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Sample records for bonded amalgam restorations

  1. Amalgam Restorations: To Bond or Not.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    This article will review the use of various liners used to eliminate microleakage in amalgam restorations. It will review the literature about whether amalgam restorations are improved by using a bonding process and if so specifically how it improves the patient outcome. PMID:26596104

  2. Bond strength of repaired amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Rey, Rosalia; Mondragon, Eduardo; Shen, Chiayi

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the interfacial flexural strength (FS) of amalgam repairs and the optimal combination of repair materials and mechanical retention required for a consistent and durable repair bond. Amalgam bricks were created, each with 1 end roughened to expose a fresh surface before repair. Four groups followed separate repair protocols: group 1, bonding agent with amalgam; group 2, bonding agent with composite resin; group 3, mechanical retention (slot) with amalgam; and group 4, slot with bonding agent and amalgam. Repaired specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 1, 10, 30, 120, or 360 days before being loaded to failure in a 3-point bending test. Statistical analysis showed significant changes in median FS over time in groups 2 and 4. The effect of the repair method on the FS values after each storage period was significant for most groups except the 30-day storage groups. Amalgam-amalgam repair with adequate condensation yielded the most consistent and durable bond. An amalgam bonding agent could be beneficial when firm condensation on the repair surface cannot be achieved or when tooth structure is involved. Composite resin can be a viable option for amalgam repair in an esthetically demanding region, but proper mechanical modification of the amalgam surface and selection of the proper bonding system are essential. PMID:26325656

  3. One-year clinical evaluation of bonded amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Mahler, D B; Engle, J H; Simms, L E; Terkla, L G

    1996-03-01

    Using one selected amalgam bonding agent, the authors evaluated bonded and unbonded restorations in clinical service. Based on postoperative sensitivity one to two weeks after placement and marginal fracture at one year, no difference was found between the bonded and unbonded restorations. Furthermore, some technical difficulties were experienced with use of the bonding agent. PMID:8819781

  4. Cuspal deflection of maxillary premolars restored with bonded amalgam.

    PubMed

    el-Badrawy, W A

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this study were to measure cuspal deflection of premolars restored with bonded amalgam and to investigate bond resistance to thermo-cycling and cyclic loading. Strain gauges were used to measure cuspal deflection of maxillary premolars restored with MOD bonded amalgam restorations. A nondestructive method was used in which teeth were loaded repeatedly to record cuspal deflection following different restorative procedures. Ten extracted premolars with similar dimensions were selected and their roots mounted in resin bases 2 mm below the CEJ. Two single-element strain gauges were bonded to the buccal and lingual surfaces of the cusps of each tooth at a level that corresponded to the pulpal floor of MOD cavities. These were connected to a strain indicator with a built-in wheat-stone bridge. An Instron machine was used to apply a 100 N compressive load. Micro-strain readings were recorded with each loading at the following stages: (1) sound unprepared teeth (baseline reading), (2) following preparation of a medium-size MOD cavity, (3) 24 hours following restoration with amalgam, (4) following amalgam removal, (5) 24 hours following restoration with bonded amalgam. Durability of the bond was further tested by cyclic loading of 2000, 4000, 6000, and 8000 load cycles. Mean micro-strain values recorded at the buccal cusp were: 48.0 (21.6), 126.8(57.2), 121.4(53.3), 120.8(56.1), and 65.2(36.5) for test stages 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 respectively. Cuspal deflections following cyclic loading recorded at the buccal cusp were: 60.0(41.0), 63.6(51.9), 59.6(36.3), and 61.6(36.8) at the above four cyclic loading stages respectively. A similar trend was also observed for measurements of the lingual cusp. It was concluded that bonding amalgam restorations decreases cuspal deflection and consequently may assist in restoring tooth strength under conditions of the oral environment. PMID:10823082

  5. Microleakage of bonded amalgam restorations: effect of thermal cycling.

    PubMed

    Helvatjoglou-Antoniades, M; Theodoridou-Pahini, S; Papadogiannis, Y; Karezis, A

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the effect of thermal cycling on the microleakage of bonded amalgam restorations. Three dental amalgam alloys and a gallium alloy were tested with two adhesive resin systems and copal varnish as a control. Class V cavity preparations were prepared on 168 freshly extracted premolars or molars. The preparations were placed parallel to and 1.0 mm occlusal to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). Four groups of 42 teeth each were treated with one of the following adhesive dentin systems: Bond-It, All-Bond 2/Resinomer or a copal varnish (Copalite). The four groups of 42 teeth each were then restored with one of three dental amalgams: Orosphere Plus, Indiloy, Oralloy or a Gallium alloy (Galloy), resulting in 12 test groups of 14 teeth each. The specimens were stored in double distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Final contouring and polishing of the restorations were performed under water spray. Half of the restorations in each group were thermocycled for 3000 cycles (5 degrees C-37 degrees C-55 degrees C-37 degrees C) with a dwell time of 15 sec at each temperature. The other half were stored in double distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Then all 168 restorations were stained with dye, sectioned and scored for microleakage. Results showed that the adhesive dentin systems reduced microleakage in amalgam restorations compared to copal varnish only in non-thermocycled specimens. Statistical analysis of the results showed that there was an extremely significant difference (p < 0.001) in microleakage between the non-thermocycled and the thermocycled specimens in all test groups, whereas, there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) among thermocycled specimens. The reduction of microleakage was not significantly different between Bond-It and All-Bond 2/Resinomer in non-thermocycled specimens. Oralloy showed the most microleakage in the non-thermocycled groups when compared to the other alloys using the same adhesive liner. PMID:11203837

  6. Mechanical retention versus bonding of amalgam and gallium alloy restorations.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S; Staninec, M; Yip, R L; Chavez, M A

    1994-10-01

    The retention of amalgam and gallium alloy restorations in proximal box forms was measured in vitro, and three different adhesives to conventional undercuts were compared. For control, restorations were placed without undercuts or adhesives. No significant difference was found between amalgam and gallium alloys with each of the five methods of retention used. Alloys placed without retention or adhesives were significantly less retentive than all other groups. When Tytin alloy was used, no difference was found in retention among the restorations retained with Panavia or All-Bond adhesive or an occlusal dovetail and retention grooves, but Amalgambond adhesive was less retentive than all three of these methods. When gallium alloy was used, both Panavia and All-Bond adhesive were more retentive than undercuts, but the effect of Amalgambond adhesive was more retentive than undercuts, but the effect of Amalgambond adhesive was comparable to that of undercuts. The results of this study indicate that adhesives could be used in place of traditional undercuts to retain amalgam and gallium alloys, thus saving a considerable amount of tooth structure. PMID:7990038

  7. Effect of restoration size on fracture resistance of bonded amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Lindemuth, J S; Hagge, M S; Broome, J S

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of restoration size on the fracture strength of amalgam restorations bonded with Amalgambond Plus (with HPA). Research has shown that this adhesive is dispersed throughout the unset amalgam during condensation and that a decrease in diametral tensile strength, proportional to the amount of adhesive incorporated into the unset amalgam, has resulted. Smaller cavity preparations have a higher ratio of surface area to volume than do larger preparations, and it was anticipated that a proportionately greater amount of adhesive would be incorporated into smaller amalgam restorations. Sixty extracted human molars were divided into four groups of 15 teeth and mounted in tray acrylic-filled PVC cylinders. Shallow approximo-occlusal channels were prepared in two groups. One group was restored with Amalgambond Plus and Tytin amalgam, the other with just Tytin amalgam. Larger proximo-occlusal preparations were made in the remaining two groups, then restored in the same fashion. Samples were stored in 37 degrees C for at least 24 hours, then thermocycled from 5-55 degrees C 1000 times with a one-minute dwell time. Specimens were mounted in a Universal Testing Machine, and a chisel was applied to the restorations in compression mode at a crosshead speed of 5.0 mm/minute until bulk fracture of the amalgam occurred. The results indicated no difference in bulk fracture strengths between large amalgam restorations restored with and without Amalgambond Plus. However, small amalgam restorations restored with Amalgambond Plus exhibited significantly greater (p < 0.025) bulk fracture strengths than small amalgam restorations restored without use of the adhesive. PMID:11203813

  8. A 3-year randomized clinical trial evaluating two different bonded posterior restorations: Amalgam versus resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Kemaloglu, Hande; Pamir, Tijen; Tezel, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the performance and postoperative sensitivity of a posterior resin composite with that of bonded amalgam in 40 (n = 20) large sized cavities and to evaluate whether resin composite could be an alternative for bonded amalgam. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial. Twenty patients in need of at least two posterior restorations were recruited. Authors randomly assigned one half of the restorations to receive bonded amalgam and the other half to composite restorations. Forty bonded amalgams (n = 20) and composites (n = 20) were evaluated for their performance on modified-US Public Health Service criteria and postoperative sensitivity using visual analogue scale (VAS) for 36-months. Results: Success rate of this study was 100%. First clinical alterations were rated as Bravo after 1 year in marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, and surface roughness for both amalgam and composite. At the 3rd year, overall “Bravo” rated restorations were 12 for bonded amalgam and 13 for resin composites. There were no significant differences among the VAS scores of composites and bonded amalgams for all periods (P > 0.05) except for the comparisons at the 3rd year evaluation (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Within the limitation of this study, both resin composite and bonded amalgam were clinically acceptable. Postoperative sensitivity results tend to decrease more in composite restorations rather than amalgams. Therefore, it was concluded that posterior resin composite can be used even in large sized cavities. PMID:27011734

  9. Shear bond strength, failure modes, and confocal microscopy of bonded amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Cianconi, Luigi; Conte, Gabriele; Mancini, Manuele

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength, failure modes, and confocal microscopy of two different amalgam alloy restorations lined with five adhesive systems. Two regular-set high-copper dental amalgam alloys, Amalcap Plus and Valiant Ph.D, and five commercially available adhesive systems were selected. One hundred and twenty freshly-extracted human third molars were used for the study. The results were statistically evaluated using two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA). The shear bond strength (SBS) of amalgam to dentin was significantly affected by both the adhesive (p<0.0001) and amalgam alloy (p<0.0002). Regarding mode of failure (MF), among samples restored with Valiant Ph.D, 31 of 50 exhibited adhesive failure, and 19 displayed mixed failure. Laser optical microscopy (OM) of the bonded interface revealed the presence of a good hybrid layer was evident in all experimental groups. Higher bond strengths were measured for four of the five adhesives when used in combination with the spherical alloy. PMID:21383518

  10. Cusp Fracture Resistance of Maxillary Premolars Restored with the Bonded Amalgam Technique Using Various Luting Agents

    PubMed Central

    Marchan, Shivaughn M.; Coldero, Larry; White, Daniel; Smith, William A. J.; Rafeek, Reisha N.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. This in vitro study uses measurements of fracture resistance to compare maxillary premolars restored with the bonded amalgam technique using a new resin luting cement, glass ionomer, and resin-modified glass ionomer as the bonding agents. Materials. Eighty-five sound maxillary premolars were selected and randomly assigned to one of five test groups of 17 teeth each. One group of intact teeth served as the control. The remaining groups were prepared to a standard cavity form relative to the dimensions of the overall tooth and restored with amalgam alone or a bonded amalgam using one of three luting agents: RelyX Arc (a new resin luting cement), RelyX luting (a resin-modified glass ionomer), or Ketac-Cem μ (a glass ionomer) as the bonding agents. Each tooth was then subjected to compressive testing until catastrophic failure occurred. The mean loads at failure of each group were statistically compared using ANOVA with a post hoc Bonferroni test. Results. It was found that regardless of the luting cement used for the amalgam bonding technique, there was little effect on the fracture resistance of teeth. Conclusion. Cusp fracture resistance of premolars prepared with conservative MOD cavity preparations is not improved by using an amalgam-bonding technique compared to similar cavities restored with amalgam alone. PMID:20339450

  11. [Comparative study of the fracture resistance of sound upper premolars and upper premolars restored with bonded amalgam].

    PubMed

    Minto, André Marcelo Peruchi; Dinelli, Welingtom; Nonaka, Tomio; Thome, Luis Henrique de Camargo

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the fracture resistance of upper premolars which had received class II preparations (conservative and extensive) and were restored with bonded amalgam, with two different adhesive systems. Seventy teeth were divided in four groups: group 1 (control), with ten sound teeth; group 2, with twenty prepared teeth (10 teeth received conservative cavities and 10, extensive cavities) restored with amalgam without any kind of liner; groups 3 and 4, similar to group 2, though with linings of glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond - 3M) (group 3) and dental adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus - 3M) (group 4). The teeth were previously fixed in PVC cylinders with acrylic resin. After being restored and thermocycled, the test specimens were submitted to fracture by means of compression in an EMIC-MEM 2000 universal testing machine. After the application of the analysis of variance and complementary Tukey's test, we concluded that the utilized adhesive systems produced an increase of the fracture resistance of teeth presenting with conventional cavities; the teeth presenting with conservative cavities were more resistant in all experimental situations. PMID:12131984

  12. Bonded amalgam sealants: two-year clinical results.

    PubMed

    Staninec, M; Eakle, W S; Silverstein, S; Marshall, G W; Artiga, N

    1998-03-01

    The authors used bonded amalgams as pit and fissure sealants without mechanical preparation. They compared the two-year retention of the bonded amalgams with that of resin-based pit and fissure sealants. Clinical examinations at six months, one year and two years revealed no difference between the retention of the two sealants. This technique opens up the possibility of using bonded amalgam in pits and fissures surrounding very conservative preparations in a preventive amalgam restoration. PMID:9529807

  13. Does Magnetic Resonance Imaging Affect the Microleakage of Amalgam Restorations?

    PubMed Central

    Akgun, Ozlem Marti; Polat, Gunseli Guven; Turan Illca, Ahmet; Yildirim, Ceren; Demir, Pervin; Basak, Feridun

    2014-01-01

    Background: The effect of MRI on microleakage of amalgam restorations is an important health issue that should be considered. If MRI application causes increase of microleakage, amalgam fillings should be reassessed after MRI and replaced if necessary. Objectives: The aim of this study is to compare the effect of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on microleakage of class II bonded amalgam versus classical amalgam restorations. Materials and Methods: Class II cavities (3 mm width × 1.5 mm depth) with gingival margins ending 1 mm below the cementoenamel junction (CEJ) were prepared in 40 permanent molar teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups. Cavities in the first and second groups were restored with dentin adhesive and amalgam (bonded amalgam), and those in the third and fourth groups with amalgam only. MRI was performed with the teeth specimens from the first and third groups. All specimens were then thermocycled at 5° to 55° C with a 30-second dwell time for 1000 cycles. The samples were then immersed in 0.5% methylene blue dye for 24 hours and sectioned longitudinally. Dye penetration at the occlusal and gingival margins was quantified by 15× stereomicroscopy. IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 (IBM Corp., Released 2012., IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Armonk, NY: IBM Corp.) and MS-Excel 2007 programs were used for statistical analyses and calculations. “nparLD” module was used for F2_LD_F1 design analysis at R program. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: In teeth with amalgam filling, there were no significant differences of occlusal and gingival surface microleakage after MRI exposure. Occlusal and gingival surface microleakages were also similar with and without MRI in teeth with bonded amalgam filling. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that MRI does not increase microleakage of amalgam restorations. PMID:25763074

  14. Long-term deterioration of composite resin and amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Smales, R J

    1991-01-01

    Previous long-term longitudinal studies of two different methods of placing an auto-cured conventional anterior composite resin, and of a low- and a high-copper amalgam alloy, had shown similar restoration survivals despite the different resin treatment methods used or the types of amalgam alloy placed. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess several clinical factors or characteristics of these restorations that were believed to affect the survival of the restorative materials. The 950 composite resin and the 1042 amalgam restorations examined were placed by many operators in numerous patients attending a dental hospital. The composite resin restorations were placed using unetched- and etched-enamel-bonding treatment methods, and the amalgam restorations were polished after insertion. Clinical ratings supplemented by color transparencies were used for the assessment of four factors for the resin, and four factors for the amalgam restoration. Significant deterioration differences were found for several of the clinical factors assessed for both the two different composite resin treatment methods, and for the two different amalgam alloys, which were not directly related to the restoration survivals. PMID:1840079

  15. Lichenoid reaction associated to amalgam restoration.

    PubMed

    Segura-Egea, Juan José; Bullón-Fernández, Pedro

    2004-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to mercury associated with amalgam restorations may occur and present in one of two different ways. Most commonly it presents as an oral lichenoid reaction affecting oral mucosa in direct contact with an amalgam restoration and represents a delayed, type IV, cell mediated immune response to mercury or one of the other constituents of the dental amalgam. We report a case of oral lichenoid reaction associated to amalgam restoration. A 38 year-old woman presented a caries lesion of tooth #37. A Blacks class I preparation was performed and filled with amalgam. After 19 months, intra-oral examination revealed atrophic lesion, lightly erythematous, affecting the left buccal mucous. The lesion contacted directly with the amalgam restoration in the lower first molar. The right buccal mucosa was normal. His medical history was unremarkable, he was taking no medication and had no known allergies. However, the patient had felt certain rare sensation in that zone when eating sharp meals. Biopsy showed histological changes compatible with oral lichen planus. The patient decided not to change again the restoration, because she did not have important annoyances and she did not wish to be treated again. Other restorations were performed with composite resins, and no reaction was evidenced in the mucosa. PMID:15580119

  16. In vitro bond strengths of amalgam added to existing amalgams.

    PubMed

    Roggenkamp, Clyde L; Berry, Frederick A; Lu, Huan

    2010-01-01

    This study determined if a standardized condensation force and dwell time per condensation pressure point could reliably bond new amalgam to older amalgam without applying extrinsic Hg. A stabilization jig was created to hold 15 friction-fit 1-inch diameter (25 mm) cylindrical resin specimen blocks face up with cavities drilled to contain the condensed primary amalgam (Valiant PhD-XT). Freshly mixed secondary amalgam (Valiant PhD-XT) was condensed against the primary amalgam surfaces through the 3.5-mm-diameter central holes of specially fabricated split-ring molds. The 15 disks fit snugly within the holes of the stabilization jig tray. Condensation was with a consistent, calibrated force of 22.5 MPa (4 lbs/0.79 mm2) applied with a spring-loaded amalgam carrier custom adapted with a 1-mm-diameter stainless steel condenser tip. Secondary amalgam additions were built up in three 1-mm thick increments with a pattern of eight 22.5 MPa two-second condenser strokes per incremental layer. Shear-bond testing with a 1-mm/minute crosshead speed occurred 24-hours post-condensation. One-way analysis of variance statistical analysis was conducted to analyze the results. The mean shear-bond forces (MPa, N = 15) found were: Control 28.1 +/- 5, 15 minutes 31 +/-5, one hour 10.7 +/-4 (N = 30), one day 25.5 +/- 4, one week 25.2 +/- 4, two months 25.1 +/- 5 and seven years 24.7 +/- 4. Under the condensation pressures used in the current study, the addition of new amalgam to smooth previously set amalgam surfaces, not including the one-hour group, up to seven years old, resulted in shear-bond forces not statistically different (p = 0.05) from the intact control. Virtually all (94%) of the bonds tested, except for the one-hour sample, resulted in cohesive rather than adhesive failures except those of the one-hour sample. Forty percent bond strengths of the controls were achieved when only 5.6 MPa (1 lb/0.79 mm2) and 14 MPa (2.5 lb/0.79 mm2) condensation pressures were used. PMID

  17. Tensile bond strength of repaired amalgam.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Czech, D; Ambrose, E R

    1992-03-01

    This study evaluated the tensile strength of repaired high-copper amalgams and analyzed the different treatments of the amalgam interface prior to repair. One hundred specimens were divided into 10 groups: group 1 was left intact and was considered as the control group. In groups 2 through 8, the specimens were sectioned into halves after 10 days and were reconstructed with new amalgam. Groups 9 and 10 were condensed with time intervals of 15 minutes and all specimens were subjected to tensile loads in a Universal Testing Machine. The tensile strengths at the junction between old and new amalgam ranged between 50% to 79% of those of the control group and verified that the same type of amalgam and uncontaminated interfaces had higher strengths. The results also suggested that if an amalgam repair is anticipated, additional retention is critical to the longevity of the restoration. PMID:1507091

  18. Effect of bonded amalgam on the fracture resistance of teeth.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S; Staninec, M; Lacy, A M

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether amalgam bonded to tooth structure with an adhesive resin cement can increase the fracture resistance of restored teeth. Extracted paired upper premolars were prepared for G.V. Black type mesioocclusodistal amalgam restorations. In one tooth of each pair (the experimental group), the enamel walls were etched with phosphoric acid and were painted with an adhesive resin (Panavia), and amalgam was condensed and carved. For the other tooth in each pair (the control group), amalgam was placed in the same manner but was not etched and lined with resin. The teeth were thermocycled and mounted for testing and then were loaded until fracture. A significant difference (p less than 0.05, the paired Student's t-test) was found in the force needed to fracture the bonded amalgam group (70.5 +/- 21.6 kg) compared with that needed to fracture the conventional amalgam group (60.3 +/- 16.8 kg). SEM examination of fractures at the interface occurred predominantly within the resin. PMID:1501170

  19. Bonding amalgam to dentin by different methods.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Strasdin, R B; McMeekin, G P

    1994-09-01

    The shear bond strengths of amalgam to dentin by use of (1) All-Bond-2 adhesive, (2) Amalgambond Plus adhesive and (3) TMS Minim pins were compared in this study. Forty-five sound human molars were mounted in acrylic resin and randomly assigned to one of the three groups. The occlusal surfaces were ground to expose the dentin, which was then wet-polished with 600-grit sand paper. All materials were applied according to manufacturer's instructions. A split die with a 5 mm opening was placed and amalgam was condensed, which created an amalgam cylinder bonded/retained to the dentin surface. A shear bond force was applied to the base of the amalgam cylinder. The data were analyzed with analysis of variance and Scheffé's test at the 95% level. All systems were found to promote adhesion/retention of amalgam to dentin. The All-Bond 2 group showed significantly higher bond strength (11.106 +/- 3.585 MPa) than Amalgambond Plus (6.343 +/- 3.564 MPa) and TMS pin (6.868 +/- 0.794 MPa) (p < 0.05). PMID:7965897

  20. Bonded amalgam sealants and adhesive resin sealants: five-year clinical results.

    PubMed

    Staninec, Michal; Artiga, Nelson; Gansky, Stuart A; Marshall, Grayson W; Eakle, Stephan

    2004-05-01

    Bonded amalgams were used as pit-and-fissure sealants without mechanical preparation. They were compared with resin-based pit-and-fissure sealants for retention over a 5-year period. Clinical examinations at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years revealed no difference between the two techniques. Although amalgam sealants may not be practical by themselves, they can be used to seal pits and fissures surrounding very conservative preparations, in the "preventive amalgam restoration." Conventional amalgam retentive features and 90-degree cavosurface margins may not be necessary when bonding is used with amalgam. PMID:15130073

  1. Improving orthodontic bonding to silver amalgam.

    PubMed

    Zachrisson, B U; Büyükyilmaz, T; Zachrisson, Y O

    1995-01-01

    Flat rectangular tabs (n = 84) prepared from lathe-cut amalgam (ANA 2000) were subjected to aluminum oxide sandblasting or roughening with a diamond bur. Mandibular incisor edgewise brackets were bonded to these tabs using: Concise (Bis-GMA resin); one of three metal-bonding adhesives, viz., Superbond C&B (4-META resin), Panavia Ex (10-MDP Bis-GMA resin) or Geristore (composite base); and Concise after application of the intermediate resins All-Bond 2 Primers A+B, or the Scotch-Bond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) system. All specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours before tensile bond strength testing. Alignment and uniform loading during testing were secured by engaging a hook in a circular ring soldered onto the bracket slot before bonding. Similar control brackets (n = 12) were bonded with Concise to extracted caries-free mandibular incisors. Bond failure sites were classified by a modified ARI system. Mean tensile bond strengths in the experimental group ranged from 3.4 to 6.4 MPa--significantly weaker than the control sample (13.2 MPa). Bond failure generally occurred at the amalgam/adhesive interface. Superbond C&B created the strongest bonds to amalgam; according to ANOVA and Duncan's Multiple-Range test, they were significantly stronger than the bonds with Panavia Ex and Concise, with Geristore in between. However, the bond strength of Concise to sandblasted amalgam was comparable to the Superbond C&B bonds when coupled with an intermediate application of All-Bond 2 Primers A+B. The SBMP, on the other hand, was less effective.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7726460

  2. [Restoration of hemi-arcades with amalgam].

    PubMed

    Vermeersch, A G

    1975-01-01

    As a rule should the half-mouth restorations in the frame of oral rehabilitation be done with gold inlays, overlays or full crowns. It is nevertheless possible to consider such restorations with amalgam and, providing that certain principles and technics and respected, such quadrant restorations could be valuable as well on the periodontal point of view as on the occlusal one. Regarding the periodontal point of view, it is now generally accepted that de restorations of the proximal aspects of the teeth have not to extend under the gingival margin. If this creates a risk for caries recurrences, still questionable, it eliminates the unavoidable periodontal lesions. Regarding the occlusal point of view, it is on the one hand difficult to build up a perfect occlusal restoration with a material which, on the moment the filling is completed acquires only a insufficient fraction of its final resistance. On the other hand it seems impossible to raise the occlusion in one or more teeth for the very same reason. The solution to this problem comprises a dubbel aspect. One has first of all to rebuild to the desired occlusal level the cavities of the whole quadrant with a temporary but resistant material wich allows at once a carefulness mastication. Polycarboxylate cement is suitable for this purpose. This temporary material is then replaced tooth after tooth in one or more sittings with amalgam. The second aspect of the solution consists in the use of amalgam wich acquires faster a sufficent resistance, allowing an ajustment of a perfect occlusion without the danger of fracturing it. Following the first estimates it seems that amalgam made of spherical particules and dispersed phase type alloys could meet with this requirements and bring an acceptable solution to our problem. PMID:1065913

  3. Effect of composite/amalgam thickness on fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth, restored with combined amalgam-composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Firouzmandi, Maryam; Doozandeh, Maryam; Abbasi, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Combined amalgam-composite restorations have been used through many years to benefit from the advantages of both dental amalgam and composite resin. Two variations have been mentioned for this technique, this study investigated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth with extended mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities, restored with the two variations of combined amalgam-composite restorations. Material and Methods Sixty intact extracted premolar teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (G1-G6) of 10 teeth. G1; consisted of intact teeth and G2; consisted of teeth with MOD preparations were assigned as the positive and negative control groups respectively. Other experimental groups after MOD preparations were as follows: G3, amalgam restoration; G4, composite restoration; G5 combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement only on 1mm of the gingival floor of the proximal boxes; G6, combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement to the height of contact area of the proximal surface of the tooth. Fracture strength of the specimens was measured and the data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The level of significance was P<0.05. Fracture mode of the specimens was also recorded. Results G1 had the highest value of fracture resistance (1736.90 N). G2 and G3 had the lowest fracture resistance (775.70 N and 874.70 N, respectively). The difference between G 4, 5 and 6 was not statistically significant. However, G4, G5 and G6 showed significantly higher resistance to fracture compared to G2 and G3. Fracture modes were favorable in all of the study groups except in G6. Conclusions Fracture resistance of the premolars restored with the two variations of combined amalgam-composite restoration was similar to that achieved with composite restoration alone and more than that of amalgam restoration alone. It can be concluded that the thickness of amalgam in combined amalgam-composite restorations did not

  4. Comparison of the push-out shear bond strength of four types of glass ionomers when used to bond amalgam: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Vinod Babu; Ramachandran, S; Indira, R; Shankar, P

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dental amalgam is the primary direct posterior restorative material used worldwide, but it have certain shortcomings due to the lack of adhesiveness to the cavity. The introduction of the concept of bonded amalgam helped improve the use of amalgam as a restorative material. Aim: Evaluation of the comparative push-out shear bond strength of four types of conventional glass ionomers used to bond amalgam to tooth in simulated class I situations. Materials and Methods: Four chemical cure glass ionomers are used: GC Fuji I, GC Fuji II, GC Fuji III and GC Fuji VII, and are compared with unbonded amalgam. The push-out bond strength was tested using the Instron Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis: One-way ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni tests were used to analyze the data. Results: The results showed that the use of glass ionomer to bond amalgam resulted in an increase in the bond strength of amalgam. The Type VII glass ionomer showed the highest bond strength in comparison with the other glass ionomers. Conclusions: Conventional glass ionomer bonds to amalgam and shows a beneficial increase in the bond strength of the restoration in comparison with unbonded amalgam. PMID:22144798

  5. [Is amalgam stained dentin a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?].

    PubMed

    Scholtanus, J D

    2016-06-01

    After the removal of amalgam restorations, black staining of dentin is often observed, which is attributed to the penetration of corrosion products from amalgam. A study was carried out to determine whether this amalgam stained dentin is a proper substrate for bonding resin composites. A literature study and an in vitro study showed that Sn and Zn in particular are found in amalgam stained dentin, and this was the case only in demineralised dentin. In vitro, demineralised dentin acted as porte d'entrÈe for amalgam corrosion products. Bond strength tests with 5 adhesive strategies showed no differences between bond strengths to amalgam stained and to sound dentin, but did show different failure types. A clinical study showed good survival of extensive cusp replacing resin composite restorations. No failures were attributed to inadequate adhesion. It is concluded that staining of dentin by amalgam corrosion products has no negative effect upon bond strength of resin composite. It is suggested that Sn and Zn may have a beneficial effect upon dentin, thus compensating the effects of previous carious attacks, preparation trauma and physico-chemical challenges during clinical lifetime. PMID:27275662

  6. Evaluation of interproximal finishing techniques for silver amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Bower, C F; Reinhardt, R A; DuBois, L M

    1986-09-01

    In spite of the incidence of recurrent caries and gingival inflammation surrounding the gingival margins of interproximal silver amalgam restorations, little information exists on the efficacy of finishing procedures in this location. This study was intended to evaluate surface smoothness of interproximal silver amalgams using four finishing techniques. Results indicated that surfaces finished using the carve, floss, and finishing strip polish consistently produced a measurably smoother surface (p less than 0.01) than did the other techniques. The use of finishing strips on the gingival margin of Class II silver amalgam restorations shows promise of improving interproximal surface smoothness. PMID:3462385

  7. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M-C; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N=84) were condensed into acrylic and randomly assigned to one of the following treatments (N=6): (1) Alloy primer + opaquer, (2) Air-particle abrasion (50 micro m Al(2)O(3)) + alloy primer + opaquer, (3) Silica coating (30 micro m SiO(x)) + silanization + opaquer, (4) Opaquer + pre-impregnated continuous bidirectional E-glass fibre sheets, (5) Silica coating + silanization + fibre sheets, (6) Silica coating + silanization + opaquer + fibre sheet application. Non-conditioned amalgam surfaces were considered as control group (7). The mean surface roughness depth (R(Z)) was measured from the control group and air-abraded amalgam surfaces. The resin composite was bonded to the conditioned amalgam specimens using polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested under dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. The shear bond strength of resin composite to amalgam substrates was measured in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Surface roughness values for the non-conditioned control group (R(Z) approximately 0.14 micro m) and for air-particle abraded surfaces with either Al(2)O(3) or SiO(x) (R(Z) approximately 0.19 micro m and R(Z) approximately 0.16 micro m, respectively) did not show significant differences (p=0.23) (One-way ANOVA). In dry conditions, silica coating and silanization followed by fibre sheet application exhibited significantly higher results (14.8+/-5.6 MPa) than those of the groups conditioned with alloy primer (2.2+/-0.7 MPa) (p<0.001), air-particle abrasion+alloy primer (4.4+/-2.0 MPa, p<0.001), silica coating+silanization alone (6.2+/-0.8 MPa, p=0.009) or non-conditioned group (1.4+/-0.6, p<0.001). Silica coating and silanization followed

  8. Bond strength comparison of amalgam repair protocols using resin composite in situations with and without dentin exposure.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Schoonbeek, Geert; Gökçe, Bülent; Cömlekoglu, Erhan; Dündar, Mine

    2010-01-01

    The replacement of defective amalgam restorations leads to loss of tooth material and weakens the tooth, creating an increased risk of cusp fracture. The repair of such defects is a minimal intervention technique. The current study compared the repair bond strengths of a resin composite to amalgam and an amalgam-dentin complex after various surface conditioning methods. The specimens (N = 50) consisted of sound human canines with cylindrical preparations (diameter: 2.3 mm, depth: 3 mm) with amalgam-dentin complex (N = 30, n = 10/per group) and two groups with amalgam only (N = 20, n = 10/per group). The teeth were embedded in auto-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The preparations were filled with non-Gamma 2 amalgam. The enamel was removed to expose dentin. The specimens with the amalgam-dentin complex were randomly assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 1: Silicacoating amalgam, etching dentin, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both; Group 2: Etching dentin, silicacoating amalgam, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both and Group 3: Etching dentin, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer, resin composite. The specimens with only amalgam were assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 4: Silicacoating, silane application, opaquer, resin composite and Group 5: Opaquer, resin composite. For the two control groups, where no dentin was involved (Groups 4 and 5), bonding was achieved only on amalgam and Group 5 had no conditioning. The specimens were kept in water at 37 degrees C for five weeks before bond strength (MPa +/- SD) testing (Universal Testing Machine). After debonding, the failure types were analyzed. The results were significantly affected by the surface conditioning method (ANOVA). Only dentin conditioning (Group 3) showed the highest bond strength (39.9 +/- 14). The unconditioned control

  9. Observation of an amalgam-bonded tooth through a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Orosa, Jose Luis B

    2003-01-01

    Bonding dental amalgam to tooth reduces the occurrence of marginal leakage, fracture and sensitivity. However, most studies of amalgam bonding have made use of resin cements and the conventional three-bottle bonding agents. In this study, a newer, single-bottle bonding agent was used to bond amalgam both to dentin and enamel. Interfaces of bonded amalgam and unbonded amalgam were observed under the scanning electron microscope. PMID:13677864

  10. Bonding of a light-curing glass-ionomer cement to dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Aboush, Y E; Elderton, R J

    1991-04-01

    In the clinical situation, the need may arise for placement of a glass-ionomer cement over an existing amalgam restoration. This study assessed the tensile bond strength of a recently developed light-curing glass ionomer (Vitrabond) to dental amalgam (Dispersalloy), with and without the use of Scotchbond dual cure as an intermediary. Amalgam adherend specimens were prepared, then aged in water at 37 degrees C for seven days. Immediately before being bonded, the amalgam surfaces were finished flat on 600-grit paper. Forty specimens were used for bonding in this condition, and another 40 were covered with a thin layer of Scotchbond, which was light-cured for 10 s. The glass-ionomer was applied to the adherend surface in two increments, each light-cured for 30 s. After being bonded, half the specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C, while half were stored in an environment of 95 +/- 5% RH at 37 degrees C. The 24-hour tensile bond strengths, in MPa, were: for specimens stored in water, without Scotchbond 8.4 +/- 1.2, with Scotchbond 4.7 +/- 1.3%; and for specimens stored in 95 +/- 5% RH, without Scotchbond 9.2 +/- 2.1, with Scotchbond 4.6 +/- 1.5. The data were further analyzed by the Weibull distribution function. It was concluded that a strong reliable bond can be achieved between Vitrabond and set Dispersalloy, and that the use of Scotchbond as an intermediary is contra-indicated. PMID:1936641

  11. Clinical evaluation of occlusal glass ionomer, resin, and amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Smales, R J; Gerke, D C; White, I L

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate four materials (a glass ionomer (polyalkenoate) silver cermet, two composite resin restoratives and a high copper content dental amalgam) placed in either conventional Class I cavities or in modified odontotomy-enameloplasty-sealant (OES) fissure preparations. One experienced operator inserted 438 occlusal. Class I restorations in the posterior permanent teeth of 124 patients in a private dental practice. Restorations were assessed for bulk loss of material, surface voids and cracking, restoration margin fractures and staining, and surface staining and roughness, by using colour transparencies taken at baseline and at recalls for up to 3 years. The glass ionomer cermet was the most difficult material to handle and also gave the least satisfactory clinical result. Loss of material and surface voids were common in the cermet restorations with surface cracking or crazing being seen in 11.4 per cent of the restorations, especially in the larger, conventional Class I preparations. One posterior resin was more viscous and difficult to handle than the other resin and exhibited more surface voids. The amalgam alloy was used in Class I preparations only and showed more restoration margin fractures and surface staining than did the other three materials. However, there were no unsatisfactory clinical assessments given for either restoration margin fracture and staining, or surface staining and roughness for any of the materials. Patient acceptance of the modified OES fissure preparation was extremely good. PMID:2127419

  12. Shear bond strength of composite resin to amalgam: an experiment in vitro using different bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Ambrose, E R

    1991-01-01

    The shear bond strength between amalgam and composite resin with and without the use of adhesive systems was evaluated. It was found that the application of Cover-Up II or Prisma Universal Bond prior to placement of composite resin enhanced the shear bond strength between amalgam and composite resin more than five times; and a shear strength of 4.34 and 4.30 MPa was measured respectively. Acid-etching of the roughened amalgam surface prior to application of Prisma Universal Bond decreased the bond strength by nearly 45%. PMID:1784535

  13. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists’ Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Kopperud, Simen E.; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-01-01

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p < 0.01), employees in the Public Dental Service (PDS) (p < 0.01) and dentists working in counties with low dentist density (p = 0.03). There was a tendency towards choosing minimally invasive treatment among dentists who also avoided operative treatment of early approximal lesions (p < 0.01). Norwegian dentists showed positive attitudes towards composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations. PMID:27110804

  14. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists' Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations.

    PubMed

    Kopperud, Simen E; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-01-01

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists' satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists' treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p < 0.01), employees in the Public Dental Service (PDS) (p < 0.01) and dentists working in counties with low dentist density (p = 0.03). There was a tendency towards choosing minimally invasive treatment among dentists who also avoided operative treatment of early approximal lesions (p < 0.01). Norwegian dentists showed positive attitudes towards composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations. PMID:27110804

  15. Retention and resistance features for complex amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Robbins, J W; Burgess, J O; Summitt, J B

    1989-04-01

    Although not absolute, there are indications for each of the retention and resistance features described. Amalgapins and circumferential slots have their greatest indication in teeth with short clinical crowns and in cusps that have been reduced 2-3 mm for coverage with amalgam. In these situations, slots provide more resistance than amalgapins and amalgam inserts. When amalgapins or slots are used as the only retention and resistance features, the restoration is susceptible to early fracture during matrix removal. When the technical requirements for placement of vertical pins can be met, they provide excellent retention and resistance form. Vertical pins should be placed at least 0.5 mm inside the dentinoenamel junction, at a depth of approximately 2 mm, and should protrude from the tooth approximately 2 mm. However, there are inherent risks involved with pin placement; these include crazing of tooth structure, perforation into the pulp or periodontium, and weakening of the amalgam restoration over the pins. The use of both vertical and horizontal pins may be limited by inadequate access; in these cases, alternate devices should be used. When a cusp has been reduced and increased resistance is needed, a ledge or peripheral step may be indicated. It must be remembered that this feature will result in a greater display of amalgam and may be esthetically unacceptable on a facial cusp. If esthetic appearance is a factor, horizontal pins may be used to reinforce a remaining facial cusp. Horizontal pins may also be used to splint or tie a remaining cusp to the restoration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2651502

  16. The pin-amalgam restoration. Part 1. A review.

    PubMed

    Evans, J R; Wetz, J H

    1977-01-01

    A review of the literature indicates that the use of pins to support amalgam or cast gold restorations in advanced caries in posterior teeth is a quick and relatively inexpensive method of restoring teeth otherwise doomed to extraction. However, the use of pins demands a careful and skillful dentist who understands the morphology of these teeth and the proper use of the materials if injury to the pulp, accidental perforations, crazing of the dentin, and splitting of teeth are to be prevented. Until more objective and controlled studies are completed, the use of cemented pins vs. self-threading pins remains a matter of empirical and personal preference. It is clear that success in the use of any pin or pins depends more on the dentist's skill and judgment than on the particular type of pin technique used. In order to more objectively evaluate the use of pin-amalgam restorations, Part 11 of this study will analyze the results obtained in the Clinic at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine. PMID:318695

  17. Detection of Caries Around Amalgam Restorations on Approximal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Diniz, M B; Cordeiro, R C L; Ferreira-Zandona, A G

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the in vitro performance of the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) visual examination, bitewing radiography (BW), and the DIAGNOdent 2190, a pen-type laser fluorescence device (LFpen), in detecting caries around amalgam restorations on approximal surfaces. Approximal surfaces (N=136) of permanent posterior teeth (N=110) with Class II amalgam restorations were assessed twice by two experienced examiners using ICDAS, BW, and LFpen. The occurrence of proximal overhangs was also evaluated. The teeth were histologically prepared and assessed for caries extension. Different cutoff limits for the LFpen were used. Intraexaminer and interexaminer reproducibility showed moderate to good agreement for all the methods (weighted κ/intraclass correlation coefficient=0.40 to 0.87). The specificities at D1 (all visible lesions affecting enamel) and D3 (lesions extended into dentin) were, respectively, 0.41 and 0.82 for ICDAS, 0.70 and 0.82 for BW, and 0.77-0.89 and 0.88-0.94 for LFpen. The sensitivities were 0.80 and 0.52 for ICDAS, 0.56 and 0.51 for BW, and 0.04-0.23 and 0.01-0.02 for LFpen at D1 and D3, respectively. At the D1/D3 thresholds, the accuracy and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) values were similar and statistically higher for ICDAS (0.65/0.68 and 0.633/0.688) and BW (0.64/0.68 and 0.655/0.719), respectively; whereas, LFpen presented lower accuracy (0.37-0.44/0.49-0.52) and Az (0.390-0.454/0.345-0.395) values. The occurrence of overhangs (26.8%) was shown to be irrelevant in determining the presence of secondary caries. The ICDAS and BW methods presented the best performance in detecting caries lesions affecting enamel and dentin on approximal surfaces of amalgam restorations. PMID:26237637

  18. Amalgam

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Kevin

    2012-09-05

    Amalgam is a system that allows you to generate collections of files that work with conventional tools but take up minimal extra space on storage. If you already are archiving files in a file system and don't want to make multiple copies of whole files in order to ship the data somewhere then this system is for you. Amalgam consists of tools that allow you to create and get information about '.amalgam' files which contain just the metadata associated with a set of files. It also contains a fuse file system that, using amalgam files, will dynamically create traditional tar files. With this setup, you can see multiple orders of magnitude reduction in storage requirements for temporary data collections.

  19. Amalgam

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-09-05

    Amalgam is a system that allows you to generate collections of files that work with conventional tools but take up minimal extra space on storage. If you already are archiving files in a file system and don't want to make multiple copies of whole files in order to ship the data somewhere then this system is for you. Amalgam consists of tools that allow you to create and get information about '.amalgam' files which containmore » just the metadata associated with a set of files. It also contains a fuse file system that, using amalgam files, will dynamically create traditional tar files. With this setup, you can see multiple orders of magnitude reduction in storage requirements for temporary data collections.« less

  20. The effects of cavity smear layer removal on experimental marginal leakage around amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Jodaikin, A; Austin, J C

    1981-11-01

    Unvarnished freshly-packed dental amalgam restorations leak initially. However, with time, a marginal seal is usually effected. It is not known whether the smear layer which forms during cavity preparation is associated with this leakage pattern. This study was undertaken to evaluate experimental marginal leakage around amalgam restorations (left in situ for one and 12 wk) which had been placed in cavities prepared with and without removal of the smear layer in vital and devitalized teeth. The cavities were obturated with two types of dental amalgams, a conventional and a dispersed-phase amalgam. The excised teeth restorations were subjected to a fluorescent dye marginal leakage experiment. All of the short-term specimens leaked severely, but some of the long-term specimens displayed significant sealing properties. No significant differences were found between the two types of amalgams. However, the non-vital tooth specimens and cavities without smear layers displayed significantly improved sealing properties. PMID:7026631

  1. Lichenoid reaction associated with silver amalgam restoration in a Bombay blood group patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Rohini Rangarao; Mattigatti, Sudha S.; Mahaparale, Rushikesh R.; Kamble, Amit P.

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic relationship between the oral lichenoid reaction (OLR) and dental restorative materials has been confirmed many times. An OLR affecting oral mucosa in direct contact with an amalgam restoration represents a delayed, type IV, cell mediated immune response to mercury or one of the other constituents of the dental amalgam. Bombay blood group patients are more prone to this. A case of bilateral OLR is presented, which is present in relation to amalgam restoration. The lesion healed up after the replacement of restorations with an intermediate restorative material. The clinician should be aware of all the possible pathological etiologies of white lesions. If there is any doubt about the nature or management of a usual oral lesion, a referral to an appropriate specialist is mandatory. PMID:27217647

  2. Lichenoid reaction associated with silver amalgam restoration in a Bombay blood group patient: A case report.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Rohini Rangarao; Mattigatti, Sudha S; Mahaparale, Rushikesh R; Kamble, Amit P

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic relationship between the oral lichenoid reaction (OLR) and dental restorative materials has been confirmed many times. An OLR affecting oral mucosa in direct contact with an amalgam restoration represents a delayed, type IV, cell mediated immune response to mercury or one of the other constituents of the dental amalgam. Bombay blood group patients are more prone to this. A case of bilateral OLR is presented, which is present in relation to amalgam restoration. The lesion healed up after the replacement of restorations with an intermediate restorative material. The clinician should be aware of all the possible pathological etiologies of white lesions. If there is any doubt about the nature or management of a usual oral lesion, a referral to an appropriate specialist is mandatory. PMID:27217647

  3. Replacing Amalgam Restorations: A Standardized Protocol Based on Analyzing Tissue Physicochemical Modifications.

    PubMed

    Decup, Franck; Epaillard, Alexandre; Chemla, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Almost 60% of operative dentistry is devoted to replacing restorations. When practitioners have to replace an amalgam restoration, they tend to opt for an adhesive restoration, as it is conservative of tooth tissues and mimics the natural appearance of teeth. Based on a literature review, the aim of this article is to determine the best tissue approach when replacing an old amalgam by a new adhesive restoration. After analyzing and understanding tissue alterations due to the amalgam corrosion process, the authors propose an analytical approach to managing the situation. Both tissue orientated and specific mechanical approaches are developed and should be implemented to carry out the optimal clinical procedure and achieve the most conservative and durable treatment. PMID:26767237

  4. The effect of 3 T MRI on microleakage of amalgam restorations

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, S; Misirlioğlu, M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effects of 3 T magnetic field on microleakage of amalgam restorations containing three different types of silver (Ag). Methods: 60 extracted teeth were restored with three different types of amalgam filling materials. Restored teeth were sectioned mesiodistally and divided into experimental and control groups. Experimental groups were exposed to a magnetic field of 3 T for 20 min. All samples were plunged into 2% basic fuchsin solution and examined under a digital microscope by three different observers with regard to microleakage. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant differences in microleakage between the groups exposed to MRI and controls, whereas differences in microleakage between amalgam types were insignificant. Conclusions: The primary risk of MRI systems arises from the effects of its strong magnetic field on objects containing ferromagnetic materials. An MRI of 1.5 T is known to be safe for amalgam restorations. However, our research indicates that MRI is not completely devoid of any effects on amalgam restorations. PMID:23674614

  5. Bonding dental amalgam to a light-curing glass-ionomer liner/base.

    PubMed

    Aboush, Y E; Elderton, R J

    1991-03-23

    At a time when amalgam is used widely, yet when the criteria for its use are still evolving, the incorporation of an element of adhesive bonding between the amalgam and the base material may come into greater prominence and aid the general move towards more conservative new or replacement cavity preparations. This study assessed the 24-hour tensile bond strength of amalgam (Dispersalloy) to a light-curing glass-ionomer liner/base (Vitrabond), using Scotchbond dual cure, uncured Vitrabond or Vitrabond liquid as intermediaries. Using the Weibull distribution function, it was found that uncured Vitrabond was a better intermediary than Scotchbond or Vitrabond liquid. The bond strengths obtained with uncured Vitrabond intermediary were of the same order as those which can be expected between a glass-ionomer cement and dentine. This suggests scope for developing techniques for bonding amalgam to parts of cavity preparations. PMID:2021495

  6. Clinical Success Rate of Compomer and Amalgam Class II Restorations in First Primary Molars: A Two-year Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghaderi, Faezeh; Mardani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The majority of failures in Class II amalgam restorations occur in the first primary molar teeth; in addition, use of compomer instead of amalgam for primary molar teeth restorations is a matter of concern. The aim ofthe present study was to compare the success rate of Class II compomer and amalgam restorations in the first primary molars. Materials and methods. A total of 17 amalgams and 17 compomer restorations were placed in 17 children based on a split-mouth design. Restorations were assessed at 12- and 24-month intervals for marginal integrity, the anatomic form and recurrent caries. Data were analyzed with SPSS 11. Chi-squared test was applied for the analysis. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results. A total 34 restorations of 28 restorations (14 pairs) of the total restorations still survived after 24 months. Compomerrestorations showed significantly better results in marginal integrity. Recurrent caries was significantly lower incompomer restorations compared to amalgam restorations. Cumulative success rate at 24-month interval was significantlyhigher in compomer restorations compared to amalgam restorations. There was no statistically significant difference inanatomic form between the two materials. Conclusion. Compomer appears to be a suitable alternative to amalgam for Class II restorations in the first primary mo-lars. PMID:26236434

  7. Effect of a copal varnish, ZOE or glass ionomer cement bases on microleakage of amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Manders, C A; Garcia-Godoy, F; Barnwell, G M

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sealing ability of four cavity preparation treatment modalities under amalgam restorations. Class V cavity preparations were placed in 20 extracted teeth and randomly divided into four groups of five teeth each (10 restorations for each group): 1) no liner; 2) two applications of Copalite; 3) a base of IRM; and 4) a base of Chelon-Silver. After assigned cavity preparation treatment was accomplished, the teeth were restored with amalgam. The restored teeth were subjected to thermocycling and subsequently stained with basic fuchsin. The teeth were longitudinally sectioned and dye penetration recorded. Amalgam restorations with a Copalite or Chelon-Silver base exhibited significantly less microleakage than those amalgam restorations with an IRM base or no cavity preparation treatment. With the Copalite varnish, microleakage extended beyond the axial wall (toward the pulp chamber through the dentinal tubules) while with the Chelon-Silver base, microleakage was limited to the restoration-tooth interface. PMID:2076225

  8. Pulpal uptake of mercury from lined amalgam restorations in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Akyüz, Serap; Caglar, Esber

    2002-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine pulp in amalgam-restored teeth of guinea pigs with respect to the presence of mercury, and to evaluate whether lining of cavities with resin modified glass ionomer cements had any effect on the penetration of mercury. Class V cavities were prepared in 63 incisor teeth of 21 guinea pigs. Three amalgam restorations were placed per animal, one without base liner and two with different resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GC Lining LC and Ionoseal). Following observation periods of 1, 7 or 30 d, teeth were extracted and the mercury concentration in the pulp tissue was evaluated using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. It was found that resin-modified glass ionomer cements significantly diminished the transport of mercury into the pulp between day 7 and day 30 after amalgam insertion. PMID:12507220

  9. Clinical evaluation of marginal fracture of amalgam restorations: one-year report.

    PubMed

    Osborne, J W; Friedman, S J

    1986-03-01

    Fourteen dental amalgam alloys were used in this study. After 1 year, amalgam restorations were evaluated for fracture at the margins. The clinical results indicated that Dispersalloy, Indiloy, a high-copper blend by Syntex, Cluster, and Unison had the least marginal failure. This was followed by Premalloy, Cupralloy, Tytin, Cupralloy ESP, and Contour. Velvalloy and Sybraloy and Orosphere II were the third major grouping with Summalloy having the most fracture at the margins. Different batches of the same alloy performed similarly. The correlation between creep and ridit means (fracture at the margins) was not found to be statistically significant. PMID:3457164

  10. Clinical Evaluation of Reasons for Replacement of Amalgam Restorations in Patients Referring to a Dental School in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Pouralibaba, Firoz; Joulaei, Mohammad; Kashefimehr, Atabak; Pakdel, Farzaneh; Jamali, Zahra; Esmaeili, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims The present study evaluated the most common reasons for replacing amalgam restorations in a university clinic. Materials and methods A total of 217 restorations which needed to be replaced were clinically and radiographically evaluated in a period of 4 months. The frequencies of reasons for replacing amalgam restorations were calculated: The assessed items included recurrent caries, tooth structure fracture (functional or non-functional cusps), amalgam bulk fracture, amalgam marginal fracture, proximal overhangs, and esthetics. Data were analyzed using Fischer’s exact test. Results Both in vital teeth and teeth which had undergone root canal therapy, the most common reason for amalgam replacement was cusp fracture, with the fracture of non-functional cusps being statistically significant. Recurrent caries was the second most common reason for amalgam replacement. In Class I restorations, the most common reasons were recurrent caries and esthetics, with no statistical significance. The most frequent problem in Class II restorations was fracture of non-functional cusps, with a statistical significance in three-surface restorations. Conclusion According to the results, failing to reduce undermined cusps and neglectful caries removal are the reasons for majority of amalgam restoration replacements. These issues should be emphasized in the curriculum for dental students and continuing education courses. PMID:22991598

  11. An in vitro Evaluation of Microleakage of Posterior Teeth Restored with Amalgam, Composite and Zirconomer – A Stereomicroscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Punia, Sandhya Kapoor; Bhat, Surekha; Singh, Gautam; Goyal, Pravesh; Oza, Swapnil; Raiyani, Chirag M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Numerous restorative materials are being used in dentistry to achieve adequate strength and restore aesthetics. However, a perfect ideal restorative material has still eluded dentist. Dental amalgam is versatile material with self-sealing property, but is unaesthetic. Other restorative materials like, composites require conservative preparation, but exhibits polymerisation shrinkage resulting in microleakage. To overcome these drawbacks a high strength restorative material reinforced with ceramic and zirconia fillers known as zirconomer has been introduced. The aim of this study was to evaluate the micro-leakage of these three different restorative materials. Materials and Methods Thirty non-carious human permanent first and second molars were utilized in this study. Class I cavities were prepared on the occlusal surface; cavities were then restored with amalgam, composite and zirconomer as per manufacture’s instruction. All samples were stored for 24 hours in distilled water followed by thermocycling. The entire tooth surface was painted with two coats of varnish to within 1mm of the restoration margins. The teeth were immersed in dye. Teeth were sectioned and observed under stereomicroscope. Results In this study the zirconomer exhibited the highest micro leakage as compared to composite and amalgam but composite having higher micro leakage as compared to amalgam and lower micro leakage as compared to zirconomer. Conclusion Even though composite and amalgam are being marketed aggressively and new material like zirconomer are on origin, amalgam still proves to be one of the best materials. PMID:26393208

  12. Effect of restorative materials and in vitro carious challenge on amalgam margin quality.

    PubMed

    Grossman, E S; Matejka, J M

    1996-09-01

    The surface margin of a restoration is where the restored tooth is subjected to aggressive oral attack. Any resistance to this attack will have favorable consequences on the clinical performance and longevity of the restoration. In this study, Black's class I classic cavity preparations were completed in 120 extracted intact human premolars that were restored with one of two silver amalgams, six different base conditions, and with or without cavity varnish, resulting in 20 different restoration combinations. The cavities were aged for 3 months and 1 year in 1% NaCl at 20 degrees C. A resin cast impression was made of the restoration margin for each specimen. Thereafter 80 restored teeth were subjected to an in vitro bacterial challenge for 36 days. The other 40 specimens were placed in an acidified (pH = 4.0) broth for the same length of time. A second cast impression was then made of the margin of each specimen. The casts were examined with a scanning electron microscope and the widest gap of the margin opening and the length of margin showing a discrepancy were measured. Specimens were ranked first on the basis of the gap size and then on percent of margin discrepancy length. Results were evaluated with one-way ANOVA and Turkey's Student range test with a critical level of statistical significance (p < 0.05). Base type significantly affected aged margin quality. Cariogenic challenge caused a significant breakdown of the amalgam margin although the type of challenge was not significant. A shorter aging time, varnish, and high copper amalgam exacerbated the breakdown. Margin breakdown can be reduced by judicious selection of restoration material combinations. PMID:8887794

  13. Occlusal glass ionomer cermet, resin sandwich and amalgam restorations: a 2-year clinical study.

    PubMed

    Lidums, A; Wilkie, R; Smales, R

    1993-08-01

    This study compared the clinical behavior of a glass ionomer silver cermet (Ketac-Silver), a posterior resin composite (Visio-Molar) used with the "sandwich" technique, and a high-copper amalgam (Dispersalloy) for restoring conventional Class I occlusal cavity preparations. Two dentists placed 116 restorations in the posterior permanent teeth of 35 adults treated at a dental hospital. Restorations were assessed at 6-month intervals over 2 years for bulk loss of material and occlusal wear, surface voids, roughness and cracking, surface and marginal staining, and marginal fracture. Losses of material and surface voids were obvious with the cermet material, with surface crazing or cracking being present in 33% of the restorations. The cermet cannot be recommended as a long-term permanent restorative material if the restorations are likely to be subjected to heavy occlusal stresses and abrasive wear. PMID:7803005

  14. The influence of an adhesive system on shear bond strength of repaired high-copper amalgams.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Ambrose, E R; elBadrawy, H E

    1991-01-01

    The shear bond strengths of intact high-copper spherical and admixed amalgams were compared with repaired high-copper spherical and admixed amalgam specimens with and without the use of an adhesive system (Amalgambond). In the spherical group the shear bond strength of the repaired specimens was found to be 55 and 53.2% of the intact specimens without and with the use of the adhesive system. After thermocycling those percentages were 48.5 and 43. In the admixed groups those percentages were 39, 36.5, 34.5, and 35.2 respectively. It was found that the application of Amalgambond did not significantly increase the strength of the repaired amalgam. Thermocycling only had a significantly adverse effect on the repair strength in the admixed group repaired without an adhesive system. PMID:1813872

  15. Preservation-based approaches to restore posterior teeth with amalgam, resin or a combination of materials.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, Ziad D

    2002-02-01

    This review is a systematic assessment, from the literature, of the status quo of dental amalgam, resin-based composite and glass-ionomer restorations for carious lesions as it applies to new concepts, coupled with clinical research. Scientifically based and practical new materials and techniques are recommended to include in contemporary practice throughout the world. Clinical and laboratory studies which have been carried out in light of modern conservative principles, and in light of the current emphasis of treating dental caries as a disease process were reviewed and discussed. An approach to managing carious lesions based upon selected advantages of dental amalgam, resin-based composite and glass-ionomer technology applied to what is termed "preservation-based" approaches to restoring teeth has been synthesized. Researched evidence contradicts the notion of "extension for prevention" in favor of maintaining sound tooth structure which would translate into more patients with healthy dentitions for entire lifetimes. PMID:12074231

  16. Class II glass ionomer cermet tunnel, resin sandwich and amalgam restorations over 2 years.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, R; Lidums, A; Smales, R

    1993-08-01

    This study compared the clinical behavior of a glass ionomer (polyalkenoate) silver cermet, a posterior resin composite used with the "tunnel" technique, a posterior resin composite used with the "closed sandwich" technique, and a high-copper amalgam for restoring small, proximal surface carious lesions. Two dentists placed 86 restorations in the posterior permanent teeth of 26 adults treated at a dental hospital. Restorations were assessed at 6-month intervals over 2 years for gingivitis adjacent to them, the tightness of proximal contacts, occlusal wear, surface voids, roughness and cracking, surface and marginal staining, and marginal fracture. Small filling defects, surface voids and occlusal wear were obvious with the cermet material, with surface crazing and cracking present in 48% of the tunnel restorations. Two of the posterior resin composites, but none of the amalgam restorations, also failed. The cermet cannot be recommended as a long-term permanent restorative material in situations where it is likely to be subjected to heavy occlusal stresses and abrasive wear. PMID:7803004

  17. Comparison of wear and clinical performance between amalgam, composite and open sandwich restorations: 2-year results.

    PubMed

    Sachdeo, A; Gray, Gordon B; Sulieman, M A; Jagger, Daryll C

    2004-03-01

    There has been some disquiet over the use of mercury containing restorative materials. The most commonly used alternative is composite resin but this has the potential disadvantage associated with wear and marginal leakage, which in turn, has proven to result in secondary caries and sensitivity. To overcome the shortcomings of a directly placed composite restoration, the glass-ionomer/composite open sandwich technique was introduced followed by the subsequent introduction of compomer systems. The aims of this study were to evaluate the wear and clinical performance of a control group of amalgam restorations compared with that of a group of posterior composite resin restorations fillings and a group of compomer/composite open sandwich restorations placed by a single general dental practitioner. The duration of the study was 2 years. One hundred and thirty three (71.4%) patients were successfully recalled and the wear and clinical performance of each restoration after 6, 12 and 24 months was measured, indirectly. There was no statistically significant difference recorded between the groups at 6 months or 1 year (p > 0.05). However, at the end of the 2-year study, there was a significantly lower rate of wear recorded for the control amalgam restorations compared with other two groups (p = 0.033). There was no statistically significant difference in wear recorded between the two groups of tooth-coloured restorations (p > 0.05). With regards to clinical performance of the restorations, occlusal and proximal contacts in each group of restoration remained satisfactory throughout the study. PMID:15058177

  18. Reinforcement of Unsupported Enamel by Restorative Materials and Dentin Bonding Agents: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, M.; Ghavam, M.; Rostamzadeh, T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Preservation of unsupported occlusal enamel after removal of underlying carious dentin may result in maintenance of aesthetics as well as wear resistance against the opposing enamel. This study investigates the influence of different restorative materials and bonding agents on reinforcement of unsupported enamel in molars and compares it with sound dentin. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, forty- five extracted human molars were selected and randomly divided into five groups of nine. All lingual cusps were cut off. The dentin underlying the buccal cusps was removed in all groups except the positive control. The negative control group received no restorations. After application of varnish and Panavia F, spherical amalgam (Sina) and after application of Single-Bond (3M), composite resin (Tetric Ceram) was used to replace missing dentin. All specimens were thermocycled, then mounted in acrylic resin using a surveyor. Lingual inclination of facial cusps was positioned horizontally. Load was applied by an Instron machine at a crosshead speed of 10 mm/min until fracture. Data were subjected to ANOVA (one way) and Post hoc Test (Duncan). Results: Statistically significant differences were found between the five groups (P<0.001); however, no significant difference was revealed between bonded amalgam and the positive control groups (P=0.762). Composite and amalgam had the same effect (P=0.642), while the composite and negative group had no significant difference (P=0.056). Conclusion: Bonded amalgam systems (Panavia F) could reinforce the undermined occlusal enamel effectively. PMID:21998780

  19. Effects of the Nd:YAG laser on amalgam dental restorative material: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernavin, Igor; Hogan, Sean P.

    1996-09-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has been marketed as an instrument for use on both hard and soft dental tissues. Its potential for use on hard tissues is limited but it may be the instrument of choice for use in certain soft tissue procedures. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the Nd:YAG laser on amalgam restorations which frequently occur on tooth surfaces adjacent to areas of soft tissue which may be subjected to the laser. The amalgam used was Tytin. The laser firing was controlled by a computer and a constant repetition rate of 40 Hz was used. Energy per pulse was altered as follows, 30 mJ, 40 mJ, 60 mJ, 80 mJ, 120 mJ and 140 mJ. Exposure times of 0.05 sec, 0.125 sec, 0.25 sec, 0.5 sec, 1 sec, 2 sec, 3 sec, 4 sec, and 5 sec were used. The width of defect was measured using a Nikon measurescope with 10x magnification and it was established that the damage threshold lies between 0.125 sec and 0.25 sec for 30 mJ per pulse. The data was analyzed using a one way ANOVA statistical test. There was a significant correlation between the width of the defect and energy per pulse setting as well as exposure time. The findings indicate that amalgam restorations are prone to damage from inadvertent laser exposure and clinicians must take measures to protect such restorations during lasing of soft tissues.

  20. In vivo assessment of secondary caries and dentin characteristics after traditional amalgam restorations

    PubMed Central

    de Assunção Pinheiro, Isauremi Vieira; Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra; de Lima, Kenio Costa

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate in vivo the occurrence of secondary caries and dentin characteristics in permanent molars after traditional amalgam restorations, by means of clinical visual examination, radiographs and laser-induced fluorescence (LF) (DIAGNOdent). Methods: Thirty first permanent molars of 30 schoolchildren in the 7 to14 year-old age group were included. Caries was removed by hand. Thus, indirect pulp capping was performed with glass-ionomer cement (GIC), the cavity was varnished and amalgam filled. LF was measured before and after cavity preparation and after a 12-month observation period. Dentin color after cavity preparation and after the 12-month observation period was recorded. Recurrent caries was also investigated by visual clinical and radiographic examinations, in addition to dentin thickness between pulp and indirect GIC pulp capping. Data was analyzed by ANOVA for repeated measurements, paired “t” test and descriptive statistic. Results: There were statistically significant differences (P<.05) among LF scores for dentin in all periods evaluated, with the lowest scores shown after 12 month of observation. There was no statistical difference between dentin color after cavity preparation and following 12 months of observation. Moreover, there was no recurrent caries attack at 12-month follow-up; dentin thickness between pulp and indirect GIC pulp capping was similar between baseline and final observation periods. It was concluded that the clinical restorative procedure using hand caries removal, indirect pulp capping with GIC, varnishing and amalgam filling the cavity did not provide secondary caries and increased dentin mineral content after 12 months. PMID:22904654

  1. Effects of mercury release from amalgam dental restorations during cremation on soil mercury levels of three New Zealand crematoria

    SciTech Connect

    Nieschmidt, A.K.; Kim, N.D.

    1997-05-01

    A vast amount of research has been undertaken in the last 15-20 years on the corrosion reactions occurring in dental amalgam, release of mercury from amalgam restorations, and the toxic effects of this released mercury on the human body. However, one environmental aspect of amalgam dental restorations that has not received a great deal of attention is the release of mercury during cremation. Mercury is liberated during cremation both because dental amalgams are unstable at cremation temperatures (650-700{degrees}C) and because the free mercury metal is highly volatile. In New Zealand, 58% of deaths are followed by cremation and this figure is likely to rise in the future. This increasing use of cremation as the method of corpse disposal, coupled with the fact that each amalgam restoration is approximately 50% mercury, implies that a significant amount of mercury may be emitted into the environment every year. This study examines mercury released from crematoria in New Zealand. 20 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Seal, replacement or monitoring amalgam restorations with occlusal marginal defects? Results of a 10-year clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Moncada, G; Fernández, E; Mena, K; Martin, J; Vildósola, P; De Oliveira Junior, O B; Estay, J; Mjör, I A; Gordan, V V

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this prospective and blind clinical trial was to assess the effectiveness of sealing localized marginal defects of amalgam restoration that were initially scheduled to be replaced. A cohort of twenty six patients with 60 amalgam restorations (n=44Class I and n=16Class II), that presented marginal defects deviating from ideal (Bravo) according to USPHS criteria, were assigned to either sealing or replacement groups: A: sealing n=20, Replacement n=20, and no treatment (n=20). Two blind examiners evaluated the restorations at baseline (K=0.74) and after ten years (K=0.84) according with USPHS criteria, in four parameters: marginal adaptation (MA), secondary caries (SC), marginal staining (MS) and teeth sensitivity (TS). Multiple comparison of restorations degradation/upgrade was analyzed by Friedman test and the comparisons within groups were performed by Wilcoxon test. After 10 years, 44 restorations were assessed (73.3%), Group A: n=14 and Group B: n=16; and Group C: n=14 sealing and replacement amalgam restorations presented similar level of quality in MA (p=0.76), SC (p=0.25) and TS (p=0.52), while in MS (p=0.007) presented better performance in replacement group after 10-years. Most of the occlusal amalgam restorations with marginal gaps showed similar long term outcomes than the restorations were sealed, replaced, or not treated over a 10-year period. Most of the restorations of the three groups were clinically acceptable, under the studied parameters. All restorations had the tendency to present downgrade/deterioration over time. PMID:26231302

  3. Reasons for Retreatment of Amalgam and Composite Restorations among the Patients Referring to Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Kimyai, Soodabeh; Mehdipour, Masomeh; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Abbaszadeh, Armin

    2007-01-01

    Background and aims Retreatment of existing restorations not only requires a lot of money and time but also there is a danger of weakening tooth structure and irritating the pulp. Since awareness of the reasons for the retreatment of teeth will save the teeth from possible future failure, the aim of this study was to assess the reasons for retreatment of amalgam and composite restorations in patients referring to Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry. Materials and methods In this descriptive study, the subjects had previously received an amalgam or a composite restoration in the Operative Department by dental students and were judged to need retreatment in their second visit. A total of 300 defective teeth were selected by simple random sampling method. The data was collected through examination and questionnaires and analyzed using chi-square test. Results There was a statistically significant association between the type of the restorative material and the reason for retreatment (p=0.001). Conclusion Although the reasons for the retreatment of amalgam and composite restorations were different, recurrent caries was the main reason for the retreatment for both restorative materials. PMID:23277830

  4. The effect of thermocycling on the bonding of different restorative materials to access opening through porcelain fused to metal restorations

    PubMed Central

    AL-Moaleem, Mohammed M.; Shah, Farhan Khalid; Khan, Nausheen Saied

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Porcelain fused to metal (PFM) crowns provide the best treatment option for teeth that have a large or defective restoration. More than 20% of teeth with PFM crowns or bridges require non-surgical root canal treatment (NSRCT). This may be due to the effect of restorative procedures and the possible leakage of bacteria and or their by-products, which leads to the demise of the tooth pulp. Thus, this study was planned to compare the ability of the restorative materials to seal perforated PFM specimens. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study evaluates the ability of amalgam, composite or compomer restorative materials to close perforated PFM specimen's in-vitro. Ninety PFM specimens were constructed using Ni-Cr alloys and feldspathic porcelain, and then they were divided into 3 groups: amalgam (A), composite + Exite adhesive bond (B) and compomer + Syntac adhesive bond (C). All the PFM samples were embedded in an acrylic block to provide complete sealing of the hole from the bottom side. After the aging period, each group was further divided into 3 equal subgroups according to the thermocycling period (one week for 70 cycles, one month for 300 cycles and three months for 900 cycles). Each subgroup was put into containers containing dye (Pelikan INK), one maintained at 5℃ and the other at 55℃, each cycle for 30 sec time. The data obtained was analyzed by SPSS, 2006 using one way ANOVA test and student t-test and significant difference level at (P<.01). RESULTS The depth of dye penetration was measured at the interfaces of PFM and filling materials using Co-ordinate Vernier Microscope. The lowest levels of the dye penetration for the three groups, as well as subgroups were during the first week. The values of dye leakage had significantly increased by time intervals in subgroups A and C. CONCLUSION It was seen that amalgam showed higher leakage than composite while compomer showed the lowest level of leakage. PMID:22259701

  5. Validity and reliability of methods for the detection of secondary caries around amalgam restorations in primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Braga, Mariana Minatel; Chiarotti, Ana Paula Sturion; Imparato, José Carlos Pettorossi; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros

    2010-01-01

    Secondary caries has been reported as the main reason for restoration replacement. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the performance of different methods--visual inspection, laser fluorescence (DIAGNOdent), radiography and tactile examination--for secondary caries detection in primary molars restored with amalgam. Fifty-four primary molars were photographed and 73 suspect sites adjacent to amalgam restorations were selected. Two examiners evaluated independently these sites using all methods. Agreement between examiners was assessed by the Kappa test. To validate the methods, a caries-detector dye was used after restoration removal. The best cut-off points for the sample were found by a Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) analysis, and the area under the ROC curve (Az), and the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the methods were calculated for enamel (D2) and dentine (D3) thresholds. These parameters were found for each method and then compared by the McNemar test. The tactile examination and visual inspection presented the highest inter-examiner agreement for the D2 and D3 thresholds, respectively. The visual inspection also showed better performance than the other methods for both thresholds (Az = 0.861 and Az = 0.841, respectively). In conclusion, the visual inspection presented the best performance for detecting enamel and dentin secondary caries in primary teeth restored with amalgam. PMID:20339722

  6. On modeling and nanoanalysis of caries-affected dentin surfaces restored with Zn-containing amalgam and in vitro oral function.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S; Osorio, Estrella; López-López, Modesto T; Cabello, Inmaculada; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to assess the influence of mechanical loading on the ability of Zn-free versus Zn-containing amalgams to promote remineralization at the dentin interface. Sound and caries-affected dentin surfaces (CAD) were restored using Zn-free or Zn-containing dental amalgams. Midcoronal dentin surfaces were studied by (1) atomic force microscopy analysis (including plot and phase imaging, nanoindentation test [modulus of Young (Ei), nanoroughness measurements, and fibril diameter assessment], (2) Raman spectroscopy/cluster analysis, (3) x-ray diffraction, (4) field emission electron microscope and energy-dispersive analysis, for morphological, mechanical, and physicochemical characterization. Analyses were performed before amalgam placement and after amalgam removal, at 24 h and 3 weeks of load cycling. Zn-free and Zn-containing amalgams restorations promoted an increase in the modulus of Young of CAD surfaces, after 3 weeks of load cycling; at this time, Zn-containing amalgams attained higher Ei than Zn-free restorations. Zn-containing amalgams induced tubular occlusion after load cycling, in both sound and CAD. Zn free-amalgams promoted remineralization of both intertubular and peritubular dentin in CAD substrata. These minerals were identified as calcium-phosphate deposits and crystals as hydroxyl-apatite with augmented crystallographic maturity but with some components of lattice distortion. Crosslinking of collagen diminished and secondary structure of collagen increased in CAD substrate restored with Zn-containing amalgam after 3 weeks of load cycling, indicating an advanced preservation, molecular organization, and orientation of collagen fibrils after load cycling. Plot and phase images permitted to observe the topographical changes which were promoted by the mineral deposits; in general, the indexes related to higher remineralization gave rise to a decrease of nanoroughness and an augmentation of the bandwidth of the collagen fibrils. Zn

  7. Bacteriology of deep carious lesions underneath amalgam restorations with different pulp-capping materials - an in vivo analysis

    PubMed Central

    NEELAKANTAN, Prasanna; RAO, Chandragiri Venkata Subba; INDRAMOHAN, Jamuna

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms remaining in dentin following cavity preparation may induce pulp damage, requiring the use of pulp-capping agents with antimicrobial activity underneath permanent restorations. Objective The aims of this study were to analyze the bacteriological status of carious dentin and to assess the efficacy of different base underneath silver amalgam restorations. Material and Methods This study was conducted on 50 patients aged 13 to 30 years. Sterile swabs were used to take samples after cavity preparation, which was assessed by microbiological culture to identify the microorganisms present. Following this, cavities were restored with silver amalgam, using one of the materials being investigated, as the base: calcium hydroxide (Group II), polyantibiotic paste (Group III), a novel light-cured fluoride-releasing hydroxyapatite-based liner (Group IV) and mineral trioxide aggregate - MTA (Group V). In Group I, the cavities were restored with silver amalgam, without any base. After 3 months, the amalgam was removed and samples taken again and analyzed for the microbial flora. Results Lactobacilli were the most commonly isolated microorganisms in the samples of carious dentin. Groups IV and V showed negative culture in the 3-month samples. There was no statistically significant difference between Groups I, II and III. There was no significant difference between Groups IV and V (p>0.05). Both Groups IV and V showed significantly better results when compared to Groups I, II and III (p<0.05). Conclusions The hydroxyapatite-based liner and MTA performed significantly better in terms of antibacterial activity than the other materials. PMID:22666827

  8. Biomechanical Stress Analysis of Mandibular First Permanent Molar; Restored with Amalgam and Composite Resin: A Computerized Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, AR

    2010-01-01

    Normal mastication with its varying magnitude and direction generates considerable reactionary stresses in teeth and their supporting tissues. The structure of the human tooth and its supporting tissues is a complex assemblage of materials of varied mechanical properties. The finite element method (FEM), a modern technique of numerical stress analysis, has the great advantage of being applicable to solids of irregular geometry and heterogeneous material properties and therefore ideally suited to the examination of structural behavior of teeth. The mandibular first permanent molar is one of the earliest permanent teeth to erupt in the oral cavity and hence most prone to caries. The purpose of the present study was to construct a two-dimensional FE model of the mandibular first permanent molar and its supporting structures, using a FE software called NISA II-Display III, EMRC, USA to study the following: • To compare stress distributions patterns when a modeled Class I Cavity was restored with dental amalgam and composite resin. • To compare the stress distributions pattern when the load was applied to different to locations, i.e.: At the mesial cusp tip, and at the center of the occlusal surface. Both amalgam and composite resin showed similar stress distribution pattern, however, the magnitudes of stresses generated in the tooth restored with composite resin were higher. Thus, amalgam is a better restorative material in distributing stresses.

  9. Biocompatibility of a flowable composite bonded with a self-etching adhesive compared with a glass lonomer cement and a high copper amalgam.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yasushi; Seki, Yuichi; Sasafuchi, Yasutaka; Arakawa, Makoto; Burrow, Michael F; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the pulpal response and in-vivo microleakage of a flowable composite bonded with a self-etching adhesive and compared the results with a glass ionomer cement and amalgam. Cervical cavities were prepared in monkey teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into three groups. A self-etching primer system (Imperva FluoroBond, Shofu) was applied to the teeth in one of the experimental groups, and the cavities were filled with a flowable composite (SI-BF-2001-LF, Shofu). In the other groups, a glass ionomer cement (Fuji II, GC) or amalgam (Dispersalloy, Johnson & Johnson) filled the cavity. The teeth were then extracted after 3, 30 and 90 days, fixed in 10% buffered formalin solution and prepared according to routine histological techniques. Five micrometer sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or Brown and Brenn gram stain for bacterial observation. No serious inflammatory reaction of the pulp, such as necrosis or abscess formation, was observed in any of the experimental groups. Slight inflammatory cell infiltration was the main initial reaction, while deposition of reparative dentin was the major long-term reaction in all groups. No bacterial penetration along the cavity walls was detected in the flowable composite or glass ionomer cement except for one case at 30 days in the glass ionomer cement. The flowable composite bonded with self-etching adhesive showed an acceptable biological com- patibility to monkey pulp. The in vivo sealing ability of the flowable composite in combination with the self-etching adhesive was considered comparable to glass ionomer cement. Amalgam restorations without adhesive liners showed slight bacterial penetration along the cavity wall. PMID:14753328

  10. Effect of amalgam corrosion products in non-discolored dentin on the bond strength of replaced composite resin

    PubMed Central

    Ghavamnasiri, Marjaneh; Eslami, Samaneh; Ameri, Hamide; Chasteen, Joseph E.; Majidinia, Sara; Moghadam, Fatemeh Velayaty

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of amalgam corrosion products in non-discolored dentin on the bond strength of replaced composite resin. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty-one Class I cavities were prepared on extracted premolars and divided into seven groups. Group 1: Light-cured composite; Groups 2, 3, and 4: Amalgam stored in 37°C normal saline for respectively 1, 3, and 6 months and then replaced with composite leaving the cavity walls intact. Groups 5, 6, and 7: Identical to Groups 2, 3, and 4, except the cavity walls were extended 0.5 mm after amalgam removal. Eighteen specimens from each group were selected for shear bond strength testing, while on remaining five samples, elemental microanalysis was conducted. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Freidman (α = 0.05). Results: There was a significant difference between Groups 1 and 4 and also between Group 1 and Groups 5, 6, and 7. However, Groups 1, 2, and 3 showed no significant difference regarding bond strength. Bond strengths of Group 4 was significantly less than Groups 2 and 3. However, Groups 5, 6, and 7 showed similar bond strength. There was no difference among all groups in terms of metal elements at any storage times. PMID:25657522

  11. The Changes in Dentists’ Perception and Patient’s Acceptance on Amalgam Restoration in Kurdistan-Iraq: A Questionnaire-based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Hawzhen Masoud; Mohammad, Kale Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Background There has been considerable controversy concerning the health risks and benefits of utilizing mercury-containing amalgam. Across the developing countries, a reduction in the use of dental amalgam in oral health care provision is expected. Purpose Assessment of dentists’ and patient’s attitude of dental amalgam regarding attractiveness, perceived health, and treatment preferences in Kurdistan, Iraq. Materials and Methods A 4-page questionnaire comprised two parts, specific for dentist and patient were structured and delivered to each dentist oneself. Both open-ended and close-ended questions about the treatment needs of patients, uses of amalgam and its alternative, the properties and usefulness of different materials. Patient’s acceptance was assessed by means of structured questionnaire prepared based on commonly asked questions from routinely daily practice. Questions on the type of filling material in their mouth, previous knowledge of mercury in dental amalgam and disappointment due to mercury hazard and toxicity. They were to indicate their acceptance with filling their cavities by dental amalgam with or without prior information about its mercury content. This part was also accomplished by the dentists participated in this survey. Results Out of 185 dentists shared, only 39 (21.1%) indicated that amalgam presents no harm for the dentists and patients. While majority of dentists 85 (45.9%) were uncertain about this issue. Amalgam was selected most often 107 (57.8%) as the material of choice for restoring posterior teeth. About 94(50.8%) and 85(45.9%) of the practitioners primarily used glass ionomer/resin-reinforced glass ionomer and composite, respectively. Among 1850 patients received treatment, only 450 (24.32%) claimed to have heard about adverse reactions to dental amalgams. Those who believed it to be safe were 200 (10.82%).Acceptance towards amalgam was 62%. Conclusion While amalgam was the most common material used for posterior

  12. Randomized clinical comparison of endodontically treated teeth restored with amalgam or with fiber posts and resin composite: five-year results.

    PubMed

    Mannocci, Francesco; Qualtrough, Alison J E; Worthington, Helen V; Watson, Timothy F; Pitt Ford, Thomas R

    2005-01-01

    Prospective clinical studies comparing the results of different types of restorations of endodontically treated teeth are lacking. This study compared the clinical success rate of endodontically treated premolars restored with fiber posts and direct composite to the restorations of premolars using amalgam. Premolars with Class II carious lesions were selected and randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: (1) restoration with amalgam or (2) restoration with fiber posts and composite. One hundred and nine teeth were included in Group 1 and 110 in Group 2. Patients were recalled after 1, 3 and 5 years. No statistically significant difference was found between the proportion of failed teeth in the two experimental groups. Significant differences were observed between the proportion of root fractures (p=0.029) and caries (p=0.047), with more root fractures and less caries observed in the teeth restored with amalgam at the five-year recall. Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that restorations with fiber posts and composite were found to be more effective than amalgam in preventing root fractures but less effective in preventing secondary caries. PMID:15765952

  13. Absence of carious lesions at margins of glass-ionomer cement and amalgam restorations: An update of systematic review evidence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This article aims to update the existing systematic review evidence elicited by Mickenautsch et al. up to 18 January 2008 (published in the European Journal of Paediatric Dentistry in 2009) and addressing the review question of whether, in the same dentition and same cavity class, glass-ionomer cement (GIC) restored cavities show less recurrent carious lesions on cavity margins than cavities restored with amalgam. Methods The systematic literature search was extended beyond the original search date and a further hand-search and reference check was done. The quality of accepted trials was assessed, using updated quality criteria, and the risk of bias was investigated in more depth than previously reported. In addition, the focus of quantitative synthesis was shifted to single datasets extracted from the accepted trials. Results The database search (up to 10 August 2010) identified 1 new trial, in addition to the 9 included in the original systematic review, and 11 further trials were included after a hand-search and reference check. Of these 21 trials, 11 were excluded and 10 were accepted for data extraction and quality assessment. Thirteen dichotomous datasets of primary outcomes and 4 datasets with secondary outcomes were extracted. Meta-analysis and cumulative meta-analysis were used in combining clinically homogenous datasets. The overall results of the computed datasets suggest that GIC has a higher caries-preventive effect than amalgam for restorations in permanent teeth. No difference was found for restorations in the primary dentition. Conclusion This outcome is in agreement with the conclusions of the original systematic review. Although the findings of the trials identified in this update may be considered to be less affected by attrition- and publication bias, their risk of selection- and detection/performance bias is high. Thus, verification of the currently available results requires further high-quality randomised control trials. PMID

  14. [Is amalgam a health hazard?].

    PubMed

    Göhring, Till N; Schicht, Olivier O; Imfeld, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Since more than 100 years amalgam is successfully used for the functional restoration of decayed teeth. During the early 1990s the use of amalgam has been discredited by a not very objective discussion about small amounts of quicksilver that can evaporate from the material. Recent studies and reviews, however, found little to no correlation between systemic or local diseases and amalgam restorations in man. Allergic reactions are extremely rare. Most quicksilver evaporates during placement and removal of amalgam restorations. Hence it is not recommended to make extensive rehabilitations with amalgam in pregnant or nursing women. To date, there is no dental material, which can fully substitute amalgam as a restorative material. According to present scientific evidence the use of amalgam is not a health hazard. PMID:18517065

  15. Long-term clinical evaluation of fracture and pulp injury following glass-ionomer cement or composite resin applied as a base filling in teeth restored with amalgam.

    PubMed

    De C Luz, M A; Ciaramicoli-Rodrigues, M T; Garone Netto, N; De Lima, A C

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this research was to analyse the long-term clinical behaviour of two dental materials applied as filling under silver amalgam restorations: glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and composite resin with adhesive system (CR). In this study, 117 posterior teeth (29 premolars and 88 molars) were selected with carious lesions which resulted in great loss of dentin and cusps with unsupported enamel. After caries removal, cavities were prepared and totally filled with GIC or with CR. In a following visit, new cavities were prepared, leaving the employed filling material as a base and support for the enamel, which were then restored with silver amalgam. Restorations were evaluated periodically after 6 months and up to 5 years. Both fracture and pulpal involvement rates were low. Although differences could be observed in the behaviour of the materials, statistical survival estimation showed that the performances of GIC and CR as filling material were similar. There was a significant association both between kind of tooth (molar or premolar) and long-term survival of the restorations; and between degree of unsupported enamel and the same long-term survival. Our results confirmed that the technique in which GIC or CR are used as filling under silver amalgam restorations is clinically acceptable. PMID:11422695

  16. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  17. Durability of bonds and clinical success of adhesive restorations

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Manso, Adriana P.; Geraldeli, Saulo; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Resin-dentin bond strength durability testing has been extensively used to evaluate the effectiveness of adhesive systems and the applicability of new strategies to improve that property. Clinical effectiveness is determined by the survival rates of restorations placed in non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). While there is evidence that the bond strength data generated in laboratory studies somehow correlates with the clinical outcome of NCCL restorations, it is questionable whether the knowledge of bonding mechanisms obtained from laboratory testing can be used to justify clinical performance of resin-dentin bonds. There are significant morphological and structural differences between the bonding substrate used in in vitro testing versus the substrate encountered in NCCL. These differences qualify NCCL as a hostile substrate for bonding, yielding bond strengths that are usually lower than those obtained in normal dentin. However, clinical survival time of NCCL restorations often surpass the durability of normal dentin tested in the laboratory. Likewise, clinical reports on the long-term survival rates of posterior composite restorations defy the relatively rapid rate of degradation of adhesive interfaces reported in laboratory studies. This article critically analyzes how the effectiveness of adhesive systems is currently measured, to identify gaps in knowledge where new research could be encouraged. The morphological and chemical analysis of bonded interfaces of resin composite restorations in teeth that had been in clinical service for many years, but were extracted for periodontal reasons, could be a useful tool to observe the ultrastructural characteristics of restorations that are regarded as clinically acceptable. This could help determine how much degradation is acceptable for clinical success. PMID:22192252

  18. Shear bond strength of partial coverage restorations to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Alonso-Pérez-Barquero, Jorge; Fons-Font, Antonio; Solá-Ruíz, María-Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Background When partial coverage restorations (veneers, inlays, onlays…) must be cemented to dentin, bond strength may not reach the same predictable values as to enamel. The purpose of this study was: 1. To compare, with a shear bond test, the bond strength to dentin of a total-etch and a self-etching bonding agent. 2. To determine whether creating microretention improves the bond strength to dentin. Material and Methods Two bonding agents were assayed, Optibond FL® (Kerr), two-bottle adhesive requiring acid etching, and Clearfil SE Bond® (Kuraray), two-bottle self-etching adhesive. The vestibular, lingual, distal and mesial surfaces of ten molars (n=10) were ground to remove all enamel and 40 ceramic samples were cemented with Variolink II® (Ivoclar Vivadent). Half the molar surfaces were treated to create round microretention (pits) to determine whether these could influence bond strength to dentin. The 40 molar surfaces were divided into four groups (n=10): Optibond FL (O); Clearfil SE (C); Optibond FL + microretention (OM); Clearfil SE + micro retention (CM). A shear bond test was performed and the bond failures provoked examined under an optical microscope. Results O=35.27±8.02 MPa; C=36.23±11.23 MPa; OM=28.61±6.27 MPa; CM=27.01±7.57 MPa. No statistically significant differences were found between the adhesives. Optibond FL showed less statistical dispersion than Clearfil SE. The presence of microretentions reduced bond strength values regardless of the adhesive used. Conclusions 1. Clearfil SE self-etching adhesive and Optibond FL acid-etch showed adequate bond strengths and can be recommended for bonding ceramic restorations to dentin. 2. The creation of round microretention pits compromises these adhesives’ bond strength to dentin. Key words:Adhesion to dentin, bonding agent, Optibond FL, Clearfil SE, microretention, shear bond test. PMID:26330937

  19. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed. PMID:24320063

  20. Creep as a mechanism for sealing amalgams.

    PubMed

    Osborne, John W

    2006-01-01

    Dental amalgam seals itself over time. The reduction of microleakage in amalgam restorations has been explained by corrosion products filling in the interface gap between amalgam and tooth structure in order to seal the restoration interface. This concept has been widely accepted; yet, curiously, there is little research supporting this theory. The creep mechanism may be a plausible alternative to explaining why microleakage is reduced over time in amalgam restorations. Amalgam restorations are confined to the fixed space of the cavity preparation; expansion of the amalgam through internal phase changes in this confined area must be relieved. The resultant creep-expansion of the amalgam restoration fills in the tooth/amalgam interface gap. Once the interfacial gap is filled and amalgam has made intimate contact with the cavity wall, the dental amalgam slides along the tooth preparation plane as predicted by classic metallurgical studies. The results of the creep of amalgam have been observed clinically as the extrusion of amalgam from the cavity preparation. This explanation for amalgam sealing the tooth/amalgam gap fits many clinical observations and certain research data. PMID:16827016

  1. In-vitro study of the adhesive strengths of brackets on metals, ceramic and composite. Part 1: Bonding to precious metals and amalgam.

    PubMed

    Jost-Brinkmann, P G; Drost, C; Can, S

    1996-04-01

    Adult patients often have fillings, artificial crowns and/or bridges that make fitting of conventional bands difficult or even impossible. In such cases bonding rather than banding would be preferable. The present paper presents the investigation of more than 25 resin/conditioner combinations with respect to their bond strength to different metals as well as to amalgam. For that purpose stainless steel lingual buttons were bonded with the various adhesives and their shear bond strengths and types of bond failure were determined after 24 hours. All specimens were air-abraded with 50 microns Al2O3 for 2 or 4 seconds by means of a Microetcher before bonding. For comparison, buttons were also bonded to bovine enamel after air-abrasion or conventional etching with 37% H3PO4. Results show that, on all metals investigated, several materials yield bond strengths which are similar to or higher than what is achieved with the conventional acid etch technique on enamel. Maximum adhesive strength is not always desirable, however, for bonding brackets. The type of bond failure and the risk of irreversible damage to the bonded material have also to be taken into consideration. Al2O3 abrasion may cause considerable damage to enamel within 4 seconds. Since the bond strength on air-abraded enamel is about the same as on acid etched enamel, conventional etching with H3PO4 is preferable to the sandblasting of enamel. PMID:8647560

  2. Effect of dentin surface roughness on the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations

    PubMed Central

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Poursoltan, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to investigate whether dentin surface preparation with diamond rotary instruments of different grit sizes affects the shear bond strength of resin-bonded restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS The buccal enamel of 60 maxillary central incisors was removed with a low speed diamond saw and wet ground with silicon carbide papers. The polished surfaces of the teeth were prepared with four groups of rotary diamond burs with super-coarse (SC), coarse (C), medium (M), and fine (F) grit sizes. Following surface preparation, 60 restorations were casted with nickel-chromium alloy and bonded with Panavia cement. To assess the shear bond strength, the samples were mounted on a universal testing machine and an axial load was applied along the cement-restoration interface at the crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The acquired data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test (α=.05). RESULTS The mean ± SD shear bond strengths (in MPa) of the study groups were 17.75 ± 1.41 for SC, 13.82 ± 1.13 for C, 10.40 ± 1.45 for M, and 7.13 ± 1.18 for F. Statistical analysis revealed the significant difference among the study groups such that the value for group SC was significantly higher than that for group F (P<.001). CONCLUSION Dentin surface roughness created by diamond burs of different grit sizes considerably influences the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations. PMID:27350858

  3. Filling cavities or restoring teeth?

    PubMed

    Versluis, Antheunis; Versluis-Tantbirojn, Daranee

    2011-01-01

    Teeth seldom fracture under normal functional loading. This indicates that the natural tooth design is optimized for the distribution of regular masticatory forces by means of its properties and structure. When a tooth is restored with an intracoronal restoration, however, the incidence of tooth fracture increases. Since remaining tissues do not change, the restorative actions apparently alter the original stress distributions. In this study, the effect of different restoration types (unbonded amalgam and bonded composite restorations) were compared with the original stress conditions of the intact tooth, using finite element analysis. It was shown that an unbonded amalgam restoration did not restore the original stress conditions but led to much higher stresses in the buccal and lingual enamel and to higher tensile stresses in the cavity floor. The unbonded amalgam thus filled the cavity but did not restore the tooth. In contrast, a bonded composite restoration restored the original stress pattern in the tooth if there was no polymerization shrinkage. Polymerization shrinkage causes residual tensile stresses in the dentin around the cavity and in the buccal and lingual enamel. Residual tensile stresses in the buccal and lingual enamel are momentary compensated by compressive stress components during occlusal loading. It was concluded that bonding and elimination of residual stresses are prerequisites for restoring the original tooth integrity. PMID:21748978

  4. Direct Contra Naïve-Indirect Comparison of Clinical Failure Rates between High-Viscosity GIC and Conventional Amalgam Restorations: An Empirical Study

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2013-01-01

    Background Naïve-indirect comparisons are comparisons between competing clinical interventions’ evidence from separate (uncontrolled) trials. Direct comparisons are comparisons within randomised control trials (RCTs). The objective of this empirical study is to test the null-hypothesis that trends and performance differences inferred from naïve-indirect comparisons and from direct comparisons/RCTs regarding the failure rates of amalgam and direct high-viscosity glass-ionomer cement (HVGIC) restorations in permanent posterior teeth have similar direction and magnitude. Methods A total of 896 citations were identified through systematic literature search. From these, ten and two uncontrolled clinical longitudinal studies for HVGIC and amalgam, respectively, were included for naïve-indirect comparison and could be matched with three out twenty RCTs. Summary effects sizes were computed as Odds ratios (OR; 95% Confidence intervals) and compared with those from RCTs. Trend directions were inferred from 95% Confidence interval overlaps and direction of point estimates; magnitudes of performance differences were inferred from the median point estimates (OR) with 25% and 75% percentile range, for both types of comparison. Mann-Whitney U test was applied to test for statistically significant differences between point estimates of both comparison types. Results Trends and performance differences inferred from naïve-indirect comparison based on evidence from uncontrolled clinical longitudinal studies and from direct comparisons based on RCT evidence are not the same. The distributions of the point estimates differed significantly for both comparison types (Mann–Whitney U  =  25, nindirect  =  26; ndirect  =  8; p  =  0.0013, two-tailed). Conclusion The null-hypothesis was rejected. Trends and performance differences inferred from either comparison between HVGIC and amalgam restorations failure rates in permanent posterior teeth are not the same. It is

  5. Amalgam--Resurrection and redemption. Part 1: the clinical and legal mythology of anti-amalgam.

    PubMed

    Wahl, M J

    2001-01-01

    Dental amalgam has come under attack for its allegedly poor physical properties and clinical performance in addition to its poor appearance. It has been claimed that the American Dental Association has a hidden agenda to protect amalgam and that other countries have banned its use. A literature search revealed that the vast majority of amalgam restorations do not cause fractured cusps or have recurrent caries. Most amalgam restorations have been shown to last longer than resin composite restorations. In addition, the materials and techniques involved in amalgam restorations have vastly improved in recent years. Like resin composite restorations, amalgam restorations can often be repaired. The American Dental Association has no vested interest in protecting amalgam. The use of amalgam has not been banned in any country in the European Union. According to the latest scientific information available, dental amalgam is a remarkably durable and long-lasting restorative material. Although its appearance is unesthetic, its clinical performance and effectiveness are unsurpassed by those of resin composite. PMID:11495565

  6. A 4 year follow-up study of alveolar bone height influenced by two dissimilar Class II amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Fisher, D; Markitziu, A; Fishel, D; Brayer, L

    1984-07-01

    Fifty-four paired, approximal amalgam fillings, extended (E) versus unextended (NE) were placed in forty-three patients and followed up to 4 years. Yearly measurements between the alveolar crest and (a) the apical margin of the fillings (E, NE), and (b) the cemento-enamel junction of the control group, were performed using bite-wing radiographs joined to a translucent grid magnified ten-fold. The rate of alveolar crest resorption was similar for the control (C) and the unextended filling (NE) and reached 0.45 mm after 4 years of follow-up. The resorption of the alveolar crest under the extended (E) filling was significantly higher and reached 0.80 mm after 4 years (P less than 0.001). PMID:6589386

  7. Bacterial leakage of mineral trioxide aggregate as compared with zinc-free amalgam, intermediate restorative material, and Super-EBA as a root-end filling material.

    PubMed

    Fischer, E J; Arens, D E; Miller, C H

    1998-03-01

    Several dye leakage studies have demonstrated the fact that mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) leaks significantly less than other root-end filling materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the time needed for Serratia marcescens to penetrate a 3 mm thickness of zinc-free amalgam, Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), Super-EBA, and MTA when these materials were used as root-end filling materials. Fifty-six, single-rooted extracted human teeth were cleaned and shaped with a series of .04 Taper rotary instruments (Pro-series 29 files). Once the canals were prepared in a crown down approach, the ends were resected and 48 root-end cavities were ultrasonically prepared to a 3 mm depth. The teeth were then steam sterilized. Using an aseptic technique, under a laminar air flow hood, the root-end cavities were filled with amalgam, IRM, Super-EBA, and MTA. Four root-end cavities were filled with thermoplasticized gutta-percha without a root canal sealer and served as positive controls. Another four root-end cavities were filled with sticky wax covered with two layers of nail polish and served as negative controls. The teeth were attached to presterilized (ethylene oxide gas) plastic caps, and the root ends were placed into 12-ml vials of phenol red broth. Using a micropipette, a tenth of a milliliter of S. marcescens was placed into the root canal of each tooth. To test the sterility of the apparatus set-up, the root canals of two teeth with test root-end filling materials and one tooth from the positive and negative control groups were filled with sterile saline. The number of days required for S. marcescens to penetrate the four root-end filling materials and grow in the phenol red broth was recorded and analyzed. Most of the samples filled with zinc-free amalgam leaked bacteria in 10 to 63 days. IRM began leaking 28 to 91 days. Super-EBA began leaking 42 to 101 days. MTA did not begin leaking until day 49. At the end of the study, four of the MTA samples

  8. The dental amalgam controversy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Feuer, George; Injeyan, H Stephen

    1996-01-01

    In spite of the long history of mercury amalgam as a dental restorative material, its use continues to be controversial. Mercury vapour is continuously released from dental amalgam and is ultimately absorbed into a variety of tissues. Experimental data have demonstrated that the uptake, tissue retention and excretion of mercury from dental amalgam is significant. Evidence has accumulated indicating a relationship between tissue mercury levels and a multitude of clinical manifestations. However, the clinical significance of mercury toxicity from dental amalgams is a matter for debate. The literature is devoid of randomized clinical trials that are rigorously designed to address this issue. Thus, although research data renders the notion of amalgam safety questionable, the dental community appears determined to continue its use as long as unequivocal evidence correlating amalgam mercury toxicity to specific clinical conditions is lacking.

  9. Novel Amalgams for In-Space Parts Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Calvin; VanHoose, James R.; Grugel, Richard N.

    2012-01-01

    Sound amalgams can be fabricated by substituting Ga-In liquid for mercury; Cu-coated steel fibers bond well with the amalgam components. Inclusion of steel fibers significantly improved mechanical properties. An application scenario utilizing amalgams for in-space parts fabrication and repair was suggested. Procedure and materials need to be optimized

  10. Dental amalgam--environmental aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholt-Bindslev, D. )

    1992-09-01

    Increasing knowledge about the risk of toxic effects caused by anthropogenic mercury accumulation in ecosystems has resulted in a growing pressure for reduction of the discharge of mercury waste. Consequently, the mercury waste problems of dental clinics have been given increased attention, and restrictions on handling and discharge of contaminated waste have been established in several countries. Major amalgam particles from trituration surplus of those produced during the carving and burnishing of new amalgam restorations are generally collected in coarse filters and sold for refinement. Minor amalgam particles released by production of new fillings or by removal of old restorations partly sediment in tubes and drains. The remaining particles are carried with the waste water stream to the local purifying plant. In Scandinavia, the industrial discharge of mercury-contaminated waste water has been reduced to a minimum. According to recent investigations, dental clinics appear to be responsible for the major amount of mercury collected in the sludge generated in purifying plants. If threshold values for heavy metal content, including mercury, are exceeded, the sludge is not allowed to be recycled as fertilizer. Installation of an approved amalgam-separating apparatus in dental clinics is now mandatory in several countries--for example, Switzerland, Germany, Sweden, and Denmark. Approval of amalgam separators is based on national testing programs, including clinical or laboratory tests demanding 95-99% separating efficiency. 18 refs.

  11. Fracture resistance of teeth restored with class II bonded composite resin.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S

    1986-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether composite resin bonded to enamel or to both enamel and dentin can increase the fracture resistance of teeth with Class II cavity preparations. Extracted maxillary pre-molars with MOD slot preparations were restored with composite resin bonded to enamel (P-30 and Enamel Bond) or composite resin bonded to enamel and dentin (P-30 and Scotch-bond). Teeth in a control group were prepared but left unrestored. All teeth were loaded occlusally in a universal testing machine until they fractured. Means of forces required to fracture teeth in each of the three groups were statistically compared (one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni t test). Teeth restored with combined enamel- and dentin-bonded composite resins were significantly more resistant to fracture than were similarly prepared but unrestored teeth and also than teeth restored with enamel-bonded composite resin (p less than 0.05). A significant difference was not demonstrated between the enamel-bonded group and the unrestored group. Further testing is needed to determine the durability of the bonds between tooth and restoration in the clinical setting. PMID:3511111

  12. The effects of glass ionomer and flowable composite liners on the fracture resistance of open-sandwich class II restorations.

    PubMed

    Güray Efes, Begüm; Yaman, Batu Can; Gümüştaş, Burak; Tıryakı, Murat

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to investigate the effects of glass-ionomer and flowable composite liners on the fracture resistance of Class II amalgam and composite restorations. Group 1 cavities were restored with amalgam and Group 4 cavities with nanofill composite after the application of a dentin-bonding agent. For the remaining groups, light-cured-glass-ionomer liner was used in a gingival floor proximal box (Groups 2, 5) or flowable composite was used as a liner (Groups 3, 6), the remainder of the cavity was restored with amalgam (Groups 2, 3) or composite (Groups 5, 6). The restorations were loaded in compression to failure. The data was analyzed using Tukey's multiple comparison test. The fracture resistance was significantly higher (p<0.05) in Group 3 than in all other groups, except Group 2 (p>0.05). Flowable composite, glass-ionomer liners increased the fracture resistance of open-sandwich Class II amalgam restorations. PMID:24240900

  13. Do Laboratory Results Concerning High-Viscosity Glass-Ionomers versus Amalgam for Tooth Restorations Indicate Similar Effect Direction and Magnitude than that of Controlled Clinical Trials? - A Meta-Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2015-01-01

    Background A large percentage of evidence concerning dental interventions is based on laboratory research. The apparent wealth of laboratory evidence is sometimes used as basis for clinical inference and recommendations for daily dental practice. In this study two null-hypotheses are tested: whether trial results from laboratory and controlled clinical trials concerning the comparison of high-viscosity glass-ionomer cements (HVGIC) to amalgam for restorations placed in permanent posterior teeth have: (i) similar effect direction and (ii) similar effect magnitude. Methods 7 electronic databases were searched, as well as reference lists. Odds ratios (OR) and Standardised Mean Differences (SMD) with 95% Confidence intervals were computed for extracted dichotomous and continuous data, respectively. Pooled effect estimates for laboratory and clinical data were computed to test for effect direction. Odds ratios were converted into SMDs. SMDs from laboratory and clinical data were statistically compared to test for differences in effect magnitude. The analysed results were further investigated within the context of potential influencing or confounding factors using a Directed acyclic graph. Results Of the accepted eight laboratory and nine clinical trials, 13 and 21 datasets could be extracted, respectively. The pooled results of the laboratory datasets were highly statistically significant in favor of amalgam. No statistically significant differences, between HVGICs and amalgam, were identified for clinical data. For effect magnitude, statistically significant differences between clinical and laboratory trial results were found. Both null-hypotheses were rejected. Conclusion Laboratory results concerning high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus amalgam for tooth restorations do not indicate similar effect direction and magnitude than that of controlled clinical trials. PMID:26168274

  14. Replacement of a tooth with a fiber-reinforced direct bonded restoration.

    PubMed

    Shuman, I E

    2000-01-01

    Today's methods and materials for tooth replacement are multiple and varied. Modern materials now allow for highly conservative abutment preparations that can retain bonded single tooth replacement fixed prostheses. A case report is presented in which fiber reinforced with composite resin was used for placement of a three-unit fixed long-term provisional restoration, providing fracture resistance while achieving an esthetically pleasing, durable restoration. PMID:11199598

  15. Novel fabrication method for zirconia restorations: bonding strength of machinable ceramic to zirconia with resin cements.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Soichi; Terui, Yuichi; Higuchi, Daisuke; Goto, Daisuke; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Manabe, Atsufumi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A novel method was developed to fabricate all-ceramic restorations which comprised CAD/CAM-fabricated machinable ceramic bonded to CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia framework using resin cement. The feasibility of this fabrication method was assessed in this study by investigating the bonding strength of a machinable ceramic to zirconia. A machinable ceramic was bonded to a zirconia plate using three kinds of resin cements: ResiCem (RE), Panavia (PA), and Multilink (ML). Conventional porcelain-fused-to-zirconia specimens were also prepared to serve as control. Shear bond strength test (SBT) and Schwickerath crack initiation test (SCT) were carried out. SBT revealed that PA (40.42 MPa) yielded a significantly higher bonding strength than RE (28.01 MPa) and ML (18.89 MPa). SCT revealed that the bonding strengths of test groups using resin cement were significantly higher than those of Control. Notably, the bonding strengths of RE and ML were above 25 MPa even after 10,000 times of thermal cycling -adequately meeting the ISO 9693 standard for metal-ceramic restorations. These results affirmed the feasibility of the novel fabrication method, in that a CAD/CAM-fabricated machinable ceramic is bonded to a CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia framework using a resin cement. PMID:21597207

  16. Bacterial penetration of restored cavities using two self-etching bonding systems

    PubMed Central

    Cobanoglu, Nevin; Ozer, Fusun; Demirci, Mustafa; Erganis, Osman; Imazato, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two bonding systems, with and without antibacterial monomers, on marginal bacterial and dye leakage. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared in extracted teeth for a bacterial leakage test, and the teeth were sterilized using a steam autoclave. Four cavities were not restored for the controls, and the other teeth were divided into two groups (n = 16 cavities each): Clearfil Protect Bond group (CPB) and Clearfil SE Bond group (CSE). After application of the bonding agent, the cavities were restored using a composite resin (Clearfil AP-X). The teeth were thermocycled, stored in a broth culture of 1.56 × 108 colony forming units (CFU)/ml of Streptococcus mutans at 37°C for 10 days, and subsequently processed for bacterial staining. Sections from the demineralized teeth were evaluated under a light microscope. In the dye leakage test, the cavities were restored as described in the bacterial penetration test. After thermocycling, the teeth were immersed in 5% basic fuchsin for 24 h, and then divided in half and observed under a stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests (P = 0.05). Results: The bacterial stain was detected at the cavity wall of five cavities in both bonding systems. Additionally, two cavities in the CSE group, one cavity in the CPB group, and all control cavities showed bacterial staining within the cut dentinal tubules. Dye staining at the axial cavity wall was detected in only three of the teeth for both bonding systems. Conclusion: The bonding systems used in this study provided an acceptable marginal seal to prevent bacterial and dye leakage. PMID:24966765

  17. Cervical Interfacial Bonding Effectiveness of Class II Bulk Versus Incremental Fill Resin Composite Restorations.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, F; Kaisarly, D; Michna, A; ArRejaie, A; Bader, D; El Gezawi, M

    2015-01-01

    Cervical interfacial bonding quality has been a matter of deep concern. The purpose of this study was to analyze microtensile bond strength (MTBS) and cervical interfacial gap distance (IGD) of bulk-fill vs incremental-fill Class II composite restorations. Box-only Class II cavities were prepared in 91 maxillary premolars (n = 7) with gingival margin placement 1 mm above the cementoenamel junction at one side and 1 mm below it on the other side. Eighty-four maxillary premolars were divided into self-etch and total-etch groups and further subdivided into six restorative material subgroups used incrementally and with an open-sandwich technique: group 1, Tetric Ceram HB (TC) as a control; group 2, Tetric EvoFlow (EF); group 3, SDR Smart Dentin Replacement (SDR); group 4, SonicFill (SF); group 5, Tetric N-Ceram Bulk Fill (TN); and group 6, Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TE). Groups 2-6 were bulk-fill restoratives. Tetric N-Bond Self-Etch (se) and Tetric N-Bond total-etch (te) adhesive were used in subgroups 1-5, whereas AdheSE (se) and ExciTE F (te) were used in subgroup 6. In an additional group, Filtek P90 Low Shrink Restorative (P90) was used only with its corresponding self-etch bond. The materials were manipulated, light-cured (1600 mW/cm(2)), artificially aged (thermal and occlusal load-cycling), and sectioned. Two microrods/restoration (n = 14/group) were tested for MTBS at a crosshead-speed of 0.5 mm/min (Instron testing machine). Fracture loads were recorded (Newtons), and MTSBs were calculated (Megapascals). Means were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test, Conover-Inman post hoc analysis for MTBS (multiple comparisons), and Mann-Whitney U test for IGD. The ends of the fractures were examined for failure mode. One microrod/restoration (n = 7/group) was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (×1200) for IGD. MTBS values for SF/te, P90 in enamel, and TC+SDR/te in enamel and cementum were significantly higher compared with those for the control TC

  18. Amalgam use and waste management by Pakistani dentists: an environmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, R; Ali Khan, A; Noor, N; Humayun, S

    2010-03-01

    To assess amalgam use and waste management protocols practised by Pakistani dentists, a cross-sectional study was made of 239 dentists in Islamabad and Rawalpindi, recruited by convenience and cluster sampling. Amalgam was the most frequently used restorative material, with the choice dictated by patients' financial constraints. While 90.4% of dentists perceived amalgam as a health risk, only 46.4% considered it an environmental hazard. The majority disposed of amalgam waste in the trash, down the sink or as hospital waste. Very few (5.9%) had an amalgam separator installed in their dental office. Amalgam waste management protocols and mercury recycling should be introduced in Pakistan. PMID:20795451

  19. Effect of filling technique on the bond strength of methacrylate and silorane-based composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Machado, Fernanda Weingartner; Borges, Fernanda Blos; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio; Moraes, Rafael Ratto de; Boscato, Noéli

    2016-01-01

    The bond strength of methacrylate (Z350, 3M ESPE) and silorane (P90, 3M ESPE) restorations, using different cavity filling techniques, was investigated. Cavities (6 × 3 × 3) in bovine teeth were filled using bulk, oblique, or horizontal increments. A push-out test was carried out after 24 h. Data were statistically analyzed (α = 5%). Methacrylate-based composites and the horizontal filling technique showed the highest bond strength values (10.2 ± 3.9, p < 0.05). Silorane-based composites showed no statistically significant differences regarding the filling techniques (p > 0.05). PMID:27050940

  20. Influence of different transitional restorations on the fracture resistance of premolar teeth.

    PubMed

    Qualtrough, A J; Cawte, S G; Wilson, N H

    2001-01-01

    Controversy exists over the most favorable material and type of restoration to be used to transitionally restore teeth destined to be crowned. This in vitro study uses fracture resistance testing to compare eight different transitional restorations in maxillary premolars. Ninety sound maxillary premolars were randomly selected and allocated to nine groups, each comprising 10 teeth. One group remained unrestored and was used as the control. Teeth in the remaining groups were prepared to a standard cavity form using: a copy milling process removing the palatal cusp. Restorations were placed using amalgam with dentin pins and cavity varnish; amalgam with an amalgam bonding agent; resin composite with dentin pins and a dentin bonding agent; resin composite with a dentin bonding agent only; resin-modified glass ionomer with dentin pins; resin-modified glass ionomer cement alone and cermet with dentin pins and cermet alone. Each restored tooth was then subjected to axial loading via a bar contacting the buccal and restored palatal cusps until failure of the restored tooth occurred. The mean load-to-fracture values were statistically compared and the modes of failure recorded. It was found that the choice of restorative material and type of restoration had little effect on the fracture resistance of the restored tooth with the exception of those teeth restored with reinforced glass ionomer cement alone, which exhibited a significantly lower resistance to fracture than the other restored teeth. However, the choice of restorative material/technique did influence the mode of failure. Failure in teeth restored with resin-modified glass ionomer cement alone produced the least damage to the remaining tooth tissue when failure occurred. Consequently, this material may offer the most favorable range of properties for the transitional restoration of extensively broken-down maxillary premolar teeth destined to be crowned. Furthermore, the findings of this study fail to support the

  1. DESENSITIZING BIOACTIVE AGENTS IMPROVES BOND STRENGTH OF INDIRECT RESIN-CEMENTED RESTORATIONS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Pires-De-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri; de Marco, Fabíola Fiorezi; Casemiro, Luciana Assirati; Panzeri, Heitor

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of indirect composite restorations cemented with a resin-based cement associated with etch-and-rinse and self-etching primer adhesive systems to dentin treated or not with a bioactive material. Materials and Method: Twenty bovine incisor crowns had the buccal enamel removed and the dentin ground flat. The teeth were assigned to 4 groups (n=5): Group I: acid etching + Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply); Group II: application of a bioactive glass (Biosilicato®)+ acid etching + Prime & Bond NT; Group III: One-up Bond F (J Morita); Group IV: Biosilicato® + One-up Bond F. Indirect composite resin (Artglass, Kulzer) cylinders (6x10mm) were fabricated and cemented to the teeth with a dualcure resin-based cement (Enforce, Dentsply). After cementation, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37oC for 30 days and thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC) with 50 kgf load cell at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure modes were assessed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (95% level of confidence). Results: Groups I, II and III had statistically similar results (p>0.05). Group IV had statistically significant higher bond strength means (p<0.05) than the other groups. The analysis of the debonded surfaces showed a predominance of adhesive failure mode for Group III and mixed failure mode for the other groups. Conclusion: The use of desensitizing agent did not affect negatively the bonding of the indirect composite restorations to dentin, independently of the tested adhesive systems. PMID:19089114

  2. [Biocompatibility of dental amalgam].

    PubMed

    Missias, P

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of the present review was to present a detailed description of those current scientific results and opinions relative to the biocompatibility of dental amalgam. The first section of the percent review to the pulpar reactions caused by amalgam fillings, especially when no protective base has been used, while the second part concerns itself with the biocompatibility of the dental amalgam per se. Specifically, reference is made to: a) the adverse reactions due to amalgam fillings both on the patient's physiological system and on the dentist's employing the material under consideration. b) those investigation results bearing a relation on the amount of mercury liberated during the amalgam filling procedures, i.e., mixing, condensation, finishing and polishing and/or removal of old amalgam fillings. c) Liberation of mercury, as well as metallic ions in the patients mouth cavity during chewing and/or during the process of intrabuccal galvanization and corrosion, and d) on the amount of mercury traced in the blood and urine of the patient following amalgam fillings. No conclusive evidence on any adverse reactions on the patient's health, attributable to the liberation of mercury from amalgam fillings, could be presented by the scientific investigations under consideration. Moreover, the number of cases reported on toxic reactions due to dental amalgam is negligible compared to the immense number of amalgam fillings performed in practice. It merits mentioning in this connection, however, the fact that the total amount of mercury attained by the patient from any other source, in conjunction with that liberated from amalgam fillings, could by all means contribute to a number of toxic reactions on the patient's health in general. Conclusively, one could state without reservations, that dental amalgam fillings per se are by and large free of toxic reactions on the patient, based on current scientific observations. Mentioning is finally made on several simple but

  3. Influence of eugenol-containing temporary restorations on bond strength of composite to dentin.

    PubMed

    Yap, A U; Shah, K C; Loh, E T; Sim, S S; Tan, C C

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of eugenol-containing temporary restorations on bond strength of composite to dentin. Thirty-two freshly extracted human molars were embedded and horizontally sectioned at a level 2 mm from the central fossa to obtain a flat dentin surface. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups of eight teeth. Specimens in Group 1 (control) received no pre-treatment with any temporary restorations. Group 2 and 3 specimens were covered with IRM (eugenol-containing) mixed at powder: liquid (P:L) ratio of 10 g: 1 g and 10 g: 2 g, respectively. Specimens in Group 4 were covered with polycarboxylate cement (eugenol-free) mixed at a P:L ratio of 2.85 g: 1 g. The temporary restorations were mechanically removed with an ultrasonic scaler after one-week storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C. The dentin surfaces were cleaned with pumice-water slurry and treated with Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus bonding system according to manufacturer's instructions. Composite (Z100) columns (3 mm diameter, 2 mm high) were applied and shear bond testing was carried out after 24 hours storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C using an Instron Universal testing machine with a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The mode of failure was examined using a stereomicroscope at X40 magnification. Results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA/Scheffes's post-hoc test at significance level 0.05. Ranking of bond strengths was as follows: Group 1 (22.58 MPa) > Group 2 (21.14 MPa) > Group 4 (15.35 MPa) > Group 3 (13.02 MPa). Group 3 had significantly lower bond strength than Groups 1 and 2. No significant difference in dentin bond strength was observed between the Group 1 (control) and Groups 2 and 4. Although the predominant mode of failure for Groups 1, 2 and 4 was cohesive in dentin, all specimens in Group 3 exhibited adhesive failure. Pre-treatment with polycarboxylate cement or IRM mixed at P:L ratio of 10 g: 1 g did not affect shear bond strength of composite to

  4. Resin-bonded restorations: a strategy for managing anterior tooth loss in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, Nicola U; Özcan, Mutlu; Scherrer, Susanne S; Bühler, Julia M; Weiger, Roland; Krastl, Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    In children or adolescents with anterior tooth loss, space closure with the patient's own teeth should be considered as the first choice to avoid lifelong restorative needs. Thorough diagnostics and treatment planning are required when autotransplantation or orthodontic space closure is considered. If these options are not indicated and a single tooth implant restoration is considered, implant placement should be postponed until adulthood, particularly in young women and in patients with hyperdivergent skeletal growth pattern. A ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prosthesis with 1 retainer is an excellent treatment solution for the interim period; it may also serve as a long-term restoration, providing that sound enamel structure is present, sufficient framework dimensions have been provided, adhesive cementation techniques have been meticulously applied, and functional contacts of the cantilever pontic avoided. In contrast, a resin-bonded fixed dental prosthesis with a metal framework and retentive preparation is indicated if the palatal enamel structure is compromised, interocclusal clearance is limited, splinting (such as after orthodontic treatment) is required, or more than 1 tooth has to be replaced. PMID:25702966

  5. [Amalgam gingival tatoo].

    PubMed

    Iacobelli, L; Ferraro, M; Vairo, F; Ianniciello, L; Venneri, A

    1988-01-01

    The Authors present (5) cases of gingival tattooing resulted by rapport between argentum amalgam and prosthetic reconstruction with aurum or combination. Theu concluded is opportune to substitute the stumps reconstructions in amalgam with other materials not cause of electrogalvanism. So we avaid principally the antiaesthetic aspect of pigmentation. PMID:3274159

  6. Electrical activity in dental amalgam of submerged divers during welding.

    PubMed

    Ortendahl, T W; Holland, R I

    1987-10-01

    Divers performing underwater manual metal arc welding/cutting (UMMA) have complained about a metallic taste phenomenon. In several dives with voluntary leakage in their diving suits, potential alterations in dental amalgam were registered when they performed UMMA. Polarization resistance values were obtained for the test amalgam cylinders used and the diver's dental restorations. These values, along with the recorded potential values of the amalgam test cylinders and of the diver's dental restorations, enabled us to calculate the depolarizing current, using the law of Ohm. The current depolarizing the amalgam test cylinder did not differ significantly from the mean intermetallic currents between the dental restorations. The clinical effect of intraoral currents when performing UMMA welding should be regarded as small, whereas considerably higher currents should not be ruled out in an intense cutting situation. PMID:3478937

  7. Maternal-fetal distribution of mercury ( sup 203 Hg) released from dental amalgam fillings

    SciTech Connect

    Vimy, M.J.; Takahashi, Y.; Lorscheider, F.L. )

    1990-04-01

    In humans, the continuous release of Hg vapor from dental amalgam tooth restorations is markedly increased for prolonged periods after chewing. The present study establishes a time-course distribution for amalgam Hg in body tissues of adult and fetal sheep. Under general anesthesia, five pregnant ewes had twelve occlusal amalgam fillings containing radioactive 203Hg placed in teeth at 112 days gestation. Blood, amniotic fluid, feces, and urine specimens were collected at 1- to 3-day intervals for 16 days. From days 16-140 after amalgam placement (16-41 days for fetal lambs), tissue specimens were analyzed for radioactivity, and total Hg concentrations were calculated. Results demonstrate that Hg from dental amalgam will appear in maternal and fetal blood and amniotic fluid within 2 days after placement of amalgam tooth restorations. Excretion of some of this Hg will also commence within 2 days. All tissues examined displayed Hg accumulation. Highest concentrations of Hg from amalgam in the adult occurred in kidney and liver, whereas in the fetus the highest amalgam Hg concentrations appeared in liver and pituitary gland. The placenta progressively concentrated Hg as gestation advanced to term, and milk concentration of amalgam Hg postpartum provides a potential source of Hg exposure to the newborn. It is concluded that accumulation of amalgam Hg progresses in maternal and fetal tissues to a steady state with advancing gestation and is maintained. Dental amalgam usage as a tooth restorative material in pregnant women and children should be reconsidered.

  8. Shear bond strength of bulk-fill and nano-restorative materials to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Hakan; Ercan, Ertugrul; Hamidi, Mehmet Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Bulk-fill composite materials are being developed for preparation depths of up to 4 mm in an effort to simplify and improve the placement of direct composite posterior restorations. The aim of our study was to compare shear-bond strength of bulk-fill and conventional posterior composite resins. Materials and Methods: In this study, 60 caries free extracted human molars were used and sectioned parallel to occlusal surface to expose midcoronal dentin. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups. Total-etch dentine bonding system (Adper Scotchbond 1XT, 3M ESPE) was applied to dentin surface in all the groups to reduce variability in results. Then, dentine surfaces covered by following materials. Group I: SonicFill Bulk-Fill, Group II: Tetric EvoCeram (TBF), Group III: Herculite XRV Ultra, and Group IV: TBF Bulk-Fill, 2 mm × 3 mm cylindrical restorations were prepared by using application apparatus. Shear bond testing was measured by using a universal testing machine. Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests were performed to evaluate the data. Results: The highest value was observed in Group III (14.42 ± 4.34) and the lowest value was observed in Group IV (11.16 ± 2.76) and there is a statistically significant difference between these groups (P = 0.046). However, there is no statistically significant difference between the values of other groups. In this study, Group III was showed higher strength values. Conclusion: There is a need for future studies about long-term bond strength and clinical success of these adhesive and bulk-fill systems. PMID:27011738

  9. Repair bond strength of restorative resin composite applied to fiber-reinforced composite substrate.

    PubMed

    Tezvergil, Arzu; Lassila, Lippo V J; Yli-Urpo, Antti; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2004-02-01

    Delamination or fracture of composite veneers can occur as a result of improper design of the fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) framework. This in vitro study tested the repair bond strength of restorative composite to aged FRC. The substrate was multiphase polymer matrix FRC (everStick) aged by boiling for 8 h and storing at 37 degrees C in water for 6 weeks. The aged substrate surfaces were wet-ground flat with 1200-grit silicon carbide paper and subjected randomly to 5 different surface treatments: 1) An adhesion primer (Composite Activator) and resin (CA), 2) Silane (EspeSil) and resin (SIL-MP), 3) Silane, adhesive primer, and resin (Clearfil Repair) (CF), 4) Air particle-abrading (CoJet), silane, and resin (CJ-SIL-MP), 5) Resin (Scotchbond Multipurpose Resin) only as control (MP). Restorative composite resin (Z250) was added to the substrate in 2 mm layer increments and light-cured. Subsequently, every surface treatment group was divided into 2 subgroups of 12 specimens each. The specimens were either 48 h water-stored or thermocycled (6000 x 5-55 degrees C). The shear bond strengths of composite resin to FRC were measured at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The data were analyzed by ANOVA for factors 'treatment type' and 'storage condition'; Tukey's post-hoc tests and Weibull analysis were performed. ANOVA showed a significant difference as a function of surface treatment (P<0.05) and storage condition (P<0.05). The CJ-SIL-MP group showed highest bond strength and Weibull modulus after thermocycling. Repair of multiphase polymer matrix FRC may show reliable bond strength when silane treatment is used along with air-particle abrading. PMID:15124783

  10. Bond and fracture strength of metal-ceramic restorations formed by selective laser sintering

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Hae-Young

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture strength of the metal and the bond strength in metal-ceramic restorations produced by selective laser sintering (SLS) and by conventional casting (CAST). MATERIALS AND METHODS Non-precious alloy (StarLoy C, DeguDent, Hanau, Germany) was used in CAST group and metal powder (SP2, EOS GmbH, Munich, Germany) in SLS group. Metal specimens in the form of sheets (25.0 × 3.0 × 0.5 mm) were produced in accordance with ISO 9693:1999 standards (n=30). To measure the bond strength, ceramic was fired on a metal specimen and then three-point bending test was performed. In addition, the metal fracture strength was measured by continuing the application of the load. The values were statistically analyzed by performing independent t-tests (α=.05). RESULTS The mean bond strength of the SLS group (50.60 MPa) was higher than that of the CAST group (46.29 MPa), but there was no statistically significant difference. The metal fracture strength of the SLS group (1087.2 MPa) was lower than that of the CAST group (2399.1 MPa), and this difference was statistically significant. CONCLUSION In conclusion the balling phenomenon and the gap formation of the SLS process may increase the metal-ceramic bond strength. PMID:25177469

  11. Push-Out Bond Strength of Restorations with Bulk-Fill, Flow, and Conventional Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Caixeta, Rodrigo Vieira; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Kaneshima, Edmilson Nobumitu; Barbosa, Aline Silvestre; Picolotto, Cassiana Pedrotti; Lima, Ana Eliza de Souza; Gonini Júnior, Alcides; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strengths of composite restorations made with different filler amounts and resin composites that were photoactivated using a light-emitting diode (LED). Thirty bovine incisors were selected, and a conical cavity was prepared in the facial surface of each tooth. All preparations were etched with Scotchbond Etching Gel, the Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus adhesive system was applied followed by photoactivation, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Filtek Z350 XT, Filtek Z350 XT Flow, or bulk-fill X-tra fil resin composite (n = 10) followed by photoactivation. A push-out test to determine bond strength was conducted using a universal testing machine. Data (MPa) were submitted to Student's t-test at a 5% significance level. After the test, the fractured specimens were examined using an optical microscope under magnification (10x). Although all three composites demonstrated a high prevalence of adhesive failures, the bond strength values of the different resin composites photoactivated by LED showed that the X-tra fil resin composite had a lower bond strength than the Filtek Z350 XT and Filtek Z350 XT Flow resin composites. PMID:26457322

  12. 43 CFR 3215.12 - What will BLM do if I do not restore the face amount or file a new bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... face amount or file a new bond? 3215.12 Section 3215.12 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to... restore the face amount or file a new bond? If we collect against your bond and you do not restore it to the original face amount, we may shut in any well(s) or utilization facilities covered by that...

  13. 43 CFR 3215.12 - What will BLM do if I do not restore the face amount or file a new bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... face amount or file a new bond? 3215.12 Section 3215.12 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to... restore the face amount or file a new bond? If we collect against your bond and you do not restore it to the original face amount, we may shut in any well(s) or utilization facilities covered by that...

  14. 43 CFR 3215.12 - What will BLM do if I do not restore the face amount or file a new bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... face amount or file a new bond? 3215.12 Section 3215.12 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to... restore the face amount or file a new bond? If we collect against your bond and you do not restore it to the original face amount, we may shut in any well(s) or utilization facilities covered by that...

  15. 43 CFR 3215.12 - What will BLM do if I do not restore the face amount or file a new bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... face amount or file a new bond? 3215.12 Section 3215.12 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to... restore the face amount or file a new bond? If we collect against your bond and you do not restore it to the original face amount, we may shut in any well(s) or utilization facilities covered by that...

  16. Marginal microleakage of class V resin-based composite restorations bonded with six one-step self-etch systems.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ayala, Alfonso; Farias-Neto, Arcelino; Vilanova, Larissa Soares Reis; Gomes, João Carlos; Gomes, Osnara Maria Mongruel

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the microleakage of class V restorations bonded with various one-step self-etching adhesives. Seventy class V resin-based composite restorations were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 35 premolars, by using: Clearfil S3 Bond, G-Bond, iBond, One Coat 7.0, OptiBond All-In-One, or Xeno IV. The Adper Single Bond etch-and-rinse two-step adhesive was employed as a control. Specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles in separate water baths at 5°C and 55°C and loaded under 40 to 70 N for 50,000 cycles. Marginal microleakage was measured based on the penetration of a tracer agent. Although the control showed no microleakage at the enamel margins, there were no differences between groups (p = 0.06). None of the adhesives avoided microleakage at the dentin margins, and they displayed similar performances (p = 0.76). When both margins were compared, iBond® presented higher microleakage (p < 0.05) at the enamel margins (median, 1.00; Q3-Q1, 1.25-0.00) compared to the dentin margins (median, 0.00; Q3-Q1, 0.25-0.00). The study adhesives showed similar abilities to seal the margins of class V restorations, except for iBond®, which presented lower performance at the enamel margin. PMID:23739787

  17. Bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of short fiber-reinforced resin composite in comparison with other composite restoratives.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) and surface free-energy (SFE) of short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC), using different adhesive systems, in comparison with other composite restoratives. The resin composites used were everX Posterior (EP), Clearfil AP-X (CA), and Filtek Supreme Ultra Universal Restorative (FS). The adhesive systems used were Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and G-Premio Bond (GB). Resin composite was bonded to dentin, and SBS was determined after 24 h of storage in distilled water and after 10,000 thermal cycles (TCs). The SFEs of the resin composites and the adhesives were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. The SFE values and SFE characteristics were not influenced by the type of resin composite, but were influenced by the type of adhesive system. The results of this study suggest that the bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of SFRC are the same as for other composite restoratives, but that these parameters are affected by the type of adhesive system. The bonding performance of SFRC was enhanced by thermal cycling in a manner similar to that for other composite restoratives. PMID:26954878

  18. An effect of immediate dentin sealing on the shear bond strength of resin cement to porcelain restoration

    PubMed Central

    Cho, In-Ho

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine differences in shear bond strength to human dentin using immediate dentin sealing (IDS) technique compared to delayed dentin sealing (DDS). MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty extracted human molars were divided into 4 groups with 10 teeth each. The control group was light-cured after application of dentin bonding agent (Excite® DSC) and cemented with Variolink® II resin cement. IDS/SE (immediate dentin sealing, Clearfil™ SE Bond) and IDS/SB (immediate dentin sealing, AdapterTM Single Bond 2) were light-cured after application of dentin bonding agent (Clearfil™ SE Bond and Adapter™ Sing Bond 2, respectively), whereas DDS specimens were not treated with any dentin bonding agent. Specimens were cemented with Variolink® II resin cement. Dentin bonding agent (Excite® DSC) was left unpolymerized until the application of porcelain restoration. Shear strength was measured using a universal testing machine at a speed of 5 mm/min and evaluated of fracture using an optical microscope. RESULTS The mean shear bond strengths of control group and IDS/SE group were not statistically different from another at 14.86 and 11.18 MPa. Bond strength of IDS/SE group had a significantly higher mean than DDS group (3.14 MPa) (P < .05). There were no significance in the mean shear bond strength between IDS/SB (4.11 MPa) and DDS group. Evaluation of failure patterns indicates that most failures in the control group and IDS/SE groups were mixed, whereas failures in the DDS were interfacial. CONCLUSION When preparing teeth for indirect ceramic restoration, IDS with Clearfil™ SE Bond results in improved shear bond strength compared with DDS. PMID:21165186

  19. Shear bond strength of provisional restoration materials repaired with light-cured resins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiu-Lin; Lai, Yu-lin; Chou, I-chiang; Hu, Chiung-Jen; Lee, Shyh-yuan

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the repair bond strengths of light-cured resins to provisional restoration materials with different chemical compositions and polymerization techniques. Fifty discs (10 mm in diameter and 1.5 mm thick) were fabricated for each provisional resin base material, including a self-cured methacrylate (Alike), self-cured bis-acrylate (Protemp 3 Garant), light-cured bis-acrylate (Revotek LC) and a heat-cured methacrylate (Namilon). All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for seven days before undergoing repair with one of four light-cured resins, including AddOn, Revotek LC, Dyractflow and Unifast LC and a self-cured resin (Alike), according to the manufacturers' instructions, for a total of 200 specimens. After 24 hours of storage in 37 degrees C water, the shear bond strengths were measured with a universal testing machine and fracture surfaces were examined under a stereomicroscope. Two-way ANOVA revealed that provisional resin-base material (p < 0.001), repair material (p < 0.001) and their interactions (p < 0.001) significantly affected the repair strength. Tukey's multiple comparisons showed that the lowest bonding strengths were found in specimens of heat-cured methacrylate resin materials repaired with bis-acryl resins, with their failure modes primarily being of the adhesive type. The highest bond strengths were recorded when the provisional resin-base materials and repairing resins had similar chemical components and the failure modes tended to be of the cohesive type. PMID:18833857

  20. Evaluation of Marginal Leakage and Shear Bond Strength of Bonded Restorations in Primary Teeth after Caries Removal by Conventional and Chemomechanical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Pravin Maru, Viral; Shakuntala, Bethur Siddaiah; Dharma, Nagarathna

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose. To evaluate and compare the marginal leakage and shear bond strength between conventional and Papacarie techniques of caries removal in primary molars. Materials and Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human carious primary molars were randomly divided into two groups: group I—caries removal by conventional method and group II—caries removal using Papacarie. After bonded restorations, both groups were further randomly subdivided into four subgroups for marginal leakage and shear bond strength evaluation. Results. Papacarie treated teeth (46.70%) showed less marginal leakage when compared to conventionally treated teeth (86.70%) for caries removal. The mean shear bond strength was found more in Papacarie treated teeth (12.91 MPa) than in those treated conventionally (9.64 MPa) for caries removal. Conclusion. Papacarie showed less marginal leakage and more shear bond strength when compared to those treated conventionally for caries removal.

  1. Effect of cyclic loading on marginal adaptation and bond strength in direct vs. indirect class II MO composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Logani, Ajay; Jain, Veena; Shah, Naseem

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of cyclic loading on the marginal adaptation and microtensile bond strength of direct vs indirect Class II composite restorations in an in-vitro model. Forty Class II cavities were prepared on the mesial surface of extracted human maxillary first premolars and divided into two groups: Group I--direct composite restorations and Group II--indirect composite restorations. Groups I and II were further divided into subgroups: A (without cyclic loading) and B (with cyclic loading of 150,000 cycles at 60N). The gingival margin of the proximal box was evaluated at 200x magnification for marginal adaptation in a low vacuum scanning electron microscope. The restorations were sectioned perpendicular to the bonded surface into 1 mm thickslabs. The slabswere further trimmed at the interface to produce a cross-sectional surface area of approximately 1 mm2. All specimens were subjected to microtensile bond strength testing. The marginal adaptation was analyzed using descriptive studies and bond strength data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA test. The indirect composite restorations performed better under cyclic loading. PMID:18833866

  2. Partial-prep bonded restorations in the anterior dentition: Long-term gingival health and predictability. A case report.

    PubMed

    Molina, Ivan Contreras; Molina, Gil Contreras; Stanley, Kyle; Lago, Carlo; Xavier, Clessius Ferreira; Volpato, Claudia Angela Maziero

    2016-01-01

    Bonded porcelain restorations are a predictable and durable treatment option that can restore not only the strength and function of the teeth but also the esthetic appearance. One important issue in adhesive dentistry is the preservation of sound enamel. Following biomimetic principles, employing minimally invasive applications and adhesive technologies is of paramount importance for successful restorations. While it is widely accepted that minimally invasive restorative techniques should be favored, there is still some controversy over the noninvasive approaches. The purpose of this article is to question the complete "no-prep veneer" concept due to the possible negative effects on periodontal health caused by excessive contour and overhangs of the ceramic restoration, and to propose a new method to assess the quality and longevity of veneers with a partial-prep concept. PMID:26417617

  3. Dentin bonding performance and interface observation of an MMA-based restorative material.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Junichi; Inoue, Go; Nikaido, Toru; Ikeda, Masaomi; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2016-07-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bonding performance and dentin interface acid resistance using a 4-META/MMA-TBB based restorative material (BF) compared to a conventional 4-META/MMA-TBB resin cement (SB), and the effect of sodium fluoride (NaF) addition to the materials. Dentin surfaces were treated with 10% citric acid-3% ferric chloride (10-3) or 4-META containing self-etching primer (TP), followed by application of BF or SB polymer powders with or without NaF, to evaluate microtensile bond strength (µTBS) in six experimental groups; 10-3/SB, 10-3/BF, TP/SB, TP/BF, TP/SB/NaF and TP/BF/NaF. SEM observation of the resin-dentin interface was performed after acid-base challenge to evaluate interfacial dentin resistance to acid attack. TP/BF showed highest µTBS, while NaF polymers decreased µTBS. TP/BF showed funnel-shaped erosion at the interface, however, NaF polymers improved acid resistance of interface. In conclusion, BF demonstrated high µTBSs and low acid-resistance at the interface. NaF addition enhanced acid resistance but decreased µTBS. PMID:27335135

  4. Assessing microleakage at the junction between amalgam and composite resin: a new method in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Ambrose, E R

    1991-01-01

    A new dye-diffusion test method was utilized to evaluate the microleakage between amalgam and composite resin. An amalgam cylinder was made to which a base of composite was added. The effects of several factors upon the microleakage were investigated. The test results indicated less microleakage when bonding agent was applied directly to the roughened amalgam prior to placement of composite resin. The most microleakage was found when roughened amalgam surface was acid-etched before placement of bonding agent and composite resin. PMID:1784538

  5. Restoration of structural stability and ligand binding after removal of the conserved disulfide bond in tear lipocalin

    PubMed Central

    Gasymov, Oktay K.; Abduragimov, Adil R.; Glasgow, Ben J.

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide bonds play diverse structural and functional roles in proteins. In tear lipocalin (TL), the conserved sole disulfide bond regulates stability and ligand binding. Probing protein structure often involves thiol selective labeling for which removal of the disulfide bonds may be necessary. Loss of the disulfide bond may destabilize the protein so strategies to retain the native state are needed. Several approaches were tested to regain the native conformational state in the disulfide-less protein. These included the addition of thrimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and the substitution of the Cys residues of disulfide bond with residues that can either form a potential salt bridge or others that can create a hydrophobic interaction. TMAO stabilized the protein relaxed by removal of the disulfide bond. In the disulfide-less mutants of TL, 1.0 M TMAO increased the free energy change (ΔG0) significantly from 2.1 to 3.8 kcal/mol. Moderate recovery was observed for the ligand binding tested with NBD-cholesterol. Because the disulfide bond of TL is solvent exposed, the substitution of the disulfide bond with a potential salt bridge or hydrophobic interaction did not stabilize the protein. This approach should work for buried disulfide bonds. However, for proteins with solvent exposed disulfide bonds, the use of TMAO may be an excellent strategy to restore the native conformational states in disulfide-less analogs of the proteins. PMID:25223802

  6. Restoration of structural stability and ligand binding after removal of the conserved disulfide bond in tear lipocalin.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, Oktay K; Abduragimov, Adil R; Glasgow, Ben J

    2014-10-01

    Disulfide bonds play diverse structural and functional roles in proteins. In tear lipocalin (TL), the conserved sole disulfide bond regulates stability and ligand binding. Probing protein structure often involves thiol selective labeling for which removal of the disulfide bonds may be necessary. Loss of the disulfide bond may destabilize the protein so strategies to retain the native state are needed. Several approaches were tested to regain the native conformational state in the disulfide-less protein. These included the addition of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and the substitution of the Cys residues of disulfide bond with residues that can either form a potential salt bridge or others that can create a hydrophobic interaction. TMAO stabilized the protein relaxed by removal of the disulfide bond. In the disulfide-less mutants of TL, 1.0M TMAO increased the free energy change (ΔG(0)) significantly from 2.1 to 3.8kcal/mol. Moderate recovery was observed for the ligand binding tested with NBD-cholesterol. Because the disulfide bond of TL is solvent exposed, the substitution of the disulfide bond with a potential salt bridge or hydrophobic interaction did not stabilize the protein. This approach should work for buried disulfide bonds. However, for proteins with solvent exposed disulfide bonds, the use of TMAO may be an excellent strategy to restore the native conformational states in disulfide-less analogs of the proteins. PMID:25223802

  7. The effect of prophylaxis method on microtensile bond strength of indirect restorations to dentin.

    PubMed

    Soares, C J; Pereira, J C; Souza, S J B; Menezes, M S; Armstrong, S R

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different materials used for dentin prophylaxis on the microtensile bond strengths (μTBS) of adhesively cemented indirect composite restorations. Sixty bovine incisors had the buccal surface ground with wet #600-grit silicon carbide abrasive paper to obtain a flat exposed superficial dentin and were submitted to different prophylaxis protocols, as follows: 3% hydrogen peroxide (HydP); 0.12% chlorhexidine (Chlo); sodium bicarbonate jet (SodB); 50-μm aluminum oxide air abrasion (AirA); pumice paste (PumP), and control group-water spray (Cont). After prophylaxis protocols a resin composite block (3.0 mm × 5.0 mm × 5.0 mm) was adhesively cemented using dual resin cement (Rely X ARC). After 24 hours of water storage, specimens were serially sectioned perpendicular to the bonded interface into 1-mm-thick slices. Each specimen was trimmed with a diamond bur to an hourglass shape with a cross-sectional area of approximately 1.0 mm(2) at the bonded area. Specimens were tested (μTBS) at 0.5 mm/min using a universal testing machine. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the effects of prophylaxis techniques on dentin. Bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and failure mode by Fisher test (α=0.05). μTBS data, means (SD), were (different superscripted letters indicate statistically significant differences): AirA, 25.2 (7.2)(a); PumP, 24.1 (7.8)(a); Chlo, 21.5 (5.6)(a); Cont, 20.6 (8.1)(a); HydP(,) 15.5 (7.6)(b); and SodB(,) 11.5 (4.4)(c). The use of aluminum oxide air abrasion, pumice paste, and chlorhexidine before acid etching did not significantly affect μTBS to dentin; however, the use of hydrogen peroxide and sodium bicarbonate jet significantly reduced μTBS. PMID:22616925

  8. Microstructural studies of dental amalgams using analytical transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooghan, Tejpal Kaur

    Dental amalgams have been used for centuries as major restorative materials for decaying teeth. Amalgams are prepared by mixing alloy particles which contain Ag, Sn, and Cu as the major constituent elements with liquid Hg. The study of microstructure is essential in understanding the setting reactions and improving the properties of amalgams. Until the work reported in this dissertation, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) were used commonly to analyze amalgam microstructures. No previous systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study has been performed due to sample preparation difficulties and composite structure of dental amalgams. The goal of this research was to carry out detailed microstructural and compositional studies of dental amalgams. This was accomplished using the enhanced spatial resolution of the TEM and its associated microanalytical techniques, namely, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) and micro-microdiffraction (mumuD). A new method was developed for thinning amalgam samples to electron transparency using the "wedge technique." Velvalloy, a low-Cu amalgam, and Tytin, a high-Cu amalgam, were the two amalgams characterized. Velvalloy is composed of a Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) matrix surrounding unreacted Agsb3Sn (gamma) particles. In addition, hitherto uncharacterized reaction layers between Agsb3Sn(gamma)/Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb2)\\ and\\ Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) were observed and analyzed. An Ag-Hg-Sn (betasb1) phase was clearly identified for the first time. In Tytin, the matrix consists of Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1) grains. Fine precipitates of Cusb6Snsb5\\ (etasp') are embedded inside the gammasb1 and at the grain boundaries. These precipitates are responsible for the improved creep resistance of Tytin compared to Velvalloy. The additional Cu has completely eliminated the gammasb

  9. Amalgam components drift in teeth-toxicity risks: A preliminary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, M. L.; Pinheiro, T.; Barreiros, M. A.; Casaca, C.; Cunha, A. S.; Chevallier, P.

    1998-03-01

    The use of ion beam techniques applied to teeth studies have been extensive in what concerns the major elements distribution. However, it is not clarified whether amalgam components are absorbed and drifted through teeth material, although the toxicity of the elements used in amalgams, such as Hg, are well known. This work is an attempt to assess a possible teeth contamination originated by the amalgams. Therefore, teeth with metallic amalgam, as well as healthy ones, were studied. The teeth were longitudinally cut and each slice was scanned from the inner region to the surface enamel for elemental profiles determination purposes using Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Fluorescence (SRXRF) techniques. High levels of Zn, Ag, Sn, Hg and Pb were found along the scanned teeth restored with the metallic amalgam. The elemental distribution patterns suggest diffusion of these elements in the teeth material from amalgam constituents.

  10. Adhesive/Dentin Interface: The Weak Link in the Composite Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Paulette; Ye, Qiang; Park, Jonggu; Topp, Elizabeth M.; Misra, Anil; Marangos, Orestes; Wang, Yong; Bohaty, Brenda S.; Singh, Viraj; Sene, Fabio; Eslick, John; Camarda, Kyle; Katz, J. Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Results from clinical studies suggest that more than half of the 166 million dental restorations that were placed in the United States in 2005 were replacements for failed restorations. This emphasis on replacement therapy is expected to grow as dentists use composite as opposed to dental amalgam to restore moderate to large posterior lesions. Composite restorations have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries, and increased frequency of replacement as compared to amalgam. Penetration of bacterial enzymes, oral fluids, and bacteria into the crevices between the tooth and composite undermines the restoration and leads to recurrent decay and premature failure. Under in vivo conditions the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface can be the first defense against these noxious, damaging substances. The intent of this article is to review structural aspects of the clinical substrate that impact bond formation at the adhesive/dentin interface; to examine physico-chemical factors that affect the integrity and durability of the adhesive/dentin interfacial bond; and to explore how these factors act synergistically with mechanical forces to undermine the composite restoration. The article will examine the various avenues that have been pursued to address these problems and it will explore how alterations in material chemistry could address the detrimental impact of physico-chemical stresses on the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface. PMID:20195761

  11. Bonding of restorative materials to dentine: the present status in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, N

    1985-06-01

    Monomers which promote adhesion not only to enamel but also to dentine have been prepared. They have both hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups. The monomers are 2-hydroxy-3-beta-naphthoxypropyl methacrylate, 2-methacryloxyethyl phenyl hydrogen phosphoric acid and 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride. Chemical reaction between monomers and tooth substrates did not lead to adhesion. Cleaning of the ground tooth surface to remove the smeared layer with aqueous 10 per cent citric acid and 3 per cent ferric chloride solution prior to adhesion is recommended. Then, the lipophilic monomers will promote the inter-penetration of monomers into the hard tissues. The infiltrated methacrylates polymerize there and good adhesion takes place. The layer has good resistance against acid and is, in effect, a resin reinforced dentine and enamel as demonstrated by SEM and TEM. The tensile adhesive strength to the cleaned dentine was 18 MN/m2 and to the enamel 14 MN/m2. On the other hand, the value was reduced to 6 MN/m2 when the dentine had been etched by phosphoric acid or citric acid. The ferric chloride added to the citric acid protected dentinal collagen during demineralization. However, the ferric chloride provided ineffective protection against an acid as strong as phosphoric acid. The high bond strength was not dependent upon interlocking at the dentinal tubules as had been considered previously. The resin reinforced dentine and enamel is a hybrid of natural tissue and artificial material and is valuable in the prevention of secondary caries after restoration. PMID:3894241

  12. Evidence-based concepts and procedures for bonded inlays and onlays. Part II. Guidelines for cavity preparation and restoration fabrication.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Giovanni Tommaso; Rizcalla, Nicolas; Krejci, Ivo; Dietschi, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The second part of this article series presents an evidence-based update of clinical protocols and procedures for cavity preparation and restoration selection for bonded inlays and onlays. More than ever, tissue conservation dictates preparation concepts, even though some minimal dimensions still have to be considered for all restorative materials. In cases of severe bruxism or tooth fragilization, CAD/CAM composite resins or pressed CAD/CAM lithium disilicate glass ceramics are often recommended, although this choice relies mainly on scarce in vitro research as there is still a lack of medium- to long-term clinical evidence. The decision about whether or not to cover a cusp can only be made after a multifactorial analysis, which includes cavity dimensions and the resulting tooth biomechanical status, as well as occlusal and esthetic factors. The clinical impact of the modern treatment concepts that were outlined in the previous article - Dual Bonding (DB)/Immediate Dentin Sealing (IDS), Cavity Design Optimization (CDO), and Cervical Margins Relocation (CMR) - are described in detail in this article and discussed in light of existing clinical and scientific evidence for simpler, more predictable, and more durable results. Despite the wide choice of restorative materials (composite resin or ceramic) and techniques (classical or CAD/CAM), the cavity for an indirect restoration should meet five objective criteria before the impression. PMID:26171443

  13. Effect of postoperative peroxide bleaching on the marginal seal of composite restorations bonded with self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Roubickova, A; Dudek, M; Comba, L; Housova, D; Bradna, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of peroxide bleaching on the marginal seal of composite restorations bonded with several adhesive systems. Combined cylindrical Class V cavities located half in enamel and half in dentin were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of human molars. The cavities were bonded with the self-etch adhesives Clearfil SE-Bond (CLF), Adper Prompt (ADP), and iBond (IBO) and an etch-and-rinse adhesive Gluma Comfort Bond (GLU) and restored with a microhybrid composite Charisma. Experimental groups were treated 25 times for eight hours per day with a peroxide bleaching gel Opalescence PF 20, while the control groups were stored in distilled water for two months and then subjected to a microleakage test using a dye penetration method. Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the etching and penetration abilities of the adhesives and morphology of debonded restoration-enamel interfaces after the microleakage tests. Statistical analyses were performed using nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney, and Wilcoxon tests at p=0.05. The microleakage of all GLU groups was low and not significantly affected by peroxide bleaching. Low microleakage was recorded for CLF control groups, but after bleaching, a small but significant increase in microleakage at the enamel margin indicated its sensitivity to peroxide bleaching. For ADP and IBO control groups, the microleakage at the enamel margins was significantly higher than for GLU and CLF and exceeded that at the dentin margins. Bleaching did not induce any significant changes in the microleakage. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that in our experimental setup, decreased adhesion and mechanical resistance of the ADP- and IBO-enamel interfaces could be more important than the chemical degradation effects induced by the peroxide bleaching gel. PMID:23570299

  14. Evaluation of bond strength of silorane and methacrylate based restorative systems to dentin using different cavity models

    PubMed Central

    ISAAC, Stephano Zerlottini; BERGAMIN, Ana Claudia Pietrobom; TURSSI, Cecília Pedroso; do AMARAL, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; BASTING, Roberta Tarkany; FRANÇA, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) to dentin of two different restorative systems: silorane-based (P90), and methacrylate-based (P60), using two cavity models. Material and Methods Occlusal enamel of 40 human third molars was removed to expose flat dentin surface. Class I cavities with 4 mm mesial-distal width, 3 mm buccal-lingual width and 3 mm depth (C-factor=4.5) were prepared in 20 teeth, which were divided into two groups (n=10) restored with P60 and P90, bulk-filled after dentin treatment according to manufacturer's instructions. Flat buccal dentin surfaces were prepared in the 20 remaining teeth (C-factor=0.2) and restored with resin blocks measuring 4x3x3 mm using the two restorative systems (n=10). The teeth were sectioned into samples with area between 0.85 and 1.25 mm2 that were submitted to µTBS testing, using a universal testing machine (EMIC) at speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fractured specimens were analyzed under stereomicroscope and categorized according to fracture pattern. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey Kramer tests. Results For flat surfaces, P60 obtained higher bond strength values compared with P90. However, for Class I cavities, P60 showed significant reduction in bond strength (p<0.05). No statistical difference between restorative systems was shown for Class I cavity model (p>0.05), or between Class I Cavity and Flat Surface group, considering P90 restorative system (p>0.05). Regarding fracture pattern, there was no statistical difference among groups (p=0.0713) and 56.3% of the fractures were adhesive. Conclusion It was concluded that methacrylate-based composite µTBS was influenced by cavity models, and the use of silorane-based composite led to similar bond strength values compared to the methacrylate-based composite in cavities with high C-factor. PMID:24212992

  15. A Safe Protocol for Amalgam Removal

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Dana G.

    2012-01-01

    Today's environment has different impacts on our body than previous generations. Heavy metals are a growing concern in medicine. Doctors and individuals request the removal of their amalgam (silver mercury) restorations due to the high mercury content. A safe protocol to replace the silver mercury filling will ensure that there is minimal if any absorption of materials while being removed. Strong alternative white composite and lab-processed materials are available today to create a healthy and functioning mouth. Preparation of the patient prior to the procedure and after treatment is vital to establish the excretion of the mercury from the body. PMID:22315627

  16. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST OF GOLD AMALGAMATION ROOM, SHOWING AMALGAMATION BARREL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST OF GOLD AMALGAMATION ROOM, SHOWING AMALGAMATION BARREL AT CENTER FOREGROUND, BULLION FURNACE IN LARGE HOOD BEHIND IT, AND GOLD RETORT IN BACKGROUND HOOD. NOTE OVERHEAD MONORAIL FOR MATERIALS HANDLING. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  17. Mercury Exposure Levels in Children with Dental Amalgam Fillings

    PubMed Central

    Miriam Varkey, Indu; Shetty, Rajmohan; Hegde, Amitha

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT% Objectives: Mercury combined with other metals to form solid amalgams has long been used in reconstructive dentistry but its use has been controversial since at least the middle of the 19th century. The exposure and body burden of mercury reviews have consistently stated that there is a deficiency of adequate epidemiological studies addressing this issue. Fish and dental amalgam are two major sources of human exposure to organic (MeHg) and inorganic Hg respectively. Materials and methods: A total of 150 subjects aged between 9 and 14 years were divided into two groups of 75 subjects each depending on their diet, i.e. seafood or nonseafood consuming. Each category was subdivided into three groups based on number of restorations. Scalp hair and urine samples were collected at baseline and 3 months later to assess the organic and inorganic levels of mercury respectively by atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). Results: The mean values of urinary mercury (inorganic mercury) in the group of children with restorations were 1.5915 μg/l as compared to 0.0130 μg/l in the groups with no amalgam restorations (p < 0.001) (Wilcoxon sign rank test and paired t-test). The hair mercury levels (organic mercury) varied signi-ficantly between the fsh-eating group and nonfsh-eating group, the average values being 1.03 μg/l and 0.84 μg/l respectively (p < 0.001) (Mann-Whitney U-test and paired t-test). Conclusion and significance: The notion about the mercury being released from the amalgam restorations as a sole exposure source needs to be put to a rest, as environmental factors collectively overpower the exposure levels from restorations alone. How to cite this article: Varkey IM, Shetty R, Hegde A. Mercury Exposure Levels in Children with Dental Amalgam Fillings. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):180-185. PMID:25709298

  18. Evaluation of Microleakage of Silorane and Methacrylate Based Composite Materials in Class I Restorations by Using Two Different Bonding Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alshetili, Mohsen S; Aldeyab, Sultan S

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the microleakage of silorane-based composite material (Filtek P90) with that of two homologous methacrylate-based composites materials (Filtek Z250 and Filtek Z250 XT), by using two different bonding techniques. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human maxillary first premolars prepared for standardized Class I cavities (4 mm × 2 mm × 2 mm) were randomly divided into three groups. Group A (n = 20) was filled with Filtek Z250 (Methacrylate) using single bond universal total etching technique, Group B (n = 20) was filled with Filtek Z250 XT (Methacrylate) using single bond universal self-etching technique and Group C (n = 20) restored with Filtek P90 (Silorane) with dedicated two-step self-etching prime and bond adhesive system (P90 system adhesive). Teeth were subjected to thermocycling regime (500×, 5-55°C), and dye penetration by immersing in 2% methylene blue for 24 h. Tooth sectioning was performed, and extent of the dye penetration was scored based on dye penetration scale to evaluate the microleakage. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and inferential statistics of Kruskal–Wallis test to compare the mean ranks between groups. Results: There was no significant difference observed for microleakage among the three composite materials tested in the present study. However, the cavities restored with silorane (Filtek P90) based composite displayed higher microleakage than the Filtek Z250, Z250 XT. Conclusion: All the restorative systems tested in this study exhibited microleakage, but the silorane technology showed more microleakage when compared to the methacrylate-based composite systems. PMID:26668473

  19. The use of bonded partial ceramic restorations to recover heavily compromised teeth.

    PubMed

    Politano, Gianfranco; Fabianelli, Andrea; Papacchini, Federica; Cerutti, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Restorative procedures are accompanied by a reduction of tooth stability, a decrease of fracture resistance, and an increase in deflection of weakened cusps. The choice between a direct or an indirect restorative technique, mainly in posterior areas, is a challenge, and involves biomechanical, anatomical, functional, esthetic, and financial considerations. In this article, the pros and cons of direct restorations are examined, as well as an analysis of indirect restorations and an overview of dental ceramics. In particular, several clinical uses of lithium disilicate overlays with a circumferential adhesive ferrule effect are proposed: heavily compromised vital teeth with thin walls, cracked teeth, and endodontically treated molars. Clinical procedures are described step by step on the basis of data from scientific literature. In conclusion, the use of lithium disilicate in combination with adhesive technologies can lead to a more conservative, economic, and esthetic approach in the restoration of heavily compromised teeth. PMID:27433548

  20. [Abrasion measurements in vivo in occlusal composite and amalgam fillings].

    PubMed

    Meier, C; Lutz, F

    1978-09-01

    A new method for quantitative measurement of occlusal wear on restorations is described. In a clinical evaluation with four different composites and an amalgam the method proved to be simple in execution and very exact. Statistical analysis after 7 months has shown significant differences in wear resistance of the different materials. The nature of the resulting wear was electron optically examined. Typical structural surface characteristics were observed for each of the different materials. More recently developed composities utilizing extremly small filler particles (Aerosil) seem to be comparable to amalgam in wear resistance. PMID:279445

  1. Evaluation of the Effect of Different Ferrule Designs on Fracture Resistance of Maxillary Incisors Restored with Bonded Posts and Cores

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi Izadi, Z.; Jalalian, E.; Eyvaz Ziaee, A.; Zamani, L.; Javanshir, B.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: In cases of severe hard tissue loss, 2 mm circumferential ferrule is difficult to achieve. So in these cases we should use different ferrule designs. This in vitro study investigated the effect of different ferrule designs on the fracture resistance of teeth restored with bonded post and cores. Materials and Methods: Forty freshly-extracted central incisors were endodontically treated. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups; group 1 were teeth with 2 mm circumferential ferrule above the CEJ, group 2 were teeth with 2 mm ferrule only on the palatal side of the teeth, group 3 consisted of teeth with 2 mm ferrule only on the facial side and group 4 were teeth with 2 mm ferrule on the palatal and facial side of teeth with interproximal concavities. All teeth were restored with fiber posts and composite cores. The specimen was mounted on a universal testing machine and compressive load was applied to the long axis of the specimen until failure occurred. Results: The fracture resistance was 533.79 ± 232.28 in group 1, 634.75± 133.35 in group 2, 828.90 ±118.27 in group 3 and 678.78± 160.20 in group 4. The post hoc analysis showed statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 3. Conclusions: The results of this in vitro study showed that facial ferrule increases the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with bonded post and cores. PMID:21998789

  2. Influence of periodontal ligament simulation on bond strength and fracture resistance of roots restored with fiber posts

    PubMed Central

    MARCHIONATTI, Ana Maria Estivalete; WANDSCHER, Vinícius Felipe; BROCH, Juliana; BERGOLI, César Dalmolin; MAIER, Juliana; VALANDRO, Luiz Felipe; KAIZER, Osvaldo Bazzan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Considering that periodontal ligament simulation may influence the stress distribution over teeth restored with intraradicular retainers, this study aimed to assess the combined effect of mechanical cycling and periodontal ligament simulation on both the bond strength between fiber posts and root dentin and the fracture resistance of teeth restored using glass fiber posts. Material and Methods Ninety roots were randomly distributed into 3 groups (n=10) (C-MC: control; P-MC: polyether; AS-MC: addition silicone) to test bond strength and 6 groups (n=10) (C: control; P: polyether; AS: addition silicone, without mechanical cycling, and C-MC, P-MC and AS-MC with mechanical cycling) to test fracture strength, according to the material used to simulate the periodontal ligament. For the bond strength test, fiber posts were cemented, cores were built, mechanical cycling was applied (2×106 cycles, 88 N, 2.2 Hz, and 45º incline), and the teeth cut into 3 slices (2 mm), which were then subjected to the push-out test at 1 mm/min. For the fracture strength test, fiber posts were cemented, cores were built, and half of the groups received mechanical cycling, followed by the compressive strength (45° to the long axis and 1 mm/min) performed on all groups. Results Periodontal ligament simulation did not affect the bond strength (p=0.244) between post and dentin. Simulation of periodontal ligament (p=0.153) and application of mechanical cycling (p=0.97) did not affect fracture resistance. Conclusions The materials used to simulate the periodontal ligament did not affect fracture or bond strength, therefore periodontal ligament simulation using the tested materials could be considered optional in the conditions of the study. PMID:25466478

  3. [Effect of the storage method on microleakage of primary teeth restored with different bonding systems: in vitro study].

    PubMed

    Ghersel, E L; Guedes-Pinto, A C; Ciamponi, A L

    2001-01-01

    The influence of the method of storage of teeth and the effect of two kinds of dentin-bonding agents on the microleakage at the axial and cervical walls of composite restorations, in primary second molars, were evaluated. The samples were divided in three groups: Dehydrated, Hydrated and Frozen. The Dehydrated group was kept dry, the Hydrated group was stored in physiological saline solution under refrigeration, and the Frozen group was kept in the freezer, also immersed in physiological solution. The samples received two vertical slot preparations: a mesio-occlusal and a disto-occlusal one. In the mesio-occlusal cavities, Scotchbond Multi-Use adhesive system was used, whereas in the disto-occlusal cavities Prime & Bond 2.1 system was used, and all cavities were filled with Solitaire composite resin. The groups were then thermocycled and immersed in silver nitrate solution. Microleakage was measured by means of a digitized image system and the values were submitted to statistical analysis. The results showed that the method of storage had no statistically significant influence on marginal microleakage. Microleakage at the cervical wall was significantly greater than that at the axial wall, with 99.9% of certainty. The adhesive systems did not show significant influence on microleakage, in the studied methods of storage. However, there was statistical difference in the Dehydrated group samples, with the use of Prime & Bond 2.1 adhesive, when considering the margins of the restoration (axial and cervical). PMID:11705313

  4. Bonding All-Ceramic Restorations with Two Resins Cement Techniques: A Clinical Report of Three-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; de Almeida, Erika Oliveira; Junior, Amilcar Chagas Freitas; Martini, Ana Paula

    2011-01-01

    Ceramics have been widely used for esthetic and functional improvements. The resin cement is the material of choice for bonding ceramics to dental substrate and it can also dictate the final esthetic appearance and strength of the restoration. The correct use of the wide spectrum of resin luting agents available depends on the dental tooth substrate. This article presents three-year clinical results of a 41 years old female patient B.H.C complaining about her unattractive smile. Two all-ceramic crowns and two laminates veneers were placed in the maxillary incisors and cemented with a self-adhesive resin luting cement and conventional resin luting cement, respectively. After a three-year follow-up, the restorations and cement/teeth interface were clinically perfect with no chipping, fractures or discoloration. Proper use of different resin luting cements shows clinical appropriate behavior after a three-year follow-up. Self-adhesive resin luting cement may be used for cementing all-ceramic crowns with high predictability of success, mainly if there is a large dentin surface available for bonding and no enamel at the finish line. Otherwise, conventional resin luting agent should be used for achieving an adequate bonding strength to enamel. PMID:21912505

  5. Extreme masking: achieving predictable outcomes in challenging situations with lithium disilicate bonded restorations.

    PubMed

    Hatai, Yugo

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary dentistry, we have a vast range of materials to choose from, and metal free restorations have become the premier materials for achieving the ultimate in both esthetics and durability. Metal-free restorations are utilized with more conservative preparations to preserve the vital natural dentition, and have proven to be superior alternatives to traditional porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) restorations in many cases. There are always "pros and cons" when selecting materials, and to make the best choice it is essential for dental professionals to plan precisely and understand their options in any clinical situation. Selecting suitable materials and techniques involves consideration of the following factors: - Esthetic zone. - Required strength based on the patient's occlusion/dental habits. - Preparation reduction. - Position of the margin. - Type of restoration/preparation. - The treating clinician's philosophy. - Stump shade. Final shade. One of the most significant challenges in the metal-free dentistry is the reproduction of natural dentition without the influence of a "negative stump" - a very dark or metal core showing through the final restorations. There are many factors to be considered when working on such a case, and controlling the opacity of the coping and crown is the key to success. This article presents a unique "outside of the box" technique that provides consistent, predictable and durable restorations, which provide the best possible esthetic outcome. PMID:24765627

  6. In vitro evaluation of the effect of deproteinization on the marginal leakage of resin restorations using three bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Ravishanker, Padmanabhan; Chaitanya, Krishna

    2012-01-01

    Background: The perfect sealing of the tooth/restoration interface is important to prevent bacteria penetration that may lead to secondary caries and also, when dentin is involved, prevent excessive fluid movement in the dentinal tubules that may cause hypersensitivity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of deproteinization and application of reducing agent on the marginal integrity of composite restorations using three different bonding agents (Prime & Bond NT, AdheSE and G-Bond). Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface of 90 recently extracted human premolars and were divided into three groups (I, II, and III) based on the adhesives. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of 10 each according to the surface treatment: application according to clinical protocol; etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds/5% NaOCl; 10% sodium ascorbate after etching/NaOCl. The cavities were restored with Filtek Z 350 nanocomposite. The specimens were sectioned and evaluated under stereomicroscope. The morphology of the resin-dentin interface was visualized using SEM. Statistical analysis was done using Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA followed by a Mann-Whitney U- test (P<0.05). Results: Group I showed significantly least microleakage among the groups. No significant difference in microleakage was found between groups I and II. Within the subgroups for each group, no significant difference in microleakage scores was observed. SEM micrographs presented gap free areas in group I and varying degrees of gaps in the other two groups. Conclusion: Etch and rinse adhesives were tenable for deproteinization than self etch adhesives. PMID:23162588

  7. Microleakage in Resin Composite Restoration following Antimicrobial Pre-treatments with 2% Chlorhexidine and Clearfil Protect Bond

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Hisham; Babu, Biju P; Sagir, V M Mohammed; Chiriyath, Kennet J; Mathias, Jones; Shaji, A P

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate microleakage in resin composite restorations after antimicrobial pre – treatments Materials and Methods: Forty freshly extracted non carious human premolars were procured. In all forty premolar specimens, class V preparation of standard dimension were prepared and were randomly divided into three experimental and one control group. In all control and experimental groups the class V preparations were restored with FILTEK Z350 composite restorative material. The experimental groups included different self etching primers and 2% Chlorhexidine gluconate. The control group included Xeno III and no antimicrobial pre-treatment was done for the control group. Thereafter these specimens were thermocycled, dried and sealed with nail varnish, leaving 1mm around the restoration and immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 hours and then the specimens were subjected for microleakage evaluation. The results were statistically analyzed by Kruskal Wallis Test and Mann Whitney ‘U’ test. Results: Results indicate that group II (2% chlorhexidine gluconate group) had the minimum mean value (15.05) and group III(Clearfil protect Bond group) and IV(control group) had the maximum mean microleakage at the enamel margin (23.00). At the gingival margin the lowest mean microleakage values were obtained with group I (Clearfil SE bond group) and group II (2% chlorhexidine gluconate) (20.25) and highest with group III and group IV (20.85). The difference was not statistically significant both at the enamel margin and the dentin margin (p>0.05). Interpretation & Conclusions: Within the limitations of this in-vitro study, we conclude that: None of the materials tested in this study completely eliminated microleakage at the enamel and at the gingival margin.All of the tested materials provided better sealing at the enamel margin than at the gingival margin. PMID:26229374

  8. The 24-year clinical performance of porcelain laminate veneer restorations bonded with a two-liquid silane primer and a tri-n-butylborane-initiated adhesive resin.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuo; Matsumura, Hideo

    2014-09-01

    This report describes the bonding technique and clinical course of porcelain laminate veneer restorations applied to discolored maxillary incisors and canines. The patient was an 18-year-old woman, and tooth reduction was limited to the enamel. Laminate veneer restorations were made with a feldspathic porcelain material (Cosmotech Porcelain). After try-in, enamel surfaces were etched with 65% phosphoric acid gel, and a tri-n-butylborane-initiated resin (Super-Bond C&B) was applied as a bonding agent. The inner surface of the restorations was etched with 5% hydrofluoric acid gel (HF Gel) and treated with a two-liquid silane primer (Porcelain Liner M), after which the Super-Bond resin was applied. Each restoration was seated with a dual-activated composite luting agent (Cosmotech Composite). After 24 years and 8 months, the restorations are functioning satisfactorily. The luting system and bonding technique described in this report are an option for seating laminate veneer restorations made of silica-based tooth-colored ceramics. PMID:25231150

  9. Novel Amalgams for In-Space Fabrication of Replacement Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Calvin T.; Van Hoose, James R.; Grugel, R. N.

    2012-01-01

    Being able to fabricate replacement parts during extended space flight missions precludes the weight, storage volume, and speculation necessary to accommodate spares. Amalgams, widely used in dentistry, are potential candidates for fabricating parts in microgravity environments as they are moldable, do not require energy for melting, and do not pose fluid handling problems. Unfortunately, amalgams have poor tensile strength and the room temperature liquid component is mercury. To possibly resolve these issues a gallium-indium alloy was substituted for mercury and small steel fibers were mixed in with the commercial alloy powder. Subsequent microscopic examination of the novel amalgam revealed complete bonding of the components, and mechanical testing of comparable samples showed those containing steel fibers to have a significant improvement in strength. Experimental procedures, microstructures, and test results are presented and discussed in view of further improving properties.

  10. EFFECT OF DEPROTEINIZATION AND TUBULAR OCCLUSION ON MICROTENSILE BOND STRENGTH AND MARGINAL MICROLEAKAGE OF RESIN COMPOSITE RESTORATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Baseggio, Wagner; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; de Carvalho, Flávia Lunardelli Negreiros; Ueda, Julio Katuhide; Schmitt, Vera Lucia; Formighieri, Luis Alberto; Naufel, Fabiana Scarparo

    2009-01-01

    Dentin adhesion procedure presents limitations, especially regarding to lifetime stability of formed hybrid layer. Alternative procedures have been studied in order to improve adhesion to dentin. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of deproteinization or dentin tubular occlusion, as well as the combination of both techniques, on microtensile bond strength μTBS) and marginal microleakage of composite resin restorations. Material and Methods: Extracted erupted human third molars were randomly divided into 4 groups. Dentin surfaces were treated with one of the following procedures: (A) 35% phosphoric acid gel (PA) + adhesive system (AS); (B) PA + 10% NaOCl + AS; (C) PA + oxalate + AS and (D) PA + oxalate + 10% NaOCl + AS. Bond strength data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. The microleakage scores were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney non-parametric tests. Significance level was set at 0.05 for all analyses. Results: μTBS data presented statistically lower values for groups D and B, ranking data as A>C>B>D. The use of oxalic acid resulted in microleakage reduction along the tooth/restoration interface, being significant when used alone. On the other hand, the use of 10% NaOCl alone or in combination with oxalic acid, resulted in increased microleakage. Conclusions: Dentin deproteinization with 10% NaOCl or in combination with oxalate significantly compromised both the adhesive bond strength and the microleakage at interface. Tubular occlusion prior to adhesive system application seems to be a useful technique to reduce marginal microleakage. PMID:19936527

  11. Mercury release of amalgams with various silver contents after exposure to bleaching agent

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Morsali Ahari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Since it is possible for carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent to contact old amalgam restorations, the present in vitro study evaluated the amount of dissolved mercury released from amalgam restorations with various percent-ages of silver content subsequent to the use of 15% CP. Methods. Thirty ANA 2000 amalgam disks with 43.1% silver content and thirty ANA 70 amalgam disks with 69.3% silver content were prepared. In each group, 15 samples were randomly placed in glass tubes containing 15% CP (as experimental groups) and the remaining 15 samples were placed in buffered phosphate solution (as control groups) with the same 3-mL volume for 48 hours. Subsequently, the amount of mercury dissolved in each test tube was measured using Mercury Analyzing System (Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption, MASLO, Shimadzu, Japan). Data was analyzed with two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test. (α = 0.05). Results. The amount of mercury released after exposure to CP was significantly higher than that released after exposure to buffered phosphate (P < 0.001). In addition, the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 43% was significantly higher than that released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 69% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The amount of mercury release is inversely proportional to the silver content of dental amalgam. PMID:27429729

  12. Mercury release of amalgams with various silver contents after exposure to bleaching agent.

    PubMed

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Morsali Ahari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Since it is possible for carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent to contact old amalgam restorations, the present in vitro study evaluated the amount of dissolved mercury released from amalgam restorations with various percent-ages of silver content subsequent to the use of 15% CP. Methods. Thirty ANA 2000 amalgam disks with 43.1% silver content and thirty ANA 70 amalgam disks with 69.3% silver content were prepared. In each group, 15 samples were randomly placed in glass tubes containing 15% CP (as experimental groups) and the remaining 15 samples were placed in buffered phosphate solution (as control groups) with the same 3-mL volume for 48 hours. Subsequently, the amount of mercury dissolved in each test tube was measured using Mercury Analyzing System (Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption, MASLO, Shimadzu, Japan). Data was analyzed with two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test. (α = 0.05). Results. The amount of mercury released after exposure to CP was significantly higher than that released after exposure to buffered phosphate (P < 0.001). In addition, the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 43% was significantly higher than that released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 69% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The amount of mercury release is inversely proportional to the silver content of dental amalgam. PMID:27429729

  13. Comparison of the abrasive wear resistance between amalgams, hybrid composite material and different dental cements.

    PubMed

    Gil, F J; Espias, A; Sánchez, L A; Planell, J A

    1999-12-01

    This paper reports on the abrasion wear of various restorative dental materials (three amalgams and two dental cements and a hybrid composite material) commonly used in dentistry. The mechanical properties, surface roughness and the volume loss by abrasion were determined for the different materials studied. The results showed a better profile for the amalgams versus the composite materials due to the failure of the polymeric matrix of the latter materials. However, the amalgams exhibited corrosion observed by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy. PMID:10907431

  14. Ormocer: An aesthetic direct restorative material; An in vitro study comparing the marginal sealing ability of organically modified ceramics and a hybrid composite using an ormocer-based bonding agent and a conventional fifth-generation bonding agent

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sarika; Singh, Arundeep; Gupta, Manish; Chadha, Vandana

    2012-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To compare the marginal sealing ability of ormocer with a hybrid composite using an ormocer based bonding agent and a conventional fifth generation bonding agent. Materials and Methods: Fifty four human premolars were randomly distributed into four test groups of 12 teeth each and two control groups of 3 teeth each. Class I occlusal preparation of 1.5 mm depth were made in each tooth. These were restored using the adhesive and restorative material according to the group. The restorations were finished using a standard composite finishing and polishing kit. Thermocycling between 5° C and 55°C was carried out. Having blocked the root apex and the entire tooth surface except 1 mm around the restoration margin, the teeth were immersed in 2% methylene blue for 48 hours, after which the dye penetration through the margins of each sample was studied under a stereomicroscope. Results and Discussion: Group IV (Admira with Admira Bond) showed the minimum marginal leakage with a mean of 0.200 mm. Four samples in this group showed no microleakage at all and a maximum of 0.400 mm was seen in one sample. Group II (Spectrum TPH with Admira Bond) showed the maximum leakage with a mean of 0.433 mm. One sample showed as much as 1.00 mm of microleakage. Admira when used with Admira Bond showed lesser microleakage than Spectrum TPH used with Prime & Bond NT, the difference being statistically insignificant. PMID:22557897

  15. Long-Term Provisional Bonded Composite Restorations Make Full-Mouth Rehabilitation Possible.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Ronald G

    2016-05-01

    Full-mouth rehabilitation cases frequently require an extended period to complete. In this case involving a patient who presented with a significant amount of lost tooth structure, treatment featured laboratory-fabricated composite provisional restorations aimed at stabilizing the dentition and enabling definitive treatment to be completed in segments. The approach taken allowed occlusal and esthetic issues to be resolved through use of the provisionals while minimizing tooth preparation. The technique provided immediate improvement in esthetics, function, and comfort. PMID:27213778

  16. Restoration of Strip Crown with a Resin-Bonded Composite Cement in Early Childhood Caries

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Mi-ae; Kim, Ah-hyeon; Shim, Youn-soo; An, So-youn

    2013-01-01

    Background. Early childhood caries is a widely prevalent disease throughout the world. It is necessary to treat this condition in early childhood; however, child behavior management may be particularly challenging during treatment. To overcome this challenge, we used Carigel to remove caries and RelyX Unicem resin cement for strip crown restoration. It not only has the desired aesthetic effect but is also more effective for primary teeth, which are used for a shorter period than permanent teeth are. Case Presentation. We report a case of three pediatric patients with early childhood caries, in whom caries was removed by using Carigel to avoid the risk of pulpal exposure associated with high-speed handpieces. Subsequently, aesthetic restoration was performed using strip crown with RelyX Unicem self-adhesive resin cement. Conclusion. RelyX Unicem has the following advantages: (1) not requiring have any special skills for the dentist for performing the procedure, (2) decreased occurrence of bubbles during injection of the cement, and (3) overall short duration of the procedure. Thus, it is appropriate for the treatment of pediatric patients whose behavior is difficult to manage. However, further studies are required in order to establish the use of RelyX Unicem as a stable restorative material in early childhood caries. PMID:24490090

  17. Ceramic Inlays: Effect of Mechanical Cycling and Ceramic Type on Restoration-dentin Bond Strength.

    PubMed

    Trindade, F Z; Kleverlaan, C J; da Silva, L H; Feilzer, A J; Cesar, P F; Bottino, M A; Valandro, L F

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between dentin and five different ceramic inlays in permanent maxillary premolars, with and without mechanical cycling. One hundred permanent maxillary premolars were prepared and divided into 10 groups (n=10) according to the ceramic system (IPS e.Max Press; IPS e.Max CAD; Vita PM9; Vita Mark II; and Vita VM7) and the mechanical cycling factor (with and without [100 N, 2 Hz, 1.2×10(6) cycles]). The inlays were adhesively cemented, and all of the specimens were cut into microbars (1×1 mm, nontrimming method), which were tested under microtensile loading. The failure mode was classified and contact angle, roughness, and microtopographic analyses were performed on each ceramic surface. The mechanical cycling had a significant effect (p=0.0087) on the bond strength between dentin and IPS e.max Press. The Vita Mark II group had the highest bond strength values under both conditions, with mechanical cycling (9.7±1.8 MPa) and without (8.2±1.9 MPa), while IPS e.Max CAD had the lowest values (2.6±1.6 and 2.2±1.4, respectively). The adhesive failure mode at the ceramic/cement interface was the most frequent. Vita Mark II showed the highest value of average roughness. IPS e.max Press and Vita Mark II ceramics presented the lowest contact angles. In conclusion, the composition and manufacturing process of ceramics seem to have an influence on the ceramic surface and resin cement bond strength. Mechanical cycling did not cause significant degradation on the dentin and ceramic bond strength under the configuration used. PMID:27455117

  18. Behavior of three high-Cu amalgams.

    PubMed

    Mahler, D B

    1979-09-01

    Amalgams made from three single-composition high-Cu alloys of the same nominal composition were investigated for differences in creep behavior. The curves of creep vs. final Hg content for all three alloys showed a sudden creep increase (jump) at approximately 46% final Hg content. Previous studies have shown this creep jump to be associated with the initiation of the Sn--Hg phase (gamma 2). The anticipated final Hg content in clinical restorations for two of these alloys is below the creep jump and gamma 2 would not be expected. On the other hand, the clinical Hg content for the third alloy was above its creep jump and gamma 2 would be expected. The effect on clinical behavior of this finding require further investigation. PMID:479216

  19. Biologic assessment of copper-containing amalgams.

    PubMed

    Mjor, I A; Eriksen, H M; Haugen, E; Skogedal, O

    1977-12-01

    In order to reduce creep and avoid marginal fractures in amalgam restorations, new alloys containing higher proportions of copper have been introduced. Fillings of these materials were placed in cavities prepared in the deciduous teeth of monkeys or placed in polyethylene tubes and implanted subcutaneously in rats. Conventional silver/tin alloys and zinc oxide eugenol cement were used as reference materials. Despite limitations due to the varying depths of cavities and the small number of animals involved it was concluded that the high copper alloys caused more severe pulp damage than the other materials studied. In the implantation studies many of the high copper specimens were exfoliated before the end of the experimental period. It is concluded that in deep cavities these materials require the use of a non-toxic base or lining material although as they are commonly used in young children's teeth the placement of linings and the isolation of the cavity pose problems. PMID:412793

  20. The effect of oxalate desensitizers on the microleakage of resin composite restorations bonded by etch and rinse adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Motamedi, Mehran; Alavi, Ali Asghar; Namvar, Babak

    2010-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of an oxalate desensitizer (OX) on the marginal microleakage of resin composite restorations bonded by two three-step and two two-step etch and rinse adhesives. Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 126 extracted premolars at the cementoenamel junction and randomly divided into nine groups of 14 each. In the control groups (1-4), four adhesives were applied, respectively, including Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP), Optibond FL (OBFL), One-Step Plus (OS) and Excite (EX). In the experimental groups (5-8), the same adhesives, in combination with OX (BisBlock), were applied. And, in one group, OX was applied without any adhesive, as the negative control group (9). All the groups were restored with a resin composite. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water and thermocycling, the samples were placed in 1% methylene blue dye solution. The dye penetration was evaluated using a stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed using non-parametric tests. The OX application, in combination with OBFL and EX, resulted in significantly increasing microleakage at the gingival margins (p < 0.05), while it had no effect on OS and SBMP (p > 0.05). At the occlusal margins, no significant difference in microleakage was observed after OX application for each of four adhesives (p > 0.05). PMID:21180008

  1. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury... elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury... elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury... elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury... elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury... elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  6. Effects of Dentin Surface Treatments on Hypersensitivity to Bond Strength of Restorations: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Tulga, Ayça; Saraç, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of desensitizing treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS) of adhesive resin cement (Rely X U100) applied to dentin. Human molars (n = 120) with exposed dentin were divided into 12 groups. In the experimental groups, dentin surfaces were treated with (1) an erbium:yttrium- aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) laser, (2) a neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser, (3) glutaraldehyde (Gluma)-, (4) fluoride (Aqua Prep-F)-, and (5) oxalate (BisBlock)-containing desensitizing agents, (6) Gluma preceding the Er:YAG laser, (7) Aqua Prep-F preceding the Er:YAG laser, (8) BisBlock preceding the Er:YAG laser, (9) Gluma preceding the Nd:YAG laser, (10) Aqua Prep-F preceding the Nd:YAG laser, (11) and BisBlock preceding the Nd:YAG laser, in groups EL, NL, G, F, O, EL-G, EL-F, EL-O, NL-G , NL-F, and NL-O, respectively. Then, lithium disilicate ceramics were cemented to the treated surfaces. Subsequently, an SBS test was performed and the data were statistically analyzed (α = .001). The results suggested that the combined treatment of Gluma preceding Er:YAG laser increased the bond strength of ceramic to the dentin surface using a self-adhesive resin cement. PMID:26357704

  7. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  12. Dental composites and amalgam and physical development in children.

    PubMed

    Maserejian, N N; Hauser, R; Tavares, M; Trachtenberg, F L; Shrader, P; McKinlay, S

    2012-11-01

    Resin-based composite dental restoration materials may release bisphenol-A, an endocrine-disrupting chemical. Using secondary analysis of a randomized clinical safety trial of amalgam vs. composites, we tested the hypothesis that dental restoration materials affect children's growth. Children (N = 218 boys, N = 256 girls) aged 6 to 10 yrs at baseline with ≥ 2 decayed posterior teeth were randomized to amalgam or composites (bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-dimethacrylate composite for permanent teeth, urethane-dimethacrylate compomer for primary teeth) for treatment of posterior caries throughout follow-up. Primary outcomes for this analysis were 5-year changes in BMI-for-age z-scores, body fat percentage (BF%), and height velocity; exploratory analyses (n = 113) examined age at menarche. Results showed no significant differences between treatment assignment and changes in physical development in boys [(composites vs. amalgam) BF%, 4.9 vs. 5.7, p = 0.49; (BMI-z-score) 0.13 vs. 0.25, p = 0.36] or girls (8.8 vs. 7.7, p = 0.95; 0.36 vs. 0.21, p = 0.49). Children with more treatment on primary teeth had greater increases in BF% regardless of material type. Girls assigned to composites had lower risk of menarche during follow-up (hazard ratio = 0.57, 95% CI 0.35-0.95). Overall, there were no significant differences in physical development over 5 years in children treated with composites or amalgam. Additional studies examining these restoration materials in relation to age at menarche are warranted (clinicaltrials.gov number NCT00065988). PMID:22972857

  13. Managing the phase-down of amalgam: Part I. Educational and training issues.

    PubMed

    Lynch, C D; Wilson, N H F

    2013-08-01

    Following the recently agreed Minamata Convention, a phase-down in the use of dental amalgam will become a priority for the profession. With a lead-in period of a number of years, important changes in the mind-set of the profession are required to ensure that patient safety is not compromised. Posterior composites have been a viable, and in many cases preferable, alternative to amalgam for many years. However, notwithstanding considerable developments in dental school teaching on the application and placement of posterior composites, growing evidence to support the use of composites in the restoration of posterior teeth and advances in composite systems, many practitioners remain reluctant to place composite rather than amalgam. This paper considers the present and future use of posterior composites and highlights ways in which dental school teaching and continuing professional development (CPD) may contribute to the successful phase-down, and now inevitable discontinuation, in the use of dental amalgam. PMID:23928599

  14. Amalgam ablation with the Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.; Visuri, Steven R.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1995-04-01

    Any laser that will be used by dentist to replace the dental drill (handpiece) must remove dental hard tissues safely. These lasers must also have the ability to ablate the restorative dental materials which are present in the teeth being treated. Prior to any laser being used to treat humans a thorough knowledge of the effects of the laser treatment on dental materials must be understood. Cores of dental amalgam were created and sliced into thin wafers for this experiment. Ablation efficiency and thermal changes were evaluated with and without water. It appears as if the Er:YAG laser can effectively ablate amalgam dental material with and without water. The water prevents the temperature from increasing much above baseline and does not reduce efficiency of ablation.

  15. Effect of different adhesive systems on microleakage at the amalgam/composite resin interface.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Ambrose, E R; Elbadrawy, H E

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different bonding systems on teh microleakage at the amalgam/composite interface. The microleakage at the amalgam/composite resin interface was evaluated with a quantitative dye penetration method. Amalgam cylinders were made and a 2 mm composite base was added after the application of five different bonding systems to the roughened interface of the amalgam cylinders. The cylinders were filled with an exact volume of 0.05% fuchsin solution, and the total weight of the sample was measured. The cylinders were placed on a filter paper with the composite base down and evaluated for leakage after 1, 3, 6, and 24 hours. Weight loss and coloring of the filter paper represented microleakage. The results indicated that the application of Prisma Universal Bond 2 adhesive, Cover Up II, or Amalgambond (groups E, F, and G) reduced the amount of microleakage significantly as compared to the groups in which no adhesive system, 3M Porcelain Repair Kit (with and without acid etching of the amalgam surface), or Prisma Universal Bond 2 primer and adhesive (groups A, B, C or D) was applied. PMID:8332537

  16. Overexpression of the rhodanese PspE, a single cysteine-containing protein, restores disulfide bond formation to an Escherichia coli strain lacking DsbA

    PubMed Central

    Chng, Shu-Sin; Dutton, Rachel J.; Denoncin, Katleen; Vertommen, Didier; Collet, Jean-Francois; Kadokura, Hiroshi; Beckwith, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Summary Escherichia coli uses the DsbA/DsbB system for introducing disulfide bonds into proteins in the cell envelope. Deleting either dsbA or dsbB or both reduces disulfide bond formation but does not entirely eliminate it. Whether such background disulfide bond forming activity is enzyme-catalyzed is not known. To identify possible cellular factors that might contribute to the background activity, we studied the effects of overexpressing endogenous proteins on disulfide bond formation in the periplasm. We find that overexpressing PspE, a periplasmic rhodanese, partially restores substantial disulfide bond formation to a dsbA strain. This activity depends on DsbC, the bacterial disulfide bond isomerase, but not on DsbB. We show that overexpressed PspE is oxidized to the sulfenic acid form and reacts with substrate proteins to form mixed disulfide adducts. DsbC either prevents the formation of these mixed disulfides or resolves these adducts subsequently. In the process, DsbC itself gets oxidized and proceeds to catalyze disulfide bond formation. Although this PspE/DsbC system is not responsible for the background disulfide bond forming activity, we suggest that it might be utilized in other organisms lacking the DsbA/DsbB system. PMID:22809289

  17. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Luting Cements to Different Core Buildup Materials in Lactic Acid Buffer Solution

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Siddharam M.; Desai, Raviraj G.; Arabbi, Kashinath C.; Prakash, Ved

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Objectives The core buildup material is used to restore badly broken down tooth to provide better retention for fixed restorations. The shear bond strength of a luting agent to core buildup is one of the crucial factors in the success of the cast restoration. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of luting cements with different core buildup materials in lactic acid buffer solution. Materials and Methods Two luting cements {Traditional Glass Ionomer luting cement (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer luting cement (RMGIC)} and five core buildup materials {Silver Amalgam, Glass ionomer (GI), Glass Ionomer Silver Reinforced (GI Silver reinforced), Composite Resin and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer(RMGIC)} were selected for this study. Total 100 specimens were prepared with 20 specimens for each core buildup material using a stainless steel split metal die. Out of these 20 specimens, 10 specimens were bonded with each luting cement. All the bonded specimens were stored at 370c in a 0.01M lactic acid buffer solution at a pH of 4 for 7days. Shear bond strength was determined using a Universal Testing Machine at a cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. The peak load at fracture was recorded and shear bond strength was calculated. The data was statistically analysed using Two-way ANOVA followed by HOLM-SIDAK method for pair wise comparison at significance level of p<0.05. Results Two-Way ANOVA showed significant differences in bond strength of the luting cements (p<0.05) and core materials (p<0.05) and the interactions (p<0.05). Pairwise comparison of luting cements by HOLM-SIDAK test, showed that the RMGIC luting cement had higher shear bond strength values than Traditional GIC luting cement for all the core buildup materials. RMGIC core material showed higher bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI silver reinforced, GI and silver amalgam core materials for both the luting agents. Conclusion Shear bond strength of

  18. Effect of aluminum chloride hemostatic agent on microleakage of class V composite resin restorations bonded with all-in-one adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Bahari, Mahmood; Pournaghi-Azar, Fatemeh; Mozafari, Aysan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Since hemostatic agents can induce changes on enamel and dentin surfaces and influence composite resin adhesion, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the aluminum chloride hemostatic agent on the gingival margin microleakage of class V (Cl V) composite resin restorations bonded with all-in-one adhesive. Study design: Cl V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 60 sound bovine permanent incisors. Gingival margins of the cavities were placed 1.5 mm apical to the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). The teeth were randomly divided into two groups of 30. In group 1, the cavities were restored without the application of a hemostatic agent; in group 2, the cavities were restored after the application of the hemostatic agent. In both groups all-in-one adhesive and Z250 composite resin were used to restore the cavities with the incremental technique. After finishing and polishing, the samples underwent a thermocycling procedure, followed by immersion in 2% basic fuschin solution for 24 hours. The samples were sectioned and gingival microleakage was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. The non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare microleakage between the two groups. Statistical significance was defined at P<0.05. Results: A statistically significant difference was observed in microleakage between the two groups (P<0.001). Conclusions: Contamination of Cl V composite resin restorations bonded with all-in-one adhesive with aluminum chloride hemostatic agent significantly increases restoration gingival margin microleakage. Key words:All-in-one adhesive resin, composite resin restoration, hemostatic agent, microleakage. PMID:22322497

  19. [Composites versus amalgam: comparative measurements of abrasion resistance in vivo: 1-year results].

    PubMed

    Meier, C; Lutz, F

    1979-03-01

    A method for the in-vivo measurement of wear resistance of restorative materials is described. A profilometer is used to record the reduction in vertical dimension of the test material's occlusal surface. This loss of substance is calculated as the wear resistance index. The technique was used in a 13 month clinical evaluation of 3 different restorative materials, Adaptic, Amalgam (Dispersalloy) and Estic microfill. The procedure is simple in execution and very accurate. Statistical analysis has shown significant differences in wear resistance of the examined materials independent of patient variation. Attrition and abrasion were definitely greater with a standard composite material (Adaptic) than with amalgam and a test composite (Estic microfill). The newly developed composite material utilizing extremely fine filler particles of pyrogenic SiO2 (Estic microfill) was shown to be comparable to amalgam in wear resistance during the 13-month test period. PMID:293032

  20. Characterisation of baroque tin amalgam mirrors of the historical Green Vault in Dresden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zywitzki, O.; Nedon, W.; Kopte, T.; Modes, T.

    2008-07-01

    The historical Green Vault, one of Europe’s most sumptuous treasure chambers, has reopened in September 2006 in the Dresden Royal Palace. For the baroque presentation of the artworks the special properties of tin amalgam mirrors are of great importance. A comprehensive analytic characterisation was necessary for restoration and reconstruction. The different original casting glasses were analysed in respect of chemical composition, roughness, waviness and optical properties like chromaticity coordinates and transmittance. The microstructure of the tin amalgam layers were investigated on metallographic cross-sections and by X-ray diffraction. The investigations reveal that the tin amalgam layers are composed of γ-HgSn6-10 phase with a grain size between 5 and 50 μm surrounded by a thin mercury phase with about 2 wt. % tin. However the most important property of the baroque tin amalgam mirrors is a relative low reflectivity of about 59% which is drastically lower than for silver mirrors with a reflectivity of about 96%. According to the characterisation results a suitable glass for reconstruction was selected. The mirror layers were produced by historical tin amalgam technology for the rooms not destroyed by bombarding of Dresden in February 1945. For the completely destroyed Jewel Room pure tin layers were deposited by magnetron sputtering. The results show that this new technology enables an adequate substitute for the original tin amalgam layers.

  1. Environmental hazard evaluation of amalgam scrap.

    PubMed

    Fan, P L; Chang, S B; Siew, C

    1992-11-01

    Amalgam scrap was subjected to two different Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) extraction procedures to determine if it presents an environmental hazard. The results indicate that concentrations of mercury and silver in the extracts do not exceed the EPA's maximum allowable concentrations. It was concluded that amalgam scrap is not a hazardous solid waste. Proper handling of amalgam scrap disposal by recycling is, however, highly recommended. PMID:1303382

  2. Hg, Bi, Cu and Zn distribution in human teeth treated by dental amalgam measured by synchrotron microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, M. L.; Marques, J. P.; Brito, J.; Casaca, C.; Cunha, A. S.

    2002-11-01

    Human teeth restored with dental amalgam were analysed by a synchrotron microprobe to evaluate the diffusion of its major constituents, Cu, Zn and Hg, throughout the tooth structures. We measured the elemental distribution inside the tooth from the root to the enamel, specially the region around the amalgam, after its total removal. Hg is present only in restored teeth and concentration profiles show strongly increased levels of this element close to the amalgam region, reaching 500 μg g -1 in one or two cases, decreasing strongly to the inner part of the tooth. Pb concentration profiles do not seem to be affected by metallic amalgam. Very high concentrations of Bi were found in one of the restored teeth, reaching more than 2000 μg g -1, decreasing sharply to the outer regions. The distribution of Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn was also determined in order to evaluate elemental influences by amalgam components. No significant changes in elemental concentrations were detected for Mn and Fe between healthy and restored teeth. However, the levels of Zn and Cu are increased in restored teeth. An X-ray fluorescence set-up with microprobe capabilities, 100 μm of spatial resolution and an energy of 18 keV, installed at LURE synchrotron (France) was used.

  3. A Comparison between Shear Bond Strength of VMK Master Porcelain with Three Base-metal Alloys (Ni-cr-T3, VeraBond, Super Cast) and One Noble Alloy (X-33) in Metal-ceramic Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadzadeh, A; Neshati, A; Mousavi, N; Epakchi, S; Dabaghi Tabriz, F; Sarbazi, AH

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: The increase in the use of metal-ceramic restorations and a high prevalence of porcelain chipping entails introducing an alloy which is more compatible with porcelain and causes a stronger bond between the two. This study is to compare shear bond strength of three base-metal alloys and one noble alloy with the commonly used VMK Master Porcelain. Materials and Method: Three different groups of base-metal alloys (Ni-cr-T3, Super Cast, and VeraBond) and one group of noble alloy (X-33) were selected. Each group consisted of 15 alloy samples. All groups went through the casting process and change from wax pattern into metal disks. The VMK Master Porcelain was then fired on each group. All the specimens were put in the UTM; a shear force was loaded until a fracture occurred and the fracture force was consequently recorded. The data were analyzed by SPSS Version 16 and One-Way ANOVA was run to compare the shear strength between the groups. Furthermore, the groups were compared two-by-two by adopting Tukey test. Results: The findings of this study revealed shear bond strength of Ni-Cr-T3 alloy was higher than the three other alloys (94 MPa or 330 N). Super Cast alloy had the second greatest shear bond strength (80. 87Mpa or 283.87 N). Both VeraBond (69.66 MPa or 245 N) and x-33 alloys (66.53 MPa or 234 N) took the third place. Conclusion: Ni-Cr-T3 with VMK Master Porcelain has the greatest shear bond strength. Therefore, employment of this low-cost alloy is recommended in metal-ceramic restorations. PMID:24724144

  4. Restoring Bonds of Respect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brokenleg, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In writing about the Circle of Courage, Martin Brokenleg and his co-authors brought together different professions, racial backgrounds, and upbringing (Brendtro, Brokenleg, & Van Bockern, 2002). While the Circle of Courage philosophy transcends culture, they initially used Native American images and stories to express these ideas. Because…

  5. Effect of Surface Polishing on Mercury Release from Dental Amalgam After Treatment 16% Carbamide Peroxide Gel

    PubMed Central

    Azarsina, M.; Kasraei, Sh.; Masoum, T.; Khamverdi, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the effect of surface polishing on mercury release from dental amalgam after treatment with 16% carbamide peroxide gel. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six samples from two different amalgam brands were prepared in truncated cone-shaped PVC polymer molds with an external surface area of 195 mm2. Half of the specimens were polished with green and red rubber, a brush and tin oxide paste at low speed. Samples were treated with 16% carbamide peroxide gel in tubes containing 3 mL of carbamide peroxide gel and 0.1 mL of distilled water for 14 and 28 hours. Subsequently, carbamide peroxide gel on the sample surfaces was rinsed away with 7.0 mL of distilled water until the volume of each tube increased to 10 mL. The mercury level of each solution was measured using the VAV–440 mercury analyzer system. Considering the surface area of each amalgam disc, mercury amounts were calculated in μg/mm2. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results: There were significant differences between the mean levels of mercury release from polished vs. unpolished amalgam surfaces after treatment with 16% carbamide peroxide. Increasing the storage time from 14 to 28 hours did not result in significant changes in the amount of mercury release. There was no significant interaction effect between amalgam surface polish and storage time statistically. Conclusion: Polished amalgam restorations release less mercury after treatment with carbamide peroxide bleaching gel in comparison with unpolished amalgam restorations. PMID:21998805

  6. [Total amalgam reconstruction. Clinical evaluation after three years].

    PubMed

    Pivetta, G; Pivetta, E

    1989-03-15

    This study reports the results of the evaluation after three years of total amalgam restorations, made on molars and premolars vital and devitalized. The clinical parameters examinated were: 1) anatomic form and axial contour 2) marginal integrity 3) recurrent caries 4) occlusal contacts 5) interproximal contacts 6) pulpar or periodontal complication. To each of these parameters was given a degree of judgement expressed by Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, Delta. Alpha is the best evaluation, Bravo expresses a lower degree but clinically acceptable, Charlie and Delta are worse. Considering for each parameter the sum of the evaluations Alpha + Bravo, the clinically acceptable rate per cent of results has been quite good. PMID:2636172

  7. The effect of an erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser on the microleakage and bond strength of silorane and micro-hybrid composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Baygin, Ozgul; Tuzuner, Tamer; Bagis, Bora; Arslan, Ipek

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the microleakage and bond strength of Class V silorane-based and universal micro-hybrid composite restorations prepared either with diamond bur or with an erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er, Cr:YSGG) laser. Materials and Methods: A total of 160 molar teeth were used for microleakage assessment and shear bond strength (SBS) test. The specimens were prepared using either diamond bur or 3 W-, 4 W- and 5 W-20 Hz Er, Cr:YSGG laser irradiation. All specimens were subjected to thermocycling (500 times at 5 ± 2°C to 55 ± 2°C, dwell time 15 s and transfer time 10 s). Microleakage was assessed using a 0.5% basic-fuchsin solution. The bond strengths were determined using a microtensile tester at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The Kruskal Wallis test was used for the analysis of microleakage and a one-way analysis of variance test was used to analyze the SBS (P < 0.05). Results: No statistically significant differences were found (P > 0.05) between Er, Cr:YSGG laser and bur preparation methods regarding microleakage and bond strength values. Conclusion: Irradiation with Er, Cr:YSGG laser was confirmed to be as effective as conventional methods for preparing cavities before adhesive restorations. PMID:24966726

  8. Effect of restorative procedures on the strength of endodontically treated molars.

    PubMed

    Linn, J; Messer, H H

    1994-10-01

    Endodontically treated molar teeth are considered susceptible to fracture because of loss of tooth bulk. This study evaluated the significance of retaining intact marginal ridges and selective cusp coverage in preserving tooth stiffness during restoration. Strain gauges were bonded to four cusps of 36 intact extracted human lower molars. Teeth were loaded mesially and distally in a closed-loop servohydraulic system to measure stiffness. Endodontic access was followed by mesio-occlusal or mesio-occluso-distal preparation. Teeth were restored with either amalgam (no overlay), amalgam overlay, or gold overlay with partial or complete cusp coverage. Relative stiffness was calculated for all test conditions. Preserving a marginal ridge in molars did not fully conserve the strength of adjacent cusps; selective cusp coverage reinforced only the capped cusps; full occlusal coverage with gold or amalgam strengthened all cusps, but gold did so more consistently. It is more important to cover cusps than to preserve tooth structure (including a marginal ridge) in endodontically treated molar teeth. PMID:7714419

  9. [Retrograde root filling utilizing resin and a dentin bonding agent: indication and applications].

    PubMed

    Rud, J; Rud, V; Munksgaard, E C

    1989-05-01

    With Gluma a methacrylate-based resin may be chemically bonded to dentin with considerable strength. Resin may therefore be used for retrograde root fillings. Whereas a retrograde amalgam filling demands a box-like preparation, retroplast (Gluma and resin) may be applied to a slightly concave root surface. It may therefore be employed in areas normally inaccessible with amalgam technique. Retroplast can thus be used on roots of all molars and to restore root perforations, root resorptions, cracks, grooves and defects of the root. In addition on lateral canals, on extremely thin roots and to cover perforating root canal posts, this technique can also be used. Dentin/root-cement transplantation may be performed for the purpose of reattachment. The article discusses the technique and its applications with examples showing that it may result in satisfactory healing. PMID:2696126

  10. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  11. Clinical performance of Class II adhesive restorations in pulpectomized primary molars: 12-month results.

    PubMed

    Zulfikaroglu, Burcu Togay; Atac, Atila Stephan; Cehreli, Zafer C

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to present the 12-month results of a prospective, randomized study evaluating the clinical and radiographic success rates of Class II adhesive restorations in pulpectomized primary molars. A total of 75 restorations were placed over root canal-treated primary molars, filled with a calcium hydroxide paste. The restorative systems tested were: (1) group 1: amalgam (negative control); (2) group 2: a hybrid resin composite (TPH, Dentsply) with prior acid conditioning and bonding with an etch-and-rinse adhesive (Prime&Bond NT, Dentsply); (3) group 3: a polyacid-modified resin composite (Dyract, Dentsply) bonded with Prime&Bond NT; (4) group 4: Dyract with prior nonrinse conditioner (NRC) treatment and bonding with Prime&Bond NT; and (5) group 5: a polyacid-modified resin composite (F2000) in conjunction with a self-etch adhesive (Prompt-L-Pop, 3M/ESPE). The restorations were evaluated clinically using the modified USPHS/Ryge criteria at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, and 12 months. Radiographic evaluations were made in accordance with predetermined criteria. During the evaluation period, 12 teeth (group1=4, group2=1, group3=4, group4=3, and group5=2) were extracted due to radiographic evidence of failure. There was no difference between groups regarding the clinical evaluation criteria (P>.05) except marginal discoloration at 9 and 12 months (P<.05). The overall success rate at 12 months was 81% (group 1=73%, group 2=93%, group 3=73%, group 4=80%, and group 5=87%). Teeth restored with the resin composite+total-etch/bonding (group 2), followed by those with F2000+self-etch adhesive (group 5) exhibited the highest clinical and radiographic success rates. Radiographic failures observed beneath failed restorations were strongly suggestive of coronal microleakage. PMID:18505646

  12. An in-vitro investigation into the sealing ability of two fourth generation dentine bonding agents and two resin modified glass polyalkenoate restoratives.

    PubMed

    Quinn, F

    1995-03-01

    To determine the in-vitro sealing ability of two resin modified glass polyalkenoate cements and two fourth generation dentine bonding systems, fifty mixed class V cavities were filled with each material and evaluated for leakage. At enamel margins, no significant differences in leakage extent was noted; however, at cemental margins the two resin modified glass polyalkenoates performed significantly better than the resin based systems. Crazing was frequently noted on enamel margins with both glass polyalkenoate materials. Surface application of unfilled glaze did not affect the leakage at either enamel or cemental margins for one of the polyalkenoate restorative materials. PMID:8603154

  13. The cognitive-emotional amalgam.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Luiz

    2015-01-01

    In the précis to The Cognitive-Emotional Brain, I summarize a framework for understanding the organization of cognition and emotion in the brain. Here, I address six major themes that emerged in the commentaries: (1) emotional perception and automaticity; (2) the status of cognition and emotion: together or separate? (3) evolutionary implications for the understanding of emotion and cognition; (4) the diverse forms of cognitive-emotional integration; (5) dual process theories; and (6) functional diversity of brain regions/networks and cognitive ontologies. The central argument is, again, that cognition and emotion are so highly interactive, and indeed integrated, that these two elements blend into a new amalgam. PMID:26815655

  14. Extensive amalgam tattoo on the alveolar-gingival mucosa.

    PubMed

    Galletta, Vivian C; Artico, Gabriela; Dal Vechio, Aluana M C; Lemos Jr, Celso A; Migliari, Dante A

    2011-01-01

    Amalgam tattoos are common exogenous pigmented lesions of the oral mucosa occurring mainly by inadvertent placement of amalgam particles into soft tissues. The diagnosis of amalgam tattoo is simple, usually based on clinical findings associated with presence or history of amalgam fillings removal. Intraoral X-rays may be helpful in detecting amalgam-related radiopacity. In cases where amalgam tattoo cannot be differentiated from other causes of oral pigmentation, a biopsy should be performed. This article deals with an extensive amalgam tattoo lesion which required a biopsy for a definitive diagnosis. PMID:22147048

  15. Radiochemical separation of gold by amalgam exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruch, R.R.

    1970-01-01

    A rapid and simple method for the radiochemical separation of gold after neutron activation. The technique is based on treatment with a dilute indium-gold amalgam, both chemical reduction and isotopic exchange being involved. The counting efficiency for 198Au in small volumes of the amalgam is good. Few interferences occur and the method is applicable to clays, rocks, salts and metals. The possibility of determining silver, platinum and palladium by a similar method is mentioned. ?? 1970.

  16. Further study of restored and un-restored teeth subjected to high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Merlati, G; Savlo, C; Danesino, P; Fassina, G; Menghini, P

    2004-12-01

    Forensic dentistry has been shown to be of fundamental importance in medico-legal investigations aimed at identifying human remains involving high temperature incidents because dental remains and prosthetic devices are resistant to quite high thermal change. In this project we studied teeth containing class I and V amalgam and composite fillings and compared them to un-restored teeth when exposed to high temperatures. Twenty five un-restored teeth, 25 teeth with class I amalgam restorations, 25 teeth with class V amalgam restorations and 25 teeth with class I composite fillings were placed in a furnace and heated at a rate of 30 degrees C/min. The effects at the predetermined temperatures 200, 400, 600, 800, 1000 and 1100 degrees C were examined macroscopically and then observed microscopically by means of a stereomicroscope. Our observations showed that the class I amalgam restorations at the different temperature levels remained in place, maintaining their shape despite disintegration of the crowns, whilst the class I composite restorations remained in place but in an altered shape. Comparing restored with un-restored teeth we observed different responses in crown disintegration at the different temperature levels. PMID:16223018

  17. Abrasion of restorative materials by toothaste.

    PubMed

    Heath, J R; Wilson, H J

    1976-04-01

    The procedure developed in this investigation is suitable for determining the abrasion resistance of restorative materials to toothbrush/dentifrice abrasion. Ideally, a restoration should have an abrasion resistance similar to that of enamel. Of the materials tested, gold was the only one that wore slightly less than enamel, whilst amalgam wore almost twice as quickly. The silicate material and composites (excluding TD.71) wear away 2-4 times faster than enamel. TD.71 and especially the unfilled resin exhibited very high rates of abrasion. After prolonged toothbrush/dentifrice abrasion, the surfaces of gold and amalgam were considerably smoother than those of the silicate and composite materials. PMID:1066445

  18. Marginal microleakage of cervical composite resin restorations bonded using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives: two dimensional vs. three dimensional methods

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was evaluated the marginal microleakage of two different adhesive systems before and after aging with two different dye penetration techniques. Materials and Methods Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 48 human molars. Clearfil SE Bond and Single Bond (self-etching and etch-and-rinse systems, respectively) were applied, each to half of the prepared cavities, which were restored with composite resin. Half of the specimens in each group underwent 10,000 cycles of thermocycling. Microleakage was evaluated using two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) dye penetration techniques separately for each half of each specimen. Data were analyzed with SPSS 11.5 (SPSS Inc.), using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α = 0.05). Results The difference between the 2D and 3D microleakage evaluation techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of Single bond groups (p = 0.002). The differences between 2D and 3D microleakage evaluation techniques were significant at both the occlusal and cervical margins of Clearfil SE Bond groups (p = 0.017 and p = 0.002, respectively). The difference between the 2D and 3D techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of non-aged groups (p = 0.003). The difference between these two techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of the aged groups (p = 0.001). The Mann-Whitney test showed significant differences between the two techniques only at the occlusal margins in all specimens. Conclusions Under the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that the 3D technique has the capacity to detect occlusal microleakage more precisely than the 2D technique. PMID:27200275

  19. Analysis of Resin-Dentin Interface Morphology and Bond Strength Evaluation of Core Materials for One Stage Post-Endodontic Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Bitter, Kerstin; Gläser, Christin; Neumann, Konrad; Blunck, Uwe; Frankenberger, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Restoration of endodontically treated teeth using fiber posts in a one-stage procedure gains more popularity and aims to create a secondary monoblock. Data of detailed analyses of so called “post-and-core-systems” with respect to morphological characteristics of the resin-dentin interface in combination with bond strength measurements of fiber posts luted with these materials are scarce. The present study aimed to analyze four different post-and-core-systems with two different adhesive approaches (self-etch and etch-and-rinse). Materials and Methods Human anterior teeth (n = 80) were endodontically treated and post space preparations and post placement were performed using the following systems: Rebilda Post/Rebilda DC/Futurabond DC (Voco) (RB), Luxapost/Luxacore Z/Luxabond Prebond and Luxabond A+B (DMG) (LC), X Post/Core X Flow/XP Bond and Self Cure Activator (Dentsply DeTrey) (CX), FRC Postec/MultiCore Flow/AdheSE DC (Ivoclar Vivadent) (MC). Adhesive systems and core materials of 10 specimens per group were labeled using fluorescent dyes and resin-dentin interfaces were analyzed using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). Bond strengths were evaluated using a push-out test. Data were analyzed using repeated measurement ANOVA and following post-hoc test. Results CLSM analyses revealed significant differences between groups with respect to the factors hybrid layer thickness (p<0.0005) and number of resin tags (p = 0.02; ANOVA). Bond strength was significantly affected by core material (p = 0.001), location inside the root canal (p<0.0005) and incorporation of fluorescent dyes (p = 0.036; ANOVA). CX [7.7 (4.4) MPa] demonstrated significantly lower bond strength compared to LC [14.2 (8.7) MPa] and RB [13.3 (3.7) MPa] (p<0.05; Tukey HSD) but did not differ significantly from MC [11.5 (3.5) MPa]. Conclusion It can be concluded that bond strengths inside the root canal were not affected by the adhesive approach of the post

  20. Radiochemical separation of gallium by amalgam exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruch, R.R.

    1969-01-01

    An amalgam-exchange separation of radioactive gallium from a number of interfering radioisotopes has been developed. A dilute (ca. 0.3%) gallium amalgam is agitated with a slightly acidic solution of 72Ga3+ containing concentrations of sodium thiocyanate and either perchlorate or chloride. The amalgam is then removed and the radioactive gallium stripped by agitation with dilute nitric acid. The combined exchange yield of the perchlorate-thiocyanate system is 90??4% and that of the chloride-thiocyanate system is 75??4%. Decontamination yields of most of the 11 interfering isotopes studied were less than 0.02%. The technique is applicable for use with activation analysis for the determination of trace amounts of gallium. ?? 1969.

  1. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with...

  6. Engineered disulfide bonds restores chaperone like function of DJ-1 mutants linked to familial Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Todd; Clark, Lindsay; Ray, Soumya S.

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations such as L166P, A104T and M26I in the DJ-1 gene (PARK7) have been linked to autosomal-recessive early onset Parkinson’s disease (PD). Cellular and structural studies of the familial mutants suggest that these mutations may destabilize the dimeric structure. In order to look for common dynamical signatures among the DJ-1 mutants, short MD simulations up to 1000ps were carried out to identify the weakest region of the protein (residues 38–70). In an attempt at stabilizing the protein, we mutated residue Val 51 to cysteine (V51C) to make a symmetry-related disulfide bridge with the pre-existing Cys 53 on the opposite subunit. We found that the introduction of this disulfide linkage stabilized the mutants A104T and M26I against thermal denaturation, showed increased ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and restored a chaperone-like function of blocking α-synuclein aggregation. The L166P mutant was far too unstable to be rescued by introduction of V51C. The results presented here points towards the possible development of pharmacological chaperones, which may eventually lead to PD therapeutics. PMID:20527929

  7. Amalgam Surface Treatment by Different Output Powers of Er:YAG Laser:SEM Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mohammad Hashem; Hassanpour, Mehdi; Etemadi, Ardavan; Ranjbar Omrani, Ladan; Darvishpour, Hojat; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate amalgam surfaces treated by different output powers of erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Methods: Twenty-one amalgam blocks (8 mm × 8 mm, 3 mm thickness) were prepared by condensing silver amalgam (into putty impression material. After keeping them for 24 hours in distilled water, they were divided into 7 groups as follow: G1: Er:YAG laser (1 W, 50 mJ), G2: Er:YAG laser (2 W, 100 mJ), G3: Er:YAG laser (3 W, 150 mJ), G4: Sandblast, G5: Sandblast + Er:YAG laser (1 W, 50 mJ), G6: Sandblast +Er:YAG laser (2 W, 100 mJ) and G7: Sandblast +Er:YAG laser (3 W, 150 mJ). Then after preparation of all samples, they were examined by SEM. Results: The SEM results of amalgam surfaces treated by different output powers of Er:YAG laser showed some pitting areas with non-homogenous irregularities Conclusion: It seems that the application of sandblasting accompanied by Er:YAG laser irradiation can provide proper surface for bonding of orthodontic brackets. PMID:26705463

  8. Amalgam containing nickel or tungsten dispersions. I.

    PubMed

    Reisbick, M H; Bunshah, R F; Agarwal, N

    1977-12-01

    Wetting tests were conducted to determine compatability between select dispersion powders and Ag3Sn. Subsequently, a method was perfected for incorporating nickel or tungsten powder into the Ag3 Sn ingot. Initial studies reveal good distributions of the dispersed phase in the ingots and the comminuted alloys, after amalgamation, appear to retain their normal working characteristics. PMID:277462

  9. Restoration Materials and Secondary Caries Using an In Vitro Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    van de Sande, F.H.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; de Soet, J.J.; Cenci, M.S.; Huysmans, M.C.D.J.N.M.

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated whether restoration materials and adhesives influence secondary caries formation in gaps using a short-term in vitro biofilm model. Sixty enamel–dentin blocks were restored with 6 different restoration materials with or without adhesives (n = 10 per group) with a gap: 1) Clearfil AP-X composite, 2) Clearfil AP-X composite + SE Bond, 3) Clearfil AP-X composite + ProtectBond, 4) Filtek Silorane composite, 5) Filtek Silorane composite + Silorane System adhesive, or 6) Tytin amalgam. Specimens were subjected to an intermittent 1% sucrose biofilm model for 20 days to create artificial caries lesions. Lesion progression in the enamel–dentin next to the different materials was measured in lesion depth (LD) and mineral loss (ML) using transversal wavelength independent microradiography (T-WIM). A regression analysis was used to compare the LD and ML of the different restoration materials at 4 measurement locations: 1 location at the surface of the enamel, 1 location at the wall of the enamel, and 2 locations at the wall of the dentin. A statistically significant effect of AP-X composite with Protect Bond was found for LD and ML at the WallDentin1 location, leading to less advanced wall lesions. An additional finding was that gap size was also statistically significant at the 2 wall locations in dentin, leading to increasing lesion progression with wider gaps. In conclusion, adhesives can influence wall lesion development in gaps. Protect Bond showed significantly less caries progression compared to bare restoration materials or other adhesives in this short-term in vitro biofilm model. PMID:25297114

  10. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DETERMINING AMALGAM DECOMPOSITION RATE

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, R.W.; Wright, C.C.

    1962-04-24

    A method and apparatus for measuring the rate at which an amalgam decomposes in contact with aqueous solutions are described. The amalgam and an aqueous hydroxide solution are disposed in an electrolytic cell. The amalgam is used as the cathode of the cell, and an electrode and anode are disposed in the aqueous solution. A variable source of plating potential is connected across the cell. The difference in voltage between the amalgam cathode and a calibrated source of reference potential is used to control the variable source to null the difference in voltage and at the same time to maintain the concentration of the amalgam at some predetermined constant value. The value of the current required to maintain this concentration constant is indicative of the decomposition rate of the amalgam. (AEC)

  11. 48. INTERIOR VIEW FROM THE WEST END OF THE AMALGAMATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. INTERIOR VIEW FROM THE WEST END OF THE AMALGAMATION TABLES LOOKING NORTH TOWARDS THE STAMP BATTERIES WITH AMALGAM TRAPS SHOWN IN THE BOTTOM FOREGROUND. NOTE THE EXTANT EQUIPMENT IN THE FOREGROUND THAT THE PARK USES TO INTERPRET THE MILL. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, A SCREEN FROM THE MORTAR BOX, A STAMP STOP. A (HUMAN'S) SHOE, A DIE FROM THE BOTTOM OF A MORTAR BOX, AN AMALGAM SCRAPPER AND AN AMALGAM BUCKET. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  12. Accessing and restoring root caries: a case report.

    PubMed

    Turner, E W; Shook, Larry W; Lackey, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Adequate access to root caries can be problematic. The inability to view, isolate, and access the entire lesion may result in residual caries, poor adaptation of the restoration, and defective margins. Minor periodontal procedures, ranging from a mini-flap involving only one tooth, to conventional flap surgery can provide increased visibility and access to these troublesome areas. Through utilization of this technique, excellent preparations and restorations can be achieved. Restorative materials with a high potential for fluoride release as well as uptake should be highly considered in cases of root caries. The selection of a conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer provides several advantages. Most notably are the ability of these restoratives to chemically bond to tooth structure, and to provide significant fluoride release and uptake. These properties are not present in amalgam, composites, or compomers. Additionally, the material itself is relatively easy to use and provides an effective zone of caries inhibition around the margins of the restoration. Glass ionomers are not as sensitive to moisture as conventional resin composites or compomers, and, as a result, may provide a better bond to tooth structure and margination in areas where moisture control is troublesome. Finally, the polymerization shrinkage of these materials is not as great as resin composites, which should also improve marginal integrity. Clinical studies have demonstrated longevity of ten years or greater as well as success in xerostomic patients. Management of xerostomic patients should be directed toward finding satisfactory methods to relieve dryness. Some prescription medications are available, but should only be recommended after consultation with the primary care physician. Oral moisturizers are also available as are saliva substitutes. Caution should be used when recommending saliva substitutes due to the fact that some commercial products have been demonstrated to have a pH below

  13. An approach to biomimetics: the natural CAD/CAM restoration: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Schlichting, Luís Henrique; Schlichting, Kathryn Klemz; Stanley, Kyle; Magne, Michel; Magne, Pascal

    2014-02-01

    Those in the dental field have always pursued the perfect dental material for the treatment of compromised teeth. Gold, amalgam, composite resin, glass ionomer, and porcelain have been used. Tooth-like restorative materials (composite resin and porcelain) combined with an effective hard tissue bond have met the growing demand for esthetic or metal-free restorations in the past 15 to 20 years. However, none of those materials can fully mimic the unique properties of dentin (compliance and crack-stopping behavior) and enamel (wear resistance, function). The aim of this article is to report the restoration of an extensively damaged tooth with a natural restoration obtained by milling an extracted third molar tooth with a computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system. The main benefit of this novel technique is the replacement of lost tissues by actual enamel and dentin, with the potential to recover mechanical, esthetic, and biologic properties. The indication for extracting third molars and premolars because of impaction or for orthodontic reasons makes these posterior teeth readily available. The innovation of the method presented here is the optimal use of the extracted tooth substrate thanks to its positioning technique in the CAD/CAM milling chamber. PMID:24355511

  14. Measurement of resistance of amalgam mixes to condensation.

    PubMed

    Ogura, H; Hadavi, F; Asgar, K

    1983-08-01

    A method was designed to evaluate the resistance of amalgam mixes to condensation forces. For the purpose of classification with respect to the plasticity of amalgam, the optimum test condition was to apply 40 or 50 lb of static load at 30 sec after trituration. PMID:6575043

  15. Restorative material and other tooth-specific variables associated with the decision to repair or replace defective restorations: findings from The Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Gordan, Valeria V.; Riley, Joseph L.; Worley, Donald C.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Using data from dentists participating in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN), the study had 2 main objectives: (1) to identify and quantify the types of restorative materials in the existing failed restorations; and (2) to identify and quantify the materials used to repair or replace those failed restorations. Methods This cross-sectional study used a consecutive patient/restoration recruitment design. Practitioner-investigators recorded data on consecutive restorations in permanent teeth that needed repair or replacement. Data included the primary reason for repair or replacement, tooth surface(s) involved, restorative materials used, and patient demographics. Results Data for 9,875 restorations were collected from 7,502 patients in 197 practices for which 75% of restorations were replaced and 25% repaired. Most of the restorations that were either repaired or replaced were amalgam (56%) for which most (56%) of the material used was direct tooth-colored. The restorative material was 5 times more likely to be changed when the original restoration was amalgam (OR=5.2, p<.001). The likelihood of changing an amalgam restoration differed as a function of the tooth type (OR=3.0, p<.001), arch (OR=6.6, p<.001); and number of surfaces in the original restoration (OR=12.2, p<.001). Conclusion The probability of changing from amalgam to another restorative material differed with several characteristics of the original restoration. The change was most likely to take place when (1) the treatment was a replacement; (2) the tooth was not a molar; (3) the tooth was in the maxillary arch; and (4) the original restoration involved a single surface. PMID:22342563

  16. Durable bonds at the adhesive/dentin interface: an impossible mission or simply a moving target?

    PubMed Central

    SPENCER, Paulette; Jonggu PARK, Qiang YE; MISRA, Anil; BOHATY, Brenda S.; SINGH, Viraj; PARTHASARATHY, Ranga; SENE, Fábio; de Paiva GONÇALVES, Sérgio Eduardo; LAURENCE, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Composite restorations have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries and increased frequency of replacement as compared to dental amalgam. Penetration of bacterial enzymes, oral fluids, and bacteria into the crevices between the tooth and composite undermines the restoration and leads to recurrent decay and failure. The gingival margin of composite restora tions is particularly vulnerable to decay and at this margin, the adhesive and its seal to dentin provides the primary barrier between the prepared tooth and the environment. The intent of this article is to examine physico-chemical factors that affect the integrity and durability of the adhesive/dentin interfacial bond; and to explore how these factors act synergistically with mechanical forces to undermine the composite restoration. The article will examine the various avenues that have been pursued to address these problems and it will explore how alterations in material chemistry could address the detrimental impact of physico-chemical stresses on the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface. PMID:24855586

  17. An in vitro and in vivo study of the release of mercury vapor from different types of amalgam alloys.

    PubMed

    Berglund, A

    1993-05-01

    The aim of the in vitro part of the study was to measure the rate of release of mercury vapor from different types of dental amalgam in air, and in air during cyclic dipping into isotonic saline solution or Fusayama solution. The measurements were carried out by means of the Mercollector/Mercometer system, based on atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Both new (age approximately 2 months) and old (age approximately 1.5 years) amalgam specimens were studied. The variations in the rate of release of mercury vapor in air during cyclic dipping into aqueous media were most pronounced during the first day of the 10-day period studied. In air during cyclic dipping into the aqueous media, the conventional amalgam specimens released mercury vapor at lower rates over the whole period than did the dispersed and single-composition types studied. The aim of the in vivo part of the study was to determine the daily release of mercury vapor from amalgam restorations made of alloys of the same types and batches as those used in the in vitro part of the study. A series of measurements was carried out on each of eight subjects before and after amalgam therapy. None of the subjects was occupationally exposed to mercury. The subjects had to follow a standardized schedule for 24 h, where they ate, drank, and brushed their teeth at predetermined times (Berglund, 1990). The amount of mercury vapor released per time unit was measured at intervals of 30-45 min. Samples of urine and saliva were analyzed formercury.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8501292

  18. British Society of Prosthodontics Debate on the Implications of the Minamata Convention on Mercury to Dental Amalgam--Should our Patients be Worried?.

    PubMed

    Austin, Rupert; Eliyas, Shiyana; Burke, F J Trevor; Taylor, Phil; Toner, James; Briggs, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the Minamata Convention on Mercury called for a global phase-down of amalgam use, with a view to reduce environmental mercury pollution. This will significantly impact UK dentistry, given the still extensive use of amalgam in U.K. general dental practice. However, until now there has been little national discussion or debate. In Spring 2015, The British Society of Prosthodontics dedicated a significant part of its Annual Conference to debating the implications of this issue. Clinical case examples were discussed with audience interaction and voting facilitated using innovative Audience Response System Technology. A remarkable range of concerns and opinions were given. The debate elicited specific concerns amongst clinicians regarding the suitability of mercury-free alternatives to amalgam; particularly where cavities are large and extend beneath the gingival anatomy. There are also anecdotal reports of Dental Foundation (DF) dentists not being adequately taught the use of dental amalgam in undergraduate dental schools. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Many clinicians, especially those treating patients for whom moisture control is challenging, feel that amalgam should remain available for clinicians to choose in certain clinical circumstances for the restoration of posterior teeth, even in the event of a complete phase-down. PMID:27024898

  19. Effect of light-curing, pressure, oxygen inhibition, and heat on shear bond strength between bis-acryl provisional restoration and bis-acryl repair materials

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Ji-Suk; Lee, Jeong-Yol; Choi, Yeon-Jo; Shin, Sang-Wan

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to discover a way to increase the bond strength between bis-acryl resins, using a comparison of the shear bond strengths attained from bis-acryl resins treated with light curing, pressure, oxygen inhibition, and heat. MATERIALS AND METHODS Self-cured bis-acryl resin was used as both a base material and as a repair material. Seventy specimens were distributed into seven groups according to treatment methods: pressure - stored in a pressure cooker at 0.2 Mpa; oxygen inhibition- applied an oxygen inhibitor around the repaired material,; heat treatment - performed heat treatment in a dry oven at 60℃, 100℃, or 140℃. The shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine, and the shear bond strength (MPa) was calculated from the peak load of failure. A comparison of the bond strength between the repaired specimens was conducted using one-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison tests (α=.05). RESULTS There were no statistically significant differences in the shear bond strength between the control group and the light curing, pressure, and oxygen inhibition groups. However, the heat treatment groups showed statistically higher bond strengths than the groups treated without heat, and the groups treated at a higher temperature resulted in higher bond strengths. Statistically significant differences were seen between groups after different degrees of heat treatment, except in groups heated at 100℃ and 140℃. CONCLUSION Strong bonding can be achieved between a bis-acryl base and bis-acryl repair material after heat treatment. PMID:25722837

  20. A scanning transmission electron microscopy study of two dental amalgams.

    PubMed

    Williams, K R

    1983-10-01

    Two fully aged amalgam alloys were examined using a scanning transmission electron microscope both in the transmission and scanning mode. The dispersed type amalgam containing a distribution of silver-copper spheres in addition to the Ag3Sn powder showed a markedly reduced gamma 1 grain size compared to a conventional Ag3Sn type amalgam. It is suggested that the increased compressive creep strength of the dispersed type material is a direct result of the reduced gamma 1 grain size and not due to a dispersion hardening effect from the cores of the remaining Ag-Cu spheres. Similarly, the formation of complex Cu-Sn intermediate phases at the Ag-Cu sphere surfaces are unlikely to lead to a dispersion strengthening effect. It is postulated that the reduced grain size in high copper amalgams is a consequence of the enhanced nucleating effect of a copper based phase on gamma 1. PMID:6640049

  1. Mercury recovery in situ of four different dental amalgam separators.

    PubMed

    Hylander, Lars D; Lindvall, Anders; Uhrberg, Roland; Gahnberg, Lars; Lindh, Ulf

    2006-07-31

    Amalgam separators are used to physically remove dental amalgam from waste water in dental clinics. They are thereby supposed to reduce mercury (Hg) emissions to the municipal waste water system to acceptable levels. We here present results from a comparative study in situ of three amalgam separators available on the market, all with a claimed efficiency of 99% according to Danish and ISO protocols, and using sedimentation as the principle of separation. We also present corresponding data for an investigational prototype of an improved separator. The obtained efficiency of the three commercial separators is far below what is stated by the manufacturer and by authorities assumed to be the efficiency in clinical conditions. They reduced Hg emissions by 79 - 91%, leaving an average Hg content in outgoing waste water of 1.5 mg L(-1). However, the prototype separator participating in this study retained 99.9% of the waste water Hg emissions, leaving an average Hg content in outgoing waste water of 0.004 mg L(-1). Physical restrictions prohibit sedimentary type separators to recover the Hg fractions causing the largest damages in wastewater treatment plants. This fraction is not considered in the ISO protocol for testing amalgam separators, which therefore needs to be revised. Abolishing the use of dental amalgam and cleaning the tubing systems is the most efficient long-term solution to reduce Hg emissions from dental clinics. Until then, Hg emissions originating from placing, polishing or removing existing amalgam fillings, should be counteracted by the use of low-emission amalgam separators, already on the market or presently being developed for use alone or together with sedimentary type amalgam separators. PMID:16182343

  2. Teaching the placement of posterior resin-based composite restorations in Spanish dental schools

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Christopher; McConnell, Robert; Wilson, Nairn

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: In an area of esthetic dentistry such as posterior composites, in which new materials and techniques are being devolved continuously, it is important to confirm that dental students have a clear understanding of the basic principles of clinical application of this knowledge. Considering that the preparation of dental graduates in Spain may be of interest to competent dental authorities and employers with whom they can work worldwide, this study investigated the teaching of posterior composite restorations in Spanish dental schools. Study design: In late 2009⁄ early 2010, a questionnaire seeking information on the teaching of posterior composites was emailed to the professor responsible for teaching operative dentistry in each of the fifteen dental schools having complete undergraduate dental degree programs in Spain. Results: The response rate was 100%. Most investigated topics did not show noteworthy differences depending on whether the schools were public or private. Variations were found among Spanish dental schools in both the amount and content of the teaching programs concerning posterior composite restorations. Differences were recorded in the teaching of cavity design, contraindications to composite placement, indications for liners and bases, matrix and wedging techniques, composite and bonding systems, light curing and finishing procedures for composite restorations. More consistency was observed in teaching methods of moisture-control, indirect composites and amalgam bonding. Conclusions: As recommended in previously surveyed countries, efforts must be made to promote harmonization of dental curricula to make it easier for graduates to work elsewhere, and to ensure they meet the needs of their patients on entering independent practice. Key words:Aesthetic dentistry, composite restoration, dental education, teaching program, undergraduate dental student. PMID:22322491

  3. Backscattering from dental restorations and splint materials during therapeutic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, A.G.; Sharma, S.; George, D.I.; Wilson, D.; Dodd, D.; Figa, R.; Haskell, B.

    1985-08-01

    Models were constructed to simulate as closely as possible the human oral cavity. Radiation absorbed doses were determined for controls and various test situations involving the presence of dental restorative and splint materials during cobalt-60 irradiation of the models. Adjacent gold full crowns and adjacent solid dental silver amalgam cores both increased the dose to the interproximal gingivae by 20%. Use of orthodontic full bands for splinting the jaws increased the dose to the buccal tissues by an average of 10%. Augmentation of dose through backscatter radiation was determined to be only slight for intracoronal amalgam fillings and stainless steel or plastic bracket splints.

  4. Determination of ablation threshold for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, A. Z.; Freschi, L. R.; Samad, R. E.; Zezell, D. M.; Gouw-Soares, S. C.; Vieira, N. D., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    The use of laser for caries removal and cavity preparation is already a reality in the dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to consider the viability of ultrashort laser pulses for restorative material selective removal, by determining the ablation threshold fluence for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. Lasers pulses centered at 830 nm with 50 fs of duration and 1 kHz of repetition rate, with energies in the range of 300 to 770 μJ were used to irradiate the samples. The samples were irradiated using two different geometrical methods for ablation threshold fluence determinations and the volume ablation was measured by optical coherence tomography. The shape of the ablated surfaces were analyzed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The determined ablation threshold fluence is 0.35 J/cm2 for the composite resins Z-100 and Z-350, and 0.25 J/cm2 for the amalgam. These values are half of the value for enamel in this temporal regime. Thermal damages were not observed in the samples. Using the OCT technique (optical coherence tomography) was possible to determine the ablated volume and the total mass removed.

  5. The Chemical Forms of Mercury in Aged and Fresh Dental Amalgam Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    George, Graham N.; Singh, Satya P.; Hoover, Jay; Pickering, Ingrid J.

    2009-01-01

    Mercury-containing dental amalgam is known to be a source of human exposure to mercury. We have explored the use of electron-yield Hg LIII X-ray absorption spectroscopy to characterize the chemical nature of dental amalgam surfaces. We find that the method is practical, and that it shows extensive mercury depletion in the surface of the aged amalgam with significant differences between old and fresh amalgam surfaces. Whereas the fresh amalgam gives spectra that are typical of metallic mercury, the aged amalgam is predominantly β-mercuric sulfide. The toxicological implications of these results are discussed. PMID:19842619

  6. Conservative approach to restore the first molar with extensive destruction: A 30-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, Rafael Francisco; Azevedo, Larissa Marinho; Silva, Luciana Mendonça; Garrido, Ana Miriam; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; Mondelli, José

    2013-01-01

    The available options for restoring multiple surface cavities are: amalgam, composite resin, or indirect restorations. Adhesive system and intradentinal pin-retained composite resin restorations should have a similar performance to pin-retained amalgam, regarding resistance to support occlusal forces. Polymerization shrinkage is a major concern when performing direct posterior composite resin restorations and the incremental insertion technique can provide less stress and outstanding margin behavior. Intradentinal pins can potentially enhance composite resin's retention, while reducing gaps caused by polymerization shrinkage. This article reports a clinical case involving an extensive restoration on a posterior tooth with cusp loss that was successfully treated using an intradentinal pin and direct nano-hybrid composite resin restoration. PMID:23534051

  7. Longevity of posterior dental restorations and reasons for failure.

    PubMed

    Kopperud, Simen E; Tveit, Anne Bjørg; Gaarden, Torunn; Sandvik, Leiv; Espelid, Ivar

    2012-12-01

    Tooth-coloured restorative materials are being used increasingly more often in Class II preparations in permanent teeth. Using a practice-based study design, we aimed to assess the survival time of Class II restorations and to identify factors relevant to their longevity. Class II restorations (n = 4,030), consisting of resin composites (81.5%), compomers (12.7%), amalgams (4.6%), and glass-ionomer cement restorations (1.2%), were placed in 1,873 patients with a median age of 15 yr. In total, 92.7% of restorations were placed due to primary caries and 5.8% were replacements. After an average follow-up period of 4.6 yr, 61.6% of the restorations were successful, 11.2% had failed, and 27.2% were not available for evaluation (owing to patient drop-out). The mean annual failure rate was 2.9% for resin-composite restorations and 1.6% for amalgams. For resin-composite restorations, secondary caries was the most common reason for replacement (73.9%), followed by loss (8.0%), fracture (5.3%), and marginal defects (2.4%). Multilevel Cox-regression analyses identified young age of the patient, high previous caries experience, deep cavities, and saucer-shaped preparation technique as predisposing to shorter longevity of resin-composite restorations. One brand of resin composite had a shorter survival time than the others. PMID:23167471

  8. Microstructure in gold-containing Ag3Sn-amalgam.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, M L

    1976-01-01

    The present study was conducted in order to understand the microstructural characteristics in dental amalgam which consists of both spherical and irregular Ag3Sn alloy particles with gold substituted in varying amounts for silver (0, 9, and 15%). Spherical alloy particles were used as obtained from Western Gold and Platinum and irregular alloy particles were prepared in the laboratory and then employed in the present study. The amalgam was prepared from the alloy particles by the trituration and condensation method. The polished and etched samples were studied using the techniques of X-ray diffraction, optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. The microstructure in both types amalgam studied after two weeks of preparation contains gamma (unreacted Ag3Sn particles), gamma1 (Ag2Hg3), and gamma2 (Sn7-8Hg) phases in pure Ag3Sn-amalgam and gamma, gamma1, and (Au-Sn) phases in gold-containing amalgam. The The (Au-Sn) phase existed in the form of rings surrounding the gamma grains and acted as a barrier for mercury diffusion in Ag3Sn particles. PMID:1249092

  9. Mechanical Properties Comparing Composite Fiber Length to Amalgam

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.; Liu, Perng-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Photocure fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) with varying chopped quartz-fiber lengths were incorporated into a dental photocure zirconia-silicate particulate-filled composite (PFC) for mechanical test comparisons with a popular commercial spherical-particle amalgam. FRC lengths included 0.5-mm, 1.0 mm, 2.0 mm, and 3.0 mm all at a constant 28.2 volume percent. Four-point fully articulated fixtures were used according to American Standards Test Methods with sample dimensions of 2×2×50 mm3 across a 40 mm span to provide sufficient Euler flexural bending and prevent top-load compressive shear error. Mechanical properties for flexural strength, modulus, yield strength, resilience, work of fracture, critical strain energy release, critical stress intensity factor, and strain were obtained for comparison. Fiber length subsequently correlated with increasing all mechanical properties, p < 1.1×10−5. Although the modulus was significantly statistically higher for amalgam than all composites, all FRCs and even the PFC had higher values than amalgam for all other mechanical properties. Because amalgams provide increased longevity during clinical use compared to the standard PFCs, modulus would appear to be a mechanical property that might sufficiently reduce margin interlaminar shear stress and strain-related microcracking that could reduce failure rates. Also, since FRCs were tested with all mechanical properties that statistically significantly increased over the PFC, new avenues for future development could be provided toward surpassing amalgam in clinical longevity.

  10. Silver-tin alloys and amalgams: electrochemical considerations.

    PubMed

    Mueller, H J

    1980-01-01

    The corrosion potential and anodic polarization profiles of a representative number of silver-tin alloys and their corresponding amalgams in a physiological solution were determined and compared to their microstructures. For the alloys with tin-content greater than 27%(wt) and for all amalgams, the corrosion process is related to the attack of free tin for the alloys and to the gamma-2 tin for the amalgams. The gamma-2 concentration in the amalgams increases with an increase in tin-content. For alloys with tin-content less than 27%, the corrosion process is even more restricted than for the process observed with pure silver. From a developed theory based upon the potential-time and polarization results, association of the O2 reduction process on a SnO cathodic film to an intermediate specie of H2O2 is made. The rate of H2O2 decomposition on a SnO surface in a four electron process is thought to control the O2 reduction overvoltage. The O2 reduction overvoltage decreases with increases in the silver-content of the amalgam, particularily seen with the 8 and 12% tin compositions. Due to the polarization induced corrosion process, a phase with high silver and high mercury concentrations was observed over the unreacted particles. PMID:7362862

  11. Monte Carlo dose calculation in dental amalgam phantom.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Mohd Zahri Abdul; Yusoff, A L; Osman, N D; Abdullah, R; Rabaie, N A; Salikin, M S

    2015-01-01

    It has become a great challenge in the modern radiation treatment to ensure the accuracy of treatment delivery in electron beam therapy. Tissue inhomogeneity has become one of the factors for accurate dose calculation, and this requires complex algorithm calculation like Monte Carlo (MC). On the other hand, computed tomography (CT) images used in treatment planning system need to be trustful as they are the input in radiotherapy treatment. However, with the presence of metal amalgam in treatment volume, the CT images input showed prominent streak artefact, thus, contributed sources of error. Hence, metal amalgam phantom often creates streak artifacts, which cause an error in the dose calculation. Thus, a streak artifact reduction technique was applied to correct the images, and as a result, better images were observed in terms of structure delineation and density assigning. Furthermore, the amalgam density data were corrected to provide amalgam voxel with accurate density value. As for the errors of dose uncertainties due to metal amalgam, they were reduced from 46% to as low as 2% at d80 (depth of the 80% dose beyond Zmax) using the presented strategies. Considering the number of vital and radiosensitive organs in the head and the neck regions, this correction strategy is suggested in reducing calculation uncertainties through MC calculation. PMID:26500401

  12. Monte Carlo dose calculation in dental amalgam phantom

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Mohd. Zahri Abdul; Yusoff, A. L.; Osman, N. D.; Abdullah, R.; Rabaie, N. A.; Salikin, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    It has become a great challenge in the modern radiation treatment to ensure the accuracy of treatment delivery in electron beam therapy. Tissue inhomogeneity has become one of the factors for accurate dose calculation, and this requires complex algorithm calculation like Monte Carlo (MC). On the other hand, computed tomography (CT) images used in treatment planning system need to be trustful as they are the input in radiotherapy treatment. However, with the presence of metal amalgam in treatment volume, the CT images input showed prominent streak artefact, thus, contributed sources of error. Hence, metal amalgam phantom often creates streak artifacts, which cause an error in the dose calculation. Thus, a streak artifact reduction technique was applied to correct the images, and as a result, better images were observed in terms of structure delineation and density assigning. Furthermore, the amalgam density data were corrected to provide amalgam voxel with accurate density value. As for the errors of dose uncertainties due to metal amalgam, they were reduced from 46% to as low as 2% at d80 (depth of the 80% dose beyond Zmax) using the presented strategies. Considering the number of vital and radiosensitive organs in the head and the neck regions, this correction strategy is suggested in reducing calculation uncertainties through MC calculation. PMID:26500401

  13. Treatment of an endodontic perforation with a restoration and a root coverage gingival graft.

    PubMed

    Harris, R J

    1995-07-01

    This case report describes the treatment of a perforation on the facial surface of the maxillary right central incisor made during endodontic therapy. Treatment of this highly visible area required a creative approach to therapy. The perforation was repaired with an amalgam restoration. A connective tissue with partial thickness double pedicle graft was used to replace missing periodontal structures, cover the exposed root surface, and obscure from view, as much as possible, the amalgam restoration placed in the perforation. This unconventional therapy is offered as a possible treatment option when few or no other acceptable options exist. PMID:7562357

  14. Surface characterization of amalgam made with Hg-In liquid alloy.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, H; Akaiwa, Y; Hashimoto, H; Ferracane, J L; Okabe, T

    1997-01-01

    When amalgam was triturated with Hg-In liquid alloys instead of pure mercury, the resultant amalgams released a significantly smaller amount of mercury vapor during setting. To understand the mechanisms responsible for the drastic decrease in mercury evaporation from the In-containing amalgam, we used Auger Electron Spectroscopy to examine surface oxide films on amalgams made with Hg-10 wt% In or pure mercury. The surface of the In-containing amalgam was rapidly covered with both indium and tin oxide films. Greater amounts of oxygen were found on the gamma 1 Ag-Hg matrix in the In-containing amalgam than in the amalgam without indium. The rapid formation of the oxide film contributes to a reduction in the mercury release from the In-containing amalgam by forming an effective barrier to evaporation. PMID:9042085

  15. Integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless fluorescent lamp

    DOEpatents

    Borowiec, Joseph Christopher; Cocoma, John Paul; Roberts, Victor David

    1998-01-01

    An integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless SEF fluorescent lamp includes a wire mesh amalgam support constructed to jointly optimize positions of a starting amalgam and a running amalgam in the lamp, thereby optimizing mercury vapor pressure in the lamp during both starting and steady-state operation in order to rapidly achieve and maintain high light output. The wire mesh amalgam support is constructed to support the starting amalgam toward one end thereof and the running amalgam toward the other end thereof, and the wire mesh is rolled for friction-fitting within the exhaust tube of the lamp. The positions of the starting and running amalgams on the wire mesh are jointly optimized such that high light output is achieved quickly and maintained, while avoiding any significant reduction in light output between starting and running operation.

  16. Microstructure of dental amalgams containing high and low copper contents.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, M L; Asgar, K

    1977-12-01

    Microstructure of commercial dental alloys and their amalgams were studied primarily by x-ray diffraction, optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction revealed more phases than normally reported in these materials. Presence of new phase was discussed and their formation mechanism understood. Some phases having interacting 2 theta degrees values with others were properly identified. Both new and conventional dental alloys and their amalgams, namely Tytin, Sybraloy, Dispersalloy, Kerr Spheraloy, Caulk Spherical, Shofu Spherical, and Caulk 20th Century Microcut were used to complete the investigation. PMID:277466

  17. Assessment of Microleakage of Class V Composite Resin Restoration Following Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) Laser Conditioning and Acid Etching with Two Different Bonding Systems

    PubMed Central

    Arbabzadeh Zavareh, Farahnaz; Samimi, Pouran; Birang, Reza; Eskini, Massoumeh; Bouraima, Stephane Ayoub

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The use of laser for cavity preparation or conditioning of dentin and enamelsurfaces as an alternative for dental tissue acid-etch have increased in recent years. Theaim of this in vitro study was to compare microleakage at enamel-composite and dentincompositeinterfaces following Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet(Er:YAG) laserconditioning or acid-etching of enamel and dentin, hybridized with different bonding systems. Methods: Class V cavities were prepared on the lingual and buccal surfaces of 50 recentlyextracted intact human posterior teeth with occlusal margin in the enamel and gingival marginin the dentin. The cavities were randomly assigned to five groups: group1:conditioned withlaser (Energy=120mJ, Frequency=10Hz, Pulse duration=100μs for Enamel and Energy=80mJ,Frequency=10Hz, Pulse duration=100μs for Dentin) + Optibond FL, group2:conditioned withlaser + etching with 35% phosphoric acid + Optibond FL, group3:conditioned with laser+ Clearfil SE Bond, group 4 (control):acid etched with 35% phosphoric acid + OptibondFL, group 5 (control): Clearfil SE Bond. All cavities were restored using Point 4 compositeresin. All samples were stored in distilled water at 37°c for 24 h, then were thermocycled for500 cycles and immersed in 50% silver nitrate solution for 24 h. The teeth were sectionedbucco-lingually to evaluate the dye penetration. Kruskal-Wallis & Mann-Whitney testswere used for statistical analysis. Results: In occlusal margins, the least microleakage showed in groups 2, 4 and 5. Themaximum microleakage was observed in group 3 (P=0.009). In gingival margins, the leastmicroleakage was recorded in group2, while the most microleakage was found in group5 (P=0.001). Differences between 5 study groups were statistically significant (P<0.05).The microleakage scores were higher at the gingival margins. Conclusion: The use of the Er:YAG laser for conditioning with different dentin adhesivesystems influenced the marginal sealing of composite resin

  18. Dentists' restorative decision-making and implications for an 'amalgamless' profession. Part 2: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Alexander, G; Hopcraft, M S; Tyas, M J; Wong, R H K

    2014-12-01

    In some countries the use of amalgam has been restricted, and the dental profession may be forced into using alternatives to amalgam by a combination of public opinion and legislation, including the proposal that the material be 'phased-down'. The limited research that exists as to restorative decision-making is quantitative in nature and focuses on 'when' a restoration is placed. There is little qualitative research exploring 'why' a material is chosen. Purposive sampling of a representative group of dentists registered in Australia was carried out in two phases; initially six interviews followed by a focus group of six different participants who were audio-recorded. Qualitative data were analysed using computer aided qualitative data analysis software. The findings suggest that dentists' restorative decision-making is a complex interplay of factors. These may be categorized as 'clinical', 'knowledge', 'patient', 'practice type', 'biological' and 'environmental'. Use of amalgam is influenced by each of these to varying degrees. Quantitative analysis of the influences on restorative decision-making is recommended. While the potential future 'phase-down' of amalgam as a restorative material was of concern, there was a general sense of resignation or apathy to the matter. The implications for public health authorities, dental organizations and educators are noted. PMID:25091200

  19. Reaction of mercury with silver-tin dental amalgam alloy.

    PubMed

    Abbott, J R; Miller, D R; Netherway, D J

    1982-09-01

    Electron diffraction evidence confirming the ordered orthorhombic crystal structure of the gamma phase of the silver-tin system has been obtained, and it has been established by optical metallography that an alloy with a composition corresponding to the dental amalgam alloy formula Ag3Sn (i.e., 26.85 wt % Sn) lies outside the single gamma phase field and in the duplex (gamma + Sn) phase field adjacent to it. Studies of the mechanism of the hardening reaction of single crystals of homogeneous gamma phase alloys with mercury were carried out using both scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Mercury attack occurred preferentially along well-defined planes in the single crystals. Using electron channeling and trace analysis techniques these planes of preferential attack were found to be [010] and [011], and from transmission electron microscopy of thin foils these were shown to be slip bands and deformation twins, respectively. In bicrystals of gamma phase material, preferential attack also occurred along grain boundaries. Similar preferential mercury attack, leading to the development of deep planar intrusions into the gamma phase material, was observed in an experimental dental amalgam prepared from a lathe-cut homogeneous gamma phase amalgam alloy. It is believed that the presence of such features would have important implications for the clinical performance of dental amalgam. PMID:7130210

  20. The problem of motivating teaching staff in a complex amalgamation.

    PubMed

    Kenrick, M A

    1993-09-01

    This paper addresses some of the problems brought about by the merger of a number of schools of nursing into a new complex amalgamation. A very real concern in the new colleges of nursing and midwifery in the United Kingdom is the effect of amalgamation on management systems and staff morale. The main focus of this paper is the motivation of staff during this time of change. There is currently a lack of security amongst staff and in many instances the personal job satisfaction of nurse teachers and managers of nurse education has been reduced, which has made the task of motivating staff difficult. Hence, two major theories of motivation and the implications of these theories for managers of nurse education are discussed. The criteria used for the selection of managers within the new colleges, leadership styles and organizational structures are reviewed. The amalgamations have brought about affiliation with higher-education institutions. Some problems associated with these mergers and the effects on the motivation of staff both within the higher-education institutions and the nursing colleges are outlined. Strategies for overcoming some of the problems are proposed including job enlargement, job enrichment, potential achievement rewards and the use of individual performance reviews which may be useful for assessing the ability of all staff, including managers, in the new amalgamations. PMID:8258610

  1. Test of Picture-Text Amalgams in Procedural Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, David Edey

    Designed to assess how people read and comprehend information presented in picture-text amalgams in procedural texts, this instrument presents various combinations of text information and illustrative information on slides. Subjects are assigned to one of four conditions and directed to follow the instructions presented on the slides. Videotapes…

  2. Solidification/Stabilization of Elemental Mercury Waste by Amalgamation

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, S. P.; Ahn, B. G.; Lee, H. J.; Shon, J. S.; Chung, H.; Kim, K. J.; Lee, C. K.

    2003-02-24

    Experiments on solidification of elemental mercury waste were conducted by amalgamation with several metal powders such as copper, zinc, tin, brass and bronze. Unlike the previous studies which showed a dispersible nature after solidification, the waste forms were found to possess quite large compressive strengths in both copper and bronze amalgam forms. The durability was also confirmed by showing very minor changes of strength after 90 days of water immersion. Leachability from the amalgam forms is also shown to be low: measured mercury concentration in the leachate by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was well below the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) limit. Long term leaching behavior by Accelerated Leach Test (ALT) has shown that the leaching process was dominated by diffusion and the effective diffusion coefficient was quite low (around 10-19 cm2/sec). The mercury vapor concentration from the amalgam forms were reduced to a 20% level of that for elemental mercury and to one-hundredth after 3 months.

  3. An estimate for the rank of the intersection of subgroups in free amalgamated products of two groups with normal finite amalgamated subgroup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Alexander O.

    2013-02-01

    We generalize the estimate for the rank of intersection of subgroups in free products of groups, proved earlier by Ivanov and Dicks (which is analogous to the Hanna Neumann inequality in free groups) to the case of free amalgamated products of groups with normal finite amalgamated subgroup. We also prove that the estimate obtained is sharp and cannot be further improved when the amalgamated product contains an involution. Bibliography: 11 titles.

  4. An estimate for the rank of the intersection of subgroups in free amalgamated products of two groups with normal finite amalgamated subgroup

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, Alexander O

    2013-02-28

    We generalize the estimate for the rank of intersection of subgroups in free products of groups, proved earlier by Ivanov and Dicks (which is analogous to the Hanna Neumann inequality in free groups) to the case of free amalgamated products of groups with normal finite amalgamated subgroup. We also prove that the estimate obtained is sharp and cannot be further improved when the amalgamated product contains an involution. Bibliography: 11 titles.

  5. Management of large radicular cyst associated with amalgam particles in cystic lining.

    PubMed

    Borkar, Swati A; Dhupar, Vikas; Gadkar, Abhilasha M; Nivedita, C K V S

    2016-01-01

    The failure of amalgam retrofilling and presence of an associated cystic lesion makes surgical endodontic intervention inevitable. Amalgam retrofilling can also give rise to mucoperiosteal tattoo formation and allow incorporation of amalgam particles in the cystic lining. Such a finding has not yet been reported in the endodontic literature. This case report describes the successful endodontic management of a large radicular cyst associated with failed amalgam retrofilling, mucoperiosteal tattoo and amalgam particles dispersed in the epithelial cystic lining. All four mandibular incisors associated with the lesion presented with Weine Type II canal anatomy. The follow-up revealed clinical and radiographic signs of healing. PMID:27217645

  6. Management of large radicular cyst associated with amalgam particles in cystic lining

    PubMed Central

    Borkar, Swati A.; Dhupar, Vikas; Gadkar, Abhilasha M.; Nivedita, C.K.V.S.

    2016-01-01

    The failure of amalgam retrofilling and presence of an associated cystic lesion makes surgical endodontic intervention inevitable. Amalgam retrofilling can also give rise to mucoperiosteal tattoo formation and allow incorporation of amalgam particles in the cystic lining. Such a finding has not yet been reported in the endodontic literature. This case report describes the successful endodontic management of a large radicular cyst associated with failed amalgam retrofilling, mucoperiosteal tattoo and amalgam particles dispersed in the epithelial cystic lining. All four mandibular incisors associated with the lesion presented with Weine Type II canal anatomy. The follow-up revealed clinical and radiographic signs of healing. PMID:27217645

  7. Reasons for Placement of Restorations on Previously Unrestored Tooth Surfaces by Dental PBRN Dentists

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Marcelle M.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Qvist, Vibeke; Litaker, Mark S.; Rindal, D. Brad; Williams, O.D.; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Ritchie, Lloyd K.; Mjör, Ivar A.; McClelland, Jocelyn; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify and quantify the reasons for placing restorations on unrestored permanent tooth surfaces and the dental materials used by Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN; www.DentalPBRN.org) dentists. Methods A total of 229 DPBRN practitioner-investigators collected data on 9,890 consecutive restorations from 5,810 patients. Information included: (1) reasons for restoring; (2) tooth and surfaces restored; and (3) restorative materials employed. Results Primary caries (85%) and non-carious defects (15%), which included abrasion/ abfraction/ erosion lesions and tooth fracture, were the main reasons for placement of restorations. Restorations due to caries were frequently placed on occlusal surfaces (49%), followed by distal, mesial, buccal/facial, lingual/palatal, and incisal surfaces. Amalgam was used for 46% of the molar and 45% of the premolar restorations. Directly placed resin-based composite (RBC) was used for 48% of the molar, 49% of the premolar, and 92% of the anterior restorations. Conclusion Dental caries on occlusal and proximal surfaces of molar teeth are the main reasons for placing restorations on previously unrestored tooth surfaces by DPBRN practitioner-investigators. RBC is the material most commonly used for occlusal and anterior restorations. Amalgam remains the material of choice to restore proximal caries in posterior teeth, although there are significant differences by DPBRN region. PMID:20354094

  8. Exploiting the higher specificity of silver amalgamation: selective detection of mercury(II) by forming Ag/Hg amalgam.

    PubMed

    Deng, Li; Ouyang, Xiangyuan; Jin, Jianyu; Ma, Cheng; Jiang, Ying; Zheng, Jing; Li, Jishan; Li, Yinhui; Tan, Weihong; Yang, Ronghua

    2013-09-17

    Heavy metal ion pollution poses severe risks in human health and the environment. Driven by the need to detect trace amounts of mercury, this article demonstrates, for the first time, that silver/mercury amalgamation, combining with DNA-protected silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), can be used for rapid, easy and reliable screening of Hg(2+) ions with high sensitivity and selectivity over competing analytes. In our proposed approach, Hg(2+) detection is achieved by reducing the mercury species to elemental mercury, silver atoms were chosen as the mercury atoms' acceptors by forming Ag/Hg amalgam. To signal fluorescently this silver amalgamation event, a FAM-labeled ssDNA was employed as the signal reporter. AgNPs were grown on the DNA strand that resulted in greatly quenching the FAM fluorescence. Formation of Ag/Hg amalgam suppresses AgNPs growth on the DNA, leading to fluorescence signal increase relative to the fluorescence without Hg(2+) ions, as well as marked by fluorescence quenching. This FAM fluorescence enhancement can be used for detection of Hg(2+) at the a few nanomolar level. Moreover, due to excellent specificity of silver amalgamation with mercury, the sensing system is highly selective for Hg(2+) and does not respond to other metal ions with up to millimolar concentration levels. This sensor is successfully applied to determination of Hg(2+) in tap water, spring water and river water samples. The results shown herein have important implications in the development of new fluorescent sensors for the fast, easy, and selective detection and quantification of Hg(2+) in environmental and biological samples. PMID:23937672

  9. Mercury vapour exposure during dental student training in amalgam removal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Amalgam that is used for dental fillings contains approximately 50% elemental mercury. During dental student training, amalgam is often removed by drilling without the use of water spray and suction, which are protective measures in preventing mercury aerosol. In this study we measured mercury vapor levels in ambient air during amalgam removal as is typically performed in dental training. Methods Mercury vapor levels in ambient air were measured in a dental school laboratory during removal of amalgam fillings from artificial teeth set into a dental jaw simulator. Mercury vapor was measured under three conditions (25 measurements each): with the simultaneous use of water spray and suction, with the use of suction only, and with the use of neither suction nor water spray. These three conditions are all used during dental student training. Results were compared to Alberta occupational exposure limits for mercury vapor in order to assess potential occupational risk to students. Analysis of variance testing was used to compare data obtained under the three conditions. Results When water spray and suction were used, mercury vapor levels ranged from 4.0 to 19.0 μg/m3 (arithmetic mean = 8.0 μg/m3); when suction only was used, mercury vapor levels ranged from 14.0 to 999.0 (999.0 μg/m3 represents the high limit detection of the Jerome analyzer) (arithmetic mean = 141.0 μg/m3); when neither suction nor water was used, the vapor levels ranged from 34.0 to 796.0 μg/m3 (arithmetic mean = 214.0 μg/m3). Conclusions The Alberta Occupational Health and Safety threshold limit value for mercury vapor over an eight-hour time-weighted period is 25.0 μg/m3. The absolute ceiling for mercury vapor, not to be exceeded at any time, is 125.0 μg/m3. When both water spray and suction were used, mercury vapor levels were consistently below this threshold. When suction without water spray was used, mercury vapor levels exceeded the safety threshold 8% of

  10. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen. PMID:12412967