peaked (HSP) BL Lac objects are distinguished by lower than average radio core brightness temperatures, and none display large radio modulation indices or high linear core polarization levels. No equivalent trends are seen for the flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) in our sample. Given the association of such properties with relativistic beaming, we suggest that the HSP BL Lac objects have generally lower Doppler factors than the lower-synchrotron peaked BL Lac objects or FSRQs in our sample.

  19. Water maser variability over 20 years in a large sample of star-forming regions: the complete database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felli, M.; Brand, J.; Cesaroni, R.; Codella, C.; Comoretto, G.; Di Franco, S.; Massi, F.; Moscadelli, L.; Nesti, R.; Olmi, L.; Palagi, F.; Panella, D.; Valdettaro, R.

    2007-12-01

    Context: Water vapor emission at 22 GHz from masers associated with star-forming regions is highly variable. Aims: We present a database of up to 20 years of monitoring of a sample of 43 masers within star-forming regions. The sample covers a large range of luminosities of the associated IRAS source and is representative of the entire population of H2O masers of this type. The database forms a good starting point for any further study of H2O maser variability. Methods: The observations were obtained with the Medicina 32-m radiotelescope, at a rate of 4-5 observations per year. Results: To provide a database that can be easily accessed through the web, we give for each source: plots of the calibrated spectra, the velocity-time-flux density plot, the light curve of the integrated flux, the lower and upper envelopes of the maser emission, the mean spectrum, and the rate of the maser occurrence as a function of velocity. Figures for just one source are given in the text for representative purposes. Figures for all the sources are given in electronic form the appendix. A discussion of the main properties of the H2O variability in our sample will be presented in a forthcoming paper. Based on observations with the Medicina radiotelescope operated by INAF - Istituto di Radioastronomia.

  20. MATLAS, a complete optical sample to probe the stellar populations on the outskirts of galaxies: overview and instrumental challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Ferrarese, Laura; Karabal, Emin; Regnault, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    The MATLAS project (Mass Assembly of early-Type GaLAxies with their fine Structures) has now turned into an extensive collection of early-type and late-type galaxies. It is made of more than 250 early-type galaxies from the ATLAS3D survey and 150 spirals, many of which from the NGVS. Unique by its size, the MATLAS volume limited sample is effective to characterize the external parts of massive nearby galaxies and constraints models used in numerical simulations of mergers, the mass assembly of galaxies leaving various imprints in their surroundings, such as shells, streams, tails, tidal dwarf galaxies. Detecting those extremely faint features is instrumental in understanding further the mechanisms driving the mass assembly. The MATLAS sample is made exclusively of ultra deep optical images obtained with MegaCam on the CFHT, leading to colour profiles at large galactic radii, 5 - 10 effective radii. Following a general presentation of MATLAS and its main results, I will report on advances in deep low surface brightness photometry using the wide-field instrument MegaCam. Focusing on deep imaging of galaxies, addressing challenges, and discussing the optimization of an observing strategy coupled to a dedicated data reduction pipeline. With new territories in signal level being explored (~28.5 mag/arcsec2 in direct detection and 32 mag/arcsec2 on integrated profiles) I will then address a number of limiting issues such as optical reflection halos, stray light, airglow, and the ubiquitous cirrus emission.

  1. Spatial Analyses of a Complete Sample of Rich Abell/ACO Clusters to z=0.14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.

    1999-12-01

    Galaxy clusters act as excellent mass tracers in our local Universe. They are bright, contain hundreds of galaxies, and are easy to observe. The most recognized galaxy cluster catalogs are those of Abell (1958) and Abell, Corwin and Olowin (1989-ACO). I will present the results of a new survey of Abell/ACO cluster redshifts that extends our knowledge of the large-scale mass distribution to a redshift of z = 0.14. The volume of the Universe traced by this survey is four times larger than any of its predecessors. The large number of clusters within the survey boundaries ( 560) as well as the large volume traced, allow for statistical analyses on scales never before probed. I will present the cluster power spectrum to scales approaching 1000h-1Mpc. I will also demonstrate the high-level of completeness for this survey, which allows one to study the effects of large-scale structure on internal cluster properties. I will then summarize some recent collaborative efforts which show that (1) Wide-Angle Tail radio jets are ``blown'' in the direction of the local large-scale axis; (2) High dM/dt cooling flow clusters reside in crowded environments; (3) Clusters with close near-neighbors are also close to the fundamental plane created from Lo, Lx and Ro. CM was funded in part by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Maine Science and Technology Foundation.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Multidrug-Resistant Citrobacter freundii Strain P10159, Isolated from Urine Samples from a Patient with Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaodong; Huang, Yong; Xu, Xiaomeng; Zhao, Yachao; Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Zhiyi; Zhang, Xianglilan; Wu, Yi; Wang, Jie; Zhou, Dongsheng; An, Xiaoping; Pei, Guangqian; Wang, Yunfei; Mi, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Citrobacter freundii is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause diarrhea, septicemia, meningitis, and urinary tract infections. We report here the complete genome sequence of C. freundii strain P10159, isolated from urine samples from a patient in China with esophageal carcinoma. The genome has 5,080,321 bp and 4,768 coding sequences, with a G+C content of 51.7%. PMID:26893430

  3. INFRARED SPECTRA AND PHOTOMETRY OF COMPLETE SAMPLES OF PALOMAR-GREEN AND TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yong; Rieke, G. H.; Su, K. Y. L.; Ogle, P. M.; Balog, Z.

    2014-10-01

    As a step toward a comprehensive overview of the infrared (IR) diagnostics of the central engines and host galaxies of quasars at low redshift, we present Spitzer Space Telescope spectroscopic (5-40 μm) and photometric (24, 70, and 160 μm) measurements of all Palomar-Green (PG) quasars at z < 0.5 and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) quasars at z < 0.3. We supplement these data with Herschel measurements at 160 μm. The sample is composed of 87 optically selected PG quasars and 52 near-IR-selected 2MASS quasars. Here we present the data, measure the prominent spectral features, and separate emission due to star formation from that emitted by the dusty circumnuclear torus. We find that the mid-IR (5-30 μm) spectral shape for the torus is largely independent of quasar IR luminosity with scatter in the spectral energy distribution (SED) shape of ≲0.2 dex. Except for the silicate features, no large difference is observed between PG (unobscured—silicate emission) and 2MASS (obscured—silicate absorption) quasars. Only mild silicate features are observed in both cases. When in emission, the peak wavelength of the silicate feature tends to be longer than 9.7 μm, possibly indicating effects on grain properties near the active galactic nucleus. The IR color is shown to correlate with the equivalent width of the aromatic features, indicating that the slope of the quasar mid- to far-IR SED is to first order driven by the fraction of radiation from star formation in the IR bands.

  4. Bologna and Quality Assurance: Progress Made or Pulling the Wrong Cart?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huisman, Jeroen; Westerheijden, Don F.

    2010-01-01

    This contribution looks critically at the achievements regarding the Bologna action line "European cooperation in quality assurance". Much has been realised but most of the visible achievements are at the supranational level: the development of the European Standards and Guidelines, the launch of the European Network of Quality Assurance Agencies,…

  5. Chapter 1: Redefining Short-Cycle Higher Education across Europe--The Challenges of Bologna

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slantcheva-Durst, Snejana

    2010-01-01

    This essay examines the impact of the Bologna Process on the development of short-cycle higher education in Europe, noting that the integration of short-cycle qualifications within the Qualifications Framework for the European Higher Education Area, combined with the critical place allotted to those programs in national lifelong learning…

  6. The Boundaries of Competency within Lisbon and Bologna: The Short-Cycle/Foundation Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brine, Jacqueline

    2008-01-01

    The concept of competency is considered both in relation to the educational competency of the short-cycle student described in the "Dublin Descriptors" of the Bologna Process and in the European Commission's European Qualifications Framework, and in relation to the legal competency that the European Commission has within the field of education and…

  7. Latin American Universities and the Bologna Process: From Commercialisation to the "Tuning" Competencies Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aboites, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    Through the "Tuning-Latin America" competencies project, Latin American universities have been incorporated into the Bologna Process. In 2003 the European Commission approved an initiative of this project for Latin America and began to promote it among ministries, university presidents' organisations and other institutions in Latin America. This…

  8. Focus on Higher Education in Europe 2010: The Impact of the Bologna Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosier, David; Dalferth, Simon; Parveva, Teodora

    2010-01-01

    This 2010 edition of the "Focus" report has been prepared for the European Ministerial Conference in Budapest/Vienna, 11-12 March 2010, that officially launches the European Higher Education Area. The report has been developed as a fully collaborative exercise between the Eurydice Network and the Bologna Follow-up Group (BFUG), with the aim of…

  9. The Open Method of Coordination and the Implementation of the Bologna Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veiga, Amelia; Amaral, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the authors argue that the use of the Open Method of Coordination (OMC) in the implementation of the Bologna process presents coordination problems that do not allow for the full coherence of the results. As the process is quite complex, involving three different levels (European, national and local) and as the final actors in the…

  10. The European Higher Education Area in 2012: Bologna Process Implementation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosier, David; Horvath, Anna; Kerpanova, Viera; Kocanova, Daniela; Parveva, Teodora; Dalferth, Simon; Orr, Dominic; Mejer, Lene; Reis, Fernando; Rauhvargers, Andrejs

    2012-01-01

    The report, which reflects the framework of the Leuven/Louvain-la-Neuve Communique, is the result of a joint effort by Eurostat, Eurydice as well as by Eurostudent and has been overseen by the Bologna Follow-up Group and more specifically by a working group established by the latter. In line with the specific mission and methodology of the…

  11. The Devil in the Detail: Contradictory National Requirements and Bologna Master Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sin, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    This article compares the national-level requirements for master degree provision in England, Denmark and Portugal following the implementation of the Bologna Process, and ponders upon the reconcilability of these requirements in cross-national initiatives (e.g. joint degrees). In all three countries, master degrees have to comply with the…

  12. Managing the Dynamics of the Bologna Reforms: How Institutional Actors Re-Construct the Policy Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veiga, Amélia; Neave, Guy

    2015-01-01

    How do the constituencies in higher education re-interpret Bologna's function with regard to the European Higher Education Area? This research examines how institutional actors re-construct the policy framework in the light of their own institutional agendas. Drawing on empirical data from a survey of academics, students and administrative and…

  13. The Regional University: Paths of Integration in the Framework of the Bologna Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarev, G.; Martynenko, O.

    2006-01-01

    The development of international systems of education is opening the way to accomplish tasks in the sphere of higher education that are common to the world community. The Bologna Process, in the framework of which the educational systems of Europe are becoming integrated, makes it possible for Russia to make a choice of the forms of its…

  14. The Governance of Higher Education Regionalisation: Comparative Analysis of the Bologna Process and MERCOSUR-Educativo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verger, Antoni; Hermo, Javier Pablo

    2010-01-01

    The article analyses two processes of higher education regionalisation, MERCOSUR-Educativo in Latin America and the Bologna Process in Europe, from a comparative perspective. The comparative analysis is centered on the content and the governance of both processes and, specifically, on the reasons of their uneven evolution and implementation. We…

  15. "Bildung", the Bologna Process and Kierkegaard's Concept of Subjective Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reindal, Solveig M.

    2013-01-01

    The Bologna Framework for higher education has agreed on three "cycle descriptors"--knowledge, skill and general competence--which are to constitute the learning outcomes and credit ranges for the three cycles of higher education: The Bachelor, the Master and the PhD. In connection with the implementations of the national qualification…

  16. Aligning Seminars with Bologna Requirements: Reciprocal Peer Tutoring, the Solo Taxonomy and Deep Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lueg, Rainer; Lueg, Klarissa; Lauridsen, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Changes in public policy, such as the Bologna Process, require students to be equipped with multifunctional competencies to master relevant tasks in unfamiliar situations. Achieving this goal might imply a change in many curricula toward deeper learning. As a didactical means to achieve deep learning results, the authors suggest reciprocal peer…

  17. Music in Higher Education after the Bologna Treaty: Or, in Search of a New Educational Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mota, Graca

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to introduce a critical reflection on the field of music education in higher education, using the Bologna Declaration and the European context as a backdrop. However, the author would like to clarify that she does not intend to develop a thorough comparative analysis of music education in European countries. In fact, this is being…

  18. The Impact of the Bologna Process on Academic Staff in Ukraine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Marta A.; Chapman, David W.; Rumyantseva, Nataliya L.

    2012-01-01

    Academic staff in Ukraine face a convergence of institutional and professional pressures precipitated by a national economic crisis, projected declines in enrolment and dramatic changes to institutional procedures as institutions implement the Bologna Process. This article examines the extent to which these pressures are reshaping the way academic…

  19. Importing Education: Europeanisation and the Bologna Process in Europe's Backyard--The Case of Kazakhstan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tampayeva, Gulnara Y.

    2015-01-01

    This article studies the problem of the implementation of European educational standards in Kazakhstan higher education. This is considered in the frame of post-socialist education, when reforms in several post-Soviet states were undertaken under the Bologna Process. Kazakhstan, as this article argues, is justified for consideration in the frame…

  20. What the Instructors and Administrators of Russia's Higher Educational Institutions Think about the Bologna Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aref'ev, A. L.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing integration of national educational systems, in particular in Europe, is giving rise to conflict among traditional forms of instruction, curricula, pedagogical norms and values, and firmly established standards of education. The center of this conflict now, which was catalyzed by Russia's joining the Bologna process, consists of the…

  1. The US Response to Bologna: Expanding Knowledge, First Steps of Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Clifford

    2010-01-01

    The roads of incoming information to the US higher education system about the Bologna Process are varied and numerous. They include not only the on-line and traditional trade press, but also conferences of national organisations. Whether anyone remembers much of that information, on the other hand, is an open question, as a limited survey…

  2. The Bologna Process and Higher Education in Mercosur: Regionalization or Europeanization?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Azevedo, Mário Luiz Neves

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades regional agreements have become more significant in educational and training. This paper situates and analyses the European Higher Education Area (EHEA), the Bologna Process and the Lisbon Strategy and explores their influence on the integration of higher education systems in Mercosur (the Southern Common Market of…

  3. Looking for Synergies: Education for Sustainable Development and the Bologna Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadeeva, Zinaida; Galkute, Laima

    2012-01-01

    In defining quality of higher education, competences achieved by graduates are interpreted as essential criteria. There are two political processes in education dealing, among other issues, with competence development: the Bologna Process in European Higher Education Area and a global process--the United Nations (UN) Decade (2005-2014) of…

  4. Higher Romanian Education Post-Bologna: Required Changes, Instruments and Ethical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrisor, Alexandru-Ionut

    2011-01-01

    In 1999 Romania became part of the Bologna process, focused on the European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System, design to increase the compatibility of European universities, ensuring the mobility of students and professors in the context of re-orienting education to the formation of competences continuously adapted to market requirements.…

  5. Bologna through Ontario Eyes: The Case of the Advanced Diploma in Architectural Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Amy D.; Feltham, Mark; Trotter, Lane

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by Ontario's burgeoning interest in postsecondary student mobility, this article examines how elements of Europe's Bologna Process can help bridge the college--university divide of Ontario's postsecondary system. Via discourse analysis of relevant qualification frameworks and program standards, it argues that the current system…

  6. The Bologna Process as a New Public Management Tool in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Štech, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    This essentially polemical article questions whether the Bologna Process (BP) is necessary (and desirable) in the adaptation of universities to the new social conditions or whether it is a Trojan horse sent out to introduce neo-liberal changes in the field of higher education. First, it addresses the circumstances surrounding the origins of the…

  7. The Bologna Process and Its Impact on Higher Education at Russia's Margins: The Case of Kaliningrad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganzle, Stefan; Meister, Stefan; King, Conrad

    2009-01-01

    Embracing the Russian Federation since 2003, the Bologna process is no longer exclusively confined to western European countries. As early as 1999, Vladimir Putin declared the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad, wedged between Lithuania and Poland, as a potential pilot region for intensified cooperation between Russia and the EU on a number of policy…

  8. The Bologna Process in Higher Education: An Exploratory Case Study in a Russian Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esyutina, Maria; Fearon, Colm; Leatherbarrow, Nicky

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the current article is to discuss the role of the Bologna process in enabling quality of educational change, internationalisation and greater mobility using an example case study of a Russian university. Some discussion is provided to offer insights and inform future research and practice. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  9. "Rationalized Myths" in European Higher Education: The Construction and Diffusion of the Bologna Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schriewer, Jurgen

    2009-01-01

    This article is about the so-called Bologna process and the historically unprecedented diffusion of an abstract model for the restructuring and harmonization of higher education studies and degrees across Europe it has fuelled. This process is interpreted here as a particular example of much larger processes of world-level interconnection and…

  10. Future Challenges in Higher Education--Bologna Experts' Community Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yemini, Miri

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results from systematic analysis of the challenges for the future of higher education in European and neighboring countries as it was extracted from the Bologna experts and Higher Education Reform experts' opinions. Opinions of more than 100 experts from 35 countries were documented and analyzed. Significant differences in the…

  11. The Bologna Process and Its Achievements in Europe 1999-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinalda, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with the Bologna Process (BP), which since its creation in 1999 has deeply influenced European higher education: What is it? How did it come into being? How far has it come? The BP is both a political phenomenon and a reform taking place in European higher education. As a political phenomenon it consists of a series of…

  12. The Impact of the Bologna Process in Ibero-America: Prospects and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrer, Alejandro Tiana

    2010-01-01

    The Bologna Process is one of the major developments to have taken place in higher education in recent centuries. It has had an impact beyond European borders and repercussions in other parts of the world. Ibero-America has also sat up and taken note, even though scholars agree that there would be difficulties with its direct implementation in the…

  13. Testing the Pairs-Reflection Model with X-Ray Spectral Variability and X-Ray Properties of Complete Samples of Radio-Selected BL Lacertae Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urry, C. Megan

    1997-01-01

    This grant was awarded to Dr. C. Megan Urry of the Space Telescope Science Institute in response to two successful ADP proposals to use archival Ginga and Rosat X-ray data for 'Testing the Pairs-Reflection model with X-Ray Spectral Variability' (in collaboration with Paola Grandi, now at the University of Rome) and 'X-Ray Properties of Complete Samples of Radio-Selected BL Lacertae Objects' (in collaboration with then-graduate student Rita Sambruna, now a post-doc at Goddard Space Flight Center). In addition, post-docs Joseph Pesce and Elena Pian, and graduate student Matthew O'Dowd, have worked on several aspects of these projects. The grant was originally awarded on 3/01/94; this report covers the full period, through May 1997. We have completed our project on the X-ray properties of radio-selected BL Lacs.

  14. A complete X-ray sample of the high latitude sky from HEAO-1 A-2: log N lo S and luminosity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piccinotti, G.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Marshall, F. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Shafer, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment was performed in which a complete X-ray survey of the 8.2 steradians of the sky at galactic latitudes where the absolute value of b is 20 deg down to a limiting sensitivity of 3.1 x ten to the minus 11th power ergs/sq cm sec in the 2-10 keV band. Of the 85 detected sources 17 were identified with galactic objects, 61 were identified with extragalactic objects, and 7 remain unidentified. The log N - log S relation for the non-galactic objects is well fit by the Euclidean relationship. The X-ray spectra of these objects were used to construct log N - log S in physical units. The complete sample of identified sources was used to construct X-ray luminosity functions, using the absolute maximum likelihood method, for clusters galaxies and active galactic nuclei.

  15. LabDisk with complete reagent prestorage for sample-to-answer nucleic acid based detection of respiratory pathogens verified with influenza A H3N2 virus.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, F; Schwemmer, F; Hutzenlaub, T; Baumann, D; Strohmeier, O; Dingemanns, G; Simons, G; Sager, C; Plobner, L; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Mark, D

    2016-01-01

    Portable point-of-care devices for pathogen detection require easy, minimal and user-friendly handling steps and need to have the same diagnostic performance compared to centralized laboratories. In this work we present a fully automated sample-to-answer detection of influenza A H3N2 virus in a centrifugal LabDisk with complete prestorage of reagents. Thus, the initial supply of the sample remains the only manual handling step. The self-contained LabDisk automates by centrifugal microfluidics all necessary process chains for PCR-based pathogen detection: pathogen lysis, magnetic bead based nucleic acid extraction, aliquoting of the eluate into 8 reaction cavities, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Prestored reagents comprise air dried specific primers and fluorescence probes, lyophilized RT-PCR mastermix and stick-packaged liquid reagents for nucleic acid extraction. Employing two different release frequencies for the stick-packaged liquid reagents enables on-demand release of highly wetting extraction buffers, such as sequential release of lysis and binding buffer. Microfluidic process-flow was successful in 54 out of 55 tested LabDisks. We demonstrate successful detection of the respiratory pathogen influenza A H3N2 virus in a total of 18 LabDisks with sample concentrations down to 2.39 × 10(4) viral RNA copies per ml, which is in the range of clinical relevance. Furthermore, we detected RNA bacteriophage MS2 acting as internal control in 3 LabDisks with a sample concentration down to 75 plaque forming units (pfu) per ml. All experiments were applied in a 2 kg portable, laptop controlled point-of-care device. The turnaround time of the complete analysis from sample-to-answer was less than 3.5 hours. PMID:26610171

  16. Gian Domenico Cassini in Bologna and his contributions to the assessment of the planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccesi, A.

    1998-10-01

    G. D. Cassini was hired as a professor of astronomy in Bologna in 1649, at the age of only 24, and left for Paris in 1669, when he was 44. We will outline in this Paper his major contributions to astronomy during those year according to the judgement of the scholars : the demonstration of the physical inequality of the Suns motion using the meridian line he had built in the church of S. Petronio and the discovery of Mars and Jupiter rotation. The first result unequivocally dismissed Aristotles celestial mechanics based on uniform circular motions, pointing to the unity of the terrestrial and celestial worlds; the second contributed to renew the debate on whether the dynamical structure of the planetary system was Ptolemaic or Copernican. In this respect, some recently discovered lessons, which Cassini gave in Bologna in the year 1666, appear enlightening. Excerpts are reported and commented upon.

  17. MOJAVE: Monitoring of Jets in Active Galactic Nuclei with VLBA Experiments. VI. Kinematics Analysis of a Complete Sample of Blazar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, M. L.; Cohen, M. H.; Homan, D. C.; Kadler, M.; Kellermann, K. I.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Ros, E.; Savolainen, T.; Zensus, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    We discuss the jet kinematics of a complete flux-density-limited sample of 135 radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) resulting from a 13 year program to investigate the structure and evolution of parsec-scale jet phenomena. Our analysis is based on new 2 cm Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) images obtained between 2002 and 2007, but includes our previously published observations made at the same wavelength, and is supplemented by VLBA archive data. In all, we have used 2424 images spanning the years 1994-2007 to study and determine the motions of 526 separate jet features in 127 jets. The data quality and temporal coverage (a median of 15 epochs per source) of this complete AGN jet sample represent a significant advance over previous kinematics surveys. In all but five AGNs, the jets appear one-sided, most likely the result of differential Doppler boosting. In general, the observed motions are directed along the jet ridge line, outward from the optically thick core feature. We directly observe changes in speed and/or direction in one third of the well-sampled jet components in our survey. While there is some spread in the apparent speeds of separate features within an individual jet, the dispersion is about three times smaller than the overall dispersion of speeds among all jets. This supports the idea that there is a characteristic flow that describes each jet, which we have characterized by the fastest observed component speed. The observed maximum speed distribution is peaked at ~10c, with a tail that extends out to ~50c. This requires a distribution of intrinsic Lorentz factors in the parent population that range up to ~50. We also note the presence of some rare low-pattern speeds or even stationary features in otherwise rapidly flowing jets that may be the result of standing re-collimation shocks, and/or a complex geometry and highly favorable Doppler factor.

  18. CosmoBolognaLib: Open source C++ libraries for cosmological calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marulli, Federico; Veropalumbo, Alfonso; Moresco, Michele

    2015-11-01

    CosmoBolognaLib contains numerical libraries for cosmological calculations; written in C++, it is intended to define a common numerical environment for cosmological investigations of the large-scale structure of the Universe. The software aids in handling real and simulated astronomical catalogs by measuring one-point, two-point and three-point statistics in configuration space and performing cosmological analyses. These open source libraries can be included in either C++ or Python codes.

  19. Comparing recidivism rates of treatment responders/nonresponders in a sample of 413 child molesters who had completed community-based sex offender treatment in the United kingdom.

    PubMed

    Beech, Anthony R; Mandeville-Norden, Rebecca; Goodwill, Alasdair

    2012-02-01

    Analysis of psychometric data from a sample of 413 child molesters who had completed a U.K. probation-based sex offender treatment program was carried out to assess (a) the effectiveness of therapy in the short term and (b) the longer term implications of treatment in relation to sexual recidivism. It was found that 12% (51 offenders) of the sample had recidivated within 2 to 4 years. Of these recidivists, 86% (44 offenders) had been reconvicted for a sexually related offense. One hundred thirty-five offenders (33%) demonstrated a treated profile (i.e., demonstrated no offense-specific problems and few, or no, socioaffective problems at the posttreatment stage). This group was compared with a sample of offenders deemed as not responding to treatment, matched by their levels of pretreatment risk/need. It was found that a significantly smaller proportion (n = 12, 9%) of treatment responders had recidivated, compared to the treatment nonresponders (n = 20, 15%), indicating a 40% reduction in recidivism in those who had responded to treatment (effect size = .18). Matching length of treatment to the offenders' level of pretreatment risk/need (i.e., higher risk/treatment-need offenders typically undertook longer treatment) reduced the rate of recidivism among this group to the level of recidivism observed among the lower risk/need offenders. PMID:21187301

  20. Magnetic resonance for fluids in porous media at the University of Bologna.

    PubMed

    Fantazzini, Paola

    2005-02-01

    The magnetic resonance in porous media (MRPM) community is now a vast community of scientists from all over the world who recognize magnetic resonance as an instrument of choice for the characterization of pore space and of the distribution, diffusion and flow of fluids inside a vast range of different materials. The MRPM conferences are the occasions in which this community gets together, compares notes and grows. The scene was different in 1990, when this series of conferences was promoted at Bologna. I will go briefly over the history of these events, showing the role played by the University of Bologna and in particular by the intuition, ingenuity and passion of Giulio Cesare Borgia. The MRPM work at Bologna began in the mid-1980s. New correlations were found among parameters from NMR relaxation measurements and oil field parameters such as porosity, permeability to fluid flow, irreducible water saturation, residual oil saturation and pore-system surface-to-volume ratio, and fast algorithms were developed to give the different NMR parameters. Interest in valid interpretation of data led to extensive work also on the inversion of multiexponential relaxation data and the effects of inhomogeneous fields from susceptibility differences on distributions of relaxation times. In the last few years, extensive developments were made of combined magnetic resonance imaging and relaxation measurements in different fields. PMID:15833602

  1. [O iii] λ5007 and X-Ray Properties of a Complete Sample of Hard X-Ray Selected AGNs in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Y.; Hashimoto, Y.; Ichikawa, K.; Ishino, Y.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Väisänen, P.; Ricci, C.; Berney, S.; Gandhi, P.; Koss, M.; Mushotzky, R.; Terashima, Y.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Crenshaw, M.

    2015-12-01

    We study the correlation between the [O iii] λ5007 and X-ray luminosities of local active galactic nuclei (AGNs), using a complete, hard X-ray (>10 keV) selected sample in the Swift/BAT 9-month catalog. From our optical spectroscopic observations at the South African Astronomical Observatory and the literature, a catalog of [O iii] λ5007 line flux for all 103 AGNs at Galactic latitudes of | b| \\gt 15^\\circ is compiled. Significant correlations with intrinsic X-ray luminosity ({L}{{X}}) are found for both observed ({L}[{{O} {{III}}] }) and extinction-corrected ({L}[{{O} {{III}}]}{{cor}}) luminosities, separately for X-ray unabsorbed and absorbed AGNs. We obtain the regression form of {L}[{{O} {{III}}] } \\propto \\{L}2-10\\{keV}1.18+/- 0.07 and {L}[{{O} {{III}}]}{{cor}} \\propto \\{L}2-10\\{keV}1.16+/- 0.09 from the whole sample. The absorbed AGNs with low (<0.5%) scattering fractions in soft X-rays show on average smaller {L}[{{O} {{III}}]}/{L}{{X}} and {L}[{{O} {{III}}]}{{cor}}/{L}{{X}} ratios than the other absorbed AGNs, while those in edge-on host galaxies do not. These results suggest that a significant fraction of this population is buried in tori with small opening angles. By using these {L}[{{O} {{III}}] } versus {L}{{X}} correlations, the X-ray luminosity function (LF) of local AGNs (including Compton-thick AGNs) in a standard population synthesis model gives much better agreement with the [O iii] λ5007 LF derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey than previously reported. This confirms that hard X-ray observations are a very powerful tool to find AGNs with high completeness.

  2. Deep IRAC1,2 Imaging of the Extended Tidal Debris Fields for the Complete GOALS Sample of LIRGs (Part 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, David; Armus, Lee; Barnes, Josh; Chan, Ben; Evans, Aaron; Frayer, David; Howell, Justin; Kewley, Lisa; Koda, Jin; Lord, Steve; Mazzarella, Joseph; Surace, Jason; U, Vivian

    2011-05-01

    We propose to obtain IRAC1,2 observations (~1400 sec) to complete our flux-limited sample of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), selected from the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Survey, in order to measure the full extent and internal structure of the large tidal debris fields that have recently been revealed (~70-130 kpc diameter) in deep optical imaging of these objects using the Subaru 8m Telescope on Mauna Kea. Our 115 targets represent the lower luminosity objects in the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRGs Survey (GOALS), defining the important transition region between LIRGs and ULIRGs, for which we are obtaining both spacecraft and ground-based data at a wide range of wavelengths (radio thru X-Rays). All of our targets have previous shallow (~150 sec) IRAC observations, which are insufficient for detecting all but the brightest, and much less extended tidal features. Our deeper IRAC observations will allow us to fully characterize the history, geometry and morphology of the interaction (major and minor mergers) for comparison with new sets of model calculations using 'IDENTIKIT' (Barnes & Hibbard, 2009). We also plan to combine our new IRAC1,2 data with deep optical (Subaru and VLT) and NIR (HST-NIC, -WFC3) data to determine spectral energy distributions, and to measure stellar masses as well as detect warm dust in these extended features. These new data will also allow us for the first time to obtain a clearer picture of the possible interrelation of nearby objects (e.g. putative tidal dwarf galaxies, other disconnected debris arms, shells, etc.) to the merger history of our complete sample of local (U)LIRGs.

  3. Phylogenetic analyses of Vitis (Vitaceae) based on complete chloroplast genome sequences: effects of taxon sampling and phylogenetic methods on resolving relationships among rosids

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Robert K; Kaittanis, Charalambos; Saski, Christopher; Lee, Seung-Bum; Tomkins, Jeffrey; Alverson, Andrew J; Daniell, Henry

    2006-01-01

    Background The Vitaceae (grape) is an economically important family of angiosperms whose phylogenetic placement is currently unresolved. Recent phylogenetic analyses based on one to several genes have suggested several alternative placements of this family, including sister to Caryophyllales, asterids, Saxifragales, Dilleniaceae or to rest of rosids, though support for these different results has been weak. There has been a recent interest in using complete chloroplast genome sequences for resolving phylogenetic relationships among angiosperms. These studies have clarified relationships among several major lineages but they have also emphasized the importance of taxon sampling and the effects of different phylogenetic methods for obtaining accurate phylogenies. We sequenced the complete chloroplast genome of Vitis vinifera and used these data to assess relationships among 27 angiosperms, including nine taxa of rosids. Results The Vitis vinifera chloroplast genome is 160,928 bp in length, including a pair of inverted repeats of 26,358 bp that are separated by small and large single copy regions of 19,065 bp and 89,147 bp, respectively. The gene content and order of Vitis is identical to many other unrearranged angiosperm chloroplast genomes, including tobacco. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood were performed on DNA sequences of 61 protein-coding genes for two datasets with 28 or 29 taxa, including eight or nine taxa from four of the seven currently recognized major clades of rosids. Parsimony and likelihood phylogenies of both data sets provide strong support for the placement of Vitaceae as sister to the remaining rosids. However, the position of the Myrtales and support for the monophyly of the eurosid I clade differs between the two data sets and the two methods of analysis. In parsimony analyses, the inclusion of Gossypium is necessary to obtain trees that support the monophyly of the eurosid I clade. However, maximum

  4. H I emission and absorption in nearby, gas-rich galaxies - II. Sample completion and detection of intervening absorption in NGC 5156

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, S. N.; Sadler, E. M.; Allison, J. R.; Koribalski, B. S.; Curran, S. J.; Pracy, M. B.; Phillips, C. J.; Bignall, H. E.; Reynolds, C.

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of a survey for intervening 21 cm H I absorption in a sample of 10 nearby, gas-rich galaxies selected from the H I Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS). This follows the six HIPASS galaxies searched in previous work and completes our full sample. In this paper, we searched for absorption along 17 sightlines with impact parameters between 6 and 46 kpc, making one new detection. We also obtained simultaneous H I emission-line data, allowing us to directly relate the absorption-line detection rate to the H I distribution. From this, we find the majority of the non-detections in the current sample are because sightline does not intersect the H I disc of the galaxy at sufficiently high column density, but that source structure is also an important factor. The detected absorption-line arises in the galaxy NGC 5156 (z = 0.01) at an impact parameter of 19 kpc. The line is deep and narrow with an integrated optical depth of 0.82 km s-1. High-resolution Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) images at 5 and 8 GHz reveal that the background source is resolved into two components with a separation of 2.6 arcsec (500 pc at the redshift of the galaxy), with the absorption likely occurring against a single component. We estimate that the ratio of the spin temperature and covering factor, TS/f, is approximately 950 K in the outer disc of NGC 5156, but further observations using very long baseline interferometry would allow us to accurately measure the covering factor and spin temperature of the gas.

  5. Chapter 27: Deja vu All Over Again: Using NVO Tools to Re-Investigate a Complete Sample of Texas Radio Survey Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Ray A.; Rohde, David; Tamura, Takayuki; van Dyne, Jeffrey

    At the first NVO Summer School in September 2004, a complete sample of Texas Radio Survey sources, first derived in 1989 and subsequently observed with the VLA in A-array snapshot mode in 1990, was revisited. The original investigators had never had the occasion to reduce the A-array 5-minute snapshot data, nor to do any other significant follow-up, though the sample still seemed a possibly useful but relatively small study of radio galaxies, AGN, quasars, extragalactic sources, and galaxy clusters, etc. At the time of the original sample definition in late 1989, the best optical material available for the region was the SRC-J plate from the UK Schmidt Telescope in Australia. In much more recent times, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey has included the region in its DR2 data release, so good multicolor optical imaging in a number of standard bandpasses has finally become available. These data, along with other material in the radio, infrared, and (where available) were used to get a better preliminary idea of the nature of the objects in the 1989 sample. We also investigated one of the original questions: whether these radio sources with steeper (or at least non-flat) radio spectra were associated with galaxy clusters, and in some cases higher-redshift galaxy clusters and AGN. A rudimentary web service was created which allowed the user to perform simple cone searches and SIAP image extractions of specified field sizes for multiwavelength data across the electromagnetic spectrum, and a prototype web page was set up which would display the resulting images in wavelength order across the page for sources in the sample. Finally, as an additional investigation, using radio and X-ray IDs as a proxy for AGN which might be associated with large, central cluster galaxies, positional matches of radio and X-ray sources from two much larger catalogs were done using the tool TOPCAT in order to search for the degree of correlation between ID positions, radio luminosity, and cluster

  6. Deep IRAC1,2 Imaging of the Extended Tidal Debris Fields for the Complete HST-GOALS Sample of (U)LIRGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, David; Armus, Lee; Barnes, Josh; Chan, Ben; Evans, Aaron; Frayer, David; Howell, Justin; Kewley, Lisa; Koda, Jin; Lord, Steve; Mazzarella, Joseph; Surace, Jason; U, Vivian

    2010-06-01

    We propose to obtain IRAC1,2 observations (~1400 sec) of a flux-limited sample of 88 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) originally selected from the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Survey, in order to measure the full extent and internal structure of the large tidal debris fields that have recently been revealed (~70-130 kpc diameter) in deep optical imaging of these objects using the Subaru 8m Telescope on Mauna Kea. Our 88 targets are part of the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRGs Survey (GOALS), for which we are obtaining both spacecraft and ground-based data at a wide range of wavelengths (radio thru X-Rays). All of our targets have previous shallow (~150 sec) IRAC observations, which are insufficient for detecting all but the brightest, and much less extended tidal features. Our deeper IRAC observations will allow us to better characterize the history, geometry and morphology of the interaction for comparison with new sets of model calculations using 'IDENTIKIT' (Barnes & Hibbard, 2009). We also plan to combine our new IRAC1,2 data with deep optical (Subaru and VLT) and NIR (HST-NIC, -WFC3) data to determine spectral energy distributions, and to measure stellar masses as well as detect warm dust in these extended features. These new data will also allow us for the first time to obtain a clearer picture of the possible interrelatedness of nearby objects (e.g. putative tidal dwarf galaxies, and other previously disconnected arms, shells, etc.) to the merger history of this complete sample of local (U)LIRGs.

  7. Identification and complete genome analysis of kobuvirus in faecal samples of European roller (Coracias garrulus): for the first time in a bird.

    PubMed

    Pankovics, Péter; Boros, Ákos; Kiss, Tamás; Reuter, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    The genus Kobuvirus (Picornaviridae) consists of three species, Aichivirus A (e.g., Aichi virus, which infects humans), Aichivirus B and Aichivirus C. Kobuvirus have not been detected in non-mammal species including birds. In this study, a novel kobuvirus was identified in 3 (17 %) out of 18 faecal samples collected from European rollers (Coracias garrulus) in Hungary. The complete genome sequence of strain SZAL6-KoV/2011/HUN (KJ934637), which was determined using a novel 5'/3' RACE method (dsRNA-RACE) involving a double-stranded (ds)RNA intermediate, has a type-V IRES at the 5' end and a cis-acting element (CRE) in the 3C gene and encodes L and 2A(H-box/NC) proteins, but it does not contain the sequence forming a "barbell-like" secondary RNA structure in the 3'UTR. SZAL6-KoV/2011/HUN has 72 %, 73 %, and 81 % amino acid sequence identity to the P1, P2, and P3 protein, respectively, of Aichi virus. Evolutionary analysis showed that SZAL6-KoV/2011/HUN shares a common ancestor with other kobuviruses but belongs to a more ancient lineage in the species Aichivirus A. Investigation of the known kobuviruses in different animals and discovery of novel kobuviruses in potential host species helps to clarify the evolutionary connection and zoonotic potential of kobuviruses. PMID:25195063

  8. Reliability assessment of the complete 3D etch rate distribution of Si in anisotropic etchants based on vertically micromachined wagon wheel samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosálvez, M. A.; Pal, Prem; Ferrando, N.; Sato, K.

    2011-12-01

    As a sequel to part I (Gosálvez et al J. Micromech. Microeng. 12 125007), the present paper is part II of a series of two papers dedicated to the presentation of a novel, large-throughput, experimental procedure to determine the complete three-dimensional orientation dependence of the etch rate of silicon by using vertically micromachined wagon wheel samples. While the first part provides the experimental details and compares the results to realistic simulations, the present paper focuses on characterizing the reliability of the obtained etch rates. For this purpose, the shape of the etched structures is analyzed and corresponding formulas are derived, enabling the estimation of an upper bound to the measured etch rates. It is shown that the measured etch rates remain below this limit, strongly indicating that the observed wedge retraction values are consistent with the assumed geometrical shape of the wedges. An exception to this rule are the etch rates of {1 1 0} obtained from lang1 1 0rang-oriented wafers, which are systematically larger. This deviation is explained by a kinetic acceleration process due to the small size of the step-flow structures that are formed on the affected wagon wheel spokes. The comparison to previous experiments indicates that the proposed method provides similar or even more accurate etch rates for some of the etchants with a more affordable and less labor-intensive approach.

  9. [Syphilis in sixteenth-century in Bologna. Health care and social assistance (Part one)].

    PubMed

    Sabbatani, S

    2006-03-01

    Syphilis arrived in Bologna in the summer of 1495, after Fornovo's battle on the Taro where Charles VIII's army, following the invasion of Naples, fought against the anti-French league who faced up to the invaders as they withdrew. It was the battle-weary Bolognesi, prisoners, deserters and probably some prostitutes following the French and mercenary army who introduced the infection into the city. At the beginning of the syphilis epidemic, the disease was very aggressive with particularly visible symptoms and many resulting deaths. Subsequently, contemporaries mention an abatement of this aggressivity in time spans that varied, but in no cases exceeded 60 years. In 1507 Bologna lost its political autonomy, becoming dependent on Rome. This was symptomatic of the upheavals throughout Italy in the sixteenth century. In this situation of economic and institutional crisis the Bolognesi were able to react with decision to the epidemic, re-converting the municipal hospital dedicated to S. Maria dei Guarini during the sixteenth century. This hospital, specializing in treating syphilis, was called "Ospedale di San Giobbe". It was closed in 1798, after the entry of the French army into Bologna. In 1560 the Bolognesi, realising that the most important causes of the spread of syphilis were social degradation, prostitution and poverty, founded another institution for the poor and for the prevention of prostitution. This institution was developed by the Opera dei Mendicanti and provided hospitality during the 1590 famine, in a city of 55,000 inhabitants, for as many as 1400 poor and sick. We also present the cure (guaiac and mercury) that they used at the time against syphilis. In such a difficult historical period beset with political and economic problems, the Bolognesi established two important institutions and showed that social solidarity is a value for the whole population. PMID:16794380

  10. The Challenge of Bologna: What United States Higher Education Has to Learn from Europe, and Why It Matters That We Learn It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaston, Paul L.

    2010-01-01

    In 1999, a declaration formalizing "the European process" was signed at and informally named for Europe's oldest university: Bologna. "The Bologna Process" has transformed higher education in Europe. This book is essential reading for anyone concerned about the ability of America's higher education system to position the country for…

  11. Effects and interactions of sodium lactate, sodium diacetate, and pediocin on the thermal inactivation of starved cells of Listeria monocytogenes on the surface of bologna

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects and interactions of temperature (56.3-60C) sodium lactate (SL; 0-4.8%), sodium diacetate (SDA; 0-2.5%), and pediocin (0-10,000 AU) on starved Listeria monocytogenes on bologna were investigated. Bologna slices containing SL and SDA in the formulation were dipped in pediocin, surface inoc...

  12. Impact of the Bologna Process and German Higher Education Reforms on Professorial Work and Role Definition at the University of Potsdam: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hairston, Christen Cullum

    2013-01-01

    The Bologna Process and German higher education reforms over the past decade have created significant waves of change at German universities. This case study focuses on the enduring impact of both the Bologna Process and German higher education reforms on how professors experience their work and define their roles during the winter term 2011-12 at…

  13. Women and the practice and teaching of medicine in Bologna in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

    PubMed

    Logan, Gabriella Berti

    2003-01-01

    When Bologna's political and intellectual elites had control over the university and associated institutions during the eighteenth century, a few women were allowed to participate in medical fields not typically associated with their gender. Laura Bassi could occasionally teach and debate on anatomy at the university, and the practical anatomist Anna Morandi Manzolini could make contributions to the research and teaching of anatomy. With the arrival of the French in Bologna in 1796, the control of the university and associated institutions passed from the local elite to the Ministry of Public Instruction in Milan. This article shows that a few women were awarded degrees in medicine, surgery, and pharmacy from the University of Bologna when the French were in control-however, these women, unlike Bassi and Morandi, were directed to fields deemed appropriate to their gender, such as the training of midwives, or apothecary practice within female institutions. PMID:14523259

  14. Waste flow analysis and life cycle assessment of integrated waste management systems as planning tools: Application to optimise the system of the City of Bologna.

    PubMed

    Tunesi, Simonetta; Baroni, Sergio; Boarini, Sandro

    2016-09-01

    The results of this case study are used to argue that waste management planning should follow a detailed process, adequately confronting the complexity of the waste management problems and the specificity of each urban area and of regional/national situations. To support the development or completion of integrated waste management systems, this article proposes a planning method based on: (1) the detailed analysis of waste flows and (2) the application of a life cycle assessment to compare alternative scenarios and optimise solutions. The evolution of the City of Bologna waste management system is used to show how this approach can be applied to assess which elements improve environmental performance. The assessment of the contribution of each waste management phase in the Bologna integrated waste management system has proven that the changes applied from 2013 to 2017 result in a significant improvement of the environmental performance mainly as a consequence of the optimised integration between materials and energy recovery: Global Warming Potential at 100 years (GWP100) diminishes from 21,949 to -11,169 t CO2-eq y(-1) and abiotic resources depletion from -403 to -520 t antimony-eq. y(-1) This study analyses at great detail the collection phase. Outcomes provide specific operational recommendations to policy makers, showing the: (a) relevance of the choice of the materials forming the bags for 'door to door' collection (for non-recycled low-density polyethylene bags 22 kg CO2-eq (tonne of waste)(-1)); (b) relatively low environmental impacts associated with underground tanks (3.9 kg CO2-eq (tonne of waste)(-1)); (c) relatively low impact of big street containers with respect to plastic bags (2.6 kg CO2-eq. (tonne of waste)(-1)). PMID:27170193

  15. STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF 12.2 GHz METHANOL MASERS ASSOCIATED WITH A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, S. L.; Caswell, J. L.; Green, J. A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Fuller, G. A.; Quinn, L. J.; Avison, A.

    2011-06-01

    We present definitive detection statistics for 12.2 GHz methanol masers toward a complete sample of 6.7 GHz methanol masers detected in the Methanol Multibeam survey south of declination -20{sup 0}. In total, we detect 250 12.2 GHz methanol masers toward 580 6.7 GHz methanol masers. This equates to a detection rate of 43.1%, which is lower than that of previous significant searches of comparable sensitivity. Both the velocity ranges and the flux densities of the target 6.7 GHz sources surpass that of their 12.2 GHz companion in almost all cases. Eighty percent of the detected 12.2 GHz methanol maser peaks are coincident in velocity with the 6.7 GHz maser peak. Our data support an evolutionary scenario whereby the 12.2 GHz sources are associated with a somewhat later evolutionary stage than the 6.7 GHz sources devoid of this transition. Furthermore, we find that the 6.7 GHz and 12.2 GHz methanol sources increase in luminosity as they evolve. In addition to this, evidence for an increase in velocity range with evolution is presented. This implies that it is not only the luminosity but also the volume of gas conducive to the different maser transitions that increases as the sources evolve. Comparison with GLIMPSE mid-infrared sources has revealed a coincidence rate between the locations of the 6.7 GHz methanol masers and GLIMPSE point sources similar to that achieved in previous studies. Overall, the properties of the GLIMPSE sources with and without 12.2 GHz counterparts are similar. There is a higher 12.2 GHz detection rate toward those 6.7 GHz methanol masers that are coincident with extended green objects.

  16. LCA of integrated MSW management systems: case study of the Bologna District.

    PubMed

    Buttol, P; Masoni, P; Bonoli, A; Goldoni, S; Belladonna, V; Cavazzuti, C

    2007-01-01

    LCA as a decision-supporting tool in planning integrated municipal solid waste management is not, as yet, widely used in Italy. This paper presents a study concerning the application of the LCA methodology to support the development of the new waste management plan for the Bologna District. The main goal of the study was to show decision-makers at the political level the benefits obtainable with the use of LCA, in terms of the identification and quantification of the potential environmental impacts of different waste management strategies. The integrated waste management system of the Bologna District includes waste collection and transport, sorting, recycling, composting, incineration and landfilling. Three scenarios, referring to 2006 and assuming the presence of 950,000 inhabitants and the production of approximately 566,000 t of waste in the district, have been compared. A detailed model has been developed in order to capture effects related to the waste fraction from separated collection and to the different waste treatments. The discussion of the results has focussed in particular on the greenhouse effect and the acidification potential. On the basis of the results obtained, the analysis of an additional scenario characterised by a further increase in separated collection has been put forward. PMID:17418562

  17. Reforms of the pre-graduate curriculum for medical students: the Bologna process and beyond.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Pierre-André

    2012-01-01

    For several years, all five medical faculties of Switzerland have embarked on a reform of their training curricula for two reasons: first, according to a new federal act issued in 2006 by the administration of the confederation, faculties needed to meet international standards in terms of content and pedagogic approaches; second, all Swiss universities and thus all medical faculties had to adapt the structure of their curriculum to the frame and principles which govern the Bologna process. This process is the result of the Bologna Declaration of June 1999 which proposes and requires a series of reforms to make European Higher Education more compatible and comparable, more competitive and more attractive for Europeans students. The present paper reviews some of the results achieved in the field, focusing on several issues such as the shortage of physicians and primary care practitioners, the importance of public health, community medicine and medical humanities, and the implementation of new training approaches including e-learning and simulation. In the future, faculties should work on several specific challenges such as: students' mobility, the improvement of students' autonomy and critical thinking as well as their generic and specific skills and finally a reflection on how to improve the attractiveness of the academic career, for physicians of both sexes. PMID:23254322

  18. LCA of integrated MSW management systems: Case study of the Bologna District

    SciTech Connect

    Buttol, P. Masoni, P.; Bonoli, A.; Goldoni, S.; Belladonna, V.; Cavazzuti, C.

    2007-07-01

    LCA as a decision-supporting tool in planning integrated municipal solid waste management is not, as yet, widely used in Italy. This paper presents a study concerning the application of the LCA methodology to support the development of the new waste management plan for the Bologna District. The main goal of the study was to show decision-makers at the political level the benefits obtainable with the use of LCA, in terms of the identification and quantification of the potential environmental impacts of different waste management strategies. The integrated waste management system of the Bologna District includes waste collection and transport, sorting, recycling, composting, incineration and landfilling. Three scenarios, referring to 2006 and assuming the presence of 950,000 inhabitants and the production of {approx}566,000 t of waste in the district, have been compared. A detailed model has been developed in order to capture effects related to the waste fraction from separated collection and to the different waste treatments. The discussion of the results has focussed in particular on the greenhouse effect and the acidification potential. On the basis of the results obtained, the analysis of an additional scenario characterised by a further increase in separated collection has been put forward.

  19. Source apportionment of particulate matter in a large city of southeastern Po Valley (Bologna, Italy).

    PubMed

    Tositti, L; Brattich, E; Masiol, M; Baldacci, D; Ceccato, D; Parmeggiani, S; Stracquadanio, M; Zappoli, S

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the results of an experimental research project carried out in Bologna, a midsize town in central Po valley, with the aim at characterizing local aerosol chemistry and tracking the main source emissions of airborne particulate matter. Chemical speciation based upon ions, trace elements, and carbonaceous matter is discussed on the basis of seasonal variation and enrichment factors. For the first time, source apportionment was achieved at this location using two widely used receptor models (principal component analysis/multi-linear regression analysis (PCA/MLRA) and positive matrix factorization (PMF)). Four main aerosol sources were identified by PCA/MLRA and interpreted as: resuspended particulate and a pseudo-marine factor (winter street management), both related to the coarse fraction, plus mixed combustions and secondary aerosol largely associated to traffic and long-lived species typical of the fine fraction. The PMF model resolved six main aerosol sources, interpreted as: mineral dust, road dust, traffic, secondary aerosol, biomass burning and again a pseudo-marine factor. Source apportionment results from both models are in good agreement providing a 30 and a 33% by weight respectively for PCA-MLRA and PMF for the coarse fraction and 70% (PCA-MLRA) and 67% (PMF) for the fine fraction. The episodic influence of Saharan dust transport on PM10 exceedances in Bologna was identified and discussed in term of meteorological framework, composition, and quantitative contribution. PMID:23828727

  20. Complete genome sequence, lifestyle, and multi-drug resistance of the human pathogen Corynebacterium resistens DSM 45100 isolated from blood samples of a leukemia patient

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Corynebacterium resistens was initially recovered from human infections and recognized as a new coryneform species that is highly resistant to antimicrobial agents. Bacteremia associated with this organism in immunocompromised patients was rapidly fatal as standard minocycline therapies failed. C. resistens DSM 45100 was isolated from a blood culture of samples taken from a patient with acute myelocytic leukemia. The complete genome sequence of C. resistens DSM 45100 was determined by pyrosequencing to identify genes contributing to multi-drug resistance, virulence, and the lipophilic lifestyle of this newly described human pathogen. Results The genome of C. resistens DSM 45100 consists of a circular chromosome of 2,601,311 bp in size and the 28,312-bp plasmid pJA144188. Metabolic analysis showed that the genome of C. resistens DSM 45100 lacks genes for typical sugar uptake systems, anaplerotic functions, and a fatty acid synthase, explaining the strict lipophilic lifestyle of this species. The genome encodes a broad spectrum of enzymes ensuring the availability of exogenous fatty acids for growth, including predicted virulence factors that probably contribute to fatty acid metabolism by damaging host tissue. C. resistens DSM 45100 is able to use external L-histidine as a combined carbon and nitrogen source, presumably as a result of adaptation to the hitherto unknown habitat on the human skin. Plasmid pJA144188 harbors several genes contributing to antibiotic resistance of C. resistens DSM 45100, including a tetracycline resistance region of the Tet W type known from Lactobacillus reuteri and Streptococcus suis. The tet(W) gene of pJA144188 was cloned in Corynebacterium glutamicum and was shown to confer high levels of resistance to tetracycline, doxycycline, and minocycline in vitro. Conclusions The detected gene repertoire of C. resistens DSM 45100 provides insights into the lipophilic lifestyle and virulence functions of this newly recognized

  1. Making Higher Education More European through Student Mobility? Revisiting EU Initiatives in the Context of the Bologna Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papatsiba, Vassiliki

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the analysis of student mobility in the EU as a means to stimulate convergence of diverse higher education systems. The argument is based on official texts and other texts of political communication of the European Commission. The following discussion is placed within the current context of the Bologna process and its aim to…

  2. The Bologna Process as a Reform Initiative in Higher Education in the Balkan Countries: The Case of Romania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damian, Radu Mircea

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Bologna process in Romania. The historical context covers the last years of the communist regime through 1989. From 1990 free elections of university leadership, the foundation of private universities and new democratic legislation, and projects for reforming higher education funded by different sources…

  3. Legal Developments and Problems of the Bologna Process within the European Higher Education Area and European Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cippitani, Roberto; Gatt, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    2010 sees the end of the process of establishing the European Higher Education Area (EHEA). Although not all countries may have achieved all the objectives, many are those countries and universities who have implemented many of the targets set. Within the Bologna Process, there have been many developments such as: European Credit Transfer and…

  4. Pan-European Grading Scales: Lessons from National Systems and the ECTS. The Bologna Process: Retrospect and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karran, Terence

    2005-01-01

    This article assesses the impact of the Bologna Process on the grading schemes of EU member countries. In light of some problems regarding the implementation of the European Credit Transfer system (ECTS), the author proposes further reforms and offers some elements of a unified grading system for European higher education. The author explores the…

  5. Teacher Education Curricula after the Bologna Process--A Comparative Analysis of Written Curricula in Finland and Estonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakku-Sihvonen, Ritva; Tissari, Varpu; Ots, Aivar; Uusiautti, Satu

    2012-01-01

    During the Bologna process, from 2003 to 2006, degree programmes, including teacher education curricula, were developed in line with the two-tier system--the European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) and modularization. The purpose of the present study is to contribute to the development of teacher education profiling measures by…

  6. Bologna in Context: A Horizontal Perspective on the Dynamics of Governance Sites for a Europe of Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gornitzka, Ase

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a horizontal perspective on the dynamics of governance sites currently active for the European of Knowledge and places the Bologna process in this wider European level context. It introduces two dynamics of change in political organisation: (a) institutional differentiation and specialisation and (b) the interaction between…

  7. Higher Education Reform in Germany: How the Aims of the Bologna Process Can Be Simultaneously Supported and Missed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Olaf

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide information about the current reform of higher education in Germany, which can be described as German reading of the Bologna process, about the problems and deficits occurring in this area, and about ways to correct unwelcome developments. Design/methodology/approach: The paper starts with a review…

  8. Towards the Two-Cycle Degree Structure: Bologna, Reform and Path Dependency in German and Norwegian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehm, Barbara M.; Michelsen, Svein; Vabo, Agnete

    2010-01-01

    This article describes and analyses changes made in the organisation of higher education studies in Germany and Norway, following the recommendations of the Bologna Declaration. In both countries, the characteristic modes of university study have been circumscribed by the tradition of Humboldtian values and ideals, albeit to a different extent. On…

  9. State of Play of the Bologna Process in the Tempus Partner Countries (2012). A Tempus Study. Issue 09

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffio, Philippe; Mc Cabe, Roisin; Xhaferri, Elona

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this report is to map, for the second time, the state of play of the higher education reforms in accordance with the Bologna Process in the 27 countries participating in the Tempus programme. The 2010 edition described the situation at that time and concluded that all Tempus Partner Countries are following the process to some extent,…

  10. Design of the Curriculum for a Second-Cycle Course in Civil Engineering in the Context of the Bologna Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gavin, K. G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the design of the curriculum for a Master of Engineering programme in civil engineering at University College Dublin. The revised programme was established to meet the requirements of the Bologna process and this paper specifically considers the design of a new, second-cycle master's component of the programme. In addition to…

  11. The Bologna Process as a Hegemonic Tool of Normative Power Europe (NPE): The Case of Chilean and Mexican Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figueroa, Francis Espinoza

    2010-01-01

    The scenario of Latin America in the higher education area, especially in Chile and Mexico, appears to be significantly affected by some European influences. We can see this by examining the implementation of two "hegemonic tools": the Bologna Process and the Tuning Project. This paper argues that if we analyse the European influences as a…

  12. Has the Bologna Process Been Worthwhile? An Analysis of the Learning Society-Adapted Outcome Index through Quantile Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez-Sainz, A.; García-Merino, J. D.; Urionabarrenetxea, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper seeks to discover whether the performance of university students has improved in the wake of the changes in higher education introduced by the Bologna Declaration of 1999 and the construction of the European Higher Education Area. A principal component analysis is used to construct a multi-dimensional performance variable called the…

  13. Changing Meanings of "The Europe of Knowledge" and "Modernizing the University," from Bologna to the "New Lisbon"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Roger

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author shows how the meaning of the phrases "Europe of Knowledge" and "modernization of the University" have changed since the Bologna Declaration. In terms of the former, the Europe of Knowledge is now seen essentially as a regionally based and governed space of innovation, which includes, but is by no means confined to…

  14. Organizational Culture in the Adoption of the Bologna Process: A Study of Academic Staff at a Ukrainian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Marta A.; Chapman, David W.; Rumyantseva, Nataliya L.

    2013-01-01

    The growing influence of the Bologna Process on higher education around the world has raised concerns about the applicability of this set of reforms in diverse cultural contexts. Ukraine provides an instructive case study highlighting the dynamics occurring at the convergence of the new framework with a state-centred model of higher education. The…

  15. The S(IV)-type Asteroids as Ordinary Chondrite Parent Body Candidates: Implications for the Completeness of the Meteorite Sample of Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffey, M. J.

    1995-09-01

    (IV) objects are viable OC-parent bodies [3 Juno, 6 Hebe, and 7 Iris are the leading candidates], their proximity to the 3:1 chaotic zone would allow them to contribute a significant portion of the ordinary chondrites. In particular, dynamical models suggest that Hebe should be a major contributor to the terrestrial meteorite flux [9]. Each leading contender is currently undergoing detailed spectral evaluation as a potential OC source. From both asteroid observational constraints and from chemical and isotopic studies of meteorites, the ordinary chondrites appear to represent an extensive and relatively complete (by meteoritic standards) sample of a few asteroid source bodies. In a similar fashion, the Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite suite sample a single primary parent body (Vesta) and are over-represented in meteorite collections due to a fortuitous (and temporary on a solar system timescale) emplacement of Vesta ejecta fragments close to the 3:1 resonance. This suggests that the particular value of the ordinary chondrites lies in the good sample provided for each source body rather than as representatives of an abundant asteroid type. Acknowledgments: Various portions of this research were supported by NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics grant NAGW-642 and NSF Planetary Astronomy grant AST-9012180. References: [1] Wetherill G. W. and Chapman C. R. (1988) in Meteorites and the Early Solar System, pp. 35-67, Univ. of Arizona. [2] Bell J. F. et al. (1989) in Asteroids II, pp. 921-945, Univ. of Arizona. [3] Gaffey M. J. et al. (1989) in Asteroids II, pp. 98-127, Univ. of Arizona. [4] Britt D. T. and Pieters C. M. (1991) LPS XXII, 141-142. [5] Gaffey M. J. (1984) Icarus, 60, 83-114. [6] Binzel R. P. et al. (1993) Science, 262, 1541-1543. [7] Shui X. et al. (1995) Icarus, 115, 1-35. [8] Gaffey M. J. et al. (1993) Icarus, 106, 573-602. [9] Farinella P. et al. (1993) Icarus, 101, 174-187.

  16. Techniques and methods to guarantee Bologna-conform higher education in GNSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Bologna Declaration is aiming for student-centered, outcome-related, and competence-based teaching. In order to fulfill these demands, deep level learning techniques should be used to meet the needs of adult-compatible and self-determined learning. The presentation will summarize selected case studies carried out in the framework of the lecture course "Introduction into GNSS positioning" of the Geodetic Institute of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Karlsruhe, Germany). The lecture course "Introduction into GNSS positioning" is a compulsory part of the Bachelor study course "Geodesy and Geoinformatics" and also a supplementary module of the Bachelor study course "Geophysics". Within the lecture course, basic knowledge and basic principles of Global Navigation Satellite Systems, like GPS, are imparted. The lecture course was migrated starting from a classically designed geodetic lecture course, which consisted of a well-adapted combination of teacher-centered classroom lectures and practical training (e.g., field exercises). The recent Bologna-conform blended learning concepts supports and motivates students to learn more sustainable using online and classroom learning methods. Therefore, an appropriate combination of - classroom lectures: Students and teacher give lectures - practical training: Students select topics individually - online learning: ILIAS (learning management system) is used as data, result, and communication platform. The framing didactical method is based on the so-called anchored instruction approach. Within this approach, an up-to-date scientific GNSS-related paper dealing with the large-scale geodetic project "Fehmarn Belt Fixed Link" is used as anchor. The students have to read the paper individually in the beginning of the semester. This enables them to realize a lot of not-known GNSS-related facts. Therefore, questions can be formulated. The lecture course deals with these questions, in order to answer them. At the end of the

  17. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC IN DIETARY AND DIETARY COMPOSITE SAMPLES TO PROVIDE A MORE COMPLETE ASSESSMENT OF ARSENIC EXPOSURE FROM DIETARY SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The FDA's market basket study reports total arsenic concentrations from composite diet samples. The use of composite diets, based on market basket sampling, is the most cost effective means of obtaining a generic arsenic exposure estimate for a population. For example, the tota...

  18. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC IN DIETARY AND DIETARY COMPOSITE SAMPLES TO PROVIDE A MORE COMPLETE ASSESSMENT OF ARSENIC EXPOSURE FROM DIETARY SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The FDA's market basket study reports total arsenic concentrations from composite diet samples. The use of composite diets, based on market basket sampling, is the most cost effective means of obtaining a generic exposure estimate for a population. For example, the total arseni...

  19. Chemical characterization of polar organic markers in aerosols in a local area around Bologna, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrogrande, Maria Chiara; Bacco, Dimitri; Rossi, Mauro

    2013-08-01

    The composition and seasonal variations of water-soluble organic compounds, including 18 dicarboxylic acids and 7 sugars, were determined in the atmospheric aerosol in the surroundings of Bologna, Northern Italy, during intensive summer and winter campaigns. In both seasons the most abundant compound is levoglucosan, as the major by-product from biomass burning. The abundances of dicarboxylic acids exhibit a seasonal pattern with higher winter concentrations (mean total concentrations are 60 ng m-3 and 23 ng m-3, in winter and summer, respectively). The distribution profiles and the diagnostic ratios of these markers allowed to estimate the contribution of primary emission sources (power plants, vehicular circulation, biomass burning) associated with secondary constituents from both biogenic and anthropogenic precursors. The distinct seasonal pattern of abundances suggests, overall, the dominant role of secondary formation of particulate organics in summer, and the highest strength of primary emissions in winter.

  20. 24 CFR Appendix A to Part 3500 - Instructions for Completing HUD-1 and HUD-1a Settlement Statements; Sample HUD-1 and HUD-1a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Instructions for Completing HUD-1... and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN...

  1. 24 CFR Appendix A to Part 3500 - Instructions for Completing HUD-1 and HUD-1a Settlement Statements; Sample HUD-1 and HUD-1a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Instructions for Completing HUD-1... and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN...

  2. 24 CFR Appendix A to Part 3500 - Instructions for Completing HUD-1 and HUD-1a Settlement Statements; Sample HUD-1 and HUD-1a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... instructions for completing the HUD-1 settlement statement, required under section 4 of RESPA and 24 CFR part... (24 CFR 3500.2) for specific definitions of many of the terms that are used in these instructions... is converted to a loan to finance purchase by the first user. For other loans covered by 24 CFR...

  3. 24 CFR Appendix A to Part 3500 - Instructions for Completing HUD-1 and HUD-1a Settlement Statements; Sample HUD-1 and HUD-1a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... instructions for completing the HUD-1 settlement statement, required under section 4 of RESPA and 24 CFR part... (24 CFR 3500.2) for specific definitions of many of the terms that are used in these instructions... is converted to a loan to finance purchase by the first user. For other loans covered by 24 CFR...

  4. 24 CFR Appendix A to Part 3500 - Instructions for Completing HUD-1 and HUD-1a Settlement Statements; Sample HUD-1 and HUD-1a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... instructions for completing the HUD-1 settlement statement, required under section 4 of RESPA and 24 CFR part... (24 CFR 3500.2) for specific definitions of many of the terms that are used in these instructions... is converted to a loan to finance purchase by the first user. For other loans covered by 24 CFR...

  5. Music Undergraduates' Usefulness and Importance Expectations: The Bologna Process from an Australian University Perspective.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Dominic G; Davidson, Jane W; Nair, Chenicheri S

    2016-01-01

    The Bologna Process model of higher education has been introduced into some Australian universities since 2008. This model promoted university study through a liberal arts philosophy that advanced a worldview approach at the undergraduate level. The model generalized the student experience and eliminated undergraduate specialization. An interesting situation for music undergraduate study thus arose. Expertise and expert performance research has argued an opposing educational approach, namely: Extensive long-term commitment through focused practical engagement and specialized tuition as prerequisites to achieving musical mastery, especially in performance. Motivation research has shown that the majority of this specialized development in pre-university years would be accessed and reinforced predominantly through private music tuition. Drawing on this contextual literature, commencing university music undergraduates would have expectations of their prospective study founded from two historical influences. The first: How undergraduates had accessed pre-university music tuition. The second: How and in what ways undergraduates' pre-university musical activities were experienced and reinforced. Using usefulness and importance measures, the study observed the expectations of students about to commence music undergraduate studies at three representative Australian university music schools. One of these universities operated the Bologna styled model. No other known Australian study has investigated this implementation for any effects upon music undergraduate expectations. How much commencing music undergraduates would draw on their pre-university music instruction and experiences to predict their usefulness and importance expectations formed the basis for this investigation. Strong relationships between usefulness and importance were found across all units of study. Despite strong correlations across all units of study between usefulness and importance, there was a

  6. Music Undergraduates' Usefulness and Importance Expectations: The Bologna Process from an Australian University Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Dominic G.; Davidson, Jane W.; Nair, Chenicheri S.

    2016-01-01

    The Bologna Process model of higher education has been introduced into some Australian universities since 2008. This model promoted university study through a liberal arts philosophy that advanced a worldview approach at the undergraduate level. The model generalized the student experience and eliminated undergraduate specialization. An interesting situation for music undergraduate study thus arose. Expertise and expert performance research has argued an opposing educational approach, namely: Extensive long-term commitment through focused practical engagement and specialized tuition as prerequisites to achieving musical mastery, especially in performance. Motivation research has shown that the majority of this specialized development in pre-university years would be accessed and reinforced predominantly through private music tuition. Drawing on this contextual literature, commencing university music undergraduates would have expectations of their prospective study founded from two historical influences. The first: How undergraduates had accessed pre-university music tuition. The second: How and in what ways undergraduates' pre-university musical activities were experienced and reinforced. Using usefulness and importance measures, the study observed the expectations of students about to commence music undergraduate studies at three representative Australian university music schools. One of these universities operated the Bologna styled model. No other known Australian study has investigated this implementation for any effects upon music undergraduate expectations. How much commencing music undergraduates would draw on their pre-university music instruction and experiences to predict their usefulness and importance expectations formed the basis for this investigation. Strong relationships between usefulness and importance were found across all units of study. Despite strong correlations across all units of study between usefulness and importance, there was a

  7. Dual NRASQ61R and BRAFV600E mutation-specific immunohistochemistry completes molecular screening in melanoma samples in a routine practice.

    PubMed

    Uguen, Arnaud; Guéguen, Paul; Legoupil, Delphine; Bouvier, Stéphanie; Costa, Sebastian; Duigou, Sandrine; Lemasson, Gilles; Ledé, Françoise; Sassolas, Bruno; Talagas, Matthieu; Férec, Claude; Le Maréchal, Cédric; De Braekeleer, Marc; Marcorelles, Pascale

    2015-11-01

    NRAS and BRAF mutational status has become mandatory to treat patients with metastatic melanomas. Mutation-specific immunohistochemistry (IHC) can help analyze challenging tumor samples. We report our experience integrating NRASQ61R (SP174) and BRAFV600E (VE1) IHC in routine practice in a cancer molecular genetic platform. All samples screened for BRAF and NRAS mutations during the year 2014 were analyzed by IHC and pyrosequencing, with an independent analysis of the 2 methods. Cases with first-line discordant results benefited from a complementary second-round IHC and next-generation sequencing (NGS) with a final interpretation taking into account the results of pyrosequencing, IHC, NGS, and quantification of the tumor cells. We analyzed 111 consecutive formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded melanoma samples from 101 patients. Twenty-two and 11 samples were concordant for BRAFV600E and NRASQ61R mutations, respectively. Second-round analyses of 9 discordant and 1 molecularly inconclusive samples allowed conclusion in 4 further mutated samples (2 BRAFV600E and 2 NRASQ61R). A sample remained NRASQ61R IHC negative but NRASQ61R mutated with molecular methods. Overall, BRAFV600 and NRASQ61 mutation frequencies were 31.7% and 30.7%, respectively. When compared to molecular results, the sensitivity and specificity of IHC were 100% for BRAFV600E IHC and 92.3% and 98.9% for NRASQ61R IHC, respectively. IHC interpretation required a more stringent cutoff for BRAFV600E IHC than NRASQ61R to minimize false results. We conclude that NRASQ61R and BRAFV600E IHC coupled with NGS allow detection of mutations in melanoma challenging samples. PMID:26297254

  8. Healthy reduced-fat Bologna sausages enriched in ALA and DHA and stabilized with Melissa officinalis extract.

    PubMed

    Berasategi, Izaskun; Navarro-Blasco, Iñigo; Calvo, Maria Isabel; Cavero, Rita Yolanda; Astiasarán, Iciar; Ansorena, Diana

    2014-03-01

    Reduced-energy and reduced-fat Bologna products enriched with ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids were formulated by replacing the pork back-fat by an oil-in-water emulsion containing a mixture of linseed-algae oil stabilized with a lyophilized Melissa officinalis extract. Healthier composition and lipid profile was obtained: 85 kcal/100 g, 3.6% fat, 0.6 g ALA and 0.44 g DHA per 100 g of product and ω-6/ω-3 ratio of 0.4. Technological and sensory problems were not detected in the new formulations. Reformulation did not cause oxidation problems during 32 days of storage under refrigeration. The results suggest that it is possible to obtain reduced-fat Bologna-type sausages rich in ALA and DHA and stabilized with natural antioxidants, applying the appropriate technology without significant effects on the sensory quality, yielding interesting products from a nutritional point of view. PMID:24334039

  9. New astronomy library in Bologna is named after Guido Horn D'Arturo: a forefather of modern telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, M.; D'Arturo, G. H.

    2000-04-01

    Some BAA Journal readers with interests in large mirror telescopes may perhaps have read about the tessellated mirror,1 an instrument that, according to the astronomer Luigi Jacchia, was a forefather of the Multiple Mirror Telescope of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.The tessellated mirror is the most famous contribution to astronomy by Guido Horn D'Arturo (1879-1967), director of Bologna Astronomical Observatory from 1920 to 1949.

  10. Balancing Bologna: opportunities for university teaching that integrates academic and practical learning outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probst, Lorenz; Pflug, Verena; Brandenburg, Christiane; Guggenberger, Thomas; Mentler, Axel; Wurzinger, Maria

    2014-05-01

    In the course of the Bologna Process, the quality of university teaching has become more prominent in the discourse on higher education. More attention is now paid to didactics and methods and learner-oriented modes of teaching are introduced. The application of knowledge, practical skills and in consequence the employability of university graduates have become requirements for university teaching. Yet, the lecture-style approach still dominates European universities, although empirical evidence confirms that student-centred, interdisciplinary and experiential learning is more effective. Referring to the learning taxonomy introduced by Bloom, we argue that standard approaches rarely move beyond the learning level of comprehension and fail to reach the levels of application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation. Considering the rapid changes and multiple challenges society faces today, responsible practitioners and scientists who can improve the current management of natural resources are urgently needed. Universities are expected to equip their graduates with the necessary skills to reflect and evaluate their actions when addressing 'real world' problems in order to improve impact and relevance of their work. Higher education thus faces the challenge of providing multi-level learning opportunities for students with diverse practical and theoretical learning needs. In this study, we reflect on three cases of university teaching attempting to bridge theory and practice and based on the principles of systemic, problem based learning. The described courses focus on organic farming, rural development and landscape planning and take place in Uganda, Nicaragua and Italy. We show that being part of a real-world community of stakeholders requires hands-on learning and the reflection and evaluation of actions. This prepares students in a more effective and realistic way for their future roles as responsible decision makers in complex social, economic and ecological systems. We

  11. Complete diphallia.

    PubMed

    Acimi, Smail

    2008-01-01

    A case of complete diphallia in a 4-month-old boy is reported. This is the second case to be published from this institution. The embryogenesis and associated anomalies of diphallia are discussed, together with a proposal for a classification based on anatomical, functional and therapeutic aspects of the malformation. PMID:19230173

  12. A complete X-ray sample of the high-latitude /absolute value of b greater than 20 deg/ sky from HEAO 1 A-2 - Log N-log S and luminosity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piccinotti, G.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Marshall, F. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Shafer, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    An all-sky survey of X-ray sources was performed, complete to a limiting sensitivity of 3.1 x 10 to the -11 ergs/sq cm/s in the 2-10 keV band. The complete sample has allowed construction of luminosity functions based on a flux-limited sample for clusters of galaxies and active galactic nuclei. Integration of the best-fit luminosity functions indicates that clusters of galaxies contribute about 4% of the 2-10 keV DXRB, and active galactic nuclei about 20%. It is predicted that many of the objects seen in the deep survey should be local, relatively low luminosity active galactic nuclei and clusters of galaxies.

  13. The BL LAC phenomenon: X-ray observations of transition objects and determination of the x-ray spectrum of a complete sample of flat-spectrum radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worrall, Diana M.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities related to two ROSAT investigations: (1) x-ray properties of radio galaxies thought to contain BL Lac type nuclei; and (2) x-ray spectra of a complete sample of flat-spectrum radio sources. The following papers describing the research are provided as attachments: Multiple X-ray Emission Components in Low Power Radio Galaxies; New X-ray Results on Radio Galaxies; Analysis Techniques for a Multiwavelength Study of Radio Galaxies; Separation of X-ray Emission Components in Radio Galaxies; X-ray Emission in Powerful Radio Galaxies and Quasars; Extended and Compact X-ray Emission in Powerful Radio Galaxies; and X-ray Spectra of a Complete Sample of Extragalactic Core-dominated Radio Sources.

  14. The longitudinal curriculum "social and communicative competencies" within Bologna-reformed undergraduate medical education in Basel

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Claudia; Langewitz, Wolf

    2013-01-01

    Background: Within the Bologna reform, a longitudinal curriculum of “social and communicative competencies” (SOKO) was implemented into the new Bachelor-Master structure of undergraduate medical education in Basel (Switzerland). Project description: The aim of the SOKO curriculum is to enable students to use techniques of patient-centred communication to elicit and provide information to patients in order to involve them as informed partners in decision making processes. The SOKO curriculum consists of 57 lessons for the individual student from the first bachelor year to the first master year. Teaching encompasses lectures and small group learning. Didactic methods include role play, video feedback, and consultations with simulated and real patients. Summative assessment takes place in objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE). Conclusion: In Basel, a longitudinal SOKO curriculum based on students’ cumulative learning was successfully implemented. Goals and contents were coordinated with the remaining curriculum and are regularly assessed in OSCEs. At present, most of the workload rests on the shoulders of the department of psychosomatic medicine at the university hospital. For the curriculum to be successful in the long-term, sustainable structures need to be instituted at the medical faculty and the university hospital to guarantee high quality teaching and assessment. PMID:24062811

  15. Palliative Care Training and Research: The Development in Europe and the Bologna Experience

    PubMed Central

    Bolognesi, Deborah; Brighi, Nicole; Muciarelli, Pier-Angelo; Biasco, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Development of palliative care (PC) culture spur the need of proper and formal training. Palliative medicine is not fully recognized as an academic medical discipline due to its humanistic influences, and studies show that physicians declare to be not prepared to provide care and pain management to dying patients. Nowadays, despite leading countries in PC being considered more innovative than other countries,such as Italy, facts show that the achievement of acknowledged discipline went through a long process. In Italy,professionals from about 450 PC units and organizations need to receive a proper and homogeneous training. In Italy, palliative medicine official certification is an undergoing process advocated by a few organizations and in Bologna the Academy of the Sciences of Palliative Medicine operates since 2007 with the defined mission of developing PC culture, also within the University. In order to be as much effective in pursuing its mission, the Academy has strengthened several international cooperation programs and today is leader in PC professional training and research in Italy. The recent law and its feasibility is fastening the process of development of Palliative Care Culture in Italy even if training is not properly regulated and official certification for physician is under evaluation. In Europe, the European Association of Palliative Care is stressing the need for training programs in palliative medicine and the outcomes of the dedicated task force on official certification and specialty in Palliative Medicine will remarkably force policy makers and national councils to officially recognize the discipline. PMID:23766591

  16. Palliative care training and research: the development in europe and the bologna experience.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, Deborah; Brighi, Nicole; Muciarelli, Pier-Angelo; Biasco, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Development of palliative care (PC) culture spur the need of proper and formal training. Palliative medicine is not fully recognized as an academic medical discipline due to its humanistic influences, and studies show that physicians declare to be not prepared to provide care and pain management to dying patients. Nowadays, despite leading countries in PC being considered more innovative than other countries,such as Italy, facts show that the achievement of acknowledged discipline went through a long process. In Italy,professionals from about 450 PC units and organizations need to receive a proper and homogeneous training. In Italy, palliative medicine official certification is an undergoing process advocated by a few organizations and in Bologna the Academy of the Sciences of Palliative Medicine operates since 2007 with the defined mission of developing PC culture, also within the University. In order to be as much effective in pursuing its mission, the Academy has strengthened several international cooperation programs and today is leader in PC professional training and research in Italy. The recent law and its feasibility is fastening the process of development of Palliative Care Culture in Italy even if training is not properly regulated and official certification for physician is under evaluation. In Europe, the European Association of Palliative Care is stressing the need for training programs in palliative medicine and the outcomes of the dedicated task force on official certification and specialty in Palliative Medicine will remarkably force policy makers and national councils to officially recognize the discipline. PMID:23766591

  17. EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES FROM THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE PROBING EVOLUTION AND REIONIZATION SPECTROSCOPICALLY (PEARS) GRISM SURVEY. II. THE COMPLETE SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Pirzkal, Nor; Rothberg, Barry; Ly, Chun; Grogin, Norman A.; Dahlen, Tomas; Noeske, Kai G.; Bellini, Andrea; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Cohen, Seth H.; Mechtley, Matthew; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Walsh, Jeremy R.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Straughn, Amber N.

    2013-07-20

    We present a full analysis of the Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) slitess grism spectroscopic data obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board Hubble Space Telescope. PEARS covers fields within both the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) North and South fields, making it ideal as a random survey of galaxies, as well as the availability of a wide variety of ancillary observations complemented by the spectroscopic results. Using the PEARS data, we are able to identify star-forming galaxies (SFGs) within the redshift volume 0 < z < 1.5. Star-forming regions in the PEARS survey are pinpointed independently of the host galaxy. This method allows us to detect the presence of multiple emission-line regions (ELRs) within a single galaxy. We identified a total of 1162 H{alpha}, [O III], and/or [O II] emission lines in the PEARS sample of 906 galaxies to a limiting flux of {approx}10{sup -18} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The ELRs have also been compared to the properties of the host galaxy, including morphology, luminosity, and mass. From this analysis, we find three key results: (1) the computed line luminosities show evidence of a flattening in the luminosity function with increasing redshift; (2) the star-forming systems show evidence of complex morphologies with star formation occurring predominantly within one effective (half-light) radius. However, the morphologies show no correlation with host stellar mass. (3) Also, the number density of SFGs with M{sub *} {>=} 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} decreases by an order of magnitude at z {<=} 0.5 relative to the number at 0.5 < z < 0.9, supporting the argument of galaxy downsizing.

  18. Complete prewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyshin, P.; Parry, A. O.; Kalliadasis, S.

    2016-07-01

    We study continuous interfacial transitions, analagous to two-dimensional complete wetting, associated with the first-order prewetting line, which can occur on steps, patterned walls, grooves and wedges, and which are sensitive to both the range of the intermolecular forces and interfacial fluctuation effects. These transitions compete with wetting, filling and condensation producing very rich phase diagrams even for relatively simple prototypical geometries. Using microscopic classical density functional theory to model systems with realistic Lennard-Jones fluid–fluid and fluid–substrate intermolecular potentials, we compute mean-field fluid density profiles, adsorption isotherms and phase diagrams for a variety of confining geometries.

  19. Are long gamma-ray bursts biased tracers of star formation? Clues from the host galaxies of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of bright LGRBs. II. Star formation rates and metallicities at z < 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japelj, J.; Vergani, S. D.; Salvaterra, R.; D'Avanzo, P.; Mannucci, F.; Fernandez-Soto, A.; Boissier, S.; Hunt, L. K.; Atek, H.; Rodríguez-Muñoz, L.; Scodeggio, M.; Cristiani, S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Flores, H.; Gallego, J.; Ghirlanda, G.; Gomboc, A.; Hammer, F.; Perley, D. A.; Pescalli, A.; Petitjean, P.; Puech, M.; Rafelski, M.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are associated with the deaths of massive stars and might therefore be a potentially powerful tool for tracing cosmic star formation. However, especially at low redshifts (z< 1.5) LGRBs seem to prefer particular types of environment. Our aim is to study the host galaxies of a complete sample of bright LGRBs to investigate the effect of the environment on GRB formation. Methods: We studied host galaxy spectra of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of 14 z< 1 bright LGRBs. We used the detected nebular emission lines to measure the dust extinction, star formation rate (SFR), and nebular metallicity (Z) of the hosts and supplemented the data set with previously measured stellar masses M⋆. The distributions of the obtained properties and their interrelations (e.g. mass-metallicity and SFR-M⋆ relations) are compared to samples of field star-forming galaxies. Results: We find that LGRB hosts at z< 1 have on average lower SFRs than if they were direct star formation tracers. By directly comparing metallicity distributions of LGRB hosts and star-forming galaxies, we find a good match between the two populations up to 12 +log ≤ft( frac{OHright)} 8.4-8.5, after which the paucity of metal-rich LGRB hosts becomes apparent. The LGRB host galaxies of our complete sample are consistent with the mass-metallicity relation at similar mean redshift and stellar masses. The cutoff against high metallicities (and high masses) can explain the low SFR values of LGRB hosts. We find a hint of an increased incidence of starburst galaxies in the Swift/BAT6 z< 1 sample with respect to that of a field star-forming population. Given that the SFRs are low on average, the latter is ascribed to low stellar masses. Nevertheless, the limits on the completeness and metallicity availability of current surveys, coupled with the limited number of LGRB host galaxies, prevents us from investigating more quantitatively whether the starburst incidence is such as expected

  20. The Bologna criteria for poor ovarian response: a contemporary critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Younis, Johnny S; Ben-Ami, Moshe; Ben-Shlomo, Izhar

    2015-01-01

    Postponement of child bearing and maternal age at first pregnancy are on the rise, contributing considerably to an increase in age-related infertility and the demand for assisted reproductive technologies (ART) treatment. This brings to the infertility clinics many women with low ovarian reserve and poor ovarian response (POR) to conventional stimulation. The Bologna criteria were released to standardize the definition of POR and pave the way for the formulation of evidence-based, efficient modalities of treatment for women undergoing IVF-ET. More than four years have passed since the introduction of these criteria and the debate is still ongoing whether a revision is due. Women with POR comprise several sub-groups with diverse baseline distinctiveness, a major issue that has fueled the discussion. Although antral follicle count (AFC) and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), are considered good predictors of ovarian reserve, their threshold values are still not universally standardized. Different definitions for sonographic AFC and diverse assays for AMH are held responsible for this delay in standardization. Adding established risk factors to the criteria will lead to more reliable and reproducible definition of a POR, especially in young women. The original criteria did not address the issue of oocyte quality, and the addition of risk factors may yield specific associations with quality vs. quantity. Patient's age is the best available criterion, although limited, to predict live-birth and presumably oocyte quality. High scale studies to validate these criteria are still missing while recent evidence raises concern regarding over diagnosis. PMID:26577149

  1. Chagas Disease in a Non-endemic Country: A Multidisciplinary Research, Bologna, Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, Chiara; Martelli, Giulia; Ciannameo, Anna; Vocale, Caterina; Fini, Marco; Stefanini, Angelo; Landini, Maria Paola; Viale, Pierluigi; Verucchi, Gabriella

    2016-06-01

    Global processes have brought about a substantial change in the epidemiological landscape of Chagas disease, spreading it to non-endemic areas. Italy is the second country in Europe in terms of Latin American migrants and expected infection rate. Given that scenario, the Bologna University Teaching Hospital undertaken a study aimed at providing preliminary data on the prevalence and investigating the knowledge and the subjective perceptions of Chagas disease, migration pathways and other relevant ill-health experiences. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in association with an ethnographic research. Between November 2010 and May 2013 Chagas disease testing was offered to people who attended the hospital and data were collected to investigate the broader socio-demographic and cultural factors. 151 individuals were screened for anti T. cruzi antibodies; 12 of them, 10 Bolivians and 2 Argentinians, were seroreactive, resulting in an overall prevalence of 7.94 %. Both the quantitative and the qualitative analysis revealed a degree of heterogeneity in terms of knowledge and perceptions of the disease as well as of migration pathways. The results are comparable with those reported by previous studies with similar characteristics and highlight the relevance of such public health issue in a non-endemic context. Moreover, the interdisciplinary approach has greatly helped to unveil the complex social and cultural implications of Chagas disease, to explain the subjective ill-health experiences, and to understand the ways in which the broader socio-economic and cultural context affects an intervention and its potential for success or failure. PMID:25935443

  2. Effect of biofilm dryness on the transfer of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms grown on stainless steel to bologna and hard salami.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Andrés; Autio, Wesley R; McLandsborough, Lynne A

    2007-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes continues to be a major cause of class I food recalls in the United States. Very little is known about its transfer and cross-contamination in processing scenarios. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydration level on L. monocytogenes biofilms grown on stainless steel and its effect on the biofilm transfer to foods. Biofilms were grown on stainless steel in diluted tryptic soy broth 1:20 for 48 h at 32 degrees C. After this, biofilms were equilibrated over saturated salt solutions at 20 degrees C for 24 h (94, 75, 58, and 33% relative humidity; % RH) prior to transferring. Transfer experiments were conducted from inoculated stainless steel to bologna and hard salami at a constant pressure (45 kPa) and time (30 s) with a universal testing machine. The experiment was designed with a factorial design 4 x 2 (biofilms equilibrated at 4% RH and two foods) and duplicated every day, and the whole experiment was repeated nine times. The results were analyzed with an analysis of variance by SAS Statistical Analysis Software. Our results showed that more bacteria were transferred to bologna (mean efficiency of transfer [EOT] = 3.0) than to hard salami (mean EOT = 0.35, P < 0.01). As biofilms became drier, the transfer of Listeria from stainless steel to both foods increased (P < 0.05). The EOT increased from 2 to 3.8 and from 0.2 to 0.51 upon transfer when drying the biofilm for bologna and hard salami, respectively. This study may be an indication that as biofilms were dried, the cell-cell and cell-surface interactions became weaker, and bacterial transfer increased. This phenomenon was enhanced in foods containing higher water activity levels. We hypothesize that this increased in transfer was due to the presence of capillary forces in the food. PMID:18044424

  3. Implementation of the Bologna Objectives in a Sample of European Private Higher Education Institutions: Outcomes of a Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlasceanu, Lazar; Voicu, Bogdan

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the main results of a recent survey of private higher education institutions from twelve selected European countries (Austria, Germany, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Poland, Estonia, Bulgaria, Romania, Turkey, Ukraine, Russia) [in the framework of the UNESCO-CEPES project on "Private Higher Education in Europe and Quality Assurance…

  4. Complete Makeover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released July 23, 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    We finish our look at Mars's dynamic atmosphere with an image of the surface that has been completely modified by the wind. Even the small ridges that remain have been ground down to a cliff-face with a 'tail' of eroded material. The crosshatching shows that the wind regime has remained mainly E/W to ENE/WSW.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 8.9, Longitude 221 East (139 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip

  5. Properties of bologna-type sausages with pork back-fat replaced with pork skin and amorphous cellulose.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Faria, Miriam; Cipriano, Tayssa Martins; da Cruz, Adriano Gomes; Santos, Bibiana Alves Dos; Pollonio, Marise Aparecida Rodrigues; Campagnol, Paulo Cezar Bastianello

    2015-06-01

    Bologna-type sausages were produced with 50% of their pork back-fat content replaced with gels elaborated with different ratios of pork skin, water, and amorphous cellulose (1:1:0, 1:1:0.1, 1:1:0.2, 1:1:0.3, and 1:1:0.4). The impact of such replacement on the physico-chemical characteristics and the consumer sensory profiling was evaluated. The modified treatments had 42% less fat, 18% more protein, and 8% more moisture than the control group. Treatments with amorphous cellulose had a lower cooking loss and higher emulsion stability. High amorphous cellulose content (1:1:0.3 and 1:1:0.4) increased hardness, gumminess, and chewiness. The gel formulated with the ratio of 1:1:0.2 (pork skin: water: amorphous cellulose gel) provided a sensory sensation similar to that provided by fat and allowed products of good acceptance to be obtained. Therefore, a combination of pork skin and amorphous cellulose is useful in improving technological quality and producing healthier and sensory acceptable bologna-type sausages. PMID:25688689

  6. Production of healthier bologna type sausages using pork skin and green banana flour as a fat replacers.

    PubMed

    Alves, Larissa Aparecida Agostinho Dos Santos; Lorenzo, José Manuel; Gonçalves, Carlos Antonio Alvarenga; Santos, Bibiana Alves Dos; Heck, Rosane Teresinha; Cichoski, Alexandre José; Campagnol, Paulo Cezar Bastianello

    2016-11-01

    The effect of pork skin (PS) and green banana flour (GBF) on the physicochemical, technological, microbiological, and sensory properties of Bologna-type sausages was assessed. For this propose, six batches were manufactured: control (formulated with 20% fat) and five treatments replacing 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% of pork-fat by a mixture of PS, water, and GBF (1:2:2). Fat contents significantly (P<0.05) decreased, while moisture, resistant starch and ash levels significantly (P<0.05) increased with the addition of PS and GBF gel. Lower cooking loss and higher emulsion stability (P<0.05) were observed in the modified treatments. No difference was observed between the treatments for the microbiological quality. The substitution of up to 60% fat did not influence (P>0.05) on color (L*, a*, b*, and whiteness), texture parameters, and sensory acceptability. Therefore, healthier Bologna type sausages could be produced by replacing up to 60% of the fat with a mixture of PS, water, and GBF without depreciating product's quality. PMID:27288899

  7. Normal modes of oscillation of the Asinelli and Garisenda towers in Bologna (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, A.; Azzara, R. M.; Cavaliere, A.; Zaccarelli, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Asinelli and Garisenda medieval towers represent the best-know city landmark in Bologna. Asinelli is also known to physics historians for early experiments on free fall of bodies for the first measurements of g (Giovanni Battista Riccioli, ca. 1650) and proof of Earth rotation (Giovanni Battista Guglielmini, 1791). The Two Towers (as they are commonly known) are essentially tall, square cross-section hollow masonry cuboids. Taller Asinelli, built between 1109 and 1119, is 97 m high, with an overhang of 2.2 m, while more seriously leaning Garisenda has an overhang of 3.2 m with a heigth of 48 m. During the summer of 2012 -- in the aftermath of two M≈6 earthquakes occurred in the proximity of the city -- the permanent engineering monitoring system of the towers has been temporarily supplemented by 6 seismometric stations installed at different levels inside the masonry buildings, to study their dynamical response to induced vibrations. We have thus been able to observe and measure the oscillation of the two towers excited by ambient noise, mostly due to city traffic. The two towers show similar behaviour, more clear in taller Asinelli. The first three flexural normal modes of oscillation, and the first torsional mode, can easily be detected. Their frequencies are split because of the asymmetry due to leaning of the tower. This asymmetry produces slightly different frequencies of oscillation in two orthogonal directions, quite consistent with preliminary dynamical modeling. Horizontal particle-motion polarization plots clearly show the cyclic energy transfer between these two degrees of freedom of the system. Oscillations of taller Asinelli influence its close sister, such that the Asinelli spectral signature can also be easily recognized in the motion recorded at the base of Garisenda, overimposed over Garisenda own free oscillations. Horizontal component polarization analysis done simultaneously at the two ground-level stations often point to a nearby common

  8. Blurring Boundaries: How the Bologna Process Changes the Relationship between University and Non-University Higher Education in Germany, the Netherlands and France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte, Johanna; Van der Wende, Marijk; Huisman, Jeroen

    2008-01-01

    Between 1998 and 2004, the higher education systems of Germany, France and the Netherlands underwent major changes. The changes were framed in the context of the Bologna process, and linked to the reform of degree structure towards a system of undergraduate and graduate cycles. This article investigates how a key feature of these systems was…

  9. Conformity or Confusion? Changing Higher Education Grading Scales as a Part of the Bologna Process: The Cases of Denmark, Norway and Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahl, Bettina; Lien, Eirik; Lindberg-Sand, Asa

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the Bologna Process is to make higher education systems across Europe more transparent. It is crucial for this purpose that confusion concerning the characteristics of the systems should be replaced by conformity. But, as we will show, conformity brought about at one level may create confusion at another. The curricular aspect of the…

  10. ReProTool Version 2.0: Re-Engineering Academic Curriculum Using Learning Outcomes, ECTS and Bologna Process Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pouyioutas, Philippos; Gjermundrod, Harald; Dionysiou, Ioanna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present ReProTool Version 2.0, a software tool that is used for the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) and the Bologna Process re-engineering of academic programmes. The tool is the result of an 18 months project (February 2012-July 2013) project, co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund…

  11. State of Play of the Bologna Process in the Tempus Countries of the Southern Mediterranean (2009/2010). A Tempus Study. Issue 03

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffio, Philippe; Heinamaki, Piia; Tchoukaline, Claire Chastang

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe and map the current state of play of the Bologna Process in the nine countries of the Southern Mediterranean participating in the Tempus programme. For the last twenty years, the Tempus programme has supported the modernisation of higher education systems in countries neighbouring the EU by financing…

  12. The Impact on Education for Librarianship and Information Studies of the Bologna Process and Related European Commission Programmes--and Some Outstanding Issues in Europe and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ian M.

    2013-01-01

    The Bologna Declaration of 1999 is the basis for continuing reforms in higher education intended to support international mobility in employment within the European Union. This paper describes the standardised structure and nomenclature for courses that have been implemented, together with a credit transfer system, a quality assurance regime, and…

  13. EFFECTS AND INTERACTIONS OF SODIUM LACTATE, SODIUM DIACETATE, AND PEDIOCIN ON THE THERMAL INACTIVATION OF STARVED CELLS OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES ON THE SURFACE OF BOLOGNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects and interactions of sodium lactate, sodium diacetate, and pediocin on the thermal inactivation of starved cells of Listeria monocytogenes on the surface of bologna were investigated. The heating temperatures used in the study were 56.3 to 60 degrees C and the antimicrobials were: sodium ...

  14. Similarities, Divergence, and Incapacity in the Bologna Process Reform Implementation by the Former-Socialist Countries: The Self-Defeat of State Regulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltys, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative analysis describes the socialist legacy in the governance of higher education within the former Soviet-led member countries that entered the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) between 2001 and 2010. In joining the EHEA these countries signed on for the Bologna Process (BP), but are not members of the European Union. The…

  15. Teaching Biochemistry at Lisbon University--Facing the Challenge of the Bologna Declaration in the 25th Anniversary of the Biochemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farinha, Carlos M.; Freire, Ana Ponces

    2007-01-01

    The biochemistry degree has been taught at Lisbon University for 25 years. Since its creation, the curriculum is characterized for being widely eclectic and multidisciplinary. The adoption of the concepts proposed in Europe by the Declaration of Bologna and incorporation of these ideas at Lisbon University is discussed here for the biochemistry…

  16. Evolution of the Urban Heat Island of the city of Bologna (Italy) in the last 30 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Francesca; Gaspari, Nicola; Piana, Stefano; Rossi Pisa, Paola

    2010-05-01

    The Urban Heat Island (UHI) phenomenon is the air temperature difference between the urban area and the surrounding agricultural area of a city, due to the anthropic activities and different surfaces typical of the town. This phenomenon has been documented for many cities with different population, topography and climate (Chandler, 1962 and Oke, 1982 among the first), and has been quantified in many areas (see as an example for Italy Agnese et al, 2008). Many causes contribute to the UHI, such as different heat capacities of vegetated surfaces as compared to buildings and paving materials; different absorption due to canopy geometry; anthropogenic heat sources and so on. (for example see Camilloni and Barros, 1997) What is not so easy to find in literature is the study of the evolution of this phenomenon with time. UHI could be improved by changes in the town behaviour (increase in car traffic or winter-heating/summer-cooling), reduced by the enlargement of the suburb area, arriving to include the rural meteorological stations, or mitigated by the general growth of air temperature due to global warming. In this work, results from the analysis of two 30 years time series air temperature data are presented. The first data set comes from an agrometeorological station sited in the Botanical garden of the University of Bologna, in the centre of the town (44° 30' 05"N, 11° 21' 18" E). The second agrometeorological station is sited in the experimental farm of the University of Bologna in Cadriano (44° 33' 03" N, 11° 24' 36" E), 9 km from the first and outside of the town boundaries. Both data series range from 1978 to 2007 and are measured by mechanical thermoigrometers. Detailed information about instruments and data treatment are available in Matzneller et al. (2009). Results show an increasing trend in both stations for air maximum (Tmax) and minimum (Tmin) temperatures, more evident in the rural data. The mean UHI is of about 1.3 ± 0.7 °C as an average on the 30

  17. Validation of a 5-log10 reduction of Listeria monocytogenes following simulated commercial processing of Lebanon bologna in a model system.

    PubMed

    Chikthimmah, N; Guyer, R B; Knabel, S J

    2001-06-01

    Recently, numerous product recalls and one devastating outbreak that claimed 21 lives were attributed to Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat meat products. Consequently, the Food Safety and Inspection Service published a federal register notice requiring manufacturers of ready-to-eat meat and poultry products to reassess their hazard analysis and critical control point plans for these products as specified in 9 CFR 417.4(a). Lebanon bologna is a moist, fermented ready-to-eat sausage. Because of undesirable quality changes. Lebanon bologna is often not processed above 48.9 degrees C (120 degrees F). Therefore, the present research was conducted to validate the destruction of L. monocytogenes in Lebanon bologna batter in a model system. During production, fermentation of Lebanon bologna to pH 4.7 alone significantly reduced L. monocytogenes by 2.3 log10 CFU/g of the sausage mix (P < 0.01). Heating the fermented mix to 48.9 degrees C in 10.5 h destroyed at least 7.0 log10 CFU of L. monocytogenes per g of sausage mix. A combination of low pH (5.0 or lower) and high heating temperatures (> or =43.3 degrees C, 115 degrees F) destroyed more than 5 log10 CFU of L. monocytogenes per g of sausage mix during the processing of Lebanon bologna. In conclusion, an existing commercial process, which was validated for destruction of Escherichia coli O157:H7, was also effective for the destruction of more than 5 log10 CFU of L. monocytogenes. PMID:11403142

  18. Completeness and Reliability of Location Data Collected on the Web: Assessing the Quality of Self-Reported Locations in an Internet Sample of Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Michael R; Cooper, Hannah LF; Rosenberg, Eli S; Sullivan, Patrick S

    2016-01-01

    Background Place is critical to our understanding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States. However, within the scientific literature, place is almost always represented by residential location, suggesting a fundamental assumption of equivalency between neighborhood of residence, place of risk, and place of prevention. However, the locations of behaviors among MSM show significant spatial variation, and theory has posited the importance of nonresidential contextual exposures. This focus on residential locations has been at least partially necessitated by the difficulties in collecting detailed geolocated data required to explore nonresidential locations. Objective Using a Web-based map tool to collect locations, which may be relevant to the daily lives and health behaviors of MSM, this study examines the completeness and reliability of the collected data. Methods MSM were recruited on the Web and completed a Web-based survey. Within this survey, men used a map tool embedded within a question to indicate their homes and multiple nonresidential locations, including those representing work, sex, socialization, physician, and others. We assessed data quality by examining data completeness and reliability. We used logistic regression to identify demographic, contextual, and location-specific predictors of answering all eligible map questions and answering specific map questions. We assessed data reliability by comparing selected locations with other participant-reported data. Results Of 247 men completing the survey, 167 (67.6%) answered the entire set of eligible map questions. Most participants (>80%) answered specific map questions, with sex locations being the least reported (80.6%). Participants with no college education were less likely than those with a college education to answer all map questions (prevalence ratio, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8). Participants who reported sex at their partner’s home

  19. MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF A COMPLETE IRAC 3.6 {mu}m SELECTED GALAXY SAMPLE: A FAIR CENSUS OF RED AND BLUE POPULATIONS AT REDSHIFTS 0.4-1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.-S.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D.; Rigopoulou, D.; Magdis, G.; Newman, J.; Shu, C.; Luo, Z.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Wang, T.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Barmby, P.; Coil, A.; Zheng, X. Z.

    2013-03-20

    We present a multi-wavelength study of a 3.6 {mu}m selected galaxy sample in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). The sample is complete for galaxies with stellar mass >10{sup 9.5} M{sub Sun} and redshift 0.4 < z < 1.2. In this redshift range, the Infrared Array Camera 3.6 {mu}m band measures the rest-frame near-infrared band, permitting nearly unbiased selection with respect to both quiescent and star-forming galaxies. The numerous spectroscopic redshifts available in the EGS are used to train an artificial neural network to estimate photometric redshifts. The distribution of photometric redshift errors is Gaussian with standard deviation {approx}0.025(1 + z), and the fraction of redshift failures (>3{sigma} errors) is about 3.5%. A new method of validation based on pair statistics confirms the estimate of standard deviation even for galaxies lacking spectroscopic redshifts. Basic galaxy properties measured include rest-frame U - B colors, B- and K-band absolute magnitudes, and stellar masses. We divide the sample into quiescent and star-forming galaxies according to their rest-frame U - B colors and 24-3.6 {mu}m flux density ratios and derive rest K-band luminosity functions and stellar mass functions for quiescent, star-forming, and all galaxies. The results show that massive, quiescent galaxies were in place by z Almost-Equal-To 1, but lower mass galaxies generally ceased their star formation at later epochs.

  20. Effect of green tea or rosemary extract on protein oxidation in Bologna type sausages prepared from oxidatively stressed pork.

    PubMed

    Jongberg, Sisse; Tørngren, Mari Ann; Gunvig, Annemarie; Skibsted, Leif H; Lund, Marianne N

    2013-03-01

    Bologna type sausages were prepared from oxidatively stressed pork (UV-irradiation, 48 h, 5 °C) using a traditional recipe (control) or the same recipe but added green tea extract (500 ppm total phenolic compounds) or rosemary extract (400 ppm total phenolic compounds). Green tea and rosemary extracts protected against formation of TBARS and protein carbonyls. On the contrary, increased thiol loss and a distinct loss of myosin heavy chain and actin due to polymerization by reducible bonds as determined by SDS-page were found by addition of green tea extract. The enhanced protein polymerization was ascribed to the reaction between quinone compounds from the plant extracts and protein thiol groups to yield phenol-mediated protein polymerization. Analysis by ESR spectroscopy revealed increased radical intensities in sausages added plant extracts, which was ascribed to originate from protein-bound phenoxyl radicals, which may protect against other oxidatively induced protein modifications. PMID:23273462

  1. Evaluation of novel micronized encapsulated essential oil-containing phosphate and lactate blends for growth inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella on poultry bologna, pork ham, and roast beef ready-to-eat deli loaves.

    PubMed

    Casco, G; Taylor, T M; Alvarado, C

    2015-04-01

    Essential oils and their constituents are reported to possess potent antimicrobial activity, but their use in food processing is limited because of low solubility in aqueous systems and volatilization during processing. Two proprietary noncommercial essential oil-containing phosphate blends were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against Salmonella enterica cocktail (SC)-and Listeria monocytogenes (Lm)-inoculated deli meat products made from pork, poultry, or beef. Four treatments were tested on restructured cured pork ham, emulsified chicken bologna, and restructured beef loaf: nonencapsulated essential oil with phosphate version 1 at 0.45% of final batch (EOV145; chicken and pork, or EEOV245 beef), micronized encapsulated essential oil with phosphate version 2 at 0.60% of final batch (EEOV260), a 2.0% potassium lactate (PL) control, and a negative control (CN) with no applied antimicrobial agent. Compared with the CN, none of the antimicrobial agents (EEOV260, EOV145, PL) successfully limited Lm or SC growth to <2.0 log cycles over 49 days or 35 days of refrigerated storage, respectively. The PL and EEOV260-treated ham loaves did show Lm growth limiting ability of up to 1 log cycle by days 35 and 42. On formed roast beef, the EEOV260 was able to extend the lag phase and inhibited the growth of Lm in the same manner as the PL. For SC-treated samples, the following effects were observed: in poultry bologna treated with EEOV260, a lag-phase extension was observed through 35 days of storage compared with the other samples. For pork deli loaves, the EEOV260 inhibited growth of SC at days 21 and 28 to the same level of efficacy as PL (0.5 log cycle). In roast beef samples, on day 35, the SC growth was inhibited ca. 0.5 log CFU/g by EEOV260 when compared with the CN. In conclusion the EEOV260 can function to replace PL to limit Salmonella and Lm growth in ready-to-eat deli products. Further testing is needed to ensure consumer acceptability. PMID:25836394

  2. [Clinical practice quality in BNC (Bachelor of Nursing Course). Evaluation of students' satisfaction in the Italian Red Cross School of Nursing, University of Bologna].

    PubMed

    Scalorbi, Sandra; Burrai, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    This study is linked to the previous our "UNI EN ISO 9001:2000 quality system. Project and application at BNC (Bachelor of nursing Course), University of Bologna: degree of satisfaction of third year's students". The aim of this study, carried on in 2006, were to find out how satisfied second (n=61) and third years (n=95) nursing bachelor course students, University of Bologna, were with their clinical practice, about each essential element in this kind of learning. The data were collected using a questionnaire purposely made, with 48 items in 9 fields. 279 questionnaires returned ,79 by second year students and 190 by third year students. Results suggest a general satisfaction of students about their clinical practice experiences. Also in this study, the intermediate evaluation, very important in nursing clinical learning, is a critical variable. PMID:18667126

  3. Live Birth and Cumulative Live Birth Rates in Expected Poor Ovarian Responders Defined by the Bologna Criteria Following IVF/ICSI Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Joyce; Lee, Vivian Chi-Yan; Yeung, Tracy Wing-Yee; Li, Raymond Wun-Hang; Ho, Pak-Chung; Ng, Ernest Hung-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the live birth and cumulative live birth rates of expected poor ovarian responders according to the Bologna criteria and to compare their outcomes with those of expected normal responders Design Retrospective analysis Setting University infertility clinic Patients A total of 1,152 subfertile women undergoing their first in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle Interventions Women were classified into 4 groups according to the Bologna criteria for comparison Main Outcome Measure(s) Live birth and cumulative live birth rates Results Women with expected poor response (POR) had the lowest live birth rate than the other 3 groups (23.8%, p = 0.031). Cumulative live birth rates were significantly lower in those with expected POR than those with expected normal ovarian response (NOR) (35.8% vs 62.8%, p<0.0001). In the subgroup analysis, the cumulative live birth rates in expected PORs were significantly lower in those who had ≤3 oocytes retrieved (18.6% for ≤3 oocytes vs 44.0% for >3 oocytes, p = 0.006) whereas the live birth rates in fresh cycle did not differ (17.8% vs 30.9%, p = 0.108). Conclusion Women who were expected POR according to the Bologna criteria had lower live birth and cumulative live birth than expected NOR but they still can achieve reasonable treatment outcomes and IVF treatment should not be precluded. PMID:25748478

  4. Company profile: Complete Genomics Inc.

    PubMed

    Reid, Clifford

    2011-02-01

    Complete Genomics Inc. is a life sciences company that focuses on complete human genome sequencing. It is taking a completely different approach to DNA sequencing than other companies in the industry. Rather than building a general-purpose platform for sequencing all organisms and all applications, it has focused on a single application - complete human genome sequencing. The company's Complete Genomics Analysis Platform (CGA™ Platform) comprises an integrated package of biochemistry, instrumentation and software that sequences human genomes at the highest quality, lowest cost and largest scale available. Complete Genomics offers a turnkey service that enables customers to outsource their human genome sequencing to the company's genome sequencing center in Mountain View, CA, USA. Customers send in their DNA samples, the company does all the library preparation, DNA sequencing, assembly and variant analysis, and customers receive research-ready data that they can use for biological discovery. PMID:21345140

  5. [Biological review of completed suicide].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Ikuo; Sora, Ichiro; Hishimoto, Akitoyo

    2016-06-01

    Family, twin and adoption studies have revealed genetic factors involved in suicide, while the accumulation of stress and mental illnesses are major contributing factors of suicide. Since higher lethality of suicidal behavior is considered to increase familial liability to suicidal behavior, we believe biological research of completed suicide is most important for a better understanding of the pathophysiology in suicide. Dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis has gained a special interest in the neurobiology of suicide, mostly because of the findings using a dexamethasone suppression test (DST), in which DST non-suppressors show a nearly 10-fold higher risk of completed suicide than DST suppressors in a depressed cohort. Other data mainly from postmortem brain studies indicate abnormalities of the noradrenergic-locus coeruleus system, serotonergic system, endogenous opioid system, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, inflammatory cytokines and omega-3 fatty acid in completed suicide. However, genetic research of complete suicide is behind other mental problems because it is extremely difficult to obtain tissue samples of completed suicide. Under the difficult situation, we now retain over 800 blood samples of suicide completers thanks to bereaved families' cooperation. We are actively working on the research of suicide, for instance, by performing a GWAS using 500 samples of suicide completers. PMID:27506081

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of neutron backscattering from concrete walls in the dense plasma focus laboratory of Bologna University.

    PubMed

    Frignani, M; Mostacci, D; Rocchi, F; Sumini, M

    2005-01-01

    Between 2001 and 2003 a 3.2 kJ dense plasma focus (DPF) device has been built at the Montecuccolino Laboratory of the Department of Energy, Nuclear and Environmental Control Engineering (DIENCA) of the University of Bologna. A DPF is a pulsed device in which deuterium nuclear fusion reactions can be obtained through the pinching effects of electromagnetic fields upon a dense plasma. The empirical scale law that governs the total D-D neutron yield from a single pulse of a DPF predicts for this machine a figure of approximately 10(7) fast neutrons per shot. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the role of backscattering of neutrons from the concrete walls surrounding the Montecuccolino DPF in total neutron yield measurements. The evaluation is performed by MCNP-5 simulations that are aimed at estimating the neutron spectra at a few points of interest in the laboratory, where neutron detectors will be placed during the experimental campaigns. Spectral information from the simulations is essential because the response of detectors is influenced by neutron energy. Comparisons are made with the simple r(-2) law, which holds for a DPF in infinite vacuum. The results from the simulations will ultimately be used both in the design and optimisation of the neutron detectors and in their final calibration and placement inside the laboratory. PMID:16381750

  7. Tuning research competences for Bologna three cycles in medicine: report of a MEDINE2 European consensus survey.

    PubMed

    Marz, Richard; Dekker, Friedo W; Van Schravendijk, Chris; O'Flynn, Siun; Ross, Michael T

    2013-09-01

    Medical curricula, like healthcare systems and medical practice, have a strong cultural component and vary considerably between countries. Increasing mobility of medical graduates, and increasing pressure to ensure they are all fit for practice, have highlighted an urgent need to establish common ground in learning outcomes at all stages of training. A research-based approach, developed by the Tuning project, was used previously by the MEDINE Thematic Network to gain consensus on core learning outcomes/competences for primary medical degrees ( www.tuning-medicine.com ), but no consensus was reached for learning outcomes relating to research. As part of MEDINE2, a focussed Tuning project was undertaken to explore opinions on more detailed core learning outcomes in research for all three Bologna cycles (Bachelor, Master, and Doctor). Responses from 417 stakeholders, representing 29 European and 13 non-European countries, revealed a relatively high degree of consensus. The findings strongly suggest that these stakeholders think that learning outcomes related both to 'using research' and 'doing research' should be core components of medical curricula in Europe. The challenge now, however, is to promote further local and international discussion on these issues, and to find ways of achieving these competences within the context of already crowded medical curricula. PMID:24101579

  8. Digital and palmar dermatoglyphics and the population structure of the Upper Bologna Apennine.

    PubMed

    Gualdi-Russo, E; Facchini, F; Brasili-Gualandi, P; Gruppioni, G; Pettener, D

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of digital and palmar dermatoglyphics in an Italian mountain population was carried out. Dermatoglyphic variability was particularly investigated in samples from four different valleys. Microgeographical differences in qualitative and quantitative traits among valleys were found. The relationship between degree of endogamy and dermatoglyphic differences is discussed. The biological repercussion of isolation in the history of this Apennine population is also pointed out by means of comparisons with a nearby plains population characterized by low inbreeding. PMID:7840492

  9. Record completeness for individual volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebbington, Mark

    2016-04-01

    There has been considerable recent attention paid to completeness in global and regional (e.g. Japan) eruption data bases. This has taken the form of estimating dates at which the record is complete, either at a global or regional level, at a given VEI or magnitude. This has obvious utility when estimating hazard from very large eruptions, which may have effects 1000s of km from source. However, at a more local level, the question of interest is not so much the global, or the regional, completeness level, but the completeness of the record for an individual volcano. For example, forecast hazard is critically dependent on the size of the eruption, but it is impossible even to statistically describe the size distribution without knowing the completeness of the record. Current methods for eruption catalogue completeness using extreme value statistics rely on large samples for their validity, so a new approach is required for individual volcanoes, which may have only a handful of known eruptions. We will consider one possible such approach based using a Bayesian sequential algorithm assuming that the underlying process is Poissonian and that completeness at a lower VEI implies completeness at all higher VEIs. Results for individual volcanoes are compared with regional figures and, time-permitting, implications for a statistical model of VEI discussed.

  10. Normal Mode Analysis of Ambient-Noise Induced Free Oscillations of a Slender Medieval Masonry Tower in Bologna (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, A.; Azzara, R. M.; Cavaliere, A.; Zaccarelli, L.

    2014-12-01

    Analysis of the oscillations of buildings — either excited by earthquakes or by ambient noise — has become an effective tool to evaluate the response of such structures to strong ground motion, and hence to assess their seismic vulnerability. Response to small-amplitude ground motion may also provide crucial information on the elastic and anelastic properties of a structure — essential in the case of historical buildings — and constrain numerical full dynamic structural analyses. We report about an analysis carried out for a tall medieval monumental building in the urban center of the Norther Italian city of Bologna. Seismic monitoring, carried on for six months using field seismic instrumentation, has revealed the response to ambient noise, and has allowed to reconstruct, with high detail, the free oscillation modes of the tower. At 97 meters, the XII-century tower of the Asinelli is the tallest masonry building in Europe, and the most slender. We measured the fundamental, and several higher-order, flexural normal modes of oscillation, as well as the fundamental torsional mode. Asymmetry due to non-coincidence of centers of mass and of stiffness produces slightly different modal frequencies of oscillation in two orthogonal directions, consistently with dynamical modeling. Horizontal particle-motion polarization plots show the cyclic energy transfer between two degrees of freedom of the system. The Asinelli spectral signature can also be easily recognized in the motion recorded at the base of nearby Garisenda. We verify that there is correlation of spectral amplitudes with time of the day — in agreement with expected time-variance of anthropic disturbance —- but also with wind velocity and, intriguingly, with temperature variations inside the buidings. We are using these data to adjust the numerical dynamical models of the buildings, to examine time variations of behavior, and to identify the origin of anthropogenic sources of vibration in view of their

  11. Antimicrobial effects of alginate-based films containing essential oils on Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella typhimurium present in bologna and ham.

    PubMed

    Oussalah, Mounia; Caillet, Stéphane; Salmiéri, Stéphane; Saucier, Linda; Lacroix, Monique

    2007-04-01

    Bologna and ham slices (300 of each) were inoculated with Salmonella Typhimurium or Listeria monocytogenes at 10(3) CFU/cm(2). Alginate-based edible films that had been immersed in a 2 or 20% (wt/vol) CaC12 solution and contained 1% (wt/ vol) essential oils of Spanish oregano (O; Corydothymus capitatus), Chinese cinnamon (C; Cinnamomum cassia), or winter savory (S; Satureja montana) were then applied to slices to control pathogen growth. On bologna, C-based films pretreated with 20% CaC12 were the most effective against the growth of Salmonella Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes. L. monocytogenes was the more sensitive bacterium to O-, C-, and S-based films. L. monocytogenes concentrations were below the detection level (<10 CFU/ml) after 5 days of storage on bologna coated with O-, C-, or S-based films pretreated with 20% CaCl2. On ham, a 1.85 log CFU/cm2 reduction of Salmonella Typhimurium (P < 0.05) was found after 5 days of storage with C-based films regardless of the type of pretreatment used (2 or 20% CaC12) or when coated with O-based films pretreated with 20% CaCl2. L. monocytogenes was highly resistant in ham, even in the presence of O-, C-, or S-based films. However, C-based films pretreated with 20% CaCl2 were the most effective against the growth of L. monocytogenes. Evaluation of the availability of active compounds in films revealed a significantly higher release of active compounds in C-based films (P < 0.05) regardless of pretreatment or meat tested (bologna or ham). O-based films had the lowest release level of active compounds. The release of active compounds from O- and S-based films pretreated with 20% CaCl2 was faster than that in the same respective films pretreated with 2% CaCl2 regardless of the meat type. C-based film pretreated by immersion in a 20% CaCl2 solution was most efficient against both pathogens, and migration of active compounds was higher in C-based films than in O- and S-based films. PMID:17477259

  12. [Planning and application of a valutation methodology in UNI EN ISO 9001:2000 quality system, for the analysis satisfaction level of third-year student University of Bologna, Bachelor of Nursing Course, CRI School of Nursing formative section].

    PubMed

    Bernardi, M G; Scalorbi, Sandra; Burrai, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    The quality of nursing assistance is closely related to the quality of training. In the certification UNI EN ISO 9001:2000 in 2004 of the Bologna nursing school regarding Planning and performance of theoretical-practical nursing training a continual improvement of the product/service is implicit. A method was therefore devised to evaluate the degree of satisfaction in third-year nursing students in Bologna which demonstrated a medium/high level of satisfaction regarding all teaching-related procedures. By monitoring satisfaction levels , it is possible to identify any critical areas and to implement improvement where needed. PMID:17825218

  13. Amodal Completion in Bonobos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagasaka, Yasuo; Brooks, Daniel I.; Wasserman, Edward A.

    2010-01-01

    We trained two bonobos to discriminate among occluded, complete, and incomplete stimuli. The occluded stimulus comprised a pair of colored shapes, one of which appeared to occlude the other. The complete and incomplete stimuli involved the single shape that appeared to have been partially covered in the occluded stimulus; the complete stimulus…

  14. Use of Landsat imagery to detect land cover changes for monitoring soil sealing; case study: Bologna province (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casciere, Rossella; Franci, Francesca; Bitelli, Gabriele

    2014-08-01

    Landsat archives (made accessible by USGS at no charge since 2011) have made available to the scientific community a large amount of satellite multispectral images, providing new opportunities for environmental information, such as the analysis of land use/cover changes, which represent important tools for planning and sustainable land management. Processing a time series images, the creation of land cover maps has been improved in order to analyze phenomena such as the soil sealing. The main topic of this work is in fact the detection of roads and buildings construction or everything that involve soil removing. This subject is highly relevant, given the impact of the phenomenon on land use planning, environmental sustainability, agricultural policies and urban runoff. The analysis, still in progress, has been applied to Bologna Province (Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy) that covers 3703 Km2. This area is strongly urbanized: 8,9% of the total surface is sealed against a national value of 6,7%, with the soil sealing rate which has been defined from recent studies as the fourth Italian value in the 2001/2011 period. Other information available for this territory derive from CORINE Land Cover and Copernicus Projects. In the first one, the minimum mapping unit is 25 ha and the one for change is 5 ha; these values are too large for an accurate detection of the soil sealing dynamics. On the other hand, the Copernicus Project provides an imperviousness layer with a better resolution (20x20 m2), but its maps start from 2006. Therefore, the potential of multispectral remote sensing analysis over large areas and the multitemporal Landsat availability have been combined for a better knowledge about land cover changes. For this work, Landsat 5 and Landsat 8 images have been acquired between 1987 and 2013, according to basic requirements as low cloud cover and a common acquisition season (summer). A supervised pixel-based classification has been performed, with maximum likelihood

  15. Complete analyticity for 2D Ising completed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonmann, Roberto H.; Shlosman, Senya B.

    1995-06-01

    We study the behavior of the two-dimensional nearest neighbor ferromagnetic Ising model under an external magnetic field h. We extend to every subcritical value of the temperature a result previously proven by Martirosyan at low enough temperature, and which roughly states that for finite systems with — boundary conditions under a positive external field, the boundary effect dominates in the bulk if the linear size of the system is of order B/h with B small enough, while if B is large enough, then the external field dominates in the bulk. As a consequence we are able to complete the proof that “complete analyticity for nice sets” holds for every value of the temperature and external field in the interior of the uniqueness region in the phase diagram of the model. The main tools used are the results and techniques developed to study large deviations for the block magnetization in the absence of the magnetic field, and recently extended to all temperatures below the critical one by Ioffe.

  16. The Introduction of Two-Tiered Study Structures in the Context of the Bologna Process: A Theoretical Framework for an International Comparative Study of Change in Higher Education Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte, Johanna

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical framework for an encompassing international comparative study of a central aspect of the Bologna process; the introduction of two-tiered study structures (TTSS), often referred to as "Bachelor and Master". The framework is tailored to understand and explain the patterns of TTSS that currently emerge in various…

  17. Policy Borrowing and Transfer, and Policy Convergence: Justifications for the Adoption of the Bologna Process in the CEMAC Region and the Cameroonian Higher Education System through the LMD Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eta, Elizabeth Agbor

    2015-01-01

    The borrowing and transfer of policies, ideas and practices from one system to another may in part explain the convergence of educational systems. Using text documents as research material, this paper examines the adoption and transfer of Bologna Process (BP) ideas in the Economic and Monetary Community of Central Africa (CEMAC) and in the…

  18. Latino College Completion: Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  19. Latino College Completion: Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  20. Latino College Completion: Wisconsin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  1. Latino College Completion: Wyoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  2. Latino College Completion: Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  3. Latino College Completion: Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  4. Latino College Completion: Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  5. Latino College Completion: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  6. Latino College Completion: Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  7. Latino College Completion: Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  8. Latino College Completion: Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  9. Latino College Completion: Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  10. Latino College Completion: Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  11. Latino College Completion: Maine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  12. Latino College Completion: Connecticut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  13. Latino College Completion: Indiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  14. Latino College Completion: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  15. Latino College Completion: Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  16. Latino College Completion: Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  17. Latino College Completion: Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  18. Latino College Completion: Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  19. Latino College Completion: Mississippi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  20. Latino College Completion: Nevada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  1. Latino College Completion: California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  2. Latino College Completion: Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  3. Latino College Completion: Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  4. Latino College Completion: Vermont

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  5. Latino College Completion: Montana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  6. Latino College Completion: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  7. Latino College Completion: Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  8. Latino College Completion: Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  9. Latino College Completion: Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  10. Latino College Completion: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  11. Latino College Completion: Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  12. Latino College Completion: Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  13. Latino College Completion: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  14. Latino College Completion: Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  15. Latino College Completion: Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  16. Latino College Completion: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  17. Latino College Completion: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  18. Classical versus quantum completeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Stefan; Schneider, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The notion of quantum-mechanical completeness is adapted to situations where the only adequate description is in terms of quantum field theory in curved space-times. It is then shown that Schwarzschild black holes, although geodesically incomplete, are quantum complete.

  19. Sampling and Sample Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawicki, Rubén O.

    Quality attributes in food products, raw materials, or ingredients are measurable characteristics that need monitoring to ensure that specifications are met. Some quality attributes can be measured online by using specially designed sensors and results obtained in real time (e.g., color of vegetable oil in an oil extraction plant). However, in most cases quality attributes are measured on small portions of material that are taken periodically from continuous processes or on a certain number of small portions taken from a lot. The small portions taken for analysis are referred to as samples, and the entire lot or the entire production for a certain period of time, in the case of continuous processes, is called a population. The process of taking samples from a population is called sampling. If the procedure is done correctly, the measurable characteristics obtained for the samples become a very accurate estimation of the population.

  20. The Book of the Sick of Santa Maria della Morte in Bologna and the Medical Organization of a Hospital in the Sixteenth-Century.

    PubMed

    Savoia, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In 2012 a manuscript was rediscovered in the Biblioteca dell'Archiginnasio of Bologna, titled Libro degli infermi dell'Arciconfraternita di S. Maria della Morte. It is the record of incoming patients of one for the main hospitals of the city, devoted exclusively to the sick poor and not just to the poor, called Santa Maria della Morte, compiled by a young student assistant (astante) for the period 1558-1564. I publish here a transcription of a portion of this Libro pertaining to the year 1560. My introduction situates the manuscript within the context of the history of early modern Italian hospitals, describes the organization of the hospital of Santa Maria della Morte based on archival sources of the period, and finally highlights the connections between surgical and anatomical education and the internal organization of the hospital. PMID:27071302

  1. The evolution of midwifery education at the master's level: a study of Swedish midwifery education programmes after the implementation of the Bologna process.

    PubMed

    Hermansson, Evelyn; Mårtensson, Lena B

    2013-08-01

    In Europe, midwifery education has undergone a number of reforms in the past few decades. In several countries, it has shifted from vocational training to academic education. The higher education reform, known as the "Bologna process" aimed to create convergence in higher education among a number of European countries and enhance opportunities for mobility, employment and collaborative research. It also indicated a transparent and easily compared system of academic degrees, generating a new educational system in three cycles. This study explores the implementation of the process in Sweden when the midwifery education was transferred from diploma to postgraduate or master's level. The aim of this study was to analyse how the implementation of the Bologna process in the Swedish higher education system has impacted midwifery education programmes in the country. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were employed to analyse 32 questionnaire responses from teachers and the 2009-2010 curricula and syllabi of 11 postgraduate midwifery education programmes at Swedish universities and university colleges. The results revealed variations among the universities at the major subject into the three disciplines; midwifery, nursing and caring with different conceptualisations, even when the content was identical in the curricula to that of the midwifery professional knowledge base. Implementation of the new reform not only has accelerated the academisation process, but also puts higher demand on the students and requires higher competencies among teachers to involve more evidence-based knowledge, seminars, independent studies and a postgraduate degree project in the major subject. Thus the students earn not only a diploma in midwifery, but also a master's degree in the major subject, which affords the opportunity for an academic career. But still there is a tension between professional and academic education. PMID:23154149

  2. Making College Completion Personal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Heather

    2011-01-01

    There are countless justifications for why young adults, faced with so many distractions, do not complete their educations. Many students fail to finish college because of a lack of information and understanding about healthy relationships and sex education. The author's own struggles and eventual successes as a student and mother compelled her to…

  3. Beyond FASFA Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castleman, Ben; Page, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)--which students must complete to qualify for most federal, state, and institutional financial aid--is a gateway to college through which many students must pass, particularly those from low- to moderate-income households (King, 2004; Kofoed, 2013). Yet given the complexity of the…

  4. Completing a Simple Circuit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Timothy F.; Adams, Jeffrey P.; Brown, Thomas R.

    2000-01-01

    Students have problems successfully arranging an electric circuit to make the bulb produce light. Investigates the percentage of students able to complete a circuit with a given apparatus, and the effects of prior experience on student success. Recommends hands-on activities at the elementary and secondary school levels. (Contains 14 references.)…

  5. Generation of complete source samples from the Slew Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schachter, Jonathan

    1992-01-01

    The Einstein Slew Survey consists of 819 bright X-ray sources, of which 636 (or 78 percent) are identified with counterparts in standard catalogs. We argue for the importance of bright X-ray surveys, and compare the slew results to the ROSAT all-sky survey. Also, we discuss statistical techniques for minimizing confusion in arcminute error circles in digitized data. We describe the 238 Slew Survey AGN, clusters, and BL Lac objects identified to date and their implications for logN-logS and source evolution studies. Also given is a catalog of 1075 sources detected in the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) Slew Survey of the X-ray sky. Five hundred fifty-four of these sources were not previously known as X-ray sources.

  6. Sleep Disturbance Preceding Completed Suicide in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Tina R.; Bridge, Jeffrey A.; Brent, David A.

    2008-01-01

    We examined sleep difficulties preceding death in a sample of adolescent suicide completers as compared with a matched sample of community control adolescents. Sleep disturbances were assessed in 140 adolescent suicide victims with a psychological autopsy protocol and in 131 controls with a similar semistructured psychiatric interview. Rates of…

  7. Liquid sample processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnsen, V. J.; Campen, C. F., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Processor is automatic and includes series of extraction tubes packed with fibrous absorbent material of large surface area. When introduced into these tubes, liquid test samples become completely absorbed by packing material as thin film.

  8. Complete scanpaths analysis toolbox.

    PubMed

    Augustyniak, Piotr; Mikrut, Zbigniew

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a complete open software environment for control, data processing and assessment of visual experiments. Visual experiments are widely used in research on human perception physiology and the results are applicable to various visual information-based man-machine interfacing, human-emulated automatic visual systems or scanpath-based learning of perceptual habits. The toolbox is designed for Matlab platform and supports infra-red reflection-based eyetracker in calibration and scanpath analysis modes. Toolbox procedures are organized in three layers: the lower one, communicating with the eyetracker output file, the middle detecting scanpath events on a physiological background and the one upper consisting of experiment schedule scripts, statistics and summaries. Several examples of visual experiments carried out with use of the presented toolbox complete the paper. PMID:17945877

  9. Image Zoom Completion.

    PubMed

    Hidane, Moncef; El Gheche, Mireille; Aujol, Jean-Francois; Berthoumieu, Yannick; Deledalle, Charles-Alban

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of recovering a high-resolution image from a pair consisting of a complete low-resolution image and a high-resolution but incomplete one. We refer to this task as the image zoom completion problem. After discussing possible contexts in which this setting may arise, we introduce a nonlocal regularization strategy, giving full details concerning the numerical optimization of the corresponding energy and discussing its benefits and shortcomings. We also derive two total variation-based algorithms and evaluate the performance of the proposed methods on a set of natural and textured images. We compare the results and get with those obtained with two recent state-of-the-art single-image super-resolution algorithms. PMID:27249829

  10. Form development sample test matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, B B

    1999-10-15

    This document summarizes the status of sample fabrication and analysis in the Form Development Sample Test Matrix. Since its publication in the ''Baseline Formulation'' report (UCRL-ID- 133089, PIP-99-O 12) and in the ''Complete Single-Phase Sample Fabrications that Support the Licensing Application and Complete Process and Compositional Extreme Sample Fabrications that Support the Licensing Application'' report (PIP-99-078), the Sample Test Matrix has been updated and expanded. This version is current though September 30, 1999.

  11. Insert tree completion system

    SciTech Connect

    Brands, K.W.; Ball, I.G.; Cegielski, E.J.; Gresham, J.S.; Saunders, D.N.

    1982-09-01

    This paper outlines the overall project for development and installation of a low-profile, caisson-installed subsea Christmas tree. After various design studies and laboratory and field tests of key components, a system for installation inside a 30-in. conductor was ordered in July 1978 from Cameron Iron Works Inc. The system is designed to have all critical-pressure-containing components below the mudline and, with the reduced profile (height) above seabed, provides for improved safety of satellite underwater wells from damage by anchors, trawl boards, and even icebergs. In addition to the innovative nature of the tree design, the completion includes improved 3 1/2-in. through flowline (TFL) pumpdown completion equipment with deep set safety valves and a dual detachable packer head for simplified workover capability. The all-hydraulic control system incorporates a new design of sequencing valve for both Christmas tree control and remote flowline connection. A semisubmersible drilling rig was used to initiate the first end flowline connection at the wellhead for subsequent tie-in to the prelaid, surface-towed, all-welded subsea pipeline bundle.

  12. Beyond complete positivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominy, Jason M.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2016-04-01

    We provide a general and consistent formulation for linear subsystem quantum dynamical maps, developed from a minimal set of postulates, primary among which is a relaxation of the usual, restrictive assumption of uncorrelated initial system-bath states. We describe the space of possibilities admitted by this formulation, namely that, far from being limited to only completely positive (CP) maps, essentially any C-linear, Hermiticity-preserving, trace-preserving map can arise as a legitimate subsystem dynamical map from a joint unitary evolution of a system coupled to a bath. The price paid for this added generality is a trade-off between the set of admissible initial states and the allowed set of joint system-bath unitary evolutions. As an application, we present a simple example of a non-CP map constructed as a subsystem dynamical map that violates some fundamental inequalities in quantum information theory, such as the quantum data processing inequality.

  13. Completely bootstrapped tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R.H. ); Boozer, A.H. )

    1992-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields have been developed using a mean-field Ohm's law. The Ohm's law is coupled to a {Delta}{prime} stabilty analysis and a magnetic island growth equation in order to simulate the behavior of tokamak plasmas that are subject to tearing modes. In one set of calculations, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-stable regime of the tokamak is examined via the construction of an {ital l}{sub {ital i}} -{ital q}{sub {ital a}} diagram. The results confirm previous calculations that show that tearing modes introduce a stability boundary into the {ital l}{sub {ital i}} -{ital q}{sub {ital a}} space. In another series of simulations, the interaction between tearing modes and the bootstrap current is investigated. The results indicate that a completely bootstrapped tokamak may be possible, even in the absence of any externally applied loop voltage or current drive.

  14. The Bologna Process Implementation and its Consequent Changes in the Teaching/Learning Model—the Industrial Management and Engineering Degree Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luísa Soares, Ana; Costa, Elga; Ferreira, Luís Pinto

    2009-11-01

    The present paper aims to present a Project included in a diversified programme and consequent implementation of a new Teaching/Learning model adapted to the Industrial Management and Engineering Degree (IMED) of the Management and Industrial Studies School (O'Porto Polytechnic Institute). Owning particular and specific characteristics, this model is based on the graduates' professional profile as well as on the work market dynamics, placing the student in the centre of the Learning Process, in opposition to the `teacher centred' method (as conceived by the Bologna Treat). Diverse in the approach, the model includes differentiating factors when compared to the project based traditional model. Through the development and conception of practical Interdisciplinary Projects, centring knowledges and techniques from the different Industrial Management and Engineering areas, we seek a new way of implementing the `Project Led Education' (PLE) bases, according to the Active Learning paradigm. This teaching/learning model aims to contribute to the Industrial Management and Engineering graduates' formation focused on a high level of performance and professional rectitude, to induce students' enthusiasm and motivation for acquiring scientific and technical knowledge, as well as to satisfy the diverse interest groups' expectations and promote the regional development.

  15. Complete Genome Sequences of 61 Mycobacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Hatfull, Graham F

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteriophages-viruses of mycobacteria-provide insights into viral diversity and evolution as well as numerous tools for genetic dissection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Here we report the complete genome sequences of 61 mycobacteriophages newly isolated from environmental samples using Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155 that expand our understanding of phage diversity. PMID:27389257

  16. Complete Genome Sequences of 61 Mycobacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteriophages—viruses of mycobacteria—provide insights into viral diversity and evolution as well as numerous tools for genetic dissection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here we report the complete genome sequences of 61 mycobacteriophages newly isolated from environmental samples using Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155 that expand our understanding of phage diversity. PMID:27389257

  17. Sampling mechanisms for asteroid sample return missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, D.; Franzen, M. A.; Preble, J.; Long, T.

    2003-04-01

    There is a unique challenge in developing sample collectors for low-gravity bodies such as asteroids. Traditional devices rely mostly on gravity for sample collection which is inappropriate in the case of asteroids. The NEAR Shoemaker has shown that we can design spacecrafts that can maneuver very closely to asteroids and provide us with a wealth of valuable data. However, a sample collector that can return samples to the Earth has yet to be fully developed. During the Near-Earth Sample Return Workshop held in Los Angeles in July 2002, the scientific requirements and engineering constraints of sample return collectors were discussed. It was proposed that the touch-and-go-sampler is to be preferred for the first missions. The collector should be as simple as possible, with the minimum of moving parts to reduce cost and prevent damage to the sampler during the collection process as well as minimize surface disturbance on the asteroid. However, the collection procedure must meet certain conditions in order for a complete assessment of the samples. The collection process should not change the composition (molecular, elemental, or isotopic), physical properties, mineral and phase proportions, or grain size distribution. Our answer to these challenges is an adhesive tray collector. The adhesive tray touch-and-go-sampler would include a thirty centimeter in diameter tray bound to a boom. The boom would allow the spacecraft to collect samples with a minimum amount of disturbance from the one to two second encounter with the surface of the asteroid with the adhesive tray. The adhesive tray would be able to sample surface regolith including one to two centimeter clasts in a diverse number of scientifically valuable sites. Once the sample has been collected, the boom will retract and place the adhesive sample tray into a sample return canister. Progress in the development of this collector and preliminary results of testing under microgravity and space conditions will be

  18. Water masers associated with compact molecular clouds and ultracompact H II regions - The extended sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaroni, R.; Comoretto, G.; Felli, M.; Palla, F.; Brand, J.; Caselli, P.

    We present the results of a survey of water maser emission at 22.2 GHz towards a selected sample of IRAS-PSC sources which are believed to be associated with very young massive stars. The sample consists of 591 sources. The observations have been carried out using the Medicina 32-m radiotelescope, operated by the Istituto di Radioastronomia - C.N.R., Bologna. Whereas previous searches for maser emission have been directed towards known H II regions, the aim of the present survey is to identify new sources in an even earlier evolutionary phase, corresponding to the development of an ultracompact H II region. It is shown that our sample contains a significant number of sources that could be considered good candidates of massive protostellar cores still in the main accretion phase.

  19. Capillary sample

    MedlinePlus

    ... using capillary blood sampling. Disadvantages to capillary blood sampling include: Only a limited amount of blood can be drawn using this method. The procedure has some risks (see below). Capillary ...

  20. Long-term carcinogenicity bioassays on industrial chemicals and man-made mineral fibers, at the Bentivoglio (BT) laboratories of the Bologna Institute of Oncology: premises, programs, and results

    SciTech Connect

    Maltoni, C.; Minardi, F.; Soffritti, M.; Lefemine, G. )

    1991-09-01

    After having stressed the need of primary prevention in the strategy for cancer control, the crucial role of the long-term carcinogenicity bioassays in providing scientific support to primary prevention has been focused. The state-of-the-art, the present inadequacies, the necessity of implementation, and the perspectives of the long-term carcinogenicity bioassays have been briefly reviewed. The performed and ongoing programs of carcinogenicity bioassays at the Bentivoglio (BT) Laboratories of the Bologna Institute of Oncology have been presented, together with the currently available results on several compounds of industrial and commercial relevance.

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF A COMPLETE 160 {mu}m FLUX-LIMITED SAMPLE OF INFRARED GALAXIES IN THE ISO LOCKMAN HOLE 1 deg{sup 2} DEEP FIELDS: SOURCE PROPERTIES AND EVIDENCE FOR STRONG EVOLUTION IN THE FIR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FOR ULIRGs

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, B. A.; Sanders, D. B.; Rupke, D. S. N. E-mail: sanders@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2011-04-15

    We have identified a complete, flux-limited (S{sub 160}>120 mJy) sample of 160 {mu}m selected sources from Spitzer observations of the 1 deg{sup 2} Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) Deep Field region in the Lockman Hole (LH). Ground-based UV, optical, and near-infrared (NIR) photometry and optical spectroscopy have been used to determine colors, redshifts, and masses for the complete sample of 40 galaxies. Spitzer-IRAC+MIPS photometry, supplemented by ISOPHOT data at 90 {mu}m and 170 {mu}m, has been used to calculate accurate total infrared luminosities, L{sub IR}(8-1000 {mu}m), and to determine the IR luminosity function (LF) of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs). The maximum observed redshift is z {approx} 0.80 and the maximum total infrared luminosity is log (L{sub IR}/L{sub sun}) = 12.74. Over the luminosity range log (L{sub IR}/L{sub sun}) = 10-12, the LF for LIRGs in the LH Deep Field is similar to that found previously for local sources at similar infrared luminosities. The mean host galaxy mass, log (M/M{sub sun}) = 10.7, and dominance of H II-region spectral types, is also similar to what has been found for local LIRGs, suggesting that intense starbursts likely power the bulk of the infrared luminosity for sources in this range of L{sub IR}. However for the most luminous sources, log (L{sub IR}/L{sub sun})>12.0, we find evidence for strong evolution in the LF {proportional_to}(1 + z){sup 6{+-}1}, assuming pure number density evolution. These ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) have a larger mean host mass, log (M/M{sub sun}) = 11.0, and exhibit disturbed morphologies consistent with strong interactions/mergers, and they are also more likely to be characterized by starburst-active galactic nucleus (AGN) composite or AGN spectral types.

  2. Complete to Compete: Common College Completion Metrics. Technical Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyna, Ryan; Reindl, Travis; Witham, Keith; Stanley, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Improved college completion rates are critical to the future of the United States, and states must have better data to understand the nature of the challenges they confront or target areas for policy change. The 2010-2011 National Governors Association (NGA) Chair's initiative, "Complete to Compete", recommends that all states collect data from…

  3. Sampling Development

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, Karen E.; Robinson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Research in developmental psychology requires sampling at different time points. Accurate depictions of developmental change provide a foundation for further empirical studies and theories about developmental mechanisms. However, overreliance on widely spaced sampling intervals in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs threatens the validity of the enterprise. This article discusses how to sample development in order to accurately discern the shape of developmental change. The ideal solution is daunting: to summarize behavior over 24-hour intervals and collect daily samples over the critical periods of change. We discuss the magnitude of errors due to undersampling, and the risks associated with oversampling. When daily sampling is not feasible, we offer suggestions for sampling methods that can provide preliminary reference points and provisional sketches of the general shape of a developmental trajectory. Denser sampling then can be applied strategically during periods of enhanced variability, inflections in the rate of developmental change, or in relation to key events or processes that may affect the course of change. Despite the challenges of dense repeated sampling, researchers must take seriously the problem of sampling on a developmental time scale if we are to know the true shape of developmental change. PMID:22140355

  4. BUGJEFF311.BOLIB (JEFF-3.1.1) and BUGENDF70.BOLIB (ENDF/B-VII.0) - Generation Methodology and Preliminary Testing of two ENEA-Bologna Group Cross Section Libraries for LWR Shielding and Pressure Vessel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescarini, Massimo; Sinitsa, Valentin; Orsi, Roberto; Frisoni, Manuela

    2016-02-01

    Two broad-group coupled neutron/photon working cross section libraries in FIDO-ANISN format, dedicated to LWR shielding and pressure vessel dosimetry applications, were generated following the methodology recommended by the US ANSI/ANS-6.1.2-1999 (R2009) standard. These libraries, named BUGJEFF311.BOLIB and BUGENDF70.BOLIB, are respectively based on JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data and adopt the same broad-group energy structure (47 n + 20 γ) of the ORNL BUGLE-96 similar library. They were respectively obtained from the ENEA-Bologna VITJEFF311.BOLIB and VITENDF70.BOLIB libraries in AMPX format for nuclear fission applications through problem-dependent cross section collapsing with the ENEA-Bologna 2007 revision of the ORNL SCAMPI nuclear data processing system. Both previous libraries are based on the Bondarenko self-shielding factor method and have the same AMPX format and fine-group energy structure (199 n + 42 γ) as the ORNL VITAMIN-B6 similar library from which BUGLE-96 was obtained at ORNL. A synthesis of a preliminary validation of the cited BUGLE-type libraries, performed through 3D fixed source transport calculations with the ORNL TORT-3.2 SN code, is included. The calculations were dedicated to the PCA-Replica 12/13 and VENUS-3 engineering neutron shielding benchmark experiments, specifically conceived to test the accuracy of nuclear data and transport codes in LWR shielding and radiation damage analyses.

  5. Bologna Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction (ASBO): 2010 Evidence-Based Guidelines of the World Society of Emergency Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is no consensus on diagnosis and management of ASBO. Initial conservative management is usually safe, however proper timing for discontinuing non operative treatment is still controversial. Open surgery or laparoscopy are used without standardized indications. Methods A panel of 13 international experts with interest and background in ASBO and peritoneal diseases, participated in a consensus conference during the 1st International Congress of the World Society of Emergency Surgery and 9th Peritoneum and Surgery Society meeting, in Bologna, July 1-3, 2010, for developing evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and management of ASBO. Whenever was a lack of high-level evidence, the working group formulated guidelines by obtaining consensus. Recommendations In absence of signs of strangulation and history of persistent vomiting or combined CT scan signs (free fluid, mesenteric oedema, small bowel faeces sign, devascularized bowel) patients with partial ASBO can be managed safely with NOM and tube decompression (either with long or NG) should be attempted. These patients are good candidates for Water Soluble Contrast Medium (WSCM) with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The appearance of water-soluble contrast in the colon on X-ray within 24 hours from administration predicts resolution. WSCM may be administered either orally or via NGT (50-150 ml) both immediately at admission or after an initial attempt of conservative treatment of 48 hours. The use of WSCM for ASBO is safe and reduces need for surgery, time to resolution and hospital stay. NOM, in absence of signs of strangulation or peritonitis, can be prolonged up to 72 hours. After 72 hours of NOM without resolution surgery is recommended. Patients treated non-operatively have shorter hospital stay, but higher recurrence rate and shorter time to re-admission, although the risk of new surgically treated episodes of ASBO is unchanged. Risk factors for recurrences are age <40 years and

  6. Seawater sampling and collection.

    PubMed

    Zaikova, Elena; Hawley, Alyse; Walsh, David A; Hallam, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    This video documents methods for collecting coastal marine water samples and processing them for various downstream applications including biomass concentration. nucleic acid purification, cell abundance, nutrient and trace gas analyses. For today's demonstration samples were collected from the deck of the HMS John Strickland operating in Saanich Inlet. An A-frame derrick, with a multi-purpose winch and cable system, is used in combination with Niskin or Go-Flo water sampling bottles. A Conductivity, Temperature, and Depth (CTD) sensor is also be used to sample the underlying water mass. To minimize outgassing, trace gas samples are collected first. Then, nutrients, chemistry, and cell counts are determined. Finally, waters are collected for biomass filtration. The set-up and collection time for a single cast is approximately 1.5 hours at a maximum depth of 215 meters. Therefore, a total of 6 hours is generally needed to complete the four-part collection series described here. PMID:19536065

  7. Sampling Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adolph, Karen E.; Robinson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Research in developmental psychology requires sampling at different time points. Accurate depictions of developmental change provide a foundation for further empirical studies and theories about developmental mechanisms. However, overreliance on widely spaced sampling intervals in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs threatens the validity of…

  8. Wireline fluid sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Michaels, J.; Moody, M.; Shwe, T.

    1995-12-31

    Accurate PVT data are crucial to well completion and production, formation evaluation and reservoir characterization. This is especially true for initial reservoir characterization where the PVF sample needs to be obtained prior to production. It is essential that the fluid sample be recovered as closely as possible to in-situ conditions whether by drill stem or wireline formation for. The need to remove drilling mud filtrate prior to collecting a sample has been widely recognized. Wireline testers which can pump fluid from a formation until filtrate is reduced to a minimum overcome this problem. While reducing sample contamination has been addressed, little emphasis has been placed on the need to control inlet pressure during filtrate removal or during sampling. Reducing contamination is important; however, there is equal need to determine the critical sampling pressure. The purpose is to prevent phase separation in the formation by regulating the sampling process based on this information and thereby obtain a more representative reservoir fluid sample. A recently introduced wireline instrument provides the capability of measuring the critical pressure prior to sampling, of controlling the sample pressure and of increasing the pressure in the sample container to compensate for temperature decline during delivery of that sample to a testing laboratory. Example of pressure tests while pumping and during pressure buildup are presented along with indicated sample properties. Introduction Wireline Formation Testers (WFT) provide an cost effective means to determine pressure as a function of depth and to recover samples of fluid from formations at selected depths. No other method can provide this type of information. Pressure data are used to estimate mobility, fluid contact and fluid density.

  9. Latino College Completion: Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  10. Latino College Completion: United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  11. Latino College Completion: North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  12. Latino College Completion: New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  13. Latino College Completion: South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  14. Latino College Completion: New Hampshire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  15. Latino College Completion: South Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  16. Latino College Completion: North Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  17. Latino College Completion: New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  18. Latino College Completion: West Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  19. Strictly homogeneous laterally complete modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilin, V. I.; Karimov, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Let A be a laterally complete commutative regular algebra and X be a laterally complete A-module. In this paper we introduce a notion of homogeneous and strictly homogeneous A-modules. It is proved that any homogeneous A-module is strictly homogeneous A-module, if the Boolean algebra of all idempotents in A is multi-σ-finite.

  20. High School Completion Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    While Alberta enjoys proven high, world-class results in student achievement, raising high school completion rates is one of the top priorities in improving the provincial education system. The 2011-12 targeted high school completion rate is 82% five years after entering Grade 10--a 2.5% increase from the current average rate of 79.5%. The purpose…

  1. Latino College Completion: New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  2. Pure-state informationally complete and 'really' complete measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, J.

    2004-11-01

    I construct a positive-operator-valued measure (POVM) which has 2d rank-1 elements and which is informationally complete for generic pure states in d dimensions, thus confirming a conjecture made by Flammia, Silberfarb, and Caves (e-print quant-ph/0404137). I show that if a rank-1 POVM is required to be informationally complete for all pure states in d dimensions, it must have at least 3d-2 elements. I also show that, in a POVM which is informationally complete for all pure states in d dimensions, for any vector there must be at least 2d-1 POVM elements which do not annihilate that vector.

  3. SAMPLING ARTIFACTS IN MEASUREMENT OF ELEMENTAL AND ORGANIC CARBON: LOW VOLUME SAMPLING IN INDOOR AND OUTDOOR ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were completed to determine the extent of artifacts from sampling elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) under sample conditions consistent with personal sampling. Two different types of experiments were completed; the first examined possible artifacts from oil...

  4. Elevating sampling

    PubMed Central

    Labuz, Joseph M.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    Sampling – the process of collecting, preparing, and introducing an appropriate volume element (voxel) into a system – is often under appreciated and pushed behind the scenes in lab-on-a-chip research. What often stands in the way between proof-of-principle demonstrations of potentially exciting technology and its broader dissemination and actual use, however, is the effectiveness of sample collection and preparation. The power of micro- and nanofluidics to improve reactions, sensing, separation, and cell culture cannot be accessed if sampling is not equally efficient and reliable. This perspective will highlight recent successes as well as assess current challenges and opportunities in this area. PMID:24781100

  5. SAMPLING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Hannaford, B.A.; Rosenberg, R.; Segaser, C.L.; Terry, C.L.

    1961-01-17

    An apparatus is given for the batch sampling of radioactive liquids such as slurries from a system by remote control, while providing shielding for protection of operating personnel from the harmful effects of radiation.

  6. Deterministic multidimensional nonuniform gap sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Bradley; Powers, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Born from empirical observations in nonuniformly sampled multidimensional NMR data relating to gaps between sampled points, the Poisson-gap sampling method has enjoyed widespread use in biomolecular NMR. While the majority of nonuniform sampling schemes are fully randomly drawn from probability densities that vary over a Nyquist grid, the Poisson-gap scheme employs constrained random deviates to minimize the gaps between sampled grid points. We describe a deterministic gap sampling method, based on the average behavior of Poisson-gap sampling, which performs comparably to its random counterpart with the additional benefit of completely deterministic behavior. We also introduce a general algorithm for multidimensional nonuniform sampling based on a gap equation, and apply it to yield a deterministic sampling scheme that combines burst-mode sampling features with those of Poisson-gap schemes. Finally, we derive a relationship between stochastic gap equations and the expectation value of their sampling probability densities.

  7. Fluidic sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, E.D.

    1992-04-20

    This paper covers the development of the fluidic sampler and its testing in a fluidic transfer system. The major findings of this paper are as follows. Fluidic jet samples can dependably produce unbiased samples of acceptable volume. The fluidic transfer system with a fluidic sampler in-line will transfer water to a net lift of 37.2--39.9 feet at an average ratio of 0.02--0.05 gpm (77--192 cc/min). The fluidic sample system circulation rate compares very favorably with the normal 0.016--0.026 gpm (60--100 cc/min) circulation rate that is commonly produced for this lift and solution with the jet-assisted airlift sample system that is normally used at ICPP. The volume of the sample taken with a fluidic sampler is dependant on the motive pressure to the fluidic sampler, the sample bottle size and on the fluidic sampler jet characteristics. The fluidic sampler should be supplied with fluid having the motive pressure of the 140--150 percent of the peak vacuum producing motive pressure for the jet in the sampler. Fluidic transfer systems should be operated by emptying a full pumping chamber to nearly empty or empty during the pumping cycle, this maximizes the solution transfer rate.

  8. Fluidic sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houck, E. D.

    1992-04-01

    This paper covers the development of the fluidic sampler and its testing in a fluidic transfer system. The major findings of this paper are as follows. Fluidic jet samples can dependably produce unbiased samples of acceptable volume. The fluidic transfer system with a fluidic sampler in-line will transfer water to a net lift of 37.2-39.9 feet at an average ratio of 0.02-0.05 gpm (77-192 cc/min). The fluidic sample system circulation rate compares very favorably with the normal 0.016-0.026 gpm (60-100 cc/min) circulation rate that is commonly produced for this lift and solution with the jet-assisted airlift sample system that is normally used at ICPP. The volume of the sample taken with a fluidic sampler is dependant on the motive pressure to the fluidic sampler, the sample bottle size and on the fluidic sampler jet characteristics. The fluidic sampler should be supplied with fluid having the motive pressure of the 140-150 percent of the peak vacuum producing motive pressure for the jet in the sampler. Fluidic transfer systems should be operated by emptying a full pumping chamber to nearly empty or empty during the pumping cycle, this maximizes the solution transfer rate.

  9. Genotype imputation via matrix completion.

    PubMed

    Chi, Eric C; Zhou, Hua; Chen, Gary K; Del Vecchyo, Diego Ortega; Lange, Kenneth

    2013-03-01

    Most current genotype imputation methods are model-based and computationally intensive, taking days to impute one chromosome pair on 1000 people. We describe an efficient genotype imputation method based on matrix completion. Our matrix completion method is implemented in MATLAB and tested on real data from HapMap 3, simulated pedigree data, and simulated low-coverage sequencing data derived from the 1000 Genomes Project. Compared with leading imputation programs, the matrix completion algorithm embodied in our program MENDEL-IMPUTE achieves comparable imputation accuracy while reducing run times significantly. Implementation in a lower-level language such as Fortran or C is apt to further improve computational efficiency. PMID:23233546

  10. Completeness for sparse potential scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Zhongwei

    2014-01-15

    The present paper is devoted to the scattering theory of a class of continuum Schrödinger operators with deterministic sparse potentials. We first establish the limiting absorption principle for both modified free resolvents and modified perturbed resolvents. This actually is a weak form of the classical limiting absorption principle. We then prove the existence and completeness of local wave operators, which, in particular, imply the existence of wave operators. Under additional assumptions on the sparse potential, we prove the completeness of wave operators. In the context of continuum Schrödinger operators with sparse potentials, this paper gives the first proof of the completeness of wave operators.

  11. JWST Primary Mirror Installation Complete

    NASA Video Gallery

    Completing the assembly of the primary mirror, which took place at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, is a significant milestone and the culmination of over a decade of desi...

  12. Is complete seizure control imperative?

    PubMed

    Andermann, Frederick

    2002-01-01

    Is complete control imperative? The answer depends on whether complete control is indeed possible, on the possibility of achieving modifications of lifestyle, and on the type of epilepsy, with particular reference to the presence of progressive dysfunction. This may be seen in patients with temporal lobe or other forms of focal epilepsy, in the epileptic encephalopathies such as West and Lennox Gastaut Syndromes and even in some patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Progressive memory changes and global cognitive problems are examples. Progressive language deterioration, secondary epileptogenesis and phenomena analogous to kindling are also important issues. How long treatment should be continued depends on many factors, not least the preference of the patient and of the family. Weighing the benefits of complete control versus the side effects and risks of medication or surgery is crucial. There are obvious benefits to complete control; it is imperative if these benefits are greater than the cost. PMID:12143366

  13. Complete Blood Count (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... Metabolic Panel (BMP) Blood Test: Hemoglobin Basic Blood Chemistry Tests Word! Complete Blood Count (CBC) Medical Tests ...

  14. Complete colonic duplication in children

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghnejad Tabari, Ahmad; Mirshemirani, Alireza; Khaleghnejad Tabari, Nasibeh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Complete colonic duplication is a very rare congenital anomaly that may have different presentations according to its location and size. Complete colonic duplication can occur in 15% of gastrointestinal duplication. We report two cases of complete colonic duplications, and their characteristics. Case Presentation: We present two patients with complete colonic duplication with different types and presentations. Case 1: A 2- year old boy presented to the clinic with abdominal protrusion, difficulty to defecate, chronic constipation and mucosal prolaps covered bulging (rectocele) since he was 6 months old. The patient had palpable pelvic mass with doughy consistency. Rectal exam confirmed perirectal mass with soft consistency. The patient underwent a surgical operation that had total tubular colorectal duplication with one blind end and was treated with simple fenestration of distal end, and was discharged without complication. After two years follow up, he had normal defecation and good weight gain. Case 2: A 2 –day old infant was referred with imperforate anus and complete duplication of recto-sigmoid colon, diphallus, double bladder, and hypospadiasis. After clinical and paraclinical investigations, he underwent operations in several stages in different periods, and was discharged without complications. After four years follow up, he led a normal life. Conclusion: The patients with complete duplication have to be examined carefully because of the high incidence of other systemic anomalies. Treatment includes simple resection of distal common wall, fenestration, and repair other associated anomalies. PMID:24358440

  15. Creating Sample Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, Joseph H.; Seebode, Linda C.

    1999-03-24

    The program has been designed to increase the accuracy and reduce the preparation time for completing sampling plans. It consists of our files 1. Analyte/Combination (AnalCombo) A list of analytes and combinations of analytes that can be requested of the onsite and offsite labs. Whenever a specific combination of analytes or suite names appear on the same line as the code number, this indicates that one sample can be placed in one bottle to be analyzed for these paremeters. A code number is assigned for each analyte and combination of analytes. 2. Sampling Plans Database (SPDb) A database that contains all of the analytes and combinations of analytes along with the basic information required for preparing a sample plan. That basic information includes the following fields; matrix, hold time, preservation, sample volume, container size, if the bottle caps are taped, acceptable choices. 3. Sampling plans create (SPcreate) a file that will lookup information from the Sampling Plans Database and the Job Log File (JLF98) A major database used by Sample Managemnet Services for recording more than 100 fields of information.

  16. Creating Sample Plans

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-03-24

    The program has been designed to increase the accuracy and reduce the preparation time for completing sampling plans. It consists of our files 1. Analyte/Combination (AnalCombo) A list of analytes and combinations of analytes that can be requested of the onsite and offsite labs. Whenever a specific combination of analytes or suite names appear on the same line as the code number, this indicates that one sample can be placed in one bottle to bemore » analyzed for these paremeters. A code number is assigned for each analyte and combination of analytes. 2. Sampling Plans Database (SPDb) A database that contains all of the analytes and combinations of analytes along with the basic information required for preparing a sample plan. That basic information includes the following fields; matrix, hold time, preservation, sample volume, container size, if the bottle caps are taped, acceptable choices. 3. Sampling plans create (SPcreate) a file that will lookup information from the Sampling Plans Database and the Job Log File (JLF98) A major database used by Sample Managemnet Services for recording more than 100 fields of information.« less

  17. Sampling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Norman R.; King, Lloyd L.; Jackson, Peter O.; Zulich, Alan W.

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface.

  18. Sampling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, N.R.; King, L.L.; Jackson, P.O.; Zulich, A.W.

    1989-07-18

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface. 15 figs.

  19. SAMPLING OSCILLOSCOPE

    DOEpatents

    Sugarman, R.M.

    1960-08-30

    An oscilloscope is designed for displaying transient signal waveforms having random time and amplitude distributions. The oscilloscopc is a sampling device that selects for display a portion of only those waveforms having a particular range of amplitudes. For this purpose a pulse-height analyzer is provided to screen the pulses. A variable voltage-level shifter and a time-scale rampvoltage generator take the pulse height relative to the start of the waveform. The variable voltage shifter produces a voltage level raised one step for each sequential signal waveform to be sampled and this results in an unsmeared record of input signal waveforms. Appropriate delay devices permit each sample waveform to pass its peak amplitude before the circuit selects it for display.

  20. Predicting Drug Court Treatment Completion Using the MMPI-2-RF

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Curtis; Powers, Bradley; Halfaker, Dale; Akeson, Steven; Ben-Porath, Yossef

    2012-01-01

    We examined the ability of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008) substantive scales to predict Drug Court treatment completion in a sample of individuals identified as being at risk for failure to complete the program. Higher scores on MMPI-2-RF scales Behavior/Externalizing…

  1. Sampling properties of directed networks.

    PubMed

    Son, S-W; Christensen, C; Bizhani, G; Foster, D V; Grassberger, P; Paczuski, M

    2012-10-01

    For many real-world networks only a small "sampled" version of the original network may be investigated; those results are then used to draw conclusions about the actual system. Variants of breadth-first search (BFS) sampling, which are based on epidemic processes, are widely used. Although it is well established that BFS sampling fails, in most cases, to capture the IN component(s) of directed networks, a description of the effects of BFS sampling on other topological properties is all but absent from the literature. To systematically study the effects of sampling biases on directed networks, we compare BFS sampling to random sampling on complete large-scale directed networks. We present new results and a thorough analysis of the topological properties of seven complete directed networks (prior to sampling), including three versions of Wikipedia, three different sources of sampled World Wide Web data, and an Internet-based social network. We detail the differences that sampling method and coverage can make to the structural properties of sampled versions of these seven networks. Most notably, we find that sampling method and coverage affect both the bow-tie structure and the number and structure of strongly connected components in sampled networks. In addition, at a low sampling coverage (i.e., less than 40%), the values of average degree, variance of out-degree, degree autocorrelation, and link reciprocity are overestimated by 30% or more in BFS-sampled networks and only attain values within 10% of the corresponding values in the complete networks when sampling coverage is in excess of 65%. These results may cause us to rethink what we know about the structure, function, and evolution of real-world directed networks. PMID:23214649

  2. Fish monitoring: Getting a complete picture

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehl, E.S.; Johnson, G.E. ); Olson, F.W. )

    1991-02-01

    During licensing or relicensing procedures, resource agencies often recommend that hydroelectric project owners monitor fish passage at the site of the power plant. By using multiple sampling techniques, an owner can made a comprehensive assessment of the fish population surrounding a site and determine how the project affects these fish. This approach was recently used at a hydro project in southern Ohio along the Ohio River. Recognizing that each commonly used biological sampling method has strengths and weaknesses, the plant owner, its consultants, and agency representatives decided on a strategy that employed four techniques to study the effects of the project on fish. Combining various monitoring methods provided complementary sampling of fish distributions and behavior in the river and at the dam. In this study, hydroacoustic techniques allowed extensive sampling over time and space. When complemented with species composition information from net sampling, hydroacoustic techniques produced useful information on fish population and entrainment. Radiotelemetry was used to estimate minimum survival rates of fish passing through a dam gate and turbine unit. In combination, the use of hydroacoustics, netting, electrofishing, and radio telemetry provided a complete picture of the fish population at Greenup Dam over three seasons, and facilitated an accurate assessment of the project's effects on fish.

  3. Ultraviolet completion without symmetry restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endlich, Solomon; Nicolis, Alberto; Penco, Riccardo

    2014-03-01

    We show that it is not possible to UV complete certain low-energy effective theories with spontaneously broken spacetime symmetries by embedding them into linear sigma models, that is, by adding "radial" modes and restoring the broken symmetries. When such a UV completion is not possible, one can still raise the cutoff up to arbitrarily higher energies by adding fields that transform nonlinearly under the broken symmetries, that is, new Goldstone bosons. However, this (partial) UV completion does not necessarily restore any of the broken symmetries. We illustrate this point by considering a concrete example in which a combination of spacetime and internal symmetries is broken down to a diagonal subgroup. Along the way, we clarify a recently proposed interpretation of inverse Higgs constraints as gauge-fixing conditions.

  4. Complete nitrification by Nitrospira bacteria.

    PubMed

    Daims, Holger; Lebedeva, Elena V; Pjevac, Petra; Han, Ping; Herbold, Craig; Albertsen, Mads; Jehmlich, Nico; Palatinszky, Marton; Vierheilig, Julia; Bulaev, Alexandr; Kirkegaard, Rasmus H; von Bergen, Martin; Rattei, Thomas; Bendinger, Bernd; Nielsen, Per H; Wagner, Michael

    2015-12-24

    Nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia via nitrite to nitrate, has always been considered to be a two-step process catalysed by chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms oxidizing either ammonia or nitrite. No known nitrifier carries out both steps, although complete nitrification should be energetically advantageous. This functional separation has puzzled microbiologists for a century. Here we report on the discovery and cultivation of a completely nitrifying bacterium from the genus Nitrospira, a globally distributed group of nitrite oxidizers. The genome of this chemolithoautotrophic organism encodes the pathways both for ammonia and nitrite oxidation, which are concomitantly activated during growth by ammonia oxidation to nitrate. Genes affiliated with the phylogenetically distinct ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine dehydrogenase genes of Nitrospira are present in many environments and were retrieved on Nitrospira-contigs in new metagenomes from engineered systems. These findings fundamentally change our picture of nitrification and point to completely nitrifying Nitrospira as key components of nitrogen-cycling microbial communities. PMID:26610024

  5. Clerical Machine Operator Work Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational-Technical High School, Billerica, MA.

    This manual contains a work sample intended to assess a handicapped student's interest in and potential to successfully pass a clerical business machine course (typing) in a comprehensive or vocational school. Section 1 describes the assessment, correlates the work performed and worker traits required for completing the work sample, and lists…

  6. Horizontal completions challenge for industry

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, T.E. Jr.; Spatz, E.

    1988-05-02

    As the technology to drill horizontal wells continues to evolve, the problem of efficiently and cost-effectively completing such wells grows. The economics of applying horizontal technology in high-productivity reservoirs demands both increased production and lower development costs. Such high productivity reservoirs are typical of the Gulf of Mexico, North Sea, South China basin, and other areas. Lowering development costs is achieved by drilling fewer wells and in the offshore environment by reducing the number of platforms and other well structures. Specifically addressed in this article are the problems of achieving high efficiency, long lasting completions while controlling costs in unconsolidated and poorly consolidated sandstone reservoirs.

  7. Sampling Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Three locations to the right of the test dig area are identified for the first samples to be delivered to the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA), the Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL), and the Optical Microscope (OM) on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. These sampling areas are informally labeled 'Baby Bear', 'Mama Bear', and 'Papa Bear' respectively. This image was taken on the seventh day of the Mars mission, or Sol 7 (June 1, 2008) by the Surface Stereo Imager aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. Sampling properties of directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, S.-W.; Christensen, C.; Bizhani, G.; Foster, D. V.; Grassberger, P.; Paczuski, M.

    2012-10-01

    For many real-world networks only a small “sampled” version of the original network may be investigated; those results are then used to draw conclusions about the actual system. Variants of breadth-first search (BFS) sampling, which are based on epidemic processes, are widely used. Although it is well established that BFS sampling fails, in most cases, to capture the IN component(s) of directed networks, a description of the effects of BFS sampling on other topological properties is all but absent from the literature. To systematically study the effects of sampling biases on directed networks, we compare BFS sampling to random sampling on complete large-scale directed networks. We present new results and a thorough analysis of the topological properties of seven complete directed networks (prior to sampling), including three versions of Wikipedia, three different sources of sampled World Wide Web data, and an Internet-based social network. We detail the differences that sampling method and coverage can make to the structural properties of sampled versions of these seven networks. Most notably, we find that sampling method and coverage affect both the bow-tie structure and the number and structure of strongly connected components in sampled networks. In addition, at a low sampling coverage (i.e., less than 40%), the values of average degree, variance of out-degree, degree autocorrelation, and link reciprocity are overestimated by 30% or more in BFS-sampled networks and only attain values within 10% of the corresponding values in the complete networks when sampling coverage is in excess of 65%. These results may cause us to rethink what we know about the structure, function, and evolution of real-world directed networks.

  9. Program Costs and Student Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Terri M.; Crosta, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Community colleges are under pressure to increase completion rates, prepare students for the workplace, and contain costs. Colleges need to know the financial implications of what are often perceived as routine decisions: course scheduling, program offerings, and the provision of support services. This chapter presents a methodology for estimating…

  10. Algebraic Squares: Complete and Incomplete.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardella, Francis J.

    2000-01-01

    Illustrates ways of using algebra tiles to give students a visual model of competing squares that appear in algebra as well as in higher mathematics. Such visual representations give substance to the symbolic manipulation and give students who do not learn symbolically a way of understanding the underlying concepts of completing the square. (KHR)

  11. Review of "A Complete Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Beth

    2010-01-01

    The research summary, "A Complete Education," presents the Obama administration's proposal for ensuring that all students have a comprehensive education. The key areas include: strengthening instruction in literacy and in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM); increasing access to instruction in a broader range of subject…

  12. Shannon Information in Complete Genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Li-Ching; Chang, Chang-Heng; Lee, Hoong-Chien

    2004-03-01

    Genomes are books of life and necessarily carry a huge amount of information. This study was first motivated by the question: "How much information do complete genomes have?" As an answer we measured a particular type of Shannon information in all prokaryotes and eukaryotes whose complete genomes have been sequenced and are available in publically assessible database. The Shannon information in complete genome sequences follow an extremely simple pattern. With the exception of one eukaryote the Shannon information in all (more than 200) complete sequences belong to a single universality class given by a simple geometric recursion formula. The data are interpreted in terms of models for genome growth and inferred to suggest that the ancestors of present day genomes began to grow, mainly by stochastic, selectively neutral, duplications and short mutations, most likely when they were not more than 300 nt long. This notion of selective neutralism independently corroborates Kimura's neutral theory of evolution which was based on the investigation of polymorphisms of genes.

  13. A-3 steel work completed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Stennis Space Center engineers celebrated a key milestone in construction of the A-3 Test Stand on April 9 - completion of structural steel work. Workers with Lafayette (La.) Steel Erector Inc. placed the last structural steel beam atop the stand during a noon ceremony attended by more than 100 workers and guests.

  14. Completing College: Rethinking Institutional Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinto, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Even as the number of students attending college has more than doubled in the past forty years, it is still the case that nearly half of all college students in the United States will not complete their degree within six years. It is clear that much remains to be done toward improving student success. For more than twenty years, Vincent Tinto's…

  15. Complete feeds-intensive systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most commercially cultivated fish are raised in high-density culture systems where the assumption is that the contribution of natural foods to the nutrition of the fish is insignificant. Thus, intensively cultured fish must be fed a nutritionally complete feed. A short section on the concept and im...

  16. Lunar Sample Compendium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Charles

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the Lunar Sample Compendium will be to inform scientists, astronauts and the public about the various lunar samples that have been returned from the Moon. This Compendium will be organized rock by rock in the manor of a catalog, but will not be as comprehensive, nor as complete, as the various lunar sample catalogs that are available. Likewise, this Compendium will not duplicate the various excellent books and reviews on the subject of lunar samples (Cadogen 1981, Heiken et al. 1991, Papike et al. 1998, Warren 2003, Eugster 2003). However, it is thought that an online Compendium, such as this, will prove useful to scientists proposing to study individual lunar samples and should help provide backup information for lunar sample displays. This Compendium will allow easy access to the scientific literature by briefly summarizing the significant findings of each rock along with the documentation of where the detailed scientific data are to be found. In general, discussion and interpretation of the results is left to the formal reviews found in the scientific literature. An advantage of this Compendium will be that it can be updated, expanded and corrected as need be.

  17. Completing the Next Generation Spectral Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Michael

    2014-10-01

    We propose to complete our STIS UV+optical snapshot program, the Next Generation SpectralLibrary, which now stands at 380 targets. When complete the NGSL will comprise 600 stars,roughly equally divided among four metallicities, very low {[Fe/H] < -1.5}, low {-1.5 <[Fe/H] < -0.5}, near-solar {-0.3 < [Fe/H] < 0.1}, and super-solar {[Fe/H] > 0.2},well-sampling the entire HR-diagram in each bin. The finished NGSL will be invaluable formodeling the integrated light of galaxies and clusters, as well as calibrating the stellareffective temperature scale to <1% precision. Included in the updated target list forCycle 22 are select "touchstone" stars with precise radii measured with long baselineinterferometry, which will be used in the absolute calibration of the stellar effectivetemperature scale. Upon completion, the NGSL will surpass all extant spectral librariesbecause of its combination of UV spectral coverage and comprehensive metallicity range,with lasting archival value well into the JWST era and beyond. Because of the universalutility and community-broad nature of this venture, we waive the proprietary period.While snapshot proposals are ineligible for the UV initiative, the scientific returns fromthis program stem mainly from the HST/STIS UV capabilities.

  18. Complete EOS for PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph S

    2009-10-08

    PBX 9502 is an insensitive plastic-bonded explosive based on triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB). A complete equation of state (EOS) is constructed for unreacted PBX 9502 suitable for reactive burn models, i.e., high pressure regime in which material strength is unimportant. The PBX EOS is composed of two parts: a complete EOS for TATB and a porosity model which allows for variations in the initial PBX density. The TATB EOS is based on a cold curve and a thermal model for lattice vibrations. The heat capacity, and hence thermal model, is determined by the vibrational spectrum from Raman scattering. The cold curve is calibrated to diamond anvil cell data for isothermal compression using a two-piece Keane fitting form. Hugoniot data for PBX 9502 is used as a consistency check.

  19. Complete lives in the balance.

    PubMed

    Kerstein, Samuel J; Bognar, Greg

    2010-04-01

    The allocation of scarce health care resources such as flu treatment or organs for transplant presents stark problems of distributive justice. Persad, Wertheimer, and Emanuel have recently proposed a novel system for such allocation. Their "complete lives system" incorporates several principles, including ones that prescribe saving the most lives, preserving the most life-years, and giving priority to persons between 15 and 40 years old. This paper argues that the system lacks adequate moral foundations. Persad and colleagues' defense of giving priority to those between 15 and 40 leaves them open to the charge that they discriminate unfairly against children. Second, the paper contends that the complete lives system fails to provide meaningful practical guidance in central cases, since it contains no method for balancing its principles when they conflict. Finally, the paper proposes a new method for balancing principles of saving the most lives and maximizing life-years. PMID:20379920

  20. Subsea completion technology needs advances

    SciTech Connect

    Ledbetter, R.

    1995-09-18

    Subsea technology needs further advances to reduce operational costs before operators will expand the use of subsea well completions in the Gulf of Mexico. They will continue to choose surface completion-oriented systems as long as these are more economical operationally than subsea system. Designs of subsea equipment such as trees, connectors, control pods, umbilicals, and flow lines, must bring about reductions in the cost of both installation and workover compatibility. Remote operated vehicle (ROV) manipulation is one avenue that should be exploited. The bottom line is that significant cooperation between equipment manufacturers and ROV companies is needed to develop advanced ROV technology, and operators should be involved to help guide operational strategies.

  1. Complete liquefaction methods and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2013-10-15

    A method and apparatus are described to provide complete gas utilization in the liquefaction operation from a source of gas without return of natural gas to the source thereof from the process and apparatus. The mass flow rate of gas input into the system and apparatus may be substantially equal to the mass flow rate of liquefied product output from the system, such as for storage or use.

  2. One Bacterial Cell, One Complete Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Woyke, Tanja; Tighe, Damon; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Clum, Alicia; Copeland, Alex; Schackwitz, Wendy; Lapidus, Alla; Wu, Dongying; McCutcheon, John P.; McDonald, Bradon R.; Moran, Nancy A.; Bristow, James; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2010-04-26

    While the bulk of the finished microbial genomes sequenced to date are derived from cultured bacterial and archaeal representatives, the vast majority of microorganisms elude current culturing attempts, severely limiting the ability to recover complete or even partial genomes from these environmental species. Single cell genomics is a novel culture-independent approach, which enables access to the genetic material of an individual cell. No single cell genome has to our knowledge been closed and finished to date. Here we report the completed genome from an uncultured single cell of Candidatus Sulcia muelleri DMIN. Digital PCR on single symbiont cells isolated from the bacteriome of the green sharpshooter Draeculacephala minerva bacteriome allowed us to assess that this bacteria is polyploid with genome copies ranging from approximately 200?900 per cell, making it a most suitable target for single cell finishing efforts. For single cell shotgun sequencing, an individual Sulcia cell was isolated and whole genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA). Sanger-based finishing methods allowed us to close the genome. To verify the correctness of our single cell genome and exclude MDA-derived artifacts, we independently shotgun sequenced and assembled the Sulcia genome from pooled bacteriomes using a metagenomic approach, yielding a nearly identical genome. Four variations we detected appear to be genuine biological differences between the two samples. Comparison of the single cell genome with bacteriome metagenomic sequence data detected two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), indicating extremely low genetic diversity within a Sulcia population. This study demonstrates the power of single cell genomics to generate a complete, high quality, non-composite reference genome within an environmental sample, which can be used for population genetic analyzes.

  3. Complete normal ordering 1: Foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; Mavromatos, Nick E.; Skliros, Dimitri P.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new prescription for quantising scalar field theories (in generic spacetime dimension and background) perturbatively around a true minimum of the full quantum effective action, which is to 'complete normal order' the bare action of interest. When the true vacuum of the theory is located at zero field value, the key property of this prescription is the automatic cancellation, to any finite order in perturbation theory, of all tadpole and, more generally, all 'cephalopod' Feynman diagrams. The latter are connected diagrams that can be disconnected into two pieces by cutting one internal vertex, with either one or both pieces free from external lines. In addition, this procedure of 'complete normal ordering' (which is an extension of the standard field theory definition of normal ordering) reduces by a substantial factor the number of Feynman diagrams to be calculated at any given loop order. We illustrate explicitly the complete normal ordering procedure and the cancellation of cephalopod diagrams in scalar field theories with non-derivative interactions, and by using a point splitting 'trick' we extend this result to theories with derivative interactions, such as those appearing as non-linear σ-models in the world-sheet formulation of string theory. We focus here on theories with trivial vacua, generalising the discussion to non-trivial vacua in a follow-up paper.

  4. Sustainable Mars Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Christie; Hancock, Sean; Laub, Joshua; Perry, Christopher; Ash, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The proposed Mars sample return mission will be completed using natural Martian resources for the majority of its operations. The system uses the following technologies: In-Situ Propellant Production (ISPP), a methane-oxygen propelled Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV), a carbon dioxide powered hopper, and a hydrogen fueled balloon system (large balloons and small weather balloons). The ISPP system will produce the hydrogen, methane, and oxygen using a Sabatier reactor. a water electrolysis cell, water extracted from the Martian surface, and carbon dioxide extracted from the Martian atmosphere. Indigenous hydrogen will fuel the balloon systems and locally-derived methane and oxygen will fuel the MAV for the return of a 50 kg sample to Earth. The ISPP system will have a production cycle of 800 days and the estimated overall mission length is 1355 days from Earth departure to return to low Earth orbit. Combining these advanced technologies will enable the proposed sample return mission to be executed with reduced initial launch mass and thus be more cost efficient. The successful completion of this mission will serve as the next step in the advancement of Mars exploration technology.

  5. Complete Photo-production Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D'Angelo, A.; Bartalini, O.; Fantini, A.; Schaerf, C.; Vegna, V.; Ardashev, K.; Bade, C.; Hicks, K.; Kizilgul, S.; Lucas, M.; Mahon, J.; Bellini, V.; Blecher, M.; Bocquet, J.-P.; Lleres, A.; Rebreyend, D.; Capogni, M.; Caracappa, A.; Kistner, O. C.; Miceli, L.

    2011-10-24

    The extraction of resonance parameters from meson photo-reaction data is a challenging effort, that would greatly benefit from the availability of several polarization observables, measured for each reaction channel on both proton and neutron targets. In the aim of obtaining such complete experiments, polarized photon beams and targets have been developed at facilities, worldwide. We report on the latest results from the LEGS and GRAAL collaborations, providing single and double polarization measurements on pseudo-scalar meson photo-production from the nucleon.

  6. Summer Coursework and Completing College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attewell, Paul; Jang, Sou Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The summer school sessions that colleges offer their undergraduates are sometimes considered supplementary activities and are rarely perceived as central to a college's mission or effectiveness. However, analyses of college transcript data that tracked a nationally-representative sample of undergraduates for several years and through multiple…

  7. Complete bicornuate uterus with complete transverse vaginal septum

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Hatav Ghasemi; Hashemi, Leila; Ghasemi, Mojdeh

    2014-01-01

    Bicornuate uterus has two symmetric uterine cavities that are fused caudally and have some degree of communication between two cavities, usually at the uterine isthmus. A complete bicornuate uterus has a seperatory cleft of tissue that is extended to the internal OS. Lesser degree of septation of the two uterine horns has constitution, a partial bicornuate uterus. Bicornuate uterus is a class of four anomaly of American fertility society classification of mullerian anomalies. Here we report a case of a 19-year-old female patient with complaint of abdominal pain and spotting since 4 months ago. In sonography it revealed bicornuate uterus and hematocolpos. The patient underwent general anesthesia and examination that reveal the transverse vaginal septum. Septum removed by resectoscope was successful. PMID:25097613

  8. Contour Completion Without Region Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yansheng; Li, Hongdong; He, Xuming

    2016-08-01

    Contour completion plays an important role in visual perception, where the goal is to group fragmented low-level edge elements into perceptually coherent and salient contours. Most existing methods for contour completion have focused on pixelwise detection accuracy. In contrast, fewer methods have addressed the global contour closure effect, despite psychological evidences for its importance. This paper proposes a purely contour-based higher order CRF model to achieve contour closure, through local connectedness approximation. This leads to a simplified problem structure, where our higher order inference problem can be transformed into an integer linear program and be solved efficiently. Compared with the methods based on the same bottom-up edge detector, our method achieves a superior contour grouping ability (measured by Rand index), a comparable precision-recall performance, and more visually pleasing results. Our results suggest that contour closure can be effectively achieved in contour domain, in contrast to a popular view that segmentation is essential for this purpose. PMID:27168599

  9. Obstructions to Sampling Qualitative Properties

    PubMed Central

    Reimers, Arne C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sampling methods have proven to be a very efficient and intuitive method to understand properties of complicated spaces that cannot easily be computed using deterministic methods. Therefore, sampling methods became a popular tool in the applied sciences. Results Here, we show that sampling methods are not an appropriate tool to analyze qualitative properties of complicated spaces unless RP = NP. We illustrate these results on the example of the thermodynamically feasible flux space of genome-scale metabolic networks and show that with artificial centering hit and run (ACHR) not all reactions that can have variable flux rates are sampled with variables flux rates. In particular a uniform sample of the flux space would not sample the flux variabilities completely. Conclusion We conclude that unless theoretical convergence results exist, qualitative results obtained from sampling methods should be considered with caution and if possible double checked using a deterministic method. PMID:26287384

  10. [Samples in Coagulation Test].

    PubMed

    Komiyama, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    An understanding and ability to develop a strategy to prevent pre-analytical errors of laboratory tests in the hemostasis area are two of the most important skills of medical technologists and related doctors. Recently, the working group for standardization of sampling in coagulation tests is working towards a consensus. This article reviews a summary of the consensus: (1) The anticoagulant for coagulation tests is 3.13-3.2% sodium citrate at a ratio of 1:9 to whole blood and the accuracy of the ratio is within 10%. (2) Blood sampling is achieved with the use of a 21-23G needle and coagulation. Blood sampling can be achieved by both a syringe and vacuum tube system. After taking blood, laboratory tests such as of the prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) should be completed within one hour and the storage temperature should be at room temperature, not ice-cold conditions. 3) To prepare a plasma sample, citrated blood is centrifuged at 1,500 x g for 15 min at room temperature to minimize the remaining platelets in plasma (below 10,000/microL at least). PMID:27089656

  11. Completion thyroidectomy for initially misdiagnosed thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Auguste, L.J.; Attie, J.N. )

    1990-06-01

    Intraoperative frozen sections fails to diagnose thyroid carcinoma accurately in 16% of cases. In such instances, we recommend that completion thyroidectomy be performed in the patient who has invasive carcinoma, is less than 70 years old, and has a reasonable life expectancy. The procedure should be carried out immediately if the error in diagnosis is discovered within a week; otherwise the procedure should be delayed until 3 to 4 months later. At that time, the recurrent laryngeal nerves and at least two parathyroid glands should be dissected and preserved. A paratracheal lymph node dissection should also be performed and the lower jugular lymph nodes should be sampled. If these jugular lymph nodes are found to be positive, a modified radical neck dissection should be added. The morbidity associated with the completion thyroidectomy is minimal. Postoperatively, a 131I scan of the neck should be carried out and ablative doses of radioactive iodine can be given if the uptake in the thyroid bed is greater than 1.5%. Subsequently, all patients are given thyroid suppressive therapy and are monitored closely. This approach will reduce the local recurrence rate and improve the long-term survival. 19 references.

  12. Complete event simulations of nuclear fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Ramona

    2015-10-01

    For many years, the state of the art for treating fission in radiation transport codes has involved sampling from average distributions. In these average fission models energy is not explicitly conserved and everything is uncorrelated because all particles are emitted independently. However, in a true fission event, the energies, momenta and multiplicities of the emitted particles are correlated. Such correlations are interesting for many modern applications. Event-by-event generation of complete fission events makes it possible to retain the kinematic information for all particles emitted: the fission products as well as prompt neutrons and photons. It is therefore possible to extract any desired correlation observables. Complete event simulations can be included in general Monte Carlo transport codes. We describe the general functionality of currently available fission event generators and compare results for several important observables. This work was performed under the auspices of the US DOE by LLNL, Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. We acknowledge support of the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development in DOE/NNSA.

  13. Ear recognition: a complete system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaza, Ayman; Harrison, Mary Ann F.

    2013-05-01

    Ear Recognition has recently received significant attention in the literature. Even though current ear recognition systems have reached a certain level of maturity, their success is still limited. This paper presents an efficient complete ear-based biometric system that can process five frames/sec; Hence it can be used for surveillance applications. The ear detection is achieved using Haar features arranged in a cascaded Adaboost classifier. The feature extraction is based on dividing the ear image into several blocks from which Local Binary Pattern feature distributions are extracted. These feature distributions are then fused at the feature level to represent the original ear texture in the classification stage. The contribution of this paper is three fold: (i) Applying a new technique for ear feature extraction, and studying various optimization parameters for that technique; (ii) Presenting a practical ear recognition system and a detailed analysis about error propagation in that system; (iii) Studying the occlusion effect of several ear parts. Detailed experiments show that the proposed ear recognition system achieved better performance (94:34%) compared to other shape-based systems as Scale-invariant feature transform (67:92%). The proposed approach can also handle efficiently hair occlusion. Experimental results show that the proposed system can achieve about (78%) rank-1 identification, even in presence of 60% occlusion.

  14. Tag Completion for Image Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Jin, Rong; Jain, Anil K

    2013-03-01

    Many social image search engines are based on keyword/tag matching. This is because tag-based image retrieval (TBIR) is not only efficient but also effective. The performance of TBIR is highly dependent on the availability and quality of manual tags. Recent studies have shown that manual tags are often unreliable and inconsistent. In addition, since many users tend to choose general and ambiguous tags in order to minimize their efforts in choosing appropriate words, tags that are specific to the visual content of images tend to be missing or noisy, leading to a limited performance of TBIR. To address this challenge, we study the problem of tag completion, where the goal is to automatically fill in the missing tags as well as correct noisy tags for given images. We represent the image-tag relation by a tag matrix, and search for the optimal tag matrix consistent with both the observed tags and the visual similarity. We propose a new algorithm for solving this optimization problem. Extensive empirical studies show that the proposed algorithm is significantly more effective than the state-of-the-art algorithms. Our studies also verify that the proposed algorithm is computationally efficient and scales well to large databases. PMID:22641703

  15. Sampling Assumptions in Inductive Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarro, Daniel J.; Dry, Matthew J.; Lee, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Inductive generalization, where people go beyond the data provided, is a basic cognitive capability, and it underpins theoretical accounts of learning, categorization, and decision making. To complete the inductive leap needed for generalization, people must make a key "sampling" assumption about how the available data were generated. Previous…

  16. 40 CFR 72.61 - Completeness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.61 Completeness. (a) Determination of Completeness. The Administrator will determine whether the Acid Rain permit application is complete within 60... the Acid Rain permit application is complete under paragraph (a) of this section, the...

  17. 40 CFR 72.61 - Completeness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.61 Completeness. (a) Determination of Completeness. The Administrator will determine whether the Acid Rain permit application is complete within 60... the Acid Rain permit application is complete under paragraph (a) of this section, the...

  18. 40 CFR 72.61 - Completeness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.61 Completeness. (a) Determination of Completeness. The Administrator will determine whether the Acid Rain permit application is complete within 60... the Acid Rain permit application is complete under paragraph (a) of this section, the...

  19. 40 CFR 72.61 - Completeness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.61 Completeness. (a) Determination of Completeness. The Administrator will determine whether the Acid Rain permit application is complete within 60... the Acid Rain permit application is complete under paragraph (a) of this section, the...

  20. 24 CFR 884.212 - Project completion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Project completion. 884.212 Section... RENTAL HOUSING PROJECTS Project Development and Operation § 884.212 Project completion. (a) FmHA certifications upon completion. Upon completion of the project, FmHA shall inspect the project and, if...

  1. 24 CFR 884.212 - Project completion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Project completion. 884.212 Section... RENTAL HOUSING PROJECTS Project Development and Operation § 884.212 Project completion. (a) FmHA certifications upon completion. Upon completion of the project, FmHA shall inspect the project and, if...

  2. 24 CFR 884.212 - Project completion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Project completion. 884.212 Section... RENTAL HOUSING PROJECTS Project Development and Operation § 884.212 Project completion. (a) FmHA certifications upon completion. Upon completion of the project, FmHA shall inspect the project and, if...

  3. 24 CFR 884.212 - Project completion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Project completion. 884.212 Section... RENTAL HOUSING PROJECTS Project Development and Operation § 884.212 Project completion. (a) FmHA certifications upon completion. Upon completion of the project, FmHA shall inspect the project and, if...

  4. 24 CFR 884.212 - Project completion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Project completion. 884.212 Section... RENTAL HOUSING PROJECTS Project Development and Operation § 884.212 Project completion. (a) FmHA certifications upon completion. Upon completion of the project, FmHA shall inspect the project and, if...

  5. 30 CFR 250.505 - Subsea completions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.505 Subsea completions. No subsea well completion shall be commenced until the lessee obtains written approval from the... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Subsea completions. 250.505 Section...

  6. 30 CFR 250.505 - Subsea completions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.505 Subsea completions. No subsea well completion shall be commenced until the... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Subsea completions. 250.505 Section...

  7. 40 CFR 761.289 - Compositing samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROHIBITIONS Sampling To Verify Completion of Self-Implementing Cleanup and On-Site Disposal of Bulk PCB.... Compositing is a method of combining several samples of a specific type of bulk PCB remediation waste or... compositing bulk PCB remediation waste samples. These procedures are based on the method for...

  8. 40 CFR 761.289 - Compositing samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROHIBITIONS Sampling To Verify Completion of Self-Implementing Cleanup and On-Site Disposal of Bulk PCB.... Compositing is a method of combining several samples of a specific type of bulk PCB remediation waste or... compositing bulk PCB remediation waste samples. These procedures are based on the method for...

  9. 40 CFR 761.289 - Compositing samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROHIBITIONS Sampling To Verify Completion of Self-Implementing Cleanup and On-Site Disposal of Bulk PCB.... Compositing is a method of combining several samples of a specific type of bulk PCB remediation waste or... compositing bulk PCB remediation waste samples. These procedures are based on the method for...

  10. Vacuum handling system for powdered samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birkebak, R. C.; Cremers, C. J.; Lyons, W. E.

    1971-01-01

    A sample system for handling powdered material under vacuum conditions is described. The system features linear motion of up to 0.25 m and the means for complete isolation of the sample and sample system from external apparatus. The system was designed for the measurement of thermophysical properties of lunar material from Apollo missions under thoroughest possible prevention of contamination.

  11. Completely quantized collapse and consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Pearle, Philip

    2005-08-15

    Promotion of quantum theory from a theory of measurement to a theory of reality requires an unambiguous specification of the ensemble of realizable states (and each state's probability of realization). Although not yet achieved within the framework of standard quantum theory, it has been achieved within the framework of the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) wave-function collapse model. In CSL, a classical random field w(x,t) interacts with quantum particles. The state vector corresponding to each w(x,t) is a realizable state. In this paper, I consider a previously presented model, which is predictively equivalent to CSL. In this completely quantized collapse (CQC) model, the classical random field is quantized. It is represented by the operator W(x,t) which satisfies [W(x,t),W(x{sup '},t{sup '})]=0. The ensemble of realizable states is described by a single state vector, the 'ensemble vector'. Each superposed state which comprises the ensemble vector at time t is the direct product of an eigenstate of W(x,t{sup '}), for all x and for 0{<=}t{sup '}{<=}t, and the CSL state corresponding to that eigenvalue. These states never interfere (they satisfy a superselection rule at any time), they only branch, so the ensemble vector may be considered to be, as Schroedinger put it, a 'catalog' of the realizable states. In this context, many different interpretations (e.g., many worlds, environmental decoherence, consistent histories, modal interpretation) may be satisfactorily applied. Using this description, a long-standing problem is resolved, where the energy comes from the particles gain due to the narrowing of their wave packets by the collapse mechanism. It is shown how to define the energy of the random field and its energy of interaction with particles so that total energy is conserved for the ensemble of realizable states. As a by-product, since the random-field energy spectrum is unbounded, its canonical conjugate, a self-adjoint time operator, can be

  12. School Incorporation and High School Completion among Latino Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Using data from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002, a nationally representative sample of US high school students, I investigate how features of secondary schools influence the likelihood of Latino students completing high school. To do so, I introduce the concept of school incorporation, which includes school policies, school receptivity…

  13. Sediment Properties: E-Area Completion Project

    SciTech Connect

    Millings, M.; Bagwell, L.; Amidon, M.; Dixon, K.

    2011-04-29

    To accommodate a future need for additional waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site, the Solid Waste Management Division (SWMD) designated nine additional plots for development (Kasraii 2007; SRS 2010); these plots are collectively known as the E Area Completion Project (ECP). Subsurface samples were collected from ECP plots 6, 7, 8 and 9 (Figure 1) for chemical and physical property analyses to support Performance Assessment (PA) and Special Analyses (SA) modeling. This document summarizes the sampling and analysis scheme and the resultant data, and provides interpretations of the data particularly in reference to existing soil property data. Analytical data in this document include: gamma log, cone penetrometer log, grain size (sieve and hydrometer), water retention, saturated hydraulic conductivity (falling head permeameter), porosity, dry bulk density, total organic carbon, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence data. SRNL provided technical and safety oversight for the fieldwork, which included completion of eight soil borings, four geophysical logs, and the collection of 522 feet of core and 33 Shelby tubes from ECP plots 6, 7, 8, and 9. Boart Longyear provided sonic drilling and logging services. Two soil borings were completed at each location. The first set of boreholes extended into (but did not fully penetrate) the Warley Hill Formation. These boreholes were continuously cored, then geophysically (gamma ray) logged. The recovered core was split, photographed, and described; one half of the core was archived at SRS's Core Lab facilities, and the remaining half was consumed as necessary for testing at SRS and off-site labs. Core descriptions and geophysical data were used to calculate target elevations for Shelby tube samples, which were obtained from the second set of boreholes. Shelby tubes were shipped to MACTEC Engineering and Consulting Inc. (MACTEC) in Atlanta for physical property testing. SRNL deployed their Site Characterization

  14. School Non-Completers: Profiles and Initial Destinations. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. Research Report 54

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, David D.; McMillan, Julie

    2008-01-01

    This study examines non-completion of Year 12 at school for a nationally representative sample of young people who were 15 years old and still attending school in 2003. The study explores relationships between non-completion and selected socio-demographic and school-related factors, and changes in rates of school non-completion from the early…

  15. The Molecular Weight Distribution of Polymer Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horta, Arturo; Pastoriza, M. Alejandra

    2007-01-01

    Various methods for the determination of the molecular weight distribution (MWD) of different polymer samples are presented. The study shows that the molecular weight averages and distribution of a polymerization completely depend on the characteristics of the reaction itself.

  16. Dinuclear systems in complete fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Zubov, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    Formation and evolution of dinuclear systems in reactions of complete fusion are considered. Based on the dinuclear system concept, the process of compound nucleus formation is studied. Arguments confirming the validity of this concept are given. The main problems of describing the complete fusion in adiabatic approximation are listed. Calculations of evaporation residue cross sections in complete fusion reactions leading to formation of superheavy nuclei are shown. Isotopic trends of the cross sections of heavy nuclei formation in complete fusion reactions are considered.

  17. Sampling and analyses report for postburn sampling at the RM1 UCG Site, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Crader, S.E.

    1989-06-01

    Between June 22, 1989 and June 26, 1989, Western Research Institute (WRI) completed the second quarterly Rocky Mountain 1 Underground Coal Gasification (RM1 UCG) site groundwater monitoring for the year 1989. This quarterly sample outing represents the third sampling since the completion of the RM1 groundwater restoration. Background material and the sampling and analytical procedures associated with this task are described in the `Rocky Mountain 1 Postburn Groundwater Monitoring Quality Assurance Plan`, prepared by the U.S. DOE.

  18. Modeling the Complete Catalytic Cycle of Aspartoacylase.

    PubMed

    Kots, Ekaterina D; Khrenova, Maria G; Lushchekina, Sofya V; Varfolomeev, Sergei D; Grigorenko, Bella L; Nemukhin, Alexander V

    2016-05-12

    The complete catalytic cycle of aspartoacylase (ASPA), a zinc-dependent enzyme responsible for cleavage of N-acetyl-l-aspartate, is characterized by the methods of molecular modeling. The reaction energy profile connecting the enzyme-substrate (ES) and the enzyme-product (EP) complexes is constructed by the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method assisted by the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the QM/MM potentials. Starting from the crystal structure of ASPA complexed with the intermediate analogue, the minimum-energy geometry configurations and the corresponding transition states are located. The stages of substrate binding to the enzyme active site and release of the products are modeled by MD calculations with the replica-exchange umbrella sampling technique. It is shown that the first reaction steps, nucleophilic attack of a zinc-bound nucleophilic water molecule at the carbonyl carbon and the amide bond cleavage, are consistent with the glutamate-assisted mechanism hypothesized for the zinc-dependent hydrolases. The stages of formation of the products, acetate and l-aspartate, and regeneration of the enzyme are characterized for the first time. The constructed free energy diagram from the reactants to the products suggests that the enzyme regeneration, but not the nucleophilic attack of the catalytic water molecule, corresponds to the rate-determining stage of the full catalytic cycle of ASPA. PMID:27089954

  19. Improving Completion Rates for TAFE Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uren, Judith

    A study examined individual student, institutional, and environmental factors influencing student non-completions and determined strategies that Western Australia's Central TAFE (technical and further education) might introduce to improve student retention. After completing a multivariate analysis of module completion rates, further data for a…

  20. 40 CFR 72.61 - Completeness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Completeness. 72.61 Section 72.61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.61 Completeness. (a) Determination of Completeness. The Administrator will...

  1. Completion Mindsets and Contexts in Doctoral Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Pam; Bowden, John

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Doctoral candidates are now located within a research context of performativity where the push to successfully complete in a timely manner is central. The purpose of this paper is to develop a model of completion mindset within a completion context to assist research students and supervisors. Design/methodology/approach: The research was…

  2. Isaac Newton and Student College Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinto, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Success in college is built upon classroom success, but success in the classroom does not in itself ensure college completion. Completion arises from success in a sequence of classes one after another over time. It does so most frequently when students are presented with coherent course pathways to degree completion, are able to gain degree credit…

  3. Measuring Homework Completion in Behavioral Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Andrew M.; Uebelacker, Lisa A.; Kalibatseva, Zornitsa; Miller, Ivan W.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate an observer-based coding system for the characterization and completion of homework assignments during Behavioral Activation (BA). Existing measures of homework completion are generally unsophisticated, and there is no current measure of homework completion designed to capture the particularities…

  4. Completing cremation forms: a practical guide.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Ian; Winstanley, Alison

    2013-07-01

    Before a body can be cremated doctors must complete a series of lengthy forms better known as 'crem forms'. One doctor first completes a medical certificate (Cremation Form 4, previously known as 'Part B') while a second must complete a confirmatory medical certificate (Cremation Form 5, previously 'Part C'). PMID:24145671

  5. Governing Board Oversight of College Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The issue of college completion has become a hot-button topic for higher education and the public in recent years. While completion is not a new issue, several national and state-level efforts, including President Obama's 2020 college-completion goal to increase the number of college graduates to 50 percent of the population, have brought…

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of Recurvirostra avosetta (Charadriiformes: Recurvirostridea).

    PubMed

    Hu, Dongfang; Ge, Xiaohui; Zhao, Fangzheng; Xie, Wenli; Chang, Qing

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Recurvirostra avosetta (Charadriiformes: Recurvirostridea) is a circular DNA with 16,897 bp in length, which contained 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs, and a control region. The overall base compositions of the complete mtDNA are A (31.72%), T (23.59%), G (13.56%), and C (31.13%). The non-coding regions include a control region (1333 bp) and a few intergenic spacers (range from 17 to 90). The phylogentic trees were also reconstructed to validate the samples. PMID:26065850

  7. Designer disordered materials with large, complete photonic band gaps

    PubMed Central

    Florescu, Marian; Torquato, Salvatore; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    We present designs of 2D, isotropic, disordered, photonic materials of arbitrary size with complete band gaps blocking all directions and polarizations. The designs with the largest band gaps are obtained by a constrained optimization method that starts from a hyperuniform disordered point pattern, an array of points whose number variance within a spherical sampling window grows more slowly than the volume. We argue that hyperuniformity, combined with uniform local topology and short-range geometric order, can explain how complete photonic band gaps are possible without long-range translational order. We note the ramifications for electronic and phononic band gaps in disordered materials. PMID:19918087

  8. Air Sampling System Evaluation Template

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-05-09

    The ASSET1.0 software provides a template with which a user can evaluate an Air Sampling System against the latest version of ANSI N13.1 "Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities". The software uses the ANSI N13.1 PIC levels to establish basic design criteria for the existing or proposed sampling system. The software looks at such criteria as PIC level, type of radionuclide emissions, physical state ofmore » the radionuclide, nozzle entrance effects, particulate transmission effects, system and component accuracy and precision evaluations, and basic system operations to provide a detailed look at the subsystems of a monitoring and sampling system/program. A GAP evaluation can then be completed which leads to identification of design and operational flaws in the proposed systems. Corrective measures can then be limited to the GAPs.« less

  9. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J. , Blocksome; Michael A. , Parker; Jeffrey J.

    2011-02-15

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for DMA transfer completion notification that include: inserting, by an origin DMA on an origin node in an origin injection FIFO, a data descriptor for an application message; inserting, by the origin DMA, a reflection descriptor in the origin injection FIFO, the reflection descriptor specifying a remote get operation for injecting a completion notification descriptor in a reflection injection FIFO on a reflection node; transferring, by the origin DMA to a target node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; in response to completing the message transfer, transferring, by the origin DMA to the reflection node, the completion notification descriptor in dependence upon the reflection descriptor; receiving, by the origin DMA from the reflection node, a completion packet; and notifying, by the origin DMA in response to receiving the completion packet, the origin node's processing core that the message transfer is complete.

  10. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2011-02-15

    DMA transfer completion notification includes: inserting, by an origin DMA engine on an origin node in an injection first-in-first-out (`FIFO`) buffer, a data descriptor for an application message to be transferred to a target node on behalf of an application on the origin node; inserting, by the origin DMA engine, a completion notification descriptor in the injection FIFO buffer after the data descriptor for the message, the completion notification descriptor specifying a packet header for a completion notification packet; transferring, by the origin DMA engine to the target node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; sending, by the origin DMA engine, the completion notification packet to a local reception FIFO buffer using a local memory FIFO transfer operation; and notifying, by the origin DMA engine, the application that transfer of the message is complete in response to receiving the completion notification packet in the local reception FIFO buffer.

  11. SP CREATE. Creating Sample Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, J.H.; Seebode, L.

    1998-11-10

    The program has been designed to increase the accuracy and reduce the preparation time for completing sampling plans. It consists of our files 1. Analyte/Combination (AnalCombo) A list of analytes and combinations of analytes that can be requested of the onsite and offsite labs. Whenever a specific combination of analytes or suite names appear on the same line as the code number, this indicates that one sample can be placed in one bottle to be analyzed for these paremeters. A code number is assigned for each analyte and combination of analytes. 2. Sampling Plans Database (SPDb) A database that contains all of the analytes and combinations of analytes along with the basic information required for preparing a sample plan. That basic information includes the following fields; matrix, hold time, preservation, sample volume, container size, if the bottle caps are taped, acceptable choices. 3. Sampling plans create (SPcreate) a file that will lookup information from the Sampling Plans Database and the Job Log File (JLF98) A major database used by Sample Managemnet Services for recording more than 100 fields of information.

  12. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring; Volume II of II, Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Michak, Patty

    1991-12-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) initiated the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project in 1986. This project was a five year interagency project involving fish rearing agencies in the Columbia Basin. Participating agencies included: Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). This is the final data report for the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project. Data collected and sampling results for 1990 and 1991 are presented within this report. An evaluation of this project can be found in Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, Volume 1, Completion Report.'' May, 1991. Pathogen detection methods remained the same from methods described in Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, Annual Report 1989,'' May, 1990. From January 1, 1990 to June 30, 1991 fish health monitoring sampling was conducted. In 1990 21 returning adult stocks were sampled. Juvenile pre-release exams were completed on 20 yearling releases, and 13 sub-yearling releases in 1990. In 1991 17 yearling releases and 11 sub-yearling releases were examined. Midterm sampling was completed on 19 stocks in 1990. Organosomatic analysis was performed at release on index station stocks; Cowlitz spring and fall chinook, Lewis river early coho and Lyons Ferry fall chinook.

  13. Differences among those who complete and fail to complete inpatient detoxification.

    PubMed

    Blondell, Richard D; Amadasu, Aimiamia; Servoss, Timothy J; Smith, Susan J

    2006-01-01

    Some individuals hospitalized for alcohol or drug detoxification leave against medical advice (AMA). We hypothesized that certain characteristics would be associated with AMA discharges. A case-control study of 1,426 hospital admissions for detoxification (representing 1,080 individuals) was conducted to compare patients leaving the hospital AMA (n=231) with a random sample of those completing detoxification (n=286). Latino ethnicity, detoxification from drugs, Friday or Saturday discharge, Medicaid or no health insurance, and not being treated by one specific attending physician were characteristics associated with an AMA discharge in a backward logistic regression model. Although 85% of the patients with all these characteristics left AMA, only one patient, without any of these five characteristics, did so. We conclude that clinicians can use certain clinical features to predict AMA discharge. Additional research could evaluate if treatment strategies that consider these ethnic and socioeconomic disparities may reduce rates of AMA discharge. PMID:16597577

  14. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2010-08-17

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for DMA transfer completion notification that include: inserting, by an origin DMA engine on an origin compute node in an injection FIFO buffer, a data descriptor for an application message to be transferred to a target compute node on behalf of an application on the origin compute node; inserting, by the origin DMA engine, a completion notification descriptor in the injection FIFO buffer after the data descriptor for the message, the completion notification descriptor specifying an address of a completion notification field in application storage for the application; transferring, by the origin DMA engine to the target compute node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; and notifying, by the origin DMA engine, the application that the transfer of the message is complete, including performing a local direct put operation to store predesignated notification data at the address of the completion notification field.

  15. Informationally complete sets of Gaussian measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiukas, Jukka; Schultz, Jussi

    2013-12-01

    We prove the necessary and sufficient conditions for the informational completeness of an arbitrary set of Gaussian observables on continuous variable systems with a finite number of degrees of freedom. In particular, we show that an informationally complete set either contains a single informationally complete observable, or includes infinitely many observables. We show that for a single informationally complete observable, the minimal outcome space is the phase space, and the corresponding probability distribution can always be obtained from the quantum optical Q-function by linear postprocessing and Gaussian convolution, in a suitable symplectic coordinatization of the phase space. In the case of projection valued Gaussian observables, e.g., generalized field quadratures, we show that an informationally complete set of observables is necessarily infinite. Finally, we generalize the treatment to the case where the measurement coupling is given by a general linear bosonic channel, and characterize informational completeness for an arbitrary set of the associated observables.

  16. Rapid Sampling from Sealed Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.G.; Garcia, A.R.E.; Martinez, R.K.; Baca, E.T.

    1999-02-28

    The authors have developed several different types of tools for sampling from sealed containers. These tools allow the user to rapidly drill into a closed container, extract a sample of its contents (gas, liquid, or free-flowing powder), and permanently reseal the point of entry. This is accomplished without exposing the user or the environment to the container contents, even while drilling. The entire process is completed in less than 15 seconds for a 55 gallon drum. Almost any kind of container can be sampled (regardless of the materials) with wall thicknesses up to 1.3 cm and internal pressures up to 8 atm. Samples can be taken from the top, sides, or bottom of a container. The sampling tools are inexpensive, small, and easy to use. They work with any battery-powered hand drill. This allows considerable safety, speed, flexibility, and maneuverability. The tools also permit the user to rapidly attach plumbing, a pressure relief valve, alarms, or other instrumentation to a container. Possible applications include drum venting, liquid transfer, container flushing, waste characterization, monitoring, sampling for archival or quality control purposes, emergency sampling by rapid response teams, counter-terrorism, non-proliferation and treaty verification, and use by law enforcement personnel during drug or environmental raids.

  17. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  18. A Mars Sample Return Sample Handling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, David; Stroker, Carol

    2013-01-01

    We present a sample handling system, a subsystem of the proposed Dragon landed Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission [1], that can return to Earth orbit a significant mass of frozen Mars samples potentially consisting of: rock cores, subsurface drilled rock and ice cuttings, pebble sized rocks, and soil scoops. The sample collection, storage, retrieval and packaging assumptions and concepts in this study are applicable for the NASA's MPPG MSR mission architecture options [2]. Our study assumes a predecessor rover mission collects samples for return to Earth to address questions on: past life, climate change, water history, age dating, understanding Mars interior evolution [3], and, human safety and in-situ resource utilization. Hence the rover will have "integrated priorities for rock sampling" [3] that cover collection of subaqueous or hydrothermal sediments, low-temperature fluidaltered rocks, unaltered igneous rocks, regolith and atmosphere samples. Samples could include: drilled rock cores, alluvial and fluvial deposits, subsurface ice and soils, clays, sulfates, salts including perchlorates, aeolian deposits, and concretions. Thus samples will have a broad range of bulk densities, and require for Earth based analysis where practical: in-situ characterization, management of degradation such as perchlorate deliquescence and volatile release, and contamination management. We propose to adopt a sample container with a set of cups each with a sample from a specific location. We considered two sample cups sizes: (1) a small cup sized for samples matching those submitted to in-situ characterization instruments, and, (2) a larger cup for 100 mm rock cores [4] and pebble sized rocks, thus providing diverse samples and optimizing the MSR sample mass payload fraction for a given payload volume. We minimize sample degradation by keeping them frozen in the MSR payload sample canister using Peltier chip cooling. The cups are sealed by interference fitted heat activated memory

  19. DP-Complete Problems Derived from Extremal NP-Complete Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Culberson, Joseph; Stewart, Lorna

    In contrast to the extremal variants of coNP-complete problems, which are frequently DP-complete, many extremal variants of NP-complete problems are in P. We investigate the extremal variants of two NP-complete problems, the extremal colorability problem with restricted degree and the extremal unfrozen non-implicant problem, and show that both of them are DP-complete.

  20. Innovative methods for inorganic sample preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Essling, A.M.; Huff, E.A.; Graczyk, D.G.

    1992-04-01

    Procedures and guidelines are given for the dissolution of a variety of selected materials using fusion, microwave, and Parr bomb techniques. These materials include germanium glass, corium-concrete mixtures, and zeolites. Emphasis is placed on sample-preparation approaches that produce a single master solution suitable for complete multielement characterization of the sample. In addition, data are presented on the soil microwave digestion method approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Advantages and disadvantages of each sample-preparation technique are summarized.

  1. Perceptual Completion in Newborn Human Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valenza, Eloisa; Leo, Irene; Gava, Lucia; Simion, Francesca

    2006-01-01

    Despite decades of studies of human infants, a still open question concerns the role of visual experience in the development of the ability to perceive complete shapes over partial occlusion. Previous studies show that newborns fail to manifest this ability, either because they lack the visual experience required for perceptual completion or…

  2. Computer Scoring of Sentence Completion Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veldman, Donald J.; And Others

    This paper outlines the development of techniques for computer-based personality assessment from sentence completions. The One-Word Sentence Completion (OWSC) instrument was designed to elicit data suitable for machine processing, while retaining most of the advantages of a free-response format. Two operative scoring systems are described. The…

  3. Gravel packing feasible in horizontal well completions

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, T.E. Jr.; Ashton, J.P. )

    1990-06-11

    Successful completion of horizontal wells in unconsolidated formations depends on proper equipment selection and installation method balanced with reservoir objectives, formation parameters, and costs. The guidelines for designing these completions are based on generalized field experience, including horizontal cases where applicable.

  4. Improving Closing Task Completion in a Drugstore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fante, Rhiannon; Davis, Ora L.; Kempt, Vivian

    2013-01-01

    A within-subject ABAB reversal design was utilized to investigate the effects of graphic feedback and goal setting on employee closing task completion. Goal setting was contingent upon baseline performance and graphic feedback was posted weekly. It was found that goal setting and graphic feedback improved employee closing task completion.…

  5. 78 FR 76257 - Rural Call Completion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ...In this document the FCC seeks comments on additional measures that may help the Commission ensure a reasonable and nondiscriminatory level of service for completing long-distance calls to rural areas. This document also; seeks to improve the Commission's ability to monitor problems with completing calls to rural areas, and enhance our ability to enforce restrictions against blocking, choking,......

  6. 7 CFR 1703.134 - Completed application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Completed application. 1703.134 Section 1703.134 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL DEVELOPMENT Distance Learning and Telemedicine Combination Loan and Grant Program § 1703.134 Completed application....

  7. 7 CFR 1703.144 - Completed application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Completed application. 1703.144 Section 1703.144 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL DEVELOPMENT Distance Learning and Telemedicine Loan Program § 1703.144 Completed application. The following items are...

  8. Completion Agenda for Baby Boomers. Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Seth

    2011-01-01

    In the article, "Completion Agenda for Baby Boomers", Moltz highlights how community colleges are currently implementing programs, such as the American Association of Community Colleges' Plus 50 Completion strategy, to encourage older learners to return to America's college campuses. The effects of the recent recession and the educational desires…

  9. Postscript: Filling-in Models of Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Barton L.

    2007-01-01

    Presents some additional comments from the current author regarding his original article "Filling-in models of completion: Rejoinder to Kellman, Garrigan, Shipley, and Keane (2007) and Albert (2007)." Despite repeated assertions by Kellman et al., I have never claimed that luminance constraints block modal completion; rather, they merely weaken…

  10. 30 CFR 777.15 - Completeness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Completeness. 777.15 Section 777.15 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL... CONTENT REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMIT APPLICATIONS § 777.15 Completeness. An application for a permit to...

  11. 30 CFR 777.15 - Completeness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Completeness. 777.15 Section 777.15 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL... CONTENT REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMIT APPLICATIONS § 777.15 Completeness. An application for a permit to...

  12. 30 CFR 777.15 - Completeness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Completeness. 777.15 Section 777.15 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL... CONTENT REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMIT APPLICATIONS § 777.15 Completeness. An application for a permit to...

  13. 30 CFR 777.15 - Completeness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Completeness. 777.15 Section 777.15 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL... CONTENT REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMIT APPLICATIONS § 777.15 Completeness. An application for a permit to...

  14. 30 CFR 777.15 - Completeness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Completeness. 777.15 Section 777.15 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL... CONTENT REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMIT APPLICATIONS § 777.15 Completeness. An application for a permit to...

  15. 43 CFR Appendix B to Part 10 - Sample Notice of Inventory Completion

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... modified beaver tooth, and several animal and fish bone fragments were found associated with the eight... Park area as a historic gathering place for his people and stated his belief that there exists...

  16. Investigation of a complete sample of flat spectrum radio sources from the S5 survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckart, A.; Witzel, A.; Biermann, P.; Johnston, K. J.; Simon, R.; Schalinski, C.; Kuhr, H.

    1986-11-01

    An analysis of 13 extragalactic sources of the S5 survey with flux densities greater than or equal to 1 Jy at 4990 MHz, mapped with milliarcsecond resolution at 1.6 and 5 GHz by means of VLBI, is presented. All sources appear to display multiple components dominated in flux density at 6 cm by a core component which is self-absorbed at 18 cm. Comparison of the measured to predicted X-ray flux density of the core radio components suggests that all sources should display bulk relativistic motion with small angles to the line of sight, and four sources show rapid changes in their radio structures which can be interpreted as apparent superliminal motion.

  17. Observations at 7 mm of a Complete Sample of 148 GHz Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Bruce; Massardi, Marcella; Hughes, David; Sanchez, David; Marriage, Tobias; Marsden, Danica; Reese, Erik; Lin, Yen-Ting; Moodley, Kavilan

    2010-10-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) has measured 148GHz flux densities for hundreds of extragalactic sources, down to a threshold of 20mJy. This proposal focuses of 159 sources in one of ACT's southern fields. Of these, only 48 are not identified in the AT20G (Murphy et al. 2010). ACT also found 11 additional sources at 218GHz not seen either 148 or 20GHz (or, in some cases, in PMN or SUMSS). We request 19h to explore the mm spectra of the ACT sources, to determine if they are inverted-spectrum synchrotron emitters, gravitationally lensed dusty galaxies or variable sources. A companion proposal led by T. Marriage addresses 5-20GHz measurementd of the ACT sources not seen in AT20G. Results from these two programs will substantially improve models of the radio source contamination in current and future programs to measure CMB fluctuations and SZ effect.

  18. Absolute measures of the completeness of the fossil record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, M.; Sepkoski, J. J. Jr; Sepkoski JJ, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Measuring the completeness of the fossil record is essential to understanding evolution over long timescales, particularly when comparing evolutionary patterns among biological groups with different preservational properties. Completeness measures have been presented for various groups based on gaps in the stratigraphic ranges of fossil taxa and on hypothetical lineages implied by estimated evolutionary trees. Here we present and compare quantitative, widely applicable absolute measures of completeness at two taxonomic levels for a broader sample of higher taxa of marine animals than has previously been available. We provide an estimate of the probability of genus preservation per stratigraphic interval, and determine the proportion of living families with some fossil record. The two completeness measures use very different data and calculations. The probability of genus preservation depends almost entirely on the Palaeozoic and Mesozoic records, whereas the proportion of living families with a fossil record is influenced largely by Cenozoic data. These measurements are nonetheless highly correlated, with outliers quite explicable, and we find that completeness is rather high for many animal groups.

  19. Monobore completions for slim-hole wells

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, C.E. )

    1994-09-01

    A growing number of operators are looking at monobore and slimhole completion techniques as possible solutions to economic and operational problems. Each technique can enhance the completion, and because the advantages of each concept affect a different phase of well technology, a broad spectrum of operational advantages could be generated is these techniques were merged into a single completion approach. Each philosophy, however, requires specialized equipment to provide its benefits, and attempts to unite the two strategies have created unique challenges for equipment designers. In many cases, these challenges are not really fully understood. This paper overviews several new equipment designs that are ideally suited for monobore completions in slim-hole wells. Also discussed are new servicing methods and how using these options and the newly designed equipment can overcome the difficulties challenging the design of completion equipment for the combined technologies.

  20. Completion processing for data communications instructions

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Kumar, Sameer; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2014-07-01

    Completion processing of data communications instructions in a distributed computing environment with computers coupled for data communications through communications adapters and an active messaging interface (`AMI`), injecting for data communications instructions into slots in an injection FIFO buffer a transfer descriptor, at least some of the instructions specifying callback functions; injecting a completion descriptor for each instruction that specifies a callback function into an injection FIFO buffer slot having a corresponding slot in a pending callback list; listing in the pending callback list callback functions specified by data communications instructions; processing each descriptor in the injection FIFO buffer, setting a bit in a completion bit mask corresponding to the slot in the FIFO where the completion descriptor was injected; and calling by the AMI any callback functions in the pending callback list as indicated by set bits in the completion bit mask.