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Sample records for bone marrow disorders

  1. Bone marrow transplantation in subjects with mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Akaho, Rie; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Yoshino, Miyo; Hagiya, Katsuko; Akiyama, Hideki; Sakamaki, Hisashi

    2003-06-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is a critical treatment of malignant illnesses including leukemia and others. Successful achievement of BMT requires the patients to tolerate isolation for several weeks to avoid infections. They are also required to follow several regulations and instructions to survive the treatment because the patients' physical condition is complicated due to the malignant illness, preparatory treatment and transplant of bone marrow from other subjects. These could be a significant challenge for patients with mental disorders. Here the cases are reported of seven leukemia patients who were referred to the Metropolitan Komagome Hospital for BMT from April 1996 through May 2000, who had been suffering from mental disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar I mood disorder, panic disorder, dysthymic disorder, autistic disorder, and borderline personality disorder, prior to the treatment. The BMT was achieved in six out of the seven subjects; the exception was a subject with borderline personality disorder. Psychiatric treatments, including medication, to improve and maintain mental status appeared to be critical for the achievement of BMT in several patients. Understanding of the status of the malignant disease and the role of BMT was another significant issue. Test admission seemed to be helpful to reduce concerns and anxiety both in the patients and hospital staff. PMID:12753572

  2. Imaging of Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sopo; Ouyang, Tao; Kanekar, Sangam

    2016-08-01

    Bone marrow is the essential for function of hematopoiesis, which is vital for the normal functioning of the body. Bone marrow disorders or dysfunctions may be evaluated by blood workup, peripheral smears, marrow biopsy, plain radiographs, computed tomography (CT), MRI and nuclear medicine scan. It is important to distinguish normal spinal marrow from pathology to avoid missing a pathology or misinterpreting normal changes, either of which may result in further testing and increased health care costs. This article focuses on the diffuse bone marrow pathologies, because the majority of the bone marrow pathologies related to hematologic disorders are diffuse. PMID:27444005

  3. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; ...

  4. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity, nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; Umbilical ...

  5. Adult bone marrow: which stem cells for cellular therapy protocols in neurodegenerative disorders?

    PubMed

    Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine; Laudet, Emerence; Neirinckx, Virginie; Rogister, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crests (NCSCs) might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this paper, we will review all information available concerning NCSC from adult tissues and their possible use in regenerative medicine. Moreover, as multiple recent studies showed the beneficial effect of bone marrow stromal cells in neurodegenerative diseases, we will discuss which stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow should be more suitable for cell replacement therapy. PMID:22319243

  6. Adult Bone Marrow: Which Stem Cells for Cellular Therapy Protocols in Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine; Laudet, Emerence; Neirinckx, Virginie; Rogister, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crests (NCSCs) might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this paper, we will review all information available concerning NCSC from adult tissues and their possible use in regenerative medicine. Moreover, as multiple recent studies showed the beneficial effect of bone marrow stromal cells in neurodegenerative diseases, we will discuss which stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow should be more suitable for cell replacement therapy. PMID:22319243

  7. Bone marrow biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may be taken from the pelvic or breast bone. Sometimes, other areas are used. Marrow is removed ...

  8. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  9. Bone Marrow Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. ... the platelets that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem cells ...

  10. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a person's ...

  11. Bone marrow aspiration

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003658.htm Bone marrow aspiration To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside bones that helps ...

  12. Bone Marrow Derived Eosinophil Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas X.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional effector cells implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases including asthma, eosinophil gastrointestinal disorders and helminth infection. Mouse bone marrow derived progenitor cells can be differentiated into eosinophils following IL-5 exposure. These bone marrow derived eosinophils are fully differentiated at the end of a 14 day culture based on morphology and expression of molecular markers.

  13. Starvation marrow - gelatinous transformation of bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Osgood, Eric; Muddassir, Salman; Jaju, Minal; Moser, Robert; Farid, Farwa; Mewada, Nishith

    2014-01-01

    Gelatinous bone marrow transformation (GMT), also known as starvation marrow, represents a rare pathological entity of unclear etiology, in which bone marrow histopathology demonstrates hypoplasia, fat atrophy, and gelatinous infiltration. The finding of gelatinous marrow transformation lacks disease specificity; rather, it is an indicator of severe illness and a marker of poor nutritional status, found in patients with eating disorders, acute febrile illnesses, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, alcoholism, malignancies, and congestive heart failure. We present a middle-aged woman with a history of alcoholism, depression, and anorexia nervosa who presented with failure to thrive and macrocytic anemia, with bone marrow examination demonstrative of gelatinous transformation, all of which resolved with appropriate treatment. To our knowledge, there are very few cases of GMT which have been successfully treated; thus, our case highlights the importance of proper supportive management. PMID:25317270

  14. Bone marrow (stem cell) donation

    MedlinePlus

    Stem cell transplant; Allogeneic-donation ... There are two types of bone marrow donation: Autologous bone marrow transplant is when people donate their own bone marrow. "Auto" means self. Allogenic bone marrow transplant is when another person ...

  15. Bone marrow aspiration

    MedlinePlus

    ... creates suction. A small sample of bone marrow fluid flows into the tube. The needle is removed. Pressure and then a bandage are applied to the skin. The bone marrow fluid is sent to a laboratory and examined under ...

  16. Bone Marrow Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem cells or ... marrow makes too many white blood cells Other diseases, such as lymphoma, can spread into the bone ...

  17. Bone marrow biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may ... This captures a tiny sample, or core, of bone marrow within the needle. The sample and needle are ...

  18. Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplant for Inherited Metabolic Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-21

    Mucopolysaccharidosis; Hurler Syndrome; Hunter Syndrome; Maroteaux-Lamy Syndrome; Sly Syndrome; Alpha Mannosidosis; Fucosidosis; Aspartylglucosaminuria; Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD); Krabbe Disease; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy (MLD); Sphingolipidoses; Peroxisomal Disorders

  19. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains immature cells, called stem cells. The ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a ...

  20. Borderline personality disorder and bone marrow transplantation: ethical considerations and review.

    PubMed

    Weitzner, M A; Lehninger, F; Sullivan, D; Fields, K K

    1999-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is rapidly becoming a part of conventional cancer treatment. However, it remains a 'last-ditch' treatment option for patients who have exhausted other treatment modalities. Patients experience a significant amount of emotional distress during all stages of the BMT process. Patients with personality disorders experience even more emotional distress than average and their behavior is often detrimental to effective patient-staff interactions. A case of a borderline patient is presented with a discussion of the ethical issues involved in the evaluation of these patients and the determination of their appropriateness for transplant. PMID:10202782

  1. The Role of Telomere Biology in Bone Marrow Failure and Other Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Sharon A.; Alter, Blanche P.

    2008-01-01

    Telomeres, consisting of nucleotide repeats and a protein complex at chromosome ends, are essential in maintaining chromosomal integrity. Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is the inherited bone marrow failure syndrome (IBMFS) that epitomizes the effects of abnormal telomere biology. Patients with DC have extremely short telomere lengths (<1st percentile) and many have mutations in telomere biology genes. Interpretation of telomere length in other IBMFSs is less straightforward. Abnormal telomere shortening has been reported in patients with apparently acquired hematologic disorders, including aplastic anemia, myeolodysplasia, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and leukemia. In these disorders, the shortest lived cells have the shortest telomeres, suggestive of increased hematopoietic stress. Telomeres are also markers of replicative and/or oxidative stress in other complex disease pathways, such as inflammation, stress, and carcinogenesis. The spectrum of related disorders caused by mutations in telomere biology genes extends beyond classical DC to include marrow failure that does not respond to immunosuppression, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and possibly other syndromes. We suggest that such patients are categorized as having an inherited disorder of telomere biology. Longitudinal studies of patients with very short telomeres but without classical DC are necessary to further understand the long-term sequelae, such as malignancy, osteonecrosis/osteoporosis, and pulmonary and liver disease. PMID:18160098

  2. A comparison of flow cytometry, bone marrow biopsy, and bone marrow aspirates in the detection of lymphoid infiltration in B cell disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sah, S P; Matutes, E; Wotherspoon, A C; Morilla, R; Catovsky, D

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the diagnostic value of bone marrow aspirates, trephine biopsies (BMB), and flow cytometry (FC) in the assessment of bone marrow infiltration in chronic lymphoid disorders. Methods: Investigations were carried out in 110 diagnostic and follow up specimens from B cell disorders, namely: chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL; 65), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL; 39), and hairy cell leukaemia (HCL; 6). A selected panel of monoclonal antibodies was used both for FC and immunohistochemistry. Results: In CLL there was agreement between the three investigations in 71% of samples and in 88% when only FC and BMB were compared. In nine of 65 samples, FC and BMB were positive, although the aspirate was reported as negative. Four BMB negative samples had minimal residual disease (MRD) detected by FC, whereas two samples were positive both on BMB and aspirate but showed no evidence of disease on FC. In NHL, there was agreement between the three investigations in 22 of 39 cases, and in 27 of 39 cases there was agreement between FC and BMB. In eight of 39 NHL cases, FC was negative but the BMB was either positive (five) or uncertain (three), whereas in three of 39, FC was positive but BMB was either negative (one) or uncertain (two). In three of five uncertain BMB, no clonal population was detected by the polymerase chain reaction, whereas in the remaining two cases the nodular aggregates disappeared on further sectioning. Conclusions: Both BMB and FC are better than bone marrow aspirates for the detection of infiltration in B cell disorders. FC might be slightly more sensitive than BMB to detect MRD in CLL, whereas BMB may be slightly better than FC in NHL. PMID:12560392

  3. Bone marrow fat.

    PubMed

    Hardouin, Pierre; Pansini, Vittorio; Cortet, Bernard

    2014-07-01

    Bone marrow fat (BMF) results from an accumulation of fat cells within the bone marrow. Fat is not a simple filling tissue but is now considered as an actor within bone microenvironment. BMF is not comparable to other fat depots, as in subcutaneous or visceral tissues. Recent studies on bone marrow adipocytes have shown that they do not appear only as storage cells, but also as cells secreting adipokines, like leptin and adiponectin. Moreover bone marrow adipocytes share the same precursor with osteoblasts, the mesenchymal stem cell. It is now well established that high BMF is associated with weak bone mass in osteoporosis, especially during aging and anorexia nervosa. But numerous questions remain discussed: what is the precise phenotype of bone marrow adipocytes? What is the real function of BMF, and how does bone marrow adipocyte act on its environment? Is the increase of BMF during osteoporosis responsible for bone loss? Is BMF involved in other diseases? How to measure BMF in humans? A better understanding of BMF could allow to obtain new diagnostic tools for osteoporosis management, and could open major therapeutic perspectives. PMID:24703396

  4. Intravitreal Implantation of Genetically Modified Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells for Treating Retinal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Christopher J; Sanders, Douglas N; Bryan, Jeffrey N; Jensen, Cheryl A; Castaner, Leilani J; Kirk, Mark D; Katz, Martin L

    2016-01-01

    A number of retinal degenerative diseases may be amenable to treatment with continuous intraocular delivery of therapeutic agents that cannot be delivered effectively to the retina via systemic or topical administration. Among these disorders are lysosomal storage diseases resulting from deficiencies in soluble lysosomal enzymes. Most cells, including those of the retina, are able to take up these enzymes and incorporate them in active form into their lysosomes. In theory, therefore, continuous intraocular administration of a normal form of a soluble lysosomal enzyme should be able to cure the molecular defect in the retinas of subjects lacking this enzyme. Experiments were conducted to determine whether genetically modified bone marrow-derived stem cells implanted into the vitreous could be used as -vehicles for continuous delivery of such enzymes to the retina. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from normal mice were implanted into the vitreous of mice undergoing retinal degeneration as a result of a mutation in the PPT1 gene. The implanted cells appeared to survive indefinitely in the vitreous without proliferating or invading the retina. This indicates that intravitreal implantation of MSCs is likely a safe means of long-term delivery of proteins synthesized by the implanted cells. Experiments have been initiated to test the efficacy of using genetically modified autologous MSCs to inhibit retinal degeneration in a canine model of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. PMID:26427461

  5. Intravitreal Implantation of Genetically Modified Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells for Treating Retinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Christopher J.; Sanders, Douglas N.; Bryan, Jeffrey N.; Jensen, Cheryl A.; Castaner, Leilani J.; Kirk, Mark D.; Katz, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    A number of retinal degenerative diseases may be amenable to treatment with continuous intraocular delivery of therapeutic agents that cannot be delivered effectively to the retina via systemic or topical administration. Among these disorders are lysosomal storage diseases resulting from deficiencies in soluble lysosomal enzymes. Most cells, including those of the retina, are able to take up these enzymes and incorporate them in active form into their lysosomes. In theory, therefore, continuous intraocular administration of a normal form of a soluble lysosomal enzyme should be able to cure the molecular defect in the retinas of subjects lacking this enzyme. Experiments were conducted to determine whether genetically modified bone marrow-derived stem cells implanted into the vitreous could be used as vehicles for continuous delivery of such enzymes to the retina. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from normal mice were implanted into the vitreous of mice undergoing retinal degeneration as a result of a mutation in the PPT1 gene. The implanted cells appeared to survive indefinitely in the vitreous without proliferating or invading the retina. This indicates that intravitreal implantation of MSCs is likely a safe means of long-term delivery of proteins synthesized by the implanted cells. Experiments have been initiated to test the efficacy of using genetically modified autologous MSCs to inhibit retinal degeneration in a canine model of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. PMID:26427461

  6. Bone marrow culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2015 Updated by: Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. Also reviewed ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  7. Bone marrow skeletal stem/progenitor cell defects in dyskeratosis congenita and telomere biology disorders.

    PubMed

    Balakumaran, Arun; Mishra, Prasun J; Pawelczyk, Edyta; Yoshizawa, Sayuri; Sworder, Brian J; Cherman, Natasha; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Bianco, Paolo; Giri, Neelam; Savage, Sharon A; Merlino, Glenn; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Young, Neal S; Alter, Blanche P; Robey, Pamela G

    2015-01-29

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is an inherited multisystem disorder, characterized by oral leukoplakia, nail dystrophy, and abnormal skin pigmentation, as well as high rates of bone marrow (BM) failure, solid tumors, and other medical problems such as osteopenia. DC and telomere biology disorders (collectively referred to as TBD here) are caused by germline mutations in telomere biology genes leading to very short telomeres and limited proliferative potential of hematopoietic stem cells. We found that skeletal stem cells (SSCs) within the BM stromal cell population (BMSCs, also known as BM-derived mesenchymal stem cells), may contribute to the hematologic phenotype. TBD-BMSCs exhibited reduced clonogenicity, spontaneous differentiation into adipocytes and fibrotic cells, and increased senescence in vitro. Upon in vivo transplantation into mice, TBD-BMSCs failed to form bone or support hematopoiesis, unlike normal BMSCs. TERC reduction (a TBD-associated gene) in normal BMSCs by small interfering TERC-RNA (siTERC-RNA) recapitulated the TBD-BMSC phenotype by reducing proliferation and secondary colony-forming efficiency, and by accelerating senescence in vitro. Microarray profiles of control and siTERC-BMSCs showed decreased hematopoietic factors at the messenger RNA level and decreased secretion of factors at the protein level. These findings are consistent with defects in SSCs/BMSCs contributing to BM failure in TBD. PMID:25499762

  8. Detection of bone marrow involvement in newly diagnosed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder: (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography versus bone marrow biopsy.

    PubMed

    Gheysens, Olivier; Thielemans, Sanne; Morscio, Julie; Boeckx, Nancy; Goffin, Karolien E; Deroose, Christophe M; Sagaert, Xavier; Wlodarska, Iwona; Verhoef, Gregor; Dierickx, Daan; Tousseyn, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Detecting bone marrow involvement (BMI) in lymphoma is important as it adversely affects stage. Bone marrow biopsy (BMB) remains the standard to detect BMI but is prone to sampling error. We retrospectively investigated whether (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET/CT) could identify BMI in patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) with sufficient accuracy in comparison with staging BMB. Twenty-five patients diagnosed with PTLD who underwent (18)F-FDG-PET/CT and BMB within one month were evaluated. Based on our criteria, six patients (24%) were considered positive for BMI on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT compared to one by BMB. Although we cannot completely exclude false positive results on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT, our data indicate a significantly higher sensitivity of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT compared to BMB (100% vs 17%) but similar specificity. These data confirm the high diagnostic performance of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT for detecting BMI, but prospective studies are needed to determine whether (18)F-FDG-PET/CT could indeed replace staging BMB in PTLD. PMID:26854937

  9. [Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes].

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yusuke

    2016-02-01

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes comprise a series of disorders caused by various gene mutations. Genetic tests were formerly difficult to perform because of the large size and number of causative genes. However, recent advances in next-generation sequencing has enabled simultaneous testing of all causative genes to be performed at an acceptable cost. We collaboratively conducted a series of whole-exome sequencing studies of patients with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes and discovered RPS27/RPL27 and FANCT as causative genes of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Fanconi anemia, respectively. Furthermore, we established a target gene sequencing system to cover 189 genes associated with pediatric blood diseases to assist genetic diagnoses in clinical practice. In this review, discovery of new causative genes and possible roles of next-generation sequencing in the genetic diagnosis of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are discussed. PMID:26935625

  10. Comparison of a restrictive versus liberal red cell transfusion policy for patients with myelodysplasia, aplastic anaemia, and other congenital bone marrow failure disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yisu; Estcourt, Lise J; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Vyas, Paresh

    2015-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the efficacy and safety of a restrictive versus liberal red cell transfusion strategy for patients with long-term bone marrow failure. These include myelodysplasia, acquired aplastic anaemia, and other inherited bone marrow failure disorders. PMID:25983657

  11. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow KidsHealth > For Teens > Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow Print A A A Text Size What's in ... Risks If You Have Questions What It Is Bone marrow aspirations and biopsies are performed to examine bone ...

  12. Bone marrow-derived macrophages and the CNS: An update on the use of experimental chimeric mouse models and bone marrow transplantation in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Larochelle, Antoine; Bellavance, Marc-André; Michaud, Jean-Philippe; Rivest, Serge

    2016-03-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is a very unique system with multiple features that differentiate it from systemic tissues. One of the most captivating aspects of its distinctive nature is the presence of the blood brain barrier (BBB), which seals it from the periphery. Therefore, to preserve tissue homeostasis, the CNS has to rely heavily on resident cells such as microglia. These pivotal cells of the mononuclear lineage have important and dichotomous roles according to various neurological disorders. However, certain insults can overwhelm microglia as well as compromising the integrity of the BBB, thus allowing the infiltration of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). The use of myeloablation and bone marrow transplantation allowed the generation of chimeric mice to study resident microglia and infiltrated BMDM separately. This breakthrough completely revolutionized the way we captured these 2 types of mononuclear phagocytic cells. We now realize that microglia and BMDM exhibit distinct features and appear to perform different tasks. Since these cells are central in several pathologies, it is crucial to use chimeric mice to analyze their functions and mechanisms to possibly harness them for therapeutic purpose. This review will shed light on the advent of this methodology and how it allowed deciphering the ontology of microglia and its maintenance during adulthood. We will also compare the different strategies used to perform myeloablation. Finally, we will discuss the landmark studies that used chimeric mice to characterize the roles of microglia and BMDM in several neurological disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuro Inflammation edited by Helga E. de Vries and Markus Schwaninger. PMID:26432480

  13. Bone marrow aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Bain, B

    2001-01-01

    Bone marrow aspiration biopsies are carried out principally to permit cytological assessment but also for immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, molecular genetic, and other specialised investigations. Often, a trephine biopsy is carried out as part of the same procedure. Bone marrow aspirations should be carried out by trained individuals who are aware of the indications, contraindications, and hazards of the procedure. They should follow a standard operating procedure. The operator should have made an adequate assessment of clinical and haematological features to ensure both that appropriate indications exist and that all relevant tests are performed. For the patient's comfort and safety, the posterior iliac crest is generally the preferred site of aspiration. Films of aspirated marrow and, when appropriate, films of crushed particles should be made and labelled. Once thoroughly dry, films should be fixed and stained. As a minimum, a Romanowsky stain and a Perls' stain are required. A cover slip should be applied. The bone marrow films should be assessed and reported in a systematic manner so that nothing of importance is overlooked, using a low power, then intermediate, then high power objective. A differential count should be performed. An interpretation of the findings, in the light of the clinical and haematological features, should be given. The report should be signed or computer authorised, using a secure password, and issued in a timely manner. Key Words: bone marrow aspirate • haematological diagnosis PMID:11533068

  14. Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bone marrow and capability for blood cell production, including red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells ( ... can affect the bone marrow and blood cell production. A specialist who has expertise in the diagnosis ...

  15. Bone-marrow transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100112.htm Bone-marrow transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Go to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Bone-marrow is a soft, fatty tissue found inside of ...

  16. The effect of rat bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells transplantation for restoration of olfactory disorder.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hyogyeong; Jung, Minyoung; Seo, Dong Jin; Park, Dong Joon

    2015-11-13

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) transplantation on olfactory epithelium (OE) of morphologic and functional restoration following neural Sensorineural Disorder in rats. Except the Normal group, twenty-one rats underwent Triton X-100 (TX-100) irrigation to induce degeneration of OE, and then BMSCs and PBS were treated from the both medial canthus to the rear part of the both nasal cavity into the experimental group and then were observed for restoration according to time point. At two and four weeks after transplantation with BMSCs, restoration of OE was observed with olfactory marker protein (OMP) and behavioral test. And we observed the expression of OMP, nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). After TX-100 irrigation, the OE almost disappeared in 3 days. At four weeks after transplantation with BMSCs, the thickness and cellular composition of OE was considerably restored to normal group and expression of OMP was markedly increased when compared with PBS group and reduced the searching time in the behavioral test. Furthermore at two weeks after treatment with BMSCs, expression of NGF and BDNF was greatly increased when compared with PBS group. However at four weeks after treatment with BMSCs, expression of NGF and BDNF was slightly decreased. Our results suggest the BMSCs transplantation affect restoration of OE and olfaction, most likely via regulation of the neurotrophic factor expression, especially the expression of NGF and BDNF and has a possibility of a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of olfactory disorder caused by the degeneration of OE. PMID:26427869

  17. Living with the unknown: Posttraumatic stress disorder in pediatric bone marrow transplantation survivors and their mothers.

    PubMed

    Taskıran, Gülseren; Sürer Adanır, Aslı; Özatalay, Esin

    2016-04-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is used to treat children with various hematologic, oncologic, and metabolic diseases. Although the treatment can be lifesaving, it is also physically and psychologically demanding for both the child and caregivers. In previous studies, BMT is found to be related with anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and psychosocial problems both in children and parents. The aim of this study was to investigate PTSD in pediatric BMT survivors and their mothers compared with the healthy controls. Twenty-seven BMT survivors and their mothers and 28 healthy peers and their mothers were recruited as the study group and as the comparison group, respectively. All children were interviewed using Child Posttraumatic Stress Disorder-Reaction Index (CPTSD-RI) for assessing posttraumatic stress responses. As for mothers, Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) was used. In healthy children and mothers, instead of BMT, the most important traumatic event reported by them was included. All data were analyzed by a neutral statistician from the Department of Biostatistics of the university. The BMT group, both children and mothers, obtained significantly higher PTSD rates than the control group (66.5% and 17.8%, respectively, in children; 57.6% and 7%, respectively, in mothers). However, there was a weak correlation between survivors' and mothers' posttraumatic stress responses. These findings suggest that BMT is a significant stressor for both children and mothers. Clinicians should be aware of psychiatric symptoms of children who underwent such a life-threatening condition. Combination of medical treatment with psychosocial support is imperative. PMID:26949991

  18. Starvation marrow – gelatinous transformation of bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Osgood, Eric; Muddassir, Salman; Jaju, Minal; Moser, Robert; Farid, Farwa; Mewada, Nishith

    2014-01-01

    Gelatinous bone marrow transformation (GMT), also known as starvation marrow, represents a rare pathological entity of unclear etiology, in which bone marrow histopathology demonstrates hypoplasia, fat atrophy, and gelatinous infiltration. The finding of gelatinous marrow transformation lacks disease specificity; rather, it is an indicator of severe illness and a marker of poor nutritional status, found in patients with eating disorders, acute febrile illnesses, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, alcoholism, malignancies, and congestive heart failure. We present a middle-aged woman with a history of alcoholism, depression, and anorexia nervosa who presented with failure to thrive and macrocytic anemia, with bone marrow examination demonstrative of gelatinous transformation, all of which resolved with appropriate treatment. To our knowledge, there are very few cases of GMT which have been successfully treated; thus, our case highlights the importance of proper supportive management. PMID:25317270

  19. Bone marrow trephine biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Bain, B

    2001-01-01

    Trephine biopsies of the bone marrow should be carried out, when clinically indicated, by trained individuals following a standard operating procedure. A bone marrow aspiration should be performed as part of the same procedure. For patient safety and convenience, biopsies are usually performed on the posterior iliac crest. The biopsy specimen should measure at least 1.6 cm and, if it does not, consideration should be given to repeating the procedure, possibly on the contralateral iliac crest. If bone marrow aspiration is found to be impossible, imprints from the biopsy specimen should be obtained. Otherwise, the specimen is placed immediately into fixative and after fixation is embedded in a resin or, more usually, decalcified and embedded in paraffin wax. Thin sections are cut and are stained, as a minimum, with haematoxylin and eosin and with a reticulin stain. A Giemsa stain is also desirable. A Perls' stain does not often give useful information and is not essential in every patient. The need for other histochemical or immunohistochemical stains is determined by the clinical circumstances and the preliminary findings. Trephine biopsy sections should be examined and reported in a systematic manner, assessment being made of the bones, the vessels and stroma, and the haemopoietic and any lymphoid or other tissue. Assessment should begin with a very low power objective, the entire section being examined. Further examination is then done with an intermediate and high power objective. Ideally, reporting of trephine biopsy sections should be done by an individual who is competent in both histopathology and haematology, and who is able to make an appropriate assessment of both the bone marrow aspirate and the trephine biopsy sections. When this is not possible, there should be close consultation between a haematologist and a histopathologist. The report should both describe the histological findings and give an interpretation of their importance. A signed or computer

  20. GATA2 deficiency-associated bone marrow disorder differs from idiopathic aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathi, Karthik A.; Townsley, Danielle M.; Hsu, Amy P.; Arthur, Diane C.; Zerbe, Christa S.; Cuellar-Rodriguez, Jennifer; Hickstein, Dennis D.; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Braylan, Raul C.; Young, Neal S.; Holland, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Germ-line GATA2 gene mutations, leading to haploinsufficiency, have been identified in patients with familial myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia, monocytopenia and mycobacterial infections, Emberger syndrome, and dendritic cell, monocyte, B-, and NK-cell deficiency. GATA2 mutations have also been reported in a minority of patients with congenital neutropenia and aplastic anemia (AA). The bone marrow (BM) from patients with GATA2 deficiency is typically hypocellular, with varying degrees of dysplasia. Distinguishing GATA2 patients from those with AA is critical for selecting appropriate therapy. We compared the BM flow cytometric, morphologic, and cytogenetic features of 28 GATA2 patients with those of 32 patients being evaluated for idiopathic AA. The marrow of GATA2 patients had severely reduced monocytes, B cells, and NK cells; absent hematogones; and inverted CD4:CD8 ratios. Atypical megakaryocytes and abnormal cytogenetics were more common in GATA2 marrows. CD34+ cells were comparably reduced in GATA2 and AA. Using these criteria, we prospectively identified 4 of 32 patients with suspected AA who had features suspicious for GATA2 mutations, later confirmed by DNA sequencing. Our results show that routine BM flow cytometry, morphology, and cytogenetics in patients who present with cytopenia(s) can identify patients for whom GATA2 sequencing is indicated. PMID:25359990

  1. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Recipes En Español Teachers - Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents ... bone marrow sample for procedures (such as a stem cell transplant ) or other testing (such as chromosomal ...

  2. Impact of bone marrow on respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Sara M

    2008-06-01

    The bone marrow is not only a site of haematopoiesis but also serves as an important reservoir for mature granulocytes and stem cells, including haematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and fibrocytes. In respiratory diseases, such as asthma and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis these cells are mobilised from the bone marrow in response to blood-borne mediators and subsequently recruited to the lungs. Although the granulocytes contribute to the inflammatory reaction, stem cells may promote tissue repair or remodelling. Understanding the factors and molecular mechanisms that regulate the mobilisation of granulocytes and stem cells from the bone marrow may lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of a wide range of respiratory disorders. PMID:18372214

  3. Bone biopsy in haematological disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, R; Frisch, B; Bartl, R

    1982-01-01

    Bone marrow biopsies are now widely used in the investigation and follow-up of many diseases. Semi-thin sections of 8216 undecalcified biopsies of patients with haematological disorders were studied. Observations were made on the cytopenias and the myelodysplastic syndromes, the acute leukaemias the myeloproliferative disorders, Hodgkin's disease and the malignant lymphomas including multiple myeloma, hairy cell leukaemia and angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy. Bone marrow biopsies are essential for the differential diagnosis of most cytopenias and for the early recognition of fibrosis which most frequently occurred as a consequence of megakaryocytic proliferation in the myeloproliferative disorders. Different patterns of bone marrow involvement were found in the lymphoproliferative disorders and both their type and extent constituted factors of prognostic significance. A survey of the literature is given and the conclusion is drawn that bone marrow biopsies provide indispensible information for the diagnostic evaluation and the follow-up of patients with haematological disorders. Images PMID:7040489

  4. Mechanics of intact bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lauren E; Birch, Nathan P; Schiffman, Jessica D; Crosby, Alfred J; Peyton, Shelly R

    2015-10-01

    The current knowledge of bone marrow mechanics is limited to its viscous properties, neglecting the elastic contribution of the extracellular matrix. To get a more complete view of the mechanics of marrow, we characterized intact yellow porcine bone marrow using three different, but complementary techniques: rheology, indentation, and cavitation. Our analysis shows that bone marrow is elastic, and has a large amount of intra- and inter-sample heterogeneity, with an effective Young׳s modulus ranging from 0.25 to 24.7 kPa at physiological temperature. Each testing method was consistent across matched tissue samples, and each provided unique benefits depending on user needs. We recommend bulk rheology to capture the effects of temperature on tissue elasticity and moduli, indentation for quantifying local tissue heterogeneity, and cavitation rheology for mitigating destructive sample preparation. We anticipate the knowledge of bone marrow elastic properties for building in vitro models will elucidate mechanisms involved in disease progression and regenerative medicine. PMID:26189198

  5. Bone-marrow transplant - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Bone-marrow transplants are performed for: deficiencies in red blood cells (aplastic anemia) and white blood cells (leukemia or ... Bone-marrow transplants prolong the life of patients who might otherwise die. As with all major organ transplants, however, ...

  6. Bone Marrow Transplants: "Another Possibility at Life"

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Bone Marrow Transplants “Another Possibility at Life” Past Issues / Summer ... year, and, for 16,000 of them, a bone marrow transplant is the best treatment option, notes Susan ...

  7. Planning for a Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Planning for a Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) If you're going to have ... to a friend or family member undergoing a bone marrow or cord blood transplant. Help Your Loved One ...

  8. Transplant Outcomes (Bone Marrow and Cord Blood)

    MedlinePlus

    ... reports show patient survival and transplant data of bone marrow and umbilical cord blood transplants in the transplant ... Data by Center Report —View the number of bone marrow and cord blood transplants performed at a specific ...

  9. Bone scan appearances following bone and bone marrow biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Maharaj, D.; Boyce, B.F.; Fogelman, I.

    1984-01-01

    Bone marrow and bone biopsies are performed not infrequently in patients referred for bone scans and represent a potential cause of a ''false positive'' focal abnormality on the bone scan. The authors have therefore examined the scan appearances in a series of patients who had undergone either sternal marrow biopsy, (Salah needle, diameter 1.2 mm) trephine iliac crest marrow biopsy (Jamshidi 11 gauge needle, diameter 3.5 mm) or a transiliac bone biopsy (needle diameter 8 mm). Of 18 patients studied 1 to 45 days after sternal marrow 17 had normal scan appearances at the biopsy site and 1 had a possible abnormality. None of 9 patients studied 4 to 19 days after trephine iliac crest marrow biopsy had a hot spot at the biopsy site. A focal scan abnormality was present at the biopsy site in 9/11 patients studied 5 to 59 days after a trans iliac bone biopsy. No resultant scan abnormality was seen in 4 patients imaged within 3 days of the bone biopsy or in 3 patients imaged 79 to 138 days after the procedure. Bone marrow biopsy of the sternum or iliac crest does not usually cause bone scan abnormalities. A focal abnormality at the biopsy site is common in patients imaged 5 days to 2 months after bone biopsy. The gauge of the needle employed in the biopsy and thus the degree of bone trauma inflicted, is likely to be main factor determining the appearance of bone scan abnormalities at the biopsy site.

  10. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and TGF-β signaling in bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Janet L.; Cao, Xu

    2014-01-01

    During bone resorption, abundant factors previously buried in the bone matrix are released into the bone marrow microenvironment, which results in recruitment and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for subsequent bone formation, temporally and spatially coupling bone remodeling. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) orchestrates the signaling of many pathways that direct MSC fate. The spatiotemporal release and activation of matrix TGF-β during osteoclast bone resorption recruits MSCs to bone-resorptive sites. Dysregulation of TGF-β alters MSC fate, uncoupling bone remodeling and causing skeletal disorders. Modulation of TGF-β or PTH signaling may reestablish coupled bone remodeling and be a potential therapy. PMID:24487640

  11. Bone scan appearances following biopsy of bone and bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Maharaj, D.; Boyce, B.F.; Fogelman, I.

    1984-10-01

    The influence of sternal marrow aspiration, iliac crest marrow aspiration, and iliac crest bone biopsy on bone scan appearances was examined. Eighteen patients were scanned a mean of 9.9 days after sternal marrow aspiration with a Salah needle. Bone scans obtained in 9 patients a mean of 10 days aftr iliac crest trephine marrow biopsy with a Jamshidi needle showed no abnormality at the biopsy site. In 18 patients with metabolic bone disease who had undergone iliac crest bone biopsy with an 8 mm needle, a scan abnormality due to the biopsy was usually present when the interval between the biopsy and the scan was 5 days to 2 months. Patients who were scanned within 3 days of iliac crest bone biopsy or more than 2 months after biopsy had normal scan appearance at the biopsy site.

  12. 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer or Bone Marrow Disorder

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-01-25

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Diseases; Precancerous/Nonmalignant Condition

  13. G-CSF-Treated Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-24

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Graft Versus Host Disease; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Diseases; Sarcoma

  14. Bone Marrow Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Mark; Maklad, Rania; Heaney, Emma

    2014-01-01

    As a final-year student teacher specialising in primary science, Emma Heaney faced the challenge of having to plan, organise, and conduct a small-scale, classroom-based research project. She had to teach about bones in the final block practice session and thought it would be a good idea to bring in some biological specimens obtained from the local…

  15. Gillick, bone marrow and teenagers.

    PubMed

    Cherkassky, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    The Human Tissue Authority can authorise a bone marrow harvest on a child of any age if a person with parental responsibility consents to the procedure. Older children have the legal capacity to consent to medical procedures under Gillick, but it is unclear if Gillick can be applied to non-therapeutic medical procedures. The relevant donation guidelines state that the High Court shall be consulted in the event of a disagreement, but what is in the best interests of the teenage donor under s.1 of the Children Act 1989? There are no legal authorities on child bone marrow harvests in the United Kingdom. This article considers the best interests of the older saviour sibling and questions whether, for the purposes of welfare, the speculative benefits could outweigh the physical burdens. PMID:25911618

  16. Primary bone marrow oedema syndromes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    MRI scanning in patients with rheumatological conditions often shows bone marrow oedema, which can be secondary to inflammatory, degenerative, infective or malignant conditions but can also be primary. The latter condition is of uncertain aetiology and it is also uncertain whether it represents a stage in the progression to osteonecrosis in some patients. Patients with primary bone marrow oedema usually have lower limb pain, commonly the hip, knee, ankle or feet. The diagnosis is one of exclusion with the presence of typical MRI findings. Treatment is usually conservative and includes analgesics and staying off the affected limb. The natural history is that of gradual resolution of symptoms over a number of months. Evidence for medical treatment is limited, but open-label studies suggest bisphosphonates may help in the resolution of pain and improve radiological findings. Surgical decompression is usually used as a last resort. PMID:24080251

  17. Analyzing the cellular contribution of bone marrow to fracture healing using bone marrow transplantation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Colnot, C. . E-mail: colnotc@orthosurg.ucsf.edu; Huang, S.; Helms, J.

    2006-11-24

    The bone marrow is believed to play important roles during fracture healing such as providing progenitor cells for inflammation, matrix remodeling, and cartilage and bone formation. Given the complex nature of bone repair, it remains difficult to distinguish the contributions of various cell types. Here we describe a mouse model based on bone marrow transplantation and genetic labeling to track cells originating from bone marrow during fracture healing. Following lethal irradiation and engraftment of bone marrow expressing the LacZ transgene constitutively, wild type mice underwent tibial fracture. Donor bone marrow-derived cells, which originated from the hematopoietic compartment, did not participate in the chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages during fracture healing. Instead, the donor bone marrow contributed to inflammatory and bone resorbing cells. This model can be exploited in the future to investigate the role of inflammation and matrix remodeling during bone repair, independent from osteogenesis and chondrogenesis.

  18. Metastatic thymoma involving the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Wenceslao, Stella; Krause, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, thymomas can be involved in a considerable variety of clinical presentations. Clinicians should be mindful of the breadth of associations with other diseases, including autoimmune disorders and many secondary nonthymic malignancies. For the pathologist, knowledge of the extremely varied histopathologic presentation of thymoma is vital to formulate a proper differential, workup, and diagnosis. The presented case illustrates the finding of very rare metastatic thymoma involvement of bone marrow, identified during evaluation for pancytopenia. The history of prior prostate cancer and an uncharacterized pancreatic lesion, as well as the familial presentation, also suggests a possible underlying hereditary syndrome. PMID:26722174

  19. Bone Marrow Immunity and Myelodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Claude; Wu, Yuenv; Aanei, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is characterized by an ineffective hematopoiesis with production of aberrant clones and a high cell apoptosis rate in bone marrow (BM). Macrophages are in charge of phagocytosis. Innate Immune cells and specific T cells are in charge of immunosurveillance. Little is known on BM cell recruitment and activity as BM aspirate is frequently contaminated with peripheral blood. But evidences suggest an active role of immune cells in protection against MDS and secondary leukemia. BM CD8+ CD28− CD57+ T cells are directly cytotoxic and have a distinct cytokine signature in MDS, producing TNF-α, IL-6, CCL3, CCL4, IL-1RA, TNFα, FAS-L, TRAIL, and so on. These tools promote apoptosis of aberrant cells. On the other hand, they also increase MDS-related cytopenia and myelofibrosis together with TGFβ. IL-32 produced by stromal cells amplifies NK cytotoxicity but also the vicious circle of TNFα production. Myeloid-derived suppressing cells (MDSC) are increased in MDS and have ambiguous role in protection/progression of the diseases. CD33 is expressed on hematopoietic stem cells on MDS and might be a potential target for biotherapy. MDS also has impact on immunity and can favor chronic inflammation and emergence of autoimmune disorders. BM is the site of hematopoiesis and thus contains a complex population of cells at different stages of differentiation from stem cells and early engaged precursors up to almost mature cells of each lineage including erythrocytes, megakaryocytes, myelo-monocytic cells (monocyte/macrophage and granulocytes), NK cells, and B cells. Monocytes and B cell finalize their maturation in peripheral tissues or lymph nodes after migration through the blood. On the other hand, T cells develop in thymus and are present in BM only as mature cells, just like other well vascularized tissues. BM precursors have a strong proliferative capacity, which is usually associated with a high risk for genetic errors, cell dysfunction, and

  20. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma with bone marrow metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zen, H G; Jame, J M; Chang, A Y; Li, W Y; Law, C K; Chen, K Y; Lin, C Z

    1991-02-01

    Five of 23 patients with recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) were diagnosed to have bone marrow metastasis. They all had advanced local-regional disease, and were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and definitive radiotherapy after the initial diagnosis. Bone marrow metastasis developed 4-24 months later. The clinical features were anemia (5 of 5), leukopenia (3 of 5), thrombocytopenia (4 of 5), sepsis (3 of 5), tenderness of the sternum (3 of 5), and fever (4 of 5). Patients frequently had elevation of serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase (ALK-P), and IgG and IgA antibody titers to Epstein-Barr viral capsid antigen when bone marrow involvement was diagnosed. However, clinical manifestations and laboratory tests were not specific. It is important that three patients had normal bone scans. All five patients had a rapid downhill course; four patients died within 23 days, and the fifth 3 months after the diagnosis of bone marrow metastasis. We concluded that bone marrow was a common metastatic site in NPC patients. Bone marrow metastasis adversely affected patients' survival and required a high index of suspicion for diagnosis. We suggested that bone marrow biopsy should be considered as a routine staging procedure in NPC patients and indicated especially when patients presented with abnormal blood counts, sepsis, bone pain, or tenderness of the sternum. It may be positive in the face of a normal bone scan. PMID:1987743

  1. Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes (IBMFS)

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI IBMFS Cohort Study consists of affected individuals and their immediate families in North America who have an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome (IBMFS)-either one that has been specifically identified and defined, or bone marrow failure that appears to be inherited but has not yet been clearly identified as having a genetic basis.

  2. Comparison of a restrictive versus liberal red cell transfusion policy for patients with myelodysplasia, aplastic anaemia, and other congenital bone marrow failure disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yisu; Estcourt, Lise J; Doree, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Vyas, Paresh

    2015-01-01

    Background Bone marrow failure disorders include a heterogenous group of disorders, of which myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), forms the largest subgroup. MDS is predominantly a disease of the elderly, with many elderly people managed conservatively with regular allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusions to treat their anaemia. However, RBC transfusions are not without risk. Despite regular transfusions playing a central role in treating such patients, the optimal RBC transfusion strategy (restrictive versus liberal) is currently unclear. Objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of a restrictive versus liberal red blood cell transfusion strategy for patients with myelodysplasia, acquired aplastic anaemia, and other inherited bone marrow failure disorders. Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 4), Ovid MEDLINE (from 1946), Ovid EMBASE (from 1974), EBSCO CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980) and ongoing trial databases to 26th May 2015. Selection criteria RCTs including patients with long-term bone marrow failure disorders that require allogeneic blood transfusion, who are not being actively treated with a haematopoietic stem cell transplant, or intensive chemotherapy. Data collection and analysis We used standard Cochrane review methodology. One author initially screened all references, and excluded any that were clearly irrelevant or duplicates. Two authors then independently screened all abstracts of articles, identified by the review search strategy, for relevancy. Two authors independently assessed the full text of all potentially relevant articles for eligibility, completed the data extraction and assessed the studies for risk of bias using The Cochrane Collaboration’s ’Risk of bias’ tool. Main results We included one trial (13 participants) and identified three ongoing trials that assess RBC

  3. Bone Marrow Stress Decreases Osteogenic Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Ng, Adeline H; Baht, Gurpreet S; Alman, Benjamin A; Grynpas, Marc D

    2015-11-01

    Age-related bone loss may be a result of declining levels of stem cells in the bone marrow. Using the Col2.3Δtk (DTK) transgenic mouse, osteoblast depletion was used as a source of marrow stress in order to investigate the effects of aging on osteogenic progenitors which reside in the marrow space. Five-month-old DTK mice were treated with one or two cycles of ganciclovir to conditionally ablate differentiated osteoblasts, whereas controls were saline-treated. Treatment cycles were two weeks in length followed by four weeks of recovery. All animals were sacrificed at 8 months of age; bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were harvested for cell culture and whole bones were excised for bone quality assessment. Colony-forming unit (CFU) assays were conducted to investigate the osteogenic potential of BMSC in vitro, and RNA was extracted to assess the expression of osteoblastic genes. Bone quality assessments included bone histomorphometry, TRAP staining, microcomputed tomography, and biomechanical testing. Osteoblast depletion decreased CFU-F (fibroblast), CFU-ALP (alkaline phosphatase), and CFU-VK (von Kossa) counts and BMSC osteogenic capacity in cell culture. Ex vivo, there were no differences in bone mineral density of vertebrae or femurs between treatment groups. Histology showed a decrease in bone volume and bone connectivity with repeated osteoblast depletion; however, this was accompanied by an increase in bone formation rate. There were no notable differences in osteoclast parameters or observed bone marrow adiposity. We have developed a model that uses bone marrow stress to mimic age-related decrease in osteogenic progenitors. Our data suggest that the number of healthy BMSCs and their osteogenic potential decline with repeated osteoblast depletion. However, activity of the remaining osteoblasts increases to compensate for this loss in progenitor osteogenic potential. PMID:26220824

  4. Murine Hind Limb Long Bone Dissection and Bone Marrow Isolation.

    PubMed

    Amend, Sarah R; Valkenburg, Kenneth C; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the bone and the bone marrow is critical in many research fields including basic bone biology, immunology, hematology, cancer metastasis, biomechanics, and stem cell biology. Despite the importance of the bone in healthy and pathologic states, however, it is a largely under-researched organ due to lack of specialized knowledge of bone dissection and bone marrow isolation. Mice are a common model organism to study effects on bone and bone marrow, necessitating a standardized and efficient method for long bone dissection and bone marrow isolation for processing of large experimental cohorts. We describe a straightforward dissection procedure for the removal of the femur and tibia that is suitable for downstream applications, including but not limited to histomorphologic analysis and strength testing. In addition, we outline a rapid procedure for isolation of bone marrow from the long bones via centrifugation with limited handling time, ideal for cell sorting, primary cell culture, or DNA, RNA, and protein extraction. The protocol is streamlined for rapid processing of samples to limit experimental error, and is standardized to minimize user-to-user variability. PMID:27168390

  5. Bone marrow lesions: A systematic diagnostic approach

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Filippo Del; Farahani, Sahar J; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow lesions on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are common and may be seen with various pathologies. The authors outline a systematic diagnostic approach with proposed categorization of various etiologies of bone marrow lesions. Utilization of typical imaging features on conventional MR imaging techniques and other problem-solving techniques, such as chemical shift imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), to achieve accurate final diagnosis has been highlighted. PMID:25114392

  6. Fat embolism syndrome following bone marrow harvesting.

    PubMed

    Baselga, J; Reich, L; Doherty, M; Gulati, S

    1991-06-01

    A case of fat embolism syndrome is reported following an uncomplicated bone marrow harvest. The presenting symptoms were restlessness, shortness of breath and arterial hypoxemia. A lung perfusion scan ruled out the presence of a lung thromboembolism. The patient received supportive therapy and recovered within a few hours. We speculate that the larger gauge needle (13 vs 15) used to aspirate the bone marrow may have represented increased trauma to the iliac crest leading to fat embolism. PMID:1873595

  7. Osteosarcoma after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Hideaki; Maeda, Naoko; Sekimizu, Masahiro; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Horibe, Keizo

    2013-03-01

    Three children treated with bone marrow transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Diamond-Blackfan anemia, and congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia developed secondary osteosarcoma in the left tibia at the age of 13, 13, and 9 years, respectively, at 51, 117, and 106 months after transplantation, respectively. Through treatment with chemotherapy and surgery, all 3 patients are alive without disease. We surveyed the literature and reviewed 10 cases of osteosarcoma after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT), including our 3 cases. Eight of the patients had received myeloablative total body irradiation before SCT. The mean interval from SCT to the onset of osteosarcoma was 6 years and 4 months, and the mean age at the onset of osteosarcoma was 14 years and 5 months. The primary site of the post-SCT osteosarcoma was the tibia in 6 of 10 cases, in contrast to de novo osteosarcoma, in which the most common site is the femur. At least 7 of the 10 patients are alive without disease. Osteosarcoma should be one of the items for surveillance in the follow-up of patients who undergo SCT. PMID:22995925

  8. Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David B; Link, Daniel C; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica

    2014-09-01

    The inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are a diverse group of genetic diseases associated with inadequate production of one or more blood cell lineages. Examples include Fanconi anemia, dyskeratosis congenita, Diamond-Blackfan anemia, thrombocytopenia absent radii syndrome, severe congenital neutropenia, and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. The management of these disorders was once the exclusive domain of pediatric subspecialists, but increasingly physicians who care for adults are being called upon to diagnose or treat these conditions. Through a series of patient vignettes, we highlight the clinical manifestations of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes in adolescents and young adults. The diagnostic and therapeutic challenges posed by these diseases are discussed. PMID:24888387

  9. Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes in adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, David B.; Link, Daniel C.; Mason, Philip J.; Bessler, Monica

    2015-01-01

    The inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are a diverse group of genetic diseases associated with inadequate production of one or more blood cell lineages. Examples include Fanconi anemia, dyskeratosis congenita, Diamond-Blackfan anemia, thrombocytopenia absent radii syndrome, severe congenital neutropenia, and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. The management of these disorders was once the exclusive domain of pediatric subspecialists, but increasingly physicians who care for adults are being called upon to diagnose or treat these conditions. Through a series of patient vignettes, we highlight the clinical manifestations of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes in adolescents and young adults. The diagnostic and therapeutic challenges posed by these diseases are discussed. PMID:24888387

  10. The Great Migration of Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells Toward the Ischemic Brain: Therapeutic Implications for Stroke and Other Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Borlongan, Cesar V.; Glover, Loren E.; Tajiri, Naoki; Kaneko, Yuji; Freeman, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    Accumulating laboratory studies have implicated the mobilization of bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells in brain plasticity and stroke therapy. This mobilization of bone cells to the brain is an essential concept in regenerative medicine. Over the past ten years, mounting data have shown the ability of bone marrow–derived stem cells to mobilize from BM to the peripheral blood (PB) and eventually enter the injured brain. This homing action is exemplified in BM stem cell mobilization following ischemic brain injury. Various BM-derived cells, such as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and very small embryonic-like cells (VSELs) have been demonstrated to exert therapeutic benefits in stroke. Here, we discuss the current status of these BM-derived stem cells in stroke therapy, with emphasis on possible cellular and molecular mechanisms of action that mediate the cells’ beneficial effects in the ischemic brain. When possible, we also discuss the relevance of this therapeutic regimen in other central nervous system (CNS) disorders. PMID:21903148

  11. Intravitreal Autologous Bone Marrow CD34+ Cell Therapy for Ischemic and Degenerative Retinal Disorders: Preliminary Phase 1 Clinical Trial Findings

    PubMed Central

    Park, Susanna S.; Bauer, Gerhard; Abedi, Mehrdad; Pontow, Suzanne; Panorgias, Athanasios; Jonnal, Ravi; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Werner, John S.; Nolta, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Because human bone marrow (BM) CD34+ stem cells home into damaged tissue and may play an important role in tissue repair, this pilot clinical trial explored the safety and feasibility of intravitreal autologous CD34+ BM cells as potential therapy for ischemic or degenerative retinal conditions. Methods. This prospective study enrolled six subjects (six eyes) with irreversible vision loss from retinal vascular occlusion, hereditary or nonexudative age-related macular degeneration, or retinitis pigmentosa. CD34+ cells were isolated under Good Manufacturing Practice conditions from the mononuclear cellular fraction of the BM aspirate using a CliniMACs magnetic cell sorter. After intravitreal CD34+ cell injection, serial ophthalmic examinations, microperimetry/perimetry, fluorescein angiography, electroretinography (ERG), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and adaptive optics OCT were performed during the 6-month follow-up. Results. A mean of 3.4 million (range, 1–7 million) CD34+ cells were isolated and injected per eye. The therapy was well tolerated with no intraocular inflammation or hyperproliferation. Best-corrected visual acuity and full-field ERG showed no worsening after 6 months. Clinical examination also showed no worsening during follow-up except among age-related macular degeneration subjects in whom mild progression of geographic atrophy was noted in both the study eye and contralateral eye at 6-month follow-up, concurrent with some possible decline on multifocal ERG and microperimetry. Cellular in vivo imaging using adaptive optics OCT showed changes suggestive of new cellular incorporation into the macula of the hereditary macular degeneration study eye. Conclusions. Intravitreal autologous BM CD34+ cell therapy appears feasible and well tolerated in eyes with ischemic or degenerative retinal conditions and merits further exploration. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01736059.) PMID:25491299

  12. Rare Bone Marrow Biopsy Complication: A Challenging Case of Sacroiliitis and Staphilococcus Aureus Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Morotti, Alessandro; Barozzino, Maria Consiglio; Guerrasio, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow biopsy is a mandatory procedure to diagnose several hematological disorders. This invasive analysis is generally safe and the procedure-related risks are rare and include bleeding at the site of puncture and, very occasionally, local infections. Here, we describe a case of sacroiliitis that occurred as a consequence of bone marrow biopsy. PMID:27162606

  13. [Diagnosis and management of inherited bone marrow failure syndrome].

    PubMed

    Yabe, Miharu; Yabe, Hiromasa

    2015-10-01

    The inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS) are rare disorders in which there is usually some form of bone marrow failure and typical changes in physical appearance, associated with a family history of the same disorder. Patients with IBMFS have a very high risk of developing myelodysplastic syndrome, acute myeloid leukemia, and solid tumors. The latest technology applied to the molecular pathogenesis of these disorders has led to identification of specific genetic mutations and now facilitates determining the appropriate diagnosis and management of afflicted patients. In this section, we describe physical and laboratory findings and management of the major IBMFS: Fanconi anemia, dyskeratosis congenita, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, and Diamond Blackfan anemia. We also discuss their possible implications in the clinical features of Japanese patients. PMID:26458429

  14. Hematogones: a multiparameter analysis of bone marrow precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Longacre, T A; Foucar, K; Crago, S; Chen, I M; Griffith, B; Dressler, L; McConnell, T S; Duncan, M; Gribble, J

    1989-02-01

    Morphologically distinct lymphoid cells with homogeneous, condensed chromatin and scant cytoplasm can be observed in large numbers in the bone marrow of children with a variety of hematologic and nonhematologic disorders. In some patients, these cells may account for greater than 50% of the bone marrow cells, creating a picture that can be confused with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or metastatic tumor. Although originally called hematogones (HGs), a variety of other names have been proposed for these unique cells. The clinical significance of expanded HGs has not been resolved, and the biologic features of these cells are incompletely described. In this study, we correlate the clinical, morphologic, cytochemical, flow cytometric, molecular, and cytogenetic properties of bone marrow samples from 12 children with substantial numbers of HGs (range 8% to 55% of bone marrow cells). Diagnoses in these patients included anemia, four; neutropenia, one; anemia and neutropenia, one; idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, two; retinoblastoma, two; Ewing's sarcoma, one; and germ cell tumor, one. Flow cytometric analyses of bone marrow cells demonstrated a spectrum extending from early B-cell precursors (CD10+, CD19+, TdT+, HLA-Dr+) to mature surface immunoglobulin-bearing B cells in these patients, corroborating our morphologic impression of HGs, intermediate forms, and mature lymphocytes. DNA content was normal, and no clonal abnormality was identified by either cytogenetic or immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement studies. Follow-up ranged from 3 months to 3 years. None of the patients has developed acute leukemia or bone marrow involvement by solid tumor. The possible role of HGs in immune recovery and hematopoiesis is presented. PMID:2917189

  15. Eating disorders and bone.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Dale; Morgan, Sarah L

    2013-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) is a frequent and often-overlooked consequence of eating disorders, in particular anorexia nervosa and eating disorders associated with the female athlete triad. The causes of low BMD are multifactorial and include low peak bone mass accrual, accelerated bone resorption, and changes in bone microarchitecture. Early diagnosis and interventions focused on nutritional rehabilitation and weight gain reduce the risk of further BMD deficits and fractures. PMID:24094471

  16. Comparison of bone marrow aspiration and bone marrow biopsy in neoplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Hamid, G A; Hanbala, N

    2009-07-01

    Naturally trephine biopsies have definitive advantages over aspirates in case of dry tap bone marrow aspirates as a result of fibrosis or densely packed bone marrow by tumour cells and may be informative independent of cytology especially in bone marrow involvement by lymphomas and carcinomas. In this prospective descriptive study we aimed to compare between the bone marrow trephine biopsy (BMTB) and bone marrow aspirates (BMAs) regarding the detection rate of solid tumours, lymphoma and myeloma involvement of the bone marrow. The study was carried out in the department of pathology and Haematology-Oncology of Al-Gamhouria Teaching Hospital/Aden during the period between Jan 2005 to Dec 2005. A total of 32 patients with suspected or confirmed malignancy undergone both BMTB and BMA from the posterior superior iliac crest and both results were compared. We divided them into three groups: those with solid tumours (21) patients, lymphoma (7) patients and with MM (4) patients. Our results showed that BMA had a 47.6% sensitivity, 100.0% specificity, with positive predictive value (100%), and negative predictive value (50.0%). In solid tumours alone it had a sensitivity of (40.0%), 100% specificity, with positive predictive value (100%), and negative predictive value (64.7%). This gives the BMA a lower sensitivity in detecting solid tumour metastasis and lymphoma involvement in comparison to BMTB. In conclusion, any patient with suspected or confirmed cancer should undergo BMTB because of its high sensitivity compared to BMA. PMID:20194084

  17. Myxomatous stromal changes and necrosis of bone marrow--a retrospective study of 3 years.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nalini; Kumar, Vijay; Varma, Neelam; Garewal, Gurjeevan; Das, Reena; Ahluwalia, Jasmina; Dash, Sumitra

    2004-07-01

    Myxomatous stromal changes and bone marrow necrosis (BMN) are uncommon histologic findings. These changes have been found in various conditions like disseminated carcinomatosis, postchemotherapy cases, chronic infections, infiltrative disorders of the marrow etc. The present study is a retrospective study of 3 years (Jan, 1999 to Dec. 2001) from Deptt. Of Hematology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh (India). During this period, 3740 bone marrow samples were examined. Myxomatous stromal changes and bone marrow necrosis were noted in 0.43% (16/3740) and 0.45% (17/3740) samples respectively. In addition to common causes of myxomatous stromal changes and bone marrow necrosis as described in the literature, this study highlights the association of these conditions with some of the rarer entities like hyperoxalosis, leishmaniasis, parvovirus induced marrow aplasia and cryptococcal infection. There is paucity of such associations in the literature. PMID:16295422

  18. MR imaging of therapy-induced changes of bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Tobias; Link, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    MR imaging of bone marrow infiltration by hematologic malignancies provides non-invasive assays of bone marrow cellularity and vascularity to supplement the information provided by bone marrow biopsies. This article will review the MR imaging findings of bone marrow infiltration by hematologic malignancies with special focus on treatment effects. MR imaging findings of the bone marrow after radiation therapy and chemotherapy will be described. In addition, changes in bone marrow microcirculation and metabolism after anti-angiogenesis treatment will be reviewed. Finally, new specific imaging techniques for the depiction of regulatory events that control blood vessel growth and cell proliferation will be discussed. Future developments are directed to yield comprehensive information about bone marrow structure, function and microenvironment. PMID:17021706

  19. Knowledge and attitude of Lublin universities students' toward the opportunity of becoming unrelated bone marrow donor.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Agnieszka; Wiorkowski, Krzysztof; Szara, Paulina; Drabko, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) is a very important life-saving procedure to treat many disorders. In August 2014, there were more than 24.5 million donor registered in the Worldwide Bone Marrow Donor Register. In the Polish Register of Unrelated Bone Marrow and Umbilical Cord Blood Donors at the end of 2013 there were almost 540 thousand registered bone marrow donors. Despite increasing numbers of registered donors, the amount of requests also increased. It shows that the number of donors is still insufficient. The analysis of knowledge and attitude of Lublin universities students' toward the opportunity to become an unrelated bone marrow donor was the aim of our study. 1609 Lublin students from non-medical universities from different years and specializations of study, of both sexes, aged 19-35 took part in the survey. It consisted of 16 questions. There were knowledge-testing questions, and also personal ones. Among interviewees, 16% were registered as potential bone marrow donors. The reason for not being registered registration chosen most often was that the surveyed did not take this into consideration. Correct answers to all of the questions were given by 21% of students. The biggest number of incorrect answers was given to the question about a place from bone marrow is harvested - nearly 49%. Registered students showed a better level of knowledge than the unregistered. We noted a low level of knowledge about bone marrow donation and possibility of becoming potential bone marrow donor among Lublin universities students. PMID:25648307

  20. Ethical issues in bone marrow transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Bendorf, Aric; Kerridge, Ian H

    2011-09-01

    In the 50 years since the first successful human bone marrow transplant (BMT) was performed in 1959, BMT has become the optimal therapy for a wide variety of life-threatening paediatric haematological, immunological and genetic disorders. Unfortunately, while BMT generally provides the only possibility of cure for such afflicted children, few (25%) have a matched sibling available, and suitably matched unrelated donors are often not identified for many children in need of BMT. And even where BMT is possible, treatment is complex and arduous and associated with significant mortality and morbidity. The issues raised when either or both the donor and recipient are children and lack the capacity to make informed and rational decisions relating to BMT pose great challenges for all involved. This paper examines some of the ethical dilemmas that confront patients, families and medical practitioners when considering bone marrow transplantation in a child. PMID:21951444

  1. [Allogenic bone marrow transplantation complications. Part II].

    PubMed

    Saloua, L; Tarek, B O; Abderrahman, A; Abdeladhim, B A

    2000-03-01

    Bone marrow transplantation increase the chances of cure of many hematology and also neoplasms cancers. The procedure is however a cause of expected mortality and morbidity. The complications are represented by mucocutaneous, toxicity graft versus host disease, veno-occlusive disease and most importantly injections consequences all this complications needs to be prevented and treated considering the risk associated to the moderling immunosuppression. PMID:11026816

  2. Liver disease after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Farthing, M J; Clark, M L; Sloane, J P; Powles, R L; McElwain, T J

    1982-01-01

    Liver dysfunction occurs after bone marrow transplantation but the relative importance of graft versus host disease and other factors, such as infection, radiation, and drugs, has not been clearly established. We have studied liver status before and after bone marrow transplantation in 43 consecutive patients and have related this to survival and factors that are recognised to cause liver injury. Minor abnormalities of liver tests occurred in 21% of patients before grafting but this did not influence survival or the development of liver disease after transplantation. During the first 50 days after grafting, 83% of patients had abnormal liver tests which were more severe in patients who subsequently died. Alanine transaminase was significantly higher in non-survivors and appeared to predict survival early after transplantation. Only non-survivors developed clinical signs of liver disease. Severe liver disease was always associated with graft versus host disease and atypia of the small bile ducts was the most useful histological marker of hepatic involvement with this disease. Two of the patients with hepatic graft versus host disease also has hepatic veno-occlusive disease and three fatalities had opportunistic infection of the liver, although, in the latter, death was not due primarily to liver dysfunction. Previous hepatitis and androgen therapy could not be implicated as important causes of hepatic damage but chemotherapy for acute leukaemia and conditioning regimens for bone marrow transplantation appear to be the most important factors in the development of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7042484

  3. Chromosome anomalies in bone marrow as primary cause of aplastic or hypoplastic conditions and peripheral cytopenia: disorders due to secondary impairment of RUNX1 and MPL genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chromosome changes in the bone marrow (BM) of patients with persistent cytopenia are often considered diagnostic for a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Comprehensive cytogenetic evaluations may give evidence of the real pathogenetic role of these changes in cases with cytopenia without morphological signs of MDS. Results Chromosome anomalies were found in the BM of three patients, without any morphological evidence of MDS: 1) an acquired complex rearrangement of chromosome 21 in a boy with severe aplastic anaemia (SAA); the rearrangement caused the loss of exons 2–8 of the RUNX1 gene with subsequent hypoexpression. 2) a constitutional complex rearrangement of chromosome 21 in a girl with congenital thrombocytopenia; the rearrangement led to RUNX1 disruption and hypoexpression. 3) an acquired paracentric inversion of chromosome 1, in which two regions at the breakpoints were shown to be lost, in a boy with aplastic anaemia; the MPL gene, localized in chromosome 1 short arms was not mutated neither disrupted, but its expression was severely reduced: we postulate that the aplastic anaemia was due to position effects acting both in cis and in trans, and causing Congenital Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia (CAMT). Conclusions A clonal anomaly in BM does not imply per se a diagnosis of MDS: a subgroup of BM hypoplastic disorders is directly due to chromosome structural anomalies with effects on specific genes, as was the case of RUNX1 and MPL in the patients here reported with diagnosis of SAA, thrombocytopenia, and CAMT. The anomaly may be either acquired or constitutional, and it may act by deletion/disruption of the gene, or by position effects. Full cytogenetic investigations, including a-CGH, should always be part of the diagnostic evaluation of patients with BM aplasia/hypoplasia and peripheral cytopenias. PMID:23025896

  4. Large-scale gene expression profiling data of bone marrow stromal cells from osteoarthritic donors.

    PubMed

    Stiehler, Maik; Rauh, Juliane; Bünger, Cody; Jacobi, Angela; Vater, Corina; Schildberg, Theresa; Liebers, Cornelia; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Bretschneider, Henriette

    2016-09-01

    This data article contains data related to the research article entitled, "in vitro characterization of bone marrow stromal cells from osteoarthritic donors" [1]. Osteoarthritis (OA) represents the main indication for total joint arthroplasty and is one of the most frequent degenerative joint disorders. However, the exact etiology of OA remains unknown. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can be easily isolated from bone marrow aspirates and provide an excellent source of progenitor cells. The data shows the identification of pivotal genes and pathways involved in osteoarthritis by comparing gene expression patterns of BMSCs from osteoarthritic versus healthy donors using an array-based approach. PMID:27508214

  5. Bone marrow manifestations in multicentric Castleman disease.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hazem A H; Balachandran, Kirsty; Bower, Mark; Naresh, Kikkeri N

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to document the morphological and immunophenotypic features, and describe the diagnostic features of bone marrow (BM) involvement in human herpes virus 8 Multicentric Castleman disease (HHV8-MCD). BM trephine biopsy (BMTB) specimens from 28 patients were revisited. Samples were evaluated for expression of CD3, CD20, CD138, CD68R, glycophorin C, CD42b, HHV8-latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA1), Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA and light chains. Presence of significant numbers of HHV8-LANA1(+) lymphoid/plasmacytic cells, noted in 10/28 cases, was indicative of BM involvement and was associated with low CD4 and CD8 counts in peripheral blood. The characteristic morphological appearance of MCD seen in lymph nodes is a rare finding in BMTB. 4/5 cases with lymphoid aggregates were involved by MCD, whereas 6/23 cases without lymphoid aggregates were involved by MCD (P = 0·023). 9/18 cases with hypercellular marrow were involved by MCD, whilst only 1/8 cases with normo/hypocellular marrow showed involvement by MCD (P = 0·070). While 9/21 cases with increased marrow reticulin were involved by MCD, none of the cases with no increase in reticulin were involved by MCD (P = 0·080). Reactive plasmacytosis is a frequent finding. We conclude that bone marrow is involved in a significant proportion of patients with MCD (36%), and involvement can be identified by HHV8-LANA1 immunohistochemistry. PMID:26817834

  6. Post-bone marrow transplant patient management.

    PubMed Central

    Poliquin, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    Increasingly, bone marrow transplant (BMT) is the treatment of choice for certain hematologic diseases. BMT is, however, a risky procedure with many potentially serious complications. Some complications are the result of the conditioning regimen, a stage of transplantation that includes large doses of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Conditioning-induced neutropenia and thrombocytopenia often result in infection, bleeding, and mucositis. Veno-occlusive disease (VOD), a chemotherapy-induced hepatotoxicity, can cause a mild to severe form of liver disease. Other complications are directly attributable to the engrafted new marrow. Graft-versus-host disease, a rejection process initiated by immunocompetent donor T lymphocytes, is a complication frequently observed in allogeneic BMT. Approximately 14-28 days after the day of transplant, signs of engraftment begin to appear. When specific discharge criteria are met, the BMT patient is discharged from the hospital. Specific follow-up medical care is ongoing for about one year after BMT. PMID:2293508

  7. Bone marrow fibrosis in myelofibrosis: pathogenesis, prognosis and targeted strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zahr, Abdallah Abou; Salama, Mohamed E.; Carreau, Nicole; Tremblay, Douglas; Verstovsek, Srdan; Mesa, Ruben; Hoffman, Ronald; Mascarenhas, John

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow fibrosis is a central pathological feature and World Health Organization major diagnostic criterion of myelofibrosis. Although bone marrow fibrosis is seen in a variety of malignant and non-malignant disease states, the deposition of reticulin and collagen fibrosis in the bone marrow of patients with myelofibrosis is believed to be mediated by the myelofibrosis hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, contributing to an impaired microenvironment favoring malignant over normal hematopoiesis. Increased expression of inflammatory cytokines, lysyl oxidase, transforming growth factor-β, impaired megakaryocyte function, and aberrant JAK-STAT signaling have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone marrow fibrosis. A number of studies indicate that bone marrow fibrosis is an adverse prognostic variable in myeloproliferative neoplasms. However, modern myelofibrosis prognostication systems utilized in risk-adapted treatment approaches do not include bone marrow fibrosis as a prognostic variable. The specific effect on bone marrow fibrosis of JAK2 inhibition, and other rationally based therapies currently being evaluated in myelofibrosis, has yet to be fully elucidated. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative therapeutic approach that reliably results in resolution of bone marrow fibrosis in patients with myelofibrosis. Here we review the pathogenesis, biological consequences, and prognostic impact of bone marrow fibrosis. We discuss the rationale of various anti-fibrogenic treatment strategies targeting the clonal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, aberrant signaling pathways, fibrogenic cytokines, and the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27252511

  8. Bone marrow fibrosis in myelofibrosis: pathogenesis, prognosis and targeted strategies.

    PubMed

    Zahr, Abdallah Abou; Salama, Mohamed E; Carreau, Nicole; Tremblay, Douglas; Verstovsek, Srdan; Mesa, Ruben; Hoffman, Ronald; Mascarenhas, John

    2016-06-01

    Bone marrow fibrosis is a central pathological feature and World Health Organization major diagnostic criterion of myelofibrosis. Although bone marrow fibrosis is seen in a variety of malignant and non-malignant disease states, the deposition of reticulin and collagen fibrosis in the bone marrow of patients with myelofibrosis is believed to be mediated by the myelofibrosis hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, contributing to an impaired microenvironment favoring malignant over normal hematopoiesis. Increased expression of inflammatory cytokines, lysyl oxidase, transforming growth factor-β, impaired megakaryocyte function, and aberrant JAK-STAT signaling have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone marrow fibrosis. A number of studies indicate that bone marrow fibrosis is an adverse prognostic variable in myeloproliferative neoplasms. However, modern myelofibrosis prognostication systems utilized in risk-adapted treatment approaches do not include bone marrow fibrosis as a prognostic variable. The specific effect on bone marrow fibrosis of JAK2 inhibition, and other rationally based therapies currently being evaluated in myelofibrosis, has yet to be fully elucidated. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative therapeutic approach that reliably results in resolution of bone marrow fibrosis in patients with myelofibrosis. Here we review the pathogenesis, biological consequences, and prognostic impact of bone marrow fibrosis. We discuss the rationale of various anti-fibrogenic treatment strategies targeting the clonal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, aberrant signaling pathways, fibrogenic cytokines, and the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27252511

  9. Bone marrow and splenic histology in hairy cell leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Wotherspoon, Andrew; Attygalle, Ayoma; Mendes, Larissa Sena Teixeira

    2015-12-01

    diffuse red pulp small B-cell lymphoma and hairy cell leukaemia variant. This can be done by assessment of the spleen but as this is now rarely performed in this disorder distinction is almost always possible by a combination of morphological and immunophenotypic studies on bone marrow trephine biopsy, which can be supplemented by assessment of BRAF-V600E mutation assessment in borderline cases. PMID:26614898

  10. CXCR2 and CXCR4 antagonistically regulate neutrophil trafficking from murine bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Eash, Kyle J.; Greenbaum, Adam M.; Gopalan, Priya K.; Link, Daniel C.

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils are a major component of the innate immune response. Their homeostasis is maintained, in part, by the regulated release of neutrophils from the bone marrow. Constitutive expression of the chemokine CXCL12 by bone marrow stromal cells provides a key retention signal for neutrophils in the bone marrow through activation of its receptor, CXCR4. Attenuation of CXCR4 signaling leads to entry of neutrophils into the circulation through unknown mechanisms. We investigated the role of CXCR2-binding ELR+ chemokines in neutrophil trafficking using mouse mixed bone marrow chimeras reconstituted with Cxcr2–/– and WT cells. In this context, neutrophils lacking CXCR2 were preferentially retained in the bone marrow, a phenotype resembling the congenital disorder myelokathexis, which is characterized by chronic neutropenia. Additionally, transient disruption of CXCR4 failed to mobilize Cxcr2–/– neutrophils. However, neutrophils lacking both CXCR2 and CXCR4 displayed constitutive mobilization, showing that CXCR4 plays a dominant role in neutrophil trafficking. With regard to CXCR2 ligands, bone marrow endothelial cells and osteoblasts constitutively expressed the ELR+ chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL2, and CXCL2 expression was induced in endothelial cells during G-CSF–induced neutrophil mobilization. Collectively, these data suggest that CXCR2 signaling is a second chemokine axis that interacts antagonistically with CXCR4 to regulate neutrophil release from the bone marrow. PMID:20516641

  11. Radionuclide evaluation of nonmalignant bone disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Winzelberg, G.G.

    1983-02-01

    Recent advances in nuclear imaging have improved the noninvasive evaluation of patients with nonmalignant bone disorders. When bone scanning agents are combined with bone marrow scanning agents and gallium-67 scintigraphy, a more accurate diagnosis can be obtained. By selecting the appropriate imaging sequence, it is often possible to distinguish cellulitis from underlying osteomyelitis. In patients with total hip replacements, it may be possible to separate postsurgical changes from prosthetic loosening or infection. Stress fractures in joggers may be detected by radionuclide bone scintigraphy before radiographs become abnormal. These nuclear imaging procedures can be done in most hospitals.

  12. Bone marrow and bone marrow derived mononuclear stem cells therapy for the chronically ischemic myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Waksman, Ron; Baffour, Richard

    2003-09-01

    Bone marrow stem cells have been shown to differentiate into various phenotypes including cardiomyocytes, vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle. Bone marrow stem cells are mobilized and home in to areas of injured myocardium where they are involved in tissue repair. In addition, bone marrow secretes multiple growth factors, which are essential for angiogenesis and arteriogenesis. In some patients, these processes are not enough to avert clinical symptoms of ischemic disease. Therefore, in vivo administration of an adequate number of stem cells would be a significant therapeutic advance. Unfractionated bone marrow derived mononuclear stem cells, which contain both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells may be more appropriate for cell therapy. Studies in animal models suggest that implantation of different types of stem cells improve angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, tissue perfusion as well as left ventricular function. Several unanswered questions remain. For example, the optimal delivery approach, dosage and timing of the administration of cell therapy as well as durability of improvements need to be studied. Early clinical studies have demonstrated safety and feasibility of various cell therapies in ischemic disease. Randomized, double blind and placebo-controlled clinical trials need to be completed to determine the effectiveness of stem cell.

  13. The inherited bone marrow failure syndromes.

    PubMed

    Chirnomas, S Deborah; Kupfer, Gary M

    2013-12-01

    Molecular pathogenesis may be elucidated for inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS). The study and presentation of the details of their molecular biology and biochemistry is warranted for appropriate diagnosis and management of afflicted patients and to identify the physiology of the normal hematopoiesis and mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Several themes have emerged within each subsection of IBMFS, including the ribosomopathies, which include ribosome assembly and ribosomal RNA processing. The Fanconi anemia pathway has become interdigitated with the familial breast cancer syndromes. In this article, the diseases that account for most IBMFS diagnoses are analyzed. PMID:24237972

  14. Autologous bone marrow transplantation by photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.

    1992-06-01

    Simultaneous exposure of Merocyanine 540 dye containing cultured tumor cells to 514-nm laser light (93.6 J/cm2) results in virtually complete cell destruction. Under identical conditions, 40% of the normal progenitor (CFU-GM) cells survive the treatment. Laser- photoradiation treated, cultured breast cancer cells also were killed, and living tumor cells could not be detected by clonogenic assays or by anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibody method. Thus, laser photoradiation therapy could be useful for purging of contaminating tumor cells from autologous bone marrow.

  15. Marrow Fat and Bone: Review of Clinical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Ann V.

    2015-01-01

    With growing interest in the connection between fat and bone, there has been increased investigation of the relationship with marrow fat in particular. Clinical research has been facilitated by the development of non-invasive methods to measure bone marrow fat content and composition. Studies in different populations using different measurement techniques have established that higher marrow fat is associated with lower bone density and prevalent vertebral fracture. The degree of unsaturation in marrow fat may also affect bone health. Although other fat depots tend to be strongly correlated, marrow fat has a distinct pattern, suggesting separate mechanisms of control. Longitudinal studies are limited, but are crucial to understand the direct and indirect roles of marrow fat as an influence on skeletal health. With greater appreciation of the links between bone and energy metabolism, there has been growing interest in understanding the relationship between marrow fat and bone. It is well established that levels of marrow fat are higher in older adults with osteoporosis, defined by either low bone density or vertebral fracture. However, the reasons for and implications of this association are not clear. This review focuses on clinical studies of marrow fat and its relationship to bone. PMID:25870585

  16. Investigation of effect of variations in bone fraction and red marrow cellularity on bone marrow dosimetry in radio-immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilderman, S. J.; Roberson, P. L.; Bolch, W. E.; Dewaraja, Y. K.

    2013-07-01

    A method is described for computing patient-specific absorbed dose rates to active marrow which accounts for spatial variation in bone volume fraction and marrow cellularity. A module has been added to the 3D Monte Carlo dosimetry program DPM to treat energy deposition in the components of bone spongiosa distinctly. Homogeneous voxels in regions containing bone spongiosa (as defined on CT images) are assumed to be comprised only of bone, active (red) marrow and inactive (yellow) marrow. Cellularities are determined from biopsy, and bone volume fractions are computed from cellularities and CT-derived voxel densities. Electrons are assumed to deposit energy locally in the three constituent components in proportions determined by electron energy absorption fractions which depend on energy, cellularity, and bone volume fraction, and which are either taken from the literature or are derived from Monte Carlo simulations using EGS5. Separate algorithms are used to model primary β particles and secondary electrons generated after photon interactions. Treating energy deposition distinctly in bone spongiosa constituents leads to marrow dosimetry results which differ from homogeneous spongiosa dosimetry by up to 20%. Dose rates in active marrow regions with cellularities of 20, 50, and 80% can vary by up to 20%, and can differ by up to 10% as a function of bone volume fraction. Dose to bone marrow exhibits a strong dependence on marrow cellularity and a potentially significant dependence on bone volume fraction.

  17. The bone-fat interface: basic and clinical implications of marrow adiposity.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Maureen J; Rosen, Clifford J

    2015-02-01

    Obesity and osteoporosis are two of the most common chronic disorders of the 21st century. Both are accompanied by significant morbidity. The only place in the mammalian organism where bone and fat lie adjacent to each other is in the bone marrow. Marrow adipose tissue is a dynamic depot that probably exists as both constitutive and regulated compartments. Adipocytes secrete cytokines and adipokines that either stimulate or inhibit adjacent osteoblasts. The relationship of marrow adipose tissue to other fat depots is complex and might play very distinct parts in modulation of metabolic homoeostasis, haemopoiesis, and osteogenesis. Understanding of the relationship between bone and fat cells that arise from the same progenitor within the bone marrow niche provides insight into the pathophysiology of age-related osteoporosis, diabetes, and obesity. PMID:24731667

  18. The Ukrainian-American Study of Leukemia and Related Disorders among Chornobyl Cleanup Workers from Ukraine: II. Estimation of Bone Marrow Doses

    PubMed Central

    Chumak, Vadim V.; Romanenko, Anatoly Ye.; Voillequé, Paul G.; Bakhanova, Elena V.; Gudzenko, Natalya; Hatch, Maureen; Zablotska, Lydia B.; Golovanov, Ivan A.; Luckyanov, Nickolas K.; Sholom, Sergey V.; Kryuchkov, Viktor P.; Bouville, André

    2011-01-01

    After the accident that took place on 26 April 1986 at the Chornobyl nuclear power plant, hundreds of thousands of cleanup workers were involved in emergency measures and decontamination activities. In the framework of an epidemiological study of leukemia and other related blood diseases among Ukrainian cleanup workers, individual bone marrow doses have been estimated for 572 cases and controls. Because dose records were available for only about half of the study subjects, a time-and-motion method of dose reconstruction that would be applicable to all study subjects, whether dead or alive, was developed. The doses were calculated in a stochastic mode, thus providing estimates of uncertainties. The arithmetic mean individual bone marrow doses were found to range from 0.00004 to 3,300 mGy, with an average value of 87 mGy over the 572 study subjects. The uncertainties, characterized by the geometric standard deviation of the probability distribution of the individual dose, varied from subject to subject and had a median value of about 2. These results should be treated as preliminary; it is likely that the dose calculations and particularly the uncertainty estimates will be improved in the follow-up of this effort. PMID:19138037

  19. Skeletal cell fate decisions within periosteum and bone marrow during bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Colnot, Céline

    2009-02-01

    Bone repair requires the mobilization of adult skeletal stem cells/progenitors to allow deposition of cartilage and bone at the injury site. These stem cells/progenitors are believed to come from multiple sources including the bone marrow and the periosteum. The goal of this study was to establish the cellular contributions of bone marrow and periosteum to bone healing in vivo and to assess the effect of the tissue environment on cell differentiation within bone marrow and periosteum. Results show that periosteal injuries heal by endochondral ossification, whereas bone marrow injuries heal by intramembranous ossification, indicating that distinct cellular responses occur within these tissues during repair. [corrected] Next, lineage analyses were used to track the fate of cells derived from periosteum, bone marrow, and endosteum, a subcompartment of the bone marrow. Skeletal progenitor cells were found to be recruited locally and concurrently from periosteum and/or bone marrow/endosteum during bone repair. Periosteum and bone marrow/endosteum both gave rise to osteoblasts, whereas the periosteum was the major source of chondrocytes. Finally, results show that intrinsic and environmental signals modulate cell fate decisions within these tissues. In conclusion, this study sheds light into the origins of skeletal stem cells/progenitors during bone regeneration and indicates that periosteum, endosteum, and bone marrow contain pools of stem cells/progenitors with distinct osteogenic and chondrogenic potentials that vary with the tissue environment. PMID:18847330

  20. Primary Hyperparathyroidism: The Influence of Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue on Bone Loss and of Osteocalcin on Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Maira L.; Batista, Sérgio L.; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H.; Salmon, Carlos E.G.; de Paula, Francisco J.A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Bone marrow adipose tissue has been associated with low bone mineral density. However, no data exist regarding marrow adipose tissue in primary hyperparathyroidism, a disorder associated with bone loss in conditions of high bone turnover. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between marrow adipose tissue, bone mass and parathyroid hormone. The influence of osteocalcin on the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was also evaluated. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at a university hospital, involving 18 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and 21 controls (CG). Bone mass was assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and marrow adipose tissue was assessed by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biochemical evaluation included the determination of parathyroid hormone, osteocalcin, glucose and insulin levels. RESULTS: A negative association was found between the bone mass at the 1/3 radius and parathyroid hormone levels (r = -0.69; p<0.01). Marrow adipose tissue was not significantly increased in patients (CG = 32.8±11.2% vs PHPT = 38.6±12%). The serum levels of osteocalcin were higher in patients (CG = 8.6±3.6 ng/mL vs PHPT = 36.5±38.4 ng/mL; p<0.005), but no associations were observed between osteocalcin and insulin or between insulin and both marrow adipose tissue and bone mass. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the increment of adipogenesis in the bone marrow microenvironment under conditions of high bone turnover due to primary hyperparathyroidism is limited. Despite the increased serum levels of osteocalcin due to primary hyperparathyroidism, these patients tend to have impaired insulin sensitivity.

  1. Vertebral hyperemia associated with bone marrow insult and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, H.A.; Bolden, R.O.; Simone, F.J.

    1984-06-01

    A 15-year-old boy with rhabdoid sarcoma received chemotherapy, which was followed by bone marrow depression, massive nosebleeds and, finally, hematologic recovery. On both hepatobiliary and renal scintigraphy, prominent vertebral activity was present in early images. Correlation with his clinical course suggests that the findings reflect hyperemia due to marrow insult and recovery. Radionuclide imaging to detect hyperemia may be a useful probe for drug effects on hematopoietic bone marrow.

  2. Bone marrow lesions and subchondral bone pathology of the knee.

    PubMed

    Kon, Elizaveta; Ronga, Mario; Filardo, Giuseppe; Farr, Jack; Madry, Henning; Milano, Giuseppe; Andriolo, Luca; Shabshin, Nogah

    2016-06-01

    Bone marrow lesions (BMLs) around the knee are a common magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) finding. However, despite the growing interest on BMLs in multiple pathological conditions, they remain controversial not only for the still unknown role in the etiopathological processes, but also in terms of clinical impact and treatment. The differential diagnosis includes a wide range of conditions: traumatic contusion and fractures, cyst formation and erosions, hematopoietic and infiltrated marrow, developmental chondroses, disuse and overuse, transient bone marrow oedema syndrome and, lastly, subchondral insufficiency fractures and true osteonecrosis. Regardless the heterogeneous spectrum of these pathologies, a key factor for patient management is the distinction between reversible and irreversible conditions. To this regard, MRI plays a major role, leading to the correct diagnosis based on recognizable typical patterns that have to be considered together with coexistent abnormalities, age, and clinical history. Several treatment options have been proposed, from conservative to surgical approaches. In this manuscript the main lesion patterns and their management have been analysed to provide the most updated evidence for the differential diagnosis and the most effective treatment. PMID:27075892

  3. [Bone marrow stromal damage mediated by immune response activity].

    PubMed

    Vojinović, J; Kamenov, B; Najman, S; Branković, Lj; Dimitrijević, H

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this work was to estimate influence of activated immune response on hematopoiesis in vitro, using the experimental model of BCG immunized BALB/c mice and in patients with chronic immunoactivation: long-lasting infections, autoimmunity or malignancy. We correlated changes in long term bone marrow cultures (Dexter) and NBT reduction with appearance of anemia in patients and experimental model of immunization by BCG. Increased spontaneous NBT reduction pointed out role of macrophage activation in bone marrow stroma damage. Long-term bone marrow cultures showed reduced number of hematopoietic cells, with predomination of fibroblasts and loss of fat cells. This results correlated with anemia and leucocytosis with stimulated myelopoiesis in peripheral blood. Activation of immune response, or acting of any agent that directly changes extracellular matrix and cellularity of bone marrow, may result in microenviroment bone marrow damage that modify hematopoiesis. PMID:18173180

  4. Impact of parathyroid hormone on bone marrow-derived stem cell mobilization and migration.

    PubMed

    Huber, Bruno C; Grabmaier, Ulrich; Brunner, Stefan

    2014-11-26

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is well-known as the principal regulator of calcium homeostasis in the human body and controls bone metabolism via actions on the survival and activation of osteoblasts. The intermittent administration of PTH has been shown to stimulate bone production in mice and men and therefore PTH administration has been recently approved for the treatment of osteoporosis. Besides to its physiological role in bone remodelling PTH has been demonstrated to influence and expand the bone marrow stem cell niche where hematopoietic stem cells, capable of both self-renewal and differentiation, reside. Moreover, intermittent PTH treatment is capable to induce mobilization of progenitor cells from the bone marrow into the bloodstream. This novel function of PTH on modulating the activity of the stem cell niche in the bone marrow as well as on mobilization and regeneration of bone marrow-derived stem cells offers new therapeutic options in bone marrow and stem cell transplantation as well as in the field of ischemic disorders. PMID:25426261

  5. Pathophysiological role of enhanced bone marrow adipogenesis in diabetic complications

    PubMed Central

    Piccinin, Meghan A; Khan, Zia A

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes leads to complications in select organ systems primarily by disrupting the vasculature of the target organs. These complications include both micro- (cardiomyopathy, retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy) and macro-(atherosclerosis) angiopathies. Bone marrow angiopathy is also evident in both experimental models of the disease as well as in human diabetes. In addition to vascular disruption, bone loss and increased marrow adiposity have become hallmarks of the diabetic bone phenotype. Emerging evidence now implicates enhanced marrow adipogenesis and changes to cellular makeup of the marrow in a novel mechanistic link between various secondary complications of diabetes. In this review, we explore the mechanisms of enhanced marrow adipogenesis in diabetes and the link between changes to marrow cellular composition, and disruption and depletion of reparative stem cells. PMID:26317050

  6. The Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Chirnomas, S. Deborah; Kupfer, Gary M

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the rarity of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS), they represent diseases for which the molecular pathogenesis may be elucidated. Their study and presentation of the details of their molecular biology and biochemistry is warranted not only for appropriate diagnosis and management of afflicted patients but also because they lend clues to the normal physiology of the normal hematopoiesis and, in many cases, mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Several themes have emerged within each subsection of IBMFS, including the ribosomopathies that entail both ribosome assembly as well as ribosomal RNA processing. The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway itself has become interdigitated with the familial breast cancer syndromes. The sections that follow present a more detailed analysis of the diseases that account for the majority of IBMFS diagnoses. PMID:24237972

  7. Lung function after bone marrow grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Depledge, M.H.; Barrett, A.; Powles, R.L.

    1983-02-01

    Results of a prospective lung function study are presented for 48 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treated with total body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) at the Royal Marsden Hospital between 1978 and 1980. Patients with active disease or who were in remission following cytoreductive chemotherapy had mildly impaired gas exchange prior to grafting. After TBI and BMT all patients studied developed progressive deterioration of lung function during the first 100 days, although these changes were subclinical. Infection and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) were associated with further worsening of restrictive ventilatory defects and diffusing capacity (D/sub L/CO). Beyond 100 days, ventilatory ability returned to normal and gas transfer improved, although it failed to reach pre-transplant levels. There was no evidence of progressive pulmonary fibrosis during the first year after grafting.

  8. [Current problems in pediatric bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    Kato, S

    1993-05-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has been increasingly applied to a variety of potentially fatal diseases in childhood. However, trends of indication of BMT are changing because chemotherapy in leukemia and immunosuppressive therapy with/without colony stimulating factor in aplastic anemia are improving. Several progresses have been noted in matched unrelated BMT and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation as well as in sibling BMT or autologous BMT. Many efforts are being made to decrease rejection rate or leukemia relapse and to improve quality of life by new conditioning regimens. Attempts to induce GVL effects or syngeneic GVHD are currently under progress. The quality of life in long term surviving children are generally good and acceptable, although delay in growth, infertility, cataract and obstructive lung disease are seen in a few patients. PMID:8315825

  9. Therapeutic impact of erythropoietin-encapsulated liposomes targeted to bone marrow on renal anemia.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yuri; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Sou, Keitaro; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ishima, Yu; Miyakawa, Toshikazu; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2014-11-01

    Bone marrow is a key element in the diagnosis of disorders of erythropoiesis, including anemia, and a potential target in their treatment. However, because efficient delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to bone marrow is difficult, such delivery is achieved by administering drugs in large quantities that often have adverse effects. Here, we achieved selective delivery of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) to bone marrow, via its encapsulation in liposomes with l-glutamic acid, N-(3-carboxy-1-oxopropyl)-, 1,5-dihexadecyl ester (SA) (liposome-EPO). The result, in a rabbit model of renal anemia, was a beneficial effect on hematopoiesis, better than with rHuEPO alone. Also, we determined that liposome-EPO delivery to bone marrow depended on specific uptake by bone marrow macrophages because of the presence of SA. These results indicate both that liposome-EPO is a new, promising erythropoietin-stimulating agent and that liposomes with SA have potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in diseases originating from bone marrow. PMID:25255196

  10. A Method for Generation of Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages from Cryopreserved Mouse Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Djalma S.; Zamboni, Dario S.

    2010-01-01

    The broad use of transgenic and gene-targeted mice has established bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) as important mammalian host cells for investigation of the macrophages biology. Over the last decade, extensive research has been done to determine how to freeze and store viable hematopoietic human cells; however, there is no information regarding generation of BMDM from frozen murine bone marrow (BM) cells. Here, we establish a highly efficient protocol to freeze murine BM cells and further generate BMDM. Cryopreserved murine BM cells maintain their potential for BMDM differentiation for more than 6 years. We compared BMDM obtained from fresh and frozen BM cells and found that both are similarly able to trigger the expression of CD80 and CD86 in response to LPS or infection with the intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila. Additionally, BMDM obtained from fresh or frozen BM cells equally restrict or support the intracellular multiplication of pathogens such as L. pneumophila and the protozoan parasite Leishmania (L.) amazonensis. Although further investigation are required to support the use of the method for generation of dendritic cells, preliminary experiments indicate that bone marrow-derived dendritic cells can also be generated from cryopreserved BM cells. Overall, the method described and validated herein represents a technical advance as it allows ready and easy generation of BMDM from a stock of frozen BM cells. PMID:21179419

  11. Orchiectomy increases bone marrow interleukin-6 levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Pugh, T D; Stebler, B; Ershler, W B; Keller, E T

    1998-03-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) appears to be an important factor in disease states associated with bone resorption. There is both in vitro and in vivo evidence supporting the fact that androgens down-regulate interleukin-6 production. These observations, in combination with the fact that osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells produce IL-6, led us to hypothesize that orchiectomy-induced androgen loss will result in increased IL-6 expression in the bone microenvironment. To prove our hypothesis we assessed the effect of orchiectomy on IL-6 protein and mRNA expression in bone marrow and spleen. We found that orchiectomy was associated with increased serum IL-6 levels at 3 and 28 days postsurgery. Phorbol ester-stimulated IL-6 levels were also higher in supernatants from bone marrow and spleen cell cultures from orchiectomized mice compared with unoperated or sham-operated mice. Additionally, we found that steady state IL-6 mRNA levels were increased in bone marrow but not spleen cells. Finally, we found that orchiectomized mice had splenomegaly and increased bone marrow cellularity. Histopathology of the spleen revealed lymphoid hyperplasia accompanied by a marked mononuclear cell infiltration of the red pulp. We conclude that orchiectomy induces IL-6 expression in the bone marrow. These findings suggest that endocrine and cytokine interactions contribute to bone pathophysiology. PMID:9501955

  12. Bone and bone-marrow blood flow in chronic granulocytic leukemia and primary myelofibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lahtinen, R.; Lahtinen, T.; Romppanen, T.

    1982-03-01

    Blood flow in hematopoietic bone marrow and in nonhematopoietic bone has been measured with a Xe-133 washout method in 20 patients with chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL) and in seven with primary myelofibrosis. Age-matched healthy persons served as controls. Bone-marrow blood flow in CGL was dependent upon the phase of the disease. In the metamorphosis phase, bone-marrow blood flow was high compared with that in the well-controlled phase. Apart from the initial phase, the mean values for bone blood flow in CGL were increased compared with the values of the healthy controls. In myelofibrosis the bone blood flow was also increased. Bone-marrow blood flow in these diseases was dependent upon the cellularity of bone marrow as measured morphometrically.

  13. Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue: A New Player in Cancer Metastasis to Bone

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Emma V.; Edwards, Claire M.

    2016-01-01

    The bone marrow is a favored site for a number of cancers, including the hematological malignancy multiple myeloma, and metastasis of breast and prostate cancer. This specialized microenvironment is highly supportive, not only for tumor growth and survival but also for the development of an associated destructive cancer-induced bone disease. The interactions between tumor cells, osteoclasts and osteoblasts are well documented. By contrast, despite occupying a significant proportion of the bone marrow, the importance of bone marrow adipose tissue is only just emerging. The ability of bone marrow adipocytes to regulate skeletal biology and hematopoiesis, combined with their metabolic activity, endocrine functions, and proximity to tumor cells means that they are ideally placed to impact both tumor growth and bone disease. This review discusses the recent advances in our understanding of how marrow adipose tissue contributes to bone metastasis and cancer-induced bone disease. PMID:27471491

  14. Endocrine complications following pediatric bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Josephine; Lewis, Victor; Guilcher, Gregory M T; Stephure, David K; Pacaud, Danièle

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for various diseases can lead to endocrine system dysfunction owing to preparative regimens involving chemotherapy and radiation therapy. We assessed the prevalence of post-BMT endocrine complications in children treated at the Alberta Children's Hospital (ACH) from 1991 to 2001. Time of onset of endocrine dysfunction, underlying disease processes, chemotherapy, radiation therapy and age at BMT were characterized. Subjects of <18 years of age at the time of allogeneic or autologous BMT for whom 1-year follow-up through the ACH and a chart were available for review were included in the study. Subjects with a pre-existing endocrine condition were excluded. Of the 194 pediatric BMT procedures performed at the ACH between January 1, 1991 and December 31, 2001, 150 complete charts were available for review. Sixty five subjects received follow-up care at other centers and were excluded. Therefore, a total of 85 subjects were included in the review. The prevalence of endocrine complications identified was: primary hypothyroidism 1.2%, compensated hypothyroidism 7.0%, hyperthyroidism 2.4%, hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism 22.4%, abnormal bone density 2.4%, and secondary diabetes mellitus 1.2%. These findings emphasize the need to screen for endocrine system dysfunction, particularly hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism, in children who have undergone BMT. Children need long-term follow-up so that endocrine complications can be diagnosed and treated promptly. PMID:21823531

  15. Gelatinous bone marrow transformation secondary to unusual eating habits and drastic weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Rafiullah; Islam, Rezwan; Mahmood, Ruth; Sitwala, Kajal V

    2013-01-01

    Gelatinous bone marrow transformation (GMT), also known as starvation bone marrow, has been reported in a number of chronic illnesses, eating disorders (anorexia nervosa) and malignancies. We report the case of a 37-year-old man with a history of bipolar disorder and obesity (weighing >300 pounds) who presented due to recently developing a deep yellow colour to his skin. Over the past 2 years, through diet and exercise, he lost over 150 pounds. He reported running 6–8 miles per day and eating ‘lots of squash’. We made the diagnosis of starvation hepatitis and bone marrow degeneration, and referred the patient to a dietician and haematologist/oncologist, where improvements were observed at 4 weeks follow-up. PMID:23861277

  16. Gelatinous bone marrow transformation secondary to unusual eating habits and drastic weight loss.

    PubMed

    Rafiullah; Islam, Rezwan; Mahmood, Ruth; Sitwala, Kajal V

    2013-01-01

    Gelatinous bone marrow transformation (GMT), also known as starvation bone marrow, has been reported in a number of chronic illnesses, eating disorders (anorexia nervosa) and malignancies. We report the case of a 37-year-old man with a history of bipolar disorder and obesity (weighing >300 pounds) who presented due to recently developing a deep yellow colour to his skin. Over the past 2 years, through diet and exercise, he lost over 150 pounds. He reported running 6-8 miles per day and eating 'lots of squash'. We made the diagnosis of starvation hepatitis and bone marrow degeneration, and referred the patient to a dietician and haematologist/oncologist, where improvements were observed at 4 weeks follow-up. PMID:23861277

  17. Marrow-tumor interactions: the role of the bone marrow in controlling chemically induced tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosse, C

    1980-01-01

    This report summarizes work done to evaluate the role of the bone marrow in tumor growth regulation. Work done with the MCA tumor showed that several subclasses of mononuclear bone marrow cells (e.g. natural regulatory cell, NRC) play a major role in the regulation of tumor growth. Experiments with the spontaneous CE mammary carcinoma system illustrate that a rapid growth of certain neoplasms may be due to the fact that through some as yet undefined mechanism the tumor eliminates mononuclear cells in the bone marrow of the host and stops their production. (KRM)

  18. Jaw bone marrow-derived osteoclast precursors internalize more bisphosphonate than long-bone marrow precursors.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Jenny A F; Jansen, Ineke D C; Marthi, Matangi; Coxon, Fraser P; McKenna, Charles E; Sun, Shuting; de Vries, Teun J; Everts, Vincent

    2013-11-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are widely used in the treatment of several bone diseases, such as osteoporosis and cancers that have metastasized to bone, by virtue of their ability to inhibit osteoclastic bone resorption. Previously, it was shown that osteoclasts present at different bone sites have different characteristics. We hypothesized that BPs could have distinct effects on different populations of osteoclasts and their precursors, for example as a result of a different capacity to endocytose the drugs. To investigate this, bone marrow cells were isolated from jaw and long bone from mice and the cells were primed to differentiate into osteoclasts with the cytokines M-CSF and RANKL. Before fusion occurred, cells were incubated with fluorescein-risedronate (FAM-RIS) for 4 or 24h and uptake was determined by flow cytometry. We found that cultures obtained from the jaw internalized 1.7 to 2.5 times more FAM-RIS than long-bone cultures, both after 4 and 24h, and accordingly jaw osteoclasts were more susceptible to inhibition of prenylation of Rap1a after treatment with BPs for 24h. Surprisingly, differences in BP uptake did not differentially affect osteoclastogenesis. This suggests that jaw osteoclast precursors are less sensitive to bisphosphonates after internalization. This was supported by the finding that gene expression of the anti-apoptotic genes Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL was higher in jaw cells than long bone cells, suggesting that the jaw cells might be more resistant to BP-induced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that bisphosphonates have distinct effects on both populations of osteoclast precursors and support previous findings that osteoclasts and precursors are bone-site specific. This study may help to provide more insights into bone-site-specific responses to bisphosphonates. PMID:23962725

  19. Gluteal Compartment Syndrome following an Iliac Bone Marrow Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Najera, Carlos; Leal-Contreras, Carlos; Leal-Berumen, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is a condition characterized by a raised hydraulic pressure within a closed and non expandable anatomical space. It leads to a vascular insufficiency that becomes critical once the vascular flow cannot return the fluids back to the venous system. This causes a potential irreversible damage of the contents of the compartment, especially within the muscle tissues. Gluteal compartment syndrome (GCS) secondary to hematomas is seldom reported. Here we present a case of a 51-year-old patient with history of a non-Hodgkin lymphoma who underwent a bone marrow aspiration from the posterior iliac crest that had excessive bleeding at the puncture zone. The patient complained of increasing pain, tenderness, and buttock swelling. Intraoperative pressure validation of the gluteal compartment was performed, and a GCS was diagnosed. The patient was treated with a gluteal region fasciotomy. The patient recovered from pain and swelling and was discharged shortly after from the hospital. We believe clotting and hematologic disorders are a primary risk factor in patients who require bone marrow aspirations or biopsies. It is important to improve awareness of GCS in order to achieve early diagnosis, avoid complications, and have a better prognosis. PMID:24392235

  20. Current insights into inherited bone marrow failure syndromes.

    PubMed

    Chung, Nack-Gyun; Kim, Myungshin

    2014-08-01

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndrome (IBMFS) encompasses a heterogeneous and complex group of genetic disorders characterized by physical malformations, insufficient blood cell production, and increased risk of malignancies. They often have substantial phenotype overlap, and therefore, genotyping is often a critical means of establishing a diagnosis. Current advances in the field of IBMFSs have identified multiple genes associated with IBMFSs and their pathways: genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, such as those associated with Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome; genes involved in telomere maintenance, such as dyskeratosis congenita genes; genes encoding neutrophil elastase or neutrophil adhesion and mobility associated with severe congenital neutropenia; and genes involved in DNA recombination repair, such as those associated with Fanconi anemia. Early and adequate genetic diagnosis is required for proper management and follow-up in clinical practice. Recent advances using new molecular technologies, including next generation sequencing (NGS), have helped identify new candidate genes associated with the development of bone marrow failure. Targeted NGS using panels of large numbers of genes is rapidly gaining potential for use as a cost-effective diagnostic tool for the identification of mutations in newly diagnosed patients. In this review, we have described recent insights into IBMFS and how they are advancing our understanding of the disease's pathophysiology; we have also discussed the possible implications they will have in clinical practice for Korean patients. PMID:25210520

  1. Current insights into inherited bone marrow failure syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Nack-Gyun

    2014-01-01

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndrome (IBMFS) encompasses a heterogeneous and complex group of genetic disorders characterized by physical malformations, insufficient blood cell production, and increased risk of malignancies. They often have substantial phenotype overlap, and therefore, genotyping is often a critical means of establishing a diagnosis. Current advances in the field of IBMFSs have identified multiple genes associated with IBMFSs and their pathways: genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, such as those associated with Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome; genes involved in telomere maintenance, such as dyskeratosis congenita genes; genes encoding neutrophil elastase or neutrophil adhesion and mobility associated with severe congenital neutropenia; and genes involved in DNA recombination repair, such as those associated with Fanconi anemia. Early and adequate genetic diagnosis is required for proper management and follow-up in clinical practice. Recent advances using new molecular technologies, including next generation sequencing (NGS), have helped identify new candidate genes associated with the development of bone marrow failure. Targeted NGS using panels of large numbers of genes is rapidly gaining potential for use as a cost-effective diagnostic tool for the identification of mutations in newly diagnosed patients. In this review, we have described recent insights into IBMFS and how they are advancing our understanding of the disease's pathophysiology; we have also discussed the possible implications they will have in clinical practice for Korean patients. PMID:25210520

  2. Telomerase gene therapy rescues telomere length, bone marrow aplasia, and survival in mice with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Bär, Christian; Povedano, Juan Manuel; Serrano, Rosa; Benitez-Buelga, Carlos; Popkes, Miriam; Formentini, Ivan; Bobadilla, Maria; Bosch, Fatima; Blasco, Maria A

    2016-04-01

    Aplastic anemia is a fatal bone marrow disorder characterized by peripheral pancytopenia and marrow hypoplasia. The disease can be hereditary or acquired and develops at any stage of life. A subgroup of the inherited form is caused by replicative impairment of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells due to very short telomeres as a result of mutations in telomerase and other telomere components. Abnormal telomere shortening is also described in cases of acquired aplastic anemia, most likely secondary to increased turnover of bone marrow stem and progenitor cells. Here, we test the therapeutic efficacy of telomerase activation by using adeno-associated virus (AAV)9 gene therapy vectors carrying the telomeraseTertgene in 2 independent mouse models of aplastic anemia due to short telomeres (Trf1- andTert-deficient mice). We find that a high dose of AAV9-Terttargets the bone marrow compartment, including hematopoietic stem cells. AAV9-Terttreatment after telomere attrition in bone marrow cells rescues aplastic anemia and mouse survival compared with mice treated with the empty vector. Improved survival is associated with a significant increase in telomere length in peripheral blood and bone marrow cells, as well as improved blood counts. These findings indicate that telomerase gene therapy represents a novel therapeutic strategy to treat aplastic anemia provoked or associated with short telomeres. PMID:26903545

  3. Bone marrow invasion in multiple myeloma and metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, J C; Luna, A

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine is the imaging study of choice for the management of bone marrow disease. MRI sequences enable us to integrate structural and functional information for detecting, staging, and monitoring the response the treatment of multiple myeloma and bone metastases in the spine. Whole-body MRI has been incorporated into different guidelines as the technique of choice for managing multiple myeloma and metastatic bone disease. Normal physiological changes in the yellow and red bone marrow represent a challenge in analyses to differentiate clinically significant findings from those that are not clinically significant. This article describes the findings for normal bone marrow, variants, and invasive processes in multiple myeloma and bone metastases. PMID:26767542

  4. Distinct bone marrow blood vessels differentially regulate haematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Itkin, Tomer; Gur-Cohen, Shiri; Spencer, Joel A; Schajnovitz, Amir; Ramasamy, Saravana K; Kusumbe, Anjali P; Ledergor, Guy; Jung, Yookyung; Milo, Idan; Poulos, Michael G; Kalinkovich, Alexander; Ludin, Aya; Kollet, Orit; Shakhar, Guy; Butler, Jason M; Rafii, Shahin; Adams, Ralf H; Scadden, David T; Lin, Charles P; Lapidot, Tsvee

    2016-04-21

    Bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs) form a network of blood vessels that regulate both leukocyte trafficking and haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) maintenance. However, it is not clear how BMECs balance these dual roles, and whether these events occur at the same vascular site. We found that mammalian bone marrow stem cell maintenance and leukocyte trafficking are regulated by distinct blood vessel types with different permeability properties. Less permeable arterial blood vessels maintain haematopoietic stem cells in a low reactive oxygen species (ROS) state, whereas the more permeable sinusoids promote HSPC activation and are the exclusive site for immature and mature leukocyte trafficking to and from the bone marrow. A functional consequence of high permeability of blood vessels is that exposure to blood plasma increases bone marrow HSPC ROS levels, augmenting their migration and differentiation, while compromising their long-term repopulation and survival. These findings may have relevance for clinical haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and mobilization protocols. PMID:27074509

  5. [Bone marrow involvement in ovarian cancer determined by immunohistochemical methods].

    PubMed

    Gabriel, M; Obrebowska, A; Spaczyński, M

    2000-01-01

    Atypical epithelial cells in the bone marrow of patients with ovarian cancer were evaluated using immunohistochemical techniques. We investigated cytospin preparations of bone marrow taken from 9 women with benign ovarian tumors and 59 women with malignant ovarian tumors. Two monoclonal antibodies (NCL-C11 and NCL-CA 125) were used. With both antibodies we were able to detect keratin and CA 125 antigen expression in the bone marrow of 9 (18.4%) of the patients with ovarian cancer. With regard to the wide histological differentiation of ovarian carcinomas, the presence of atypical epithelial cells in the bone marrow was required as a prognostic factor for survival and relapses. This should be investigated in a larger study group. PMID:11326158

  6. Understanding Bone Marrow Transplantation as a Treatment Option

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have had, and your overall health. Transplant Process A bone marrow or cord blood transplant is ... The Transplant Process . For more about the search process, HLA matching, and steps of a transplant, such ...

  7. Technetium-99m antimony colloid for bone-marrow imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Martindale, A.A.; Papadimitriou, J.M.; Turner, J.H.

    1980-11-01

    Technetium-99m antimony colloid was prepared in our laboratory for bone-marrow imaging. Optimal production of colloid particles of size range 1 to 13 nm was achieved by the use of polyvinylpyrrolidone of mol. wt. 44,000. Electron microscopy was used to size the particles. Studies in rabbits showed exclusive concentration in the subendothelial dendritic phagocytes of the bone marrow. Pseudopods from these cells were found to traverse interendothelial junctions and concentrate colloid from the sinusoids. Imaging studies of bone marrow in rabbits showed the superiority of the Tc-99m antimony colloid over the much larger colloidal particle of Tc-99m sulfur colloid. Tissue distribution studies in the rat confirmed that bone-marrow uptake of Tc-99m antimony colloid was greater than that of Tc-99m sulfur colloid, although blood clearance was much slower.

  8. Bone Marrow Diseases - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bone Marrow Diseases URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bonemarrowdiseases.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  9. Bone Marrow Diseases - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bone Marrow Diseases URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/bonemarrowdiseases.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  10. Memory T-cell competition for bone marrow seeding.

    PubMed

    Di Rosa, Francesca; Santoni, Angela

    2003-03-01

    The presence in the bone marrow of memory CD8 T cells is well recognized. However, it is still largely unclear how T-cell migration from the lymphoid periphery to the bone marrow is regulated. In the present report, we show that antigen-specific CD4 T cells, as well as antigen-specific CD8 T cells, localize to the bone marrow of immunized mice, and are sustained there over long periods of time. To investigate the rules governing T-cell migration to the bone marrow, we generated chimeric mice in which the lymphoid periphery contained two genetically or phenotypically distinct groups of T cells, one of which was identical to the host. We then examined whether a distinct type of T cell had an advantage over the others in the colonization of bone marrow. Our results show that whereas ICAM1 and CD18 molecules are both involved in homing to lymph nodes, neither is crucial for T-cell bone marrow colonization. We also observed that memory-phenotype CD44high T cells, but not virgin-type CD44-/low T cells, preferentially home to the bone marrow upon adoptive transfer to normal young mice, but not to thymectomized old recipients where an existing memory T-cell pool precludes their free access. Thus, T-cell colonization of the bone marrow uses distinct molecules from those implicated in lymph node homing, and is regulated both by the properties of the T cell and by the competitive efficacy of other T cells inhabiting the same, saturable niche. This implies that the homing potential of an individual lymphocyte is not merely an intrinsic property of the cell, but rather a property of the lymphoid system taken as a whole. PMID:12603595

  11. A marker chromosome in post-transplant bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Morsberger, Laura; Powell, Kerry; Ning, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Detection of small supernumerary marker chromosomes in karyotype analysis represents a diagnostic challenge. While such markers are usually detected during cytogenetic studies of constitutional chromosome abnormalities, they have also been found in specimens submitted from patients with acquired malignancies. We report here the detection of a marker chromosome in a bone marrow specimen from a patient who received a bone marrow transplantation. We discuss the importance of proper characterization and interpretation of marker chromosomes in clinical practice. PMID:27252781

  12. Bone Marrow Negative Visceral Leishmaniasis in an Adolescent Male

    PubMed Central

    Jetley, S; Rana, S; Khan, S; Zeeba, JS; Hassan, MJ; Kapoor, P

    2013-01-01

    Visceral Leishmaniasis or Kala Azar is endemic in certain regions of India. In endemic areas, the constellation of fever, progressive weight loss, weakness, pronounced splenomegaly, anemia, leukopenia, and hypergammaglobulinemia is highly suggestive of visceral leishmaniasis. Demonstration of the parasite in liver, splenic or bone marrow aspirates is confirmatory. We present a case in which Leishmania donovani (LD) bodies were demonstrated on splenic aspirate. We were unable to demonstrate LD bodies on bone marrow aspiration. PMID:23682278

  13. Hypercalcemia and altered biochemical bone markers in post-bone marrow transplantation osteopetrosis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kulpiya, Alisa; Mahachoklertwattana, Pat; Pakakasama, Samart; Hongeng, Suradej; Poomthavorn, Preamrudee

    2012-08-01

    Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis is a rare disorder of bone resorption defect that results in generalized sclerotic bones and bone marrow failure. Allogeneic BMT is the only treatment for cure. One of the complications following a successful BMT is hypercalcemia that is a unique complication in this group of patients. We report a three-yr-old boy with osteopetrosis who developed hypercalcemia following the successful BMT. His maximal calcium level was 13.3 mg/dL. Markedly increased both bone formation and resorption markers were demonstrated along with hypercalcemia. These findings indicated an active donor-derived osteoclastic function and thus bone resorption following the successful donor engraftment in the patient. Treatment with hyperhydration, furosemide and bone resorption inhibitors, calcitonin, and bisphosphonate led to normalization of the serum calcium level. Bone resorption but not bone formation marker was persistently elevated despite having normocalcemia during a 16.5-month follow-up period. PMID:21323826

  14. Activation of bone marrow phagocytes following benzene treatment of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Laskin, D L; MacEachern, L; Snyder, R

    1989-01-01

    Techniques in flow cytometry/cell sorting were used to characterize the effects of benzene and its metabolites on subpopulations of bone marrow cells. Treatment of male Balb/c mice with benzene (880 mg/kg) or a combination of its metabolites, hydroquinone and phenol (50 mg/kg), resulted in a 30 to 40% decrease in bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed two subpopulations of bone marrow cells that could be distinguished by their size and density or granularity. The larger, more dense subpopulation was found to consist predominantly of macrophages and granulocytes as determined by monoclonal antibody binding and by cell sorting. Benzene treatment had no selective cytotoxic effects on subpopulations of bone marrow cells. To determine if benzene treatment activated bone marrow phagocytes, we quantified production of hydrogen peroxide by these cells using the fluorescent indicator dye, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate. We found that macrophages and granulocytes from bone marrow of treated mice produced 50% more hydrogen peroxide in response to the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate than did cells from control animals. It is hypothesized that phagocyte activation and production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen intermediates may contribute to hematotoxicity induced by benzene. PMID:2676504

  15. Pulmonary fat and bone marrow embolism in aircraft accident victims.

    PubMed

    Bierre, A R; Koelmeyer, T D

    1983-04-01

    On 28 November 1979, an Air New Zealand DC10 aircraft crashed into Mt Erebus, Antarctica with the loss of 257 passengers and crew. Postmortem examinations were carried out on 231 victims in Auckland, 4641 kilometres north of the crash site, and lung tissue was present in 205 cases. Pulmonary fat emboli were present in 134 cases (65%), pulmonary bone marrow emboli in 60 (29%) and pulmonary edema in 76 cases (37%). Clear relationships were demonstrated, firstly between the extent of fat and bone marrow embolism, secondly between the extent of fat and bone marrow embolism and the presence of pulmonary edema, and thirdly between the extent of fat and bone marrow embolism and the extent of cardiovascular damage. It was apparent that death had occurred immediately following impact, and the extent of fat and bone marrow embolism varied inversely with the severity of the injuries found. The most severely injured victims were those seated in the rear cabin of the aircraft suggesting that this was the site of impact with the ground. Our studies show that pulmonary fat embolism occurs very rapidly after severe injury and is followed by increasing numbers of fat and bone marrow emboli depending on the nature of the mortal injuries. PMID:6888959

  16. Transplantation immunology: Solid Organ and bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Chinen, Javier; Buckley, Rebecca H.

    2010-01-01

    Development of the field of organ and tissue transplantation has accelerated remarkably since the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) was discovered in 1967. Matching of donor and recipient for MHC antigens has been shown to have a significant positive effect on graft acceptance. The roles of the different components of the immune system involved in the tolerance or rejection of grafts and in graft-versus-host disease have been clarified. These components include: antibodies, antigen presenting cells, helper and cytotoxic T cell subsets, immune cell surface molecules, signaling mechanisms and cytokines that they release. The development of pharmacologic and biological agents that interfere with the alloimmune response and graft rejection has had a crucial role in the success of organ transplantation. Combinations of these agents work synergistically, leading to lower doses of immunosuppressive drugs and reduced toxicity. Reports of significant numbers of successful solid organ transplants include those of the kidneys, liver, heart and lung. The use of bone marrow transplantation for hematological diseases, particularly hematological malignancies and primary immunodeficiencies, has become the treatment of choice in many of these conditions. Other sources of hematopoietic stem cells are also being used, and diverse immunosuppressive drug regimens of reduced intensity are being proposed to circumvent the mortality associated with the toxicity of these drugs. Gene therapy to correct inherited diseases by infusion of gene-modified autologous hematopoietic stem cells has shown efficacy in two forms of severe combined immunodeficiency, providing an alternative to allogeneic tissue transplantation. PMID:20176267

  17. Post-bone marrow transplant thrombotic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Obut, F; Kasinath, V; Abdi, R

    2016-07-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a systemic disease characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and organ failure. Post-bone marrow transplant TMA (post-BMT TMA) is a life-threatening condition that has been reported to afflict between 0.5 and 63.6% of BMT patients. The incidence of post-BMT TMA is affected by evolving therapies such as conditioning regimens. The etiology of post-BMT TMA is thought to be multifactorial, including the effects of immunosuppressive agents, viral infections, TBI and GvHD. A growing body of evidence highlights the importance of complement system activation and endothelial damage in post-BMT TMA. Although plasmapheresis has commonly been used, its therapeutic rationale for the majority of post-BMT TMA cases is unclear in the absence of circulatory inhibitors. It has become possible to target complement activation with eculizumab, a drug that blocks the terminal complement pathway. Early studies have highlighted the importance of anti-complement therapies in treating post-BMT TMA. Moreover, finding complement gene mutations may identify patients at risk, but whether such patients benefit from prophylactic anti-complement therapies before BMT remains to be studied. This review focuses on diagnostic criteria, pathophysiology, treatment and renal outcomes of post-BMT TMA. PMID:26974272

  18. Neonatal manifestations of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes.

    PubMed

    Khincha, Payal P; Savage, Sharon A

    2016-02-01

    The inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS) are a rare yet clinically important cause of neonatal hematological and non-hematological manifestations. Many of these syndromes, such as Fanconi anemia, dyskeratosis congenita and Diamond-Blackfan anemia, confer risks of multiple medical complications later in life, including an increased risk of cancer. Some IBMFS may present with cytopenias in the neonatal period whereas others may present only with congenital physical abnormalities and progress to pancytopenia later in life. A thorough family history and detailed physical examination are integral to the work-up of any neonate in whom there is a high index of suspicion for an IBMFS. Correct detection and diagnosis of these disorders is important for appropriate long-term medical surveillance and counseling not only for the patient but also for appropriate genetic counselling of their families regarding recurrence risks in future children and generations. PMID:26724991

  19. Adeno associated viral-mediated intraosseous labeling of bone marrow derived cells for CNS tracking.

    PubMed

    Selenica, Maj-Linda B; Reid, Patrick; Pena, Gabriela; Alvarez, Jennifer; Hunt, Jerry B; Nash, Kevin R; Morgan, Dave; Gordon, Marcia N; Lee, Daniel C

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation, including microglial activation in the CNS, is an important hallmark in many neurodegenerative diseases. Microglial stimuli not only impact the brain microenvironment by production and release of cytokines and chemokines, but also influence the activity of bone marrow derived cells and blood born macrophage populations. In many diseases including brain disorders and spinal cord injury, researchers have tried to harbor the neuroprotective and repair properties of these subpopulations. Hematopoietic bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) are of great interest, especially during gene therapy because certain hematopoietic cell subpopulations traffic to the sites of injury and inflammation. The aim of this study was to develop a method of labeling endogenous bone marrow derived cells through intraosseous impregnation of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) or lentivirus. We utilized rAAV serotype 9 (rAAV-9) or lentivirus for gene delivery of green florescence protein (GFP) to the mouse bone marrow cells. Flow cytometry showed that both viruses were able to efficiently transduce mouse bone marrow cells in vivo. However, the rAAV9-GFP viral construct transduced BMDCs more efficiently than the lentivirus (11.2% vs. 6.8%), as indicated by cellular GFP expression. We also demonstrate that GFP labeled cells correspond to bone marrow cells of myeloid origin using CD11b as a marker. Additionally, we characterized the ability of bone marrow derived, GFP labeled cells to extravasate into the brain parenchyma upon acute and subchronic neuroinflammatory stimuli in the mouse CNS. Viral mediated over expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) or intracranial injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) recruited GFP labeled BMDCs from the periphery into the brain parenchyma compared to vehicle treated mice. Altogether our findings demonstrate a useful method of labeling endogenous BMDCs via viral transduction and the ability to track subpopulations throughout the body

  20. Bone marrow fibrosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, J P; Reid, M M

    1989-01-01

    Bone marrow trephine biopsy specimens were obtained at diagnosis from 63 of 76 consecutively presenting children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The association between marrow fibrosis and presenting features, including immunophenotype, was analysed. Reticulin was increased in 45 of 56 cases in which blasts expressed B lineage markers, but in only one of seven with T-ALL. A weak association was also found between marrow fibrosis and splenomegaly in those with common ALL. Marrow fibrosis is apparently associated with some examples of ALL of B cell lineage, but precisely which subtypes and whether the phenomenon is clinically important remain to be determined. PMID:2613918

  1. Clinical application of intrauterine bone marrow transplantation for treatment of genetic diseases--feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Slavin, S; Naparstek, E; Ziegler, M; Lewin, A

    1992-01-01

    Intrauterine bone marrow transplantation (BMT) may represent a new approach for correction of a large variety of genetic disorders in utero. The procedure may become feasible for more genetic disorders in the future, since a large majority of potentially correctible diseases can be diagnosed at an early stage of gestation in utero using molecular probes that permit analysis of small biologic samples and even few cells that may be obtained by chorionic villi biopsy and/or amniocentesis. Haploidentical paternal marrow (2 cases) and sibling bone marrow cells from a disease-free family members, were infused into the fetus. GVHD was avoided following in vitro T-lymphocyte depletion using monoclonal antilymphocyte (CDW52) antibodies (Campath-1) without affecting stem cell viability, similarly to the procedures in routine use in clinical BMT programs in man. Three women underwent intrauterine BMT at 34, 23 and 25 weeks of gestation for metachromatic leucodystrophy (Arylsulfatase A deficiency, 2 cases) and beta thalassemia major (1 case), respectively. A total of 33 x 10(8), 30 x 10(8) and 30 x 10(8) bone marrow cells were infused intraperitoneally (1 case), intraportally plus intraperitoneally (2 cases) with no fetal distress. Although the procedure was uneventful and no clinical evidence of GVHD was observed following delivery, correction of the basic disorders was not accomplished because of anticipated rejection of marrow allografts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1504665

  2. Bone marrow transplantation in Basel: single center experience from 1973 to 1989.

    PubMed

    Speck, B; Nissen, C; Tichelli, A; Roth, J; Dazzi, H; Stebler, C H; Wernli, M; Signer, E; Gratwohl, A

    1989-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation with a small to medium-sized single hospital team is feasible. It leads to results similar to those observed at large centers and with the same major risk factors: age, stage of the disease at the time of transplant, degree of histocompatibility, graft-versus-host disease prevention method, and selection. A single small to medium-sized center cannot conduct prospective randomized studies but it can pioneer new concepts. Bone marrow transplantation today offers a good choice for patients suffering from otherwise lethal bone marrow diseases. These include severe aplastic anemia, acute leukemias, chronic myeloid and chronic lymphoid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and congenital disorders. Changes in outcome are due to innovative steps, such as the introduction of CsA for GvHD prevention. In addition they are certainly influenced by unrecognized changes in the patient selection process. PMID:2487556

  3. The Bone Fat Interface: Basic and Clinical Implications of Marrow Adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Maureen; Rosen, Clifford J

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and osteoporosis are two of the most common chronic disorders of the 21st century. Both are accompanied by significant morbidity. The only place in the mammalian organism where bone and fat lie adjacent to each other is in the bone marrow. Marrow adipose tissue is a dynamic depot that likely exists as both constitutive and regulated compartments. Adipocytes secrete cytokines and adipokines that either stimulate or inhibit adjacent osteoblasts. The relationship of marrow adipose to other fat depots is complex and may play very distinct roles in modulating metabolic homeostasis, hematopoiesis and osteogenesis. Understanding the relationship between bone and fat cells that arise from the same progenitor within the ‘niche’ provides insight into the pathophysiology of age-related osteoporosis, diabetes mellitus and obesity. PMID:24731667

  4. Bone marrow atrophy induced by murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, A E; Price, P; Shellam, G R

    1994-01-01

    Acute, sublethal infection of mice with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) resulted in up to 80% decreases in the number of cells recoverable from the bone marrow, and a decrease in peripheral blood leucocyte counts during the first week of infection. Depopulation of the leucopoietic areas of the marrow was evident from examination of histological sections. The severity of bone marrow atrophy in MCMV-infected mice of different strains correlated with previously described genetically determined sensitivity to MCMV disease. Although the phenomenon only occurred when mice were inoculated with infectious virus preparations, fewer than one in 10(5) marrow cells were productively infected, suggesting that atrophy was not due to lytic infection of large numbers of bone marrow cells. Interestingly, increases in serum colony-stimulating activity were observed and these were proportional to the severity of bone marrow atrophy. After MCMV infection, we observed increases in the proportions of cells expressing some B-cell and myeloid cell markers and a decrease in the proportion of cells expressing an erythroid cell marker. There was no change in the frequency of marrow cells expressing mature T-cell markers. The numbers of myeloid lineage-committed progenitor cells (GM-CFU) in the marrow decreased 10- to 20-fold in BALB/c nu/+ mice, while there was a threefold decrease in their numbers in BALB/c nu/nu mice. In addition, increases in serum colony-stimulating activity were greater in BALB/c nu/+ mice than in BALB/c nu/nu mice. Our results suggest that growth factors produced after MCMV infection may accelerate the maturation and migration of cells from the marrow to sites of virus replication and inflammation, thus accounting for the depletion in numbers of marrow cells observed soon after MCMV infection. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7959876

  5. Spinal nociceptive transmission by mechanical stimulation of bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Sekiguchi, Takemi; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Kawamata, Mikito

    2016-01-01

    Background Since bone marrow receives innervation from A-delta and C-fibers and since an increase in intramedullary pressure in bone marrow may induce acute pain in orthopedic patients during surgery and chronic pain in patients with bone marrow edema, skeletal pain may partly originate from bone marrow. Intraosseous lesions, such as osteomyelitis and bone cancer, are also known to produce cutaneous hypersensitivity, which might be referred pain from bone. However, little is known about pain perception in bone marrow and referred pain induced by bone disease. Thus, we carried out an in vivo electrophysiological study and behavioral study to determine whether increased intraosseous pressure of the femur induces acute pain and whether increased intraosseous pressure induces referred pain in the corresponding receptive fields of the skin. Results Intraosseous balloon inflation caused spontaneous pain-related behavior and mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia in the lumbosacral region. Single neuronal activities of spinal dorsal horn neurons were extracellularly isolated, and then evoked responses to non-noxious and noxious cutaneous stimuli and intraosseous balloon inflation were recorded. Ninety-four spinal dorsal horn neurons, which had somatic receptive fields at the lower back and thigh, were obtained. Sixty-two percent of the wide-dynamic-range neurons (24/39) and 86% of the high-threshold neurons (12/14) responded to intraosseous balloon inflation, while none of the low-threshold neurons (0/41) responded to intraosseous balloon inflation. Spinally administered morphine (1 µg) abolished balloon inflation-induced spontaneous pain-related behavior and mechanical hyperalgesia in awake rats and also suppressed evoked activities of wide-dynamic-range neurons to noxious cutaneous stimulation and intraosseous balloon inflation. Conclusions The results suggest that mechanical stimulation to bone marrow produces nociception, concomitantly producing its referred pain

  6. Lymphoproliferations in the bone marrow: identification and evolution, classification and staging.

    PubMed Central

    Bartl, R; Frisch, B; Burkhardt, R; Jäger, K; Pappenberger, R; Hoffmann-Fezer, G

    1984-01-01

    Bone marrow biopsies from 3229 patients with lymphoproliferative disorders and 1156 patients with benign or reactive lymphoproliferations were investigated and criteria for distinguishing between them are given. Bone marrow involvement was found in 89% of multiple myeloma, 64% of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and 8% of Hodgkin's disease. According to the predominant proliferative cell type there were five major entities in multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas: (1) plasmacytic; (2) lymphocytic; (3) hairy cell; (4) immunocytic; (5) centrocytic. These were further classified into distinct subtypes each of which had independent prognostic significance. The mode of spread of the lymphoproliferative disorders in the bone marrow showed one of six architectural patterns, which together with the quantity of infiltration in the biopsy (reflecting the tumour cell burden) had significant predictive value. These results demonstrate the value of bone marrow biopsies in the identification, classification and staging of lymphoproliferative disorders, as well as in monitoring the course of disease and the response to therapy. Images PMID:6699189

  7. Urothelial Cancer With Occult Bone Marrow Metastases and Isolated Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Alva, Ajjai; Davis, Elizabeth; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Dhanasekaran, Saravana; Mehra, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer rarely presents clinically with a myelophthisic picture from diffuse bone marrow infiltration especially in the absence of detectable skeletal metastases. A 75-year old man presented with newly diagnosed urothelial cell carcinoma of the bladder. Pathology from transurethral resection of bladder tumor demonstrated muscle-invasive disease. Pre-therapy imaging including CT abdomen/pelvis, CXR and bone scan demonstrated liver lesions concerning for metastatic disease but no skeletal metastases. Labs were notable for isolated thrombocytopenia, hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury prompting hospitalization. Hematologic work-up including bone marrow aspiration and biopsy revealed diffuse infiltration of the bone marrow by urothelial cancer. The case illustrates the importance of fully investigating otherwise unexplained clinical findings in patients with clinically localized urothelial cancer prior to curative intent surgery. PMID:26793516

  8. Long-term survival of murine allogeneic bone marrow chimeras: effect of anti-lymphocyte serum and bone marrow dose

    SciTech Connect

    Norin, A.J.; Emeson, E.E.; Veith, F.J.

    1981-02-01

    Graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) and failure of donor stem cells to engraft permanently are two major obstacles to successful bone marrow transplantation. The effect of a single large dose of anti-lymphocyte serum (ALS) on mice receiving various numbers of H-2 incompatible bone marrow cells was evaluated. Most animals receiving lethal total body irradiation (TBI) and allogeneic marrow died within 45 days due to GVHD. Mice that were given ALS 6 to 24 h before TBI and bone marrow 24 h after irradiation survived in good health for more than 200 days. These cell preparations caused lethal GVHD in third party mice indicating that the lack of alloreactivity was specific to the strain in which the unresponsiveness was originally induced.

  9. Bone marrow cells other than stem cells seed the bone marrow after rescue transfusion of fatally irradiated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E.P.; Inoue, T.; Bullis, J.E.

    1987-12-01

    In a previous publication, iodinated deoxyuridine (/sup 125/IUdR) incorporation data were interpreted as indicating that spleen colony-forming units (CFU-S) in DNA synthesis preferentially seeded bone marrow. In the present studies, the CFU-S content of marrow from irradiated, bone-marrow transfused mice was directly determined. Pretreatment of the transfused cells with cytocidal tritiated thymidine resulted in an insignificant diminution in CFU-S content when compared with nontritiated thymidine pretreatment, implying that there is no preferential seeding. The /sup 125/IUdR incorporation data have been reinterpreted as being a result of the proliferation of other progenitor cells present that have seeded the bone marrow.

  10. Usefulness of bone marrow imaging in childhood malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Oseas, R.S.; Siddiqui, A.R.; Wellman, H.N.; Baehner, R.L.

    1982-08-01

    Two hundred six /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid bone marrow scans in 110 pediatrics patients were reviewed. The normal distribution of sulfur colloid in the lower extremities in various age groups was established. There was progressive loss of uptake with increasing age from less than two years to greater than ten years. Tumor replacement was seen as regions of decreased radioactivity, and the extent of the scan defect paralleled the response of the disease to therapy. Both chemotherapy and irradiation resulted in an extension of the /sup 99m/Tc SC to peripheral marrow sites. In irradiated areas, marrow scan defects were demonstrated and generally recovered normal activity by six months after the completion of therapy. Marrow scan abnormalities caused by tumor replacement were present in four patients despite normal bone scans and radiographs. Ultimate confirmation of tumor involvement was by needle aspiration or biopsy. Persistent marrow defects were seen in two patients with neuroblastoma who had remission of their disease: biopsy revealed myelofibrosis. /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid bone marrow scanning is a sensitive monitor of altered marrow activity associated with pediatric hematologic or oncologic diseases.

  11. Cell survival kinetics in peripheral blood and bone marrow during total body irradiation for marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Shank, B.; Andreeff, M.; Li, D.

    1983-11-01

    Cell survival kinetics in both peripheral blood and in bone marrow have been studied over the time course of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) for bone marrow transplantation. Our unique TBI regimen allows the study of the in vivo radiation effect uncomplicated by prior cyclophosphamide, since this agent is given after TBI in our cytoreduction scheme. Peripheral blood cell concentrations were monitored with conventional laboratory cell counts and differentials. Absolute bone marrow cell concentrations were monitored by measuring cell concentrations in an aspirate sample and correcting for dilution with blood by a cell cycle kinetic method using cytofluorometry. For lymphocytes in peripheral blood in patients in remission, the effective D/sub 0/ ranged from 373 rad in 10 children less than or equal to 10 y old, to 536 rad in the four patients between 11 to 17 y old, while n = 1.0 in all groups. There was no trend observed according to age. Granulocytes had a much higher effective D/sub 0/, approximately 1000 rad in vivo. Absolute nucleated cell concentration in marrow dropped slowly initially, due to an increased lymphocyte concentration in marrow during a concurrent drop in lymphocyte concentration in peripheral blood, but eventually fell on the last day of TBI ranging from 7 to 44% of the initial marrow nucleated cell concentration. Marrow myeloid elements, however, dropped continuously throughout the course of TBI.

  12. Marble Bone Disease: A Rare Bone Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Harinathbabu, Maheswari; Thillaigovindan, Ranjani; Prabhu, Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis, or marble bone disease, is a rare skeletal disorder due to a defective function of the osteoclasts. This defect renders bones more susceptible to osteomyelitis due to decreased vascularity. This disorder is inherited as autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive. Healthcare professionals should urge these patients to maintain their oral health as well as general health, as this condition makes these patients more susceptible to frequent infections and fractures. This case report emphasizes the signs and symptoms of marble bone disease and presents clinical and radiographic findings.  PMID:26594603

  13. The microcirculation of bone and marrow in the diaphysis of the rat hemopoietic long bones.

    PubMed

    de Saint-Georges, L; Miller, S C

    1992-06-01

    The nature of the microcirculation of the diaphyseal portion of long bones and the adjacent bone marrow is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to describe the blood supply in the diaphyseal cortex and the relationship of the bone vascular circulation to that of the bone marrow in the growing rat. India ink-gelatin was infused in the arterial system of 3-month-old rats and the vascularization was determined from histological sections. In some studies the periosteal circulation was blocked but the nutrient and metaphyseal arteriole systems were left intact. In the growing rat, most of the vascular flow appears to be centripetally through the diaphyseal cortex and this appears to be the primary blood supply for the adjacent bone marrow. The India ink traversed the cortex and entered the marrow through osteal canals at the endocortical surface. At the marrow-endocortical bone surface interface, ink exiting from the osteal canals filled the adjacent marrow sinusoids in what appeared as "bush-like" structures. From the bone marrow the ink appeared to drain into the central vein. Some arterioles from the nutrient system were found to penetrate the inner two thirds of the cortical bone and then re-enter the bone marrow. The centripetal flow of blood and the importance of the cortical flow for perfusion of the hemopoietic tissue was further documented when periosteal flow was obstructed. In this situation, the cortical bone and adjacent bone marrow were not perfused while the nutrient system and central vein were filled with ink.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1605383

  14. Understanding donors' motivations: a study of unrelated bone marrow donors.

    PubMed

    Switzer, G E; Dew, M A; Butterworth, V A; Simmons, R G; Schimmel, M

    1997-07-01

    Medical advances in bone marrow transplantation techniques and immunosuppressive medications have dramatically increased the number of such transplants performed each year, and consequently, the demand for bone marrow from unrelated donors. Although physiological aspects of bone marrow donation have been thoroughly investigated, very few studies have examined psychosocial factors that may impact individuals' donation decisions and outcomes. To examine one particular set of donor psychosocial issues, this study investigated motives for bone marrow donation among 343 unrelated bone marrow donors who donated through the National Marrow Donor Program. Six distinct types of donor motives were identified from open-ended questionnaire responses. Donors most frequently reported motives reflecting some awareness of both the costs (to themselves) and potential benefits (to themselves and the recipient) of donation. A desire to act in accordance with social or religious precepts, expected positive feelings about donating, empathy for the recipient, and the simple desire to help another person were also commonly cited reasons for donating. Among a series of donor background characteristics, donors' gender was the variable most strongly associated with motive type; women were most likely to cite expected positive feelings, empathy, and the desire to help someone. Central study findings indicated that donor motives predicted donors reactions to donation even after the effects of donor background characteristics (including gender) were controlled. Donors who reported exchange motives (weighing costs and benefits) and donors who reported simple (or idealized) helping motives experienced the donation as less positive in terms of higher predonation ambivalence and negative postdonation psychological reactions than did remaining donors. Donors who reported positive feeling and empathy motives had the most positive donation reactions in terms of lower ambivalence, and feeling like

  15. Spine Fusion Using Cell Matrix Composites Enriched in Bone Marrow-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nitto, Hironori; Matsukura, Yoichi; Boehm, Cynthia; Valdevit, Antonio; Kambic, Helen; Davros, William; Powell, Kimerly; Easley, Kirk

    2005-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells including osteoblastic progenitors can be concentrated rapidly from bone marrow aspirates using the surface of selected implantable matrices for selective cell attachment. Concentration of cells in this way to produce an enriched cellular composite graft improves graft efficacy. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that the biologic milieu of a bone marrow clot will significantly improve the efficacy of such a graft. An established posterior spinal fusion model and cancellous bone matrix was used to compare an enriched cellular composite bone graft alone, bone matrix plus bone marrow clot, and an enriched bone matrix composite graft plus bone marrow clot. Union score, quantitative computed tomography, and mechanical testing were used to define outcome. The union score for the enriched bone matrix plus bone marrow clot composite was superior to the enriched bone matrix alone and the bone matrix plus bone marrow clot. The enriched bone matrix plus bone marrow clot composite also was superior to the enriched bone matrix alone in fusion volume and in fusion area. These data confirm that the addition of a bone marrow clot to an enriched cell-matrix composite graft results in significant improvement in graft performance. Enriched composite grafts prepared using this strategy provide a rapid, simple, safe, and inexpensive method for intraoperative concentration and delivery of bone marrow-derived cells and connective tissue progenitors that may improve the outcome of bone grafting. PMID:12567137

  16. Hematopoietic bone marrow recovery after radiation therapy: MRI evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Casamassima, F.; Ruggiero, C.; Caramella, D.; Tinacci, E.; Villari, N.; Ruggiero, M. )

    1989-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is able to detect the increase of adipocytes in the hematopoietic bone marrow that occurs as a consequence of radiotherapy and is indicative of the loss of myeloid tissue. By monitoring this process, it is also possible to determine the recovery of the bone marrow. The amount of viable hematopoietic tissue plays a fundamental role in determining whether the patient is able to undergo further antineoplastic therapy, particularly chemotherapy. We examined 35 patients who had been treated with radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma (12), uterine cervix carcinoma (nine), ovarian dysgerminoma (six), testicular seminoma (four), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (four). We observed that radiation-induced modifications of the MRI pattern in the bone marrow are tightly linked to two parameters; the administered radiation dose and the length of time passed after the treatment. Bone marrow recovery was observed only when patients were treated with doses lower than 50 Gy. The earlier radiation-induced modifications of the bone marrow MRI pattern occurred 6 to 12 months after irradiation, and they were most evident 5 to 6 years after the treatment. From 2 to 9 years after radiotherapy, we observed partial recovery. Complete recovery, when it occurred, was observed only 10 to 23 years after the treatment. Our results indicate that MRI studies are likely to be useful in the assessment of radiation-induced injuries.

  17. Lasting engraftment of histoincompatible bone marrow cells in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Klapwijk, W.M.; van Kessel, A.M.C.; Zurcher, C.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    Conditioning protocols were tested for their efficacy in increasng the incidence of engraftment of histoincompatible dog bone marrow cells. Cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (TBI), Corynebacterium parvum and TBI, a 3- or 5-day delayed transfusion of bone marrow cells after TBI, or an increase in the number of donor bone marrow cells or lymphocytes appeared to be ineffective. These protocols were previously reported to promote recovery of splenic hemopoiesis in mice in short-term assays. The noted discrepancy between studies with mice and dogs invalidated allogeneic resistance as measured in the mouse spleen assay as a model for bone marrow allograft rejection. Intravenous treatment with silica particles or L-asparaginase did improve the engraftment rate after 7.5 Gy TBI. Low efficiency and significant extra toxicity restrict the applicability of these procedures. The most promising conditioning schedule found appeared to be two fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI separated by a 72-h interval. Prolonged survival was noted after transplantation of bone marrow cells from a one-DLA haplotype-mismatched donor. Possibilities for further improvement of this protocol are discussed.

  18. Lasting engraftment of histoincompatible bone marrow cells in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Klapwijk, W.M.; van Kessel, A.M.; Zurcher, C.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    Conditioning protocols were tested for their efficacy in increasing the incidence of engraftment of histoincompatible dog bone marrow cells. Cyclophosphamide and total body irradation (TBI), Corynebacterium parvum and TBI, a 3- or 5-day delayed transfusion of bone marrow cells after TBI, or an increase in the number of donor bone marrow cells or lymphocytes appeared to be ineffective. These protocols were previously reported to promote recovery of splenic hemopoiesis in mice in short-term assays. The noted discrepancy between studies with mice and dogs invalidated allogeneic resistance as measured in the mouse spleen assay as a model for bone marrow allograft rejection. Intravenous treatment with silica particles or L-asparaginase did improve the engraftment rate after 7.5 Gy TBI. Low efficiency and significant extra toxicity restrict the applicability of these procedures. The most promising conditioning schedule found appeared to be two fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI separated by a 72-hr interval. Prolonged survival was noted after transplantation of bone marrow cells from a one-DLA haplo-type-mismatched donor. Possibilities for further improvement of this protocol are discussed.

  19. Targeting bone marrow lymphoid niches in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Uy, Geoffrey L; Hsu, Yen-Michael S; Schmidt, Amy P; Stock, Wendy; Fletcher, Theresa R; Trinkaus, Kathryn M; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F; Link, Daniel C

    2015-12-01

    In acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) the bone marrow microenvironment provides growth and survival signals that may confer resistance to chemotherapy. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) potently inhibits lymphopoiesis by targeting stromal cells that comprise the lymphoid niche in the bone marrow. To determine whether lymphoid niche disruption by G-CSF sensitizes ALL cells to chemotherapy, we conducted a pilot study of G-CSF in combination with chemotherapy in patients with relapsed or refractory ALL. Thirteen patients were treated on study; three patients achieved a complete remission (CR/CRi) for an overall response rate of 23%. In the healthy volunteers, G-CSF treatment disrupted the lymphoid niche, as evidenced by reduced expression of CXCL12, interleukin-7, and osteocalcin. However, in most patients with relapsed/refractory ALL expression of these genes was markedly suppressed at baseline. Thus, although G-CSF treatment was associated with ALL cell mobilization into the blood, and increased apoptosis of bone marrow resident ALL cells, alterations in the bone marrow microenvironment were modest and highly variable. These data suggest that disruption of lymphoid niches by G-CSF to sensitize ALL cells to chemotherapy may be best accomplished in the consolidation where the bone marrow microenvironment is more likely to be normal. PMID:26467815

  20. Navigating the bone marrow niche: translational insights and cancer-driven dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Michaela R; Rosen, Clifford J

    2016-03-01

    The bone marrow niche consists of stem and progenitor cells destined to become mature cells such as haematopoietic elements, osteoblasts or adipocytes. Marrow cells, influenced by endocrine, paracrine and autocrine factors, ultimately function as a unit to regulate bone remodelling and haematopoiesis. Current evidence highlights that the bone marrow niche is not merely an anatomic compartment; rather, it integrates the physiology of two distinct organ systems, the skeleton and the marrow. The niche has a hypoxic microenvironment that maintains quiescent haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and supports glycolytic metabolism. In response to biochemical cues and under the influence of neural, hormonal, and biochemical factors, marrow stromal elements, such as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), differentiate into mature, functioning cells. However, disruption of the niche can affect cellular differentiation, resulting in disorders ranging from osteoporosis to malignancy. In this Review, we propose that the niche reflects the vitality of two tissues - bone and blood - by providing a unique environment for stem and stromal cells to flourish while simultaneously preventing disproportionate proliferation, malignant transformation or loss of the multipotent progenitors required for healing, functional immunity and growth throughout an organism's lifetime. Through a fuller understanding of the complexity of the niche in physiologic and pathologic states, the successful development of more-effective therapeutic approaches to target the niche and its cellular components for the treatment of rheumatic, endocrine, neoplastic and metabolic diseases becomes achievable. PMID:26607387

  1. Mechanical stimulation of bone marrow in situ induces bone formation in trabecular explants.

    PubMed

    Birmingham, E; Kreipke, T C; Dolan, E B; Coughlin, T R; Owens, P; McNamara, L M; Niebur, G L; McHugh, P E

    2015-04-01

    Low magnitude high frequency (LMHF) loading has been shown to have an anabolic effect on trabecular bone in vivo. However, the precise mechanical signal imposed on the bone marrow cells by LMHF loading, which induces a cellular response, remains unclear. This study investigates the influence of LMHF loading, applied using a custom designed bioreactor, on bone adaptation in an explanted trabecular bone model, which isolated the bone and marrow. Bone adaptation was investigated by performing micro CT scans pre and post experimental LMHF loading, using image registration techniques. Computational fluids dynamic models were generated using the pre-experiment scans to characterise the mechanical stimuli imposed by the loading regime prior to adaptation. Results here demonstrate a significant increase in bone formation in the LMHF loaded group compared to static controls and media flow groups. The calculated shear stress in the marrow was between 0.575 and 0.7 Pa, which is within the range of stimuli known to induce osteogenesis by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro. Interestingly, a correlation was found between the bone formation balance (bone formation/resorption), trabecular number, trabecular spacing, mineral resorption rate, bone resorption rate and mean shear stresses. The results of this study suggest that the magnitude of the shear stresses generated due to LMHF loading in the explanted bone cores has a contributory role in the formation of trabecular bone and improvement in bone architecture parameters. PMID:25281407

  2. 99Tcm-LL1: a potential new bone marrow imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Juweid, M; Dunn, R M; Sharkey, R M; Rubin, A D; Hansen, H J; Goldenberg, D M

    1997-02-01

    LL1, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) to HLA Class-II-like antigen (li determinant) on the surface of B-lymphocytes, monocytes and histiocytes, was evaluated as an agent for bone marrow imaging. Six patients with diverse diseases (non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, n = 2; multiple myeloma, n = 1; polycythaemia vera, n = 1; lung cancer, n = 1; breast cancer, n = 1) were given low protein doses (< 1 mg) of 99Tcm (30 mCi) labelled Fab' of LL1. 99Tcm-sulphur colloid (SC) imaging was performed in three patients for comparison. Both planar and single photon emission tomographic images were acquired using Sopha gamma cameras. As early as 2 h post-MAb injection, excellent bone marrow images were achieved in all patients, demonstrating both normal or hyperproliferative marrow, as well as 'cold' bone marrow abnormalities such as radiation defects or cancer metastases. Similar to SC, relatively high uptake of LL1 was found in the liver and spleen. However, the bone marrow-to-liver and -spleen uptake ratios were approximately 19-fold higher (0.75 vs 0.04) and 6-fold higher (1.23 vs 0.22), respectively, with LL1 than with SC. The higher bone marrow uptake allowed clearly superior visualization of the thoracic spine when compared to SC. The mean T1/2 of blood and whole-body clearance were 0.4 and 66 h, respectively. The highest radiation absorbed doses (in cGy mCi-1) were observed in the spleen (0.47 +/- 0.24), kidneys (0.25 +/- 0.09) and liver (0.14 +/- 0.04). The bone marrow dose was only 0.05 +/- 0.02 cGy mCi-1. These results indicate that bone marrow imaging with 99Tcm-LL1 is feasible, and that LL1 may be a suitable alternative to SC because of better visualization of the lower thoracic spine. Potential applications include the improved detection of bone marrow metastases of solid tumours and the assessment of haematological disorders. PMID:9076770

  3. Cell Fate and Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jimi, Eijiro

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblasts and bone marrow adipocytes originate from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and there appears to be a reciprocal relationship between adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis. Alterations in the balance between adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis in BMMSCs wherein adipogenesis is increased relative to osteoblastogenesis are associated with decreased bone quality and quantity. Several proteins have been reported to regulate this reciprocal relationship but the exact nature of the signals regulating the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte formation within the bone marrow space remains to be determined. In this review, we focus on the role of Transducin-Like Enhancer of Split 3 (TLE3), which was recently reported to regulate the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte formation from BMMSCs. We also discuss evidence implicating canonical Wnt signalling, which plays important roles in both adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis, in regulating TLE3 expression. Currently, there is demand for new effective therapies that target the stimulation of osteoblast differentiation to enhance bone formation. We speculate that reducing TLE3 expression or activity in BMMSCs could be a useful approach towards increasing osteoblast numbers and reducing adipogenesis in the bone marrow environment. PMID:27298623

  4. Whole bone marrow irradiation for the treatment of multiple myeloma

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, M.; Saletan, S.; Wolf, D.; Nisce, L.; Wasser, J.; McIntyre, O.R.; Tulloh, M.

    1982-04-01

    Nine patients with multiple myeloma were treated with whole bone marrow irradiation. Six had heavily pretreated disease refractory to chemotherapy. Three had stable disease lightly pretreated by chemotherapy. A modification of the ''three and two'' total nodal radiation technique was employed. Although varying and often severe treatment related cytopenia occurred, infectious complications, clinical bleeding, and nonhematalogic complications were minimal. Five of nine patients showed a decrease in monoclonal protein components, and one showed an increase during treatment. These preliminary results indicate that a reduction of tumor cell burden may occur in patients following whole bone marrow irradiation and that the technique is feasible. Whole bone marrow irradiation combined with chemotherapy represents a new conceptual therapeutic approach for multiple myeloma.

  5. Modeling Selective Elimination of Quiescent Cancer Cells from Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Cavnar, Stephen P.; Rickelmann, Andrew D.; Meguiar, Kaille F.; Xiao, Annie; Dosch, Joseph; Leung, Brendan M.; Cai Lesher-Perez, Sasha; Chitta, Shashank; Luker, Kathryn E.; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with many types of malignancy commonly harbor quiescent disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow. These cells frequently resist chemotherapy and may persist for years before proliferating as recurrent metastases. To test for compounds that eliminate quiescent cancer cells, we established a new 384-well 3D spheroid model in which small numbers of cancer cells reversibly arrest in G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle when cultured with bone marrow stromal cells. Using dual-color bioluminescence imaging to selectively quantify viability of cancer and stromal cells in the same spheroid, we identified single compounds and combination treatments that preferentially eliminated quiescent breast cancer cells but not stromal cells. A treatment combination effective against malignant cells in spheroids also eliminated breast cancer cells from bone marrow in a mouse xenograft model. This research establishes a novel screening platform for therapies that selectively target quiescent tumor cells, facilitating identification of new drugs to prevent recurrent cancer. PMID:26408255

  6. P-glycoprotein expression in normal and reactive bone marrows.

    PubMed Central

    Hegewisch-Becker, S.; Fliegner, M.; Tsuruo, T.; Zander, A.; Zeller, W.; Hossfeld, D. K.

    1993-01-01

    The expression of mdr1 gene product P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was investigated in 53 normal and reactive bone marrows by means of immunocytochemistry, using the monoclonal antibody (mAb) C219 and the alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase method. In a limited number of patients, data were confirmed by using the mAb MRK16 or a polymerase chain reaction assay for mdr1 gene expression. There was no history of prior chemotherapy or any malignancy in this group. Bone marrow aspirates were obtained as part of a routine diagnostic programme in bone marrow donors or in patients presenting with a variety of diagnoses such as unexplained gammopathy, fever, anaemia, other changes in peripheral blood smear, rheumatoid arthritis, vasculitis, or urticaria pigmentosa. Morphologically the bone marrow was normal in 23 patients, a megaloblastic erythropoiesis was seen in two patients and unspecific changes were seen in 28 patients. Twenty-seven of 53 samples were found to be positive for P-gp expression with the percentage of positive cells ranging from 2%-80% (mean = 24%). With a cutoff point of 10%, five of 23 normal (22%) and 13 of 28 reactive bone marrows (46%) were considered positive for P-gp expression. There was no obvious correlation between diagnosis or age and P-gp expression. Additional staining for the early surface marker CD-34 was performed in 12 samples, with none of them revealing more than 1% positivity. Since P-gp expression has so far been described only in CD-34 positive bone marrow cells, data suggest that P-gp expression may be reinduced in CD-34 negative cells under conditions which remain to be determined. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8094974

  7. Genomic Characterization of the Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Khincha, Payal P.; Savage, Sharon A.

    2013-01-01

    The inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS) are a set of clinically related yet heterogeneous disorders in which at least one hematopoietic cell lineage is significantly reduced. Many of the IBMFS have notably increased cancer risks as well as other physical findings. Highly penetrant germline mutations in key pathways, such as DNA repair, telomere biology, or ribosomal biogenesis are causative of Fanconi anemia (FA), dyskeratosis congenita (DC) and Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), respectively. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) generally refers to high-throughput, large-scale sequencing technologies and is being used more frequently to understand disease etiology. In the IBMFS, NGS has facilitated the discovery of germline mutations that cause thombocytopenia absent radii syndrome, a subset of DC and DBA, and other uncharacterized, but related, disorders. Panels of large numbers of genes are being used to molecularly characterize patients with IBMFS, such as FA and DBA. NGS is also accelerating the discovery of the genetic etiology of previously unclassified IBMFS. In this review, we will highlight recent studies that have employed NGS to ascertain the genetic etiology of IBMFS, namely FA, DC, DBA and TAR and discuss the translational utility of these findings. PMID:24246701

  8. Consequences of irradiation on bone and marrow phenotypes, and its relation to disruption of hematopoietic precursors

    PubMed Central

    Green, Danielle E.; Rubin, Clinton T.

    2014-01-01

    The rising levels of radiation exposure, specifically for medical treatments and accidental exposures, have added great concern for the long term risks of bone fractures. Both the bone marrow and bone architecture are devastated following radiation exposure. Even sub-lethal doses cause a deficit to the bone marrow microenvironment, including a decline in hematopoietic cells, and this deficit occurs in a dose dependent fashion. Certain cell phenotypes though are more susceptible to radiation damage, with mesenchymal stem cells being more resilient than the hematopoietic stem cells. The decline in total bone marrow hematopoietic cells is accompanied with elevated adipocytes into the marrow cavity, thereby inhibiting hematopoiesis and recovery of the bone marrow microenvironment. Poor bone marrow is also associated with a decline in bone architectural quality. Therefore, the ability to maintain the bone marrow microenvironment would hinder much of the trabecular bone loss caused by radiation exposure, ultimately decreasing some comorbidities in patients exposed to radiation. PMID:24607941

  9. Autologous bone-marrow mesenchymal cell induced chondrogenesis (MCIC).

    PubMed

    Huh, Sung Woo; Shetty, Asode Ananthram; Ahmed, Saif; Lee, Dong Hwan; Kim, Seok Jung

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative and traumatic articular cartilage defects are common, difficult to treat, and progressive lesions that cause significant morbidity in the general population. There have been multiple approaches to treat such lesions, including arthroscopic debridement, microfracture, multiple drilling, osteochondral transplantation and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) that are currently being used in clinical practice. Autologous bone-marrow mesenchymal cell induced chondrogenesis (MCIC) is a single-staged arthroscopic procedure. This method combines a modified microfracture technique with the application of a bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC), hyaluronic acid and fibrin gel to treat articular cartilage defects. We reviewed the current literatures and surgical techniques for mesenchymal cell induced chondrogenesis. PMID:27489409

  10. Immune Cell Isolation from Mouse Femur Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Quan, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The bone marrow is the site of hematopoesis and contains mixed population of blood cells including erythrocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, dendritic cells, lymphocytes and hematopoietic stem cells. The following protocol provides a simple and fast method for isolation of bone marrow immune cells (no erythrocytes) from mouse femurs with a yield of approximate 8 × 107 cells in 5 ml culture media (1.6 × 104 cells/μl). Further isolation or flow cytometric analysis might be required for study of specific immune cell types.

  11. Growth Hormone Regulates the Balance Between Bone Formation and Bone Marrow Adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Menagh, Philip J; Turner, Russell T; Jump, Donald B; Wong, Carmen P; Lowry, Malcolm B; Yakar, Shoshana; Rosen, Clifford J; Iwaniec, Urszula T

    2010-01-01

    Cancellous bone decreases and bone marrow fat content increases with age. Osteoblasts and adipocytes are derived from a common precursor, and growth hormone (GH), a key hormone in integration of energy metabolism, regulates the differentiation and function of both cell lineages. Since an age-related decline in GH is associated with bone loss, we investigated the relationship between GH and bone marrow adiposity in hypophysectomized (HYPOX) rats and in mice with defects in GH signaling. HYPOX dramatically reduced body weight gain, bone growth and mineralizing perimeter, serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels, and mRNA levels for IGF-1 in liver and bone. Despite reduced body mass and adipocyte precursor pool size, HYPOX resulted in a dramatic increase in bone lipid levels, as reflected by increased bone marrow adiposity and bone triglyceride and cholesterol content. GH replacement normalized bone marrow adiposity and precursor pool size, as well as mineralizing perimeter in HYPOX rats. In contrast, 17β -estradiol, IGF-1, thyroxine, and cortisone were ineffective. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) reversed the inhibitory effects of HYPOX on mineralizing perimeter but had no effect on adiposity. Finally, bone marrow adiposity was increased in mice deficient in GH and IGF-1 but not in mice deficient in serum IGF-1. Taken together, our findings indicate that the reciprocal changes in bone and fat mass in GH signaling-deficient rodents are not directly coupled with one another. Rather, GH enhances adipocyte as well as osteoblast precursor pool size. However, GH increases osteoblast differentiation while suppressing bone marrow lipid accumulation. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research PMID:19821771

  12. Significance of bone marrow edema in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Kontny, Ewa; Maśliński, Włodzimierz; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Warczyńska, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2013-01-01

    Summary Assessing the pathology of the synovium, its thickening and increased vascularity through ultrasound and magnetic resonance examinations (more often an ultrasound study alone) is still considered a sensitive parameter in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis and in monitoring of treatment efficacy. Magnetic resonance studies showed that, aside from the joint pannus, the subchondral bone tissue constitutes an essential element in the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Bone marrow edema correlates with inflammation severity, joint destruction, clinical signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, and thus is considered a predictor of rapid radiological progression of the disease. The newest studies reveal that bone marrow edema may be a more sensitive indicator of the response to therapy than appearance of the synovium. Bone marrow edema presents with increased signal in T2-weighted images, being most visible in fat saturation or IR sequences (STIR, TIRM). On the other hand, it is hypointense and less evident in T1-weighted images. It becomes enhanced (hyperintense) after contrast administration. Histopathological studies confirmed that it is a result of bone inflammation (osteitis/osteomyelitis), i.e. replacememt of bone marrow fat by inflammatory infiltrates containing macrophages, T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, plasma cells and osteoclasts. Bone marrow edema appears after a few weeks from occurrence of symptoms and therefore is considered an early marker of inflammation. It correlates with clinical assessment of disease activity and elevated markers of acute inflammatory phase, i.e. ESR and CRP. It is a reversible phenomenon and may become attenuated due to biological treatment. It is considered a “herald” of erosions, as the risk of their formation is 6-fold higher in sites where BME was previously noted PMID:23493495

  13. Neonatal bone marrow transplantation prevents bone pathology in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type I.

    PubMed

    Pievani, Alice; Azario, Isabella; Antolini, Laura; Shimada, Tsutomu; Patel, Pravin; Remoli, Cristina; Rambaldi, Benedetta; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Riminucci, Mara; Biondi, Andrea; Tomatsu, Shunji; Serafini, Marta

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal bone marrow transplantation (BMT) could offer a novel therapeutic opportunity for genetic disorders by providing sustainable levels of the missing protein at birth, thus preventing tissue damage. We tested this concept in mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS IH; Hurler syndrome), a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-l-iduronidase. MPS IH is characterized by a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, including severe progressive skeletal abnormalities. Although BMT increases the life span of patients with MPS IH, musculoskeletal manifestations are only minimally responsive if the timing of BMT delays, suggesting already irreversible bone damage. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that transplanting normal BM into newborn MPS I mice soon after birth can prevent skeletal dysplasia. We observed that neonatal BMT was effective at restoring α-l-iduronidase activity and clearing elevated glycosaminoglycans in blood and multiple organs. At 37 weeks of age, we observed an almost complete normalization of all bone tissue parameters, using radiographic, microcomputed tomography, biochemical, and histological analyses. Overall, the magnitude of improvements correlated with the extent of hematopoietic engraftment. We conclude that BMT at a very early stage in life markedly reduces signs and symptoms of MPS I before they appear. PMID:25298037

  14. Neonatal bone marrow transplantation prevents bone pathology in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type I

    PubMed Central

    Pievani, Alice; Azario, Isabella; Antolini, Laura; Shimada, Tsutomu; Patel, Pravin; Remoli, Cristina; Rambaldi, Benedetta; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Riminucci, Mara; Biondi, Andrea; Tomatsu, Shunji

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal bone marrow transplantation (BMT) could offer a novel therapeutic opportunity for genetic disorders by providing sustainable levels of the missing protein at birth, thus preventing tissue damage. We tested this concept in mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS IH; Hurler syndrome), a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-l-iduronidase. MPS IH is characterized by a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, including severe progressive skeletal abnormalities. Although BMT increases the life span of patients with MPS IH, musculoskeletal manifestations are only minimally responsive if the timing of BMT delays, suggesting already irreversible bone damage. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that transplanting normal BM into newborn MPS I mice soon after birth can prevent skeletal dysplasia. We observed that neonatal BMT was effective at restoring α-l-iduronidase activity and clearing elevated glycosaminoglycans in blood and multiple organs. At 37 weeks of age, we observed an almost complete normalization of all bone tissue parameters, using radiographic, microcomputed tomography, biochemical, and histological analyses. Overall, the magnitude of improvements correlated with the extent of hematopoietic engraftment. We conclude that BMT at a very early stage in life markedly reduces signs and symptoms of MPS I before they appear. PMID:25298037

  15. Rampant infections of bone marrow stem cell niches as triggers for spondyloarthropathies and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Sibilia, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Tropheryma Whipplei can induce rheumatism mimicking SpA or RA, but even more rampant bacterial/viral infections in epiphyseal bones could also contribute to the onset of RA and SpA. Indeed, as bone marrow stem cell niches are enriched in Tregs and myeloid derived suppressor cells, these areas are favourable for the persistence of quiescent viruses and/or dormant bacteria. This review focuses on the possibility that such silent infections of bone marrow stem cell niches might contribute to the pathogenesis of SpA and RA, at least during their onset. Some infections can affect the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, which can transmit these pathogens to their progeny. Transient but repeated revivals of viruses or dormant bacteria could promote the conversion of marrow regulatory T cells into effector phenotypes, leading to autoimmunity in the epiphyseal bone marrow, entheses and adjacent synovium. This scenario would also fit the flares of rheumatic disorders and explain why some joints or enthuses can be severely involved whereas their neighbours remain intact. The efficiency of anti-TNF drugs does not rule out a role of persistent infections in SpA and RA. These drugs do not affect chlamydial clearance, or the reactivation of latent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in mice or Epstein-Barr virus in humans. Anti-TNF might even prevent, rather than foster, the revival of dormant bacteria and viruses in marrow stem cell niches. Indeed, anti-TNF enhance the maturation of the immunosuppressive immature myeloid cells around stem cells into dendritic cells and macrophages, thus restoring immune responses in these areas. PMID:26886813

  16. Diagnostic Value of Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy in Routine Hematology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Singh Rana, Amrit Pal; Kapoor, Shivali; Puri, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Background: The bone marrow is frequently involved in variety of cases presenting with hematological and non-hematological disorders, which are diagnosed by two separate but interrelated techniques such as bone marrow aspiration (BMA) and bone marrow biopsy (BMB). Aim: This study was aimed to assess the diagnostic value of the BMA and BMB and role of both the procedures to reach final diagnosis when done simultaneously. Settings and Design: It was a prospective study. The findings of BMA smears were correlated with BMB sections and data obtained was analysed. Materials and Methods: BMA and BMB were performed on 50 patients. Criteria of inclusion included the main indications for performing this procedure, the availability of full medical records and patient consent. The patients had a male to female sex ratio of 1.6:1 and a wide age range from 4 years to 74 years. Results: In the present study, the main indications for bone marrow examination were categorized. Out of 50 cases studied, in 23 cases, a strong positive correlation between BMA and BMB was noted. However, it was found that in the cases of aplastic anaemia, different phases of myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN), multiple myeloma, tubercular granulomas and hemato-lymphoid neoplasm, involvement of the marrow was detected better in bone marrow biopsies. Conclusion: The study concludes that preparations of aspirate and trephine biopsy are easy, rapid and complementary to each other in majority of the lesions. The advantage of both the procedures done together enabled us to study the cytomorphology of the cells along with the pattern of distribution of the cells depending on the cases, hence help in making the diagnosis accurately. PMID:25302200

  17. The survival of cryopreserved human bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hill, R S; Mackinder, C A; Postlewaight, B F; Blacklock, H A

    1979-07-01

    Two methods for cryopreservation of bone marrow stem cells were compared using bone marrow obtained from 36 patients. Included in this group were 21 persons with the diagnosis of leukaemia including 14 either with acute myeloid or lymphoblastic leukaemia in remission following intensive remission induction chemotherapy. After freeze-preservation and reconstitution, all marrow samples were tested for nucleated cell (NC) recovery and grown on agar to assess colony forming units (CFUC) and cluster forming units in culture (CluFUc). A slow dilution reconstitution method using freezing media containing AB negative plasma resulted in recovery of 85% of the CFUc activity of fresh marrow. This result was significantly better than the 47% CFUc recovery obtained when freezing media without plasma and a rapid dilution reconstitution technique were used. NC recoveries following slow dilution (51%) and rapid dilution (44%) were not significantly different. CluFUc were disproportionately reduced compared with CFUc although yielding similar results with both methods (26% and 32%). No correlation was found for either method between CFUc and NC recovery or between CFUc and CluFUc recovery in cryopreserved bone marrow. PMID:392422

  18. Mature adipocytes in bone marrow protect myeloma cells against chemotherapy through autophagy activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major problem in patients with multiple myeloma is chemotherapy resistance, which develops in myeloma cells upon interaction with bone marrow stromal cells. However, few studies have determined the role of bone marrow adipocytes, a major component of stromal cells in the bone marrow, in myeloma ch...

  19. Total body irradiation in bone marrow transplantation: the influence of fractionation and delay of marrow infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lichter, A.S.; Tracy, D.; Lam, W.C.; Order, S.E.

    1980-03-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) after total body irradiation (TBI) and cyclophosphamide is being employed increasingly in the therapy of end stage leukemia. Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) represents a major acute toxicity after allogeneic transplantation. A more rapid reconstitution of lymphoid organs and bone marrow post transplant may result in increased immune competence and hence fewer opportunistic pulmonary infections and IP. By delaying the infusion of marrow to 72 hr after TBI (1250 rad at 7.5 rad/min) instead of the customary 24 hr, we can demonstrate an increase in initial repopulation of thymus, spleen and bone marrow, with syngeneic transplants in Lewis rats. Interstitial pneumonitis may also be caused, in part, by the pulmonary toxicity of large single exposures of TBI. Clinical and laboratory data suggest that fractionated TBI may be less toxic to the lung. When fractionated TBI (625 rad x 2, 7.5 rad/min) is compared to single dose TBI (1250 rad, 7.5 rad/min), and increased initial repopulation of lymphoid organs is observed when fractionated therapy is employed. Delay in marrow infusion and fractionation of TBI exposure may have clinical advantages in patients who receive BMT.

  20. Chronic hepatitis C infection in a patient with bone marrow hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Bethlen, S; Chandrikakumari, K; de Leval, L; Giot, J-B; Mukeba, D; Leonard, P; Frippiat, F; Meuris, C; Delwaide, J; Moutschen, M

    2008-07-14

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with multifarious extra-hepatic manifestations; the most described and discussed being mixed cryoglobulinemia which is strongly related to B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs). We present a case of chronic HCV infection and mixed cryoglobulinemia, with minimal liver involvement. The case is a 53-year-old patient who was diagnosed as having bone marrow hypoplasia at the age of three. She received several blood transfusions to normalize her haemoglobin. At the age of 31, she was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis on account of her diffuse joint pain and inflammation, elevated rheumatoid factor (RF) and Raynaud's phenomenon. Twenty years later, monoclonal gammopathy of IgG Lambda (one year later, changed to IgM Kappa) was detected during a routine examination. A bone marrow biopsy showed hypoplasia, Kappa positive B-lymphocytes and low-grade malignant lymphoma cells. PCR of the bone marrow aspirate was not contributory. No treatment was initiated owing to her poor bone marrow function and she is under regular follow-up. PMID:18636673

  1. Cure of murine thalassemia by bone marrow transplantation without eradication of endogenous stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wagemaker, G.; Visser, T.P.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1986-09-01

    alpha-Thalassemic heterozygous (Hbath/+) mice were used to investigate the possible selective advantage of transplanted normal (+/+) hemopoietic cells. Without conditioning by total-body irradiation (TBI), infusion of large numbers of normal bone marrow cells failed to correct the thalassemic peripheral blood phenotype. Since the recipients' stem cells are normal with respect to number and differentiation capacity, it was thought that the transplanted stem cells were not able to lodge, or that they were not stimulated to proliferate. Therefore, a nonlethal dose of TBI was given to temporarily reduce endogenous stem cell numbers and hemopoiesis. TBI doses of 2 or 3 Gy followed by infusion of normal bone marrow cells proved to be effective in replacing the thalassemic red cells by normal red cells, whereas a dose of 1 Gy was ineffective. It is concluded that cure of thalassemia by bone marrow transplantation does not necessarily require eradication of thalassemic stem cells. Consequently, the objectives of conditioning regimens for bone marrow transplantation of thalassemic patients (and possibly other nonmalignant hemopoietic disorders) should be reconsidered.

  2. Bone health in eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman-Levin, N; Hochberg, Z; Latzer, Y

    2014-03-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) put adolescents and young adults at risk for impaired bone health. Low bone mineral density (BMD) with ED is caused by failure to accrue peak bone mass in adolescence and bone loss in young adulthood. Although ED patients diagnosed with bone loss may be asymptomatic, some suffer bone pains and have increased incidence of fractures. Adolescents with ED are prone to increased prevalence of stress fractures, kyphoscoliosis and height loss. The clinical picture of the various EDs involves endocrinopathies that contribute to impaired bone health. Anorexia nervosa (AN) is characterized by low bone turnover, with relatively higher osteoclastic (bone resorptive) than osteoblastic (bone formation) activity. Bone loss in AN occurs in both the trabecular and cortical bones, although the former is more vulnerable. Bone loss in AN has been shown to be influenced by malnutrition and low weight, reduced fat mass, oestrogen and androgen deficiency, glucocorticoid excess, impaired growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor 1 axis, and more. Bone loss in AN may not be completely reversible despite recovery from the illness. Treatment modalities involving hormonal therapies have limited effectiveness, whereas increased caloric intake, weight gain and resumption of menses are essential to improved BMD. PMID:24165231

  3. Therapy Effects of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells on Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xinchun; Hu, Jinxia; Cui, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of death and major cause of disability worldwide. Recently, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been shown to improve functional outcome after stroke. In this review, we will focus on the protective effects of BMSCs on ischemic brain and the relative molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of BMSCs on stroke. PMID:27069533

  4. Treating Families of Bone Marrow Recipients and Donors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Marie; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Luekemia and aplastic anemia are beginning to be treated by bone marrow transplants, involving donors and recipients from the same family. Such intimate involvement in the patient's life and death struggles typically produces a family crisis and frequent maladaptive responses by various family members. (Author)

  5. [Bone marrow biopsy: processing and use of molecular techniques].

    PubMed

    Quintanilla-Martinez, L; Tinguely, M; Bonzheim, I; Fend, F

    2012-11-01

    The rapid technological development in diagnostic pathology, especially of immunohistochemical and molecular techniques, also has a significant impact on diagnostic procedures for the evaluation of bone marrow trephine biopsies. The necessity for optimal morphology, combined with preservation of tissue antigens and nucleic acids on one hand and the wish for short turnaround times on the other hand require careful planning of the workflow for fixation, decalcification and embedding of trephines. Although any kind of bone marrow processing has its advantages and disadvantages, formalin fixation followed by EDTA decalcification can be considered a good compromise, which does not restrict the use of molecular techniques. Although the majority of molecular studies in haematological neoplasms are routinely performed on bone marrow aspirates or peripheral blood cells, there are certain indications, in which molecular studies such as clonality determination or detection of specific mutations need to be performed on the trephine biopsy. Especially, the determination of B- or T-cell clonality for the diagnosis of lymphoid malignancies requires stringent quality controls and knowledge of technical pitfalls. In this review, we discuss technical aspects of bone marrow biopsy processing and the application of diagnostic molecular techniques. PMID:23085692

  6. Effect of Rosiglitazone on Radiation Damage in Bone Marrow Hemopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Benko', Klara; Pintye, Eva; Szabo, Boglarka; Geresi, Krisztina; Megyeri, Attila; Benko, Ilona

    2008-12-08

    To study radiobiological effects and drugs, which can modify radiation injury, has an importance if we would like to avoid harmful effects of radiation due to emergency situations or treat patients with malignant diseases by radiotherapy. During the long treatment schedules patients may be treated by not only anticancer but many other drugs because of accompanying diseases. These drugs may also modify radiobiological effects. Rosiglitazone pre-treatment proved to be myeloprotective and accelerated recovery of 5-fluorouracil-damaged bone marrow in our previous experiments. Our new studies are designed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone has similar beneficial effects in radiation-damaged hemopoiesis. Bone marrow damage was precipitated by total body irradiation (TBI) using single increasing doses (2-10 Gy) of {gamma}--irradiation in groups of mice. Lethality was well correlated with damage in hemopoiesis measured by cellularity of bone marrow (LD{sub 50} values were 4.8 and 5.3 gray respectively). Rosiglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug, had no significant effect on bone marrow cellularity. Insulin resistance associated with obesity or diabetes mellitus type 2 is intensively growing among cancer patients requiring some kind of radiotherapy. Therefore it is important to know whether drugs used for their therapy can modify radiation effects.

  7. Effect of Rosiglitazone on Radiation Damage in Bone Marrow Hemopoiesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkő, Klára; Pintye, Éva; Szabó, Boglárka; Géresi, Krisztina; Megyeri, Attila; Benkő, Ilona

    2008-12-01

    To study radiobiological effects and drugs, which can modify radiation injury, has an importance if we would like to avoid harmful effects of radiation due to emergency situations or treat patients with malignant diseases by radiotherapy. During the long treatment schedules patients may be treated by not only anticancer but many other drugs because of accompanying diseases. These drugs may also modify radiobiological effects. Rosiglitazone pre-treatment proved to be myeloprotective and accelerated recovery of 5-fluorouracil-damaged bone marrow in our previous experiments. Our new studies are designed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone has similar beneficial effects in radiation-damaged hemopoiesis. Bone marrow damage was precipitated by total body irradiation (TBI) using single increasing doses (2-10 Gy) of γ—irradiation in groups of mice. Lethality was well correlated with damage in hemopoiesis measured by cellularity of bone marrow (LD50 values were 4.8 and 5.3 gray respectively). Rosiglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug, had no significant effect on bone marrow cellularity. Insulin resistance associated with obesity or diabetes mellitus type 2 is intensively growing among cancer patients requiring some kind of radiotherapy. Therefore it is important to know whether drugs used for their therapy can modify radiation effects.

  8. Body/bone-marrow differential-temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmo, V. J.; Berdahl, C. M.

    1978-01-01

    Differential-temperature sensor developed to compare bone-marrow and body temperature in leukemia patients uses single stable amplifier to monitor temperature difference recorded by thermocouples. Errors are reduced by referencing temperatures to each other, not to separate calibration points.

  9. Agent-Based Deterministic Modeling of the Bone Marrow Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of stem cells not only describes but also predicts how a stem cell's environment can control its fate. The first stem cell populations discovered were hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). In this paper, we present a deterministic model of bone marrow (that hosts HSCs) that is consistent with several of the qualitative biological observations. This model incorporates stem cell death (apoptosis) after a certain number of cell divisions and also demonstrates that a single HSC can potentially populate the entire bone marrow. It also demonstrates that there is a production of sufficient number of differentiated cells (RBCs, WBCs, etc.). We prove that our model of bone marrow is biologically consistent and it overcomes the biological feasibility limitations of previously reported models. The major contribution of our model is the flexibility it allows in choosing model parameters which permits several different simulations to be carried out in silico without affecting the homeostatic properties of the model. We have also performed agent-based simulation of the model of bone marrow system proposed in this paper. We have also included parameter details and the results obtained from the simulation. The program of the agent-based simulation of the proposed model is made available on a publicly accessible website. PMID:27340402

  10. Agent-Based Deterministic Modeling of the Bone Marrow Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kurhekar, Manish; Deshpande, Umesh

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of stem cells not only describes but also predicts how a stem cell's environment can control its fate. The first stem cell populations discovered were hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). In this paper, we present a deterministic model of bone marrow (that hosts HSCs) that is consistent with several of the qualitative biological observations. This model incorporates stem cell death (apoptosis) after a certain number of cell divisions and also demonstrates that a single HSC can potentially populate the entire bone marrow. It also demonstrates that there is a production of sufficient number of differentiated cells (RBCs, WBCs, etc.). We prove that our model of bone marrow is biologically consistent and it overcomes the biological feasibility limitations of previously reported models. The major contribution of our model is the flexibility it allows in choosing model parameters which permits several different simulations to be carried out in silico without affecting the homeostatic properties of the model. We have also performed agent-based simulation of the model of bone marrow system proposed in this paper. We have also included parameter details and the results obtained from the simulation. The program of the agent-based simulation of the proposed model is made available on a publicly accessible website. PMID:27340402

  11. A Dosimetric Study of Radionuclide Therapy for Bone Marrow Ablation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayouth, John Ellis

    In a phase I clinical trial, six multiple myeloma patients, who were non-responsive to conventional therapy and were scheduled for bone marrow transplantation, received Holmium-166 (166Ho) labeled to a bone seeking agent, DOTMP (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane -1,4,7,10-tetramethylene-phosphonic acid), for the purpose of bone marrow ablation. The specific aims of my research within this protocol were to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of 166Ho DOTMP by quantifying the in vivo pharmacokinetics and radiation dosimetry, and by correlating these results to the biologic response observed. The reproducibility of pharmacokinetics from multiple injections of 166 Ho DOTMP administered to these myeloma patients was demonstrated from both blood and whole body retention. The skeletal concentration of 166 Ho DOTMP was heterogenous in all six patients: high in the ribs, pelvis, and lumbar vertebrae regions, and relatively low in the femurs, arms, and head. A novel technique was developed to calculate the radiation dose to the bone marrow in each skeletal ROI, and was applied to all six 166 Ho DOTMP patients. Radiation dose estimates for the bone marrow calculated using the standard MIRD "S" factors were compared with the average values derived from the heterogenous distribution of activity in the skeleton (i.e., the regional technique). The results from the two techniques were significantly different; the average of the dose estimates from the regional technique were typically 30% greater. Furthermore, the regional technique provided a range of radiation doses for the entire marrow volume, while the MIRD "S" factors only provided a single value. Dose volume histogram analysis of data from the regional technique indicated a range of dose estimates that varied by a factor of 10 between the high dose and low dose regions. Finally, the observed clinical response of cells and abnormal proteins measured in bone marrow aspirates and peripheral blood samples were compared with

  12. Preemptive Bone Marrow Transplantation for FANCD1/BRCA2.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nicholas E; Rosenberg, Philip S; Lehmann, Harold P; Alter, Blanche P

    2015-10-01

    Children with biallelic mutations in FANCD1/BRCA2 are at uniquely high risks of leukemia and solid tumors. Preemptive bone marrow transplantation (PE-BMT) has been proposed to avoid the development of leukemia, but empirical study of PE-BMT is unlikely because of the rarity of these children and the unknown benefit of PE-BMT. We used survival analysis to estimate the risks of leukemia and the expected survival if leukemia could be eliminated by curative PE-BMT. We used the results in a decision analysis model to explore the plausibility of PE-BMT for children with variable ages at diagnosis and risks of transplantation-related mortality. For example, PE-BMT at 1 year of age with a 10% risk of transplantation-related mortality increased the mean survival by 1.7 years. The greatest benefit was for patients diagnosed between 1 and 3 years of age, after which the benefit of PE-BMT decreased with age at diagnosis, and the risk of death from solid tumors constituted a relatively greater burden of mortality. Our methods may be used to model survival for other hematologic disorders with limited empirical data and a pressing need for clinical guidance. PMID:26183081

  13. Influence of Bone Marrow Composition on Measurements of Trabecular Microstructure using Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF) MRI: Simulations and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sprinkhuizen, Sara M.; Ackerman, Jerome L.; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF) MRI allows for measurements of microstructures of porous materials at low spatial resolution and thus has potential for trabecular bone quality measurements. In trabecular bone, solid bone changes (osteoporosis) as well as changes in bone marrow composition occur. The influence of such changes on DDIF MRI was studied by simulations and in vivo measurements. Methods Monte Carlo simulations of DDIF in various trabecular bone models were conducted. Changes in solid bone and marrow composition were simulated with numerical bone erosion and marrow susceptibility variations. Additionally, in vivo measurements were performed in the lumbar spine of healthy volunteers of ages 23 to 62 years. Results Simulations and in vivo results yielded that 1) DDIF decay times decrease with increasing marrow fat and 2) the marrow fat percentage needs to be incorporated in the DDIF analysis to discriminate between healthy and osteoporotic solid bone structures. Conclusions Bone marrow composition plays an important role in DDIF MRI: incorporation of marrow fat percentage into DDIF MRI allowed for differentiation of young and old age groups (in vivo experiments). DDIF MRI may develop into a means of assessing osteoporosis and disorders that affect marrow composition. PMID:24382681

  14. Stimulation of bone marrow cells and bone formation by nacre: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Lamghari, M; Almeida, M J; Berland, S; Huet, H; Laurent, A; Milet, C; Lopez, E

    1999-08-01

    There is frequently a loss of vertebral bone due to disease or aging. Nacre (mother of pearl from the oyster Pinctada maxima) stimulates bone cell differentiation and bone formation in vitro and in vivo. Experimental bone defects were prepared in the vertebrae of sheep and used to test the suitability of nacre as an injectable osteogenic biomaterial for treating vertebral bone loss. Twenty-one cavities were prepared in the first four upper lumbar vertebrae of 11 sheep and filled with nacre powder. The lumbar vertebrae were removed after 1 to 12 weeks, embedded undecalcified in methacrylate, and processed for histological studies. The nacre slowly dissolved and the experimental cavities contained a large active cell population. By 12 weeks, the experimental cavity was occupied by newly matured bone trabeculae in contact with or adjacent to the dissolving nacre. The functional new bone trabeculae were covered with osteoid lined with osteoblasts, indicating continuing bone formation. The in vitro study on rat bone marrow explants cultured with a water-soluble extract of the nacre organic matrix also resulted in the stimulation of osteogenic bone marrow cells with enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity. Thus, both the in vivo and in vitro findings suggest that nacre contains one or more signal molecules capable of activating osteogenic bone marrow cells. PMID:10458284

  15. Pressure and shear stress in trabecular bone marrow during whole bone loading.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Thomas A; Schwaner, Stephen A; LaNeve, Anthony J; Kreipke, Tyler C; Niebur, Glen L

    2015-09-18

    Skeletal adaptation to mechanical loading is controlled by mechanobiological signaling. Osteocytes are highly responsive to applied strains, and are the key mechanosensory cells in bone. However, many cells residing in the marrow also respond to mechanical cues such as hydrostatic pressure and shear stress, and hence could play a role in skeletal adaptation. Trabecular bone encapsulates marrow, forming a poroelastic solid. According to the mechanical theory, deformation of the pores induces motion in the fluid-like marrow, resulting in pressure and velocity gradients. The latter results in shear stress acting between the components of the marrow. To characterize the mechanical environment of trabecular bone marrow in situ, pore pressure within the trabecular compartment of whole porcine femurs was measured with miniature pressure transducers during stress-relaxation and cyclic loading. Pressure gradients ranging from 0.013 to 0.46 kPa/mm were measured during loading. This range was consistent with calculated pressure gradients from continuum scale poroelastic models with the same permeability. Micro-scale computational fluid dynamics models created from computed tomography images were used to calculate the micromechanical stress in the marrow using the measured pressure differentials as boundary conditions. The volume averaged shear stress in the marrow ranged from 1.67 to 24.55 Pa during cyclic loading, which exceeds the mechanostimulatory threshold for mesenchymal lineage cells. Thus, the loading of bone through activities of daily living may be an essential component of bone marrow health and mechanobiology. Additional studies of cell-level interactions during loading in healthy and disease conditions will provide further incite into marrow mechanobiology. PMID:26283413

  16. Bone marrow-derived stem cells and radiation response.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, Joel S; Epperly, Michael

    2009-04-01

    The recovery of tissues and organs from ionizing irradiation is critically dependent on the repopulation of resident stem cells, defined as the subset of cells with capacity for both self-renewal and differentiation. Stem cells of both hematopoietic and epithelial origin reside in defined areas of the cellular microenvironment (recently defined as the stem cell "niche"). Experiments using serial repopulation assays in serial generations of total body irradiated mice receiving transplanted marrow and in continuous bone marrow cultures both identified specific microanatomic sites that comprise the bone marrow stem cell niche. Supportive cells of the hematopoietic microenvironment not only contribute to stem cell repopulation capacity but also to the maintenance of their quiescent or nonproliferative state, which allows the most primitive hematopoietic stem cells to stay in a noncycling state protected from both direct ionizing radiation-induced cell-cycle phase-specific killing and indirect cytokine and free radical mediated killing. Recent evidence has defined both cell contact and humoral mechanisms of protection of hematopoietic stem cells by stromal cells. There is also recent evidence for multilineage differentiation capacity of cells of the hematopoietic microenvironment termed bone marrow stromal cells (mesenchymal stem cells). Both hematopoietic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cell populations have been shown to be involved in the repair of ionizing irradiation damage of distant epithelial as well as other hematopoietic sites through their capacity to migrate through the circulation. The radiobiology of these 2 bone marrow stem cell populations is the subject of intense investigation. This review defines the status of research in the areas of stem cell quiescence, niche contact, and migratory responses to ionizing irradiation. PMID:19249651

  17. Probabilistic Prediction of the Outcome of Bone-Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Suermondt, H. Jacques; Amylon, Michael D.

    1989-01-01

    Bone-marrow transplantation is considered the treatment of choice for pediatric patients with recurring acute lymphoblastic leukemia, provided that a suitable donor is available. Many prognostic factors are known that help to predict the likely outcome of transplantation. We have implemented a system that applies probabilistic reasoning to the available data about individual patients to help determine the risk of recurrence and morbidity after transplantation, and to predict life expectancy. The resulting predictions can be used to decide whether marrow transplantation is the most desirable treatment modality for the patient.

  18. Bone marrow ablation followed by allogeneic marrow grafting during first complete remission of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.J.; Spruce, W.E.; Farbstein, M.J.

    1983-03-01

    Of 33 patients who had undergone allogeneic bone marrow transplantation during first complete remission of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, 21 patients have now been followed in continued complete remission for 6-64 mo (median greater than 18 mo) without maintenance chemotherapy. The median age of the surviving patients is 27 yr. Transplant-related complications occurring throughout the first year after marrow grafting were fatal in 7 patients, and leukemic recurrence led to the death of 5 patients. The actuarial long-term disease-free survival is 60% and the actuarial remission rate is 79%.

  19. Bone marrow aspiration in north Sudan: the procedure, indications and the diagnostic value

    PubMed Central

    Elmadhoun, Wadie M; Noor, Sufian K; Bushara, Sarra O; Almobarak, Ahmed O; Husain, Nazik Elmalaika; Ahmed, Mohamed H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow aspiration (BMA) is a common and useful investigation tool in clinical practice to obtain information about both hematological and non-hematological disorders. The aim of the work was to identify the main indications for BMA in Atbara city, north Sudan and to determine the common diagnoses encountered. Methods All reports of BMA carried out during a 6-year period from 2009 to 2014, in the Modern Specialized Laboratory (the only site where BMA is conducted in Atbara) were reviewed. The information extracted included the main indications for performing this procedure, age groups involved, and the most common diagnoses established. A specially designed form was used for this purpose and the data were analyzed using SPSS computer program. Results A total number of 112 cases were subjected to bone marrow aspiration. The most frequent indications were: pancytopenia 43(38.4%), anemia 39 (34.8%), and suspected leukemia 13 (11.6%). In 86(76.8%) cases, BMA provided either the diagnosis or diagnostic clues to the disease process, while 26 (23.2%) of the aspirates revealed a normally functioning marrow. Conclusion Bone marrow aspiration is an important investigation for establishing the diagnosis in many medical conditions. The most common indication for this procedure in our study was pancytopenia and the most common finding was aplastic anemia. PMID:26715923

  20. Bone marrow adipocytes promote tumor growth in bone via FABP4-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Herroon, Mackenzie K; Rajagurubandara, Erandi; Hardaway, Aimalie L; Powell, Katelyn; Turchick, Audrey; Feldmann, Daniel; Podgorski, Izabela

    2013-11-01

    Incidence of skeletal metastases and death from prostate cancer greatly increases with age and obesity, conditions which increase marrow adiposity. Bone marrow adipocytes are metabolically active components of bone metastatic niche that modulate the function of neighboring cells; yet the mechanisms of their involvement in tumor behavior in bone have not been explored. In this study, using experimental models of intraosseous tumor growth and diet-induced obesity, we demonstrate the promoting effects of marrow fat on growth and progression of skeletal prostate tumors. We reveal that exposure to lipids supplied by marrow adipocytes induces expression of lipid chaperone FABP4, pro-inflammatory interleukin IL-1β, and oxidative stress protein HMOX-1 in metastatic tumor cells and stimulates their growth and invasiveness. We show that FABP4 is highly overexpressed in prostate skeletal tumors from obese mice and in bone metastasis samples from prostate cancer patients. In addition, we provide results suggestive of bi-directional interaction between FABP4 and PPARγ pathways that may be driving aggressive tumor cell behavior in bone. Together, our data provide evidence for functional relationship between bone marrow adiposity and metastatic prostate cancers and unravel the FABP4/IL-1β axis as a potential therapeutic target for this presently incurable disease. PMID:24240026

  1. Specific bone cells produce DLL4 to generate thymus-seeding progenitors from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Vionnie W.C.; Saez, Borja; Cook, Colleen; Lotinun, Sutada; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Wang, Ying-Hua; Lymperi, Stefania; Ferraro, Francesca; Raaijmakers, Marc H.G.P.; Wu, Joy Y.; Zhou, Lan; Rajagopal, Jayaraj; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Baron, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Production of the cells that ultimately populate the thymus to generate α/β T cells has been controversial, and their molecular drivers remain undefined. Here, we report that specific deletion of bone-producing osteocalcin (Ocn)-expressing cells in vivo markedly reduces T-competent progenitors and thymus-homing receptor expression among bone marrow hematopoietic cells. Decreased intrathymic T cell precursors and decreased generation of mature T cells occurred despite normal thymic function. The Notch ligand DLL4 is abundantly expressed on bone marrow Ocn+ cells, and selective depletion of DLL4 from these cells recapitulated the thymopoietic abnormality. These data indicate that specific mesenchymal cells in bone marrow provide key molecular drivers enforcing thymus-seeding progenitor generation and thereby directly link skeletal biology to the production of T cell–based adaptive immunity. PMID:25918341

  2. Homing of chloromethylbenzoyl ammonia-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in an immune-mediated bone marrow failure mouse model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Wang, Y; Li, L; Li, Y H; Pang, Y; Song, J Y; Jiang, Z J

    2014-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is an abnormal immune reaction disease in which T lymphocytes destroy hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells because of immune hyperactivity. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have hematopoietic supporting and immune regulation functions. This study investigated BMSCs homing in mice transplantation models after bone marrow failure. BALB/c mice were randomly divided into three groups: normal control, bone marrow failure model, and BMSC transplantation group. Chloromethyl benzamido-labeled BMSCs of BALB/c mice were transplanted through tail vein injection in mouse models with bone marrow failure. Flow cytometry and histological fluorescence microscopy were used to observe the dynamic distribution of labeled cells in different tissues. Average survival time, peripheral blood, and bone marrow morphological features were observed in mice from each group. Twenty-four hours after tail vein infusion of BMSCs, positively labeled cells were observed in the bone marrows of recipient mice, and the number of positive cells increased significantly at 72 h (P < 0.05). In dead or dying mice, white blood cells, hemoglobin, platelets, and bone marrow mononuclear cells were all significantly higher in the BMSC transplantation group than in the BMSCs of the model group (P < 0.01). Mean survival time was significantly shorter in the bone marrow failure model group than in the transplantation group (P < 0.05). These results confirmed that the major of BMSCs injected via tail vein could migrate to injured bone marrow tissues within 24-72 h in a mouse model of bone marrow failure. Furthermore, BMSCs can promote hematopoietic recovery, reduce the degree of bone marrow failure, and significantly prolong survival time. PMID:24421151

  3. Effects of prostaglandin on experimental bone malignancy and on scintigrams of bone and marrow. [Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, N.; Ito, Y.; Nagai, K.; Terashima, H.; Yanagimoto, S.; Muranaka, A.

    1981-05-01

    The correlation between prostaglandin E (PgE) and scintigrams of bone (Tc-99m MDP) and bone marrow (Tc-99m SC) was investigated in normal and VX-2-bearing rabbits. PgE in plasma of normal rabbits was 486.2. In rabbits with VX-2 transplanted into femoral muscles, PgE was in the normal range unless the tumor invaded bone. PgE was not increase significantly in rabbits when the tumor was transplanted into the marrow cavity. When tumor invaded bone, PgE increassed markedly (to 1335). Elevation of PgE did not necessarily coincide with the appearance of positive bone scans. PgE in an indomethacin-treated group did not necessarily coincide with the appearance of positive bone scans. PgE in an indomethacin-treated group did not higher than in the untreated group. Indomethacin may suppress the local acceleration of calcium metabolism.

  4. I walk the line: How to tell MDS from other bone marrow failure conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gondek, Lukasz P.; DeZern, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by peripheral cytopenias and ineffective hematopoiesis. MDS is an example of an age-related malignancy and its increasing prevalence and incidence can be attributed to a greater life expectancy in developed countries. Although frequently encountered in hematology/oncology clinics, MDS may constitute a diagnostic challenge especially with equivocal bone marrow morphology. Certain syndromes of bone marrow failure (BMF) may mimic MDS and formulating a correct diagnosis is vital for adequate prognostication as well as therapeutic approaches. Metaphase karyotyping (MK) is a very important diagnostic tool and marker of prognosis and can be an indicator of response to certain therapies. Unfortunately chromosomal abnormalities may only be found in approximately 50% of patients with MDS. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic approaches to patients with pancytopenia with a particular focus on the growing number of somatic mutations through new molecular testing. PMID:25079655

  5. A stochastic model of radiation-induced bone marrow damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cotlet, G.; Blue, T.E.

    2000-03-01

    A stochastic model, based on consensus principles from radiation biology, is used to estimate bone-marrow stem cell pool survival (CFU-S and stroma cells) after irradiation. The dose response model consists of three coupled first order linear differential equations which quantitatively describe time dependent cellular damage, repair, and killing of red bone marrow cells. This system of differential equations is solved analytically through the use of a matrix approach for continuous and fractionated irradiations. The analytic solutions are confirmed through the dynamical solution of the model equations using SIMULINK. Rate coefficients describing the cellular processes of radiation damage and repair, extrapolated to humans from animal data sets and adjusted for neutron-gamma mixed fields, are employed in a SIMULINK analysis of criticality accidents. The results show that, for the time structures which may occur in criticality accidents, cell survival is established mainly by the average dose and dose rate.

  6. Bone marrow examination before steroids in thrombocytopenic purpura or arthritis.

    PubMed

    Reid, M M

    1992-12-01

    Corticosteroids were used to treat two children with presumed idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and one with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis without examination of the bone marrow. Of the two with presumed idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, one had Fanconi's anaemia and the other may have had aplastic anaemia. The third child had acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. The diagnosis of Fanconi's anaemia was delayed. A diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma was caused in the second case. In the third, delayed diagnosis and, perhaps, compromised outlook resulted. These three cases re-emphasize the well aired caveats about the diagnosis of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and provide further support for the arguments of those who believe that if corticosteroids are to be used to treat such children, their bone marrow should be examined first. PMID:1290852

  7. Total lymphatic irradiation and bone marrow in human heart transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, D.R.; Hong, R.; Greenberg, A.J.; Gilbert, E.F.; Dacumos, G.C.; Dufek, J.H.

    1984-08-01

    Six patients, aged 36 to 59 years, had heart transplants for terminal myocardial disease using total lymphatic irradiation (TLI) and donor bone marrow in addition to conventional therapy. All patients were poor candidates for transplantation because of marked pulmonary hypertension, unacceptable tissue matching, or age. Two patients are living and well more than four years after the transplants. Two patients died of infection at six and seven weeks with normal hearts. One patient, whose preoperative pulmonary hypertension was too great for an orthotopic heart transplant, died at 10 days after such a procedure. The other patient died of chronic rejection seven months postoperatively. Donor-specific tolerance developed in 2 patients. TLI and donor bone marrow can produce specific tolerance to donor antigens and allow easy control of rejection, but infection is still a major problem. We describe a new technique of administering TLI with early reduction of prednisone that may help this problem.

  8. Bone marrow hypoplasia associated with fenbendazole administration in a dog.

    PubMed

    Gary, Anthony T; Kerl, Marie E; Wiedmeyer, Charles E; Turnquist, Susan E; Cohn, Leah A

    2004-01-01

    A 1.5-year-old Doberman pinscher was presented with sudden-onset of fever and malaise. Twelve days prior to presentation, fenbendazole therapy was initiated for a suspected lungworm infection. Results of a complete blood count on presentation showed pancytopenia, while histopathological evaluation of a bone marrow core sample revealed bone marrow hypoplasia of undetermined etiology. Bactericidal antibiotics and fluid therapy, as well as discontinuation of fenbendazole administration, led to a complete resolution of clinical and hematological abnormalities within 15 days. An idiosyncratic reaction to fenbendazole was suspected based on the absence of infectious, neoplastic, autoimmune, and toxic etiologies, as well as resolution of clinical signs and pancytopenia upon drug withdrawal. PMID:15131104

  9. Bone marrow stem cell as a potential treatment for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Ikehara, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood glucose levels resulting from defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. The chronic hyperglycemia damages the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart, and blood vessels. Curative therapies mainly include diet, insulin, and oral hypoglycemic agents. However, these therapies fail to maintain blood glucose levels in the normal range all the time. Although pancreas or islet-cell transplantation achieves better glucose control, a major obstacle is the shortage of donor organs. Recently, research has focused on stem cells which can be classified into embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and tissue stem cells (TSCs) to generate functional β cells. TSCs include the bone-marrow-, liver-, and pancreas-derived stem cells. In this review, we focus on treatment using bone marrow stem cells for type 1 and 2 DM. PMID:23671865

  10. Bone marrow-derived stem cells and respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Carla P; Rankin, Sara M

    2011-07-01

    Adult bone marrow contains a number of discrete populations of progenitor cells, including endothelial, mesenchymal, and epithelial progenitor cells and fibrocytes. In the context of a range of diseases, endothelial progenitor cells have been reported to promote angiogenesis, mesenchymal stem cells are potent immunosuppressors but can also contribute directly to tissue regeneration, and fibrocytes have been shown to induce tissue fibrosis. This article provides an overview of the basic biology of these different subsets of progenitor cells, reporting their distinct phenotypes and functional activities. The differences in their secretomes are highlighted, and the relative role of cellular differentiation vs paracrine effects of progenitor cells is considered. The article reviews the literature examining the contribution of progenitor cells to the pathogenesis of respiratory disease, and discusses recent studies using bone marrow progenitor cells as stem cell therapies in the context of pulmonary hypertension, COPD, and asthma. PMID:21729891

  11. Late renal dysfunction in adult survivors of bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, C.A.; Cohen, E.P.; Barber-Derus, S.W.; Murray, K.J.; Ash, R.C.; Casper, J.T.; Moulder, J.E. )

    1991-06-01

    Until recently long-term renal toxicity has not been considered a major late complication of bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Late renal dysfunction has been described in a pediatric population status post-BMT which was attributable to the radiation in the preparatory regimen. A thorough review of adults with this type of late renal dysfunction has not previously been described. Fourteen of 103 evaluable adult patients undergoing allogeneic (96) or autologous (7) bone marrow transplantation, predominantly for leukemia and lymphomas, at the Medical College of Wisconsin (Milwaukee, WI) have had a syndrome of renal insufficiency characterized by increased serum creatinine, decreased glomerular filtration rate, anemia, and hypertension. This syndrome developed at a median of 9 months (range, 4.5 to 26 months) posttransplantation in the absence of specific identifiable causes. The cumulative probability of having this renal dysfunction is 20% at 1 year. Renal biopsies performed on seven of these cases showed the endothelium widely separated from the basement membrane, extreme thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, and microthrombi. Previous chemotherapy, antibiotics, and antifungals as well as cyclosporin may add to and possibly potentiate a primary chemoradiation marrow transplant renal injury, but this clinical syndrome is most analogous to clinical and experimental models of radiation nephritis. This late marrow transplant-associated nephritis should be recognized as a potentially limiting factor in the use of some intensive chemoradiation conditioning regimens used for BMT. Some selective attenuation of the radiation to the kidneys may decrease the incidence of this renal dysfunction.

  12. Cigarette Smoking Is Associated with a Lower Concentration of CD105+ Bone Marrow Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Beyth, Shaul; Mosheiff, Rami; Safran, Ori; Daskal, Anat; Liebergall, Meir

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with musculoskeletal degenerative disorders, delayed fracture healing, and nonunion. Bone marrow progenitor cells (BMPCs), known to express CD105, are important in local trophic and immunomodulatory activity and central to musculoskeletal healing/regeneration. We hypothesized that smoking is associated with lower levels of BMPC. Iliac bone marrow samples were collected from individuals aged 18–65 years during the first steps of pelvic surgery, under IRB approval with informed consent. Patients with active infectious or neoplastic disease, a history of cytotoxic or radiation therapy, primary or secondary metabolic bone disease, or bone marrow dysfunction were excluded. Separation process purity and the number of BMPCs recovered were assessed with FACS. BMPC populations in self-reported smokers and nonsmokers were compared using the two-tailed t-test. 13 smokers and 13 nonsmokers of comparable age and gender were included. The average concentration of BMPCs was 3.52 × 105/mL ± 2.45 × 105/mL for nonsmokers versus 1.31 × 105/mL ± 1.61 × 105/mL for smokers (t = 3.2,  P = 0.004). This suggests that cigarette smoking is linked to a significant decrease in the concentration of BMPCs, which may contribute to the reduced regenerative capacity of smokers, with implications for musculoskeletal maintenance and repair. PMID:26346476

  13. Cigarette Smoking Is Associated with a Lower Concentration of CD105(+) Bone Marrow Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Beyth, Shaul; Mosheiff, Rami; Safran, Ori; Daskal, Anat; Liebergall, Meir

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with musculoskeletal degenerative disorders, delayed fracture healing, and nonunion. Bone marrow progenitor cells (BMPCs), known to express CD105, are important in local trophic and immunomodulatory activity and central to musculoskeletal healing/regeneration. We hypothesized that smoking is associated with lower levels of BMPC. Iliac bone marrow samples were collected from individuals aged 18-65 years during the first steps of pelvic surgery, under IRB approval with informed consent. Patients with active infectious or neoplastic disease, a history of cytotoxic or radiation therapy, primary or secondary metabolic bone disease, or bone marrow dysfunction were excluded. Separation process purity and the number of BMPCs recovered were assessed with FACS. BMPC populations in self-reported smokers and nonsmokers were compared using the two-tailed t-test. 13 smokers and 13 nonsmokers of comparable age and gender were included. The average concentration of BMPCs was 3.52 × 10(5)/mL ± 2.45 × 10(5)/mL for nonsmokers versus 1.31 × 10(5)/mL ± 1.61 × 10(5)/mL for smokers (t = 3.2,  P = 0.004). This suggests that cigarette smoking is linked to a significant decrease in the concentration of BMPCs, which may contribute to the reduced regenerative capacity of smokers, with implications for musculoskeletal maintenance and repair. PMID:26346476

  14. MR-Based Assessment of Bone Marrow Fat in Osteoporosis, Diabetes, and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, Christian; Baum, Thomas; Dieckmeyer, Michael; Ruschke, Stefan; Diefenbach, Maximilian N.; Hauner, Hans; Kirschke, Jan S.; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.

    2016-01-01

    Bone consists of the mineralized component (i.e., cortex and trabeculae) and the non-mineralized component (i.e., bone marrow). Most of the routine clinical bone imaging uses X-ray-based techniques and focuses on the mineralized component. However, bone marrow adiposity has been also shown to have a strong linkage with bone health. Specifically, multiple previous studies have demonstrated a negative association between bone marrow fat fraction (BMFF) and bone mineral density. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) are ideal imaging techniques for non-invasively investigating the properties of bone marrow fat. In the present work, we first review the most important MRI and MRS methods for assessing properties of bone marrow fat, including methodologies for measuring BMFF and bone marrow fatty acid composition parameters. Previous MRI and MRS studies measuring BMFF and fat unsaturation in the context of osteoporosis are then reviewed. Finally, previous studies investigating the relationship between bone marrow fat, other fat depots, and bone health in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes are presented. In summary, MRI and MRS are powerful non-invasive techniques for measuring properties of bone marrow fat in osteoporosis, obesity, and type 2 diabetes and can assist in future studies investigating the pathophysiology of bone changes in the above clinical scenarios. PMID:27445977

  15. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis and idiopathic bone marrow aplasia.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Karina Colossi; Pires, Mario Cezar; Kakizaki, Priscila; Chartuni, Juliana Cabral Nunes; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 9-year-old boy with idiopathic bone marrow aplasia and severe neutropenia, who developed skin ulcers under cardiac monitoring electrodes. The diagnosis of primary cutaneous aspergillosis was made after the second biopsy and culture. Imaging investigation did not reveal internal fungal infection. The child was treated, but did not improve and died 3 months after admission. The report highlights and discusses the preventable risk of aspergillus skin infection in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27438213

  16. Shifts in bone marrow cell phenotypes caused by spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Ortega, M Teresa; Pecaut, Michael J; Gridley, Daila S; Stodieck, Louis S; Ferguson, Virginia; Chapes, Stephen K

    2009-02-01

    Bone marrow cells were isolated from the humeri of C57BL/6 mice after a 13-day flight on the space shuttle Space Transportation System (STS)-118 to determine how spaceflight affects differentiation of cells in the granulocytic lineage. We used flow cytometry to assess the expression of molecules that define the maturation/activation state of cells in the granulocytic lineage on three bone marrow cell subpopulations. These molecules included Ly6C, CD11b, CD31 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1), Ly6G (Gr-1), F4/80, CD44, and c-Fos. The three subpopulations were small agranular cells [region (R)1], larger granular cells (R2), which were mostly neutrophils, and very large, very granular cells (R3), which had properties of macrophages. Although there were no composite phenotypic differences between total bone marrow cells isolated from spaceflight and ground-control mice, there were subpopulation differences in Ly6C (R1 and R3), CD11b (R2), CD31 (R1, R2, and R3), Ly6G (R3), F4/80 (R3), CD44(high) (R3), and c-Fos (R1, R2, and R3). In particular, the elevation of CD11b in the R2 subpopulation suggests neutrophil activation in response to landing. In addition, decreases in Ly6C, c-Fos, CD44(high), and Ly6G and an increase in F4/80 suggest that the cells in the bone marrow R3 subpopulation of spaceflight mice were more differentiated compared with ground-control mice. The presence of more differentiated cells may not pose an immediate risk to immune resistance. However, the reduction in less differentiated cells may forebode future consequences for macrophage production and host defenses. This is of particular importance to considerations of future long-term spaceflights. PMID:19056998

  17. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis and idiopathic bone marrow aplasia*

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Karina Colossi; Pires, Mario Cezar; Kakizaki, Priscila; Chartuni, Juliana Cabral Nunes; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 9-year-old boy with idiopathic bone marrow aplasia and severe neutropenia, who developed skin ulcers under cardiac monitoring electrodes. The diagnosis of primary cutaneous aspergillosis was made after the second biopsy and culture. Imaging investigation did not reveal internal fungal infection. The child was treated, but did not improve and died 3 months after admission. The report highlights and discusses the preventable risk of aspergillus skin infection in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27438213

  18. Pancytopenia after allogeneic bone marrow transplant due to copper deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hudspeth, Michelle; Turner, Amy; Miller, Nicole; Lazarchick, John

    2014-05-01

    Pancytopenia occurring 1 year or later after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation typically prompts a primary consideration for relapse. We present the case of a 15-year old-girl who underwent transplantation for therapy-related myelodysplasia secondary to Ewing sarcoma treatment who developed pancytopenia with myelodysplasia 1 year after transplant due to copper deficiency. Copper deficiency is an important consideration in the evaluation of pancytopenia and myelodysplasia in pediatric patients. PMID:23652881

  19. Thymopoietic and Bone Marrow Response to Murine Pneumocystis Pneumonia▿

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xin; Zhang, Ping; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Shellito, Judd E.

    2011-01-01

    CD4+ T cells play a key role in host defense against Pneumocystis infection. To define the role of naïve CD4+ T cell production through the thymopoietic response in host defense against Pneumocystis infection, Pneumocystis murina infection in the lung was induced in adult male C57BL/6 mice with and without prior thymectomy. Pneumocystis infection caused a significant increase in the number of CCR9+ multipotent progenitor (MPP) cells in the bone marrow and peripheral circulation, an increase in populations of earliest thymic progenitors (ETPs) and double negative (DN) thymocytes in the thymus, and recruitment of naïve and total CD4+ T cells into the alveolar space. The level of murine signal joint T cell receptor excision circles (msjTRECs) in spleen CD4+ cells was increased at 5 weeks post-Pneumocystis infection. In thymectomized mice, the numbers of naïve, central memory, and total CD4+ T cells in all tissues examined were markedly reduced following Pneumocystis infection. This deficiency of naïve and central memory CD4+ T cells was associated with delayed pulmonary clearance of Pneumocystis. Extracts of Pneumocystis resulted in an increase in the number of CCR9+ MPPs in the cultured bone marrow cells. Stimulation of cultured bone marrow cells with ligands to Toll-like receptor 2 ([TLR-2] zymosan) and TLR-9 (ODN M362) each caused a similar increase in CCR9+ MPP cells via activation of the Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) pathway. These results demonstrate that enhanced production of naïve CD4+ T lymphocytes through the thymopoietic response and enhanced delivery of lymphopoietic precursors from the bone marrow play an important role in host defense against Pneumocystis infection. PMID:21343353

  20. The bone marrow niche for haematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Sean J.; Scadden, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Niches are local tissue microenvironments that maintain and regulate stem cells. Haematopoiesis provides a paradigm for understanding mammalian stem cells and their niches, yet the haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche remains incompletely defined and beset by competing models. Here we review progress in elucidating the location and cellular components of the HSC niche in the bone marrow. The niche is perivascular, created partly by mesenchymal stromal cells and endothelial cells and often, but not always, located near trabecular bone. Outstanding questions concern the cellular complexity of the niche, the role of the endosteum, and functional heterogeneity among perivascular microenvironments. PMID:24429631

  1. The in situ mechanics of trabecular bone marrow: the potential for mechanobiological response.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Thomas A; Kreipke, Tyler C; Vaughan, Ted J; McNamara, Laoise M; Niebur, Glen L

    2015-01-01

    Bone adapts to habitual loading through mechanobiological signaling. Osteocytes are the primary mechanical sensors in bone, upregulating osteogenic factors and downregulating osteoinhibitors, and recruiting osteoclasts to resorb bone in response to microdamage accumulation. However, most of the cell populations of the bone marrow niche,which are intimately involved with bone remodeling as the source of bone osteoblast and osteoclast progenitors, are also mechanosensitive. We hypothesized that the deformation of trabecular bone would impart mechanical stress within the entrapped bone marrow consistent with mechanostimulation of the constituent cells. Detailed fluid-structure interaction models of porcine femoral trabecular bone and bone marrow were created using tetrahedral finite element meshes. The marrow was allowed to flow freely within the bone pores, while the bone was compressed to 2000 or 3000 microstrain at the apparent level.Marrow properties were parametrically varied from a constant 400 mPas to a power law rule exceeding 85 Pas. Deformation generated almost no shear stress or pressure in the marrow for the low viscosity fluid, but exceeded 5 Pa when the higher viscosity models were used. The shear stress was higher when the strain rate increased and in higher volume fraction bone. The results demonstrate that cells within the trabecular bone marrow could be mechanically stimulated by bone deformation, depending on deformation rate, bone porosity, and bone marrow properties. Since the marrow contains many mechanosensitive cells, changes in the stimulatory levels may explain the alterations in bone marrow morphology with aging and disease, which may in turn affect the trabecular bone mechanobiology and adaptation. PMID:25363343

  2. Imiquimod and Photodynamic Therapy Are Useful in the Treatment of Porokeratosis in Children with Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gracia-Cazaña, Tamara; Vera-Álvarez, Jesús; García-Patos, Vicente; Gilaberte, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Porokeratosis is an uncommon disorder that affects keratinization. Immunosuppression may favor the development of porokeratotic lesions. Patients who receive allogenic transplants represent a therapeutic challenge to dermatologists. We report two cases of porokeratosis in children with bone marrow transplant and their excellent response to imiquimod and photodynamic therapy. PMID:26223374

  3. High Incidence of Xenogenic Bone Marrow Engraftment in Pig-to-Baboon Intra-Bone Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tasaki, M.; Wamala, I.; Tena, A.; Villani, V.; Sekijima, M.; Pathiraja, V.; Wilkinson, R. A.; Pratts, S.; Cormack, T.; Clayman, E.; Arn, J. S.; Shimizu, A.; Fishman, J. A.; Sachs, D. H.; Yamada, K.

    2015-01-01

    Previous attempts of α-1,3-galactocyltransferase knockout (GalTKO) pig bone marrow (BM) transplantation (Tx) into baboons have demonstrated a loss of macro-chimerism within 24 h in most cases. In order to achieve improved engraftment with persistence of peripheral chimerism, we have developed a new strategy of intra-bone BM (IBBM) Tx. Six baboons received GalTKO BM cells, with one-half of the cells transplanted into the bilateral tibiae directly and the remaining cells injected intravenously (IBBM/BM-Tx) with a conditioning immunosuppressive regimen. In order to assess immune responses induced by the combined IBBM/BM-Tx, three recipients received donor SLA-matched GalTKO kidneys in the peri-operative period of IBBM/BM-Tx (Group 1), and the others received kidneys 2 months after IBBM/BM-Tx (Group 2). Peripheral macro-chimerism was continuously detectable for up to 13 days (mean 7.7 days; range 3–13) post-IBBM/BM-Tx and in three animals, macro-chimerism reappeared at days 10, 14 and 21. Pig CFUs, indicating porcine progenitor cell engraftment, were detected in the host BM in four of six recipients on days 14, 15, 19 and 28. In addition, anti-pig unresponsiveness was observed by in vitro assays. GalTKO/pCMV-kidneys survived for extended periods (47 and 60 days). This strategy may provide a potent adjunct for inducing xenogeneic tolerance through BM-Tx. PMID:25676635

  4. Bone marrow stem cells: current and emerging concepts.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Ferrer, Simón; Scadden, David T; Sánchez-Aguilera, Abel

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of stromal cells with hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow have long been a subject of research, but only recently have technologies allowed us to dissect them at the stem cell level. On the other hand, limitations of these technical tools might explain numerous discrepancies in this field. It is becoming increasingly clear that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent an important component of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche in the bone marrow. However, there is heterogeneity among HSCs, and many putatively different mesenchymal progenitors identified in the bone marrow using Cre recombinase-driven mouse lines seem to exhibit HSC niche properties. Development of better reporter lines has demonstrated that some of these Cre lines do not always specifically mark the expected cells. Also, characterization of different cell populations has often been partial, and issues of redundancy and compensation might explain apparently contradictory results. Recognizing and overcoming these limitations, while also clearly defining the distinctions between subgroups of mesenchymal cells, will be essential to advance the field. PMID:25573321

  5. Effect of cyclophosphamide and electromagnetic fields on mouse bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Cadossi, R.; Zucchini, P.; Emilia, G.; Torelli, G. )

    1990-02-26

    The authors have previously shown that the exposure to low frequency pulsing electromagnetic fields (PEMF) of mice X-ray irradiated resulted in an increased damage to the bone marrow. The series of experiments here reported were designed to investigate the effect of PEMF exposure after intraperitoneum injection of 200mg/kg of cyclophosphamide (CY). Control mice were CY injected only; experimental mice were CY injected and then exposed to PEMF. Exposure to PEMF (24 hours/day) increased the rate of decline of white blood cells in peripheral blood. Spleen weight was statistically higher among control mice than among mice exposed to PEMF at day 6, 8 and 10 after CY injection. Spleen autoradiography proved to be higher among PEMF exposed mice than among controls at day 8 and 9 after CY injection. The grafting efficiency of the bone marrow obtained from control mice was higher than the grafting efficiency of the bone marrow recovered from mice exposed to PEMF. All these data indicate that the exposure to PEMF increases the cytotoxic effect of CY.

  6. Isolation of Mouse Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Boregowda, Siddaraju V; Krishnappa, Veena; Phinney, Donald G

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were initially characterized as connective tissue progenitors resident in bone marrow, but have now been isolated from a variety of tissues and organs and shown to also exhibit potent tissue regenerative properties mediated largely via paracrine actions. These findings have spurred the development of MSC-based therapies for treating a diverse array of nonskeletal diseases. Although genetic and experimental rodent models of disease represent important tools for developing efficacious MSC-based therapies, development of reliable methods to isolate MSCs from mouse bone marrow has been hampered by the unique biological properties of these cells. Indeed, few isolation schemes afford high yields and purity while maintaining the genomic integrity of cells. We recently demonstrated that mouse MSCs are highly sensitive to oxidative stress, and long-term expansion of these cells in atmospheric oxygen selects for immortalized clones that lack a functional p53 protein. Herein, we describe a protocol for the isolation of primary MSCs from mouse bone marrow that couples immunodepletion with culture in a low-oxygen environment and affords high purity and yield while preserving p53 function. PMID:27236673

  7. Bone Marrow Stem Cell Contribution to Pulmonary Homeostasis and Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Lindsay T; LaRue, Amanda C

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of bone marrow stem cell plasticity and contribution of bone marrow stem cells to pathophysiology is evolving with the advent of innovative technologies. Recent data has led to new mechanistic insights in the field of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) research, and an increased appreciation for the plasticity of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). In this review, we discuss current research examining the origin of pulmonary cell types from endogenous lung stem and progenitor cells as well as bone marrow-derived stem cells (MSCs and HSCs) and their contributions to lung homeostasis and pathology. We specifically highlight recent findings from our laboratory that demonstrate an HSC origin for pulmonary fibroblasts based on transplantation of a clonal population of cells derived from a single HSC. These findings demonstrate the importance of developing an understanding of the sources of effector cells in disease state. Finally, a perspective is given on the potential clinical implications of these studies and others addressing stem cell contributions to lung tissue homeostasis and pathology. PMID:26798846

  8. Bone marrow leishmaniasis: a review of situation in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2011-10-01

    Leishmaniasis is an important tropical vector-borne disease. This infection can be seen in tropical area and it is considered to be one of the most important vector-borne infections at present. The general situation of the leishmaniasis in Thailand is hereby reviewed. Although Thailand is a tropical country, the leishmaniasis is not endemic but sporadic. The imported cases are documented in some literatures. The serious form of leishmaniasis, the visceral leishmaniasis is also detectable in Thailand. Also, the author performed an in depth literature review of the reports of bone marrow leishmaniasis, a specific kind of visceral leishmaniasis, in Thailand in order to summarize the characteristics of this infection among Thai patients. According to this review, there have been at least 5 reports in the literature of 6 cases of bone marrow leishmaniasis in the Thai population, of which no case was lethal. Concerning the clinical manifestations, all except had prolonged fever with unknown origin. From physical examination, all had hepatosplenomegaly. The striking findings were active hemophagocytosis with increased proliferation of lymphoidplasma cell line in the bone marrow and amastigotes of Leishmania donovani was demonstrated. Considering the treatment, pantavalent antimony compound was used and the excellent improvement and complete recovery. Finally, the author also discussed on the importance of leishmaniasis in Thailand relating to the present globalization and good traveling system. PMID:22014727

  9. T2 vertebral bone marrow changes after space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, A.; Lin, C.; Evans, H.; Shackelford, L.; Martin, C.; Hedrick, T.

    1999-01-01

    Bone biopsies indicate that during immobilization bone marrow adipose tissue increases while the functional cellular fraction decreases. One objective of our Spacelab flight experiment was to determine, using in vivo volume-localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (VLMRS), whether bone marrow composition was altered by space flight. Four crew members of a 17 day Spacelab mission participated in the experiment. The apparent cellular fraction and transverse relaxation time (T2) were determined twice before launch and at several times after flight. Immediately after flight, no significant change in the cellular fraction was found. However, the T2 of the cellular, but not the fat component increased following flight, although to a variable extent, in all crew members with a time course for return to baseline lasting several months. The T2 of seven control subjects showed no significant change. Although these observations may have several explanations, it is speculated that the observed T2 changes might reflect increased marrow osteoblastic activity during recovery from space flight.

  10. Bone marrow purging by a xanthine oxidase-antibody conjugate.

    PubMed

    Dinota, A; Tazzari, P L; Abbondanza, A; Battelli, M G; Gobbi, M; Stirpe, F

    1990-07-01

    The selective cytotoxicity of the xanthine oxidase conjugated to an 8A monoclonal antibody recognizing a human plasma cell-associated antigen has been described. The selectivity and the toxicity of the hypoxanthine/conjugated xanthine oxidase system was increased by removing the excess of conjugate and by adding chelated iron. Under these experimental conditions the cytotoxicity of the conjugate exceeded that of free xanthine oxidase by one order of magnitude. The conjugate effectively purged bone marrow from infiltrating neoplastic plasma cells and added target Raji cells, provided blood was removed and bone marrow peroxidases were exhausted. In conditions of purging effectiveness the conjugate had no toxicity to CFU-GM. No toxicity to mice was observed after i.v. injection of xanthine oxidase-antibody conjugate up to 2.9 U/kg body weight. Thus the hypoxanthine/conjugated xanthine oxidase system could be an effective and nontoxic tool for the ex vivo bone marrow purging in multiple myeloma patients for autologous transplantation. PMID:2390631

  11. [The role of blood banks in bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    Höcker, P; Wagner, A; Sklenar, G

    1991-01-01

    The transfusion service (TS) plays an important role in bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Many of the techniques and methods employed are also used in the daily work of a TS like tissue typing, apheresis techniques, handling of blood and its components under sterile conditions. In the pretransplantation phase the TS is responsible for the typing of recipient and presumptive donors, harvesting of autologous blood and selection of appropriate blood components. During BMT the TS can perform bone marrow harvesting, depletion of red cells in case of ABO-incompatibility and bone marrow manipulation when T-cell depletion or purging procedures are considered. Peripheral stem cell harvest by apheresis is also best performed by the TS experienced in such techniques. Storage of hematopoietic cells in liquid nitrogen and thawing are also techniques already used in most of the transfusion services. Post BMT, the support with blood components, irradiated and almost free of white cells to avoid TA-GVH and CMV-infection, is a major job of the TS. These facts demonstrate that a well organized transfusion service is a 'conditio sine qua non' for successful BMT. PMID:1725636

  12. Bone Marrow Transplantation Improves Autoinflammation and Inflammatory Bone Loss in SH3BP2 Knock-In Cherubism Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitaka, Teruhito; Kittaka, Mizuho; Ishida, Shu; Mizuno, Noriyoshi; Mukai, Tomoyuki; Ueki, Yasuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Cherubism (OMIM#118400) is a genetic disorder in children characterized by excessive jawbone destruction with proliferation of fibro-osseous lesions containing a large number of osteoclasts. Mutations in the SH3-domain binding protein 2 (SH3BP2) are responsible for cherubism. Analysis of the knock-in (KI) mouse model of cherubism showed that homozygous cherubism mice (Sh3bp2KI/KI) spontaneously develop systemic autoinflammation and inflammatory bone loss and that cherubism is a TNF-α-dependent hematopoietic disorder. In this study, we investigated whether bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is effective for the treatment of inflammation and bone loss in Sh3bp2KI/KI mice. Bone marrow (BM) cells from wild-type (Sh3bp2+/+) mice were transplanted to 6-week-old Sh3bp2KI/KI mice with developing inflammation and to 10-week-old Sh3bp2KI/KI mice with established inflammation. Six-week-old Sh3bp2KI/KI mice transplanted with Sh3bp2+/+ BM cells exhibited improved body weight loss, facial swelling, and survival rate. Inflammatory lesions in the liver and lung as well as bone loss in calvaria and mandibula were ameliorated at 10 weeks after BMT compared to Sh3bp2KI/KI mice transplanted with Sh3bp2KI/KI BM cells. Elevation of serum TNF-α levels was not detected after BMT. BMT was effective for up to 20 weeks in 6-week-old Sh3bp2KI/KI mice transplanted with Sh3bp2+/+ BM cells. BMT also ameliorated the inflammation and bone loss in 10-week-old Sh3bp2KI/KI mice. Thus our study demonstrates that BMT improves the inflammation and bone loss in cherubism mice. BMT may be effective for the treatment of cherubism patients. PMID:25445458

  13. The effect of autologous bone marrow stromal cells differentiated on scaffolds for canine tibial bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Özdal-Kurt, F; Tuğlu, I; Vatansever, H S; Tong, S; Deliloğlu-Gürhan, S I

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow contains mesenchymal stem cells that form many tissues. Various scaffolds are available for bone reconstruction by tissue engineering. Osteoblastic differentiated bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) promote osteogenesis on scaffolds and stimulate bone regeneration. We investigated the use of cultured autologous BMSC on different scaffolds for healing defects in tibias of adult male canines. BMSC were isolated from canine humerus bone marrow, differentiated into osteoblasts in culture and loaded onto porous ceramic scaffolds including hydroxyapatite 1, hydroxyapatite gel and calcium phosphate. Osteoblast differentiation was verified by osteonectine and osteocalcine immunocytochemistry. The scaffolds with stromal cells were implanted in the tibial defect. Scaffolds without stromal cells were used as controls. Sections from the defects were processed for histological, ultrastructural, immunohistochemical and histomorphometric analyses to analyze the healing of the defects. BMSC were spread, allowed to proliferate and differentiate to osteoblasts as shown by alizarin red histochemistry, and osteocalcine and osteonectine immunostaining. Scanning electron microscopy showed that BMSC on the scaffolds were more active and adhesive to the calcium phosphate scaffold compared to the others. Macroscopic bone formation was observed in all groups, but scaffolds with stromal cells produced significantly better results. Bone healing occurred earlier and faster with stromal cells on the calcium phosphate scaffold and produced more callus compared to other scaffolds. Tissue healing and osteoblastic marker expression also were better with stromal cells on the scaffolds. Increased trabecula formation, cell density and decreased fibrosis were observed in the calcium phosphate scaffold with stromal cells. Autologous cultured stromal cells on the scaffolds were useful for healing of canine tibial bone defects. The calcium phosphate scaffold was the best for both cell

  14. Issues in diagnosis of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms involving the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Report on the Bone Marrow Workshop of the XVIIth meeting of the European Association for Haematopathology and the Society for Hematopathology.

    PubMed

    Porwit, Anna; Fend, Falko; Kremer, Marcus; Orazi, Attilio; Safali, Mükerrem; van der Walt, Jon

    2016-09-01

    Small B cell lymphoid neoplasms are the most common lymphoproliferative disorders involving peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM). The Bone Marrow Workshop (BMW) organized by the European Bone Marrow Working Group (EBMWG) of the European Association for Haematopathology (EAHP) during the XVIIth EAHP Meeting in Istanbul, October 2014, was dedicated to discussion of cases illustrating how the recent advances in immunophenotyping, molecular techniques and cytogenetics provide better understanding and classification of these entities. Submitted cases were grouped into following categories: (i) cases illustrating diagnostic difficulties in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL); (ii) cases of BM manifestations of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms other than CLL; (iii) transformation of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms in the BM; and (iv) multiclonality and composite lymphomas in the BM. This report summarizes presented cases and conclusions of the BMW and provides practical recommendations for classification of the BM manifestations of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms based on the current state of knowledge. PMID:27208429

  15. Generation of clinical grade human bone marrow stromal cells for use in bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Robey, Pamela G; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Ren, Jiaqiang; Klein, Harvey G; Sabatino, Marianna; Stroncek, David F

    2015-01-01

    In current orthopaedic practice, there is a need to increase the ability to reconstruct large segments of bone lost due to trauma, resection of tumors and skeletal deformities, or when normal regenerative processes have failed such as in non-unions and avascular necrosis. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells), when used in conjunction with appropriate carriers, represent a means by which to achieve bone regeneration in such cases. While much has been done at the bench and in pre-clinical studies, moving towards clinical application requires the generation of clinical grade cells. What is described herein is an FDA-approved cell manufacturing procedure for the ex vivo expansion of high quality, biologically active human BMSCs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Stem Cells and Bone. PMID:25064527

  16. Hurler syndrome: a case report of a 5-year follow-up of dental findings after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wadenya, Rose O; Stout, Angela M; Gupta, Avin; Monge, Janet

    2010-01-01

    Hurler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of mucopolysaccharide metabolism. It results from a deficiency in lysosomal enzymes responsible for the breakdown of glycosaminoglycans. Affected individuals may show progressive physical and mental deterioration as glycosaminoglycans are deposited in the organs of the body. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is effective in improving some of the clinical manifestations of Hurler syndrome. Death is caused by cardiorespiratory failure and usually occurs before the second decade of life. In this case report, the course of dental development was followed over 5 years, from the primary dentition into the permanent dentition, of a child who was successfully treated with a bone marrow transplant in infancy. The timing of bone marrow therapy has significant and variable effect on the stages of tooth development with implications for the long-term maintenance of the dentition. PMID:20051069

  17. [Demonstration of the calcified osseous component in decalcified bone marrow biopsies. Study of hematological cases].

    PubMed

    Vigliani, R

    2000-08-01

    In order to investigate the possibility of the evidentiation of the mineralized component of decalcified bone a series of Jamshidi-type consecutive bone marrow biopsies for various hematological disorders were pre-stained with von Kossa modified procedure for calcium. Methodologically the controls showed reliable silver staining as far as localization (osteo-medullary interface and mineralization front) and preservation (after decalcification) were concerned. The results were: 1) a good morphology of bone marrow tissue also concerning immunohistochemical stainings; 2) a better overview of the osseous components and related artifacts as induced by biopsy, processing and sampling; 3) precise identification of the osteoid seams and remarkably of the relative angle of sectioning for an appropriate measurement; 4) better evidentiation of the remodelling osteoblastic-osteoclastic units; 5) visualization of the osteocytic lacunae and canaliculi and the mineralized matrix to some extent depending on their effective permeability. Summarizing the osteologic features were: normality or minimal abnormality of difficult interpretation; classical osteometabolic alterations; lesions specifically due to hematological disorders; various combination of these findings. Theoretical and practical aspects are discussed. In conclusion this methodological variant in comparison with the usual paraffin procedure clearly gives more information concerning osteometabolic evaluation in routine hematological biopsies; offers a vicarious or complementary approach to osteometabolic diseases; represents a conceptual stimulus to interpret diagnostically and prognostically the osseous pathology as determined by routinely encountered hematological disorders. PMID:11029887

  18. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (Bone marrow syndrome, Aplastic Anemia): Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri

    Key Words: Aplastic Anemia (AA), Pluripotential Stem Cells (PSC) Introduction: Aplastic Anemia (AA) is a disorder of the pluripotential stem cells involve a decrease in the number of cells of myeloid, erythroid and megakaryotic lineage [Segel et al. 2000 ]. The etiology of AA include idiopathic cases and secondary aplastic anemia after exposure to drugs, toxins, chemicals, viral infections, lympho-proliferative diseases, radiation, genetic causes, myelodisplastic syndromes and hypoplastic anemias, thymomas, lymphomas. [Brodskyet al. 2005.,Modan et al. 1975., Szklo et al. 1975]. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (or Bone marrow syndrome, or Radiation-Acquired Aplastic Anemia) is the acute toxic syndrome which usually occurs with a dose of irradiation between 0.7 and 10 Gy (70- 1000 rads), depending on the species irradiated. [Waselenko et al., 2004]. The etiology of bone morrow damage from high-level radiation exposure results depends on the radiosensitivity of certain bone marrow cell lines. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Aplastic anemia after radiation exposure is a clinical syndrome that results from a marked disorder of bone marrow blood cell production. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Radiation hematotoxicity is mediated via genotoxic and other specific toxic mechanisms, leading to aplasia, cell apoptosis or necrosis, initiation via genetic mechanisms of clonal disorders, in cases such as the acute radiation-acquired form of AA. AA results from radiation injury to pluripotential and multipotential stem cells in the bone marrow. The clinical signs displayed in reticulocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The number of marrow CD34+ cells (multipotential hematopoietic progenitors) and their derivative colony-forming unit{granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst forming unit {erythroid (BFU{E) are reduced markedly in patients with AA. [Guinan 2011, Brodski et al. 2005, Beutler et al.,2000] Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally

  19. Changes in vertebral bone marrow fat and bone mass after gastric bypass surgery: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Schafer, A L; Li, X; Schwartz, A V; Tufts, L S; Wheeler, A L; Grunfeld, C; Stewart, L; Rogers, S J; Carter, J T; Posselt, A M; Black, D M; Shoback, D M

    2015-05-01

    Bone marrow fat may serve a metabolic role distinct from other fat depots, and it may be altered by metabolic conditions including diabetes. Caloric restriction paradoxically increases marrow fat in mice, and women with anorexia nervosa have high marrow fat. The longitudinal effect of weight loss on marrow fat in humans is unknown. We hypothesized that marrow fat increases after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery, as total body fat decreases. In a pilot study of 11 morbidly obese women (6 diabetic, 5 nondiabetic), we measured vertebral marrow fat content (percentage fat fraction) before and 6 months after RYGB using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Total body fat mass declined in all participants (mean ± SD decline 19.1 ± 6.1 kg or 36.5% ± 10.9%, p<0.001). Areal bone mineral density (BMD) decreased by 5.2% ± 3.5% and 4.1% ± 2.6% at the femoral neck and total hip, respectively, and volumetric BMD decreased at the spine by 7.4% ± 2.8% (p<0.001 for all). Effects of RYGB on marrow fat differed by diabetes status (adjusted p=0.04). There was little mean change in marrow fat in nondiabetic women (mean +0.9%, 95% CI -10.0 to +11.7%, p=0.84). In contrast, marrow fat decreased in diabetic women (-7.5%, 95% CI -15.2 to +0.1%, p=0.05). Changes in total body fat mass and marrow fat were inversely correlated among nondiabetic (r=-0.96, p=0.01) but not diabetic (r=0.52, p=0.29) participants. In conclusion, among those without diabetes, marrow fat is maintained on average after RYGB, despite dramatic declines in overall fat mass. Among those with diabetes, RYGB may reduce marrow fat. Thus, future studies of marrow fat should take diabetes status into account. Marrow fat may have unique metabolic behavior compared with other fat depots. PMID:25603463

  20. Changes in Vertebral Bone Marrow Fat and Bone Mass After Gastric Bypass Surgery: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, AL; Li, X; Schwartz, AV; Tufts, LS; Wheeler, AL; Grunfeld, C; Stewart, L; Rogers, SJ; Carter, JT; Posselt, AM; Black, DM; Shoback, DM

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow fat may serve a metabolic role distinct from other fat depots, and it may be altered by metabolic conditions including diabetes. Caloric restriction paradoxically increases marrow fat in mice, and women with anorexia nervosa have high marrow fat. The longitudinal effect of weight loss on marrow fat in humans is unknown. We hypothesized that marrow fat increases after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery, as total body fat decreases. In a pilot study of 11 morbidly obese women (6 diabetic, 5 nondiabetic), we measured vertebral marrow fat content (percentage fat fraction) before and 6 months after RYGB using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Total body fat mass declined in all participants (mean ±SD decline 19.1 ±6.1 kg or 36.5 ±10.9%, p<0.001). Areal bone mineral density (BMD) decreased by 5.2 ±3.5% and 4.1 ±2.6% at the femoral neck and total hip, respectively, and volumetric BMD decreased at the spine by 7.4 ±2.8% (p<0.001 for all). Effects of RYGB on marrow fat differed by diabetes status (adjusted p=0.04). There was little mean change in marrow fat in nondiabetic women (mean +0.9%, 95% CI -10.0 to +11.7%, p=0.84). In contrast, marrow fat decreased in diabetic women (−7.5%, 95% CI -15.2 to +0.1%, p=0.05). Changes in total body fat mass and marrow fat were inversely correlated among nondiabetic (r=−0.96, p=0.01) but not diabetic (r=0.52, p=0.29) participants. In conclusion, among those without diabetes, marrow fat is maintained on average after RYGB, despite dramatic declines in overall fat mass. Among those with diabetes, RYGB may reduce marrow fat. Thus, future studies of marrow fat should take diabetes status into account. Marrow fat may have unique metabolic behavior compared with other fat depots. PMID:25603463

  1. Failure to Generate Bone Marrow Adipocytes Does Not Protect Mice from Ovariectomy-Induced Osteopenia

    PubMed Central

    Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Turner, Russell T.

    2012-01-01

    A reciprocal association between bone marrow fat and bone mass has been reported in ovariectomized rodents, suggesting that bone marrow adipogenesis has a negative effect on bone growth and turnover balance. Mice with loss of function mutations in kit receptor (kitW/W-v) have no bone marrow adipocytes in tibia or lumbar vertebra. We therefore tested the hypothesis that marrow fat contributes to development of osteopenia by comparing the skeletal response to ovariectomy (ovx) in growing wild type (WT) and bone marrow adipocyte-deficient kitW/W-v mice. Mice were ovx at 4 weeks of age and sacrificed 4 or 10 weeks post-surgery. Body composition was measured at necropsy by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Cortical (tibia) and cancellous (tibia and lumbar vertebra) bone architecture were evaluated by microcomputed tomography. Bone marrow adipocyte size and density, osteoblast- and osteoclast-lined bone perimeters, and bone formation were determined by histomorphometry. Ovx resulted in an increase in total body fat mass at 10 weeks post-ovx in both genotypes, but the response was attenuated in the in kitW/W-v mice. Adipocytes were present in bone marrow of tibia and lumbar vertebra in WT mice and bone marrow adiposity increased following ovx. In contrast, marrow adipocytes were not detected in either intact or ovx kitW/W-v mice. However, ovx in WT and kitW/W-v mice resulted in statistically indistinguishable changes in cortical and cancellous bone mass, cortical and cancellous bone formation rate, and cancellous osteoblast and osteoclast-lined bone perimeters. In conclusion, our findings do not support a causal role for increased bone marrow fat as a mediator of ovx-induced osteopenia in mice. PMID:23246792

  2. Bone marrow transplantation after the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, A.; Gale, R.P.; Guskova, A.; Piatkin, E.; Selidovkin, G.; Muravyova, L.; Champlin, R.E.; Danilova, N.; Yevseeva, L.; Petrosyan, L. )

    1989-07-27

    On April 26, 1986, an accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in the Soviet Union exposed about 200 people to large doses of total-body radiation. Thirteen persons exposed to estimated total-body doses of 5.6 to 13.4 Gy received bone marrow transplants. Two transplant recipients, who received estimated doses of radiation of 5.6 and 8.7 Gy, are alive more than three years after the accident. The others died of various causes, including burns (the cause of death in five), interstitial pneumonitis (three), graft-versus-host disease (two), and acute renal failure and adult respiratory distress syndrome (one). There was hematopoietic (granulocytic) recovery in nine transplant recipients who could be evaluated, six of whom had transient partial engraftment before the recovery of their own marrow. Graft-versus-host disease was diagnosed clinically in four persons and suspected in two others. Although the recovery of endogenous hematopoiesis may occur after exposure to radiation doses of 5.6 to 13.4 Gy, we do not know whether it is more likely after the transient engraftment of transplanted stem cells. Because large doses of radiation affect multiple systems, bone marrow recovery does not necessarily ensure survival. Furthermore, the risk of graft-versus-host disease must be considered when the benefits of this treatment are being weighed.

  3. C/EBPβ in bone marrow is essential for diet induced inflammation, cholesterol balance, and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Shaikh M.; Baquero, Karalee C.; Choudhury, Mahua; Janssen, Rachel C.; de la Houssaye, Becky A.; Sun, Ming; Miyazaki-Anzai, Shinobu; Wang, Shu; Moustaid-Moussa, Naima; Miyazaki, Makoto; Friedman, Jacob E.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Atherosclerosis is both a chronic inflammatory disease and a lipid metabolism disorder. C/EBPβ is well documented for its role in the development of hematopoietic cells and integration of lipid metabolism. However, C/EBPβ's role in atherosclerotic progression has not been examined. We assessed the impact of hematopoietic CEBPβ deletion in ApoE−/− mice on hyperlipidemia, inflammatory responses and lesion formation in the aorta. Methods and Results ApoE−/− mice were reconstituted with bone marrow cells derived from either WT or C/EBPβ−/− mice and placed on low fat or high fat/high cholesterol diet for 11 weeks. Hematopoietic C/EBPβ deletion in ApoE−/− mice reduced blood and hepatic lipids and gene expression of hepatic stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 and fatty acid synthase while expression of ATP binding cassette transporter G1, cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase, and liver X receptor alpha genes were significantly increased. ApoE−/− mice reconstituted with C/EBPβ−/− bone marrow cells also significantly reduced blood cytokine levels and reduced lesion area in aortic sinuses compared with ApoE−/− mice reconstituted with WT bone marrow cells. Silencing of C/EBPβ in RAW264.7 macrophage cells prevented oxLDL-mediated foam cell formation and inflammatory cytokine secretion in conditioned medium. Conclusion C/EBPβ in hematopoietic cells is crucial to regulate diet-induced inflammation, hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis development. PMID:27072340

  4. Imported visceral leishmaniasis – unexpected bone marrow diagnosis in a patient with fever, pancytopenia, and splenomegaly

    PubMed Central

    Gallina, Valentina; Binazzi, Raffaella; Golemi, Arber; Farsad, Mohsen; Weiss, Günter; Wiedermann, Christian J

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is spreading from mediterranean countries to the north of Europe. The Alps are not an endemic region and there are only few reports of sporadic cases. We report the case of a 72 year old male who presented after a syncope with fever, cough and a sacral skin rash. Clinical examination revealed splenomegaly, elevated liver enzymes and pancytopenia; differential diagnosis included myeloproliferative or lymphoproliferative disorders, infections and auto-immune conditions that cause enlargement of the spleen and liver diseases, however, all tests were negative. In 18FDG PET computerized tomography, pathological and diffuse uptake in the spleen was seen, with mild and homogeneous FDG uptake in the bone marrow and normal tracer uptake elsewhere in the body. Bone marrow aspiration revealed the presence of numerous intra- and extracellular Leishmania amastigotes. Travel history indicated that he had been in Sardinia for a 7-day vacation several months ago. The patient promptly responded to treatment with liposomal amphotericin B. Imported visceral leishmaniasis is likely to be seen more frequently in non-endemic regions and fever, pancytopenia and splenomegaly are diagnostic clues, whereas diagnostic confirmation may be done by detection of Leishmania spp. amastigotes in the bone marrow. PMID:25755910

  5. Role of immobilization of irradiated rats in the protective effect of bone marrow shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gronskaya, N. F.; Strelin, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    Rats were exposed to X-radiation to study the influence of immobilization and shielding of part of bone marrow during exposure on survival. It is concluded that (1) the beneficial effect of the stress factor (created by the immobilization of rats during exposure) can aggregate with the effect of bone marrow shielding and, under certain conditions, imitate the latter; and (2) the probability of the protective effect of immobilization should be taken into account when assessing the influence of bone marrow shielding.

  6. Different expression of chemokines in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Kurowska, Weronika J.; Radzikowska, Anna; Massalska, Magdalena A.; Burakowski, Tomasz; Kontny, Ewa; Słowińska, Iwona; Gasik, Robert; Maśliński, Włodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease leading to joint destruction. In addition to involvement of the joints, there is growing evidence that inflammatory/autoimmune processes take place in bone marrow, beginning the disease onset. Activated T and B cells accumulate in bone marrow, where also effective antigen presentation takes place. An increased number of activated T cells was observed in RA in comparison to osteoarthritis (OA) bone marrow. In the present study we analyzed the levels of chemokines that may be responsible for accumulation/retention of T-cells in the bone marrow of RA and OA patients. Material and methods Bone marrow samples were obtained from RA and OA patients during total hip replacement surgery, and bone marrow plasma was obtained by gradient centrifugation. Levels of the chemokines CX3CL1, CCL5, CCL2, CXCL12 and CXCL1 were measured in bone marrow plasma by specific ELISAs. Comparison between the groups of patients and statistical significance were analyzed by the two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test. Results Increased levels of CX3CL1 (818 ±431 pg/ml vs. 502 ±131 pg/ml, p < 0.0007) and CCL5 (5967 ±1680 pg/ml vs. 4878 ±2360 pg/ml, p < 0.05) respectively in bone marrow plasma from RA in comparison with OA patients were observed. In contrast, similar levels of CCL2, CXCL12 and CXCL1 in RA and OA bone marrow suggest that these cytokines do not play a significant role in the observed T cell accumulation in RA bone marrow. Conclusions CX3CL1 and CCL5 overproduced in RA bone marrow may contribute to the accumulation of T cells observed in RA bone marrow. PMID:27407279

  7. Bone Marrow Dosimetry Using 124I-PET

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jazmin; Humm, John L.; Divgi, Chaitanya R.; Larson, Steven M.; O'Donoghue, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow is usually dose-limiting for radioimmunotherapy. In this study, we directly estimated red marrow activity concentration and the self-dose component of absorbed radiation dose to red marrow based on PET/CT of 2 different 124I-labeled antibodies (cG250 and huA33) and compared the results with plasma activity concentration and plasma-based dose estimates. Methods Two groups of patients injected with 124I-labeled monoclonal antibodies (11 patients with renal cancer receiving 124I-cG250 and 5 patients with colorectal cancer receiving 124I- huA33) were imaged by PET or PET/CT on 2 or 3 occasions after infusion. Regions of interest were drawn over several lumbar vertebrae, and red marrow activity concentration was quantified. Plasma activity concentration was also quantified using multiple patient blood samples. The red marrow–to–plasma activity concentration ratio (RMPR) was calculated at the times of imaging. The self-dose component of the absorbed radiation dose to the red marrow was estimated from the images, from the plasma measurements, and using a combination of both sets of measurements. Results RMPR was observed to increase with time for both groups of patients. Mean (±SD) time-dependent RMPR (RMPR(t)) for the cG250 group increased from 0.13 ± 0.06 immediately after infusion to 0.23 ± 0.09 at approximately 6 d after infusion. For the huA33 group, mean RMPR(t) was 0.10 ± 0.04 immediately after infusion, 0.13 ± 0.05 approximately 2 d after infusion, and 0.20 ± 0.09 approximately 7 d after infusion. Plasma-based estimates of red marrow self-dose tended to be greater than image-based values by, on average, 11% and 47% for cG250 and huA33, respectively, but by as much as −73% to 62% for individual patients. The hybrid method combining RMPR(t) and plasma activity concentration provided a closer match to the image-based dose estimates (average discrepancies, −2% and 18% for cG250 and huA33, respectively). Conclusion These results suggest that

  8. Male genital lichen sclerosus in recipients of bone marrow transplants.

    PubMed

    Thomas, L J; Shim, T N; Borysiewicz, C; Dinneen, M; Fawcett, H; Roy, A; Francis, N; Bunker, C B

    2016-07-01

    We describe two patients who received haematopoietic stem cell marrow transplantation, and developed male genital lichen sclerosus (MGLSc), one of whom also had squamous carcinoma in situ (Bowen disease). MGLSc has previously been associated with graft-versus-host disease. Various aetiological factors for LSc have been proposed, including a role for chronic occluded epithelial exposure to urine. A number of factors imply that the risk of malignant transformation in this bone marrow transplant group is likely to be higher than the overall figure of 2-9% cited for MGLSc. It is vital, therefore, that clinicians involved in the care of those with haematological malignancies are adequately prepared to examine the genitals of their patients, and to recognize and refer any suspect penile lesions. PMID:26936088

  9. Lamellar Spacing in Cuboid Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds Regulates Bone Formation by Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Afghani, Shahrzad; Franco, Jaime; Launey, Max; Marshall, Sally; Marshall, Grayson W.; Nissenson, Robert; Lee, Janice; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Saiz, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Background A major goal in bone engineering is the creation of large volume constructs (scaffolds and stem cells) that bear load. The scaffolds must satisfy two competing requirements—they need be sufficiently porous to allow nutrient flow to maintain cell viability, yet sufficiently dense to bear load. We studied the effect of scaffold macroporosity on bone formation and scaffold strength, for bone formed by human bone marrow stromal cells. Methods Rigid cubical hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate scaffolds were produced by robo-casting. The ceramic line thickness was held constant, but the distance between adjacent lines was either 50, 100, 200, 500, or 1000 μm. Cultured human bone marrow stromal cells were combined with the scaffolds in vitro; transplants were placed into the subcutis of immunodeficient mice. Transplants were harvested 9, 18, 23, 38, or 50 weeks later. Bone formation and scaffold strength were analyzed using histology and compression testing. Results Sixty transplants were evaluated. Cortical bone increased with transplant age, and was greatest among 500 μm transplants. In contrast, maximum transplant strength was greatest among 200 μm transplants. Conclusions Lamellar spacing within scaffolds regulates the extent of bone formation; 500 μm yields the most new bone, whereas 200 μm yields the strongest transplants. PMID:21294634

  10. Dissecting the Role of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells on Bone Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Buenrostro, Denise; Park, Serk In; Sterling, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-induced bone disease is a dynamic process that involves interactions with many cell types. Once metastatic cancer cells reach the bone, they are in contact with many different cell types that are present in the cell-rich bone marrow. These cells include the immune cells, myeloid cells, fibroblasts, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and mesenchymal stem cells. Each of these cell populations can influence the behavior or gene expression of both the tumor cells and the bone microenvironment. Additionally, the tumor itself can alter the behavior of these bone marrow cells which further alters both the microenvironment and the tumor cells. While many groups focus on studying these interactions, much remains unknown. A better understanding of the interactions between the tumor cells and the bone microenvironment will improve our knowledge on how tumors establish in bone and may lead to improvements in diagnosing and treating bone metastases. This review details our current knowledge on the interactions between tumor cells that reside in bone and their microenvironment. PMID:25054153