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Sample records for boron isotope ratios

  1. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry of nanogram quantities of boron and sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieser, Michael Eugene

    1998-09-01

    Instrumentation and analytical techniques were developed to measure isotope abundances from nanograms of sulfur and boron. Sulfur isotope compositions were determined employing continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectroscopy (CF-IRMS) procedures and AsS+ thermal ionization mass spectrometry techniques (AsS+-TIMS). Boron isotope abundances were determined by BO2/sp--TIMS. CF-IRMS measurements realized δ34S values from 10 μg sulfur with precisions of ±0.3/perthous. To extend sulfur isotope measurements to much smaller samples, a TIMS procedure was developed to measure 75As32S+ and 75As34S+ at masses 108 and 109 from 200 ng S on a Finnigan MAT 262 with an ion counter. This is possibly the smallest amount of sulfur which has been successfully analyzed isotopically. The internal precision of 32S/34S ratios measured by AsS+-TIMS was better than ±0.15 percent. δ34S-values calculated relative to the measured 32S/34S value of an IAEA AG2S standard (S-1) agreed with those determined by CF-IRMS to within ±3/perthous. The increasing sensitivity of S-isotope analyses permits hiterto impossible investigations e.g. sulfur in tree rings and ice cores. Boron isotope abundances were measured as BO2/sp- from 50 ng B using an older thermal ionization mass spectrometer which had been extensively upgraded including the addition of computer control electronics, sensitive ion current amplification and fiber optic data bus. The internal precisions of the measured 11B/10B ratios were ±0.15 percent and the precisions of δ11B values calculated relative to the accepted international standard (SRM-951) were ±3/perthous. Two applications of boron isotope abundance variations were initiated (1) ground waters of Northern Alberta and (2) coffee beans in different regions of the world. In the first it was demonstrated that boron isotopes could be used to trace boron released during steam injection of oil sands into the surrounding environment. Data from the second study suggest that boron

  2. Estimation of boron isotope ratios using high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltsche, Helmar; Prattes, Karl; Zischka, Michael; Knapp, Günter

    2009-04-01

    In the production of 10B enriched steels, the production-recycling process needs to be closely monitored for inadvertent mix-up of materials with different B isotope levels. A quick and simple method for the estimation of boron isotope ratios in high alloyed steels using high resolution continuum source flame AAS (HR-CS-FAAS) was developed. On the 208.9 nm B line the wavelength of the peak absorption of 10B and 11B differs by 2.5 pm. The wavelength of the peak absorption of boron was determined by fitting a Gauss function through spectra simultaneously recorded by HR-CS-FAAS. It was shown that a linear correlation between the wavelength of the peak absorption and the isotope ratio exists and that this correlation is independent of the total boron concentration. Internal spectroscopic standards were used to compensate for monochromator drift and monochromator resolution changes. Accuracy and precision of the analyzed samples were thereby increased by a factor of up to 1.3. Three steel reference materials and one boric acid CRM, each certified for the boron isotope ratio were used to validate the procedure.

  3. Wich Parameter of the Carbonate System Influences the Boron Isotopic Composition and the Boron Calcium Ratio in Foraminiferal Tests?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarek, K.; Nehrke, G.; Horn, I.; Langer, G.; Misra, S.; Bijma, J.

    2013-12-01

    We performed culture experiments with the benthic symbiont bearing foraminifer Amphistegina lessonii in order to determine which parameter of the marine carbonate system influences the boron isotopic composition (δ11B) and the boron calcium ratio (B/Ca) in the test. A. lessonii grew for two months in treatments of culture media with decoupled pH-carbonate chemistry. We measured δ11B and B/Ca simultaneously on single tests using a recently new developed mass spectrometric technique. Our results show a clear pH dependence on δ11B. The B/Ca in the shell show a positive correlation with aqueous B(OH)4-/HCO3-.

  4. Intra-Shell boron isotope ratios in benthic foraminifera: Implications for paleo-pH reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollion-Bard, C.; Erez, J.

    2009-12-01

    The boron isotope composition of marine carbonates is considered to be a seawater pH proxy. Nevertheless, the use of δ11B has some limitations: 1) the knowledge of fractionation factor (α4-3) between the two boron dissolved species (boric acid and borate ion), 2) the δ11B of seawater may have varied with time and 3) the amplitude of the "vital effects" of this proxy. Using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), we looked at the internal variability in the boron isotope ratio of the shallow water, symbionts bearing foraminiferan Amphistegina lobifera. Specimens were cultured at constant temperature (24±0.1 °C) in seawater with pH ranging between 7.90 and 8.45. We performed 6 to 8 measurements of δ11B in each foraminifera. Intra-shell boron isotopes show large variability with an upper threshold value of pH ~ 9. The ranges of the skeletal calculated pH values in different cultured foraminifera, show strong correlation with the culture pH values and may thus serve as proxy for pH in the past ocean.

  5. Determination of boron isotope ratios and rare earth elements by ETC-ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Richner, P.; Wanner, B.

    1994-12-31

    Matrix modifiers play an important role in ETV-ICP-MS as they do in GF-AAS. In ETV-ICP-MS matrix modifiers, which are used as carriers for the analyte from the furnace to the ICP, enhance both sensitivity and reproducibility. Furthermore, matrix modifiers can be used to bring the element investigated into a specific compound with certain properties. The graphite furnace plays the role of a chemical reactor. In GF-AAS volatile elements are transformed into refractory compounds in order to prevent loss during the ashing stage of the temperature program. In ETV-ICP-MS, refractory elements can be transformed into volatile compounds with the help of matrix modifiers. Both B and the REE`s are known to form refractory compounds such as carbides and oxides which make them difficult to analyze by GF-AAS. However, halides of both B and the REE`s have boiling points below 2000{degrees}C. If these compounds are formed within the furnace the analyte elements can then be effectively transported into the ICP where they will be consequentially atomized and ionized. The technique will be applied to the determination of boron isotope ratios in a tracer study of the boron metabolism in vegetables, using NH4F as a matrix modifier, and the determination of REE`s in geological samples, with CHF{sub 3} as matrix modifier.

  6. Boron abundances and isotopic ratios of olivine grains on Itokawa returned by the Hayabusa spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiya, Wataru; Hoppe, Peter; Ott, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    We report the B abundances and isotopic ratios of two olivine grains from the S-type asteroid Itokawa sampled by the Hayabusa spacecraft. Olivine grains from the Dar al Gani (DaG) 989 LL6 chondrite were used as a reference. Since we analyzed polished thin sections in both cases, we expect the contribution from the solar wind B (rich in 10B) to be minimal because the solar wind was implanted only within very thin layers of the grain surface. The Itokawa and DaG 989 olivine grains have homogeneous B abundances (~400 ppb) and 11B/10B ratios compatible with the terrestrial standard and bulk chondrites. The observed homogeneous B abundances and isotopic ratios of the Itokawa olivine grains are likely the result of thermal metamorphism which occurred in the parent asteroid of Itokawa, which had a similar composition as LL chondrites. The chondritic B isotopic ratios of the Itokawa samples suggest that they contain little cosmogenic B (from cosmic-ray spallation reactions) rich in 10B. This observation is consistent with the short cosmic-ray exposure ages of Itokawa samples inferred from the small concentrations of cosmogenic 21Ne. If other Itokawa samples have little cosmogenic B as well, the enrichment in 10B found previously on the surface of another Itokawa particle (as opposed to the bulk grain study here) may be attributed to implanted solar wind B.

  7. Boron abundances and isotopic ratios of olivine grains on Itokawa returned by the Hayabusa spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiya, Wataru; Hoppe, Peter; Ott, Ulrich

    2016-09-01

    We report the B abundances and isotopic ratios of two olivine grains from the S-type asteroid Itokawa sampled by the Hayabusa spacecraft. Olivine grains from the Dar al Gani (DaG) 989 LL6 chondrite were used as a reference. Since we analyzed polished thin sections in both cases, we expect the contribution from the solar wind B (rich in 10B) to be minimal because the solar wind was implanted only within very thin layers of the grain surface. The Itokawa and DaG 989 olivine grains have homogeneous B abundances (~400 ppb) and 11B/10B ratios compatible with the terrestrial standard and bulk chondrites. The observed homogeneous B abundances and isotopic ratios of the Itokawa olivine grains are likely the result of thermal metamorphism which occurred in the parent asteroid of Itokawa, which had a similar composition as LL chondrites. The chondritic B isotopic ratios of the Itokawa samples suggest that they contain little cosmogenic B (from cosmic-ray spallation reactions) rich in 10B. This observation is consistent with the short cosmic-ray exposure ages of Itokawa samples inferred from the small concentrations of cosmogenic 21Ne. If other Itokawa samples have little cosmogenic B as well, the enrichment in 10B found previously on the surface of another Itokawa particle (as opposed to the bulk grain study here) may be attributed to implanted solar wind B.

  8. Method for separating boron isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.

    1978-01-01

    A method of separating boron isotopes .sup.10 B and .sup.11 B by laser-induced selective excitation and photodissociation of BCl.sub.3 molecules containing a particular boron isotope. The photodissociation products react with an appropriate chemical scavenger and the reaction products may readily be separated from undissociated BCl.sub.3, thus effecting the desired separation of the boron isotopes.

  9. Boron isotopic compositions of some boron minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oi, Takao; Nomura, Masao; Musashi, Masaaki; Ossaka, Tomoko; Okamoto, Makoto; Kakihana, Hidetake

    1989-12-01

    Boron minerals that have different structural formulae but are supposed to have the same geologic origin have been collected and analyzed for the 11B /10B isotopic ratio. It has been reconfirmed that minerals of marine origin have higher 11B /10B ratios than those of nonmarine origin. It has been found that the sequence of decreasing 11B /10B values among the minerals with the same geologic origin is; borax, tincal, kernite (Na borates) > ulexite ( Na/Ca borate) > colemanite, iyoite, meyerhofferite (Ca borates). This sequence is explainable on the basis of the difference in crystal structure among the minerals. That is, minerals with higher BO 3/BO 4 ratios, (the ratio of the number of the BO 3 triangle units to the number of the BO 4 tetrahedron units in the structural formula of a mineral) have higher 11B /10B ratios.

  10. Boron-isotope geochemistry. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Spivack, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of the major aspects of the boron-isotope geochemical cycle was carried out. Particular emphasis was directed at developing a reproducible, high-precision method for the determination of boron isotope ratios in geologic materials and determining the processes that influence the boron-isotope composition of seawater. A method for the determination of the isotopic composition of boron by thermal ionization mass spectrometry of Cs/sub 2/B/sub 4/O/sub 7/ is described. Samples analyzed for boron content and isotopic composition included: seawater, unaltered mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB), altered MORB (dredge and core samples), serpentinized periodotites, marine sediments, marine sedimentary pore waters, hydrothermally altered sediments, oceanic hydrothermal solutions, rainwater, river water and suspended sediments, island arc volcanics and a soil profile.

  11. Boron isotopic compositions of some boron minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Oi, Takao; Musashi, Masaaki; Ossaka, Tomoko; Kakihana, Hidetake ); Nomura, Masao; Okamoto, Makoto )

    1989-12-01

    Boron minerals that have different structural formulae but are supposed to have the same geologic origin have been collected and analyzed for the {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B isotopic ratio. It has been reconfirmed that minerals of marine origin have higher {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B ratios than those of nonmarine origin. It has been found that the sequence of decreasing {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B values among the minerals with the same geologic origin is; borax, tincal, kernite (Na borates) > ulexite (Na/Ca borate) > colemanite, iyoite, meyerhofferite (Ca borates). This sequence is explainable on the basis of the difference in crystal structure among the minerals. That is, minerals with high BO{sub 3}/BO{sub 4} ratios, (the ratio of the number of the BO{sub 3} triangle units to the number of the BO{sub 4} tetrahedron units in the structural formula of a mineral) have higher {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B ratios.

  12. The Role of Boron-Chloride and Noble Gas Isotope Ratios in TVZ Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hulston, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The model of the geothermal system in which deep circulating groundwater containing noble gases, at air saturated water concentrations, mixes with hot fluids of mantle origin at depth, is extended to include the effect of interaction of the ascending fluid with both solid and gaseous phases of basement (or other) rocks en route to the surface. It is demonstrated that this interaction is responsible for most of the CO{sub 2} in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) geothermal systems. It is proposed that the modeling of this interaction might be accomplished by techniques similar to those used for the understanding of the oxygen isotope shift found in geothermal systems. The water rock interaction experiments of Ellis and Mahon (1964, 1967) provides some data on the kinetic rates for B and Cl dissolution from rocks likely to be encountered in the geothermal system, but further information on the behavior of B may be needed. If these problems can be overcome this modeling technique has promise for the estimation of the recharge of geothermal systems and hence the sustainability of these systems.

  13. Method of separating boron isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Thorne, J.M.; Cluff, C.L.

    1981-01-23

    A method of boron isotope enrichment involving the isotope preferential photolysis of (2-chloroethenyl)-dichloroborane as the feed material. The photolysis can readily by achieved with CO/sub 2/ laser radiation and using fluences significantly below those required to dissociate BCl/sub 3/.

  14. Method of separating boron isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Reed J.; Thorne, James M.; Cluff, Coran L.; Hayes, John K.

    1984-01-01

    A method of boron isotope enrichment involving the isotope preferential photolysis of (2-chloroethenyl)dichloroborane as the feed material. The photolysis can readily be achieved with CO.sub.2 laser radiation and using fluences significantly below those required to dissociate BCl.sub.3.

  15. Evaluation of Ground-Water and Boron Sources by Use of Boron Stable-Isotope Ratios, Tritium, and Selected Water-Chemistry Constituents near Beverly Shores, Northwestern Indiana, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buszka, Paul M.; Fitzpatrick, John A.; Watson, Lee R.; Kay, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    Concentrations of boron greater than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) 900 ?g/L removal action level (RAL) standard were detected in water sampled by the USEPA in 2004 from three domestic wells near Beverly Shores, Indiana. The RAL regulates only human-affected concentrations of a constituent. A lack of well logs and screened depth information precluded identification of whether water from sampled wells, and their boron sources, were from human-affected or natural sources in the surficial aquifer, or associated with a previously defined natural, confined aquifer source of boron from the subtill or basal sand aquifers. A geochemically-based classification of the source of boron in ground water could potentially determine the similarity of boron to known sources or mixtures between known sources, or classify whether the relative age of the ground water predated the potential sources of contamination. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the USEPA, investigated the use of a geochemical method that applied boron stable isotopes, and concentrations of boron, tritium, and other constituents to distinguish between natural and human-affected sources of boron in ground water and thereby determine if the RAL was applicable to the situation. Boron stable-isotope ratios and concentrations of boron in 17 ground-water samples and tritium concentrations in 9 ground-water samples collected in 2004 were used to identify geochemical differences between potential sources of boron in ground water near Beverly Shores, Indiana. Boron and d11B analyses for this investigation were made on unacidified samples to assure consistency of the result with unacidified analyses of d11B values from other investigations. Potential sources of boron included surficial-aquifer water affected by coal-combustion products (CCP) or domestic-wastewater, upward discharge of ground water from confined aquifers, and unaffected water from the surficial aquifer that was distant

  16. Fractionation of Boron Isotopes in Icelandic Hydrothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, J.K.; Palmer, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Boron isotope ratios have been determined in a variety of different geothermal waters from hydrothermal systems across Iceland. Isotope ratios from the high temperature meteoric water recharged systems reflect the isotope ratio of the host rocks without any apparent fractionation. Seawater recharged geothermal systems exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B values than the meteoric water recharged geothermal systems. Water/rock ratios can be assessed from boron isotope ratios in the saline hydrothermal systems. Low temperature hydrothermal systems also exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B than the high temperature systems, indicating fractionation of boron due to adsorption of the lighter isotope onto secondary minerals. Fractionation of boron in carbonate deposits may indicate the level of equilibrium attained within the systems.

  17. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, C.K.; Smith, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Intra-shell boron isotope ratios in the symbiont-bearing benthic foraminiferan Amphistegina lobifera: Implications for δ 11B vital effects and paleo-pH reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollion-Bard, C.; Erez, J.

    2010-03-01

    The boron isotope composition of marine carbonates is considered to be a seawater pH proxy. Nevertheless, the use of δ 11B has some limitations such as the knowledge of the fractionation factor ( α4-3) between boric acid and the borate ion and the amplitude of "vital effects" on this proxy that are not well constrained. Using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) we have examined the internal variability of the boron isotope ratio in the shallow water, symbionts bearing foraminiferan Amphistegina lobifera. Specimens were cultured at constant temperature (24 ± 0.1 °C) in seawater with pH ranging between 7.90 and 8.45. Intra-shell boron isotopes showed large variability with an upper limit value of ≈30‰. Our results suggest that the fractionation factor α4-3 of 0.97352 ( Klochko et al., 2006) is in better agreement with our experiments and with direct pH measurements in seawater vacuoles associated with the biomineralization process in these foraminifera. Despite the large variability of the skeletal pH values in each cultured specimen, it is possible to link the lowest calculated pH values to the experimental culture pH values while the upper pH limit is slightly below 9. This variability can be interpreted as follows: foraminifera variably increase the pH at the biomineralization site to about 9. This increase above ambient seawater pH leads to a range in δ 11B (Δ 11B) for each seawater pH. This Δ 11B is linearly correlated with the culture seawater pH with a slope of -13.1 per pH unit, and is independent of the fractionation factor α4-3, or the δ 11B sw through time. It may also be independent of the p KB (the dissociation constant of boric acid) value. Therefore, Δ 11B in foraminifera can potentially reconstruct paleo-pH of seawater.

  19. Separation and Analysis of Boron Isotope in High Plant by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingcai; Dong, Yuliang; Zhu, Huayu; Sun, Aide

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of boron and its isotope in plants is useful to better understand the transposition and translocation of boron within plant, the geochemical behavior in the interface between soil and plant, and the biogeochemical cycle of boron. It is critical to develop a useful method to separate boron from the plant for the geochemical application of boron and its isotope. A method was developed for the extraction of boron in plant sample, whose isotope was determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The results indicated that this method of dry ashing coupled with two-step ion-exchange chromatography is powerful for the separation of boron in plant sample with large amounts of organic matters completely. The ratios of boron isotope composition in those plant tissue samples ranged from −19.45‰ to +28.13‰ (total range: 47.58‰) with a mean value of 2.61 ± 11.76‰ SD. The stem and root isotopic compositions were lower than those in flower and leaf. The molecular mechanism of boron isotope may be responsible for the observed variation of boron isotopic composition and are considered as a useful tool for the better understanding of boron cycling process in the environment and for the signature of living systems. PMID:26819618

  20. Separation and Analysis of Boron Isotope in High Plant by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingcai; Dong, Yuliang; Zhu, Huayu; Sun, Aide

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of boron and its isotope in plants is useful to better understand the transposition and translocation of boron within plant, the geochemical behavior in the interface between soil and plant, and the biogeochemical cycle of boron. It is critical to develop a useful method to separate boron from the plant for the geochemical application of boron and its isotope. A method was developed for the extraction of boron in plant sample, whose isotope was determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The results indicated that this method of dry ashing coupled with two-step ion-exchange chromatography is powerful for the separation of boron in plant sample with large amounts of organic matters completely. The ratios of boron isotope composition in those plant tissue samples ranged from -19.45‰ to +28.13‰ (total range: 47.58‰) with a mean value of 2.61 ± 11.76‰ SD. The stem and root isotopic compositions were lower than those in flower and leaf. The molecular mechanism of boron isotope may be responsible for the observed variation of boron isotopic composition and are considered as a useful tool for the better understanding of boron cycling process in the environment and for the signature of living systems. PMID:26819618

  1. Rapid mass-spectrometric determination of boron isotopic distribution in boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Rein, J E; Abernathey, R M

    1972-07-01

    Boron isotopic ratios are measured in boron carbide by thermionic ionization mass spectrometry with no prior chemical separation. A powder blend of boron carbide and sodium hydroxide is prepared, a small portion is transferred to a tantalum filament, the filament is heated to produce sodium borate, and the filament is transferred to the mass spectrometer where the(11)B/(10)B ratio is measured, using the Na(2)BO(2)(+) ion. Variables investigated for their effect on preferential volatilization of (10)B include the sodium hydroxide-boron carbide ratio and the temperature and duration of filament heating. A series of boron carbide pellets containing natural boron, of the type proposed for the control rods of the Fast Flux Test Facility reactor, were analysed with an apparently unbiased result of 4.0560 for the (11)B/(10)B ratio (standard deviation 0.0087). The pellets contained over 3% metal impurities typically found in this material. Time of analysis is 45 min per sample, with one analyst. PMID:18961131

  2. New Carbonate Standard Reference Materials for Boron Isotope Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J.; Christopher, S. J.; Day, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The isotopic composition of boron (δ11B) in marine carbonates is well established as a proxy for past ocean pH. Yet, before palaeoceanographic interpretation can be made, rigorous assessment of analytical uncertainty of δ11B data is required; particularly in light of recent interlaboratory comparison studies that reported significant measurement disagreement between laboratories [1]. Well characterised boron standard reference materials (SRMs) in a carbonate matrix are needed to assess the accuracy and precision of carbonate δ11B measurements throughout the entire procedural chemistry; from sample cleaning, to ionic separation of boron from the carbonate matrix, and final δ11B measurement by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. To date only two carbonate reference materials exist that have been value-assigned by the boron isotope measurement community [2]; JCp-1 (porites coral) and JCt-1 (Giant Clam) [3]. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will supplement these existing standards with new solution based inorganic carbonate boron SRMs that replicate typical foraminiferal and coral B/Ca ratios and δ11B values. These new SRMs will not only ensure quality control of full procedural chemistry between laboratories, but have the added benefits of being both in abundant supply and free from any restrictions associated with shipment of biogenic samples derived from protected species. Here we present in-house δ11B measurements of these new boron carbonate SRM solutions. These preliminary data will feed into an interlaboratory comparison study to establish certified values for these new NIST SRMs. 1. Foster, G.L., et al., Chemical Geology, 2013. 358(0): p. 1-14. 2. Gutjahr, M., et al., Boron Isotope Intercomparison Project (BIIP): Development of a new carbonate standard for stable isotopic analyses. Geophysical Research Abstracts, EGU General Assembly 2014, 2014. 16(EGU2014-5028-1). 3. Inoue, M., et al., Geostandards and

  3. Isotopic composition of cosmic-ray boron and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krombel, K. E.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    New measurements of the cosmic-ray boron and nitrogen isotopes at earth and of the elemental abundances of boron, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are presented. A region of mutually allowed values for the cosmic-ray nitrogen source ratios is determined, and the cosmic-ray escape mean free path is determined as a function of energy using a leaky box model for cosmic-ray propagation in the Galaxy. Relative to O-16, a N-15 source abundance consistent with solar system composition and a N-14 source abundance which is a factor of about three underabundant relative to the solar value are found.

  4. GUM Analysis for TIMS and SIMS Isotopic Ratios in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, Patrick G.; Gerlach, David C.; Cliff, John B.; Petersen, Steven L.

    2007-04-01

    This report describes GUM calculations for TIMS and SIMS isotopic ratio measurements of reactor graphite samples. These isotopic ratios are used to estimate reactor burn-up, and currently consist of various ratios of U, Pu, and Boron impurities in the graphite samples. The GUM calculation is a propagation of error methodology that assigns uncertainties (in the form of standard error and confidence bound) to the final estimates.

  5. Experimental determination of boron isotope fractionation in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochko, K.; Kaufman, A. J.; Yao, W.; Byrne, R. H.; Tossell, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    The boron isotopic composition of marine carbonates is believed to be a useful tracer of seawater pH, which may then be used to reconstruct atmospheric pCO2 through time. Use of this proxy requires an intimate understanding of chemical kinetics and thermodynamic isotope exchange reactions between the two dominant boron-bearing species in seawater: boric acid B(OH)3 and borate ion B(OH)4-, which is preferentially incorporated into the carbonate lattice. However, due to our inability to quantitatively isolate these species from seawater, the magnitude of boron isotope fractionation at different temperatures and salinities has not previously been empirically measured. All paleo-pH studies have relied on the boron isotope equilibrium constant (11-10Kb = 1.0194 at 25°C) estimated theoretically in 1977 by Kakihana and colleagues. Here we present results of empirical determination of the boron isotope equilibrium constant at different temperatures and ionic strengths. The determinations are based on titration of isotopically labeled solutions, containing either 10B(OH)3 or 11B(OH)3, with NaOH. The pH of the titrated solutions is precisely measured using thymol blue indicator absorbance ratios. Differences in solution pH or, equivalently, borate/boric acid pK values between the isotopically substituted solutions, provides the desired equilibrium constant for the reaction: 10B(OH)3 + 11B(OH)4- <=> 11B(OH)3 + 10B(OH)4-. We have performed experiments to assess the influence of the temperature (25 and 40°C), ionic strength (0.05 and 0.7 molar) and medium composition (pure water, 0.6 M KCl, and synthetic seawater) on the isotopic equilibrium constant. Within experimental uncertainty maximum of ±0.002 (1σ), our results show only a weak dependence of the equilibrium constant on the above factors. The boron isotope equilibrium constant in seawater (S = 35) was determined to be 1.0269 ± 0.0013 at 25°C (1σ, n=6), which is in poor agreement with the theoretical basis for all

  6. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Deegan, Frances M.; Troll, Valentin R.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Jolis, Ester M.; Freda, Carmela

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ11B values down to −41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of 10B into the assimilating melt. Loss of 11B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports 11B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ11B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle. PMID:27488228

  7. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution.

    PubMed

    Deegan, Frances M; Troll, Valentin R; Whitehouse, Martin J; Jolis, Ester M; Freda, Carmela

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ(11)B values down to -41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of (10)B into the assimilating melt. Loss of (11)B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports (11)B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ(11)B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle. PMID:27488228

  8. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deegan, Frances M.; Troll, Valentin R.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Jolis, Ester M.; Freda, Carmela

    2016-08-01

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ11B values down to ‑41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of 10B into the assimilating melt. Loss of 11B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports 11B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ11B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle.

  9. Boron and strontium isotope ratios and major/trace elements concentrations in tea leaves at four major tea growing gardens in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Ta; You, Chen-Feng; Aggarwal, Suresh Kumar; Chung, Chuan-Hsiung; Chao, Hung-Chun; Liu, Hou-Chun

    2016-06-01

    Isotopic compositions of B and Sr in rocks and sediments can be used as tracers for plant provincial sources. This study aims to test whether tea leaf origin can be discriminated using (10)B/(11)B and Sr isotopic composition data, along with concentrations of major/trace elements, in tea specimens collected from major plantation gardens in Taiwan. The tea leaves were digested by microwave and analyzed by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). The data showed significant variations in (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios (from 0.70482 to 0.71462), which reflect changes in soil, groundwater or irrigation conditions. The most radiogenic tea leaves were found at the Taitung garden and the least radiogenic ones were from the Hualien garden. The δ (11)B was found to change appreciably (δ (11)B = 0.38-23.73 ‰) which could be due to fertilizers. The maximum δ (11)B was also observed in tea samples from the Hualien garden. Principal component analysis combining (87)Sr/(86)Sr, δ (11)B and major/trace elements results successfully discriminated different sources of major tea gardens in Taiwan, except the Hualien gardens, and this may be due to rather complicated local geological settings. PMID:26254888

  10. Boron isotopic constraints on the source of Hawaiian shield lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura, Eizo

    2005-07-01

    Boron isotopic compositions of lavas from three representative Hawaiian shield volcanoes (Kilauea, Mauna Loa, and Koolau) were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The boron isotopic composition of each sample was analyzed twice, once with and once without acid leaching to evaluate the effect of posteruptive boron contamination. Our acid-leaching procedure dissolved glass, olivine, secondary zeolite, and adsorbed boron; this dissolved boron was completely removed from the residue, which was comprised of plagioclase, pyroxenes, and newly formed amorphous silica. We confirmed that an appropriate acid-leaching process can eliminate adsorbed and incorporated boron contamination from all submarine samples without modifying the original 11B/ 10B ratio. On the other hand, when the sample was weathered, i.e., the olivine had an iddingsite rim, 11B/ 10B of the acid-resistant minerals are also modified, thus it is impossible to get the preeruptive 11B/ 10B value from the weathered samples. Through this elimination and evaluation procedure of posteruptive contamination, preeruptive δ 11B values for the shield lavas are -4.5 to -5.4‰ for Koolau ( N = 8), -3.6 to -4.6‰ for Kilauea ( N = 11), and -3.0 to -3.8‰ for Mauna Loa ( N = 6). Historical Kilauea lavas show a systematic temporal trend for B content and Nb/B coupled with other radiogenic isotopic ratios and trace element ratios, at constant δ 11B, indicating little or no assimilation of crustal materials in these lavas. Uncorrelated B content and δ 11B in Koolau and Mauna Loa lavas may also indicate little or no effect of crustal assimilation in these lavas. The source of KEA-component (identical to the so-called Kea end member in Hawaiian lavas) of the Hawaiian source mantle, represented by Kilauea, should be derived from lower part of subducted oceanic crust or refractory peridotite in the recycled subducted slab. The systematic trend from Kilauea to Koolau—decreasing δ 11B coupled with decreasing

  11. Isotopic Ratio, Isotonic Ratio, Isobaric Ratio and Shannon Information Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Wei, Hui-Ling

    2014-11-01

    The isoscaling and the isobaric yield ratio difference (IBD) probes, both of which are constructed by yield ratio of fragment, provide cancelation of parameters. The information entropy theory is introduced to explain the physical meaning of the isoscaling and IBD probes. The similarity between the isoscaling and IBD results is found, i.e., the information uncertainty determined by the IBD method equals to β - α determined by the isoscaling (α (β) is the parameter fitted from the isotopic (isotonic) yield ratio).

  12. Isotopic ratios in planetary atmospheres.

    PubMed

    de Bergh, C

    1995-03-01

    Recent progress on measurements of isotopic ratios in planetary or satellite atmospheres include measurements of the D/H ratio in the methane of Uranus, Neptune and Titan and in the water of Mars and Venus. Implications of these measurements on our understanding of the formation and evolution of the planets and satellite are discussed. Our current knowledge of the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen isotopic ratios in the atmospheres of these planets, as well as on Jupiter and Saturn, is also reviewed. We finally show what progress can be expected in the very near future due to some new ground-based instrumentation particularly well suited to such studies, and to forthcoming space missions. PMID:11539257

  13. The boron isotope geochemistry of the Kirka borate deposit, western Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, M. R.; Helvaci, C.

    1995-09-01

    We have measured the boron isotope composition of seventeen samples of borate minerals (colemanite, ulexite, and borax) and the 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio in thirteen borate samples from the Kirka borate deposit in western Anatolia, Turkey. These Neogene deposits were formed by evaporation of playa lakes fed by geothermal springs. The δ 11B values range from -14.9% o in colemanite to -1.6% o in borax. To a first approximation the relative differences in the δ 11B values of the borate minerals are consistent with their basic boron atomic configuration, but the magnitude of the boron isotope fractionation between the three minerals precludes their simultaneous precipitation from a brine with the same boron isotope composition and pH. Rather the data are consistent with precipitation of colemanite from a brine with lower pH than that required for ulexite precipitation, which in turn requires a lower pH than is needed for borax precipitation. The boron isotope data also suggest that the borate minerals did not maintain boron isotopic equilibrium with the brine after they precipitated. Rayleigh fractionation models indicate that during borax precipitation the δ 11B value of the brine was slightly heavier than during precipitation of ulexite and colemanite.

  14. Outside the pH box: Boron isotopes in synthetic calcite precipitated under varying solution chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, J. R.; Uchikawa, J.; Penman, D. E.; Hoenisch, B.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Boron isotopic measurements (δ11B) in marine carbonates are a powerful tool for reconstructing past ocean carbon chemistry and the carbon cycle. Boron systematics in marine carbonates are rooted in the equilibrium dissociation of dissolved boron in seawater, but existing evidence from biogenic carbonates (corals, planktic and benthic foraminifers) suggests somewhat variable controls on boron concentration and δ11B. Synthetic precipitation experiments provide an opportunity to study boron systematics without biological interference, and recent studies (e.g., Uchikawa et al., 2015, GCA v150, 171-191) suggest that boron incorporation (measured as B/Ca ratios) into synthetic carbonates varies both with the elemental composition of experimental seawater and precipitation rate. Here we extend the geochemical characterization of synthetic calcite by investigating the influences of changing solution chemistry (pH, [Ca2+], [DIC] and [B]) and precipitation rate on their boron isotopic composition. Our results will be evaluated in the context of carbonate precipitation rates, modes of boron incorporation, and changing seawater chemistry through geologic time.

  15. A reconnaissance of the boron isotopic composition of tourmaline

    SciTech Connect

    Swihart, G.H.; Moore, P.B. )

    1989-04-01

    A preliminary investigation of the boron isotopic composition of tourmaline from some boron-rich associations has been made. The results for tourmaline from metasedimentary paragneisses (n = 12) range from {delta}{sup 11}B = {minus}22 to +22 per mil. These data mainly fall between the boron isotopic compositions of normal marine sediments with {delta}{sup 11}B = {minus}2 to +5 per mil and seawater with {delta}{sup 11}B = +39.5 per mil. Tourmaline samples from granitic pegmatites (n = 6), on the other hand, range from {delta}{sup 11}B = {minus}12 to {minus}5 per mil. The data provide a rudimentary indication of the range of boron isotopic variation in tourmaline, some of the processes leading to this range, and some possible geochemical tracer applications.

  16. Utilization of intrinsic boron isotopes as co-migrating tracers for identifying potential nitrate contamination sources

    SciTech Connect

    Leenhouts, J.M.; Bassett, R.L.; Maddock, T. III

    1998-03-01

    The stable isotopes of the conservative element boron, {sup 11}B and {sup 10}B, have been employed as co-migrating isotopic tracers to trace potential sources of nitrate observed in ground water pumped from a large capacity 0.167 m{sup 3}/s irrigation well in the Avra Valley of southeastern Arizona. The isotopic ratios provided an identifying signature for two nitrogen carrying source waters: municipal waste water and agricultural return flow. Additional chemical parameters were also examined to corroborate the isotopic indications. Boron isotopes provided a superior delineation of mixing processes in the system compared to the general inorganic chemical parameters. Findings of this investigation indicate that the water pumped by the study well at the beginning of the 1993 irrigation season was composed of a mixture of approximately 25% municipal waste water and 75% background ground water. As the irrigation season progressed, an increasing proportion of water was contributed by irrigation return flow from neighboring agricultural fields.

  17. Boron isotopic composition of tourmaline from massive sulfide deposits and tourmalinites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palmer, M.R.; Slack, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    Boron isotope ratios (11B/10B) have been measured on 60 tourmaline separates from over 40 massive sulfide deposits and tourmalinites from a variety of geologic and tectonic settings. The coverage of these localities is global (5 continents) and includes the giant ore bodies at Kidd Creek and Sullivan (Canada), Broken Hill (Australia), and Ducktown (USA). Overall, the tourmalines display a wide range in ??11B values from -22.8 to +18.3??? Possible controls over the boron isotopic composition of the tourmalines include: 1) composition of the boron source, 2) regional metamorphism, 3) water/rock ratios, 4) seawater entrainment, 5) temperature of formation, and 6) secular variations in seawater ??11B. The most significant control appears to be the composition of the boron source, particularly the nature of footwall lithologies; variations in water/ rock ratios and seawater entrainment are of secondary importance. The boron isotope values seem especially sensitive to the presence of evaporites (marine and non-marine) and carbonates in source rocks to the massive sulfide deposits and tourmalinites. ?? 1989 Springer-Verlag.

  18. Isotopic Enrichment of Boron in the Sputtering of Boron Nitride with Xenon Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, P. K.; Shutthanandan, V.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental study is described to measure the isotopic enrichment of boron. Xenon ions from 100 eV to 1.5 keV were used to sputter a boron nitride target. An ion gun was used to generate the ion beam. The ion current density at the target surface was approximately 30 microA/sq cm. Xenon ions impinged on the target surface at 50 deg angle to the surface normal. Since boron nitride is an insulator, a flood electron gun was used in our experiments to neutralize the positive charge buildup on the target surface. The sputtered secondary ions of boron were detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The spectrometer entrance aperture was located perpendicular to the ion beam direction and 10 mm away from the target surface. The secondary ion flux was observed to be enriched in the heavy isotopes at lower ion energies. The proportion of heavy isotopes in the sputtered secondary ion flux was found to decrease with increasing primary ion energy from 100 to 350 eV. Beyond 350 eV, light isotopes were sputtered preferentially. The light isotope enrichment factor was observed to reach an asymptotic value of 1.27 at 1.5 keV. This trend is similar to that of the isotopic enrichment observed earlier when copper was sputtered with xenon ions in the same energy range.

  19. Short-term coral bleaching is not recorded by skeletal boron isotopes.

    PubMed

    Schoepf, Verena; McCulloch, Malcolm T; Warner, Mark E; Levas, Stephen J; Matsui, Yohei; Aschaffenburg, Matthew D; Grottoli, Andréa G

    2014-01-01

    Coral skeletal boron isotopes have been established as a proxy for seawater pH, yet it remains unclear if and how this proxy is affected by seawater temperature. Specifically, it has never been directly tested whether coral bleaching caused by high water temperatures influences coral boron isotopes. Here we report the results from a controlled bleaching experiment conducted on the Caribbean corals Porites divaricata, Porites astreoides, and Orbicella faveolata. Stable boron (δ11B), carbon (δ13C), oxygen (δ18O) isotopes, Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca, U/Ca, and Ba/Ca ratios, as well as chlorophyll a concentrations and calcification rates were measured on coral skeletal material corresponding to the period during and immediately after the elevated temperature treatment and again after 6 weeks of recovery on the reef. We show that under these conditions, coral bleaching did not affect the boron isotopic signature in any coral species tested, despite significant changes in coral physiology. This contradicts published findings from coral cores, where significant decreases in boron isotopes were interpreted as corresponding to times of known mass bleaching events. In contrast, δ13C and δ18O exhibited major enrichment corresponding to decreases in calcification rates associated with bleaching. Sr/Ca of bleached corals did not consistently record the 1.2°C difference in seawater temperature during the bleaching treatment, or alternatively show a consistent increase due to impaired photosynthesis and calcification. Mg/Ca, U/Ca, and Ba/Ca were affected by coral bleaching in some of the coral species, but the observed patterns could not be satisfactorily explained by temperature dependence or changes in coral physiology. This demonstrates that coral boron isotopes do not record short-term bleaching events, and therefore cannot be used as a proxy for past bleaching events. The robustness of coral boron isotopes to changes in coral physiology, however, suggests that reconstruction of

  20. Short-Term Coral Bleaching Is Not Recorded by Skeletal Boron Isotopes

    PubMed Central

    Schoepf, Verena; McCulloch, Malcolm T.; Warner, Mark E.; Levas, Stephen J.; Matsui, Yohei; Aschaffenburg, Matthew D.; Grottoli, Andréa G.

    2014-01-01

    Coral skeletal boron isotopes have been established as a proxy for seawater pH, yet it remains unclear if and how this proxy is affected by seawater temperature. Specifically, it has never been directly tested whether coral bleaching caused by high water temperatures influences coral boron isotopes. Here we report the results from a controlled bleaching experiment conducted on the Caribbean corals Porites divaricata, Porites astreoides, and Orbicella faveolata. Stable boron (δ11B), carbon (δ13C), oxygen (δ18O) isotopes, Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca, U/Ca, and Ba/Ca ratios, as well as chlorophyll a concentrations and calcification rates were measured on coral skeletal material corresponding to the period during and immediately after the elevated temperature treatment and again after 6 weeks of recovery on the reef. We show that under these conditions, coral bleaching did not affect the boron isotopic signature in any coral species tested, despite significant changes in coral physiology. This contradicts published findings from coral cores, where significant decreases in boron isotopes were interpreted as corresponding to times of known mass bleaching events. In contrast, δ13C and δ18O exhibited major enrichment corresponding to decreases in calcification rates associated with bleaching. Sr/Ca of bleached corals did not consistently record the 1.2°C difference in seawater temperature during the bleaching treatment, or alternatively show a consistent increase due to impaired photosynthesis and calcification. Mg/Ca, U/Ca, and Ba/Ca were affected by coral bleaching in some of the coral species, but the observed patterns could not be satisfactorily explained by temperature dependence or changes in coral physiology. This demonstrates that coral boron isotopes do not record short-term bleaching events, and therefore cannot be used as a proxy for past bleaching events. The robustness of coral boron isotopes to changes in coral physiology, however, suggests that reconstruction of

  1. Pressure-dependent boron isotopic fractionation observed by column chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musashi, M.; Oi, T.; Matsuo, M.; Nomura, M.

    2007-12-01

    Boron isotopic fractionation factor ( S ) between boron taken up in strongly basic anion exchange resin and boron in aqueous solution was determined by breakthrough column chromatography at 5 and 17 MPa at 25°C, using 0.1 mmol/L boric acid solution as feed solution. The S values obtained were 1.018 and 1.012, respectively, which were smaller than the value reported by using the same chromatographic method at atmospheric pressure at 25°C with the boron concentration of 10 mmol/L, but were larger than the values at the same condition with much higher concentration of 100 and 501 mmol/L, indicating that borate-polymerization reducing the isotopic fractionation was negligible. However, calculations based on the theory of isotope distribution between two phases estimated that 21% (5MPa) and 47% (17MPa) of boron taken up in the resin phase was in the three-coordinated B(OH)3-form, instead of in the four-coordinated B(OH)4--form, at high pressures even with the very diluted solution. We discussed this discrepancy by introducing (1) hydration or (2) a partial molar volume difference between isotopic molecules. It was inferred that borate ions were partially dehydrated upon transfer from the solution phase to the resin phase at high pressures, which resulted in smaller S values compared with those at the atmospheric pressure. Alternatively, it was likely that the S value decreased with increasing pressure, because the difference of the partial isotopic molar volumes between 10B(OH)3 and 11B(OH)3 was larger than that between 10B(OH)4- and 11B(OH)4-. If either will be the case, the influence of a pressure upon the isotope effect may not be negligible for boron isotopic exchange equilibrium. This knowledge is crucial for the principle of the boron isotopic pH-metry reconstructing a chemical variation at the paleo-deep oceanic environment where the early life may have been evolved.

  2. Separation of the isotopes of boron by chemical exchange reactions

    DOEpatents

    McCandless, F.P.; Herbst, R.S.

    1995-05-30

    The isotopes of boron, {sup 10}B and {sup 11}B, are separated by means of a gas-liquid chemical exchange reaction involving the isotopic equilibrium between gaseous BF{sub 3} and a liquid BF{sub 3} donor molecular addition complex formed between BF{sub 3} gas and a donor chosen from the group consisting of: nitromethane, acetone, methyl isobutyl ketone, or diisobutyl ketone. 1 Fig.

  3. Separation of the isotopes of boron by chemical exchange reactions

    DOEpatents

    McCandless, Frank P.; Herbst, Ronald S.

    1995-01-01

    The isotopes of boron, .sup.10 B and .sup.11 B, are separated by means of a gas-liquid chemical exchange reaction involving the isotopic equilibrium between gaseous BF.sub.3 and a liquid BF.sub.3 . donor molecular addition complex formed between BF.sub.3 gas and a donor chosen from the group consisting of: nitromethane, acetone, methyl isobutyl ketone, or diisobutyl ketone.

  4. Reconstructing Ocean pH with Boron Isotopes in Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Gavin L.; Rae, James W. B.

    2016-06-01

    In order to better understand the effect of CO2 on the Earth system in the future, geologists may look to CO2-induced environmental change in Earth's past. Here we describe how CO2 can be reconstructed using the boron isotopic composition (δ11B) of marine calcium carbonate. We review the chemical principles that underlie the proxy, summarize the available calibration data, and detail how boron isotopes can be used to estimate ocean pH and ultimately atmospheric CO2 in the past. δ11B in a variety of marine carbonates shows a coherent relationship with seawater pH, in broad agreement with simple models for this proxy. Offsets between measured and predicted δ11B may in part be explained by physiological influences, though the exact mechanisms of boron incorporation into carbonate remain unknown. Despite these uncertainties, we demonstrate that δ11B may provide crucial constraints on past ocean acidification and atmospheric CO2.

  5. Coprecipitation and isotopic fractionation of boron in modern biogenic carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Vengosh, A. Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem ); Chivas, A.R.; McCulloch, M.T. ); Kolodny, Y.; Starinsky, A. )

    1991-10-01

    The abundances and isotopic composition of boron in modern, biogenic calcareous skeletons from the Gulf of Elat, Israel, the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and in deep-sea sediments have been examined by negative thermal-ionization mass spectrometry. The selected species (Foraminifera, Pteropoda, corals, Gastropoda, and Pelecypoda) yield large variations in boron concentration that range from 1 ppm in gastropod shells to 80 ppm in corals. The variations of {delta}{sup 11}B may be controlled by isotopic exchange of boron species in which {sup 10}B is preferentially partitioned into the tetrahedral species, and coprecipitation of different proportions of trigonal and tetrahedral species in the calcium carbonates. The B content and {delta}{sup 11}B values of deep-sea sediments, Foraminifera tests, and corals are used to estimate the global oceanic sink of elemental boron by calcium carbonate deposition. As a result of enrichment of B in corals, a substantially higher biogenic sink of 6.4 {plus minus} 0.9 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr is calculated for carbonates. This is only slightly lower than the sink for desorbable B in marine sediments (10 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr) and approximately half that of altered oceanic crust (14 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr). Thus, carbonates are an important sink for B in the oceans being {approximately}20% of the total sinks. The preferential incorporation of {sup 10}B into calcium carbonate results in oceanic {sup 11}B-enrichment, estimated as 1.2 {plus minus} 0.3 {times} 10{sup 12} per mil {center dot} g/yr. The boron-isotope composition of authigenic, well-preserved carbonate skeletons may provide a useful tool to record secular boron-isotope variations in seawater at various times in the geological record.

  6. Quantitative Determination of Isotope Ratios from Experimental Isotopic Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Parminder; O’Connor, Peter B.

    2008-01-01

    Isotope variability due to natural processes provides important information for studying a variety of complex natural phenomena from the origins of a particular sample to the traces of biochemical reaction mechanisms. These measurements require high-precision determination of isotope ratios of a particular element involved. Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometers (IRMS) are widely employed tools for such a high-precision analysis, which have some limitations. This work aims at overcoming the limitations inherent to IRMS by estimating the elemental isotopic abundance from the experimental isotopic distribution. In particular, a computational method has been derived which allows the calculation of 13C/12C ratios from the whole isotopic distributions, given certain caveats, and these calculations are applied to several cases to demonstrate their utility. The limitations of the method in terms of the required number of ions and S/N ratio are discussed. For high-precision estimates of the isotope ratios, this method requires very precise measurement of the experimental isotopic distribution abundances, free from any artifacts introduced by noise, sample heterogeneity, or other experimental sources. PMID:17263354

  7. Boron isotopes at the Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillardet, J.; Noireaux, J.; Sullivan, P. L.; Steinhoefel, G.; Louvat, P.; Brantley, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory is a Northern Appalachian catchment site where a series of geochemical tracers have been applied in order to build a multi-isotope integrative model (referred to as "CZ-tope"). The catchment is small (8ha) and relief is about 30 m. It receives about 107 cm of precipitation per year. Mean annual temperature is 10°C. Shales Hills observatory has a relatively simple lithology consisting of organic-poor shales rich in illite and relatively infrequent interbedded carbonates and sandstones. Vegetation consists mainly of deciduous trees. Soil thickness ranges from 0.3 m at the ridgetop to 3 m in the valley floor. Following the CZ-tope concept, boron isotopes were analysed in the main geochemical reservoirs of the SH catchment (stream, vegetation, soil pore waters, solid phases, groundwaters). Measurements were conducted using MC-ICPMS and a direct injection system after a chemical procedure aiming at isolating boron from geological matrix. Results are expressed as δ11B. Error bars are better than 0.5‰ Boron isotopes in Shale Hills catchment show a large range of variation. While bedrock values are within a narrow range around -5‰, stream waters range between 10‰ and 15‰, and exhibit temporal variations. This very strong 11B enrichment is also observed in the vegetation, groundwater and rainwater reservoirs but with a much larger range of variation. The input of 11B-enriched water by precipitation is contributing to the B budget at the catchment outlet but cannot explain all the 11B enrichment with respect to parent bedrock. The solid phases collected along two different soil profiles and as suspended sediments in the stream are close to the bedrock value or slightly 10B-enriched. The most important conclusion from boron isotope investigation at Shale Hills CZO is that a simple mass budget is not able to reconcile the strong 11B-enrichment measured in the water phases and vegetation with the isotopic signature of the

  8. Development of particle induced gamma-ray emission methods for nondestructive determination of isotopic composition of boron and its total concentration in natural and enriched samples.

    PubMed

    Chhillar, Sumit; Acharya, Raghunath; Sodaye, Suparna; Pujari, Pradeep K

    2014-11-18

    We report simple particle induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) methods using a 4 MeV proton beam for simultaneous and nondestructive determination of the isotopic composition of boron ((10)B/(11)B atom ratio) and total boron concentrations in various solid samples with natural isotopic composition and enriched with (10)B. It involves measurement of prompt gamma-rays at 429, 718, and 2125 keV from (10)B(p,αγ)(7)Be, (10)B(p, p'γ)(10)B, and (11)B(p, p'γ)(11)B reactions, respectively. The isotopic composition of boron in natural and enriched samples was determined by comparing peak area ratios corresponding to (10)B and (11)B of samples to natural boric acid standard. An in situ current normalized PIGE method, using F or Al, was standardized for total B concentration determination. The methods were validated by analyzing stoichiometric boron compounds and applied to samples such as boron carbide, boric acid, carborane, and borosilicate glass. Isotopic compositions of boron in the range of 0.247-2.0 corresponding to (10)B in the range of 19.8-67.0 atom % and total B concentrations in the range of 5-78 wt % were determined. It has been demonstrated that PIGE offers a simple and alternate method for total boron as well as isotopic composition determination in boron based solid samples, including neutron absorbers that are important in nuclear technology. PMID:25312472

  9. Boron and strontium isotopic characterization of coal combustion residuals: validation of new environmental tracers.

    PubMed

    Ruhl, Laura S; Dwyer, Gary S; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Hower, James C; Vengosh, Avner

    2014-12-16

    In the U.S., coal fired power plants produce over 136 million tons of coal combustion residuals (CCRs) annually. CCRs are enriched in toxic elements, and their leachates can have significant impacts on water quality. Here we report the boron and strontium isotopic ratios of leaching experiments on CCRs from a variety of coal sources (Appalachian, Illinois, and Powder River Basins). CCR leachates had a mostly negative δ(11)B, ranging from -17.6 to +6.3‰, and (87)Sr/(86)Sr ranging from 0.70975 to 0.71251. Additionally, we utilized these isotopic ratios for tracing CCR contaminants in different environments: (1) the 2008 Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) coal ash spill affected waters; (2) CCR effluents from power plants in Tennessee and North Carolina; (3) lakes and rivers affected by CCR effluents in North Carolina; and (4) porewater extracted from sediments in lakes affected by CCRs. The boron isotopes measured in these environments had a distinctive negative δ(11)B signature relative to background waters. In contrast (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios in CCRs were not always exclusively different from background, limiting their use as a CCR tracer. This investigation demonstrates the validity of the combined geochemical and isotopic approach as a unique and practical identification method for delineating and evaluating the environmental impact of CCRs. PMID:25417938

  10. What's all the stink about BO-? Using negative molecular ions to measure boron isotopes in samples with trace boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervig, R. L.; Williams, L. B.

    2011-12-01

    Boron isotope fractionation depends strongly on the coordination of boron in coexisting phases. When boron is tetrahedrally coordinated in one phase and trigonally coordinated in another, equilibrium fractionation can record parameters such as temperature (over a surprisingly wide T for a stable isotope system) or the pH at which phases precipitated from low temperature solutions. The heavy isotope of B is strongly partitioned into fluid phases relative to minerals containing tetrahedrally-coordinated boron and thus B isotope ratios can provide evidence for separation of hydrous fluids from subducted materials and from silicate melts in volcanoes. However, in many cases, the B concentration of relevant solid phases is very low, leading to large errors in the isotope ratio. For example, common analytical protocols for the microanalysis of B on our secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS, Cameca 6f) use an O- primary beam, and detection of positive secondary ions at moderate mass resolving power. On samples containing a few ppm B, analyses may require up to ~2 hours to give integrated signals corresponding to errors of +/- 7 per mil (2 sigma). Increases in ion intensity would result from simply increasing the primary current (at the expense of beam diameter) or increasing transmission by reducing mass resolving power (at the expense of including 10BH+ ions on the 11B+ peak). Large magnetic sector SIMS instruments achieve higher transmission at high resolution, but the challenges of obtaining desired precision (+/- 1 permil) remain when boron is present at <2 ppm levels. Another direction to pursue is to find a B-containing ion that is formed more readily than the elemental positive ion. The logical choice is BO-, an ion isoelectronic with F-, and one we would expect to show very high ion yields. However, BO- can be unpleasant to deal with. Isobaric interferences include the toxic species of CN-: various combinations of the two carbon and nitrogen isotopes are silent

  11. The boron isotope geochemistry of the neogene borate deposits of western Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, M. R.; Helvaci, C.

    1997-08-01

    We have analyzed the boron isotope composition of 80 borate minerals (major minerals: borax, colemanite, and ulexite; minor minerals: veatchite-A, tunellite, kernite, terrugite, probertite, meyer-hofferite, inderite, inyoite, hydroboracite, howlite, and pandermite) from the main deposits (Kirka, Bigadiç, and Emet) and two smaller deposits (Kestelek and Sultançayir) in the western Turkish borate deposits. Forty-three samples were also analysed for their Sr isotope composition. The data span a wide range in δ11B values from -1.6%o to -25.3%o. The δ 11B values of the main borate minerals are largely controlled by their mineralogy and the pH of the brines from which they precipitated. An inverse correlation between the average δ 11B and 87Sr/86Sr ratios of colemanite in the different deposits suggests there is some variation in the sources of boron and Sr to the deposits. Emet has the highest contribution from aluminosilicates and Kirka the highest contribution from Eocene carbonates, with Bigadiç occupying an intermediate position. The δ11B values of the minor borate minerals distinguish between those which are primary precipitates from the original brines (or formed from primary borates without boron loss from the system) and those which formed from alteration of preexisting borate minerals with substantial loss of boron from the system.

  12. The CN isotopic ratios in comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfroid, J.; Jehin, E.; Hutsemékers, D.; Cochran, A.; Zucconi, J.-M.; Arpigny, C.; Schulz, R.; Stüwe, J. A.; Ilyin, I.

    2009-08-01

    Our aim is to determine the isotopic ratios 12C/13C and 14N/15N in a variety of comets and link these measurements to the formation and evolution of the solar system. The 12C/13C and 14N/15N isotopic ratios are measured for the CN radical by means of high-resolution optical spectra of the R branch of the B-X (0, 0) violet band. 23 comets from different dynamical classes have been observed, sometimes at various heliocentric and nucleocentric distances, in order to estimate possible variations of the isotopic ratios in parent molecules. The 12C/13C and 14N/15N isotopic ratios in CN are remarkably constant (average values of, respectively, 91.0 ± 3.6 and 147.8 ± 5.7) within our measurement errors, for all comets whatever their origin or heliocentric distance. While the carbon isotopic ratio does agree with the terrestrial value (89), the nitrogen ratio is a factor of two lower than the terrestrial value (272), indicating a fractionation in the early solar system, or in the protosolar nebula, common to all the comets of our sample. This points towards a common origin of the comets independently of their birthplaces, and a relationship between HCN and CN. Appendices and Table [see full textsee full textsee full text] are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programmes ID 268.C-5570, 270.C-5043, 073.C-0525, 274.C-5015 and 075.C-0355(A).

  13. Boron and strontium isotope compositions of groundwater from the La Paz arid coastal aquifer, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahlknecht, Jürgen; Rosner, Martin; Meixner, Anette

    2016-04-01

    In groundwater studies boron and strontium isotopic compositions can be used to identify natural and anthropogenic sources as well as processes related to groundwater recharge, flow and mixing. The La Paz arid costal aquifer in Baja California Sur, Mexico, is the most important source of drinking and irrigation water for La Paz area and suffers from anthropogenic contamination and intensive exploitation of the aquifer causing seawater intrusion and general groundwater abatement. The relatively un-radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratios of the La Paz groundwater range in a narrow field between 0.7054 and 0.7062. In contrast to strontium the boron isotope composition displays a large variability between +27 and +55 permil d11B. The relatively low 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the La Paz groundwater highlight a significant contribution of strontium derived from local terrestrial sediments and igneous rocks with known 87Sr/86Sr ratios between 0.705 and 0.7035. The large variability of d11B values indicate that multiple sources and processes determine the boron isotope composition of La Paz groundwater. Rainwater (high d11B), seawater (~+40 permil) due to seawater intrusions, wastewater (low to medium d11B) and boron derived from the local geology (low to medium d11B) explain most of the observed groundwater d11B variability. However, d11B values higher than modern seawater point to significant boron isotope fractionation by preferential absorption of 10B onto clay minerals during the evolution of some groundwater samples. Due to low boron concentrations in rainwater a significant contribution of 11B-rich rainwater (>+40 permil) on the La Paz groundwater is unlikely.

  14. Behavior of Boron and Boron Isotopes During Uptake by Atriplex canescens: Desert Plants as Samplers of Boron from Soils and Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenhouts, J. M.; Bassett, R. L.; Maddock, T.

    2002-12-01

    This research was conducted to determine if B isotope ratios (11B/10B) in plant tissue provide an isotopic "fingerprint" of imbibed groundwater and soil moisture. In essence, this work sought to ascertain whether plants can function as in situ samplers for B as an environmental isotope. Because very little is known about the transport and isotopic fractionation of B in plants, this study was designed to reveal any isotopic fractionation that might occur during root uptake and vascular transport by a specific arid-adapted species. The relation between the B isotope ratios sequestered in the leaves of Atriplex canescens and the growth conditions of the plant were investigated using a semihydroponic greenhouse experiment. Nutrient B concentration and solution pH were selected as experimental variables as these parameters span large ranges in nature. In addition, the transition of plant-available B species from neutrally charged to anionic as a function of pH provides a mechanism through which pH-dependent B isotope fractionation may occur. The experimental setup was a randomized factorial block design in which the plants were provided six different nutrient solutions with pH values that ranged from 7.5 to 9.5 and B concentrations that ranged from 0.1 mg/L to 10.0 mg/L. Boron concentration in the plant's leaf and stem samples followed expected patterns, with the highest B amount in the leaves of the plants fed the nutrient solution with 10.0 mg/L B. The stem samples of plants fed 0.1 mg/L B contained the least B. The ratio of B in plants fed 10.0 mg/L vs. 0.1 mg/L B was far less than the 100:1 ratio of B in the nutrients, which implies that a component of uptake is actively controlled by the plant. Negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry was used to analyze the minute amounts of B extracted from the plant tissue digests. Statistical tests indicated that no significant isotopic fractionation occurred during uptake at any treatment pH level. The results indicate

  15. Feasibility of Isotopic Measurements: Graphite Isotopic Ratio Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Thomas W.; Gerlach, David C.; Reid, Bruce D.; Morgan, W. C.

    2001-04-30

    This report addresses the feasibility of the laboratory measurements of isotopic ratios for selected trace constituents in irradiated nuclear-grade graphite, based on the results of a proof-of-principal experiment completed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 1994. The estimation of graphite fluence through measurement of isotopic ratio changes in the impurity elements in the nuclear-grade graphite is referred to as the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). Combined with reactor core and fuel information, GIRM measurements can be employed to estimate cumulative materials production in graphite moderated reactors. This report documents the laboratory procedures and results from the initial measurements of irradiated graphite samples. The irradiated graphite samples were obtained from the C Reactor (one of several production reactors at Hanford) and from the French G-2 Reactor located at Marcoule. Analysis of the irradiated graphite samples indicated that replicable measurements of isotope ratios could be obtained from the fluence sensitive elements of Ti, Ca, Sr, and Ba. While these impurity elements are present in the nuclear-grade graphite in very low concentrations, measurement precision was typically on the order of a few tenths of a percent to just over 1 percent. Replicability of the measurements was also very good with measured values differing by less than 0.5 percent. The overall results of this initial proof-of-principal experiment are sufficiently encouraging that a demonstration of GIRM on a reactor scale basis is planned for FY-95.

  16. Isotope Ratios of Cellulose from Plants Having Different Photosynthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Leonel O.; Deniro, Michael J.; Johnson, Hyrum B.

    1984-01-01

    Hydrogen and carbon isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate and oxygen isotope ratios of cellulose from C3, C4, and Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants were determined for plants growing within a small area in Val Verde County, Texas. Plants having CAM had distinctly higher deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratios than plants having C3 and C4 metabolism. When hydrogen isotope ratios are plotted against carbon isotope ratios, each photosynthetic mode separates into a distinct cluster of points. C4 plants had many D/H ratios similar to those of C3 plants, so that hydrogen isotope ratios cannot be used to distinguish between these two photosynthetic modes. Portulaca mundula, which may have a modified photosynthetic mode between C4 and CAM, had a hydrogen isotope ratio between those of the C4 and CAM plants. When oxygen isotope ratios are plotted against carbon isotope ratios, no distinct clustering of the C4 and CAM plants occurs. Thus, oxygen isotope ratios are not useful in distinguishing between these metabolic modes. A plot of hydrogen isotope ratios versus oxygen isotope ratios for this sample set shows considerable overlap between oxygen isotope ratios of the different photosynthetic modes without a concomitant overlap in the hydrogen isotope ratios of CAM and the other two photosynthetic modes. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that higher D/H ratios in CAM plants relative to C3 and C4 plants are due to isotopic fractionations occurring during biochemical reactions. PMID:16663460

  17. Isotopic ratio measurements with ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, G.P. III; Bazan, J.M.

    1986-06-03

    An inductively-coupled-plasma source mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) has been used to measure the isotopic composition of U, Pb, Os, and B standards. Particular emphasis has been placed on uranium because of its nuclear and environmental interest and because of the availability of a well-characterized set of standards with a wide range of isotopic compositions. The precision and accuracy obtainable in isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS depend on many factors including background, interferences, dead time, mass fractionation (bias), abundance sensitivity, and counting statistics. Which, if any, of these factors controls accuracy and precision depends on the type of sample being analyzed and the characteristics of the mass spectrometer. These issues are discussed in detail.

  18. Measuring Isotope Ratios Across the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Chris R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios in C, H, N, O and S are powerful indicators of a wide variety of planetary geophysical processes that can identify origin, transport, temperature history, radiation exposure, atmospheric escape, environmental habitability and biology [1]. For the Allan Hills 84001 meteorite, for example, the (sup 1)(sup 3)C/(sup 1)(sup 2)C ratio identifies it as a Mars (SNC) meteorite; the ??K/??Ar ratio tells us the last time the rock cooled to solid, namely 4 Gya; isotope ratios in (sup 3)He, (sup 2)(sup 1)Ne and (sup 3)?Ar show it was in space (cosmic ray exposure) for 10-20 million years; (sup 1)?C dating that it sat in Antarctica for 13,000 years before discovery; and clumped isotope analysis of (sup 1)?O(sup 1)(sup 3)C(sup 1)?O in its carbonate that it was formed at 18+/-4 ?C in a near-surface aqueous environment [2]. Solar System Formation

  19. Tracing recycled volatiles in a heterogeneous mantle with boron isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walowski, Kristina; Kirstein, Linda; de Hoog, Cees-Jan; Elliot, Tim; Savov, Ivan; Devey, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Recycling of oceanic lithosphere drives the chemical evolution of the Earth's mantle supplying both solids and volatiles to the Earth's interior. Yet, how subducted material influences mantle composition remains unclear. A perfect tracer for slab recycling should be only fractionated at the Earth's surface, have a strong influence on mantle compositions but be resistant to perturbations en route back to the surface. Current understanding suggests that boron concentrations linked to B isotope determinations fulfil all these requirements and should be an excellent tracer of heterogeneity in the deep mantle. Here, we present the trace element, volatile and the B isotope composition of basaltic glasses and melt inclusions in olivine from distinct end-member ocean island basalts (OIB) to track the fate of recycled lithosphere and ultimately document how recycling contributes to mantle heterogeneity. The chosen samples represent the different end member OIB compositions and include: EMI (Pitcairn), EMII (MacDonald), HIMU (St. Helena), and FOZO (Cape Verde & Reunion). The data is derived from both submarine and subaerial deposits, with B isotope determination of both basaltic glass and melt inclusions from each locality. Preliminary results suggest OIB have B isotopic compositions that overlap the MORB array (-7.5‰±0.7; Marschall et al., 2015) but extend to both lighter and heavier values. These results suggest that B isotopes will be useful for resolving mantle source heterogeneity at different ocean islands and contribute to our understanding of the volatile budget of the deep mantle.

  20. Uranium isotope ratio measurements in field settings

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R.W.; Barshick, C.M.; Young, J.P.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1997-06-01

    The authors have developed a technique for uranium isotope ratio measurements of powder samples in field settings. Such a method will be invaluable for environmental studies, radioactive waste operations, and decommissioning and decontamination operations. Immediate field data can help guide an ongoing sampling campaign. The measurement encompasses glow discharge sputtering from pressed sample hollow cathodes, high resolution laser spectroscopy using conveniently tunable diode lasers, and optogalvanic detection. At 10% {sup 235}U enrichment and above, the measurement precision for {sup 235}U/({sup 235}U+{sup 238}U) isotope ratios was {+-}3%; it declined to {+-}15% for 0.3% (i.e., depleted) samples. A prototype instrument was constructed and is described.

  1. Oxygen Isotope Ratios in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brittain, Sean; Najita, Joan; Carr, John; Doppmann, Greg

    2009-08-01

    Meteorites provide important clues about the environment from which our solar system formed. Their mineralogical and isotopic composition provides important insight into the thermal, chemical and dynamical history of the protoplanetary disk. One of the most intriguing discoveries to come from the study of meteorites is the depletion of the ^18O/^16O and ^17O/^16O ratios in the oldest components of meteorites relative to Earth. These measurements suggest that the gas from which the sun condensed was more ^16O-rich than the material from which planets formed. The leading explanation for this isotopic anomaly is the selective dissociation of CO in the outer protoplanetary disk or envelope. The basic premise is that the freed ^17,18O atoms in the outer disk formed water that then enriched the ^17,18O abundance in rocky material. Thus, bodies that formed later (such as planets) were increasingly enriched in ^17,18O. To test this scenario, we will probe the efficiency of selective dissociation of CO in nearby protoplanetary disk systems. We will measure the isotopic ratio of C^17O/C^18O/C^16O by acquiring high-resolution absorption spectra of ro-vibrational CO lines from edge-on disks and envelopes.

  2. Structure and superconductivity of isotope-enriched boron-doped diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Joe D; Ekimov, E A; Sidorov, V A; Zoteev, A; Lebed, Y; Stishov, S M

    2008-01-01

    Superconducting boron-doped diamond samples were synthesized with isotopes of {sup 10}B, {sup 11}B, {sup 13}C and {sup 12}C. We claim the presence of a carbon isotope effect on the superconducting transition temperature, which supports the 'diamond-carbon'-related nature of superconductivity and the importance of the electron-phonon interaction as the mechanism of superconductivity in diamond. Isotope substitution permits us to relate almost all bands in the Raman spectra of heavily boron-doped diamond to the vibrations of carbon atoms. The 500 cm{sup 01} Raman band shifts with either carbon or boron isotope substitution and may be associated with vibrations of paired or clustered boron. The absence of a superconducting transition (down to 1.6 K) in diamonds synthesized in the Co-C-B system at 1900 K correlates with the small boron concentration deduced from lattice parameters.

  3. Boron isotopes in Archean cherts: investigating early Earth marine conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarchand, D.; Jeambrun, M.; van Bergen, M. J.; van Cappellen, P.

    2009-12-01

    The Archean Eon was a period of intense modifications of the Earth surface environment that led to the emergence of life in the early ocean. Therefore, the chemistry of Archean seawater and its relationship to that of the solid Earth, through oceanic and continental crust alteration, remain a matter of great interest and debate. Here, we present new boron (B) isotopes data in well-characterized cherts (ca. 3.5 Ga) from the Pilbara Craton, in order to provide new constraints on their depositional environments. Boron isotopes offer a potentially powerful tool for investigating seawater/rock interactions. The modern differences between B isotopes in seawater, continental crust and oceanic crust greatly facilitate the identification of B sources, while mineral precipitation processes are also accompanied by large isotopic fractionations. We analyzed B concentrations and δ11B in 12 subsamples from two types of stratiform chert; one type (C-chert) is interpreted as resulting from direct precipitation of a seawater-hydrothermal fluid mixture, the second type (S-chert) as resulting from silicification of detritic sediment precursors (Van den Boorn et al., 2007). The C-cherts subsamples show relative large ranges of δ11B values (from -3 to +16 ‰) and B concentrations (0.4-20 ppm). The cm scale variations argue against significant post depositional alteration and thus support the hypothesis that the primary signature is preserved. The similarity of our results with B isotopes in modern cherts suggests that Archean seawater conditions during chert deposition were rather close to those in the modern ocean, at least with respect to B isotopes. In particular, the marine B isotopic budget was likely comparable to the present one. If this is correct, the B isotopes data imply that Archean seawater pH was neutral to slightly basic (pH ≈ 7-9). The S-chert subsamples show remarkably constant δ11B values (≈ -20 ‰) despite a wide range of B concentrations (3-120 ppm). These

  4. Final Report on Isotope Ratio Techniques for Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, David C.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Meriwether, George H.; Reid, Bruce D.

    2009-07-01

    The Isotope Ratio Method (IRM) is a technique for estimating the energy or plutonium production in a fission reactor by measuring isotope ratios in non-fuel reactor components. The isotope ratios in these components can then be directly related to the cumulative energy production with standard reactor modeling methods.

  5. Raman scattering method and apparatus for measuring isotope ratios and isotopic abundances

    DOEpatents

    Harney, Robert C.; Bloom, Stewart D.

    1978-01-01

    Raman scattering is used to measure isotope ratios and/or isotopic abundances. A beam of quasi-monochromatic photons is directed onto the sample to be analyzed, and the resulting Raman-scattered photons are detected and counted for each isotopic species of interest. These photon counts are treated mathematically to yield the desired isotope ratios or isotopic abundances.

  6. Boron Isotope Intercomparison Project (BIIP): Development of a new carbonate standard for stable isotopic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutjahr, Marcus; Bordier, Louise; Douville, Eric; Farmer, Jesse; Foster, Gavin L.; Hathorne, Ed; Hönisch, Bärbel; Lemarchand, Damien; Louvat, Pascale; McCulloch, Malcolm; Noireaux, Johanna; Pallavicini, Nicola; Rodushkin, Ilia; Roux, Philippe; Stewart, Joseph; Thil, François; You, Chen-Feng

    2014-05-01

    Boron consists of only of two isotopes with a relatively large mass difference (~10 %). It is also volatile in acidic media and prone to contamination during analytical treatment. Nevertheless, an increasing number of isotope laboratories are successfully using boron isotope compositions (expressed in δ11B) in marine biogenic carbonates to reconstruct seawater pH. Recent interlaboratory comparison efforts [1] highlighted the existence of a relatively high level of disagreement between laboratories when measuring such material, so in order to further strengthen the validity of this carbonate system proxy, appropriate reference materials need to be urgently characterised. We describe here the latest results of the Boron Isotope Intercomparison Project (BIIP) where we aim to characterise the boron isotopic composition of two marine carbonates: Japanese Geological Survey carbonate standard materials JCp-1 (coral porites) [2] and JCt-1 (Giant Clam) [3]. This boron isotope interlaboratory comparison study has two aims: (i) to assess to what extent chemical pre-treatment, aimed at removing organic material, can influence the resulting carbonate δ11B; (ii) to determine the isotopic composition of the two reference materials with a number of analytical techniques to provide the community with reference δ11B values for JCp-1 and JCt-1 and to further explore any differences related to analytical technique. In total eight isotope laboratories participated, of which one determined δ11B via negative thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (NTIMS) and seven used multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). For the latter several different introduction systems and chemical purification methods were used. Overall the results are strikingly consistent between the participating labs. The oxidation of organic material slightly lowered the median δ11B by ~0.1 ‰ for both JCp-1 and JCt-1, while the mean δ11B of all labs for both standards was lowered by 0

  7. How the oxygen isotope ratio of rain water influences the isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Gregory; Grimes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The stable oxygen isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate was analysed from chicken eggs laid under free range, and organic farming regimes from across the UK. The eggshell carbonate oxygen isotope data shows a clear depletion in delta18O distribution from the southwest to the northeast. Although consistently offset by around 1 permil, the same isotopic distribution as that seen in eggshell carbonate is observed in the delta18O ratio of rainfall and groundwater from across the UK. This distribution is related to the Rayleigh distillation of rainfall driven by westerly winds across the UK landmass. The clear relationship observed between eggshell delta18O values and that of rainwater presumably reflects the nature of free range chickens which must be drinking locally derived rainwater and supplementing their diet and water intake with locally derived food. These results suggest that the oxygen isotope value of chicken eggshells can be used as a forensic tool to identify the locality that free range and organic eggs were laid within the UK. Furthermore, if suitable material is preserved in the archaeological and geological record then such a relationship can potentially be used to establish the oxygen isotope value of rainwater from which ancient and / or ancestral birds lived.

  8. Temperature measurements from oxygen isotope ratios of fish otoliths.

    PubMed

    Devereux, I

    1967-03-31

    Measurements have shown that the temperature of a fish's habitat can be deduced from the Oxygen isotope ratio of its otoliths (ear bones). Isotope ratios Obtained from fossil otoliths indicate a water temperature which agrees wiht that found by isotope measurements on associated benthonic foraminifera. PMID:6020293

  9. The Boron Isotopic Composition of Elephant Dung: Inputs to the Global Boron Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, L. B.; Hervig, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    A survey of boron in kerogen showed isotopically light δ11B values (0 to -50%) that are distinctly different from most mineral and natural water B reservoirs. Diagenesis releases this isotopically light B into pore fluids when hydrocarbons are generated, thus enriching oilfield brines in 10B. This observation suggests that borated biomolecules (BM) are primarily tetrahedral favoring 10B, whereas 11B is preferred in trigonal coordination. Plants, with optimal concentrations up to 100ppm, contribute more B than animal remains to sediment. Elephants are one of the largest herbivores on earth, consuming 200 - 250 kg of plant material/day and producing 50 kg of manure/day. They are inefficient at digestion, thus the manure contains >50% undigested plant material. Dung samples are therefore ideal for studying the δ11B of both the food input and digested output of a significant B supply to sedimentary systems. Horse and rabbit manure were studied for comparison to evaluate B isotope variations in the food supply and potential vital effects on the output. B-content and isotopic composition of dung plant material and digested fractions were measured in the solid state by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The digests were rinsed in 1.8% mannitol, a B-complexing agent, to remove surface adsorbed-B, then air dried and Au-coated for charge compensation. Results showed that the elephant diet contains 3-13 ppm B, with an average δ11B of -20 ± 0.8% (1σ), while rabbit food had 88 ppm B with a δ11B of -50 ± 1.3 %. The digested fraction of the elephant dung contains 4-10ppm B with average δ11B values of -12 ± 1.2%. In comparison, horse manure with 11-21 ppm B has a δ11B of -10.7 ± 0.5% and rabbit manure contains 2-3 ppm B with a δ11B of -8.8 ± 1%. Boron isotope compositions of these manures are indistinguishable (within error). Clearly plant material is a major contributor of isotopically light B to sediments. The herbivores studied fractionate their total B intake in

  10. Laser spectroscopic measurement of helium isotope ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.-B.; Mueller, P.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Sano, Y.; Sturchio, N.; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Tokyo; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2003-06-13

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He = 10{sup -7}--10{sup -5}. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable {sup 3}He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of {sup 4}He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3{sigma} detection limit of {sup 3}He in helium is 4 x 10{sup -9}. This demonstration required a 200 {mu}L STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  11. Boron isotopic fractionation related to boron sorption on humic acid and the structure of surface complexes formed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarchand, Emmanuel; Schott, Jacques; Gaillardet, Jérôme

    2005-07-01

    Boron isotopic fractionation during adsorption onto Ca-flocculated Aldrich humic acid (HA) has been investigated experimentally as a function of solution pH at 25°C and I = 0.15 M. Boron aqueous concentration and isotopic composition were determined by Cs 2BO 2+ Positive Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry analysis, while the structure of B surface complexes on HA was characterized using 11B Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR). Significant B sorption on HA was observed at 6 < pH < 12 with a maximum value of Kd, the partition coefficient between adsorbed and aqueous boron, equal to 40 at pH = 9.5-10. Combined 11B MAS NMR analysis and FITEQL modeling of B sorption on HA showed that this element forms tetrahedrally coordinated five- or six-membered ring chelates, most likely 1,2-diol and 1,3-diol complexes at alkaline pH (8 < pH < 11) and dicarboxylic complexes at near neutral conditions (6 < pH < 9). Results of this study demonstrate for the first time that boron sorption on HA induces a strong pH-dependent isotope fractionation—with 11B depleted at the surface of HA—that reaches a maximum at 5 < pH < 9 (α = 0.975, Δ = -25‰) and decreases sharply at pH >9. The measured isotope fractionation cannot be modeled assuming that the isotopic composition of the sorbed borate species is identical to that of B(OH) 4- species in the parent solution. It is shown that the extent of isotopic fractionation depends not only on B aqueous speciation but also on the distribution and structure of the borate surface complexes formed. In agreement with energetic constrains, calculation of the isotope fractionation factors between aqueous boric acid and boron surface complexes suggests that the formation of the strained six-membered ring 1,3-diol complex yields a much higher fractionation (α BL P1-III = 0.954-0.960, Δ = -41/-47‰) than that of the very stable five-membered ring 1,2-diol (α BL P2-III = 0.983, Δ = -18‰). The results of this study open

  12. Neoproterozoic ice ages, boron isotopes, and ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasemann, S. A.; Prave, A. R.; Fallick, A. E.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Hoffmann, K.

    2010-12-01

    The Neoproterozoic Earth underwent at least two severe glaciations, each extending to low palaeomagnetic latitudes and punctuating warmer climates. In concert with the environmental changes, the rocks display large amplitude fluctuations in their stable isotopic composition. These fluctuations are stratigraphically systematic, occur in many sections worldwide and are interpreted as being globally significant1. Thus, the Neoproterozoic carbonates provide a unique geological and isotopic archive to improve our understanding of major non-anthropogenically influenced changes in Earth System behaviour. The two widespread older and younger Cryogenian glacial deposits (commonly referred to as the Sturtian and Marinoan, respectively) in Namibia are directly overlain by cap carbonates deposited under inferred periods of high atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Oceanic uptake of carbon dioxide decreases ocean pH and here we present a record of Cryogenian inter-glacial ocean pH, based on boron isotopes in marine carbonates. Our data document characteristically different B isotope profiles of the two Cryogenian carbonate transects that are consistent with the presence of two panglacial climate states, but indicate that each had its own distinct environmental conditions. The Marinoan interglacial δ11B profiles are systematic and remarkably consistent, and they vary by up to 11‰. This yields a relative pH variation of up to 1.5 pH units, and implies a pH of 8.5 at the onset of cap carbonate deposition, followed by a decrease in pH to ~7 and then a return to pH ~8 for the upper part of the section. The transient ocean acidification excursion and the alkaline pH condition near the start and termination of the inferred greenhouse state suggests a rapid draw-down of CO2 initiated at the start of the deglaciation and supports inferences of a thick, global sea-ice shield with minimal air-sea gas exchange during glaciation. In contrast, largely constant B isotope values for

  13. Authentication of bell peppers using boron and strontium isotope compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, Martin; Pritzkow, Wolfgang; Vogl, Jochen; Voerkelius, Susanne

    2010-05-01

    The wrong declaration of food in terms of geographical origin and production method is a major problem for the individual consumer and public regulatory authorities. The authentication of food matrices using H-C-N-O-S isotopic compositions is already well established. However, specific questions require additional isotopic systems, which are more diagonstic for the source reservoires involved or production methods used. Here we present B and Sr isotopic compositions of bell peppers from Europe (Germany, Austria, Netherlands, Spain) and Israel to verfiy their origin. The bell peppers' B isotopic compositions between different locations are highly variable (d11BNISTSRM951 -8 to +35 ‰), whereas the 87Sr/86Sr ratios are all close to modern seawater Sr isotopic composition of about 0.7092 (0.7078 to 0.7107), but still can reliably be distinguished. Distinct isotopically heavy and light B isotopic fingerprints are obtained for bell peppers from Israel and the Netherlands. Samples from Germany, Austria, and Spain display overlapping d11B values between 0 and +12 ‰. Bell peppers from Israel show high d11B values (+28 to +35 ‰) combined with 87Sr/86Sr ratios slightly more unradiogenic than modern seawater (ca 0.7079). Bell peppers from the Netherlands, however, show low d11B values (-8 ‰) combinded with 87Sr/86Sr ratios of modern seawater (approx. 0.7085). Mainly based on diagnostic B isotopic compositions bell peppers from Israel and the Netherlands can be related to a specific geographical growing environment (Israel) or production method (Netherlands). The isotope fingerprints of bell peppers from the Netherlands are consistent with growing conditions in greenhouses typical for the Netherlands vegetable farming. Using optimized production methods crops in greenhouses were supplied with nutritients by liquid fertilizers on artificial substrates. As most fertilizers derive from non-marine salt deposits, fertilization typically imprints invariant d11B values close

  14. Alternative Filament Loading Solution for Accurate Analysis of Boron Isotopes by Negative Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, G. S.; Vengosh, A.

    2008-12-01

    The negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry technique has become the major tool for investigating boron isotopes in the environment. The high sensitivity of BO2- ionization enables measurements of ng levels of boron. However, B isotope measurement by this technique suffers from two fundamental problems (1) fractionation induced by selective ionization of B isotopes in the mass spectrometer; and (2) CNO- interference on mass 42 that is often present in some load solutions (such as B-free seawater processed through ion-exchange resin). Here we report a potentially improved methodology using an alternative filament loading solution with a recently-installed Thermo Scientific TRITON thermal ionization mass spectrometer. Our initial results suggest that this solution -- prepared by combining high-purity single- element standard solutions of Ca, Mg, Na, and K in proportions similar to those in seawater in a 5% HCl matrix -- may offer significant improvement over some other commonly used load solutions. Total loading blank is around 15pg as determined by isotope dilution (NIST952). Replicate analyses of NIST SRM951 and modern seawater thus far have yielded 11B/10B ratios of 4.0057 (±0.0008, n=14) and 4.1645 (±0.0017, n=7; δ11B=39.6 permil), respectively. Replicate analyses of samples and SRM951 yield an average standard deviation (1 σ) of approximately 0.001 (0.25 permil). Fractionation during analysis (60-90 minutes) has thus far typically been less than 0.002 (0.5 permil). The load solution delivers ionization efficiency similar to directly-loaded seawater and has negligible signal at mass 26 (CN-), a proxy for the common interfering molecular ion (CNO-) on mass 42. Standards and samples loaded with the solution behave fairly predictably during filament heating and analysis, thus allowing for the possibility of fully automated data collection.

  15. ICP-MS for isotope ratio measurement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of stable isotopes in mineral nutrition research has become a fundamental aspect of conducting this research. A gradual transition has occurred, now virtually complete, from radioactive isotope studies to those using stable isotopes. Although primarily used in human research, mineral stable ...

  16. Glacial-interglacial Changes in Ocean Carbon Chemistry constrained by Boron Isotopes, Trace Elements, and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, J. W. B.; Adkins, J. F.; Foreman, A. D.; Charles, C.

    2014-12-01

    Deep ocean carbon storage and release is commonly invoked to explain glacial-interglacial CO2 cycles, but records of the carbonate chemistry of the glacial ocean have, until recently, been scarce. Here we present new boron isotope (δ11B) and trace metal data from benthic foraminifera from a suite of 15 cores from the South Atlantic from depths ranging from 1500 to 4000 m. These records show distinct changes in the water column depth structure of these tracers between the last glacial maximum (LGM) and late Holocene. Comparison of these paired trace element and isotope ratios reveals new insights to the shared and individual controls on tracers including Li/Ca, Sr/Ca, U/Ca, Mg/Li and δ11B. We further examine these data using a recently developed tracer fields modelling approach (Lund et al. 2011). This has previously been applied to δ18O data to investigate changes in circulation at the LGM. Here we extend this method to non-conservative isotopic and trace elemental tracers, allowing us to constrain the roles of circulation, the biological pump of organic carbon and CaCO3, and carbonate compensation, in setting deep ocean carbon storage at the LGM. Lund, D. C., J. F. Adkins, and R. Ferrari (2011), Abyssal Atlantic circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum: Constraining the ratio between transport and vertical mixing, Paleoceanography, 26, PA1213, doi:10.1029/2010PA001938.

  17. The boron isotope systematics of the Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming) hydrothermal system: A reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, M.R. ); Sturchio, N.C. )

    1990-10-01

    Boron concentrations and isotope compositions have been measured in fourteen hot spring waters, two drill hole waters, an unaltered rhyolite flow, and hydrothermally altered rhyolite from the geothermal system in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The samples are representative of the major thermal areas within the park and span the range of fluid types. For the fluids, the B concentrations range from 0.043-2.69 mM/kg, and the {delta}{sup 11}B values range from {minus}9.3 to +4.4{per thousand}. There is no relationship between the dissolved B concentrations or isotope compositions with the concentration of any major element (other than Cl) or physical property. Each basin is characterized by a restricted range in B/Cl ratios and {delta}{sup 11}B values. Hot spring waters from the Norris Basin, Upper Geyser Basin, Calcite Springs, and Clearwater have {delta}{sup 11}B values close to that of unaltered rhyolite ({minus}5.2{per thousand}) and are interpreted to have derived their B from this source. Waters from Mammoth Hot Springs, Sheepeater, and Rainbow Springs have lower {delta}{sup 11}B values close to {minus}8{per thousand}. These lower values may reflect leaching of B from sedimentary rocks outside the Yellowstone caldera, but they are similar to the {delta}{sup 11}B value of hydrothermally altered rhyolite ({minus}9.7{per thousand}). Hence, the light boron isotope compositions recorded in these hot spring waters may reflect leaching of previously deposited hydrothermal minerals. Cooler springs along the Yellowstone River just outside the park boundary have lower B concentrations and higher {delta}{sup 11}B values that may reflect mixing with shallow meteoric water.

  18. Boron

    MedlinePlus

    Boron is a mineral that is found in food and the environment. People take boron supplements as medicine. Boron is used for building ... to affect the way the body handles other minerals such as magnesium and phosphorus. It also seems ...

  19. Use of Sulphur and Boron Isotopes to Identify Natural Gas Processing Emissions Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, C. E.; Norman, A.; Wieser, M. E.

    2003-12-01

    Natural gas processing results in the emission of large amounts of gaseous pollutants as a result of planned and / or emergency flaring, sulphur incineration, and in the course of normal operation. Since many gas plants often contribute to the same air shed, it is not possible to conclusively determine the sources, amounts, and characteristics of pollution from a particular processing facility using traditional methods. However, sulphur isotopes have proven useful in the apportionment of sources of atmospheric sulphate (Norman et al., 1999), and boron isotopes have been shown to be of use in tracing coal contamination through groundwater (Davidson and Bassett, 1993). In this study, both sulphur and boron isotopes have been measured at source, receptor, and control sites, and, if emissions prove to be sufficiently distinct isotopically, they will be used to identify and apportion emissions downwind. Sulphur is present in natural gas as hydrogen sulphide (H2S), which is combusted to sulphur dioxide (SO2) prior to its release to the atmosphere, while boron is present both in hydrocarbon deposits as well as in any water used in the process. Little is known about the isotopic abundance variations of boron in hydrocarbon reservoirs, but Krouse (1991) has shown that the sulphur isotope composition of H2S in reservoirs varies according to both the concentration and the method of formation of H2S. As a result, gas plants processing gas from different reservoirs are expected to produce emissions with unique isotopic compositions. Samples were collected using a high-volume air sampler placed directly downwind of several gas plants, as well as at a receptor site and a control site. Aerosol sulphate and boron were collected on quartz fibre filters, while SO2 was collected on potassium hydroxide-impregnated cellulose filters. Solid sulphur samples were taken from those plants that process sulphur in order to compare the isotopic composition with atmospheric measurements. A

  20. Boron isotope evidence for the involvement of non-marine evaporites in the origin of the Broken Hill ore deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, J.F.; Palmer, M.R.; Stevens, B.P.J.

    1989-01-01

    IDENTIFYING the palaeogeographic setting and mode of origin of stratabound ore deposits can be difficult in high-grade metamorphic terranes, where the effects of metamorphism may obscure the nature of the protoliths. Here we report boron isotope data for tourmalines from the early Proterozoic Broken Hill block, in Australia, which hosts giant lead-zinc-silver sulphide deposits. With one exception the 11B/10B ratios are lower than those for all other tourmalines from massive sulphide deposits and tour-malinites elsewhere in the world. We propose that these low ratios reflect leaching of boron from non-marine evaporitic borates by convecting hydrothermal fluids associated with early Proterozoic continental rifting. A possible modern analogue is the Salton Sea geothermal field in California. ?? 1989 Nature Publishing Group.

  1. System and method for high precision isotope ratio destructive analysis

    DOEpatents

    Bushaw, Bruce A; Anheier, Norman C; Phillips, Jon R

    2013-07-02

    A system and process are disclosed that provide high accuracy and high precision destructive analysis measurements for isotope ratio determination of relative isotope abundance distributions in liquids, solids, and particulate samples. The invention utilizes a collinear probe beam to interrogate a laser ablated plume. This invention provides enhanced single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range, and isotope ratios that can be determined at approximately 1% or better precision and accuracy (relative standard deviation).

  2. Boron's Isotopes Help Trace Water in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, A.; Whitehead, B.

    2010-12-01

    Using boron isotopic composition (δ11B) values from different bodies of water (surface and ground) in New Zealand to trace the water as it moves through a portion of the hydrologic system. This research focuses on two major rivers, the Tarawera and the Rangitaiki, as they cross the Rangitaiki plains in the Bay of Plenty region of the North Island. The Tarawera River is 59 km (37 miles) long, from the mouth of Lake Tarawera, west of the Rangitaiki plains, to the ocean outlet. The lower reaches (42 km or 26 miles) of the 155 km (94 miles) Rangitaiki River travels a similar course across the plains south of, and running parallel to, the Tarawera River. Geothermal activity, plantation forests, municipal activities, wood processing industries, a pulp and paper mill, and agricultural practices all contribute to the chemical makeup of the Tarawera River. The two main industries that influence the lower reaches of the Rangitaiki River, after the dam at Lake Matahina, are a dairy milk processing plant and farming, both dairy and horticultural. Currently, more data has been collected on the Tarawera River because of the greater number of influences on it. The results of this research have revealed distinctly different δ11B signatures for the two rivers. In addition, along the Tarawera River there are significant differences in the δ11B values between the sampling sites that appear to correlate well with different inputs into the river. The added benefit of the spatial representation of the δ11B data, obtained from all the sampling sites on the Rangitaiki plains, aids in visualizing how this information can help trace the water in the hydrologic system of this area.

  3. Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of brines - comparing isotope ratio mass spectrometry and isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, Christian; Koeniger, Paul; van Geldern, Robert; Stadler, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    Today's standard analytical methods for high precision stable isotope analysis of fluids are gas-water equilibration and high temperature pyrolysis coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometers (IRMS). In recent years, relatively new laser-based analytical instruments entered the market that are said to allow high isotope precision data on nearly every media. This optical technique is referred to as isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS). The objective of this study is to evaluate the capability of this new instrument type for highly saline solutions and a comparison of the analytical results with traditional IRMS analysis. It has been shown for the equilibration method that the presence of salts influences the measured isotope values depending on the salt concentration (see Lécuyer et al, 2009; Martineau, 2012). This so-called 'isotope salt effect' depends on the salt type and salt concentration. These factors change the activity in the fluid and therefore shift the isotope ratios measured by the equilibration method. Consequently, correction factors have to be applied to these analytical data. Direct conversion techniques like pyrolysis or the new laser instruments allow the measurement of the water molecule from the sample directly and should therefore not suffer from the salt effect, i.e. no corrections of raw values are necessary. However, due to high salt concentrations this might cause technical problems with the analytical hardware and may require labor-intensive sample preparation (e.g. vacuum distillation). This study evaluates the salt isotope effect for the IRMS equilibration technique (Thermo Gasbench II coupled to Delta Plus XP) and the laser-based IRIS instruments with liquid injection (Picarro L2120-i). Synthetic salt solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, MgCl2, MgSO4, CaSO4) and natural brines collected from the Stassfurt Salt Anticline (Germany; Stadler et al., 2012) were analysed with both techniques. Salt concentrations ranged from seawater salinity

  4. Possible roles of pH, temperature, and partial dissolution in determining boron concentration and isotopic composition in planktonic foraminifera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wara, M.W.; Delaney, M.L.; Bullen, T.D.; Ravelo, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    We present the first continuous records from 0 to 5 Ma (in 0.333 m.y. integrated time steps) of paired boron/calcium (B/Ca) ratios and boron isotopes (??11B) in the planktonic foraminifera Globogerinoides sacculifer (without sacc) from a site in the western equatorial Pacific Ocean (Ocean Drilling Program Site 806). These measurements, the first made in conjunction with calcification temperature (magnesium/calcium ratios) and average shell mass measurements, indicate that pH is not the sole environmental variable controlling B in planktonic foraminiferal calcite. Our data are consistent with calcification temperature exerting a primary control on B concentration and isotopic composition in planktonic foraminifera. If so, calcification temperature must be taken into account if pH for past oceans and atmospheric pCO2 are to be estimated from B isotope measurements in foraminiferal calcite. Doing so will substantially increase the uncertainty of PH estimates. Although this work was designed as a temporal study, its results define new aspects of calibrating the ??11B paleo-pH tracer. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Possible roles of pH, temperature, and partial dissolution in determining boron concentration and isotopic composition in planktonic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wara, M. W.; Delaney, M. L.; Bullen, T. D.; Ravelo, A. C.

    2003-12-01

    We present the first continuous records from 0 to 5 Ma (in 0.333 m.y. integrated time steps) of paired boron/calcium (B/Ca) ratios and boron isotopes (δ11B) in the planktonic foraminifera Globogerinoides sacculifer (without sacc) from a site in the western equatorial Pacific Ocean (Ocean Drilling Program Site 806). These measurements, the first made in conjunction with calcification temperature (magnesium/calcium ratios) and average shell mass measurements, indicate that pH is not the sole environmental variable controlling B in planktonic foraminiferal calcite. Our data are consistent with calcification temperature exerting a primary control on B concentration and isotopic composition in planktonic foraminifera. If so, calcification temperature must be taken into account if pH for past oceans and atmospheric pCO2 are to be estimated from B isotope measurements in foraminiferal calcite. Doing so will substantially increase the uncertainty of pH estimates. Although this work was designed as a temporal study, its results define new aspects of calibrating the δ11B paleo-pH tracer.

  6. Boron Isotopes Analyses of Carbonates, Phosphates and Silicates by Laser Ablation MC-ICP-MS: the Influence of Sample Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdes, A.

    2013-12-01

    Methods for in-situ analyses of boron isotopes by laser ablation MC-ICP-MS, although presented by 3 labs over the last years, are still not routinely applied despite of the growing interest in B isotopes, e.g. in palaeoclimate research. This study evaluates the ability to analyse boron isotopes by laser ablation at levels down to 0.2 ppm in biogenic carbonates as well as in various minerals (e.g., calcit, garnet, cpx, apatite, hematite, quartz, diamond ...) and natural and synthetic glass (NIST, USGS, and MPI-DING). Mounted and polished samples were ablated in a two-volume Helix cell using a RESOlution 193nm Excimer laser coupled to a Thermo-Finnigan Neptune (No. 1, build in 2000). Due to high sensitivity isotope signals were detected using Faraday collectors (1011 Ohm resistors). Analyses were performed as static spots over 25s with diameters of 235 to 7 μm depending on boron concentration, which yield typical 11B signals of about 0.04 (≤ 1ppm; e.g., cherts) to >0.6 V (3wt.%; tourmaline). Therefore, sample amount consumed during analyses range from 1 nanogram to 10 microgram with total analysed B content in the range of 5 to 1000 picogram. For correction of drift and mass fractionation soda-lime glass NIST-612 or NIST-610 were analysed every 30min. The applied method yields for various materials a typical analytical precision and reproducibility (1σ) of the 11B/10B of about 0.5‰ or better at boron concentration of more than 2 ppm. The effect of various parameters such as gas background, surface contamination, cross contamination, spot size, laser energy, and depth drilling will be discussed briefly. However, crucial for in-situ analyse is the evaluation of the accuracy and the influence of the sample matrix on it. Approaches to test this are still hampered by the lack of well-characterized low-B (e.g. <20ppm) reference materiel of different sample matrix. Nevertheless, in contrast to previous studies an effect of sample matrix on the boron isotope ratio was

  7. THE ATOMIC WEIGHTS COMMISSION AND ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO DETERMINATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-07

    Following Thomson's discovery of stable isotopes in non-radioactive chemical elements, the derivation of atomic weight values from mass spectrometric measurements of isotopic abundance ratios moved very slowly. Forty years later, only 3 1/2 % of the recommended values were based on mass spectrometric measurements and only 38% in the first half century. It might be noted that two chemical elements (tellurium and mercury) are still based on chemical measurements, where the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement either agrees with the value from the chemical measurement or the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement falls within the uncertainty of the chemical measurement of the atomic weight. Of the 19 chemical elements, whose atomic weight is based on non-corrected relative isotopic abundance measurements, five of these are two isotope systems (indium, iridium, lanthanum, lutetium and tantalum) and one is a three-isotope system (oxygen).

  8. Isotope yield ratios of fragments from heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Deak, F.; Kiss, A. ); Seres, Z. ); Galonsky, A.; Heilbronn, L. )

    1991-05-01

    Isotope yield ratios produced in collisions of 35 MeV/nucleon {sup 14}N with targets of C, Ni, Ag, and Ho have an exponential dependence on total neutron-to-proton ratio. A statistical multifragmentation model including particle emission from excited fragments predicted such behavior for yield ratios measured earlier at the higher energy of 84 MeV/nucleon.

  9. Symbiodinium Clade Affects Coral Skeletal Isotopic Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carilli, J.; Charles, C. D.; Garren, M.; McField, M.; Norris, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    The influence of different physiologies of Symbiodinium dinoflagellate symbiont clades on the skeletal chemistry of associated coral hosts has not previously been investigated. This is an important issue because coral skeletons are routinely used for tropical paleoclimatic reconstructions. We analyzed coral skeletal samples collected simultaneously from neighboring colonies off Belize and found that those harboring different clades of Symbiodinium displayed significantly different skeletal oxygen isotopic compositions. We also found evidence for mean shifts in skeletal oxygen isotopic composition after coral bleaching (the loss and potential exchange of symbionts) in two of four longer coral cores from the Mesoamerican Reef, though all experienced similar climatic conditions. Thus, we suggest that symbiont clade identity leaves a signature in the coral skeletal archive and that this influence must be considered for quantitative environmental reconstruction. In addition, we suggest that the skeletal isotopic signature may be used to identify changes in the dominant symbiont clade that have occurred in the past, to identify how common and widespread this phenomenon is--a potential adaptation to climate change.

  10. Combination of carbon isotope ratio with hydrogen isotope ratio determinations in sports drug testing.

    PubMed

    Piper, Thomas; Emery, Caroline; Thomas, Andreas; Saugy, Martial; Thevis, Mario

    2013-06-01

    Carbon isotope ratio (CIR) analysis has been routinely and successfully applied to doping control analysis for many years to uncover the misuse of endogenous steroids such as testosterone. Over the years, several challenges and limitations of this approach became apparent, e.g., the influence of inadequate chromatographic separation on CIR values or the emergence of steroid preparations comprising identical CIRs as endogenous steroids. While the latter has been addressed recently by the implementation of hydrogen isotope ratios (HIR), an improved sample preparation for CIR avoiding co-eluting compounds is presented herein together with newly established reference values of those endogenous steroids being relevant for doping controls. From the fraction of glucuronidated steroids 5β-pregnane-3α,20α-diol, 5α-androst-16-en-3α-ol, 3α-Hydroxy-5β-androstane-11,17-dione, 3α-hydroxy-5α-androstan-17-one (ANDRO), 3α-hydroxy-5β-androstan-17-one (ETIO), 3β-hydroxy-androst-5-en-17-one (DHEA), 5α- and 5β-androstane-3α,17β-diol (5aDIOL and 5bDIOL), 17β-hydroxy-androst-4-en-3-one and 17α-hydroxy-androst-4-en-3-one were included. In addition, sulfate conjugates of ANDRO, ETIO, DHEA, 3β-hydroxy-5α-androstan-17-one plus 17α- and androst-5-ene-3β,17β-diol were considered and analyzed after acidic solvolysis. The results obtained for the reference population encompassing n = 67 males and females confirmed earlier findings regarding factors influencing endogenous CIR. Variations in sample preparation influenced CIR measurements especially for 5aDIOL and 5bDIOL, the most valuable steroidal analytes for the detection of testosterone misuse. Earlier investigations on the HIR of the same reference population enabled the evaluation of combined measurements of CIR and HIR and its usefulness regarding both steroid metabolism studies and doping control analysis. The combination of both stable isotopes would allow for lower reference limits providing the same statistical

  11. Boron isotopes as pH proxy: A new look at boron speciation in deep-sea corals using 11B MAS NMR and EELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollion-Bard, Claire; Blamart, Dominique; Trebosc, Julien; Tricot, Grégory; Mussi, Alexandre; Cuif, Jean-Pierre

    2011-02-01

    Dissolved boron in modern seawater occurs in the form of two species, trigonal boric acid B(OH) 3 and tetrahedral borate ion B(OH)4-. One of the key assumption in the use of boron isotopic compositions of carbonates as pH proxy is that only borate ions, B(OH)4-, are incorporated into the carbonate. Here, we investigate the speciation of boron in deep-sea coral microstructures ( Lophelia pertusa specimen) by using high field magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ( 11B MAS NMR) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). We observe both boron coordination species, but in different proportions depending on the coral microstructure, i.e. centres of calcification versus fibres. These results suggest that careful sampling is necessary before performing boron isotopic measurements in deep-sea corals. By combining the proportions of B(OH) 3 and B(OH)4- determined by NMR and our previous ion microprobe boron isotope measurements, we propose a new equation for the relation between seawater pH and boron isotopic composition in deep-sea corals.

  12. Temperature Dependence of Isotope Ratios in Tree Rings

    PubMed Central

    Libby, L. M.; Pandolfi, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    The stable isotope ratios of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen have been measured for a German oak in wood samples of roughly three years each, for the years 1712-1954 A.D., and correlated with the existing weather records from England, Basel, and Geneva to evaluate the empirical temperature coefficients. Isotope ratios in a second official oak, measured for the years 1530-1800 A.D., show the cold temperatures of the Little Ice Age interspersed with warm intervals. PMID:16592163

  13. Boron

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron is an essential micronutrient element required for plant growth. Boron deficiency is wide-spread in crop plants throughout the world especially in coarse-textured soils in humid areas. Boron toxicity can also occur, especially in arid regions under irrigation. Plants respond directly to the...

  14. Oxygen isotope ratios in eclogites from kimberlites.

    PubMed

    Garlick, G D; Macgregor, I D; Vogel, D E

    1971-06-01

    The oxygen isotope compositions (delta(18)O) of eclogitic xenoliths from the Roberts Victor kimberlite range from 2 to 8 per mil relative to SMOW (standard mean ocean water). This surprising variation appears to be due to fractional crystallization: the eclogites rich in oxygen-18 represent early crystal accumulates; the eclogites poor in oxygen-18 represent residual liquids. Crystal-melt partitioning probably exceeded 3 per mil and is interpreted to be pressure-dependent. Anomalous enrichment of oxygen-18 in cumulate eclogites relative to ultramafic xenoliths suggests that crystal-melt partitioning increased after melt-formation but prior to crystallization. PMID:17798552

  15. Microstructure and tensile properties of neutron irradiated Cu and Cu sbnd 5Ni containing isotopically controlled boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muroga, T.; Watanabe, H.; Yoshida, N.; Kurishita, H.; Hamilton, M. L.

    1995-08-01

    Cu and Cu sbnd 5Ni dopwe with either natural boron (20% 10B) or isotopically enriched boron (91% 10B) were irradiated in FFTF/MOTA at 646 K to 6.3 dpa and 683 K to 4.9 dpa. The He/dpa ratio varied from 0.1 to 224. The dependence of irradiation-induced microstructures and mechanical properties (yield stress change and uniform elongation) on the helium level was examined. In pure Cu, the void size distribution changed from unimodal to bimodal with the increase of He/dpa ratio. The swelling peak occured at a He/dpa ratio of 5 to 10. In Cu sbnd 5Ni, the swelling rapidly decreased with He/dpa ratio. The yield stress change was well correlated with microstructural-based calculations describing contributions to hardening by voids and dislocations. Cavity formation and growth at grain boundaries resulted in enhanced grain boundary fracture and significant loss of elongation in the case of high He/dpa ratio. This effect, however, was small at fusion-relevant He/dpa ratio.

  16. The atomic weight and isotopic composition of boron and their variation in nature

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1993-08-01

    The boron isotopic composition and atomic weight value and their variation in nature are reviewed. Questions are raised about the previously recommended value and the uncertainty for the atomic weight. The problem of what constitutes an acceptable range for normal material and what should then be considered geologically exceptional is discussed. Recent measurements make some previous decisions in need of re-evaluation.

  17. Direct path integral estimators for isotope fractionation ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Bingqing; Ceriotti, Michele

    2014-12-28

    Fractionation of isotopes among distinct molecules or phases is a quantum effect which is often exploited to obtain insights on reaction mechanisms, biochemical, geochemical, and atmospheric phenomena. Accurate evaluation of isotope ratios in atomistic simulations is challenging, because one needs to perform a thermodynamic integration with respect to the isotope mass, along with time-consuming path integral calculations. By re-formulating the problem as a particle exchange in the ring polymer partition function, we derive new estimators giving direct access to the differential partitioning of isotopes, which can simplify the calculations by avoiding thermodynamic integration. We demonstrate the efficiency of these estimators by applying them to investigate the isotope fractionation ratios in the gas-phase Zundel cation, and in a few simple hydrocarbons.

  18. Plutonium isotope ratio variations in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert E; La Mont, Stephen P; Eisele, William F; Fresquez, Philip R; Mc Naughton, Michael; Whicker, Jeffrey J

    2010-12-14

    Historically, approximately 12,000 TBq of plutonium was distributed throughout the global biosphere by thermo nuclear weapons testing. The resultant global plutonium fallout is a complex mixture whose {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio is a function of the design and yield of the devices tested. The average {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio in global fallout is 0.176 + 014. However, the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio at any location may differ significantly from 0.176. Plutonium has also been released by discharges and accidents associated with the commercial and weapons related nuclear industries. At many locations contributions from this plutonium significantly alters the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios from those observed in global fallout. We have measured the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in environmental samples collected from many locations in North America. This presentation will summarize the analytical results from these measurements. Special emphasis will be placed on interpretation of the significance of the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios measured in environmental samples collected in the Arctic and in the western portions of the United States.

  19. The boron isotopic composition of geothermal waters and crater lakes from Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnomo, B. J.; Pichler, T.; You, C. F.

    2014-12-01

    The presences of two different types of geothermal systems, volcanic-hosted and fault-hosted, and two different types of acid crater lakes, acid sulfate and acid chloride, on Java, Indonesia presented the opportunity to investigate boron isotope systematic in such contrasting systems. Fault-hosted hot springs and the acid chloride crater lakes had light δ11B (-2.4 to +0.49 ‰), similar to geothermal brines. Meanwhile, the δ11B values of volcanic-hosted hot springs ranged from -0.7 to +12.8 ‰ and acid-sulfate crater lakes ranged from +5.5 to +34.8 ‰, which were heavier than the geothermal vapor phase (δ11B= +3.8 ‰). The absence of magmatic gases and the fast ascent of the fault-hosted thermal waters inhibited B isotope fractionation, thus their original light δ11B signature from the reservoir was maintained. In contrast, in volcanic-hosted geothermal systems magmatic degassing produced a more reactive geothermal water, which combined with the relatively longer ascent produced heavy δ11B signatures. The light δ11B signature of acid chloride crater lakes was produced by rock dissolution, also indicated by its B/Cl ratios, which were similar to those of andesitic rocks. The continuous H2S, SO2 and HCl gases supply favors rock dissolution in the acid chloride crater lakes and thus little to no B isotope fractionation was observed. In contrast, condensation of the geothermal vapor phase combined with evaporation and B adsorption onto clay minerals caused a δ11B enrichment in the acid sulfate crater lakes. The very heavy δ11B value of +34.8 ‰ in the acid sulfate crater lake of Kawah Sikidang likely involved some reaction with sedimentary rocks in the subsurface.

  20. Synthetic isotope mixtures for the calibration of isotope amount ratio measurements of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russe, K.; Valkiers, S.; Taylor, P. D. P.

    2004-07-01

    Synthetic isotope mixtures for the calibration of carbon isotope amount ratio measurements have been prepared by mixing carbon tetrafluoride highly enriched in 13C with carbon tetrafluoride depleted in 13C. Mixing procedures based on volumetry and gravimetry are described. The mixtures served as primary measurement standards for the calibration of isotope amount ratio measurements of the Isotopic Reference Materials PEF1, NBS22 and USGS24. Thus SI-traceable measurements of absolute carbon isotope amount ratios have been performed for the first time without any hypothesis needed for a correction of oxygen isotope abundances, such as is the case for measurements on carbon dioxide. As a result, "absolute" carbon isotope amount ratios determined via carbon tetrafluoride have smaller uncertainties than those published for carbon dioxide. From the measurements of the Reference Materials concerned, the absolute carbon isotope amount ratio of Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite (VPDB)--the hypothetical material upon which the scale for relative carbon isotope ratio measurements is based--was calculated to be R13(VPDB) = (11 101 +/- 16) × 10-6.

  1. Evaluating chlorine isotope effects from isotope ratios and mass spectra of polychlorinated molecules.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Martin; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2008-06-15

    Compound-specific chlorine isotope analysis receives much interest to assess the fate of chlorinated hydrocarbons in contaminated environments. This paper provides a theoretical basis to calculate isotope ratios and quantify isotope fractionation from ion-current ratios of molecular- and fragment-ion multiplets. Because both (35)Cl and (37)Cl are of high abundance, polychlorinated hydrocarbons consist of molecules containing different numbers of (37)Cl denoted as isotopologues. We show that, during reactions, the changes in isotopologue ratios are proportional to changes in the isotope ratio assuming a nonselective isotope distribution in the initial compound. This proportionality extents even to fragments formed in the ion source of a mass spectrometer such as C 2Cl 2 (double dechlorinated fragment of perchloroethylene, PCE). Fractionation factors and kinetic isotope effects (KIE) may, therefore, be evaluated from isotope, isotopologue or even fragment ratios according to conventional simple equations. The proportionality is exact with symmetric molecules such as dichloroethylene (DCE) and PCE, whereas it is approximately true with molecules containing nonreactive positions such as trichloroethylene (TCE). If in the latter case isotope ratios are derived from dechlorinated fragments, e.g., C 2HCl 2, it is important that fragmentation in the ion source affect all molecular positions alike, as otherwise isotopic changes in reactive positions may be underrepresented. PMID:18484745

  2. H-isotope retention and thermal/ion-induced release in boronized films

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, D.S. ); Doyle, B.L.; Wampler, W.R.; Hays, A.K. )

    1990-01-01

    Over the past decade, it has been clearly demonstrated that the composition of the very near surface ({approximately}100nm) of plasma-interactive components plays a determinant role in most processes which occur in the plasma-edge of Tokamaks. Two very successful techniques to effect control of the plasma-wall interaction are (1) in-situ deposition of amorphous carbon or boron-carbon films and (2) the use of He/C conditioning discharges or He glow discharge cleaning to modify the near surface of bulk graphite components. We have deposited boronized layers into Si using plasma-assisted CVD and sputter deposition. The PCVD deposition conditions were as close as possible to those used in TFTR, and some films deposited in TFTR have also been studied. Using these two deposition techniques, B{sub x}CH{sub y} films have been produced with x varying from 1/2 -- 4, and y from {approximately}1 (sputtered) to {approximately}3 (PCVD). Most films also contained significant amounts of 0. Thermal and ion-induced release of H-isotopes from BC films is qualitatively similar to that measured for graphite. Implanted H saturates in these films at a H/host atom ratio of 0.7 which is considerably higher than that of graphite({approximately}0.4). As-deposited PCVD films are already saturated with H, while sputtered films are not. Sputtered BC films therefore possess an inherent H-pumping capability which could prove to be extremely beneficial to TFTR. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Evidence of Northeastern Atlantic Ocean Acidification Recorded by Boron Isotopes on Deep-sea Coral Madrepora oculata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Roubaud, C.; Douville, E.; Bordier, L.; Louvat, P.; Gaillardet, J.; Hall-Spencer, J. M.; Juillet-Leclerc, A.

    2011-12-01

    Ocean acidification is caused by the rising levels of CO2 in the atmosphere since the industrial era. Seawater pH has already decreased 0.1 units in surface waters and will continue to drop as atmospheric CO2 levels increase. Assessing the pH variability during the last decades is essential as survival of calcifying organisms strongly depends on seawater pH. Several studies have shown the potential of boron isotopic composition in tropical corals for reconstructing for sea-surface paleo-pH at low latitudes. For highest latitudes and deeper waters (50-4500 m), cold-water corals are interesting and unique as natural archives not only because they live between 4°C and 12°C under strong currents, recording the parameters of sub-surface or intermediate currents, but also because they build their aragonite skeleton without the photosynthesis process. In order to assess if the seawater acidification has already reached the North Atlantic Ocean at high latitudes, pH reconstruction has been performed on a deep-sea coral Madrepora oculata sample from Rost Reef (67°N, 9°E, 350 m of depth). Boron isotopes have been measured on the Neptune Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (MCICP-MS) with direct injection system (d-DIHEN). External reproducibility obtained here for seawater reference NASS-2 was 0.1%. The model age estimates its life-span to 40±3 years (2σ) and the Li/Mg ratio estimates a relative constant seawater temperature during the whole period of growth of the coral (7.0±0.5°C). A drop tendency is observed on boron isotopes, reflecting a potential decrease of seawater pH of approximately 0.06±0.02 pH units during the last 40 years, depending on the isotopic fractionation coefficient employed for calculations. Similarly, seawater acidification rate is 0.0012±0.00015 pH units per year. pH and temperature reconstructions revealed an influence of thermohaline circulation and surface winds on the skeleton geochemistry. Supplementary

  4. LITERATURE SURVEY ON ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO MEASUREMENTS - 2001-2005

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-13

    Along with my usual weekly review of the published literature for new nuclear data, I also search for new candidates for best measurements of isotopic abundances from a single source. Most of the published articles, that I previously had found in the Research Library at the Brookhaven Lab, have already been sent to the members of the Atomic Weights Commission, by either Michael Berglund or Thomas Walczyk. In the last few days, I checked the published literature for any other articles in the areas of natural variations in isotopic abundance ratios, measurements of isotopic abundance ratios on samples of extra-terrestrial material and isotopic abundance ratio measurements performed using ICPMS instruments. Hopefully this information will be of interest to members of the Commission, the sub-committee on isotopic abundance measurements (SIAM), members of the former sub-committee on natural isotopic fractionation (SNIF), the sub-committee on extra-terrestrial isotope ratios (SETIR), the RTCE Task Group and the Guidelines Task Group, who are dealing with ICPMS and TIMS comparisons. In the following report, I categorize the publications in one of four areas. Measurements performed using either positive or negative ions with Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer, TIMS, instruments; measurements performed on Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer, ICPMS, instruments; measurements of natural variations of the isotopic abundance ratios; and finally measurements on extra-terrestrial samples with instrumentation of either type. There is overlap in these areas. I selected out variations and ET results first and then categorized the rest of the papers by TIMS and ICPMS.

  5. Matrix Effects on Boron Containing Materials due to Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Staci R.; Akpovo, Charlemagne A.; Martinez, Jorge; Ford, Alan; Herbert, Kenley; Johnson, Lewis

    2014-03-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a spectroscopic technique that is used for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of materials in the liquid, solid, or gas phase. LIBS can also be used for the detection of isotopic shifts in atomic and diatomic species via Laser-Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectroscopy (LAMIS). However, any additional elements that are entrained into the plasma other than the element of interest, can affect the extent of ablation and quality of spectra and hence, potentially obscure or aid in the relative abundance assessment for a given element. To address the importance of matrix effects, the isotopic analysis of boron obtained from boron oxide (BO) emission originating from different boron-containing compounds, such as boron nitride (BN), boric acid (H3BO3) , and borax (Na2B4O710H2O), via LIBS has been performed here. Each of these materials has different physical properties and elemental composition in order to illustrate possible challenges for the LAMIS method. A calibration-free model similar to that for the original LAMIS work is used to determine properties of the plasma as the matrix is changed. DTRA

  6. Ca Isotopic Ratios in Igneous Rocks: Some Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Farkas, J.; Jacobsen, S. B.

    2009-12-01

    Calcium (Ca) is the 5th most abundant element on the Earth, and it is an important geochemical and cosmochemical tracer. It has six isotopes and only H and He have a larger percentage mass difference (Δm/m) between the heaviest and the lightest isotopes. Systematic Ca isotopic studies have mostly focused on low-temperature geochemical processes, and most Ca isotopic analyses have been applied on modern and ancient marine carbonates and sulphates, documenting large and systematic isotopic variations, which were used to infer the chemical evolution of seawater. Detailed work on igneous rocks is very limited. Here we show two examples of how stable Ca isotopic ratios can be a useful geochemical tool in understanding igneous processes. Ca isotopic fractionation between coexisting clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene from mantle peridotites: We report Ca isotopic ratios on co-existing clino- and ortho-pyroxenes from Kilbourne Hole and San Carlos mantle peridotites. The 44Ca/40Ca in orthopyroxenes is ~0.5 per mil heavier than that in co-existing clinopyroxenes. Combined with published Ca isotopic data on low-temperature Ca-bearing minerals (calcite, aragonite and barite), we show that the fractionation of Ca isotopes between Ca-bearing minerals (at both low-temperature and high-temperature) is primarily controlled by the strength of Ca-O bond in the minerals. The mineral with shorter (i.e., stronger) Ca-O bond yields heavier Ca isotopic ratio. Using our measured 44Ca/40Ca in mantle pyroxenes and the relative proportions of major Ca-bearing minerals in the upper mantle, the estimated 44Ca/40Ca of the upper mantle is 1.1 per mil heavier relative to the NIST 915a, ~0.1 to 0.2 per mil higher than basalts. Ca isotopic variation in Hawaiian shield lavas: Large geochemical and isotopic variations have been observed in lavas forming the large tholeiitic shields of Hawaiian volcanoes, with lavas from the surface of the Koolau volcano (Makapuu-stage) defining one compositional and

  7. Stable Isotope Ratios and the Forensic Analysis of Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Jarman, Kristin H.

    2007-06-01

    In the aftermath of the anthrax letters of 2001, researchers have been exploring various analytical signatures for the purpose of characterizing the production environment of microorganisms. One such signature is stable isotope ratios, which in heterotrophs are a function of nutrient and water sources. Here we discuss the use of stable isotope ratios in microbe forensics, using as a database the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope ratios of 247 separate cultures of B. subtilis 6051 spores produced on a total of 32 different culture media. In the context of using stable isotope ratios as a signature for sample matching, we present an analysis of variation between individual samples, between cultures produced in tandem, and between cultures produced in the same medium but at different times. Additionally, we correlate the stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen for growth medium nutrients or water with those of spores and show examples of how these relationships can be used to exclude nutrient or water samples as possible growth substrates for specific cultures.

  8. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry - history and terminology in brief.

    PubMed

    Flenker, Ulrich

    2012-12-01

    The history of isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is briefly described. It is shown that the fundamental design of isotope ratio mass spectrometers has not changed since the 1940s. The basic findings concerning the natural variation of isotope abundances even date back to the 1930s. Recent improvements in the methodology mainly concern online coupling and analytical peripherals. The nature of isotopic scales necessitates a specific terminology which is unfamiliar to many analysts. However, corresponding guidelines exist that should be adopted by the anti-doping community. Currently, steroids represent the only group of compounds routinely analyzed by IRMS in doping-control. Suggestions are made in respect to a harmonized terminology concerning the nature and origins of steroids. PMID:22972693

  9. Stable Isotope Ratios as Biomarkers of Diet for Health Research

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Diane M.

    2016-01-01

    Diet is a leading modifiable risk factor for chronic disease, but it remains difficult to measure accurately due to the error and bias inherent in self-reported methods of diet assessment. Consequently there is a pressing need for more objective biomarkers of diet for use in health research. The stable isotope ratios of light elements are a promising set of candidate biomarkers because they vary naturally and reproducibly among foods, and those variations are captured in molecules and tissues with high fidelity. Recent studies have identified valid isotopic measures of short and long-term sugar intake, meat intake, and fish intake in specific populations. These studies provide a strong foundation for validating stable isotopic biomarkers in the general United States population. Approaches to improve specificity for specific foods are needed, for example, by modeling intake using multiple stable isotope ratios, or by isolating and measuring specific molecules linked to foods of interest. PMID:26048703

  10. Column chromatographic boron isotope separation at 5 and 17 MPa with diluted boric acid solution.

    PubMed

    Musashi, Masaaki; Oi, Takao; Matsuo, Motoyuki; Nomura, Masao

    2008-08-01

    Boron isotopic fractionation factor (S) between boron taken up in strongly basic anion exchange resin and boron in aqueous solution was determined by breakthrough column chromatography at 5 and 17 MPa at 25 degrees C, using 0.1 mM boric acid solution as feed solution. The S values obtained were 1.018 and 1.012, respectively, which were smaller than the value reported by using the same chromatographic method at the atmospheric pressure at 25 degrees C with the boron concentration of 10mM, but were larger than the values under the same condition with much higher concentration of 100 and 501 mM. Calculations based on the theory of isotope distribution between two phases estimated that 21% (5 MPa) and 47% (17 MPa) of boron taken up in the resin phase was in the three-coordinated B(OH)(3)-form, instead of in the four-coordinated B(OH)(4)-form, at high pressures even with a very diluted boric acid solution. We discussed the present results by introducing (1) hydration and (2) a partial molar volume difference between isotopic molecules. Borate may have been partially dehydrated upon transfer from the solution phase to the resin phase at high pressures, which resulted in smaller S values compared with those at the atmospheric pressure. Instead, it may be possible that the difference in the isotopic partial molar volume difference between B(OH)(3) and B(OH)(4)(-) caused the S value to decrease with increasing pressure. PMID:18585727

  11. Comparison of CF4 and SF6 based plasmas for ECR etching of isotopically enriched 10Boron films

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, L F; Reinhardt, C E; Graff, R T; Conway, A M; Nikolic, R J; Deo, N; Cheung, C L

    2009-02-23

    Isotopically enriched {sup 10}boron films have been successfully etched in an ECR etching tool using CF{sub 4} and SF{sub 6} based plasmas. Comparisons between the two are made with regards to etch rate, selectivity to the underlying Si device structure, and morphology of the {sup 10}boron post-etching. The present film etching development is expected to be critical for the fabrication of next generation thermal neutron solid state detectors based on {sup 10}boron.

  12. Isotope Ratio Monitoring Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (IRM-GCMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Ricci, S. A.; Studley, A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    On Earth, the C-13 content of organic compounds is depleted by roughly 13 to 23 permil from atmospheric carbon dioxide. This difference is largely due to isotope effects associated with the fixation of inorganic carbon by photosynthetic organisms. If life once existed on Mars, then it is reasonable to expect to observe a similar fractionation. Although the strongly oxidizing conditions on the surface of Mars make preservation of ancient organic material unlikely, carbon-isotope evidence for the existence of life on Mars may still be preserved. Carbon depleted in C-13 could be preserved either in organic compounds within buried sediments, or in carbonate minerals produced by the oxidation of organic material. A technique is introduced for rapid and precise measurement of the C-13 contents of individual organic compounds. A gas chromatograph is coupled to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer through a combustion interface, enabling on-line isotopic analysis of isolated compounds. The isotope ratios are determined by integration of ion currents over the course of each chromatographic peak. Software incorporates automatic peak determination, corrections for background, and deconvolution of overlapped peaks. Overall performance of the instrument was evaluated by the analysis of a mixture of high purity n-alkanes of know isotopic composition. Isotopic values measured via IRM-GCMS averaged withing 0.55 permil of their conventionally measured values.

  13. High Resolution Double-Focusing Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radke, J.; Deerberg, M.; Hilkert, A.; Schlüter, H.-J.; Schwieters, J.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years isotope ratio mass spectrometry has extended to the capability of quantifying very small isotope signatures related with low abundances and simultaneously detecting molecular masses such as isotopomers and isotopologues containing clumped isotopes. Some of those applications are limited by molecular interferences like different gas molecules with the same nominal mass, e.g. Ar/O2, adducts of the same molecule or of different molecules, and very small isotope abundances. The Thermo Scientific MAT 253 ULTRA is the next generation of high precision gas isotope ratio mass spectrometry, which combines a 10 KV gas ionization source (Thermo Scientific MAT 253) with a double focusing multi-collector mass analyzer (Thermo Scientific Neptune) and reduces those limitations by measuring isotope ratios on a larger dynamic range with high precision. Small ion beam requirements and high sensitivity are achieved by signal-to-noise improvements through enhanced ion beam amplification in faraday cups and ion counters. Interfering backgrounds, e.g. interfering isotopologues or isobaric ions of contaminants, are dramatically decreased by a dynamic range increase combined with high evacuation leading to undisturbed ion transmission through the double-focusing analyser. Furthermore, automated gain calibration for mathematical baseline corrections, switchable detector arrays, ion source control, analyser focusing and full data export is controlled under Isodat data control. New reference/sample strategies are under investigation besides incorporation of the continuous-flow technique and its versatile inlet devices. We are presenting first results and applications of the MAT 253 Ultra.

  14. Radioactive halos and ion microprobe measurement of Pb isotope ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    This investigation was to obtain, if possible, the Pb isotope ratios of both lunar and meteoritic troilite grains by utilizing ion microprobe techniques. Such direct in situ measurement of Pb isotope ratios would eliminate contamination problems inherent in wet chemistry separation procedures, and conceivably determine whether lunar troilite grains were of meteoritic origin. For comparison purposes two samples of meteoritic troilite were selected (one from Canyon Diablo) for analysis along with two very small lunar troilite grains (approximately 50-100 microns). It was concluded that the ion microprobe as presently operating, does not permit the in situ measurement of Pb isotope ratios in lunar or meteoritic troilite. On the basis of these experiments no conclusions could be drawn as to the origin of the lunar troilite grains.

  15. Calcium isotope ratios in animal and human bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynard, L. M.; Henderson, G. M.; Hedges, R. E. M.

    2010-07-01

    Calcium isotopes in tissues are thought to be influenced by an individual's diet, reflecting parameters such as trophic level and dairy consumption, but this has not been carefully assessed. We report the calcium isotope ratios (δ 44/42Ca) of modern and archaeological animal and human bone ( n = 216). Modern sheep raised at the same location show 0.14 ± 0.08‰ higher δ 44/42Ca in females than in males, which we attribute to lactation by the ewes. In the archaeological bone samples the calcium isotope ratios of the herbivorous fauna vary by location. At a single site, the archaeological fauna do not show a trophic level effect. Humans have lower δ 44/42Ca than the mean site fauna by 0.22 ± 0.22‰, and the humans have a greater δ 44/42Ca range than the animals. No effect of sex or age on the calcium isotope ratios was found, and intra-individual skeletal δ 44/42Ca variability is negligible. We rule out dairy consumption as the main cause of the lower human δ 44/42Ca, based on results from sites pre-dating animal domestication and dairy availability, and suggest instead that individual physiology and calcium intake may be important in determining bone calcium isotope ratios.

  16. Oxygen isotopic ratios toward molecular clouds in the Galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-Kun; Zhang, Jiang-Shui; Liu, Zhi-Wei; Lu, Deng-Rong; Wang, Min; Wang, Jin

    2016-03-01

    We present our observations of the J = 1 - 0 rotation transitions in molecular isotopes C18O and C17O toward a sample of molecular clouds with different galactocentric distances, using the Delingha 13.7m (DLH 13.7 m) telescope, administered by Purple Mountain Observatory, and its 9-beam SIS receiver. Complementary observations toward several sources with large galactocentric distance are obtained with the IRAM 30m and Mopra 22m telescopes. C18O/C17O abundance ratios reflecting the 18O/17O isotope ratios are obtained from integrated intensity ratios of C18O and C17O. We derived the ratio value for 13 sources covering a galactocentric distance range of 3kpc to 16kpc. In combination with our mapping results that provide a ratio value of 3.01±0.14 in the Galactic center region, it shows that the abundance ratio tends to increase with galactocentric distance, i.e., it supports a radial gradient along the Galactic disk for the abundance ratio. This is consistent with the inside-out formation scenario of our Galaxy. However, our results may suffer from small samples with large galactocentric distance. Combining our data with multi-transition lines of C18O and C17O will be helpful for constraining opacities and abundances and further confirming the Galactic radial gradient shown by the isotope ratio 18O/17O.

  17. Carbon isotope ratio analysis of steroids by high-temperature liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijun; Thevis, Mario; Piper, Thomas; Jochmann, Maik A; Wolbert, J Benjamin; Kujawinski, Dorothea M; Wiese, Steffen; Teutenberg, Thorsten; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2014-03-01

    Generally, compound-specific isotope analysis of steroids is carried out by gas chromatography combined with isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Thus, a derivatization of the steroids prior to the measurement is compulsory, and a correction of the isotopic data is often necessary. To overcome this limitation, we present a new approach of high-temperature liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HT-LC/PDA/IRMS) for the carbon isotope ratio analysis of unconjugated steroids. A steroid mixture containing 19-norandrosterone, testosterone, epitestosterone, androsterone, and 5β-pregnane-3α,17α,20α-triol was fully separated on a C4 column under high-temperature elution with water as the sole eluent. The accuracy for isotope analysis (±0.5 ‰) was around 20 μg g(-1) for testosterone, epitestosterone (79 ng steroid absolute on column), and 30 μg g(-1) for 19-norandrosterone, androsterone, and 5β-pregnane-3α,17α,20α-triol (119 ng steroid absolute on column). The applicability of the method was tested by measuring a pharmaceutical gel containing testosterone. With this work, the scope of LC/IRMS applications has been extended to nonpolar compounds. PMID:24491121

  18. Analytical techniques in biomedical stable isotope applications: (isotope ratio) mass spectrometry or infrared spectrometry?

    PubMed

    Stellaard, Frans; Elzinga, Henk

    2005-12-01

    An overview is presented of biomedical applications of stable isotopes in general, but mainly focused on the activities of the Center for Liver, Digestive and Metabolic Diseases of the University Medical Center Groningen. The aims of metabolic studies in the areas of glucose, fat, cholesterol and protein metabolism are briefly explained, as well as the principle of breath testing and the techniques to study body composition and energy expenditure. Much attention is paid to the analytical considerations based upon metabolite concentrations, sample size restrictions, the availability of stable isotope labelled substrates and dose requirements in relation to compound-specific isotope analysis. The instrumental advantages and limitations of the generally used techniques gas chromatography/reaction/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry are described as well as the novelties of the recently commercialised liquid chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The present use and future perspective of infrared (IR) spectrometry for clinical and biomedical stable isotope applications are reviewed. In this respect, the analytical demands on IR spectrometry are discussed to enable replacement of isotope ratio mass spectrometry by IR spectrometry, in particular, for the purpose of compound-specific isotope ratio analysis in biological matrices. PMID:16543190

  19. Heavy element stable isotope ratios: analytical approaches and applications.

    PubMed

    Tanimizu, Masaharu; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Hirata, Takafumi

    2013-03-01

    Continuous developments in inorganic mass spectrometry techniques, including a combination of an inductively coupled plasma ion source and a magnetic sector-based mass spectrometer equipped with a multiple-collector array, have revolutionized the precision of isotope ratio measurements, and applications of inorganic mass spectrometry for biochemistry, geochemistry, and marine chemistry are beginning to appear on the horizon. Series of pioneering studies have revealed that natural stable isotope fractionations of many elements heavier than S (e.g., Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ce, Nd, Mo, Cd, W, Tl, and U) are common on Earth, and it had been widely recognized that most physicochemical reactions or biochemical processes induce mass-dependent isotope fractionation. The variations in isotope ratios of the heavy elements can provide new insights into past and present biochemical and geochemical processes. To achieve this, the analytical community is actively solving problems such as spectral interference, mass discrimination drift, chemical separation and purification, and reduction of the contamination of analytes. This article describes data calibration and standardization protocols to allow interlaboratory comparisons or to maintain traceability of data, and basic principles of isotope fractionation in nature, together with high-selectivity and high-yield chemical separation and purification techniques for stable isotope studies. PMID:23397089

  20. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdas, D. A.; Cristea, G.; Bot, A.; Mirel, V.

    2013-11-01

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in δ13C between batches from -29.7 to -31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between -31.3 to -34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

  1. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Magdas, D. A. Cristea, G. Bot, A. Mirel, V.

    2013-11-13

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in δ{sup 13}C between batches from −29.7 to −31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between −31.3 to −34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

  2. Boron occurrence in halite and boron isotope geochemistry of halite in the Qarhan Salt Lake, western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, QiShun; Ma, YunQi; Cheng, HuaiDe; Wei, HaiCheng; Yuan, Qin; Qin, ZhanJie; Shan, FaShou

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have investigated boron (B) isotope composition of salt lake brines in the Qaidam Basin, western China. However, the research on B isotope geochemistry of halite from a sediment core in a typical sedimentary basin has been very limited. In this study, a 102-m-long drill core (ISL1A) was recovered from Qarhan Salt Lake in eastern Qaidam Basin. Forty-three halite samples from upper 44.0 m in ISL1A were collected and analyzed for chemical compositions (K+, Na+, Ca2 +, Mg2 +, Cl-, SO42 -, Sr2 + and B3 +) and B isotopes in order to investigate their relationships, and B isotope fractionation between halite and brines in the Qarhan Salt Lake. The results show that: (1) more B3 + and Mg2 + values in halite are low concentrations and more concentrated, and low B3 + concentrations have a strong correlation with low Mg2 + in halite, which imply that they might be the same source; (2) low Mg2 + values in halite from ISL1A have a similar trend with mMg2 + (molarity) of fluid inclusion brines from two sediment cores (east to ISL1A about 50 km) in the study area, suggesting that low B3 + and Mg2 + concentrations should derive from fluid inclusions in halite based on X-ray diffraction results in ISL1A that no borate and small amount of magnesium salts were deposited; (3) δ11B values of halite in ISL1A range from - 0.35 to + 5.84‰, which are in the range of those of river water and brines (- 1.0 to + 9.6‰), and almost overlapped with those of brines (+ 2.9 to + 7.5‰) in the Qarhan Salt Lake. These results suggest that no or minor B isotope fractionation between halite and brine occurred.

  3. Nucleosynthesis in AGB Stars Traced by Oxygen Isotopic Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Nutte, R.; Decin, L.; Olofsson, H.; de Koter, A.; Lombaert, R.; Milam, S.; Ramstedt, S.

    2015-08-01

    Isotopic ratios are by far the best diagnostic tracers of the stellar origin of elements, as they are very sensitive to the precise conditions in the nuclear burning regions. They allow us to give direct constraints on stellar evolution models and on the progenitor mass. However, up to now different isotopic ratios have been well constrained for only a handful of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. We present new data on isotopologue lines of a well-selected sample of AGB stars, covering the three spectral classes of C-, S- and M-type stars. We report on the first efforts made in determining accurate isotopologue fractions, focusing on oxygen isotopes which are a crucial tracer of the poorly constrained extra mixing processes in stellar atmospheres.

  4. Isotope Ratios Reveal Trickery in the Produce Aisle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    A new technique for the proper checking and banning of organic food items is proposed. The analysis of the nitrogen isotope ratio present in the food is found to be a perfect standard for the organic checking of the food products.

  5. Effects of seawater-pH and biomineralization on the boron isotopic composition of deep-sea bamboo corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Jesse R.; Hönisch, Bärbel; Robinson, Laura F.; Hill, Tessa M.

    2015-04-01

    The ocean is currently absorbing excess carbon from anthropogenic emissions, leading to reduced seawater-pH (termed 'ocean acidification'). Instrumental records of ocean acidification are unavailable from well-ventilated areas of the deep ocean, necessitating proxy records to improve spatio-temporal understanding on the rate and magnitude of deep ocean acidification. Here we investigate boron, carbon, and oxygen isotopes on live-collected deep-sea bamboo corals (genus Keratoisis) from a pHtot range of 7.5-8.1. These analyses are used to explore the potential for using bamboo coral skeletons as archives of past deep-sea pH and to trace anthropogenic acidification in the subsurface North Atlantic Ocean (850-2000 m water depth). Boron isotope ratios of the most recently secreted calcite of bamboo coral skeletons are close to the calculated isotopic composition of borate anion in seawater (δ11Bborate) for North Atlantic corals, and 1-2‰ higher than δ11Bborate for Pacific corals. Within individual coral skeletons, carbon and oxygen isotopes correlate positively and linearly, a feature associated with vital effects during coral calcification. δ11B variability of 0.5-2‰ is observed within single specimens, which exceeds the expected anthropogenic trend in modern North Atlantic corals. δ11B values are generally elevated in Pacific corals relative to δ11Bborate, which may reflect pH-driven physiological processes aiding coral calcification in environments unfavorable for calcite precipitation. Elevated δ11B values are also observed proximal to the central axis in multiple Atlantic and Pacific specimens, relative to δ11Bborate, which might reflect ontogenetic variability in calcification rates. Although the observed boron isotope variability is too large to resolve the present anthropogenic ocean acidification signal at the studied depths in the North Atlantic (∼0.03-0.07 pH units), pH changes ⩾0.1 units might still be reconstructed using δ11B measurements in

  6. Indirect Measurements for (p,{alpha}) Reactions Involving Boron Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Romano, S.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Sergi, M. L.; Tudisco, S.; Tumino, A.; Carlin, N.; Szanto, M. G. del; Liguori Neto, R.; Moura, M. M. de; Munhoz, M. G.; Souza, F. A.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Szanto, E.

    2008-04-06

    Light elements lithium, beryllium and boron (LiBeB) were used in the last years as 'possible probe' for a deeper understanding of some extra-mixing phenomena occurring in young Main-Sequence stars. They are mainly destroyed by (p,{alpha}) reactions and cross section measurements for such channels are then needed. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) allows one to extract the astrophysical S(E)-factor without the experience of tunneling through the Coulomb barrier. In this work a resume of the recent results about the {sup 11}B(p,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 8}Be and {sup 10}B(p,{alpha}){sup 7}Be reactions is shown.

  7. Seawater calcium isotope ratios across the Eocene-Oligocene transition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, E.M.; Paytan, A.; Eisenhauer, A.; Bullen, T.D.; Thomas, E.

    2011-01-01

    During the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT, ca. 34 Ma), Earth's climate cooled significantly from a greenhouse to an icehouse climate, while the calcite (CaCO3) compensation depth (CCD) in the Pacific Ocean increased rapidly. Fluctuations in the CCD could result from various processes that create an imbalance between calcium (Ca) sources to, and sinks from, the ocean (e.g., weathering and CaCO3 deposition), with different effects on the isotopic composition of dissolved Ca in the oceans due to differences in the Ca isotopic composition of various inputs and outputs. We used Ca isotope ratios (??44/40Ca) of coeval pelagic marine barite and bulk carbonate to evaluate changes in the marine Ca cycle across the EOT. We show that the permanent deepening of the CCD was not accompanied by a pronounced change in seawater ??44/40Ca, whereas time intervals in the Neogene with smaller carbonate depositional changes are characterized by seawater ??44/40Ca shifts. This suggests that the response of seawater ??44/40Ca to changes in weathering fluxes and to imbalances in the oceanic alkalinity budget depends on the chemical composition of seawater. A minor and transient fluctuation in the Ca isotope ratio of bulk carbonate may reflect a change in isotopic fractionation associated with CaCO3 precipitation from seawater due to a combination of factors, including changes in temperature and/or in the assemblages of calcifying organisms. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  8. Boron isotope composition of geothermal fluids and borate minerals from salar deposits (central Andes/NW Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasemann, Simone A.; Meixner, Anette; Erzinger, Jörg; Viramonte, José G.; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Franz, Gerhard

    2004-06-01

    We have measured the boron concentration and isotope composition of regionally expansive borate deposits and geothermal fluids from the Cenozoic geothermal system of the Argentine Puna Plateau in the central Andes. The borate minerals borax, colemanite, hydroboracite, inderite, inyoite, kernite, teruggite, tincalconite, and ulexite span a wide range of δ11B values from -29.5 to -0.3‰, whereas fluids cover a range from -18.3 to 0.7‰. The data from recent coexisting borate minerals and fluids allow for the calculation of the isotope composition of the ancient mineralizing fluids and thus for the constraint of the isotope composition of the source rocks sampled by the fluids. The boron isotope composition of ancient mineralizing fluids appears uniform throughout the section of precipitates at a given locality and similar to values obtained from recent thermal fluids. These findings support models that suggest uniform and stable climatic, magmatic, and tectonic conditions during the past 8 million years in this part of the central Andes. Boron in fluids is derived from different sources, depending on the drainage system and local country rocks. One significant boron source is the Paleozoic basement, which has a whole-rock isotopic composition of δ11B=-8.9±2.2‰ (1 SD); another important boron contribution comes from Neogene-Pleistocene ignimbrites ( δ11B=-3.8±2.8‰, 1 SD). Cenozoic andesites and Mesozoic limestones ( δ11B≤+8‰) provide a potential third boron source.

  9. On Poisson's ratio for metal matrix composite laminates. [aluminum boron composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Shuart, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The definition of Poisson's ratio for nonlinear behavior of metal matrix composite laminates is discussed and experimental results for tensile and compressive loading of five different boron-aluminum laminates are presented. It is shown that there may be considerable difference in the value of Poisson's ratio as defined by a total strain or an incremental strain definition. It is argued that the incremental definition is more appropriate for nonlinear material behavior. Results from a (0) laminate indicate that the incremental definition provides a precursor to failure which is not evident if the total strain definition is used.

  10. A Time-Measurement System Based on Isotopic Ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Vo, Duc T.; Karpius, P. J.; MacArthur, D. W.; Thron, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    A time-measurement system can be built based on the ratio of gamma-ray peak intensities from two radioactive isotopes. The ideal system would use a parent isotope with a short half-life decaying to a long half-life daughter. The activities of the parent-daughter isotopes would be measured using a gamma-ray detector system. The time can then be determined from the ratio of the activities. The best-known candidate for such a system is the {sup 241}Pu-{sup 241}Am parent-daughter pair. However, this {sup 241}Pu-{sup 241}Am system would require a high-purity germanium detector system and sophisticated software to separate and distinguish between the many gamma-ray peaks produced by the decays of the two isotopes. An alternate system would use two different isotopes, again one with a short half-life and one with a half-life that is long relative to the other. The pair of isotopes {sup 210}Pb and {sup 241}Am (with half-lives of 22 and 432 years, respectively) appears suitable for such a system. This time-measurement system operates by measuring the change in the ratio of the 47-keV peak of {sup 210}Pb to the 60-keV peak of {sup 241}Am. For the system to work reasonably well, the resolution of the detector would need to be such that the two gamma-ray peaks are well separated so that their peak areas can be accurately determined using a simple region-of-interest (ROI) method. A variety of detectors were tested to find a suitable system for this application. The results of these tests are presented here.

  11. NUSIMEP-7: uranium isotope amount ratios in uranium particles.

    PubMed

    Truyens, J; Stefaniak, E A; Aregbe, Y

    2013-11-01

    The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) has extensive experience in the development of isotopic reference materials and the organization of interlaboratory comparisons (ILC) for nuclear measurements in compliance with the respective international guidelines (ISO Guide 34:2009 and ISO/IEC 17043:2010). The IRMM Nuclear Signatures Interlaboratory Measurement Evaluation Program (NUSIMEP) is an external quality control program with the objective of providing materials for measurements of trace amounts of nuclear materials in environmental matrices. Measurements of the isotopic ratios of the elements uranium and plutonium in small amounts, typical of those found in environmental samples, are required for nuclear safeguards and security, for the control of environmental contamination and for the detection of nuclear proliferation. The measurement results of participants in NUSIMEP are evaluated according to international guidelines in comparison to independent external certified reference values with demonstrated metrological traceability and uncertainty. NUSIMEP-7 focused on measurements of uranium isotope amount ratios in uranium particles aiming to support European Safeguards Directorate General for Energy (DG ENER), the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) network of analytical laboratories for environmental sampling (NWAL) and laboratories in the field of particle analysis. Each participant was provided two certified test samples: one with single and one with double isotopic enrichment. These NUSIMEP test samples were prepared by controlled hydrolysis of certified uranium hexafluoride in a specially designed aerosol deposition chamber at IRMM. Laboratories participating in NUSIMEP-7 received the test samples of uranium particles on two graphite disks with undisclosed isotopic ratio values n((234)U)/n((238)U), n((235)U)/n((238)U) and n((236)U)/n((238)U). The uranium isotope ratios had to be measured using their routine analytical

  12. Finite mixture models for the computation of isotope ratios in mixed isotopic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffler, Daniel; Laaha, Gregor; Leisch, Friedrich; Kappel, Stefanie; Prohaska, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Finite mixture models have been used for more than 100 years, but have seen a real boost in popularity over the last two decades due to the tremendous increase in available computing power. The areas of application of mixture models range from biology and medicine to physics, economics and marketing. These models can be applied to data where observations originate from various groups and where group affiliations are not known, as is the case for multiple isotope ratios present in mixed isotopic samples. Recently, the potential of finite mixture models for the computation of 235U/238U isotope ratios from transient signals measured in individual (sub-)µm-sized particles by laser ablation - multi-collector - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICPMS) was demonstrated by Kappel et al. [1]. The particles, which were deposited on the same substrate, were certified with respect to their isotopic compositions. Here, we focus on the statistical model and its application to isotope data in ecogeochemistry. Commonly applied evaluation approaches for mixed isotopic samples are time-consuming and are dependent on the judgement of the analyst. Thus, isotopic compositions may be overlooked due to the presence of more dominant constituents. Evaluation using finite mixture models can be accomplished unsupervised and automatically. The models try to fit several linear models (regression lines) to subgroups of data taking the respective slope as estimation for the isotope ratio. The finite mixture models are parameterised by: • The number of different ratios. • Number of points belonging to each ratio-group. • The ratios (i.e. slopes) of each group. Fitting of the parameters is done by maximising the log-likelihood function using an iterative expectation-maximisation (EM) algorithm. In each iteration step, groups of size smaller than a control parameter are dropped; thereby the number of different ratios is determined. The analyst only influences some control

  13. Boron Isotope Constraints on Fluid-Rock Interactions in the Shallow Megathrust at the Japan Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, T.; Matsuoka, J.; Kameda, J.; Sample, J. C.; Mori, J. J.; Chester, F. M.

    2014-12-01

    IODP Expedition 343 (JFAST) drilled three holes through the plate boundary near the Japan Trench to investigate the cause of very large fault slip during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. Interstitial fluids and rocks within and around the plate-boundary fault were recovered from Hole C0019E. Chemical characteristics of these fluids and rocks provide useful information for understanding fluid-related processes that occurred in the shallow megathrust fault zone at the Japan Trench. In this paper, we report concentrations and isotope ratios of boron determined for JFAST fluids and rocks, as well as for sediments from DSDP site 436, which is a nearby input site. Depth profiles of B content and B isotope ratio (δ11B value) for the interstitial fluids show a clear minimum and a maximum, respectively, around the plate boundary fault. Fluids from the vicinity of the fault are characterized by lower B content and higher δ11B value compared with seawater. The B contents and δ11B values of the plate-boundary fault rocks are indistinguishable from those of smectite-rich sediments from DPDP site 436, which is consistent with observations for other trace element compositions. In the systems composed of seawater-like fluid and sediment, both B concentrations and δ11B values in the fluid and solid phases are temperature-sensitive, and higher temperatures result in higher B and lower δ11B in the fluid phase and lower B and lower δ11B in the solid phase. Actually, interstitial fluids from ODP site 808 (Nankai Trough) showed a clear increase and a decrease of B and δ11B, respectively, with increasing depth at temperatures higher than 50 deg. C (You et al., 1995). The ODP site 808 rocks also showed distinct decreases of B and δ11B at the depths with temperatures higher than 100 deg. C (You et al., 1995). The observed B and δ11B characteristics of the JFAST fluids and rocks thus indicate that fluids and rocks within and around the plate-boundary fault have no clear record for

  14. MAGNESIUM ISOTOPE RATIOS IN {omega} CENTAURI RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Da Costa, G. S.; Norris, John E.; Yong, David

    2013-05-20

    We have used the high-resolution observations obtained at the Anglo-Australian Telescope with Ultra-High Resolution Facility (R {approx} 100,000) and at Gemini-S with b-HROS (R {approx} 150,000) to determine magnesium isotope ratios for seven {omega} Cen red giants that cover a range in iron abundance from [Fe/H] = -1.78 to -0.78 dex, and for two red giants in M4 (NGC 6121). The {omega} Cen stars sample both the ''primordial'' (i.e., O-rich, Na- and Al-poor) and the ''extreme'' (O-depleted, Na- and Al-rich) populations in the cluster. The primordial population stars in both {omega} Cen and M4 show ({sup 25}Mg, {sup 26}Mg)/{sup 24}Mg isotopic ratios that are consistent with those found for the primordial population in other globular clusters with similar [Fe/H] values. The isotopic ratios for the {omega} Cen extreme stars are also consistent with those for extreme population stars in other clusters. The results for the extreme population stars studied indicate that the {sup 26}Mg/{sup 24}Mg ratio is highest at intermediate metallicities ([Fe/H] < -1.4 dex), and for the highest [Al/Fe] values. Further, the relative abundance of {sup 26}Mg in the extreme population stars is notably higher than that of {sup 25}Mg, in contrast to model predictions. The {sup 25}Mg/{sup 24}Mg isotopic ratio in fact does not show any obvious dependence on either [Fe/H] or [Al/Fe] nor, intriguingly, any obvious difference between the primordial and extreme population stars.

  15. Lignin methoxyl hydrogen isotope ratios in a coastal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feakins, Sarah J.; Ellsworth, Patricia V.; Sternberg, Leonel da Silveira Lobo

    2013-11-01

    Stable hydrogen isotope ratios of plant lignin methoxyl groups have recently been shown to record the hydrogen isotopic composition of meteoric water. Here we extend this technique towards tracing water source variations across a saltwater to freshwater gradient in a coastal, subtropical forest ecosystem. We measure the hydrogen isotopic composition of xylem water (δDxw) and methoxyl hydrogen (δDmethoxyl) to calculate fractionations for coastal mangrove, buttonwood and hammock tree species in Sugarloaf Key, as well as buttonwoods from Miami, both in Florida, USA. Prior studies of the isotopic composition of cellulose and plant leaf waxes in coastal ecosystems have yielded only a weak correlation to source waters, attributed to leaf water effects. Here we find δDmethoxyl values range from -230‰ to -130‰, across a 40‰ range in δDxw with a regression equation of δDmethoxyl ‰ = 1.8 * δDxw - 178‰ (R2 = 0.48, p < 0.0001, n = 74). This is comparable within error to the earlier published relationship for terrestrial trees which was defined across a much larger 125‰ isotopic range in precipitation. Analytical precision for measurements of δD values of pure CH3I by gas chromatography-pyrolysis-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-P-IRMS) is σ = 6‰ (n = 31), which is considerably better than for CH3I liberated through cleavage with HI from lignin with σ = 18‰ (n = 26). Our results establish that δDmethoxyl can record water sources and salinity incursion in coastal ecosystems, where variations sufficiently exceed method uncertainties (i.e., applications with δD excursions >50‰). For the first time, we also report yields of propyl iodide, which may indicate lignin synthesis of propoxyl groups under salt-stress.

  16. Crystallographic control on the boron isotope paleo-pH proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noireaux, J.; Mavromatis, V.; Gaillardet, J.; Schott, J.; Montouillout, V.; Louvat, P.; Rollion-Bard, C.; Neuville, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    When using the boron isotopic composition (δ11B) of marine carbonates as a seawater pH proxy, it is assumed that only the tetrahedral borate ion is incorporated into the growing carbonate crystals and that no boron isotope fractionation occurs during uptake. However, the δ11B of the calcium carbonate from most modern foraminifera shells or corals skeletons is not the same as the δ11B of seawater borate, which depends on pH, an observation commonly attributed to vital effects. In this study, we combined previously published high-field 11B MAS NMR and new δ11B measurements on the same synthetic calcite and aragonite samples precipitated inorganically under controlled environments to avoid vital effects. Our results indicate that the main controlling factors of δ11B are the solution pH and the mineralogy of the precipitated carbonate mineral, whereas the aqueous boron concentration of the solution, CaCO3 precipitation rate and the presence or absence of growth seeds all appear to have negligible influence. In aragonite, the NMR data show that boron coordination is tetrahedral (BO4), in addition, its δ11B is equal to that of aqueous borate, thus confirming the paleo-pH hypothesis. In contrast, both trigonal BO3 and tetrahedral BO4 are present in calcite, and its δ11B values are higher than that of aqueous borate and are less sensitive to solution pH variations compared to δ11B in aragonite. These observations are interpreted in calcite as a reflection of the incorporation of decreasing amounts of boric acid with increasing pH. Moreover, the fraction of BO3 measured by NMR in calcite is higher than that inferred from δ11B which indicates a coordination change from BO4 to BO3 upon boron incorporation in the solid. Overall, this study shows that although the observed differences in δ11B between inorganic and biological aragonite are compatible with a pH increase at calcification sites, the B speciation and isotope composition of biological calcites call for a

  17. Utilizing Isotopic Uranium Ratios in Groundwater Evaluations at FUSRAP Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, W.T.; Keil, K.G.; Rhodes, M.C.; Peterson, J.M.; MacDonell, M.M.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District is evaluating environmental radioactive contamination at several Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites throughout New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana. The investigations follow the process defined in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). Groundwater data from the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) in Lewiston, New York were evaluated for isotopic uranium ratios, specifically uranium-234 versus uranium-238 (U- 234 and U-238, respectively), and the results were presented at Waste Management 2006. Since uranium naturally occurs in all groundwater, it can be difficult to distinguish where low-concentration impacts from past releases differ from the high end of a site-specific natural background range. In natural groundwater, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 exceeds 1 (unity) due to the alpha particle recoil effect, in which U-234 is preferentially mobilized to groundwater from adjacent rock or soil. This process is very slow and may take hundreds to thousands of years before a measurable increase is seen in the natural isotopic ratio. If site releases are the source of uranium being measured in groundwater, the U-234 to U-238 ratio is commonly closer to 1, which normally reflects FUSRAP-related, uranium-contaminated wastes and soils. This lower ratio occurs because not enough residence time has elapsed since the 1940's and 1950's for the alpha particle recoil effect to have significantly altered the contamination-derived ratio. An evaluation of NFSS-specific and regional groundwater data indicate that an isotopic ratio of 1.2 has been identified as a signature value to help distinguish natural groundwater, which may have a broad background range, from zones impacted by past releases. (authors)

  18. D/H isotope ratios in the global hydrologic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Stephen P.; Noone, David; Kurita, Naoyuki; Benetti, Marion; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2015-06-01

    Deuterium to hydrogen (D/H) ratios in Earth's hydrologic cycle have long served as important tracers of climate processes, yet the global HDO budget remains poorly constrained because of uncertainties in the isotopic compositions of continental evapotranspiration and runoff. Here bias-corrected satellite retrievals of HDO and H2O concentrations from the Tropospheric Emissions Spectrometer are used to estimate the marine atmospheric surface layer HDO vapor pressure deficit, from which we calculate the global flux-weighted average oceanic evaporation isotopic composition as -37.6‰. Using these estimates, combined with D/H ratios in precipitation, global mass balance suggests H isotope compositions for global runoff and terrestrial evapotranspiration of -77.3‰ and -40.0‰, respectively. By resolving the HDO budget, we establish an accurate global baseline for geochemically enabled Earth system models, demonstrate patterns in entrainment of moisture into the marine surface layer, and determine the isotopic composition of continental fluxes critical for global ecohydrologic investigations.

  19. Accurate and Precise Zinc Isotope Ratio Measurements in Urban Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, D.; Gioia, S. M. C. L.; Coles, B.; Arnold, T.; Babinski, M.

    2009-04-01

    We developed an analytical method and constrained procedural boundary conditions that enable accurate and precise Zn isotope ratio measurements in urban aerosols. We also demonstrate the potential of this new isotope system for air pollutant source tracing. The procedural blank is around 5 ng and significantly lower than published methods due to a tailored ion chromatographic separation. Accurate mass bias correction using external correction with Cu is limited to Zn sample content of approximately 50 ng due to the combined effect of blank contribution of Cu and Zn from the ion exchange procedure and the need to maintain a Cu/Zn ratio of approximately 1. Mass bias is corrected for by applying the common analyte internal standardization method approach. Comparison with other mass bias correction methods demonstrates the accuracy of the method. The average precision of δ66Zn determinations in aerosols is around 0.05 per mil per atomic mass unit. The method was tested on aerosols collected in Sao Paulo City, Brazil. The measurements reveal significant variations in δ66Zn ranging between -0.96 and -0.37 per mil in coarse and between -1.04 and 0.02 per mil in fine particular matter. This variability suggests that Zn isotopic compositions distinguish atmospheric sources. The isotopic light signature suggests traffic as the main source.

  20. Thermal conduction mechanisms in isotope-disordered boron nitride and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savic, Ivana; Mingo, Natalio; Stewart, Derek

    2009-03-01

    We present first principles studies which determine dominant effects limiting the heat conduction in isotope-disordered boron nitride and carbon nanotubes [1]. Using an ab initio atomistic Green's function approach, we demonstrate that localization cannot be observed in the thermal conductivity measurements [1], and that diffusive scattering is the dominant mechanism which reduces the thermal conductivity [2]. We also give concrete predictions of the magnitude of the isotope effect on the thermal conductivities of carbon and boron nitride single-walled nanotubes [2]. We furthermore show that intershell scattering is not the main limiting mechanism for the heat flow through multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes [1], and that heat conduction restricted to a few shells leads to the low thermal conductivities experimentally measured [1]. We consequently successfully compare the results of our calculations [3] with the experimental measurements [1]. [1] C. W. Chang, A. M. Fennimore, A. Afanasiev, D. Okawa, T. Ikuno, H. Garcia, D. Li, A. Majumdar, A. Zettl, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2006, 97, 085901. [2] I. Savic, N. Mingo, D. A. Stewart, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 101, 165502. [3] I. Savic, D. A. Stewart, N. Mingo, to be published.

  1. Position-specific measurement of oxygen isotope ratios in cellulose: Isotopic exchange during heterotrophic cellulose synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterhouse, John S.; Cheng, Shuying; Juchelka, Dieter; Loader, Neil J.; McCarroll, Danny; Switsur, V. Roy; Gautam, Lata

    2013-07-01

    We describe the first reported method for the measurement of oxygen isotope ratios at each position in the glucose units of the cellulose molecule. The overall process comprises a series of synthetic organic sequences, by which α-cellulose is hydrolysed to glucose, and oxygen atoms at specific positions in the glucose molecule are removed in samples of benzoic acid for measurement of δ18O. Values of δ18O at specific positions in cellulose are calculated from these δ18O values and the overall δ18O value of the cellulose. We apply the method to determine the degree to which oxygen atoms at each position undergo isotopic exchange with water during heterotrophic cellulose synthesis, such as occurs in the cambium of trees. To do this we extract α-cellulose from wheat seedlings germinated in the dark in aqueous media of differing oxygen isotope ratios. Results indicate that oxygen atoms at positions 5 and 6 (O-5 and O-6 respectively) undergo around 80% exchange with medium water, O-3 undergoes around 50% exchange, and O-2 and O-4 do not undergo isotopic exchange. The results have important implications for extracting palaeoclimatic records from oxygen isotope time series obtained from tree ring cellulose. As O-5 and O-6 undergo significant exchange with medium water during heterotrophic cellulose synthesis, oxygen isotopes at these positions in tree ring cellulose should carry a predominantly trunk (source) water signal. On the other hand, O-2 and O-4 should retain the isotopic signature of leaf water in tree ring cellulose. Our method therefore potentially enables the separate reconstruction of past temperature and humidity data from oxygen isotope ratios of tree ring cellulose - something that has hitherto not been possible. The measured degrees of isotopic exchange are to some extent unexpected and cannot be fully explained using current biochemical mechanisms, suggesting that knowledge of these processes is incomplete.

  2. Development of a Micropyrolyzer for Enhanced Isotope Ratio Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jianli; Dagle, Robert A.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Roberts, Benjamin Q.; Alexander, M. L.

    2008-11-19

    This paper presents design, fabrication and testing of a micro scale reactor for the pyrolysis of organic compounds. The reactor system described here is suitable for use in enhanced isotope ratio measurement in a continuous flow mode. A characteristic of such a system is it can be utilized to pyrolyze organic compounds with sample size 20-50 times smaller than conventional. Results have shown that organic compounds, such as 1-butanol, ethanol, and ethanol amine, can be fully decomposed to desired products CO and H2, at temperature of 1200oC, which is 200oC lower than conventionally reported. Undesired products methane and CO2 are eliminated in the pyrolysis process. The proof-of-concept experimental results clearly demonstrate that the micro pyrolyzer can be readily integrated with isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) to differentiate between different sources of the same materials.

  3. Boron isotope variations in geothermal systems on Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnomo, Budi Joko; Pichler, Thomas; You, Chen-Feng

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents δ11B data for hot springs, hot acid crater lakes, geothermal brines and a steam vent from Java, Indonesia. The processes that produce a large range of the δ11B values were investigated, including the possible input of seawater as well as the contrast δ11B compositions of acid sulfate and acid chloride crater lakes. The δ11B values of hot springs ranged from - 2.4 to + 28.7‰ and acid crater lakes ranged from + 0.6 to + 34.9‰. The δ11B and Cl/B values in waters from the Parangtritis and Krakal geothermal systems confirmed seawater input. The δ11B values of acid sulfate crater lakes ranged from + 5.5 to + 34.9‰ and were higher than the δ11B of + 0.6‰ of the acid chloride crater lake. The heavier δ11B in the acid sulfate crater lakes was caused by a combination of vapor phase addition and further enrichment due to evaporation and B adsorption onto clay minerals. In contrast, the light δ11B of the acid chloride crater lake was a result of acid water-rocks interaction. The correlations of δ11B composition with δ18O and δ2H indicated that the B isotope corresponded to their groundwater mixing sources, but not for J21 (Segaran) and J48 (Cikundul) that underwent 11B isotope enrichment by B adsorption into minerals.

  4. Boron isotopes in deep-sea bamboo corals: pH, vital effects and environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, J. R.; Hoenisch, B.; Hill, T. M.; LaVigne, M.; Robinson, L. F.

    2011-12-01

    Deep-sea corals are an intriguing archive for reconstructing deep-ocean environmental conditions, in particular with regard to anthropogenic climate change and ocean acidification. However, previous research in deep-sea aragonitic scleractinian corals observed heterogeneity in their geochemical composition that greatly exceeded the magnitude of variability expected from environmental conditions. Here we investigate the boron isotopic composition (δ11B) and B/Ca ratios of the calcitic gorgonian bamboo coral Keratoisis sp. (family Isididae) as potential indicators of seawater-pH at depth. Initial results from a specimen collected alive on Little Joe Seamount, CA (2136m depth) show that the δ11B of surface calcite is within the expected range of aqueous borate-δ11B, based on seawater pH, temperature, pressure and salinity. A radial cross section through an ~5 cm thick internode reveals largely homogeneous δ11B. However, in the centermost 0.5 cm of calcite growth adjacent to the axial core of the coral, a ~2% increase in δ11B corresponds with disequilibrium depletions in δ13C and δ18O, consistent with hypotheses for different growth modes of central calcite perhaps as a result of active calcite deposition along the axial core. Aside from this central region, the geochemical homogeneity and good agreement between coral surface δ11B and seawater borate δ11B suggests that bamboo corals may record deep-ocean carbon chemistry and thus pH. The cosmopolitan distribution of Keratoisis sp. in both living and fossil deep-sea coral communities thus potentially presents the opportunity to reconstruct recent and Holocene deep-water pH at high resolution.

  5. Daily Variation of Isotope Ratios in Mars Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livengood, Timothy A.; Kostiuk, Theodor; Kolasinski, John R.; Hewagama, Tilak; Henning, Wade G.; Sornig, Manuela; Stangier, Tobias; Krause, Pia; Sonnabend, Guido; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2014-11-01

    The atmosphere of Mars has been shown by ground based high-resolution infrared spectroscopy and in situ measurements with the Phoenix lander and Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover to be enriched in C and O heavy isotopes, consistent with preferential loss of light isotopes in eroding Mars’ primordial atmosphere. The relative abundance of heavy isotopes, combined with contemporary measurements of loss rates to be obtained with MAVEN, will enable estimating the primordial atmospheric inventory on Mars. IR spectroscopy of Mars collected in May 2012 as well as in March and May of 2014 from the NASA IRTF has resolved transitions of all three singly-substituted minor isotopologues of carbon dioxide in addition to the normal isotope, enabling remote measurements of all the carbon and oxygen isotope ratios as a function of latitude, longitude, and time of day. Earlier measurements obtained in October 2007 demonstrated that the relative abundance of O-18 increased linearly with increasing surface temperature over a relatively warm early-afternoon temperature range, but did not extend far enough to inspect the effect of late-afternoon cooling. These results imply that isotopically enriched gas is sequestered overnight when surface temperature is minimum and desorbs through the course of the day as temperature increases. Current spectroscopic constants indicate that the peak isotopic enrichment could be significantly greater than what has been measured in situ, apparently due to sampling the atmosphere at different time of day and surface temperature. The observing runs in 2012 and 2014 measured O-18 enrichment at several local times in both morning and afternoon sectors as well as at the subsolar, equatorial, and anti-subsolar latitudes. The two runs in 2014 have additionally observed O-17 and C-13 transitions in the morning sector, from local dawn to noon. These observations include a limited sampling of measurements over Gale Crater, which can be compared with

  6. Laser annealing of neutron irradiated boron-10 isotope doped diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Jagannadham, K.; Butler, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    10B isotope doped p-type diamond epilayer grown by chemical vapor deposition on (110) oriented type IIa diamond single crystal substrate was subjected to neutron transmutation at a fluence of 2.4 9 1020 thermal and 2.4 9 1020 fast neutrons. After neutron irradiation, the epilayer and the diamond substrate were laser annealed using Nd YAG laser irradiation with wave length, 266 nm and energy, 150 mJ per pulse. The neutron irradiated diamond epilayer and the substrate were characterized before and after laser annealing using different techniques. The characterization techniques include optical microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, Raman, photoluminescence and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, and electrical sheet conductance measurement. The results indicate that the structure of the irradiation induced amorphous epilayer changes to disordered graphite upon laser annealing. The irradiated substrate retains the (110) crystalline structure with neutron irradiation induced defects.

  7. Calibration of the boron isotope proxy in the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber for use in palaeo-CO2 reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henehan, Michael J.; Rae, James W. B.; Foster, Gavin L.; Erez, Jonathan; Prentice, Katherine C.; Kucera, Michal; Bostock, Helen C.; Martínez-Botí, Miguel A.; Milton, J. Andy; Wilson, Paul A.; Marshall, Brittney J.; Elliott, Tim

    2013-02-01

    The boron isotope-pH proxy, applied to mixed-layer planktic foraminifera, has great potential for estimating past CO2 levels, which in turn is crucial to advance our understanding of how this greenhouse gas influences Earth's climate. Previous culture experiments have shown that, although the boron isotopic compositions of various planktic foraminifera are pH dependent, they do not agree with the aqueous geochemical basis of the proxy. Here we outline the results of culture experiments on Globigerinoides ruber (white) across a range of pH (∼7.5-8.2) and analysed via multicollector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS), and compare these data to core-top and sediment-trap samples to derive a robust new species-specific boron isotope-pH calibration. Consistent with earlier culture studies, we show a reduced pH dependency of the boron isotopic composition of symbiont-bearing planktonic foraminifera compared to borate ion in seawater. We also present evidence for a size fraction effect in the δ11B of G. ruber. Finally, we reconstruct atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the last deglacial using our new calibration at two equatorial sites, ODP Site 999A and Site GeoB1523-1. These data provide further grounding for the application of the boron isotope-pH proxy in reconstructions of past atmospheric CO2 levels.

  8. Measurement of Absolute Carbon Isotope Ratios: Mechanisms and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, J. S.; Giacomo, J. A.; Dueker, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    An accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) produced absolute isotope ratio measurements for 14C/13C as tested against >500 samples of NIST SRM-4990-C (OxII 14C standard) to an accuracy of 2.2±0.6‰ over a period of one year with measurements made to 1% counting statistics. The spectrometer is not maximized for 13C/12C, but measured ∂13C to 0.4±0.1‰ accuracy, with known methods for improvement. An AMS produces elemental anions from a sputter ion source and includes a charge-changing collision in a gas cell to isolate the rare 14C from the common isotopes and molecular isobars. Both these physical processes have been modeled to determine the parameters providing such absolute measures. Neutral resonant ionization in a cesium plasma produces mass-independent ionization, while velocity dependent charge-state distributions in gas collisions produce relative ion beam intensities that are linear in mass at specific collision energies. The mechanisms are not specific to carbon isotopes, but stand alone absolute IRMS (AIR-MS) instruments have not yet been made. Aside from the obvious applications in metrology, AIR-MS is particularly valuable in coupled separatory MS because no internal or external standards are required. Sample definition processes can be compared, even if no exact standard reference sample exists. Isotope dilution measurements do not require standards matching the dilution end-points and can be made over an extended, even extrapolated, range.

  9. Exploring antimony isotope ratio variations for provenancing purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, L.; Degryse, P.; Vanhaecke, F.

    2012-04-01

    Production sites and trade routes of Roman glass have received much attention over the past decade. It is assumed that raw glass was produced in primary workshops near the raw material sources used, to be transported to secondary glass houses. Colourless glass was a particularly prestigious material in this process, difficult to make. It has been looked at from the perspective of the provenance of its sand and flux, but rarely from the perspective of the origin of the decolourizing material. In effect, for the production of early Roman colourless glass, antimony was used, deliberately added under the form of Sb-bearing minerals. Isotopic analysis of Sb ores could help identify the origin of the decolorizing agent present in Roman glasses and, consequently, to reconstruct how such material was traded and transported, and how this can be integrated in the network of primary and secondary glass producers. In this work, variations in the isotopic composition of Sb in different ore sources (stibnites) are explored using multi-collector ICP - mass spectrometry. A new method is proposed, where Sb is directly analysed for its isotopic composition using MC-ICP-MS after chromatographic isolation of the target element from a sample digest. The isotopic composition of the selected materials shows variations up to 6 ?-units relative to an antimony standard solution. Indium was used as internal standard for correction for instrumental mass discrimination and an external precision for the 123Sb/121Sb ratio of 0.01% RSD was obtained

  10. TOWARD A UNIQUE NITROGEN ISOTOPIC RATIO IN COMETARY ICES

    SciTech Connect

    Rousselot, Philippe; Cordier, Daniel; Mousis, Olivier; Pirali, Olivier; Vervloet, Michel; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Gruet, Sébastien; Jehin, Emmanuël; Hutsemékers, Damien; Manfroid, Jean; Arpigny, Claude; Decock, Alice

    2014-01-10

    Determination of the nitrogen isotopic ratios in different bodies of the solar system provides important information regarding the solar system's origin. We unambiguously identified emission lines in comets due to the {sup 15}NH{sub 2} radical produced by the photodissociation of {sup 15}NH{sub 3}. Analysis of our data has permitted us to measure the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N isotopic ratio in comets for a molecule carrying the amine (-NH) functional group. This ratio, within the error, appears similar to that measured in comets in the HCN molecule and the CN radical, and lower than the protosolar value, suggesting that N{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} result from the separation of nitrogen into two distinct reservoirs in the solar nebula. This ratio also appears similar to that measured in Titan's atmospheric N{sub 2}, supporting the hypothesis that, if the latter is representative of its primordial value in NH{sub 3}, these bodies were assembled from building blocks sharing a common formation location.

  11. Detailed Distribution of the Helium Isotope Ratios in Northeastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiguchi, K.; Ueki, S.; Sano, Y.; Takahata, N.; Hasegawa, A.

    2007-12-01

    The geographical distribution of helium isotope ratios (3He/4He ratios) is characterized by high values of 4 to 8RA (where RA is the atmospheric 3He/4He ratio of 1.39×10-6) along the volcanic front and in the back-arc region at Tohoku district, northeastern Japan. In contrast forearc region shows low values less than 1RA. On the other hand, there is no clear contrast of the 3He/4He ratios except at the central region (e.g., Sano and Wakita, 1985). We perform the helium isotope ratio analysis in northeastern Japan, and around the source region of the Niigataken Chuetsu-oki Earthquake in 2007 (M6.8) where 3He/4He ratios data were reported. We have collected 41 samples of gases from hot springs, mineral springs, and deep wells, distributing mainly in the forearc region at Tohoku district. In addition, we also collected 19 samples of gases from hot springs, volcanoes and natural gas fields around the source region of the Niigataken Chuetsu-oki Earthquake in 2007. We measured 3He/4He ratios by noble gas mass spectrometers (Helix and VG5400) of Ocean Research Institute (ORI), the University of Tokyo. The 4He/20Ne were measured by a quadruple mass spectrometer to evaluate air contamination in the samples. δ13C (CO2) values were measured by using a mass spectrometer (DELTA plus XP) of ORI. Main features of our results for Tohoku region are as follows: 1) The 3He/4He ratios in the forearc region are less than 1RA. 2) The 3He/4He ratios vary along the volcanic front. In Miyagi prefecture [38-39N], the ratios range from 2 to 5 RA. On the other hand, the ratios are less than 1RA in and around the southern boundary of Iwate and Akita prefectures [39-39.5N]. The distribution of 3He/4He ratios in Niigata plans to be discussed by comparing with the well-studied seismotectonics and the structure of the crust and upper mantle.

  12. Combining boron isotopes and carbamazepine to monitor artificial recharge (southern Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cary, Lise; Guerrot, Catherine; Casanova, Joël

    2014-05-01

    The groundwater resources of coastal areas are highly vulnerable, being located either in complex hydrogeological structures or in local shallow aquifers where water stress and salt water intrusion occur under the multiple constraints governed by increasing anthropogenic pressures and climatic conditions. Yet, recent integrated water resource planning often relies on alternative water supplies. In order to limit seawater intrusion in an agricultural overexploited watershed and to ensure water availability, managed aquifer recharge with treated wastewater was settled in the Korba aquifer on the east coast of Tunisia. Water quality monitoring was implemented in order to determine the different system components and to trace the effectiveness of the artificial recharge. Groundwater samples taken from recharge control piezometers and surrounding farm wells were analyzed for their chemical contents, for their boron isotopes, a proven tracer of groundwater salinization and domestic sewage, and their carbamazepine content, an anti-epileptic known to pass through wastewater treatment and so recognized as a pertinent tracer of wastewater contamination. The aquifer system is constituted by the superficial and shallow Plio-Quaternary formations and by the deeper Miocene units which constitute its basement. Marine Pliocene sediments display interbedded sandstone-sand-marl topped with variably clayey sandstone. Quaternary deposits are mainly made of fossiliferous carbonated sandstones. The system equilibrium was permanently disturbed by the different temporal dynamics of continuous processes such as cation exchange, and by threshold processes linked to oxidation-reductive conditions. The boron isotopic compositions of groundwaters displayed a significant variability (10 - 45 ) and significantly shifted back-and-forth due to mixing with end-members of various origins. Under the variable contribution of meteoric recharge, the Plio-Quaternary groundwater was subject to seawater

  13. Isotope shifts in beryllium-, boron-, carbon-, and nitrogen-like ions from relativistic configuration interaction calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Nazé, C.; Verdebout, S.; Godefroid, M.

    2014-09-15

    Energy levels, normal and specific mass shift parameters as well as electronic densities at the nucleus are reported for numerous states along the beryllium, boron, carbon, and nitrogen isoelectronic sequences. Combined with nuclear data, these electronic parameters can be used to determine values of level and transition isotope shifts. The calculation of the electronic parameters is done using first-order perturbation theory with relativistic configuration interaction wavefunctions that account for valence, core–valence, and core–core correlation effects as zero-order functions. Results are compared with experimental and other theoretical values, when available.

  14. Utilizing Isotopic Uranium Ratios in Groundwater Evaluations at NFSS

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.C.; Keil, K.G.; Frederick, W.T.; Papura, T.R.; Leithner, J.S.; Peterson, J.M.; MacDonell, M.M.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Buffalo District is currently evaluating environmental contamination at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) as part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The NFSS is located in the Town of Lewiston in western New York and has been used to store uranium-contaminated materials since 1944. Most of the radioactive materials are currently contained in an on-site structure, but past contamination remains in soil and groundwater. As a naturally occurring radionuclide, uranium is present in all groundwater. Because contamination levels at the site are quite low, it can be difficult to distinguish zones that have been impacted by the past releases from those at the high end of the natural background range. The differences in the isotopic ratio of uranium-234 (U-234) to uranium-238 (U-238) between natural groundwater systems and affected areas are being used in an innovative way to better define the nature and extent of groundwater contamination at NFSS. In natural groundwater, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 exceeds 1 due to the alpha particle recoil effect, in which U-234 is preferentially mobilized to groundwater from adjacent rock or soil. This process is very slow, and it can be hundreds to thousands of years before a measurable impact is seen in the isotopic ratio. Thus, as a result of the recoil effect, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 will be higher in natural groundwater than in contaminated groundwater. This means that if site releases were the source of the uranium being measured in groundwater at NFSS, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 would be expected to be very close to 1 (the same ratio that exists in wastes and soil at the site), because not enough time has elapsed for the alpha particle recoil effect to have significantly altered that ratio. From an evaluation of site and regional groundwater data, an isotopic ratio

  15. Protein stable isotope fingerprinting: multidimensional protein chromatography coupled to stable isotope-ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Wiebke; Tang, Tiantian; Sattin, Sarah R; Bovee, Roderick J; Pearson, Ann

    2014-09-01

    Protein stable isotope fingerprinting (P-SIF) is a method to measure the carbon isotope ratios of whole proteins separated from complex mixtures, including cultures and environmental samples. The goal of P-SIF is to expose the links between taxonomic identity and metabolic function in microbial ecosystems. To accomplish this, two dimensions of chromatography are used in sequence to resolve a sample containing ca. 5-10 mg of mixed proteins into 960 fractions. Each fraction then is split in two aliquots: The first is digested with trypsin for peptide sequencing, while the second has its ratio of (13)C/(12)C (value of δ(13)C) measured in triplicate using an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer interfaced with a spooling wire microcombustion device. Data from cultured species show that bacteria have a narrow distribution of protein δ(13)C values within individual taxa (±0.7-1.2‰, 1σ). This is moderately larger than the mean precision of the triplicate isotope measurements (±0.5‰, 1σ) and may reflect heterogeneous distribution of (13)C among the amino acids. When cells from different species are mixed together prior to protein extraction and separation, the results can predict accurately (to within ±1σ) the δ(13)C values of the original taxa. The number of data points required for this endmember prediction is ≥20/taxon, yielding a theoretical resolution of ca. 10 taxonomic units/sample. Such resolution should be useful to determine the overall trophic breadth of mixed microbial ecosystems. Although we utilize P-SIF to measure natural isotope ratios, it also could be combined with experiments that incorporate stable isotope labeling. PMID:25121924

  16. Ab initio prediction of equilibrium boron isotope fractionation between minerals and aqueous fluids at high P and T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Piotr M.; Wunder, Bernd; Jahn, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade experimental studies have shown a large B isotope fractionation between materials carrying boron incorporated in trigonally and tetrahedrally coordinated sites, but the mechanisms responsible for producing the observed isotopic signatures are poorly known. In order to understand the boron isotope fractionation processes and to obtain a better interpretation of the experimental data and isotopic signatures observed in natural samples, we use first principles calculations based on density functional theory in conjunction with ab initio molecular dynamics and a new pseudofrequency analysis method to investigate the B isotope fractionation between B-bearing minerals (such as tourmaline and micas) and aqueous fluids containing HBO and HBO4- species. We confirm the experimental finding that the isotope fractionation is mainly driven by the coordination of the fractionating boron atoms and have found in addition that the strength of the produced isotopic signature is strongly correlated with the Bsbnd O bond length. We also demonstrate the ability of our computational scheme to predict the isotopic signatures of fluids at extreme pressures by showing the consistency of computed pressure-dependent β factors with the measured pressure shifts of the Bsbnd O vibrational frequencies of HBO and HBO4- in aqueous fluid. The comparison of the predicted with measured fractionation factors between boromuscovite and neutral fluid confirms the existence of the admixture of tetrahedral boron species in neutral fluid at high P and T found experimentally, which also explains the inconsistency between the various measurements on the tourmaline-mica system reported in the literature. Our investigation shows that the calculated equilibrium isotope fractionation factors have an accuracy comparable to the experiments and give unique and valuable insight into the processes governing the isotope fractionation mechanisms on the atomic scale.

  17. Cesium Isotope Ratios as Indicators of Nuclear Power Plant Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Darin Snyder; James Delmore; Troy Tranter; Nick Mann; Michael Abbott; John Olson

    2011-11-01

    There are multiple paths by which radioactive cesium can reach the effluent from reactor operations. The radioactive 135Cs/137Cs ratios are controlled by these paths. In an effort to better understand the origin of this radiation, these 135Cs/137Cs ratios in effluents from three power reactor sites have been measured in offsite samples. These ratios are different from global fallout by up to six fold and as such cannot have a significant component from this source. A cesium ratio for a sample collected outside of the plant boundary provides integration over the operating life of the reactor. A sample collected inside the plant at any given time can be much different from this lifetime ratio. The measured cesium ratios vary significantly for the three reactors and indicate that the multiple paths have widely varying levels of contributions. There are too many ways these isotopes can fractionate to be useful for quantitative evaluations of operating parameters in an offsite sample, although it may be possible to obtain limited qualitative information for an onsite sample.

  18. Cesium isotope ratios as indicators of nuclear power plant operations.

    PubMed

    Delmore, James E; Snyder, Darin C; Tranter, Troy; Mann, Nick R

    2011-11-01

    There are multiple paths by which radioactive cesium can reach the effluent from reactor operations. The radioactive (135)Cs/(137)Cs ratios are controlled by these paths. In an effort to better understand the origin of this radiation, these (135)Cs/(137)Cs ratios in effluents from three power reactor sites have been measured in offsite samples. These ratios are different from global fallout by up to six fold and as such cannot have a significant component from this source. A cesium ratio for a sample collected outside of the plant boundary provides integration over the operating life of the reactor. A sample collected inside the plant at any given time can be much different from this lifetime ratio. The measured cesium ratios vary significantly for the three reactors and indicate that the multiple paths have widely varying levels of contributions. There are too many ways these isotopes can fractionate to be useful for quantitative evaluations of operating parameters in an offsite sample, although it may be possible to obtain limited qualitative information for an onsite sample. PMID:21816522

  19. Potential uses of lead isotope ratios in gunshot cases.

    PubMed

    Keisch, B; Callahan, R C

    1978-05-01

    The determination of lead isotope ratios in 14 bullets, and in material taken from 9 hand swabs and 5 primers shows that there are potentially valuable forensic uses for such a method. While a more complete study is required, this method could possibly be used to prove (or disprove) relatiohships between bullets and manufacturers, weapons, or persons firing the weapons. Sample size requirements (1 microgram or less) are such that damaged or fragmented bullets, or minute particles therefrom, may be used for the required analyses. An experiment showed that gunshot residue from a test-fired weapon was detectable even after washing the hands. PMID:649545

  20. Direct measurement of the boron isotope fractionation factor: Reducing the uncertainty in reconstructing ocean paleo-pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nir, Oded; Vengosh, Avner; Harkness, Jennifer S.; Dwyer, Gary S.; Lahav, Ori

    2015-03-01

    The boron isotopic composition of calcium carbonate skeletons is a promising proxy method for reconstructing paleo-ocean pH and atmospheric CO2 from the geological record. Although the boron isotope methodology has been used extensively over the past two decades to determine ancient ocean-pH, the actual value of the boron isotope fractionation factor (εB) between the two main dissolved boron species, 11B(OH)3 and 10B(OH)-4, has remained uncertain. Initially, εB values were theoretically computed from vibrational frequencies of boron species, resulting in a value of ∼ 19 ‰. Later, spectrophotometric pH measurements on artificial seawater suggested a higher value of ∼ 27 ‰. A few independent theoretical models also pointed to a higher εB value. Here we provide, for the first time, an independent empirical fractionation factor (εB = 26.0 ± 1.0 ‰ ; 25 °C), determined by direct measurements of B(OH)3 in seawater and other solutions. Boric acid was isolated by preferential passage through a reverse osmosis membrane under controlled pH conditions. We further demonstrate that applying the Pitzer ion-interaction approach, combined with ion-pairing calculations, results in a more accurate determination of species distribution in aquatic solutions of different chemical composition, relative to the traditional two-species boron-system approach. We show that using the revised approach reduces both the error in simulating ancient atmospheric CO2 (by up to 21%) and the overall uncertainty of applying boron isotopes for paleo-pH reconstruction. Combined, this revised methodology lays the foundation for a more accurate determination of ocean paleo-pH through time.

  1. Carbon isotope ratios and isotopic correlations between components in fruit juices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzchnicki, Ryszard

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays food products are defined by geographical origin, method of production and by some regulations concerning terms of their authenticity. Important data for confirm the authenticity of product are providing by isotopic methods of food control. The method checks crucial criteria which characterize the authenticity of inspected product. The European Union Regulations clearly show the tendency for application of the isotopic methods for food authenticity control (wine, honey, juice). The aim of the legislation steps is the protection of European market from possibility of the commercial frauds. Method of isotope ratio mass spectrometry is very effective tool for the use distinguishably the food products of various geographical origin. The basic problem for identification of the sample origin is the lack of databases of isotopic composition of components and information about the correlations of the data. The subject of the work was study the isotopic correlations existing between components of fruits. The chemical and instrumental methods of separation: water, sugars, organic acids and pulp from fruit were implemented. IRMS technique was used to measure isotopic composition of samples. The final results for original samples of fruits (apple, strawberry etc.) will be presented and discussed. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education under grant NR12-0043-10/2010.

  2. Crystallization kinetics of rhyolitic melts using oxygen isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Crystals provide the means to understand igneous systems, but natural constraints on crystallization kinetics are rare because thermal conditions and crystallization timescales are typically unknown. Oxygen isotope ratios in quartz and alkali feldspar crystals in spherulites provide a natural record of the temperature interval of crystallization and crystal growth rates in rhyolitic melts. Oxygen isotope compositions in both phases change progressively with position from the spherulite core to rim. Quartz δ18O increases from 5.0 ± 0.3‰ in the core to 5.6 ± 0.3‰ at the rims, whereas alkali feldspar decreases from 3.7 ± 0.4‰ in the core to 2.7 ± 0.9‰ at the rims. Fractionation therefore increases from 1.3 ± 0.7‰ in the cores to 2.9 ± 1.1‰ at the rims. Oxygen isotope thermometry tracks crystallization temperature with position. Spherulites nucleate at 578 ± 160°C and continue to grow until 301 ± 88°C. The in situ analyses demonstrate that spherulites self-contain a record of their thermal history and that of the host lava.

  3. Isotopic Ratio Outlier Analysis Global Metabolomics of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Szewc, Mark A.; Garrett, Timothy; Menger, Robert F.; Yost, Richard A.; Beecher, Chris; Edison, Arthur S.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the global metabolic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans stress responses using a mass spectrometry-based technique called Isotopic Ratio Outlier Analysis (IROA). In an IROA protocol, control and experimental samples are isotopically labeled with 95% and 5% 13C, and the two sample populations are mixed together for uniform extraction, sample preparation, and LC-MS analysis. This labeling strategy provides several advantages over conventional approaches: 1) compounds arising from biosynthesis are easily distinguished from artifacts, 2) errors from sample extraction and preparation are minimized because the control and experiment are combined into a single sample, 3) measurement of both the molecular weight and the exact number of carbon atoms in each molecule provides extremely accurate molecular formulae, and 4) relative concentrations of all metabolites are easily determined. A heat shock perturbation was conducted on C. elegans to demonstrate this approach. We identified many compounds that significantly changed upon heat shock, including several from the purine metabolism pathway, which we use to demonstrate the approach. The metabolomic response information by IROA may be interpreted in the context of a wealth of genetic and proteomic information available for C. elegans. Furthermore, the IROA protocol can be applied to any organism that can be isotopically labeled, making it a powerful new tool in a global metabolomics pipeline. PMID:24274725

  4. Isotope ratio monitoring of small molecules and macromolecules by liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Godin, Jean-Philippe; Hau, Jörg; Fay, Laurent-Bernard; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2005-01-01

    In the field of isotope ratio mass spectrometry, the introduction of an interface allowing the connection of liquid chromatography (LC) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has opened a range of new perspectives. The LC interface is based on a chemical oxidation, producing CO2 from organic molecules. While first results were obtained from the analysis of low molecular weight compounds, the application of compound-specific isotope analysis by irm-LC/MS to other molecules, in particular biomolecules, is presented here. The influence of the LC flow rate on the CO2 signal and on the observed delta13C values is demonstrated. The limits of quantification for angiotensin III and for leucine were 100 and 38 pmol, respectively, with a standard deviation of the delta13C values better than 0.4 per thousand. Also, accuracy and precision of delta13C values for elemental analyser-IRMS and flow injection analysis-IRMS (FIA-LC/MS) were compared. For compounds with molecular weights ranging from 131 to 66,390 Da, precision was better than 0.3 per thousand, and accuracy varied from 0.1 to 0.7 per thousand. In a second part of the work, a two-dimensional (2D)-LC method for the separation of 15 underivatised amino acids is demonstrated; the precision of delta13C values for several amino acids by irm-LC/MS was better than 0.3 per thousand at natural abundance. For labelled mixtures, the coefficient of variation was between 1% at 0.07 atom % excess (APE) for threonine and alanine, and around 10% at 0.03 APE for valine and phenylalanine. The application of irm-LC/MS to the determination of the isotopic enrichment of 13C-threonine in an extract of rat colon mucosa demonstrated a precision of 0.5 per thousand, or 0.001 atom %. PMID:16124031

  5. Oxygen-18 Carbon Dioxide Isotope Ratio in Mars Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostiuk, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Hewagama, T.; Smith, R.; Fast, K. E.; Annen, J.; Sonnabend, G.; Sornig, M.

    2012-09-01

    The determination of isotopic ratios on Mars is important to the study of atmospheric evolution [1]. The relative abundance of isotopes of CO2 provides insight into the loss of Mars' primordial atmosphere. Isotopic ratios also provide markers in the study of geochemistry of Mars meteorites and future returned samples formed in equilibrium with ambient atmosphere, and are probes of biogenic and abiotic chemistry, which differ in isotope fractionation. Due to its lesser gravity and relatively thin residual atmosphere, Mars' atmosphere should be enriched in heavy isotopes [1]. However Viking [2] results indicated an Earth-like singly substituted oxygen-18 CO2 isotopic ratio, 18OCO/OCO, with δ18O = 0±50‰ relative to Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW). By comparison, isotopic ratios in Earth atmospheric CO2 are not uniquely defined due to seasonal and biotic variability, but have a range 0-41‰ relative to VSMOW [3, 4]. Phoenix lander TEGA [3] measurements found a modest enrichment of δ18O = 31.0±5.7‰. Only the Viking and Phoenix landers have carried a mass spectrometer to Mars, so far, until the arrival of Mars Science Laboratory in August 2012. Using ground-based spectroscopic techniques Krasnopolsky et al. [5] also found modest enrichment δ18O = 18±18‰. We present results from fully resolved spectroscopic measurements near 10.6 μm of both the normal and singly substituted oxygen- 18 CO2 lines, taken with the Goddard Space Flight Center Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Winds And Composition (HIPWAC) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Measurements with spectral resolving power λ/Δλ=107 were obtained in October 2007 with an instantaneous field-of-view on the planet of ~1 arcsec, at the locations shown in Fig. 1 as open squares. The solid and broken line tracks show Mars SPICAM measurements of ozone corresponding to ozone measurements also obtained with HIPWAC and shown as hatched and solid regions [6]. Figure 1

  6. Carbon isotope ratios and impurities in diamonds from Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidane, Abiel; Koch-Müller, Monika; Morales, Luiz; Wiedenbeck, Michael; De Wit, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    We are investigating the sources of diamonds from southern Africa by studying both their carbon isotopic composition and chemical impurities. Our samples include macro-sized diamonds from River Ranch kimberlite in Zimbabwe and the Helam and Klipspringer kimberlitic deposits from South Africa, as well as micro-sized diamonds from Klipspringer and Premier kimberlites in South Africa. We have characterized the samples for their structurally bounded nitrogen, hydrogen and platelets defect using a Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Using the DiaMap routine, open source software (Howell et al., 2012), IR spectra were deconvulated and quantified for their nitrogen (A, B and D components) and hydrogen contents. High to moderate nitrogen concentrations (1810 to 400 µg/g; 400 to 50 µg/g respectively) were found in diamonds from Klipspringer and Helam. Moderate to low (<50 µg/g) nitrogen concentrations were observed in diamonds from Premier and River Ranch. Type II diamonds, i.e. diamonds with no N impurities, which are presumed to have been derived from ultramafic sources, are found in the River Ranch deposit. The macro- and micro-size diamonds from the Klipspringer deposit display similar nitrogen defects, with higher nitrogen concentration and more frequent D components found in the macro-size diamonds. One of the first steps towards reliable carbon isotope studies is the development of calibration materials for SIMS carbon isotopic analyses. We have investigated candidate materials both from a polycrystalline synthetic diamond sheet and two natural gem quality diamonds from Juina (Brazil). Electron-based images of the synthetic diamond sheet, obtained using GFZ Potsdam's dual beam FIB instrument, show many diamond grains with diameters greater than 35 µm. SIMS testing of the isotopic homogeneity of the back and front sides of the synthetic sheets reveal similar 13C/12C ratio within a RSD of <1 ‰ . SIMS isotopic analyses of the two natural diamond RMs

  7. Investigating Carbonate System Perturbations across the Cretaceous-Palaeogene Transition using Boron Isotopes in Planktonic Foraminifera.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henehan, M. J.; Hull, P. M.; Planavsky, N. J.; Huber, B. T.; Thomas, E.

    2014-12-01

    The interval spanning the latest Maastrichtian to the early Palaeocene has great potential in helping to elucidate the stabilising mechanisms on the Earth's carbonate system on both long and very short geological timescales, from the geologically-instantaneous production of sulphate-rich aerosols and nitrogen oxides from the K-Pg bolide impact to the relatively more gradual degassing from Deccan volcanism in the latest Maastrichtian. The extent to which ocean pH (and atmospheric CO2 concentrations) changed in response to these contrasting acidification pressures, and the timescales of their recovery, may provide unique insight into the efficiency of the Earth's oceans in buffering greenhouse gas increases (through carbonate dissolution, weathering-derived alkalinity flux, and biological carbon cycling). The boron isotope palaeo-pH proxy in planktic foraminifera is well suited to such investigations, but its application over this interval has been problematic, not least due to a scarcity of sample material and a near-complete turnover of planktonic foraminiferal species across the K-Pg boundary. To attempt to circumvent these issues, we investigate the biological influences on boron isotope signals in Maastrichtian and Danian planktonic foraminifera, with the goal of producing more accurate palaeo-pH reconstructions. With these findings in mind, we present preliminary constraints on ocean pH and carbonate system dynamics across this critical interval of geological time.

  8. Modern and Pleistocene boron isotope composition of the benthic foraminifer Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönisch, Bärbel; Bickert, Torsten; Hemming, N. Gary

    2008-07-01

    Here we present the first species-specific study of boron isotopes in the epibenthic foraminifer species Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi. Coretop samples from a water depth profile from 1000 to 4500 m on the northern flank of the Walvis Ridge are 4.4‰ lower than the values expected, based on calculations of the δ11B borate of ambient seawater. Similar values for this foraminifer species are presented from ODP site 668B at the Sierra Leone Rise, in the equatorial Atlantic. The consistency between data of the same species suggests the offsets are primary, rather than diagenetic. Glacial C. wuellerstorfi from ODP 668B and Walvis Ridge have boron isotope compositions only slightly different to interglacial samples, that is no larger than + 0.10 pH units, or + 23 µmol kg - 1 in [CO 32-] above the reconstructed glacial lysocline, and - 0.07 pH units, or - 14 µmol kg - 1 in [CO 32-] below. We use these results to suggest that glacial deep water pH in the Atlantic was similar to interglacial pH. The new data resolve the inconsistency between the previously reported high bottom water pH and the lack of significant carbonate preservation of the glacial deep ocean.

  9. Last Glacial Maximum and deglacial abyssal seawater oxygen isotopic ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunsch, Carl

    2016-06-01

    An earlier analysis of pore-water salinity (chlorinity) in two deep-sea cores, using terminal constraint methods of control theory, concluded that although a salinity amplification in the abyss was possible during the LGM, it was not required by the data. Here the same methodology is applied to δ18Ow in the upper 100 m of four deep-sea cores. An ice volume amplification to the isotopic ratio is, again, consistent with the data but not required by it. In particular, results are very sensitive, with conventional diffusion values, to the assumed initial conditions at -100 ky and a long list of noise (uncertainty) assumptions. If the calcite values of δ18O are fully reliable, then published enriched values of the ratio in seawater are necessary to preclude sub-freezing temperatures, but the seawater δ18O in pore fluids does not independently require the conclusion.

  10. Theoretical uncertainties in extracting cosmic-ray diffusion parameters: the boron-to-carbon ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genolini, Yoann

    2016-05-01

    PAMELA and, more recently, AMS-02, are ushering us into a new era of greatly reduced statistical uncertainties in experimental measurements of cosmic ray fluxes. In particular, new determinations of traditional diagnostic tools such as the boron to carbon ratio (B/C) are expected to significantly reduce errors on cosmic-ray diffusion parameters, with important implications for astroparticle physics, ranging from inferring primary source spectra to indirect dark matter searches. It is timely to stress, however, that the conclusions inferred crucially depend on the framework in which the data are interpreted as well as on some nuclear input parameters. We aim at assessing the theoretical uncertainties affecting the outcome, with models as simple as possible while still retaining the key dependences. We compare different semi-analytical, two-zone model descriptions of cosmic ray transport in the Galaxy: infinite slab(lD), cylindrical symmetry (2D) with homogeneous sources, cylindrical symmetry (2D) with inhomogeneous source distribution. We tested for the effect of a primary source contamination in the boron flux by parametrically altering its flux. We also tested for nuclear cross-section uncertainties.

  11. Improving the Sensitivity of Uranium Isotope Ratio Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, J.; Snow, J.

    2003-12-01

    Accurate and precise measurements of natural and anthropogenic 235/238 U isotope ratios are important for a range of investigations where the amount of sample is extremely restricted and/or the analyte is only present in ultra-trace quantities. Examples include biological, cosmochemical, environmental, geological, and radiological studies. We have developed and validated a novel method using our Nu Instruments Nu Plasma Multi Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (MC-ICPMS) and a 233U, 236U mixed double spike for the measurement of 235U/238U ratios. Our multi-dynamic technique employs the installed quadrupole zoom optics and fixed positioning of the ion counting detectors such that rather than the commonly used mass dispersion of 1 or 2, we utilize a mass dispersion of 1.5. Using this configuration, we can simultaneously monitor the 235U and 238U ion beams in the first cycle followed by a second cycle that simultaneously monitors the 233U and 236U beams. This innovative approach allows us to correct for the considerable, but consistent, instrumental mass fractionation and ion-counter amplification bias within each sequence. Since we were hesitant to use a U500 (235U, 238U equal atom) solution for spike calibration because of possible enriched U laboratory and instrumentation contamination, we used a U960 (terrestrial 235U/238U) solution for isotopic calibration of the spike. This standardization corrected for the small amounts of 235U and 238U in the spike solution by using a U960 standard solution. With a mean intraday 2-sigma precision of 1.5 permil and an overall 2-sigma precision of 2.25 permil using individual sample sizes of 350 pg (8.8 x10 E11 atoms), we are confident our technique will be useful for identifying U isotopic anomalies present in many sample types.

  12. Oxygen-18 Carbon Dioxide Isotope Ratio in Mars Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostiuk, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Hewagama, T.; Smith, R.; Fast, K. E.; Annen, J.; Sonnabend, G.; Sornig, M.

    2012-09-01

    The determination of isotopic ratios on Mars is important to the study of atmospheric evolution [1]. The relative abundance of isotopes of CO2 provides insight into the loss of Mars' primordial atmosphere. Isotopic ratios also provide markers in the study of geochemistry of Mars meteorites and future returned samples formed in equilibrium with ambient atmosphere, and are probes of biogenic and abiotic chemistry, which differ in isotope fractionation. Due to its lesser gravity and relatively thin residual atmosphere, Mars' atmosphere should be enriched in heavy isotopes [1]. However Viking [2] results indicated an Earth-like singly substituted oxygen-18 CO2 isotopic ratio, 18OCO/OCO, with δ18O = 0±50‰ relative to Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW). By comparison, isotopic ratios in Earth atmospheric CO2 are not uniquely defined due to seasonal and biotic variability, but have a range 0-41‰ relative to VSMOW [3, 4]. Phoenix lander TEGA [3] measurements found a modest enrichment of δ18O = 31.0±5.7‰. Only the Viking and Phoenix landers have carried a mass spectrometer to Mars, so far, until the arrival of Mars Science Laboratory in August 2012. Using ground-based spectroscopic techniques Krasnopolsky et al. [5] also found modest enrichment δ18O = 18±18‰. We present results from fully resolved spectroscopic measurements near 10.6 μm of both the normal and singly substituted oxygen- 18 CO2 lines, taken with the Goddard Space Flight Center Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Winds And Composition (HIPWAC) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Measurements with spectral resolving power λ/Δλ=107 were obtained in October 2007 with an instantaneous field-of-view on the planet of ~1 arcsec, at the locations shown in Fig. 1 as open squares. The solid and broken line tracks show Mars SPICAM measurements of ozone corresponding to ozone measurements also obtained with HIPWAC and shown as hatched and solid regions [6]. Figure 1

  13. Understanding radioxenon isotopical ratios originating from radiopharmaceutical facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saey, P. R. J.; Ringbom, A.; Bowyer, T. W.; Becker, A.; de Geer, L.-E.; Nikkinen, M.; Payne, R. F.

    2009-04-01

    It was recently shown that radiopharmaceutical facilities (RPF) are major contributors to the general background of 133Xe and other xenon isotopes both in the northern and southern hemisphere. To distinguish a nuclear explosion signal from releases from civil nuclear facilities, not only the activity concentrations but also the ratios of the four different CTBT relevant radioxenon isotopes (131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 135Xe) have to be well understood. First measurements taken recently in and around two of the world's largest RPF's: NTP at Pelindaba, South Africa and IRE at Fleurus, Belgium have been presented. At both sites, also stack samples were taken in close cooperation with the facility operators. The radioxenon in Belgium could be classified in four classes: the normal European background (133Xe activity between 0 - 5 mBq/m3) on one hand and then the samples where all four isotopes were detected with 133mXe/131mXe > 1. In northern South Africa the Pelindaba RPF is in practice the sole source of radioxenon. It generated a background of 133Xe at the measurement site some 230 km to the west of the RPF of 0 - 5 mBq/m3. In the cases where the air from the Pelindaba facility reached the measurement site directly and in a short time period, the 133Xe was higher, also 135Xe was present and in some samples 133mXe as well. The ratios of the activity concentrations of 135Xe/133Xe vs. 133mXe/131mXe (Multiple Isotope Ratio Plot - MIRC) have been analysed. For both facilities, the possible theoretical ratio's for different scenarios were calculated with the information available and compared with the measurements. It was found that there is an excess of 131mXe present in the European samples compared to theoretical calculations. A similar excess has also been seen in samples measured in northern America. In South Africa, neither the environmental samples nor the stack ones contained 131mXe at measurable levels. This can probably be explained by different processes and

  14. Examining Changes in Radioxenon Isotope Activity Ratios during Subsurface Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annewandter, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) has demonstrated and modelled the usefulness of barometric pumping induced soil gas sampling during On-Site inspections. Gas transport has been widely studied with different numerical codes. However, gas transport of all radioxenons in the post-detonation regime and their possible fractionation is still neglected in the open literature. Atmospheric concentrations of the radioxenons Xe-135, Xe-133m, Xe-133 and Xe-131m can be used to discriminate between civilian releases (nuclear power plants or medical isotope facilities), and nuclear explosion sources. It is based on the isotopic activity ratio method. Yet it is not clear whether subsurface migration of the radioxenons, with eventual release into the atmosphere, can affect the activity ratios due to fractionation. Fractionation can be caused by different diffusivities due to mass differences between the radioxenons. A previous study showed surface arrival time of a chemically inert gaseous tracer is affected by its diffusivity. They observed detectable amount for SF6 50 days after detonation and 375 days for He-3. They predict 50 and 80 days for Xe-133 and Ar-37 respectively. Cyclical changes in atmospheric pressure can drive subsurface gas transport. This barometric pumping phenomenon causes an oscillatoric flow in upward trending fractures which, combined with diffusion into the porous matrix, leads to a net transport of gaseous components - a ratcheting effect. We use a general purpose reservoir simulator (Complex System Modelling Platform, CSMP++) which has been applied in a range of fields such as deep geothermal systems, three-phase black oil simulations , fracture propagation in fractured, porous media, Navier-Stokes pore-scale modelling among others. It is specifically designed to account for structurally complex geologic situation of fractured, porous media. Parabolic differential equations are solved by a continuous Galerkin finite-element method, hyperbolic

  15. Sulfur isotopic ratio of DMS and DMSP from Lake Kinneret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sela-Adler, Michal; Said-Ahmad, Ward; Eckert, Werner; Kamyshny, Alexey; Sivan, Orit; Amrani, Alon

    2014-05-01

    Volatile Organic sulfur compounds (VOSC) such as dimethylsulfide (DMS) are an important source of biogenic sulfur to the atmosphere. The main precursor of DMS is dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), a common osmolyte in marine algae. Atmospheric release of VOS compounds contributes to the formation of sulfate aerosols. The latter are of global importance due to their role as cloud-condensation nuclei. VOSC are abundant in terrestrial environments as well and may be involved in important biogeochemical cycles. In lake sediments, another mechanism for the formation of DMS by H2S methylation may be important. The 34S/32S ratio (d34S values) of DMSP of marine surface water around the globe is very homogeneous ranging between +18.9 o to +20.3 o and the fractionation between DMSP and DMS is < +1 o (Amrani et al. 2013). The δ34S values of DMS and other VOSC in sediments should be 34S depleted, similar to its H2S precursor (Oduro et al., 2011). Our goal was to quantify the benthic DMS and DMSP emissions from the sediments of warm monomictic Lake Kinneret relative to their formation by surface water algae by using sulfur isotope ratios. Water column samples and sediment samples from Lake Kinneret were purged and trap in order to extract the VOSC and then introduced to a GC/MC-ICPMS for isotopic measurements (Amrani et al. 2013). The δ34S of DMSP in the water and sediment columns of Lake Kinneret a mesotrophic monomictic lake were measured. Our preliminary results show δ34S values for DMSP ranged between +10.3 o and +13.4 o in the water column. The sulfate δ34S values ranged between +12.6 o to +14.9 o. δ34S -DMSP in the sediment column showed similar values between +9.4 o and +13.0 o, indicating a similar sulfur source. Similar δ34S values obtain for other VOSC such as ethanethiol that contributes significantly to the VOSC of Lake Kinneret sediments. Amrani, A., W. Said-Ahmad,Y. Shaked, and R. P. Kiene. 2013. Sulfur isotopes homogeneity of oceanic DMSP and DMS. PNAS 110

  16. Using Oxygen Isotopes in Fish Scale Apatite to Reconstruct Past Temperatures and Water Isotope Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, T. D.; Paytan, A.

    2009-12-01

    Oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) of apatite phosphate in fish bones and teeth vary according to the temperature and δ18O of water during formation. Since isotope ratios in apatite are often well preserved over geologic timescales, fish bones and teeth have been used to determine past environmental conditions. Fish scales offer several advantages over bones and teeth: they are relatively common in certain sedimentary basins, and they are more easily identified to species level. Analysis of paired bone and scale samples will be presented. The data indicate that fish scale apatite similarly records environmental conditions during growth. Thus δ18O of apatite phosphate in fish scales may provide useful paleoecological information and also indicate past environmental conditions.

  17. Boron isotope systematics of tourmaline formation in the Sullivan Pb-Zn-Ag deposit, British Columbia, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiang, S.-Y.; Palmer, M.R.; Slack, J.F.; Shaw, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    We report here the results of 54 boron isotope analyses of tourmaline associated with the giant Sullivan Pb-Zn-Ag deposit in southeastern British Columbia, Canada. The ??11B values range from -11.1 to -2.9???, which is almost as great as the range found worldwide in tourmalines from 33 massive sulfide deposits and tourmalinites in dominantly clastic metasedimentary terranes. The major control on the overall ??11B values of the Sullivan tourmalinites is the boron source. Potential controls over the large range of the data also include: (1) differences in formation temperatures of the tourmalinites, (2) different stages of tourmaline formation, (3) variations in the proportions of dissolved boron incorporated into the tourmaline (Rayleigh fractionation), (4) seawater entrainment, and (5) post-depositional metamorphism. The boron isotope data at Sullivan are consistent with boron derivation from leaching of footwall clastic sediments. However, the great abundance of tourmaline in the Sullivan deposit suggests that the local clastic sediments were not the sole source of boron, and we argue that non-marine evaporites, buried deep below the orebody, are the most viable source of this additional boron. It is likely that some of the variation in tourmaline ??11B values reflect mixing of boron from these two sources. Comparison of the potential effects of these controls with geologic and other geochemical evidence suggests that major causes for the wide range of ??11B values measured at Sullivan are seawater entrainment and Rayleigh fractionation, although in places, post-depositional alteration and thermal metamorphism were important in determining ??11B values of some of the recrystallized tourmalinites.

  18. Stable isotope methods: The effect of gut contents on isotopic ratios of zooplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J. M.; McQuaid, C. D.

    2011-05-01

    In the past decade there has been an increased awareness of the potential for methodological bias resulting from multiple pre-analytical procedures in foodweb interpretations based on stable isotope techniques. In the case of small organisms, this includes the effect of gut contents on whole body signatures. Although gut contents may not reflect actual assimilation, their carbon and nitrogen values will be isotopically lighter than after the same material has been assimilated. The potential skewing of isotopic ratios in whole organism samples is especially important for aquatic environments as many studies involve trophic relationships among small zooplankton. This is particularly important in pelagic waters, where herbivorous zooplankton comprise small taxa. Hence this study investigated the effect of gut contents on the δ13C and δ15N ratios of three size classes of zooplankton (1.0-2.0, 2.0-4.0 and >4.0 mm) collected using bongo net tows in the tropical waters of the south-west Indian Ocean. Animals were collected at night, when they were likely to be feeding, sieved into size classes and separated into genera. We focused on Euphausia spp which dominated zooplankton biomass. Three treatment types were processed: bulk animals, bulk animals without guts and tail muscle from each size class at 10 bongo stations. The δ15N ratios were influenced by zooplankton size class, presumably reflecting ontogenetic changes in diet. ANOVA post hoc results and correlations in δ15N signatures among treatments suggest that gut contents may not affect overall nitrogen signatures of Euphausia spp., but that δ13C signatures may be significantly altered by their presence. Carbon interpretations however, were complicated by potential effects of variation in chitin, lipids and metabolism among tissues and the possibility of opportunistic omnivory. Consequently we advocate gut evacuation before sacrifice in euphausiids if specific tissue dissection is impractical and recommend

  19. Examining Changes in Radioxenon Isotope Activity Ratios during Subsurface Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annewandter, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) has demonstrated and modelled the usefulness of barometric pumping induced gas transport and subsequent soil gas sampling during On-Site inspections. Generally, gas transport has been widely studied with different numerical codes. However, gas transport of radioxenons and radioiodines in the post-detonation regime and their possible fractionation is still neglected in the open peer-reviewed literature. Atmospheric concentrations of the radioxenons Xe-135, Xe-133m, Xe-133 and Xe-131m can be used to discriminate between civilian releases (nuclear power plants or medical isotope facilities), and nuclear explosion sources. It is based on the multiple isotopic activity ratio method. Yet it is not clear whether subsurface migration of the radionuclides, with eventual release into the atmosphere, can affect the activity ratios due to fractionation. Fractionation can be caused by different mass diffusivities due to mass differences between the radionuclides. Cyclical changes in atmospheric pressure can drive subsurface gas transport. This barometric pumping phenomenon causes an oscillatoric flow in upward trending fractures or highly conductive faults which, combined with diffusion into the porous matrix, leads to a net transport of gaseous components - a so-called ratcheting effect. We use a general purpose reservoir simulator (Complex System Modelling Platform, CSMP++) which is recognized by the oil industry as leading in Discrete Fracture-Matrix (DFM) simulations. It has been applied in a range of fields such as deep geothermal systems, three-phase black oil simulations, fracture propagation in fractured, porous media, and Navier-Stokes pore-scale modelling among others. It is specifically designed to account for structurally complex geologic situation of fractured, porous media. Parabolic differential equations are solved by a continuous Galerkin finite-element method, hyperbolic differential equations by a complementary finite

  20. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Ratios for Nearby Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Lebzelter, Thomas; Straniero, Oscar

    2016-07-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios are reported for a sample of 46 Mira and SRa-type variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Vibration–rotation first and second-overtone CO lines in 1.5–2.5 μm spectra were measured to derive isotopic ratios for 12C/13C, 16O/17O, and 16O/18O. Comparisons with previous measurements for individual stars and with various samples of evolved stars, as available in the extant literature, are discussed. Models for solar composition AGB stars of different initial masses are used to interpret our results. We find that the majority of M-stars have main sequence masses ≤2 M ⊙ and have not experienced sizable third dredge-up (TDU) episodes. The progenitors of the four S-type stars in our sample are slightly more massive. Of the six C-stars in the sample three have clear evidence relating their origin to the occurrence of TDU. Comparisons with O-rich presolar grains from AGB stars that lived before the formation of the solar system reveal variations in the interstellar medium chemical composition. The present generation of low-mass AGB stars, as represented by our sample of long period variables (LPVs), shows a large spread of 16O/17O ratios, similar to that of group 1 presolar grains and in agreement with theoretical expectations for the composition of mass 1.2–2 M ⊙ stars after the first dredge-up. In contrast, the 16O/18O ratios of present-day LPVs are definitely smaller than those of group 1 grains. This is most probably a consequence of the the decrease with time of the 16O/18O ratio in the interstellar medium due to the chemical evolution of the Milky Way. One star in our sample has an O composition similar to that of group 2 presolar grains originating in an AGB star undergoing extra-mixing. This may indicate that the extra-mixing process is hampered at high metallicity, or, equivalently, favored at low metallicity. Similarly to O-rich grains, no star in our sample shows evidence of hot bottom burning, which is expected

  1. A New Multi Collector Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelhans, A. D.; Olson, J. E.; Ward, M. B.; Dahl, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    With the goal of improving the sensitivity of isotope ratio measurements, particularly for actinides, a new magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes up to seven full-sized discrete dynode electron multipliers operating simultaneously has been designed, constructed and is in the early stages of testing. The design is based on a newly developed ion dispersion lens that enables the mass dispersed individual isotope beams to be separated by 35 mm; this allows a full-sized discrete dynode pulse counting multiplier to be used for each beam. The ion dispersion lens (US patents 6,297,501 and pending) is a two element electrostatic 90 degree sector device that causes the beam-to-beam dispersion to increase faster than the intra-beam dispersion. Each of the multipliers is housed in an isolated case and is equipped with a deflector/condenser lens at the entrance to optimize pulse generation. The instrument includes a 9-sample filament cartridge mounted on a micro-manipulator X-Y stage that enables adjustment of the filament position with 10 micron resolution within the ion lens. Initial testing has shown that the instrument is performing as predicted by the ion optics model of the design.

  2. Nitrogen isotopic ratios in fecal pellets produced by marine zooplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Altabet, M.A. ); Small, L.F. )

    1990-01-01

    At each site and in every season studied, zooplankton in the upper ocean produced fecal pellets that were 1.3% lower in {delta}{sup 15}N than their body tissue but 2.2% higher than their apparent food source. {sup 14}N-containing molecules are evidently preferentially assimilated in zooplankton intestinal tracts, though other isotopic effects must account for the enrichment in {sup 15}N of these organisms relative to their food. These results also show zooplankton to be important modifiers of nitrogen isotopic ratios for marine particulate matter. {delta}{sup 15}N values for sinking particles and fecal pellets are similar, supporting the perspective that macrozooplankton are important factors in producing and processing particles that sink into the ocean's interior and sediments. In contrast, the relationship in {delta}{sup 15}N between fecal pellets and suspended particles in the euphotic zone is more variable. It appears that zooplankton select food particles of varying {delta}{sup 15}N from the suspended particle pool. These results suggest that both zooplankton feeding behavior and their digestive chemistry are important in determining the composition of sinking particulate matter in the ocean with respect to the suspended particle source in the euphotic zone.

  3. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkinis, V.; Popp, T. J.; Blunier, T.; Bigler, M.; Schüpbach, S.; Kettner, E.; Johnsen, S. J.

    2011-11-01

    A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We built an interface between a Wavelength Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS) purchased from Picarro Inc. and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneuous water isotopic analysis of δ18O and δD on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub μl amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100% efficiency in a~home made oven at a temperature of 170 °C. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW-SLAP scale. We apply the necessary corrections based on the assessed performance of the system regarding instrumental drifts and dependance on the water concentration in the optical cavity. The melt rates are monitored in order to assign a depth scale to the measured isotopic profiles. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1‰ and 0.5‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sample in the transfer lines limits the temporal resolution of the technique. In this work we investigate and assess these dispersion effects. By using an optimal filtering method we show how the measured profiles can be corrected for the smoothing effects resulting from the sample dispersion. Considering the significant advantages the technique offers, i.e. simultaneuous measurement of δ18O and δD, potentially in combination with chemical components that are traditionally measured on CFA systems, notable reduction on analysis time and power consumption, we consider it as an alternative to traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry with the possibility to be deployed for field ice core studies. We present

  4. Enhanced thermal conductivity and isotope effect in single-layer hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, L.; Broido, D. A.

    2011-10-01

    The thermal conductivity, κ, of single layers of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), as well as that of bulk h-BN have been calculated utilizing an exact numerical solution of the phonon Boltzmann transport equation. The stronger phonon-phonon scattering in h-BN is revealed as the cause for its lower κ compared with graphite. A reduction in such scattering in the single layer arising mainly from a symmetry-based selection rule leads to a substantial increase in κ, with calculated room temperature values of more than 600 Wm-1K-1. Isotopic enrichment further increases κ, with the calculated enhancement exhibiting a peak with temperature, whose magnitude shows a dramatic sensitivity to crystallite size.

  5. Boron Isotopic Composition Variation During Early-Bajocian δ13Cmin Positive Excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, G.; Gaillardet, J.; Bartolini, A.; Donnadieu, Y.; Beaumont, V.

    2008-12-01

    Early Bajocian is a period of sea level rise and platform drowning during the mid-Jurassic greenhouse world. This period is geochemically characterized by a positive excursion of inorganic δ13C signal as recorded in Western Thetys sections. This signal, concomitant with an increased biosiliceous sedimentation, is meant to reflect both a eutrophication event and a carbonate production crisis (Bartolini et al. 1996 ; Bartolini and Cecca 1999). High atmospheric CO2 level is assumed for this period, linked with the birth of the Pacific Plate and a faster sea-floor spreading (Bartolini and Larson 2001). Opening of the Liguro- Piemontese ocean may have led to rearrangement of oceanic current circulation patterns. These global conditions, potentially leading to oceanic eutrophication and carbonate saturation state modification, have been suggested as a trigger for Early-Bajocian events. Atmospheric CO2, carbon cycle and seawater pH are connected through the seawater carbonate system and boron isotopes in carbonates are a paleopH proxy. Geochemical analyses including δ11B were performed on bajocian carbonates from Terminilletto section, Italy, one of the rare carbonate section spanning this period. A new extraction process combined with a new direct injection method for MC-ICP-MS (d-DIHEN) helped to improve analyses reproducibilty (Louvat et al. in prep). The results show clearly a variation of the isotopic signal. This variation can be explained by a rise of seawater pH, occuring just before the carbonate production crisis and connected to the eutrophication. Modelisation will thus be performed to reproduce pH variation and reconstitute carbon cycle perturbation at this time. Bartolini A., Baumgartner P. O., and Hunziker J. (1996) Middle and Late Jurassic carbon stable-isotope stratigraphy and radiolarite sedimentation of the Umbria- Marche Basin (Central Italy). Eclogae geol. Helv. 89(2), 811-844. Bartolini A. and Cecca F. (1999) 20 My hiatus in the Jurassic of Umbria

  6. Theoretical uncertainties in extracting cosmic-ray diffusion parameters: the boron-to-carbon ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genolini, Y.; Putze, A.; Salati, P.; Serpico, P. D.

    2015-08-01

    Context. PAMELA and, more recently, AMS-02, are ushering us into a new era of greatly reduced statistical uncertainties in experimental measurements of cosmic-ray fluxes. In particular, new determinations of traditional diagnostic tools such as the boron-to-carbon ratio (B/C) are expected to significantly reduce errors on cosmic-ray diffusion parameters, with important implications for astroparticle physics, ranging from inferring primary source spectra to indirect dark matter searches. Aims: It is timely to stress, however, that the conclusions obtained crucially depend on the framework in which the data are interpreted as well as on some nuclear input parameters. We aim at assessing the theoretical uncertainties affecting the outcome, with models as simple as possible while still retaining the key dependencies. Methods: We compared different semi-analytical, two-zone model descriptions of cosmic-ray transport in the Galaxy: infinite slab(1D), cylindrical symmetry (2D) with homogeneous sources, cylindrical symmetry (2D) with inhomogeneous source distribution. We tested for the effect of a primary source contamination in the boron flux by parametrically altering its flux. We also tested for nuclear cross-section uncertainties. All hypotheses were compared by χ2 minimisation techniques to preliminary results from AMS-02. Results: We find that the main theoretical bias on the determination of the diffusion coefficient index δ (up to a factor two) is represented by the assumption that no injection of boron takes place at the source. The next most important uncertainty is represented by cross-section uncertainties, which reach ± 20% in δ. As a comparison, nuclear uncertainties are more important than the shift in the best-fit when introducing a convective wind of velocity ≲30 km s-1, with respect to a pure diffusive baseline model. Perhaps surprisingly, homogeneous 1D vs. 2D performances are similar in determining diffusion parameters. An inhomogeneous source

  7. Predicting the Hydrogen Isotope Ratios of Leaf Waxes Across Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipple, B. J.; Berke, M. A.; Hambach, B.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Leaf wax n-alkanes 2H/1H ratios are widely used as a proxy of paleoprecipitation in climate reconstruction. While the broad nature of the relationships between n-alkane δ2H values and climate are appreciated on geologic scales, the quantitative details of what this proxy is reflecting remain ambiguous on plant and ecosystem levels. Areas of uncertainty on these smaller scales of importance to geologic interpretations are both the biosynthetic fractionation and the leaf-growth interval that is recorded by the isotope signal. To clarify these details, we designed a series of experiments in which modern plants were grown under controlled and monitored conditions. To determine the biosynthetic fractionation, we analyzed n-alkanes from plant grown hydroponically on isotopically distinct waters and under contrasting and controlled humidities. We observed δ2H values of n-alkane were linearly related to growth water δ2H values, but with slope differences associated with humidity. These findings suggested leaf water were central controls on δ2H values of n-alkane and support a relatively constant biosynthetic fractionation factor between leaf water and n-alkanes. To determine the interval that the leaf wax isotope signal reflects, we studied a species naturally growing on water with a constant δ2H value. Here we found the δ2H values of n-alkanes recorded only a two-week period during leaf flush and did not vary thereafter. These data indicated the δ2H values of n-alkanes record conditions early in the season, rather than integrating over the entire growing season. Using these data, we are beginning to develop geospatial predictions of the δ2H values of n-alkane across landscapes for given climate conditions, plant phenologies, and ecosystems. These emerging modeling tools may be used to assess modern ecosystem dynamics, to estimate weathering of leaf waxes to geologic repositories, and to define and test paleoclimate reconstructions from the δ2H values of n-alkanes.

  8. Boron Isotope Evidence for Shallow Fluid Transfer Across Subduction Zones by Serpentinized Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scambelluri, M.; Tonarini, S.; Agostini, S.; Cannaò, E.

    2012-12-01

    Boron Isotope Evidence for Shallow Fluid Transfer Across Subduction Zones by Serpentinized Mantle M. Scambelluri (1), S. Tonarini (2), S. Agostini (2), E. Cannaò (1) (1) Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Ambiente e vita, University of Genova, Italy (2) Istituto di Geoscienze e Georisorse-CNR, Pisa, Italy In subduction zones, fluid-mediated chemical exchange between slabs and mantle dictates volatile and incompatible element cycles and influences arc magmatism. Outstanding issues concern the sources of water for arc magmas and its slab-to-mantle wedge transport. Does it occur by slab dehydration beneath arc fronts, or by hydration of fore-arc mantle and subsequent subduction of the hydrated mantle? So far, the deep slab dehydration hypothesis had strong support, but the hydrated mantle wedge idea is advancing supported by studies of fluid-mobile elements in serpentinized wedge peridotites and their subducted high-pressure (HP) equivalents. Serpentinites are volatile and fluid-mobile element reservoirs for subduction: their dehydration causes large fluid and element flux to the mantle.However, direct evidence for their key role in arc magmatism and identification of dehydration environments has been elusive and boron isotopes can trace the process. Until recently, the altered oceanic crust (AOC) was considered the 11B reservoir for arcs, which largely display positive δ11B. However, shallow slab dehydration transfers 11B to the fore-arc mantle and leaves the residual AOC very depleted in 11B below arcs. Here we present high positive δ11B of HP serpentinized peridotites from Erro Tobbio (Ligurian Alps), recording subduction metamorphism from hydration at low-grade to eclogite-facies dehydration. We show a connection among serpentinite dehydration, release of 11B-rich fluids and arc magmatism. The dataset is completed by B isotope data on other HP Alpine serpentinites from Liguria and Lanzo Massif. In general, the δ11B of these rocks is heavy (16 to + 30 permil

  9. Carbon, Hydrogen, and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Cellulose from Plants Having Intermediary Photosynthetic Modes 1

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Leonel O'Reilly; Deniro, Michael J.; Ting, Irwin P.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate and oxygen isotope ratios of cellulose from species of greenhouse plants having different photosynthetic modes were determined. When hydrogen isotope ratios are plotted against carbon isotope ratios, four clusters of points are discernible, each representing different photosynthetic modes: C3 plants, C4 plants, CAM plants, and C3 plants that can shift to CAM or show the phenomenon referred to as CAM-cycling. The combination of oxygen and carbon isotope ratios does not distinguish among the different photosynthetic modes. Analysis of the carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate should prove useful for screening different photosynthetic modes in field specimens that grew near one another. This method will be particularly useful for detection of plants which show CAM-cycling. PMID:16663360

  10. Titan's Carbon Isotopic Ratio: A Clue To Atmospheric Evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Jolly, A.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G.; Bézard, B.; Vinatier, S.; Coustenis, A.; Flasar, F. M.

    2009-12-01

    In this presentation we describe the latest results to come from Cassini CIRS and ground-based telescopic measurements of Titan's 12C/13C ratio in atmospheric molecules, focusing on hydrocarbons. Previously, the Huygens GCMS instrument measured 12CH4/13CH4 to be 82±1 (Niemann et al., Nature, 438, 779-784, 2005), substantially and significantly lower than the VPDB inorganic Earth standard of 89.4. It is also at odds with measurements for the giant planets. Cassini CIRS infrared spectra have confirmed this enhancement in 13CH4, but also revealed that the ratio in ethane, the major photochemical product of methane photolysis, does not appear enhanced (90±7) (Nixon et al.. Icarus, 195, 778-791, 2008) and is compatible with the terrestrial and combined giant planet value (88±7, Sada et al., Ap. J., 472, p. 903-907, 1996). Recently-published results from spectroscopy using the McMath-Pierce telescope at Kitt Pitt (Jennings et al., JCP, 2009, in press) have confirmed this deviation between methane and ethane, and an explanation has been proposed. This invokes a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) in the abstraction of methane by ethynyl, a major ethane formation pathway, to preferentially partition 12C into ethane and leave an enhancement in atmospheric 13CH4 relative to the incoming flux from the reservoir. Modeling shows that a steady-state solution exists where the 12C/13C methane is decreased from the reservoir value by exactly the KIE factor (the ratio of 12CH4 to 13CH4 abstraction reaction rates): which is plausibly around 1.08, very close to the observed amount. However, a second solution exists in which we are observing Titan about ~1 methane lifetime after a major injection of methane into the atmosphere which is rapidly being eliminated. Updated measurements by Cassini CIRS of both the methane and ethane 12C/13C ratios will be presented, along with progress in interpreting this ratio. In addition, we summarize the 12C/13C measurements by CIRS in multiple other Titan

  11. Nitrogen isotopic analyses by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, D. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Amino acids containing natural-abundance levels of 15N were derivatized and analyzed isotopically using a technique in which individual compounds are separated by gas chromatography, combusted on-line, and the product stream sent directly to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For samples of N2 gas, standard deviations of ratio measurement were better than 0.1% (Units for delta are parts per thousand or per million (%).) for samples larger than 400 pmol and better than 0.5% for samples larger than 25 pmol (0.1% 15N is equivalent to 0.00004 atom % 15N). Results duplicated those of conventional, batchwise analyses to within 0.05%. For combustion of organic compounds yielding CO2/N2 ratios between 14 and 28, in particular for N-acetyl n-propyl derivatives of amino acids, delta values were within 0.25% of results obtained using conventional techniques and standard deviations were better than 0.35%. Pooled data for measurements of all amino acids produced an accuracy and precision of 0.04 and 0.23%, respectively, when 2 nmol of each amino acid was injected on column and 20% of the stream of combustion products was delivered to the mass spectrometer.

  12. Detailed assessment of isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the stable isotope analysis of plant and soil waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Xiao, H.; Zhou, J.; Wang, L.; Cheng, G.; Zhou, M.; Yin, L.; McCabe, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    As an alternative to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) the isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) approach has the advantage of low cost, continuous measurement and capacity for field based application for the analysis of stable water isotopes. Recent studies have indicated that there are potential issues of organic contamination of the spectral signal in the IRIS method, resulting in errant readings for leaf samples. To gain a more thorough understanding of the effects of sample type (e.g., leaf, root, stem and soil), sample species, sampling time and climatic condition (dry vs. wet) on water isotope estimates using IRIS, we collected soil samples and plant components from a number of major species at a fine temporal resolution (every two hours for 24-48 hours) across three locations with different climatic conditions in the Heihe River Basin, China. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of the extracted water from these samples was measured using both an IRMS and IRIS instrument. Results show that the mean discrepancy between the IRMS and IRIS approach, for δ18O and δD respectively, was: -5.6% and -75.7% for leaf water; -4.0% and -23.3% for stem water; -3.4% and -28.2% for root water; -6.7% and -0.5% for xylem water; -0.06% and -0.3% for xylem flow; and -0.1% and 0.3% for soil water. The order of the discrepancy followed: leaf > stem ≈ root > xylem > xylem flow ≈ soil. In general, species of the same functional types (e.g., woody vs. herbaceous) within similar habitats showed similar deviations. For different functional types, the differences were large. Sampling during the nighttime did not remove the observed deviations.

  13. Detailed assessment of isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the stable isotope analysis of plant and soil waters.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liangju; Xiao, Honglang; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Lixin; Cheng, Guodong; Zhou, Maoxian; Yin, Li; McCabe, Matthew F

    2011-10-30

    As an alternative to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), the isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) approach has the advantage of low cost, continuous measurement and the capacity for field-based application for the analysis of the stable isotopes of water. Recent studies have indicated that there are potential issues of organic contamination of the spectral signal in the IRIS method, resulting in incorrect results for leaf samples. To gain a more thorough understanding of the effects of sample type (e.g., leaf, root, stem and soil), sample species, sampling time and climatic condition (dry vs. wet) on water isotope estimates using IRIS, we collected soil samples and plant components from a number of major species at a fine temporal resolution (every 2 h for 24-48 h) across three locations with different climatic conditions in the Heihe River Basin, China. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the extracted water from these samples were measured using both an IRMS and an IRIS instrument. The results show that the mean discrepancies between the IRMS and IRIS approaches for δ(18) O and δD, respectively, were: -5.6‰ and -75.7‰ for leaf water; -4.0‰ and -23.3‰ for stem water; -3.4‰ and -28.2‰ for root water; -0.5‰ and -6.7‰ for xylem water; -0.06‰ and -0.3‰ for xylem flow; and -0.1‰ and 0.3‰ for soil water. The order of the discrepancy was: leaf > stem ≈ root > xylem > xylem flow ≈ soil. In general, species of the same functional types (e.g., woody vs. herbaceous) within similar habitats showed similar deviations. For different functional types, the differences were large. Sampling at nighttime did not remove the observed deviations. PMID:21953962

  14. On-site isotopic analysis of dissolved inorganic carbon using an isotope ratio infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltmann, Tim; Mandic, Magda; Stöbener, Nils; Wapelhorst, Eric; Aepfler, Rebecca; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Taubner, Heidi; Jost, Hj; Elvert, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    An Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer (IRIS) has been adapted to perform measurements of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in marine pore waters. The resulting prototype allowed highly automated analysis of δ13C isotopic ratios and CO2 concentration. We achieved a throughput of up to 70 samples per day with DIC contents as low as 1.7 μmol C. We achieved an internal precision of 0.066 ‰ and an external precision of 0.16 ‰, which is comparable to values given for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometers (IRMS). The prototype instrument is field deployable, suitable for shipboard analysis of deep sea core pore waters. However, the validation of the prototype was centered around a field campaign in Eckernförde Bay, NW- Baltic Sea. As a proof of concept, a shallow site within an area of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and a site outside this area was investigated. We present profiles of δ13C of DIC over 50 cm exhibiting well understood methane turnover processes (anaerobic oxidation of methane). At the lowest point below the seafloor, microbial reduction of CO2 to CH4 dominates. 12CO2 is reduced preferentially over 13CO2, leading to more positive δ13C values in the remaining DIC pool; in layers closer to the surface, the oxidation of CH4 to CO2 becomes more prominent. Since the CH4 pool is enriched in 12C a shift to more negative δ13C can be observed in the DIC pool. In the upper 15 cm, the pore water DIC mixes with the sea water DIC, increasing δ13C again. Finally, we will present recent developments to further improve performance and future plans for deployments on research cruises.

  15. ISOTOPIC RATIOS IN TITAN's METHANE: MEASUREMENTS AND MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Temelso, B.; Vinatier, S.; Bezard, B.; Coustenis, A.; Teanby, N. A.; Mandt, K. E.; Sherrill, C. D.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Flasar, F. M.

    2012-04-20

    The existence of methane in Titan's atmosphere ({approx}6% level at the surface) presents a unique enigma, as photochemical models predict that the current inventory will be entirely depleted by photochemistry in a timescale of {approx}20 Myr. In this paper, we examine the clues available from isotopic ratios ({sup 12}C/{sup 13}C and D/H) in Titan's methane as to the past atmosphere history of this species. We first analyze recent infrared spectra of CH{sub 4} collected by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer, measuring simultaneously for the first time the abundances of all three detected minor isotopologues: {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 12}CH{sub 3}D, and {sup 13}CH{sub 3}D. From these we compute estimates of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C = 86.5 {+-} 8.2 and D/H = (1.59 {+-} 0.33) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, in agreement with recent results from the Huygens GCMS and Cassini INMS instruments. We also use the transition state theory to estimate the fractionation that occurs in carbon and hydrogen during a critical reaction that plays a key role in the chemical depletion of Titan's methane: CH{sub 4} + C{sub 2}H {yields} CH{sub 3} + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. Using these new measurements and predictions we proceed to model the time evolution of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C and D/H in Titan's methane under several prototypical replenishment scenarios. In our Model 1 (no resupply of CH{sub 4}), we find that the present-day {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C implies that the CH{sub 4} entered the atmosphere 60-1600 Myr ago if methane is depleted by chemistry and photolysis alone, but much more recently-most likely less than 10 Myr ago-if hydrodynamic escape is also occurring. On the other hand, if methane has been continuously supplied at the replenishment rate then the isotopic ratios provide no constraints, and likewise for the case where atmospheric methane is increasing. We conclude by discussing how these findings may be combined with other evidence to constrain the overall history of the atmospheric

  16. Isotopic Ratios in Titan's Methane: Measurements and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Temelso, B.; Vinatier, S.; Teanby, N. A.; Bezard, B.; Achterberg, R. K.; Mandt, K. E.; Sherrill, C. D.; Irwin, P. G.; Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Coustenis, A.; Flasar, F. M.

    2012-01-01

    The existence of methane in Titan's atmosphere (approx. 6% level at the surface) presents a unique enigma, as photochemical models predict that the current inventory will be entirely depleted by photochemistry in a timescale of approx 20 Myr. In this paper, we examine the clues available from isotopic ratios (C-12/C-13 and D/H) in Titan's methane as to the past atmosphere history of this species. We first analyze recent infrared spectra of CH4 collected by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer, measuring simultaneously for the first time the abundances of all three detected minor isotopologues: (13)CH4, (12)CH3D, and (13)CH3D. From these we compute estimates of C-12/C-13 = 86.5 +/- 8.2 and D/H = (1.59 +/- 0.33) x 10(exp -4) , in agreement with recent results from the Huygens GCMS and Cassini INMS instruments. We also use the transition state theory to estimate the fractionation that occurs in carbon and hydrogen during a critical reaction that plays a key role in the chemical depletion of Titan's methane: CH4 + C2H yields CH3 + C2H2. Using these new measurements and predictions we proceed to model the time evolution of C-12/C-13 and D/H in Titan's methane under several prototypical replenishment scenarios. In our Model 1 (no resupply of CH4), we find that the present-day C-12/C-13 implies that the CH4 entered the atmosphere 60-1600 Myr ago if methane is depleted by chemistry and photolysis alone, but much more recently-most likely less than 10 Myr ago-if hydrodynamic escape is also occurring. On the other hand, if methane has been continuously supplied at the replenishment rate then the isotopic ratios provide no constraints, and likewise for the case where atmospheric methane is increasing, We conclude by discussing how these findings may be combined with other evidence to constrain the overall history of the atmospheric methane.

  17. Enhanced thermal conductivity and isotope effect in single-layer hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broido, David; Lindsay, Lucas

    2012-02-01

    We have calculated the lattice thermal conductivity, k, of both naturally occurring and isotopically enriched single layers of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) as well as bulk h-BN using an exact numerical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation for phonons [1]. Good agreement is obtained with measured bulk h-BN data [2], and the stronger phonon-phonon scattering identified in these systems explains why their k values are significantly lower than those in graphene and graphite. A reduction in such scattering in the single layer arising mainly from a symmetry-based selection rule leads to a substantial increase in k, with calculated room temperature values of more than 600 W/m-K. Additional enhancement is obtained from isotopic enrichment, which exhibits a strong peak as a function of temperature, with magnitude growing rapidly with crystallite size. [1] L. Lindsay and D. A. Broido, Phys. Rev. B 84, 155421 (2011). [2] E. K. Sichel, R. E. Miller, M. S. Abrahams, and C. J. Buiocchi, Phys. Rev. B 13, 4607 (1976).

  18. A new method for calibrating a boron isotope paleo-pH proxy using massive Porites corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Kaoru; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2015-09-01

    The boron isotope ratio (δ11B) of marine biogenic carbonates can reconstruct pH and pCO2 of seawater, and potentially CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. To date, δ11B-pHSW calibration has been proposed via culturing experiments, where calcifying organisms are cultured under artificially acidified seawater. However, in scleractinian corals, reconstructed pH values using culture-based calibrations do not agree well with actual observations of seawater CO2 chemistry. Thus, another approach is needed to establish a more reliable calibration method. In this study, we established field-based calibrations for Chichijima and Tahiti, both located in subtropical gyres where surface seawater is close to CO2 equilibrium. We suggest a new approach to calibration of δ11B-pH in which the long-term δ11B variation of massive Porites corals is compared with the decreasing pH trend (i.e., ocean acidification) that has occurred since the Industrial Revolution. This calibration will offer a new avenue for studying seawater CO2 chemistry using coral δ11B in diverse settings, such as upwelling regions, coral reefs, and coastal areas.

  19. Boron contents and isotopic compositions of hog manure, selected fertilizers, and water in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Komor, S.C.

    1997-01-01

    Boron-isotope (δ11B) values may be useful as surrogate tracers of contaminants and indicators of water mixing in agricultural settings. This paper characterizes the B contents and isotopic compositions of hog manure and selected fertilizers, and presents δ11B data for ground and surface water from two agricultural areas. Boron concentrations in dry hog manure averaged 61 mg/kg and in commercial fertilizers ranged from below detection limits in some brands of ammonium nitrate and urea to 382 mg/kg in magnesium sulfate. Values of δ11B of untreated hog manure ranged from 7.2 to 11.2o/oo and of N fertilizers were −2.0 to 0.7o/oo. In 22 groundwater samples from a sand-plain aquifer in east-central Minnesota, B concentrations averaged 0.04 mg/L and δ11B values ranged from 2.3 to 41.5o/oo. Groundwater beneath a hog feedlot and a cultivated field where hog manure was applied had B-isotope compositions consistent with the water containing hog-manure leachate. In a 775-km2 watershed with silty-loam soils in southcentral Minnesota: 18 samples of subsurface drainage from corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) fields had average B concentrations of 0.06 mg/L and δ11B values of 5.3 to 15.1o/oo; 27 stream samples had average B concentrations of 0.05 mg/L and δ11B values of 1.0 to 19.0o/oo; and eight groundwater samples had average B concentrations of 0.09 mg/L and δ11B values of −0.3 to 23.0o/oo. Values of δ11B and B concentrations, when plotted against one another, define a curved mixing trend that suggests subsurface drainage and stream water contain mixtures of B from shallow and deep groundwater.

  20. Effects of carbonate leaching on foraminifer stable isotopes ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrochta, S.; Yokoyama, Y.; Sakai, S.; Ishimura, T.

    2011-12-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios were measured on 125 individual epifaunal and infaunal benthic foraminifers from two discrete Holocene intervals in a shallow-water sediment core (~ 450 m) from the Timor Sea. Methane seeps are common in the area, resulting in significant precipitation of secondary calcite that is confirmed by SEM photomicrographs and has likely resulted in inconsistent downcore results. To assess the degree of removal of contaminants, individual Uvigerina peregrina were subjected to varying degrees of pretreatment prior to analysis. All foraminifers received standard cleaning with ethanol and brief sonication. A subset were further cleaned and sonicated in a dilute HCl solution (~ 0.003 M). Foraminifer tests were photographed using both reflected light and scanning electron microscopes during the course of treatment to monitor the changing degree of contaminant removal as increasingly aggressive cleaning methods were employed. Visible contamination remained on individuals not subjected to HCl treatment. The leached individuals exhibit a lower overall relative standard deviation and consistent results within morphotype groups. Based on these results, a 2% value is expected to be typical of the Holocene, though further downcore analyses are pending restoration of equipment adversely effected by the Eastern Japan 3/11 earthquake.

  1. Areal Distribution of the Oxygen-Isotope Ratio in Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Giovinetto, Mario B.

    1997-01-01

    Mean values of the oxygen-isotope ratio relative to standard mean ocean water reported for 46 sites on the Greenland ice sheet are compiled together with data on mean annual surface temperature, latitude, 6180 elevation, and mean annual shortest distance to the open ocean denoted by the 10% sea-ice concentration boundary. Stepwise regression analyses, with 6180 as the dependent variable, define two robust models. In the forward mode at the 99.9% confidence level, only temperature enters the model. In the backward mode at the 95% confidence level, only temperature, latitude, and distance to the open ocean remain in the model. Inversions of the models on the basis of 160 gridpoint locations 100 km apart in the area delimited by the surface equilibrium line produce four contoured distributions of 6"0. Two distributions are based on the bivariate model and two on the multivariate model. The second distribution for each model is obtained substituting mean annual surface-temperature values obtained from the Nimbus-7 Temperature Humidity Infrared Radiometer (THIR) database. All four distributions are considered valid, and differences between them are evaluated using contoured anomaly maps. It is suggested that the inversion of the multivariate model using THIR data provides the more reliable pattern for studies of atmospheric advection or for the derivation of ice-flow adjustments for 6180 series obtained from deep-core or ablation-zone sites.

  2. Discrepancies between isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the stable isotope analysis of plant and soil waters.

    PubMed

    West, Adam G; Goldsmith, Gregory R; Brooks, Paul D; Dawson, Todd E

    2010-07-30

    The use of isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) for the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope analysis of water is increasing. While IRIS has many advantages over traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), it may also be prone to errors that do not impact upon IRMS analyses. Of particular concern is the potential for contaminants in the water sample to interfere with the spectroscopy, thus leading to erroneous stable isotope data. Water extracted from plant and soil samples may often contain organic contaminants. The extent to which contaminants may interfere with IRIS and thus impact upon data quality is presently unknown. We tested the performance of IRIS relative to IRMS for water extracted from 11 plant species and one organic soil horizon. IRIS deviated considerably from IRMS for over half of the samples tested, with deviations as large as 46 per thousand (delta(2)H) and 15.4 per thousand (delta(18)O) being measured. This effect was reduced somewhat by using activated charcoal to remove organics from the water; however, deviations as large as 35 per thousand (delta(2)H) and 11.8 per thousand (delta(18)O) were still measured for these cleaned samples. Interestingly, the use of activated charcoal to clean water samples had less effect than previously thought for IRMS analyses. Our data show that extreme caution is required when using IRIS to analyse water samples that may contain organic contaminants. We suggest that the development of new cleaning techniques for removing organic contaminants together with instrument-based software to flag potentially problematic samples are necessary to ensure accurate plant and soil water analyses using IRIS. PMID:20552579

  3. Environmental controls on stable isotope ratios in New Zealand Podocarpaceae: Implications for palaeoclimate reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, Marianne J.; Baldini, James U. L.; Gröcke, Darren R.

    2014-09-01

    Stable isotope ratios of various proxies are widely used for palaeoclimate reconstruction, and it is often assumed that isotope ratios reflect vegetation abundance or type. However, very little research exists on the isotopic equilibration of extant biomes under variable environmental conditions. In this study, carbon and oxygen isotope ratios from leaves of various Podocarpaceae genera, endemic to New Zealand, are linked to environmental parameters from the Land Environments New Zealand model. The dominant influence on stable isotope ratios within the majority of Podocarpaceae studied here is vapour pressure deficit (VPD). A simple latitudinal trend does not exist, and neither temperature nor rainfall (decoupled from VPD) controls the stable isotope ratios. The results suggest that modern spatial heterogeneity in VPD affects the stable isotope values of vegetation, and that historic VPD variability would change the stable isotope ratios of Podocarpaceae without necessitating a change in vegetation type, density, or productivity. This represents an alternative model for temporal isotope change within geochemical proxies and reinforces the need for increased stable isotopic research in modern plant ecosystems to better understand modern, and eventually palaeoclimatic processes affecting the terrestrial biosphere.

  4. A study of galactic cosmic ray propagation models based on the isotopic composition of the elements lithium, beryllium and boron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, G. F.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Greiner, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    A good test for a cosmic ray propagation model is its ability to predict the abundances of the light secondary nuclei lithium, beryllium, and boron. By using measured isotopic abundances of lithium, beryllium, and boron, Garcia-Munoz et al. (1979) were able to place limits on three important parameters of a leaky box propagation model. The considered parameters include the source spectral parameter, the leakage mean free path, and the characteristic adiabatic energy loss due to solar modulation. The present investigation is concerned with a critical evaluation of the information which can be deduced about these parameters from isotopic composition alone, taking into account the effects of uncertainties in the spallation cross section data.

  5. Alternative Methodology for Boron Isotopic Analysis of CaCO3 by Negative Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, G. S.; Vengosh, A.

    2012-12-01

    Negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry (NTIMS) has been a common tool for investigating boron isotopes in CaCO3 and other environmental samples, the high sensitivity of BO2- ionization enabling measurements of ng levels of boron. However, B isotope measurement by this technique suffers from a number of problems, including: (1) fractionation induced by selective ionization of B isotopes in the mass spectrometer; (2) CNO- interference on mass 42 ([10BO2]-) that may be present in some filament load solutions (such as B-free seawater processed through ion-exchange resin), and (3) potential matrix effects due to widely differing chemistry of samples and standards. Here we examine a potentially improved NTIMS methodology that incudes removal of sample-related calcium (and other cations) by ion exchange and uses an alternative filament loading solution prepared from high-purity single-element solutions of Ca, Mg, Na, and K. Initial results suggest that this new method may offer significant improvement over the more traditional NTIMS approach in which digested CaCO3 samples are directly loaded onto filaments in B-free seawater. Replicate analyses of standards and samples yield a typical standard deviation of approximately 0.3‰ δ11B and boron isotopic compositions comparable to reported or consensus values. Fractionation during analysis has thus far typically been less than 0.5‰ δ11B. The method delivers boron ionization efficiency similar to directly-loaded seawater, and negligible signal at mass 26 (CN-), a proxy for the possible interfering molecular CNO- ion. Standards and samples behave similarly and predictably during filament heating and analysis, thus allowing for fully automated data acquisition, which in turn may increase sample throughput and reduce potential analytical inconsistencies associated with operator-controlled heating and analysis.

  6. Compilation of minimum and maximum isotope ratios of selected elements in naturally occurring terrestrial materials and reagents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Hopple, J.A.; Böhlke, J.K.; Peiser, H.S.; Rieder, S.E.; Krouse, H.R.; Rosman, K.J.R.; Ding, T.; Vocke, R.D., Jr.; Revesz, K.M.; Lamberty, A.; Taylor, P.; De Bievre, P.

    2002-01-01

    Documented variations in the isotopic compositions of some chemical elements are responsible for expanded uncertainties in the standard atomic weights published by the Commission on Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. This report summarizes reported variations in the isotopic compositions of 20 elements that are due to physical and chemical fractionation processes (not due to radioactive decay) and their effects on the standard atomic weight uncertainties. For 11 of those elements (hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, sulfur, chlorine, copper, and selenium), standard atomic weight uncertainties have been assigned values that are substantially larger than analytical uncertainties because of common isotope abundance variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin. For 2 elements (chromium and thallium), recently reported isotope abundance variations potentially are large enough to result in future expansion of their atomic weight uncertainties. For 7 elements (magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, molybdenum, palladium, and tellurium), documented isotope-abundance variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin are too small to have a significant effect on their standard atomic weight uncertainties. This compilation indicates the extent to which the atomic weight of an element in a given material may differ from the standard atomic weight of the element. For most elements given above, data are graphically illustrated by a diagram in which the materials are specified in the ordinate and the compositional ranges are plotted along the abscissa in scales of (1) atomic weight, (2) mole fraction of a selected isotope, and (3) delta value of a selected isotope ratio. There are no internationally distributed isotopic reference materials for the elements zinc, selenium, molybdenum, palladium, and tellurium. Preparation of such materials will help to make isotope ratio measurements among

  7. Stable isotope ratio determination of the origin of vanillin in vanilla extracts and its relationship to vanillin/potassium ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, G.E.; Alfonso, F.C.; Figert, D.M.; Burggraff, J.M.

    1981-09-01

    A method is described for isolating vanillin from vanilla extract, followed by stable isotope ratio analysis to determine the amount of natural vanillin contained in adulterated vanilla extracts. After the potassium content is determined, the percent Madagascar and/or Java vanilla beans incorporated into the extract may then be approximated from the vanillin/potassium ratio.

  8. Dynamical and Microphysical Controls on Subtropical Water Vapor Isotope Ratios: Using New Spectroscopic Measurements to Link Isotopic and Climatic Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raudzens Bailey, A.; Nusbaumer, J. M.; Sato, P.; Noone, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Water vapor isotope ratios are critical in shaping the isotopic composition of paleo-proxies used to interpret past climate. Indeed, previous research suggests speleothems are sensitive to water vapor transport, and experiments currently underway are evaluating the role of Greenlandic vapor in setting the isotopic record of the ice sheet. The recent and rapid spread of commercial vapor isotopic analyzers—based on cavity-enhanced near-infrared laser absorption spectroscopy—is creating unparalleled opportunities to elucidate which climatic factors control the vapor isotopic composition globally. This presentation describes both an exciting application of this new technology and relevant limitations imposed by measurement uncertainties associated with long-term field deployments. Using three years of continuous water vapor isotope ratio observations from Hawaii's Mauna Loa Observatory—one of the longest records of its kind—we evaluate the influence of large-scale dynamics and cloud microphysical processes in establishing the isotopic composition of water vapor during strong convective activity. Despite the fact that vapor isotope ratios tend to decrease with latitude, greater enrichment in Mauna Loa vapor is associated with a westward retraction of the jet stream, which funnels Asiatic outflow southward, while greater depletion is associated with southwesterly low-level flow. Differences in precipitation efficiency—which are verified by differences in aerosol concentration and total scattering—cause this apparent discrepancy. These results suggest local cloud and precipitation processes are more influential than airmass origin in setting the isotope ratios observed during these strong convective events. The length of the Mauna Loa record, meanwhile, presents a unique opportunity to evaluate long-term stability of biases associated with laser-based isotopic analyzers and to discuss calibration strategies best suited for monitoring programs designed to

  9. Processes for the "vital effect" of Porites corals as revealed by microanalysis of oxygen, carbon and boron isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollion-Bard, C.; Chaussidon, M.; France-Lanord, C.

    2003-04-01

    Since the discovery by Knutson et al. (1972) of annual banding in massive corals, they have intensively been used to provide paleoclimate reconstructions. The oxygen isotopic composition (18O) of coral aragonite skeletons is a function of sea surface temperature (SST) and salinity (SSS) through the 18O of the seawater in which the carbonate precipitates and pH of the calcifying fluid. Carbon cycle in hermatypic corals is relatively complex because of the interaction between symbiotic algae (zooxanthellae) and coral (Goreau, 19777). Coral 13C seems to be under influence of the ratio between algae photosynthesis and algae and coral respiration (Swart, 1983). The carbonate deposited by some foraminifera and scleractinian corals is depleted 13C and 18O relative to isotope equilibrium with ambient seawater. This deviation of the biogenic carbonate - water fractionation from the inorganic fractionation is called the "vital effect" (Urey et al., 1951). Different explanations for the vital effect are proposed: (1) McConnaughey (1989) attributes the coral disequilibria to kinetic effects. (2) Spero et al. (1997) and Zeebe (1999) consider that the carbonate depletion in 18O is due to [CO32-] or pH variations. The carbon isotopic disequilibrium would be due, in this case, to 13C depleted metabolic DIC incorporation coming from the respiration. The micrometer scale analysis by ion microprobe of B, C and O isotopic compositions can allow to better understand responsible process(es) of the vital effect and the existence of a great diversity in 18O - SST calibrations for differents colonies of the same species. These analyses show that 11B and 18O of coral skeleton have a great variability at micrometer scale (10 and 12 , respectively), whereas 13C have no so important variations and that all the values are in the range of 13C measured by "classical" method (acid digestion and mass spectrometry). Thus the in

  10. Spatial and Temporal Trends in Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Juvenile Winter Flounder

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isotopic ratios of fish otoliths have been used in numerous studies as natural tags or markers to aid the study of connectivity among fish populations. We investigated the use of spatial and temporal changes in the stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of otoliths to different...

  11. Liquid and gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the determination of 13C-valine isotopic ratios in complex biological samples.

    PubMed

    Godin, Jean-Philippe; Breuillé, Denis; Obled, Christiane; Papet, Isabelle; Schierbeek, Henk; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Fay, Laurent-Bernard

    2008-10-01

    On-line gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) is commonly used to measure isotopic ratios at natural abundance as well as for tracer studies in nutritional and medical research. However, high-precision (13)C isotopic enrichment can also be measured by liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS). Indeed, LC-IRMS can be used, as shown by the new method reported here, to obtain a baseline separation and to measure (13)C isotopic enrichment of underivatised amino acids (Asp, Thr-Ser, Glu, Pro, Gly, Ala, Cys and Val). In case of Val, at natural abundance, the SD(delta(13)C) reported with this method was found to be below 1 per thousand . Another key feature of the new LC-IRMS method reported in this paper is the comparison of the LC-IRMS approach with the conventional GC-C-IRMS determination. To perform this comparative study, isotopic enrichments were measured from underivatised Val and its N(O, S)-ethoxycarbonyl ethyl ester derivative. Between 0.0 and 1.0 molar percent excess (MPE) (delta(13)C= -12.3 to 150.8 per thousand), the calculated root-mean-square (rms) of SD was 0.38 and 0.46 per thousand and the calculated rms of accuracy was 0.023 and 0.005 MPE, respectively, for GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS. Both systems measured accurately low isotopic enrichments (0.002 atom percent excess (APE)) with an SD (APE) of 0.0004. To correlate the relative (delta(13)C) and absolute (atom%, APE and MPE) isotopic enrichment of Val measured by the GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS devices, mathematical equations showing the slope and intercept of the curves were established and validated with experimental data between 0.0 to 2.3 MPE. Finally, both GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS instruments were also used to assess isotopic enrichment of protein-bound (13)C-Val in tibial epiphysis in a tracer study performed in rats. Isotopic enrichments measured by LC-IRMS and GC-C-IRMS were not statistically different (p>0.05). The results of this work indicate that

  12. Boron isotopic composition of fumarolic condensates from some volcanoes in Japanese island arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Masao; Kanzaki, Tadao; Ozawa, Takejiro; Okamoto, Makoto; Kakihana, Hidetake

    1982-11-01

    Boron samples from 40 fumarolic condensates from volcanoes in the Ryukyu arc (Satsuma Iwo-jima and Shiratori Iwo-yama) and the North-east Japan arc (Usu-shinzan, Showa-shinzan, Esan and Issaikyo-yama) all have 11B /10B ratios close to 4.07. Higher values, from 4.09 to 4.13, were only observed in condensates from volcanoes in the southernmost end of the North-east Japan arc (Nasu-dake), the northern part of the Izu-Bonin arc (Hakone), and the North Mariana arc (Ogasawara Iwo-jima). These higher values suggest geological interaction of the magmas with sea-water enriched in 11B.

  13. Forensic Applications of Light-Element Stable Isotope Ratios of Ricinus communis Seeds and Ricin Preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; West, Jason B.; Ehleringer, James

    2013-01-01

    Seeds of the castor plant Ricinus communis, also known as castor beans, are of forensic interest because they are the source of the poison ricin. We have tested whether stable isotope ratios of castor seeds and ricin prepared by various methods can be used as a forensic signature. We collected over 300 castor seed samples from locations around the world and measured the C, N, O, and H stable isotope ratios of the whole seeds, oil, and three types of ricin preparations. Our results demonstrate that N isotope ratios can be used to correlate ricin prepared by any of these methods to source seeds. Further, stable isotope ratios distinguished >99% of crude and purified ricin protein samples in pair-wise comparison tests. Stable isotope ratios therefore constitute a valuable forensic signature for ricin preparations.

  14. Carbon isotopic analysis of atmospheric methane by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, Dawn A.; Hayes, J. M.; Des Marais, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Less than 15 min are required for the determination of delta C(sub PDB)-13 with a precision of 0.2 ppt(1 sigma, single measurement) in 5-mL samples of air containing CH4 at natural levels (1.7 ppm). An analytical system including a sample-introduction unit incorporating a preparative gas chromatograph (GC) column for separation of CH4 from N2, O2, and Ar is described. The 15-min procedure includes time for operation of that system, high-resolution chromatographic separation of the CH4, on-line combustion and purification of the products, and isotopic calibration. Analyses of standards demonstrate that systematic errors are absent and that there is no dependence of observed values of delta on sample size. For samples containing 100 ppm or more CH4, preconcentration is not required and the analysis time is less than 5 min. The system utilizes a commercially available, high-sensitivity isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For optimal conditions of smaple handling and combustion, performance of the system is within a factor of 2 of the shot-noise limit. The potential exists therefore for analysis of samples as small as 15 pmol CH4 with a standard deviation of less than 1 ppt.

  15. Boron content and isotopic composition of tektites and impact glasses: Constraints on source regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaussidon, Marc; Koeberl, Christian

    1995-02-01

    Abundances of Li, Be, and B, as well as boron isotopic compositions, were determined in twenty-seven tektite and impact glass samples, using an ion microprobe. Samples included tektites from the Australasian, North American, and Ivory Coast strewn fields, and Aouelloul and Darwin impact glasses. Variations of B abundance and isotopic composition in a flanged australite were also studied. δ 11B variations of only a few permil were found within the australite flange. The isotopic composition shows no correlation with the B contents or with the distance from the rim of the flange. The mean δ 11B value for the flanged australite is very similar to that of Muong-Nong type tektites (-1.9 ± 1.9‰). Thus, vapor fractionation has been unimportant during tektite formation. This is supported by the observation that B contents and the δ 11B values of the different samples from the Australasian tektite strewn field are not correlated with each other. Most tektites show a rather limited range of δ 11B values (-9.3 ± 1.5 to +2.7 ± 1.5%o), which is small compared to the range observed for common terrestrial rocks (-30 to +40‰). The B abundance and isotopic data can be used to place constraints on the tektite source rocks. Australasian tektites have high B and Li abundances; only clay-rich sediments, such as pelagic and neritic sediments, as well as river and deltaic sediments have B contents (up to 100 ppm) and δ 11B values that are in agreement with the range shown by Australasian tektites (-4.9 to + 1.4‰). 10Be and RbSr data indicate continental crustal source rocks and exclude pelagic and neritic sediments. However, deltaic sediments, e.g., from the Mekong river, which are of continental crustal origin, agree with 10Be, RbSr, and B data, and support a possible source locality close to the coast of SE Indochina in the South China Sea. On the other hand, one bediasite sample has a very high δ 11B value of +15.1 ± 2.1‰, requiring the presence of marine

  16. Guidelines and recommended terms for expression of stable-isotope-ratio and gas-ratio measurement results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.

    2011-01-01

    To minimize confusion in the expression of measurement results of stable isotope and gas-ratio measurements, recommendations based on publications of the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) are presented. Whenever feasible, entries are consistent with the Système International d'Unités, the SI (known in English as the International System of Units), and the third edition of the International Vocabulary of Basic and General Terms in Metrology (VIM, 3rd edition). The recommendations presented herein are approved by the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights and are designed to clarify expression of quantities related to measurement of isotope and gas ratios to ensure that quantity equations instead of numerical value equations are used for quantity definitions. Examples of column headings consistent with quantity calculus (also called the algebra of quantities) and examples of various deprecated usages connected with the terms recommended are presented.

  17. Equations for Lipid Normalization of Carbon Stable Isotope Ratios in Aquatic Bird Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Kyle H.; Davis, Mikaela; Elliott, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios are biogeochemical tracers that can be used to determine the source of nutrients and contaminants in avian eggs. However, the interpretation of stable carbon ratios in lipid-rich eggs is complicated because 13C is depleted in lipids. Variation in 13C abundance can therefore be obscured by variation in percent lipids. Past attempts to establish an algebraic equation to correct carbon isotope ratios for lipid content in eggs have been unsuccessful, possibly because they relied partly on data from coastal or migratory species that may obtain egg lipids from different habitats than egg protein. We measured carbon, nitrogen and sulphur stable isotope ratios in 175 eggs from eight species of aquatic birds. Carbon, nitrogen and sulphur isotopes were enriched in lipid-extracted egg samples compared with non extracted egg samples. A logarithmic equation using the C∶N ratio and carbon isotope ratio from the non extracted egg tissue calculated 90% of the lipid-extracted carbon isotope ratios within ±0.5‰. Calculating separate equations for eggs laid by species in different habitats (pelagic, offshore and terrestrial-influenced) improved the fit. A logarithmic equation, rather than a linear equation as often used for muscle, was necessary to accurately correct for lipid content because the relatively high lipid content of eggs compared with muscle meant that a linear relationship did not accurately approximate the relationship between percent lipids and the C∶N ratio. Because lipid extraction alters sulphur and nitrogen isotope ratios (and cannot be corrected algebraically), we suggest that isotopic measurement on bulk tissue followed by algebraic lipid normalization of carbon stable isotope ratio is often a good solution for homogenated eggs, at least when it is not possible to complete separate chemical analyses for each isotope. PMID:24465384

  18. Uranium Isotope Ratios in Modern and Precambrian Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCorte, B.; Planavsky, N.; Wang, X.; Auerbach, D. J.; Knudsen, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Uranium isotopes (δ238U values) are an emerging paleoredox proxy that can help to better understand the redox evolution of Earth's surface environment. Recently, uranium isotopes have been used to reconstruct ocean and atmospheric redox conditions (Montoya-Pino et al., 2010; Brennecka et al., 2011; Kendall et al., 2013; Dahl et al., 2014). However, to date, there have not been studies on paleosols, despite that paleosols are, arguably better suited to directly tracking the redox conditions of the atmosphere. Sedimentary δ238U variability requires the formation of the soluble, oxidized form of U, U(VI). The formation of U(VI) is generally thought to require oxygen levels orders of magnitude higher than prebiotic levels. Without significant U mobility, it would have been impossible to develop isotopically distinct pools of uranium in ancient Earth environments. Conversely, an active U redox cycle leads to significant variability in δ238U values. Here we present a temporally and geographically expansive uranium isotope record from paleosols and modern soils to better constrain atmospheric oxygen levels during the Precambrian. Preliminary U isotope measurements of paleosols are unfractionated (relative to igneous rocks), possibly because of limited fractionation during oxidation (e.g., {Wang, 2015 #478}) or insufficient atmospheric oxygen levels to oxidize U(IV)-bearing minerals in the bedrock. Further U isotope measurements of paleosols with comparison to modern soils will resolve this issue.

  19. Reducing and correcting for contamination of ecosystem water stable isotopes measured by isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Markus; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Lett, Céline; Biron, Philippe; Richard, Patricia; Bariac, Thierry; Seibt, Ulli

    2012-01-30

    Concern exists about the suitability of laser spectroscopic instruments for the measurement of the (18)O/(16)O and (2)H/(1)H values of liquid samples other than pure water. It is possible to derive erroneous isotope values due to optical interference by certain organic compounds, including some commonly present in ecosystem-derived samples such as leaf or soil waters. Here we investigated the reliability of wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) (18)O/(16)O and (2)H/(1)H measurements from a range of ecosystem-derived waters, through comparison with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We tested the residual of the spectral fit S(r) calculated by the CRDS instrument as a means to quantify the difference between the CRDS and IRMS δ-values. There was very good overall agreement between the CRDS and IRMS values for both isotopes, but differences of up to 2.3‰ (δ(18)O values) and 23‰ (δ(2)H values) were observed in leaf water extracts from Citrus limon and Alnus cordata. The S(r) statistic successfully detected contaminated samples. Treatment of Citrus leaf water with activated charcoal reduced, but did not eliminate, δ(2)H(CRDS) - δ(2)H(IRMS) linearly for the tested range of 0-20% charcoal. The effect of distillation temperature on the degree of contamination was large, particularly for δ(2)H values but variable, resulting in positive, negative or no correlation with distillation temperature. S(r) and δ(CRDS) - δ(IRMS) were highly correlated, in particular for δ(2)H values, across the range of samples that we tested, indicating the potential to use this relationship to correct the δ-values of contaminated plant water extracts. We also examined the sensitivity of the CRDS system to changes in the temperature of its operating environment. We found that temperature changes ≥4 °C for δ(18)O values and ≥10 °C for δ(2)H values resulted in errors larger than the CRDS precision for the respective isotopes and advise the use of such

  20. High Acidification Rate of Norwegian Sea Revealed by Boron Isotopes in the Deep-Sea Coral Madrepora Oculata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, C.; Douville, E.; Hall-Spencer, J.; Montagna, P.; Louvat, P.; Gaillardet, J.; Frank, N.; Bordier, L.; Juillet-Leclerc, A.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean acidification and global warming due to the increase of anthropogenic CO2 are major threats for marine calcifying organisms, such as deep-sea corals, particularly in high-latitude regions. In order to evaluate the current anthropogenic perturbation and to properly assess the impacts and responses of calcifiers to previous changes in pH it is critical to investigate past changes of the seawater carbonate system. Unfortunately, current instrumental records of oceanic pH are limited, covering only a few decades. Scleractinian coral skeletons record chemical parameters of the seawater in which they grow. However, pH variability over multidecadal timescales remains largely unknown in intermediate and deep seawater masses. Here we present a study that highlights the potential of deep-sea-corals to overcome the lack of long-term pH records and that emphasizes a rapid acidification of high latitude subsurface waters of Norwegian Sea during the past decades. We have reconstructed seawater pH and temperature from a well dated deep-sea coral specimen Madrepora oculata collected alive from Røst reef in Norwegian Sea (67°N, 9°E, 340 m depth). This large branching framework forming coral species grew its skeleton over more than four decades determined using AMS 14C and 210Pb dating (Sabatier et al. 2012). B-isotopes and Li/Mg ratios yield an acidification rate of about -0.0030±0.0008 pH-unit.year-1 and a warming of 0.3°C during the past four decades (1967-2007). Overall our reconstruction technique agrees well with previous pH calculations (Hönisch et al., 2007 vs. Trotter et al., 2011 and McCulloch et al., 2012, i.e. the iterative method), but additional corrections are here applied using stable isotope correlations (O, C, B) to properly address kinetic fractionation of boron isotopes used for pH reconstruction. The resulting pH curve strongly anti-correlates with the annual NAO index, which further strengthens our evidence for the ocean acidification rate

  1. Boron isotopes in tourmaline from the ca. 3.7-3.8 Ga Isua supracrustal belt, Greenland: Sources for boron in Eoarchean continental crust and seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grew, Edward S.; Dymek, Robert F.; De Hoog, Jan C. M.; Harley, Simon L.; Boak, Jeremy; Hazen, Robert M.; Yates, Martin G.

    2015-08-01

    Boron is highly concentrated in Earth's crust relative to primitive mantle. However, when present-day crustal concentrations were achieved remains debatable. It has been proposed that seawater boron δ11B was lower than at present, consistent with a model relating increase in sea-water δ11B to the proportion of B extracted from Earth's mantle into the oceans and crust. Our in situ ion microprobe analyses of tourmaline in 17 samples from the Eoarchean Isua supracrustal belt, Southwest Greenland, gave the following average δ11B with uncertainties ranging from ±0.4 to ±1.9‰: δ11B = -7.1 to -11.5‰ in amphibolite; δ11B = -10.5 to -25.3‰ in mica schist; δ11B = -19.2‰ in metachert (one sample), and δ11B = -21.9‰ in metaconglomerate (one sample). Tourmaline is largely schorl-dravite, rarely uvite-feruvite, and shows color and compositional zoning. δ11B varies from grain to grain in most samples; grains in a kyanite-staurolite schist are isotopically zoned, possibly because the rims incorporated B released by muscovite breakdown. The patterns in color-zoned tourmaline grains in our samples are not consistent with detrital origin of the cores, which rules out the possibility of there being tourmaline detritus from pre-existing continental crust in the studied samples. The tourmaline-bearing rocks are found in both the ca. 3700 Ma northern and ca. 3800 Ma southern terranes in the Isua supracrustal belt. Following an approach suggested by Chaussidon and Appel, we estimated Eoarchean seawater δ11B by calculating back from δ11B of tourmaline in metasedimentary rocks using fractionation of boron isotopes between clays and muscovite, tourmaline and aqueous fluid. This calculation gave an estimated δ11B ≈ +14 ± 15‰ for Eoarchean seawater, 25‰ lower than present-day seawater (δ11B = +39.5‰). For comparison, an estimate obtained simply by direct comparison of δ11B for Eoarchean and Phanerozoic tourmaline presumed to have crystallized in similar

  2. Self- and dopant diffusion in extrinsic boron doped isotopically controlled silicon multilayer structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, Ian D.; Bracht, Hartmut A.; Silvestri, Hughes H.; Nicols, Samuel P.; Beeman, Jeffrey W.; Hansen, John L.; Nylandsted Larsen, Arne; Haller, Eugene E.

    2002-04-01

    Isotopically controlled silicon multilayer structures were used to measure the enhancement of self- and dopant diffusion in extrinsic boron doped silicon. {sup 30}Si was used as a tracer through a multilayer structure of alternating natural Si and enriched {sup 28}Si layers. Low energy, high resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) allowed for simultaneous measurement of self- and dopant diffusion profiles of samples annealed at temperatures between 850 C and 1100 C. A specially designed ion- implanted amorphous Si surface layer was used as a dopant source to suppress excess defects in the multilayer structure, thereby eliminating transient enhanced diffusion (TED) behavior. Self- and dopant diffusion coefficients, diffusion mechanisms, and native defect charge states were determined from computer-aided modeling, based on differential equations describing the diffusion processes. We present a quantitative description of B diffusion enhanced self-diffusion in silicon and conclude that the diffusion of both B and Si is mainly mediated by neutral and singly positively charged self-interstitials under p-type doping. No significant contribution of vacancies to either B or Si diffusion is observed.

  3. Tracing the strength of the southwest monsoon using boron isotopes in the eastern Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Sushant S.; Divakar Naidu, P.; Foster, Gavin L.; Martínez-Botí, Miguel A.

    2015-03-01

    Here we present the first boron isotope-based pCO2sw (pCO2 of seawater) reconstruction from the eastern Arabian Sea using the planktic foraminifera species Globigerinoides ruber. Our results from sediment core AAS9/21 show that pCO2sw varied between ~160 and 300 µatm during the last 23 kyr. The ΔpCO2, the sea-air pCO2 difference, is relatively small during the last glacial maximum and becomes more negative toward the Holocene, with the exception of a significant excess during the last deglaciation centered on the Bølling-Ållerød. Throughout the record, ΔpCO2 is predominantly negative, probably as a result of enhanced biological productivity (and higher nutrient and carbon utilization) during the southwest monsoon. A reduction in ΔpCO2 during the last glacial maximum is therefore consistent with a reduction in the strength of this monsoon system.

  4. Development and validation of a single collector ICPMS procedure to determine boron isotopeic compositions of water and food samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, Jochen; Rosner, Martin; Pritzkow, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    Authenticity and provenance studies as well as issues in environmental- and geo-sciences are hot topics in nowadays isotope research. Elements being known for their natural isotopic variation, such as lead and strontium, are being used to assign the provenance of artefacts, food and other products. A recent study revealed the potential of boron (B) isotopes for delivering information on the provenance of crop plants. To offer alternative analytical instrumentations beside the classical TIMS procedures a single collector ICPMS procedure for B isotope analyses has been developed and validated. This procedure should enable more B isotope studies, as single collector ICPMS intruments are more widepread in the relevant laboratories compared to TIMS. The developed procedures for the determination of B isotopic compositions use a magnetic sector ICPMS and consist of one low resolution (LR) and one medium resolution (MR) procedure. The absolute standard deviation for the δ11B determination in three independently measured samples lies between 0.2 and 0.8 ‰ for the LR and between 0.3 and 1.5 ‰ for the MR. The expanded uncertainties with a coverage factor of k=2 range between 1.4 and 1.6 ‰ for the LR and between 2.9 and 3.2 ‰ for the MR. The trueness, expressed as average deviation from the reference values, is less than 1.1 ‰ for LR and 0.8 ‰ for MR. To test the practicability of the procedure the matrix tolerance has been investigated. Using a measurement solution containing 100 µg/kg boron a matrix of 2 mg/kg of alkaline and earth alkaline elements was found as a limit for stable instrumental mass discrimination. Thus a highly efficient matrix separation is required, similar to TIMS. The developed procedure is well suited for the for B isotope studies of various matrices and especially the LR procedure offers relatively small uncertainties combined with high sample throughput.

  5. Secondary ionization mass spectrometric analysis of impurity element isotope ratios in nuclear reactor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, D. C.; Cliff, J. B.; Hurley, D. E.; Reid, B. D.; Little, W. W.; Meriwether, G. H.; Wickham, A. J.; Simmons, T. A.

    2006-07-01

    During reactor operations and fuel burn up, some isotopic abundances change due to nuclear reactions and provide sensitive indicators of neutron fluence and fuel burnup. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis has been used to measure isotope ratios of selected impurity elements in irradiated nuclear reactor graphite. Direct SIMS measurements were made in graphite samples, following shaping and surface cleaning. Models predicting local fuel burnup based on isotopic measurements of B and Li isotopes by SIMS agreed well with U and Pu isotopic measurements obtained by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS).

  6. LITHIUM-BERYLLIUM-BORON ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS IN METEORITIC HIBONITE: IMPLICATIONS FOR ORIGIN OF {sup 10}Be AND EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ming-Chang; Nittler, Larry R.; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Lee, Typhoon

    2010-08-10

    NanoSIMS isotopic measurements of Li, Be, and B in individual hibonite grains extracted from the Murchison meteorite revealed that {sup 10}B excesses correlate with the {sup 9}Be/{sup 11}B ratios in {sup 26}Al-free PLAty hibonite Crystals. From these data, an initial {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be = (5.5 {+-} 1.6) x 10{sup -4} (2{sigma}) and {sup 10}B/{sup 11}B = 0.2508 {+-} 0.0015 can be inferred. On the other hand, chondritic boron isotopic compositions were found in {sup 26}Al-bearing Spinel-HIBonite spherules, most likely due to contamination with normal boron. No {sup 7}Li excesses due to {sup 7}Be decay were observed. When combined with previously reported data, the new data yield the best defined {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be = (5.3 {+-} 1.0) x 10{sup -4} (2{sigma}) and {sup 10}B/{sup 11}B = 0.2513 {+-} 0.0012 for PLACs. A comparison of this value and the best constrained {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be = (8.8 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -4} in CV Ca-Al-rich inclusions supports a heterogeneous distribution of {sup 10}Be and its protosolar irradiation origin. We consider two possible irradiation scenarios that could potentially lead to the observed Li-Be-B isotopic compositions in PLACs. Although in situ irradiation of solids with hibonite chemistry seems to provide the simplest explanation, more high quality data will be needed for quantitatively constraining the irradiation history.

  7. Simultaneous stable carbon isotopic analysis of wine glycerol and ethanol by liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cabañero, Ana I; Recio, Jose L; Rupérez, Mercedes

    2010-01-27

    A novel procedure was established for the simultaneous characterization of wine glycerol and ethanol (13)C/(12)C isotope ratio, using liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS). Several parameters influencing separation of glycerol and ethanol from wine matrix were optimized. Results obtained for 35 Spanish samples exposed no significant differences and very strong correlations (r = 0.99) between the glycerol (13)C/(12)C ratios obtained by an alternative method (gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry) and the proposed new methodology, and between the ethanol (13)C/(12)C ratios obtained by the official method (elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry) and the proposed new methodology. The accuracy of the proposed method varied from 0.01 to 0.19 per thousand, and the analytical precision was better than 0.25 per thousand. The new developed LC-IRMS method it is the first isotopic method that allows (13)C/(12)C determination of both analytes in the same run directly from a liquid sample with no previous glycerol or ethanol isolation, overcoming technical difficulties associated with complex sample treatment and improving in terms of simplicity and speed. PMID:20025274

  8. The isotope systematics of a juvenile intraplate volcano: Pb, Nd, and Sr isotope ratios of basalts from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staudigel, H.; Zindler, A.; Hart, S.R.; Leslie, T.; Chen, C.-Y.; Clague, D.

    1984-01-01

    Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios for a representative suite of 15 basanites, alkali basalts, transitional basalts and tholeiites from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii, display unusually large variations for a single volcano, but lie within known ranges for Hawaiian basalts. Nd isotope ratios in alkali basalts show the largest relative variation (0.51291-0.51305), and include the nearly constant tholeiite value ( ??? 0.51297). Pb isotope ratios show similarly large ranges for tholeiites and alkali basalts and continue Tatsumoto's [31] "Loa" trend towards higher 206Pb 204Pb ratios, resulting in a substantial overlap with the "Kea" trend. 206Pb 204Pb ratios for Loihi and other volcanoes along the Loa and Kea trends [31] are observed to correlate with the age of the underlying lithosphere suggesting lithosphere involvement in the formation of Hawaiian tholeiites. Loihi lavas display no correlation of Nd, Sr, or Pb isotope ratios with major element compositions or eruptive age, in contrast with observations of some other Hawaiian volcanoes [38]. Isotope data for Loihi, as well as average values for Hawaiian volcanoes, are not adequately explained by previously proposed two-end-member models; new models for the origin and the development of Hawaiian volcanoes must include mixing of at least three geochemically distinct source regions and allow for the involvement of heterogeneous oceanic lithosphere. ?? 1984.

  9. BOREAS TE-5 Tree Ring and Carbon Isotope Ratio Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Ehleriinger, Jim; Brooks, J. Renee; Flanagan, Larry

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-5 team collected several data sets to investigate the vegetation-atmosphere CO2 and H2O exchange processes. These data include tree ring widths and cellulose carbon isotope data from coniferous trees collected at the BOREAS NSA and SSA in 1993 and 1994 by the BOREAS TE-5 team. Ring width data are provided for both Picea mariana and Pinus banksiana. The carbon isotope data are provided only for Pinus banksiana. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  10. The IRHUM (Isotopic Reconstruction of Human Migration) database - bioavailable strontium isotope ratios for geochemical fingerprinting in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmes, M.; McMorrow, L.; Kinsley, L.; Armstrong, R.; Aubert, M.; Eggins, S.; Falguères, C.; Maureille, B.; Moffat, I.; Grün, R.

    2013-11-01

    Strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) are a key geochemical tracer used in a wide range of fields including archaeology, ecology, food and forensic sciences. These applications are based on the principle that the Sr isotopic ratios of natural materials reflect the sources of strontium available during their formation. A major constraint for current studies is the lack of robust reference maps to evaluate the source of strontium isotope ratios measured in the samples. Here we provide a new dataset of bioavailable Sr isotope ratios for the major geologic units of France, based on plant and soil samples (Pangaea data repository doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.819142). The IRHUM (Isotopic Reconstruction of Human Migration) database is a web platform to access, explore and map our dataset. The database provides the spatial context and metadata for each sample, allowing the user to evaluate the suitability of the sample for their specific study. In addition, it allows users to upload and share their own datasets and data products, which will enhance collaboration across the different research fields. This article describes the sampling and analytical methods used to generate the dataset and how to use and access of the dataset through the IRHUM database. Any interpretation of the isotope dataset is outside the scope of this publication.

  11. The IRHUM (Isotopic Reconstruction of Human Migration) database - bioavailable strontium isotope ratios for geochemical fingerprinting in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmes, M.; McMorrow, L.; Kinsley, L.; Armstrong, R.; Aubert, M.; Eggins, S.; Falguères, C.; Maureille, B.; Moffat, I.; Grün, R.

    2014-03-01

    Strontium isotope ratios (87Sr / 86Sr) are a key geochemical tracer used in a wide range of fields including archaeology, ecology, food and forensic sciences. These applications are based on the principle that the Sr isotopic ratios of natural materials reflect the sources of strontium available during their formation. A major constraint for current studies is the lack of robust reference maps to evaluate the source of strontium isotope ratios measured in the samples. Here we provide a new data set of bioavailable Sr isotope ratios for the major geologic units of France, based on plant and soil samples (Pangaea data repository doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.819142). The IRHUM (Isotopic Reconstruction of Human Migration) database is a web platform to access, explore and map our data set. The database provides the spatial context and metadata for each sample, allowing the user to evaluate the suitability of the sample for their specific study. In addition, it allows users to upload and share their own data sets and data products, which will enhance collaboration across the different research fields. This article describes the sampling and analytical methods used to generate the data set and how to use and access the data set through the IRHUM database. Any interpretation of the isotope data set is outside the scope of this publication.

  12. Improved isotope ratio measurement performance in liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry by removing excess oxygen.

    PubMed

    Hettmann, Elena; Brand, Willi A; Gleixner, Gerd

    2007-01-01

    A low dead volume oxygen scrubbing system was introduced in a commercially available liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) interface to enhance the analytical capability of the system. In the LC/IRMS interface carbon from organic samples is converted into CO(2) inside the mobile phase by wet chemical oxidation using peroxodisulfate (Na(2)S(2)O(8)). After passing the hot reaction zone, surplus oxygen (O(2)) remains dissolved in the liquid phase. Both CO(2) and O(2) diffuse through a transfer membrane into the helium carrier and are transferred to the mass spectrometer. The presence of O(2) in the ion source may have detrimental effects on measurement accuracy and precision as well as on filament lifetime. As a remedy, a new on-line O(2)-removing device has been incorporated into the system. The new O(2) scrubber consists of two parallel hot copper reduction reactors (0.8 mm i.d., active length 120 mm) and a switch-over valve between them. One reactor is regenerated using He/H(2) while the other is actively scavenging O(2) from the gas stream. The capacity of each reduction reactor, expressed as usage time, is between 40 and 50 min. This is sufficient for a single LC run for sugars and organic acids. A further increase of the reduction capacity is accompanied by a peak broadening of about 100%. After switching to a freshly reduced reactor the oxygen background and the delta(13)C values of the reference gas need up to 500 s to stabilize. For repeated injections the delta(13)C values of sucrose remain constant (+/-0.1 per thousand) for about 3000 s. The long-term stability for measurements of sucrose was 0.11 per thousand without the reduction oven and improved slightly to 0.08 per thousand with the reduction oven. The filament lifetime improved by more than 600%, thereby improving the long-term system stability and analytical efficiency. In addition the costs per analysis were reduced considerably. PMID:18041012

  13. In-Vivo Zinc Metabolism by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this chapter is to highlight some of the methodological and technical issues surrounding the in vivo use of stable isotopes and to provide examples of how such studies have advanced our knowledge of human zinc metabolism. The advantages and disadvantages of the currently available in...

  14. Strontium isotope ratios and the origin of anorthosites

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradov, V.I.

    1986-01-01

    Anorthosites are rocks consisting almost completely of calcic plagioclase, usually from andesine to labradorite. They are not widespread, and until recently were of no economic interest. However, with the advance of the new global tectonics, which has excited considerable interest in the structure and composition of upper-mantle rocks, interest in the anorthosites has grown. This has particularly been the case since the discovery of anorthosites on the moon, where they appear to be more widespread than on the earth. Data have recently been obtained on the strontium isotope compositions of anorthosite intrusions in the Dzhugdzhur-Stanovoy zone and in the rocks surrounding them, which have revealed some unexpected features. The paper describes the geological features of anorthosites, initial concepts on strontium isotope geochemistry, strontium isotope compositions of this region, and discusses some genetic consequences from the isotope data. Although the data of this study are insufficient to determine the origin of anorthosites, the data indicate several points which should be considered in following studies. 11 references, 1 figure.

  15. Stable carbon isotope ratios of toluene in the boundary layer and the lower free troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintel, J.; Hösen, E.; Koppmann, R.; Krebsbach, M.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Rohrer, F.

    2013-11-01

    During the field campaign ZEPTER-2 in autumn 2008 whole air samples were collected on board a Zeppelin NT airship in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and the lower free troposphere (LFT) over south-west Germany using the ZEppelin Based Isotope Sampler (ZEBIS). These samples were analysed with respect to volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios using a gas chromatograph combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-C-IRMS). In this study we present results for toluene, one of the major anthropogenic pollutants, which emphasise the viability of isotope ratio measurements in VOC for atmospheric research, especially to study VOC sources or to track both dynamical and chemical processes. In situ measurements of CO mixing ratios on board the Zeppelin NT were used to allocate the air samples either to the PBL or the LFT. In the PBL we observed rather fresh emissions mixing into the background air. We estimated a toluene source isotope ratio of δ13C = -28.2 ± 0.5‰. Samples from the PBL and the LFT were clearly distinguishable by means of their mixing ratio and isotope ratio signatures. Using the concept of the effective kinetic isotope effect, we were able to separate the effects of dilution processes and photochemical degradation in the free troposphere. We calculated the photochemical age of toluene in the atmosphere in two different ways using isotope ratios and mixing ratios. The results differ strongly in the PBL, probably due to mixing processes, but are compatible with each other in the LFT. Here, they correlate with a slope of 0.90±0.31.

  16. Stable carbon isotope ratios of rock varnish organic matter: a new paleoenvironmental indicator.

    PubMed

    Dorn, R I; Deniro, M J

    1985-03-22

    Stable carbon isotope ratios of organic matter in rock varnishes of Holocene age from western North America and the Middle East show a strong association with the environment. This isotopic variability reflects the abundance of plants with different photosynthetic pathways in adjacent vegetation. Analyses of different layers of varnish on late Pleistocene desert landforms indicate that the carbon isotopic composition of varnish organic matter is a paleoenvironmental indicator. PMID:17777781

  17. Chlorine isotope effects from isotope ratio mass spectrometry suggest intramolecular C-Cl bond competition in trichloroethene (TCE) reductive dehalogenation.

    PubMed

    Cretnik, Stefan; Bernstein, Anat; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Löffler, Frank; Elsner, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Chlorinated ethenes are prevalent groundwater contaminants. To better constrain (bio)chemical reaction mechanisms of reductive dechlorination, the position-specificity of reductive trichloroethene (TCE) dehalogenation was investigated. Selective biotransformation reactions (i) of tetrachloroethene (PCE) to TCE in cultures of Desulfitobacterium sp. strain Viet1; and (ii) of TCE to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) in cultures of Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ were investigated. Compound-average carbon isotope effects were -19.0‰ ± 0.9‰ (PCE) and -12.2‰ ± 1.0‰ (TCE) (95% confidence intervals). Using instrumental advances in chlorine isotope analysis by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry, compound-average chorine isotope effects were measured for PCE (-5.0‰ ± 0.1‰) and TCE (-3.6‰ ± 0.2‰). In addition, position-specific kinetic chlorine isotope effects were determined from fits of reactant and product isotope ratios. In PCE biodegradation, primary chlorine isotope effects were substantially larger (by -16.3‰ ± 1.4‰ (standard error)) than secondary. In TCE biodegradation, in contrast, the product cis-DCE reflected an average isotope effect of -2.4‰ ± 0.3‰ and the product chloride an isotope effect of -6.5‰ ± 2.5‰, in the original positions of TCE from which the products were formed (95% confidence intervals). A greater difference would be expected for a position-specific reaction (chloride would exclusively reflect a primary isotope effect). These results therefore suggest that both vicinal chlorine substituents of TCE were reactive (intramolecular competition). This finding puts new constraints on mechanistic scenarios and favours either nucleophilic addition by Co(I) or single electron transfer as reductive dehalogenation mechanisms. PMID:24853618

  18. Multi-collector Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer -- Operational Performance Report

    SciTech Connect

    Appelhans, Anthony D; Olson, John E; Watrous, Matthew G; Ward, Michael B.; Dahl, David A.

    2010-12-01

    This report describes the operational testing of a new magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes seven full-sized discrete dynode electron multipliers operating simultaneously. The instrument includes a newly developed ion dispersion lens that enables the mass dispersed individual isotope beams to be separated sufficiently to allow a full-sized discrete dynode pulse counting multiplier to be used to measure each isotope beam. The performance of the instrument was measured using SRM 996 (244Pu spike) at loadings of 2.4 and 12 fg on resin beads and with SRM 4350B Columbia River Sediment samples. The measured limit of detection (3s) for 240Pu was 3.4 attograms for SRM 996. The limit of quantitation (LOQ), defined as 10 s, was 11.2 attograms. The measured concentration of 239Pu in the CRS standard was 152 ± 6 fg/g.

  19. High Spatial Resolution Isotope Ratio Imaging and 3D Reconstruction of Presolar SiC Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, I. C.; Henkel, T.; Clarke, A.

    2015-07-01

    Presolar SiC grains have been analysed with a new NanoSIMS for isotope ratio measurements of C, N and Si. High spatial resolution imaging suggests that nitrogen isotope heterogeneity within the grains may lead to anomalous results in the literature.

  20. Influence of isotopic re-equilibration on speleothem and fluid inclusion isotope ratios after primary calcite precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, Tobias; Haderlein, Astrid; Weißbach, Therese

    2016-04-01

    Oxygen isotope ratios in speleothems (notably stalagmites) have been used since decades to successfully infer paleotemperatures and deduce paleo-environmental information. In addition, recent technical developments allow to increasingly use fluid inclusions as an archive for drip-water and together with the surrounding calcite as paleothermometer. A basic requirement for isotope data interpretation is the complete knowledge of the fractionation between calcite and fluid. Most laboratory and in-situ cave experiments focus on calcite growth and the isotope fractionation between calcite and feed solution. Potential isotope exchange and re-equilibration processes after the initial deposition have mostly been neglected. However, experiments of Oelkers et al. (2015) showed that the isotope exchange between minerals and fluid can proceed rapidly (within days), even at chemical equilibrium. In hydrous Mg carbonates a similar process of continuous isotope exchange between carbonate and fluid was observed after the carbonate precipitation was completed (Mavromatis et al., 2015). These observations suggest that the isotope ratios of speleothem calcite may be affected by this continuous exchange, likely driving the isotope composition continuously towards equilibrium at the respective cave conditions. In addition, fluid inclusions are suspected to be sensitive to an isotope exchange with the surrounding carbonate highlighting the need to precisely understand and quantify this effect. We assessed the oxygen isotope exchange between calcite and solution at chemical equilibrium conditions with theoretical estimates and laboratory experiments over an intermediate time scale (hours-weeks). A large isotope gradient (~20 ‰)) between solution and calcite was prepared in the experiment to investigate the dynamics of this re-equilibration process. We used a theoretical model based on a Rayleigh fractionation approach and the direct comparison with the experiment to determine

  1. Reconstruction of pH and partial pressure of carbon dioxide during the Mesozoic era period using boron and oxygen isotopic compositions of fresh ammonoids & nautiloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahata, Hodaka; Fukushima, Ayaka; Moriya, Kazuyori; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Tanabe, Kazushige

    2013-04-01

    The increase of partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in the atmosphere induces global warming and ocean acidification at the modern condition. The reconstruction of pCO2 during the geological time is required together with proxy calibration by laboratory experiments to predict the future environments. Boron isotopic ratio is an excellent proxy for pH and the relevant partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the seawater (PCO2). This study is the first to quantify pH dependence of delta 11B of the ammonoids and nautiloids mainly in the Cretaceous and in Jurassic (70-162 Ma), which are expected to be much warmer due to higher PCO2. However, no reliable reconstruction data using foraminiferal delta 11B before Cenozoic era has been reported. We used the very fresh aragonite shells of ammonoids and nautiloids by big advantages. Since aragonite changes into secondary calcite by diagenesis, it is easy and effective to identify the degree of alteration at each sample by measuring calcite/aragonite ratio. Also we carefully conducted the assessment of secondary alteration from three perspectives: 1) Determination of calcite/aragonite ratio by X-ray diffraction (XRD), 2) Observation of microstructures of the nacreous layers by scanning electron microscope (SEM), and 3) Measurement of trace element contents and stable isotope ratios. We conducted high precision boron isotope analysis of biogenic carbonates with +/- 0.1 per mil reproducibility by adopting positive thermal ionization mass spectrometry (P-TIMS) methods. Also we analyzed delta 18O to estimate paleo-temperature, at which biogenic aragonite was formed. Combination of delta 11B and delta 18O of biogenic aragonite in 80 Ma and 86 Ma revealed that deeper dwellers showed lower delta 11B values, which corresponded to lower pH. This feature is consistent with those observed in the modern vertical water column. The respective shallow water temperature was 19.7 and 19.1 centigrade. Based on these results, the

  2. Stable carbon isotope ratios of toluene in the boundary layer and the lower free troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintel, J.; Hösen, E.; Koppmann, R.; Krebsbach, M.

    2013-04-01

    Measurements of stable carbon isotope ratios in VOC are a powerful tool to identify sources or to track both dynamical and chemical processes. During the field campaign ZEPTER-2 in autumn 2008 whole air samples were collected on board a Zeppelin NT airship in the planetary boundary layer and the lower free troposphere over south-west Germany. These samples were analysed with respect to VOC mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios using a gas chromatograph combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometer. In this study we present the results for toluene, one of the major anthropogenic pollutants. In the boundary layer we observed rather fresh emissions mixing into the background and derived a toluene source isotope ratio of δ13C = -28.2 ± 0.5 ‰. Using the concept of the effective kinetic isotope effect, we were able to separate the effects of dilution processes and photochemical degradation in the free troposphere. We estimated the photochemical age of toluene in the atmosphere in two different ways (using isotope ratios and mixing ratios, respectively). The results differ strongly in the planetary boundary layer, probably due to mixing processes, but are compatible with each other in the free troposphere.

  3. Boron isotope evidence for oceanic carbon dioxide leakage during the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Botí, M A; Marino, G; Foster, G L; Ziveri, P; Henehan, M J; Rae, J W B; Mortyn, P G; Vance, D

    2015-02-12

    Atmospheric CO2 fluctuations over glacial-interglacial cycles remain a major challenge to our understanding of the carbon cycle and the climate system. Leading hypotheses put forward to explain glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 variations invoke changes in deep-ocean carbon storage, probably modulated by processes in the Southern Ocean, where much of the deep ocean is ventilated. A central aspect of such models is that, during deglaciations, an isolated glacial deep-ocean carbon reservoir is reconnected with the atmosphere, driving the atmospheric CO2 rise observed in ice-core records. However, direct documentation of changes in surface ocean carbon content and the associated transfer of carbon to the atmosphere during deglaciations has been hindered by the lack of proxy reconstructions that unambiguously reflect the oceanic carbonate system. Radiocarbon activity tracks changes in ocean ventilation, but not in ocean carbon content, whereas proxies that record increased deglacial upwelling do not constrain the proportion of upwelled carbon that is degassed relative to that which is taken up by the biological pump. Here we apply the boron isotope pH proxy in planktic foraminifera to two sediment cores from the sub-Antarctic Atlantic and the eastern equatorial Pacific as a more direct tracer of oceanic CO2 outgassing. We show that surface waters at both locations, which partly derive from deep water upwelled in the Southern Ocean, became a significant source of carbon to the atmosphere during the last deglaciation, when the concentration of atmospheric CO2 was increasing. This oceanic CO2 outgassing supports the view that the ventilation of a deep-ocean carbon reservoir in the Southern Ocean had a key role in the deglacial CO2 rise, although our results allow for the possibility that processes operating in other regions may also have been important for the glacial-interglacial ocean-atmosphere exchange of carbon. PMID:25673416

  4. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient secondary organic aerosols in Toronto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Huang, L.; Moukhtar, S.; Rudolph, J.

    2015-06-01

    A method to quantify concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been applied to study atmospheric nitrophenols in Toronto, Canada. The sampling of five nitrophenols, all primarily formed from the photo-oxidation of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOC), in the gas phase and particulate matter (PM) together and PM alone was conducted. Since all of the target compounds are secondary products, their concentrations in the atmosphere are in the low ng m-3 range and consequently a large volume of air (> 1000 m3) is needed to analyze samples for stable carbon isotope ratios, resulting in sampling periods of typically 24 h. While this extended sampling period increases the representativeness of average values, it at the same time reduces possibilities to identify meteorological conditions or atmospheric pollution levels determining nitrophenol concentrations and isotope ratios. Average measured carbon isotope ratios of the different nitrophenols are between -34 and -33‰, which is well within the range predicted by mass balance calculations. However, the observed carbon isotope ratios cover a range of nearly 9‰, and approximately 20% of the isotope ratios of the products have isotope ratios lower than predicted from the kinetic isotope effect of the first step of the reaction mechanism and the isotope ratio of the precursor. This can be explained by isotope fractionation during reaction steps following the initial reaction of the precursor VOCs with the OH radical. Limited evidence for local production of nitrophenols is observed since sampling was done in the Toronto area, an urban centre with significant anthropogenic emission sources. Strong evidence for significant local formation of nitrophenols is only found for samples collected in summer. On average, the difference in carbon isotope ratios between nitrophenols in the particle phase and in the gas phase is insignificant, but for a limited number of observations in

  5. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient secondary organic aerosols in Toronto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Huang, L.; Moukhtar, S.; Rudolph, J.

    2015-09-01

    A method to quantify concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of secondary organic aerosols has been applied to study atmospheric nitrophenols in Toronto, Canada. The sampling of five nitrophenols, all with substantial secondary formation from the photooxidation of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), was conducted in the gas phase and particulate matter (PM) together and in PM alone. Their concentrations in the atmosphere are in the low ng m-3 range and, consequently, a large volume of air (> 1000 m3) is needed to analyze samples for stable carbon isotope ratios, resulting in sampling periods of typically 24 h. While this extended sampling period increases the representativeness of average values, it at the same time reduces possibilities to identify meteorological conditions or atmospheric pollution levels determining nitrophenol concentrations and isotope ratios. Average measured carbon isotope ratios of the different nitrophenols are between -34 and -33 ‰, which is well within the range predicted by mass balance. However, the observed carbon isotope ratios cover a range of nearly 9 ‰ and approximately 20 % of the isotope ratios of the products have isotope ratios lower than predicted from the kinetic isotope effect of the first step of the reaction mechanism and the isotope ratio of the precursor. This can be explained by isotope fractionation during reaction steps following the initial reaction of the precursor VOCs with the OH radical. Limited evidence for local production of nitrophenols is observed since sampling was done in the Toronto area, an urban center with significant anthropogenic emission sources. Strong evidence for significant local formation of nitrophenols is only found for samples collected in summer. On average, the difference in carbon isotope ratios between nitrophenols in the particle phase and in the gas phase is insignificant, but for a limited number of observations in summer, a substantial difference is observed. This

  6. Temporal trends in nitrogen isotope ratios of winter flounder collected from Rhode Island coastal systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen isotope ratios (15N) were measured in muscle tissue of juvenile winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several estuarine systems along the coast of Rhode Island, USA, including Narragansett Bay, Narrow River and three coastal lagoons. Fish collect...

  7. Accuracy of delta 18O isotope ratio measurements on the same sample by continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The doubly labeled water method is considered the reference method to measure energy expenditure. Conventional mass spectrometry requires a separate aliquot of the same sample to be prepared and analyzed separately. With continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry, the same sample could be analy...

  8. Oxidative Unzipping and Transformation of High Aspect Ratio Boron Nitride Nanotubes into "White Graphene Oxide" Platelets.

    PubMed

    Nautiyal, Pranjal; Loganathan, Archana; Agrawal, Richa; Boesl, Benjamin; Wang, Chunlei; Agarwal, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and chemical transformations in boron nitride nanotubes under high temperature atmospheric conditions is probed in this study. We report atmospheric oxygen induced cleavage of boron nitride nanotubes at temperatures exceeding 750 °C for the first time. Unzipping is then followed by coalescence of these densely clustered multiple uncurled ribbons to form stacks of 2D sheets. FTIR and EDS analysis suggest these 2D platelets to be Boron Nitride Oxide platelets, with analogous structure to Graphene Oxide, and therefore we term them as "White Graphene Oxide" (WGO). However, not all BNNTs deteriorate even at temperatures as high as 1000 °C. This leads to the formation of a hybrid nanomaterial system comprising of 1D BN nanotubes and 2D BN oxide platelets, potentially having advanced high temperature sensing, radiation shielding, mechanical strengthening, electron emission and thermal management applications due to synergistic improvement of multi-plane transport and mechanical properties. This is the first report on transformation of BNNT bundles to a continuous array of White Graphene Oxide nanoplatelet stacks. PMID:27388704

  9. Graphite Isotope Ratio Method Development Report: Irradiation Test Demonstration of Uranium as a Low Fluence Indicator

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, B.D.; Gerlach, D.C.; Love, E.F.; McNeece, J.P.; Livingston, J.V.; Greenwood, L.R.; Petersen, S.L.; Morgan, W.C.

    1999-10-20

    This report describes an irradiation test designed to investigate the suitability of uranium as a graphite isotope ratio method (GIRM) low fluence indicator. GIRM is a demonstrated concept that gives a graphite-moderated reactor's lifetime production based on measuring changes in the isotopic ratio of elements known to exist in trace quantities within reactor-grade graphite. Appendix I of this report provides a tutorial on the GIRM concept.

  10. Stable isotope ratios of tap water in the contiguous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Gabriel J.; Ehleringer, James R.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Stange, Erik; Cerling, Thure E.

    2007-03-01

    Understanding links between water consumers and climatological (precipitation) sources is essential for developing strategies to ensure the long-term sustainability of water supplies. In pursing this understanding a need exists for tools to study and monitor complex human-hydrological systems that involve high levels of spatial connectivity and supply problems that are regional, rather than local, in nature. Here we report the first national-level survey of stable isotope ratios in tap water, including spatially and temporally explicit samples from a large number of cities and towns across the contiguous United States. We show that intra-annual ranges of tap water isotope ratios are relatively small (e.g., <10‰ for δ2H) at most sites. In contrast, spatial variation in tap water isotope ratios is very large, spanning ranges of 163‰ for δ2H and 23.6‰ for δ18O. The spatial distribution of tap water isotope ratios at the national level is similar to that of stable isotope ratios of precipitation. At the regional level, however, pervasive differences between tap water and precipitation isotope ratios can be attributed to hydrological factors in the water source to consumer chain. These patterns highlight the potential for monitoring of tap water isotope ratios to contribute to the study of regional water supply stability and provide warning signals for impending water resource changes. We present the first published maps of predicted tap water isotope ratios for the contiguous United States, which will be useful in guiding future research on human-hydrological systems and as a tool for applied forensics and traceability studies.

  11. Isotope ratios of uranium using high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hearn, R.; Wildner, H.

    1998-12-31

    Actinide element isotope ratios have been determined in environmental samples using high resolution ICP-MS with ultrasonic nebulization. Precisions as low as 0.1% RSD have been achieved using various methods of acquisition. The methodology has been used for environmental monitoring of uranium isotope ratios as an indicator of nuclear activity. Also, it has been applied to calcite dating studies as a measure of past geochemical disturbances.

  12. Quantum statistical thermodynamics of hot finite nuclear systems: Temperatures and isotopic yield ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Majka, Z.; Staszel, P.; Cibor, J.; Natowitz, J.B.; Hagel, K.; Li, J.; Mdeiwayeh, N.; Wada, R.; Zhao, Y.

    1997-06-01

    We investigate the importance of the quantum statistics and deexcitation of primary fragments on the isotope yield ratio temperature determination. A phenomenological formula is presented which allows derivation of the temperature of the decaying nuclear system at the freeze-out time from the measured double yield ratios of two isotope pairs. This prescription is applied to the recent ALADIN and EOS Collaboration data. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Mare basalt genesis - Modeling trace elements and isotopic ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, A. B.

    1985-11-01

    Various types of mare basalt data have been synthesized, leading to the production of an internally consistent model of the mare basalt source region and mare basalt genesis. The model accounts for the mineralogical, major oxide, compatible siderophile trace element, incompatible trace element, and isotopic characteristics of most of the mare basalt units and of all the pyroclastic glass units for which reliable data are available. Initial tests of the model show that it also reproduces the mineralogy and incompatible trace element characteristics of the complementary highland anorthosite suite of rocks and, in a general way, those of the lunar granite suite of rocks.

  14. High-precision measurement of chlorine stable isotope ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, A.; Eastoe, C.J.; Kaufmann, R.S.; Martin, J.G.; Wirt, L.; Finley, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    We present an analysis procedure that allows stable isotopes of chlorine to be analyzed with precision sufficient for geological and hydrological studies. The total analytical precision is ?????0.09%., and the present known range of chloride in the surface and near-surface environment is 3.5???. As Cl- is essentially nonreactive in natural aquatic environments, it is a conservative tracer and its ??37Cl is also conservative. Thus, the ??37Cl parameter is valuable for quantitative evaluation of mixing of different sources of chloride in brines and aquifers. ?? 1993.

  15. Observations and sources of carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio variation of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN).

    PubMed

    Howa, John D; Lott, Michael J; Ehleringer, James R

    2014-11-01

    Isotope ratio analysis allows forensic investigators to discriminate materials that are chemically identical but differ in their isotope ratios. Here we focused on the discrimination of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), an explosive with military and civilian applications, using carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotope ratios. Our goal was to understand some of the factors influencing the isotope ratios of commercially manufactured PETN. PETN was isolated from bulk explosives using preparative HPLC, which reduced chemical and isotopic within-sample variability. We observed isotope ratio variation in a survey of 175 PETN samples from 22 manufacturing facilities, with δ(13)C values ranging from -49.7‰ to -28.0‰ and δ(15)N values ranging from -48.6‰ to +6.2‰. Both within-sample variability and variation of PETN within an explosive block were much smaller than between-sample variations. Isotopic ratios of PETN were shown to discriminate explosive blocks from the same manufacturer, whereas explosive component composition measurements by HPLC were not able to do so. Using samples collected from three industrial PETN manufacturers, we investigated the isotopic relationship between PETN and its reactants, pentaerythritol (PE) and nitric acid. Our observations showed that δ(13)C values of PETN were indistinguishable from that of the reactant pentaerythritol. Isotopic separation between nitric acid and PETN was consistent within each sampled manufacturer but differed among manufacturers, and was likely dependent upon reaction conditions. These data indicate that δ(13)C variation in PETN is dependent on δ(13)C variation of PE supplies, while δ(15)N variation in PETN is due to both nitric acid δ(15)N and reaction conditions. PMID:25244291

  16. A new isotopic reference material for stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope-ratio measurements of water—USGS50 Lake Kyoga Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Mukwaya, Christine; Qi, Haiping; Lorenz, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    This isotopic reference material, designated as USGS50, is intended as one of two reference waters for daily normalization of stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic analysis of water with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer or a laser absorption spectrometer, of use especially for isotope-hydrology laboratories analyzing freshwater samples from equatorial and tropical regions.

  17. Preliminary results of oxygen isotope ratio measurement with a particle-gamma coincidence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borysiuk, Maciek; Kristiansson, Per; Ros, Linus; Abdel, Nassem S.; Elfman, Mikael; Nilsson, Charlotta; Pallon, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The possibility to study variations in the oxygen isotopic ratio with photon tagged nuclear reaction analysis (pNRA) is evaluated in the current work. The experiment described in the article was performed at Lund Ion Beam Analysis Facility (LIBAF) with a 2 MeV deuteron beam. Isotopic fractionation of light elements such as carbon, oxygen and nitrogen is the basis of many analytical tools in hydrology, geology, paleobiology and paleogeology. IBA methods provide one possible tool for measurement of isotopic content. During this experimental run we focused on measurement of the oxygen isotopic ratio. The measurement of stable isotopes of oxygen has a number of applications; the particular one driving the current investigation belongs to the field of astrogeology and specifically evaluation of fossil extraterrestrial material. There are three stable isotopes of oxygen: 16O, 17O and 18O. We procured samples highly enriched with all three isotopes. Isotopes 16O and 18O were easily detected in the enriched samples, but no significant signal from 17O was detected in the same samples. The measured yield was too low to detect 18O in a sample with natural abundances of oxygen isotopes, at least in the current experimental setup, but the spectral line from the reaction with 16O was clearly visible.

  18. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Sodium and Potassium Cyanide as a Forensic Signature

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J.; Tomkins, Bruce; Janszen, Derek B.; Carman, April J.

    2012-01-03

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a future chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. A few of these samples displayed non-homogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of these, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples.

  19. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Sodium and Potassium Cyanide as a Forensic Signature

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzer, Helen W; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Janszen, Derek B; Carman, April

    2012-01-01

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a future chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. A few of these samples displayed non-homogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of these, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples.

  20. Atmospheric helium isotope ratio: Possible temporal and spatial variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yuji; Furukawa, Yukiko; Takahata, Naoto

    2010-09-01

    The atmospheric 3He/ 4He ratio has been considered to be constant on a global scale, because the residence time of helium is significantly longer than the mixing time in the atmosphere. However, this ratio may be decreasing with time owing to the anthropogenic release of crustal helium from oil and natural gas wells, although this observation has been disputed. Here, we present the 3He/ 4He ratios of old air trapped in historical slags in Japan and of modern surface air samples collected at various sites around the world, measured with a newly developed analytical system. In air helium extracted from metallurgical slag found at refineries in operation between AD 1603 and 1907 in Japan, we determined a mean 3He/ 4He ratio of (5106 ± 108) × 10 -5 R HESJ (where R HESJ is the 3He/ 4He ratio of the Helium Standard of Japan), which is consistent with the previously reported value of (5077 ± 59) × 10 -5 R HESJ for historical slags in France and United Arab Emirates and about 4% higher than that of average modern air, (4901 ± 4) × 10 -5 R HESJ. This result implies that the air 3He/ 4He ratio has decreased with time as expected by anthropogenic causes. Our modern surface air samples revealed that the 3He/ 4He ratio increases from north to south at a rate of (0.16 ± 0.08) × 10 -5 R HESJ/degree of latitude, suggesting that the low 3He/ 4He ratio originates in high-latitude regions of the northern hemisphere, which is consistent with the fact that most fossil fuel is extracted and consumed in the northern hemisphere.

  1. Do Strontium Isotope Ratios of Animal Bone and Teeth Really Reflect the Isotope Ratios of its birth- and growth-places?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, M.; Goto, A.; Suzuki, K.; Kato, T.; Watanabe, K.; Hasegawa, T.

    2007-12-01

    Strontium enters the human body through the food chain as nutrients pass from bedrock through soil and water to plants and animals. Strontium substitutes for calcium in the hydroxyapatite mineral of skeletal tissue, and is stored there. 87Sr/86Sr ratios in an individual's bone and teeth could directly reflect the isotopic ratios found in the plants and animals that she or he consumed, which reflect the isotope ratios found in the soil and bedrock of that geologic region. Therefore, 87Sr/86Sr ratios of human skeletons could be useful tools for assessing human residential mobility in prehistory, and many studies on them have been often made. In this study, to evaluate whether the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of a bone or teeth really reflects the isotopic ratios of its birth and growth places, several bone and teeth samples were measured for 87Sr/86Sr ratios, compared with 87Sr/86Sr ratios of geological samples in their growth-places. Bone and teeth samples were leached with 5% acetic acid. After drying, samples were ashed in a muffle furnace at 825°C for 8h, and then digested in nitric acid, followed by cation exchange chromatography with 2.4M hydrochloric acid. 87Sr/86Sr ratios were measured using a thermal ionization mass Spectrometer (VG Sector 54) or an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (Finnigan ELEMENT2). A modern boar bone collected at Asuke, Toyota City, Aichi prefecture, Japan showed a 87Sr/86Sr of 0.71001±0.00002 (2 σ), while stream sediments in the Asuke area showed around 0.710 (Asahara et al., 2006). The 87Sr/86Sr ratio of a modern black bass bone collected from Lake Biwa, Shiga prefecture, Japan was 0.71215±0.00002, while those of surface water in Lake Biwa was 0.71233±0.00002. The similar 87Sr/86Sr ratios between bone and its provenance geology could indicate that the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of bones reflect the isotopic ratios of the birth- and growth-places. The more results of modern and fossil skeletons will be shown in our presentation.

  2. Method for the determination of concentration and stable carbon isotope ratios of atmospheric phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccon, M.; Busca, R.; Facca, C.; Huang, L.; Irei, S.; Kornilova, A.; Lane, D.; Rudolph, J.

    2013-05-01

    A method for the determination of the stable carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrophenols in the gas and particulate phases is presented. It has been proposed to use the combination of concentration and isotope ratio measurements of precursor and product to test the applicability of results of laboratory studies to the atmosphere. Nitrophenols are suspected to be secondary products formed specifically from the photooxidation of volatile organic compounds. XAD-4™ resin was used as an adsorbent on quartz filters to sample ambient phenols using conventional high-volume air samplers at York University in Toronto, Canada. Filters were extracted in acetonitrile, with a HPLC clean-up step and a solid phase extraction step prior to derivatization with BSTFA. Concentration measurements were done with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry was used for isotope ratio analysis. The technique presented allows for atmospheric compound-specific isotopic composition measurements for five semi-volatile phenols with an estimated accuracy of 0.3‰ to 0.5‰ at atmospheric concentrations exceeding 0.1 ng m-3 while the detection limits for concentration measurements are in the pg m-3 range. Isotopic fractionation throughout the entire extraction procedure and analysis was proven to be below the precision of the isotope ratio measurements. The method was tested by conducting ambient measurements from September to December 2011.

  3. Method for the determination of concentration and stable carbon isotope ratios of atmospheric phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccon, M.; Busca, R.; Facca, C.; Huang, L.; Irei, S.; Kornilova, A.; Lane, D.; Rudolph, J.

    2013-11-01

    A method for the determination of the stable carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrophenols in the gas and particulate phases is presented. It has been proposed to use the combination of concentration and isotope ratio measurements of precursor and product to test the applicability of results of laboratory studies to the atmosphere. Nitrophenols are suspected to be secondary products formed specifically from the photooxidation of volatile organic compounds. XAD-4TM resin was used as an adsorbent on quartz filters to sample ambient phenols using conventional high volume air samplers at York University in Toronto, Canada. Filters were extracted in acetonitrile, with a HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) clean-up step and a solid phase extraction step prior to derivatization with BSTFA (bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide). Concentration measurements were done with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry was used for isotope ratio analysis. The technique presented allows for atmospheric compound-specific isotopic composition measurements for five semi-volatile phenols with an estimated accuracy of 0.3-0.5‰ at atmospheric concentrations exceeding 0.1 ng m-3 while the detection limits for concentration measurements are in the pg m-3 range. Isotopic fractionation throughout the entire extraction procedure and analysis was proven to be below the precision of the isotope ratio measurements. The method was tested by conducting ambient measurements from September to December 2011.

  4. Isotope ratio and trace element imaging of pyrite grains in gold ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Ronald H.; Bekken, Barbara M.

    1995-05-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry techniques for imaging measurements of 34S/32S isotope ratios and quantitative trace element concentrations in pyrite mineral grains have been demonstrated. Test samples show that the 34S/32S isotope ratios are constant within Poisson error, independent of image position. Variable 34S/32S isotope ratios have been found within a a single pyrite grain in a sample of gold ore from the Carlin mine in the Carlin District of Nevada. The locations of trace gold concentrations in this ore sample correlate with relative 34S enrichment. Imaging has the inherent problem of spreading already limited minor isotope signals among many pixels. This problem can be overcome with improved analysis methodology including new electron multiplier circuitry to accommodate more intense secondary ion signals, stable data collection over relatively long time periods, and improved software. High mass resolution imaging and careful neutralization of ion beam induced sample charging are also required.

  5. Bayesian Integration of Isotope Ratios for Geographic Sourcing of Castor Beans

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Hart, Garret L.; Ehleringer, James; West, Jason B.; Gill, Gary A.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

    2012-08-15

    Recent years have seen an increase in the forensic interest associated with the poison ricin, which is extracted from the seeds of the Ricinus communis plant. Both light element (C, N, O, and H) and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios have previously been used to associate organic material with geographic regions of origin. We present a Bayesian integration methodology that can more accurately predict the region of origin for a castor bean than individual models developed independently for light element stable isotopes or Sr isotope ratios. Our results demonstrate a clear improvement in the ability to correctly classify regions based on the integrated model with a class accuracy of 6 0 . 9 {+-} 2 . 1 % versus 5 5 . 9 {+-} 2 . 1 % and 4 0 . 2 {+-} 1 . 8 % for the light element and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios, respectively. In addition, we show graphically the strengths and weaknesses of each dataset in respect to class prediction and how the integration of these datasets strengthens the overall model.

  6. Are sulfur isotope ratios sufficient to determine the antiquity of sulfate reduction. [implications for chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashendorf, D.

    1980-01-01

    Possible limitations on the use of sulfur isotope ratios in sedimentary sulfides to infer the evolution of microbial sulfate reduction are discussed. Current knowledge of the ways in which stable sulfur isotope ratios are altered by chemical and biological processes is examined, with attention given to the marine sulfur cycle involving various microbial populations, and sulfur reduction processes, and it is noted that satisfactory explanations of sulfur isotope ratios observed in live organisms and in sediments are not yet available. It is furthermore pointed out that all members of the same genus of sulfate reducing bacteria do not always fractionate sulfur to the same extent, that the extent of sulfur fractionation by many sulfate-reducing organisms has not yet been determined, and that inorganic processes can also affect sulfur isotope fractionation values. The information currently available is thus concluded to be insufficient to determine the time of initial appearance of biological sulfate reduction.

  7. Evaluation of the 34S/32S ratio of Soufre de Lacq elemental sulfur isotopic reference material by continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, H.P.; Coplen, T.B.

    2003-01-01

    Soufre de Lacq elemental sulfur reference material (IAEA-S-4) isotopically is homogeneous in amounts as small as 41 ??g as determined by continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. The ??34S value for this reference material is +16.90 ?? 0.12??? (1??) on a scale (Vienna Can??on Diablo troilite, VCDT) where IAEA-S-1 Ag2S is -0.3??? and IAEA-S-2 Ag2S is +22.67???. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  8. Seven Channel Multi-collector Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony D. Appelhans

    2008-07-01

    A new magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes seven full-sized discrete dynode electron multipliers operating simultaneously has been designed, constructed and is in preliminary testing. The instrument utilizes a newly developed ion dispersion lens that enables the mass dispersed individual isotope beams to be separated sufficiently (35 mm) to allow a full-sized discrete dynode pulse counting multiplier to be used for each beam. The ion dispersion lens is a two element electrostatic 90 degree sector device that causes the beam-to-beam dispersion to increase faster than the intra-beam dispersion. Each multiplier is contained in an isolated case with a deflector/condenser lens at the entrance. A 9-sample filament cartridge is mounted on a micro-manipulator two-axis stage that enables adjustment of the filament position with 10 micron resolution within the ion lens. Results of initial testing with actinides will be presented.

  9. D/H Isotope Ratio Measurements of Atmospheric Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisehen, Thomas; Bühler, Fred; Koppmann, Ralf; Krebsbach, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of isotope ratios in atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOC) is a reliable method to allocate their sources, to estimate atmospheric residence times and investigate physical and chemical processes on various temporal and spatial scales. Most investigations yet focus on carbon isotope ratios. Certainly more detailed information can be gained by the ratio of deuterium (D) to hydrogen (H) in VOC, especially due to the high mass ratio. Combining measurements of carbon and hydrogen isotopes could lead to considerable improvement in our understanding of atmospheric processes. For this purpose we set up and thoroughly characterised a gas chromatograph pyrolysis isotope ratio mass spectrometer to measure the D/H ratio in atmospheric VOC. From a custom-made gas standard mixture VOC were adsorbed on Tenax®TA which has the advantage that CO2 is not preconcentrated when measuring ambient air samples. Our results show that the pyrolysis method has significant impact on the D/H ratios. A pyrolysis temperature of at least 1723 K and conditioning of the ceramic tube on a regular basis is essential to obtain reproducible D/H isotope ratios. For an independent comparison D/H ratios of the pure VOC used in the gas standard were determined using elemental analysis by Agroisolab (Jülich, Germany). Comparisons of 10 VOC show perfect agreement within the standard deviations of our measurements and the errors given by Agroisolab, e.g. for n-pentane, toluene, 4-methyl-2-pentanone and n-octane. A slight mean difference of 5.1 o was obtained for n-heptane while significant mean differences of 15.5 o and 20.3 o arose for 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and isoprene, respectively. We further demonstrate the stability of our system and show that the sample preparation does not affect the isotope ratios. Moreover the applicability of our system to ambient air samples is demonstrated.

  10. Certification of the Uranium Isotopic Ratios in Nbl Crm 112-A, Uranium Assay Standard (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, K. J.; Mason, P.; Narayanan, U.

    2010-12-01

    Isotopic reference materials are needed to validate measurement procedures and to calibrate multi-collector ion counting detector systems. New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) provides a suite of certified isotopic and assay standards for the US and international nuclear safeguards community. NBL Certified Reference Material (CRM) 112-A Uranium Metal Assay Standard with a consensus value of 137.88 for the 238U/235U ratio [National Bureau of Standards -- NBS, currently named National Institute for Standards and Technology, Standard Reference Material (SRM) 960 had been renamed CRM 112-A] is commonly used as a natural uranium isotopic reference material within the earth science community. We have completed the analytical work for characterizing the isotopic composition of NBL CRM 112-A Uranium Assay Standard and NBL CRM 145 (uranyl nitrate solution prepared from CRM 112-A). The 235U/238U isotopic ratios were characterized using the total evaporation (TE) and the modified total evaporation (MTE) methods. The 234U/238U isotope ratios were characterized using a conventional analysis technique and verified using the ratios measured in the MTE analytical technique. The analysis plan for the characterization work was developed such that isotopic ratios that are traceable to NBL CRM U030-A are obtained. NBL is preparing a certificate of Analysis and will issue a certificate for Uranium Assay and Isotopics. The results of the CRM 112-A certification measurements will be discussed. These results will be compared with the average values from Richter et al (2010). A comparison of the precision and accuracy of the measurement methods (TE, MTE and Conventional) employed in the certification will be presented. The uncertainties in the 235U/238U and 234U/238U ratios, calculated according to the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurements (GUM) and the dominant contributors to the combined standard uncertainty will be discussed.

  11. STABLE ISOTOPE RATIOS IN ARCHIVED STRIPED BASS SCALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years fishermen and scientists have noted that striped bass caught along the East Coast of the United States have reduced weight to length ratios with many of the fish caught in Chesapeake Bay exhibiting skin lesions. Several theories have been suggested to explain thes...

  12. Source characteristics of marine oils as indicated by carbon isotopic ratios of volatile hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Claypool, G.E.; Rooney, M.A. ); Squires, R.M. )

    1994-03-01

    Carbon isotopic ratios of volatile hydrocarbon fractions of marine oils are diagnostic of organic facies and depositional environments of source rocks. For carbonate oils, low-molecular-weight volatile hydrocarbons (< C[sub 9]) are isotopically lighter than high-molecular-weight volatile hydrocarbons (C[sub 9]-C[sub 17]). In contrast, for deltaic oils, low-molecular-weight volatile hydrocarbons are isotopically heavier than high-molecular-weight volatile hydrocarbons. Marine shale oils show patterns intermediate between carbonate and deltaic oils. This relative variation of carbon isotopic ratios among volatile hydrocarbons of oils is explained by earlier expulsion of marine oils derived from isotopically homogeneous (algal-bacterial) kerogens in rich source rocks, and secondary cracking of petroleum prior to expulsion for marine oils derived from isotopically heterogeneous (terrestrial) kerogens in lean source rocks. In basins with multiple source rocks, carbon isotopic ratios of volatile hydrocarbons are useful for determining oil-oil correlation and for inferring oil-source rock relationship. 67 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Direct uranium isotope ratio analysis of single micrometer-sized glass particles

    PubMed Central

    Kappel, Stefanie; Boulyga, Sergei F.; Prohaska, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present the application of nanosecond laser ablation (LA) coupled to a ‘Nu Plasma HR’ multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) for the direct analysis of U isotope ratios in single, 10–20 μm-sized, U-doped glass particles. Method development included studies with respect to (1) external correction of the measured U isotope ratios in glass particles, (2) the applied laser ablation carrier gas (i.e. Ar versus He) and (3) the accurate determination of lower abundant 236U/238U isotope ratios (i.e. 10−5). In addition, a data processing procedure was developed for evaluation of transient signals, which is of potential use for routine application of the developed method. We demonstrate that the developed method is reliable and well suited for determining U isotope ratios of individual particles. Analyses of twenty-eight S1 glass particles, measured under optimized conditions, yielded average biases of less than 0.6% from the certified values for 234U/238U and 235U/238U ratios. Experimental results obtained for 236U/238U isotope ratios deviated by less than −2.5% from the certified values. Expanded relative total combined standard uncertainties Uc (k = 2) of 2.6%, 1.4% and 5.8% were calculated for 234U/238U, 235U/238U and 236U/238U, respectively. PMID:22595724

  14. Final report of the key comparison CCQM-K98: Pb isotope amount ratios in bronze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, Jochen; Yim, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Kyoung-Seok; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi; Malinowskiy, Dmitriy; Ren, Tongxiang; Wang, Jun; Vocke, Robert D., Jr.; Murphy, Karen; Nonose, Naoko; Rienitz, Olaf; Noordmann, Janine; Näykki, Teemu; Sara-Aho, Timo; Ari, Betül; Cankur, Oktay

    2014-01-01

    Isotope amount ratios are proving useful in an ever increasing array of applications that range from studies unravelling transport processes, to pinpointing the provenance of specific samples as well as trace element quantification by using isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). These expanding applications encompass fields as diverse as archaeology, food chemistry, forensic science, geochemistry, medicine and metrology. However, to be effective tools, the isotope ratio data must be reliable and traceable to enable the comparability of measurement results. The importance of traceability and comparability in isotope ratio analysis has already been recognized by the Inorganic Analysis Working Group (IAWG) within the CCQM. While the requirements for isotope ratio accuracy and precision in the case of IDMS are generally quite modest, 'absolute' Pb isotope ratio measurements for geochemical applications as well as forensic provenance studies require Pb isotope ratio measurements of the highest quality. To support present and future CMCs on isotope ratio determinations, a key comparison was urgently needed and therefore initiated at the IAWG meeting in Paris in April 2011. The analytical task within such a comparison was decided to be the measurement of Pb isotope amount ratios in water and bronze. Measuring Pb isotope amount ratios in an aqueous Pb solution tested the ability of analysts to correct for any instrumental effects on the measured ratios, while the measurement of Pb isotope amount ratios in a metal matrix sample provided a real world test of the whole chemical and instrumental procedure. A suitable bronze material with a Pb mass fraction between 10 and 100 mg•kg-1 and a high purity solution of Pb with a mass fraction of approximately 100 mg•kg-1 was available at the pilot laboratory (BAM), both offering a natural-like Pb isotopic composition. The mandatory measurands, the isotope amount ratios n(206Pb)/n(204Pb), n(207Pb)/n(204Pb) and n(208Pb)/n(204Pb

  15. A balloon measurement of the isotopic composition of galactic cosmic ray boron, carbon and nitrogen. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumberge, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of galactic cosmic ray boron, carbon, and nitrogen were measured at energies near 300 MeV amu, using a balloon-borne instrument at an atmospheric depth of approximately 5 g/sq cm. The calibrations of the detectors comprising the instrument are described. The saturation properties of the cesium iodide scintillators used for measurement of particle energy are studied in the context of analyzing the data for mass. The achieved rms mass resolution varies from approximately 0.3 amu at boron to approximately 0.5 amu at nitrogen, consistent with a theoretical analysis of the contributing factors. Corrected for detector interactions and the effects of the residual atmosphere the results are B-10/B=0.33 (+0.17, -0.11), C-13/C=0.06 (+0.13, -0.11), and N-15/N=0.42 (+0.19, -0.17). A model of galactic propagation and solar modulation is described. Assuming a cosmic ray source composition of solar-like isotopic abundances, the model predicts abundances near Earth consistent with the measurements.

  16. Reconstruction of Late Pleistocene Surface Water pCO2 in the Eastern Equatorial Atlantic Based on Alkenone and Boron Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benthien, A.; Balestra, B.; Hoenisch, B.; Mollenhauer, G.

    2008-12-01

    Reconstructing the long-term history of the partial pressure of atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO2) is a big challenge in paleoclimatic and paleoceanographic research. Hence, a number of proxies have been proposed to estimate paleo-CO2 concentrations at time periods prior to those covered by ice cores. Two of the most prominent proxy approaches are (a) the carbon isotopic fractionation of C37-alkenones produced by certain haptophyte algae and (b) the boron isotopic composition in planktonic foraminifer shells. Both techniques have limitations and uncertainties due to their specific methodology. In past paleoceanographic studies, either one or the other approach has been applied individually. Here, we present a study where we directly compare alkenone carbon isotopic fractionation over several late Pleistocene glacial cycles with published boron isotope data at the same location (ODP site 668B, Sierra Leone Rise). The site is presently characterised by an air-sea equilibrium in CO2 as well as low productivity. We show that over the last 800,000 years alkenone isotope data are not primarily controlled by atmospheric pCO2 levels. We further demonstrate that the species assemblage of alkenone producing algae has no influence on their isotopic signal. In contrast, the boron isotope proxy has been shown to have a great potential for estimating atmospheric pCO2 at this location.

  17. Relation between hydrogen isotopic ratios of bone collagen and rain

    SciTech Connect

    Cormie, A.B.; Schwarcz, H.P. ); Gray, J. )

    1994-01-01

    The hydrogen isotopic value ([delta]D) of deer bone collagen is related to both [delta]D of rain during the growing season and growing season relative humidity (RH). With correction for the effects of RH, bone [delta]D is related to growing season rain [delta]D in a simple manner with a slope of 1.0. This indicates that, with RH correction, there are no additional sources of bias in the [delta]D of bone due to unaccounted for biologic or climatic effects. Due to a low sensitivity of bone [delta]D to RH effects, both yearly and growing season rain [delta]D can be estimated with considerable accuracy (R = 0.97 and R = 0.96) from bone collagen [delta]D and [delta][sup 15]N. Here, [delta][sup 15]N is used to correct bone [delta]D for the effects of RH. From these estimates of rain [delta]D, it may then be possible to evaluate temperature since the [delta]D of rain primarily reflects local temperature. Therefore, the measurement of bone collagen [delta]D has good potential for evaluating paleoclimates.

  18. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled to liquid and gas chromatography for wine ethanol characterization.

    PubMed

    Cabañero, Ana I; Recio, Jose L; Rupérez, Mercedes

    2008-10-01

    Two new procedures for wine ethanol 13C/12C isotope ratio determination, using high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC/IRMS and GC/IRMS), have been developed to improve isotopic methods dedicated to the study of wine authenticity. Parameters influencing separation of ethanol from wine matrix such as column, temperature, mobile phase, flow rates and injection mode were investigated. Twenty-three wine samples from various origins were analyzed for validation of the procedures. The analytical precision was better than 0.15 per thousand, and no significant isotopic fractionation was observed employing both separative techniques coupled to IRMS. No significant differences and a very strong correlation (r = 0.99) were observed between the 13C/12C ratios obtained by the official method (elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry) and the proposed new methodology. The potential advantages of the developed methods over the traditional one are speed (reducing time required from hours to minutes) and simplicity. In addition, these are the first isotopic methods that allow 13C/12C determination directly from a liquid sample with no previous ethanol isolation, overcoming technical difficulties associated with sample treatment. PMID:18798196

  19. A Plant-Based Proxy for the Oxygen Isotope Ratio of Atmospheric Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helliker, B.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric water vapor is a major component of the global hydrological cycle, but the isotopic balance of vapor is largely unknown. It is shown here that the oxygen isotope ratio of leaf water in the epiphytic Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant Tillandsia usneoides (Spanish Moss) is controlled by the oxygen isotope ratio of atmospheric water vapor in both field and lab studies. Assuming that the leaf-water isotopic signature (and hence the atmospheric water vapor signature) is recorded in plant organic material, the atmospheric water vapor oxygen isotope ratios for Miami, Florida (USA) were reconstructed for several years from 1878 to 2005 using contemporary and herbarium specimens. T. usneoides ranges from Virginia, USA southwards through the tropics to Argentina, and the CAM epiphytic lifeform is widespread in other species. Therefore, epiphytes may be used to reconstruct the isotope ratio of atmospheric water for spatial scales that span over 60° of latitude and temporal scales that cover the last century of global temperature increase.

  20. Hydrogen isotope ratios of mouse tissues are influenced by a variety of factors other than diet

    SciTech Connect

    DeNiro, M.J.; Epstein, S.

    1981-12-16

    Hydrogen isotopes are fractionated during biochemical reactions in a variety of organisms. A number of experiments have shown that the D/H ratios of animals and their tissues are not controlled solely by the D/H ratios of their food. The authors performed a simple experiment which indicated that the D/H ratios of a significant fraction of the organically bonded hydrogen in animal tissues must be determined by the isotopic composition of water that the samples encounter. Aliquots of dried mouse brain and liver and mouse food were exposed to water vapors of different D/H ratios prior to isotopic analysis. The results of the experiment showed that at least 16 percent of the hydrogen in mouse brain is exchangeable with the hydrogen of water; the corresponding values for mouse liver and mouse food were 25 to 29 percent. (JMT)

  1. Analysis of the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios of beverage waters without prior water extraction using isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chesson, Lesley A; Bowen, Gabriel J; Ehleringer, James R

    2010-11-15

    Hydrogen (δ(2)H) and oxygen (δ(18)O) stable isotope analysis is useful when tracing the origin of water in beverages, but traditional analytical techniques are limited to pure or extracted waters. We measured the isotopic composition of extracted beverage water using both isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS; specifically, wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We also analyzed beer, sodas, juices, and milk 'as is' using IRIS. For IRIS analysis, four sequential injections of each sample were measured and data were corrected for sample-to-sample memory using injections (a) 1-4, (b) 2-4, and (c) 3-4. The variation between δ(2)H and δ(18)O values calculated using the three correction methods was larger for unextracted (i.e., complex) beverages than for waters. The memory correction was smallest when using injections 3-4. Beverage water δ(2)H and δ(18)O values generally fit the Global Meteoric Water Line, with the exception of water from fruit juices. The beverage water stable isotope ratios measured using IRIS agreed well with the IRMS data and fit 1:1 lines, with the exception of sodas and juices (δ(2)H values) and beers (δ(18)O values). The δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of waters extracted from beer, soda, juice, and milk were correlated with complex beverage δ(2)H and δ(18)O values (r = 0.998 and 0.997, respectively) and generally fit 1:1 lines. We conclude that it is possible to analyze complex beverages, without water extraction, using IRIS although caution is needed when analyzing beverages containing sugars, which can clog the syringe and increase memory, or alcohol, a known spectral interference. PMID:20941769

  2. Determination of the sulfur isotope ratio in carbonyl sulfide using gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry on fragment ions 32S+, 33S+, and 34S+.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Shohei; Toyoda, Akari; Toyoda, Sakae; Ishino, Sakiko; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the sulfur isotopic composition of carbonyl sulfide (OCS), the most abundant atmospheric sulfur species. We present a promising new analytical method for measuring the stable sulfur isotopic compositions (δ(33)S, δ(34)S, and Δ(33)S) of OCS using nanomole level samples. The direct isotopic analytical technique consists of two parts: a concentration line and online gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) using fragmentation ions (32)S(+), (33)S(+), and (34)S(+). The current levels of measurement precision for OCS samples greater than 8 nmol are 0.42‰, 0.62‰, and 0.23‰ for δ(33)S, δ(34)S, and Δ(33)S, respectively. These δ and Δ values show a slight dependence on the amount of injected OCS for volumes smaller than 8 nmol. The isotope values obtained from the GC-IRMS method were calibrated against those measured by a conventional SF6 method. We report the first measurement of the sulfur isotopic composition of OCS in air collected at Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan. The δ(34)S value obtained for OCS (4.9 ± 0.3‰) was lower than the previous estimate of 11‰. When the δ(34)S value for OCS from the atmospheric sample is postulated as the global signal, this finding, coupled with isotopic fractionation for OCS sink reactions in the stratosphere, explains the reported δ(34)S for background stratospheric sulfate. This suggests that OCS is a potentially important source for background (nonepisodic or nonvolcanic) stratospheric sulfate aerosols. PMID:25439590

  3. Evaluating the status of uranium isotope ratio measurements using an inter-laboratory comparison campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, S.; Alonso, A.; Truyens, J.; Kühn, H.; Verbruggen, A.; Wellum, R.

    2007-07-01

    The REIMEP 18 (Regular European Inter-laboratory Measurement Evaluation Programme) campaign for the measurement isotopic ratios of uranium in nitric acid solution was completed in December 2006. The task for all participating laboratories was to measure the uranium isotopic composition of four uranium samples ranging from depleted to slightly enriched uranium. With 71 participating laboratories REIMEP 18 has become the largest nuclear isotopic measurement campaign organized by IRMM so far. Participation in this kind of measurement campaign is an integral part of the external quality control required for nuclear safeguards laboratories worldwide. For the first time also a significant number of academic laboratories, mainly from the geochemistry area was included. Certification measurements were carried out at IRMM using state-of-the-art mass spectrometric methodology. A MAT511 UF6-gas source mass spectrometer (GSMS) was used to determine the n(235U)/n(238U) ratios and a TRITON thermal-ionization mass-spectrometer (TIMS) for the minor isotope ratios n(234U)/n(238U) and n(236U)/n(238U). Verification measurements on ampouled samples were performed successfully prior to sample shipping and showed good agreement with the certified ratios. The results of the REIMEP 18 campaign confirm in general the excellent capability of nuclear safeguards and scientific laboratories in measuring isotopic abundances of uranium, although some problems were discovered for the measurements of the minor isotope ratios n(234U)/n(238U) and n(236U)/n(238U) and the calculation of measurement uncertainties for isotope ratios in general. This paper describes the outcome of the REIMEP 18 campaign. It includes a graphical evaluation and discussion of the results, an evaluation of the applied measurement and calibration techniques and a discussion of conclusions and actions to be taken.

  4. A hydrogen gas-water equilibration method produces accurate and precise stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements in nutrition studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable hydrogen isotope methodology is used in nutrition studies to measure growth, breast milk intake, and energy requirement. Isotope ratio MS is the best instrumentation to measure the stable hydrogen isotope ratios in physiological fluids. Conventional methods to convert physiological fluids to ...

  5. Chemical and boron isotopic compositions of tourmaline from the Paleoproterozoic Houxianyu borate deposit, NE China: Implications for the origin of borate deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xue-long; Chen, Bin

    2014-11-01

    The Houxianyu borate deposit in northeastern China is one of the largest boron sources of China, hosted mainly in the Paleoproterozoic meta-volcanic and sedimentary rocks (known as the Liaohe Group) that are characterized by high boron concentrations. The borate ore-body has intimate spatial relationship with the Mg-rich carbonates/silicates of the Group, with fine-grained gneisses (meta-felsic volcanic rocks) as main country rocks. The presence of abundant tourmalinites and tourmaline-rich quartz veins in the borate orebody provides an opportunity to study the origin of boron, the nature of ore-forming fluids, and possible mineralization mechanism. We report the chemical and boron isotopic compositions of tourmalines from the tourmaline-rich rocks in the borate deposit and from the tourmaline-bearing fine-grained gneisses. Tourmalines from the fine-grained gneisses are chemically homogeneous, showing relatively high Fe and Na and low Mg, with δ11B values in a narrow range from +1.22‰ to +2.63‰. Tourmalines from the tourmaline-rich rocks, however, commonly show compositional zoning, with an irregular detrital core and a euhedral overgrowth, and have significantly higher Mg, REE (and more pronounced positive Eu anomalies), V (229-1852 ppm) and Sr (208-1191 ppm) than those from the fine-grained gneisses. They show varied B isotope values ranging from +4.51‰ to +12.43‰, which plot intermediate between those of the terrigenous sediments and arc rocks with low boron isotope values (as represented by the δ11B = +1.22‰ to +2.63‰ of the fine-grained gneisses of this study) and those of marine carbonates and evaporates with high boron isotope values. In addition, the rim of the zoned tourmaline shows notably higher Mg, Ti, V, Sn, and Pb, and REE (particularly LREEs), but lower Fe, Co, Cr, Ni, Zn, Mn, and lower δ11B values than the core. These data suggest that (1) the sources of boron of the borate ore-body are mainly the Paleoproterozoic meta-volcanic and

  6. Measurement of stable carbon isotope ratios of non-methane hydrocarbons and halocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuiderweg, A. T.

    2012-09-01

    Within the realm of volatile organic compounds, hydrocarbons and halocarbons form a sizable proportion of carbon input to the atmosphere. Within these compound categories, the light non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC, two to seven carbon atoms) and monocarbon halocarbons have a special place as these have strong, if not exclusive, anthropogenic (human-caused) sources. With common atmospheric molar mixing ratios in the parts-per-trillion (10-12 mole/mole) to parts-per-billion (10-9 mole/mole) range, these trace gases, though decidedly minor constituants of the atmosphere, have diverse consequences due to their atmospheric presence and their removal processes. Effects range from causing ground level air pollution and resulting hazards to health, to contributing to anthropogenic climate change and the destruction of the ozone layer in the stratosphere, among many others. The existance of stable isotopes (otherwise identical atoms with varying amounts of neutrons that do not spontaneously disintegrate) in several elements relevant to atmospheric chemistry and physics is a boon to research. Their presence in molecules is detectable by mass and cause small intra- and intermolecular property changes. These changes range from the physical (e.g. boiling point variation) to the chemical (reaction rate variation) and can influence external interactions as well. The measurement of the ratio of a minor stable isotope of an element to the major one (the stable isotope ratio) can be used to establish source fingerprints, trace the interaction dynamics, and refine the understanding of the relative contribution of sources and sinks to the atmosphere as a whole. The stable minor stable isotope of carbon, 13C, has a natural abundance of approximately 1.1 %. It has a sufficient fractional mass difference from its major isotope as to cause significant effects, making it ideal for measuring the ratios and properties of hydro- and halocarbons. In order to enable a better understanding of the

  7. Forensic utility of isotope ratio analysis of the explosive urea nitrate and its precursors.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Roman; Stern, Libby A; Dietz, Marianne E; McCormick, Meghan C; Barrow, Jason A; Mothershead, Robert F

    2011-03-20

    Urea nitrate (UN) is an improvised explosive made from readily available materials. The carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of UN and its component ions, urea and nitrate, could aid in a forensic investigation. A method was developed to separate UN into its component ions for δ(15)N measurements by dissolving the sample with KOH, drying the sample, followed by removal of the urea by dissolution into 100% methanol. UN was synthesized to assess for preservation of the carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions of reactants (urea and nitric acid) and product UN. Based on nitrogen isotope mass balance, all UN samples contained varying amounts of excess nitric acid, making the ionic separation an essential step in the nitrogen isotope analysis. During UN synthesis experiments, isotopic composition of the reactants is preserved in the product UN, but the urea in the product UN is slightly enriched in (15)N (<1‰) relative to the reactant urea. Published isotopic compositions of UN reactants, urea and nitric acid, have large ranges (urea δ(15)N = -10.8 to +3.3‰; urea δ(13)C = -18.2 to -50.6‰; and nitric acid δ(15)N = -1.8 to +4.0‰). The preservation of isotopic composition of reactants in UN, along with a significant variability in isotopic composition of reactants, indicates that isotope ratio analysis may be used to test if urea or nitric acid collected during an investigation is a possible reactant for a specific UN sample. The carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios differ significantly between two field-collected UN samples, as well as the lab-synthesized UN samples. These observed variations suggest that this approach is useful for discriminating between materials which are otherwise chemically identical. PMID:20729019

  8. Helium Isotopic Ratios of Core Samples from IODP Exp. 319 (NanTroSEIZE Stage 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiguchi, K.; Matsuda, J.; Wiersberg, T.; Shimo, Y.; Tamura, H.; Kumagai, H.; Suzuki, K.; Saito, S.; Kinoshita, M.; Araki, E.; Byrne, T.; McNeill, L. C.; Saffer, D.; Takahashi, K.; Eguchi, N. O.; Toczko, S.

    2009-12-01

    IODP Exp.319 of Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Drilling Program Stage 2 started at May 2009. Various advanced technologies including first riser-based scientific ocean drilling were carried out at this cruise. The Hole C0009A (Site C0009/ Hole A) recovered cutting and partly core samples from 703.9-1604 mbsf by riser-drilling. The core samples were collected between the depth of 1510.5 and 1593.9 mbsf. Here we report preliminary helium isotopic ratios of these cores. We collected three types of samples for our study: (1) gas of cores, (2) whole round cores (100 cc) and (3) small whole round cores (10 cc). The gas samples were taken immediately after the core recovery. The gas samples were collected from each core section by using a syringe, and it was transferred to the glass bottle using the water displacement method. The glass bottle was made by Pyrex glass with vacuum valve at each end. We collected two sizes of whole round core samples (100 cc and 10 cc) The 100 cc cores were collected from the bottom and top sections of coring. The 10 cc cores were taken from the other sections. The outer parts of these samples were carefully removed to avoid contaminations from drilling fluid. After the removal of contamination, we immediately stored the 100 cc samples into vacuum container and 10 cc samples into plastic bag under a dry condition, respectively. The gas samples were measured for helium isotopic ratios. The noble gas measurement was carried out at Osaka University by using VG5400 mass spectrometer. We measured helium isotopic ratio and 4He/20Ne ratio. The latter is useful for making correction of the air contamination. The obtained result of helium isotopic ratios shows that the radiogenic helium is prominent in all samples. In addition, the helium isotope ratios show a trend that the ratio at shallower part is slightly higher than that at deeper part. It is conceivable that this trend is due to the larger radiogenic ingrowths at the deeper part. However, the

  9. A mechanistic model for interpretation of hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios in tree-ring cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, John S.; Lin, Guanghui; Ehleringer, James R.

    2000-01-01

    A mechanistic model is presented to quantify both the physical and biochemical fractionation events associated with hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios in tree-ring cellulose. The model predicts the isotope ratios of tree-rings, incorporating both humidity and source water environmental information. Components of the model include (1) hydrogen and oxygen isotope effects associated with leaf water enrichment; (2) incorporation of leaf water isotope ratio values into photosynthetic carbohydrates along with the biochemical fractionation associated with autotrophic synthesis; (3) transport of exported carbohydrates (such as sucrose) from leaves to developing xylem in shoots and stems where cellulose is formed; (4) a partial exchange of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in carbohydrates with xylem sap water during conversion into cellulose; and (5) a biochemical fractionation associated with cellulose synthesis. A modified version of the Craig-Gordon model for evaporative enrichment adequately described leaf water δD and δ 18O values. The leaf water model was robust over a wide range of leaf waters for both controlled experiments and field studies, far exceeding the range of values to be expected under natural conditions. The isotopic composition of cellulose was modeled using heterotrophic and autotrophic fractionation factors from the literature as well as the experimentally derived proportions of H and O that undergo exchange with xylem water during cellulose synthesis in xylem cells of tree-rings. The fraction of H and O from carbohydrates that exchange with xylem sap water was estimated to be 0.36 and 0.42, respectively. The proportions were based on controlled, long-term greenhouse experiments and field studies where the variations in the δD and δ 18O of tree-ring cellulose were measured under different source water isotopic compositions. The model prediction that tree-ring cellulose contains information on environmental water source and atmospheric vapor pressure

  10. Activities of Pu and Am isotopes and isotopic ratios in a soil contaminated by weapons-grade plutonium.

    PubMed

    Lee, M H; Clark, S B

    2005-08-01

    An accident and fire at the former McGuire Air Force Base and Boeing Michigan Aeronautical Research Center (BOMARC) site in New Jersey resulted in dispersion of weapons-grade plutonium in particulate form to the local environment. Soil samples collected at the BOMARC site were measured for their activities and isotopic ratios of Pu and Am isotopes by radioanalytical techniques. The activities of the Pu and Am isotopes in the BOMARC soil were markedly higher than fallout levels, and they decreased nearly exponentially with increasing particle size of the soil. The measured (241)Am activity was compared to calculated values based on decay of (241)Pu. The activity ratios of (238)Pu/(239,240)Pu, (241)Pu/(239,240)Pu, and (241)Am/(239,240)Pu observed in the BOMARC soil were much lower than those attributed to nuclear reprocessing plants and Chernobyl fallout. From the activity ratios of (241)Pu/(239,240)Pu and (241)Am/(239,240)Pu, the origin of the Pu isotopes was identified as weapons-grade and the time since production of the material was estimated. Furthermore, the atomic ratio of (240)Pu/(239)Pu in the BOMARC soil was remarkably lower than the fallout value influenced by nuclear weapons testing and the Chernobyl accident. The atomic ratio of (240)Pu/(239)Pu was very close to the value of the weapons-grade Pu detected from the Thule accident in Greenland. This work demonstrates the utility of radioanalytical measurements and decay calculations for defining characteristics of the source term and discriminating multiple processes that contribute to a source. Such an approach would also be needed to respond to a terrorist event involving an improvised nuclear device or radiological dispersal device. PMID:16124281

  11. Boron Isotope Compositions of Selected Fresh MORB Glasses From the Northern EPR (8-10° N): Implications for MORB Magma Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, P. J.; Shirey, S. B.; Hauri, E. H.; Perfit, M. R.

    2003-12-01

    at depths within the oceanic crust close to the top of the AMC. These MORB samples have 0.56 to 2.61 ppm B, and B isotope compositions that are surprisingly restricted ranging from δ 11B -5.50 to -8.96‰ . The low δ 11B values are close to the depleted upper mantle value (-10‰ ). The δ 11B data do not correlation with B concentrations, Mg#, Sr, Nd or Pb isotopes, or proxies for brine addition (e.g. Cl/Nb). The lowest δ 11B samples are also the most-incompatible element depleted (high B/Nb ratios). The δ 11B of the on-axis samples increases slightly with increased levels of magma degassing (i.e. lowest δ 11B values in samples extracted undegassed from depths closest to AMC top).Therefore, although the Cl data indicate significant addition of probably a saline brine component to both on- and off-axis MORB magmas, their δ 11B compositions were not significantly affected by this process and the observed variations in δ 11B may have a different origin. Possibly, the low B/Cl ratio of seawater ( ˜ 0.001) coupled with preferential partitioning of Cl relative to B into brines during supercritical phase separation (Berndt and Seyfried, 1990) of seawater in hydrothermal system, results in very saline brines with low boron concentrations. The coupled B-Cl data effectively eliminates simple magmatic assimilation of altered Cl-rich high-B isotope composition oceanic crust in this region.

  12. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Coplen, Tyler B; Qi, Haiping

    2010-09-15

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ‰ in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) δ(2)H reproducibility (1σ standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1 ‰ to 0.58 ‰. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN(2) is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen. PMID:20718408

  13. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Qi, H.

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ??? in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN2) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) ??2H reproducibility (1?? standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1 ??? to 0.58 ???. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN2 is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen. ?? This article not subject to U.S. Copyright. Published 2010 by the American Chemical Society.

  14. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ‰ in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN2) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) δ2H reproducibility (1& sigma; standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1‰ to 0.58 ‰. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN2 is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen

  15. Osmium isotopic ratio measurements by inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, G.P. III; Bazan, J.M.; Date, A.R.

    1987-04-01

    The isotopic composition of nanogram quantities of osmium was measured by using an inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometer. Sensitivity was enhanced a factor of approx.100 by the use of an osmium tetraoxide vapor generator rather than nebulization of solution. For samples less than or equal to5 ng, the ratios /sup 190/Os//sup 192/Os, /sup 189/Os//sup 192/Os, and /sup 188/Os//sup 192/Os were determined to better than +/- 0.5% (1sigma/sub m/) precision. For the minor isotopes, the ratios /sup 187/Os//sup 192/Os and /sup 186/Os//sup 192/Os were determined to +/-1%, and /sup 184/Os//sup 192/Os (4 x 10/sup -4/) was determined to approx.10%. Isotope ratios for common osmium are reported.

  16. Boron, Sr, O, and H isotope geochemistry of groundwaters from Mt. Etna (Sicily) -- Hydrologic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Pennisi, M.; Leeman, W.P.; Tonarini, S.; Pennisi, A.; Nabelek, P.

    2000-03-01

    Combined B, O, H, and Sr isotopic studies of groundwaters from Mt. Etna provide new constraints on their origin and the consequences of fluid-rock interaction within this hydrologic system. Variations in {delta}{sup 18}O ({minus}9.7 to {minus}7.2%) and {delta}D ({minus}62 to {minus}23%) mainly lie along the regional meteoric water line and suggest that most waters originated as local precipitation. However, small shifts in {delta}{sup 18}O, and variable {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr (0.70355 to 0.70879) and {delta}{sup 11}B ({minus}5.2 to 25.8%) indicate that subsequent interactions occurred between the fluids and local rocks. High B/Cl ratios in all samples seemingly preclude direct involvement of seawater in the hydrologic system despite the proximity to the coast and, in some samples, elevated {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr and {delta}{sup 11}B. Two general end-member water types are recognized on the basis of their chemistry. These apparently are produced by interactions of local meteoric waters with the dominant reservoir rocks--either basaltic lavas of Etna or the underlying sediments, respectively; high {delta}{sup 11}B in the sediment-hosted end-member points to a significant marine carbonate contribution. Subsequent mixing between these or similar end-members produced a range of intermediate composition groundwaters. Certain anomalous water compositions require the presence locally of a distinct component with high B and moderate {delta}{sup 11}B (ca. 10%) but relatively low {sup 87}/Sr/{sup 86}Sr; an anthropogenic source for this component is plausible. One unusual sample has B and Sr isotopic compositions similar to the other volcanic rock-hosted waters, but anomalously high Cl content that likely reflects local magmatic outgassing near this sampling locality. In general, this study indicates that groundwater B and Sr isotopic compositions are rock-dominated; these data provide useful constraints on the origin and evolution of groundwaters.

  17. Determination of phenylalanine isotope ratio enrichment by liquid chromatography/time- of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhanpin; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Cody, Robert B; Wolfe, Robert R

    2004-01-01

    The application of time-of-flight mass spectrometry to isotope ratio measurements has been limited by the relatively low dynamic range of the time-to-digital converter detectors available on commercial LC/ToF-MS systems. Here we report the measurement of phenylalanine isotope ratio enrichment by using a new LC/ToF-MS system with wide dynamic range. Underivatized phenylalanine was injected onto a C18 column directly with 0.1% formic acid/acetonitrile as the mobile phase. The optimal instrument parameters for the time-of-flight mass spectrometer were determined by tuning the instrument with a phenylalanine standard. The accuracy of the isotope enrichment measurement was determined by the injection of standard solutions with known isotope ratios ranging from 0.02% to 9.2%. A plot of the results against the theoretical values gave a linear curve with R2 of 0.9999. The coefficient of variation for the isotope ratio measurement was below 2%. The method is simple, rapid, and accurate and presents an attractive alternative to traditional GC/MS applications. PMID:15531795

  18. Analysis of the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane by gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, Alison; Sessions, Alex; Lawson, Michael; Ferreira, A. A.; Neto, E. V. Santos; Eiler, John M.

    2016-09-01

    Site-specific isotope ratio measurements potentially provide valuable information about the formation and degradation of complex molecules-information that is lost in conventional bulk isotopic measurements. Here we discuss the background and possible applications of such measurements, and present a technique for studying the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane at natural abundance based on mass spectrometric analysis of the intact propane molecule and its fragment ions. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach through measurements of mixtures of natural propane and propane synthesized with site-specific 13C enrichment, and we document the limits of precision of our technique. We show that mass balance calculations of the bulk δ13C of propane based on our site-specific measurements is generally consistent with independent constraints on bulk δ13C. We further demonstrate the accuracy of the technique, and illustrate one of its simpler applications by documenting the site-specific carbon isotope signature associated with gas phase diffusion of propane, confirming that our measurements conform to the predictions of the kinetic theory of gases. This method can be applied to propane samples of moderate size (tens of micromoles) isolated from natural gases. Thus, it provides a means of studying the site-specific stable isotope systematics of propane at natural isotope abundances on sample sizes that are readily recovered from many natural environments. This method may also serve as a model for future techniques that apply high-resolution mass spectrometry to study the site-specific isotopic distributions of larger organic molecules, with potential applications to biosynthesis, forensics and other geochemical subjects.

  19. Carbon Isotope Measurements of Experimentally-Derived Hydrothermal Mineral-Catalyzed Organic Products by Pyrolysis-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Fu, Qi; Niles, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    We report results of experiments to measure the C isotope composition of mineral catalyzed organic compounds derived from high temperature and high pressure synthesis. These experiments make use of an innovative pyrolysis technique designed to extract and measure C isotopes. To date, our experiments have focused on the pyrolysis and C isotope ratio measurements of low-molecular weight intermediary hydrocarbons (organic acids and alcohols) and serve as a proof of concept for making C and H isotope measurements on more complicated mixtures of solid-phase hydrocarbons and intermediary products produced during high temperature and high pressure synthesis on mineral-catalyzed surfaces. The impetus for this work stems from recently reported observations of methane detected within the Martian atmosphere [1-4], coupled with evidence showing extensive water-rock interaction during Martian history [5-7]. Methane production on Mars could be the result of synthesis by mineral surface-catalyzed reduction of CO2 and/or CO by Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) reactions during serpentization reactions [8,9]. Others have conducted experimental studies to show that FTT reactions are plausible mechanisms for low-molecular weight hydrocarbon formation in hydrothermal systems at mid-ocean ridges [10-12]. Further, recent experiments by Fu et al. [13] focus on examining detailed C isotope measurements of hydrocarbons produced by surface-catalyzed mineral reactions. Work described in this paper details the experimental techniques used to measure intermediary organic reaction products (alcohols and organic acids).

  20. Stable hydrogen and carbon isotope ratios of extractable hydrocarbons in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R. V.; Epstein, S.; Pizzarello, S.; Cronin, J. R.; Yuen, G. U.

    1991-01-01

    A fairly fool-proof method to ensure that the compounds isolated from meteorites are truly part of the meteorites and not an artifact introduced by exposure to the terrestrial environment, storage, or handling is presented. The stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios in several of the chemical compounds extracted from the Murchison meteorite were measured. The results obtained by studying the amino acids in this meteorite gave very unusual hydrogen and carbon isotope ratios. The technique was extended to the different classes of hydrocarbons and the hydrocarbons were isolated using a variety of separation techniques. The results and methods used in this investigation are described in this two page paper.

  1. Carbon Isotopic Ratios of Amino Acids in Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned to Earth samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 in January 2006. Preliminary examinations revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds could not be identified. Here. we present the carbon isotopic ratios of glycine and E-aminocaproic acid (EACH), the two most abundant amino acids observed, in Stardust-returned foil samples measured by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio crass spectrometry coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QMS/IRMS).

  2. Uptake of dissolved sulfide by Spartina alterniflora: evidence from natural sulfur isotope abundance ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, P.R. Jr.; Forrest, J.

    1982-05-07

    The difference in the stable sulfur isotope ratios of sulfate and sulfide in marsh pore water was used to verify the uptake of hydrogen sulfide by the salt marsh cordgrass Spartina alterniflora in a North Carolina salt marsh. Most of the plant sulfur derived from pore-water sulfide was recovered as sulfate, an indication that the sulfide had been oxidized within the plant. The anaysis of the sulfur isotope ratios of other coastal halophytes may be a useful technique for determining whether sulfide is taken up by plants in saline wetlands.

  3. Sulfur isotope ratios as evidence of dissolved sulfur uptake by salt marsh cordgrass. [Spartina alterniflora

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, P.R. Jr.; Forrest, J.

    1985-06-01

    The difference in stable sulfur isotope ratios of sulfate and sulfide in marsh porewater was used to verify the uptake of hydrogen sulfide by the salt marsh cordgrass, Spartina alterniflora, in North Carlina salt marsh. Most of the plant sulfur derived from porewater sulfide was recovered as sulfate indicating that the sulfide had been oxidized within the plant. The analysis of sulfur isotope ratios of other marsh halophytes is suggested as a technique to determine whether sulfide is taken up by plants. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. On the cross-sensitivity between water vapor mixing ratio and stable isotope measurements of in-situ analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, Stephen; Wang, Lixin; McCabe, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing amount of water vapor stable isotope data collected using in-situ instrumentation. A number of papers have characterized the performance of these in-situ analyzers and suggested methods for calibrating raw measurements. The cross-sensitivity of the isotopic measurements on the mixing ratio has been shown to be a major uncertainty and a variety of techniques have been suggested to characterize this inaccuracy. However, most of these are based on relating isotopic ratios to water vapor mixing ratios from in-situ analyzers when the mixing ratio is varied and the isotopic composition kept constant. An additional correction for the span of the isotopic ratio scale is then applied by measuring different isotopic standards. Here we argue that the water vapor cross-sensitivity arises from different instrument responses (span and offset) of the parent H2O isotope and the heavier isotopes, rather than spectral overlap that could cause a true variation in the isotopic ratio with mixing ratio. This is especially relevant for commercial laser optical instruments where absorption lines are well resolved. Thus, the cross-sensitivity determined using more conventional techniques is dependent on the isotopic ratio of the standard used for the characterization, although errors are expected to be small. Consequently, the cross-sensitivity should be determined by characterizing the span and zero offset of each isotope mixing ratio. In fact, this technique makes the span correction for the isotopic ratio redundant. In this work we model the impact of changes in the span and offset of the heavy and light isotopes and illustrate the impact on the cross-sensitivity of the isotopic ratios on water vapor. This clearly shows the importance of determining the zero offset for the two isotopes. The cross-sensitivity of the isotopic ratios on water vapor is then characterized by determining the instrument response for the individual isotopes for a

  5. Correlation between multielement stable isotope ratio and geographical origin in Peretta cows' milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Manca, G; Franco, M A; Versini, G; Camin, F; Rossmann, A; Tola, A

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the isotopic composition and protect "Peretta" cows' milk cheese, a typical product of Sardinia, against other cheeses of the same appearance sold under the same name, but made of raw materials from northern Europe. The study was concerned with 3 types of cheese: those produced in local dairies from milk from free-grazing or pasture-grazing cows in Sardinia (local dairy product), cheeses made on an industrial scale from milk produced by intensive farming in Sardinia (factory cheese), and cheeses made with raw materials imported from other countries (imported product). To distinguish the Sardinian cheeses from the imported product, the stable isotope ratios 13C/12C, 15N/14N, D/H, 34S/32S, and (18)O/(16)O were used. Determination of the isotopic data delta13C, delta15N, delta2H, and delta34S was performed in the casein fraction, whereas delta(18)O and delta13C were determined in the glycerol fraction. Measurements were performed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. A comparison between mean values of the isotope ratios by statistical analysis (ANOVA and Tukey's test) showed that the greatest difference between the 3 types of cheese (local dairy, factory, and imported products) was in the 13C/12C, 34S/32S, and (18)O/(16)O isotope ratios. In the other parameters, either no differences (delta15N) or minimal differences (delta2H) were found. Evaluation of the data by multivariate statistical analysis (principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis) revealed that the isotope characteristics of the factory products were similar to those of the cheeses produced from imported raw materials, whereas a difference was found between the local dairy-produced cheeses and the products in the other 2 categories. PMID:16507675

  6. Measurement of the stable carbon isotope ratio of atmospheric volatile organic compounds using chromatography, combustion, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled with thermal desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Hiroto; Murakami, Mai

    2014-06-01

    The isotopic analysis of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and in particular of their stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C), could potentially be used as an effective tool for identifying the sources of VOCs. However, to date, there have been very few such analyses. In this work, we analyze the δ13C values of VOCs using thermal desorption coupled with chromatography, combustion, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (TD-GC/C/IRMS). The measured peak shapes were of high quality and 36 compounds in a standard gas containing 58 VOCs (C5-C11) were detected. The measured δ13C varied widely, from -49.7‰ to -22.9‰, while the standard deviation of the δ13C values varied from 0.07‰ to 0.85‰ (n = 5). We then measured samples from two passenger cars in hot and cold modes, three gas stations, roadside air, and ambient air. In comparison with existing studies, the analytical precision for the 36 compounds in this study was reasonable. By comparing the δ13C values obtained from the cars and gas stations, we could identify some degree of the sources of VOCs in the roadside and ambient air samples.

  7. The boron trifluoride nitromethane adduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ownby, P. Darrell

    2004-02-01

    The separation of the boron isotopes using boron trifluoride·organic-donor, Lewis acid·base adducts is an essential first step in preparing 10B enriched and depleted crystalline solids so vital to nuclear studies and reactor applications such as enriched MgB 2, boron carbide, ZrB 2, HfB 2, aluminum boron alloys, and depleted silicon circuits for radiation hardening and neutron diffraction crystal structure studies. The appearance of this new adduct with such superior properties demands attention in the continuing search for more effective and efficient means of separation. An evaluation of the boron trifluoride nitromethane adduct, its thermodynamic and physical properties related to large-scale isotopic separation is presented. Its remarkably high separation factor was confirmed to be higher than the expected theoretical value. However, the reportedly high acid/donor ratio was proven to be an order of magnitude lower. On-going research is determining the crystal structure of deuterated and 11B enriched 11BF 3·CD 3NO 2 by X-ray and neutron diffraction.

  8. Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios of Toluene in the Boundary Layer and the Lower Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintel, J.; Hösen, E.; Bühler, F.; Heuser, H.-P.; Knieling, P.; Koppmann, R.; Krebsbach, M.; Linke, C.; Spahn, H.

    2012-04-01

    Large amounts of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) are emitted into the atmosphere by various sources at the surface. Since these emissions permanently mix with each other and also are chemically processed in a large number of reactions, measurements of VOC concentrations in the troposphere are not easy to interpret. Additional measurements of stable carbon isotope ratios in VOC provide further useful information. They allow the determination of the photochemical age of the corresponding compound and, making use of the concept of the effective Kinetic Isotope Effect (KIE), to separate the effects of mixing and chemical processing. Whole air samples were taken in the boundary layer and the lower troposphere onboard a zeppelin over the Lake Constance region in late autumn 2008 and analysed in the laboratory using a GC-C-IRMS (Gas Chromatograph - Combustion - Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer). The GC-C-IRMS was characterised carefully to estimate the precision as well as the effect of sample humidity on the measurement results. The major ion signal was used to derive VOC mixing ratios. We present stable isotope ratios (δ13C) and mixing ratios of toluene as an example compound and apply the aforementioned concepts of interpretation. The results show that the evolution of air masses in the boundary layer was characterised mainly by mixing, whereas the air masses in the free troposphere show significant influence of chemical processing.

  9. Irradiated Xenon Isotopic Ratio Measurement for Failed Fuel Detection and Location in Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Chikara; Iguchi, Tetsuo; Harano, Hideki

    2009-08-01

    The accuracy of xenon isotopic ratio burn-up calculations used for failed fuel identification was evaluated by an irradiation test of xenon tag gas samples in the Joyo test reactor. The experiment was carried out using pressurized steel capsules containing unique blend ratios of stable xenon tag gases in an on-line creep rupture experiment in Joyo. The tag gas samples were irradiated to total neutron fluences of 1.6 to 4.8 × 1026 n/m2. Laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry was used to analyze the cover gas containing released tag gas diluted to isotopic ratios of 100 to 102 ppb. The isotopic ratios of xenon tag gases after irradiation were calculated using the ORIGEN2 code. The neutron cross sections of xenon nuclides were based on the JENDL-3.3 library. These cross sections were collapsed into one group using the neutron spectra of Joyo. The comparison of measured and calculated xenon isotopic ratios provided C/E values that ranged from 0.92 to 1.10. The differences between calculation and measurement were considered to be mainly due to the measurement errors and the xenon nuclide cross section uncertainties.

  10. Advances in Multicollector ICPMS for precise and accurate isotope ratio measurements of Uranium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouman, C.; Lloyd, N. S.; Schwieters, J.

    2011-12-01

    The accurate and precise determination of uranium isotopes is challenging, because of the large dynamic range posed by the U isotope abundances and the limited available sample material. Various mass spectrometric techniques are used for the measurement of U isotopes, where TIMS is the most accepted and accurate one. Multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) can offer higher productivity compared to TIMS, but is traditionally limited by low efficiency of sample utilisation. This contribution will discuss progress in MC-ICPMS for detecting 234U, 235U, 236U and 238U in various uranium reference materials from IRMM and NBL. The Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus with Jet Interface offers a modified dry plasma ICP interface using a large interface pump combined with a special set of sample and skimmer cones giving ultimate sensitivity for all elements across the mass range. For uranium, an ion yield of > 3 % was reported previously [1]. The NEPTUNE Plus also offers Multi Ion Counting using discrete dynode electron multipliers as well as two high abundance-sensitivity filters to discriminate against peak tailing effects on 234U and 236U originating from the major uranium beams. These improvements in sensitivity and dynamic range allow accurate measurements of 234U, 235U and 236U abundances on very small samples and at low concentration. In our approach, minor U isotopes 234U and 236U were detected on ion counters with high abundance sensitivity filters, whereas 235U and 238U were detected on Faraday Cups using a high gain current amplifier (10e12 Ohm) for 235U. Precisions and accuracies for 234U and 236U were down to ~1%. For 235U, subpermil levels were reached.

  11. Childhood lead exposure in an industrial town in China: coupling stable isotope ratios with bioaccessible lead.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Bo; Chen, Kai; Juhasz, Albert L; Huang, Lei; Ma, Lena Q

    2015-04-21

    Fingerprinting based on stable isotopes of lead (Pb) in blood and environmental media helps to identify Pb exposure pathways in children. However, previous studies used stable isotopes of total Pb in media. In this study, a wire rope production town in China (Zhuhang) was selected for investigating the effectiveness of using isotope ratios in bioaccessible Pb to identify childhood Pb exposure pathways. Blood Pb levels of 115 children in Zhuhang were 1.7-20.4 μg dL(-1), averaging 6.1 ± 3.2 μg dL(-1) (mean ± standard deviation), and were ∼1.6 times the national average in China (3.9 ± 1.8 μg dL(-1)). Among different environmental media (housedust, soil, PM10, vegetables, rice, and drinking water), housedust (695 ± 495 mg kg(-1)) and vegetables [0.36 ± 0.40 mg (kg of fresh weight)(-1)] contained elevated Pb concentrations. The isotope ratios ((207)Pb/(206)Pb and (208)Pb/(206)Pb) of total Pb were the highest in housedust (0.8587 ± 0.0039 and 2.1049 ± 0.0087) but lower than blood Pb ratios (0.8634 ± 0.0027 and 2.1244 ± 0.0061). When using bioaccessible Pb in housedust (0.8639 ± 0.0018 and 2.1171 ± 0.0036), the isotope ratios overlapped with blood Pb ratios, suggesting that incidental ingestion of housedust was the predominant contributor to children's blood Pb. Coupling the stable isotope technique with bioaccessible Pb is more reliable for identifying Pb exposure pathways than total Pb determinations. PMID:25803404

  12. Method for determination of stable carbon isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric PM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukhtar, S.; Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Irei, S.; Huang, L.; Rudolph, J.

    2011-05-01

    A technique for the measurement of the stable isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is presented. It has been found in numerous laboratory studies that these compounds are photooxidation products of toluene in PM. Atmospheric samples from rural and suburban areas were collected for evaluation of the procedure. PM was collected on quartz fibre filters using dichotomous high volume air samplers for PM 2.5. Methylnitrophenols were extracted from the filters using acetonitrile. The sample was then purified using a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and solid phase extraction (SPE). The final solution was then divided into two aliquots. To one aliquot, a derivatising agent, Bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA), was added to the solution for Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS) analysis. The second half of the sample was stored at low temperature. When GC/MS analysis showed high enough concentrations the remaining sample was derivatized with BSTFA and analysed for stable isotope ratio using a Gas Chromatography/Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GC-IRMS). In all atmospheric PM samples analysed, 2-methyl-4-nitrophenol was found to be the most abundant methylnitrophenol. Nevertheless, due to low pollution levels occurring in the rural area, no samples had concentrations high enough to perform stable carbon isotope composition measurements of the methylnitrophenols. Samples collected in the suburban area could be analysed for carbon stable isotope ratio using GC-IRMS. The procedure described in this paper provides a very sensitive and selective method for the analysis of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric PM at concentrations as low as 1 pg m-3. For accurate (within ±0.5‰) stable isotope ratio analysis significantly higher concentrations in the range of 100 pg m-3 or more are required.

  13. Novel Apparatus for the Real-Time Quantification of Dissolved Gas Concentrations and Isotope Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, M.; Leen, J.; Baer, D. S.; Owano, T. G.; Liem, J.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of dissolved gases and their isotopic composition are critical in studying a variety of phenomena, including underwater greenhouse gas generation, air-surface exchange, and pollution migration. These studies typically involve obtaining water samples from streams, lakes, or ocean water and transporting them to a laboratory, where they are degased. The gases obtained are then generally measured using gas chromatography and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for concentrations and isotope ratios, respectively. This conventional, off-line methodology is time consuming, significantly limits the number of the samples that can be measured and thus severely inhibits detailed spatial and temporal mapping of gas concentrations and isotope ratios. In this work, we describe the development of a new membrane-based degassing device that interfaces directly to Los Gatos Research (cavity enhanced laser absorption or Off-Axis ICOS) gas analyzers (cavity enhanced laser absorption or Off-Axis ICOS analyzers) to create an autonomous system that can continuously and quickly measure concentrations and isotope ratios of dissolved gases in real time in the field. By accurately controlling the water flow rate through the membrane degasser, gas pressure on the outside of the membrane, and water pressure on the inside of the membrane, the system is able to generate precise and highly reproducible results. Moreover, by accurately measuring the gas flow rates in and out of the degasser, the gas-phase concentrations (ppm) could be converted into dissolved gas concentrations (nM). We will present detailed laboratory test data that quantifies the linearity, precision, and dynamic range of the system for the concentrations and isotope ratios of dissolved methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide. By interfacing the degassing device to a novel cavity-enhanced spectrometer (developed by LGR), preliminary data will also be presented for dissolved volatile organics (VOC) and other

  14. Density separation of boron particles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.M.

    1980-04-01

    A density distribution much broader than expected was observed in lots of natural boron powder supplied by two different sources. The material in both lots was found to have a rhombohedral crystal structure, and the only other parameters which seemed to account for such a distribution were impurities within the crystal structure and varying isotopic ratios. A separation technique was established to isolate boron particles in narrow densty ranges. The isolated fractions were subsequently analyzed for B/sup 10/ and total boron content in an effort to determine whether selective isotopic enrichment and nonhomogeneous impurity distribution were the causes for the broad density distribution of the boron powders. It was found that although the B/sup 10/ content remained nearly constant around 18%, the total boron content varied from 37.5 to 98.7%. One of the lots also was found to contain an apparently high level of alpha rhombohedral boron which broadened the density distribution considerably. During this work, a capability for removing boron particles containing gross amounts of impurities and, thereby, improving the overall purity of the remaining material was developed. In addition, the separation technique used in this study apparently isolated particles with alpha and beta rhombohedral crystal structures, although the only supporting evidence is density data.

  15. Determination of Light Water Reactor Fuel Burnup with the Isotope Ratio Method

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, David C.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.

    2007-11-01

    For the current project to demonstrate that isotope ratio measurements can be extended to zirconium alloys used in LWR fuel assemblies we report new analyses on irradiated samples obtained from a reactor. Zirconium alloys are used for structural elements of fuel assemblies and for the fuel element cladding. This report covers new measurements done on irradiated and unirradiated zirconium alloys, Unirradiated zircaloy samples serve as reference samples and indicate starting values or natural values for the Ti isotope ratio measured. New measurements of irradiated samples include results for 3 samples provided by AREVA. New results indicate: 1. Titanium isotope ratios were measured again in unirradiated samples to obtain reference or starting values at the same time irradiated samples were analyzed. In particular, 49Ti/48Ti ratios were indistinguishably close to values determined several months earlier and to expected natural values. 2. 49Ti/48Ti ratios were measured in 3 irradiated samples thus far, and demonstrate marked departures from natural or initial ratios, well beyond analytical uncertainty, and the ratios vary with reported fluence values. The irradiated samples appear to have significant surface contamination or radiation damage which required more time for SIMS analyses. 3. Other activated impurity elements still limit the sample size for SIMS analysis of irradiated samples. The sub-samples chosen for SIMS analysis, although smaller than optimal, were still analyzed successfully without violating the conditions of the applicable Radiological Work Permit

  16. Uranium isotopic ratio measurements of U3O8 reference materials by atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Albert J; Perea, Daniel E; Bartrand, Jonah; Arey, Bruce W; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2016-03-01

    We report results of measurements of isotopic ratios obtained with atom probe tomography on U3O8 reference materials certified for their isotopic abundances of uranium. The results show good agreement with the certified values. High backgrounds due to tails from adjacent peaks complicate the measurement of the integrated peak areas as well as the fact that only oxides of uranium appear in the spectrum, the most intense of which is doubly charged. In addition, lack of knowledge of other instrumental parameters, such as the dead time, may bias the results. Isotopic ratio measurements can be performed at the nanometer-scale with the expectation of sensible results. The abundance sensitivity and mass resolving power of the mass spectrometer are not sufficient to compete with magnetic-sector instruments but are not far from measurements made by ToF-SIMS of other isotopic systems. The agreement of the major isotope ratios is more than sufficient to distinguish most anthropogenic compositions from natural. PMID:26774651

  17. Proportions of convective and stratiform precipitation revealed in water isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Pradeep K.; Romatschke, Ulrike; Araguas-Araguas, Luis; Belachew, Dagnachew; Longstaffe, Frederick J.; Berg, Peter; Schumacher, Courtney; Funk, Aaron

    2016-08-01

    Tropical and midlatitude precipitation is fundamentally of two types, spatially limited and high-intensity convective or widespread and lower-intensity stratiform, owing to differences in vertical air motions and microphysical processes governing rain formation. These processes are difficult to observe or model and precipitation partitioning into rain types is critical for understanding how the water cycle responds to changes in climate. Here, we combine two independent data sets--convective and stratiform precipitation fractions, derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite or synoptic cloud observations, and stable isotope and tritium compositions of surface precipitation, derived from a global network--to show that isotope ratios reflect rain type proportions and are negatively correlated with stratiform fractions. Condensation and riming associated with boundary layer moisture produces higher isotope ratios in convective rain, along with higher tritium when riming in deep convection occurs with entrained air at higher altitudes. On the basis of our data, stable isotope ratios can be used to monitor changes in the character of precipitation in response to periodic variability or changes in climate. Our results also provide observational constraints for an improved simulation of convection in climate models and a better understanding of isotope variations in proxy archives, such as speleothems and tropical ice.

  18. Stable isotope ratio measurements of royal jelly samples for controlling production procedures: impact of sugar feeding.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Gaëlle; Wytrychowski, Marine; Batteau, Magali; Guibert, Sylvie; Casabianca, Hervé

    2011-07-30

    The carbon and nitrogen stable ratios of royal jelly (RJ) samples from various origins are determined using an elemental analyser linked online to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer to evaluate authenticity and adulteration. The (13)C/(12)C and (15)N/(14)N stable isotope ratios are measured in more than 500 RJs (domestic, imported and derived from feeding experiments) in order to obtain isotopic measurements that take into account seasonal, botanical and geographical effects. Authenticity intervals are established for traditional beekeeping practices, without feeding, in the range -22.48 to -27.90‰ for δ(13)C. For these samples, the δ(15)N values range from -1.58 to 7.98‰, depending on the plant sources of pollen and nectar. The δ(13)C values of the commercial samples vary from -18.54 to -26.58‰. High δ(13)C values are typical of sugar cane or corn syrups which have distinctive isotopic (13)C signatures because both plants use the C4 photosynthetic cycle, in contrast to most RJs which are derived from C3 plants. These differences in the (13)C-isotopic composition allow the detection of the addition of such sugars. RJs from traditional sources and from industrial production by sugar feeding are thus successfully distinguished. PMID:21698675

  19. Uranium Isotopic Ratio Measurements of U3O8 Reference Materials by Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Fahey, Albert J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Bartrand, Jonah AG; Arey, Bruce W.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2016-01-01

    We report results of measurements of isotopic ratios obtained with atom probe tomography on U3O8 reference materials certified for their isotopic abundances of uranium. The results show good agreement with the certified values. High backgrounds due to tails from adjacent peaks complicate the measurement of the integrated peak areas as well as the fact that only oxides of uranium appear in the spectrum, the most intense of which is doubly charged. In addition, lack of knowledge of other instrumental parameters, such as the dead time, may bias the results. Isotopic ratio measurements can be performed at the nanometer-scale with the expectation of sensible results. The abundance sensitivity and mass resolving power of the mass spectrometer are not sufficient to compete with magnetic-sector instruments but are not far from measurements made by ToF-SIMS of other isotopic systems. The agreement of the major isotope ratios is more than sufficient to distinguish most anthropogenic compositions from natural.

  20. Spectral analysis software improves confidence in plant and soil water stable isotope analyses performed by isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS).

    PubMed

    West, A G; Goldsmith, G R; Matimati, I; Dawson, T E

    2011-08-30

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for large errors to occur when analyzing waters containing organic contaminants using isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS). In an attempt to address this problem, IRIS manufacturers now provide post-processing spectral analysis software capable of identifying samples with the types of spectral interference that compromises their stable isotope analysis. Here we report two independent tests of this post-processing spectral analysis software on two IRIS systems, OA-ICOS (Los Gatos Research Inc.) and WS-CRDS (Picarro Inc.). Following a similar methodology to a previous study, we cryogenically extracted plant leaf water and soil water and measured the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of identical samples by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and IRIS. As an additional test, we analyzed plant stem waters and tap waters by IRMS and IRIS in an independent laboratory. For all tests we assumed that the IRMS value represented the "true" value against which we could compare the stable isotope results from the IRIS methods. Samples showing significant deviations from the IRMS value (>2σ) were considered to be contaminated and representative of spectral interference in the IRIS measurement. Over the two studies, 83% of plant species were considered contaminated on OA-ICOS and 58% on WS-CRDS. Post-analysis, spectra were analyzed using the manufacturer's spectral analysis software, in order to see if the software correctly identified contaminated samples. In our tests the software performed well, identifying all the samples with major errors. However, some false negatives indicate that user evaluation and testing of the software are necessary. Repeat sampling of plants showed considerable variation in the discrepancies between IRIS and IRMS. As such, we recommend that spectral analysis of IRIS data must be incorporated into standard post-processing routines. Furthermore, we suggest that the results from spectral analysis be

  1. Boron isotope fractionation in groundwaters as an indicator of past permafrost conditions in the fractured crystalline bedrock of the fennoscandian shield.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Joël; Négrel, Philippe; Blomqvist, Runar

    2005-01-01

    The Fennoscandian Shield has been subjected to several glaciations over the past million years, the last of which (Weichselian Ice Age) ended only at about 10Ka. Here we used boron isotopes and B contents to (a) establish the degree of water-rock interaction (WRI) and (b) clarify freezing processes within groundwaters from the Aspo site in Sweden and from various sites in Finland. The high delta(11)B values recorded by all groundwaters (up to 51.9 per thousand) including diluted, boron-poor, inland groundwaters suggest selective uptake of (10)B into ice related to freezing processes under permafrost conditions. According to co-existing ice and residual brines in a Canadian frozen mine, this fractionation process, enhanced by Rayleigh fractionation, can generate a natural field of isotopic variation around 60 per thousand and provides a new application of B isotope that makes possible to easily characterise groundwaters that underwent past permafrost conditions. PMID:15644244

  2. Tracing contamination sources in soils with Cu and Zn isotopic ratios.

    PubMed

    Fekiacova, Z; Cornu, S; Pichat, S

    2015-06-01

    Copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) are naturally present and ubiquitous in soils and are important micronutrients. Human activities contribute to the input of these metals to soils in different chemical forms, which can sometimes reach a toxic level for soil organisms and plants. Isotopic signatures could be used to trace sources of anthropogenic Cu and Zn pollution. The aim of this paper is to determine whether it is possible to identify (i) Cu and Zn contamination in soils and their sources, on the basis of their isotopic signatures, and (ii) situations that are a priori favorable or not for tracing Cu and Zn pollution using the isotopic approach. Therefore, we compiled data from the literature on Cu and Zn isotopes in soils, rocks and pollutants and added to this database the results of our own research. As only a few studies have dealt with agricultural contamination, we also studied a soil toposequence from Brittany, France, that experienced spreading of pig slurry for tens of years. In the surface horizons of the natural soils, the δ(65)Cu values vary from -0.15 to 0.44‰ and the δ(66)Zn from -0.03 to 0.43‰. Furthermore, vertical variations along soil profiles range from -0.95 to 0.44‰ for δ(65)Cu and from -0.53 to 0.64‰ for δ(66)Zn values. We concluded that pedogenetic processes can produce isotopic fractionation, yet, it is not always discernible and can be overprinted by an exogenous isotopic signature. Furthermore, some contaminants are enriched in heavy Cu or in light Zn compared to the rock or soil, but no generalization can be made. The anthropogenic inputs can be identified based on stable Cu and Zn isotope ratios if the isotope ratios of the sources are different from those of the soil, which needs to be tested for each individual case. PMID:25723961

  3. Deuterium stable isotope ratios as tracers of water resource use: an experimental test with rock doves.

    PubMed

    McKechnie, Andrew E; Wolf, Blair O; Martínez del Rio, Carlos

    2004-07-01

    Naturally-occurring deuterium stable isotope ratios can potentially be used to trace water resource use by animals, but estimating the contribution of isotopically distinct water sources requires the accurate prediction of isotopic discrimination factors between water inputs and an animal's body water pool. We examined the feasibility of using estimates of water fluxes between a bird and its environment with a mass-balance model for the deuterium stable isotope ratio of avian body water (deltaDbody) to predict isotopic discrimination factors. Apparent fractionation and thus discrimination factors were predicted to vary with the proportion of an animal's total water losses than could be attributed to evaporative processes. To test our ability to predict isotopic discrimination, we manipulated water intake and evaporative water loss in rock doves (Columba livia) by providing them with fresh water or 0.15 M NaCl solution in thermoneutral or hot environments. After we switched the birds from drinking water with deltaD=-95 per thousand VSMOW (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water) to enriched drinking water with deltaD=+52 per thousand VSMOW, steady-state deltaDbody was approached asymptotically. The equilibrium deltaDbody was enriched by 10-50 per thousand relative to water inputs. After isotopic equilibrium was reached, the degree of enrichment was positively related (r2=0.34) to the fraction of total water loss that occurred by evaporation (revap/rH2O)supporting the major prediction of the model. The variation we observed in discrimination factors suggests that the apparent fractionation of deuterium will be difficult to predict accurately under natural conditions. Our results show that accurate estimates of the contribution of different water sources to a bird's body water pool require large deuterium isotopic differences between the sources. PMID:15185137

  4. Electron screening effects in (p,α) reactions induced on boron isotopes studied via the Trojan Horse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Carlin, N.; Cherubini, S.; Gameiro Munhoz, M.; Gimenez Del Santo, M.; Gulino, M.; Kiss, G. G.; Kroha, V.; Kubono, S.; La Cognata, M.; Li, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Wen, Qungang; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Somorjai, E.; Souza, F. A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Tumino, A.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2013-04-01

    The Trojan Horse Method is a powerful indirect technique allowing one to measure the bare nucleus S(E)-factor and the electron screening potential for astrophysically relevant reactions without the needs of extrapolations. The case of the (p,α) reactions induced on the two boron isotopes 10,11B is here discussed in view of the recent Trojan Horse (TH) applications to the quasi-free 10,11B+2H reactions. The comparison between the TH and the low-energy direct data allowed us to determine the electron screening potential for the 11B(p,α) reaction, while preliminary results on the 10B(p,α) reaction have been extracted.

  5. The first protocol of stable isotope ratio assessment in tumor tissues based on original research.

    PubMed

    Taran, Katarzyna; Frączek, Toma; Kamiński, Rafal; Sitkiewicz, Anna; Kobos, Jozef; Paneth, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    Thanks to proteomics and metabolomics, for the past several years there has been a real explosion of information on the biology of cancer, which has been achieved by spectroscopic methods, including mass spectrometry. These modern techniques can provide answers to key questions about tissue structure and mechanisms of its pathological changes. However, despite the thousands of spectroscopic studies in medicine, there is no consensus on issues ranging from the choice of research tools, acquisition and preparation of test material to the interpretation and validation of the results, which greatly reduces the possibility of transforming the achieved knowledge to progress in the treatment of individual patients. The aim of this study was to verify the utility of isotope ratio mass spectrometry in the evaluation of tumor tissues. Based on experimentation on animal tissues and human neoplasms, the first protocol of stable isotope ratio assessment of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in tumor tissues was established. PMID:26619108

  6. Locally Grown, Natural Ingredients? The Isotope Ratio Can Reveal a Lot!

    PubMed

    Rossier, Joël S; Maury, Valérie; Pfammatter, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    This communication gives an overview of selected isotope analyses applied to food authenticity assessment. Different isotope ratio detection technologies such as isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) are briefly described. It will be explained how δ(18)O of water contained in fruits and vegetables can be used to assess their country of production. It will be explained why asparagus grown in Valais, in the centre of the Alps carries much less heavy water than asparagus grown closer to the sea coast. On the other hand, the use of δ(13)C can reveal whether a product is natural or adulterated. Applications including honey or sparkling wine adulteration detection will be briefly presented. PMID:27198812

  7. Improved precision and accuracy in quantifying plutonium isotope ratios by RIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Isselhardt, B. H.; Savina, M. R.; Kucher, A.; Gates, S. D.; Knight, K. B.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-09-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) holds the promise of rapid, isobar-free quantification of actinide isotope ratios in as-received materials (i.e. not chemically purified). Recent progress in achieving this potential using two Pu test materials is presented. RIMS measurements were conducted multiple times over a period of two months on two different Pu solutions deposited on metal surfaces. Measurements were bracketed with a Pu isotopic standard, and yielded absolute accuracies of the measured 240Pu/239Pu ratios of 0.7% and 0.58%, with precisions (95% confidence intervals) of 1.49% and 0.91%. In conclusion, the minor isotope 238Pu was also quantified despite the presence of a significant quantity of 238U in the samples.

  8. Improved precision and accuracy in quantifying plutonium isotope ratios by RIMS

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Isselhardt, B. H.; Savina, M. R.; Kucher, A.; Gates, S. D.; Knight, K. B.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-09-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) holds the promise of rapid, isobar-free quantification of actinide isotope ratios in as-received materials (i.e. not chemically purified). Recent progress in achieving this potential using two Pu test materials is presented. RIMS measurements were conducted multiple times over a period of two months on two different Pu solutions deposited on metal surfaces. Measurements were bracketed with a Pu isotopic standard, and yielded absolute accuracies of the measured 240Pu/239Pu ratios of 0.7% and 0.58%, with precisions (95% confidence intervals) of 1.49% and 0.91%. In conclusion, the minor isotope 238Pu was also quantified despite the presence ofmore » a significant quantity of 238U in the samples.« less

  9. Intercolony variability of skeletal oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of corals: temperature-controlled tank experiment and field observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, A.; Omata, T.; Kawahata, H.

    2005-12-01

    We conducted tank experiments in which we grew Porites spp. colonies in thermostated seawater at five temperature settings under moderate light intensity. A skeletal isotope microprofiling technique applied along the major growth axis of each colony revealed that the oxygen isotope ratios of newly deposited skeleton in most colonies remained almost constant during tank incubation. However, the oxygen isotope ratios displayed a surprisingly large intercolony variability (~1‰ at each temperature setting) although the mean slope obtained for the temperature - skeletal oxygen isotope ratio relationship was close to previous results. The variations in the oxygen isotope ratios were apparently caused by kinetic isotope effects related to variations in the skeletal growth rate rather than by species-specific variability or genetic differences within species. Carbon isotope ratios showed significantly inverse correlation with linear growth rates, suggesting a kinetic isotope control at low growth rates. We also examined oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of Porites corals collected from coral reefs of southern Ryukyu Islands, Japan. In shallow faster-growing corals, oxygen and carbon isotope ratios showed out-of-phase annual fluctuations. In contrast, in deep slower growing corals (mean annual linear extension < 4.8 mm yr1), oxygen and carbon isotope fluctuations were in phase, which has been identified as a pattern influenced by kinetic isotope effects. The slower growing corals were strongly influenced, and the faster growing corals weakly influenced, by kinetic isotope effects over metabolic isotope effects. Growth-rate-related kinetic isotope effects found in both the cultured corals and the deep slower-growing corals may be, at least partly, attributed to low light condition.

  10. Insights into Ocean Acidification During the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum from Boron Isotopes at Southern Ocean Site 738

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, I.; Hoenisch, B.; Friedrich, O.

    2015-12-01

    The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) is a ~650-kyr interval of global warming, with a brief ~50 ky long peak warming interval, and an abrupt termination. Deep sea and surface ocean temperature evolution across this interval are fairly well constrained, but thus far we have little understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the gradual warming and rapid recovery. Carbonate mass accumulation rates suggest a shoaling of the carbonate compensation depth, and studies on alkenones indicate increasing atmospheric CO2 levels during the MECO. This suggests an increase in surface ocean CO2, and consequently ocean acidification. However, the severity and timing of the proposed ocean acidification with respect to the onset, peak warming and the termination are currently not well resolved. The boron isotopic composition (δ11B) recorded in planktic foraminifer shells offers an opportunity to infer oceanic pH across this interval. We are working on a boron isotope reconstruction from Southern Ocean IODP site 738 and South Atlantic IODP site 1263, covering 42.0 to 38.5 Ma. These sites are characterized by good carbonate preservation and well-defined age models have been established. Additionally, ecology, nutrient content and bottom-water oxygenation have been shown to change significantly across the event towards a more eutrophic, periodically oxygen-depleted environment supporting different biological communities. We selected the planktic foraminifera species Acarinina spinuloinflata for this study because it is symbiont-bearing, suggesting a near-surface habitat and little vertical migration in the water column, and because of its abundance in the samples. δ11B data will be translated to surface ocean pH and atmospheric pCO2 will be approximated to refine knowledge about the carbon cycle during this time. Parallel analysis of two core sites will help to evaluate the tenacity of the data.

  11. NITROGEN STABLE ISOTOPE RATIOS IN SPOROCARPS OF ECTOMYCORRHIZAL FUNGI: INFLUENCE OF PHYLOGENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been suggested that nitrogen stable isotope ratios (expressed as delta 15-N) of fungus sporocarps, in conjunction with delta 15-N data from other ecosystem compartments, can be used to elucidate key processes in forest N-cycling. Although results of previous studies genera...

  12. PHYLOGENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES ON NITROGEN STABLE ISOTOPE RATIOS IN SPOROCARPS OF ECTOMYCORRHIZAL FUNGI

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been suggested that nitrogen stable isotope ratios (expressed as d15N) of fungus sporocarps, in conjunction with d15N data from other ecosystem compartments, can be used to elucidate key processes in forest N-cycling. Although results of previous studies generally support ...

  13. Correlation of carbon isotope ratios in the cellulose and wood extractives of Douglas-fir

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cellulose is usually isolated from the other components of plant material for analysis of carbon stable isotope ratios (δ13C). However, many studies have shown a strong correlation between whole-wood and cellulose δ13C values, prompting debate about the necessity of cellulose ext...

  14. SPATIAL VARIABILITY IN MUSSELS USED TO ASSESS BASE LEVEL NITROGEN ISOTOPE RATIO IN FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater mussels have been used to establish base level nitrogen isotope ratio values ( 15N) used in trophic position and food web studies in freshwater ecosystems. In this study, we assess the variability introduced when using unionid mussels in this manner by investigating th...

  15. Method for determination of stable carbon isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukhtar, S.; Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Irei, S.; Huang, L.; Rudolph, J.

    2011-11-01

    A technique for the measurement of the stable isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter is presented. Atmospheric samples from rural and suburban areas were collected for evaluation of the procedure. Particulate matter was collected on quartz fibre filters using dichotomous high volume air samplers. Methylnitrophenols were extracted from the filters using acetonitrile. The sample was then purified using a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and solid phase extraction. The final solution was then divided into two aliquots. To one aliquot, a derivatising agent, Bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide, was added for Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry analysis. The second half of the sample was stored in a refrigerator. For samples with concentrations exceeding 1 ng μl-1, the second half of the sample was used for measurement of stable carbon isotope ratios by Gas Chromatography-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry. The procedure described in this paper provides a method for the analysis of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter at concentrations as low as 0.3 pg m-3 and for stable isotope ratios with an accuracy of better than ±0.5‰ for concentrations exceeding 100 pg m-3. In all atmospheric particulate matter samples analysed, 2-methyl-4-nitrophenol was found to be the most abundant methylnitrophenol, with concentrations ranging from the low pg m-3 range in rural areas to more than 200 pg m-3 in some samples from a suburban location.

  16. Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Otoliths Differentiate Winter Flounder (Pseudopleuonectes americanus) Habitats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable carbon (13C) and oxygen (18O) isotope ratios were measured in otoliths of juvenile winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus) collected from 18 nursery areas along the coast of Rhode Island, USA. Samples were obtained during June and July of 2002 from locations tha...

  17. USE OF FATTY ACID STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO TO INDICATE MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCE IN TROPICAL SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory


    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotope ratio of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils as indicators of live microbial biomass levels, broad microbial community structure, and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil o...

  18. Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of juvenile winter flounder as indicators of inputs to estuarine systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were measured in the muscle tissues of young-of-the-year (YOY) winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several estuarine systems along the coast of Rhode Island, USA. These systems included three coastal lagoons (Ni...

  19. Breath carbon stable isotope ratios identify changes in energy balance and substrate utilization in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid detection of shifts in substrate utilization and energy balance would provide a compelling biofeedback tool to enable individuals to lose weight. In a pilot study, we tested whether the natural abundance of exhaled carbon stable isotope ratios (breath d13C values) reflects shifts between negat...

  20. Homogeneous diet of contemporary Japanese inferred from stable isotope ratios of hair.

    PubMed

    Kusaka, Soichiro; Ishimaru, Eriko; Hyodo, Fujio; Gakuhari, Takashi; Yoneda, Minoru; Yumoto, Takakazu; Tayasu, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The globalization of food production and distribution has homogenized human dietary patterns irrespective of geography, but it is uncertain how far this homogenization has progressed. This study investigated the carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in the scalp hair of 1305 contemporary Japanese and found values of -19.4 ± 0.6‰ and 9.4 ± 0.6‰ (mean ± SD), respectively. Within Japan, the inter-regional differences for both isotope ratios was less than 1‰, which indicates low dietary heterogeneity among prefectural divisions. The carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of the hair showed a significant correlation with the results of questionnaires on self-reported dietary habits. The carbon isotope ratios from Japan were lower than those in samples from the USA but higher than those in samples from Europe. These differences stem from the varying dietary proportions of food products originally derived from C3 and C4 plants. The dietary variation of Japan is as small as those of Europe and USA and smaller than those of some Asian countries. These results indicate that dietary homogeneity has progressed in Japan, which may indicate the influence from the spread of the Western-style diet and food globalization, although dietary heterogeneity among countries is still preserved. PMID:27616586

  1. Stabel Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Otoliths from Juvenile and Adult Winter Flounder

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was designed to determine if stable carbon (13C) and oxygen (18O) isotope ratios in otoliths could be used to differentiate the locations that serve as important nursery areas for winter flounder along the Rhode Island, USA coastline. In recent years the populations ...

  2. STABLE ISOTOPE RATIOS AND CONTAMINANT CONCENTRATIONS IN A SEWAGE - DISTORTED FOOD WEB

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concentrations of selected neutral organic contaminants and stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and deuterium/hydrogen in invertebrates and fish were compared from near a large, 60m deep municipal waste outfall near Los Angeles, California, where waste has a measurable infl...

  3. Characterizing Pb mobilization from upland soils to streams using (206)Pb/(207)Pb isotopic ratios.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Julian J C; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Carey, Anne-Marie; Raab, Andrea; Soulsby, Chris; Killham, Kenneth; Meharg, Andrew A

    2010-01-01

    Anthropogenically deposited lead (Pb) binds efficiently to soil organic matter, which can be mobilized through hydrologically mediated mechanisms, with implications for ecological and potable quality of receiving waters. Lead isotopic ((206)Pb/(207)Pb) ratios change down peat profiles as a consequence of long-term temporal variation in depositional sources, each with distinctive isotopic signatures. This study characterizes differential Pb transport mechanisms from deposition to streams at two small catchments with contrasting soil types in upland Wales, U.K., by determining Pb concentrations and (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios from soil core profiles, interstitial pore waters, and stream water. Hydrological characteristics of soils are instrumental in determining the location in soil profiles of exported Pb and hence concentration and (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios in surface waters. The highest Pb concentrations from near-surface soils are mobilized, concomitant with high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exports, from hydrologically responsive peat soils with preferential shallow subsurface flows, leading to increased Pb concentrations in stream water and isotopic signatures more closely resembling recently deposited Pb. In more minerogenic soils, percolation of water allows Pb, bound to DOC, to be retained in mineral horizons and combined with other groundwater sources, resulting in Pb being transported from throughout the profile with a more geogenic isotopic signature. This study shows that (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios can enhance our understanding of the provenances and transport mechanisms of Pb and potentially organic matter within upland soils. PMID:19954181

  4. Towards a better understanding of magnesium-isotope ratios from marine skeletal carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippler, Dorothee; Buhl, Dieter; Witbaard, Rob; Richter, Detlev K.; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2009-10-01

    This study presents magnesium stable-isotope compositions of various biogenic carbonates of several marine calcifying organisms and an algae species, seawater samples collected from the western Dutch Wadden Sea, and reference materials. The aim of this study is to explore the influence of mineralogy, taxonomy and environmental factors (e.g., seawater isotopic composition, temperature, salinity) on magnesium-isotopic (δ 26Mg) ratios of skeletal carbonates. Using high-precision multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, we observed that the magnesium-isotopic composition of seawater from the semi-enclosed Dutch Wadden Sea is identical to that of open marine seawater. We further found that a considerable component of the observed variability in δ 26Mg values of marine skeletal carbonates can be attributed to differences in mineralogy. Furthermore, magnesium-isotope fractionation is species-dependent, with all skeletal carbonates being isotopically lighter than seawater. While δ 26Mg values of skeletal aragonite and high-magnesium calcite of coralline red algae indicate the absence or negligibility of metabolic influences, the δ 26Mg values of echinoids, brachiopods and bivalves likely result from a taxon-specific level of control on Mg-isotope incorporation during biocalcification. Moreover, no resolvable salinity and temperature effect were observed for coralline red algae and echinoids. In contrast, Mg-isotope data of bivalves yield ambiguous results, which require further validation. The data presented here, point to a limited use of Mg isotopes as temperature proxy, but highlight the method's potential as tracer of seawater chemistry through Earth's history.

  5. Assessing connectivity of estuarine fishes based on stable isotope ratio analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzka, Sharon Z.

    2005-07-01

    Assessing connectivity is fundamental to understanding the population dynamics of fishes. I propose that isotopic analyses can greatly contribute to studies of connectivity in estuarine fishes due to the high diversity of isotopic signatures found among estuarine habitats and the fact that variations in isotopic composition at the base of a food web are reflected in the tissues of consumers. Isotopic analysis can be used for identifying nursery habitats and estimating their contribution to adult populations. If movement to a new habitat is accompanied by a shift to foods of distinct isotopic composition, recent immigrants and residents can be distinguished based on their isotopic ratios. Movement patterns thus can be reconstructed based on information obtained from individuals. A key consideration is the rate of isotopic turnover, which determines the length of time that an immigrant to a given habitat will be distinguishable from a longtime resident. A literature survey indicated that few studies have measured turnover rates in fishes and that these have focused on larvae and juveniles. These studies reveal that biomass gain is the primary process driving turnover rates, while metabolic turnover is either minimal or undetectable. Using a simple dilution model and biomass-specific growth rates, I estimated that young fishes with fast growth rates will reflect the isotopic composition of a new diet within days or weeks. Older or slower-growing individuals may take years or never fully equilibrate. Future studies should evaluate the factors that influence turnover rates in fishes during various stages of the life cycle and in different tissues, as well as explore the potential for combining stable isotope and otolith microstructure analyses to examine the relationship between demographic parameters, movement and connectivity.

  6. Geochemical evolution of tourmaline in the Darasun gold district, Transbaikal region, Russia: evidence from chemical and boron isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksheev, Ivan A.; Prokofiev, Vsevolod Yu.; Trumbull, Robert B.; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Yapaskurt, Vasilii O.

    2015-01-01

    The Darasun gold district, Transbaikal region, eastern Russia comprises three deposits: Teremkyn, Talatui, and Darasun, where gold-bearing quartz veins are hosted in metagabbro and granitoids. Tourmaline is a common gangue mineral in these deposits and a useful indicator of fluid source. The tourmaline compositions are oxy-dravite-povondraite, dravite, and schorl. We report here in situ B-isotope analyses by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) on tourmaline from veins in metagabbro and K-rich granodiorite, as well as from a breccia pipe at the margin of granodiorite porphyry. The B-isotope composition of tourmalines from the Darasun gold district as a whole covers a very wide range from -15.7 to +11.2 ‰, with distinctive differences among the three deposits. The δ11B values in the Teremkyn tourmalines are the most diverse, from -15.7 to +2.5 ‰. Tourmaline core compositions yield an inferred δ11B value of the initial fluid of ca. -12 ‰, suggesting granitic rocks as the B source, whereas the heavier rims and late-stage grains reflect Rayleigh fractionation. The δ11B values of tourmaline from Talatuiare -5.2 to -0.9 ‰. Taking into account fluid inclusion temperatures from vein quartz (ca. 400 °C), the inferred δ11B value of fluid is heavy (-2.5 to +2.2 ‰) suggesting a B source from the host metagabbro. At the Darasun deposit, tourmaline from the breccia pipe is isotopically uniform (δ11 B -6 to -5 ‰) and suggested to have precipitated from a 10B-depleted, residual fluid derived from granitic rocks. The Darasun vein-hosted tourmalines I and II (δ11B from -4.4 to +1.5 ‰) may have crystallized from strongly fractionated residual granitic fluid although mixing with heavy boron from the metagabbro rocks probably occurred as well; the boron isotopic composition of tourmaline III (-11.2 ‰) is attributed to a less-fractionated fluid, possibly a recharge from the same source.

  7. Variations in Sr and Nd isotopic ratios of cryoconite on glaciers in Asia, Alaska, and Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsuka, N.; Takeuchi, N.; Nakano, T.

    2012-12-01

    Recent shrinkages of glacial mass are not only due to global warming, but also possibly to accumulation of cryoconite on the glacial surface. Cryoconite is a biogenic surface dust consisting of organic matter mainly derived from living microbes on the glaciers, and mineral particles originated from basal till and/or wind-blown dust. Since cryoconite is dark color, it can reduce surface albedo of glaciers and accelerate their melting. Thus, it is important to understand their sources and formation process on the glaciers. The characteristics of cryoconite vary among geographical locations. For example, there are small amounts of cryoconite on Arctic glaciers and their glacial surface is clean. In contrast, large amounts of cryoconite accumulate on Asian glaciers and their glacial surface appears very dirty. These differences in cryoconite are likely to affect on surface albedo and melting of each glacier. However, the formation process of cryoconite, especially origins of minerals and production process of organic matters are still not well understood. Stable isotopic ratios of strontium (Sr) and neodymium (Nd) provide a means of identifying sources of substances and have been commonly used in loess or sediment studies. Furthermore, Sr isotope has been used as a tracer of Ca ion in studies of geochemical process, because its chemical characteristics are similar to Ca. Thus, Sr in organic matter including such organisms on the glacier may reveal their nutrient sources and ecology of them. In this study, we analyzed Sr and Nd isotopic ratios of four mineral and organic fractions in cryoconite on Asian and Polar glaciers. Based on the isotopic ratios, we identified origins of minerals in cryoconite and mineral sources used as nutrients by microbes on the glaciers. Sr and Nd isotopic ratios in the mineral fractions, especially silicate minerals, which are major components of mineral particles, vary significantly among the glaciers. Cryoconite on Asian glaciers showed

  8. Stable Cl And O Isotope Ratios Of Anthropogenic And Natural Perchlorates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloso, A.; Sturchio, N. C.; Böhlke, J.; Gu, B.; Horita, J.; Brown, G.; Hatzinger, P.

    2004-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) in aqueous systems, even in low concentrations, is recognized to have potential human health risks. The drinking and irrigation water supplies of millions of people in the U.S. have recently been found to be contaminated with perchlorate, and this problem continues to become even more widespread. Perchlorate, as a highly soluble and relatively inert anion, tends to persist over long time periods and its removal by conventional water treatment technologies is difficult and expensive. Many known sources of perchlorate contamination are anthropogenic, resulting from its extensive use as an oxidizer component in solid propellants for missiles, rockets, and fireworks. However, certain fertilizers derived from Chilean nitrate evaporate deposits are known to contain a low percentage of perchlorate (<0.5%) that may contaminate groundwater. New isotopic evidence provides insights on the possible natural sources of perchlorate in surface and ground waters. Stable isotope ratios of Cl and O can now be used to determine whether the source of perchlorates in a given area is natural or anthropogenic. Microbial perchlorate reduction has a large (˜15 per mil) kinetic isotope effect, and this may be used to identify whether natural attenuation of perchlorate is occurring. Anthropogenic perchlorate salts in milligram amounts are readily analyzed for 37Cl and 18O isotopes. Extracting an isotopically measurable amount of perchlorate from natural waters, which are usually within ppb range of concentrations, is a challenge. But with the use of a new class of highly-selective bifunctional anion exchange resins, recovery of trace amounts of perchlorate for accurate isotopic analysis has been demonstrated. Isotopic characterization is being conducted on anthropogenic perchlorate reagents, natural perchlorate-bearing salt deposits, and perchlorate-bearing groundwaters. Significant and consistent isotopic differences in both the Cl and O isotope ratios between

  9. The IRHUM database - bioavailable strontium isotope ratios of France for geochemical fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmes, Malte; Moffat, Ian; Grün, Rainer; Armstrong, Richard; Kinsley, Les; McMorrow, Linda

    2013-04-01

    Strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) are used as a geochemical tracer in a wide range of fields including archaeology, ecology, soil, food and forensic sciences. These applications are based on the principle that strontium isotopic ratios of materials reflect the geological sources of the strontium, which were available during its formation. Geologic regions with distinct strontium isotope ranges, which depend on their age and composition, can be differentiated. A major constraint for current studies is the lack of robust reference maps to evaluate the strontium isotope ratios measured in the samples. The aim of the IRHUM (isotopic reconstruction of human migration) database is to provide a reference map of bioavailable strontium isotope ratios for continental France. The current dataset contains 400 sample locations covering the major geologic units of the Paris and Aquitaine Basin, the Massif Central, and the Pyrenees. At each site soil and plant samples have been collected to cover the whole range of strontium ratios at a specific location. The database is available online at www.rses.anu.edu.au/research-areas/archaeogeochemistry and contains the bioavailable strontium isotope data as well as major and trace element concentrations for soil and plant samples. Strontium isotopes were analysed using a Neptune multi-collector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) and elemental concentrations with a Varian Vista Pro Axial ICP-AES (inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer). In addition, IRHUM provides spatial context for each sample, including background geology, field observations and soil descriptions. This metadata allows users to evaluate the suitability of a specific data point for their study. The IRHUM database fills an important gap between high resolution studies from specific sites (e.g. archaeological sites), to the very broad geochemical mapping of Europe. Thus it provides an excellent tool to evaluate the regional context

  10. Concentration and isotope ratio of sulfur species in snow along the route to Dome Fuji, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, M.; Motoyama, H.

    2014-12-01

    Snow ice sample in Antarctica contains particulate matter. Particulates originate from continent, volcano, sea, space, and organism. Methanesulfonate ion and sulfate ion are major sulfur compounds packed in snow ice in Antarctica. The isotopic ratio of an element reflects the origin and the history of the particle matter. Since the isotopic ratio of sulfur species depends on the source, the information about the source contribution of particulate matter can be estimated by analyzing the isotopic ratios of sulfur species. In this research, concentrations of sulfur species and isotopic ratios of sulfur species in snow collected on the route form coastal area to Dome Fuji station in Antarctica were analyzed. The snow samples were collected along ca. 1000 km traverse route from Mikaeridai (S16; 69°01'S, 40°03'E, 590 m) to Dome Fuji station (77°19'S, 39°42'E, 3810 m) by the Japan Antarctica research expedition. The snow samples were also collected from a pit dug at Dome Fuji station. Those samples were collected in the 2009/2010 austral summer. The samples were transported to Japan without thawing. Quantitative analyses of sulfur species were performed using ion chromatograph and quadrupole type mass spectrometer. The isotopic ratios of isolated sulfur species were measured using elemental analyzer and the magnetic field type mass spectrometer. Average concentrations and maximum concentration of methanesulfonate ion in the snow samples were 17 ng/ml and 123 ng/ml, respectively. Average concentrations and maximum concentration of sulfate ion were ng/ml 63 and 419 ng/ml, respectively. Further results and discussion about the behavior and origin of sulfur species in the snow will be presented.

  11. Forensic utility of the carbon isotope ratio of PVC tape backings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, L. A.; Thompson, A. H.; Mehltretter, A. H.; McLaskey, V.; Parish, A.; Aranda, R.

    2008-12-01

    Forensic interest in adhesive tapes with PVC-backings (polyvinyl chloride, electrical tapes) derives from their use in construction of improvised explosive devices, drug packaging and in a variety of other illicit activities. Due to the range of physical characteristics and chemical compositions of such tapes, traditional microscopic and chemical analysis of the tape backings and adhesives offer a high degree of discrimination between tapes from different manufacturers and products. To evaluate whether carbon isotope ratios may be able to increase discrimination of electrical tapes, particularly with regards to different tapes of the same product, we assessed the PVC-backings of 87 rolls of black electrical tape for their δ13C values. The adhesive on these tapes was physically removed with hexane, and plasticizers within the PVC tape backings were removed by three-20 minute extractions with chloroform. The δ13C values of the PVC tape backings ranged between -23.8 and -41.5 (‰ V-PDB). The carbon isotopic variation within a product (identical brand and product identification) is significant, based on five products with at least 3 rolls (ranges of 7.4‰ (n=3), 10.0‰ (n=6), 4.2‰ (n=16), 3.8‰ (n=6), and 11.5‰ (n=8), respectively). There was no measurable carbon isotope variation in regards to the following: a) along the length of a roll (4 samples from 1 roll); b) between the center and edge of a strip of tape (1 pair); c) between rolls assumed to be from the same lot of tape (2 pairs); d) between different rolls from the same batch of tape (same product purchased at the same time and place; 5 pairs); and e) between samples of a tape at room temperature, heated to 50° C and 80° C for 1 week. For each sample within the population of 87 tapes, carbon isotopes alone exclude 80 to 100% of the tapes as a potential match, with an average exclusion power of 92.5%, using a window of ± 0.4‰. Carbon isotope variations originate from variations in starting

  12. The application of isotope ratio mass spectrometry for discrimination and comparison of adhesive tapes.

    PubMed

    Horacek, Micha; Min, Ji-Sook; Heo, Sangcheol; Park, Jongseo; Papesch, Wolfgang

    2008-06-01

    Forensic scientists are frequently requested to differentiate between, or compare, adhesive tapes from a suspect or a crime scene. The most common polymers used to back packaging tape are polypropylene and polyvinyl chloride. Much of the oriented polypropylene (OPP) needed to produce packaging tapes, regardless of the tape brand, is supplied by just a few polymer manufacturers. Consequently, the composition of the backing material varies little. Therefore, the discriminating power of classical methods (physical fit, tape dimensions, colour, morphology, FTIR, PyGC/MS, etc.) is limited. Analysis of stable isotopes using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been applied in the broad area of forensics and it has been reported that isotope analysis is a valuable tool for the identification of adhesive tapes. We have tested the usefulness of this method by distinguishing different South Korean adhesive tapes produced by just a few manufacturers in the small South Korean market. Korean adhesive tapes were collected and analysed for their isotope signatures. The glue of the tapes was separated from the backing material and these sub-samples were analysed for their H- and C-isotope composition. The result shows the possibility for discriminating most tape samples, even from the same brand. Variations within single rolls have also been investigated, where no variations in H- and C-isotope composition significantly exceeding the standard deviation were found. PMID:18438979

  13. Precise determination of stable chlorine isotopic ratios in low-concentration natural samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magenheim, A. J.; Spivack, A. J.; Volpe, C.; Ransom, B.

    1994-07-01

    Investigation of stable chlorine isotopes in geological materials has been hindered by large sample requirements and/or lack of analytical precision. Here we describe precise methods for the extraction, isolation, and isotopic analysis of low levels of chlorine in both silicate and aerosol samples. Our standard procedure uses 2 μg of Cl for each isotopic analysis. External reproducibility (1 σ) is 0.25%. for the 37Cl /35Cl measurements. Chlorine is extracted from silicate samples (typically containing at least 20 μg of Cl) via pyrohydrolysis using induction heating and water vapor as the carrier, and the volatilized chlorine is condensed in aqueous solution. Atmospheric aerosols collected on filters are simply dissolved in water. Prior to isotopic measurement, removal of high levels of SO 42-, F -, and organic compounds is necessary for the production of stable ion beams. Sulfate is removed by BaSCO 4 precipitation, F - by CaF 2 precipitation, and organic compounds are extracted with activated carbon. Chlorine is converted to stoichiometric CsCl by cation exchange, and isotopic ratios are determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry of Cs 2Cl +. We demonstrate that the sensitivity and precision of this method allow resolution of natural variations in chlorine isotopic composition, and thereby provide insight to some fundamental aspects of chlorine geochemistry.

  14. Simulating oxygen isotope ratios in tree ring cellulose using a dynamic global vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keel, Sonja G.; Joos, Fortunat; Spahni, Renato; Saurer, Matthias; Weigt, Rosemarie B.; Klesse, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Records of stable oxygen isotope ratios in tree rings are valuable tools to reconstruct past climatic conditions and investigate the response of trees to those conditions. So far the use of stable oxygen isotope signatures of tree rings has not been systematically evaluated in dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). DGVMs integrate many hydrological and physiological processes and their application could improve proxy-model comparisons and the interpretation of oxygen isotope records. Here we present an approach to simulate leaf water and stem cellulose δ18O of trees using the LPX-Bern DGVM (LPX-Bern). Our results lie within a few per mil of measured tree ring δ18O of 31 different forest stands mainly located in Europe. Temporal means over the last 5 decades as well as interannual variations for a subset of sites in Switzerland are captured. A sensitivity analysis reveals that relative humidity, temperature, and the water isotope boundary conditions have the largest influence on simulated stem cellulose δ18O, followed by all climatic factors combined, whereas increasing atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen deposition exert no impact. We conclude that simulations with LPX-Bern are useful for investigating large-scale oxygen isotope patterns of tree ring cellulose to elucidate the importance of different environmental factors on isotope variations and therefore help to reduce uncertainties in the interpretation of δ18O of tree rings.

  15. Zinc Isotope Ratios as Indicators of Diet and Trophic Level in Arctic Marine Mammals.

    PubMed

    Jaouen, Klervia; Szpak, Paul; Richards, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of bone collagen are an established method for dietary reconstruction, but this method is limited by the protein preservation. Zinc (Zn) is found in bioapatite and the isotopic compositions of this element constitute a very promising dietary indicator. The extent of fractionation of Zn isotopes in marine environments, however, remains unknown. We report here on the measurement of zinc, carbon and nitrogen isotopes in 47 marine mammals from the archaeological site of Arvik in the Canadian Arctic. We undertook this study to test and demonstrate the utility of Zn isotopes in recent mammal bone minerals as a dietary indicator by comparing them to other isotopic dietary tracers. We found a correlation between δ66Zn values and trophic level for most species, with the exception of walruses, which may be caused by their large seasonal movements. δ6Zn values can therefore be used as a dietary indicator in marine ecosystems for both modern and recent mammals. PMID:27010907

  16. Zinc Isotope Ratios as Indicators of Diet and Trophic Level in Arctic Marine Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Jaouen, Klervia; Szpak, Paul; Richards, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of bone collagen are an established method for dietary reconstruction, but this method is limited by the protein preservation. Zinc (Zn) is found in bioapatite and the isotopic compositions of this element constitute a very promising dietary indicator. The extent of fractionation of Zn isotopes in marine environments, however, remains unknown. We report here on the measurement of zinc, carbon and nitrogen isotopes in 47 marine mammals from the archaeological site of Arvik in the Canadian Arctic. We undertook this study to test and demonstrate the utility of Zn isotopes in recent mammal bone minerals as a dietary indicator by comparing them to other isotopic dietary tracers. We found a correlation between δ66Zn values and trophic level for most species, with the exception of walruses, which may be caused by their large seasonal movements. δ6Zn values can therefore be used as a dietary indicator in marine ecosystems for both modern and recent mammals. PMID:27010907

  17. Dietary Heterogeneity among Western Industrialized Countries Reflected in the Stable Isotope Ratios of Human Hair

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Luciano O.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Cerling, Thure E.; Ehleringer, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Although the globalization of food production is often assumed to result in a homogenization of consumption patterns with a convergence towards a Western style diet, the resources used to make global food products may still be locally produced (glocalization). Stable isotope ratios of human hair can quantify the extent to which residents of industrialized nations have converged on a standardized diet or whether there is persistent heterogeneity and glocalization among countries as a result of different dietary patterns and the use of local food products. Here we report isotopic differences among carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotope ratios of human hair collected in thirteen Western European countries and in the USA. European hair samples had significantly lower δ13C values (−22.7 to −18.3‰), and significantly higher δ15N (7.8 to 10.3‰) and δ34S (4.8 to 8.3‰) values than samples from the USA (δ13C: −21.9 to −15.0‰, δ15N: 6.7 to 9.9‰, δ34S: −1.2 to 9.9‰). Within Europe, we detected differences in hair δ13C and δ34S values among countries and covariation of isotope ratios with latitude and longitude. This geographic structuring of isotopic data suggests heterogeneity in the food resources used by citizens of industrialized nations and supports the presence of different dietary patterns within Western Europe despite globalization trends. Here we showed the potential of stable isotope analysis as a population-wide tool for dietary screening, particularly as a complement of dietary surveys, that can provide additional information on assimilated macronutrients and independent verification of data obtained by those self-reporting instruments. PMID:22479574

  18. Identifying the change in atmospheric sulfur sources in China using isotopic ratios in mosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hua-Yun; Tang, Cong-Guo; Xiao, Hong-Wei; Liu, Xue-Yan; Liu, Cong-Qiang

    2009-08-01

    A considerable number of studies on rainwater sulfur isotopic ratios (δ34Srain) have been conducted to trace sulfur sources at a large number of sites in the past. If longitudinal studies on the isotope composition of precipitation sulfate were conducted, it is possible to relate that to changes in sulfur emissions. But direct measurement needs considerable labor and time. So, in this study, sulfur isotopic ratios in rainwater and mosses were analyzed at Guiyang and Nanchang to evaluate the possibility of using mosses as a substitute for rainwater. We found that present moss sulfur isotopic ratios were comparable to those of present rainwater. Additionally, we investigated the changes of atmospheric sulfur sources and sulfur concentrations using an isotopic graphic analysis at five industrial cities, two forested areas, and two remote areas in China. Mosses in industrial cities show a wide range of δ34S values, with the highest occurring at Chongqing (+3.9‰) and the lowest at Guiyang (-3.1‰). But as compared to those in forested and remote areas, δ34S values of mosses in all the five industrial cities are lower. On the basis of isotopic comparisons between past rainwater (reported in the literature) and present mosses, in the plot of δ34Smoss versus δ34Srain, six zones indicating different atmospheric sulfur change are separated by the 1:1 line and δ34S values of potential sulfur sources. Our results indicate that atmospheric sulfur pollution in most of the industrial cities decreased, while at the two forested areas, no significant changes were observed, and a new anxiousness coming from new energy sources (e.g., oil) appeared in some cities. Studies on the change of ambient SO2 concentrations support these results.

  19. Alleviation of overlap interferences for determination of potassium isotope ratios by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, S.J.; Houk, R.S.; Stevens, M.A.

    1988-06-01

    Positioning the sampling orifice relatively far from the load coil combined with use of low forward power and high aerosol gas flow rate causes the background mass spectrum to become dominated by NO/sup +/. Nearly all the Ar/sup +/ and ArH/sup +/ ions are suppressed under these conditions, which frees m/z 39 and 41 for potassium isotope ratio measurements. The precision is 0.3-0.9% relative standard deviation for potassium concentrations in the range 1-50 mg L/sup -1/. The determined ratios are approx. 9% higher than the accepted value and also vary with the concentration of sodium concomitant, so calibrations and chemical separations are desirable. These observations should permit use of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for rapid isotope ratio determinations of potassium from biological organisms or water sources.

  20. Bayesian Integration of Isotope Ratio for Geographic Sourcing of Castor Beans

    PubMed Central

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Kreuzer, Helen; Hart, Garret; Ehleringer, James; West, Jason; Gill, Gary; Duckworth, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the forensic interest associated with the poison ricin, which is extracted from the seeds of the Ricinus communis plant. Both light element (C, N, O, and H) and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios have previously been used to associate organic material with geographic regions of origin. We present a Bayesian integration methodology that can more accurately predict the region of origin for a castor bean than individual models developed independently for light element stable isotopes or Sr isotope ratios. Our results demonstrate a clear improvement in the ability to correctly classify regions based on the integrated model with a class accuracy of 60.9 ± 2.1% versus 55.9 ± 2.1% and 40.2 ± 1.8% for the light element and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios, respectively. In addition, we show graphically the strengths and weaknesses of each dataset in respect to class prediction and how the integration of these datasets strengthens the overall model. PMID:22919270

  1. Bayesian Integration of Isotope Ratio for Geographic Sourcing of Castor Beans

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Kreuzer, Helen; Hart, Garret; Ehleringer, James; West, Jason; Gill, Gary; Duckworth, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Recenmore » t years have seen an increase in the forensic interest associated with the poison ricin, which is extracted from the seeds of the Ricinus communis plant. Both light element (C, N, O, and H) and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios have previously been used to associate organic material with geographic regions of origin. We present a Bayesian integration methodology that can more accurately predict the region of origin for a castor bean than individual models developed independently for light element stable isotopes or Sr isotope ratios. Our results demonstrate a clear improvement in the ability to correctly classify regions based on the integrated model with a class accuracy of 60.9 ± 2.1 % versus 55.9 ± 2.1 % and 40.2 ± 1.8 % for the light element and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios, respectively. In addition, we show graphically the strengths and weaknesses of each dataset in respect to class prediction and how the integration of these datasets strengthens the overall model.« less

  2. Selenium stable isotope ratios in California agricultural drainage water management systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herbel, M.J.; Johnson, T.M.; Tanji, K.K.; Gao, S.; Bullen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    Selenium stable isotope ratios are known to shift in predictable ways during various microbial, chemical, and biological processes, and can be used to better understand Se cycling in contaminated environments. In this study we used Se stable isotopes to discern the mechanisms controlling the transformation of oxidized, aqueous forms of Se to reduced, insoluble forms in sediments of Se-affected environments. We measured 80Se/76Se in surface waters, shallow ground waters, evaporites, digested plants and sediments, and sequential extracts from several sites where agricultural drainage water is processed in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Selenium isotope analyses of samples obtained from the Tulare Lake Drainage District flow-through wetland reveal small isotopic contrasts (mean difference 0.7%o) between surface water and reduced Se species in the underlying sediments. Selenium in aquatic macrophytes was very similar isotopically to the NaOH and Na2SO3 sediment extracts designed to recover soluble organic Se and Se(O), respectively. For the integrated on-farm drainage management sites, evaporite salts were slightly (approximately 0.6%o) enriched in the heavier isotope relative to the inferred parent waters, whereas surface soils were slightly (approximately 1.4%o) depleted. Bacterial or chemical reduction of Se(VI) or Se(IV) may be occurring at these sites, but the small isotopic contrasts suggest that other, less isotopically fractionating mechanisms are responsible for accumulation of reduced forms in the sediments. These findings provide evidence that Se assimilation by plants and algae followed by deposition and mineralization is the dominant transformation pathway responsible for accumulation of reduced forms of Se in the wetland sediments.

  3. Improving precision in resonance ionization mass spectrometry : influence of laser bandwidth in uranium isotope ratio measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Isselhardt, B. H.; Savina, M. R.; Knight, K. B.; Pellin, M. J.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Prussin, S. G.

    2011-03-01

    The use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U ratios by resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. By broadening the bandwidth of the first laser in a three-color, three-photon ionization process from a bandwidth of 1.8 GHz to about 10 GHz, the variation in sequential relative isotope abundance measurements decreased from 10% to less than 0.5%. This procedure was demonstrated for the direct interrogation of uranium oxide targets with essentially no sample preparation.

  4. Progress in AMS measurement of U isotope ratios in nanogram U samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kejun; He, Ming; Wang, Chen; Zhao, Xinhong; Li, Lili; Zhao, Yonggang; Wang, Xianggao; Shen, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaoming; Pang, Fangfang; Xu, Yongning; Zhao, Qingzhang; Dou, Liang; Yang, Xuran; Wu, Shaoyong; Lin, Deyu; Li, Kangning; You, Qubo; Bao, Yiwen; Hu, Yueming; Xia, Qingliang; Yin, Xinyi; Jiang, Shan

    2015-10-01

    The determination of uranium isotopic composition in ultra-trace U samples is very important in different fields, especially for the nuclear forensics. A new Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique has been developed for the measurement of uranium isotopic ratios in ng level uranium samples at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). Recently, the method was further optimized and developed by using a series of blank and standard samples. The results show that the 236U at the femtogram level can be determined in nanogram U samples by the newly developed AMS technique at CIAE. The experimental setup, performances and results will be detailed in this contribution.

  5. Frontiers of QC Laser spectroscopy for high precision isotope ratio analysis of greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmenegger, Lukas; Mohn, Joachim; Harris, Eliza; Eyer, Simon; Ibraim, Erkan; Tuzson, Béla

    2016-04-01

    An important milestone for laser spectroscopy was achieved when isotope ratios of greenhouse gases were reported at precision levels that allow addressing research questions in environmental sciences. Real-time data with high temporal resolution at moderate cost and instrument size make the optical approach highly attractive, complementary to the well-established isotope-ratio mass-spectrometry (IRMS) method. Especially appealing, in comparison to IRMS, is the inherent specificity to structural isomers having the same molecular mass. Direct absorption in the MIR in single or dual QCL configuration has proven highly reliable for the sta-ble isotopes of CO2, N2O and CH4. The longest time series of real-time measurements is currently available for δ13C and δ18O in CO2 at the high-alpine station Jung-fraujoch. At this well-equipped site, QCL based direct absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS) measurements are ongoing since 2008 1,2. Applications of QCLAS for N2O and CH4 stable isotopes are considerably more challenging because of the lower atmospheric mixing ratios, especially for the less abundant species, such as N218O and CH3D. For high precision (< 0.1 ‰) measurements in ambient air, QCLAS may be combined with a fully automated preconcentration unit yielding an up to 500 times concentration increase and the capability to separate the target gas from spectral interferants by se-quential desorption 3. Here, we review our recent developments on high precision isotope ratio analysis of greenhouse gases, with special focus on the isotopic species of N2O and CH4. Furthermore, we show environ-mental applications illustrating the highly valuable information that isotope ratios of atmospheric trace gases can carry. For example, the intramolecular distribution of 15N in N2O gives important information on the geochemical cycle of N2O4-6, while the analysis of δ13C and δ D in CH4 may be applied to disentangle microbial, fossil and landfill sources 7. 1 Sturm, P., Tuzson, B

  6. Boron and Lithium Isotope Determinations in Minerals from Subduction-Related Rocks by LA-MC-ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, C.; Harlow, G. E.; Ponzevera, E.; Marschall, H.

    2014-12-01

    Lithium (Li) and boron (B) are incompatible light elements that preferentially partition into the fluid phase, whether melt or aqueous liquid, and thus are useful for tracking fluid-related processes in rocks. Currently, most of the Li isotopic data available on subduction-related rocks are whole-rock analysis; and the few B isotopic analyses on subduction material have been carried out on whole-rock or in-situ in accessory phase (tourmaline). The new method presented here couples an ESI New Wave UP-193-FX ArF* (193 nm) excimer laser ablation microscope with a Neptune Plus (Thermo Scientific) MC-ICP-MS. In situ B and Li isotopic analyses were carried out on mica and pyroxenes from jadeitites and albite mica-rocks from a subduction-related mélange. These results have been compared with SIMS analyses for B on the same mineral samples and with MC-ICP-MS analyses for Li on whole-rock or a mineral separate from the same sample. The results show that for B concentrations above 15 μg/g, the data obtained by LA-MC-ICPMS and by SIMS are similar within error, for both mica and pyroxene. The significant improvement of LA-MC-ICPMS compared to SIMS is the duration of measurements: one analysis takes 3 minutes by LA-MC-ICPMS, and 32 minutes by SIMS. Such a method therefore permits multiplying the number of isotopic analyses, providing a better interpretation of the studied samples, with a lateral resolution and an error on each measurement similar to those obtained with SIMS. The results show that for Li concentrations above 10μg/g, the data obtained by LA-MC-ICPMS and by MC-ICP-MS are also similar within error, for both mica and pyroxene. The significant improvement of LA-MC-ICPMS compared to MC-ICP-MS is better spatial resolution. Indeed, many of the mineral phases encountered in subduction-related rocks display a strong chemical zoning, and the analyses carried out by wet chemistry and MC-ICP-MS average the isotopic values of the different zones. This newly developed

  7. Simultaneous measurement of CO2 concentration and isotopic ratios in gas samples using IRMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Eun-Ji; Lee, Dongho; Bong, Yeon-Sik; Lee, Kwang-Sik

    2014-05-01

    Isotopic methods are indispensable tools for studies on atmosphere-biosphere exchanges of CO2 and environmental monitoring such as CO2 leakage detection from subsurface carbon storages. CO2 concentration is an important variable in interpreting isotopic composition of CO2 especially in atmospheric applications (e.g., 'Keeling plot'). Optical methods such as CRDS (Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy) are gaining attention recently because of its capability to simultaneously measure CO2 concentration and isotopic ratios with a short measurement interval (up to 1 sec.). On the other hand, IRMS (Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer) has been used only for isotopic measurements. In this study, we propose a method to measure CO2 concentration from gas samples along with isotopic ratios using conventional IRMS system. The system consists of Delta V Plus IRMS interfaced with GasBench II (Thermo Scientific, Germany). 12-mL vials with open top screw cap and rubber septum were used for both gas sampling and analysis. For isotopic analysis, gases in the vials were transferred into GasBench II by He carrier flow and CO2 was trapped by a single cryotrap (-180 ºC) after passing a water trap (Mg(ClO4)2). Upon release of the cryotrap, liberated CO2 was separated from N2O using gas chromatography column inside the GasBench II and introduced online into the IRMS. Isotopic ratios were measured for the masses of 44, 45 and 46, and the peak intensity (mV of mass 44 and peak area) was recorded for the concentration calculation. For the determination of CO2 concentration, a calibration curve relating the peak intensity with molar concentration of CO2 was constructed. By dissolving NaHCO3 in de-ionized water, solutions containing 0.05, 0.1, 0.25 and 0.5 µmol of inorganic carbon were prepared in 12 mL vials. Phosphoric acid was injected through rubber septum of the vials to acidify the solution and released CO2 was analyzed for the isotopic ratios and the corresponding peak intensity was recorded

  8. Geospatial modeling of plant stable isotope ratios - the development of isoscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, J. B.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Hurley, J. M.; Cerling, T. E.

    2007-12-01

    Large-scale spatial variation in stable isotope ratios can yield critical insights into the spatio-temporal dynamics of biogeochemical cycles, animal movements, and shifts in climate, as well as anthropogenic activities such as commerce, resource utilization, and forensic investigation. Interpreting these signals requires that we understand and model the variation. We report progress in our development of plant stable isotope ratio landscapes (isoscapes). Our approach utilizes a GIS, gridded datasets, a range of modeling approaches, and spatially distributed observations. We synthesize findings from four studies to illustrate the general utility of the approach, its ability to represent observed spatio-temporal variability in plant stable isotope ratios, and also outline some specific areas of uncertainty. We also address two basic, but critical questions central to our ability to model plant stable isotope ratios using this approach: 1. Do the continuous precipitation isotope ratio grids represent reasonable proxies for plant source water?, and 2. Do continuous climate grids (as is or modified) represent a reasonable proxy for the climate experienced by plants? Plant components modeled include leaf water, grape water (extracted from wine), bulk leaf material ( Cannabis sativa; marijuana), and seed oil ( Ricinus communis; castor bean). Our approaches to modeling the isotope ratios of these components varied from highly sophisticated process models to simple one-step fractionation models to regression approaches. The leaf water isosocapes were produced using steady-state models of enrichment and continuous grids of annual average precipitation isotope ratios and climate. These were compared to other modeling efforts, as well as a relatively sparse, but geographically distributed dataset from the literature. The latitudinal distributions and global averages compared favorably to other modeling efforts and the observational data compared well to model predictions

  9. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dishon, G.; Fisch, J.; Horn, I.; Kaczmarek, K.; Bijma, J.; Gruber, D. F.; Nir, O.; Popovich, Y.; Tchernov, D.

    2015-06-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~0.1% of the oceans habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced significant global declines due to a variety of causes, one of the major being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching the coral expels its symbiotic algae losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been extensively investigated, there is no scientific data on historical coral bleaching prior to 1979. In this study, we employ high-resolution femtosecond Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) to demonstrate a distinct biologically-induced decline of boron (B) isotopic composition (δ11B) as a result of coral bleaching. These findings and methodology offer a new use for a previously developed isotopic proxy to reconstruct paleo-coral bleaching events. Based on a literature review of published δ11B data and our recorded "vital effect" of coral bleaching on the δ11B signal, we also describe at least two possible coral bleaching events since the Last Glacial Maximum. The implementation of this bleaching proxy holds the potential of identifying occurrences of coral bleaching throughout the geological record. A deeper temporal view of coral bleaching will enable scientists to determine if it occurred in the past during times of environmental change and what outcome it may have had on coral population structure.

  10. Boron isotope systematics during magma-carbonate interaction: an experimental study from Merapi (Indonesia) and Vesuvius (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deegan, F. M.; Jolis, E. M.; Troll, V. R.; Freda, C.; Whitehouse, M.

    2011-12-01

    Carbonate assimilation is increasingly recognized as an important process affecting the compositional evolution of magma and its inherent ability to erupt explosively due to release of carbonate-derived CO2 [e.g., 1, 2, 3]. In order to gain insights into this process, we performed short time-scale carbonate dissolution experiments in silicate melt using natural starting materials from Merapi and Vesuvius volcanoes at magmatic pressure and temperature [2, 4]. The experiments enable us to resolve in detail the timescales, textures and chemical features of carbonate assimilation. Three compositionally distinct glass domains have been defined: i) Ca-normal glass, similar in composition to the starting material; ii) Ca-rich, contaminated glass; and iii) a diffusional glass interface between the Ca-normal and Ca-rich glass, characterized by steady interchange between SiO2 and CaO. Here we present new boron isotope data for the experimental products obtained by SIMS. The glasses show distinct and systematic variation in their δ11B (%) values. The contaminated glasses generally show extremely negative δ11B values (down to -41 %) relative to both the uncontaminated experimental glass and fresh arc volcanics (-7 to +7 % [5]). Considering that carbonates have δ11B values of +9 to +26 [6], the data cannot be explained by simple mixing processes between the end-members alone. This implies that the δ11B of the original contaminant was drastically modified before being incorporated into the melt, which can be explained by B isotope fractionation during breakdown and degassing of the carbonate. Our data represents the first B isotope analyses of experimental products of carbonate assimilation. They provide novel and well constrained insights into the behavior of boron upon degassing of carbonate. This, in turn, has implications for both i) late stage contamination and volatile addition to hazardous volcanic systems located over carbonate basement (cf. [7]) and ii) studies of

  11. Detection of counterfeit antiviral drug Heptodin and classification of counterfeits using isotope amount ratio measurements by multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS).

    PubMed

    Santamaria-Fernandez, Rebeca; Hearn, Ruth; Wolff, Jean-Claude

    2009-06-01

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) are highly important techniques that can provide forensic evidence that otherwise would not be available. MC-ICP-MS has proved to be a very powerful tool for measuring high precision and accuracy isotope amount ratios. In this work, the potential of combining isotope amount ratio measurements performed by MC-ICP-MS and IRMS for the detection of counterfeit pharmaceutical tablets has been investigated. An extensive study for the antiviral drug Heptodin has been performed for several isotopic ratios combining MC-ICP-MS and an elemental analyser EA-IRMS for stable isotope amount ratio measurements. The study has been carried out for 139 batches of the antiviral drug and analyses have been performed for C, S, N and Mg isotope ratios. Authenticity ranges have been obtained for each isotopic system and combined to generate a unique multi-isotopic pattern only present in the genuine tablets. Counterfeit tablets have then been identified as those tablets with an isotopic fingerprint outside the genuine isotopic range. The combination of those two techniques has therefore great potential for pharmaceutical counterfeit detection. A much greater power of discrimination is obtained when at least three isotopic systems are combined. The data from these studies could be presented as evidence in court and therefore methods need to be validated to support their credibility. It is also crucial to be able to produce uncertainty values associated to the isotope amount ratio measurements so that significant differences can be identified and the genuineness of a sample can be assessed. PMID:19606588

  12. Resonant laser-SNMS of boron for analysis of paleoceanographic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vering, G.; Crone, C.; Kathers, P.; Bijma, J.; Arlinghaus, H. F.

    2006-07-01

    Calcite shells of foraminifera, which are accumulated in the ocean sediment, are an important object of paleoceanographic studies to reconstruct environmental parameters of the past. Foraminifera are unicellular organisms living in almost all parts of the ocean during the entire paleoceanographic time scale. The isotope ratio of boron incorporated in the calcite shell delivers information about the pH-value of the ocean at the time the shell was formed. Since the boron fraction of such a shell is about 5 ppm, an extremely sensitive technique is necessary for an exact boron isotope ratio determination. Resonant laser secondary neutral mass spectrometry (r-laser-SNMS) was used to measure boron isotope ratios in calcite shells. Analysis was carried out with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer equipped with an electron impact gun for sputtering and a Ga + primary ion source. Resonant ionization of sputtered boron neutrals was performed via a three-step ionization scheme accomplished with two tunable dye lasers and the fundamental wavelength of a Nd:YAG laser. After optimizing the boron ionization and detection process, boron isotope ratios were directly measured on single foraminiferal shells after removing contaminants by Ar + ion beam sputtering.

  13. Isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: methods for isotopic calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, D. A.; Brand, W. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    In trial analyses of a series of n-alkanes, precise determinations of 13C contents were based on isotopic standards introduced by five different techniques and results were compared. Specifically, organic-compound standards were coinjected with the analytes and carried through chromatography and combustion with them; or CO2 was supplied from a conventional inlet and mixed with the analyte in the ion source, or CO2 was supplied from an auxiliary mixing volume and transmitted to the source without interruption of the analyte stream. Additionally, two techniques were investigated in which the analyte stream was diverted and CO2 standards were placed on a near-zero background. All methods provided accurate results. Where applicable, methods not involving interruption of the analyte stream provided the highest performance (sigma = 0.00006 at.% 13C or 0.06% for 250 pmol C as CO2 reaching the ion source), but great care was required. Techniques involving diversion of the analyte stream were immune to interference from coeluting sample components and still provided high precision (0.0001 < or = sigma < or = 0.0002 at.% or 0.1 < or = sigma < or = 0.2%).

  14. USE OF GC-MS/COMBUSTION/IRMS TO IDENTIFY AND DETERMINE THE STABLE CARBON ISOTOPIC RATIO OF INDIVIDUAL LIPIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A system that couples a gas chromatograph (GC) via a split to a quadrapole mass spectrometer (MS) and, through a combustion interface, to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) allows the simultaneous detection of electron impact mass spectra and stable carbon isotope ratio an...

  15. Nitrogen-isotope ratios of nitrate in ground water under fertilized fields, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flipse, W.J., Jr.; Bonner, F.T.

    1985-01-01

    Ground-water samples from two heavily fertilized sites in Suffolk County, New York, were collected through the 1978 growing season and analyzed for nitrate-N concentrations and nitrogen-isotope ratios. Six wells were at a potato farm; six were on a golf course. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the 15N/14N ratios (??15N values) of fertilizer are increased during transit from land surface to ground water to an extent which would preclude use of this ratio to distinguish agricultural from animal sources of nitrate in ground water. Ground water at both sites contained a greater proportion of 15N than the fertilizers being applied. At the potato farm, the average ??15N value of the fertilizers was 0.2???; the average ??15N value of the ground-water nitrate was 6.2???. At the golf course, the average ??15N value of the fertilizers was -5.9???, and that of ground-water nitrate was 6.5???. The higher ??15N values of ground-water nitrate are probably caused by isotopic fractionation during the volatile loss of ammonia from nitrogen applied in reduced forms (NH4+ and organic-N). The ??15N values of most ground-water samples from both areas were less than 10???, the upper limit of the range characteristic of agricultural sources of nitrate; these sources include both fertilizer nitrate and nitrate derived from increased mineralization of soil nitrogen through cultivation. Previous studies have shown that the ??15N values of nitrate derived from human or animal waste generally exceed 10???. The nitrogen-isotope ratios of fertilizer-derived nitrate were not altered to an extent that would make them indistinguishable from animal-waste-derived nitrates in ground water.Ground-water samples from two heavily fertilized sites in Suffolk County, New York, were collected through the 1978 growing season and analyzed for nitrate-N concentrations and nitrogen-isotope ratios. Six wells were at a potato farm; six were on a golf course. The purpose of this study was to

  16. Along-strike magma mixing beneath mid-ocean ridges - Effects on isotopic ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, P. M.; Turcotte, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of mixing processes on the isotopic variability of midocean ridge basalts are studied. The processes considered are porous flow dispersion and convective mixing in magma chambers. Porous flow dispersion is capable of mixing magmas over distances of only a few tens of meters. Convective mixing, on the other hand, is found to produce continuous magma chambers, where mixing is limited by convective processes, and for discontinuous chambers, where mixing is limited by chamber size. Preliminary comparison of the calculations with observations along the midocean ridges shows that the calculations are consistent with the existence of a correlation between bathymetry and isotopic ratio at long, but not at short, wavelengths. They are also capable of explaining a decrease in isotopic variability with increasing spreading rate.

  17. Performance and limits of liquid chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry system for halogenated compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilevska, Tetyana; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans

    2014-05-01

    Compound Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) has been an important step for the assessment of the origin and fate of compounds in environmental science.[1] Biologically or pharmaceutically important compounds often are not amenable for gas chromatographic separation because of high polarity and lacking volatility, thermostability. In 2004 liquid chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS) became commercially available. LC-IRMS system intent a quantitative conversion of analytes separation into CO2 via wet oxidation with sodium persulfate in the presence of phosphoric acid while analytes are still dissolved in the aqueous liquid phase.[2] The aim of this study is to analyze the oxidation capacity of the interface of the LC-IRMS system and determine which parameters could improve oxidation of compounds which are resistant to persulfate oxidation. Oxidation capacity of the liquid chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry system was tested with halogenated acetic acid and a set of aromatic compounds with different substitutes. Acetic acid (AA) was taken as a model compound for complete oxidation and compared to the oxidation of other analytes on a molar basis. Correct values were obtained for di- and mono chlorinated and fluorinated and also for tribrominated acetic acid and for all studied aromatic compounds. Incomplete oxidation for trichloroacetic (TCAA) and trifluoroacetic (TFAA) acid was revealed with lower recovery compared to acetic acid and isotope fractionation leading to depleted carbon isotope composition compared to values obtained with an elementary analyzer connected to an isotope mass spectrometer Several optimization steps were tried in order to improve the oxidation of TCAA and TFAA: (i) increasing the concentration of the oxidizing agent, (ii) variation of flow rate of the oxidizing and acid solution, (iii) variation of flow rate of liquid chromatography pump (iv) addition of a catalyzer. These modifications lead to longer reaction time

  18. Stable carbon isotope ratios as proxies for CO2 migration: An experimental approach with analogue fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrttinen, A.; Becker, V.; Mayer, B.; Barth, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios have proven to be highly sensitive tracers of CO2 migration in the subsurface, provided that the δ13C value of injected CO2 is distinct from that of baseline carbon in the reservoir and in shallow aquifers. This is of great importance for tracing the movement and the fate of injected CO2 in storage reservoirs where fluid and gas samples for chemical and isotope analyses can be obtained. One fundamental aspect that needs to be considered is carbon isotope fractionation between the various dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species and sub- or super-critical CO2. Such isotope fractionation may occur at various stages of CO2 migration including, the initial stages of injection during CO2 dissolution; during possible CO2 desiccation in pores; during CO2 migration within the reservoir or even during potential leakage into the near-surface environment. The magnitude and direction of carbon isotope fractionation (1000lnαDIC-CO2) between the DIC species and the injected CO2 depends highly on temperature and pH. At shallow depths, where temperatures are moderate and pH values are typically close to neutral, HCO3- is the dominant form of DIC. Carbon isotope fractionation between CO2 and DIC is therefore expected to reach ~ +10 ‰, resulting in a more positive δ13C value of DIC compared to that of the injected CO2. On the other hand, during injection, elevated temperatures and pH values of below 6 are usually observed. Here, H2CO3 is the dominant form of DIC and carbon isotope fractionation of close to -1 ‰ is expected. However, literature data on isotope fractionation values between H2CO3 and CO2 at temperatures above ˜ 60 °C are limited. In order to investigate the effects of pH and temperature on carbon isotope fractionation at various subsurface conditions, including elevated temperatures and pressures typical for CO2 reservoirs, laboratory experiments with analogue fluids were conducted within the framework of the CO2ISO-LABEL project

  19. The fractionation factors of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios for VOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, H.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are important precursors of ozone and secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere, some of which are carcinogenic, teratogenic, or mutagenic. VOCs in ambient air originate from many sources, including vehicle exhausts, gasoline evaporation, solvent use, natural gas emissions, and industrial processes, and undergo intricate chemical reactions in the atmosphere. To develop efficient air pollution remediation strategies, it is important to clearly identify the emission sources and elucidate the reaction mechanisms in the atmosphere. Recently, stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of VOCs in some sources and ambient air have been measured by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). In this study, we measured δ13C and stable hydrogen isotope ratios (δD) of atmospheric VOCs by using the gas chromatography/thermal conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled with a thermal desorption instrument (TD-GC/TC/IRMS). The wider δD differences between sources were found in comparison with the δ13C studies. Therefore, determining δD values of VOCs in ambient air is potentially useful in identifying VOC sources and their reactive behavior in the atmosphere. However, to elucidate the sources and behavior of atmospheric VOCs more accurately, isotopic fractionation during atmospheric reaction must be considered. In this study, we determined isotopic fractionation of the δ13C and δD values for the atmospheric some VOCs under irradiation conditions. As the results, δ13C for target all VOCs and δD for most VOCs were increasing after irradiation. But, the δD values for both benzene and toluene tended to decrease as irradiation time increased. We also estimated the fractionation factors for benzene and toluene, 1.27 and 1.05, respectively, which differed from values determined in previous studies. In summary, we were able to identify an inverse isotope effect for the δD values of benzene and toluene

  20. Forensic utility of carbon isotope ratio variations in PVC tape backings.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Marianne E; Stern, Libby A; Mehltretter, Andria Hobbs; Parish, Ashley; McLasky, Velvet; Aranda, Roman

    2012-03-01

    Forensic interest in adhesive tapes with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) backings (electrical tape) derives from their use in a variety of illicit activities. Due to the range of physical characteristics, chemical compositions, and homogeneity within a single roll of tape, traditional microscopic and chemical analyses can offer a high degree of discrimination between tapes, permitting the assessment of potential associations between evidentiary tape samples. The carbon isotope ratios of tapes could provide additional discrimination among tape samples. To evaluate whether carbon isotope ratios may be able to increase discrimination of electrical tapes, particularly with regards to different rolls of tape of the same product, we assessed the δ(13)C values of backings from 87 rolls of PVC-based black electrical tape (~20 brands, >60 products) Prior to analysis, adhesives were removed to prevent contamination by adhering debris, and plasticizers were extracted because of concern over their potential mobility. This result is consistent with each of these tapes having approximately the same plasticizer δ(13)C value and proportion of carbon in these plasticizers. The δ(13)C values of the 87 PVC tape backings ranged between -23.5 and -41.3 (‰, V-PDB), with negligible carbon isotopic variation within single rolls of tape, yet large variations among tape brands and tape products. Within this tape population, carbon isotope ratios permitted an average exclusion power of 93.7%, using a window of +/-0.3‰; the combination of carbon isotope ratio measurement with additional chemical and physical analyses raises the discrimination power to over 98.9%, with only 41 out of a possible 3741 pairs of tape samples being indistinguishable. There was a linear relationship between the δ(13)C value of tape backings and the change in δ(13)C value with the extraction of plasticizers. Analyses of pre- and post-blast tape sample pairs show that carbon isotope signatures are within 0.3‰ of

  1. Stable isotope ratios as indicators of trophic status: Uncertainties imposed by geographic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1995-12-31

    Isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen are often suggested as indicators to determine trophic status and carbon sources of marine organisms in explaining relative concentrations of pollutants. Whereas this technique is effective with organisms resident in ecosystems having homogeneous primary productivity regimes and uniform isotope ratios in the productivity base, it often is confounded by migratory movements by larger organisms across isotopic gradients. Tissues containing a temporal record such as baleen plates or whiskers show these effects clearly. Bowhead whales in Alaskan waters seasonally move across carbon isotope gradients of 5{per_thousand} in zooplankton and reflect these differences in the keratin of baleen plates and in overall body composition. However, no significant differences in {delta}{sup 15}N are evident regionally in northern Alaskan zooplankton. In contrast, the Southern Ocean is characterized by extreme latitudinal gradients in both {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N with the most pronounced effects occurring at the subtropical convergence. Prey taken by marine mammals south of this zone are depleted in both {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C by up to 8{per_thousand}. Data on southern right whales (Eubalaena glacialis), Bryde`s whale (Balaenoptera edenl), pygmy right whales (Caperea marginate) and antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalos gazella) show the effects of migratory movements across the gradient in both carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. Similar patterns in marine mammal tissues from Australia, South Africa and South America indicate that the observed patterns are circumpolar. Within a given region, trophic effects shift {delta}{sup 15}N values consistent with observed feeding habits.

  2. Identification of Marchfeld asparagus using Sr isotope ratio measurements by MC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Swoboda, S; Brunner, M; Boulyga, S F; Galler, P; Horacek, M; Prohaska, T

    2008-01-01

    This work focuses on testing and application of Sr isotope signatures for the fast and reliable authentication and traceability of Asparagus officinalis originating from Marchfeld, Austria, using multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after optimised Rb/Sr separation. The major sample pool comprises freeze-dried and microwave-digested asparagus samples from Hungary and Slovakia which are compared with Austrian asparagus originating from the Marchfeld region, which is a protected geographical indication. Additional samples from Peru, The Netherlands and Germany were limited in number and allowed therefore only restricted statistical evaluation. Asparagus samples from Marchfeld were harvested within two subsequent years in order to investigate the annual variation. The results show that the Sr isotope ratio is consistent within these 2 years of investigation. Moreover, the Sr isotope ratio of total Sr in soil was found to be significantly higher than in an NH4NO3 extract, reflecting the mobile (bioavailable) phase. The isotope composition in the latter extract corresponds well to the range found in the asparagus samples in Marchfeld, even though the concentration of Sr in asparagus shows no direct correlation to the concentration of Sr in the mobile phase of the soil. The major question was whether the 'Marchfelder Spargel' can be distinguished from samples from the neighbouring countries of Hungary and Slovakia. According to our findings, they can be clearly (100%) singled out from the Hungarian samples and can be distinguished from the Slovakian asparagus samples with a probability of more than 80%. PMID:17874075

  3. Carbon Stable Isotope Analysis of Methylmercury Toxin in Biological Materials by Gas Chromatography Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Masbou, Jeremy; Point, David; Guillou, Gaël; Sonke, Jeroen E; Lebreton, Benoit; Richard, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    A critical component of the biogeochemical cycle of mercury (Hg) is the transformation of inorganic Hg to neurotoxic monomethylmercury (CH3Hg). Humans are exposed to CH3Hg by consuming marine fish, yet the origin of CH3Hg in fish is a topic of debate. The carbon stable isotopic composition (δ(13)C) embedded in the methyl group of CH3Hg remains unexplored. This new isotopic information at the molecular level is thought to represent a new proxy to trace the carbon source at the origin of CH3Hg. Here, we present a compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) technique for the determination of the δ(13)C value of CH3Hg in biological samples by gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry analysis (GC-C-IRMS). The method consists first of calibrating a CH3Hg standard solution for δ(13)C CSIA. This was achieved by comparing three independent approaches consisting of the derivatization and halogenation of the CH3Hg standard solution. The determination of δ(13)C(CH3Hg) values on natural biological samples was performed by combining a CH3Hg selective extraction, purification, and halogenation followed by GC-C-IRMS analysis. Reference δ(13)C values were established for a tuna fish certified material (ERM-CE464) originating from the Adriatic Sea (δ(13)C(CH3Hg) = -22.1 ± 1.5‰, ± 2 SD). This value is similar to the δ(13)C value of marine algal-derived particulate organic carbon (δ(13)CPOC = -21‰). PMID:26511394

  4. Late Miocene evolution of the Black Sea: insights from palynology and strontium isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothe, Arjen; van Baak, Christiaan; Vasiliev, Iuliana; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Stoica, Marius; Krijgsman, Wout

    2016-04-01

    During the late Miocene, the connection(s) between the Mediterranean Basin and the Atlantic Ocean deteriorated, which ultimately culminated in thick evaporite deposits and a water level drop in the Mediterranean Basin during the so-called Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC, 5.97 - 5.33 Ma). It has been claimed that Black Sea, in response to the MSC, also desiccated but these claims have been proven incorrectly. Here we present palynological (dinoflagellate cysts and pollen) and strontium isotope ratios from two Black Sea records: the Zheleznyi Rog outcrop section and Deep Sea Drilling Project Hole 380A. Organic walled cyst-producing dinoflagellates are highly sensitive to even small changes in surface waters and strontium isotope ratios are excellent recorders of changing connectivity. Our records provide therefore more insights in the sensitivity of the Black Sea to Messinian Salinity Crisis and the general evolution of the late Miocene Black Sea.

  5. Detection of exogenous citric acid in fruit juices by stable isotope ratio analysis.

    PubMed

    Jamin, Eric; Martin, Frédérique; Santamaria-Fernandez, Rebeca; Lees, Michèle

    2005-06-29

    A new method has been developed for measuring the D/H ratio of the nonexchangeable sites of citric acid by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). Pure citric acid is transformed into its calcium salt and subsequently analyzed by pyrolysis-IRMS. The citric acid isolated from authentic fruit juices (citrus, pineapple, and red fruits) systematically shows higher D/H values than its nonfruit counterpart produced by fermentation of various sugar sources. The discrimination obtained with this simplified method is similar to that obtained previously by applying site specific isotopic fractionation-nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to an ester derivative of citric acid. The combination of carbon 13 and deuterium measurements of extracted citric acid is proposed as a routine method for an optimum detection of exogenous citric acid in all kinds of fruit juices. PMID:15969486

  6. The jackknife as an approach for uncertainty assessment in gamma spectrometric measurements of uranium isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramebäck, H.; Vesterlund, A.; Tovedal, A.; Nygren, U.; Wallberg, L.; Holm, E.; Ekberg, C.; Skarnemark, G.

    2010-08-01

    The jackknife as an approach for uncertainty estimation in gamma spectrometric uranium isotope ratio measurements was evaluated. Five different materials ranging from depleted uranium (DU) to high enriched uranium (HEU) were measured using gamma spectrometry. High resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) was used as a reference method for comparing the results obtained with the gamma spectrometric method. The relative combined uncertainty in the gamma spectrometric measurements of the 238U/ 235U isotope ratio using the jackknife was about 10-20% ( k = 2), which proved to be fit-for-purpose in order to distinguish between different uranium categories. Moreover, the enrichment of 235U in HEU could be measured with an uncertainty of 1-2%.

  7. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurement of isotope ratios in depleted uranium contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Michael D

    2003-09-01

    Laser ablation of pressed soil pellets was examined as a means of direct sample introduction to enable inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) screening of soils for residual depleted uranium (DU) contamination. Differentiation between depleted uranium, an anthropogenic contaminant, and naturally occurring uranium was accomplished on the basis of measured 235U/238U isotope ratios. The amount of sample preparation required for laser ablation is considerably less than that typically required for aqueous sample introduction. The amount of hazardous laboratory waste generated is diminished accordingly. During the present investigation, 235U/238U isotope ratios measured for field samples were in good agreement with those derived from gamma spectrometry measurements. However, substantial compensation was required to mitigate the effects of impaired pulse counting attributed to sample inhomogeneity and sporadic introduction of uranium analyte into the plasma. PMID:14611049

  8. Hydrogen chloride 37Cl/35Cl isotopic ratio field analyzer for the investigation of volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amato, Francesco; Burton, Mike; Chiarugi, Antonio; Viciani, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    We present a new analyzer for the in-field measurement of the isotopic ratio 37Cl/35Cl in the hydrogen chloride emitted by volcanoes, developed within the frame of the ERC Project CO2Volc (Grant 279802). The Project aims to the measurement of several molecular species in the volcanic plumes. The analyzer is based on molecular spectroscopy. The volcanic plume interacts in a multipass cell with two laser beams at suitable wavelengths. From the absorptions of the two beams by the two isotopologues the isotopic ratio is retrieved. We report here the results of the laboratory checks of the instrument, and the results of a measurement campaign carried out on Etna and Vulcano. The campaign aimed to verify not only the in-field performances of the analyzer but also to assess its robustness in such a hostile environment.

  9. Flow injection analysis-isotope ratio mass spectrometry for bulk carbon stable isotope analysis of alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Jochmann, Maik A; Steinmann, Dirk; Stephan, Manuel; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2009-11-25

    A new method for bulk carbon isotope ratio determination of water-soluble samples is presented that is based on flow injection analysis-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (FIA-IRMS) using an LC IsoLink interface. Advantages of the method are that (i) only very small amounts of sample are required (2-5 microL of the sample for up to 200 possible injections), (ii) it avoids complex sample preparation procedures such as needed for EA-IRMS analysis (only sample dilution and injection,) and (iii) high throughput due to short analysis times is possible (approximately 15 min for five replicates). The method was first tested and evaluated as a fast screening method with industrially produced ethanol samples, and additionally the applicability was tested by the measurement of 81 alcoholic beverages, for example, whiskey, brandy, vodka, tequila, and others. The minimal sample concentration required for precise and reproducible measurements was around 50 microL L(-1) ethanol/water (1.71 mM carbon). The limit of repeatability was determined to be r=0.49%. FIA-IRMS represents a fast screening method for beverage authenticity control. Due to this, samples can be prescreened as a decisive criterion for more detailed investigations by HPLC-IRMS or multielement GC-IRMS measurements for a verification of adulteration. PMID:19856915

  10. Mixing ratio and carbon isotopic composition investigation of atmospheric CO2 in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jiaping; Wen, Xuefa; Sun, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    The stable isotope composition of atmospheric CO2 can be used as a tracer in the study of urban carbon cycles, which are affected by anthropogenic and biogenic CO2 components. Continuous measurements of the mixing ratio and δ(13)C of atmospheric CO2 were conducted in Beijing from Nov. 15, 2012 to Mar. 8, 2014 including two heating seasons and a vegetative season. Both δ(13)C and the isotopic composition of source CO2 (δ(13)CS) were depleted in the heating seasons and enriched in the vegetative season. The diurnal variations in the CO2 mixing ratio and δ(13)C contained two peaks in the heating season, which are due to the effects of morning rush hour traffic. Seasonal and diurnal patterns of the CO2 mixing ratio and δ(13)C were affected by anthropogenic emissions and biogenic activity. Assuming that the primary CO2 sources at night (22:00-04:00) were coal and natural gas combustion during heating seasons I and II, an isotopic mass balance analysis indicated that coal combustion had average contributions of 83.83±14.11% and 86.84±12.27% and that natural gas had average contributions of 16.17±14.11% and 13.16±12.27%, respectively. The δ(13)C of background CO2 in air was the main error source in the isotopic mass balance model. Both the mixing ratio and δ(13)C of atmospheric CO2 had significant linear relationships with the air quality index (AQI) and can be used to indicate local air pollution conditions. Energy structure optimization, for example, reducing coal consumption, will improve the local air conditions in Beijing. PMID:26363727

  11. Evaluating the deep-ocean circulation of a global ocean model using carbon isotopic ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, André; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Gebbie, Jake; Losch, Martin; Marchal, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    We study the sensitivity of a global three-dimensional biotic ocean carbon-cycle model to the parameterizations of gas exchange and biological productivity as well as to deep-ocean circulation strength, and we employ the carbon isotopic ratios δ13C and Δ14C of dissolved inorganic carbon for a systematic evaluation against observations. Radiocarbon (Δ14C) in particular offers the means to assess the model skill on a time scale of 100 to 1000 years relevant to the deep-ocean circulation. The carbon isotope ratios are included as tracers in the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The implementation involves the fractionation processes during photosynthesis and air-sea gas exchange. We present the results of sixteen simulations combining two different parameterizations of the piston velocity, two different parameterizations of biological productivity (including the effect of iron fertilization) and four different overturning rates. These simulations were first spun up to equilibrium (more than 10,000 years of model simulation) and then continued from AD 1765 to AD 2002. For the model evaluation, we followed the OCMIP-2 (Ocean Carbon-Cycle Model Intercomparision Project phase two) protocol, comparing the results to GEOSECS (Geochemical Ocean Sections Survey) and WOCE (World Ocean Circulation Experiment) δ13C and natural Δ14C data in the world ocean. The range of deep natural Δ14C (below 1000 m) for our single model (MITgcm) was smaller than for the group of different OCMIP-2 models. Furthermore, differences between different model parameterizations were smaller than for different overturning rates. We conclude that carbon isotope ratios are a useful tool to evaluate the deep-ocean circulation. Since they are also available from deep-sea sediment records, we postulate that the simulation of carbon isotope ratios in a global ocean model will aid in estimating the deep-ocean circulation and climate during present and past.

  12. The isotopic composition of galactic cosmic-ray lithium, beryllium, and boron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Mason, G. M.; Simpson, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    The isotopes of cosmic-ray Li, Be, and B near 100 MeV per nucleon have been measured with cosmic-ray telescopes on board the IMP-7 and IMP-8 satellites during 1973 and 1974. The measured isotopic abundances provide a stringent test for models of interstellar propagation and solar modulation. It is found that the isotopic abundances can be explained using a steady-state interstellar propagation model with a 5-g/sq cm leakage mean free path. These results, taken along with Be-10 abundance measurements, indicate a longer lifetime for cosmic rays than that predicted by the usual assumption of an average interstellar density of 1 to 3 atoms per cu cm.

  13. Advancement and application of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry techniques for atmospheric trace gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giebel, Brian M.

    2011-12-01

    The use of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) for compound specific stable isotope analysis is an underutilized technique because of the complexity of the instrumentation and high analytical costs. However stable isotopic data, when coupled with concentration measurements, can provide additional information on a compounds production, transformation, loss, and cycling within the biosphere and atmosphere. A GC-IRMS system was developed to accurately and precisely measure delta13C values for numerous oxygenated volatile organic compounds having natural and anthropogenic sources. The OVOCs include methanol, ethanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, 2-pentanone, and 3-pentanone. Guided by the requirements for analysis of trace components in air, the GC-IRMS system was developed with the goals of increasing sensitivity, reducing dead-volume and peak band broadening, optimizing combustion and water removal, and decreasing the split ratio to the IRMS. The technique relied on a two-stage preconcentration system, a low-volume capillary reactor and water trap, and a balanced reference gas delivery system. Measurements were performed on samples collected from two distinct sources (i.e. biogenic and vehicle emissions) and ambient air collected from downtown Miami and Everglades National Park. However, the instrumentation and the method have the capability to analyze a variety of source and ambient samples. The measured isotopic signatures that were obtained from source and ambient samples provide a new isotopic constraint for atmospheric chemists and can serve as a new way to evaluate their models and budgets for many OVOCs. In almost all cases, OVOCs emitted from fuel combustion were enriched in 13C when compared to the natural emissions of plants. This was particularly true for ethanol gas emitted in vehicle exhaust, which was observed to have a uniquely enriched isotopic signature that was attributed to ethanol's corn origin and use as an alternative

  14. A Widely Tunable Infrared Laser Spectrometer for Measurements of Isotopic Ratios of Carbon Cycle Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Joanne H. Shorter; J. Barry McManus; David D. Nelson; Charles E. Kolb; Mark S. Zahniser; Ray Bambha; Uwe Lehmann; Tomas Kulp; Stanley C. Tyler

    2005-01-31

    The atmospheric abundances of carbon dioxide and methane have increased dramatically during the industrial era. Measurements of the isotopic composition of these gases can provide a powerful tool for quantifying their sources and sinks. This report describes the development of a portable instrument for isotopic analysis CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} using tunable infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. This instrument combines novel optical design and signal processing methods with a widely tunable mid-infrared laser source based on difference frequency generation (DFG) which will can access spectral regions for all the isotopes of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} with a single instrument. The instrument design compensates for the large difference in concentration between major and minor isotopes by measuring them with path lengths which differ by a factor of 100 within the same multipass cell. During Phase I we demonstrated the basic optical design and signal processing by determining {sup 13}CO{sub 2} isotopic ratios with precisions as small as 0.2{per_thousand} using a conventional lead salt diode laser. During Phase II, the DFG laser source was coupled with the optical instrument and was demonstrated to detect {sup 13}CH{sub 4}/{sup 12}CH{sub 4} ratios with a precision of 0.5{per_thousand} and an averaging time of 20 s using concentrated methane in air with a mixing ratio of 2700 ppm. Methods for concentrating ambient air for isotopic analysis using this technique have been evaluated. Extensions of this instrument to other species such as {sup 13}CO{sub 2}, C{sup 18}OO, and CH{sub 3}D are possible by substituting lasers at other wavelengths in the DFG source module. The immediate commercial application of this instrument will be to compete with existing mass spectrometric isotope instruments which are expensive, large and relatively slow. The novel infrared source developed in this project can be applied to the measurement of many other gas species and will have wide

  15. Temperature-programmed high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Godin, Jean-Philippe; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Fay, Laurent

    2008-09-15

    The utility of liquid chromatography coupled to the isotope ratio mass spectrometry technique (LC-IRMS) has already been established through a variety of successful applications. However, the analytical constraint related to the use of aqueous mobile phases limits the LC separation mechanism. We report here a new strategy for high-precision (13)C isotopic analyses based on temperature-programmed LC-IRMS using aqueous mobile phases. Under these conditions, the isotopic precision and accuracy were studied. On one hand, experiments were carried out with phenolic acids using isothermal LC conditions at high temperature (170 degrees C); on the other hand, several experiments were performed by ramping the temperature, as conventionally used in a gas chromatography-based method with hydrosoluble fatty acids and pulses of CO 2 reference gas. In isothermal conditions at 170 degrees C, despite the increase of the CO 2 background, p-coumaric acid and its glucuronide conjugate gave reliable isotopic ratios compared to flow injection analysis-isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (FIA-IRMS) analyses (isotopic precision and accuracy are lower than 0.3 per thousand). On the opposite, for its sulfate conjugate, the isotopic accuracy is affected by its coelution with p-coumaric acid. Not surprisingly, this study also demonstrates that at high temperature (170 degrees C), a compound eluting with long residence time (i.e., ferulic acid) is degraded, affecting thus the delta (13)C (drift of 3 per thousand) and the peak area (compared to FIA-IRMS analysis at room temperature). Quantitation is also reported in isothermal conditions for p-coumaric acid in the range of 10-400 ng/mL and with benzoic acid as an internal standard. For temperature gradient LC-IRMS, in the area of the LC gradient (set up at 20 degrees C/min), the drift of the background observed produces a nonlinearity of SD (delta (13)C) approximately 0.01 per thousand/mV. To circumvent this drift, which impacts severely the

  16. Carbon Isotope Ratios Demonstrate Carbon Flux from C4 Host to C3 Parasite 1

    PubMed Central

    Press, Malcolm C.; Shah, Nishith; Tuohy, Janet M.; Stewart, George R.

    1987-01-01

    Carbon isotope ratios of mature leaves from the C3 angiosperm root hemiparasites Striga hermonthica (Del.) Benth (−26.7‰) and S. asiatica (L.) Kuntze (−25.6‰) were more negative than their C4 host, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench cv CSH1), (−13.5‰). However, in young photosynthetically incompetent plants of S. hermonthica this difference was reduced to less than 1‰. Differences between the carbon isotope ratios of two C3-C3 associations, S. gesnerioides (Willd.) Vatke—Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. and Oryza sativa L.—Rhamphicarpa fistulosa (Hochst.) Benth differed by less than 1‰. Theoretical carbon isotope ratios for mature leaves of S. hermonthica and S. asiatica, calculated from foliar gas exchange measurements, were −31.8 and −32.0‰, respectively. This difference between the measured and theoretical δ13C-values of 5 to 6‰ suggests that even in mature, photosynthetically active plants, there is substantial input of carbon from the C4 host. We estimate this to be approximately 28% of the total carbon in S. hermonthica and 35% in S. asiatica. This level of carbon transfer contributes to the host's growth reductions observed in Striga-infected sorghum. PMID:16665818

  17. Requirements for the early atmosphere of Mars from nitrogen isotope ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    The N escape models of Fox and Dalgarno and Fox required the presence of a dense, early CO2 atmosphere to inhibit fractionation of the N isotopes N-15 and N-14. The computed photochemical escape fluxes are so large at the present that the isotope ratio measured by Viking (about 1.62x terrestrial) can be produced in about 1.5 b.y. This model was refined in several ways. It was updated to incorporate the variation of the escape fluxes with increases in the solar fluxes at earlier times according to the model of Zahnle and Walker. As expected, this exacerbates the problem with overfractionation, but not greatly. Most of the escape and fractionation of the N occurs in the last 1.5 b.y., when the solar flux was only slightly different from the present. The dense early atmosphere must persist only a bit longer in order to reproduce the measured isotope ratio. The model was also modified to take into account changes in the O mixing ratio with time in the past, assuming that the O abundance is proportional to the square root of the solar flux. Although the production rate of O from photodissociation of CO2 scales as the solar flux, the strength of the winds and other mixing processes also increases with the solar flux, resulting in possibly more effective transport of O to the lower atmosphere where it is destroyed by catalytic and three-body recombination mechanisms.

  18. DoE optimization of a mercury isotope ratio determination method for environmental studies.

    PubMed

    Berni, Alex; Baschieri, Carlo; Covelli, Stefano; Emili, Andrea; Marchetti, Andrea; Manzini, Daniela; Berto, Daniela; Rampazzo, Federico

    2016-05-15

    By using the experimental design (DoE) technique, we optimized an analytical method for the determination of mercury isotope ratios by means of cold-vapor multicollector ICP-MS (CV-MC-ICP-MS) to provide absolute Hg isotopic ratio measurements with a suitable internal precision. By running 32 experiments, the influence of mercury and thallium internal standard concentrations, total measuring time and sample flow rate was evaluated. Method was optimized varying Hg concentration between 2 and 20ngg(-1). The model finds out some correlations within the parameters affect the measurements precision and predicts suitable sample measurement precisions for Hg concentrations from 5ngg(-1) Hg upwards. The method was successfully applied to samples of Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) coming from the Marano and Grado lagoon (NE Italy), a coastal environment affected by long term mercury contamination mainly due to mining activity. Results show different extents of both mass dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass independent fractionation (MIF) phenomena in clams according to their size and sampling sites in the lagoon. The method is fit for determinations on real samples, allowing for the use of Hg isotopic ratios to study mercury biogeochemical cycles in complex ecosystems. PMID:26992509

  19. Stable carbon isotope ratios in atmospheric methane and some of its sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyler, Stanley C.

    1986-01-01

    Ratios of C-13/C-12 have been measured in atmospheric methane and in methane collected from sites and biota that represent potentially large sources of atmospheric methane. These include temperate marshes (about -48 percent to about -54 percent), landfills (about -51 percent to about -55 percent), and the first reported values for any species of termite (-72.8 + or - 3.1 percent for Reticulitermes tibialis and -57.3 + or - 1.6 percent for Zootermopsis angusticollis). Numbers in parentheses are delta C-13 values with respect to PDB (Peedee belemnite) carbonate. Most methane sources reported thus far are depleted in C-13 with respect to atmospheric methane (-47.0 + or - 0.3 percent). Individual sources of methane should have C-13/C-12 ratios characteristic of mechanisms of CH4 formation and consumption prior to release to the atmosphere. The mass-weighted average isotopic composition of all sources should equal the mean C-13 of atmospheric methane, corrected for a kinetic isotope effect in the OH attack of CH4. Assuming the kinetic isotope effect to be small (about -3.0 percent correction to -47.0), as in the literature, the new values given here for termite methane do not help to explain the apparent discrepancy between C-13/C-12 ratios of the known CH4 sources and that of atmospheric CH4.

  20. He isotope ratios in the Nankai Trough and Costa Rica subduction zones - implications for volatile cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, M.; Hilton, D. R.; Jenkins, W. J.; Solomon, E. A.; Spivack, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    The noble gas 3He is a clear indicator of primordial volatile flux from the mantle, thus providing important insights on the interaction between Earth's interior and exterior reservoirs. Volatile cycling at ridge-crests and its impact on the evolution of seawater chemistry is rather well known as constrained by the 3He flux, whereas the impact of volatile cycling at subduction zones (SZs) on seawater chemistry is as yet poorly known. Constraining chemical and isotopic cycling at SZs is important for understanding the evolution of the mantle-crust and ocean-atmosphere systems. To gain insights on volatile cycling in SZs, pore fluids were sampled for He concentration and isotopic analyses at two tectonically contrasting SZs, Nankai Trough (offshore Japan, Muroto and Kumano transects), an accretionary SZ, and Costa Rica (Offshore Osa Peninsula), an erosional SZ. Sampling for He was achieved by rapidly subsampling core sediments, cleaning and transferring these samples into Ti squeezers in a glove bag, and storing the squeezed pore fluids in crimped Cu tubes for shore-based He concentration and isotope ratio analyses. At the Nankai Trough SZ there is a remarkable range of He isotopic values. The 3He/4He ratios relative to atmospheric ratio (RA) range from mostly crustal 0.47 RA to 4.30 RA which is ~55% of the MORB value of 8 RA. Whereas at the Costa Rica SZ, offshore Osa Peninsula, the ratios range from 0.86 to 1.14 RA, indicating the dominance of crustal radiogenic 4He that is from U and Th decay. The distribution of the He isotope values at Nankai Trough is most interesting, fluids that contain significant mantle 3He components (3He/4He >1) were sampled along and adjacent to fluid conduits that were identified by several chemical and isotopic data (i.e. Cl, B, and Li), including the presence of thermogenic hydrocarbons. Whereas the fluids dominated by 4He (3He/4He ≤1) were obtained from sediment sections that were between the fluid conduits. At Costa Rica, however

  1. Boron Isotope Based CO2 Reconstructions and Insights into the Sensitivity of the Climate System to CO2-forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, G. L.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the role of atmospheric CO2 in driving global climate is one of the great challenges facing Earth Scientists today. Ultimately we are driven by the pressing need to predict how hot the Earth will get in the near future. Increasingly the palaeo-community has been willing to contribute to the debate, since the geological record is littered with examples of warm climate states, in part associated with elevated levels of atmospheric CO2. Whilst these provide real world examples of how the Earth System responds to CO2 forcing, no geological period is a perfect analogue for our warm future. Furthermore, climate models suggest that a significant level of state dependency exists for climate sensitivity. Therefore examining the response of the climate system to CO2 forcing in the Eocene, for example, does not have direct relevance due to the different continental arrangements, ice sheet configurations and vegetation. When these factors are accounted for, it has however been recently shown that the available palaeo-data largely confirms the sensitivity of the Earth system to CO2forcing determined by climate models alone [1]. Despite this overall conformity, there are several warmer time periods in the geological record (e.g. the Pliocene, the PETM) that apparently exhibit significantly elevated climate sensitivites (e.g. [1]). Importantly, these are above the range typically, but not always (e.g. [2]), achievable in climate models - clearly suggesting that the Earth can exist in states that appear to be particularly sensitive to CO2 forcing. Such a state dependency to sensitivity has worrying implications for predictions of our warm future climate. In this contribution I will summarise the results of new boron isotope data from planktic foraminifera from a number of key periods. I will also focus on the challenges of generating accuract CO2 data form boron isotope measurements and discuss methodologies to use such data to further probe the response of the Earth

  2. Holocene fluctuations of neodymium isotope ratios in eastern Fram Strait sediments - An indication for deepwater variability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, K.; Frank, M.; Teschner, C.; Zieringer, M.; Spielhagen, R. F.

    2012-04-01

    The Fram Strait as the only deep water connection of the world's oceans to the Arctic plays a substantial role for the heat influx to the Arctic Ocean and controls freshening of the Nordic Seas through Arctic sea ice export. Large amounts of warm and saline Atlantic Water derived from the North Atlantic Drift transport most of the heat through eastern Fram Strait to the Arctic basin, resulting in year-round ice-free conditions. Arctic sea ice and cold and fresh waters exit the western part of the strait southward along the Greenland shelf. However, little is still known about the water mass transport at intermediate and bottom water depths in the Fram Strait. High-resolution Holocene sediment sequences from the Western Svalbard margin have been investigated for its neodymium isotope ratios stored in ferromanganese oxyhydroxide coatings of the sediment to derive information on the source of bottom seawater passing the site. The radiogenic isotope data are compared to a multitude of proxy indicators for the climatic and oceanographic variability in the eastern Fram Strait during the past 8,500 years. In order to obtain a calibration of the Nd isotope compositions extracted from sediments to modern bottom water mass signatures in the area, a set of core top and water samples from different water depths in the Fram Strait was additionally investigated for its present-day Nd isotope signatures. A significantly higher inflow of deepwater produced in the Nordic Seas to the core site is inferred for the earlier periods of the Holocene. Cooler surface water conditions and increased sea ice abundances during the late Holocene coincide with more radiogenic Nd isotope ratios likely resembling the neoglacial trend of the northern North Atlantic.

  3. The stability and calibration of water vapor isotope ratio measurements during long-term deployments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, A.; Noone, D.; Berkelhammer, M.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Sato, P.

    2015-10-01

    With the recent advent of commercial laser absorption spectrometers, field studies measuring stable isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen in water vapor have proliferated. These pioneering analyses have provided invaluable feedback about best strategies for optimizing instrumental accuracy, yet questions still remain about instrument performance and calibration approaches for multi-year field deployments. With clear scientific potential for using these instruments to carry out monitoring of the hydrological cycle, this study examines the long-term stability of the isotopic biases associated with three cavity-enhanced laser absorption spectrometers - calibrated with different systems and approaches - at two remote field sites: Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, USA, and Greenland Environmental Observatory, Summit, Greenland. The analysis pays particular attention to the stability of measurement dependencies on water vapor concentration and also evaluates whether these so-called concentration dependences are sensitive to statistical curve-fitting choices or measurement hysteresis. The results suggest evidence of monthly-to-seasonal concentration-dependence variability - which likely stems from low signal-to-noise at the humidity-range extremes - but no long-term directional drift. At Mauna Loa, where the isotopic analyzer is calibrated by injection of liquid water standards into a vaporizer, the largest source of inaccuracy in characterizing the concentration dependence stems from an insufficient density of calibration points at low water vapor volume mixing ratios. In comparison, at Summit, the largest source of inaccuracy is measurement hysteresis associated with interactions between the reference vapor, generated by a custom dew point generator, and the sample tubing. Nevertheless, prediction errors associated with correcting the concentration dependence are small compared to total measurement uncertainty. At both sites, changes in measurement repeatability that are

  4. Fukushima Daiichi reactor source term attribution using cesium isotope ratios from contaminated environmental samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Snow, Mathew S.; Snyder, Darin C.; Delmore, James E.

    2016-01-18

    Source term attribution of environmental contamination following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) disaster is complicated by a large number of possible similar emission source terms (e.g. FDNPP reactor cores 1–3 and spent fuel ponds 1–4). Cesium isotopic analyses can be utilized to discriminate between environmental contamination from different FDNPP source terms and, if samples are sufficiently temporally resolved, potentially provide insights into the extent of reactor core damage at a given time. Rice, soil, mushroom, and soybean samples taken 100–250 km from the FDNPP site were dissolved using microwave digestion. Radiocesium was extracted and purified using two sequentialmore » ammonium molybdophosphate-polyacrylonitrile columns, following which 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios were measured using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Results were compared with data reported previously from locations to the northwest of FDNPP and 30 km to the south of FDNPP. 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios from samples 100–250 km to the southwest of the FDNPP site show a consistent value of 0.376 ± 0.008. 135Cs/137Cs versus 134Cs/137Cs correlation plots suggest that radiocesium to the southwest is derived from a mixture of FDNPP reactor cores 1, 2, and 3. Conclusions from the cesium isotopic data are in agreement with those derived independently based upon the event chronology combined with meteorological conditions at the time of the disaster. In conclusion, cesium isotopic analyses provide a powerful tool for source term discrimination of environmental radiocesium contamination at the FDNPP site. For higher precision source term attribution and forensic determination of the FDNPP core conditions based upon cesium, analyses of a larger number of samples from locations to the north and south of the FDNPP site (particularly time-resolved air filter samples) are needed. Published in 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain

  5. Argon, oxygen, and boron isotopic evidence documenting 40ArE accumulation in phengite during water-rich high-pressure subduction metasomatism of continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menold, Carrie A.; Grove, Marty; Sievers, Natalie E.; Manning, Craig E.; Yin, An; Young, Edward D.; Ziegler, Karen

    2016-07-01

    The Luliang Shan area of the North Qaidam high pressure (HP) to ultrahigh pressure (UHP) metamorphic terrane in northwestern China features thick, garnet- and phengite-rich metasomatic selvages that formed around gneiss-hosted mafic eclogite blocks during HP conditions. Here we present new 40Ar/39Ar, δ18 O, and δ11 B results from a previously studied 30 m, 18 sample traverse that extends from the host gneiss into a representative eclogite block. Previous thermobarometry and new mica-quartz oxygen isotope thermometry from the traverse reveal that the phengite-rich selvage formed at temperatures similar to those recorded by the eclogites at peak pressure. Quartz and white mica δ18 O data from the selvage cannot be explained by simple mixing of gneiss and eclogite, and indicate a fluid/rock ratio >1 during regional-scale infiltration of high δ18 O (ca. 14‰) fluids. Heavy δ18 O overgrowths of metamorphic zircon over lighter δ18 O detrital grains indicate that the gneiss was similarly affected. Starkly contrasting boron content and δ11 B compositions for the host gneiss and the selvage also cannot be explained by local-scale devolatilization of the gneiss to form the selvage. Instead, the boron systematics are best attributed to two distinct phases of fluid infiltration: (1) low-boron selvage phengite with δ11 B from -10 to -30‰ grew under HP conditions; and (2) tourmaline and boron-rich muscovite with generally positive δ11 B crystallized in the host gneiss under subsequent lower pressure epidote-amphibolite facies conditions as the Luliang Shan gneiss terrane was exhumed past shallower portions of the subduction channel. Consistent with observations made worldwide, we were able to identify uptake of excess argon (40ArE) in phengite as a high pressure phenomenon. Phengite 40Ar/39Ar ages from massive eclogite exceed the ca. 490 Ma zircon U-Pb age of eclogite metamorphism by a factor of 1.5. However, phengite ages from the more permeable schistose selvage

  6. Source Attribution of Cyanides Using Anionic Impurity Profiling, Stable Isotope Ratios, Trace Elemental Analysis and Chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Mirjankar, Nikhil S; Fraga, Carlos G; Carman, April J; Moran, James J

    2016-02-01

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) for chemical threat agents (CTAs), such as cyanides, are being investigated to provide an evidentiary link between CTAs and specific sources to support criminal investigations and prosecutions. Herein, stocks of KCN and NaCN were analyzed for trace anions by high performance ion chromatography (HPIC), carbon stable isotope ratio (δ(13)C) by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The collected analytical data were evaluated using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), Fisher-ratio (F-ratio), interval partial least-squares (iPLS), genetic algorithm-based partial least-squares (GAPLS), partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA), K nearest neighbors (KNN), and support vector machines discriminant analysis (SVMDA). HCA of anion impurity profiles from multiple cyanide stocks from six reported countries of origin resulted in cyanide samples clustering into three groups, independent of the associated alkali metal (K or Na). The three groups were independently corroborated by HCA of cyanide elemental profiles and corresponded to countries each having one known solid cyanide factory: Czech Republic, Germany, and United States. Carbon stable isotope measurements resulted in two clusters: Germany and United States (the single Czech stock grouped with United States stocks). Classification errors for two validation studies using anion impurity profiles collected over five years on different instruments were as low as zero for KNN and SVMDA, demonstrating the excellent reliability associated with using anion impurities for matching a cyanide sample to its factory using our current cyanide stocks. Variable selection methods reduced errors for those classification methods having errors greater than zero; iPLS-forward selection and F-ratio typically provided the lowest errors. Finally, using anion profiles to classify cyanides to a specific stock

  7. High precision Faraday collector MC-ICPMS thorium isotope ratio determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Emma-Kate; Stirling, Claudine H.; Andersen, Morten B.; Halliday, Alex N.

    2005-12-01

    Uranium-series dating of carbonate materials requires precise determination of the spike sample thorium isotope ratio, 230Th/229Th. This ratio is commonly measured using ion counting techniques, however the precision of analyses using ion counting devices suffers from beam intensity limitations, drift in multiplier gain and non-linearities in electron multiplier response. Here, we describe the application of multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) to determine thorium isotope ratios at hitherto unattained precision. For the first time, thorium isotope analyses were performed using only Faraday collectors coupled to 1011 [Omega] feedback resistors in the amplifier system. Spiked thorium solutions were concentrated to produce 230Th and 229Th signal intensities of around 50 mV and 100 mV, respectively (across a 1011 [Omega] resistor) and are run at high intensity for a short period of time (~1 min). These analyses yield a 230Th/229Th external reproducibility of better than 0.3[per mille sign] for ~25-30 pg of consumed 230Th. This is a factor of two better than the best published thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) and MC-ICPMS techniques for similar sample sizes, and represents up to an order of magnitude improvement over many other established protocols. Combined with new techniques for high precision Faraday measurement of uranium isotopic composition [1], this permits improvements in the uncertainty of U-series ages to better than 0.1 thousand years (ka) at 100 ka and 1 ka at 300 ka. It should also be possible to resolve events to ~14 ka at 600 ka. Using these techniques, the U-series dating limit can be extended from 500-600 ka to 800 ka enabling a more detailed study of the frequency of late Pleistocene climate events.

  8. Correlation between hydrogen isotope ratios of lipid biomarkers and sediment maturity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radke, Jens; Bechtel, Achim; Gaupp, Reinhard; Püttmann, Wilhelm; Schwark, Lorenz; Sachse, Dirk; Gleixner, Gerd

    2005-12-01

    We investigated the influence of thermal maturity on the hydrogen isotope ratios of sedimentary hydrocarbons to prove that the isotope ratio of hydrocarbons mirrors paleoclimate signatures. δD values from n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids of two sediment sections (Kupferschiefer [KS], 258 Ma, and Posidonienschiefer [PS], 184 Ma) with different maturation history were investigated. Both covered thermal maturity from 0.48 to 1.3 Rc (vitrinite reflectance and reflectance calculated from MPI1). Sediment burial up to 4500 m caused thermal maturation of organic matter in the KS horizon from the Early Zechstein basin of Poland, whereas contact metamorphic thermal maturation originated in the Early Toarcian PS (Posidonienschiefer) of the North German Vlotho Massif. The δD values of the extracted n-alkanes positively correlate with thermal maturity in the KS ( y = 56‰ × MPI1[ x] - 160‰ [VSMOW]) and in the PS ( y = 104‰ × MPI1[ x] - 200‰ [VSMOW]). The δD values of isoprenoids (i.e., pristane, phytane) were even more enriched with increasing maturity ( y = 179‰ × MPI1[ x] - 341‰ [VSMOW] in the KS; y = 300‰ × MPI1[ x] - 415‰ [VSMOW] in PS). These results explain why isotope ratios of n-alkanes and isoprenoids in mature sediments are generally enriched in D and do not have the expected isotopic difference between n-alkanes and isoprenoids of ˜190‰. Moreover, the correlation between sediment maturity parameters and δD values suggests that after correction the δD values of n-alkanes can be used to reconstruct climate and environment in the geological past.

  9. Zn/Cd ratios and cadmium isotope evidence for the classification of lead-zinc deposits

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Hanjie; Zhu, Chuanwei; Zhang, Yuxu; Cloquet, Christophe; Fan, Haifeng; Fu, Shaohong

    2016-01-01

    Lead-zinc deposits are often difficult to classify because clear criteria are lacking. In recent years, new tools, such as Cd and Zn isotopes, have been used to better understand the ore-formation processes and to classify Pb-Zn deposits. Herein, we investigate Cd concentrations, Cd isotope systematics and Zn/Cd ratios in sphalerite from nine Pb-Zn deposits divided into high-temperature systems (e.g., porphyry), low-temperature systems (e.g., Mississippi Valley type [MVT]) and exhalative systems (e.g., sedimentary exhalative [SEDEX]). Our results showed little evidence of fractionation in the high-temperature systems. In the low-temperature systems, Cd concentrations were the highest, but were also highly variable, a result consistent with the higher fractionation of Cd at low temperatures. The δ114/110Cd values in low-temperature systems were enriched in heavier isotopes (mean of 0.32 ± 0.31‰). Exhalative systems had the lowest Cd concentrations, with a mean δ114/110Cd value of 0.12 ± 0.50‰. We thus conclude that different ore-formation systems result in different characteristic Cd concentrations and fraction levels and that low-temperature processes lead to the most significant fractionation of Cd. Therefore, Cd distribution and isotopic studies can support better understanding of the geochemistry of ore-formation processes and the classification of Pb-Zn deposits. PMID:27121538

  10. The oxygen isotope partition function ratio of water and the structure of liquid water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Adami, L.H.

    1969-01-01

    By means of the CO2-equilibration technique, the temperature dependence and absolute values of the oxygen isotope partition function ratio of liquid water have been determined, often at 1?? intervals, from -2 to 85??. A linear relationship between In (Q2/Q1) (H2O) and T-1 was obtained that is explicable in terms of the Bigeleisen-Mayer theory of isotopic fractionation. The data are incompatible with conventional, multicomponent mixture models of water because liquid water behaves isotopically as a singly structured homogeneous substance over the entire temperature range studied. A two-species model of water is proposed in which approximately 30% of the hydrogen bonds in ice are broken on melting at 0?? and in which this per cent of monomer changes by only a small amount over the entire liquid range. Because of the high precision and the fundamental property determined, the isotopic fractionation technique is particularly well suited to the detection of thermal anomalies. No anomalies were observed and those previously reported are ascribed to under-estimates of experimental error.

  11. Calibration and Data Processing in Gas Chromatography Combustion Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Tobias, Herbert J.; Sacks, Gavin L.; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) by gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GCC-IRMS) is a powerful technique for the sourcing of substances, such as determination of the geographic or chemical origin of drugs and food adulteration, and it is especially invaluable as a confirmatory tool for detection of the use of synthetic steroids in competitive sport. We review here principles and practices for data processing and calibration of GCC-IRMS data with consideration to anti-doping analyses, with a focus on carbon isotopic analysis (13C/12C). After a brief review of peak definition, the isotopologue signal reduction methods of summation, curve-fitting, and linear regression are described and reviewed. Principles for isotopic calibration are considered in the context of the Δ13C = δ13CM – δ13CE difference measurements required for establishing adverse analytical findings for metabolites relative to endogenous reference compounds. Considerations for the anti-doping analyst are reviewed. PMID:22362612

  12. An analytical approach to Sr isotope ratio determination in Lambrusco wines for geographical traceability purposes.

    PubMed

    Durante, Caterina; Baschieri, Carlo; Bertacchini, Lucia; Bertelli, Davide; Cocchi, Marina; Marchetti, Andrea; Manzini, Daniela; Papotti, Giulia; Sighinolfi, Simona

    2015-04-15

    Geographical origin and authenticity of food are topics of interest for both consumers and producers. Among the different indicators used for traceability studies, (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotopic ratio has provided excellent results. In this study, two analytical approaches for wine sample pre-treatment, microwave and low temperature mineralisation, were investigated to develop accurate and precise analytical method for (87)Sr/(86)Sr determination. The two procedures led to comparable results (paired t-test, with tisotopic values were compared with isotopic data coming from (i) soils of their territory of origin and (ii) wines obtained by same grape varieties cultivated in different districts. The obtained results have shown no significant variability among the different vintages of wines and a perfect agreement between the isotopic range of the soils and wines has been observed. Nevertheless, the investigated indicator was not enough powerful to discriminate between similar products. To this regard, it is worth to note that more soil samples as well as wines coming from different districts will be considered to obtain more trustworthy results. PMID:25466059

  13. A new concept for sensitive in situ stable isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy based on sample modulation.

    PubMed

    Werle, Peter; Dyroff, Christoph; Zahn, Andreas; Mazzinghi, Piero; D'amato, Francesco

    2005-12-01

    Diode-laser absorption spectroscopy finds increasing applications in the emerging field of stable isotope research. To meet the requirements of the water isotopes measurement challenge in environmental research, ways have to be found to cope with the present limitations of spectroscopic systems. In this article, we discuss an approach based on the Stark effect in molecular spectra to reduce the influence of time-dependent, unwanted background structures generally superimposed on the desired signal from the spectral feature under investigation. A road map to high-sensitivity isotopic ratio measurements of water isotopes is presented. On the basis of an Allan Variance analysis of measured data, the detection limits have been calculated as a function of the integration time. To achieve the required optical density of about 6 x 10(-7) for H(2)(17)O measurements, the duty cycle has to be optimized and the implementation of a sample modulation within an optical multipass cell is a promising approach to increase the stability of spectroscopic instrumentation required for ecosystem research and airborne atmospheric platforms. PMID:16543188

  14. Calibration and data processing in gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Tobias, Herbert J; Sacks, Gavin L; Brenna, J Thomas

    2012-12-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) by gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GCC-IRMS) is a powerful technique for the sourcing of substances, such as determination of the geographic or chemical origin of drugs and food adulteration, and it is especially invaluable as a confirmatory tool for detection of the use of synthetic steroids in competitive sport. We review here principles and practices for data processing and calibration of GCC-IRMS data with consideration to anti-doping analyses, with a focus on carbon isotopic analysis ((13)C/(12)C). After a brief review of peak definition, the isotopologue signal reduction methods of summation, curve-fitting, and linear regression are described and reviewed. Principles for isotopic calibration are considered in the context of the Δ(13)C = δ(13)C(M) - δ(13)C(E) difference measurements required for establishing adverse analytical findings for metabolites (M) relative to endogenous (E) reference compounds. Considerations for the anti-doping analyst are reviewed. PMID:22362612

  15. Variation in oxygen isotope ratio of dissolved orthophosphate induced by uptake process in natural coral holobionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrera, Charissa M.; Miyajima, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Atsushi; Umezawa, Yu; Morimoto, Naoko; San Diego-McGlone, Maria Lourdes; Nadaoka, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    A model incubation experiment using natural zooxanthellate corals was conducted to evaluate the influence of phosphate uptake by coral holobionts on oxygen isotope ratio of dissolved PO4 3- (δ18Op). Live coral samples of Acropora digitifera, Porites cylindrica, and Heliopora coerulea were collected from coral reefs around Ishigaki Island (Okinawa, Japan) and Bolinao (northern Luzon, Philippines) and incubated for 3-5 d after acclimatization under natural light conditions with elevated concentrations of PO4 3-. Phosphate uptake by corals behaved linearly with incubation time, with uptake rate depending on temperature. δ18Op usually increased with time toward the equilibrium value with respect to oxygen isotope exchange with ambient seawater, but sometimes became higher than equilibrium value at the end of incubation. The magnitude of the isotope effect associated with uptake depended on coral species; the greatest effect was in A. digitifera and the smallest in H. coerulea. However, it varied even within samples of a single coral species, which suggests multiple uptake processes with different isotope effects operating simultaneously with varying relative contributions in the coral holobionts used. In natural environments where concentrations of PO4 3- are much lower than those used during incubation, PO4 3- is presumably turned over much faster and the δ18Op easily altered by corals and other major primary producers. This should be taken into consideration when using δ18Op as an indicator of external PO4 3- sources in coastal ecosystems.

  16. Concentrations and activity ratios of uranium isotopes in groundwater from Donana National Park, South of Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Bolivar, J. P.; Olias, M.; Gonzalez-Garcia, F.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2008-08-07

    The levels and distribution of natural radionuclides in groundwaters from the unconfined Almonte-Marismas aquifer, upon which Donana National Park is located, have been analysed. Most sampled points were multiple piezometers trying to study the vertical distribution of the hydrogeochemical characteristics in the aquifer. Temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen and redox potential were determined in the field. A large number of parameters, physico-chemical properties, major and minor ions, trace elements and natural radionuclides (U-isotopes, Th-isotopes, Ra-isotopes and {sup 210}Po), were also analysed. In the southern zone, where aeolian sands crop out, water composition is of the sodium chloride type, and the lower U-isotopes concentrations have been obtained. As water circulates through the aquifer, bicarbonate and calcium concentrations increase slightly, and higher radionuclides concentrations were measured. Finally, we have demonstrated that {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios can be used as markers of the type of groundwater and bedrock, as it has been the case for old waters with marine origin confined by a marsh in the south-east part of aquifer.

  17. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dishon, G.; Fisch, J.; Horn, I.; Kaczmarek, K.; Bijma, J.; Gruber, D. F.; Nir, O.; Popovich, Y.; Tchernov, D.

    2015-10-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~ 0.1 percent of the ocean's habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced a significant global decline due to a variety of causes, one of the major causes being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching, the coral expels its symbiotic algae, thereby losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been extensively investigated, there is no scientific data on historical coral bleaching prior to 1979. In this study, we employ high-resolution femtosecond Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) to demonstrate a distinct biologically induced decline of boron (B) isotopic composition (δ11B) as a result of coral bleaching. These findings and methodology offer a new use for a previously developed isotopic proxy to reconstruct paleo-coral bleaching events. Based on a literature review of published δ11B data and our recorded vital effect of coral bleaching on the δ11B signal, we also describe at least two possible coral bleaching events since the Last Glacial Maximum. The implementation of this bleaching proxy holds the potential of identifying occurrences of coral bleaching throughout the geological record. A deeper temporal view of coral bleaching will enable scientists to determine if it occurred in the past during times of environmental change and what outcome it may have had on coral population structure. Understanding the frequency of bleaching events is also critical for determining the relationship between natural and anthropogenic causes of these events.

  18. High Precision Boron Isotopic Analysis in Coral Skeletons: Implications for pCO2 variation in surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; You, C.; Huang, K.; Chung, C.; Wan, N.; Chiu, C.

    2006-12-01

    To advance our knowledge of oceanic CO2 variation in northwestern Pacific, a boron isotopic record with monthly resolution in a hermatypic coral was investigated using high precision Cs2BO2+ thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) technique. Trace elements (B and Sr) and stable isotopes (O and C) were also analyzed to constrain sea surface temperature and symbiotic photosynthesis. After filtering out short-term climatic influence, coralline δ^{11}B vary seasonally with a range between 23.1 and 29.1 ‰ during 1988 to 1991. The coralline δ13C reflect also seasonal variability and show high photosynthetic activity in summer-fall months. The δ18O in skeleton was affected by temperature and kinetic fractionation. The pH reconstruction based on δ^{11}B range between 7.6 and 8.3, implying pH of calcification microenvironment were faithful recorded. High pH values appear in the summer-fall intervals, agree with active photosynthesis and high ambient temperature. However, intensity variation of Kuroshio Current water masses at the Philippine Sea and the South China Sea, as well as local upwelling, El Niño/La Niña episodes, may also need to be considered. An interesting relationship between δ^{11}B and the CO2 fugacity was obtained for summer-fall and winter-spring, respectively. It is also important to note that extra care should be taken when applying δ^{11}B as a proxy for pH reconstruction in SST sensitive regions.

  19. Reformulated 17O correction of mass spectrometric stable isotope measurements in carbon dioxide and a critical appraisal of historic 'absolute' carbon and oxygen isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Jan

    2008-03-01

    Mass-spectrometric stable isotope measurements of CO 2 use molecular ion currents at mass-to-charge ratios m/ z 44, 45 and 46 to derive the elemental isotope ratios n( 13C)/ n( 12C) and n( 18O)/ n( 16O), abbreviated 13C/ 12C and 18O/ 16O, relative to a reference. The ion currents have to be corrected for the contribution of 17O-bearing isotopologues, the so-called ' 17O correction'. The magnitude of this correction depends on the calibrated isotope ratios of the reference. Isotope ratio calibrations are difficult and are therefore a matter of debate. Here, I provide a comprehensive evaluation of the existing 13C/ 12C ( 13R), 17O/ 16O ( 17R) and 18O/ 16O ( 18R) calibrations of the reference material Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW) and CO 2 generated from the reference material Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite (VPDB) by reaction with 100% H 3PO 4 at 25 °C (VPDB-CO 2). I find 17R/10-6=382.7-2.1+1.7, 18RVSMOW/10 -6 = 2005.20 ± 0.45, 13R/10-6= 11124 ± 45, 17R/10-6=391.1-2.1+1.7 and 18R/10-6=2088.37±0.90. I also rephrase the calculation scheme for the 17O correction completely in terms of relative isotope ratio differences ( δ values). This reveals that only ratios of isotope ratios (namely, 17R/ 13R and 13R17R/ 18R) are required for the 17O correction. These can be, and have been, measured on conventional stable isotope mass spectrometers. I then show that the remaining error for these ratios of isotope ratios can lead to significant uncertainty in the derived relative 13C/ 12C difference, but not for 18O/ 16O. Even though inter-laboratory differences can be corrected for by a common 'ratio assumption set' and/or normalisation, the ultimate accuracy of the 17O correction is hereby limited. Errors of similar magnitude can be introduced by the assumed mass-dependent relationship between 17O/ 16O and 18O/ 16O isotope ratios. For highest accuracy in the 13C/ 12C ratio, independent triple oxygen isotope measurements are required. Finally, I propose an experiment that

  20. Tunable Diode Laser Measurements of Leaf-scale Carbon Isotope Discrimination and Ecosystem Respired Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios in a Semi-arid Woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, N.; Chris, B.; Hanson, D.; Kern, S.; Meyer, C.; Pockman, W.; Powers, H.

    2005-12-01

    We present results and speculative interpretation of leaf-level carbon isotope discrimination and ecosystem respired carbon and oxygen isotope ratios from a semi-arid, C3/C4 woodland located in northern New Mexico, USA. Overstory leaf area index (LAI) is dominated by live juniper (Juniperus monosperma) trees with an LAI value of approximately 1.0 m2 per m2 ground area, and has a seasonally dynamic understory of mixed C3 forbs and C4 grasses and cacti, with a maximum LAI of 0.30 m2 per m2 ground area. Ecosystem respired carbon isotope ratios showed values characteristic of C3 dominated photosynthesis (Keeling plot intercepts of -35 to -22 per mil). Seasonal variation was typical of that found in wetter, C3 dominated forests, as was the dependence on climate (e.g. relationships with vapor pressure deficit, soil water content, and canopy conductance). Leaf-level carbon isotope discrimination of the junipers, measured by coupling a Li-Cor 6400 photosynthesis system to the TDL, provided discrimination-Ci and discrimination-vpd relationships consistent with measured ecosystem respired carbon isotope ratios. The oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration was dependent on rain water isotope composition, but was correlated with soil water content during rain-free periods. The cumulative effect of vapor pressure deficit after a rain event was tightly correlated with the oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration, suggesting the primary drivers are evaporative enrichment of soil water and perhaps nocturnal leaf enrichment. Instrument precision for carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of carbon dioxide is 0.06 to 0.18 per mil; however, overall precision is somewhat lower due to pressure and sampling effects.

  1. Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of juvenile winter flounder as indicators of inputs to estuarine systems.

    PubMed

    Pruell, Richard J; Taplin, Bryan K

    2015-12-30

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were measured in young-of-the-year (YOY) winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several Rhode Island, USA estuarine systems. These included three coastal lagoons, an estuarine river and Narragansett Bay. The δ(13)C trends observed along transects in several systems showed isotopically depleted terrestrial signals in the upper reaches of the estuaries. Significant differences (P<0.05) in δ(15)N were observed among all estuarine systems and these differences correlated (P<0.01) with human population densities in the watersheds. Although Narragansett Bay has a strong north-south gradient in nutrient concentrations this trend was not reflected in flounder δ(15)N. The northernmost station with the highest nutrient concentrations unexpectedly had significantly lower δ(15)N values. Depleted δ(15)N values at this nutrient-rich station may indicate that concentration-dependent fractionation needs to be considered when using nitrogen isotope ratios in biota to monitor anthropogenic nitrogen inputs in systems with high nitrogen loadings. PMID:26541984

  2. Carbon isotope ratio (13C/12C) of pine honey and detection of HFCS adulteration.

    PubMed

    Çinar, Serap B; Ekşi, Aziz; Coşkun, İlknur

    2014-08-15

    Carbon isotope ratio ((13)C/(12)C=δ(13)C) of 100 pine honey samples collected from 9 different localities by Mugla region (Turkey) in years 2006, 2007 and 2008 were investigated. The δ(13)Cprotein value of honey samples ranged between -23.7 and -26.6‰, while the δ(13)Choney value varied between -22.7 and -27‰. For 90% of the samples, the difference in the C isotope ratio of protein and honey fraction (δ(13)Cpro-δ(13)Chon) was -1.0‰ and/or higher. Therefore, it can be said that the generally anticipated minimum value of C isotope difference (-1.0‰) for honey is also valid for pine honey. On the other hand, C4 sugar value (%), which was calculated from the δ(13)Cpro-δ(13)Chon difference, was found to be linearly correlated with the amount of adulterant (HFCS) in pine honey. These results indicate that C4 sugar value is a powerful criteria for detecting HFCS adulteration in pine honey. The δ(13)Choney and δ(13)Cprotein-δ(13)Choney values of the samples did not show any significant differences in terms of both year and locality (P>0.05), while the δ(13)Cprotein values showed significant differences due to year (P<0.05) but not due to locality (P>0.05). PMID:24679745

  3. Development and Airborne Operation of a Compact Water Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannone, Rosario Q.; Kassi, Samir; Jost, Hans-Juerg; Chenevier, Marc; Romanini, Daniele; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Dhaniyala, Suresh; Snels, Marcel; Kerstel, Erik R. T.

    2009-01-01

    A sensitive laser spectrometer, named IRIS (water isotope ratio infrared spectrometer), was developed for the in situ detection of the isotopic composition of water vapour in the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere. Isotope ratio measurements can be used to quantify troposphere stratosphere exchange, and to study the water chemistry in the stratosphere. IRIS is based on the technique of optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy. It uses a room temperature near-infrared laser, and does not require cryogenic cooling of laser or detectors. The instrument weighs 51 kg including its support structure. Airborne operation was demonstrated during three flights aboard the European M55-Geophysica stratospheric research aircraft, as part of the AMMA/SCOUT-03 (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis/Stratospheric Climate links with emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and lower stratosphere) campaign in Burkina Faso in August 2006. The data are discussed with reference to a Rayleigh distillation model. As expected, there is no indication of non-mass-dependent fractionation (also known as mass-independent fractionation) in the troposphere. Furthermore, improvements to the thermal management system and a move to a (cryogen-free) longer-wavelength laser source are discussed, which together should result in approximately two orders of magnitude improvement of the sensitivity

  4. Relationship between carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios for lower trophic ecosystem in marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aita, M. N.; Ishii, R.; Tadokoro, K.; Smith, S. L.; Wada, E.

    2012-12-01

    To examine the relationship between carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) along food chains, we analyzed using the data from the Oyashio waters at the western North Pacific (samples collected from March to October 2009), the warm-core ring 86-B derived from the Kuroshio extension region (preserved samples), and previously published data from the Gulf of Alaska and Antarctic Ocean. The statistical analysis suggested a common slope of δ15N versus δ13C (Δδ15N/Δδ13C) among regions. We attribute this similarity to common physiological aspects of feeding processes (e.g., kinetic isotope effects inherent in the processes of amino acid synthesis). We also compared seasonal differences seasonal in Δδ15N/Δδ13C for the euphotic layers of the Oyashio waters. The Δδ15N/Δδ13C slope of the food chain during the spring bloom differs from its common value in other seasons. If we could better understand both carbon and nitrogen trophic fractionation within ecosystems, the stable isotope ratios may help to elucidate migratory behavior of higher trophic levels such as fishes in marine ecosystems as well as frame work of biogeochemical cycles in question.

  5. Isotope-ratio infrared spectroscopy: a reliable tool for the investigation of plant-water sources?

    PubMed

    Martín-Gómez, Paula; Barbeta, Adrià; Voltas, Jordi; Peñuelas, Josep; Dennis, Kate; Palacio, Sara; Dawson, Todd E; Ferrio, Juan Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Stable isotopes are extensively used as tracers for the study of plant-water sources. Isotope-ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) offers a cheaper alternative to isotope-ratio mass spectroscopy (IRMS), but its use in studying plant and soil water is limited by the spectral interference caused by organic contaminants. Here, we examine two approaches to cope with contaminated samples in IRIS: on-line oxidation of organic compounds (MCM) and post-processing correction. We assessed these methods compared to IRMS across 136 samples of xylem and soil water, and a set of ethanol- and methanol-water mixtures. A post-processing correction significantly improved IRIS accuracy in both natural samples and alcohol dilutions, being effective with concentrations up to 8% of ethanol and 0.4% of methanol. MCM outperformed the post-processing correction in removing methanol interference, but did not effectively remove interference for high concentrations of ethanol. By using both approaches, IRIS can overcome with reasonable accuracy the analytical uncertainties associated with most organic contaminants found in soil and xylem water. We recommend the post-processing correction as the first choice for analysis of samples of unknown contamination. Nevertheless, MCM can be more effective for evaluating samples containing contaminants responsible for strong spectral interferences at low concentrations, such as methanol. PMID:25790288

  6. Can stable isotope ratios provide for community-wide measures of trophic structure?

    PubMed

    Layman, Craig A; Arrington, D Albrey; Montaña, Carmen G; Post, David M

    2007-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios (typically of carbon and nitrogen) provide one representation of an organism's trophic niche and are widely used to examine aspects of food web structure. Yet stable isotopes have not been applied to quantitatively characterize community-wide aspects of trophic structure (i.e., at the level of an entire food web). We propose quantitative metrics that can be used to this end, drawing on similar approaches from ecomorphology research. For example, the convex hull area occupied by species in delta13C-delta15N niche space is a representation of the total extent of trophic diversity within a food web, whereas mean nearest neighbor distance among all species pairs is a measure of species packing within trophic niche space. To facilitate discussion of opportunities and limitations of the metrics, we provide empirical and conceptual examples drawn from Bahamian tidal creek food webs. These examples illustrate how this methodology can be used to quantify trophic diversity and trophic redundancy in food webs, as well as to link individual species to characteristics of the food web in which they are embedded. Building from extensive applications of stable isotope ratios by ecologists, the community-wide metrics may provide a new perspective on food web structure, function, and dynamics. PMID:17489452

  7. The isotopic composition of galactic cosmic ray lithium, beryllium and boron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Mason, G. M.; Simpson, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The isotopic composition of galactic-cosmic-ray Li, Be, and B has been measured near 100 MeV/nucleon by using the University of Chicago IMP 7 and IMP 8 cosmic-ray telescopes during 1973-1975. The measured abundances allow detailed checks of models of interstellar propagation and solar modulation to be made and conclusions to be drawn concerning the spectral forms at the source and the minimum solar modulation level. For example, comparing these results with local interstellar spectra calculated by using a 'leaky box' model, it is found that if solar modulation is ignored, there is no unique leakage mean free path consistent with all the observations. However, by taking account of a sizable level of residual solar modulation, excellent agreement is obtained between the calculated and measured abundances. Thus, these isotopic abundances confirm the old hypothesis that cosmic-ray Li, Be, and B are produced as secondaries in interstellar space.

  8. Lithium and boron in late-orogenic granites - Isotopic fingerprints for the source of crustal melts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romer, Rolf L.; Meixner, Anette; Förster, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-04-01

    Geochemically diverse late- and post-Variscan granites of the Erzgebirge-Vogtland, the Saxon Granulite Massif, and Thuringia (Germany) formed by anatectic melting of Palaeozoic sedimentary successions and associated mafic to felsic volcanic rocks. The compositional diversity of the least evolved of these granites is largely inherited from the protoliths. We present Li and B-isotopic data of these granites and compare them with the isotopic composition of their protoliths, to investigate whether (i) there exist systematic differences in the Li and B-isotopic composition among different granite types and (ii) Li and B-isotopic compositions provide information on the granite sources complementary to information from the isotopic composition of Sr, Nd, and Pb and the trace-element signatures. Low-F biotite and two-mica granite types have flat upper continental crust (UCC)-normalized trace-element pattern with variable enrichments in Li, Rb, Cs, Sn, and W and depletions in Sr, Ba, and Eu. These signatures are least pronounced for the Niederbobritzsch biotite granite, which has the largest contribution of mafic material, and most pronounced for the two-mica granites. The granites show a relatively narrow range of δ7Li values (-3.0 to -0.5) and a broad range of δ11B values (-13.4 to +20.1). The δ11B values are lower in rocks with distinctly higher contents of Li, Rb, Cs, and Sn. The high δ11B of the Niederbobritzsch granite may be explained by the melting of former altered oceanic crust in its source. Relative to UCC, intermediate-F to high-F low-P granites show strong depletions in Sr, Ba, Eu as well as Zr and Hf, strong enrichments in Li, Rb, and Cs as well as Nb, Sn, Ta, and W, and REE pattern with stronger enrichments for HREE than for LREE. These granites show narrow ranges of δ7Li (-2.0 to +1.6) and δ11B values (-14.7 to -9.1), reflecting the smaller variability of the Li and B-isotopic composition in their source lithologies. The anomalously high δ7Li value

  9. Chemistry and isotope ratios of sulfur in basalts and volcanic gases at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sakai, H.; Casadevall, T.J.; Moore, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Eighteen basalts and some volcanic gases from the submarine and subaerial parts of Kilauea volcano were analyzed for the concentration and isotope ratios of sulfur. By means of a newly developed technique, sulfide and sulfate sulfur in the basalts were separately but simultaneously determined. The submarine basalt has 700 ?? 100 ppm total sulfur with ??34S??s of 0.7 ?? 0.1 ???. The sulfate/sulfide molar ratio ranges from 0.15 to 0.56 and the fractionation factor between sulfate and sulfide is +7.5 ?? 1.5???. On the other hand, the concentration and ??34S??s values of the total sulfur in the subaerial basalt are reduced to 150 ?? 50 ppm and -0.8 ?? 0.2???, respectively. The sulfate to sulfide ratio and the fractionation factor between them are also smaller, 0.01 to 0.25 and +3.0???, respectively. Chemical and isotopic evidence strongly suggests that sulfate and sulfide in the submarine basalt are in chemical and isotopic equilibria with each other at magmatic conditions. Their relative abundance and the isotope fractionation factors may be used to estimate the f{hook}o2 and temperature of these basalts at the time of their extrusion onto the sea floor. The observed change in sulfur chemistry and isotopic ratios from the submarine to subaerial basalts can be interpreted as degassing of the SO2 from basalt thereby depleting sulfate and 34S in basalt. The volcanic sulfur gases, predominantly SO2, from the 1971 and 1974 fissures in Kilauea Crater have ??34S values of 0.8 to 0.9%., slightly heavier than the total sulfur in the submarine basalts and definitely heavier than the subaerial basalts, in accord with the above model. However, the ??34S value of sulfur gases (largely SO2) from Sulfur Bank is 8.0%., implying a secondary origin of the sulfur. The ??34S values of native sulfur deposits at various sites of Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanos, sulfate ions of four deep wells and hydrogen sulfide from a geothermal well along the east rift zone are also reported. The high

  10. An analytical system for stable isotope analysis on carbon monoxide using continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathirana, S. L.; van der Veen, C.; Popa, M. E.; Röckmann, T.

    2015-12-01

    A fully automated system for the determination of δ13C and δ18O in atmospheric CO has been developed. CO is extracted from an air sample and converted into carbon dioxide (CO2) using the Schütze reagent. The isotopic composition is determined with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) technique. The entire system is continuously flushed with high-purity helium (He), the carrier gas. The blank signal of the Schütze reagent is ~ 4 nmol mol-1, or 1-3 % of the typical sample size. The repeatability is 0.1 ‰ for δ13C and 0.2 ‰ for δ18O. The peak area allows for simultaneous determination of the mole fraction with an analytical repeatability of ~ 0.7 nmol mol-1 for 100 mL of ambient air (185.4 nmol mol-1 of CO). An automated single measurement is performed in only 18 min, and the achieved time efficiency (and small volume of sample air) allows for repetitive measurements practically.

  11. Tracking mammoths and mastodons: Reconstruction of migratory behavior using strontium isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Kathryn A.; Koch, Paul L.; Carlson, Richard W.; Webb, S. David

    1999-05-01

    Variations in the strontium isotope ratio (87Sr/86Sr) of tooth enamel are used to examine the migration patterns of late Pleistocene mammoths and mastodons from Florida. An animal's 87Sr/86Sr ratio tracks the ratios of its environment, which vary with differences in bedrock and soil. Consequently, the environmentally controlled differences in 87Sr/86Sr ratio recorded in mineralized tissue, such as tooth enamel, may be used to reconstruct the movement patterns of an individual. We map variations in local 87Sr/86Sr ratios across modern Florida and Georgia through analysis of rodent teeth, plants, and surface water, then use this map to interpret the movement patterns of extinct mammals. Mastodons from northern and central Florida have higher 87Sr/86Sr ratios than both modern environmental samples from Florida and fossils from nonmigratory species, suggesting that mastodons migrated north into Georgia. Mammoths display ratios similar to those of environmental samples and resident species, suggesting that they did not migrate outside Florida.

  12. Molecular medicine: Synthesis and in-vivo detection of agents for use in boron neutron capture therapy. Final report, May 1, 1993--April 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kabalka, G.W.

    1997-08-01

    During the early stages of this project, the author developed the first whole-body boron MRI technique. They found that, for the first time, information concerning both the location and the quantity of boron present in living tissues could be obtained through the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) respectively. However, it was also discovered that boron MRI was not without problems. Both naturally occurring isotopes of boron (boron-10 and boron-11) possess magnetic moments, making them amenable to MR detection. The author found that there are difficulties in obtaining boron MRI images which are a consequence of the inherently poor magnetic resonance characteristics of the boron nucleus. The magnetogyric ratios of both boron-10 and boron-11 are smaller than those of hydrogen, which makes boron much less sensitive to magnetic resonance detection. In addition, both isotopes of boron posses nuclear electric quadrupole moments which serve to shorten their magnetization relaxation times; this causes the MR signal to broaden and decay rapidly, often before the receiver coils can collect the MR information. The rapid rate of signal decay is enhanced in biological systems which leads to further signal loss and a decrease in the signal to noise ratio (SNR).

  13. Laboratory investigations of stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratio data enhance monitoring of CO2 underground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Johannes A. C.; Myrttinen, Anssi; Becker, Veith; Nowak, Martin; Mayer, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope data play an important role in monitoring CO2 in the subsurface, for instance during carbon capture and storage (CCS). This includes monitoring of supercritical and gaseous CO2 movement and reactions under reservoir conditions and detection of potential CO2 leakage scenarios. However, in many cases isotope data from field campaigns are either limited due to complex sample retrieval or require verification under controlled boundary conditions. Moreover, experimentally verified isotope fractionation factors are also accurately known only for temperatures and pressures lower than commonly found in CO2 reservoirs (Myrttinen et al., 2012). For this reason, several experimental series were conducted in order to investigate effects of elevated pressures, temperatures and salinities on stable carbon and oxygen isotope changes of CO2 and water. These tests were conducted with a heateable pressure device and with glass or metal gas containers in which CO2 reacted with fluids for time periods of hours to several weeks. The obtained results revealed systematic differences in 13C/12C-distributions between CO2 and the most important dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species under reservoir conditions (CO2(aq), H2CO3 and HCO3-). Since direct measurements of the pH, even immediately after sampling, were unreliable due to rapid CO2 de-gassing, one of the key results of this work is that carbon isotope fractionation data between DIC and CO2 may serve to reconstruct in situ pH values. pH values reconstructed with this approach ranged between 5.5 and 7.4 for experiments with 60 bars and up to 120 °C and were on average 1.4 pH units lower than those measured with standard pH electrodes directly after sampling. In addition, pressure and temperature experiments with H2O and CO2 revealed that differences between the oxygen isotope ratios of both phases depended on temperature, water-gas ratios as well as salt contents of the solutions involved. Such

  14. Concentrations of iodine isotopes ((129)I and (127)I) and their isotopic ratios in aerosol samples from Northern Germany.

    PubMed

    Daraoui, A; Riebe, B; Walther, C; Wershofen, H; Schlosser, C; Vockenhuber, C; Synal, H-A

    2016-04-01

    New data about (129)I, (127)I concentrations and their isotopic ratios in aerosol samples from the trace survey station of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig, Northern Germany, are presented and discussed in this paper. The investigated samples were collected on a weekly basis during the years 2011 to 2013. Iodine was extracted from aerosol filters using a strong basic solution and was separated from the matrix elements with chloroform and was analysed by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for (129)I and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for (127)I. The concentrations of (127)I and (129)I in aerosol filters ranged from 0.31 to 3.71 ng m(-3) and from 0.06 to 0.75 fg m(-3), respectively. The results of (129)I/(127)I isotopic ratios were in the order 10(-8) to 10(-7). The (129)I originated directly from gaseous emissions and indirectly from liquid emissions (via sea spray) from the reprocessing plants in Sellafield and La Hague. In comparison with the results of (131)I after the Fukushima accident, no contribution of (129)I from this accident was detectable in Central Europe due to the high background originating from the (129)I releases of the European reprocessing plants. (129)I atmospheric activity concentrations were compared with those of an anthropogenic radionuclide ((85)Kr). We did not find any correlation between (129)I and (85)Kr, both having nuclear reprocessing plant as the main source. PMID:26867099

  15. Ground-based IR observation of oxygen isotope ratios in Venus's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwagami, N.; Hashimoto, G. L.; Ohtsuki, S.; Takagi, S.; Robert, S.

    2015-08-01

    The oxygen isotope ratios 17O/16O and 18O/16O in Venus's atmosphere were measured simultaneously by ground-based IR spectroscopy. The CO2 absorption lines in the 2648 cm-1 (for 17O/18O) and 4582 cm-1 (for 18O/16O) regions were observed using the IRTF/CSHELL spectrometer. The deviations of the isotope fractions are found to be δ17O=+92±158‰ and δ18O=-42±85‰ as compared to the terrestrial standard (HITRAN 2012) where the uncertainties include both random and systematic errors. Such combination agrees with the Earth-Moon fractionation line within the errors. This is consistent to the fact that the proto-Venus matter was also well mixed with the proto-Earth-Moon matter.

  16. Sedimentary nitrogen isotopic ratio as a recorder for surface ocean nitrate utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Altabet, M.A.; Francois, R. )

    1994-03-01

    The availability of nutrients in the near surface ocean is an important control on primary production, whose variability over geologic time may have altered major biogeochemical cycles. Ocean models have suggested a specific link between glacial/interglacial variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations and changes in nutrient concentration at the surface of high latitude seas. Isotope ratios have been used to evaluate nutrients in the ocean surface. To test the fidelity with which surface generated isotopic signals are recorded in deep-sea sediments, this study focused on equatorial Pacific ocean and the southern ocean. In both regions large gradients in near surface NO3 concentration and depletion dominate any local temporal variation. Corresponding gradients were found in Nitrogen 15 and compared to sedimentary values. Results indicate that strong near surface N15 gradients are indeed recorded in underlying surface sediments. 55 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  17. The stable carbon isotope ratios in benthic food webs of the gulf of Calvi, Corsica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauby, Patrick

    1989-02-01

    The Gulf of Calvi, Corsica, presents a wide diversity of biocoenoses, amongst which the seagrass Posidonia meadow is prevalent. More than 100 plant, animal and sediment samples from various biotopes were analysed for their stable carbon isotope ratios, to assess carbon flows within the food chains. Marine plants display a wide range of δ 13C values, from -6 to -32‰ but with three relatively well distinct peaks for Posidonia, brown algae and phytoplankton (-9, -19 and -23‰, respectively), which are the main carbon sources. The range of isotopic values of animals is narrower, from -14 to -24‰, suggesting that they feed mainly on algae and plankton. Computations based on simple equations show the proportion of each carbon source in the diet of the animals. Posidonia, notwithstanding their important biomass, appear to be a minor food source; this is possibly because of the transfer of their dead leaves, towards the shorelines, in winter.

  18. Groundwater ''fast paths'' in the Snake River plain aquifer: Radiogenic isotope ratios as natural groundwater tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Thomas M.; Roback, Robert C.; McLing, Travis L.; Bullen, Thomas D.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Doughty, Christine; Hunt, Randall J.; Smith, Robert W.; Cecil, L. DeWayne; Murrell, Michael T.

    2000-09-01

    Preferential flow paths are expected in many groundwater systems and must be located because they can greatly affect contaminant transport. The fundamental characteristics of radiogenic isotope ratios in chemically evolving waters make them highly effective as preferential flow path indicators. These ratios tend to be more easily interpreted than solute-concentration data because their response to water-rock interaction is less complex. We demonstrate this approach with groundwater {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios in the Snake River Plain aquifer within and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. These data reveal slow-flow zones as lower {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr areas created by prolonged interaction with the host basalts and a relatively fast flowing zone as a high {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr area.

  19. Direct isotope ratio analysis of individual uranium-plutonium mixed particles with various U/Pu ratios by thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Esaka, Fumitaka; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Magara, Masaaki

    2015-02-01

    Uranium and plutonium isotope ratios in individual uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) mixed particles with various U/Pu atomic ratios were analyzed without prior chemical separation by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Prior to measurement, micron-sized particles with U/Pu ratios of 1, 5, 10, 18, and 70 were produced from uranium and plutonium certified reference materials. In the TIMS analysis, the peaks of americium, plutonium, and uranium ion signals were successfully separated by continuously increasing the evaporation filament current. Consequently, the uranium and plutonium isotope ratios, except the (238)Pu/(239)Pu ratio, were successfully determined for the particles at all U/Pu ratios. This indicates that TIMS direct analysis allows for the measurement of individual U-Pu mixed particles without prior chemical separation. PMID:25479434

  20. New developments in high-resolution gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clog, M. D.; Ellam, R. M.; Hilkert, A.; Schwieters, J. B.; Hamilton, D.

    2015-12-01

    Gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is one of the main tools for the study of the isotopic compositions of light elements, extended in the last 10 years to the measurements of molecules bearing several rare isotopes (e.g., clumped isotopes of CO2) as well as position-specific isotopic substitutions in a few choice analytes (e.g., in N2O). Measuring those low-abundance species creates several technical challenges, with the main one being the presence of numerous isobaric interferences. Those can come either from contaminants (background gases present in the source of the instrument or impurities introduced with the analyte), or unwanted beams created by the analyte itself during the ionization process (for example adducts and fragments). In order to avoid those isobaric species, new high-resolution, double-focusing IRMS have been developed. We present here the capabilities of the production series version of the ThermoFisher Scientific 253 Ultra, which was installed at SUERC in July 2015. The instrument is capable of reaching high mass resolving power (above 40,000) and is similar in design to the Caltech 253 Ultra prototype. The collector array has 9 detector positions, 8 of which are movable. Faraday cups at each detector can be linked to amplifiers with gains ranging from 3.108 to 1012 Ohm (and 1013 Ohm amplifiers being currently developped). There are also 4 ion counters, one of which located behind a retardation lens (RPQ) to limit background noise and improve abundance sensitivity. Additionally, one of the Faraday cup in the new instrument has a very narrow entrance slit, allowing high mass resolving power and high resolution, with a complete separation of the ion beams instead of complex peak shapes corresponding to overlapping ion beams. This will potentially remove the need for adduct lines or peak stripping schemes for analytes like CH4.

  1. Microbial activities and phosphorus cycling: An application of oxygen isotope ratios in phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Lisa M.; Joshi, Sunendra R.; Kana, Todd M.; Jaisi, Deb P.

    2014-08-01

    Microorganisms carry out biochemical transformations of nutrients that make up their cells. Therefore, understanding how these nutrients are transformed or cycled in natural environments requires knowledge of microbial activity. Commonly used indicators for microbial activity typically include determining microbial respiration by O2/CO2 measurements, cell counts, and measurement of enzyme activities. However, coupled studies on nutrient cycling and microbial activity are not given enough emphasis. Here we apply phosphate oxygen isotope ratios (δ18OP) as a tool for measurement of microbial activity and compare the rate of isotope exchange with methods of measuring microbial activities that are more commonly applied in environmental studies including respiration, dehydrogenase activity, alkaline phosphatase activity, and cell counts. Our results show that different bacteria may have different strategies for P uptake, storage and release, their respiration and consequently expression of DHA and APase activities, but in general the trend of their enzyme activities are comparable. Phosphate δ18OP values correlated well with these other parameters used to measure microbial activity with the strongest linear relationships between δ18OP and CO2 evolution (r = -0.99). Even though the rate of isotope exchange for each microorganism used in this study is different, the rate per unit CO2 respiration showed one general trend, where δ18OP values move towards equilibrium while CO2 is generated. While this suggests that P cycling among microorganisms used in this study can be generalized, further research is needed to determine whether the microorganism-specific isotope exchange trend may occur in natural environments. In summary, phosphate oxygen isotope measurements may offer an alternative for use as a tracer to measure microbial activity in soils, sediments, and many other natural environments.

  2. Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of hydrothermal minerals from Yellowstone drill cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sturchio, N.C.; Keith, T.E.C.; Muehlenbachs, K.

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios were measured for hydrothermal minerals (silica, clay and calcite) from fractures and vugs in altered rhyolite, located between 28 and 129 m below surface (in situ temperatures ranging from 81 to 199??C) in Yellowstone drill holes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of formation of these minerals. The ??18O values of the thirty-two analyzed silica samples (quartz, chalcedony, ??-cristobalite, and ??-cristobalite) range from -7.5 to +2.8???. About one third of the silica 7samples have ??18O values that are consistent with isotopic equilibrium with present thermal waters; most of the other silica samples appear to have precipitated from water enriched in 18O (up to 4.7???) relative to present thermal water, assuming precipitation at present in situ temperatures. Available data on fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures in hydrothermal quartz indicate that silica precipitation occurred mostly at temperatures above those measured during drilling and imply that 15O enrichments in water during silica precipitation were generally larger than those estimated from present conditions. Similarly, clay minerals (celadonite and smectite) have ??18O values higher (by 3.5 to 7.9???) than equilibrium values under present conditions. In contrast, all eight analyzed calcite samples are close to isotopic equilibrium with present thermal waters. The frequent incidence of apparent 18O enrichment in thermal water from which the hydrothermal minerals precipitated may indicate that a higher proportion of strongly 18O-enriched deep hydrothermal fluid once circulated through shallow portions of the Yellowstone system, or that a recurring transient 18O-enrichment effect occurs at shallow depths and is caused either by sudden decompressional boiling or by isotopic exchange at low water/rock ratios in new fractures. The mineralogy and apparent 18O enrichments of hydrothermal fracture-filling minerals are consistent with deposition

  3. Cryogenic separation of oxygen-argon mixture in natural air samples for isotopic and molecular ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habeeb Rahman, Keedakkadan; Abe, Osamu

    2014-05-01

    The discovery of mass independent isotope fractionation in oxygen during the formation of ozone in the stratosphere has initiated a wide application in isotope geochemistry field. Separation of oxygen-argon mixture has become the foundation of high precision analysis of Δ17O and δ(O2/Ar) for geochemical applications. Here we present precise and simplified cryogenic separation of argon oxygen mixture from the atmospheric and dissolved air using 30/60 mesh 5A molecular sieve zeolite. A pioneer study of this method was conducted by Thiemens and Meagher in 1984. The column which is made of glass tube contains about 1.1 grams of molecular sieve zeolite and both ends of column was filled with glass wools. The experimental set up was tested for different combination of molecular sieves and slurry temperatures. We found the most efficient condition for the separation was at a column temperature of -103°C. For complete transfer of O2 and Ar mixture usually takes in 15-20 minutes time. The isotopic ratios of oxygen were analyzed using mass spectrometer (Thermo Fischer Delta Plus) relative to reference oxygen-argon mixture at 3V of m/z 32 for both sample and reference side. The signals of m/z 28, 32, and 40 were measured by dynamically to determine oxygen -argon ratio and to check nitrogen contamination. Repeated measurements of atmospheric air yielded a reproducibility (SE n=80) of 0.006, 0.004 and 0.19‰ for δ17O, δ18O and δO2/Ar respectively. The isotopic and molecular fractionation of argon- oxygen mixture during gas adsorption and desorption while using molecular sieve under liquid nitrogen temperature was studied. We have established a linear relationship governing the effect of 13X and 5A molecular sieves on molecular fractionation. And suggested the use of single 1/8" pellet 13X molecular sieve provided a negligible fractionation.

  4. Early Eocene SST recorded in clumped isotopic ratios of fish otoliths of North Sea Basin, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, P.; Vanhove, D.; Ghosh, P.

    2012-12-01

    Application of clumped isotope thermometry (Ghosh et al., 2007) in well preserved fish otoliths reveals environmental temperature. Fossil specimen of otoliths from marginal marine sedimentary sequence belonging to Ypresian (ca. 50.9 Ma) age reveals environmental temperature and salinity at the time of deposition. Fossil otoliths from two demersal, non-migratory species belonging to genuses namely Neobythitinorum subregularis and Paraconger papoiniti are considered here for this study. Intertaxon clumped isotope ratios allows to distinguish between the temperature habitat of fishes considered. Sedimentary record from the study area suggests large sea level changes and deposition close to shore line (Steurbaut, 2006). It was estimated that 150 kys was the time taken for deposition of the sequence from which the otolith fossils were retrieved (Steurbaut, 2006). The clumped isotope ratio and temperature estimates based on the otoliths composition are classified into two categories. Firstly, genus Neobythitinorum subregularis registering both low temperature (2 and 5°C) and high temperature (30 and 36°C) observed in eight specimens analysed. Secondly, genus Paraconger papoiniti registers warm water condition with consistent temperature of 32±2° C observed in six specimens analysed in this study. Based on the temperature estimates we conclude that North Sea water temperature was 20°C warmer compared to present day record of long time average during early Eocene. This estimate is consistent with previous estimates (Vanhove et al., 2011) based on stable isotope composition. Several hypotheses proposed previously will be explained and the inter-taxonomic variability will be explored in this presentation.

  5. Regional Modeling of Stable Carbon Isotope ratio of non Methane Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghan, F.-

    2004-05-01

    The study of stable isotope ratio (δ 13C) can be useful to understand the history of an air parcel that include sources, mixing and photochemical processing. The 3D regional model (MC2AQ) was modified (with two different resolution, 21.2km and 5.3km) to include isotope information for Propene, Toluene, Propane, Benzene, Xylenes, and Isoprene. These compounds (both 12C and 13C) were included as tracers in the model reacting only with OH, with no feedback on the main chemistry. This model structure can help to constrain the OH concentration. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) was included for the reactions with OH. The results show that the δ 13C varies with emissions: when emissions are high the δ 13C is close to that of the sources, and as the air parcel moves away from the sources the δ 13C gets heavier due to the chemical processing. We see a clear diurnal pattern in the δ 13C after removing the effect of the sources. This is an indication of the effect of the processing by OH. The results show that the vertical gradient of δ 13C depends on the lifetime and the KIE of the hydrocarbons. The back trajectories of the stable isotope ratio (δ 13C) were determined to study the history of each hydrocarbon independently using the average photochemical age. The results can help in the determination of the possible sources of individual hydrocarbons and the effects of mixing and dilution during the parcel advection. The back trajectory analysis of δ 13C provides information of the possible locations of the sources of the compounds being investigated. The model was also set up to study the effect of the different emission type (area sources or point sources) of NMHCs on δ 13C, using this method can help us to identify the fractionation and location of these two sources.

  6. Acidification processes and soil leaching influenced by agricultural practices revealed by strontium isotopic ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierson-Wickmann, Anne-Catherine; Aquilina, Luc; Weyer, Christina; Molénat, Jérôme; Lischeid, Gunnar

    2009-08-01

    In natural river systems, the chemical and isotopic composition of stream- and ground waters are mainly controlled by the geology and water-rock interactions. The leaching of major cations from soils has been recognized as a possible consequence of acidic deposition from atmosphere for over 30 years. Moreover, in agricultural areas, the application of physiological acid fertilizers and nitrogen fertilizers in the ammonia form may enhance the cation leaching through the soil profile into ground- and surface waters. This origin of leached cations has been studied on two small and adjacent agricultural catchments in Brittany, western France. The study catchments are drained by two first-order streams, and mainly covered with cambisoils, issued from the alteration and weathering of a granodiorite basement. Precipitations, soil water- and NH 4 acetate-leachates, separated minerals, and stream waters have been investigated. Chemical element ratios, such as Ba/Sr, Na/Sr and Ca/Sr ratios, as well as Sr isotopic ratios are used to constrain the relative contribution from potential sources of stream water elements. Based on Sr isotopic ratio and element concentration, soil water- and NH 4 acetate leaching indicates (1) a dominant manure/slurry contribution in the top soil, representing a cation concentrated pool, with low 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios; (2) in subsoils, mineral dissolution is enhanced by fertilizer application, becoming the unique source of cations in the saprolite. The relatively high weathering rates encountered implies significant sources of cations which are not accessory minerals, but rather plagioclase and biotite dissolution. Stream water has a very different isotopic and chemical composition compared to soil water leaching suggesting that stream water chemistry is dominated by elements issued from mineral and rock weathering. Agriculture, by applications of chemical and organic fertilizers, can influence the export of major base cations, such as Na +. Plagioclase

  7. Metrology for laser spectroscopic concentration and isotope ratio measurements of atmospheric greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwaboh, Javis; Manninen, Albert; Mohn, Joachim; Petersen, Jan C.; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2015-04-01

    Continuous, accurate and precise measurements of greenhouse gases (GHG) and their isotopic composition are required to understand the global cycle as well as source and sink processes of these environmentally harmful substances. Part of the EMRP project HIGHGAS (Metrology for high-impact greenhouse gases) [1] focuses on spectroscopic methods for GHG isotopic composition measurements and optical transfer standards. Harmonization of terminologies and concepts used in the GHG measurement communities and the metrology community are in focus, especially for isotope ratio measurements by laser spectroscopy, where gas metrology is still at an early stage. The focus of the HIGHGAS project here is on 13C/12C and 18O/16O ratios in CO2, 15N/14N ratios in N2O and 13C/12C and 2H/1H ratios in CH4. As an alternative and complement of gas mixture standards, optical spectroscopic transfer standards for CO2 and CO shall be developed providing concentration results that are directly traceable to the international system of units (SI). Optical transfer standards offer an alternative in situ calibration route for other GHG measurement devices operating in the field. An optical transfer standard becomes particularly interesting when measuring sticky or reactive gases where cylinder-based reference gas mixtures may not be feasible. We present an approach to perform IR-spectrometry on gases with results directly traceable to the SI. This is crucial for the development of optical spectroscopic transfer standards providing SI-traceability to field measurements. Ideas for spectroscopic isotope ratio measurements aiming at SI-traceability will be discussed. Finally, we demonstrate the current performance and limitations of our measurement approaches and project possible solutions. Acknowledgement Parts of this work have been carried out within the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) ENV52 project-HIGHGAS (Metrology for high-impact greenhouse gases). The EMRP is jointly funded by the

  8. Ptolemy an Instrument to Measure Stable Isotopic Ratios of Key Volatiles on a Cometary Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, I. P.; Barber, S. J.; Morgan, G. H.; Morse, A. D.; Sheridan, S.; Andrews, D. J.; Maynard, J.; Yau, D.; Evans, S. T.; Leese, M. R.; Zarnecki, J. C.; Kent, B. J.; Waltham, N. R.; Whalley, M. S.; Heys, S.; Drummond, D. L.; Edeson, R. L.; Sawyer, E. C.; Turner, R. F.; Pillinger, C. T.

    2007-02-01

    A fundamental goal of cometary studies is to determine the exact relationship between these bodies and the Solar System the question(s) can be summarised as follows: did comets originate during the same events that spawned the Sun and planets, are they more primitive bodies that record a pre-solar history, or are they interstellar materials collected in relatively more recent times? Now, whatever the origin of comets, it is entirely possible that they could, in part, contain interstellar or pre-solar components indeed, it seems rather likely in light of the fact that primitive meteorites contain such entities. These particular components are likely to be refractory (dust, macromolecular organic complexes, etc.). Of more relevance to the issues above are the volatile constituents, which make up the bulk of a comet's mass. Since these materials, by their very nature, volatilise during perihelion passage of a comet they can, in some instances, be detected and measured spectroscopically. Perhaps the most useful species for isotopic investigations are C2, HCN and CN. Unfortunately, spectroscopic measurements can only currently be made with accuracies of ±10 to ±20%. As such it is very often not practical to conclude anything further than the fact that isotopic measurements are compatible with ‘`solar’' values, which tends to imply an origin from the margins of the solar accretion disk. But there is another problem with the spectroscopic measurements since these are made on gaseous species in the coma (and relatively minor species at that) it is impossible to be certain that these represent the true nuclear values. In other words, if the processes of sublimation, active jetting, and photochemistry in the coma impart isotopic fractionation, the spectroscopic measurements could give a false impression of the true isotope ratios. What is required is an experiment capable of measuring isotopic ratios at the very surface of a comet. Herein we describe the Ptolemy

  9. Simultaneous determination of the quantity and isotopic ratios of uranium in individual micro-particles by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS).

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Ho; Choi, Eun-Ju

    2016-11-01

    A method to determine the quantity and isotopic ratios of uranium in individual micro-particles simultaneously by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) has been developed. This method consists of sequential sample and spike loading, ID-TIMS for isotopic measurement, and application of a series of mathematical procedures to remove the contribution of uranium in the spike. The homogeneity of evaporation and ionization of uranium content was confirmed by the consistent ratio of n((233)U)/n((238)U) determined by TIMS measurements. Verification of the method was performed using U030 solution droplets and U030 particles. Good agreements of resulting uranium quantity, n((235)U)/n((238)U), and n((236)U)/n((238)U) with the estimated or certified values showed the validity of this newly developed method for particle analysis when simultaneous determination of the quantity and isotopic ratios of uranium is required. PMID:27591656

  10. Mapping and defining sources of variability in bioavailable strontium isotope ratios in the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Gideon; Richards, Mike

    2014-02-01

    The relative contributions of bedrock and atmospheric sources to bioavailable strontium (Sr) pools in local soils was studied in Northern Israel and the Golan regions through intensive systematic sampling of modern plants and invertebrates, to produce a map of modern bioavailable strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) for regional reconstructions of human and animal mobility patterns. The study investigates sources of variability in bioavailable 87Sr/86Sr ratios, in particular the intra-and inter-site range of variation in plant 87Sr/86Sr ratios, the range of 87Sr/86Sr ratios of plants growing on marine sedimentary versus volcanic geologies, the differences between ligneous and non-ligneous plants with varying growth and water utilization strategies, and the relative contribution of atmospheric Sr sources from different soil and vegetation types and climatic zones. Results indicate predictable variation in 87Sr/86Sr ratios. Inter- and intra-site differences in bioavailable 87Sr/86Sr ratios average of 0.00025, while the range of 87Sr/86Sr ratios measured regionally in plants and invertebrates is 0.7090 in Pleistocene calcareous sandstone and 0.7074 in mid-Pleistocene volcanic pyroclast. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios measured in plants growing on volcanic bedrock show time dependent increases in atmospheric deposition relative to bedrock weathering. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios measured in plants growing on renzina soils depends on precipitation. The spacing between bedrock 87Sr/86Sr ratios and plants is highest in wet conditions and decreases in dry conditions. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios measured in plants growing on terra rossa soils is relatively constant (0.7085) regardless of precipitation. Ligneous plants are typically closer to bedrock 87Sr/86Sr ratios than non-ligneous plants. Since the bioavailable 87Sr/86Sr ratios currently measured in the region reflect a mix of both exogenous and endogenous sources, changes in the relative contribution of exogenous sources can cause variation

  11. Stable carbon isotope ratios of intact GDGTs indicate heterogeneous sources to marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Ann; Hurley, Sarah J.; Walter, Sunita R. Shah; Kusch, Stephanie; Lichtin, Samantha; Zhang, Yi Ge

    2016-05-01

    Thaumarchaeota, the major sources of marine glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether lipids (GDGTs), are believed to fix the majority of their carbon directly from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The δ13C values of GDGTs (δ13CGDGT) may be powerful tools for reconstructing variations in the ocean carbon cycle, including paleoproductivity and water mass circulation, if they can be related to values of δ13CDIC. To date, isotope measurements primarily are made on the C40 biphytane skeletons of GDGTs, rather than on complete tetraether structures. This approach erases information revealed by the isotopic heterogeneity of GDGTs within a sample and may impart an isotopic fractionation associated with the ether cleavage. To circumvent these issues, we present δ13C values for GDGTs from twelve recent sediments representing ten continental margin locations. Samples are purified by orthogonal dimensions of HPLC, followed by measurement of δ13C values by Spooling Wire Microcombustion (SWiM)-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) with 1σ precision and accuracy of ±0.25‰. Using this approach, we confirm that GDGTs, generally around -19‰, are isotopically "heavy" compared to other marine lipids. However, measured δ13CGDGT values are inconsistent with predicted values based on the 13C content of DIC in the overlying water column and the previously-published biosynthetic isotope fractionation for a pure culture of an autotrophic marine thaumarchaeon. In some sediments, the isotopic composition of individual GDGTs differs, indicating multiple source inputs. The data appear to confirm that crenarchaeol primarily is a biomarker for Thaumarchaeota, but its δ13C values still cannot be explained solely by autotrophic carbon fixation. Overall the complexity of the results suggests that both organic carbon assimilation (ca. 25% of total carbon) and multiple source(s) of exogenous GDGTs (contributing generally <30% of input to sediments) are necessary to explain the observed

  12. Isotopic Ratios of Carbon and Oxygen in Titan’s CO using ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serigano, Joseph; Nixon, C. A.; Cordiner, M. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Teanby, N. A.; Charnley, S. B.; Lindberg, J. E.

    2016-04-01

    We report interferometric observations of carbon monoxide (CO) and its isotopologues in Titan’s atmosphere using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The following transitions were detected: CO (J = 1–0, 2–1, 3–2, 6–5), 13CO (J = 2–1, 3–2, 6–5), C18O (J = 2–1, 3–2), and C17O (J = 3–2). Molecular abundances and the vertical atmospheric temperature profile were derived by modeling the observed emission line profiles using NEMESIS, a line-by-line radiative transfer code. We present the first spectroscopic detection of 17O in the outer solar system with C17O detected at >8σ confidence. The abundance of CO was determined to be 49.6 +/- 1.8 ppm, assumed to be constant with altitude, with isotopic ratios 12C/13C = 89.9 +/- 3.4, 16O/18O = 486 +/- 22, and 16O/17O = 2917 +/- 359. The measurements of 12C/13C and 16O/18O ratios are the most precise values obtained in Titan’s atmospheric CO to date. Our results are in good agreement with previous studies and suggest no significant deviations from standard terrestrial isotopic ratios.

  13. Rapid Method for the Determination of the Stable Oxygen Isotope Ratio of Water in Alcoholic Beverages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daobing; Zhong, Qiding; Li, Guohui; Huang, Zhanbin

    2015-10-28

    This paper demonstrates the first successful application of an online pyrolysis technique for the direct determination of oxygen isotope ratios (δ(18)O) of water in alcoholic beverages. Similar water concentrations in each sample were achieved by adjustment with absolute ethyl alcohol, and then a fixed GC split ratio can be used. All of the organic ingredients were successfully separated from the analyte on a CP-PoraBond Q column and subsequently vented out, whereas water molecules were transferred into the reaction furnace and converted to CO. With the system presented, 15-30 μL of raw sample was diluted and can be analyzed repeatedly; the analytical precision was better than 0.4‰ (n = 5) in all cases, and more than 50 injections can be made per day. No apparent memory effect was observed even if water samples were injected using the same syringe; a strong correlation (R(2) = 0.9998) was found between the water δ(18)O of measured sample and that of working standards. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the mean δ(18)O value and that obtained by the traditional method (CO2-water equilibration/isotope ratio mass spectrometry) and the newly developed method in this study. The advantages of this new method are its rapidity and straightforwardness, and less test portion is required. PMID:26373434

  14. He and Ne isotopic ratios along the Terceira Rift: implications for the Azores mantle source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madureira, P.; Moreira, M. A.; Nunes, J.; Lourenco, N.; Carvalho, M.; Mata, J.; Pinto de Abreu, M.

    2010-12-01

    Noble gas data (He and Ne) on olivine phenocrysts obtained from Azores’ lavas sampled along the Terceira Rift will be presented in this work. The Terceira Rift is considered as one of the slowest spreading system in the world (Vogt & Jung, 2004). Lava samples were collected inland at S. Miguel, Terceira, Graciosa, Pico and Faial Islands as well at sea at D. João de Castro Bank and south Hirondelle basin, the latter being sampled by the ROV cruises in 2008 and 2009. Noble gas data were analyzed in the Noblesse mass spectrometer housed at the IPGP. The most primitive He isotopic ratios were obtained from Pico, Terceira and Hirondelle olivines. Most Ne isotopic ratios are similar to the present-day atmosphere, but distinct 20Ne/22Ne ratios were found for the majority of submarine samples and also Pico and Faial Islands, defining mixing lines with the atmospheric end-member with slopes greater than that defined from MORB lavas. The He-Ne systematics shows that most of the new noble gas data fit in a mixing model between a dominant MORB-type mantle source and a relatively primitive mantle source related with the regional Azores component. However, data from the D. João de Castro Bank argue for the presence of a radiogenic He end-member distinct from MORB. References: Vogt, P. & Jung W. (2004). Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 218: 77 90.

  15. Isomer residual ratio of odd-odd isotope {sup 180}Ta in supernova nucleosynthsis

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Takehito; Kajino, Toshitaka; Chiba, Satoshi; Mathews, Grant

    2010-06-01

    The nucleosynthesis of {sup 180}Ta has remained an unsolved problem and as its origin many nucleosynthesis mechanisms have been proposed. This isotope has the unique feature that the naturally occurring abundance of {sup 180}Ta is actually a meta-stable isomer (half-life of >=10{sup 15} yr), while the ground state is a 1{sup +} unstable state which beta-decays with a half-life of only 8.15 hr. We have made a new time-dependent calculation of {sup 180}Ta meta-stable isomer residual ratio after supernova neutrino-induced reactions. This residual isomer ratio is crucial for understanding the production and survival of this naturally occurring rare isotope. We have constructed a new model under temperature evolution after type II supernova explosion. We include the explicit linking between the isomer and all known excited states and found that the residual ratio is insensitive to astrophysical parameters such as neutrino energy spectrum, explosion energy, decay time constant. We find that the explicit time evolution of the synthesis of {sup 180}Ta avoids the overproduction relative to {sup 138}La for a neutrino process neutrino temperature of 4 MeV.

  16. Stable isotope ratios of H, C, N and O in Italian citrus juices.

    PubMed

    Bontempo, L; Caruso, R; Fiorillo, M; Gambino, G L; Perini, M; Simoni, M; Traulo, P; Wehrens, R; Gagliano, G; Camin, F

    2014-09-01

    Stable isotope ratios (SIRs) of C, N, H and O have been exensively used in fruit juices quality control (ENV and AOAC methods) to detect added sugar and the watering down of concentrated juice, practices prohibited by European legislation (EU Directive 2012/12). The European Fruit Juice Association (AIJN) set some reference guidelines in order to allow the judging of the genuiness of a juice. Moreover, various studies have been carried out to determine the natural variability of SIRs in fruit juices, but none of these has investigated SIRs extensively in authentic citrus juices from Italy. In this work, about 500 citrus juice samples were officially collected in Italy by the Italian Ministry of Agricultural and Forestry Policies from 1998 onwards. (D/H)(I) and (D/H)(II) in ethanol and δ(13) C(ethanol), δ(13) C(pulp), δ(13) C(sugars), δ(18) O(vegetalwater), δ(15) N(pulp), and δ(18) O(pulp) were determined using Site-Specific Natural Isotope Fractionation-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry, respectively. The characteristic ranges of variability in SIRs in genuine Italian citrus juice samples are here presented as well as their relationships and compliance with the limits indicated by the AIJN and others proposed in the literature. In particular, the Italian range of values was found to be not completely in agreement with AIJN guidelines, with the risk that genuine juices could be judged as not genuine. Variety seems not to influence SIRs, whereas harvest year and region of origin have some influence on the different ratios, although their data distribution shows overlapping when principal component analysis is applied.