Sample records for bone cell cultures

  1. Long-Term Culture of Human Bone Marrow Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suzanne Gartner; Henry S. Kaplan

    1980-01-01

    A method has been described for the long-term culture of human bone marrow cells in liquid medium. Hematopoiesis, as measured by the production of granulocytic-macrophage progenitor cells (CFUc), continued for at least 20 weeks and was dependent upon the presence of a marrow-derived adherent layer of cells. As in the case of murine marrow liquid cultures, the adherent layer consisted

  2. The Effect of Spaceflight on Bone Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the response of bone to mechanical loading (unloading) is extremely important in defining the means of adaptation of the body to a variety of environmental conditions such as during heightened physical activity or in extended explorations of space or the sea floor. The mechanisms of the adaptive response of bone are not well defined, but undoubtedly they involve changes occurring at the cellular level of bone structure. This proposal has intended to examine the hypothesis that the loading (unloading) response of bone is mediated by specific cells through modifications of their activity cytoskeletal elements, and/or elaboration of their extracellular matrices. For this purpose, this laboratory has utilized the results of a number of previous studies defining molecular biological, biochemical, morphological, and ultrastructural events of the reproducible mineralization of a primary bone cell (osteoblast) culture system under normal loading (1G gravity level). These data and the culture system then were examined following the use of the cultures in two NASA shuttle flights, STS-59 and STS-63. The cells collected from each of the flights were compared to respective synchronous ground (1G) control cells examined as the flight samples were simultaneously analyzed and to other control cells maintained at 1G until the time of shuttle launch, at which point they were terminated and studied (defined as basal cells). Each of the cell cultures was assayed in terms of metabolic markers- gene expression; synthesis and secretion of collagen and non-collagenous proteins, including certain cytoskeletal components; assembly of collagen into macrostructural arrays- formation of mineral; and interaction of collagen and mineral crystals during calcification of the cultures. The work has utilized a combination of biochemical techniques (radiolabeling, electrophoresis, fluorography, Western and Northern Blotting, and light microscopic immunofluorescence) and structural methods (conventional and high voltage electron microscopy, inununocytochemistry, stereomicroscopy, and 3D image reconstruction). The studies have provided new knowledge of aspects of bone cell development and structural regulation, extracellular matrix assembly, and mineralization during spaceflight and under normal gravity. The information has contributed to insights into the means in general by which cells respond and adapt to different conditions of gravity (loading). The data may as well have suggested an underlying basis for the observed loss of bone by vertebrates, including man, in microgravity; and these scientific results may have implications for understanding bone loss following fracture healing and extended periods of inactivity such as during long-term bedrest.

  3. Comparisons of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Primary Adherent Culture of Compact Bone Fragments and Whole Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yiting; Liu, Tianshu; Fang, Fang; Xiong, Chengliang; Shen, Shiliang

    2015-01-01

    The purification of mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) by using the standard method of whole bone marrow adherence to plastic still remains ineffective. An increasing number of studies have indicated compact bone as an alternative source of BMSCs. We isolated BMSCs from cultured compact bone fragments and investigated the proliferative capacity, surface immunophenotypes, and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiations of the cells after the first trypsinization. The fragment culture was based on the fact that BMSCs were assembled in compact bones. Thus, the procedure included flushing bone marrow out of bone cavity and culturing the fragments without any collagenase digestion. The cell yield from cultured fragments was slightly less than that from cultured bone marrow using the same bone quantity. However, the trypsinized cells from cultured fragments exhibited significantly higher proliferation and were accompanied with more CD90 and CD44 expressions and less CD45 expression. The osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation capacity of cells from cultured fragments were better than those of cells from bone marrow. The directly adherent culture of compact bone is suitable for mouse BMSC isolation, and more BMSCs with potentially improved proliferation capacity can be obtained in the primary culture.

  4. Expansion of Endothelial Progenitor Cells in High Density Dot Culture of Rat Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Kretlow, James D.; Zhou, Guangdong; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wen Jie

    2014-01-01

    In vitro expansion of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) remains a challenge in stem cell research and its application. We hypothesize that high density culture is able to expand EPCs from bone marrow by mimicking cell-cell interactions of the bone marrow niche. To test the hypothesis, rat bone marrow cells were either cultured in high density (2×105 cells/cm2) by seeding total 9×105 cells into six high density dots or cultured in regular density (1.6×104 cells/cm2) with the same total number of cells. Flow cytometric analyses of the cells cultured for 15 days showed that high density cells exhibited smaller cell size and higher levels of marker expression related to EPCs when compared to regular density cultured cells. Functionally, these cells exhibited strong angiogenic potentials with better tubal formation in vitro and potent rescue of mouse ischemic limbs in vivo with their integration into neo-capillary structure. Global gene chip and ELISA analyses revealed up-regulated gene expression of adhesion molecules and enhanced protein release of pro-angiogenic growth factors in high density cultured cells. In summary, high density cell culture promotes expansion of bone marrow contained EPCs that are able to enhance tissue angiogenesis via paracrine growth factors and direct differentiation into endothelial cells. PMID:25254487

  5. Early expression of bone matrix proteins in osteogenic cell cultures.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Paulo Tambasco; Zalzal, Sylvia Francis; Irie, Kazuharu; Nanci, Antonio

    2003-05-01

    Osteogenic cells express some matrix proteins at early culture intervals. The aim of this study was to determine if, and in what proportion, cells used for plating contain bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteopontin (OPN), two matrix proteins associated with initial events in bone formation. Their pattern of expression, as well as that of fibronectin (FN) and type I pro-collagen, was also examined at 6 hr and at 1 and 3 days. The cells were obtained by enzymatic digestion of newborn rat calvariae, and grown on glass coverslips. Cytocentrifuge preparations of isolated cells and coverslips were processed for single or dual immunolabeling with monoclonal and/or polyclonal primary antibodies, followed by fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies. The cell labeling was mainly associated with perinuclear elements. OPN was also distinctively found at peripheral cytoplasmic sites. About 31% of isolated cells were OPN-positive and 18% were BSP-positive. After 1 day, almost 50% of cells were immunoreactive for OPN and for type I pro-collagen, and still less than 20% reacted for BSP. Approximately 7% exhibited peripheral staining for OPN. Almost all cells were associated with extracellular FN. However, only 15% showed intracellular labeling. These results indicate that an important proportion of cells used for plating contain BSP and OPN, a situation that should be taken into consideration in experimental analyses of osteoblast activity in vitro. PMID:12704211

  6. Spaceflight effects on cultured embryonic chick bone cells.

    PubMed

    Landis, W J; Hodgens, K J; Block, D; Toma, C D; Gerstenfeld, L C

    2000-06-01

    A model calcifying system of primary osteoblast cell cultures derived from normal embryonic chicken calvaria has been flown aboard the shuttle, Endeavour, during the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) mission STS-59 (April 9-20, 1994) to characterize unloading and other spaceflight effects on the bone cells. Aliquots of cells (approximately 7 x 10(6)) grown in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) + 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) were mixed with microcarrier beads, inoculated into cartridge culture units of artificial hollow fiber capillaries, and carried on the shuttle. To promote cell differentiation, cartridge media were supplemented with 12.5 microg/ml ascorbate and 10 mM beta-glycerophosphate for varying time periods before and during flight. Four cartridges contained cells from 17-day-old embryos grown for 5 days in the presence of ascorbate prior to launch (defined as flight cells committed to the osteoblastic lineage) and four cartridges supported cells from 14-day-old embryos grown for 10 days with ascorbate before launch (uncommitted flight cells). Eight cartridges prepared in the same manner were maintained under normal gravity throughout the flight (control cells) and four additional identical cartridges under normal gravity were terminated on the day of launch (basal cells). From shuttle launch to landing, all cartridges were contained in closed hardware units maintaining 5% CO2, 37 degrees C, and media delivery at a rate of approximately 1.5 ml/6 h. During day 3 and day 5 of flight, duplicate aliquots of conditioned media and accumulated cell products were collected in both the flight and the control hardware units. At the mission end, comparisons among flight, basal, and control samples were made in cell metabolism, gene expression for type I collagen and osteocalcin, and ultrastructure. Both committed and uncommitted flight cells were metabolically active, as measured by glucose uptake and lactate production, at approximately the same statistical levels as control counterparts. Flight cells elaborated a less extensive extracellular matrix, evidenced by a reduced collagen gene expression and collagen protein appearance compared with controls. Osteocalcin was expressed by all cells, a result indicating progressive differentiation of both flight and control osteoblasts, but its message levels also were reduced in flight cells compared with ground samples. This finding suggested that osteoblasts subjected to flight followed a slower progression toward a differentiated function. The summary of data indicates that spaceflight, including microgravity exposure, demonstrably affects bone cells by down-regulating type I collagen and osteocalcin gene expression and thereby inhibiting expression of the osteogenic phenotype notably by committed osteoblasts. The information is important for insight into the response of bone cells to changes of gravity and of force in general. PMID:10841178

  7. Spaceflight effects on cultured embryonic chick bone cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Hodgens, K. J.; Block, D.; Toma, C. D.; Gerstenfeld, L. C.

    2000-01-01

    A model calcifying system of primary osteoblast cell cultures derived from normal embryonic chicken calvaria has been flown aboard the shuttle, Endeavour, during the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) mission STS-59 (April 9-20, 1994) to characterize unloading and other spaceflight effects on the bone cells. Aliquots of cells (approximately 7 x 10(6)) grown in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) + 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) were mixed with microcarrier beads, inoculated into cartridge culture units of artificial hollow fiber capillaries, and carried on the shuttle. To promote cell differentiation, cartridge media were supplemented with 12.5 microg/ml ascorbate and 10 mM beta-glycerophosphate for varying time periods before and during flight. Four cartridges contained cells from 17-day-old embryos grown for 5 days in the presence of ascorbate prior to launch (defined as flight cells committed to the osteoblastic lineage) and four cartridges supported cells from 14-day-old embryos grown for 10 days with ascorbate before launch (uncommitted flight cells). Eight cartridges prepared in the same manner were maintained under normal gravity throughout the flight (control cells) and four additional identical cartridges under normal gravity were terminated on the day of launch (basal cells). From shuttle launch to landing, all cartridges were contained in closed hardware units maintaining 5% CO2, 37 degrees C, and media delivery at a rate of approximately 1.5 ml/6 h. During day 3 and day 5 of flight, duplicate aliquots of conditioned media and accumulated cell products were collected in both the flight and the control hardware units. At the mission end, comparisons among flight, basal, and control samples were made in cell metabolism, gene expression for type I collagen and osteocalcin, and ultrastructure. Both committed and uncommitted flight cells were metabolically active, as measured by glucose uptake and lactate production, at approximately the same statistical levels as control counterparts. Flight cells elaborated a less extensive extracellular matrix, evidenced by a reduced collagen gene expression and collagen protein appearance compared with controls. Osteocalcin was expressed by all cells, a result indicating progressive differentiation of both flight and control osteoblasts, but its message levels also were reduced in flight cells compared with ground samples. This finding suggested that osteoblasts subjected to flight followed a slower progression toward a differentiated function. The summary of data indicates that spaceflight, including microgravity exposure, demonstrably affects bone cells by down-regulating type I collagen and osteocalcin gene expression and thereby inhibiting expression of the osteogenic phenotype notably by committed osteoblasts. The information is important for insight into the response of bone cells to changes of gravity and of force in general.

  8. Cadmium stimulates osteoclast-like multinucleated cell formation in mouse bone marrow cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, Tatsuro; Takata, Masakazu; Miyata, Masaki; Nagai, Miyuki; Sugure, Akemi; Kozuka, Hiroshi; Kuze, Shougo (Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan))

    1991-08-01

    Most of cadmium (Cd)-treated animals have been reported to show osteoporosis-like changes in bones. This suggests that Cd may promote bone loss by a direct action on bone. It was found that Cd stimulated prostaglandin E{sub 2}(PGE{sub 2}) production in the osteoblast-like cell, MC3T3-E1. Therefore, Cd stimulates bone resorption by increasing PGE{sub 2} production. Recently, several bone marrow cell culture systems have been developed for examining the formation of osteoclast-like multinucleated cells in vitro. As osteoblasts produce PGE{sub 2} by Cd-induced cyclooxygenase and may play an important role in osteoclast formation, the present study was undertaken to clarify the possibility that Cd might stimulate osteoclast formation in a mouse bone marrow culture system.

  9. The Impairment of Osteogenesis in Bone Sialoprotein (BSP) Knockout Calvaria Cell Cultures Is Cell Density Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bouet, Guenaelle; Bouleftour, Wafa; Juignet, Laura; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Thomas, Mireille; Vanden-Bossche, Arnaud; Aubin, Jane E.; Vico, Laurence; Marchat, David; Malaval, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) belongs to the "small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoprotein" (SIBLING) family, whose members interact with bone cells and bone mineral. BSP is strongly expressed in bone and we previously showed that BSP knockout (BSP-/-) mice have a higher bone mass than wild type (BSP+/+) littermates, with lower bone remodelling. Because baseline bone formation activity is constitutively lower in BSP-/- mice, we studied the impact of the absence of BSP on in vitro osteogenesis in mouse calvaria cell (MCC) cultures. MCC BSP-/- cultures exhibit fewer fibroblast (CFU-F), preosteoblast (CFU-ALP) and osteoblast colonies (bone nodules) than wild type, indicative of a lower number of osteoprogenitors. No mineralized colonies were observed in BSP-/- cultures, along with little/no expression of either osteogenic markers or SIBLING proteins MEPE or DMP1. Osteopontin (OPN) is the only SIBLING expressed in standard density BSP-/- culture, at higher levels than in wild type in early culture times. At higher plating density, the effects of the absence of BSP were partly rescued, with resumed expression of osteoblast markers and cognate SIBLING proteins, and mineralization of the mutant cultures. OPN expression and amount are further increased in high density BSP-/- cultures, while PHEX and CatB expression are differentiatlly regulated in a manner that may favor mineralization. Altogether, we found that BSP regulates mouse calvaria osteoblast cell clonogenicity, differentiation and activity in vitro in a cell density dependent manner, consistent with the effective skeletogenesis but the low levels of bone formation observed in vivo. The BSP knockout bone microenvironment may alter the proliferation/cell fate of early osteoprogenitors. PMID:25710686

  10. In vitro generation of equine osteoclasts from bone marrow cells using a novel culture system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. W. Gray; M. E. Davies; L. B. Jeffcott

    1998-01-01

    We report on preliminary results of a novel in vitro culture system designed to generate equine osteoclasts in large numbers. Osteoclast generation, as determined by the expression of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and ability to resorb bone, was enhanced in equine bone marrow cultures supplemented with fibroblastic cell (L929) conditioned medium (L929-CM). Bone marrow was collected from a total

  11. Heterotransplantation of the cultured cell from a human giant cell tumour of bone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shohei Manabe; Buhei Takase; Yasuaki Yamazaki; Hiroshi Miaki; Shiro Yamauchi

    1978-01-01

    We have transplanted cultured cells derived from a human giant cell tumour of bone (G-1 cell) into immunologically suppressed mice. The resulting growths were morphologically and cytokinetically analyzed. We have obtained information on the cytokinetic influences of anti-cancer agents on heterotransplanted tumours using the double labelling method.

  12. Long-term culture of leukemic bone marrow primary cells in biomimetic osteoblast niche

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Li Hou; Ting Liu; Jing Tan; Wentong Meng; Li Deng; Hongtao Yu; Xingli Zou; Yuchun Wang

    2009-01-01

    We constructed a “biomimetic osteoblast niche” with bio-derived bone as a scaffold, on which we seeded marrow mesenchymal\\u000a stem cells (MSCs) from CML patients, and induced the MSCs to differentiate into osteoblasts. Bone marrow mononuclear cells\\u000a from CML patients were cultured in the biomimetic niche (3D culture system) or a 2D culture system with the induced MSCs\\/osteoblasts\\u000a as a feeder

  13. Growth and Maintenance of Human Giant-cell Bone Tumors (Osteoclastomas) in Continuous Culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Gallardo; Eugenia S. de Lustig; F. Schajowicz

    1970-01-01

    Tissue culture of six human giant cell tumors of bone was undertaken (one on two occasions). All of them were cultivated successfully. Five cultures have shown outgrowth in about 25 days. In the remaining two cases continuous culture (nine generations) was successfully carried out. From this study the following results were obtained: the giant cells usually persist for about 48

  14. Mitosis in Tissue Cultures of Human Giant Cell Tumors of Bone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Graciela Duran Troise; Eugenia S. de Lustig; F. Schajowicz; H. Gallardo

    1973-01-01

    In in vitro tissue cultures of human bone tumors (osteoclastomas, chondroblastomas) containing numerous multinucleated cells, the finding of tri-, quadri- and other types of multipolar mitosis has been studied. The presence of multipolar mitosis in the cultures and its role in the formation of multinucleated cells suggest the existence of a combined mechanism of mitosis and fusion for the formation

  15. Vascularized Bone Tissue Formation Induced by Fiber-Reinforced Scaffolds Cultured with Osteoblasts and Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinhui; Zhang, Guoping; Hou, Chuanyong; Wang, Hua; Yang, Yelin; Guan, Guoping; Dong, Wei; Gao, Hongyang

    2013-01-01

    The repair of the damaged bone tissue caused by damage or bone disease was still a problem. Current strategies including the use of autografts and allografts have the disadvantages, namely, diseases transmission, tissue availability and donor morbidity. Bone tissue engineering has been developed and regarded as a new way of regenerating bone tissues to repair or substitute damaged or diseased ones. The main limitation in engineering in vitro tissues is the lack of a sufficient blood vessel system, the vascularization. In this paper, a new-typed hydroxyapatite/collagen composite scaffold which was reinforced by chitosan fibers and cultured with osteoblasts and endothelial cells was fabricated. General observation, histological observation, detection of the degree of vascularization, and X-ray examination had been done to learn the effect of vascularized bone repair materials on the regeneration of bone. The results show that new vessel and bone formed using implant cultured with osteoblasts and endothelial cells. Nanofiber-reinforced scaffold cultured with osteoblasts and endothelial cells can induce vascularized bone tissue formation. PMID:24369019

  16. Bone tissue engineering with a collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold and culture expanded bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Villa, Max M; Wang, Liping; Huang, Jianping; Rowe, David W; Wei, Mei

    2015-02-01

    Osteoprogenitor cells combined with supportive biomaterials represent a promising approach to advance the standard of care for bone grafting procedures. However, this approach faces challenges, including inconsistent bone formation, cell survival in the implant, and appropriate biomaterial degradation. We have developed a collagen-hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold that supports consistent osteogenesis by donor-derived osteoprogenitors, and is more easily degraded than a pure ceramic scaffold. Herein, the material properties are characterized as well as cell attachment, viability, and progenitor distribution in vitro. Furthermore, we examined the biological performance in vivo in a critical-size mouse calvarial defect. To aid in the evaluation of the in-house collagen-HA scaffold, the in vivo performance was compared with a commercial collagen-HA scaffold (Healos(®) , Depuy). The in-house collagen-HA scaffold supported consistent bone formation by predominantly donor-derived osteoblasts, nearly completely filling a 3.5 mm calvarial defect with bone in all samples (n?=?5) after 3 weeks of implantation. In terms of bone formation and donor cell retention at 3 weeks postimplantation, no statistical difference was found between the in-house and commercial scaffold following quantitative histomorphometry. The collagen-HA scaffold presented here is an open and well-defined platform that supports robust bone formation and should facilitate the further development of collagen-hydroxyapatite biomaterials for bone tissue engineering. PMID:24909953

  17. A comparison of bioreactors for culture of fetal mesenchymal stem cells for bone tissue engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhi-Yong Zhang; Swee Hin Teoh; Erin Yiling Teo; Mark Seow Khoon Chong; Chong Woon Shin; Foo Toon Tien; Mahesh A. Choolani; Jerry K. Y. Chan

    2010-01-01

    Bioreactors provide a dynamic culture system for efficient exchange of nutrients and mechanical stimulus necessary for the generation of effective tissue engineered bone grafts (TEBG). We have shown that biaxial rotating (BXR) bioreactor-matured human fetal mesenchymal stem cell (hfMSC) mediated-TEBG can heal a rat critical sized femoral defect. However, it is not known whether optimal bioreactors exist for bone TE

  18. Regulation of heme metabolism in normal and sideroblastic bone marrow cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Ibraham, N.G.; Lutton, J.D.; Hoffman, R.; Levere, R.D.

    1985-05-01

    Heme metabolism was examined in developing in vitro erythroid colonies (CFUE) and in bone marrow samples taken directly from four normal donors and four patients with sideroblastic anemia. Maximum activities of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS), ALA dehydratase (ALAD), and /sup 14/C-ALA incorporation into heme were achieved in normal marrow CFUE after 8 days of culture, whereas heme oxygenase progressively decreased to low levels of activity during the same period. Assays on nucleated bone marrow cells taken directly from patients revealed that ALAS activity was considerably reduced in idiopathic sideroblastic anemia (IASA) and X-linked sideroblastic anemia (X-SA) bone marrow specimens, whereas the activity increased more than twofold (normal levels) when cells were assayed from 8-day CFUE. In all cases, ALAD activity appeared to be within normal levels. Measurement of heme synthesis revealed that normal levels of /sup 14/C-ALA incorporation into heme were achieved in IASA cells but were reduced in X-SA cells. In marked contrast to levels in normal cells, heme oxygenase was found to be significantly elevated (two- to fourfold) in bone marrow cells taken directly from patients with IASA and X-SA. Results from this study demonstrate that IASA and X-SA bone marrow cells have disturbances in ALAS and heme metabolism, and that erythropoiesis (CFUE) can be restored to normal levels when cells are cultured in methylcellulose.

  19. Bone culture research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Nicola C.

    1993-01-01

    The experiments described are aimed at exploring PTH regulation of production of collagenase and protein inhibitors of collagenase (tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases, TIMP-1 and -2) by osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells under conditions of weightlessness. The results of this work will contribute to information as to whether a microgravity environment alters the functions and responsiveness of the osteoblast. The objectives of the Bone Culture Research (BCR) experiment are: to observe the effects of microgravity on the morphology, rate of proliferation, and behavior of the osteoblastic cells, UMR 106-01; to determine whether microgravy affects the hormonal sensitivity of osteroblastic cells; and to measure the secretion of collagenase and its inhibitors into the medium under conditions of microgravity. The methods employed will consist of the following: the osteoblast-like cells, UMR-106-01, will be cultured in four NASDA cell culture chambers; two chambers will be subjected to microgravity on SL-J; two chambers will remain on the ground at KSC as ground controls but subjected to an identical set of culture conditions as on the shuttle; media will be changed four times; twice the cells will receive the hormone parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) and media collected; cells will be photographed under conditions of microgravity; and media and photographs will be analyzed upon return to determine whether functions of the cells changed.

  20. Proliferation and functional characterization of human CD34+ bone marrow cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. A. Plett; S. Frankovitz; A. Jetmore; R. Abonour; C. M. Orschell-Traycoff

    2000-01-01

    The ability of the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor, developed by NASA for benchtop simulation of microgravity (?-G), to support expansion of primitive human hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) was assessed during short-term cultures. Human bone marrow (BM) enriched for CD34+ cells (mean purity = 85%, n = 3) was seeded at 1.1 to 2.0 × 10e5 cells\\/mL in 10 mL

  1. Clonal distribution of osteoprogenitor cells in cultured chick periostea: Functional relationship to bone formation

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, C.A.; Fair, C.A.; Tenenbaum, H.C.; Limeback, H.; Homareau, R. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1990-08-01

    Folded explants of periosteum from embryonic chick calvaria form bone-like tissue when grown in the presence of ascorbic acid, organic phosphate, and dexamethasone. All osteoblast-like cells in these cultures arise de novo by differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells present in the periosteum. To study the spatial and functional relationships between bone formation and osteoprogenitor cells, cultures were continuously labeled with (3H)thymidine for periods of 1-5 days. Radioautographs of serial 2-microns plastic sections stained for alkaline phosphatase (AP) showed maximal labeling of 30% of fibroblastic (AP-negative) cells by 3 days while osteogenic cells (AP-positive) exhibited over 95% labeling by 5 days. No differential shifts in labeling indices, grain count histograms of fibroblastic and osteogenic cells or numbers of AP-positive cells were observed, indicating no significant recruitment of cells from the fibroblastic to the osteogenic compartment. Despite the continuous presence of (3H)thymidine, less than 35% of both osteoblasts and osteocytes were labeled at 5 days, indicating that only one-third of the osteoprogenitor cells had cycled prior to differentiation. Spatial clustering of (3H)thymidine-labeled cells was measured by computer-assisted morphometry and application of the Poisson distribution to assess contagion. Cluster size and number of labeled cells per cluster did not vary between 1-3 days, but the number of clusters increased 20-fold between Day 1 and Day 3. Three-dimensional reconstruction from serial sections showed that clusters formed long, tubular arrays of osteogenic cells up to eight cells in length and located within 2-3 cell layers from the bone surface. Selective killing of S-phase cells with two pulse labels of high specific activity (3H)thymidine at 1 and 2 days of culture completely blocked bone formation.

  2. Production of Interleukin 1\\/ff,a Potent Bone Resorbing Cytokine, by Cultured Human Myeloma Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Itsuo Yamamoto; Michio Kawano; Koji Iwato; Hideo Tanaka; Hideaki Ishikawa; Nobuyasu Kitamura; Chohei Shigeno; Junji Konishi; Hideki Asaoku; Osamu Tanabe; Masaharu Nobuyoshi; Yasukazu Ohmoto; Yoshikatsu Hirai; Masahiro Higuchi; Toshiaki Ohsawa; Atsushi Kuramoto

    Supernatantsof freshly isolated human myeloma cell cultures were examinedboth for bone-resorbingactivity (BRA) in vitro using newborn mouse calvaría, and for identificationof the causal substances of the BRA. Eight of 14 culture supernatantsof myelomacells had BRA. All of these BRA-positive supernatants were from patients with marked destructivebonelesions of multiplemyeloma.The presenceof interleukin 1 (IL-1), especially IL-1\\/3, was demonstratedin seven of these BRA-

  3. Membrane culture of bone marrow stromal cells yields better tissue than pellet culture for engineering cartilage-bone substitute biphasic constructs in a two-step process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Whitaik David; Hurtig, Mark B; Kandel, Rita A; Stanford, William L

    2011-09-01

    Our long-term goal is to treat osteochondral lesions with bioengineered biphasic constructs. We have previously demonstrated that biphasic constructs, created in vitro with primary chondrocytes harvested from healthy joints and a porous calcium polyphosphate (CPP) substrate bone substitute, could successfully repair a focal defect in sheep joints. However, primary chondrocytes are limited in supply and cannot be used in engineering constructs large enough for clinical use. Thus, we developed a robust protocol to predifferentiate sheep bone marrow-derived stromal cells to chondrocytes on collagen-coated polytetrafluoroethane membrane inserts, and harvest the chondrocytes that develop and subsequently culturing these predifferentiated cells scaffold-free on the intended articulation surface of the CPP. Chondrocytes predifferentiated on membrane culture accumulated similar matrix as those in conventional pellet culture, but expressed less Col1a1 RNA. Membrane culture predifferentiated cells gave rise to a functionally superior hyaline cartilage tissue compared to pellet culture predifferentiated cells. Studies demonstrated that 2 weeks of membrane predifferentiation culture followed by 8 weeks of biphasic construct culture was the optimal culture period at which the compressive mechanical strength and the accumulation of extracellular matrix were maximized while avoiding tissue mineralization. This protocol will be used to generate implants for preclinical study to determine their ability to repair osteochondral lesions. PMID:21563981

  4. CFU-GM Like Colonies Derived from Embryonic Stem Cells Cultured on the Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali Akbar Movassagh Pour; Mojdeh Salehnia; Ali Akbar Pourfatollah; Masoud Soleimani

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate mouse embryonic stem cells from late blastocyst stage embryos and to use them as a model system for the study of hematopoietic induction outside the embryo by coculturing of embryonic stem cells with bone marrow stromal cells. Blastocyst stage embryos from pregnant NMRI mice were obtained and cultured for 1-2 days in

  5. Evaluation of Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion in Sheep Using Mineral Scaffolds Seeded with Cultured Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca-López, María D.; Andrades, José A.; Gómez, Santiago; Zamora-Navas, Plácido; Guerado, Enrique; Rubio, Nuria; Blanco, Jerónimo; Becerra, José

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the efficacy of hybrid constructs in comparison to bone grafts (autograft and allograft) for posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) in sheep, instrumented with transpedicular screws and bars. Hybrid constructs using cultured bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown promising results in several bone healing models. In particular, hybrid constructs made by calcium phosphate-enriched cells have had similar fusion rates to bone autografts in posterolateral lumbar fusion in sheep. In our study, four experimental spinal fusions in two animal groups were compared in sheep: autograft and allograft (reference group), hydroxyapatite scaffold, and hydroxyapatite scaffold seeded with cultured and osteoinduced bone marrow MSCs (hybrid construct). During the last three days of culture, dexamethasone (dex) and beta-glycerophosphate (?-GP) were added to potentiate osteoinduction. The two experimental situations of each group were tested in the same spinal segment (L4–L5). Spinal fusion and bone formation were studied by clinical observation, X-ray, computed tomography (CT), histology, and histomorphometry. Lumbar fusion rates assessed by CT scan and histology were higher for autograft and allograft (70%) than for mineral scaffold alone (22%) and hybrid constructs (35%). The quantity of new bone formation was also higher for the reference group, quite similar in both (autograft and allograft). Although the hybrid scaffold group had a better fusion rate than the non-hybrid scaffold group, the histological analysis revealed no significant differences between them in terms of quantity of bone formation. The histology results suggested that mineral scaffolds were partly resorbed in an early phase, and included in callus tissues. Far from the callus area the hydroxyapatite alone did not generate bone around it, but the hybrid scaffold did. In nude mice, labeled cells were induced to differentiate in vivo and monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Although the cultured MSCs had osteogenic potential, their contribution to spinal fusion when seeded in mineral scaffolds, in the conditions disclosed here, remains uncertain probably due to callus interference with the scaffolds. At present, bone autografts are better than hybrid constructs for posterolateral lumbar fusion, but we should continue to seek better conditions for efficient tissue engineering. PMID:25522168

  6. Dynamic cell culture on calcium phosphate microcarriers for bone tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Roman A; Riccardi, Kiara; Altankov, George

    2014-01-01

    Developing appropriate cell culturing techniques to populate scaffolds has become a great challenge in tissue engineering. This work describes the use of spinner flask dynamic cell cultures to populate hydroxyapatite microcarriers for bone tissue engineering. The microcarriers were obtained through the emulsion of a self-setting aqueous ?-tricalcium phosphate slurry in oil. After setting, hydroxyapatite microcarriers were obtained. The incorporation of gelatin in the liquid phase of the ?-tricalcium phosphate slurry allowed obtaining hybrid gelatin/hydroxyapatite-microcarriers. Initial cell attachment on the microcarriers was strongly influenced by the speed of the dynamic culture, achieving higher attachment at low speed (40 r/min) as compared to high speed (80 r/min). Under moderate culture speeds (40 r/min), the number of cells present in the culture as well as the number of microcarrier-containing cells considerably increased after 3 days, particularly in the gelatin-containing microcarriers. At longer culture times in dynamic culture, hydroxyapatite-containing microcarriers formed aggregates containing viable and extracellular matrix proteins, with a significantly higher number of cells compared to static cultures. PMID:25383168

  7. Analysis of cells isolated from bone cultured on collagen gels and polystyrene culture dishes

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, K.

    1981-01-01

    Bone is a complex tissue which contains three types of differentiated cells viz., osteoblasts, osteoclasts and osteocytes. In mature bone, these cells are identified both by their location within the tissue and their morphological characteristics. In fetal tissue, one also finds many progenitor cells, fibroblasts and some cartilage cells. Each of these cell types has distinct functions which are reflected in their morphology, metabolic properties and response to hormones. Studies were also undertaken to evaluate the class of problems associated with electron microprobe analysis of the extracellular fluid space in bone. It was determined that differences in elemental composition in a small volume between cells and mineral cannot be quantitatively corrected for fluorescence, atomic number or absorption effects of the mineral. A study of the use of free-flow dialysis in the study of metal binding to protein demonstrates the anomalous behavior of mercury in this experimental approach and emphasizes the importance of a thorough examination of the control situation before protein to metal binding is examined.

  8. Mechanical stretching increases the number of cultured bone cells synthesizing DNA and alters their pattern of protein synthesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shin Hasegawa; S. Sato; S. Saito; Y. Suzuki; D. M. Brunette

    1985-01-01

    Summary  A simple method was devised for applying mechanical stretching to bone cell cultures. Bone cells cultured on the flexible\\u000a plastic membrane of a Petriperm dish are placed over a template with a convex surface. A lead weight is then placed on top\\u000a of the dish which causes the membrane and the tightly attached cells to be stretched. Mechanical stretching, applied

  9. Increased hematopoietic progenitor cell maintenance in long-term bone marrow cultures containing minimal numbers of contaminating breast cancer cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. L. Mann; S. S. Joshi; D. A. Crouse; J. O. Armitage; A. Kessinger; D. D. Weisenburger; W. P. Vaughan; J. G. Sharp

    1997-01-01

    The maintenance of hematopoietic progenitor cells as assayedin the mixed colony (CFU-GEMM) assay in humanlong-term bone marrow cultures was compared between normalallogeneic marrow transplantation donor collections and those fromcandidates for high-dose therapy and autologous bone marrowtransplantation (ABMT). To be eligible for ABMT, patientswere required to have a histologically normal appearingbone marrow and therefore any tumor contamination wasat minimal levels and

  10. In Vivo Ectopic Bone Formation by Devitalized Mineralized Stem Cell Carriers Produced Under Mineralizing Culture Condition

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yoke Chin; Geris, Liesbet; Bolander, Johanna; Pyka, Grzegorz; Van Bael, Simon; Luyten, Frank P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Functionalization of tissue engineering scaffolds with in vitro–generated bone-like extracellular matrix (ECM) represents an effective biomimetic approach to promote osteogenic differentiation of stem cells in vitro. However, the bone-forming capacity of these constructs (seeded with or without cells) is so far not apparent. In this study, we aimed at developing a mineralizing culture condition to biofunctionalize three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds with highly mineralized ECM in order to produce devitalized, osteoinductive mineralized carriers for human periosteal-derived progenitors (hPDCs). For this, three medium formulations [i.e., growth medium only (BM1), with ascorbic acid (BM2), and with ascorbic acid and dexamethasone (BM3)] supplemented with calcium (Ca2+) and phosphate (PO43?) ions simultaneously as mineralizing source were investigated. The results showed that, besides the significant impacts on enhancing cell proliferation (the highest in BM3 condition), the formulated mineralizing media differentially regulated the osteochondro-related gene markers in a medium-dependent manner (e.g., significant upregulation of BMP2, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and Wnt5a in BM2 condition). This has resulted in distinguished cell populations that were identifiable by specific gene signatures as demonstrated by the principle component analysis. Through devitalization, mineralized carriers with apatite crystal structures unique to each medium condition (by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis) were obtained. Quantitatively, BM3 condition produced carriers with the highest mineral and collagen contents as well as human-specific VEGF proteins, followed by BM2 and BM1 conditions. Encouragingly, all mineralized carriers (after reseeded with hPDCs) induced bone formation after 8 weeks of subcutaneous implantation in nude mice models, with BM2-carriers inducing the highest bone volume, and the lowest in the BM3 condition (as quantitated by nano-computed tomography [nano-CT]). Histological analysis revealed different bone formation patterns, either bone ossicles containing bone marrow surrounding the scaffold struts (in BM2) or bone apposition directly on the struts' surface (in BM1 and BM3). In conclusion, we have presented experimental data on the feasibility to produce devitalized osteoinductive mineralized carriers by functionalizing 3D porous scaffolds with an in vitro cell-made mineralized matrix under the mineralizing culture conditions. PMID:25469312

  11. In vivo ectopic bone formation by devitalized mineralized stem cell carriers produced under mineralizing culture condition.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yoke Chin; Geris, Liesbet; Bolander, Johanna; Pyka, Grzegorz; Van Bael, Simon; Luyten, Frank P; Schrooten, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Functionalization of tissue engineering scaffolds with in vitro-generated bone-like extracellular matrix (ECM) represents an effective biomimetic approach to promote osteogenic differentiation of stem cells in vitro. However, the bone-forming capacity of these constructs (seeded with or without cells) is so far not apparent. In this study, we aimed at developing a mineralizing culture condition to biofunctionalize three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds with highly mineralized ECM in order to produce devitalized, osteoinductive mineralized carriers for human periosteal-derived progenitors (hPDCs). For this, three medium formulations [i.e., growth medium only (BM1), with ascorbic acid (BM2), and with ascorbic acid and dexamethasone (BM3)] supplemented with calcium (Ca(2+)) and phosphate (PO4 (3-)) ions simultaneously as mineralizing source were investigated. The results showed that, besides the significant impacts on enhancing cell proliferation (the highest in BM3 condition), the formulated mineralizing media differentially regulated the osteochondro-related gene markers in a medium-dependent manner (e.g., significant upregulation of BMP2, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and Wnt5a in BM2 condition). This has resulted in distinguished cell populations that were identifiable by specific gene signatures as demonstrated by the principle component analysis. Through devitalization, mineralized carriers with apatite crystal structures unique to each medium condition (by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis) were obtained. Quantitatively, BM3 condition produced carriers with the highest mineral and collagen contents as well as human-specific VEGF proteins, followed by BM2 and BM1 conditions. Encouragingly, all mineralized carriers (after reseeded with hPDCs) induced bone formation after 8 weeks of subcutaneous implantation in nude mice models, with BM2-carriers inducing the highest bone volume, and the lowest in the BM3 condition (as quantitated by nano-computed tomography [nano-CT]). Histological analysis revealed different bone formation patterns, either bone ossicles containing bone marrow surrounding the scaffold struts (in BM2) or bone apposition directly on the struts' surface (in BM1 and BM3). In conclusion, we have presented experimental data on the feasibility to produce devitalized osteoinductive mineralized carriers by functionalizing 3D porous scaffolds with an in vitro cell-made mineralized matrix under the mineralizing culture conditions. PMID:25469312

  12. PCL-coated hydroxyapatite scaffold derived from cuttlefish bone: in vitro cell culture studies.

    PubMed

    Milovac, Dajana; Gamboa-Martínez, Tatiana C; Ivankovic, Marica; Gallego Ferrer, Gloria; Ivankovic, Hrvoje

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, we examined the potential of using highly porous poly(?-caprolactone) (PCL)-coated hydroxyapatite (HAp) scaffold derived from cuttlefish bone for bone tissue engineering applications. The cell culture studies were performed in vitro with preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells in static culture conditions. Comparisons were made with uncoated HAp scaffold. The attachment and spreading of preosteoblasts on scaffolds were observed by Live/Dead staining Kit. The cells grown on the HAp/PCL composite scaffold exhibited greater spreading than cells grown on the HAp scaffold. DNA quantification and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed a good proliferation of cells on the scaffolds. DNA content on the HAp/PCL scaffold was significantly higher compared to porous HAp scaffolds. The amount of collagen synthesis was determined using a hydroxyproline assay. The osteoblastic differentiation of the cells was evaluated by determining alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and collagen type I secretion. Furthermore, cell spreading and cell proliferation within scaffolds were observed using a fluorescence microscope. PMID:25063118

  13. Desensitization of parathyroid hormone receptors on cultured bone cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pun, K.K.; Ho, P.W.; Nissenson, R.A.; Arnaud, C.D. (Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong))

    1990-12-01

    Administration of excessive amounts of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in the treatment of osteoporosis can reverse the beneficial effects of a low-dose, intermittent regime. To investigate the direct actions and the possible cellular mechanisms of PTH in inducing desensitization of PTH receptors, we studied the effects of desensitization on rat osteoblastic UMR-106 cells. When the osteoblasts were preincubated with bPTH-(1-34), complete refractoriness to a subsequent challenge with the hormone developed within 1 h and at hormone concentrations as low as 5 nM. When osteoblasts thus desensitized were incubated in hormone-free medium, recovery of the cAMP responses began within 2 h and reached maximum after 16 h. Cycloheximide did not affect the process of desensitization. (Nle8,Nle18,Tyr34)bPTH-(3-34)amide significantly impaired the desensitization process by PTH-(1-34) but did not have stimulatory effect on cAMP responses. No significant heterologous desensitization was obvious after preincubation with isoprenaline (50 microM), prostaglandin E1 (50 microM), or prostaglandin E2 (50 microM) for 2 h. Binding experiments with (125I)PLP-(1-36)amide after desensitization revealed that there was an approximate twofold decrease in receptor affinities as analyzed by Scatchard analysis, showing that the decrease in affinity was prominent in the process of desensitization. When the cells were treated with monensin during desensitization, PTH challenge after desensitization produced significantly lower cyclic AMP responses. Recovery after desensitization occurred over a period of 16 h. Inclusion of monensin, but not cycloheximide, impaired the recovery. The results show that homologous desensitization of rat osteoblasts to PTH is brought about by the occupancy of receptors by PTH-(1-34) but not by cAMP generation itself.

  14. Individual clones of hemopoietic cells in murine long-term bone marrow culture

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, J.L.; Deryugina, E.I.; Drize, N.J.; Udalov, G.A.

    1987-06-01

    Forty-seven individual hemopoietic cell clones bearing unique radiation markers were studied in long-term bone marrow cultures. Throughout cultivation clones appeared at different times, from 1 to 12 weeks after explantation, survived during 1-10 more weeks, and were characterized by marked variability in size. Usually, the number of metaphases peculiar to an individual clone rapidly increased, achieved maximum, and then underwent a decline. Cells of reliably disappearing clones were never seen again. The experimental results provide further evidence for the model of hemopoiesis by clonal succession.

  15. Pre-culture period of mesenchymal stem cells in osteogenic media influences their in vivo bone forming potential

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Castano-Izquierdo; J. Alvarez-Barreto; J. van den Dolder; J. A. Jansen; A. G. Mikos; V. I. Sikavitsas

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if the in vitro pre-culture period in osteogenic media of rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), influences their ability to regenerate bone when implanted in a critical size cranial defect. MSCs were harvested from the bone marrow of 6-8 weeks old male Fisher rats and expanded in vitro in osteogenic media for different

  16. Optimization of culture conditions for stem cells derived from human anterior cruciate ligament and bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ming-Te; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Lee, Oscar K

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering with stem cells is a fascinating approach for treating anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. In our previous study, stem cells isolated from the human anterior cruciate ligament were shown to possess extensive proliferation and differentiation capabilities when treated with specific growth factors. However, optimal culture conditions and the usefulness of fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a growth factor in in vitro culture systems are yet to be determined. In this study, we compared the effects of different culture media containing combinations of various concentrations of FBS and the growth factors basic fibroblastic growth factor (bFGF) and transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1) on the proliferation and differentiation of ligament-derived stem cells (LSCs) and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). We found that ?-MEM plus 10% FBS and bFGF was able to maintain both LSCs and BMSCs in a relatively undifferentiated state but with lower major extracellular matrix (ECM) component gene expression and protein production, which is beneficial for stem cell expansion. However, the differentiation and proliferation potentials of LSCs and BMSCs were increased when cultured in MesenPRO, a commercially available stem cell medium containing 2% FBS. MesenPRO in conjunction with TGF-?1 had the greatest ability to induce the differentiation of BMSCs and LSCs to ligament fibroblasts, which was evidenced by the highest ligamentous ECM gene expression and protein production. These results indicate that culture media and growth factors play a very important role in the success of tissue engineering. With ?-MEM plus 10% FBS and bFGF, rapid proliferation of stem cells can be achieved. In this study, MesenPRO was able to promote differentiation of both LSCs and BMSCs to ligament fibroblasts. Differentiation was further increased by TGF-?1. With increasing understanding of the effects of different culture media and growth factors, manipulation of stem cells in the desired direction for ligament tissue engineering can be achieved. PMID:23582177

  17. Stromal cells in long-term murine bone marrow culture: FACS studies and origin of stromal cells in radiation chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Lennon, J.E.; Micklem, H.S.

    1986-05-01

    Adherent layers from hematopoietically active long-term bone marrow cultures (LTBMC), incubated with fluorescent beads, were analyzed for autofluorescence and phagocytic ability, using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). Four groups of cells were separated from the adherent layers, including a group of large polygonal fibroblastoid stromal cells. Long-term chimeras were made by lethal irradiation of CBA/Ca (CBA) and C57Bl6/J (B6) mice and repopulation with phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK-1) alloenzyme-congenic bone marrow cells. Hematopoietically active LTBMC were established from such chimeras, and donor and host contributions of FACS-sorted adherent-layer cells were measured. While macrophages and other hematopoietic cells were of donor origin, the fibroblastoid stromal cells were mainly or entirely host derived.

  18. Rapid clinical-scale propagation of mesenchymal stem cells using cultures initiated with immunoselected bone marrow CD105+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Spiropoulos, Antonia; Theodosaki, Maria; Stefanaki, Kalliopi; Paterakis, George; Tzetis, Maria; Giannikou, Krinio; Petrakou, Eftichia; Dimopoulou, Maria N; Papassotiriou, Ioannis; Roma, Eleptheria S; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Graphakos, Stelios; Goussetis, Evgenios

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Current clinical protocols used for isolation and purification of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are based on long-term cultures starting with bone marrow (BM) mononuclear cells. Using a commercially available immunoselection kit for enrichment of MSC, we investigated whether culture of enriched BM-CD105+ cells could provide an adequate number of pure MSC in a short time for clinical use in the context of graft versus host disease and graft failure/rejection. We isolated a mean of 5.4 × 105 ± 0.9 × 105 CD105+ cells from 10 small volume (10–25 ml) BM samples achieving an enrichment >100-fold in MSC. Seeding 2 × 103 immunoselected cells/cm2 we were able to produce 2.5 × 108 ± 0.7 × 108 MSC from cultures with autologous serum enriched medium within 3 weeks. Neither haematopoietic nor endothelial cells were detectable even in the primary culture cell product. Expanded cells fulfilled both phenotypic and functional current criteria for MSC; they were CD29+, CD90+, CD73+, CD105+, CD45?; they suppressed allogeneic T-cell reaction in mixed lymphocyte cultures and retained in vitro differentiation potential. Moreover, comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed chromosomal stability of the cultured MSC. Our data indicate that adequate numbers of pure MSC suitable for clinical applications can be generated within a short time using enriched BM-CD105+ cells. PMID:20731745

  19. Ex vivo expansion of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells on microcarrier beads in spin culture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Rossi, Fabio M V; Putnins, Edward E

    2007-07-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSC) are attractive candidates for connective tissue regeneration. Currently, their use is limited by poor overall cell survival and high apoptosis rates upon transplantation in vivo. We hypothesized that disruption of cell-extracellular matrix contact either during cell expansion or immediately prior to cell transplantation may impair cell viability and facilitate apoptosis. We therefore investigated whether BM-MSC can be expanded on microcarrier beads in spin culture and directly transplanted. This novel approach removes the need for the repeated trypsinizations that are usually required for expansion and transplantation. CultiSpher-S gelatin microcarrier beads supported Fisher and transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP)(+) Sprague Dawley rat BM-MSC expansion. Bead-expanded BM-MSC could still be differentiated along the chondrogenic, osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. In the short term, direct subcutaneous transplantation of cells expanded on microcarriers was associated with significantly less apoptosis than trypsinized control cells. In the long term, BM-MSC expanded on microcarrier beads induced de novo trabecular bone formation in vivo. This novel approach present several advantages over current expansion-transplantation protocols for mesenchymal tissue regeneration. PMID:17433434

  20. Pasteurella multocida toxin is a mitogen for bone cells in primary culture.

    PubMed Central

    Mullan, P B; Lax, A J

    1996-01-01

    The effect of recombinant Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) on primary cultures of embryonic chick bone-derived osteoblastic cells was investigated. It was found that PMT was a potent mitogen for primary derived chicken osteoblasts. The toxin stimulated DNA synthesis and cell proliferation in quiescent osteoblasts at the first passage and accelerated cell growth in subconfluent cultures. Cell viability was not affected by PMT, even at relatively high concentrations. Osteoblast numbers increased in a dose-dependent manner in response to PMT. Intracellular inositol phosphates were elevated in response to PMT, but no elevation in cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels was evident. Indeed, PMT inhibited cAMP elevation in osteoblasts in response to cholera toxin at a stage before other PMT-mediated events take place. In addition to increased cell turnover, PMT down-regulated the expression of several markers of osteoblast differentiation. Both alkaline phosphatase and type I collagen were reduced, but osteonectin was not affected. The in vitro deposition of mineral in cultures of primary osteoblasts and osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells was also inhibited by the presence of PMT. This suggests that PMT interferes with differentiation at a preosteoblastic stage. PMID:8641807

  1. Long-term three-dimensional perfusion culture of human adult bone marrow mononuclear cells in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Eva; Finoli, Anthony; Nettleship, Ian; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2015-04-01

    The construction and long-term maintenance of three-dimensional in vitro bone marrow models is of great interest but still quite challenging. Here we describe the use of a multi-compartment hollow-fiber membrane based three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor for long-term culture of whole human bone marrow mononuclear cells. We also investigated bioreactors with incorporated open-porous foamed hydroxyapatite scaffolds, mimicking the in vivo bone matrix. Cells in bioreactors with and without scaffolds were cultured to 6 weeks and compared to Petri dish controls. Cells were analyzed for gene expression, surface markers by flow cytometry, metabolic activity, hematopoietic potential, viability, and attachment by immunocytochemistry. Cells in bioreactors were metabolic active during long-term culture. The percentages of hematopoietic stem cell and mature endothelial cell fractions were maintained in bioreactors. The expression of most of the analyzed genes stabilized and increased after long-term culture of 6 weeks. Compared to Petri dish culture controls, bioreactor perfusion culture improved in both the short and long-term, the colony formation unit capacity of hematopoietic progenitors. Cells attached to the ample surface area provided by hydroxyapatite scaffolds. The implementation of a hydroxyapatite scaffold did not influence colony formation capacity, percentages of cell type specific fractions, gene expression, cell viability or metabolic turnover when compared to control cells cultured in bioreactors without scaffolds. In conclusion, three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture enables long-term maintenance of primary human bone marrow cells, with hydroxyapatite scaffolds providing an in vivo-like scaffold for three-dimensional culture. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2015;112: 801-810. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25335987

  2. Embryonic stem cells in scaffold-free three-dimensional cell culture: osteogenic differentiation and bone generation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Extracorporeal formation of mineralized bone-like tissue is still an unsolved challenge in tissue engineering. Embryonic stem cells may open up new therapeutic options for the future and should be an interesting model for the analysis of fetal organogenesis. Here we describe a technique for culturing embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in the absence of artificial scaffolds which generated mineralized miromasses. Embryonic stem cells were harvested and osteogenic differentiation was stimulated by the addition of dexamethasone, ascorbic acid, and ß-glycerolphosphate (DAG). After three days of cultivation microspheres were formed. These spherical three-dimensional cell units showed a peripheral zone consisting of densely packed cell layers surrounded by minerals that were embedded in the extracellular matrix. Alizarine red staining confirmed evidence of mineralization after 10 days of DAG stimulation in the stimulated but not in the control group. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated scorching crystallites and collagenous fibrils as early indication of bone formation. These extracellular structures resembled hydroxyl apatite-like crystals as demonstrated by distinct diffraction patterns using electron diffraction analysis. The micromass culture technique is an appropriate model to form three-dimensional bone-like micro-units without the need for an underlying scaffold. Further studies will have to show whether the technique is applicable also to pluripotent stem cells of different origin. PMID:21752302

  3. Rotating three-dimensional dynamic culture of adult human bone marrow-derived cells for tissue engineering of hyaline cartilage.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinsuke; Mishima, Hajime; Ishii, Tomoo; Akaogi, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Ohyabu, Yoshimi; Chang, Fei; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2009-04-01

    The method of constructing cartilage tissue from bone marrow-derived cells in vitro is considered a valuable technique for hyaline cartilage regenerative medicine. Using a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor developed in a NASA space experiment, we attempted to efficiently construct hyaline cartilage tissue from human bone marrow-derived cells without using a scaffold. Bone marrow aspirates were obtained from the iliac crest of nine patients during orthopedic operation. After their proliferation in monolayer culture, the adherent cells were cultured in the RWV bioreactor with chondrogenic medium for 2 weeks. Cells from the same source were cultured in pellet culture as controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluations (collagen type I and II) and quantification of glycosaminoglycan were performed on formed tissues and compared. The engineered constructs obtained using the RWV bioreactor showed strong features of hyaline cartilage in terms of their morphology as determined by histological and immunohistological evaluations. The glycosaminoglycan contents per microg DNA of the tissues were 10.01 +/- 3.49 microg/microg DNA in the case of the RWV bioreactor and 6.27 +/- 3.41 microg/microg DNA in the case of the pellet culture, and their difference was significant. The RWV bioreactor could provide an excellent environment for three-dimensional cartilage tissue architecture that can promote the chondrogenic differentiation of adult human bone marrow-derived cells. PMID:18932231

  4. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc., has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc., is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  5. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc. has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc. is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  6. A comparison of bioreactors for culture of fetal mesenchymal stem cells for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Teoh, Swee Hin; Teo, Erin Yiling; Khoon Chong, Mark Seow; Shin, Chong Woon; Tien, Foo Toon; Choolani, Mahesh A; Chan, Jerry K Y

    2010-11-01

    Bioreactors provide a dynamic culture system for efficient exchange of nutrients and mechanical stimulus necessary for the generation of effective tissue engineered bone grafts (TEBG). We have shown that biaxial rotating (BXR) bioreactor-matured human fetal mesenchymal stem cell (hfMSC) mediated-TEBG can heal a rat critical sized femoral defect. However, it is not known whether optimal bioreactors exist for bone TE (BTE) applications. We systematically compared this BXR bioreactor with three most commonly used systems: Spinner Flask (SF), Perfusion and Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) bioreactors, for their application in BTE. The BXR bioreactor achieved higher levels of cellularity and confluence (1.4-2.5x, p < 0.05) in large 785 mm(3) macroporous scaffolds not achieved in the other bioreactors operating in optimal settings. BXR bioreactor-treated scaffolds experienced earlier and more robust osteogenic differentiation on von Kossa staining, ALP induction (1.2-1.6×, p < 0.01) and calcium deposition (1.3-2.3×, p < 0.01). We developed a Micro CT quantification method which demonstrated homogenous distribution of hfMSC in BXR bioreactor-treated grafts, but not with the other three. BXR bioreactor enabled superior cellular proliferation, spatial distribution and osteogenic induction of hfMSC over other commonly used bioreactors. In addition, we developed and validated a non-invasive quantitative micro CT-based technique for analyzing neo-tissue formation and its spatial distribution within scaffolds. PMID:20739062

  7. Oncornavirus-Like Particles from Cultured Bone Marrow Cells Preceding Leukemia and Malignant Histiocytosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerald J. Vosika; William Krivit; Jon M. Gerrard; Peter F. Coccia; Mark E. Nesbit; Jacqueline J. Coalson; B. J. Kennedy

    1975-01-01

    Particles with the density and enzymatic activity characteristic of known oncornavirus have been previously described in bone marrow cells from patients with leukemia in relapse and in remission. We have confirmed these findings and studied two patients in whom preleukemia was among the diagnostic considerations. Following cultivation of bone marrow from these patients for 1 week in conditioned media with

  8. Hematopoietic microenvironment. Origin, lineage, and transplantability of the stromal cells in long-term bone marrow cultures from chimeric mice

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, S.; Fleischman, R.A.

    1988-04-01

    Studies of bone marrow transplant patients have suggested that the stromal cells of the in vitro hematopoietic microenvironment are transplantable into conditioned recipients. Moreover, in patients with myeloproliferative disorders, all of the stromal cells, which include presumptive endothelial cells, appear to be derived from hematopoietic precursors. To confirm these findings, we have constructed two chimeric mouse models: (a) traditional radiation chimeras, and (b) fetal chimeras, produced by placental injection of bone marrow into genetically anemic Wx/Wv fetuses, a technique that essentially precludes engraftment of nonhematopoietic cells. Using two-color indirect immunofluorescence, the stromal cells in long-term bone marrow culture derived from these chimeras were analyzed for donor or host origin by strain-specific H-2 antigens, and for cell lineage by a variety of other specific markers. 75-95% of the stromal cells were shown to be hematopoietic cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, based upon donor origin, phagocytosis, and expression of specific hematopoietic surface antigens. The remaining 5-25% of the stromal cells were exclusively host in origin. Apart from occasional fat cells, these cells uniformly expressed collagen type IV, laminin, and a surface antigen associated with endothelial cells. Since these endothelial-like cells are not transplantable into radiation or fetal chimeras, they are not derived from hematopoietic stem cells. The contrast between our findings and human studies suggests either unexpected species differences in the origin of stromal lineages or limitations in the previous methodology used to detect nonhematopoietic stromal cells.

  9. PRESENCE OF LEUKAEMIA INHIBITORY FACTOR (LIF) AND LIF-RECEPTOR CHAIN (gp190) IN OSTEOCLAST-LIKE CELLS CULTURED FROM HUMAN GIANT CELL TUMOUR OF BONE. ULTRASTRUCTURAL DISTRIBUTION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    François Gouin; Séverine Couillaud; Mireille Cottrel; Anne Godard; Norbert Passuti; Dominique Heymann

    1999-01-01

    The behaviour of multinucleated giant cells (MNC) obtained from a giant cell tumour of the tibia and cultured on glass coverslips or on devitalized dentin slices was investigated using light and electron microscopy. Cells were studied in the presence or absence of LIF a cytokine known to be involved in bone turnover and to act as a growth factor in

  10. Inhibition of osteoclast-like cell formation by bisphosphonates in long-term cultures of human bone marrow.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, D E; MacDonald, B R; Russell, R G; Gowen, M

    1989-01-01

    Bisphosphonates inhibit bone resorption in vivo and in vitro by unknown mechanisms. The effect of bisphosphonates on the formation of osteoclasts from their mononuclear hematopoietic precursors was investigated using human long-term marrow cultures in which multinucleated cells form that express most of the known features of the osteoclast phenotype (e.g., bone resorption, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, calcitonin responsiveness, and reactivity with specific MAbs). The five bisphosphonates that were tested strongly inhibited 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-stimulated formation of these cells with the same relative potencies as they inhibit bone resorption in vivo. Two representative compounds (3-amino-1-hydroxypropylidene-1,1-bisphosphonate and dichloromethylene bisphosphonate) failed to inhibit the proliferation of precursors of the osteoclast-like cells. However, these compounds decreased the proportion of mononuclear and multinucleated cells expressing an osteoclast antigen, thus suggesting a degree of specificity for cells of the osteoclast lineage. We conclude that bisphosphonates are potent inhibitors of osteoclast-like cell formation in long-term human marrow cultures, and that this may be related to their ability to inhibit bone resorption in vivo. Images PMID:2524504

  11. An advanced culture method for generating large quantities of highly pure dendritic cells from mouse bone marrow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manfred B Lutz; Nicole Kukutsch; Alexandra L. J Ogilvie; Susanne Rößner; Franz Koch; Nikolaus Romani; Gerold Schuler

    1999-01-01

    As dendritic cells (DC) are rare populations in all organs, their generation from hematopoietic precursors in large quantities has proven critical to study their biology. From murine bone marrow about 5×106 cells at 70% purity are obtained per mouse after 8 days of culture with GM-CSF. We have improved this standard method and routinely achieve a 50-fold higher yield, i.e.,

  12. Cell Stem Cell Endogenous Bone Marrow MSCs

    E-print Network

    Mootha, Vamsi K.

    of cultured cells (Sacchetti et al., 2007). Similar multipotent MSCs can be isolated from mouse bone marrowCell Stem Cell Article Endogenous Bone Marrow MSCs Are Dynamic, Fate-Restricted Participants Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA 4Harvard Stem Cell Institute, 1350 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA

  13. Human bone marrow and umbilical cord blood cells generate CD4+ and CD8+ single-positive T cells in murine fetal thymus organ culture.

    PubMed Central

    Yeoman, H; Gress, R E; Bare, C V; Leary, A G; Boyse, E A; Bard, J; Shultz, L D; Harris, D T; DeLuca, D

    1993-01-01

    Murine fetal thymus lobes isolated from both normal and scid/scid mice can be colonized by donor cells from either human bone marrow or human umbilical cord blood in vitro. Subsequent organ culture results in a transient production of a few CD4+ CD8+ (double-positive) cells and then the accumulation of CD4+ or CD8+ (single-positive) T cells. A significant number of immature T-cell intermediates (e.g., CD8low, CD3-/low cells) were present in early organ cultures, suggesting that these were progenitors of the mature CD3+/high single-positive T cells that dominated late cultures. Depletion of mature T cells from the donor-cell populations did not affect their ability to colonize thymus lobes. However, colonization depended on the presence of CD7+ progenitor T cells. Limiting dilution experiments using mature T-cell populations (human peripheral blood leukocytes, human bone marrow cells, and human umbilical cord blood cells) suggested that thymic organ culture supports the growth of progenitor T cells but does not support the growth of mature human T cells. Each of these donor populations produced single-positive populations with different CD4/CD8 ratios, suggesting that precursor cells from different sources differ qualitatively in their capacity to differentiate into T cells. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7902570

  14. Regulation of hormone-induced cyclic AMP response to parathyroid hormone and prostaglandin E 2 in cells cultured from human giant cell tumors of bone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven R. Goldring; Jean-Michel Dayer; Stephen M. Krane

    1979-01-01

    Summary  Cells dispersed from human giant cell tumors of bone and grown in monolayer culture increase intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP)\\u000a when incubated with parathyroid hormone (PTH) or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). When cells are continuously exposed to PTH, cAMP levels increase acutely but then decrease rapidly to pretreatment values\\u000a despite continued presence of hormone or addition of new hormone. Preincubation of cells

  15. Microgravity and bone cell mechanosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Klein-Nulend, J; Bacabac, R G; Veldhuijzen, J P; Van Loon, J J W A

    2003-01-01

    The capacity of bone tissue to alter its mass and structure in response to mechanical demands has long been recognized but the cellular mechanisms involved remained poorly understood. Bone not only develops as a structure designed specifically for mechanical tasks, but it can adapt during life toward more efficient mechanical performance. Mechanical adaptation of bone is a cellular process and needs a biological system that senses the mechanical loading. The loading information must then be communicated to the effector cells that form new bone or destroy old bone. The in vivo operating cell stress derived from bone loading is likely the flow of interstitial fluid along the surface of osteocytes and lining cells. The response of bone cells in culture to fluid flow includes prostaglandin (PG) synthesis and expression of prostaglandin G/H synthase inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2). Cultured bone cells also rapidly produce nitric oxide (NO) in response to fluid flow as a result of activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS), which enzyme also mediates the adaptive response of bone tissue to mechanical loading. Earlier studies have shown that the disruption of the actin-cytoskeleton abolishes the response to stress, suggesting that the cytoskeleton is involved in cellular mechanotransduction. Microgravity, or better near weightlessness, is associated with the loss of bone in astronauts, and has catabolic effects on mineral metabolism in bone organ cultures. This might be explained as resulting from an exceptional form of disuse under near weightlessness conditions. However, under near weightlessness conditions the assembly of cytoskeletal elements may be altered since it has been shown that the direction of the gravity vector determines microtubular pattern formation in vivo. We found earlier that the transduction of mechanical signals in bone cells also involves the cytoskeleton and is related to PGE2 production. Therefore it is possible that the mechanosensitivity of bone cells is altered under near weightlessness conditions, and that this abnormal mechanosensation contributes to disturbed bone metabolism observed in astronauts. In our current project for the International Space Station, we wish to test this hypothesis experimentally using an in vitro model. The specific aim of our research project is to test whether near weightlessness decreases the sensitivity of bone cells for mechanical stress through a decrease in early signaling molecules (NO, PGs) that are involved in the mechanical loading-induced osteogenic response. Bone cells are cultured with or without gravity prior to and during mechanical loading, using our modified in vitro oscillating fluid flow apparatus. In this "FlowSpace" project we are developing a cell culture module that is used to provide further insight in the mechanism of mechanotransduction in bone. PMID:15000126

  16. Microgravity and bone cell mechanosensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-Nulend, J.; Bacabac, R. G.; Veldhuijzen, J. P.; Van Loon, J. J. W. A.

    2003-10-01

    The capacity of bone tissue to alter its mass and structure in response to mechanical demands has long been recognized but the cellular mechanisms involved remained poorly understood. Bone not only develops as a structure designed specifically for mechanical tasks, but it can adapt during life toward more efficient mechanical performance. Mechanical adaptation of bone is a cellular process and needs a biological system that senses the mechanical loading. The loading information must then be communicated to the effector cells that form new bone or destroy old bone. The in vivo operating cell stress derived from bone loading is likely the flow of interstitial fluid along the surface of osteocytes and lining cells. The response of bone cells in culture to fluid flow includes prostaglandin (PG) synthesis and expression of prostaglandin G/H synthase inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2). Cultured bone cells also rapidly produce nitric oxide (NO) in response to fluid flow as a result of activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS), which enzyme also mediates the adaptive response of bone tissue to mechanical loading. Earlier studies have shown that the disruption of the actin-cytoskeleton abolishes the response to stress, suggesting that the cytoskeleton is involved in cellular mechanotransduction. Microgravity, or better near weightlessness, is associated with the loss of bone in astronauts, and has catabolic effects on mineral metabolism in bone organ cultures. This might be explained as resulting from an exceptional form of disuse under near weightlessness conditions. However, under near weightlessness conditions the assembly of cytoskeletal elements may be altered since it has been shown that the direction of the gravity vector determines microtubular pattern formation in vivo. We found earlier that the transduction of mechanical signals in bone cells also involves the cytoskeleton and is related to PGEZ production. Therefore it is possible that the mechanosensitivity of bone cells is altered under near weightlessness conditions, and that this abnormal mechanosensation contributes to disturbed bone metabolism observed in astronauts. In our current project for the International Space Station, we wish to test this hypothesis experimentally using an in vitro model. The specific aim of our research project is to test whether near weightlessness decreases the sensitivity of bone cells for mechanical stress through a decrease in early signaling molecules (NO, PGs) that are involved in the mechanical loading-induced osteogenic response. Bone cells are cultured with or without gravity prior to and during mechanical loading, using our modified in vitro oscillating fluid flow apparatus. In this "FlowSpace" project we are developing a cell culture module that is used to provide further insight in the mechanism of mechanotransduction in bone.

  17. Characterization of osteoblast-like behavior of cultured bone marrow stromal cells on various polymer surfaces

    E-print Network

    Weiss, Lee E.

    . This study was designed to test certain polymers, specifically poly(caprolactone) (PCL), poly(D,L-lactic-co- glycolic acid) (PLGA), and combinations of these polymers for their ability to support bone marrow stromal. There was no statistically significant difference in growth rate of the cells on any poly- mer or polymer combination

  18. Dynamics of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cell/mesenchymal stem cell interaction in co-culture and its implications in angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, A.; Planell, J.A. [Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain) [Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Dept. of Material Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CIBER-BBN, Maria de Luna 11, Ed. CEEI, 50118 Zaragoza (Spain); Engel, E., E-mail: elisabeth.engel@upc.edu [Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Dept. of Material Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CIBER-BBN, Maria de Luna 11, Ed. CEEI, 50118 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-09-17

    Research highlights: {yields} BM-EPCs and MSCs establish complex, self-organizing structures in co-culture. {yields} Co-culture decreases proliferation by cellular self-regulatory mechanisms. {yields} Co-cultured cells present an activated proangiogenic phenotype. {yields} qRT-PCR and cluster analysis identify new target genes playing important roles. -- Abstract: Tissue engineering aims to regenerate tissues and organs by using cell and biomaterial-based approaches. One of the current challenges in the field is to promote proper vascularization in the implant to prevent cell death and promote host integration. Bone marrow endothelial progenitor cells (BM-EPCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are bone marrow resident stem cells widely employed for proangiogenic applications. In vivo, they are likely to interact frequently both in the bone marrow and at sites of injury. In this study, the physical and biochemical interactions between BM-EPCs and MSCs in an in vitro co-culture system were investigated to further clarify their roles in vascularization. BM-EPC/MSC co-cultures established close cell-cell contacts soon after seeding and self-assembled to form elongated structures at 3 days. Besides direct contact, cells also exhibited vesicle transport phenomena. When co-cultured in Matrigel, tube formation was greatly enhanced even in serum-starved, growth factor free medium. Both MSCs and BM-EPCs contributed to these tubes. However, cell proliferation was greatly reduced in co-culture and morphological differences were observed. Gene expression and cluster analysis for wide panel of angiogenesis-related transcripts demonstrated up-regulation of angiogenic markers but down-regulation of many other cytokines. These data suggest that cross-talk occurs in between BM-EPCs and MSCs through paracrine and direct cell contact mechanisms leading to modulation of the angiogenic response.

  19. Culture and differentiation of osteoblasts on coral scaffold from human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cong Toai Tran; Ciro Gargiulo; Huynh Duy Thao; Huynh Minh Tuan; Luis Filgueira; D. Michael Strong

    In this paper we describe an approach that aims to provide fundamental information towards a scientific, biomechanical basis\\u000a for the use of natural coral scaffolds to initiate mesenchymal stem cells into osteogenic differentiation for transplant purposes.\\u000a Biomaterial, such as corals, is an osteoconductive material that can be used to home human derived stem cells for clinical\\u000a regenerative purposes. In bone

  20. Microgravity and Bone Cell Mechanosensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-Nulend, J.; Bacabac, R.; Veldhuijzen, J.; van Loon, J.

    The capacity of bone tissue to alter its mass and structure in response to mechanical demands has long been recognized but the cellular mechanisms involved remained poorly understood. Bone not only develops as a structure designed specifically for mechanical tasks, but it can adapt during life toward more efficient mechanical performance. Mechanical adaptation of bone is a cellular process and needs a biological system that senses the mechanical loading. The loading information must then be communicated to the effector cells that form new bone or destroy old bone.The in vivo operating cell stress derived from bone loading is likely flow of interstitial fluid along the surface of osteocytes and lining cells. The response of bone cells in culture to fluid flow includes prostaglandin (PG) synthesis and expression of prostaglandin G/H synthase inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2). Cultured bone cells also rapidly produce nitric oxide (NO) in response to fluid flow as a result of activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS), which enzyme also mediates the adaptive response of bone tissue to mechanical loading. Disruption of the actin-cytoskeleton abolishes the response to stress, suggesting that the cytoskeleton is involved in cellular mechanotransduction.Microgravity, or better near weightlessness, has catabolic effects on the skeleton of astronauts, and on mineral metabolism in bone organ cultures. This might be explained as resulting from an exceptional form of disuse under near weightlessness conditions. However, under near weightlessness conditions the assembly of cytoskeletal elements may be altered since it has been shown that the direction of the gravity vector determines microtubular pattern formation in vivo. We found that the transduction of mechanical signals in bone cells also involves the cytoskeleton and is related to PGE2 production. Therefore it is possible that the mechanosensitivity of bone cells is altered under near weightlessness conditions, and that this abnormal mechanosensation contributes to disturbed bone metabolism observed in astronauts.In our current project for the International Space Station, we wish to test this hypothesis experimentally using an in vitro model. The specific aim of our research project is to test whether near weightlessness decreases the sensitivity of bone cells for mechanical stress through a decrease in early signaling molecules (NO, PGs) that are involved in the mechanical loading-induced osteogenic response. Bone cells are cultured with or without gravity prior to and during mechanical loading, using our modified in vitro oscillating fluid flow apparatus. In this "FlowSpace" project we are developing a cell culture module that is used to provide further insight in the mechanism of mechanotransduction in bone.

  1. CpG oligonucleotides and Astragalus polysaccharides are effective adjuvants in cultures of avian bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Kang, H; Liang, J; Fu, J; Yu, Q; Yang, Q

    2015-02-01

    The potential use of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and/or Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) as adjuvants for the culture of chicken bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells (chBM-DCs) was investigated. Chicken dendritic cells (DCs) were isolated and cultured in the presence of recombinant chicken granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)-4. The chBM-DC displayed typical DC morphology and expressed DC surface markers (MHC-II and CD11c). Cultured chBM-DC showed effective T-cell activation in vitro, based on a mixed lymphocyte response (MLR). Flow cytometry analysis showed an increased proportion of cells expressing CD40 and CD80 in the APS-stimulated culture, compared to the control culture. In the MLR, the APS- and CpG-stimulated chBM-DC could activate T-cells more than control chBM-DC. Real-time PCR assays showed that CpG can activate the TLR21 and an inflammatory response, while APS just reduced the expression of IRF-3. The results demonstrated that in vitro the adjuvant CpG can stimulate chBM-DC to mature by activation of the TLR-signalling pathway, whereas the adjuvant APS stimulates maturation of chBM-DC in vitro to a lesser degree and by another mechanism. PMID:25403700

  2. Culture Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells With Calcium Phosphate Cement Scaffolds for Bone Repair

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Michael D.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2010-01-01

    Because of its moldability and excellent osteoconductivity, calcium phosphate cement (CPC) is highly promising for craniofacial and orthopedic applications. The objectives of this study were to investigate the response of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to a high-strength CPC-chitosan scaffold and to examine cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. hMSCs were seeded onto CPC-chitosan composite, CPC control, and tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). Alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) and mineralization of hMSCs were measured. CPC-chitosan had a flexural strength (mean ± SD; n = 5) of (19.5 ± 1.4) MPa, higher than (8.0 ± 1.4) MPa of CPC control (p < 0.05). The percentage of live hMSCs on CPC-chitosan was (90.5 ± 1.3)% at 8 days, matching (90.7 ± 3.8)% of CPC control (p > 0.1). The CPC-chitosan surface area covered by the attached hMSCs increased from (51 ± 11)% at 1 day to (90 ± 4)% at 8 days (p < 0.05), matching those of CPC control (p > 0.1). Hence, the CPC strength was significantly increased via chitosan without compromising the hMSC response. At 8 days, there was a significant increase in ALP of cells in osteogenic media (10.99 ± 0.93) [(mM pNpp/min)/(?g DNA)] versus control media (3.62 ± 0.40) (p < 0.05). hMSCs in osteogenic media exhibited greater mineralization area of (47.5 ± 19.7)% compared with (6.1 ± 2.3)% in control medium on TCPS (p < 0.05). In conclusion, hMSCs showed excellent attachment and viability on the strong and tough CPC-chitosan scaffold, matching the hMSC response on CPC control. hMSCs were successfully differentiated down the osteogenic lineage. Hence, the strong, in situ hardening CPC-chitosan scaffold may be useful as a moderate load-bearing vehicle to deliver hMSCs for maxillofacial and orthopedic bone tissue engineering. PMID:20091907

  3. Human Bone Marrow and Umbilical Cord Blood Cells Generate CD4^+ and CD8^+ Single-Positive T Cells in Murine Fetal Thymus Organ Culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helen Yeoman; Ronald E. Gress; Catherine V. Bare; Anne G. Leary; Edward A. Boyse; Judith Bard; Leonard D. Shultz; David T. Harris; Dominick Deluca

    1993-01-01

    Murine fetal thymus lobes isolated from both normal and scid\\/scid mice can be colonized by donor cells from either human bone marrow or human umbilical cord blood in vitro. Subsequent organ culture results in a transient production of a few CD4^+ CD8^+ (double-positive) cells and then the accumulation of CD4^+ or CD8^+ (single-positive) T cells. A significant number of immature

  4. Demonstration of early functional compromise of bone marrow derived hematopoietic progenitor cells during bovine neonatal pancytopenia through in vitro culture of bone marrow biopsies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bovine neonatal pancytopenia (BNP) is a syndrome characterised by thrombocytopenia associated with marked bone marrow destruction in calves, widely reported since 2007 in several European countries and since 2011 in New Zealand. The disease is epidemiologically associated with the use of an inactivated bovine virus diarrhoea (BVD) vaccine and is currently considered to be caused by absorption of colostral antibody produced by some vaccinated cows (“BNP dams”). Alloantibodies capable of binding to the leukocyte surface have been detected in BNP dams and antibodies recognising bovine MHC class I and ?-2-microglobulin have been detected in vaccinated cattle. In this study, calves were challenged with pooled colostrum collected from BNP dams or from non-BNP dams and their bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) cultured in vitro from sternal biopsies taken at 24 hours and 6 days post-challenge. Results Clonogenic assay demonstrated that CFU-GEMM (colony forming unit-granulocyte/erythroid/macrophage/megakaryocyte; pluripotential progenitor cell) colony development was compromised from HPCs harvested as early as 24 hour post-challenge. By 6 days post challenge, HPCs harvested from challenged calves failed to develop CFU-E (erythroid) colonies and the development of both CFU-GEMM and CFU-GM (granulocyte/macrophage) was markedly reduced. Conclusion This study suggests that the bone marrow pathology and clinical signs associated with BNP are related to an insult which compromises the pluripotential progenitor cell within the first 24 hours of life but that this does not initially include all cell types. PMID:23110710

  5. Composite Scaffolds Containing Silk Fibroin, Gelatin, and Hydroxyapatite for Bone Tissue Regeneration and 3D Cell Culturing

    PubMed Central

    Moisenovich, M. M.; Arkhipova, A. Yu.; Orlova, A. A.; Drutskaya, M. S; Volkova, S. V.; Zacharov, S. E.; Agapov, I. I.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) silk fibroin scaffolds were modified with one of the major bone tissue derivatives (nano-hydroxyapatite) and/or a collagen derivative (gelatin). Adhesion and proliferation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) within the scaffold were increased after modification with either nano-hydroxyapatite or gelatin. However, a significant increase in MEF adhesion and proliferation was observed when both additives were introduced into the scaffold. Such modified composite scaffolds provide a new and better platform to study wound healing, bone and other tissue regeneration, as well as artificial organ bioengineering. This system can further be applied to establish experimental models to study cell-substrate interactions, cell migration and other complex processes, which may be difficult to address using the conventional two-dimensional culture systems. PMID:24772332

  6. A study of murine bone marrow cells cultured in bioreactors which create an environment which simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, Brother Desales

    1990-01-01

    Previous research indicated that mouse bone marrow cells could be grown in conditions of simulated microgravity. This environment was created in rotating bioreactor vessels. On three attempts mouse cells were grown successfully in the vessels. The cells reached a stage where the concentrations were doubling daily. Phenotypic analysis using a panel of monoclonal antibodies indicated that the cell were hematopoietic pluripotent stem cells. One unsuccessful attempt was made to reestablish the immune system in immunocompromised mice using these cells. Since last summer, several unsuccessful attempts were made to duplicate these results. It was determined by electron microscopy that the cells successfully grown in 1989 contained virus particles. It was suggested that these virally parasitized cells had been immortalized. The work of this summer is a continuation of efforts to grow mouse bone marrow in these vessels. A number of variations of the protocol were introduced. Certified pathogen free mice were used in the repeat experiments. In some attempts the medium of last summer was used; in others Dexture Culture Medium containing Iscove's Medium supplemented with 20 percent horse serum and 10-6 M hydrocortisone. Efforts this summer were directed solely to repeating the work of last summer. Plans were made for investigations if stem cells were isolated. Immortalization of the undifferentiated stem cell would be attempted by transfection with an oncogenic vector. Selective differentiation would be induced in the stem cell line by growing it with known growth factors and immune response modulators. Interest is in identifying any surface antigens unique to stem cells that would help in their characterization. Another goal was to search for markers on stem cells that would distinguish them from stem cells committed to a particular lineage. If the undifferentiated hematopoietic stem cell was obtained, the pathways that would terminally convert it to myeloid, lyphoid, erythroid, or other cell lines would be studied. Transfection with a known gene would be attempted and then conversion to a terminally identifiable cell.

  7. Cell biological effects of mechanical stimulations generated by focused extracorporeal shock wave applications on cultured human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Suhr, Frank; Delhasse, Yvonne; Bungartz, Gerd; Schmidt, Annette; Pfannkuche, Kurt; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2013-09-01

    Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) bear tremendous clinical potential due to their immunomodulatory properties in transplantation settings and their contribution to tissue regeneration. In fact, they are among the most promising types of stem-like cells for therapeutic applications and are the subject of intense research. However, the clinical use of hBMSCs has been confounded by limitations in their availability; they are scarce cells cumbersome to isolate and purify. Additionally, they are difficult to target to the site of injury in regeneration experiments. In order to combat these limitations, focused extracorporeal shock waves (fESW, 0.2/0.3mJ?mm(-2)) were applied to purified, cultured hBMSCs. fESW (0.2mJ?mm(-2)) stimulations were found to increase hBMSCs' growth rate (p<0.05), proliferation (p<0.05), migration, cell tracking and wound healing (p<0.05, respectively), as well as to reduce the rate of apoptosis activation (p<0.05). The increase in hBMSC migration behavior was found to be mediated by active remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton as indicated by increased directed stress fiber formations (p<0.05). Furthermore, hBMSCs maintain their differentiation potentials after fESW treatment, whereas 0.2mJ?mm(-2) is the most effective application. In conclusion, our results establish first-timely that hBMSCs' behavior can be modified and optimized in response to defined mechanical stimulation. These findings appear particularly promising as they suggest that mechanical stress preconditions hBMSCs for improved therapeutic performance without genetic manipulations and that mechanically preconditioned hBMSCs will be advantageous for hBMSC-based tissue regeneration. Therefore, this approach opens the door for exploiting the full potential of these cells in regenerative medicine. PMID:23880536

  8. Influence of Culture Medium on Smooth Muscle Cell Differentiation from Human Bone Marrow–Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhaodi; Calkins, Geoffrey; Cheng, Ee-chun; Krause, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) represent an appealing source of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) for engineering small-diameter vascular grafts due to the limited availability and replicative capacity of somatic SMCs. However, lack of standardization of hMSC culture conditions has limited some progress in hMSC research. Because, at the moment, a chemically defined, serum-free medium without growth factors is not capable of amplifying hMSCs in vitro, the usage of serum (either human serum or fetal bovine serum [FBS]) continues in hMSC research. The emergence of commercial hMSCs and hMSC media opened a series of questions regarding the compatibility of commercial and homemade hMSCs and hMSC media. In this study, two types of commonly used FBS-containing hMSC media—MSCGM (containing 10% FBS) and MesenPro (containing 2% FBS), along with our homemade medium (low-glucose Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium plus 10% selected lot FBS)—were compared in their ability to support SMC differentiation from hMSCs. The effects of FBS level, medium supplements (ascorbic acid, copper, etc.), and growth factors (transforming growth factor ?1) were also examined for their impact on SMC differentiation. It was discovered that MesenPro and transforming growth factor ?1 are the strongest SMC inducers from hMSCs. In contrast, hMSCs grown in homemade (10% Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium) and commercial MSCGM media remained undifferentiated. FBS concentration did not affect SMC differentiation when 10% FBS was compared with 2%. Finally, the mechanism underlying SMC differentiation from hMSCs grown in FBS-containing medium was explored by following the expression changes of serum response factor during the establishment of hMSC culture. PMID:19115826

  9. Influence of culture medium on smooth muscle cell differentiation from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhaodi; Calkins, Geoffrey; Cheng, Ee-chun; Krause, Diane; Niklason, Laura E

    2009-02-01

    Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) represent an appealing source of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) for engineering small-diameter vascular grafts due to the limited availability and replicative capacity of somatic SMCs. However, lack of standardization of hMSC culture conditions has limited some progress in hMSC research. Because, at the moment, a chemically defined, serum-free medium without growth factors is not capable of amplifying hMSCs in vitro, the usage of serum (either human serum or fetal bovine serum [FBS]) continues in hMSC research. The emergence of commercial hMSCs and hMSC media opened a series of questions regarding the compatibility of commercial and homemade hMSCs and hMSC media. In this study, two types of commonly used FBS-containing hMSC media-MSCGM (containing 10% FBS) and MesenPro (containing 2% FBS), along with our homemade medium (low-glucose Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium plus 10% selected lot FBS)-were compared in their ability to support SMC differentiation from hMSCs. The effects of FBS level, medium supplements (ascorbic acid, copper, etc.), and growth factors (transforming growth factor beta1) were also examined for their impact on SMC differentiation. It was discovered that MesenPro and transforming growth factor beta1 are the strongest SMC inducers from hMSCs. In contrast, hMSCs grown in homemade (10% Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium) and commercial MSCGM media remained undifferentiated. FBS concentration did not affect SMC differentiation when 10% FBS was compared with 2%. Finally, the mechanism underlying SMC differentiation from hMSCs grown in FBS-containing medium was explored by following the expression changes of serum response factor during the establishment of hMSC culture. PMID:19115826

  10. A Comparative Study on Morphochemical Properties and Osteogenic Cell Differentiation within Bone Graft and Coral Graft Culture Systems

    PubMed Central

    Puvaneswary, Subramaniam; Balaji Raghavendran, Hanumantha Rao; Ibrahim, Nurul Syuhada; Murali, Malliga Raman; Merican, Azhar Mahmood; Kamarul, T.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the morphological and chemical composition of bone graft (BG) and coral graft (CG) as well as their osteogenic differentiation potential using rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) in vitro. SEM analysis of BG and CG revealed that the pores in these grafts were interconnected, and their micro-CT confirmed pore sizes in the range of 107-315 µm and 103-514 µm with a total porosity of 92% and 94%, respectively. EDS analysis indicated that the level of calcium in CG was relatively higher than that in BG. FTIR of BG and CG confirmed the presence of functional groups corresponding to carbonyl, aromatic, alkyl, and alkane groups. XRD results revealed that the phase content of the inorganic layer comprised highly crystalline form of calcium carbonate and carbon. Atomic force microscopy analysis showed CG had better surface roughness compared to BG. In addition, significantly higher levels of osteogenic differentiation markers, namely, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Osteocalcin (OC) levels, and Osteonectin and Runx2, Integrin gene expression were detected in the CG cultures, when compared with those in the BG cultures. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the osteogenic differentiation of rMSCs is relatively superior in coral graft than in bone graft culture system. PMID:24151432

  11. Neural Markers Espression in Rat Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Cultures Treated with Neurosteroids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniela BronziVincenzo Bramanti; Vincenzo Bramanti; Daniele Tomassoni; Floriana Laureanti; Sonia Grasso; Guido Li Volsi; Roberto Avola

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to study the effects of DEX or E2 treatment during differentiation towards neural cell line of rat BM-MSCs in culture. In order to better characterize biochemically\\u000a our in vitro model, we evaluate by western blotting and immunocytochemical analysis some neural lineage markers (nestin, neurofilament,\\u000a ?-tubulin) and MAP-Kinases. An enhanced expression of the neural

  12. Bone cell culture in a three-dimensional polymer bead stabilizes the differentiated phenotype and provides evidence that osteoblastic cells synthesize type III collagen and fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Majmudar, G; Bole, D; Goldstein, S A; Bonadio, J

    1991-08-01

    We report a novel method to culture chick embryo osteoblasts in vitro. Primary cells were grown from explants of calvaria and then cultured within alginate polymer beads. Enriched cultures of primary osteoblasts were obtained because these cells grow readily within alginate beads but other cell types present in the initial outgrowth from calvarial fragments, such as fibroblasts, do not. A reproducible bone cell phenotype was observed in calvarial cells cultured in the alginate polymer for as long as 8 months. Alginate is a uronic acid monomer that reversibly polymerizes based on the presence or absence of divalent cations. Osteoblasts derived from the alginate beads elaborated and mineralized an extracellular matrix in vitro that contained fibronectin, type III collagen, and type I collagen. The synthesis and deposition of these matrix molecules was also demonstrated in the chick embryo calvaria in vivo. Together, these in vitro and in vivo observations provide the first evidence that type III collagen and fibronectin colocalize with type I collagen during the development of avian membranous bone. They also indicate that the phenotype of chick embryo osteoblasts can be expanded to include the synthesis of fibronectin and type III collagen. PMID:1664648

  13. Concise review: Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells change phenotype following in vitro culture: implications for basic research and the clinic.

    PubMed

    Bara, Jennifer J; Richards, R Geoff; Alini, Mauro; Stoddart, Martin J

    2014-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are increasingly being used in tissue engineering and cell-based therapies in all fields ranging from orthopedic to cardiovascular medicine. Despite years of research and numerous clinical trials, MSC therapies are still very much in development and not considered mainstream treatments. The majority of approaches rely on an in vitro cell expansion phase in monolayer to produce large cell numbers prior to implantation. It is clear from the literature that this in vitro expansion phase causes dramatic changes in MSC phenotype which has very significant implications for the development of effective therapies. Previous reviews have sought to better characterize these cells in their native and in vitro environments, described known stem cell interactions within the bone marrow, and discussed the use of innovative culture systems aiming to model the bone marrow stem cell niche. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on our knowledge of MSCs in their native environment, focusing on bone marrow-derived MSCs. We provide a detailed description of the differences between naive cells and those that have been cultured in vitro and examine the effect of isolation and culture parameters on these phenotypic changes. We explore the concept of "one step" MSC therapy and discuss the potential cellular and clinical benefits. Finally, we describe recent work attempting to model the MSC bone marrow niche, with focus on both basic research and clinical applications and consider the challenges associated with these new generation culture systems. PMID:24449458

  14. Role of colony-stimulating activity in murine long-term bone marrow cultures: evidence for its production and consumption by the adherent cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-MiChel Heard; Serge Fichelson; Bruno Varet

    1982-01-01

    The involvement of colony-stimulating activity (CSA) in murine long-term bone marrow cultures (LTBMC) was studied using bilayer agar cultures. The supernatants of LTBMC were removed. a layer of dense agar was spread over the cells adherent to the bottom of the flask. and fresh myeloid cells were plated as source of CFU-C in an upper agar layer. Large numbers of

  15. Bone tissue engineering with human stem cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darja Marolt; Miomir Knezevic; Gordana Vunjak Novakovic

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of extensive bone defects requires autologous bone grafting or implantation of bone substitute materials. An attractive\\u000a alternative has been to engineer fully viable, biological bone grafts in vitro by culturing osteogenic cells within three-dimensional scaffolds, under conditions supporting bone formation. Such grafts\\u000a could be used for implantation, but also as physiologically relevant models in basic and translational studies of

  16. PERSISTENCE OF NUCLEOLI IN SHORT TERM AND LONG TERM CELL CULTURES AND IN DIRECT BONE MARROW PREPARATIONS IN MAMMALIAN MATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Heneen, Waheeb K.; Nichols, Warren W.

    1966-01-01

    Persistent nucleoli were studied in Chinese hamster and human long term cultures, human peripheral blood short term cultures, as well as direct bone marrow preparations. No colchicine or hypotonic treatments were applied and the cells were differentially stained with the Feulgen method and light green. Nucleoli were found to persist in the three systems studied, although to a much greater extent in the long term culture. The persistent nucleolar materials were usually in the form of individualized nucleoli mainly at chromosome ends. They also sometimes existed in a fluidlike or dropletlike condition around the chromosomes. Association of acrocentrics in humans and end-to-end associations in hamsters are likely to result from persistence of nucleoli and the possible effects of colchicine and hypotonic treatments that are usually applied. Other phenomena, such as stickiness at metaphase and separation difficulties and fragmentation at anaphase, may result from persistence of nucleoli. Nucleoli were often associated with large chromosomes and sometimes at sites exhibiting faint or clear constrictions. The possibilities of a partial correspondence between sites of persistence and sites of organization, as well as of the organization of nucleolar materials at sites other than the main organizers, are discussed. The persistent nucleoli were not included in daughter nuclei. They either degenerated in the cytoplasm or were eliminated from the cell. The three systems used may represent different intensities of metabolism reflected in the amounts of nucleolar materials built up and the amount that persists. PMID:5971647

  17. Investigation of magnesium-zinc-calcium alloys and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell response in direct culture.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Aaron F; Sallee, Amy; Guan, Ren-Guo; Zhao, Zhan-Yong; Tayoba, Myla; Sanchez, Jorge; Liu, Huinan

    2015-01-01

    Crystalline Mg-Zn-Ca ternary alloys have recently attracted significant interest for biomedical implant applications due to their promising biocompatibility, bioactivity, biodegradability and mechanical properties. The objective of this study was to characterize as-cast Mg-xZn-0.5Ca (x=0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0wt.%) alloys, and determine the adhesion and morphology of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) at the interface with the Mg-xZn-0.5Ca alloys. The direct culture method (i.e. seeding cells directly onto the surface of the sample) was established in this study to probe the highly dynamic cell-substrate interface and thus to elucidate the mechanisms of BMSC responses to dynamic alloy degradation. The results showed that the BMSC adhesion density on these alloys was similar to the cell-only positive control and the BMSC morphology appeared more anisotropic on the rapidly degrading alloy surfaces in comparison with the cell-only positive control. Importantly, neither culture media supplemented with up to 27.6mM Mg(2+) ions nor media intentionally adjusted up to alkaline pH 9 induced any detectable adverse effects on BMSC responses. We speculated that degradation-induced dynamic surface topography played an important role in modulating cell morphology at the interface. This study presents a clinically relevant in vitro model for screening bioresorbable alloys, and provides useful design guidelines for determining the degradation rate of implants made of Mg-Zn-Ca alloys. PMID:25449917

  18. Expansion and preservation of multipotentiality of rabbit bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in dextran-based microcarrier spin culture.

    PubMed

    Boo, Lily; Selvaratnam, Lakshmi; Tai, Cheh Chin; Ahmad, Tunku Sara; Kamarul, Tunku

    2011-05-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in tissue repair and regeneration despite their multipotentiality has been limited by their cell source quantity and decelerating proliferative yield efficiency. A study was thus undertaken to determine the feasibility of using microcarrier beads in spinner flask cultures for MSCs expansion and compared to that of conventional monolayer cultures and static microcarrier cultures. Isolation and characterization of bone marrow derived MSCs were conducted from six adult New Zealand white rabbits. Analysis of cell morphology on microcarriers and culture plates at different time points (D0, D3, D10, D14) during cell culture were performed using scanning electron microscopy and bright field microscopy. Cell proliferation rates and cell number were measured over a period of 14 days, respectively followed by post-expansion characterization. MTT proliferation assay demonstrated a 3.20 fold increase in cell proliferation rates in MSCs cultured on microcarriers in spinner flask as compared to monolayer cultures (p < 0.05). Cell counts at day 14 were higher in those seeded on stirred microcarrier cultures (6.24 ± 0.0420 cells/ml) × 10(5) as compared to monolayer cultures (0.22 ± 0.004 cells/ml) × 10(5) and static microcarrier cultures (0.20 ± 0.002 cells/ml) × 10(5). Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated an increase in cell colonization of the cells on the microcarriers in stirred cultures. Bead-expanded MSCs were successfully differentiated into osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages. This system offers an improved and efficient alternative for culturing MSCs with preservation to their phenotype and multipotentiality. PMID:21461701

  19. Culture medium of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells effects lymphatic endothelial cells and tumor lymph vessel formation

    PubMed Central

    ZHAN, JIE; LI, YAHONG; YU, JING; ZHAO, YUANYAUN; CAO, WENMING; MA, JIE; SUN, XIAOXIAN; SUN, LI; QIAN, HUI; ZHU, WEI; XU, WENRONG

    2015-01-01

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) favor tumor growth and metastasis in vivo and in vitro. Neovascularization is involved in several pathological conditions, including tumor growth and metastasis. Previous studies have demonstrated that human bone marrow MSC-derived conditioned medium (hBM-MSC-CM) can promote tumor growth by inducing the expression of vascular epidermal growth factor (VEGF) in tumor cells. However, the effect of BM-MSCs on tumor lymph vessel formation has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, the effect of BM-MSCs on processes involved in lymph vessel formation, including tube formation, migration and proliferation, was investigated in human-derived lymphatic endothelial cells (HDLECs). It was identified that hBM-MSC-CM promoted the tube formation and migration of HDLECs. In addition, tumor cells were revealed to participate in lymph vessel formation. In the present study, the SGC-7901, HGC-27 and GFP-MCF-7 cell lines were treated with hBM-MSC-CM. The results demonstrated that the expression of the lymph-associated markers, prospero homeobox protein 1 and VEGF receptor-3, were increased in the SGC-7901 and HGC-27 cell lines, but not in the GFP-MCF-7 cells. The tube formation assay demonstrated that the HGC-27 cells treated with hBM-MSC-CM for 20 days underwent tube formation. These findings indicate that hBM-MSC-CM can promote tube formation in HDLECs and HGC-27 cells, which may be associated with lymph vessel formation during tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:25663886

  20. Development of magnetic particle techniques for long-term culture of bone cells with intermittent mechanical activation.

    PubMed

    Cartmell, Sarah H; Dobson, Jon; Verschueren, Sarah B; El Haj, Alicia J

    2002-06-01

    Magnetic particles were coated with RGD and adhered to primary human osteoblasts. During a 21-day culture, the osteoblasts plus adhered magnetic particles underwent a daily exposure to a time-varying magnetic field via a permanent NdFeB magnet, thus applying a direct mechanical stress to the cells (Bmax approximately 60 mT). After 21 days, preliminary results show that the cells plus magnetic particles were viable and had proliferated. A von-kossa stain showed mineralized bone matrix produced at 21 days in the experimental group whereas the control groups showed no mineralized matrix production. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction at 21 days showed an upregulation of osteopontin from the experimental group in comparison to the control group of cells with adhered particles and no magnet applied. These preliminary results indicate that adherence of RGD-coated 4.5 microm ferromagnetic particles to primary human osteoblasts does not initiate cell necrosis up to 21 days in vitro. Also, mechanical stimulation of human osteoblasts by magnetic particle technology appears to have an influence on osteoblastic activity. PMID:16689213

  1. An Exploratory Clinical Trial for Idiopathic Osteonecrosis of Femoral Head by Cultured Autologous Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Augmented with Vascularized Bone Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, Tomoki; Goto, Koji; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Ikeguchi, Ryosuke; Ueda, Michiko; Kasai, Yasunari; Maekawa, Taira; Tada, Harue; Teramukai, Satoshi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic osteonecrosis of femoral head (ION) is a painful disorder that progresses to collapse of the femoral head and destruction of the hip joint. Although its precise pathology remains unknown, the loss of blood supply causing the loss of living bone-forming cells is a hallmark of the pathophysiology of osteonecrosis. Transplantation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is a promising tool for regenerating the musculoskeletal system. The aim of the present study was to assess the safety and efficacy of transplantation of cultured autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs mixed with ?-tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP) in combination with vascularized bone grafts for the treatment of advanced stage ION in a clinical trial. Ten patients with stage 3 ION were enrolled in this study. Autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs were cultured with autologous serum, and cells (0.5–1.0×108) were transplanted after mixing with ?-TCP granules in combination with vascularized iliac bone grafts. Patients were assessed 24 months after treatment. The primary and secondary endpoints were progression of the radiological stage and changes in bone volume at the femoral head, and clinical score, respectively. Nine of ten patients completed the protocol, seven of whom remained at stage 3, and the remaining two cases progressed to stage 4. The average bone volume increased from 56.5±8.5?cm3 to 57.7±10.6?cm3. The average clinical score according to the Japan Orthopaedic Association improved from 65.6±25.5 points to 87.9±19.0 points. One severe adverse event was observed, which was not related to the clinical trial. Although the efficacy of cell transplantation was still to be determined, all procedures were successfully performed and some young patients with extensive necrotic lesions with pain demonstrated good bone regeneration with amelioration of symptoms. Further improvements in our method using MSCs and the proper selection of patients will open a new approach for the treatment of this refractory disease. PMID:24593258

  2. An exploratory clinical trial for idiopathic osteonecrosis of femoral head by cultured autologous multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells augmented with vascularized bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Tomoki; Goto, Koji; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Ikeguchi, Ryosuke; Ueda, Michiko; Kasai, Yasunari; Maekawa, Taira; Tada, Harue; Teramukai, Satoshi; Nakamura, Takashi; Toguchida, Junya

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic osteonecrosis of femoral head (ION) is a painful disorder that progresses to collapse of the femoral head and destruction of the hip joint. Although its precise pathology remains unknown, the loss of blood supply causing the loss of living bone-forming cells is a hallmark of the pathophysiology of osteonecrosis. Transplantation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is a promising tool for regenerating the musculoskeletal system. The aim of the present study was to assess the safety and efficacy of transplantation of cultured autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs mixed with ?-tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP) in combination with vascularized bone grafts for the treatment of advanced stage ION in a clinical trial. Ten patients with stage 3 ION were enrolled in this study. Autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs were cultured with autologous serum, and cells (0.5-1.0×10(8)) were transplanted after mixing with ?-TCP granules in combination with vascularized iliac bone grafts. Patients were assessed 24 months after treatment. The primary and secondary endpoints were progression of the radiological stage and changes in bone volume at the femoral head, and clinical score, respectively. Nine of ten patients completed the protocol, seven of whom remained at stage 3, and the remaining two cases progressed to stage 4. The average bone volume increased from 56.5±8.5?cm(3) to 57.7±10.6?cm(3). The average clinical score according to the Japan Orthopaedic Association improved from 65.6±25.5 points to 87.9±19.0 points. One severe adverse event was observed, which was not related to the clinical trial. Although the efficacy of cell transplantation was still to be determined, all procedures were successfully performed and some young patients with extensive necrotic lesions with pain demonstrated good bone regeneration with amelioration of symptoms. Further improvements in our method using MSCs and the proper selection of patients will open a new approach for the treatment of this refractory disease. PMID:24593258

  3. Umbilical Cord Wharton’s Jelly Repeated Culture System: A New Device and Method for Obtaining Abundant Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Junchao; Wu, Xuehui; Jin, Huiyong; Li, Zhiqiang; Deng, Moyuan; Xie, Zhao; Xu, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    To date, various types of cells for seeding regenerative scaffolds have been used for bone tissue engineering. Among seed cells, the mesenchymal stem cells derived from human umbilical cord Wharton’s jelly (hUCMSCs) represent a promising candidate and hold potential for bone tissue engineering due to the the lack of ethical controversies, accessibility, sourced by non-invasive procedures for donors, a reduced risk of contamination, osteogenic differentiation capacities, and higher immunomodulatory capacity. However, the current culture methods are somewhat complicated and inefficient and often fail to make the best use of the umbilical cord (UC) tissues. Moreover, these culture processes cannot be performed on a large scale and under strict quality control. As a result, only a small quantity of cells can be harvested using the current culture methods. To solve these problems, we designed and evaluated an UC Wharton’s jelly repeated culture device. Using this device, hUCMSCs were obtained from the repeated cultures and their quantities and biological characteristics were compared. We found that using our culture device, which retained all tissue blocks on the bottom of the dish, the total number of obtained cells increased 15–20 times, and the time required for the primary passage was reduced. Moreover, cells harvested from the repeated cultures exhibited no significant difference in their immunophenotype, potential for multilineage differentiation, or proliferative, osteoinductive capacities, and final osteogenesis. The application of the repeated culture frame (RCF) not only made full use of the Wharton’s jelly but also simplified and specified the culture process, and thus, the culture efficiency was significantly improved. In summary, abundant hUCMSCs of dependable quality can be acquired using the RCF. PMID:25329501

  4. Evaluation of the effects of different culture media on the myogenic differentiation potential of adipose tissue- or bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Stern-Straeter, Jens; Bonaterra, Gabriel Alejandro; Juritz, Stephanie; Birk, Richard; Goessler, Ulrich Reinhart; Bieback, Karen; Bugert, Peter; Schultz, Johannes; Hörmann, Karl; Kinscherf, Ralf; Faber, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The creation of functional muscles/muscle tissue from human stem cells is a major goal of skeletal muscle tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from fat/adipose tissue (AT-MSCs), as well as bone marrow (BM-MSCs) have been shown to bear myogenic potential, which makes them candidate stem cells for skeletal muscle tissue engineering applications. The aim of this study was to analyse the myogenic differentiation potential of human AT-MSCs and BM-MSCs cultured in six different cell culture media containing different mixtures of growth factors. The following cell culture media were used in our experiments: mesenchymal stem cell growth medium (MSCGM)™ as growth medium, MSCGM + 5-azacytidine (5-Aza), skeletal muscle myoblast cell growth medium (SkGM)-2 BulletKit™, and 5, 30 and 50% conditioned cell culture media, i.e., supernatant of human satellite cell cultures after three days in cell culture mixed with MSCGM. Following the incubation of human AT-MSCs or BM-MSCs for 0, 4, 8, 11, 16 or 21 days with each of the cell culture media, cell proliferation was measured using the alamarBlue® assay. Myogenic differentiation was evaluated by quantitative gene expression analyses, using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunocytochemical staining (ICC), using well-defined skeletal markers, such as desmin (DES), myogenic factor 5 (MYF5), myosin, heavy chain 8, skeletal muscle, perinatal (MYH8), myosin, heavy chain 1, skeletal muscle, adult (MYH1) and skeletal muscle actin-?1 (ACTA1). The highest proliferation rates were observed in the AT-MSCs and BM-MSCs cultured with SkGM-2 BulletKit medium. The average proliferation rate was higher in the AT-MSCs than in the BM-MSCs, taking all six culture media into account. qRT-PCR revealed the expression levels of the myogenic markers, ACTA1, MYH1 and MYH8, in the AT-MSC cell cultures, but not in the BM-MSC cultures. The muscle-specific intermediate filament, DES, was only detected (by ICC) in the AT-MSCs, but not in the BM-MSCs. The strongest DES expression was observed using the 30% conditioned cell culture medium. The detection of myogenic markers using different cell culture media as stimuli was only achieved in the AT-MSCs, but not in the BM-MSCs. The strongest myogenic differentiation, in terms of the markers examined, was induced by the 30% conditioned cell culture medium. PMID:24220225

  5. Dynamic perfusion bioreactor system for 3D culture of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on nanohydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 scaffold in vitro.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xu; Yuan, Fang; Zhimin, Zhu; Anchun, Mo

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the biocompatibility and osteogenic effectiveness of the porous nanohydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 (n-HA/PA66) scaffold material that was cultured with the rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs), under the static culture condition and the dynamic perfusion culture condition in vitro, and to investigate whether the 3D perfusion culture condition was better in provoking proliferation of rBMSCs than the 3D static culture condition. The Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assay, Osteocalcin (OCN) assay and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to observe the proliferation and differentiation of rBMSCs. The samples were respectively harvested at 1st, 3rd, 7th, 14th, and 21st days and effect comparisons were made between the two of the culture conditions. The results showed that values of MTT, ALP, and OCN were increased continuously and revealed a significant difference between the two culture conditions (p < 0.05). On the 14th day, SEM revealed calcified nodules 2-8 ?m in diameter in the lamellar structure. Under the static culture condition, the pores were covered with the cells looking like a piece of blanket, but under the perfusion culture condition the cells were observed to have a 3D lamellar structure. In conclusion, the porous n-HA/PA66 scaffold material can be used as a good candidate material for the bone scaffold construction in the tissue engineering because of its excellent 3D structure, which can greatly improve the proliferation and differentiation of rBMSCs and make them proliferate and osteogenesis even better under the perfusion culture condition. PMID:23362119

  6. Adult Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Very Small Embryonic-Like Stem Cells (VSELs) Differentiate Into the Hematopoietic Lineage After Co-Culture Over OP9 Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ratajczak, Janina; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Zuba-Surma, Ewa; Wan, Wu; Kucia, Magda; Yoder, Mervin C.; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We recently identified a population of small Sca-1+/Lin?/CD45? cells in adult murine bone marrow that express several epiblast/germ line and pluripotent stem cell markers (e.g., Oct-4 and SSEA-4) that we named “very small embryonic-like stem cells” (VSELs). In this report, we test the hypothesis that VSELs can differentiate along the hemato/lymphopoietic lineage. Material and Methods Purified from BM VSELs were primed/co-cultured over OP9 stroma cell line and subsequently tested in vitro and in vivo assays for their hematopoietic potential. In parallel cells derived from VSELs were evaluated for expression of hematopoietic genes and surface markers. Results While we observed that freshly isolated VSELs do not exhibit in vitro and in vivo hematopoietic potential, they may, after co-culture over OP9 stromal cells, differentiate along the hematopoietic lineage in a similar way as embryonic stem cells or inducible pluripotent stem cells. “OP9-primed,” VSEL-derived cells acquired expression of several hemato/lymphopoiesis-specific genes and markers, gave rise to hematopoietic colonies in vitro, and protected lethally irradiated mice in both primary and secondary transplant models upon transplantation. We also observed that, compared to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs), VSELs are highly resistant to total body irradiation. Conclusions Based on these observations, we postulate that VSELs are the most primitive murine BM-residing population of stem cells that have the potential to become specified into the hematopoietic lineage and thus may share some of the characteristics of long-term repopulating HSCs. PMID:21034791

  7. Up-regulation of BMP2/4 signaling increases both osteoblast-specific marker expression and bone marrow adipogenesis in Gja1Jrt/+ stromal cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Zappitelli, Tanya; Chen, Frieda; Aubin, Jane E

    2015-03-01

    Gja1(Jrt)/+ mice carry a mutation in one allele of the gap junction protein ?1 gene (Gja1), resulting in a G60S connexin 43 (Cx43) mutant protein that is dominant negative for Cx43 protein production of <50% of wild-type (WT) levels and significantly reduced gap junction formation and function in osteoblasts and other Cx43-expressing cells. Previously we reported that Gja1(Jrt)/+ mice exhibited early-onset osteopenia caused by activation of osteoclasts secondary to activation of osteoblast lineage cells, which expressed increased RANKL and produced an abnormal resorption-stimulating bone matrix high in BSP content. Gja1(Jrt)/+ mice also displayed early and progressive bone marrow atrophy, with a significant increase in bone marrow adiposity versus WT littermates but no increase in adipose tissues elsewhere in the body. BMP2/4 production and signaling were increased in Gja1(Jrt)/+ trabecular bone and osteogenic stromal cell cultures, which contributed to the up-regulated expression of osteoblast-specific markers (e.g., Bsp and Ocn) in Gja1(Jrt)/+ osteoblasts and increased Pparg2 expression in bone marrow-derived adipoprogenitors in vitro. The elevated levels of BMP2/4 signaling in G60S Cx43-containing cells resulted at least in part from elevated levels of cAMP. We conclude that up-regulation of BMP2/4 signaling in trabecular bone and/or stromal cells increases osteoblast-specific marker expression in hyperactive Gja1(Jrt)/+ osteoblasts and may also increase bone marrow adipogenesis by up-regulation of Pparg2 in the Cx43-deficient Gja1(Jrt)/+ mouse model. PMID:25568340

  8. Equine bone marrow mesenchymal or amniotic epithelial stem cells as feeder in a model for the in vitro culture of bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Lange-Consiglio, Anna; Maggio, Valentina; Pellegrino, Laura; Cremonesi, Fausto

    2012-02-01

    Various studies have shown that the in vitro culture environment is one of the key determinants of the blastocyst output. In the present study we investigated the effects of co-culturing bovine embryos with equine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) or equine amniotic epithelial stem cells (AE-SCs) on in vitro blastocysts development. BM specimens were obtained aseptically from sternal aspirates of horses under local anaesthesia and the isolated cells were resuspended in Dulbecco Modified Earle's Medium supplemented with 10 ng/ml of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Amniotic membranes were obtained from fresh placentas and, to release the AE cells, amniotic fragments were incubated with 0.05% trypsin for 45 min. Separated AE cells were plated in standard culture medium containing 10 ng/ml epidermal growth factor (EGF). Seven hundred and five cumulus-oocyte complexes were used and, after IVM and IVF, cumulus-free presumptive zygotes were randomly transferred into one of three co-culture systems in which they were cultured up to day 7: (1) co-culture with cumulus cells (control); (2) co-culture with BM-MSCs; and (3) co-culture with AE-SCs. Statistical analyses were performed by ANOVA. Blastocyst developmental rates were significantly different (p < 0.001) between control, AE-SCs and BM-MSCs (respectively 35.45, 41.84 and 30.09%). In conclusion, the AE-SC monolayer create a more suitable microenvironment necessary for inducing local cell activation and proliferation of the growing embryos in comparison with BM-MSCs and cumulus cells. It can be suggested that these cells secrete biologically active substances, including signalling molecules and growth factors of epithelial nature, different to those of the BM cells of mesenchymal origin. PMID:21205388

  9. A porous scaffold for bone tissue engineering\\/45S5 Bioglass ® derived porous scaffolds for co-culturing osteoblasts and endothelial cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sanjukta Deb; Ramin Mandegaran; Lucy Di Silvio

    2010-01-01

    One of the major factors in the therapeutic success of bone tissue engineered scaffolds is the ability of the construct to\\u000a vascularise post implantation. One of the approaches for improving vascularisation within scaffolds has been to co-culture\\u000a human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECS) with human osteoblasts (HOBS), which may then promote vascularisation and\\u000a facilitate tissue regeneration. However, in order to

  10. Phenomenon of Formation of Giant Fat-Containing Cells in Human Bone Marrow Cultures Induced by Human Serum Factor: Normal and Leukemic Patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Inna A. Svet-Moldavskaya; Svetlana N. Zinzar; George J. Svet-Moldavsky; Zalmen Arlin; Carol Vergara; Benjamin Koziner; Bayard D. Clarkson; James F. Holland

    1983-01-01

    Normal human sera induce the formation of fat-containing cells (FCC) in human bone marrow cultures. A nearly complete monolayer of FCC is formed after 7-14 days of cultivation with 20% human sera in the medium. FCC-inducing activity (FCCIA) is nondialyzable through 14,000-dalton cutoff membrane and is stable at 56 degrees C for 30 min. Abundant FCCIA was found in 83%

  11. Onset of heterogeneity in culture-expanded bone marrow stromal cells

    E-print Network

    Whitfield, Matthew J.

    Inconsistencies among in vitro and in vivo experiments using adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) confound development of therapeutic, regenerative medicine applications, and in vitro expansion is typically required to ...

  12. Interactions between mesenchymal stem cells, adipocytes, and osteoblasts in a 3D tri-culture model of hyperglycemic conditions in the bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Torri E; Hammoudi, Taymour M; Kemp, Melissa L; Lu, Hang; Temenoff, Johnna S

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have found that uncontrolled diabetes and consequential hyperglycemic conditions can lead to an increased incidence of osteoporosis. Osteoblasts, adipocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are all components of the bone marrow microenvironment and thus may have an effect on diabetes-related osteoporosis. However, few studies have investigated the influence of these three cell types on each other, especially in the context of hyperglycemia. Thus, we developed a hydrogel-based 3D culture platform engineered to allow live-cell retrieval in order to investigate the interactions between MSCs, osteoblasts, and adipocytes in mono-, co-, and tri-culture configurations under hyperglycemic conditions for 7 days of culture. Gene expression, histochemical analysis of differentiation markers, and cell viability were measured for all cell types, and MSC-laden hydrogels were degraded to retrieve cells to assess their colony-forming capacity. Multivariate models of gene expression data indicated that primary discrimination was dependent on the neighboring cell type, validating the need for co-culture configurations to study conditions modeling this disease state. MSC viability and clonogenicity were reduced when mono- and co-cultured with osteoblasts at high glucose levels. In contrast, MSCs showed no reduction of viability or clonogenicity when cultured with adipocytes under high glucose conditions, and the adipogenic gene expression indicates that cross-talk between MSCs and adipocytes may occur. Thus, our unique culture platform combined with post-culture multivariate analysis provided a novel insight into cellular interactions within the MSC microenvironment and highlights the necessity of multi-cellular culture systems for further investigation of complex pathologies such as diabetes and osteoporosis. PMID:24463781

  13. Interactions between Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Adipocytes, and Osteoblasts in a 3D Tri-Culture Model of Hyperglycemic Conditions in the Bone Marrow Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rinker, Torri E.; Hammoudi, Taymour M.; Kemp, Melissa L.; Lu, Hang; Temenoff, Johnna S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have found that uncontrolled diabetes and consequential hyperglycemic conditions can lead to increased incidence of osteoporosis. Osteoblasts, adipocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are all components of the bone marrow microenvironment and thus may have an effect on diabetes-related osteoporosis. However, few studies have investigated the influence of these three cell types on each other, especially in the context of hyperglycemia. Thus, we developed a hydrogel-based 3D culture platform engineered to allow live-cell retrieval in order to investigate the interactions between MSCs, osteoblasts, and adipocytes in mono-, co-, and tri-culture configurations under hyperglycemic conditions for 7 days of culture. Gene expression, histochemical analysis of differentiation markers, and cell viability were measured for all cell types, and MSC-laden hydrogels were degraded to retrieve cells to assess colony-forming capacity. Multivariate models of gene expression data indicated that primary discrimination was dependent on neighboring cell type, validating the need for co-culture configurations to study conditions modeling this disease state. MSC viability and clonogenicity were reduced when mono- and co-cultured with osteoblasts in high glucose levels. In contrast, MSCs had no reduction of viability or clonogenicity when cultured with adipocytes in high glucose conditions and adipogenic gene expression indicated that cross-talk between MSCs and adipocytes may occur. Thus, our unique culture platform combined with post-culture multivariate analysis provided novel insight into cellular interactions within the MSC microenvironment and highlights the necessity of multi-cellular culture systems for further investigation of complex pathologies such as diabetes and osteoporosis. PMID:24463781

  14. Effect of Lithium Chloride on Proliferation and Bone Differentiation of Rat Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohamadreza Baghaban Eslaminejad; Mahmood Talkhabi; Bahman Zeynali

    2008-01-01

    Objective(s) It is believed that the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation and proliferation are the results of activation of wnt signaling pathway. On the other hand, lithium chloride is reported to be able to activate this pathway. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of lithium on in vitro proliferation and bone differentiation of marrow-derived MSC. Materials

  15. Osteoinduction and survival of osteoblasts and bone-marrow stromal cells in 3D biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds under static and dynamic culture conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Subha N; Strobel, Leonie A; Arkudas, Andreas; Beier, Justus P; Maier, Anne-Kathrin; Greil, Peter; Horch, Raymund E; Kneser, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In many tissue engineering approaches, the basic difference between in vitro and in vivo conditions for cells within three-dimensional (3D) constructs is the nutrition flow dynamics. To achieve comparable results in vitro, bioreactors are advised for improved cell survival, as they are able to provide a controlled flow through the scaffold. We hypothesize that a bioreactor would enhance long-term differentiation conditions of osteogenic cells in 3D scaffolds. To achieve this either primary rat osteoblasts or bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) were implanted on uniform-sized biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) scaffolds produced by a 3D printing method. Three types of culture conditions were applied: static culture without osteoinduction (Group A); static culture with osteoinduction (Group B); dynamic culture with osteoinduction (Group C). After 3 and 6 weeks, the scaffolds were analysed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP), dsDNA amount, SEM, fluorescent labelled live-dead assay, and real-time RT-PCR in addition to weekly alamarBlue assays. With osteoinduction, increased ALP values and calcium deposition are observed; however, under static conditions, a significant decrease in the cell number on the biomaterial is observed. Interestingly, the bioreactor system not only reversed the decreased cell numbers but also increased their differentiation potential. We conclude from this study that a continuous flow bioreactor not only preserves the number of osteogenic cells but also keeps their differentiation ability in balance providing a suitable cell-seeded scaffold product for applications in regenerative medicine. PMID:22304383

  16. Osteoinduction and survival of osteoblasts and bone-marrow stromal cells in 3D biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds under static and dynamic culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Rath, Subha N; Strobel, Leonie A; Arkudas, Andreas; Beier, Justus P; Maier, Anne-Kathrin; Greil, Peter; Horch, Raymund E; Kneser, Ulrich

    2012-10-01

    In many tissue engineering approaches, the basic difference between in vitro and in vivo conditions for cells within three-dimensional (3D) constructs is the nutrition flow dynamics. To achieve comparable results in vitro, bioreactors are advised for improved cell survival, as they are able to provide a controlled flow through the scaffold. We hypothesize that a bioreactor would enhance long-term differentiation conditions of osteogenic cells in 3D scaffolds. To achieve this either primary rat osteoblasts or bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) were implanted on uniform-sized biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) scaffolds produced by a 3D printing method. Three types of culture conditions were applied: static culture without osteoinduction (Group A); static culture with osteoinduction (Group B); dynamic culture with osteoinduction (Group C). After 3 and 6 weeks, the scaffolds were analysed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP), dsDNA amount, SEM, fluorescent labelled live-dead assay, and real-time RT-PCR in addition to weekly alamarBlue assays. With osteoinduction, increased ALP values and calcium deposition are observed; however, under static conditions, a significant decrease in the cell number on the biomaterial is observed. Interestingly, the bioreactor system not only reversed the decreased cell numbers but also increased their differentiation potential. We conclude from this study that a continuous flow bioreactor not only preserves the number of osteogenic cells but also keeps their differentiation ability in balance providing a suitable cell-seeded scaffold product for applications in regenerative medicine. PMID:22304383

  17. Retinoic acid induces mouse bone marrow-derived CD15?, Oct4? and CXCR4? stem cells into male germ-like cells in a two-dimensional cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Kashani, Iraj Ragerdi; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Soleimani, Masoud; Abdolvahabi, Mir Abbas; Nayernia, Karim; Shirazi, Reza

    2014-06-01

    We have examined the effect of retinoic acid (RA) on differentiation of bone marrow-derived CD15(+) , Oct4(+) and CXCR4(+) cells into male germ cells. Bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) were isolated from the femur of 3-4-week-old male C57BL/6 mice. Magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) system was used to sort CD15(+) , Oct4(+) and CXCR4(+) cells. RT-PCR was used to follow the expression of pluripotency markers. Sorted CD15(+) , Oct4(+) and CXCR4(+) cells were cultured in an undifferentiated condition on a feeder layer of mitomycin C-inactivated C2C12. The embryoid-like bodies were differentiated into male germ cells by retinoic acid. To identify the expression of male germ specific markers, differentiated cells were analysed by means of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence staining. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence show that bone marrow-derived CD15(+) , Oct4(+) and CXCR4(+) cells express pluripotency markers, Oct4, Nanog, Rex-1, SOX-2 and AP. The purified CD15(+) , Oct4(+) and CXCR4(+) formed structures like embryoid bodies when plated over a feeder layer; these bodies were alkaline phosphatase positive. When cells were induced by RA, bone marrow-derived CD15(+) , Oct4(+) and CXCR4(+) were positive for Mvh, Dazl, Piwil2, Dppa3 and Stra8, that known molecular markers of male germ cells. Thus RA can induce differentiation of mouse bone marrow-derived CD15(+) , Oct4(+) and CXCR4(+) cells into male germ cells in vitro. Negative results for the gene expression analysis of female germ cells markers, GDF9 and ZP3, confirmed this conclusion. PMID:24677291

  18. Potential role of 20S proteasome in maintaining stem cell integrity of human bone marrow stromal cells in prolonged culture expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Li, E-mail: luli7300@126.com [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China)] [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Song, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Wei-Guo; Liu, Xue-Qin; Zhu, Qian; Cheng, Xiao-Long; Yang, Gui-Jiao [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China)] [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Li, Ang [Department of Anatomy, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong)] [Department of Anatomy, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Xiao, Zhi-Cheng, E-mail: zhicheng.xiao@monash.edu [Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Kunming Medical College, Kunming 650031 (China) [Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Kunming Medical College, Kunming 650031 (China); Monash Immunology and Stem Cell Laboratories, Monash University, Clayton, Melbourne 3800 (Australia)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prolonged culture expansion retards proliferation and induces senescence of hBMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduced 20S proteasomal activity and expression potentially contribute to cell aging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MG132-mediated 20S proteasomal inhibition induces senescence-like phenotype. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 18{alpha}-GA stimulates proteasomal activity and restores replicative senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 18{alpha}-GA retains differentiation without affecting stem cell characterizations. -- Abstract: Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) could be used in clinics as precursors of multiple cell lineages following proper induction. Such application is impeded by their characteristically short lifespan, together with the increasing loss of proliferation capability and progressive reduction of differentiation potential after the prolonged culture expansion. In the current study, we addressed the possible role of 20S proteasomes in this process. Consistent with prior reports, long-term in vitro expansion of hBMSCs decreased cell proliferation and increased replicative senescence, accompanied by reduced activity and expression of the catalytic subunits PSMB5 and PSMB1, and the 20S proteasome overall. Application of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 produced a senescence-like phenotype in early passages, whereas treating late-passage cells with 18{alpha}-glycyrrhetinic acid (18{alpha}-GA), an agonist of 20S proteasomes, delayed the senescence progress, enhancing the proliferation and recovering the capability of differentiation. The data demonstrate that activation of 20S proteasomes assists in counteracting replicative senescence of hBMSCs expanded in vitro.

  19. A comparative study of the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells cultured on ?-TCP ceramics and demineralized bone matrix with or without osteogenic inducers in vitro.

    PubMed

    An, Shaofeng; Gao, Yan; Huang, Xiangya; Ling, Junqi; Liu, Zhaohui; Xiao, Yin

    2015-05-01

    The repair of bone defects that result from periodontal diseases remains a clinical challenge for periodontal therapy. ?-tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP) ceramics are biodegradable inorganic bone substitutes with inorganic components that are similar to those of bone. Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) is an acid-extracted organic matrix derived from bone sources that consists of the collagen and matrix proteins of bone. A few studies have documented the effects of DBM on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of inorganic and organic elements of bone on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs using three-dimensional porous ?-TCP ceramics and DBM with or without osteogenic inducers. Primary hPDLCs were isolated from human periodontal ligaments. The proliferation of the hPDLCs on the scaffolds in the growth culture medium was examined using a Cell?Counting kit?8 (CCK-8) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the osteogenic differentiation of the hPDLCs cultured on the ?-TCP ceramics and DBM were examined in both the growth culture medium and osteogenic culture medium. Specific osteogenic differentiation markers were examined using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). SEM images revealed that the cells on the ?-TCP were spindle-shaped and much more spread out compared with the cells on the DBM surfaces. There were no significant differences observed in cell proliferation between the ?-TCP ceramics and the DBM scaffolds. Compared with the cells that were cultured on ?-TCP ceramics, the ALP activity, as well as the Runx2 and osteocalcin (OCN) mRNA levels in the hPDLCs cultured on DBM were significantly enhanced both in the growth culture medium and the osteogenic culture medium. The organic elements of bone may exhibit greater osteogenic differentiation effects on hPDLCs than the inorganic elements. PMID:25738431

  20. Dynamic culture improves MSC adhesion on freeze-dried bone as a scaffold for bone engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Fabiany da Costa; Paz, Ana Helena da Rosa; Lora, Priscila Schmidt; Passos, Eduardo Pandolfi; Cirne-Lima, Elizabeth Obino

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the interaction between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and bone grafts using two different cultivation methods: static and dynamic. METHODS: MSCs were isolated from rat bone marrow. MSC culture was analyzed according to the morphology, cell differentiation potential, and surface molecular markers. Before cell culture, freeze-dried bone (FDB) was maintained in culture for 3 d in order to verify culture medium pH. MSCs were co-cultured with FDB using two different cultivation methods: static co-culture (two-dimensional) and dynamic co-culture (three-dimensional). After 24 h of cultivation by dynamic or static methods, histological analysis of Cell adhesion on FDB was performed. Cell viability was assessed by the Trypan Blue exclusion method on days 0, 3 and 6 after dynamic or static culture. Adherent cells were detached from FDB surface, stained with Trypan Blue, and quantified to determine whether the cells remained on the graft surface in prolonged non-dynamic culture. Statistical analyses were performed with SPSS and a P < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: The results showed a clear potential for adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of MSC cultures. Rat MSCs were positive for CD44, CD90 and CD29 and negative for CD34, CD45 and CD11bc. FDBs were maintained in culture for 3 d and the results showed there was no significant variation in the culture medium pH with FDB compared to pure medium pH (P > 0.05). In histological analysis, there was a significant difference in the amount of adhered cells on FDB between the two cultivation methods (P < 0.05). The MSCs in the dynamic co-culture method demonstrated greater adhesion on the bone surface than in static co-culture method. On day 0, the cell viability in the dynamic system was significantly higher than in the static system (P < 0.05). There was a statistical difference in cell viability between days 0, 3 and 6 after dynamic culture (P < 0.05). In static culture, cell viability on day 6 was significantly lower than on day 3 and 0 (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: An alternative cultivation method was developed to improve the MSCs adhesion on FDB, demonstrating that dynamic co-culture provides a superior environment over static conditions. PMID:22468180

  1. Analysis of thymic stromal cell subpopulations grown in vitro on extracellular matrix in defined medium. IV. Cytokines secreted by human thymic epithelial cells in culture and their activities on murine thymocytes and bone marrow cells.

    PubMed Central

    Meilin, A; Shoham, J; Sharabi, Y

    1992-01-01

    In previous reports we described our approach to the cultivation of murine and human thymic epithelial cells in primary cultures, using defined, serum-free growth factor-supplemented medium and extracellular matrix-coated culture plates. The cells in these cultures displayed high metabolic activity and their supernatant was highly active on thymocytes. In the study reported here we analysed cytokine activities in the supernatant of human thymic epithelial cell cultures (HTES), by using the respective cytokine-dependent cell lines and by neutralization with specific monoclonal antibodies. Three cytokine activities were detected--interleukin-6 (IL-6), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and macrophage (M)-CSF. Other cytokine activities tested for [IL-1, IL-2, IL-7, interferon (IFN) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)] were negative. The effect of HTES on concanavalin A (Con A)-induced proliferation of murine thymocytes could be completely abolished by anti-IL-6 antibodies, but not by antibodies to CSF, whereas enhancement of bone marrow cell proliferation by HTES was partially inhibited by either anti-G-CSF or anti-M-CSF antibodies and completely inhibited by both antibodies, but not at all by anti-IL-6. We can thus distinguish between thymocyte-related cytokines (IL-6) and bone marrow (myeloid/monocyte) related ones (G-CSF, M-CSF) in HTES. PMID:1385312

  2. Bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Duong, Minh Ngoc; Ma, Yu-Ting; Chiu, Ray C J

    2013-01-01

    The "mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)" are cells adherent in the bone marrow, which can be isolated to induce differentiation. In contrast to the "embryonic stem cells" whose goal is to develop a new organism, the "MSC adult stem cells" can participate in tissue growth and repair throughout postnatal life. Addition of 5-azacytidine to MSCs in vitro induces the gradual increase in cellular size and begins spontaneous beatings, thereafter differentiating into cardiomyocytes. The "Methods" and "Protocols" to induce structural and functional maturations of MSCs, thus to achieve "Cellular Cardiomyoplasty," are described. With appropriate media, differentiations of MSCs to various kinds of cells such as chondrocytes, osteocytes, and adipocytes are also achievable. PMID:23807784

  3. GDNF and NT-3 Induce Progenitor Bone Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation into Neurons in Fetal Gut Culture Medium.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tianqi; Yu, Donghai; Feng, Jiexiong; Wu, Xiaojuan; Xiang, Lei; Gao, Heyun; Zhang, Xueqin; Wei, Mingfa

    2015-03-01

    With the increasing use of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in cell therapies, factors regulating BMSC differentiation have become the interest of current research. In this study, we investigated the effects of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) on the course of BMSC differentiation. BMSCs were isolated from rat bone marrow and transfected with GDNF and NT-3 genes. Compared to mock-transfected BMSCs, GDNF and NT-3 induced BMSC differentiation to reveal neuron-like characteristics, i.e., the positive expression of neuronal marker MAP-2 and astrocyte marker GFAP, as detected by immunofluorescence assays. Semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot analyses showed that the increase of expression of GDNF and NT-3 in BMSCs also simultaneously elevated the mRNA expression of NSE, nestin, and MAP-2. Furthermore, the cell patch-clamp test demonstrated that the overexpression of GDNF and NT-3 in BMSCs enhanced voltage-activated potassium currents, implying that BMSCs possess great potential as a cell-based therapeutic candidate to treat neurological diseases. PMID:25301495

  4. Cell-based therapies for regenerating bone

    PubMed Central

    GOODMAN, S. B.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular therapies to replenish bone lost due to acquired conditions such as trauma, infection, tumor, periprosthetic osteolysis and other etiologies have become widespread. Traditional, open, surgical bone grafting techniques have given way to newer cellular therapies that are potentially less invasive and have a lower complication rate and faster recovery time. These new technologies include bone marrow harvesting with concentration of osteoprogenitor cells with/without cell culture, scaffolds which are both osteoconductive and osteoinductive, attempts to facilitate mesenchymal stem cell and osteoprogenitor cell homing both locally and systemically, genetic engineering of specialized stem cells, and the use of potentially immune-privileged fetal and other types of stem cells. Some of these techniques have already been introduced into the orthopaedic clinic, whereas others are still in the pre-clinical testing phase. Given the limited supply of autologous graft, these new techniques will have a dramatic impact on bone regeneration in the future. PMID:24436510

  5. Three-dimensional co-cultures of osteoblasts and endothelial cells in DegraPol foam: histological and high-field magnetic resonance imaging analyses of pre-engineered capillary networks in bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Buschmann, Johanna; Welti, Manfred; Hemmi, Sonja; Neuenschwander, Peter; Baltes, Christof; Giovanoli, Pietro; Rudin, Markus; Calcagni, Maurizio

    2011-02-01

    Tissue engineering of bone grafts was addressed in a critical-sized model on the chick chorioallantoic membrane model, using DegraPol(®) foam as scaffold material. The scaffolds were seeded with cultures of human osteoblasts and human endothelial cells, respectively, or with a co-culture of the two cell types (control: no cells). In vitro samples (7 days cultivation) and ex vivo chorioallantoic membrane model samples at incubation day 15 were analyzed by high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology. The co-culture system performed best with respect to perfusion, as assessed by contrast-enhanced MRI using gadolinium-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA). The scaffold seeded by the co-culture supported an increased vascular ingrowth, which was confirmed by histological analysis. DegraPol foam is a suitable scaffold for bone tissue engineering and the MRI technique allows for nondestructive and quantitative assessment of perfusion capability during early stages of bone forming constructs. PMID:20799888

  6. Growth and Potential Damage of Human Bone-Derived Cells Cultured on Fresh and Aged C60/Ti Films

    PubMed Central

    Kopova, Ivana; Lavrentiev, Vasily; Vacik, Jiri; Bacakova, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Thin films of binary C60/Ti composites, with various concentrations of Ti ranging from ~ 25% to ~ 70%, were deposited on microscopic glass coverslips and were tested for their potential use in bone tissue engineering as substrates for the adhesion and growth of bone cells. The novelty of this approach lies in the combination of Ti atoms (i.e., widely used biocompatible material for the construction of stomatological and orthopedic implants) with atoms of fullerene C60, which can act as very efficient radical scavengers. However, fullerenes and their derivatives are able to generate harmful reactive oxygen species and to have cytotoxic effects. In order to stabilize C60 molecules and to prevent their possible cytotoxic effects, deposition in the compact form of Ti/C60 composites (with various Ti concentrations) was chosen. The reactivity of C60/Ti composites may change in time due to the physicochemical changes of molecules in an air atmosphere. In this study, we therefore tested the dependence between the age of C60/Ti films (from one week to one year) and the adhesion, morphology, proliferation, viability, metabolic activity and potential DNA damage to human osteosarcoma cells (lines MG-63 and U-2 OS). After 7 days of cultivation, we did not observe any negative influence of fresh or aged C60/Ti layers on cell behavior, including the DNA damage response. The presence of Ti atoms resulted in improved properties of the C60 layers, which became more suitable for cell cultivation. PMID:25875338

  7. Whey protein suppresses the osteoclast-mediated bone resorption and osteoclast cell formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yukihiro Takada; Naomichi Kobayashi; Hiroaki Matsuyama; Ken Kato; Junichi Yamamura; Masatoshi Yahiro; Masayoshi Kumegawa; Seiichiro Aoe

    1997-01-01

    Effects of whey protein on bone resorption and osteoclastic cell formation were evaluated. In the pre-existed and newly formed osteoclast, in bone resorption methods using an unfractionated bone cell culturing system, whey protein suppressed the area of pits formed by osteoclasts. In the osteoclastic cell formation method using the hemopoietic blast cell culturing system, whey protein also suppressed osteoclastic cell

  8. In vitro cultivation of Anaplasma marginale in bovine bone marrow cells

    E-print Network

    Baradji, Issa

    1986-01-01

    donor animals Bone marrow cells from exsanguinated animals ~Ana I ~ai I -I f ct d a d infect d erythrocyte cultures Initiation of bone marrow cultures Slide preparation Infection of bone marrow cultures with A mar inale Iitit ~ noma I I ifetinof... cultures inoculated with Ana lasma mar inale infected erythrocytes ca f ?13, 13. 7 parasi temi a). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Percent parasitemias obtained from bone marrow cell cultures inoculated with Ana lasma mar inale infected erythrocytes ca...

  9. Effect of BMP-2 protein on the count and osteogenic properties of multipotent stromal cells and expression of cytokine genes in primary cultures of bone marrow and spleen cells from CBA mice immunized with bacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Gorskaya, Yu F; Danilova, T A; Mezentseva, M V; Shapoval, I M; Grunina, T M; Bartov, M S; Karyagina, A S; Lunin, V G; Chailakhyan, R K; Kuralesova, A I; Gerasimov, Yu V; Nesterenko, V G

    2013-09-01

    We studied the effect of BMP-2 added to the culture medium on osteogenic and proliferative properties of multipotent stromal cells (MSC) and on the expression of cytokine genes induced by immunization of experimental animals with bacterial antigens. It is shown that the presence of BMP-2 in the culture medium stimulates proliferation of bone marrow MSC and especially spleen MSC (which was seen from enlargement of MSC colonies); improves the efficiency of MSC cloning; increases osteogenic activity of mouse bone marrow MSC; induces osteogenic differentiation of splenic MSC (osteogenesis is normally not observed in the spleen); reduces the number of macrophages in cultures; inhibits synthesis of mRNA for proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-?) that typically occurs in cultures of the bone marrow and spleen from animals immunized with S. typhimurium or group A streptococcus antigens. Bearing in mind that proinflammatory cytokines negatively affect osteogenic activity of the bone marrow, we can hypothesize that BMP-2 not only stimulates osteogenesis, but also provides optimal conditions for its realization by suppressing the expression of genes encoding these cytokines. PMID:24288731

  10. Mammalian Cell Culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simon P. Langdon

    Mammalian cell culture is used widely in academic, medical and industrial settings. It has provided a means to study the physiology and biochemistry of the cell and developments in the fields of cell and molecular biology have required the use of reproducible model systems that only cultured cell lines can provide. For medical use, cell culture provides test systems to

  11. Adaptation and Infection of Mouse Bone Marrow (JLS-V9) Cells in Suspension Culture for Production of Rauscher Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Howard M.; Klein, Frederick; Bandyopadhyay, Alok K.; Robinson, Orson R.; Shibley, George P.

    1974-01-01

    JLS-V9 mouse bone marrow cells were readily adapted to suspension culture, chronically infected with Rauscher leukemia virus (RLV), and subsequently grown in 7.5- and 14-liter New Brunswick fermentors. The suspension-type cell system can be modified to produce virus with clearly defined properties, such as high ribonucleic acid-dependent deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase (RDDP) activity, high particle count, and high infectious particle count. Biological and biophysical properties of suspension-produced RLV were not affected by concentration and purification employing continuous-flow and rate-zonal centrifugation procedures. The RDDP assay was standardized and showed a linear incorporation of 3H-thymidine 5?-monophosphate (3H-TMP) up to 30 min. Further characterization indicated that a high percentage of 3H-TMP incorporation was due to RDDP. Images PMID:4129475

  12. Comparison of the efficiency of transplantation of bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions and their conditioned media on the model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Chailakhyan, R K; Aver'yanov, A V; Zabozlaev, F G; Sobolev, P A; Sorokina, A V; Akul'shin, D A; Gerasimov, Yu V

    2014-05-01

    The therapeutic efficiency of intravenous injection of rat bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells grown under conditions of normoxia and hypoxia (3% O2) and conditioned media from these cultures were compared on the rat model of acute lung injury induced by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide. The best therapeutic efficiency was demonstrated by cells grown under hypoxic conditions. The effect of conditioned media was less pronounced and did not depend on the culturing conditions. PMID:24913579

  13. Co?culture with bone marrow stromal cells protects PC12 neuronal cells from tumor necrosis factor???induced apoptosis by inhibiting the tumor necrosis factor receptor/caspase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Wang, Jing; Tang, Ling; Yu, Xin; Sui, Yi; Zhang, Chaodong

    2015-07-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), derived from the mesoderm, have been applied in the repair and reconstruction of injured tissues. The present study was conducted to explore the effects of BMSCs on cell viability of tumor necrosis factor?? (TNF??)?stimulated PC12 cells. PC12 cells were co?cultured with BMSCs under TNF?? treatment, with normal PC12 cells as controls. Results from an MTT assay indicated that BMSCs significantly increased cell growth and proliferation of TNF???treated PC12 cells (survival rates were 56.71 and 76.86% for the positive control (PC) and co?culture group, respectively). Furthermore, Annexin V/propidium iodide staining and flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that TNF?? increased PC12?cell apoptosis from 3.49 to 40.74% in the negative control and PC group, and the apoptotic rate was significantly reduced upon co?culture with BMSCs to 16.97%. In addition, data from reverse transcription?quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses illustrated that TNF???induced upregulation in TNF receptor (TNFR)?1 (TNFR1) and caspase?8 expression in PC12 cells were partially reversed by co?culture with BMSCs. In conclusion, the present study suggested that BMSCs protect PC12 cells against stimulation with TNF??, which is partially mediated through the TNFR/caspase signaling pathway. The results of the present study also suggested a therapeutic use of BMSCs in clinical neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25738414

  14. Single cell mutational analysis of PIK3CA in circulating tumor cells and metastases in breast cancer reveals heterogeneity, discordance, and mutation persistence in cultured disseminated tumor cells from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Therapeutic decisions in cancer are generally guided by molecular biomarkers or, for some newer therapeutics, primary tumor genotype. However, because biomarkers or genotypes may change as new metastases emerge, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from blood are being investigated for a role in guiding real-time drug selection during disease progression, expecting that CTCs will comprehensively represent the full spectrum of genomic changes in metastases. However, information is limited regarding mutational heterogeneity among CTCs and metastases in breast cancer as discerned by single cell analysis. The presence of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in bone marrow also carry prognostic significance in breast cancer, but with variability between CTC and DTC detection. Here we analyze a series of single tumor cells, CTCs, and DTCs for PIK3CA mutations and report CTC and corresponding metastatic genotypes. Methods We used the MagSweeper, an immunomagnetic separation device, to capture live single tumor cells from breast cancer patients’ primary and metastatic tissues, blood, and bone marrow. Single cells were screened for mutations in exons 9 and 20 of the PIK3CA gene. Captured DTCs grown in cell culture were also sequenced for PIK3CA mutations. Results Among 242 individual tumor cells isolated from 17 patients and tested for mutations, 48 mutated tumor cells were identified in three patients. Single cell analyses revealed mutational heterogeneity among CTCs and tumor cells in tissues. In a patient followed serially, there was mutational discordance between CTCs, DTCs, and metastases, and among CTCs isolated at different time points. DTCs from this patient propagated in vitro contained a PIK3CA mutation, which was maintained despite morphological changes during 21 days of cell culture. Conclusions Single cell analysis of CTCs can demonstrate genotypic heterogeneity, changes over time, and discordance from DTCs and distant metastases. We present a cautionary case showing that CTCs from any single blood draw do not always reflect metastatic genotype, and that CTC and DTC analyses may provide independent clinical information. Isolated DTCs remain viable and can be propagated in culture while maintaining their original mutational status, potentially serving as a future resource for investigating new drug therapies. PMID:24947048

  15. The divalent strontium salt S12911 enhances bone cell replication and bone formation in vitro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Canalis; M. Hott; P. Deloffre; Y. Tsouderos; P. J. Marie

    1996-01-01

    In this study, we have determined the effect of the divalent strontium salt S12911 on bone cell replication and bone formation in two culture systems. In the first series of experiments, half-calvariae of newborn rats were cultured with S12911 from 24 to 96 h and labeled with 3H-thymidine for the last 6 h of culture or treated with S12911 for

  16. Tissue Engineered Bone Grafts: Biological Requirements, Tissue Culture and Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Mirjam; Grayson, Warren L.; Wan, Leo Q.; Marolt, Darja; Drobnic, Matej; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    The tremendous need for bone tissue in numerous clinical situations and the limited availability of suitable bone grafts are driving the development of tissue engineering approaches to bone repair. In order to engineer viable bone grafts, one needs to understand the mechanisms of native bone development and fracture healing, as these processes should ideally guide the selection of optimal conditions for tissue culture and implantation. Engineered bone grafts have been shown to have capacity for osteogenesis, osteoconduction, osteoinduction and osteointegration - functional connection between the host bone and the graft. Cells from various anatomical sources in conjunction with scaffolds and osteogenic factors have been shown to form bone tissue in vitro. The use of bioreactor systems to culture cells on scaffolds before implantation further improved the quality of the resulting bone grafts. Animal studies confirmed the capability of engineered grafts to form bone and integrate with the host tissues. However, the vascularization of bone remains one of the hurdles that need to be overcome if clinically sized, fully viable bone grafts are to be engineered and implanted. We discuss here the biological guidelines for tissue engineering of bone, the bioreactor cultivation of human mesenchymal stem cells on three-dimensional scaffolds, and the need for vascularization and functional integration of bone grafts following implantation. PMID:19075755

  17. In vitro formation of osteoclasts from long-term cultures of bone marrow mononuclear phagocytes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. H. Burger; J. S. van de Gevel; J. C. Gribnau; C. W. Thesingh; R. van Furth

    1982-01-01

    The origin of osteoclasts was studied in an in vitro model using organ cultures of periosteum-free embryonic mouse long-bone primordia, which were co-cultured with various cell populations. The bone rudiments were freed of their periosteum-perichondrium by collagenase treatment in a stage before cartilage erosion and osteoclast formation, and co-cultured for 7 d with either embryonic liver or mononuclear phagocytes from

  18. In Vivo Bone Regeneration Using Tubular Perfusion System Bioreactor Cultured Nanofibrous Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Yeatts, Andrew B.; Both, Sanne K.; Yang, Wanxun; Alghamdi, Hamdan S.; Yang, Fang; Jansen, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The use of bioreactors for the in vitro culture of constructs for bone tissue engineering has become prevalent as these systems may improve the growth and differentiation of a cultured cell population. Here we utilize a tubular perfusion system (TPS) bioreactor for the in vitro culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and implant the cultured constructs into rat femoral condyle defects. Using nanofibrous electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/poly(?-caprolactone) scaffolds, hMSCs were cultured for 10 days in vitro in the TPS bioreactor with cellular and acellular scaffolds cultured statically for 10 days as a control. After 3 and 6 weeks of in vivo culture, explants were removed and subjected to histomorphometric analysis. Results indicated more rapid bone regeneration in defects implanted with bioreactor cultured scaffolds with a new bone area of 1.23±0.35?mm2 at 21 days compared to 0.99±0.43?mm2 and 0.50±0.29?mm2 in defects implanted with statically cultured scaffolds and acellular scaffolds, respectively. At the 21 day timepoint, statistical differences (p<0.05) were only observed between defects implanted with cell containing scaffolds and the acellular control. After 42 days, however, defects implanted with TPS cultured scaffolds had the greatest new bone area with 1.72±0.40?mm2. Defects implanted with statically cultured and acellular scaffolds had a new bone area of 1.26±0.43?mm2 and 1.19±0.33?mm2, respectively. The increase in bone growth observed in defects implanted with TPS cultured scaffolds was statistically significant (p<0.05) when compared to both the static and acellular groups at this timepoint. This study demonstrates the efficacy of the TPS bioreactor to improve bone tissue regeneration and highlights the benefits of utilizing perfusion bioreactor systems to culture MSCs for bone tissue engineering. PMID:23865551

  19. Hepatic differentiation capability of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and hematopoietic stem cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sai-Nan Shu; Lai Wei; Jiang-Hua Wang; Yu-Tao Zhan; Hong-Song Chen; Yu Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the different effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) on hepatic differentiation. METHODS: MSCs from rat bone marrow were isolated and cultured by standard methods. HSCs from rat bone marrow were isolated and purified by magnetic activated cell sorting. Both cell subsets were induced. Morphology, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry were used to identify the

  20. Stem cell culture engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gargi Seth; Catherine M. Verfaillie

    2005-01-01

    Stem cells have the capacity for self renewal and undergo multilineage differentiation. Stem cells isolated from both blastocysts and adult tissues represent valuable sources of cells for applications in cell therapy, drug screening and tissue engineering. While expanding stem cells in culture, it is critical to maintain their self?renewal and differentiation capacity. In generating particular cell types for specific applications,

  1. Optimizing stem cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Sanden, Boudewijn; Dhobb, Mehdi; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells always balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Hence, stem cell culture parameters are critical and need to be continuously refined according to progress in our stem cell biology understanding and the latest technological developments. This led to the progressive replacement of ill-defined additives such as serum or feeder cell layers by recombinant cytokines or growth factors. Another example is the control of the oxygen pressure. For many years cell cultures have been done under atmospheric oxygen pressure which is much higher than the one experienced by stem cells in vivo. A consequence of cell metabolism is that cell culture conditions are constantly changing. Therefore, the development of high sensitive monitoring processes and control algorithms is required for ensuring cell culture medium homeostasis. Stem cells also sense the physical constraints of their microenvironment. Rigidity, stiffness and geometry of the culture substrate influence stem cell fate. Hence, nanotopography is probably as important as medium formulation in the optimization of stem cell culture conditions. Recent advances include the development of synthetic bioinformative substrates designed at the micro- and nanoscale level. On going research in many different fields including stem cell biology, nanotechnology, and bioengineering suggest that our current way to culture cells in Petri dish or flasks will soon be outdated as flying across the Atlantic Ocean in the Lindbergh’s plane. PMID:20803548

  2. Growth of erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) in cultures of canine bone marrow and peripheral blood cells: effect of serum from irradiated dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Kreja, L.; Baltschukat, K.; Nothdurft, W.

    1988-08-01

    Erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) from canine bone marrow and peripheral blood could be grown in methylcellulose in the presence of an appropriate batch of fetal calf serum (FCS), transferrin, and erythropoietin (Epo). However, improved colony formation (size and number of bursts) was obtained when serum from total body irradiated dogs was present in the culture. This serum, obtained from dogs at day 9 after total body irradiation with a dose of 3.9 Gy, reduced markedly the Epo requirement of BFU-E. Furthermore, it allowed the omission of FCS from the culture medium if cholesterol and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were used as FCS substitutes. BFU-E concentrations were found to be rather different in the peripheral blood and in bone marrow samples from different sites (i.e., iliac crest, sternum, and humerus) of normal beagles. The studies further show that canine bone marrow BFU-E can be cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen.

  3. Giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Raskin, Kevin A; Schwab, Joseph H; Mankin, Henry J; Springfield, Dempsey S; Hornicek, Francis J

    2013-02-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is one type of giant cell-rich lesion of bone. This benign mesenchymal tumor has characteristic multinuclear giant cells. Mononuclear stromal cells are the physiologically active and diagnostic cell type. Most GCTs are located in the epiphyseal regions of long bones. The axial skeleton-primarily the sacrum-is a secondary site of involvement. Most patients present with pain, swelling, joint effusion, and disability in the third and fourth decades of life. Imaging studies are important for tumor staging and radiographic grading. Typically, these clinically active but slow-growing tumors are confined to bone, with relatively well-defined radiographic borders. Monostotic disease is most common. Metastatic spread to the lungs is rare. Extended intralesional curettage with or without adjuvant therapy is the primary treatment choice. Local recurrence is seen in ? 20% of cases, and a second local intralesional procedure is typically sufficient in cases that are detected early. Medical therapies include diphosphonates and denosumab. Denosumab has been approved for use in osteoporosis as well as breast and prostate cancer metastatic to bone. Medical therapy and radiotherapy can alter the management of GCT of bone, especially in multifocal disease, local recurrences, and bulky central/axial disease. PMID:23378375

  4. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A; Baldini, N; Cenni, E; Gomez-Barrena, E; Granchi, D; Kassem, M; Konttinen, Y T; Mustafa, K; Pioletti, D P; Sillat, T; Finne-Wistrand, A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This invited review covers research areas of central importance for orthopaedic and maxillofacial bone tissue repair, including normal fracture healing and healing problems, biomaterial scaffolds for tissue engineering, mesenchymal and foetal stem cells, effects of sex steroids on mesenchymal stem cells, use of platelet-rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed. PMID:21129153

  5. Basics of Cell Culture

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Afshar, Golnar

    These manuals are used in the Stem Cell Culture Course at City College of San Francisco. This course is about general mammalian cell culture techniques but includes a laboratory exercise using stem cells (takes 3 weeks to complete). The course is taught to high school students but the materials are also used for college students. Laboratory exercises provide instruction in basic techniques of routine cell culture using common cell lines before progressing to differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells. Photographs and explanations of common equipment (laminar flow hood, inverted microscope, etc.) and reagents are provided. Laboratory exercises include the following: Basic Aseptic Technique; Media Preparation; Plating cells from frozen stock; Cell counting and plating; Survival assay (UV); Live Cell Identification; Transfection; Freezing cells; Stem cell differentiation. A student lab manual and an instructor manual are provided.

  6. Multicellular tumor spheroid interactions with bone cells and bone

    SciTech Connect

    Wezeman, F.H.; Guzzino, K.M.; Waxler, B.

    1985-10-01

    In vitro coculture techniques were used to study HSDM1C1 murine fibrosarcoma multicellular tumor spheroid (HSDM1C1-MTS) interactions with mouse calvarial bone cells having osteoblastic characteristics and mouse bone explants. HSDM1C1-MTS attached to confluent bone cell monolayers and their attachment rate was quantified. HSDM1C1-MTS interaction with bone cells was further demonstrated by the release of /sup 3/H-deoxyuridine from prelabeled bone cells during coculture with multicellular tumor spheroids. HSDM1C1-MTS-induced cytotoxicity was mimicked by the addition of 10(-5) M prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) to /sup 3/H-deoxyuridine-labeled bone cells. The effects of low (10(-9) M) and high (10(-5) M) concentrations of PGE2 on bone cell proliferation were also studied. Higher concentrations of PGE2 inhibited bone cell proliferation. HSDM1C1-MTS resorbed living explants in the presence of indomethacin, suggesting that other tumor cell products may also participate in bone resorption. HSDM1C1-MTS caused direct bone resorption as measured by the significantly elevated release of /sup 45/Ca from prelabeled, devitalized calvaria. However, the growth of a confluent bone cell layer on devitalized, /sup 45/Ca-prelabeled calvaria resulted in a significant reduction in the amount of /sup 45/Ca released subsequent to the seeding of HSDM1C1-MTS onto the explants. Bone cells at the bone surface may act as a barrier against invasion and tumor cell-mediated bone resorption. Violation of this cellular barrier is achieved, in part, by tumor cell products.

  7. Generation of Large Numbers of Dendritic Cells from Mouse Bone Marrow Cultures Supplemented with Granulocyte\\/Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kayo Inaba; Muneo Inaba; Nikolaus Romani; Hideki Aya; Masashi Deguchi; Susumu Ikehara; Shigeru Muramatsu; Ralph M. Steinmanll

    1992-01-01

    Summary Antigen-presenting, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-rich dendritic cells are known to arise from bone marrow. However, marrow lacks mature dendritic cells, and substantial numbers of proliferating less-mature cells have yet to be identified. The methodology for inducing dendritic cell growth that was recently described for mouse blood now has been modified to MHC class II-negative precursors in marrow.

  8. Collagenase expression and activity in the stromal cells from giant cell tumour of bone?

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Robert W.; Mak, Isabella W.Y.; Colterjohn, Nigel; Singh, Gurmit; Ghert, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The characteristic bone destruction in giant cell tumour of bone (GCT) is largely attributed to the osteoclast-like giant cells. However, experimental analyses of bone resorption by cells from GCT often fail to exclude the neoplastic spindle-like stromal cells, and several studies have demonstrated that bone resorption by GCT cells is increased in the presence of stromal cells. The spindle-like stromal cells from GCT may therefore actively contribute to the bone resorption observed in the tumour. Type I collagen, a major organic constituent of bone, is effectively degraded by three matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) known as the collagenases: MMP-1, MMP-8 and MMP-13. We established primary cell cultures from nine patients with GCT and the stromal cell populations were isolated in culture. The production of collagenases by primary cultures of GCT stromal cells was determined through real-time PCR, western blot analysis and a multiplex assay system. Results show that the cells produce MMP-1 and MMP-13 but not MMP-8. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of MMP-1 and MMP-13 in paraffin-embedded GCT tissue samples. Medium conditioned by the stromal cell cultures was capable of proteolytic activity as determined by MMP-1 and MMP-13-specific standardized enzyme activity assays. The spindle-like stromal cells from GCT may therefore actively participate in the bone destruction that is characteristic of the tumour. PMID:19442604

  9. Tumor necrosis factor alpha promotes the expression of immunosuppressive proteins and enhances the cell growth in a human bone marrow-derived stem cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Miettinen, Johanna A., E-mail: johanna.miettinen@oulu.fi [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Pietilae, Mika [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland)] [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Salonen, Riikka J. [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland) [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Ohlmeier, Steffen [Proteomics Core Facility, Biocenter Oulu, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland)] [Proteomics Core Facility, Biocenter Oulu, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Ylitalo, Kari; Huikuri, Heikki V. [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland)] [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Lehenkari, Petri [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland)] [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2011-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely used in experimental treatments for various conditions that involve normal tissue regeneration via inflammatory repair. It is known that MSCs can secrete multiple soluble factors and suppress inflammation. Even though the effect of MSCs on inflammation has been extensively studied, the effect of inflammation on MSCs is poorly understood. One of the major cytokines released at the site of inflammation is tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}) which is known to induce MSC invasion and proliferation. Therefore, we wanted to test the effects of TNF-{alpha} exposure on MSCs derived from human bone marrow. We found, as expected, that cell proliferation was significantly enhanced during TNF-{alpha} exposure. However, according to the cell surface marker analysis, the intensity of several antigens in the minimum criteria panel for MSCs proposed by International Society of Cellular Therapy (ISCT) was decreased dramatically, and in certain cases, the criteria for MSCs were not fulfilled. In addition, TNF-{alpha} exposure resulted in a significant but transient increase in human leukocyte antigen and CD54 expression. Additional proteomic analysis by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry revealed three proteins whose expression levels decreased and 8 proteins whose expression levels increased significantly during TNF-{alpha} exposure. The majority of these proteins could be linked to immunosuppressive and signalling pathways. These results strongly support reactive and immunosuppressive activation of MSCs during TNF-{alpha} exposure, which might influence MSC differentiation stage and capacity.

  10. Fabrication and perfusion culture of anatomically shaped artificial bone using stereolithography.

    PubMed

    Du, Dajiang; Asaoka, Teruo; Ushida, Takashi; Furukawa, Katsuko S

    2014-12-01

    Because patient bone defects are usually varied and complicated in geometry, it would be preferred to fabricate custom-made artificial bone grafts that are anatomically specific to individual patient defects. Using a rabbit femoral segment as a bone reconstruction model, we successfully produced customized ceramic scaffolds by stereolithography, which not only had an anatomically correct external shape according to computed tomography data but also contained an interconnecting internal network of channels designed for perfusion culture. Rabbit bone marrow stromal cells were isolated and cultured with these scaffolds using a novel oscillatory perfusion system that was stereolithographically fabricated to fit well to the unique scaffold shapes. After five days of three-dimensional culture with oscillatory perfusion, the cells attached and proliferated homogenously in the scaffolds. However, control cells inside the scaffolds cultured under static conditions were dead after prolonged in vitro culture. Cellular DNA content and alkaline phosphatase activities were significantly higher in the perfusion group versus the static group. Therefore, anatomically correct artificial bone can be successfully constructed using stereolithography and oscillatory culture technology, and could be useful for bone engraftment and defect repair. PMID:25215543

  11. Canine Cranial Reconstruction Using Autologous Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mankani, Mahesh H.; Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Shannon, Brian; Nalla, Ravi K.; Ritchie, Robert O.; Qin, Yixian; Robey, Pamela Gehron

    2006-01-01

    Limited-sized transplants of culture-expanded autologous or allogeneic bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) form cortico-cancellous bone in rodent models. Initiation of clinical studies using autologous BMSC transplantation requires effective bone formation among sizable transplants in a large animal model as well as noninvasive techniques for evaluating transplant success. Here, we obtained bone marrow from the femurs of six dogs and expanded BMSCs in tissue culture. Autologous BMSC-hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) transplants were introduced into critical-sized calvarial defects and contralateral control skull defects received HA/TCP vehicle alone. At intervals ranging from 2 to 20 months, transplants were biopsied or harvested for histological and mechanical analysis. Noninvasive studies, including quantitative computed tomography scans and ultrasound, were simultaneously obtained. In all animals, BMSC-containing transplants formed significantly more bone than their control counterparts. BMSC-associated bone possessed mechanical properties similar to the adjacent normal bone, confirmed by both ultrasound and ex vivo analysis. Evaluation by quantitative computed tomography confirmed that the extent of bone formation demonstrated by histology could be discerned through noninvasive means. These results show that autologous cultured BMSC transplantation is a feasible therapy in clinical-sized bone defects and that such transplants can be assessed noninvasively, suggesting that this technique has potential for use in patients with certain bone defects. PMID:16436668

  12. Mammalian Cell Culture

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This "Course-in-a-Box" from Bio-Link is a good starting point for instructors to develop a course on how to maintain mammalian cells in culture. Students will learn "basic techniques of routine cell culture using common cell lines before progressing to differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells." Laboratories include Basic Aseptic Technique, Media Preparation, and Plating Cells from Frozen Stock. Materials include an Instructor Laboratory Manual, Student Laboratory Manual, Problem Sets, and Quizzes. A free login is required to access the materials.

  13. Repair of Segmental Bone Defect Using Totally Vitalized Tissue Engineered Bone Graft by a Combined Perfusion Seeding and Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ya-Fei; Li, Xiang; Hu, Yun-Yu; Wang, Zhen; Ma, Zhen-Sheng; Lei, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background The basic strategy to construct tissue engineered bone graft (TEBG) is to combine osteoblastic cells with three dimensional (3D) scaffold. Based on this strategy, we proposed the “Totally Vitalized TEBG” (TV-TEBG) which was characterized by abundant and homogenously distributed cells with enhanced cell proliferation and differentiation and further investigated its biological performance in repairing segmental bone defect. Methods In this study, we constructed the TV-TEBG with the combination of customized flow perfusion seeding/culture system and ?-tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP) scaffold fabricated by Rapid Prototyping (RP) technique. We systemically compared three kinds of TEBG constructed by perfusion seeding and perfusion culture (PSPC) method, static seeding and perfusion culture (SSPC) method, and static seeding and static culture (SSSC) method for their in vitro performance and bone defect healing efficacy with a rabbit model. Results Our study has demonstrated that TEBG constructed by PSPC method exhibited better biological properties with higher daily D-glucose consumption, increased cell proliferation and differentiation, and better cell distribution, indicating the successful construction of TV-TEBG. After implanted into rabbit radius defects for 12 weeks, PSPC group exerted higher X-ray score close to autograft, much greater mechanical property evidenced by the biomechanical testing and significantly higher new bone formation as shown by histological analysis compared with the other two groups, and eventually obtained favorable healing efficacy of the segmental bone defect that was the closest to autograft transplantation. Conclusion This study demonstrated the feasibility of TV-TEBG construction with combination of perfusion seeding, perfusion culture and RP technique which exerted excellent biological properties. The application of TV-TEBG may become a preferred candidate for segmental bone defect repair in orthopedic and maxillofacial fields. PMID:24728277

  14. Mammalian Cell Culture Simplified.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A tissue culture experiment that does not require elaborate equipment and that can be used to teach sterile technique, the principles of animal cell line maintenance, and the concept of cell growth curves is described. The differences between cancerous and normal cells can be highlighted. The procedure is included. (KR)

  15. Leukemia cells induce changes in human bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are multipotent cells that support angiogenesis, wound healing, and immunomodulation. In the hematopoietic niche, they nurture hematopoietic cells, leukemia, tumors and metastasis. BMSCs secrete of a wide range of cytokines, growth factors and matrix proteins which contribute to the pro-tumorigenic marrow microenvironment. The inflammatory cytokines IFN-? and TNF-? change the BMSC secretome and we hypothesized that factors produced by tumors or leukemia would also affect the BMSC secretome and investigated the interaction of leukemia cells with BMSCs. Methods BMSCs from healthy subjects were co-cultured with three myeloid leukemia cell lines (TF-1, TF-1? and K562) using a trans-well system. Following co-culture, the BMSCs and leukemia cells were analyzed by global gene expression analysis and culture supernatants were analyzed for protein expression. As a control, CD34+ cells were also cocultured with BMSCs. Results Co-culture induced leukemia cell gene expression changes in stem cell pluripotency, TGF-? signaling and carcinoma signaling pathways. BMSCs co-cultured with leukemia cells up-regulated a number of proinflammatory genes including IL-17 signaling-related genes and IL-8 and CCL2 levels were increased in co-culture supernatants. In contrast, purine metabolism, mTOR signaling and EIF2 signaling pathways genes were up-regulated in BMSCs co-cultured with CD34+ cells. Conclusions BMSCs react to the presence of leukemia cells undergoing changes in the cytokine and chemokine secretion profiles. Thus, BMSCs and leukemia cells both contribute to the creation of a competitive niche more favorable for leukemia stem cells. PMID:24304929

  16. Bone-Marrow-Derived Side Population Cells for Myocardial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Hesham A.; Martin, Cindy M.; Latif, Shuaib S.; Garry, Mary G.

    2015-01-01

    Bone-marrow-derived stem cells have displayed the potential for myocardial regeneration in animal models as well as in clinical trials. Unfractionated bone marrow mononuclear cell (MNC) population is a heterogeneous group of cells known to include a number of stem cell populations. Cells in the side population (SP) fraction have a high capacity for differentiation into multiple lineages. In the current study, we investigated the role of murine and human bone-marrow-derived side population cells in myocardial regeneration. In these studies, we show that mouse bone-marrow-derived SP cells expressed the contractile protein, alpha-actinin, following culture with neonatal cardiomyocytes and after delivery into the myocardium following injury. Moreover, the number of green-fluorescent-protein-positive cells, of bone marrow side population origin, increased progressively within the injured myocardium over 90 days. Transcriptome analysis of these bone marrow cells reveals a pattern of expression consistent with immature cardiomyocytes. Additionally, the differentiation capacity of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor stimulated peripheral blood stem cells were assessed following injection into injured rat myocardium. Bone marrow mononuclear cell and side population cells were both readily identified within the rat myocardium 1 month following injection. These human cells expressed human-specific cardiac troponin I as determined by immunohistochemistry as well as numerous cardiac transcripts as determined by polymerase chain reaction. Both human bone marrow mononuclear cells and human side population cells augmented cardiac systolic function following a modest drop in function as a result of cryoinjury. The augmentation of cardiac function following injection of side population cells occurred earlier than with bone marrow mononuclear cells despite the fact that the number of side population cells used was one tenth that of bone marrow mononuclear cells (9 × 105 cells per heart in the MNC group compared to 9 × 104 per heart in the SP group). These results support the hypotheses that rodent and human-bone-marrow derived side population cells are capable of acquiring a cardiac fate and that human bone-marrow-derived side population cells are superior to unfractionated bone marrow mononuclear cells in augmenting left ventricular systolic function following cryoinjury. PMID:20559985

  17. Saliva suppresses osteoclastogenesis in murine bone marrow cultures.

    PubMed

    Caballé-Serrano, J; Cvikl, B; Bosshardt, D D; Buser, D; Lussi, A; Gruber, R

    2015-01-01

    Saliva can reach mineralized surfaces in the oral cavity; however, the relationship between saliva and bone resorption is unclear. Herein, we examined whether saliva affects the process of osteoclastogenesis in vitro. We used murine bone marrow cultures to study osteoclast formation. The addition of fresh sterile saliva eliminated the formation of multinucleated cells that stained positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). In line with the histochemical staining, saliva substantially reduced gene expression of cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, and TRAP. Addition of saliva led to considerably decreased gene expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK) and, to a lesser extent, that of c-fms. The respective master regulators of osteoclastogenesis (c-fos and NFATc1) and the downstream cell fusion genes (DC-STAMP and Atp6v0d2) showed decreased expression after the addition of saliva. Among the costimulatory molecules for osteoclastogenesis, only OSCAR showed decreased expression. In contrast, CD40, CD80, and CD86-all costimulatory molecules of phagocytic cells-were increasingly expressed with saliva. The phagocytic capacity of the cells was confirmed by latex bead ingestion. Based on these in vitro results, it can be concluded that saliva suppresses osteoclastogenesis and leads to the development of a phagocytic cell phenotype. PMID:25297116

  18. CONTRACTION AND ORGANIZATION OF COLLAGEN GELS BY CELLS CULTURED FROM PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT, GINGIVA AND BONE SUGGEST FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN CELL TYPES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. G. BELLOWS; A. H. MELCHER; J. E. AUBIN

    1981-01-01

    SUMMARY Monkey periodontal ligament fibroblasts (MPLF cells), human gingival fibroblasts (HGF cells), rat embryonic calvaria cells (REC cells), porcine periodontal ligament epithelial cells (PPLE cells) and rat osteosarcoma 17\\/2 cells (ROS cells) were incorporated into 3-dimensional collagen gels plated in 60 mm Petri dishes in order: first, to measure the capacity of these cell types to contract; second, to investigate

  19. Molluscan cells in culture: primary cell cultures and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, T. P.; Bickham, U.; Bayne, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cell culture systems from molluscs have significantly contributed to our basic understanding of complex physiological processes occurring within or between tissue-specific cells, yielding information unattainable using intact animal models. In vitro cultures of neuronal cells from gastropods show how simplified cell models can inform our understanding of complex networks in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures from marine and freshwater bivalve and gastropod species are used as biomonitors for environmental contaminants, as models for gene transfer technologies, and for studies of innate immunity and neoplastic disease. Despite efforts to isolate proliferative cell lines from molluscs, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 embryonic (Bge) cell line is the only existing cell line originating from any molluscan species. Taking an organ systems approach, this review summarizes efforts to establish molluscan cell cultures and describes the varied applications of primary cell cultures in research. Because of the unique status of the Bge cell line, an account is presented of the establishment of this cell line, and of how these cells have contributed to our understanding of snail host-parasite interactions. Finally, we detail the difficulties commonly encountered in efforts to establish cell lines from molluscs and discuss how these difficulties might be overcome. PMID:24198436

  20. Generation of Eosinophils from Cryopreserved Murine Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schollaert, Kaila L.; Stephens, Michael R.; Gray, Jerilyn K.; Fulkerson, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are produced in the bone marrow from CD34+ eosinophil lineage–committed progenitors, whose levels in the bone marrow are elevated in a variety of human diseases. These findings suggest that increased eosinophil lineage–committed progenitor production is an important process in disease-associated eosinophilia. The pathways central to the biology of the eosinophil lineage–committed progenitor remain largely unknown. Thus, developing new methods to investigate the regulators of eosinophil lineage–committed progenitor differentiation is needed to identify potential therapeutic targets to specifically inhibit eosinophil production. We tested cytokine regimens to optimize liquid cultures for the study of eosinophil lineage–committed progenitor and eosinophil precursor differentiation into mature eosinophils. Stem cell factor (but not fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand) was required for optimal yield of eosinophils. Furthermore, we evaluated the effects of cell preservation and scale on the culture, successfully culturing functional eosinophils from fresh and frozen murine bone marrow cells and in a standard-sized and 96-well culture format. In summary, we have developed an adaptable culture system that yields functionally competent eosinophils from murine low-density bone marrow cells and whose cytokine regime includes expansion of progenitors with stem cell factor alone with subsequent differentiation with interleukin 5. PMID:25551463

  1. Stem cells for reutilization in bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Im, Gun-Il

    2015-04-01

    Bone is one of the most transplanted tissues. While most bone defects heal spontaneously, critical size defects caused by major trauma/malignant tumor and osteonecrosis of femoral head in young adults pose a great challenge in treatment. While the golden standard in treating bone defects is autologous bone grafting, available bone for grafting is quite limited in an individual. To solve the dilemma, stem cell therapy has been tried as a new modality of treatment in lesions not amenable to autologous bone grafting. While successful results were reported from individual studies, the stem cell therapy is still not an established treatment modality for bone regeneration and needs further assessment. Our focus herein is to introduce stem cell sources that have been investigated so far and review the current status of stem cell reutilization for bone regeneration as well as suggesting future perspectives. PMID:25491657

  2. Conditioned media from mesenchymal stem cells enhanced bone regeneration in rat calvarial bone defects.

    PubMed

    Osugi, Masashi; Katagiri, Wataru; Yoshimi, Ryoko; Inukai, Takeharu; Hibi, Hideharu; Ueda, Minoru

    2012-07-01

    Tissue engineering has recently become available as a treatment procedure for bone augmentation. However, this procedure has several problems, such as high capital investment and expensive cell culture, complicated safety and quality management issues regarding cell handling, and patient problems with the invasive procedure of cell collection. Moreover, it was reported that stem cells secrete many growth factors and chemokines during their cultivation, which could affect cellular characteristics and behavior. This study investigated the effect of stem-cell-cultured conditioned media on bone regeneration. Cultured conditioned media from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-CM) enhanced the migration, proliferation, and expression of osteogenic marker genes, such as osteocalcin and Runx2, of rat MSCs (rMSCs) in vitro. MSC-CM includes cytokines such as insulin-like growth factor-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor. In vivo, a prepared bone defect of a rat calvarial model was implanted in five different rat groups using one of the following graft materials: human MSCs/agarose (MSCs), MSC-CM/agarose (MSC-CM), Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium without serum [DMEM(-)]/agarose [DMEM(-)], PBS/agarose (PBS), and defect only (Defect). After 4 and 8 weeks, implant sections were evaluated using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis. Micro-CT analysis indicated that the MSC-CM group had a greater area of newly regenerated bone compared with the other groups (p<0.05) and histological analysis at 8 weeks indicated that the newly regenerated bone bridge almost covered the defect. Interestingly, the effects of MSC-CM were stronger than those of the MSC group. In vivo imaging and immunohistochemical staining of transgenic rats expressing green fluorescent protein also showed that migration of rMSCs to the bone defect in the MSC-CM group was greater than in the other groups. These results demonstrated that MSC-CM can regenerate bone through mobilization of endogenous stem cells. The use of stem-cell-cultured conditioned media for bone regeneration is a unique concept that utilizes paracrine factors of stem cells without cell transplantation. PMID:22443121

  3. Mechanical Behavior of Bone Cells micrograph view of bone

    E-print Network

    Gefen, Amit

    of the formation of osteocytes and lining cells from osteoblast From: Burger, 2001, In: Bone Mechanics , S. Cowin, Ed., CRC Press. 3 Morphology of osteocytes, osteoblasts and periosteal fibroblasts From: Burger, 2001, Ed., CRC Press. Schematic representation of how the osteocyte network may regulate bone modeling #12

  4. A three-dimensional tissue culture model to study primary human bone marrow and its malignancies.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Mukti R; Belch, Andrew R; Pilarski, Linda M; Kirshner, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Tissue culture has been an invaluable tool to study many aspects of cell function, from normal development to disease. Conventional cell culture methods rely on the ability of cells either to attach to a solid substratum of a tissue culture dish or to grow in suspension in liquid medium. Multiple immortal cell lines have been created and grown using such approaches, however, these methods frequently fail when primary cells need to be grown ex vivo. Such failure has been attributed to the absence of the appropriate extracellular matrix components of the tissue microenvironment from the standard systems where tissue culture plastic is used as a surface for cell growth. Extracellular matrix is an integral component of the tissue microenvironment and its presence is crucial for the maintenance of physiological functions such as cell polarization, survival, and proliferation. Here we present a 3-dimensional tissue culture method where primary bone marrow cells are grown in extracellular matrix formulated to recapitulate the microenvironment of the human bone (rBM system). Embedded in the extracellular matrix, cells are supplied with nutrients through the medium supplemented with human plasma, thus providing a comprehensive system where cell survival and proliferation can be sustained for up to 30 days while maintaining the cellular composition of the primary tissue. Using the rBM system we have successfully grown primary bone marrow cells from normal donors and patients with amyloidosis, and various hematological malignancies. The rBM system allows for direct, in-matrix real time visualization of the cell behavior and evaluation of preclinical efficacy of novel therapeutics. Moreover, cells can be isolated from the rBM and subsequently used for in vivo transplantation, cell sorting, flow cytometry, and nucleic acid and protein analysis. Taken together, the rBM method provides a reliable system for the growth of primary bone marrow cells under physiological conditions. PMID:24637629

  5. Human saliva exposure modulates bone cell performance in vitro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susanne Proksch; Thorsten Steinberg; Constantin Keller; Martin Wolkewitz; Margit Wiedmann-Al-Ahmad; Guenter Finkenzeller; Christian Hannig; Elmar Hellwig; Ali Al-Ahmad

    Various situations encountered by a clinician during the daily routine including surgical periodontitis therapy, dental implant\\u000a insertion, or tooth extraction involve the contact of saliva with the jaw bone. However, there are only sparse data concerning\\u000a the influence of saliva on bone cells. Saliva specimens were incorporated within culture medium and administered to murine\\u000a MC3T3 osteoblasts, of which the morphology

  6. Bone marrow derived stem cells in joint and bone diseases: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Marmotti, Antonio; de Girolamo, Laura; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Bruzzone, Matteo; Mattia, Silvia; Rossi, Roberto; Montaruli, Angela; Dettoni, Federico; Castoldi, Filippo; Peretti, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Stem cells have huge applications in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Their use is currently not restricted to the life-threatening diseases but also extended to disorders involving the structural tissues, which may not jeopardize the patients' life, but certainly influence their quality of life. In fact, a particularly popular line of research is represented by the regeneration of bone and cartilage tissues to treat various orthopaedic disorders. Most of these pioneering research lines that aim to create new treatments for diseases that currently have limited therapies are still in the bench of the researchers. However, in recent years, several clinical trials have been started with satisfactory and encouraging results. This article aims to review the concept of stem cells and their characterization in terms of site of residence, differentiation potential and therapeutic prospective. In fact, while only the bone marrow was initially considered as a "reservoir" of this cell population, later, adipose tissue and muscle tissue have provided a considerable amount of cells available for multiple differentiation. In reality, recently, the so-called "stem cell niche" was identified as the perivascular space, recognizing these cells as almost ubiquitous. In the field of bone and joint diseases, their potential to differentiate into multiple cell lines makes their application ideally immediate through three main modalities: (1) cells selected by withdrawal from bone marrow, subsequent culture in the laboratory, and ultimately transplant at the site of injury; (2) bone marrow aspirate, concentrated and directly implanted into the injury site; (3) systemic mobilization of stem cells and other bone marrow precursors by the use of growth factors. The use of this cell population in joint and bone disease will be addressed and discussed, analysing both the clinical outcomes but also the basic research background, which has justified their use for the treatment of bone, cartilage and meniscus tissues. PMID:25005462

  7. Oscillating Cell Culture Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Lisa E.; Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo G.

    2010-01-01

    To better exploit the principles of gas transport and mass transport during the processes of cell seeding of 3D scaffolds and in vitro culture of 3D tissue engineered constructs, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor provides a flow of cell suspensions and culture media directly through a porous 3D scaffold (during cell seeding) and a 3D construct (during subsequent cultivation) within a highly gas-permeable closed-loop tube. This design is simple, modular, and flexible, and its component parts are easy to assemble and operate, and are inexpensive. Chamber volume can be very low, but can be easily scaled up. This innovation is well suited to work with different biological specimens, particularly with cells having high oxygen requirements and/or shear sensitivity, and different scaffold structures and dimensions. The closed-loop changer is highly gas permeable to allow efficient gas exchange during the cell seeding/culturing process. A porous scaffold, which may be seeded with cells, is fixed by means of a scaffold holder to the chamber wall with scaffold/construct orientation with respect to the chamber determined by the geometry of the scaffold holder. A fluid, with/without biological specimens, is added to the chamber such that all, or most, of the air is displaced (i.e., with or without an enclosed air bubble). Motion is applied to the chamber within a controlled environment (e.g., oscillatory motion within a humidified 37 C incubator). Movement of the chamber induces relative motion of the scaffold/construct with respect to the fluid. In case the fluid is a cell suspension, cells will come into contact with the scaffold and eventually adhere to it. Alternatively, cells can be seeded on scaffolds by gel entrapment prior to bioreactor cultivation. Subsequently, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor will provide efficient gas exchange (i.e., of oxygen and carbon dioxide, as required for viability of metabolically active cells) and controlled levels of fluid dynamic shear (i.e., as required for viability of shear-sensitive cells) to the developing engineered tissue construct. This bioreactor was recently utilized to show independent and interactive effects of a growth factor (IGF-I) and slow bidirectional perfusion on the survival, differentiation, and contractile performance of 3D tissue engineering cardiac constructs. The main application of this system is within the tissue engineering industry. The ideal final application is within the automated mass production of tissue- engineered constructs. Target industries could be both life sciences companies as well as bioreactor device producing companies.

  8. Hematopoietic effects of benzene inhalation assessed by long-term bone marrow culture

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, N.G. [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The strong and long-lasting hematotoxic effect after benzene exposure in vivo (300 ppm, 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 2 weeks) was assessed in mice with bone marrow cells grown in long-term bone marrow culture (LTBMC). Bone marrow cultures initiated 1 day after the last benzene exposure did not produce adequate numbers of hematopoietic cells over 3 weeks and, in most cases, no erythroid or myeloid clonogenic cells could be recovered. The adherent cell layer of these cultures had a lower capacity for supporting in vitro hematopoiesis after the second seeding with normal bone marrow cells compared with control cultures. Two weeks after the last benzene exposure, body weight, hematocrit, bone marrow cellularity, and committed hematopoietic progenitor content (BFU-E and CFU-GM) were regenerated to normal or subnormal values, whereas hematopoiesis in LTB MC was very poor. Over 8 weeks, little or no significant committed progenitor production was observed. Treatment of mice exposed to benzene with hemin (three doses of 3 {mu}g/g bw iv over 2 weeks for a total dose of 9 {mu}g/g) partially overcame the toxic effect of benzene on the hematopoietic system as measured by the LTBMC method. Cultures from mice treated with hemin had a modest recovery of BFU-E and CFU-GM clonogenic potential after 5 to 6 weeks in LTBMC. In contrast, little or no recovery was obtained for the adherent cell layer clonogenic capacity, even after hemin treatment. These results clearly indicate a strong, long-lasting toxic effect on the bone marrow stroma and a limited recovery of hematopoietic potential by clonogenic cells of the nonadherent population after in vivo hemin treatment. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells suppress T cell proliferation and support the culture expansion of cord blood CD34? cells: a comparison with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Luan, Xiying; Li, Guangyun; Wang, Guoyan; Wang, Feifei; Lin, Yanhua

    2013-02-01

    Human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hPMSCs) have been shown to possess immunosuppressive effects against T cells and support the expansion of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) from umbilical cord blood (UCB). However, the characteristics of hPMSCs compared with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) are not fully understood. Here, we show that hPMSCs have similar regulatory effects on T cell activation, proliferation and cytokine secretion as hBMSCs and demonstrate that PDL1 and B7H4, negative co-stimulatory molecules, are involved in the T cell immunosuppressive activities of hPMSCs and hBMSCs, respectively. hPMSCs efficiently enhanced the expansion of CD34? cells from UCB compared with hBMSCs. Furthermore, hPMSCs maintained the expression of adhesion molecules (CD11a, CD44 and CD49e) in CD34? cells. Similar effects were observed for both hPMSCs and hBMSCs on CD34? cell chemotaxis and cytokine production, such as SDF-1?, IL-6 and SCF. Therefore, hPMSCs may be an ideal alternative source of hBMSCs for basic research and clinical applications, which may be significant in future efforts to explore the potential clinical utility of hPMSCs. PMID:23107983

  10. Directing mesenchymal stem cells to bone to augment bone formation and increase bone mass

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Min Guan; Ruiwu Liu; Kit S Lam; Jan Nolta; Junjing Jia; Brian Panganiban; Liping Meng; Ping Zhou; Mohammad Shahnazari; Robert O Ritchie; Wei Yao

    2012-01-01

    Aging reduces the number of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that can differentiate into osteoblasts in the bone marrow, which leads to impairment of osteogenesis. However, if MSCs could be directed toward osteogenic differentiation, they could be a viable therapeutic option for bone regeneration. We have developed a method to direct MSCs to the bone surface by attaching a synthetic high-affinity

  11. Microarray Analysis of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Three-Dimensional Collagen Culture: Osteogenesis Inhibits Bone Morphogenic Protein and Wnt Signaling Pathways, and Cyclic Tensile Strain Causes Upregulation of Proinflammatory Cytokine Regulators and Angiogenic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Charoenpanich, Adisri; Wall, Michelle E.; Tucker, Charles J.; Andrews, Danica M.K.; Lalush, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) have shown great potential for bone tissue engineering. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this potential are not yet known, in particular the separate and combined effects of three-dimensional (3D) culture and mechanical loading on hASC osteogenesis. Mechanical stimuli play a pivotal role in bone formation, remodeling, and fracture repair. To further understand hASC osteogenic differentiation and response to mechanical stimuli, gene expression profiles of proliferating or osteogenically induced hASC in 3D collagen I culture in the presence and absence of 10% uniaxial cyclic tensile strain were examined using microarray analysis. About 847 genes and 95 canonical pathways were affected during osteogenesis of hASC in 3D culture. Pathway analysis indicated the potential roles of Wnt/?-catenin signaling, bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling in hASC during osteogenic differentiation. Application of 10% uniaxial cyclic tensile strain suggested synergistic effects of strain with osteogenic differentiation media on hASC osteogenesis as indicated by significantly increased calcium accretion of hASC. There was no significant further alteration in the four major pathways (Wnt/?-catenin, BMP, PDGF, and IGF-1). However, 184 transcripts were affected by 10% cyclic tensile strain. Function and network analysis of these transcripts suggested that 10% cyclic tensile strain may play a role during hASC osteogenic differentiation by upregulating two crucial factors in bone regeneration: (1) proinflammatory cytokine regulators interleukin 1 receptor antagonist and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3; (2) known angiogenic inductors fibroblast growth factor 2, matrix metalloproteinase 2, and vascular endothelial growth factor A. This is the first study to investigate the effects of both 3D culture and mechanical load on hASC osteogenic differentiation. A complete microarray analysis investigating both the separate effect of soluble osteogenic inductive factors and the combined effects of chemical and mechanical stimulation was performed on hASC undergoing osteogenic differentiation. We have identified specific genes and pathways associated with mechanical response and osteogenic potential of hASC, thus providing significant information toward improved understanding of our use of hASC for functional bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:21767168

  12. [Effect of osthol on apoptosis and bone resorption of osteoclasts cultured in vitro].

    PubMed

    Ming, Lei-Guo; Wang, Ming-Gang; Chen, Ke-Ming; Zhou, Jian; Han, Gui-Qiu; Zhu, Rui-Qing

    2012-02-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of osthol on osteoclasts' activity, bone resorption as well as apoptosis in vitro, and explore the mechanism of osthol in preventing osteoporosis. Osteoclasts were separated from long-limb bones of new born rabbits, cultured in 24-well plate with glass slices and bone slices, and treated by 1 x 10(-5) mol x L(-1) osthol. Osteoclasts were identified by observing live cells with phase contrast microscope, HE staining, TRAP staining and toluidine blue staining of bone resorption pits. The numbers of bone resorption pits were counted as well as the surface area of bone resorption on bone slice. Osteoclasts were stained with acridine orange to detect the cell apoptosis. The ratio of apoptotic osteoclasts was observed under fluorescence microscope. The gene expression of RANKL, OPG, TRAP and p-JNK1/2 protein expression were examined using real time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Comparing with the control group without osthol, the rates of apoptotic osteoclasts increased obviously and the number and area of bone resorption pits decreased evidently with 1 x 10(-5) mol x L(-1) osthol. There is significant difference between control group and experiment group treated by 1 x 10(-5) mol x L(-1) osthol. Therefore, the osthol through RANK+RANKL/TRAF6/Mkk/JNK signal pathway inhibits the osteoclasts activity, enhances osteoclasts apoptotic and inhibits the bone resorption. PMID:22512027

  13. Effects of ionizing radiation on bone cell differentiation in an experimental murine bone cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Lau, Patrick; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    During long-term space travel astronauts are exposed to a complex mixture of different radiation types under conditions of dramatically reduced weight-bearing activity. It has been validated that astronauts loose a considerable amount of bone mass at a rate up to one to two percent each month in space. Therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation cause bone damage and increase fracture risks after treatment for head-and-neck cancer and in pelvic irradiation. For low radiation doses, the possibility of a disturbed healing potential of bone was described. Radiation induced damage has been discussed to inflict mainly on immature and healing bone. Little is known about radiation effects on bone remodelling and even less on the combined action of microgravity and radiation. Bone remodelling is a life-long process performed by balanced action of cells from the osteoblast and osteoclast lineages. While osteoblasts differentiate either into bone-lining cells or into osteocytes and play a crucial role in bone matrix synthesis, osteoclasts are responsible for bone resorption. We hypothesize that the balance between bone matrix assembly by osteocytes and bone degradation by osteoclasts is modulated by microgravity as well as by ionizing radiation. To address this, a cell model consisting of murine cell lines with the potential to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts (OCT-1, MC3T3-E1 S24, and MC3T3-E1 S4) was used for studying radiation response after exposure to simulated components of cosmic radiation. Cells were exposed to graded doses of 150 kV X-rays, ? particles (0.525 MeV/u, 160 keV/µm; PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) and accelerated heavy ions (75 MeV/u carbon, 29 keV/µm; 95 MeV/u argon, 230 keV/µm; GANIL, Caen, France). Cell survival was measured as colony forming ability; cell cycle progression was analyzed via fluorescence-activated cell scanning (FACS) by measurement of the content of propidium iodide-stained DNA, DNA damage was visualized by ?H2AX-immunostaining. Osteoblastogenesis was estimated by measurement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and production of mineralized matrix (von-Kossa staining, Alizarin Red staining). During the process of osteoblastic cell differentiation, the expression of the bone specific marker genes osteocalcin (OCN) and osteopontin (OPN) were recorded by quantitative real time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Compared with standard culture conditions, the osteogenic marker genes OCN and OPN were highly expressed during the differentiation process induced either by osteo-inductive media additives (50 µg/ml ascorbic acid, 10 mmol/l ?-glycero phosphate) or by sparsely ionizing radiation (X-rays). After 21 days of postirradiation incubation sparsely ionizing radiation could be shown to induce the formation of bone-like nodules (von-Kossa staining) for OCT-1 and MC3T3-E1 S4 cells but nor for MC3T3- E1 S24 cells. Ionizing radiation leads to a cell cycle arrest which is resolved in a dose and time dependent way. This was accompanied by a dose dependent regulation of the cyclin kinase inhibitor CDKN1A (p21/WAF) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-?1). TGF-?1 is known to affect osteoblast differentiation, matrix formation and mineralization. Modulation of its expression could influence the expression of main osteogenic transcription factors. For exposure with high LET radiation a pronounced cell cycle block was evident. The expression of the osteogenic marker genes OCN and Osterix (OSX) was increased in the OCT-1 cells with differentiation potential for exposure to ? particles and accelerated carbon and argon ions. The results on the expression of differentiation markers during radiation-induced premature differentiation of bone cells of the osteoblast lineage show that densely ionizing radiation results in expression of proteins essential for bone formation and consequently in an increase in bone volume. Such an effect has been observed in in-vivo carbon ion irradiated rats. As radiation dependent permanent cell cycle blocks lead to a depletion of proliferation-competent cel

  14. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  15. Bone marrow: all the cells of the immune system are derived from stem cells in the bone marrow. The bone

    E-print Network

    Morante, Silvia

    Bone marrow: all the cells of the immune system are derived from stem cells in the bone marrow as part of the immune system and as a filter #12;Cells of the Immune System Cells destined to become workings of the immune system, while others are cytotoxic and directly contact infected cells and destroy

  16. In vitro culture and characterization of alveolar bone osteoblasts isolated from type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dao-Cai; Li, De-Hua; Ji, Hui-Cang; Rao, Guo-Zhou; Liang, Li-Hua; Ma, Ai-Jie; Xie, Chao; Zou, Gui-Ke; Song, Ying-Liang

    2012-06-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of poor osseointegration following dental implants in type 2 diabetics, it is important to study the biological properties of alveolar bone osteoblasts isolated from these patients. We collected alveolar bone chips under aseptic conditions and cultured them in vitro using the tissue explants adherent method. The biological properties of these cells were characterized using the following methods: alkaline phosphatase (ALP) chemical staining for cell viability, Alizarin red staining for osteogenic characteristics, MTT test for cell proliferation, enzyme dynamics for ALP contents, radio-immunoassay for bone gla protein (BGP) concentration, and ELISA for the concentration of type I collagen (COL-I) in the supernatant. Furthermore, we detected the adhesion ability of two types of cells from titanium slices using non-specific immunofluorescence staining and cell count. The two cell forms showed no significant difference in morphology under the same culture conditions. However, the alveolar bone osteoblasts received from type 2 diabetic patients had slower growth, lower cell activity and calcium nodule formation than the normal ones. The concentration of ALP, BGP and COL-I was lower in the supernatant of alveolar bone osteoblasts received from type 2 diabetic patients than in that received from normal subjects (P < 0.05). The alveolar bone osteoblasts obtained from type 2 diabetic patients can be successfully cultured in vitro with the same morphology and biological characteristics as those from normal patients, but with slower growth and lower concentration of specific secretion and lower combining ability with titanium than normal ones. PMID:22473318

  17. Genetic Modification of Stem Cells to Enhance Bone Repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seth C. Gamradt; Jay R. Lieberman

    2004-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons are often faced with difficult bone loss problems. Conventional bone grafting is usually accomplished with autogenous iliac crest bone graft that provides osteogenic cells, osteoinductive growth factors, and an osteoconductive matrix. Cadaveric bone allograft and bone graft substitutes are inferior to autogenous bone graft because they fail to supply osteogenic cells or a significant amount of osteoinductive growth

  18. [Stromal cells of the bone marrow in growing bone].

    PubMed

    Rodionova, N V; Skripchenko, E V

    1986-10-01

    By means of electron microscopy, cytochemistry and radioautography with 3H-thymidine, the bone marrow stromal cells have been studied in the zones of endochondral osteogenesis in the rabbit and rat femoral bones. In the stromal cells demonstrating a high alkaline phosphatase activity are distinguished: perivascular, reticular fibroblastic, osteogenic cells. Populations of the perivascular phosphatase-positive cells include poorly differentiated DNA-synthesizing forms, as well as cells with signs of differentiation into stromal fibroblasts. Cleft-like spaces in cytoplasm of the fibroblastic reticular cells are, probably, formed as a result of lymphocyte-like mononuclears passing through. Phagocyting stromal elements are presented by macrophages, having perivascular localization and including into composition of erythroblastic islets. Mononuclear macrophages are revealed also on the surface of osseous trabecules, where they participate in destruction of hemopoetic and osteogenic cells. PMID:3800669

  19. In VitroChondrogenesis of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian Johnstone; Thomas M. Hering; Arnold I. Caplan; Victor M. Goldberg; Jung U. Yoo

    1998-01-01

    A culture system that facilitates the chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells has been developed. Cells obtained in bone marrow aspirates were first isolated by monolayer culture and then transferred into tubes and allowed to form three-dimensional aggregates in a chemically defined medium. The inclusion of 10?7M dexamethasone in the medium induced chondrogenic differentiation of cells within

  20. Characterization of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in suspension

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) are a heterogeneous population of postnatal precursor cells with the capacity of adhering to culture dishes generating colony-forming unit-fibroblasts (CFU-F). Here we identify a new subset of BMMSCs that fail to adhere to plastic culture dishes and remain in culture suspension (S-BMMSCs). Methods To catch S-BMMSCs, we used BMMSCs-produced extracellular cell matrix (ECM)-coated dishes. Isolated S-BMMSCs were analyzed by in vitro stem cell analysis approaches, including flow cytometry, inductive multiple differentiation, western blot and in vivo implantation to assess the bone regeneration ability of S-BMMSCs. Furthermore, we performed systemic S-BMMSCs transplantation to treat systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like MRL/lpr mice. Results S-BMMSCs are capable of adhering to ECM-coated dishes and showing mesenchymal stem cell characteristics with distinction from hematopoietic cells as evidenced by co-expression of CD73 or Oct-4 with CD34, forming a single colony cluster on ECM, and failure to differentiate into hematopoietic cell lineage. Moreover, we found that culture-expanded S-BMMSCs exhibited significantly increased immunomodulatory capacities in vitro and an efficacious treatment for SLE-like MRL/lpr mice by rebalancing regulatory T cells (Tregs) and T helper 17 cells (Th17) through high NO production. Conclusions These data suggest that it is feasible to improve immunotherapy by identifying a new subset BMMSCs. PMID:23083975

  1. Bone cell mechanosensitivity, estrogen deficiency, and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; van Oers, René F M; Bakker, Astrid D; Bacabac, Rommel G

    2015-03-18

    Adaptation of bone to mechanical stresses normally produces a bone architecture that combines a proper resistance against failure with a minimal use of material. This adaptive process is governed by mechanosensitive osteocytes that transduce the mechanical signals into chemical responses, i.e. the osteocytes release signaling molecules, which orchestrate the recruitment and activity of bone forming osteoblasts and/or bone resorbing osteoclasts. Computer models have shown that the maintenance of a mechanically-efficient bone architecture depends on the intensity and spatial distribution of the mechanical stimulus as well as on the osteocyte response. Osteoporosis is a condition characterized by a reduced bone mass and a compromized resistance of bone against mechanical loads, which has led us to hypothesize that mechanotransduction by osteocytes is altered in osteoporosis. One of the major causal factors for osteoporosis is the loss of estrogen, the major hormonal regulator of bone metabolism. Loss of estrogen may increase osteocyte-mediated activation of bone remodeling, resulting in impaired bone mass and architecture. In this review we highlight current insights on how osteocytes perceive mechanical stimuli placed on whole bones. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of estrogen in signaling pathway activation by mechanical stimuli, and on computer simulation in combination with cell biology to unravel biological processes contributing to bone strength. PMID:25582356

  2. Improved heart function with myogenesis and angiogenesis after autologous porcine bone marrow stromal cell transplantation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shinji Tomita; Donald A. G. Mickle; Richard D. Weisel; Zhi-Qiang Jia; Laura C. Tumiati; Yasmin Allidina; Peter Liu; Ren-Ke Li

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The study evaluated the utility of transplanting bone marrow stromal cells in a porcine myocardial infarction model. Methods: A myocardial infarction was created by occluding the distal left anterior descending artery in pigs with coils and Gelfoam sponge. Sternal bone marrow was aspirated, and stromal cells were cultured and induced to differentiate to a myogenic phenotype with 5-azacytidine. Four

  3. Remyelination of the Rat Spinal Cord by Transplantation of Identified Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yukinori Akiyama; Christine Radtke; Jeffery D. Kocsis

    2002-01-01

    Bone marrow contains a population of stem-like cells that can differentiate into neurons or glia. Stromal cells from green fluo- rescent protein (GFP)-expressing mice were isolated by initial separation on a density gradient and then cultured as adherent cells on plastic that proliferated in culture to confluency with a typical flattened elongative morphology. The large majority of the isolated stromal

  4. Cell culture's spider silk road.

    PubMed

    Perkel, Jeffrey

    2014-06-01

    A number of synthetic and natural materials have been tried in cell culture and tissue engineering applications in recent years. Now Jeffrey Perkel takes a look at one new culture component that might surprise you-spider silk. PMID:24924388

  5. Embryonic stem cells are right now being used around the world to grow different types of cells--heart muscle cells, brain cells, pancreatic cells, liver cells, retinal cells, blood cells, bone cells and much more. Cultures of these cells are

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    more. Cultures of these cells are right now being used to test new drugs for toxicity and effectiveness are right now undergoing preclinical trials (animal trials), as required by the Federal Food and Drug in accordance with the requirements of the Animal Welfare Act and with multiple layers of regulation by numerous

  6. Craniofacial defect regeneration using engineered bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Putnins, Edward E

    2011-10-01

    Large craniofacial bony defects remain a significant clinical challenge. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) constitute a multipotent population. Previously, we developed a novel approach for BM-MSC expansion on 3D CultiSpher-S gelatin microcarrier beads in spin culture with preservation of their multipotentiality, reduction of apoptosis, and enhancement of bone formation in vivo. Here, we hypothesized that such cultured BM-MSCs without exogenous growth factors would respond to the orthopedic microenvironment, thus promoting craniofacial defect regeneration. BM-MSCs isolated from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic rats were ex vivo expanded and transplanted into critical-sized (5-mm diameter) rat calvaria defects. Gelatin beads or defect alone served as controls. By 28 and 42 days, rats were sacrificed for microcomputed tomography (microCT), histologic, and immunohistochemistry examination. MicroCT results demonstrated that BM-MSCs were a statistically significant factor contributing to new bone volume regeneration. Histologic assessment showed that the BM-MSCs group produced more and higher quality new bone compared with beads or defect-alone groups in both osteoinductive and osteoconductive manners. Specifically, immunohistochemical staining identified GFP(+) cells residing in new bone lacunae in conjunction with non-GFP(+) cells. Therefore, ex vivo expanded BM-MSCs at least in part regenerated critical-sized calvaria defects by osteogenic differentiation in vivo. PMID:21800417

  7. Amelogenin expression in long bone and cartilage cells and in bone marrow progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Haze, Amir; Taylor, Angela L; Blumenfeld, Anat; Rosenfeld, Eli; Leiser, Yoav; Dafni, Leah; Shay, Boaz; Gruenbaum-Cohen, Yael; Fermon, Eran; Haegewald, Stefan; Bernimoulin, Jean-Pierre; Deutsch, Dan

    2007-05-01

    The amelogenin protein is considered as the major molecular marker of developing ectodermal enamel. Recent data suggest other roles for amelogenin beyond structural regulation of enamel mineral crystal growth. Here we describe our novel discovery of amelogenin expression in long bone cells, in cartilage cells, in cells of the epiphyseal growth plate, and in bone marrow stromal cells. PMID:17393535

  8. Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells as a cell source for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Márcia T; Lee, Sang Jin; Gomes, Manuela E; Reis, Rui L; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2012-12-01

    In tissue engineering, stem cells have become an ideal cell source that can differentiate into most human cell types. Among the stem cells, bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) have been widely studied, and there is strong evidence that these cells can be differentiated into cells of the osteogenic lineage. Thus, BMSCs have become the gold standard for studies of tissue engineering in orthopedics. However, novel stem cell sources, such as amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) have been identified, and these have important and unique features that may lead to novel and successful applications toward the regeneration of bone tissue. This study was designed to originally compare the osteogenic potential of both BMSCs and AFSCs under distinct culture environments to determine whether the osteogenic differentiation process of both types of stem cells is related to the origin of the cells. Osteogenic differentiation was carried out in both two and three dimensions using a tissue culture plate and by means of seeding the cells onto microfibrous starch and poly(?-caprolactone) scaffolds (a blend of starch and polycaprolactone), respectively. BMSCs and AFSCs were successfully differentiated into the osteogenic cell type, as cells derived from them produced a mineralized extracellular matrix. Nevertheless, the two types of cells presented different expression patterns of bone-related markers as well as different timing of differentiation, indicating that both cell origin and the culture environment have a significant impact on the differentiation into the osteogenic phenotype in AFSCs and BMSCs. PMID:22891759

  9. Cell culture purity issues and DFAT cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shengjuan [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100 (China) [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100 (China); Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Bergen, Werner G. [Program in Cellular and Molecular Biosciences/Department of Animal Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)] [Program in Cellular and Molecular Biosciences/Department of Animal Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Hausman, Gary J. [Animal Science Department, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2771 (United States)] [Animal Science Department, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2771 (United States); Zan, Linsen, E-mail: zanls@yahoo.com.cn [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100 (China)] [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100 (China); Dodson, Michael V., E-mail: dodson@wsu.edu [Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •DFAT cells are progeny cells derived from dedifferentiated mature adipocytes. •Common problems in this research is potential cell contamination of initial cultures. •The initial cell culture purity is crucial in DFAT cell research field. -- Abstract: Dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes, in vitro, has been pursued/documented for over forty years. The subsequent progeny cells are named dedifferentiated adipocyte-derived progeny cells (DFAT cells). DFAT cells are proliferative and likely to possess mutilineage potential. As a consequence, DFAT cells and their progeny/daughter cells may be useful as a potential tool for various aspects of tissue engineering and as potential vectors for the alleviation of several disease states. Publications in this area have been increasing annually, but the purity of the initial culture of mature adipocytes has seldom been documented. Consequently, it is not always clear whether DFAT cells are derived from dedifferentiated mature (lipid filled) adipocytes or from contaminating cells that reside in an impure culture.

  10. Directing mesenchymal stem cells to bone to augment bone formation and increase bone mass

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Min; Yao, Wei; Liu, Ruiwu; Lam, Kit S.; Nolta, Jan; Jia, Junjing; Panganiban, Brian; Meng, Liping; Zhou, Ping; Shahnazari, Mohammad; Ritchie, Robert O.; Lane, Nancy E.

    2013-01-01

    Aging reduces the number of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the bone marrow which leads to impairment of osteogenesis. However, if MSCs could be directed toward osteogenic differentiation, they could be a viable therapeutic option for bone regeneration. We have developed a method to direct the MSCs to the bone surface by attaching a synthetic high affinity and specific peptidomimetic ligand (LLP2A) against integrin ?4?1 on the MSC surface, to a bisphosphonate (alendronate, Ale) that has high affinity for bone. LLP2A-Ale increased MSCs migration and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. A single intravenous injection of LLP2A-Ale increased trabecular bone formation and bone mass in both xenotransplantation and immune competent mice. Additionally, LLP2A-Ale prevented trabecular bone loss after peak bone acquisition was achieved or following estrogen deficiency. These results provide a proof of principle that LLP2A-Ale can direct MSCs to the bone to form new bone and increase bone strength. PMID:22306732

  11. [Bone and Stem Cells. Immune cell regulation by the bone marrow niche].

    PubMed

    Terashima, Asuka; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are maintained in the bone marrow and give rise to all blood cell types. The maintenance and the differentiation of blood cells including immune cells are essential for host defense and oxygen delivery. HSCs are maintained in microenvironments called stem cell niches, which consists of various cell types in bone marrow. Recently, new visualization technologies and assay systems brought advances in studies on the stem cell niche. In addition, several reports demonstrated that osteoblasts and osteocytes regulate not only HSC homeostasis but also immune cell differentiation, suggesting a close relationship between bone cells and HSCs. PMID:24681499

  12. Haute Culture: Tailoring stem cells

    E-print Network

    Chou, James

    research projects and its faculty have founded five stem cell-related startup companies and serveHaute Culture: Tailoring stem cells to make us well Tuesday, April 24, 2012 6:00-7:30 p;Haute Culture: Tailoring stem cells to make us well Moderator Brock Reeve, MPhil, MBA Executive Director

  13. OSTEOBLAST DIFFERENTIATION AND BONE FORMATION GENE EXPRESSION IN STRONTIUM-INDUCING BONE MARROW MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Monnipha Sila-asna; Ahnond Bunyaratvej; Sakan Maeda; Hiromichi Kitaguchi; Narong Bunyaratavej

    2007-01-01

    Osteoblastic differentiation from human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) is an important step of bone formation. We studied the in vitro induction of hMSCs by using strontium ranelate, a natural trace amount in water, food and human skeleton. The mRNA synthesis of various osteoblast specific genes was assessed by means of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In the hMSCs culture,

  14. Paracrine Factors Produced by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Induce Apoptosis and Neuroendocrine Differentiation in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chu; Soori, Mehrnoosh; Miles, Fayth; Sikes, Robert A.; Carson, Daniel D.; Chung, Leland L.W.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Preferential bony metastasis of human prostate cancer (PCa) cells contributes to disease mortality and morbidity. Local factors in bone stromal extracellular matrix microenvironment affect tumor growth through paracrine interactions between tumor and stromal cells. Methods Using co-culture and medium transfer, we used several methods to assess interactions between PCa and bone stromal cells using three PCa cell lines: PC3, LNCaP, and the LNCaP derivative, C4-2B. Results Co-culture of LNCaP and C4-2B cells with bone marrow stromal cell lines, HS27a and HS5, decreased cell number, as did culture with conditioned medium (CM) harvested from these two cell lines suggesting a soluble paracrine factor was responsible. PC3 cell growth was unaffected. CM harvested from bone stromal cell lines triggered apoptosis in LNCaP and C4-2B cell lines, but not in PC3 cells. Surviving C4-2B cells grown in bone stromal cell CM over several days were growth arrested, suggesting presence of a growth inhibitor. Apoptosis induced by CM was dose-dependent. Flow cytometry demonstrated that over a five day culture period in stromal cell CM, LNCaP and C4-2B cell lines, but not PC3 cells, underwent greater apoptosis than parallel cultures in SF medium. The LNCaP and C4-2B cells showed morphology and biomarker expression consistent with transdifferentiation towards a neuroendocrine phenotype after exposure to stromal cell CM. Conclusions The reactive bone stromal microenvironment initially is hostile to PCa cells producing widespread apoptosis. Activation of transdifferentiation in a subset of apoptotic resistant cells may support phenotypic adaptation during disease progression in bone, eventually favoring lethal disease. PMID:20665531

  15. Role of cell-cell interactions on the regeneration of soft tissue-to-bone interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-Ning E; Lu, Helen H

    2006-01-01

    Soft tissues such as the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) connect to bone tissue through a characteristic fibrocartilagenous interface. This interface is essential for load transfer between soft and hard tissues, and its absence is the primary cause of graft failure post ACL reconstruction surgeries. Currently, the mechanism of interface regeneration is not known. Based on in vivo observations that a fibrocartilage-like tissue forms when the graft is in direct contact with bone, we propose here the original hypothesis that fibroblast-osteoblast interactions may lead to the recruitment and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells or progenitor cells for interface regeneration. To test this hypothesis, a tri-culture model of fibroblasts-osteoblasts and interface-relevant cells was designed. This model mimics the graft-to-bone interface, supports direct cell-to-cell contact, as well as controlled homotypic and heterotypic cell-to-cell interactions. We used this model to determine the effects of fibroblast-osteoblast interaction on the response of interface-relevant cells such as bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), chondrocytes and fibroblasts. The response of osteoblasts and fibroblasts in triculture were also assessed. It was found that tri-culture with chondrocytes led to significant changes in cell proliferation and reduced osteoblast-mediated mineralization, accompanied by increased fibroblast mineralization. Interestingly, BMSCs in tri-culture measured higher ALP activity compared to controls. Positive glycosaminoglycan (GAG) production was detected in the chondrocyte tri-culture group. Moreover, expressions of interface-relevant markers such as type II collagen and GAG were detected in tri-culture with BMSCs and fibroblasts. Our results collectively demonstrate that osteoblast-fibroblast interactions modulate cell phenotypes, promote chondrocyte matrix elaboration and may initiate the differentiation of BMSCs into interface relevant phenotype. The findings of thi- s study provide new insight into the mechanisms governing the regeneration of soft tissue-to-bone interfaces. PMID:17946859

  16. Epithelial Cells Derived from Swine Bone Marrow Express Stem Cell Markers and Support Influenza Virus Replication In Vitro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mahesh Khatri; Yehia M. Saif

    2011-01-01

    The bone marrow contains heterogeneous population of cells that are involved in the regeneration and repair of diseased organs, including the lungs. In this study, we isolated and characterized progenitor epithelial cells from the bone marrow of 4- to 5-week old germ-free pigs. Microscopically, the cultured cells showed epithelial-like morphology. Phenotypically, these cells expressed the stem cell markers octamer-binding transcription

  17. Laser Light Induced Photosensitization Of Lymphomas Cells And Normal Bone Marrow Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Pervaiz, Shazib; Nealon, Don G.; VanderMeulen, David L.

    1988-06-01

    Dye mediated, laser light induced photosensitization was tested in an in vitro model for its efficacy in eliminating the contaminating tumor cells for ex vivo autologous bone marrow purging. Daudi and U-937 cells (3 x 106/ml) in RPMI-1640 supplemented with 0.25% human albumin were mixed with 20 µg/ml and 25 µg/ml of MC-540, respectively. These cell-dye mixtures were then exposed to 514 nm argon laser light. Identical treatment was given to the normal bone marrow cells. Viability was determined by the trypan blue exclusion method. Results show that at 31.2 J/cm2 irradiation, 99.9999% Daudi cells were killed while 87% of the normal bone marrow cells survived. No regrowth of Daudi cells was observed for 30 days in culture. However, a light dose of 93.6 J/cm2 was required to obtain 99.999% U-937 cell kill with 80% normal bone marrow cell survival. Mixing of irradiated bone marrow cells with an equal number of lymphoma cells did not interfere with the photodynamic killing of lymphoma cells. Exposure of cells to low doses of recombinant interferon-alpha prior to photodynamic therapy increased the viability of lymphoma cells.

  18. Incorporation of Bone Marrow Cells in Pancreatic Pseudoislets Improves Posttransplant Vascularization and Endocrine Function

    PubMed Central

    Wittig, Christine; Laschke, Matthias W.; Scheuer, Claudia; Menger, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Failure of revascularization is known to be the major reason for the poor outcome of pancreatic islet transplantation. In this study, we analyzed whether pseudoislets composed of islet cells and bone marrow cells can improve vascularization and function of islet transplants. Pancreatic islets isolated from Syrian golden hamsters were dispersed into single cells for the generation of pseudoislets containing 4×103 cells. To create bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets 2×103 islet cells were co-cultured with 2×103 bone marrow cells. Pseudoislets and bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets were transplanted syngeneically into skinfold chambers to study graft vascularization by intravital fluorescence microscopy. Native islet transplants served as controls. Bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets showed a significantly improved vascularization compared to native islets and pseudoislets. Moreover, bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets but not pseudoislets normalized blood glucose levels after transplantation of 1000 islet equivalents under the kidney capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals, although the bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets contained only 50% of islet cells compared to pseudoislets and native islets. Fluorescence microscopy of bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets composed of bone marrow cells from GFP-expressing mice showed a distinct fraction of cells expressing both GFP and insulin, indicating a differentiation of bone marrow-derived cells to an insulin-producing cell-type. Thus, enrichment of pseudoislets by bone marrow cells enhances vascularization after transplantation and increases the amount of insulin-producing tissue. Accordingly, bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets may represent a novel approach to increase the success rate of islet transplantation. PMID:23875013

  19. Adult rat and human bone marrow stromal cells differentiate into neurons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dale Woodbury; Emily J. Schwarz; Darwin J. Prockop; Ira B. Black

    2000-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells exhibit multiple traits of a stem cell population. They can be greatly expanded in vitro and induced to differentiate into multiple mesenchymal cell types. However, differentiation to non-mesenchymal fates has not been demonstrated. Here, adult rat stromal cells were expanded as undifferentiated cells in culture for more than 20 passages, indicating their proliferative capacity. A simple

  20. N-acetyl muramyl dipeptide stimulation of bone resorption in tissue culture.

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, F E

    1982-01-01

    N-Acetyl-muramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP), a structurally defined fragment of bacterial peptidoglycan, stimulated significant release of previously incorporated 45Ca from fetal rat bones in tissue culture over the concentration range of 0.1 to 10.0 micrograms/ml. MDP-Stimulated bone resorption was not inhibited by the addition of the prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor indomethacin to the culture medium. MDP was neither mitogenic for nor stimulated the release of osteoclast-activating factor from cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Thus, MDP-stimulated bone resorption in vitro is mediated by a mechanism which is not dependent upon prostaglandins or osteoclast-activating factor. 6-O-Stearoyl-N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine, a lipophilic analog of MDP, was slightly more potent than MDP. Two diastereomers of MDP, N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanyl-L-isoglutamine and N-acetyl-muramyl-D-alanyl-D-isoglutamine, which are inactive as adjuvants, were at least 1,000 times less active than MDP in stimulating bone resorption. The stereochemical specificity for bone-resorptive activity paralleled that required for adjuvant activity, macrophage activation, and activation of the reticuloendothelial system. PMID:7054120

  1. Primary cilia exist in a small fraction of cells in trabecular bone and marrow.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Thomas R; Voisin, Muriel; Schaffler, Mitchell B; Niebur, Glen L; McNamara, Laoise M

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are potent mechanical and chemical sensory organelles in cells of bone lineage in tissue culture. Cell culture experiments suggest that primary cilia sense fluid flow and this stimulus is translated through biochemical signaling into an osteogenic response in bone cells. Moreover, in vivo, primary cilia knockout in bone cells attenuates bone formation in response to loading. However, understanding the role of the primary cilium in bone mechanotransduction requires knowledge of its incidence and location in vivo. We used immunohistochemistry to quantify the number of cells with primary cilia within the trabecular bone tissue and the enclosed marrow of ovine cervical vertebrae. Primary cilia were identified in osteocytes, bone lining cells, and in cells within the marrow, but were present in only a small fraction of cells. Approximately 4% of osteocytes and 4.6% of bone lining cells expressed primary cilia. Within the marrow space, only approximately 1% of cells presented primary cilia. The low incidence of primary cilia may indicate that cilia either function as mechanosensors in a selected number of cells, function in concert with other mechanosensing mechanisms, or that the role of primary cilia in mechanosensing is secondary to its role in chemosensing or cellular attachment. PMID:25398598

  2. Fermentation with immobilized cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Werner, R G; Merk, W; Walz, F

    1988-02-01

    For the production of monoclonal antibodies and complex recombinant human proteins or glycoproteins a number of immobilized cell culture systems have been developed. The advantages of such cell culture systems are that cells can be kept in small volumes of cell culture fluid and media can be changed continuously if necessary for induction of product synthesis or removal and harvest of metabolic products. Whereas the hollow fiber and the opticell culture systems can be limited in scaling up the microcarrier system, the fluidized bed bioreactor and the solid bed bioreactor are suitable for scaling up. In contrast to the other systems, the solid bed bioreactor requires no special manipulation for anchoring the cells to the wire springs. In situ cleaning is possible and the beads are reusable. With this cell culture fermentation system, production processes for interferon beta, monoclonal antibodies for interferon alfa and recombinant human tissue plasminogen activator were developed. PMID:3285839

  3. Human placenta and bone marrow derived MSC cultured in serum-free, b-FGF-containing medium express cell surface frizzled-9 and SSEA-4 and give rise to multilineage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Battula, Venkata Lokesh; Bareiss, Petra M; Treml, Sabrina; Conrad, Sabine; Albert, Ingrid; Hojak, Sigrid; Abele, Harald; Schewe, Bernhard; Just, Lothar; Skutella, Thomas; Bühring, Hans-Jörg

    2007-04-01

    Conventionally, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are generated by plating cells from bone marrow (BM) or other sources into culture flasks and selecting plastic-adherent cells with fibroblastoid morphology. These cells express CD9, CD10, CD13, CD73, CD105, CD166, and other markers but show only a weak or no expression of the embryonic markers stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4), Oct-4 and nanog-3. Using a novel protocol we prepared MSC from BM and non-amniotic placenta (PL) by culture of Ficoll-selected cells in gelatin-coated flasks in the presence of a serum-free, basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF)-containing medium that was originally designed for the expansion of human embryonic stem cells (ESC). MSC generated in gelatin-coated flasks in the presence of ESC medium revealed a four-to fivefold higher proliferation rate than conventionally prepared MSC which were grown in uncoated flasks in serum-containing medium. In contrast, the colony forming unit fibroblast number was only 1.5- to twofold increased in PL-MSC and not affected in BM-MSC. PL-MSC grown in ESC medium showed an increased surface expression of SSEA-4 and frizzled-9 (FZD-9), an increased Oct-4 and nestin mRNA expression, and an induced expression of nanog-3. BM-MSC showed an induced expression of FZD-9, nanog-3, and Oct-4. In contrast to PL-MSC, only BM-MSC expressed the MSC-specific W8B2 antigen. When cultured under appropriate conditions, these MSC gave rise to functional adipocytes and osteoblast-like cells (mesoderm), glucagon and insulin expressing pancreatic-like cells (endoderm), as well as cells expressing the neuronal markers neuron-specific enolase, glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (GAD), or class III beta-tubulin, and the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (ectoderm). In conclusion, using a novel protocol we demonstrate that adult BM-and neonatal PL-derived MSC can be induced to express high levels of FZD-9, Oct-4, nanog-3, and nestin and are able of multi-lineage differentiation. PMID:17288545

  4. Cadmium accelerates bone loss in ovariectomized mice and fetal rat limb bones in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Whelton, B.D.; Stern, P.H.; Peterson, D.P. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1988-11-01

    Loss of bone mineral after ovariectomy was studied in mice exposed to dietary cadmium at 0.25, 5, or 50 ppm. Results show that dietary cadmium at 50 ppm increased bone mineral loss to a significantly greater extent in ovariectomized mice than in sham-operated controls. These results were obtained from two studies, one in which skeletal calcium content was determined 6 months after ovariectomy and a second in which {sup 45}Ca release from {sup 45}Ca-prelabeled bones was measured immediately after the start of dietary cadmium exposure. Furthermore, experiments with {sup 45}Ca-prelabeled fetal rat limb bones in culture demonstrated that Cd at 10 nM in the medium, a concentration estimated to be in the plasma of mice exposed to 50 ppm dietary Cd, strikingly increased bone resorption. These in vitro results indicate that cadmium may enhance bone mineral loss by a direct action on bone. Results of the in vivo studies are consistent with a significant role of cadmium in the etiology of Itai-Itai disease among postmenopausal women in Japan and may in part explain the increased risk of postmenopausal osteoporosis among women who smoke.

  5. Enhanced Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Adhesion and Growth on Segmented Poly(ether ester)s Based on Poly(ethylene oxide) and Poly(butylene terephthalate)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Menno B. Claase; Mark B. Olde Riekerink; Bruijn de Joost D; Dirk W. Grijpma; Gerard H. M. Engbers; Jan Feijen

    2003-01-01

    In previous studies in rats and goats, hydrophilic compositions of the PEOT\\/PBT block copolymer family have shown in vivo calcification and bone bonding. These copolymers are therefore interesting candidates as scaffolding materials in bone tissue engineering applications. Model studies using goat bone marrow stromal cells, however, showed that it was not possible to culture bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

  6. Unique and reliable rat model for the assessment of cell therapy: bone union in the rat mandibular symphysis using bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Yagyuu, Takahiro; Kirita, Tadaaki; Hattori, Koji; Tadokoro, Mika; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2015-03-01

    Many kinds of bone graft materials have been developed and reported to repair various bone defects. The defects are usually created by surgical resection of pre-existing bone tissue. However, spontaneous healing of bone defects without implantation of materials could be seen, because bone tissue possesses inherent repairing property. The central portion of the lower jaw bone in many animals consists of fibrous tissue and is called the mandibular symphysis. It persists even in old animals and thus can be interpreted as a physiological bone gap or a non-healing bone defect. We implanted calcium phosphate porous ceramics alone or composites of the ceramics and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) into the bone defect (mandibular symphysis) to examine whether it could be filled with new bone tissue, resulting in bone union. Eight weeks after implantation, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histological and biomechanical analyses demonstrated that bone union of the mandibles occurred in all rats with composites but in none of those with ceramics alone. These results showed that the rat mandibular symphysis is a unique bone defect site for the evaluation of bone graft materials. These analyses demonstrated that ceramics alone could not contribute to bone healing in the defect; however, supplementation with BMSCs drastically changed the properties of the ceramics (turning them into osteogenic ceramics), which completely healed the defect. As BMSCs can be culture-expanded using small amounts of bone marrow, the use of the composites might have clinical significance for the reconstruction of various bone tissues, including facial bone. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23255518

  7. Concise Review: Cell-Based Strategies in Bone Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jinling; Both, Sanne K.; Yang, Fang; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Pan, Juli; Meijer, Gert J.; Jansen, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular strategies play an important role in bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (BTE/RM). Variability in cell culture procedures (e.g., cell types, cell isolation and expansion, cell seeding methods, and preculture conditions before in vivo implantation) may influence experimental outcome. Meanwhile, outcomes from initial clinical trials are far behind those of animal studies, which is suggested to be related to insufficient nutrient and oxygen supply inside the BTE/RM constructs as some complex clinical implementations require bone regeneration in too large a quantity. Coculture strategies, in which angiogenic cells are introduced into osteogenic cell cultures, might provide a solution for improving vascularization and hence increasing bone formation for cell-based constructs. So far, preclinical studies have demonstrated that cell-based tissue-engineered constructs generally induce more bone formation compared with acellular constructs. Further, cocultures have been shown to enhance vascularization and bone formation compared with monocultures. However, translational efficacy from animal studies to clinical use requires improvement, and the role implanted cells play in clinical bone regeneration needs to be further elucidated. In view of this, the present review provides an overview of the critical procedures during in vitro and in vivo phases for cell-based strategies (both monoculture and coculture) in BTE/RM to achieve more standardized culture conditions for future studies, and hence enhance bone formation. PMID:24300556

  8. Engineering bone tissue substitutes from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    de Peppo, Giuseppe Maria; Marcos-Campos, Iván; Kahler, David John; Alsalman, Dana; Shang, Linshan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Marolt, Darja

    2013-01-01

    Congenital defects, trauma, and disease can compromise the integrity and functionality of the skeletal system to the extent requiring implantation of bone grafts. Engineering of viable bone substitutes that can be personalized to meet specific clinical needs represents a promising therapeutic alternative. The aim of our study was to evaluate the utility of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for bone tissue engineering. We first induced three hiPSC lines with different tissue and reprogramming backgrounds into the mesenchymal lineages and used a combination of differentiation assays, surface antigen profiling, and global gene expression analysis to identify the lines exhibiting strong osteogenic differentiation potential. We then engineered functional bone substitutes by culturing hiPSC-derived mesenchymal progenitors on osteoconductive scaffolds in perfusion bioreactors and confirmed their phenotype stability in a subcutaneous implantation model for 12 wk. Molecular analysis confirmed that the maturation of bone substitutes in perfusion bioreactors results in global repression of cell proliferation and an increased expression of lineage-specific genes. These results pave the way for growing patient-specific bone substitutes for reconstructive treatments of the skeletal system and for constructing qualified experimental models of development and disease. PMID:23653480

  9. Efficiently engineered cell sheet using a complex of polyethylenimine-alginate nanocomposites plus bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene to promote new bone formation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Han; Zhang, Kai; Qiao, Chunyan; Yuan, Anliang; Li, Daowei; Zhao, Liang; Shi, Ce; Xu, Xiaowei; Ni, Shilei; Zheng, Changyu; Liu, Xiaohua; Yang, Bai; Sun, Hongchen

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of large bone defects is a common clinical problem. Recently, stem cell sheet has been an emerging strategy in bone tissue engineering. To enhance the osteogenic potential of stem cell sheet, we fabricated bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) gene-engineered cell sheet using a complex of polyethylenimine-alginate (PEI-al) nanocomposites plus human BMP-2 complementary(c)DNA plasmid, and studied its osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. PEI-al nanocomposites carrying BMP-2 gene could efficiently transfect bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The cell sheet was made by culturing the cells in medium containing vitamin C for 10 days. Assays on the cell culture showed that the genetically engineered cells released the BMP-2 for at least 14 days. The expression of osteogenesis-related gene was increased, which demonstrated that released BMP-2 could effectively induce the cell sheet osteogenic differentiation in vitro. To further test the osteogenic potential of the cell sheet in vivo, enhanced green fluorescent protein or BMP-2-producing cell sheets were treated on the cranial bone defects. The results indicated that the BMP-2-producing cell sheet group was more efficient than other groups in promoting bone formation in the defect area. Our results suggested that PEI-al nanocomposites efficiently deliver the BMP-2 gene to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and that BMP-2 gene-engineered cell sheet is an effective way for promoting bone regeneration. PMID:24855355

  10. Efficiently engineered cell sheet using a complex of polyethylenimine–alginate nanocomposites plus bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene to promote new bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Han; Zhang, Kai; Qiao, Chunyan; Yuan, Anliang; Li, Daowei; Zhao, Liang; Shi, Ce; Xu, Xiaowei; Ni, Shilei; Zheng, Changyu; Liu, Xiaohua; Yang, Bai; Sun, Hongchen

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of large bone defects is a common clinical problem. Recently, stem cell sheet has been an emerging strategy in bone tissue engineering. To enhance the osteogenic potential of stem cell sheet, we fabricated bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) gene-engineered cell sheet using a complex of polyethylenimine–alginate (PEI–al) nanocomposites plus human BMP-2 complementary(c)DNA plasmid, and studied its osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. PEI–al nanocomposites carrying BMP-2 gene could efficiently transfect bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The cell sheet was made by culturing the cells in medium containing vitamin C for 10 days. Assays on the cell culture showed that the genetically engineered cells released the BMP-2 for at least 14 days. The expression of osteogenesis-related gene was increased, which demonstrated that released BMP-2 could effectively induce the cell sheet osteogenic differentiation in vitro. To further test the osteogenic potential of the cell sheet in vivo, enhanced green fluorescent protein or BMP-2-producing cell sheets were treated on the cranial bone defects. The results indicated that the BMP-2-producing cell sheet group was more efficient than other groups in promoting bone formation in the defect area. Our results suggested that PEI–al nanocomposites efficiently deliver the BMP-2 gene to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and that BMP-2 gene-engineered cell sheet is an effective way for promoting bone regeneration. PMID:24855355

  11. Microenvironmental niches in the bone marrow required for B-cell development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takashi Nagasawa

    2006-01-01

    B-cell development is known to occur in a complex bone-marrow microenvironment but its functional organization remains unclear. It is thought that bone-marrow stromal cells create distinct microenvironments, known as niches, that provide support for haematopoiesis and B-cell development. Although it has been more than 20 years since the development of a culture system that allows the growth of B-cell progenitors

  12. Dormancy and growth of metastatic breast cancer cells in a bone-like microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sosnoski, Donna M; Norgard, Robert J; Grove, Cassidy D; Foster, Shelby J; Mastro, Andrea M

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer can reoccur, often as bone metastasis, many years if not decades after the primary tumor has been treated. The factors that stimulate dormant metastases to grow are not known, but bone metastases are often associated with skeletal trauma. We used a dormancy model of MDA-MB-231BRMS1, a metastasis-suppressed human breast cancer cell line, co-cultured with MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts in a long term, three dimensional culture system to test the hypothesis that bone remodeling cytokines could stimulate dormant cells to grow. The cancer cells attached to the matrix produced by MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts but grew slowly or not at all until the addition of bone remodeling cytokines, TNF? and IL-?. Stimulation of cell proliferation by these cytokines was suppressed with indomethacin, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and of prostaglandin production, or a prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor antagonist. Addition of PGE2 directly to the cultures also stimulated cell proliferation. MCF-7, non-metastatic breast cancer cells, remained dormant when co-cultured with normal human osteoblast and fibroblast growth factor. Similar to the MDA-MB-231BRMS1 cells, MCF-7 proliferation increased in response to TNF? and IL-?. These findings suggest that changes in the bone microenvironment due to inflammatory cytokines associated with bone repair or excess turnover may trigger the occurrence of latent bone metastasis. PMID:25749879

  13. Huanglongbing and psyllid cell cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We successfully established cell cultures of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Psyllidae: Hemiptera), DcHH-1. The cell culture also supported growth of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. This bacterial pathogen is associated with Huanglongbing, known as citrus greening disease. Research on...

  14. Tendon stem cells: experimental and clinical perspectives in tendon and tendon-bone junction repair

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Pauline Po Yee; Wong, On Tik

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tendon and tendon-bone junction injuries, while heal, have high re-tear rates. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have great appeal for the promotion of tendon and tendon-bone junction healing because of their high proliferation rate, multi-potency and relative ease of isolation from various tissues. Tendon stem cells have been identified recently and could be an alternative new cell source for tendon and tendon-bone junction repair. In this review, we summarized the in vitro characteristics of tendon stem cells. The evidence supporting the potential use of these cells for tendon and tendon-bone junction repair was presented. In order to therapeutically apply tendon stem cells in the clinical settings, standardization of tendon stem cell culture is essential. Issues relating to the sources, purity, efficacy, safety and delivery of tendon stem cells for tendon and tendon-bone junction repair were summarized and discussed. The direction for future research was suggested. PMID:23738293

  15. Bone marrow-derived osteoblast progenitor cells in circulating blood contribute to ectopic bone formation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuru, Satoru [Division of Gene Therapy Science, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tamai, Katsuto [Division of Gene Therapy Science, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)]. E-mail: tamai@gts.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Yamazaki, Takehiko [Division of Gene Therapy Science, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Hideki [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kaneda, Yasufumi [Division of Gene Therapy Science, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2007-03-09

    Recent studies have suggested the existence of osteoblastic cells in the circulation, but the origin and role of these cells in vivo are not clear. Here, we examined how these cells contribute to osteogenesis in a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-induced model of ectopic bone formation. Following lethal dose-irradiation and subsequent green fluorescent protein-transgenic bone marrow cell-transplantation (GFP-BMT) in mice, a BMP-2-containing collagen pellet was implanted into muscle. Three weeks later, a significant number of GFP-positive osteoblastic cells were present in the newly generated ectopic bone. Moreover, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) from the BMP-2-implanted mouse were then shown to include osteoblast progenitor cells (OPCs) in culture. Passive transfer of the PBMNCs isolated from the BMP-2-implanted GFP-mouse to the BMP-2-implanted nude mouse led to GFP-positive osteoblast accumulation in the ectopic bone. These data provide new insight into the mechanism of ectopic bone formation involving bone marrow-derived OPCs in circulating blood.

  16. Rat bone marrow stromal cells-seeded porous gelatin/tricalcium phosphate/oligomeric proanthocyanidins composite scaffold for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuo-Yu; Chung, Chia-Mei; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Bau, Da-Tian; Yao, Chun-Hsu

    2013-09-01

    Repair of bone defects remains a major challenge in orthopaedic surgery. Bone tissue engineering is an attractive approach for treating bone loss in various shapes and amounts. The aim of this study was to prepare and evaluate the feasibility of a porous scaffold, which was composed of oligomeric proanthocyanidin crosslinked gelatin mixed with ?-tricalcium phosphate (GTP) and was seeded with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) as a bone substitute. GTP scaffolds were made porous using a salt-leaching method. The physicochemical properties of the scaffold were evaluated to determine the optimal salt:composite weight ratio. The results indicated that the GTP scaffold had a favourable macroporous structure and higher porosity when the salt:composite weight ratio was 4:1. Cytotoxic tests demonstrated that extracts from the GTP scaffolds promoted the proliferation of BMSCs. Rat BMSCs were seeded on a GTP scaffold and cultured in a spinner flask. After 2 weeks of culture, scanning electron microscopy observation showed that the cells adhered well to the surfaces of the pores in the scaffold. Moreover, this study explored the biological response of rat calvarial bone to the scaffold to evaluate its potential in bone tissue engineering. Bone defects were filled with BMSC-seeded GTP scaffold and acellular GTP scaffold. After 8 weeks, the scaffold induced new bone formation at a bone defect, as was confirmed by X-ray microradiography and histology. The BMSC-seeded scaffold induced more new bone formation than did an acellular scaffold. These observations suggest that the BMSCs-seeded GTP scaffold can promote the regeneration of defective bone tissue. PMID:22392838

  17. Interactions between breast cancer cells and bone marrow derived cells in vitro define a role for osteopontin in affecting breast cancer cell migration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Konstantin Koro; Stephen Parkin; Brant Pohorelic; An-Dao Yang; Aru Narendran; Cay Egan; Anthony Magliocco

    2011-01-01

    The preferential metastasis of breast cancer cells to bone is a complex set of events including homing and preferential growth\\u000a which may include unique factors produced by bone cells in the immediate microenvironment. In this study, we evaluated the\\u000a suitability of bone cells derived from orthoplastic surgeries for use in an in vitro co-culture system representing a model\\u000a of the

  18. Influence of cassette design on three-dimensional perfusion culture of artificial bone.

    PubMed

    Du, Dajiang; Ushida, Takashi; Furukawa, Katsuko S

    2015-01-01

    Media perfusion is often required to maintain cell viability within topographically complex 3-dimensional scaffold cultures. Osteoblast-seeded scaffolds for bone regeneration require robust cell proliferation and survival both within the scaffold and over the exterior for optimal osteogenic capacity. Conventional press-fitting cassettes ensure internal fluid flow through the scaffold but may restrict external flow around the scaffold, resulting in a barren (cell-free) external scaffold surface. In this study, we aimed to solve this problem by modifying the cassette structure to enhance external flow in an oscillatory perfusion culture system. Mouse osteoblast-like MC 3T3-E1 cells were seeded in porous ceramic scaffolds and incubated for 3 days either under static culture conditions or in an oscillatory perfusion bioreactor. Scaffolds were held in the bioreactor with either conventional press-fitting cassettes or cassettes with rings to separate the scaffold exterior from the internal cassette wall. The external surfaces of scaffolds maintained under static conditions were well seeded, but cells failed to grow deeply into the core, reflecting poor internal chemotransport. Alternatively, scaffolds cultured by perfusion with press-fitting cassettes had poor cell viability at the cassette-external scaffold surface interface, but cells were widely distributed within the scaffold core. Scaffolds cultured using the modified cassettes with 1 or 2 rings exhibited uniformly distributed living cells throughout the internal pores and over the entire external surface, possibly because of the improved medium flow over the scaffold surface. This modified oscillatory perfusion culture system may facilitate the production of engineered bone with superior osteogenic capacity for grafting. PMID:24764314

  19. Evaluation of calcium phosphates and experimental calcium phosphate bone cements using osteogenic cultures.

    PubMed

    Knabe, C; Driessens, F C; Planell, J A; Gildenhaar, R; Berger, G; Reif, D; Fitzner, R; Radlanski, R J; Gross, U

    2000-12-01

    In this study, rat bone marrow cells (RBM) were used to evaluate two biodegradable calcium phosphate bone cements and bioactive calcium phosphate ceramics. The substances investigated were: two novel calcium phosphate cements, Biocement F and Biocement H, tricalcium phosphate (TCP), surface-modified alpha-tricalcium phosphate [TCP (s)] and a rapid resorbable calcium phosphate ceramic consisting of CaKPO(4) (sample code R5). RBM cells were cultured on disc-shaped test substrates for 14 days. The culture medium was changed daily and also examined for calcium, phosphate, and potassium concentrations. Specimens were evaluated using light microscopy, and morphometry of the cell-covered substrate surface, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis and morphometry of the cell-covered substrate surface. Areas of mineralization were identified by tetracyline labeling. Except for R 5, rat bone-marrow cells attached and grew on all substrate surfaces. Of the different calcium phosphate materials tested, TCP and TCP (s) facilitated osteoblast growth and extracellular matrix elaboration to the highest degree, followed by Biocements H and F. The inhibition of cell growth encountered with R 5 seems to be related to its high phosphate and potassium ion release. PMID:11007618

  20. MATERIALS AND METHODS Cell culture

    E-print Network

    cell line hCMEC/D3 which retains the main characteristics of primary brain endothelial cells, has beenMATERIALS AND METHODS Reagents Cell culture The immortalized human brain microvessel endothelial previously described (S1). hCMEC/D3 were grown at a density of 25 000 cells per cm2 in flasks coated with 5

  1. Differential effects of drugs upon hematopoiesis can be assessed in long-term bone marrow cultures established on nylon screens.

    PubMed

    Naughton, B A; Sibanda, B; Azar, L; San Roman, J

    1992-04-01

    Hematotoxicity is associated with exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs and numerous other agents. Most measurements of the hematopoietic effects of prospective therapeutic drugs and environmental agents have been made in animal models. We tested the influence of various drugs on hematopoiesis in long-term cultures of Long-Evans rat bone marrow cells. These cultures were established on nylon screen-bone marrow stromal cell templates that were suspended in liquid medium. Previous phenotypic analyses of adherent zone cells of suspended nylon screen bone marrow cultures (NSBMC) using monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry indicated that they maintain a multilineage character for extended periods in culture and display continuous proliferation of hematopoietic progenitors (colony-forming unit culture [CFU-C]). NSBMC of various ages were incubated for 21 hr with several concentrations of beta-D-cytosine arabinofuranoside, 5-fluorouracil, cyclophosphamide, or methotrexate. Adherent zone cells were dissociated enzymatically, phenotyped by flow cytometry, and assayed for colony-forming unit culture content. beta-D-cytosine arabinofuranoside, 5-fluorouracil, and methotrexate treatment of bone marrow cultures resulted in a dose-related diminution in colony-forming unit culture numbers in the adherent zones of NSBMC. Phenotypic analyses revealed similar trends but certain of these drugs manifested lineage specificities. Toxicity was also related to cyclophosphamide dose, but the presence of bone marrow stroma was necessary to demonstrate this effect in vitro. A subpopulation of these cells was found to metabolize ethoxyfluorescein ethyl ester to fluorescein after induction with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, an effect which was quantified by flow cytometry. NSBMC may be used to ascertain lineage-specific toxicities and evaluate the effects of drugs on the proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. PMID:1549628

  2. Curcumin analog UBS109 prevents bone marrow osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis disordered by coculture with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 bone metastatic cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Zhu, Shijun; Weitzmann, M Neale; Snyder, James P; Shoji, Mamoru

    2015-03-01

    UBS109 is a curcumin analog that possesses antitumor properties has been shown to stimulate osteoblastogenesis and suppress osteoclastogenesis in vitro. This study was undertaken to determine whether UBS109 might alleviate the inhibitory activity of breast cancer cells on osteoblastic mineralization and stimulatory effects on osteoclastogenesis. Mouse bone marrow cells were cocultured with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 bone metastatic cells in vitro. UBS109 stimulated osteoblastic mineralization and suppressed adipogenesis and osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow culture. Coculture with MDA-MB-231 cells suppressed osteoblastic mineralization and enhanced osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow culture. Effects that were reserved by UBS109 (50-200 nM). Mineralization in preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells was suppressed by coculture with MDA-MB-231 cells, while MDA-MB-231 cells did not have effects on osteoclastogenesis of RAW267.4 cells in vitro. UBS109 (500 nM) revealed toxic effects on MDA-MB-231 bone metastatic cells. This study demonstrates that UBS109, which is an antitumor agent, reveals restorative effects on bone marrow cell differentiation disordered by coculture with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 bone metastatic cells in vitro. This in vitro model may be a useful tool to evaluate the mechanism of breast cancer cell bone metastasis. PMID:25416449

  3. High density cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  4. Cannabinoids Stimulate Fibroblastic Colony Formation by Bone Marrow Cells Indirectly via CB 2 Receptors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Scutt; E. M. Williamson

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 were shown to modulate bone formation and resorption in vivo, although little is known of the mechanisms underlying this. The effects of cannabinoids on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) recruitment\\u000a in whole bone marrow were investigated using either the fibroblastic colony-forming unit (CFU-f) assay or high-density cultures\\u000a of whole bone marrow. Levels of the

  5. [Bone and Stem Cells. Bone marrow microenvironment niches for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells].

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    In bone marrow, the special microenvironments known as niches control proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) . However, the identity and functions of the niches has been a subject of longstanding debate. Although it has been reported previously that osteoblasts lining the bone surface act as HSC niches, their precise role in HSC maintenance remains unclear. On the other hand, the adipo-osteogenic progenitors with long processes, termed CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, which preferentially express the chemokine CXCL12, stem cell factor (SCF) , leptin receptor and PDGF receptor-? were identified in the bone marrow. Recent studies revealed that endothelial cells of bone marrow vascular sinuses and CAR cells provided niches for HSCs. The identity and functions of various other candidate HSC niche cells, including nestin-expressing cells and Schwann cells would also be discussed in this review. PMID:24681497

  6. Dexamethasone Enhances Osteogenic Differentiation of Bone Marrow- and Muscle-Derived Stromal Cells and Augments Ectopic Bone Formation Induced by Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Yuasa, Masato; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Taniyama, Takashi; Masaoka, Tomokazu; Xuetao, Wei; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Horie, Masaki; Yasuda, Hiroaki; Uemura, Toshimasa; Okawa, Atsushi; Sotome, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated whether dexamethasone augments the osteogenic capability of bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) and muscle tissue-derived stromal cells (MuSCs), both of which are thought to contribute to ectopic bone formation induced by bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and determined the underlying mechanisms. Rat BMSCs and MuSCs were cultured in growth media with or without 10-7 M dexamethasone and then differentiated under osteogenic conditions with dexamethasone and BMP-2. The effects of dexamethasone on cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation, and also on ectopic bone formation induced by BMP-2, were analyzed. Dexamethasone affected not only the proliferation rate but also the subpopulation composition of BMSCs and MuSCs, and subsequently augmented their osteogenic capacity during osteogenic differentiation. During osteogenic induction by BMP-2, dexamethasone also markedly affected cell proliferation in both BMSCs and MuSCs. In an in vivo ectopic bone formation model, bone formation in muscle-implanted scaffolds containing dexamethasone and BMP-2 was more than two fold higher than that in scaffolds containing BMP-2 alone. Our results suggest that dexamethasone potently enhances the osteogenic capability of BMP-2 and may thus decrease the quantity of BMP-2 required for clinical application, thereby reducing the complications caused by excessive doses of BMP-2. Highlights: 1. Dexamethasone induced selective proliferation of bone marrow- and muscle-derived cells with higher differentiation potential. 2. Dexamethasone enhanced the osteogenic capability of bone marrow- and muscle-derived cells by altering the subpopulation composition. 3. Dexamethasone augmented ectopic bone formation induced by bone morphogenetic protein-2. PMID:25659106

  7. Ionizing radiation sensitizes bone cells to apoptosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. H Szymczyk; I. M Shapiro; C. S Adams

    2004-01-01

    Osteoradionecrosis is a common sequelae of radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. To test the hypothesis that radiation induces osteoradionecrosis by induction of bone cell apoptosis, we exposed MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells to ?-radiation and evaluated cell viability. Twenty-four hours postirradiation, measurement of osteoblast dehydrogenase activity suggested that there was a small decrease in cell viability. However, TUNEL and flow

  8. Bone regeneration using coculture of mesenchymal stem cells and angiogenic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jin-Ling; van den Beucken, Jeroen J. J. P.; Pan, Ju-Li; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Chen, Su

    2014-03-01

    Cellular strategies remain a crucial component in bone tissue engineering (BTE). So far, the outcome of cell-based strategies from initial clinical trials is far behind compared to animal studies, which is suggested to be related to insufficient nutrient and oxygen supply inside the tissue-engineered constructs. Cocultures, by introducing angiogenic cells into osteogenic cell cultures, might provide a solution for improving vascularization and hence increasing bone formation for cell-based constructs. So far, pre-clinical studies demonstrated that cocultures enhance vascularization and bone formation compared to monocultures. However, there has been no report on the application of cocultures in clinics. Therefore, this mini-review aims to provide an overview regarding (i) critical parameters in cocultures and the outcomes of cocultures compared to monocultures in the currently available pre-clinical studies using human mesenchymal stem cells implanted in orthotopic animal models; and (ii) the usage of monocultures in clinical application in BTE.

  9. T cells stimulate catabolic gene expression by the stromal cells from giant cell tumor of bone

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Robert W. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada) [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada); Ghert, Michelle [Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada) [Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada); Department of Surgery, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Singh, Gurmit, E-mail: gurmit.singh@jcc.hhsc.ca [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada) [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two T cell lines stimulate PTHrP, RANKL, MMP13 gene expression in GCT cell cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD40 expressed by stromal cells; CD40L detected in whole tumor but not cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of CD40L treatment on GCT cells increased PTHrP and MMP13 gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTHrP treatment increased MMP13 expression, while inhibition decreased expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells may stimulate GCT stromal cells and promote the osteolysis of the tumor. -- Abstract: The factors that promote the localized bone resorption by giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) are not fully understood. We investigated whether T cells could contribute to bone resorption by stimulating expression of genes for parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, and the receptor activator of nuclear-factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL). Two cell lines, Jurkat clone E6-1 and D1.1, were co-cultured with isolated GCT stromal cells. Real-time PCR analyses demonstrated a significant increase of all three genes following 48 h incubation, and PTHrP and MMP-13 gene expression was also increased at 24 h. Further, we examined the expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L), a protein expressed by activated T cells, and its receptor, CD40, in GCT. Immunohistochemistry results revealed expression of the CD40 receptor in both the stromal cells and giant cells of the tumor. RNA collected from whole GCT tissues showed expression of CD40LG, which was absent in cultured stromal cells, and suggests that CD40L is expressed within GCT. Stimulation of GCT stromal cells with CD40L significantly increased expression of the PTHrP and MMP-13 genes. Moreover, we show that inhibition of PTHrP with neutralizing antibodies significantly decreased MMP13 expression by the stromal cells compared to IgG-matched controls, whereas stimulation with PTHrP (1-34) increased MMP-13 gene expression. These results suggest that T cells may potentiate the catabolic effect of GCT.

  10. Bone formation by three-dimensional stromal osteoblast culture in biodegradable polymer scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishaug, S. L.; Crane, G. M.; Miller, M. J.; Yasko, A. W.; Yaszemski, M. J.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Bone formation was investigated in vitro by culturing stromal osteoblasts in three-dimensional (3-D), biodegradable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foams. Three polymer foam pore sizes, ranging from 150-300, 300-500, and 500-710 microns, and two different cell seeding densities, 6.83 x 10(5) cells/cm2 and 22.1 x 10(5) cells/cm2, were examined over a 56-day culture period. The polymer foams supported the proliferation of seeded osteoblasts as well as their differentiated function, as demonstrated by high alkaline phosphatase activity and deposition of a mineralized matrix by the cells. Cell number, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineral deposition increased significantly over time for all the polymer foams. Osteoblast foam constructs created by seeding 6.83 x 10(5) cells/cm2 on foams with 300-500 microns pores resulted in a cell density of 4.63 x 10(5) cells/cm2 after 1 day in culture; they had alkaline phosphatase activities of 4.28 x 10(-7) and 2.91 x 10(-6) mumol/cell/min on Days 7 and 28, respectively; and they had a cell density that increased to 18.7 x 10(5) cells/cm2 by Day 56. For the same constructs, the mineralized matrix reached a maximum penetration depth of 240 microns from the top surface of the foam and a value of 0.083 mm for mineralized tissue volume per unit of cross sectional area. Seeding density was an important parameter for the constructs, but pore size over the range tested did not affect cell proliferation or function. This study suggests the feasibility of using poly(alpha-hydroxy ester) foams as scaffolding materials for the transplantation of autogenous osteoblasts to regenerate bone tissue.

  11. Comparison of endometrial regenerative cells and bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Endometrial regenerative cells (ERC) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) are being used in clinical trials. While they have been reported to have similar characteristics, they have not been directly compared. Methods We compared micro RNA (miRNA) and gene expression profiles, soluble cytokine and growth factor levels and ability to inhibit ongoing mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR) of ERC and BMSC each derived from 6 healthy subjects. Results ERC and BMSC miRNA and gene expression profiles were similar, but not identical; more differences were noted in the expression of genes than in miRNAs. Genes overexpressed in ERCs were more likely to be in immune and inflammation pathways and those overexpressed in BMSCs were more likely to be in stem cell and cancer signaling pathways. In addition, the levels of IL-8 and ICAM-1 were greater in ERC supernatants while the levels of HGF, VEGF, IL-6, CXCL12, TGFB1 and TGFB2 were greater in BMSC supernatants. Additionally, ERC demonstrated greater inhibition of the proliferation of mixed leukocyte cultures. Conclusions These results suggest that the in vivo effects of ERC and BMSC may differ. Multiple properties of stromal cells are responsible for their in vivo effectiveness and ERC may be more effective for some of the clinical applications and BMSC for others. Studies in animal models or clinical trials will be required to more fully characterize the differences between ERC and BMSC. PMID:23038994

  12. Titanium containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon films (aC : H\\/Ti): surface analysis and evaluation of cellular reactions using bone marrow cell cultures in vitro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anouk Schroeder; Gilbert Francz; Arend Bruinink; Roland Hauert; Joerg Mayer; Erich Wintermantel

    2000-01-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) coatings, also called diamond-like carbon (DLC), have many properties required for a protective coating material in biomedical applications. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new surface coating for bone-related implants by combining the hardness and inertness of a-C:H films with the biological acceptance of titanium. For this purpose, different amounts of titanium were

  13. Morphological characteristics of cultured olfactory bulb cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. P. Fracek; L. Guo; R. Schafer

    1994-01-01

    Cultured olfactory bulb cells from embryonic mice had ultrastructural characteristics similar to those of many cell types in the intact adult mouse olfactory bulb. Identified cultured cells included mitral\\/tufted cells, granule cells, short-axon cells, and fibrous and protoplasmic astrocytes. Cultured neurons were found as individual cells, clusters or aggregates. Clusters consisted of a loose array of neurons that appeared to

  14. Recent highlights on bone stem cells: a report from Bone Stem Cells 2009, and not only…

    PubMed Central

    Cenni, Elisabetta; Perut, Francesca; Baglío, Serena Rubina; Fiorentini, Elisa; Baldini, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The use of stem cells has opened new prospects for the treatment of orthopaedic conditions characterized by large bone defects. However, many issues still exist to which answers are needed before routine, large-scale application becomes possible. Bone marrow stromal cells (MSC), which are clonogenic, multipotential precursors present in the bone marrow stroma, are generally employed for bone regeneration. Stem cells with multilineage differentiation similar to MSC have also been demonstrated in adipose tissue, peripheral blood, umbilical cord and amniotic fluid. Each source presents its own advantages and drawbacks. Unfortunately, no unique surface antigen is expressed by MSC, and this hampers simple MSC enrichment from heterogeneous populations. MSC are identified through a combination of physical, morphological and functional assays. Different in vitro and in vivo models have been described for the research on bone stem cells. These models should predict the in vivo bone healing capacity of MSC and if the induced osteogenesis is similar to the physiological one. Although stem cells offer an exciting possibility of a renewable source of cells and tissues for replacement, orthopaedic applications often represent case reports whereas controlled randomized trials are still lacking. Further biological aspects of bone stem cells should be elucidated and a general consensus on the best models, protocols and proper use of scaffolds and growth factors should be achieved. PMID:20874718

  15. Recent highlights on bone stem cells: a report from Bone Stem Cells 2009, and not only….

    PubMed

    Cenni, Elisabetta; Perut, Francesca; Baglìo, Serena Rubina; Fiorentini, Elisa; Baldini, Nicola

    2010-11-01

    The use of stem cells has opened new prospects for the treatment of orthopaedic conditions characterized by large bone defects. However, many issues still exist to which answers are needed before routine, large-scale application becomes possible. Bone marrow stromal cells (MSC), which are clonogenic, multipotential precursors present in the bone marrow stroma, are generally employed for bone regeneration. Stem cells with multilineage differentiation similar to MSC have also been demonstrated in adipose tissue, peripheral blood, umbilical cord and amniotic fluid. Each source presents its own advantages and drawbacks. Unfortunately, no unique surface antigen is expressed by MSC, and this hampers simple MSC enrichment from heterogeneous populations. MSC are identified through a combination of physical, morphological and functional assays. Different in vitro and in vivo models have been described for the research on bone stem cells. These models should predict the in vivo bone healing capacity of MSC and if the induced osteogenesis is similar to the physiological one. Although stem cells offer an exciting possibility of a renewable source of cells and tissues for replacement, orthopaedic applications often represent case reports whereas controlled randomized trials are still lacking. Further biological aspects of bone stem cells should be elucidated and a general consensus on the best models, protocols and proper use of scaffolds and growth factors should be achieved. PMID:20874718

  16. Candidates Cell Sources to Regenerate Alveolar Bone from Oral Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Masahiro; Takase, Kazuma; Suehiro, Fumio; Murata, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Most of the cases of dental implant surgery, especially the bone defect extensively, are essential for alveolar ridge augmentation. As known as cell therapy exerts valuable effects on bone regeneration, numerous reports using various cells from body to regenerate bone have been published, including clinical reports. Mesenchymal cells that have osteogenic activity and have potential to be harvested from intra oral site might be a candidate cells to regenerate alveolar bone, even dentists have not been harvested the cells outside of mouth. This paper presents a summary of somatic cells in edentulous tissues which could subserve alveolar bone regeneration. The candidate tissues that might have differentiation potential as mesenchymal cells for bone regeneration are alveolar bone chip, bone marrow from alveolar bone, periosteal tissue, and gingival tissue. Understanding their phenotype consecutively will provide a rational approach for alveolar ridge augmentation. PMID:22505911

  17. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells: Characterization and Clinical Application

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. H. Krebsbach; S. A. Kuznetsov; P. Bianco; P. Gehron Robey

    1999-01-01

    The bone marrow stroma consists of a heterogeneous population of cells that provide the structural and physiological support for hematopoietic cells. Additionally, the bone marrow stroma contains cells with a stem-cell-like character that allows them to differentiate into bone, cartilage, adipocytes, and hematopoietic supporting tissues. Several experimental approaches have been used to characterize the development and functional nature of these

  18. Boning up on Wolff's Law: Mechanical regulation of the cells that make and maintain bone

    E-print Network

    Simmons, Craig A.

    a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Accepted 21 August 2009 Keywords: Osteocyte Osteoprogenitor players in bone mechanobiology: osteocytes, the putative primary mechanosensors in intact bone by the cells in bone: osteocytes, the putative mechanosensors; osteoblasts that deposit bone matrix

  19. Co-cultured tissue-specific scaffolds for tendon/bone interface engineering

    PubMed Central

    Bumgardner, Joel D; Cole, Judith A; Smith, Richard A; Haggard, Warren O

    2014-01-01

    The tendon/ligament-to-bone interface has a complex organization to enable transfer of forces through the tendon/ligament to the bone. The purpose of this study is to create a co-culture environment enabling a tissue-specific tendon region and tissue-specific bone region on a degradable scaffold, using NIH 3T3 fibroblast–deposited extracellular matrix and MC 3T3 osteoblast–deposited extracellular matrix, respectively. Before full characterization of the deposited extracellular matrix coating can be analyzed, co-culture parameters including culture medium and seeding technique should be addressed. An appropriate medium formulation was developed to reduce fibroblast to osteoblast mineralization by adjusting beta-glycerophosphate concentrations. Standard growth medium with fetal bovine serum + 3 mM beta-glycerophosphate + 25 µg/mL ascorbic acid was found to be the most suitable formulation evaluated in these study conditions. Seeding and cell migration studies of co-cultured fibroblast- and osteoblast-specific scaffolds were performed to identify whether tissue regions could be created on the scaffold. Fibroblast and osteoblast regions were successfully seeded and little to no cell migration was observed up to 42 h after seeding. Finally, a preliminary analysis of basic extracellular matrix components was measured in the fibroblast, osteoblast, and transition regions. Tissue-specific DNA, glycosaminoglycan, and collagen were found in uniform amounts on the scaffolds and were not different significantly between scaffold regions. In conclusion, initial steps to create tissue-specific fibroblast and osteoblast regions on a degradable scaffold were successful in preparation for further characterization investigations as a tendon-to-bone interface scaffold. PMID:25383167

  20. Growth of erythroid colonies in agar cultures of normal human bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Barr, R D; Koekebakker, M; Rand, C A

    1985-03-01

    The use of methylcellulose (MC) gels or plasma clots, for the support of human erythropoiesis in vitro, is associated with several technical disadvantages. Substitution of soft agar offers the prospect of overcoming these difficulties. In comparative studies, normal human bone marrow cells were cultured with erythropoietin (Epo) in agar (0.1%-0.3%) and MC. Concentrations of 0.175% and 0.2% agar proved to be optimal with respect to the combination of cloning efficiency and colony density. Further morphological examination revealed that subcolony formation in erythroid 'bursts' was influenced by gel viscosity. In additional experiments, miniaturising the assay system, to 0.25 ml culture volumes, increased cloning efficiency and reduced Epo utilization. These results confirm and expand earlier observations, and support a preference for the general use of agar in human erythroid cell cultures. PMID:3978242

  1. Cryopreservation of Dedifferentiated Cell Cultures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elke Heine-Dobbernack; Heiko Kiesecker; Heinz Martin Schumacher

    When Gottlieb Haberlandt made the first efforts to cultivate single isolated plant cells in salt solutions his goal was to\\u000a prove the totipotency of single cells (Haberlandt 1902). The cultivation of isolated plant cells in a chemically defined culture\\u000a medium became possible only after the discovery and application of auxins (Gautheret 1939). Today plant cells as well as tissues\\u000a can

  2. Engineering tubular bone using mesenchymal stem cell sheets and coral particles

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Wenxin [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, No.229 North Taibai Road, Xi’an 710069 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, No.229 North Taibai Road, Xi’an 710069 (China); Ma, Dongyang [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Lanzhou General Hospital, Lanzhou Command of PLA, BinHe 333 South Road, Lanzhou 730052 (China)] [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Lanzhou General Hospital, Lanzhou Command of PLA, BinHe 333 South Road, Lanzhou 730052 (China); Yan, Xingrong; Liu, Liangqi; Cui, Jihong; Xie, Xin; Li, Hongmin [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, No.229 North Taibai Road, Xi’an 710069 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, No.229 North Taibai Road, Xi’an 710069 (China); Chen, Fulin, E-mail: chenfl@nwu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, No.229 North Taibai Road, Xi’an 710069 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, No.229 North Taibai Road, Xi’an 710069 (China)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: • We developed a novel engineering strategy to solve the limitations of bone grafts. • We fabricated tubular constructs using cell sheets and coral particles. • The composite constructs showed high radiological density and compressive strength. • These characteristics were similar to those of native bone. -- Abstract: The development of bone tissue engineering has provided new solutions for bone defects. However, the cell-scaffold-based approaches currently in use have several limitations, including low cell seeding rates and poor bone formation capacity. In the present study, we developed a novel strategy to engineer bone grafts using mesenchymal stem cell sheets and coral particles. Rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were continuously cultured to form a cell sheet with osteogenic potential and coral particles were integrated into the sheet. The composite sheet was then wrapped around a cylindrical mandrel to fabricate a tubular construct. The resultant tubular construct was cultured in a spinner-flask bioreactor and subsequently implanted into a subcutaneous pocket in a nude mouse for assessment of its histological characteristics, radiological density and mechanical property. A similar construct assembled from a cell sheet alone acted as a control. In vitro observations demonstrated that the composite construct maintained its tubular shape, and exhibited higher radiological density, compressive strength and greater extracellular matrix deposition than did the control construct. In vivo experiments further revealed that new bone formed ectopically on the composite constructs, so that the 8-week explants of the composite sheets displayed radiological density similar to that of native bone. These results indicate that the strategy of using a combination of a cell sheet and coral particles has great potential for bone tissue engineering and repairing bone defects.

  3. Long term culture of tumour-specific cytotoxic T cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Gillis; Kendall A. Smith

    1977-01-01

    MANY investigators have been successful in the maintenance of long term tissue culture of human bone marrow-derived (B) cells. These cell lines have been established from both normal subjects1 and from patients with lymphoproliferative disorders2. In most cases, long term B-cell lines have been shown to harbour the Epstein-Barr virus genome which some investigators feel is required for establishment and

  4. Dorsal root ganglion neurons promote proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pei-xun; Jiang, Xiao-rui; Wang, Lei; Chen, Fang-min; Xu, Lin; Huang, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary animal experiments have confirmed that sensory nerve fibers promote osteoblast differentiation, but motor nerve fibers have no promotion effect. Whether sensory neurons promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains unclear. No results at the cellular level have been reported. In this study, dorsal root ganglion neurons (sensory neurons) from Sprague-Dawley fetal rats were co-cultured with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transfected with green fluorescent protein 3 weeks after osteogenic differentiation in vitro, while osteoblasts derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells served as the control group. The rat dorsal root ganglion neurons promoted the proliferation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived osteoblasts at 3 and 5 days of co-culture, as observed by fluorescence microscopy. The levels of mRNAs for osteogenic differentiation-related factors (including alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, osteopontin and bone morphogenetic protein 2) in the co-culture group were higher than those in the control group, as detected by real-time quantitative PCR. Our findings indicate that dorsal root ganglion neurons promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, which provides a theoretical basis for in vitro experiments aimed at constructing tissue-engineered bone. PMID:25788931

  5. Olfactory Ensheathing Cell Cultures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald Doucette

    \\u000a Over the past several years, neuroscientists have developed a considerable interest in a glial cell found only in the first\\u000a cranial nerve. These glial cells, which are referred to as “olfactory ensheath-ing cells,” provide ensheathment for the unmyelinated\\u000a axons of the olfactory nerve (Doucette, 1984, Doucette, 1986, 11,1; Raisman, 1985). Two major reasons why these cells have become so popular

  6. Identification of a hypoxic population of bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allalunis, M.J.; Chapman, J.D.; Turner, A.R.

    1983-02-01

    A technique using collagenase has been devised to release and separate, with reproducibility, hematopoietic cells (HC) from various microenvironments of mouse femurs. HC were assayed by an in vitro gel culture technique used traditionally to score granulocyte-macrophage precursor cells (CFU-C). CFU-C which resided in the medullary cavity and endosteal regions were sensitive to ionizing radiation and resistant to misonidazole (MISO) cytotoxicity. CFU-C which resided within the compact bone were resistant to ionizing radiation and sensitive to the cytotoxic action of MISO. These results suggest that HC which reside in the bone are hypoxic and retain clonogenic potential. When animals were exposed to various treatments with MISO followed by myelotoxic doses of cyclophosphamide (CTX) or total body irradiation (TBI), the LD/sub 50/ of both agents was significantly reduced. This result suggests that a hypoxic component of HC could be important in the regenerative process within the marrow after such myelotoxic trauma.

  7. Treatment of severe post-traumatic bone defects with autologous stem cells loaded on allogeneic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Vulcano, Ettore; Murena, Luigi; Cherubino, Paolo; Falvo, Daniele A; Rossi, Antonio; Baj, Andreina; Toniolo, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells may differentiate into angiogenic and osteoprogenitor cells. The effectiveness of autologous pluripotent mesenchymal cells for treating bone defects has not been investigated in humans. We present a case series to evaluate the rationale of using nucleated cells from autologous bone marrow aspirates in the treatment of severe bone defects that failed to respond to traditional treatments. Ten adult patients (mean age, 49.6-years-old) with severe bone defects were included in this study. Lower limb bone defects were >or=5 cm3 in size, and upper limb defects .or=2 cm3. Before surgery, patients were tested for antibodies to common pathogens. Treatment consisted of bone allogeneic scaffold enriched with bone marrow nucleated cells harvested from the iliac crest and concentrated using an FDA-approved device. Postsurgery clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. To assess viability, morphology, and immunophenotype, bone marrow nucleated cells were cultured in vitro, tested for sterility, and assayed for the possible replication of adventitious (contaminating) viruses. In 9 of 10 patients, both clinical and radiographic healing of the bone defect along with bone graft integration were observed (mean time, 5.6 months); one patient failed to respond. No post-operative complications were observed. Bone marrow nucleated cells were enriched 4.49-fold by a single concentration step, and these enriched cells were free of microbial contamination. The immunophenotype of adherent cells was compatible with that of mesenchymal stem cells. We detected the replication of Epstein-Barr virus in 2/10 bone marrow cell cultures tested. Hepatitis B virus, cytomegalovirus, parvovirus B19, and endogenous retrovirus HERV-K replication were not detected. Overall, 470 to 1,150 million nucleated cells were grafted into each patient. This case series, with a mean follow-up of almost 2 years, demonstrates that an allogeneic bone scaffold enriched with concentrated autologous bone marrow cells obtained from the iliac crest provides orthopedic surgeons a novel option for treating important bone defects that are unresponsive to traditional therapies. PMID:23065806

  8. Renal cell carcinoma bone metastases: clinical advances

    PubMed Central

    Sahi, Chakshu; Knox, Jennifer J.; Clemons, Mark; Joshua, Anthony M.; Broom, Reuben

    2010-01-01

    Bone is a common site of metastatic spread in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) occurring in around one-third of patients enrolled in clinical trials evaluating modern systemic therapies for this disease. Until recently, limited systemic therapeutic options were available for advanced RCC. Nowadays, a quiver of agents have demonstrated activity, including compounds targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) axis and those targeting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Despite a detailed biological understanding of how these drugs work, their effect on bony metastases is less clear. Data suggesting that bisphosphonates (namely zoledronic acid) benefit patients with bone metastases from advanced RCC was gathered prior to the targeted therapy era; therefore, there is some uncertainty about their role in patients on modern RCC therapies. This review summarizes the current targeted therapies registered for use in advanced RCC and postulates how some of them might affect the behavior of bone metastases. It also explores the data available on the role of bisphosphonates for bone metastases from RCC, describes methods of assessing response to therapy for bone metastases and delineates future expectations for the treatment of bone metastases from advanced RCC. PMID:21789128

  9. [Encounter of cancer cells with bone. The bone microenvironment and cancer metastases].

    PubMed

    Hata, Kenji; Nakanishi, Masako; Morita, Yoshihiro; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2011-03-01

    Bone is one of the most preferential metastatic target sites for cancers. However, based on the anatomical structure of the vascular system, bone is not recognized as a preferential metastatic target. Therefore, the biological crosstalk between metastatic cancer cells and bone is critical to the development and progression of bone metastases. Bone microenvironments possess unique biological features characterized by abundant growth factors and diverse cellular network including osteoblasts, osteoclasts and hematopietic cells. Cancers develop bone metastases by utilizing these unique bone environments for colonization and bone destruction. Better understandings of precise molecular mechanisms underlying cancer and bone crosstalk would contribute to the development of new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of bone metastasis at molecular levels. PMID:21358055

  10. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cells by bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Bryan A; Link, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in specialized microenvironments (niches) in the bone marrow. The stem cell niche is thought to provide signals that support key HSC properties, including self-renewal capacity and long-term multilineage repopulation ability. The stromal cells that comprise the stem cell niche and the signals that they generate that support HSC function are the subjects of intense investigation. Here, we review the complex and diverse stromal cell populations that reside in the bone marrow and examine their contribution to HSC maintenance. We highlight recent data suggesting that perivascular chemokine CXC ligand (CXCL)12-expressing mesenchymal progenitors and endothelial cells are key cellular components of the stem cell niche in the bone marrow. PMID:24210164

  11. Regulation of human bone marrow-derived osteoprogenitor cells by osteogenic growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Long, M W; Robinson, J A; Ashcraft, E A; Mann, K G

    1995-01-01

    Human bone marrow contains a distinct cell population that expresses bone proteins and responds to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta), but not to hematopoietic growth factors (Long, M. W., J. L. Williams, and K. G. Mann. 1990. J. Clin. Invest. 86:1387-1395). We now report the isolation, characterization, and growth factor responsiveness of these precursors to human osteoblasts and the identification of a human osteoprogenitor cell. Immunological separation of human bone marrow nonadherent low-density (NALD) cells results in a marked enrichment of cells that express osteocalcin, osteonectin, and bone alkaline phosphatase. Flow cytometric analyses show that distinct cell subpopulations exist among these isolated cells. The majority of the bone antigen-positive cells are approximately the size of a lymphocyte, whereas other, less frequent antibody-separated subpopulations consist of osteoblast-like cells and osteoprogenitor cells. In serum-free cultures, TGF-beta stimulates the small, antigen-positive cells to become osteoblast-like, as these cells both increase in size, and express increased levels of osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase. Antibody-separated cells also contain a separate population of clonal progenitor cells that form colonies of osteoblast-like cells when cultured in serum-free, semi-solid media. Two types of human osteoprogenitor cells are observed: a colony-forming cell (CFC) that generates several hundred bone antigen-positive cells, and a more mature cluster-forming cell that has a lesser proliferative potential and thus generates clusters of 20-50 antigen-positive cells. Osteopoietic colony-forming cells and cluster-forming cells have an obligate but differential requirement for osteogenic growth factors. The CFCs respond to TGF-beta, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2), and 1, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 (1,25-OH D3). In contrast to the colony-forming cells, cluster-forming cells are regulated predominantly by 1,25-OH D3 and TGF-beta, but fail to respond to bFGF. We conclude that human bone marrow contains a nonhematogenous, heterogeneous population of bone precursor cells among which exists a population of proliferating osteoprogenitor cells. Further characterization of these bone precursor cell populations should yield important information on their role in osteogenesis in both health and disease. Images PMID:7860771

  12. The effects of simulated hypogravity on murine bone marrow cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, Desales

    1989-01-01

    Mouse bone marrow cells grown in complete medium at unit gravity were compared with a similar population cultured in conditions that mimic some aspects of microgravity. After the cells adjusted to the conditions that simulated microgravity, they proliferated as fetal or oncogenic populations; their numbers doubled in twelve hour periods. Differentiated subpopulations were depleted from the heterogeneous mixture with time and the undifferentiated hematopoietic stem cells increased in numbers. The cells in the control groups in unit gravity and those in the bioreactors in conditions of microgravity were monitored under a number of parameters. Each were phenotyped as to cell surface antigens using a panel of monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry. Other parameters compared included: pH, glucose uptake, oxygen consumption and carbon-dioxide production. Nuclear DNA was monitored by flow cytometry. Functional responses were studied by mitogenic stimulation by various lectins. The importance of these findings should have relevance to the space program. Cells should behave predictably in zero gravity; specific populations can be eliminated from diverse populations and other populations isolated. The availability of stem cell populations will enhance both bone marrow and gene transplant programs. Stem cells will permit developmental biologists study the paths of hematopoiesis.

  13. Assessing the repair of critical size bone defects performed in a goat tibia model using tissue-engineered constructs cultured in a bidirectional flow perfusion bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gardel, Ls; Afonso, M; Frias, C; Gomes, Me; Reis, Rl

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluated in vivo performance of a tissue-engineered bone-like matrix obtained by culturing cell-scaffold constructs in a flow perfusion bioreactor, designed to enable culture of large constructs, envisioning the regeneration of critical-sized defects. A blend of starch with polycaprolactone scaffolds was seeded with goat bone marrow stromal cells (GBMSCs) cultured in the perfusion bioreactor for 14 days using osteogenic medium. Cell seeded scaffolds cultured in static conditions acted as controls. After 14 days, constructs (42?mm length and 16?mm in diameter) were implanted in critical size defects performed in the tibial bone of six adult goats from which the bone marrow had been collected previously. Explants were retrieved after six and 12 weeks of implantation and characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, micro-computed tomography and radiographic analysis to assess tissue morphology and calcification. Explants were histologically analyzed, using Hematoxylin & Eosin and Masson Trichrome staining. Results provided relevant information about the performance and functionality of starch with polycaprolactone-goat bone marrow stromal cell constructs in a critical size orthotopic defect performed in a large animal model and demonstrated that culture of the starch with polycaprolactone scaffolds with the autologous cells in perfusion culture provide a good therapy for the healing and regenerative process of bone defects. PMID:24413026

  14. A novel bidirectional continuous perfusion bioreactor for the culture of large-sized bone tissue-engineered constructs.

    PubMed

    Gardel, Leandro S; Correia-Gomes, Carla; Serra, Luís A; Gomes, Manuela E; Reis, Rui L

    2013-11-01

    This works reports the development and preliminary assessment of a new bioreactor for culturing large-sized three-dimensional constructs in bone tissue engineering. The bidirectional continuous perfusion bioreactor (BCPB) promotes mechanical stimulation of cells through the creation of shear forces induced by flow perfusion. The main innovation consists in the possibility of culturing scaffolds of large dimensions that can be suitable for the regeneration of critical sized defects. The functionality of BCPB was preliminarily evaluated by culturing starch-polycaprolactone scaffolds/goat bone marrow stromal cells for 14 and 21 days. Cylindrical blocks were stacked (42 mm thick). Static culture was used as controls. The samples were collected for DNA, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and histological analysis. The results showed higher ALP levels in the bioreactor cultures than those obtained under static conditions. The number of cells in constructs cultured in the bioreactor showed lower values compared to static cultures, suggesting that static conditions tend to privilege the metabolic path way for cellular proliferation while dynamic conditions tend to privilege the metabolic path for osteogenic differentiation. SEM observations show that, the migration and cell distribution was observed in the bioreactor. These results demonstrate the feasibility and the benefit of culturing constructs in BCPB. PMID:23681695

  15. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dooner, Mark; Aliotta, Jason M.; Pimental, Jeffrey; Dooner, Gerri J.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Colvin, Gerald; Liu, Qin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli; Dooner, Mark S.; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2007-12-31

    Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow cells transplanted into lethally irradiated mice can be detected in the lungs of transplanted mice and have been shown to express lung specific proteins while lacking the expression of hematopoietic markers. We have studied marrow cells induced to transit cell cycle by exposure to IL-3, IL-6, IL-11 and steel factor at different times of culture corresponding to different phases of cell cycle. We have found that marrow cells at the G1/S interface have a 3-fold increase in cells which assume a lung phenotype and that this increase is no longer seen in late S/G2. These cells have been characterized as GFP{sup +} CD45{sup -} and GFP{sup +} cytokeratin{sup +}. Thus marrow cells with the capacity to convert into cells with a lung phenotype after transplantation show a reversible increase with cytokine induced cell cycle transit. Previous studies have shown the phenotype of bone marrow stem cells fluctuates reversibly as these cells traverse cell cycle, leading to a continuum model of stem cell regulation. The present studies indicate that marrow stem cell production of nonhematopoietic cells also fluctuates on a continuum.

  16. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  17. Th17 and Treg Cells in Bone Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Tian, Tian; Yu, Shuang; He, Na; Ma, Daoxin

    2013-01-01

    Bone-related diseases share the process of immune response that targets bone tissue and bone marrow and then induce adverse effects on structure and function. In recent years, reciprocal relationship between immune cells and bone systems has been uncovered gradually. Regulatory T (Treg) and T helper 17 (Th17) cells are newly identified subsets of CD4+ T cells, and the balance between them is particularly essential for maintaining immune homeostasis. Accumulated data have demonstrated quantitative or functional imbalance between Th17 and Treg in bone related diseases, suggesting that Th17 and Treg cells are involved in these bone diseases. Understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating Th17 and Treg cells will create opportunities for the development of therapeutic approaches. This review will present the role of Th17 and Treg cells in the inflammatory bone diseases and bone marrow malignancies and find the potential therapeutic target for immunotherapy. PMID:24187560

  18. Dissecting the Role of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells on Bone Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Buenrostro, Denise; Park, Serk In; Sterling, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-induced bone disease is a dynamic process that involves interactions with many cell types. Once metastatic cancer cells reach the bone, they are in contact with many different cell types that are present in the cell-rich bone marrow. These cells include the immune cells, myeloid cells, fibroblasts, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and mesenchymal stem cells. Each of these cell populations can influence the behavior or gene expression of both the tumor cells and the bone microenvironment. Additionally, the tumor itself can alter the behavior of these bone marrow cells which further alters both the microenvironment and the tumor cells. While many groups focus on studying these interactions, much remains unknown. A better understanding of the interactions between the tumor cells and the bone microenvironment will improve our knowledge on how tumors establish in bone and may lead to improvements in diagnosing and treating bone metastases. This review details our current knowledge on the interactions between tumor cells that reside in bone and their microenvironment. PMID:25054153

  19. Bone Repair Cells for Craniofacial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pagni, G; Kaigler, D; Rasperini, G; Avila-Ortiz, G; Bartel, R; Giannobile, WV

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction of complex craniofacial deformities is a clinical challenge in situations of injury, congenital defects or disease. The use of cell-based therapies represents one of the most advanced methods for enhancing the regenerative response for craniofacial wound healing. Both Somatic and Stem Cells have been adopted in the treatment of complex osseous defects and advances have been made in finding the most adequate scaffold for the delivery of cell therapies in human regenerative medicine. As an example of such approaches for clinical application for craniofacial regeneration, Ixmyelocel-T or bone repair cells are a source of bone marrow derived stem and progenitor cells. They are produced through the use of single pass perfusion bioreactors for CD90+ mesenchymal stem cells and CD14+ monocyte/macrophage progenitor cells. The application of ixmyelocel-T has shown potential in the regeneration of muscular, vascular, nervous and osseous tissue. The purpose of this manuscript is to highlight cell therapies used to repair bony and soft tissue defects in the oral and craniofacial complex. The field at this point remains at an early stage, however this review will provide insights into the progress being made using cell therapies for eventual development into clinical practice. PMID:22433781

  20. Tissue engineering construction from 3D porous ceramic carriers and multipotent stromal cells for the repair of bone tissue defects.

    PubMed

    Bukharova, T B; Fatkhudinov, T Kh; Tsedik, L V; Ilyushchenko, A F; Goldshtein, D V

    2009-01-01

    The tissue engineering construction was developed from human bone marrow multipotent stromal cells and 3D porous foamed-ceramic carriers of a zirconium oxide-aluminum oxide system. The carriers had no cytotoxic activity and were potent in maintaining the cell adhesion and proliferation. We developed the method for inoculation and cultivation of bone marrow multipotent stromal cells on these carriers. The optimal time of incubation to obtain a tissue engineering construction was estimated. Bone marrow multipotent stromal cells could be cultured at a depth of 9 mm from the edge of the matrix. The tissue engineering construction holds promise for the repair of extensive defects in bone tissue. PMID:19526150

  1. Mitogenesis in fetal rat bone cells simultaneously exposed to type 3 transforming growth factor and other growth regulators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MICHAEL CENTRELLA; ERNESTO CANALIS

    Type j3 transforming growth factor (TGF-(3)is found in large amounts in bone tissue, and is a potent mitogen for osteoblast-enriched cell cultures obtained from fetal rat parietal bone. Because other local and systemic fac- tors may be presented to bone cells simultaneously with TGF-$, it is important to understand the effects of this complex growth regulator in such circumstances. Un-

  2. Bone marrow stromal cells mediate androgenic suppression of B lymphocyte development.

    PubMed

    Olsen, N J; Gu, X; Kovacs, W J

    2001-12-01

    Castration of normal male mice induces expansion of the bone marrow B cell population, an effect that can be reversed by androgen replacement. We employed in vitro cultures and two in vivo models to investigate whether androgens exert these effects directly on marrow lymphoid precursors or whether actions on marrow stromal elements are required. Immature B cells from normal mouse bone marrow were not responsive to the suppressive effect of androgens unless they were cocultured with marrow stromal cells or with supernatants from androgen-treated stromal cells, suggesting that the androgen effects are exerted through marrow stromal elements by production of a diffusible mediator. Further experiments revealed that bone marrow stromal cells produced TGF-beta in response to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and neutralization of TGF-beta in the DHT-treated stromal cells reversed the suppressive effects. The stromal cell requirement for androgen-mediated effects was confirmed in vivo by experiments using chimeric animals created by bone marrow transplantation in which androgen receptor expression was restricted to either the stromal or lymphoid cells of the bone marrow. Androgens only affected B cell development in chimeric mice with androgen-sensitive stromal cells. These experiments suggest that effects of androgens on developing B cells are mediated through androgen receptors in bone marrow stromal cells. TGF-beta is a candidate mediator for these hormonal effects. PMID:11733565

  3. Targeted delivery of mesenchymal stem cells to the bone.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wei; Lane, Nancy E

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a disease of excess skeletal fragility that results from estrogen loss and aging. Age related bone loss has been attributed to both elevated bone resorption and insufficient bone formation. We developed a hybrid compound, LLP2A-Ale in which LLP2A has high affinity for the ?4?1 integrin on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and alendronate has high affinity for bone. When LLP2A-Ale was injected into mice, the compound directed MSCs to both trabecular and cortical bone surfaces and increased bone mass and bone strength. Additional studies are underway to further characterize this hybrid compound, LLP2A-Ale, and how it can be utilized for the treatment of bone loss resulting from hormone deficiency, aging, and inflammation and to augment bone fracture healing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Stem Cells and Bone". PMID:25173607

  4. Cell culture compositions

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yiao, Jian

    2014-03-18

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6 (SEQ ID NO:1 encodes the full length endoglucanase; SEQ ID NO:4 encodes the mature form), and the corresponding endoglucanase VI amino acid sequence ("EGVI"; SEQ ID NO:3 is the signal sequence; SEQ ID NO:2 is the mature sequence). The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  5. Transforming growth factor-? synthesized by stromal cells and cancer cells participates in bone resorption induced by oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ryosuke; Kayamori, Kou; Oue, Erika; Sakamoto, Kei; Harada, Kiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2015-03-20

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-?) plays a significant role in the regulation of the tumor microenvironment. To explore the role of TGF-? in oral cancer-induced bone destruction, we investigated the immunohistochemical localization of TGF-? and phosphorylated Smad2 (p-Smad2) in 12 surgical specimens of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). These studies revealed TGF-? and p-Smad2 expression in cancer cells in all tested cases. Several fibroblasts located between cancer nests and resorbing bone expressed TGF-? in 10 out of 12 cases and p-Smad2 in 11 out of 12 cases. Some osteoclasts also exhibited p ? Smad2 expression. The OSCC cell line, HSC3, and the bone marrow-derived fibroblastic cell line, ST2, synthesized substantial levels of TGF-?. Culture media derived from HSC3 cells could stimulate Tgf-?1 mRNA expression in ST2 cells. Recombinant TGF-?1 could stimulate osteoclast formation induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) in RAW264 cells. TGF-?1 could upregulate the expression of p-Smad2 in RAW264 cells, and this action was suppressed by the addition of a neutralizing antibody against TGF-? or by SB431542. Transplantation of HSC3 cells onto the calvarial region of athymic mice caused bone destruction, associated with the expression of TGF-? and p-Smad2 in both cancer cells and stromal cells. The bone destruction was substantially inhibited by the administration of SB431542. The present study demonstrated that TGF-? synthesized by both cancer cells and stromal cells participates in the OSCC-induced bone destruction. PMID:25681764

  6. Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Expression in Prostate Cancer Cells Modulates the Oxidative Response in Bone Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando, Mercedes; Wan, Xinhai; Meiss, Roberto; Yang, Jun; De Siervi, Adriana; Navone, Nora; Vazquez, Elba

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a leading cause of death among males. It is currently estimated that inflammatory responses are linked to 15-20% of all deaths from cancer worldwide. PCa is dominated by complications arising from metastasis to the bone where the tumor cells interact with the bone microenvironment impairing the balance between bone formation and degradation. However, the molecular nature of this interaction is not completely understood. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) counteracts oxidative damage and inflammation. Previous studies from our laboratory showed that HO-1 is implicated in PCa, demonstrating that endogenous HO-1 inhibits bone derived-prostate cancer cells proliferation, invasion and migration and decreases tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo. The aim of this work was to analyze the impact of HO-1 modulated PCa cells on osteoblasts proliferation in vitro and on bone remodeling in vivo. Using a co-culture system of PC3 cells with primary mice osteoblasts (PMOs), we demonstrated that HO-1 pharmacological induction (hemin treatment) abrogated the diminution of PMOs proliferation induced by PCa cells and decreased the expression of osteoclast-modulating factors in osteoblasts. No changes were detected in the expression of genes involved in osteoblasts differentiation. However, co-culture of hemin pre-treated PC3 cells (PC3 Hem) with PMOs provoked an oxidative status and activated FoxO signaling in osteoblasts. The percentage of active osteoblasts positive for HO-1 increased in calvarias explants co-cultured with PC3 Hem cells. Nuclear HO-1 expression was detected in tumors generated by in vivo bone injection of HO-1 stable transfected PC3 (PC3HO-1) cells in the femur of SCID mice. These results suggest that HO-1 has the potential to modify the bone microenvironment impacting on PCa bone metastasis. PMID:24224047

  7. Isolation and culture of protoplasts from cotton cell cultures

    E-print Network

    Finer, John James

    1981-01-01

    ISOLATION AND CULTURE OF PROTOPLASTS FROM COTTON CELL CULTURES A Thesis by JOHN JAMES FINER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981... Major Subject: Plant Physiology ISOLATION AND CULTURE OF PROTOPLASTS FROM COTTON CELL CULTURES A Thesis by John James Finer Approved as tc style and content by: (Chairman ot Committee) (Member) (Member) (Member) (Head oF Department) May 1981...

  8. Communications between bone cells and hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Porter, R.L.; Calvi, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    The skeletal system, while characterized by a hard tissue component, is in fact an extraordinarily dynamic system, with disparate functions ranging from structural support, movement and locomotion and soft-organ protection, to the maintenance of calcium homeostasis. Amongst these functions, it has long been known that mammalian bones house definitive hematopoiesis. In fact, several data demonstrate that the bone microenvironment provides essential regulatory cues to the hematopoietic system. In particular, interactions between the bone forming cells, or osteoblasts, and the most primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) have recently been defined. This review will focus mainly on the role of osteoblasts as HSC regulatory cells, discussing the signaling mechanisms and molecules currently thought to be involved in their modulation of HSC behavior. We will then review additional cellular components of the HSC niche, including endothelial cells and osteoclasts. Finally, we will discuss the potential clinical implications of our emerging understanding of the complex HSC microenvironment. PMID:18410740

  9. Mineralized bone nodules formed in vitro from enzymatically released rat calvaria cell populations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. G. Bellows; J. E. Aubin; J. N. M. Heersche; M. E. Antosz

    1986-01-01

    Summary  Single-cell suspensions obtained from sequential enzymatic digestions of fetal rat calvaria were grown in long-term culture\\u000a in the presence of ascorbic acid, Na ?-glycerophosphate, and dexamethasone to determine the capacity of these populations\\u000a to form mineralized bone. In cultures of osteoblastlike cells grown in the presence of ascorbic acid and ?-glycerophosphate\\u000a or ascorbic acid alone, three-dimensional nodules (?75 ?m thick)

  10. Painful scoliosis due to superposed giant cell bone tumor and aneurysmal bone cyst in a child.

    PubMed

    Togral, Guray; Arikan, Murat; Hasturk, Askin E; Gungor, Safak

    2014-07-01

    Giant cell bone tumors are the most common precursor lesions of aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) developing secondarily. In giant cell bone tumors containing an explicit ABC component, the observation of the solid component of the giant cell bone tumor plays a critical role in the separation of the primary ABC. In general, ABC cases together with giant cell tumors in the bone are diagnosed histopathologically. The combination of giant cell bone tumor with superposed ABC and that of painful scoliosis with backache is rarely seen in children. In this case study, we discussed the diagnosis and the treatment of a giant cell tumor and superposed an ABC present in the fifth lumbar spine in a pediatric patient admitted to our clinic with a complaint of acute scoliotic back pain. PMID:24858183

  11. 3D Porous Calcium-Alginate Scaffolds Cell Culture System Improved Human Osteoblast Cell Clusters for Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ching-Yun; Ke, Cherng-Jyh; Yen, Ko-Chung; Hsieh, Hui-Chen; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Age-related orthopedic disorders and bone defects have become a critical public health issue, and cell-based therapy is potentially a novel solution for issues surrounding bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Long-term cultures of primary bone cells exhibit phenotypic and functional degeneration; therefore, culturing cells or tissues suitable for clinical use remain a challenge. A platform consisting of human osteoblasts (hOBs), calcium-alginate (Ca-Alginate) scaffolds, and a self-made bioreactor system was established for autologous transplantation of human osteoblast cell clusters. The Ca-Alginate scaffold facilitated the growth and differentiation of human bone cell clusters, and the functionally-closed process bioreactor system supplied the soluble nutrients and osteogenic signals required to maintain the cell viability. This system preserved the proliferative ability of cells and cell viability and up-regulated bone-related gene expression and biological apatite crystals formation. The bone-like tissue generated could be extracted by removal of calcium ions via ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) chelation, and exhibited a size suitable for injection. The described strategy could be used in therapeutic application and opens new avenues for surgical interventions to correct skeletal defects.

  12. Unique cell culture systems for ground based research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1990-01-01

    The horizontally rotating fluid-filled, membrane oxygenated bioreactors developed at NASA Johnson for spacecraft applications provide a powerful tool for ground-based research. Three-dimensional aggregates formed by cells cultured on microcarrier beads are useful for study of cell-cell interactions and tissue development. By comparing electron micrographs of plant seedlings germinated during Shuttle flight 61-C and in an earth-based rotating bioreactor it is shown that some effects of microgravity are mimicked. Bioreactors used in the UAH Bioreactor Laboratory will make it possible to determine some of the effects of altered gravity at the cellular level. Bioreactors can be valuable for performing critical, preliminary-to-spaceflight experiments as well as medical investigations such as in vitro tumor cell growth and chemotherapeutic drug response; the enrichment of stem cells from bone marrow; and the effect of altered gravity on bone and muscle cell growth and function and immune response depression.

  13. Morphological characteristics of cultured olfactory bulb cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. P. Fracek; L. Guo; R. Schafer

    1994-01-01

    Cultured olfactory bulb cells from embryonic mice had ultrastructural characteristics similar to those of many cell types\\u000a in the intact adult mouse olfactory bulb. Identified cultured cells included mitral\\/tufted cells, granule cells, short-axon\\u000a cells, and fibrous and protoplasmic astrocytes. Cultured neurons were found as individual cells, clusters or aggregates. Clusters\\u000a consisted of a loose array of neurons that appeared to

  14. Transcriptomic profile induced in bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells after interaction with multiple myeloma cells: implications in myeloma progression and myeloma bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gomez, Antonio; Las Rivas, Javier De; Ocio, Enrique M.; Díaz-Rodríguez, Elena; Montero, Juan C.; Martín, Montserrat; Blanco, Juan F.; Sanchez-Guijo, Fermín M.; Pandiella, Atanasio; San Miguel, Jesús F.; Garayoa, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Despite evidence about the implication of the bone marrow (BM) stromal microenvironment in multiple myeloma (MM) cell growth and survival, little is known about the effects of myelomatous cells on BM stromal cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from healthy donors (dMSCs) or myeloma patients (pMSCs) were co-cultured with the myeloma cell line MM.1S, and the transcriptomic profile of MSCs induced by this interaction was analyzed. Deregulated genes after co-culture common to both d/pMSCs revealed functional involvement in tumor microenvironment cross-talk, myeloma growth induction and drug resistance, angiogenesis and signals for osteoclast activation and osteoblast inhibition. Additional genes induced by co-culture were exclusively deregulated in pMSCs and predominantly associated to RNA processing, the ubiquitine-proteasome pathway, cell cycle regulation, cellular stress and non-canonical Wnt signaling. The upregulated expression of five genes after co-culture (CXCL1, CXCL5 and CXCL6 in d/pMSCs, and Neuregulin 3 and Norrie disease protein exclusively in pMSCs) was confirmed, and functional in vitro assays revealed putative roles in MM pathophysiology. The transcriptomic profile of pMSCs co-cultured with myeloma cells may better reflect that of MSCs in the BM of myeloma patients, and provides new molecular insights to the contribution of these cells to MM pathophysiology and to myeloma bone disease. PMID:25268740

  15. Connecting Mechanics and Bone Cell Activities in the Bone Remodeling Process: An Integrated Finite Element Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Hambli, Ridha

    2014-01-01

    Bone adaptation occurs as a response to external loadings and involves bone resorption by osteoclasts followed by the formation of new bone by osteoblasts. It is directly triggered by the transduction phase by osteocytes embedded within the bone matrix. The bone remodeling process is governed by the interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts through the expression of several autocrine and paracrine factors that control bone cell populations and their relative rate of differentiation and proliferation. A review of the literature shows that despite the progress in bone remodeling simulation using the finite element (FE) method, there is still a lack of predictive models that explicitly consider the interaction between osteoblasts and osteoclasts combined with the mechanical response of bone. The current study attempts to develop an FE model to describe the bone remodeling process, taking into consideration the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain–damage stimulus function is proposed, which controls the level of autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.’s (2003) dynamic law, which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cells dynamic rather than adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed FE model has been implemented in the FE code Abaqus (UMAT routine). An example of human proximal femur is investigated using the model developed. The model was able to predict final human proximal femur adaptation similar to the patterns observed in a human proximal femur. The results obtained reveal complex spatio-temporal bone adaptation. The proposed FEM model gives insight into how bone cells adapt their architecture to the mechanical and biological environment. PMID:25152881

  16. Connecting mechanics and bone cell activities in the bone remodeling process: an integrated finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha

    2014-01-01

    Bone adaptation occurs as a response to external loadings and involves bone resorption by osteoclasts followed by the formation of new bone by osteoblasts. It is directly triggered by the transduction phase by osteocytes embedded within the bone matrix. The bone remodeling process is governed by the interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts through the expression of several autocrine and paracrine factors that control bone cell populations and their relative rate of differentiation and proliferation. A review of the literature shows that despite the progress in bone remodeling simulation using the finite element (FE) method, there is still a lack of predictive models that explicitly consider the interaction between osteoblasts and osteoclasts combined with the mechanical response of bone. The current study attempts to develop an FE model to describe the bone remodeling process, taking into consideration the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain-damage stimulus function is proposed, which controls the level of autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.'s (2003) dynamic law, which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cells dynamic rather than adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed FE model has been implemented in the FE code Abaqus (UMAT routine). An example of human proximal femur is investigated using the model developed. The model was able to predict final human proximal femur adaptation similar to the patterns observed in a human proximal femur. The results obtained reveal complex spatio-temporal bone adaptation. The proposed FEM model gives insight into how bone cells adapt their architecture to the mechanical and biological environment. PMID:25152881

  17. A new stretching apparatus for applying anisotropic mechanical strain to bone cells in-vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabner, B.; Varga, F.; Fratzl-Zelman, N.; Luegmayr, E.; Glantschnig, H.; Rumpler, M.; Tatschl, A.; Fratzl, P.; Klaushofer, K.

    2000-09-01

    Bone is adapting to in-vivo loading by modeling and remodeling processes. The sensors of the external forces acting on the bone matrix seem to be the bone cells. Osteocytes, osteoblasts, and bone lining cells have been shown to respond to mechanical forces in-vitro. In this work, we describe a new in-vitro system which applies anisotropic stress conditions to MC3T3-E1, osteoblast-like mouse calvaria derived cells. The system allows stretching of cell cultures under well-defined stretching conditions. Cells are grown on an elastic polyurethane culture support (PUCS) that is subjected to uniaxial tensile stress using a direct current (dc) motor-driven linear positioning stage, situated within the incubator. The physical stretching parameters, the maximum elongation of the PUCS (the maximum strain applied to the cells), the strain rate, and the number of cycles, can be varied. First, the actual strains occurring at different locations of the PUCS were determined using optical methods. The surface strain appeared to be uniform over the PUCS and biaxial with a Poisson contraction nearly 80% in magnitude to the axial extension. Second, we tested the behavior of the MC3T3-E1 cells on PUCS compared to the cells grown in petridishes (PD). After 11 days of culture, cell number per dish on PUCS was significantly reduced to PD cultures (20% of control). At that time, cultures on PUCS reached confluency as compared to day 4 for the PD cultures. However, histochemical staining of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and multilayer formation of the PUCS cultures appeared to be not significantly different from PD cultures. We also looked at the cytoskeleton by phalloidin staining, at vinculin, a protein of the cell-matrix and cell-cell interaction, and at fibronectin, a protein of the extracellular matrix using immuno staining methods. All these features tested so far seemed not to be different in cells cultured on PUCS compared to cultures in PD. Third, the responsiveness to the external force was tested using confluent cells on PUCS. A strain of 6.8 millistrain (6800 microstrain) was applied to the cells, using a strain rate of 4.9 millistrain/s and 350 cycles/h for a period of 48 h. These loading conditions led to significantly decreased cell proliferation, as measured by [3H] deoxythymidine ([3H] dT) incorporation, and significantly increased ALP activity. These data show that the stretching device introduced in this paper offers new possibilities to study the response of osteoblast-like cells to anisotropic forces.

  18. Proliferative activity of vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kramvis, A.; Garnett, H.M.

    1987-11-01

    Vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cell population cultured in Fischer's medium supplemented with 12.5% fetal calf serum and 12.5% horse serum consists of two cell shapes: fusiform (type I) and polygonal (type II). Limiting-dilution cloning of the cells suggested that the two morphologically distinct cell types belong to the same cellular system even though they differ in their proliferative capabilities. The labeling index of type II cells, as measured by autoradiography, was found to be consistently lower than that of type I cells. It is probable that these two phenotypes represent different stages of differentiation, where progenitor type I gives rise to type II cells. The bone marrow-derived adherent cells were found to be cytokinetically at rest in vivo, using the thymidine suicide test, and relatively radioresistant with a D0 = 2.1 Gy and n = 2.36 at the time of explantation from the bone. Furthermore, in culture these cells are characterized by a relatively long cell cycle of 60 h, where the length of the S phase is 30 h, G2 is 12 h, M is 6 h, and G1 is 12 h. Thus, the vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cells represent a cell population with a low turnover rate both in vivo and in vitro.

  19. Bone marrow transplantation in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Vermylen, C; Cornu, G; Philippe, M; Ninane, J; Borja, A; Latinne, D; Ferrant, A; Michaux, J L; Sokal, G

    1991-01-01

    Sickle cell anaemia is still responsible for severe crippling and death in young patients living in developing countries. Apart from prophylaxis and treatment of infections, no active treatment can be safely proposed in such areas of the world. Therefore a bone marrow transplantation was performed in 12 patients staying in Belgium and planning to return to Africa. Twelve patients, aged between 11 months and 23 years (median 4 years), underwent a HLA identical bone marrow transplantation. The conditioning regimen included oral busulphan for four consecutive days (4 mg/kg) followed by four days of intravenous cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg). In 10 patients the engraftment was rapid and sustained. A further patient suffered transient red cell hypoplasia and another underwent a second bone marrow transplantation from the same donor at day 62 because of graft rejection. All patients are alive and well with a follow up ranging from 9-51 months (median 27 months). In all cases a complete cessation of vaso-occlusive episodes and haemolysis was observed as was a change in the haemoglobin pattern in accordance with the donor's electrophoretic pattern. PMID:1953001

  20. Investigation of In Vitro Bone Cell Adhesion and Proliferation on Ti Using Direct Current Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bodhak, Subhadip; Bose, Susmita; Kinsel, William C.; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to establish an in vitro cell culture protocol to improve bone cell attachment and proliferation on Ti substrate using direct current stimulation. For this purpose, a custom made electrical stimulator was developed and a varying range of direct currents, from 5 to 25 µA, were used to study the current stimulation effect on bone cells cultured on conducting Ti samples in vitro. Cell–materials interaction was studied for a maximum of 5 days by culturing with human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB). The direct current was applied in every 8 h time interval and the duration of electrical stimulation was kept constant at 15 min for all cases. In vitro results showed that direct current stimulation significantly favored bone cell attachment and proliferation in comparison to nonstimulated Ti surface. Immunochemistry and confocal microscopy results confirmed that the cell adhesion was most pronounced on 25 µA direct current stimulated Ti surfaces as hFOB cells expressed higher vinculin protein with increasing amount of direct current. Furthermore, MTT assay results established that cells grew 30% higher in number under 25 µA electrical stimulation as compared to nonstimulated Ti surface after 5 days of culture period. In this work we have successfully established a simple and cost effective in vitro protocol offering easy and rapid analysis of bone cell-materials interaction which can be used in promotion of bone cell attachment and growth on Ti substrate using direct current electrical stimulation in an in vitro model. PMID:23144532

  1. The performance of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell--implant complexes prepared by cell sheet engineering techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Han, Chun; Song, Yingliang; Yan, Xingrong; Li, Dehua; Chai, Zhiguo; Feng, Zhihong; Dong, Yan; Li, Liwen; Xie, Xing; Chen, Fulin; Zhao, Yimin

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that cell sheets composed of multilayered rabbit bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) could be assembled with two kinds of implants (surface-modified titanium and zirconia) for the construction of a MSC-implant. The MSC sheets were harvested from culture flasks, wrapped around implants to construct the complexes, and then cultured in osteogenic medium. The layered cell sheets integrated well with implants and remained viable, with small mineralized nodules visible on the implant surfaces for up to four weeks after culture. Cells on the implants underwent classical in vitro osteogenic differentiation with an associated elevation of alkaline phosphatase activity and bone- and vascular-related protein expression. In vivo, two kinds of cell sheet-implant complexes were transplanted under the skin of SCID mice and cultured for eight weeks. For the MSC sheet titanium implant complex, histological examination revealed that new bone tissue that formed around implants followed a predominantly endochondral pathway, exhibiting histological markers of native bone; for the MSC sheet zirconia implant complex, however, intramembranous ossification appeared to occur on the surface of the zirconia implant, as observed with typical osteocytes embedded in dense matrix and accompanied by both microvessels and marrow cavities. These findings demonstrate that MSC-implants possessing osteogenic and vascularization abilities can be produced using cell sheet engineering techniques in conjunction with routine implant materials, which provide a novel technology to modify the implant surface. PMID:20132981

  2. Characteristics of Bone Marrow Fibroblast Colony-Forming Cells (CFU-F) and Their Progeny in Patients With Myeloproliferative Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hugo Castro-Malaspina; Renate E. Gay; Suresh C. Jhanwar; John A. Hamilton; Dominick A. Chiarieri; Paul A. Meyers; Steffen Gay; Malcolm A. S. Moore

    1982-01-01

    Chronic myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) are clonal dis- eases of the pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell frequently associated with myelofibrosis (MF). There is only indirect evidence indicating that the increased deposition of col- lagen in bone marrow matrix is a secondary phenomenon. A liquid culture system for cloning and growing bone marrow fibroblasts has permitted us to approach more directly the understanding

  3. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6...AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to...

  4. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6...AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to...

  5. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6...AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to...

  6. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6...AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to...

  7. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6...AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to...

  8. Lead effects on development and function of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells promote Th2 immune responses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donghong Gao; Tapan K. Mondal; David A.. Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Although lead (Pb) has significant effects on the development and function of macrophages, B cells, and T cells and has been suggested to promote allergic asthma in mice and humans, Pb modulation of bone marrow (BM)-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and the resultant DC effects on Th1 and Th2 development have not been examined. Accordingly, we cultured BM cells with murine

  9. Mimicking the nanofeatures of bone increases bone-forming cell adhesion and proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palin, Erica; Liu, Huinan; Webster, Thomas J.

    2005-09-01

    There is a great need to design better orthopaedic implant devices by modifying their surface properties. In this respect, one approach that has received much attention of late is the simulation of the surface roughness of bone in synthetic orthopaedic implant materials. Bone has numerous nanometre features due to the presence of nanostructured entities such as collagen and hydroxyapatite. Despite this fact, current orthopaedic implant materials are smooth at the nanoscale. Previous studies have measured increased osteoblast (bone-forming cell) functions on biologically inspired nanophase titania compared to conventional titania formulations. In fact, in vitro calcium deposition by osteoblasts was up to three times higher on nanostructured compared to conventional titania. However, it was unclear in those studies what underlying surface properties (roughness, crystallinity, crystal phase, chemistry, etc) promoted enhanced functions of osteoblasts on nanophase titania. For that reason, the objective of the present in vitro study was to specifically determine the role nanostructured surface roughness of titania had on increasing functions of osteoblasts. To achieve this, the surface roughness of nanophase and conventional titania was transferred to a model tissue engineering polymer: poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA). Results of the present study demonstrated greater osteoblast adhesion and proliferation for up to 5 days of culture on PLGA moulds of nanophase compared to conventional titania. In this manner, this study elucidated that the property of nanophase titania which increased osteoblast function was a large degree of nanometre surface features that mimicked bone. For this reason, nanophase materials deserve more attention in improving orthopaedic implant applications.

  10. Modeling of bone adaptative behavior based on cells activities.

    PubMed

    Bonfoh, Napo; Novinyo, Edem; Lipinski, Paul

    2011-10-01

    Bone remodeling occurs in an adult's skeleton to adapt its architecture to external loadings. This involves bone resorption by osteoclasts cells followed by formation of new bone by osteoblasts cells. During bone remodeling, osteoclasts and osteoblasts interact with each other by expressing autocrine and paracrine factors that regulate cells' population. Therefore, changes in bone density depend on the amount of each acting cell population. The aim of this paper is to propose a model for the bone remodeling process, which takes into account the opposite activity of both types of cells. For this purpose, a system of differential equations, proposed by Komarova et al. (Bone 33:206-215, 2003), is introduced to describe bone cell interactions using parameters which characterize the autocrine and paracrine factors. Such equations allow us to determine how the autocrine and paracrine factors vary in response to an external stimulus. It is assumed that an equilibrium state can be obtained for values of stimulus near to some reference quantity. Far from this value, unbalanced activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts is observed, which leads to bone apposition or resorption. The proposed model has been implemented into the finite element software ABAQUS to analyze the qualitative response of a bone structure when subjected to certain mechanical loadings. Obtained results are satisfactory and in accordance with the expected bone remodeling behavior. PMID:21136134

  11. Cytokines and growth factors which regulate bone cell function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, Yoshiki

    Everybody knows that growth factors are most important in making bone. Hormones enhance bone formation from a long distance. Growth factors promote bone formation as an autocrine or paracrine factor in nearby bone. BMP-2 through BMP-8 are in the TGF-? family. BMP makes bone by enchondral ossification. In bone, IGF-II is most abundant, second, TGF-?, and third IGF-I. TGF-? enhances bone formation mainly by intramembranous ossification in vivo. TGF-? affects both cell proliferation and differentiation, however, TGF-? mainly enhances bone formation by intramembranous ossification. Interestingly, TGF-? is increased by estrogen(E 2), androgen, vitamin D, TGF-? and FGF. IGF-I and IGF-II also enhance bone formation. At present it remains unclear why IGF-I is more active in bone formation than IGF-II, although IGF-II is more abundant in bone compared to IGF-I. However, if only type I receptor signal transduction promotes bone formation, the strong activity of IGF-I in bone formation is understandable. GH, PTH and E 2 promotes IGF-I production. Recent data suggest that hormones containing vitamin D or E 2 enhance bone formation through growth factors. Therefore, growth factors are the key to clarifying the mechanism of bone formation.

  12. Skin-derived precursors differentiate into skeletogenic cell types and contribute to bone repair.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Jean-Francois; Biernaskie, Jeffrey A; Chen, Yan; Bagli, Darius; Alman, Benjamin; Kaplan, David R; Miller, Freda D

    2009-01-01

    Skin-derived precursors (SKPs) are multipotent dermal precursors that share similarities with neural crest stem cells and that can give rise to peripheral neural and some mesodermal cell types, such as adipocytes. Here, we have asked whether rodent or human SKPs can generate other mesenchymally derived cell types, with a particular focus on osteocytes and chondrocytes. In culture, rodent and human foreskin-derived SKPs differentiated into alkaline-positive, collagen type-1-positive, mineralizing osteocytes, and into collagen type-II-positive chondrocytes that secreted chondrocyte-specific proteoglycans. Clonal analysis demonstrated that SKPs efficiently generated these skeletogenic cell types, and that they were multipotent with regard to the osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages. To ask if SKPs could generate these same lineages in vivo, genetically tagged, undifferentiated rat SKPs were transplanted into a tibial bone fracture model. Over the ensuing 6 weeks, many of the transplanted cells survived within the bone callus, where they were morphologically and phenotypically similar to the endogenous mesenchymal/osteogenic cells. Moreover, some transplanted cells adopted a mature osteocyte phenotype and integrated into the newly formed bone. Some transplanted cells also differentiated into chondrocytes and into smooth muscle cells and/or pericytes that were associated with blood vessels. Thus, both rodent and human SKPs generate skeletogenic cell types in culture, and the injured bone environment is sufficient to instruct SKPs to differentiate down an osteogenic lineage, in a fashion similar to the endogenous mesenchymal precursors. PMID:18834279

  13. Formation of engineered bone with adipose stromal cells from buccal fat pad.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, T; Sumita, Y; Wakamastu, Y; Nagai, K; Asahina, I

    2012-06-01

    A robust method for inducing bone formation from adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) has not been established. Moreover, the efficacy of strong osteogenic inducers including BMP-2 for ADSC-mediated bone engineering remains controversial. Meanwhile, the buccal fat pad (BFP), which is found in the oral cavity as an adipose-encapsulated mass, has been shown to have potential as a new accessible source of ADSCs for oral surgeons. However, to date, there have been no reports that define the practical usefulness of ADSCs from BFP (B-ADSCs) for bone engineering. Here, we report an efficient method of generating bone from B-ADSCs using rhBMP-2. The analyses show that B-ADSCs can differentiate in vitro toward the osteoblastic lineage by the addition of rhBMP-2 to culture medium, regardless of the presence of osteoinductive reagents (OSR), as demonstrated by measurements of ALP activity, in vitro calcification, and osteogenic gene expression. Interestingly, adipogenic genes were clearly detectable only in cultures with rhBMP-2 and OSR. However, in vivo bone formation was most substantial when B-ADSCs cultured in this condition were transplanted. Thus, B-ADSCs reliably formed engineered bone when pre-treated with rhBMP-2 for inducing mature osteoblastic differentiation. This study supports the potential translation for B-ADSC use in the clinical treatment of bone defects. PMID:22538411

  14. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are abnormal in multiple myeloma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Corre; K Mahtouk; M Attal; M Gadelorge; A Huynh; S Fleury-Cappellesso; C Danho; P Laharrague; B Klein; T Rème; P Bourin

    2007-01-01

    Recent literature suggested that cells of the microenvironment of tumors could be abnormal as well. To address this hypothesis in multiple myeloma (MM), we studied bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), the only long-lived cells of the bone marrow microenvironment, by gene expression profiling and phenotypic and functional studies in three groups of individuals: patients with MM, patients with monoclonal

  15. Kingella kingae DNA in langerhans cell histiocytosis of bone.

    PubMed

    El Houmami, Nawal; Dubourg, Grégory; Minodier, Philippe; Verschuur, Arnauld; Bouvier, Corinne; Jouve, Jean-Luc; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2015-03-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis of bone is a rare pediatric neoplastic disorder of unclear pathogenesis. We report the case of a 3-year-old girl who presented with Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the ilium in which Kingella kingae was detected. Our findings argue for the search for K. kingae by polymerase chain reaction in children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis of bone. PMID:25144797

  16. Bone Sialoprotein Peptides Are Potent Inhibitors of Breast Cancer Cell

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabri van der Pluijm; Hans J. M. Vloedgraven; Boris Ivanov; Frank A. Robey; Wojciech J. Grzesik; Gehron Robey; Socrates E. Papapoulos; Clemens W. G. M. LÃ

    Bone and bone marrow are important sites of metastasis formation in breast cancer. Extracellular matrix proteins with attachment properties are generally believed to play a key role in tumorigenesis and metastasis formation. We have investigatedwhether mammary carcinoma cells (MDA-MB-231) can recognize constructs of the fairly bone-specific hu man bone sialoprotein, which encompass the RGD sequence (EPRGD NYR).Exogenously addedboneslaloproteinpeptideswith this aminoacid

  17. The Alliance of Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Bone, and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, Nicola; Paladini, Angela; Briganti, Silvia I.; Pozzilli, Paolo; Epstein, Sol

    2014-01-01

    Bone fragility has emerged as a new complication of diabetes. Several mechanisms in diabetes may influence bone homeostasis by impairing the action between osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes and/or changing the structural properties of the bone tissue. Some of these mechanisms can potentially alter the fate of mesenchymal stem cells, the initial precursor of the osteoblast. In this review, we describe the main factors that impair bone health in diabetic patients and their clinical impact. PMID:25140176

  18. CXCL2 synthesized by oral squamous cell carcinoma is involved in cancer-associated bone destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Oue, Erika [Section of Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan) [Section of Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Section of Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Global Center of Excellence (GCOE) Program, International Research Center for Molecular Science in Tooth and Bone Diseases, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Lee, Ji-Won; Sakamoto, Kei [Section of Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan)] [Section of Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Iimura, Tadahiro [Section of Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan) [Section of Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Global Center of Excellence (GCOE) Program, International Research Center for Molecular Science in Tooth and Bone Diseases, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Aoki, Kazuhiro [Section of Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan)] [Section of Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Kayamori, Kou [Section of Diagnostic Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan) [Section of Diagnostic Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Department of Pathology, Ome Municipal General Hospital, Ome, Tokyo (Japan); Michi, Yasuyuki; Yamashiro, Masashi; Harada, Kiyoshi; Amagasa, Teruo [Section of Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan)] [Section of Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Yamaguchi, Akira, E-mail: akira.mpa@tmd.ac.jp [Section of Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan) [Section of Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Global Center of Excellence (GCOE) Program, International Research Center for Molecular Science in Tooth and Bone Diseases, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oral cancer cells synthesize CXCL2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CXCL2 synthesized by oral cancer is involved in osteoclastogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CXCL2-neutralizing antibody inhibited osteoclastogenesis induced by oral cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We first report the role of CXCL2 in cancer-associated bone destruction. -- Abstract: To explore the mechanism of bone destruction associated with oral cancer, we identified factors that stimulate osteoclastic bone resorption in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Two clonal cell lines, HSC3-C13 and HSC3-C17, were isolated from the maternal oral cancer cell line, HSC3. The conditioned medium from HSC3-C13 cells showed the highest induction of Rankl expression in the mouse stromal cell lines ST2 and UAMS-32 as compared to that in maternal HSC3 cells and HSC3-C17 cells, which showed similar activity. The conditioned medium from HSC3-C13 cells significantly increased the number of osteoclasts in a co-culture with mouse bone marrow cells and UAMS-32 cells. Xenograft tumors generated from these clonal cell lines into the periosteal region of the parietal bone in athymic mice showed that HSC3-C13 cells caused extensive bone destruction and a significant increase in osteoclast numbers as compared to HSC3-C17 cells. Gene expression was compared between HSC3-C13 and HSC3-C17 cells by using microarray analysis, which showed that CXCL2 gene was highly expressed in HSC3-C13 cells as compared to HSC3-C17 cells. Immunohistochemical staining revealed the localization of CXCL2 in human oral squamous cell carcinomas. The increase in osteoclast numbers induced by the HSC3-C13-conditioned medium was dose-dependently inhibited by addition of anti-human CXCL2-neutralizing antibody in a co-culture system. Recombinant CXCL2 increased the expression of Rankl in UAMS-32 cells. These results indicate that CXCL2 is involved in bone destruction induced by oral cancer. This is the first report showing the role of CXCL2 in cancer-associated bone destruction.

  19. Osteoblasts modulate Ca 2+ signaling in bone-metastatic prostate and breast cancer cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julia D’Ambrosio; Alessandro Fatatis

    2009-01-01

    Metastatic prostate and breast cancers display a predilection for the skeleton. The high incidence of skeletal metastasis\\u000a may be a reflection of favorable reciprocal interactions between the bone microenvironment and disseminated cancer cells.\\u000a Here we show that bone-metastatic PC3-ML prostate cancer cells and MDA-231 breast cancer cells—when co-cultured with human\\u000a osteoblasts—down-regulate the increase in cytosolic free calcium (Ca2+) induced by

  20. Response and adaptation of bone cells to simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lifang; Li, Runzhi; Su, Peihong; Arfat, Yasir; Zhang, Ge; Shang, Peng; Qian, Airong

    2014-11-01

    Bone loss induced by microgravity during space flight is one of the most deleterious factors on astronaut's health and is mainly attributed to an unbalance in the process of bone remodeling. Studies from the space microgravity have demonstrated that the disruption of bone remodeling is associated with the changes of four main functional bone cells, including osteoblast, osteoclast, osteocyte, and mesenchymal stem cells. For the limited availability, expensive costs and confined experiment conditions for conducting space microgravity studies, the mechanism of bone cells response and adaptation to microgravity is still unclear. Therefore, some ground-based simulated microgravity methods have been developed to investigate the bioeffects of microgravity and the mechanisms. Here, based on our studies and others, we review how bone cells (osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes and mesenchymal stem cells) respond and adapt to simulated microgravity.

  1. Generation of clinical grade human bone marrow stromal cells for use in bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Robey, Pamela G; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Ren, Jiaqiang; Klein, Harvey G; Sabatino, Marianna; Stroncek, David F

    2015-01-01

    In current orthopaedic practice, there is a need to increase the ability to reconstruct large segments of bone lost due to trauma, resection of tumors and skeletal deformities, or when normal regenerative processes have failed such as in non-unions and avascular necrosis. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells), when used in conjunction with appropriate carriers, represent a means by which to achieve bone regeneration in such cases. While much has been done at the bench and in pre-clinical studies, moving towards clinical application requires the generation of clinical grade cells. What is described herein is an FDA-approved cell manufacturing procedure for the ex vivo expansion of high quality, biologically active human BMSCs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Stem Cells and Bone. PMID:25064527

  2. Therapeutic benefit of intracerebral transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells after cerebral ischemia in rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jieli Chen; Yi Li; Lei Wang; Mei Lu; Xuehui Zhang; Michael Chopp

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) transplanted into the ischemic boundary zone, survive, differentiate and improve functional recovery after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). MSCs were harvested from adult rats and cultured with or without nerve growth factor (NGF). For cellular identification, MSCs were prelabeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Rats (n=24) were subjected to 2 h of

  3. Culture and differentiation of embryonic stem cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Austin G. Smith

    1991-01-01

    Summary Techniques are described for the culture of murine embryonic stem cells in the absence of heterologous feeder cells and for the induction of differentiation programs. The regulatory factor differentiation inhibiting activity\\/ leukaemia inhibitory factor (DIA\\/LIF) is produced at high concentration by transient expression in Cos cells and is used to suppress stem cell differentiation by addition to the culture

  4. Osterix enhances proliferation and osteogenic potential of bone marrow stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tu Qisheng [Division of Oral Biology, Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Valverde, Paloma [Division of Oral Biology, Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)]. E-mail: paloma.valverde@tufts.edu; Chen, Jake [Division of Oral Biology, Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)

    2006-03-24

    Osterix (Osx) is a zinc-finger-containing transcription factor that is expressed in osteoblasts of all endochondral and membranous bones. In Osx null mice osteoblast differentiation is impaired and bone formation is absent. In this study, we hypothesized that overexpression of Osx in murine bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) would be able to enhance their osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization in vitro. Retroviral transduction of Osx in BMSC cultured in non-differentiating medium did not affect expression of Runx2/Cbfa1, another key transcription factor of osteoblast differentiation, but induced an increase in the expression of other markers associated with the osteoblastic lineage including alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and osteopontin. Retroviral transduction of Osx in BMSC also increased their proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and ability to form bone nodules. These events occurred without significant changes in the expression of {alpha}1(II) procollagen or lipoprotein lipase, which are markers of chondrogenic and adipogenic differentiation, respectively.

  5. Epithelial Cells Derived from Swine Bone Marrow Express Stem Cell Markers and Support Influenza Virus Replication In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Mahesh; Saif, Yehia M.

    2011-01-01

    The bone marrow contains heterogeneous population of cells that are involved in the regeneration and repair of diseased organs, including the lungs. In this study, we isolated and characterized progenitor epithelial cells from the bone marrow of 4- to 5-week old germ-free pigs. Microscopically, the cultured cells showed epithelial-like morphology. Phenotypically, these cells expressed the stem cell markers octamer-binding transcription factor (Oct4) and stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA-1), the alveolar stem cell marker Clara cell secretory protein (Ccsp), and the epithelial cell markers pan-cytokeratin (Pan-K), cytokeratin-18 (K-18), and occludin. When cultured in epithelial cell growth medium, the progenitor epithelial cells expressed type I and type II pneumocyte markers. Next, we examined the susceptibility of these cells to influenza virus. Progenitor epithelial cells expressed sialic acid receptors utilized by avian and mammalian influenza viruses and were targets for influenza virus replication. Additionally, differentiated type II but not type I pneumocytes supported the replication of influenza virus. Our data indicate that we have identified a unique population of progenitor epithelial cells in the bone marrow that might have airway reconstitution potential and may be a useful model for cell-based therapies for infectious and non-infectious lung diseases. PMID:22216319

  6. Bone morphogenetic proteins induce the expression of noggin, which limits their activity in cultured rat osteoblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Gazzerro, E; Gangji, V; Canalis, E

    1998-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce the differentiation of cells of the osteoblastic lineage and enhance the function of the osteoblast. Growth factors are regulated by binding proteins, but there is no information about binding proteins for BMPs in skeletal cells. Noggin specifically binds BMPs, but its expression by cells of the osteoblastic lineage has not been reported. We tested for the expression of noggin and its induction by BMP-2 in cultures of osteoblast-enriched cells from 22-d-old fetal rat calvariae (Ob cells). BMP-2 caused a time- and dose-dependent increase in noggin mRNA and polypeptide levels, as determined by Northern and Western blot analyses. The effects of BMP-2 on noggin transcripts were dependent on protein, but independent of DNA synthesis. BMP-2 increased the rates of noggin transcription as determined by nuclear run-on assays. BMP-4, BMP-6, and TGF-beta1 increased noggin mRNA in Ob cells, but basic fibroblast growth factor, platelet- derived growth factor BB, and IGF-I did not. Noggin decreased the stimulatory effects of BMPs on DNA and collagen synthesis and alkaline phosphatase activity in Ob cells. In conclusion, BMPs induce noggin transcription in Ob cells, a probable mechanism to limit BMP action in osteoblasts. PMID:9854046

  7. Immunophenotypic characterization of stromal cells in aspirated human bone marrow samples.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, B S; Jones, D B

    1998-10-01

    The presence of stromal cells was investigated in aspirated bone marrow prepared by the same method as that used for the initiation of human long-term bone marrow culture (hLTBMC). In previous studies, we performed immunocytochemical staining of cytocentrifuge cell preparations using a panel of antibodies with which we characterized stromal cell populations in hLTBMC. This approach allowed morphological as well as immunophenotypic assessment of cells of interest. Morphologically distinctive cell populations expressing vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) were observed to be present, but no cells expressing alpha-smooth muscle actin were found. Few macrophages were present, consistent with the origin of hLTBMC stroma-adherent macrophages from monocytes and their precursor cells rather than from mature macrophages among the culture-initiating cells. In the absence of double immunostaining, it was not possible to deduce whether CD34+ cells, which were present in varying numbers in the cytocentrifuge preparations, included stromal as well as primitive hematopoietic cells. In addition to single cells, multicellular tissue fragments containing a variety of stromal cell types were detected in many samples. Their presence raises the possibility that at least some components of hLTBMC stroma may arise by explant growth from complex tissue fragments containing vascular and fibroblastic elements. Overall, our results indicate that demonstration of a variety of stroma-associated antigens, in particular NGFR, provides a useful new tool for identifying stromal elements in aspirated bone marrow. PMID:9766446

  8. Tissue-engineered bone repair of sheep cranial defects with autologous bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Shang, Q; Wang, Z; Liu, W; Shi, Y; Cui, L; Cao, Y

    2001-11-01

    Cranial bone defect remains a major challenge to craniofacial surgeons because of limited availability of autologous bone graft to repair the defects and the donor site defects secondary to tissue harvesting. In contrast, tissue-engineering technique can generate a large bone tissue using small amount of autologous cells and therefore avoid these problems. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells (MSCs) have the potential of multi-lineage (including osteogenic) differentiation. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of using autologous MSCs to repair cranial bone defects by a tissue-engineering approach. Autologous MSCs were isolated from eight adult sheep respectively and were in vitro expanded and induced to become osteogenic cells. Bilateral full-thickness defects (20 mm in diameter) of parietal bones were created in animals and the bone defects were either repaired with the bone implants constituted with MSCs and calcium alginate at the experimental side (n = 8) or treated with calcium alginate only without MSCs (n = 4) or left unrepaired (n = 4) at the control side. New bone tissues were observed either grossly or histologically at the defects of experimental group as early as 6 weeks post-repairing, but not in control groups. The engineered bone tissue became more mature at 18 weeks post-repairing. Three-dimensional computerized tomography (CT) scan revealed an almost complete repair of the defect of experimental group at 18 weeks. This study may provide insight for future clinical repair of cranial defect. PMID:11711828

  9. Therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cold stress induced changes in the hippocampus of rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Saravana Kumar Sampath; Perumal, Saraswathi; Rajagopalan, Vijayaraghavan

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cold stress induced neuronal changes in hippocampal CA1 region of Wistar rats. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from a 6-week-old Wistar rat. Bone marrow from adult femora and tibia was collected and mesenchymal stem cells were cultured in minimal essential medium containing 10% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum and were sub-cultured. Passage 3 cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for positive expression of CD44 and CD90 and negative expression of CD45. Once CD44 and CD90 positive expression was achieved, the cells were cultured again to 90% confluence for later experiments. Twenty-four rats aged 8 weeks old were randomly and evenly divided into normal control, cold water swim stress (cold stress), cold stress + PBS (intravenous infusion), and cold stress + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (1 × 106; intravenous infusion) groups. The total period of study was 60 days which included 1 month stress period followed by 1 month treatment. Behavioral functional test was performed during the entire study period. After treatment, rats were sacrificed for histological studies. Treatment with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells significantly increased the number of neuronal cells in hippocampal CA1 region. Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells injected by intravenous administration show potential therapeutic effects in cognitive decline associated with stress-related lesions. PMID:25422634

  10. Dynamized Preparations in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Sunila, Ellanzhiyil Surendran; Preethi, Korengath Chandran; Kuttan, Girija

    2009-01-01

    Although reports on the efficacy of homeopathic medicines in animal models are limited, there are even fewer reports on the in vitro action of these dynamized preparations. We have evaluated the cytotoxic activity of 30C and 200C potencies of ten dynamized medicines against Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites, Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma, lung fibroblast (L929) and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines and compared activity with their mother tinctures during short-term and long-term cell culture. The effect of dynamized medicines to induce apoptosis was also evaluated and we studied how dynamized medicines affected genes expressed during apoptosis. Mother tinctures as well as some dynamized medicines showed significant cytotoxicity to cells during short and long-term incubation. Potentiated alcohol control did not produce any cytotoxicity at concentrations studied. The dynamized medicines were found to inhibit CHO cell colony formation and thymidine uptake in L929 cells and those of Thuja, Hydrastis and Carcinosinum were found to induce apoptosis in DLA cells. Moreover, dynamized Carcinosinum was found to induce the expression of p53 while dynamized Thuja produced characteristic laddering pattern in agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA. These results indicate that dynamized medicines possess cytotoxic as well as apoptosis-inducing properties. PMID:18955237

  11. Cell Sources for Bone Tissue Engineering: Insights from Basic Science

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    One of the goals of bone tissue engineering is to design delivery methods for skeletal stem/progenitor cells to repair or replace bone. Although the materials used to retain cells play a central role in the quality of the constructs, the source of cells is key for bone regeneration. Bone marrow is the most common cell source, but other tissues are now being explored, such as the periosteum, fat, muscle, cord blood, and embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells. The therapeutic effect of exogenous stem/progenitor cells is accepted, yet their contribution to bone repair is not well defined. The in vitro osteo- and/or chondrogenic potential of these skeletal progenitors do not necessarily predict their differentiation potential in vivo and their function may be affected by their ability to home correctly to bone. This review provides an overview of animal models used to test the efficacy of cell-based approaches. We examine the mechanisms of endogenous cell recruitment during bone repair and compare the role of local versus systemic cell recruitment. We discuss how the normal repair process can help define efficacious cell sources for bone tissue engineering and improve their methods of delivery. PMID:21902612

  12. Cell-Based Approaches to the Engineering of Vascularized Bone Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rameshwar R.; Stegemann, Jan P.

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes recent efforts to create vascularized bone tissue in vitro and in vivo using cell-based therapy approaches. The treatment of large and recalcitrant bone wounds is a serious clinical problem, and in the United States approximately 10% of all fractures are complicated by delayed or non-union. Treatment approaches using growth factor and gene delivery have shown some promise, but results are variable and clinical complications have arisen. Cell-based therapies offer the potential to recapitulate key components of the bone healing cascade, which involves concomitant regeneration of vasculature and new bone tissue. For this reason, osteogenic and vasculogenic cell types have been combined in co-cultures to capitalize on the function of each cell type, and to promote heterotypic interactions. Experiments in both 2D and 3D systems have provided insight into the mechanisms by which osteogenic and vasculogenic cells interact to form vascularized bone, and these approaches have been translated to ectopic and orthotopic models in small animal studies. The knowledge generated by these studies will inform and facilitate the next generation of pre-clinical studies, which are needed to move cell-based orthopaedic repair strategies into the clinic. The science and application of cytotherapy for repair of large and ischemic bone defects is developing rapidly, and promises to provide new treatment methods for these challenging clinical problems. PMID:23999157

  13. Silicate bioceramics enhanced vascularization and osteogenesis through stimulating interactions between endothelia cells and bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Xue, Ke; Kong, Ni; Liu, Kai; Chang, Jiang

    2014-04-01

    The facts that biomaterials affect the behavior of single type of cells have been widely accepted. However, the effects of biomaterials on cell-cell interactions have rarely been reported. Bone tissue engineering involves osteoblastic cells (OCs), endothelial cells (ECs) and the interactions between OCs and ECs. It has been reported that silicate biomaterials can stimulate osteogenic differentiation of OCs and vascularization of ECs. However, the effects of silicate biomaterials on the interactions between ECs and OCs during vascularization and osteogenesis have not been reported, which are critical for bone tissue regeneration in vivo. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of calcium silicate (CS) bioceramics on interactions between human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and on stimulation of vascularization and osteogenesis in vivo through combining co-cultures with CS containing scaffolds. Specifically, the effects of CS on the angiogenic growth factor VEGF, osteogenic growth factor BMP-2 and the cross-talks between VEGF and BMP-2 in the co-culture system were elucidated. Results showed that CS stimulated co-cultured HBMSCs (co-HBMSCs) to express VEGF and the VEGF activated its receptor KDR on co-cultured HUVECs (co-HUVECs), which was also up-regulated by CS. Then, BMP-2 and nitric oxide expression from the co-HUVECs were stimulated by CS and the former stimulated osteogenic differentiation of co-HBMSCs while the latter stimulated vascularization of co-HVUECs. Finally, the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/CS composite scaffolds with the co-cultured HBMSCs and HUVECs significantly enhanced vascularization and osteogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo, which indicates that it is a promising way to enhance bone regeneration by combining scaffolds containing silicate bioceramics and co-cultures of ECs and OCs. PMID:24486216

  14. Bioreactor Strategy in Bone Tissue Engineering: Pre-Culture and Osteogenic Differentiation Under Two Flow Configurations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junho

    2012-01-01

    Since robust osteogenic differentiation and mineralization are integral to the engineering of bone constructs, understanding the impact of the cellular microenvironments on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) osteogenic differentiation is crucial to optimize bioreactor strategy. Two perfusion flow conditions were utilized in order to understand the impact of the flow configuration on hMSC construct development during both pre-culture (PC) in growth media and its subsequent osteogenic induction (OI). The media in the in-house perfusion bioreactor was controlled to perfuse either around (termed parallel flow [PF]) the construct surfaces or penetrate through the construct (termed transverse flow [TF]) for 7 days of the PC followed by 7 days of the OI. The flow configuration during the PC not only changed growth kinetics but also influenced cell distribution and potency of osteogenic differentiation and mineralization during the subsequent OI. While shear stress resulted from the TF stimulated cell proliferation during PC, the convective removal of de novo extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and growth factors (GFs) reduced cell proliferation on OI. In contrast, the effective retention of de novo ECM proteins and GFs in the PC constructs under the PF maintained cell proliferation under the OI but resulted in localized cell aggregations, which influenced their osteogenic differentiation. The results revealed the contrasting roles of the convective flow as a mechanical stimulus, the redistribution of the cells and macromolecules in 3D constructs, and their divergent impacts on cellular events, leading to bone construct formation. The results suggest that the modulation of the flow configuration in the perfusion bioreactor is an effective strategy that regulates the construct properties and maximizes the functional outcome. PMID:22690750

  15. Cultivation of Human Bone-Like Tissue from Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Osteogenic Progenitors in Perfusion Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    de Peppo, Giuseppe Maria; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Marolt, Darja

    2014-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an unlimited source of skeletal tissue progenitors for studies of bone biology, pathogenesis, and the development of new approaches for bone reconstruction and therapies. In order to construct in vitro models of bone tissue development and to grow functional, clinical-size bone substitutes for transplantation, cell cultivation in three-dimensional environments composed of porous osteoconductive scaffolds and dynamic culture systems—bioreactors—has been studied. Here, we describe a stepwise procedure for the induction of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (collectively termed PSCs) into mesenchymal-like progenitors, and their subsequent cultivation on decellularized bovine bone scaffolds in perfusion bioreactors, to support the development of viable, stable bone-like tissue in defined geometries. PMID:24281874

  16. Cadherin-11 in renal cell carcinoma bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Satcher, Robert L; Pan, Tianhong; Cheng, Chien-Jui; Lee, Yu-Chen; Lin, Song-Chang; Yu, Guoyu; Li, Xiaoxia; Hoang, Anh G; Tamboli, Pheroze; Jonasch, Eric; Gallick, Gary E; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Bone is one of the common sites of metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC), however the mechanism by which RCC preferentially metastasize to bone is poorly understood. Homing/retention of RCC cells to bone and subsequent proliferation are necessary steps for RCC cells to colonize bone. To explore possible mechanisms by which these processes occur, we used an in vivo metastasis model in which 786-O RCC cells were injected into SCID mice intracardially, and organotropic cell lines from bone, liver, and lymph node were selected. The expression of molecules affecting cell adhesion, angiogenesis, and osteolysis were then examined in these selected cells. Cadherin-11, a mesenchymal cadherin mainly expressed in osteoblasts, was significantly increased on the cell surface in bone metastasis-derived 786-O cells (Bo-786-O) compared to parental, liver, or lymph node-derived cells. In contrast, the homing receptor CXCR4 was equivalently expressed in cells derived from all organs. No significant difference was observed in the expression of angiogenic factors, including HIF-1?, VEGF, angiopoeitin-1, Tie2, c-MET, and osteolytic factors, including PTHrP, IL-6 and RANKL. While the parental and Bo-786-O cells have similar proliferation rates, Bo-786-O cells showed an increase in migration compared to the parental 786-O cells. Knockdown of Cadherin-11 using shRNA reduced the rate of migration in Bo-786-O cells, suggesting that Cadherin-11 contributes to the increased migration observed in bone-derived cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of cadherin-11 expression in a human renal carcinoma tissue array showed that the number of human specimens with positive cadherin-11 activity was significantly higher in tumors that metastasized to bone than that in primary tumors. Together, these results suggest that Cadherin-11 may play a role in RCC bone metastasis. PMID:24587095

  17. Fluoride inhibits the response of bone cells to mechanical loading

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hubertine M. E. Willems; Ellen G. H. M. van den Heuvel; Seb Castelein; Joost Keverling Buisman; Antonius L. J. J. Bronckers; Astrid D. Bakker; Jenneke Klein-Nulend

    2011-01-01

    The response of bone cells to mechanical loading is mediated by the cytoskeleton. Since the bone anabolic agent fluoride disrupts\\u000a the cytoskeleton, we investigated whether fluoride affects the response of bone cells to mechanical loading, and whether this\\u000a is cytoskeleton mediated. The mechano-response of osteoblasts was assessed in vitro by measuring pulsating fluid flow-induced\\u000a nitric oxide (NO) production. Osteocyte shape

  18. Response of endothelial cells to decellularized extracellular matrix deposited by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yue; Yan, Mengdie; Gong, Yihong; Chen, Lei; Zhao, Feng; Zhang, Zhaoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the behavior and function of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) on decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) deposited by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Methods: Prepared through chemical approach, decellularized ECM was characterized by use of immunofluorescence staining. The morphology, attachment, proliferation and migration of HUVECs cultured on six-well tissue culture plastic (TCP) and decellularized ECM were investigated. Results: Decellularized ECM was successfully prepared without three-dimensional architecture disruption. This biological scaffold is similar to nature vascular ECM, preserved various matrix proteins such as type I collagen, type III collagen and fibronection. HUVECs on decellularized ECM showed well attachment and regular arrangement. Decellularized ECM could also significantly enhance the migration and proliferation potential of HUVECs in contrast to TCP. Conclusion: Deposited by BMSCs, ECM can affect the behavior of endothelial cell and could be used as a promising material in tissue engineering. PMID:25663998

  19. Phenotype and functional identity of GM-CSF–independent dendritic cells generated by long-term propagation of DC progenitor cells in bone marrow cells and skin langerhans cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Katayama; Y. Hattori; K. Ogata; H. Yan; E. Satoh; K. Teramoto; S. Arii; R. Kamide; H. Nakagawa; H. Kimura

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is provided that dendritic cells (DC) generated by either long-term bone marrow cell (BMC) culture with Flt3L and interleukin-6 (IL-6), or after short-term BMC culture with granulocyte macrophage–colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4), contain heterogeneous cell populations of admixed DC and M?, regardless of the cytokine source. By employing GM-CSF–independent culture systems with the aid of Flt3\\/Flk-2 ligand and

  20. Integrins and bone metastasis: Integrating tumor cell and stromal cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jochen G.; Amend, Sarah H.; Weilbaecher, Katherine N.

    2010-01-01

    Integrins on both tumor cells and the supporting host stromal cells in bone (osteoclasts, new blood vessels, inflammatory cells, platelets and bone marrow stromal cells) play key roles in enhancing bone metastasis. Tumor cells localize to specific tissues through integrin-mediated contacts with extracellular matrix and stromal cells. Integrin expression and signaling are perturbed in cancer cells, allowing them to “escape” from cell-cell and cell matrix tethers, invade, migrate and colonize within new tissues and matrices. Integrin signaling through ?v?3 and VLA-4 on tumor cells can promote tumor metastasis to and proliferation in the bone microenvironment. Osteoclast (OC) mediated bone resorption is a critical component of bone metastasis and can promote tumor growth in bone and ?v?3 integrins are critical to osteoclast function and development. Tumors in the bone microenvironment can recruit new blood vessel formation, platelets, pro-tumor immune cells and bone marrow stromal cells that promote tumor growth and invasion in bone. Integrins play critical roles in platelet aggregation (?v?3 and ?IIb?3), hematopoietic cell mobilization (VLA-4, osteopontin), neoangiogenesis (?v?3,?v?5, ?6?4, ?1 integrin) and stromal function (osteopontin, VLA-4). Integrins are involved in the pathogenesis of bone metastasis at many levels and further study to define integrin dysregulation by cancer will yield new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of bone metastasis. PMID:20850578

  1. Reduced ischemic brain injury by partial rejuvenation of bone marrow cells in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Akihiko; Zhu, Pengxiang; Cao, Fang; Kikuchi-Taura, Akie; Kasahara, Yukiko; Stern, David M; Soma, Toshihiro; Matsuyama, Tomohiro; Hata, Ryuji

    2011-01-01

    Circulating bone marrow-derived immature cells, including endothelial progenitor cells, have been implicated in homeostasis of the microvasculature. Decreased levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells, associated with aging and/or cardiovascular risk factors, correlate with poor clinical outcomes in a range of cardiovascular diseases. Herein, we transplanted bone marrow cells from young stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-SP) into aged SHR-SP, the latter not exposed to radiation or chemotherapy. Analysis of recipient peripheral blood 28 days after transplantation revealed that 5% of circulating blood cells were of donor origin. Cerebral infarction was induced on day 30 posttransplantation. Animals transplanted with bone marrow from young SHR-SP displayed an increase in density of the microvasculature in the periinfarction zone, reduced ischemic brain damage and improved neurologic function. In vitro analysis revealed enhanced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and reduced activation p38 microtubule-associated protein (MAP) kinase, the latter associated with endothelial apoptosis, in cultures exposed to bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells from young animals versus cells from aged counterparts. Our findings indicate that partial rejuvenation of bone marrow from aged rats with cells from young animals enhances the response to ischemic injury, potentially at the level of endothelial/vascular activation, providing insight into a novel approach ameliorate chronic vascular diseases. PMID:20859292

  2. Cell fusion contributes to the rescue of apoptotic cardiomyocytes by bone marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei-Jian; Li, Shu-Hong; Weisel, Richard D; Liu, Shi-Ming; Li, Ren-Ke

    2012-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte apoptosis is an important contributor to the progressive cardiac dysfunction that culminates in congestive heart failure. Bone marrow cells (BMCs) restore cardiac function following ischaemia, and transplanted BMCs have been reported to fuse with cells of diverse tissues. We previously demonstrated that the myogenic conversion of bone marrow stromal cells increased nearly twofold when the cells were co-cultured with apoptotic (TNF-? treated) cardiomyocytes. We therefore hypothesized that cell fusion may be a major mechanism by which BMCs rescue cardiomyocytes from apoptosis. We induced cellular apoptosis in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes by treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The TUNEL assay demonstrated an increase in apoptosis from 4.5 ± 1.3% in non-treated cells to 19.0 ± 4.4% (P < 0.05) in treated cells. We subsequently co-cultured the apoptotic cardiomyocytes with BMCs and assessed cell fusion using flow cytometry. Fusion was rare in the non-treated control cardiomyocytes (0.3%), whereas H2O2 treatment led to significantly higher fusion rates than the control group (P < 0.05), with the highest rate of 7.9 ± 0.3% occurring at 25 ?M H2O2. We found an inverse correlation between cell fusion and completion of cardiomyocyte apoptosis (R2 = 0.9863). An in vivo mouse model provided evidence of cell fusion in the infarcted myocardium following the injection of BMCs. The percentage of cells undergoing fusion was significantly higher in mice injected with BMCs following infarction (8.8 ± 1.3%) compared to mice that did not undergo infarction (4.6 ± 0.6%, P < 0.05). Enhancing cell fusion may be one method to preserve cardiomyocytes following myocardial infarction, and this new approach may provide a novel target for cardiac regenerative therapies. PMID:22805279

  3. Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 and Cell Division in Neuroblastoma Cells and Bone Marrow Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sans-Fons, M. Gloria; Sole, Sonia; Sanfeliu, Coral; Planas, Anna M.

    2010-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade the extracellular matrix and carry out key functions in cell development, cancer, injury, and regeneration. In addition to its well recognized extracellular action, functional intracellular MMP activity under certain conditions is supported by increasing evidence. In this study, we observed higher gelatinase activity by in situ zymography and increased MMP-9 immunoreactivity in human neuroblastoma cells and in bone marrow macrophages undergoing mitosis compared with resting cells. We studied the pattern of immunoreactivity at the different stages of cell division by confocal microscopy. Immunostaining with different monoclonal antibodies against MMP-9 revealed a precise, dynamic, and well orchestrated localization of MMP-9 at the different stages of cell division. The cellular distribution of MMP-9 staining was studied in relation to that of microtubules. The spatial pattern of MMP-9 immunoreactivity suggested some participation in both the reorganization of the nuclear content and the process of chromatid segmentation. We then used several MMP-9 inhibitors to find out whether MMP-9 might be involved in the cell cycle. These drugs impaired the entry of cells into mitosis, as revealed by flow cytometry, and reduced cell culture growth. In addition, the silencing of MMP-9 expression with small interfering RNA also reduced cell growth. Taken together, these results suggest that intracellular MMP-9 is involved in the process of cell division in neuroblastoma cells and in primary cultures of macrophages. PMID:20971732

  4. Migration of bone marrow stem cells in ischaemic brain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. S. Poon; G. Lu; K. S. Tsang; X. L. Zhu; G. G. Chen; H. K. Ng

    Stem cell therapy has been demonstrated to be effective in the management of haematological malignancy and solid cancer, but its role in neurodegenerative conditions remains uncertain. We hypothesize that: (1) ventricular delivery of bone marrow stem cells improves functional outcome in experimental ischaemia of the mouse brain; and (2) this improved outcome is due to migration of bone marrow stem

  5. Resveratrol increases the bone marrow hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell capacity.

    PubMed

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Lofek-Czubek, Sébastien; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2014-12-01

    Resveratrol is a plant-derived polyphenol that has shown protective effects against many disorders including, several types of cancers and other age-associated diseases as well as blood disorders in cultured cells and/or animal models. However, whether resveratrol has any impact specifically on normal blood stem cells remains unknown. Here, we show that a 3-week treatment of resveratrol increases the frequency and total numbers of normal bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) without any impact on their competitive repopulation capacity. In addition, we show that resveratrol enhances the bone marrow multipotent progenitor capacity in vivo. These results have therapeutic value for disorders of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) as well as for bone marrow transplantation settings. PMID:25163926

  6. Bone marrow cells from allogeneic bone marrow chimeras inhibit the generation of cytotoxic lymphocyte responses against both donor and recipient cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ogasawara, M.; Iwabuchi, K.; Good, R.A.; Onoe, K.

    1988-11-15

    When added to a mixed lymphocyte culture, bone marrow cells suppress the generation of CTL activity against H-2 Ag shared by the BM cells and the stimulator cells. These cells have been referred to as veto cells and are thought to play a role in maintaining self-tolerance. We analyzed the H-2 specificity of the suppression expressed by the veto cells from H-2 incompatible bone marrow chimeras, because lymphocytes of such chimeras had been shown to be tolerant to both donor and recipient Ag when tested by CTL responses. We found that the bone marrow cells of such chimeras which were featured by non-T and non-B cell characteristics inhibited the generation of CTL directed against either donor or recipient Ag, but not against third-party Ag. These observations suggest that in allogeneic chimeras the veto or veto-like cells alter the inhibitory specificity exhibited in the recipient microenvironment and indicate that these cells are directly involved in the induction and maintenance of self-tolerance.

  7. A Rare Location for a Common Bone Tumor, Meta-Diaphyseal Giant Cell Tumor of Bone in an Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Darioush, M. Barzi; H. Sámi, Sam; Fallah, Ehsan

    2013-01-01

    Primary bone tumors can be either benign or malignant considering their natural history and cellular morphology. Benign bone tumors are much more frequent than malignant ones although some of them like giant cell tumor of bone can behave just like a malignant one that means has the capacity for massive local destruction and remote metastasis. Giant cell tumor of bone in adult people has a very strong and diagnostic predilection for epiphysial location in long bones. Very few cases have been so far reported for a giant cell tumor of bone with non-epiphysial location in a long bone. PMID:24179645

  8. Cell culture techniques in honey bee research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cell culture techniques are indispensable in most if not all life science disciplines to date. Wherever cell culture models are lacking scientific development is hampered. Unfortunately this has been and still is the case in honey bee research because permanent honey bee cell lines have not yet been...

  9. Cell Culture as an Alternative in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardone, Roland M.

    1990-01-01

    Programs that are intended to inform and provide "hands-on" experience for students and to facilitate the introduction of cell culture-based laboratory exercises into the high school and college laboratory are examined. The components of the CellServ Program and the Cell Culture Toxicology Training Programs are described. (KR)

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells: mechanisms and role in bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yunhao; Guan, Junjie; Zhang, Changqing

    2014-01-01

    Stimulating bone growth and regeneration, especially in patients with delayed union or non-union of bone, is a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. Treatments employed for bone regeneration are based on the use of cells, biomaterials and factors. Among these therapies, cell treatment with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has a number of advantages as MSCs: (1) are multipotent cells that can migrate to sites of injury; (2) are capable of suppressing the local immune response; and (3) are available in large quantities from the patients themselves. MSC therapies have been used for stimulating bone regeneration in animal models and in patients. Methods of application range from direct MSC injection, seeding MSCs on synthetic scaffolds, the use of gene-modified MSCs, and hetero-MSCs application. However, only a small number of these cell-based strategies are in clinical use, and none of these treatments has become the gold standard treatment for delayed or non-union of bone. PMID:25335795

  11. Further studies on the intermediary metabolism of bone in vitro and a monoclonal cell line (MMB-1) derived from bone: effects of parathyroid hormone and acetazolamide

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F.C.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism/mechanisms by which PTH affects Ca homeostasis between blood and bone have not been clearly established. Most studies of metabolic acid production in bone took place during the late 1950s and early 1960s. Since that time, assay techniques for metabolic acid production have been improved for greater sensitivity, more has been learned as to how PTH mediates its cellular responses, and techniques for cell isolation and culture have dramatically improved. These improvements have made possible new approaches to the study of short term effects of PTH on metabolic acid production in bone. Chapter 1 explores the potential of bone to utilize substrates other than glucose for metabolic energy transfer. Chapter 2 characterizes glucose metabolism in mouse calvaria in vitro and explores effects of PTH, acetazolamide, and C1 13,850 on calvaria oxidative metabolism. Chapter 3 describes PTH effects on glucose metabolism of MMB-1 cells, a monoclonal cell line reported to possess osteoblast-like characteristics.

  12. Reconstruction of alveolar bone defects using bone morphogenetic protein 2 mediated rabbit dental pulp stem cells seeded on nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/poly(L-lactide).

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Chen; E, Ling-Ling; Wang, Dong-Sheng; Su, Fang; Wu, Xia; Shi, Zhan-Ping; Lv, Yan; Wang, Jia-Zhu

    2011-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the capacity of a tissue-engineered bone complex of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2)-mediated dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/poly(L-lactide) (nHAC/PLA) to reconstruct critical-size alveolar bone defects in New Zealand rabbit. Autologous DPSCs were isolated from rabbit dental pulp tissue and expanded ex vivo to enrich DPSCs numbers, and then their attachment and differentiation capability were evaluated when cultured on the culture plate or nHAC/PLA. The alveolar bone defects were treated with nHAC/PLA, nHAC/PLA+rhBMP-2, nHAC/PLA+DPSCs, nHAC/PLA+DPSCs+rhBMP-2, and autogenous bone (AB) obtained from iliac bone or were left untreated as a control. X-ray and a polychrome sequential fluorescent labeling were performed postoperatively and the animals were sacrificed 12 weeks after operation for histological observation and histomorphometric analysis. Our results showed that DPSCs expressed STRO-1 and vementin, and favored osteogenesis and adipogenesis in conditioned media. DPSCs attached and spread well, and retained their osteogenic phenotypes on nHAC/PLA. The rhBMP-2 could significantly increase protein content, alkaline phosphatase activity/protein, osteocalcin content, and mineral formation of DPSCs cultured on nHAC/PLA. The X-ray graph, the fluorescent, histological observation, and histomorphometric analysis showed that the nHAC/PLA+DPSCs+rhBMP-2 tissue-engineered bone complex had an earlier mineralization and more bone formation inside the scaffold than nHAC/PLA, nHAC/PLA+rhBMP-2, and nHAC/PLA+DPSCs, or even autologous bone. Implanted DPSCs' contribution to new bone was detected through transfected eGFP genes. Our findings indicated that stem cells existed in adult rabbit dental pulp tissue. The rhBMP-2 promoted osteogenic capability of DPSCs as a potential cell source for periodontal bone regeneration. The nHAC/PLA could serve as a good scaffold for autologous DPSC seeding, proliferation, and differentiation. The tissue-engineered bone complex with nHAC/PLA, rhBMP-2, and autologous DPSCs might be a better alternative to autologous bone for the clinical reconstruction of periodontal bone defects. PMID:21563858

  13. Bone marrow Schwann cells induce hematopoietic stem cell hibernation.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Satoshi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2014-06-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are clonogenic cells capable of both self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. In adult mouse bone marrow (BM), most HSCs remain in the non-dividing G0-phase of cell cycle, in close contact with supporting cells known as the HSC "niche". In the present study, we focused on signaling mechanisms that regulate stem cell dormancy in the BM niche. We show that TGF-? type II receptor deficiency causes reduced phosphorylation of Smad2/3 and impairs long-term repopulating activity in HSCs, suggesting a significant role for TGF-?/Smad signaling in hematopoiesis. Furthermore, we aimed at defining the candidate BM niche responsible for homeostasis of hematopoiesis, and revealed that non-myelinating Schwann cells sustain HSC hibernation by converting TGF-? from its latent to its active form. PMID:24817152

  14. Applicability of human dental follicle cells to bone regeneration without dexamethasone: an in vivo pilot study.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Ogura, N; Tomoki, R; Eda, T; Okada, H; Kato, R; Iwai, S; Ito, K; Kuyama, K; Kondoh, T

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of human dental follicle cells (hDFCs) for bone formation in vivo. hDFCs were obtained from wisdom teeth extracted from patients aged 14 and 22 years. hDFCs from the 5th to 8th passages were grown in three-dimensional (3D) culture using gelatin sponges. Cells were transplanted onto the calvaria of F344/NJcl-rnu/rnu male rats (immunodeficient rats). Haematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and immunohistochemistry were performed, and newly formed bone was evaluated by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). HE staining showed newly formed bone in 3D culture. Immunohistochemistry showed bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), and osterix staining in areas with newly formed bone. Furthermore, micro-CT showed that, in comparison to controls, transplanted hDFCs promoted better bone quality and bone mineral density (BMD 582±131.1 vs. 300.5±77.7mg/cm(3); P=0.039), bone mineral content (BMC 5.6±1.1 vs. 2.1±0.4mg; P=0.006), bone volume (BV 9.7±0.5×10(-3) vs. 7.0±0.4×10(-3)cm(3); P=0.002), BMC/total volume (TV) (399.9±76.3 vs. 147.7±30.8mg/cm(3); P=0.006), and BV/TV (69.1±3.6% vs. 49.6±3.1%; P=0.002). This suggests that human dental follicles are potentially useful for regenerative therapy. PMID:25496849

  15. Mechanical characterization of adult stem cells from bone marrow and perivascular niches.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Alexandre J S; Tottey, Steven; Taylor, Richard W E; Bise, Ryoma; Kanade, Takeo; Badylak, Stephen F; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2012-04-30

    Therapies using adult stem cells often require mechanical manipulation such as injection or incorporation into scaffolds. However, force-induced rupture and mechanosensitivity of cells during manipulation is largely ignored. Here, we image cell mechanical structures and perform a biophysical characterization of three different types of human adult stem cells: bone marrow CD34+ hematopoietic, bone marrow mesenchymal and perivascular mesenchymal stem cells. We use micropipette aspiration to characterize cell mechanics and quantify deformation of subcellular structures under force and its contribution to global cell deformation. Our results suggest that CD34+ cells are mechanically suitable for injection systems since cells transition from solid- to fluid-like at constant aspiration pressure, probably due to a poorly developed actin cytoskeleton. Conversely, mesenchymal stem cells from the bone marrow and perivascular niches are more suitable for seeding into biomaterial scaffolds since they are mechanically robust and have developed cytoskeletal structures that may allow cellular stable attachment and motility through solid porous environments. Among these, perivascular stem cells cultured in 6% oxygen show a developed cytoskeleton but a more compliant nucleus, which can facilitate the penetration into pores of tissues or scaffolds. We confirm the relevance of our measurements using cell motility and migration assays and measure survival of injected cells. Since different types of adult stem cells can be used for similar applications, we suggest considering mechanical properties of stem cells to match optimal mechanical characteristics of therapies. PMID:22349118

  16. Effects of novel calcium phosphate cements on human bone marrow fibroblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Oreffo, R O; Driessens, F C; Planell, J A; Triffitt, J T

    1998-01-01

    The identification and characterization of biocompatible materials that augment bone cell proliferation and osteogenic activity have important therapeutic implications in skeletal reconstruction and joint replacement. In the present study, we have examined the effects of three biocements, biocement H, calcium-deficient apatite; biocement F, apatite + CaHPO(4); biocement D, carbonated apatite + CaHPO(4) + CaCO(3) and an amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) proposed as implant fixing materials, on the growth, differentiation, and cell surface interaction of human bone marrow fibroblastic cells. These cells are known to be progenitors of osteoblasts, chondroblasts, adipocytes, myoblasts, and reticulocytes. Alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity, a marker of the osteoblast phenotype, was increased by a factor of two- to sixfold on carbonated apatite, one- to sixfold on apatite and three- to 10-fold on calcium-deficient apatite, over levels observed on plastic. Cell proliferation was significantly reduced. Photomicroscopic examination indicated high biocompatibility with close adhesion of the bone marrow fibroblastic cells to composites D, F, and H. Longer term marrow cultures (15 days) confirmed the stimulation of cell differentiation, as assessed by collagen production, over cell proliferation, of cells grown on carbonated apatite. Enhanced osteoblastic differentiation was observed on a 70% carbonated apatite, which has a composition similar to bone mineral, whereas cell toxicity was observed on cells grown on amorphous calcium phosphate. This in vitro human bone marrow fibroblast culture system provides a simple and effective method for the evaluation of new biomaterials. The development of these novel cements may be of potential use in orthopedic implants. PMID:9836792

  17. Age-related molecular genetic changes of murine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are pluripotent cells, present in the bone marrow and other tissues that can differentiate into cells of all germ layers and may be involved in tissue maintenance and repair in adult organisms. Because of their plasticity and accessibility these cells are also prime candidates for regenerative medicine. The contribution of stem cell aging to organismal aging is under debate and one theory is that reparative processes deteriorate as a consequence of stem cell aging and/or decrease in number. Age has been linked with changes in osteogenic and adipogenic potential of MSCs. Results Here we report on changes in global gene expression of cultured MSCs isolated from the bone marrow of mice at ages 2, 8, and 26-months. Microarray analyses revealed significant changes in the expression of more than 8000 genes with stage-specific changes of multiple differentiation, cell cycle and growth factor genes. Key markers of adipogenesis including lipoprotein lipase, FABP4, and Itm2a displayed age-dependent declines. Expression of the master cell cycle regulators p53 and p21 and growth factors HGF and VEGF also declined significantly at 26 months. These changes were evident despite multiple cell divisions in vitro after bone marrow isolation. Conclusions The results suggest that MSCs are subject to molecular genetic changes during aging that are conserved during passage in culture. These changes may affect the physiological functions and the potential of autologous MSCs for stem cell therapy. PMID:20374652

  18. Human Perivascular Stem Cell-Based Bone Graft Substitute Induces Rat Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Choon G.; James, Aaron W.; Asatrian, Greg; Chang, Le; Nguyen, Alan; Le, Khoi; Bayani, Georgina; Lee, Robert; Stoker, David; Zhang, Xinli

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) because of its abundance and accessibility. We have previously defined a population of native MSCs termed perivascular stem cells (PSCs), purified from diverse human tissues, including adipose tissue. Human PSCs (hPSCs) are a bipartite cell population composed of pericytes (CD146+CD34?CD45?) and adventitial cells (CD146?CD34+CD45?), isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and with properties identical to those of culture identified MSCs. Our previous studies showed that hPSCs exhibit improved bone formation compared with a sample-matched unpurified population (termed stromal vascular fraction); however, it is not known whether hPSCs would be efficacious in a spinal fusion model. To investigate, we evaluated the osteogenic potential of freshly sorted hPSCs without culture expansion and differentiation in a rat model of posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion. We compared increasing dosages of implanted hPSCs to assess for dose-dependent efficacy. All hPSC treatment groups induced successful spinal fusion, assessed by manual palpation and microcomputed tomography. Computerized biomechanical simulation (finite element analysis) further demonstrated bone fusion with hPSC treatment. Histological analyses showed robust endochondral ossification in hPSC-treated samples. Finally, we confirmed that implanted hPSCs indeed differentiated into osteoblasts and osteocytes; however, the majority of the new bone formation was of host origin. These results suggest that implanted hPSCs positively regulate bone formation via direct and paracrine mechanisms. In summary, hPSCs are a readily available MSC population that effectively forms bone without requirements for culture or predifferentiation. Thus, hPSC-based products show promise for future efforts in clinical bone regeneration and repair. PMID:25154782

  19. Adult multipotent stromal cell technology for bone regeneration: a review.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Mandi J; Daigle, Patrick R

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of bone marrow derived stromal cell osteogenesis in the 1960s, tissue engineering with adult multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) has evolved as a promising approach to restore structure and function of bone compromised by injury or disease. To date, accelerated bone formation with MSCs has been demonstrated with a variety of tissue engineering strategies. Though MSC bone tissue engineering has advanced over the last few decades, limitations to clinical translation remain. A current review of this promising field is presented with a specific focus on equine investigations. PMID:23215894

  20. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells repair spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury by promoting axonal growth and anti-autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fei; Meng, Chunyang; Lu, Rifeng; Li, Lei; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Hao; Qin, Yonggang; Guo, Li

    2014-09-15

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into neurons and astrocytes after transplantation in the spinal cord of rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury. Although bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are known to protect against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury through anti-apoptotic effects, the precise mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were cultured and proliferated, then transplanted into rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury via retro-orbital injection. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence with subsequent quantification revealed that the expression of the axonal regeneration marker, growth associated protein-43, and the neuronal marker, microtubule-associated protein 2, significantly increased in rats with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation compared with those in rats with spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. Furthermore, the expression of the autophagy marker, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B, and Beclin 1, was significantly reduced in rats with the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation compared with those in rats with spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of growth associated protein-43 and neurofilament-H increased but light chain 3B and Beclin 1 decreased in rats with the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. Our results therefore suggest that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation promotes neurite growth and regeneration and prevents autophagy. These responses may likely be mechanisms underlying the protective effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:25374587

  1. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Srivastava, Rupesh K.; Gupta, Navita; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Pote, Satish T. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)] [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Jhaveri, Hiral M. [Department of Periodontics and Oral Implantology, Dr. D.Y. Patil Dental College and Hospital, Pune (India)] [Department of Periodontics and Oral Implantology, Dr. D.Y. Patil Dental College and Hospital, Pune (India); Mishra, Gyan C. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)] [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Wani, Mohan R., E-mail: mohanwani@nccs.res.in [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-03-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Presently, bone marrow is considered as a prime source of MSCs; however, there are some drawbacks and limitations in use of these MSCs for cell therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that human gingival tissue-derived MSCs have several advantages over bone marrow-derived MSCs. Gingival MSCs are easy to isolate, homogenous and proliferate faster than bone marrow MSCs without any growth factor. Importantly, gingival MSCs display stable morphology and do not loose MSC characteristic at higher passages. In addition, gingival MSCs maintain normal karyotype and telomerase activity in long-term cultures, and are not tumorigenic. Thus, we reveal that human gingiva is a better source of MSCs than bone marrow, and large number of functionally competent clinical grade MSCs can be generated in short duration for cell therapy in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  2. Genetic stability of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells in the Quantum System

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Mark; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Skokan, Margaret; Bryce, Steven; Schowinsky, Jeffrey; Peters, Rebecca; Vang, Boah; Brecheisen, Michelle; Startz, Thomas; Frank, Nathan; Nankervis, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Background aims The Quantum® Cell Expansion System (Quantum; Terumo BCT, Inc, Lakewood, CO, USA) is a novel hollow fiber-based device that automates and closes the cell culture process, reducing labor intensive tasks such as manual cell culture feeding and harvesting. The manual cell selection and expansion processes for the production of clinical-scale quantities of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-hMSCs) have been successfully translated onto the Quantum platform previously. The formerly static, manual, in vitro process performed primarily on tissue culture polystyrene substrates may raise the question of whether BM-hMSCs cultured on a hollow fiber platform yields comparable cell quality. Methods A rigorous battery of assays was used to determine the genetic stability of BM-hMSCs selected and produced with the Quantum. In this study, genetic stability was determined by assessing spectral karyotype, micronucleus formation and tumorigenicity to resolve chromosomal aberrations in the stem cell population. Cell phenotype, adherent growth kinetics and tri-lineage differentiation were also evaluated. HMSC bone marrow aspirates, obtained from three approved donors, were expanded in parallel using T225 culture flasks and the Quantum. Results BM-hMSCs harvested from the Quantum demonstrated immunophenotype, morphology and tri-lineage differentiation capacity characteristics consistent with the International Society of Cell Therapy standard for hMSCs. Cell populations showed no malignant neoplastic formation in athymic mice 60 days post-transplant, no clonal chromosomal aberrations were observed and no DNA damage was found as measured by micronucleus formation. Conclusions Quantum-produced BM-hMSCs are of comparable quality and demonstrate analogous genetic stability to BM-hMSCs cultured on tissue culture polystyrene substrates. PMID:23992670

  3. Effects of Polymer Surfaces on Proliferation and Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells and Bone Marrow Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Sisi; Liao, Wenbin; Ma, Yupo; Simon, Marcia; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2013-03-01

    Currently, proliferation and differentiation of stem cell is usually accomplished either in vivo, or on chemical coated tissue culture petri dish with the presence of feeder cells. Here we investigated whether they can be directly cultured on polymeric substrates, in the absence of additional factors. We found that mouse embryonic stem cells did not require gelatin and could remain in the undifferentiated state without feeder cells at least for four passages on partially sulfonated polystyrene. The modulii of cells was measured and found to be higher for cells plated directly on the polymer surface than for those on the same surface covered with gelatin and feeder cells. When plated with feeder cells, the modulii was not sensitive to gelatin. Whereas the differentiation properties of human bone marrow stem cells, which are not adherent, are less dependent on either chemical or mechanical properties of the substrate. However, they behave differently on different toughness hydrogels as oppose to on polymer coated thin films.

  4. A Novel Single Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Stimulates Osteogenesis of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Bone Repair

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Je-Ken; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Tai, I-Chun; Wang, Gwo-Jaw; Ho, Mei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) has been successfully applied to accelerate fracture repair since 1979. Recent studies suggest that PEMF might be used as a nonoperative treatment for the early stages of osteonecrosis. However, PEMF treatment requires a minimum of ten hours per day for the duration of the treatment. In this study, we modified the protocol of the single-pulsed electromagnetic field (SPEMF) that only requires a 3-minute daily treatment. In the in vitro study, cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation was evaluated in the hBMSCs. In the in vivo study, new bone formation and revascularization were evaluated in the necrotic bone graft. Results from the in vitro study showed no significant cytotoxic effects on the hBMSCs after 5 days of SPEMF treatment (1 Tesla, 30 pulses per day). hBMSC proliferation was enhanced in the SPEMF-treated groups after 2 and 4 days of treatment. The osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs was significantly increased in the SPEMF-treated groups after 3–7 days of treatment. Mineralization also increased after 10, 15, 20, and 25 days of treatment in SPEMF-treated groups compared to the control group. The 7-day short-course treatment achieved similar effects on proliferation and osteogenesis as the 25-day treatment. Results from the in vivo study also demonstrated that both the 7-day and 25-day treatments of SPEMF increased callus formation around the necrotic bone and also increased new vessel formation and osteocyte numbers in the grafted necrotic bone at the 2nd and 4th weeks after surgery. In conclusion, the newly developed SPEMF accelerates osteogenic differentiation of cultured hBMSCs and enhances bone repair, neo-vascularization, and cell growth in necrotic bone in mice. The potential clinical advantage of the SPEMF is the short daily application and the shorter treatment course. We suggest that SPEMF may be used to treat fractures and the early stages of osteonecrosis. PMID:24632682

  5. Bone resorption by cells isolated from rheumatoid synovium.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, J S; Quinn, J M; Demaziere, A; Bulstrode, C J; Francis, M J; Duthie, R B; Athanasou, N A

    1992-01-01

    Cellular mechanisms accounting for the osteolysis of rheumatoid erosions are poorly understood. Cells were isolated and characterised from the synovium of 16 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and four patients with osteoarthritis and their ability to resorb bone was assessed using a scanning electron microscope bone resorption assay. Macrophages were the major cell type isolated from the synovium of patients with RA. These produced extensive roughening of the bone surface without resorption pit formation. This low grade type of bone resorption was not affected by systemic (calcitonin, parathyroid hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3) or local (interleukin 1, prostaglandin E2) factors influencing bone resorption. Macrophage mediated bone resorption differs qualitatively and quantitatively from that of osteoclasts but is likely to play an important part in the development of marginal erosions in RA. Images PMID:1334644

  6. Migration of Co-cultured Endothelial Cells and Osteoblasts in Composite Hydroxyapatite/Polylactic Acid Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    SHAH, AMITA R.; SHAH, SARITA R.; OH, SUNHO; ONG, JOO L.; WENKE, JOSEPH C.; AGRAWAL, C. MAULI

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of bone in large segmental bone defects requires regeneration of both cortical bone and trabecular bone. A scaffold design consisting of a hydroxyapatite (HA) ring surrounding a polylactic acid (PLA) core simulates the structure of bone and provides an environment for indirect and direct co-culture conditions. In this exper iment, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) and normal human primary osteoblasts (OB) were co-cultured to evaluate cell migration and interactions within this biphasic composite scaffold. Both cell types were able to migrate between the different material phases of the scaffold. It was also observed that OB migration increased when they were co-cultured with ECs, whereas EC migration decreased in co-culture. The results show that co-culture of ECs and OBs in this composite biphasic scaffold allows for migration of cells throughout the scaffold and that pre-seeding a scaffold with ECs can increase OB infiltration into desired areas of the scaffold. PMID:21769541

  7. Culture of Cells from Amphibian Embryos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanisstreet, Martin

    1983-01-01

    Describes a method for in vitro culturing of cells from amphibian early embryos. Such cells can be used to demonstrate such properties of eukaryote cells as cell motility, adhesion, differentiation, and cell sorting into tissues. The technique may be extended to investigate other factors. (Author/JN)

  8. Clinical application of human mesenchymal stromal cells for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chatterjea, Anindita; Meijer, Gert; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The gold standard in the repair of bony defects is autologous bone grafting, even though it has drawbacks in terms of availability and morbidity at the harvesting site. Bone-tissue engineering, in which osteogenic cells and scaffolds are combined, is considered as a potential bone graft substitute strategy. Proof-of-principle for bone tissue engineering using mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been demonstrated in various animal models. In addition, 7 human clinical studies have so far been conducted. Because the experimental design and evaluation parameters of the studies are rather heterogeneous, it is difficult to draw conclusive evidence on the performance of one approach over the other. However, it seems that bone apposition by the grafted MSCs in these studies is observed but not sufficient to bridge large bone defects. In this paper, we discuss the published human clinical studies performed so far for bone-tissue regeneration, using culture-expanded, nongenetically modified MSCs from various sources and extract from it points of consideration for future clinical studies. PMID:21113294

  9. Clinical Application of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjea, Anindita; Meijer, Gert; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The gold standard in the repair of bony defects is autologous bone grafting, even though it has drawbacks in terms of availability and morbidity at the harvesting site. Bone-tissue engineering, in which osteogenic cells and scaffolds are combined, is considered as a potential bone graft substitute strategy. Proof-of-principle for bone tissue engineering using mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been demonstrated in various animal models. In addition, 7 human clinical studies have so far been conducted. Because the experimental design and evaluation parameters of the studies are rather heterogeneous, it is difficult to draw conclusive evidence on the performance of one approach over the other. However, it seems that bone apposition by the grafted MSCs in these studies is observed but not sufficient to bridge large bone defects. In this paper, we discuss the published human clinical studies performed so far for bone-tissue regeneration, using culture-expanded, nongenetically modified MSCs from various sources and extract from it points of consideration for future clinical studies. PMID:21113294

  10. Improved Cell Culture Method for Growing Contracting Skeletal Muscle Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquette, Michele L.; Sognier, Marguerite A.

    2013-01-01

    An improved method for culturing immature muscle cells (myoblasts) into a mature skeletal muscle overcomes some of the notable limitations of prior culture methods. The development of the method is a major advance in tissue engineering in that, for the first time, a cell-based model spontaneously fuses and differentiates into masses of highly aligned, contracting myotubes. This method enables (1) the construction of improved two-dimensional (monolayer) skeletal muscle test beds; (2) development of contracting three-dimensional tissue models; and (3) improved transplantable tissues for biomedical and regenerative medicine applications. With adaptation, this method also offers potential application for production of other tissue types (i.e., bone and cardiac) from corresponding precursor cells.

  11. Three-dimensional differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Khorsandi, Layasadat; Nejad-Dehbashi, Fereshteh; Ahangarpour, Akram; Hashemitabar, Mahmoud

    2015-02-01

    Fibrin glue (FG) is used in a variety of clinical applications and in the laboratory for localized and sustained release of factors potentially important for tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to evaluate FG scaffold effect on differentiation of insulin-producing cells (IPCs) from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). In this experimental study BM-MSCs were cultured and the cells characterized by analysis of cell surface markers using flow cytometry. BM-MSCs were seeded in FG scaffold (3D culture) and then treated with induction media. After induction, the presence of IPCs was demonstrated using gene expression profiles for pancreatic cell differentiation markers (PDX-1, GLUT-2 and insulin) and insulin detection in cytoplasm. Release of insulin by these cells was confirmed by radioimmunoassay. Expression of the islet-associated genes PDX-1, GLUT-2 and Insulin genes in 3D cultured cells was markedly higher than the 2D cultured cells exposure differentiation media. Compared to 2D culture of BM-MSCs-derived IPCs, the insulin release from 3D BM-MSCs-derived IPCs showed a nearly 3 fold (p<0.05) increase when exposed to a high glucose (25mM) medium. Percentage of insulin positive cells in 3D experimental group showed an approximately 3.5-fold increase in compared to 2D experimental culture cells. The results of this study demonstrated that FG scaffold can enhance the differentiation of IPCs from rats BM-MSCs. PMID:25554603

  12. Clonal analysis of bone marrow and macrophage cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.C.; Walker, E.B.; Johnson, C.; Little, R.

    1984-01-01

    To establish lineages that can be used to study their functional heterogeneity, the proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow derived mononuclear phagocytes and the lineages derived from them were studied. 28 references, 7 figures, 5 tables. (ACR)

  13. Bone pulsating metastasis due to renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    C?nar, Murat; Derincek, Alihan; Karan, Belgin; Akp?nar, Sercan; Tuncay, Cengiz

    2010-11-01

    Pulsation on the bone cortex surface is a rare condition. Pulsative palpation of the superficial-located bone tumors can be misperceived as an aneurysm. Fifty-eight-year-old man is presented with pulsating bone mass in his proximal tibia. During angiographic examination, hypervascular masses were diagnosed both at right kidney and at right proximal tibia. Renal cell carcinoma was diagnosed after abdominal CT scan. Proximal tibia biopsy was complicated with projectile bleeding. PMID:20376589

  14. Extracellular matrix mineralization in murine MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cultures: an ultrastructural, compositional and comparative analysis with mouse bone.

    PubMed

    Addison, W N; Nelea, V; Chicatun, F; Chien, Y-C; Tran-Khanh, N; Buschmann, M D; Nazhat, S N; Kaartinen, M T; Vali, H; Tecklenburg, M M; Franceschi, R T; McKee, M D

    2015-02-01

    Bone cell culture systems are essential tools for the study of the molecular mechanisms regulating extracellular matrix mineralization. MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cell cultures are the most commonly used in vitro model of bone matrix mineralization. Despite the widespread use of this cell line to study biomineralization, there is as yet no systematic characterization of the mineral phase produced in these cultures. Here we provide a comprehensive, multi-technique biophysical characterization of this cell culture mineral and extracellular matrix, and compare it to mouse bone and synthetic apatite mineral standards, to determine the suitability of MC3T3-E1 cultures for biomineralization studies. Elemental compositional analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed calcium and phosphorus, and trace amounts of sodium and magnesium, in both biological samples. X-ray diffraction (XRD) on resin-embedded intact cultures demonstrated that similar to 1-month-old mouse bone, apatite crystals grew with preferential orientations along the (100), (101) and (111) mineral planes indicative of guided biogenic growth as opposed to dystrophic calcification. XRD of crystals isolated from the cultures revealed that the mineral phase was poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite with 10 to 20nm-sized nanocrystallites. Consistent with the XRD observations, electron diffraction patterns indicated that culture mineral had low crystallinity typical of biological apatites. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed apatitic carbonate and phosphate within the biological samples. With all techniques utilized, cell culture mineral and mouse bone mineral were remarkably similar. Scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy showed that the cultures had a dense fibrillar collagen matrix with small, 100nm-sized, collagen fibril-associated mineralization foci which coalesced to form larger mineral aggregates, and where mineralized sites showed the accumulation of the mineral-binding protein osteopontin. Light microscopy, confocal microscopy and three-dimensional reconstructions showed that some cells had dendritic processes and became embedded within the mineral in an osteocyte-like manner. In conclusion, we have documented characteristics of the mineral and matrix phases of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cultures, and have determined that the structural and compositional properties of the mineral are highly similar to that of mouse bone. PMID:25460184

  15. Bone marrow stem cell transplant into intra-bone cavity prevents type 2 diabetes: Role of heme oxygenase-adiponectin

    E-print Network

    Abraham, Nader G.

    Review Bone marrow stem cell transplant into intra-bone cavity prevents type 2 diabetes: Role Abstract Increase in endothelial cell sloughing and diminished function of endothelial stem cell stem cells (BMSCs) including mesenchymal stem cells but not limited to CD34þ stem cells into type 2

  16. The stiffness of bone marrow cell-knit composites is increased during mechanical load.

    PubMed

    Bruinink, A; Siragusano, D; Ettel, G; Brandsberg, T; Brandsberg, F; Petitmermet, M; Müller, B; Mayer, J; Wintermantel, E

    2001-12-01

    A novel device for mechanical stimulation of primary adult rat bone marrow cells cultured on three-dimensional knitted textiles has been prototyped. A method has been developed ensuring a well-defined, high-density, and reproducible cell seeding on the knitted fabric. After culturing for 18-52 days the cell-knit composites were subjected to uniaxial 2% stretching and relaxation. The frequency was altered between 0.1 Hz (196 min, loading phase) and 0.01 Hz (360 min, resting phase). Identically treated knits without cells exhibited a slight stiffness reduction, whereas the stiffness of knits with cells increased from cycle to cycle. The stiffness increase was found to depend on the duration of the culture period before mechanical loading. Our data suggest that the extracellular matrix deposited by the cells on the knit and intact microtubuli of living cells cause the observed stiffness increase. In comparison to the unstrained static cell-knit composites cell proliferation and bone cell differentiation were reduced by the mechanical load. PMID:11603589

  17. Renal cell carcinoma bone metastasis--elucidating the molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Weber, Kristy; Doucet, Michele; Kominsky, Scott

    2007-12-01

    The development of bone metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) signals a transition to a terminal state for the patient with previously isolated disease. These patients may suffer the morbidity of severe, persistent pain, pathologic fractures, and spinal compression from vertebral metastasis before they succumb to their cancer. Although recent advancements have been made in the understanding of breast and prostate bone metastasis, there has been less knowledge in the area of metastatic RCC to the skeleton. This particular cancer in bone remains relatively resistant to standard forms of treatment such as radiation and chemotherapy. A better understanding of the biology of RCC bone metastasis is critically needed in order to improve treatment. Bone-derived cell lines and an experimental animal model have been developed in order to explore the relevant mechanisms of how RCC cells survive within and destroy the bone. This review will focus on the growth factor signaling pathways most important for the RCC-stimulated osteoclast-mediated bone destruction, namely the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) and transforming growth factor-beta receptor (TGF-betaR) pathways. By inhibiting these receptors, growth of RCC within the bone is decreased which, directly or indirectly, decreases bone destruction. PMID:17768599

  18. Embryonic Stem Cells: Isolation, Characterization and Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    Embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells isolated from the mammalian blastocyst. Traditionally, these cells have been derived and cultured with mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) supportive layers, which allow their continuous growth in an undifferentiated state. However, for any future industrial or clinical application hESCs should be cultured in reproducible, defined, and xeno-free culture system, where exposure to animal pathogens is prevented. From their derivation in 1998 the methods for culturing hESCs were significantly improved. This chapter wills discuss hESC characterization and the basic methods for their derivation and maintenance.

  19. Characterization of Distinct Classes of Differential Gene Expression in Osteoblast Cultures from Non-Syndromic Craniosynostosis Bone

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Peña, Monica L.; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Hyzy, Sharon; Arafat, Dalia; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D.; Williams, Joseph; Gibson, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Craniosynostosis, the premature fusion of one or more skull sutures, occurs in approximately 1 in 2500 infants, with the majority of cases non-syndromic and of unknown etiology. Two common reasons proposed for premature suture fusion are abnormal compression forces on the skull and rare genetic abnormalities. Our goal was to evaluate whether different sub-classes of disease can be identified based on total gene expression profiles. RNA-Seq data were obtained from 31 human osteoblast cultures derived from bone biopsy samples collected between 2009 and 2011, representing 23 craniosynostosis fusions and 8 normal cranial bones or long bones. No differentiation between regions of the skull was detected, but variance component analysis of gene expression patterns nevertheless supports transcriptome-based classification of craniosynostosis. Cluster analysis showed 4 distinct groups of samples; 1 predominantly normal and 3 craniosynostosis subtypes. Similar constellations of sub-types were also observed upon re-analysis of a similar dataset of 199 calvarial osteoblast cultures. Annotation of gene function of differentially expressed transcripts strongly implicates physiological differences with respect to cell cycle and cell death, stromal cell differentiation, extracellular matrix (ECM) components, and ribosomal activity. Based on these results, we propose non-syndromic craniosynostosis cases can be classified by differences in their gene expression patterns and that these may provide targets for future clinical intervention. PMID:25184005

  20. Neovascular Niche for Human Myeloma Cells in Immunodeficient Mouse Bone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hirono Iriuchishima; Keiyo Takubo; Yoshitaka Miyakawa; Ayako Nakamura-Ishizu; Yoshiteru Miyauchi; Nobuyuki Fujita; Kana Miyamoto; Takeshi Miyamoto; Eiji Ikeda; Masahiro Kizaki; Yoshihisa Nojima; Toshio Suda

    2012-01-01

    The interaction with bone marrow (BM) plays a crucial role in pathophysiological features of multiple myeloma (MM), including cell proliferation, chemoresistance, and bone lesion progression. To characterize the MM-BM interactions, we utilized an in vivo experimental model for human MM in which a GFP-expressing human MM cell line is transplanted into NOG mice (the NOG-hMM model). Transplanted MM cells preferentially

  1. J Cell Biochem . Author manuscript Optimizing stem cell culture

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    J Cell Biochem . Author manuscript Page /1 7 Optimizing stem cell culture Boudewijn Van Der Sanden * Correspondence should be adressed to: Didier Wion Abstract Stem cells always balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Hence, stem cell culture parameters are critical

  2. Single-cell growth analysis in a mixed cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Jun; Bato, Mary Grace P.; Daria, Vincent Ricardo

    2008-06-01

    We perform single cell analysis of cell growth in a mixed cell culture. Two species of yeast cells: Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans, are optically trapped using focused continuous-wave near infrared laser. Cell growth for both cells is inhibited only when the two species of cells are in contact with each other. This indicates cell-cell interaction mediated cell growth inhibition mechanism. Single cell level analysis of cell growth studied here contributes to the further understanding of yeast growth arrest in a mixed yeast culture.

  3. Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Pregenerated Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds in the Absence of Osteogenic Cell Culture Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Richard A.; Scott Baggett, L.; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2010-01-01

    This study utilized a full-factorial design to investigate the effect of four factors: presence of whole bone marrow cells, presence of in vitro-generated mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM), presence of dexamethasone, and variations in culture duration, on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured on a polymer scaffold. Electrospun poly(?-caprolactone) (PCL) fiber mesh scaffolds were seeded with rat MSCs and cultured in complete osteogenic medium for 12 days to generate constructs containing mineralized ECM. MSCs or MSCs and whole bone marrow cells were seeded onto decellularized ECM constructs (PCL/ECM) or plain PCL scaffolds and cultured statically for 4, 8, and 16 days in medium either with or without dexamethasone. After each culture period, the cell number was determined by DNA analysis, and the osteogenic differentiation state of the cells was determined by alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium assays. MSCs seeded onto PCL/ECM constructs and cultured in medium either with or without dexamethasone demonstrated similar amounts of calcium deposition after 16 days. A significant increase in cell number over time compared with all other groups was observed when whole bone marrow cells were cocultured with MSCs on PCL scaffolds in medium without dexamethasone. This study establishes that the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs seeded onto ECM-containing constructs is maintained even in the absence of dexamethasone and that the coculture of MSCs and whole bone marrow cells without dexamethasone and ECM enhances the proliferation of a cell population (or populations) present in the whole bone marrow. PMID:19863274

  4. Cartilaginous tissue formation from bone marrow cells using rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ohyabu, Yoshimi; Kida, Naoko; Kojima, Hiroko; Taguchi, Tetsushi; Tanaka, Junzo; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2006-12-01

    This is the first successful report of the rapid regeneration of three-dimensional large and homogeneous cartilaginous tissue from rabbit bone marrow cells without a scaffold using a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor, which simulates a microgravity environment for cells. Bone marrow cells cultured for 3 weeks in DMEM were resuspended and cultured for 4 weeks in the chondrogenic medium within the vessel. Large cylindrical cartilaginous tissue with dimensions of (1.25 +/- 0.06) x (0.60 +/- 0.08) cm (height x diameter) formed. Their cartilage marker expression was confirmed by mRNA expressions of aggrecan, collagen type I and II, and glycosaminoglycan (GAG)/DNA ratio. Their cartilaginous properties were demonstrated by toluidine blue, safranin-O staining, and polarization. PMID:16986169

  5. AMMONIA REMOVAL FROM MAMMALIAN CELL CULTURE MEDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolites such as ammonia and lactic formed during mammalian cell culture can frequently be toxic to the cells themselves beyond a threshold concentration of the metabolites. ell culture conducted in the presence of such accumulated metabolites is therefore limited in productiv...

  6. Gametogony of Sarcocystis sp. in Cell Culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald Fayer

    1972-01-01

    Sexual stages and cystlike bodies of Sarcocystis sp., a protozoan parasite found in muscles of reptiles, birds, and mammals, including man, developed in cell culture. Motile organisms, obtained from leg muscles of wild grackles, were inoculated into cell line cultures of embryonic bovine kidney. Mature micro- and macrogametes and the cystlike forms were found 30 and 42 hours after inoculation,

  7. Gene expression during induced differentiation of sheep bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Tang, X-X; He, H-Y

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the dynamic expression of osteopontin, type I collagen, and osteocalcin genes during the differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) into osteoblasts and confirm whether BMSCs can differentiate and mature into osteoblasts. A healthy, 2-month-old Altay tailed sheep was obtained, and 10 mL bone marrow was extracted from the posterior superior iliac spine of the sheep via puncture. Sheep BMSCs were extracted using a whole bone marrow culture method and cultured for osteogenic induction. Total RNA from the BMSCs was extracted, and the gene expression levels of osteopontin, type I collagen, and osteocalcin at the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th passages of uninduced and induced BMSCs were detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The surface antigen CD44 was also detected in the BMSCs. After induction by culturing in osteoinductive medium, BMSCs in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th passages displayed stage-specific expression of osteopontin, type I collagen, and osteocalcin genes. The positive expression rate of BMSC-specific antigen CD44 in the 4th passage of osteogenic-induced BMSCs was 99.8%. In vitro-cultured sheep BMSCs in osteogenic culture medium gradually differentiated into osteoblasts, which stage-specifically expressed osteoblast-specific genes such as osteopontin, type I collagen, and osteocalcin at the 4th passage after induction. At this passage, these cells had osteoblast functions. PMID:24390999

  8. Effects of prostaglandin F2 alpha on bone formation and resorption in cultured neonatal mouse calvariae: Role of prostaglandin E2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Raisz, L.G.; Alander, C.B.; Fall, P.M.; Simmons, H.A. (Univ. of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Although most studies show that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the most potent and effective of the prostanoids in bone, recent data in cell culture suggest that PGF2 alpha may have unique effects, particularly on cell replication. The present study was undertaken to compare the effects of PGF2 alpha and PGE2 in cultured neonatal mouse parietal bones by simultaneous measurement of bone resorption as release of previously incorporated 45Ca, bone formation as incorporation of (3H)proline into collagenase-digestible (CDP) and noncollagen protein, and DNA synthesis as incorporation of (3H)thymidine. PGF2 alpha was less effective than PGE2 as a stimulator of bone resorption, and its effects were partially inhibited by indomethacin and markedly inhibited by glucocorticoids. In contrast, the resorptive response to PGE2 was unaffected by indomethacin and only partially inhibited by cortisol. PGF2 alpha had little effect on bone formation, in contrast to the biphasic effect of PGE2, which inhibited labeling of CDP in the absence of cortisol and stimulated CDP labeling in the presence of cortisol. PGF2 alpha increased thymidine incorporation into DNA, but the effect was smaller than that of PGE2 and was inhibited by indomethacin. These observations suggested that PGF2 alpha might act in part by stimulating PGE2 production. By RIA, PGE2 concentrations were increased in the medium of bones treated with PGF2 alpha, and this increase was blocked by indomethacin. By HPLC, bones prelabeled with (3H)arachidonic acid showed an increase in labeled PGE2 release, and RIA showed an increase in PGE2 after PGF2 alpha treatment. These results indicate that PGF2 alpha is a relatively weak agonist in bone compared to PGE2 and that some of the effects of PGF2 alpha on bone resorption, formation, and cell replication may be mediated by an increase in endogenous PGE2 production.

  9. The impact of simulated and real microgravity on bone cells and mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Claudia; Wehland, Markus; Pietsch, Jessica; Aleshcheva, Ganna; Wise, Petra; van Loon, Jack; Magnusson, Nils; Infanger, Manfred; Grosse, Jirka; Eilles, Christoph; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Grimm, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    How microgravity affects the biology of human cells and the formation of 3D cell cultures in real and simulated microgravity (r- and s-µg) is currently a hot topic in biomedicine. In r- and s-µg, various cell types were found to form 3D structures. This review will focus on the current knowledge of tissue engineering in space and on Earth using systems such as the random positioning machine (RPM), the 2D-clinostat, or the NASA-developed rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWV) to create tissue from bone, tumor, and mesenchymal stem cells. To understand the development of 3D structures, in vitro experiments using s-µg devices can provide valuable information about modulations in signal-transduction, cell adhesion, or extracellular matrix induced by altered gravity conditions. These systems also facilitate the analysis of the impact of growth factors, hormones, or drugs on these tissue-like constructs. Progress has been made in bone tissue engineering using the RWV, and multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS), formed in both r- and s-µg, have been reported and were analyzed in depth. Currently, these MCTS are available for drug testing and proteomic investigations. This review provides an overview of the influence of µg on the aforementioned cells and an outlook for future perspectives in tissue engineering. PMID:25110709

  10. The Impact of Simulated and Real Microgravity on Bone Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wehland, Markus; Pietsch, Jessica; Aleshcheva, Ganna; Wise, Petra; van Loon, Jack; Magnusson, Nils; Infanger, Manfred; Grosse, Jirka; Eilles, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    How microgravity affects the biology of human cells and the formation of 3D cell cultures in real and simulated microgravity (r- and s-µg) is currently a hot topic in biomedicine. In r- and s-µg, various cell types were found to form 3D structures. This review will focus on the current knowledge of tissue engineering in space and on Earth using systems such as the random positioning machine (RPM), the 2D-clinostat, or the NASA-developed rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWV) to create tissue from bone, tumor, and mesenchymal stem cells. To understand the development of 3D structures, in vitro experiments using s-µg devices can provide valuable information about modulations in signal-transduction, cell adhesion, or extracellular matrix induced by altered gravity conditions. These systems also facilitate the analysis of the impact of growth factors, hormones, or drugs on these tissue-like constructs. Progress has been made in bone tissue engineering using the RWV, and multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS), formed in both r- and s-µg, have been reported and were analyzed in depth. Currently, these MCTS are available for drug testing and proteomic investigations. This review provides an overview of the influence of µg on the aforementioned cells and an outlook for future perspectives in tissue engineering. PMID:25110709

  11. Alterations in bone forming cells due to reduced weight bearing.

    PubMed

    Doty, S B; Morey-Holton, E

    1984-01-01

    A reduction in new bone formation occurred as a result of space flight (Cosmos 1129) and in the suspended animal model of Morey-Holton. Our results indicate that alkaline phosphatase activity of the bone forming cells is also reduced under these conditions, and the cells in the diaphysis are more affected than those in the metaphyseal region. In addition, these cells show (1) reduced proline incorporation into bone matrix, and (2) increased intracellular lysosomal activity. A change in the cytoskeleton could be the common factor in explaining these results. This suggestion is further supported by our previous observations that colchicine injections result in decreased osteoblastic function. PMID:11539017

  12. Skeletal Muscle and Bone Marrow Derived Stromal Cells: A Comparison of Tenocyte Differentiation Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Sassoon, Adam A.; Ozasa, Yasuhiro; Chikenji, Takako; Sun, Yu-Long; Larson, Dirk R.; Maas, Mary L.; Zhao, Chunfeng; Jen, Jin; Amadio, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the comparative ability of bone marrow and skeletal muscle derived stromal cells (BMSC’s and SMSC’s) to express a tenocyte phenotype, and whether this expression could be augmented by growth and differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5). Methods Tissue harvest was performed on the hind limbs of seven dogs. Stromal cells were isolated via serial expansion in culture. After 4 passages, tenogenesis was induced using either ascorbic acid alone or in conjunction with GDF-5. CD44, tenomodulin, collagen I, and collagen III expression levels were compared for each culture condition at 7 and 14 days following induction. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed to evaluate cell morphology and production of tenomodulin and collagen I. Results SMSC’s and BMSC’s were successfully isolated in culture. Following tenocytic induction, SMSC’s demonstrated an increased mean relative expression of tenomodulin, collagen I, and collagen III at 14 days. BMSC’s only showed increased mean relative expression of collagen I, and collagen III at 14 days. IHC revealed positive staining for tenomodulin and collagen I at 14 days for both cell types. The morphology of skeletal muscle derived stromal cells at 14 days had an organized appearance in contrast to the haphazard arrangement of the bone marrow derived cells. GDF-5 did not affect gene expression, cell staining, or cell morphology significantly. Conclusion Stromal cells from either bone marrow or skeletal muscle can be induced to increase expression of matrix genes; however, based on expression of tenomodulin and cell culture morphology SMSC’s may be a more ideal candidate for tenocytic differentiation. PMID:22511232

  13. Reconstitution activity of hypoxic cultured human cord blood CD34-positive cells in NOG mice

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, Haruko [Department of Cell Differentiation, Sakaguchi Laboratory of Developmental Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Pediatrics, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Takubo, Keiyo; Iwasaki, Hiroko [Department of Cell Differentiation, Sakaguchi Laboratory of Developmental Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Yoshihara, Hiroki [Department of Cell Differentiation, Sakaguchi Laboratory of Developmental Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Pediatrics, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Gomei, Yumiko; Hosokawa, Kentaro; Arai, Fumio [Department of Cell Differentiation, Sakaguchi Laboratory of Developmental Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Takahashi, Takao [Department of Pediatrics, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Suda, Toshio [Department of Cell Differentiation, Sakaguchi Laboratory of Developmental Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan)], E-mail: sudato@sc.itc.keio.ac.jp

    2009-01-16

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in hypoxic areas of the bone marrow. However, the role of hypoxia in the maintenance of HSCs has not been fully characterized. We performed xenotransplantation of human cord blood cells cultured in hypoxic or normoxic conditions into adult NOD/SCID/IL-2R{gamma}{sup null} (NOG) mice. Hypoxic culture (1% O{sub 2}) for 6 days efficiently supported the maintenance of HSCs, although cell proliferation was suppressed compared to the normoxic culture. In contrast, hypoxia did not affect in vitro colony-forming ability. Upregulation of a cell cycle inhibitor, p21, was observed in hypoxic culture. Immunohistochemical analysis of recipient bone marrow revealed that engrafted CD34{sup +}CD38{sup -} cord blood HSCs were hypoxic. Taken together, these results demonstrate the significance of hypoxia in the maintenance of quiescent human cord blood HSCs.

  14. Endochondral bone tissue engineering using embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Jukes, Jojanneke M.; Both, Sanne K.; Leusink, Anouk; Sterk, Lotus M. Th.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.; de Boer, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells can provide an unlimited supply of pluripotent cells for tissue engineering applications. Bone tissue engineering by directly differentiating ES cells (ESCs) into osteoblasts has been unsuccessful so far. Therefore, we investigated an alternative approach, based on the process of endochondral ossification. A cartilage matrix was formed in vitro by mouse ESCs seeded on a scaffold. When these cartilage tissue-engineered constructs (CTECs) were implanted s.c., the cartilage matured, became hypertrophic, calcified, and was ultimately replaced by bone tissue in the course of 21 days. Bone aligning hypertrophic cartilage was observed frequently. Using various chondrogenic differentiation periods in vitro, we demonstrated that a cartilage matrix is required for bone formation by ESCs. Chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and articular chondrocytes showed that a cartilage matrix alone was not sufficient to drive endochondral bone formation. Moreover, when CTECs were implanted orthotopically into critical-size cranial defects in rats, efficient bone formation was observed. We report previously undescribed ESC-based bone tissue engineering under controlled reproducible conditions. Furthermore, our data indicate that ESCs can also be used as a model system to study endochondral bone formation. PMID:18467492

  15. Multiple melanocortin receptors are expressed in bone cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Qing; Sridhar, Supriya; Ruan, Ling; Ding, Ke-Hong; Xie, Ding; Insogna, Karl; Kang, Baolin; Xu, Jianrui; Bollag, Roni J.; Isales, Carlos M.

    2005-01-01

    Melanocortin receptors belong to the seven transmembrane domain, G-protein coupled family of receptors. There are five members of this receptor family labeled MC1R-MC5R. These receptors are activated by fragments derived from a larger molecule, proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and include ACTH, alpha beta and gamma-MSH and beta-endorphin. Because of in vitro and in vivo data suggesting direct effects of these POMC molecules on bone and bone turnover, we examined bone and bone derived cells for the presence of the various members of the melanocortin receptor family. We report that the five known melanocortin receptors are expressed to varying degrees in osteoblast-like and osteoclastic cells. POMC fragments increased proliferation and expression of a variety of genes in osteoblastic cells. Furthermore, POMC mRNA was detected in osteoclastic cells. These data demonstrate that POMC-derived peptide hormones acting through high affinity melanocortin receptors have specific effects on bone cells. Thus, in addition to the indirect effects of POMC-derived hormones on bone turnover through their modulation of steroid hormone secretion, POMC fragments may have direct and specific effects on bone cell subpopulations.

  16. Notch signaling and the bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell niche

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan M. Weber; Laura M. Calvi

    2010-01-01

    Recently there has been increased interest in the regulatory interactions between osteoblasts and cells in the surrounding bone marrow microenvironment. The proximity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with osteoblastic cells first suggested regulatory interactions, and recent data have highlighted the role of osteoblastic cells in providing a HSC niche. Reports have indicated that direct contact is necessary to mediate the

  17. Bone-marrow haematopoietic-stem-cell niches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Wilson; Andreas Trumpp

    2006-01-01

    Adult stem cells hold many promises for future clinical applications and regenerative medicine. The haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) is the best-characterized somatic stem cell so far, but in vitro expansion has been unsuccessful, limiting the future therapeutic potential of these cells. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the composition of the HSC bone-marrow microenvironment, known as the HSC niche.

  18. Autologous bone marrow cells and ischemic cardiomyopathy Jerome Roncalli1

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    clinical trials. Keywords Heart failure, Ischemic cardiomyopathy, MRI, Cardiac cell therapy, Mesenchymal cell therapy in this population has shown enormous promise to provide benefit to patients.A variety-scale clinical studies underscored the potential effects of cell-based therapy largely by using bone marrow cells

  19. Bone marrow regeneration promoted by biophysically sorted osteoprogenitors from mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Poon, Zhiyong; Lee, Wong Cheng; Guan, Guofeng; Nyan, Lin Myint; Lim, Chwee Teck; Han, Jongyoon; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2015-01-01

    Human tissue repair deficiencies can be supplemented through strategies to isolate, expand in vitro, and reimplant regenerative cells that supplant damaged cells or stimulate endogenous repair mechanisms. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), a subset of which is described as mesenchymal stem cells, are leading candidates for cell-mediated bone repair and wound healing, with hundreds of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. An outstanding key challenge for successful clinical translation of MSCs is the capacity to produce large quantities of cells in vitro with uniform and relevant therapeutic properties. By leveraging biophysical traits of MSC subpopulations and label-free microfluidic cell sorting, we hypothesized and experimentally verified that MSCs of large diameter within expanded MSC cultures were osteoprogenitors that exhibited significantly greater efficacy over other MSC subpopulations in bone marrow repair. Systemic administration of osteoprogenitor MSCs significantly improved survival rates (>80%) as compared with other MSC subpopulations (0%) for preclinical murine bone marrow injury models. Osteoprogenitor MSCs also exerted potent therapeutic effects as "cell factories" that secreted high levels of regenerative factors such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor A, bone morphogenetic protein 2, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 1, and angiopoietin-1; this resulted in increased cell proliferation, vessel formation, and reduced apoptosis in bone marrow. This MSC subpopulation mediated rescue of damaged marrow tissue via restoration of the hematopoiesis-supporting stroma, as well as subsequent hematopoiesis. Together, the capabilities described herein for label-freeisolation of regenerative osteoprogenitor MSCs can markedly improve the efficacy of MSC-based therapies. PMID:25411477

  20. Cell Mechanisms of Bone Tissue Loss Under Space Flight Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionova, Natalia

    Investigations on the space biosatellites has shown that the bone skeleton is one of the most im-portant targets of the effect space flight factors on the organism. Bone tissue cells were studied by electron microscopy in biosamples of rats' long bones flown on the board american station "SLS-2" and in experiments with modelling of microgravity ("tail suspension" method) with using autoradiography. The analysis of data permits to suppose that the processes of remod-eling in bone tissue at microgravity include the following succession of cell-to-cell interactions. Osteocytes as mechanosensory cells are first who respond to a changing "mechanical field". The next stage is intensification of osteolytic processes in osteocytes, leading to a volume en-largement of the osteocytic lacunae and removal of the "excess bone". Then mechanical signals have been transmitted through a system of canals and processes of the osteocytic syncitium to certain superficial bone zones and are perceived by osteoblasts and bone-lining cells (superficial osteocytes), as well as by the bone-marrow stromal cells. The sensitivity of stromal cells, pre-osteoblasts and osteoblasts, under microgravity was shown in a number of works. As a response to microgravity, the system of stromal cells -preosteoblasts -osteoblasts displays retardation of proliferation, differentiation and specific functions of osteogenetic cells. This is supported by the 3H-thymidine studies of the dynamics of differentiation of osteogenetic cells in remodeling zones. But unloading is not adequate and in part of the osteocytes are apoptotic changes as shown by our electron microscopic investigations. An osteocytic apoptosis can play the role in attraction the osteoclasts and in regulation of bone remodeling. The apoptotic bodies with a liquid flow through a system of canals are transferred to the bone surface, where they fulfil the role of haemoattractants for monocytes come here and form osteoclasts. The osteoclasts destroy bone tissue. The macrophages are incorporated into resorption lacunaes and utilize the organic matrix and cellular detritus. The products are secreted to remodeling zones and act as haemoattractants for recruiting and subsequent differentiation here of the osteogenic precursor cells. However, as shown by our results with 3H-glycine, in absence of mechanical stimulus the activization of osteoblastogenesis either doesn't occur, or takes place on a smaller scale. According to our electron-microscopic data a load deficit leads to an adaptive differentiation of fibroblasts and adipocytes in this remodeling zones. This sequence of events is considered as a mechanism of bone tissue loss which underlies the development of osteopenia and osteoporosis under space flight condition.

  1. Chondrogenesis of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in an Osteochondral Environment Is Mediated by the Subchondral Bone

    PubMed Central

    de Vries–van Melle, Marloes L.; Narcisi, Roberto; Kops, Nicole; Koevoet, Wendy J.L.M.; Bos, P. Koen; Murphy, J. Mary; Verhaar, Jan A.N.; van der Kraan, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    In articular cartilage repair, cells that will be responsible for the formation of repair tissue are often exposed to an osteochondral environment. To study cartilage repair mechanisms in vitro, we have recently developed a bovine osteochondral biopsy culture model in which cartilage defects can be simulated reproducibly. Using this model, we now aimed at studying the chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) in an osteochondral environment. In contrast to standard in vitro chondrogenesis, it was found that supplementing transforming growth factor beta (TGF?) to culture medium was not required to induce chondrogenesis of hBMSCs in an osteochondral environment. hBMSC culture in defects created in osteochondral biopsies or in bone-only biopsies resulted in comparable levels of cartilage-related gene expression, whereas culture in cartilage-only biopsies did not induce chondrogenesis. Subcutaneous implantation in nude mice of osteochondral biopsies containing hBMSCs in osteochondral defects resulted in the formation of more cartilaginous tissue than hBMSCs in chondral defects. The subchondral bone secreted TGF?; however, the observed results could not be attributed to TGF?, as either capturing TGF? with an antibody or blocking the canonical TGF? signaling pathway did not result in significant changes in cartilage-related gene expression of hBMSCs in the osteochondral culture model. Inhibition of BMP signaling did not prevent chondrogenesis. In conclusion, we demonstrate that chondrogenesis of hBMSCs is induced by factors secreted from the bone. We have strong indications that this is not solely mediated by members of the TGF? family but other, yet unknown, factors originating from the subchondral bone appeared to play a key role. PMID:23980750

  2. Mammalian cell cultures for biologics manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Kantardjieff, Anne; Zhou, Weichang

    2014-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals represent a growing sector of the pharmaceutical industry, and are used for a wide range of indications, including oncology and rheumatology. Cultured mammalian cells have become the predominant expression system for their production, partly due to their ability to complete the posttranslational modifications required for drug safety and efficacy. Over the past decade, the productivity of mammalian cell culture production processes has growth dramatically through improvements in both volumetric and specific productivities. This article presents an overview of the biologics market, including analysis of sales and approvals; as well as a review of industrial production cell lines and cell culture operations. PMID:24258145

  3. Thermoresponsive Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Films as Culture Substrates for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tianqing Liao

    2008-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are colony-forming unit fibroblasts (CFU-F) derived from adult bone marrow and have significant potential for many cell-based tissue-engineering applications. Their therapeutic potential, however, is restricted by the diminishing plasticity as they are expanded in culture. In this study, we investigated using N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM)-based thermoresponsive polyelectrolyte multilayer films as a culture substrate to support hMSC expansion

  4. Mechanically stimulated bone cells secrete paracrine factors that regulate osteoprogenitor recruitment, proliferation, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Brady, Robert T; O'Brien, Fergal J; Hoey, David A

    2015-03-27

    Bone formation requires the recruitment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal progenitors. A potent stimulus driving this process is mechanical loading, yet the signalling mechanisms underpinning this are incompletely understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of the mechanically-stimulated osteocyte and osteoblast secretome in coordinating progenitor contributions to bone formation. Initially osteocytes (MLO-Y4) and osteoblasts (MC3T3) were mechanically stimulated for 24hrs and secreted factors within the conditioned media were collected and used to evaluate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and osteoblast recruitment, proliferation and osteogenesis. Paracrine factors secreted by mechanically stimulated osteocytes significantly enhanced MSC migration, proliferation and osteogenesis and furthermore significantly increased osteoblast migration and proliferation when compared to factors secreted by statically cultured osteocytes. Secondly, paracrine factors secreted by mechanically stimulated osteoblasts significantly enhanced MSC migration but surprisingly, in contrast to the osteocyte secretome, inhibited MSC proliferation when compared to factors secreted by statically cultured osteoblasts. A similar trend was observed in osteoblasts. This study provides new information on mechanically driven signalling mechanisms in bone and highlights a contrasting secretome between cells at different stages in the bone lineage, furthering our understanding of loading-induced bone formation and indirect biophysical regulation of osteoprogenitors. PMID:25721667

  5. Treatment with at Homeopathic Complex Medication Modulates Mononuclear Bone Marrow Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Beatriz; Abud, Ana Paula R.; de Oliveira, Carolina C.; Cardoso, Francolino; Bernardi, Raffaello Popa Di; Guimarães, Fernando S. F.; Gabardo, Juarez; de Freitas Buchi, Dorly

    2011-01-01

    A homeopathic complex medication (HCM), with immunomodulatory properties, is recommended for patients with depressed immune systems. Previous studies demonstrated that the medication induces an increase in leukocyte number. The bone marrow microenvironment is composed of growth factors, stromal cells, an extracellular matrix and progenitor cells that differentiate into mature blood cells. Mice were our biological model used in this research. We now report in vivo immunophenotyping of total bone marrow cells and ex vivo effects of the medication on mononuclear cell differentiation at different times. Cells were examined by light microscopy and cytokine levels were measured in vitro. After in vivo treatment with HCM, a pool of cells from the new marrow microenvironment was analyzed by flow cytometry to detect any trend in cell alteration. The results showed decreases, mainly, in CD11b and TER-119 markers compared with controls. Mononuclear cells were used to analyze the effects of ex vivo HCM treatment and the number of cells showing ring nuclei, niche cells and activated macrophages increased in culture, even in the absence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Cytokines favoring stromal cell survival and differentiation in culture were induced in vitro. Thus, we observe that HCM is immunomodulatory, either alone or in association with other products. PMID:19736221

  6. Activin-A binding and biochemical effects in osteoblast-enriched cultures from fetal-rat parietal bone.

    PubMed Central

    Centrella, M; McCarthy, T L; Canalis, E

    1991-01-01

    Activin, a disulfide-linked polypeptide dimer first isolated from gonadal tissue extracts, has amino acid sequence and structural homology with transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta). Along with other activities, TGF beta regulates replication and differentiation and interacts with a defined set of binding sites on isolated bone cells. To determine if activin shares these properties, recombinant human activin-A (A-chain homodimer) was examined in osteoblast-enriched cultures obtained from fetal-rat parietal bone. After 23 h of treatment, 60 to 6,000 pM activin-A increased the rate of [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA 1.5- to 4.0-fold, and at 600 to 6,000 pM, it enhanced the rate of [3H]proline incorporation into collagen and noncollagen protein by up to 1.7-fold. Like earlier studies with TGF beta in primary osteoblast-enriched cultures, the stimulatory effects of activin-A on DNA and protein synthesis were opposed by parathyroid hormone, and the influence of activin-A on collagen synthesis was independent of cell replication. Binding studies with 125I-activin-A indicated approximately 8,000 high-affinity (Kd = 0.4 nM) and 300,000 low-affinity (Kd = 40 to 50 nM) binding sites per cell. Polyacrylamide gel analysis revealed 125I-activin-A-binding complexes of Mr greater than 200,000 and 73,000 which did not appear to correspond to primary TGF beta-binding sites. These results indicate that activin-A produces TGF beta-like effects in bone and that some of these effects may be mediated, at least in part, by distinct activin receptors on bone cells. Images PMID:1846021

  7. HUMAN VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS IN CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Gimbrone, Michael A.; Cotran, Ramzi S.; Folkman, Judah

    1974-01-01

    Human endothelial cells, obtained by collagenase treatment of term umbilical cord veins, were cultured using Medium 199 supplemented with 20% fetal calf serum. Small clusters of cells initially spread on plastic or glass, coalesced and grew to form confluent monolayers of polygonal cells by 7 days. Cells in primary and subcultures were identified as endothelium by the presence of Weibel-Palade bodies by electron microscopy. A morphologically distinct subpopulation of cells contaminating some primary endothelial cultures was selectively subcultured, and identified by ultrastructural criteria as vascular smooth muscle. Autoradiography of endothelial cells after exposure to [3H]thymidine showed progressive increases in labeling in growing cultures beginning at 24 h. In recently confluent cultures, labeling indices were 2.4% in central closely packed regions, and 53.2% in peripheral growing regions. 3 days after confluence, labeling was uniform, being 3.5 and 3.9% in central and peripheral areas, respectively. When small areas of confluent cultures were experimentally "denuded," there were localized increases in [3H]thymidine labeling and eventual reconstitution of the monolayer. Liquid scintillation measurements of [3H]thymidine incorporation in primary and secondary endothelial cultures in microwell trays showed a similar correlation of DNA synthesis with cell density. These data indicate that endothelial cell cultures may provide a useful in vitro model for studying pathophysiologic factors in endothelial regeneration. PMID:4363161

  8. Longterm cultures of sheep thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, M K; Malone, J F; Cullen, M J

    1980-01-01

    A thyroid tissue culture system has been established in which follicular morphology can be preserved for at least 30 days. The system is highly dependent on whether or not the medium supporting the cells is changed during the culture period. The high levels of TSH (40 mU/ml) normally used in thyroid culture systems enhance follicular morphology but are not a prerequisite for differentiation. In the absence of medium changes follicular morphology improves for up to 20 days after initiation of the culture. Thereafter, the cells die unless the medium is changed. If differentiation is to be preserved after 20 days the medium into which the cells are transferred must be "conditioned" by preincubation with thryoid cultures. Regular medium changes into fresh medium causes the cultures to lose their differentiated characteristics and revert to a conventional monolayer. The capacity of these cultures to trap iodide has been quantified using a new method. The method is based on comparison of the 125I--iodide retained by thyroid cells with that retained in a undifferentiated established cell line (CHO--K1). The results demonstrated that trapping can be preserved for at least 20 days in cells cultured in the presence of TSH, provided the medium is not changed; and that under appropriate conditions the cells can trap iodide even in the absence of TSH stimulation. The extent to which the above cultures proliferate is also investigated. At the relatively high innoculation of cells used in primary cultures little proliferation takes place even when the cells are stimulated by TSH. However, regular medium changed induce some growth. In the absence of medium changes the cells die after 15-20 days. Those grown in the presence of TSH live slightly longer than those grown in its absence. Subculturing thyroid cells and innoculating them at low densities in Petri dishes leads to substantial cell proliferation whether or not TSH is present. The doubling time of cells in these cultures is the order of 1 to 2 days. The population resulting from this growth exhibit both epithelial and fibroblast like morphology although the former predominates. When cells from primary thryoid cultures are reseeded at very low concentrations (approximately 10(3) cells/Petri dish) about 3-10 per cent of the population give rise to viable macroscopic clones. PMID:6996408

  9. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  10. Dimethyloxaloylglycine Improves Angiogenic Activity of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in the Tissue-Engineered Bone

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hao; Chen, Song; Song, Wen-Qi; Gao, You-Shui; Guan, Jun-Jie; Wang, Yang; Sun, Yuan; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2014-01-01

    One of the big challenges in tissue engineering for treating large bone defects is to promote the angiogenesis of the tissue-engineered bone. Hypoxia inducible factor-1? (HIF-1?) plays an important role in angiogenesis-osteogenesis coupling during bone regeneration, and can activate a broad array of angiogenic factors. Dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG) can activate HIF-1? expression in cells at normal oxygen tension. In this study, we explored the effect of DMOG on the angiogenic activity of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in the tissue-engineered bone. The effect of different concentrations of DMOG on HIF-1a expression in BMSCs was detected with western blotting, and the mRNA expression and secretion of related angiogenic factors in DMOG-treated BMSCs were respectively analyzed using qRT-PCR and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The tissue-engineered bone constructed with ?-tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP) and DMOG-treated BMSCs were implanted into the critical-sized calvarial defects to test the effectiveness of DMOG in improving the angiogenic activity of BMSCs in the tissue-engineered bone. The results showed DMOG significantly enhanced the mRNA expression and secretion of related angiogenic factors in BMSCs by activating the expression of HIF-1?. More newly formed blood vessels were observed in the group treated with ?-TCP and DMOG-treated BMSCs than in other groups. And there were also more bone regeneration in the group treated with ?-TCP and DMOG-treated BMSCs. Therefore, we believed DMOG could enhance the angiogenic activity of BMSCs by activating the expression of HIF-1?, thereby improve the angiogenesis of the tissue-engineered bone and its bone healing capacity. PMID:25013382

  11. A composite demineralized bone matrix--self assembling peptide scaffold for enhancing cell and growth factor activity in bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tianyong; Li, Zhiqiang; Luo, Fei; Xie, Zhao; Wu, Xuehui; Xing, Junchao; Dong, Shiwu; Xu, Jianzhong

    2014-07-01

    The need for suitable bone grafts is high; however, there are limitations to all current graft sources, such as limited availability, the invasive harvest procedure, insufficient osteoinductive properties, poor biocompatibility, ethical problems, and degradation properties. The lack of osteoinductive properties is a common problem. As an allogenic bone graft, demineralized bone matrix (DBM) can overcome issues such as limited sources and comorbidities caused by invasive harvest; however, DBM is not sufficiently osteoinductive. Bone marrow has been known to magnify osteoinductive components for bone reconstruction because it contains osteogenic cells and factors. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow are the gold standard for cell seeding in tissue-engineered biomaterials for bone repair, and these cells have demonstrated beneficial effects. However, the associated high cost and the complicated procedures limit the use of tissue-engineered bone constructs. To easily enrich more osteogenic cells and factors to DBM by selective cell retention technology, DBM is modified by a nanoscale self-assembling peptide (SAP) to form a composite DBM/SAP scaffold. By decreasing the pore size and increasing the charge interaction, DBM/SAP scaffolds possess a much higher enriching yield for osteogenic cells and factors compared with DBM alone scaffolds. At the same time, SAP can build a cellular microenvironment for cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation that promotes bone reconstruction. As a result, a suitable bone graft fabricated by DBM/SAP scaffolds and bone marrow represents a new strategy and product for bone transplantation in the clinic. PMID:24755526

  12. The Multiple Roles of Osteoclasts in Host Defense: Bone Remodeling and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Orit Kollet; Ayelet Dar; Tsvee Lapidot

    2007-01-01

    Bone remodeling by bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts dynamically alters the bone inner wall and the endos- teum region, which harbors osteoblastic niches for hematopoietic stem cells. Investigators have recently elucidated mechanisms of re- cruitment and mobilization; these mechanisms consist of stress sig- nals that drive migration of leukocytes and progenitor cells from the bone marrow reservoir to the circulation

  13. Emulsions Containing Perfluorocarbon Support Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Lu-Kwang; Lee, Jaw Fang; Armiger, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Addition of emulsion containing perfluorocarbon liquid to aqueous cell-culture medium increases capacity of medium to support mammalian cells. FC-40 Fluorinert (or equivalent) - increases average density of medium so approximately equal to that of cells. Cells stay suspended in medium without mechanical stirring, which damages them. Increases density enough to prevent cells from setting, and increases viscosity of medium so oxygen bubbled through it and nutrients stirred in with less damage to delicate cells.

  14. T CELLS: CRITICAL BONE REGULATORS IN HEALTH AND DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis and hyperparathyroidism are to two common forms of bone loss caused primarily by an expansion of the osteoclastic pool only partially compensated by a stimulation of bone formation. The intimate mechanisms by which estrogen deficiency and excessive production of PTH cause bone loss remain to be determined in part because in vitro studies do not provide the means to adequately reproduce the effects of ovx and PTH overproduction observed in vivo. This article examines the connection between T cells and bone in health and disease and reviews the evidence in favor of the hypothesis that T cells play an unexpected critical role in the mechanism of action of estrogen and PTH in bone. PMID:20452473

  15. Constructing a High Density Cell Culture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  16. Effects of Spaceflight on Cells of Bone Marrow Origin

    PubMed Central

    Özçivici, Engin

    2013-01-01

    Once only a subject for science fiction novels, plans for establishing habitation on space stations, the Moon, and distant planets now appear among the short-term goals of space agencies. This article reviews studies that present biomedical issues that appear to challenge humankind for long-term spaceflights. With particularly focus on cells of bone marrow origin, studies involving changes in bone, immune, and red blood cell populations and their functions due to extended weightlessness were reviewed. Furthermore, effects of mechanical disuse on primitive stem cells that reside in the bone marrow were also included in this review. Novel biomedical solutions using space biotechnology will be required in order to achieve the goal of space exploration without compromising the functions of bone marrow, as spaceflight appears to disrupt homeostasis for all given cell types. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24385745

  17. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Niches and Regenerative Medicine

    E-print Network

    Amrhein, Valentin

    1 Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Niches and Regenerative Medicine Inauguraldissertation zur are a powerful tool in regenerative medicine, but suffer from a rapid loss of differentiation potential during

  18. A cell-based model of bone remodeling for identifying activity of icarrin in the treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Qiu; Han, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Tiegang; Cheng, Meng-Chun; Xiao, Hong-Bin

    2015-01-01

    The activity of icarrin (a flavonoid from Herba epimedii) was investigated in the regulation of bone remodeling, a process coupled by osteoblast-mediated bone forming and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. By directly co-culturing mouse bone marrow stromal cells and mouse preosteoclastic RAW264.7, and transwell co-culturing rat ovarian follicular granulosa cells (FGC), a 30 % increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and 25 % increase in estradiol level occurred. Compared with the antiresorptive drug, alendronate, and an anabolic drug, PTH1-34, icarrin possessed all of the positive effects on the co-culture by increasing ALP activity, estradiol production and decreasing tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity. A similar action of icarrin occurred on co-culture of mesenchymal stem cells, mouse peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and FGC. Overall, by using a co-cultured cell-based in vitro screening assay, icarrin is suggested as a new class of dual-action therapeutic agent for osteoporosis. PMID:25257584

  19. Effect of fluoride on bone and bone cells in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Modrowski, D; Miravet, L; Feuga, M; Bannié, F; Marie, P J

    1992-08-01

    To evaluate whether treatment with a mitogenic agent may increase bone formation and bone mass in osteopenia induced by estrogen deficiency, we determined the effect of oral fluoride treatment on bone and bone cells in ovariectomized rats. Sodium fluoride (NaF) was administered to 3-month-old ovariectomized rats 1 day after ovariectomy (OVX) for 1, 3, and 6 months. NaF was given in drinking water at the dose of 1 mg/kg body weight per day. Fluoride administration led to a partial prevention of the bone loss induced by OVX as shown by histologic analysis of tibial metaphysis and by evaluation of femoral calcium content. These beneficial effects of fluoride were more striking at early time points (1 and 3 months postovariectomy) than after 6 months of treatment. The increase in trabecular bone volume in OVX rats treated with fluoride was associated with a rise in the osteoblast surface, which was increased by 60, 72, and 235% at 1, 3, and 6 months postovariectomy compared to untreated OVX rats. In OVX rats and in sham-operated rats plasma osteocalcin was increased in correlation with the osteoblast surface. However, these two parameters were not correlated in OVX rats treated with fluoride. The heat-labile bone-specific alkaline phosphatase in plasma was decreased in OVX rats treated with fluoride compared to OVX rats, suggesting that both the number and the activity of osteoblasts were affected by NaF treatment. To examine the effect of fluoride on the osteocalcin production and the proliferative capacity of bone cells, osteoblastic cells were isolated by collagenase digestion from the bone surface of tibia in treated and untreated OVX rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1442210

  20. Microassay of decarboxylation reactions in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Bartos, D; Vlessis, A A; Muller, P; Mela-Riker, L; Trunkey, D D

    1993-09-01

    The currently described methods for determination of decarboxylation reaction rates in cultured cells require large quantities of cells and often involve cell manipulation prior to assay. We describe a simple microassay for the rapid measurement of various decarboxylation reaction rates in intact cultured cells. The assay is based on the traditional measurement of 14CO2 generated from 14C-labeled substrates. Key to the method is a novel modification of the standard petri dish. Pyruvate dehydrogenase, branched chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, and ornithine decarboxylase activities were determined in adult cardiomyocyte cultures containing only 0.1-0.5 mg of protein per culture dish. Efficiency of 14CO2 collection ranged between 94 and 100%. Pharmacological enhancement or inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was easily detected in the culture system. This new method simplifies the measurement of various decarboxylation reaction rates in cultured cells and allows rapid, reproducible measurements to be made on small numbers of cells without perturbation of the culture conditions or the cells themselves. PMID:8238897

  1. The bone marrow niche for haematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Sean J; Scadden, David T

    2014-01-16

    Niches are local tissue microenvironments that maintain and regulate stem cells. Haematopoiesis provides a model for understanding mammalian stem cells and their niches, but the haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche remains incompletely defined and beset by competing models. Recent progress has been made in elucidating the location and cellular components of the HSC niche in the bone marrow. The niche is perivascular, created partly by mesenchymal stromal cells and endothelial cells and often, but not always, located near trabecular bone. Outstanding questions concern the cellular complexity of the niche, the role of the endosteum and functional heterogeneity among perivascular microenvironments. PMID:24429631

  2. Biomaterials and bone mechanotransduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikavitsas, V. I.; Temenoff, J. S.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Bone is an extremely complex tissue that provides many essential functions in the body. Bone tissue engineering holds great promise in providing strategies that will result in complete regeneration of bone and restoration of its function. Currently, such strategies include the transplantation of highly porous scaffolds seeded with cells. Prior to transplantation the seeded cells are cultured in vitro in order for the cells to proliferate, differentiate and generate extracellular matrix. Factors that can affect cellular function include the cell-biomaterial interaction, as well as the biochemical and the mechanical environment. To optimize culture conditions, good understanding of these parameters is necessary. The new developments in bone biology, bone cell mechanotransduction, and cell-surface interactions are reviewed here to demonstrate that bone mechanotransduction is strongly influenced by the biomaterial properties.

  3. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section 864.2280... HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification....

  4. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section 864.2280... HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification....

  5. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section 864.2280... HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification....

  6. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section 864.2280... HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification....

  7. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section 864.2280... HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification....

  8. Bone marrow-derived cells can acquire cardiac stem cells properties in damaged heart

    PubMed Central

    Barile, Lucio; Cerisoli, Francesco; Frati, Giacomo; Gaetani, Roberto; Chimenti, Isotta; Forte, Elvira; Cassinelli, Letizia; Spinardi, Laura; Altomare, Claudia; Kizana, Eddy; Giacomello, Alessandro; Messina, Elisa; Ottolenghi, Sergio; Magli, Maria Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Experimental data suggest that cell-based therapies may be useful for cardiac regeneration following ischaemic heart disease. Bone marrow (BM) cells have been reported to contribute to tissue repair after myocardial infarction (MI) by a variety of humoural and cellular mechanisms. However, there is no direct evidence, so far, that BM cells can generate cardiac stem cells (CSCs). To investigate whether BM cells contribute to repopulate the Kit+ CSCs pool, we transplanted BM cells from transgenic mice, expressing green fluorescent protein under the control of Kit regulatory elements, into wild-type irradiated recipients. Following haematological reconstitution and MI, CSCs were cultured from cardiac explants to generate ‘cardiospheres’, a microtissue normally originating in vitro from CSCs. These were all green fluorescent (i.e. BM derived) and contained cells capable of initiating differentiation into cells expressing the cardiac marker Nkx2.5. These findings indicate that, at least in conditions of local acute cardiac damage, BM cells can home into the heart and give rise to cells that share properties of resident Kit+ CSCs. PMID:19912439

  9. Cells Derived from Young Bone Marrow Alleviate Renal Aging

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hai-Chun; Rossini, Michele; Ma, Li-Jun; Zuo, Yiqin; Ma, Ji

    2011-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived stem cells may modulate renal injury, but the effects may depend on the age of the stem cells. Here we investigated whether bone marrow from young mice attenuates renal aging in old mice. We radiated female 12-mo-old 129SvJ mice and reconstituted them with bone marrow cells (BMC) from either 8-wk-old (young-to-old) or 12-mo-old (old-to-old) male mice. Transfer of young BMC resulted in markedly decreased deposition of collagen IV in the mesangium and less ?-galactosidase staining, an indicator of cell senescence. These changes paralleled reduced expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), PDGF-B (PDGF-B), the transdifferentiation marker fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1), and senescence-associated p16 and p21. Tubulointerstitial and glomerular cells derived from the transplanted BMC did not show ?-galactosidase activity, but after 6 mo, there were more FSP-1-expressing bone marrow-derived cells in old-to-old mice compared with young-to-old mice. Young-to-old mice also exhibited higher expression of the anti-aging gene Klotho and less phosphorylation of IGF-1 receptor ?. Taken together, these data suggest that young bone marrow-derived cells can alleviate renal aging in old mice. Direct parenchymal reconstitution by stem cells, paracrine effects from adjacent cells, and circulating anti-aging molecules may mediate the aging of the kidney. PMID:21965376

  10. Translational Research: Palatal-derived Ecto-mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Palate: A New Hope for Alveolar Bone and Cranio-Facial Bone Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Wolf Dieter; Dannan, Aous; Giesenhagen, Bernd; Schau, Ingmar; Varga, Gabor; Vukovic, Mark Alexander; Sirak, Sergey Vladimirovich

    2014-01-01

    The management of facial defects has rapidly changed in the last decade. Functional and esthetic requirements have steadily increased along with the refinements of surgery. In the case of advanced atrophy or jaw defects, extensive horizontal and vertical bone augmentation is often unavoidable to enable patients to be fitted with implants. Loss of vertical alveolar bone height is the most common cause for a non primary stability of dental implants in adults. At present, there is no ideal therapeutic approach to cure loss of vertical alveolar bone height and achieve optimal pre-implantological bone regeneration before dental implant placement. Recently, it has been found that specific populations of stem cells and/or progenitor cells could be isolated from different dental resources, namely the dental follicle, the dental pulp and the periodontal ligament. Our research group has cultured palatal-derived stem cells (paldSCs) as dentospheres and further differentiated into various cells of the neuronal and osteogenic lineage, thereby demonstrating their stem cell state. In this publication will be shown whether paldSCs could be differentiated into the osteogenic lineage and, if so, whether these cells are able to regenerate alveolar bone tissue in vivo in an athymic rat model. Furthermore, using these data we have started a proof of principle clinical- and histological controlled study using stem cell-rich palatal tissues for improving the vertical alveolar bone augmentation in critical size defects. The initial results of the study demonstrate the feasibility of using stem cell-mediated tissue engineering to treat alveolar bone defects in humans. PMID:24921024

  11. Incidence of trypanosomes in the Canada goose as revealed by bone marrow culture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diamond, L.S.; Herman, C.M.

    1954-01-01

    1. Techniques are described for the cultural isolation of trypanosomes from avian bone marrow obtained from living birds or at autopsy. A new medium SNB-9 (saline-neopeptone-blood) is described. In addition to being a good medium for growing avian trypanosomes, it is excellent for growing trypanosomes of amphibians and mammals. 2. Evidence is presented demonstrating the superiority of (a) cultures over stained smears for detecting the presence of trypanosomes in the Canada goose, and (b) bone marrow over heart blood of this species as a source of trypanosomes for culture. 3. In April 1952, from cultures of bone marrow collected at autopsy it was demonstrated that trypanosome infection occurred in 33 (40.2%) of 82 Canada geese from the Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge. On February 17, 1953, cultures of bone marrow obtained from living birds revealed presence of trypanosomes in 12 (20.7%) of 58 geese from the same refuge. On February 26, 1953, by employing the latter method, 9 (20.4%) of 44 geese from Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge were shown to harbor the parasites. In another survey ninety-two geese from seven national wildlife refuges subjected to the biopsy technique showed evidence of infection in 13 (14.1 %) birds and indicated that trypanosome infection is widely distributed in this host.

  12. Quantitative study of calcium uptake by tumorigenic bone (TE85) and neuroblastoma × glioma (NG108-15) cells exposed to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electric fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. S. Kenny; W. S. Kisaalita; G. Rowland; C. Thai; T. Foutz

    1997-01-01

    To verify the effect of cell culture state on frequency dependent increase in proliferation as well as Ca2+ flux across the plasma membrane, tumorigenic bone (TE-85) and neuroblastoma × glioma (NG108-15) cells cultured in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS) were exposed to capacitively coupled electric (CCEF) fields in the extremely low frequency (ELF) range of 10 to 18

  13. Incorporation of biphasic calcium phosphate microparticles in injectable thermoresponsive hydrogel modulates bone cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jyh-Ping; Tsai, Ming-Jin; Liao, Han-Tsung

    2013-10-01

    To provide osteoblast cells with a three-dimensional environment closer to bone matrix, an engineered construct mimicking bone components have been designed and evaluated. A biocompatible injectable thermo-responsive hydrogel, hyaluronic acid-g-chitosan-g-poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (HA-CPN), was used as a biomimetic organic gel matrix while embedded biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramic micoparticles were used to replace mineralized matrix. The physicochemical properties of HA-CPN/BCP hydrogel composite were characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimeric analysis, differential scanning calorimetric, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Human fetal osteoblast cells were cultured in vitro in HA-CPN and HA-CPN/BCP scaffold to study cell viability, proliferation, gene expression, and maintenance of their osteoblastic differential potentials. Overall, HA-CPN/BCP can serve as a better injectable carrier for bone cells than HA-CPN with enhanced proliferation rate and alkaline phosphatase activity from biochemical assays, improved calcium deposition and mineralization of extracellular matrix by histological examinations, and elevated gene expression of all essential osteoblastic genes from quantitative real-time PCR, to provide a cell/scaffold construct with higher mechanical strength and elasticity. From in vivo nude mice subcutaneous implantation experiments, the injected cell mass can form ectopic bone tissue in HA-CPN/BCP hydrogel composite. PMID:23711782

  14. Effective combination of aligned nanocomposite nanofibers and human unrestricted somatic stem cells for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshandeh, Behnaz; Soleimani, Masoud; Ghaemi, Nasser; Shabani, Iman

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Bioartificial bone tissue engineering is an increasingly popular technique to solve bone defect challenges. This study aimed to investigate the interactions between matrix composition and appropriate cell type, focusing on hydroxyapatite (HA), to achieve a more effective combination for bone regeneration. Methods: Human unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs) were isolated from placental cord blood. The cellular and molecular events during the osteo-induction of USSCs were evaluated for 21 d under the following conditions: (1) in basal culture, (2) supplemented with hydroxyapatite nanoparticle (nHA) suspension, and (3) seeded on electrospun aligned nanofibrous poly-?-caprolactone/poly-L-lactic acid/nHA (PCL/PLLA/nHA) scaffolds. The scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and tensile test. Results: Maintenance of USSCs for 21 d in basal or osteogenic culture resulted in significant increase in osteoblast differentiation. With nHA suspension, even soluble osteo-inductive additives were ineffective, probably due to induced apoptosis of the cells. In contrast to the hindrance of proliferation by nHA suspension, the scaffolds improved cell growth. The scaffolds mimic the nanostructure of natural bone matrix with the combination of PLLA/PCL (organic phase) and HA (inorganic phase) offering a favorable surface topography, which was demonstrated to possess suitable properties for supporting USSCs. Quantitative measurement of osteogenic markers, enzymatic activity and mineralization indicated that the scaffolds did not disturb, but enhanced the osteogenic potential of USSCs. Moreover, the alignment of the fibers led to cell orientation during cell growth. Conclusion: The results demonstrated the synergism of PCL/PLLA/nHA nanofibrous scaffolds and USSCs in the augmentation of osteogenic differentiation. Thus, nHA grafted into PCL/PLLA scaffolds can be a suitable choice for bone tissue regeneration. PMID:21516135

  15. Porous collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds with mesenchymal stem cells for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ning, Li; Malmström, Hans; Ren, Yan-Fang

    2015-02-01

    Current bone grafting materials have significant limitations for repairing maxillofacial and dentoalveolar bone deficiencies. An ideal bone tissue-engineering construct is still lacking. The purpose of the present study was first to synthesize and develop a collagen-hydroxyapatite (Col-HA) composite through controlled in situ mineralization on type I collagen fibrils with nanometer-sized apatite crystals, and then evaluate their biologic properties by culturing with mouse and human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We synthesized Col-HA scaffolds with different Col:HA ratios. Mouse C3H10T1/2 MSCs and human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDSCs) were cultured with scaffolds for cell proliferation and biocompatibility assays. We found that the porous Col-HA composites have good biocompatibility and biomimetic properties. The Col-HA composites with ratios 80:20 and 50:50 composites supported the attachments and proliferations of mouse MSCs and hPDSCs. These findings indicate that Col-HA composite complexes have strong potentials for bone tissue regeneration. PMID:23574526

  16. Bioactive cell-derived matrices combined with polymer mesh scaffold for osteogenesis and bone healing.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Gul; Hwang, Mintai P; Du, Ping; Ko, Jaehoon; Ha, Chul-Won; Do, Sun Hee; Park, Kwideok

    2015-05-01

    Successful bone tissue engineering generally requires an osteoconductive scaffold that consists of extracellular matrix (ECM) to mimic the natural environment. In this study, we developed a PLGA/PLA-based mesh scaffold coated with cell-derived extracellular matrix (CDM) for the delivery of bone morphogenic protein (BMP-2), and assessed the capacity of this system to provide an osteogenic microenvironment. Decellularized ECM from human lung fibroblasts (hFDM) was coated onto the surface of the polymer mesh scaffolds, upon which heparin was then conjugated onto hFDM via EDC chemistry. BMP-2 was subsequently immobilized onto the mesh scaffolds via heparin, and released at a controlled rate. Human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hPMSCs) were cultured in such scaffolds and subjected to osteogenic differentiation for 28 days in vitro. The results showed that alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mineralization, and osteogenic marker expression were significantly improved with hPMSCs cultured in the hFDM-coated mesh scaffolds compared to the control and fibronectin-coated ones. In addition, a mouse ectopic and rat calvarial bone defect model was used to examine the feasibility of current platform to induce osteogenesis as well as bone regeneration. All hFDM-coated mesh groups exhibited a significant increase of newly formed bone and in particular, hFDM-coated mesh scaffold loaded with a high dose of BMP-2 exhibited a nearly complete bone defect healing as confirmed via micro-CT and histological observation. This work proposes a great potency of using hFDM (biophysical) coupled with BMP-2 (biochemical) as a promising osteogenic microenvironment for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:25736498

  17. Bioprocessing technology for plant cell suspension cultures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei wen Su

    1995-01-01

    Considering various forms of in vitro plant tissue cultures, cell suspension culture is most amenable to large-scale production\\u000a of natural compounds, owing primarily to its superior culture homogeneity. This fact has already been demonstrated in several\\u000a largescale applications, including the commercial shikonin process. The scope of this work is to review the state of the art\\u000a in bioprocessing technologies pertinent

  18. Rotating cell culture systems for human cell culture: human trophoblast cells as a model.

    PubMed

    Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Warner, Jessica A; Machado, Heather L; Morris, Cindy A; Höner zu Bentrup, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    The field of human trophoblast research aids in understanding the complex environment established during placentation. Due to the nature of these studies, human in vivo experimentation is impossible. A combination of primary cultures, explant cultures and trophoblast cell lines support our understanding of invasion of the uterine wall and remodeling of uterine spiral arteries by extravillous trophoblast cells (EVTs), which is required for successful establishment of pregnancy. Despite the wealth of knowledge gleaned from such models, it is accepted that in vitro cell culture models using EVT-like cell lines display altered cellular properties when compared to their in vivo counterparts. Cells cultured in the rotating cell culture system (RCCS) display morphological, phenotypic, and functional properties of EVT-like cell lines that more closely mimic differentiating in utero EVTs, with increased expression of genes mediating invasion (e.g. matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)) and trophoblast differentiation. The Saint Georges Hospital Placental cell Line-4 (SGHPL-4) (kindly donated by Dr. Guy Whitley and Dr. Judith Cartwright) is an EVT-like cell line that was used for testing in the RCCS. The design of the RCCS culture vessel is based on the principle that organs and tissues function in a three-dimensional (3-D) environment. Due to the dynamic culture conditions in the vessel, including conditions of physiologically relevant shear, cells grown in three dimensions form aggregates based on natural cellular affinities and differentiate into organotypic tissue-like assemblies. The maintenance of a fluid orbit provides a low-shear, low-turbulence environment similar to conditions found in vivo. Sedimentation of the cultured cells is countered by adjusting the rotation speed of the RCCS to ensure a constant free-fall of cells. Gas exchange occurs through a permeable hydrophobic membrane located on the back of the bioreactor. Like their parental tissue in vivo, RCCS-grown cells are able to respond to chemical and molecular gradients in three dimensions (i.e. at their apical, basal, and lateral surfaces) because they are cultured on the surface of porous microcarrier beads. When grown as two-dimensional monolayers on impermeable surfaces like plastic, cells are deprived of this important communication at their basal surface. Consequently, the spatial constraints imposed by the environment profoundly affect how cells sense and decode signals from the surrounding microenvironment, thus implying an important role for the 3-D milieu. We have used the RCCS to engineer biologically meaningful 3-D models of various human epithelial tissues. Indeed, many previous reports have demonstrated that cells cultured in the RCCS can assume physiologically relevant phenotypes that have not been possible with other models. In summary, culture in the RCCS represents an easy, reproducible, high-throughput platform that provides large numbers of differentiated cells that are amenable to a variety of experimental manipulations. In the following protocol, using EVTs as an example, we clearly describe the steps required to three-dimensionally culture adherent cells in the RCCS. PMID:22297395

  19. Tricetin, a dietary flavonoid, suppresses benzo(a)pyrene?induced human non?small cell lung cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jen-Yu; Chang, Wei-An; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Hsu, Ya-Ling; Chiang, Hung-Hsing; Chou, Shah-Hwa; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2015-05-01

    This is the first study to demonstrate that benzo(a)-pyrene (BaP) was able to enhance the production of parathyroid hormone?related protein (PTHrP) by human non?small cell lung cancer H460 cells. Such effect would further contribute to bone metastasis of lung cancer by increasing osteoclastogenesis. This study is also the first to reveal that tricetin (TCN), a flavonoid derivative found in Myrtaceae pollen and Eucalyptus honey, was able to reverse BaP?mediated bone resorption activity of lung cancer cells. Human non?small cell lung cancer H460 cells were treated with BaP to generate conditioned medium. When osteoblasts were cultured with BaP?H460?CM, their expression of osteoclastogenesis activator macrophage colony?stimulating factor (M?CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor ?B ligand (RANKL) was increased. BaP?H460?CM reduced the production of osteoprotegerin (OPG), an osteoclastogenesis inhibitor, in osteoblasts. Osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption activity of H460 cells were increased by BaP?H460?CM. With BaP?mediated PTHrP upregulation, IL?8 secretion in H460 cells was increased contributing to human non?small cell lung cancer?mediated osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. Moreover, TCN suppressed BaP?mediated bone resorption. Therefore, TCN may be a novel agent for treatment of non?small cell lung cancer patients with bone metastasis. PMID:25738754

  20. Sinus augmentation in two patients with severe posterior maxillary height atrophy using tissue-engineered bone derived from autologous bone cells: a case report.

    PubMed

    Montesani, Luigi; Schulze-Späte, Ulrike; Dibart, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Implant placement in the edentulous maxilla often represents a clinical challenge because of insufficient bone height after crestal bone resorption and maxillary sinus pneumatization. In this study, tissue engineering techniques were used to increase bone height in the posterior maxilla before implant placement. Periosteal biopsies were harvested, and osteoblast precursor cells were isolated and cultured on three-dimensional fleeces (nonwoven polyglactin-910 fibers connected by poly-p-dioxanon bonding sites) in vitro. Tissue-engineered bone chips were implanted into the sinus cavity using a lateral window approach. Four months post-sinus augmentation, implants were placed and subsequently restored. During a 12-month follow-up period, no implant failure was observed. PMID:21837305

  1. Human Bone-Forming Chondrocytes Cultured in the Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor Retain Matrix Proteins: Similarities to Spaceflight Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, P. J.; Hecht, J.; Montufar-Solis, D.

    2006-01-01

    Fracture healing, crucial to a successful Mars mission, involves formation of a cartilaginous fracture callus which differentiates, mineralizes, ossifies and remodels via the endochondral process. Studies of spaceflown and tailsuspended rats found that, without loading, fracture callus formation and cartilage differentiation within the callus were minimal. We found delayed differentiation of chondrocytes within the rat growth plate on Cosmos 1887, 2044, and Spacelab 3. In the current study, differentiation of human bone-forming chondrocytes cultured in the hydrodynamic focusing bioreactor (HFB) was assessed. Human costochondral chondrocytes in suspension were aggregated overnight, then cultured in the HFB for 25 days. Collagen Type II, aggrecan and unsulfated chondroitin were found extracellularly and chondroitin sulfates 4 and 6 within the cell. Lack of secretion was also found in pancreatic cells of spaceflown rats, and in our SL3 studies. The HFB can be used to study cartilage differentiation in simulated microgravity.

  2. ICAM-3 Activation Modulates Cell-Cell Contacts of Human Bone Marrow Endothelial Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. van Buul; F. P. J. Mul; C. E. van der Schoot; P. L. Hordijk

    2004-01-01

    The Ig-like cell adhesion molecule ICAM-3 is mainly expressed on human leukocytes and is involved in cell-cell interactions. Its expression on endothelium is observed during disorders such as Crohn’s disease and in solid tumors. We found low but detectable expression of ICAM-3 on VE-cadherin-expressing cells from primary human bone marrow aspirates, i.e. endothelial cells, and on primary human endothelial cells

  3. Group V Secretory Phospholipase A2 Amplifies the Induction of Cyclooxygenase 2 and Delayed Prostaglandin D2 Generation in Mouse Bone Marrow Culture-Derived Mast Cells in a Strain-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Bruno L.; Satake, Yoshiyuki; Kikawada, Eriya; Balestrieri, Barbara; Arm, Jonathan P.

    2006-01-01

    Activation of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) with stem cell factor (SCF) or IgE and antigen elicits exocytosis and an immediate phase of prostaglandin (PG) D2 and leukotriene (LT) C4 generation. Activation of BMMC by SCF, IL-1? and IL-10 elicits a delayed phase of PGD2 generation dependent on cyclooxygenase (COX) 2 induction. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 ? provides arachidonic acid in both phases and amplifies COX-2 induction. Pharmacological experiments implicate an amplifying role for secretory (s) PLA2. We used mice lacking the gene encoding group V sPLA2 (Pla2g5 ?/?) to definitively test its role in eicosanoid generation by BMMC. Pla2g5 ?/? BMMC on a C57BL/6 genetic background showed a modest reduction in exocytosis and immediate PGD2 generation after activation with SCF or with IgE and antigen, while LTC4 generation was not modified. Delayed-phase PGD2 generation and COX-2 induction were reduced ~35% in C57BL/6 Pla2g5 ?/? BMMC and were restored by exogenous PGE2. There was no deficit in either phase of eicosanoid generation by Pla2g5 ?/? BMMC on a BALB/c background. Thus, group V sPLA2 amplifies COX-2 expression and delayed phase PGD2 generation in a strain-dependent manner; it has at best a limited role in immediate eicosanoid generation by BMMC. PMID:17064958

  4. VEGF and BMP-2 promote bone regeneration by facilitating bone marrow stem cell homing and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Zhu, C; Wu, Y; Ye, D; Wang, S; Zou, D; Zhang, X; Kaplan, D L; Jiang, X

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) have been widely used in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine to stimulate angiogenesis and bone formation. The goal of this study was to determine whether VEGF and BMP-2 are involved in the homing of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) for bone regeneration and to provide insights into their mechanism of action. The chemoattraction of BMSCs to VEGF and BMP-2 was analysed in vitro using a checkerboard assay. VEGF and BMP-2 stimulated the chemotaxis of BMSCs but not chemokinesis. In vivo, both VEGF and BMP-2 also have been confirmed to induce the homing of tail vein injected BMSCs to the site of silk scaffold subcutaneous implantation in nude mice. When the scaffolds were implanted in the rabbit skull defects, more SSEA+ mesenchymal stem cells were mobilised and homed to silk scaffolds containing VEGF and/or BMP-2. More importantly, autogenic BMSCs were reinjected via the ear vein after labelling with lenti-GFP, and the cells were detected to home to the defects and differentiate into endothelial cells and osteogenic cells induced by VEGF and BMP-2. Finally, perfusion with Microfil showed that initial angiogenesis was enhanced in tissue-engineered complexes containing VEGF. Observations based on µCT assay and histological study revealed that bone formation was accelerated on BMP-2-containing scaffolds. These findings support our hypothesis that the localised release of VEGF and BMP-2 promote bone regeneration, in part by facilitating the mobilisation of endogenous stem cells and directing the differentiation of these cells into endothelial and osteogenic lineages. PMID:24425156

  5. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Cells for Bone Regereneration: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Cicione, Claudia; Bernardini, Camilla; Michetti, Fabrizio; Lattanzi, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue represents a hot topic in regenerative medicine because of the tissue source abundance, the relatively easy retrieval, and the inherent biological properties of mesenchymal stem cells residing in its stroma. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) are indeed multipotent somatic stem cells exhibiting growth kinetics and plasticity, proved to induce efficient tissue regeneration in several biomedical applications. A defined consensus for their isolation, classification, and characterization has been very recently achieved. In particular, bone tissue reconstruction and regeneration based on ASCs has emerged as a promising approach to restore structure and function of bone compromised by injury or disease. ASCs have been used in combination with osteoinductive biomaterial and/or osteogenic molecules, in either static or dynamic culture systems, to improve bone regeneration in several animal models. To date, few clinical trials on ASC-based bone reconstruction have been concluded and proved effective. The aim of this review is to dissect the state of the art on ASC use in bone regenerative applications in the attempt to provide a comprehensive coverage of the topics, from the basic laboratory to recent clinical applications. PMID:24307997

  6. Culture and Manipulation of Embryonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Lois G.; Goldstein, Bob

    2012-01-01

    The direct manipulation of embryonic cells is an important tool for addressing key questions in cell and developmental biology. C. elegans is relatively unique among genetic model systems in being amenable to manipulation of embryonic cells. Embryonic cell manipulation has allowed the identification of cell interactions by direct means, and it has been an important technique for dissecting mechanisms by which cell fates are specified, cell divisions are oriented, and morphogenesis is accomplished. Here, we present detailed methods for isolating, manipulating and culturing embryonic cells of C. elegans. PMID:22226523

  7. Cell Culture on MEMS Platforms: A Review

    E-print Network

    Ni, Ming

    Microfabricated systems provide an excellent platform for the culture of cells, and are an extremely useful tool for the investigation of cellular responses to various stimuli. Advantages offered over traditional methods ...

  8. Effect of plasma needle on cultured cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. E. Kieft; N. A. Dvinskikh; Jos L. V. Broers; Dick W. Slaaf; Eva Stoffels

    2004-01-01

    To investigate a possible application of plasma in fine surgery, we studied the effects of a small atmospheric glow discharge on living cultured cells. The plasma source used for this purpose was the \\

  9. Isolation of pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells and clonable precursor cells of erythrocytes, granulocytes, macrophages and megakaryocytes from mouse bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Williams, N; Jackson, H; Meyers, P

    1979-11-01

    Murine pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells and precursor cells with restricted commitment to erythrocytes, granulocytes and macrophages as well as megakaryocytes have been purified 30- to 50-fold from mouse bone marrow cells. Purification was achieved by a three-step procedure. Bone marrow cell populations free of erythroid cells and lymphocytes were obtained by culturing the cells for several weeks. Macrophages and adherent polymorphic neutrophils (PMN) were removed by adherence to plastic. The remainder of the PMN along with more primitive granulocytes (but not promyelocytes and some monocytoid cells) were removed either by neutral density centrifugation or by differential centrifugation after rosette formation with sheep erythrocytes coated with immunoglobulin (EA rosettes). The remaining population of marrow-derived cells contained 40-66% blast cells, 20-35% promyelocytes and 5-10% other cells (usually PMNs and monocytes). Using cloning techniques to detect immature hemopoietic cells, this population contained 15-35% granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells, approximately 0.2% erythroid burst-forming cells, approximately 0.1% megakaryocyte progenitor cells and 1-3% pluripotent stem cells (based on seeding efficiency 0.06). PMID:317649

  10. Mechanical unloading of bone in microgravity reduces mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Blaber, E A; Dvorochkin, N; Torres, M L; Yousuf, R; Burns, B P; Globus, R K; Almeida, E A C

    2014-09-01

    Mechanical loading of mammalian tissues is a potent promoter of tissue growth and regeneration, whilst unloading in microgravity can cause reduced tissue regeneration, possibly through effects on stem cell tissue progenitors. To test the specific hypothesis that mechanical unloading alters differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell lineages, we studied cellular and molecular aspects of how bone marrow in the mouse proximal femur responds to unloading in microgravity. Trabecular and cortical endosteal bone surfaces in the femoral head underwent significant bone resorption in microgravity, enlarging the marrow cavity. Cells isolated from the femoral head marrow compartment showed significant down-regulation of gene expression markers for early mesenchymal and hematopoietic differentiation, including FUT1(-6.72), CSF2(-3.30), CD90(-3.33), PTPRC(-2.79), and GDF15(-2.45), but not stem cell markers, such as SOX2. At the cellular level, in situ histological analysis revealed decreased megakaryocyte numbers whilst erythrocytes were increased 2.33 fold. Furthermore, erythrocytes displayed elevated fucosylation and clustering adjacent to sinuses forming the marrow-blood barrier, possibly providing a mechanistic basis for explaining spaceflight anemia. Culture of isolated bone marrow cells immediately after microgravity exposure increased the marrow progenitor's potential for mesenchymal differentiation into in-vitro mineralized bone nodules, and hematopoietic differentiation into osteoclasts, suggesting an accumulation of undifferentiated progenitors during exposure to microgravity. These results support the idea that mechanical unloading of mammalian tissues in microgravity is a strong inhibitor of tissue growth and regeneration mechanisms, acting at the level of early mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell differentiation. PMID:25011075

  11. Influence of different modifications of a calcium phosphate bone cement on adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Vater, Corina; Lode, Anja; Bernhardt, Anne; Reinstorf, Antje; Heinemann, Christiane; Gelinsky, Michael

    2010-03-15

    Collagen and noncollagenous proteins of the extracellular bone matrix are able to stimulate bone cell activities and bone healing. The modification of calcium phosphate bone cements used as temporary bone replacement materials with these proteins seems to be a promising approach to accelerate new bone formation. In this study, we investigated adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) on Biocement D/collagen composites which have been modified with osteocalcin and O-phospho-L-serine. Modification with osteocalcin was carried out by its addition to the cement precursor before setting as well as by functionalization of the cement samples after setting and sterilization. hBMSC were cultured on these samples for 28 days with and without osteogenic supplements. We found a positive impact especially of the phosphoserine-modifications but also of both osteocalcin-modifications on differentiation of hBMSC indicated by higher expression of the osteoblastic markers matrix metalloproteinase-13 and bone sialo protein II. For hBMSC cultured on phosphoserine-containing composites, an increased proliferation has been observed. However, in case of the osteocalcin-modified samples, only osteocalcin adsorbed after setting and sterilization of the cement samples was able to promote initial adhesion and proliferation of hBMSC. The addition of osteocalcin before setting results in a finer microstructure but the biological activity of osteocalcin might be impaired due to the sterilization process. Thus, our data indicate that the initial adhesion and proliferation of hBMSC is enhanced rather by the biological activity of osteocalcin than by the finer microstructure. PMID:19373921

  12. ERR{alpha} regulates osteoblastic and adipogenic differentiation of mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rajalin, Ann-Marie; Pollock, Hanna [Institute of Biomedicine, Biomedicum Helsinki, University of Helsinki (Finland)] [Institute of Biomedicine, Biomedicum Helsinki, University of Helsinki (Finland); Aarnisalo, Piia, E-mail: piia.aarnisalo@helsinki.fi [Institute of Biomedicine, Biomedicum Helsinki, University of Helsinki (Finland) [Institute of Biomedicine, Biomedicum Helsinki, University of Helsinki (Finland); Department of Clinical Chemistry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland)

    2010-05-28

    The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor-{alpha} (ERR{alpha}) has been reported to have both a positive and a negative regulatory role in osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation. We have studied the role of ERR{alpha} in osteoblastic and adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from ERR{alpha} deficient mice and their differentiation capacities were compared to that of the wild-type cells. ERR{alpha} deficient cultures displayed reduced cellular proliferation, osteoblastic differentiation, and mineralization. In the complementary experiment, overexpression of ERR{alpha} in MC3T3-E1 cells increased the expression of osteoblastic markers and mineralization. Alterations in the expression of bone sialoprotein (BSP) may at least partially explain the effects on mineralization as BSP expression was reduced in ERR{alpha} deficient MSCs and enhanced upon ERR{alpha} overexpression in MC3T3-E1 cells. Furthermore, a luciferase reporter construct driven by the BSP promoter was efficiently transactivated by ERR{alpha}. Under adipogenic conditions, ERR{alpha} deficient cultures displayed reduced adipocytic differentiation. Our data thus propose a positive role for ERR{alpha} in osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation. The variability in the results yielded in the different studies implies that ERR{alpha} may play different roles in bone under different physiological conditions.

  13. Isolation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells and their Cultivation on the Porous Bone Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Fuentes, Nayeli; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana; Ambrosio-Hernández, Javier R.; Piña-Barba, Maria C.; Zepeda-Rodríguez, Armando; Cerbón-Cervantes, Marco A.; Tapia-Ramírez, José; Alcantara-Quintana, Luz E.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a differentiation potential towards osteoblastic lineage when they are stimulated with soluble factors or specific biomaterials. This work presents a novel option for the delivery of MSCs from human amniotic membrane (AM-hMSCs) that employs bovine bone matrix Nukbone (NKB) as a scaffold. Thus, the application of MSCs in repair and tissue regeneration processes depends principally on the efficient implementation of the techniques for placing these cells in a host tissue. For this reason, the design of biomaterials and cellular scaffolds has gained importance in recent years because the topographical characteristics of the selected scaffold must ensure adhesion, proliferation and differentiation into the desired cell lineage in the microenvironment of the injured tissue. This option for the delivery of MSCs from human amniotic membrane (AM-hMSCs) employs bovine bone matrix as a cellular scaffold and is an efficient culture technique because the cells respond to the topographic characteristics of the bovine bone matrix Nukbone (NKB), i.e., spreading on the surface, macroporous covering and colonizing the depth of the biomaterial, after the cell isolation process. We present the procedure for isolating and culturing MSCs on a bovine matrix. PMID:25742362

  14. Stem cells and bone diseases: new tools, new perspective.

    PubMed

    Riminucci, Mara; Remoli, Cristina; Robey, Pamela G; Bianco, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal skeletal stem cells are a unique class of progenitors with biological properties that extend well beyond the limits of stemness as commonly defined. Skeletal stem cells sustain skeletal tissue homeostasis, organize and maintain the complex architectural structure of the bone marrow microenvironment and provide a niche for hematopoietic progenitor cells. The identification of stem cells in the human post-natal skeleton has profoundly changed our approach to the physiology and pathology of this system. Skeletal diseases have been long interpreted essentially in terms of defective function of differentiated cells and/or abnormal turnover of the matrix that they produce. The notion of a skeletal stem cell has brought forth multiple, novel concepts in skeletal biology that provide potential alternative concepts. At the same time, the recognition of the complex functions played by skeletal progenitors, such as the structural and functional organization of the bone marrow, has provided an innovative, unifying perspective for understanding bone and bone marrow changes simultaneously occurring in many disorders. Finally, the possibility to isolate and highly enrich for skeletal progenitors, enables us to reproduce perfectly normal or pathological organ miniatures. These, in turn, provide suitable models to investigate and manipulate the pathogenetic mechanisms of many genetic and non-genetic skeletal diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Stem cells and Bone. PMID:25240458

  15. Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from human placenta: Comparison with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zongning Miao; Jun Jin; Lei Chen; Jianzhong Zhu; Wei Huang; Jidong Zhao; Hanguang Qian; Xueguang Zhang

    2006-01-01

    The presence within bone marrow of a population of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) able to differentiate into a number of different mesenchymal tissues, including bone and cartilage, was first suggested by Friedenstein nearly 40years ago. Since then MSCs have been demonstrated in a variety of fetal and adult tissues, including bone marrow, fetal blood and liver, cord blood, amniotic fluid

  16. Cell-free and cell-based approaches for bone regeneration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ericka M. Bueno; Julie Glowacki

    2009-01-01

    The clinical augmentation of bone currently involves the use of autogenous or allogeneic bone grafts and synthetic materials, all of which are associated with limitations. Research on the safe enhancement of bone formation concerns the potential value of scaffolds, stem cells, gene therapy, and chemical and mechanical signals. Optimal scaffolds are engineered to provide mechanical stability while supporting osteogenesis, osteoconduction

  17. Hematopoietic regulatory factors produced in long-term murine bone marrow cultures and the effect of in vitro irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gualtieri, R.J.; Shadduck, R.K.; Baker, D.G.; Quesenberry, P.J.

    1984-08-01

    The nature of hematopoietic regulatory factors elaborated by the adherent (stromal) cells of long-term murine bone marrow cultures and the effect of in vitro stromal irradiation (XRT) on the production of these factors was investigated. Using an in situ stromal assay it was possible to demonstrate stromal elaboration of at least two colony-stimulating activities, ie, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating activity (G/M-CSA) and megakaryocyte colony-stimulating activity (Meg-CSA). Exposure of the stroma to XRT resulted in dose-dependent elevations of both activities that correlated inversely with total myeloid cell mass. Mixture experiments that combined control and irradiated stroma revealed that the hematopoietically active control stroma could block detection of XRT-related G/M-CSA elevations. Antiserum directed against purified L cell colony-stimulating factor (CSF) reduced granulocyte/macrophage colony formation in the target layer but did not effect the increased Meg-CSA. While a radioimmunoassay for L-cell type CSF was unable to detect significant differences in concentrated media from control and irradiated cultures, bioassays of these media revealed XRT-related G/M-CSA elevations. These results indicate that the G/M-CSA elaborated in these cultures is immunologically distinct from the Meg-CSA produced, and although distinct from L cell CSF, the G/M-CSA is crossreactive with the L cell CSF antiserum. Morphologic, histochemical, and factor VII antigen immunofluorescent studies were performed on the stromal cell population responsible for production of these stimulatory activities. In addition to ''fat'' cells, the stromal cells remaining after XRT were composed of two predominant cell populations. These included a major population of acid phosphatase and nonspecific esterase-positive macrophage-like cells and a minor population of factor VII antigen negative epithelioid cells.

  18. Morphostructural analysis of human follicular stem cells on highly porous bone hydroxyapatite scaffold.

    PubMed

    Tetè, S; Mastrangelo, F; Carone, L; Nargi, E; Costanzo, G; Vinci, R; Burruano, F; Tortorici, S; Dadorante, V; Caciagli, F; Traini, T; Gherlone, E; Caraffa, A; Salini, V; Conti, P; Ciccarelli, R

    2007-01-01

    In this study we investigated the in vitro behaviour, morphostructure and extracellular matrix synthesis of human dental follicular stem cells (hDFSCs) isolated from human dental bud, which resulted to be positive for mesenchymal markers (CD29, CD90, CD146 and CD166) by FACS analysis. Cells were analysed by light and electronic microscopy to evaluate their biological response either at week 1, that is before differentiation, or at weeks 3-6, when they had been cultured in osteogenic medium onto a highly porous natural scaffold material (Bio-Oss). Microscopy analysis of primary culture cells showed they had a mesenchymal stem cell-like morphostructure, spindle shaped, similar to the culture of mesenchymal stem cells derived from adult bone marrow. Also, after osteogenic differentiation, these analyses indicate typical osteoblast morphostructure and reveale a tri-dimensional organization of the cells and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) in close contact with biomaterial. This approach would allow to personalize the scaffold for bone tissue engineering in order to accelerate the process of osteogenesis. PMID:18179737

  19. Development of an In Vitro Cell System from Zebrafish Suitable to Study Bone Cell Differentiation and Extracellular Matrix Mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Parameswaran; Laizé, Vincent; Cardeira, João; Trindade, Marlene

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Mechanisms of bone formation and skeletal development have been successfully investigated in zebrafish using a variety of in vivo approaches, but in vitro studies have been hindered due to a lack of homologous cell lines capable of producing an extracellular matrix (ECM) suitable for mineral deposition. Here we describe the development and characterization of a new cell line termed ZFB1, derived from zebrafish calcified tissues. ZFB1 cells have an epithelium-like phenotype, grow at 28°C in a regular L-15 medium supplemented with 15% of fetal bovine serum, and are maintained and manipulated using standard methods (e.g., trypsinization, cryopreservation, and transfection). They can therefore be propagated and maintained easily in most cell culture facilities. ZFB1 cells show aneuploidy with 2n=78 chromosomes, indicative of cell transformation. Furthermore, because DNA can be efficiently delivered into their intracellular space by nucleofection, ZFB1 cells are suitable for gene targeting approaches and for assessing gene promoter activity. ZFB1 cells can also differentiate toward osteoblast or chondroblast lineages, as demonstrated by expression of osteoblast- and chondrocyte-specific markers, they exhibit an alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker of bone formation in vivo, and they can mineralize their ECM. Therefore, they represent a valuable zebrafish-derived in vitro system for investigating bone cell differentiation and extracellular matrix mineralization. PMID:23909483

  20. Coordinated regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation on microstructured titanium surfaces by endogenous bone morphogenetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Hyzy, Sharon L; Haithcock, David A; Cundiff, Caitlin A; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2015-04-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into osteoblasts on microstructured titanium (Ti) surfaces without addition of medium supplements, suggesting that surface-dependent endogenous mechanisms are involved. They produce bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), which regulate MSC differentiation and bone formation via autocrine/paracrine mechanisms that are modulated by changes in BMP mRNA and protein, receptors, and inhibitors (Noggin, Cerberus, Gremlin 1, and Chordin). We examined expression of BMPs, their receptors and their inhibitors over time and used BMP2-silenced cells to determine how modulating endogenous BMP signaling can affect the process. MSCs were cultured on tissue culture polystyrene or Ti [PT (Ra<0.4?m); sandblasted/acid-etched Ti (SLA, Ra=3.2?m); or hydrophilic-SLA (modSLA)]. BMP mRNAs and proteins increased by day 4 of culture. Exogenous BMP2 increased differentiation whereas differentiation was decreased in BMP2-silenced cells. Noggin was regulated by day 2 whereas Gremlin 1 and Cerberus were regulated after 6days. Osteoblastic differentiation increased in cells cultured with blocking antibodies against Noggin, Gremlin 1, and Cerberus. Endogenous BMPs enhance an osteogenic microenvironment whereas exogenous BMPs are inhibitory. Antibody blocking of the BMP2 inhibitor Cerberus resulted in IL-6 and IL-8 levels that were similar to those observed when treating cells with exogenous BMP2, while antibodies targeting the inhibitors Gremlin or Noggin did not. These results suggest that microstructured titanium implants supporting therapeutic stem cells may be treated with appropriately selected agents antagonistic to extracellular BMP inhibitors in order to enhance BMP2 mediated bone repair while avoiding undesirable inflammatory side effects observed with exogenous BMP2 treatment. PMID:25554602

  1. Mechanical strain effect on bone-resorbing activity and messenger RNA expressions of marker enzymes in isolated osteoclast culture.

    PubMed

    Kurata, K; Uemura, T; Nemoto, A; Tateishi, T; Murakami, T; Higaki, H; Miura, H; Iwamoto, Y

    2001-04-01

    Adaptive modeling and remodeling are controlled by the activities of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, which are capable of sensing their mechanical environments and regulating deposition or resorption of bone matrix. The effects of mechanical stimuli on isolated osteoclasts have been scarcely examined because it has proven to be difficult to prepare a number of pure osteoclasts and to cultivate them on mineralized substratum during mechanical stimulation. Recently, we developed an apparatus for applying mechanical stretching to the ivory slice/plastic plate component on which cells could be cultured. The loading frequency, strain rate, and generated strain over an ivory surface could be controlled by a personal computer. Using this apparatus, we examined the role of mechanical stretching on the bone-resorbing activity of the osteoclasts. Mature and highly enriched osteoclasts were cultured for 2, 12, and 24 h on the ivory/plate component while being subjected to intermittent tensile strain. The stretched osteoclasts showed enhanced messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of osteoclast marker enzymes, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), and cathepsin K and increases of resorbed-pit formation, suggesting that the mechanical stretching up-regulated the bone-resorbing activity of the osteoclasts. A stretch-activated cation (SA-cat) channel blocker significantly inhibited the increases of the mRNA level and pit formation after 24 h of stretching. This study suggested the possibility that the mature osteoclasts responded to mechanical stretching through a mechanism involving a SA-cat channel in the absence of mesenchymal cells and, as a result, up-regulated their bone-resorbing activity. PMID:11316000

  2. Paracrine Interactions between Mesenchymal Stem Cells Affect Substrate Driven Differentiation toward Tendon and Bone Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ram I.; Snedeker, Jess G.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated substrate dependent paracrine signaling between subpopulations of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) that may affect the formation, or perhaps malformation, of the regenerating tendon to bone enthesis. Polyacrylamide substrates approximating the elastic modulus of tendon granulation tissue and the osteoid of healing bone (10–90 kPa) were functionalized with whole length fibronectin (Fn), type-I collagen (Col), or a mixed ligand solution (Fn/Col), and BMSCs were cultured in growth media alone or media supplemented with soluble Col or Fn. More rigid substrates with a narrow mechanical gradient (70–90 kPa) robustly induced osteogenic cell differentiation when functionalized with either Col or Fn. On broader mechanical gradient substrates (with a linear elastic modulus gradient from 10–90 kPa), cell differentiation was markedly osteogenic on subregions of Fn functionalized substrates above 20 kPa, but osteogenic activity was inhibited on all subregions of Col substrates. Osteogenic behavior was not observed when cells were cultured on Fn substrates if Col was present either in the media or on the substrate (Fn/Col). Tenogenic differentiation markers were observed only on Col substrates with moderate rigidity (?30–50 kPa). Tenogenic differentiation was unaltered by soluble or substrate bound Fn. Co-culture of narrow gradient subsections revealed that any inclusion of tenogenic substrates (30–50 kPa, Col), caused otherwise osteogenic substrates to not develop markers of osteogenic differentiation, while increasing cell proliferation. These apparently paracrine effects could be mediated by bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), as first confirmed by gene-level expression of BMP-2 and the transcription factor Smad8, and verified by BMP-2 media supplementation at levels similar to observed cell-secreted concentrations, which arrested osteogenic differentiation in 14 day cultures. Thus, cell instructive biomaterials with engineered mechanical and biochemical properties represent potentially powerful tools for directing BMSC differentiation to tendon and bone, however paracrine signals from tenogenic cells may delay osteogenesis at the healing enthesis. PMID:22355373

  3. T lymphocyte differentiation in vitro from adult human prethymic CD34+ bone marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Pluripotent lymphohematopoietic stem cells are probably confined to bone marrow cells expressing CD34 surface molecules. To investigate the capacity of adult human CD34+ bone marrow cells to differentiate along the T lymphoid lineage, we plated purified CD34+ cells from healthy adults in liquid culture on adherent thymic stromal cells prepared from HLA- or blood group-mismatched postnatal thymic tissue. We show that purified CD34+CD3-CD4-CD8- bone marrow cells contained progenitors with the ability to differentiate into CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes expressing surface (s)CD3 and T cell receptor alpha/beta in vitro. These progenitors were found in the CD34+CD2+sCD3-CD4-CD8-, CD34+CD7+sCD3-CD4-CD8-, and CD34+CD2+CD7+sCD3-CD4-CD8-, as well as in the CD34+CD2-sCD3-CD4-CD8-, CD34+CD7-sCD3-CD4-CD8-, and CD34+CD2-CD7- sCD3-CD4-CD8- subsets, indicating that T lymphocyte progenitors sensitive to signals mediated by thymic stroma in vitro are not restricted to CD34+ cells already coexpressing early T lymphocyte- associated markers. Finally, we show that T lymphopoiesis was enhanced by c-kit ligand. PMID:7684429

  4. Labeling and tracing of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for tendon-to-bone tunnel healing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yong-Gang Li; Ji-Nan Wei; Jun Lu; Xiao-Tao Wu; Gao-Jun Teng

    Purpose  To investigate the effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on tendon-to-bone tunnel healing and provide experimental\\u000a evidence for labeling and tracing of stem cells.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Rat BMSCs were harvested using the adherence separation technique and labeled by super paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) and\\u000a 1,1-Dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (Dil) particles. Thirty-nine male Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats\\u000a aged 8 weeks were randomly divided into two

  5. Characteristics and response of mouse bone marrow derived novel low adherent mesenchymal stem cells acquired by quantification of extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ri-Cheng; Heo, Seong-Joo; Koak, Jai-Young; Lee, Joo-Hee; Park, Ji-Man

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of present study was to identify characteristic and response of mouse bone marrow (BM) derived low-adherent bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) obtained by quantification of extracellular matrix (ECM). MATERIALS AND METHODS Non-adherent cells acquired by ECM coated dishes were termed low-adherent BMMSCs and these cells were analyzed by in vitro and in vivo methods, including colony forming unit fibroblast (CFU-f), bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), multi-potential differentiation, flow cytometry and transplantation into nude mouse to measure the bone formation ability of these low-adherent BMMSCs. Titanium (Ti) discs with machined and anodized surfaces were prepared. Adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs were cultured on the Ti discs for testing their proliferation. RESULTS The amount of CFU-f cells was significantly higher when non-adherent cells were cultured on ECM coated dishes, which was made by 7 days culturing of adherent BMMSCs. Low-adherent BMMSCs had proliferation and differentiation potential as adherent BMMSCs in vitro. The mean amount bone formation of adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs was also investigated in vivo. There was higher cell proliferation appearance in adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs seeded on anodized Ti discs than machined Ti discs by time. CONCLUSION Low-adherent BMMSCs acquired by ECM from non-adherent cell populations maintained potential characteristic similar to those of the adherent BMMSCs and therefore could be used effectively as adherent BMMSCs in clinic. PMID:25352957

  6. Bioactive Copper-Doped Glass Scaffolds Can Stimulate Endothelial Cells in Co-Culture in Combination with Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Subha N.; Brandl, Andreas; Hiller, Daniel; Hoppe, Alexander; Gbureck, Uwe; Horch, Raymund E.; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Kneser, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive glass (BG) scaffolds are being investigated for bone tissue engineering applications because of their osteoconductive and angiogenic nature. However, to increase the in vivo performance of the scaffold, including enhancing the angiogenetic growth into the scaffolds, some researchers use different modifications of the scaffold including addition of inorganic ionic components to the basic BG composition. In this study, we investigated the in vitro biocompatibility and bioactivity of Cu2+-doped BG derived scaffolds in either BMSC (bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells)-only culture or co-culture of BMSC and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC). In BMSC-only culture, cells were seeded either directly on the scaffolds (3D or direct culture) or were exposed to ionic dissolution products of the BG scaffolds, kept in permeable cell culture inserts (2D or indirect culture). Though we did not observe any direct osteoinduction of BMSCs by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay or by PCR, there was increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, observed by PCR and ELISA assays. Additionally, the scaffolds showed no toxicity to BMSCs and there were healthy live cells found throughout the scaffold. To analyze further the reasons behind the increased VEGF expression and to exploit the benefits of the finding, we used the indirect method with HDMECs in culture plastic and Cu2+-doped BG scaffolds with or without BMSCs in cell culture inserts. There was clear observation of increased endothelial markers by both FACS analysis and acetylated LDL (acLDL) uptake assay. Only in presence of Cu2+-doped BG scaffolds with BMSCs, a high VEGF secretion was demonstrated by ELISA; and typical tubular structures were observed in culture plastics. We conclude that Cu2+-doped BG scaffolds release Cu2+, which in turn act on BMSCs to secrete VEGF. This result is of significance for the application of BG scaffolds in bone tissue engineering approaches. PMID:25470000

  7. Bioactive copper-doped glass scaffolds can stimulate endothelial cells in co-culture in combination with mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rath, Subha N; Brandl, Andreas; Hiller, Daniel; Hoppe, Alexander; Gbureck, Uwe; Horch, Raymund E; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Kneser, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive glass (BG) scaffolds are being investigated for bone tissue engineering applications because of their osteoconductive and angiogenic nature. However, to increase the in vivo performance of the scaffold, including enhancing the angiogenetic growth into the scaffolds, some researchers use different modifications of the scaffold including addition of inorganic ionic components to the basic BG composition. In this study, we investigated the in vitro biocompatibility and bioactivity of Cu2+-doped BG derived scaffolds in either BMSC (bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells)-only culture or co-culture of BMSC and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC). In BMSC-only culture, cells were seeded either directly on the scaffolds (3D or direct culture) or were exposed to ionic dissolution products of the BG scaffolds, kept in permeable cell culture inserts (2D or indirect culture). Though we did not observe any direct osteoinduction of BMSCs by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay or by PCR, there was increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, observed by PCR and ELISA assays. Additionally, the scaffolds showed no toxicity to BMSCs and there were healthy live cells found throughout the scaffold. To analyze further the reasons behind the increased VEGF expression and to exploit the benefits of the finding, we used the indirect method with HDMECs in culture plastic and Cu2+-doped BG scaffolds with or without BMSCs in cell culture inserts. There was clear observation of increased endothelial markers by both FACS analysis and acetylated LDL (acLDL) uptake assay. Only in presence of Cu2+-doped BG scaffolds with BMSCs, a high VEGF secretion was demonstrated by ELISA; and typical tubular structures were observed in culture plastics. We conclude that Cu2+-doped BG scaffolds release Cu2+, which in turn act on BMSCs to secrete VEGF. This result is of significance for the application of BG scaffolds in bone tissue engineering approaches. PMID:25470000

  8. Effect of Intra-Medullar and Intra-Venous Infusions of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Cell Engraftment by In-Vivo Cell Tracking and Osteoinductivity in Rabbit Long Bones: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, Akikazu; Ohmine, Ken; Weisbrode, Steve E; Bertone, Alicia L

    2014-01-01

    Objective Stem cell therapy can be an efficacious treatment option for bone fragility disorders (eg, osteogenesis imperfecta, disuse osteopenia, and osteoporosis), and successful cell therapy application may be dependent on optimal cell engraftment in target bones. The objective of this study was to compare the efficiency of intra-medullar and intra-venous delivery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to improve cell engraftment rate, bone mineral density, and micro-architecture. Methods By using six healthy juvenile New Zealand White rabbits, MSC were isolated from cancellous bone harvests and confirmed to have osteogenic capacity by inducing ectopic bone formation. The MSC were cultured, transduced by foamy viral vectors with marker genes for in vivo cell tracking, and expanded. All rabbits had one randomly selected limb receive intra-medullar infusion of 3×107 to 1×108 autologous MSC in the distal femur or the distal femur and proximal tibia. Two of six rabbits also received an intra-venous MSC infusion. At 28 days, MSC bone engraftment was assessed by PCR and the bone density and microstructure assessed by computed tomography and histomorphometry. Results The intra-medullar-infused MSC were detected in epiphysis or diaphysis of the distal femurs and/or proximal tibiae. Infused MSC comprised 0.01 to 0.3% of all cells in the bone tissues. The intra-venous-infused MSC were not detected in any location. Neither intra-medullar nor intra-venous MSC infusion altered bone volume, bone mineral density, or cortical bone porosity/thickness. Systemic biodistribution of intra-medullar-infused MSC was not evident. Conclusions Our results indicated that intra-medullar infusion can be an effective cell delivery route for stem cell therapy potentially for orthopedic disorders, in preference to systemic administration. Further research is warranted to demonstrate an efficacy of intra-medullar MSC infusion on bone density and micro-architecture using animal models of bone disorders. PMID:25520900

  9. Parathyroid hormone-related protein is a gravisensor in lung and bone cell biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torday, J. S.

    2003-10-01

    Parathyroid Hormone-related Protein (PTHrP) has been shown to be essential for the development and homeostatic regulation of lung and bone. Since both lung and bone structure and function are affected by microgravity, we hypothesized that 0 × g down-regulates PTHrP signaling. To test this hypothesis, we suspended lung and bone cells in the simulated microgravity environment of a Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor, which simulates microgravity, for up to 72 hours. During the first 8 hours of exposure to simulated 0 × g, PTHrP expression fell precipitously, decreasing by 80-90%; during the subsequent 64 hours, PTHrP expression remained at this newly established level of expression. PTHrP production decreased from 12 pg/ml/hour to 1 pg/ml/hour in culture medium from microgravity-exposed cells. The cells were then recultured at unit gravity for 24hours, and PTHrP expression and production returned to normal levels. Based on these findings, we have obtained bones from rats flown in space for 2 weeks (Mission STS-58, SL-2). Analysis of PTHrP expression by femurs and tibias from these animals (n=5) revealed that PTHrP expression was 60% lower than in bones from control ground-based rats. Interestingly, there were no differences in PTHrP expression by parietal bone from space-exposed versus ground-based animals, indicating that the effect of weightlessness on PTHrP expression is due to the unweighting of weight-bearing bones. This finding is consistent with other studies of microgravity-induced osteoporosis. The loss of the PTHrP signaling mechanism may be corrected using chemical agents that up-regulate this pathway. In conclusion, PTHrP represents a stretch-sensitive paracrine signaling mechanism that may sense gravity.

  10. In vivo bone formation by human bone marrow stromal cells: Effect of carrier particle size and shape

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mahesh H. Mankani; Sergei A. Kuznetsov; Bruce Fowler; Albert Kingman; Pamela Gehron Robey

    2001-01-01

    Successful closure of bone defects in patients remains an active area of basic and clinical research. A novel and promising approach is the transplantation of human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), which have been shown to possess a significant osteogenic poten- tial. The extent and quality of bone formation by trans- planted human BMSCs strongly depends on the carrier matrix

  11. Dual growth factor delivery and controlled scaffold degradation enhance in vivo bone formation by transplanted bone marrow stromal cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig A. Simmons; Eben Alsberg; Susan Hsiong; Woo J. Kim; David J. Mooneya

    2004-01-01

    Supraphysiological concentrations of exogenous growth factors are typically required to obtain bone regeneration, and it is unclear why lower levels are not effective. We hypothesized that delivery of bone progenitor cells along with appropriate combinations of growth factors and scaffold characteristics would allow physiological doses of proteins to be used for therapeutic bone regeneration. We tested this hypothesis by measuring

  12. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor and Spatiotemporal Cues Induce Development of Vascularized Bone Tissue by Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Daphne L.; Moore, Erika M.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Vasculature is essential to the functional integration of a tissue-engineered bone graft to enable sufficient nutrient delivery and viability after implantation. Native bone and vasculature develop through intimately coupled, tightly regulated spatiotemporal cell–cell signaling. The complexity of these developmental processes has been a challenge for tissue engineers to recapitulate, resulting in poor codevelopment of both bone and vasculature within a unified graft. To address this, we cultured adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs), a clinically relevant, single cell source that has been previously investigated for its ability to give rise to vascularized bone grafts, and studied the effects of initial spatial organization of cells, the temporal addition of growth factors, and the presence of exogenous platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) on the codevelopment of bone and vascular tissue structures. Human ASCs were aggregated into multicellular spheroids via the hanging drop method before encapsulation and subsequent outgrowth in fibrin gels. Cellular aggregation substantially increased vascular network density, interconnectivity, and pericyte coverage compared to monodispersed cultures. To form robust vessel networks, it was essential to culture ASCs in a purely vasculogenic medium for at least 8 days before the addition of osteogenic cues. Physiologically relevant concentrations of exogenous PDGF-BB (20?ng/mL) substantially enhanced both vascular network stability and osteogenic differentiation. Comparisons with the bone morphogenetic protein-2, another pro-osteogenic and proangiogenic growth factor, indicated that this potential to couple the formation of both lineages might be unique to PDGF-BB. Furthermore, the resulting tissue structure demonstrated the close association of mineral deposits with pre-existing vascular structures that have been described for developing tissues. This combination of a single cell source with a potent induction factor used at physiological concentrations can provide a clinically relevant approach to engineering highly vascularized bone grafts. PMID:23582144

  13. Bone marrow stem cells contribute to healing of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Poulsom, Richard; Alison, Malcolm R; Cook, Terry; Jeffery, Rosemary; Ryan, Eoin; Forbes, Stuart J; Hunt, Toby; Wyles, Susannah; Wright, Nicholas A

    2003-06-01

    A variety of recent studies support the existence of pathways, in adult humans and rodents, that allow adult stem cells to be surprisingly flexible in their differentiation repertoires. Termed plasticity, this property allows adult stem cells, assumed until now to be committed to generating a fixed range of progeny, on relocation to switch to make other specialized sets of cells appropriate to their new niche. Cells normally present within the bone marrow seem particularly flexible and are able to contribute usefully to many recipient organs. In studies of the liver, bone marrow-derived cells are seen with specialized structural and metabolic adaptations commensurate with their new locations, and these may be abundant, even sufficient, to rescue recipient mice from genetic defects and with evidence that they have proliferated in situ. In the kidney, several studies provide evidence for the presence of "reprogrammed" cells, but in most, it remains possible that cells arrive and redifferentiate but are no longer stem cells. Nevertheless, that appropriately differentiated cells are delivered deep within organs simply by injection of bone marrow cells should make us think differently about the way organs regenerate and repair. Migratory pathways for multipotential cells could be exploited to effect repairs using an individual's own stem cells, perhaps after gene therapy. This concept makes it clear that a transplanted organ would in time become affected by the genetic susceptibilities of the recipient, because of phenotypes that are expressed when trafficking cells incorporate and differentiate. PMID:12761239

  14. Maxillofacial-derived stem cells regenerate critical mandibular bone defect.

    PubMed

    Steinhardt, Yair; Aslan, Hadi; Regev, Eran; Zilberman, Yoram; Kallai, Ilan; Gazit, Dan; Gazit, Zulma

    2008-11-01

    Stem cell-based bone tissue regeneration in the maxillofacial complex is a clinical necessity. Genetic engineering of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to follow specific differentiation pathways may enhance the ability of these cells to regenerate and increase their clinical relevance. MSCs isolated from maxillofacial bone marrow (BM) are good candidates for tissue regeneration at sites of damage to the maxillofacial complex. In this study, we hypothesized that MSCs isolated from the maxillofacial complex can be engineered to overexpress the bone morphogenetic protein-2 gene and induce bone tissue regeneration in vivo. To demonstrate that the cells isolated from the maxillofacial complex were indeed MSCs, we performed a flow cytometry analysis, which revealed a high expression of mesenchyme-related markers and an absence of non-mesenchyme-related markers. In vitro, the MSCs were able to differentiate into osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. Gene delivery of the osteogenic gene BMP2 via an adenoviral vector revealed high expression levels of BMP2 protein that induced osteogenic differentiation of these cells in vitro and induced bone formation in an ectopic site in vivo. In addition, implantation of genetically engineered maxillofacial BM-derived MSCs into a mandibular defect led to regeneration of tissue at the site of the defect; this was confirmed by performing micro-computed tomography analysis. Histological analysis of the mandibles revealed osteogenic differentiation of implanted cells as well as bone tissue regeneration. We conclude that maxillofacial BM-derived MSCs can be genetically engineered to induce bone tissue regeneration in the maxillofacial complex and that this finding may be clinically relevant. PMID:18636943

  15. An Osteoblast-Derived Proteinase Controls Tumor Cell Survival via TGF-beta Activation in the Bone Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Thiolloy, Sophie; Edwards, James R.; Fingleton, Barbara; Rifkin, Daniel B.; Matrisian, Lynn M.; Lynch, Conor C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast to bone metastases frequently induce a “vicious cycle” in which osteoclast mediated bone resorption and proteolysis results in the release of bone matrix sequestered factors that drive tumor growth. While osteoclasts express numerous proteinases, analysis of human breast to bone metastases unexpectedly revealed that bone forming osteoblasts were consistently positive for the proteinase, MMP-2. Given the role of MMP-2 in extracellular matrix degradation and growth factor/cytokine processing, we tested whether osteoblast derived MMP-2 contributed to the vicious cycle of tumor progression in the bone microenvironment. Methodology/Principal Findings To test our hypothesis, we utilized murine models of the osteolytic tumor-bone microenvironment in immunocompetent wild type and MMP-2 null mice. In longitudinal studies, we found that host MMP-2 significantly contributed to tumor progression in bone by protecting against apoptosis and promoting cancer cell survival (caspase-3; immunohistochemistry). Our data also indicate that host MMP-2 contributes to tumor induced osteolysis (?CT, histomorphometry). Further ex vivo/in vitro experiments with wild type and MMP-2 null osteoclast and osteoblast cultures identified that 1) the absence of MMP-2 did not have a deleterious effect on osteoclast function (cd11B isolation, osteoclast differentiation, transwell migration and dentin resorption assay); and 2) that osteoblast derived MMP-2 promoted tumor survival by regulating the bioavailability of TGF?, a factor critical for cell-cell communication in the bone (ELISA, immunoblot assay, clonal and soft agar assays). Conclusion/Significance Collectively, these studies identify a novel “mini-vicious cycle” between the osteoblast and metastatic cancer cells that is key for initial tumor survival in the bone microenvironment. In conclusion, the findings of our study suggest that the targeted inhibition of MMP-2 and/or TGF? would be beneficial for the treatment of bone metastases. PMID:22238668

  16. Solitary phalangeal metastasis of renal cell carcinoma on bone scintigram.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Luke I; Halim, Mohamed Y; Balan, Kottekkattu K

    2011-03-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is known to cause lytic metastasis at various sites including axial and appendicular skeleton. However, it is unusual to find an isolated metastasis of renal cell carcinoma in the distal extremity on bone scintigraphy. A 70-year-old woman with renal cell carcinoma was referred to the Nuclear Medicine Department for a bone scintigram to exclude metastasis. The whole-body planar images were unremarkable, but the local views of the hands demonstrated a solitary metastasis in the middle phalanx of the finger. This rare experience illustrates the need for including local views of extremities in a standard whole-body study. PMID:21285689

  17. Stimulating effects of Grifola frondosa (Maitake) on human osteoblastic cell cultures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ashraf Saif; Ulrike Lindequist; Kristian Wende

    2007-01-01

    The effect of Grifola frondosa (GF) total water extract on two osteoblastic cell cultures (HOS58 and SaOS-2) was investigated to determine if this edible\\u000a medicinal mushroom has osteoinductive properties. The activity of alkaline phosphate and mineralization were used as indicators\\u000a for the vitality and maturation of bone cells. The cultivation of human osteosarcoma cells HOS58 for 5 days in the presence

  18. Human bone marrow stem cell-encapsulating calcium phosphate scaffolds for bone repair

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Michael D.; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2010-01-01

    Due to its injectability and excellent osteoconductivity, calcium phosphate cement (CPC) is highly promising for orthopedic applications. However, a literature search revealed no report on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (hBMSC) encapsulation in CPC for bone tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to encapsulate hBMSCs in alginate hydrogel beads and then incorporate them into CPC, CPC–chitosan and CPC–chitosan–fiber scaffolds. Chitosan and degradable fibers were used to mechanically reinforce the scaffolds. After 21 days, that the percentage of live cells and the cell density of hBMSCs inside CPC-based constructs matched those in alginate without CPC, indicating that the CPC setting reaction did not harm the hBMSCs. Alkaline phosphate activity increased by 8-fold after 14 days. Mineral staining, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction confirmed that apatitic mineral was deposited by the cells. The amount of hBMSC-synthesized mineral in CPC–chitosan–fiber matched that in CPC without chitosan and fibers. Hence, adding chitosan and fibers, which reinforced the CPC, did not compromise hBMSC osteodifferentiation and mineral synthesis. In conclusion, hBMSCs were encapsulated in CPC and CPC–chitosan–fiber scaffolds for the first time. The encapsulated cells remained viable, osteodifferentiated and synthesized bone minerals. These self-setting, hBMSC-encapsulating CPC-based constructs may be promising for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:20451676

  19. Cytokine production by bone marrow mononuclear cells in inherited bone marrow failure syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Ken; Giri, Neelam; Alter, Blanche P.; Pinto, Ligia A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fanconi anaemia (FA), dyskeratosis congenita (DC), Diamond-Blackfan anaemia (DBA), and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) are characterized by the progressive development of bone marrow failure. Overproduction of tumour necrosis factor-? (TNF-?, TNF) from activated bone marrow T-cells has been proposed as a mechanism of FA-related aplasia. Whether such overproduction occurs in the other syndromes is unknown. We conducted a comparative study on bone marrow mononuclear cells to examine the cellular subset composition and cytokine production. We found lower proportions of haematopoietic stem cells in FA, DC, and SDS, and a lower proportion of monocytes in FA, DC, and DBA compared with controls. The T- and B-lymphocyte proportions were similar to controls, except for low B-cells in DC. We did not observe overproduction of TNF-? or IFN-? by T-cells in any patients. Induction levels of TNF-?, interleukin (IL)-6 (IL6), IL-1?, IL-10, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in monocytes stimulated with high-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were similar at 4 h but lower at 24 h when compared to controls. Unexpectedly, patient samples showed a trend toward higher cytokine level in response to low-dose (0.001 ?g/ml) LPS. Increased sensitivity to LPS may have clinical implications and could contribute to the development of pancytopenia by creating a chronic subclinical inflammatory micro-environment in the bone marrow. PMID:23889587

  20. PTH Regulates the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche in Bone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henry M. Kronenberg

    \\u000a In late fetal life, hematopoiesis moves from the liver to the bone marrow in mammals, and continues to occur throughout postnatal\\u000a life, with extramedullary hematopoiesis occurring only when disease blocks hematopoiesis in the marrow. Hematopoietic stem\\u000a cells (HSCs) are uniquely the cells that can generate cells of all hematopoietic lineages. These cells do so by balancing\\u000a an ability to increase

  1. Bone-marrow-derived stem cells — our key to longevity?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mariusz Z. Ratajczak; Ewa K. Zuba-Surma; Bogus?aw Machalinski; Magdalena Kucia

    2007-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) was for many years primarily regarded as the source of hematopoietic stem cells. In this review we discuss\\u000a current views of the BM stem cell compartment and present data showing that BM contains not only hematopoietic but also heterogeneous\\u000a non-hematopoietic stem cells. It is likely that similar or overlapping populations of primitive non-hematopoietic stem cells\\u000a in BM

  2. Infrared Spectroscopy of Plant Cell Cultures 1

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Sharon; Towill, Leigh E.

    1991-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy was used to examine suspension-cultured pear (Pyrus communis L.) and Spartina pectinata cells. Noninvasive measurements were made using internal reflectance sampling. Spectra of actively growing cells exhibited a pronounced absorbance at 2343 reciprocal centimeters. The absorbance peak was identified and verified as CO2 dissolved in water. This peak was absent in nonviable cells. Peak height was directly proportional to percent viability in artificial mixtures of viable and nonviable cells, indicating that the level of intracellular CO2 production could be used as a viability determinant for plant cells. Suspension-cultured cells were slowly cooled to subzero temperatures and analyzed for viability using infrared spectroscopy and tetrazolium staining. Both methods showed similar trends in viability assessment. Infrared spectroscopy could provide a more detailed understanding of cell viability and allow measurement on a noninvasive basis. PMID:16668026

  3. Comparison of human bone marrow stromal cells seeded on calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite, ?-tricalcium phosphate and demineralized bone matrix

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Kasten; R. Luginbühl; M. van Griensven; T. Barkhausen; C. Krettek; M. Bohner; U. Bosch

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare three resorbable biomaterials regarding seeding efficacy with human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), cell penetration into the matrix, cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA), ?-tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP), and demineralized bone matrix (DBM) were seeded with human BMSCs and kept in human serum and osteogenic supplements for 3 weeks. Morphologic and

  4. Human amnion mesenchymal stem cells promote proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuli; Yin, Ying; Jiang, Fei; Chen, Ning

    2015-02-01

    Human amnion mesenchymal stem cells (HAMSCs) can be obtained from human amniotic membrane, a highly abundant and readily available tissue. HAMSC sources present fewer ethical issues, have low immunogenicity, anti-inflammatory properties, considerable advantageous characteristics, and are considered an attractive potential treatment material in the field of regenerative medicine. We used a co-culture system to determine whether HAMSCs could promote osteogenesis in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs). We isolated HAMSCs from discarded amnion samples and collected them using pancreatin/collagenase digestion. We cultured HAMSCs and HBMSCSs in basal medium. Activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an early osteogenesis marker, was increased in the co-culture system compared to the control single cultures, which we also confirmed by ALP staining. We used immunofluorescence testing to investigate the effects of co-culturing with HAMSCs on HBMSC proliferation, which revealed that the co-culturing enhanced EdU expression in HBMSCs. Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR indicated that co-culturing promoted osteogenesis in HBMSCs. Furthermore, Alizarin red S staining revealed that extracellular matrix calcium levels in mineralized nodule formation produced by the co-cultures were higher than that in the controls. Using the same co-culture system, we further observed the effects of HAMSCs on osteogenic differentiation in primary osteoblasts by Western blotting, which better addressed the mechanism for HAMSCs in bone regeneration. The results showed HAMSCs are osteogenic and not only play a role in promoting HBMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation but also in osteoblasts, laying the foundation for new regenerative medicine methods. PMID:25432786

  5. A clinicopathological study of giant cell tumor of small bones

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Giant cell tumor (GCT) of the small bones (small-bone GCT) is usually rare and considered somewhat different from conventional GCT. The purpose of this study was to investigate and report the clinicopathological features of 11 cases with small-bone GCT. Materials and methods Patient information was obtained with the help of questionnaires. X-rays and paraffin blocks obtained from several institutions were clinically, radiographically, and histologically evaluated. Results Small-bone GCT was observed in younger patients compared to conventional GCT; 5 of the 11 (45%) patients were below 20 years of age, whereas the corresponding figure for all GCT patients is 16% in Japan. Excessive cortical bone expansion is a special feature. There were two cases of recurrence and one case of lung metastasis; the primary lesion was in the hand for all three cases. In contrast, no primary lesion of the foot recurred or metastasized. Varying degrees of positive p63 immunostaining were observed in all examined cases (n = 9) of small-bone GCT but were negative in case of giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) and solid variant of aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC). One case that demonstrated high-intensity positive staining had two episodes of recurrence. Conclusion Small-bone GCT tends to develop in younger patients than does conventional GCT. Primary GCTs of the hand may be biologically more aggressive than those of the feet. The p63 immunostaining may be useful not only for differential diagnosis but also for prognostication of small-