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1

Borate and imidacloprid treatment of ash logs infested with the emerald ash borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

As of January 2006, portions of Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Ontario were infested with the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, a destructive exotic Asian beetle that feeds within the inner bark of ash (Fraxinus) trees. This project evaluated borate (dissodium octaborate tetrahydrate) and imidacloprid to sanitize EAB-infested logs, which would then facilitate log transport to mills outside the quarantine

Pascal Nzokou; Toby R. Petrice; Robert A. Haack; D. Pascal Kamdem

2006-01-01

2

Aflatoxin in corn hybrids infested at different growth stages with southwestern corn borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Aflatoxin is a potent toxin produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus. Contamination of corn, Zea mays L., with aflatoxin greatly reduces the value of corn grain and is a major impediment to profitable corn production in the South. Infestation of developing corn ears with southwestern corn borer, D...

3

Preservative treatment of ash wood from emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) infested trees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Portions of Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Ontario have been infested by the emerald ash borer (EAB), an exotic pest believed to have been imported from Asia. The pest is reported to have killed 10 million to 15 million ash trees and continues to spread. Most of southern Michigan is under quarantine, and the movement of ash lumber, firewood, logs, and

Pascal Nzokou; Sedric M. Pankras; D. Pascal

4

Injury and interplant compensation for southwestern corn borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) infestations in field corn.  

PubMed

Growers that plant Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Berliner corn (Zea mays L.) hybrids are required to plant non-Bt corn for resistance management. Refuge in a bag (RIB) is an emerging approach for resistance management where, for some hybrids having multiple Bt traits for a target species, the refuge is planted as a blend of Bt and non-Bt corn. Studies were conducted to evaluate how southwestern corn borer (Diatraea grandiosella Dyar), when infested at different densities and growth stages, affected the yield of infested, non-Bt plants and neighboring Bt plants. Infesting non-Bt corn plants with southwestern corn borer larvae caused significant injury. Both the number of larvae infested on plants and the timing of these infestations affected the number of kernels per ear, total kernel weight, and the weight of individual kernels. Infestation timing was more important than the number of larvae inoculated onto plants, with pretassel infestations causing more yield loss. There was little compensation by Bt plants that were adjacent to infested plants. Thus, the risk of yield loss from stalk tunneling larvae in a refuge in a bag scenario should be directly proportional to the percentage of non-Bt plants and the level of yield loss observed in these non-Bt plants. Because current refuge in a bag systems have five or 10% non-Bt corn plants within the seed unit, the likelihood of substantial yield losses from infestations of corn boring larvae is remote given our results, especially for infestations that occur after silking has begun. PMID:23786069

Steckel, S; Stewart, S D

2013-04-01

5

Bark beetle and wood borer infestation in the greater Yellowstone area during four postfire years. Forest Service research paper  

SciTech Connect

Surveys of bark beetle and wood borer infestation in the Greater Yellowstone Area were conducted from 1991 through 1993 to determine the effect of delayed tree mortality on mosaics of fire-killed and green tree stands, the relationship between fire injury and infestation, but both types of mortality greatly altered the mosaics immediately apparent after the 1988 fires. The high level of infestation suggests that insects built up in fire-injured trees and then caused increased infestation of uninjured trees.

Rasmussen, L.A.; Amman, G.D.; Vandygriff, J.C.; Oakes, R.D.; Munson, A.S.

1996-03-01

6

Seasonal infestations of two stem borers (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) in noncrop grasses of Gulf Coast rice agroecosystems.  

PubMed

Infestations of two stem borers, Eoreuma loftini (Dyar) and Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), were compared in noncrop grasses adjacent to rice (Oryza sativa L.) fields. Three farms in the Texas rice Gulf Coast production area were surveyed every 6-8 wk between 2007 and 2009 using quadrat sampling along transects. Although D. saccharalis densities were relatively low, E. loftini average densities ranged from 0.3 to 5.7 immatures per m(2) throughout the 2-yr period. Early annual grasses including ryegrass, Lolium spp., and brome, Bromus spp., were infested during the spring, whereas the perennial johnsongrass, Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers., and Vasey's grass, Paspalum urvillei Steud., were infested throughout the year. Johnsongrass was the most prevalent host (41-78% relative abundance), but Vasey's grass (13-40% relative abundance) harbored as much as 62% of the recovered E. loftini immatures (during the winter). Young rice in newly planted fields did not host stem borers before June. April sampling in fallow rice fields showed that any available live grass material, volunteer rice or weed, can serve as a host during the spring. Our study suggests that noncrop grasses are year-round sources of E. loftini in Texas rice agroecosystems and may increase pest populations. PMID:22251716

Beuzelin, J M; Mészáros, A; Reagan, T E; Wilson, L T; Way, M O; Blouin, D C; Showler, A T

2011-10-01

7

The development of quantitative occurrence prediction of infestation by the rice stem-borer, Chilo suppressalis Walker , in Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The new method was developed with the objective to meet the universal demand for the prediction of the abundance of the rice\\u000a stem-borer,Chilo suppressalis\\u000a Walker, after 30 years’ pending state. The degrees of infestation were assessed by the sequential sampling test under the prevailing\\u000a three categories, low, moderate and high in terms of percentage infested rice hills. The numerical table

T. Torii

1971-01-01

8

Dendrochronological parameters of northern red oak ( Quercus rubra L. (Fagaceae)) infested with red oak borer ( Enaphalodes rufulus (Haldeman) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae))  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oak-dominated forests in northwestern Arkansas have recently experienced an oak mortality event associated with an unprecedented outbreak of a native insect, the red oak borer, Enaphalodes rufulus (Haldeman). To determine whether prior drought was associated with increased E. rufulus infestation level of Quercus rubra L. trees, we employed a suite of dendrochronological measurements from Q. rubra in affected forest stands.

L. J. Haavik; F. M. Stephen; M. K. Fierke; V. B. Salisbury; S. W. Leavitt; S. A. Billings

2008-01-01

9

The role of some agricultural practices and fertilizer type on both the incidence of stem borers infestation and corn yield in Egypt.  

PubMed

Maize, Zea mays, L. is one of the most important field crops in Egypt. It is used mainly for human, animal and poultry feeding. Corn plants are usually attacked by several injourious insect pests at different stages of development. Out of them, the pink stem borer, Sesamia cretica (Led.), the purple lined borer, Chilo agamemnon (Bles.), and the European corn borer Ostrinia nubilalis (Hb.); which cause great damage and yield losses. It is profitable to adopt an effective and sustainable strategy for controlling these insect-pests. In this concern, sowing dates, planting spaces, foliar fertilizers (macro and micro-nutrients), mineral and/or biofertilization, were investigated to evaluate their role as tools in the so-called Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program of corn pests. In general, the used planting spaces of 60 and 70 cm apart between furrows insignificantly affected the level of stem borers infestation. It was clearly observed that the sowing dates have a role in the incidence of stem borers infestation throughout the corn growing seasons of 1994 and 1995. Moreover, The biofertilized corn plants were more tolerant to the infestation by the stem borers than the minerally fertilized ones. Application of Polytrin significantly decreased the mean numbers of larvae. The tested nutrients preparations affected to less extent, the infestation levels. Concerning the interaction effect of applied nutrients preparations, used sowing dates and/or fertilizer type on the deduced means of larval numbers, it was revealed that: (i) the application of the nutrients preparations decreased to a great extent the effect of the studied sowing dates on the stem borers infestation; particularly in case of spraying ascorbic acid alone or in sequence with Polymex, coppersulphate & Potasin-F, (ii) the dressing of corn grains with the biofertilizers Phosphorin & Rhizobacterin before sowing, lowered to some extent the levels of infestation by Ch. agamemnon and O. nubilalis, in comparison to the minerally fertilized corn plants, especially in case of spraying Potasin-F, copper sulphate and scorbic acid followed by Polymex for Ch. agamemnon. Spraying Ascorbic acid alone or in sequence with Polymex; Potasin-F followed by Copper sulphate gave promising results for the control of O. nubilalis. In comparison to insecticide treatment, the used foliar nutrients & fertilizer type in both sowing dates gave positive interaction effects in decreasing levels of stem borers infestation and greatly improved the yield and yield characteristics of corn plants. Such agricultural practices enabled corn plants to tackle the going on infestation; thus crop loss due to the attack of the stem borers could be compensated. PMID:12696425

Mesbah, H A; Mourad, A K; el-Nimr, Hanyiat M; Massoud, M A; Abd el-Aziz, A A

2002-01-01

10

Sanitation options for managing oak wood infested with the invasive goldspotted oak borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in southern California.  

PubMed

Movement of invasive wood-boring insects in wood products presents a threat to forest health and a management challenge for public and private land managers. The goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a new pest in San Diego and Riverside Cos., CA, believed to have been introduced on firewood. This beetle has caused elevated levels of oak mortality since 2002. From 2009-2011, we tested several sanitation methods, applicable to large and small land parcels, to reduce or prevent goldspotted oak borer emergence from infested oak wood. In most experiments, emergence of goldspotted oak borer adults from the positive controls demonstrated that the beetle could complete development in firewood-sized pieces of cut oak wood. In 2009, adult emergence from sun-exposed oak wood began and peaked 2- to 4-wks earlier at a low elevation site than at a high elevation site (late May to late June). However, there were no significant effects of elevation or host species on the emergence response of goldspotted oak borer by solarization treatment in this study. Solarization of infested wood with thick (6 mil) and thin (1 mil) plastic tarpaulins (tarps) did not significantly reduce emergence of adults despite recordings of greater mean and maximum daily temperatures in both tarped treatments and greater relative humidity in the thick-tarped treatment (all compared with nontarped controls). Grinding wood with a 3"-minus screen (< or = 7.6 cm) significantly reduced goldspotted oak borer emergence compared with control treatments, and this was the best method for reducing adult emergence among those tested. In a separate grinding study, no adults emerged when wood was ground to 9"-minus (22.9 cm), 2"-minus (5.1 cm), or 1"-minus (2.5 cm) screen sizes, but a low level of adult emergence from the positive controls limited any inferences from this experiment. Debarking cut wood pieces eliminated goldspotted oak borer emergence from the wood fraction, but adults emerged from the shaved bark and phloem. PMID:23448037

Jones, Michael I; Coleman, Tom W; Graves, Andrew D; Flint, Mary Louise; Seybold, Steven J

2013-02-01

11

An Assessment of the Relationship Between Emerald Ash Borer Presence and Landscape Pattern  

Microsoft Academic Search

Six years after its 2002 detection near Detroit, MI, the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) has spread hundreds of miles across the Upper Midwest and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. Human-assisted transportation of infested ash materials is the primary mechanism of EAB dispersal over long distances. Natural spread occurs locally and is influenced by factors, such as

Susan J. Crocker; Dacia M. Meneguzzo

12

Acoustic detection of arthropod infestation of grape roots: scouting for grape root borer (Lepidoptera:Sesiidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Grape root borer, Vitacea polistiformis (Harris), is the key pest of grapes in Florida. Chlorpyrifos is the only chemical registered in Florida for control, but it is not an ideal control tool because it is highly toxic to birds, fish, aquatic invertebrates, and honeybees, and its recommended timing...

13

A technique using reusable components for hand-infesting cornstalks with European corn borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) larvae.  

PubMed

Field trials were conducted in 2005 and 2006 to evaluate the use of reusable wire nuts and nonreusable gelatin capsules for hand-infesting cornstalks with European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner), (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) larvae. The reusable technique, which consists of a modified WingGard plastic wire connector (i.e., wire nut) as a containment device for larvae, was compared over three plant growth stages to a gelatin capsule technique. In 2005 and 2006, the wire nut technique resulted in significantly higher number of wire nuts still intact (i.e., undamaged, with or without a larva) on the stalk at 72 h after infestation compared with the gelatin capsule technique. In addition, the wire nut technique resulted in significantly higher number of tunnels per stalk compared with the gelatin capsule technique at all three corn growth stages during both years. In 2005, the mean +/- SEM number of tunnels per stalk was 0.53 +/- 0.03 in the wire nut technique compared with 0.13 +/- 0.03 tunnels per stalk in the gelatin capsule technique. In 2006, the mean number of tunnels per stalk was 0.45 +/- 0.03 in the wire nut technique compared with 0.08 +/- 0.02 tunnels per stalk in the gelatin capsule technique. In addition, the relative net precision in the wire-nut technique was approximately 2 times higher compared with the gelatin capsule technique. PMID:21309228

Tiwari, S; Youngman, R R; Jordan, T A; Laub, C A

2010-12-01

14

Progression of ash canopy thinning and dieback outward from the initial infestation of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in southeastern Michigan.  

PubMed

Our objective was to characterize the rate at which ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees decline in areas adjacent to the leading edge of visible ash canopy thinning due to emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Trees in southeastern Michigan were surveyed from 2003 to 2006 for canopy thinning and dieback by comparing survey trees with a set of 11 standard photographs. Freeways stemming from Detroit in all directions were used as survey transects. Between 750 and 1,100 trees were surveyed each year. A rapid method of sampling populations of emerald ash borer was developed by counting emerald ash borer emergence holes with binoculars and then felling trees to validate binocular counts. Approximately 25% of the trees surveyed for canopy thinning in 2005 and 2006 also were sampled for emerald ash borer emergence holes using binoculars. Regression analysis indicates that 41-53% of the variation in ash canopy thinning can be explained by the number of emerald ash borer emergence holes per tree. Emerald ash borer emergence holes were found at every site where ash canopy thinning averaged > 40%. In 2003, ash canopy thinning averaged 40% at a distance of 19.3 km from the epicenter of the emerald ash borer infestation in Canton. By 2006, the point at which ash trees averaged 40% canopy thinning had increased to a distance of 51.2 km away from Canton. Therefore, the point at which ash trees averaged 40% canopy thinning, a state of decline clearly visible to the average person, moved outward at a rate of 10.6 km/yr during this period. PMID:18950047

Smitley, David; Davis, Terrance; Rebek, Eric

2008-10-01

15

[Reduced survival and infestation of coffee borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), on coffee fruits, in response to neem sprays in laboratory].  

PubMed

Aqueous solutions of neem oil and aqueous extracts of neem seeds and leaves were sprayed on coffee fruits for laboratory evaluation of their efficiency in reducing infestation of the coffee borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari), in multi-choice preference assays in laboratory. Neem oil and extracts reduced infestation of fruits in a dose-dependent manner, acting as a repellent. At 0.5%, 1% and 1.5%, the oil reduced fruit infestation by 30.2%, 42.5% (P > 0.05), and 58.6% (P < 0.05), respectively, as compared with the control. Seed extracts at 1%, 2% and 4% (w/v) reduced infestation by 30.9%, 38.3% (P > 0.05) and 70.2% (P < 0.05), respectively; seed extracts at 0.15%, 1.5% and 15% (w/v) reduced fruit infestation by 16.5%, 38.5% (P > 0.05) and 56.9% (P < 0.05), respectively. Spraying the emulsifiable oil at 1% on coffee fruits and adult borers was compared with spraying on fruits or adults only. Adult-only spraying caused low mortality (P > 0.05) and low reduction on the number of damaged fruits (P > 0.05). Fruit-only spraying significantly reduced insect survival rates and the number of damaged fruits (P < 0.05). However, spraying on adults and fruits caused the greatest reduction in adult survival (55.6%; P < 0.05) and in fruit infestation (78.7%; P < 0.05), probably due to insect mortality and neem oil repellence acting together. PMID:20878003

Depieri, Rogério A; Martinez, Sueli S

16

Apple Burrknot Borers in New York - Revisited  

Microsoft Academic Search

After reports of severe damage to dwarf apple trees caused by American plum borer, a survey was conducted in the major apple growing regions of New York State to determine the incidence of borers infesting burrknots on clonal apple rootstocks. Dogwood borer was prevalent throughout the state, in general. However, in western NY apple orchards, American plum borer was sometimes

DAVID P. KAIN; RICHARD W. STRAUB; ARTHUR M. AGNELLO

17

Genome-wide transcriptional changes and defence-related chemical profiling of rice in response to infestation by the rice striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis.  

PubMed

How rice defends itself against pathogen infection is well documented, but little is known about how it defends itself against herbivore attack. We measured changes in the transcriptome and chemical profile of rice when the plant is infested by the striped stem borer (SSB) Chilo suppressalis. Infestation by SSBs resulted in changes in the expression levels of 4545 rice genes; this number accounts for about 8% of the genome and is made up of 18 functional groups with broad functions. The largest group comprised genes involved in metabolism, followed by cellular transport, transcription and cellular signaling. Infestation by SSBs modulated many genes responsible for the biosynthesis of plant hormones and plant signaling. Jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid (SA) and ethylene were the major hormones that shaped the SSB-induced defence responses of rice. Many secondary signal transduction components, such as those involved in Ca²? signaling and G-protein signaling, receptor and non-receptor protein kinases, and transcription factors were involved in the SSB-induced responses of rice. Photosynthesis and ATP synthesis from photophosphorylation were restricted by SSB feeding. In addition, SSB infestation induced the accumulation of defence compounds, including trypsin proteinase inhibitors (TrypPIs) and volatile organic compounds. These results demonstrate that SSB-induced defences required rice to reconfigure a wide variety of its metabolic, physiological and biochemical processes. PMID:21534978

Zhou, Guoxin; Wang, Xia; Yan, Feng; Wang, Xia; Li, Ran; Cheng, Jiaan; Lou, Yonggen

2011-06-09

18

Ash decline assessment in emerald ash borer-infested regions: A test of tree-level, hyperspectral technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emerald ash borer (EAB) is an exotic insect pest currently threatening ash species in the Great Lakes region. Because of the potential impact on forests in this area, multiple government agencies are currently focusing their efforts on developing new technologies to detect, monitor and control this insect pest. Previous work has shown that hyperspectral remote sensing technologies can produce

Jennifer Pontius; Mary Martin; Lucie Plourde; Richard Hallett

2008-01-01

19

Impact of Pesticides Borate and Imidacloprid on Insect Emergence from Logs Infested by the Emerald Ash Borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) was discovered on North American soil in the summer of 2002 near Detroit, Michigan, U.S., and has since spread to six states\\/provinces. To alleviate these costs, a method of sanitization is urgently needed. This study evaluated four different chemical sanitation methods in laboratory and field conditions. Treatments included two borate treatments, spray and dip, with

Pascal Nzokou; Samuel Tourtellot; D. Pascal

2008-01-01

20

Diversity of Bacillus thuringiensis strains isolated from coffee plantations infested with the coffee berr y borer Hypothenemus hampei  

Microsoft Academic Search

The coffee berry borer Hypothenemus hampei Ferrari (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) was first reported infecting Costa Rican cof fee plantations in the year 2000. Due to the impact that this plague has in the economy of the country, we were interested in seeking new alternatives for the biological control of H. hampei, based on the entomopathogenic bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis. A total of

Glen Arrieta; Alejandro Hernández; Ana M. Espinoza

2004-01-01

21

Kiln and microwave heat treatment of logs infested by the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Invasive alien pest species periodically infest forests in North America and worldwide, resulting in significant economic and ecological losses for areas involved. One common approach used to control pests is the establishment of quarantine zones, which impose limitations on circulation of products and therefore affect the economic viability of goods already affected by the infestation. This project investigated the use

Pascal Nzokou; Sam Tourtellot; D. Pascal Kamdem

22

Emerald ash borer biological control  

Treesearch

Description: Emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis), an invasive ... in North America via infested solid wood packaging materials from China in the early 1990s ... Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors ...

23

Can EmErald ash borEr, agrilus planipEnnis (ColEoptEra: buprEstidaE), EmErgE from logs two summErs aftEr infEstEd trEEs arE Cut?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a serious invasive pest of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. Much of EAB's range expansion has been attributed to human-assisted movement of infested items such as ash logs and firewood. It is unclear the amount of time that logs cut from live EAB-infested ash trees should be restricted

Toby R. Petrice; Robert A. Haack

24

Monitoring and Modeling of Field Infestation and Damage by the Maize Ear Borer Mussidia nigrivenella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae ) in Benin, West Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

In many countries in West Africa, the pyralid ear borer Mussidia nigrivenella Ragonot occasionally causes severe damage to pre- and postharvest maize. Between 1992 and 1995, the distribution of and damage caused by M. nigrivenella were studied in Benin using survey data and an on-station field experiment. The borer was distributed across the whole country, and at maturity an average

Mamoudou Sétamou; Fritz Schulthess; Hans-Michael Poehling; Christian Borgemeister

2000-01-01

25

Impact of Beauveria bassiana and imidacloprid, alone and in combination, used against emerald ash borer in a newly-infested ash nursery  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

We are investigating the potential of Beauveria bassiana (strain GHA), alone or in combination with imidacloprid, for use against the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis. We treated approximately 400 Fraxinus pennsylvanica and F. americana (height ca. 5-6 m) at a commercial tree nursery wit...

26

A comparison of infestation patterns by Ixodes ticks in urban and rural populations of the Common Blackbird Turdus merula  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although spatial variation in the patterns of parasite infestations among host populations may have important ecological and epidemiological consequences, the causes underlying such variation are poorly known. In the context of a long-term study on the population biology of Common Blackbirds Turdus merula , we examined the prevalence and intensity of infestation by Ixodes ticks between birds living in rural

Arnaud Gregoire; Bruno Faivre; Philipp Heeb; Frank Cezilly

2002-01-01

27

Influence of environmental factors on activity patterns of Incisitermes minor (Isoptera: Kalotermitidae) in naturally infested logs.  

PubMed

Acoustic emission (AE) activity patterns were measured from seven loquat [Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl.] logs, five containing live western drywood termite [Incisitermes minor (Hagen)] infestations, and two without an active drywood termite infestation. AE activity, as well as temperature, were monitored every 3 min under unrestricted ambient conditions in a small wooden building, under unrestricted ambient conditions but in constant darkness, or in a temperature-controlled cabined under constant darkness. Logs with active drywood termite infestations displayed similar diurnal cycles of AE activity that closely followed temperature with a peak of AE activity late in the afternoon (1700-1800 hours). When light was excluded from the building, a circadian pattern continued and apparently was driven by temperature. When the seven logs were kept at a relatively constant temperature (approximately 23 +/- 0.9 degrees C) and constant darkness, the pattern of activity was closely correlated with temperature, even with minimal changes in temperature. Temperature is the primary driver of activity of these drywood termites, but the effects are different when temperature is increasing or decreasing. At constant temperature, AE activity was highly correlated with the number of termites in the logs. The possible implications of these findings on our understanding of drywood termite biology and how this information may affect inspections and posttreatment evaluations are discussed. PMID:23448049

Lewis, Vernard R; Leighton, Shawn; Tabuchi, Robin; Baldwin, James A; Haverty, Michael I

2013-02-01

28

Life history studies of Prorops nasuta , a parasitoid of the coffee berry borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Life history studies were conducted in the laboratory on the African parasitoid Prorops nasuta Waterston (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae), a parasitoid of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). The female wasp enters an infested coffee berry, kills the adult borer and seals the entrance of the berry with the body of the borer, impeding the entry of other organisms

Francisco Infante; John Mumford; Peter BAKER

2005-01-01

29

Behavior of the lesser grain borer Rhyzopertha dominica (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adult males of the lesser grain borer,Rhyzopertha dominica (F.), produce a pheromone that attracts both sexes. The volatiles from males collected on filter paper or Porapak-Q were attractive in two laboratory bioassays. The mating behavior is described and the function of the phen infested with the borer.

A. Khorramshahi; W. E. Burkholder

1981-01-01

30

Spatial distribution pattern of attack of the oak borer, Platypus quercivorus (Murayama) (Coleoptera: Platypodidae), and scolytid ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) on fresh logs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spatial distribution patterns of the attack on fresh logs ofPasania edulis was studied for the oak borer,Platypus quercivorus (Murayama), and two species of Scolytid ambrosia beetles,Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky) andXyleborus attenuatus Blanford, in 1994 and 1995. On the logs where onlyP. quercivorus attacked, the entry holes were distributed uniformly when attack intensity was low. However, the distribution pattern became\\u000a more

Koichi Soné; Takeshi Mori; Masamichi Ide

1998-01-01

31

Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Agrilus planipennis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Emerald ash borer (EAB) Agrilus planipennis is a devastating insect pest of ash Fraxinus species first discovered in the United States in 2002. Native to eastern Russia, northeast China, Mongolia, Taiwan, Japan, and Korea, it was accidentally imported into the U.S. through infested ash crating or pallets at least 10 years ago. It is capable of killing numerous ash

Joseph D. Scianna; Robert Logar; State Forester

32

EXPLORATION FOR EMERALD ASH BORER IN CHINA  

Microsoft Academic Search

In June 2002, the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), native to several Asian countries, was identified as the cause of ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in greater than 2,500 square miles of southeastern Michigan and southwestern Ontario; more recent infestations were found in Ohio, Maryland, and Virginia in 2003. Federal and state agencies adopted a strategy of

Houping Liu; Toby R. Petrice; Leah S. Bauer; Robert A. Haack; Ruitong Gao; Tonghai Zhao

2003-01-01

33

Modeling the spread of the Emerald Ash Borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, an invasive Asian beetle known as the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Coleoptera: Buprestidae) has emerged as a threat to ash trees in the Midwestern United States and Canada [McCullough, D.G., Katovich, S.A., 2004. Pest Alert: Emerald Ash Borer. United States Forest Service, Northeastern Area. NA-PR-02-04]. Significant infestations in Michigan and nearby areas have all but doomed nearly

Todd K. BenDor; Sara S. Metcalf; Lauren E. Fontenot; Brandi Sangunett; Bruce Hannon

2006-01-01

34

Patterns of infestation by the trombiculid mite Eutrombicula alfreddugesi in four sympatric lizard species (genus Tropidurus) in northeastern Brazil.  

PubMed

We studied the parasitism by the chigger mite Eutrombicula alfreddugesi on four sympatric lizard species of the genus Tropidurus in Morro do Chapéu, Bahia state, Brazil: T. hispidus, T. cocorobensis, T. semitaeniatus and T. erythrocephalus. For each species, we investigated the patterns of infestation and analyzed to which extent they varied among the hosts. We calculated the spatial niche breadth of the chigger mite on the body of each host species and the distribution of mites along the hosts' bodies for each Tropidurus species. All four species of Tropidurus at Morro do Chapéu were parasited by the chigger mite, with high (97-100%) prevalences. Host body size significantly explained the intensity of mite infestation for all species, except T. erythrocephalus. The body regions with highest intensity of infestation in the four lizard species were the mite pockets. The spacial niche width of the chigger varied consistently among the four lizards species studied being highest for T. erytrocephalus and lowest for T. cocorobensis. We conclude that the distribution and intensity with which lizards of the genus Tropidurus are infested by Eutrombicula alfreddugesi larvae results from the interaction between aspects of host morphology (such as body size and the occurrence and distribution of mite pockets) and ecology (especially microhabitat use). PMID:18642505

Rocha, C F D; Cunha-Barros, M; Menezes, V A; Fontes, A f; Vrcibradic, D; Van Sluys, M

2008-06-01

35

FIRST-FLIGHT ADULT EUROPEAN CORN BORER (LEPIDOPTERA: CRAMBIDAE) DISTRIBUTION IN ROADSIDE VEGETATION RELATIVE TO CROPPING PATTERNS AND CORN PHENOLOGY  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner), is a serious pest of commercial maize throughout the U.S. Corn Belt. Adults aggregate in grassy areas around and within the cornfield where they spend the daylight hours resting, and where mating activity occurs at night. Mated females leave th...

36

Tolerance of Bt corn (MON 810) to maize stem borer, Chilo partellus (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transgenic corn (MON 810), expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) protein, Cry1Ab, was evaluated under greenhouse conditions for its tolerance to the maize stem borer, Chilo partellus. Bt corn (MON 810) provided effective protection against the stem borer even under a high level of larval infestation in the greenhouse. The observed tolerance is examined and discussed in the light of the

Ramkumar Singh; K. C. Ravi; Farah Deeba; J. N. Nandi; K. S. Mohan; T. M. Manjunath

2005-01-01

37

USDA Forest Service: Emerald Ash Borer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Emerald Ash Borer(EAB) has become a pesky problem in North America in recent years, after being introduced into the ecosystem in the early 1990s. This information site from the USDA Forest Service is dedicated to providing the northeastern part of North America (where the bug has become a big problem) with information on identifying the insect, its infestations, and quarantine information, as well as control and management resources. The "Infestations" section contains several maps outlining the infected and quarantined ares of Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Maryland, and the United States as a whole. This is a great resource for anyone interested or concerned about the current EAB problem.

2008-02-25

38

Sugarcane borer in Florida  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis, is one of the most important of the above-ground pests of sugarcane in Florida. This article presents information pertaining to the borer’s biology, damage to cane, scouting, biological control, cultural control and chemical control. ...

39

Mussel Glochidia Identification and Infestation Patterns on Fishes in the Sipsey River, Alabama  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We examined fishes monthly for naturally occurring infestations of mussel larvae (glochidia) in the Sipsey River, Alabama, and tested the utility of simple morphometrics to identify glochidia from this assemblage. We examined 41 fish species (n = 654 individuals) representing 9 families but found glochidia on only 13 species from 5 families. Across all fish species, 14% of individuals were infested. The most commonly infested fishes were Ammocrypta beani (57% of individuals), A. meridiana (50%), Cyprinella venusta (51%), and Etheostoma stigmaeum (36%). Number of glochidia on individual fishes ranged from 1-231. We measured shell length, hinge length, and height of known glochidia from 21 mussel species occurring in the Sipsey River. Mean dimensions for the largest species were 5-7 times greater than the smallest species. Glochidia size varied little within species except for Pleurobema decisum which was represented by two glochidial morphotypes. Discriminant functions analysis classified 72% of total glochidia (n = 870) to the correct species. For individual species, percentage of correct classification ranged from 42-100%. Glochidia of closely related species were not necessarily more similar than to distantly related species. For example, species of Quadrulini represented some of the smallest and largest glochidia in the study.

Kennedy, T. B.; Haag, W. R.

2005-05-01

40

The influence of wild and cultivated Gramineae and Cyperaceae on populations of sugarcane borers and their parasites in North India  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sugarcane borers frequently inhabit wild and semi-cultivated grasses growing in the proximity of cane fields. In India, in\\u000a view of the year-round cultivation of sugarcane, wild grasses are not necessary for the perpetuation of borer species, but\\u000a observations indicate that certain borer species migrate from wild or other cultivated grasses to cane, thereby increasing\\u000a levels of infestation in cane during

Sudha Nagarkatti; K. Ramachandran Nair

1973-01-01

41

Damage and Loss Caused by the Larger Grain Borer Prostephanus truncatus  

Microsoft Academic Search

An overview of information on damage caused by the larger grain borer is provided, including details of early studies examining commodities that might be attacked and the importance of LGB field infestations in relation to storage losses. In addition, examples are given from published information on the weight losses that can result from LGB infestation in maize and cassava, with

R. A. Boxall

2002-01-01

42

EFFECTIVENESS OF TRICHOGRAMMA CHILONIS (ISHII) (HYMENOPTERA: TRICHOGRAMMATIDAE) AGAINST SUGARCANE STEM BORER (CHILO INFUSCATELLUS SNELLEN) (LEPIDOTERA: PYRALLIDAE)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Trichogramma chilonis Ishii against sugarcane stem borer (Chilo infuscatellus Snellen) was evaluated in experimental plots of sugarcane in the field at Faisalabad, Pakistan. Among five treatments of T. chilonis, the treatment having 60,000 parasitized eggs per acre showed significant results causing 83% reduction in infestation of C. infuscatellus as compare to control having 30.67% infestation. Population of C. infuscatellus showed

Muhammad Rafiq Shahid; Anjum Suhail; Muhammad Dildar Gogi; Munir Ahmad Shahzad; Sabir Hussain

2007-01-01

43

Patterns of Knemidokoptes jamaicensis (Acari: Knemidokoptidae) infestations among eight new avian hosts in the Dominican Republic.  

PubMed

The ectoparasitic mite Knemidokoptes jamaicensis Turk burrows into the cornified epithelium of the legs and feet of Passeriform birds and has been reported from 12 species of North American birds. Here we establish new host and distribution records for K. jamaicensis from eight species of birds from three habitats in the Dominican Republic. These species include Hispaniolan pewee (Contopus hispaniolensis Bryant), northern mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos L.), Cape May warbler (Dendoica tigrina Gmelin), prairie warbler (Dendroica discolor Vieillot), palm warbler (Dendroica palmarum Gmelin), green-tailed warbler (Microligea palustris Cory), black-crowned palm tanager (Phaenicophilus palmarum L.), and Greater Antillean bullfinch (Loxigilla violacea L.). Rates of infestation were as great as 18.2% but varied between species and habitats. Mites were far more common in the dry desert thorn scrub than they were in higher elevation and more moist habitats, despite the fact that many of the affected species had distributions that spanned multiple habitat types. Results suggest that the abundance of scaley-leg mites is controlled by the abundance of suitable host species and by specific ecological conditions that promote transmission. PMID:11372970

Latta, S C; O'Connor, B M

2001-05-01

44

Does the wood-borer Sphaeroma terebrans (Crustacea) shape the distribution of the mangrove Rhizophora mucronata?  

PubMed

Field surveys were conducted to evaluate the occurrence of the isopod borer Sphaeroma terebrans (Crustacea) in aerial roots (prop roots) of the red mangrove Rhizophora mucronata on several different spatial scales (m to 100 km) in East Africa. In 6 out of 17 sites studied in Kenya and on Zanzibar Island, Tanzania, no signs of the isopods were found. When the isopods were present the frequency of infestation was high. Trees in muddy substrates in the lower intertidal, in particular at fringing channels or the open sea, showed high prevalence and intensity of infestation, with large part of their roots damaged or dead. Trees at the upper range of Rhizophora, in sandy and muddy areas, showed no signs of isopod infestation. This pattern recurred in mangrove forests on large spatial scales and there was no indication that island forests differed from the mainland forests. This indicates that sediment characteristics, vertical height in the tidal zone, and direct exposure to incoming water are the major factors controlling the abundance of S. terebrans. The isopod may play an important role in determining the lower intertidal limits of R. mucronata. Trees with numerous dead or nongrowing roots, as result of Sphaeroma attack, are likely to tumble due to a lack of root support and this is most likely to occur along channels at the lower, muddy intertidal. Tumbled trees were frequently observed along channels in the lower, muddy intertidal, but rarely in the mid or high intertidal. Implications for management of mangrove forests are discussed. PMID:12572825

Svavarsson, Jörundur; Osore, Melckzedeck K W; Olafsson, Emil

2002-12-01

45

Emerald ash borer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The emerald ash borer is an insect that was introduced to the United States on accident. The larvae of this insect feed on essential parts of the ash tree. This non-native species has killed several million trees already.

N/A N/A (USDA;Forest Service)

2004-11-13

46

Occurrence of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and biotic factors affecting its immature stages in the Russian Far East.  

PubMed

Field surveys were conducted from 2008 to 2011 in the Khabarovsk and Vladivostok regions of Russia to investigate the occurrence of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, and mortality factors affecting its immature stages. We found emerald ash borer infesting both introduced North American green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall) and native oriental ashes (F. mandshurica Rupr. and F. rhynchophylla Hance) in both regions. Emerald ash borer densities (larvae/m(2) of phloem area) were markedly higher on green ash (11.3-76.7 in the Khabarovsk area and 77-245 in the Vladivostok area) than on artificially stressed Manchurian ash (2.2) or Oriental ash (10-59). Mortality of emerald ash borer larvae caused by different biotic factors (woodpecker predation, host plant resistance and/or undetermined diseases, and parasitism) varied with date, site, and ash species. In general, predation of emerald ash borer larvae by woodpeckers was low. While low rates (3-27%) of emerald ash borer larval mortality were caused by undetermined biotic factors on green ash between 2009 and 2011, higher rates (26-95%) of emerald ash borer larval mortality were caused by putative plant resistance in Oriental ash species in both regions. Little (<1%) parasitism of emerald ash borer larvae was observed in Khabarovsk; however, three hymenopteran parasitoids (Spathius sp., Atanycolus nigriventris Vojnovskaja-Krieger, and Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang) were observed attacking third - fourth instars of emerald ash borer in the Vladivostok area, parasitizing 0-8.3% of emerald ash borer larvae infesting Oriental ash trees and 7.3-62.7% of those on green ash trees (primarily by Spathius sp.) in two of the three study sites. Relevance of these findings to the classical biological control of emerald ash borer in newly invaded regions is discussed. PMID:22506996

Duan, Jian J; Yurchenko, Galina; Fuester, Roger

2012-04-01

47

Patterns of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Infestation and Container Productivity Measured Using Pupal and Stegomyia Indices in Northern Argentina  

PubMed Central

A citywide control program of Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) mainly based on the use of larvicides reduced infestations but failed to achieve the desired target levels in Clorinda, northeastern Argentina, over 5 yr of interventions. To understand the underlying causes of persistent infestations and to develop new control tactics adapted to the local context, we conducted two pupal surveys in a large neighborhood with ?2,500 houses and recorded several variables for every container inspected in fall and spring 2007. In total, 4,076 lots and 4,267 containers were inspected over both surveys, and 8,391 Ae. aegypti pupae were collected. Large tanks used for potable water storage were the most abundant and the most productive type of container, accounting for 65–84% of all the pupae collected. Therefore, large tanks were key containers and candidates for improved targeted interventions. Multivariate analysis showed that containers located in the yard, at low sun exposure, unlidded, filled with rain water, and holding polluted water were all more likely to be infested by larvae or pupae. When only infested containers were considered, productivity of pupae was most closely associated with large tanks and rain water. A stochastic simulation model was developed to calculate the expected correlations between pupal and Stegomyia indices according to the characteristics of the distribution of larvae and pupae per container and the spatial scale at which the indices were computed. The correlation between pupal and Stegomyia indices is expected to increase as infestation levels decline.

Garelli, F. M.; Espinosa, M. O.; Weinberg, D.; Coto, H. D.; Gaspe, M. S.; Gurtler, R. E.

2011-01-01

48

A Decision Support System for Emerald Ash Borer Eradication Using Spatial-Dynamic Modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, an invasive Asian beetle known as the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) ( Agrilus planipennis Coleoptera: Buprestidae) has emerged as a threat to Ash trees in the Midwestern United States and Canada (McCullough and Katovich 2004). Significant infestations in Michigan and nearby areas have all but doomed nearly one billion native ash trees. This paper presents an argument for the

Todd K. BenDor; Sara S. Metcalf; Lauren E. Fontenot; Brandi Sangunett

49

Sentinel: Intelligent Information Sharing for Controlling the Emerald Ash Borer Threat  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has killed or infested millions of ash trees in Michigan and is fast spreading to neighboring states. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) estimates that if EAB went unchecked in the rest of the country, the loss to the nation could range from $20 billion to $60 billion. One key requirement for the success of

Brahim Medjahed; William Grosky

50

Attraction of the emerald ash borer to ash trees stressed by girdling, herbicide treatment, or wounding  

Microsoft Academic Search

New infestations of emerald ash borer, Agrilusplanipennis Fairmaire, an invasive pest native to Asia, are diffi­ cult to detect until densities build and symptoms appear on affected ash (Fraxinus spp). We compared the attraction of A. planipennisto ash trees stressed by girdling (bark and phloem removed from a 15 cm wide band around the tree (2003­ 2(05», vertical wounding (same

Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; David Cappaert

2009-01-01

51

Biological control of emerald ash borers: the role of indigenous North American parasitoids  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Field surveys of the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, and associated parasitoids were conducted in Cranberry Township, PA; Granville, PA; and Cheltenham, MD. Several species of parasitic Hymenoptera were collected from EAB-infested green ash trees or reared from late-instar E...

52

Economic assessment of controlling stem borers (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) with insecticides in Texas rice  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 4-year field study was conducted to evaluate insecticide applications on infestations of the stem borers Diatraea saccharalis (F.) and Eoreuma loftini (Dyar) in rice, Oryza sativa L. Except for rice yield in 2002, whiteheads per square meter and rice yield were significantly affected by insecticide treatments in each year of the study. Biorational insecticides (diflubenzuron, novaluron and tebufenozide) did

F. P. F. Reay-Jones; T. E. Reagan

2007-01-01

53

Effect of emerald ash borer on structure and material properties of ash trees  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Emerald ash borer (EAB) currently occurs in fifteen states in the United States, as well as Ontario and Quebec in Canada. A decline in ash tree strength following EAB infestation is potentially hazardous to public safety, particularly when trees are left standing for several years after dying. Dead ...

54

EXPANDED EXPLORATIONS FOR EMERALD ASH BORER IN ASIA AND IMPLICATIONS FOR GENETIC ANALYSIS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Emerald ash borer (EAB) is considered native to northeast China, Korea, Japan, Taiwan, Mongolia, and eastern Russia. We are using genetic analyses to determine the origin of North America’s EAB infestations; however, acquiring samples from countries other than China has been difficult. To increase t...

55

Use of Beauveria bassiana and imidacloprid for control of emerald ash borer in an ash nursery  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

We wish to determine the potential of Beauveria bassiana strain GHA, alone or in combination with imidacloprid, for control and management of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis. We have undertaken this work at a commercial tree nursery in southern Michigan within the EAB-infested area. App...

56

Economic analysis of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) management options.  

PubMed

Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), plays a significant role in the health and extent of management of native North American ash species in urban forests. An economic analysis of management options was performed to aid decision makers in preparing for likely future infestations. Separate ash tree population valuations were derived from the i-Tree Streets program and the Council of Tree and Landscape Appraisers (CTLA) methodology. A relative economic analysis was used to compare a control option (do-nothing approach, only removing ash trees as they die) to three distinct management options: 1) preemptive removal of all ash trees over a 5 yr period, 2) preemptive removal of all ash trees and replacement with comparable nonash trees, or 3) treating the entire population of ash trees with insecticides to minimize mortality. For each valuation and management option, an annual analysis was performed for both the remaining ash tree population and those lost to emerald ash borer. Retention of ash trees using insecticide treatments typically retained greater urban forest value, followed by doing nothing (control), which was better than preemptive removal and replacement. Preemptive removal without tree replacement, which was the least expensive management option, also provided the lowest net urban forest value over the 20-yr simulation. A "no emerald ash borer" scenario was modeled to further serve as a benchmark for each management option and provide a level of economic justification for regulatory programs aimed at slowing the movement of emerald ash borer. PMID:22420272

Vannatta, A R; Hauer, R H; Schuettpelz, N M

2012-02-01

57

Delusional Infestation  

PubMed Central

Summary: This papers aims at familiarizing psychiatric and nonpsychiatric readers with delusional infestation (DI), also known as delusional parasitosis. It is characterized by the fixed belief of being infested with pathogens against all medical evidence. DI is no single disorder but can occur as a delusional disorder of the somatic type (primary DI) or secondary to numerous other conditions. A set of minimal diagnostic criteria and a classification are provided. Patients with DI pose a truly interdisciplinary problem to the medical system. They avoid psychiatrists and consult dermatologists, microbiologists, or general practitioners but often lose faith in professional medicine. Epidemiology and history suggest that the imaginary pathogens change constantly, while the delusional theme “infestation” is stable and ubiquitous. Patients with self-diagnosed “Morgellons disease” can be seen as a variation of this delusional theme. For clinicians, clinical pathways for efficient diagnostics and etiology-specific treatment are provided. Specialized outpatient clinics in dermatology with a liaison psychiatrist are theoretically best placed to provide care. The most intricate problem is to engage patients in psychiatric therapy. In primary DI, antipsychotics are the treatment of choice, according to limited but sufficient evidence. Pimozide is no longer the treatment of choice for reasons of drug safety. Future research should focus on pathophysiology and the neural basis of DI, as well as on conclusive clinical trials, which are widely lacking. Innovative approaches will be needed, since otherwise patients are unlikely to adhere to any study protocol.

Freudenmann, Roland W.; Lepping, Peter

2009-01-01

58

Dermatologic infestations.  

PubMed

Head lice are transmitted by head to head contact. Optimal therapy includes malathion lotion 0.5% repeated in one week left on for 30 minutes to 8 hours. Spinosad topical suspension 0.9% repeated in one week left on for 10 minutes is another option. Scabies is transmitted mainly by direct contact but also via heavily infested fomites due to crusted scabies. Permethrin 5% cream to the body repeated in four days is often sufficient; however, scalp treatment with malathion lotion 0.5% is helpful in crusted scabies and in infested children. Oral ivermectin 200 mcg/kg is another option, repeated in four days. For scabies more than lice, fomites should be placed in a drier at 60 °C for 10 minutes to kill the arthropods. Treatment of close contacts in both cases will control outbreaks and repeated infestations. Both have been associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. Bed bugs are a common cause for papular urticaria. Identification of the insect in the mattress or bedding confirms the diagnosis. Prevention involves encasing the mattress in a sealed plastic cover and extermination. Delusions of parasitosis is a diagnosis of exclusion that is best treated with an antipsychotic. PMID:22250620

Shmidt, Eugenia; Levitt, Jacob

2012-02-01

59

Delusional infestation.  

PubMed

This papers aims at familiarizing psychiatric and nonpsychiatric readers with delusional infestation (DI), also known as delusional parasitosis. It is characterized by the fixed belief of being infested with pathogens against all medical evidence. DI is no single disorder but can occur as a delusional disorder of the somatic type (primary DI) or secondary to numerous other conditions. A set of minimal diagnostic criteria and a classification are provided. Patients with DI pose a truly interdisciplinary problem to the medical system. They avoid psychiatrists and consult dermatologists, microbiologists, or general practitioners but often lose faith in professional medicine. Epidemiology and history suggest that the imaginary pathogens change constantly, while the delusional theme "infestation" is stable and ubiquitous. Patients with self-diagnosed "Morgellons disease" can be seen as a variation of this delusional theme. For clinicians, clinical pathways for efficient diagnostics and etiology-specific treatment are provided. Specialized outpatient clinics in dermatology with a liaison psychiatrist are theoretically best placed to provide care. The most intricate problem is to engage patients in psychiatric therapy. In primary DI, antipsychotics are the treatment of choice, according to limited but sufficient evidence. Pimozide is no longer the treatment of choice for reasons of drug safety. Future research should focus on pathophysiology and the neural basis of DI, as well as on conclusive clinical trials, which are widely lacking. Innovative approaches will be needed, since otherwise patients are unlikely to adhere to any study protocol. PMID:19822895

Freudenmann, Roland W; Lepping, Peter

2009-10-01

60

Impact of plant resistance on southwestern corn borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) biology and plant damage.  

PubMed

Southwestern corn borer, Diatraea grandiosella Dyar (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), is a major insect pest of corn, Zea mays L., in the southern United States. Germplasm lines with resistance to southwestern corn borer have been developed and released by the USDA-ARS. Two single-cross hybrids produced by crossing germplasm lines with resistance to southwestern corn borer and a susceptible single-cross hybrid were infested with southwestern corn borer larvae in a 2-yr field test conducted in Mississippi. The susceptible hybrid sustained significantly more leaf damage and stalk tunneling than either resistant hybrid. The number of tunnels and the length of tunneling were significantly lower on the resistant hybrids. In 2003, up to 15 times more tunneling was observed on the susceptible hybrid. Larvae feeding on the resistant hybrids were delayed in their movement from the whorl to the stalk and larval survival was 50% lower on the resistant hybrids than on the susceptible hybrid. Larvae recovered from the susceptible hybrid 7-14 d after infestation weighed twice as much as those recovered from the resistant hybrids. Similar differences in larval weight were observed in the laboratory when larvae were reared on diets prepared from lyophilized tissue from the three hybrids. These results provide a foundation for other investigations designed to identify and determine the roles of specific genes and gene families associated with southwestern corn borer resistance in corn. PMID:17598563

Daves, C A; Williams, W P; Davis, F M

2007-06-01

61

Incidence, symptoms, and intensity of damage by three coffee stem borers (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in South Yunan, China.  

PubMed

Sampling studies were conducted in coffee plantations in South Yunan to assess the incidence, symptoms, and intensity of damage by three stem borers: Xylotrechus quadripes (Chevrolat), Acalolepta cervina (Hope), and Bacchisa sp. near pallidiventris (Thomson). Of 5,690 plants sampled in eight plantations, 440 were infested with A. cervina, 63 with X. quadripes, and three with B. pallidiventris. Plants 5-7 yr old were 10 times more heavily infested with X. quadripes than 3- to 4-yr-old plants, whereas both age groups of plants had similar levels of infestation with A. cervina. Larval galleries of the three borer species markedly differ: A. cervina and B. pallidiventris larvae develop in subcortical galleries in the main stem (A. cervina) and lateral branches (B. pallidiventris), whereas larval galleries of X. quadripes intermittently punctuate and transverse the xylem of main stems or lateral branches. Significantly more plant tissue was damaged in stems infested with X. quadripes than in those infested with A. cervina or B. pallidiventris. Stems infested with A. cervina or B. pallidiventris generally had only one or a few pupation chambers, whereas stems infested with X. quadripes contained numerous chambers. Quantitative and qualitative data collected through this study provide farmers with diagnostic tools to determine which borer species infested coffee plants. Comparison of life history traits and intensity of damage for the three borer species indicates that X. quadripes is the most severe pest of coffee in Yunan, and suggests that populations of X. quadripes have the greatest potential to steadily increase with time. PMID:11942744

Rhainds, Marc; Lan, Chin Chiew; Zhen, Mo Li; Gries, Gerhard

2002-02-01

62

Epidemiology of the Hemp Borer, Grapholita delineanaWalker (Lepidoptera: Oleuthreutidae), a Pest of Cannabis sativa L  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hemp borer, Grapholita delineana, is newly described from feral hemp in Vermont, USA. It may pose a serious pest should hemp cultivation resume in the USA. A similar situation occurred in the 1960s, when G. delineanasuddenly became a serious pest in southeastern Europe. Evidence suggests the pest was imported from its native range via infested hemp seed. Larvae of

John M. McPartland

2002-01-01

63

SUSCEPTIBILITY OF LONG, SHORT, AND MEDIUM-GRAIN RICE TO RHYZOPERTHA DOMINICA (F.), THE LESSER GRAIN BORER (COLEOPTERA: BOSTRICHIDAE)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) can infest long, short, and medium grain rough rice. There is little current information regarding susceptibility of these types or of individual varieties within these general classifications. A series of tests were conducted in which lesser grain b...

64

Effectiveness of differing trap types for the detection of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).  

PubMed

The early detection of populations of a forest pest is important to begin initial control efforts, minimizing the risk of further spread and impact. Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is an introduced pestiferous insect of ash (Fraxinus spp. L.) in North America. The effectiveness of trapping techniques, including girdled trap trees with sticky bands and purple prism traps, was tested in areas with low- and high-density populations of emerald ash borer. At both densities, large girdled trap trees (>30 cm diameter at breast height [dbh], 1.37 m in height) captured a higher rate of adult beetles per day than smaller trees. However, the odds of detecting emerald ash borer increased as the dbh of the tree increased by 1 cm for trap trees 15-25 cm dbh. Ash species used for the traps differed in the number of larvae per cubic centimeter of phloem. Emerald ash borer larvae were more likely to be detected below, compared with above, the crown base of the trap tree. While larval densities within a trap tree were related to the species of ash, adult capture rates were not. These results provide support for focusing state and regional detection programs on the detection of emerald ash borer adults. If bark peeling for larvae is incorporated into these programs, peeling efforts focused below the crown base may increase likelihood of identifying new infestations while reducing labor costs. Associating traps with larger trees ( approximately 25 cm dbh) may increase the odds of detecting low-density populations of emerald ash borer, possibly reducing the time between infestation establishment and implementing management strategies. PMID:19689904

Marshall, Jordan M; Storer, Andrew J; Fraser, Ivich; Beachy, Jessica A; Mastro, Victor C

2009-08-01

65

Effect of sequential applications of foliar nutrients, biofertilizers and sowing dates on the incidence of corn stem borers in Egypt.  

PubMed

In this study either early sown (May 1st) or lately sown (June 2nd) corn plants were treated with Phosphorin & Rhizobactrin as biofertilizers and sprayed with six selected foliar nutrients, i.e. Polymex; Greenzit SP100, Greenzit NPK, Potasin-F, Copper sulphate and Ascorbic acid; in mono-, bi-, and/or tri-sequential applications. Such practices were conducted to show their beneficial effects compared with the chemical treatment in checking the incidence of the stem borers and hence increasing the corn yield. The obtained results could be summarized in the following chief points: (a) the lately sown biofertilized plants showed somewhat higher levels of infestation than the early planted ones., (b) in general, spraying the biofertilized corn plants in both sowing dates with the tested foliar nutrients, significantly decreased the rate of the stem borers infestation than the untreated plants of control., (c) the foliar sprays of Greenzit NPK alone, bi- or tri-sequential applications of Potasin-F, Polymex, Ascorbic acid and Copper sulphate achieved considerable success in reducing larval numbers of the borers species. For example, in case of using the bi-sequential nutrients (Polymex/Ascorbic acid) the numbers were 1.2, 1.5 and 1.2 larvae/5 plants, whereas the numbers were 1.3, 1.0 and 0.7 larvae/5 plants as a result, of the tri-sequential applications (Potasin-F/Ascorbic acid/Polymex) for the pink stem borer, Sesamia cretica, (Led.), the purple lined borer, Chilo agamemnon, (Bels.), and the European corn borer Ostrinia nubilalis (Hb.), in respect, vs. 4.8, 4.5 and 2.9 larvae/5 plants for the same stem borers, respectively, in case of the untreated corn plants. In addition, the other trisequential applications (Polymex/ascorbic acid/Copper sulphate), (Potasin-F/Copper sulphate/ascorbic acid) and (Potasin-F/Copper sulphate/Polymex) reduced the stem borers infestation; (d) from the view point of the interaction effects of sowing dates and the tested foliar nutrients, it was found that the tri-sequential sprayings (Potasin-F/Copper sulphate/Polymex) and/or (Potasin-F/Copper sulphate/Ascorbic acid) have lowered the rate of the stem borers infestation to 3.3 and 3.3 and 5.7 and 4.3 larvae/5 plants for the tri-applications in the 1st and 2nd sowing dates, respectively. Such reductions in the levels of infestation led to an increase in the grain yield up to 6.9 and 7.2 and 5.4 and 5.8 ton/fed, for the early and lately sown corn plants, in respect, and (e) All the foliar nutrients, with no exception, proved to be efficient in managing the stem borers infestation as compared with the insecticide treatment using Polytrin. Although the chemical application had lowered the level of infestation to 2.3 and 5.7 larvae/5 plants in the 1st and 2nd sowing dates as compared with 9.7 and 14.7 larvae/5 untreated plants for the same sowing dates, lesser grain yield of 5.6 and 4.4 ton/fed. was obtained in the first and second dates of planting, successively, in comparison to the grain yield resulted from the tri-applications of Potasin-F/Copper sulphate with either Polymex or Ascorbic acid. The abovementioned results assured the profitable effects of using foliar nutrients as well as the biofertilizers for attaining healthy corn plants, which would be capable of tolerating the injury inflicted by the studied stem borers and compensating for the harmful effects of insects infestation, so high grain yields could be obtained than those of the untreated and/or the insecticide treated plants. PMID:12696416

Mesbah, H A; Mourad, A K; el-Nimr, Hanyiat M; el-Kady, Magda B; Haroun, Nagah S

2002-01-01

66

Emerald ash borer life cycle  

Treesearch

USA.gov Government Made Easy ... Title: Emerald ash borer life cycle ... Morgantown, WV: U.S. Forest Service, Forest Health Technology Enterprise ... Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this ...

67

Shipworms and Other Marine Borers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Mollusks, crustaceans and other groups of invertebrates attack underwater structures causing great loss. This article describes shipworms (teredos) and other marine borers. Among the mollusks the most destructive are Teredo and Bankia (pelecypoda). Three ...

M. Castagna

1973-01-01

68

Genetic analysis of emerald ash borer ( Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) populations in Asia and North America  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an invasive pest of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees first discovered outside of its native range of northeastern Asia in 2002. EAB spread from its initial zone of\\u000a discovery in the Detroit, Michigan and Windsor, Ontario metropolitan areas, in large part, from inadvertent human-assisted\\u000a movement of infested ash materials.

Alicia M. Bray; Leah S. Bauer; Therese M. Poland; Robert A. Haack; Anthony I. Cognato; James J. Smith

69

Evaluation of Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) rice varieties against stem borer (Chilo suppressalis).  

PubMed

Three transgenic rice varieties namely Khazar, Neda and Nemat, all containing a cry1Ab gene, were evaluated through PCR analysis and field examinations for their resistance at natural infestation of insect pests during 2007. The results showed that all transgenic varieties produced 1.2 kb PCR product derived from application of cry1Ab gene. In field conditions, transgenic varieties exhibited high levels of resistance against natural infestation of stem borer and the damaged plants based on dead heart or white heat for them were less than 1%. Moreover, in stem-cut bioassay 100% of released larvae died within four days after infestation. These results demonstrate that expression of cry1Ab gene in the genome of transgenic varieties provided season-long protection from the natural infestation of lepidopteran insects. PMID:18817142

Kiani, Ghaffar; Nematzadeh, Ghorban Ali; Ghareyazie, Behzad; Sattari, Majid

2008-02-15

70

Cutaneous infestations and infections.  

PubMed

Cutaneous infections and infestations are common problems in childhood and adolescence. This article provides an update focusing on the diagnosis and management of several frequently encountered infections and infestations: scabies, bedbugs, head lice, tinea capitis, and tinea versicolor. PMID:21815448

Haisley-Royster, Camille

2011-04-01

71

Automated Nondestructive Detection of lnternal lnsect Infestation of Wheat Kernels by Using Near-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wheat kernels infested internally with larvae of 3 primary insect pests of grain, the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.); the lesser grain borer, Hhgzoperthn dominica (F'); and the Angoumois grain moth, Sitotroga cereaLelln (Olivier), were scanned with a near-infrared spectrom- etei incorpoiated into a single kernel characterization system to determine differences in absorption due to th! p.\\

FLOYD E. DOWELL; JAMES E. THRONE

72

The influence of satellite populations of emerald ash borer on projected economic costs in U.S. communities, 2010–2020  

Microsoft Academic Search

The invasion spread of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is characterized by the formation of satellite populations that expand and coalesce with the continuously invading population front. As of January 2010, satellite infestations have been detected in 13 states and two Canadian provinces. Understanding how newly established satellite populations may affect economic costs can help program

Kent F. Kovacs; Rodrigo J. Mercader; Robert G. Haight; Nathan W. Siegert; Deborah G. McCullough; Andrew M. Liebhold

2011-01-01

73

Sequential sampling plans for estimating European corn borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) and corn earworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larval density in sweet corn ears  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed a flexible fixed-precision sequential sampling plan for estimating the density of European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis Hübner and corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), larvae, using infestation data collected from 1994 to 2000. The purpose of each sampling plan was to provide statistically sound estimates of larval densities for each pest in sweet corn ears, near harvest, with minimal

Patrick K. O’Rourke; W. D. Hutchison

2003-01-01

74

Evaluation of heat treatment schedules for emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).  

PubMed

The thermotolerance of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), was evaluated by subjecting larvae and prepupae to a number of time-temperature regimes. Three independent experiments were conducted during 2006 and 2007 by heating emerald ash borer infested firewood in laboratory ovens. Heat treatments were established based on the internal wood temperature. Treatments ranged from 45 to 65 degrees C for 30 and 60 min, and the ability of larvae to pupate and emerge as adults was used to evaluate the success of each treatment. A fourth experiment was conducted to examine heat treatments on exposed prepupae removed from logs and subjected to ambient temperatures of 50, 55, and 60 degrees C for 15, 30, 45, and 60 min. Results from the firewood experiments were consistent in the first experiment. Emergence data showed emerald ash borer larvae were capable of surviving a temperatures-time combination up to 60 degrees C for 30 min in wood. The 65 degrees C for 30 min treatment was, however, effective in preventing emerald ash borer emergence on both dates. Conversely, in the second experiment using saturated steam heat, complete mortality was achieved at 50 and 55 degrees C for both 30 and 60 min. Results from the prepupae experiment showed emerald ash borer survivorship in temperature-time combinations up to 55 degrees C for 30 min, and at 50 degrees C for 60 min; 60 degrees C for 15 min and longer was effective in preventing pupation in exposed prepupae. Overall results suggest that emerald ash borer survival is variable depending on heating conditions, and an internal wood temperature of 60 degrees C for 60 min should be considered the minimum for safe treatment for firewood. PMID:20069830

Myers, Scott W; Fraser, Ivich; Mastro, Victor C

2009-12-01

75

Effect of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis rice lines on mortality and feeding behavior of rice stem borers (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).  

PubMed

Ten transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis Bt rice, Oryza sativa L., lines with different Bt genes (two Cry1Ac lines, three Cry2A lines, and five Cry9C lines) derived from the same variety Minghui 63 were evaluated in both the laboratory and the field. Bioassays were conducted by using the first instars of two main rice lepidopteran insect species: yellow stem borer, Scirpophaga incertulas (Walker) and Asiatic rice borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker). All transgenic lines exhibited high toxicity to these two rice borers. Field evaluation results also showed that all transgenic lines were highly insect resistant with both natural infestation and manual infestation of the neonate larvae of S. incertulas compared with the nontransformed Minghui63. Bt protein concentrations in leaves of 10 transgenic rice lines were estimated by the sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The cry9C gene had the highest expression level, next was cry2A gene, and the cry1Ac gene expressed at the lowest level. The feeding behavior of 7-d-old Asiatic rice borer to three classes of Bt transgenic rice lines also was detected by using rice culm cuttings. The results showed that 7-d-old larvae of Asiatic rice borer have the capacity to distinguish Bt and non-Bt culm cuttings and preferentially fed on non-Bt cuttings. When only Bt culm cuttings with three classes of different Bt proteins (CrylAc, Cry2A, and Cry9C) were fed, significant distribution difference of 7-d-old Asiatic rice borer in culm cuttings of different Bt proteins also was found. In the current study, we evaluate different Bt genes in the same rice variety in both the laboratory and the field, and also tested feeding behavior of rice insect to these Bt rice. These data are valuable for the further development of two-toxin Bt rice and establishment of appropriate insect resistance management in the future. PMID:18330134

Chen, Hao; Zhang, Guoan; Zhang, Qifa; Lin, Yongjun

2008-02-01

76

Isolation and characterization of Isaria farinosa and Purpureocillium lilacinum associated with emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Entomopathogenic fungi of the genera Isaria and Purpureocillium were recovered from infestation sites of emerald ash borer (EAB) in southern Ontario, Canada. Isolates were identified using morphological characters and by sequencing the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 ribosomal DNA gene and partial ?-tubulin gene. Phylogenetic analysis and constructed trees based on the ITS and ?-tubulin gene explicitly confirm isolates L66B, SY17-a and LHY46-a as

Shajahan Johny; George Kyei-Poku; Debbie Gauthier; Kees van Frankenhuyzen

2012-01-01

77

Impacts of the emerald ash borer (EAB) eradication and tree mortality: potential for a secondary spread of invasive plant species  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the discovery of the emerald ash borer in 2002, eradication efforts have been implemented in an attempt to eliminate\\u000a or contain the spread of this invasive beetle. The eradication protocol called for the removal of every ash tree within a\\u000a 0.8 km radius around an infested tree. In 2005 this study was established to identify environmental changes attributed to\\u000a the

Constance E. HausmanJohn; John F. Jaeger; Oscar J. Rocha

2010-01-01

78

Temperature-Dependent Models for Predicting European Corn Borer Early Feeding on Corn in Missouri  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) is one of the most damaging insect pests to corn. Current yield losses attributed to the European corn borer are in the region of 400 million annually. Even though the European corn borer (ECB) has been extensively studied, few models exist that attempt to accurately predict its early infestation on corn. The basic problem encountered in formulating a first generation infestation prediction model is when to start calculating the temperature index. The exact conditions required to terminate diapause and the resumption of normal development are not well established. One of the old methods used in Missouri to predict the earliest date of ECB infestation involves the use of growing degree days, and by convention the heat units are arbitrarily calculated from January 1. This study was conducted to formulate prediction, and simulation-decision models for corn and first generation ECB infestation. The effects of variable maximum and minimum temperatures on the growth and development of the ECB were studied both in the laboratory and field designed experiments. Archival biological data from the IPM programs in three Missouri counties and weather data from weather stations were also used in corn phenology studies and to determine the dates of earliest ECB infestation on corn, for the period covering 1984 through 1989. Results from laboratory experiments suggest that the total growth and development period of ECB reared at variable temperatures is a constant value. However, the phenological development of the ECB stages does not follow a linear trend as earlier assumed during the introduction of the growing degree day model, but assumes a cubic curve. The starting point for the calculation of the temperature index in early spring occurs under conditions of longer than 13.0 hours of day length and a daily mean temperature of 60^ circF and above for at least five consecutive days. Three prediction models were developed. These are, the temperature departure model (R^2 = 0.36), and two time sequence models (R^2 = 0.68 and 0.90, respectively) using mean weekly temperatures for weeks 4, 5, and 6, coded from April 1. A single corn phenology model developed in this study can universally be applied to corn planted at any time during the growing season (R^2 = 0.79). Damage to corn by ECB can only occur when the first instar of the corn borer larvae coincides with the sixth stage of corn or greater.

Magai, Robert Nthipe

79

Ev Alu ATion of fiREWood BAgging And vACuum TREATmEnT foR REgulAT oRy ConTRol of EmERAld Ash BoRER  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since its discovery in Detroit, Michigan, in 2002, the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), has caused extensive mortality of ash (Fraxinus spp.) as it has spread across southeast Michigan, Ohio, and Ontario, Canada (Haack et al. 2002, Poland and McCullough 2006). In addition to this core infested area, numerous outlier populations have been found throughout Michigan's Lower

Chen Zhangjing

80

Development of transgenic sorghum for insect resistance against the spotted stem borer (Chilo partellus).  

PubMed

Transgenic sorghum plants expressing a synthetic cry1Ac gene from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) under the control of a wound-inducible promoter from the maize protease inhibitor gene (mpiC1) were produced via particle bombardment of shoot apices. Plants were regenerated from the transformed shoot apices via direct somatic embryogenesis with an intermittent three-step selection strategy using the herbicide Basta. Molecular characterisation based on polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis revealed multiple insertions of the cry1Ac gene in five plants from three independent transformation events. Inheritance and expression of the Bt gene was confirmed in T(1) plants. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay indicated that Cry1Ac protein accumulated at levels of 1-8 ng per gram of fresh tissue in leaves that were mechanically wounded. Transgenic sorghum plants were evaluated for resistance against the spotted stem borer (Chilo partellus Swinhoe) in insect bioassays, which indicated partial resistance to damage by the neonate larvae of the spotted stem borer. Reduction in leaf damage 5 days after infestation was up to 60%; larval mortality was 40%, with the surviving larvae showing a 36% reduction in weight over those fed on control plants. Despite the low levels of expression of Bt delta-endotoxin under the control of the wound-inducible promoter, the transgenic plants showed partial tolerance against first instar larvae of the spotted stem borer. PMID:16172896

Girijashankar, V; Sharma, H C; Sharma, Kiran K; Swathisree, V; Prasad, L Sivarama; Bhat, B V; Royer, Monique; Secundo, Blanca San; Narasu, M Lakshmi; Altosaar, I; Seetharama, N

2005-09-20

81

Control of Marine Borer Attack on Wood.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This patent application pertains to substances that are used in treating wood, which are normally subject to deterioration due to marine borers. These materials are preserved by applying to the substance certain 4-(3-phenylpropenylidene)-2,5-cyclohexadien...

J. D. Bultman L. Jurd R. D. Turner

1976-01-01

82

Ocular leech infestation.  

PubMed

A 67-year-old myopic man presented to the Ophthalmology Department of a teaching hospital in the mountainous state of Sikkim with complaints of red eye, ocular discomfort, and sensation of something moving in his right eye that led to occasional visual blurring from the previous four days. His symptoms started after washing his face in a stream. Clinical diagnosis was a leech in the limbus of the right eye at the 12 o'clock position. Ocular leech infestation should be considered in a patient with a history of swimming or face washing in streams and lakes. Herein we report a case of ocular leech infestation that presented as red eye with intermittent blurring of vision in the affected eye, and discuss the differential diagnosis and clinical significance. PMID:20804315

Dey, Rubi; Dey, Subhajeet

2010-09-01

83

Chemical ecology of the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis.  

PubMed

The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is a serious invasive pest that has caused devastating mortality of ash trees (Fraxinus sp., Oleaceae) since it was first identified in North America in 2002. Shortly after its discovery, surveys were conducted, based on the visual inspection of trees. The shortcomings of visual surveys have led to a critical research need to find an efficient survey method for detecting A. planipennis infestations. Here, we present a review of research that has led to the development of effective trapping methods for A. planipennis. Studies on the insect's biology and behavior have led to the identification of several potential attractants as well as the design of a visually attractive trap. The ongoing challenge in developing an optimally efficient trapping methodology for A. planipennis will involve finding the best combination of variables, such as trap shape, trap color (or other visual properties), trap placement, lure components, as well as the ratios and release rates of those components. PMID:20108026

Crook, Damon J; Mastro, Victor C

2010-01-28

84

Effects of rearing conditions on reproduction of Spathius agrili (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a parasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).  

PubMed

Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) can be successfully reared on emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), larvae feeding in chambers drilled in small ash twigs that are wrapped with floral tape. Females maintained in groups with males for one week can receive enough sperm for production of female progeny throughout their lives. Volatiles released by emerald ash borer adults feeding on ash foliage increased parasitoid fecundity over ash foliage alone or no stimulus. The temperature at which the parasitoids were reared ranged from 20 to 25 degrees C in a daily cycle; however, raising the daily maximum temperature to 28 degrees C did not affect parasitoid longevity or fecundity. Adult females lived between 12 and 127 d, with an average of 60.8 +/- 4.5 d. Males lived slightly longer, with an average of 66 +/- 4.5 d. The first clutch of eggs was laid when the female was between 2 and 42 d old, with the average preoviposition period lasting 11.4 +/- 1.4 or 19.5 +/- 2.0 d in 2007 and 2009 trials, respectively. A higher proportion of the emerald ash borer larvae were feeding and thus attractive to parasitoids in the 2009 trial, and female S. agrili laid an average of 9.5 +/- 1.0 clutches containing 5.4 +/- 0.2 eggs, for an average of 51.2 eggs per female. Approximately three quarters of the progeny were female. The number of eggs per clutch was significantly greater when deposited on larger emerald ash borer larvae, further highlighting the need for quality larvae in rearing. Chilling S. agrili pupae at 10 degrees C to stockpile them for summer release was not successful; chilling resulted in lower survival and lower fecundity of emerging progeny. Female S. agrili proved capable of attacking emerald ash borer larvae through even the thickest bark of an ash tree that was 30-cm diameter at breast height. Even emerald ash borer larvae that were creating overwintering chambers in the outer sapwood of the tree were successfully attacked, suggesting that S. agrili could be reared on field collected logs infested with emerald ash borer. PMID:21510183

Gould, Juli R; Ayer, Tracy; Fraser, Ivich

2011-04-01

85

EValUating tHE UsE OF Plastic Bags tO PrEVEnt EscaPE OF tHE EMErald asH BOrEr, agrilUs PlaniPEnnis (cOlEOPtEra: BUPrEstidaE) FrOM FirEWOOd  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Bu- prestidae), is a highly destructive exotic pest of ash (Fraxinus) in North America. Human movement of infested logs, primarily pieces of firewood, is a major pathway for long distance spread of the beetle. Firewood may be confiscated at campgrounds, rest-areas, and key transportation gateways. Treatment guide- lines for handling and storage

Therese M. Poland; Tina M. Ciaramitaro; Deepa S. Pureswaran

86

Integrated Management of Rice Stem Borers in the Yangtze Delta, China  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rice striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis (Walker), the yellow stem borer Scirpophaga incertulas (Walker), and the pink stem borer Sesamia inferens (Walker) are the most injurious insect pests of rice in the Yangtze Delta, one of the country's rice \\

Z. R. Zhu; J. Cheng; W. Zuo; X. W. Lin; Y. R. Guo; Y. P. Jiang; X. W. Wu; K. Teng; B. P. Zhai; J. Luo; X. H. Jiang; Z. H. Tang

87

Transgenic rice plants expressing a fused protein of Cry1Ab/Vip3H has resistance to rice stem borers under laboratory and field conditions.  

PubMed

Six transgenic rice, Oryza sativa L., lines (G6H1, G6H2, G6H3, G6H4, G6H5, and G6H6) expressing a fused Cry1Ab/Vip3H protein, were evaluated for resistance against the Asiatic rice borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), and the stem borer Sesamia inferens (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in the laboratory and field. The bioassay results indicated that the mortality of Asiatic rice borer and S. inferens neonate larvae on six transgenic lines from seedling to filling stage was up to 100% at 168 h after infestation. The cumulative feeding area by Asiatic rice borer neonate larvae on all transgenic lines was significantly reduced compared with the untransformed parental 'Xiushui 110' rice. A 2-yr field evaluation showed that damage during the vegetative stage (deadheart) or during the reproductive stage (whitehead) caused by Asiatic rice borer and S. inferens for transgenic lines was much lower than the control. For three lines (G6H1, G6H2, and G6H6), no damage was found during the entire growing period. Estimation of fused Cry1Ab/Vip3H protein concentrations using PathoScreen kit for Bt-Cry1Ab/1Ac protein indicated that the expression levels of Cry1Ab protein both in main stems (within the average range of 0.006-0.073% of total soluble protein) and their flag leaves (within the average range of 0.001-0.038% of total soluble protein) were significantly different among six transgenic lines at different developmental stages. Both laboratory and field researches suggested that the transgenic rice lines have considerable potential for protecting rice from attack by both stem borers. PMID:20857760

Chen, Yang; Tian, Jun-Ce; Shen, Zhi-Chen; Peng, Yu-Fa; Hu, Cui; Guo, Yu-Yuan; Ye, Gong-Yin

2010-08-01

88

Detectability of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in asymptomatic urban trees by using branch samples.  

PubMed

The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is an exotic invasive insect causing extensive mortality to ash trees, Fraxinus spp., in Canada and the United States. Detection of incipient populations of this pest is difficult because of its cryptic life stages and a multiyear time lag between initial attack and the appearance of signs or symptoms of infestation. We sampled branches from open-grown urban ash trees to develop a sample unit suitable for detecting low density A. planipennis infestation before any signs or symptoms are evident. The sample unit that maximized detection rates consisted of one 50-cm-long piece from the base of a branch ?6 cm diameter in the midcrown. The optimal sample size was two such branches per tree. This sampling method detected ?75% of asymptomatic trees known to be infested by using more intensive sampling and ?3 times more trees than sampling one-fourth of the circumference of the trunk at breast height. The method is less conspicuous and esthetically damaging to a tree than the removal of bark from the main stem or the use of trap trees, and could be incorporated into routine sanitation or maintenance of city-owned trees to identify and delineate infested areas. This research indicates that branch sampling greatly reduces false negatives associated with visual surveys and window sampling at breast height. Detection of A. planipennis-infested asymptomatic trees through branch sampling in urban centers would provide landowners and urban foresters with more time to develop and implement management tactics. PMID:22251647

Ryall, Krista L; Fidgen, Jeffrey G; Turgeon, Jean J

2011-06-01

89

The chemotaxonomy of Beauveria bassiana (Deuteromycotina: Hyphomycetes) isolates from the coffee berry borer Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A preliminary chemotaxonomic analysis was carried out on 16 isolates ofBeauveria bassiana from adults of coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei) from 10 countries in Latin America, Africa, Asia and the Pacific. Thirteen formed an homogeneous group with very similar electrophoretic and physiological profiles. Two isolates differed in esterase and acid phosphatase band patterns, one of which was also deficient in

P. D. Bridge; Y. J. Abraham; M. C. Cornish; C. Prior; D. Moore

1990-01-01

90

Mountain pine beetle infestation impacted by water availability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Vegetation pattern and landscape structure intersect to exert strong control over ecohydrological dynamics at the watershed scale. The hydrologic implications of vegetation disturbance (e.g. fire, disease etc.) depend on the spatial pattern and form of environmental change. Here we investigate this intersection at Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest (TCEF), Montana with a focus on the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) epidemic currently affecting the Rocky Mountains. We calibrated QuickBird remote sensing imagery with a leaf-level spectral library of local vegetation. We used this spectral library to determine optimal vegetation indices for differentiating stages of beetle infestation within the 37 km2 TCEF watershed. These indices formed the basis of a three-component mixing model to quantify the extent and magnitude of beetle infestation across the TCEF watershed. We compared disturbance patterns to spatially distributed topography and vegetation variables derived from a LiDAR-based digital elevation model (DEM) of TCEF. We determined that certain landscape characteristics (low vegetation density, south facing slopes, steep slopes, locations with small contributing areas, and locations with lower values of the topographic wetness index (TWI)) were significantly more likely to exhibit the effects of beetle infestation. Our efforts to monitor vegetation mortality across space and time provide a context for assessing landscape susceptibility to initial mountain pine beetle infestation via feedbacks between biodiversity and hydrological patterns and further research into understanding how outbreak (i.e. landscape scale infestation) patterns may affect watershed ecohydrology via altered water and biogeochemical cycles.

Kaiser, K. E.; McGlynn, B.; Emanuel, R.

2012-04-01

91

Parasitic infestations requiring surgical interventions.  

PubMed

Parasitic infestation is common in developing countries especially in Africa. Children are often more vulnerable to these infections. Many health problems result from these infestations, including malnutrition, iron-deficiency anemia, surgical morbidities, and even impaired cognitive function and educational achievement. Surgical intervention may be needed to treat serious complications caused by some of these parasites. Amoebic colitis and liver abscess caused by protozoan infections; intestinal obstruction, biliary infestation with cholangitis and liver abscess, and pancreatitis caused by Ascaris lumbricoides; biliary obstruction caused by Faschiola; hepatic and pulmonary hydatid cysts caused by Echinococcus granulosus and multilocularis are examples. Expenditure of medical care of affected children may cause a great burden on many African governments, which are already suffering from economic instability. The clinical presentation, investigation, and management of some parasitic infestations of surgical relevance in African children are discussed in this article. PMID:22475120

Hesse, Afua A J; Nouri, Abdellatif; Hassan, Hussam S; Hashish, Amel A

2012-05-01

92

Genetic analysis of bed bug populations reveals small propagule size within individual infestations but high genetic diversity across infestations from the eastern United States.  

PubMed

Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L.) are a resurgent pest worldwide and infestations within the United States are increasing at a rapid rate. Because of the physical and psychological discomfort inflicted by their blood feeding habits, and allergies and secondary infections associated with bites, bed bugs are recognized as a significant public health problem. Although bed bug infestations are spreading and becoming more prevalent, we have a poor understanding of their dispersal patterns and sources of infestation. To help fill this gap, we conducted a genetic study of 21 bed bug infestations from the eastern United States, nearly all of which came from single rooms within residences. We genotyped samples comprised of 8-10 individuals per infestation at nine polymorphic microsatellite loci. Despite high genetic diversity across all infestations, with 5-17 alleles per locus (mean = 10.3 alleles per locus), we found low genetic diversity (1-4 alleles per locus) within all but one of the infestations. These results suggest that nearly all the studied infestations were started by a small propagule possibly consisting of a singly mated female and/or her progeny, or a female mated with multiple males that were highly related to her. All infestations were strongly genetically differentiated from each other (mean pairwise F(ST) between populations = 0.68) and we did not find strong evidence of a geographic pattern of genetic structure, indicating infestations located in closer proximity to each other were nearly as genetically differentiated as those located hundreds of kilometers away. The high level of genetic diversity across infestations from the eastern United States together with the lack of geographically organized structure is consistent with multiple introductions into the United States from foreign sources. PMID:22897047

Saenz, Virna L; Booth, Warren; Schal, Coby; Vargo, Edward L

2012-07-01

93

Facultative Intraguild Predation of Red Oak Borer Larvae (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the Ozark National forests of Arkansas and Missouri, an outbreak of a native cerambycid beetle, the red oak borer, Enaphalodes rufulus (Haldeman), seems responsible for widespread oak mortality. The underlying reasons for this outbreak are being studied. Historically, a small portion of within-tree red oak borer mortality has been attributed to natural enemies (wood- peckers and nitidulid larvae), but

V. L. Ware; F. M. Stephen

2006-01-01

94

Assessing invasive plant infestation in freshwater wetlands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent shifts in wetland ecosystem management goals have directed efforts toward measuring ecological integrity, rather than only using physical and chemical measures of ecosystems as health indicators. Invasive species pose one of the largest threats to wetlands integrity. Resource managers can benefit from improved methods for identifying invasive plant species, assessing infestation, and monitoring control measures. The utilization of advanced remote sensing tools for species-level mapping has been increasing and techniques need to be explored for identifying species of interest and characterizing infestation. The overarching goal of this research was to develop monitoring technologies to map invasive plants and quantify wetland infestation. The first field-level objective was to characterize absorption and reflectance features and assess processing techniques for separating wetland species. The second field-level objective was to evaluate the abilities of a shape filter to identify wetland invasive plant species. The first landscape-level objective was to classify hyperspectral imagery in order to identify invasives of interest. The second landscape-level objective was to quantify infestation within the study area. Field-level hyperspectral data (350-2500nm) were collected for twenty-two wetland plant species in a wetland located in the lower Muskegon River watershed in Michigan, USA. The Jeffries-Matusita distance measure, continuum removal, and a shape-filter were applied to hyperspectral species reflectance data to characterize spectral features. Generally, continuum removal decreased separation distance for the invasive species of interest. Using the shape-filter, Lythrum salicaria, Phragmites australis, and Typha latifolia possessed maximum separation (distinguished from other species) at the near-infrared edge (700nm) and water absorption region (1350nm), the near-infrared down slope (1000 and 1100nm), and the visible/chlorophyll absorption region (500nm) and near-infrared edge (650nm), respectively. Airborne hyperspectral imagery was classified using a two-step approach in order to obtain an optimal map (overall accuracy ˜ 70%). Information in the near-infrared enabled relatively accurate classification for Phragmites australis using the Spectral Angle Mapper algorithm and image-derived training, while Typha latifolia signatures possessed high spectral overlap and required ISODATA clustering techniques. Landscape pattern metrics relate infestation to disturbances and hydrological controls. The highest levels of infestation and infestation patterns coincide with the most substantial levels of hydrological modifications indicating human disturbances are correlated with Typha and Phragmites percentages in the landscape. Overall the approach was successful and increased the level of information ultimately desired by decision makers. The rapidly advancing field of wetland remote sensing science can obtain more meaningful information from hyperspectral imagery; however, the data are challenging to work with and only the most precisely calibrated datasets will provide utility. Combining these data with traditional wetland assessment techniques can substantially advanced goals of preserving and restoring wetland ecosystem integrity.

Torbick, Nathan M.

95

Keys to immatures of the Sugarcane Borer and Neotropical Cornstalk Borer from Mexico intercepted on corn in Southeastern Texas  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Diatraea larvae and pupae intercepted on corn from northeastern Mexico at south Texas ports of entry were reared to adults and identified as the sugarcane borer (Diatraea saccharalis) and the neotropical cornstalk borer (Diatraea lineolata). Keys to aid in the identification of larvae and pupae of t...

96

Interspecific variation in resistance of Asian, European, and North American birches (Betula spp.) to bronze birch borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).  

PubMed

Bronze birch borer (Agrilus anxius Gory) is the key pest of birches (Betula spp.) in North America, several of which have been recommended for ornamental landscapes based on anecdotal reports of borer resistance that had not been confirmed experimentally. In a 20-yr common garden experiment initiated in 1979 in Ohio, North American birch species, including paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marshall), 'Whitespire' gray birch (Betula populifolia Marshall), and river birch (Betula nigra L.), were much more resistant to bronze birch borer than species indigenous to Europe and Asia, including European white birch (Betula pendula Roth), downy birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.), monarch birch (Betula maximowicziana Regel), and Szechuan white birch (Betula szechuanica Jansson). Within 8 yr of planting, every European white, downy, and Szechuan birch had been colonized and killed, although 100% of monarch birch had been colonized and 88% of these plants were killed after nine years. Conversely, 97% of river birch, 76% of paper birch, and 73% Whitespire gray birch were alive 20 yr after planting, and river birch showed no evidence of colonization. This pattern is consistent with biogeographic theory of plant defense: North American birch species that share a coevolutionary history with bronze birch borer were much more resistant than naïve hosts endemic to Europe and Asia, possibly by virtue of evolution of targeted defenses. This information suggests that if bronze birch borer were introduced to Europe or Asia, it could threaten its hosts there on a continental scale. This study also exposed limitations of anecdotal observation as evidence of host plant resistance. PMID:22251643

Nielsen, David G; Muilenburg, Vanessa L; Herms, Daniel A

2011-06-01

97

Coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei)—a vector for toxigenic molds and ochratoxin A contamination in coffee beans.  

PubMed

Coffee berry borer (CBB, Hypothenemus hampei Ferrari) is a common insect pest in coffee plantations and is a suspected vector of various mycotoxin-producing molds. In the present study, field trials were undertaken consecutively for 3 years to evaluate the impact of CBB on the microbial contamination of Arabica and Robusta coffee bean varieties, with emphasis laid toward ochratoxin A (OTA)-producing fungi. Results revealed higher microbial contamination in CBB-infested beans in both the varieties of coffee with the presence of toxigenic molds (such as Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus ochraceus). The "timely harvested" coffee, which was infested with CBB, was found to possess comparatively lesser OTA levels than those berries left in soil or on coffee plants. Studies carried out on coffee beans collected from nine curing factories indicated the presence of OTA in almost all the CBB-infested coffee beans, irrespective of the variety. Results of the present study provide sufficient baseline information and evidence to understand and correlate the role of CBB with various OTA-producing molds in coffee beans. Understanding the role of CBB might be useful and applicable in the coffee-growing regions of the world, especially in plantations for production of quality coffee. PMID:20618085

Velmourougane, Kulandaivelu; Bhat, Rajeev; Gopinandhan, Thirukonda Nannier

2010-10-01

98

Geostatistical analysis of the spatial variation of the berry borer and leaf miner in a coffee agroecosystem  

Microsoft Academic Search

The advent of geostatistics and geographical information systems has made it possible to analyze complex spatial patterns\\u000a of ecological phenomena over large areas in applied insect ecology and pest management. The objective of this study was to\\u000a use geostatistics to characterize the spatial structure and map the spatial variation of damage caused by the berry borer\\u000a (Hypothenemus hampei) and leaf

Marcelo C. de Alves; Fábio M. da Silva; Jair Campos Moraes; Edson A. Pozza; Marcelo S. de Oliveira; Júlio C. S. Souza; Luciana S. Alves

2011-01-01

99

Emerald Ash Borer Microbial Control with the Entomopathogen ...  

Treesearch

Emerald ash borer research and development meeting; 2007 October 23-24; Pittsburgh ... wood-boring pest native to northeastern Asia, was found attacking ash trees ... Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors ...

100

Emerald Ash Borer, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire), Biological Control Release Guidelines.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

These New Pest Response Guidelines contain information to guide a management program for the emerald ash borer (EAB) beetle, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire), (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). The guidelines are intended to assist Plant Protection and Quarantine ...

J. Duan J. H. Buck J. S. Gould L. S. Bauer

2010-01-01

101

Macadamia pests in Malawi. IV. Control of bugs and borers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Details of the field trials which led to the discovery of an insecticide efficacious against both bug (Nezara spp.) and borer (Cryptophlebia spp.) attacking the fruit of macadamia in Malawi are given. Cypermethrin as a 002% a.i. mist application has been shown to be the best all?round insecticide but in the absence of borer a 0.1% a.i. application of fenitrothion

E. A. S. La Croix; H. Z. Thindwa

1986-01-01

102

Suicide following an infestation of bed bugs  

PubMed Central

Patient: Male, 62 Final Diagnosis: Bipolar disorder Symptoms: Bordeline personality disorder Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Bed bug infestation Specialty: Psychiatry Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: In the past decade, bed bug infestations have been increasingly common in high income countries. Psychological consequences of these infestations are rarely examined in the scientific literature. Case Report: We present a case, based on a coroner’s investigation report, of a woman with previous psychiatric morbidity who jumped to her death following repeated bed bug infestations in her apartment. Our case report shows that the bed bug infestations were the likely trigger for the onset a negative psychological state that ultimately led to suicide. Conclusions: Given the recent surge in infestations, rapid action needs to be taken not only in an attempt to control and eradicate the bed bugs but also to adequately care for those infested by bed bugs.

Burrows, Stephanie; Perron, Stephane; Susser, Stephanie

2013-01-01

103

The impact of predators on maize stem borers in coastal Kenya  

Microsoft Academic Search

Damage caused by Lepidopteran stem borers is one of the most important constraints to maize production in East and southern Africa. Of the stem borer complex, Chilo partellus Swinhoe is the most abundant species in lowland areas. Although control strategies exist, many are not effective or feasible for small-scale subsistence farmers to practice. Consequently, stem borers are rarely actively controlled.

M. J. Bonhof

2000-01-01

104

Mechanisms of compensation of rice plants to yellow stem borer Scirpophaga incertulas (Walker) injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Field and greenhouse experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of stem borer injury on the physiology and yield response of irrigated rice. The compensation mechanisms investigated included increased tillering, increased percentage of productive tillers, and increased grain weight. Assimilates were translocated from stem borer-injured tillers to healthy tillers. The photosynthesis rate of green leaves in stem borer-injured tillers increased.

E. G. Rubia; K. L. Heong; M. Zalucki; B. Gonzales; G. A. Norton

1996-01-01

105

[Evaluation on control efficacy of Scleroderma guani against borer].  

PubMed

Scleroderma guani is an ectoparasitic insect of some borer, especially the larvae or the pupae of longicorn. In Pingyi county of Shandong province, Scleroderma guani was found when it naturally parasitized Xylotrechus grayii in 1980. Passed more than ten years systematic studies, it has been found that this harpactophayeous insect has great boring ability and can be parasitize many hosts. In the fields to release Scleroderma guani for controlling Xylotrechus grayii, Phytoecia rufiventris, Anoplophora glabripennis etc. have achieved good results and kept steady effects. Therefore, spreading Scleroderma guani to control the borer is a new technology in sustaining plant protection. PMID:12858762

Cheng, Huizhen; Meng, Xianhua; Chen, Jun; Shi, Chenghua

2003-01-01

106

Infestation of extraocular muscle by Cysticercus cellulosae.  

PubMed Central

Reports of orbital cysticercosis are uncommon despite the high incidence of brain and ocular involvement. Infestation of extraocular muscle is exceedingly rare. Two cases of cysticercosis of the extraocular muscles are reported here. Surgical removal of the encysted parasites successfully resolved the infestation in both cases. Images

DiLoreto, D A; Kennedy, R A; Neigel, J M; Rootman, J

1990-01-01

107

Bed Bug Infestations in an Urban Environment  

PubMed Central

Until recently, bed bugs have been considered uncommon in the industrialized world. This study determined the extent of reemerging bed bug infestations in homeless shelters and other locations in Toronto, Canada. Toronto Public Health documented complaints of bed bug infestations from 46 locations in 2003, most commonly apartments (63%), shelters (15%), and rooming houses (11%). Pest control operators in Toronto (N = 34) reported treating bed bug infestations at 847 locations in 2003, most commonly single-family dwellings (70%), apartments (18%), and shelters (8%). Bed bug infestations were reported at 20 (31%) of 65 homeless shelters. At 1 affected shelter, 4% of residents reported having bed bug bites. Bed bug infestations can have an adverse effect on health and quality of life in the general population, particularly among homeless persons living in shelters.

Svoboda, Tomislav J.; De Jong, Iain J.; Kabasele, Karl J.; Gogosis, Evie

2005-01-01

108

Survival of emerald ash borer in wood chips  

Treesearch

USA.gov Government Made Easy ... Emerald ash borer research and technology development meeting; 2003 ... Quarantine regulations have been imposed which restrict movement of all life stages of the beetle in ash trees, limbs or ... Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this ...

109

Chemical Ecology of the Emerald Ash Borer Agrilus planipennis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is a serious invasive pest that has caused devastating mortality of ash trees (Fraxinus sp., Oleaceae) since it was first identified in North America in 2002. Shortly after its discovery, surveys were conducted,\\u000a based on the visual inspection of trees. The shortcomings of visual surveys have led to a critical

Damon J. Crook; Victor C. Mastro

2010-01-01

110

Beyond the Asian Longhorned Beetle and Emerald Ash Borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) and emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) are exotic forest insects that have had severe impacts on host tree species where they have become established in North America in recent years. Several other exotic forest arthropods have also appeared recently in North America, but have gained less notoriety. Although their potential impacts are less, the

Robert K. Lawrence

111

Development of Harmonic Radar Systems for Tracking Emerald Ash Borer  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Emerald ash borers (EAB) have killed millions of ash trees since they were identified in North America in the summer of 2002. Data are needed on EAB behavior to aid development of treatment and management strategies and enable more effectively schedule and target control measures. Entomological ra...

112

EVALUATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ANDROGENETIC ALOPECIA AND DEMODEX INFESTATION  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is one of the most common dermatologic disorders with a multifactorial etiology. Inflammatory activators such as Demodex infestation may play a role in the pathogenesis of some cases of androgenetic alopecia that do not respond to common treatments such as minoxidil and finasteride. The goal of this study is to evaluate the relationship between Demodex infestation and AGA. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, 41 patients with AGA referred to the Dermatology Clinic of Imam Reza Hospital and 33 healthy individuals were evaluated as control. All of them were between 20 and 40 years old men. In order to identify Demodex infestation they were referred to the Parasitology laboratory. Results: Demodex was detected in 19.5% of patients and 15.2% of controls; therefore, there was no significant relationship between them statistically (P = 0.0787). Most of patients (85.4%) had greasy hair. The most common pattern of baldness was II degree in Hamilton scale. Conclusion: There is no relation between AGA and Demodex.

Zari, Javidi; Abdolmajid, Fata; Masood, Maleki; Vahid, Mashayekhi; Yalda, Nahidi

2008-01-01

113

Prevalence of and risk factors for canine tick infestation in the United States, 2002-2004.  

PubMed

Knowledge of the geographic range and seasonal activity of vector ticks is important for determining which people or animals are at risk of acquiring tick-borne infections. Several time-consuming methods requiring large-scale organization are used to map geographic and seasonal variations in tick distribution. A cost-effective, complementary approach to study tick distribution using a large nation-wide veterinary database is described in this paper. Prevalence of canine tick infestation in 40 states was estimated by analyzing electronic medical records of more than 8 million dog visits to Banfield veterinary hospitals in 2002-2004. Prevalence was defined as the proportion of dog visits in which tick infestation was recorded, and was expressed per 10,000 dog visits with 95% confidence intervals (CI). The overall prevalence (CI) of tick infestation was 52 (51, 53) dogs per 10,000 dog visits. Among states, Oklahoma (249 [229, 271) dogs with ticks per 10,000 dog-visits), Arkansas (242 [213, 274]), Connecticut (136 [119, 155]), West Virginia (130 [105, 161]), and Rhode Island (122 [97, 154]) ranked highest in prevalence of canine tick infestation. Overall prevalence peaked from May through July, although monthly prevalence varied by geographic region. In multiple logistic regression, younger dogs, male dogs, and sexually intact dogs, were at increased risk of tick infestation. Toy breeds were least likely to be infested, but no linear pattern of risk was evident with body weight. Identified risk factors should enable veterinarians to prevent tick infestation in pet dogs although differences in risk of tick infestation may be related to outdoor activity of dogs. Feasibility of collecting information for surveillance of vectors ticks on a national level using this large, electronic veterinary database is discussed. PMID:17417959

Raghavan, Malathi; Glickman, Nita; Moore, George; Caldanaro, Richard; Lewis, Hugh; Glickman, Larry

2007-01-01

114

Public Street Lights Increase House Infestation by the Chagas Disease Vector Triatoma dimidiata  

PubMed Central

Triatoma dimidiata is one of the primary vectors of Chagas disease. We previously documented the spatio-temporal infestation of houses by this species in the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico, and found that non-domiciliated triatomines were specifically attracted to houses. However, the factors mediating this attraction remained unclear. Artificial light has been known for a long time to attract many insect species, and therefore may contribute to the spread of different vector-borne diseases. Also, based on the collection of different species of triatomines with light traps, several authors have suggested that light might attract triatomines to houses, but the role of artificial light in house infestation has never been clearly demonstrated and quantified. Here we performed a spatial analysis of house infestation pattern by T. dimidiata in relation to the distribution of artificial light sources in three different villages from the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico. In all three villages, infested houses were significantly closer to public street light sources than non-infested houses (18.0±0.6 vs 22.6±0.4 m), and street lights rather than domestic lights were associated with house infestation. Accordingly, houses closer to a public street lights were 1.64 times more likely to be infested than houses further away (OR, CI95% 1.23–2.18). Behavioral experiments using a dual-choice chamber further confirmed that adult male and females were attracted to white light during their nocturnal activity. Attraction was also dependent on light color and decreased with increasing wavelength. While public lighting is usually associated with increased development, these data clearly show that it also directly contributes to house infestation by non-domiciliated T. dimidiata.

Pacheco-Tucuch, Freddy Santiago; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Gourbiere, Sebastien; Dumonteil, Eric

2012-01-01

115

Controlling zebra mussel infestations at hydroelectric plants  

SciTech Connect

U.S. and Canadian utilities in the great lakes area have adopted techniques to temporarily prevent infestation of the zebra mussel in their hydro facilities, but are still looking for more permanent solutions.

Sblendorio, R.P.; Malinchock, J.C. (New York Power Authority, Lewiston, NY (United States)); Claudi, R. (Ontario Hydro, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

1991-07-01

116

Insects in relation to black locust culture on surface-mine spoil in Kentucky, with emphasis on the locust twig borer, Ecdytolopha insiticiana Zell. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)  

SciTech Connect

This research evaluated the impacts of herbivorous insects, emphasizing the locust twig borer, Ecdytolopha insiticiana Zeller, on black locust, Robinia pseudoacacia L., coppice production on a coal surface-mine spoil site in southeastern Kentucky. The natural history of E. insiticiana was also studied. The locust twig borer was a persistent and damaging pest in first-year coppice, which provided suitable larval habitat throughout the growing season. The locust leafminer, Odontota dorsalis (Thunberg), fed minimally on first-year coppice foliage except during 1983, when trees were severely drought-stressed. Soil-applied granular carbofuran significantly reduced infestations. Lindane stem treatments were not effective, but entire-tree applications did reduce herbivory. Stump sprouts with reduced levels of herbivory grew significantly taller than controls at both spacings in 1983, but only at the more dense spacing in 1984. Blacklight trap collections revealed two generations/year, and adults were present from early May until late August. Four species of hymenopterous and two species of dipterous parasitoids were recovered from E. insiticiana larvae.

Thoeny, W.T.

1986-01-01

117

Interspecific Proteomic Comparisons Reveal Ash Phloem Genes Potentially Involved in Constitutive Resistance to the Emerald Ash Borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an invasive wood-boring beetle that has killed millions of ash trees since its accidental introduction to North America. All North American ash species (Fraxinus spp.) that emerald ash borer has encountered so far are susceptible, while an Asian species, Manchurian ash (F. mandshurica), which shares an evolutionary history with emerald ash borer, is

Justin G. A. Whitehill; Alexandra Popova-Butler; Kari B. Green-Church; Jennifer L. Koch; Daniel A. Herms; Pierluigi Bonello; Haibing Yang

2011-01-01

118

Rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), overwintering in super rice and its control using cultivation techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

Super rice has the potential to deliver very high yields but is also susceptible to attack by the striped rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis. In this study, surveys and field trials were performed to examine this problem and efficient ways were found to lower the borer’s population density. It was found that larger super rice plants provided more refuges for

Weihua Jiang; Xiaojing Jiang; Jianren Ye; Qiang Fu; Yongbin Feng; Ju Luo; Zhaojun Han

2011-01-01

119

Development of mass trapping technique for control of brinjal shoot and fruit borer, Leucinodes orbonalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).  

PubMed

Locally-produced clear plastic water traps (12 cm x 14 cm base and 21 cm height) were optimized for use in large-scale mass trapping trials for control of brinjal fruit and shoot borer, Leucinodes orbonalis Guenée. Changing the shape (square and triangular) and number (two and four) of entry holes in the water trap had no significant effect on trap catch. Significantly more male moths were caught in traps treated with water containing powdered detergent than liquid detergent, light gear oil or insecticide. All water traps tested caught significantly higher numbers of moths than sticky delta traps with open sides under farmers' field conditions. Trap catches per 100 m2 were found to increase with increasing number of traps from 3 to 6 but the difference in catch between 4 and 6 traps per 100 m2 was not significant. Two small-scale replicated integrated pest management (IPM) trials were conducted consisting of the optimized water trap placed out with 10 m spacing (4 per 100 m2) and infested shoots pruned and destroyed. The first season trial had two treatments, IPM and farmers' practice in which farmers applied insecticide every two days in the peak harvest period. Overall, the percentage of healthy fruit and yields in both treatments were comparable at 53.8 and 49.6% and 20 and 19.4 tonnes per ha in the IPM and farmers' practice plots respectively. However, the initial infestations in the IPM plots (68%) were significantly higher than in farmers' practice plots (16%) due to the proximity of the nurseries used for the IPM plots to stacks of brinjal crop residues from the previous season that acted as a source of infestation. The second season's trials contained a third treatment in which IPM and farmers' practice were combined. The percent total healthy fruits harvested were 46.1, 58.6 and 69.1% respectively for the farmers' practice, farmers' practice plus IPM and IPM alone. Averaged total fruit yields were approximately 12 tonnes per ha for the farmers' practice plots and 30 tonnes per ha for each of the IPM-treated plots. The IPM plot had significantly fewer infested fruit than the IPM plus farmers practice plots and this was attributed to the activity of the larval parasitoid Trathala flavo-orbitalis (Cameron) that was suppressed in trial plots treated with insecticides. PMID:16336706

Cork, A; Alam, S N; Rouf, F M A; Talekar, N S

2005-12-01

120

The Life Cycle of the Root Borer, Oryctes agamemnon, Under Laboratory Conditions  

PubMed Central

The root borer, Oryctes agamemnon Burmeister (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), has become a serious pest of date palm trees in southwest Tunisia. Under natural conditions, mated females lay eggs in different parts of palm tree: between the hairy roots, all along the stem at the leaf axils and at the base of cut branches. Larvae bore into targeted places of the plant and were never seen outside. Pupation takes place in the plant and emergence of the adults begins in June. Larval feeding causes extensive damage to the respiratory roots. To examine the life cycle more closely, the O. agamemnon life cycle was studied under laboratory conditions. Different larval stages were collected from infested oases in Tozeur and placed in plastic boxes with natural food that was collected from the oases. After emergence, adults were paired in opaque plastic boxes for mating with the same food substrate which also served as an oviposition site. Eggs were collected daily and isolated in new boxes. Hatched eggs were recorded. The number of larval instars was determined by measuring the width of cephalic capsules. Under laboratory conditions (23 ± 2'C and 55 ± 6% RH)embryogenesis took 14.3 ± 1.42 days and the first, second and third larval instars were 33.1 ± 2.69, 63.88 ± 6.6 and 118.3 ± 13.38 days respectively. The pupal period lasted 24.1 ± 3.02 days and the adult 65.27 ± 9.48 days. These facts indicated that O. agamemnon is univoltine.

Soltani, Rasmi; Chaieb, Ikbel; Hamouda, Med Habib Ben

2008-01-01

121

Low-temperature methyl bromide fumigation of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in ash logs.  

PubMed

Ash (Fraxinus spp.) logs, infested with fully developed, cold-acclimated larval and prepupal emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), were fumigated with methyl bromide (MeBr) at 4.4 and 10.0 degrees C for 24 h. Concentrations X time dosages of MeBr obtained were 1579 and 1273 g-h/m3 (24-h exposure) at 4.4 and 10.0 degrees C after applied doses of 112 and 96 g/m3, respectively. MeBr concentrations were simultaneously measured with a ContainIR infrared monitor and Fumiscope thermal conductivity meter calibrated for MeBr to measure the effect of CO2 on Fumiscope concentration readings compared with the infrared (IR) instrument. The presence of CO2 caused false high MeBr readings. With the thermal conductivity meter, CO2 measured 11.36 g/m3 MeBr per 1% CO2 in clean air, whereas the gas-specific infrared ContainIR instrument measured 9.55% CO2 as 4.2 g/m3 MeBr (0.44 g/m3 per 1% CO2). The IR instrument was 0.4% as sensitive to CO2 as the thermal conductivity meter. After aeration, fumigated and control logs were held for 8 wk to capture emerging beetles. No A. planipennis adults emerged from any of the fumigated logs, whereas 262 emerged from control logs (139 and 123/m2 at 4.4 and 10.0 degrees C, respectively). An effective fumigation dose and minimum periodic MeBr concentrations are proposed. The use of a CO2 scrubber in conjunction with nonspecific thermal conductivity instruments is necessary to more accurately measure MeBr concentrations. PMID:21404841

Barak, Alan V; Elder, Peggy; Fraser, Ivich

2011-02-01

122

Estimating potential emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) populations using ash inventory data.  

PubMed

Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a phloem-feeding pest native to Asia, was identified in June 2002 as the cause of widespread ash (Fraxinus spp.), mortality in southeastern Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Localized populations of A. planipennis have since been found across lower Michigan and in areas of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Maryland, and Ontario. Officials working to contain A. planipennis and managers of forestlands near A. planipennis infestations must be able to compare alternative strategies to allocate limited funds efficiently and effectively. Empirical data from a total of 148 green ash, Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh., and white ash, Fraxinus americana L., trees were used to develop models to estimate surface area of the trunk and branches by using tree diameter at breast height (dbh). Data collected from 71 additional F. pennsylvanica and F. americana trees killed by A. planipennis showed that on average, 88.9 +/- 4.6 beetles developed and emerged per m2 of surface area. Models were applied to ash inventory data collected at two outlier sites to estimate potential production of A. planipennis beetles at each site. Large trees of merchantable size (dbh > or = 26 cm) accounted for roughly 6% of all ash trees at the two sites, but they could have contributed 55-65% of the total A. planipennis production at both sites. In contrast, 75- 80% of the ash trees at the outlier sites were < or =13 cm dbh, but these small trees could have contributed only < or =12% of the potential A. planipennis production at both sites. Our results, in combination with inventory data, can be used by regulatory officials and resource managers to estimate potential A. planipennis production and to compare options for reducing A. planipennis density and slowing the rate of spread for any area of interest. PMID:17972635

McCullough, Deborah G; Siegert, Nathan W

2007-10-01

123

Stand Dynamics Associated with Chronic Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Infestations in Southern New England  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Vegetation dynamics were monitored for 6 years in eight hemlock (Tsuga canadensis(L.) Carriere) stands with varying levels of hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) (Adelges tsugaeAnnand) damage in southcentral Connecticut to examine the patterns of overstory hemlock mortality and subsequent community reorganization associated with chronic HWA infestations. Since 1995, overstory and understory mortality has risen 5 to 15% per year to

David A. Orwig; Harvard Forest

124

Bt Corn and the European Corn Borer: Evaluation Tool  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interactive predictive model uses years of past weather data and a model of the European corn borer's life cycle under different temperatures to calculate the net benefit of planting Bt corn versus non-Bt corn in a certain geographic area. Great data visualization. Requires Flash. This is an excellent tool incorporating a large volume of data. The tool should be quite useful for IPM classes.

0002-11-30

125

Classical Biological Control of Emerald Ash Borer and Asian Longhorned Beetle  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, and Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky), are both invasive plant pests recently introduced to North America from the Far East. The emerald ash borer (EAB) is an oligophagous buprestid on Fraxinus spp., whereas the Asi...

126

Cost of potential emerald ash borer damage in U.S. communities, 2009–2019  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), a phloem-feeding beetle native to Asia, was discovered near Detroit, Michigan and Windsor, Ontario in 2002. As of March 2009, isolated populations of emerald ash borer (EAB) have been detected in nine additional states and Quebec. EAB is a highly invasive forest pest that has the potential to spread and kill native ash trees

Kent F. Kovacs; Robert G. Haight; Deborah G. McCullough; Rodrigo J. Mercader; Nathan W. Siegert; Andrew M. Liebhold

2010-01-01

127

Impact of Plant Resistance on Southwestern Corn Borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) Biology and Plant Damage  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Southwestern corn borer, Diatraea grandiosella Dyar (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), is a major insect pest of corn in the southern United States. Germplasm lines with resistance to southwestern corn borer have been developed and released by USDA-ARS. Two single-cross hybrids produced by crossing germplasm...

128

Alternate crop and weed host plant oviposition preferences by the Mexican rice borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The Mexican rice borer, Eoreuma loftini (Dyar), is the key pest of sugarcane, Saccharum hybrids, in south Texas, having largely displaced the sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F.), and it is moving into rice- and sugarcane-growing areas of east Texas and Louisiana. While a number of alternativ...

129

76 FR 3077 - Notice of Decision To Revise a Heat Treatment Schedule for Emerald Ash Borer  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Notice of Decision To Revise a Heat Treatment Schedule for Emerald Ash Borer...public of our decision to revise a heat treatment schedule for the emerald ash borer...schedule T314-a, which provides a heat treatment schedule for ash logs,...

2011-01-19

130

Post-mating behavior of female dogwood borer (lepidoptera: sesiidae) in apple orchards  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The post-mating behavior of female dogwood borer, Synanthedon scitula (Harris) (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae), was examined in a young apple orchard planted on size-controlling rootstock in Virginia. All female dogwood borers captured while exhibiting casting flight near the base of trees were mated, base...

131

SOUTHWESTERN CORN BORER DAMAGE AND AFLATOXIN ACCUMULATION IN CONVENTIONAL AND TRANSGENIC CORN HYBRIDS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Southwestern corn borer, Diatraea grandiosella Dyar, is a major pest of corn, Zea mays, L., in the southern United States. In addition to the direct yield losses caused by southwestern corn borer, larval feeding on developing ears provides a site for fungi to enter the ear. Aspergillus flavus infe...

132

DIVERSITY OF PENICILLIUM SPECIES ASSOCIATED WITH THE COFFEE BERRY BORER IN CHIAPAS, MEXICO  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The coffee berry borer Hypothenemus hampei (CBB) causes great damage to coffee crops around the world. Borer eggs are laid in developing coffee berries, and the larvae feed on tissue of the berry. It has been hypothesized that fungal growth in insect galleries provides exogenous sterols needed for...

133

PENICILLIUM BROCAE A NEW SPECIES ASSOCIATED WITH THE COFFEE BERRY BORER IN CHIAPAS, MEXICO  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Penicillium brocae is a new monoverticillate species isolated from coffee berry borers collected at coffee plantations in Mexico near Cacahoatán, Chiapas, or from borers reared on artificial diets at ECOSUR laboratory facilities in Tapachula, Chiapas. Phenotypically, it is in Penicillium series Imp...

134

Effects of trap type, placement and ash distribution on emerald ash borer captures in a low density site.  

PubMed

Effective methods for early detection of newly established, low density emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) infestations are critically needed in North America. We assessed adult A. planipennis captures on four types of traps in a 16-ha site in central Michigan. The site was divided into 16 blocks, each comprised of four 50- by 50-m cells. Green ash trees (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall) were inventoried by diameter class and ash phloem area was estimated for each cell. One trap type was randomly assigned to each cell in each block. Because initial sampling showed that A. planipennis density was extremely low, infested ash logs were introduced into the center of the site. In total, 87 beetles were captured during the summer. Purple double-decker traps baited with a blend of ash leaf volatiles, Manuka oil, and ethanol captured 65% of all A. planipennis beetles. Similarly baited, green double-decker traps captured 18% of the beetles, whereas sticky bands on girdled trees captured 11% of the beetles. Purple traps baited with Manuka oil and suspended in the canopies of live ash trees captured only 5% of the beetles. At least one beetle was captured on 81% of the purple double-decker traps, 56% of the green double-decker traps, 42% of sticky bands, and 25% of the canopy traps. Abundance of ash phloem near traps had no effect on captures and trap location and sun exposure had only weak effects on captures. Twelve girdled and 29 nongirdled trees were felled and sampled in winter. Current-year larvae were present in 100% of the girdled trees and 72% of the nongirdled trees, but larval density was five times higher on girdled than nongirdled trees. PMID:22251735

McCullough, Deborah G; Siegert, Nathan W; Poland, Therese M; Pierce, Steven J; Ahn, Su Zie

2011-10-01

135

House infestation dynamics and feeding sources of Triatoma dimidiata in central Veracruz, Mexico.  

PubMed

Chagas disease is endemic in the state of Veracruz, Mexico, and we investigated here the dynamics of house infestation by Chagas disease vectors to understand disease transmission and design effective control interventions. Bug collections in 42 rural villages confirmed the widespread distribution of Triatoma dimidiata in central Veracruz. Unexpectedly, collection data further indicated a clear pattern of seasonal infestation by mostly adult bugs. Analysis of feeding sources with a polymerase chain reaction-heteroduplex assay indicated a frequent feeding on humans, in agreement with the high seroprevalence previously observed. Feeding sources also confirmed a significant dispersal of bugs between habitats. High dispersal capabilities and seasonal infestation may thus be a shared characteristic of several of the T. dimidiata sibling species from this complex. It would thus be critical to adapt vector control interventions to this behavior to improve their efficacy and sustainability, as the control of T. dimidiata has been notoriously challenging. PMID:22492153

Torres-Montero, Jesús; López-Monteon, Aracely; Dumonteil, Eric; Ramos-Ligonio, Angel

2012-04-01

136

House Infestation Dynamics and Feeding Sources of Triatoma dimidiata in Central Veracruz, Mexico  

PubMed Central

Chagas disease is endemic in the state of Veracruz, Mexico, and we investigated here the dynamics of house infestation by Chagas disease vectors to understand disease transmission and design effective control interventions. Bug collections in 42 rural villages confirmed the widespread distribution of Triatoma dimidiata in central Veracruz. Unexpectedly, collection data further indicated a clear pattern of seasonal infestation by mostly adult bugs. Analysis of feeding sources with a polymerase chain reaction-heteroduplex assay indicated a frequent feeding on humans, in agreement with the high seroprevalence previously observed. Feeding sources also confirmed a significant dispersal of bugs between habitats. High dispersal capabilities and seasonal infestation may thus be a shared characteristic of several of the T. dimidiata sibling species from this complex. It would thus be critical to adapt vector control interventions to this behavior to improve their efficacy and sustainability, as the control of T. dimidiata has been notoriously challenging.

Torres-Montero, Jesus; Lopez-Monteon, Aracely; Dumonteil, Eric; Ramos-Ligonio, Angel

2012-01-01

137

Nasal leech infestation causing persistent epistaxis  

PubMed Central

Foreign bodies in the nasal cavity are commonly encountered as a cause of epistaxis; however, nasal leech infestation as a cause of unilateral persistent epistaxis is very rare. Examination of nasal cavity revealed fleshy material in the left nostril, which was identified as leech. The leech was removed with the help of an artery forceps following irrigation of the left nostril with normal saline and adopting wait-and-watch policy. In developing countries, leech infestation as a cause of epistaxis should be suspected in patients with lower socioeconomic status or in those living in rural areas who give history of drinking polluted water from, or bathing in, stagnant ponds and puddles.

Sarathi, Kalra

2011-01-01

138

A Severe Infestation of Lygodium microphyllum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A severe infestation of Lygodium microphyllum (Cav.) R. Br. located at Jonathan Dickinson State Park, Martin County, Florida, USA. A native of the Old World tropics, L. microphyllum has become a serious pest in the forested wetlands of South Florida since naturalizing in the 1960s. Within severe infestations, this vine-like fern can smother both the understory and canopy, disrupting the recruitment of native vegetation and altering local fire ecology. The spread of this species appears to be facilitated by its ability to reproduce via intragametophytic selfing.

Michael S. Lott (Florida Atlantic University;Department of Biological Sciences ADR;POSTAL)

2004-03-09

139

Epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa triggered by scabies infestation.  

PubMed

Epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa (EB-Pr) is an unusual variant of dystrophic EB. Potential genetic disease modifiers and metabolic factors have been investigated, but thus far no specific insight into this phenotype has emerged. We report an in-depth description of three patients diagnosed as having EB-Pr in whom this particular phenotype developed after scabies infestation and dramatically improved after full treatment. This short communication suggests that scabies infestation could be one of the important triggering factors for the development of the EB-Pr phenotype. PMID:23663219

Kim, Jaehwan; Loh, Chee Hoou; Murrell, Dedee F

2013-05-10

140

Small Ruminant Collaborative Research Support Program. Simulation of the Effects of Parasite Infestation on the Performance of Goats in Northeastern Brazil.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Parasite infestation is a global problem which impairs productivity of goats. Effective control of parasites is difficult due to a large number of interacting variables (e.g.; plane of nutrition, breed resistance, precipitation pattern, drenching frequenc...

H. D. Blackburn E. A. P. Figueiredo C. F. Costa M. E. A. Berne L. S. Vieira

1988-01-01

141

Modeling potential movements of the emerald ash borer: the model ...  

Treesearch

Research & Development ... The fine-scale (270-m cells) ash basal area maps show highly variable values, but woodlots ... to weight factors related to potential human-assisted movements of EAB-infested ash wood or just hitchhiking insects.

142

Response of Grape Leaf Spectra to Phylloxera Infestation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During the 1993 growing season, leaf reflectance and chlorophyll concentrations were monitored with respect to phylloxera (root-louse) infestation in a Napa Valley (California) vineyard. Study plots were established in areas of severely infested, mildly i...

L. F. Johnson

1999-01-01

143

A review of bronze birch borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) life history, ecology, and management.  

PubMed

Bronze birch borer (Agrilus anxius Gory) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a specialist wood-borer endemic to North America, is prone to periodic outbreaks that have caused widespread mortality of birch (Betula spp.) in boreal and north temperate forests. It is also the key pest of birch in ornamental landscapes. Amenity plantings have extended the distribution of birch in North America, for which we report an updated map. Life history and phenology also are summarized. Larvae feed primarily on phloem tissue of stems and branches, which can girdle and kill trees. Stressors such as drought, elevated temperature, and defoliation predispose trees to bronze birch borer colonization and trigger outbreaks, which implicates the availability of suitable host material in the bottom-up regulation of populations. Stress imposed by climate change may increase the frequency of outbreaks and alter the distribution of birch. Bronze birch borer has a diverse array of natural enemies, but their role in top-down population regulation has not been studied. There is substantial interspecific variation in resistance to this insect. North American species share a coevolutionary history with bronze birch borer and are much more resistant than Eurasian species, which are evolutionarily naïve. Potential resistance mechanisms are reviewed. The high susceptibility of Eurasian birch species and climatic similarities of North America and Eurasia create high risk of widespread birch mortality in Eurasia if the borer was inadvertently introduced. Bronze birch borer can be managed in amenity plantings through selection of resistant birch species, plant health care practices, and insecticides. PMID:23321083

Muilenburg, Vanessa L; Herms, Daniel A

2012-12-01

144

Coffee berry borer joins bark beetles in coffee klatch.  

PubMed

Unanswered key questions in bark beetle-plant interactions concern host finding in species attacking angiosperms in tropical zones and whether management strategies based on chemical signaling used for their conifer-attacking temperate relatives may also be applied in the tropics. We hypothesized that there should be a common link in chemical signaling mediating host location by these Scolytids. Using laboratory behavioral assays and chemical analysis we demonstrate that the yellow-orange exocarp stage of coffee berries, which attracts the coffee berry borer, releases relatively high amounts of volatiles including conophthorin, chalcogran, frontalin and sulcatone that are typically associated with Scolytinae chemical ecology. The green stage of the berry produces a much less complex bouquet containing small amounts of conophthorin but no other compounds known as bark beetle semiochemicals. In behavioral assays, the coffee berry borer was attracted to the spiroacetals conophthorin and chalcogran, but avoided the monoterpenes verbenone and ?-pinene, demonstrating that, as in their conifer-attacking relatives in temperate zones, the use of host and non-host volatiles is also critical in host finding by tropical species. We speculate that microorganisms formed a common basis for the establishment of crucial chemical signals comprising inter- and intraspecific communication systems in both temperate- and tropical-occurring bark beetles attacking gymnosperms and angiosperms. PMID:24073204

Jaramillo, Juliana; Torto, Baldwyn; Mwenda, Dickson; Troeger, Armin; Borgemeister, Christian; Poehling, Hans-Michael; Francke, Wittko

2013-09-20

145

Coffee Berry Borer Joins Bark Beetles in Coffee Klatch  

PubMed Central

Unanswered key questions in bark beetle-plant interactions concern host finding in species attacking angiosperms in tropical zones and whether management strategies based on chemical signaling used for their conifer-attacking temperate relatives may also be applied in the tropics. We hypothesized that there should be a common link in chemical signaling mediating host location by these Scolytids. Using laboratory behavioral assays and chemical analysis we demonstrate that the yellow-orange exocarp stage of coffee berries, which attracts the coffee berry borer, releases relatively high amounts of volatiles including conophthorin, chalcogran, frontalin and sulcatone that are typically associated with Scolytinae chemical ecology. The green stage of the berry produces a much less complex bouquet containing small amounts of conophthorin but no other compounds known as bark beetle semiochemicals. In behavioral assays, the coffee berry borer was attracted to the spiroacetals conophthorin and chalcogran, but avoided the monoterpenes verbenone and ?-pinene, demonstrating that, as in their conifer-attacking relatives in temperate zones, the use of host and non-host volatiles is also critical in host finding by tropical species. We speculate that microorganisms formed a common basis for the establishment of crucial chemical signals comprising inter- and intraspecific communication systems in both temperate- and tropical-occurring bark beetles attacking gymnosperms and angiosperms.

Jaramillo, Juliana; Torto, Baldwyn; Mwenda, Dickson; Troeger, Armin; Borgemeister, Christian; Poehling, Hans-Michael; Francke, Wittko

2013-01-01

146

Pyrantel Embonate in Treatment of Hookworm Infestation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficacy of pyrantel embonate (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-1-methyl-2-(trans-2-(2-thienyl)-vinyl)-pyrimidine embonic acid salt; Combantrin) was evaluated in 60 cases of hookworm infestation. They were divided into six groups of 10 cases. Pyrantel embonate was administered orally, in dosage schedules (randomized) of 100, 75, 50, 20, 15, and 10 mg\\/kg of body weight. The stool examination for hookworm ova and coproculture were positive in each

K. N. Pandey; S. G. Sharathchandra; G. S. Sarin; N. K. Ajmani; H. K. Chuttani

1971-01-01

147

Parasitic infestations of the biliary tract  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parasitic infestations of the biliary tract are a common cause of biliary obstruction in tropical countries and can lead to\\u000a such serious complications as cholangitis and cholangiocarcinoma. Endoscopic therapy has helped in the management of biliary\\u000a complications caused by these parasites. Ascaris lumbricoides organisms, which normally reside in the jejunum, are actively motile and can invade the papilla, thus migrating

Surinder Singh Rana; Deepak Kumar Bhasin; Mohit Nanda; Kartar Singh

2007-01-01

148

Cutaneous infections and infestations: new therapies.  

PubMed

Directed and preventive therapies for cutaneous infectious disease and infestation continue to evolve, providing physicians with new options for care. Common infectious diseases (e.g., genital herpes, herpes zoster, and head lice) occur in the outpatient and inpatient setting. This review of the literature highlights new therapies, including those still in development, such as novel drugs and vaccines, all of which should help to decrease the frequency and severity of common infectious diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissues. PMID:22191004

Keller, Emily C; Tomecki, Kenneth J

2011-12-01

149

Emerald Ash Borer Program Manual, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire), Ver. 1.1.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

These New Pest Response Guidelines contain information to guide a management program for the emerald ash borer (EAB) beetle, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire), (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). The guidelines are intended to assist Plant Protection and Quarantine ...

J. H. Buck S. Frappier

2009-01-01

150

Engineering Services in Connection with an Investigation of Marine Protective Elements Against Marine Borers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Biological and chemical evaluation of effectiveness against marine borers, particularly Limnoria tripunctata, of creosote and creosote preceded by waterborne copper compounds in wood coupons is made. Assays of outer 1/8 in. of exposed surfaces performed a...

B. R. Richards R. H. Baechler A. P. Richards H. G. Roth

1969-01-01

151

Safety Analysis of the Blind Shaft Borer. Volume 1. Summary Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report, sponsored by the Bureau of Mines, presents the results of an examination of the safety of the Blind Shaft Borer (BSB) shaft sinking system and an alternative modified BSB design concept in comparison to conventional shaft sinking technology. ...

C. A. Geffen-Fowler J. M. Hobbs J. J. Jacobsen J. M. Oylear T. B. Powers

1981-01-01

152

Safety Analysis of the Blind Shaft Borer. Volume 3. Supplementary Reports F through J.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report, sponsored by the Bureau of Mines, presents the results of an examination of the safety of the Blind Shaft Borer (BSB) shaft sinking system and an alternative modified BSB design concept in comparison to conventional shaft sinking technology. ...

C. A. Geffen-Fowler J. J. Jacobsen J. M. Hobbs J. M. Oylear T. B. Powers

1981-01-01

153

Safety Analysis of the Blind Shaft Borer. Volume 2. Supplementary Reports A through E.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report, sponsored by the Bureau of Mines, presents the results of an examination of the safety of the Blind Shaft Borer (BSB) shaft sinking system and an alternative modified BSB design concept in comparison to conventional shaft sinking technology. ...

C. A. Geffen-Fowler J. J. Jacobsen J. M. Hobbs J. M. Oylear T. B. Powers

1981-01-01

154

Integrated Pest Management Plan for Control of the Eucalyptus Longhorned Borer in California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The research program sponsored by California Department of Transportation on the Eucalyptus longhorned borer has produced a multi-faceted and integrated pest management program for control of the insect. Tree stress, particularly water stress, has been id...

T. D. Paine J. G. Millar

1994-01-01

155

Biotic and abiotic factors affect green ash volatile production and emerald ash borer adult feeding preference.  

PubMed

The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an exotic woodborer first detected in 2002 in Michigan and Ontario and is threatening the ash resource in North America. We examined the effects of light exposure and girdling on green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh) volatile production, and effects of light exposure, girdling, and leaf age on emerald ash borer adult feeding preferences and phototaxis. Green ash seedlings grown under higher light exposure had lower amounts of three individual volatile compounds, (Z)-3-hexenol, (E)-beta-ocimene, and (Z,E)-alpha-farnesene, as well as the total amount of six detected volatile compounds. Girdling did not affect the levels of these volatiles. Emerald ash borer females preferred mature leaves, leaves from girdled trees, and leaves grown in the sun over young leaves, leaves from nongirdled trees, and leaves grown in the shade, respectively. These emerald ash borer preferences were most likely because of physical, nutritional, or biochemical changes in leaves in response to the different treatments. Emerald ash borer females and males showed positive phototaxis in laboratory arenas, a response consistent with emerald ash borer preference for host trees growing in sunlight. PMID:20021772

Chen, Yigen; Poland, Therese M

2009-12-01

156

Interspecific variation in resistance to emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) among North American and Asian ash (Fraxinus spp.).  

PubMed

We conducted a 3-yr study to compare the susceptibility of selected North American ash and an Asian ash species to emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an invasive wood-boring beetle introduced to North America from Asia. Because of a coevolutionary relationship between Asian ashes and emerald ash borer, we hypothesized an Asian ash species, Manchurian ash, is more resistant to the beetle than its North American congeners. Consistent with our hypothesis, Manchurian ash experienced far less mortality and yielded far fewer adult beetles than several cultivars of North American green and white ash. Surprisingly, a black ash (North American) x Manchurian ash hybrid was highly susceptible to emerald ash borer, indicating this cultivar did not inherit emerald ash borer resistance from its Asian parent. A corollary study investigated the efficacy of soil-applied imidacloprid, a systemic, neonicotinoid insecticide, for controlling emerald ash borer in each of the five cultivars. Imidacloprid had no effect on emerald ash borer colonization of Manchurian ash, which was low in untreated and treated trees. In contrast, imidacloprid did enhance survival of the North American and hybrid cultivars and significantly reduced the number of emerald ash borer adults emerging from green and white ash cultivars. We identify a possible mechanism of resistance of Manchurian ash to emerald ash borer, which may prove useful for screening, selecting, and breeding emerald ash borer-resistant ash trees. PMID:18348816

Rebek, Eric J; Herms, Daniel A; Smitley, David R

2008-02-01

157

Parasitic Infestation and Choice of Reproductive Regimes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Penna model is used to simulate the competition between an asexual parthenogenetic and asexual population inhabiting the same environment represented by a square lattice. With a small probability, a newborn from the sexual population mutates into an asexual one and vice versa. Then, the asexual population rapidly dominates the sexual one, which all but disappears. However, when an infestation by mutating genetically coupled parasites, that mimic trematodes that feed on gonads, is introduced, the outcome may be one in which both populations coevolve or one in which one of the populations overcomes the other, depending on the density of parasites on the lattice.

Sousa, A. O.; de Oliveira, S. Moss; Sá Martins, J. S.

158

Cross-kingdom effects of plant-plant signaling via volatile organic compounds emitted by tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants infested by the greenhouse whitefly (Trialeurodes vaporariorum).  

PubMed

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from plants in response to insect infestation can function as signals for the attraction of predatory/parasitic insects and/or repulsion of herbivores. VOCs also may play a role in intra- and inter-plant communication. In this work, the kinetics and composition of VOC emissions produced by tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants infested with the greenhouse whitefly Trialeurodes vaporariorum was determined within a 14 days period. The VOC emission profiles varied concomitantly with the duration of whitefly infestation. A total of 36 different VOCs were detected during the experiment, 26 of which could be identified: 23 terpenoids, plus decanal, decane, and methyl salicylate (MeSA). Many VOCs were emitted exclusively by infested plants, including MeSA and 10 terpenoids. In general, individual VOC emissions increased as the infestation progressed, particularly at 7 days post-infestation (dpi). Additional tunnel experiments showed that a 3 days exposure to VOC emissions from whitefly-infested plants significantly reduced infection by a biotrophic bacterial pathogen. Infection of VOC-exposed plants induced the expression of a likely tomato homolog of a methyl salicylate esterase gene, which preceded the expression of pathogenesis-related protein genes. This expression pattern correlated with reduced susceptibility in VOC-exposed plants. The observed cross-kingdom effect of plant-plant signaling via VOCs probably represents a generalized defensive response that contributes to increased plant fitness, considering that resistance responses to whiteflies and biotrophic bacterial pathogens in tomato share many common elements. PMID:23085855

Ángeles López, Yesenia Ithaí; Martínez-Gallardo, Norma Angélica; Ramírez-Romero, Ricardo; López, Mercedes G; Sánchez-Hernández, Carla; Délano-Frier, John Paul

2012-10-20

159

Effects of chipping, grinding, and heat on survival of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in chips.  

PubMed

The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a phloem-feeding insect from Asia, was identified in 2002 as the cause of widespread ash (Fraxinus sp.) mortality in southeastern Michigan and Essex County, Ontario. Most larvae overwinter as nonfeeding prepupae in the outer sapwood or thick bark of large trees. In a series of studies, we evaluated effects of grinding, chipping, and heat treatment on survival of A. planipennis prepupae in ash material. Heavily infested ash bolts containing roughly 8,700 prepupae were processed by a horizontal grinder with either a 2.5- or 10-cm screen. There was no evidence of A. planipennis survival in chips processed with the 2.5-cm screen, but eight viable prepupae were recovered from chips processed with the 10-cm screen. We chiseled additional sentinel chips with prepupae from ash logs and buried 45 in each chip pile. In total, six prepupae in sentinel chips survived the winter, but we found no sign of adult A. planipennis emergence from the processed chips. Subsequently, we assessed prepupal survival in chips processed by a chipper or a horizontal grinder fit with 5-, 10-, or 12.7-cm screens. An estimated 1,565 A. planipennis prepupae were processed by each treatment. Chips from the chipper were shorter than chips from the grinder regardless of the screen size used. No live prepupae were found in chips produced by the chipper, but 21 viable prepupae were found in chips from the grinder. Infested wood and bark chips chiseled from logs were held in ovens at 25, 40, or 60 degrees C for 8, 24, or 48 h. Prepupal survival was consistently higher in wood chips than bark chips at 40 degrees C, whereas no prepupae survived exposure to 60 degrees C for eight or more hours. In a second study, prepupae in wood chips were exposed to 40, 45, 50, 55, or 60 degrees C for 20 or 120 min. Some prepupae survived 20 min of exposure to all temperatures. No prepupae survived exposure to 60 degrees C for 120 min, but 17% survived exposure to 55 degrees C for 120 min, suggesting that some fraction of the population may survive internationally recognized phytosanitary standards (ISPM-15) for treatment of wood packing material. PMID:17849884

McCullough, Deborah G; Poland, Therese M; Cappaert, David; Clark, Erin L; Fraser, Ivich; Mastro, Victor; Smith, Sarah; Pell, Christopher

2007-08-01

160

Impregnated netting slows infestation by Triatoma infestans.  

PubMed

We used sentinel animal enclosures to measure the rate of infestation by the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, in an urban community of Arequipa, Peru, and to evaluate the effect of deltamethrin-impregnated netting on that rate. Impregnated netting decreased the rate of infestation of sentinel enclosures (rate ratio, 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.13-0.38; P < 0.001), controlling for the density of surrounding vector populations and the distance of these to the sentinel enclosures. Most migrant insects were early-stage nymphs, which are less likely to carry the parasitic agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. Spread of the vector in the city therefore likely precedes spread of the parasite. Netting was particularly effective against adult insects and late-stage nymphs; taking into account population structure, netting decreased the reproductive value of migrant populations from 443.6 to 40.5. Impregnated netting can slow the spread of T. infestans and is a potentially valuable tool in the control of Chagas disease. PMID:18840739

Levy, Michael Z; Quíspe-Machaca, Victor R; Ylla-Velasquez, Jose L; Waller, Lance A; Richards, Jean M; Rath, Bruno; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; del Carpio, Juan G Cornejo; Cordova-Benzaquen, Eleazar; McKenzie, F Ellis; Wirtz, Robert A; Maguire, James H; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn

2008-10-01

161

Impregnated Netting Slows Infestation by Triatoma infestans  

PubMed Central

We used sentinel animal enclosures to measure the rate of infestation by the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, in an urban community of Arequipa, Peru, and to evaluate the effect of deltamethrin-impregnated netting on that rate. Impregnated netting decreased the rate of infestation of sentinel enclosures (rate ratio, 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.13–0.38; P < 0.001), controlling for the density of surrounding vector populations and the distance of these to the sentinel enclosures. Most migrant insects were early-stage nymphs, which are less likely to carry the parasitic agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. Spread of the vector in the city therefore likely precedes spread of the parasite. Netting was particularly effective against adult insects and late-stage nymphs; taking into account population structure, netting decreased the reproductive value of migrant populations from 443.6 to 40.5. Impregnated netting can slow the spread of T. infestans and is a potentially valuable tool in the control of Chagas disease.

Levy, Michael Z.; Quispe-Machaca, Victor R.; Ylla-Velasquez, Jose L.; Waller, Lance A.; Richards, Jean M.; Rath, Bruno; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; del Carpio, Juan G. Cornejo; Cordova-Benzaquen, Eleazar; McKenzie, F. Ellis; Wirtz, Robert A.; Maguire, James H.; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

2008-01-01

162

Glutathione-S-transferase profiles in the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis.  

PubMed

The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire is a recently discovered invasive insect pest of ash, Fraxinus spp. in North America. Glutathione-S-transferases (GST) are a multifunctional superfamily of enzymes which function in conjugating toxic compounds to less toxic and excretable forms. In this study, we report the molecular characterization and expression patterns of different classes of GST genes in different tissues and developmental stages plus their specific activity. Multiple sequence alignment of all six A. planipennis GSTs (ApGST-E1, ApGST-E2, ApGST-E3, ApGST-O1, ApGST-S1 and ApGST-?1) revealed conserved features of insect GSTs and a phylogenetic analysis grouped the GSTs within the epsilon, sigma, omega and microsomal classes of GSTs. Real time quantitative PCR was used to study field collected samples. In larval tissues high mRNA levels for ApGST-E1, ApGST-E3 and ApGST-O1 were obtained in the midgut and Malpighian tubules. On the other hand, ApGST-E2 and ApGST-S1 showed high mRNA levels in fat body and ApGST-?1 showed constitutive levels in all the tissues assayed. During development, mRNA levels for ApGST-E2 were observed to be the highest in feeding instars, ApGST-S1 in prepupal instars; while the others showed constitutive patterns in all the developmental stages examined. At the enzyme level, total GST activity was similar in all the tissues and developmental stages assayed. Results obtained suggest that A. planipennis is potentially primed with GST-driven detoxification to metabolize ash allelochemicals. To our knowledge this study represents the first report of GSTs in A. planipennis and also in the family of wood boring beetles. PMID:23499941

Rajarapu, Swapna Priya; Mittapalli, Omprakash

2013-03-07

163

Monoterpene emissions from bark beetle infested Engelmann spruce trees  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bark beetle infestation impacts the health of coniferous forests, which are an important source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere. The types and amounts of VOCs emitted from forests can influence secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and impact overall air quality. In this initial work, the impact of bark beetle infestation on SOA precursors from Engelmann spruce is assessed. The VOCs emitted from the trunk of infested and healthy spruce trees were sampled using both sorbent traps and evacuated canisters that were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. The samples from the infested spruce tree suggest a nine-fold enhancement in the total VOC emissions. The dominant VOCs in the infested spruce trees were 3-carene, ?-pinene, and ?-pinene. The increase observed in VOCs sampled at the trunk of the infested spruce was consistent with increases observed at infested lodgepole pine trunks. However, the types and amounts of VOCs emitted from Engelmann spruce and lodgepole pine are different, which suggests that additional measures of VOC emissions are needed to characterize the impact of bark beetle infestation on VOC emissions and SOA precursors.

Amin, Hardik S.; Russo, Rachel S.; Sive, Barkley; Richard Hoebeke, E.; Dodson, Craig; McCubbin, Ian B.; Gannet Hallar, A.; Huff Hartz, Kara E.

2013-06-01

164

Relationship between horn fly infestation and polymorphisms in cytochrome  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Individual animal variation occurs regarding external parasite infestation in beef cattle. Our objective was to determine if horn flies infestations present on beef cattle are associated with the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; T-318C) in the cytochrome P450 gene (CYP3A28) and the prolactin (PR...

165

Variation in Herbivore Infestation: Historical vs. Genetic Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Variation in insect infestation levels among plants is a result of both genetic variation in susceptibility and variation in previous insect attack. A plant's history of insect attack can either increase or decrease susceptibility and can also influence the number of potential colonizers. Experiments were conducted to determine whether infestation levels of Eurosta solidaginis, the goldenrod ball gallmaker, on Solidago

Kenneth D. McCrea; Warren G. Abrahamson

1987-01-01

166

The influence of satellite populations of emerald ash borer on projected economic costs in U.S. communities, 2010-2020.  

PubMed

The invasion spread of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is characterized by the formation of satellite populations that expand and coalesce with the continuously invading population front. As of January 2010, satellite infestations have been detected in 13 states and two Canadian provinces. Understanding how newly established satellite populations may affect economic costs can help program managers to justify and design prevention and control strategies. We estimate the economic costs caused by EAB for the 10-yr period from 2010 to 2020 for scenarios of fewer EAB satellite populations than those found from 2005 to 2010 and slower expansion of satellite populations found in 2009. We measure the projected discounted cost of treatment, removal, and replacement of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) growing in managed landscapes in U.S. communities. Estimated costs for the base scenario with the full complement of satellites in 2005-2010 and no program to mitigate spread is $12.5 billion. Fewer EAB satellites from 2005 to 2010 delay economic costs of $1.0 to 7.4 billion. Slower expansion of 2009 satellite populations delays economic costs of $0.1 to 0.7 billion. Satellite populations that are both distant from the core EAB infestation and close to large urban areas caused more economic costs in our simulations than did other satellites. Our estimates of delayed economic costs suggest that spending on activities that prevent establishment of new satellite EAB populations or slow expansion of existing populations can be cost-effective and that continued research on the cost and effectiveness of prevention and control activities is warranted. PMID:21546148

Kovacs, Kent F; Mercader, Rodrigo J; Haight, Robert G; Siegert, Nathan W; McCullough, Deborah G; Liebhold, Andrew M

2011-05-04

167

Host range of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in North America: results of multiple-choice field experiments.  

PubMed

Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive phloem-feeding pest, was identified as the cause of widespread ash (Fraxinus) mortality in southeast Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, Canada, in 2002. A. planipennis reportedly colonizes other genera in its native range in Asia, including Ulmus L., Juglans L., and Pterocarya Kunth. Attacks on nonash species have not been observed in North America to date, but there is concern that other genera could be colonized. From 2003 to 2005, we assessed adult A. planipennis landing rates, oviposition, and larval development on North American ash species and congeners of its reported hosts in Asia in multiple-choice field studies conducted at several southeast Michigan sites. Nonash species evaluated included American elm (U. americana L.), hackberry (Celtis occidentalis L.), black walnut (J. nigra L.), shagbark hickory [Carya ovata (Mill.) K.Koch], and Japanese tree lilac (Syringa reticulata Bl.). In studies with freshly cut logs, adult beetles occasionally landed on nonash logs but generally laid fewer eggs than on ash logs. Larvae fed and developed normally on ash logs, which were often heavily infested. No larvae were able to survive, grow, or develop on any nonash logs, although failed first-instar galleries occurred on some walnut logs. High densities of larvae developed on live green ash and white ash nursery trees, but there was no evidence of larval survival or development on Japanese tree lilac and black walnut trees in the same plantation. We felled, debarked, and intensively examined >28 m2 of phloem area on nine American elm trees growing in contact with or adjacent to heavily infested ash trees. We found no sign of A. planipennis feeding on any elm. PMID:18348815

Anulewicz, Andrea C; McCullough, Deborah G; Cappaert, David L; Poland, Therese M

2008-02-01

168

Serodiagnostic antibody responses to Psoroptes sp. infestations in bighorn sheep.  

PubMed

The antibody responses of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) infected with Psoroptes sp. mites were investigated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay on western blots of P. cuniculi antigens. Serum from 20 Psoroptes sp.-infested bighorn sheep (O. canadensis mexicana, O. canadensis nelsoni, O. canadensis canadensis) from New Mexico, Nevada, California, and Idaho reacted strongly with mite antigens ranging from 12 to 34 kd. Serum from 35 Psoroptes sp.-free bighorn sheep of unknown tick infestation status and from three Psoroptes sp.-free bighorn sheep infested with Dermacentor hunteri ticks did not react with these antigens. Psoroptes sp.-specific antibody responses were present throughout a 16 mo period in one infected bighorn sheep, but were not detectable 8 mo following successful treatment. These results demonstrate that specific serodiagnosis of Psoroptes sp. infestation is feasible in bighorn sheep and suggest that antibody responses are indicative of current or recent infestation. PMID:2023305

Boyce, W M; Jessup, D A; Clark, R K

1991-01-01

169

Do rice water weevils and rice stem borers compete when sharing a host plant?*  

PubMed Central

The rice water weevil (RWW) Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is an invasive insect pest of rice Oryza sativa L. in China. Little is known about the interactions of this weevil with indigenous herbivores. In the present study, adult feeding and population density of the weevil, injury level of striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and pink stem borer Sesamia inferens (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) to rice, as well as growth status of their host plants were surveyed in a rice field located in Southeastern Zhejiang, China, in 2004 with the objective to discover interspecific interactions on the rice. At tillering stage, both adult feeding of the weevil and injury of the stem borers tended to occur on larger tillers (bearing 5 leaves) compared with small tillers (bearing 2~4 leaves), but the insects showed no evident competition with each other. At booting stage, the stem borers caused more withering/dead hearts and the weevil reached a higher density on the plants which had more productive tillers and larger root system; the number of weevils per tiller correlated negatively with the percentage of withering/dead hearts of plants in a hill. These observations indicate that interspecific interactions exist between the rice water weevil and the rice stem borers with negative relations occurring at booting or earlier developmental stages of rice.

Shi, Sheng-wei; He, Yan; Ji, Xiang-hua; Jiang, Ming-xing; Cheng, Jia-an

2008-01-01

170

Do rice water weevils and rice stem borers compete when sharing a host plant?  

PubMed

The rice water weevil (RWW) Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is an invasive insect pest of rice Oryza sativa L. in China. Little is known about the interactions of this weevil with indigenous herbivores. In the present study, adult feeding and population density of the weevil, injury level of striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and pink stem borer Sesamia inferens (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) to rice, as well as growth status of their host plants were surveyed in a rice field located in Southeastern Zhejiang, China, in 2004 with the objective to discover interspecific interactions on the rice. At tillering stage, both adult feeding of the weevil and injury of the stem borers tended to occur on larger tillers (bearing 5 leaves) compared with small tillers (bearing 2~4 leaves), but the insects showed no evident competition with each other. At booting stage, the stem borers caused more withering/dead hearts and the weevil reached a higher density on the plants which had more productive tillers and larger root system; the number of weevils per tiller correlated negatively with the percentage of withering/dead hearts of plants in a hill. These observations indicate that interspecific interactions exist between the rice water weevil and the rice stem borers with negative relations occurring at booting or earlier developmental stages of rice. PMID:18600788

Shi, Sheng-Wei; He, Yan; Ji, Xiang-Hua; Jiang, Ming-Xing; Cheng, Jia-An

2008-07-01

171

Male-produced pheromone of Spathius agrili, a parasitoid introduced for the biological control of the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis.  

PubMed

The braconid wasp, Spathius agrili, has been released in the U.S. as a biocontrol agent for the invasive emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae: Agrilus planipennis), a destructive pest of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). We identified and synthesized seven male-specific volatile compounds. Three of these, dodecanal, (4R,11E)-tetradecen-4-olide, and (Z)-10-heptadecen-2-one, were the key behaviorally active components in flight tunnel bioassays. Male specificity was demonstrated by gas chromatographic comparison of male and female volatile emissions and whole body extracts. Identifications were aided by coupled gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis, microchemical reactions, NMR, chiral GC analysis, and GC and MS comparison with authentic standards. Both the racemic and chiral forms of the ?-lactone, as well as both E- and Z-isomers were synthesized. Flight tunnel behavioral tests showed positive male and female S. agrili responses to both natural pheromone and synthetic blends, with upwind flight and landing on the source. Large field-cage tests, using yellow sticky traps baited with pheromone, captured approximately 50% of the released male and female wasps in 24-h periods. The use of pheromone-baited traps in the field could simplify the current detection method for determining parasitoid establishment (i.e., laboriously felling and peeling ash trees for recovery of S. agrili from infested EAB larvae). PMID:22456948

Cossé, Allard A; Petroski, Richard J; Zilkowski, Bruce W; Vermillion, Karl; Lelito, Jonathan P; Cooperband, Miriam F; Gould, Juli R

2012-03-29

172

Field evaluation of soybean engineered with a synthetic cry1Ac transgene for resistance to corn earworm, soybean looper, velvetbean caterpillar (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), and lesser cornstalk borer (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).  

PubMed

A transgenic line of the soybean 'Jack', Glycine max (L.) Merrill, expressing a synthetic cry1Ac gene from Bacillus thuringiensis variety kurstaki (Jack-Bt), was evaluated for resistance to four lepidopteran pests in the field. Jack-Bt and genotypes serving as susceptible and resistant controls were planted in field cages and artificially infested with larvae of corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), and velvetbean caterpillar, Anticarsia gemmatalis (Hübner), in 1996, 1997, and 1998, and also with soybean looper, Pseudoplusia includens (Walker), in 1996. Susceptible controls included Jack (1996-1998), 'Cobb' (1996), and Jack-HPH (1996). GatIR 81-296 was used as the resistant control in all 3 yr. Compared with untransformed Jack, Jack-Bt showed three to five times less defoliation from corn earworm and eight to nine times less damage from velvetbean caterpillar. Defoliation of GatIR 81-296 was intermediate between that of Jack and Jack-Bt for corn earworm, and similar to that of Jack for velveltbean caterpillar. Jack-Bt exhibited significant, but lower resistance to soybean looper. Jack-Bt also showed four times greater resistance than Jack to natural infestations of lesser cornstalk borer, Elasmopalpus lignosellus (Zeller), in conventional field plots at two locations in 1998. Data from these experiments suggest that expression of this cry1Ac construct in soybean should provide adequate levels of resistance to several lepidopteran pests under field conditions. PMID:10902306

Walker, D R; All, J N; McPherson, R M; Boerma, H R; Parrott, W A

2000-06-01

173

The overwintering physiology of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis fairmaire (coleoptera: buprestidae).  

PubMed

Ability to survive cold is an important factor in determining northern range limits of insects. The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an invasive beetle introduced from Asia that is causing extensive damage to ash trees in North America, but little is known about its cold tolerance. Herein, the cold tolerance strategy and mechanisms involved in the cold tolerance of the emerald ash borer were investigated, and seasonal changes in these mechanisms monitored. The majority of emerald ash borers survive winter as freeze-intolerant prepupae. In winter, A. planipennis prepupae have low supercooling points (approximately -30°C), which they achieve by accumulating high concentrations of glycerol (approximately 4M) in their body fluids and by the synthesis of antifreeze agents. Cuticular waxes reduce inoculation from external ice. This is the first comprehensive study of seasonal changes in cold tolerance in a buprestid beetle. PMID:21070784

Crosthwaite, Jill C; Sobek, Stephanie; Lyons, D Barry; Bernards, Mark A; Sinclair, Brent J

2010-11-18

174

Zebra mussel infestation of unionid bivalves (Unionidae) in North America  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 1989, zebra mussels received national attention in North America when they reached densities exceeding 750,000/mA? in a water withdrawal facility along the shore of western Lake Erie of the Laurentian Great Lakes. Although water withdrawal problems caused by zebra mussels have been of immediate concern, ecological impacts attributed to mussels are likely to be the more important long-term issue for surface waters in North America. To date, the epizoic colonization (i.e., infestation) of unionid bivalve mollusks by zebra mussels has caused the most direct and severe ecological impact. Infestation of and resulting impacts caused by zebra mussels on unionids in the Great Lakes began in 1988. By 1990, mortality of unionids was occurring at some locations; by 1991, extant populations of unionids in western Lake Erie were nearly extirpated; by 1992, unionid populations in the southern half of Lake St. Clair were extirpated; by 1993, unionids in widely separated geographic areas of the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River showed high mortality due to mussel infestation. All infested unionid species in the Great Lakes (23) have become infested and exhibited mortality within two to four years after heavy infestation began. Data indicate that mean zebra mussel densities > 5,000-6,000/mA? and infestation intensities > 100-200/unionid in the presence of heavy zebra mussel recruitment results in near total mortality of unionids. At present, all unionid species in rivers, streams, and lakes that sympatrically occur with zebra mussels have been infested and, in many locations, negatively impacted by zebra mussels. We do not know the potential consequences of infestation on the 297 unionid species found in North America, but believe zebra mussels pose an immediate threat to the abundance and diversity of unionids.

Schloesser, Don W.; Nalepa, Thomas F.; Mackie, Gerald L.

1996-01-01

175

Interspecific comparison of constitutive ash phloem phenolic chemistry reveals compounds unique to manchurian ash, a species resistant to emerald ash borer.  

PubMed

The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis, EAB) is an invasive wood-borer indigenous to Asia and is responsible for widespread ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in the U.S. and Canada. Resistance and susceptibility to EAB varies among Fraxinus spp., which is a result of their co-evolutionary history with the pest. We characterized constitutive phenolic profiles and lignin levels in the phloem of green, white, black, blue, European, and Manchurian ash. Phloem was sampled twice during the growing season, coinciding with phenology of early and late instar EAB. We identified 66 metabolites that displayed a pattern of variation, which corresponded strongly with phylogeny. Previously identified lignans and lignan derivatives were confirmed to be unique to Manchurian ash, and may contribute to its high level of resistance to EAB. Other compounds that had been considered unique to Manchurian ash, including hydroxycoumarins and the phenylethanoids calceolarioside A and B, were detected in closely related, but susceptible species, and thus are unlikely to contribute to EAB resistance of Manchurian ash. The distinct phenolic profile of blue ash may contribute to its relatively high resistance to EAB. PMID:22588569

Whitehill, Justin G A; Opiyo, Stephen O; Koch, Jennifer L; Herms, Daniel A; Cipollini, Donald F; Bonello, Pierluigi

2012-05-16

176

Monitoring the Blind Shaft Borer Project, Oak Grove, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

In 1974, plans of the United States to obtain energy self-sufficiency included a significant increase in coal production, primarily from new underground mines in the Eastern states. The poor condition of coal shaft sinking companies was a major concern. The US Bureau of Mines perceived similarities between shaft sinking and tunnel boring and felt that a machine could be produced for faster, safer shaft sinking. In January 1975, the Robbins Co., a major producer of tunnel boring machines, submitted an unsolicited proposal to the Bureau of Mines to develop, design, build and demonstrate a Blind Shaft Borer (BSB). In June 1975, a contract was initiated to start work on a BSB. After the Department of Energy was formed, the project was transferred to their Department of Fossil Fuel. In late 1978, while the BSB was being assembled for the field trial near Oak Grove, Alabama, the DOE contracted with Williams Brothers Engineering Company to monitor the site activities and provide technical advice to the Technical Project Manager. This report reviews the BSB project prior to the field trial, describes field trial operations as observed by Williams Brothers Engineering Company personnel and provides a summary of daily activities. It also details project problems, interim efforts to resolve them, results obtained and recommendations to preclude their re-occurrence on future BSB projects.

Amstutz, R.; Danowski, T.

1982-03-01

177

Economic evaluation of the blind-shaft borer (BSB)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the present study is to assess the economic feasibility of Blind Shaft Boring versus alternate methods of shaft sinking. In Section 1 a review is made of two previous economic analyses. Comparisons have been made between projected performance of a fully commercialized Blind Shaft Borer (BSB) and the actual results of the DOE sponsored field trial at Oak Grove, Alabama. Problems encountered with the prototype are fully discussed and considered. The purpose of this review is to determine if the methodology used in the previous reports is valid. For a better familiarization of the reader with the details of the Paul Weir Co. and TRW studies, a rather comprehensive review of these two studies is given in Appendix A. In Section 2, the operating costs for a commercialized BSB, including amortization of capital costs, are determined. Probable costs associated with shaft sinking using a second generation BSB are predicted in dollars per foot and include mobilization, capital, and operating costs. In Section 3, BSB costs derived in Section 2 are compared with costs of alternate methods including: (1) Conventional Shaft Sinking, (2) Large Diameter Drilling, (3) Multi-Pass Reaming Methods. In Section 4, a Sensitivity Analysis is performed to determine the relative influence of parameters such as shaft diameter, shaft depth, penetration rate, etc. The conclusions of the report and the main topics addressed in the study are summarized in Section 5.

Not Available

1981-05-01

178

Biology and control of the raspberry crown borer (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae).  

PubMed

This study explored the biology of raspberry crown borer, Pennisetia marginata (Harris) (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae), in Arkansas and the optimum timing for insecticide and nematode applications. The duration of P. marginata's life cycle was observed to be 1 yr in Arkansas. Insecticide trials revealed that bifenthrin, chlorpyrifos, imidacloprid, metaflumizone, and metofluthrin efficacy were comparable with that of azinphosmethyl, the only labeled insecticide for P. marginata in brambles until 2005. Applications on 23 October 2003 for plots treated with bifenthrin, chlorpyrifos, and azinphosmethyl resulted in >88% reduction in larvae per crown. Applications on 3 November 2004 of metaflumizone, metofluthrin, and bifenthrin resulted in >89% reduction in larvae per crown. Applications on 7 April 2005 for metofluthrin, imidacloprid, bifenthrin, metaflumizone, and benzoylphenyl urea resulted in >64% reduction in the number of larvae per crown. Applications on 6 May 2004 did not reduce larval numbers. The optimum timing for treatments was found to be between October and early April, before the larvae tunneled into the crowns of plants. Applying bifenthrin with as little as 468 liters water/ha (50 gal/acre) was found to be as effective against larvae as higher volumes of spray. Nematode applications were less successful than insecticides. Nematode applications of Steinernemafeltiae, Steinernema carpocapsae, and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora reduced larvae counts per plant by 46, 53, and 33%, respectively. PMID:17461064

McKern, Jacquelyn A; Johnson, Donn T; Lewis, Barbara A

2007-04-01

179

Molecular markers reveal infestation dynamics of the bed bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) within apartment buildings.  

PubMed

The bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), has experienced an extraordinary global resurgence in recent years, the reasons for which remain poorly understood. Once considered a pest of lower socioeconomic classes, bed bugs are now found extensively across all residential settings, with widespread infestations established in multiapartment buildings. Within such buildings, understanding the population genetic structure and patterns of dispersal may prove critical to the development of effective control strategies. Here, we describe the development of 24 high-resolution microsatellite markers through next generation 454 pyrosequencing and their application to elucidate infestation dynamics within three multistory apartment buildings in the United States. Results reveal contrasting characteristics potentially representative of geographic or locale differences. In Raleigh, NC, an infestation within an apartment building seemed to have started from a single introduction followed by extensive spread. In Jersey City, NJ, two or more introductions followed by spread are evident in two buildings. Populations within single apartments in all buildings were characterized by high levels of relatedness and low levels of diversity, indicative of foundation from small, genetically depauperate propagules. Regardless of the number of unique introductions, genetic data indicate that spread within buildings is extensive, supporting both active and human-mediated dispersal within and between adjacent rooms or apartments spanning multiple floors. PMID:22679860

Booth, Warren; Saenz, Virna L; Santangelo, Richard G; Wang, Changlu; Schal, Coby; Vargo, Edward L

2012-05-01

180

Tissue-Specific Transcriptomics of the Exotic Invasive Insect Pest Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis)  

PubMed Central

Background The insect midgut and fat body represent major tissue interfaces that deal with several important physiological functions including digestion, detoxification and immune response. The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis), is an exotic invasive insect pest that has killed millions of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) primarily in the Midwestern United States and Ontario, Canada. However, despite its high impact status little knowledge exists for A. planipennis at the molecular level. Methodology and Principal Findings Newer-generation Roche-454 pyrosequencing was used to obtain 126,185 reads for the midgut and 240,848 reads for the fat body, which were assembled into 25,173 and 37,661 high quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for the midgut and the fat body of A. planipennis larvae, respectively. Among these ESTs, 36% of the midgut and 38% of the fat body sequences showed similarity to proteins in the GenBank nr database. A high number of the midgut sequences contained chitin-binding peritrophin (248)and trypsin (98) domains; while the fat body sequences showed high occurrence of cytochrome P450s (85) and protein kinase (123) domains. Further, the midgut transcriptome of A. planipennis revealed putative microbial transcripts encoding for cell-wall degrading enzymes such as polygalacturonases and endoglucanases. A significant number of SNPs (137 in midgut and 347 in fat body) and microsatellite loci (317 in midgut and 571 in fat body) were predicted in the A. planipennis transcripts. An initial assessment of cytochrome P450s belonging to various CYP clades revealed distinct expression patterns at the tissue level. Conclusions and Significance To our knowledge this study is one of the first to illuminate tissue-specific gene expression in an invasive insect of high ecological and economic consequence. These findings will lay the foundation for future gene expression and functional studies in A. planipennis.

Mittapalli, Omprakash; Bai, Xiaodong; Bonello, Pierluigi; Herms, Daniel A.

2010-01-01

181

Feeding by emerald ash borer larvae induces systemic changes in black ash foliar chemistry.  

PubMed

The exotic wood-boring pest, emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), has been threatening North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) resources, this being recognized since its first detection in Michigan, USA and Ontario, Canada in 2002. Ash trees are killed by larval feeding in the cambial region, which results in disruption of photosynthate and nutrient translocation. In this study, changes in volatile and non-volatile foliar phytochemicals of potted 2-yr-old black ash, Fraxinus nigra Marshall, seedlings were observed in response to EAB larval feeding in the main stem. EAB larval feeding affected levels of six compounds [hexanal, (E)-2-hexenal, (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, (E)-?-ocimene, methyl salicylate, and (Z,E)-?-farnesene] with patterns of interaction depending upon compounds of interest and time of observation. Increased methyl salicylate emission suggests similarity in responses induced by EAB larval feeding and other phloem-feeding herbivores. Overall, EAB larval feeding suppressed (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate emission, elevated (E)-?-ocimene emission in the first 30days, but emissions leveled off thereafter, and generally increased the emission of (Z,E)-?-farnesene. Levels of carbohydrates and phenolics increased overall, while levels of proteins and most amino acids decreased in response to larval feeding. Twenty-three amino acids were consistently detected in the foliage of black ash. The three most abundant amino acids were aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glutamine, while the four least abundant were ?-aminobutyric acid, ?-aminoisobutyric acid, methionine, and sarcosine. Most (16) foliar free amino acids and 6 of the 9 detected essential amino acids decreased with EAB larval feeding. The ecological consequences of these dynamic phytochemical changes on herbivores harbored by ash trees and potential natural enemies of these herbivores are discussed. PMID:21802697

Chen, Yigen; Whitehill, Justin G A; Bonello, Pierluigi; Poland, Therese M

2011-07-28

182

Leech (Hirudinea) infestations among waterfowl near Yellowknife, Northwest Territories  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fourteen species of aquatic birds, including 11 species of ducks, were infested with leeches Theromyzon rude and Placobdella ornata near Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. Leeches infested 88% of 41 American Wigeon (Anas americana) and 31% of 86 Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis) examined after death. Lesser Scaup captured by drive-trapping contained significantly more leeches than undisturbed ducks. Leeches were attached to the host within the mucosa of the nasal chamber, to the conjunctiva of the eye and on the skin of the body. Although only two deaths of ducklings were directly attributed to leech infestations, other birds probably died as a result of parasitism by leeches.

Bartonek, J. C.; Trauger, D. L.

1975-01-01

183

Mite Infestations of Man Contracted from Dogs and Cats  

PubMed Central

Acarine infestations of the dog and cat are transmissible to man. The relation between age incidence in the host, duration of disease, and circumstances under which the animal is kept are stated. Fifty out of 65 human contacts at risk to 42 infected dogs and cats showed lesions of mite infestation; 48% of these lesions were confined to the arms and torso. It is important to consider animal mite infestation in the differential diagnosis of human pruritic and papular skin disease. ImagesFig. 1

Thomsett, L. R.

1968-01-01

184

Hemlock declines rapidly with hemlock woolly adelgid infestation ...  

Treesearch

US Forest Service Treesearch. Hemlock declines rapidly with hemlock woolly adelgid infestation: impacts on the carbon cycle of the Southern Appalachian forests ... Language: English. Continent: North America. Country: United States. State:.

185

Enzymes of Glucose Metabolism in the Caecum of the Marine Borer Bankia Setacea.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The caecum of the marine borer Bankia setacea was found to contain the enzymes for a modified Embden-Meyerhof pathway, a pentose cycle, and a complete citric acid cycle. The pathways are linked to the digestion of cellulose by the enzyme cellobiase. Signi...

D. L. Liu C. C. Walden

1969-01-01

186

Antennally active macrolide from the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis emitted predominantly by females  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The macrocyclic lactone (3Z)-dodecen-12-olide was identified from the emissions of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, feeding on ash foliage. The compound was detected from both sexes but was at least 8 times more abundant from females. It was readily sensed by both male and female antenn...

187

Male Aggregation Pheromone of Date Palm Fruit Stalk Borer Oryctes elegans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory and field investigations were carried out to characterize the chemical communication system of the date palm fruit stalk borer, Oryctes elegans, and to develop pheromone-based trapping in Eastern Iran. Adults of both sexes feeding on date palm pieces attracted conspecifics, whereas date palm alone was minimally attractive. Males were twice as attractive as females. More beetles were captured at

Didier Rochat; Kazem Mohammadpoor; Christian Malosse; Arman Avand-Faghih; Martine Lettere; Josiane Beauhaire; Jean-Paul Morin; Adeline Pezier; Michel Renou; Gholam Abbas Abdollahi

2004-01-01

188

European corn borer: Pheromonal catabolism and behavioral response to sex pheromone  

Microsoft Academic Search

When physiologically excessive amounts of the female sex pheromone of the European corn borer (ECB) or esters analogous to the pheromone were applied to the antennae of males, their behavioral responsiveness to pheromone in a flight tunnel was significantly impaired for 2 hr. Concurrent quantitative analyses of heptane extracts of the male antennae by gasliquid chromatography showed that the compounds

J. A. Klun; M. Schwarz; E. G. Uebel

1991-01-01

189

Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis) Density and Canopy Dieback in Three North American Ash Species  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a phloem-feeding insect native to Asia, was identified in 2002 as the cause of widespread ash (Fraxinus) mortality in southeast Michigan, U.S. and Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Little information about A. planipennis is available from its native range and it was not known whether this invasive pest would exhibit a preference for a

Andrea C. Anulewicz; Deborah G. McCullough; David L. Cappaert

2007-01-01

190

Antioxidant genes of the emerald ash borer ( Agrilus planipennis): Gene characterization and expression profiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phytophagous insects frequently encounter reactive oxygen species (ROS) from exogenous and endogenous sources. To overcome the effect of ROS, insects have evolved a suite of antioxidant defense genes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX). The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), an exotic invasive insect pest from Asia has killed millions of

Swapna Priya Rajarapu; Praveen Mamidala; Daniel A. Herms; Pierluigi Bonello; Omprakash Mittapalli

2011-01-01

191

Dispersal of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis , in newly-colonized sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is an invasive forest insect pest threatening more than 8 billion ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in North America. Development of effective survey methods and strategies to slow the spread of A. planipennis requires an understanding of dispersal, particularly in recently established satellite populations. 2 We assessed the dispersal of A. planipennis beetles

Rodrigo J. Mercader; Nathan W. Siegert; Andrew M. Liebhold; Deborah G. McCullough

2009-01-01

192

The overwintering physiology of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ability to survive cold is an important factor in determining northern range limits of insects. The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an invasive beetle introduced from Asia that is causing extensive damage to ash trees in North America, but little is known about its cold tolerance. Herein, the cold tolerance strategy and mechanisms involved in the cold tolerance of

Jill C. Crosthwaite; Stephanie Sobek; D. Barry Lyons; Mark A. Bernards; Brent J. Sinclair

2011-01-01

193

Genetic transformation and regeneration of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) for resistance to the Emerald Ash Borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica; Oleaceae; Section Melioides), is a widely distributed native tree species, planted for timber production and popular for landscaping in North America. However, the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is attacking all North American ash spp. and it has become the most important pest of ash trees in North America. The objectives of this project were to develop

Ningxia Du

2008-01-01

194

Tissue-Specific Transcriptomics of the Exotic Invasive Insect Pest Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis)  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe insect midgut and fat body represent major tissue interfaces that deal with several important physiological functions including digestion, detoxification and immune response. The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis), is an exotic invasive insect pest that has killed millions of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) primarily in the Midwestern United States and Ontario, Canada. However, despite its high impact status little

Omprakash Mittapalli; Xiaodong Bai; Praveen Mamidala; Swapna Priya Rajarapu; Pierluigi Bonello; Daniel A. Herms; Michael N. Nitabach

2010-01-01

195

Measuring the impact of biotic factors on populations of immature emerald ash borers (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Cohorts of emerald ash borer (EAB) larvae, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, were experimentally established in July of 2008 on healthy green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) trees in two wooded plots at each of three sites near Lansing, Michigan by caging gravid EAB females or placing laboratory-reared eg...

196

Hymenopteran Parasitoids Attacking the Invasive Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Western and Central Pennsylvania  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

We conducted field surveys of the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, and associated larval parasitoids in western and central Pennsylvania (Cranberry and Granville Townships) in the spring and fall of 2009. The survey procedure involved destructively debarking sections of the m...

197

Assessing the Hazard of Emerald Ash Borer and Other Exotic Stressors to Community Forests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exotic stressors such as emerald ash borer are an increasing concern to many communities across North America. One means of assessing the hazard these stressors may represent to a community's publicly managed trees is through an inventory of their street trees. The South Dakota Division of Resource Conservation and Forestry conducted street tree inventories in selected communities across the state

John Ball; Sarah Mason; Aaron Kiesz; Dan McCormick; Craig Brown

2007-01-01

198

Characteristics and distribution of potential ash tree hosts for emerald ash borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis) is a recently discovered (July 2002) exotic insect pest, which has caused the death of millions of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in Detroit, MI, USA and has also spread into other areas of Michigan, isolated locations in Indiana, Ohio, Maryland and Virginia, and nearby Windsor, Ont., in Canada. Ash trees occur in many

David W. MacFarlane; Shawna Patterson Meyer

2005-01-01

199

A Potential Plan of Action for Emerald Ash Borer in Nebraska  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u0009Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis) (EAB) is an invasive insect pest. It feeds on the cambium tissues of ash tree species. It was first discovered in the United States in 2002 in Detroit, Michigan. Their effects on ash trees are deadly, and it is quickly spreading across the Midwest. Nebraska has not yet been invaded, but confirmed findings continue getting

Lee Wheeler

2010-01-01

200

UPDATE ON EMERALD ASH BORER NATURAL ENEMY SURVEYS IN MICHIGAN AND CHINA  

Microsoft Academic Search

We began research on natural enemies of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis soon after its discovery in Michigan and Ontario in 2002. Regulatory agencies in the United States and Canada adopted a strategy of eradication for EAB in an effort to protect New World ash. Should eradication fail, however, conventional biological control will be needed to suppress populations of

Leah S. Bauer; Houping Liu; Robert A. Haack; Ruitong Gao; Tonghai Zhao; Deborah L. Miller

201

Feeding by emerald ash borer larvae induces systemic changes in black ash foliar chemistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The exotic wood-boring pest, emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), has been threatening North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) resources, this being recognized since its first detection in Michigan, USA and Ontario, Canada in 2002. Ash trees are killed by larval feeding in the cambial region, which results in disruption of photosynthate and nutrient translocation. In this study,

Yigen Chen; Justin G. A. Whitehill; Pierluigi Bonello; Therese M. Poland

2011-01-01

202

GENETIC BASIS OF RESISTANCE TO FALL ARMYWORM AND SOUTHWESTERN CORN BORER LEAF FEEDING DAMAGE IN MAIZE  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

To clarify the genetic basis of resistance to leaf feeding damage by fall armyworm and southwestern corn borer a study was undertaken to compare quantitative trait loci involved in two related resistant maize lines, Mp704 and Mp708. Models containing four and seven QTL explaining southwestern corn ...

203

MYCOBIOTA ASSOCIATED WITH THE COFFEE BERRY BORER HYPOTHENEMUS HAMPEI (FERRARI) (COLEOPTERA: SCOLYTIDAE) IN CHIAPAS, MEXICO  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Field surveys were carried out in coffee plantations in Chiapas, Mexico, to collect and identify fungi associated with the cuticle, gut, feces and the galleries of the coffee berry borer Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari). Insects and coffee berries containing galleries were collected in three coffee fa...

204

Parasitoids for biocontrol of coffee berry borer: past, present and future.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Detailed surveys for coffee berry borer parasitoids were initiated in October 2006 in two coffee growing areas of Kenya (Kisii and Embu). The most abundant parasitoid species are Prorops nasuta (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae) and Aphanogmus sp. (Hymenoptera: Ceraphronidae). Our preliminary findings indica...

205

Registration of two sugarcane germplasm clones with antibiosis to the sugarcane borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

‘Ho 08-9001’ and ‘Ho 08-9003’ germplasm were selected as early-generation clones (Saccharum x S. spontaneum) for the combined traits of resistance to the sugarcane borer (Diatraea saccharalis), vigorous growth habit, biomass yield, and high sucrose levels for a wide cross. Ho 08-9001 expressed 13% b...

206

Morphological characterization of the antennal sensilla of the dogwood borer (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The external morphology of the dogwood borer antennae and their sensilla was investigated using light and scanning electron microscopy. Male and female antennaes were clavate before tapering to an apical point and consisted of three main segments; the scape, pedicel, and flagellum. Although, there...

207

Quantifying rice farmers’ pest management decisions: beliefs and subjective norms in stem borer control  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper introduces the pest belief model and Fishbein and Ajzen's theory of reasoned action to analyze farmers’ decisions in stem borer management. Farmers spent an average of $39\\/ha (median $18) on insecticides believing that if they had not controlled an average loss of 1004 kg\\/ha or $402 (median 592, $237) would occur. Farmers’ estimates of the worst attack averaged

K. L. Heong; M. M. Escalada

1999-01-01

208

Sex pheromone dispenser type and trap design affect capture of dogwood borer  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The capture of dogwood borer (DWB), Synanthedon scitula Harris (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae), was evaluated in field trapping studies using wing-style sticky traps baited with rubber septum or polyethylene vial dispensers containing the most effective sex pheromone ternary blend [86:6:6 v:v:v (Z,Z)-3,13-o...

209

Review of the biology and control of the Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Lep: Pyralidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The biology and control of the Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis Guenée, is reviewed. This insect is distributed from China to Australia and the Solomon Islands. In northern parts of its range the moths have one or a few generations per year, but in the tropics, generations are continuous and overlapping. The caterpillars can cause severe yield losses in corn,

D. M. Nafus; I. H. Schreiner

1991-01-01

210

Shade over coffee: its effects on berry borer, leaf rust and spontaneous herbs in Chiapas, Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this research was to determine the relationships between different ecological features of shade and the incidence of coffee berry borer, coffee leaf rust and spontaneous herbs in rustic coffee plantations in Chiapas, Mexico. Thirty-six 10 m by 10 m plots were established within coffee plantations. The following variables were measured or estimated: number of vegetation strata, percent

L. Soto-Pinto; I. Perfecto; J. Caballero-Nieto

2002-01-01

211

Monitoring and First Discovery of the Mexican Rice Borer Eoreuma loftini (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) in Louisiana  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The Mexican rice borer, Eoreuma loftini, has expanded its range from the Lower Rio Grande Valley to east Texas, and now into southwest Louisiana. Louisiana Department of Agricultural and Forestry and Louisiana State University AgCenter scientists forecast that natural and unintended movement will r...

212

Susceptibility of eggs and adult fecundity of the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica, exposed to methoprene  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A series of tests was conducted to determine the susceptibility of eggs of Rhyzopertha dominica (F.), the lesser grain borer, exposed to the insect growth regulator (IGR) methoprene on filter paper and on rough rice. In the first test, the hatch rate of eggs exposed on filter paper treated with met...

213

Maize defense response against the european corn borer (Ostrinia nubilaslis): a losing battle?  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The goal of this research is to understand how maize stems respond to European corn borer (ECB) damage and how these defense tactics affect the invading ECB. We measured the levels of the plant hormones, jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene, as well as the transcript levels of their key biosynthetic en...

214

Parasitoids attacking the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in western Pennsylvania  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Current biological control programs against the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, have primarily focused on the introduction and releases of exotic parasitoids from China, home of the pest origin (USDA APHIS 2007; Liu et al. 2008). However, recent field surveys in Michigan indicate that...

215

Explorations for Natural Enemies of Emerald Ash Borer in China, 2006  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

An exploratory survey for the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, and its natural enemies was made in China during July-August, 2006. We visited 11 field plots in four provinces. We visually inspected living Fraxinus chinensis, F. mandshurica, F. rhynchophylla, and F. velutina, then peel...

216

Parasitoids attacking emerald ash borers in western Pennsylvania and their potential use in biological control  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Current biological control programs against the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, have primarily focused on the introduction and releases of exotic parasitoids from China, home of the pest origin (USDA APHIS 2007; Liu et al. 2008). However, recent field surveys in Michigan indicate that...

217

Suitability of immature emerald ash borers to Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Since first detected in Michigan in 2002, the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), a buprestid native to Asia, has killed millions of ash trees in northeastern North America and continues to expand into new areas. Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a gregar...

218

DIATOMACEOUS EARTH PLUS METHOPRENE FOR CONTROL OF LESSER GRAIN BORER, RHYZOPERTHA DOMINICA, IN ROUGH RICE  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.), is a major insect pest of all stored grains, including rough rice. Diatomaceous earth (DE), a natural inert dust, and methoprene, an insect growth regulator, are two insecticides registered for direct application for stored grains. However, methopre...

219

Overview on current status of biotechnological interventions on yellow stem borer Scirpophaga incertulas (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) resistance in rice.  

PubMed

Yellow stem borer (YSB), Scirpophaga incertulas (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), a monophagous pest of paddy is considered as most important pest of rain fed low land and flood prone rice eco-systems. Breeding of yellow stem borer resistance in rice is difficult owing to the complex genetics of the trait, inherent difficulties in screening and poor understanding of the genetics of resistance. On the other hand, a good level of resistance against the widespread yellow stem borer has been rare in the rice germplasm. Resistance to insects has been demonstrated in transgenic plants expressing genes for delta-endotoxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), protease inhibitors, enzymes and plant lectins. The performance of insect resistant GM rice in trials in China has been quite impressive. The present review is an attempt to assess the current state of development in biotechnological intervention for yellow stem borer resistance in rice. PMID:19811767

Deka, Sikha; Barthakur, Sharmistha

220

Evaluation of Transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis Corn Hybrids Against Cry1Ab-Susceptible and Resistant Sugarcane Borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Louisiana strain of the sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), was selected for resistance to the Cry1Ab protein of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) by using an F2 screening procedure. Survival of Bt-resistant, -susceptible, and -heterozygous genotypes of sugarcane borer was evaluated on vegetative and reproductive stages of Þve non-Bt and seven Bt Þeld corn, Zea mays L., hybrids in

Xiaoyi Wu; Fangneng Huang; B. Rogers Leonard; Steven H. Moore

2007-01-01

221

Evaluation of Thiamethoxam and Imidacloprid as Seed Treatments to Control European Corn Borer and Indianmeal Moth (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) Larvae  

Microsoft Academic Search

EfÞcacy of thiamethoxam (Cruiser) and imidacloprid (Gaucho) were evaluated as seed treatments for controlling European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hubner) and Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hubner) larvae in stored grain. At 22Ð26C, all Þfth instar European corn borers died after two o r4do fexposure to corn treated with 250and 50 0ppm thiamethoxam, respectively, while mortality of larvae exposed for two

Bisong Yue; Gerald E. Wilde; Frank Arthur

2003-01-01

222

Agrobacterium mediated transformation of sugarcane for borer resistance using Cry 1Aa 3 gene and one-step regeneration of transgenic plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sugarcane borers are the major biotic pest in sugarcane that accounts nearly 25–30% yield loses. Most of the present sugarcane\\u000a varieties are not resistant to borers. Development of borer resistance in sugarcane through transgenic technology could be\\u000a the best approach. Cry series of genes are known for development of insect pest resistance in plants in particular for the\\u000a most damaging

Raviraj M. Kalunke; Archana M. Kolge; K. Harinath Babu; D. Theertha Prasad

2009-01-01

223

Association between severity of prescribed burns and subsequent activity of conifer-infesting beetles in stands of longleaf pine  

SciTech Connect

A randomized complete block experiment was performed to measure the effect of prescribed, dormant-season burns of three different levels of severity (measured as fuel consumption and soil surface heating) on subsequent insect infestation and mortality of mature longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.). Multiple-funnel traps baited with a low release rate of turpentine and ethanol were used to monitor activity of certain coniferophagous beetles. Non-aggressive species, including the root beetles Hylastes salebrosus Eichhoff and H. tenuis Eichhoff, the ambrosia beetle Xyleborus pubescens Zimmermann, the reproduction weevil Pachylobius picivorus (Germar), and buprestid borers, were attracted to burned plots in numbers that correlated positively with burn severity. Beetle attraction to burned sites was greatest in the first weeks post-burn and disappeared by the second year. Two potential tree-killing bark beetles, Dendroctonus terebrans (Olivier) and Ips grandicollis (Eichhoff), were trapped in significant numbers but exhibited no attraction to burned plots. Tree mortality correlated significantly with the severity of the burns and amounted to 5% of stems in the hottest burn treatment after 3 years. The majority of the mortality was observed in the second and third years post-burn. Attacks of Ips and Dendroctonus bark beetles were apparent on nearly all dead or dying trees, and evidence suggested that root pathogens may have contributed to tree susceptibility to beetle attack and mortality. Our data indicate that selection of burn regimes that reduce or eliminate consumption of duff (e.g., favoring heading fires over backing fires) could significantly reduce mortality of longleaf pine managed for long rotations Published by Elsevier B.V.

Sullivan, Brian, T; Fettig, C. J.; Otrosina, William, J.; Dalusky, Mark, J.; Berrisford, C.W.

2003-05-05

224

Polarizable elements in scabies infestation: a clue to diagnosis.  

PubMed

The diagnosis of scabies infestation is straightforward in cases where mite parts are largely visible; however, mites are often not captured in a specimen's planes of section. Polariscopic examination is a fast and simple adjunctive diagnostic tool to light microscopy. We describe the unique polariscopic findings in scabies infestation. Two cases of crusted scabies and eight cases of typical scabies were subjected to polariscopic examination. Diagnostic mite parts were visualized in at least one section in all cases. Attached and detached spines as well as scybala (fecal material) are polarizable. Specifically, spines show a polarizable outer sheath with dark central core while scybala show peripherally concentrated, stippled birefringence. Similar stippled birefringence is visible within the gut of some mites whereas significant birefringence is not appreciated in other mite parts. These results suggest that polariscopic examination is a helpful clue in the diagnosis of scabies infestation, especially in cases where the body of the mite is not visualized. PMID:23110486

Foo, Chong Wee; Florell, Scott R; Bowen, Anneli R

2012-10-30

225

9 CFR 72.21 - Animals infested with or exposed to ticks subject to same restrictions as cattle.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Animals infested with or exposed to ticks subject to same restrictions as cattle...21 Animals infested with or exposed to ticks subject to same restrictions as cattle...other than cattle which are infested with ticks [Boophilus annulatus (Margaropus...

2013-01-01

226

9 CFR 72.21 - Animals infested with or exposed to ticks subject to same restrictions as cattle.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Animals infested with or exposed to ticks subject to same restrictions as cattle...21 Animals infested with or exposed to ticks subject to same restrictions as cattle...other than cattle which are infested with ticks [Boophilus annulatus (Margaropus...

2009-01-01

227

9 CFR 72.21 - Animals infested with or exposed to ticks subject to same restrictions as cattle.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Animals infested with or exposed to ticks subject to same restrictions as cattle...21 Animals infested with or exposed to ticks subject to same restrictions as cattle...other than cattle which are infested with ticks [Boophilus annulatus (Margaropus...

2010-01-01

228

Characterization of Acetylcholinesterase Purified from the Lesser Grain Borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

1. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7) purified from the lesser grain borer (Rhyzopertha dominica) was significantly inhibited by higher concentrations of the substrates acetylthiocholine (ATC), acetyl-(?-methyl) thiocholine (A?MTC) and propionylthiocholine (PTC). 2. The efficiency of AChE for hydrolyzing different substrates was ATC > A?MTC > PTC > S-butyrylthiocholine. The enzyme activity was completely inhibited by 10?5 M eserine or BW284C51, but

R. N. C Guedes; K. Y Zhu; S Kambhampati; B. A Dover

1998-01-01

229

Identification of a coffee berry borer-associated yeast: does it break down caffeine?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two yeasts isolated from laboratory reared adult coffee berry borers ( Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)) and from insects collected in the field in Colombia were identified as Pichia burtonii Boidin and Candida fermentati (Saito) Bai, based on sequencing of the nuclear large subunit 26S rDNA variable D1\\/D2 domain. Liquid culture experiments using P. burtonii in media containing different caffeine

Fernando E. Vega; Michael B. Blackburn; Cletus P. Kurtzman; Patrick F. Dowd

2003-01-01

230

Sex pheromone blend discrimination by male moths from E and Z strains of European corn borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sex pheromone behavioral responses were analyzed in a flight tunnel with European corn borer,Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner), males from three distinct populations. Males from a bivoltine and a univoltine biotype using a 97.8:2.2 blend (Z strains) of (Z)- and (E)-11-tetradecenyl acetate were assayed with treatments containing 0, 0.5, 1, and 3% of theE isomer. Males from neither population oriented in the

T. J. Glover; X.-H. Tang; W. L. Roelofs

1987-01-01

231

Distinguishing Defensive Characteristics in the Phloem of Ash Species Resistant and Susceptible to Emerald Ash Borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the extent to which three Fraxinus cultivars and a wild population that vary in their resistance to Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) could be differentiated on the basis\\u000a of a suite of constitutive chemical defense traits in phloem extracts. The EAB-resistant Manchurian ash (F. mandshurica, cv. Mancana) was characterized by having a rapid rate of wound browning, a high

Don Cipollini; Qin Wang; Justin G. A. Whitehill; Jeff R. Powell; Pierluigi Bonello; Daniel A. Herms

2011-01-01

232

Modeling the invasive emerald ash borer risk of spread using a spatially explicit cellular model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis) is decimating native ashes (Fraxinus sp.) throughout midwestern North America, killing millions of trees over the years. With plenty of ash available throughout\\u000a the continent, the spread of this destructive insect is likely to continue. We estimate that the insect has been moving along\\u000a a “front” at about 20 km\\/year since about 1998, but

Anantha M. Prasad; Louis R. Iverson; Matthew P. Peters; Jonathan M. Bossenbroek; Stephen N. Matthews; T. Davis Sydnor; Mark W. Schwartz

2010-01-01

233

Antennally Active Macrolide from the Emerald Ash Borer Agrilus planipennis Emitted Predominantly by Females  

Microsoft Academic Search

The macrocyclic lactone (3Z)-dodecen-12-olide was identified from the emissions of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, feeding on ash foliage. The compound was detected from both sexes but was ca. 10 times more abundant from females. It was\\u000a readily sensed by antennae of both males and females. Identification was confirmed by synthesis. The behavioral effects of\\u000a the lactone remain unstudied

Robert J. Bartelt; Allard A. Cossé; Bruce W. Zilkowski; Ivich Fraser

2007-01-01

234

Behavioral Evidence for a Contact Sex Pheromone Component of the Emerald Ash Borer, Agrilus Planipennis Fairmaire  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cuticular hydrocarbon profiles of emerald ash borers, Agrilus planipennis, were examined to determine if there are differences in these compounds between the sexes. We also assessed feral male EAB\\u000a in the field for behavioral changes based on the application of a female-specific compound to dead, solvent-washed beetles.\\u000a Males in the field spent significantly more time attempting copulation with dead,

Jonathan P. Lelito; Katalin Böröczky; Tappey H. Jones; Ivich Fraser; Victor C. Mastro; James H. Tumlinson; Thomas C. Baker

2009-01-01

235

A contact sex pheromone component of the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analyses of the elytral hydrocarbons from male and female emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, that were freshly emerged vs. sexually mature (>10 days old) revealed a female-specific compound, 9-methyl-pentacosane\\u000a (9-Me-C25), only present in sexually mature females. This material was synthesized by the Wittig reaction of 2-decanone with (n-hexadecyl)-triphenylphosphonium bromide followed by catalytic reduction to yield racemic 9-Me C25, which matched

Peter J. Silk; Krista Ryall; D. Barry Lyons; Jon Sweeney; Junping Wu

2009-01-01

236

Genetic Components of Resistance to Stalk Tunneling by the European Corn Borer in Maize  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT,Cardinal et al., 2001). Identification of genetic compo- nents of resistance to tunneling,has been hindered,by Identification of the genes conferring resistance to European corn environmental variation, a laborious and lengthy screen- borer (ECB) [Ostrinia nubilalis (Hu ¨ bner)] is an important step in understanding how resistance is expressed and whether different ing process, and the polygenic nature of the trait;

M. D. Krakowsky; M. J. Brinkman; W. L. Woodman-Clikeman; M. Lee

2002-01-01

237

Molecular cloning and expression analysis of ultraspiracle (USP) from the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis  

Microsoft Academic Search

cDNA for ultraspiracle (USP) from the lepidopteran rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis was cloned using PCR techniques. The deduced amino acid sequence of C. suppressalis USP (CsUSP) was very similar to those of other lepidopteran USPs, especially to the Manduca sexta USP-2 isoform. Northern hybridization analysis detected a 6.5-kb message in the epidermis, fat body, and midgut of wandering larvae.

Chieka Minakuchi; Yoshiaki Nakagawa; Makoto Kiuchi; Atsushi Seino; Shuichiro Tomita; Manabu Kamimura

2003-01-01

238

Mutation in acetylcholinesterase1 associated with triazophos resistance in rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two full-length genes encoding different acetylcholinesterases (AChEs), designated as Ch-ace1 and Ch-ace2, were cloned from strains of the rice stem borer (Chilo suppressalis) susceptible and resistant to the organophosphate insecticide triazophos. Sequence analysis found an amino acid mutation A314S in Ch-ace1 (corresponding to A201 in Torpedo californica AChE) that was consistently associated with the occurrence of resistance. This mutation removed

Xiaojing Jiang; Mingjing Qu; Ian Denholm; Jichao Fang; Weihua Jiang; Zhaojun Han

2009-01-01

239

Triazophos resistance mechanisms in the rice stem borer ( Chilo suppressalis Walker)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A field population of the rice stem borer (Chilo suppressalis Walker) with 203.3-fold resistance to triazophos was collected. After 8-generation of continuous selection with triazophos in laboratory, resistance increased to 787.2-fold, and at the same time, the resistance to isocarbophos and methamidophos was also enhanced by 1.9- and 1.4-fold, respectively, implying some cross-resistance between triazophos and these two organophosphate insecticides.

Qu Mingjing; Han Zhaojun; Xu Xinjun; Yue lina

2003-01-01

240

Diapause induction, maintenance and termination in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis (Walker)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, enters facultative diapause as fully grown larvae in response to short-day conditions during the autumn. Our results showed that the critical night length for diapause induction in C. suppressalis was between 10h 22min and 10h 45min at 22, 25 and 28°C, 11h 18min at 31°C, and between 10h 5min and 10h 20min under field

Hai-Jun Xiao; Feng-Chen Mou; Xing-Fen Zhu; Fang-Sen Xue

2010-01-01

241

Cold Hardiness of Diapausing Rice Stem Borer, Chilo suppressalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was carried out to investigate the supercooling point (SCP), cold hardiness, and content of glycerol in the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, larvae field-collected at different dates to understand the relationship between diapause and cold hardiness. Field-collected C. suppressalis larvae became cold-hardy from late autumn and higher level of survival was maintained from October to April. Lab-reared C.

Jum Rae Cho; Jeong Seok Lee; Jeong Jun Kim; Minho Lee; Hong Sun Kim; Kyung Saeng Boo

2005-01-01

242

Twelve nuclear microsatellite loci for rice stem borer (Chilo suppressalis W.).  

PubMed

We developed 12 polymorphic microsatellite markers for the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis (Walker). These loci were screened for 96 individuals from eight populations across China. The total number of alleles ranged from 3 to 33 and the expected heterozygosity at these loci ranged from 0.131 to 0.671. These molecular markers will be useful for fully investigating the population structure and host preference of C. suppressalis at fine spatial scales. PMID:21564596

Liu, Yu-Di; Hou, Mao-Lin; Hao, Li-Xia

2008-10-21

243

Managing the Risk of European Corn Borer Resistance to Bt Corn  

Microsoft Academic Search

New pesticidal crops are taking advantage of advances in geneticengineering. For example, corn has been engineered to express\\u000a Bt proteinsthat are toxic to the European corn borer. These crops are effective pestmanagement tools for United States growers.\\u000a However, there is concern thatpests will develop resistance to these crops resulting in the increased useof more hazardous\\u000a pesticides. The purpose of this

Terrance M. Hurley; Silvia Secchi; Bruce A. Babcock; Richard L. Hellmich

2002-01-01

244

Dispersal behavior of neonate European corn borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) on Bt corn.  

PubMed

European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), has historically been a significant economically important insect pest of corn (Zea mays L.) in the United States and Canada. The development in the 1990s of genetically modified corn expressing genes derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) that encodes insecticidal crystalline (Cry) proteins has proven to be effective in controlling this insect as well as other corn pests. The purpose of this study was to assess the movement and dispersal behavior of neonate European corn borer on Bt corn. We examined differences in neonate European corn borer dispersal behavior for the first 4 h after eclosion in the field among a stacked pyramid (Cry1F X Cry1Ab X Cry34/35Ab1) Bt corn, a Cry1F Bt corn, and a non-Bt sweet corn; and in the laboratory among a Bt corn hybrid containing Cry1F, a hybrid containing Cry1Ab, a pyramid combining these two hybrids (Cry1F X Cry1Ab), and a non-Bt near isoline corn. In field experiments, we found that dispersal was significantly higher on Bt corn compared with sweet corn. In laboratory experiments, dispersal was significantly higher on Cry1Ab Bt corn and Cry1F X Cry1Ab Bt corn than on non-Bt near isoline corn. Results indicated that neonate dispersal may be significantly greater in Bt cornfields compared with non-Bt cornfields. The findings on dispersal behavior in this study will be useful in evaluating the efficacy of a blended seed refuge system for managing European corn borer resistance in Bt corn. PMID:22928300

Razze, J M; Mason, C E

2012-08-01

245

Inheritance of central neuroanatomy and physiology related to pheromone preference in the male European corn borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The European corn borer (ECB), Ostrinia nubilalis, is a textbook example of pheromone polymorphism. Males of the two strains (Z and E) prefer opposite ratios of the two pheromone components, Z11- and E11-tetradecenyl acetate, with a sex-linked factor underlying this difference in preference. The male antennal lobes of the two strains contain a pheromone sensitive macroglomerular complex (MGC) that

Zsolt Kárpáti; Shannon Olsson; Bill S Hansson; Teun Dekker

2010-01-01

246

Reversed functional topology in the antennal lobe of the male European corn borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY The European corn borer Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner) is a model of evolution of sexual communication in insects. Two pheromone strains produce and respond to opposite ratios of the two pheromone components, Z11 and E11-tetradecenylacetate. The Z-strain uses a ratio of 97:3 of Z11:E11 tetradecenylacetate, whereas the E-strain uses a ratio of 1:99. We studied how the difference in male

Z. Karpati; Teun Dekker; Bill S. Hansson

2008-01-01

247

7 CFR 319.77-3 - Gypsy moth infested areas in Canada.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Gypsy moth infested areas in Canada. 319...AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Gypsy Moth Host Material from Canada § 319.77-3 Gypsy moth infested areas in Canada....

2013-01-01

248

7 CFR 319.77-3 - Gypsy moth infested areas in Canada.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Gypsy moth infested areas in Canada. 319...AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Gypsy Moth Host Material from Canada § 319.77-3 Gypsy moth infested areas in Canada....

2010-01-01

249

7 CFR 319.77-3 - Gypsy moth infested areas in Canada.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-01-01 2009-01-01 false Gypsy moth infested areas in Canada. 319...AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Gypsy Moth Host Material from Canada § 319.77-3 Gypsy moth infested areas in Canada....

2009-01-01

250

The patterns of tungiasis in Araruama township, state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes patterns of infestation with Tunga penetrans (L., 1758) within the poor community of Araruama municipality, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, assessed by the number of persons and domestic animals parasitized. The overall prevalence of infestation was 49.2% (211 parasitized hosts) of the 429 examined. Humans (p < 0.01) and dogs (p < 0.01) were the most

Raimundo Wilson de Carvalho; Adilson Benedito de Almeida; Silvia Cristina Barbosa-Silva; Marinete Amorim; Paulo César Ribeiro; Nicolau Maués Serra-Freire

2003-01-01

251

Differential fipronil susceptibility and metabolism in two rice stem borers from China.  

PubMed

The susceptibilities of larvae of two rice stem borers, namely, Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) and Sesamia inferens (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Nocutidae) to fipronil and its metabolites were investigated, and then the activities of microsomal O-demethylase, and glutathione transferase (GST) in two species were measured. The metabolism of fipronil in both stem borers was determined in vivo and in vitro. The LD50 value of fipronil to S. inferens was 118.5-fold higher than that of C. suppressalis. The bioassay results offipronil metabolites showed that the toxicities of sulfone and sulfide were higher than fipronil for both species, and the differential toxicity between sulfone and fipronil was remarkable. Alternatively, the activities of microsomal O-demethylase and GST of C. suppressalis were 1.35- and 2.06-fold higher than S. inferens, respectively. The in vivo and in vitro studies on metabolism of fipronil showed that all of fipronil, sulfone, and sulfide were detected and the content of sulfone was higher than sulfide in both stem borers. The residue of sulfone in C. suppressalis was significantly higher than that in S. inferens. These results suggest that the higher activity of mixed function oxidases may cause the higher capacity of C. suppressalis to produce fipronil-sulfone, which is more toxic than fipronil leading to the higher susceptibility of this species. PMID:18767755

Fang, Qi; Huang, Cheng-Hua; Ye, Gong-Yin; Yao, Hong-Wei; Cheng, Jia-An; Akhtar, Zunnu-Raen

2008-08-01

252

INTERNATIONAL GUIDELINES FOR EFFECTIVECONTROL OF HEAD LOUSE INFESTATIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Head louse infestations are increasing or remain high in most countries. In order to reduce the proportion of children infestedwith head lice and slow down the emergence of strains oflice resistant to pediculicides. more active involvement ofhealth and educational authorities, as well as parents, is of paramount importance. We suggest that health authorities should introduce more efficient methods for evaluating

Kosta Y. Mumcuoglu; Stephen C. Barker; Ian F. Burgess; Catherine Combescot-Lang; Robert C. Dalgleish; Kim S. Larsen; Jacqueline Miller; Richard J. Roberts; Aysegul Taylan-Ozkan

253

Charring does not affect wood infestation by subterranean termites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fire is an important part of forest ecosystems, as is the insect fauna. Changes in wood brought about by fire may alter the ability of termites to use the wood, interrupting the decay cycle of woody debris. The ability of termites to find, infest, and feed upon wood after it had been charred was evaluated in the laboratory and field.

C. J. Peterson; P. D. Gerard; T. L. Wagner

2007-01-01

254

Reducing costly zebra mussel infestations at power plants  

SciTech Connect

The fast-spreading-zebra mussel has significant potential to foul intakes and other water systems at North American hydro projects. Chemical controls can be effective in reducing infestations, but most have environmental and other drawbacks. Several non-chemical methods promise to help project operators reduce problems associated with the mussels.

Smythe, G. [Acres International Corporation, Amherst, NY (United States)

1994-10-01

255

Genetic profile of Varroa destructor infesting Apis mellifera iberiensis colonies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The genetic profile of the Varroa destructor mite infesting Apis mellifera iberiensis colonies located in the Iberian Peninsula and also on Canarian and Balearic islands was determined through standard molecular assays (RFLP of the mitochondrial cox1 fragment). The V. destructor Korea haplotype was found in all of the 575 samples analyzed except in one, confirming the worldwide expansion of

Irene Muñoz; Encarna Garrido-Bailón; Raquel Martín-Hernández; Aranzazu Meana; Mariano Higes; Pilar De la Rúa

2008-01-01

256

A survey of ectoparasite infestation in dogs in Tehran, Iran.  

PubMed

This survey was conducted to identify and estimate the frequencies of ectoparasites of dogs in Tehran, Iran. A total of 143 dogs attended at the Small Animal Hospital of the Veterinary School, the University of Tehran, were examined for the presence of ectoparasites and dermatological lesions. Ectoparasite specimens and blood samples were sent to parasitology and hematology laboratories, respectively. Ticks were the most frequent ectoparasite (36.4%, 52/143), followed by fleas (29.4%, 42/143), mites (25.9%, 37/143), and lice (8.4%, 12/143). Mixed infestations with two or more ectoparasites were detected in eight dogs. Rhipicephalus bursa was the most frequent ectoparasite in spring and summer. Ectoparasitic infestations were recorded mainly in large breeds and juvenile animals. Eosinophilia was more observed in dogs infested with Sarcoptes scabiei. The most common clinical sign, skin pruritus, was associated with mite and lice infestations. These results indicate that the tick R. bursa was the most prominent species of ectoparasite found in the evaluated group, followed by Ctenocephalides canis and S. scabiei var canis. PMID:23070452

Jamshidi, Shahram; Maazi, Nadi; Ranjbar-Bahadori, Shahrokh; Rezaei, Mahdiyeh; Morakabsaz, Pedram; Hosseininejad, Morteza

257

Some physiological effects of spider mite infestation on bean plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using autoradiography it was shown that saliva ofT. urticae injected into the plant was transported to the growing regions. Indications were found that the two-spotted spider mite has an active phosphate metabolism. A local mite infestation on a bean plant caused an increased transport of phosphates to the top leaves and the roots.

J. J. H. Storms

1971-01-01

258

Entodermoscopy: A New Tool for Diagnosing Skin Infections and Infestations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: There is upcoming evidence that dermoscopy facilitates the in vivo diagnosis of skin infections and infestations. As such, dermoscopy connects the research fields of dermatologists and entomologists, opening a new research field of ‘entodermoscopy’. Objective: To provide an overview on the current applications of entodermoscopy. Methods: Systematic review of the English- and German-language literature by searches of Medline, Medscape

Iris Zalaudek; Jason Giacomel; Horacio Cabo; Alessandro Di Stefani; Gerardo Ferrara; Rainer Hofmann-Wellenhof; Joseph Malvehy; Susana Puig; Wilhelm Stolz; Giuseppe Argenziano

2008-01-01

259

Rehabilitation of cheatgrass-infested rangelands: applications and practices  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The challenges that land owners and resource managers face when trying to attempt applications and practices when attempting to rehabilitate rangelands infested with cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) are over-whelming. Simply purchasing seed and spreading it throughout the rangelands is doomed for failu...

260

Knockdown, Mortality, and Progeny Production of Lesser Grain Borers (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and Rice Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Exposed for Short Intervals on Wheat Treated with Cyfluthrin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adult lesser grain borers, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.), and adult rice weevils, Sitophilus oryzae (L.), were exposed at bimonthly intervals for 2, 4, 8, and 24 h on wheat treated with 0, 1, 2, and 4 ppm cyfluthrin EC, then removed and held for 2 wk on untreated wheat. The percentage of lesser grain borers that were knocked down after they

FRANK H. ARTHUR

1999-01-01

261

Thermal tolerance of the coffee berry borer Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae): inferences of climate change impact on a tropical insect pest  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

We determined the thermal tolerance of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, and make inferences on the possible effects of climate change on the insect using climatic data from Colombia, Kenya, Tanzania, and Ethiopia. The extremes for coffee berry borer survival are 59 and 86 degrees F, but ...

262

Effective Social and Extension Factors Involved in adoption of Iintegrated Campaign in Control of Rice Stem Borer, (Chilo Suppressalis), A Case Study in Isfahan Province, Iran  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rice is an important part of the food diet in Iran. Rice stem borer, (Chilo suppressalis) is a dominant pest of rice crop in Mobarakeh and Lengan counties of Isfahan. The purpose of this study was to examine effective factors involved in adoption of integrated management of rice stem borer, in Isfahan province. The study utilized descriptive survey research. The

Gholamreza Pezeshki-Raad; Mohammad Masaeli; Jafar Yaghoubi

263

Transcriptomic analysis of the temporal host response to skin infestation with the ectoparasitic mite Psoroptes ovis  

PubMed Central

Background Infestation of ovine skin with the ectoparasitic mite Psoroptes ovis results in a rapid cutaneous immune response, leading to the crusted skin lesions characteristic of sheep scab. Little is known regarding the mechanisms by which such a profound inflammatory response is instigated and to identify novel vaccine and drug targets a better understanding of the host-parasite relationship is essential. The main objective of this study was to perform a combined network and pathway analysis of the in vivo skin response to infestation with P. ovis to gain a clearer understanding of the mechanisms and signalling pathways involved. Results Infestation with P. ovis resulted in differential expression of 1,552 genes over a 24 hour time course. Clustering by peak gene expression enabled classification of genes into temporally related groupings. Network and pathway analysis of clusters identified key signalling pathways involved in the host response to infestation. The analysis implicated a number of genes with roles in allergy and inflammation, including pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL1A, IL1B, IL6, IL8 and TNF) and factors involved in immune cell activation and recruitment (SELE, SELL, SELP, ICAM1, CSF2, CSF3, CCL2 and CXCL2). The analysis also highlighted the influence of the transcription factors NF-kB and AP-1 in the early pro-inflammatory response, and demonstrated a bias towards a Th2 type immune response. Conclusions This study has provided novel insights into the signalling mechanisms leading to the development of a pro-inflammatory response in sheep scab, whilst providing crucial information regarding the nature of mite factors that may trigger this response. It has enabled the elucidation of the temporal patterns by which the immune system is regulated following exposure to P. ovis, providing novel insights into the mechanisms underlying lesion development. This study has improved our existing knowledge of the host response to P. ovis, including the identification of key parallels between sheep scab and other inflammatory skin disorders and the identification of potential targets for disease control.

2010-01-01

264

Determination of degree of infestation of triticale seed using NIR spectroscopy  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Insect infestation of seeds of the triticale hybrid, Triticosecale, causes extraordinary storage losses as a consequence of vulnerability of triticale seed to insect infestation and its soft coat. Rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.), is a common insect that causes infestation in Florida, which was t...

265

Lotus japonicus Infested with Herbivorous Mites Emits Volatile Compounds That Attract Predatory Mites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lotus Japonicus   has an indirect defense mechanism against spider mites, Tetranychus urticae, we investigated the responses of predatory mites, Phytoseiulus persimilis, to volatile compounds released from T. urticae-infested L. japonicus in a Y-tube olfactometer. Plants infested with spider mites attracted more P. persimilis than did clean air. Uninfested plants and artificially damaged plants did not attract P. persimilis. When infested

Rika Ozawa; Takeshi Shimoda; Masayoshi Kawaguchi; Gen-ichiro Arimura; Jun-ichiro Horiuchi; Takaaki Nishioka; Junji Takabayashi

2000-01-01

266

Infestations of the bont tick Amblyomma hebraeum (Acari: Ixodidae) on different breeds of cattle in Zimbabwe  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infestations of adults and nymphs of Amblyomma hebraeum were counted on Brahman (Br), Brahman x Simmental (BS), Sanga (Sa) and Hereford (He) steers exposed to infested pastures at Mbizi in southern Zimbabwe in 1986–1987. Herefords were always the most heavily infested, while the Sanga tended to carry the fewest ticks with the Brahman and Brahman x Simmental groups being in

R. A. I. Norval; R. W. Sutherst; J. D. Kerr

1996-01-01

267

PRELIMINARY RESULTS ON THE REMOVAL RESPONSE OF RUSSIAN HONEY AGAINST BROOD INFESTED WITH SMALL HIVE BEETLES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

de Guzman, L. I. & A. M. Frake. PRELIMINARY RESULTS ON THE REMOVAL RESPONSE OF RUSSIAN HONEY AGAINST BROOD INFESTED WITH SMALL HIVE BEETLES - Removal response of Russian (n = 9) and Italian (n = 9) honey bees against brood infested with small hive beetles (SHB) was compared. SHB-infested brood wer...

268

9 CFR 95.28 - Hay or straw and similar material from tick-infested areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Hay or straw and similar material from tick-infested areas. 95.28 Section...Hay or straw and similar material from tick-infested areas. Hay or straw, grass, or similar material from tick-infested pastures, ranges, or...

2013-01-01

269

9 CFR 72.12 - Cattle; exposure to tick infestation after treatment or inspection prohibited.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Cattle; exposure to tick infestation after treatment or inspection...CATTLE § 72.12 Cattle; exposure to tick infestation after treatment or inspection... The cattle shall not be exposed to tick infestation after treatment and/or...

2013-01-01

270

9 CFR 72.12 - Cattle; exposure to tick infestation after treatment or inspection prohibited.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Cattle; exposure to tick infestation after treatment or inspection...CATTLE § 72.12 Cattle; exposure to tick infestation after treatment or inspection... The cattle shall not be exposed to tick infestation after treatment and/or...

2010-01-01

271

Skin lesions and cattle hide damage from Haematobia irritans infestations.  

PubMed

The horn fly Haematobia irritans L. (Diptera: Muscidae) has recently spread to Argentina and Uruguay and is believed to cause damage to cattle hides. Four groups of ten Holstein steers each were maintained for 58 weeks under different infestation levels with H. irritans to determine if it was the cause of this problem. Hides (chrome tanned) from steers maintained under minimum infestation level had 4.7 +/- 3.8% of the area damaged. Maintaining the steers under low H. irritans level for the last 44 days of the trial using insecticidal ear-tags, resulted in 29.5 +/- 15.8% of hide area being damaged. Steers that were treated with 5% cypermethrin pour-on, when the H. irritans population was close to 50 flies, showed that 31.3 +/- 16.6% of hide area was injured, and 46.6 +/- 12.8% of damaged hide area was found in hides from non-treated steers. Significant differences were found between mean hide damage from steers maintained continuously under low H. irritans infestation levels and all other groups. Hyperaemia was significantly lower in the skin of steers under low H. irritans infestation level than in the skins of non-treated steers and steers maintained under low-level infestations for the final 44 days. Eosinophil and mononuclear cell infiltration was significantly lower when the population of H. irritans was less than six per steer than when the population was more than 100 flies per steer. Low numbers of Stomoxys calcitrans were found in all groups, but most hide damage was presumed due to H. irritans. PMID:10514060

Guglielmone, A A; Gimeno, E; Idiart, J; Fisher, W F; Volpogni, M M; Quaino, O; Anziani, O S; Flores, S G; Warnke, O

1999-07-01

272

Evolution of signal emission by non-infested plants growing near infested plants to avoid future risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several plant species indirectly defend themselves against herbivory by attracting natural enemies of herbivores by releasing signal chemicals when infested. Previous empirical research suggested that the chemical signals also reflexively induce signal emission by neighboring undamaged plants. We hypothesize that such a reflexively induced signal is a defensive strategy used by undamaged plants to avoid possible future risk. Using a

Yutaka Kobayashi; Norio Yamamura

2003-01-01

273

DNA identification confirms pecan weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) infestation of Carpathian walnut.  

PubMed

Larvae found infesting fruit from a Carpathian walnut, Juglans regia L., tree in Missouri were confirmed by DNA analysis to be those of pecan weevil, Curculio caryae (Horn) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). The infested walnut tree occurs in the midst of pecan weevil-infested pecans, Carya illinoinensis (Wang.) K. Koch; the larval haplotypes were found to be identical to pecan weevil larvae from the region, indicating that the walnut infestation arose by association with infested pecan. This is the first confirmed DNA analysis showing pecan weevil attacks J. regia and the second report that J. regia may be at risk of infestation by pecan weevil. Further study indicates this infestation on walnut is established and ongoing. The pecan weevil is a key pest of pecan and seems capable of inflicting similar damage to walnut if spread to commercial areas that produce J. regia. PMID:20857742

Harris, Marvin K; Hunt, Kenneth L; Cognato, Anthony I

2010-08-01

274

Biophoton Emission from Kidney Bean Leaf Infested with Tetranychus Kanzawai Kishida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We studied spontaneous photon emission from kidney bean leaves infested with spider mites. Strong photon radiation was observed from the leaf veins where spider mites were crowding. Photon emission intensity increased with the decreases in chlorophyll content and photosynthesis yield; these decreases represented the degree of damage caused by the pest. When both infested and un-infested leaves were put on the same wet cotton, photon emission from the un-infested leaf increased, too. Photon emission from the un-infested leaf might be induced by an aqueous elicitor released from the infested leaf. Such an elicitor activates the plant defense response. Therefore, it is suggested that photon emission from an infested leaf conveys information on the direct injury (physical stresses) and physiological (biochemical) actions associated with the defensive response.

Kawabata, Ryuzou; Uefune, Masayoshi; Miike, Tohru; Okabe, Hirotaka; Takabayashi, Junji; Takagi, Masami; Kai, Shoichi

2004-08-01

275

Role of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) larval vibrations in host-quality assessment by Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).  

PubMed

The biological control agent Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is a gregarious larval endoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive cambium-feeding species responsible for recent, widespread mortality of ash (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. T. planipennisi is known to prefer late-instar emerald ash borer, but the cues used to assess host size by this species and most other parasitoids of concealed hosts remain unknown. We sought to test whether vibrations produced by feeding emerald ash borer vary with larval size and whether there are any correlations between these cues and T. planipennisi progeny number (i.e., brood size) and sex ratio. The amplitudes and rates of 3-30-ms vibrational impulses produced by emerald ash borer larvae of various sizes were measured in the laboratory before presenting the larvae to T. planipennisi. Impulse-rate did not vary with emerald ash borer size, but vibration amplitude was significantly higher for large larvae than for small larvae. T. planipennisi produced a significantly higher proportion of female offspring from large hosts than small hosts and was shown in previous work to produce more offspring overall from large hosts. There were no significant correlations, however, between the T. planipennisi progeny data and the emerald ash borer sound data. Because vibration amplitude varied significantly with host size, however, we are unable to entirely reject the hypothesis that T. planipennisi and possibly other parasitoids of concealed hosts use vibrational cues to assess host quality, particularly given the low explanatory potential of other external cues. Internal chemical cues also may be important. PMID:21404843

Ulyshen, Michael D; Mankin, Richard W; Chen, Yigen; Duan, Jian J; Poland, Therese M; Bauer, Leah S

2011-02-01

276

Interspecific Proteomic Comparisons Reveal Ash Phloem Genes Potentially Involved in Constitutive Resistance to the Emerald Ash Borer  

PubMed Central

The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an invasive wood-boring beetle that has killed millions of ash trees since its accidental introduction to North America. All North American ash species (Fraxinus spp.) that emerald ash borer has encountered so far are susceptible, while an Asian species, Manchurian ash (F. mandshurica), which shares an evolutionary history with emerald ash borer, is resistant. Phylogenetic evidence places North American black ash (F. nigra) and Manchurian ash in the same clade and section, yet black ash is highly susceptible to the emerald ash borer. This contrast provides an opportunity to compare the genetic traits of the two species and identify those with a potential role in defense/resistance. We used Difference Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE) to compare the phloem proteomes of resistant Manchurian to susceptible black, green, and white ash. Differentially expressed proteins associated with the resistant Manchurian ash when compared to the susceptible ash species were identified using nano-LC-MS/MS and putative identities assigned. Proteomic differences were strongly associated with the phylogenetic relationships among the four species. Proteins identified in Manchurian ash potentially associated with its resistance to emerald ash borer include a PR-10 protein, an aspartic protease, a phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and a thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase. Discovery of resistance-related proteins in Asian species will inform approaches in which resistance genes can be introgressed into North American ash species. The generation of resistant North American ash genotypes can be used in forest ecosystem restoration and urban plantings following the wake of the emerald ash borer invasion.

Whitehill, Justin G. A.; Popova-Butler, Alexandra; Green-Church, Kari B.; Koch, Jennifer L.; Herms, Daniel A.; Bonello, Pierluigi

2011-01-01

277

Delusional infestation with unusual pathogens: a report of three cases.  

PubMed

Delusional infestation (DI) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by a fixed, false belief that the patient is infested with extracorporeal agents. It is known by several names, including the more commonly used term 'delusional parasitosis'. The psychiatric disease is responsible for the cutaneous pathology. About 90% of patients with DI seek help from dermatologists, and most reject psychiatric referral. Thus, effective management requires incorporation of psychiatric principles. We report three cases of DI with inanimate materials, and examine 'Morgellons' disease. We believe that patients with unusual presentations of DI are likely to be seen more commonly in the future. These patients appear to be a subgroup of DI, and may be even more difficult to treat than other patients with DI. PMID:21933231

Dewan, P; Miller, J; Musters, C; Taylor, R E; Bewley, A P

2011-10-01

278

A massive infestation of sea snakes by cymothoid isopods.  

PubMed

In this study, a massive infestation of the sea snake Enhydrina schistosa by the cymothoid isopod Nerocila serra, commonly parasitizing fishes, is reported for the first time from India. This isopod was found attached on the different parts of the body of the snake. According to the month, the parasitic prevalence ranged from 30.8 to 55.3%, increasing during the monsson period. It was higher in female than in male snakes. PMID:22223034

Saravanakumar, A; Balasubramanian, T; Raja, K; Trilles, Jean-Paul

2012-01-06

279

Pneumonyssoides species infestation in two Pekingese dogs in the UK.  

PubMed

Two male, neutered, Pekingese dogs aged four years and 12 years were presented for acute-onset nasal pruritus and sneezing following a visit to a beach in northern Scotland. Routine nasal investigations revealed the presence of the canine nasal mite Pneumonyssoides both by direct visualisation and histopathologically. Resolution of clinical signs was observed following selamectin treatment. To the authors' knowledge, this report describes the first cases of Pneumonyssoides infestation in non-travelled UK dogs. PMID:18251989

Wills, S J; Arrese, M; Torrance, A; Lloyd, S; Pratschke, K; Whitbread, T; Gould, S

2008-02-01

280

Clinical diagnosis of Spirocerca lupi infestation in dogs.  

PubMed

The clinical criteria used to establish a diagnosis of Spirocerca lupi infestation in dogs are discussed, with special emphasis on the radiographic feature that may be observed. Plain radiographs show a typical grey circumscribed area posterior to the heart. Following the administration of a barium meal this area takes on a dappled appearance due to barium accumulated in the crypts of the S. lupi granuloma. The granuloma itself may be outlined by the barium. PMID:6655660

Evans, L B

1983-09-01

281

Genetic Variability of the European Corn Borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, Suggests Gene Flow Between Populations in the Midwestern United States  

PubMed Central

The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), is a widely distributed and serious economic pest to corn production in the U.S. Genetic variability of O. nubilalis was studied in 18 sub-populations in the upper Midwestern United States using amplified fragment length polymorphism. The relatively low GST values indicate that more variation exists within populations than between populations. High gene flow (Nm) values were indicated across the entire O. nubilalis population; the lowest degree of gene flow was in the northern samples (Nm = 1.96) and the highest degree of gene flow was in the southern samples (Nm = 2.77). The differences observed in the respective regions (north vs. south) may be explained by the voltinism patterns (univoltine vs. multivoltine, respectively) of O. nubilalis: southern multivoltine populations have opportunities for multiple matings for the duration of the year, further mix alleles. AMOVA results also indicated that most of the genetic variation was within sub-populations (? 81% of total variation); less variation (? 13%) was detected among populations within each of the three regions as designated for this study. However, the most striking and unexpected result was the low percentage of variation between all groups (? 6%), further supporting implications of a high degree of gene flow. These results provide support for current requirements of refugia corn planting in Bt-corn management. These results also indicate that if resistance to Bt were to evolve in O. nubilalis, quick action would be necessary to deter the rapid spread of the gene for resistance.

Krumm, Jeffrey T.; Hunt, Thomas E.; Skoda, Steven R.; Hein, Gary L.; Lee, Donald J.; Clark, Pete L.; Foster, John E.

2008-01-01

282

Health and safety evaluation of a modified tunnel-borer design for application to single-entry coal-mine development  

SciTech Connect

The health and safety analysis is part of an overall effort to identify and develop innovative underground coal extraction systems. The single-entry tunnel borer system was initially considered an innovative approach to underground mining because it exhibited a means of increasing the speed and efficiency of entry development by reducing the number of entries. However, to be considered a truly advanced system, the tunnel borer had to meet distinct safety criteria as well. The objective was to examine the tunnel borer design and determine whether it offset major health hazards, and satisfied the prescribed safety levels. As a baseline for comparison, the tunnel borer was compared against the continuous mining entry driving system. The results of the health analysis indicated that while the tunnel borer design offered improvements in dust control through the use of water sprays, a higher face ventilation rate, and the application of spalling rather than the conventional grinding process, it interjected an additional mutagenic is and toxic compound into the environment through the use of shotcrete. The tunnel borer system easily conformed with the prescribed fatality limit, but exceeded the required limits for disabling and overall injuries. It also exhibited projected disabling and overall injury rates considerably higher than existing continuous mining injury rates. Consequently, the tunnel borer system was not considered an advanced system.

Zimmerman, W. F.

1982-02-15

283

Determination of Binding of Bacillus thuringiensis (delta)-Endotoxin Receptors to Rice Stem Borer Midguts  

PubMed Central

Insecticidal activity and receptor binding properties of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins to yellow and striped rice stem borers (Sciropophaga incertulas and Chilo suppresalis, respectively) were investigated. Yellow stem borer (YSB) was susceptible to Cry1Aa, Cry1Ac, Cry2A, and Cry1C toxins with similar toxicities. To striped stem borer (SSB), Cry1Ac, Cry2A, and Cry1C were more toxic than Cry1Aa toxin. Binding assays were performed with (sup125)I-labeled toxins (Cry1Aa, Cry1Ac, Cry2A, and Cry1C) and brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) prepared from YSB and SSB midguts. Both Cry1Aa and Cry1Ac toxins showed saturable, high-affinity binding to YSB BBMV. Cry2A and Cry1C toxins bound to YSB BBMV with relatively low binding affinity but with high binding site concentration. To SSB, both Cry1Aa and Cry1Ac exhibited high binding affinity, although these toxins are less toxic than Cry1C and Cry2A. Cry1C and Cry2A toxins bound to SSB BBMV with relatively low binding affinity but with high binding site concentration. Heterologous competition binding assays were performed to investigate the binding site cross-reactivity. The results showed that Cry1Aa and Cry1Ac recognize the same binding site, which is different from the Cry2A or Cry1C binding site in YSB and SSB. These data suggest that development of multitoxin systems in transgenic rice with toxin combinations which recognize different binding sites may be useful in implementing deployment strategies that decrease the rate of pest adaptation to B. thuringiensis toxin-expressing rice varieties.

Lee, M. K.; Aguda, R. M.; Cohen, M. B.; Gould, F. L.; Dean, D. H.

1997-01-01

284

Influence of trap color and host volatiles on capture of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).  

PubMed

Field trapping assays were conducted in 2009 and 2010 throughout western Michigan, to evaluate lures for adult emerald ash borer, A. planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Several ash tree volatiles were tested on purple prism traps in 2009, and a dark green prism trap in 2010. In 2009, six bark oil distillate lure treatments were tested against manuka oil lures (used in 2008 by USDA APHIS PPQ emerald ash borer cooperative program). Purple traps baited with 80/20 (manuka/phoebe oil) significantly increased beetle catch compared with traps baited with manuka oil alone. In 2010 we monitored emerald ash borer attraction to dark green traps baited with six lure combinations of 80/20 (manuka/phoebe), manuka oil, and (3Z)-hexenol. Traps baited with manuka oil and (3Z)-hexenol caught significantly more male and total count insects than traps baited with manuka oil alone. Traps baited with manuka oil and (3Z)-hexenol did not catch more beetles when compared with traps baited with (3Z)-hexenol alone. When compared with unbaited green traps our results show that (3Z)-hexenol improved male catch significantly in only one of three field experiments using dark green traps. Dark green traps caught a high number of A. planipennis when unbaited while (3Z)-hexenol was seen to have a minimal (nonsignificant) trap catch effect at several different release rates. We hypothesize that the previously reported kairomonal attractancy of (3Z)-hexenol (for males) on light green traps is not as obvious here because of improved male attractancy to the darker green trap. PMID:22606813

Crook, Damon J; Khrimian, Ashot; Cossé, Allard; Fraser, Ivich; Mastro, Victor C

2012-04-01

285

Self-reported bed bug infestation among New York City residents: prevalence and risk factors.  

PubMed

Bed bug infestations have risen precipitously in urban areas. Little is known about risk factors for infestations or health outcomes resulting from these infestations. In the 2009 Community Health Survey, which is a representative population-based survey, 9,934 noninstitutionalized adults in New York City reported on bed bug infestations requiring an exterminator in the past year. The authors estimated infestation prevalence and explored predictors of infestation and associations between infestations and health outcomes using logistic regression. Seven percent of adults in New York City reported bed bug infestations. Significant individual and household risk factors were younger age, increased household poverty, and having three or more adults in the household. Environmental risk factors included living in high poverty neighborhoods and in buildings with more housing units, suggesting apartment-to-apartment transmission. Bed bug infestations were not associated with stress-related outcomes of alcohol consumption or recent depression, and, unlike cockroach infestation, were not associated with recent asthma episodes caused by allergens or contaminants. PMID:23947287

Ralph, Nancy; Jones, Heidi E; Thorpe, Lorna E

286

Antennally active macrolide from the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis emitted predominantly by females.  

PubMed

The macrocyclic lactone (3Z)-dodecen-12-olide was identified from the emissions of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, feeding on ash foliage. The compound was detected from both sexes but was ca. 10 times more abundant from females. It was readily sensed by antennae of both males and females. Identification was confirmed by synthesis. The behavioral effects of the lactone remain unstudied in A. planipennis, but a verified pheromonal function could lead to improved monitoring for this invasive pest. The lactone is part of the pheromone of Cryptolestes pusillus, an unrelated beetle species. PMID:18027429

Bartelt, Robert J; Cossé, Allard A; Zilkowski, Bruce W; Fraser, Ivich

2007-07-01

287

Population dynamics, infestation and host selection of Vexilla vexillum, an ectoparasitic muricid of echinoids, in Madagascar.  

PubMed

The symbiotic interaction, population and infestation dynamics of the muricid Vexilla vexillum (Gmelin, 1791) on 2 echinoid species, Tripneustes gratilla (Linnaeus, 1785) and Echinometra mathaei (Blainville, 1825), was investigated on the barrier reef off Toliara (Madagascar). V. vexillum is an ectoparasitic muricid which was exclusively found in association with sea urchins, on which it moves freely and browses over the integument. Host recovery from damage caused by muricid grazing was dependent on lesion size. Small lesions regenerated while larger ones were subjected to secondary infections, which led to host death. A 27 mo survey (2000 to 2003) of the muricid's population dynamics revealed annual recruitment episodes during the mid-summer season (December to January). Patterns of recruitment peaks were apparently linked to its reproductive cycle. Demographic parameters including growth and mortality rates of the muricid were estimated from analysis of size-frequency distributions. Growth was described by the von Bertalanffy function. The model predicts that V. vexillum is a fast-growing species in which asymptotic shell length (L infinity = 1.024 cm) is reached 6 to 7 mo after recruitment. The growth rate constant K, and shell length at settlement L0, were estimated from the model. Estimated mortality rate was 55% yr(-1); V. vexillum has a short lifespan. The observed high growth rate together with the high mortality rate suggest that V. vexillum is a semelparous species. A field survey of the infestation dynamics of V. vexillum was performed during 3 consecutive years, with seasonal variation in parasite prevalence on both echinoid host species. Although both T. gratilla and E. mathaei were infested, a preference towards T. gratilla was noted. This was attributed to T. gratilla's test morphology (which allows better accessibility for grazing), to the muricid's higher recognition capacity of T. gratilla (as determined by olfactory experiments) and to the high recruitment predictability of that particular host. This study provides novel information on the biology of V. vexillum, an echinoid epidermal grazer, and its relationship with 2 ecologically and economically important echinoid species. PMID:15609879

Vaïtilingon, Devarajen; Eeckhaut, Igor; Fourgon, Didier; Jangoux, Michel

2004-11-01

288

SUSCEPTIBILITY OF THE PEACHTREE BORER, SYNANTHEDON EXITIOSA, TO STEINERNEMA CARPOCAPSAE AND STEINERNEMA RIOBRAVE IN LABORATORY AND FIELD TRIALS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The peachtree borer, Synanthedon exitiosa (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae), is a serious pest of peach that attacks the trunk and roots at, and just below, soil level. At present, a trunk-applied insecticide is the only control used against this pest throughout the southeastern US. We investigated the susc...

289

EXPLORATORY SURVEY FOR THE EMERALD ASH BORER, AGRILUS PLANIPENNIS (COLEOPTERA: BUPRESTIDAE), AND ITS NATURAL ENEMIES IN CHINA  

Microsoft Academic Search

An exploratory survey for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, and its natural enemies was conducted in China during October and November 2003. We examined 29 field plots in six provinces. We visually inspected living Fraxinus chinensis, F. mandshurica, F. pennsylvanica, F. rhynchophylla, and F. velutina then peeled off the bark in search of A. planipennis and associated natural enemies.

Houping Liu; Leah S. Bauer; Ruitong Gao; Tonghai Zhao; Toby R. Petrice; Robert A. Haack

290

DEVELOPMENT OF A WEB-BASED TOOL FOR PROJECTING COSTS OF MANAGING EMERALD ASH BORER IN MUNICIPAL FORESTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

City managers faced with the invasion of emerald ash borer into their urban forests need to plan for the invasion in order to obtain the resources they need to protect the public from harm caused by dying ash trees. Currently, city foresters can avoid harm from falling trees by removing, replacing, or treating them with insecticides. Costs for these activities

Clifford S. Sadof

2009-01-01

291

Interactive Influence of Leaf Age, Light Intensity, and Girdling on Green Ash Foliar Chemistry and Emerald Ash Borer Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biotic and abiotic environmental factors affect plant nutritional quality and defensive compounds that confer plant resistance\\u000a to herbivory. Influence of leaf age, light availability, and girdling on foliar nutrition and defense of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh) was examined in this study. Longevity of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), adults reared on green ash foliage subjected

Yigen Chen; Therese M. Poland

2009-01-01

292

douBlE-dECKERs And ToWERs: EmERAld Ash BoRER TRAPs in 2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effective and efficient methods to detect and monitor emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus plani- pennis Fairmaire, have been a high priority for scientists since this invasive pest was identified in 2002. In 2006, our objectives included development of a practical trap design suitable for operational programs and evaluation of lures. In 2007, we continued this work and assessed additional trap

Andrea C. Anulewicz

293

Microbial control of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) with Beauveria bassiana strain GHA: Greenhouse and field trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2003–2004, the lethal and sublethal effects of Beauveria bassiana strain GHA on emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) adults and larvae were evaluated using topical spray and fungal band treatments in the greenhouse and field. B. bassiana strain GHA was moderately effective against A. planipennis adults in greenhouse studies. However, efficacy was improved in the field when B.

Houping Liu; Leah S. Bauer

2008-01-01

294

Landing surface color preferences of Spathius agrili (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a parasitoid of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The color preferences for landing surfaces were examined for Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a parasitic wasp introduced for biocontrol of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Lures with the 3-component pheromone blend of male S. agrili were use...

295

Host-seeking behavior and parasitism by Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a parasitoid of the emerald ash borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a newly described and important idiobiont ectoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer (EAB) that has excellent potential as a biological control agent against EAB populations in the USA. In order to understand the ecological factors involved in the search and discovery of concealed hosts by S. agrili, we investigated the behavioral responses of adult

Xiao-Yi Wang; Zhong-Qi Yang; Juli R. Gould; Hui Wu; Jian-Hai Ma

2010-01-01

296

Developing rearing methods for Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a larval endoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Tetrastichus planipennisi Yong, a gregarious koinobiont endoparasitoid, is one of three hymenopteran parasitoids being released in the U.S. for biological control of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmair, EAB), an invasive beetle from Asia causing mortality of the ash trees (Fraxinus s...

297

Population responses of hymenopteran parasitoids to the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in recently invaded areas in Michigan  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Populations of hymenopteran parasitoids associated with immature stages of the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB) Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) were surveyed in 2009 and 2010 in the recently invaded areas in Michigan, where the two introduced EAB larval parasitoids, Tetrastic...

298

Effects of Chipping, Grinding, and Heat on Survival of Emerald Ash Borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in Chips  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a phloem-feeding insect from Asia, was identiÞed in 2002 as the cause of widespread ash (Fraxinus sp.) mortality in southeastern Michigan and Essex County, Ontario. Most larvae overwinter as nonfeeding prepupae in the outer sapwood or thick bark of large trees. In a series of studies, we evaluated effects of grinding,

Deborah G. Mccullough; Therese M. Poland; David Cappaert; Erin L. Clark; Ivich Fraser; Victor Mastro; Sarah Smith; Christopher Pell

2007-01-01

299

Biology and life history of Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a larval endoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera:Eulophidae) is a gregarious larval endoparasitoid from China that is being released in North America in an effort to control the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), an exotic beetle responsible for widespread ash mortality. The developmental tim...

300

Nontarget effects on aquatic decomposer organisms of imidacloprid as a systemic insecticide to control emerald ash borer in riparian trees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Imidacloprid is effective against emerald ash borer when applied as a systemic insecticide. Following stem or soil injections to trees in riparian areas, imidacloprid residues could be indirectly introduced to aquatic systems via leaf fall or leaching. Either route of exposure may affect non-target, aquatic decomposer organisms. Leaves from ash trees treated with imidacloprid at two field rates and an

David Kreutzweiser; Kevin Good; Derek Chartrand; Taylor Scarr; Dean Thompson

2007-01-01

301

Relationships between the emergence and oviposition of ectoparasitoid Spathius agrili Yang and its host emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), (= A. marcopoli Obenberger), is an important bark beetle attacking ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). It is very difficult to detect and control because of its highly concealed life history. This pest mainly distributed\\u000a in partial Asian countries (China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia) and Far East Russia, while in China it presented in

Xiaoyi Wang; Zhongqi Yang; Guijun Liu; Enshan Liu

2007-01-01

302

African marigold as a trap crop for the management of the fruit borer Helicoverpa armigera on tomato  

Microsoft Academic Search

The possibility of using okra, field bean, pigeon pea, sunflower, maize and marigold as trap crops for the management of the fruit borer Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner) on tomato was evaluated. Initial experiments involved observational row trials with simultaneous planting\\/seeding of both tomato and trap crops in exploded blocks. One row of these crops was raised on either side and parallel

K. Srinivasan; P. N. Krishna Moorthy; T. N. Raviprasad

1994-01-01

303

Impact of Cotesia flavipes (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) as an augmentative biocontrol agent for sugarcane borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) on rice  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In an effort to find an appropriate biological control agent for release in rice, a 2-year field cage experiment was conducted in Beaumont, Texas to estimate parasitism of sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F.), by Cotesia flavipes (Cameron). The effective search rate was 0.0049 square meter gro...

304

THE EFFECT OF DIAZINON ON SOME BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CHILO SUPPRESSALIS WALKER (LEPIDOPTERA: PYRALIDAE), RICE STRIPED STEM BORER  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rice striped stem borer is a cosmopolitan pest that widely distributed in different regions of northen Iran and spraying with diazinon is the most common procedure to control this pest. We evaluated comparative physiological effects of diazinon spraying on the three populations of Chilo suppresalis collected from Gourabzarmikh (Go), Sheikhmahale (Sh) and Rasht (Ra) in Iran. The determination of physiological

Arash Zibaee; Jalal Jalali Sendi; Kayvan Etebari; Faramarz Alinia; Mohammad Ghadamyari

305

Occurrence of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and biotic factors affecting its immature stages in far eastern Russia  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Field surveys were conducted from 2008 to 2011 in southern Khabarovskiy Kray (Khabarovsk area) and Primorskiy Kray (Vladivostok area) to investigate the occurrence of the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, and mortality factors affecting its immature stages. Survey findings ind...

306

Ionizing radiation as a phytosanitary treatment against European corn borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) in ambient, low oxygen, and cold conditions  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hubner), (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), is a quarantine pest for several fresh commodities, including corn-on-the-cob, bell peppers, and green beans. Methyl bromide fumigation is the usual phytosanitary treatment, but the chemical is under increasing regulat...

307

Quantitative Trait Loci for First and Second-Generation European Corn Borer Resistance Derived from the Maize Inbred Mo47  

Microsoft Academic Search

fied QTLs for resistance to 1ECB and 2ECB. Schone t al. (1991) identified four QTLs for resistance to 1ECB European corn borer (ECB), Ostrinia nubilalis (Hubner), family on chromosomes 1, 4, 6, and 9 in F3 families from the Crambidae, order Lepidoptera, is a serious insect pest of maize (Zea mays L.) in the USA. Understanding the genetic basis for

Chaba Jampatong; Michael D. McMullen; B. Dean Barry; Larry L. Darrah; Patrick F. Byrne; Heike Kross

2002-01-01

308

Genetic Mapping and Analysis of Quantitative Trait Loci for Resistance to Stalk Tunneling by the European Corn Borer in Maize  

Microsoft Academic Search

al., 1997). Some of these difficulties could be addressed and resolved through genetic analysis facilitated by mo- The European corn borer (ECB), Ostrinia nubilalis (Hubner), is lecular genetic maps (Paterson et al., 1991). Information an important pest of temperate maize (Zea mays L.). Damage to the stalk could be minimized by breeding for resistant genotypes but from such analysis could

Andrea J. Cardinal; Michael Lee; Natalya Sharopova; Wendy L. Woodman-Clikeman; Mary J. Long

2001-01-01

309

Genetic Variability of the European Corn Borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, Suggests Gene Flow Between Populations in the Midwestern United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), is a widely distributed and serious economic pest to corn production in the U.S. Genetic variability of O. nubilalis was studied in 18 sub-populations in the upper Midwestern United States using amplified fragment length polymorphism. The relatively low GST values indicate that more variation exists within populations than between populations. High

Jeffrey T. Krumm; Thomas E. Hunt; Steven R. Skoda; Gary L. Hein; Donald J. Lee; Pete L. Clark; John E. Foster

2008-01-01

310

DISPERSAL OF NEWLY-ECLOSED EUROPEAN CORN BORER ADULTS (LEPIDOPTERA: CRAMBIDAE) FROM CORN INTO SMALL-GRAIN AGGREGATION PLOTS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Genetically-modified, insecticidal corn hybrids [Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) corn] are used throughout the U.S. Corn Belt for European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hubner), control. To slow development of Bt-corn resistance, the EPA requires provision of nearby refugia. The appropriate distance...

311

Biological Deterioration of Woods in Tropical Environments. Part 3. Chemical Wood Treatments for Long-Term Marine-Borer Protection.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Six chemical wood preservatives were selected for evaluation over long periods of exposure in extremely borer-active marine environments. Southern Yellow Pine and Douglas Fir were full-cell pressure-treated with these chemicals and exposed in tropical sea...

C. R. Southwell J. D. Bultman

1970-01-01

312

Optimization of pheromone dispenser density for managing the rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker), by mating disruption  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) is one of the most important rice pests worldwide. Rice is frequently grown in an intensive production system in areas adjacent to environmentally sensitive areas. Therefore, the use of insecticides is problematic and new techniques, including mating disruption, are being introduced. Due to the high cost of pheromones, it is

C. Alfaro; V. Navarro-Llopis; J. Primo

2009-01-01

313

Lipase and invertase activities in midgut and salivary glands of Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae), rice striped stem borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rice striped stem borer, Chilo supprressalis, was introduced to Iran in 1973 where it is now widely distributed and causes severe damages. Lipases, which catalyses the hydrolysis of fatty acid ester bonds, are widely distributed among animals, plants and microorganisms. Invertases (?- fructofuranosidase) are glycosidehydrolases that catalyze the cleavage of sucrose (?-D- glucopyranosyl-S-D-fructofuranoside) into the monosaccharides glucose and fructose.

S Ramzi

2008-01-01

314

Interactions between the striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis (Walk.) (Lep., Pyralidae) larvae and rice plants in response to nitrogen fertilization  

Microsoft Academic Search

A screenhouse experiment was conducted to examine the damage and compensation in rice plants when injured by the striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker), larvae at tillering stage, as well as larval survival and development of the insect at different nitrogen (N) fertilization levels. Potted plants were fertilized at late seedling stage at the rates 0, 200, 400, 600 and

M. X. Jiang; J. A. Cheng

2003-01-01

315

A study on biochemical differences among five different groups of rice striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identification of biodiversity in different rice striped stem borer (Chilo supprressalis) populations is very important to adopt suitable integrated pest management procedures. Larvae were collected from five different regions in north of Iran including Gourabzarmikh (Go), Sheikhmahaleh (Sh), Rasht (Ra), Amol (Am) and Babol (Ba). Activity levels of five enzymes including alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase and

F Alinia; K Etebari

316

Thermal Tolerance of the Coffee Berry Borer Hypothenemus hampei: Predictions of Climate Change Impact on a Tropical Insect Pest  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coffee is predicted to be severely affected by climate change. We determined the thermal tolerance of the coffee berry borer , Hypothenemus hampei, the most devastating pest of coffee worldwide, and make inferences on the possible effects of climate change using climatic data from Colombia, Kenya, Tanzania, and Ethiopia. For this, the effect of eight temperature regimes (15, 20, 23,

Juliana Jaramillo; Adenirin Chabi-Olaye; Charles Kamonjo; Alvaro Jaramillo; Fernando E. Vega; Hans-Michael Poehling; Christian Borgemeister

2009-01-01

317

Transcript analysis and comparative evaluation of shaker and slowmo gene homologues from the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The movement and dispersal of larval Lepidoptera are factors that govern their survival and distribution within the natural landscape. Homologs of the Drosophila behavior-linked genes slowmo and shaker involved in larval locomotion were identified from the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (L...

318

LARVAL DISTRIBUTION AND SURVIVAL OF SECOND GENERATION EUROPEAN CORN BORER, OSTRINIA NUBILALIS (HUBNER) (LEPIDOPTERA: CRAMBIDAE) ON EVENT 176 BT CORN  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) larvae that have completed development on Event 176 Bt corn hybids have either survived exposure to sublethal doses of Cry1Ab Bt toxin or exploited plant tissues that do not express the toxin. To evaluate the impact of such exposure on larval establishment an...

319

Insect gladiators II: Competitive interactions within and between bethylid parasitoid species of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) causes substantial reductions in coffee production. It originates from Africa but is now present in almost all of the major coffee producing countries. Classical biological control attempts around the world, including South and Central America, the Caribbean, Indian sub-continent, Indonesia, and Polynesia, including introductions of the African bethylid wasps Prorops nasuta

Tim P. Batchelor; Ian C. W. Hardy; Juan F. Barrera; Gabriela Pérez-Lachaud

2005-01-01

320

Insect gladiators: competitive interactions between three species of bethylid wasps attacking the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), originates from Africa and has since invaded all major coffee growing areas in the world. The parasitoid species, Cephalonomia stephanoderis Betrem and Prorops nasuta Waterston (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae) have been introduced into many countries as biological control agents. Recently, a further bethylid, Cephalonomia hyalinipennis Ashmead, was found naturally attacking the coffee berry

Gabriela Pérez-Lachaud; Ian C. W Hardy; Jean-Paul Lachaud

2002-01-01

321

Response of the shot-hole borer of tea, Xyleborus fornicatus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) to conspecifics and plant semiochemicals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The responses of the tea shot-hole borer beetle, Xyleborus fornicatus, to conspecific and host plant odours were tested in an olfactometer. Males showed greater attraction to unmated females than to mated females and mated females showed a negative density dependent response with extremely significant repulsion shown when 10 mated females were present. Plants of the susceptible tea cultivar TRI2025 were

W. Subodhi Karunaratne; Vijaya Kumar; Jan Pettersson; N. Savitri Kumar

2008-01-01

322

Application of indoxacarb for managing shoot and fruit borer of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) and its decontamination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Indoxacarb was applied at 75 and 150 g a.i. ha for two years to an eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) crop grown in the field plots in order to evaluate its efficacy for management of the lepidopteron pest, shoot and fruit borer. The residues of the insecticide were quantified by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The mean initial deposits of indoxacarb on

Jayakrishnan Saimandir; Madhuban Gopal

2009-01-01

323

The role of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) larval vibrations in host-quality assessment by Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

1. The biological control agent, Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang, is a gregarious larval endoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer (EAB), an invasive phloem-feeding species responsible for recent, widespread mortality of ash (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. 2. Tetrastichus planipennisi is known to pre...

324

Development of life tables to assess the establishment and population impact of parasitoids for control of the emerald ash borers  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Life tables may be used as a quantitative tool to assess the establishment and impact of introduced natural enemies. One of the critical challenges in constructing life tables for concealed insects such as emerald ash borer is to establish cohorts of the pest. The present study investigates and co...

325

Role of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) larval vibrations in host-quality assessment by Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

1. The biological control agent, Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang, is a gregarious larval endoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer (EAB), an invasive phloem-feeding species responsible for recent, widespread mortality of ash (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. 2. Tetrastichus planipennisi is known to pre...

326

Identification and antennal electrophysiology of ash bark volatiles for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Biologically active bark volatiles from ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) might be used as tools in monitoring the presence of the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis. Two compounds have been identified from the volatile emissions from white ash bark. These two compounds were readily sen...

327

Aphanogmus sp. (Hymenoptera: Ceraphronidae): a hyperparasitoid of the coffee berry borer parasitoid Prorops nasuta (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae) in Kenya  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This is the first report of a hyperparasitod of the primary parasitoid of the coffee berry borer Prorops nasuta Waterston (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae). Aphanogmus sp is a gregarious ectoparasitoid of larval and pupal stages of P. nasuta, which was found in coffee berry samples collected on the ground o...

328

The spatial genetic differentiation of the legume pod borer, Maruca vitrata F. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) populations in West Africa  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The legume pod borer, Maruca vitrata, is an endemic insect pest that causes significant yield loss to the cowpea crop in West Africa, and contributes to food shortages and malnutrition in native human populations. The genetic structure of Maruca vitrata was investigated among five sites from Burkin...

329

Reduced Fusarium Ear Rot and Symptomless Infection in Kernels of Maize Genetically Engineered for European Corn Borer Resistance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Munkvold, G. P., Hellmich, R. L., and Showers, W. B. 1997. Reduced Fusarium ear rot and symptomless infection in kernels of maize geneti- cally engineered for European corn borer resistance. Phytopathology 87: 1071-1077. Field experiments were conducted in 1994, 1995, and 1996 to evaluate the incidence and severity of Fusarium ear rot and the incidence of symp- tomless Fusarium infection

G. P. Munkvold; R. L. Hellmich; W. B. Showers

1997-01-01

330

Applications and mechanisms of wax-based semiochemical dispenser technology for disruption of grape root borer mating  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Grape root borer, Vitacea polistiformis Harris, is an important pest of cultivated grapes in the Eastern United States from North Carolina to Florida. There are few effective registered insecticides for effective control of this pest and their efficacy is limited. Pheromone-based mating disruption i...

331

Combination treatments with diatomaceous earth and methoprene to control Rhyzopertha dominica, the lesser grain borer, in stored rough rice  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica, is a major insect pest of stored grains, including rough rice. Diatomaceous earth (DE) is a natural inert dust that can be used to control stored-grain beetles, however, R. dominica is more tolerant to DE compared to other beetle species. Mortality of ad...

332

Combination treatments with diatomaceous earth and methoprene to control the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica, in stored rough rice  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica, is a major insect pest of stored grains, including rough rice. Diatomaceous earth (DE) is a natural inert dust that can be used to control stored-grain beetles, however, R. dominica is more tolerant to DE compared to other beetle species. Mortality of ad...

333

Cloning and expression of an endo-1,4-?-xylanase from the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei  

PubMed Central

Background The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, reproduces and feeds exclusively on the mature endosperm of the coffee seed, which has a cell wall composed mainly of a heterogeneous mixture of hemicellulose polysaccharides, including arabinoxylans. Xylanases are digestive enzymes responsible for the degradation of xylan based polymers, hydrolyzing them into smaller molecules that are easier to assimilate by insects. We report the cloning, expression and enzymatic characterization of a xylanase gene that was identified in the digestive tract of the coffee berry borer. Methods The complete DNA sequence encoding a H. hampei xylanase (HhXyl) was obtained using a genome walking technique in a cDNA library derived from the borer digestive tract. The XIP-I gene was amplified from wheat (Triticum aestivum variety Soisson). A Pichia pastoris expression system was used to express the recombinant form of these enzymes. The xylanase activity and XIP-I inhibitory activity was quantified by the 3,5-dinitrosalicylic (DNS). The biological effects of XIP-I on borer individuals were evaluated by providing an artificial diet enriched with the recombinant XIP-I protein to the insects. Results The borer xylanase sequence contains a 951 bp open reading frame that is predicted to encode a 317-amino acid protein, with an estimated molecular weight of 34.92 kDa and a pI of 4.84. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that HhXyl exhibits high sequence homology with endo-?-D-xylanases of Streptomyces bingchenggensis from glycosyl hydrolase 10 (GH10). The recombinant xylanase showed maximal activity at pH 5.5 and 37°C. XIP-I expressed as a recombinant protein inhibited HhXyl activity in vitro and caused individual H. hampei mortality in bioassays when included as a supplement in artificial diets. Conclusion A xylanase from the digestive tract of the coffee berry borer was identified and functionally characterized. A xylanase inhibitor protein, XIP-I, from wheat was shown to be a potent inhibitor of this xylanase, suggesting that its deployment has potential as a strategy to control coffee berry borer colonization of coffee plants.

2012-01-01

334

Effect of seaweed concentrate from Ecklonia maxima (Osbeck) Papenfuss on Meloidogyne incognita infestation on tomato  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seaweed concentrate (SWC), prepared fromEcklonia maxima, when applied as a soil drench to tomato seedlings, significantly increased plant growth and reduced infestation byMeloidogyne incognita. Foliar applied SWC had little effect on plant growth and increased nematode galling. Ashing SWC reduced the suppressive effect on nematode infestation. In anin vitro experiment, SWC lessened infestation of root-knot nematodes on excised roots of

I. J. Crouch; J. Van Staden

1993-01-01

335

Differential efficacy of mebendazole and albendazole against Necator americanus but not for Trichuris trichiura infestations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The effect of single oral doses of albendazole 600 mg and mebendazole 1 g given to 56 and 60 men, respectively, withT. trichiura and\\/orN. americanus infestation has been studied. Both albendazole and mebendazole cured more than 90% ofT. trichiura infestations, but only albendazole (95%) and not mebendazole (21%) had a high cure rate forN. americanus infestations.\\u000a \\u000a Thus, albendazole is the

B. R. Holzer; F. J. Frey

1987-01-01

336

Semiochemicals used in host location by the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei.  

PubMed

The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei is a serious pest in many coffee growing countries. Electrophysiological and behavioral responses of H. hampei to volatiles of different phenological stages of coffee, Coffea arabica, fruits were studied in order to identify volatile semiochemicals used in host location. Volatiles were collected from different phenological stages of C. arabica fruit by air entrainment. Electrophysiological recordings were made from insect antennae. Behavioral assays were carried out using a Perspex four-arm olfactometer. Insects spent significantly more time in the region of the olfactometer where ripe and dry fruit volatiles were present compared to control regions. Coupled gas chromatography--electroantennography revealed the presence of six electrophysiologically active compounds in C. arabica volatiles. These were identified by using GC and GC-MS as methylcyclohexane, ethylbenzene, nonane, 1-octen-3-ol, (R)-limonene, and (R)-3-ethyl-4-methylpentanol. In the olfactometer bioassay, H. hampei showed a significant response to 3-ethyl-4-methylpentanol, methylcyclohexane, nonane, ethylbenzene, and a synthetic blend of these four compounds. Attraction to the synthetic blend was comparable to that for the natural sample. The significance of the study is discussed in terms of semiochemical based pest management methods of the coffee berry borer. PMID:19714284

Mendesil, Esayas; Bruce, Toby J A; Woodcock, Christine M; Caulfield, John C; Seyoum, Emiru; Pickett, John A

2009-08-01

337

The Biology and Ecology of the Emerald Ash Borer, Agrilus planipennis, in China  

PubMed Central

The biology, ecology, and life cycle of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), were studied using regular inspection in the forest and observations in the laboratory. Results indicated that A. planipennis are mostly univoltine in Tianjin, China. They overwintered individually as mature larvae in shallow chambers excavated in the outer sapwood. In late July, some full-grown larvae began to build overwintering chambers, and all larvae entered the sapwood for dormancy by early November. A. planipennis pupated in the overwintering chamber from early April to mid May the following year, and the average pupal duration was about 20 days. In late April, some newly eclosed adults could be found in the pupal cells, but they had not yet emerged from the tree. Adults began to emerge in early May, with peak flight occurring in mid May. The average longevity of adults was about 21 days and the adult stage lasted through early July. The adults fed on ash foliage as a source of nutrition. Mating was usually conducted and completed on the leaf or trunk surfaces of ash trees. Oviposition began in mid May and eggs hatched on average in 15.7 days. The first instar larvae appeared in early June. The larval stage lasted about 300 days to complete an entire generation. The emerald ash borer had four larval instars on velvet ash, Fraxinus velutina (Scrophulariales: Oleaceae). The major natural control factors of A. planipennis were also investigated, and preliminary suggestions for its integrated management are proposed.

Wang, Xiao-Yi; Yang, Zhong-Qi; Gould, Juli R.; Zhang, Yi-Nan; Liu, Gui-Jun; Liu, EnShan

2010-01-01

338

The biology and ecology of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, in China.  

PubMed

The biology, ecology, and life cycle of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), were studied using regular inspection in the forest and observations in the laboratory. Results indicated that A. planipennis are mostly univoltine in Tianjin, China. They overwintered individually as mature larvae in shallow chambers excavated in the outer sapwood. In late July, some full-grown larvae began to build overwintering chambers, and all larvae entered the sapwood for dormancy by early November. A. planipennis pupated in the overwintering chamber from early April to mid May the following year, and the average pupal duration was about 20 days. In late April, some newly eclosed adults could be found in the pupal cells, but they had not yet emerged from the tree. Adults began to emerge in early May, with peak flight occurring in mid May. The average longevity of adults was about 21 days and the adult stage lasted through early July. The adults fed on ash foliage as a source of nutrition. Mating was usually conducted and completed on the leaf or trunk surfaces of ash trees. Oviposition began in mid May and eggs hatched on average in 15.7 days. The first instar larvae appeared in early June. The larval stage lasted about 300 days to complete an entire generation. The emerald ash borer had four larval instars on velvet ash, Fraxinus velutina (Scrophulariales: Oleaceae). The major natural control factors of A. planipennis were also investigated, and preliminary suggestions for its integrated management are proposed. PMID:20879922

Wang, Xiao-Yi; Yang, Zhong-Qi; Gould, Juli R; Zhang, Yi-Nan; Liu, Gui-Jun; Liu, En-shan

2010-01-01

339

Cloning and characterization of serpin-like genes from the striped rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis.  

PubMed

Serpins, also called serine proteinase inhibitors, are widely distributed in eukaryotes. In insects, serpins play important roles in regulating immune responses, gut physiology, and other processes. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of 12 serpin-like cDNAs from the striped rice stem borer (Chilo suppressalis), a major rice pest. The putative proteins share significant sequence similarity with known insect serpins, especially those from lepidopterons. Analysis of functional domains revealed that nine of the cloned serpins are putative trypsin- or chymotrypsin-like inhibitors; two are mixed-type serpins that may act as inhibitors for trypsins, elastases, or thrombin; and the remaining one is truncate. The potential functions of these serpins in interacting with host plants were also investigated by analyzing tissue-specific expression and the impact of different host plant genotypes on gene expression. Our results provide a foundation for future studies on the role of serpins in gut physiology in the striped rice stem borer, and also useful information for comparative analyses of serpins from different insect species. PMID:23957676

Ge, Zhao-Yu; Wan, Pin-Jun; Cheng, Xiong-Feng; Zhang, Yang; Li, Guo-Qing; Han, Zhao-Jun

2013-07-16

340

Understanding successful resistance management: the European corn borer and Bt corn in the United States.  

PubMed

The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis Hübner (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) has been a major pest of corn and other crops in North America since its accidental introduction nearly a hundred years ago. Wide adoption of transgenic corn hybrids that express toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis, referred to as Bt corn, has suppressed corn borer populations and reduced the pest status of this insect in parts of the Corn Belt. Continued suppression of this pest, however, will depend on managing potential resistance to Bt corn, currently through the high-dose refuge (HDR) strategy. In this review, we describe what has been learned with regard to O. nubilalis resistance to Bt toxins either through laboratory selection experiments or isolation of resistance from field populations. We also describe the essential components of the HDR strategy as they relate to O. nubilalis biology and ecology. Additionally, recent developments in insect resistance management (IRM) specific to O. nubilalis that may affect the continued sustainability of this technology are considered. PMID:22688691

Siegfried, Blair D; Hellmich, Richard L

2012-07-01

341

Unilateral cacosmia: a presentation of maxillary fungal infestation.  

PubMed

We present a case of long-standing unilateral cacosmia in a healthy 67-year-old man due to maxillary fungal infestation. Treatment with septoplasty had been attempted 10 years prior but no further investigation or management undertaken and symptoms continued. Subsequent MRI scan revealed significant opacification of the left maxillary sinus. This was readily amenable to treatment by balloon sinuplasty. This yielded viscous grey mucus which grew Scedosporium apiospermum. The case highlights the need for careful investigation of olfactory symptoms, including blood tests to exclude systemic causes, endoscopy and imaging where indicated. PMID:23563684

Erskine, Sally E; Schelenz, Silke; Philpott, Carl M

2013-04-05

342

Leech infestation: the unusual cause of upper airway obstruction.  

PubMed

This paper presents a case of a 7 year-old child who presented with a 14-days history of blood stained saliva and shortness of breath of 3 days with signs of upper airway obstruction. Laryngoscopy revealed a blackish living foreign body in the proximal trachea. Under general anesthesia the leech was removed by applying forceps. I conclude that a high index of suspicion of leech infestation is required when faced with a child presenting with unexplained bleeding per mouth and signs of upper airway obstruction. PMID:23559840

Mekonnen, Demeke

2013-03-01

343

Phthriasis palpebrarum can resemble tick larva infestation in an eyelid.  

PubMed

The similarities of the larval and nymph stages of the tick and louse (Pthirus pubis) may lead to misdiagnosis in rare cases of infestation of the eyelashes. The most frequent manifestations of tick in the eye are conjunctivitis, uveitis, keratitis, and vasculitis. Tick inoculation of the skin can locally lead to formation of granuloma and abscess. More concerning is the potential systemic sequelae that can result from transmission of zoonoses such as Lyme disease. P. pubis can cause pruritic eyelid margins or unusual blepharoconjunctivitis. We present a case of phthiriasis palpebrarum in a 4-year-old boy. PMID:23993722

Da?delen, Serkan; Aykan, Umit; Cetinkaya, Kubilay

2013-08-01

344

Dispersal by Larvae of the Stem Borers Scirpophaga incertulas (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) in Plots of Transplanted Rice  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied larval dispersal behavior of two rice stem borers, Scirpophaga incertulas (Walker) and Chilo suppressalis (Walker), to evaluate the potential of seed mixtures for resistance management in B. thuringiensis (Bt) rice. Both species showed extensive movement among plants (or \\

Michael B. Cohen; Angelita M. Romena; Fred Gould

2000-01-01

345

Laboratory studies of biology and life history of Balcha indica (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae), an ectoparasitoid attacking the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in North America  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Classical biological control efforts against emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (EAB) in North America primarily have focused on introduction and releases of exotic parasitoid species collected from northern parts of China. Recently, field surveys in Michigan, Pennsylvania, Ohio and ...

346

Biology and life history of Balcha indica (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae), an ectoparasitoid attacking the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in North America  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Balcha indica (Hymenoptera:Eupelmidae) is a solitary ectoparasitoid attacking larvae, prepupae, and pupae of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire). Its fecundity, oviposition rate, longevity and development time were determined in the laboratory. Lifetime fecundity averaged 36 eggs...

347

An annoted list of the parasites of graminaceous stem borers in East Africa, with a discussion of their potential in biological control  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is based on a survey of the parasites of the lepidopterous stem borers of graminaceous crops throughout East Africa\\u000a and on laboratory studies of the more abundant species. In the survey emphasis was placed on the borers of maize and sorghum,\\u000a but samples of other cultivated Graminae and wild grasses were also taken.\\u000a \\u000a Notes on the distribution and

A. I. Mohyuddin; D. J. Greathead

1970-01-01

348

Mapping and characterization of quantitative trait loci affecting resistance against second-generation European corn borer in maize with the aid of RFLPs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis Hübner) is an important pest in the global production of maize (Zea mays L.). In this study, we mapped and characterized quantitative trait loci (QTLs) significantly affecting resistance against second-generation European corn borer (2ECB) and plant height with the aid of RFLP markers. A total of 300 F3 lines derived from cross B73 (susceptible)

Chris C Schön; Michael Lee; Albrecht E Melchinger; Wilbur D Guthrie; Wendy L Woodman

1993-01-01

349

Expression of a Bacillus thuringiensis cryIA(c) gene in transgenic peanut plants and its efficacy against lesser cornstalk borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The invasion of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) pods and seeds by aflatoxin-forming species of Aspergillus is linked to injury by the lesser cornstalk borer and frequently causes a severe reduction in crop quality. The lesser cornstalk borer is susceptible to the lepidopteran-active Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal protein. We have introduced a codon-modified Bacillus thuringiensis cryIA(c) gene into peanut using microprojectile

CHONG S INGSIT; M ICHAEL; J. A DANG; ROBERT E. LY NCH

1997-01-01

350

Abnormal gray and white matter volume in delusional infestation.  

PubMed

Little is known about the neural basis of delusional infestation (DI), the delusional belief to be infested with pathogens. Case series and the response to anti-dopaminergic medication indicate disruptions in dopaminergic neurotransmission in the striatum (caudate, putamen), but did not allow for population-based inference. Here, we report the first whole-brain structural neuroimaging study to investigate gray and white matter abnormalities in DI compared to controls. In this study, we used structural magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based morphometry to investigate gray and white matter volume in 16 DI patients and 16 matched healthy controls. Lower gray matter volume in DI patients compared to controls was found in left medial, lateral and right superior frontal cortices, left anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral insula, left thalamus, right striatal areas and in lateral and medial temporal cortical regions (p<0.05, cluster-corrected). Higher white matter volume in DI patients compared to controls was found in right middle cingulate, left frontal opercular and bilateral striatal regions (p<0.05, cluster-corrected). This study shows that structural changes in prefrontal, temporal, insular, cingulate and striatal brain regions are associated with DI, supporting a neurobiological model of disrupted prefrontal control over somato-sensory representations. PMID:23791615

Wolf, Robert Christian; Huber, Markus; Depping, Malte Sebastian; Thomann, Philipp Arthur; Karner, Martin; Lepping, Peter; Freudenmann, Roland W

2013-06-19

351

Scabies infestation: the effect of intervention by public health education.  

PubMed

The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of scabies in an infested village; to educate the residents on self-treatment and prevention by the use of 5% monosulfiram soap; to evaluate the short term effectiveness of this intervention by determining, 2 weeks later, the compliance to self-treatment and prevention; and to determine the prevalence rate on the second visit. In 59 households (96.7% of the village) containing 313 persons, an educational session was held and a leaflet distributed on the use and availability of the soap. Thirteen persons (4.2%) from eight households (13.6%) had scabies. After 2 weeks, 7 persons (2.2%) (2 persisting and 5 new cases) from 5 households (8.5%) were infested. Thus a cure rate of 85% was obtained though the prevalence rate showed no statistically significant difference. Among the under 15 year olds, the numbers infected decreased from 10 to 3 while among the over 15 years olds, the numbers infected increased from 3 to 4, neither reading significance at the 5% level. PMID:2249723

Reid, H F; Thorne, C D

1990-12-01

352

Scabies infestation: the effect of intervention by public health education.  

PubMed Central

The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of scabies in an infested village; to educate the residents on self-treatment and prevention by the use of 5% monosulfiram soap; to evaluate the short term effectiveness of this intervention by determining, 2 weeks later, the compliance to self-treatment and prevention; and to determine the prevalence rate on the second visit. In 59 households (96.7% of the village) containing 313 persons, an educational session was held and a leaflet distributed on the use and availability of the soap. Thirteen persons (4.2%) from eight households (13.6%) had scabies. After 2 weeks, 7 persons (2.2%) (2 persisting and 5 new cases) from 5 households (8.5%) were infested. Thus a cure rate of 85% was obtained though the prevalence rate showed no statistically significant difference. Among the under 15 year olds, the numbers infected decreased from 10 to 3 while among the over 15 years olds, the numbers infected increased from 3 to 4, neither reading significance at the 5% level.

Reid, H. F.; Thorne, C. D.

1990-01-01

353

Detection of greenbug infestation on wheat using ground-based radiometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope of methods of study. The purpose of this greenhouse study was to characterize stress in wheat caused by greenbugs using ground-based radiometry. Experiments were conducted to (a) identify spectral bands and vegetation indices sensitive to greenbug infestation; (b) differentiate stress caused due to greenbugs from water stress; (c) examine the impacts of plant growth stage on detection of greenbug infestation; and (d) compare infestations due to greenbug and Russian wheat aphid. Wheat (variety-TAM 107) was planted (seed spacing 1 in. x 3 in.) in plastic flats with dimension 24 in. x 16 in. x 8.75 in. Fifteen days after sowing, wheat seedlings were infested with greenbugs (biotype-E). Nadir measurement of canopy reflectance started the day after infestation and lasted until most infested plants were dead. Using a 16-band Cropscan radiometer, spectral reflectance data were collected daily (between 13:00--14:00 hours) and 128 vegetation indices were derived in addition to greenbug counts per tiller. Using SAS PROC MIXED, sensitivity of band and vegetation indices was identified based on Threshold Day. Subsequent to Threshold Day there was a consistent significant spectral difference between control and infested plants. Sensitivity of band and vegetation indices was further examined using correlation and relative sensitivity analyses. Findings and conclusions. Results show that it is possible to detect greenbug-induced stress on wheat using hand-held radiometers, such as Cropscan. Band 694 nm and the ratio-based vegetation index (RVI) derived from the band 694 nm and 800 nm were identified as most sensitive to greenbug infestation. Landsat TM bands and their derived vegetation indices also show potential for detecting wheat stress caused by greenbug infestation. Also, RVIs particularly derived using spectral band 694 nm and 800 nm were found useful in differentiating greenbug infestation from water stress. Furthermore, vegetation indices such as Normalized total Pigment to Chlorophyll Index (NPCI) could be used to distinguish greenbug infestation and infestation caused by Russian wheat aphid. Finally, stress was detected in a shorter time interval when wheat plants were infested with greenbugs at two-leaf stage than wheat plants infested at tillering stage. This study demonstrated the utility of adopting remote sensing techniques for detecting greenbug infestation on wheat. Further field-based studies are suggested to apply the technology that has great potential for integrated pest management.

Yang, Zhiming

354

TETRASTICHUS PLANIPENNISIS (HYMENOPTERA: EULOPHIDAE), A GREGARIOUS LARVAL ENDOPARASITOID OF EMERALD ASH BORER FROM CHINA  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT Agrilus planipennisFairmaire, a buprestid native to Asia, was identifi ed in 2002 as the causal agent of ash (Fraxinus spp.) decline and mortality in Michigan and Ontario. Since then, infestations have been found in Ohio, Indiana, Maryland, Virginia, and Illinois. E fforts to contain and eradicate this pest in North America are proving,diffi cult due to the size of

Houping Liu; Leah S. Bauer

2006-01-01

355

Seasonal and spatial distribution of ixodid tick species feeding on naturally infested dogs from Eastern Austria and the influence of acaricides/repellents on these parameters  

PubMed Central

Background Effective control of tick infestation and pathogen transmission requires profound knowledge of tick biology in view of their vector function. The particular time of the year when the different tick species start to quest and the favoured sites on the canine host are of major interest. The efficacy of acaricides/repellents to control ticks in the field requires observation. Methods To address these issues, 90 dogs, grouped in “untreated”, “acaricide/repellent” (permethrin) and “acaricide only” (fipronil) animals and subjected to tick infestation under natural conditions in Burgenland (Eastern Austria), were examined. The number and species of ticks occurring during and outside the protection time was evaluated during a period of 11?months and the biting location on the dogs’ skin was recorded. Results Of the 700 ticks collected, the most common species in that particular walking area was Ixodes ricinus, followed by Dermacentor reticulatus and Haemaphysalis concinna. Regarding the on-host activity, D. reticulatus displayed more infestations in early spring and late autumn, whereas I. ricinus occurred almost one month later in spring and one month earlier in autumn. H. concinna followed a monophasic pattern of activity with a peak in summer. The preferred feeding sites of the ticks on the dogs were on the head, neck, shoulder and chest. This distribution over the dog’s body was not influenced by the use of the drugs, although on the whole fewer ticks (22.5% of all ticks) were found during the protection time. Interestingly, differences occurred with the use of drugs compared to non-protected dogs with regard to the infestation over the year. Acaricide-treated dogs displayed a higher prevalence in April, May and September, whereas dogs of the acaricide/repellent group showed a higher infestation in March, July, October and November. Conclusion The different tick species display different on-dog activity peaks over the year, during which particular canine diseases can be expected and predicted, considering the specific incubation times for each pathogen. The tick species occurring in this study do not seem to choose particular sites on the dogs. Their arrival place seems to represent the attachment and consequently the feeding sites. The use of acaricides leads to a significantly (p<0.01) lower number of infesting ticks but no change of the distribution pattern on the dogs was observed.

2013-01-01

356

Detection and characterization of kodamaea ohmeri associated with Small Hive Beetle Aethina tumida infesting honeybee hives  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Honeybee hive infestation by the Small Hive Beetle (SHB) is associated with fermentation of hive materials. Pollen, beetles, and robbing bees (ten of each) were collected from hives infested with SHB in both Florida and Kenya. Plating of homogenized bodies of beetles and bees and comb swabs result...

357

Survival of mite infested (Varroa destructor )h oney bee (Apis mellifera) colonies in a Nordic climate  

Microsoft Academic Search

An isolated honey bee population (N = 150) was established on the southern tip of Gotland, an island in the Baltic sea. After infestation with 36 to 89 Varroa destructor mites per colony, they were unmanaged and allowed to swarm. For over six years colonies were monitored for swarming, winter losses, infestation rate in the fall, and bee population size

Ingemar F; Peter R

358

End-Use Quality of Flour from Rhyzopertha dominica Infested Wheat  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cereal Chem. 74(4):481-483 The objective of this study was to evaluate how Rhyzopertha dominica infestation of stored wheat grain affects the rheological and baking prop- erties of bread made with the milled flour. Wheat samples were infested with R. dominica and stored for up to 180 days at room temperature. Every 45 days, samples of wheat were collected and evaluated

R. I. Sánchez-Mariñez; M. O. Cortez-Rocha; F. Ortega-Dorame; M. Morales-Valdes; M. I. Silveira

1997-01-01

359

Detection of internal wheat seed infestation by Rhyzopertha dominica using X-ray imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Standardization for grain grades has been established in most countries to maintain the quality of a crop until it reaches consumers. Different methods have been investigated for their potential to detect insect infestations in grain destined for domestic and export markets. The potential of detecting infestations caused by Rhyzopertha dominica in wheat kernels using a real-time soft X-ray method was

C Karunakaran; D. S Jayas; N. D. G White

2004-01-01

360

Appendiceal Enterobius Vermicularis Infestation Associated With Right-Sided Chronic Pelvic Pain  

PubMed Central

Parasitic infestation is an uncommon cause of chronic pelvic pain among women of reproductive age. A case of chronic right-sided pelvic pain associated with appendiceal Enterobius vermicularis infestation was managed with appendectomy and antiparasitic therapy resulting in a complete resolution of symptoms.

Nackley, Anna C.; Nackley, James J.; Gunasekaran, Sivaselvi

2004-01-01

361

Plants are better protected against spider-mites after exposure to volatiles from infested conspecifics  

Microsoft Academic Search

When infested by herbivorous mites, cotton seedlings produce volatile cues that elicit attraction of predatory mites. Experiments were carried out to elucidate how downwinduninfested conspecific seedlings are affected by these volatiles. It was found that the rate of oviposition of herbivorous mites was reduced on seedlings exposed to volatiles from infested seedlings. Moreover, predatory mites were attracted by exposeduninfested seedlings.

J. Bruin; M. Dicke; M. W. Sabelis

1992-01-01

362

Effects of Intensive Forest Management Practices on Insect Infestation Levels and Loblolly Pine Growth  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates the relationship between intensive management practices and insect infestation, maximum growth potential studies of loblolly pine over four years using different levels of cultural treatments. Results indicate tree fertilization can increase coneworm infestation and demonstrated that tip moth management can improve initial tree growth.

Nowak, J.T.; Berisford, C.W.

2000-04-01

363

INFESTATION OF UNIONIDS BY DREISSENA POLYMORPHA IN A POWER PLANT CANAL IN LAKE ERIE  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT The infestation of unionid mollusks (Unionidae) by the recently introduced zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, and the age structure of the zebra mussel population were examined,in February and August 1989 in a power plant intake canal located in western Lake Erie. In February, unionids (Leptodea fragilis and Anodonta grandis) were infested with one- (2 to 6 mm long) and two-

Don W. Schloesser; William P. Kovalak

364

Using airborne hyperspectral imagery for mapping saltcedar infestations in west Texas  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The Rio Grande of west Texas contains, by far, the largest infestation of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) in Texas. The objective of this study was to evaluate airborne hyperspectral imagery and different classification techniques for mapping saltcedar infestations. Hyperspectral imagery with 102 usable ba...

365

Detection of Fruit Fly Infestation in Pickling Cucumbers using Hyperspectral Imaging  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fruit fly infestation can be a serious problem in pickling cucumber production. In the United States and many other countries, there is zero tolerance for fruit flies in pickled products. Currently, processors rely on manual inspection to detect and remove fruit fly-infested cucumbers, which is labo...

366

Parasitic Varroa destructor mites influence flight duration and homing ability of infested Apis mellifera foragers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study confirmed that infestation by Varroa destructor is lower in foragers returning to the colony than in those leaving the colony and explored causes of mite loss. Video recordings of bees at the flight entrance revealed that some mites may get lost from foragers but also showed that infested bees stay outside the colony longer. Returning tests of foragers

Jasna Kralj; Stefan Fuchs

2006-01-01

367

Biopower generation from mountain pine infested wood in Canada: An economical opportunity for greenhouse gas mitigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biomass is considered carbon neutral, and displacement of fossil fuel-based power by biomass-based power is one means to mitigate greenhouse gases. Large forest areas in British Columbia (BC), Canada, are infested by the mountain pine beetle (MPB). Dead wood from the infestation is expected to vastly exceed the ability of the pulp and lumber industry to utilize it; current estimates

Amit Kumar; Peter Flynn; Shahab Sokhansanj

2008-01-01

368

Detection of Stored-Grain Insect Infestation in Wheat Transported in Railroad Hopper-Cars  

Microsoft Academic Search

Levels of insect infestation, insect spatial distribution, and the relationship between the number of insect-damaged kernels (IDK) and the number of insects present in grain samples in three-hopper railcars transporting wheat from country elevators to a mill were studied. Six of eight sampled railcars were infested with more than two species of insects. The most abundant species collected were the

Joel Perez-Mendoza; Paul W. Flinn; James F. Campbell; David W. Hagstrum; James E. Throne

2004-01-01

369

78 FR 24665 - Gypsy Moth Generally Infested Areas; Additions in Wisconsin  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...is necessary to prevent the artificial spread of the gypsy moth to noninfested areas...infested areas to prevent the artificial spread of the gypsy moth. In accordance with...adequate to prevent the artificial interstate spread of infestations of the gypsy moth....

2013-04-26

370

CASTE, SEX AND STRAIN OF HONEY BEES (APIS MELLIFERA) AFFECT INFESTATION WITH TRACHEAL MITES (ACARAPIS WOODI)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Worker honey bees from genetic stocks selected for being resistant (R) or susceptible (S) to tracheal mites typically show large differences in infestation in field colonies and in bioassays that involve controlled exposure to infested bees. We used bioassays to compare the propensity for tracheal ...

371

A survey of ectoparasites infesting urban and rural dogs of Maranhão state, Brazil.  

PubMed

This study evaluated for the first time, ectoparasite infestations on dogs from urban and rural areas of the continental land of the state of Maranhão, northeastern Brazil. In total, 622 dogs were examined for ectoparasite infestations. Overall, 392 (63.0%) were infested with ectoparasites, 154 (51.3%) of 300 urban dogs and 238 (73.9%) of 322 rural dogs. Five species of ectoparasites were found, three ticks [Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille), Amblyomma ovale Koch, and Amblyomma cajennense (F.)], one flea [Ctenocephalides felis (Bouché)], and one louse [(Heterodoxus spininger (Enderlein)]. The frequency of infestation by R. sanguineus tended to be higher in urban than in rural areas, whereas infestations by Amblyomma ticks and C. felis fleas tended to be higher among rural dogs. Louse (H. spininger) infestations were similarly low among all areas. Mixed infestations by at least two species of ectoparasites on the same dog were significantly more frequent on rural than on urban dogs. The most frequent mixed infestation was by R. sanguineus and C. felis, found on 11.4% of the dogs. Further studies are warranted to evaluate canine vector-borne agents in Maranhão, especially because most of the ectoparasites here reported are vectors of major vector-borne diseases, including zoonoses of continental importance. PMID:23802466

Costa, Andrea P; Silva, Arannadia B; Costa, Francisco B; Xavier, Gabriel S; Martins, Thiago F; Labruna, Marcelo B; Guerra, Rita M S N C

2013-05-01

372

78 FR 63369 - Gypsy Moth Generally Infested Areas; Additions in Wisconsin  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

We are adopting as a final rule, without change, an interim rule that amended the regulations to add areas in Wisconsin to the list of generally infested areas based on the detection of infestations of gypsy moth in those areas. The interim rule was necessary to prevent the artificial spread of the gypsy moth to noninfested areas of the United...

2013-10-24

373

Assessment of Immune Activation in Mice before and after Eradication of Mite Infestation  

PubMed Central

Mite infestation of mice remains a persistent problem for many institutions, leading to numerous health problems and creating unknown and unwanted variables for research. In this study, mice with mite infestation demonstrated significantly higher levels of inflammatory cytokines, both at draining lymph nodes (axillary) and systemically, as compared with mice without mites. In addition, histologic evaluation revealed significant inflammation in mite-infested mice. Inflammatory changes were still present in the skin of mice at 6 to 8 wk after treatment, despite absence of detectable infestation at that time. Because these significant and lasting local and systemic changes have the potential to alter research findings, eradication of mites infestations should be an important goal for all institutions.

Johnston, Nancy A; Trammell, Rita A; Ball-Kell, Susan; Verhulst, Steven; Toth, Linda A

2009-01-01

374

Herbivore-induced extrafloral nectar production in lima bean plants enhanced by previous exposure to volatiles from infested conspecifics.  

PubMed

In response to herbivory by spider mites (Tetranychus urticae), lima bean plants produced significantly greater quantities of extrafloral nectar (EFN) than intact conspecific plants. Moreover, EFN amounts of infested plants depended on exposure to odor of infested neighbor plants. Two d after spider mite infestation, a test plant produced more EFN when exposed prior to infestation to volatiles from infested neighbor plants than when exposed to volatiles from uninfested conspecific plants. However, this effect was only detectable 2 d after spider mite infestation and vanished 4 d after infestation. These results suggest that EFN production is enhanced during the earlier stages of damage by T. urticae in response to previous exposure to volatiles from infested neighbor plants. PMID:16874565

Choh, Yasuyuki; Takabayashi, Junji

2006-07-28

375

Methodology for Assessing Rice Varieties for Resistance to the Lesser Grain Borer, Rhyzopertha dominica  

PubMed Central

Several physical and chemical attributes of rice were evaluated to determine which character would be best to use to assess multiple rice varieties for resistance to the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.). Laboratory tests were conducted on single varieties of long-, short-, and medium grain-rice to develop procedures and methodologies that could be used for large-scale screening studies. Progeny production of R. dominica was positively correlated with the percentage of broken hulls. Although kernel hardness, amylose content, neonate preference for brown rice, and adult emergence from neonates varied among the three rice varieties tested they did not appear to be valid indicators of eventual progeny production, and may not be useful predictors of resistance or susceptibility. Soundness and integrity seem to be the best characters to use for varietal screening studies with R. dominica.

Chanbang, Y; Arthur, F. H; Wilde, G. E; Throne, J. E; Subramanyam, B. H

2008-01-01

376

Mutation in acetylcholinesterase1 associated with triazophos resistance in rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).  

PubMed

Two full-length genes encoding different acetylcholinesterases (AChEs), designated as Ch-ace1 and Ch-ace2, were cloned from strains of the rice stem borer (Chilo suppressalis) susceptible and resistant to the organophosphate insecticide triazophos. Sequence analysis found an amino acid mutation A314S in Ch-ace1 (corresponding to A201 in Torpedo californica AChE) that was consistently associated with the occurrence of resistance. This mutation removed an MspA1 I restriction site from the wild type allele. An assay based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was developed to diagnose A314S genotypes in field populations. Results showed a strong correlation between frequencies of the mutation and phenotypic levels of resistance to triazophos. The assay offers a prospect for rapid monitoring of resistance and assisting with the appropriate choice of insecticide for combating damage caused by C. suppressalis. PMID:19028456

Jiang, Xiaojing; Qu, Mingjing; Denholm, Ian; Fang, Jichao; Jiang, Weihua; Han, Zhaojun

2008-11-24

377

Sociodemographic characteristics and risk factor analysis of Demodex infestation (Acari: Demodicidae).  

PubMed

To identify sociodemographic characteristics and risk factor of Demodex infestation, 756 students aged 13-22 years in Xi'an, China were sampled for the school-based cross-sectional study. Demodex was examined using the cellophane tape method (CTP). The results showed that the total detection rate of Demodex was 67.6%. Logistic regression analysis revealed that five variables (gender, residence, sharing sanitary ware, frequency of face-wash per day, and use of facial cleanser) were found to be uncorrelated with Demodex infestation, whereas three variables (age, skin type, and skin disease) were found to be independent correlates. Students aged over 18 years had 22.1 times higher odds of Demodex infestation compared to those under 16 years and students aged 16-18 years also had 2.1 times higher odds compared to those aged 13-15 years. Odds of having a Demodex infestation for oily or mixed skin were 2.1 times those for dry or neutral skin. Students with a facial skin disease had 3.0 times higher odds of being infested with Demodex compared to those without. The inception rate of students with facial dermatoses increased in parallel with increasing mite count. The inception rates were 21.3%, 40.7%, 59.2%, and 67.7% in the negative, mild, moderate, and severe infestation groups, respectively (?(2)=60.6, P<0.001). Specifically, the amount of infested mites and inception rate of acne vulgaris were positively correlated (R(2)=0.57, moderate infestation odds ratio (OR)=7.1, severe infestation OR=10.3). It was concluded that Demodex prevalence increases with age, and Demodex presents in nearly all adult human. Sebaceous hyperplasia with oily or mixed skin seems to favour Demodex proliferation. Demodex infestation could be associated with acne vulgaris. The CTP is a good sampling method for studies of Demodex prevalence. PMID:22135149

Zhao, Ya-e; Guo, Na; Xun, Meng; Xu, Ji-ru; Wang, Mei; Wang, Duo-lao

2011-12-01

378

Pterygosomatidae and Trombiculidae mites infesting Tropidurus hispidus (Spix, 1825) (Tropiduridae) lizards in northeastern Brazil.  

PubMed

Parasitism of the lizard Tropidurus hispidus by Geckobiella sp. and by larvae of Eutrombicula alfreddugesi was examined in a mountainous area in Chapada do Araripe (07° 16' S and 39° 26' W), southern Ceará State, Brazil. Of the 56 lizards collected (26 females, 27 males, and 3 juveniles), 40 (total prevalence of 71.42%) were infested by mites. Mite-pockets were the sites most heavily infested by E. alfreddugesi larvae, while Geckobiella sp. was found uniformly distributed under scales over the host's entire body. The female specimens of T. hispidus parasitised by E. alfreddugesi had an average infestation rate of 8.57 ± 3.62, 1-27, while the males had an average infestation rate of 11.90 ± 2.63, 1-25. The female specimens parasitised by Geckobiella sp. had an average infestation rate of 5.91 ± 2.28, 1-25, while the males had an average infestation rate of 5.43 ± 1.52, 1-23. Seven specimens were also infested by eggs and immature forms of unidentified mites (average 2.28 ± 0.89, 1-7). There were no significant differences between the total prevalence of mites on adult male (70.4%) and adult female (65.4%) lizards. The body sizes of the hosts did not influence their infestation rates. The average infestation intensity by E. alfreddugesi (10.2 ± 8.7) was significantly greater than the average infestation intensity by Geckobiella sp. (5.9 ± 6.8). T. hispidus is the new host record to Geckobiella mites. PMID:21755176

Delfino, M M S; Ribeiro, S C; Furtado, I P; Anjos, L A; Almeida, W O

2011-05-01

379

Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin binding to brush border membrane vesicles of rice stem borers.  

PubMed

The receptor binding step in the molecular mode of action of five delta-endotoxins (Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1C, Cry2A, and Cry9C) from Bacillus thuringiensis was examined to find toxins with different receptor sites in the midgut of the striped stem borer (SSB) Chilo suppressalis (Walker) and yellow stem borer (YSB) Scirpophaga incertulas (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Homologous competition assays were used to estimate binding affinities (K(com)) of (125)I-labelled toxins to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). The SSB BBMV affinities in decreasing order was: Cry1Ab = Cry1Ac > Cry9C > Cry2A > Cry1C. In YSB, the order of decreasing affinities was: Cry1Ac > Cry1Ab > Cry9C = Cry2A > Cry1C. The number of binding sites (B(max)) estimated by homologous competition binding among the Cry toxins did not affect toxin binding affinity (K(com)) to both insect midgut BBMVs. Results of the heterologous competition binding assays suggest that Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac compete for the same binding sites in SSB and YSB. Other toxins bind with weak (Cry1C, Cry2A) or no affinity (Cry9C) to Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac binding sites in both species. Cry2A had the lowest toxicity to 10-day-old SSB and Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac were the most toxic. Taken together, the results of this study show that Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac could be combined with either Cry1C, Cry2A, or Cry9C for more durable resistance in transgenic rice. Cry1Ab should not be used together with Cry1Ac because a mutation in one receptor site could diminish binding of both toxins. PMID:15027071

Alcantara, Edwin P; Aguda, Remedios M; Curtiss, April; Dean, Donald H; Cohen, Michael B

2004-04-01

380

Response of grape root borer (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) neonates to root extracts from Vitaceae species and rootstocks.  

PubMed

Observations at regular intervals of the location of newly hatched grape root borer, Vitacea polistiformis (Harris), larvae moving freely within circular petri dish bioassays were used to measure and compare their response to dry filter paper discs treated with ethanol- or hexane-based extracts of roots from known and potential Vitaceae hosts and a nonhost. Larvae responded most strongly to discs treated with ethanol extracts, suggesting the presence of behaviorally active, polar compounds associated with roots. In single extract bioassays comparing extract versus solvent treated discs, larvae responded positively to ethanol extracts from all Vitis species and rootstocks and Virginia creeper [Parthenocissus quinquefolia (L.) Planch.], but not to apple (Malus domestica Borkh). Paired extract bioassays, in which an extract from the commercially important 3309 rootstock was used as the standard and presented simultaneously with extracts from other root sources, revealed examples of equal, significantly weaker and significantly stronger responses to the 3309 extract. Extracts of the 420 A and V. riparia 'Gloire' rootstocks appeared to possess qualities that elicited a consistently greater response than to 3309 extract in these pair-wise comparisons. The active compounds were eluted in ethanol during a 30-min extraction; larvae responded equally to 30- and 60-min 3309 root extracts in paired extract bioassays. Larvae responded equally to extracts of 3309 roots from three spatially separate vineyards in northern Virginia. These results are discussed in relation to the subterranean, plant-insect interactions of grape root borer neonates with the numerous native and non-native Vitis species that may serve as hosts in the eastern United States. PMID:22251689

Bergh, J C; Zhang, A; Meyer, J R; Kim, D

2011-08-01

381

Control of parasitic infestations in killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis).  

PubMed

California killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis) trapped in a Southern California estuary were infested with Gyrodactylus sp, Argulus sp, or Ergasilus sieboldii. They were treated with 0,0-dimethyl 2,2,2-trichloro-1-hydroxyethylphosphonate (DTHP). The effective dosage regimen for Gyrodactylus was 7.50 mg/l for 1 hour on day 1, 3.25 mg/l for 1 hour on day 5, and 0.75 mg/l for 1 hour on day 9; for Argulus, 2.50 mg/l for 1 hour once only; for Ergasilus, 2.50 mg/l for 1 hour once every third day for three treatments. Toxicity testing indicated that repetitive doses of 4.20 mg/l were toxic and that static exposures of more than 1 hour to doses of 7.50 mg/l were lethal to Fundulus. PMID:7242019

Puffer, H W; Beal, M L

1981-04-01

382

Risk Factors Associated with Head Louse Infestation in Korea  

PubMed Central

Head louse infestation (HLI) is one of the most frequently occurring parasitic diseases in children. This study was conducted to investigate the socioeconomic and personal factors influencing HLI in the Republic of Korea. A total of 2,210 questionnaires about various factors related to HLI were obtained from children in 17 primary schools throughout the country. The rate of HLI was significantly lower in children who lived together with mother or in a family where both parents worked. In addition, HLI was lower in children whose fathers or mothers were public officers or teachers. However, HLI was higher in children who had small families and washed their hair less often. Education levels of parents and the number of children in family were not significant. Improvement of socioeconomic factors and personal hygiene will be helpful for reducing HLI.

Sim, Seobo; Lee, Won-Ja; Yu, Jae-Ran; Lee, In Yong; Lee, Seung Hyun; Oh, Soo-Youn; Seo, Min

2011-01-01

383

9 CFR 72.24 - Litter and manure from carriers and premises of tick-infested animals; destruction or treating...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...and manure from carriers and premises of tick-infested animals; destruction or treating...and manure from carriers and premises of tick-infested animals; destruction or treating...have contained interstate shipments of tick-infested animals, shall be...

2013-01-01

384

Identification of Volatiles That Are Used in Discrimination Between Plants Infested with Prey or Nonprey Herbivores by a Predatory Mite  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carnivorous arthropods can use herbivore-induced plant volatiles to locate their herbivorous prey. In the field, carnivores are confronted with information from plants infested with herbivores that may differ in their suitability as prey. Discrimination by the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis between volatiles from lima bean plants infested with the prey herbivore Tetranychus urticae, or plants infested with the nonprey caterpillar

Jetske G. De Boer; Maarten A. Posthumus; Marcel Dicke

2004-01-01

385

Diferulate content of maize sheaths is associated with resistance to the Mediterranean corn borer Sesamia nonagrioides (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).  

PubMed

The leaf sheaths of selected inbred lines of maize (Zea mays L.) with variable levels of stem resistance to the Mediterranean corn borer Sesamia nonagrioides (Lefèvbre) were evaluated for antibiotic effect on insect development. Phytochemical analyses of leaf sheaths were conducted for cell wall phenylpropanoid content to gain a better understanding of maize-resistance mechanisms. Laboratory bioassays established that sheath tissues from different genotypes significantly affected the growth of neonate larvae. Three hydroxycinnamates, p-coumaric, trans-ferulic, and cis-ferulic acids, and three isomers of diferulic acid, 8-5', 8-O-4', and 8-5' b (benzofuran form), were identified. Significant negative correlations were found between larvae weight and diferulic acid content for six genotypes. These results are in agreement with previous studies concerning the role of cell wall structural components in stem borer resistance. PMID:17117802

Santiago, Rogelio; Butrón, Ana; Reid, Lana M; Arnason, John T; Sandoya, German; Souto, Xose C; Malvar, Rosa A

2006-11-29

386

Cadherin-like receptor from the European corn borer (Ostrinia Nubilalis) for Bacillus thuringiensis cry1A toxins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A toxins are lethal to the corn pest European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) larvae. Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac bind to a protein of ~205-kDa in the brush border membrane vesicles. In addition, Cry1Ab binds to proteins of ~ 150 and 170-kDa and Cry1Ac binds to proteins of ~ 120 kDa. A competition ligand blot using unlabeled Cry1Ab to

Salah A. Mostafa; W. S. A. Maaty; M. A. Madkour; L. A. Bulla

2003-01-01

387

Dominicalure 1 and 2: Components of aggregation pheromone from male lesser grain borer Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volatiles from lesser grain borers,Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), were collected on Porapak Q, and those from the male beetles were shown to contain two compounds, that were attractive individually and in combination to both sexes. These compounds were identified as (S)-(+)-1-methylbutyl (E)-2-methyl-2-pentenoate and (S)-(+)-1-methylbutyl (E)-2,4-dimethyl-2-pentenoate by spectrometry and comparison with synthesized compounds. The two compounds have been assigned the

H. J. Williams; R. M. Silverstein; W. E. Burkholder; A. Khorramshahi

1981-01-01

388

Geographic and voltinism differentiation among North American Ostrinia nubilalis (European corn borer) mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase haplotypes  

Microsoft Academic Search

DNA sequence of European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (cox1) and II (cox2) genes were characterized and used for population genetic analysis. Twenty-six point mutations were identified from a 2,156 bp DNA sequence alignment. The frequency of polymorphic cox1 DdeI and HaeIII, and cox2 Sau3AI and MspI restriction sites were determined from 1,414

Brad S. Coates; Douglas V. Sumerford; Richard L. Hellmich

389

Synthesis of (3E)-dodecen-12-olide, a Potential Pheromone Component of the Emerald Ash Borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), AgrilusplanipennisFairmaire, is an invasive insect that has killed millions of ash trees in the USA and Canada. A concise synthesis of a potential EAB pheromone component, (3E)-dodecen-12-olide, using a highly stereoselective Julia-Kocienski olefination as the key step, is reported.Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Synthetic Communications® to view

D. I. MaGee; P. D. Mayo; P. J. Silk; B. Beattie

2012-01-01

390

Electrophysiological Response and Attraction of Emerald Ash Borer to Green Leaf Volatiles (GLVs) Emitted by Host Foliage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) function as host attractants, pheromone synergists, or sexual kairomones for a number of coleopteran\\u000a folivores. Hence, we focused on host GLVs to determine if they were attractive to adults of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), which feeds on ash (Fraxinus) foliage. Eight GLVs were identified by chromatography-electroantennogram (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry in foliar

Peter de Groot; Gary G. Grant; Therese M. Poland; Roger Scharbach; Linda Buchan; Reginald W. Nott; Linda Macdonald; Doug Pitt

2008-01-01

391

North American arthropods at risk due to widespread Fraxinus mortality caused by the Alien Emerald ash borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (EAB), an alien invasive wood-boring buprestid beetle, is causing large-scale decline and mortality of the most\\u000a widely distributed species of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees endemic to eastern North America. We determined which arthropod species that are associated with ash may become\\u000a threatened, endangered, and co-extinct with the demise of ash as a dominant tree

Kamal J. K. GandhiDaniel; Daniel A. Herms

2010-01-01

392

Could phenotypic plasticity limit an invasive species? Incomplete reversibility of mid-winter deacclimation in emerald ash borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis, Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is a wood-boring invasive pest devastating North American ash (Fraxinus spp.). A. planipennis overwinters primarily as a freeze-avoiding prepupa within the outer xylem or inner bark of the host tree. The range of this\\u000a species is expanding outward from its presumed introduction point in southwestern Michigan. We hypothesized that loss of cold

Stephanie Sobek-SwantJill; Jill C. Crosthwaite; D. Barry Lyons; Brent J. Sinclair

393

Transgenic fertile japonica rice plants expressing a modified cryIA(b) gene resistant to yellow stem borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The japonica rice variety Taipei 309 was cotransformed by particle bombardment of immature embryo-derived embryogenic calli\\u000a with a modified ?-endotoxin gene cryIA(b) of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) under the control of the rice Actin1 promoter, and the hygromycin resistance gene, hph driven by the CaMV35S promoter. Selected transgenic rice plants showed enhanced insecticidal activity against yellow stem\\u000a borer (Scirpophaga incertulas), with

C. Wu; Y. Fan; C. Zhang; N. Oliva; S. K. Datta

1997-01-01

394

Molecular cloning, expression analysis and functional confirmation of two ecdysone receptor isoforms from the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis  

Microsoft Academic Search

PCR techniques were used to clone and identify cDNAs for ecdysone receptor A and B1 (EcR-A and EcR-B1) isoforms from the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis. They differ only in the N-terminal A\\/B regions and show high sequence identities to other insects’ EcRs. At the wandering stage, EcR-B1 mRNA was expressed more abundantly in the midgut than in the epidermis

C Minakuchi; Y Nakagawa; M Kiuchi; S Tomita; M Kamimura

2002-01-01

395

Interactive influence of leaf age, light intensity, and girdling on green ash foliar chemistry and emerald ash borer development.  

PubMed

Biotic and abiotic environmental factors affect plant nutritional quality and defensive compounds that confer plant resistance to herbivory. Influence of leaf age, light availability, and girdling on foliar nutrition and defense of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh) was examined in this study. Longevity of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), adults reared on green ash foliage subjected to these factors was assayed. Mature leaves generally were more nutritious with greater amino acids and a greater ratio of protein to non-structural carbohydrate (P:C) than young leaves, in particular when trees were grown in shade. On the other hand, mature leaves had lower amounts of trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors, and total phenolics compared to young leaves. Lower defense of mature leaves alone, or along with higher nutritional quality may lead to increased survival and longevity of emerald ash borer feeding on mature leaves. Sunlight reduced amino acids and P:C ratio, irrespective of leaf age and girdling, and elevated total protein of young foliage, but not protein of mature leaves. Sunlight also dramatically increased all investigated defensive compounds of young, but not mature leaves. Girdling reduced green ash foliar nutrition, especially, of young leaves grown in shade and of mature leaves grown in sun. However emerald ash borer performance did not differ when fed leaves from trees grown in sun or shade, or from girdled or control trees. One explanation is that emerald ash borer reared on lower nutritional quality food may compensate for nutrient deficiency by increasing its consumption rate. The strong interactions among leaf age, light intensity, and girdling on nutrition and defense highlight the need for caution when interpreting data without considering possible interactions. PMID:19568811

Chen, Yigen; Poland, Therese M

2009-07-02

396

Characterization of ?-amylase in the midgut and the salivary glands of rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rice striped stem borer, Chilo supprressalis, is a destructive pest of rice that was introduced to Iran in 1973 and has since become widely distributed. Amylases are hydrolytic enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of the ?-d-(1,4)-glucan linkage in glycogen and other related carbohydrates. Laboratory-reared 4th stadium larvae were randomly selected; the midgut and the salivary glands were removed by

Arash Zibaee; Ali Reza Bandani; Maryam Kafil; Samar Ramzi

2008-01-01

397

Alpha-amylases of the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei) and their inhibition by two plant amylase inhibitors.  

PubMed

The adult coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei Ferrari [Coleoptera: Scolytidae]), a major insect pest of coffee, has two major digestive alpha-amylases that can be separated by isoelectric focusing. The alpha-amylase activity has a broad pH optimum between 4.0 and 7.0. Using pH indicators, the pH of the midgut was determined to be between 4.5 and 5.2. At pH 5.0, the coffee berry borer alpha-amylase activity is inhibited substantially (80%) by relatively low levels of the amylase inhibitor (alphaAI-1) from the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., and much less so by the amylase inhibitor from Amaranthus. We used an in-gel zymogram assay to demonstrate that seed extracts can be screened to find suitable inhibitors of amylases. The prospect of using the genes that encode these inhibitors to make coffee resistant to the coffee berry borer via genetic engineering is discussed. PMID:10732988

Valencia, A; Bustillo, A E; Ossa, G E; Chrispeels, M J

2000-03-01

398

Efficacy of multifunnel traps for capturing emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): effect of color, glue, and other trap coatings.  

PubMed

Tens of thousands of adhesive-coated purple prism traps are deployed annually in the United States to survey for the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). A reusable, more user-friendly trap is desired by program managers, surveyors, and researchers. Field assays were conducted in southeastern Michigan to ascertain the feasibility of using nonsticky traps as survey and detection tools for emerald ash borer. Three nonsticky trap designs, including multifunnel (Lindgren), modified intercept panel, and drainpipe (all painted purple) were compared with the standard purple prism trap; no statistical differences in capture of emerald ash borer adults were detected between the multifunnel design and the prism. In subsequent color comparison assays, both green- and purple-painted multifunnel traps (and later, plastic versions of these colors) performed as well or better than the prism traps. Multifunnel traps coated with spray-on adhesive caught more beetles than untreated traps. The increased catch, however, occurred in the traps' collection cups and not on the trap surface. In a separate assay, there was no significant difference detected between glue-coated traps and Rain-X (normally a glass treatment)-coated traps, but both caught significantly more A. planipennis adults than untreated traps. PMID:21735910

Francese, Joseph A; Fraser, Ivich; Lance, David R; Mastro, Victor C

2011-06-01

399

Oviposition behavior of the wheat stem sawfly when encountering plants infested with cryptic conspecifics.  

PubMed

Insect herbivores typically oviposit on the most suitable hosts, but choices can be modulated by detection of potential competition among conspecifics, especially when eggs are deposited cryptically. Larvae of the wheat stem sawfly, Cephus cinctus Norton, developing within an already infested stem, experience elevated risk when only one will survive because of cannibalism. To increase our understanding of host selection when the choices made by females can lead to severe intraspecific competition, females were presented with either uninfested wheat plants or with plants previously exposed to other females in laboratory choice tests. The oviposition behavior of this insect was described by recording the behavioral sequences that lead to and follow the insertion of the ovipositor in both previously infested and uninfested stems. No significant differences were found in frequencies of specific behaviors or behavioral transitions associated with oviposition. In choice tests, there was no difference in the numbers of eggs laid in infested and uninfested plants. Taller plants received more eggs, irrespective of infestation. Females neither preferred nor avoided previously infested hosts. Other characteristics of the host, such as stem height, may be more important in determining suitability for oviposition. These findings support the use of management tactics relying on the manipulation of oviposition behavior, such as trap cropping. Given that there is no evidence for response to previously infested hosts, the infested plants in a trap crop would remain as suitable as they were when uninfested, which could also lead to an increase in mortality caused by intraspecific competition. PMID:20021767

Buteler, Micaela; Weaver, David K; Peterson, Robert K D

2009-12-01

400

Estimating the economic injury level and the economic threshold for the use of 𝛂-cypermethrin against the sugarcane borer, Eldana saccharina Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five years of data from insecticide trials that assessed the value of using ?-cypermethrin (Fastac®) against the sugarcane borer Eldana saccharina Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) were used to estimate the economic injury level (EIL) and the economic threshold (ET) for this pest. The analysis was based on estimates of borer damage (percentage of internodes bored) and larval numbers, and the effect

Graeme W. Leslie

2009-01-01

401

Incorporating insect infestation into rodent seed dispersal: better if the larva is still inside.  

PubMed

Many nutritious seeds are commonly attacked by insects which feed on the seed reserves. However, studies have not fully explored the ecological implications of insect infestation in animal seed dispersal and subsequent plant regeneration. Our question is whether the fact that an infested seed still contains the larva or not might increase/decrease the probability of being successfully dispersed by animals. This study examines the effects of weevil-infested seeds on the natural regeneration of a rodent-dispersed oak species. Rodents showed a high ability to discriminate between sound and infested seeds, even when the larva was still inside. As a result, rodents caused differential seed dispersal for sound and infested seeds by modifying multiple aspects of the dispersal process. We found that, for the same seed weight, infested acorns with a larva still inside can contribute to natural regeneration (0.7 % of seedlings in next summer), although in comparison to sound acorns they suffered higher predation rates by rodents (both partial and complete), were removed later from the ground (less preferred), cached less frequently, and dispersed to shorter distances, which reduced their potential to colonize new environments. However, infested seeds with exit holes are notably less preferred by rodents and, when dispersed, they are mostly deposited on the litter (uncached) with shorter dispersal distances and lower emergence success. Thus, the probability that larval-holed acorns will produce viable seedlings is extremely low (null in this study). Whether infested seeds still contain a larva or not clearly determines the probability of being successfully dispersed. Premature seed drop prolongs the presence of the larva inside the acorn after seed drop, and could be a possible mechanism to allow dispersal of infested seeds. PMID:22588632

Perea, Ramón; López, David; San Miguel, Alfonso; Gil, Luis

2012-05-16

402

Field-cage methodology for evaluating climatic suitability for introduced wood-borer parasitoids: preliminary results from the emerald ash borer system.  

PubMed

Field-cage methods were developed to evaluate the abilities of Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) and Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), biocontrol agents of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), to parasitize, develop and overwinter following three late-season releases at both a northern (Michigan) and a southern (Maryland) location within the current North American range of A. planipennis. In August, September and October of 2009, five young green ash trees were selected at each location. Tetrastichus planipennisi and S. agrili were each randomly assigned to one of two cages attached to each tree, surrounding separate sections of trunk in which late-instar A. planipennis had been inserted. The following April, the caged trunk sections were dissected to determine the fate of each A. planipennis larva and the developmental stages of all recovered parasitoid progeny. At both locations, T. planipennisi and S. agrili were able to parasitize hosts and successfully overwinter (i.e., reach adulthood the following spring). For T. planipennisi, successful parasitism (i.e., parasitoid progeny reached adulthood) occurred for all caged releases in Maryland, but only for the August and September releases in Michigan. At both locations, percent parasitism by T. planipennisi was higher in August and September than in October. For S. agrili, successful parasitism occurred for all caged releases in Maryland, but only for the August release in Michigan. In Maryland, percent parasitism by S. agrili in August and September was higher than in October. The caging method described here should be useful in determining the climatic suitability of other regions before proceeding with large-scale releases of either species and may have utility in other wood-borer parasitoid systems as well. PMID:22233133

Ulyshen, Michael D; Duan, Jian J; Bauer, Leah S; Gould, Juli; Taylor, Phil; Bean, Dick; Holko, Carol; Van Driesche, Roy

2011-01-01

403

Trombiculidae larvae (Neotrombicula autumnalis) infestation in a Little Bittern (Ixobrychus minutus) in Turkey.  

PubMed

With this case report, we describe Trombiculidae larvae (Neotrombicula autumnalis) infestation in a Little Bittern (Ixobrychus minutus) which was brought to our clinics by the Directorship of Environmental and Forestry authorities of Samsun, Turkey in April, 2007. The male Little Bittern (I. minutus), with a black back and crown, and black wings with a large white patch on each wing, had thick Trombiculidae larvae infestation both on its legs. There were neither dermatological nor general conditional changes observed, except its superficial larval attachments to the skin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Trombiculidae larvae (N. autumnalis) infestation in a Little Bittern (I. minutus) in Turkey. PMID:18266010

Cakiroglu, Duygu; Pekmezci, Didem; Meral, Yücel; Gokalp, Güvenç; Acici, Mustafa

2008-02-12

404

Severe Tick Infestation in a Hare and Potential Risk for Transmitting Pathogens to Humans  

PubMed Central

Severe tick infestation was found in a hare in a suburban area of Nanchang, Jiangxi Province, China. We sampled ticks and identified them based on their morphologic characteristics. Three species, Ixodes sinensis, which is commonly found in China and can experimentally transmit Borrelia burgdorferi, Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides, and Haemaphysalis longicornis which can transmit Lyme disease were detected with an optical microscope and a stereomicroscope. Risk of spreading ticks from suburban to urban areas exists due to human transportation and travel between the infested and non-infested areas around Nanchang.

Chen, Haiying; Liu, Xiaoqing; Guo, Xuejian; Fu, Renlong

2011-01-01

405

Landscape context and scale differentially impact coffee leaf rust, coffee berry borer, and coffee root-knot nematodes.  

PubMed

Crop pest and disease incidences at plot scale vary as a result of landscape effects. Two main effects can be distinguished. First, landscape context provides habitats of variable quality for pests, pathogens, and beneficial and vector organisms. Second, the movements of these organisms are dependent on the connectivity status of the landscape. Most of the studies focus on indirect effects of landscape context on pest abundance through their predators and parasitoids, and only a few on direct effects on pests and pathogens. Here we studied three coffee pests and pathogens, with limited or no pressure from host-specific natural enemies, and with widely varying life histories, to test their relationships with landscape context: a fungus, Hemileia vastatrix, causal agent of coffee leaf rust; an insect, the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae); and root-knot nematodes, Meloidogyne spp. Their incidence was assessed in 29 coffee plots from Turrialba, Costa Rica. In addition, we characterized the landscape context around these coffee plots in 12 nested circular sectors ranging from 50 to 1500 m in radius. We then performed correlation analysis between proportions of different land uses at different scales and coffee pest and disease incidences. We obtained significant positive correlations, peaking at the 150 m radius, between coffee berry borer abundance and proportion of coffee in the landscape. We also found significant positive correlations between coffee leaf rust incidence and proportion of pasture, peaking at the 200 m radius. Even after accounting for plot level predictors of coffee leaf rust and coffee berry borer through covariance analysis, the significance of landscape structure was maintained. We hypothesized that connected coffee plots favored coffee berry borer movements and improved its survival. We also hypothesized that wind turbulence, produced by low-wind-resistance land uses such as pasture, favored removal of coffee leaf rust spore clusters from host surfaces, resulting in increased epidemics. In contrast, root-knot nematode population density was not correlated to landscape context, possibly because nematodes are almost immobile in the soil. We propose fragmenting coffee plots with forest corridors to control coffee berry borer movements between coffee plots without favoring coffee leaf rust dispersal. PMID:22611856

Avelino, Jacques; Romero-Gurdián, Alí; Cruz-Cuellar, Héctor F; Declerck, Fabrice A J

2012-03-01

406

The patterns of tungiasis in Araruama township, state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  

PubMed

This paper describes patterns of infestation with Tunga penetrans (L., 1758) within the poor community of Araruama municipality, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, assessed by the number of persons and domestic animals parasitized. The overall prevalence of infestation was 49.2% (211 parasitized hosts) of the 429 examined. Humans (p < 0.01) and dogs (p < 0.01) were the most important hosts with 62.6% and 35.6% respectively. Dogs were considered as the potential infestation source to humans. Considering sex and age groups, both measures showed a significant difference (p < 0.01): female (62.2% infested of 143 examined) and male (43.9% infested of 98 examined). All age classes were found infested with significant difference (G = 42.5; p < 0.01) and most of the infestation occurred in children in the 0-9-year old category (27.3%). In contrast and based on mean of chigoe burden per person, the parasitic intensity was significantly higher on male than on female in all age categories, except for the 50+ (H = 27.1; p < 0.01) and decreasing with the increase of age (chi2 = 69.7, A = -124.6, p < 0.01). Growing urbanization, improved housing and sewage systems, use of appropriate footwear, examination of the feet principally in young children, antitetanus prophylaxis and reduction of stray dogs population are the major prophylactic methods recommended. PMID:12700859

de Carvalho, Raimundo Wilson; de Almeida, Adilson Benedito; Barbosa-Silva, Silvia Cristina; Amorim, Marinete; Ribeiro, Paulo César; Serra-Freire, Nicolau Maués

2003-04-09

407

Abiotic and Biotic Factors Associated with Tick Population Dynamics on a Mammalian Host: Ixodes hexagonus Infesting Otters, Lutra lutra  

PubMed Central

The Eurasian otter, Lutra lutra, hosts several parasites with zoonotic potential. As this semiaquatic mammal has large ranges across terrestrial, freshwater and marine habitats, it has the capacity for wide dispersion of pathogens. Despite this, parasites of otters have received relatively little attention. Here, we examine their ectoparasite load and assess whether this is influenced by abiotic or biotic variables. Climatic phenomena such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) affect weather conditions in northern Europe. Consequently parasite distributions, particularly species with life stages exposed to the external environment, can be affected. We assessed the extent to which inter-annual variations in large-scale weather patterns (specifically the NAO and Central England (CE) temperatures) and host characteristics influenced tick prevalence and intensity. Ectoparasites consisted of a single species, the nidiculous tick Ixodes hexagonus (prevalence ?=?24.3%; mean intensity ?=?7.2; range ?=?1–122; on n ?=?820 otter hosts). The prevalence, but not intensity of infestation, was associated with high CE temperatures, while both prevalence and intensity were associated with positive phases of the NAO. Such associations indicate that I. hexagonus are most abundant when weather conditions are warmer and wetter. Ticks were more prevalent on juvenile than sub-adult or adult otters, which probably reflects the length of time the hosts spend in the holt where these ticks quest. High tick number was associated with poor host condition, so either poor condition hosts are more susceptible to ticks, or tick infestations negatively impact on host condition. Otters are clearly an important and common host for I. hexagonus, which has implications for vector-borne diseases. This work is the first to consider the impacts of long-term weather patterns on I. hexagonus and uses wild-animal cadavers to illustrate the importance of abiotic and biotic pressures impacting parasitic populations.

Sherrard-Smith, Ellie; Chadwick, Elizabeth; Cable, Joanne

2012-01-01

408

Abiotic and biotic factors associated with tick population dynamics on a mammalian host: Ixodes hexagonus infesting otters, Lutra lutra.  

PubMed

The Eurasian otter, Lutra lutra, hosts several parasites with zoonotic potential. As this semiaquatic mammal has large ranges across terrestrial, freshwater and marine habitats, it has the capacity for wide dispersion of pathogens. Despite this, parasites of otters have received relatively little attention. Here, we examine their ectoparasite load and assess whether this is influenced by abiotic or biotic variables. Climatic phenomena such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) affect weather conditions in northern Europe. Consequently parasite distributions, particularly species with life stages exposed to the external environment, can be affected. We assessed the extent to which inter-annual variations in large-scale weather patterns (specifically the NAO and Central England (CE) temperatures) and host characteristics influenced tick prevalence and intensity. Ectoparasites consisted of a single species, the nidiculous tick Ixodes hexagonus (prevalence = 24.3%; mean intensity = 7.2; range = 1-122; on n = 820 otter hosts). The prevalence, but not intensity of infestation, was associated with high CE temperatures, while both prevalence and intensity were associated with positive phases of the NAO. Such associations indicate that I. hexagonus are most abundant when weather conditions are warmer and wetter. Ticks were more prevalent on juvenile than sub-adult or adult otters, which probably reflects the length of time the hosts spend in the holt where these ticks quest. High tick number was associated with poor host condition, so either poor condition hosts are more susceptible to ticks, or tick infestations negatively impact on host condition. Otters are clearly an important and common host for I. hexagonus, which has implications for vector-borne diseases. This work is the first to consider the impacts of long-term weather patterns on I. hexagonus and uses wild-animal cadavers to illustrate the importance of abiotic and biotic pressures impacting parasitic populations. PMID:23071736

Sherrard-Smith, Ellie; Chadwick, Elizabeth; Cable, Joanne

2012-10-05

409

Infestation of the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis by the copepod Pseudomyicola spinosus and its relation to size, density, and condition index of the host  

Microsoft Academic Search

The copepod Pseudomyicola spinosus infests marine mussels and other commercial bivalve species. There is a lack of information on the infestation process and on its relationship to size, density, and health of the host. To obtain this information, an infestation study of the copepod in Mytilus galloprovincialis in field conditions was carried out. Results showed that the intensity of infestation

José Angel Olivas-Valdez; Jorge Cáceres-Mart??nez

2002-01-01

410

Modeling Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) within-tree colonization patterns and development of a subsampling technique.  

PubMed

Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an insect native to central Asia, was first detected in southeast Michigan in 2002, and has since killed millions of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. The objectives of this study were to 1) determine an optimal sampling location on girdled ash trap trees for detection of A. planipennis larvae based on measurements of tree characteristics, and 2) develop a whole-tree estimation method for extrapolating larval densities from subsampled heights. We conducted sampling at 1-m increments, recording larval presence, height on tree bole, bolt diameter, and bark roughness for 58 infested ash trees. Analyzing height and diameter separately, generalized linear mixed models indicated the probability of A. planipennis detection was maximized at 17.2 cm for diameter and increased linearly as vertical height increased. There was also a positive relationship between intermediate bark roughness and A. planipennis presence. Stepwise regression indicated the optimal bolts for extrapolating whole tree larval densities were, in order of importance, at heights of 1-2 m, 4-5 m, 7-8 m, and 0-1 m. Subsampling with just one or two bolts explained 70% and 86%, respectively, of the variance in A. planipennis densities. Our results can be used by resource managers to improve efficiency of detection efforts and estimate infestations of A. planipennis. PMID:23726062

Foelker, C J; Vandenberg, J D; Whitmore, M; Fierke, M K

2013-06-01

411

[Facial Demodex infestation among urban and rural residents in Shangqiu City of Henan Province].  

PubMed

A survey with improved transparent tape method indicated that the prevalence of demodex infestation among 565 urban and rural residents in Shangqiu was 21.2% (120/565). Farmers (32.3%, 53/164) and service employees (33.7%, 29/86) showed higher prevalence than other occupations (P < 0.05). Among age groups, lowest prevalence was found in people under 20 years old (4.8%, 5/105), while the highest in people over the age of 50 (44.4%, 40/90). Prevalence among females, the rural residents and those sharing public toiletries and people with oily skin and acne or other facial sickness was statistically higher than others (P < 0.05). Among the couples with demodex infestation, 79.6% of the couples only had one side infested while both sides got infested in 20.4% of the couples. PMID:23072157

Cui, Jin-Huan; Wang, Chen

2012-08-30

412

76 FR 60358 - Gypsy Moth Generally Infested Areas; Additions in Indiana, Maine, Ohio, Virginia, West Virginia...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Infested Areas; Additions in Indiana, Maine, Ohio, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health...regulations to add areas in Indiana, Maine, Ohio, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin to the list of...

2011-09-29

413

A Case of Tinea Saginata (tape worm) Infestation of the uterus presenting with abnormal vaginal bleeding  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are many reported causes of abnormal uterine bleeding. We report an unusual case of uterine bleeding caused by tapeworm infestation, mimicking retained prod- ucts of conception in a 35 year old multipara.

Sadiah Ahsan; Samiah Ahsan Zia; Jameel Ahmed

414

Using Pheromones to Protect Heat-Injured Lodgepole Pine from Mountain Pine Beetle Infestation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The bark beetle antiaggregative pheromones, verbenone and ipsdienol, were tested in protecting heat-injured lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.) from mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) infestation in the Sawtooth National Recreation...

G. D. Amman K. C. Ryan

1994-01-01

415

Survey of bed bugs in infested premises in Malaysia and Singapore.  

PubMed

A total of 54 bed bug-infested sites (hotels, public accommodations, and residential premises) in Malaysia and Singapore was surveyed between July, 2005 and December, 2008. Only one species of bed bug was found, the tropical bed bug Cimex hemipterus (Fabricius). Bed bug infestations were common in hotels and public accommodations when compared to residential premises. The three most common locations of infestation within an infested premise were the bedding (31.1%), the headboard (30.3%), and cracks and crevices surrounding the baseboard, wall, or floor (23.5%). We speculate that the route of movement of bed bugs in hotels and public accommodations is more direct than in residential premises. PMID:20618653

How, Yee-Fatt; Lee, Chow-Yang

2010-06-01

416

Diel infestation dynamics of gnathiid isopod larvae parasitic on Caribbean reef fish  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Infestation dynamics of parasitic gnathiid isopods on Caribbean reefs were studied throughout the 24-h diel cycle. Gnathiid infestation on caged longfin damselfish ( Stegastes diencaeus) peaked strongly at dawn, remained low during the remainder of the day, and increased again at night until about midnight. Gnathiids were less abundant during the pre-dawn period. Peak loads on fish retrieved at dawn were the highest reported in any study thus far. The dawn peak consisted almost exclusively of individuals from the smallest size class, whereas nocturnal activity consisted almost exclusively of individuals of the largest size class. Because of the high rates of infestation at night and dawn, and the high variation in parasite loads on fish collected during that time, reduction of parasite infestation may play an important role in the selection of nocturnal and crepuscular shelter holes and settlement sites by reef fishes.

Sikkel, Paul C.; Schaumburg, Collin S.; Mathenia, Jeremy K.

2006-11-01

417

76 FR 21613 - Gypsy Moth Generally Infested Areas; Additions in Indiana, Maine, Ohio, Virginia, West Virginia...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Infested Areas; Additions in Indiana, Maine, Ohio, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health...regulations by adding areas in Indiana, Maine, Ohio, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin to the list of...

2011-04-18

418

Eye bleeding due to leech infestation in an ischemic heart- disease patient.  

PubMed

A 49-year-old Iranian male with diagnosis of ischemic heart disease (IHD) and arterial hypertension (AH) was admitted at Emergency Ward of Vase'ee Hospital of Sabzevar, Iran. As well, the patient had red eye and left eye bleeding. On eye examination, leech infestation was found to be the cause of the eye bleeding. In the endemic regions in a patient presenting red eye and eye bleeding, leech infestation came up to be an important differential diagnosis. Therefore, to prevent leech infestation in endemic regions, local people are advised to be informed more effectively about the necessity to use safe, clean, and filtered drinking water, and a perfect scrutiny for leeches or other sources of infestation that should be undertaken before bathing. PMID:22754689

Shirzadeh, E; Golmohammadi, R

2012-04-01

419

7 CFR 301.45-2 - Authorization to designate and terminate designation of generally infested areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Gypsy Moth § 301.45-2 Authorization...or each portion thereof in which a gypsy moth general infestation has been... (1) The area is subject to a gypsy moth eradication program conducted...

2010-01-01

420

7 CFR 301.45-2 - Authorization to designate and terminate designation of generally infested areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Gypsy Moth § 301.45-2 Authorization...or each portion thereof in which a gypsy moth general infestation has been... (1) The area is subject to a gypsy moth eradication program conducted...

2013-01-01

421

7 CFR 301.45-2 - Authorization to designate and terminate designation of generally infested areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Gypsy Moth § 301.45-2 Authorization...or each portion thereof in which a gypsy moth general infestation has been... (1) The area is subject to a gypsy moth eradication program conducted...

2009-01-01

422

Reduction of contact sensitivity reactions to oxazolone in mite-infested mice.  

PubMed Central

Oxazolone-sensitized mite-infested (SWR-M) and mite-free (SWR-J) mice were challenged with oxazolone on the skin of the neck and shoulder. The migration of radioactively labeled cells to the site of contact sensitivity reaction to oxazolone was significantly less in SWR-M than in SWR-J mice. Serum obtained from SWR-M mice suppressed the extravasation of cells into the skin site of SWR-J mice challenged with oxazolone. The decrease in cellular influx in SWR-M mice occurred in areas of mite infestation (skin of neck and shoulder) as well as in areas not infested with mites (the ears). SWR-M mice also gave evidence of enhanced vascular permeability. A possible role for histamine in the inhibition of contact sensitivity in mite-infested mice is discussed. Images

Laltoo, H; Kind, L S

1979-01-01

423

Percutaneous heartworm removal from dogs with severe heart worm (Dirofilaria immitis) infestation  

PubMed Central

Canine heart worm disease is often life-threatening due to its various complications, including right side heart failure, caval syndrome and pulmonary eosinophilic granulomatosis. Several preventive medications and melarsomine have been developed and they are very effective to control heartworm infestation. However, in a case of severe infestation, melarsomine therapy often results in an unfavorable outcome because of the severe immune reaction caused by rapid killing of the adult worm. Surgical removal and an interventional method using flexible alligator forceps have been well described in the literature. Despite the usefulness of mechanical removal using flexible alligator forceps, the methodology still needs to be upgraded for increasing the applicability for treating dogs with severe infestation. We describe herein a newly developed percutaneous removal method for heartworms and this was successfully applied to 4 dogs with severe heartworm infestation. The follow-up studies also showed favorable outcomes with no complications.

Lee, Seung-Gon; Moon, Hyeong-Sun

2008-01-01

424

The effect of ivomec super on dogs experimentally infested with Sarcoptes scabiei isolated from a patient.  

PubMed

Scabies infestation is a community health problem worldwide. This is particularly true in overcrowded and unhygienic areas. Seven dogs were experimentally infested with Sarcoptes scabiei freshly recovered from a patient. The dogs after infestation were treated with a mixture of ivermectin and clorsulon (Ivomec Super). The dose given to a single dog was 1 ml/50 kg body weight. This is equivalent to 200 mcg ivermectin and 2 mg clorsulon per Kg body weight. Five of the dogs (71.43%) were completely cured with 1 ml/50 Kg body weight. The remaining two dogs needed each, another injection of the same dose two weeks later. So, ivomec super is effective against the human strain of Sarcoptes scabiei in experementally infested dogs. A general discussion was given. PMID:12557931

Morsy, T A; Abdel-Mawla, M Y; Morsy, A T

2001-04-01

425

Survey of flea infestation in cats in Spain.  

PubMed

Fleas are a common cause of feline skin disorders as well as vectors of zoonotic diseases. This study evaluated the flea species infesting domestic cats in Spain and assessed factors influencing their distribution. Fleas from 217 cats from 57 localities in Spain were identified and associations between abundance, and host-dependent, host habitat and environmental factors were examined. Variations in infracommunity and component community structure were also explored. Three species were present, of which Ctenocephalides felis (Bouché) (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) was the most abundant (98.4%), followed by Ctenocephalides canis (Curtis) (1.1%) and Pulex irritans (L.) (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) (0.5%). Overall abundance and abundances of both C. felis and C. canis were higher on farms than in apartments, but overall flea abundance and abundances of both C. felis and C. canis were lower in rural than urban environments. Overall abundance and C. felis abundance were lower during the warmest months, and mean annual rainfall was positively correlated with overall, C. felis and C. canis abundances. No relationship between the number of species per cat and any host, habitat or physiographical variable was found. Species richness was not correlated with mean annual temperature or rainfall. Flea abundance was mainly associated with host habitat and environmental factors. PMID:23600822

Gracia, M J; Calvete, C; Estrada, R; Castillo, J A; Peribáñez, M A; Lucientes, J

2012-07-02

426

Plant–plant interactions mediated by volatiles emitted from plants infested by spider mites  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an earlier study, we demonstrated plant–plant interactions mediated by volatiles released from lima bean leaves infested by spider mites (Tetranychus urticae) (Nature 406 (2000a) 512, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 277 (2000b) 305). In the present study, we further show that, under laboratory conditions, volatiles emitted from T. urticae-infested lima bean plants activate transcription of genes encoding pathogenesis-related proteins and

Gen-ichiro Arimura; Rika Ozawa; Jun-ichiro Horiuchi; Takaaki Nishioka; Junji Takabayashi

2001-01-01

427

Characteristics of Cimex lectularius (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), infestation and dispersal in a high-rise apartment building.  

PubMed

Bed bugs, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), are a fast-growing urban pest of significant public health importance in the United States and many other countries. Yet, there is very little field research on the ecology of this pest due to its near absence in the United States and most developed nations for several decades. We investigated characteristics of the bed bug infestation and dispersal in a 223-unit high-rise apartment building through visual inspections, intercepting devices, and resident and staff interviews between December 2008 and April 2009. The following results were obtained: 1) 101 apartments (45% of the high-rise building complex) experienced bed bug infestations (within 41 mo of the first confirmed introduction), 2) 78% of the bed bugs trapped were nymphs, 3) an average of six bed bugs were detected dispersing through apartment entry doors every 4 wk, 4) adult bed bugs were 9 times more likely to disperse than nymphs, 5) 53% of apartments adjacent to infested apartments also were infested, and 6) 50% of the interviewed residents who had infestations were unaware of the bed bugs in their apartments. In addition to active dispersal, several passive bed bug dispersal mechanisms were observed: bringing bed bug-infested furniture into the building, travel, resident turnover, resident visits, and use of a bed bug-infested wheelchair in building common areas. These findings validate an urgent need for public education, early detection, and adoption of more effective bed bug monitoring and intervention programs to curb the exploding problem of bed bug infestations. PMID:20214383

Wang, Changlu; Saltzmann, Kurt; Chin, Eva; Bennett, Gary W; Gibb, Timothy

2010-02-01

428

Assessing invasive plant infestation and disturbance gradients in a freshwater wetland using a GIScience approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The assessment of aquatic ecosystems requires information on biological and disturbance gradients in order to evaluate quality.\\u000a As a result decision makers need improved monitoring tools for characterizing relationships between invasive species infestation\\u000a and disturbance to make informed choices regarding wetland condition and management plans. The overarching goal of this research\\u000a was to assess invasive plant infestation and disturbance gradients

Nathan M. Torbick; Brian L. Becker; Sarah L. Hession; Jiaguo Qi; Gary J. Roloff; R. Jan Stevenson

2010-01-01

429

Study of the Efficacy of Compound Go.9333 (Ciba-Geigy) in Hookworm Infestation  

Microsoft Academic Search

50 cases with hookworm infestation were studied to find out the species of the parasite, 25 of them were included for a double-blind trial of compound Go.9333 (Ciba-Geigy)\\/placebo. Results of the study revealed predominance of Necator americanus (96%) in and around Pondicherry, South India. Compound Go.9333 was found to be very effective in the treatment of hookworm infestation. Side effects

D. S. Singh; R. Bala-Subramaniam; V. N. Bhatia; Vasantha Kumar; S. Chandrasekar

1981-01-01

430

Impact of glucosinolate in relation to leafminer, Liriomyza brassicae Riley (Diptera: Agromyzidae) infestation in crucifers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eight species belonging to the Family Cruciferae were classified to lafminer resistant, tolerant and susceptible on the basis\\u000a of leafminer infestation. They were analyzed for the glucosinolate content and correlated with leafminer infestation.\\u000a \\u000a Total glucosinolate content in general and sinigrin content in particular appeared to have the ability to repel the attack\\u000a ofLiriomyza brassicae, while gluconapin appeared to attract them.

Isamil Abdel; Khalek Ismail

1999-01-01

431

Leaf volatiles and polyphenols in pear trees infested by Psylla pyricola . Evidence of simultaneously induced responses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Feeding by the homopteranPsylla pyricola on leaves of pear trees induces the production of volatile compounds, such as (E,E)-a-farnesene and methyl-salicylate, as well as the production of polyphenols. The inference on induction is based on GC-MS and HPLC chromatograms from the same samples ofPsylla infested leaves, leaves from the same pear tree beforePsylla infestation and uninfested leaves from other

P. Scutareanu; B. Drukker; J. Bruin; M. A. Posthumus; M. W. Sabelis

1996-01-01

432

The tick Ixodes granulatus infests Rattus rattus populating a small island offshore of Singapore.  

PubMed

The ixodid tick Ixodes granulosus Supino 1897 was found infesting Rattus rattus in Semakau island, one of the small offshore islands fringing Singapore to the south. None of the examined R. rattus from the other islands fringing Singapore, or from Singapore island were found infested. Ixodes granulatus occurs, however, on Singapore island on Rattus annandalei, resident of undisturbed forested habitats. We speculate that invading black rats in Semakau replaced autochthonous sylvatic rodent population and contracted their associate tick population. PMID:16605073

Paperna, I

2006-03-01

433

Diel infestation dynamics of gnathiid isopod larvae parasitic on Caribbean reef fish  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infestation dynamics of parasitic gnathiid isopods on Caribbean reefs were studied throughout the 24-h diel cycle. Gnathiid\\u000a infestation on caged longfin damselfish (Stegastes diencaeus) peaked strongly at dawn, remained low during the remainder of the day, and increased again at night until about midnight.\\u000a Gnathiids were less abundant during the pre-dawn period. Peak loads on fish retrieved at dawn were

Paul C. Sikkel; Collin S. Schaumburg; Jeremy K. Mathenia

2006-01-01

434

Risk factors for domestic infestation by the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma dimidiata in Chiquimula, Guatemala.  

PubMed

In Guatemala prior to control initiatives, the main vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, were Rhodnius prolixus and Triatoma dimidiata. This study conducted in 2006 in the department of Chiquimula recorded a high level of T. dimidiata infestation and an absence of R. prolixus in all surveyed communities. In Guatemala, the presence of T. dimidiata as domestic, peridomestic and sylvatic populations results in control difficulties as houses are re-infested from the surrounding environment. Entomological surveys, the current method used to select houses in need of control efforts, are labour intensive and time consuming. A time- and cost-effective way to prioritize houses for evaluation and subsequent treatment is the stratification of houses based on the risk of triatomine infestation. In the present study, 17 anthropogenic risk factors were evaluated for associations with house infestation of T. dimidiata including: wall, floor and roof type. There was an increased likelihood of domestic infestation with T. dimidiata associated with the presence of dirt floors (18/29; OR 8.075, 95% CI 2.13-30.6), uncoated bajareque walls (12/17; OR 4.80, 95% CI 1.35-17.1) and triatomine-like faeces on walls (16/26; OR 3.89, 95% CI 1.19-12.7). These factors could be used to target control of T. dimidiata to communities with an increased risk of being infested. PMID:23597014

Weeks, E N I; Cordón-Rosales, C; Davies, C; Gezan, S; Yeo, M; Cameron, M M

2013-04-19

435

Artificial carbon dioxide source to attract lesser cornstalk borer (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larvae.  

PubMed

Different combinations of urea, urease (in jack bean meal, Canavalia DC.), and water were tested as carbon dioxide sources to attract larvae of lesser cornstalk borer, Elasmopalus lignosellus (Zeller), by using olfactory bioassays with an olfactometer and infrared gas analysis. A combination of urea, jack bean meal, and water was necessary to release a high level of carbon dioxide to attract the larvae. Different proportions of the three ingredients had different carbon dioxide release rates and exhibited different levels of attraction to the larvae. When carbon dioxide concentration was too high, attractiveness declined. Combinations with different amounts of water remained attractive for a period of up to 3 d, depending on the moisture of the samples. When Zonolite was used to simulate the soil conditions in the olfactometer, significantly more larvae located the area near the artificial carbon dioxide sources compared with the control. When combined with the artificial carbon dioxide sources, three insecticides (Lorsban, Temik, and Force) did not obviously affect the release rates of carbon dioxide, and more larvae were attracted to samples with the carbon dioxide source than to the samples without carbon dioxide. PMID:11561844

Huang, X; Mack, T P

2001-08-01

436

Synthesis of the deuterated sex pheromone components of the grape borer, Xylotrechus pyrrhoderus.  

PubMed

Adult males of the grape borer, Xylotrechus pyrrhoderus, secrete (S)-2-hydroxy-3-octanone [(S)-1] and (2S,3S)-2,3-octanediol [(2S,3S)-2] from their nota of prothoraces as sex pheromone components. Their structural similarity suggests that one of them is the biosynthetic precursor of the other component. In order to confirm the biochemical conversion, deuterated derivatives of both components were synthesized by starting from a Wittig reaction between hexanal and an ylide derived from D(5)-iodoethane and ending with enantiomeric resolution by chiral HPLC. The molecular ions of 1 and 2 could scarcely be detected by using a GC-MS analysis, and the labeled compounds showed similar mass spectra to the unlabeled pheromone components. However, several fragment ions, including four deuterium atoms, were observed in the mass spectra of their acetate derivatives, indicating that the conversion could be confirmed by examining a compound with the diagnostic ions after acetylation of the volatiles collected from insects treated with the labeled precursors. PMID:19809185

Kiyota, Ryutaro; Yamakawa, Rei; Iwabuchi, Kikuo; Hoshino, Keita; Ando, Tetsu

2009-10-07

437

Behavioral evidence for a contact sex pheromone component of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire.  

PubMed

The cuticular hydrocarbon profiles of emerald ash borers, Agrilus planipennis, were examined to determine if there are differences in these compounds between the sexes. We also assessed feral male EAB in the field for behavioral changes based on the application of a female-specific compound to dead, solvent-washed beetles. Males in the field spent significantly more time attempting copulation with dead, pinned female beetles coated with a three-beetle-equivalent dose of 3-methyltricosane than with solvent-washed beetles or those coated in 3-methyltricosane at lower concentrations. Males in the field spent the most time investigating pinned dead, unwashed female beetles. In the laboratory, sexually mature males were presented with one of several mixtures applied in hexane to filter paper disks or to the elytra of dead female beetles first washed in solvent. Male EAB also spent more time investigating dead beetles treated with solution applications that contained 3-methyltricosane than dead beetles and filter paper disks treated with male body wash or a straight-chain hydrocarbon not found on the cuticle of EAB. PMID:19153798

Lelito, Jonathan P; Böröczky, Katalin; Jones, Tappey H; Fraser, Ivich; Mastro, Victor C; Tumlinson, James H; Baker, Thomas C

2009-01-20

438

Analysis of Gene Expression in Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis) Using Quantitative Real Time-PCR  

PubMed Central

Emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis) is an exotic invasive pest, which has killed millions of ash trees (Fraxinus spp) in North America.EAB continues to spread rapidly and attacks ash trees of different ages, from saplings to mature trees. However, to date very little or no molecular knowledge exists for EAB. We are interested in deciphering the molecular-based physiological processes at the tissue level that aid EAB in successful colonization of ash trees. In this report we show the effective use of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to ascertain mRNA levels in different larval tissues (including midgut, fat bodies and cuticle) and different developmental stages (including 1st-, 2nd-, 3rd-, 4th-instars, prepupae and adults) of EAB. As an example, a peritrophin gene (herein named, AP-PERI1) is exemplified as the gene of interest and a ribosomal protein (AP-RP1) as the internal control. Peritrophins are important components of the peritrophic membrane/matrix (PM), which is the lining of the insect gut. The PM has diverse functions including digestion and mechanical protection to the midgut epithelium.

Bhandary, Binny; Rajarapu, Swapna Priya; Rivera-Vega, Loren; Mittapalli, Omprakash

2010-01-01

439

A contact sex pheromone component of the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).  

PubMed

Analyses of the elytral hydrocarbons from male and female emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, that were freshly emerged vs. sexually mature (>10 days old) revealed a female-specific compound, 9-methyl-pentacosane (9-Me-C(25)), only present in sexually mature females. This material was synthesized by the Wittig reaction of 2-decanone with (n-hexadecyl)-triphenylphosphonium bromide followed by catalytic reduction to yield racemic 9-Me C(25), which matched the natural compound by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (retention time and EI mass spectrum). In field bioassays with freeze-killed sexually mature A. planipennis females, feral males spent significantly more time in contact and attempting copulation with unwashed females than with females that had been washed in n-hexane to remove the cuticular lipids. Hexane-washed females to which 9-Me-C(25) had been reapplied elicited similar contact time and percentage of time attempting copulation as unwashed females, indicating that 9-methyl-pentacosane is a contact sex pheromone component of A. planipennis. This is the first contact sex pheromone identified in the Buprestidae. PMID:19238346

Silk, Peter J; Ryall, Krista; Barry Lyons, D; Sweeney, Jon; Wu, Junping

2009-02-24

440

Analysis of gene expression in emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) using quantitative real time-PCR.  

PubMed

Emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis) is an exotic invasive pest, which has killed millions of ash trees (Fraxinus spp) in North America. EAB continues to spread rapidly and attacks ash trees of different ages, from saplings to mature trees. However, to date very little or no molecular knowledge exists for EAB. We are interested in deciphering the molecular-based physiological processes at the tissue level that aid EAB in successful colonization of ash trees. In this report we show the effective use of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to ascertain mRNA levels in different larval tissues (including midgut, fat bodies and cuticle) and different developmental stages (including 1(st)-, 2(nd)-, 3(rd)-, 4(th)-instars, prepupae and adults) of EAB. As an example, a peritrophin gene (herein named, AP-PERI1) is exemplified as the gene of interest and a ribosomal protein (AP-RP1) as the internal control. Peritrophins are important components of the peritrophic membrane/matrix (PM), which is the lining of the insect gut. The PM has diverse functions including digestion and mechanical protection to the midgut epithelium. PMID:20445495

Bhandary, Binny; Rajarapu, Swapna Priya; Rivera-Vega, Loren; Mittapalli, Omprakash

2010-05-04

441

Ultrasonic courtship song in the Asian corn borer moth, Ostrinia furnacalis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although sex pheromone communication in the genus Ostrinia (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) has been studied intensively, acoustic communication in this genus has not been explored. In this study, we report that male-produced ultrasound serves as a courtship song in the Asian corn borer moth, O. furnacalis. Upon landing close to a pheromone-releasing female, a male showed a series of courtship behaviors involving emission of ultrasound. The sounds were produced when the wings were vibrated quickly in an upright position. The male song was composed of chirps, i.e., groups of pulses (duration of a chirp = 58.9 ms, 8.8 pulses/chirp), with a broadband frequency of 25-100 kHz. In flight tunnel experiments, deaf and hearing females showed a significant difference in the incidence of three behavioral responses to courting males, i.e., immediate acceptance, acceptance after walking, and rejection. Deaf females showed more ‘rejection’ and less ‘acceptance after walking’ than hearing females, indicating that the detection of male-produced ultrasound plays an important role in the acceptance of a male. The findings are discussed in the context of exploitation of receiver bias and mate choice.

Nakano, Ryo; Ishikawa, Yukio; Tatsuki, Sadahiro; Surlykke, Annemarie; Skals, Niels; Takanashi, Takuma

2006-06-01

442

Diapause induction, maintenance and termination in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis (Walker).  

PubMed

The rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, enters facultative diapause as fully grown larvae in response to short-day conditions during the autumn. Our results showed that the critical night length for diapause induction in C. suppressalis was between 10 h 22 min and 10h 45 min at 22, 25 and 28 degrees C, 11 h 18 min at 31 degrees C, and between 10 h 5 min and 10 h 20 min under field conditions (average temperature ranged from 27.2 to 30.7 degrees C). The diapause incidence declined in ultra-long nights (18-22 h scotophases) and DD, and increased in ultra-short nights (2-6 h scotophases) and LL. Moreover, we found that the third instar was the stage most sensitive to the photoperiod, and night length played an essential role in the initiation of diapause. Night-interruption experiments with a 1-h light pulse at LD 12:12 (light 12:dark 12) exhibited two troughs of diapause inhibition, with one occurring in early scotophase and the other in late scotophase. Field observations for six years showed that most larvae entered winter diapause in August in response to declining day lengths, despite the high temperatures prevailing during August. By periodically transferring the field-collected overwintering larvae to different photoperiods and temperatures, the results showed that photoperiod had a significant influence on diapause development during the early phase of diapause, while high temperature significantly accelerated the termination of larval diapause. PMID:20546744

Xiao, Hai-Jun; Mou, Feng-Chen; Zhu, Xing-Fen; Xue, Fang-Sen

2010-05-28

443

Induction of serotonin accumulation by feeding of rice striped stem borer in rice leaves.  

PubMed

Tryptophan (Trp)-related secondary metabolism has been implicated in the defense against pathogen infection and insect feeding in various gramineous species. Recently, we also reported that rice plant accumulated serotonin and tryptamine as well as their amide compounds coupled with phenolic acids in response to the infection by fungal pathogen. These compounds were likely to play an important role in the formation of physical barrier to the invading pathogens. To extend our study to elucidate the defensive role of Trp-derived secondary metabolism in gramineous plants, we examined in this study whether it is activated in response to herbivore attack as well. Third leaves of rice plant were fed on by third instar larvae of rice striped stem borer for 24 h or 48 h. The analysis of four Trp-derived metabolites including tryptamine, serotonin feruloyltryptamine (FerTry) and p-coumaroylserotonin (CouSer) by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry revealed that their contents clearly increased in response to the larvae feeding. The respective amounts of tryptamine, serotonin, FerTry and CouSer in the larvae-fed leaves were 12-, 3.5-, 33- and 140-fold larger than those in control leaves 48 h after the start of feeding. PMID:19704837

Ishihara, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Yumi; Miyagawa, Hisashi; Wakasa, Kyo

2008-09-01

444

Molecular cloning and expression analysis of ultraspiracle (USP) from the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis.  

PubMed

cDNA for ultraspiracle (USP) from the lepidopteran rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis was cloned using PCR techniques. The deduced amino acid sequence of C. suppressalis USP (CsUSP) was very similar to those of other lepidopteran USPs, especially to the Manduca sexta USP-2 isoform. Northern hybridization analysis detected a 6.5-kb message in the epidermis, fat body, and midgut of wandering larvae. CsUSP mRNA expression in the epidermis varied little during the last larval instar. Gel mobility shift assays showed that in vitro translated C. suppressalis ecdysone receptor (CsEcR) and CsUSP proteins bound to the Pal1 or Drosophila melanogaster hsp27 ecdysone response element as a heterodimer. In a ligand-receptor binding assay, [(3)H]ponasterone A ([(3)H]PoA) did not bind to individual CsEcR or CsUSP protein, but bound strongly to the CsEcR/CsUSP complex. [(3)H]PoA binding to CsEcR/CsUSP complex was competed by 20-hydroxyecdysone and a non-steroidal ecdysteroid agonist, RH-5992, but not by cholesterol, indicating that compounds with molting hormone activity against C. suppressalis can bind specifically to the CsEcR/CsUSP complex. PMID:12459199

Minakuchi, Chieka; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Kiuchi, Makoto; Seino, Atsushi; Tomita, Shuichiro; Kamimura, Manabu

2003-01-01

445

Induction of serotonin accumulation by feeding of rice striped stem borer in rice leaves  

PubMed Central

Tryptophan (Trp)-related secondary metabolism has been implicated in the defense against pathogen infection and insect feeding in various gramineous species. Recently, we also reported that rice plant accumulated serotonin and tryptamine as well as their amide compounds coupled with phenolic acids in response to the infection by fungal pathogen. These compounds were likely to play an important role in the formation of physical barrier to the invading pathogens. To extend our study to elucidate the defensive role of Trp-derived secondary metabolism in gramineous plants, we examined in this study whether it is activated in response to herbivore attack as well. Third leaves of rice plant were fed on by third instar larvae of rice striped stem borer for 24 h or 48 h. The analysis of four Trp-derived metabolites including tryptamine, serotonin feruloyltryptamine (FerTry) and p-coumaroylserotonin (CouSer) by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry revealed that their contents clearly increased in response to the larvae feeding. The respective amounts of tryptamine, serotonin, FerTry and CouSer in the larvae-fed leaves were 12-, 3.5-, 33- and 140-fold larger than those in control leaves 48 h after the start of feeding.

Ishihara, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Yumi; Wakasa, Kyo

2008-01-01

446

A contact sex pheromone component of the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Analyses of the elytral hydrocarbons from male and female emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, that were freshly emerged vs. sexually mature (>10 days old) revealed a female-specific compound, 9-methyl-pentacosane (9-Me-C25), only present in sexually mature females. This material was synthesized by the Wittig reaction of 2-decanone with ( n-hexadecyl)-triphenylphosphonium bromide followed by catalytic reduction to yield racemic 9-Me C25, which matched the natural compound by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (retention time and EI mass spectrum). In field bioassays with freeze-killed sexually mature A. planipennis females, feral males spent significantly more time in contact and attempting copulation with unwashed females than with females that had been washed in n-hexane to remove the cuticular lipids. Hexane-washed females to which 9-Me-C25 had been reapplied elicited similar contact time and percentage of time attempting copulation as unwashed females, indicating that 9-methyl-pentacosane is a contact sex pheromone component of A. planipennis. This is the first contact sex pheromone identified in the Buprestidae.

Silk, Peter J.; Ryall, Krista; Barry Lyons, D.; Sweeney, Jon; Wu, Junping

2009-05-01

447

Genetic similarity of eggplant shoot and fruit borer, Leucinodes orbonalis, populations.  

PubMed

Shoot and fruit borer, Leucinodes orbonalis (Guenee) (Pyraustidae: Lepidoptera), has become a production constraint in all eggplant (Solanum melongena Linn. [Solanaceae])-growing countries. In India, transgenic eggplants expressing Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins have been tested in fields by private- and public-sector agencies. Understanding population diversity is important in designing strategies for better pest management. In the present investigation, random-amplified polymorphic DNA markers were used to assess the genetic diversity of L. orbonalis population collected from different field locations in the Tamilnadu State of India. Of 17 random-amplified polymorphic DNA primers screened, only 11 primers generated polymorphic bands (up to 14 bands). According to their level of similarities, only two major clusters with no variation among population were deduced. Our results indicated that there is a steady genetic flow among the present population of L. orbonalis alleviating genetic variation, which may be attributed to passive and active dispersal of the insect besides absence of host-induced variations among the population. As molecular variability of L. orbonalis population is an important consideration for shoot and fruit damage of the eggplant, constant monitoring is essential to study the possible development of Cry protein resistance in L. orbonalis. PMID:19715478

Marimuthu, Murugan; Perumal, Yasodha; Salim, Abida Puthenpeedikal; Sharma, Gautam

2009-12-01

448

Cascading indirect effects in a coffee agroecosystem: effects of parasitic phorid flies on ants and the coffee berry borer in a high-shade and low-shade habitat.  

PubMed

Nonconsumptive effects (NCE) of parasites on hosts vary with habitat complexity thereby modifying trait-mediated effects on lower trophic levels. In coffee agroecosystems, Pseudacteon sp. phorid fly parasites negatively affect Azteca instabilis F. Smith ants via NCE thereby indirectly benefiting prey. It is unknown how differences in habitat complexity influence Azteca-phorid interactions or how phorids affect the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei Ferrari), an important pest of coffee (Coffea arabica L). We tested the following hypotheses in field and lab experiments to find the impact of NCE of phorids on A. instabilis and trait-mediated indirect effects of phorids on the coffee berry borer: (1) Phorid effects on A. instabilis differ between complex and simple shade habitats and (2) Phorids, by modifying A. instabilis behavior, indirectly affect coffee berry borer abilities to invade coffee berries. Phorids had greater impacts on A. instabilis activity in low-shade farms, but differences in phorid impacts were not mediated by phorid density or light availability. In the lab, phorids had strong cascading effects on abilities of A. instabilis to deter coffee berry borers. Without phorids, A. instabilis limited coffee berry borer attacks, whereas when the coffee berry borer was alone or with A. instabilis and phorids, more coffee fruits were attacked by coffee berry borer. These results indicate that A. instabilis has stronger biological control potential in high-shade farms, but the exact mechanism deserves further attention. PMID:22251635

Pardee, Gabriella L; Philpott, Stacy M

2011-06-01

449

Spatial Heterogeneity and Risk Maps of Community Infestation by Triatoma infestans in Rural Northwestern Argentina  

PubMed Central

Background Fifty years of residual insecticide spraying to control Triatoma infestans in the Gran Chaco region of northern Argentina, Paraguay and Bolivia shows that vertically coordinated interventions aiming at full coverage have limited effects and are unsustainable. We quantified the spatial distribution of T. infestans domestic infestation at the district level, identified environmental factors associated with high infestation and then explored the usefulness of risk maps for the spatial stratification of interventions. Methods and Findings We performed spatial analyses of house infestation data collected by the National Chagas Service in Moreno Department, northern Argentina (1999–2002). Clusters of high domestic infestation occurred in the southwestern extreme of the district. A multi-model selection approach showed that domestic infestation clustered in areas of low elevation, with few farmlands, high density of rural houses, high mean maximum land surface temperature, large NDVI, and high percentage of degraded and deforested lands. The best model classified 98.4% of the communities in the training dataset (sensitivity, 93.3%; specificity, 95.4%). The risk map evidenced that the high-risk area only encompassed 16% of the district. By building a network-based transportation model we assessed the operational costs of spatially contiguous and spatially targeted interventions. Targeting clusters of high infestation would have reached ?80% of all communities slated for full-coverage insecticide spraying, reducing in half the total time and economic cost incurred by a spatially contiguous strategy. Conclusions and Significance In disperse rural areas where control programs can accomplish limited coverage, consideration of infestation hot spots can contribute to the design and execution of cost-effective interventions against Chagas disease vectors. If field validated, targeted vertical control in high risk areas and horizontal control in medium to low risk areas may provide both a logistically and economically feasible alternative to blanket vertical insecticide spraying when resources are limited.

Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.; Spillmann, Cynthia; Zaidenberg, Mario; Gurtler, Ricardo E.; Kitron, Uriel

2012-01-01

450

Stand and individual tree characteristics associated with Enaphalodes rufulus (Haldeman) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) infestations within the Ozark and Ouachita National Forests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many oak decline events have been reported within the past century in the eastern U.S., and important causal factors often differ among them. Coincident with a recent decline event in upland oak-dominant forests of Arkansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma was an unexpected outbreak of a native cerambycid beetle, Enaphalodes rufulus (Haldeman), the red oak borer. A large range in estimates of

L. J. Haavik; F. M. Stephen

2010-01-01

451

Comparison of Midgut Proteinases in Bacillus thuringiensis-Susceptible and Resistant European Corn Borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Lepidoptera; Pyralidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The midgut proteinases from a Bacillus thuringiensis-susceptible (IA-S) and four laboratory-selected resistant strains (KS-SC, KS-NE, IA-1, and IA-3) of European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) were characterized using three synthetic substrates, N?-benzoyl-L-arginine p-nitroanilide (BApNA) for trypsin-like, N-succinyl-ala-ala-pro-phe p-nitroanilide (SAAPFpNA) for chymotrypsin-like, and N-succinyl-ala-ala-pro-leu p-nitroanilide (SAAPLpNA) for elastase-like proteinase activities. The hydrolyzing efficiency of trypsin-like proteinases, determined by Vmax, decreased 35% in

Fangneng Huang; Kun Yan Zhu; Lawrent L. Buschman; Randall A. Higgins; Brenda Oppert

1999-01-01

452

Antigen-presenting cells in draining lymph nodes of goats repeatedly infested by the Cayenne tick Amblyomma cajennense nymphs.  

PubMed

Resistance to tick feeding has been previously shown to be an acquired, immunologically mediated phenomenon in goats, associated with cutaneous basophilia to nymphs of Amblyomma cajennense, the Cayenne tick, after repeated infestations. On the other hand, it is well known that antigen-presenting cells (APCs) play an important role in the host immune reaction to tick infestations. The most able APCs for Th cells are the well defined dendritic cells, mononuclear phagocytes and B-lymphocytes. Immunohistochemical analysis of draining lymph nodes of goats repeatedly infested with nymphs of the ixodid tick A. cajennense to search for APCs was done. Pre-scapular lymph nodes draining the tick attachment sites were collected 15 days after both the first and third infestations. Tick infestations resulted in increased number of CD21(+) B lymphocytes in lymph nodes after the tertiary infestation. However, the number of CD11b(+) and CD11c(+) cells were not altered after the successive infestations. Lower numbers of CD11c(+) cells had infiltrated lymph nodes responsible for draining the tick infested skin. These findings suggest that acquired immunity of goats against nymphs of A. cajennense is possibly established by B lymphocytes during the first infestation and that APCs may play a key role in this mechanism. PMID:20596885

Monteiro, Gaby Ermelindo Roberto; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Franzin, Alessandra Maria; de Miranda Santos, Isabel Kinney Ferreira

2010-07-02

453

Preference and performance of Anagrus nilaparvatae (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae): effect of infestation duration and density by Nilaparvata lugens (Homoptera: Delphacidae).  

PubMed

The effect of Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) infestation duration and density on the host preference and performance of Anagrus nilaparvatae Pang et Wang, an egg parasitoid of rice planthoppers, was determined. The results showed that the parasitoid preferred N. lugens eggs on the plants infested with 10 gravid N. lugens females for 1 d to those plants infested with 10 gravid females for 2 or 3 d. It was also found to prefer N. lugens eggs on plants infested with 10 or 20 adult females after 24 h of infestation to those plants infested with 5 or 80 females. The parasitoid's offsprings had lower survival rates, fecundities, female ratios, indexes of capacity for population increase, and longer developmental durations on plants when they were infested with high N. lugens density (80 adult females per plant). However, the performance of the parasitoid on plants infested with low N. lugens density (5 female adults per plant) was similar to those on plants with intermediate N. lugens density (10 or 20 adult females per plant). Low preference of the parasitoid for N. lugens eggs on plants with heavy or light infestation levels may be correlated with low host suitability and detectability, respectively. The result implies an important role of herbivore-induced rice volatiles in the host preference of the parasitoid A. nilaparvatae, by which the parasitoid perceives the host and its suitability. PMID:18559181

Xiang, Caiyu; Ren, Nan; Wang, Xia; Sumera, Afsheen; Cheng, Jiaan; Lou, Yonggen

2008-06-01

454

Evaluation on the effectiveness of actions for controlling infestation by rodents in Campo Limpo region, Sao Paulo Municipality, Brazil.  

PubMed

Rodents are responsible for the transmission of more than 60 diseases both to human beings and to domestic animals. The increase in rodent infestation in a given area brings several health problems to the nearby population. Thus, when infestation increases, it is time to take intervention measures. Although many countries have implemented programs aimed at controlling rodent infestation, literature on studies evaluating the effectiveness of intervention measures in urban areas is scarce. Aimed at contributing to the understanding of rodents' population dynamics in urban areas, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the control methods proposed by "Programa de Vigilancia e Controle de Roedores do Municipio de Sao Paulo" (Program for Rodents Surveillance and Control in Sao Paulo Municipality), conducted on Jardim Comercial District. As a first step, a survey to assess infestation rates was conducted in 1529 dwellings located in the area studied. After that, a chemical control upon rodents was accomplished in every dwelling infested. One week and six months after completion of control measures, a new evaluation on infestation rates was carried out, in order to verify the effectiveness of the procedures taken and to estimate the re-infestation capacity. Initial infestation rate was 40.0%, and the final infestation rate, 14.4%. Therefore, the effectiveness of the control methods utilized was 63.8%. It can thus be concluded that the control methods applied were quite effective. PMID:20183196

de Masi, Eduardo; Vilaça, Pedro José; Razzolini, Maria Tereza Pepe

2009-08-01

455

Infestation by pyrethroids resistant bed bugs in the suburb of Paris, France  

PubMed Central

Bed bugs are hematophagous insects responsible for a re-emerging and challenging indoor pest in many countries. Bed bugs infestations may have health consequences including nuisance biting, cutaneous and systemic reactions. This resurgence can probably be attributed to factors such as increased international travel and development of resistance against insecticides. Resistance against pyrethroids has been reported several times from the USA and rarely in Europe. In France, very few data on bed bugs are available. The present study aimed to assess the infestation by bed bugs of a complex of two high-rise apartment buildings in the suburb of Paris and to evaluate their susceptibility to pyrethroid insecticides. We inspected for bed bugs 192 out of 198 apartments units (97%) and interviewed their residents. 76 (39.6%) apartments were infested. Among the 97 residents living in infested apartments, 53 (54.6%) reported bed bug bites. A total of 564 bed bugs were collected in the infested units. Bioassays showed that 54 out of 143 bed bugs were resistant to pyrethroids (37.8%; 95% confidence interval: 29.9-45.7%). DNA sequencing showed that all bed bugs tested (n = 124) had homozygous L925I kdr-like gene mutation. The level of pyrethroid resistance found indicates that this phenomenon was already established in the site and prompts the need to reevaluate the wide use of pyrethroids to control bed bugs.

Durand, R.; Cannet, A.; Berdjane, Z.; Bruel, C.; Haouchine, D.; Delaunay, P.; Izri, A.

2012-01-01

456

Infestation by pyrethroids resistant bed bugs in the suburb of Paris, France.  

PubMed

Bed bugs are hematophagous insects responsible for a re-emerging and challenging indoor pest in many countries. Bed bugs infestations may have health consequences including nuisance biting, cutaneous and systemic reactions. This resurgence can probably be attributed to factors such as increased international travel and development of resistance against insecticides. Resistance against pyrethroids has been reported several times from the USA and rarely in Europe. In France, very few data on bed bugs are available. The present study aimed to assess the infestation by bed bugs of a complex of two high-rise apartment buildings in the suburb of Paris and to evaluate their susceptibility to pyrethroid insecticides. We inspected for bed bugs 192 out of 198 apartments units (97%) and interviewed their residents. 76 (39.6%) apartments were infested. Among the 97 residents living in infested apartments, 53 (54.6%) reported bed bug bites. A total of 564 bed bugs were collected in the infested units. Bioassays showed that 54 out of 143 bed bugs were resistant to pyrethroids (37.8%; 95% confidence interval: 29.9-45.7%). DNA sequencing showed that all bed bugs tested (n=124) had homozygous L925I kdr-like gene mutation. The level of pyrethroid resistance found indicates that this phenomenon was already established in the site and prompts the need to reevaluate the wide use of pyrethroids to control bed bugs. PMID:23193523

Durand, R; Cannet, A; Berdjane, Z; Bruel, C; Haouchine, D; Delaunay, P; Izri, A

2012-11-01

457

Infestation of Werneckiella equi on Icelandic horses, characteristics of predilection sites and lice dermatitis.  

PubMed

Lice infestations on horses caused by the lice Werneckiella (Damalinia) equi and Haematopinus equi are observed worldwide. In this study, the distribution and clinical manifestations of lice on Icelandic horses were examined. Thirty-eight out of 93 animals (40.86%) were identified as infested with W. equi. Sixty-eight animals (73.12%) presented dermatological lesions associated with lice infestation, while only 32 of these animals presented lice. Six animals had no clinical signs although of being lice-positive, and 19 animals (20.43%) showed neither lice nor clinical manifestations. Lice burdens varied from animal to animal, and clinical manifestations occurred at all levels of infestation. Focal alopecia was the main clinical sign (83.78%) on lice-positive horses, while scaling and crusts occurred in 10.81% and 9.68% of the cases, respectively. Clinical signs present in the head and the neck/mane area were found to be an indication of lice infestation in horses. PMID:15940519

Larsen, K S; Eydal, M; Mencke, N; Sigurdsson, H

2005-06-07

458

A meta-analysis of association between acne ulgaris and Demodex infestation*  

PubMed Central

Until now, etiology of acne vulgaris is still uncertain. Although clinicians usually deny the association between Demodex infestation and acne vulgaris, it has been proved in some clinical practices. To confirm the association between Demodex infestation and acne vulgaris, a meta-analysis was conducted. Predefined selection criteria were applied to search all published papers that analyzed the association between Demodex infestation and acne vulgaris (January 1950 to August 2011) in ISI Web of Knowledge, MEDLINE, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases. A meta-analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) based on fixed effects models or random effects models. We enrolled the 60 Chinese and 3 English papers in this meta-analysis, which covered Turkey and 25 different provinces/municipalities in China and 42 130 participants including students and residents, aged from 1 to 78 years. The pooled OR in random effects models is 2.80 (95% CI, 2.34–3.36). Stability is robust according to sensitivity analysis. The fail-safe number is 18 477, suggesting that at least 18 477 articles with negative conclusions would be needed to reverse the conclusion that acne vulgaris was related to Demodex infestation. So the effect of publication bias was insignificant and could be ignored. It was concluded that acne vulgaris is associated with Demodex infestation. This indicates that when regular treatments for acne vulgaris are ineffective, examination of Demodex mites and necessary acaricidal therapies should be considered.

Zhao, Ya-e; Hu, Li; Wu, Li-ping; Ma, Jun-xian

2012-01-01

459

Development of shaft lining and service line extension systems compatible with blind shaft borer excavation rates. Phase I. Design. Final technical report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents a conceptual design of shaft lining and service line extension systems to be used in conjunction with the Blind Shaft Borer (BSB) developed by the Robbins Company. These systems will allow the BSB to advance at a rate of 50 ft\\/day on a steady-state basis to depths of 2000 ft. In addition, these systems will ensure that

J. M. Halter; J. D. Eklund

1978-01-01

460

Pheromone behavioral responses in unusual male European corn borer hybrid progeny not correlated to electrophysiological phenotypes of their pheromone-specific antennal neurons  

Microsoft Academic Search

In genetic studies on the sex pheromone communication system of two races of European corn borer, which use opposite pheromone blends of the E and Z compounds, it was found that antennal olfactory cell response amplitudes to the two compounds were controlled by an autosomal factor, whereas behavioral responses to the blends were controlled by a sex-linked locus. Because of

A. A. Cossé; M. G. Campbell; T. J. Glover; C. E. Linn; J. L. Todd; T. C. Baker; W. L. Roelofs

1995-01-01

461

Development of methods for the field evaluation of Oobius agrili (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) in North America, a newly introduced egg parasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A field study was conducted in forested plots near Lansing, Michigan in 2008 and 2009 to evaluate the newly introduced egg parasitoid, Oobius agrili Zhang and Huang (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), for control of the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)...

462

Assessing deposition and persistence of Beauveria bassiana GHA (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) applied for control of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in a commercial tree nursery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Determining the deposition and field persistence of mycoinsecticides is essential in the development of effective and economical application strategies, including specifically the timing and frequency of spray applications. In this study we used three methods to evaluate the persistence of Beauveria bassiana strain GHA applied for control of the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, an invasive pest attacking ash

Louela A. Castrillo; Michael H. Griggs; Houping Liu; Leah S. Bauer; John D. Vandenberg

2010-01-01

463

Assessing the potential for ash canopy tree replacement via current regeneration following emerald ash borer-caused mortality on southeastern Michigan landscapes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emerald ash borer (EAB) has killed millions of ash trees in Michigan and at least fourteen other states since its first detection near its introduction point in metropolitan Detroit in 2002. Despite overstory ash mortality near 100% in many areas, ash seedling and saplings remain unaffected and provide the potential for ash re-establishment into the canopy of deciduous forests

Daniel M. Kashian; John A. Witter

2011-01-01

464

Attitudes of Residents Toward Street Trees on Four Streets in Toledo, Ohio, U.S. Before Removal of Ash Trees (Fraxinus spp.) from Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Toledo, Ohio, U.S. residents on four streets in an area with mature street trees, including ash, scheduled for removal as a result of attack by emerald ash borer were surveyed to determine their attitudes toward their street trees. Toledo is in the process of removing some 5,000 trees. Large trees with a variety of summer and fall foliar characteristics were

Joseph Heimlich; T. Davis Sydnor; Matthew Bumgardner; Patrick O'Brien

2008-01-01

465

Evaluation of potential strategies to SLow Ash Mortality (SLAM) caused by emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis): SLAM in an urban forest  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive pest native to Asia, has killed millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in North America since it was first discovered there in 2002. As of autumn 2011, A. planipennis has been detected in 15 US states and two Canadian provinces. A pilot project to slow the onset and progression of

Deborah G. McCullough; Rodrigo J. Mercader

2012-01-01

466

Effects of host size on the sex ratio, clutch size, and size of adult Spathius agrili, an ectoparasitoid of emerald ash borer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The idiobiont ectoparasitoid, Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), parasitizes the concealed larvae of the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), which feed on the inner bark of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of host larval size on parasitoid clutch size, offspring sex allocation, and adult body length. Results

Xiao-Yi Wang; Zhong-Qi Yang; Hui Wu; Juli R. Gould

2008-01-01

467

Development of methods for the field evaluation of Oobius agrili (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) in North America, a newly introduced egg parasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A field study was conducted in forested plots near Lansing, Michigan in 2008 and 2009 to evaluate the newly introduced egg parasitoid Oobius agrili Zhang and Huang (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) for control of the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). To measure parasitism by O. agrili, laboratory-reared “sentinel EAB eggs” were deployed under bark flaps on trunks

Jian J. Duan; Leah S. Bauer; Michael D. Ulyshen; Juli R. Gould; Roy Van Driesche

2011-01-01

468

Distribution of trunk-injected 14C-imidacloprid in ash trees and effects on emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is a destructive exotic pest of North American ash (Fraxinus sp.) trees. Trunk injection of imidacloprid is commonly used to protect landscape ash trees from A. planipennis damage. Efficacy can vary and little is known about the distribution, accumulation and persistence of this compound in trees. Green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) and

David Mota-Sanchez; Bert M. Cregg; Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; Robert M. Hollingworth

2009-01-01

469

Quantitative detection of Beauveria bassiana GHA (Ascomycota: Hypocreales), a potential microbial control agent of the emerald ash borer, by use of real-time PCR  

Microsoft Academic Search

Accurate monitoring of an introduced, mass-released microbial control agent is essential in evaluating its persistence and in designing application strategies for insect pest control. As part of our multi-year study on the development and use of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana against the emerald ash borer, a major invasive pest of ash trees, we are determining persistence of the fungus

Louela A. Castrillo; Michael H. Griggs; John D. Vandenberg

2008-01-01

470

Action thresholds for the management of pod borer, Adisura atkinsoni Moore (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) on field bean (hyacinth bean), Lablab purpureus (L.) in India  

Microsoft Academic Search

Action thresholds for initiating insecticide sprays based on peak egg laying and flat pod damage were evaluated in the field for the pod borer, Adisura atkinsoni Moore on field (hyacinth) bean. An initial spray at peak egg laying and tender pod stage, followed by sprays to maintain 0.5 flat pods damaged\\/inflorescence reduced pod and seed damage and maximized the yield

S. Mallikarjunappa; D. Rajagopal

1991-01-01

471

Some Like It Hot: The Influence and Implications of Climate Change on Coffee Berry Borer (Hypothenemus hampei) and Coffee Production in East Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

The negative effects of climate change are already evident for many of the 25 million coffee farmers across the tropics and the 90 billion dollar (US) coffee industry. The coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei), the most important pest of coffee worldwide, has already benefited from the temperature rise in East Africa: increased damage to coffee crops and expansion in its

Juliana Jaramillo; Eric Muchugu; Fernando E. Vega; Aaron Davis; Christian Borgemeister; Adenirin Chabi-Olaye; Simon Thrush

2011-01-01

472

Characterization of six antibacterial response genes from the European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) larval gut and their expression in response to bacterial challenge  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Six cDNAs encoding putative antibacterial response proteins (ARPs) were identified and characterized from the larval gut of the European corn borer (ECB, Ostrinia nubilalis). These ARPs include four peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs), one ß-1,3 glucanase-1 (ßglu-1), and one lysozyme. Tissue-...