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Sample records for bond oxidation reaction

  1. Oxidation Protection of Porous Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics of both as-fabricated and coated reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) were studied at 900 and 1000 C with thermogravimetry. Uncoated RBSN exhibited internal oxidation and parabolic kinetics. An amorphous Si-C-O coating provided the greatest degree of protection to oxygen, with a small linear weight loss observed. Linear weight gains were measured on samples with an amorphous Si-N-C coating. Chemically vapor deposited (CVD) Si3N4 coated RBSN exhibited parabolic kinetics, and the coating cracked severely. A continuous-SiC-fiber-reinforced RBSN composite was also coated with the Si-C-O material, but no substantial oxidation protection was observed.

  2. Oxidant-Free Au(I)-Catalyzed Halide Exchange and Csp2-O Bond Forming Reactions.

    PubMed

    Serra, Jordi; Whiteoak, Christopher J; Acuña-Parés, Ferran; Font, Marc; Luis, Josep M; Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Ribas, Xavi

    2015-10-21

    Au has been demonstrated to mediate a number of organic transformations through the utilization of its ? Lewis acid character, Au(I)/Au(III) redox properties or a combination of both. As a result of the high oxidation potential of the Au(I)/Au(III) couple, redox catalysis involving Au typically requires the use of a strong external oxidant. This study demonstrates unusual external oxidant-free Au(I)-catalyzed halide exchange (including fluorination) and Csp2-O bond formation reactions utilizing a model aryl halide macrocyclic substrate. Additionally, the halide exchange and Csp2-O coupling reactivity could also be extrapolated to substrates bearing a single chelating group, providing further insight into the reaction mechanism. This work provides the first examples of external oxidant-free Au(I)-catalyzed carbon-heteroatom cross-coupling reactions. PMID:26397959

  3. Oxidation behavior in reaction-bonded aluminum-silicon alloy/alumina powder compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, S.H.

    1992-12-01

    Goal of this research is to determine the feasibility of producing low-shrinkage mullite/alumina composites by applying the reaction-bonded alumina (RBAO) process to an aluminum-silicon alloy/alumina system. Mirostructural and compositional changes during heat treatment were studied by removing samples from the furnace at different steps in the heating schedule and then using optical and scanning electron microscopy, EDS and XRD to characterize the powder compacts. Results suggest that the oxidation behavior of the alloy compact is different from the model proposed for the pure Al/alumina system.

  4. Studies on reactions of oxidizing sulfur-sulfur three-electron-bond complexes and reducing alpha-amino radicals derived from OH reaction with methionine in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Lu, C; Yao, S; Lin, N

    2001-02-16

    The technique of pulse radiolysis with spectrophotometric detection has been used to investigate the possibility of electron transfer reactions between oxidizing sulfur-sulfur three-electron-bond complexes (Met2/S thereforeS+), or reducing alpha-amino radicals (CH3SCH2CH2CH.NH2) derived from reaction of methionine with OH radicals and hydroxycinnamic acid (HCA) derivatives, riboflavin (RF) or flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), respectively. The HCA derivatives, such as caffeic acid, ferulic acid, sinapic acid and chlorogenic acid, widely distributed phenolic acids in fruit and vegetables, have been identified as good antioxidants previously can rapidly and efficiently repair oxidizing three-electron-bond complexes via electron transfer. RF and FAD can oxidize reducing alpha-amino radicals derived from methionine. The electron transfer rate constants approximately 10(9) dm3 x mol(-1)x s(-1) were determined by following the build-up kinetics of species produced. PMID:11342257

  5. Oxidation effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1989-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride composites were measured after 100 hrs exposure at temperatures to 1400 C in nitrogen and oxygen environments. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The results indicate that composites heat treated in a nitrogen environment at temperatures to 1400 C showed deformation and fracture behavior equivalent to that of the as-fabricated composites. Also, the composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment beyond 400 C yielded significantly lower tensile strength values. Specifically in the temperature range from 600 to 1000 C, composites retained approx. 40 percent of their as-fabricated strength, and those heat treated in the temperatures from 1200 to 1400 C retained 70 percent. Nonetheless, for all oxygen heat treatment conditions, composite specimens displayed strain capability beyond the matrix fracture stress; a typical behavior of a tough composite.

  6. A hydrogen-bonding network is important for oxidation and isomerization in the reaction catalyzed by cholesterol oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Chen, Lin; Sampson, Nicole S.; Vrielink, Alice

    2009-11-01

    The importance of active-site electrostatics for oxidative and reductive half-reactions in a redox flavoenzyme (cholesterol oxidase) have been investigated by a combination of biochemistry and atomic resolution crystallography. A detailed examination of active-site dynamics demonstrates that the oxidation of substrate and the re-oxidation of the flavin cofactor by molecular oxygen are linked by a single active-site asparagine. Cholesterol oxidase is a flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidation and isomerization of 3?-hydroxysteroids. Structural and mutagenesis studies have shown that Asn485 plays a key role in substrate oxidation. The side chain makes an NH?? interaction with the reduced form of the flavin cofactor. A N485D mutant was constructed to further test the role of the amide group in catalysis. The mutation resulted in a 1800-fold drop in the overall k{sub cat}. Atomic resolution structures were determined for both the N485L and N485D mutants. The structure of the N485D mutant enzyme (at 1.0 Å resolution) reveals significant perturbations in the active site. As predicted, Asp485 is oriented away from the flavin moiety, such that any stabilizing interaction with the reduced flavin is abolished. Met122 and Glu361 form unusual hydrogen bonds to the functional group of Asp485 and are displaced from the positions they occupy in the wild-type active site. The overall effect is to disrupt the stabilization of the reduced FAD cofactor during catalysis. Furthermore, a narrow transient channel that is shown to form when the wild-type Asn485 forms the NH?? interaction with FAD and that has been proposed to function as an access route of molecular oxygen, is not observed in either of the mutant structures, suggesting that the dynamics of the active site are altered.

  7. Sintered-reaction Bonded Silicon Nitride Densified by a Gas Pressure Sintering Process Effects of Rare Earth Oxide Sintering Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. H.; Ko, J. W.; Park, Y. J.; Kim, H. D.; Lin, Hua-Tay; Becher, Paul F

    2012-01-01

    Reaction-bonded silicon nitrides containing rare-earth oxide sintering additives were densified by gas pressure sintering. The sintering behavior, microstructure and mechanical properties of the resultant specimens were analyzed. For that purpose, Lu2O3-SiO2 (US), La2O3-MgO (AM) and Y2O3-Al2O3 (YA) additive systems were selected. Among the tested compositions, densification of silicon nitride occurred at the lowest temperature when using the La2O3-MgO system. Since the Lu2O3-SiO2 system has the highest melting temperature, full densification could not be achieved after sintering at 1950oC. However, the system had a reasonably high bending strength of 527 MPa at 1200oC in air and a high fracture toughness of 9.2 MPa m1/2. The Y2O3-Al2O3 system had the highest room temperature bending strength of 1.2 GPa

  8. Stereoelectronic effects in C-H bond oxidation reactions of Ni(I) N-heterocyclic carbene complexes.

    PubMed

    Poulten, Rebecca C; López, Isidoro; Llobet, Antoni; Mahon, Mary F; Whittlesey, Michael K

    2014-07-21

    Activation of O2 by the three-coordinate Ni(I) ring-expanded N-heterocyclic carbene complexes Ni(RE-NHC)(PPh3)Br (RE-NHC = 6-Mes, 1; 7-Mes, 2) produced the structurally characterized dimeric Ni(II) complexes Ni(6-Mes)(Br)(?-OH)(?-O-6-Mes')NiBr (3) and Ni(7-Mes)(Br)(?-OH)(?-O-7-Mes')NiBr (4) containing oxidized ortho-mesityl groups from one of the carbene ligands. NMR and mass spectrometry provided evidence for further oxidation in solution to afford bis-?-aryloxy compounds; the 6-Mes derivative was isolated, and its structure was verified. Low-temperature UV-visible spectroscopy showed that the reaction between 1 and O2 was too fast even at ca. -80 °C to yield any observable intermediates and also supported the formation of more than one oxidation product. Addition of O2 to Ni(I) precursors containing a less electron-donating diamidocarbene (6-MesDAC, 7) or less bulky 6- or 7-membered ring diaminocarbene ligands (6- or 7-o-Tol; 8 and 9) proceeded quite differently, affording phosphine and carbene oxidation products (Ni(O?PPh3)2Br2 and (6-MesDAC)?O) and the mononuclear Ni(II) dibromide complexes (Ni(6-o-Tol)(PPh3)Br2 (10) and (Ni(7-o-Tol)(PPh3)Br2 (11)) respectively. Electrochemical measurements on the five Ni(I) precursors show significantly higher redox potentials for 1 and 2, the complexes that undergo oxygen atom transfer from O2. PMID:24972307

  9. Metal-Free Oxidative C?C Bond Formation through C?H Bond Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Rishikesh; Matcha, Kiran; Antonchick, Andrey P

    2015-10-12

    The formation of C?C bonds embodies the core of organic chemistry because of its fundamental application in generation of molecular diversity and complexity. C?C bond-forming reactions are well-known challenges. To achieve this goal through direct functionalization of C?H bonds in both of the coupling partners represents the state-of-the-art in organic synthesis. Oxidative C?C bond formation obviates the need for prefunctionalization of both substrates. This Minireview is dedicated to the field of C?C bond-forming reactions through direct C?H bond functionalization under completely metal-free oxidative conditions. Selected important developments in this area have been summarized with representative examples and discussions on their reaction mechanisms. PMID:26239615

  10. Bulk gold catalyzed oxidation reactions of amines and isocyanides and iron porphyrin catalyzed N-H and O-H bond insertion/cyclization reactions of diamines and aminoalcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Klobukowski, Erik

    2011-12-29

    This work involves two projects. The first project entails the study of bulk gold as a catalyst in oxidation reactions of isocyanides and amines. The main goal of this project was to study the activation and reactions of molecules at metal surfaces in order to assess how organometallic principles for homogeneous processes apply to heterogeneous catalysis. Since previous work had used oxygen as an oxidant in bulk gold catalyzed reactions, the generality of gold catalysis with other oxidants was examined. Amine N-oxides were chosen for study, due to their properties and use in the oxidation of carbonyl ligands in organometallic complexes. When amine N-oxides were used as an oxidant in the reaction of isocyanides with amines, the system was able to produce ureas from a variety of isocyanides, amines, and amine N-oxides. In addition, the rate was found to generally increase as the amine N-oxide concentration increased, and decrease with increased concentrations of the amine. Mechanistic studies revealed that the reaction likely involves transfer of an oxygen atom from the amine N-oxide to the adsorbed isocyanide to generate an isocyanate intermediate. Subsequent nucleophilic attack by the amine yields the urea. This is in contrast to the bulk gold-catalyzed reaction mechanism of isocyanides with amines and oxygen. Formation of urea in this case was proposed to proceed through a diaminocarbene intermediate. Moreover, formation of the proposed isocyanate intermediate is consistent with the reactions of metal carbonyl ligands, which are isoelectronic to isocyanides. Nucleophilic attack at coordinated CO by amine N-oxides produces CO{sub 2} and is analogous to the production of an isocyanate in this gold system. When the bulk gold-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenation of amines was examined with amine N-oxides, the same products were afforded as when O{sub 2} was used as the oxidant. When the two types of oxidants were directly compared using the same reaction system and conditions, it was found that the oxidative dehydrogenation of dibenzylamine to Nbenzylidenebenzylamine, with N-methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMMO), was nearly quantitative (96%) within 24 h. However, the reaction with oxygen was much slower, with only a 52% yield of imine product over the same time period. Moreover, the rate of reaction was found to be influenced by the nature of the amine N-oxide. For example, the use of the weakly basic pyridine N-oxide (PyNO) led to an imine yield of only 6% after 24 h. A comparison of amine N-oxide and O2 was also examined in the oxidation of PhCH{sub 2}OH to PhCHO catalyzed by bulk gold. In this reaction, a 52% yield of the aldehyde was achieved when NMMO was used, while only a 7% product yield was afforded when O{sub 2} was the oxidant after 48 h. The bulk gold-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclic amines generates amidines, which upon treatment with Aerosil and water were found to undergo hydrolysis to produce lactams. Moreover, 5-, 6-, and 7-membered lactams could be prepared through a one-pot reaction of cyclic amines by treatment with oxygen, water, bulk gold, and Aerosil. This method is much more atom economical than industrial processes, does not require corrosive acids, and does not generate undesired byproducts. Additionally, the gold and Aerosil catalysts can be readily separated from the reaction mixture. The second project involved studying iron(III) tetraphenylporphyrin chloride, Fe(TPP)Cl, as a homogeneous catalyst for the generation of carbenes from diazo reagents and their reaction with heteroatom compounds. Fe(TPP)Cl, efficiently catalyzed the insertion of carbenes derived from methyl 2-phenyldiazoacetates into O-H bonds of aliphatic and aromatic alcohols. Fe(TPP)Cl was also found to be an effective catalyst for tandem N-H and O-H insertion/cyclization reactions when 1,2-diamines and 1,2-alcoholamines were treated with diazo reagents. This approach provides a one-pot process for synthesizing piperazinones and morpholinones and related analogues such as quinoxalinones and benzoxazin-2-ones.

  11. Sensor/ROIC Integration using Oxide Bonding

    E-print Network

    Zhenyu Ye; for the Fermilab Pixel R&D Group

    2009-02-16

    We explore the Ziptronix Direct Bond Interconnect technology for the integration of sensors and readout integrated circuits (ROICs) for high energy physics. The technology utilizes an oxide bond to form a robust mechanical connection between layers which serves to assist with the formation of metallic interlayer connections. We report on testing results of sample sensors bonded to ROICs and thinned to 100 microns.

  12. Interfacial Bonding Stabilizes Rhodium and Rhodium Oxide Nanoparticles on Layered Nb Oxide and Ta Oxide Supports

    E-print Network

    Interfacial Bonding Stabilizes Rhodium and Rhodium Oxide Nanoparticles on Layered Nb Oxide and Ta temperatures. Rhodium oxide and rhodium metal nanoparticles on niobate and tantalate supports are anomalously

  13. Oxide formation: reaction details studied,

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Edward A.

    Oxide formation: reaction details studied, reported in brief Sir -- Nineteen years ago, I published-nitrosohydroxylamines undergo an alternative decomposition under very similar reaction conditions to liberate nitrous oxide, N2O (refs 4,5). Moreover, this alternative reaction involves highly electrophilic intermediates analogous

  14. Sensor/ROIC Integration using Oxide Bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Zhenyu; /Fermilab

    2009-02-01

    We explore the Ziptronix Direct Bond Interconnect (DBI) technology [2] for the integration of sensors and readout integrated circuits (ROICs) for high energy physics. The technology utilizes an oxide bond to form a robust mechanical connection between layers which serves to assist with the formation of metallic interlayer connections. We report on testing results of sample sensors bonded to ROICs and thinned to 100 {micro}m.

  15. Sintering of reaction bonded silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangels, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A process to produce sintered reaction-bonded Si3N4 (SRBSN) articles has been developed. This process consists of the addition of an appropriate sintering aid to reaction-bonded Si3N4 followed by sintering between 1780 and 2000 C, using an over pressure of nitrogen. The principal advantage of this process is the low sintering shrinkages of 5 to 10 percent. The properties and microstructure of two SRBSN systems sintered with MgO and Y2O3 additives are described and were found to be comparable to corresponding hot-pressed Si3N4 systems. Examples of applications of both systems are illustrated, demonstrating near net shape fabrication capability of the process.

  16. Effect of processing parameters on reaction bonding of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richman, M. H.; Gregory, O. J.; Magida, M. B.

    1980-01-01

    Reaction bonded silicon nitride was developed. The relationship between the various processing parameters and the resulting microstructures was to design and synthesize reaction bonded materials with improved room temperature mechanical properties.

  17. Multiple Metal-Carbon Bonds for Catalytic Metathesis Reactions

    E-print Network

    Reed, Christopher A.

    Multiple Metal-Carbon Bonds for Catalytic Metathesis Reactions Nobel Lecture December 8, 2005 1 #12Pont, Wilmington, private communication) have recently been synthesized." Geoffrey Wilkinson, Nobel Lecture

  18. Oxidation and Reduction Reactions in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibley, Ivan A., Jr.; Amaral, Katie E.; Aurentz, David J.; McCaully, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of approaches to the concept of oxidation and reduction appear in organic textbooks. The method proposed here is different than most published approaches. The oxidation state is calculated by totaling the number of heterogeneous atoms, [pi]-bonds, and rings. A comparison of the oxidation states of reactant and product determine what type…

  19. SULFUR DIOXIDE OXIDATION REACTIONS IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is the final report on a three year project to study the kinetics and mechanisms of some 105 reactions involving the aqueous oxidation of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides in mixed catalyst-oxidant systems at low pH (0-3). The 105 systems involve six redox reaction types: S...

  20. Isotope Effects in C-H Bond Activation Reactions by

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    Isotope Effects in C-H Bond Activation Reactions by Transition Metals WILLIAM D. JONES Department to occur via transient -alkane complexes. This Account summarizes how isotope effects can be used to probe, the subject of isotope effects in some of these reactions will be examined in detail, as these effects

  1. A comparison of the bonding in the second-row transition-metal oxides and carbenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegbahn, Per E. M.

    1993-01-01

    Calculations including electron correlation of all valence electrons have been performed for the sequence of second-row transition-metal oxides and carbenes. For the atoms to the right the bond strengths of the carbenes and the oxides are similar while for the atoms to the left the oxide bond strengths are much larger. The origin of this difference is the interaction between the oxygen lone pairs and empty 4d orbitals on the metal. With the large donation of electrons from the oxygen lone pair to the metal for the atoms to the left, the bonding can almost be described as triple bond formation for YO, ZrO and NbO. For MoO, where a 4d ? orbital is singly occupied on the metal, the bond strength is much smaller than for the oxides to the left. For the metal carbenes two covalent bonds are formed. The ground state spin for the oxides to the right is higher than for the corresponding carbenes, which can be explained by the presence of the ? degeneracy for the oxides. The relevance of the present results for the epoxidation and the olefin metathesis reactions are discussed.

  2. Dynamic fracture toughnesses of reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, A. S.; Emery, A. F.; Liaw, B. M.

    1983-01-01

    The room-temperature dynamic fracture response of reaction-bonded silicon nitride is investigated using a hybrid experimental-numerical procedure. In this procedure, experimentally determined crack velocities are utilized to drive a dynamic finite-element code or dynamic finite-difference code in its generation mode in order to extract numerically the dynamic stress intensity factor of the fracturing specimen. Results show that the dynamic fracture toughness vs crack velocity relations of the two reaction-bonded silicon nitrides do not follow the general trend in those relations of brittle polymers and steel. A definite slow crack velocity during the initial phase of dynamic crack propagation is observed in reaction-bonded silicon nitride, which results in a nonunique dynamic fracture toughness vs crack velocity relation. In addition, it is found that a propagating crack will continue to propagate under a static stress intensity factor substantially lower than K(IC).

  3. REACTIONS OF ISOPROPOXY RADICALS WITH NITROGEN OXIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Information was sought concerning reactions of isopropoxy radicals with nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide. Isopropyl nitrate was photodissociated in the presence of oxides of nitrogen and an inert gas. The reaction was found to be less important than the alkoxy radical NO reactio...

  4. Uranium oxidation: characterization of oxides formed by reaction with water

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Smyrl, N.R.; Condon, J.B.; Eager, M.H.

    1983-04-27

    Three different uranium oxide samples have been characterized with respect to the different preparation techniques. Results show that the water reaction with uranium metal occurs cyclically forming laminar layers of oxide which spall off due to the strain at the oxide/metal interface. Single laminae are released if liquid water is present due to the prizing penetration at the reaction zone. The rate of reaction of water with uranium is directly proportional to the amount of adsorbed water on the oxide product. Rapid transport is effected through the open hydrous oxide product. Dehydration of the hydrous oxide irreversibly forms a more inert oxide which cannot be rehydrated to the degree that prevails in the original hydrous product of uranium oxidation with water. 27 figures.

  5. Oxidative addition of the C-I bond on aluminum nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Turbasu; Das, Susanta; Pal, Sourav

    2015-07-01

    Energetics and the in-depth reaction mechanism of the oxidative addition step of the cross-coupling reaction are studied in the framework of density functional theory (DFT) on aluminum nanoclusters. Aluminum metal in its bulk state is totally inactive towards carbon-halogen bond dissociation but selected Al nanoclusters (size ranging from 3 to 20 atoms) have shown a significantly lower activation barrier towards the oxidative addition reaction. The calculated energy barriers are lower than the gold clusters and within a comparable range with the conventional and most versatile Pd catalyst. Further investigations reveal that the activation energies and other reaction parameters are highly sensitive to the geometrical shapes and electronic structures of the clusters rather than their size, imposing the fact that comprehensive studies on aluminum clusters can be beneficial for nanoscience and nanotechnology. To understand the possible reaction mechanism in detail, the reaction pathway is investigated with the ab initio Born Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD) simulation and the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. In short, our theoretical study highlights the thermodynamic and kinetic details of C-I bond dissociation on aluminum clusters for future endeavors in cluster chemistry.Energetics and the in-depth reaction mechanism of the oxidative addition step of the cross-coupling reaction are studied in the framework of density functional theory (DFT) on aluminum nanoclusters. Aluminum metal in its bulk state is totally inactive towards carbon-halogen bond dissociation but selected Al nanoclusters (size ranging from 3 to 20 atoms) have shown a significantly lower activation barrier towards the oxidative addition reaction. The calculated energy barriers are lower than the gold clusters and within a comparable range with the conventional and most versatile Pd catalyst. Further investigations reveal that the activation energies and other reaction parameters are highly sensitive to the geometrical shapes and electronic structures of the clusters rather than their size, imposing the fact that comprehensive studies on aluminum clusters can be beneficial for nanoscience and nanotechnology. To understand the possible reaction mechanism in detail, the reaction pathway is investigated with the ab initio Born Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD) simulation and the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. In short, our theoretical study highlights the thermodynamic and kinetic details of C-I bond dissociation on aluminum clusters for future endeavors in cluster chemistry. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Cartesian coordinates for the optimized structures and harmonic frequencies, sample IRC data and plot, grid data for three dimensional potential energy surface and contour plot and data for BOMD simulation. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02278a

  6. Activation of CH Bonds:Stoichiometric Reactions William D. Jones

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    Activation of C­H Bonds:Stoichiometric Reactions William D. Jones Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, NY 14627 USA E-mail: jones@chem.rochester.edu The activation of hydrocarbon C involved and the mechanism(s) of activation. Thermodynamic and kinetic selectivities have been estab

  7. Microscopic aspects of interfacial reactions in diffusion bonding processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, M. P.; Bauer, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    Microscopic aspects of interfacial reactions are discussed, such as interdiffusion, formation of intermetallic phases, generation and annihilation of lattice defects, effect of temperature, grain size, etc., which normally occur in diffusion bonding processes. Relationships between properties and microstructure in thin film couples are examined utilizing a unique combination of contact resistance measurements and characterization by transmission electron microscopy.

  8. Palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Feng; Neumann, Helfried; Beller, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions have become a powerful tool for advanced organic synthesis. This type of reaction is of significant value for the preparation of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, as well as advanced materials. Both, academic as well as industrial laboratories continuously investigate new applications of the different methodologies. Clearly, this area constitutes one of the major topics in homogeneous catalysis and organic synthesis. Among the different palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions, several carbonylations have been developed and widely used in organic syntheses and are even applied in the pharmaceutical industry on ton-scale. Furthermore, methodologies such as the carbonylative Suzuki and Sonogashira reactions allow for the preparation of interesting building blocks, which can be easily refined further on. Although carbonylative coupling reactions of aryl halides have been well established, palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation reactions are also interesting. Compared with the reactions of aryl halides, oxidative carbonylation reactions offer an interesting pathway. The oxidative addition step could be potentially avoided in oxidative reactions, but only few reviews exist in this area. In this Minireview, we summarize the recent development in the oxidative carbonylation reactions. PMID:23307763

  9. Phase Evolution in Boride-Based Cermets and Reaction Bonding onto Plain Low Carbon Steel Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanisamy, B.; Upadhyaya, A.

    2012-04-01

    Reaction sinter bonding is a process that aims to bond two materials for improvement in properties through reactive sintering technique. The process has been effectively used to sinter hard materials like borides in situ which not only possess excellent oxidation resistance, good corrosion resistance but also resistant to abrasive wear. Sinter bonding is a unique surface modification process achieved through powder metallurgy and is competent with other techniques like boronizing sintering and sinter-brazing since it eliminates the additional operations of heat treatment and assembly and removes the inherent setbacks with these processes. This study focuses on identifying the phase evolution mechanism using characterization tools like x-ray diffractometry and energy dispersive spectroscopy and study of sinter bonding of the boron containing precursors (Mo-Cr-Fe-Ni-FeB-MoB) onto plain carbon steel. A microstructure containing Fe-based matrix dispersed with complex borides develops with temperature in the tape cast sheets. A fivefold increase in hardness between plain carbon steel in wrought condition and sinter bonded steel was observed. The multilayer consisted of a reaction zone adjacent to the interface and was investigated with the composition profile and hardness measurements. A model of sinter bonding between the cermet and the steel has also been proposed.

  10. Copper-catalyzed dehydrogenative cross-coupling reaction between allylic C-H bonds and ?-C-H bonds of ketones or aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xing-Fen; Salman, Muhammad; Huang, Zhi-Zhen

    2014-05-26

    A dehydrogenative cross-coupling reaction between allylic C-H bonds and the ?-C-H bond of ketones or aldehydes was developed using Cu(OTf)2 as a catalyst and DDQ as an oxidant. This synthetic approach to ?,?-unsaturated ketones and aldehydes has the advantages of broad scope for both ketones and aldehydes as reactants, mild reaction conditions, good yields and atom economy. A plausible mechanism using Cu(OTf)2 as a Lewis acid catalyst was also proposed (DDQ=2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone; Tf=trifluoromethanesulfonate). PMID:24757128

  11. Diffusion bonding of the oxide dispersion strengthened steel PM2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittel, Wiebke; Basuki, Widodo W.; Aktaa, Jarir

    2013-11-01

    Ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are well suited as structural materials, e.g. for claddings in fission reactors and for plasma facing components in fusion power plants due to their high mechanical and oxidation stability at high temperatures and their high irradiation resistance. PM2000 is an iron based ODS ferritic steel with homogeneously distributed nanometric yttria particles. Melting joining techniques are not suitable for such ODS materials because of the precipitation and agglomeration of the oxide particles and hence the loss of their strengthening effect. Solid state diffusion bonding is thus chosen to join PM2000 and is investigated in this work with a focus on oxide particles. The diffusion bonding process is aided by the computational modeling, including the influence of the ODS particles. For modeling the microstructure stability and the creep behavior of PM2000 at various, diffusion bonding relevant temperatures (50-80% Tm) are investigated. Particle distribution (TEM), strength (tensile test) and toughness (Charpy impact test) obtained at temperatures relevant for bonding serve as input for the prediction of optimal diffusion bonding parameters. The optimally bonded specimens show comparable strength and toughness relative to the base material.

  12. Alkali metal mediated C–C bond coupling reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2015-02-14

    Metal catalyzed carbon-carbon (C–C) bond formation is one of the important reactions in pharmacy and in organic chemistry. In the present study, the electron and hole capture dynamics of a lithium-benzene sandwich complex, expressed by Li(Bz){sub 2}, have been investigated by means of direct ab-initio molecular dynamics method. Following the electron capture of Li(Bz){sub 2}, the structure of [Li(Bz){sub 2}]{sup ?} was drastically changed: Bz–Bz parallel form was rapidly fluctuated as a function of time, and a new C–C single bond was formed in the C{sub 1}–C{sub 1}? position of Bz–Bz interaction system. In the hole capture, the intermolecular vibration between Bz–Bz rings was only enhanced. The mechanism of C–C bond formation in the electron capture was discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  13. Ab initio modeling of the bonding of benzotriazole corrosion inhibitor to reduced and oxidized copper surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kokalj, Anton

    2015-01-01

    The bonding of benzotriazole-an outstanding corrosion inhibitor for copper-on reduced and oxidized copper surfaces is discussed on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Calculations reveal that benzotriazole is able to bond with oxide-free and oxidized copper surfaces and on both of them it bonds significantly stronger to coordinatively unsaturated Cu sites. This suggests that benzotriazole is able to passivate the reactive under-coordinated surface sites that are plausible microscopic sites for corrosion attack. Benzotriazole can adsorb in a variety of different forms, yet it forms a strong molecule-surface bond only in deprotonated form. The bonding is even stronger when the deprotonated form is incorporated into organometallic adcomplexes. This is consistent with existing experimental evidence that benzotriazole inhibits corrosion by forming protective organometallic complexes. It is further shown that adsorption of benzotriazole considerably reduces the metal work function, which is a consequence of a large permanent molecular dipole and a properly oriented adsorption structure. It is argued that such a pronounced effect on the work function might be relevant for corrosion inhibition, because it should diminish the anodic corrosion reaction, which is consistent with existing experimental evidence that benzotriazole, although a mixed type inhibitor, predominantly affects the anodic reaction. PMID:25955130

  14. (*/*) Conical Intersection Seam Experimentally Observed in the S-D Bond Dissociation Reaction of Thiophenold1

    E-print Network

    Kim, Sang Kyu

    , *) and continuum (S2, *) states has been observed in the ultrafast S-D bond dissociation reaction of thiophenol-d1(*/*) Conical Intersection Seam Experimentally Observed in the S-D Bond Dissociation Reaction

  15. Transient liquid phase bonding of ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnardula, Venu Gopal

    2006-04-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys possess excellent properties including resistance to oxidation, corrosion, creep and thermal fatigue. In addition, ferritic ODS alloys exhibit resistance to void swelling and are of particular interest to the nuclear industry. The present study involves the joining of fuel cans to end caps that will be utilized in the nuclear industry. Mechanically alloyed (MA) ODS alloys possess coarse columnar grain structure strengthened with nanosize yttria dispersoids. In that past, fusion welding techniques resulted in microstructural disruption leading to poor joints. This work investigated joining of two ferritic MA ODS alloys, MA956 and PM2000, using; (a) Transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding and (b) Solid-state diffusion bonding. TLP bonds were prepared with MA956 and PM2000 in the unrecrystallized and recrystallized conditions using electron beam physical vapor deposited (EBPVD) boron thin films as interlayers. The use of thin interlayers reduced the amount of substrate dissolution and minimized the bondline microstructural disruption. Different bond orientations were also investigated. Successful bonds with better microstructural continuity were obtained when substrates were joined in the unrecrystallized condition followed by post bond recrystallization heat treatment with the substrate faying surface aligned along the working (extrusion or rolling) direction than when substrates were aligned perpendicular to the working direction. This was attributed to the number of yttria stringers cut by the bondline, which is less when the substrate faying surface is lying parallel to the working direction than when the substrate faying surface is lying perpendicular to the working direction. Solid-state diffusion bonding was conducted using MA956 and PM2000 in the unrecrystallized and recrystallized conditions. Bonding occurred only when an unrecrystallized substrate was involved. Bonding occurred at unusually low stresses. This may be attributed to the grain boundary diffusion, owing to submicron grain size of the unrecrystallized substrates. Post bond heat treatment was conducted in order to induce recrystallization in the bonds. Room temperature mechanical testing was conducted on the bonds and the bulk. Bond shear strengths and tensile strengths of up to 80% and 110% of bulk, respectively, were obtained. Defects in the bulk material such as porosity and unwanted fine grain formation were observed. Pore formation at the bondline during post bond heat treatment seems to decrease the bond strength. These defects were attributed to prior thermomechanical history of the materials.

  16. Oxidative Reactions with Nonaqueous Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan S. Dordick; Douglas Clark; Brian H Davison; Alexander Klibanov

    2001-12-30

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate a proof-of-concept of enzymatic oxidative processing in nonaqueous media using alkene epoxidation and phenolic polymerization as relevant targets. This project will provide both the fundamental and applied investigations necessary to initiate the implementation of oxidative biocatalysts as commercially relevant alternatives to chemical processing in general, and to phenolic polymerizations and alkene epoxidation specifically. Thus, this work will address the Bioprocessing Solicitation Area to: (1) makes major improvements to phenolic polymerization and alkene epoxidation technologies; (2) is expected to be cost competitive with competing conventional processes; and (3) produces higher yields with less waste.

  17. Bonding of sapphire to sapphire by eutectic mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluca, J. J. (inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An element comprising sapphire, ruby or blue sapphire can be bonded to another element of such material with a eutectic mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide. The bonding mixture may be applied in the form of a distilled water slurry or by electron beam vapor deposition. In one embodiment the eutectic is formed in situ by applying a layer of zirconium oxide and then heating the assembly to a temperature above the eutectic temperature and below the melting point of the material from which the elements are formed. The formation of a sapphire rubidium maser cell utilizing eutectic bonding is shown.

  18. Initial Backbond Oxidation at an Unpaired Dangling Bond Site on a Hydrogen-Terminated Si(100)2×1 Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiyama, Hiroshi; Heike, Seiji; Hitosugi, Taro; Hashizume, Tomihiro

    1998-11-01

    The oxidation reaction at an unpaired dangling bond (DB) site on a hydrogen-terminated Si(100)2×1 surface was studied using an ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscope. The surface image was observed in situ during the exposure to O2 molecules at room temperature. During exposure, the unpaired DBs induced structural changes around themselves, and they were mostly localized on one side of a Si dimer bond. We conclude that the backbonds near an unpaired DB were preferentially oxidized, following the dissociation of O2 molecules at the unpaired DB site. Based on high-resolution measurements, models of backbond-oxidized-structure were proposed.

  19. O-H bond oxidation by a monomeric Mn(III)-OMe complex.

    PubMed

    Wijeratne, Gayan B; Day, Victor W; Jackson, Timothy A

    2015-02-21

    Manganese-containing, mid-valent oxidants (Mn(III)-OR) that mediate proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactions are central to a variety of crucial enzymatic processes. The Mn-dependent enzyme lipoxygenase is such an example, where a Mn(III)-OH unit activates fatty acid substrates for peroxidation by an initial PCET. This present work describes the quantitative generation of the Mn(III)-OMe complex, [Mn(III)(OMe)(dpaq)](+) (dpaq = 2-[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)]amino-N-quinolin-8-yl-acetamidate) via dioxygen activation by [Mn(II)(dpaq)](+) in methanol at 25 °C. The X-ray diffraction structure of [Mn(III)(OMe)(dpaq)](+) exhibits a Mn-OMe group, with a Mn-O distance of 1.825(4) Å, that is trans to the amide functionality of the dpaq ligand. The [Mn(III)(OMe)(dpaq)](+) complex is quite stable in solution, with a half-life of 26 days in MeCN at 25 °C. [Mn(III)(OMe)(dpaq)](+) can activate phenolic O-H bonds with bond dissociation free energies (BDFEs) of less than 79 kcal mol(-1) and reacts with the weak O-H bond of TEMPOH (TEMPOH = 2,2'-6,6'-tetramethylpiperidine-1-ol) with a hydrogen/deuterium kinetic isotope effect (H/D KIE) of 1.8 in MeCN at 25 °C. This isotope effect, together with other experimental evidence, is suggestive of a concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) mechanism for O-H bond oxidation by [Mn(III)(OMe)(dpaq)](+). A kinetic and thermodynamic comparison of the O-H bond oxidation reactivity of [Mn(III)(OMe)(dpaq)](+) to other M(III)-OR oxidants is presented as an aid to gain more insight into the PCET reactivity of mid-valent oxidants. In contrast to high-valent counterparts, the limited examples of M(III)-OR oxidants exhibit smaller H/D KIEs and show weaker dependence of their oxidation rates on the driving force of the PCET reaction with O-H bonds. PMID:25597362

  20. SURFACE REACTIONS OF OXIDES OF SULFUR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface reactions of several sulfur-containing molecules have been studied in order to understand the mechanism by which sulfate ions are formed on atmospheric aerosols. At 25C the heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 by NO2 to sulfuric acid and sulfate ions occurred on hydrated silica...

  1. Catalytic hydrocarbon reactions over supported metal oxides. Progress report, April 1, 1994--January 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1995-01-31

    Oxide catalysis plays a central role in hydrocarbon processing and improvements in catalytic activity or selectivity are of great technological importance because these improvements will translate directly into more efficient utilization of hydrocarbon supplies and lower energy consumption in separation processes. An understanding of the relationships between surface structure and catalytic properties is needed to describe and improve oxide catalysts. Our approach has been to prepare supported oxides that have a specific structure and oxidation state and then employ these structures in reaction studies. Our current research program is focused on studying the fundamental relationships between structure and reactivity for two important reactions that are present in many oxide-catalyzed processes, partial oxidation and carbon-carbon bond formation. Oxide catalysis can be a complex process with both metal cation and oxygen anions participating in the chemical reactions. From an energy perspective carbon-carbon bond formation is particularly relevant to CO hydrogenation in isosynthesis. Hydrogenolysis and hydrogenation form the basis for heteroatom removal in fuels processing. Understanding the catalysis of these processes (and others) requires isolating reaction steps in the overall cycle and determining how structure and composition influence the individual reaction steps. Specially designed oxides, such as we use, permit one to study some of the steps in oxidation, carbon-carbon coupling and heteroatom removal catalysis. During the course of our studies we have: (1) developed methods to form and stabilize various Mo and W oxide structures on silica; (2) studied C-H abstraction reactions over the fully oxidized cations; (3) studied C-C bond coupling by methathesis and reductive coupling of aldehydes and ketones over reduced cation structures; and (4) initiated a study of hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis over reduced cation structures.

  2. Oxidation reactions on neutral cobalt oxide clusters: experimental and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan; Dong, Feng; Heinbuch, Scott; Rocca, Jorge J; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2010-01-28

    Reactions of neutral cobalt oxide clusters (Co(m)O(n), m = 3-9, n = 3-13) with CO, NO, C(2)H(2), and C(2)H(4) in a fast flow reactor are investigated by time of flight mass spectrometry employing 118 nm (10.5 eV) single photon ionization. Strong cluster size dependent behavior is observed for all the oxidation reactions; the Co(3)O(4) cluster has the highest reactivity for reactions with CO and NO. Cluster reactivity is also highly correlated with either one or more following factors: cluster size, Co(iii) concentration, the number of the cobalt atoms with high oxidation states, and the presence of an oxygen molecular moiety (an O-O bond) in the Co(m)O(n) clusters. The experimental cluster observations are in good agreement with condensed phase Co(3)O(4) behavior. Density functional theory calculations at the BPW91/TZVP level are carried out to explore the geometric and electronic structures of the Co(3)O(4) cluster, reaction intermediates, transition states, as well as reaction mechanisms. CO, NO, C(2)H(2), and C(2)H(4) are predicted to be adsorbed on the Co(ii) site, and react with one of the parallel bridge oxygen atoms between two Co(iii) atoms in the Co(3)O(4) cluster. Oxidation reactions with CO, NO, and C(2)H(2) on the Co(3)O(4) cluster are estimated as thermodynamically favorable and overall barrierless processes at room temperature. The oxidation reaction with C(2)H(4) is predicted to have a very small overall barrier (<0.23 eV). The oxygen bridge between two Co(iii) sites in the Co(3)O(4) cluster is responsible for the oxidation reactions with CO, NO, C(2)H(2), and C(2)H(4). Based on the gas phase experimental and theoretical cluster studies, a catalytic cycle for these oxidation reactions on a condensed phase cobalt oxide catalyst is proposed. PMID:20066380

  3. Catalytic ?-activation of carbon-carbon triple bonds: reactions of propargylic alcohols and alkynes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rapolu Kiran; Bi, Xihe

    2016-01-01

    The majority reactions of alkynes in the literature are reported to proceed via either structural ?-activation or catalytic ?-activation of C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C bonds. We skillfully designed novel methods for the catalytic ?-activation of C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C bonds of alkynyl compounds. For terminal alkynyl compounds, ?-activation was achieved by silver(i)-catalyzed C-H functionalization. Whereas ?-activation of internal alkynes was accomplished by the generation of propargylic cations from propargylic alcohols under Lewis-acid catalysis. These ?-activated species have been successfully used for new C-C and C-heteroatom bond formation reactions. Plausible reaction pathways were proposed based on typical control experiments to help the readers to gain insights into reactions and for further discovery of new reactions based on this concept of catalytic ?-activation of C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C bonds. PMID:26658835

  4. Synthetic Reactions of MTC and MTN Bonds: Ylide Formation, Rearrangement, and 1,3-Dipolar

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jianbo

    rearrangements) and related reactions 166 11.05.3.1.3 Addition to CTO and CTN bonds 166 11.05.3.2 Thiocarbonyl simple starting materials. In addition, some of these reactions show excellent chemo-, regio11.05 Synthetic Reactions of MTC and MTN Bonds: Ylide Formation, Rearrangement, and 1,3-Dipolar

  5. Rhodium(iii)-catalyzed annulation of arenes with alkynes assisted by an internal oxidizing N-O bond.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zisong; Tang, Guo-Dong; Pan, Cheng-Ling; Li, Xingwei

    2015-12-01

    Rh(iii)-catalyzed C-H activation of 3-aryl-dihydroisoxazoles in the coupling with diarylacetylenes has been developed under redox-neutral conditions. This reaction occurred under mild conditions with no by-product, and the N-O bond functions as an oxidizing directing group, leading to efficient synthesis of isoquinolines functionalized with a proximal secondary alcohol. PMID:26477970

  6. Effects of Cu and Pd addition on Au bonding wire/Al pad interfacial reactions and bond reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gam, Sang-Ah; Kim, Hyoung-Joon; Cho, Jong-Soo; Park, Yong-Jin; Moon, Jeong-Tak; Paik, Kyung-Wook

    2006-11-01

    Finer pitch wire bonding technology has been needed since chips have more and finer pitch I/Os. However, finer Au wires are more prone to Au-Al bond reliability and wire sweeping problems when molded with epoxy molding compound. One of the solutions for solving these problems is to add special alloying elements to Au bonding wires. In this study, Cu and Pd were added to Au bonding wire as alloying elements. These alloyed Au bonding wires—Au-1 wt.% Cu wire and Au-1 wt.% Pd wire—were bonded on Al pads and then subsequently aged at 175°C and 200°C. Cu and Pd additions to Au bonding wire slowed down interfacial reactions and crack formation due to the formation of a Cu-rich layer and a Pd-rich layer at the interface. Wire pull testing (WPT) after thermal aging showed that Cu and Pd addition enhanced bond reliability, and Cu was more effective for improving bond reliability than Pd. In addition, comparison between the results of observation of interfacial reactions and WPT proved that crack formation was an important factor to evaluate bond reliability.

  7. Rules of Stereoselectivity in Tandem Oxidative Polycyclization Reaction with Rhenium(VII) Oxides

    E-print Network

    Keinan, Ehud

    Rules of Stereoselectivity in Tandem Oxidative Polycyclization Reaction with Rhenium(VII) Oxides, Israel ReceiVed April 17, 1998 The tandem oxidative polycyclization reaction with rhenium- (VII) reagents

  8. Iron-catalyzed aerobic oxidative cleavage of the C-C ?-bond using air as the oxidant: chemoselective synthesis of carbon chain-shortened aldehydes, ketones and 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Xing, Qi; Lv, Hui; Xia, Chungu; Li, Fuwei

    2016-01-11

    A simple iron-catalyzed aerobic oxidative C-C ?-bond cleavage of ketones has been developed. Readily available and environmentally benign air is used as the oxidant. This reaction avoids the use of noble metal catalysts or specialized oxidants, chemoselectively yielding carbon chain-shortened aldehydes, ketones and 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds without overoxidation. PMID:26529597

  9. Cold bond agglomeration of waste oxides for recycling

    SciTech Connect

    D`Alessio, G.; Lu, W.K.

    1996-12-31

    Recycling of waste oxides has been an on-going challenge for integrated steel plants. The majority of these waste oxides are collected from the cleaning systems of ironmaking and steelmaking processes, and are usually in the form of fine particulates and slurries. In most cases, these waste materials are contaminated by oils and heavy metals and often require treatment at a considerable expense prior to landfill disposal. This contamination also limits the re-use or recycling potential of these oxides as secondary resources of reliable quality. However, recycling of some selected wastes in blast furnaces or steelmaking vessels is possible, but first requires agglomeration of the fine particulate by such methods as cold bond briquetting. Cold bond briquetting technology provides both mechanical compacting and bonding (with appropriate binders) of the particulates. This method of recycling has the potential to be economically viable and environmentally sustainable. The nature of the present study is cold bond briquetting of iron ore pellet fines with a molasses-cement-H{sub 2}O binder for recycling in a blast furnace. The inclusion of molasses is for its contribution to the green strength of briquettes. During the curing stage, significant gains in strength may be credited to molasses in the presence of cement. The interactions of cement (and its substitutes), water and molasses and their effects on the properties of the agglomerates during and after various curing conditions were investigated. Tensile strengths of briquettes made in the laboratory and subjected to experimental conditions which simulated the top part of a blast furnace shaft were also examined.

  10. Synthesis of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles by the Reaction of Zinc Metal with Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, M. A.

    A novel approach has been described for the synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles by a very simple reaction of zinc metal with ethanol at 200°C. The diameters of the nanoparticles range from 50-200 nm. The reaction involves the cleavage of C-O bond of the alcohol, which occurs readily on the zinc metal surface. Addition of ethylenediamine to the reaction yields nanorods, thus acting as a shape-directing agent. A plausible mechanism is proposed for the formation of these nanostructures and it is expected that this synthetic technique can be extended to obtain other metal oxides.

  11. Synthesis of substituted ?-diketiminate gallium hydrides via oxidative addition of H-O bonds.

    PubMed

    Herappe-Mejía, Eduardo; Trujillo-Hernández, Karla; Carlos Garduño-Jiménez, Juan; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Martínez-Otero, Diego; Jancik, Vojtech

    2015-10-14

    Oxidative addition of LGa into the OH bonds from HCCCH2OH, Ph2Si(OH)2, (nBuO)2P(O)(OH) and 4-MeC6H4S(O)2(OH) results in the formation of four compounds of the general formula LGa(H)(O-X). The correlation of the Ga-O bond length and the strength of the Ga-H bond depending on the acidity of the OH group in the starting materials has been demonstrated. The molecular structures of all four compounds have been determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction experiments. DFT calculations were performed on the reacting complex of LGa with propargyl alcohol and show an OHGa hydrogen bond as the first interaction between the reagents. This reacting complex changes into a D-A complex where the oxygen atom of the propargyl alcohol coordinates to the gallium atom and in a concerted reaction the oxidative addition product is formed. PMID:26351779

  12. Interfacial bonding stabilizes rhodium and rhodium oxide nanoparticles on layered Nb oxide and Ta oxide supports.

    PubMed

    Strayer, Megan E; Binz, Jason M; Tanase, Mihaela; Shahri, Seyed Mehdi Kamali; Sharma, Renu; Rioux, Robert M; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2014-04-16

    Metal nanoparticles are commonly supported on metal oxides, but their utility as catalysts is limited by coarsening at high temperatures. Rhodium oxide and rhodium metal nanoparticles on niobate and tantalate supports are anomalously stable. To understand this, the nanoparticle-support interaction was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM), and synchrotron X-ray absorption and scattering techniques. Nanosheets derived from the layered oxides KCa2Nb3O10, K4Nb6O17, and RbTaO3 were compared as supports to nanosheets of Na-TSM, a synthetic fluoromica (Na0.66Mg2.68(Si3.98Al0.02)O10.02F1.96), and ?-Zr(HPO4)2·H2O. High surface area SiO2 and ?-Al2O3 supports were also used for comparison in the ITC experiments. A Born-Haber cycle analysis of ITC data revealed an exothermic interaction between Rh(OH)3 nanoparticles and the layered niobate and tantalate supports, with ?H values in the range -32 kJ·mol(-1) Rh to -37 kJ·mol(-1) Rh. In contrast, the interaction enthalpy was positive with SiO2 and ?-Al2O3 supports. The strong interfacial bonding in the former case led to "reverse" ripening of micrometer-size Rh(OH)3, which dispersed as 0.5 to 2 nm particles on the niobate and tantalate supports. In contrast, particles grown on Na-TSM and ?-Zr(HPO4)2·H2O nanosheets were larger and had a broad size distribution. ETEM, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and pair distribution function analyses were used to study the growth of supported nanoparticles under oxidizing and reducing conditions, as well as the transformation from Rh(OH)3 to Rh nanoparticles. Interfacial covalent bonding, possibly strengthened by d-electron acid/base interactions, appear to stabilize Rh(OH)3, Rh2O3, and Rh nanoparticles on niobate and tantalate supports. PMID:24654835

  13. Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed C-H Activation/Alkyne Annulation by Weak Coordination of Peresters with O-O Bond as an Internal Oxidant.

    PubMed

    Mo, Jiayu; Wang, Lianhui; Cui, Xiuling

    2015-10-16

    A redox-economic strategy has been developed, involved in an efficient Rh(III)-catalyzed oxidative C-H activation and alkyne annulation with perester as the oxidizing directing group. In this process, the cleavage of an oxidizing O-O bond as an internal oxidant is described for the first time. This reaction could be carried out under mild conditions and exhibits excellent regioselectivity and wide functional groups tolerance. PMID:26414431

  14. Thermochemistry and reaction paths in the oxidation reaction of benzoyl radical: C6H5C•(?O).

    PubMed

    Sebbar, Nadia; Bozzelli, Joseph W; Bockhorn, Henning

    2011-10-27

    Alkyl substituted aromatics are present in fuels and in the environment because they are major intermediates in the oxidation or combustion of gasoline, jet, and other engine fuels. The major reaction pathways for oxidation of this class of molecules is through loss of a benzyl hydrogen atom on the alkyl group via abstraction reactions. One of the major intermediates in the combustion and atmospheric oxidation of the benzyl radicals is benzaldehyde, which rapidly loses the weakly bound aldehydic hydrogen to form a resonance stabilized benzoyl radical (C6H5C(•)?O). A detailed study of the thermochemistry of intermediates and the oxidation reaction paths of the benzoyl radical with dioxygen is presented in this study. Structures and enthalpies of formation for important stable species, intermediate radicals, and transition state structures resulting from the benzoyl radical +O2 association reaction are reported along with reaction paths and barriers. Enthalpies, ?fH298(0), are calculated using ab initio (G3MP2B3) and density functional (DFT at B3LYP/6-311G(d,p)) calculations, group additivity (GA), and literature data. Bond energies on the benzoyl and benzoyl-peroxy systems are also reported and compared to hydrocarbon systems. The reaction of benzoyl with O2 has a number of low energy reaction channels that are not currently considered in either atmospheric chemistry or combustion models. The reaction paths include exothermic, chain branching reactions to a number of unsaturated oxygenated hydrocarbon intermediates along with formation of CO2. The initial reaction of the C6H5C(•)?O radical with O2 forms a chemically activated benzoyl peroxy radical with 37 kcal mol(-1) internal energy; this is significantly more energy than the 21 kcal mol(-1) involved in the benzyl or allyl + O2 systems. This deeper well results in a number of chemical activation reaction paths, leading to highly exothermic reactions to phenoxy radical + CO2 products. PMID:21942384

  15. An unusual carbon?carbon bond cleavage reaction during phosphinothricin biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cicchillo, Robert M.; Zhang, Houjin; Blodgett, Joshua A.V.; Whitteck, John T.; Li, Gongyong; Nair, Satish K.; van derDonk, Wilfred A.; Metcalf, William W.

    2010-01-12

    Natural products containing phosphorus-carbon bonds have found widespread use in medicine and agriculture. One such compound, phosphinothricin tripeptide, contains the unusual amino acid phosphinothricin attached to two alanine residues. Synthetic phosphinothricin (glufosinate) is a component of two top-selling herbicides (Basta and Liberty), and is widely used with resistant transgenic crops including corn, cotton and canola. Recent genetic and biochemical studies showed that during phosphinothricin tripeptide biosynthesis 2-hydroxyethylphosphonate (HEP) is converted to hydroxymethylphosphonate (HMP). Here we report the in vitro reconstitution of this unprecedented C(sp{sup 3})-C(sp{sup 3}) bond cleavage reaction and X-ray crystal structures of the enzyme. The protein is a mononuclear non-haem iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that converts HEP to HMP and formate. In contrast to most other members of this family, the oxidative consumption of HEP does not require additional cofactors or the input of exogenous electrons. The current study expands the scope of reactions catalysed by the 2-His-1-carboxylate mononuclear non-haem iron family of enzymes.

  16. Catalytic hydrocarbon reactions over supported metal oxides. Final report, August 1, 1986--July 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1995-10-20

    Oxide catalysis plays a central role in hydrocarbon processing and improvements in catalytic activity or selectivity are of great technological importance because these improvements will translate directly into more efficient utilization of hydrocarbon supplies and lower energy consumption in separation processes. An understanding of the relationships between surface structure and catalytic properties is needed to describe and improve oxide catalysts. The approach has been to prepare supported oxides that have a specific structure and oxidation state and then employ these structures in reaction studies. The current research program is focused on studying the fundamental relationships between structure and reactivity for two important reactions that are present in many oxide-catalyzed processes, partial oxidation and carbon-carbon bond formation. During the course of these studies the author has: (1) developed methods to form and stabilize various Mo and W oxide structures on silica; (2) studied C-H abstraction reactions over the fully oxidized cations; (3) studied C-C bond coupling by metathesis and reductive coupling of aldehydes and ketones over reduced cation structures; and (4) initiated a study of hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis over reduced cation structures.

  17. Pyridine N-Oxide vs Pyridine Substrates for Rh(III)-Catalyzed Oxidative C-H Bond Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Neufeldt, Sharon R; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Huckins, John R; Thiel, Oliver R; Houk, K N

    2015-08-12

    The origin of the high reactivity and site selectivity of pyridine N-oxide substrates in O-pivaloyl hydroxamic acid-directed Rh(III)-catalyzed (4+2) annulation reactions with alkynes was investigated computationally. The reactions of the analogous pyridine derivatives were previously reported to be slower and to display poor site selectivity for functionalization of the C(2)-H vs the C(4)-H bonds of the pyridine ring. The N-oxide substrates are found to be more reactive overall because the directing group interacts more strongly with Rh. For N-oxide substrates, alkyne insertion is rate-limiting and selectivity-determining in the reaction with a dialkyl alkyne, but C-H activation can be selectivity-determining with other coupling partners such as terminal alkynes. The rates of reaction with a dialkyl alkyne at the two sites of a pyridine substrate are limited by two different steps: C-H activation is limiting for C(2)-functionalization, while alkyne insertion is limiting for C(4)-functionalization. Consistent with the observed poor site selectivity in the reaction of a pyridine substrate, the overall energy barriers for functionalization of the two positions are nearly identical. High C(2)-selectivity in the C-H activation step of the reaction of the N-oxide is due to a cooperative effect of the C-H Brønsted acidity, the strength of the forming C-Rh bond, and intramolecular electrostatic interactions between the [Rh]Cp* and the heteroaryl moieties. On the other hand, some of these forces are in opposition in the case of the pyridine substrate, and C(4)-H activation is moderately favored overall. The alkyne insertion step is favored at C(2) over C(4) for both substrates, and this preference is largely influenced by electrostatic interactions between the alkyne and the heteroarene. Experimental results that support these calculations, including kinetic isotope effect studies, H/D exchange studies, and results using a substituted pyridine, are also described. PMID:26197041

  18. Nanocrystalline Complex Oxides Prepared by Mechanochemical Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sepelak, V.; Bergmann, I.; Indris, S.; Subrt, J.; Heitjans, P.; Becker, K.-D.

    2010-07-13

    The preparation of complex oxides by the conventional solid-state (ceramic) route requires a number of stages, including homogenization of the powder precursors, compaction of the reactants, and finally prolonged heat treatment at considerably elevated temperatures under controlled oxygen fugacity. One goal of modern materials research and development has been to identify simpler processing schemes that do not rely upon high-temperature treatments for inducing solid-state reactions. At present, mechanochemical methods become widely used for the preparation of nanocrystalline materials due to their relative simplicity and availability. In this work, selected examples of the preparation of nanoscale complex oxides via single-step mechanochemical routes are presented. Nuclear spectroscopic methods are employed to follow the mechanically induced formation of nanooxides and to characterize the nonequilibrium structural state of the resulting nanophases at the atomic level.

  19. Graphene-hemin hybrid material as effective catalyst for selective oxidation of primary C-H bond in toluene

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongjia; Huang, Xiaoqing; Li, Yujing; Xu, Yuxi; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Enbo; Duan, Xiangfeng; Huang, Yu

    2013-01-01

    An effective hemin catalyst on graphene support for selective oxidation of primary C-H bond in toluene is reported with an over 50% conversion rate achieved at mild conditions. Significantly this hybrid material shows catalytic efficiency in toluene oxidation with selectivity towards benzoic acid. The role of graphene support is discussed here as providing large contact area between the catalyst and the substrate, maintaining hemin in catalytically active monomer form, attracting electron to promote site isolation, as well as protecting hemin from oxidative degradation during the reaction. Moreover, graphene is suggested to largely alter the final product selectivity, due to the different ?-? interaction strength between the graphene support and the substrate/oxidized products. With longer reaction time, overall conversion rate tends to maintain relatively unchanged while toluene undergoes a series of oxidation to convert mostly to benzoic acid.

  20. Graphene-hemin hybrid material as effective catalyst for selective oxidation of primary C-H bond in toluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongjia; Huang, Xiaoqing; Li, Yujing; Xu, Yuxi; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Enbo; Duan, Xiangfeng; Huang, Yu

    2013-05-01

    An effective hemin catalyst on graphene support for selective oxidation of primary C-H bond in toluene is reported with an over 50% conversion rate achieved at mild conditions. Significantly this hybrid material shows catalytic efficiency in toluene oxidation with selectivity towards benzoic acid. The role of graphene support is discussed here as providing large contact area between the catalyst and the substrate, maintaining hemin in catalytically active monomer form, attracting electron to promote site isolation, as well as protecting hemin from oxidative degradation during the reaction. Moreover, graphene is suggested to largely alter the final product selectivity, due to the different ?-? interaction strength between the graphene support and the substrate/oxidized products. With longer reaction time, overall conversion rate tends to maintain relatively unchanged while toluene undergoes a series of oxidation to convert mostly to benzoic acid.

  1. Modeling and experimental evaluation of the diffusion bonding of the oxide dispersion strengthened steel PM2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittel, Wiebke; Basuki, Widodo W.; Aktaa, Jarir

    2015-10-01

    A modeling based optimization process of the solid state diffusion bonding is presented for joining ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened steels PM2000. An optimization study employing varying bonding temperatures and pressures results in almost the same strength and toughness of the bonded compared to the as received material. TEM investigations of diffusion bonded samples show a homogeneous distribution of oxide particles at the bonding seam similar to that in the bulk. Hence, no loss in strength or creep resistance due to oxide particle agglomeration is found, as verified by the mechanical properties observed for the joint.

  2. Overcoming the "oxidant problem": strategies to use O2 as the oxidant in organometallic C-H oxidation reactions catalyzed by Pd (and Cu).

    PubMed

    Campbell, Alison N; Stahl, Shannon S

    2012-06-19

    Oxidation reactions are key transformations in organic chemistry because they can increase chemical complexity and incorporate heteroatom substituents into carbon-based molecules. This principle is manifested in the conversion of petrochemical feedstocks into commodity chemicals and in the synthesis of fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and other complex organic molecules. The utility and function of these molecules correlate directly with the presence and specific placement of oxygen and nitrogen heteroatoms and other functional groups within the molecules. Methods for selective oxidation of C-H bonds have expanded significantly over the past decade, and their role in the synthesis of organic chemicals will continue to increase. Our group's contributions to this field are linked to our broader interest in the development and mechanistic understanding of aerobic oxidation reactions. Molecular oxygen (O(2)) is the ideal oxidant. Its low cost and lack of toxic byproducts make it a highly appealing reagent that can address key "green chemistry" priorities in industry. With strong economic and environmental incentives to use O(2), the commmodity chemicals industry often uses aerobic oxidation reactions. In contrast, O(2) is seldom used to prepare more-complex smaller-volume chemicals, a limitation that reflects, in part, the limited synthetic scope and utility of existing aerobic reactions. Pd-catalyzed reactions represent some of the most versatile methods for selective C-H oxidation, but they often require stoichiometric transition-metal or organic oxidants, such as Cu(II), Ag(I), or benzoquinone. This Account describes recent strategies that we have identified to use O(2) as the oxidant in these reactions. In Pd-catalyzed C-H oxidation reactions that form carbon-heteroatom bonds, the stoichiometric oxidant is often needed to promote difficult reductive elimination steps in the catalytic mechanism. To address this challenge, we have identified new ancillary ligands for Pd that promote reductive elimination, or replaced Pd with a Cu catalyst that undergoes facile reductive elimination from a Cu(III) intermediate. Both strategies have enabled O(2) to be used as the sole stoichiometric oxidant in the catalytic reactions. C-H oxidation reactions that form the product via ?-hydride or C-C reductive elimination steps tend to be more amenable to the use of O(2). The use of new ancillary ligands has also overcome some of the limitations in these methods. Mechanistic studies are providing insights into some (but not yet all) of these advances in catalytic reactivity. PMID:22263575

  3. Mode specificity in bond selective reactions F + HOD ? HF + OD and DF + OH

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Hongwei; Guo, Hua

    2015-05-07

    The influence of vibrational excitations in the partially deuterated water (HOD) reactant on its bond selective reactions with F is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum wave packet method on an accurate global potential energy surface. Despite the decidedly early barrier of the F + H{sub 2}O reaction, reactant vibrational excitation in each local stretching mode of HOD is found to significantly enhance the reaction which breaks the excited bond. In the mean time, excitation of the HOD bending mode also enhances the reaction, but with much lower efficacy and weaker bond selectivity. Except for low collision energies, all vibrational modes are more effective in promoting the bond selective reactions than the translational energy. These results are compared with the predictions of the recently proposed sudden vector projection model.

  4. Mode specificity in bond selective reactions F + HOD ? HF + OD and DF + OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hongwei; Guo, Hua

    2015-05-01

    The influence of vibrational excitations in the partially deuterated water (HOD) reactant on its bond selective reactions with F is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum wave packet method on an accurate global potential energy surface. Despite the decidedly early barrier of the F + H2O reaction, reactant vibrational excitation in each local stretching mode of HOD is found to significantly enhance the reaction which breaks the excited bond. In the mean time, excitation of the HOD bending mode also enhances the reaction, but with much lower efficacy and weaker bond selectivity. Except for low collision energies, all vibrational modes are more effective in promoting the bond selective reactions than the translational energy. These results are compared with the predictions of the recently proposed sudden vector projection model.

  5. Mode specificity in bond selective reactions F + HOD ? HF + OD and DF + OH.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongwei; Guo, Hua

    2015-05-01

    The influence of vibrational excitations in the partially deuterated water (HOD) reactant on its bond selective reactions with F is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum wave packet method on an accurate global potential energy surface. Despite the decidedly early barrier of the F + H2O reaction, reactant vibrational excitation in each local stretching mode of HOD is found to significantly enhance the reaction which breaks the excited bond. In the mean time, excitation of the HOD bending mode also enhances the reaction, but with much lower efficacy and weaker bond selectivity. Except for low collision energies, all vibrational modes are more effective in promoting the bond selective reactions than the translational energy. These results are compared with the predictions of the recently proposed sudden vector projection model. PMID:25956102

  6. Oxidation reactions on neutral cobalt oxide clusters: experimental and theoretical studies

    E-print Network

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    Oxidation reactions on neutral cobalt oxide clusters: experimental and theoretical studies Yan Xie.1039/b915590b Reactions of neutral cobalt oxide clusters (ComOn, m = 3­9, n = 3­13) with CO, NO, C2H2(III) concentration, the number of the cobalt atoms with high oxidation states, and the presence of an oxygen

  7. KINETICS, CATALYSIS, AND REACTION ENGINEERING Nonthermal Plasma Reactions of Dilute Nitrogen Oxide Mixtures

    E-print Network

    Yeung, Man-Chung

    KINETICS, CATALYSIS, AND REACTION ENGINEERING Nonthermal Plasma Reactions of Dilute Nitrogen Oxide atom and N2(A) are found to control the conversion of nitrogen oxides and the evolution of byproducts for the conversion of nitrogen oxides,1,2,4-10 sulfur dioxide,11 and volatile organic car- bons.12 Despite its

  8. Palladium-Catalyzed Aryl C(sp(2))-H Bond Hydroxylation of 2-Arylpyridine Using TBHP as Oxidant.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiawei; Liu, Ping; Sun, Peipei

    2015-03-01

    An efficient synthesis of phenols via Pd-catalyzed, pyridyl-directed homogeneous hydroxylation of the aryl C-H bond was developed, in which tert-butyl hydroperoxide was used as the sole oxidant. The method had a broad group tolerance and was available for both electron-rich and electron-deficient substrates. The reaction of a series of 2-arylpyridine derivatives gave the ortho-hydroxylation products in moderate to good yields. PMID:25664805

  9. Mechanistic studies on metal-catalyzed carbon-nitrogen bond forming reactions

    E-print Network

    Strieter, Eric R

    2005-01-01

    Mechanistic studies on copper and palladium-catalyzed C-N bond forming reactions are described. To understand the mechanistic details of these processes, several principles of physical organic chemistry have been employed. ...

  10. Can the Bond Price Reaction to Earnings Announcements Predict Future Stock Returns?

    E-print Network

    Tipple, Brett

    Can the Bond Price Reaction to Earnings Announcements Predict Future Stock Returns? Omri Even predictive power for post-announcement stock returns and that it is incremental to previously documented relative to the stock market is what gives bond returns the ability to predict future stock returns

  11. Analytic bond-order potential for atomistic simulations of zinc oxide

    E-print Network

    Nordlund, Kai

    Analytic bond-order potential for atomistic simulations of zinc oxide Paul Erhart1 , Niklas Juslin2 for zinc oxide and its elemental constituents is derived based on an analytical bond-order formalism. The model potential provides a good description of the bulk properties of various solid structures of zinc

  12. Effects of Thermal Cycling on Thermal Expansion and Mechanical Properties of Sic Fiber-reinforced Reaction-bonded Si3n4 Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Palczer, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal expansion curves for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix composites (SiC/RBSN) and unreinforced RBSN were measured from 25 to 1400 C in nitrogen and in oxygen. The effects of fiber/matrix bonding and cycling on the thermal expansion curves and room-temperature tensile properties of unidirectional composites were determined. The measured thermal expansion curves were compared with those predicted from composite theory. Predicted thermal expansion curves parallel to the fiber direction for both bonding cases were similar to that of the weakly bonded composites, but those normal to the fiber direction for both bonding cases resulted in no net dimensional changes at room temperature, and no loss in tensile properties from the as-fabricated condition. In contrast, thermal cycling in oxygen for both composites caused volume expansion primarily due to internal oxidation of RBSN. Cyclic oxidation affected the mechanical properties of the weakly bonded SiC/RBSN composites the most, resulting in loss of strain capability beyond matrix fracture and catastrophic, brittle fracture. Increased bonding between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix due to oxidation of the carbon-rich fiber surface coating and an altered residual stress pattern in the composite due to internal oxidation of the matrix are the main reasons for the poor mechanical performance of these composites.

  13. Proton transfer reactions and hydrogen-bond networks in protein environments

    PubMed Central

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Saito, Keisuke

    2014-01-01

    In protein environments, proton transfer reactions occur along polar or charged residues and isolated water molecules. These species consist of H-bond networks that serve as proton transfer pathways; therefore, thorough understanding of H-bond energetics is essential when investigating proton transfer reactions in protein environments. When the pKa values (or proton affinity) of the H-bond donor and acceptor moieties are equal, significantly short, symmetric H-bonds can be formed between the two, and proton transfer reactions can occur in an efficient manner. However, such short, symmetric H-bonds are not necessarily stable when they are situated near the protein bulk surface, because the condition of matching pKa values is opposite to that required for the formation of strong salt bridges, which play a key role in protein–protein interactions. To satisfy the pKa matching condition and allow for proton transfer reactions, proteins often adjust the pKa via electron transfer reactions or H-bond pattern changes. In particular, when a symmetric H-bond is formed near the protein bulk surface as a result of one of these phenomena, its instability often results in breakage, leading to large changes in protein conformation. PMID:24284891

  14. Method and reaction pathway for selectively oxidizing organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Camaioni, Donald M. (Richland, WA); Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01

    A method of selectively oxidizing an organic compound in a single vessel comprises: a) combining an organic compound, an acid solution in which the organic compound is soluble, a compound containing two oxygen atoms bonded to one another, and a metal ion reducing agent capable of reducing one of such oxygen atoms, and thereby forming a mixture; b) reducing the compound containing the two oxygen atoms by reducing one of such oxygen atoms with the metal ion reducing agent to, 1) oxidize the metal ion reducing agent to a higher valence state, and 2) produce an oxygen containing intermediate capable of oxidizing the organic compound; c) reacting the oxygen containing intermediate with the organic compound to oxidize the organic compound into an oxidized organic intermediate, the oxidized organic intermediate having an oxidized carbon atom; d) reacting the oxidized organic intermediate with the acid counter ion and higher valence state metal ion to bond the acid counter ion to the oxidized carbon atom and thereby produce a quantity of an ester incorporating the organic intermediate and acid counter ion; and e) reacting the oxidized organic intermediate with the higher valence state metal ion and water to produce a quantity of alcohol which is less than the quantity of ester, the acid counter ion incorporated in the ester rendering the carbon atom bonded to the counter ion less reactive with the oxygen containing intermediate in the mixture than is the alcohol with the oxygen containing intermediate.

  15. Nitrogen-doped and simultaneously reduced graphene oxide with superior dispersion as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Cheol-Ho; Yun, Jin-Mun; Lee, Sungho; Jo, Seong Mu; Yoo, Sung Jong; Cho, Eun Ae; Khil, Myung-Seob; Joh, Han-Ik

    2014-11-15

    Nitrogen doped graphene oxide (Nr-GO) with properties suitable for electrocatalysts is easily synthesized using phenylhydrazine as a reductant at relatively low temperature. The reducing agent removes various oxygen functional groups bonded to graphene oxide and simultaneously dope the nitrogen atoms bonded with phenyl group all over the basal planes and edge sites of the graphene. The Nr-GO exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic activities for oxygen reduction reaction compared to the commercial carbon black and graphene oxide due to the electronic modification of the graphene structure. In addition, Nr-GO shows excellent dispersibility in various solvent due to the dopant molecules.

  16. Theory of chemical bonds in metalloenzymes - Manganese oxides clusters in the oxygen evolution center -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, K.; Shoji, M.; Saito, T.; Isobe, H.; Yamada, S.; Nishihara, S.; Kawakami, T.; Kitagawa, Y.; Yamanaka, S.; Okumura, M.

    2012-12-01

    In early 1980 we have initiated broken-symmetry (BS) MO theoretical calculations of transition-metal oxo species M = O (M = Ti,V,Cr,Mn,Fe,Ni,Cu) to elucidate the nature of d?-p? and d?-p? bonds. It has been concluded that high-valent M = O species such as [Mn(IV) = O]2+ and [Fe(IV) = O]2+ exhibit electrophilic property in a sharp contrast with nucleophilic character of low-valent M = O bonds: [M(II)O2-]0, and closed-shell d?-p? bonds of high-valent M = O species often suffer the triplet-instability, giving rise to open-shell (BS) configurations with significant metal-diradical (MDR) character: •M-O•: note that these bonds are therefore regarded as typical examples of strongly correlated electron systems. Because of the MDR character, 1,4-metal diradical mechanism was indeed preferable to four-centered mechanism in the case of addition reaction of naked Mn(IV) = O to ethylene. Recently the manganese-oxo species have been receiving renewed interest in relation to catalytic cycle of oxygen evolution from water molecules in the photosynthesis II (PSII) system. Accumulated experimental results indicate that this process is catalyzed with four manganese oxide clusters coordinated with calcium ion (CaMn4O4). Past decade we have performed BS MO theoretical investigations of manganese oxide clusters related to CaMn4O4. These calculations have elucidated that high-valent Mn(X) = O (X = IV,V) bonds exhibit intermediate MDR character (y=40-60%) in the case of total low-spin (LS) configuration but the MDR character decreases with coordination of Ca2+ and water molecules. While the MDR character of the Mn-oxo bonds becomes very high at the high-spin (HS) configuration. Our computational results enabled us to propose two possible mechanisms on the theoretical ground: (A) electrophilic (EP) mechanism and (B) radical coupling (RC) mechanism. The theoretical results indicate that the EP mechanism is preferable for the low-spin (LS) state in polar media like in the protein environments (native OEC), whereas the RC mechanism is feasible at the state without such environmental stabilization: local singlet and local triplet diradical mechanisms are proposed for the OO coupling process. Possibilities of EP and RC mechanisms are examined in comparison with a lot of experimental results accumulated and theoretical results with several groups.

  17. C-H Bond Oxidation Catalyzed by an Imine-Based Iron Complex: A Mechanistic Insight.

    PubMed

    Olivo, Giorgio; Nardi, Martina; Vìdal, Diego; Barbieri, Alessia; Lapi, Andrea; Gómez, Laura; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo; Costas, Miquel; Di Stefano, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    A family of imine-based nonheme iron(II) complexes (LX)2Fe(OTf)2 has been prepared, characterized, and employed as C-H oxidation catalysts. Ligands LX (X = 1, 2, 3, and 4) stand for tridentate imine ligands resulting from spontaneous condensation of 2-pycolyl-amine and 4-substituted-2-picolyl aldehydes. Fast and quantitative formation of the complex occurs just upon mixing aldehyde, amine, and Fe(OTf)2 in a 2:2:1 ratio in acetonitrile solution. The solid-state structures of (L1)2Fe(OTf)(ClO4) and (L3)2Fe(OTf)2 are reported, showing a low-spin octahedral iron center, with the ligands arranged in a meridional fashion. (1)H NMR analyses indicate that the solid-state structure and spin state is retained in solution. These analyses also show the presence of an amine-imine tautomeric equilibrium. (LX)2Fe(OTf)2 efficiently catalyze the oxidation of alkyl C-H bonds employing H2O2 as a terminal oxidant. Manipulation of the electronic properties of the imine ligand has only a minor impact on efficiency and selectivity of the oxidative process. A mechanistic study is presented, providing evidence that C-H oxidations are metal-based. Reactions occur with stereoretention at the hydroxylated carbon and selectively at tertiary over secondary C-H bonds. Isotopic labeling analyses show that H2O2 is the dominant origin of the oxygen atoms inserted in the oxygenated product. Experimental evidence is provided that reactions involve initial oxidation of the complexes to the ferric state, and it is proposed that a ligand arm dissociates to enable hydrogen peroxide binding and activation. Selectivity patterns and isotopic labeling studies strongly suggest that activation of hydrogen peroxide occurs by heterolytic O-O cleavage, without the assistance of a cis-binding water or alkyl carboxylic acid. The sum of these observations provides sound evidence that controlled activation of H2O2 at (LX)2Fe(OTf)2 differs from that occurring in biomimetic iron catalysts described to date. PMID:26457760

  18. A molecular dynamics study of bond exchange reactions in covalent adaptable networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Yu, Kai; Mu, Xiaoming; Shi, Xinghua; Wei, Yujie; Guo, Yafang; Qi, H Jerry

    2015-08-21

    Covalent adaptable networks are polymers that can alter the arrangement of network connections by bond exchange reactions where an active unit attaches to an existing bond then kicks off its pre-existing peer to form a new bond. When the polymer is stretched, bond exchange reactions lead to stress relaxation and plastic deformation, or the so-called reforming. In addition, two pieces of polymers can be rejoined together without introducing additional monomers or chemicals on the interface, enabling welding and reprocessing. Although covalent adaptable networks have been researched extensively in the past, knowledge about the macromolecular level network alternations is limited. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the macromolecular details of bond exchange reactions in a recently reported epoxy system. An algorithm for bond exchange reactions is first developed and applied to study a crosslinking network formed by epoxy resin DGEBA with the crosslinking agent tricarballylic acid. The trace of the active units is tracked to show the migration of these units within the network. Network properties, such as the distance between two neighboring crosslink sites, the chain angle, and the initial modulus, are examined after each iteration of the bond exchange reactions to provide detailed information about how material behaviors and macromolecular structure evolve. Stress relaxation simulations are also conducted. It is found that even though bond exchange reactions change the macroscopic shape of the network, microscopic network characteristic features, such as the distance between two neighboring crosslink sites and the chain angle, relax back to the unstretched isotropic state. Comparison with a recent scaling theory also shows good agreement. PMID:26166382

  19. On the Nature of Carbon-Hydrogen Bond Activation at Rhodium and Related Reactions

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    On the Nature of Carbon-Hydrogen Bond Activation at Rhodium and Related Reactions William D. Jones an overview of the use of pentamethylcyclopentadienyl and trispyrazolylborate rhodium complexes to reaction also. In this paper, a historical summary is made in the use of rhodium complexes for discerning

  20. COPPER-CATALYZED CROSS-COUPLING REACTIONS: THE FORMATION OF CARBON-CARBON AND CARBON-SULFUR BONDS

    E-print Network

    Venkataraman, Dhandapani "DV"

    COPPER-CATALYZED CROSS-COUPLING REACTIONS: THE FORMATION OF CARBON-CARBON AND CARBON-SULFUR BONDS-COUPLING REACTIONS: THE FORMATION OF CARBON-CARBON AND CARBON-SULFUR BONDS A Dissertation Presented by CRAIG G. BATES: THE FORMATION OF CARBON-CARBON AND CARBON-SULFUR BONDS MAY 2005 CRAIG G BATES, B.S., ROGER WILLIAMS UNIVERISTY

  1. Correlation among electronegativity, cation polarizability, optical basicity and single bond strength of simple oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrov, Vesselin; Komatsu, Takayuki

    2012-12-15

    A suitable relationship between free-cation polarizability and electronegativity of elements in different valence states and with the most common coordination numbers has been searched on the basis of the similarity in physical nature of both quantities. In general, the cation polarizability increases with decreasing element electronegativity. A systematic periodic change in the polarizability against the electronegativity has been observed in the isoelectronic series. It has been found that generally the optical basicity increases and the single bond strength of simple oxides decreases with decreasing the electronegativity. The observed trends have been discussed on the basis of electron donation ability of the oxide ions and type of chemical bonding in simple oxides. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the single bond strength of simple oxides as a function of element electronegativity. A remarkable correlation exists between these independently obtained quantities. High values of electronegativity correspond to high values of single bond strength and vice versa. It is obvious that the observed trend in this figure is closely related to the type of chemical bonding in corresponding oxide. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A suitable relationship between free-cation polarizability and electronegativity of elements was searched. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cation polarizability increases with decreasing element electronegativity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The single bond strength of simple oxides decreases with decreasing the electronegativity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The observed trends were discussed on the basis of type of chemical bonding in simple oxides.

  2. Preparation and properties of UV curable acrylic PSA by vinyl bonded graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Beili; Ryu, Chong-Min; Jin, Xin; Kim, Hyung-Il

    2013-11-01

    Acrylic pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) with higher thermal stability for thin wafer handling were successfully prepared by forming composite with the graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles modified to have vinyl groups via subsequent reaction with isophorone diisocyanate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. The acrylic copolymer was synthesized as a base resin for PSAs by solution radical polymerization of ethyl acrylate, 2-ethylhexyl acrylate, and acrylic acid followed by further modification with GMA to have the vinyl groups available for UV curing. The peel strength of PSA decreased with the increase of gel content which was dependent on both modified GO content and UV dose. Thermal stability of UV-cured PSA was improved noticeably with increasing the modified GO content mainly due to the strong and extensive interfacial bonding formed between the acrylic copolymer matrix and GO fillers

  3. Acetaldehyde partial oxidation on the Au(111) model catalyst surface: C-C bond activation and formation of methyl acetate as an oxidative coupling product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatok, Mustafa; Vovk, Evgeny I.; Shah, Asad A.; Turksoy, Abdurrahman; Ozensoy, Emrah

    2015-11-01

    Partial oxidation of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) on the oxygen pre-covered Au(111) single crystal model catalyst was investigated via Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) and Temperature Programmed Reaction Spectroscopy (TPRS) techniques, where ozone (O3) was utilized as the oxygen delivery agent providing atomic oxygen to the reacting surface. We show that for low exposures of O3 and small surface oxygen coverages, two partial oxidation products namely, methyl acetate (CH3COOCH3) and acetic acid (CH3COOH) can be generated without the formation of significant quantities of carbon dioxide. The formation of methyl acetate as the oxidative coupling reaction product implies that oxygen pre-covered Au(111) single crystal model catalyst surface can activate C-C bonds. In addition to the generation of these products; indications of the polymerization of acetaldehyde on the gold surface were also observed as an additional reaction route competing with the partial and total oxidation pathways. The interplay between the partial oxidation, total oxidation and polymerization pathways reveals the complex catalytic chemistry associated with the interaction between the acetaldehyde and atomic oxygen on catalytic gold surfaces.

  4. Gas-phase reaction of CeV2O7+ with C2H4: activation of C-C and C-H bonds.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia-Bi; Yuan, Zhen; Meng, Jing-Heng; Liu, Qing-Yu; He, Sheng-Gui

    2014-12-15

    The reactivity of metal oxide clusters toward hydrocarbon molecules can be changed, tuned, or controlled by doping. Cerium-doped vanadium cluster cations CeV2O7(+) are generated by laser ablation, mass-selected by a quadrupole mass filter, and then reacted with C2H4 in a linear ion trap reactor. The reaction is characterized by a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Three types of reaction channels are observed: 1) single oxygen-atom transfer , 2) double oxygen-atom transfer , and 3) C=C bond cleavage. This study provides the first bimetallic oxide cluster ion, CeV2O7(+), which gives rise to C=C bond cleavage of ethene. Neither Ce(x)O(y)(±) nor V(x)O(y)(±) alone possess the necessary topological and electronic properties to bring about such a reaction. PMID:25208512

  5. Water oxidation reaction in natural and artificial photosynthetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal

    2013-12-10

    Understanding the structure and mechanism of water oxidation catalysts is an essential component for developing artificial photosynthetic devices. In the natural water oxidation catalyst, the geometric and electronic structure of its inorganic core, the Mn{sub 4}CaO{sub 5} cluster, has been studied by spectroscopic and diffraction measurements. In inorganic systems, metal oxides seem to be good candidates for water oxidation catalysts. Understanding the reaction mechanism in both natural and oxide-based catalysts will helpin further developing efficient and robust water oxidation catalysts.

  6. Design Insights for Tuning the Electrocatalytic Activity of Perovskite Oxides for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Malkhandi, S; Trinh, P; Manohar, AK; Manivannan, A; Balasubramanian, M; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2015-04-16

    Rechargeable metal-air batteries and water electrolyzers based on aqueous alkaline electrolytes hold the potential to be sustainable solutions to address the challenge of storing large amounts of electrical energy generated from solar and wind resources. For these batteries and electrolyzers to be economically viable, it is essential to have efficient, durable, and inexpensive electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction. In this article, we describe new insights for predicting and tuning the activity of inexpensive transition metal oxides for designing efficient and inexpensive electrocatalysts. We have focused on understanding the factors determining the electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution in a strong alkaline medium. To this end, we have conducted a systematic investigation of nanophase calcium-doped lanthanum cobalt manganese oxide, an example of a mixed metal oxide that can be tuned for its electrocatalytic activity by varying the transition metal composition. Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical polarization experiments, and analysis of mechanisms, we have identified the key determinants of electrocatalytic activity. We have found that the Tafel slopes are determined by the oxidation states and the bond energy of the surface intermediates of Mn-OH and Co-OH bonds while the catalytic activity increased with the average d-electron occupancy of the sigma* orbital of the M-OH bond. We anticipate that such understanding will be very useful in predicting the behavior of other transition metal oxide catalysts.

  7. Modeling of metal-oxide semiconductor: Analytical bond-order potential for cupric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kun; Yang, Wen; Wei, Ji-Lin; Du, Shi-Wen; Li, Yong-Tang

    2014-04-01

    Atomistic potentials for cupric element and cupric oxide are derived based on the analytical bond-order scheme that was presented by Brenner [Brenner D W, “Erratum: Empirical potential for hydrocarbons for use in simulating the chemical vapor deposition of diamond films”, Phys. Rev. B 1992, 46 1948]. In this paper, for the pure cupric element, the energy and structural parameters for several bulk phases as well as dimmer structure are well reproduced. The reference data are taken from our density functional theory calculations and the available experiments. The model potential also provides a good description of the bulk properties of various solid structures of cupric oxide compound structures, including cohesive energies, lattice parameters, and elastic constants.

  8. Reaction Mechanism for m-Xylene Oxidation in the Claus Process by Sulfur Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sourab; Raj, Abhijeet; Al Shoaibi, Ahmed S; Chung, Suk Ho

    2015-09-24

    In the Claus process, the presence of aromatic contaminants such benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX), in the H2S feed stream has a detrimental effect on catalytic reactors, where BTX form soot particles and clog and deactivate the catalysts. Among BTX, xylenes are proven to be most damaging contaminant for catalysts. BTX oxidation in the Claus furnace, before they enter catalyst beds, provides a solution to this problem. A reaction kinetics study on m-xylene oxidation by SO2, an oxidant present in Claus furnace, is presented. The density functional theory is used to study the formation of m-xylene radicals (3-methylbenzyl, 2,6-dimethylphenyl, 2,4-dimethylphenyl, and 3,5-dimethylphenyl) through H-abstraction and their oxidation by SO2. The mechanism begins with SO2 addition on the radicals through an O-atom rather than the S-atom with the release of 180.0-183.1 kJ/mol of reaction energies. This exothermic reaction involves energy barriers in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ/mol for several m-xylene radicals. Thereafter, O-S bond scission takes place to release SO, and the O-atom remaining on aromatics leads to CO formation. Among four m-xylene radicals, the resonantly stabilized 3-methylbenzyl exhibited the lowest SO2 addition and SO elimination rates. The reaction rate constants are provided to facilitate Claus process simulations to find conditions suitable for BTX oxidation. PMID:26334187

  9. Bond cleavage, fragment modification and reassembly in enantioselective three-component reactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan; Zhou, Jun; Xia, Fei; Kang, Zhenghui; Hu, Wenhao

    2015-01-01

    Chemical bond cleavage and reconstruction are common processes in traditional rearrangement reactions. In contrast, the process that involves bond cleavage, fragment modification and then reconstruction of the modified fragment provides an efficient way to build structurally diversified molecules. Here, we report a palladium(II)/chiral phosphoric acid catalysed three-component reaction of aryldiazoacetates, enamines and imines to afford ?-amino-?-oxo pentanoic acid derivatives in good yields with excellent diastereoselectivities and high enantioselectivities. The stereoselective reaction went through a unique process that involves cleavage of a C–N bond, modification of the resulting amino fragment and selective reassembly of the modified fragment. This innovative multi-component process represents a highly efficient way to build structurally diversified polyfunctional molecules in an atom and step economic fashion. A keto-iminium is proposed as a key intermediate and a chiral palladium/phosphate complex is proposed as an active catalyst. PMID:25586817

  10. In-process oxidation protection in fluxless brazing or diffusion bonding of aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelly, K. P.; Featherston, A. B.

    1974-01-01

    Aluminum is cleaned of its oxide coating and is sealed immediately with polymeric material which makes it suitable for fluxless brazing or diffusion bonding. Time involved between cleaning and brazing is no longer critical factor.

  11. Iodine Oxide Thermite Reactions: Physical and Biological Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Rod; Pantoya, Michelle; Bless, Stephan; Clark, William

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the potential for some thermite-like material reactions to kill bacteria spores. Iodine oxides and silver oxides react vigorously with metals like aluminum, tantalum, and neodymium. These reactions theoretically produce temperatures as high as 8000K, leading to vaporization of the reactants, producing very hot iodine and/or silver gases. We performed a series of computations and experiments to characterize these reactions under both quasi-static and ballistic impact conditions. Criteria for impact reaction were established. Measurements of temperature and pressure changes and chemical evolution will be reported. Basic combustion characterizations of these reactions, such as thermal equilibrium analysis and reaction propagation rates as well as ignition sensitivity, will be discussed. Additionally, testing protocols were developed to characterize the biocidal effects of these reactive materials on B. subtilis spores. The evidence from these tests indicates that these reactions produce heat, pressure, and highly biocidal gases.

  12. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Laboratory-Scale Carbon–Carbon Bond-Forming Reactions of Ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Vaneet; Stokes, Benjamin J.; Sigman, Matthew S.

    2014-01-01

    Ethylene, the simplest alkene, is the most abundantly synthesized organic molecule by volume. It is readily incorporated into transitionmetal–catalyzed carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions through migratory insertions into alkylmetal intermediates. Because of its D2h symmetry, only one insertion outcome is possible. This limits byproduct formation and greatly simplifies analysis. As described within this Minireview, many carbon–carbon bond-forming reactions incorporate a molecule (or more) of ethylene at ambient pressure and temperature. In many cases, a useful substituted alkene is incorporated into the product. PMID:24105881

  13. Reaction-diffusion analysis for one-step plasma etching and bonding of microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rosso, Michel; Steijn, Volkert van; Smet, Louis C. P. M. de; Sudhoelter, Ernst J. R.; Kreutzer, Michiel T.; Kleijn, Chris R.

    2011-04-25

    A self-similar reaction front develops in reactive ion etching when the ions penetrate channels of shallow height h. This relates to the patterning of microchannels using a single-step etching and bonding, as described by Rhee et al. [Lab Chip 5, 102 (2005)]. Experimentally, we report that the front location scales as x{sub f{approx}}ht{sup 1/2} and the width is time-invariant and scales as {delta}{approx}h. Mean-field reaction-diffusion theory and Knudsen diffusion give a semiquantitative understanding of these observations and allow optimization of etching times in relation to bonding requirements.

  14. Isotopic Tracer Studies of Reaction Pathways for Propane Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Molybdenum Oxide Catalysts

    E-print Network

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Isotopic Tracer Studies of Reaction Pathways for Propane Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Molybdenum of propane over ZrO2-supported MoOx catalysts. Competitive reactions of C3H6 and CH3 13 CH2CH3 showed combustion of propene, or by direct combustion of propane. A mixture of C3H8 and C3D8 undergoes oxidative

  15. 40 CFR 721.10375 - Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene oxide and ethylene oxide, copolymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction... Substances § 721.10375 Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene oxide and ethylene oxide... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as hydroxypropyl methacrylate,...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10375 - Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene oxide and ethylene oxide, copolymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction... Substances § 721.10375 Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene oxide and ethylene oxide... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as hydroxypropyl methacrylate,...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10375 - Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene oxide and ethylene oxide, copolymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction... Substances § 721.10375 Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene oxide and ethylene oxide... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as hydroxypropyl methacrylate,...

  18. The Effect of Metal Oxide on Nanoparticles from Thermite Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Lewis Ryan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine how metal oxide used in a thermite reaction can impact the production of nanoparticles. The results showed the presence of nanoparticles (less than 1 micron in diameter) of at least one type produced by each metal oxide. The typical particles were metallic spheres, which ranged from 300 nanometers in…

  19. Classification of metal-oxide bonded interactions based on local potential- and kinetic-energy densities

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Cox, David; Crawford, T Daniel; Rosso, Kevin M.; Ross, Nancy; Downs, R. T.

    2006-02-28

    A classification of the HF bonded interactions comprising a large number of molecules has been proposed by Espinosa et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 117, 5529 (2002)] based on the ratio |V(rc)|/G(rc) where |V(rc)| is the magnitude of the local potential energy density and G(rc) is the local kinetic density evaluated at the bond critical points, rc. A calculation of the ratio for the MO bonded interactions comprising a relatively large number of molecules and earth materials, together with the constraints imposed by the values of Ñ2?(rc) and the local electronic energy density H(rc) = G(rc) + V(rc) in the HF study, yielded the same classification for the oxides as found for the fluorides. This is true despite the different trends of the bond critical point and local energy properties with the bond length displayed by the HF and MO bonded interactions. LiO, NaO and MgO bonded interactions classify as closed shell ionic bonds, BeO, AlO, SiO, BO and PO bonded interactions classify as bonds of intermediate character and NO bonded interactions classify as shared covalent bonds. CO and SO bonded interactions classify as both intermediate and covalent bonded interactions. The CO triple bonded interaction classifies as a bond of intermediate character and the CO single bonded interaction classifies as a covalent bond whereas their H(rc) value indicates that they are both covalent bonds. The |V(rc)|/G(rc) ratios for the BeO, AlO and SiO bonded interactions indicate that they have a substantial component of ionic character despite their classification as bonds of intermediate character. The trend between |V(rc)|/G(rc) and the character of the bonded interaction is consistent with trends expected from electronegativity considerations. The connection between the net charges and the experimental SiO bond length evaluated for the Si and O atoms comprising two orthosilicates are examined in terms of the |V(rc)|/G(rc) values.

  20. Deamination, oxidation, and C-C bond cleavage reactivity of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-formylcytosine, and 5-carboxycytosine.

    PubMed

    Schiesser, Stefan; Pfaffeneder, Toni; Sadeghian, Keyarash; Hackner, Benjamin; Steigenberger, Barbara; Schröder, Arne S; Steinbacher, Jessica; Kashiwazaki, Gengo; Höfner, Georg; Wanner, Klaus T; Ochsenfeld, Christian; Carell, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Three new cytosine derived DNA modifications, 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine (hmdC), 5-formyl-2'-deoxycytidine (fdC) and 5-carboxy-2'-deoxycytidine (cadC) were recently discovered in mammalian DNA, particularly in stem cell DNA. Their function is currently not clear, but it is assumed that in stem cells they might be intermediates of an active demethylation process. This process may involve base excision repair, C-C bond cleaving reactions or deamination of hmdC to 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine (hmdU). Here we report chemical studies that enlighten the chemical reactivity of the new cytosine nucleobases. We investigated their sensitivity toward oxidation and deamination and we studied the C-C bond cleaving reactivity of hmdC, fdC, and cadC in the absence and presence of thiols as biologically relevant (organo)catalysts. We show that hmdC is in comparison to mdC rapidly oxidized to fdC already in the presence of air. In contrast, deamination reactions were found to occur only to a minor extent. The C-C bond cleavage reactions require the presence of high concentration of thiols and are acid catalyzed. While hmdC dehydroxymethylates very slowly, fdC and especially cadC react considerably faster to dC. Thiols are active site residues in many DNA modifiying enzymes indicating that such enzymes could play a role in an alternative active DNA demethylation mechanism via deformylation of fdC or decarboxylation of cadC. Quantum-chemical calculations support the catalytic influence of a thiol on the C-C bond cleavage. PMID:23980549

  1. Concerted O atom-proton transfer in the O—O bond forming step in water oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zuofeng; Concepcion, Javier C.; Hu, Xiangqian; Yang, Weitao; Hoertz, Paul G.; Meyer, Thomas J

    2010-04-20

    As the terminal step in photosystem II, and a potential half-reaction for artificial photosynthesis, water oxidation (2H2O ? O2 + 4e- + 4H+) is key, but it imposes a significant mechanistic challenge with requirements for both 4e-/4H- loss and O—O bond formation. Significant progress in water oxidation catalysis has been achieved recently by use of single-site Ru metal complex catalysts such as [Ru(Mebimpy)(bpy)(OH2)]2+ [Mebimpy = 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine]. When oxidized from RuII-OH22+ to RuV = O3+, these complexes undergo O—O bond formation by O-atom attack on a H2O molecule, which is often the rate-limiting step. Microscopic details of O—O bond formation have been explored by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations the results of which provide detailed insight into mechanism and a strategy for enhancing catalytic rates. It utilizes added bases as proton acceptors and concerted atom–proton transfer (APT) with O-atom transfer to the O atom of a water molecule in concert with proton transfer to the base (B). Base catalyzed APT reactivity in water oxidation is observed both in solution and on the surfaces of oxide electrodes derivatized by attached phosphonated metal complex catalysts. These results have important implications for catalytic, electrocatalytic, and photoelectrocatalytic water oxidation.

  2. CONTAMINANT ADSORPTION AND OXIDATION VIA FENTON REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground water treatment process is proposed involving two cgemical processes: adsorption and oxidation. Adsorption of an organic compound onto granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing iron conveniently results in immobilizing and concentrating contaminants from the ground w...

  3. Mechanistic Studies of the Reactions of Silicon-Carbon Double Bonds. Addition of Alcohols to

    E-print Network

    Leigh, William J.

    Mechanistic Studies of the Reactions of Silicon-Carbon Double Bonds. Addition of Alcohols to 1 11, 1995X The addition of water, aliphatic alcohols, and acetic acid to 1,1-diphenylsilene (generated isotope effects for the addition of water, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, tert-butyl alcohol, and acetic

  4. Students' Understandings of Chemical Bonds and the Energetics of Chemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boo, Hong Kwen

    1998-01-01

    Investigates Grade 12 students' understandings of the nature of chemical bonds and the energetics elicited across five familiar chemical reactions following a course of instruction. Discusses the many ways in which students can misconstruct concepts and principles. Contains 63 references. (DDR)

  5. Bond length estimates for oxide crystals with a molecular power law expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.

    2015-07-01

    A molecular power law bond length regression expression, R(M-O) = 1.39( s/ r)-0.22, defined in terms of the quotient, s/ r, where s is the averaged Pauling bond strength for the bonded interaction comprising a given molecular coordination polyhedron and r is the periodic table row number for the M atom, serves to replicate the bulk of the 470 individual experimental M-O average bond lengths estimated with Shannon's (Acta Crystallogr A 32(5):751-767, 1976) crystal radii for oxides to within 0.10 Å. The success of the molecular expression is ascribed to a one-to-one deep-seated connection that obtains between the electron density accumulated between bonded pairs of atoms and the average Pauling bond strength. It also implies that the bonded interactions that constitute oxide crystals are governed in large part by local forces. Although the expression reproduces the bond lengths involving rare earth atoms typically to within ~0.05 Å, it does not reproduce the lanthanide ionic radius contraction. It also fails to reproduce the experimental bond lengths for selected transition cations like Cu1+, Ag1+ and VILSFe2+ and for cations like IVK+, VIBa2+ and IIU6+.

  6. Reactions of calcium orthosilicate and barium zirconate with oxides and sulfates of various elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1979-01-01

    Calcium orthosilicate and barium zirconate were evaluated as the insulation layer of thermal barrier coatings for air cooled gas turbine components. Their reactions with various oxides and sulfates were studied at 1100 C and 1300 C for times ranging up to 400 and 200 hours, respectively. These oxides and sulfates represent potential impurities or additives in gas turbine fuels and in turbine combustion air, as well as elements of potential bond coat alloys. The phase compositions of the reaction products were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. BaZrO3 and 2CaO-SiO2 both reacted with P2O5, V2O5, Cr2O3, Al2O3, and SiO2. In addition, 2CaO-SiO2 reacted with Na2O, BaO, MgO, and CoO and BaZrO3 reacted with Fe2O3.

  7. Studies on the Reactive Species in Fluoride-Mediated Carbon-Carbon Bond-Forming Reactions: Carbanion Formation

    E-print Network

    Reich, Hans J.

    Studies on the Reactive Species in Fluoride-Mediated Carbon-Carbon Bond-Forming ReactionsVed October 27, 2005 The reactive species in fluoride-mediated carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions- methylsilicate (TASF) or crypt[2.1.1]-solvated lithium enolates. The catalytic cycle runs smoothly with the crypt

  8. Interplay of Experiment and Theory in Elucidating Mechanisms of Oxidation Reactions by a Nonheme Ru(IV)O Complex.

    PubMed

    Dhuri, Sunder N; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Lee, Yong-Min; Shin, Sun Young; Kim, Jin Hwa; Mandal, Debasish; Shaik, Sason; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-07-01

    A comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the reactivity patterns and reaction mechanisms in alkane hydroxylation, olefin epoxidation, cyclohexene oxidation, and sulfoxidation reactions by a mononuclear nonheme ruthenium(IV)-oxo complex, [Ru(IV)(O)(terpy)(bpm)](2+) (1), has been conducted. In alkane hydroxylation (i.e., oxygen rebound vs oxygen non-rebound mechanisms), both the experimental and theoretical results show that the substrate radical formed via a rate-determining H atom abstraction of alkanes by 1 prefers dissociation over oxygen rebound and desaturation processes. In the oxidation of olefins by 1, the observations of a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) value of 1 and styrene oxide formation lead us to conclude that an epoxidation reaction via oxygen atom transfer (OAT) from the Ru(IV)O complex to the C?C double bond is the dominant pathway. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the epoxidation reaction is a two-step, two-spin-state process. In contrast, the oxidation of cyclohexene by 1 affords products derived from allylic C-H bond oxidation, with a high KIE value of 38(3). The preference for H atom abstraction over C?C double bond epoxidation in the oxidation of cyclohexene by 1 is elucidated by DFT calculations, which show that the energy barrier for C-H activation is 4.5 kcal mol(-1) lower than the energy barrier for epoxidation. In the oxidation of sulfides, sulfoxidation by the electrophilic Ru-oxo group of 1 occurs via a direct OAT mechanism, and DFT calculations show that this is a two-spin-state reaction in which the transition state is the lowest in the S = 0 state. PMID:26075466

  9. Thermal oxidative degradation reactions of perfluoroalkylethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Ito, T. I.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanisms operative in thermal oxidative degradation of Fomblin Z and hexafluoropropene oxide derived fluids and the effect of alloys and additives upon these processes are investigated. The nature of arrangements responsible for the inherent thermal oxidative instability of the Fomblin Z fluids is not established. It was determined that this behavior is not associated with hydrogen end groups or peroxy linkages. The degradation rate of these fluids at elevated temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres is dependent on the surface/volume ratio. Once a limiting ratio is reached, a steady rate appears to be attained. Based on elemental analysis and oxygen consumption data, CF2OCF2CF2O2, no. CF2CF2O, is one of the major arrangements present. The action of the M-50 and Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloys is much more drastic in the case of Fomblin Z fluids than that observed for the hexafluoropropene derived materials. The effectiveness of antioxidation anticorrosion additives, P-3 and phospha-s-triazine, in the presence of metal alloys is very limited at 316 C; at 288 C the additives arrested almost completely the fluid degradation. The phospha-s-triazine appears to be at least twice as effective as the P-3 compound; it also protected the coupon better. The Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloy degraded the fluid mainly by chain scission processes this takes place to a much lesser degree with M-50.

  10. Thermal oxidative degradation reactions of perfluoroalklethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Harris, D. H.; Smythe, M. E.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this contract was to investigate the mechanisms operative in thermal and thermal oxidative degradation of Fomblin Z and hexafluoropropene oxide derived fluids and the effect of alloys and additives upon these processes. The nature of arrangements responsible for the inherent thermal oxidative instability of the Fomblin Z fluids has not been established. It was determined that this behavior was not associated with hydrogen end-groups or peroxy linkages. The degradation rate of these fluids at elevated temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres was found to be dependent on the surface/volume ratio. Once a limiting ratio was reached, a steady rate appeared to be attained. Based on elemental analysis and oxygen consumption data, -CF2OCF2CF2O-, not -CF2CF2O-, is one of the major arrangements present. The action of the M-50 and Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloys was found to be much more drastic in the case of Fomblin Z fluids than that observed for the hexalfuoropropane oxide derived materials. The effectiveness of antioxidation/anticorrosion additives, P-3 and phospha-s-triazine, in the presence of metal alloys was very limited at 316 C; at 288 C the additives arrested almost completely the fluid degradation. The phospha-s-triazine appeared to be at least twice as effective as the P-3 compound; it also protected the coupon better. The Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloy degraded the fluid mainly by chain scission processes; this took place to a much lesser degree with M-50.

  11. Elementary reaction schemes for physical and chemical vapor deposition of transition metal oxides on silicon for high-k gate dielectric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, D.; Ashcraft, R. W.; Kelly, M. J.; Chambers, J. J.; Klein, T. M.; Parsons, G. N.

    2002-05-01

    This article describes the kinetics of reactions that result in substrate consumption during formation of ultrathin transition metal oxides on silicon. Yttrium silicate films (˜40 Å) with an equivalent silicon dioxide thickness of ˜11 Å are demonstrated by physical vapor deposition (PVD) routes. Interface reactions that occur during deposition and during postdeposition treatment are observed and compared for PVD and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) yttrium oxides and CVD aluminum-oxide systems. Silicon diffusion, metal-silicon bond formation, and reactions involving hydroxides are proposed as critical processes in interface layer formation. For PVD of yttrium silicate, oxidation is thermally activated with an effective barrier of 0.3 eV, consistent with the oxidation of silicide being the rate-limited step. For CVD aluminum oxide, interface oxidation is consistent with a process limited by silicon diffusion into the deposited oxide layer.

  12. Reactions of Propylene Oxide on Supported Silver Catalysts: Insights into Pathways Limiting Epoxidation Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Apoorva; Bedolla-Pantoja, Marco; Singh, Suyash; Lobo, Raul F.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Barteau, Mark A.

    2012-02-04

    The reactions of propylene oxide (PO) on silver catalysts were studied to understand the network of parallel and sequential reactions that may limit the selectivity of propylene epoxidation by these catalysts. The products of the anaerobic reaction of PO on Ag/a-Al2O3 were propanal, acetone and allyl alcohol for PO conversions below 2–3%. As the conversion of PO was increased either by increasing the temperature or the contact time, acrolein was formed at the expense of propanal, indicating that acrolein is a secondary reaction product in PO decomposition. With addition of oxygen to the feedstream the conversion of PO increased moderately. In contrast to the experiments in absence of oxygen, CO2 was a signi?cant product while the selectivity to propanal decreased as soon as oxygen was introduced in the system. Allyl alcohol disappeared completely from the product stream in the presence of oxygen, reacting to form acrolein and CO2. The product distribution may be explained by a network of reactions involving two types of oxametallacycles formed by ring opening of PO: one with the oxygen bonded to C1 (OMC1, linear) and the other with oxygen bonded to C2 (OMC2, branched). OMC1 reacts to form PO, propanal, and allyl alcohol.

  13. Studies of the kinetics and mechanisms of perfluoroether reactions on iron and oxidized iron surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Napier, Mary E.; Stair, Peter C.

    1992-01-01

    Polymeric perfluoroalkylethers are being considered for use as lubricants in high temperature applications, but have been observed to catalytically decompose in the presence of metals. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to explore the decomposition of three model fluorinated ethers on clean polycrystalline iron surfaces and iron surfaces chemically modified with oxygen. Low temperature adsorption of the model fluorinated ethers on the clean, oxygen modified and oxidized iron surfaces was molecular. Thermally activated defluorination of the three model compounds was observed on the clean iron surface at remarkably low temperatures, 155 K and below, with formation of iron fluoride. Preferential C-F bond scission occurred at the terminal fluoromethoxy, CF3O, of perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy ethane and perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy propane and at CF3/CF2O of perfluoro-1,3-diethoxy propane. The reactivity of the clean iron toward perfluoroalkylether decomposition when compared to other metals is due to the strength of the iron fluoride bond and the strong electron donating ability of the metallic iron. Chemisorption of an oxygen overlayer lowered the reactivity of the iron surface to the adsorption and decomposition of the three model fluorinated ethers by blocking active sites on the metal surface. Incomplete coverage of the iron surface with chemisorbed oxygen results in a reaction which resembles the defluorination reaction observed on the clean iron surface. Perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy ethane reacts on the oxidized iron surface at 138 K, through a Lewis acid assisted cleavage of the carbon oxygen bond, with preferential attack at the terminal fluoromethoxy, CF3O. The oxidized iron surface did not passivate, but became more reactive with time. Perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy propane and perfluoro-1,3-diethoxy propane desorbed prior to the observation of decomposition on the oxidized iron surface.

  14. Oxidation of low carbon steel in multicomponent gases. Part 1: Reaction mechanisms during isothermal oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Abuluwefa, H.T.; Guthrie, R.I.L.; Ajersch, F.

    1997-08-01

    The article describes rates of oxidation of low carbon steel in various nitrogen-based atmospheres of O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O in the temperature range 800 C to 1,150 C. In characterizing the oxidation process, the weight gains of the samples per unit surface area vs time data were analyzed. Reaction rates during oxidation in the binary atmospheres of Co{sub 2}-N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O-N{sub 2} followed a linear rate law and were found to be proportional to the partial pressures of CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O. These rates were controlled by rate of reactions at the oxide surface and were highly dependent on oxidation temperature. The activation energies of the phase boundary reactions obtained were approximately 274 and 264 kJ/mole, for oxidation in CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O atmospheres, respectively. Oxidation in gases containing free oxygen showed that the main oxidizing agent was the free oxygen and that additions of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O had little effect on the magnitude of the initial oxidation rates. Experiments for oxidation in multicomponent gases showed that the overall oxidation rates were the additions of rates resulting from oxidation with the individual gaseous species O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O. Oxidation in these atmospheres exhibited an initial linear rate law which gradually transformed into a parabolic. Examination of scale microstructure after 1 hour of oxidation showed that, for oxidation in carbon dioxide and water vapor atmospheres, only wustite was present, while in atmospheres containing free oxygen, all three iron oxides, wustite, magnetite, and hematite, were present.

  15. Improving the bond strength between steel rebar and concrete by oxidation treatments of the rebar

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, X.; Chung, D.D.L.

    1996-10-01

    Oxidation treatments of steel rebar by water immersion (2--5 days) and ozone exposure increased the bond strength between steel rebar and concrete by 14% and 22% respectively. The treatments slightly increased the electrical contact resistivity between rebar and concrete. Increase of the water immersion time to 7 or 10 days caused the bond strength to decrease to values still above that of the case without water treatment. The contact resistivity increased monotonically with the water immersion time.

  16. Hydrogen Bond Networks in Graphene Oxide Composite Paper: Structure and

    E-print Network

    graphitic compounds such as graphene oxide (GO) is an efficient and ver- satile option.6 Apart from being with the interlayer adhesive (water molecules). In this article, we elucidate the atomic- level structure

  17. A critical study of the role of the surface oxide layer in titanium bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, S.; Wightman, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning electron microscope/X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SEM/XPS) analysis of fractured adhesively bonded Ti 6-4 samples is discussed. The text adhesives incuded NR 056X polyimide, polypheylquinoxaline (PPQ), and LARC-13 polyimide. Differentiation between cohesive and interfacial failure was based on the absence of presence of a Ti 2p XPS photopeak. In addition, the surface oxide layer on Ti-(6A1-4V) adherends is characterized and bond strength and durability are addressed. Bond durability in various environmental conditions is discussed.

  18. Reaction Pathways and Energetics of Etheric C?O Bond Cleavage Catalyzed by Lanthanide Triflates

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Atesin, Abdurrahman C.; Li, Zhi; Curtiss, Larry A.; Marks, Tobin J.

    2013-07-15

    Efficient and selective cleavage of etheric C?O bonds is crucial for converting biomass into platform chemicals and liquid transportation fuels. In this contribution, computational methods at the DFT B3LYP level of theory are employed to understand the efficacy of lanthanide triflate catalysts (Ln(OTf)3, Ln = La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Yb, and Lu) in cleaving etheric C?O bonds. In agreement with experiment, the calculations indicate that the reaction pathway for C?O cleavage occurs via a C?H ? O?H proton transfer in concert with weakening of the C?O bond of the coordinated ether substrate to ultimately yield a coordinated alkenol. The activation energy for this process falls as the lanthanide ionic radius decreases, reflecting enhanced metal ion electrophilicity. Details of the reaction mechanism for Yb(OTf)3-catalyzed ring opening are explored in depth, and for 1-methyl-d3-butyl phenyl ether, the computed primary kinetic isotope effect of 2.4 is in excellent agreement with experiment (2.7), confirming that etheric ring-opening pathway involves proton transfer from the methyl group alpha to the etheric oxygen atom, which is activated by the electrophilic lanthanide ion. Calculations of the catalytic pathway using eight different ether substrates indicate that the more rapid cleavage of acyclic versus cyclic ethers is largely due to entropic effects, with the former C?O bond scission processes increasing the degrees of freedom/particles as the transition state is approached.

  19. Cyanoalkylation: Alkylnitriles in Catalytic C?C Bond-Forming Reactions.

    PubMed

    López, Rosa; Palomo, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Alkylnitriles are one of the most ubiquitous nitrogen-containing chemicals and are widely employed in reactions which result in nitrile-group conversion into other functionalities. Nevertheless, their use as carbon pronucleophiles in carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions has been hampered by difficulties associated mainly with the catalytic generation of active species, that is, ?-cyano carbanions or metalated nitriles. Recent investigations have addressed this challenge and have resulted in different modes of alkylnitrile activation. This review illustrates these findings, which have set the foundation for the development of practical and conceptually new catalytic, direct cyanoalkylation methodologies. PMID:26387483

  20. Bioinspired Nonheme Iron Catalysts for C-H and C?C Bond Oxidation: Insights into the Nature of the Metal-Based Oxidants.

    PubMed

    Oloo, Williamson N; Que, Lawrence

    2015-09-15

    Recent efforts to design synthetic iron catalysts for the selective and efficient oxidation of C-H and C?C bonds have been inspired by a versatile family of nonheme iron oxygenases. These bioinspired nonheme (N4)Fe(II) catalysts use H2O2 to oxidize substrates with high regio- and stereoselectivity, unlike in Fenton chemistry where highly reactive but unselective hydroxyl radicals are produced. In this Account, we highlight our efforts to shed light on the nature of metastable peroxo intermediates, which we have trapped at -40 °C, in the reactions of the iron catalyst with H2O2 under various conditions and the high-valent species derived therefrom. Under the reaction conditions that originally led to the discovery of this family of catalysts, we have characterized spectroscopically an Fe(III)-OOH intermediate (EPR gmax = 2.19) that leads to the hydroxylation of substrate C-H bonds or the epoxidation and cis-dihydroxylation of C?C bonds. Surprisingly, these organic products show incorporation of (18)O from H2(18)O, thereby excluding the possibility of a direct attack of the Fe(III)-OOH intermediate on the substrate. Instead, a water-assisted mechanism is implicated in which water binding to the iron(III) center at a site adjacent to the hydroperoxo ligand promotes heterolytic cleavage of the O-O bond to generate an Fe(V)(O)(OH) oxidant. This mechanism is supported by recent kinetic studies showing that the Fe(III)-OOH intermediate undergoes exponential decay at a rate enhanced by the addition of water and retarded by replacement of H2O with D2O, as well as mass spectral evidence for the Fe(V)(O)(OH) species obtained by the Costas group. The nature of the peroxo intermediate changes significantly when the reactions are carried out in the presence of carboxylic acids. Under these conditions, spectroscopic studies support the formation of a (?(2)-acylperoxo)iron(III) species (EPR gmax = 2.58) that decays at -40 °C in the absence of substrate to form an oxoiron(IV) byproduct, along with a carboxyl radical that readily loses CO2. The alkyl radical thus formed either reacts with O2 to form benzaldehyde (as in the case of PhCH2COOH) or rebounds with the incipient Fe(IV)(O) moiety to form phenol (as in the case of C6F5COOH). Substrate addition leads to its 2-e(-) oxidation and inhibits these side reactions. The emerging mechanistic picture, supported by DFT calculations of Wang and Shaik, describes a rather flat reaction landscape in which the (?(2)-acylperoxo)iron(III) intermediate undergoes O-O bond homolysis reversibly to form an Fe(IV)(O)((•)OC(O)R) species that decays to Fe(IV)(O) and RCO2(•) or isomerizes to its Fe(V)(O)(O2CR) electromer, which effects substrate oxidation. Another short-lived S = 1/2 species just discovered by Talsi that has much less g-anisotropy (EPR gmax = 2.07) may represent either of these postulated high-valent intermediates. PMID:26280131

  1. Predicting gold-mediated catalytic oxidative-coupling reactions from single crystal studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingjun; Madix, Robert J; Friend, Cynthia M

    2014-03-18

    Though metallic gold is chemically inert under ambient conditions, its surface is extremely reactive and selective for many key oxidative chemical transformations when activated by atomic oxygen. A molecular-level understanding of the mechanism of these processes could allow researchers to design "green" catalytic processes mediated by gold-based materials. This Account focuses on the mechanistic framework for oxidative-coupling reactions established by fundamental studies on oxygen-activated Au(111) and the application of these principles to steady-state catalytic conditions. We also discuss the importance of the paradigms discovered both for predicting new oxidative-coupling reactions and for understanding existing literature. The mechanistic framework for the oxidative coupling of alcohols on gold surfaces predicts that new oxidative-coupling reactions should occur between amines and aldehydes and amines and alcohols as well as through alcohol carbonylation. Adsorbed atomic oxygen on the gold surface facilitates the activation of the substrates, and nucleophilic attack and ?-H elimination are the two fundamental reactions that propagate the versatile chemistry that ensues. In the self-coupling of primary alcohols, adsorbed atomic oxygen first activates the O-H bond in the hydroxyl group at ?150 K, which forms the corresponding adsorbed alkoxy groups. The rate-limiting step of the self-coupling reaction is the ?-H elimination reaction of alkoxy groups to form the corresponding aldehydes and occurs with an activation barrier of approximately 12 kcal/mol. The remaining alkoxy groups nucleophilically attack the electron-deficient aldehyde carbonyl carbon to yield the adsorbed "hemiacetal". This intermediate undergoes facile ?-H elimination to produce the final coupling products, esters with twice the number of carbon atoms as the starting alcohols. This mechanistic insight suggests that cross-coupling occurs between alcohols and aldehydes, based on the logic that the nucleophilic reaction should be independent of the origin of the aldehydes, whether formed in situ or introduced externally. As a further example, adsorbed amides, formed from deprotonation of amines by atomic oxygen, can also attack aldehydes nucleophilically to yield the corresponding amides. Our mechanistic framework can also explain more elaborate gold-mediated chemistry, such as a unique carbonylation reaction via two subsequent nucleophilic attacks. These model studies on well-defined Au(111) at low pressure predict steady-state catalytic behavior on nanoporous gold under practical conditions. The fundamental principles of this research can also explain many other oxygen-assisted gold-mediated reactions observed under ambient conditions. PMID:24387694

  2. Atomic Wire Oxidation of H-Terminated Si(100)-( 2×1): Domino Reaction via Oxidation and H Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Koichi; Kajiyama, Hiroshi; Heike, Seiji; Hashizume, Tomihiro; Uda, Tsuyoshi

    2001-03-01

    We studied oxidation at a dangling bond (DB) on the H-terminated Si(100) surface by the first-principles calculations. We found that oxidation easily occurs at the exposed DB on the H-terminated Si(100) surface. The dissociated O atoms are chemisorbed at a dimer bond and a back bond, resulting in adjacent H atom migration onto the DB. As a consequence of the alternate oxidation and subsequent H atom migration processes, the atomic wire oxidation is actually found to occur on the H-terminated Si(100) surface at low temperatures without desorbing H atoms, as observed in our scanning tunneling microscopy experiment.

  3. Chemical reactions on metal oxide surfaces investigated by vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuemin; Wöll, Christof

    2009-06-01

    The most successful method to unravel the microscopic mechanisms governing reactions in heterogeneous catalysis is the "surface science" approach which is based on well-controlled studies on model catalysts (usually single crystal surfaces) under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions [G. Ertl, Angew. Chem. 47 (2008) 3524]. In this review our recent vibrational spectroscopic studies on selected model reactions at various single-crystalline metal oxide surfaces are summarized. Two vibrational spectroscopic methods, high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS), were applied to characterize the adsorbed species and to elucidate the elementary processes of chemical reactions at oxide surfaces ranging from well-defined single crystals to modified surfaces with deliberately introduced defects. The combination of both methods allows us to extend the vibrational spectroscopic studies from ideal to complex systems.

  4. Gold supported on well-ordered ceria films: nucleation, growth and morphology in CO oxidation reaction

    E-print Network

    Gao, Hongjun

    are found to be stable in O2 ambient up to 10 mbar, meanwhile gold sintering emerges at CO pressures above oxidation reaction. KEY WORDS: gold; ceria; CO oxidation; thin films; scanning tunneling microscopy. 1 oxidation, selective oxidation of propene to propene oxide, water gas shift reaction, NO reduction

  5. Biotransformations Utilizing ?-Oxidation Cycle Reactions in the Synthesis of Natural Compounds and Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Œwizdor, Alina; Panek, Anna; Milecka-Tronina, Natalia; Ko?ek, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    ?-Oxidation cycle reactions, which are key stages in the metabolism of fatty acids in eucaryotic cells and in processes with a significant role in the degradation of acids used by microbes as a carbon source, have also found application in biotransformations. One of the major advantages of biotransformations based on the ?-oxidation cycle is the possibility to transform a substrate in a series of reactions catalyzed by a number of enzymes. It allows the use of sterols as a substrate base in the production of natural steroid compounds and their analogues. This route also leads to biologically active compounds of therapeutic significance. Transformations of natural substrates via ?-oxidation are the core part of the synthetic routes of natural flavors used as food additives. Stereoselectivity of the enzymes catalyzing the stages of dehydrogenation and addition of a water molecule to the double bond also finds application in the synthesis of chiral biologically active compounds, including medicines. Recent advances in genetic, metabolic engineering, methods for the enhancement of bioprocess productivity and the selectivity of target reactions are also described. PMID:23443116

  6. Carbon-nitrogen bond-forming reactions in supercritical and expanded-liquid carbon dioxide media : green synthetic chemistry with multiscale reaction and phase behavior modeling

    E-print Network

    Ciccolini, Rocco P

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop a detailed understanding of carbon-nitrogen (C-N) bond-forming reactions of amines carried out in supercritical and expanded-liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) media. Key motivations behind ...

  7. Organocatalytic Aerobic Oxidation of Benzylic sp(3) C-H Bonds of Ethers and Alkylarenes Promoted by a Recyclable TEMPO Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiguang; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Yuan; Li, Jianjun; Xie, Hexin; Li, Hao; Wang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    An entirely metal-free catalyst system consisting of an easily prepared recyclable new TEMPO derived sulfonic salt catalyst, and mineral acids (NaNO2 and HCl) has been developed for selective aerobic oxidation of structurally diverse benzylic sp(3) C-H bonds of ethers and alkylarenes. The mild reaction conditions allow for the generation of synthetically and biologically valued isochromanones and xanthones from readily accessible alkyl aromatic precursors in good yields. PMID:26513695

  8. C-H vs C-C Bond Activation of Acetonitrile and Benzonitrile via Oxidative Addition: Rhodium vs Nickel and Cp* vs Tp

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    C-H vs C-C Bond Activation of Acetonitrile and Benzonitrile via Oxidative Addition: Rhodium vs@chem.rochester.edu Abstract: The photochemical reaction of (C5Me5)Rh(PMe3)H2 (1) in neat acetonitrile leads to formation of the C-H activation product, (C5Me5)Rh(PMe3)(CH2CN)H (2). Thermolysis of this product in acetonitrile

  9. Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions

    DOEpatents

    Cortright, Randy D. (Madison, WI); Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI)

    2011-01-18

    A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

  10. Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions

    DOEpatents

    Cortright, Randy D. (Madison, WI); Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI)

    2012-04-10

    A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

  11. Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions

    DOEpatents

    Cortright, Randy D.; Dumesic, James A.

    2013-04-02

    A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

  12. Activation and Oxidation of Mesitylene C-H Bonds by (Phebox)Iridium(III) Complexes

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    Activation and Oxidation of Mesitylene C-H Bonds by (Phebox)Iridium(III) Complexes Meng Zhou Supporting Information ABSTRACT: A pincer iridium(III) complex, (Phebox)Ir- (OAc)2OH2 (1) (Phebox = 3 an isolable iridium mesityl complex, (Phebox)Ir(mesityl)(OAc) (3), in >90% yield. The trifluor- oacetate

  13. Competition between Covalent Bonding and Charge Transfer at Complex-Oxide Interfaces

    E-print Network

    Tennessee, University of

    Competition between Covalent Bonding and Charge Transfer at Complex-Oxide Interfaces Juan is observed. Model calculations rationalize the profile in terms of the competition between standard charge- (LCMO/YBCO) have attracted much attention. This system is a paradigmatic example of competition between

  14. DFT study of the hydrolysis reaction in atranes and ocanes: the influence of transannular bonding.

    PubMed

    Ignatyev, Igor S; Montejo, Manuel; Rodriguez Ortega, Pilar G; Kochina, Tatiana A; López González, Juan Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Thermochemical kinetics of hydrolysis reactions of compounds with transannular intramolecular M…N bonds, i.e., atranes RM(OCH2CH2)3N and ocanes R2M(OCH2CH2)2NH (M?=?Si, Ge; R?=?F, Cl, Me), is studied at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ theoretical level. Several DFT methods are assessed for the reproduction of the experimental activation barrier for the Si-O bond cleavage of 1-methylsilatrane. Activation barriers for atranes and ocanes show the tendency for their growth with the decrease of the electronegativity of a substituent R on going from F to Me and their decrease from Si to Ge. Hydrolysis activation barriers of atranes and ocanes are compared with those of their acyclic analogs RM(OCH3)3 and R2M(OCH2)2NH in order to study the role of transannular M…N bonds in the stability of these molecules to hydrolysis. Substantially larger barriers for atranes support the opinion that stability of atranes may be explained by the formation of intramolecular bonds; however, the strengthening of transannular M…N bonds results in lower M-O cleavage barriers. It was proposed that the M-O cleavage barrier height is determined not by a weak M…N bonding itself, but rather by the contribution of a nitrogen lone pair to the antibonding orbitals of M-O bonds. The NBO analysis show that this interaction increases with the decrease of the electronegativity of a substituent R and decreases on going from atranes to ocanes. In ocanes, the presence of M…N bonds does not kinetically hinder the hydrolytic process; M-O cleavage activation barriers for acyclic analogs are higher. M-Hal cleavage barriers are substantially higher than those for M-O cleavage for R?=?F, but lower for R?=?Cl. Graphical Abstract The experimental barrier height of the Si-O bond cleavage in 1-methylsilatrane is well reproduced when three explicit water molecules are included in the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ theoretical model. PMID:26645807

  15. Heterogeneous oxidation reactions relevant to tropospheric aerosol chemistry studied by sum frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Grace; Buchbinder, Avram; Gibbs-Davis, Julianne; Scheidt, Karl; Geiger, Franz

    2008-03-01

    Unsaturated organic molecules (terpenes) that commonly form molecular films on tropospheric aerosols can be oxidized by ozone, influencing the microphysics of cloud formation and thus the earth's climate. Using a laboratory approach that combines organic synthesis with surface spectroscopy, we track the ozone oxidation reactions of tropospherically relevant terpenes bound to glass surfaces that serve as mimics for mineral dust. Specifically, vibrational broadband sum frequency generation (SFG) is used to study a number of tailor-made terpene-modified glass surfaces and to track their interactions with ozone in real time. Exposure of these surfaces to ppm levels of ozone at 1 atm and 300 K yield initial reaction probabilities that are significantly higher than corresponding gas phase reactions. SFG spectra help elucidate the molecular orientations of the surface-bound terpenes and the accessibility of reactive C=C bonds. Our work shows the successful use of SFG spectroscopy to determine heterogeneous atmospheric reaction probabilities and bridges the gap between atmospheric aerosol science and surface spectroscopy.

  16. Reactions of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide with coenzyme Q: involvement of the isoprenic chain.

    PubMed

    Astolfi, Paola; Charles, Laurence; Gigmes, Didier; Greci, Lucedio; Rizzoli, Corrado; Sorana, Federico; Stipa, Pierluigi

    2013-02-28

    The formation of a di-tert-alkyl nitroxide has been observed by Electron Spin Resonance during the exposure of coenzyme CoQ(10), in both the oxidized and reduced forms, to nitrogen dioxide (?NO(2)) or to nitric oxide (?NO) in the presence of oxygen. The same kind of nitroxide has been observed also with CoQ(1), CoQ(3) or with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-2-butene, chosen as model compounds. In all cases, the formation of the nitroxide may be justified only by admitting the involvement of the isoprenic chain of the coenzymes and in particular the addition of ?NO(2) to the double bond. A mechanism which accounts for the formation of the nitroxide as well as the other compounds observed in the reactions is proposed and confirmed by a spectroscopic investigation (FT-IR, (1)H NMR, X-ray analysis) and by ESI-MS. PMID:23334659

  17. Reactions of neutral vanadium oxide clusters with methanol.

    PubMed

    Dong, Feng; Heinbuch, Scott; Xie, Yan; Rocca, Jorge J; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2009-04-01

    Reactions of neutral vanadium oxide clusters with methanol and ethanol in a fast-flow reactor are investigated by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Single-photon ionization through soft X-ray (46.9 nm, 26.5 eV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 118 nm, 10.5 eV) lasers is employed to detect both neutral cluster distributions and reaction products. In order to distinguish isomeric products generated in the reactions V(m)O(n) + CH(3)OH, partially deuterated methanol (CD(3)OH) is also used as a reactant in the experiments. Association products are observed for most vanadium oxide clusters in reaction with methanol. Products VOD, V(2)O(3)D, V(3)O(6)D, and V(4)O(9)D are observed for oxygen-deficient vanadium oxide clusters reacting with methanol, while oxygen-rich and the most stable clusters can extract more than one hydrogen atom (H/D) from CD(3)OH to form products VO(2)DH(0,1), V(2)O(4)DH(0,1), V(2)O(5)DH(0,1), V(3)O(7)DH(0,1), and V(4)O(10)DH(0,1). Species VO(2)(CH(3))(2), VO(3)(CH(3))(2), V(2)O(5)(CH(3))(2), V(3)O(7)(CH(3))(2), and V(3)O(8)(CH(3))(2) are identified as some of the main products generated from a dehydration reaction for V(m)O(n) + CH(3)OH. A minor reaction channel that generates VOCH(2)O (VOCD(2)O) and VO(2)CH(2)O (VO(2)CD(2)O) can also be identified. An obviously different behavior appears in the reaction V(m)O(n) + C(2)H(5)OH. The main observed products for this reaction are association products of the form V(m)O(n)C(2)H(5)OH. In order to explore the mechanism of V(m)O(n) + CH(3)OH reactions, DFT calculations are performed to study the reaction pathways of VO(2) + CH(3)OH and VO + CH(3)OH reaction systems. The calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental observations. PMID:19278217

  18. Multiple Reaction Pathways during Radiolytic Oxidation of Pyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefticariu, L.; Pratt, L.; Laverne, J. A.; Ripley, E. M.

    2005-12-01

    Passage of ionizing radiation through groundwater produces a complex mixture of short-lived ions, free radicals, and excited molecules that participate in a wide range of chemical reactions and accelerate water-rock interaction. Radiolysis of groundwater in contact with sulfide minerals or elemental sulfur can produce plumes of partially to fully oxidized sulfur species, thereby stimulating microbial metabolism in unexpected subsurface environments. In order to study fractionation of sulfur isotopes during radiolysis, initial experiments were performed using sealed quartz tubes that contained pyrite and millimolar solutions of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) that were reacted at temperatures from 4 to 150 C over time periods of days to week. Mineralogical, chemical, and stable isotopic date from H2O2 experiments reveal multiple pathways for pyrite oxidation and distinct assemblages of products at difference temperatures. Sulfur isotopic signatures of oxidized products are enriched in 32S by 0.5 to 2 per mil compared to source sulfate. Radiation experiments were carried out using a 60Co gamma sources at the Radiation Laboratory of the University of Notre Dame. Sealed quartz tubes that contained pyrite and deoxygenated DI water were irradiated from 1 to 14 hours with a dose rate of 11.3 krad/min (113 Gy/min). Initial experiments produced oxidized sulfur as gaseous (e.g., SO2) and aqueous (e.g, SO4) species at concentrations directly correlated to the volume of water and total irradiation dose. Radiolysis proves to be an effective mechanism for the production of oxidizing species in geologically long-lived oxidizing systems. Iron sulfide minerals are decomposed and iron oxide/hydroxide minerals and sulfate ions are produced. Recognizing geochemical signatures of radiolytic oxidation is particularly important for understanding biotic and abiotic reaction pathways in environments where molecular oxygen is negligible and for assessing potential sources of chemical energy for microbial metabolism in the deep subsurface of Earth and Mars.

  19. Reaction Energies of Oxides using Random Phase Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jun; Hummelshoej, Jens; Nørskov, Jens

    2013-03-01

    Oxides are widely used in industrial heterogeneous catalysis, photo catalysis, electrochemistry and in making batteries and fuel cells. To facilitate the computational engineer and design of novel materials in these fields, it is vital important to quantitatively predict the formation and reactions energies of the oxides. LDA/GGA, the success of which has largely relied on the mysterious error cancellation in the exchange-correlation term, generally failed for these oxides, showing systematic and non-canceling errors. Recently, the use of exact exchange (EXX), plus correlation energy from Random Phase Approximation (RPA) emerges as a promising approach to obtain non-empirical exchange-correlation terms. Exact exchange energy is free of self-interaction error, while RPA correlation energy takes into account dynamic electronic screening and is fully non-local. EXX +RPA has shown to systematically improve lattice constants, atomization energies, adsorption energies, reaction barriers for a wide range of systems that have ironic, covalent and van der Waals interactions. In this talk I will present our results comparing RPA and GGA functional for the formation and reaction energies of oxides.

  20. The oxidative burst reaction in mammalian cells depends on gravity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Gravity has been a constant force throughout the Earth’s evolutionary history. Thus, one of the fundamental biological questions is if and how complex cellular and molecular functions of life on Earth require gravity. In this study, we investigated the influence of gravity on the oxidative burst reaction in macrophages, one of the key elements in innate immune response and cellular signaling. An important step is the production of superoxide by the NADPH oxidase, which is rapidly converted to H2O2 by spontaneous and enzymatic dismutation. The phagozytosis-mediated oxidative burst under altered gravity conditions was studied in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages by means of a luminol assay. Ground-based experiments in “functional weightlessness” were performed using a 2 D clinostat combined with a photomultiplier (PMT clinostat). The same technical set-up was used during the 13th DLR and 51st ESA parabolic flight campaign. Furthermore, hypergravity conditions were provided by using the Multi-Sample Incubation Centrifuge (MuSIC) and the Short Arm Human Centrifuge (SAHC). The results demonstrate that release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the oxidative burst reaction depends greatly on gravity conditions. ROS release is 1.) reduced in microgravity, 2.) enhanced in hypergravity and 3.) responds rapidly and reversible to altered gravity within seconds. We substantiated the effect of altered gravity on oxidative burst reaction in two independent experimental systems, parabolic flights and 2D clinostat / centrifuge experiments. Furthermore, the results obtained in simulated microgravity (2D clinorotation experiments) were proven by experiments in real microgravity as in both cases a pronounced reduction in ROS was observed. Our experiments indicate that gravity-sensitive steps are located both in the initial activation pathways and in the final oxidative burst reaction itself, which could be explained by the role of cytoskeletal dynamics in the assembly and function of the NADPH oxidase complex. PMID:24359439

  1. Method for facilitating catalyzed oxidation reactions, device for facilitating catalyzed oxidation reactions

    DOEpatents

    Beuhler, Robert J. (East Moriches, NY); White, Michael G. (Blue Point, NY); Hrbek, Jan (Rocky Point, NY)

    2006-08-15

    A catalytic process for the oxidation of organic. Oxygen is loaded into a metal foil by heating the foil while in contact with an oxygen-containing fluid. After cooling the oxygen-activated foil to room temperature, oxygen diffuses through the foil and oxidizes reactants exposed to the other side of the foil.

  2. Effects of Oxide Layer on the Bonding Strength of Ni-Cr Alloys with Porcelain Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Park, W U; Jung, S H; Zhao, Jingming; Hwang, Kyu H; Lee, J K; Mitchell, John C

    2015-08-01

    The metal-ceramic crown restoration was the most actively used at esthetic restoration for its convenience of forming. Due to constant rise of gold price, non-precious metal such as Ni-Cr alloy have been widely used as metal-ceramic restorations. For easy casting and lower melting point Be was added as minor component to Ni-Cr for a long time, but the use of Be was regulated to deteriorate to human lung. In this study, Ni-Cr specimens containing Be (T-3, Ticonium, USA) and non-Be (Bellabond Plus, BEGO, Germany) were fabricated and by heat treatments at 800-1050 0C oxide layer was formed for subsequent bonding to porcelain ceramics. By heat treatment of the non-Be specimens at high temperature more thick oxide layer was formed and showed lower bonding strength due to the debonding at oxide layers. But in the Be-containing specimens debonding was occurred at porcelain layer so that they showed higher bonding strength. So by heat treatment of non-Be specimens at vacuum condition rather thinner oxide film could be formed so that showed higher coupling strength due to the debonding at porcelain layers than oxide layers. PMID:26369169

  3. Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of HVOF Bond Coatings Deposited on La- and Y-doped Superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Bestor, Michael A; Haynes, James A

    2011-01-01

    One suggested strategy for improving the performance of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems used to protect hot section components in gas turbines is the addition of low levels of dopants to the Ni-base superalloy substrate. To quantify the benefit of these dopants, the oxidation behavior of three commercial superalloys with different Y and La contents was evaluated with and without a NiCoCrAlYHfSi bond coating deposited by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spraying. Cyclic oxidation experiments were conducted in dry O{sub 2} at 1050, 1100 and 1150 C. At the highest temperature, the bare superalloy without La showed more attack due to its lower Al content but no difference in oxidation rate or scale adhesion was noted at lower temperatures. With a bond coating, the alumina scale was non-uniform in thickness and spalled at each temperature. Among the three coated superalloys, no clear difference in oxide growth rate or scale adhesion was observed. Evaluations with a YSZ top coat and a bond coating without Hf are needed to better determine the effect of superalloy dopants on high temperature oxidation performance.

  4. Theoretical Study of the Reaction Formalhydrazone with Singlet Oxygen. Fragmentation of the C=N Bond, Ene Reaction, and Other Processes†

    PubMed Central

    Rudshteyn, Benjamin; Castillo, Álvaro; Ghogare, Ashwini A.; Liebman, Joel F.; Greer, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Photobiologic and synthetic versatility of hydrazones has not yet been established with 1O2 as a route to commonly encountered nitrosamines. Thus, to determine whether the “parent” reaction of formalhydrazone and 1O2 leads to facile C=N bond cleavage and resulting nitrosamine formation, we have carried out CCSD(T)//DFT calculations and analyzed the energetics of the oxidation pathways. A [2 + 2] pathway occurs via diradicals and formation of 3-amino-1,2,3-dioxazetidine in a 16 kcal/mol process. Reversible addition or physical quenching of 1O2 occurs either on the formalhydrazone carbon for triplet diradicals at 2–3 kcal/mol, or on the nitrogen (N(3)) atom forming zwitterions at ~15 kcal/mol, although the quenching channel by charge-transfer interaction was not computed. The computations also predict a facile conversion of formalhydrazone and 1O2 to hydroperoxymethyl diazene in a low-barrier ‘ene’ process, but no 2-amino-oxaziridine-O-oxide (perepoxide-like) intermediate was found. A Benson-like analysis (group increment calculations) on the closed shell species are in accord with the quantum chemical results. PMID:24354600

  5. Theoretical study of the reaction formalhydrazone with singlet oxygen. Fragmentation of the C=N bond, ene reaction and other processes.

    PubMed

    Rudshteyn, Benjamin; Castillo, Alvaro; Ghogare, Ashwini A; Liebman, Joel F; Greer, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Photobiologic and synthetic versatility of hydrazones has not yet been established with (1)O2 as a route to commonly encountered nitrosamines. Thus, to determine whether the "parent" reaction of formalhydrazone and (1)O2 leads to facile C=N bond cleavage and resulting nitrosamine formation, we have carried out CCSD(T)//DFT calculations and analyzed the energetics of the oxidation pathways. A [2 + 2] pathway occurs via diradicals and formation of 3-amino-1,2,3-dioxazetidine in a 16 kcal/mol(-1) process. Reversible addition or physical quenching of (1)O2 occurs either on the formalhydrazone carbon for triplet diradicals at 2-3 kcal mol(-1), or on the nitrogen (N(3)) atom forming zwitterions at ~15 kcal/mol(-1), although the quenching channel by charge-transfer interaction was not computed. The computations also predict a facile conversion of formalhydrazone and (1)O2 to hydroperoxymethyl diazene in a low-barrier 'ene' process, but no 2-amino-oxaziridine-O-oxide (perepoxide-like) intermediate was found. A Benson-like analysis (group increment calculations) on the closed-shell species are in accord with the quantum chemical results. PMID:24354600

  6. Femtosecond dynamics of dative bonding: Concepts of reversible and dissociative electron transfer reactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Dongping; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    1999-01-01

    With fs time, speed, and angular resolution of the elementary steps in electron transfer reactions, we report direct observation of reversible and dissociative processes for dative bonding involving covalent and ionic characters. For bimolecular reactions of various donors and acceptors we find strong correlation between the structure and the dynamics. The dynamics from the transition state to final products involve two elementary processes, with different reaction times, speed, and angular distributions. For example, for the R2S?I2 (R = C2H5) system, it is shown that after charge separation, the reversible electron transfer occurs in less than 150 fs (fastest trajectory) and is followed by the rupture of the I—I bond with the release of the first I-atom in 510 fs. However, the second process of the remaining and trapped I-atom takes 1.15 ps with its speed (500 m/s) being much smaller than the first one (1,030 m/s). The S—I—I average angle is 130°. These findings, on this and the other systems reported here, elucidate the mechanism and address some concepts of nonconcertedness, caging, and restricted energy redistribution. PMID:10077556

  7. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Zevely, J.; Mayo, F.R.

    1981-11-12

    The objective of this project is to determine the structure of bituminous coal by determining the proportions of the various kinds of connecting bonds and how they can best be broken. Results obtained during the past quarter are presented for the following tasks: (1) extractions and fractionations of coal products which covers pyridine extraction, fractionation of TIPS fractions, EDA extraction of Illinois No. 6 coal and swelling ratios of coal samples; (2) experiments on breakable single bonds which cover reactions of ethylenediamine and model ethers, reaction of pyridine-extracted coal with Me/sub 3/SiI, Baeyer-Villiger oxidations, reaction to diphenylmethane with 15% HNO/sub 3/, cleavage of TIPS with ZnI/sub 2/, and cleavage of black acids; and (3) oxygen oxidation No. 18. Some of the highlights of these studies are: (1) some model ethers are not cleaved by EDA under extraction conditions; (2) oxidation of diaryl ketones with m-chloroperbenzoic acid and saponification of the resulting esters in promising for identifying ketones, (3) treatment of a black acid with pyridine hydroiodide reduced the acid's molecular weight and increased its solubility in pyridine, but treatment with ZnI/sub 2/ was ineffective; (4) in comparison with 0.1 M K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/, 0.01 M persulfate is relatively ineffective in accelerating oxidation of BnNH/sub 2/-extracted coal in water suspension. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  8. 40 CFR 721.10574 - Alkylcarboxy polyester acrylate reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.10574 Section 721.10574 Protection of Environment... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (PMN P-09-48) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10574 - Alkylcarboxy polyester acrylate reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.10574 Section 721.10574 Protection of Environment... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (PMN P-09-48) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. Photovoltaic-driven organic electrosynthesis and efforts toward more sustainable oxidation reactions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bichlien H; Perkins, Robert J; Smith, Jake A

    2015-01-01

    Summary The combination of visible light, photovoltaics, and electrochemistry provides a convenient, inexpensive platform for conducting a wide variety of sustainable oxidation reactions. The approach presented in this article is compatible with both direct and indirect oxidation reactions, avoids the need for a stoichiometric oxidant, and leads to hydrogen gas as the only byproduct from the corresponding reduction reaction. PMID:25815081

  11. Selective molecular recognition, C-H bond activation, and catalysis in nanoscale reaction vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Fiedler, Dorothea; Leung, Dennis H.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Bergman, Robert G.

    2004-11-27

    Supramolecular chemistry represents a way to mimic enzyme reactivity by using specially designed container molecules. We have shown that a chiral self-assembled M{sub 4}L{sub 6} supramolecular tetrahedron can encapsulate a variety of cationic guests, with varying degrees of stereoselectivity. Reactive iridium guests can be encapsulated and the C-H bond activation of aldehydes occurs, with the host cavity controlling the ability of substrates to interact with the metal center based upon size and shape. In addition, the host container can act as a catalyst by itself. By restricting reaction space and preorganizing the substrates into reactive conformations, it accelerates the sigmatropic rearrangement of enammonium cations.

  12. Oligomerization reactions of deoxyribonucleotides on montmorillonite clay - The effect of mononucleotide structure on phosphodiester bond formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.; KAMALUDDIN

    1989-01-01

    The formation of oligomers from deoxynucleotides, catalyzed by Na(+)-montmorillonite, was investigated with special attention given to the effect of the monomer structure on the phosphodiester bond formation. It was found that adenine deoxynucleotides bind more strongly to montmorillonite than do the corresponding ribonucleotides and thymidine nucleotides. Tetramers of 2-prime-dpA were detected in the reaction of 2-prime-d-5-prime-AMP with a water-soluble carbodiimide EDAC in the presence of Na(+)-montmorillonite, illustrating the possible role of minerals in the formation of biopolymers on the primitive earth.

  13. Bend strengths of reaction bonded silicon nitride prepared from dry attrition milled silicon powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, T. P.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    Dry attrition milled silicon powder was compacted, sintered in helium, and reaction bonded in nitrogen-4 volume percent hydrogen. Bend strengths of bars with as-nitrided surfaces averaged as high as 210 MPa at room temperature and 220 MPa at 1400 C. Bars prepared from the milled powder were stronger than those prepared from as-received powder at both room temperature and at 1400 C. Room temperature strength decreased with increased milling time and 1400 C strength increased with increased milling time.

  14. Model reaction studies on vanadium oxide nanostructures on Pd(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratzer, M.; Surnev, S.; Netzer, F. P.; Winkler, A.

    2006-08-01

    Deuterium desorption and reaction between deuterium and oxygen to water has been studied on ultrathin vanadium oxide structures prepared on Pd(111). The palladium sample was part of a permeation source, thus enabling the supply of atomic deuterium to the sample surface via the bulk. Different vanadium oxide films have been prepared by e-beam evaporation in UHV under oxygen atmosphere. The structure of these films was determined using low energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy. The mean translational energy of the desorption and reaction products has been measured with a time-of-flight spectrometer. The most stable phases for monolayer and submonolayer VOx are particular surface-V2O3 and VO phases at 523 and 700K, respectively. Thicker films grow in the form of bulk V2O3. The mean translational energy of the desorbing deuterium species corresponds in all cases to the thermalized value. Apparent deviations from this energy distribution could be attributed to different adsorption/desorption and/or accommodation behaviors of molecular deuterium from the gas phase on the individual vanadium oxide films. The water reaction product shows a slightly hyperthermal mean translational energy, suggesting that higher energetic permeating deuterium contributes with higher probability to the water formation.

  15. Forming mechanism of nitrogen doped graphene prepared by thermal solid-state reaction of graphite oxide and urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Zhigang; Chen, Xiaoye; Du, Yukou; Wang, Xiaomei; Yang, Ping; Wang, Suidong

    2011-12-01

    Nitrogen doped graphene was synthesized from graphite oxide and urea by thermal solid-state reaction. The samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectra, element analysis, and electrical conductivity measurement. The results reveal that there is a gradual thermal transformation of nitrogen bonding configurations from amide form nitrogen to pyrrolic, then to pyridinic, and finally to "graphitic" nitrogen in graphene sheets with increasing annealing temperature from 200 to 700 °C. The products prepared at 600 °C and 700 °C show that the quantity of nitrogen incorporated into graphene lattice is ˜10 at.% with simultaneous reduction of graphite oxide. Oxygen-containing functional groups in graphite oxide are responsible for the doping reaction to produce nitrogen doped graphene.

  16. Cation insertion reactions of electrochromic tungsten and iridium oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, J. D. E.; Basu, S.; Peck, W. F., Jr.; Brown, W. L.; Augustyniak, W. M.

    1982-06-01

    Electrochemical coloration mechanisms of electrochromic (EC), amorphous tungsten and iridium oxide films have been investigated by direct elemental analysis of their compositions in oxidized and reduced states. Combined Rutherford backscattering and nuclear-reaction-analysis techniques were employed to determine the identities and concentrations of ions injected as charge compensators from the contacting electrolyte during EC redox reactions. In aqueous electrolytes, the cathodic coloration of an anodically formed, hydrous tungsten oxide film (composition ~WO3.H2O), is accompanied by injection of protons, in accordance with mechanisms determined for anhydrous WO3. The anodic coloration and coloration bleaching of an anodically formed, hydrous iridium oxide (IROX) film, which has a varying degree of hydration throughout its thickness, is accompanied by ejection and injection of H+ and H3O+ ions. In nonaqueous aprotic electrolytes, the slow but reversible insertion of Li+ (r=0.60 Å) and Na+ (r=0.95 Å) ions into IROX films has been successfully demonstrated for the first time. Li+ ions were found to exchange with H+ ions in these hydrous films. No evidence could be found for insertion of K+ (r=1.33 Å), F- (r=1.36 Å), or OH- (r=1.55 Å) ions as charge compensators. These results provide a measure of the size and concentration of vacancies and defects in amorphous IROX films.

  17. Kinetics of the reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, W. L.; Hanson, R. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    Mixtures of NO and H2 diluted in argon or krypton were heated by incident shock waves, and the infrared emission from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO at 5.3 microns was used to monitor the time-varying NO concentration. The reaction kinetics were studied in the temperature range 2400-4500 K using a shock-tube technique. The decomposition of nitric oxide behind the shock was found to be modeled well by a fifteen-reaction system. A principle result of the study was the determination of the rate constant for the reaction H + NO yields N + OH, which may be the rate-limiting step for NO removal in some combustion systems. Experimental values of k sub 1 were obtained for each test through comparisons of measured and numerically predicted NO profiles.

  18. Reaction between nitric oxide and ozone in solid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, D.; Pimentel, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide, NO2, is produced when nitric oxide, NO, and ozone, O3, are suspended in a nitrogen matrix at 11-20 K. The NO2 is formed with first-order kinetics, a 12 K rate constant of (1.4 + or - 0.2) x 0.00001/sec, and an apparent activation energy of 106 + or - 10 cal/mol. Isotopic labeling, variation of concentrations, and cold shield experiments show that the growth of NO2 is due to reaction between ozone molecules and NO monomers, and that the reaction is neither infrared-induced nor does it seem to be a heavy atom tunneling process. Reaction is attributed to nearest-neighbor NO.O3 pairs probably held in a specific orientational relationship that affects the kinetic behavior. When the temperature is raised, more such reactive pairs are generated, presumably by local diffusion. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  19. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  20. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-04-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  1. Raman spectroscopic characterization of the core-rim structure in reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Jannotti, Phillip; Subhash, Ghatu; Zheng, James Q.; Halls, Virginia; Karandikar, Prashant G.; Salamone, S.; Aghajanian, Michael K.

    2015-01-26

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the microstructure of reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics. Compositional and structural gradation in the silicon-doped boron carbide phase (rim), which develops around the parent boron carbide region (core) due to the reaction between silicon and boron carbide, was evaluated using changes in Raman peak position and intensity. Peak shifting and intensity variation from the core to the rim region was attributed to changes in the boron carbide crystal structure based on experimental Raman observations and ab initio calculations reported in literature. The results were consistent with compositional analysis determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The Raman analysis revealed the substitution of silicon atoms first into the linear 3-atom chain, and then into icosahedral units of the boron carbide structure. Thus, micro-Raman spectroscopy provided a non-destructive means of identifying the preferential positions of Si atoms in the boron carbide lattice.

  2. Hydrolysis of Surfactants Containing Ester Bonds: Modulation of Reaction Kinetics and Important Aspects of Surfactant Self-Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, Dan; Stjerndahl, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The effects of self-assembly on the hydrolysis kinetics of surfactants that contain ester bonds are discussed. A number of examples on how reaction rates and apparent reaction orders can be modulated by changes in the conditions, including an instance of apparent zero-order kinetics, are presented. Furthermore, it is shown that the examples on…

  3. Variational RRKM theory calculation of thermal rate constant for carbon—hydrogen bond fission reaction of nitro benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manesh, Afshin Taghva; Heidarnezhad, Zabi alah; Masnabadi, Nasrin

    2013-07-01

    The present work provides quantitative results for the rate of unimolecular carbon-hydrogen bond fission reaction of benzene and nitro benzene at elevated temperatures up to 2000 K. The potential energy surface for each C-H (in the ortho, meta, and para sites) bond fission reaction of nitro benzene was investigated by ab initio calculations. The geometry and vibrational frequencies of the species involved in this process were optimized at the MP2 level of theory, using the cc-pvdz basis set. Since C-H bond fission channel is barrier less reaction, we have used variational RRKM theory to predict rate constants. By means of calculated rate constant at the different temperatures, the activation energy and exponential factor were determined. The Arrhenius expression for C-H bond fission reaction of nitro benzene on the ortho, meta and para sites are k( T) = 2.1 × 1017exp(-56575.98/ T), k( T) = 2.1 × 1017exp(-57587.45/ T), and k( T) = 3.3 × 1016exp(-57594.79/ T) respectively. The Arrhenius expression for C-H bond fission reaction of benzene is k( T) = 2 × 1018exp(-59343.48.18/ T). The effect of NO2 group, location of hydrogen atoms on the substituted benzene ring, reaction degeneracy, benzene ring resonance and tunneling effect on the rate expression have been discussed.

  4. Design, fabrication, and test of a meter-class reaction bonded SiC mirror blank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Eph; Magida, Matthew B.; Kishner, Stanley J.; Krim, Michael H.

    1995-10-01

    The potential for using silicon carbide as an optical substrate has been recognized for a number of years. The primary characteristics silicon carbide offers relative to other more traditional materials include high stiffness, high toughness, low toxicity, low thermal distortion and potential cost and schedule advantages. These attractive properties become accentuated as the size of the mirror blank increases, especially when considering space borne applications. In this paper, we report on the continuing development of silicon carbide for use in large lightweight mirror applications. In particular we describe the design, fabrication and testing of a 0.8 multiplied by 1.1 meter open backed, 'egg-crate' reaction bonded silicon carbide mirror blank. Several process demonstration (sub-scale blank fabrication repeatability and optical finishing) and material evaluation (coefficient of thermal expansion, modulus of rupture, and chemistry) tasks were performed to initiate a database for future optical designs and evaluation. Finally, the results of cryogenic testing of the blank are presented. All of the silicon carbide blank fabrication work in support of this program was performed by Carborundum Specialty Products. The results indicate that reaction bonded silicon carbide is an excellent material for large lightweight mirror substrates.

  5. Evidence of a reduction reaction of oxidized iron/cobalt by boron atoms diffused toward naturally oxidized surface of CoFeB layer during annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Soshi Honjo, Hiroaki; Niwa, Masaaki; Ikeda, Shoji; Ohno, Hideo; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2015-04-06

    We have investigated the redox reaction on the surface of Ta/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction stack samples after annealing at 300, 350, and 400?°C for 1?h using angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for precise analysis of the chemical bonding states. At a capping tantalum layer thickness of 1?nm, both the capping tantalum layer and the surface of the underneath CoFeB layer in the as-deposited stack sample were naturally oxidized. By comparison of the Co 2p and Fe 2p spectra among the as-deposited and annealed samples, reduction of the naturally oxidized cobalt and iron atoms occurred on the surface of the CoFeB layer. The reduction reaction was more significant at higher annealing temperature. Oxidized cobalt and iron were reduced by boron atoms that diffused toward the surface of the top CoFeB layer. A single CoFeB layer was prepared on SiO{sub 2}, and a confirmatory evidence of the redox reaction with boron diffusion was obtained by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the naturally oxidized surface of the CoFeB single layer after annealing. The redox reaction is theoretically reasonable based on the Ellingham diagram.

  6. Isotopic Studies of O-O Bond Formation During Water Oxidation (SISGR)

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Justine P.

    2015-03-03

    Isotopic Studies of O-O Bond Formation During Water Oxidation (SISGR) Research during the project period focused primarily on mechanisms of water oxidation by structurally defined transition metal complexes. Competitive oxygen isotope fractionation of water, mediated by oxidized precursors or reduced catalysts together with ceric, Ce(IV), ammonium nitrate in aqueous media, afforded oxygen-18 kinetic isotope effects (O-18 KIEs). Measurement, calculation, and interpretation of O-18 KIEs, described in the accompanying report has important ramifications for the production of electricity and solar hydrogen (as fuel). The catalysis division of BES has acknowledged that understanding mechanisms of transition metal catalyzed water oxidation has major ramifications, potentially leading to transformation of the global economy and natural environment in years to come. Yet, because of program restructuring and decreased availability of funds, it was recommended that the Solar Photochemistry sub-division of BES would be a more appropriate parent program for support of continued research.

  7. Photosynthetic water oxidation: binding and activation of substrate waters for O-O bond formation.

    PubMed

    Vinyard, David J; Khan, Sahr; Brudvig, Gary W

    2015-12-22

    Photosynthetic water oxidation occurs at the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of Photosystem II (PSII). The OEC, which contains a Mn4CaO5 inorganic cluster ligated by oxides, waters and amino-acid residues, cycles through five redox intermediates known as Si states (i = 0-4). The electronic and structural properties of the transient S4 intermediate that forms the O-O bond are not well understood. In order to gain insight into how water is activated for O-O bond formation in the S4 intermediate, we have performed a detailed analysis of S-state dependent substrate water binding kinetics taking into consideration data from Mn coordination complexes. This analysis supports a model in which the substrate waters are both bound as terminal ligands and react via a water-nucleophile attack mechanism. PMID:26447686

  8. Chlorine atom-initiated low-temperature oxidation of prenol and isoprenol: The effect of C=C double bonds on the peroxy radical chemistry in alcohol oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Welz, Oliver; Savee, John D.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2014-07-04

    The chlorine atom-initiated oxidation of two unsaturated primary C5 alcohols, prenol (3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, (CH3)2CCHCH2OH) and isoprenol (3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, CH2C(CH3)CH2CH2OH), is studied at 550 K and low pressure (8 Torr). The time- and isomer-resolved formation of products is probed with multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry (MPIMS) using tunable vacuum ultraviolet ionizing synchrotron radiation. The peroxy radical chemistry of the unsaturated alcohols appears much less rich than that of saturated C4 and C5 alcohols. The main products observed are the corresponding unsaturated aldehydes – prenal (3-methyl-2-butenal) from prenol oxidation and isoprenal (3-methyl-3-butenal) from isoprenol oxidation. No significant products arising from QOOH chemistry are observed. Thesemore »results can be qualitatively explained by the formation of resonance stabilized allylic radicals via H-abstraction in the Cl + prenol and Cl + isoprenol initiation reactions. The loss of resonance stabilization upon O2 addition causes the energies of the intermediate wells, saddle points, and products to increase relative to the energy of the initial radicals and O2. These energetic shifts make most product channels observed in the peroxy radical chemistry of saturated alcohols inaccessible for these unsaturated alcohols. The experimental findings are underpinned by quantum-chemical calculations for stationary points on the potential energy surfaces for the reactions of the initial radicals with O2. Under our conditions, the dominant channels in prenol and isoprenol oxidation are the chain-terminating HO2-forming channels arising from radicals, in which the unpaired electron and the –OH group are on the same carbon atom, with stable prenal and isoprenal co-products, respectively. These results suggest that the presence of C=C double bonds in alcohols will reduce low-temperature reactivity during autoignition.« less

  9. Electrophilic, Ambiphilic, and Nucleophilic C-H bond Activation. Understanding the electronic continuum of C-H bond activation through transition-state and reaction pathway interaction energy decompositions

    SciTech Connect

    Ess, Daniel H.; Goddard, William A.; Periana, Roy A.

    2010-10-29

    The potential energy and interaction energy profiles for metal- and metal-ligand-mediated alkane C-H bond activation were explored using B3LYP density functional theory (DFT) and the absolutely localized molecular orbital energy decomposition analysis (ALMO-EDA). The set of complexes explored range from late transition metal group 10 (Pt and Pd) and group 11 (Au) metal centers to group 7-9 (Ir, Rh, Ru, and W) metal centers as well as a group 3 Sc complex. The coordination geometries, electron metal count (d8, d6, d4, and d0), and ligands (N-heterocycles, O-donor, phosphine, and Cp*) are also diverse. Quantitative analysis using ALMO-EDA of both directions of charge-transfer stabilization (occupied to unoccupied orbital stabilization) energies between the metal-ligand fragment and the coordinated C-H bond in the transition state for cleavage of the C-H bond allows classification of C-H activation reactions as electrophilic, ambiphilic, or nucleophilic on the basis of the net direction of charge-transfer energy stabilization. This bonding pattern transcends any specific mechanistic or bonding paradigm, such as oxidative addition, ?-bond metathesis, or substitution. Late transition metals such as Au(III), Pt(II), Pd(II), and Rh(III) metal centers with N-heterocycle, halide, or O-donor ligands show electrophilically dominated reaction profiles with forward charge-transfer from the C-H bond to the metal, leading to more stabilization than reverse charge transfer from the metal to the C-H bond. Transition states and reaction profiles for d6 Ru(II) and Ir(III) metals with Tp and acac ligands were found to have nearly equal forward and reverse charge-transfer energy stabilization. This ambiphilic region also includes the classically labeled electrophilic cationic species Cp*(PMe3)Ir(Me). Nucleophilic character, where the metal to C-H bond charge-transfer interaction is most stabilizing, was found in metathesis reactions with W(II) and Sc(III) metal center complexes in reactions as well as late transition metal Ir(I) and Rh(I) pincer complexes that undergo C-H bond insertion. Comparison of pincer ligands shows that the PCP ligand imparts more nucleophilic character to an Ir metal center than a deprotonated PNP ligand. The PCP and POCOP ligands do not show a substantial difference in the electronics of C-H activation. It was also found that Rh(I) is substantially more nucleophilic than Ir(I). Lastly, as a qualitative approximation, investigation of transition-state fragment orbital energies showed that relative frontier orbital energy gaps correctly reflect electrophilic, ambiphilic, or nucleophilic charge-transfer stabilization patterns.

  10. Harnessing Excited-State Intramolecular Proton-Transfer Reaction via a Series of Amino-Type Hydrogen-Bonding Molecules.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Huan-Wei; Liu, Jun-Qi; Chen, Yi-An; Chao, Chi-Min; Liu, Kuan-Miao; Chen, Chi-Lin; Lin, Tzu-Chieh; Hung, Cheng-Hsien; Chou, Yen-Lin; Lin, Ta-Chun; Wang, Tian-Lin; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2015-04-16

    A series of new amino (NH)-type hydrogen-bonding (H-bonding) compounds comprising 2-(2'-aminophenyl)benzothiazole and its extensive derivatives were designed and synthesized. Unlike in the hydroxyl (OH)-type H-bonding systems, one of the amino hydrogens can be replaced with electron-donating/withdrawing groups. This, together with a versatile capability for modifying the parent moiety, makes feasible the comprehensive spectroscopy and dynamics studies of amino-type excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT), which was previously inaccessible in the hydroxyl-type ESIPT systems. Empirical correlations were observed among the hydrogen-bonding strength (the N-H bond distances and proton acidity), ESIPT kinetics, and thermodynamics, demonstrating a trend that the stronger N-H···N hydrogen bond leads to a faster ESIPT, as experimentally observed, and a more exergonic reaction thermodynamics. Accordingly, ESIPT reaction can be harnessed for the first time from a highly endergonic type (i.e., prohibition) toward equilibrium with a measurable ESIPT rate and then to the highly exergonic, ultrafast ESIPT reaction within the same series of amino-type intramolecular H-bond system. PMID:26263155

  11. An in vitro study to evaluate the effects of addition of zinc oxide to an orthodontic bonding agent

    PubMed Central

    Jatania, Archana; Shivalinga, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to test the antimicrobial effect of zinc oxide when incorporated into an orthodontic bonding material and to check the effect of addition of zinc oxide on the shear bond strength of the bonding material. Materials and Methods: Zinc oxide was added to a resin modified light cure glass ionomer cement (GIC) (Fuji Ortho LC GC America, Alsip, Ill) to make modified bonding agent containing 13% and 23.1% ZnO and the antimicrobial assay was done using agar disc diffusion method. Discs of the modified bonding agent were prepared and a culture of Streptococcus mutans mixed with soft agar was poured over it and incubated at 38°C for 48 h and zones of inhibition were measured. The test was repeated after a month to check the antimicrobial effect. In addition shear bond strength of the brackets bonded with the modified bonding agent was tested. Results: The agar disc showed zones of inhibition around the modified bonding agent and the antimicrobial activity was more when the concentration of ZnO was increased. The antimicrobial effect was present even after a month. The shear bond strength decreased as the concentration of ZnO increased. Conclusion: The incorporation of ZnO into a resin modified light cure GIC (Fuji Ortho LC GC America, Alsip, Ill) added antimicrobial property to the original compound. PMID:24966757

  12. Molybdenum(VI) network polymers based on anion-? interaction and hydrogen bonding: Synthesis, crystal structures and oxidation catalytic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Wang, Ge; Shi, Zhan; Yang, Mu; Luck, Rudy L.

    2009-11-01

    A crystallographic investigation of anion-? interactions and hydrogen bonds on the preferred structural motifs of molybdenum(VI) complexes has been carried out. Two molybdenum(VI) network polymers MoO 2F 4·(Hinca) 2 ( 1) and MoO 2F 3(H 2O)·(Hinpa) ( 2), where inca = isonicotinamide and inpa = isonipecotamide, have been synthesized, crystallographically characterized and successfully applied to alcohol oxidation reaction. Complex 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic space C2/ c: a = 16.832(3) Å, b = 8.8189(15) Å, c = 12.568(2) Å, ? = 118.929(3)°, V = 1560.1(5) Å 3, Z = 4. Complex 2 crystallizes in the triclinic space P-1: a = 5.459(2) Å, b = 9.189(4) Å, c = 12.204(5) Å, ? = 71.341(6)°, ? = 81.712(7)°, ? = 77.705(7)°, V = 564.8(4) Å 3, Z = 2. Complex 1 consists of hydrogen bonding and anion-? interactions, both of which are considered as important factors for controlling the geometric features and packing characteristics of the crystal structure. The geometry of the sandwich complex of [MoO 2F 4] 2- with two pyridine rings indicates that the anion-? interaction is an additive and provides a base for the design and synthesis of new complexes. For complex 2, the anions and the protonated inpa ligands form a 2D supramolecular network by four different types of hydrogen contacts (N-H⋯F, N-H⋯O, O-H⋯F and O-H⋯O). The catalytic ability of complexes 1 and 2 has also been evaluated by applying them to the oxidation of benzyl alcohol with TBHP as oxidant.

  13. Kinetics of the reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, W. L.; Hanson, R. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    The reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen has been studied in the temperature range 2400-4500 K using a shock-tube technique. Mixtures of NO and H2 diluted in argon or krypton were heated by incident shock waves, and the infrared emission from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO at 5.3 microns was used to monitor the time-varying NO concentration. The decomposition of nitric oxide behind the shock was found to be modeled well by a fifteen-reaction system. A principal result of the study was the determination of the rate constant k1 for the reaction H + NO yields N + OH, which may be the rate-limiting step for NO removal in some combustion systems. Experimental values of k1 were obtained for each test through comparisons of measured and numerically predicted NO profiles. The data are fit closely by the expression k1 = 1.34 times 10 to the fourteenth power exp(-49 200/RT) cu cm/mole-sec. These data appear to be the first available for this rate constant.

  14. Palladium-catalyzed oxidative arylalkylation of activated alkenes: dual C-H bond cleavage of an arene and acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Mu, Xin; Liu, Guosheng

    2011-12-23

    Not one but two: The title reaction proceeds through the dual C-H bond cleavage of both aniline and acetonitrile. The reaction affords a variety of cyano-bearing indolinones in excellent yield. Mechanistic studies demonstrate that this reaction involves a fast arylation of the olefin and a rate-determining C-H activation of the acetonitrile. PMID:22076660

  15. Manufacture of ?1.2m reaction bonded silicon carbide mirror blank CFID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ge; Zhao, Rucheng; Zhao, Wenxing; Bao, Jianxun

    2010-05-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a new type candidate material for large-scale lightweight space mirror. Its low thermal distortion, high stiffness, fine optical quality and dimensional stability, make SiC an ideal material for large space born telescope. Since ten years Changchun institute optics, fine mechanics and physics (CIOMP) has developed reaction bonded SiC (RB-SiC) technology for space application, and can fabricate RB-SiC mirror with scale less than 1.0 meter for telescope. The green body is prepared with gel-casting method which is an attractive new ceramic forming process for making high-quality, complex-shaped ceramic parts. And then unmolding, drying, binder burning out, reacting bonded, the RB-SiC can be obtained. But with the development of space-born or ground telescope, the scale of primary mirror has exceeded 1.0 meter. So CIOMP has developed an assembly technique which called novel reaction-formed joint technology for larger RB-SiC mirror blank. The steps include joining of green bodies with mixture comprised of SiC particles and phenolic resin etc, firing, machining and sintering. Joining the ?1.2 meter RB-SiC mirror blank by the novel reaction-formed joint technology. And testing the welding layer's performance, the results show that the thickness of 54-77?m, the microstructure and thermal property can be comparable to the substrate and the mechanical property are excellent in bending strength of 307MPa.

  16. Oxidation Reactions of Dithiocarbamate Complexes of Ruthenium(II).

    PubMed

    Leung, Wa-Hung; Chim, Joyce L. C.; Hou, Hongwei; Hun, Tom S. M.; Williams, Ian D.; Wong, Wing-Tak

    1997-09-24

    The reaction of Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(DMSO)(2) (Et(2)dtc = N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate; DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide) with t-BuNC gave trans-Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(CN-t-Bu)(2), 1. Complex 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n with a = 9.753(2) Å, b = 11.583(2) Å, c = 12.974(2) Å, and beta = 91.8(2) degrees for Z = 2. The crystal structure of 1 shows the trans disposition of the two isocyanides; the mean Ru-S and Ru-C distances are 2.409 and 1.977(2) Å, respectively. Treatment of [Ru(diene)Cl(2)](n)() with Na(Et(2)dtc) afforded Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(diene) (diene = bicyclo[2.2.1]hepta-2,5-diene (NBD), 2, 1,5-cyclooctadiene (COD), 3). Complex 2 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P&onemacr; with a = 7.316(1) Å, b = 10.346(1) Å, c = 15.123(2) Å, alpha = 103.69(2) degrees, beta = 93.54(2) degrees, and gamma = 100.61(2) degrees for Z = 2. The mean Ru-S and Ru-C distances in 2 are 2.416 and 2.137 Å, respectively. The reaction of cis-Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(CO)(2) with iodine gave the 2:1 molecular iodine complex cis-Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(CO)(2).(1)/(2)I(2) 4, which crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c with a = 7.347(2), b = 22.227(2) Å, c = 12.891(2) Å, and beta =95.98 (2) degrees for Z = 4. The mean Ru-S and Ru-C and the I-I distances in complex 4 are 2.427, 1.903, and 2.745(1) Å, respectively. Treatment of Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(DMSO)(2) with I(2) gave the linear Ru(II)-Ru(III)-Ru(III) trimer [Ru(3)(Et(2)dtc)(6)(DMSO)(2)](I(3))(2), 5, which crystallizes in the triclinic space group P&onemacr; with a = 14.125(3) Å, b = 20.829(6) Å, c = 13.658(3) Å, alpha = 97.57(2) degrees, beta = 110.01(2) degrees, and gamma = 71.25(2) degrees for Z = 2. The structure of complex 6 can be viewed as consisting of a {Ru(2)(III)(Et(2)dtc)(4)}(2+) core and a {Ru(II)(Et(2)dtc)(2)(DMSO)(2)} moiety, which are linked together via the two dithiocarbamate sulfurs of the latter. While the two Ru(III) centers are connected by a Ru-Ru single bond (Ru-Ru = 2.826(2) Å), there is no direct interaction between the Ru(III) and Ru(II) centers. Oxidation of Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)L(2) (L = PPh(3), t-BuNC) by I(2) gave the respective [Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)L(2)](+) cations. The reaction of cis-Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(PPh(3))(2) with excess tosyl azide gave the diamagnetic Ru(IV) tetrazene complex Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(Ts(2)N(4)), 7. Complex 7 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P&onemacr; with a = 10.380(1) Å, b = 11.322(1) Å, c = 15.310(1) Å, alpha = 106.84(2) degrees, beta = 106.87(2) degrees, and gamma = 92.63(2) degrees for Z = 2. The Ru-S and Ru-N(alpha) distances in 7 are 2.385 and 1.98 Å, respectively. The formal potentials of the Ru dithiocarbamate complexes were determined by cyclic voltammetry. PMID:11670104

  17. Density Functional Theory Calculations and Analysis of Reaction Pathways for Reduction of Nitric Oxide by Hydrogen on Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Farberow, Carrie A.; Dumesic, James A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-10-03

    Reaction pathways are explored for low temperature (e.g., 400 K) reduction of nitric oxide by hydrogen on Pt(111). First-principles electronic structure calculations based on periodic, self-consistent density functional theory(DFT-GGA, PW91) are employed to obtain thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for proposed reaction schemes on Pt(111). The surface of Pt(111) during NO reduction by H? at low temperatures is predicted to operate at a high NO coverage, and this environment is explicitly taken into account in the DFT calculations. Maximum rate analyses are performed to assess the most likely reaction mechanisms leading to formation of N?O, the major product observed experimentally at low temperatures. The results of these analyses suggest that the reaction most likely proceeds via the addition of at least two H atoms to adsorbed NO, followed by cleavage of the N-O bond.

  18. Fly Ash and Mercury Oxidation/Chlorination Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sukh Sidhu; Patanjali Varanasi

    2008-12-31

    Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury have different physical and chemical properties. Mercury leaves the boiler in its elemental form but goes through various transformations in the post-combustion zone. There is a need to understand how fly ash and flue gas composition affect speciation, partitioning, and reactions of mercury under the full range of post-combustion zone conditions. This knowledge can then be used to predict the chemical transformation of mercury (elemental, oxidized or particulate) in the post combustion zone and thus help with the control of mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. To accomplish this goal present study was conducted using five coal fly ashes. These ashes were characterized and their catalytic activity was compared under selected reaction conditions in a fixed bed reactor. Based on the results from these fly ash experiments, three key components (carbon, iron oxide and calcium oxide) were chosen. These three components were then used to prepare model fly ashes. Silica/alumina was used as a base for these model fly ashes. One, two or three component model fly ashes were then prepared to investigate mercury transformation reactions. The third set of experiments was performed with CuO and CuCl2 catalysts to further understand the mercury oxidation process. Based on the results of these three studies the key components were predicted for different fly ash compositions under variety of flue gas conditions. A fixed bed reactor system was used to conduct this study. In all the experiments, the inlet concentration of Hg0(g) was maintained at 35 {micro}g/m3 using a diffusion tube as the source of Hg0(g). All experiments were conducted using 4% O2 in nitrogen mix as a reaction gas, and other reactants (HCl, H2O and SO2, NO2, Br2) were added as required. The fixed bed reactor was operated over a temperature range of 200 to 400 C. In each experiment, the reactor effluent was analyzed using the modified Ontario-Hydro method. After each experiment, fly ash particles were also analyzed for mercury. The results show that the ability of fly ash to adsorb and/or oxidize mercury is primarily dependent on its carbon, iron and calcium content. There can be either one or more than one key component at a particular temperature and flue gas condition. Surface area played a secondary role in effecting the mercury transformations when compared to the concentration of the key component in the fly ash. Amount of carbon and surface area played a key important role in the adsorption of mercury. Increased concentration of gases in the flue gas other than oxygen and nitrogen caused decreased the amount of mercury adsorbed on carbon surface. Mercury adsorption by iron oxide primarily depended on the crystalline structure of iron oxide. {alpha}-Iron oxide had no effect on mercury adsorption or oxidation under most of the flue gas conditions, but ?-iron oxide adsorbed mercury under most of the flue gas conditions. Bromine is a very good oxidizing agent for mercury. But in the presence of calcium oxide containing fly ashes, all the oxidized mercury would be reduced to elemental form. Among the catalysts, it was observed that presence of free lattice chlorine in the catalyst was very important for the oxidation of mercury. But instead of using the catalyst alone, using it along with carbon may better serve the purpose by providing the adsorption surface for mercury and also some extra surface area for the reaction to occur (especially for fly ashes with low surface area).

  19. Photochemical reactions of biologically important quinoxaline n-oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Dvoryantseva, G.G.; Tetenchuk, K.P.; Pol'shakov, V.I.; Elina, A.S.

    1987-02-01

    The authors study the photochemical reactions of quinoxidine, dioxidine, and a number of related derivatives of quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxides containing methyl, halomethyl, and carboxamide groups in the pyrazine ring. Thin-layer chromatography, UV spectrophotometry, and NMR/sup 1/H and /sup 13/C spectroscopy were used as the main methods for monitoring the photolysis process and establishing the structure of the products formed. The investigation established that two types of photochemical reactions are observed in the series of compounds discussed: photoisomerization with migration of a substitutent to the nitrogen atom of the heterocycle, and photorearrangement with elimination of a substituent and the formation of the corresponding lactams.

  20. Plasma-activated direct bonding of diamond-on-insulator wafers to thermal oxide grown silicon wafers

    E-print Network

    Akin, Tayfun

    Plasma-activated direct bonding of diamond-on-insulator wafers to thermal oxide grown silicon September 2010 Keywords: Diamond-on-insulator Plasma activation Ultrananocrystalline diamond Direct bonding Diamond-on-insulator (DOI) wafers featuring ultrananocrystalline diamond are studied via atomic force

  1. Precursors with Metal-Nitrogen Bonds for ALD of Metals, Nitrides and Oxides Gordon@chemistry.harvard.edu

    E-print Network

    Precursors with Metal-Nitrogen Bonds for ALD of Metals, Nitrides and Oxides Roy Gordon Gordon@chemistry.harvard.edu Harvard University, Cambridge, MA Abstract To achieve ALD's unique characteristics, ALD precursors must or the substrates. Precursors with metal-nitrogen bonds have been found to be particularly effective for ALD

  2. Initial Reactions in Anaerobic Oxidation of m-Xylene by the Denitrifying Bacterium Azoarcus sp. Strain T

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Cynthia J.; Beller, Harry R.; Reinhard, Martin; Spormann, Alfred M.

    1999-01-01

    The initial enzymatic steps in anaerobic m-xylene oxidation were studied in Azoarcus sp. strain T, a denitrifying bacterium capable of mineralizing m-xylene via 3-methylbenzoate. Permeabilized cells of m-xylene-grown Azoarcus sp. strain T catalyzed the addition of m-xylene to fumarate to form (3-methylbenzyl)succinate. In the presence of succinyl coenzyme A (CoA) and nitrate, (3-methylbenzyl)succinate was oxidized to E-(3-methylphenyl)itaconate (or a closely related isomer) and 3-methylbenzoate. Kinetic studies conducted with permeabilized cells and whole-cell suspensions of m-xylene-grown Azoarcus sp. strain T demonstrated that the specific rate of in vitro (3-methylbenzyl)succinate formation accounts for at least 15% of the specific rate of in vivo m-xylene consumption. Based on these findings, we propose that Azoarcus sp. strain T anaerobically oxidizes m-xylene to 3-methylbenzoate (or its CoA thioester) via (3-methylbenzyl)succinate and E-(3-methylphenyl)itaconate (or its CoA thioester) in a series of reactions that are analogous to those recently proposed for anaerobic toluene oxidation to benzoyl-CoA. A deuterium kinetic isotope effect was observed in the (3-methylbenzyl)succinate synthase reaction (and the benzylsuccinate synthase reaction), suggesting that a rate-determining step in this novel fumarate addition reaction involves breaking a C-H bond. PMID:10515931

  3. Phosphinocyclodextrins as confining units for catalytic metal centres. Applications to carbon-carbon bond forming reactions.

    PubMed

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Gramage-Doria, Rafael; Sémeril, David; Armspach, Dominique; Matt, Dominique; Oberhauser, Werner; Toupet, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    The capacity of two cavity-shaped ligands, HUGPHOS-1 and HUGPHOS-2, to generate exclusively singly phosphorus-ligated complexes, in which the cyclodextrin cavity tightly wraps around the metal centre, was explored with a number of late transition metal cations. Both cyclodextrin-derived ligands were assessed in palladium-catalysed Mizoroki-Heck coupling reactions between aryl bromides and styrene on one hand, and the rhodium-catalysed asymmetric hydroformylation of styrene on the other hand. The inability of both chiral ligands to form standard bis(phosphine) complexes under catalytic conditions was established by high-pressure NMR studies and shown to have a deep impact on the two carbon-carbon bond forming reactions both in terms of activity and selectivity. For example, when used as ligands in the rhodium-catalysed hydroformylation of styrene, they lead to both high isoselectivity and high enantioselectivity. In the study dealing with the Mizoroki-Heck reactions, comparative tests were carried out with WIDEPHOS, a diphosphine analogue of HUGPHOS-2. PMID:25383109

  4. Phosphinocyclodextrins as confining units for catalytic metal centres. Applications to carbon–carbon bond forming reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Gramage-Doria, Rafael; Sémeril, David; Oberhauser, Werner; Toupet, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    Summary The capacity of two cavity-shaped ligands, HUGPHOS-1 and HUGPHOS-2, to generate exclusively singly phosphorus-ligated complexes, in which the cyclodextrin cavity tightly wraps around the metal centre, was explored with a number of late transition metal cations. Both cyclodextrin-derived ligands were assessed in palladium-catalysed Mizoroki–Heck coupling reactions between aryl bromides and styrene on one hand, and the rhodium-catalysed asymmetric hydroformylation of styrene on the other hand. The inability of both chiral ligands to form standard bis(phosphine) complexes under catalytic conditions was established by high-pressure NMR studies and shown to have a deep impact on the two carbon–carbon bond forming reactions both in terms of activity and selectivity. For example, when used as ligands in the rhodium-catalysed hydroformylation of styrene, they lead to both high isoselectivity and high enantioselectivity. In the study dealing with the Mizoroki–Heck reactions, comparative tests were carried out with WIDEPHOS, a diphosphine analogue of HUGPHOS-2. PMID:25383109

  5. Synthesis of Polyheteroaromatic Compounds via Rhodium-Catalyzed Multiple C-H Bond Activation and Oxidative Annulation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shiyong; Liu, Suna; Zhang, Sai; Cao, Shengyu; Sun, Jiangtao

    2015-10-16

    Polyheteroaromatic compounds are potential optoelectronic conjugated materials due to their electro- and photochemical properties. Transition-metal-catalyzed multiple C-H activation and sequential oxidative annulation allows rapidly assembling of those compounds from readily available starting materials. A rhodium-catalyzed cascade oxidative annulation of ?-enamino esters or 4-aminocoumarins with internal alkynes is described to access those compounds, featuring multiple C-H/N-H bond cleavages and sequential C-C/C-N bond formations in one pot. PMID:26439472

  6. Short Access to Belt Compounds with Spatially Close C=C Bonds and Their Transannular Reactions.

    PubMed

    Camps, Pelayo; Gómez, Tània; Otermin, Ane; Font-Bardia, Mercè; Estarellas, Carolina; Luque, Francisco Javier

    2015-09-28

    Two domino Diels-Alder adducts were obtained from 3,7-bis(cyclopenta-2,4-dien-1-ylidene)-cis-bicyclo[3.3.0]octane and dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate or N-methylmaleimide under microwave irradiation. From the first adduct, a C20H24 diene with C2v symmetry was obtained by Zn/AcOH reduction, hydrolysis, oxidative decarboxylation, and selective hydrogenation. Photochemical [2+2] cycloaddition of this diene gave a thermally unstable cyclobutane derivative, which reverts to the diene. However, both the diene and the cyclobutane derivatives could be identified by X-ray diffraction analysis upon irradiation of the diene crystal. New six-membered rings are formed upon the transannular addition of bromine or iodine to the diene. The N-type selectivity of the addition was examined by theoretical calculations, which revealed the distinct susceptibility of the doubly bonded carbon atoms to the bromine attack. PMID:26376331

  7. Infrared driven CO oxidation reactions on isolated platinum cluster oxides, Pt(n)O(m)+.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Alexander C; Hamilton, Suzanne M; Cooper, Graham A; Kerpal, Christian; Harding, Dan J; Meijer, Gerard; Fielicke, André; Mackenzie, Stuart R

    2012-01-01

    This collaboration has recently shown that infrared excitation can drive decomposition reactions of molecules on the surface of gas-phase transition metal clusters. We describe here a significant extension of this work to the study of bimolecular reactions initiated in a similar manner. Specifically, we have observed the infrared activated CO oxidation reaction (CO(ads) + O(ads) --> CO2(g)) on isolated platinum oxide cations, Pt(n)O(m)+. Small platinum cluster oxides Pt(n)O(m)+ (n = 3-7, m = 2, 4), have been decorated with CO molecules and subjected to multiple photon infrared excitation in the range 400-2200 cm(-1) using the Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments (FELIX). The Pt(n)O(m)CO+ clusters have been characterised by infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy using messenger atom tagging. Evidence is observed for isomers involving both dissociatively and molecularly adsorbed oxygen on the cluster surface. Further information is obtained on the evolution of the cluster structure with number of platinum atoms and CO coverage. In separate experiments, Pt(n)O(m)CO+ clusters have been subjected to infrared heating via the CO stretch around 2100 cm(-1). On all clusters investigated, the CO oxidation reaction, indicated by CO2 loss and production of Pt(n)O(m) = 1+, is found to compete effectively with the CO desorption channel. The experimental observations are compared with the results of preliminary DFT calculations in order to identify both cluster structures and plausible mechanisms for the surface reaction. PMID:23230771

  8. Oxidation of phenyl and hydride ligands of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium derivatives by nitrous oxide via selective oxygen atom transfer reactions: insights from quantum chemistry calculations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hujun; Liu, Chengcheng; Yuan, Ying; Zhou, Tao; Fan, Ting; Lei, Qunfang; Fang, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms for the oxidation of phenyl and hydride ligands of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium derivatives (Cp* = ?(5)-C5Me5) by nitrous oxide via selective oxygen atom transfer reactions have been systematically studied by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On the basis of the calculations, we investigated the original mechanism proposed by Hillhouse and co-workers for the activation of N2O. The calculations showed that the complex with an initial O-coordination of N2O to the coordinatively unsaturated Hf center is not a local minimum. Then we proposed a new reaction mechanism to investigate how N2O is activated and why N2O selectively oxidize phenyl and hydride ligands of . Frontier molecular orbital theory analysis indicates that N2O is activated by nucleophilic attack by the phenyl or hydride ligand. Present calculations provide new insights into the activation of N2O involving the direct oxygen atom transfer from nitrous oxide to metal-ligand bonds instead of the generally observed oxygen abstraction reaction to generate metal-oxo species. PMID:26660046

  9. Te-Te and Te-C bond cleavage reactions using a monovalent gallanediyl.

    PubMed

    Ganesamoorthy, Chelladurai; Bendt, Georg; Bläser, Dieter; Wölper, Christoph; Schulz, Stephan

    2015-03-21

    LGa (L = [(2,6-i-Pr2-C6H3)NC(Me)]2CH) reacts with elemental tellurium with formation of the Te-bridged compound [LGa-?-Te]2 1, whereas the reactions with Ph2Te2 and i-Pr2Te occurred with cleavage of the Te-Te and Te-C bond, respectively, and subsequent formation of LGa(TePh)2 2 and LGa(i-Pr)Tei-Pr 3. 1-3 were characterized by heteronuclear NMR ((1)H, (13)C, (125)Te) and IR spectroscopy and their solid state structures were determined by single crystal X-ray analyses. PMID:25680084

  10. Experimental investigation on material migration phenomena in micro-EDM of reaction-bonded silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Pay Jun; Yan, Jiwang; Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto

    2013-07-01

    Material migration between tool electrode and workpiece material in micro electrical discharge machining of reaction-bonded silicon carbide was experimentally investigated. The microstructural changes of workpiece and tungsten tool electrode were examined using scanning electron microscopy, cross sectional transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray under various voltage, capacitance and carbon nanofibre concentration in the dielectric fluid. Results show that tungsten is deposited intensively inside the discharge-induced craters on the RB-SiC surface as amorphous structure forming micro particles, and on flat surface region as a thin interdiffusion layer of poly-crystalline structure. Deposition of carbon element on tool electrode was detected, indicating possible material migration to the tool electrode from workpiece material, carbon nanofibres and dielectric oil. Material deposition rate was found to be strongly affected by workpiece surface roughness, voltage and capacitance of the electrical discharge circuit. Carbon nanofibre addition in the dielectric at a suitable concentration significantly reduced the material deposition rate.

  11. Effects of Bond Location on the Ignition and Reaction Pathways of trans-Hexene Isomers.

    PubMed

    Wagnon, Scott W; Barraza-Botet, Cesar L; Wooldridge, Margaret S

    2015-07-16

    Chemical structure and bond location are well-known to impact combustion reactivity. The current work presents new experimental autoignition and speciation data on the three trans-hexene isomers (1-hexene, trans-2-hexene, and trans-3-hexene), which describe the effects of the location of the carbon-carbon double bond. Experiments were conducted with the University of Michigan rapid compression facility to determine ignition delay times from pressure time histories. Stoichiometric (? = 1.0) mixtures at dilution levels of buffer gas:O2 = 7.5 (mole basis) were investigated at an average pressure of 11 atm and temperatures from 837 to 1086 K. Fast gas sampling and gas chromatography were also used to quantitatively measure 13 stable intermediate species formed during the ignition delay period of each isomer at a temperature of ?900 K. The measured ignition delay times and species measurements were in good agreement with previous experimental studies at overlapping conditions. The results were modeled using a gasoline surrogate reaction mechanism from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which contains a submechanism for the trans-hexene isomers. The model predictions captured the overall autoignition characteristics of the hexene isomers well (within a factor of 2), as well as the time histories of several of the intermediate species (e.g., propene). However, there were discrepancies between the model predictions and the experimental data for some species, particularly for the 3-hexene isomer. PMID:25837302

  12. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  13. Oxidation Numbers, Oxidants, and Redox Reactions: Variants of the Electrophilic Bromination of Alkenes and Variants of the Application of Oxone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eissen, Marco; Strudthoff, Merle; Backhaus, Solveig; Eismann, Carolin; Oetken, Gesa; Kaling, Soren; Lenoir, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Oxidation-state and donor-acceptor concepts are important areas in the chemical education. Student worksheets containing problems that emphasize oxidation numbers, redox reactions of organic compounds, and stoichiometric reaction equations are presented. All of the examples are incorporated under one unifying topic: the production of vicinal…

  14. Specific Bonds between an Iron Oxide Surface and Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Brian H.; Shi, Liang; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Droubay, Timothy C.; Mccready, David E.; Lower, Steven

    2007-07-31

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is purported to express outer membrane cytochromes (e.g., MtrC and OmcA) that transfer electrons directly to Fe(III) in a mineral during anaerobic respiration.  A prerequisite for this type of reaction would be the formation of a stable bond between a cytochrome and an iron oxide surface.  Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to detect whether a specific bond forms between a hematite (Fe2O3) thin film, created with oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and recombinant MtrC or OmcA molecules coupled to gold substrates.  Force spectra displayed a unique force signature indicative of a specific bond between each cytochrome and the hematite surface.  The strength of the OmcA-hematite bond was approximately twice as strong as the MtrC-hematite bond, but direct binding to hematite was twice as favorable for MtrC.  Reversible folding/unfolding reactions were observed for mechanically denatured MtrC molecules bound to hematite.  The force measurements for the hematite-cytochrome pairs were compared to spectra collected between an iron oxide and S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions.  There is a strong correlation between the whole cell and pure protein force spectra suggesting that the unique binding attributes of each cytochrome complement one another and allow both MtrC and OmcA to play a prominent role in the transfer of electrons to Fe(III) in minerals.  Finally, by comparing the magnitude of binding force for the whole cell vs. pure protein data, we were able to estimate that a single bacterium of S. oneidensis (2 x 0.5 ?m) expresses ~104 cytochromes on its outer surface. 

  15. Aerobic oxidation reactions catalyzed by vanadium complexes of bis(phenolate) ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqi; Scott, Brian L; Wu, Ruilian; Silks, L A Pete; Hanson, Susan K

    2012-07-01

    Vanadium(V) complexes of the tridentate bis(phenolate)pyridine ligand H(2)BPP (H(2)BPP = 2,6-(HOC(6)H(2)-2,4-(t)Bu(2))(2)NC(5)H(3)) and the bis(phenolate)amine ligand H(2)BPA (H(2)BPA = N,N-bis(2-hydroxy-4,5-dimethylbenzyl)propylamine) have been synthesized and characterized. The ability of the complexes to mediate the oxidative C-C bond cleavage of pinacol was tested. Reaction of the complex (BPP)V(V)(O)(O(i)Pr) (4) with pinacol afforded the monomeric vanadium(IV) product (BPP)V(IV)(O)(HO(i)Pr) (6) and acetone. Vanadium(IV) complex 6 was oxidized rapidly by air at room temperature in the presence of NEt(3), yielding the vanadium(V) cis-dioxo complex [(BPP)V(V)(O)(2)]HNEt(3). Complex (BPA)V(V)(O)(O(i)Pr) (5) reacted with pinacol at room temperature, to afford acetone and the vanadium(IV) dimer [(BPA)V(IV)(O)(HO(i)Pr)](2). Complexes 4 and 5 were evaluated as catalysts for the aerobic oxidation of 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol and arylglycerol ?-aryl ether lignin model compounds. Although both 4 and 5 catalyzed the aerobic oxidation of 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol, complex 4 was found to be a more active and robust catalyst for oxidation of the lignin model compounds. The catalytic activities and selectivities of the bis(phenolate) complexes are compared to previously reported catalysts. PMID:22708725

  16. Structure, bonding and redox properties of scandium oxide clusters, a model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. R. Tobias; Panas, Itai

    1999-10-01

    A systematic survey of scandium oxide molecules and clusters was performed by means of density functional theory (DFT). Various types of scandium to oxygen bonding were characterized. Main features of the resulting menagerie of stable gas phase species are: (1) a basic Sc 2O 2 molecule with rhombic structure, (2) a highly symmetric Sc 2O 3 molecule with structure and D 3h symmetry, (3) an Sc 2O 4 dimer, which is an O?Sc-O-O-Sc?O analogue to hydrogen peroxide, and (4) the most stable cluster of Sc 2O 4 stoichiometry. The latter can be understood as two Sc atoms bridged by two oxygen atoms and a peroxy unit, i.e.? Bond breaking in the peroxy bridge, forming, can be used as a model for O 2 dissociation on an early transition metal oxide surface. The formation of ionic species was also investigated, and for all the oxide systems both cationic and anionic species were found to be stable. Ionization was also found to enhance the formation of cluster species.

  17. Electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Indirect cholesterol electrochemical oxidation in the presence of various mediators leads to electrophilic addition to the double bond, oxidation at the allylic position, oxidation of the hydroxy group, or functionalization of the side chain. Recent studies have proven that direct electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol is also possible and affords different products depending on the reaction conditions. PMID:25977713

  18. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Zhu, Yihan; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Fudong; Huang, Jianfeng; Meng, Xiangju; Basset, Jean-Marie; Han, Yu; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold–gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen. PMID:25902034

  19. Catalysis of Reduction and Oxidation Reactions for Application in Gas Particle Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Udron, L.; Turek, T.

    2002-09-19

    The present study is a first part of an investigation addressing the simultaneous occurrence of oxidation and reduction reactions in catalytic filters. It has the objectives (a) to assess the state of knowledge regarding suitable (types of) catalysts for reduction and oxidation, (b) to collect and analyze published information about reaction rates of both NOx reduction and VOC oxidation, and (c) to adjust a lab-scale screening method to the requirements of an activity test with various oxidation/reduction catalysts.

  20. The reaction of hydrogen peroxide with nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, D.; Lissi, E.; Heicklen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The reactions were studied with the aid of a mass spectrometer. A pinhole bleed system provided continuous sampling of the gas mixture in the cell during the reaction. It was found that the homogeneous reactions of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide with hydrogen peroxide are too slow to be of any significance in the upper atmosphere. However, the heterogeneous reactions may be important in the conversion of nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide in the case of polluted urban atmospheres.

  1. Kinetics and Mechanism of Iodide Oxidation by Iron(III): A Clock Reaction Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Jurica; Tomisic, Vladislav; Vrkljan, Petar B. A.

    2008-01-01

    A simple method for studying the kinetics of a chemical reaction is described and the significance of reaction orders in deducing reaction mechanisms is demonstrated. In this student laboratory experiment, oxidation of iodide by iron(III) ions in an acidic medium is transformed into a clock reaction. By means of the initial rates method, it is…

  2. Laminate behavior for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatt, R. T.; Phillips, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composite laminates (SiC/RBSN) have been measured. The laminates contained approx 30 volume fraction of aligned 142-micron diameter SiC fiber in a porous RBSN matrix. Three types of laminate studied were unidirectional: (1) (0) sub 8, (2) (10) sub 8, and (3) (45) sub 8, and (90) sub 8; cross plied laminates (0 sub 2/90 sub 2); and angle plied laminates: (+45 sub 2/-45 sub 2). Each laminate contained eight fiber plies. Results of the unidirectionally reinforced composites tested at various angles to the reinforcement direction indicate large anisotropy in in-plane properties. In addition, strength properties of these composites along the fiber direction were independent of specimen gage length and were unaffected by notches normal to the fiber direction. Splitting parallel to the fiber at the notch tip appears to be the dominant crack blunting mechanism responsible for notch insensitive behavior of these composites. In-plane properties of the composites can be improved by 2-D laminate construction. Mechanical property results for (0 sub 2/90 sub 2)sub s and (+45/-45 sub 2) sub s laminates showed that their matrix failure strains were similar to that for (0) sub 8 laminates, but their primary elastic moduli, matrix cracking strengths, and ultimate composite strengths were lower. The elastic properties of unidirectional, cross-ply, and angle-ply composites can be predicted from modified constitutive equations and laminate theory. Further improvements in laminate properties may be achieved by reducing the matrix porosity and by optimizing the bond strength between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix.

  3. Laminate behavior for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Phillips, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composite laminates (SiC/RBSN) have been measured. The laminates contained approx 30 volume fraction of aligned 142-micron diameter SiC fiber in a porous RBSN matrix. Three types of laminate studied were unidirectional: (1) (0) sub 8, (2) (10) sub 8, and (3) (45) sub 8, and (90) sub 8; cross plied laminates (0 sub 2/90 sub 2); and angle plied laminates: (+45 sub 2/-45 sub 2). Each laminate contained eight fiber plies. Results of the unidirectionally reinforced composites tested at various angles to the reinforcement direction indicate large anisotropy in in-plane properties. In addition, strength properties of these composites along the fiber direction were independent of specimen gage length and were unaffected by notches normal to the fiber direction. Splitting parallel to the fiber at the notch tip appears to be the dominant crack blunting mechanism responsible for notch insensitive behavior of these composites. In-plane properties of the composites can be improved by 2-D laminate construction. Mechanical property results for (0 sub 2/90 sub 2) sub s and (+45/-45 sub 2) sub s laminates showed that their matrix failure strains were similar to that for (0) sub 8 laminates, but their primary elastic moduli, matrix cracking strengths, and ultimate composite strengths were lower. The elastic properties of unidirectional, cross-ply, and angle-ply composites can be predicted from modified constitutive equations and laminate theory. Further improvements in laminate properties may be achieved by reducing the matrix porosity and by optimizing the bond strength between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix.

  4. Dielectric isolation of silicon by anodic bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Thomas R.

    1985-08-01

    Dielectrically isolated silicon was produced by anodically bonding together a pair of silicon wafers whose surfaces were covered with an electrically nonconductive micron layer of thermally grown oxide. Although anodic bonding normally requires a conductive oxide, anodic bonding works with nonconductive silicon oxide if the total layer of silicon oxide is less than ten microns thick. The time needed for the anodic bonding process decreases monotonically with temperature because the increase in the deformability of silicon oxide overcomes the decrease in the maximum permissible anodic bonding voltage with temperature. However, factors such as silicon degradation and electrode reactions at very high temperatures indicate that a compromise temperature range of 850-950 °C is best for the anodic bonding of silicon oxide. Bonding voltages of 30-50 V for times of about an hour produced the best bonding yields at these temperatures. Anodically bonded silicon wafers were examined with infrared and ultrasonic transmission microscopy for bond quality. Small scattered nonbonded zones comprising on the average 5% of the total wafer area were found in all wafers. These nonbonded zones were the result of dust particles, entrapped gas, and dimensional mismatches between multiple bonding fronts.

  5. Reactions of CFCs with aluminum oxide surfaces at stratospheric temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, G.N.; Dai, Q.; Freedman, A.

    1996-10-01

    Approximately 30 wt % of the exhaust emitted by the Space Shuttle`s solid-propellant rocket motors is composed of micron and submicron sized aluminum oxide particles. In order to assess the impact of these particles on stratospheric chemistry, we have investigated the reactions of several chlorofluorcarbons (CFCs) on {alpha}- and {gamma}-aluminum oxide powders at temperatures from 80-400 K. Using a combination of molecular beam dosing under UHV conditions, FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption (TPD), we conclude that CFCs dissociatively chemisorb on dehydroxylated alumina surfaces at temperatures as low as 130 K. A number of temperature-dependent absorption features are observed in the infrared spectra which can be attributed to carbonate species. TPD spectra indicate that CO{sub 2} desorbs from CFC-dosed alumina at temperatures below 370 K. X-ray photoelectron spectra reveal the presence of inorganic halides at temperatures as low As 150 K. The relative reactivities of the CFCs with alumina surfaces at stratospheric temperatures ({approximately}200 K) reflect differences in the initial sticking probabilities of the molecules and in the energetics of the dissociative chemisorption process.

  6. Oxidation reactions of 2-thiouracil: a theoretical and pulse radiolysis study.

    PubMed

    Prasanthkumar, K P; Suresh, C H; Aravindakumar, C T

    2012-11-01

    The reaction of hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) with the nucleic acid base analogue 2-thiouracil (1) has been studied by pulse radiolysis experiments and DFT. The generic intermediate radicals feasible for the (•)OH reactions with 1, namely, one electron oxidation product (1(•+)), (•)OH-adducts (3(•), 4(•), and 5(•)), and H-abstracted radicals (6(•) and 7(•)), were characterized by interpreting their electronic and structural properties along with calculated energetics and UV-vis spectra. Pulse radiolysis experiments showed that the transient formed in the reaction of (•)OH with 1 in water at pH 6.5 has ?(max) at 430 nm. A bimolecular rate constant, k(2) of 9.6 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), is determined for this reaction via competition kinetics with 2-propanol. The experiments suggested that the transient species could be a dimer radical cation 2(•+), formed by the reaction of 1 with the radical cation 1(•+). For this reaction, an equilibrium constant of 4.7 × 10(3) M(-1) was determined. The transient formed in the reaction of 1 with pulse radiolytically produced Br(2)(•-) at pH 6.5 as well as Cl(2)(•-) at pH 1 has also produced ?(max) at 430 nm and suggested the formation of 2(•+). The calculated UV-vis spectra of the transient species (1(•+), 3(•), 4(•), 5(•), 6(•), and 7(•)) showed no resemblance to the experimental spectra, while that of 2(•+) (?(max) = 420 nm) agreed well with the experimental value and thus confirmed the formation of 2(•+). The 420 nm peak was due to ? ? ?* electronic excitation centered on a 2-center-3-electron (2c-3e) sulfur-sulfur bond [-S?S-]. 2(•+) is the first reported example of a dimer radical cation in a pyrimidine heterocyclic system. Further, 5-C and 6-C substituted (substituents are -F, -Cl, -NH(2), -N(CH(3))(2), -OCH(3), -CF(3), -CH(3), -CH(2)CH(3), n-propyl, phenyl, and benzyl) and 5,6-disubstituted 2-thiouracil systems have been characterized by DFT and found that the reaction (1 + 1(•+) ? 2(•+)) is exergonic (1.12-13.63 kcal/mol) for many of them. PMID:23061532

  7. A study on thermal barrier coatings including thermal expansion mismatch and bond coat oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, George C.; Phucharoen, Woraphat; Miller, Robert A.

    1986-01-01

    The present investigation deals with a plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) intended for high temperature applications to advanced gas turbine blades. Typically, this type of coating system consists of a zirconia-yttria ceramic layer with a nickel-chromium-aluminum bond coat on a superalloy substrate. The problem on hand is a complex one due to the fact that bond coat oxidation and thermal mismatch occur in the TBC. Cracking in the TBC has also been experimentally illustrated. A clearer understanding of the mechanical behavior of the TBC is investigated. The stress states in a model thermal barrier coating as it cools down in air is studied. The powerful finite element method was utilized to model a coating cylindrical specimen. Four successively refined finite element models were developed. Some results obtained using the first two models have been reported previously. The major accomplishment is the successful development of an elastic TBC finite element model known as TBCG with interface geometry between the ceramic layer and the bond coat. An equally important milestone is the near-completion of the new elastic-plastic TBC finite element model called TBCGEP which yielded initial results. Representative results are presented.

  8. Reactions of oxide radical ion (Orad>-) with pyrimidine nucleosides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Ioele, Marcella; Mulazzani, Quinto G.

    2005-02-01

    The reaction of oxide radical ions (O rad - ) with nucleosides 1- 5 at pH 13.7 has been investigated by the pulse radiolysis technique. Rate constants for the reaction of the O rad - radical with the various nucleosides are in the range of (0.7-1.3)×10 9 M -1 s -1. The intermediate derived from uridine ( 1) disappeared by second-order kinetics, whereas the initial transient species derived from 2'-deoxyribonucleosides ( 2- 5) undergo unimolecular transformations with rate constant in the range of (0.6-1.0)×10 4 s -1 followed by a second slower unimolecular process with rate constant in the range of 30-50 s -1. The observed differences suggest two distinct mechanistic paths. In the uridine case, hydrogen abstraction preferentially occurs at the C2' position, whereas in the 2'-deoxynucleosides favored hydrogen abstraction occurs at the C5' position. Both attacks lead to release of the base as shown by ?-radiolysis experiments associated with product studies.

  9. Pre-treatments applied to oxidized aluminum surfaces to modify the interfacial bonding with bis-1,2-(triethoxysilyl)ethane (BTSE). Part I. High-purity Al with native oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, M.; Kim, J.; Wong, P. C.; Wong, K. C.; Mitchell, K. A. R.

    2005-12-01

    A remote microwave-generated H 2 plasma and heating to 250 °C were separately used to modify high-purity oxidized aluminum surfaces and to assess whether these treatments can help enhance adhesion with bis-1,2-(triethoxysilyl)ethane (BTSE) coatings. Different initial oxide surfaces were considered, corresponding to the native oxide and to surfaces formed by the Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) treatment applied for either 15 or 60 min. BTSE is applied from solution at pH 4, and competing processes of etching, protonation (to form OH groups) and coupling (to form Al sbnd O sbnd Si interfacial bonds) occur at the solid-liquid interface. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to determine how the topographies of the modified Al surfaces changed with the different pre-treatments and with exposure to a buffer solution of pH 4. Secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to determine the direct amount of Al sbnd O sbnd Si interfacial bonds by measuring the ratio of peak intensities 71-70 amu, while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the overall strength of the silane coating adhesion by measuring the Si 2p signals before and after application of an ultrasonic rinse to the coated sample. Measured Al 2p and O 1s spectra helped assess how the different pre-treatments modified the various Al oxidized surfaces prior to BTSE coating. Pre-treated samples that showed increased Al sbnd O sbnd Si bonding after BTSE coating corresponded to surfaces, which did not show evidence of significant etching after exposure to a pH 4 environment. This suggests that such surfaces are more receptive to the coupling reaction during exposure to the BTSE coating solution. These surfaces include all H 2 plasma-treated samples, the heated native oxide and the sample that only received the 15 min FPL treatment. In contrast, other surfaces that show evidence of etching in pH 4 environments are samples that received lower amounts of Al sbnd O sbnd Si interfacial bonding. Overall, heating improved the BTSE adhesive bonding for the native Al oxide, while H 2 plasma treatment improved the BTSE bonding for surfaces that had initially been FPL-treated for 15 and 60 min.

  10. Thermal barrier coating life and isothermal oxidation of low-pressure plasma-sprayed bond coat alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J.; Miller, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper investigates the isothermal oxidation kinetics of Ni-35Cr-6Al-0.95Y, Ni-18Cr-12Al-0.3Y, and Ni-16Cr-6Al-0.3Y low-pressure plasma-sprayed bond coat alloys and examines the effect of these alloys on the thermal barrier coating (TBC) cyclic life. TBC life was examined by cycling substrates coated with the different bond coats and a ZrO2-7 wt pct Y2O3 TBC in an air-rich burner rig flame between 1150 C and room temperature. The oxidation kinetics of the three bond coat alloys was examined by isothermal oxidation of monolithic NJiCrAlY coupons at 1083 C. The Ni-35Cr-6Al-0.95Y alloy exhibits comparatively high isothermal oxidation weight gains and provides the longest TBC life, whereas the Ni-16Cr-6Al-0.3Y alloy had the lowest weight gains and provided the shortest TBC life. The results show that, although bond coat oxidation is known to have a strong detrimental effect on TBC life, it is not the only bond coat factor that determines TBC life.

  11. Bond length and local energy density property connections for non-transition-metal oxide-bonded interactions.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, G V; Spackman, M A; Jayatilaka, D; Rosso, K M; Cox, D F

    2006-11-01

    For a variety of molecules and earth materials, the theoretical local kinetic energy density, G(r(c)), increases and the local potential energy density, V(r(c)), decreases as the M-O bond lengths (M = first- and second-row metal atoms bonded to O) decrease and the electron density, rho(r(c)), accumulates at the bond critical points, r(c). Despite the claim that the local kinetic energy density per electronic charge, G(r(c))/rho(r(c)), classifies bonded interactions as shared interactions when less than unity and closed-shell when greater, the ratio was found to increase from 0.5 to 2.5 au as the local electronic energy density, H(r(c)) = G(r(c)) + V(r(c)), decreases and becomes progressively more negative. The ratio appears to be a measure of the character of a given M-O bonded interaction, the greater the ratio, the larger the value of rho(r(c)), the smaller the coordination number of the M atom and the more shared the bonded interaction. H(r(c))/rho(r(c)) versus G(r(c))/rho(r(c)) scatter diagrams categorize the M-O bonded interactions into domains with the local electronic energy density per electron charge, H(r(c))/rho(r(c)), tending to decrease as the electronegativity differences for the bonded pairs of atoms decrease. The values of G(r(c)) and V(r(c)), estimated with a gradient-corrected electron gas theory expression and the local virial theorem, are in good agreement with theoretical values, particularly for the bonded interactions involving second-row M atoms. The agreement is poorer for shared C-O and N-O bonded interactions. PMID:17078623

  12. Destruction of hydrogen bonds of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) aqueous solution by trimethylamine N-oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, P. Madhusudhana; Taha, Mohamed; Venkatesu, Pannuru; Kumar, Awanish; Lee, Ming-Jer

    2012-06-01

    Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) is a compatible or protective osmolyte that stabilizes the protein native structure through non-bonding mechanism between TMAO and hydration surface of protein. However, we have shown here first time the direct binding mechanism for naturally occurring osmolyte TMAO with hydration structure of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM), an isomer of polyleucine, and subsequent aggregation of PNIPAM. The influence of TMAO on lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PNIPAM was investigated as a function of TMAO concentration at different temperatures by fluorescence spectroscopy, viscosity (?), multi angle dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements. To address some of the basis for further analysis of FTIR spectra of PNIPAM, we have also measured FTIR spectra for the monomer of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) in deuterium oxide (D2O) as a function of TMAO concentration. Our experimental results purportedly elucidate that the LCST values decrease with increasing TMAO concentration, which is mainly contributing to the direct hydrogen bonding of TMAO with the water molecules that are bound to the amide (-CONH) functional groups of the PNIPAM. We believed that the present work may act as a ladder to reach the heights of understanding of molecular mechanism between TMAO and macromolecule.

  13. Pentavalent Uranium Oxide via Reduction of [UO2]2+ Under Hydrothermal Reaction Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Balai, N.; Frisch, M; Ilton, E; Ravel, B; Cahill, C

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis, crystal structure, and spectroscopic characterization of [UV(H2O)2(UVIO2)2O4(OH)](H2O)4 (1), a mixed-valent UV/UVI oxide material, are reported. The hydrothermal reaction of UO22+ with Zn and hydrazine at 120 degrees C for three days yields 1 in the form of a dark red crystalline solid. Compound 1 has been characterized by a combination of single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The structure consists of an extended sheet of edge and corner shared UVI pentagonal bipyramids that are further connected by edge sharing to square bipyramidal UV units. The overall topology is similar to the mineral ianthinite. The uranium L|||-edge XAS revealed features consistent with those observed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. High resolution XPS data analysis of the U4f region confirmed the oxidation states of U as originally assigned from XRD analysis and bond valence summations.

  14. Pentavalent Uranium Oxide via Reduction of [UO2]2+ Under Hydrothermal Reaction Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Belai, Nebebech; Frisch, Mark; Ilton, Eugene S.; Ravel, Bruce; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2008-11-03

    The synthesis, crystal structure and spectroscopic characterization of [UV(H2O)2(UVIO2)2O4(OH)](H2O)4 (1), a mixed-valent UV/UVI oxide material, are reported. The hydrothermal reaction of UO22+ with Zn and hydrazine at 120 °C for three days yields 1 in the form of a dark red crystalline solid. Compound 1 has been characterized by a combination of single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The structure consists of an extended sheet of edge and point shared UVI pentagonal bipyramids that are further connected by edge sharing to square bipyramidal UV units. The overall topology is similar to the mineral ianthinite. The uranium L|||-edge XAS revealed features consistent with those observed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. High resolution XPS data analysis of the U4f region confirmed the oxidation states of U as originally assigned from XRD analysis and bond valence summations.

  15. Pentavalent uranium oxide via reduction of [UO2]2+ under hydrothermal reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Belai, Nebebech; Frisch, Mark; Ilton, Eugene S; Ravel, Bruce; Cahill, Christopher L

    2008-11-01

    The synthesis, crystal structure, and spectroscopic characterization of [U(V)(H2O)2(U(VI)O2)2O4(OH)](H2O)4 (1), a mixed-valent U(V)/U(VI) oxide material, are reported. The hydrothermal reaction of UO2(2+) with Zn and hydrazine at 120 degrees C for three days yields 1 in the form of a dark red crystalline solid. Compound 1 has been characterized by a combination of single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The structure consists of an extended sheet of edge and corner shared U(VI) pentagonal bipyramids that are further connected by edge sharing to square bipyramidal U(V) units. The overall topology is similar to the mineral ianthinite. The uranium L(III)-edge XAS revealed features consistent with those observed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. High resolution XPS data analysis of the U4f region confirmed the oxidation states of U as originally assigned from XRD analysis and bond valence summations. PMID:18842038

  16. Air oxidation method employed for the disulfide bond formation of natural and synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Calce, Enrica; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Scaloni, Andrea; Amodeo, Pietro; De Luca, Stefania

    2015-08-01

    Among the available protocols, chemically driven approaches to oxidize cysteine may not be required for molecules that, under the native-like conditions, naturally fold in conformations ensuring an effective pairing of the right disulfide bridge pattern. In this contest, we successfully prepared the distinctin, a natural heterodimeric peptide, and some synthetic cyclic peptides that are inhibitors of the CXCR4 receptor. In the first case, the air oxidation reaction allowed to connect two peptide chains via disulfide bridge, while in the second case allowed the cyclization of rationally designed peptides by an intramolecular disulfide bridge. Computational approaches helped to either drive de-novo design or suggest structural modifications and optimal oxidization protocols for disulfide-containing molecules. They are able to both predict and to rationalize the propensity of molecules to spontaneously fold in suitable conformations to achieve the right disulfide bridges. PMID:25900810

  17. Phenyliodonium diacetate mediated direct synthesis of benzonitriles from styrenes through oxidative cleavage of C?C bonds.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin-Hui; Jiang, Qing; Guo, Can-Cheng

    2013-12-01

    A metal-free PhI(OAc)2 mediated nitrogenation of alkenes through C?C bond cleavage using inorganic ammonia salt as nitrogen source under mild conditions was developed, affording nitriles in moderate to good yields. The advantages of this reaction are mild reaction conditions, operational simplicity, and use of an ammonium salt as nitrogen source. Based upon experimental observations, a plausible reaction mechanism is proposed. PMID:24171555

  18. Chlorine atom-initiated low-temperature oxidation of prenol and isoprenol: The effect of C=C double bonds on the peroxy radical chemistry in alcohol oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Welz, Oliver; Savee, John D.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2014-07-04

    The chlorine atom-initiated oxidation of two unsaturated primary C5 alcohols, prenol (3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, (CH3)2CCHCH2OH) and isoprenol (3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, CH2C(CH3)CH2CH2OH), is studied at 550 K and low pressure (8 Torr). The time- and isomer-resolved formation of products is probed with multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry (MPIMS) using tunable vacuum ultraviolet ionizing synchrotron radiation. The peroxy radical chemistry of the unsaturated alcohols appears much less rich than that of saturated C4 and C5 alcohols. The main products observed are the corresponding unsaturated aldehydes – prenal (3-methyl-2-butenal) from prenol oxidation and isoprenal (3-methyl-3-butenal) from isoprenol oxidation. No significant products arising from QOOH chemistry are observed. These results can be qualitatively explained by the formation of resonance stabilized allylic radicals via H-abstraction in the Cl + prenol and Cl + isoprenol initiation reactions. The loss of resonance stabilization upon O2 addition causes the energies of the intermediate wells, saddle points, and products to increase relative to the energy of the initial radicals and O2. These energetic shifts make most product channels observed in the peroxy radical chemistry of saturated alcohols inaccessible for these unsaturated alcohols. The experimental findings are underpinned by quantum-chemical calculations for stationary points on the potential energy surfaces for the reactions of the initial radicals with O2. Under our conditions, the dominant channels in prenol and isoprenol oxidation are the chain-terminating HO2-forming channels arising from radicals, in which the unpaired electron and the –OH group are on the same carbon atom, with stable prenal and isoprenal co-products, respectively. These results suggest that the presence of C=C double bonds in alcohols will reduce low-temperature reactivity during autoignition.

  19. Quantification of reaction violence and combustion enthalpy of plastic bonded explosive 9501 under strong confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, W. Lee; Dickson, Peter M.; Parker, Gary R.; Asay, B. W.

    2005-01-01

    The confinement experienced by an explosive during thermal self-initiation can substantially affect performance in terms of deflagration-to-detonation characteristics and explosion/detonation violence. To this end, we have developed an experiment to quantitatively observe enthalpy change and reaction violence in thermally initiated plastic bonded explosive (PBX) 9501. Traditionally, researchers attempt to quantify violence using terminal observations of fragment size, fragment velocity, and through subjective observations. In the work presented here, the explosive was loaded into a heated gun assembly where we subjected a 300 mg charge to a cook-off schedule and a range of static and inertial confinements. Static confinement was controlled using rupture disks calibrated at 34.5 and 138 MPa. The use of 3.15 and 6.3 g projectile masses provided a variation in inertial confinement. This was a regime of strong confinement; a significant fraction of the explosive energy was required to rupture the disk, and the projectile mass was large compared to the charge mass. The state variables pressure and volume were measured in the breech. From these data, we quantified both the reaction enthalpy change and energy release rate of the explosive on a microsecond time scale using a thermodynamic analyisis. We used these values to unambiguously quantify explosion violence as a function of confinement at a fixed cook-off schedule of 190 C for 1 h. P2?, a measure of critical shock energy required for shock ignition of an adjacent explosive was also computed. We found variations in this confinement regime to have a weak effect on enthalpy change, power, violence and shock energy. Violence was approximately 100 times lower than detonating trinitrotoluene, but the measured shock energy approached the critical shock energy for initiating secondary high explosives.

  20. N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes of Rh: Reaction With Dioxygen Without Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Praetorius, J.M.; Allen, D.P.; Wang, R.; Webb, J.D.; Grein, F.; Kennepohl, P.; Crudden, C.M.

    2009-05-21

    The reaction of oxygen with rhodium complexes containing N-heterocyclic carbenes was found to give dioxygen complexes with rare square planar geometries and unusually short O-O bond lengths. Analysis of the bonding in these complexes by Rh L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Raman spectroscopy, and DFT calculations provides evidence for a bonding model in which singlet oxygen is bound to a Rh(I) d{sup 8} metal complex, rather than the more common Rh(III) d{sup 6} peroxo species with octahedral geometry and O-O bond lengths in the 1.4-1.5 {angstrom} range.

  1. Moisture distribution measurements in adhesive-bonded composites using the D (/sup 3/He,p)/sup 4/ He reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, R.L.; Deiasi, R.J.

    1981-04-01

    Adhesive bonding of composite materials for many aircraft components offers a distinct advantage in weight and cost reduction compared to similar structures that have been joined by riveting. However, the long term performance of adhesive-bonded components depends on the degree and rate of moisture absorption by the adhesive in the service environment. To investigate the rate and the mechanism of water transport in adhesive-bonded composite materials, a nuclear reaction analysis method based on the D(/sup 3/He,p)/sup 4/He reaction is used to measure the moisture distributions. Samples of graphite/epoxy composite materials were bonded with an epoxy adhesive and isothermally conditioned in a controlled D/sub 2/O environment at 70% relative humidity and 77/sup 0/C for various exposure times. The moisture profiles were measured along the adhesive (adhesive scan) as well as through the thickness of the bonded joint (transverse scan). The dimensions of the probing beam were 125 ..mu..m x 125 ..mu..m for the adhesive scan and 25 ..mu.. x 200 ..mu..m for the transverse scan. Absolute deuterium concentrations were determined by comparison of the proton yield from the composite/adhesive to that from reference standards. Calculations from diffusion models of water transport based on parameters determined from bulk measurement techniques are compared to the measured profile and the agreement indicates that classical Fickian diffusion describes the transport of moisture in these materials.

  2. Lubricating Properties of Some Bonded Fluoride and Oxide Coatings for Temperature to 1500 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1960-01-01

    The lubricating properties of some experimental ceramic coatings, diffusion-bonded fluoride coatings, and ceramic-bonded fluoride coatings were determined. The experiments were conducted in an air atmosphere at a sliding velocity of 430 feet per minute and at temperatures from 75 to 1500 F. Several ceramic coatings provided substantial reductions in friction coefficient and rider wear (compared with the unlubricated metals). For example, a cobaltous oxide (CoO) base coating gave friction coefficients of 0.24 to 0.36 within the temperature range of 75 to 1400 F; serious galling and welding of the metal surfaces were prevented. The friction coefficients were higher than the arbitrary maximum (0.2) usually considered for effective boundary lubrication. However, when a moderately high friction coefficient can be tolerated, this type of coating may be a useful antiwear composition. Diffusion-bonded calcium fluoride (CaF2) on Haynes Stellite 21 and on Inconel X gave friction coefficients of 0.1 to 0.2 at 1500 F. Endurance life was dependent on the thermal history of the coating; life improved with increased exposure time at elevated temperatures prior to running. Promising results were obtained with ceramic-bonded CaF2 on Inconel X. Effective lubrication and good adherence were obtained with a 3 to 1 ratio of CaF2 to ceramic. A very thin sintered and burnished film of CaF2 applied to the surface of this coating further improved lubrication, particularly above 1350 F. The friction coefficient was 0.2 at 500 F and decreased with increasing temperature to 0.06-at 1500 F. It was 0.25 at 75 F and 0.22 at 250 F.

  3. A study of bond-length fluctuations in transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiaqiang

    Bond-length fluctuations with different origins have been investigated by thermal conductivity measurement performed on La1.60-xNd 0.40SrxCuO4, RCoO3, and RVO3 single crystals grown by floating zone method. Thermal conductivity has been proved to be a sensitive probe to bond-length fluctuations in strongly-correlated transition-metal oxides. Superconductivity in cuprates occurs at a crossover from localized to itinerant electronic behavior. The segregation of localized spins and delocalized holes into hole-poor and hole-rich regions in La2-xSr xCuO4 induces bond-length fluctuations via a strong electron-lattice coupling. This bond-length fluctuation suppresses in-plane thermal conductivity due to charge fluctuations in this quasi-2D system. In the La1.60-x Nd0.40SrxCuO4 system, the low-temperature orthorhombic (LTO) phase transforms into a low-temperature-tetragonal (LTT) phase with decreasing temperature. The hole-rich regions order into static stripes in the LTT phase of La2-x-yNdySr xCuO4; this charge order revives the phonon contribution to the thermal conductivity. The phonon thermal conductivity in the normal state of LTT phase and the LTO phase of some underdoped compositions of LSCO calls for reconsideration of the role of bond-length fluctuations on superconducting pairing in different structures. Suppression of the phonon thermal conductivity in the Mott-Hubbard insulator RCoO3 is interpreted to be caused by the spin-state transition from the low-spin t6e0 ground state to a higher spin-state, either intermediate-spin t 5e1 or high-spin t4e2, with increasing temperature. RVO3 offers us a unique chance to study the bond-length fluctuations caused by strong spin-orbital-lattice coupling. An unusually strong orbital-lattice and spin-lattice coupling has been clearly demonstrated.

  4. Bonding, ion mobility, and rate-limiting steps in deintercalation reactions with ThCr2Si2-type KNi2Se2.

    PubMed

    Neilson, James R; McQueen, Tyrel M

    2012-05-01

    Here, we study the nature of metal-metal bonding in the ThCr(2)Si(2) structure type by probing the rate-limiting steps in the oxidative deintercalation of KNi(2)Se(2). For low extents of oxidation, alkali ions are removed exclusively to form K(1-x)Ni(2)Se(2). For greater extents of oxidation, the rate of the reaction decreases dramatically, concomitant with the extraction of both potassium and nickel to form K(1-x)Ni(2-y)Se(2). The appreciable mobility of transition metal ions is unexpected, but illustrates the relative energy scales of different defects in the ThCr(2)Si(2) structure type. Furthermore, the fully oxidized compounds, K(0.25)Ni(1.5)Se(2), spontaneously convert from the tetrahedral [NiSe(4)]-containing ThCr(2)Si(2) structure to a vacancy-ordered NiAs structure with [NiSe(6)] octahedra. From analysis of the atom positions and kinetic data, we have determined that this transformation occurs by a continuous, low-energy pathway via subtle displacements of Ni atoms and buckling of the Se sublattice. These results have profound implications for our understanding of the stability, mobility, and reactivity of ions in materials. PMID:22530571

  5. Effect of composition on the processing and properties of sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Kiggans, J.O.; Montgomery, F.C.; Lin, H.T.; Barker, D.L.; Snodgrass, J.D.; Sabolsky, E.M.; Coffey, D.W.

    1996-04-01

    The type of silicon powder and sintering additive were found to influence the processing and final mechanical properties of sintered reaction bonded silicon nitride. High purity silicon powders produced low {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} content during nitridation. The Si powder type had no apparent effect on densification. More complete nitridation and higher room temperature mechanical properties were observed for the Si powders with higher Fe contents. However, the higher Fe contents resulted in greater high temperature strength degradation and so there was better high temperature strength retention with the higher purity Si. High {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} contents were found after nitridation with {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} seeded materials and with MgO-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the sintering additive. Densification was inhibited by refractory additives, such as Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}. The highest room temperature strength and fracture toughness values correlated to high nitrided {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} contents. The high temperature strength behavior was similar for all additive types.

  6. Photolysis of an intrachain peptide disulfide bond: primary and secondary processes, formation of H2S, and hydrogen transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Mozziconacci, Olivier; Kerwin, Bruce A; Schöneich, Christian

    2010-03-18

    The photodissociation of intrachain disulfide bonds in a model peptide and salmon calcitonin generates a series of cyclic peptide products following the generation of a CysS(*) thiyl radical pair. Key to the formation of these cyclic products are disproportionation and reversible hydrogen atom transfer reactions as well as secondary photoreactions, which lead to C-S bond breakage of primary photoproducts. Depending on the wavelength of the incident light, disulfides ultimately convert into cyclic thioethers. An important photolytic product is H(2)S, which is highly relevant for the production and storage of protein pharmaceuticals, where H(2)S can catalyze disulfide scrambling and protein degradation. PMID:20178349

  7. Ruthenium-catalyzed alkylation of indoles with tertiary amines by oxidation of a sp3 C-H bond and Lewis acid catalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Zhong; Zhou, Cong-Ying; Wong, Man-Kin; Che, Chi-Ming

    2010-05-17

    Ruthenium porphyrins (particularly [Ru(2,6-Cl(2)tpp)CO]; tpp=tetraphenylporphinato) and RuCl(3) can act as oxidation and/or Lewis acid catalysts for direct C-3 alkylation of indoles, giving the desired products in high yields (up to 82% based on 60-95% substrate conversions). These ruthenium compounds catalyze oxidative coupling reactions of a wide variety of anilines and indoles bearing electron-withdrawing or electron-donating substituents with high regioselectivity when using tBuOOH as an oxidant, resulting in the alkylation of N-arylindoles to 3-{[(N-aryl-N-alkyl)amino]methyl}indoles (yield: up to 82%, conversion: up to 95%) and the alkylation of N-alkyl or N-H indoles to 3-[p-(dialkylamino)benzyl]indoles (yield: up to 73%, conversion: up to 92%). A tentative reaction mechanism involving two pathways is proposed: an iminium ion intermediate may be generated by oxidation of an sp(3) C-H bond of the alkylated aniline by an oxoruthenium species; this iminium ion could then either be trapped by an N-arylindole (pathway A) or converted to formaldehyde, allowing a subsequent three-component coupling reaction of the in situ generated formaldehyde with an N-alkylindole and an aniline in the presence of a Lewis acid catalyst (pathway B). The results of deuterium-labeling experiments are consistent with the alkylation of N-alkylindoles via pathway B. The relative reaction rates of [Ru(2,6-Cl(2)tpp)CO]-catalyzed oxidative coupling reactions of 4-X-substituted N,N-dimethylanilines with N-phenylindole (using tBuOOH as oxidant), determined through competition experiments, correlate linearly with the substituent constants sigma (R(2)=0.989), giving a rho value of -1.09. This rho value and the magnitudes of the intra- and intermolecular deuterium isotope effects (k(H)/k(D)) suggest that electron transfer most likely occurs during the initial stage of the oxidation of 4-X-substituted N,N-dimethylanilines. Ruthenium-catalyzed three-component reaction of N-alkyl/N-H indoles, paraformaldehyde, and anilines gave 3-[p-(dialkylamino)benzyl]indoles in up to 82% yield (conversion: up to 95%). PMID:20391566

  8. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Oxidative Coupling of Primary Amines with Internal Alkynes through C-H Bond Activation: Scope and Mechanistic Studies.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Sara; Villuendas, Pedro; Ortuño, Manuel A; Lledós, Agustí; Urriolabeitia, Esteban P

    2015-06-01

    The oxidative coupling of primary amines with internal alkynes catalyzed by Ru complexes is presented as a general atom-economy methodology with a broad scope of applications in the synthesis of N-heterocycles. Reactions proceed through regioselective C-H bond activation in 15 minutes under microwave irradiation or in 24 hours with conventional heating. The synthesis of 2,3,5-substituted pyridines, benzo[h]isoquinolines, benzo[g]isoquinolines, 8,9-dihydro-benzo[de]quinoline, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroisoquinolines, pyrido[3,4g]isoquinolines, and pyrido[4,3g]isoquinolines is achievable depending on the starting primary amine used. DFT calculations on a benzylamine substrate support a reaction mechanism that consists of acetate-assisted C-H bond activation, migratory-insertion, and C-N bond formation steps that involve 28-30 kcal mol(-1) . The computational study is extended to additional substrates, namely, 1-naphthylmethyl-, 2-methylallyl-, and 2-thiophenemethylamines. PMID:25916684

  9. A Novel Reaction of Peroxiredoxin 4 towards Substrates in Oxidative Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi’e; Wang, Xi; Wang, Chih-chen

    2014-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin 4 (Prx4) is the only endoplasmic reticulum localized peroxiredoxin. It functions not only to eliminate peroxide but also to promote oxidative protein folding via oxidizing protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). In Prx4-mediated oxidative protein folding we discovered a new reaction that the sulfenic acid form of Prx4 can directly react with thiols in folding substrates, resulting in non-native disulfide cross-linking and aggregation. We also found that PDI can inhibit this reaction by exerting its reductase and chaperone activities. This discovery discloses an off-pathway reaction in the Prx4-mediated oxidative protein folding and the quality control role of PDI. PMID:25137134

  10. Oxidation Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings with a TiAl3 Bond Coat on ?-TiAl Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiqiang; Kong, Lingyan; Li, Tiefan; Xiong, Tianying

    2015-02-01

    The thermal barrier coatings investigated in this paper included a TiAl3 bond coat and a yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) layer. The TiAl3 bond coat was prepared by deposition of aluminum by cold spray, followed by a heat-treatment. The YSZ layer was prepared by air plasma spray. The isothermal and cyclic oxidation tests were conducted at 900 °C for 1000 h and 500 cycles to test the oxidation resistance of the thermal barrier coatings. The microstructure and composition of the ?-TiAl alloy with and without the thermal barrier coatings after oxidation were investigated. The results showed that a dense TGO layer about 5 ?m had grown between the YSZ layer and the TiAl3 bond coat. The TGO had good adhesion to both the YSZ layer and the bond coat even after the TiAl3 bond coat entirely degraded into the TiAl2 phase, which decreased the inward oxygen diffusion. Thus, the thermal barrier coatings improved the oxidation resistance of ?-TiAl alloy effectively.

  11. Synthesis of Biaryls via Benzylic C-C Bond Cleavage of Styrenes and Benzyl Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Shah, Bhahwal Ali

    2015-11-01

    A metal-free oxidative coupling of styrenes and benzyl alcohols with arenes has been developed for the synthesis of biaryls. The reaction features a conspicuous benzylic C-C bond cleavage of styrenes and benzyl alcohols. The reaction with both substrates proceeds through a common aldehydic intermediate formed through oxidative C-C bond cleavage of alkene and oxidation of benzyl alcohols. The reaction proceeds efficiently over a broad range of substrates with excellent functional group tolerance. PMID:26479321

  12. Reaction of Laser-Ablated Uranium and Thorium Atoms with H2Se: A Rare Example of Selenium Multiple Bonding.

    PubMed

    Vent-Schmidt, Thomas; Andrews, Lester; Thanthiriwatte, K Sahan; Dixon, David A; Riedel, Sebastian

    2015-10-19

    The compounds H2ThSe and H2USe were synthesized by the reaction of laser-ablated actinide metal atoms with H2Se under cryogenic conditions following the procedures used to synthesize H2AnX (An = Th, U; X = O, S). The molecules were characterized by infrared spectra in an argon matrix with the aid of deuterium substitution and electronic structure calculations at the density functional theory level. The main products, H2ThSe and H2USe, are shown to have a highly polarized actinide-selenium triple bond, as found for H2AnS on the basis of electronic structure calculations. There is an even larger back-bonding of the Se with the An than found for the corresponding sulfur compounds. These molecules are of special interest as rare examples of multiple bonding of selenium to a metal, particularly an actinide metal. PMID:26418218

  13. On the reaction of the ethylene oxide radical cation with neutral ethylene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittle, C. Ed; Farrar, John; Henrickson, Charles; Wilson, Daniel S.; Hollis, Jay; Holman, R. W.; Gross, M. L.

    1997-12-01

    The gas-phase reaction between the ethylene oxide radical cation and neutral ethylene oxide, when performed in the high-pressure source of a tandem mass spectrometer, forms a C4H8O2 radical cation adduct. The adduct ion was formed with varying degrees of collisional damping within the ion source so that the ion structure, in successive experiments, could be evaluated as a function of internal energy. The adduct ion structure changes with energy. When formed with maximum damping (minimum energy), the adduct is proposed to be an acyclic distonic ion. The adduct formed in the absence of collisional damping (maximum energy) possesses a high-energy collisional-activated dissociation (CAD) mass spectrum that is nearly identical to that of the 1,4-dioxane radical cation. The most likely mechanism for the reaction is a step-wise process involving a long-chain distonic radical cation intermediate that subsequently forms a non-distonic cyclic radical ion. Computational investigations at the MP2/6-31G* level support the proposed mechanism. An enthalpic driving force of ca. 23 kcal mol-1 exists for the cyclization of the long-chain distonic radical cation.

  14. Development of Nitric Oxide Oxidation Catalysts for the Fast SCR Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Crocker

    2005-09-30

    This study was undertaken in order to assess the potential for oxidizing NO to NO{sub 2} in flue gas environments, with the aim of promoting the so-called fast SCR reaction. In principle this can result in improved SCR kinetics and reduced SCR catalyst volumes. Prior to commencing experimental work, a literature study was undertaken to identify candidate catalysts for screening. Selection criteria comprised (1) proven (or likely) activity for NO oxidation, (2) low activity for SO2 oxidation (where data were available), and (3) inexpensive component materials. Catalysts identified included supported base metal oxides, supported and unsupported mixed metal oxides, and metal ion exchanged ZSM-5 (Fe, Co, Cu). For comparison purposes, several low loaded Pt catalysts (0.5 wt% Pt) were also included in the study. Screening experiments were conducted using a synthetic feed gas representative of flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers: [NO] = 250 ppm, [SO{sub 2}] = 0 or 2800 ppm, [H{sub 2}O] = 7%, [CO{sub 2}] = 12%, [O{sub 2}] = 3.5%, balance = N{sub 2}; T = 275-375 C. Studies conducted in the absence of SO{sub 2} revealed a number of supported and unsupported metal oxides to be extremely active for NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}. These included known catalysts (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, FeMnO{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}), as well as a new one identified in this work, CrFeO{sub x}/SiO{sub 2}. However, in the presence of SO{sub 2}, all the catalysts tested were found to be severely deactivated with respect to NO oxidation. Of these, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/ZSM-5 and Pt/CeO{sub 2} showed the highest activity for NO oxidation in the presence of SO{sub 2} (based on peak NO conversions to NO{sub 2}), although in no cases did the NO conversion exceed 7%. Reactor studies indicate there are two components to SO{sub 2}-induced deactivation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, corresponding to an irreversible deactivation due to sulfation of the surface of the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase, together with a reversible inhibition due to competitive adsorption of SO{sub 2} with NO on the catalyst. In an effort to minimize the deactivating effect of SO{sub 2} on Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, two synthetic approaches were briefly examined. These consisted of (1) the incorporation of highly dispersed Co(II) ions in silica, as a non-sulfating matrix, via the sol-gel preparation of CoO-SiO{sub 2}; and (2) the sol-gel preparation of a mixed metal oxide, CoO-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2}, with the aim of exploiting the acidity of the niobium oxide to minimize SO2 adsorption. While both catalysts showed almost no activity for NO oxidation in the absence of SO{sub 2}, when SO{sub 2} was present low activity was observed, indicating that SO{sub 2} acts as a promoter for NO oxidation over these materials. The kinetics of NO oxidation over Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/CeO{sub 2} were also examined. Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} was found to exhibit a higher apparent activation energy for NO oxidation than the Pt catalysts, while the combined reaction order in NO and O{sub 2} for the three catalysts was very close to one. CO{sub 2} was found to have no effect on the kinetics of NO oxidation over these catalysts. The presence of H{sub 2}O caused a decrease in NO conversion for both Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/CeO{sub 2} catalysts, while no effect was observed for Pt/SiO{sub 2}. The inhibiting effect of water was reversible and is attributed to competitive adsorption with the reactants. In sum, this study has shown that a variety of base metal catalysts are very active for NO oxidation. However, all of the catalysts studied are strongly deactivated in the presence of 2800 ppm SO{sub 2} at typical flue gas temperatures; consequently improving catalyst resistance to SO{sub x} will be a pre-requisite if the fast SCR concept is to be applied to coal-fired flue gas conditions.

  15. Novel carbon–carbon bond formations for biocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Resch, Verena; Schrittwieser, Joerg H; Siirola, Elina; Kroutil, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Carbon–carbon bond formation is the key transformation in organic synthesis to set up the carbon backbone of organic molecules. However, only a limited number of enzymatic C–C bond forming reactions have been applied in biocatalytic organic synthesis. Recently, further name reactions have been accomplished for the first time employing enzymes on a preparative scale, for instance the Stetter and Pictet–Spengler reaction or oxidative C–C bond formation. Furthermore, novel enzymatic C–C bond forming reactions have been identified like benzylation of aromatics, intermolecular Diels-Alder or reductive coupling of carbon monoxide. PMID:21354781

  16. Activation energy of tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes, Octavio G.; Munir, Zuhair A.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2011-01-15

    The activation energy of a sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the high-pressure spark plasma sintering (HPSPS) technique at 300 and 400 C. The ignition temperatures were investigated under high heating rates (500-2000 C min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Samples consolidated at 300 C exhibit an abrupt change in temperature response prior to the main ignition temperature. This change in temperature response is attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465 to 670 C. The activation energies of the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite consolidated at 300 and 400 C were determined to be 38{+-} 2 kJ mol{sup -1} and 57 {+-} 2 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  17. Activation Energy of Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2010-02-25

    The activation energy of a high melting temperature sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique to 300 and 400 C to produce pellets with dimensions of 5 mm diameter by 1.5 mm height. A custom built ignition setup was developed to measure ignition temperatures at high heating rates (500-2000 C {center_dot} min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Unlike the 400 C samples, results show that the samples consolidated to 300 C undergo an abrupt change in temperature response prior to ignition. This change in temperature response has been attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465-670 C. The activation energy of the SG derived Ta-WO{sup 3} thermite composite consolidated to 300 and 400 C were determined to be 37.787 {+-} 1.58 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and 57.381 {+-} 2.26 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, respectively.

  18. Femtosecond Infrared Studies of a Prototypical One-Electron Oxidative-Addition Reaction: Chlorine

    E-print Network

    Harris, Charles B.

    Femtosecond Infrared Studies of a Prototypical One-Electron Oxidative-Addition Reaction: Chlorine. The 17-e- radical reacts to extract a Cl atom from a chlorinated methane solvent. The reaction may the nature of the reaction barrier, the rates are measured along a series of chlorinated methane solutions

  19. Chemical Bonding, Interfaces and Defects in Hafnium Oxide/Germanium Oxynitride Gate Stacks on Ge (100)

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, Yasuhiro; Sun, Yun; Kuzum, Duygu; Sugawara, Takuya; Saraswat, Krishna C.; Pianetta, Piero; McIntyre, Paul C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.

    2008-10-31

    Correlations among interface properties and chemical bonding characteristics in HfO{sub 2}/GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge MIS stacks were investigated using in-situ remote nitridation of the Ge (100) surface prior to HfO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition (ALD). Ultra thin ({approx}1.1 nm), thermally stable and aqueous etch-resistant GeO{sub x}N{sub y} interfaces layers that exhibited Ge core level photoelectron spectra (PES) similar to stoichiometric Ge{sub 3}N{sub 4} were synthesized. To evaluate GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface defects, the density of interface states (D{sub it}) was extracted by the conductance method across the band gap. Forming gas annealed (FGA) samples exhibited substantially lower D{sub it} ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}) than did high vacuum annealed (HVA) and inert gas anneal (IGA) samples ({approx} 1x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}). Germanium core level photoelectron spectra from similar FGA-treated samples detected out-diffusion of germanium oxide to the HfO{sub 2} film surface and apparent modification of chemical bonding at the GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface, which is related to the reduced D{sub it}.

  20. Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging of Composition and Bonding at Perovskite Oxide Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitting Kourkoutis, L.

    2010-03-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in combination with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) has proven to be a powerful technique to study buried perovskite oxide heterointerfaces. With the recent addition of 3^rd order and now 5^th order aberration correction, which provides a factor of 100x increase in signal over an uncorrected system, we are now able to record 2D maps of composition and bonding of oxide interfaces at atomic resolution [1]. Here, we present studies of the microscopic structure of oxide/oxide multilayers and heterostructures by STEM in combination with EELS and its effect on the properties of the film. Using atomic-resolution spectroscopic imaging we show that the degradation of the magnetic and transport properties of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/SrTiO3 multilayers correlates with atomic intermixing at the interfaces and the presence of extended defects in the La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 layers. When these defects are eliminated, metallic ferromagnetism at room temperature can be stabilized in 5 unit cell thick manganite layers, almost 40% thinner than the previously reported critical thickness of 3-5 nm for sustaining metallic ferromagnetism below Tc in La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 thin films grown on SrTiO3.[4pt] [1] D.A. Muller, L. Fitting Kourkoutis, M. Murfitt, J.H. Song, H.Y. Hwang, J. Silcox, N. Dellby, O.L. Krivanek, Science 319, 1073-1076 (2008).

  1. Influence of Copper Oxidation State on the Bonding and Electronic Structure of Cobalt-Copper Complexes.

    PubMed

    Eisenhart, Reed J; Carlson, Rebecca K; Clouston, Laura J; Young, Victor G; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Bill, Eckhard; Gagliardi, Laura; Lu, Connie C

    2015-12-01

    Heterobimetallic complexes that pair cobalt and copper were synthesized and characterized by a suite of physical methods, including X-ray diffraction, X-ray anomalous scattering, cyclic voltammetry, magnetometry, electronic absorption spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance, and quantum chemical methods. Both Cu(II) and Cu(I) reagents were independently added to a Co(II) metalloligand to provide (py3tren)CoCuCl (1-Cl) and (py3tren)CoCu(CH3CN) (2-CH3CN), respectively, where py3tren is the triply deprotonated form of N,N,N-tris(2-(2-pyridylamino)ethyl)amine. Complex 2-CH3CN can lose the acetonitrile ligand to generate a coordination polymer consistent with the formula "(py3tren)CoCu" (2). One-electron chemical oxidation of 2-CH3CN with AgOTf generated (py3tren)CoCuOTf (1-OTf). The Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox couple for 1-OTf and 2-CH3CN is reversible at -0.56 and -0.33 V vs Fc(+)/Fc, respectively. The copper oxidation state impacts the electronic structure of the heterobimetallic core, as well as the nature of the Co-Cu interaction. Quantum chemical calculations showed modest electron delocalization in the (CoCu)(+4) state via a Co-Cu ? bond that is weakened by partial population of the Co-Cu ? antibonding orbital. By contrast, no covalent Co-Cu bonding is predicted for the (CoCu)(+3) analogue, and the d-electrons are fully localized at individual metals. PMID:26551246

  2. Metalloporphyrin-based oxidation systems: from biomimetic reactions to application in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Che, Chi-Ming; Huang, Jie-Sheng

    2009-07-21

    The oxidation of organic substrates catalyzed by metalloporphyrins constitutes a major class of biomimetic oxidation reactions used in modern synthetic chemistry. Ruthenium porphyrins are among the most extensively studied metalloporphyrin oxidation catalysts. This article provides a brief outline of the metalloporphyrin-based oxidation systems and is focused on the oxidation reactions catalyzed by ruthenium porphyrins performed in the author's laboratory. A series of ruthenium porphyrin catalysts, including those immobilized onto insoluble supports and covalently attached to soluble supports, promote the oxidation of a wide variety of organic substrates such as styrenes, cycloalkenes, alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones, steroids, benzylic hydrocarbons and arenes with 2,6-dichloropyridine-N-oxide or air in up to >99% yields, with high regio-, chemo- and/or stereoselectivity, and with product turnovers of up to 3.0x10(4), demonstrating the potential application of ruthenium porphyrin-based oxidation systems in organic syntheses. PMID:19568617

  3. Pyroprocessing of oxidized sodium-bonded fast reactor fuel - An experimental study of treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, S.D.; Gese, N.J.; Wurth, L.A.

    2013-07-01

    An experimental study was conducted to assess pyrochemical treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel. As oxidized material, the degraded fuel would need to be converted back to metal to enable electrorefining within an existing electro-metallurgical treatment process. A lithium-based electrolytic reduction process was studied to assess the efficacy of converting oxide materials to metal with a particular focus on the impact of zirconium oxide and sodium oxide on this process. Bench-scale electrolytic reduction experiments were performed in LiCl-Li{sub 2}O at 650 C. degrees with combinations of manganese oxide (used as a surrogate for uranium oxide), zirconium oxide, and sodium oxide. In the absence of zirconium or sodium oxide, the electrolytic reduction of MnO showed nearly complete conversion to metal. The electrolytic reduction of a blend of MnO-ZrO{sub 2} in LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O showed substantial reduction of manganese, but only 8.5% of the zirconium was found in the metal phase. The electrolytic reduction of the same blend of MnO-ZrO{sub 2} in LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O - 6.2 wt% Na{sub 2}O showed substantial reduction of manganese, but zirconium reduction was even less at 2.4%. This study concluded that ZrO{sub 2} cannot be substantially reduced to metal in an electrolytic reduction system with LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O at 650 C. degrees due to the perceived preferential formation of lithium zirconate. This study also identified a possible interference that sodium oxide may have on the same system by introducing a parasitic and cyclic reaction of dissolved sodium metal between oxidation at the anode and reduction at the cathode. When applied to oxidized sodium-bonded EBR-II fuel (e.g., U-10Zr), the prescribed electrolytic reduction system would not be expected to substantially reduce zirconium oxide, and the accumulation of sodium in the electrolyte could interfere with the reduction of uranium oxide, or at least render it less efficient.

  4. The binding and reactions of nucleotides and polynucleotides on iron oxide hydroxide polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Nils G.; Ertem, Gözen; Ferris, James P.

    1993-06-01

    The iron oxide hydroxide minerals goethite and akaganéite were likely constituents of the sediments present in, for instance, geothermal regions of the primitive earth. They may have adsorbed organics and catalyzed the condensation processes which led to the origins of life. The binding to and reactions of nucleotides and oligonucleotides with these minerals was investigated. The adsorption of adenosine, 5'-AMP, 3'-AMP, 5'-UMP, and 5'-CMP to these minerals was studied. Adenosine did not bind to goethite and akaganéite. The adsorption isotherms for the binding of the nucleotides revealed that they all had close to the same affinity for the mineral. Binding to goethite was about four times stronger than to akagan éite. There was little difference in the adsorption of each nucleotide suggesting the binding was between the negative charge on the phosphate group and the positive charges on the mineral surface. The absence of binding of adenosine is consistent with this explanation. Binding decreases as the pH increases due to the titration of the positive (acidic) centers on the minerals. Two times as many moles of polynucleotides were bound to these minerals as compared to the mononucleotides. Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding of adenosine and 5'-AMP to poly(U) complexes with goethite and akaganéite was observed. There was no interaction of uridine with the poly(U)-goethite complex as expected if Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding is taking place. Neither goethite nor akaganéite catalyzed the oligomerization of the phosphorimidazolide of adenosine (ImpA). The template directed synthesis of oligomers of 5'-GMP on the poly(C) bound to goethite was observed. Higher molecular weight oligomers were observed when the poly (C) was bound to goethite than was found in the absence of the mineral.

  5. High-temperature oxidation behavior of reaction-formed silicon carbide ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. J. T.; Singh, M.

    1995-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of reaction-formed silicon carbide (RFSC) ceramics was investigated in the temperature range of 1100 to 1400 C. The oxidation weight change was recorded by TGA; the oxidized materials were examined by light and electron microscopy, and the oxidation product by x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The materials exhibited initial weight loss, followed by passive weight gain (with enhanced parabolic rates, k(sub p)), and ending with a negative (logarithmic) deviation from the parabolic law. The weight loss arose from the oxidation of residual carbon, and the enhanced k(sub p) values from internal oxidation and the oxidation of residual silicon, while the logarithmic kinetics is thought to have resulted from crystallization of the oxide. The presence of a small amount of MoSi, in the RFSC material caused a further increase in the oxidation rate. The only solid oxidation product for all temperatures studied was silica.

  6. NITROGEN OXIDES REACTIONS WITHIN URBAN PLUMES TRANSPORTED OVER THE OCEAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes an airborne measurements program in the downwind urban plume of Boston. The variables measured included ozone, nitric oxide, oxides of nitrogen, nitric acid, peroxyacetylnitrate, carbon monoxide, nonmethane hydrocarbon, freon-11, C1-C5 hydrocarbons, condensat...

  7. Exploring Oxidation of Half-Sandwich Rhodium Complexes: Oxygen Atom Insertion into the Rhodium-Carbon Bond of 2

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    Exploring Oxidation of Half-Sandwich Rhodium Complexes: Oxygen Atom Insertion into the Rhodium into the rhodium-carbon bond of coordinated phpy was observed. This resulted in the formation of a 2 2-(2-pyridyl as a neutral, two-electron donor ligand, coordinated to the rhodium center through the iodosyl oxygen. Over

  8. A dielectric barrier discharge terminally inactivates RNase A by oxidizing sulfur-containing amino acids and breaking structural disulfide bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackmann, J.-W.; Baldus, S.; Steinborn, E.; Edengeiser, E.; Kogelheide, F.; Langklotz, S.; Schneider, S.; Leichert, L. I. O.; Benedikt, J.; Awakowicz, P.; Bandow, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    RNases are among the most stable proteins in nature. They even refold spontaneously after heat inactivation, regaining full activity. Due to their stability and universal presence, they often pose a problem when experimenting with RNA. We investigated the capabilities of nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas to inactivate RNase A and studied the inactivation mechanism on a molecular level. While prolonged heating above 90 °C is required for heat inactivating RNase A, direct plasma treatment with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) source caused permanent inactivation within minutes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that DBD-treated RNase A unfolds rapidly. Raman spectroscopy indicated methionine modifications and formation of sulfonic acid. A mass spectrometry-based analysis of the protein modifications that occur during plasma treatment over time revealed that methionine sulfoxide formation coincides with protein inactivation. Chemical reduction of methionine sulfoxides partially restored RNase A activity confirming that sulfoxidation is causal and sufficient for RNase A inactivation. Continued plasma exposure led to over-oxidation of structural disulfide bonds. Using antibodies, disulfide bond over-oxidation was shown to be a general protein inactivation mechanism of the DBD. The antibody’s heavy and light chains linked by disulfide bonds dissociated after plasma exposure. Based on their ability to inactivate proteins by oxidation of sulfur-containing amino acids and over-oxidation of disulfide bonds, DBD devices present a viable option for inactivating undesired or hazardous proteins on heat or solvent-sensitive surfaces.

  9. Effect of Layer-Graded Bond Coats on Edge Stress Concentration and Oxidation Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) durability is closely related to design, processing and microstructure of the coating Z, tn systems. Two important issues that must be considered during the design of a thermal barrier coating are thermal expansion and modulus mismatch between the substrate and the ceramic layer, and substrate oxidation. In many cases, both of these issues may be best addressed through the selection of an appropriate bond coat system. In this study, a low thermal expansion and layer-graded bond coat system, that consists of plasma-sprayed FeCoNiCrAl and FeCrAlY coatings, and a high velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) sprayed FeCrAlY coating, is developed to minimize the thermal stresses and provide oxidation resistance. The thermal expansion and oxidation behavior of the coating system are also characterized, and the strain isolation effect of the bond coat system is analyzed using the finite element method (FEM). Experiments and finite element results show that the layer-graded bond coat system possesses lower interfacial stresses. better strain isolation and excellent oxidation resistance. thus significantly improving the coating performance and durability.

  10. Sulfonylation of quinoline N-oxides with aryl sulfonyl chlorides via copper-catalyzed C-H bonds activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiyong; Song, Hongyu; Cui, Xiuling; Pi, Chao; Du, Weiwei; Wu, Yangjie

    2013-03-15

    An efficient and concise one-pot protocol to synthesize sulfonylated quinoline N-oxides via copper-catalyzed C-H bond activation has been developed. Commercially available and less expensive aryl sulfonyl chlorides were used as the sulfonylation reagents. Various 2-aryl sulfonyl quinolines were obtained in up to 91% yields in chemo- and regioselective manners. PMID:23461790

  11. Competition between covalent bonding and charge transfer tendencies at complex-oxides interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salafranca, J.; Tornos, J.; García-Barriocanal, J.; León, C.; Santamaria, J.; Rincón, J.; Álvarez, G.; Pennycook, S. J.; Dagotto, E.; Varela, M.

    2013-03-01

    Interfaces alter the subtle balance among different degrees of freedom responsible for exotic phenomena in complex oxides, such as cuprate-manganite interfaces. We study these interfaces by means of scanning transmission electron microscopy and theoretical calculations. Microscopy and EEL spectroscopy indicate that the interfaces are sharp, and the chemical profile is symmetric with two equivalent interfaces. Spectroscopy also allows us to establish an oxidation state profile with sub-nanometer resolution. We find an anomalous charge redistribution: a non-monotonic behavior of the occupancy of d orbitals in the manganite layers as a function of distance to the interface. Relying on model calculations, we establish that this profile is a result of the competition between standard charge transfer tendencies involving materials with different chemical potentials and strong bonding effects across the interface. The competition can be tuned by different factors (temperature, doping, magnetic fields...). As examples, we report different charge distributions as a function of doping of the manganite layers. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ORNL:U.S. DOE-BES, Material Sciences and Engineering Division & ORNL's ShaRE. UCM:Juan de la Cierva, Ramon y Cajal, & ERC Starting Investigator Award programs.

  12. Reaction products and mechanisms for the reaction of n-butyl vinyl ether with the oxidants OH and Cl: Atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmenar, Inmaculada; Martín, Pilar; Cabañas, Beatriz; Salgado, Sagrario; Tapia, Araceli; Martínez, Ernesto

    2015-12-01

    A reaction product study for the degradation of butyl vinyl ether (CH3(CH2)3OCHdbnd CH2) by reaction with chlorine atoms (Cl) and hydroxyl radicals (OH) has been carried out using Fourier Transform Infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) and/or Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry with a Time of Flight analyzer (GC-TOFMS). The rate coefficient for the reaction of butyl vinyl ether (BVE) with chlorine atoms has also been evaluated for the first time at room temperature (298 ± 2) K and atmospheric pressure (708 ± 8) Torr. The rate coefficient obtained was (9.9 ± 1.5) × 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 and this indicates the high reactivity of butyl vinyl ether with Cl atoms. However, this value may be affected by the dark reaction of BVE with Cl2. The results of a qualitative study of the Cl reaction show that the main oxidation products are butyl formate (CH3(CH2)3OC(O)H), butyl chloroacetate (CH3(CH2)3OC(O)CH2Cl and formyl chloride (HCOCl). Individual yields in the ranges ?16-40% and 30-70% in the absence and presence of NOx, respectively, have been estimated for these products. In the OH reaction, butyl formate and formic acid were identified as the main products, with yields of around 50 and 20%, respectively. Based on the results of this work and a literature survey, the addition of OH radicals and Cl atoms at the terminal C atom of the double bond in CH3(CH2)3OCHdbnd CH2 has been proposed as the first step in the reaction mechanism for both of the studied oxidants. The tropospheric lifetime of butyl vinyl ether is very short and, as a consequence, it will be rapidly degraded and will only be involved in tropospheric chemistry at a local level. The degradation products of these reactions should be considered when evaluating the atmospheric impact.

  13. The oxidative half-reaction of xanthine dehydrogenase with NAD; reaction kinetics and steady-state mechanism.

    PubMed

    Harris, C M; Massey, V

    1997-11-01

    The reaction between reduced xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) from bovine milk and NAD has been studied in detail. An understanding of this reaction is necessary for a complete description of XDH turnover with its presumed natural electron acceptor and to address the preference of XDH for NAD over oxygen as a substrate. The reaction between pre-reduced XDH and NAD was studied by stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The reaction was found to involve two rounds of oxidation with 2 eq of NAD. The first round goes to completion, and the second round reaches a slightly disfavored equilibrium. Rapid binding of NAD with an apparent Kd of 25 +/- 2 microM is followed by NAD reduction at a rate constant of 130 +/- 13 s-1. NADH dissociation at a rate constant of 42 +/- 12 s-1 completes a round of oxidation. These steps have been successfully tested and modeled to repeat themselves in the second round of oxidation. The association rate constant for NAD binding was estimated to be much greater than any rate constant measured in the oxidation by molecular oxygen, thus explaining how NAD competes with oxygen for reducing equivalents. Rate constants for NAD reduction and NADH dissociation are respectively 21- and 7-fold greater than kcat, indicating that the reductive half-reaction of the enzyme by xanthine is mostly rate-limiting in xanthine/NAD turnover. A steady-state mechanism for XDH is discussed. PMID:9353290

  14. Aerosol synthesis and electrochemical analysis of niobium mixed-metal oxides for the ethanol oxidation reaction in acid and alkaline electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopka, Daniel A.

    Direct ethanol fuel cells are especially important among emerging electrochemical power systems with the potential to offset a great deal of the energy demand currently met through the use of fossil fuels. Ethanol can be refined from petroleum sources or attained from renewable biomass, and is more easily and safely stored and transported than hydrogen, methanol or gasoline. The full energy potential of ethanol in fuel cells can only be realized if the reaction follows a total oxidation pathway to produce CO2. This must be achieved by the development of advanced catalysts that are electrically conductive, stable in corrosive environments, contain a high surface area on which the reaction can occur, and exhibit a bi-functional effect for the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). The latter criterion is achievable in mixed-metal systems. Platinum is an effective metal for catalyzing surface reactions of many adsorbates and is usually implemented in the form of Pt nanoparticles supported on inexpensive carbon. This carbon is believed to be neutral in the catalysis of Pt. Instead, carbon can be replaced with carefully designed metals and metal oxides as co-catalysis or support structures that favorably alter the electronic structure of Pt slightly through a strong metal support interaction, while also acting as an oxygen source near adsorbates to facilitate the total oxidation pathway. Niobium mixed-metal-oxides were explored in this study as bi-functional catalyst supports to Pt nanoparticles. We developed a thermal aerosol synthesis process by which mesoporous powders of mixed-metal-oxides decorated with Pt nanoparticles could be obtained from liquid precursors within ˜5 seconds or less, followed by carefully refined chemical and thermal post-treatments. Exceptionally high surface areas of 170--180m2/g were achieved via a surfactant-templated 3D wormhole-type porosity, comparable on a per volume basis to commercial carbon blacks and high surface area silica supports. For the first time, in situ FTIR measurements in acid electrolyte showed that highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles (2--5nm) on NbRuyO z (at% 8Nb:1Ru) catalyze the formation of CO2 from ethanol in greater yield, and 0.35--0.4V lower, than Pt(111). Compared to conventional Pt/carbon, this indicates that, (1) Pt supported on NbRuyO z can be more effective at splitting the C---C bond in ethanol and, (2) the scission occurs at potentials more ideal for a higher efficiency fuel cell anode. Ex situ-microscopy revealed the polarization-induced two- and three-dimensional formation of Pt-NbOx interfacial adsorption sites responsible for the facilitation of the total oxidation pathway of ethanol. The results show that synthesis and post-treatment of niobia supports can bias the utility of Pt/niobia systems towards the ethanol oxidation reaction at the anode or the oxygen reduction reaction at the cathode. Experimental and computational-theoretical analyses indicate that the mechanism of interfacial site formation is dependent upon the local oxygen concentration, as well as the availability of multiple, energetically accessible oxidation states like those inherent to niobia. Future directions for the development of highly active, niobium-based materials tailored for efficient catalysis of the total oxidation pathway of ethanol are discussed.

  15. [Selective carbon oxygen bond scission during reactions of oxygenates on single crystal catalysts]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    We have discovered that the carbon-oxygen bond in methanol can be selectively broken if the surface structure of the platinum catalyst is appropriately tailored. The objective of this project is to determine if variations in surface structure allow one to selectively break C-O and C-H bonds. The decomposition of a wide range of oxygenates on several carefully chosen faces of group VIII metals will be examined to see when C-O bond scission occurs and what new chemistry we can find on stepped surfaces.

  16. Investigation of the reactions of small neutral iron oxide clusters with methanol.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan; Dong, Feng; Heinbuch, Scott; Rocca, Jorge J; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2009-03-21

    Reactions of neutral iron oxide clusters (Fe(m)O(n), m=1-2, n=0-5) with methanol (CH(3)OH) in a fast flow reactor are investigated by time of flight mass spectrometry. Detection of the neutral iron oxide cluster distribution and reaction intermediates and products is accomplished through single photon ionization by a 118 nm (10.5 eV) VUV laser. Partially deuterated methanol (CD(3)OH) is employed to distinguish reaction products and reaction mechanisms. Three major reactions are identified experimentally: CH(3)OH association with FeO; methanol dehydrogenation on FeO(1,2) and Fe(2)O(2-5); and (CH(2)O)Fe formation. Density functional theory calculations are carried out to identify reaction products, and to explore the geometric and electronic structures of the iron oxide clusters, reaction intermediates, and transition states, and to evaluate reaction pathways. Neutral formaldehyde is calculated to be formed on FeO(1,2) and Fe(2)O(2-5) clusters. Hydrogen transfer from methanol to iron oxide clusters occurs first from the O-H moiety of methanol, and is followed by a hydrogen transfer from the C-H moiety of methanol. Computational results are in good agreement with experimental observations and reveal reaction mechanisms for neutral iron oxide clusters taking methanol to formaldehyde through various reaction intermediates. Based on the experimental results and the calculated reaction mechanisms and pathways, complete catalytic cycles are suggested for the heterogeneous reaction of CH(3)OH to CH(2)O facilitated by an iron oxide catalyst. PMID:19317538

  17. Non-precious metal electrocatalysts with high activity for hydrogen oxidation reaction in alkaline electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, WC; Bivens, AP; Myint, M; Zhuang, ZB; Forest, RV; Fang, QR; Chen, JG; Yan, YS

    2014-05-01

    A ternary metallic CoNiMo catalyst is electrochemically deposited on a polycrystalline gold (Au) disk electrode using pulse voltammetry, and characterized for hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) activity by temperature-controlled rotating disk electrode measurements in 0.1 M potassium hydroxide (KOH). The catalyst exhibits the highest HOR activity among all non-precious metal catalysts (e.g., 20 fold higher than Ni). At a sufficient loading, the CoNiMo catalyst is expected to outperform Pt and thus provides a promising low cost pathway for alkaline or alkaline membrane fuel cells. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and parallel H-2-temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments on structurally much simpler model alloy systems show a trend that CoNiMo has a hydrogen binding energy (HBE) similar to Pt and much lower than Ni, suggesting that the formation of multi-metallic bonds modifies the HBE of Ni and is likely a significant contributing factor for the enhanced HOR activity.

  18. Coordination-Resolved Spectrometrics of Local Bonding and Electronic Dynamics of Au Atomic Clusters, Solid Skins, and Oxidized Foils.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wang; Bo, Maolin; Huang, Yongli; Wang, Yan; Li, Can; Sun, Chang Q

    2015-07-20

    By using combination of bond-order-length-strength (BOLS) correlation, the tight-binding (TB) approach, and zone-selective photoelectron spectroscopy (ZPS), we were able to resolve local bond relaxation and the associated 4f7/2 core-level shift of Au atomic clusters, Au(100, 110, 111) skins, and Au foils exposed to ozone for different lengths of time. In addition to quantitative information, such as local bond length, bond energy, binding-energy density, and atomic cohesive energy, the results confirm our predictions that bond-order deficiency shortens and stiffens the bond between undercoordinated atoms, which results in local densification and quantum entrapment of bonding electrons. The entrapment perturbs the Hamiltonian, and hence, shifts the core-level energy accordingly. ZPS also confirms that oxidation enhances the effect of atomic undercoordination on the positive 4f7/2 energy shift, with the associated valence electron polarization contributing to the catalytic ability of undercoordinated Au atoms. PMID:25916877

  19. Stable Gold(III) Catalysts by Oxidative Addition of a Carbon-Carbon Bond

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chung-Yeh; Horibe, Takahiro; Jacobsen, Christian Borch

    2014-01-01

    Whereas low-valent late transition metal catalysis has become indispensible for chemical synthesis, homogeneous high-valent transition metal catalysis is underdeveloped, mainly due to the reactivity of high-valent transition metal complexes and the challenges associated with synthesizing them. In this manuscript, we report a mild carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction by a Au(I) complex that generates a stable Au(III) cationic complex. Complementary to the well-established soft and carbophilic Au(I) catalyst, this Au(III) complex exhibits hard, oxophilic Lewis acidity. This is exemplified by catalytic activation of ?,?-unsaturated aldehydes towards selective conjugate additions as well as activation of an unsaturated aldehyde-allene for a [2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction. The origin of the regioselectivity and catalytic activity was elucidated by X-ray crystallographic analysis of an isolated Au(III)-activated cinnamaldehyde intermediate. The concepts revealed in this study provide a strategy for accessing high-valent transition metal catalysis from readily available precursors. PMID:25612049

  20. Comparative temporal analysis of multiwalled carbon nanotube oxidation reactions: Evaluating chemical modifications on true nanotube surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Flávia G.; Cotta, Alexandre A. C.; Gorgulho, Honória F.; Santos, Adelina P.; Macedo, Waldemar A. A.; Furtado, Clascídia A.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of extensive purification on oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotube surface composition was studied through the characterization and differentiation of the actual surface submitted to three oxidation methods: microwave-assisted acid oxidation, hydrogen peroxide reflux, and Fenton reaction. The oxidized samples were purified by a multi-step procedure including the sequential use of basic reflux and dispersion in dimethylformamide (DMF). The results showed a significant increase in the amount of oxidation debris with hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reaction times longer than 8 h and strong surface characteristic modification. With regard to sample purification, basic reflux led to a reduction in oxygenated group concentration of only 10% in the samples treated by acid oxidation. On the other hand, the subsequent use of DMF led to a further decrease in concentration of 39%, proving to be a more efficient method for the removal of oxidation debris.

  1. Investigations of Isoprene Oxidation Chemistry using Proton-Transfer Reaction Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, F.; Pratt, K. A.; McAvey, K.; Rindelaub, J. D.; Mielke, L. H.; Prentice, B. M.; Hilger, R. T.; McLuckey, S. A.; Oglesbee, R. A.; Shepson, P. B.

    2011-12-01

    Isoprene, emitted primarily from forest ecosystems, comprises approximately one-third of all non-methane volatile organic compound emissions globally. However, uncertainties remain in our understanding of the atmospheric oxidation chemistry of isoprene, particularly with respect low-NOx conditions and the fate of oxidation products. Smog chamber studies allow oxidation products to be studied in detail in a controlled setting. The proton-transfer reaction linear ion trap mass spectrometer (PTR-LIT-MS) was developed to allow the differentiation and quantification of isomeric/isobaric compounds via MS/MS analysis. The PTR-LIT is used herein to examine changes in isoprene oxidation products with high temporal resolution during the photochemical reaction of isoprene and OH. In addition, using synthesized standards, the PTR-LIT is utilized to examine the OH-oxidation chemistry of first generation oxidation products, such as the primary isoprene nitrates. These measurements provide insights into the fates of isoprene oxidation products in the atmosphere.

  2. Hydrogen bonding of isoindole-1,3-dione in reaction field: Vibrational spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safinejad, F.; Asghari-Khiavi, M.

    2009-03-01

    The origin of the geometrical and spectroscopic changes in isoindole-1,3-dione molecule due to the hydrogen bonding (local electric field) is studied using ab initio and perturbation treatment of the Onsager model. In the case of C dbnd O, bond elongates and red-shifted C dbnd O stretch (s) mode results; in the case of N-H, bond contraction and blue-shifted NH s frequency is observed and for the C-H bond, both red-shifted and blue-shifted CH s mode are found. Furthermore, using vibrational Stark effect in the Onsager model we were able to determine the difference dipole moment and the difference polarizability of several stretching bands.

  3. An intrinsically disordered photosystem II subunit, PsbO, provides a structural template and a sensor of the hydrogen-bonding network in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Offenbacher, Adam R; Polander, Brandon C; Barry, Bridgette A

    2013-10-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a membrane-bound enzyme that utilizes solar energy to catalyze the photooxidation of water. Molecular oxygen is evolved after four sequential light-driven oxidation reactions at the Mn4CaO5 oxygen-evolving complex, producing five sequentially oxidized states, Sn. PSII is composed of 17 membrane-spanning subunits and three extrinsic subunits, PsbP, PsbQ, and PsbO. PsbO is intrinsically disordered and plays a role in facilitation of the water oxidizing cycle. Native PsbO can be removed and substituted with recombinant PsbO, thereby restoring steady-state activity. In this report, we used reaction-induced Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to obtain information concerning the role of PsbP, PsbQ, and PsbO during the S state cycle. Light-minus-dark difference spectra were acquired, monitoring structural changes associated with each accessible flash-induced S state transition in a highly purified plant PSII preparation (Triton X-100, octylthioglucoside). A comparison of S2 minus S1 spectra revealed that removal of PsbP and PsbQ had no significant effect on the data, whereas amide frequency and intensity changes were associated with PsbO removal. These data suggest that PsbO acts as an organizational template for the PSII reaction center. To identify any coupled conformational changes arising directly from PsbO, global (13)C-PsbO isotope editing was employed. The reaction-induced Fourier transform infrared spectra of accessible S states provide evidence that PsbO spectral contributions are temperature (263 and 277 K) and S state dependent. These experiments show that PsbO undergoes catalytically relevant structural dynamics, which are coupled over long distance to hydrogen-bonding changes at the Mn4CaO5 cluster. PMID:23940038

  4. Advances in the Stille reaction and new methods for continuous flow Pd-catalyzed C-N bond forming reactions

    E-print Network

    Naber, John R. (John Robert)

    2010-01-01

    Chapter 1: A highly active catalyst system based upon a biaryl monophosphine ligand, XPhos, for the palladium-catalyzed Stille reaction has been developed. This method allows for the coupling of aryl chlorides with a range ...

  5. Palladium and gold nanotubes as oxygen reduction reaction and alcohol oxidation reaction catalysts in base.

    PubMed

    Alia, Shaun M; Duong, Kathlynne; Liu, Toby; Jensen, Kurt; Yan, Yushan

    2014-06-01

    Palladium (PdNTs) and gold nanotubes (AuNTs) were synthesized by the galvanic displacement of silver nanowires. PdNTs and AuNTs have wall thicknesses of 6?nm, outer diameters of 60?nm, and lengths of 5-10 and 5-20??m, respectively. Rotating disk electrode experiments showed that the PdNTs and AuNTs have higher area normalized activities for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) than conventional nanoparticle catalysts. The PdNTs produced an ORR area activity that was 3.4, 2.2, and 3.7?times greater than that on carbon-supported palladium nanoparticles (Pd/C), bulk polycrystalline palladium, and carbon-supported platinum nanoparticles (Pt/C), respectively. The AuNTs produced an ORR area activity that was 2.3, 9.0, and 2.0?times greater than that on carbon-supported gold nanoparticles (Au/C), bulk polycrystalline gold, and Pt/C, respectively. The PdNTs also had lower onset potentials than Pd/C and Pt/C for the oxidation of methanol (0.236?V), ethanol (0.215?V), and ethylene glycol (0.251?V). In comparison to Pt/C, the PdNTs and AuNTs further demonstrated improved alcohol tolerance during the ORR. PMID:24757078

  6. Insertion of phosphinidene complexes into the P-H bond of secondary phosphine oxides: a new version of the phospha-Wittig synthesis of P[double bond, length as m-dash]C double bonds.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yanwei; Wu, Di; Tian, Rongqiang; Duan, Zheng; Mathey, François

    2016-01-01

    Terminal phosphinidene complexes [RP-W(CO)5], as generated at 60 °C in the presence of copper chloride from the appropriate 7-phosphanorbornadiene complexes, react with secondary phosphine oxides Ar2P(O)H to give the insertion products into the P-H bonds. After metalation with NaH, these products react with aldehydes to give the corresponding phosphaalkenes which are trapped by dimethylbutadiene. PMID:26661055

  7. PALLADIUM-CATALYZED OXIDATION OF STYRENE AND ALKENES IN PRESENCE OF IONIC LIQUIDS (WACKER REACTION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of ionic liquids in various synthetic transformations is gaining significance due to the enhanced reaction rates, potential for recycling and compatibility with various organic compounds and organometallic catalysts. Palladium-catalyzed oxidation of styrene and other alk...

  8. Carbon-coated magnetic palladium: applications in partial oxidation of alcohols and coupling reactions.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetic carbon supported Pd catalyst has been synthesized via in situ generation of nanoferrites and incorporation of carbon from renewable cellulose via calcination; catalyst can be used for oxidation of alcohols, amination reaction and arylation of aryl halides (cross coupli...

  9. Effect of oxidation heat treatment on the bond strength between a ceramic and cast and milled cobalt-chromium alloys.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieyin; Ye, Xiuhua; Li, Bohua; Liao, Juankun; Zhuang, Peilin; Ye, Jiantao

    2015-08-01

    There is a dearth of dental scientific literature on the effect of different oxidation heat treatments (OHTs) (as surface pretreatments) on the bonding performance of cast and milled cobalt-chromium (CoCr) alloys. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different OHTs on the bond strength between a ceramic and cast and milled CoCr alloys. Cobalt-chromium metallic specimens were prepared using either a cast or a milled method. Specimens were subjected to four different OHT methods: without OHT; OHT under normal atmospheric pressure; OHT under vacuum; and OHT under vacuum followed by sandblasting. The metal-ceramic bond strength was evaluated using a three-point bending test according to ISO9693. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the specimens' microstructure and elemental composition. The bond strength was not affected by the CoCr manufacturing method. Oxidation heat treatment performed under normal atmospheric pressure resulted in the highest bond strength. The concentration of oxygen on the alloy surfaces varied with the different pretreatment methods in the following order: OHT under normal atmospheric pressure > OHT under vacuum > without OHT ? OHT under vacuum followed by sandblasting. PMID:26104804

  10. Rheological Properties and Reaction Kinetics of Amidoamine Oxide Surfactants-based Acids with Calcite 

    E-print Network

    Li, Lingling

    2012-07-16

    PROPERTIES AND REACTION KINETICS OF AMIDOAMINE OXIDE SURFACTANT-BASED ACIDS WITH CALCITE A Dissertation by LINGLING LI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2011 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering Rheological Properties and Reaction Kinetics of Amidoamine Oxide Surfactant-based Acids with Calcite Copyright 2011...

  11. Chemical bonding, optical constants, and electrical resistivity of sputter-deposited gallium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ramana, C. V. Rubio, E. J.; Barraza, C. D.; Miranda Gallardo, A.; McPeak, Samantha; Kotru, Sushma; Grant, J. T.

    2014-01-28

    Gallium oxide (Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films were made by sputter deposition employing a Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic target for sputtering. The depositions were made over a wide range of substrate temperatures (T{sub s}), from 25 to 600?°C. The effect of T{sub s} on the chemical bonding, surface morphological characteristics, optical constants, and electrical properties of the grown films was evaluated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), and four-point probe measurements. XPS analyses indicate the binding energies (BE) of the Ga 2p doublet, i.e., the Ga 2p{sub 3/2} and Ga 2p{sub 1/2} peaks, are located at 1118.0 and 1145.0?eV, respectively, characterizing gallium in its highest chemical oxidation state (Ga{sup 3+}) in the grown films. The core level XPS spectra of O 1s indicate that the peak is centered at a BE???531?eV, which is also characteristic of Ga-O bonds in the Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase. The granular morphology of the nanocrystalline Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films was evident from AFM measurements, which also indicate that the surface roughness of the films increases from 0.5?nm to 3.0?nm with increasing T{sub s}. The SE analyses indicate that the index of refraction (n) of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films increases with increasing T{sub s} due to improved structural quality and packing density of the films. The n(?) of all the Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films follows the Cauchy's dispersion relation. The room temperature electrical resistivity was high (?200 ?-cm) for amorphous Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films grown at T{sub s}?=?RT-300?°C and decreased to ?1 ?-cm for nanocrystalline Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films grown at T{sub s}???500–600?°C. A correlation between growth conditions, microstructure, optical constants, and electrical properties of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films is derived.

  12. Recyclable and Reusable [RuCl2(p-cymene)]2/Cu(OAc)2/PEG-400/H2O System for Oxidative C-H Bond Alkenylations: Green Synthesis of Phthalides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Tinli; Yan, Tao; Cai, Mingzhong

    2015-09-01

    [RuCl2(p-cymene)]2 in a mixture of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-400) and water is shown to be an extremely efficient catalyst for the cross-dehydrogenative C-H bond alkenylation reaction between benzoic acids and alkenes. The reaction could be conducted at 80 °C using Cu(OAc)2·H2O as oxidant, yielding a variety of phthalide derivatives in good to excellent yields. More importantly, both [RuCl2(p-cymene)]2 and Cu(OAc)2 in the PEG-400/H2O system could be easily recycled and reused six times without any loss of catalytic activity. PMID:26244596

  13. Nickel-Catalyzed Carbon–Carbon Bond-Forming Reactions of Unactivated Tertiary Alkyl Halides: Suzuki Arylations

    PubMed Central

    Zultanski, Susan L.; Fu, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    The first Suzuki cross-couplings of unactivated tertiary alkyl electrophiles are described, employing a readily accessible catalyst (NiBr2·-diglyme/4,4?-di-t-butyl-2,2?-bipyridine, both commercially available); this also represents the initial example of the use of a Group 10 catalyst to cross-couple unactivated tertiary electrophiles to form carbon–carbon bonds. This approach to the synthesis of all-carbon quaternary carbon centers does not suffer from isomerization of the alkyl group, in contrast with the umpolung strategy for this bond construction (cross-coupling a tertiary alkylmetal with an aryl electrophile). Preliminary mechanistic studies are consistent with the generation of a radical intermediate along the reaction pathway. PMID:23281960

  14. Aminomethylation reaction of ortho-pyridyl C-H bonds catalyzed by group 3 metal triamido complexes.

    PubMed

    Nagae, Haruki; Shibata, Yu; Tsurugi, Hayato; Mashima, Kazushi

    2015-01-21

    Tris[N,N-bis(trimethylsilyl)amido] complexes of group 3 metals, especially yttrium and gadolinium, served as catalysts for ortho-C-H bond addition of pyridine derivatives and N-heteroaromatics into the C?N double bond of nonactivated imines to afford the corresponding aminomethylated products. Addition of catalytic amounts of secondary amines, such as dibenzylamine, dramatically improved the catalytic activity through the formation of a mixed ligated complex such as [(Me3Si)2N]2Y(NBn2)(THF) (4). Furthermore, kinetic studies using the isolated complex 4 provided a plausible reaction mechanism by which coordination of two pyridine derivatives afforded a penta-coordinated species as a key step. PMID:25543453

  15. Oxidative condensation reactions of (diethylenetriamine)cobalt(III) complexes with substituted bis(pyridin-2-yl)methane ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangting; Hockless, David C. R.; Willis, Anthony C.; Jackson, W. Gregory

    2005-04-01

    The synthesis and characterisation of Co(III) complexes derived from a condensation reaction with a central or terminal nitrogen of a dien ligand and the ?-carbon of a range of substituted bis(pyridin-2-yl)methane ligands are described. Aerial oxidation of bpm {bis(pyridin-2-yl)methane with Co(II)/dien or direct reaction with Co(dien)Cl 3 provided in low yield a single C-N condensation product 1 (at the primary terminal NH 2) after the pyridyl -CH 2- is formally oxidised to -CH +-. The methyl substituted ligand bpe {1,1-bis(pyridin-2-yl)ethane} behaves likewise, except both terminal (prim) and central (sec) amines condense to yield isomeric products 2 and 3. Two of these three materials have been characterised by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The corresponding reactions for the bis(pyridyl) ligand bpk {bis(pyridin-2-yl)ketone} provided C-N condensation products without the requirement for oxidation at the ?-C center; two carbinolamine complexes in different geometrical configurations resulted, mer-anti-[Co(dienbpc)Cl]ZnCl 4, 5, and unsym- fac-[Co(dienbpc)Cl]ZnCl 4, 6, {dienbpc=[2-(2-aminoethylamino)-ethylamino]-di-pyridin-2-yl-methanol}. In addition, a novel complex, [Co(bpk)(bpd-OH)Cl]ZnCl 4, 4, in which one bidentate N, N-bonded bpk ligand and one tridentate N, O, N-bonded bpd (the diol from bpk+OH -) were coordinated, was obtained via the Co(II)/O 2 synthetic route. When the bpc ligand (bpc=bis(pyridin-2-yl)methanol) was employed directly as a reagent along with dien, no condensation reactions were observed, but rather a single isomeric complex [Co(dien)(bpc)]Cl.ZnCl 4, 7, in which the ligand bpc acted as a N,N,O-bonded tridentate ligand rather than as a N,N-bidentate ligand was isolated. 13C, 1D and 2D 1H NMR studies are reported for all the complexes; they establish the structures unambiguously.

  16. Sporicidal effects of iodine-oxide thermite reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Rod; Bless, Stephan; Blinkova, Alexandra; Chen, Tiffany

    2012-03-01

    Iodine pentoxide-aluminum thermite reactions have been driven by impacts at 1000 m/s on steel plates 3 mm or thicker. This reaction releases iodine gas that is known to be a sporicide. To test the impact reactions for sporicidal effects, reactions took place in closed chambers containing dried Bacillus subtilis spores. The reduction in colony-forming units was dependent on the exposure time; long exposure times resulted in a 105 decrease in germination rate. This was shown to be due to the gas exposure rather than the heat or turbulence. Sporicidal effectiveness was increased by adding neodymium and saran resin.

  17. Theoretical study of the oxidation mechanisms of naphthalene initiated by hydroxyl radicals: the O2 addition reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Shiroudi, A; Deleuze, M S; Canneaux, S

    2015-05-28

    Atmospheric oxidation of the naphthalene-OH adduct [C10H8OH]? (R1) by molecular oxygen in its triplet electronic ground state has been studied using density functional theory along with the B3LYP, ?B97XD, UM05-2x and UM06-2x exchange-correlation functionals. From a thermodynamic viewpoint, the most favourable process is O2 addition at the C2 position in syn mode, followed by O2 addition at the C2 position in anti mode, O2 addition at the C4 position in syn mode, and O2 addition at the C4 position in anti mode, as the second, third and fourth most favourable processes. The syn modes of addition at these positions are thermodynamically favoured over the anti ones by the formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl and peroxy substituents. Analysis of the computed structures, bond orders and free energy profiles demonstrate that the reaction steps involved in the oxidation of the naphthalene-OH adduct by O2 satisfy Hammond's principle. Kinetic rate constants and branching ratios under atmospheric pressure and in the fall-off regime have been supplied, using transition state and RRKM theories. By comparison with experiment, these data confirm the relevance of a two-step reaction mechanism. Whatever the addition mode, O2 addition in C4 position is kinetically favoured over O2 addition in C2 position, in contrast with the expectations drawn from thermodynamics and reaction energies. Under a kinetic control of the reaction, and in line with the computed reaction energy barriers, the most efficient process is O2 addition at the C4 position in syn mode, followed by O2 addition at the C2 position in syn mode, O2 addition at the C4 position in anti mode, and O2 addition at the C2 position in anti mode as the second, third and fourth most rapid processes. The computed branching ratios also indicate that the regioselectivity of the reaction decreases with increasing temperatures and decreasing pressures. PMID:25942699

  18. Structure and reaction of oxametallacycles derived from styrene oxide on Ag(1 1 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukaski, A. C.; Enever, M. C. N.; Barteau, M. A.

    2007-08-01

    Styrene oxide forms a strongly bound oxametallacycle intermediate via activated adsorption on the Ag(1 1 0) surface. The oxametallacycle species derived from styrene oxide on Ag(1 1 0) fits well with the family of oxametallacycles identified previously in studies of non-allylic epoxides with unsaturated substituent groups on silver. Temperature-programmed reaction experiments demonstrate that styrene oxide ring opens at the substituted carbon, and Density Functional Theory calculations indicate that the phenyl ring of the resulting oxametallacycle is oriented nearly parallel to the Ag(1 1 0) surface. Interaction of the phenyl group with the silver surface stabilizes this intermediate relative to that derived from the mono-olefin epoxide, ethylene oxide. During temperature-programmed reaction, the oxametallacycle undergoes ring-closure to reform styrene oxide and isomerization to phenylacetaldehyde at 505 K on Ag(1 1 0). Styrene oxide-derived oxametallacycles exhibit similar ring-closure behavior on the Ag(1 1 1) surface.

  19. Effect of Oxidation and SiO2 Coating on the Bonding Strength of Ti-Porcelain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Litong; Liu, Xiaochen; Zhu, Yabo; Xu, Cheng; Gao, Jiqiang; Guo, Tianwen

    2010-11-01

    Investigations on the effect of oxidation on titanium-ceramic adhesion were performed. Cast pure titanium was subjected to surface modification by preoxidation and introduction of an intermediate layer of SiO2 by sol-gel process. Specimens were characterized by TG-DSC, XRD, and SEM/EDS. The adhesion between the titanium and porcelain was evaluated by three-point flexure bond test. Failure of the titanium-porcelain with preoxidation treatment predominantly occurred at the titanium-oxide interface. Preoxidation treatment did not affect the fracture mode of the titanium-ceramic system and did not increase the bonding strength of Ti-porcelain. The SEM results revealed the existence of microcracks on the SiO2 coating surface oxidized at 800 °C in an air furnace. During the porcelain fusion, minute amounts of oxygen were able to penetrate the cracks and caused localized oxidation of the Ti-substrate. Failure of the titanium-porcelain with SiO2 coating predominantly occurred at the SiO2 layer. The SiO2 coating served as an effective oxygen diffusion barrier and improved the mechanical and chemical bonding between porcelain and titanium.

  20. Preparation of fluoro-functionalized graphene oxide via the Hunsdiecker reaction.

    PubMed

    Xing, Ruiguang; Li, Yanan; Yu, Huitao

    2016-01-01

    We report our effort in the development of a new synthetic method for fluoro-functionalized graphene oxide, which was prepared via the Hunsdiecker reaction, and the treatment of carboxylated graphene oxide with selectfluor at 90 °C for 10 h under an atmosphere of nitrogen, using silver nitrate as a catalyst. PMID:26524464

  1. Mechanism of the Heck reaction: nature of oxidative addition and alkene insertion 

    E-print Network

    Evans, Anthony Steven

    2004-11-15

    stages of the Heck reaction suggest it should be. This study seeks to elucidate the nature of the oxidative addition of aryl halide to a palladium catalyst using a ligand that has been shown to have high activity in facilitating oxidative addition...

  2. AQUEOUS-PHASE OXIDATION OF SLUDGE USING THE VERTICAL REACTION VESSEL SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall objective of the study was to provide plant-scale operating data on the wet-oxidation of municipal wastewater sludge utilizing the Vertical Reaction Vessel System and the effect of the return flow from the wet-oxidation process on the operation of the wastewater treat...

  3. Ceramic oxide reactions with V2O5 and SO3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. L.; Williams, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Ceramic oxides are not inert in combustion environments, but can react with, inter alia, SO3, and Na2SO4 to yield low melting mixed sulfate eutectics, and with vanadium compounds to produce vanadates. Assuming ceramic degradation to become severe only when molten phases are generated in the surface salt (as found for metallic hot corrosion), the reactivity of ceramic oxides can be quantified by determining the SO3 partial pressure necessary for molten mixed sulfate formation with Na2SO3. Vanadium pentoxide is an acidic oxide that reacts with Na2O, SO3, and the different ceramic oxides in a series of Lux-Flood type of acid-base displacement reactions. To elucidate the various possible vanadium compound-ceramic oxide interactions, a study was made of the reactions of a matrix involving, on the one axis, ceramix oxides of increasing acidity, and on the other axis, vanadium compounds of increasing acidity. Resistance to vanadium compound reaction increased as the oxide acidity increased. Oxides more acidic than ZrO2 displaced V2O5. Examination of Y2O3- and CeO2-stabilized ZrO2 sintered ceramics which were degraded in 700 C NaVO3 has shown good agreement with the reactions predicted above, except that the CeO2-ZrO2 ceramic appears to be inexplicably degraded by NaVO3.

  4. Visible Light Driven Nanosecond Bromide Oxidation by a Ru Complex with Subsequent Br-Br Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Guocan; Ward, William M; Meyer, Gerald J

    2015-07-01

    Visible light excitation of [Ru(deeb)(bpz)2](2+) (deeb = 4,4'-diethylester-2,2'-bipyridine; bpz = 2,2'-bipyrazine), in Br(-) acetone solutions, led to the formation of Br-Br bonds in the form of dibromide, Br2(•-). This light reactivity stores ?1.65 eV of free energy for milliseconds. Combined (1)H NMR, UV-vis and photoluminescence measurements revealed two distinct mechanisms. The first involves diffusional quenching of the excited state by Br(-) with a rate constant of (8.1 ± 0.1) × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1). At high Br(-) concentrations, an inner-sphere pathway is dominant that involves the association of Br(-), most likely with the 3,3'-H atoms of a bpz ligand, before electron transfer from Br(-) to the excited state, ket = (2.5 ± 0.3) × 10(7) s(-1). In both mechanisms, the direct photoproduct Br(•) subsequently reacts with Br(-) to yield dibromide, Br(•) + Br(-) ? Br2(•-). Under pseudo-first-order conditions, this occurs with a rate constant of (1.1 ± 0.4) × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1) that was, within experimental error, the same as that measured when Br(•) were generated with ultraviolet light. Application of Marcus theory to the sensitized reaction provided an estimate of the Br(•) formal reduction potential E(Br(•)/Br(-)) = 1.22 V vs SCE in acetone, which is about 460 mV less positive than the accepted value in H2O. The results demonstrate that Br(-) oxidation by molecular excited states can be rapid and useful for solar energy conversion. PMID:26085129

  5. The relationship between the amount of oxidation and activation energy on the steam oxidation reaction of Zircaloy-4 cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya, Masaki; Nagase, Fumihisa

    2013-09-01

    Zirconium-based alloys are widely used as cladding material for light-water reactors, and in the case of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), oxidation of the cladding by high temperature steam plays important roles in fuel rod failure and hydrogen generation during the accident. In this study, considering that the oxidation rate is related to the activation energy of the oxidation reaction, the relationship between the amount of oxidation and the activation energy of cladding oxidation by steam was investigated by thermogravimetry. The oxidation rate of the specimen decreased with increasing heating rate. The activation energy of oxidation was evaluated based on a non-isothermal kinetics theory. It was found that the activation energy of oxidation depends on the specimen weight gain. The activation energies showed constant values of ˜300 and ˜180 kJ/mol in the oxidation range between 30 and 120 g/m2 and above 120 g/m2, respectively. A master curve which expresses the amount of steam oxidation of Zircaloy-4 cladding was formulated based on the activation energies obtained.

  6. Reaction of catalytic oxidation by liquid water and its application to waste water purification

    SciTech Connect

    Ioffe, I.I.; Rubinskaya, E.V.

    1997-06-01

    In this paper the results of experiments and some considerations of theoretical and practical problems devoted to a new type of chemical reaction--oxidation of organic substances by liquid water with the aid of noble metal catalyst--are given. Some problems of application such as reaction to self-purification of industrial waste waters are also considered.

  7. Access to aryl mellitic acid esters through a surprising oxidative esterification reaction.

    PubMed

    Geraskina, Margarita R; Juetten, Mark J; Winter, Arthur H

    2014-06-01

    A serendipitously discovered oxidative esterification reaction of cyclohexane hexacarboxylic acid with phosphorus pentachloride and phenols provides one-pot access to previously unknown aryl mellitic acid esters. The reaction features a solvent-free digestion and chromatography-free purifications and demonstrates the possibility of cyclohexane-to-benzene conversions under relatively mild, metal-free conditions. PMID:24815576

  8. Mutagenicity screening of reaction products from the enzyme-catalyzed oxidation of phenolic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, I.J.; Aitken, M.D.; Ball, L.M.; Heck, P.E. . Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    Phenol-oxidizing enzymes such as peroxidases, laccases, and mushroom polyphenol oxidase are capable of catalyzing the oxidation of a wide range of phenolic pollutants. Although the use of these enzymes in waste-treatment applications has been proposed by a number of investigators, little information exists on the toxicological characteristics of the oxidation products. The enzymes chloroperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and mushroom polyphenol oxidase were used in this study to catalyze the oxidation of phenol, several mono-substituted phenols, and pentachlorophenol. Seventeen reaction mixtures representing selected combinations of enzyme and parent phenol were subjected to mutagenicity screening using the Ames Salmonella typhimurium plate incorporation assay; five selected mixtures were also incubated with the S9 microsomal preparation to detect the possible presence of promutagens. The majority of reaction mixtures tested were not directly mutagenic, and none of those tested with S9 gave a positive response. Such lack of mutagenicity of enzymatic oxidation products provides encouragement for establishing the feasibility of enzyme-catalyzed oxidation as a waste-treatment process. The only positive responses were obtained with reaction products from the lignin peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of 2-nitrophenol and 4-nitrophenol. Clear positive responses were observed when strain TA100 was incubated with 2-nitrophenol reaction-product mixtures, and when strain TA98 was incubated with the 4-nitrophenol reaction mixture. Additionally, 2,4-dinitrophenol was identified as a reaction product from 4-nitrophenol, and preliminary evidence indicates that both 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrophenol are produced from the oxidation of 2-nitrophenol. Possible mechanism by which these nitration reactions occur are discussed.

  9. Role of van der Waals bonding in layered oxide: Bulk vanadium pentoxide

    E-print Network

    Elisa Londero; Elsebeth Schroder

    2010-06-12

    Sparse matter is characterized by regions with low electron density and its understanding calls for methods to accurately calculate both the van der Waals (vdW) interactions and other bonding. Here we present a first-principles density functional theory (DFT) study of a layered oxide (V2O5) bulk structure which shows charge voids in between the layers and we highlight the role of the vdW forces in building up material cohesion. The result of previous first-principles studies involving semilocal approximations to the exchange-correlation functional in DFT gave results in good agreement with experiments for the two in-plane lattice parameters of the unit cell but overestimated the parameter for the stacking direction. To recover the third parameter we include the nonlocal (dispersive) vdW interactions through the vdW-DF method [Dion et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004)] testing also various choices of exchange flavors. We find that the transferable first-principle vdW-DF calculations stabilizes the bulk structure. The vdW-DF method gives results in fairly good agreement with experiments for all three lattice parameters.

  10. Role of van der Waals bonding in layered oxide: Bulk vanadium pentoxide

    E-print Network

    Londero, Elisa

    2010-01-01

    Sparse matter is characterized by regions with low electron density and its understanding calls for methods to accurately calculate both the van der Waals (vdW) interactions and other bonding. Here we present a first-principles density functional theory (DFT) study of a layered oxide (V2O5) bulk structure which shows charge voids in between the layers and we highlight the role of the vdW forces in building up material cohesion. The result of previous first-principles studies involving semilocal approximations to the exchange-correlation functional in DFT gave results in good agreement with experiments for the two in-plane lattice parameters of the unit cell but overestimated the parameter for the stacking direction. To recover the third parameter we include the nonlocal (dispersive) vdW interactions through the vdW-DF method [Dion et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004)] testing also various choices of exchange flavors. We find that the transferable first-principle vdW-DF calculations stabilizes the bulk s...

  11. Synthesis of Electrochemically Reduced Graphene Oxide Bonded to Thiodiazole-Pd and Applications to Biosensor.

    PubMed

    You, Jung-Min; Han, Hyoung Soon; Jeon, Seungwon

    2015-08-01

    A novel biosensor for the determination of hydrogen peroxide and glucose was developed based on EGN-TDZ-Pd, as an electrocatalyst. The preparation of graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets was functionalized by combining it with 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thiol (TDZ) and by covalently bonding it to palladium (Pd) nanoparticles (GO-TDZ-Pd). In the electrochemical investigation, EGN-TDZ-Pd was characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA) were used to characterize the performance of EGN-TDZ-Pd. The proposed H2O2 biosensor exhibited a wide linear range from 10 µM to 6.5 mM. Also, a glucose biosensor was prepared using glucose oxidase and EGN-TDZ-Pd placed onto a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The GOx/EGN-TDZ-Pd/GCE was easily prepared using a rapid and simple procedure, and it was utilized for highly sensitive glucose determination. PMID:26369140

  12. Sporicidal Effects of Iodine-oxide Thermite Reaction Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Rod; Bless, Stephan; Blinkova, Alexandra; Chen, Tiffany; InstituteAdvanced Tehnology Collaboration; Dept of Molecular Genetics; Microbiology-UT Austin Collaboration; Chemistry; Biochemistry-UT Austin Collaboration

    2011-06-01

    Iodine pentoxide-aluminum thermite reactions have been driven by impacts at 1000 m/s on steel plates 3 mm or thicker. The activation energy of this material reaction is 197 J/g. The reactivity is increased by reducing grain size. This reaction releases iodine gas that is known to be a sporicide. In order to test the impact reactions for sporicidal effects, reactions took place in closed chambers containing dried Bacillus subtilis spores. The reduction in colony-forming units was dependent on the exposure time; long exposure times resulted in a 105 decrease in germination rate. This was shown to be due to the gas exposure and not the heat or turbulence. Sporicidal effectiveness was increased by adding neodymium and saran resin. The sporicidal effect is very dependent on exposure time, ranging from about 90% kill for times on the order of a second to 99.99% for one-hour times.

  13. Comparison of properties of sintered and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride fabricated by microwave and conventional heating

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Kiggans, J.O. Jr.; Lin, H.T.

    1995-10-01

    A comparison of microwave and conventional processing of silicon nitride-based ceramics was performed to identify any differences between the two, such as improved fabrication parameters or increased mechanical properties. Two areas of thermal processing were examined: sintered silicon nitride (SSN) and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN). The SSN powder compacts showed improved densification and enhanced grain growth. SRBSN materials were fabricated in the microwave with a one-step process using cost-effective raw materials. The SRBSN materials had properties appropriate for structural applications. Observed increases in fracture toughness for the microwave processed SRBSN materials were attributable to enhanced elongated grain growth.

  14. Comparison of properties of sintered and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride fabricated by microwave and conventional heating

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Kiggans, J.O. Jr.; Lin, H.T.; Willkens, C.A.

    1994-10-01

    A comparison of microwave and conventional processing of silicon nitride-based ceramics was performed to identify any differences between the two, such as improved fabrication parameters or increased mechanical properties. Two areas of thermal processing were examined: (1) sintered silicon nitride (SSN) and (2) sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN). The SSN powder compacts showed improved densification and enhanced grain growth. SRBSN materials were fabricated in the microwave with a one-step process using cost-effective raw materials. The SRBSN materials had properties appropriate for structural applications. Observed increases in fracture toughness for the microwave processed SRBSN materials were attributable to enhanced elongated grain growth.

  15. Process of forming catalytic surfaces for wet oxidation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B. (inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A wet oxidation process was developed for oxidizing waste materials, comprising dissolved ruthenium salt in a reactant feed stream containing the waste materials. The feed stream is introduced into a reactor, and the reactor contents are then raised to an elevated temperature to effect deposition of a catalytic surface of ruthenium black on the interior walls of the reactor. The feed stream is then maintained in the reactor for a period of time sufficient to effect at least partial oxidation of the waste materials.

  16. Rapid and effective oxidative pretreatment of woody biomass at mild reaction conditions and low oxidant loadings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One route for producing cellulosic biofuels is by the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars generated from a pretreatment that can be effectively coupled with an enzymatic hydrolysis of the plant cell wall. While woody biomass exhibits a number of positive agronomic and logistical attributes, these feedstocks are significantly more recalcitrant to chemical pretreatments than herbaceous feedstocks, requiring higher chemical and energy inputs to achieve high sugar yields from enzymatic hydrolysis. We previously discovered that alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment catalyzed by copper(II) 2,2?-bipyridine complexes significantly improves subsequent enzymatic glucose and xylose release from hybrid poplar heartwood and sapwood relative to uncatalyzed AHP pretreatment at modest reaction conditions (room temperature and atmospheric pressure). In the present work, the reaction conditions for this catalyzed AHP pretreatment were investigated in more detail with the aim of better characterizing the relationship between pretreatment conditions and subsequent enzymatic sugar release. Results We found that for a wide range of pretreatment conditions, the catalyzed pretreatment resulted in significantly higher glucose and xylose enzymatic hydrolysis yields (as high as 80% for both glucose and xylose) relative to uncatalyzed pretreatment (up to 40% for glucose and 50% for xylose). We identified that the extent of improvement in glucan and xylan yield using this catalyzed pretreatment approach was a function of pretreatment conditions that included H2O2 loading on biomass, catalyst concentration, solids concentration, and pretreatment duration. Based on these results, several important improvements in pretreatment and hydrolysis conditions were identified that may have a positive economic impact for a process employing a catalyzed oxidative pretreatment. These improvements include identifying that: (1) substantially lower H2O2 loadings can be used that may result in up to a 50-65% decrease in H2O2 application (from 100 mg H2O2/g biomass to 35–50 mg/g) with only minor losses in glucose and xylose yield, (2) a 60% decrease in the catalyst concentration from 5.0 mM to 2.0 mM (corresponding to a catalyst loading of 25 ?mol/g biomass to 10 ?mol/g biomass) can be achieved without a subsequent loss in glucose yield, (3) an order of magnitude improvement in the time required for pretreatment (minutes versus hours or days) can be realized using the catalyzed pretreatment approach, and (4) enzyme dosage can be reduced to less than 30 mg protein/g glucan and potentially further with only minor losses in glucose and xylose yields. In addition, we established that the reaction rate is improved in both catalyzed and uncatalyzed AHP pretreatment by increased solids concentrations. Conclusions This work explored the relationship between reaction conditions impacting a catalyzed oxidative pretreatment of woody biomass and identified that significant decreases in the H2O2, catalyst, and enzyme loading on the biomass as well as decreases in the pretreatment time could be realized with only minor losses in the subsequent sugar released enzymatically. Together these changes would have positive implications for the economics of a process based on this pretreatment approach. PMID:23971902

  17. Stable gold(III) catalysts by oxidative addition of a carbon-carbon bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chung-Yeh; Horibe, Takahiro; Jacobsen, Christian Borch; Toste, F. Dean

    2015-01-01

    Low-valent late transition-metal catalysis has become indispensable to chemical synthesis, but homogeneous high-valent transition-metal catalysis is underdeveloped, mainly owing to the reactivity of high-valent transition-metal complexes and the challenges associated with synthesizing them. Here we report a carbon-carbon bond cleavage at ambient conditions by a Au(I) complex that generates a stable Au(III) cationic complex. In contrast to the well-established soft and carbophilic Au(I) catalyst, this Au(III) complex exhibits hard, oxophilic Lewis acidity. For example, we observed catalytic activation of ?,?-unsaturated aldehydes towards selective conjugate additions as well as activation of an unsaturated aldehyde-allene for a [2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction. The origin of the regioselectivity and catalytic activity was elucidated by X-ray crystallographic analysis of an isolated Au(III)-activated cinnamaldehyde intermediate. The concepts revealed suggest a strategy for accessing high-valent transition-metal catalysis from readily available precursors.

  18. Stable gold(III) catalysts by oxidative addition of a carbon-carbon bond.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung-Yeh; Horibe, Takahiro; Jacobsen, Christian Borch; Toste, F Dean

    2015-01-22

    Low-valent late transition-metal catalysis has become indispensable to chemical synthesis, but homogeneous high-valent transition-metal catalysis is underdeveloped, mainly owing to the reactivity of high-valent transition-metal complexes and the challenges associated with synthesizing them. Here we report a carbon-carbon bond cleavage at ambient conditions by a Au(i) complex that generates a stable Au(iii) cationic complex. In contrast to the well-established soft and carbophilic Au(i) catalyst, this Au(iii) complex exhibits hard, oxophilic Lewis acidity. For example, we observed catalytic activation of ?,?-unsaturated aldehydes towards selective conjugate additions as well as activation of an unsaturated aldehyde-allene for a [2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction. The origin of the regioselectivity and catalytic activity was elucidated by X-ray crystallographic analysis of an isolated Au(iii)-activated cinnamaldehyde intermediate. The concepts revealed suggest a strategy for accessing high-valent transition-metal catalysis from readily available precursors. PMID:25612049

  19. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Quarterly report No. 9, October 1-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Pavelka, L.A.; Mayo, F.R.; Zevely, J.

    1981-03-24

    Objective is to determine the structure of bituminous coal with emphasis on the crosslinks and breakable single bonds. Some of the highlights of this quarter are: (1) large-scale extraction of benzylamine-extracted coal with ethylene diamine-dimethyl sulfoxide (EDA-DMSO) led to 50.4% recovery of soluble material and 40.5% recovery of undissolved coal; (2) EDA-DMSO extraction appears to have removed essentially all of the ether and ester links in both fractions, leaving only hydrocarbon links; (3) extraction of whole coal by a mixture of N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP) and EDA is no better than EDA-DMSO, even though NMP alone is a better solvent than DMSO alone; (4) investigators have no evidence that NaOCl will oxidize sulfide links to sulfuric acid and NaOCl appears to be unsuitable for determining sulfide links in coal; (5) black acid fraction from several NaOCl oxidations precipitated between pH 4.98 and 4.66 was characterized; (6) measurements of hydroxyl and carboxyl contents on pyridine and benzylamine extracts and extracted coal show increases in carboxyl content on reactions of these fractions with alcoholic KOH, and an increase in hydroxyl content on reactions of the pyridine-extracted coal with benzylamine, consistent with ester cleavage. 6 tables.

  20. Biomass Oxidation: Formyl C-H Bond Activation by the Surface Lattice Oxygen of Regenerative CuO Nanoleaves.

    PubMed

    Amaniampong, Prince N; Trinh, Quang Thang; Wang, Bo; Borgna, Armando; Yang, Yanhui; Mushrif, Samir H

    2015-07-27

    An integrated experimental and computational investigation reveals that surface lattice oxygen of copper oxide (CuO) nanoleaves activates the formyl C-H bond in glucose and incorporates itself into the glucose molecule to oxidize it to gluconic acid. The reduced CuO catalyst regains its structure, morphology, and activity upon reoxidation. The activity of lattice oxygen is shown to be superior to that of the chemisorbed oxygen on the metal surface and the hydrogen abstraction ability of the catalyst is correlated with the adsorption energy. Based on the present investigation, it is suggested that surface lattice oxygen is critical for the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid, without further breaking down the glucose molecule into smaller fragments, because of C-C cleavage. Using CuO nanoleaves as catalyst, an excellent yield of gluconic acid is also obtained for the direct oxidation of cellobiose and polymeric cellulose, as biomass substrates. PMID:26119659

  1. Method to Improve Indium Bump Bonding via Indium Oxide Removal Using a Multi-Step Plasma Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, H. Frank (Inventor); Jones, Todd J. (Inventor); Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Dickie, Matthew R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A process for removing indium oxide from indium bumps in a flip-chip structure to reduce contact resistance, by a multi-step plasma treatment. A first plasma treatment of the indium bumps with an argon, methane and hydrogen plasma reduces indium oxide, and a second plasma treatment with an argon and hydrogen plasma removes residual organics. The multi-step plasma process for removing indium oxide from the indium bumps is more effective in reducing the oxide, and yet does not require the use of halogens, does not change the bump morphology, does not attack the bond pad material or under-bump metallization layers, and creates no new mechanisms for open circuits.

  2. Multilayered thermal insulation formed of zirconia bonded layers of zirconia fibers and metal oxide fibers and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Wrenn, Jr., George E. (Clinton, TN); Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Farragut, TN)

    1988-01-01

    A multilayered thermal insulating composite is formed of a first layer of zirconia-bonded zirconia fibers for utilization near the hot phase or surface of a furnace or the like. A second layer of zirconia-bonded metal oxide fibers is attached to the zirconia fiber layer by a transition layer formed of intermingled zirconia fibers and metal oxide fibers. The thermal insulation is fabricated by vacuum molding with the layers being sequentially applied from aqueous solutions containing the fibers to a configured mandrel. A portion of the solution containing the fibers forming the first layer is intermixed with the solution containing the fibers of the second layer for forming the layer of mixed fibers. The two layers of fibers joined together by the transition layer are saturated with a solution of zirconium oxynitrate which provides a zirconia matrix for the composite when the fibers are sintered together at their nexi.

  3. Multilayered thermal insulation formed of zirconia bonded layers of zirconia fibers and metal oxide fibers and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Wrenn, G.E. Jr.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1988-09-13

    A multilayered thermal insulating composite is formed of a first layer of zirconia-bonded zirconia fibers for utilization near the hot phase or surface of a furnace or the like. A second layer of zirconia-bonded metal oxide fibers is attached to the zirconia fiber layer by a transition layer formed of intermingled zirconia fibers and metal oxide fibers. The thermal insulation is fabricated by vacuum molding with the layers being sequentially applied from aqueous solutions containing the fibers to a configured mandrel. A portion of the solution containing the fibers forming the first layer is intermixed with the solution containing the fibers of the second layer for forming the layer of mixed fibers. The two layers of fibers joined together by the transition layer are saturated with a solution of zirconium oxynitrate which provides a zirconia matrix for the composite when the fibers are sintered together at their nexi.

  4. Characterization of a paramagnetic, mononuclear Pt(III)-alkyl complex intermediate in carbon-halogen bond coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Rivada-Wheelaghan, Orestes; Ortuño, Manuel A; Díez, Josefina; García-Garrido, Sergio E; Maya, Celia; Lledós, Agustí; Conejero, Salvador

    2012-09-19

    Addition of Br(2) or I(2) to 14-electron, cationic Pt(II)-alkyl complexes led to the formation of the corresponding carbon-halogen Pt(II) coupling products. Low temperature experiments with Br(2) allowed us to isolate and characterize crystallographically a very unusual mononuclear, paramagnetic Pt(III)-alkyl intermediate with a seesaw structure that can be further oxidized to a transient Pt(IV) species before reductive carbon-halogen coupling reaction takes place. PMID:22934962

  5. Aromatic C-H Bond Functionalization Induced by Electrochemically in Situ Generated Tris(p-bromophenyl)aminium Radical Cation: Cationic Chain Reactions of Electron-Rich Aromatics with Enamides.

    PubMed

    Li, Long-Ji; Jiang, Yang-Ye; Lam, Chiu Marco; Zeng, Cheng-Chu; Hu, Li-Ming; Little, R Daniel

    2015-11-01

    An effective Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction of electron-rich aromatics with N-vinylamides, induced by electrochemically in situ-generated TBPA radical cation, has been developed; the resulting adducts are produced in good to excellent yields. In the "ex-cell" type electrolysis, TBPA is transformed to its oxidized form in situ and subsequently employed as an electron transfer reagent to initiate a cationic chain reaction. An easily recoverable and reusable polymeric ionic liquid-carbon black (PIL-CB) composite was also utilized as a supporting electrolyte for the electrochemical generation of TBPA cation radical, without sacrificing efficiency or stability after four electrolyses. Cyclic voltammetry analysis and the results of control experiments demonstrate that the reaction of electron-rich aromatics and N-vinylamides occurs via a cationic chain reaction, which takes place though an oxidative activation of a C-H bond of electron-rich aromatics instead of oxidation of the N-vinylamide as previously assumed. PMID:26444498

  6. Putative Hydrogen Bond to Tyrosine M208 in Photosynthetic Reaction Centers from Rhodobacter capsulatus Significantly Slows Primary Charge Separation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Slow, ?50 ps, P* ? P+HA– electron transfer is observed in Rhodobacter capsulatus reaction centers (RCs) bearing the native Tyr residue at M208 and the single amino acid change of isoleucine at M204 to glutamic acid. The P* decay kinetics are unusually homogeneous (single exponential) at room temperature. Comparative solid-state NMR of [4?-13C]Tyr labeled wild-type and M204E RCs show that the chemical shift of Tyr M208 is significantly altered in the M204E mutant and in a manner consistent with formation of a hydrogen bond to the Tyr M208 hydroxyl group. Models based on RC crystal structure coordinates indicate that if such a hydrogen bond is formed between the Glu at M204 and the M208 Tyr hydroxyl group, the ?OH would be oriented in a fashion expected (based on the calculations by Alden et al., J. Phys. Chem.1996, 100, 16761–16770) to destabilize P+BA– in free energy. Alteration of the environment of Tyr M208 and BA by Glu M204 via this putative hydrogen bond has a powerful influence on primary charge separation. PMID:24902471

  7. Design and Synthesis of Chiral Zn2+ Complexes Mimicking Natural Aldolases for Catalytic C–C Bond Forming Reactions in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Susumu; Sonoike, Shotaro; Kitamura, Masanori; Aoki, Shin

    2014-01-01

    Extending carbon frameworks via a series of C–C bond forming reactions is essential for the synthesis of natural products, pharmaceutically active compounds, active agrochemical ingredients, and a variety of functional materials. The application of stereoselective C–C bond forming reactions to the one-pot synthesis of biorelevant compounds is now emerging as a challenging and powerful strategy for improving the efficiency of a chemical reaction, in which some of the reactants are subjected to successive chemical reactions in just one reactor. However, organic reactions are generally conducted in organic solvents, as many organic molecules, reagents, and intermediates are not stable or soluble in water. In contrast, enzymatic reactions in living systems proceed in aqueous solvents, as most of enzymes generally function only within a narrow range of temperature and pH and are not so stable in less polar organic environments, which makes it difficult to conduct chemoenzymatic reactions in organic solvents. In this review, we describe the design and synthesis of chiral metal complexes with Zn2+ ions as a catalytic factor that mimic aldolases in stereoselective C–C bond forming reactions, especially for enantioselective aldol reactions. Their application to chemoenzymatic reactions in aqueous solution is also presented. PMID:24481060

  8. Tailoring the composition of ultrathin, ternary alloy PtRuFe nanowires for the methanol oxidation reaction and formic acid oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Scofield, Megan E.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Wang, Lei; Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2014-11-25

    In the search for alternatives to conventional Pt electrocatalysts, we have synthesized ultrathin, ternary PtRuFe nanowires (NW), possessing different chemical compositions in order to probe their CO tolerance as well as electrochemical activity as a function of composition for both (i) the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and (ii) the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR). As-prepared ‘multifunctional’ ternary NW catalysts exhibited both higher MOR and FAOR activity as compared with binary Pt?Ru? NW, monometallic Pt NW, and commercial catalyst control samples. In terms of synthetic novelty, we utilized a sustainably mild, ambient wet-synthesis method never previously applied to the fabrication of crystalline, pure ternary systems in order to fabricate ultrathin, homogeneous alloy PtRuFe NWs with a range of controlled compositions. Thus, these NWs were subsequently characterized using a suite of techniques including XRD, TEM, SAED, and EDAX in order to verify not only the incorporation of Ru and Fe into the Pt lattice but also their chemical homogeneity, morphology, as well as physical structure and integrity. Lastly, these NWs were electrochemically tested in order to deduce the appropriateness of conventional explanations such as (i) the bi-functional mechanism as well as (ii) the ligand effect to account for our MOR and FAOR reaction data. Specifically, methanol oxidation appears to be predominantly influenced by the Ru content, whereas formic acid oxidation is primarily impacted by the corresponding Fe content within the ternary metal alloy catalyst itself.

  9. Tailoring the composition of ultrathin, ternary alloy PtRuFe nanowires for the methanol oxidation reaction and formic acid oxidation reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Scofield, Megan E.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Wang, Lei; Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2014-11-25

    In the search for alternatives to conventional Pt electrocatalysts, we have synthesized ultrathin, ternary PtRuFe nanowires (NW), possessing different chemical compositions in order to probe their CO tolerance as well as electrochemical activity as a function of composition for both (i) the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and (ii) the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR). As-prepared ‘multifunctional’ ternary NW catalysts exhibited both higher MOR and FAOR activity as compared with binary Pt?Ru? NW, monometallic Pt NW, and commercial catalyst control samples. In terms of synthetic novelty, we utilized a sustainably mild, ambient wet-synthesis method never previously applied to the fabrication ofmore »crystalline, pure ternary systems in order to fabricate ultrathin, homogeneous alloy PtRuFe NWs with a range of controlled compositions. Thus, these NWs were subsequently characterized using a suite of techniques including XRD, TEM, SAED, and EDAX in order to verify not only the incorporation of Ru and Fe into the Pt lattice but also their chemical homogeneity, morphology, as well as physical structure and integrity. Lastly, these NWs were electrochemically tested in order to deduce the appropriateness of conventional explanations such as (i) the bi-functional mechanism as well as (ii) the ligand effect to account for our MOR and FAOR reaction data. Specifically, methanol oxidation appears to be predominantly influenced by the Ru content, whereas formic acid oxidation is primarily impacted by the corresponding Fe content within the ternary metal alloy catalyst itself.« less

  10. Theoretical study on the dehydrogenation reaction of dihydrogen bonded phenol-borane-trimethylamine in the excited state.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonggang; Liu, Yufang; Yang, Dapeng; Li, Hui; Jiang, Kai; Sun, Jinfeng

    2015-12-28

    Time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and transition state theory (TST) have been performed to study the dehydrogenation process of dihydrogen bonded phenol-borane-trimethylamine (phenol-BTMA) in the excited state. The potential curve of phenol-BTMA in the ground state confirms that the dehydrogenation process does not occur in the ground state. The analysis of the geometric structure and infrared spectra demonstrate that the dihydrogen bond O-HH1-B of phenol-BTMA is considerably strengthened with the cleavage of O-H when excited to the first excited state. Based on the geometric structure in the first excited state, a transition state is found with the only imaginary frequency pointing to the formation of the hydrogen molecule. This finding implies the occurrence of the dehydrogenation process of phenol-BTMA in the excited state. The dehydrogenation reaction is fully completed in the reaction product and the new formed hydrogen molecule moves away from the plane of the benzene ring. This work provides a theoretical model for the dehydrogenation process of phenol-BTMA in the excited state. PMID:26300322

  11. Low interface defect density of atomic layer deposition BeO with self-cleaning reaction for InGaAs metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H. S.; SEMATECH, 2706 Montopolis Dr., Austin, Texas 78741; The University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78758 ; Yum, J. H.; The University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78758 ; Johnson, D. W.; Texas A and M University College Station, Texas 77843 ; Harris, H. R.; Hudnall, Todd W.; Oh, J.; Kirsch, P.; Wang, W.-E.; Bielawski, C. W.; Banerjee, S. K.; Lee, J. C.; Lee, H. D.

    2013-11-25

    In this paper, we discuss atomic configuration of atomic layer deposition (ALD) beryllium oxide (BeO) using the quantum chemistry to understand the theoretical origin. BeO has shorter bond length, higher reaction enthalpy, and larger bandgap energy compared with those of ALD aluminum oxide. It is shown that the excellent material properties of ALD BeO can reduce interface defect density due to the self-cleaning reaction and this contributes to the improvement of device performance of InGaAs MOSFETs. The low interface defect density and low leakage current of InGaAs MOSFET were demonstrated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the corresponding electrical results.

  12. Determination of carbon by the oxidation reduction reaction with chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashkovich, L.; Kuteynikov, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    Free carbon was determined in silicon and boron carbides in ash, oxides, and other materials by oxidation to carbon dioxide with a mixture of K2Cr2O7 + H2SO4. The determination was made from the amount of CR(6) consumed, by adding excess Mohr's salt and titrating with a standard solution of KMnO4. The amount of Cr(6) self reduced was determined in a blank test. Optimum oxidation and conditions were achieved when the volumes of 5% k2Cr2Oz and H2SO4 were equal. The mixture was boiled for 1-2 hours using a reflex condenser. The volume should not be reduced, in order to avoid an increase in the sulfuric acid concentration. The relative error was 4-7% for 0.005-0.04 g C and less than or equal to 3.5% for 0.1 g C.

  13. Theoretical study of reactions of HO{sub 2} in low-temperature oxidation of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z.; Kennedy, Eric M.; Mackie, John C.

    2010-07-15

    We have generated a set of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for the reactions involving HO{sub 2} in the very early stages of benzene oxidation at low temperatures using density functional theory (DFT). In particular, we report the rate constants for the reactions of HO{sub 2} with benzene and phenyl. The calculated reaction rate constant for the abstraction of H-C{sub 6}H{sub 5} by HO{sub 2} is found to be in good agreement with the limited experimental values. HO{sub 2} addition to benzene is found to be more important than direct abstraction. We show that the reactions of HO{sub 2} with the phenyl radical generate the propagating radical OH in a highly exoergic reaction. The results presented herein should be useful in modeling the oxidation of aromatic compounds at low temperatures. (author)

  14. Method for catalyzing oxidation/reduction reactions of simple molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bicker, D.; Bonaventura, J.

    1988-06-14

    A method for oxidizing carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide is described comprising: (1) contacting, together, carbon monoxide, a nitrogen-containing chelating agent and water; wherein the chelating agent is at least one member selected from the group consisting of methmeoglobin bound to a support, ferric hemoglobin bound to a support, iron-containing porphyrins bound to a support, and sperm whale myoglobin bound to a support, wherein the support is glass, a natural fiber, a synthetic fiber, a gel, charcoal, carbon ceramic material, a metal oxide, a synthetic polymer, a zeolite, a silica compound of an alumina compound; and (2) obtaining carbon dioxide.

  15. Selective, nickel-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions of alkynes

    E-print Network

    Miller, Karen M. (Karen Marie)

    2005-01-01

    Catalytic addition reactions to alkynes are among the most useful and efficient methods for preparing diverse types of substituted olefins. Controlling both regioselectivity and (EIZ)- selectivity in such transformations ...

  16. A Deeper Look into Thiophene Coordination Prior to Oxidative Addition of the C-S Bond to Platinum(0): A Computational Study

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    A Deeper Look into Thiophene Coordination Prior to Oxidative Addition of the C-S Bond to Platinum(0 platinum bisalkylphosphine fragment yields a highly stable thiaplatinacycle derived from cleavage of the C

  17. REACTION OF BENZENE OXIDE WITH THIOLS INCLUDING GLUTATHIONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study accounts for the observations that the metabolism of benzene is dominated by the formation of phenol. As demonstrated here, the pathway leading to S-phenylmercapturic acid is necessarily minor on account of the low efficiency of benzene oxide capture by glutathione at ...

  18. NITROUS OXIDE: ELECTRON ATTACHMENT AND POSSIBLE SCENARIO OF THE REACTION

    E-print Network

    Nguyen, Minh Tho

    ATOMS Oksana Tishchenko&, Eugene S. Kryachko&,#, and Minh Tho Nguyen& &Department of Chemistry mechanisms, ab initio calculations 1. Prologue: Nitrous Oxide, a Molecule for All Seasons The year 1772 inertness when present in low concentration. In radiation chemistry, N2O is usually present in aqueous media

  19. Adsorption and reaction of NO on oxidized and reduced SrTiO3(100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, S.; Szanyi, J.; Peden, C. H. F.; Wang, L.-Q.

    2003-07-01

    Adsorption and reaction of NO on oxidized and reduced SrTiO3(100) surfaces have been studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Major desorption peaks for NO from the fully oxidized surface are found at 140 and 260 K, along with a long tail that continues up to 500 K. The desorption features at 140 and 260 K correspond to activation energies of 36 and 66 kJ/mol, respectively, using a simple Redhead analysis. NO reacts nondissociatively on the fully oxidized surface. Reactivity of reduced SrTiO3(100) is relatively higher than that of the fully oxidized surface and is influenced by the adsorption temperature of the NO molecules on the surface. NO and N2O are the major desorption products following adsorption of NO on the reduced surface at 110 K. Desorption of N2O from significantly reduced SrTiO3(100) indicates that the oxygen atoms of the adsorbed NO molecules are preferentially extracted by the surface oxygen vacancy sites, whereas the surface oxidizes as a result of the deoxygenation of the adsorbates. Adsorption of NO on the reduced surface at 297 K is followed by breakage of the N-O bond producing adsorbed N and O atoms and recombination of these adspecies results in desorption of NO and N2 from this surface. Adsorption of NO on the significantly reduced surface at 200 K is followed by desorption of NO, N2, and N2O as TPD products and the reactivity of this surface at 200 K presumably is a composite of the behavior observed for NO adsorption at 110 and 297 K.

  20. Adsorption and Reaction of NO on Oxidized and Reduced SrTiO{sub 3} (100) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Samina; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF.; Wang, Li Q.

    2003-07-01

    Adsorption and reaction of NO on oxidized and reduced SrTiO{sub 3}(100) surfaces have been studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Major desorption peaks for NO from the fully oxidized surface as found at 140 and 260 K, along with a long tail that continues up to 500 K. The desorption features at 140 and 260 K correspond to activation energies of 36 and 66 kJ/mol, respectively, using a simple Redhead analysis. NO reacts non-dissociatively on the fully oxidized surface. Reactivity of reduced SrTiO{sub 3}(100) is relatively higher than that of the fully oxidized surface and is influenced by the adsorption temperature of the NO molecules on the surface. NO and N{sub 2}O are the major desorption products following adsorption of NO on the reduced surface at 110 K. Desorption of N{sub 2}O from significantly reduced SrTiO{sub 3}(100) indicates that the oxygen atoms of the adsorbed NO molecules are preferentially extracted by the surface oxygen vacancy sites whereas the surface oxidizes as a result of the de-oxygenation of the adsorbates. Adsorption of NO on the reduced surface at 297 K is followed by breakage of the N-O bond producing adsorbed N and O atoms and recombination of these ad-species results in desorption of NO and N{sub 2} from this surface. Adsorption of NO on the significantly reduced surface at 200 K is followed by desorption of NO, N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O as TPD products and the reactivity of this surface at 200 K presumable is a composite of the behavior observed for NO adsorption at 110 and 297 K.

  1. Iron oxide mineral-water interface reactions studied by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, M.E.; Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1994-07-01

    Natural iron mineral surfaces have been examined in air by atomic force (AFM) and scanning tunneling (STM) microscopies. A number of different surface features were found to be characteristic of the native surface. Even surfaces freshly exposed by crushing larger crystals were found to have a pebbly surface texture caused by the presence of thin coatings of what might be surface precipitates. This finding is interpreted as evidence for previous exposure to water, probably through an extensive network of microfractures. Surface reactions on the goethite crystals were studied by AFM at size resolutions ranging from microns to atomic resolution before, during, and after reaction with distilled water and 0.lN HCl. Immediate and extensive surface reconfiguration occurred on contact with water. In one case, after equilibration with water for 3 days, surface reprecipitation, etching and pitting were observed. Atomic resolution images taken under water were found to be disordered. The result of surface reaction was generally to increase the surface area substantially through the extension of surface platelet arrays, present prior to reaction. This work is being done in support of the site characterization project at Yucca Mountain.

  2. Effect of Water Content in N-Methylmorpholine N-Oxide/Cellulose Solutions on Thermodynamics, Structure, and Hydrogen Bonding.

    PubMed

    Rabideau, Brooks D; Ismail, Ahmed E

    2015-12-01

    Native crystalline cellulose is notoriously difficult to dissolve due to its dense hydrogen bond network between chains and weaker hydrophobic forces between cellulose sheets. N-Methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMMO), the solvent behind the Lyocell process, is one of the most successful commercial solvents for the nonderivatized dissolution of cellulose. In this process, water plays a very important role. Its presence at low concentrations allows NMMO to dissolve substantial amounts of cellulose, while at much higher concentrations it precipitates the crystalline fibers. Using all-atom molecular dynamics, we study the thermodynamic and structural properties of ternary solutions of cellulose, NMMO, and water. Using the two-phase thermodynamic method to calculate solvent entropy, we estimate the free energy of dissolution of cellulose as a function of the water concentration and find a transition of spontaneity that is in excellent agreement with experiment. In pure water, we find that cellulose dissolution is nonspontaneous, a result that is due entirely to strong decreases in water entropy. Although the combined effect of enthalpy on dissolution in water is negligible, we observe a net loss of hydrogen bonds, resulting in a change in hydrogen bond energy that opposes dissolution. At lower water concentrations, cellulose dissolution is spontaneous and largely driven by decreases in enthalpy, with solvent entropy playing only a very minor role. When searching for the root causes of this enthalpy decrease, a complex picture emerges in which not one but many different factors contribute to NMMO's good solvent behavior. The reduction in enthalpy is led by the formation of strong hydrogen bonds between cellulose and NMMO's N-oxide, intensified through van der Waals interactions between NMMO's nonpolar body and the nonpolar surfaces of cellulose and unhindered by water at low concentrations due to the formation of efficient hydrogen bonds between water and cellulose. PMID:26545042

  3. Preparation of leady oxide for lead-acid battery by cementation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Joon-Ho; Kim, Ki-Won; Ahn, Hyo-Jun

    The aim of this research is to prepare leady oxide with high specific area for lead-acid batteries by a new production process. Leady oxide is produced by a cementation reaction in 1.0 wt% HCl solution using a pure aluminum or a magnesium rod as the reductant. Leady oxide prepared in this process is much superior to Barton-pot or ball-mill oxide in terms of physical characteristics. The particle-size distribution of the leady oxide produced by this new process is similar to that of ball-mill oxide. Its acid absorption, however, is much higher because of the different particle shape with respect to ball-mill oxide. Ball-mill oxide is composed of particles of non-uniform plate shape, whereas the new leady oxide is composed of particles of perfect flat (flake) shape. The former oxide has higher specific surface area and greater acid absorption than ball-mill or Barton-pot oxide.

  4. 40 CFR 721.10375 - Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene oxide and ethylene oxide, copolymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721...Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene...reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified...hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10375 - Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene oxide and ethylene oxide, copolymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721...Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene...reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified...hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10375 - Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene oxide and ethylene oxide, copolymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721...Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene...reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified...hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with...

  7. Identification of nitriding mechanisms in high purity reaction bonded silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    The rapid, low-temperature nitriding results from surface effects on the Si particles beginning with loss of chemisorbed H and sequential formation of thin amorphous Si nitride layers. Rapid complete conversion to Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] during the fast reaction can be inhibited when either too few or too many nuclei form on Si particels. Optimally, [approximately] 10 Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] nuclei form per Si particles under rapid, complete nitridation conditions. Nitridation during the slow reaction period appears to progress by both continued reaction of nonpreferred Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] growth interfaces and direct nitridation of the remaining Si/vapor interfaces.

  8. Identification of nitriding mechanisms in high purity reaction bonded silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    The rapid, low-temperature nitriding results from surface effects on the Si particles beginning with loss of chemisorbed H and sequential formation of thin amorphous Si nitride layers. Rapid complete conversion to Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} during the fast reaction can be inhibited when either too few or too many nuclei form on Si particels. Optimally, {approximately} 10 Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nuclei form per Si particles under rapid, complete nitridation conditions. Nitridation during the slow reaction period appears to progress by both continued reaction of nonpreferred Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} growth interfaces and direct nitridation of the remaining Si/vapor interfaces.

  9. The Shono-type electroorganic oxidation of unfunctionalised amides. Carbon–carbon bond formation via electrogenerated N-acyliminium ions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary N-acyliminium ions are useful reactive synthetic intermediates in a variety of important carbon–carbon bond forming and cyclisation strategies in organic chemistry. The advent of an electrochemical anodic oxidation of unfunctionalised amides, more commonly known as the Shono oxidation, has provided a complementary route to the C–H activation of low reactivity intermediates. In this article, containing over 100 references, we highlight the development of the Shono-type oxidations from the original direct electrolysis methods, to the use of electroauxiliaries before arriving at indirect electrolysis methodologies. We also highlight new technologies and techniques applied to this area of electrosynthesis. We conclude with the use of this electrosynthetic approach to challenging syntheses of natural products and other complex structures for biological evaluation discussing recent technological developments in electroorganic techniques and future directions. PMID:25670975

  10. The Shono-type electroorganic oxidation of unfunctionalised amides. Carbon-carbon bond formation via electrogenerated N-acyliminium ions.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alan M; Banks, Craig E

    2014-01-01

    N-acyliminium ions are useful reactive synthetic intermediates in a variety of important carbon-carbon bond forming and cyclisation strategies in organic chemistry. The advent of an electrochemical anodic oxidation of unfunctionalised amides, more commonly known as the Shono oxidation, has provided a complementary route to the C-H activation of low reactivity intermediates. In this article, containing over 100 references, we highlight the development of the Shono-type oxidations from the original direct electrolysis methods, to the use of electroauxiliaries before arriving at indirect electrolysis methodologies. We also highlight new technologies and techniques applied to this area of electrosynthesis. We conclude with the use of this electrosynthetic approach to challenging syntheses of natural products and other complex structures for biological evaluation discussing recent technological developments in electroorganic techniques and future directions. PMID:25670975

  11. Surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazines: Tubular reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilduff, Jan E.; Davis, Dennis D.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    The surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine, symmetrical dimethylhydrazine, trimethylhydrazine and tetramethylhydrazine were investigated in a metal-powder packed turbular flow reactor at 55 plus or minus 3 C. Hydrazine was completely reacted on all surfaces studied. The major products of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) oxidation were methanol, methane and methyldiazene. The di-, tri- and tetra-methyl hydrazines were essentially unreactive under these conditions. The relative catalytic reactivities toward MMH are: Fe greater than Al2O3 greater than Ti greater than Zn greater than 316 SS greater than Cr greater than Ni greater than Al greater than 304L SS. A kinetic scheme and mechanism involving adsorption, oxidative dehydrogenation and reductive elimination reactions on a metal oxide surface are proposed.

  12. Process for the oxidation of materials in water at supercritical temperatures utilizing reaction rate enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Swallow, K.C.; Killilea, W.R.; Hong, G.T.; Bourhis, A.L.

    1993-08-03

    A method is described for substantially completely oxidizing combustible materials in which an aqueous stream bearing the combustible materials is reacted in the presence of an oxidant comprising diatomic oxygen and at a temperature greater than the critical temperature of water and at a pressure greater than about 25 bar, within a reactor for a period of less than about 5 minutes to produce a reaction product stream, wherein the reaction is initiated in the presence of a rate enhancer comprising at least one oxidizing agent in addition to said oxidant selected from the group consisting of ozone, hydrogen peroxide, salts containing persulfate, salts containing permanganate, nitric acid, salts containing nitrate, oxyacids of chlorine and their corresponding salts, hypochlorous acid, salts containing hypochlorite, chlorous acid, salts containing chlorite, chloric acid, salts containing chlorate, perchloric acid, and salts containing perchlorate.

  13. Adaptation of a small-molecule hydrogen-bond donor catalyst to an enantioselective hetero-Diels-Alder reaction hypothesized for brevianamide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sprague, Daniel J; Nugent, Benjamin M; Yoder, Ryan A; Vara, Brandon A; Johnston, Jeffrey N

    2015-02-20

    Chiral diamine-derived hydrogen-bond donors were evaluated for their ability to effect stereocontrol in an intramolecular hetero-Diels-Alder (HDA) reaction hypothesized in the biosynthesis of brevianamides A and B. Collectively, these results provide proof of principle that small-molecule hydrogen-bond catalysis, if even based on a hypothetical biosynthesis construct, holds significant potential within enantioselective natural product synthesis. PMID:25697748

  14. Adaptation of a Small-Molecule Hydrogen-Bond Donor Catalyst to an Enantioselective Hetero-Diels–Alder Reaction Hypothesized for Brevianamide Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chiral diamine-derived hydrogen-bond donors were evaluated for their ability to effect stereocontrol in an intramolecular hetero-Diels–Alder (HDA) reaction hypothesized in the biosynthesis of brevianamides A and B. Collectively, these results provide proof of principle that small-molecule hydrogen-bond catalysis, if even based on a hypothetical biosynthesis construct, holds significant potential within enantioselective natural product synthesis. PMID:25697748

  15. Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry 185 (2007) 301311 Photodriven reduction and oxidation reactions on colloidal semiconductor

    E-print Network

    2007-01-01

    and oxidation reactions on colloidal semiconductor particles: Implications for prebiotic synthesis Xiang V. 1). Zinc sulfide, a semiconductor which occurs in nature as the minerals sphalerite and wurtzite

  16. Morphological impact on the reaction kinetics of size-selected cobalt oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartling, Stephan; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Barke, Ingo

    2015-09-01

    Apart from large surface areas, low activation energies are essential for efficient reactions, particularly in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we show that not only the size of nanoparticles but also their detailed morphology can crucially affect reaction kinetics, as demonstrated for mass-selected, soft-landed, and oxidized cobalt clusters in a 6 nm to 18 nm size range. The method of reflection high-energy electron diffraction is extended to the quantitative determination of particle activation energies which is applied for repeated oxidation and reduction cycles at the same particles. We find unexpectedly small activation barriers for the reduction reaction of the largest particles studied, despite generally increasing barriers for growing sizes. We attribute these observations to the interplay of reaction-specific material transport with a size-dependent inner particle morphology.

  17. Zinc oxide eugenol cements. V. Instrumental studies of the catalysis and acceleration of the setting reaction.

    PubMed

    Crisp, S; Ambersley, M; Wilson, A D

    1980-01-01

    Zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) cements were prepared by mixing powders of widely differing reactivity with a variety of liquid formulations. The course of the setting reaction was followed by penetrometer, rheological and electrical techniques. Small amounts of water, organic acids, and the reactivity of water, organic acids, and the reactivity of the zinc oxide all have a profound influence on the setting characteristics of cement pastes. PMID:6927984

  18. "Click" reaction in conjunction with diazeniumdiolate chemistry: developing high-load nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Oladeinde, Oyebola A; Hong, Sam Y; Holland, Ryan J; Maciag, Anna E; Keefer, Larry K; Saavedra, Joseph E; Nandurdikar, Rahul S

    2010-10-01

    The use of Cu(I)-catalyzed "click" reactions of alkyne-substituted diazeniumdiolate prodrugs with bis- and tetrakis-azido compounds is described. The "click" reaction for the bis-azide using CuSO(4)/Na-ascorbate predominantly gave the expected bis-triazole. However, CuI/diisopropylethylamine predominantly gave uncommon triazolo-triazole products as a result of oxidative coupling. Neither set of "click" conditions showed evidence of compromising the integrity of the diazeniumdiolate groups. The chemistry developed has applications in the synthesis of polyvalent and dendritic nitric oxide donors. PMID:20812718

  19. ‘Click’ Reaction in Conjunction with Diazeniumdiolate Chemistry: Developing High-Load Nitric Oxide Donors

    PubMed Central

    Oladeinde, Oyebola A.; Hong, Sam Y.; Holland, Ryan J.; Maciag, Anna E.; Keefer, Larry K.; Saavedra, Joseph E.; Nandurdikar, Rahul S.

    2010-01-01

    The use of Cu(I)-catalyzed ‘click’ reactions of alkyne-substituted diazeniumdiolate prodrugs with bis- and tetrakisazido compounds is described. The ‘click’ reaction for the bis-azide using CuSO4/Na-ascorbate predominantly gave the expected bis-triazole. However, CuI/diisopropylethylamine predominantly gave uncommon triazolo-triazole products as a result of oxidative coupling. Neither set of ‘click’ condition showed evidence of compromising the integrity of the diazeniumdiolate groups. The chemistry developed has applications in the synthesis of polyvalent and dendritic nitric oxide donors. PMID:20812718

  20. A combinatorial chemistry approach to the investigation of cerium oxide and plutonium oxide reactions with small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John T.; Warner, Benjamin P.; Bridgewater, Jon S.; Havrilla, George J.; Morris, David E.; Buscher, C. Thomas

    2000-07-01

    We are currently investigating the potential chemistry of the 3013 Standard waste storage containers. These containers are filled with waste that is a mixture of inorganic salts and plutonium oxide that has been calcined to remove water and other volatiles. There has been concern about possible pressure buildup due to the formation of hydrogen or other gases. We are utilizing a combinatorial chemistry approach to investigate a range of possible reactions that may occur in the containers with various concentrations of metal oxides and inorganic salts.

  1. Determination of absolute bond strength from hydroxyl groups at oxidized aluminum-epoxy interfaces by angle beam ultrasonic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2004-10-01

    The hydrogen bonding (H-bond) contribution to the adhesive strength of oxidized aluminum-epoxy interfaces is calculated from the Morse potential for the interaction of hydroxyl groups formed on the Al2O3 surface with epoxy receptors. A strength parameter called the normal spring constant flux KN is defined and calculated to be 3.8×1017Nm-3, corresponding to a tensile strength of 26MPa, for values of the H-bond parameters and bond densities typical of moderate strength epoxies. The KN value is in very good agreement with values determined experimentally from an inversion of ultrasonic spectral data [A. I. Laverntyev and S. I. Rokhlin, J. Appl. Phys. 76, 4643 (1994); J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 3467 (1997)]. It is also in agreement with the value KN=3.6×1017Nm-3 obtained by a reinterpretation of the periodic crack model [F. J. Margetan et al., J. Nondestr. Eval. 7, 131 (1988)] when applied to adhesive interfaces. The agreement between theory and experiment establishes KN as a quantitative nondestructive measure of adhesive strength. The relationship between the normal and transverse (shear) spring constant fluxes is derived and the effects of thermal fluctuations are addressed.

  2. Kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry reactions of the nitrogen oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampson, R. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Data sheets for thermal and photochemical reactions of importance in the atmospheric chemistry of the nitrogen oxides are presented. For each reaction the available experimental data are summarized and critically evaluated, and a preferred value of the rate coefficient is given. The selection of the preferred value is discussed and an estimate of its accuracy is given. For the photochemical process, the data are summarized, and preferred for the photoabsorption cross section and primary quantum yields are given.

  3. Intermediate in the O?O Bond Cleavage Reaction of an Extradiol Dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Kovaleva, Elena G.; Lipscomb, John D.

    2009-02-16

    The reactive oxy intermediate of the catalytic cycle of extradiol aromatic ring-cleaving dioxygenases is formed by binding the catecholic substrate and O{sub 2} in adjacent ligand positions of the active site metal [usually Fe(II)]. This intermediate and the following Fe(II)-alkylperoxo intermediate resulting from oxygen attack on the substrate have been previously characterized in a crystal of homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (HPCD). Here a subsequent intermediate in which the O-O bond is broken to yield a gem diol species is structurally characterized. This new intermediate is stabilized in the crystal by using the alternative substrate, 4-sulfonylcatechol, and the Glu323Leu variant of HPCD, which alters the crystal packing.

  4. Hydrogen bond network around the semiquinone of the secondary quinone acceptor Q(B) in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Alexander T; O'Malley, Patrick J; Wraight, Colin A; Dikanov, Sergei A

    2015-05-01

    By utilizing a combined pulsed EPR and DFT approach, the high-resolution structure of the QB site semiquinone (SQB) was determined. The development of such a technique is crucial toward an understanding of protein-bound semiquinones on the structural level, as (i) membrane protein crystallography typically results in low resolution structures, and (ii) obtaining protein crystals in the semiquinone form is rarely feasible. The SQB hydrogen bond network was investigated with Q- (?34 GHz) and X-band (?9.7 GHz) pulsed EPR spectroscopy on fully deuterated reactions centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Simulations in the SQB g-tensor reference frame provided the principal values and directions of the H-bond proton hyperfine tensors. Three protons were detected, one with an anisotropic tensor component, T = 4.6 MHz, assigned to the histidine N?H of His-L190, and two others with similar anisotropic constants T = 3.2 and 3.0 MHz assigned to the peptide NpH of Gly-L225 and Ile-L224, respectively. Despite the strong similarity in the peptide couplings, all hyperfine tensors were resolved in the Q-band ENDOR spectra. The Euler angles describing the series of rotations that bring the hyperfine tensors into the SQB g-tensor reference frame were obtained by least-squares fitting of the spectral simulations to the ENDOR data. These Euler angles show the locations of the hydrogen bonded protons with respect to the semiquinone. Our geometry optimized model of SQB used in previous DFT work is in strong agreement with the angular constraints from the spectral simulations, providing the foundation for future joint pulsed EPR and DFT semiquinone structural determinations in other proteins. PMID:25885036

  5. Nano-Bonding of Silicon Oxides-based surfaces at Low Temperature: Bonding Interphase Modeling via Molecular Dynamics and Characterization of Bonding Surfaces Topography, Hydro-affinity and Free Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whaley, Shawn D.

    In this work, a new method, "Nanobonding(TM)" [1,2] is conceived and researched to bond Si-based surfaces, via nucleation and growth of a 2 D silicon oxide SiOxHx interphase connecting the surfaces at the nanoscale across macroscopic domains. Nanobonding cross-bridges two smooth surfaces put into mechanical contact in an O2/H 2O mixed ambient below T ?200 °C via arrays of SiOxH x molecules connecting into a continuous macroscopic bonding interphase. Nano-scale surface planarization via wet chemical processing and new spin technology are compared via Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy (TMAFM) , before and after nano-bonding. Nanobonding uses precursor phases, 2D nano-films of beta-cristobalite (beta-c) SiO2, nucleated on Si(100) via the Herbots-Atluri (H-A) method [1]. beta-c SiO2 on Si(100) is ordered and flat with atomic terraces over 20 nm wide, well above 2 nm found in native oxides. When contacted with SiO2 this ultra-smooth nanophase can nucleate and grow domains with cross-bridging molecular strands of hydroxylated SiOx, instead of point contacts. The high density of molecular bonds across extended terraces forms a strong bond between Si-based substrates, nano- bonding [2] the Si and silica. A new model of beta-cristobalite SiO2 with its <110> axis aligned along Si[100] direction is simulated via ab-initio methods in a nano-bonded stack with beta-c SiO2 in contact with amorphous SiO2 (a-SiO2), modelling cross-bridging molecular bonds between beta-c SiO2 on Si(100) and a-SiO2 as during nanobonding. Computed total energies are compared with those found for Si(100) and a-SiO2 and show that the presence of two lattice cells of !-c SiO2 on Si(100) and a-SiO2 lowers energy when compared to Si(100)/ a-SiO 2 Shadow cone calculations on three models of beta-c SiO2 on Si(100) are compared with Ion Beam Analysis of H-A processed Si(100). Total surface energy measurements via 3 liquid contact angle analysis of Si(100) after H-A method processing are also compared. By combining nanobonding experiments, TMAFM results, surface energy data, and ab-initio calculations, an atomistic model is derived and nanobonding is optimized. [1] US Patent 6,613,677 (9/2/03), 7,851,365 (12/14/10), [2] Patent Filed: 4/30/09, 10/1/2011

  6. THE USE OF ISOTOPE CROSSOVER EXPERIMENTS IN INVESTIGATING CARBON-CARBON BOND FORMING REACTIONS OF BINUCLEAR DIALKYL COBALT COMPLEXES

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, Robert G.

    1980-01-01

    Our present understanding of the mechanisms of organometallic reactions stems almost completely from investigation of complexes containing only one metal. Recently interest has been increasing in the synthesis, structure elucidation and reaction mechanisms of polynuclear clusters, complexes containing more than one metal. This attention derives partially from the possibility that polynuclear catalysts and reagents might be designed in such a way that the metals could interact, generating cooperative systems which might be much more selective than their mononuclear analogs. Another stimulant to this work has been the relationship of cluster complexes to larger multi-metal systems, such as heterogeneous catalysts. Many polynuclear clusters have been prepared and characterized, and some of these have been found to function as unique catalysts or catalyst precursors. However, very little is yet known about how chemical transformations take place at multinuclear reaction centers. Given this paucity of information, they decided a few years ago to initiate mechanistic study of simple cluster systems containing two metal centers, in which each of the metals has a {sigma}-bound organic ligand attached to it. They also choose to focus on reactions of these complexes in which new carbon-carbon or carbon-hydrogen bonds are formed. This Account describes the work on such a system: a binuclear alkyl cobalt complex capable of transferring both alkyl groups to a molecule of carbon monoxide. In this work they have adopted as one of our highest priorities the determination of whether the cluster 'holds together' during its reactions, a question that is in our opinion too often ignored in such studies. They have found that isotope crossover experiments provide a powerful tool for investigating this structural integrity questions, and in this Account they outline a number of examples in which such crossover experiments have provided important, and occasionally surprising, informationa bout the mechanisms involved in the reactions of binuclear cluster complexes. Also summarized are studies of the reactions of related mononuclear complexes which have provided information critical to understanding the chemistry of these binuclear system.

  7. Nonenzymatic Reactions above Phospholipid Surfaces of Biological Membranes: Reactivity of Phospholipids and Their Oxidation Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Calero, Christian; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Frau, Juan; Muñoz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids play multiple and essential roles in cells, as components of biological membranes. Although phospholipid bilayers provide the supporting matrix and surface for many enzymatic reactions, their inherent reactivity and possible catalytic role have not been highlighted. As other biomolecules, phospholipids are frequent targets of nonenzymatic modifications by reactive substances including oxidants and glycating agents which conduct to the formation of advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There are some theoretical studies about the mechanisms of reactions related to these processes on phosphatidylethanolamine surfaces, which hypothesize that cell membrane phospholipids surface environment could enhance some reactions through a catalyst effect. On the other hand, the phospholipid bilayers are susceptible to oxidative damage by oxidant agents as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Molecular dynamics simulations performed on phospholipid bilayers models, which include modified phospholipids by these reactions and subsequent reactions that conduct to formation of ALEs and AGEs, have revealed changes in the molecular interactions and biophysical properties of these bilayers as consequence of these reactions. Then, more studies are desirable which could correlate the biophysics of modified phospholipids with metabolism in processes such as aging and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25977746

  8. First-principles investigations for oxidation reaction processes at 4H-SiC/SiO2 interface and its orientation dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Toru; Ito, Ayako; Nakamura, Kohji; Ito, Tomonori; Kageshima, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Masashi; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2015-11-01

    The reaction processes of O2 molecule at 4H-SiC/SiO2 interface are investigated by performing electronic structure calculations within density functional theory. Our calculations demonstrate characteristic features of the reaction depending on the crystal orientation of SiC: The energy barriers of CO formation at the interface are much lower than those of C-C bond formation. This implies that the reaction forming CO molecules, expressed as SiC+(3/2)O2 ? SiO2 + CO, preferentially occurs during the interfacial reaction processes of SiC oxidation. Furthermore, the energy barrier for CO formation on the (000 1 bar) C-face is found to be lower than that on the (0001) Si-face, indicating that the reaction on the C-face easily occurs compared with that on the Si-face. On the basis of calculated energy barriers, it is also suggested that the formation of CO molecule at SiO/SiO2 interface depending on the orientation could be rate-limiting during SiC oxidation.

  9. Gold-Catalyzed Oxidation of Propargylic Ethers with Internal C-C Triple Bonds: Impressive Regioselectivity Enabled by Inductive Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Kegong; D’Souza, Brendan; Nelson, Jon; Zhang, Liming

    2014-01-01

    Inductive perturbations of C-C triple bonds are shown to dictate the regiochemistry of gold-catalyzed oxidation of internal C-C triple bonds in the cases of propargylic ethers, resulting in highly regioselective formation of ?-alkoxy-?,?-unsaturated ketones (up to >50/1 selectivity) via ?-oxo gold carbene intermediates. Ethers derived from primary propargylic alcohols can be reliably transformed in good yields, and various functional groups are tolerated. With substrates derived from secondary propargylic alcohols, the development of a new P,N-bidentate ligand enables the minimization of competing alkyl group migration to the gold carbene center over the desired hydride migration; the preferred migration of a phenyl group, however, results in efficient formation of a ?-phenyl-?-alkoxy-?,?-unsaturated ketone. These results further advance the surrogacy of a propargyl moiety to synthetically versatile enone function with reliable and readily predictable regioselectivity. PMID:25284890

  10. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Quarterly report No. 13, October 1-December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Zevely, J.; Mayo, F.R.

    1982-02-26

    Bituminous coal is assumed to consist mostly of aggregates of condensed aromatic and aliphatic rings which are connected and made soluble by crosslinks containing single bonds. The objective of this project is to determine the structure of bituminous coal with emphasis on the crosslinks and breakable single bonds. During this past quarter the following studies were conducted on Illinois No. 6 coal: extraction with benzylamine (BnH/sub 2/), ethanolamine, ethylenediamine (EDA), pyridine; saponification of some toluene-insoluble, pyridine-soluble (TIPS) fraction; cleavages by amines; oxidation with aqueous NaOCl of butylated and methylated pyridine-extracted coal; decarboxylation on black acids. The investigations dealt with two kinds of connecting links in coal, which are designated as ester and ether groups. The ester groups are cleaved by strongly basic amines (to give amides) at 25/sup 0/C and by alcoholic KOH at 100/sup 0/C (to give salts and alcohols or phenols). Both esters and ethers are cleaved by HI or ZnCL/sub 2/ in pyridine at or below 50/sup 0/C. The ethers are also cleaved by BnNH/sub 2/, EDA, and EDA/DMSO to nearly the same extent on several days heating at 100/sup 0/C. Although a cleavage of model ethers by amines were not established, the parallel easy reactions of HI and ZnCl/sub 2/ and the slow 100/sup 0/C reactions of amines on coal lead the authors to designate the non-ester cleavages as ether cleavages. (ATT)

  11. Influence of aluminum oxide film on thermocompression bonding of gold wire to evaporated aluminum film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwata, S.; Ishizaka, A.; Yamamoto, H.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of Al surface condition on the thermocompression bonding of Au wires to Al electrodes for integrated electric circuits was studied. Au wires were connected to Al electrodes by nail-head bonding after various Al surface treatments. Bonding was evaluated by measuring the wire pull strength and fraction of the number of failures at Au-Al bonds to the total number of failures. Dependence of the fraction on applied load was derived theoretically with a parameter named critical load to take into consideration the differences in Al surface condition. The relation also held explicately for various surface treatments. Characterization of the Al surface was carried out by electron microscopy for chemical analysis.

  12. Heterobifunctional PEG Ligands for Bioconjugation Reactions on Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bloemen, Maarten; Van Stappen, Thomas; Willot, Pieter; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Koeckelberghs, Guy; Geukens, Nick; Gils, Ann; Verbiest, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Ever since iron oxide nanoparticles have been recognized as promising scaffolds for biomedical applications, their surface functionalization has become even more important. We report the synthesis of a novel polyethylene glycol-based ligand that combines multiple advantageous properties for these applications. The ligand is covalently bound to the surface via a siloxane group, while its polyethylene glycol backbone significantly improves the colloidal stability of the particle in complex environments. End-capping the molecule with a carboxylic acid introduces a variety of coupling chemistry possibilities. In this study an antibody targeting plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 was coupled to the surface and its presence and binding activity was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance experiments. The results indicate that the ligand has high potential towards biomedical applications where colloidal stability and advanced functionality is crucial. PMID:25275378

  13. Structural and functional investigation of graphene oxide–Fe3O4 nanocomposites for the heterogeneous Fenton-like reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zubir, Nor Aida; Yacou, Christelle; Motuzas, Julius; Zhang, Xiwang; Diniz da Costa, João C.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene oxide–iron oxide (GO–Fe3O4) nanocomposites were synthesised by co-precipitating iron salts onto GO sheets in basic solution. The results showed that formation of two distinct structures was dependent upon the GO loading. The first structure corresponds to a low GO loading up to 10?wt%, associated with the beneficial intercalation of GO within Fe3O4 nanoparticles and resulting in higher surface area up to 409?m2 g?1. High GO loading beyond 10?wt% led to the aggregation of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and the undesirable stacking of GO sheets. The presence of strong interfacial interactions (Fe-O-C bonds) between both components at low GO loading lead to 20% higher degradation of Acid Orange 7 than the Fe3O4 nanoparticles in heterogeneous Fenton-like reaction. This behaviour was attributed to synergistic structural and functional effect of the combined GO and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. PMID:24699690

  14. Oil as reaction medium for glycation, oxidation, denaturation, and aggregation of whey protein systems of low water activity.

    PubMed

    Potes, Naritchaya; Kerry, Joseph P; Roos, Yrjö H

    2013-04-17

    Whey protein isolate (WPI)-oil (75:25) and WPI-oil-(glucose-fructose) (45:15:40) as models of high-protein systems containing either olive (OO) or sunflower oil (SO) were stored at 20 or 40 °C to investigate component interactions. The indicators of protein oxidation (carbonyl content) and aggregation (total sulfhydryl content) and heats of protein denaturation and aggregation were investigated. Highest levels of disulfide bonding and carbonyls in WPI-OO formed during the first 2 weeks of storage concomitantly with enhanced protein aggregation. WPI-OO and WPI-SO systems (prestorage) showed increased protein denaturation temperature. The WPI proteins showed higher heat sensitivity with OO or SO at 40 °C, and the system with OO showed preaggregated protein as found from decreased heats of protein aggregation. OO or SO in WPI-oil-(glucose-fructose) systems reduced heats of protein aggregation. Lipid oxidation products and nonenzymatic browning reactions in glucose-fructose-containing systems decreased the solubility of solids and increased protein aggregation, hydrophobicity, and hardening of structure. PMID:23517062

  15. Standing wave patterns in CO oxidation reaction on Pt(110) surface: Experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Oertzen, A. von; Rotermund, H.H.; Mikhailov, A.S.; Ertl, G.

    2000-04-13

    Standing waves are a special type of spatio-temporal pattern observed in the CO oxidation reaction on Pt(110). The authors present new experimental data that indicate the important role played by the formation of subsurface oxygen. The formation of these patterns is correlated with reflective collisions of traveling waves that have previously been found in the same reaction. They also show that global coupling through the gas phase and external forcing are essential for stabilizing and synchronizing the standing wave patterns. The principal properties of the observed patterns are reproduced by numerical simulations based on an extended reaction-diffusion model.

  16. Ultra-stable Molecule-Surface Architectures at Metal Oxides: Structure, Bonding, and Electron-transfer Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hamers, Robert John

    2013-12-07

    Research funded by this project focused on the development of improved strategies for functionalization of metal oxides to enhance charge?transfer processes relevant to solar energy conversion. Initial studies included Fe2O3, WO3, TiO2, SnO2, and ZnO as model oxide systems; these systems were chosen due to differences in metal oxidation state and chemical bonding types in these oxides. Later studies focused largely on SnO2 and ZnO, as these materials show particularly promising surface chemistry, have high electron mobility, and can be readily grown in both spherical nanoparticles and as elongated nanorods. New molecules were synthesized that allowed the direct chemical assembly of novel nanoparticle ?dyadic? structures in which two different oxide materials are chemically joined, leading to an interface that enhances the separation of of charge upon illumination. We demonstrated that such junctions enhance photocatalytic efficiency using model organic compounds. A separate effort focused on novel approaches to linking dye molecules to SnO2 and ZnO as a way to enhance solar conversion efficiency. A novel type of surface binding through

  17. Multifunctional Ultrathin PdxCu1-x and Pt?PdxCu1-x One-Dimensional Nanowire Motifs for Various Small Molecule Oxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiqing; Adzic, Radoslav R; Wong, Stanislaus S

    2015-12-01

    Developing novel electrocatalysts for small molecule oxidation processes, including formic acid oxidation (FAOR), methanol oxidation reaction (MOR), and ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR), denoting the key anodic reactions for their respective fuel cell configurations, is a significant and relevant theme of recent efforts in the field. Herein, in this report, we demonstrated a concerted effort to couple and combine the benefits of small size, anisotropic morphology, and tunable chemical composition in order to devise a novel "family" of functional architectures. In particular, we have fabricated not only ultrathin 1-D Pd1-xCux alloys but also Pt-coated Pd1-xCux (i.e., Pt?Pd1-xCux; herein the ? indicates an intimate association, but not necessarily actual bond formation, between the inner bimetallic core and the Pt outer shell) core-shell hierarchical nanostructures with readily tunable chemical compositions by utilizing a facile, surfactant-based, wet chemical synthesis coupled with a Cu underpotential deposition technique. Our main finding is that our series of as-prepared nanowires are functionally flexible. More precisely, we demonstrate that various examples within this "family" of structural motifs can be tailored for exceptional activity with all 3 of these important electrocatalytic reactions. In particular, we note that our series of Pd1-xCux nanowires all exhibit enhanced FAOR activities as compared with not only analogous Pd ultrathin nanowires but also commercial Pt and Pd standards, with Pd9Cu representing the "optimal" composition. Moreover, our group of Pt?Pd1-xCux nanowires consistently outperformed not only commercial Pt NPs but also ultrathin Pt nanowires by several fold orders of magnitude for both the MOR and EOR reactions in alkaline media. The variation of the MOR and EOR performance with the chemical composition of our ultrathin Pt?Pd1-xCux nanowires was also discussed. PMID:26580482

  18. Elementary Steps of Syngas Reactions on Mo2C(001): Adsorption Thermochemistry and Bond Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Medford, Andrew

    2012-02-16

    Density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio thermodynamics are applied in order to investigate the most stable surface and subsurface terminations of Mo{sub 2}C(001) as a function of chemical potential and in the presence of syngas. The Mo-terminated (001) surface is then used as a model surface to evaluate the thermochemistry and energetic barriers for key elementary steps in syngas reactions. Adsorption energy scaling relations and Broensted-Evans-Polanyi relationships are established and used to place Mo{sub 2}C into the context of transition metal surfaces. The results indicate that the surface termination is a complex function of reaction conditions and kinetics. It is predicted that the surface will be covered by either C{sub 2}H{sub 2} or O depending on conditions. Comparisons to transition metals indicate that the Mo-terminated Mo{sub 2}C(001) surface exhibits carbon reactivity similar to transition metals such as Ru and Ir, but is significantly more reactive towards oxygen.

  19. Redox regulation of mitochondrial function with emphasis on cysteine oxidation reactions?

    PubMed Central

    Mailloux, Ryan J.; Jin, Xiaolei; Willmore, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria have a myriad of essential functions including metabolism and apoptosis. These chief functions are reliant on electron transfer reactions and the production of ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The production of ATP and ROS are intimately linked to the electron transport chain (ETC). Electrons from nutrients are passed through the ETC via a series of acceptor and donor molecules to the terminal electron acceptor molecular oxygen (O2) which ultimately drives the synthesis of ATP. Electron transfer through the respiratory chain and nutrient oxidation also produces ROS. At high enough concentrations ROS can activate mitochondrial apoptotic machinery which ultimately leads to cell death. However, if maintained at low enough concentrations ROS can serve as important signaling molecules. Various regulatory mechanisms converge upon mitochondria to modulate ATP synthesis and ROS production. Given that mitochondrial function depends on redox reactions, it is important to consider how redox signals modulate mitochondrial processes. Here, we provide the first comprehensive review on how redox signals mediated through cysteine oxidation, namely S-oxidation (sulfenylation, sulfinylation), S-glutathionylation, and S-nitrosylation, regulate key mitochondrial functions including nutrient oxidation, oxidative phosphorylation, ROS production, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), apoptosis, and mitochondrial fission and fusion. We also consider the chemistry behind these reactions and how they are modulated in mitochondria. In addition, we also discuss emerging knowledge on disorders and disease states that are associated with deregulated redox signaling in mitochondria and how mitochondria-targeted medicines can be utilized to restore mitochondrial redox signaling. PMID:24455476

  20. Heterogenised N-heterocyclic carbene complexes: synthesis, characterisation and application for hydroformylation and C-C bond formation reactions.

    PubMed

    Dastgir, Sarim; Coleman, Karl S; Green, Malcolm L H

    2011-01-21

    The imidazolium salts: 1-mesityl-3-(3-trimethoxysilylpropyl)imidazolium iodide and 1-tert-butyl-3-(3-trimethoxysilylpropyl)imidazolium iodide, abbreviated as (tmpMes)HI (3a) and (tmp(t)Bu)HI (3b), respectively, have been synthesised. The palladium(ii) complexes (?(3)-C(3)H(5)) (tmpMes)PdCl (5a) and (?(3)-C(3)H(5))(tmp(t)Bu)PdCl (5b), rhodium(i) and iridium(i) complexes (?(4)-1,5-COD) (tmpMes)MCl, M = Rh (6a), Ir (7a) and (?(4)-1,5-COD)(tmp(t)Bu)MCl, where M = Rh (6b), Ir (7b), were synthesised by silver transmetallation reactions using the silver(i) complexes (tmpMes)AgI (4a) and (tmp(t)Bu)AgI (4b). The iridium complex 7b has been structurally characterised. The Pd(ii) and Rh(i) complexes have been immobilised by attachment to chemically modified MCM-41. The immobilised palladium(ii) materials have been tested as recyclable catalysts for Suzuki type C-C bond formation reactions in water and the immobilised rhodium(i) materials have been examined for their catalytic ability for the hydroformylation of 1-octene. PMID:21116572

  1. The interaction of reaction-bonded silicon carbide and inconel 600 with a nickel-based brazing alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, J. R.; Pugh, M. D.; Drew, R. A. L.

    1989-09-01

    The objective of the present research was to join reaction-bonded silicon carbide (RBSC) to INCONEL 600 (a nickel-based superalloy) for use in advanced heat engine applications using either direct brazing or composite interlayer joining. Direct brazing experiments employed American Welding Society (AWS) BNi-5, a commercial nickel-based brazing alloy, as a filler material; composite interlayers consisted of intimate mixtures of ?-SiC and BNi-5 powders. Both methods resulted in the liquid filler metal forming a Ni-Si liquid with the free Si in the RBSC, which, in turn, reacted vigorously with the SiC component of the RBSC to form low melting point constituents in both starting materials and Cr carbides at the metal-ceramic interface. Using solution thermodynamics, it was shown that a Ni-Si liquid of greater than 60 at. pct Ni will decompose a-SiC at the experimental brazing temperature of 1200 ‡C; these calculations are consistent with the experimentally observed composition profiles and reaction morphology within the ceramic. It was concluded that the joining of RBSC to INCONEL 600 using a nickel-based brazing alloy is not feasible due to the inevitability of the filler metal reacting with the ceramic, degrading the high-temperature properties of the base materials.

  2. The reactions of O(ID) and OH with CH3OH, oxidation of the HCO radial, and the photochemical oxidation of formaldehyde. [photochemical reactions in stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osif, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental, laboratory study of the various photochemical reactions that can occur in the mesosphere and stratosphere is presented. N2O was photolyzed at 2139 A in the presence of CH3OH and CO. The O(id) produced in the photolysis reacted with CH3OH to produce OH radicals, and thus the reactions of both O(id) and OH were able to be studied. Also considered was the oxidation of the HCO radical. Mixtures of Cl2, O2, H2CO, and sometimes N2 or He were irradiated at 3660 A at several temperatures to photodecompose the Cl2. The photochemical oxidation of formaldehyde was studied as follows: formaldehyde in the presence of N2 and/or O2 (usually dry air) was photolyzed with a medium pressure Hg lamp used in conjunction with various filters which transmit different relative amounts of Hg lines from 2894 A to 3660 A. Results are presented and discussed, along with a description of experimental procedures and apparatus, and chemical reaction kinetics.

  3. Chemical reaction at ferromagnet/oxide interface and its influence on anomalous Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi-Wei; Teng, Jiao E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Zhang, Jing-Yan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Xi; Li, Xu-Jing; Feng, Chun; Wang, Hai-Cheng; Li, Ming-Hua; Yu, Guang-Hua E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Wu, Zheng-Long

    2014-09-08

    Chemical reactions at the ferromagnet/oxide interface in [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/MgO and [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} multilayers before and after annealing were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that Fe atoms at the Fe/MgO interface were completely oxidized in the as-grown state and significantly deoxidized after vacuum annealing. However, only some of the Fe atoms at the Fe/SiO{sub 2} interface were oxidized and rarely deoxidized after annealing. The anomalous Hall effect was modified by this interfacial chemical reaction. The saturation anomalous Hall resistance (R{sub xy}) was greatly increased in the [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/MgO multilayers after annealing and was 350% higher than that in the as-deposited film, while R{sub xy} of the [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} multilayer only increased 10% after annealing.

  4. Experimental and theoretical studies of reactions of neutral vanadium and tantalum oxide clusters with NO and NH3

    E-print Network

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    Experimental and theoretical studies of reactions of neutral vanadium and tantalum oxide clusters; accepted 16 September 2010; published online 3 November 2010 Reactions of neutral vanadium and tantalum, a vanadium oxide catalyst is loaded on an anatase support as a monolayer, and the active VOx species

  5. Catalytic migratory oxidative coupling of nitrones.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Shogo; Oisaki, Kounosuke; Kanai, Motomu

    2011-08-19

    A Cu(I)-catalyzed migratory oxidative coupling between nitrones and heterocycles or a methylamine is described. Selective C-C bond-formation proceeds through cleavage of two C(sp(3))-H bonds concomitant with C?N double bond-migration. The reaction provides an alternating nitrone moiety, allowing for further synthetically useful transformations. Radical clock studies suggest that the nucleophilic addition of nitrones to an oxidatively generated carbocation is a key step. PMID:21766802

  6. Oxidative coupling of dichalcogenides with sodium sulfinates via copper-catalyzed cleavage of S-S and Se-Se bonds.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Nobukazu

    2015-02-01

    A copper-catalyzed sulfonylation of disulfides was achieved using sodium sulfinates in air. The reaction formed various sulfur-sulfone bonds efficiently and afforded thiosulfonates in good yields. Selenosulfonates could also be prepared with this procedure. Furthermore, both chalcogenide groups on the dichalcogenides were available in these reactions. PMID:25562106

  7. Oxidative Cross-Coupling of sp(3)- and sp(2)-Hybridized C-H Bonds: Vanadium-Catalyzed Aminomethylation of Imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines.

    PubMed

    Kaswan, Pinku; Porter, Ashley; Pericherla, Kasiviswanadharaju; Simone, Marissa; Peters, Sean; Kumar, Anil; DeBoef, Brenton

    2015-11-01

    The vanadium-catalyzed oxidative coupling of substituted 2-arylimidiazo[1,2-a]pyridines to N-methylmorpholine oxide, which acts as both a coupling partner and an oxidant, has been achieved. This reaction was applied to various substituted imidiazo[1,2-a]pyridine and indole substrates, resulting in yields as high as 90%. Mechanistic investigations indicate that the reaction may proceed via a Mannich-type process. This work demonstrates how oxidative aminomethylation can be used as a useful method to introduce tertiary amines into heterocycles, thus providing an alternative method for conventional Mannich-type reactions. PMID:26479446

  8. Doubly bonded E13?P and B?E15 molecules and their reactions with H2, acetonitrile, benzophenone, and 2,3-dimethylbutadiene.

    PubMed

    Shih, Tsung-Wei; Li, Ming-Chung; Su, Ming-Der

    2015-06-01

    The bonding properties and the potential energy surfaces for the chemical reactions of doubly bonded compounds that have the >E13?E15< pattern are studied using density functional theory (M06-2X/Def2-SVPD). Nine molecules, >E13?P< (E13 = B, Al, Ga, In, and Tl) and >B?E15< (E15 = N, P, As, Sb, and Bi), are used as model reactants in this work. Four types of chemical reactions, H2 addition, acetonitrile, benzophenone [2 + 2] cycloadditions, and dimethylbutadiene [4 + 2] cycloaddition, are used to study the chemical reactivity of these inorganic, ethylene-like molecules. The results of these theoretical analyses show that only the >B?P< molecule has a weak B?P double bond, while the >Al?P< , >Ga?P< , >In?P< , >Tl?P< , >B?N< , >B?As<, >B?Sb<, and >B?Bi< compounds are best described as having a strong single ? bond, instead of a traditional p-p ? bond. The theoretical results also show that the singlet-triplet energy gap can be used to determine the relative reactivity of these doubly bonded molecules. According to these theoretical investigations, it is predicted that the order of reactivity is as follows: B?P > Al?P > Ga?P > In?P > Tl?P and B?N ? B?P < B?As < B?Sb < B?Bi. The conclusions drawn are consistent with the available experimental observations. PMID:25954984

  9. Elucidation of the reaction mechanism during the removal of copper oxide by halogen surfactant at the surface of copper plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Shun; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Itoh, Takashi; Motomiya, Kenichi; Tohji, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Although copper nanoparticles have various attractive properties, electrical applications of these was not achieved because of its surface oxide layer which prohibited electrical conduction. Thus, it can be considered that a new elimination method of the oxide on Cu surface, which simultaneously provide the resistance to re-oxidized, should be developed. In this study, the reaction between the metal oxide on Cu plate surface and halogen surfactant was introduced into development as a new elimination method of surface oxide layer. Since electrochemical and surface analysis are effective for analyzing the reaction mechanism which expected to be the reduction reaction of the oxide on metal surface, Cu electrode, which represented material of Cu nanoparticles surface, was used for the reaction mechanism analysis. The oxide is removed by controlling the temperature and selecting the optimal combination of solvents and the halogen surfactant (TIC). Results of electrochemical measurements strongly suggest that the chemical reaction between the oxides on the surface with the halogen surfactant is a substitution reaction which converts Cu oxide to Cu bromide, and continuously formed Cu bromide was dissolved into solvent. Totally, the oxide on the Cu surface was successfully eliminated.

  10. Singular characteristics and unique chemical bond activation mechanisms of photocatalytic reactions on plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Phillip; Xin, Hongliang; Marimuthu, Andiappan; Linic, Suljo

    2012-12-01

    The field of heterogeneous photocatalysis has almost exclusively focused on semiconductor photocatalysts. Herein, we show that plasmonic metallic nanostructures represent a new family of photocatalysts. We demonstrate that these photocatalysts exhibit fundamentally different behaviour compared with semiconductors. First, we show that photocatalytic reaction rates on excited plasmonic metallic nanostructures exhibit a super-linear power law dependence on light intensity (rate ? intensity(n), with n > 1), at significantly lower intensity than required for super-linear behaviour on extended metal surfaces. We also demonstrate that, in sharp contrast to semiconductor photocatalysts, photocatalytic quantum efficiencies on plasmonic metallic nanostructures increase with light intensity and operating temperature. These unique characteristics of plasmonic metallic nanostructures suggest that this new family of photocatalysts could prove useful for many heterogeneous catalytic processes that cannot be activated using conventional thermal processes on metals or photocatalytic processes on semiconductors. PMID:23178296

  11. Influence of "Island-Like" Oxides in the Bond-Coat on the Stress and Failure Patterns of the Thermal-Barrier Coatings Fabricated by Atmospheric Plasma Spraying During Long-Term High Temperature Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Zhao, Y. X.; Zhong, X. H.; Tao, S. Y.; Zhang, W.; Wang, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs) are very important ceramic-coating materials due to their excellent performance at high temperature. The inner zone of the bond-coat is often easily endured oxidized (internal oxidation) in the process of thermal spraying and the long-time exposure to the high temperature, and the "island-like" oxides can be formed. Especially, when the bond-coat was fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), this trend is more evident. In this paper, the stress distribution around the thermally grown oxide (TGO) has been calculated by the finite element method when the "island-like" oxides have been considered. The simulation results indicate that the maximum tensile stress and compressive stress existed in the TGO, and the existence of the "island-like" oxides will further decrease the maximum tensile stress level in the TGO. While the "island-like" oxides in the bond-coat will decrease the effective thickness of the TGO at the metallic layer/ceramic layer interface due to the oxidation of the metallic elements in the bond-coat. The crack propagation equation has been established and the failure mechanism of the TBC due to the formation and growth of the TGO has also been discussed in detail. The lifetime of the TBCs which have experienced high temperature oxidation has been predicted and the theoretical results agreed well with the experimental data.

  12. Oxidation of Half-Lantern Pt2(II,II) Compounds by Halocarbons. Evidence of Dioxygen Insertion into a Pt(III)-CH3 Bond.

    PubMed

    Sicilia, V; Baya, M; Borja, P; Martín, A

    2015-08-01

    The half-lantern compound [{Pt(bzq)(?-N^S)}2] (1) [bzq = benzo[h]quinoline, HN^S = 2-mercaptopyrimidine (C4H3N2HS)] reacts with CH3I and haloforms CHX3 (X = Cl, Br, I) to give the corresponding oxidized diplatinum(III) derivatives [{Pt(bzq)(?-N^S)X}2] (X = Cl 2a, Br 2b, I 2c). These compounds exhibit half-lantern structures with short intermetallic distances (?2.6 Å) due to Pt-Pt bond formation. The halogen abstraction mechanisms from the halocarbon molecules by the Pt2(II,II) compound 1 were investigated. NMR spectroscopic evidence using labeled reagents support that in the case of (13)CH3I the reaction initiates with an oxidative addition through an SN2 mechanism giving rise to the intermediate species [I(bzq)Pt(?-N^S)2Pt(bzq)((13)CH3)}]. However, with haloforms the reactions proceed through a radical-like mechanism, thermally (CHBr3, CHI3) or photochemically (CHCl3) activated, giving rise to mixtures of species [X(bzq)Pt(?-N^S)2Pt(bzq)R] (3a-c) and [X(bzq)Pt(?-N^S)2Pt(bzq)X] (2a-c). In these cases the presence of O2 favors the formation of species 2 over 3. Transformation of 3 into 2 was possible upon irradiation with UV light. In the case of [I(bzq)Pt(?-N^S)2Pt(bzq)((13)CH3)}] (3d), in the presence of O2 the formation of the unusual methylperoxo derivative [I(bzq)Pt(?-N^S)2Pt(bzq)(O-O(13)CH3)}] (4d) was detected, which in the presence of (13)CH3I rendered the final product [{Pt(bzq)(?-N^S)I}2] (2c) and (13)CH3OH. PMID:26197039

  13. Structure and Reaction of Oxametallacycles Derived from Styrene Oxide on Ag(110).

    SciTech Connect

    Lukaski, Adrienne C.; Enever, Michael C.; Barteau, Mark A.

    2007-08-15

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Styrene oxide forms a strongly bound oxametallacycle intermediate via activated adsorption on the Ag(110) surface. The oxametallacycle species derived from styrene oxide on Ag(110) fits well with the family of oxametallacycles identified previously in studies of nonallylic epoxides with unsaturated substituent groups on silver. Temperature-programmed reaction experiments demonstrate that styrene oxide ring opens at the substituted carbon, and Density Functional Theory calculations indicate that the phenyl ring of the resulting oxametallacycle is oriented nearly parallel to the Ag(110) surface. Interaction of the phenyl group with the silver surface stabilizes this intermediate relative to that derived from the mono-olefin epoxide, ethylene oxide. During temperature-programmed reaction, the oxametallacycle undergoes ring-closure to reform styrene oxide and isomerization to phenylacetaldehyde at 505 K on Ag(11 0). Styrene oxide-derived oxametallacycles exhibit similar ring-closure behavior on the Ag(111) surface.

  14. Chemical oxidation of anthracite with hydrogen peroxide via the Fenton reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heard, I.; Senftle, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    Solutions of 30% H2O2 ranging from pH = 0 to pH = 11.5 have been used to oxidize anthracite at room temperature. The inorganic impurities, primarily pyrite, catalysed the oxidation and reduction of H2O2 (the Fenton reaction) to form the hydroxyl radical; the oxidation of the organic matter was minimal and was observed only in strong acidic solutions (pH < 1.5). After acid demineralization, samples of the same anthracite underwent a significant enhancement of oxidation in both acid and alkaline solutions (pH = 0.4-11.5). As all the iron had been removed from the surface and the reactions were completed in a much shorter time, the oxidation mechanism must have been of a different nature than that for the untreated anthracite. A qualitative model based on the catalytic decomposition of H2O2 by activated carbon sites in the coal surface is used to explain the oxidation of the demineralized anthracite. ?? 1984.

  15. The carbon-bond mechanism: a condensed kinetic mechanism for photochemical smog

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, G.Z.; Hog, H.; Killus, J.P.

    1980-06-01

    Efforts to develop a model that can simulate photochemical smog with kinetic mechanisms are discussed. The carbon-bond mechanism is a set of generalized reactions that can be used to model photochemical oxidant formation. The theoretical framework of carbon-bond mechanism is outlined. Chemical variables that are incorporated into the carbon-bond mechanism model are described. Further work that is needed on the carbon-bond mechanism model is considered. (1 diagram, 13 graphs, 30 references, 2 tables)

  16. Dual C-H functionalization of N-aryl tetrahydroisoquinolines: a highly diastereoselective synthesis of dibenzo[a,f]quinolizines via visible-light induced oxidation and inverse electron-demand aza-Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guo-Qiang; Li, Chen-Guang; Liu, Ming-Qian; Cao, Jian; Luo, Yong-Chun; Xu, Peng-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Described herein is the first example of the application of an iminium intermediate generated by visible-light photocatalyzed oxidation in an inverse electron-demand aza-Diels-Alder reaction. This dual functionalization of both C(sp(3))-H and C(sp(2))-H bonds of N-aryl tetrahydroisoquinolines represents a valuable example for access to polycycles with high diastereoselectivity. PMID:26603196

  17. Designed synthesis of size-tunable Ag2S nanoclusters via distinguishable C-S bond cleavage reaction of alkyl- and aryl-thiolates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hang-Qing; He, Xin; Guo, Hui; Fu, Nan-Yan; Zhao, Liang

    2015-03-01

    We report herein the synthesis of two different silver clusters of aryl- and alkyl-thiolates. These two cluster complexes exhibited biased C-S bond cleavage reaction rates upon removing protective hexamethylazacalix[6]pyridine (Py[6]) ligands, which was applied in the fabrication of silver sulfide nanoclusters with variable and controllable sizes. PMID:25652650

  18. A cascade of acid-promoted C-O bond cleavage and redox reactions: from oxa-bridged benzazepines to benzazepinones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuewei; Yang, Fengzhi; Zheng, Lianyou; Dang, Qun; Bai, Xu

    2014-12-01

    A sequence of C-O bond cleavage and redox reactions in oxa-bridged azepines was realized under acid promoted conditions. This protocol provides an atom-economical and straightforward approach to access benzo[b]azepin-5(2H)-ones in high yields. The formal synthesis of tolvaptan was achieved by exploiting this new transformation. PMID:25397583

  19. Excited state proton transfer reaction of two new intramolecularly hydrogen bonded Schiff bases at room temperature and 77K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koll, A.; Filarowski, A.; Fitzmaurice, D.; Waghorne, E.; Mandal, A.; Mukherjee, S.

    2002-01-01

    Two new orthohydroxy Schiff bases, 7-phenylsalicylidene benzylamine (PSBA) and 7-ethylsalicylideneaniline (ESA) have been synthesized. The excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and the structure of PSBA and ESA in its crystalline form and in the solvents n-hexane, n-heptane and 1,4-dioxane have been investigated by means of absorption, emission and nanosecond spectroscopy at room temperature and 77K. One ground state species has been detected both in neutral and basic solutions of both PSBA and ESA: the cis-enol form with an intramolecular hydrogen bond. The ESIPT and formation of keto tautomer are evidenced by a large Stokes shifted emission (˜12?000 cm -1) at room temperature only in the case of ESA. On the other hand the keto tautomer is the predominant species at 77K in a solid matrix and as a solid sample at room temperature both in the case of ESA and PSBA. In the case of both ESA and PSBA the more intense, higher energy emission is due to the species which has not undergone ESIPT and attributed mainly due to cis-enol form. The trans-enol form is also observed by changing the excitation wavelength. Both the compounds are found to undergo a structural change to a zwitterionic and intermolecular hydrogen bonded form in the presence of a strong base like triethylamine. From the nanosecond measurements and quantum yield of fluorescence we have estimated the decay rates of proton transfer reaction in the case of PSBA. Our theoretical calculation at the AM1 level of approximation shows that the ground singlet state has a rather large activation barrier both in the case of PSBA and ESA. The barrier height is much lower on the corresponding excited singlet surface only in the case of ESA. The process is predicted to be endothermic in the ground state and exothermic in the excited singlet state.

  20. High oxidation state carbene complexes for C-H bond activation catalysis 

    E-print Network

    Pearson, Stephen

    2010-11-25

    Chapter one is an introduction to the less common coordination and oxidation chemistry of palladium; complexes containing Pd-OR, Pd-NR2 and those in the oxidation states of +IV. An outline of PdII/IV catalysed ligand-directed ...

  1. Bond cleavage reactions in oxygen and nitrogen heterocycles by a rhodium phosphine complex

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.D.; Dong, L.; Myers, A.W. )

    1995-02-01

    The reactions of (C[sub 5]Me[sub 5])Rh(PMe[sub 3])PhH with furan, 2,5-dimethylfuran, 2,3-dihydrofuran, dibenzofuran, pyrrole, 1-methylpyrrole, 2,5-dimethylpyrrole, 1,2,5-trimethylpyrrole, carbazole, 9-methylcarbazole, pyrrolidine, pyridine, 3,5-lutidine, 2,4,6-collidine, pyrazole, 3-methylpyrazole, and piperidine have been investigated. While the oxygen heterocycles give only C-H activation, the nitrogen heterocycles yield C-H and N-H insertion products. The chloro derivative (C[sub 5]Me[sub 5])Rh(PMe[sub 3])[2-(1-methylpyrrole)]Cl was found to crystallize in the monoclinic space group C2/c with a = 13.753 (6) A, b = 9.665 (5) A, c = 30.14 (2) A, [beta] = 99.77 (5)-[degree], Z = 8, and V = 3949 (4.1) A[sup 3] while (C[sub 5]Me[sub 5])Rh(PMe[sub 5])[2-(3,5-lutidine)]Cl was found to crystallize in the monoclinic space group P2[sub 1]/c with a = 14.976 (8) A, b = 8.613 (5) A, c = 17.12 (2) A, [beta] = 101.90 (6)[degree], Z = 4, and V = 2160 (5.2) A[sup 3]. 30 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Introduction of thiol moieties, including their thiol-ene reactions and air oxidation, onto polyelectrolyte multilayer substrates.

    PubMed

    Madaan, Nitesh; Romriell, Naomi; Tuscano, Joshua; Schlaad, Helmut; Linford, Matthew R

    2015-12-01

    We describe the derivatization of uncross-linked and cross-linked layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies of polyelectrolytes (polyallylamine hydrochloride and polyacrylic acid) with sulfydryl groups via Traut's reagent (2-iminothiolane). This thiolation was optimized with regards to temperature, concentration, and pH. The stability of the resulting -SH groups in the air was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This air oxidation has obvious implications for the use of thiol-ene reactions in materials chemistry, and there appears to be little on this topic in the literature. Three main S 2s signals were observed by XPS: at 231.5 eV (oxidized sulfur), 227.6 eV (thiol groups), and 225.4 eV (thiolate groups). Due to their rapid oxidation, we recommend that thiolated surfaces be used immediately after they are prepared. As driven by 254 nm UV light, thiol groups on polyelectrolyte multilayers react with 1,2-polybutadiene (PBd), and residual carbon-carbon double bonds on adsorbed PBd similarly react with another thiol. In the case of a fluorinated thiol, surfaces with high water contact angles (ca. 120°) are obtained. Modest exposures to light result in derivatization, while longer exposures damage the assemblies. Polyelectrolyte-thiol-PBd-thiol assemblies delaminate from their substrates when immersed for long periods of time in water. Surface silanization with an amino silane prevents this delamination and leads to stable assemblies. These assemblies withstand various stability tests. Techniques used to analyze the materials in this study include X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and contact angle goniometry. PMID:26295196

  3. Which Oxidation State Leads to O-O Bond Formation in Cp*Ir(bpy)Cl-Catalyzed Water Oxidation, Ir(V), Ir(VI), or Ir(VII)?

    E-print Network

    Liao, Rongzhen

    Which Oxidation State Leads to O-O Bond Formation in Cp*Ir(bpy)Cl-Catalyzed Water Oxidation, Ir(V), Ir(VI), or Ir(VII)? Rong-Zhen Liao* and Per E. M. Siegbahn* Department of Organic Chemistry by the Cp*Ir(bpy)Cl (Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl, bpy = 2,2-bipyridine) complex. One

  4. Design and synthesis of amidine-type peptide bond isosteres: application of nitrile oxide derivatives as active ester equivalents in peptide and peptidomimetics synthesis.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Eriko; Yamada, Ai; Hozumi, Kentaro; Tomita, Kenji; Oishi, Shinya; Ohno, Hiroaki; Nomizu, Motoyoshi; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2011-05-01

    Amidine-type peptide bond isosteres were designed based on the substitution of the peptide bond carbonyl (C=O) group with an imino (C=NH) group. The positively-charged property of the isosteric part resembles a reduced amide-type peptidomimetic. The peptidyl amidine units were synthesized by the reduction of a key amidoxime (N-hydroxyamidine) precursor, which was prepared from nitrile oxide components as an aminoacyl or peptidyl equivalent. This nitrile oxide-mediated C-N bond formation was also used for peptide macrocyclization, in which the amidoxime group was converted to peptide bonds under mild acidic conditions. Syntheses of the cyclic RGD peptide and a peptidomimetic using both approaches, and their inhibitory activity against integrin-mediated cell attachment, are presented. PMID:21423919

  5. One-electron oxidation reactions of purine and pyrimidine bases in cellular DNA

    PubMed Central

    Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J. Richard; Shafirovich, Vladimir; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this survey is to critically review the available information on one-electron oxidation reactions of nucleobases in cellular DNA with emphasis on damage induced through the transient generation of purine and pyrimidine radical cations. Since the indirect effect of ionizing radiation mediated by hydroxyl radical is predominant in cells, efforts have been made to selectively ionize bases using suitable one-electron oxidants that consist among others of high intensity UVC laser pulses. Thus, the main oxidation product in cellular DNA was found to be 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine as a result of direct bi-photonic ionization of guanine bases and indirect formation of guanine radical cations through hole transfer reactions from other base radical cations. The formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine and other purine and pyrimidine degradation products was rationalized in terms of the initial generation of related radical cations followed by either hydration or deprotonation reactions in agreement with mechanistic pathways inferred from detailed mechanistic studies. The guanine radical cation has been shown to be implicated in three other nucleophilic additions that give rise to DNA-protein and DNA-DNA cross-links in model systems. Evidence was recently provided for the occurrence of these three reactions in cellular DNA. Conclusion There is growing evidence that one-electron oxidation reactions of nucleobases whose mechanisms have been characterized in model studies involving aqueous solutions take place in a similar way in cells. It may also be pointed out that the above cross-linked lesions are only produced from the guanine radical cation and may be considered as diagnostic products of the direct effect of ionizing radiation. PMID:24369822

  6. Formation of carriers in Ti-oxide thin films by substitution reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. S.; Lin, Y. H.; Wei, Y. S.; Liu, C. Y.

    2012-02-15

    Conductive Ti-oxide thin films are produced using a reactive sputtering and post-annealing process. The lowest resistivity of Ti-oxide thin films (2.30 x 10{sup -2}{Omega}-cm) can be achieved after annealing for 1 h at 400 deg. C in ambient O{sub 2}. Additionally, the Hall measurement results indicate that the carrier concentration increases during the initial 1-h annealing process before decreasing during subsequent annealing. By curve fitting the O{sub ls} core-level peaks in the x ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectrum of the annealed Ti-oxide thin films, we found that the oxygen (O) vacancy concentration monotonically increases with annealing time, which differs from the behavior of the carrier concentration regarding annealing time. This means that the O-vacancy mechanism alone cannot explain the formation of carriers in Ti-oxide thin films. By curve-fitting core-level Ti peaks in the XPS spectrum of annealed Ti-oxide thin films, a Ti{sup 3+}-to-Ti{sup 4+} substitution reaction in the TiO{sub 2} phase of the Ti-oxide thin film after annealing plays the dominant role in the formation of conduction carriers. Instead of the O-vacancy mechanism, the Ti{sup 3+}-to-Ti{sup 4+} substitution mechanism can explain the concentration of carriers in Ti-oxide thin films following annealing.

  7. Oxidative Degradation of Nadic-End-Capped Polyimides. 2; Evidence for Reactions Occurring at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher; Cavano, Paul J.; Frimer, Aryeh A.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidative degradation of PMR (for polymerization of monomeric reactants) polyimides at elevated temperatures was followed by cross-polarized magic angle spinning (Cp-MAS) NMR. C-13 labeling of selected sites in the polymers allowed for direct observation of the transformations arising from oxidation processes. As opposed to model compound studies, the reactions were followed directly in the polymer. The labeling experiments confirm the previously reported oxidation of the methylene carbon to ketone in the methylenedianiline portion of the polymer chain. They also show the formation of two other oxidized species, acid and ester, from this same carbon. In addition, the technique provides the first evidence of the kind of degradation reactions that are occurring in the nadic end caps. Several PMR formulations containing moieties determined to be present after oxidation, as suggested by the labeling study, were synthesized. Weight loss, FTIR, and natural abundance NMR of these derivatives were followed during aging. In this way, weight loss could be related to the observed transformations.

  8. Rate Equations and Kinetic Parameters of the Reactions Involved in Pyrite Oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Lizama, Hector M.; Suzuki, Isamu

    1989-01-01

    Rate equations and kinetic parameters were obtained for various reactions involved in the bacterial oxidation of pyrite. The rate constants were 3.5 ?M Fe2+ per min per FeS2 percent pulp density for the spontaneous pyrite dissolution, 10 ?M Fe2+ per min per mM Fe3+ for the indirect leaching with Fe3+, 90 ?M O2 per min per mg of wet cells per ml for the Thiobacillus ferrooxidans oxidation of washed pyrite, and 250 ?M O2 per min per mg of wet cells per ml for the T. ferrooxidans oxidation of unwashed pyrite. The Km values for pyrite concentration were similar and were 1.9, 2.5, and 2.75% pulp density for indirect leaching, washed pyrite oxidation by T. ferrooxidans, and unwashed pyrite oxidation by T. ferrooxidans, respectively. The last reaction was competitively inhibited by increasing concentrations of cells, with a Ki value of 0.13 mg of wet cells per ml. T. ferrooxidans cells also increased the rate of Fe2+ production from Fe3+ plus pyrite. PMID:16348054

  9. Aliphatic C-C Bond Cleavage of ?-Hydroxy Ketones by Non-Heme Iron(II) Complexes: Mechanistic Insight into the Reaction Catalyzed by 2,4'-Dihydroxyacetophenone Dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Rubina; Paria, Sayantan; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2015-11-16

    2,4'-Dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase (DAD) is a bacterial non-heme enzyme that carries out oxygenative aliphatic C-C bond cleavage of 2,4'-dihydroxyacetophenone (an ?-hydroxy ketone) with the incorporation of both the oxygen atoms of dioxygen into the cleavage products. The crystal structure of the iron enzyme DAD has recently been determined, but very little is known about the mechanism of the C-C bond cleavage reaction. With the objective of gaining insights into the mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by DAD, six new biomimetic iron(II)-?-hydroxy ketone complexes, [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(PHAP)] (1), [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(HCH)] (2), [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(HBME)] (3), [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(CHPE)] (4), [(6-Me3-TPA)Fe(II)(PHAP)](+) (5), and [(6-Me3-TPA)Fe(II)(HCH)](+) (6) (Tp(Ph2) = hydrotris(3,5-diphenylpyrazol-1-yl)borate, 6-Me3-TPA = tris(6-methyl-2-pyridylmethyl)amine, PHAP-H = 2-phenyl-2-hydroxyacetophenone, HCH-H = 2-hydroxycyclohexanone, HBME-H = 2-hydroxy-1,2-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)ethanone, and CHPE-H = 1-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxy-2-phenylethanone), have been isolated and characterized. The single-crystal X-ray structure of 2 shows a five-coordinate iron(II) complex with one tridentate facial ligand and a monoanionic bidentate ?-hydroxy ketone, resulting in a distorted-square-pyramidal coordination geometry at the iron center. The iron(II) complexes react with dioxygen to oxidatively cleave the aliphatic C-C bonds of the coordinated ?-hydroxy ketones to afford 2 equiv of carboxylic acids. Mechanistic studies reveal that the C-C bond cleavage reaction proceeds through an intradiol pathway. Additionally, the coordinated ?-hydroxy ketones in all of the complexes, except in complex 4, undergo two-electron oxidation to form the corresponding 1,2-diketones. However, the yields of 1,2-diketones are higher with the iron complexes of the tripodal N4 ligand (6-Me3-TPA) in comparison to the facial N3 ligand (Tp(Ph2)). These results strongly support the natural selection of a facial N3 environment at the active site of the iron enzyme DAD. PMID:26536067

  10. Fabrication and characterization of sub-100/10?nm planar nanofluidic channels by triple thermal oxidation and silicon-glass anodic bonding

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Wei; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We reported the fabrication and characterization of nanofluidic channels by Triple Thermal Oxidation and Silicon-Glass Anodic Bonding. Planar nanochannels with depths from sub-100?nm down to sub-10?nm were realized by this method. A theoretical model was developed to precisely predict the depth of nanochannels. The depth and uniformity of nanochannels showed good stability during anodic bonding. This method is promising for various nanofluidic studies, such as nanofluidic electrokinetics, biomolecule manipulation, and energy conversion. PMID:25538802

  11. Plasmon-enhanced reverse water gas shift reaction over oxide supported Au catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, AA; Ro, I; Zeng, X; Kim, HJ; Tejedor, I; Anderson, MA; Dumesic, JA; Huber, GW

    2015-01-01

    We show that localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) can enhance the catalytic activities of different oxide-supported Au catalysts for the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. Oxide-supported Au catalysts showed 30 to 1300% higher activity for RWGS under visible light compared to dark conditions. Au/TiO2 catalyst prepared by the deposition-precipitation (DP) method with 3.5 nm average Au particle size showed the highest activity for the RWGS reaction. Visible light is converted into chemical energy for this reaction with up to a 5% overall efficiency. A shift in the apparent activation energy (from 47 kJ mol(-1) in dark to 35 kJ mol(-1) in light) and apparent reaction order with respect to CO2 (from 0.5 in dark to 1.0 in light) occurs due to the LSPR. Our kinetic results indicate that the LSPR increases the rate of either the hydroxyl hydrogenation or carboxyl decomposition more than any other steps in the reaction network.

  12. Photocatalytic benzylic C-H bond oxidation with a flavin scandium complex.

    PubMed

    Mühldorf, Bernd; Wolf, Robert

    2015-05-18

    The enhanced reduction potential of riboflavin tetraacetate coordinating to scandium triflate enables the challenging photocatalytic C-H oxidation of electron-deficient alkylbenzenes and benzyl alcohols. PMID:25647055

  13. Effect of SLP properties of vanadium SO/sub 2/ oxidation on reaction mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, K.C.; Nobile, A. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The SLP properties of a K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ catalysts during SO/sub 2/ oxidation and the intrinsic kinetics of the reaction on the SLPC were investigated and measured. The reason for the sudden drop in activation energy in the temperature range 440-470/sup 0/C is explained from the results of an investigation of the thermal and electrical behavior of the catalyst, and the distribution of active melt components. A reaction mechanism and rate equation consistent with the results are proposed and developed.

  14. Calculation of electronic structure at bonding interface between vanadium and oxide ceramics for insulator coating applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, M.; Komatsu, N.; Sawada, T.; Abe, K.

    2004-08-01

    Fundamental understanding of metal and ceramics bonding will provide useful guideline to develop a robust coating material for fusion reactor application. We have studied the bonding interface using the model that had three layers of CaO slab adhered to both sides of three layers of V slabs by means of the electronic structure calculation. The simple interface model of vanadium and CaO facing each other at the (0 0 1) plane was employed. Total energy and adhesive energy were evaluated. We found that the relation of adhesive energy and separation distance of the interface is described well by the Rydberg function. The ideal strength of the interface was calculated to be 6.4 GPa. It is proposed that these methods could be applied to systematic development of robust coating materials for fusion applications.

  15. Layer-by-layer motif hybridization: nanoporous nickel oxide flakes wrapped into graphene oxide sheets toward enhanced oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Mohamed B; Malgras, Victor; Takei, Toshiaki; Li, Cuiling; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2015-11-01

    Herein we report a novel strategy involving the hybridization of nanoporous NiO flakes with graphene oxide (GO) sheets. The as-prepared flake-like nickel cyano-bridged coordination polymers (NiCNNi) are hybridized with GO sheets and thermally treated in air, so the organic materials can be removed without affecting the integrity of the parent GO sheets. Thus, the layer-by-layer construction followed by a thermal treatment can produce a new hybrid nanoporous material consisting of NiO and GO. The obtained hybrid material exhibits an efficient catalytic activity and stability for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). PMID:26411422

  16. Variation of the oxidation state of verdoheme in the heme oxygenase reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gohya, Tomohiko; Sato, Michihiko; Zhang Xuhong; Migita, Catharina T.

    2008-11-14

    Heme oxygenase (HO) converts hemin to biliverdin, CO, and iron applying molecular oxygen and electrons. During successive HO reactions, two intermediates, {alpha}-hydroxyhemin and verdoheme, have been generated. Here, oxidation state of the verdoheme-HO complexes is controversial. To clarify this, the heme conversion by soybean and rat HO isoform-1 (GmHO-1 and rHO-1, respectively) was compared both under physiological conditions, with oxygen and NADPH coupled with ferredoxin reductase/ferredoxin for GmHO-1 or with cytochrome P450 reductase for rHO-1, and under a non-physiological condition with hydrogen peroxide. EPR measurements on the hemin-GmHO-1 reaction with oxygen detected a low-spin ferric intermediate, which was undetectable in the rHO-1 reaction, suggesting the verdoheme in the six-coordinate ferric state in GmHO-1. Optical absorption measurements on this reaction indicated that the heme degradation was extremely retarded at verdoheme though this reaction was not inhibited under high-CO concentrations, unlike the rHO-1 reaction. On the contrary, the Gm and rHO-1 reactions with hydrogen peroxide both provided ferric low-spin intermediates though their yields were different. The optical absorption spectra suggested that the ferric and ferrous verdoheme coexisted in reaction mixtures and were slowly converted to the ferric biliverdin complex. Consequently, in the physiological oxygen reactions, the verdoheme is found to be stabilized in the ferric state in GmHO-1 probably guided by protein distal residues and in the ferrous state in rHO-1, whereas in the hydrogen peroxide reactions, hydrogen peroxide or hydroxide coordination stabilizes the ferric state of verdoheme in both HOs.

  17. Densification of Reaction Bonded Silicon Nitride with the Addition of Fine Si Powder Effects on the Sinterability and Mechanical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sea-Hoon; Cho, Chun-Rae; Park, Young-Jo; Ko, Jae-Woong; Kim, Hai-Doo; Lin, Hua-Tay; Becher, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    The densification behavior and strength of sintered reaction bonded silicon nitrides (SRBSN) that contain Lu2O3-SiO2 additives were improved by the addition of fine Si powder. Dense specimens (relative density: 99.5%) were obtained by gas-pressure sintering (GPS) at 1850oC through the addition of fine Si. In contrast, the densification of conventional specimens did not complete at 1950oC. The fine Si decreased the onset temperature of shrinkage and increased the shrinkage rate because the additive helped the compaction of green bodies and induced the formation of fine Si3N4 particles after nitridation and sintering at and above 1600oC. The amount of residual SiO2 within the specimens was not strongly affected by adding fine Si powder because most of the SiO2 layer that had formed on the fine Si particles decomposed during nitridation. The maximum strength and fracture toughness of the specimens were 991 MPa and 8.0 MPa m1/2, respectively.

  18. Healing of the Interface Between Splashed Particles and Underlying Bulk Coating and Its Influence on Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of LPPS MCrAlY Bond Coat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bang-Yan; Shi, Jing; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2015-04-01

    The thermally grown oxide formed on the bond coat surface plays an important role in determining the lifetime of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). The splashed particles on the thermally sprayed MCrAlY bond coat surface are weakly bonded to the underlying bulk coating, leading to the formation of mixed oxides and contributing to the TBC failure. In this study, the healing behavior of the weakly bonded interface between splashed particles and underlying MCrAlY bulk coating deposited by low pressure plasma spraying was examined, and the influence of interface healing on the isothermal oxidation behavior of the bond coat was discussed. Results show that the granular particles resulting from splashing of molten droplets were exposed on smooth splats which make up the surface of bulk coating. After the pre-diffusion treatment in vacuum, the small granular splashed particles are immersed into the bulk coating resulting from the element diffusion on the interface between splashed particles and underlying bulk coating. After the vacuum heat treatment, the formation of mixed oxides was effectively restrained due to the healing of the splashed particle/underlying bulk coating interface.

  19. Effect of temperature towards lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in krill oil upon storage.

    PubMed

    Lu, F S H; Bruheim, I; Haugsgjerd, B O; Jacobsen, C

    2014-08-15

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature towards lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in krill oil upon storage. Krill oil was incubated at two different temperatures (20 and 40 °C) for 28 or 42 days. The oxidative stability of krill oil was assessed by peroxide value and anisidine value, measurement of lipid derived volatiles, lipid classes and antioxidants. The non-enzymatic browning reactions were assessed through the measurement of pyrroles, free amino acids content and Strecker-derived volatiles. The increase of incubation temperature firstly increased the lipid oxidation in krill oil and subsequently the non-enzymatic browning reactions. The occurrence of these reactions was most likely due to the reaction between ?-dicarbonyl or carbonyl compounds with amino acids or ammonia. In addition to tocopherol and astaxanthin esters, the formation of pyrroles might help to protect the krill oil against lipid oxidation. PMID:24679797

  20. 2-Aminopyridines via Reaction of Pyridine N-Oxides and Activated Isocyanides

    PubMed Central

    Vamos, Mitchell; Cosford, Nicholas D. P.

    2015-01-01

    A practical and efficient method for the synthesis of substituted 2-aminopyridines from pyridine N-oxides is reported. Yields of purified, isolated products of up to 84% are observed for the one-pot, two-step process. The reaction involves an in situ deprotection of an isolable N-formylaminopyridine intermediate and facilitates the synthesis of 2-aminopyridines for which other methods fail. PMID:24490824

  1. Oxidation of elemental mercury by chlorine: Gas phase, Surface,and Photo-induced reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Nai-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Heng; Chang, Shih-Ger

    2004-10-22

    Accurate oxidation rate constants of mercury gas are needed for determining its dispersion and lifetime in the atmosphere. They would also help in developing a technology for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. However, it is difficult to establish the accurate rate constants primarily due to the fact that mercury easily adsorbs on solid surface and its reactions can be catalyzed by the surface. We have demonstrated a procedure that allows the determination of gas phase, surface-induced, and photo-induced contributions in the kinetic study of the oxidation of mercury by chlorine gas. The kinetics was studied using reactors with various surface to volume ratios. The effect of the surface and the photo irradiation on the reaction was taken into consideration. The pressure dependent study revealed that the gas phase oxidation was a three-body collision process. The third order rate constant was determined to be 7.5({+-}0.2) x 10{sup -39} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -2}s{sup -1} with N{sub 2} as the third body at 297 {+-} 1 K. The surface induced reaction on quartz window was second order and the rate constant was 2.7 x 10{sup -17} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -1} cm{sup -2} sec. Meanwhile, the 253.7 nm photon employed for mercury detection was found to accelerate the reaction. The utilization efficiency of 253.7 nm photon for Hg{sup 0} oxidation was 6.7 x 10{sup -4} molecules photon{sup -1} under the conditions employed in this study.

  2. Room Temperature Solid State Reaction Involving Structural Transformation of Covalent Oxide Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eda, Kazuo; Fukiharu, Satoshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Sotani, Noriyuki

    2002-02-01

    An interesting structural transformation from a two dimensional (2d) covalent oxide network with a layered structure to a three-dimensional (3d) network with a tunnel structure was found at room temperature in the mixture of hydrated alkali-metal molybdenum bronze and amorphous alkali-metal molybdate. From various experimental results it was concluded that the transformation was due to a room temperature solid state reaction.

  3. How fast is the reaction of hydrated electrons with graphene oxide in aqueous dispersions?

    PubMed

    Kahnt, Axel; Flyunt, Roman; Laube, Christian; Knolle, Wolfgang; Eigler, Siegfried; Hermann, Ralf; Naumov, Sergej; Abel, Bernd

    2015-11-19

    Understanding the mechanism of the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) is a key-question in graphene related materials science. Here, we investigate the kinetics of the reaction of radiolytically generated hydrated electrons with GO in water. The electron transfer proceeds on the ns time scale and not on the ps time scale, as recently reported by Gengler et al. (Nat. Commun., 2013, 4, 2560). PMID:26552902

  4. Activity and stability of the oxygen evolution reaction on electrodeposited Ru and its thermal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Yeong; Choi, Jihui; Kim, Ho Young; Hwang, Eunkyoung; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Ahn, Sang Hyun; Kim, Soo-Kil

    2015-12-01

    The activity and stability of Ru metal and its thermal oxide films for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) were investigated. The metallic Ru films were prepared by electrodeposition on a Ti substrate and then thermally oxidized at various temperatures under atmospheric conditions. During long-term operation of the OER with cyclic voltammetry (CV) in H2SO4 electrolyte, changes in the properties of the Ru and its thermal oxides were monitored in terms of their morphology, crystal structure, and electronic structure. In the initial stages of the OER, all of the Ru thermal oxide films underwent an activation process that was related to the continuous removal of low-activity Ru oxides from the surface. With further cycling, the OER activity decreased. The rate of decrease was different for each Ru film and was related to the annealing temperatures. Monitoring of material properties indicates that the amount of stable anhydrous RuO2 is important for OER stability because it prevents both the severe dissolution of metallic Ru beneath the oxide surface and the formation of a less active hydrous RuO2 at the surface.

  5. Near-infrared light controlled photocatalytic activity of carbon quantum dots for highly selective oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haitao; Liu, Ruihua; Lian, Suoyuan; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hui; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-03-01

    Selective oxidation of alcohols is a fundamental and significant transformation for the large-scale production of fine chemicals, UV and visible light driven photocatalytic systems for alcohol oxidation have been developed, however, the long wavelength near infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) light have not yet fully utilized by the present photocatalytic systems. Herein, we reported carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can function as an effective near infrared (NIR) light driven photocatalyst for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Based on the NIR light driven photo-induced electron transfer property and its photocatalytic activity for H2O2 decomposition, this metal-free catalyst could realize the transformation from benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with high selectivity (100%) and conversion (92%) under NIR light irradiation. HO&z.rad; is the main active oxygen specie in benzyl alcohol selective oxidative reaction confirmed by terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing assay (TA-PL), selecting toluene as the substrate. Such metal-free photocatalytic system also selectively converts other alcohol substrates to their corresponding aldehydes with high conversion, demonstrating a potential application of accessing traditional alcohol oxidation chemistry.Selective oxidation of alcohols is a fundamental and significant transformation for the large-scale production of fine chemicals, UV and visible light driven photocatalytic systems for alcohol oxidation have been developed, however, the long wavelength near infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) light have not yet fully utilized by the present photocatalytic systems. Herein, we reported carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can function as an effective near infrared (NIR) light driven photocatalyst for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Based on the NIR light driven photo-induced electron transfer property and its photocatalytic activity for H2O2 decomposition, this metal-free catalyst could realize the transformation from benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with high selectivity (100%) and conversion (92%) under NIR light irradiation. HO&z.rad; is the main active oxygen specie in benzyl alcohol selective oxidative reaction confirmed by terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing assay (TA-PL), selecting toluene as the substrate. Such metal-free photocatalytic system also selectively converts other alcohol substrates to their corresponding aldehydes with high conversion, demonstrating a potential application of accessing traditional alcohol oxidation chemistry. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00092c

  6. Stable platinum nanoclusters on genomic DNA–graphene oxide with a high oxygen reduction reaction activity

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Jitendra N.; Nath, Krishna; Kumar, Susheel; Tiwari, Rajanish N.; Kemp, K. Christian; Le, Nhien H.; Youn, Duck Hyun; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Kwang S.

    2013-01-01

    Nanosize platinum clusters with small diameters of 2–4?nm are known to be excellent catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. The inherent catalytic activity of smaller platinum clusters has not yet been reported due to a lack of preparation methods to control their size (<2?nm). Here we report the synthesis of platinum clusters (diameter ?1.4?nm) deposited on genomic double-stranded DNA–graphene oxide composites, and their high-performance electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction. The electrochemical behaviour, characterized by oxygen reduction reaction onset potential, half-wave potential, specific activity, mass activity, accelerated durability test (10,000 cycles) and cyclic voltammetry stability (10,000 cycles) is attributed to the strong interaction between the nanosize platinum clusters and the DNA–graphene oxide composite, which induces modulation in the electronic structure of the platinum clusters. Furthermore, we show that the platinum cluster/DNA–graphene oxide composite possesses notable environmental durability and stability, vital for high-performance fuel cells and batteries. PMID:23900456

  7. Stable platinum nanoclusters on genomic DNA-graphene oxide with a high oxygen reduction reaction activity.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Jitendra N; Nath, Krishna; Kumar, Susheel; Tiwari, Rajanish N; Kemp, K Christian; Le, Nhien H; Youn, Duck Hyun; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Kwang S

    2013-01-01

    Nanosize platinum clusters with small diameters of 2-4?nm are known to be excellent catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. The inherent catalytic activity of smaller platinum clusters has not yet been reported due to a lack of preparation methods to control their size (<2?nm). Here we report the synthesis of platinum clusters (diameter ?1.4?nm) deposited on genomic double-stranded DNA-graphene oxide composites, and their high-performance electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction. The electrochemical behaviour, characterized by oxygen reduction reaction onset potential, half-wave potential, specific activity, mass activity, accelerated durability test (10,000 cycles) and cyclic voltammetry stability (10,000 cycles) is attributed to the strong interaction between the nanosize platinum clusters and the DNA-graphene oxide composite, which induces modulation in the electronic structure of the platinum clusters. Furthermore, we show that the platinum cluster/DNA-graphene oxide composite possesses notable environmental durability and stability, vital for high-performance fuel cells and batteries. PMID:23900456

  8. C and Cl isotope fractionation of 1,2-dichloroethane displays unique ?¹³C/?³?Cl patterns for pathway identification and reveals surprising C-Cl bond involvement in microbial oxidation.

    PubMed

    Palau, Jordi; Cretnik, Stefan; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Höche, Martina; Elsner, Martin; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2014-08-19

    This study investigates dual element isotope fractionation during aerobic biodegradation of 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) via oxidative cleavage of a C-H bond (Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1) versus C-Cl bond cleavage by S(N)2 reaction (Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 and Ancylobacter aquaticus AD20). Compound-specific chlorine isotope analysis of 1,2-DCA was performed for the first time, and isotope fractionation (?(bulk)(Cl)) was determined by measurements of the same samples in three different laboratories using two gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry systems and one gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry system. Strongly pathway-dependent slopes (??13C/??37Cl), 0.78 ± 0.03 (oxidation) and 7.7 ± 0.2 (S(N)2), delineate the potential of the dual isotope approach to identify 1,2-DCA degradation pathways in the field. In contrast to different ?(bulk)(C) values [-3.5 ± 0.1‰ (oxidation) and -31.9 ± 0.7 and -32.0 ± 0.9‰ (S(N)2)], the obtained ?(bulk)(Cl) values were surprisingly similar for the two pathways: -3.8 ± 0.2‰ (oxidation) and -4.2 ± 0.1 and -4.4 ± 0.2‰ (S(N)2). Apparent kinetic isotope effects (AKIEs) of 1.0070 ± 0.0002 (13C-AKIE, oxidation), 1.068 ± 0.001 (13C-AKIE, S(N)2), and 1.0087 ± 0.0002 (37Cl-AKIE, S(N)2) fell within expected ranges. In contrast, an unexpectedly large secondary 37Cl-AKIE of 1.0038 ± 0.0002 reveals a hitherto unrecognized involvement of C-Cl bonds in microbial C-H bond oxidation. Our two-dimensional isotope fractionation patterns allow for the first time reliable 1,2-DCA degradation pathway identification in the field, which unlocks the full potential of isotope applications for this important groundwater contaminant. PMID:25010210

  9. Insight into the Mechanism of Graphene Oxide Degradation via the Photo-Fenton Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Graphene represents an attractive two-dimensional carbon-based nanomaterial that holds great promise for applications such as electronics, batteries, sensors, and composite materials. Recent work has demonstrated that carbon-based nanomaterials are degradable/biodegradable, but little work has been expended to identify products formed during the degradation process. As these products may have toxicological implications that could leach into the environment or the human body, insight into the mechanism and structural elucidation remain important as carbon-based nanomaterials become commercialized. We provide insight into a potential mechanism of graphene oxide degradation via the photo-Fenton reaction. We have determined that after 1 day of treatment intermediate oxidation products (with MW 150–1000 Da) were generated. Upon longer reaction times (i.e., days 2 and 3), these products were no longer present in high abundance, and the system was dominated by graphene quantum dots (GQDs). On the basis of FTIR, MS, and NMR data, potential structures for these oxidation products, which consist of oxidized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, are proposed. PMID:24860637

  10. Mechanisms of. pi. -bond oxidation by cytochrome p-450: acetylenes as probes

    SciTech Connect

    Komives, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    Phenylacetylene and biphenylacetylene are oxidized by microsomal and purified P-450 to the corresponding arylacetic acids. During this transformation, the acetylenic hydrogen undergoes a 1,2 shift which causes a kinetic isotope effect of 1.8 on the overall enzymatic rate. The same products and kinetic isotope effects are observed when the arylacetylenes are oxidized by m-chloroperbenzoic acid. Suicide inactivation of P-450 by the arylacetylenes, which occurs simultaneously with metabolite formation, is insensitive to isotopic substitution so the partition ratio changes from 26 for phenylacetylene of 14 for (1-/sup 2/H) phenylacetylene.

  11. Enhanced methanol electro-oxidation reaction on Pt-CoOx/MWCNTs hybrid electro-catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouralishahi, Amideddin; Rashidi, Ali Morad; Mortazavi, Yadollah; Khodadadi, Abbas Ali; Choolaei, Mohammadmehdi

    2015-04-01

    The electro-catalytic behavior of Pt-CoOx/MWCNTs in methanol electro-oxidation reaction (MOR) is investigated and compared to that of Pt/MWCNTs. The electro-catalysts were synthesized by an impregnation method using NaBH4 as the reducing agent. The morphological and physical characteristics of samples are examined by XRD, TEM, ICP and EDS techniques. In the presence of CoOx, Pt nanoparticles were highly distributed on the support with an average particle size of 2 nm, an obvious decrease from 5.1 nm for Pt/MWCNTs. Cyclic voltammetry, CO-stripping, Chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements are used to study the electrochemical behavior of the electro-catalysts. The results revealed a considerable enhancement in the oxidation kinetics of COads on Pt active sites by the participation of CoOx. Compared to Pt/MWCNTs, Pt-CoOx/MWCNTs sample has a larger electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) and higher electro-catalytic activity and stability toward methanol electro-oxidation. According to the results of cyclic voltammetry, the forward anodic peak current density enhances more than 89% at the optimum atomic ratio of Pt:Co = 2:1. Furthermore, inclusion of cobalt oxide species causes the onset potential of methanol electro-oxidation reaction to shift 84 mV to negative values compared to that on Pt/MWCNTs. Based on EIS data, dehydrogenation of methanol is the rate-determining step of MOR on both Pt/MWCNTs and Pt-CoOx/MWCNTs, at small overpotentials. However, at higher overpotentials, the oxidation of adsorbed oxygen-containing groups controls the total rate of MOR process.

  12. Efficient automatic screening for Li ion conductive inorganic oxides with bond valence pathway models and percolation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Masanobu; Kimura, Mayumi; Jalem, Randy; Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Fast ion conductive solid oxide electrolytes are urgently needed because of the development of batteries, fuel cells, and sensors. Ab initio density functional theory can predict ionic conductivities with high accuracy, although it often requires large computational resources and time. In this paper, we use empirical bond valence relations [Adams et al., Phys. Status Solidi A 208, 1746 (2011)] and a percolation algorithm for fast, efficient, fully automated evaluation of migration energies for Li ion conduction in 14 olivine-type LiMXO4 compounds. The results showed a high correlation coefficient with the ab initio density functional theory (DFT) approach, indicating that our method could be attractive for identifying fast ion conductors in databases of numerous candidates.

  13. Citric Acid-Modified Fenton's Reaction for the Oxidation of Chlorinated Ethylenes in Soil Solution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-03-15

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in-situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} relative to iron catalysts (Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} < 1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelations in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  14. Geometric stability and reaction activity of Pt clusters adsorbed graphene substrates for catalytic CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanan; Lu, Zhansheng; Chen, Weiguang; Li, Wei; Dai, Xianqi

    2015-05-01

    The geometric stabilities, electronic structures and catalytic properties of tetrahedral Pt4 clusters anchored on graphene substrates are investigated using the first-principles methods. It is found that the small Pt4 clusters adsorbed on pristine graphene substrates easily interconvert between structural isomers by the small energy barriers, while the structural interconversion of Pt4 clusters on the defective graphene and oxygen-doped graphene (O-graphene) have the large energy barriers. Compared to other graphene substrates, the Pt4 clusters supported on the O-graphene substrate (Pt4/O-graphene) have the least geometrical distortion and the high symmetry of the Pt4 cluster can enhance the sensitivity of reactive gases. Moreover, the sequential reactions of CO oxidation on Pt4/O-graphene are investigated for comparison. Compared with the coadsorption reaction of CO and O2 molecules, the dissociative adsorption of O2 as a starting step has a small energy barrier (0.07 eV) and is followed through the Eley-Rideal reaction with an energy barrier of 0.42 eV (CO + Oads ? CO2). The results provide valuable guidance for fabricating graphene-based catalysts as anode materials, and explore the microscopic mechanism of the CO oxidation reaction on atomic-scale catalysts. PMID:25865213

  15. Which one is faster? A kinetic investigation of Pd and Ni catalyzed Negishi-type oxidative coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Xin, Jie; Zhang, Guanghui; Deng, Yi; Zhang, Heng; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-11-18

    The difference between Pd and Ni has been investigated based on the Negishi-type oxidative coupling reactions in which reductive elimination was proved to be the rate determining step. Although DFT calculations illustrate that the Pd catalyzed reaction should be faster than the Ni catalyzed reaction under these conditions, kinetic experiments indicate that the reaction rate of Pd and Ni is dependent on the concentration of the catalyst precursor. The Pd catalyzed reaction is faster than the Ni catalyzed reaction only when the precursor concentration is as low as 1 × 10(-7) M. PMID:26536236

  16. Onset conditions for gas phase reaction and nucleation in the CVD of transition metal oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J.; Rosner, D. E.; Castillo, J.

    1992-01-01

    A combined experimental/theoretical study is presented of the onset conditions for gas phase reaction and particle nucleation in hot substrate/cold gas CVD of transition metal oxides. Homogeneous reaction onset conditions are predicted using a simple high activation energy reacting gas film theory. Experimental tests of the basic theory are underway using an axisymmetric impinging jet CVD reactor. No vapor phase ignition has yet been observed in the TiCl4/O2 system under accessible operating conditions (below substrate temperature Tw = 1700 K). The goal of this research is to provide CVD reactor design and operation guidelines for achieving acceptable deposit microstructures at the maximum deposition rate while simultaneously avoiding homogeneous reaction/nucleation and diffusional limitations.

  17. A matrix-isolation-infrared spectroscopic study of the reactions of nitric oxide with oxygen and ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, S. C.; Hall, J. H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation of the oxidation of NO to NO2 by trapping the products of the gas-phase reactions with excess oxygen and ozone identified the transient species by their infrared spectra. The primary products of the NO + NO2 reactions were NO2, N2O3(A), N2O3(B), N2O4, and peroxy nitrate (OONO). The primary products of the NO + O3 reactions were NO2 and peroxy NO3 with the higher nitric oxides in low concentrations compared with the NO + O2 reactions. Isotopic oxygen and ozone were used to identify the infrared absorption frequency of the peroxy nitrate.

  18. Copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidation and cleavage/formation of C-S bond: a novel synthesis of aryl methyl sulfones from aryl halides and DMSO.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Gaoqing; Zheng, Junhua; Gao, Xiaofang; Li, Xianwei; Huang, Liangbin; Chen, Huoji; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2012-08-01

    With atmospheric oxygen as the oxidant, a novel copper(I)-catalyzed synthesis of aryl methyl sulfones from aryl halides and widely available DMSO is described. The procedure tolerates aryl halides with various functional groups (such as methoxy, acetyl, chloro, fluoro and nitro groups), which could afford aryl methyl sulfones in moderate to high yields. The copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidation and the cleavage/formation of C-S bond are the key steps for this transformation. PMID:22728918

  19. One pot oxidative N-S bond formation to access 2-sulfenylimine chromenes.

    PubMed

    Kale, Ashok; Chennapuram, Madhu; Bingi, Chiranjeevi; Nanubolu, Jagadeesh Babu; Atmakur, Krishnaiah

    2015-12-23

    The synthesis of 2-sulfenylimine chromene compounds () is accomplished by reacting benzaldehyde (), malanonitrile () and dimedone () followed by sequential addition of N-chlorosuccinimide and thiophenols to the in situ formed 2-amino-4(H) chromenes () in a one pot, catalyst free, five component reaction in toluene medium. When aniline was employed as the nucleophile in place of thiophenol, the formation of hexahydrobenzofuran-2-N-phenyl carboxamide derivatives () was observed. Excellent yields, simple reaction conditions and high compatibility are the advantages of this protocol. PMID:26530831

  20. Synthesis and Oxidation Behavior of Platinum-Enriched ?+?' Bond Coatings on Ni-Based Superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying; Ballard, D A; Stacy, J P; Pint, Bruce A; Haynes, James A

    2006-01-01

    Simple Pt-enriched {gamma}+{gamma}{prime} coatings were synthesized on Rene 142 and Rene N5 Ni-based superalloys by electroplating a thin layer of Pt followed by a diffusion treatment at 1150-1175 C. The Al content in the resulting {gamma}+{gamma}{prime} coating was in the range of 16-19 at.% on superalloys with 13-14 at.% Al. After oxidation testing, alumina scale adherence to these {gamma}+{gamma}{prime} coatings was not as uniform as to the {beta}-(Ni,Pt)Al coatings on the same superalloy substrates. To better understand the effect of Al, Pt and Hf concentrations on coating oxidation resistance, a number of Ni-Pt-Al cast alloys with {gamma}+{gamma}{prime} or {beta} phase were cyclically oxidized at 1100 C. The Hf-containing {gamma}+{gamma}{prime} alloys with 22 at.% Al and 10-30 at.% Pt exhibited similar oxidation resistance to the {beta} alloys with 50 at.% Al. An initial effort was made to increase the Al content in the Pt-enriched {gamma}+{gamma}{prime} coatings by introducing a short-term aluminizing process via chemical vapor deposition or pack cementation. However, too much Al was deposited, leading to the formation of {beta} or martensitic phase on the coating surface.

  1. Reactions of methyl groups on a non-reducible metal oxide: The reaction of iodomethane on stoichiometric ?-Cr2O3(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yujung; Brooks, John D.; Chen, Tsung-Liang; Mullins, David R.; Cox, David F.

    2015-11-01

    The reaction of iodomethane on the nearly stoichiometric ?-Cr2O3(0001) surface produces gas phase ethylene, methane, and surface iodine adatoms. The reaction is initiated by the dissociation of iodomethane into surface methyl fragments, - CH3, and iodine adatoms. Methyl fragments bound at surface Cr cation sites undergo a rate-limiting dehydrogenation reaction to methylene, = CH2. The methylene intermediates formed from methyl dehydrogenation can undergo coupling reactions to produce ethylene via two principle reaction pathways: (1) direct coupling of methylene and (2) methylene insertion into the methyl surface bond to form surface ethyl groups which undergo ?-H elimination to produce ethylene. The liberated hydrogen also combines with methyl groups to form methane. Iodine adatoms from the dissociation of iodomethane deactivate the surface by simple site blocking of the surface Cr3 + cations.

  2. Reactions of methyl groups on a non-reducible metal oxide: The reaction of iodomethane on stoichiometric ?-Cr2O3(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yujung; Brooks, John D.; Chen, Tsung-Liang; Mullins, David R.; Cox, David F.

    2015-06-10

    The reaction of iodomethane on the nearly stoichiometric ?-Cr2O3(0001) surface produces gas phase ethylene, methane, and surface iodine adatoms. The reaction is first initiated by the dissociation of iodomethane into surface methyl fragments, -CH3, and iodine adatoms. Methyl fragments bound at surface Cr cation sites undergo a rate-limiting dehydrogenation reaction to methylene, =CH2. The methylene intermediates formed from methyl dehydrogenation can then undergo coupling reactions to produce ethylene via two principle reaction pathways: (1) direct coupling of methylene and (2) methylene insertion into the methyl surface bond to form surface ethyl groups which undergo ?-H elimination to produce ethylene. The liberated hydrogen also combines with methyl groups to form methane. Iodine adatoms from the dissociation of iodomethane deactivate the surface by simple site blocking of the surface Cr3+ cations.

  3. Reactions of methyl groups on a non-reducible metal oxide: The reaction of iodomethane on stoichiometric ?-Cr2O3(0001)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dong, Yujung; Brooks, John D.; Chen, Tsung-Liang; Mullins, David R.; Cox, David F.

    2015-06-10

    The reaction of iodomethane on the nearly stoichiometric ?-Cr2O3(0001) surface produces gas phase ethylene, methane, and surface iodine adatoms. The reaction is first initiated by the dissociation of iodomethane into surface methyl fragments, -CH3, and iodine adatoms. Methyl fragments bound at surface Cr cation sites undergo a rate-limiting dehydrogenation reaction to methylene, =CH2. The methylene intermediates formed from methyl dehydrogenation can then undergo coupling reactions to produce ethylene via two principle reaction pathways: (1) direct coupling of methylene and (2) methylene insertion into the methyl surface bond to form surface ethyl groups which undergo ?-H elimination to produce ethylene. Themore »liberated hydrogen also combines with methyl groups to form methane. Iodine adatoms from the dissociation of iodomethane deactivate the surface by simple site blocking of the surface Cr3+ cations.« less

  4. High level of oxidized nucleosides in thyroid mitochondrial DNA; damaging effects of Fenton reaction substrates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lies in close proximity to the free radical-producing electron transport chain, thus, it is highly prone to oxidative damage. Oxyphilic type of follicular thyroid carcinoma consists of cells filled – almost exclusively – with aberrant mitochondria. In turn, bivalent iron (Fe2+) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are indispensable for thyroid hormone synthesis, therefore being available in physiological conditions presumably at high concentrations. They participate in Fenton reaction (Fe2++H2O2?Fe3++·OH?+?OH-), resulting in the formation of the most harmful free radical – hydroxyl radical (·OH). The same substrates may be used to experimentally induce oxidative damage to macromolecules. The aim of the study was to evaluate the background level of oxidative damage to mtDNA and the damaging effects of Fenton reaction substrates. Methods Thyroid mtDNA was incubated in the presence of either H2O2 [100, 10, 1.0, 0.5, 0.1, 0.001, 0.00001 mM] or FeSO4 (Fe2+) [300, 150, 30, 15, 3.0, 1.5 ?M], or in the presence of those two factors used together, namely, in the presence of Fe2+ [30 ?M] plus H2O2 [100, 10, 1.0, 0.5, 0.1, 0.001, 0.00001 mM], or in the presence of H2O2 [0.5 mM] plus Fe2+ [300, 150, 30, 15, 3.0, 1.5 ?M]. 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) concentration, as the index of DNA damage, was measured by HPLC. Results Both Fenton reaction substrates, used separately, increased 8-oxodG level for the highest H2O2 concentration of 100 mM and in Fe2+ concentration-dependent manner [300, 150, and 30 ?M]. When Fe2+ and H2O2 were applied together, Fe2+ enhanced H2O2 damaging effect to a higher degree than did H2O2 on Fe2+ effect. Conclusions The level of oxidized nucleosides in thyroid mtDNA is relatively high, when compared to nuclear DNA. Both substrates of Fenton reaction, i.e. ferrous ion and hydrogen peroxide, increase oxidative damage to mtDNA, with stronger damaging effect exerted by iron. High level of oxidative damage to mtDNA suggests its possible contribution to malignant transformation of thyroid oncocytic cells, which are known to be especially abundant in mitochondria, the latter characterized by molecular and enzymatic abnormalities. PMID:23267669

  5. The Many Paths of Hypervalent Iodine Reactions

    E-print Network

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    The Many Paths of Hypervalent Iodine Reactions Ryan McFadden Stoltz Literature Group Meeting June! In Outline I. What is Hypervalency? A. The Martin-Arduengo Notation B. Bonding in Hypervalent Iodine Compounds C. A Brief History of IBX and DMP II. Oxidation Chemistry of Hypervalent Iodine A. Oxidations

  6. Detection of intermediates in the oxidative half-reaction of the FAD-dependent thymidylate synthase from Thermotoga maritima: carbon transfer without covalent pyrimidine activation.

    PubMed

    Conrad, John A; Ortiz-Maldonado, Mariliz; Hoppe, Samuel W; Palfey, Bruce A

    2014-08-19

    Thymidylate, a vital DNA precursor, is synthesized by thymidylate synthases (TSs). A second class of TSs, encoded by the thyX gene, is found in bacteria and a few other microbes and is especially widespread in anaerobes. TS encoded by thyX requires a flavin adenine dinucleotide prosthetic group for activity. In the oxidative half-reaction, the reduced flavin is oxidized by 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-monophosphate (dUMP) and (6R)-N5,N10-methylene-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate (CH2THF), synthesizing 2'-deoxythymidine 5'-monophosphate (dTMP). dTMP synthesis is a complex process, requiring the enzyme to promote carbon transfer, probably by increasing the nucleophilicity of dUMP and the electrophilicity of CH2THF, and reduction of the transferred carbon. The mechanism of the oxidative half-reaction was investigated by transient kinetics. Two intermediates were detected, the first by a change in the flavin absorbance spectrum in stopped-flow experiments and the second by the transient disappearance of deoxynucleotide in acid quenching experiments. The effects of substrate analogues and the behavior of mutated enzymes on these reactions lead to the conclusion that activation of dUMP does not occur through a Michael-like addition, the mechanism for the activation analogous with that of the flavin-independent TS. Rather, we propose that the nucleophilicity of dUMP is enhanced by electrostatic polarization upon binding to the active site. This conclusion rationalizes many of our observations, for instance, the markedly slower reactions when two arginine residues that hydrogen bond with the uracil moiety of dUMP were mutated to alanine. The activation of dUMP by polarization is consistent with the majority of the published data on ThyX and provides a testable mechanistic hypothesis. PMID:25068636

  7. Mechanisms and reaction pathways for simultaneous oxidation of NOx and SO? by ozone determined by in situ IR measurements.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chenglang; Zhao, Nan; Zhuang, Zhuokai; Wang, Haiqiang; Liu, Yue; Weng, Xiaole; Wu, Zhongbiao

    2014-06-15

    Ozone (O3) oxidation combined with wet scrubbing is a promising method for the simultaneous removal of SO2 and NOx in flue gas. In this study, the O3 oxidation processes of NO and SO2, as well as their coexistence, were investigated using an in situ IR spectrometer. Experimental results showed that the O3 concentration and the reaction temperature played critical roles in the O3 oxidation process of NO. Around 80°C, when inlet molar ratio of O3/NO was less than 1, NO was mainly oxidized to NO2, while when the ratio was greater than 1, NO would be further oxidized to NO3, N2O5, and HNO3. NO3 was the key intermediate product for the formation of N2O5 and HNO3. However, the subsequent reactions of NO3 were temperature dependence. With the increase of reaction temperature above 100°C, the concentration of NO2 increased whereas the concentrations of N2O5 and HNO3 decreased. The oxidation of SO2 by O3 was negligible and SO2 had little influence on the oxidation of NO in the simultaneous oxidation of NO and SO2. Finally, based on the in situ IR results, the oxidation mechanism is discussed and the reaction pathways are proposed. PMID:24801895

  8. Characterization of Iron Dinitrosyl Species Formed in the Reaction of Nitric Oxide with a Biological Rieske Center

    E-print Network

    Wang, Hongxin

    Reactions of nitric oxide with cysteine-ligated iron?sulfur cluster proteins typically result in disassembly of the iron?sulfur core and formation of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs). Here we report the first evidence ...

  9. Competitive reactions and diastereoselective CH bond activation in the McLafferty rearrangement of photoionized 3-methyl valeramide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loos, Jessica; Schröder, Detlef; Schwarz, Helmut; Thissen, Roland; Dutuit, Odile

    2005-01-01

    Dissociative photoionization of 3-methyl valeramide is characterized by various degradations of the alkyl backbone, initiated by competitive intramolecular hydrogen migrations. The dominating pathway corresponds to butene elimination via the McLafferty rearrangement. At photon energies (Eh[nu]) close to the ionization threshold, the McLafferty rearrangement is followed by a second hydrogen transfer, known as [McLafferty + 1] reaction. The methyl group at C(3) in combination with diastereospecific labeling at C(4) permits steric differentiation of the two [gamma]-H(D)-atoms at C(4) according to the relative orientations of the stereogenic centers. Investigation of the syn- and anti-[4-D1]-diastereomers shows a strong preference for activation of the anti-[gamma]-hydrogen in the McLafferty rearrangement. A straightforward analysis of the product distribution is impossible, because also C(4') allows for a [1,5]-H shift, and the contributions of both sites are additionally superimposed by [McLafferty + 1] products. Photoionization studies of six isotopomers, employing tunable synchrotron radiation, combined with kinetic modeling enable a deconvolution of the branching ratios and a determination of the corresponding steric and kinetic isotope effects operative in the McLafferty rearrangement. The kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are more or less independent of Eh[nu]. The initiating [1,5]-H shifts feature very low KIEs, especially for the C(4)H bond activation, whereas the subsequent hydrogen atom transfers in the course of the [McLafferty + 1] processes are affected by substantial KIEs. Interestingly, the steric effect (SE) decreases considerably at low Eh[nu] (SE = 1.8, 2.6, and 2.8 at Eh[nu] = 9.6, 10, and 11 eV, respectively), which can be explained by more pronounced epimerization prior to dissociation at lower energies.

  10. Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relationships for C–C bond forming and C–C bond breaking reactions in thiamine-catalyzed decarboxylation of 2-keto acids using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, Rajeev Surendran; Broadbelt, Linda J.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2011-04-27

    The concept of generalized enzyme reactions suggests that a wide variety of substrates can undergo enzymatic transformations, including those whose biotransformation has not yet been realized. The use of quantum chemistry to evaluate kinetic feasibility is an attractive approach to identify enzymes for the proposed transformation. However, the sheer number of novel transformations that can be generated makes this impractical as a screening approach. Therefore, it is essential to develop structure/activity relationships based on quantities that are more efficient to calculate. In this work, we propose a structure/activity relationship based on the free energy of binding or reaction of non-native substrates to evaluate the catalysis relative to that of native substrates. While Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relationships such as that proposed here have found broad application in heterogeneous catalysis, their extension to enzymatic catalysis is limited. We report here on density functional theory (DFT) studies for C–C bond formation and C–C bond cleavage associated with the decarboxylation of six 2-keto acids by a thiamine-containing enzyme (EC 1.2.7.1) and demonstrate a linear relationship between the free energy of reaction and the activation barrier. We then applied this relationship to predict the activation barriers of 17 chemically similar novel reactions. These calculations reveal that there is a clear correlation between the free energy of formation of the transition state and the free energy of the reaction, suggesting that this method can be further extended to predict the kinetics of novel reactions through our computational framework for discovery of novel biochemical transformations.

  11. Reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine and carbon or carbon monoxide to prepare uranium chlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, P.A.; Lee, D.D.; Mailen, J.C.

    1991-11-01

    The preferred preparation concept of uranium metal for feed to an AVLIS uranium enrichment process requires preparation of uranium tetrachloride (UCI{sub 4}) by reacting uranium oxides (UO{sub 2}/UO{sub 3}) and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) in a molten chloride salt medium. UO{sub 2} is a very stable metal oxide; thus, the chemical conversion requires both a chlorinating agent and a reducing agent that gives an oxide product which is much more stable than the corresponding chloride. Experimental studies in a quartz reactor of 4-cm ID have demonstrated the practically of some chemical flow sheets. Experimentation has illustrated a sequence of results concerning the chemical flow sheets. Tests with a graphite block at 850{degrees}C demonstrated rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and evolution of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as a product. Use of carbon monoxide (CO) as the reducing agent also gave rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and formation of CO{sub 2} at lower temperatures, but the reduction reactions were slower than the chlorinations. Carbon powder in the molten salt melt gave higher rates of reduction and better steady state utilization of Cl{sub 2}. Addition of UO{sub 2} feed while chlorination was in progress greatly improved the operation by avoiding the plugging effects from high UO{sub 2} concentrations and the poor Cl{sub 2} utilizations from low UO{sub 2} concentrations. An UO{sub 3} feed gave undesirable effects while a feed of UO{sub 2}-C spheres was excellent. The UO{sub 2}-C spheres also gave good rates of reaction as a fixed bed without any molten chloride salt. Results with a larger reactor and a bottom condenser for volatilized uranium show collection of condensed uranium chlorides as a loose powder and chlorine utilizations of 95--98% at high feed rates. 14 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  12. Effect of Bonding Time on Interfacial Reaction and Mechanical Properties of Diffusion-Bonded Joint Between Ti-6Al-4V and 304 Stainless Steel Using Nickel as an Intermediate Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirunavukarasu, Gopinath; Kundu, Sukumar; Mishra, Brajendra; Chatterjee, Subrata

    2014-04-01

    In the current study, solid-state diffusion bonding between Ti-6Al-4V (TiA) and 304 stainless steel (SS) using pure nickel (Ni) of 200- ?m thickness as an intermediate material was carried out in vacuum. Uniaxial compressive pressure and temperature were kept at 4 MPa and 1023 K (750 °C), respectively, and the bonding time was varied from 30 to 120 minutes in steps of 15 minutes. Scanning electron microscopy images, in backscattered electron mode, revealed the layerwise Ti-Ni-based intermetallics like either Ni3Ti or both Ni3Ti and NiTi at titanium alloy-nickel (TiA/Ni) interface, whereas nickel-stainless steel (Ni/SS) interface was free from intermetallic phases for all the joints. Chemical composition of the reaction layers was determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and confirmed by X-ray diffraction study. Maximum tensile strength of ~382 MPa along with ~3.7 pct ductility was observed for the joints processed for 60 minutes. It was found that the extent of diffusion zone at Ni/SS interface was greater than that of TiA/Ni interface. From the microhardness profile, fractured surfaces, and fracture path, it was demonstrated that the failure of the joints was initiated and propagated apparently at TiA/Ni interface near Ni3Ti intermetallic for bonding time less than 90 minutes, and through Ni for bonding time 90 minutes and greater.

  13. Rh-Catalyzed Decarbonylation of Conjugated Ynones via Carbon–Alkyne Bond Activation: Reaction Scope and Mechanistic Exploration via DFT Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Dermenci, Alpay; Whittaker, Rachel E.; Gao, Yang; Cruz, Faben A.; Yu, Zhi-Xiang; Dong, Guangbin

    2015-01-01

    In this full article, detailed development of a catalytic decarbonylation of conjugated monoynones to synthesize disubstituted alkynes is described. The reaction scope and limitation has been thoroughly investigated, and a broad range of functional groups including heterocycles were compatible under the catalytic conditions. Mechanistic exploration via DFT calculations has also been executed. Through the computational study, a proposed catalytic mechanism has been carefully evaluated. These efforts are expected to serve as an important exploratory study for developing catalytic alkyne-transfer reactions via carbon?alkyne bond activation. PMID:26229587

  14. Base-catalyzed stereoselective vinylation of ketones with arylacetylenes: a new C(sp3)-C(sp2) bond-forming reaction.

    PubMed

    Trofimov, Boris A; Schmidt, Elena Yu; Ushakov, Igor' A; Zorina, Nadezhda V; Skital'tseva, Elena V; Protsuk, Nadezhda I; Mikhaleva, Al'bina I

    2010-07-26

    Alkylaryl- and alkylheteroarylketones, including those with condensed aromatic moieties, are readily vinylated with arylacetylenes (KOH/DMSO, 100 degrees C, 1 h) to give regio- and stereoselectively the (E)-beta-gamma-ethylenic ketones ((E)-3-buten-1-ones) in 61-84% yields and with approximately 100% stereoselectivity. This vinylation represents a new C(sp(3))-C(sp(2)) bond-forming reaction of high synthetic potential. PMID:20564291

  15. Role of TBATB in nano indium oxide catalyzed C-S bond formation

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi, Prasanta; Hazarika, Sukanya; Barman, Pranjit

    2015-01-01

    Nano sized indium oxide is found to be an efficient catalyst for the conversion of thiols to sulfides using Na2CO3 as base and TBATB as reagent in DMSO at 110?°C. Here in situ generation of bromo intermediate by TBATB takes place through indium surface. A variety of aryl sulfides can be synthesized in excellent yields from less reactive chlorides, boronic acids and thiols. PMID:26415729

  16. Role of TBATB in nano indium oxide catalyzed C-S bond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Prasanta; Hazarika, Sukanya; Barman, Pranjit

    2015-09-01

    Nano sized indium oxide is found to be an efficient catalyst for the conversion of thiols to sulfides using Na2CO3 as base and TBATB as reagent in DMSO at 110?°C. Here in situ generation of bromo intermediate by TBATB takes place through indium surface. A variety of aryl sulfides can be synthesized in excellent yields from less reactive chlorides, boronic acids and thiols.

  17. Visible-Light-Driven Oxidation of Primary C-H Bonds over CdS with Dual Co-catalysts Graphene and TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min-Quan; Zhang, Yanhui; Zhang, Nan; Tang, Zi-Rong; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2013-11-01

    Selective activation of primary C-H bonds for fine chemicals synthesis is of crucial importance for the sustainable exploitation of available feedstocks. Here, we report a viable strategy to synthesize ternary GR-CdS-TiO2 composites with an intimate spatial integration and sheet-like structure, which is afforded by assembling two co-catalysts, graphene and TiO2, into the semiconductor CdS matrix with specific morphology as a visible light harvester. The GR-CdS-TiO2 composites are able to serve as a highly selective visible-light-driven photocatalyst for oxidation of saturated primary C-H bonds using benign oxygen as oxidant under ambient conditions. This work demonstrates a wide, promising scope of adopting co-catalyst strategy to design more efficient semiconductor-based photocatalyst toward selective activation of C-H bonds using solar light and molecular oxygen.

  18. Visible-Light-Driven Oxidation of Primary C–H Bonds over CdS with Dual Co-catalysts Graphene and TiO2

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min-Quan; Zhang, Yanhui; Zhang, Nan; Tang, Zi-Rong; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Selective activation of primary C–H bonds for fine chemicals synthesis is of crucial importance for the sustainable exploitation of available feedstocks. Here, we report a viable strategy to synthesize ternary GR-CdS-TiO2 composites with an intimate spatial integration and sheet-like structure, which is afforded by assembling two co-catalysts, graphene and TiO2, into the semiconductor CdS matrix with specific morphology as a visible light harvester. The GR-CdS-TiO2 composites are able to serve as a highly selective visible-light-driven photocatalyst for oxidation of saturated primary C–H bonds using benign oxygen as oxidant under ambient conditions. This work demonstrates a wide, promising scope of adopting co-catalyst strategy to design more efficient semiconductor-based photocatalyst toward selective activation of C–H bonds using solar light and molecular oxygen. PMID:24264835

  19. Study of the Reaction Stages and Kinetics of the Europium Oxide Carbochlorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomiro, Federico J.; Fouga, Gastón G.; Gaviría, Juan P.; Bohé, Ana E.

    2015-02-01

    The europium oxide (Eu2O3(s)) chlorination reaction with sucrose carbon was studied by thermogravimetry between room temperature and 1223 K (950 °C). The nonisothermal thermogravimetry showed that the reaction consists of three stages, and their stoichiometries were studied. The product of the first stage was europium oxychloride, and it showed independence of the reaction kinetics with the carbon content. Subsequently, in the second stage, the EuOCl(s) was carbochlorinated with formation of EuCl3(l) and its evaporation is observed in the third stage. The analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of gaseous species showed that the reaction at second stage occurs with the formation of CO2(g) and CO(g). Both reactants and products were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The influence of carbon content, total flow rate, sample initial mass, chlorine partial pressure, and temperature were evaluated. The second stage kinetics was analyzed, which showed an anomalous behavior caused by generation of chlorine radicals during interaction of Cl2(g) and carbon. It was found that the reaction rate at 933 K (660 °C) was proportional to a potential function of the chlorine partial pressure whose exponent is 0.56. The conversion curves were analyzed with the Avrami-Erofeev model and it was obtained an activation energy of 154 ± 5 kJ mol-1.

  20. Oxidative tryptophan modification by terpene- and squalene-hydroperoxides and a possible link to cross-reactions in diagnostic tests.

    PubMed

    Natsch, Andreas; Emter, Roger; Badertscher, Remo P; Brunner, Gerhard; Granier, Thierry; Kern, Susanne; Ellis, Graham

    2015-06-15

    Hydroperoxides can act as specific haptens and oxidatively modify proteins. Terpene hydroperoxides trigger unusually high frequencies of positive skin reactions in human patients if tested at high concentrations. It is unknown whether this is due to specific hapten formation. Here, we show that both terpene hydroperoxides and the endogenous hydroperoxide formed from squalene can oxidatively modify tryptophan. Oxidative modifications of Trp were recently postulated to explain cross-sensitization between unrelated photosensitizers. Current observations may extend this hypothesis: Oxidative events triggered by endogenous hydroperoxides and hydroperoxides/oxidants derived from xenobiotics might lead to a sensitized state detected by patch tests with high concentrations of hydroperoxides. PMID:25942677

  1. Copper-catalyzed oxidative amination of sp(3) C-H bonds under air: synthesis of 1,3-diarylated imidazo[1,5-a]pyridines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiqiao; Xu, Wentao; Wang, Zhiqiang; Yu, Lintao; Xu, Kun

    2015-02-20

    A copper(II)-catalyzed tandem reaction between pyridine ketone and benzylamine was developed by using clean O2 as an oxidant. This transformation proceeded via an efficient condensation-amination-oxidative dehydrogenation process, affording 1,3-diarylated imidazo[1,5-a]pyridines in excellent yields. PMID:25629877

  2. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions between H2O2 and copper and copper oxides.

    PubMed

    Björkbacka, Åsa; Yang, Miao; Gasparrini, Claudia; Leygraf, Christofer; Jonsson, Mats

    2015-09-28

    One of the main challenges for the nuclear power industry today is the disposal of spent nuclear fuel. One of the most developed methods for its long term storage is the Swedish KBS-3 concept where the spent fuel is sealed inside copper canisters and placed 500 meters down in the bedrock. Gamma radiation will penetrate the canisters and be absorbed by groundwater thereby creating oxidative radiolysis products such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radicals (HO?). Both H2O2 and HO? are able to initiate corrosion of the copper canisters. In this work the kinetics and mechanism of reactions between the stable radiolysis product, H2O2, and copper and copper oxides were studied. Also the dissolution of copper into solution after reaction with H2O2 was monitored by ICP-OES. The experiments show that both H2O2 and HO? are present in the systems with copper and copper oxides. Nevertheless, these species do not appear to influence the dissolution of copper to the same extent as observed in recent studies in irradiated systems. This strongly suggests that aqueous radiolysis can only account for a very minor part of the observed radiation induced corrosion of copper. PMID:26287519

  3. The analysis of magnesium oxide hydration in three-phase reaction system

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiaojia; Guo, Lin; Chen, Chen; Liu, Quan; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin

    2014-05-01

    In order to investigate the magnesium oxide hydration process in gas–liquid–solid (three-phase) reaction system, magnesium hydroxide was prepared by magnesium oxide hydration in liquid–solid (two-phase) and three-phase reaction systems. A semi-empirical model and the classical shrinking core model were used to fit the experimental data. The fitting result shows that both models describe well the hydration process of three-phase system, while only the semi-empirical model right for the hydration process of two-phase system. The characterization of the hydration product using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was performed. The XRD and SEM show hydration process in the two-phase system follows common dissolution/precipitation mechanism. While in the three-phase system, the hydration process undergo MgO dissolution, Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation, Mg(OH){sub 2} peeling off from MgO particle and leaving behind fresh MgO surface. - Graphical abstract: There was existence of a peeling-off process in the gas–liquid–solid (three-phase) MgO hydration system. - Highlights: • Magnesium oxide hydration in gas–liquid–solid system was investigated. • The experimental data in three-phase system could be fitted well by two models. • The morphology analysis suggested that there was existence of a peel-off process.

  4. Palladium and Tin Alloyed Catalysts for the Ethanol Oxidation Reaction in an Alkaline Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Su D.; Du W.; Mackenzie K.E.; Milano D.F.; Deskins N.A.; Teng X.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we present a study of a series of carbon-supported Pd-Sn binary alloyed catalysts prepared through a modified Polyol method as anode electrocatalysts for direct ethanol fuel cell reactions in an alkaline medium. Transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy were used to characterize the Pd-Sn/C catalysts, where homogeneous Pd-Sn alloys were determined to be present with the surface Sn being partially oxidized. Among various Pd-Sn catalysts, Pd{sub 86}Sn{sub 14}/C catalysts showed much enhanced current densities in cyclic voltammetric and chronoamperometric measurements, compared to commercial Pd/C (Johnson Matthey). The overall rate law of ethanol oxidation reaction for both Pd{sub 86}Sn{sub 14}/C and commercial Pd/C were also determined, which clearly showed that Pd{sub 86}Sn{sub 14}/C was more favorable in high ethanol concentration and/or high pH environment. Density functional theory calculations also confirmed Pd-Sn alloy structures would result in lower reaction energies for the dehydrogenation of ethanol, compared to the pure Pd crystal.

  5. Iridium?Ruthenium Alloyed Nanoparticles for the Ethanol Oxidation Fuel Cell Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Su D.; Du, W.; Deskins, N.A.; Teng, X.

    2012-06-01

    In this study, carbon supported Ir-Ru nanoparticles with average sizes ranging from 2.9 to 3.7 nm were prepared using a polyol method. The combined characterization techniques, that is, scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, were used to determine an Ir-Ru alloy nanostructure. Both cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry (CA) results demonstrate that Ir{sub 77}Ru{sub 23}/C bears superior catalytic activities for the ethanol oxidation reaction compared to Ir/C and commercial Pt/C catalysts. In particular, the Ir{sub 77}Ru{sub 23}/C catalyst shows more than 21 times higher mass current density than that of Pt/C after 2 h reaction at a potential of 0.2 V vs Ag/AgCl in CA measurement. Density functional theory simulations also demonstrate the superiority of Ir-Ru alloys compared to Ir for the ethanol oxidation reaction.

  6. Diffusion-reaction of aluminum and oxygen in thermally grown Al2O3 oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, Julián D.; Giraldo, Juliana; Hernández, Juan C.; Toro, Alejandro; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P.

    2014-04-01

    The diffusion-reaction of aluminum (Al) and oxygen (O), to form thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), is studied through an analytical model. A nonsymmetrical radial basis function approach is used to numerically solve the mass balance equations that predict the TGO growth. Correct boundary conditions for the Al and O reactions are laid out using scaling arguments. The Damköhler number shows that the O-Al reaction is several orders of magnitude faster than diffusion. In addition, a comparison between aluminum and oxygen diffusivities indicates that TGO growth is governed by aluminum diffusion. The results are compared with experimental measurements on air plasma spray-deposited TBCs treated at 1,373 K with exposure times ranging from 1 to 1700 hours. We found that, for several time decades, the thickness of the thermally grown layer has power law dependence of time with an exponent of ½, following the diffusion control mechanism. At later times, however, the presence of other oxides and additional kinetics modify the diffusive exponent.

  7. Distribution of manganese species in an oxidative dimerization reaction of a bis-terpyridine mononuclear manganese (II) complex and their heterogeneous water oxidation activities.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kosuke; Sato, Taisei; Yamazaki, Hirosato; Yagi, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Heterogeneous water oxidation catalyses were studied as a synthetic model of oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in photosynthesis using mica adsorbing various manganese species. Distribution of manganese species formed in the oxidative dimerization reaction of [Mn(II)(terpy)2](2+) (terpy=2,2':6',2?-terpyridine) (1') with various oxidants in water was revealed. 1' was stoichiometrically oxidized to form di-?-oxo dinuclear manganese complex, [(OH2)(terpy)Mn(III)(?-O)2Mn(IV)(terpy)(OH2)](3+) (1) by KMnO4 as an oxidant. When Oxone and Ce(IV) oxidants were used, the further oxidation of 1 to [(OH2)(terpy)Mn(IV)(?-O)2Mn(IV)(terpy)(OH2)](4+) (2) was observed after the oxidative dimerization reaction of 1'. The mica adsorbates with various composition of 1', 1 and 2 were prepared by adding mica suspension to the various oxidant-treated solutions followed by filtration. The heterogeneous water oxidation catalysis by the mica adsorbates was examined using a Ce(IV) oxidant. The observed catalytic activity of the mica adsorbates corresponded to a content of 1 (1ads) adsorbed on mica for KMnO4- and Oxone-treated systems, indicating that 1' (1'ads) and 2 (2ads) adsorbed on mica do not work for the catalysis. The kinetic analysis suggested that 1ads works for the catalysis through cooperation with adjacent 1ads or 2ads, meaning that 2ads assists the cooperative catalysis by 1ads though 2ads is not able to work for the catalysis alone. For the Ce(IV)-treated system, O2 evolution was hardly observed although the sufficient amount of 1ads was contained in the mica adsorbates. This was explained by the impeded penetration of Ce(IV) ions (as an oxidant for water oxidation) into mica by Ce(3+) cations (generated in oxidative dimerization of 1') co-adsorbed with 1ads. PMID:25935510

  8. pH-Controlled Oxidation of an Aromatic Ketone: Structural Elucidation of the Products of Two Green Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, C. Eric

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory experiment emphasizing the structural elucidation of organic compounds has been developed as a discovery exercise. The "unknown" compounds are the products of the pH-controlled oxidation of 4'-methoxyacetophenone with bleach. The chemoselectivity of this reaction is highly dependent on the pH of the reaction media: under basic…

  9. No evidence found for Diels-Alder reaction products in soybean oil oxidized at the frying temperature by NMR study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been generally accepted that the Diels-Alder reaction mechanism is one of the major reaction mechanisms to produce dimers and polymers during heating process of vegetable oil. Soybean oil oxidized at 180 °C for 24 hrs with 1.45 surface area-to-volume ratio showed 36.1% polymer peak area in g...

  10. Effect of Bonding Temperature on Interfacial Reaction and Mechanical Properties of Diffusion-Bonded Joint Between Ti-6Al-4V and 304 Stainless Steel Using Nickel as an Intermediate Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirunavukarasu, Gopinath; Kundu, Sukumar; Mishra, Brajendra; Chatterjee, Subrata

    2014-04-01

    An investigation was carried out on the solid-state diffusion bonding between Ti-6Al-4V (TiA) and 304 stainless steel (SS) using pure nickel (Ni) of 200- ?m thickness as an intermediate material prepared in vacuum in the temperature range from 973 K to 1073 K (700 °C to 800 °C) in steps of 298 K (25 °C) using uniaxial compressive pressure of 3 MPa and 60 minutes as bonding time. Scanning electron microscopy images, in backscattered electron mode, had revealed existence of layerwise Ti-Ni-based intermetallics such as either Ni3Ti or both Ni3Ti and NiTi at titanium alloy-nickel (TiA/Ni) interface, whereas nickel-stainless steel (Ni/SS) diffusion zone was free from intermetallic phases for all joints processed. Chemical composition of the reaction layers was determined in atomic percentage by energy dispersive spectroscopy and confirmed by X-ray diffraction study. Room-temperature properties of the bonded joints were characterized using microhardness evaluation and tensile testing. The maximum hardness value of ~800 HV was observed at TiA/Ni interface for the bond processed at 1073 K (800 °C). The hardness value at Ni/SS interface for all the bonds was found to be ~330 HV. Maximum tensile strength of ~206 MPa along with ~2.9 pct ductility was obtained for the joint processed at 1023 K (750 °C). It was observed from the activation study that the diffusion rate at TiA/Ni interface is lesser than that at the Ni/SS interface. From microhardness profile, fractured surfaces and fracture path, it was demonstrated that failure of the joints was initiated and propagated apparently at the TiA/Ni interface near Ni3Ti intermetallic phase.

  11. Reaction of Antimony-Uranium Composite Oxide in the Chlorination Treatment of Waste Catalyst - 13521

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Kayo; Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Enokida, Youichi

    2013-07-01

    The effect of oxygen gas concentration on the chlorination treatment of antimony-uranium composite oxide catalyst waste was investigated by adding different concentrations of oxygen at 0-6 vol% to its chlorination agent of 0.6 or 6 vol% hydrogen chloride gas at 1173 K. The addition of oxygen tended to prevent the chlorination of antimony in the oxide. When 6 vol% hydrogen chloride gas was used, the addition of oxygen up to 0.1 vol% could convert the uranium contained in the catalyst to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} without any significant decrease in the reaction rate compared to that of the treatment without oxygen. (authors)

  12. Destruction efficiencies and dynamics of reaction fronts associated with the permanganate oxidation of trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eung Seok; Seol, Yongkoo; Fang, Y C; Schwartz, Franklin W

    2003-06-01

    Although potassium permanganate (KMnO4) flushing is commonly used to destroy chlorinated solvents in groundwater, many of the problems associated with this treatment scheme have not been examined in detail. We conducted a KMnO4 flushing experiment in a large sand-filled flow tank (L x W x D = 180 cm x 60 cm x 90 cm) to remove TCE emplaced as a DNAPL in a source zone. The study was specifically designed to investigate cleanup progress and problems of pore plugging associated with the dynamics of the solid-phase reaction front (i.e., MnO2) using chemical and optical monitoring techniques. Ambient flow through the source zone formed a plume of dissolved TCE across the flow tank. The volume and concentration of TCE plume diminished with time because of the in situ oxidation of the DNAPL source. The migration velocity of the MnO2 reaction front decreased with time, suggesting that the kinetics of the DNAPL oxidation process became diffusion-controlled because of the pore plugging. A mass balance calculation indicated that only approximately 18% of the total applied KMnO4 (MnO4- = 1250 mg/ L) participated in the oxidation reaction to destroy approximately 41% of emplaced TCE. Evidently, the efficiency of KMnO4 flushing scheme diminished with time due to pore plugging by MnO2 and likely CO2, particularly in the TCE source zone. In addition, the excess KMnO4 used for flushing may cause secondary aquifer contamination. One needs to be concerned about the efficacy of KMnO4 flushing in the field applications. Development of a new approach that can provide both contaminant destruction and plugging/ MnO4- control is required. PMID:12831041

  13. Enhancement Effect of Noble Metals on Manganese Oxide for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Linsey C; Hersbach, Thomas J P; Nordlund, Dennis; Jaramillo, Thomas F

    2015-10-15

    Developing improved catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is key to the advancement of a number of renewable energy technologies, including solar fuels production and metal air batteries. In this study, we employ electrochemical methods and synchrotron techniques to systematically investigate interactions between metal oxides and noble metals that lead to enhanced OER catalysis for water oxidation. In particular, we synthesize porous MnOx films together with nanoparticles of Au, Pd, Pt, or Ag and observe significant improvement in activity for the combined catalysts. Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) shows that increased activity correlates with increased Mn oxidation states to 4+ under OER conditions compared to bare MnOx, which exhibits minimal OER current and remains in a 3+ oxidation state. Thickness studies of bare MnOx films and of MnOx films deposited on Au nanoparticles reveal trends suggesting that the enhancement in activity arises from interfacial sites between Au and MnOx. PMID:26722794

  14. Graphene-based transition metal oxide nanocomposites for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meng; Liu, Huijuan; Liu, Yang; Qu, Jiuhui; Li, Jinghong

    2015-01-28

    The development of low cost, durable and efficient nanocatalysts to substitute expensive and rare noble metals (e.g. Pt, Au and Pd) in overcoming the sluggish kinetic process of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is essential to satisfy the demand for sustainable energy conversion and storage in the future. Graphene based transition metal oxide nanocomposites have extensively been proven to be a type of promising highly efficient and economic nanocatalyst for optimizing the ORR to solve the world-wide energy crisis. Synthesized nanocomposites exhibit synergetic advantages and avoid the respective disadvantages. In this feature article, we concentrate on the recent leading works of different categories of introduced transition metal oxides on graphene: from the commonly-used classes (FeOx, MnOx, and CoOx) to some rare and heat-studied issues (TiOx, NiCoOx and Co-MnOx). Moreover, the morphologies of the supported oxides on graphene with various dimensional nanostructures, such as one dimensional nanocrystals, two dimensional nanosheets/nanoplates and some special multidimensional frameworks are further reviewed. The strategies used to synthesize and characterize these well-designed nanocomposites and their superior properties for the ORR compared to the traditional catalysts are carefully summarized. This work aims to highlight the meaning of the multiphase establishment of graphene-based transition metal oxide nanocomposites and its structural-dependent ORR performance and mechanisms. PMID:25502117

  15. Graphene-based transition metal oxide nanocomposites for the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Meng; Liu, Huijuan; Liu, Yang; Qu, Jiuhui; Li, Jinghong

    2015-01-01

    The development of low cost, durable and efficient nanocatalysts to substitute expensive and rare noble metals (e.g. Pt, Au and Pd) in overcoming the sluggish kinetic process of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is essential to satisfy the demand for sustainable energy conversion and storage in the future. Graphene based transition metal oxide nanocomposites have extensively been proven to be a type of promising highly efficient and economic nanocatalyst for optimizing the ORR to solve the world-wide energy crisis. Synthesized nanocomposites exhibit synergetic advantages and avoid the respective disadvantages. In this feature article, we concentrate on the recent leading works of different categories of introduced transition metal oxides on graphene: from the commonly-used classes (FeOx, MnOx, and CoOx) to some rare and heat-studied issues (TiOx, NiCoOx and Co-MnOx). Moreover, the morphologies of the supported oxides on graphene with various dimensional nanostructures, such as one dimensional nanocrystals, two dimensional nanosheets/nanoplates and some special multidimensional frameworks are further reviewed. The strategies used to synthesize and characterize these well-designed nanocomposites and their superior properties for the ORR compared to the traditional catalysts are carefully summarized. This work aims to highlight the meaning of the multiphase establishment of graphene-based transition metal oxide nanocomposites and its structural-dependent ORR performance and mechanisms.

  16. Proteasome inhibition and oxidative reactions disrupt cellular homeostasis during heme stress

    PubMed Central

    Vallelian, F; Deuel, J W; Opitz, L; Schaer, C A; Puglia, M; Lönn, M; Engelsberger, W; Schauer, S; Karnaukhova, E; Spahn, D R; Stocker, R; Buehler, P W; Schaer, D J

    2015-01-01

    Dual control of cellular heme levels by extracellular scavenger proteins and degradation by heme oxygenases is essential in diseases associated with increased heme release. During severe hemolysis or rhabdomyolysis, uncontrolled heme exposure can cause acute kidney injury and endothelial cell damage. The toxicity of heme was primarily attributed to its pro-oxidant effects; however additional mechanisms of heme toxicity have not been studied systematically. In addition to redox reactivity, heme may adversely alter cellular functions by binding to essential proteins and impairing their function. We studied inducible heme oxygenase (Hmox1)-deficient mouse embryo fibroblast cell lines as a model to systematically explore adaptive and disruptive responses that were triggered by intracellular heme levels exceeding the homeostatic range. We extensively characterized the proteome phenotype of the cellular heme stress responses by quantitative mass spectrometry of stable isotope-labeled cells that covered more than 2000 individual proteins. The most significant signals specific to heme toxicity were consistent with oxidative stress and impaired protein degradation by the proteasome. This ultimately led to an activation of the response to unfolded proteins. These observations were explained mechanistically by demonstrating binding of heme to the proteasome that was linked to impaired proteasome function. Oxidative heme reactions and proteasome inhibition could be differentiated as synergistic activities of the porphyrin. Based on the present data a novel model of cellular heme toxicity is proposed, whereby proteasome inhibition by heme sustains a cycle of oxidative stress, protein modification, accumulation of damaged proteins and cell death. PMID:25301065

  17. Low-temperature oxidation of alkali overlayers: Ionic species and reaction kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krix, David; Nienhaus, Hermann

    2013-04-01

    Clean and oxidized alkali metal films have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thin films, typically 10 nm thick, of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium have been deposited on silicon substrates and oxidized at 120 K. Plasmon losses were found to dress the primary photo emission structures of the metals’ core lines which confirms the metallic, bulk like nature of the films. The emission from the O 1s core levels was used to determine the chemical composition and the reaction kinetics during the exposure to molecular oxygen at low pressures. Molecular oxide ions O2- and O22- as well as atomic oxygen ions O2- were detected in varying amounts depending on the alkali metal used. Diffusive transport of material in the film is shown to greatly determine the composition of the oxides. Especially, the growth of potassium superoxide is explained by the diffusion of potassium atoms to the surface and growth at the surface in a Deal-Grove like model.

  18. Improved reaction sintered silicon nitride. [protective coatings to improve oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Processing treatments were applied to as-nitrided reaction sintered silicon nitride (RSSN) with the purposes of improving strength after processing to above 350 MN/m2 and improving strength after oxidation exposure. The experimental approaches are divided into three broad classifications: sintering of surface-applied powders; impregnation of solution followed by further thermal processing; and infiltration of molten silicon and subsequent carburization or nitridation of the silicon. The impregnation of RSSN with solutions of aluminum nitrate and zirconyl chloride, followed by heating at 1400-1500 C in a nitrogen atmosphere containing silicon monoxide, improved RSSN strength and oxidation resistance. The room temperature bend strength of RSSN was increased nearly fifty percent above the untreated strength with mean absolute strengths up to 420 MN/m2. Strengths of treated samples that were measured after a 12 hour oxidation exposure in air were up to 90 percent of the original as-nitrided strength, as compared to retained strengths in the range of 35 to 60 percent for untreated RSSN after the same oxidation exposure.

  19. [A method for determining theo-diphenoloxidase activity in the pyrocatechol oxidation reaction].

    PubMed

    Butovich, I A; Tertykh, V A

    1984-01-01

    A new simple and sensitive spectrophotometric method is suggested for determining the catecholase activity of diphenoloxidase. The method is based on the enzymatic oxidation of pyrocatechol to 1,2-benzoquinone (BQ) in the presence of the excess of ethylenediamine sulphate (EDA). The condensation product (products) of BQ and EDA (P365) is stable in the solution and possesses strong absorption in the range of 365 nm. The molar absorption factor, E365 (under condition that the molar reaction ratio of catechol to P365 is 1:1) is 15500 M-1 cm-1 on the average. Optimal reaction conditions (pH 7.0, T=25-30 degrees C, [EDA]o = 5 mg/ml) are determined. The advantages and restrictions of the suggested technique in comparison with the methods described earlier are discussed. PMID:6437031

  20. Reaction of nitric oxide with heme proteins and model compounds of hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, V.S.; Traylor, T.G.; Gardiner, R.; Mizukami, H.

    1987-06-30

    Rates for the reaction of nitric oxide with several ferric heme proteins and model compounds have been measured. The NO combination rates are markedly affected by the presence or absence of distal histidine. Elephant myoglobin in which the E7 distal histidine has been replaced by glutamine reacts with NO 500-1000 times faster than do the native hemoglobins or myoglobins. By contrast, there is not difference in the CO combination rate constants of sperm whale and elephant myoglobins. Studies on ferric model compounds for the R and T states of hemoglobin indicate that their NO combination rate constants are similar to those observed for the combination of CO with the corresponding ferro derivatives. The last observation suggests that the presence of an axial water molecule at the ligand binding site of ferric hemoglobin A prevents it from exhibiting significant cooperativity in its reactions with NO.

  1. The adsorption and reaction of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOC's) on metal oxides. Annual progress report, September 1996--October 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, J.H.; Haw, J.F.; Goodman, D.W.

    1997-10-01

    'The interactions of carbon tetrachloride with strongly basic oxides and hydroxides have been studied by several techniques in order to understand the surface reactions and the subsequent bulk reactions that result in the destruction of the chlorinated hydrocarbon. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the surface phases, as well as the bulk phases, that are present during these transformations. As a result of the study with barium oxide, a reaction cycle has been demonstrated that may have practical significance in the removal of chlorinated hydrocarbons.'

  2. Type I allergic hypersensitivity reactions due to ethylene oxide sterilised leucocyte filters in patients with thalassaemia: report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Belen, Burcu; Polat, Meltem

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene oxide (EO) is a highly reactive gas used in sterilisation of heat sensitive medical devices, such as infusion sets, cannulae, intubation materials, ventriculoperitoneal shunts, dialysis catheters and stents. Allergic reactions due to EO have been reported in haemodialysis patients, patients undergoing extracorporeal photopheresis and donors of plasmapheresis. Clinical manifestations vary considerably and generally do not allow differentiation between IgE-mediated anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions. We report four patients with thalassaemia who experienced anaphylaxis during transfusion due to ethylene oxide sterilised leucocyte filters. The aim of this report is to highlight the fact that frequently transfused patients can have allergic reactions due to EO particles left in leucocyte filters. PMID:25725028

  3. New reaction sequences for the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Williams, J F; Blackmore, P F; Clark, M G

    1978-10-15

    1. Reactions leading to the formation of 14C-labelled volatile compounds and compounds volatile under acid conditions were investigated in a system actively synthesizing hexose 6-phosphates from [U-14C]ribose 5-phosphate by reactions catalysed by enzymes prepared from acetone-dried powder of rat liver; no reactions involving 14C-labelled volatile compounds were detected. Similarly the fixation of 14C-labelled volatile compounds into hexose 6-phosphate could not be detected. 2. A complete carbon balance was made for the reactants, intermediates and products of the reactions involved in the conversion of ribose 5-phosphate into hexose 6-phosphate by enzymes of rat liver. Five additional intermediates of pentose 5-phosphate metabolism in liver were detected, namely D-manno-heptulose 7-phosphate, D-altro-heptulose 1,7-bisphosphate, D-glycero-D-ido-octulose 1,8-bisphosphate, D-glycero-D-altro-octulose 1,8-bisphosphate and D-arabinose 5-phosphate. 3. D-Arabinose 5-phosphate was found to be utilized by a rat liver enzyme preparation to produce both hexose 6-phosphate and triose phosphate. 4. D-Arabinose 5-phosphate was reversibly converted into other pentose 5-phosphates. Paper chromatographic and enzymic evidence indicated that the conversion involved an enzyme tentatively named arabinose phosphate 2-epimerase, which catalyses the following reaction: D-arabinose 5-P in equilibrium D-ribose-5-P. 5. A variety of rat tissues also utilized D-arabinose 5-phosphate to produce both hexose 6-phosphate and triose phosphate and at a rate comparable with that obtained with D-ribose 5-phosphate. 6. A new reaction sequence for the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway in liver is proposed. PMID:728110

  4. Mobile Zhang-Rice singlets: Electron correlations and bond-length fluctuations in copper oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hozoi, L.; Nishimoto, S.; Yamasaki, A.

    2005-10-01

    We perform first principles, multiconfiguration calculations on clusters including several CuO6 octahedra and study the ground-state electron distribution and electron-lattice couplings when holes are added to the undoped d9p6 configuration. We find that the so-called Zhang-Rice state on a single CuO4 plaquette is nearly degenerate with a state whose leading configuration is of the form Cud9-Op5-Cud9 . A strong coupling between the electronic and nuclear motions gives rise to large inter-site charge transfer effects for half-breathing displacements of the oxygen ions. Under the assumption of charge segregation into alternating hole-free and hole-rich stripes, our results seem to support the vibronic mechanism and the traveling charge-density wave model proposed by J. B. Goodenough [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 15, R257 (2003)] for the superconductivity in copper oxides.

  5. Rapid Removal of Tetrabromobisphenol A by Ozonation in Water: Oxidation Products, Reaction Pathways and Toxicity Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinghao; Huang, Qingguo; Lu, Junhe; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-01-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants and has attracted more and more attention. In this work, the parent TBBPA with an initial concentration of 100 mg/L was completely removed after 6 min of ozonation at pH 8.0, and alkaline conditions favored a more rapid removal than acidic and neutral conditions. The presence of typical anions and humic acid did not significantly affect the degradation of TBBPA. The quenching test using isopropanol indicated that direct ozone oxidation played a dominant role during this process. Seventeen reaction intermediates and products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Notably, the generation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol was first observed in the degradation process of TBBPA. The evolution of reaction products showed that ozonation is an efficient treatment for removal of both TBBPA and intermediates. Sequential transformation of organic bromine to bromide and bromate was confirmed by ion chromatography analysis. Two primary reaction pathways that involve cleavage of central carbon atom and benzene ring cleavage concomitant with debromination were thus proposed and further justified by calculations of frontier electron densities. Furthermore, the total organic carbon data suggested a low mineralization rate, even after the complete removal of TBBPA. Meanwhile, the acute aqueous toxicity of reaction solutions to Photobacterium Phosphoreum and Daphnia magna was rapidly decreased during ozonation. In addition, no obvious difference in the attenuation of TBBPA was found by ozone oxidation using different water matrices, and the effectiveness in natural waters further demonstrates that ozonation can be adopted as a promising technique to treat TBBPA-contaminated waters. PMID:26430733

  6. Formation of semiquinone radical in the reaction of embelin (2,5-dihydroxy-3-undecyl-1,4-benzoquinone) with reductants as well as oxidants. Characterization by pulse radiolysis and structure investigation by quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Ravi; Ghanty, Tapan K.; Mukherjee, Tulsi

    2009-06-01

    Embelin, 2,5-dihydroxy-3-undecyl-1,4-benzoquinone, has two intra-molecular hydrogen bonds between the quinone and hydroquinone groups present on the same ring. Therefore, it is expected to produce semiquinone radical in the oxidation as well reduction reactions. To investigate this aspect, kinetics and mechanism of reduction reactions of embelin have been studied using nanosecond electron pulse radiolysis technique and compared with the oxidation process. Two distinct transients observed in the reduction ( ?max = 450 nm) and the oxidation ( ?max = 410 nm) processes with various free radicals have been characterized and assigned to two different embelin semiquinone radicals on the basis of pulse radiolysis studies. The structures of these transients have been further ascertained using density functional theory with B3LYP functional and 6-31+G(d,p) basis set. Reduction reaction of embelin has been found to produce delocalized semiquinone anion radical. On the other hand, oxidation of embelin is expected to produce several transient species. However, the calculations suggest that oxidation of hydroquinone group is the first step, which is followed by transformation into carbon-centered radical.

  7. Reversible swelling-shrinking behavior of hydrogen-bonded free-standing thin film stabilized by catechol reaction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiaxing; Su, Chao; Zhang, Xuejian; Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Jian; Yang, Shuguang

    2015-05-12

    Dopamine-modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-dopa) and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVPON) was layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled to prepare thin film based on hydrogen bonding. The carboxylic group of acrylic acid and the phenolic hydroxyl group of dopamine can both act as hydrogen bond donors. The critical assembly and the critical disintegration pH values of PVPON/PAA-dopa film are enhanced compared with PVPON/PAA film. The hydrogen-bonded PVPON/PAA-dopa thin film can be cross-linked via catechol chemistry of dopamine. After cross-linking, the film can be exfoliated from the substrate in alkaline solution to get a free-standing film. Moreover, by tuning the pH value, deprotonation and protonation of PAA will make the hydrogen bond in the film break and reconstruct, which induces that the free-standing film has a reversible swelling-shrinking behavior. PMID:25899235

  8. Flavin-photosensitized oxidation of reduced c-type cytochromes. Reaction mechanism and comparison with photoreduction of oxidized cytochromes by flavin semiquinones.

    PubMed

    Roncel, M; Hervás, M; Navarro, J A; De la Rosa, M A; Tollin, G

    1990-08-17

    In order to compare the oxidation and reduction reactions of c-type cytochromes (cytochrome c552 from the green alga Monoraphidium braunii and horse heart cytochrome c) by different flavins (lumiflavin, riboflavin and FMN), laser flash photolysis studies have been carried out using either reduced or oxidized protein in the presence of triplet or semiquinone flavin, respectively. The reaction kinetics clearly demonstrate that cytochrome oxidation is mediated by the flavin triplet state. The rate constants for reduction are 20-100 times smaller than those for oxidation, indicating that the triplet state is a more effective reactant than is the semiquinone. This is attributed to its excited state nature and correspondingly high free energy content. The rate constants for both the reduction and oxidation of cytochrome c552 by riboflavin are significantly smaller than those obtained with lumiflavin, suggesting a steric interference of the ribityl side chain in the flavin-cytochrome interaction. The comparison between oxidation and reduction indicates that the former process is less affected by steric hindrance than the latter. Both reduction and oxidation of cytochrome c552 by FMN show an ionic strength dependence with the same sign, consistent with a negatively charged reaction site on the cytochrome. The magnitude of the electrostatic effect is slightly smaller for reduction than it is for oxidation. A pattern quite similar to that observed with cytochrome c552 was obtained when parallel experiments were carried out with horse cytochrome c, although differences were observed in the steric and electrostatic properties of the electron transfer site(s) in these two cytochromes. These results suggest that the same or closely adjacent sites on the proteins are involved in the oxidation and reduction reactions. The biochemical implications of this are discussed. PMID:2167843

  9. Imaging the oxidation effects of the Fenton reaction on phospholipids at the interface between aqueous phase and thermotropic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minmin; Jang, Chang-Hyun

    2015-08-01

    The lipid peroxidation process has attracted much attention because of the growing evidence of its involvement in the pathogenesis of age-related diseases. Herein, we report a simple, label-free method to study the oxidation of phospholipids by the Fenton reaction at the interface between an aqueous phase and immiscible liquid crystals (LCs). The different images produced by the orientation of 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) corresponded to the presence or absence of oxidized 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-(1-glycerol) sodium salt (DOPG). The oxidation effects of the Fenton reaction on DOPG were evaluated by monitoring the orientational response of liquid crystals upon contact with the oxidized DOPG solutions. DOPG was oxidized into chain-changed products containing hydroxy, carbonyl, or aldehyde groups, resulting in the rearrangement of the phospholipid layer. This induced the orientational transition of LCs from homeotropic to planar states; therefore, a dark to bright optical shift was observed. This shift was due to the Fenton reaction preventing DOPG to induce the orientational alignment of LCs at the aqueous/LC interface. We also used an ultraviolet spectrophotometer to confirm the effects of oxidation on phospholipids by the Fenton reaction. Using this simple method, a new approach for investigating phospholipid oxidation was established with high resolution and easy accessibility. PMID:25656072

  10. The conversion among reactions at Ni-based anodes in solid oxide fuel cells with low concentrations of dry methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Hongxin; Gao, Hongjie; Chen, Gang; Abudula, Abuliti; Ding, Xinwei

    2011-03-01

    Dry methane with different concentrations is directly fed to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with a Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia (Ni-YSZ) anode and a Ni-scandia-stabilized zirconia (Ni-ScSZ) anode. The anode outlet gases are measured in situ by gas chromatography (GC) to study the reactions of dry methane at different current densities. The comparison between the measured open-circuit voltages (OCVs) and theoretical values, the quantitative analysis of components under different current densities and the activation energy analysis of elementary reactions of CH4 are investigated to identify the types of reactions occurring to methane in SOFCs. It is found that reactions of partial oxidation, CH4 + 2O2- ? CO + H2O + H2 + 4e-, CH4 + 3O2- ? CO + 2H2O + 6e-, and complete oxidation occur to CH4 at the Ni-based anodes in sequence while the current density increasing.

  11. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity Testing of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product (Test Report)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) propellants, or fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), has been hypothesized as a contributory cause of an anomaly which occurred in the chamber pressure (PC) transducer tube on the Reaction Control Subsystem (RCS) aft thruster 467 on flight STS-51. A small hole was found in the titanium-alloy PC tube at the first bend below the pressure transducer. It was surmised that the hole may have been caused by heat and pressure resulting from ignition of FORP. The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested to define the chemical characteristics of FORP, characterize its reactivity, and simulate the events in a controlled environment which may have lead to the Pc-tube failure. Samples of FORP were obtained from the gas-phase reaction of MMH with NTO under laboratory conditions, the pulsed firings of RCS thrusters with modified PC tubes using varied oxidizer or fuel lead times, and the nominal RCS thruster firings at WSTF and Kaiser-Marquardt. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC), ion chromatography (IC), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled to FTIR (TGA/FTIR), and mechanical impact testing were used to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the chemical, thermal, and ignition properties of FORP. These studies showed that the composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depends on the fuel loxidizer ratio at the time of formation, composition of the post-formation atmosphere (reducing or oxidizing), and reaction or postreaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate (MMHN), ammonium nitrate (AN), methylammonium nitrate (MAN), and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. The thermal decomposition reactions of FORP compositions used in this study were unremarkable, Neither the various compositions of FORP, the pure major components of FORP, nor mixtures of FORP with propellant-system corrosion products showed any unusual thermal activity when decomposed under laboratory conditions. Off-limit thruster operations were simulated by rapid mixing of liquid MMH and liquid NTO in a confined space. The test hardware was constructed with pressure- and temperature-measurement devices to determine if the expected fuel oxidizer reaction would result in increased energy release when FORP, FORP constituents, or propellant-system corrosion products were present. These tests demonstrated that FORP, MMHN, AN, or Inconel corrosion products can induce a mixture of MMH and NTO to produce component-damaging energies. The simulation-test program was not extensive enough to provide statistical probabilities for these events but did show that such events can occur. Damaging events required FORP or metal salts to be present at the initial mixing of MMH and NTO. Based on the results of these studies, it is suggested that removal or mitigation of a buildup of these materials may decrease the incidence of these high-energy, potentially damaging events.

  12. Chloroperoxidase-Catalyzed Epoxidation of Cis-?-Methylstyrene: NH-S Hydrogen Bonds and Proximal Helix Dipole Change the Catalytic Mechanism and Significantly Lower the Reaction Barrier.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Alexander N; Pardillo, Armando D; Chatfield, David C

    2015-11-12

    Proximal hydrogen bonding of the axial sulfur with the backbone amides (NH-S) is a conserved feature of heme-thiolate enzymes such as chloroperoxidase (CPO) and cytochrome P450 (P450). In CPO, the effect of NH-S bonds is amplified by the dipole moment of the proximal helix. Our gas-phase DFT studies show that the proximal pocket effect significantly enhances CPO's reactivity toward the epoxidation of olefinic substrates. Comparison of models with and without proximal pocket residues shows that with them, the barrier for C?-O bond formation is lowered by about ?4.6 kcal/mol, while C?-O-C? ring closure becomes barrierless. The dipole moment of the proximal helix was estimated to contribute 1/3 of the decrease, while the rest is attributed to the effect of NH-S bonds. The decrease of the reaction barrier correlates with increased electron density transfer to residues of the proximal pocket. The effect is most pronounced on the doublet spin surface and involves a change in the electron-transfer mechanism. A full enzyme QMMM study on the doublet spin surface gives about the same barrier as the gas-phase DFT study. The free-energy barrier was estimated to be in agreement with the experimental results for the CPO-catalyzed epoxidation of styrene. PMID:26452587

  13. Reactions of Sulfur Dioxide with Neutral Vanadium Oxide Clusters in the Gas Phase. II. Experimental Study Employing Single-Photon Ionization

    E-print Network

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    Reactions of Sulfur Dioxide with Neutral Vanadium Oxide Clusters in the Gas Phase. II. Experimental employed for the study of the reactions of neutral vanadium oxide clusters (VmOn) with sulfur dioxide (SO2 for oxidation of SO2 to SO3 (sulfuric acid production, SO2 removal), selective reduction of NOx with NH3

  14. Generation and reactivity of putative support systems, Ce-Al neutral binary oxide nanoclusters: CO oxidation and C-H bond activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Yin, Shi; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2013-11-01

    Both ceria (CeO2) and alumina (Al2O3) are very important catalyst support materials. Neutral binary oxide nanoclusters (NBONCs), CexAlyOz, are generated and detected in the gas phase and their reactivity with carbon monoxide (CO) and butane (C4H10) is studied. The very active species CeAlO4• can react with CO and butane via O atom transfer (OAT) and H atom transfer (HAT), respectively. Other CexAlyOz NBONCs do not show reactivities toward CO and C4H10. The structures, as well as the reactivities, of CexAlyOz NBONCs are studied theoretically employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The ground state CeAlO4• NBONC possesses a kite-shaped structure with an OtCeObObAlOt configuration (Ot, terminal oxygen; Ob, bridging oxygen). An unpaired electron is localized on the Ot atom of the AlOt moiety rather than the CeOt moiety: this Ot centered radical moiety plays a very important role for the reactivity of the CeAlO4• NBONC. The reactivities of Ce2O4, CeAlO4•, and Al2O4 toward CO are compared, emphasizing the importance of a spin-localized terminal oxygen for these reactions. Intramolecular charge distributions do not appear to play a role in the reactivities of these neutral clusters, but could be important for charged isoelectronic BONCs. DFT studies show that the reaction of CeAlO4• with C4H10 to form the CeAlO4H•C4H9• encounter complex is barrierless. While HAT processes have been previously characterized for cationic and anionic oxide clusters, the reported study is the first observation of a HAT process supported by a ground state neutral oxide cluster. Mechanisms for catalytic oxidation of CO over surfaces of AlxOy/MmOn or MmOn/AlxOy materials are proposed consistent with the presented experimental and theoretical results.

  15. Fabrication, strength and oxidation of molybdenum-silicon-boron alloys from reaction synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlemas, Michael Robert

    Mo-Si-B alloys are a leading candidate for the next generation of jet turbine engine blades and have the potential to raise the operating temperatures by 300-400°C, which would dramatically increase power and efficiency. The alloys of interest are a three-phase mixture of the molybdenum solid solution (Moss) and two intermetallic phases, Mo3Si (A15) and Mo5SiB2 (T2). A novel powder metallurgical method was developed which uses the reaction of molybdenum, silicon nitride (Si3N4) and boron nitride (BN) powders to synthesize a fine dispersion of the intermetallic phases in a Moss matrix. The covalent nitrides are stable in oxidizing environments up to 1000ºC, allowing for fine particle processing without the formation of silicon and boron oxides. The process developed uses standard powder processing techniques to create Mo-Si-B alloys in a less complex and expensive manner than previously demonstrated. The formation of the intermetallic phases was examined by thermo-gravimetric analysis and x-ray diffraction. The start of the reactions to form the T2 and A15 phases were observed at 1140°C and 1193°C and the reactions have been demonstrated to be complete in as little as two hours at 1300°C. This powder metallurgy approach yields a fine dispersion of intermetallics in the Moss matrix, with average grain sizes of 2-4mum. Densities up to 95% of theoretical were attained from pressureless sintering at 1600°C and full theoretical density was achieved by hot-isostatic pressing (HIP). Low temperature sintering and HIPing was attempted to limit grain growth and to reduce the equilibrium silicon concentration in the Moss matrix. Sintering and HIPing at 1300°C reduced the grain sizes of all three phases by over a factor of two. Powder metallurgy provides an opportunity for microstructure control through changes in raw materials and processing parameters. Microstructure examination by electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) imaging was used to precisely define the location of all three phases and to measure the volume fractions and grain size distributions. Microstructural quantification techniques including two-point correlation functions were used to quantify microstructural features and correlate the BN powder size and morphology to the distribution of the intermetallic phases. High-temperature tensile tests were conducted and yield strengths of 580MPa at 1100°C and 480MPa at 1200°C were measured for the Mo-2Si-1B wt.% alloy. The yield strength of the Mo-3Si-1B wt.% alloy was 680MPa at 1100°C and 420MPa at 1300°C. A review of the pertinent literature reveals that these are among the highest yield strengths measured for these compositions. The oxidation resistance in air at 1000 and 1100°C was found to be comparable to the best values reported in the literature. The protective borosilicate surface layer was formed quickly due to the close spacing of intermetallic particles and pre-oxidation treatment was developed to further limit the transient oxidation behavior. An oxidation model was developed which factors in the different stages of oxidation to predict compositions which minimize the total metal recession due to oxidation.

  16. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions, and novel technologies.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Frank; Wunderlin, Pascal; Udert, Kai M; Wells, George F

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO) production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N(2)O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH(2)OH) or the reduction of nitrite (NO(-) (2)) to NO and further to N(2)O. Our review of the biological pathways for N(2)O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO(-) (2) to NO and the further reduction of NO to N(2)O, while N(2)O formation from NH(2)OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N(2)O formation due to the reactivity of NO(-) (2), NH(2)OH, and nitroxyl (HNO). Moreover, biological N(2)O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N(2)O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N(2)O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N(2)O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N(2)O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N(2)O with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS). In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N(2)O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N(2)O build-up. PMID:23109930

  17. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions, and novel technologies

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Frank; Wunderlin, Pascal; Udert, Kai M.; Wells, George F.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO) production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N2O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) or the reduction of nitrite (NO?2) to NO and further to N2O. Our review of the biological pathways for N2O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO?2 to NO and the further reduction of NO to N2O, while N2O formation from NH2OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N2O formation due to the reactivity of NO?2, NH2OH, and nitroxyl (HNO). Moreover, biological N2O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N2O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N2O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N2O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N2O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N2O with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS). In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N2O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N2O build-up. PMID:23109930

  18. [High temperature reactivity between titanium and refractory oxides in dental casting procedure. Fundamental study on refractoriness of investments and ceramo-metal bonding by analytical SEM and oxide single crystals].

    PubMed

    Watari, F

    1989-01-01

    The reactivity of various refractory oxides (SiO2, Al2O3, MgO, CaO, ZrO2) with molten titanium was investigated by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), using single crystals of oxide as specimen. The region of the reaction boundary between titanium and single crystal oxide was observed by electron microscopy (SEM). Elemental analysis across the Ti/oxide boundary was done by EDS and the reaction layer thickness was quantitatively determined. Of these refractory oxides, SiO2 is the most reactive with titanium followed by Al2O3. The 250 microns thick Si-rich region and 100 microns thick Al-rich region were formed respectively in Ti around the remnant oxides. The diffusion of Si as a result of reaction is greater than that of Al. MgO, CaO, ZrO2 show very little reaction with Ti and the reaction layer thickness was below the spatial resolution of EDS (approximately 1 micron). The thickness and composition of the reaction layer and reactivity were determined. These results were in good agreement with those obtained by ESCA. PMID:2690391

  19. Predicting Promoter-Induced Bond Activation on Solid Catalysts Using Elementary Bond Orders.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Charlie; Latimer, Allegra A; Yoo, Jong Suk; Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2015-09-17

    In this Letter, we examine bond activation induced by nonmetal surface promoters in the context of dehydrogenation reactions. We use C-H bond activation in methane dehydrogenation on transition metals as an example to understand the origin of the promoting or poisoning effect of nonmetals. The electronic structure of the surface and the bond order of the promoter are found to establish all trends in bond activation. On the basis of these results, we develop a predictive model that successfully describes the energetics of C-H, O-H, and N-H bond activation across a range of reactions. For a given reaction step, a single data point determines whether a nonmetal will promote bond activation or poison the surface and by how much. We show how our model leads to general insights that can be directly used to predict bond activation energetics on transition metal sulfides and oxides, which can be perceived as promoted surfaces. These results can then be directly used in studies on full catalytic pathways. PMID:26722740

  20. Chemical bonding and optoelectrical properties of ruthenium doped yttrium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lei; Han, Jiecai; Zhu, Jiaqi; Zhu, Yuankun; Schlaberg, H.Inaki

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: IR transmittance of various transparent conductive materials (RYO films grown under RT, 400 °C and 600 °C, ITO films [2], Carbon Nano tube films [11], metal/dielectric multilayers [12]). - Highlights: • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ru (RYO) films were prepared on ZnS substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering. • Ru doping significantly decreases the resistivity and extends the transparent range. • Optical and electrical properties of RYO films can be tuned by substrate temperatures. • The RYO films exhibit excellent far-IR transmittance and electrical property. - Abstract: Highly infrared transparent conductive ruthenium doped yttrium oxide (RYO) films were deposited on zinc sulfide and glass substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering. The structural, optical, and electrical properties of the films as a function of growth temperature were studied. It is shown that the sputtered RYO thin films are amorphous and smooth surface is obtained. The infrared transmittance of the films increases with increasing the growth temperature. RYO films maintain greater than ?65% transmittance over a wide wavelength range from 2.5 ?m to 12 ?m and the highest transmittance value reaches 73.3% at ?10 ?m. With increasing growth temperature, the resistivity changed in a wide range and lowest resistivity of about 3.36 × 10{sup ?3} ? cm is obtained at room temperature. The RYO thin films with high conductivity and transparency in IR spectral range would be suitable for infrared optical and electromagnetic shielding devices.

  1. Mixed N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Bis(oxazolinyl)borato Rhodium and Iridium Complexes in Photochemical and Thermal Oxidative Addition Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Songchen; Manna, Kuntal; Ellern, Arkady; Sadow, Aaron D

    2014-12-08

    In order to facilitate oxidative addition chemistry of fac-coordinated rhodium(I) and iridium(I) compounds, carbene–bis(oxazolinyl)phenylborate proligands have been synthesized and reacted with organometallic precursors. Two proligands, PhB(OxMe2)2(ImtBuH) (H[1]; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImtBuH = 1-tert-butylimidazole) and PhB(OxMe2)2(ImMesH) (H[2]; ImMesH = 1-mesitylimidazole), are deprotonated with potassium benzyl to generate K[1] and K[2], and these potassium compounds serve as reagents for the synthesis of a series of rhodium and iridium complexes. Cyclooctadiene and dicarbonyl compounds {PhB(OxMe2)2ImtBu}Rh(?4-C8H12) (3), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(?4-C8H12) (4), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(CO)2 (5), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(?4-C8H12) (6), and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)2 (7) are synthesized along with ToMM(?4-C8H12) (M = Rh (8); M = Ir (9); ToM = tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate). The spectroscopic and structural properties and reactivity of this series of compounds show electronic and steric effects of substituents on the imidazole (tert-butyl vs mesityl), effects of replacing an oxazoline in ToM with a carbene donor, and the influence of the donor ligand (CO vs C8H12). The reactions of K[2] and [M(?-Cl)(?2-C8H14)2]2 (M = Rh, Ir) provide {?4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes?CH2}Rh(?-H)(?-Cl)Rh(?2-C8H14)2 (10) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(?3-C8H13) (11). In the former compound, a spontaneous oxidative addition of a mesityl ortho-methyl to give a mixed-valent dirhodium species is observed, while the iridium compound forms a monometallic allyl hydride. Photochemical reactions of dicarbonyl compounds 5 and 7 result in C–H bond oxidative addition providing the compounds {?4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes?CH2}RhH(CO) (12) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(Ph)CO (13). In 12, oxidative addition results in cyclometalation of the mesityl ortho-methyl similar to 10, whereas the iridium compound reacts with the benzene solvent to give a rare crystallographically characterized cis-[Ir](H)(Ph) complex. Alternatively, the rhodium carbonyl 5 or iridium isocyanide {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)CNtBu (15) reacts with PhSiH3 in the dark to form the silyl compound {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}RhH(SiH2Ph)CO (14) or {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(SiH2Ph)CNtBu (17). These examples demonstrate the enhanced thermal reactivity of {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}-supported iridium and rhodium carbonyl compounds in comparison to tris(oxazolinyl)borate, tris(pyrazolyl)borate, and cyclopentadienyl-supported compounds.

  2. On the structure and bonding in the B4O4(+) cluster: a boron oxide analogue of the 3,5-dehydrophenyl cation with ? and ? double aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Ou, Ting; Tian, Wen-Juan; You, Xue-Rui; Wang, Ying-Jin; Wang, Kang; Zhai, Hua-Jin

    2015-11-28

    Boron oxide clusters offer intriguing molecular models for the electron-deficient system, in which the boronyl (BO) group plays a key role and the interplay between the localized BO triple bond and the multicenter electron delocalization dominates the chemical bonding. Here we report the structural, electronic, and bonding properties of the B4O4(+) cationic cluster on the basis of unbiased Coalescence Kick global-minimum searches and first-principles electronic structural calculations at the B3LYP and single-point CCSD(T) levels. The B4O4(+) cluster is shown to possess a Cs (1, (2)A') global minimum. It represents the smallest boron oxide species with a hexagonal boroxol (B3O3) ring as the core, terminated by a boronyl group. Chemical bonding analyses reveal double (? and ?) aromaticity in Cs B4O4(+), which closely mimics that in the 3,5-dehydrophenyl cation C6H3(+) (D3h, (1)A1'), a prototypical molecule with double aromaticity. Alternative D2h (2, (2)B3g) and C2v (3, (2)A1) isomeric structures of B4O4(+) are also analyzed, which are relevant to the global minima of B4O4 neutral and B4O4(-) anion, respectively. These three structural motifs vary drastically in terms of energetics upon changing the charge state, demonstrating an interesting case in which every electron counts. The calculated ionization potentials and electron affinities of the three corresponding neutral isomers are highly uneven, which underlie the conformational changes in the B4O4(+/0/-) series. The current work presents the smallest boron oxide species with a boroxol ring, establishes an analogy between boron oxides and the 3,5-dehydrophenyl cation, and enriches the chemistry of boron oxides and boronyls. PMID:26477331

  3. The role of Ile87 of CYP158A2 in oxidative coupling reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Bin; Bellamine, Aouatef; Lei, Li; Waterman, Michael R.

    2012-05-15

    Both CYP158A1 and CYP158A2 are able to catalyze an oxidative C-C coupling reaction producing biflaviolin or triflaviolin in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). The substrate-bound crystal structures of CYP158A2 and CYP158A1 reveal that the side chain of Ile87 in CYP158A2 points to the active site contacting the distal flaviolin molecule, however, the bulkier side chain of Lys90 in CYP158A1 (corresponding to Ile87 in CYP158A2) is toward the distal surface of the protein. These results suggest that these residues could be important in determining product regiospecificity. In order to explore the role of the two residues in catalysis, the reciprocal mutants, Ile87Lys and Lys90Ile, of CYP158A2 and CYP158A1, respectively, were generated and characterized. The mutant Ile87Lys enzyme forms two isomers of biflaviolin instead of three isomers of biflaviolin in wild-type CYP158A2. CYP158A1 containing the substitution of lysine with isoleucine has the same catalytic activity compared with the wild-type CYP158A1. The crystal structure of Ile87Lys showed that the BC loop in the mutant is in a very different orientation compared with the BC loop in both CYP158A1/A2 structures. These results shed light on the mechanism of the oxidative coupling reaction catalyzed by cytochrome P450.

  4. Reactions of Phenylhydrosilanes with Pincer-Nickel Complexes: Evidence for New Si-O and Si-C Bond Formation Pathways.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jingjun; Vabre, Boris; Zargarian, Davit

    2015-12-01

    This contribution presents evidence for new pathways manifested in the reactions of the phenylhydrosilanes PhnSiH4-n with the pincer complexes (POCsp(2)OP)Ni(OSiMe3), 1-OSiMe3, and (POCsp(3)OP)Ni(OSiMe3), 2-OSiMe3 (POCsp(2)OP = 2,6-(i-Pr2PO)2C6H3; POCsp(3)OP = (i-Pr2POCH2)2CH). Excess PhSiH3 or Ph2SiH2 reacted with 1-OSiMe3 to eliminate the disilyl ethers PhnH3-nSiOSiMe3 (n = 1 or 2) and generate the nickel hydride species 1-H. Subsequent reaction of the latter with more substrate formed corresponding nickel silyl species 1-SiPhH2 or 1-SiPh2H and generated multiple Si-containing products, including disilanes and redistribution products. The reaction of 1-OSiMe3 with excess Ph2SiH2/Ph2SiD2 revealed a net KIE of ca. 1.3-1.4 at room temperature. Treating 1-OSiMe3 with excess Ph3SiH also gave 1-H and the corresponding disilyl ether Ph3SiOSiMe3, but this reaction also generated the new siloxide 1-OSiPh3 apparently via an unconventional ?-bond metathesis pathway in which the Ni center is not involved directly. The reaction of excess PhSiH3 and 2-OSiMe3 gave polysilanes of varying solubilities and molecular weights; NMR investigations showed that these polymers arise from Ni(0) species generated in situ from the reductive elimination of the highly reactive hydride intermediate, 2-H. The stoichiometric reactions of 2-OSiMe3 with Ph2SiH2 and Ph3SiH gave, respectively, siloxides 2-OSiPh2(OSiMe3) and 2-OSiPh3. Together, these results demonstrate the strong influence of pincer backbone and hydrosilane sterics on the different reactivities of 1-OSiMe3 and 2-OSiMe3 toward PhnSiH4-n (dimerization, polymerization, and redistribution vs formation of new siloxides). The mechanisms of the reactions that lead to the observed Si-O, Si-C, and Si-Si bond formations are discussed in terms of classical and unconventional ?-bond metathesis pathways. PMID:26562478

  5. In Situ Characterization of NiTi/Ti6Al4V Joints During Reaction-Assisted Diffusion Bonding Using Ni/Ti Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaleiro, A. J.; Ramos, A. S.; Braz Fernandes, F. M.; Schell, N.; Vieira, M. T.

    2014-05-01

    Reaction-assisted diffusion bonding process of NiTi and Ti6Al4V was studied in situ. For this purpose, experiments were carried out at the High Energy Materials Science beamline (P-07) at PETRA-III (DESY). Ni/Ti multilayer thin films 2.5 ?m thick with 12 and 25 nm modulation periods were directly deposited by magnetron sputtering onto the materials being joined. The NiTi and Ti6Al4V coated parts were placed with the films facing each other in a dilatometer equipped with Kapton windows for the x-ray beams. Microjoining was promoted by applying a 10 MPa pressure and inductively heating the materials, while simultaneously acquiring x-ray diffraction scans across the bond interface. Sound joints were produced at 750 °C. The formation of the NiTi2 phase could not be avoided.

  6. Michael-type addition of secondary phosphine oxides to (1,4-cyclohexadien-3-yl)phosphine oxides.

    PubMed

    Stankevi?, Marek; Jakli?ska, Magdalena; Pietrusiewicz, K Micha?

    2012-02-17

    Base-induced reaction between (1,4-cyclohexadien-3-yl)phosphine oxides and secondary phosphine oxides gives 3,4-bis(phosphinoyl)cyclohexenes and 2,3-bis(phosphinoyl)cyclohexenes through an in situ isomerization of one of the cyclohexadienyl double bonds and a subsequent Michael-type addition of the secondary phosphine oxide. PMID:22292492

  7. Reaction mechanism of CO oxidation on Cu{sub 2}O(111): A density functional study

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Baozhen; Chen Wenkai; Xu Yijun

    2010-10-21

    The possible reaction mechanisms for CO oxidation on the perfect Cu{sub 2}O(111) surface have been investigated by performing periodic density functional theoretical calculations. We find that Cu{sub 2}O(111) is able to facilitate the CO oxidation with different mechanisms. Four possible mechanisms are explored (denoted as M{sub ER1}, M{sub ER2}, M{sub LH1}, and M{sub LH2}, respectively): M{sub ER1} is CO{sub (gas)}+O{sub 2(ads)}{yields}CO{sub 2(gas)}; M{sub ER2} is CO{sub (gas)}+O{sub 2(ads)}{yields}CO{sub 3(ads)}{yields}O{sub (ads)}+CO{sub 2(gas)}; M{sub LH1} refers to CO{sub (ads)}+O{sub 2(ads)}{yields}O{sub (ads)}+CO{sub 2(ads)}; and M{sub LH2} refers to CO{sub (ads)}+O{sub 2(ads)}{yields}OOCO{sub (ads)}{yields}O{sub (ads)}+CO{sub 2(ads)}. Our transition state calculations clearly reveal that M{sub ER1} and M{sub LH2} are both viable; but M{sub ER1} mechanism preferentially operates, in which only a moderate energy barrier (60.22 kJ/mol) needs to be overcome. When CO oxidation takes place along M{sub ER2} path, it is facile for CO{sub 3} formation, but is difficult for its decomposition, thereby CO{sub 3} species can stably exist on Cu{sub 2}O(111). Of course, the reaction of CO with lattice O of Cu{sub 2}O(111) is also considered. However, the calculated barrier is 600.00 kJ/mol, which is too large to make the path feasible. So, we believe that on Cu{sub 2}O(111), CO reacts with adsorbed O, rather than lattice O, to form CO{sub 2}. This is different from the usual Mars-van Krevene mechanism. The present results enrich our understanding of the catalytic oxidation of CO by copper-based and metal-oxide catalysts.

  8. Effects of gas flow on oxidation reaction in liquid induced by He/O2 plasma-jet irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro; Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Koga, Kazunori; Sarinont, Thapanut; Amano, Takaaki; Takenaka, Kosuke; Shiratani, Masaharu; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2015-07-01

    We present here analysis of oxidation reaction in liquid by a plasma-jet irradiation under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. To estimate the total amount of oxidation reaction induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in liquid, we employ a KI-starch solution system, where the absorbance of the KI-starch solution near 600 nm behaves linear to the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. The laminar flow with higher gas velocity induces an increase in the ROS distribution area on the liquid surface, which results in a large amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. However, a much faster gas flow conversely results in a reduction in the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid under the following two conditions: first condition is that the turbulence flow is triggered in a gas flow channel at a high Reynolds number of gas flow, which leads to a marked change of the spatial distribution of the ROS concentration in gas phase. Second condition is that the dimpled liquid surface is formed by strong gas flow, which prevents the ROS from being transported in radial direction along the liquid surface.

  9. Incorporation of Hydrogen Bonding Functionalities into the Second Coordination Sphere of Iron-Based Water Oxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffert, Wesley A.; Mock, Michael T.; Appel, Aaron M.; Yang, Jenny Y.

    2013-08-06

    Energy storage and conversion schemes based on environmentally benign chemical fuels will require the discovery of faster, cheaper, and more robust catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Although pendant bases have led to enhanced turnover frequencies with non-aqueous substrates, their effect on the catalytic behavior of molecular water oxidation catalysts has received little attention. Herein, the syntheses, structures, and catalytic activities of new iron complexes with pendant bases are reported. Of these, the complex [Fe(mepydz)4(CH3CN)2](OTf)2 (mepydz = N,N?-dimethyl-N,N?-bis(pyridazin-3-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine, OTf = trifluoromethanesulonate) (8(CH3CN)22+) is the most active catalyst. Initial turnover frequencies of 141 h?1 and 24 h?1 were measured using ceric ammonium nitrate at pH 0.7 and sodium periodate at pH 4.7, respectively. At pH 4.7, 8(CH3CN)22+ the initial turnover frequency is 70% faster than the structurally analogous complex without ancillary proton relays. These results demonstrate that the incorporation of pendant bases into molecular water oxidation catalysts is a synthetic principle that should be considered in the development of new OER catalysts. This work was supported by Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  10. Oligomerization reactions of deoxyribonucleotides on montmorillonite clay - The effect of mononucleotide structure, phosphate activation and montmorillonite composition on phosphodiester bond formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.; KAMALUDDIN; Ertem, Gozen

    1990-01-01

    The 2(prime)-d-5(prime)-GMP and 2(prime)-d-5(prime)-AMP bind 2 times more strongly to montmorillonite 22A than do 2(prime)-d-5(prime)-CMP and 5(prime)-TMP. The dinucleotide d(pG)2 forms in 9.2 percent yield and the cyclic dinucleotide c(dpG)2 in 5.4 percent yield in the reaction of 2(prime)-d-5(prime)-GMP with EDAC in the presence of montmorillonite 22A. The yield of dimers which contain the phosphodiester bond decreases as the reaction medium is changed from 0.2 M NaCl to a mixture of 0.2 M NaCl and 0.075 M MgCl2. A low yield of d(pA)2 was observed in the condensation reaction of 5(prime)-ImdpA on montmorillonite 22A. The yield of d(pA)2 obtained when EDAC is used as the condensing agent increases with increasing iron content of the Na(+)-montmorillonite used as catalyst. Evidence is presented which shows that the acidity of the Na(+)-montmorillonite is a necessary but not sufficient factor for the montmorillonite catalysis of phosphodiester bond formation.

  11. Energetic study of 4(3H)-pyrimidinone: aromaticity of reactions, hydrogen bond rules, and support for an anomeric effect.

    PubMed

    Galvão, Tiago L P; Rocha, Inês M; Ribeiro da Silva, Maria D M C; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A V

    2014-05-01

    4(3H)-Pyrimidinone is observed in nature in equilibrium with other tautomeric forms, mimicking the tautomeric equilibrium in pyrimidine nucleobases. In this work, the enthalpy of formation in the gaseous phase of 4(3H)-pyrimidinone was derived from the combination of the enthalpy of formation in the crystalline phase, obtained by static bomb combustion calorimetry, and the enthalpy of sublimation, obtained by Knudsen effusion. The gaseous phase enthalpy of formation of 4(3H)-pyrimidinone was interpreted in terms of isodesmic reactions that consider the enthalpic effects of hydroxypyridines and pyrimidine. After comparison of the experimental and computational results, the same type of isodesmic reactions was used to study the substituent effects of the hydroxyl functional group of 2-, 4-, and 5-hydroxypyrimidines. The influence of aromaticity on the energetics of hydroxypyrimidines was evaluated using the variation of nucleus-independent chemical shifts for several reactions. The influence of intramolecular hydrogen bonds was investigated using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules and the geometric rule of Baker and Hubbard to identify hydrogen bonds. The energetic results obtained were also interpreted in terms of an in plane anomeric effect in the pyrimidine ring. PMID:24741997

  12. High-Temperature Oxidation-Resistant and Low Coefficient of Thermal Expansion NiAl-Base Bond Coat Developed for a Turbine Blade Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Many critical gas turbine engine components are currently made from Ni-base superalloys that are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC). The TBC consists of a ZrO2-based top coat and a bond coat that is used to enhance the bonding between the superalloy substrate and the top coat. MCrAlY alloys (CoCrAlY and NiCrAlY) are currently used as bond coats and are chosen for their very good oxidation resistance. TBC life is frequently limited by the oxidation resistance of the bond coat, along with a thermal expansion mismatch between the metallic bond coat and the ceramic top coat. The aim of this investigation at the NASA Glenn Research Center was to develop a new longer life, higher temperature bond coat by improving both the oxidation resistance and the thermal expansion characteristics of the bond coat. Nickel aluminide (NiAl) has excellent high-temperature oxidation resistance and can sustain a protective Al2O3 scale to longer times and higher temperatures in comparison to MCrAlY alloys. Cryomilling of NiAl results in aluminum nitride (AlN) formation that reduces the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the alloy and enhances creep strength. Thus, additions of cryomilled NiAl-AlN to CoCrAlY were examined as a potential bond coat. In this work, the composite alloy was investigated as a stand-alone substrate to demonstrate its feasibility prior to actual use as a coating. About 85 percent of prealloyed NiAl and 15 percent of standard commercial CoCrAlY alloys were mixed and cryomilled in an attritor with stainless steel balls used as grinding media. The milling was carried out in the presence of liquid nitrogen. The milled powder was consolidated by hot extrusion or by hot isostatic pressing. From the consolidated material, oxidation coupons, four-point bend, CTE, and tensile specimens were machined. The CTE measurements were made between room temperature and 1000 C in an argon atmosphere. It is shown that the CTE of the NiAl-AlN-CoCrAlY composite bond coat is lower than that of the commercially used coating alloy 16-6. To examine the potential of NiAl-AlN-CoCrAlY as a bond coat, we subjected two samples to cyclic furnace testing. The furnace cycle consisted of 45 min at 1163 C (2125 F ) followed by 15 min of cooling out of the furnace. The current NASA baseline TBC is a NiCrAlY bond coat below the 7YSZ top coat. The average TBC life for this baseline coating on Ren N5 is 188 plus or minus 19 cycles. NiAl-AlN-CoCrAlY specimens coated with the same 7YSZ top coat were still intact even after 1000 cycles. Therefore, the NiAl-AlN-CoCrAlY as a bulk substrate material, exhibits more than 5 times the life of the current state-of-the-art material. The next step is to evaluate this material as a coating on the same superalloy substrate.

  13. [Laser photolysis study on photo-oxidation reactions of aromatic amino acids with triplet 2-methylanthraquinone].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xi-Yan; Fu, Hai-Ying; Zhu, Li; Wu, Guo-Zhong

    2013-04-01

    The transient photo-sensitive oxidation between 2-methylanthraquinone (MAQ) and aromatic amino acids (namely tryptophan, tyrosine and phenylalanine) in acetonitrile/water (1 : 1, V/V) solution was investigated by laser photolysis techniques with the excitation wavelength of 355 nm. The triplet state absorption of 2-methylanthraquinone was attributed to 390, 450 and 590 nm and the anion radical absorption of MAQ was due to 390 and 490 nm identified by the electron transfer reactions from 4-diazabicyclo [2. 2. 2] octane (DABCO) or diphenylamine (DPA) to 3MAQ*. With the decay of 3 MAQ*, the MAQ*- at 490 nm appeared, which indicated that the electron transfer reactions between 3 MAQ* and amino acids occurred. Moreover, the rate constants were deduced to be 3.0 x 10(9), 1.1 x 10(9) and 1.8 x 10(8) L x mol(-1) x s(-1) for TrpH, TyrOH and PHE, respectively. On the other hand, the free energy changes (deltaG) of the reactions showed that the proposed electron transfer steps are thermodynamically feasible. PMID:23841398

  14. Cyclohexane oxidation using Au/MgO: an investigation of the reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Conte, Marco; Liu, Xi; Murphy, Damien M; Whiston, Keith; Hutchings, Graham J

    2012-12-21

    The liquid phase oxidation of cyclohexane was undertaken using Au/MgO and the reaction mechanism was investigated by means of continuous wave (CW) EPR spectroscopy employing the spin trapping technique. Activity tests aimed to determine the conversion and selectivity of Au/MgO catalyst showed that Au was capable of selectivity control to cyclohexanol formation up to 70%, but this was accompanied by a limited enhancement in conversion when compared with the reaction in the absence of catalyst. In contrast, when radical initiators were used, in combination with Au/MgO, an activity comparable to that observed in industrial processes at ca. 5% conversion was found, with retained high selectivity. By studying the free radical autoxidation of cyclohexane and the cyclohexyl hydroperoxide decomposition in the presence of spin traps, we show that Au nanoparticles are capable of an enhanced generation of cyclohexyl alkoxy radicals, and the role of Au is identified as a promoter of the catalytic autoxidation processes, therefore demonstrating that the reaction proceeds via a radical chain mechanism. PMID:23132082

  15. Numerical investigation of the effects of iron oxidation reactions on the fume formation mechanism in arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanibondi, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Fume formation during arc welding has been modelled using a stochastic approach taking into account iron oxidation reactions. The model includes the nucleation and condensation of Fe and FeO vapours, the reaction of gaseous O2 and O on the nanoparticle surface, the coagulation of the nanoparticles including a sintering time as a function of temperature and composition, assuming chemical equilibrium for species in the gaseous phase. Results suggest that fumes generated in gas metal arc welding with oxidizing shielding mixtures are composed of aggregates of primary particles that are nucleated from gas-phase FeO and further oxidized to Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 in the liquid and solid phase, respectively. The composition of the fumes at the end of the formation process depends on the relative initial concentration of Fe and O2 species in the gas mixture and on the diameter of the primary particles that compose the aggregates: as the oxidation reactions are driven by deposition of oxygen on nanoparticle surface, the oxidation of larger particles is slower than that of smaller particles because of their lower surface to volume ratio. Solid-state diffusion is limiting the oxidation process at temperatures lower than 1500 K, inducing the formation of not fully oxidized particles composed of Fe3O4.

  16. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Quarterly report No. 5, October 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Pavelka, L.A.; Mayo, F.R.

    1980-01-14

    Bituminous coal is assumed to consist mostly of an aggregate of condensed aromatic and aliphatic rings, connected and made insoluble (but swellable) by crosslinks containing only single bonds. The objective of this project is to determine the proportions of the various kinds of connecting links and how they can best be broken - in other words, to determine the structure of coal, with emphasis on the crosslinks and breakable single bonds. This report presents brief summaries and experimental details of the following tasks; acetylation of asphaltols and black acids; cleavages of asphatol 28-A; cleavages of benzylamine extraction products; investigations of black acids; oxidation and oxidation products of coal extracts and black acids; and gel permeation chromatography. 6 references, 1 figure, 5 tables.

  17. Visible light generation of I–I bonds by Ru-tris(diimine) excited states

    PubMed Central

    Farnum, Byron H.; Jou, Jeffrey J.; Meyer, Gerald J.

    2012-01-01

    Seven Ru-tris(diimine) compounds were prepared to study the photooxidation of iodide. Iodide oxidation results in the formation of I–I bonds, and it is therefore relevant to the conversion and storage of solar energy. Iodide oxidation is also a key step for electrical power generation in dye-sensitized solar cells. The mechanistic details of iodide oxidation and I–I bond formation were elucidated through time-resolved spectroscopic measurements. Bimolecular electron-transfer reactions between Ru-tris(diimine) excited states and iodide first yielded the iodine atom that subsequently reacted with excess I- to yield the I–I bond of diiodide (). An important finding was that excited-state iodide oxidation was rapid (k > 109 M-1 s-1) even for thermodynamically uphill reactions. These results indicated that iodide oxidation to the iodine atom may account for a significant fraction of sensitizer regeneration within dye-sensitized solar cells. PMID:22566656

  18. Highly active iridium/iridium-tin/tin oxide heterogeneous nanoparticles as alternative electrocatalysts for the ethanol oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Du, Wenxin; Wang, Qi; Saxner, David; Deskins, N Aaron; Su, Dong; Krzanowski, James E; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Teng, Xiaowei

    2011-09-28

    Ethanol is a promising fuel for low-temperature direct fuel cell reactions due to its low toxicity, ease of storage and transportation, high-energy density, and availability from biomass. However, the implementation of ethanol fuel cell technology has been hindered by the lack of low-cost, highly active anode catalysts. In this paper, we have studied Iridium (Ir)-based binary catalysts as low-cost alternative electrocatalysts replacing platinum (Pt)-based catalysts for the direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) reaction. We report the synthesis of carbon supported Ir(71)Sn(29) catalysts with an average diameter of 2.7 ± 0.6 nm through a "surfactant-free" wet chemistry approach. The complementary characterization techniques, including aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, are used to identify the "real" heterogeneous structure of Ir(71)Sn(29)/C particles as Ir/Ir-Sn/SnO(2), which consists of an Ir-rich core and an Ir-Sn alloy shell with SnO(2) present on the surface. The Ir(71)Sn(29)/C heterogeneous catalyst exhibited high electrochemical activity toward the ethanol oxidation reaction compared to the commercial Pt/C (ETEK), PtRu/C (Johnson Matthey) as well as PtSn/C catalysts. Electrochemical measurements and density functional theory calculations demonstrate that the superior electro-activity is directly related to the high degree of Ir-Sn alloy formation as well as the existence of nonalloyed SnO(2) on surface. Our cross-disciplinary work, from novel "surfactant-free" synthesis of Ir-Sn catalysts, theoretical simulations, and catalytic measurements to the characterizations of "real" heterogeneous nanostructures, will not only highlight the intriguing structure-property correlations in nanosized catalysts but also have a transformative impact on the commercialization of DEFC technology by replacing Pt with low-cost, highly active Ir-based catalysts. PMID:21812458

  19. Highly Active Iridium/Iridium Tin/Tin Oxide Heterogeneous Nanoparticles as Alternative Electrocatalysts for the Ethanol Oxidation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Du W.; Su D.; Wang Q.; Saxner D.; Deskins N.A.; Krzanowski J.E.; Frenkel A.I.; Teng X.

    2011-08-03

    Ethanol is a promising fuel for low-temperature direct fuel cell reactions due to its low toxicity, ease of storage and transportation, high-energy density, and availability from biomass. However, the implementation of ethanol fuel cell technology has been hindered by the lack of low-cost, highly active anode catalysts. In this paper, we have studied Iridium (Ir)-based binary catalysts as low-cost alternative electrocatalysts replacing platinum (Pt)-based catalysts for the direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) reaction. We report the synthesis of carbon supported Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29} catalysts with an average diameter of 2.7 {+-} 0.6 nm through a 'surfactant-free' wet chemistry approach. The complementary characterization techniques, including aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, are used to identify the 'real' heterogeneous structure of Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29}/C particles as Ir/Ir-Sn/SnO{sub 2}, which consists of an Ir-rich core and an Ir-Sn alloy shell with SnO{sub 2} present on the surface. The Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29}/C heterogeneous catalyst exhibited high electrochemical activity toward the ethanol oxidation reaction compared to the commercial Pt/C (ETEK), PtRu/C (Johnson Matthey) as well as PtSn/C catalysts. Electrochemical measurements and density functional theory calculations demonstrate that the superior electro-activity is directly related to the high degree of Ir-Sn alloy formation as well as the existence of nonalloyed SnO{sub 2} on surface. Our cross-disciplinary work, from novel 'surfactant-free' synthesis of Ir-Sn catalysts, theoretical simulations, and catalytic measurements to the characterizations of 'real' heterogeneous nanostructures, will not only highlight the intriguing structure-property correlations in nanosized catalysts but also have a transformative impact on the commercialization of DEFC technology by replacing Pt with low-cost, highly active Ir-based catalysts.

  20. Structure Sensitivity of the Oxygen Evolution Reaction Catalyzed by Cobalt(II,III) Oxide.

    PubMed

    Plaisance, Craig P; van Santen, Rutger A

    2015-11-25

    Quantum chemical calculations and simulated kinetics were used to examine the structure sensitivity of the oxygen evolution reaction on several surface terminations of Co3O4. Active sites consisting of two adjacent Co(IV) cations connected by bridging oxos were identified on both the (001) and (311) surfaces. Formation of the O-O bond proceeds on these sites by nucleophilic attack of water on a bridging oxo. It was found that the relative turnover frequencies for the different sites are highly dependent on the overpotential, with the dual-Co site on the (311) surface being most active at medium overpotentials (0.46-0.77 V), where O-O bond formation by water addition is rate limiting. A similar dual-Co site on the (001) surface is most active at low overpotentials (<0.46 V), where O2 release is rate limiting, and a single-Co site on the (110) surface is most active at overpotentials that are high enough (>0.77 V) to form a significant concentration of highly reactive terminal Co(V)?O species. Two overpotential-dependent Sabatier relationships were identified based on the Brønsted basicity and redox potential of the active site, explaining the change in the active site with overpotential. The (311) dual-Co site that is most active in the medium overpotential range is consistent with recent experimental observations suggesting that a defect site is responsible for the observed oxygen evolution activity and that a modest concentration of superoxo intermediates is present on the surface. Importantly, we find that it is essential to consider the kinetics of the water addition and O2 release steps rather than only the thermodynamics. PMID:26479891