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Sample records for book review editor

  1. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pride, John L.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews "It Isn't Fair! Siblings of Children with Disabilities" (Stanley D. Klein and Maxwell J. Schleifer, Editors). The book examines the attitudes of siblings and parents of disabled children, and discusses how parents' attitudes and actions determine whether the presence of such children in the family will be a positive or negative experience.…

  2. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecora, Peter J.; Cline, Stephanie

    1994-01-01

    Reviews two books: (1) "Advancing Family Preservation Practice" (E. Susan Morton and R. Kevin Brigsby, editors) which summarizes Intensive Family Preservation Services in the United States over the past decade; and (2) "Marketing Strategies for Nonprofit Organizations" (Siri Espy) which discusses marketing and its application for nonprofit…

  3. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes-Adam, Isobel; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reviews three books: (1) "Contemporary Issues in the Early Years: Working Collaboratively for Children" (Gillian Pugh, editor); (2) "Social Interaction and the Development of Language and Cognition," (Alison F. Garton); and (3) "Child and Nature," (World Organization for Early Childhood Education). (AC)

  4. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegener, Daan

    Writing a biography of a complex personality and mastermind like Albert Einstein is a daunting task for any historian of science. Yet the sheer temptation of writing his biography has apparently helped to overcome scholarly scruples, as biographies of Einstein have appeared quite regularly on the market. One of them is Einstein: his Life and Universe by journalist Walter Isaacson. It is a best-seller, which is one of the reasons the book deserves a critical evaluation. Isaacson is a man of considerable repute: he has been the chairman of CNN and managing editor of Time magazine. Isaacson's Einstein is written in a style that is accessible to a wide audience. Scholars who are already familiar with Einstein's physics may still enjoy the parts of the book that deal with the relation between Einstein and the press. Indeed, the breadth of its scope is the book's major merit, as it connects the personal, scientific, public and political dimensions of Einstein's life. In this review, I discuss Isaacson's treatment of these dimensions one-by-one.

  5. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Olival

    2014-05-01

    This book concerns the many lives of Hugh Everett's seminal work on the interpretation of quantum mechanics. As these many lives were spread over time, like layers, the reading of this book is like an archeological tour as well as an adventure in physics, its philosophy and history. In short, the story traces the lives of his work. The first life was around 1956-1957 when Everett, a doctoral student under John Archibald Wheeler, wrote his dissertation at Princeton University and published it in the journal Review of Modern Physics. He presented an interpretation which dispensed with the need to collapse quantum states during measurements, thus dissolving the quantum measurement problem, and consistently reproduced results from quantum mechanics using Schrödinger's equation alone. Despite the face value of such a proposal it drew little attention until the end of the 1960s. This was when the second life of Everett's work began. In 1967 Bryce DeWitt appealed to Everett's work while working on the quantization of general relativity creating what is now called the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. Furthermore, DeWitt wanted give to Everett's work a wider audience than experts in quantum gravity. Supported by the editors of Physics Today a paper by himself presenting this interpretation as one of the possible ones for quantum mechanics triggered a heated debate on the subject in the periodical. Together with this new life a layer beneath the original publication of the dissertation appeared. In contact with Everett, DeWitt discovered that the 1957 dissertation and paper had been an abridged version of a more consistently developed interpretation. The full version of the work was then published in 1973 with the enticing title, suggested by DeWitt, of "The Many-Worlds Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics." This second life was larger than the first one, indeed it is alive until today, sparking a huge amount of technical work by physicists and philosophers attempting to solve what

  6. [Book review] Ecological Scale - Theory and Applications by D.L. Peterson and V. Thomas Parker, editors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connell, A.F., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Covering the complexity of the scale topic, this volume represents an important compilation of information on a topic that is often misunderstood, and one for which little attention is paid (although, thankfully, this seems to be on the decline). Although technical, this book provides full exposure to the scale issue in ecology and is an important reference for researchers and resource managers who are working to understand and preserve ecological function in parks. The authors and editors have combined to provide a needed examination of a very important topic. In summary, why purchase all those books on scale when just one will do? The mountain of information alone stuffed into this one book should prompt all parks to get a copy and have it on hand as a quick and ready reference.

  7. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohar, C. S.

    2015-02-01

    The subject of the theory of vibrations has carried an aesthetic appeal to generations of engineering students for its richness of ideas, and for the intellectual challenges it offers. Also, the diverse range of its applications (covering civil, mechanical, automotive, and aerospace structures) has provided obvious motivations for its study. For most students, the subject provides, perhaps, the first encounter in substantial application of mathematical tools (differential equations, calculus of variations, Fourier/Laplace transforms, and matrix algebra) to engineering problems. The intimate relationship that the subject of mechanics has with mathematics strikes home probably for the first time. While teaching this subject, the instructor is spoilt for choice in selecting a text book and so are the students who wish to pursue a self-study of the subject. Many luminaries in the field have offered their own exposition of the subject: starting from the classics of Rayleigh, Timoshenko, Den Hartog, Bishop and Johnson, and the works of more recent vintage (e.g., the books by Meirovich, Clough, and Penzien, and works with computational flavour, such as, those by Bathe and Petyt), several works easily come to one's mind. Given this milieu, it requires a distinctive conviction to write a new book on this subject. And, here we have a book, written by a practitioner, which aims to deal with fundamental aspects of vibrations of engineering systems. The scepticism that this reviewer had on the need for having one more such book vanished as he browsed through the book and read selectively a few sections. The author's gift for elegant explanations is immediately noticeable even in such a preliminary reading. After a more careful reading, the reviewer has found this book to be insightful and he considers the book to be a welcome addition to the family of books on vibration engineering. The author has struck a fine balance between physical explanations, mathematical niceties

  8. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve

    2008-11-01

    The Polish physicist Józio (Joseph, Josh, Jo) Rotblat was catapulted into the public eye when he (and the 'Pugwash Conferences' organization) received the 1995 Nobel Peace Prize. His life prior to that had been most distinguished but conducted well out of the public eye. Born and raised as a Jewish physicist in pre-World War II Poland, and thus potentially educationally disadvantaged, he battled away for education and scientific achievement. He came to Liverpool University just before the outbreak of World War II, worked in James Chadwick's laboratory on the early beginnings of neutron fission physics, moved to Los Alamos to take part in the US-UK collaborative Manhattan Project to build a nuclear bomb and was motivated by a desire to rid Poland of Nazi 'racial cleansing'. On realizing the US-UK goal was somewhat wider, he resigned this work and dedicated his life to the peaceful uses of radiation and the campaigns to rid the world of the potential world-eliminating possibility of nuclear war. For this purpose he interacted with Albert Einstein and Bertrand Russell, and in July 1957 founded the 'Pugwash Conferences', named for a small fishing village in Nova Scotia, Canada where the first was held. Along the way his personal life was no less dramatic. Cruel events conspired, and his wife Tola remained in Poland and was killed in the Nazi extermination camp at Majdanek. He grieved for his beloved Poland and those left behind or unaccounted for. He was suspected by some Americans of being a spy and had his personal papers and family artefacts impounded. After the war he was Professor of Medical Physics at St Bartholomew's Hospital, London for 30 years up to retirement. After John Roberts, he was the second editor of this journal Physics in Medicine and Biology from 1961-72 (see e.g. Bob Burns' paper in our 50th birthday issue, 2006. Kit Hill's little book which chronicles the life and times of Rotblat weaves together the key events in his personal and professional

  9. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevers, Jan G. P. W.

    2016-09-01

    For many years a good introductory book for undergraduate and postgraduate students on remote sensing of the Earth's land surface, which was not starting with an emphasis on traditional photographic techniques, was missing. In 2010 the first edition of the book Fundamentals of Satellite Remote Sensing by Emilio Chuvieco and Alfredo Huete was published by CRC Press and it was filling this gap. Now the second edition by Emilio Chuvieco was published by CRC Press. This second edition is made more attractive by the use of colour and including colour illustrations instead of the black-and-white ones in the first edition.

  10. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Early Childhood, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Reviews "La Educacion Preescolar: Desafio y Aventura" (Lavanchy Bobsien); "Working towards Better Childcare" (Peeters and Vandenbroeck, editors); "Children's Savings: A Study in the Development of Economic Behavior" (Sonuga-Barke and Webley); "Curvas de Crecimiento Estaturo-ponderal en Escolares" (Saez Crespo and others); and "Helping Bereaved…

  11. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonte, Cidália C.

    2016-02-01

    The use of geospatial data for a wide variety of applications has increased continuously over the last decades and a great variety of packages of open source GIS software are now available, with diverse characteristics. R was created as free software mainly for statistical computation and graphics, but offers now a large diversity of packages to process and visualize spatial data. Many books dedicated to R are available (e.g., Zuur et al., 2009; Chambers, 2008), but not many about spatial analysis in R (Bivand et al., 2008). The book under analysis is aimed for beginners both in R and in spatial analysis, and therefore can be used as a starting point for students and professionals which may want to enter the area of spatial analysis with R.

  12. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Linden, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    Compiling a good book on urban remote sensing is probably as hard as the research in this disciplinary field itself. Urban areas comprise various environments and show high heterogeneity in many respects, they are highly dynamic in time and space and at the same time of greatest influence on connected and even tele-connected regions due to their great economic importance. Urban remote sensing is therefore of great importance, yet as manifold as its study area: mapping urban areas (or sub-categories thereof) plays an important (and challenging) role in land use and land cover (change) monitoring; the analysis of urban green and forests is by itself a specialization of ecological remote sensing; urban climatology asks for spatially and temporally highly resolved remote sensing products; the detection of artificial objects is not only a common and important remote sensing application but also a typical benchmark for image analysis techniques, etc. Urban analyses are performed with all available spaceborne sensor types and at the same time they are one of the most relevant fields for airborne remote sensing. Several books on urban remote sensing have been published during the past 10 years, each taking a different perspective. The book Global Urban Monitoring and Assessment through Earth Observation is motivated by the objectives of the Global Urban Observation and Information Task (SB-04) in the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) 2012-2015 workplan (compare Chapter 2) and wants to highlight the global aspects of state-of-the-art urban remote sensing.

  13. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powicke, J. C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews of 10 recent books and one new journal ("Catalyst: A Journal of Policy Debate") are provided. Topics of the books reviewed include: economics in modern Britain, world economics, the mixed economy, Milton Friedman's thought, British industry, economic issues, and London as a financial center. (JDH)

  14. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, Newton C. A.; Krause, Décio

    This book contains a representative selection of Erhard Scheibe's writings on the philosophy of physics. It encompasses eight sections, with 38 papers, distributed as follows: (I) Between Rationalism and Empiricism (five papers from 1969 to 1994); (II) The Philosophy of the Physicists (five papers from 1988 to 1995); (III) Reconstruction (four papers, from 1979 to 1988); (IV) Laws of Nature (five papers, from 1989 to 1998); (V) Reduction (five papers from 1973 to 1995); (VI) Foundations of Quantum Mechanics (six papers from 1985 to 1993); (VII) Spacetime, Invariance, Covariance (four papers from 1982 to 1994), and (VIII) Mathematics and Physics (four papers from 1977 to 1997).

  15. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, Helge

    While "hydrostatics" has been known since antiquity, the word "hydrodynamics" was only coined by Daniel Bernoulli in 1738. From about that time onward the mechanics of fluids became an important area of physics which attracted the interest of some of the greatest mathematical physicists, including Euler, d'Alembert, Lagrange and Cauchy. Yet, in spite of its undeniable importance in the history of science, hydrodynamics has been largely ignored by modern historians. Fortunately this situation has now changed with the publication of Olivier Darrigol's book, which offers a modern and thorough treatment of the subject from its beginning about 1740 to the 1920s. It is to be hoped that the book will stimulate further interest in the history of hydrodynamics and related areas such as the history of elasticity and aerodynamics, and continuum mechanics in general. Darrigol, who may be best known for his works in the history of quantum and relativity theories, published in 2000 a comprehensive survey of the development of electrodynamics from Ampère to Einstein, a much needed replacement of Edmund Whittaker's classical history of ether and electricity. His present work gives a concise yet wide-ranging synthetic account of the development of hydrodynamics, an area of physics with some historical connections to field electrodynamics.

  16. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John T.

    Mauro Dorato's new book is subtitled "An Introduction to the History and Philosophy of Laws of Nature". This is a bit misleading: a reader previously unacquainted with any of the literature on the topic of laws of nature and related problems in the philosophy of science will find much of the book prohibitively challenging. But the book does aim for the kind of breadth and generality that one would expect from an introduction to the subject, and it serves well as a compact overview of the issues, views, arguments, and counter-arguments that have shaped the contemporary philosophical debate on laws of nature. Almost no important facet of the debate goes untouched. There are chapters or sections on: recent scholarship on the history of the notion of a law and its role in the study of nature; the characteristics of the things called "laws" in a wide range of sciences; the relations among laws, algorithmic compressibility of information, and the theory of measurement; the puzzling question of why so many laws of nature should be mathematical in form; regularity theories of laws; the universals approach to laws; the necessitarian approach to laws; skeptical eliminativism about laws; non-reductive realism about laws; the question of the supervenience of laws on non-nomic facts; the relations of laws to counterfactuals, causality, dispositions, explanation, chance, symmetry, and necessity; ceteris paribus clauses; the evolutionary contingency thesis and the question of biological laws; Wilhelm Dilthey and the alleged distinction between "nomothetic" sciences and "historical" ones; the question of psychophysical laws and the relation between this question and the problems of mental causation and free will; even the connection between the issue of psychophysical laws and Gibson's ecological theory of perception. This is an impressive range of topics, especially considering that they are all treated in only 174 pages. One result is that not all of them are treated with as

  17. Peregrines revisited. [Book review] Peregrine Falcon Populations: Their Management and Recovery, T. J. Cade, et al., editors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    Well edited, well-produced book of invited papers from a 1985 conference. Subject categories include surveys and status, environmental contaminants, captive breeding and release, and population biology

  18. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve

    2008-11-01

    The Polish physicist Józio (Joseph, Josh, Jo) Rotblat was catapulted into the public eye when he (and the 'Pugwash Conferences' organization) received the 1995 Nobel Peace Prize. His life prior to that had been most distinguished but conducted well out of the public eye. Born and raised as a Jewish physicist in pre-World War II Poland, and thus potentially educationally disadvantaged, he battled away for education and scientific achievement. He came to Liverpool University just before the outbreak of World War II, worked in James Chadwick's laboratory on the early beginnings of neutron fission physics, moved to Los Alamos to take part in the US-UK collaborative Manhattan Project to build a nuclear bomb and was motivated by a desire to rid Poland of Nazi 'racial cleansing'. On realizing the US-UK goal was somewhat wider, he resigned this work and dedicated his life to the peaceful uses of radiation and the campaigns to rid the world of the potential world-eliminating possibility of nuclear war. For this purpose he interacted with Albert Einstein and Bertrand Russell, and in July 1957 founded the 'Pugwash Conferences', named for a small fishing village in Nova Scotia, Canada where the first was held. Along the way his personal life was no less dramatic. Cruel events conspired, and his wife Tola remained in Poland and was killed in the Nazi extermination camp at Majdanek. He grieved for his beloved Poland and those left behind or unaccounted for. He was suspected by some Americans of being a spy and had his personal papers and family artefacts impounded. After the war he was Professor of Medical Physics at St Bartholomew's Hospital, London for 30 years up to retirement. After John Roberts, he was the second editor of this journal Physics in Medicine and Biology from 1961-72 (see e.g. Bob Burns' paper in our 50th birthday issue, 2006. Kit Hill's little book which chronicles the life and times of Rotblat weaves together the key events in his personal and professional

  19. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, J. B.

    2007-02-01

    These colloquium proceedings will be valuable, the blurb says, for graduate students and researchers in cosmology and theoretical astrophysics. Specifically, the book 'looks at both the strengths and weaknesses of the current big bang model in explaining certain puzzling data' and gives a 'comprehensive coverage of the expanding field of cosmology'. The reality is rather different. Conference proceedings rarely compare in value with a solid monograph or good review articles, and Current Issues in Cosmology is no exception. The colloquium was convened by the two editors, who have both long harboured doubts about the big bang, and was held in Paris in June 2004. The proceedings contain 19 presented papers and relatively brief summary comments by four panel speakers. The questions and answers at the end of each talk and a general discussion at the end were recorded and transcribed but contain little of interest. The nature of the colloquium is indicated by panellist Francesco Bertola's comment: 'While in the 1950s it was possible to speak of rival theories in cosmology, now the big-bang picture has no strong rivals. This is confirmed by the fact that out of 1500 members of the IAU Division VIII (Galaxies and the Universe) only a dozen, although bright people, devote their time to the heterodox views.' This was largely a platform for them to give their views. At least half of the dozen, all the 'usual suspects', were present: Geoffery and Margaret Burbidge, Jayant Narlikar, Halton Arp, Chandra Wickramasinghe and, in spirit only but playing a role somewhat like the ghost of Hamlet's father, the late Fred Hoyle. Doubters presented 12 of the 19 papers. Orthodoxy should certainly be challenged and the sociology of science questioned, but I found two main problems with this book. The papers putting the orthodox view are too short, even perfunctory. The most that a serious graduate student would get out of them is a reference to a far better review article or book on modern

  20. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, John M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reviews two books on issues of Native American education: (1) "Light of the Feather: Pathways through Contemporary Indian America" (M. Fedullo); and (2) "Teaching American Indian Students" (J. Rehner). (ME)

  1. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeenk, Chris

    This volume is a fitting tribute to Howard Stein. It includes 13 original essays of remarkably high quality overall, most of which were presented at Steinfest, a celebration of Stein's 70th birthday held at the University of Chicago in 1999. The essays span a range of topics that Stein has written about with characteristic passion and insight, and they illustrate the influence of Stein's body of work, both in terms of their subject matter and their methodology. Like Gaul the volume is divided into three parts: ancient and 17th century science, 19th and 20th century science, and general epistemology and the philosophy of mathematics. Since I have neither the space nor the expertise to comment on all of these essays, this review will focus on the essays devoted to history and philosophy of physics.

  2. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, J. G.

    2004-05-01

    A book of this nature is long overdue; as could be expected from the pedigree of the editors, the coverage is comprehensive and, thanks to the authors selected, is of high quality. The book is divided into five sections, the central three of which are concerned with the measurement techniques themselves. The invasive techniques of mechanical testing and bone histology are dealt with in great detail at a level suitable for postgraduate students looking for an introduction to these techniques at a practical level. In the section dealing with the measurement techniques which use ionizing radiation, the chapters on DXA, neutron activation and radiogrammetry are well detailed and again at the appropriate level for postgraduate students. However, the chapters dealing with quantitative CT techniques are missing the sort of information that would have given them more authority. There is no mention of reconstruction algorithms or some of the typical shortcomings (e.g. partial volume artefacts) of these techniques and, given the excellent quality of the rest of the book, this was disappointing. The third of these technique sections deals with methods that do not use ionizing radiation. As one might expect with these two editors, the chapter on ultrasound is excellent and the coverage thorough and deep. The chapter on MRI and bone is particularly useful and timely as little has been published in this area and the debate about how best to measure bone quality in vivo has recently been rejoined. The chapters on finite element modelling and vibration analysis give a useful overview of the topics and have comprehensive reference lists for anyone who wishes to deepen their studies. The book has a useful introductory section. Bone biology is discussed in some detail, providing sufficient knowledge for the reader to be able to understand the basis and significance of the measurement techniques that follow. Exhaustive coverage is given to biological and radiation safety issues which

  3. Children's Books. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulton, Kate

    1994-01-01

    Reviews 10 children's books, published or reissued 1988-93, about daily life, traditional culture, and schooling among Taos Pueblo, Zuni Pueblo, Navajo, Inuit, Guatemalan, and other Native peoples, as well as tales from Native American oral tradition, the life of a buffalo, and Cherokee and Athapascan historical fiction. Includes grade range and…

  4. Research Review: Magazine Editors and Editing Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolliffe, Lee

    1994-01-01

    Reviews and critiques literature in the subfield of magazine editing research, chiefly biographical studies of individual editors and various types of studies of editorial practices, including surveys, magazine content analyses, and close qualitative examinations of editors' relationships with others. (SR)

  5. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershfield, Bruce; DeWoody, Madelyn

    1993-01-01

    Reviews two booklets edited by Kay Albrecht and by Albrecht and Margaret Plantz that outline principles of developmentally appropriate practices and criteria for quality in child care programs. Also reviews a book by John Meyers that guides helping professionals through the language, themes, rules, and roles of the legal system as the system…

  6. Book Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holeinger, Philip R.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Presents and review six books. Topics include earth science topics (Philip R. Holzinger, 1985), the wild horse controversy (Richard Symanski, 1985), historical Dutch geography (Audrey M. Lambert, 1985), urban geography (Susan L. Cutter, 1985), a geopolitical atlas (Gerard Chaliand and Jean-Pierre Rageau, 1985), and remote sensing (Robert K. Holz,…

  7. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyner, Christopher C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Scholarly reviews of nine books are presented. Topics include nuclear deterrence, urban planning in France, human rights in the Republic of China, the United States' support of Israel, U. S. military policy, an analysis of Rousseau's social contract, political influences on the U. S. presidency, the state and political theory, and the loss of…

  8. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Milton F.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reviews six books: "Parentmaking Educators Training Program" (Rothenberg and others); "Teaching Painting in the Primary School" (Gentle); "School-Age Child Care" (Seligson and Allenson); "International Handbook of Child Care Policies and Programs" (Cochran); "The Politics of Pregnancy: Adolescent Sexuality and Public Policy" (Lawson and Rhode);…

  9. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pencek, Bruce; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews of five books are presented. Topics are public property and private power (Hartog, 1983), essays on Julius Caesar (Blits, 1982), changes in the American political system (Shafer, 1983), the spiritual crisis in western civilizations (Harrington, 1983), and justice, pluralism and equality (Walzer, 1983). (JDH)

  10. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Larry M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the following Human Sexuality books: "Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Controversial Issues in Human Sexuality" (Francoeur, R.T., 1987); "Annual Editions: Human Sexuality" (Pocs, O., 1987); "Personal Issues in Human Sexuality" (Gordon, S. and Snyder, W., 1986); "Journey Into Sexuality: An Exploratory Voyage" (Reiss, I.L., 1986); and…

  11. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agathonos-Georgopoulou, Helen; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reviews seven books: (1) "Cross-Cultural Psychology" (Berry and others); (2) "Biological Asymmetry and Handedness" (Bock and Marsh); (3) "Interpersonal and Identity Development" (Vandenplas-Holper and Campus); (4) "Natural Theories of Mind" (Whitten); (5) "The Psychological Examination of the Child" (Blau); (6) "Knowing Children: Experiments in…

  12. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fein, Greta G.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reviews the following books: "Child Care in Context" (Lamb et al., Eds.); "Making Friends in School: Promoting Relationships in Early Childhood" (Ramsay); "The Epigenesis of Mind: Essays on Biology and Cognition" (Carey and Gelman, Eds.); "Moral Maturity: Measuring the Development of Sociomoral Reflection" (Gibbs et al.); and "The Effects of Child…

  13. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coates, Elizabeth; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reviews four books on early childhood education: "Understanding the Nursery School" (David Hartley), which examines Scottish Nursery Schools from a sociological standpoint; "Teaching Media in the Primary School" (Adrian Emerson); "Learning Difficulties in Primary Schools: Delivering the Whole Curriculum" (Kevin Jones and Tony Charlton, eds.); and…

  14. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ashok

    2007-01-01

    looking for and developed fully what is known today as the path integral approach to quantum theories. Although his main motivation was in the study of theories involving the concept of action-at-a-distance, as he emphasizes in his thesis, his formulation of quantum theories applies to any theory in general. The thesis develops quite systematically and in detail all the concepts of functionals necessary for this formulation. The motivation and the physical insights are described in the brilliant 'Feynman' style. It is incredible that even at that young age, the signs of his legendary teaching style were evident in his presentation of the material in the thesis. The path integral approach is now something that every graduate student in theoretical physics is supposed to know. There are several books on the subject, even one by Feynman himself (and Hibbs). Nonetheless, the thesis provides a very good background for the way these ideas came about. The two companion articles, although available in print, also gives a complete picture of the development of this line of thinking. The helpful introductory remarks by the editor also puts things in the proper historical perspective. This book would be very helpful to anyone interested in the development of modern ideas in physics.

  15. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzezinski, Tomasz

    2003-12-01

    This is a very interesting collection of introductory and review articles on the theory and applications of classical and quantum integrable systems. The book reviews several integrable systems such as the KdV equation, vertex models, RSOS and IRF models, spin chains, integrable differential equations, discrete systems, Ising, Potts and other lattice models and reaction--diffusion processes, as well as outlining major methods of solving integrable systems. These include Lax pairs, Bäcklund and Miura transformations, the inverse scattering method, various types of the Bethe Ansatz, Painlevé methods, the dbar method and fusion methods to mention just a few. The book is divided into two parts, each containing five chapters. The first part is devoted to classical integrable systems and introduces the subject through the KdV equation, and then proceeds through Painlevé analysis, discrete systems and two-dimensional integrable partial differential equations, to culminate in the review of solvable lattice models in statistical physics, solved through the coordinate and algebraic Bethe Ansatz methods. The second part deals with quantum integrable systems, and begins with an outline of unifying approaches to quantum, statistical, ultralocal and non-ultralocal systems. The theory and methods of solving quantum integrable spin chains are then described. Recent developments in applying Bethe Ansatz methods in condensed matter physics, including superconductivity and nanoscale physics, are reviewed. The book concludes with an introduction to diffusion--reaction processes. Every chapter is devoted to a different subject and is self-contained, and thus can be read separately. A reader interesting in classical methods of solitons, such as the methods of solving the KdV equation, can start from Chapter 1, while a reader interested in the Bethe Ansatz method can immediately proceed to Chapter 5, and so on. Thus the book should appeal and be useful to a wide range of theoretical

  16. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallone, B. G.

    2004-01-01

    This book represents the proceedings of the five day programme on IMRT techniques presented at the 2003 American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Summer School held in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The book is essentially an overview of IMRT techniques, discussing the history, the mathematical processes involved in the planning stages, the biological indices for evaluations, the off-line and on-line medical imaging that is required, the various IMRT delivery techniques available, positioning and motion verification, shielding and QA issues, and some clinical applications. There is some additional discussion on modulated electron and proton therapy, views on the clinical and financial impact of IMRT, as well as some speculation on the future uses of IMRT. The fact that the book is an `overview' must be emphasized. Medical physicists who are well-read in IMRT, or have implemented IMRT, even partially, may be a little disappointed with the book. Although specific details were purposely omitted, the well-read physicist would have preferred to go right to the `heart of the matter', something this book fails to do. As is typical of many proceedings-type books, there is a certain level of inconsistency of writing styles, as well as some redundancy between the different chapters. It is unfortunate that such a large volume does not have an index to allow a reader to explore a particular subject pertaining to IMRT. The reader would have to guide himself/herself by the table of contents before each chapter which could be a problem if the reader requires some information quickly. It is interesting to note that the book lends itself to a variety of professionals interested in IMRT, including administrators. It may be a source of help for medical physicists who wish to discuss IMRT issues with higher level administration, for example. Some clinical applications are also reviewed. The lack of details concerning the advantages of IMRT with respect to clinical outcome is

  17. BOOK REVIEW: ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING, 5TH EDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Book Review of Environmental Engineering, 5th Edition (Joseph A. Salvato, Nelson L. Nemerow, Franklin J. Agardy (Editors), John Wiley and Sons, Inc. Hoboken, New Jersey. 2003.). Author wrote review per the request of the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Environmental Quality.

  18. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folacci, Antoine; Jensen, Bruce

    2003-12-01

    Thanks to its impressive success in the second half of the 20th century, both in high-energy physics and in critical phenomena, quantum field theory has enjoyed an abundant literature. We therefore greet yet another book on this subject with caution: what can a monograph on quantum field theory bring now that is new, either conceptually or pedagogically? But when it is written by a physicist such as Bryce DeWitt, who has made his own contribution to the collection of field theory books with The Global Approach to Quantum Field Theory, all suspicion is naturally abandoned. One knows in advance that this book can only lead to a genuine enrichment of the literature. DeWitt has made a formidable contribution to various areas of physics: general relativity, the interpretation of quantum mechanics, and most of all the quantization of non-Abelian gauge theories and quantum gravity. In addition, his pedagogical publications, especially the Les Houches schools of 1963 and 1983 [1, 2], have had a great impact on quantum field theory. All this makes the reader keen to pick up his new work and a deeper reading confirms the reviewer's initial enthusiasm. We must begin by alerting the potential readers of this book that it cannot be compared to any other book in the field (unless of course we are talking about references [1] and [2], of which the book under review is an extension and reworking). This uniqueness applies to both the scientific content and the way the ideas are presented. A quick description of this book and a brief explanation of its title should convince the reader of the book's unique quality. For DeWitt, a central concept of field theory is that of `space of histories'. For a field varphii defined on a given spacetime M, the set of all varphii(x) for all x in all charts of M defines its history. It is the space Phi of all possible histories (dynamically allowed or not) of the fields defined on M which is called the `space of histories' by DeWitt. If only

  19. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrusciel, P. T.

    2006-06-01

    Most of us sometimes have to face a student asking: 'What do I need to get started on this'. (In my case 'this' would typically be a topic in general relativity.) After thinking about it for quite a while, and consulting candidate texts again and again, a few days later I usually end up saying: read this chapter in book I (but without going too much detail), then that chapter in book II (but ignore all those comments), then the first few sections of this review paper (but do not try to work out equations NN to NNN), and then come back to see me. In the unlikely event that the student comes back without changing the topic, there follows quite a bit of explaining on a blackboard over the following weeks. From now on I will say: get acquainted with the material covered by this book. As far as Isham's book is concerned, 'this' in the student's question above can stand for any topic in theoretical physics which touches upon differential geometry (and I can only think of very few which do not). Said plainly: this book contains most of the introductory material necessary to get started in general relativity, or those branches of mathematical physics which require differential geometry. A student who has mastered the notions presented in the book will have a solid basis to continue into specialized topics. I am not aware of any other book which would be as useful as this one in terms of the spectrum of topics covered, stopping at the right place to get sufficient introductory insight. According to the publisher, these lecture notes are the content of an introductory course on differential geometry which is taken by first-year theoretical physics PhD students, or by students attending the one-year MSc course 'Quantum Fields and Fundamental Forces' at Imperial College, London. The volume is divided into six chapters: An Introduction to Topology Differential Manifolds Vector Fields and n-Forms Lie Groups Fibre Bundles Connections in a Bundle. It is a sad reflection on current

  20. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louko, Jorma

    2007-04-01

    Bastianelli and van Nieuwenhuizen's monograph `Path Integrals and Anomalies in Curved Space' collects in one volume the results of the authors' 15-year research programme on anomalies that arise in Feynman diagrams of quantum field theories on curved manifolds. The programme was spurred by the path-integral techniques introduced in Alvarez-Gaumé and Witten's renowned 1983 paper on gravitational anomalies which, together with the anomaly cancellation paper by Green and Schwarz, led to the string theory explosion of the 1980s. The authors have produced a tour de force, giving a comprehensive and pedagogical exposition of material that is central to current research. The first part of the book develops from scratch a formalism for defining and evaluating quantum mechanical path integrals in nonlinear sigma models, using time slicing regularization, mode regularization and dimensional regularization. The second part applies this formalism to quantum fields of spin 0, 1/2, 1 and 3/2 and to self-dual antisymmetric tensor fields. The book concludes with a discussion of gravitational anomalies in 10-dimensional supergravities, for both classical and exceptional gauge groups. The target audience is researchers and graduate students in curved spacetime quantum field theory and string theory, and the aims, style and pedagogical level have been chosen with this audience in mind. Path integrals are treated as calculational tools, and the notation and terminology are throughout tailored to calculational convenience, rather than to mathematical rigour. The style is closer to that of an exceedingly thorough and self-contained review article than to that of a textbook. As the authors mention, the first part of the book can be used as an introduction to path integrals in quantum mechanics, although in a classroom setting perhaps more likely as supplementary reading than a primary class text. Readers outside the core audience, including this reviewer, will gain from the book a

  1. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, Helge

    2015-11-01

    Ever since the days of William Blake there has been an underground resistance against the soulless yet triumphant science and its unholy alliance with money, technology and political power. With the nearly undisputed hegemony that science and technological innovation has attained in the post-World War II era, this kind of resistance has resulted in numerous books and articles that in different ways warn against the dark sides of science and the socio-economic system that nourishes a science in degeneration. Classical examples include Herbert Marcuse's One-Dimensional Man (1964), Jacques Ellul's The Technological Society (1965), Theodore Roszak's The Making of a Counter Culture (1968), and Paul Feyerabend's Science in a Free Society (1978). A fair part of the literature written by sociologists and philosophers is not only critical to trends in modern science, but tends to or is overtly anti-science. The book under review belongs in some respects to this heterogeneous literary tradition, but Twilight of the Scientific Age is primarily directed against the institutional system of science and its associated ideology and not against science itself. Indeed, the author is himself a practicing scientist, an astrophysicist, and he emphasizes several times that he firmly believes in science, even that he loves it. He is not a "stupid cultural relativist," he asserts (p. 11), but a critical freethinker independent of dogmatic beliefs.

  2. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broderick, A.

    2006-10-01

    'The Black Hole at the Center of the Milky Way' collects and presents recent advances in galactic centre research in a unified form by some of the researches at the forefront of the field. This book presents an opportunity to review the observational evidence for the best constrained black hole candidate currently known. In my opinion, the authors succeed in producing a good topical reference, appropriate for advanced students and working researchers, providing and excellent summary of the state of near-infrared results in particular. While the title refers exclusively to the supermassive black hole associated with the compact radio source Sagittarius A*, the text has a broader focus, discussing the nuclear region of the galaxy. Indeed, this is necessary given that most of the restrictions upon the characteristics of the central supermassive black hole have been obtained indirectly via stellar observations in it's vicinity. This also has the virtue of introducing a number of interesting additional astrophysical mysteries associated with the galactic centre (e.g. the so-called 'paradox of youth', referring to the presence of excessively young stars). The first section of the book contains a primer on the astronomical techniques applied to the galactic Centre. As with the rest of the text, the discussion of near-infrared techniques dominates, providing only a short summary of radio interferometry, and optical through gamma-ray techniques. While this primer is a useful introduction for the working researcher, or advanced student, it is not exhaustive and thus presumes at least a passing familiarity with the methods discussed. The second and third sections are devoted to a summary of observations and their astrophysical interpretation, respectively. Necessarily there is considerable overlap between these and they may have benefited from being combined. Nevertheless, each subsection is relatively self-contained which, when combined with the numerous data and graphs

  3. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabris, Júlio C.

    2004-04-01

    very skilful way. We can say that he has found an efficient way to solve the usual dilemma in teaching this subject: physics first, mathematics later, but without sacrificing the full consistency of the theory. The book is divided into three parts. In the first, covering five chapters of the 24 in the whole book, Newtonian physics and special relativity are reviewed. This review is done in a manner that prepares the reader for the subsequent discussion of general relativity itself. The principle of relativity, the variational principle, the geometrical content of Newtonian theory and the main ideas behind special relativity are all presented. In general, this first part is quite standard, except for the emphasis on geometrical aspects, such as the employment of different coordinates in a physical problem, the consequences of specific geometries, such as that of a sphere, and the notion of a spacetime manifold. This allows the author to introduce the reader to the idea of non-Euclidean geometries and their intrinsic properties. The heart of the book is, in some sense, in the second part, containing 14 chapters and covering almost two thirds of the book. Here, the principle of equivalence is fully discussed as well as the idea that gravity can be represented by the geometry of spacetime. Gravity is no longer conceived as a force but instead as the curvature of spacetime. First, the author shows how Newtonian gravity can be obtained as the limit of a specific spacetime geometry, which is after all the weak field limit of a general pseudo-Riemannian spacetime. From this, he is able to introduce geometries that represent gravity outside this weak field limit. The general approach followed by the author could be summarized as follows. The equivalence principle is encoded in curved spacetime. When gravitation effects are weak and the velocity small compared with the velocity of light, we can recover Newtonian theory from this spacetime structure. Now, let us assume a specific

  4. Reforming Welfare in America. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Edward T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Reviews three books on welfare reform: "The Poverty of Welfare Reform" (Joel F. Handler); "The Politics of Welfare Reform" (Donald F. Norris, Lyke Thompson, editors); and "Living on the Edge: The Realities of Welfare in America" (Mark Robert Rank). (JOW)

  5. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, E.

    2006-09-01

    The motion of a charged particle interacting with its own electromagnetic field is an area of research that has a long history; this problem has never ceased to fascinate its investigators. On the one hand the theory ought to be straightforward to formulate: one has Maxwell's equations that tell the field how to behave (given the motion of the particle), and one has the Lorentz-force law that tells the particle how to move (given the field). On the other hand the theory is fundamentally ambiguous because of the field singularities that necessarily come with a point particle. While each separate sub-problem can easily be solved, to couple the field to the particle in a self-consistent treatment turns out to be tricky. I believe it is this dilemma (the theory is straightforward but tricky) that has been the main source of the endless fascination. For readers of Classical and Quantum Gravity, the fascination does not end there. For them it is also rooted in the fact that the electromagnetic self-force problem is deeply analogous to the gravitational self-force problem, which is of direct relevance to future gravitational wave observations. The motion of point particles in curved spacetime has been the topic of a recent Topical Review [1], and it was the focus of a recent Special Issue [2]. It is surprising to me that radiation reaction is a subject that continues to be poorly covered in the standard textbooks, including Jackson's bible [3]. Exceptions are Rohrlich's excellent text [4], which makes a very useful introduction to radiation reaction, and the Landau and Lifshitz classic [5], which contains what is probably the most perfect summary of the foundational ideas (presented in characteristic terseness). It is therefore with some trepidation that I received Herbert Spohn's book, which covers both the classical and quantum theories of a charged particle coupled to its own field (the presentation is limited to flat spacetime). Is this the text that graduate students

  6. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walcher, J.

    2006-10-01

    This book is a find. Mariño meets the challenge of filling in less than 200 pages the need for an accessible review of topological gauge / gravity duality. He is one of the pioneers of the subject and a clear expositor. It is no surprise that reading this book is a great pleasure. The existence of dualities between gauge theories and theories of gravity remains one of the most surprising recent discoveries in mathematical physics. While it is probably fair to say that we do not yet understand the full reach of such a relation, the impressive amount of evidence that has accumulated over the past years can be regarded as a substitute for a proof, and will certainly help to delineate the question of what is the most fundamental quantum mechanical theory. As has been the case in the past, it is in the context of Witten's 'topological' quantum theories that the mathematical framework is well enough established to firmly ground, and fully benefit from, the development of the physical theories. This book makes an important contribution to this new chapter in the math / physics interaction. There are two main instances of topological gauge/gravity duality. In the A-model, Chern Simons gauge theory on the 3-sphere is related to the closed topological string theory on the local Calabi Yau 3-fold {\\mathcal O}_{{\\mathbb P}^1}(-1) \\oplus{\\mathcal O}_{{\\mathbb P}^1} (-1), also known as the resolved conifold (Gopakumar-Vafa duality). In the B-model, certain types of matrix models are related on the gravity side to topological strings on certain cousins of the deformed conifold (Dijkgraaf-Vafa duality). In both cases, and similarly to the more physical AdS/CFT correspondence, the duality can be discovered by realizing the gauge theory as the target space theory of open strings ending on particular D-branes in a geometry closely related to the closed string background of the gravity theory. The A-branes supporting Chern Simons theory are wrapped on the Lagrangian three

  7. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borcherds, P.

    2005-03-01

    superb quotations to include all of them in this review, but one of Bragg's Golden Rules for newcomers to his laboratory should be on the door of every experimental laboratory: 'Never be afraid to carry on an experiment which is declared stupid by the theorists [sic] of the laboratory'. This book is, as its subtitle implies, about Bragg and about his science. Hunter has skilfully and seamlessly interwoven the two strands. At one minute you are reading about the man and at the next you realize you are reading about the science. In writing about the science, Hunter writes knowledgeably and expects the reader to make an effort to understand. In this he is following the precept of Bragg who, when advised to avoid technical terms when lecturing to a lay audience, ridiculed this attitude with a telling metaphor: 'What could be more technical than a description of a football match? To picture the scientist's plight, one must imagine the sports expert being told to describe the match using as little as possible such terms as "ball'' or "goal'', and of course avoiding the very complex ideas involved in "try'' or "offside'' '. Bragg made several major contributions to crystallography and these are described, as already mentioned. One has to concentrate quite hard to follow but the effort is worthwhile and Hunter manages not only to convey the excitement felt by Bragg and his colleagues but also to let the reader feel it too. Bragg interacted strongly with other crystallographers, not least with his father, but also with Pauling. At times there was a close race between Bragg and Pauling, which is fully discussed. Bragg succeeded Rutherford at Cambridge. The appointment was controversial. Under Rutherford the Cavendish Laboratory concentrated on nuclear physics, while Bragg was a crystallographer, with little interest in nuclear physics. However the crystallographic work Bragg encouraged on haemoglobin and DNA led to several Nobel prizes. Bragg's activities in canvassing for Nobel

  8. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, C.

    2005-10-01

    The most difficult unsolved problem in fundamental theoretical physics is the consistent implementation of the gravitational interaction into a quantum framework, which would lead to a theory of quantum gravity. Although a final answer is still pending, several promising attempts do exist. Despite the general title, this book is about one of them - loop quantum gravity. This approach proceeds from the idea that a direct quantization of Einstein's theory of general relativity is possible. In contrast to string theory, it presupposes that the unification of all interactions is not needed as a prerequisite for quantum gravity. Usually one divides theories of quantum general relativity into covariant and canonical approaches. Covariant theories employ four-dimensional concepts in its formulation, one example being the path integral approach. Canonical theories start from a classical Hamiltonian version of the theory in which spacetime is foliated into spacelike hypersurfaces. Loop quantum gravity is a variant of the canonical approach, the oldest being quantum geometrodynamics where the fundamental configuration variable is the three-metric. Loop quantum gravity has developed from a new choice of canonical variables introduced by Abhay Ashtekar in 1986, the new configuration variable being a connection defined on a three-manifold. Instead of the connection itself, the loop approach employs a non-local version in which the connection is integrated over closed loops. This is similar to the Wilson loops used in gauge theories. Carlo Rovelli is one of the pioneers of loop quantum gravity which he started to develop with Lee Smolin in two papers written in 1988 and 1990. In his book, he presents a comprehensive and competent overview of this approach and provides at the same time the necessary technical background in order to make the treatment self-contained. In fact, half of the book is devoted to 'preparations' giving a detailed account of Hamiltonian mechanics, quantum

  9. Book reviews.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    A Textbook of Pharmaceutical Medicine: Current Practice Edited by: R. D. Mann, M. D. Rawlins and R. M. Auty, Parthenon Publishing Group, London, 1900. 461 pages. Price £85 Clinical Application of Leukocyte Depletion S. Sekiguchi (Editor) Blackwell Scientific Publication, London, 1993. Price £35 Self-Assessment in Clinical Haematology J. A. Holmes, S. E. Kinsey, C. A. Ludlam, D. K. Webb, J. A. Whittaker. Wolfe Publishing Ltd, 136 pages. Price £18.95. PMID:21043644

  10. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, E.

    2006-09-01

    The motion of a charged particle interacting with its own electromagnetic field is an area of research that has a long history; this problem has never ceased to fascinate its investigators. On the one hand the theory ought to be straightforward to formulate: one has Maxwell's equations that tell the field how to behave (given the motion of the particle), and one has the Lorentz-force law that tells the particle how to move (given the field). On the other hand the theory is fundamentally ambiguous because of the field singularities that necessarily come with a point particle. While each separate sub-problem can easily be solved, to couple the field to the particle in a self-consistent treatment turns out to be tricky. I believe it is this dilemma (the theory is straightforward but tricky) that has been the main source of the endless fascination. For readers of Classical and Quantum Gravity, the fascination does not end there. For them it is also rooted in the fact that the electromagnetic self-force problem is deeply analogous to the gravitational self-force problem, which is of direct relevance to future gravitational wave observations. The motion of point particles in curved spacetime has been the topic of a recent Topical Review [1], and it was the focus of a recent Special Issue [2]. It is surprising to me that radiation reaction is a subject that continues to be poorly covered in the standard textbooks, including Jackson's bible [3]. Exceptions are Rohrlich's excellent text [4], which makes a very useful introduction to radiation reaction, and the Landau and Lifshitz classic [5], which contains what is probably the most perfect summary of the foundational ideas (presented in characteristic terseness). It is therefore with some trepidation that I received Herbert Spohn's book, which covers both the classical and quantum theories of a charged particle coupled to its own field (the presentation is limited to flat spacetime). Is this the text that graduate students

  11. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J. M.

    2006-02-01

    In 1952, Mme Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat published a major paper, Théorème d'existence pour certains systèmes d'équations aux dérivées partielles non linéaires (Acta Math. 88 141-225), which laid the foundation for modern studies of the Cauchy problem in general relativity. The fiftieth anniversary of this event was celebrated with an eponymous Cargèse Summer School in 2002. The proceedings of that summer school are summarized electronically (as audio, video, transparencies and lecture notes, where available) on a DVD archive included with this volume, and are also available on the internet. However the organizers decided that a separate volume describing the 'state of the art in mathematical general relativity' would be useful, and this book is the result. It includes some material not covered in the school and excludes some school material which has been covered adequately elsewhere. Unfortunately, I was unable to find, electronically, a table of contents, which every prospective purchaser would wish to see, and so this review does in fact list all the articles, ordered, roughly, by length. About one fifth of the book is devoted to a survey of Smoothness at Null Infinity and the Structure of Initial Data by Helmut Friedrich. This is a modern study of gravitational radiation, and the analysis of Einstein's equations. It is extremely helpful to survey all of this material, including some of the latest developments, using a consistent notation. This article is strongly recommended to anyone hoping to gain a foothold in this area. Note also that 47 pages of transparencies have become 84 book pages. Lars Andersson has surveyed, in The Global Existence Problem in General Relativity, some results and conjectures about the global properties of 3+1-dimensional spacetimes with a compact Cauchy surface. Again it is very useful to have essentially all of the known results presented in a consistent notation. This material is not on the DVD. Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat has

  12. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metherell, A. J. F.

    1985-01-01

    as many and as varied as the topics themselves. They include, to mention but three, the utilization of the Josephson junction, the quantized Hall resistance, and that instrument known to all schoolboy physicists, the torsion pendulum. In particular, the application of the quantum Hall effect to the determination of the fine-structure constant and to electrical resistance standards is one of the most remarkable developments in metrology in recent years. Although the effect was discovered only a short while before PMFC II, these Proceedings include eight papers devoted to it and its applications and, of course, many more have appeared since. The impact of the quantum Hall effect will certainly be considerable, not only in metrology, but also in solid state physics. It is to be expected that the proceedings of PMFC III will, in due course, reflect this. Noteworthy also for their impact on precision spectroscopy during the decade between PMFC I and II are the techniques of Doppler-free two-photon transitions and the methodology for trapping a single ion. Not all the papers, however, are devoted to reports of hard measurement. Many consist of progress reports of experiments in hand at the time of the Conference. It would be interesting to know just how many of these have been completed in the four years since the Conference took place. And of these, it would be more interesting still to learn which of them achieved the accuracies that their authors had, optimistically perhaps, hoped for. A few of the papers are purely speculative, an example being the suggestion by Faller and Bender for a space-borne gravitational-wave detector. Their suggestions involve a laser device with baseline lengths of the order of 106 km. If the authors are to launch this experiment they will need powerful friends in high places to find the necessary funding. But to return to earth and to the comments made at the beginning of this article: may this reviewer make two pleas on behalf of all those

  13. Book Review

    PubMed Central

    Donev, Doncho

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This book provides step-by-step guidance on developing a sound publication strategy for how to prepare and get research papers published. The book is a user-friendly guide, a route map for publishing that covers many topics, ranging from abstracts and blogs, tables and trial registration to ethical principles and conventions for writing scientific papers. Publishing the results of scientific research in the form of a scientific paper is the ultimate goal and the final stage of the research of each scientist. To write and publish papers is never going to be an easy task. With this book as their guide, researchers will be better informed and therefore should have an easier and altogether more pleasant path to publication with clear direction on how to choose the right journal, avoid publication delays, and resolve authorship disputes and many other problems associated with scientific publishing. CONTENTS: The 188 pages of the book are distributed in 5 chapters in Part I and 249 entries ordered by the letters of Alphabet in Part II creating an A to Z of publication strategy. In the Appendices there are four sections covering further reading, organizations, guidelines and principles of good publication practice for company-sponsored medical research. The book also contains key references and useful websites within many entries where it seemed helpful. The last ten pages of the book present an index to help users to find the information of interest in the book. CONCLUSION: The book is intended to help all authors, young and old, novice and experienced, to plan their research and publications effectively and prepare manuscripts for journals and other publications, increasing the likelihood that their work will be published. Providing essential information on publishing strategy and process, the book should be extremely useful to everyone who wants to publish research results.

  14. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Ruth

    2007-06-01

    The study of braneworlds has been an area of intense activity over the past decade, with thousands of papers being written, and many important technical advances being made. This book focuses on a particular aspect of braneworlds, namely perturbative gravity in one specific model: the Randall-Sundrum model. The book starts with an overview of the Randall-Sundrum model, discussing anti-de Sitter (AdS) space and the Israel equations in some detail. It then moves on to discuss cosmological branes, focusing on branes with constant curvature. The book then turns to brane gravity, i.e. what do we, as brane observers, perceive the gravitational interaction to be on the brane as derived from the actual five-dimensional gravitational physics? After a derivation of the general brane equations from the Israel equations, the remainder of the book deals with perturbative gravity. This part of the book is extremely detailed, with calculations given explicitly. Overall, the book is quite pedagogical in style, with the aim being to explain in detail the topics it chooses to cover. While it is not unusual to have books written on current and extremely popular research areas, it is unusual to have calculations written so explicitly. This is both a strength and a weakness of this book. It is a strength because the calculations are presented in a detail that students learning the topic will definitely appreciate; however, the narrow focus of the book also means that it lacks perspective and fails to present the broader context. In choosing to focus on one particular aspect of Randall-Sundrum branes, the book has not managed to communicate why a large number of theorists have worked so intensively on this model. In its early stages, the explicit detail of the Randall-Sundrum model would be extremely useful for a student starting out in this research area. In addition, the calculational detail later in the computation of the graviton propagator on the brane would also be welcome not

  15. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlip, S.

    2006-10-01

    The early 1980s, when I first learned theory, were desperate times for graduate students. We searched frantically for coherent introductions, passing tattered copies of review articles around like samizdat, struggling over obscure references to ancient models of strong interactions, and flocking to lectures—not least those by Joe Polchinski—that promised to really explain what was going on. If only this book had been around, it would have saved much grief. Volume I, The Bosonic String, offers a clear and well organized introduction to bosonic string theory. Topics range from the 'classical' (spectra, vertex operators, consistency conditions, etc.) to the 'modern' (D-branes first appear in an exercise at the end of chapter 1, noncommutative geometry shows up in chapter 8). Polchinski does not hesitate to discuss sophisticated matters—path integral measures, BRST symmetries, etc.—but his approach is pedagogical, and his writing is lucid, if sometimes a bit terse. Chapters end with problems that are sometimes difficult but never impossible. A very useful annotated bibliography directs readers to resources for further study, and a nearly 30-page glossary provides short but clear definitions of key terms. There is much here that will appeal to relativists. Polchinski uses the covariant Polyakov path integral approach to quantization from early on; he clearly distinguishes Weyl invariance from conformal invariance; he is appropriately careful about using complex coordinates on topologically nontrivial manifolds; he keeps the string world sheet metric explicit at the start instead of immediately hiding it by a gauge choice. Volume II includes an elegant introduction to anticommuting coordinates and superconformal transformations. A few conventions may cause confusion—%, Polchinski's stress energy tensor, for instance, differs from the standard general relativistic definition by a factor of -2π, and while this is briefly mentioned in the text, it could easily be

  16. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borcherds, P. H.

    2004-09-01

    There is a new tradition in England called Apple Day which is held on some day in October. The actual day varies from place to place. For instance, in 2003, 23 October was Apple Day at Woolsthorpe Manor, the house where Isaac Newton was born and where, during the Plague, he is said to have developed the theory of gravity. (For information on future Apple Days see, for example, http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/main/thingstodo.) Last year in our garden we picked an apple which weighed one pound, thirteen and a half ounces (1 lb 13 1/2 oz or 29 1/2 oz). The following day we went to an Apple Day event where there were many exotic apples on display, varieties which are not sold in shops. One of the varieties there was called 'Twenty Ounce'. By now you may be wondering what all this has to do with the book being reviewed. We shall return to this later. This entertaining book is ostensibly about units, in particular about Imperial and metric units, but there are numerous informative digressions. The author reminds us that almost every country 'with the exception of the United States, North and South Yemen, Burma and Brunei' has gone metric. He points out that the United States (US) became officially metric in 1893. However, as early as 1866, the US legal definition of the metre was 39.370000 inches. He tells us that after World War II the (US) inch was rounded down (from 25.400051) to 25.4 mm. There is no mention that the Imperial (British) inch was simultaneously rounded up from 25.399956 mm to 25.4 mm. The author frequently digresses, covering such matters as the trisection of angles and Eratosthenes' graphic solution for duplicating the cube. There is an informative discussion on the length of the day: appropriately 25 December, which lasts for 24 h and 30 s, is the longest day. He shows how with cycles and epicycles one can construct an ellipse. Ptolemy did not realize the importance of the focus of the ellipse. The author discusses various topics in the development of

  17. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borcherds, P. H.

    2004-09-01

    There is a new tradition in England called Apple Day which is held on some day in October. The actual day varies from place to place. For instance, in 2003, 23 October was Apple Day at Woolsthorpe Manor, the house where Isaac Newton was born and where, during the Plague, he is said to have developed the theory of gravity. (For information on future Apple Days see, for example, http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/main/thingstodo.) Last year in our garden we picked an apple which weighed one pound, thirteen and a half ounces (1 lb 13 1/2 oz or 29 1/2 oz). The following day we went to an Apple Day event where there were many exotic apples on display, varieties which are not sold in shops. One of the varieties there was called 'Twenty Ounce'. By now you may be wondering what all this has to do with the book being reviewed. We shall return to this later. This entertaining book is ostensibly about units, in particular about Imperial and metric units, but there are numerous informative digressions. The author reminds us that almost every country 'with the exception of the United States, North and South Yemen, Burma and Brunei' has gone metric. He points out that the United States (US) became officially metric in 1893. However, as early as 1866, the US legal definition of the metre was 39.370000 inches. He tells us that after World War II the (US) inch was rounded down (from 25.400051) to 25.4 mm. There is no mention that the Imperial (British) inch was simultaneously rounded up from 25.399956 mm to 25.4 mm. The author frequently digresses, covering such matters as the trisection of angles and Eratosthenes' graphic solution for duplicating the cube. There is an informative discussion on the length of the day: appropriately 25 December, which lasts for 24 h and 30 s, is the longest day. He shows how with cycles and epicycles one can construct an ellipse. Ptolemy did not realize the importance of the focus of the ellipse. The author discusses various topics in the development of

  18. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borcherds, P.

    2005-03-01

    superb quotations to include all of them in this review, but one of Bragg's Golden Rules for newcomers to his laboratory should be on the door of every experimental laboratory: 'Never be afraid to carry on an experiment which is declared stupid by the theorists [sic] of the laboratory'. This book is, as its subtitle implies, about Bragg and about his science. Hunter has skilfully and seamlessly interwoven the two strands. At one minute you are reading about the man and at the next you realize you are reading about the science. In writing about the science, Hunter writes knowledgeably and expects the reader to make an effort to understand. In this he is following the precept of Bragg who, when advised to avoid technical terms when lecturing to a lay audience, ridiculed this attitude with a telling metaphor: 'What could be more technical than a description of a football match? To picture the scientist's plight, one must imagine the sports expert being told to describe the match using as little as possible such terms as "ball'' or "goal'', and of course avoiding the very complex ideas involved in "try'' or "offside'' '. Bragg made several major contributions to crystallography and these are described, as already mentioned. One has to concentrate quite hard to follow but the effort is worthwhile and Hunter manages not only to convey the excitement felt by Bragg and his colleagues but also to let the reader feel it too. Bragg interacted strongly with other crystallographers, not least with his father, but also with Pauling. At times there was a close race between Bragg and Pauling, which is fully discussed. Bragg succeeded Rutherford at Cambridge. The appointment was controversial. Under Rutherford the Cavendish Laboratory concentrated on nuclear physics, while Bragg was a crystallographer, with little interest in nuclear physics. However the crystallographic work Bragg encouraged on haemoglobin and DNA led to several Nobel prizes. Bragg's activities in canvassing for Nobel

  19. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokulich, Alisa

    In recent years, there has been a growing resurgence of interest in the philosophical views of the founders of quantum mechanics. Kristian Camilleri's book on Werner Heisenberg's philosophy of quantum mechanics is a welcome addition to this literature. It takes Heisenberg seriously as a philosopher of science, traces the various philosophical influences on his view, and carefully distinguishes his interpretation of quantum mechanics from that of his contemporaries. It is a fine example of the new insights that can emerge when one takes an integrated approach to the history and philosophy of science. After summarizing some of the main themes of the book, I will turn to two moderate criticisms of the book-one stylistic, and the other, regarding its content.

  20. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevers, J. G. P. W.

    2015-02-01

    About thirty years after the previous advanced textbook on Microwave Remote Sensing by Ulaby, Moore and Fung has been published as three separate volumes, now an up-to-date new textbook has been published. The 1000-page book covers theoretical models, system design and operation, and geoscientific applications of active and passive microwave remote sensing systems. It is designed as a textbook at the postgraduate level, as well as a reference for the practicing professional. The book is caught by a thorough introduction into the physics and mathematics of electrical engineering applied to microwave radiation. Here on overview of its chapters with a short description of its focus will be given.

  1. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2016-08-01

    The main purpose of this exemplary book is to provide a systematic exposition of the entire field of optical tweezers and their applications. The book is divided into three (approximately equal) parts summarizing the electromagnetic theory of optical tweezers (Part I), the practice of designing and building optical tweezers (Part II), and extensive applications of optical tweezers in various branches of science (Part III). The exposition is highly methodical and addresses the needs of anyone dealing with optical tweezers, be it a theoretician, an engineer/experimentalist, a routine practitioner, or an interested scientist.

  2. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botet, R.

    2004-09-01

    The second edition of Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering by Riley et al is a great scientific textbook. The reader should not be intimidated by its size - over 1200 pages - and skimming through it, one is confronted with a vast amount of information (which could be daunting for students). However, when reading it in detail one realizes that the number of pages is justified and the result is a self-contained reference on mathematical methods for physics. The book is well organized: it starts at basic university undergraduate level and progresses to the highest graduate level. It is a tour de force to write mathematical sections that are both complete and at a appropriate academic level; the sequence of sections (and their content) has been chosen with great care in order that each section may introduce the following ones. The authors have clearly succeeded with this challenge, making this a remarkable pedagogical book. No precise knowledge is needed at the beginning, and all the material is presented in a logical progression. The student can confidently follow the material as it is presented. Even though this book is devoted to physics and engineering, it can be used by students in other scientific fields. The material covered in the book concentrates on applied theorems and formulae. But as the title of the book indicates, it is primarily written 'for physics and engineering' so this is to be expected and it greatly simplifies the text of the course. Consequently, derivations of the main results are essentially 'for physicists'. Frequently proofs are briefly outlined and are not as detailed as many mathematicians would like. Nevertheless, the final results are always clearly stated together with the technical conditions under which they should be used, thus providing a very comprehensive and practical textbook. The only criticism is that the sections on probability and statistics do not fit comfortably between their previous and following sections

  3. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. P.

    1981-04-01

    In July 1976, some thirty young scientists and their lecturers were privileged to participate in a conference on "Metrology and the Fundamental Constants" at Varenna, this being the 68th course in the "Enrico Fermi International School of Physics". Now, at last, we are all privileged to share in that experience—to a large degree—with the appearance of the Proceedings, published last summer under the auspices of the Italian Physical Society. This rather massive volume (800 pages) places in one's hands a summary of the "state of the art" in the greater part of physical metrology. It is not, however, a metrology handbook, designed to assist the unskilled in making trustworthy measurements. It summarizes, via the lectures of internationally-recognized experts, the most recent attempts to realize with enhanced accuracy the basic units of measurement and, in so doing, it presents the subject of measurement science as the central (or all-pervasive) topic in physics itself. Clearly demonstrated is the progress from discovery to "understanding" of physical phenomena which is made possible through the historical alternation of observation and measurement. The volume includes informative reviews of the fundamentals of this fundamental science, namely, the concepts of quantities and units (Allisy); systems of units and the Système International, SI. (Terrien); international aspects of metrology and standards (Terrien); practical considerations in a hierarchy of standards (Terrien); materials problems affecting metrology (Ferro Milone and Sourdo) and statistical methods (Allisy). These discussions alone, being brought together in one place, are of particular usefulness. The remaining, and major, part of the book is taken up by authoritative and generally very readable discussions of measurement topics, for the most part separately focused on one of the base units. For these one cannot help noticing nor refrain from recording a measure of imbalance: some quantities (for

  4. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Early Childhood, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Highlights key findings described in Barrie Thorne's book, "Gender Play: Girls and Boys in School," which reports research focusing on American children in kindergarten through sixth grade. Indicates that gender segregation starts at birth and that socialization and the environment are the most salient factors in gender segregation. (AC)

  5. The Book Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Janet, Ed.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Brief reviews of recently published books, arranged by subject, comprise the main section of The Book Review.'' The Books to Come'' segment includes brief reviews of a few specially noted books and a comprehensive listing of scientific, technical, medical and business books. (1000 references) (DH)

  6. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, P. K.

    2004-11-01

    `Electrodynamics of Magnetoactive Media' is an unusual book in that it cuts across conventional physics discipline boundaries. The unifying theme allowing this is, quite simply, the physics of magnetic fields in various media. I believe the authors are correct in stating that the book is unique in specifically covering electrodynamic phenomena associated with magnetic fields, though of course some of the more elementary aspects are covered in the classical textbooks on electromagnetism, which are duly acknowledged. This interdisciplinarity makes the book very interesting to people with a range of backgrounds. For example, as a plasma physicist, I was familiar with most of the material on plasmas, but liquid crystals and superconductors were entirely new territory for me. These chapters were indeed both accessible and interesting, and it was surprising for me to see how much commonality there is in the physics of these various media. The first part of the book covers some fundamentals of electrodynamics and magnetostatics, and of electromagnetic waves. Most of this material is covered in textbooks on electromagnetism, and some of it is very basic (for example, LRC circuit theory, surely covered in most first year physics courses, is included) but it is perhaps a useful prelude for what is to come. The generic topic of charged particle motion in electromagnetic fields is well covered. Three main magnetoactive media are then discussed: plasmas (focusing on waves), liquid crystals and superconductors. It is all too easy to criticise a book on the grounds of omitted material, but I do feel that a chapter on magnetostatics in plasmas would have been very helpful, covering force-free fields and so on. Some interesting analogies could then have been exploited. For example, I was intrigued to discover an equation for magnetic fields in superconductors (equation (9.36)) which, apart from a change of sign, is identical to the Helmholtz equation used to\

  7. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    The NATO Advanced Study Institute held at Erice, Sicily, in November 1981 brought together specialists in precise measurement to present a tutorial introduction to quantum metrology and the measurement of the fundamental physical constants. Ever since the evolution of experimental physics as a scientific pursuit the measurement of the values of quantities accepted to be constants of nature has commanded the attention of some of the world's most accomplished workers in this field. Their efforts to seek out the sources of systematic error and to reduce the random errors have produced significant advances in techniques and a continual interest in their results from users and critics: as Raymond T Birge, who pioneered the evaluation of the 'best' values of the constants from the available measurements, observed (perhaps with tongue-in-cheek) "it is the continual variation in the values of these quantities that furnishes most of the interest in the subject". Long before the recognition of the fundamental constants the measurement of mass, length and time grew as a matter of necessity in organized communities, especially in agriculture, commerce and navigation. The adoption of standards, first local, then national, and now international, was a natural consequence. It is particularly relevant that the published proceedings of the NATO school opens with a historical survey by Pierre Giacomo of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, which places the subsequent papers in perspective. Measurements which realize the standards of length and time, and those from which values of the fundamental constants are derived, are of such a nature that a considerable background knowledge of physics is needed for their understanding. (The principle of the caesium frequency standard and the physics of the Josephson junction are a long haul from Michelson's measurement of the speed of light and the Millikan oil drop experiment familiar in the school books.) With this in mind, George

  8. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picotto, G. B.

    2004-02-01

    This book is a comprehensive and innovative text which provides a timely overview of the state of the art on surface metrology. Besides the presentation of surface texture and roundness measurements, surface microscopy and tribology, the focus is on quality and calibration techniques, uncertainty and traceability of measurements. A detailed description of surface parameters and calibration artefacts is given with reference to the current written standards. The volume examines classical and new methodologies in use in academia and in industry. Instruments and techniques operating from the micrometre range down to the nanometre range are well described. Numerous photographs, illustrations and sketches provide a clear understanding of instruments and techniques applied in surface metrology. The text gives scientific details, applications and future perspectives in this field, including good explanations of concepts and terms of metrology. Uncertainty, traceability, reference artefacts and techniques for roundness and surface texture measurements are well discussed in this book.

  9. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardonio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The content of this book is aptly depicted by its engaging cover design, which exemplifies the vast range of circumstances where sound and vibration characterise the life of human beings and animals, the environment, the quality of buildings and halls, the operation and comfort of land, water and air transportation vehicles, the functioning of machines, etc. Also, the short and comprehensive title effectively defines the breath (sound and vibration) and depth (fundamentals) of the covered topics.

  10. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belot, Gordon; Jansson, Lina

    What is the relation between classical and quantum mechanics? Bokulich's fascinating Reexamining the Quantum-Classical Relation: Beyond Reductionism and Pluralism is devoted to this question. It is a remarkable book, deeply thoughtful, written with admirable clarity, and full of interesting ideas. It should be read by anyone with an interest in the history or philosophy of quantum theory or in relations between scientific theories.

  11. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dray, T.

    2005-10-01

    I have had a love/hate relationship with this book ever since it first came out. On the one hand, this is an excellent introduction for mathematicians to the differential geometry underlying general relativity. On the other hand, this is definitely a book for mathematicians. The book's greatest strength is its clear, precise presentation of the basic ideas in differential geometry, combined with equally clear and precise applications to theoretical physics, notably general relativity. But the book's precision is also its greatest weakness; this is not an easy book to read for non-mathematicians, who may not appreciate the notational complexity, some of which is nonstandard. The present edition is very similar to the original, published in 1992. In addition to minor revisions and clarifications of the material, there is now a brief introduction to fibre bundles, and a (very) brief discussion of the gauge theory description of fundamental particles. The index to the symbols used is also a more complete than in the past, but without the descriptive material present in the previous edition. The bulk of the book consists of a careful introduction to tensors and their properties. Tensors are introduced first as linear maps on vector spaces, and only later generalized to tensor fields on manifolds. The differentiation and integration of differential forms is discussed in detail, including Stokes' theorem, Lie differentiation and Hodge duality, and connections, curvature and torsion. To this point, Wasserman's text can be viewed as an expanded version of Bishop and Goldberg's classic text [1], one major difference being Wasserman's inclusion of the pseudo-Riemannian case from the beginning (in particular, when discussing Hodge duality). Whether one prefers Wasserman's approach to Bishop and Goldberg's is largely a matter of taste: Wasserman's treatment is both more complete and more precise, making it easier to check calculations in detail, but occasionally more difficult

  12. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beenakker, C. W. J.

    2005-08-01

    Quantum Noise is advertised as a handbook, and this is indeed how it functions for me these days: it is a book that I keep within hand's reach, ready to be consulted on the proper use of quantum stochastic methods in the course of my research on quantum dots. I should point out that quantum optics, the target field for this book, is not my field by training. So I have much to learn, and find this handbook to be a reliable and helpful guide. Crispin Gardiner previously wrote the Handbook of Stochastic Methods (also published by Springer), which provides an overview of methods in classical statistical physics. Quantum Noise, written jointly with Peter Zoller, is the counterpart for quantum statistical physics, and indeed the two books rely on each other by frequent cross referencing. The fundamental problem addressed by Quantum Noise is how the quantum dynamics of an open system can be described statistically by treating the environment as a source of noise. This is a general problem in condensed matter physics (in particular in the context of Josephson junctions) and in quantum optics. The emphasis in this book in on the optical applications (for condensed matter applications one could consult Quantum Dissipative Systems by Ulrich Weiss, published by World Scientific). The optical applications centre around the interaction of light with atoms, where the atoms represent the open system and the light is the noisy environment. A complete description of the production and detection of non-classical states of radiation (such as squeezed states) can be obtained using one of the equivalent quantum stochastic formulations: the quantum Langevin equation for the field operators (in either the Ito or the Stratonovich form), the Master equation for the density matrix, or the stochastic Schrödinger equation for the wave functions. Each formulation is fully developed here (as one would expect from a handbook), with detailed instructions on how to go from one to the other. The

  13. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vespignani, A.

    2004-09-01

    Networks have been recently recognized as playing a central role in understanding a wide range of systems spanning diverse scientific domains such as physics and biology, economics, computer science and information technology. Specific examples run from the structure of the Internet and the World Wide Web to the interconnections of finance agents and ecological food webs. These networked systems are generally made by many components whose microscopic interactions give rise to global structures characterized by emergent collective behaviour and complex topological properties. In this context the statistical physics approach finds a natural application since it attempts to explain the various large-scale statistical properties of networks in terms of local interactions governing the dynamical evolution of the constituent elements of the system. It is not by chance then that many of the seminal papers in the field have been published in the physics literature, and have nevertheless made a considerable impact on other disciplines. Indeed, a truly interdisciplinary approach is required in order to understand each specific system of interest, leading to a very interesting cross-fertilization between different scientific areas defining the emergence of a new research field sometimes called network science. The book of Dorogovtsev and Mendes is the first comprehensive monograph on this new scientific field. It provides a thorough presentation of the forefront research activities in the area of complex networks, with an extensive sampling of the disciplines involved and the kinds of problems that form the subject of inquiry. The book starts with a short introduction to graphs and network theory that introduces the tools and mathematical background needed for the rest of the book. The following part is devoted to an extensive presentation of the empirical analysis of real-world networks. While for obvious reasons of space the authors cannot analyse in every detail all the

  14. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straumann, N.

    2005-06-01

    This new book on quantum field theory by Michele Maggiore fits well into the Oxford Master Series in Physics, which is designed for final year undergraduate and beginning graduate students in physics. It is based on the teaching experience of the author with students in the fourth year at the University of Geneva. In this sense it is a two-semester course book for students exposed to quantum field theory for the first time. Maggiore gives, on slightly less than 300 pages, a balanced introduction to a vast field of twentieth century physics that will help students going on to study more advanced and specialized courses. Beside applications to many processes in particle physics that can also be found in many other textbooks, the author emphasizes conceptual, structural and methodological aspects of quantum field theory. After an introductory chapter, the group theoretical tools required to implement Lorentz invariance in quantum field theory are developed on 30 pages. Chapter 3 is devoted to classical field theory, emphasizing symmetries and conservation laws. The quantization of free fields in the next chapter follows traditional lines. Here one may miss a section describing the mathematical structure of the Fock space. It is also not said that in infinite dimensions von Neumann's uniqueness theorem for the representations of the canonical commutation relations no longer holds. The operations C, P, T are carefully discussed. In the relatively long chapter 5, perturbation theory and renormalization are developed. In this context the author discusses the modern view on renormalizability, and also emphasizes in a separate section the seriousness of the cosmological constant problem in quantum field theory. The next three chapters provide applications of the theory, especially to quantum electrodynamics and the low-energy limit of the electroweak theory. Chapters 9, 10, and 11 are meant as a bridge to more advanced courses. In these, path integral quantization, non

  15. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    maintained a very active interest in the affairs of the CCT. The above outline of the author's background is given here to emphasize his qualifications for presuming to undertake the writing of such an extensive and comprehensive monograph, and for doing it so well, since no similar information is given in "Temperature" nor in any of the advertising. He successfully conveys the viewpoints of both the basic scientist, whose interests are in standards thermometry and forefront research, and the person whose goals are the selection and use of the most appropriate thermometer. After an historical introduction, each of the various chapters (Thermodynamic and practical temperature scales, The measurement of thermodynamic temperatures, Fixed points and comparison baths, Resistance thermometry, Thermocouples, Radiation thermometry, Mercury-in-glass thermometry) and subsections has a similar format. This includes a capsule theoretical introduction and analysis of the subject to orient the reader and to establish limitations and approximations, a description of the current state of the art, and, finally, a nuts-and-bolts presentation which, where appropriate, includes industrial applications. Numerous tables, both in the text and in the appendices, document these discussions, along with an extensive listing of citations (close to 500) to original papers, review articles and other monographs. The coverage of topics is thorough and well-balanced, and suffers only moderately (but not deleteriously) from the biases of the author. My interests in low temperature thermometry extend upwards to 0 °C, and the author's treatment of this area is comprehensive and is done with understanding. He appears to have done equally well done equally well in the sections on higher temperature and more applied thermometry. The theoretical discussions are to educate the reader about the basic physics and consequent limitations and problems in each area. This is a difficult task which is done well on the

  16. Book Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, Anthony

    1986-10-01

    Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells by K. Takahashi and M. Konagai is one of the first books dealing exclusively with the subject of amorphous silicon solar cells. The book was first published in Japanese in 1983 and was translated and published in English in 1986. Part 1, covering 94 pages, is a general introduction to solar energy, including the basic concepts, the prospects for cost reduction of the various competing photovoltaic technologies, and a discussion of several types of solar power systems, while Part 2 deals exclusively with the technical issues surrounding the application of amorphous silicon to solar cells. Throughout, reference is made to the impact of photovoltaics on the Japanese economy, both as a business activity and as a domestic supply of electrical energy. As the authors point out, photovoltaics is a national priority for the Japanese, with increasing business as well as government support. Although this was also once the case in the U.S., as memories of the recent energy crises fade, the bulk of this activity is shifting toward the Far East.

  17. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, E.

    2005-10-01

    The ever growing relevance of general relativity to astrophysics and cosmology continues to motivate the publication of new textbooks which put the theory in a fresh perspective informed by recent developments. In the last few years we have witnessed the appearance of two new books which reflect this trend, and which stand proud among the classic relativity texts. While the 1970s were the decade of Weinberg [1] and Misner et al [2], and the 80s the decade of Schutz [3] and Wald [4], this is clearly the decade of Hartle [5] and Carroll. Hartle has introduced a novel pedagogical approach to teaching general relativity, which he convincingly argues [6] should be done in the standard undergraduate physics curriculum. His 'physics-first approach' emphasizes physical phenomena and minimizes mathematical formalism. Hartle achieves a lot by introducing only the spacetime metric and the geodesic equation, which are the main tools needed to explore curved spacetime and extract physical consequences. To be sure, to explain how the metric is obtained in the first place does require a background of differential geometry and the formulation of the Einstein field equations. But in Hartle's book this material is wisely presented at a later stage, after an ample sampling of the physics of curved spacetime has motivated the need for the advanced mathematics. Carroll follows instead the traditional route, what Hartle calls the 'math-first approach', in which one introduces first the required mathematical formalism and only then derives the physical consequences. He is, of course, in good company, as this is the method followed in all existing textbooks (with Hartle's being the sole exception). Carroll's approach may not be original, but it is tried and true, and the result of Carroll's efforts is an excellent introduction to general relativity. The book covers the standard topics that would be found in virtually all textbooks (differential geometry, the field equations, linearized

  18. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botet, R.

    2005-01-01

    This second edition of the popular book written by Quang Ho-Kim, Narenda Kumar and Chi Sing Lam, provides a comprehensive and interesting view of ten important topics in modern physics. All the sections have been updated: symmetry, lasers, superconductivity, chaos and fractals, stellar evolution, elementary particles and cosmology, while three new sections have been added to this edition: Bose-Einstein condensates, nanostructures and quantum computation. It is an impressive feat by the authors to cover such a wide panorama of physics from particles to cosmos and at a consistently high scientific level of information and explanation. This level is excellent and is at the frontier of current research but it does mean that some parts may be quite difficult for the undergraduate student. The ideal reader is probably the mature physicist revisiting familiar lines of thought, and following amazing bridges between distant topics. And if you are an active specialist in one particular topic, this book would give a clear insight on subjects outside your own field, allowing you to at last understand what your university colleague is really doing in a branch of physics with which you are totally unfamiliar. At the beginning, the style of writing can be disconcerting at this scientific level; equations are almost systematically avoided and illustrations are sparse, which can occasionally make the discussions rather ponderous, but the remarkable level of pedagogy and imaginative conception more than compensates for this. The fundamental ideas of exciting natural phenomena are elegantly discussed, while the authors never forget that physics is an experimental science, and address up-to-date applications in this manner. A brief bibliography is added at the end of each chapter, and a few simple exercises are given with answers. But the great strength of this book, and the main reason why it is worth reading by anyone interested in modern science, lies in the text itself which

  19. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Reviews two textbooks: "Principles of Biochemistry" by Albert L. Lehninger and "Inorganic Chemistry, A Modern Introduction" by Therald Moeller. Also reviews text, study guide, and laboratory manual for Morris Hein's "Foundations of College Chemistry, Fifth Edition" and text/study guide for David A. Ucko's "Basics for Chemistry." (JN)

  20. Book Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Edina; Szabo, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Kent A. Kiehl and Walter P. Sinnott-Armstrong, Eds. Handbook on psychopathy and law, reviewed by Edina Szabó Katherine Schreiber and Heather A. Hausenblas The truth about exercise addiction – Understanding the dark side of thinspiration, reviewed by Attila Szabo

  1. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, P.

    2006-02-01

    Cosmology is a discipline that encompasses many diverse aspects of physics and astronomy. This is part of its attraction, but also a reason why it is difficult for new researchers to acquire sufficient grounding to enable them to make significant contributions early in their careers. For this reason there are many cosmology textbooks aimed at the advanced undergraduate/beginning postgraduate level. Physical Foundations of Cosmology by Viatcheslav Mukhanov is a worthy new addition to this genre. Like most of its competitors it does not attempt to cover every single aspect of the subject but chooses a particular angle and tries to unify its treatment around that direction. Mukhanov has chosen to focus on the fundamental principles underlying modern cosmological research at the expense of some detail at the frontiers. The book places great emphasis on the particle-astrophysics interface and issues connected with the thermal history of the big-bang model. The treatment of big-bang nucleosynthesis is done in much more detail than in most texts at a similar level, for example. It also contains a very extended and insightful discussion of inflationary models. Mukhanov makes great use of approximate analytical arguments to develop physical intuition rather than concentrating on numerical approaches. The book is quite mathematical, but not in a pedantically formalistic way. There is much use of 'order-of-magnitude' dimensional arguments which undergraduate students often find difficult to get the hang of, but which they would do well to assimilate as early as possible in their research careers. The text is peppered with problems for the reader to solve, some straightforward and some exceedingly difficult. Solutions are not provided. The price to be paid for this foundational approach is that there is not much about observational cosmology in this book, and neither is there much about galaxy formation or large-scale structure. It also neglects some of the trendier recent

  2. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, W.

    2006-07-01

    The evaporation of a black hole formed by the collapse of matter is a nonunitary process involving loss of information. At least, this is how it appears in Hawking's semiclassical description, in which gravity is not quantized and the emergent radiation appears thermal. Since unitarity is one of the pillars of quantum mechanics there has been an understandable reluctance to accept this as an ironclad conclusion. Conformal field theories in flat space are manifestly unitary, and the AdS/CFT correspondence therefore suggests that the information trapped in the depths of the hole must find some way to escape—a conclusion almost universally accepted today, at least among particle theorists. Just how it could escape remains a mystery, however, since nothing can escape without violating causality until the black hole has shrunk too far to hold much information. Gerard 't Hooft and the senior author of this book, Leonard Susskind, have been vocal advocates of the view that the information paradox poses a real crisis for physics requiring significant paradigm shifts. They suggest that locality must be given up as an objective property of physical phenomena (even on large scales) and replaced by a new principle of 'black hole complementarity'. Specifically, there are two very different ways to view the process of collapse and evaporation. To a free-falling observer, nothing unusual happens at the horizon and matter and information fall deep into the hole. To a stationary observer hovering just outside the hole it appears instead that the matter and information are deposited on the horizon (which he experiences as very hot because of his large acceleration), to be eventually re-emitted from there as Hawking radiation. According to 't Hooft and Susskind, these must be viewed as equally valid, 'complementary' descriptions of the same process. Black hole complementarity is essentially the statement (supported by operational arguments) that their simultaneous validity cannot

  3. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, W. G.

    2006-02-01

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most successful theoretical structures in all of science. Developed between 1925-26 to explain the optical spectrum of atoms, the theory over the succeeding 80 years has been extended, first to quantum field theories, gauge field theories, and now even string theory. It is used every day by thousands of physicists to calculate physical phenomena to exquisite precision, with no ambiguity in the results. To claim that this is a theory which is not understood by those physicists is absurd. And yet, as eminent a physicist as Richard Feynman, who did as much as anyone else to extend quantum theory to field theories and was a master at producing those exquisite calculations, could say that anyone who claimed they understood quantum theory clearly did not understand quantum theory. One hundred years ago Einstein postulated one of the most unsettling features of the theory, the wave-particle duality, with his particulate explanation for light of the photoelectric effect, and an explanation which was in direct conflict with Maxwell's brilliant development of a wave, or field, theory of light. Einstein believed that the particulate nature would ultimately be explainable by some sort of non-linear theory of electromagnetism, and was outraged by the acceptance of the community of the probabilistic quantum theory. His programme was of course dealt a (near?) fatal blow by Bell's discovery that the three desiderata - a theory which agrees with experiment, a theory which is local in its effects, and a theory in which nature, at its heart, is not probabilistic - are incompatible. That discomfort felt by Einstein and by Feynman is felt by numerous other people as well. This discomfort is heightened by the fact that the theory of gravity, another of Einstein's great achievements, has resisted all efforts at reconciliation with quantum mechanics. This book explores that discomfort, and tries to pin down what the locus of that discomfort is. For many

  4. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2007-05-01

    Here are two textbooks, both published by Springer and each roughly half devoted to cosmology—the large scale structure and evolution of the Universe. I can imagine a context (not the same context) in which each would be useful. And there the similarities largely end. Bergstrom and Goobar's (hereafter B&G) other topic is particle astrophysics, and they are addressing students who already have some knowledge of advanced quantum mechanics and classical field theory (or who can master some relativistic dynamics and the Dirac equation on the basis of a couple of very information-dense appendices). The book is meant for use at the graduate level, probably the second year by US standards (the authors are from Stockholm). Schneider (hereafter PS), on the other hand, begins with galaxies, and then alternates between cosmological topics of gradually increasing sophistication (expanding universe to CMB fluctuations) and additional galactic topics—clusters, quasars and all. The book is meant as the second half of an introductory astronomy/astrophysics course for physics majors, and in the US would fit into an upper division `capstone' course. Each is meant for a single semester class at the target level, and might be squeezed into a 10-week term with elimination of some topics. B&G is a paperback of a second edition, with colour confined to a central block of plates, relatively few graphs and drawings, but lots of complex equations. PS is a hard cover translation from a German original, with colour used freely in astronomical images and graphs throughout, with fewer and less complex equations. Though the nominal difference in copyright date is only two years (2006 for PS, 2004 for B&G), the former is considerably more up to date, mentioning, for instance, that the third year WMAP results are not different enough from the first year to justify redoing drawings and such (I agree). What can you expect to get if you buy one or both of these? B&G have a homepage of error

  5. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, John

    2007-04-01

    ), but the latter is surprising in the context of a subject whose whole purpose is to observe the properties of primordial perturbations that may have arisen from inflation. Instead, the text concentrates on the technical heartland of the transport theory for CMB photons, and the Newtonian and relativistic theory for the development of CMB anisotropies, including polarization. It closes with more observationally-based chapters on general statistical aspects of the CMB sky, a digest of the recent results from WMAP, and an outlook. These are welcome, but the book really stands or falls on its treatment of the core physics of anisotropies. Without going too much into specifics, it can be fairly stated that the treatment given of the main material on CMB fluctuations is geared more to working professionals than to students. There is a good deal of useful technical detail, but it is not always derived systematically, and sometimes arises by reference to the research literature. There are no problem sets or worked examples, and not much attempt at intuitive illumination. As an example, one might point to the large-angle anisotropies of the CMB, which were first analysed in the classic Sachs Wolfe paper of 1967. The relativistic transport equation is there, but one looks in vain for the separation into the Sachs Wolfe effect proper (potential perturbations at last scattering) and the integrated effect of evolution since then. This latter ISW effect is in fact of huge interest in current research, since it is one of the methods for probing whether the vacuum energy differs from a cosmological constant. In general, the text seems strangely patchy on issues of contemporary interest, certainly in terms of its emphasis. It is as if the three authors contributed material separately without achieving a full integration. On the more positive side, the book has the advantage that it presents a Russian view of the subject. So much of the initial work on the `Relic Radiation' (a much

  6. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, John

    2007-04-01

    The present volume is an introduction to general relativity and cosmology, at a level suitable for beginning graduate students or advanced undergraduates. The book consists of two main parts, the first entitled `Elements of differential geometry', and the second `The theory of gravitation'. Chapters 2-7, part I, introduce the basic ideas of differential geometry in a general setting, and are based on previously unpublished notes by one of the authors. On the one hand, the treatment is modern in that it uses a `top-down' approach, i.e. starting with general differentiable manifolds, and deferring the introduction of a metric tensor until after the notions of affine connection and curvature have been introduced. On the other hand, the treatment is classical in that it relies heavily, though not exclusively, on index notation. The general material, chapters 1-7, is then followed by four more specialized chapters dealing with matters of specific interest for general relativity. Topics include symmetry groups acting on Riemannian manifolds, with spherically symmetric spacetimes and spatially homogeneous spacetimes as examples, the efficient calculation of curvature, and the Petrov classification of the Weyl curvature tensor using spinors. Part II deals with general relativity and cosmology. The basic assumptions of the theory and its application to spherically symmetric gravitational fields are discussed in two chapters, and there is some historical material and motivation for the basic assumptions at the beginning of the book. The final chapter contains a detailed discussion of the Kerr solution. But the main emphasis in part II is on relativistic cosmology, in particular the analysis of cosmological models more general than the familiar Friedmann-Lemaitre (FL) models. The material on cosmology begins with a discussion of relativistic hydrodynamics and thermodynamics. The kinematical quantities (rate of expansion, shear, etc, of a timelike congruence) are introduced

  7. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, L. D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Reviews "Nonprofits for Hire" (Steven R. Smith and Michael Lipsky), on the advantages and disadvantages of pursuing or accepting government purchase-of-service contracts; "Birthmothers" (Merry B. Jones); "Understanding Child Abuse and Neglect" (National Research Council); and "Young, Poor, and Pregnant" (Judith S. Musick). (BAC)

  8. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altschul, Brett D.

    2007-06-01

    All the physics we observe in our world is underlain by special relativity, a theory that has survived for more than a hundred years, in many respects completely intact. Yet despite its status as the most stringently tested theory in all of physics, special relativity is still frequently questioned. In the last decade and a half, many scientists have come to believe that special relativity, as Einstein formulated it, will need to be modified to accommodate a quantum theory of gravity. {\\it Special Relativity: Will it Survive the Next 101 Years?} is a volume intended to introduce the reader to this new and still slightly controversial area of research. The book is divided into four parts. The first part is essentially historical. It consists of an essay discussing Einstein's work in the context of contemporary technological developments and a amusing note by R W P Drever on a precision Lorentz test that he performed literally in his backyard. These set the stage for the more modern material that follows. Part II discusses the theory of relativity and its mathematical foundations, from completely modern perspectives. There is much here that may be new even for experts on special relativity, and a significant level of mathematical sophistication on the part of the reader is assumed. A number of the lectures delve into the crucial question of how special relativity and its generalizations can be combined with quantum mechanics. The third part discusses theoretical models of Lorentz violation, and all the important paradigms that appear in the current literature are considered. These include the standard model extension (an effective field theory), modified dispersion relations and 'double special relativity', and noncommutative geometry. These lectures generally delve into less detail than those in part II; the focus is on helping the reader digest the new principles that must arise in theories without Lorentz symmetry. The final part of the volume covers current

  9. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, R.

    2005-06-01

    This book gives a clear exposition of quantum field theory at the graduate level and the contents could be covered in a two semester course or, with some effort, in a one semester course. The book is well organized, and subtle issues are clearly explained. The margin notes are very useful, and the problems given at the end of each chapter are relevant and help the student gain an insight into the subject. The solutions to these problems are given in chapter 12. Care is taken to keep the numerical factors and notation very clear. Chapter 1 gives a clear overview and typical scales in high energy physics. Chapter 2 presents an excellent account of the Lorentz group and its representation. The decomposition of Lorentz tensors under SO(3) and the subsequent spinorial representations are introduced with clarity. After giving the field representation for scalar, Weyl, Dirac, Majorana and vector fields, the Poincaré group is introduced. Representations of 1-particle states using m2 and the Pauli Lubanski vector, although standard, are treated lucidly. Classical field theory is introduced in chapter 3 and a careful treatment of the Noether theorem and the energy momentum tensor are given. After covering real and complex scalar fields, the author impressively introduces the Dirac spinor via the Weyl spinor; Abelian gauge theory is also introduced. Chapter 4 contains the essentials of free field quantization of real and complex scalar fields, Dirac fields and massless Weyl fields. After a brief discussion of the CPT theorem, the quantization of electromagnetic field is carried out both in radiation gauge and Lorentz gauge. The presentation of the Gupta Bleuler method is particularly impressive; the margin notes on pages 85, 100 and 101 invaluable. Chapter 5 considers the essentials of perturbation theory. The derivation of the LSZ reduction formula for scalar field theory is clearly expressed. Feynman rules are obtained for the λphi4 theory in detail and those of QED

  10. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, John

    2007-04-01

    ), but the latter is surprising in the context of a subject whose whole purpose is to observe the properties of primordial perturbations that may have arisen from inflation. Instead, the text concentrates on the technical heartland of the transport theory for CMB photons, and the Newtonian and relativistic theory for the development of CMB anisotropies, including polarization. It closes with more observationally-based chapters on general statistical aspects of the CMB sky, a digest of the recent results from WMAP, and an outlook. These are welcome, but the book really stands or falls on its treatment of the core physics of anisotropies. Without going too much into specifics, it can be fairly stated that the treatment given of the main material on CMB fluctuations is geared more to working professionals than to students. There is a good deal of useful technical detail, but it is not always derived systematically, and sometimes arises by reference to the research literature. There are no problem sets or worked examples, and not much attempt at intuitive illumination. As an example, one might point to the large-angle anisotropies of the CMB, which were first analysed in the classic Sachs Wolfe paper of 1967. The relativistic transport equation is there, but one looks in vain for the separation into the Sachs Wolfe effect proper (potential perturbations at last scattering) and the integrated effect of evolution since then. This latter ISW effect is in fact of huge interest in current research, since it is one of the methods for probing whether the vacuum energy differs from a cosmological constant. In general, the text seems strangely patchy on issues of contemporary interest, certainly in terms of its emphasis. It is as if the three authors contributed material separately without achieving a full integration. On the more positive side, the book has the advantage that it presents a Russian view of the subject. So much of the initial work on the `Relic Radiation' (a much

  11. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulling, S. A.

    2006-05-01

    saying that gravity was not only an honourable member of the forces of nature, but ultimately the source of them all. It has become a cliche that the unification of relativity with quantum theory is the central problem of contemporary physics. In the 1950s, before strings, non-Abelian monopoles, or even quasars, Bryce DeWitt was applying the quantum-field-theoretical methods and conceptual framework of his mentor, Julian Schwinger, to gravity. His central insight was that the conceptual and technical problems of quantum gravity were closely analogous to those of gauge theories. He developed a unified, relentlessly abstract, and highly personal vision of the fundamentals of physical theory. It was, and is, expressed in idiosyncratic and condensed notation often different from the languages of mainstream field theorists, traditional relativists, and mathematicians alike. In short, he has never been easy reading. His ideas were systematically presented in famous lecture series at the Les Houches summer schools on Relativity, Groups and Topology in 1963 [1] and 1983 [2], the book Supermanifolds [3], and a number of (relatively) shorter expositions that have been widely read. By the middle 1970s the methods that he had developed mainly for gravity were widely recognized as very useful for Yang Mills gauge theories, and his work had become part of the mainstream. Now, another 20 years after the second Les Houches, we have this final testament of Bryce DeWitt's ideas. At over 1000 pages in two volumes in a fabric-covered slipcase, it is the sort of work usually described as 'magisterial' (meaning, perhaps, 'no one has yet succeeded in reading it all the way through'). Over the years, of course, DeWitt learned many new things and thought of ways to say the old things better. Accordingly, the new books consist of reworkings of the most important parts of the older writings together with some new material. Oxford University Press is to be thanked and congratulated for the care it

  12. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    The International Cryogenic Engineering Conferences (ICEC) are held biennially and are medium-scale events (a few hundred participants) involving a wide range of cryogenic specialists. The Proceedings of the 17th Conference reflects this range clearly, comprising four sections. The first, and shortest, presents the texts of (some of) the plenary invited papers and covers topics ranging from `The first collection of liquid hydrogen' to `The application of bulk high-temperature superconductors'. Then follow three sections of approximately equal length (250--300 pages each) covering, respectively, refrigeration, superconductivity and cryogenics. The rapid recent development of closed cycle refrigerators is reflected in the content of the first section and is a firm indicator that the topic of cryogenic engineering is spreading out from its current twin, but limited, areas of the research laboratory and the large-scale particle or energy research facility. Expansion into both industry, commerce and medicine is apparent, as is the provision of facilities for other technologies (for example, high-field magnets for NMR, extending to 1 GHz). Later in this volume some of these future applications are described. The Kleemenko cycle, as lucidly explained by Bill Little, consists of a development of the Joule--Thomson expansion technique for cooling in which the expansion and cooling of a single component gas is replaced by the expansion and cooling of a mixture of gas and liquid phase. Pulse tube coolers now come in a variety of forms and sizes, in single stage and double stage forms, providing a lowest temperature so far of around 2 K with 2 stages or 20 K with a single stage. The ability of this design is to reduce mechanical vibration levels well below those achievable with conventional Gifford--McMahon or Stirling cycle coolers and this volume includes a review of developments of these types, as well as a number of research papers setting out the leading edge of

  13. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    maintained a very active interest in the affairs of the CCT. The above outline of the author's background is given here to emphasize his qualifications for presuming to undertake the writing of such an extensive and comprehensive monograph, and for doing it so well, since no similar information is given in "Temperature" nor in any of the advertising. He successfully conveys the viewpoints of both the basic scientist, whose interests are in standards thermometry and forefront research, and the person whose goals are the selection and use of the most appropriate thermometer. After an historical introduction, each of the various chapters (Thermodynamic and practical temperature scales, The measurement of thermodynamic temperatures, Fixed points and comparison baths, Resistance thermometry, Thermocouples, Radiation thermometry, Mercury-in-glass thermometry) and subsections has a similar format. This includes a capsule theoretical introduction and analysis of the subject to orient the reader and to establish limitations and approximations, a description of the current state of the art, and, finally, a nuts-and-bolts presentation which, where appropriate, includes industrial applications. Numerous tables, both in the text and in the appendices, document these discussions, along with an extensive listing of citations (close to 500) to original papers, review articles and other monographs. The coverage of topics is thorough and well-balanced, and suffers only moderately (but not deleteriously) from the biases of the author. My interests in low temperature thermometry extend upwards to 0 °C, and the author's treatment of this area is comprehensive and is done with understanding. He appears to have done equally well done equally well in the sections on higher temperature and more applied thermometry. The theoretical discussions are to educate the reader about the basic physics and consequent limitations and problems in each area. This is a difficult task which is done well on the

  14. Why Write Book Reviews?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obeng-Odoom, Franklin

    2014-01-01

    The pressure to publish or perish or, more recently, to be visible or vanish, marginalises a culture of critical reading and reflection that has historically been the province of book reviews. Today, book reviews are roundly rejected by academic bureaucrats as unimportant, easy to write and hence, easy to get published, mere summaries, uncritical…

  15. Flagrant Misconduct of Reviewers and Editor: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Kotchoubey, Boris; Bütof, Sarah; Sitaram, Ranganatha

    2015-08-01

    A case of a particularly severe misbehavior in a review process is described. Two reviewers simply copied and pasted their critical comments from their previous reviews without reading the reviewed manuscript. The editor readily accepted the reviewers' opinion and rejected the manuscript. These facts give rise to some general questions about possible factors affecting the ethical behavior of reviewers and editors, as well as possible countermeasures to prevent ethical violations. PMID:25156788

  16. Peer reviews and the role of a journal editor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obtaining peer reviews for manuscripts submitted to scientific journals is becoming increasingly difficult. Changes to the system are necessary, and editors must cultivate and maintain a solid base of reviewers to help evaluate journal submissions. This article outlines some steps editors can and sh...

  17. BOOK REVIEW COMMENTARY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane Biotechnology (ISBN 1-57808-163-7) is a review-type book prepared by G.R. Naik (Professor and Chairman at Department of Biotechnology, Gulbarga University, Gulbarga, Karnataka, India). The 165-page book, published in 2001 by Science Publishers, Inc. (Enfield, NH, USA and Plymouth, UK), pr...

  18. RISKY BUSINESS (BOOK REVIEW)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article reviews the book 'Risk Quantitation and Regulatory Policy,' D. G. Hoel, R. A. Merrill, and F. P. Perera (eds), published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York. The book is another volume in the continuing series of Banbury Conferences devoted ...

  19. Special Book Review Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvath, Clara, Ed.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Reviews 32 books on the following topics: human resources and organizational development; guidance, assessment, and counseling; job search, networking, resumes, letters, and applications; careers in specific fields; transitions and retirement; and finding balance. (SK)

  20. Book Review: New Perspectives on Technical Editing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, A. J. (Ed.); Sterken, Christiaan

    2012-08-01

    New Perspectives on Technical Editing by Avon J. Murphy (ed.) ISBN : 978-0895033949 (2010) Baywood Publishing Company Inc, Hardcover, 210 pages, 35.5 GBP This book presents a collection of 10 chapters dealing with diverse aspects of technical editing (ie, editorial planning, and analysis and structural changes made to other people's technological documents): research in technical editing, trends and teaching of technical editing, copyediting, and technical journal editing. The role and function of the modern journal and book editor is also dealt with in detail. Each chapter is written by an expert in the field: senior editors, university professors in technical communication, technical writers and linguists. The ever-evolving role of the editor is clearly elucidated in several historical reviews, and in the descriptions of the expectations for the future. A very striking aspect of this book is its extensive collection of bibliographic resources: every chapter lists dozens of very useful references, and the closing chapter, and annotated bibliography, contain many not so well known references, and are most useful. All in all, the book is a treasure trove listing more than 400 references, in addition to numerous webpage URLs embedded in the texts. The book is designed to help the reader to understand current practices and norms in technical editing, and to help to take action in editing as well as in teaching and educating would-be editors. The audience for this book thus includes editors and teachers, but also writers, researchers and students. A deep reading of this book will result in a better understanding of the difference between full technical editing and its much narrower component so well known as copyediting, and will convince any prospective editor that editing should not be undertaken if the people involved do not master the art of precision and accuracy in technical (as well as in human) communication, do not possess the technical know how and computer

  1. Comments on ``Anonymous Reviews'' An Editor's View of Anonymous Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, John A.

    I have read with great interest the recent Forum commentaries in Eos by Myrl Beck, Charles Robinove, Robert Criss, and Anne Hofmeister regarding anonymous reviews. I heartily support their position that anonymous reviews should be avoided. I have not written an anonymous review in ages (and regret the few that I did), and have always appreciated and respected greatly anyone who signs a critical review of one of my own papers. However, I would like to add some perspective from the editorial standpoint. I have served as JGR associate editor for 3 years (never anonymously!), and as Eos editor for seismology and tectonophysics for 4. Over the years, I have rejected a fair number of papers, most of those based on anonymous reviews (fortunately, none of the above commentators was one of them). The vast majority of anonymous reviews I received were well considered. While I would wish that all reviews were signed, I don't think we can summarily dismiss the fear that many would have of enmity and reprisal over a critical review. Some of these fears are likely justified. On more than one occasion, have I witnessed overly aggressive responses on the part of authors to anonymous reviews that I considered to be entirely fair and constructive in their criticisms. I do think we need to do all we can to discourage anonymous reviews, but it will be difficult to completely remove that choice from the process.

  2. Book Review: The People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    Reviews "The Micmac: How Their Ancestors Lived Five Hundred Years Ago" (Ruth Holmes and Harold McGee), an illustrated book that shows how Micmac Indians adapted so well to the world. Describes the Micmacs' knowledge of herbs for treating sicknesses and injuries. Explains that the demise of the Micmacs came with new diseases brought to them by…

  3. BOOK REVIEW: Supergravity Supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Ruth

    2013-02-01

    Supergravity is an essential ingredient in so many areas of ultra high energy physics, yet it is rarely taught systematically, even at the graduate level. Students most often have to learn along with applying, and must use the now classic older texts. For such core material, it is surprising that there are so few good texts on the subject. It is not necessarily that supergravity is so much more conceptually complex, rather that it is technical and therefore easy for a text to become dry, dense and rather indigestible. This book, written by two experts in the field, is therefore a breath of fresh air. It not only represents a comprehensive modern overview of the subject, but achieves this with clarity, accessibility, and even humour! To paraphrase the authors, if you are not impressed by this book, you should put it down and watch television instead. It starts by reviewing, or overviewing, aspects of field theory, basic supersymmetry and gravity that will be needed for the rest of the book. This first third or so of the book is very condensed, and will not be easy to follow for those who have not encountered the material before. However, the authors acknowledge this and give plenty of suggestions for more pedagogical texts in the relevant areas, thus it does not feel overly brief. The middle section deals with the construction of supergravity, starting with basic N = 1 supergravity in 4 and 11 dimensions and gradually extending the discussion to include matter multiplets. This part of the book systematically builds up understanding and construction of models, before moving on to superconformal methods. The purpose is not to cover all supergravity theories, but to focus on a few examples in detail, and to give sufficient expertise and information for the reader to be able to deal with any other models they might need. The final part of the book deals with applications, and includes two chapters on applications in adS/CFT, which will be of most interest to new

  4. Native American Children's Books. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulton, Kathryn Elizabeth; Cornelius, Carol

    1993-01-01

    Reviews 11 children's books, published 1990-93, suitable for elementary and middle school students, covering Native riddles; Hiawatha as founder of the Iroquois confederacy; Chief Seattle's famous speech; stories about Inuit life and Mexican village life during the 1500s; Sequoyah and the Cherokee alphabet; the Iroquois creation myth; Wampanoag…

  5. A Review of Two Distance Learning Books [book review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszalka, Tiffany A.; Spector, J. Michael

    2003-01-01

    Reviews two books that are representative of the substantive books aimed at those who wish to design effective distance learning. Together these books provide a reasonably complete perspective on how to design effective distance learning. They have many strengths, and few weaknesses. (SLD)

  6. BOOK REVIEW: Quantum Squeezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubairy, Suhail

    2005-05-01

    Quantum squeezed states are a consequence of uncertainty relations; a state is squeezed when the noise in one variable is reduced below the symmetric limit at the expense of the increased noise in the conjugate variable such that the Heisenberg uncertainty relation is not violated. Such states have been known since the earliest days of quantum mechanics. The realization in the early 80's that quantum squeezed states of the radiation field can have important applications in high precision Michelson interferometry for detecting gravitational waves led to a tremendous amount of activity, both in theoretical and experimental quantum optics. The present volume, edited by two eminent scientists, is a collection of papers by leading experts in the field of squeezed states on different aspects of the field as it stands today. The book is divided into three parts. In the first part, there are three articles that review the fundamentals. The first paper by Knight and Buzek presents an introductory account of squeezed states and their properties. The chapter, which opens with the quantization of the radiation field, goes on to discuss the quantum optical properties of single mode and multimode squeezed states. The second article by Hillery provides a detailed description of field quantization in the presence of a nonlinear dielectric medium, thus providing a rigorous treatment of squeezing in nonlinear media. The third article by Yurke presents a comprehensive discussion of the input-output theory of the squeezed radiation at the dielectric boundaries. The second part of the book, comprising of three articles, deals with the generation of squeezed states. In the first article, Drummond reviews the squeezing properties of light in nonlinear systems such as parametric oscillators. He also discusses squeezed light propagation through waveguides and optical fibers. In the second article, Ralph concentrates on active laser sources of squeezing and presents an analysis based on the

  7. Editor's note: Reviews in Modern Astronomy 27

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlepsch, Regina v.

    2015-06-01

    In order to make the scientific events of the meetings of the Astronomische Gese llschaft (AG) more international and bring them to the attention of the worldwide astronomical community, it was decided to devote the Reviews in Modern Astronomy} to the outcomes of the large annual fall meetings of the AG. In particular, it emphasized the Karl Schwarzschild Lectures, the Ludwig Biermann Award Lectures, the invited reviews, and the highlight contributions on recent progress and achievements from leading scientists. The most prestigious of them, the Karl Schwarzschild Lectures, constitutes a special series of reviews by outstanding scientists who have been awarded the Karl Schwarzschild Medal during the fall meeting of the AG. At the same time, excellent young astronomers are honored by the Ludwig Biermann Award. In 2010 the ``Doctoral Thesis Award'' was established to honor the most outstanding Doctoral Thesis of the past year.

  8. Elementary Students as Book Reviewers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geier, Denise B.

    2008-01-01

    There is always a new supply of books coming into the school library, and students make great reviewers for these new titles. This article shows how library media specialists can create a student book review group as part of a program to develop school-wide incentive for reading.

  9. Book Reviews 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Barbara Ellman, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    Contains reviews of 41 books on career management, job search strategies, entrepreneurship, the Internet job search, self-improvement; specific careers, women and careers, and career development e-business. Eight guides and workbooks are also reviewed. (JOW)

  10. Editors' Spring Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    While they do not represent the rainbow of reading tastes American public libraries accommodate, Book Review editors are a wildly eclectic bunch. One look at their bedside tables and ereaders would reveal very little crossover. This article highlights an eclectic array of spring offerings ranging from print books to an audiobook to ebook apps. It…

  11. Paradigm Lost. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, James M.

    1996-01-01

    Claiming to have developed a new conceptualization of creative phenomena, Howard Gardner has rounded up the usual biographical suspects in his new book "Creating Minds: An Anatomy of Creativity Seen Through the Lives of Freud, Einstein, Picasso, Stravinsky, Eliot, Graham, and Gandhi" (Basic Books, 1993). Gardner doesn't successfully prove that…

  12. BOOK REVIEW: Minority Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, R.

    2005-02-01

    when different kinds of agents are added. It is this chapter that really justifies the MG as a toy model, and the authors succeed in stating, but not overstating, the case for the MG. The final chapter is devoted to extensions and alternative interpretations of the MG that take the `minority wins' mechanism as a starting point, but consider different approaches to inductive learning. Topics include evolutionary learning schemes, neural networks, and experiments with human players. The diversity of contributions demonstrates that the minority mechanism has a wider applicability and may inspire many more papers. Part II, as mentioned, contains reprints of 27 articles on the MG and econophysics in general that are organized along the same lines as the chapters in Part I. The selection is good; the authors resisted the temptation to place too much emphasis on their own prolific output and represent a well-rounded picture of the literature. The book thus serves several purposes, and it serves them well: it is a well-organized, concise and comprehensive introduction to the MG and the questions econophysics is concerned with, and thus of interest to researchers and graduate students who want to get involved in the field; it is a thorough summary and literature review of the MG and therefore mandatory for those who are already active on the topic; and it serves as a case study for how a toy model can be interpreted and modified to yield insight into complex phenomena, and what answers one can and cannot expect from such models. Whether the MG will serve as a foundation for econophysics in years to come (and investment firms will indeed use the MG score of applicants as a hiring criterion, as the authors jokingly speculate) or as a stepping stone to other models, only time can tell. But in the meantime, there is much to learn from it, and this book is a good place to start.

  13. The Common Vision. Reviews: Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chattin-McNichols, John

    1998-01-01

    Reviews Marshak's book describing the work of educators Maria Montessori, Rudolf Steiner, Aurobindo Ghose, and Inayat Khan. Maintains that the book gives clear, concise information on each educator and presents a common vision for children and their education; also maintains that it gives theoretical and practical information and discusses…

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Physics 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, David; Gibbs, Keith; Hutchings, Robert

    2000-09-01

    Physics 1 is an attractive book designed to cover the whole of the AS physics course and has been endorsed by OCR for its Advanced AS and A2 specifications. Built on books from the Cambridge Modular Sciences series, it provides a clearly presented path through each of the three sections: Foundation Physics, Electrons and Photons, and Wave Properties. Each chapter has clearly stated objectives and is peppered with self-assessment questions, the answers to all of which are at the back of the book. Additional questions are given at the end of each chapter. There is an excellent use of colour, summary boxes and diagrams, but relatively few photographs. At the back of the book is a useful section on uncertainties and a glossary. The key feature of this book is its accessibility to students coming from a double-award science background. A great deal of thought has gone into lessening the trauma of the transition to Advanced Level and the results are impressive. Some of the main areas of concern for many students are the mathematical sections. These areas are not rushed, especially in the foundation physics, where there are plenty of worked examples. It is assumed, also, that students will not necessarily be confident with graphs so lots of examples are given. Diagrams of the type of practical equipment students are likely to encounter add another dimension to the book. It is good to see the use of light gates and motion sensors in addition to the more traditional ticker-timers for the calculations of speed and acceleration. Accessibility is the strength of this book. The use of colour and space, as well as the content, make it enjoyable to use and to read for any student embarking on the new AS courses. Helen Reynolds

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Nonlinear Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafranov, V.

    1998-08-01

    's theory, to satisfy the above mentioned alignment of the vectors j and B. The details of this remarkable process are described. The final chapter is devoted to solar flares, which are as the author says `probably, the most spectacular eruptive events in cosmic plasmas'. This chapter describes in detail the structure of the solar convection zone and the solar atmosphere, considers the formation of the rope-like structure of the magnetic field and the thick flux tubes displayed as sunspots, as well as the buoyancy of the flux tubes and different models of the MHD processes leading to solar flares. In summary, the reviewed book is rich in content, reflecting the important issues of striking phenomena such as solar flares, the, quite dangerous for plasma confinement, major disruptions in tokamaks and the, conversely quite favourable for plasma confinement, non-linear process of L-H transition in tokamaks and continuous turbulent generation and maintenance of stabilizing toroidal magnetic fields in reversed field pinches, as well as other interesting MHD processes. The analysis of these very complicated phenomena is based on non-elementary mathematics. This could make it difficult for non-theoreticians to read some parts of the book. However, as for an explanation of the physics of the phenomena, the author achieves this in a rather simple manner: briefly, and with the minimal number of necessary formulas. This is done strictly without oversimplifications. This makes the book useful to both theoreticians and experimenters who wish to learn about non-linear processes such as disruptions and plasma self-organization.

  16. BOOK REVIEW FOR INFORM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book is an ambitious and successful collection of independent chapters on very relevant topics in the field of lipid biotechnology. Although it includes many of the most relevant topics in lipid biotechnology, it does not claim to be a comprehensive treatise on this topic. An example of an imp...

  17. The Ethics of Academic Book Reviewing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Leonard R. N.

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of ethical quandaries in academe focuses on the ethics of book reviewing. Topics include difficulties in getting published; exploitation of examination copies; reviewing books to get free copies; using book reviews as personal pulpits; inadequate rewards for reviewing books; and qualifications for reviewers. (LRW)

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Complete Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Simon

    2000-03-01

    This book contains all the essential concepts for GCSE (or equivalent) physics courses or for general science courses at Key Stage 4. It claims to be ideal for use as a bridging resource for those intending to take physics beyond GCSE: it is no surprise, then, that the book is written at a level above that of the average Key Stage 4 student. It includes material not included in many GCSE syllabuses; this is clearly identified in the contents pages. It would be a useful resource for more able students at GCSE or for beginning A-level students. The layout of the book is attractive. It is well illustrated and colourful. Some of the illustrations are striking: each of the 12 main sections of the book begins with a title page that includes some unusual photographs illustrating physical ideas. Section 2, Forces and Motion, has a photograph of a bungee jumper leaping from the Sky Tower in New Zealand, taken at night looking along the length of the tower from its foot. Section 9, Magnets and Currents, has a computer-generated picture of the magnetic field in a fusion generator. These pictures, as well as contributing to the attractiveness of the book, could be used to initiate discussions of some of the physics. However, there are pictures that serve little useful purpose: a photograph of a recording station for seismic waves looks like any other building lit up at night. A photograph of a rock band in the middle of a section on sound carries no explanatory caption at all and is purely decorative. Other illustrations - in a variety of styles - do illustrate some physical ideas very well: the diagrams of motors and generators, for instance, are far clearer than my efforts on the blackboard! The book is divided into 14 sections with titles reflecting the traditional divisions of physics syllabuses, together with a beginning section on measurement and units and two final sections, `History of Key Ideas' and `Experimental Physics'. The first section, `Measurement and Units

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Synergetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckhardt, B.

    2005-01-01

    The reductionist approach asks us to split the world into its constituents and to develop a detailed understanding of the properties of each fragment. This programme has met with considerable success in many instances, but it fails to account for properties that emerge from the interrelation between constituents and can be seen in the system as a whole only. The reductionist approach explains the spectra and intensities of the light emitted by a single atom, but it does not account for the appearance of coherent lasing action of atoms coupled by their light field. It describes the motion of individual molecules in a liquid but cannot explain how they arrange to form the majestic roll of waves on a beach. Similarly, a brain consists of millions of neurons whose biochemistry is reasonably well understood, but how they interact to give rise to memory and association and the myriad of other tasks a brain is capable off, remains unclear. These and many other examples in the anorganic and living world around us have in common that they typically operate far from thermodynamic equilibrium, that they involve the interaction of many ingredients, and that nonlinear interactions and feedback loops tend to be important. Over the past few decades many aspects of the dynamics of such systems have been explored, and fields like nonlinear dynamics, bifurcation theory, and pattern formation have prospered enourmously. Yet, the connection between the different areas and their contribution to the larger goal of explaining and exploring much of the order out of chaos around us has been in danger of being lost. Hermann Hakens book overcomes this reductionist separation of approaches and disciplines and provides a coherent collection of concepts, methods and tools with which all the previous examples and many more can be addressed. It lays the foundation for a quantitative analysis and should been seen as an invitation to the reader to apply its ideas to his or her favourite phenomenon

  20. Science, Politics, and Peer Review: An Editor's Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Describes the controversy that arose over an editor's decision to overrule an ad hoc action editor's acceptance of a journal article and request for additional changes to the manuscript. This controversy played out in various Internet discussion groups. Presents the editor's perspective, highlighting the need to protect the integrity and…

  1. Book Review: Telepractice in Audiology

    PubMed Central

    VENTO, BARBARA A.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a review of the book Telepractice in Audiology, authored by Emma Rushbrooke MPhil(AUD), BA, DipAud., MAudSA., LSLS. Cert. AVT, RNC, and K. Todd Houston, PhD, CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT, and 13 contributing authors. This is the first book entirely devoted to tele-audiology. It provides practical information for working with clients across the lifespan and for multiple practice settings. Reviewer Dr. Barbara Vento endorses this work as a comprehensive resource on the topic of teleaudiology for both students and aspiring teleaudiologists.

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Modern Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulish, Petr P.

    2006-12-01

    S/CFT correspondence. The author explains clearly most of the arguments in discussions and refers for further details to original papers (with corresponding arXiv numbers), selected lists of which appear at the end of each chapter (there are more than 300 references in the book). Considered as a whole the book covers primers on quantum fields, Feynman diagrams, renormalization procedure and renormalization groups, as well as the representation theory of classical linear Lie algebras. Some necessary information on irreducible representations of su(N), so(N) and sp(2N) is given in an appendix. There are in the text short historical and biographical notes concerning those scientists who made important contributions to the subject of the monograph: S Coleman, Yu Golfand, E Witten and others. Most of the seventeen chapters contain a few exercises to check the reader's understanding of the corresponding material. This monograph will be useful for graduate students and researchers in the field of elementary particles.

  3. BOOK REVIEW: Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, Joseph

    2008-11-01

    recent, and comprehensive, is Cosmology, in which the University of Texas physicist and Nobel Laureate, Steven Weinberg provides a concise introduction to modern cosmology. The book is aimed at the level of a final year physics undergraduate, or a first year graduate student. The discussion is self-contained, with numerous derivations. It begins with an overview of the standard cosmological model, and presents a detailed treatment of fluctuation growth. There are sections on gravitational lensing and inflationary cosmology, on microwave background fluctuations and structure growth. There are aspects however where a supplementary book is essential for the physicist being introduced to cosmology. The text is lacking in physical cosmology. The baryon physics of galaxy formation is barely mentioned, apart from a discussion of the Jeans mass. And it ignores one of the greatest contributions to the field by Russian cosmologist Yaakov Zel'dovich, who discovered the only nonspherical solution to the nonlinear evolution of density fluctuations, one that has since dominated our understanding of the large-scale structure of the universe via the cosmic web. But these are minor quibbles about what provides an outstanding introduction to modern cosmology, and one that takes us from the physics fundamentals up to the cosmic frontier. I recommend Cosmology for anyone wishing to enter the field and with a good physics background. It is ideal for the astronomer who may only have a sketchy knowledge of general relativity or particle physics. She will learn about vielbeins and scalar fields, gauge-invariant fluctuation theory and inflation. Steven Weinberg is a leading physicist who has also made important contributions to cosmology. The text provides a rigorous treatment of the standard model of cosmology, and of structure formation. Numerous exercises are provided. It provides an excellent core for a course on cosmology.

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, L. H.

    2005-11-01

    have to be rather clever to recognize that the particle interactions were rotationally invariant. Nambu and Goldstone showed that the spontaneous breakdown of a (continuous) symmetry implied the existence of massless scalar particles, referred to as Nambu Goldstone bosons, or simply Goldstone bosons. Meanwhile Anderson, in his study of (non-relativistic) superconductivity, showed that the exclusion of magnetic flux (Meissner effect) corresponds to a finite range for the electromagnetic field and hence to a `massive photon'. In a relativistic context Englert, Brout, Guralnik and more particularly Higgs showed that a spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry resulted in a massive, instead of a massless, gauge particle and no Goldstone particle; in the jargon of the day, the massless gauge particle had `eaten' the massless Goldstone boson and become massive; exactly Anderson's observation. It is this phenomenon which has been invoked so successfully to explain the masses of the W and Z bosons of weak interactions. Spontaneous symmetry breaking, therefore, has played a major role in the development of the Standard Model of particle physics, and it has also proved an important tool in condensed matter physics, for example in the understanding of phase transitions. At the same time, however, in the understanding of most (or all) particle physicists, and perhaps also condensed matter physicists, the notion of spontaneous symmetry breaking has been inexorably linked to that of a degenerate vacuum. This is the background and the starting point for Strocchi's book. Recognizing the power and importance of the concept of spontaneous symmetry breaking in theoretical physics, he defines it in a more refined and general way than usual. `Despite the many popular accounts', he writes, `the phenomenon of spontaneous symmetry breaking is deep and subtle and it is not without [reason] that it has been fully understood only in recent times.' Strocchi's main emphasis is on the fact that the

  5. International Book Review and Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dieker, Lisa; McTigue, Anna

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the book "Helping Individuals with Disabilities and Their Families: Mexican and U.S. Perspectives," edited by Todd V. Fletcher and Candace S. Bos (1999). An interview with Todd V. Fletcher is presented in which he discusses the importance of U.S. understanding and collaboration with Mexico. (CR)

  6. Book Review: Human Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2013-11-01

    This well written report reviews the evidence for variation in human sensitivity to ionizing radiation from epidemiological, clinical, animal, and experimental studies. The report also considers the mechanism(s) of radiation sensitivity and the ethical implications of current and potential knowledge that might be gained in the future. The report is concisely written, considers a large number of historical as well as recent studies, and features a ‘ bullet like ’ summary at the end of each chapter that captures the salient points.

  7. Writing a narrative biomedical review: considerations for authors, peer reviewers, and editors.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Ayvazyan, Lilit; Blackmore, Heather; Kitas, George D

    2011-11-01

    Review articles comprehensively covering a specific topic are crucial for successful research and academic projects. Most editors consider review articles for special and regular issues of journals. Writing a review requires deep knowledge and understanding of a field. The aim of this review is to analyze the main steps in writing a narrative biomedical review and to consider points that may increase the chances of success. We performed a comprehensive search through MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, and Web of Science using the following keywords: review of the literature, narrative review, title, abstract, authorship, ethics, peer review, research methods, medical writing, scientific writing, and writing standards. Opinions expressed in the review are also based on personal experience as authors, peer reviewers, and editors. PMID:21800117

  8. The RAE and Publications: A Review of Journal Editors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talib, Ameen Ali

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed editors of academic journals about publication issues related to Britain's Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), a process of grading and funding universities based on published research output. Editors were asked about research quality and output, publication practices, academics' willingness to referee manuscripts, and proliferation of…

  9. BOOK REVIEW: The Wandering Astronomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, Elizabeth

    2000-09-01

    Fans of Patrick Moore will like this book. I enjoyed it more than I expected, having anticipated a collection of personal anecdotes of the type favoured by certain tedious after-dinner speakers. Some of the 41 short items it contains do tend towards that category, but there are also some nuggets which might enliven your physics teaching. For example, did you know that, in a murder trial in 1787, the defendant's belief that the Sun was inhabited was cited as evidence of his insanity? This was despite his views being shared by many astronomers of the day including William Herschel. Or that Clyde Tombaugh had a cat called Pluto after the planet he discovered, which was itself named by an eleven-year-old girl? Another gem concerns a brief flurry, in the early 1990s, over a suspected planet orbiting a pulsar; variations in the arrival time of its radio pulses indicated the presence of an orbiting body. These shifts were later found to arise from an error in a computer program that corrected for the Earth's motion. The programmer had assumed a circular orbit for the Earth whereas it is actually elliptical. The book is clearly intended for amateur astronomers and followers of Patrick Moore's TV programmes. There is plenty of astronomy, with an emphasis on the solar system, but very little astrophysics. The author's metricophobia means that quantities are given in imperial units throughout, with metric equivalents added in brackets (by an editor, I suspect) which can get irritating, particularly as powers-of-ten notation is avoided. It is quite a novelty to see the temperature for hydrogen fusion quoted as 18 000 000 °F (10 000 000 °C). By way of contrast, astronomical terms are used freely - ecliptic, first-magnitude star, and so on. Such terms are defined in a glossary at the end, but attention is not drawn to this and I only stumbled across it by chance. Patrick Moore obviously knows his public, and this book will serve them well. For physics teachers and students

  10. Review Citations for Best-Selling Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Joseph W.

    1979-01-01

    Compares "Book Review Digest,""Book Review Index," and "Current Book Review Citations" for their coverage of titles appearing on the best-seller lists of "Publishers Weekly." Methodology is described and results are provided for both 1976 and 1978 titles. (Author/JD)

  11. Self-Interest and Scholarly Publication: The Dilemma of Researchers, Reviewers, and Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Raymond L.; Roberts, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Academic misconduct in research is of growing concern to funding agencies, scholars, and academic journal editors. Scholarly publication has ethical implications researchers, reviewers, and journal editors. The theoretical background of the ethics of scholarly publication is explored as well as the use of a case study of an untenured researcher…

  12. Appropriate roles for the subscriber, publisher, editor, author, and reviewer in the archives of plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun

    2013-11-01

    Authors, editors and reviewers, publishers, and subscribers all play their role in scientific journals. These 5 stakeholders are essential to journals. In this paper, firstly, I briefly summarize the role of each journal stakeholder and their respective goals. Secondly, the status of each participant in the Archives of Plastic Surgery is described. Finally, I propose an appropriate role and plan for each of them. Specific roles and responsibilities include the following: subscribers should welcome and submit the critiques of published papers in letters to the editor. Publishers should trust editors and provide them with adequate financial support for ongoing quality improvement of the journal. The editor-in-chief should be given a sufficient period of time-several years-to build up journal quality and train the incoming editor. The editors, including section editors, are also responsible for increasing the author pool. One editor might be designated a 'devil's referee', that is, a kind of devil's advocate with the responsibility of examining the originality of the manuscript, taking a skeptical view of the manuscript, and looking for holes in the methods and results of reported experiments. Authors' responsibilities include submitting manuscripts with scientific integrity and being ready to take responsibility for their articles even long after publication. Finally, reviewers' responsibilities include identifying similar articles not cited. Reviewers are also welcome to write a discussion on the article they review. PMID:24286037

  13. Children's Books in Review: Books on Strengthening Family Ties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winfield, Evelyn T.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews children's books that emphasize the strengthening of family ties. Characters in the books realize the importance and influence of family relationships as they struggle with sibling rivalry, self-discovery, peer relationships, a search for heritage, adoption, and death. (SM)

  14. Book Review: Regional Hydrological Response to Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal

    1998-01-01

    The book being reviewed, Regional Hydrological Response to Climate Change, addresses the effects of global climate change, particularly global warming induced by greenhouse gas emissions, on hydrological budgets at the regional scale. As noted in its preface, the book consists of peer-reviewed papers delivered at scientific meetings held by the International Geographical Union Working Group on Regional Hydrological Response to Climate Change and Global Warming, supplemented with some additional chapters that round out coverage of the topic. The editors hope that this book will serve as "not only a record of current achievements, but also a stimulus to further hydrological research as the detail and spatial resolution of Global Climate Models improves". The reviewer found the background material on regional climatology to be valuable and the methodologies presented to be of interest. The value of the book is significantly diminished, however by the dated nature of some of the material and by large uncertainties in the predictions of regional precipitation change. The book would have been improved by a much more extensive documentation of the uncertainty associated with each step of the prediction process.

  15. Medical journals' conflicts of interest in the publication of book reviews.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ronald M; Neale, Anne Victoria; Monsur, Joseph C

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess medical journals' conflicts of interest in the publication of book reviews. We examined book reviews published in 1999, 2000, and 2001 (N = 1,876) in five leading medical journals: Annals of Internal Medicine, British Medical Journal (BMJ), Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Lancet, and New England Journal of Medicine. The main outcome measure was journal publication of reviews of books that had been published by the journal's own publisher, that had been edited or authored by a lead editor of the journal, or that posed another conflict of interest. We also surveyed the editors-in-chief of the five journals about their policies on these conflicts of interests. During the study period, four of the five journals published 30 book reviews presenting a conflict of interest: nineteen by the BMJ, five by the Annals, four by JAMA, and two by the Lancet. These reviews represent 5.8%, 2.7%, 0.7%, and 0.7%, respectively, of all book reviews published by the journals. These four journals, respectively, published reviews of 11.9%, 25.0%, 0.9%, and 1.0% of all medical books published by the journals' publishers. Only one of the 30 book reviews included a disclosure statement addressing the conflict of interest. None of the journals had a written policy pertaining to the conflicts of interest assessed in this study, although four reported having unwritten policies. We recommend that scientific journals and associations representing journal editors develop policies on conflicts of interest pertaining to book reviews. PMID:14652900

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Computational Atomic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Douglass E.

    1998-02-01

    The primary purpose of `Computational Atomic Structure' is to give a potential user of the Multi-Configuration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) Atomic Structure Package an outline of the physics and computational methods in the package, guidance on how to use the package, and information on how to interpret and use the computational results. The book is successful in all three aspects. In addition, the book provides a good overview and review of the physics of atomic structure that would be useful to the plasma physicist interested in refreshing his knowledge of atomic structure and quantum mechanics. While most of the subjects are covered in greater detail in other sources, the book is reasonably self-contained, and, in most cases, the reader can understand the basic material without recourse to other sources. The MCHF package is the standard package for computing atomic structure and wavefunctions for single or multielectron ions and atoms. It is available from a number of ftp sites. When the code was originally written in FORTRAN 77, it could only be run on large mainframes. With the advances in computer technology, the suite of codes can now be compiled and run on present day workstations and personal computers and is thus available for use by any physicist, even those with extremely modest computing resources. Sample calculations in interactive mode are included in the book to illustrate the input needed for the code, what types of results and information the code can produce, and whether the user has installed the code correctly. The user can also specify the calculational level, from simple Hartree-Fock to multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock. The MCHF method begins by finding approximate wavefunctions for the bound states of an atomic system. This involves minimizing the energy of the bound state using a variational technique. Once the wavefunctions have been determined, other atomic properties, such as the transition rates, can be determined. The book begins with an

  17. Follow Your Heart [Book Review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerwinskyj, Don

    1999-01-01

    Maintains that Pieper and Pieper's book shares Montessori's ideals and approach, and that it achieves a balance between strict behaviorist approaches and permissiveness. Notes the book's strengths, including the authors' research and clinical experience and numerous examples. (KB)

  18. Book Reviews: A Guide to Locating Reviews of Books in the Social Sciences and Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Margaret, Comp.

    The guide identifies over 75 sources of book reviews in the reference department of McLennan Library at McGill University as of 1977. Describing many standard reference books, the guide was designed to assist students looking for book reviews and to illustrate the variety of sources for reviews in the McLennan Library. Section one, Major Sources…

  19. Guidelines for Reviewers and the Editor at the Nuclear Safety Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whetsel, H. B.

    The main purpose of this report is to help novice reviewers accelerate their apprenticeship at the Nuclear Safety Information Center, a computerized information service sponsored by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Guidelines for reviewers are presented in Part 1; Part 2 contains guidelines for the novice editor. The goal of the reviewers and…

  20. Redefining Book Reviews for the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Deirdre; Leahy, Margaret; McCormack, Ciaran

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a pilot study conducted in Ireland to examine the effectiveness of an online book review project. The project focused on the production of book reviews by primary school children in the form of digital video. The videos created were uploaded to a password protected website, which was available to the schools…

  1. Editorial, Forum and Book Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, H. J.

    1982-04-01

    I address myself to one of the greatest joys that befalls an editor and also to one of the greatest sadnesses. One of my great joys is the privilege of sharing my concerns as editor with my colleagues who edit other journals (John Howard of Applied Optics, Joe Goodman of the Journal of the Optical Society of America, etc.). Unfortunately, one of the concerns we have to share is a source of my greatest sadness as editor. For lack of a suitably comprehensive term, I use the term "journal gamesmanship." Journal gamesmanship is the fine and well-developed art of seeking inappropriate credit for oneself via publication in a technical or scientific journal. This can mean anything from overt plagiarism to deliberately inaccurate citations. If you are shocked that such things occur, III am pleased with your innocence. Even if you are not shocked, I hope to make you, aware of the many forms in which this unfortunate and ugly game can be and is played.

  2. BOOK REVIEWS: Quantum Mechanics: Fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, A.

    2004-02-01

    This review is of three books, all published by Springer, all on quantum theory at a level above introductory, but very different in content, style and intended audience. That of Gottfried and Yan is of exceptional interest, historical and otherwise. It is a second edition of Gottfried’s well-known book published by Benjamin in 1966. This was written as a text for a graduate quantum mechanics course, and has become one of the most used and respected accounts of quantum theory, at a level mathematically respectable but not rigorous. Quantum mechanics was already solidly established by 1966, but this second edition gives an indication of progress made and changes in perspective over the last thirty-five years, and also recognises the very substantial increase in knowledge of quantum theory obtained at the undergraduate level. Topics absent from the first edition but included in the second include the Feynman path integral, seen in 1966 as an imaginative but not very useful formulation of quantum theory. Feynman methods were given only a cursory mention by Gottfried. Their practical importance has now been fully recognised, and a substantial account of them is provided in the new book. Other new topics include semiclassical quantum mechanics, motion in a magnetic field, the S matrix and inelastic collisions, radiation and scattering of light, identical particle systems and the Dirac equation. A topic that was all but totally neglected in 1966, but which has flourished increasingly since, is that of the foundations of quantum theory. John Bell’s work of the mid-1960s has led to genuine theoretical and experimental achievement, which has facilitated the development of quantum optics and quantum information theory. Gottfried’s 1966 book played a modest part in this development. When Bell became increasingly irritated with the standard theoretical approach to quantum measurement, Viki Weisskopf repeatedly directed him to Gottfried’s book. Gottfried had devoted a

  3. BOOK REVIEWS: Quantum Mechanics: Fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, A.

    2004-02-01

    This review is of three books, all published by Springer, all on quantum theory at a level above introductory, but very different in content, style and intended audience. That of Gottfried and Yan is of exceptional interest, historical and otherwise. It is a second edition of Gottfried’s well-known book published by Benjamin in 1966. This was written as a text for a graduate quantum mechanics course, and has become one of the most used and respected accounts of quantum theory, at a level mathematically respectable but not rigorous. Quantum mechanics was already solidly established by 1966, but this second edition gives an indication of progress made and changes in perspective over the last thirty-five years, and also recognises the very substantial increase in knowledge of quantum theory obtained at the undergraduate level. Topics absent from the first edition but included in the second include the Feynman path integral, seen in 1966 as an imaginative but not very useful formulation of quantum theory. Feynman methods were given only a cursory mention by Gottfried. Their practical importance has now been fully recognised, and a substantial account of them is provided in the new book. Other new topics include semiclassical quantum mechanics, motion in a magnetic field, the S matrix and inelastic collisions, radiation and scattering of light, identical particle systems and the Dirac equation. A topic that was all but totally neglected in 1966, but which has flourished increasingly since, is that of the foundations of quantum theory. John Bell’s work of the mid-1960s has led to genuine theoretical and experimental achievement, which has facilitated the development of quantum optics and quantum information theory. Gottfried’s 1966 book played a modest part in this development. When Bell became increasingly irritated with the standard theoretical approach to quantum measurement, Viki Weisskopf repeatedly directed him to Gottfried’s book. Gottfried had devoted a

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Universe or Multiverse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2008-11-01

    More than 2000 years ago, Epicurus taught that there are an infinite number of other worlds, both like and unlike ours, and Aristotle taught that there are none. Neither hypothesis can currently be falsified, and this issue of potential for falsification (that is testability) goes to the heart of many of the chapters in Carr's book. All but one of the 27 chapters, provided by 27 pundits (almost but not quite a one-to-one mapping) are written versions of talks given at one of three meetings, held between 2001 and 2005 at Stanford and Cambridge Universities and partly sponsored by the Templeton Foundation. Every reader will surely find some chapters interesting and informative, some provocative, and some rather vacuous. These will not be the same chapters for all readers. Two 'conflict of interest' statements: first, I spoke at one of these meetings, but was not one of those asked to provide a chapter. And, second, the first time I suggested in a lecture for scientists that 'many universes, either in temporal succession or embedded in higher dimensional space' was a possible explanation of the habitability of ours was fall 1974, shortly after Brandon Carter's first paper on anthropic principles and explanations, but before Bernard Carr and Martin Rees's 1979 Nature paper, which presented all the anthropic arguments then known and divided them into numbers that required no additional physics beyond the four standard forces (like the number of particles in a star) and those that seemed essential for life but not calculable (like the ratio of the electromagnetic to nuclear force constant). My other three possibilities were 'G.d has been very careful' (now called intelligent design), additional physics to be learned, and shear complexity. The core multiverse concept is that our universe (the 4-dimensional spacetime with which we are or could be connected and all its contents) is one of many, perhaps infinitely many, probably with different values of the constants of

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Universe or Multiverse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2008-11-01

    More than 2000 years ago, Epicurus taught that there are an infinite number of other worlds, both like and unlike ours, and Aristotle taught that there are none. Neither hypothesis can currently be falsified, and this issue of potential for falsification (that is testability) goes to the heart of many of the chapters in Carr's book. All but one of the 27 chapters, provided by 27 pundits (almost but not quite a one-to-one mapping) are written versions of talks given at one of three meetings, held between 2001 and 2005 at Stanford and Cambridge Universities and partly sponsored by the Templeton Foundation. Every reader will surely find some chapters interesting and informative, some provocative, and some rather vacuous. These will not be the same chapters for all readers. Two 'conflict of interest' statements: first, I spoke at one of these meetings, but was not one of those asked to provide a chapter. And, second, the first time I suggested in a lecture for scientists that 'many universes, either in temporal succession or embedded in higher dimensional space' was a possible explanation of the habitability of ours was fall 1974, shortly after Brandon Carter's first paper on anthropic principles and explanations, but before Bernard Carr and Martin Rees's 1979 Nature paper, which presented all the anthropic arguments then known and divided them into numbers that required no additional physics beyond the four standard forces (like the number of particles in a star) and those that seemed essential for life but not calculable (like the ratio of the electromagnetic to nuclear force constant). My other three possibilities were 'G.d has been very careful' (now called intelligent design), additional physics to be learned, and shear complexity. The core multiverse concept is that our universe (the 4-dimensional spacetime with which we are or could be connected and all its contents) is one of many, perhaps infinitely many, probably with different values of the constants of

  6. Book Review: Scientific Writing for Young Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyttenhove, Jos

    2011-12-01

    EDP Sciences, Les Ulis, France. Part 1 : 162 pp. € 35 ISBN 978-2-7598-0506-8 Part 2 : 298 pp. € 60 ISBN 978-2-7598-0639-3 The journal Astronomy & Astrophysics (A&A) and EDP Sciences decided in 2007 to organize a School on the various aspects of scientific writing and publishing. In 2008 and 2009 Scientific Writing for Young Astronomers (SWYA) Schools were held in Blankenberge (B) under the direction of Christiaan Sterken (FWO-VUB). These two books (EAS publication series, Vol. 49 and 50) reflect the outcome of these Schools. Part 1 contains a set of contributions that discuss various aspects of scientific publication; it includes A&A Editors' view of the peer review and publishing process. A very interesting short paper by S.R. Pottasch (Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Groningen, and one of the two first Editors-in Chief of A&A) deals with the history of the creation of the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. Two papers by J. Adams et al. (Observatoire de Paris) discuss language editing, including a detailed guide for any non-native user of the English language. In 2002 the Board of Directors decided that all articles in A&A must be written in clear and correct English. Part 2 consists of three very extensive and elaborated papers by Christiaan Sterken, supplying guidelines to PhD students and postdoctoral fellows to help them compose scientific papers for different forums (journals, proceedings, thesis, etc.). This part is of interest not only for young astronomers but it is very useful for scholars of all ages and disciplines. Paper I "The writing process" (60 pp.) copes with the preparation of manuscripts, with communicating with editors and referees and with avoiding common errors. Delicate problems on authorship, refereeing, revising multi-authored papers etc. are treated in 26 FAQ's. Paper II "Communication by graphics" (120 pp.) is entirely dedicated to the important topic of communication with images, graphs, diagrams, tables etc. Design types of graphs

  7. The life project book review - A correction.

    PubMed

    Tallo, Donato

    2016-05-01

    I was pleased to see your review of The Life Project by Helen Pearson (reviews, April 16). However, it contained one serious error. The original cohort study started in 1946 - not 1958 as stated. I was present at the book launch and have met the author - my grandmother is one of the 1946 original cohort members. That error apart, a great review and a good book. PMID:27154115

  8. Referees, editors, and publication practices: Improving the reliability and usefulness of the peer review system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicchetti, Domenic V.

    1997-03-01

    The documented low levels of reliability of the peer review process present a serious challenge to editors who must often base their publication decisions on conflicting referee recommendations. The purpose of this article is to discuss this process and examine ways to produce a more reliable and useful peer review system.

  9. Ensuring the Quality, Fairness, and Integrity of Journal Peer Review: A Possible Role of Editors.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B; Elmore, Susan A

    2016-02-01

    A growing body of literature has identified potential problems that can compromise the quality, fairness, and integrity of journal peer review, including inadequate review, inconsistent reviewer reports, reviewer biases, and ethical transgressions by reviewers. We examine the evidence concerning these problems and discuss proposed reforms, including double-blind and open review. Regardless of the outcome of additional research or attempts at reforming the system, it is clear that editors are the linchpin of peer review, since they make decisions that have a significant impact on the process and its outcome. We consider some of the steps editors should take to promote quality, fairness and integrity in different stages of the peer review process and make some recommendations for editorial conduct and decision-making. PMID:25633924

  10. Editor in Chief: Grammar Disasters and Punctuation Faux Pas. Book C-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Michael; And Others

    The 33 activities in this book reinforce the rules of written English by providing students with practice in editing a variety of formats. The activities help students develop a basic understanding of the rules of grammar and mechanics (generally taught in grades 8 and up) in context and exercise their critical thinking abilities by identifying…

  11. Editor in Chief: Grammar Disasters and Punctuation Faux Pas. Book A-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Michael; And Others

    The 33 activities in this book reinforce the rules of written English by providing students with practice in editing a variety of formats. The activities help students develop a basic understanding of the rules of grammar and mechanics (generally taught in grades 4-5) in context and exercise their critical thinking abilities by identifying content…

  12. Editor in Chief: Grammar Disasters and Punctuation Faux Pas. Book B-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Michael; And Others

    The 33 activities in this book reinforce the rules of written English by providing students with practice in editing a variety of formats. The activities help students develop a basic understanding of the rules of grammar and mechanics (generally taught in grades 6-7) in context and exercise their critical thinking abilities by identifying content…

  13. Reviewing Academic Books: Are There Ethical Issues?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Edmund F.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses bias in academic book reviewing due to the hierarchy of perceived excellence promoted by the academic and publishing industries and that favors authors from the most prestigious universities. Focuses on pre-publication reviewing of philosophical work and considers anonymity in journal peer reviewing and transparency in academic book…

  14. BOOK REVIEW: The Odd Quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, Sam

    2003-07-01

    This is an enjoyable book by a particle physicist of some distinction, who wrote several books on the theoretical aspects of his subject. He died soon after the book was finished. This book would seem a splendid tribute to his memory. The first five chapters are an excellent introduction to quantum mechanics from the viewpoint of a particle physicist. (A solid state physicist might include some other topics.) The next three chapters give some feeling for the excitement of particle physics and describe some of the zoo of curious creatures discovered in the depths of particle accelerators, and the forces between them: strong, electromagnetic and weak. The final chapter, 'Quantum Fields', is a tour de force. The author has a light touch and a pleasant sense of humour. He does not attempt to explain everything he mentions, but he makes it very clear when he does not. These points are beautifully illustrated by the following extract from the final chapter (p 245). 'It was said above that virtual particles come into play when the real collision ingredients are all close together. In fact, virtual particles are always in play. Even a single real particle, moving along in isolation, can emit and reabsorb virtual particles over and over again. This has the effect of shifting the physical mass of the particle away from the 'bare' value that entered into the Hamiltonian. That shift inevitably turns out to be slightly infinite, and there is a whole technology for isolating and redefining away this and a few other infinities that are characteristic of renormalisable quantum field theories. But we forebear to pursue these delicacies any further here.' I particularly like 'slightly infinite'. The publisher's blurb describes this book as being suitable for popular science readers. It is not. Its level of mathematics would make it very heavy going for anyone who had not taken at least one course in mathematics at university. This is a book which can be strongly recommended as a

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Soft Condensed Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Richard A. L.

    2002-11-01

    The author states in the preface of the book that the aim is '...to give a unified overview of the various aspects of the physics of soft condensed matter'. The book succeeds in fulfilling this aim in many respects. i) The style is fluent and concise and gives the necessary explanations to make its content understandable to people with some knowledge of the basic principles of physics. ii) The content of the book is complete enough to give a panoramic view of the landscape of soft condensed matter. The first two chapters give, respectively, a short introduction and a presentation of forces, energies and timescales, giving a general overview and pointing out the particular importance of different aspects such as timescales, which are much more important in soft condensed matter than in traditional or 'hard' condensed matter. The next chapter, devoted to phase transition, recalls that the equilibrium between two phases is controlled by free energy considerations. Spinodal decomposition is presented as a counterpart of nucleation and growth. Again, characteristic length scales are considered and applied to a phase separation mixture of polymers in a common solvent. The following three chapters are devoted respectively to specific topics: colloidal dispersion, polymers and gelation. The stability and phase behaviour of colloids are related to the interaction between colloidal particles. Properties of colloidal crystals as well as colloidal dispersion are depicted in terms of stabilization of crystalline colloids. The flow properties of colloidal dispersion are presented in terms of free energy minimization and the structure of the dispersion. After a brief introduction to polymer chemistry and architecture, the coil-globule transition is discussed. Viscoelasticity of polymers is described and discussed by introducing the notion of entanglement. This leads to the introduction of the tube model and the theory of reptation. The sol-gel transition is presented

  16. BOOK REVIEW: The Wraparound Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrzewski, Wojtek J.

    2008-11-01

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. It is written in clear language supplemented with many very helpful photographs and drawings. I like the structure of the book, which is a collection of 45 rather short chapters that make it easier for the reader to read it at his/her own speed. The main aim of the author is to interest the reader in cosmology and to convey to him/her the amazing progress that has been made in recent years in our understanding of the universe, its shape and its future. However, even to formulate this problem and to describe some recent work in this field, the author has to explain to the reader many concepts from mathematics and physics. Jean-Pierre Luminet, in addition to being a well known astrophysicist, is also a very gifted writer and so he manages to do this very successfully. In fact the book contains very few formulae and most of the explanations are given in terms of a written narrative supplemented by drawings. The author is also extremely skillful in finding and then using appropriate analogies. The required ideas from mathematics, and topology in particular, present a further aim of the book—to explain to the interested reader the beautiful world of topology and its relevance to the description of the real world. Here, again, he succeeds very impressively. The central claim of the book is as follows: instead of a simple topology, the Universe may have a multiply-connected topology—hence 'wrapped around'; in consequence, it may be much smaller than is usually assumed. If this is so some of the galaxies we see are not real galaxies, but only images of a smaller number of genuine galaxies. The author then discusses possible topologies, and finally chooses the 'dodecahedral' one. A large part of the book is dedicated to showing how this hypothesis can be tested, and what the most recent data on the cosmic background radiation from the WMAP satellite say about this issue (they are inconclusive). Jean-Pierre Luminet's suggestions

  17. Book Review: Plant Growth and Climate Change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The technical book "Plant Growth and climate Change" (2006. James I.L. Morison and M.D. Morecroft, Eds. Blackwell Publishing. 213 pp.) was reviewed for the scientific readership of the peer-reviewed journal HortScience. The text is well organized into nine independently-authored chapters each of whi...

  18. BOOK REVIEW: The Odd Quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Helen

    2000-03-01

    The Odd Quantum is aiming to be odd. Falling between being a quantum mechanics textbook and a `popular' science book, it aims to convey something of the substance of quantum mechanics without being overly technical or professional. It does not shy away from the mathematics of the subject or resort solely to analogy and metaphor, as so often is the case. Books aimed at the lay reader tend to take on a particular aspect of quantum mechanics, for example, wave-particle duality, and can do little more than hint at the complexity of the subject. This book is more than a textbook on quantum mechanics; it gives the reader a comprehensive account of history and an appreciation of the nature of quantum mechanics. The introductory chapters deal with the earlier part of the century and the thinking of that time. The approach is familiar, as are the stories that Treiman tells, but he also manages to convey the speed with which ideas changed and the excitement this brought to the physics community. Classical ideas of force and energy are dealt with succinctly but with sufficient depth to set up the reader for what is to come; Maxwell's equations and a brief glimpse at relativity are included. This is followed by a brief description of what the author terms the `old' quantum mechanics, in effect a highly readable tour around black body radiation and spectroscopy and the models of the atom that emerged from them. The `new' quantum mechanics begins about a third of the way through the book, and in a chapter entitled `Foundations' starts gently but rapidly moves into a detailed mathematical treatment. This section, of necessity, relapses into the style of a textbook and covers a lot of ground quickly. It is at this point that the non-specialist popular science readers for whom Treiman has written this book may become a little bemused. Concepts such as non-degeneracy and operators come thick and fast. It is difficult to imagine an educated non-physicist with little mathematical

  19. BOOK REVIEW: The Current Comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersons, Oskars

    1989-01-01

    This 120-page book is a concise, yet comprehensive, clearly-written and well-illustrated monograph that covers the subject matter from basic principles through design, construction and calibration details to the principal applications. The book will be useful, as a primer, to the uninitiated and, as a reference book to the practitioner involved with transformer-type ratio devices. The length of the book and the style of presentation will not overburden any informed reader. The described techniques and the cited references are primarily from the work at the National Research Council, Canada (NRC). Any omissions, however, are not serious with respect to coverage of the subject matter, since most of the development work has been done at NRC. The role of transformers and transformer-like devices for establishing accurate voltage and current ratios has been recognized for over half a century. Transformer techniques were much explored and developed in the fifties and sixties for accuracy levels suitable for standards laboratories. Three-winding voltage transformers were developed for scaling of impedances in connection with the calculable Thompson Lampard capacitor; three-winding current transformers or current comparators were initially explored for the calibration of current transformers and later for specialized impedance measurements. Extensive development of the current comparator and its applications has been and is still being conducted at the NRC by a team that was started and, until his retirement, led by N L Kusters. The team is now led by W J M Moore. He and P N Miljanic, the authors of this book, have had the principal roles in the development of the current comparator. It is fortunate for the field of metrology that considerabe resources and a talented group of researchers were available to do this development along with mechanisms that were available to transfer this technology to a private sector instrument manufacturer and, thus, disseminate it world wide

  20. Book Review: "The Road to Sustainability, GDP and Future Generations" Pulselli et al, WIT Press, Southhampton, UK 197p 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    “The Road to Sustainability, GDP and future generations” by Pulselli, F.M., Bastianoni, S., Marchettini, N. Tiezzi, E. was reviewed upon request by the journal’s editor. Briefly, this book presents the authors’ perspective on the complex and important topic of sustainability. Su...

  1. BOOK REVIEW: Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoine, J.-P.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of relativistic quantum mechanics is to describe the finer details of the structure of atoms and molecules, where relativistic effects become nonnegligible. It is a sort of intermediate realm, between the familiar nonrelativistic quantum mechanics and fully relativistic quantum field theory, and thus it lacks the simplicity and elegance of both. Yet it is a necessary tool, mostly for quantum chemists. Pilkuhn's book offers to this audience an up-to-date survey of these methods, which is quite welcome since most previous textbooks are at least ten years old. The point of view of the author is to start immediately in the relativistic domain, following the lead of Maxwell's equations rather than classical mechanics, and thus to treat the nonrelativistic version as an approximation. Thus Chapter 1 takes off from Maxwell's equations (in the noncovariant Coulomb gauge) and gradually derives the basic aspects of Quantum Mechanics in a rather pedestrian way (states and observables, Hilbert space, operators, quantum measurement, scattering,. Chapter 2 starts with the Lorentz transformations, then continues with the Pauli spin equation and the Dirac equation and some of their applications (notably the hydrogen atom). Chapter 3 is entitled `Quantum fields and particles', but falls short of treating quantum field theory properly: only creation/annihilation operators are considered, for a particle in a box. The emphasis is on two-electron states (the Pauli principle, the Foldy--Wouthuysen elimination of small components of Dirac spinors, Breit projection operators. Chapter 4 is devoted to scattering theory and the description of relativistic bound states. Chapter 5, finally, covers hyperfine interactions and radiative corrections. As we said above, relativistic quantum mechanics is by nature limited in scope and rather inelegant and Pilkuhn's book is no exception. The notation is often heavy (mostly noncovariant) and the mathematical level rather low. The central topic

  2. Book Review: Sapphire. (1996). Push.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Elisabeth; Cuban, Sondra

    1998-01-01

    This review of "Push," a novel about a young single mother in a literacy education program, incorporates theoretical elements from Allan Quigley's "Rethinking Literacy Education." The review addresses issues of stereotypes, humanistic education, and advocacy and includes reflections on teaching philosophy in adult basic education. (SK)

  3. Letter to the editor : Impartial review is key.

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G. W.; Materials Science Division

    2002-08-22

    The News Feature, 'Misconduct in physics: Time to wise up? [Nature 418, 120-121; 2002], raises important issues that the physical-science community must face. Argonne National Laboratory's code of ethics calls for a response very similar to that of Bell Labs, namely: 'The Laboratory director may appoint an ad-hoc scientific review committee to investigate internal or external charges of scientific misconduct, fraud, falsification of data, misinterpretation of data, or other activities involving scientific or technical matters.'

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Once Upon Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannetto, E.

    2007-07-01

    Thibault Damour is a theoretical physicist, and a member of the French Academy of Sciences. This book is the translation, by Eric Novak, of the original French Si Einstein m'etait conté (Le Cherche Midi, 2005). It is neither a book of theoretical physics nor a biography of Einstein. It is not a book of history nor philosophy of science. In Damour's words it was written to encourage the reader to share with Einstein `those times when he understood some part of the hidden order of the universe'. It is a relatively short book, written in a very fluent style, but it deals with all the major problems and achievements of Einstein's works. Starting from special relativity, it continues with general relativity, quantum theories, unified field theory and a brief overview of the actual research related to Einstein's legacy. It is essentially a popular science book with some related exploration in history and philosophy to interpret physical theories. The most important problem discussed by Damour is the nature of time. On this subject, there is a very interesting short paragraph (pp 33--35) dedicated to the reception of the relativity idea by the great writer Marcel Proust and its counterpart within À la Recherche du Temps Perdu. A correct discussion of the implications of a relativistic time should imply the distinction of the different possible interpretations of this concept. Damour seems to conclude that only one interpretation is possible: `time does not exist', flowing of time is an illusion. One has to know that Einstein's ideas on time were related to Spinoza's perspective of a knowledge sub specie aeternitatis. However, other interpretations are possible and are related to the idea of time as an actuality. Damour speaks about the controversy between Einstein and Bergson, but Bergson is considered as a philosopher who did not understand relativity. This philosophical problem of relativistic time is indeed related to a historical problem briefly discussed by Damour

  5. The effects of an editor serving as one of the reviewers during the peer-review process.

    PubMed

    Giordan, Marco; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Collings, Andrew M; Vaggi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Background Publishing in scientific journals is one of the most important ways in which scientists disseminate research to their peers and to the wider public. Pre-publication peer review underpins this process, but peer review is subject to various criticisms and is under pressure from growth in the number of scientific publications. Methods Here we examine an element of the editorial process at eLife, in which the Reviewing Editor usually serves as one of the referees, to see what effect this has on decision times, decision type, and the number of citations. We analysed a dataset of 8,905 research submissions to eLife since June 2012, of which 2,750 were sent for peer review, using R and Python to perform the statistical analysis. Results The Reviewing Editor serving as one of the peer reviewers results in faster decision times on average, with the time to final decision ten days faster for accepted submissions (n=1,405) and 5 days faster for papers that were rejected after peer review (n=1,099). There was no effect on whether submissions were accepted or rejected, and a very small (but significant) effect on citation rates for published articles where the Reviewing Editor served as one of the peer reviewers. Conclusions An important aspect of eLife's peer-review process is shown to be effective, given that decision times are faster when the Reviewing Editor serves as a reviewer. Other journals hoping to improve decision times could consider adopting a similar approach. PMID:27508056

  6. The effects of an editor serving as one of the reviewers during the peer-review process

    PubMed Central

    Giordan, Marco; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Collings, Andrew M.; Vaggi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Background Publishing in scientific journals is one of the most important ways in which scientists disseminate research to their peers and to the wider public. Pre-publication peer review underpins this process, but peer review is subject to various criticisms and is under pressure from growth in the number of scientific publications. Methods Here we examine an element of the editorial process at eLife, in which the Reviewing Editor usually serves as one of the referees, to see what effect this has on decision times, decision type, and the number of citations. We analysed a dataset of 8,905 research submissions to eLife since June 2012, of which 2,750 were sent for peer review, using R and Python to perform the statistical analysis. Results The Reviewing Editor serving as one of the peer reviewers results in faster decision times on average, with the time to final decision ten days faster for accepted submissions (n=1,405) and 5 days faster for papers that were rejected after peer review (n=1,099). There was no effect on whether submissions were accepted or rejected, and a very small (but significant) effect on citation rates for published articles where the Reviewing Editor served as one of the peer reviewers. Conclusions An important aspect of eLife’s peer-review process is shown to be effective, given that decision times are faster when the Reviewing Editor serves as a reviewer. Other journals hoping to improve decision times could consider adopting a similar approach. PMID:27508056

  7. Book review of "Encyclopedia of soil science"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book review describes "Encyclopedia of soil science" edited by Chesworth et al. (2008), an update of the 1979 version of "The encyclopedia of soil science" edited by Fairbridge and Finkl. It is compared with Hillel et al. (2004) second edition of "Encyclopedia of soils in the environment" and w...

  8. BOOK REVIEW: Generation and Application of High Power Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshfield, J. L.

    1998-08-01

    A question often posed upon publication of a summer school proceedings is whether the contents are of lasting value, or are only an archive or diary of the gathering. This issue is exacerbated by the year's delay (or more) that is all too customary between the school itself and publication; and of course the attendees have had the contents in note form all along. Only occasionally, in this reviewer's experience, are the contents worth the purchase price of the book; and even less often is the book a useful reference for course work in a teaching context. It is thus gratifying to report that the present volume should be of lasting value, and should be a useful reference for students in high power microwave physics and related fields to have and to hold during their formative years. The editors, Professor Alan Cairns of the University of St Andrews, and Professor Alan Phelps of the University of Strathclyde, have assembled some 14 essays in the book on a range of topics on microwave source physics and the uses of high power microwaves for fusion plasma heating. Amongst the essays are several tutorials, including Alan Phelps' own 8 page introduction; Michael Petelin's elegant overview of a range of classical spontaneous and stimulated radiation processes for free electrons; Rodolfo Bonifacio's exposition on free electron waveguide lasers; James Eastwood's overview of computer modelling methods; Georges Faillon's review of klystrons; Alan Cairns's and Nat Fisch's lucid descriptions of the physical basis of plasma heating with intense microwaves; and Manfred Thumm's two thorough contributions on microwave mode converters and on applications. The other essays are less tutorial, but more topical, with expositions on new results on gyro-amplifiers by Monica Blank; on vacuum microelectronics issues for microwave power amplifiers by Morag Garven and Robert Parker; John Vomvoridis's theory of cyclotron resonance interactions for generation of high power microwaves using a

  9. BOOK REVIEW: String Theory in a Nutshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skenderis, Kostas

    2007-11-01

    The book 'String Theory in a Nutshell' by Elias Kiritsis provides a comprehensive introduction to modern string theory. String theory is the leading candidate for a theory that successfully unifies all fundamental forces of nature, including gravity. The subject has been continuously developing since the early 1970s, with classic textbooks on the subject being those of Green, Schwarz and Witten (1987) and Polchinski (1998). Since the latter was published there have been substantial developments, in particular in understanding black holes and gravity/gauge theory dualities. A textbook treatment of this important material is clearly needed, both by students and researchers in string theory and by mathematicians and physicists working in related fields. This book has a good selection of material, starting from basics and moving into classic and modern topics. In particular, Kiritsis' presentation of the basic material is complementary to that of the earlier textbooks and he includes a number of topics which are not easily found or covered adequately elsewhere, for example, loop corrections to string effective couplings. Overall the book nicely covers the major advances of the last ten years, including (non-perturbative) string dualities, black hole physics, AdS/CFT and matrix models. It provides a concise but fairly complete introduction to these subjects which can be used both by students and by researchers. Moreover the emphasis is on results that are reasonably established, as is appropriate for a textbook; concise summaries are given for subjects which are still in flux, with references to relevant reviews and papers. A positive feature of the book is that the bibliography sections at the end of each chapter provide a comprehensive guide to the literature. The bibliographies point to reviews and pedagogical papers on subjects covered in this book as well as those that were omitted. It is rare for a textbook to contain such a self-contained and detailed guide to

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Physics of Space Plasma Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, N. F.

    2007-11-01

    This book provides a timely review of our present understanding of plasma phenomena in magnetized terrestrial and solar space plasmas. The author's emphasis is on the fluid and particle modeling and interpretation of observed active processes in space plasmas, i.e. `the physical background of large plasma eruptions in space'. It is somewhat alarming for a plasma physicist to read that an emphasis on processes in spatially inhomogeneous plasmas means that the work `... excludes a considerable fraction of the available methods in space plasma physics, such as the theory of waves, instabilities and wave particle interactions on a homogeneous background', particularly in light of the fact that much of our knowledge of these plasmas is derived from observations of such waves. However, it is clear on reading the book that such a restriction is not a disadvantage, but allows the author to concentrate on the main theme of the book, namely the use of fluid and particle pictures to model the equilibrium and active states of space plasmas. There are many other books which cover the wave aspects of space plasmas, and would complement this book. The book's coverage is based on the extensive and profound research of the author and his colleagues in the area of fluid and particle modeling of space plasma structures. After an introduction to the physical setting of active plasmas, and a necessarily concise, but effective, discussion of the fluid and particle models to be used, the steady states of the magnetized plasmas of interest are treated, including the magnetosphere, solar plasmas and current sheets. Next the dynamics of unstable states is covered, including MHD and tearing instabilities, and nonlinear aspects, with a detailed discussion of magnetic reconnection. Finally, the models are applied to magnetospheric and solar observations. The book is attractively written and produced, and this reviewer managed to find a minimum number of errors. A particularly attractive

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Image-Guided IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayles, P.

    2006-12-01

    This book provides comprehensive coverage of the subject of intensity modulated radiotherapy and the associated imaging. Most of the names associated with advanced radiotherapy can be found among the 80 authors and the book is therefore an authoritative reference text. The early chapters deal with the basic principles and include an interesting comparison between views of quality assurance for IMRT from Europe and North America. It is refreshing to see that the advice given has moved on from the concept of individual patient based quality control to more generic testing of the delivery system. However, the point is made that the whole process including the data transfer needs to be quality assured and the need for thorough commissioning of the process is emphasised. The `tricks' needed to achieve a dose based IMRT plan are well covered by the group at Ghent and there is an interesting summary of biological aspects of treatment planning for IMRT by Andrzej Niemierko. The middle section of the book deals with advanced imaging aspects of both treatment planning and delivery. The contributions of PET and MR imaging are well covered and there is a rather rambling section on molecular imaging. Image guidance in radiotherapy treatment is addressed including the concept of adaptive radiotherapy. The treatment aspects could perhaps have merited some more coverage, but there is a very thorough discussion of 4D techniques. The final section of the book considers each site of the body in turn. This will be found useful by those wishing to embark on IMRT in a new area, although some of the sections are more comprehensive than others. The book contains a wealth of interesting and thought provoking articles giving details as well as broad principles, and would be a useful addition to every departmental library. The editors have done a good job of ensuring that the different chapters are complementary, and of encouraging a systematic approach to the descriptions of IMRT in

  12. The Book Review Genre: A Structural Move Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmani Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali; Montazeran, Hamed

    2012-01-01

    The current study aimed at showing whether native, ESL and EFL book review authors differed in terms of types of rhetorical moves the employ in the reviews they write. 60 book reviews (N = 60) from applied linguistics journals were randomly selected from a pool of 87 book reviews published in "Asian EFL Journal," "ESP," "System," and "TESOL…

  13. Boerhaave: Author and Editor *

    PubMed Central

    Lindeboom, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The many facets of Herman Boerhaave's life are presented. He was a renowned teacher, physician, author, and editor. Discussed here are his activities as cataloger of the Vossius Collection, author of books on chemistry, botany, and medicine, and as editor of works by Vesalius and early Greek medical writers. Printing and bookselling in Leiden during Boerhaave's era are described. Images PMID:4596962

  14. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara; Heilbrun, Margaret; Kuzyk, Raya; Kim, Ann; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Burns, Ann; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    From the fall's cascade of great new books, "Library Journal's" editors select their favorites--a dark rendition of Afghan life, a look at the "self-esteem trap," a celebration of Brooklyn activism, and much more.

  15. BOOK REVIEW: European Perceptions of Terra Australis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Christiaan

    2012-12-01

    transposition errors and thus creating pidgin or even fake geographical appellations. The evidence presented in this work brings out many issues of cartographic authorship credit, exploratory competition and plagiarism, and even ghostwriting. The book is of interest, among others, to cultural historians, historians of science, historians of cartography, the visual arts, and to scholars in the history of slavery and post-colonial studies. The Editors of this Volume have done a fine job by arranging all references into one single bibliography list at the end of the book: as such, the reader has access to one alphabetical list of about 30 pages of sources and references. The book contains more than 50 figures, mostly zonal maps and charts, world maps, and also reproductions of painted landscapes and portraits. Regretfully, none of these illustrations is in colour, and the low-contrast greytone reproductions lack the necessary luster to fully appreciate the scientific and artistic content. Worse even, some graphics are extremely poor in terms of image resolution: for example, a full-page reproduction from a 15th-century morality play has been copied from the given website at a graphical resolution of 85 dpi only. This is in complete contradiction with the hardcover-with-sleeve product of that price level.

  16. Should Authors Submit Previous Peer-Review Reports When Submitting Research Papers? Views of General Medical Journal Editors

    PubMed Central

    Cals, Jochen W. L.; Mallen, Christian D.; Glynn, Liam G.; Kotz, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Publishing research can be time consuming, as papers are often submitted and reviewed by multiple journals before final acceptance. We hypothesized that attaching previous peer-review reports to the next submission of the paper to a different journal (possibly with point-to-point responses and amendments) could decrease the workload for both reviewers and editors and could shorten the time from final draft to actual publication. We therefore performed an online survey to assess the views of the editors-in-chief of all 100 general medical journals from the citation impact factor report category “internal & general medicine” (ISI Web of Knowledge). Of contacted editors, 61% responded. One of 4 journals do currently receive peer-review reports on occasion. Editors recognized potential advantages but also concerns on using previous peer-review reports across 3 themes: scientific community, quality of papers, and the publication process. The use of previous peer-review reports has the potential to facilitate authors, reviewers, and editors in optimizing peer review in general medical science. PMID:23508606

  17. Children's Books in Review. Books That Give Cultural Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winfield, Evelyn T.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a selection of children's books that feature a variety of topics and literary representations with insight into other cultures. The books focus on foods, historical events, reliance on the environment, folktales, family experiences, community heritage, words and phrases, and linguistic eccentricities. (SM)

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Quantum Gravity (2nd edn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Viqar

    2008-06-01

    There has been a flurry of books on quantum gravity in the past few years. The first edition of Kiefer's book appeared in 2004, about the same time as Carlo Rovelli's book with the same title. This was soon followed by Thomas Thiemann's 'Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity'. Although the main focus of each of these books is non-perturbative and non-string approaches to the quantization of general relativity, they are quite orthogonal in temperament, style, subject matter and mathematical detail. Rovelli and Thiemann focus primarily on loop quantum gravity (LQG), whereas Kiefer attempts a broader introduction and review of the subject that includes chapters on string theory and decoherence. Kiefer's second edition attempts an even wider and somewhat ambitious sweep with 'new sections on asymptotic safety, dynamical triangulation, primordial black holes, the information-loss problem, loop quantum cosmology, and other topics'. The presentation of these current topics is necessarily brief given the size of the book, but effective in encapsulating the main ideas in some cases. For instance the few pages devoted to loop quantum cosmology describe how the mini-superspace reduction of the quantum Hamiltonian constraint of LQG becomes a difference equation, whereas the discussion of 'dynamical triangulations', an approach to defining a discretized Lorentzian path integral for quantum gravity, is less detailed. The first few chapters of the book provide, in a roughly historical sequence, the covariant and canonical metric variable approach to the subject developed in the 1960s and 70s. The problem(s) of time in quantum gravity are nicely summarized in the chapter on quantum geometrodynamics, followed by a detailed and effective introduction of the WKB approach and the semi-classical approximation. These topics form the traditional core of the subject. The next three chapters cover LQG, quantization of black holes, and quantum cosmology. Of these the chapter on LQG is

  19. Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newland, Robert J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reviews four organic chemistry computer programs and three books. Software includes: (1) NMR Simulator 7--for IBM or Macintosh, (2) Nucleic Acid Structure and Synthesis--for IBM, (3) Molecular Design Editor--for Apple II, and (4) Synthetic Adventure--for Apple II and IBM. Book topics include physical chemistry, polymer pioneers, and the basics of…

  20. Book Reviews as a Tool for Assessing Publisher Reputation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordy, Matthew L.; McGrath, Eileen L.; Rutledge, John B.

    1999-01-01

    Reports on the use of book reviews as selection tools to establish the reputations of publishers. Examines the quality of books of several presses, and compares each publisher against a control sample, finding discernible variations in how reviewers express themselves about books. Discusses the relationship between price and qualit,y and…

  1. Children's Books in Review: Expand Kids' Knowledge with Nonfiction Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winfield, Evelyn T.

    1991-01-01

    Examines several current nonfiction books that can expand a child's knowledge of a wide variety of subjects, noting that the breadth of a child's knowledge base affects his or her reading development. Subjects discussed include dinosaurs, animal preservation, insects, ecology, history, and drugs and alcohol. (SM)

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Time, Quantum and Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Leaf

    2004-04-01

    Time, Quantum and Information, a paean to Professor Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker, commemorates his 90th birthday. The range of Professor Weizsäcker’s endeavours is an exhilarating example of what can be accomplished by one freely-soaring human spirit, who is at the same time a physicist, a philosopher, and a humanitarian. The editors, Lutz Castell and Otfried Ischebeck, have assembled an admirable collection of essays and articles written by Weizsäcker’s past students, collaborators, colleagues and acquaintances. Time, Quantum and Information offers the reader a panoply of unique insights into twentieth century science and history. Entangled with the stories about Weizsäcker’s influence on the lives of some of the contributors are discussions of the activities of German scientists during and following World War II, emphasizing their reluctance to work on atomic weapons following the war. By outlining Weizsäcker’s role in the early development of numerous tributaries of physical science, the book gives us a new glimpse into the origins of some of its disparate domains, such as nuclear physics, the physics of stellar nucleosynthesis, cosmic ray physics, fluid turbulence, and the formation of the solar system. We physicists have all studied Weizsäcker’s semi-empirical mass formula describing the binding energy of nuclei. We are aware too that both he and Hans Bethe independently discovered the nuclear cycles that provide stars with their enduring energy output. We have studied the Weizsäcker--Williams technique of calculating the bremsstrahlung of relativistic electrons. But how many of us know of Weizsäcker’s work in fluid turbulence that he, like Werner Heisenberg under whom he had earned his doctorate, pursued while holed up in Farm Hall? And how many of us are aware of his introduction of turbulent viscosity to account for the origin of planetary orbits, involving the migration of mass inwards and angular momentum outwards? Moreover, before

  3. Science Books, A Quarterly Review, Volume 6 Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deason, Hilary J.

    1971-01-01

    For the improvement of science education and to facilitate the public understanding of science, the American Association for the Advancement of Science publishes this quarterly review of science books. Evaluations and annotations are given for trade books, textbooks, and reference works in the pure and applied sciences. Books are for students in…

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Solid State Physics: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakoby, Bernhard

    2009-07-01

    There's a wealth of excellent textbooks on solid state physics. The author of the present book is well aware of this fact and does not attempt to write just another one. Rather, he has provided a very compact introduction to solid state physics for third-year students. As we are faced with the continuous appearance interdisciplinary fields and associated study curricula in natural and engineering sciences (biophysics, mechatronics, etc), a compact text in solid state physics would be appreciated by students of these disciplines as well. The book features 11 chapters where each is provided with supplementary discussion questions and problems. The first chapters deal with a review of chemical bonding mechanisms, crystal structures and mechanical properties of solids, which are brief but by no means superficial. The following, somewhat more detailed chapter on thermal properties of lattices includes a nice introduction to phonons. The foundations of solid state electronics are treated in the next three chapters. Here the author first discusses the classical treatment of electronic behaviour in metals (Drude model) and continues with a quantum-theoretical approach starting with the free-electron model and leading to the band structures in conductive solids. The next chapter is devoted to semiconductors and ends with a brief but, with respect to the topical scope, adequate discussion of semiconductor devices. The classical topics of magnetic and dielectric behaviour are treated in the sequel. The book closes with a chapter on superconductivity and a brief chapter covering the modern topics of quantum confinement and aspects of nanoscale physics. In my opinion, the author has succeeded in creating a very concise yet not superficial textbook. The account presented often probes subjects deep enough to lay the basis for a thorough understanding, preparing the reader for more specialized textbooks. For instance, I think that this book may serve as an excellent first

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, V. M.

    2008-03-01

    Pulsar astrophysics has come a long way in the 40 years since the discovery of the first pulsar by Bell and Hewish. From humble beginnings as bits of 'scruff' on the Cambridge University group's chart recorder paper, the field of pulsars has blossomed into a major area of mainstream astrophysics, with an unparalleled diversity of astrophysical applications. These range from Nobel-celebrated testing of general relativity in the strong-field regime to constraining the equation-of-state of ultradense matter; from probing the winds of massive stars to globular cluster evolution. Previous notable books on the subject of pulsars have tended to focus on some particular topic in the field. The classic text Pulsars by Manchester and Taylor (1977 San Francisco, CA: Freeman) targeted almost exclusively rotation-powered radio pulsars, while the Mészáros book High-Energy Radiation from Magnetized Neutron Stars (1992 Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press) considered both rotation- and accretion-powered neutron stars, but focused on their radiation at x-ray energies and above. The recent book Neutron Stars 1 by Haensel et al (2007 Berlin: Springer) considers only the equation of state and neutron-star structure. Into this context appears Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars, by Pranab Ghosh. In contrast to other books, here the author takes an encyclopedic approach and attempts to synthesize practically all of the major aspects of the two main types of neutron star. This is ambitious. The only comparable undertaking is the useful but more elementary Lyne and Graham-Smith text Pulsar Astronomy (1998 Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), or Compact Stellar X-ray Sources (eds Lewin and van der Klis, 2006 Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), an anthology of technical review articles that also includes black hole topics. Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars thus fills a clear void in the field, providing a readable, graduate-level book that covers nearly everything you

  6. Electronic Books: A Review and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Siriginidi Subba

    2003-01-01

    Discusses electronic books and derives a comprehensive definition. Lists various types of e-books, their characteristics, pros and cons, and compares e-books reader hardware and software with their specifications and characteristics. Considers the publishing industry, impact on libraries, and digital rights management. (Author/LRW)

  7. BOOK REVIEW: The Oxford Companion to Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Peter

    2008-10-01

    compare the two books as I am clearly biased, but looking at mine again in the course of writing this review it struck me how much the landscape of cosmology has changed in the relatively short time that has elapsed between their publication dates. The past decade has seen the discovery of cosmic acceleration, detailed all-sky maps of the microwave background, the completion of huge galaxy surveys, and the synthesis of these observations into a standard 'concordance' cosmological model. If someone has the time and energy to undertake a project like this in ten years' time, I wonder if the current consensus will have survived.

  8. New Journal Editors Appointed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Barbara

    2009-11-01

    New editors have been appointed for Geophysical Research Letters (GRL), Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR)-Solid Earth, Reviews of Geophysics, JGR-Space Physics, Paleoceanography, and Tectonics. At GRL, new editors Noah Diffenbaugh (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.), Paolo D’Odorico (University of Virginia, Charlottesville), Ruth Harris (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Menlo Park, Calif.), Wolfgang Knorr (University of Bristol, Bristol, UK), Geoffrey Tyndall (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo.), and Michael Wysession (Washington University, St. Louis, Mo.) have joined Editor-in-Chief Eric Calais and other editors Margaret Chen, Fabio Florindo, Anne Müller, Nikolai Ostgaard, Eric Rignot, and Meric Srokosz.

  9. 12 CFR 995.10 - Review of books and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Review of books and records. 995.10 Section 995.10 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD NON-BANK SYSTEM ENTITIES FINANCING CORPORATION OPERATIONS § 995.10 Review of books and records. The Finance Board shall examine the Financing Corporation...

  10. 12 CFR 995.10 - Review of books and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Review of books and records. 995.10 Section 995.10 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD NON-BANK SYSTEM ENTITIES FINANCING CORPORATION OPERATIONS § 995.10 Review of books and records. The Finance Board shall examine the Financing Corporation...

  11. 12 CFR 995.10 - Review of books and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Review of books and records. 995.10 Section 995.10 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD NON-BANK SYSTEM ENTITIES FINANCING CORPORATION OPERATIONS § 995.10 Review of books and records. The Finance Board shall examine the Financing Corporation...

  12. 12 CFR 995.10 - Review of books and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Review of books and records. 995.10 Section 995.10 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD NON-BANK SYSTEM ENTITIES FINANCING CORPORATION OPERATIONS § 995.10 Review of books and records. The Finance Board shall examine the Financing Corporation...

  13. Science Books, A Quarterly Review, Volume 8 Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC.

    This quarterly journal reviews books in different science fields which could be used by teachers in elementary school, secondary school, and in the first two years of college. Not only are the textbooks reviewed, but trade books and reference works in pure and applied sciences are included. Annotations are listed in order of Dewey Decimal…

  14. An Estimation of Difficulty for Academic Books using Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yuki; Nambo, Hidetaka; Kimura, Haruhiko

    A collaborate filtering has been generally used as a method which recommends items to customers. However, recommending academic books, it need to consider difficulty of them and individual amount of knowledge as well as user's preference. If the recommendation method considers only user's preference, they might regret after buying or reading recommended book because it won't match user's appropriate level. In this paper, we focus on academic books and propose a method which estimates the difficulty of academic books using user's reviews. Estimating difficulty of books will support users to search and recommend academic books that match user's skill. Moreover, we evaluated applying our method to academic text books about C programming Language. We verified that our method is more effective than traditional methods for academic books.

  15. Familiarizing with science editors' associations

    PubMed Central

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri

    2011-01-01

    The number of science editors' associations is growing to resolve a variety of professional problems. The main objective of the associations is to educate their members by facilitating dissemination of information, publishing scholarly journals, books, networking of experts, and regular meetings. There are many science editing associations – general and specialized, traditional, and new. The article presents activities of some of these associations, which include upholding standards of science writing, editing, indexing, research reporting, peer review, editorial independence, and other editorial policies. PMID:22180273

  16. Book review: Current perspectives on zinc deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, Karen Duttweiler

    2016-01-01

    This book, published in 2015 by the Irish Association for Economic Geology (IAEG), is a compilation of papers and abstracts written by selected authors who attended the ZINC 2010 Conference in Cork, Ireland. Unlike most books produced each decade by the IAEG, which are focused primarily on achievements of the Irish and European mineral sectors, this book has a global perspective of a single commodity—zinc. As stated in the Preface, the theme of the conference and book was quite relevant for the IAEG because Ireland has the highest concentration of zinc per square kilometer on the planet. The book contains 7 full papers and 5 extended abstracts by keynote speakers, followed by 17 extended abstracts by other presenters, plus an Appendix (reprint) of a previously published paper.

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Fusion: The Energy of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, J.

    2006-05-01

    trails', since it is so tempting to produce a `backroom' solution to mankind's hunger for energy. Unfortunately, Chapter 8 can only regret that none of them has passed closer peer review. Chapters 9 and 10 concentrate on the `tokamak' concept for magnetic confinement, the basis for the JET and ITER projects, as well as for a wealth of smaller, national projects. The hopes and the disappointments are well and very frankly illustrated. The motivation for building a project of the size of ITER is made very clear. Present fusion research cannot forget that its mission is to develop an industrial reactor, not just a powerful research tool. Chapter 11 presents the major challenges between ITER and a reactor. Finally, Chapter 12 reminds us of why we need energy, why we do not have a credible solution at the mid-term (20 years) and why we have no solution in the longer term. The public awareness of this is growing, at last, even though the arguments were all on the table in the 1970's. This chapter therefore closes the book by bringing the reader back to earth rather suitably with the hard reality of energy needs and the absence of credible policies. This book has already received impressive approval among a wide range of people, since it so evidently succeeds in its goal to explain Fusion to many levels of reader. Gary McCracken and Peter Stott (one time editor of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion) both dedicated their careers to magnetic confinement fusion, mostly at Culham working on UKAEA projects and later on the JET project. They were both deeply involved with international collaborations and both were working abroad when they retired. The mixture between ideas, developments and people is most successfully developed. They clearly underline the importance of strong international collaboration on which this field depends. This open background is tangible in their recently published work, in which they have tried to communicate their love and understanding of this exciting

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Time, Quantum and Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Leaf

    2004-04-01

    Time, Quantum and Information, a paean to Professor Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker, commemorates his 90th birthday. The range of Professor Weizsäcker’s endeavours is an exhilarating example of what can be accomplished by one freely-soaring human spirit, who is at the same time a physicist, a philosopher, and a humanitarian. The editors, Lutz Castell and Otfried Ischebeck, have assembled an admirable collection of essays and articles written by Weizsäcker’s past students, collaborators, colleagues and acquaintances. Time, Quantum and Information offers the reader a panoply of unique insights into twentieth century science and history. Entangled with the stories about Weizsäcker’s influence on the lives of some of the contributors are discussions of the activities of German scientists during and following World War II, emphasizing their reluctance to work on atomic weapons following the war. By outlining Weizsäcker’s role in the early development of numerous tributaries of physical science, the book gives us a new glimpse into the origins of some of its disparate domains, such as nuclear physics, the physics of stellar nucleosynthesis, cosmic ray physics, fluid turbulence, and the formation of the solar system. We physicists have all studied Weizsäcker’s semi-empirical mass formula describing the binding energy of nuclei. We are aware too that both he and Hans Bethe independently discovered the nuclear cycles that provide stars with their enduring energy output. We have studied the Weizsäcker--Williams technique of calculating the bremsstrahlung of relativistic electrons. But how many of us know of Weizsäcker’s work in fluid turbulence that he, like Werner Heisenberg under whom he had earned his doctorate, pursued while holed up in Farm Hall? And how many of us are aware of his introduction of turbulent viscosity to account for the origin of planetary orbits, involving the migration of mass inwards and angular momentum outwards? Moreover, before

  19. Getting published well requires fulfilling editors' and reviewers' needs and desires.

    PubMed

    Schoenwolf, Gary C

    2013-12-01

    Publication in international scientific journals provides an unparalleled opportunity for authors to showcase their work. Where authors publish affects how the community values the work. This value directly determines the impact of the work on the field-papers must be read and cited to advance the field, and because the scientific literature is vast, only a subset of the literature is widely read and cited. Moreover, the value placed on the work also affects the authors' scientific reputation and career advancement. Consequently, it is essential that manuscripts receive the recognition they deserve by being published in one of the "best" journals that the scientific findings allow. Several factors determine where a paper is published: how well the topic of the paper fits the scope of the journal, the quality of the study and the manuscript describing it, the advance the paper makes in its field, the importance of the advance, and the extent to which the paper impacts the broader community of science. As scientists, we assume that our papers will be assessed objectively using only well defined scientific standards, but editors and reviewers also view papers subjectively, having biases of what defines a high-quality publication based on Western standards. Therefore, scientists trained in other parts of the world can be significantly disadvantaged in getting their papers published in the best journals. Here, I present concrete suggestions for improving the perception of a paper in the reader's minds, increasing the likelihood that it will get published well. PMID:24131034

  20. A BOOK REVIEW OF "ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS FOR THE NATION"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Review of the the book "Ecological Indicators for the Nation". This book is the report of the Committee to Evaluate Indicators for Monitoring Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments, which was established at the behest of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The boo...

  1. BOOK REVIEW: TETRACYCLINES IN BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY, AND MEDICINE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The book Tetracyclines in Biology, Chemistry, and Medicine edited by M. Nelson, W. Hillen, and R. A. Greenwald was reviewed at the request of the American Society for Microbiology. This book is not so much concerned with tetracycline antibiotic properties or bacterial resistance mechanisms. Instea...

  2. On the Social Development of Antisocial Behaviour. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Highly recommends Rutter et al.'s work as an important review of the major research findings on adolescent problem behavior. Describes the structure of the book, summarizing each chapter. Cites as the strength of the book its concern with interdisciplinary explanations, historical trends, and international variations. (SD)

  3. Science Books, A Quarterly Review, Volume 8 Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC.

    This quarterly journal reviews trade books, textbooks, and reference works in the pure and applied sciences for students in the elementary schools, in secondary school and in the first two years of college. Included are selected advanced and professional books useful for reference by students and faculty members. Annotations are listed in order of…

  4. Science Books: A Quarterly Review, Volume 8, Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC.

    This quarterly journal reviews trade books, textbooks, and reference works in the pure and applied sciences for students in kindergartens, elementary schools, secondary schools, and in the first two years of college. Also included are selected advanced and professional books useful for reference by students and faculty members. Annotations are…

  5. Book review of "Biophysical Chemistry of Fractal Structures and Processes in Environmental Systems"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The editors are N. Senesi and K.J. Wilkinson, and the book is published in 2008 by John Wiley and Sons, with 323 pages. This book is part of the IUPAC series on “Analytical and physical chemistry of environmental systems.” Nineteen generally well-known fractal scientists have contributed to this vol...

  6. Children's Books in Review. Saving and Appreciating Our Planet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winfield, Evelyn T.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews books for preschool through elementary school students, focusing on environmental issues in urban and rural areas. The literature examines such topics as saving the tropical rainforests, conserving energy and resources, decreasing pollution, and saving endangered species. (SM)

  7. Book Review: Venus Rising: Cultural Astronomy in Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedegar, K.

    2014-10-01

    Book review: Dr Peter G. Alcock's important new publication, Venus Rising: South African Astronomical Beliefs, Customs and Observations. See also articles by Alcock, P.G. and Labuscagne, L. in the next issue.

  8. "Infant and Child Care Skills," by Monica Bassett. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Rachel K.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews Bassett's work intended to provide information to people training to be caregivers to infants and young children. Notes the clear presentation, wide coverage, and skill checklists. Recommends the book for parents and infant and child caregivers. (JPB)

  9. Editors' Note.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Ellen R; Cason, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The Spring 2016 issue of the International Journal of Telerehabilitation (IJT) presents original and innovative work in three diverse sections: usability, intervention, and pedagogy, followed by a book review on teleaudiology. The contributors to this issue are notably multi-disciplinary and include an audiologist, computer scientists, engineers, an epidemiologist, occupational therapists, a rehabilitation counselor, a physician (physical medicine and rehabilitation), and speechlanguage pathologists. The common thread linking the Journal's authors and their manuscripts, is excellence in telerehabilitation related innovation. PMID:27563385

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Feynman Lectures on Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feynman, Richard P.; Morinigo, Fernando B.; Wagner, William G.

    2003-05-01

    In the early 1960s Feynman lectured to physics undergraduates and, with the assistance of his colleagues Leighton and Sands, produced the three-volume classic Feynman Lectures in Physics. These lectures were delivered in the mornings. In the afternoons Feynman was giving postgraduate lectures on gravitation. This book is based on notes compiled by two students on that course: Morinigo and Wagner. Their notes were checked and approved by Feynman and were available at Caltech. They have now been edited by Brian Hatfield and made more widely available. The book has a substantial preface by John Preskill and Kip Thorne, and an introduction entitled 'Quantum Gravity' by Brian Hatfield. You should read these before going on to the lectures themselves. Preskill and Thorne identify three categories of potential readers of this book. 1. Those with a postgraduate training in theoretical physics. 2. 'Readers with a solid undergraduate training in physics'. 3. 'Admirers of Feynman who do not have a strong physics background'. The title of the book is perhaps misleading: readers in category 2 who think that this book is an extension of the Feynman Lectures in Physics may be disappointed. It is not: it is a book aimed mainly at those in category 1. If you want to get to grips with gravitation (and general relativity) then you need to read an introductory text first e.g. General Relativity by I R Kenyon (Oxford: Oxford University Press) or A Unified Grand Tour of Theoretical Physics by Ian D Lawrie (Bristol: IoP). But there is no Royal Road. As pointed out in the preface and in the introduction, the book represents Feynman's thinking about gravitation some 40 years ago: the lecture course was part of his attempts to understand the subject himself, and for readers in all three categories it is this that makes the book one of interest: the opportunity to observe how a great physicist attempts to tackle some of the hardest challenges of physics. However, the book was written 40

  11. BOOK REVIEW: NMR Imaging of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of materials is a field of increasing importance. Applications extend from fundamental science like the characterization of fluid transport in porous rock, catalyst pellets and hemodialysers into various fields of engineering for process optimization and product quality control. While the results of MRI imaging are being appreciated by a growing community, the methods of imaging are far more diverse for materials applications than for medical imaging of human beings. Blümich has delivered the first book in this field. It was published in hardback three years ago and is now offered as a paperback for nearly half the price. The text provides an introduction to MRI imaging of materials covering solid-state NMR spectroscopy, imaging methods for liquid and solid samples, and unusual MRI in terms of specialized approaches to spatial resolution such as an MRI surface scanner. The book represents an excellent and thorough treatment which will help to grow research in materials MRI. Blümich developed the treatise over many years for his research students, graduates in chemistry, physics and engineering. But it may also be useful for medical students looking for a less formal discussion of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The structure of this book is easy to perceive. The first three chapters cover an introduction, the fundamentals and methods of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The book starts at the ground level where no previous knowledge about NMR is assumed. Chapter 4 discusses a wide variety of transformations beyond the Fourier transformation. In particular, the Hadamard transformation and the 'wavelet' transformation are missing from most related books. This chapter also includes a description of noise-correlation spectroscopy, which promises the imaging of large objects without the need for extremely powerful radio-frequency transmitters. Chapters 5 and 6 cover basic imaging methods. The following chapter about the use of relaxation and

  12. BOOK REVIEW: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cargill, P. J.

    2007-02-01

    The widespread importance of plasmas in many areas of contemporary physics makes good textbooks in the field that are both introductory and comprehensive invaluable. This new book by Paul Bellen from CalTech by and large meets these goals. It covers the traditional textbook topics such as particle orbits, the derivation of the MHD equations from Vlasov theory, cold and warm plasma waves, Landau damping, as well as in the later chapters less common subjects such as magnetic helicity, nonlinear processes and dusty plasmas. The book is clearly written, neatly presented, and each chapter has a number of exercises or problems at their end. The author has also thankfully steered clear of the pitfall of filling the book with his own research results. The preface notes that the book is designed to provide an introduction to plasma physics for final year undergraduate and post-graduate students. However, it is difficult to see many physics undergraduates now at UK universities getting to grips with much of the content since their mathematics is not of a high enough standard. Students in Applied Mathematics departments would certainly fare better. An additional problem for the beginner is that some of the chapters do not lead the reader gently into a subject, but begin with quite advanced concepts. Being a multi-disciplinary subject, beginners tend to find plasma physics quite hard enough even when done simply. For postgraduate students these criticisms fade away and this book provides an excellent introduction. More senior researchers should also enjoy the book, especially Chapters 11-17 where more advanced topics are discussed. I found myself continually comparing the book with my favourite text for many years, `The Physics of Plasmas' by T J M Boyd and J J Sanderson, reissued by Cambridge University Press in 2003. Researchers would want both books on their shelves, both for the different ways basic plasma physics is covered, and the diversity of more advanced topics. For

  13. Book Review: Space Weather: Physics and Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Phil

    2007-11-01

    At 438 pages, Space Weather: Physics and Effects, edited by Volker Bothmer and Ioannis A. Daglis, seems like a daunting read. But its thickness belies its conversational tone, and its content provides a different presentation of material aimed at drawing in a new audience while satisfying the present space weather audience's interest in their subject. I found reading this book a pleasure.

  14. ECOLOGY OF DESERT SYSTEMS BOOK REVIEW

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 12 chapters of Whitford's book, Ecology of Desert Systems, summarize the comprehensive experiences and knowledge of a scientist with an extensive research background on a wide variety of physical and biological aspects of desert ecology. The author illustrates facts and concepts presented in th...

  15. Sampling for natural resource monitoring: Book review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sampling for Natural Resource Monitoring provides a comprehensive introduction to natural resource sampling design for students, scientists and managers. The emphasis on cost analysis and optimization throughout the book is perhaps one of its greatest strengths. The explanations of two-phase and seq...

  16. Thinking about Parent and Child [Book Review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James Q.

    1999-01-01

    The controversy about the relative importance of heredity and environment and the role of parents in children's behavior explored by Harris is not new. Although her book offers no new policy guidance, it does offer some useful academic suggestions by clarifying the plentiful scientific evidence of the importance of genetics in behavior. (SLD)

  17. Book review: Methods for catching beetles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beetles are the most speciose animal group and found in virtually all habitats on Earth. Methods for Catching Beetles is a comprehensive general sourcebook about where and how to collect members of this diverse group. The book makes a compelling case in its Introduction about the value of scientif...

  18. Book Review: Ecology of the Shortgrass Steppe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the shortgrass steppe, the warmest, driest, and least productive region of the North American central grasslands. Encompassing an area from the Colorado-Wyoming border on the north to western Texas and southeastern New Mexico on the south; and from the ...

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Inverse Problems. Activities for Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2003-06-01

    This book is a valuable introduction to inverse problems. In particular, from the educational point of view, the author addresses the questions of what constitutes an inverse problem and how and why we should study them. Such an approach has been eagerly awaited for a long time. Professor Groetsch, of the University of Cincinnati, is a world-renowned specialist in inverse problems, in particular the theory of regularization. Moreover, he has made a remarkable contribution to educational activities in the field of inverse problems, which was the subject of his previous book (Groetsch C W 1993 Inverse Problems in the Mathematical Sciences (Braunschweig: Vieweg)). For this reason, he is one of the most qualified to write an introductory book on inverse problems. Without question, inverse problems are important, necessary and appear in various aspects. So it is crucial to introduce students to exercises in inverse problems. However, there are not many introductory books which are directly accessible by students in the first two undergraduate years. As a consequence, students often encounter diverse concrete inverse problems before becoming aware of their general principles. The main purpose of this book is to present activities to allow first-year undergraduates to learn inverse theory. To my knowledge, this book is a rare attempt to do this and, in my opinion, a great success. The author emphasizes that it is very important to teach inverse theory in the early years. He writes; `If students consider only the direct problem, they are not looking at the problem from all sides .... The habit of always looking at problems from the direct point of view is intellectually limiting ...' (page 21). The book is very carefully organized so that teachers will be able to use it as a textbook. After an introduction in chapter 1, sucessive chapters deal with inverse problems in precalculus, calculus, differential equations and linear algebra. In order to let one gain some insight

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Practical Density Measurement and Hydrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. V.

    2003-01-01

    Density determinations are very important not only for science and production but also in everyday life, since very often a product is sold by mass but the content of the package is measured by volume (or vice versa) so that the density is needed to convert the values. In production processes the density serves as a measure of mixing ratios and other properties. In science, the determination of Avogadro's constant using silicon single crystals and the potential replacement of the kilogram prototype boost density determination to an extremely low relative uncertainty of 10-7 or less. The book by S V Gupta explains in detail the foundations of any density measurement, namely the volume determination of solid artefacts in terms of the SI base unit of length and the density of water and mercury. Both the history and the actual state of science are reported. For practical density measurements, these chapters contain very useful formulae and tables. Water is treated in detail since it is most widely used as a standard not only for density determination but also to gravimetrically calibrate the capacity of volumetric glassware. Two thirds of the book are devoted to the practical density measurement of solids and liquids, mainly using classical instruments like pycnometers and hydrometers. Methods using free flotation of samples in a liquid without suspension are especially useful for small samples. Also, density determinations of powders and granular or porous samples are explained. Unfortunately, modern density meters of the oscillation type are dealt with in only a few pages. The book is clearly written and easy to understand. It contains a lot of evaluations of formulae that for practical measurements are represented in detailed tables. Methods and measurement procedures are described in detail, including also the calculation of uncertainty. Listings of the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods are very helpful. S V Gupta has written a book that will be

  1. BOOK REVIEW: Chaos: A Very Short Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klages, R.

    2007-07-01

    This book is a new volume of a series designed to introduce the curious reader to anything from ancient Egypt and Indian philosophy to conceptual art and cosmology. Very handy in pocket size, Chaos promises an introduction to fundamental concepts of nonlinear science by using mathematics that is `no more complicated than X=2. Anyone who ever tried to give a popular science account of research knows that this is a more challenging task than writing an ordinary research article. Lenny Smith brilliantly succeeds to explain in words, in pictures and by using intuitive models the essence of mathematical dynamical systems theory and time series analysis as it applies to the modern world. In a more technical part he introduces the basic terms of nonlinear theory by means of simple mappings. He masterly embeds this analysis into the social, historical and cultural context by using numerous examples, from poems and paintings over chess and rabbits to Olbers' paradox, card games and `phynance'. Fundamental problems of the modelling of nonlinear systems like the weather, sun spots or golf balls falling through an array of nails are discussed from the point of view of mathematics, physics and statistics by touching upon philosophical issues. At variance with Laplace's demon, Smith's 21st century demon makes `real world' observations only with limited precision. This poses a severe problem to predictions derived from complex chaotic models, where small variations of initial conditions typically yield totally different outcomes. As Smith argues, this difficulty has direct implications on decision-making in everyday modern life. However, it also asks for an inherently probabilistic theory, which somewhat reminds us of what we are used to in the microworld. There is little to criticise in this nice little book except that some figures are of poor quality thus not really reflecting the beauty of fractals and other wonderful objects in this field. I feel that occasionally the book

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Carl Sagan: A Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakeways, Robin

    2000-01-01

    This is a quite remarkable book. If you want a quick and sketchy evening's read about your favourite popular scientist then this is not for you! On the other hand, if you want a detailed, fascinating and exhaustively researched story about a very special person, then read it. The author has produced a painstaking picture of Sagan. The main text consists of 430 pages of stories, anecdotes, quotations etc, which lead us through the complex life of a very complex man. This is backed up with a further 70 pages of detailed references followed by a 19 page bibliography. We learn about Sagan from his early days, when he was a somewhat precocious schoolboy, right up to his final days when he was in poor health yet still turning out books at a great rate. Like many people, I knew of him but not very much about him before I read this book. He was a man of giant energy who attempted to combine the life of a working research scientist with that of a great popularizer as well as extending his tentacles into various aspects of (scientific) government policy. Even in his early days his one aim in life seemed to be that of furthering his own career by getting to know as many well-known scientists as possible. He had fingers in many pies - academic, something mysterious and military related, book writing, popular science on TV etc, etc. He was particularly concerned with the space programme, especially the planetary probes and the Voyager vehicles which took messages from Earth to outer space. We get the impression from the book that he was especially obsessed with extraterrestrial life and was desperate to confirm its existence. He was instrumental in keeping the SETI programme going even though it eventually had to go private. We learn that he was not a good family man and work usually took precedence over domestic issues. As a result his private life seems to have been as complicated as his professional life. He was a man whose mind went in several directions at once and he was

  3. The secret life of dust [Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Richard A.

    The Secret Life of Dust by Hannah Holmes is not a quick read. I frequently paused to reach for a pen to mark interesting pages, to write down surprising facts, or to tell my spouse about some wonderful story I had just read. This is not a book to rush through; it is a book to sink into, and it is densely packed with information. Holmes does not glorify dust, but she certainly finds it fascinating, little appreciated, and much misunderstood. The Secret Life of Dust is her attempt to open our eyes to something that is too small to see easily but too large to catch the attention of most physicists or chemists. Dust is everywhere, and it is far more important than most of us realize.

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Relativistic Figures of Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mars, M.

    2009-08-01

    Compact fluid bodies in equilibrium under its own gravitational field are abundant in the Universe and a proper treatment of them can only be carried out using the full theory of General Relativity. The problem is of enormous complexity as it involves two very different regimes, namely the interior and the exterior of the fluid, coupled through the surface of the body. This problem is very challenging both from a purely theoretical point of view, as well as regarding the obtaining of realistic models and the description of their physical properties. It is therefore an excellent piece of news that the book 'Relativistic Figures of Equilibrium' by R Meinel, M Ansorg, A Kleinwächter, G Neugebauer and D Petroff has been recently published. This book approaches the topic in depth and its contents will be of interest to a wide range of scientists working on gravitation, including theoreticians in general relativity, mathematical physicists, astrophysicists and numerical relativists. This is an advanced book that intends to present some of the present-day results on this topic. The most basic results are presented rather succinctly, and without going into the details, of their derivations. Although primarily not intended to serve as a textbook, the presentation is nevertheless self-contained and can therefore be of interest both for experts on the field as well as for anybody wishing to learn more about rotating self-gravitating compact bodies in equilibrium. It should be remarked, however, that this book makes a rather strong selection of topics and concentrates fundamentally on presenting the main results obtained by the authors during their research in this field. The book starts with a chapter where the fundamental aspects of rotating fluids in equilibrium, including its thermodynamic properties, are summarized. Of particular interest are the so-called mass-shedding limit, which is the limit where the body is rotating so fast that it is on the verge of starting

  5. Book Review: A Thin Cosmic Rain by Michael W. Friedlander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Frank C.; White, Nicholas (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In reviewing this book I am going to say some harsh things about it. From this one might think that I did not like the book. In fact, one would be wrong to think so. For this reason I wish to state up front that I did like the book. It was an ambitious undertaking and I think that the author has, for the most part, pulled it off. This extremely broad and rich book will allow those non-specialists with a sufficiently long attention span to obtain a good understanding of what cosmic rays are and what cosmic ray research is all about. I have pointed out things that bothered me because I believe that the book is good enough for a second edition and I hope that these matters can be addressed at that time.

  6. BOOK REVIEW: Black Holes, Wormholes & Time Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellema, Steven H.

    2000-05-01

    Black Holes Wormholes & Time Machines is a welcome addition to the collection of books written with the purpose of explaining interesting aspects of 20th century physics to a general audience. Throughout the book it is clear that the author, Jim Al-Khalili, must be a wonderful public lecturer. His style, informal yet precise, is just what is needed to convey these difficult concepts to an audience of non-specialists. As the title might suggest, the author has chosen to specifically address certain topics that have been introduced into the public imagination through the mass media (primarily movies and television). He does an admirable job, both of connecting to these media-generated perceptions (with frequent references, for example, to Star Trek) and of correcting them (or at least placing them in the proper context) insofar as the current knowledge of physics is concerned. What emerges is a well thought-out journey through the theories of special and general relativity as well as appropriate aspects of cosmology. The book eschews the standard, historical approach, which would introduce special relativity, followed by general relativity, and finally some cosmology. Rather, it begins with the promise and the paradoxes of time travel (exemplified in the movie The Terminator) and then winds its way carefully through all of the physics relevant to the possible existence of a time machine. Along the way, the reader is introduced to aspects of special and general relativity, including higher dimensional space-times and geometries. The astrophysical and cosmological journey visits the Big Bang, open and closed universes, and black holes. By meticulously piecing together the puzzle of time (and along the way meeting such oddities as parallel universes and wormholes) the author comes to the climactic chapter entitled `How to Build a Time Machine'. There may be readers who are disappointed that this ultimate question is unraveled, not so much like an instruction manual (as

  7. BOOK REVIEW: Observational Cosmology Observational Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Observational Cosmology by Stephen Serjeant fills a niche that was underserved in the textbook market: an up-to-date, thorough cosmology textbook focused on observations, aimed at advanced undergraduates. Not everything about the book is perfect - some subjects get short shrift, in some cases jargon dominates, and there are too few exercises. Still, on the whole, the book is a welcome addition. For decades, the classic textbooks of cosmology have focused on theory. But for every Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect there is a Butcher-Oemler effect; there are as many cosmological phenomena established by observations, and only explained later by theory, as there were predicted by theory and confirmed by observations. In fact, in the last decade, there has been an explosion of new cosmological findings driven by observations. Some are so new that you won't find them mentioned in books just a few years old. So it is not just refreshing to see a book that reflects the new realities of cosmology, it is vital, if students are to truly stay up on a field that has widened in scope considerably. Observational Cosmology is filled with full-color images, and graphs from the latest experiments. How exciting it is that we live in an era where satellites and large experiments have gathered so much data to reveal astounding details about the origin of the universe and its evolution. To have all the latest data gathered together and explained in one book will be a revelation to students. In fact, at times it was to me. I've picked up modern cosmological knowledge through a patchwork of reading papers, going to colloquia, and serving on grant and telescope allocation panels. To go back and see them explained from square one, and summarized succinctly, filled in quite a few gaps in my own knowledge and corrected a few misconceptions I'd acquired along the way. To make room for all these graphs and observational details, a few things had to be left out. For one, there are few derivations

  8. BOOK REVIEW: Statistical Mechanics of Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambon, C.

    2004-10-01

    This is a handbook for a computational approach to reacting flows, including background material on statistical mechanics. In this sense, the title is somewhat misleading with respect to other books dedicated to the statistical theory of turbulence (e.g. Monin and Yaglom). In the present book, emphasis is placed on modelling (engineering closures) for computational fluid dynamics. The probabilistic (pdf) approach is applied to the local scalar field, motivated first by the nonlinearity of chemical source terms which appear in the transport equations of reacting species. The probabilistic and stochastic approaches are also used for the velocity field and particle position; nevertheless they are essentially limited to Lagrangian models for a local vector, with only single-point statistics, as for the scalar. Accordingly, conventional techniques, such as single-point closures for RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) and subgrid-scale models for LES (large-eddy simulations), are described and in some cases reformulated using underlying Langevin models and filtered pdfs. Even if the theoretical approach to turbulence is not discussed in general, the essentials of probabilistic and stochastic-processes methods are described, with a useful reminder concerning statistics at the molecular level. The book comprises 7 chapters. Chapter 1 briefly states the goals and contents, with a very clear synoptic scheme on page 2. Chapter 2 presents definitions and examples of pdfs and related statistical moments. Chapter 3 deals with stochastic processes, pdf transport equations, from Kramer-Moyal to Fokker-Planck (for Markov processes), and moments equations. Stochastic differential equations are introduced and their relationship to pdfs described. This chapter ends with a discussion of stochastic modelling. The equations of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics are addressed in chapter 4. Classical conservation equations (mass, velocity, internal energy) are derived from their

  9. 12 CFR 1271.39 - Review of books and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Review of books and records. 1271.39 Section 1271.39 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS MISCELLANEOUS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OPERATIONS AND AUTHORITIES Financing Corporation Operations § 1271.39 Review of...

  10. Book Review: Bioassays with Arthropods: 2nd Edition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The technical book "Bioassays with Arthropods: 2nd Edition" (2007. Jacqueline L. Robertson, Robert M. Russell, Haiganoush K, Preisler and N. E. Nevin, Eds. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 224 pp.) was reviewed for the scientific readership of the peer-reviewed publication Journal of Economic Entomology. ...

  11. Every Reader a Reviewer: The Online Book Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, the book review landscape has changed seismically. Reviewing is no longer centralized, with a few big voices leading the way, but fractured among numerous multifarious voices found mostly on the web. In turn, readers aren't playing the captive audience any more. Undone by economics, many traditional print sources have been…

  12. BOOK REVIEW: The Artful Universe Expanded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, B. A.

    2005-07-01

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music—a new type of `cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson,\\endcolumn hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature’s code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one’s mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Observational Cosmology Observational Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Observational Cosmology by Stephen Serjeant fills a niche that was underserved in the textbook market: an up-to-date, thorough cosmology textbook focused on observations, aimed at advanced undergraduates. Not everything about the book is perfect - some subjects get short shrift, in some cases jargon dominates, and there are too few exercises. Still, on the whole, the book is a welcome addition. For decades, the classic textbooks of cosmology have focused on theory. But for every Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect there is a Butcher-Oemler effect; there are as many cosmological phenomena established by observations, and only explained later by theory, as there were predicted by theory and confirmed by observations. In fact, in the last decade, there has been an explosion of new cosmological findings driven by observations. Some are so new that you won't find them mentioned in books just a few years old. So it is not just refreshing to see a book that reflects the new realities of cosmology, it is vital, if students are to truly stay up on a field that has widened in scope considerably. Observational Cosmology is filled with full-color images, and graphs from the latest experiments. How exciting it is that we live in an era where satellites and large experiments have gathered so much data to reveal astounding details about the origin of the universe and its evolution. To have all the latest data gathered together and explained in one book will be a revelation to students. In fact, at times it was to me. I've picked up modern cosmological knowledge through a patchwork of reading papers, going to colloquia, and serving on grant and telescope allocation panels. To go back and see them explained from square one, and summarized succinctly, filled in quite a few gaps in my own knowledge and corrected a few misconceptions I'd acquired along the way. To make room for all these graphs and observational details, a few things had to be left out. For one, there are few derivations

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Bose-Einstein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaksch, D.

    2003-09-01

    L Pitaevskii and S Stringari Oxford: Oxford University Press (2003) £55.50 (hardback), ISBN 0-19-850719-4 The Gross--Pitaevskii equation, named after one of the authors of the book, and its large number of applications for describing the properties of Bose--Einstein condensation (BEC) in trapped weakly interacting atomic gases, is the main topic of this book. In total the monograph comprises 18 chapters and is divided into two parts. Part I introduces the notion of BEC and superfluidity in general terms. The most important properties of the ideal and the weakly interacting Bose gas are described and the effects of nonuniformity due to an external potential at zero temperature are studied. The first part is then concluded with a summary of the properties of superfluid ^{4}He. In Part II the authors describe the theoretical aspects of BEC in harmonically trapped weakly interacting atomic gases. A short and rather rudimentary chapter on collisions and trapping of atomic gases which seems to be included for completeness only is followed by a detailed analysis of the ground state,\

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Kinetic Theory of Granular Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trizac, Emmanuel

    2005-11-01

    Granular gases are composed of macroscopic bodies kept in motion by an external energy source such as a violent shaking. The behaviour of such systems is quantitatively different from that of ordinary molecular gases: due to the size of the constituents, external fields have a stronger effect on the dynamics and, more importantly, the kinetic energy of the gas is no longer a conserved quantity. The key role of the inelasticity of collisions has been correctly appreciated for about fifteen years, and the ensuing consequences in terms of phase behaviour or transport properties studied in an increasing and now vast body of literature. The purpose of this book is to help the newcomer to the field in acquiring the essential theoretical tools together with some numerical techniques. As emphasized by the authors—who were among the pioneers in the domain— the content could be covered in a one semester course for advanced undergraduates, or it could be incorporated in a more general course dealing with the statistical mechanics of dissipative systems. The book is self-contained, clear, and avoids mathematical complications. In order to elucidate the main physical ideas, heuristic points of views are sometimes preferred to a more rigorous route that would lead to a longer discussion. The 28 chapters are short; they offer exercises and worked examples, solved at the end of the book. Each part is supplemented with a relevant foreword and a useful summary including take-home messages. The editorial work is of good quality, with very few typographical errors. In spite of the title, kinetic theory stricto sensu is not the crux of the matter covered. The authors discuss the consequences of the molecular chaos assumption both at the individual particle level and in terms of collective behaviour. The first part of the book addresses the mechanics of grain collisions. It is emphasized that considering the coefficient of restitution ɛ —a central quantity governing the

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Introduction to Computational Plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, P.

    2006-04-01

    The use of computational modelling in all areas of science and engineering has in recent years escalated to the point where it underpins much of current research. However, the distinction must be made between computer systems in which no knowledge of the underlying computer technology or computational theory is required and those areas of research where the mastery of computational techniques is of great value, almost essential, for final year undergraduates or masters students planning to pursue a career in research. Such a field of research in the latter category is continuum mechanics, and in particular non-linear material behaviour, which is the core topic of this book. The focus of the book on computational plasticity embodies techniques of relevance not only to academic researchers, but also of interest to industrialists engaged in the production of components using bulk or sheet forming processes. Of particular interest is the guidance on how to create modules for use with the commercial system Abaqus for specific types of material behaviour. The book is in two parts, the first of which contains six chapters, starting with microplasticity, but predominantly on continuum plasticity. The first chapter on microplasticty gives a brief description of the grain structure of metals and the existence of slip systems within the grains. This provides an introduction to the concept of incompressibility during plastic deformation, the nature of plastic yield and the importance of the critically resolved shear stress on the slip planes (Schmid's law). Some knowledge of the notation commonly used to describe slip systems is assumed, which will be familiar to students of metallurgy, but anyone with a more general engineering background may need to undertake additional reading to understand the various descriptions. Any lack of knowledge in this area however, is of no disadvantage as it serves only as an introduction and the book moves on quickly to continuum plasticity

  17. Books against Television? Making an Issue of Television in Early Childhood Education. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Sandra; Brody, Marie-Helene

    2002-01-01

    Presents a critical, comparative review of three popular books about children and television. Raises questions and concerns about the multiple roles that television can assume in children's lives and the roles that adults can play in mediating children's experiences. Focuses on three key themes/concerns: changing functions of television, the…

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Introduction to Computational Plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, P.

    2006-04-01

    The use of computational modelling in all areas of science and engineering has in recent years escalated to the point where it underpins much of current research. However, the distinction must be made between computer systems in which no knowledge of the underlying computer technology or computational theory is required and those areas of research where the mastery of computational techniques is of great value, almost essential, for final year undergraduates or masters students planning to pursue a career in research. Such a field of research in the latter category is continuum mechanics, and in particular non-linear material behaviour, which is the core topic of this book. The focus of the book on computational plasticity embodies techniques of relevance not only to academic researchers, but also of interest to industrialists engaged in the production of components using bulk or sheet forming processes. Of particular interest is the guidance on how to create modules for use with the commercial system Abaqus for specific types of material behaviour. The book is in two parts, the first of which contains six chapters, starting with microplasticity, but predominantly on continuum plasticity. The first chapter on microplasticty gives a brief description of the grain structure of metals and the existence of slip systems within the grains. This provides an introduction to the concept of incompressibility during plastic deformation, the nature of plastic yield and the importance of the critically resolved shear stress on the slip planes (Schmid's law). Some knowledge of the notation commonly used to describe slip systems is assumed, which will be familiar to students of metallurgy, but anyone with a more general engineering background may need to undertake additional reading to understand the various descriptions. Any lack of knowledge in this area however, is of no disadvantage as it serves only as an introduction and the book moves on quickly to continuum plasticity

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Astrophysics (Advanced Physics Readers)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Bob

    2000-07-01

    Here is a handy and attractive reader to support students on post-16 courses. It covers the astrophysics, astronomy and cosmology that are demanded at A-level and offers anyone interested in these fields an interesting and engaging reference book. The author and the production team deserve credit for producing such an attractive book. The content, in ten chapters, covers what one would expect at this level but it is how it is presented that struck me as the book's most powerful asset. Each chapter ends with a summary of key ideas. Line drawings are clear and convey enough information to make them more than illustrations - they are as valuable as the text in conveying information. Full colour is used throughout to enhance illustrations and tables and to lift key sections of the text. A number of colour photographs complement the material and serve to maintain interest and remind readers that astrophysics is about real observable phenomena. Included towards the end is a set of tables offering information on physical and astronomical data, mathematical techniques and constellation names and abbreviations. This last table puzzled me as to its value. There is a helpful bibliography which includes society contacts and a website related to the text. Perhaps my one regret is that there is no section where students are encouraged to actually do some real astronomy. Astrophysics is in danger of becoming an armchair and calculator interest. There are practical projects that students could undertake either for school assessment or for personal interest. Simple astrophotography to capture star trails, observe star colours and estimate apparent magnitudes is an example, as is a simple double-star search. There are dozens more. However, the author's style is friendly and collaborative. He befriends the reader as they journey together through the ideas. There are progress questions at the end of each chapter. Their style tends to be rather closed and they emphasize factual recall

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Science Fair Projects: Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Helen

    2000-11-01

    I have often thought that the notion of a Science Fair is intrinsically a good one but have never set one up. With this book such an undertaking is possible, with 47 projects from which you can choose. Each project has a clearly stated purpose with an overview that contains the physics you need to get started. A hypothesis, or sometimes two, and a procedure detailing what the student should do follow this. The materials to be used are those you should be able to find at home, and safety guidelines as well as places the student needs adult help are clearly marked. Every project asks the student to write down the results of their experiment and decide whether or not their hypothesis was correct. There are also suggestions for taking each project further. Some of these projects are standard experiments that you may already do with students in class, for example, making plasticine boats, string telephones and levers. Most are interesting twists on standard experiments such as using a wedge as a simple machine, home-made spinning toys and the experiments with light bulbs. The latter are the only real cause for concern if students were to do these things at home as adult supervision would be essential. This is obviously an American book, though. Teachers in British classrooms would need to work out how to deal with the references to temperature in Fahrenheit and mass in ounces. Length is usually given in centimetres as well as inches. Translations of soda bottles and bobby pins would also be needed. This book is designed to be full of ideas and to give structure to projects students can do at home, not to provide ideas that you can transport into the classroom. It does this very well and I would recommend it to anyone thinking of starting up a Science Fair. Alternatively, this is an excellent resource for more interesting homework assignments that would put more responsibility on the student and give them something fun to do.

  1. Book Review: The Origins of Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher P.

    1992-01-01

    In The Origins of Comets, Bailey, Clube, and Napier propose that the answer to whether the ancient heavens were more interesting is a resounding "yes." The sky, in fact, has changed and is still changing. The authors trace the study of comets back to ancient Babylonian times with a focus on theories of the origins of these enigmatic visitors. The book is really of three distinct parts: the first six chapters provide an excellent and delightfully readable historical account of comet studies up to this century. The next few chapters give a rather detailed treatment of current models for comet origins. The last section treats the authors' own theories about the relationship between giant comets and extinctions on Earth.

  2. BOOK REVIEW: An Analog Electronics Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Scott

    2003-09-01

    The expression 'Analog electronics' here means the sum of a vast quantity of scientific and technical knowledge and topics. By the same token, the electronic analogue and circuit designer should also have a vast cultural and scientific know-how. The aim of this book is to be a guide for neophytes as well as a useful 'travelling companion' for the mature designer confronted with such a vast world. In my opinion it successfully meets these intentions. The subjects are treated in a concise, clear and self-contained fashion, always helped by a broad exhaustive bibliography, and cover all the necessary aspects for electronic design, such as: the essential elements of mathematical analysis, trigonometry and logarithms to reach Fourier and Laplace transforms and differential equations; physics phenomena and laws from electrostatics and electrodynamics up to Maxwell equations and electronic noise; the fundamental elements of electronic circuit theory and their methods of analysis up to the theory of feedback and control systems; an analysis of the electrical characteristics of the main passive and active electronic components. The above mentioned points take up about half of the text. The remaining topics deal with circuit applications often faced by the electronic designer. In the second part, circuit analysis is treated analytically as well as by the use of CAD, and Pspice software is provided on a CD which illustrates examples. The list of topics treated is long and ranges from operational amplifier circuits to rectifier circuits as well as current feedback amplifiers and high frequency transformers. The book closes by mentioning chaos theory. Daniele Marioli

  3. BOOK REVIEW: Quantum Physics in One Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, David

    2004-05-01

    To a casual ostrich the world of quantum physics in one dimension may sound a little one-dimensional, suitable perhaps for those with an unhealthy obsession for the esoteric. Nothing of course could be further from the truth. The field is remarkably rich and broad, and for more than fifty years has thrown up innumerable challenges. Theorists, realising that the role of interactions in 1D is special and that well known paradigms of higher dimensions (Fermi liquid theory for example) no longer apply, took up the challenge of developing new concepts and techniques to understand the undoubted pecularities of one-dimensional systems. And experimentalists have succeeded in turning pipe dreams into reality, producing an impressive and ever increasing array of experimental realizations of 1D systems, from the molecular to the mesoscopic---spin and ladder compounds, organic superconductors, carbon nanotubes, quantum wires, Josephson junction arrays and so on. Many books on the theory of one-dimensional systems are however written by experts for experts, and tend as such to leave the non-specialist a touch bewildered. This is understandable on both fronts, for the underlying theoretical techniques are unquestionably sophisticated and not usually part of standard courses in many-body theory. A brave author it is then who aims to produce a well rounded, if necessarily partial, overview of quantum physics in one dimension, accessible to a beginner yet taking them to the edge of current research, and providing en route a thorough grounding in the fundamental ideas, basic methods and essential phenomenology of the field. It is of course the brave who succeed in this world, and Thierry Giamarchi does just that with this excellent book, written by an expert for the uninitiated. Aimed in particular at graduate students in theoretical condensed matter physics, and assumimg little theoretical background on the part of the reader (well just a little), Giamarchi writes in a refreshingly

  4. Book review: Rogue waves in the ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    Review info: Rogue Waves in the Ocean. Advances in Geophysical and Environmental Mechanics and Mathematics. By Christian Kharif, Efim Pelinovsky and Alexey Slunyaev, 2009. ISBN: 978-3540884187, xiii, 216 pp.

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Quantum Physics in One Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, David

    2004-05-01

    To a casual ostrich the world of quantum physics in one dimension may sound a little one-dimensional, suitable perhaps for those with an unhealthy obsession for the esoteric. Nothing of course could be further from the truth. The field is remarkably rich and broad, and for more than fifty years has thrown up innumerable challenges. Theorists, realising that the role of interactions in 1D is special and that well known paradigms of higher dimensions (Fermi liquid theory for example) no longer apply, took up the challenge of developing new concepts and techniques to understand the undoubted pecularities of one-dimensional systems. And experimentalists have succeeded in turning pipe dreams into reality, producing an impressive and ever increasing array of experimental realizations of 1D systems, from the molecular to the mesoscopic---spin and ladder compounds, organic superconductors, carbon nanotubes, quantum wires, Josephson junction arrays and so on. Many books on the theory of one-dimensional systems are however written by experts for experts, and tend as such to leave the non-specialist a touch bewildered. This is understandable on both fronts, for the underlying theoretical techniques are unquestionably sophisticated and not usually part of standard courses in many-body theory. A brave author it is then who aims to produce a well rounded, if necessarily partial, overview of quantum physics in one dimension, accessible to a beginner yet taking them to the edge of current research, and providing en route a thorough grounding in the fundamental ideas, basic methods and essential phenomenology of the field. It is of course the brave who succeed in this world, and Thierry Giamarchi does just that with this excellent book, written by an expert for the uninitiated. Aimed in particular at graduate students in theoretical condensed matter physics, and assumimg little theoretical background on the part of the reader (well just a little), Giamarchi writes in a refreshingly

  6. BOOK REVIEW: Physics in the Real World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, Jim

    2000-05-01

    Listeners to science programmes on Canadian radio were invited to submit questions which were then answered, on air, by the author of this wee book. Its purpose, he says, is `to indicate that there are many questions in the real world to which there are no perfect answers' but most of the answers given `contain the essence, if not the whole truth, of the solution to the problem.' The questions, many of which are old chestnuts, range from the mythical - Why might Rudolph be red-nosed? Are high-flying larks harbingers of a hot summer? - through the mundane - Why does the glass handle of a cup of hot coffee stay cool? Is it easier to pull or push a wheelbarrow? - to the mystifying - How is it possible to walk barefoot on red-hot coals? - Is it true that when you take a shower large electric fields can be set up or chloroform released? As the answers were originally given on radio programmes and intended for `educated laypeople' they contain few references to mathematics and no equations! Nevertheless many of the problems are discussed in detail and most readers will find at least some of them fascinating and informative. Many of the answers will be of interest and value to science teachers. In this short book the questions and answers fill only 60 pages but there is a lengthy contents section at the beginning and, at the end, a glossary of many of the terms used throughout. At £8.99 for the UK edition it is pricy - so `feel the quality' of these sections! Outdoors contains questions such as: How is artificial snow created? Can fish really give an electric shock? Why do skates glide along ice? How can blowing on your hands sometimes cool them and sometimes warm them? Theoretical. Here questions on exponential growth, global warming, magnetic poles and energy consumption are answered. Home & Kitchen. Can clothes be whiter than white? How can you tell if an egg is boiled or not? How can a ketchup bottle explode? Why do leaves in a cup of tea collect in the centre

  7. BOOK REVIEW: Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Claus

    2008-06-01

    The open problem of constructing a consistent and experimentally tested quantum theory of the gravitational field has its place at the heart of fundamental physics. The main approaches can be roughly divided into two classes: either one seeks a unified quantum framework of all interactions or one starts with a direct quantization of general relativity. In the first class, string theory (M-theory) is the only known example. In the second class, one can make an additional methodological distinction: while covariant approaches such as path-integral quantization use the four-dimensional metric as an essential ingredient of their formalism, canonical approaches start with a foliation of spacetime into spacelike hypersurfaces in order to arrive at a Hamiltonian formulation. The present book is devoted to one of the canonical approaches—loop quantum gravity. It is named modern canonical quantum general relativity by the author because it uses connections and holonomies as central variables, which are analogous to the variables used in Yang Mills theories. In fact, the canonically conjugate variables are a holonomy of a connection and the flux of a non-Abelian electric field. This has to be contrasted with the older geometrodynamical approach in which the metric of three-dimensional space and the second fundamental form are the fundamental entities, an approach which is still actively being pursued. It is the author's ambition to present loop quantum gravity in a way in which every step is formulated in a mathematically rigorous form. In his own words: 'loop quantum gravity is an attempt to construct a mathematically rigorous, background-independent, non-perturbative quantum field theory of Lorentzian general relativity and all known matter in four spacetime dimensions, not more and not less'. The formal Leitmotiv of loop quantum gravity is background independence. Non-gravitational theories are usually quantized on a given non-dynamical background. In contrast, due to

  8. BOOK REVIEW: The Scalar-Tensor Theory of Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasunori; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2003-10-01

    Since the scalar-tensor theory of gravitation was proposed almost 50 years ago, it has recently become a robust alternative theory to Einstein's general relativity due to the fact that it appears to represent the lower level of a more fundamental theory and can serve both as a phenomenological theory to explain the recently observed acceleration of the universe, and to solve the cosmological constant problem. To my knowledge The Scalar-Tensor Theory of Gravitation by Y Fujii and K Maeda is the first book to develop a modern view on this topic and is one of the latest titles in the well-presented Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics series. This book is an excellent readable introduction and up-to-date review of the subject. The discussion is well organized; after a comprehensible introduction to the Brans-Dicke theory and the important role played by conformal transformations, the authors review cosmologies with the cosmological constant and how the scalar-tensor theory can serve to explain the accelerating universe, including discussions on dark energy, quintessence and braneworld cosmologies. The book ends with a chapter devoted to quantum effects. To make easy the lectures of the book, each chapter starts with a summary of the subject to be dealt with. As the book proceeds, important issues like conformal frames and the weak equivalence principle are fully discussed. As the authors warn in the preface, the book is not encyclopedic (from my point of view the list of references is fairly short, for example, but this is a minor drawback) and the choice of included topics corresponds to the authors' interests. Nevertheless, the book seems to cover a broad range of the most essential aspects of the subject. Long and 'boring' mathematical derivations are left to appendices so as not to interrupt the flow of the reasoning, allowing the reader to focus on the physical aspects of each subject. These appendices are a valuable help in entering into the mathematical

  9. BOOK REVIEW: "...eine ausnehmende Zierde und Vortheil"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, H. W.; Luehning, F.

    This book comprises the habilitation thesis submitted by F. Lühning to the Faculty of Mathematics of Hamburg University in 2004. Due to financial support from various organizations, it was issued in a very attractive form as a special publication of the Society for the history of the city of Kiel. The nice layout, the graphical sketches of buildings, instruments, and astronomical connexions, often designed by the author, and the scientifically precise text, written with a sense of humor, make a pleasant reading, in spite of sometimes quite extensive descriptions of architectural details or 'operating instructions' for meridan circles etc. I have rarely read such an appealing text on astronomical history. The single chapters deal with the beginnings of astronomy in Kiel (1770-1820), Schrader's giant telescope from the late 18th century, Altona Observatory (1823-1850), the first years of the Astronomische Nachrichten, the last years of Altona Observatory (1850-1872), Bothkamp Observatory (1870-1914), the genesis of Kiel Observatory (1874-1880), the era of Krueger (1880-1896), the Kiel Chronometer Observatory (1893-1913), the era of Harzer (1897-1925), the era of Rosenberg (1927-1934), the decline of Kiel Observatory (1935-1950), and the Astronomische Nachrichten under Kobold (1907-1938). The book is concluded with a glossary of technical terms, biographical sketches of known and unknown dramatis personae, as well as a list of references. The author outlines lively sketches of people that were astronomically active in Altona, Kiel and its surroundings over a time interval of 200 years. To achieve this task, he has studied many files from the Secret State Archive Preussischer Kulturbesitz (Berlin), the Schleswig-Holsteinisches State Archive (Schleswig) and the Hamburg State Archive, from which he quotes extensively. He also has evaluated private documents and has interviewed surviving witnesses of the 1930s and 1940s. He has located remote sources: for example, the

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Particle Astrophysics (Second Edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Nicole

    2009-07-01

    Particle astrophysics, the interface of elementary particle physics with astrophysics and cosmology, is a rapidly evolving field. Perkins' book provides a nice introduction to this field, at a level appropriate for senior undergraduate students. Perkins develops the foundations underlying both the particle and astrophysics areas, and also covers some of the most recent developments in this field. The latter is an appealing feature, as students rarely encounter topics of current research in their undergraduate textbooks. Part 1 of the text introduces the elementary particle content, and interactions, of the standard model of particle physics. Relativity is addressed at the level of special relativistic kinematics, the equivalence principle and the Robertson-Walker metric. Part 2 covers cosmology, starting with the expansion of the Universe and basic thermodynamics. It then moves on to primordial nucleosynthesis, baryogenesis, dark matter, dark energy, structure formation and the cosmic microwave background. Part 3 covers cosmic rays, stellar evolution, and related topics. Cutting edge topics include the use of the cosmological large scale structure power spectrum to constrain neutrino mass, the creation of the baryon asymmetry via leptogenesis, and the equation of state for dark energy. While the treatment of many topics is quite brief, the level of depth is about right for undergraduates who are being exposed to these topics for the first time. The breadth of topics spanned is excellent. Perkins does a good job connecting theory with the experimental underpinnings, and of simplifying the theoretical presentation of complex subjects to a level that senior undergraduate students should find accessible. Each chapter includes a number of exercises. Brief solutions are provided for all the exercises, while fully worked solutions are provided for a smaller subset.