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Sample records for bound defect pairs

  1. Double phase slips and bound defect pairs in parametrically driven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Riecke, H.; Granzow, G.D.

    1997-12-31

    Spatio-temporal chaos in parametrically driven waves is investigated in one and two dimensions using numerical simulations of Ginzburg-Landau equations. A regime is identified in which in one dimension the dynamics are due to double phase slips. In very small systems they are found to arise through a Hopf bifurcation off a mixed mode. In large systems they can lead to a state of localized spatio-temporal chaos, which can be understood within the framework of phase dynamics. In two dimensions the double phase slips are replaced by bound defect pairs. Our simulations indicate the possibility of an unbinding transition of these pairs, which is associated with a transition from ordered to disordered defect chaos.

  2. Approaching Tsirelson's Bound in a Photon Pair Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poh, Hou Shun; Joshi, Siddarth K.; Cerè, Alessandro; Cabello, Adán; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2015-10-01

    We present an experimental test of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt Bell inequality on photon pairs in a maximally entangled state of polarization in which a value S =2.82759 ±0.00051 is observed. This value comes close to the Tsirelson bound of |S |≤2 √{2 } , with S -2 √{2 }=0.00084 ±0.00051 . It also violates the bound |S |≤2.82537 introduced by Grinbaum by 4.3 standard deviations. This violation allows us to exclude that quantum mechanics is only an effective description of a more fundamental theory.

  3. Approaching Tsirelson's Bound in a Photon Pair Experiment.

    PubMed

    Poh, Hou Shun; Joshi, Siddarth K; Cerè, Alessandro; Cabello, Adán; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2015-10-30

    We present an experimental test of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt Bell inequality on photon pairs in a maximally entangled state of polarization in which a value S=2.82759±0.00051 is observed. This value comes close to the Tsirelson bound of |S|≤2sqrt[2], with S-2sqrt[2]=0.00084±0.00051. It also violates the bound |S|≤2.82537 introduced by Grinbaum by 4.3 standard deviations. This violation allows us to exclude that quantum mechanics is only an effective description of a more fundamental theory. PMID:26565447

  4. Synthesizing skyrmion bound pairs in Fe-Gd thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. C. T.; Chess, J. J.; Montoya, S. A.; Shi, X.; Tamura, N.; Mishra, S. K.; Fischer, P.; McMorran, B. J.; Sinha, S. K.; Fullerton, E. E.; Kevan, S. D.; Roy, S.

    2016-07-01

    We show that properly engineered amorphous Fe-Gd alloy thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy exhibit bound pairs of like-polarity, opposite helicity skyrmions at room temperature. Magnetic mirror symmetry planes present in the stripe phase, instead of chiral exchange, determine the internal skyrmion structure and the net achirality of the skyrmion phase. Our study shows that stripe domain engineering in amorphous alloy thin films may enable the creation of skyrmion phases with technologically desirable properties.

  5. Synthesizing skyrmion bound pairs in Fe-Gd thin films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, J. C. T.; Chess, J. J.; Montoya, S. A.; Shi, X.; Tamura, N.; Mishra, S. K.; Fischer, P.; McMorran, B. J.; Sinha, S. K.; Fullerton, E. E.; et al

    2016-07-11

    Here, we show that properly engineered amorphous Fe-Gd alloy thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy exhibit bound pairs of like-polarity, opposite helicity skyrmions at room temperature. Magnetic mirror symmetry planes present in the stripe phase, instead of chiral exchange, determine the internal skyrmion structure and the net achirality of the skyrmion phase. Our study shows that stripe domain engineering in amorphous alloy thin films may enable the creation of skyrmion phases with technologically desirable properties.

  6. Floquet bound states around defects and adatoms in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovey, D. A.; Usaj, Gonzalo; Foa Torres, L. E. F.; Balseiro, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have focused on laser-induced gaps in graphene which have been shown to have a topological origin, thereby hosting robust states at the sample edges. While the focus has remained mainly on these topological chiral edge states, the Floquet bound states around defects lack a detailed study. In this paper we present such a study covering large defects of different shape and also vacancy-like defects and adatoms at the dynamical gap at ℏ Ω /2 (ℏ Ω being the photon energy). Our results, based on analytical calculations as well as numerics for full tight-binding models, show that the bound states are chiral and appear in a number which grows with the defect size. Furthermore, while the bound states exist regardless of the type of the defect's edge termination (zigzag, armchair, mixed), the spectrum is strongly dependent on it. In the case of top adatoms, the bound state quasienergies depend on the adatoms energy. The appearance of such bound states might open the door to the presence of topological effects on the bulk transport properties of dirty graphene.

  7. Pair condensation and bound states in fermionic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sedrakian, Armen; Clark, John W.

    2006-03-15

    We study the finite temperature-density phase diagram of an attractive fermionic system that supports two-body (dimer) and three-body (trimer) bound states in free space. Using interactions characteristic for nuclear systems, we obtain the critical temperature T{sub c2} for the superfluid phase transition and the limiting temperature T{sub c3} for the extinction of trimers. The phase diagram features a Cooper-pair condensate in the high-density, low-temperature domain which, with decreasing density, crosses over to a Bose condensate of strongly bound dimers. The high-temperature, low-density domain is populated by trimers whose binding energy decreases toward the density-temperature domain occupied by the superfluid and vanishes at a critical temperature T{sub c3}>T{sub c2}.

  8. Metastable Frenkel pair defect in graphite: source of Wigner energy?

    PubMed

    Ewels, C P; Telling, R H; El-Barbary, A A; Heggie, M I; Briddon, P R

    2003-07-11

    The atomic processes associated with energy storage and release in irradiated graphite have long been subject to untested speculation. We examine structures and recombination routes for interstitial-vacancy (I-V) pairs in graphite. Interaction results in the formation of a new metastable defect (an intimate I-V pair) or a Stone-Wales defect. The intimate I-V pair, although 2.9 eV more stable than its isolated constituents, still has a formation energy of 10.8 eV. The barrier to recombination to perfect graphite is calculated to be 1.3 eV, consistent with the experimental first Wigner energy release peak at 1.38 eV. We expect similar defects to form in carbon nanostructures such as nanotubes, nested fullerenes, and onions under irradiation. PMID:12906489

  9. Metastable Frenkel Pair Defect in Graphite: Source of Wigner Energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewels, C. P.; Telling, R. H.; El-Barbary, A. A.; Heggie, M. I.; Briddon, P. R.

    2003-07-01

    The atomic processes associated with energy storage and release in irradiated graphite have long been subject to untested speculation. We examine structures and recombination routes for interstitial-vacancy (I-V) pairs in graphite. Interaction results in the formation of a new metastable defect (an intimate I-V pair) or a Stone-Wales defect. The intimate I-V pair, although 2.9eV more stable than its isolated constituents, still has a formation energy of 10.8eV. The barrier to recombination to perfect graphite is calculated to be 1.3eV, consistent with the experimental first Wigner energy release peak at 1.38eV. We expect similar defects to form in carbon nanostructures such as nanotubes, nested fullerenes, and onions under irradiation.

  10. Weakly-bound hydrogen on defected Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Sam K.

    2015-05-01

    Step edges and kinks, abundant on multi-faceted nanoparticles, are catalytically active sites. Weakly-bound atomic H, at either topmost surface or subsurface sites, would be important for low-temperature hydrogenation in platinum-based catalysts. Here we report experimental results for such H atoms on Pt(111). Saturation-adsorbed atomic H from molecular H2 on the defect-free Pt(111) surface indeed gave only a single-peaked H2 desorption (β2) at 285 K. Instead, defected Pt(111) surfaces rendered triple peaks (β1 to β3) including a prominent feature (β1) at as low as 205 K in addition to another desorption (β3) at 360 K. This β1-H state was inhibited and created by pre- and post-adsorbed CO, respectively. We attribute the β1-H2 desorption to H atoms trapped at interstitial sites beneath surface defects on the basis of: (1) its desorption at a very low temperature in addition to two other peaks from terrace- and defect-adsorbed H; (2) its and total H uptakes by far larger than the surface defect density; (3) its desorption amount up to ~ 3.6 times that of the β3 desorption from defects; (4) its complete inhibition by a small pre-coverage of CO; and (5) the complete β3-to-β1 H conversion, while the β1-H state remaining intact, by postdosed CO. Our proposed mechanism is that the derelaxation (upward lifting) of the H- or CO-bound Pt lattice atoms at (step) defects, as a result of strong H-H and even stronger H-CO lateral repulsions under (near) saturation surface coverages, opens a low-barrier path for H diffusion into the subsurface.

  11. Defect pair in the elastic lattice of pancake vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Slutzky, M.; Mints, R.G.; Brandt, E.H.

    1997-07-01

    An additional pancake-antipancake vortex pair is considered in the vortex lattice of layered superconductors. Within linear elastic continuum theory, the relaxation of the background lattice screens the long-range logarithmic interaction of the defect pair, reducing the factor ln(r{sub 0}/{xi}) to ln(a/{xi}) where r{sub 0} is the pair spacing, {xi} the in-plane coherence length, and a the vortex spacing. The finite tilt modulus does not destroy this ideal two-dimensional screening, yielding a small correction {approximately}(a{sup 2}/8{pi}{lambda}{sup 2})ln(r{sub 0}/a), which in principle is of long range, but has a very small prefactor when the vortex spacing a is smaller than the in-plane penetration depth {lambda}. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. A Strong Pair Correlation Bound Implies the CLT for Sinai Billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenlund, Mikko

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the possibility of proving the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) for Dynamical Systems using only information on pair correlations. A strong bound on multiple correlations is known to imply the CLT (Chernov and Markarian in Chaotic Billiards, 2006). In Chernov's paper (J. Stat. Phys. 122(6), 2006), such a bound is derived for dynamically Hölder continuous observables of dispersing Billiards. Here we weaken the regularity assumption and subsequently show that the bound on multiple correlations follows directly from the bound on pair correlations. Thus, a strong bound on pair correlations alone implies the CLT, for a wider class of observables. The result is extended to Anosov diffeomorphisms in any dimension. Some non-invertible maps are also considered.

  13. Bound free electron-positron pair production accompanied by giant dipole resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Senguel, M. Y.; Gueclue, M. C.

    2011-01-15

    At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), for example, virtual photons produce many particles. At small impact parameters where the colliding nuclei make peripheral collisions, photon fluxes are very large and these are responsible for the multiple photonuclear interactions. Free pair productions, bound free pair productions, and nuclear Coulomb excitations are important examples of such interactions, and these processes play important roles in the beam luminosity at RHIC and LHC. Here we obtained the impact parameter dependence of bound free pair production cross sections and by using this probability we obtained bound free electron-positron pair production with nuclear breakup for heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We also compared our results to the other calculations.

  14. Migration of point defects and a defect pair in zinc oxide using the dimer method

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Dong, Mingdong; Liu, Bo

    2012-09-24

    The migration mechanism and the minimum energy path of vacancies, interstitials and an interstitial-vacancy pair in zinc oxide have been studied by the dimer method. The in-plane and out-of-plane migrations of zinc and oxygen vacancies are found to be anisotropic. The kick-out mechanism is energetically preferred to zinc and oxygen interstitials that can easily migrate through the ZnO crystal lattice. In addition, the migration process of an interstitial-vacancy pair as a complex of an octahedral oxygen interstitial and a zinc vacancy is dominated by an oxygen interstitial/zinc vacancy successive migration. The energy barriers indicate that the existence of oxygen interstitial in the defect pair can promote the mobility of zinc vacancy, whereas the migration of oxygen interstitial is slowed down due to the presence of zinc vacancy. In the end, we show a possible migration path of the interstitial-vacancy pair that can be dissociated through a set of displacement movements.

  15. Bose-Einstein condensation of bound pairs of relativistic fermions in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bo; Hou, De-fu; Ren, Hai-cang; Wu, Ping-ping

    2016-04-01

    The Bose-Einstein condensation of bound pairs made of equally and oppositely charged fermions in a magnetic field is investigated using a relativistic model. The Gaussian fluctuations have been taken into account in order to study the spectrum of bound pairs in the strong coupling region. We found, in the weak coupling region, that the condensation temperature increases with an increasing magnetic field displaying the magnetic catalysis effect. In the strong coupling region, the inverse magnetic catalysis appears when the magnetic field is low and is replaced by the usual magnetic catalysis effect when magnetic field is sufficiently high, in contrast to the nonrelativistic case where the inverse magnetic catalysis prevails in the strong coupling region regardless of the strength of the magnetic field. The resulting response to the magnetic field is the consequence of the competition between the dimensional reduction by Landau orbitals in pairing dynamics and the anisotropy of the kinetic spectrum of the bound pairs. We thus conclude that dimensional reduction dominates in the weak domain and strong coupling one except in the small magnetic field region, where the enhanced fluctuations dominate.

  16. Pair creation induced by transitions between electronic and positronic bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Lv, Q. Z.; Li, Y. T.; Grobe, R.; Su, Q.

    2015-05-01

    We study the creation process of electron-positron pairs from the quantum electrodynamical vacuum under very strong electric fields by solving the quantum field theoretical Dirac equation on a space-time grid. We investigate the role of bound-bound state mixing in such a process, which can be studied if the external force can be modeled by a combination of a potential barrier and a potential well. By increasing the magnitude of the two potentials, discrete states that originate from the positive and negative energy continua can become quasidegenerate in the mass gap region (between -mc 2 and mc 2). We show that this bound-bound state mixing is quite different from the usual bound-continuum state mixing where the particles are created until the Pauli exclusion principle inhibits this process. In the case of bound-bound mixing the particle number exhibits a characteristic oscillatory behavior that in principle can last forever. These findings can be modeled by an effective two-state model.

  17. Bound-free electron-positron pair production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Senguel, M. Y.; Gueclue, M. C.; Fritzsche, S.

    2009-10-15

    The bound-free electron-positron pair production is considered for relativistic heavy ion collisions. In particular, cross sections are calculated for the pair production with the simultaneous capture of the electron into the 1s ground state of one of the ions and for energies that are relevant for the relativistic heavy ion collider and the large hadron colliders. In the framework of perturbation theory, we applied Monte Carlo integration techniques to compute the lowest-order Feynman diagrams amplitudes by using Darwin wave functions for the bound states of the electrons and Sommerfeld-Maue wave functions for the continuum states of the positrons. Calculations were performed especially for the collision of Au+Au at 100 GeV/nucleon and Pb+Pb at 3400 GeV/nucleon.

  18. Multichannel quantum defect theory of strontium bound Rydberg states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaillant, C. L.; Jones, M. P. A.; Potvliege, R. M.

    2014-08-01

    Using the reactance matrix approach, we systematically develop new multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) models for the singlet and triplet S, P, D and F states of strontium below the first ionization limit, based on improved energy level measurements. The new models reveal additional insights into the character of doubly excited perturber states, and the improved energy level measurements for certain series allow fine structure to be resolved for those series’ perturbers. Comparison between the predictions of the new models and those of previous empirical and ab initio studies reveals good agreement with most series; however, some discrepancies are highlighted. Using the MQDT wave functions derived from our models we calculate other observables such as Landé {{g}J}-factors and radiative lifetimes. The analysis reveals the impact of perturbers on the Rydberg state properties of divalent atoms, highlighting the importance of including two-electron effects in the calculations of these properties. The work enables future investigations of properties such as Stark maps and long-range interactions of Rydberg states of strontium.

  19. Phonon coupling in optical transitions for singlet-triplet pairs of bound excitons in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistol, M. E.; Monemar, B.

    1986-05-01

    A model is presented for the observed strong difference in selection rules for coupling of phonons in the one-phonon sideband of optical spectra related to bound excitons in semiconductors. The present treatment is specialized to the case of a closely spaced pair of singlet-triplet character as the lowest electronic states, as is common for bound excitons associated with neutral complexes in materials like GaP and Si. The optical transition for the singlet bound-exciton state is found to couple strongly only to symmetric A1 modes. The triplet state has a similar coupling strength to A1 modes, but in addition strong contributions are found for replicas corresponding to high-density-of-states phonons TAX, LAX, and TOX. This can be explained by a treatment of particle-phonon coupling beyond the ordinary adiabatic approximation. A weak mixing between the singlet and triplet states is mediated by the phonon coupling, as described in first-order perturbation theory. The model derived in this work, for such phonon-induced mixing of closely spaced electronic states, is shown to explain the observed phonon coupling for several bound-exciton systems of singlet-triplet character in GaP. In addition, the observed oscillator strength of the forbidden triplet state may be explained as partly derived from phonon-induced mixing with the singlet state, which has a much larger oscillator strength.

  20. Rare-earth defect pairs in GaN: LDA+U calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, Simone; Schmidt, W. G.; Frauenheim, Th.; Gerstmann, U.

    2009-09-01

    The structural and electronic properties of rare-earth (RE) (Eu, Er, and Tm) related defect pairs in GaN have been investigated theoretically. Based on LDA+U total-energy calculations, their possible role in the luminescence process is discussed. In all charge states, the lanthanides show a strong preference for the Ga-lattice site, either as isolated substitutional or complexed with intrinsic defects. With respect to the electronic valence, a proper description of correlation effects of the strongly localized 4f electrons is shown to be crucial, especially if the REGa is paired with donors like the Ga interstitial or the N vacancy. The pairs formed by REGa substitutionals and vacancies or interstitials lower the symmetry and are found to locally distort the environment. By this, they are quite effective in relaxing the selection rules for the luminescent intra- 4f -shell transitions. While for n -type GaN, the next-nearest-neighbor pair REGaVGa pair is energetically favored, for p -type GaN, the REGaVN pair provides the most stable configuration and introduces shallow levels close to the conduction band, which can act as assistant levels in the luminescence process.

  1. Quantum liquid of repulsively bound pairs of particles in a lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosyan, David; Schmidt, Bernd; Anglin, James R.; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2007-09-15

    Repulsively interacting particles in a periodic potential can form bound composite objects, whose dissociation is suppressed by a band gap. Nearly pure samples of such repulsively bound pairs of cold atoms--'dimers'--have recently been prepared by Winkler et al. [Nature (London) 441, 853 (2006)]. We here derive an effective Hamiltonian for a lattice loaded with dimers only and discuss its implications for the many-body dynamics of the system. We find that the dimer-dimer interaction includes strong on-site repulsion and nearest-neighbor attraction which always dominates over the dimer kinetic energy at low temperatures. The dimers then form incompressible, minimal-surface 'droplets' of a quantum lattice liquid. For low lattice filling, the effective Hamiltonian can be mapped onto the spin-1/2 XXZ model with fixed total magnetization which exhibits a first-order phase transition from the droplet to a gas phase. This opens the door to studying first-order phase transitions using highly controllable ultracold atoms.

  2. The formation of pentagon-heptagon pair defect by the reconstruction og vacancy defects in carbon nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.D.; Wang, C.Z.; Yoon, E.; Hwang, N.M.; Ho, K.M.

    2008-01-29

    The reconstruction process of vacancy hole in carbon nanotube is investigated by tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations and by ab initio total energy calculations. In the molecular dynamics simulation, a vacancy hole is found to reconstruct into two separated pentagon-heptagon pair defects. As the result of reconstruction, the radius of the carbon nanotube is reduced and the chirality of the tube is partly changed. During the vacancy hole healing process, the formation of pentagonal and heptagonal rings is proceeded by the subsequent Stone-Wales.

  3. Repulsive bound-atom pairs in an optical lattice with two-body interaction of nearest neighbors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Liang, J.-Q.

    2010-04-15

    Repulsively interacting particles in a periodic potential can form bound composite objects with long lifetimes, as has been observed experimentally [Winkler et al., Nature (London) 441, 853 (2006)]. In this paper, a complete two-particle solution of one-dimensional periodical potential was derived in a strong interaction regime, where the on-site approximation of a two-body interaction in the Bose-Hubbard model (BHM) is extended to include the interaction of nearest neighbors, which results in atom-pair hopping. The energy spectrum of the bound pair is drastically reshaped due to the pair-hopping term, and complex eigenenergy corresponding to metastable states is also found that has not been discovered in the usual BHM. When the absolute value of a center-of-mass quasimomentum wave vector is greater than a critical value (|K|>K{sub c}), two bound-pair solutions are found. Furthermore, the spatial and momentum distributions of the bound pair displays a crossover from dark to bright soliton-like solutions in the extended BHM. Our results reduce to that of the usual BHM in the weak interaction case.

  4. Ab initio simulations on Frenkel pairs of radiation defects in corundum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonenko, A.; Piskunov, S.; Zhukovskii, Yu F.; Kotomin, E. A.

    2015-03-01

    Large scale first principles periodic calculations based on the density functional theory within the localized atomic orbital approach (DFT-LCAO) using the hybrid exchange- correlation potential B3PW have been performed in order to study the structural and electronic properties of radiation-induced Frenkel pairs Oi+VO in corundum crystal. As an initial approach, we have used conventional 2x2x1 supercell for defective α-Al2O3 lattice containing 120 atoms. After relaxation of the ideal supercell structure, the optimized doi-vo distance has been found to be ~4.5 Å while the formation energy of Frenkel pair has achieved 11.7 eV. The interstitial Oi atom, both single and a component of Oi+VO pair, spontaneously forms a dumbbell with the adjacent atom in the regular oxygen sublattice (doi-o = 1.404 Å) with the induced charge -1.1 e. On the whole, possibilities of supercell model for proper description of Frenkel pairs with changing inter-defect distance and space orientation inside corundum crystal are rather limited. This is why the alternative cluster model must be developed for this aim.

  5. Reliability of the pair-defect-sum approximation for the strength of valence-bond orbitals

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Linus; Herman, Zelek S.; Kamb, Barclay J.

    1982-01-01

    The pair-defect-sum approximation to the bond strength of a hybrid orbital (angular wave functions only) is compared to the rigorous value as a function of bond angle for seven types of bonding situations, with between three and eight bond directions equivalent by geometrical symmetry operations and with only one independent bond angle. The approximation is seen to be an excellent one in all cases, and the results provide a rationale for the application of this approximation to a variety of problems. PMID:16593167

  6. Feshbach resonances and weakly bound molecular states of boson-boson and boson-fermion NaK pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viel, Alexandra; Simoni, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    We conduct a theoretical study of magnetically induced Feshbach resonances and near-threshold bound states in isotopic NaK pairs. Our calculations accurately reproduce Feshbach spectroscopy data on Na 40K and explain the origin of the observed multiplets in the p wave [Phys. Rev. A 85, 051602(R) (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.051602]. We apply the model to predict scattering and bound state threshold properties of the boson-boson Na 39K and Na 41K systems. We find that the Na 39K isotopic pair presents broad magnetic Feshbach resonances and favorable ground-state features for producing nonreactive polar molecules by two-photon association. Broad s -wave resonances are also predicted for Na 41K collisions.

  7. Identification of the gallium vacancy-oxygen pair defect in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Son, N. T.; Hemmingsson, C. G.; Janzen, E.; Paskova, T.; Evans, K. R.; Usui, A.; Morishita, N.; Ohshima, T.; Isoya, J.; Monemar, B.

    2009-10-15

    Cation vacancies like V{sub Ga}, V{sub Al} and their complexes with oxygen are predicted to be abundant in III-nitrides and to play an important role in nonradiative recombination. Appearing in triple or double negatively charged states, they are not paramagnetic and have not so far been detected by magnetic resonance even under illumination. In this Brief Report, we demonstrate an efficient way to make cation vacancy defects in GaN detectable by electron paramagnetic resonance and present our identification of the V{sub Ga}O{sub N} pair in GaN which is the model material for the III-nitrides and their alloys.

  8. Fano effect and bound state in continuum in electron transport through an armchair graphene nanoribbon with line defect

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Electron transport properties in an armchair graphene nanoribbon are theoretically investigated by considering the presence of line defect. It is found that the line defect causes the abundant Fano effects and bound state in continuum (BIC) in the electron transport process, which are tightly dependent on the width of the nanoribbon. By plotting the spectra of the density of electron states of the line defect, we see that the line defect induces some localized quantum states around the Dirac point and that the different localizations of these states lead to these two kinds of transport results. Next, the Fano effect and BIC phenomenon are detailedly described via the analysis about the influence of the structure parameters. According to the numerical results, we propose such a structure to be a promising candidate for graphene nanoswitch. PACS 81.05.Uw, 71.55.-i, 73.23.-b, 73.25.+i PMID:23870061

  9. Luttinger liquid in contact with a Kramers pair of Majorana bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikulin, Dmitry I.; Komijani, Yashar; Affleck, Ian

    2016-05-01

    We discuss the signatures of a Kramers pair of Majorana modes formed in a Josephson junction on top of a quantum spin Hall system. We show that, while ignoring interactions on the quantum spin Hall edge allows arbitrary Andreev processes in the system, moderate repulsive interactions stabilize Andreev transmission—the hole goes into the opposite lead from where the electron has arrived. We analyze the renormalization group equations and deduce the phase diagram as a function of interaction strength.

  10. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hydrogen defect pairs in SrTiO3 from density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Bork, Nicolai; Bonanos, Nikolaos; Rossmeisl, Jan; Vegge, Tejs

    2011-09-01

    A density functional theory investigation of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hydrogen-hydrogen defect interactions in the cubic SrTiO(3) perovskite is presented. We find a net attraction between two hydrogen atoms with an optimal separation of ∼2.3 Å. The energy gain is ca. 0.33 eV compared to two non-interacting H defects. The main cause of the net attractive potential is elastic defect interactions through lattice deformation. Two possible diffusion paths for the hydrogen defect pair are investigated and are both determined to be faster than the corresponding diffusion path for single hydrogen atoms. Finally, we set up a simple model to determine the contribution from the double hydrogen defect to the total hydrogen flux, and find the double defect to be the main diffusing species at temperatures below ca. 400 °C. Post submission infrared absorption experiments show excellent agreement with the proposed properties of the double hydrogen defect. PMID:21769355

  11. Towards building artificial light harvesting complexes: enhanced singlet-singlet energy transfer between donor and acceptor pairs bound to albumins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Challa V; Duff, Michael R

    2008-12-01

    Specific donor and acceptor pairs have been assembled in bovine serum albumin (BSA), at neutral pH and room temperature, and these dye-protein complexes indicated efficient donor to acceptor singlet-singlet energy transfer. For example, pyrene-1-butyric acid served as the donor and Coumarin 540A served as the acceptor. Both the donor and the acceptor bind to BSA with affinity constants in excess of 2x10(5) M(-1), as measured in absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectral titrations. Simultaneous binding of both the donor and the acceptor chromophores was supported by CD spectra and one chromophore did not displace the other from the protein host, even when limited concentrations of the host were used. For example, a 1:1:1 complex between the donor, acceptor and the host can be readily formed, and spectral data clearly show that the binding sites are mutually exclusive. The ternary complexes (two different ligands bound to the same protein molecule) provided opportunities to examine singlet-singlet energy transfer between the protein-bound chromophores. Donor emission was quenched by the addition of the acceptor, in the presence of limited amounts of BSA, while no energy transfer was observed in the absence of the protein host, under the same conditions. The excitation spectra of the donor-acceptor-host complexes clearly show the sensitization of acceptor emission by the donor. Protein denaturation, as induced by the addition of urea or increasing the temperature to 360 K, inhibited energy transfer, which indicate that protein structure plays an important role. Sensitization also proceeded at low temperature (77 K) and diffusion of the donor or the acceptor is not required for energy transfer. Stern-Volmer quenching plots show that the quenching constant is (3.1+/-0.2)x10(4) M(-1), at low acceptor concentrations (<35 microM). Other albumins such as human and porcine proteins also served as good hosts for the above experiments. For the first time, non

  12. Application of the bounds-analysis approach to arsenic and gallium antisite defects in gallium arsenide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wright, A. F.; Modine, N. A.

    2015-01-23

    The As antisite in GaAs (AsGa) has been the subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies. Recent density-functional-theory (DFT) studies report results in good agreement with experimental data for the +2, +1, and 0 charge states of the stable EL2 structure, the 0 charge state of the metastable EL2* structure, and the activation energy to transform from EL2* to EL2 in the 0 charge state. However, these studies did not report results for EL2* in the -1 charge state. In this paper, we report new DFT results for the +2, +1, 0, and -1 charge states of AsGa, obtained usingmore » a semilocal exchange-correlation functional and interpreted using a bounds-analysis approach. In good agreement with experimental data, we find a -1/0 EL2* level 0.06 eV below the conduction-band edge and an activation energy of 0.05 eV to transform from EL2* to EL2 in the -1 charge state. While the Ga antisite in GaAs (GaAs) has not been studied as extensively as AsGa, experimental studies report three charge states (-2, -1, 0) and two levels (-2/-1, -1/0) close to the valence-band edge. Recent DFT studies report the same charge states, but the levels are found to be well-separated from the valence-band edge. To resolve this disagreement, we performed new DFT calculations for GaAs and interpreted them using a bounds analysis. The analysis identified the -1 and 0 charge states as hole states weakly bound to a highly-localized -2 charge state. Moreover, the -2/-1, -1/0 levels were found to be near the valence-band edge, in good agreement with the experimental data.« less

  13. Application of the bounds-analysis approach to arsenic and gallium antisite defects in gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A. F.; Modine, N. A.

    2015-01-23

    The As antisite in GaAs (AsGa) has been the subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies. Recent density-functional-theory (DFT) studies report results in good agreement with experimental data for the +2, +1, and 0 charge states of the stable EL2 structure, the 0 charge state of the metastable EL2* structure, and the activation energy to transform from EL2* to EL2 in the 0 charge state. However, these studies did not report results for EL2* in the -1 charge state. In this paper, we report new DFT results for the +2, +1, 0, and -1 charge states of AsGa, obtained using a semilocal exchange-correlation functional and interpreted using a bounds-analysis approach. In good agreement with experimental data, we find a -1/0 EL2* level 0.06 eV below the conduction-band edge and an activation energy of 0.05 eV to transform from EL2* to EL2 in the -1 charge state. While the Ga antisite in GaAs (GaAs) has not been studied as extensively as AsGa, experimental studies report three charge states (-2, -1, 0) and two levels (-2/-1, -1/0) close to the valence-band edge. Recent DFT studies report the same charge states, but the levels are found to be well-separated from the valence-band edge. To resolve this disagreement, we performed new DFT calculations for GaAs and interpreted them using a bounds analysis. The analysis identified the -1 and 0 charge states as hole states weakly bound to a highly-localized -2 charge state. Moreover, the -2/-1, -1/0 levels were found to be near the valence-band edge, in good agreement with the experimental data.

  14. Bound and free self-interstitial defects in graphite and bilayer graphene: A computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Gulans, Andris; Puska, Martti J.; Nieminen, Risto M.

    2011-07-01

    The role of self-interstitials in the response of layered carbon materials such as graphite, bilayer graphene and multiwalled carbon nanotubes to irradiation has long remained a puzzle. Using density-functional-theory methods with an exchange and correlation functional which takes into account the interlayer van der Waals interaction in these systems without any material-specific empirical parameters, we study the energetics and migration of single- and di-interstitials in graphite and bilayer graphene. We show that two classes of interstitials, ''bound'' and ''free,'' can coexist. The latter are mobile at room and lower temperatures, which explains the experimental data and reconciles them with the results of atomistic simulations. Our results shed light on the behavior of graphite and carbon nanotubes under irradiation and have implications for irradiation-mediated processing of bilayer graphene.

  15. Evidence for a pairing anti-halo effect in the odd-even staggering in reaction cross sections of weakly bound nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hagino, K.; Sagawa, H.

    2011-07-15

    We investigate the spatial extension of weakly bound Ne and C isotopes by taking into account the pairing correlation with the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) method and a three-body model, respectively. We show that the odd-even staggering in the reaction cross sections of {sup 30,31,32}Ne and {sup 14,15,16}C are successfully reproduced, and thus the staggering can be attributed to the pairing anti-halo effect. A correlation between a one-neutron separation energy and the anti-halo effect is demonstrated for s and p waves using the HFB wave functions.

  16. Quantum transport through a multi-quantum-dot-pair chain side-coupled with Majorana bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao-Tan, Jiang; Cheng-Cheng, Zhong

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the quantum transport properties through a special kind of quantum dot (QD) system composed of a serially coupled multi-QD-pair (multi-QDP) chain and side-coupled Majorana bound states (MBSs) by using the Green functions method, where the conductance can be classified into two kinds: the electron tunneling (ET) conductance and the Andreev reflection (AR) one. First we find that for the nonzero MBS-QDP coupling a sharp AR-induced zero-bias conductance peak with the height of e 2/h is present (or absent) when the MBS is coupled to the far left (or the other) QDP. Moreover, the MBS-QDP coupling can suppress the ET conductance and strengthen the AR one, and further split into two sub-peaks each of the total conductance peaks of the isolated multi-QDPs, indicating that the MBS will make obvious influences on the competition between the ET and AR processes. Then we find that the tunneling rate Γ L is able to affect the conductances of leads L and R in different ways, demonstrating that there exists a Γ L-related competition between the AR and ET processes. Finally we consider the effect of the inter-MBS coupling on the conductances of the multi-QDP chains and it is shown that the inter-MBS coupling will split the zero-bias conductance peak with the height of e 2/h into two sub-peaks. As the inter-MBS coupling becomes stronger, the two sub-peaks are pushed away from each other and simultaneously become lower, which is opposite to that of the single QDP chain where the two sub-peaks with the height of about e 2/2h become higher. Also, the decay of the conductance sub-peaks with the increase of the MBS-QDP coupling becomes slower as the number of the QDPs becomes larger. This research should be an important extension in studying the transport properties in the kind of QD systems coupled with the side MBSs, which is helpful for understanding the nature of the MBSs, as well as the MBS-related QD transport properties. Project supported by the National Natural

  17. Investigating of the exclusive reaction of π⁺π⁻ pair electroproduction on a proton bound in a deuteron

    SciTech Connect

    Skorodumina, Yu. A.; Golovach, Evgeny N.; Gothe, Ralf W.; Ishkhanov, Boris S.; Isupov, Evgeny L.; Mokeev, Viktor I.; Fedotov, Gleb V.

    2015-04-01

    Preliminary results from analyzing π⁺π⁻ pair electroproduction on a proton bound in a deuteron are presented. Procedures for considering the Fermi motion of the initial proton in the deuteron and assessing the effects of interaction in the final states are developed. The yield of the reaction ep(n) → e'p'(n')π⁺π⁻ is obtained for the first time.

  18. Calculating the mean time to capture for tethered ligands and its effect on the chemical equilibrium of bound ligand pairs.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lu; Decker, Caitlin G; Maynard, Heather D; Levine, Alex J

    2016-09-01

    We present here the calculation of the mean time to capture of a tethered ligand to the receptor. This calculation is then used to determine the shift in the partitioning between (1) free, (2) singly bound, and (3) doubly bound ligands in chemical equilibrium as a function of the length of the tether. These calculations are used in the research article Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 Dimer with Superagonist in vitro Activity Improves Granulation Tissue Formation During Wound Healing (Decker et al., in press [1]) to explain quantitatively how changes in polymeric linker length in the ligand dimers modifies the efficacy of these molecules relative to that of free ligands. PMID:27408925

  19. Phase fluctuation in overdoped cuprates? Superconducting dome due to Mott-ness of the tightly bound preformed pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Wei; Yang, Fan

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to the current lore, we demonstrate that even the overdoped cuprates suffer from superconducting phase fluctuation in the strong binding limit. Specifically, the Mott-ness of the underlying doped holes dictates naturally a generic optimal doping around 15% and nearly complete loss of phase coherence around 25%, giving rise to a dome shape of superconducting transition temperature in excellent agreement with experimental observations of the cuprates. We verify this effect with a simple estimation using Gutzwiller approximation of the preformed pairs, obtained through variational Monte Carlo calculation. This realization suggests strongly the interesting possibility that the high-temperature superconductivity in the cuprates might be mostly described by Bose-Einstein condensation, without crossing over to amplitude fluctuating Cooper pairs. Supported by Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Science DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  20. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffraction Analysis of SeqA Bound to a Pair Hemimethylated GATC Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Chung,Y.; Guarne, A.

    2008-01-01

    Escherichia coli SeqA is a negative regulator of DNA replication. The SeqA protein forms a high-affinity complex with newly replicated DNA at the origin of replication and thus prevents premature re-initiation events. Beyond the origin, SeqA is found at the replication forks, where it organizes newly replicated DNA into higher ordered structures. These two functions depend on SeqA binding to multiple hemimethylated GATC sequences. In an effort to understand how SeqA forms a high-affinity complex with hemimethylated DNA, a dimeric variant of SeqA was overproduced, purified and crystallized bound to a DNA duplex containing two hemimethylated GATC sites. The preliminary X-ray analysis of crystals diffracting to 3 Angstroms resolution is presented here.

  1. Giant enhancement of the n-type conductivity in single phase p-type ZnO:N thin films by intentionally created defect clusters and pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Subodh K.; Singh, R. G.; Siva Kumar, V. V.; Singh, Fouran

    2015-09-01

    The p-type conductivity with very high transparency in visible region of electromagnetic spectrum from nitrogen doped zinc oxide (ZnO:N) thin films is reported and the origin of p-type conductivity is attributed to the formation of complex zinc interstitial-nitrogen substituted oxygen (Zni-NO) centers. The films are irradiated using energetic ions for inducing the high density of defects/defect clusters in the lattice for increasing the conductivity of the films. A systematic change in nature of charge carriers from p- to n-type and about four orders of magnitude enhancement of n-type conductivity is observed with increase in the fluence of irradiation. The intentionally induced complex defects such as VO/Zni clusters and VZn-VO defects pairs are mainly ascribed to the donor defects. These induced defects also act as the compensatory defects for the p-type charge carriers at low fluences and give rise to the giant enhancement in the n-type conductivity of films at higher fluence of irradiation.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Pax9 paired domain bound to a DC5 enhancer DNA element.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Kamesh; Hilbig, Antonia; Udayasuryan, Barath; Jayabal, Sriram; Kolatkar, Prasanna R; Jauch, Ralf

    2014-10-01

    Pax genes belong to a family of metazoan transcription factors that are known to play a critical role in eye, ear, kidney and neural development. The mammalian Pax family of transcription factors is characterized by a ∼128-amino-acid DNA-binding paired domain that makes sequence-specific contacts with DNA. The diversity in Pax gene activities emerges from complex modes of interaction with enhancer regions and heterodimerization with multiple interaction partners. Based on in vitro optimal binding-site selection studies and enhancer identification assays, it has been suggested that Pax proteins may recognize and bind their target DNA elements with different binding modes/topologies, however this hypothesis has not yet been structurally explored. One of the most extensively studied DNA target elements of the Pax6 paired domain is the eye-lens specific DC5 (δ-crystallin) enhancer element. In order to shed light on Pax6-DC5 DNA interactions, the related paired-domain prototype Pax9 was crystallized with the minimal δ-crystallin DC5 enhancer element and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis was attempted. A 3.0 Å resolution native data set was collected at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven from crystals grown in a solution consisting of 10%(w/v) PEG 20K, 20%(v/v) PEG 550 MME, 0.03 M NaNO3, 0.03 M Na2HPO4, 0.03 M NH2SO4, 0.1 M MES/imidazole pH 6.5. The data set was indexed and merged in space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 75.74, b = 165.59, c = 70.14 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The solvent content in the unit cell is consistent with the presence of one Pax9 paired domain bound to duplex DNA in the asymmetric unit. PMID:25286939

  3. Defects-assisted ferromagnetism due to bound magnetic polarons in Ce into Fe, Co:ZnO nanoparticles and first-principle calculations.

    PubMed

    Verma, Kuldeep Chand; Kotnala, R K

    2016-02-21

    Zn0.94TM0.03Ce0.03O [Zn0.94Fe0.03Ce0.03O (ZFCeO) and Zn0.94Co0.03Ce0.03O (ZCCeO)] nanoparticles were synthesized by a sol-gel process. Elemental analysis of these nanoparticles detects the weight percentage of Zn, Co, Fe, Ce and O in each sample. The Rietveld refinement of the X-ray diffraction pattern obtains the occupancy of dopant atoms, Wurtzite ZnO structure, crystallinity and lattice deformation with doping. The Ce doping into ZFO and ZCO form nanoparticles than nanorods was observed in pure ZnO, ZFO and ZCO samples that described due to chemical and ionic behavior of Ce, Fe, Co and Zn ions. The Raman active modes have peak broadening, intensity changes and peak shifts with metal doping that induces lattice defects. Photoluminescence spectra show blue-shifts at near-band edges and defects that influence broad visible emission with Ce doping. An enhancement in ferromagnetism in the magnetic hysteresis at 5 K is measured. The zero-field cooling and field cooling at H = 500 Oe and T = 300-5 K could confirm antiferromagnetic interactions mediated by defect carriers. The bound magnetic polaron at defect sites is responsible for the observed ferromagnetism. The ac magnetic susceptibility measurements determine the antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic transition with some magnetic clustered growth in the samples and reveal a frequency independent peak that shows the Neel temperature. Weak room temperature ferromagnetism and optical quenching in ZFCeO are described by valance states of Fe and Ce ions, respectively. Using first-principle calculations, we studied the occupancy of Ce (replacing Zn atoms) in the Wurtzite structure. PMID:26831598

  4. Association of Myopic Optic Disc Deformation with Visual Field Defects in Paired Eyes with Open-Angle Glaucoma: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Yu; Hangai, Masanori; Ishikawa, Makoto; Yoshitomi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the association of myopia with the visual field (VF) defects in open-angle glaucoma (OAG) using paired eyes to eliminate the effect of unknown confounding factors that are diverse among individuals. Methods One hundred eighteen eyes of 59 subjects with myopia (spherical equivalent [SE] ≥ -2 diopter [D] and axial length ≥ 24.0 mm) whose intra-ocular pressure between paired eyes was similar and the mean deviation (MD) of the Humphrey VF test differed by more than 6 dB were included. Refractive errors (SE, axial length) and parameters associated with the papillary and parapapillary myopic deformation (tilt ratio, torsion angle, and β-zone parapapillary atrophy [PPA] area without Bruch’s membrane) were measured in each eye. The paired eyes were divided into worse and better eyes according to the MD of the VF, and parameters were compared between them. Further, multiple linear regression analysis was performed to examine the correlation of the difference in various parameters with the MD difference between paired eyes. Results The SE of all eyes was -6.39 ± 2.15 D (mean ± standard deviation) and axial length was 26.42 ± 1.07 mm. MD of the worse and better VF eyes were -13.56 ± 6.65 dB and -4.87 ± 5.32 dB, respectively. Eyes with worse VFs had significantly greater SE, axial length, tilt ratio, and PPA area without Bruch’s membrane than those with better VFs (all P < 0.05). In multiple linear regression analysis, the difference of the MD between paired eyes was significantly correlated with the difference in the tilt ratio and PPA area without Bruch’s membrane. Conclusion The myopic papillary and parapapillary deformations, but not refractive error itself, were related to the worse VF in paired eyes with OAG. This suggests that myopia influences the severity of the glaucomatous VF defects via structural deformation. PMID:27571303

  5. Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopic detection of surface-bound Li(+)O2(-) defect sites in Li-doped ZnO nanocrystals derived from molecular precursors.

    PubMed

    Kirste, Ronny; Aksu, Yilmaz; Wagner, Markus R; Khachadorian, Sevak; Jana, Surajit; Driess, Matthias; Thomsen, Christian; Hoffmann, Axel

    2011-04-18

    We present a detailed study of Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence measurements on Li-doped ZnO nanocrystals with varying lithium concentrations. The samples were prepared starting from molecular precursors at low temperature. The Raman spectra revealed several sharp lines in the range of 100-200 cm(-1), which are attributed to acoustical phonons. In the high-energy range two peaks were observed at 735 cm(-1) and 1090 cm(-1). Excitation-dependent Raman spectroscopy of the 1090 cm(-1) mode revealed resonance enhancement at excitation energies around 2.2 eV. This energy coincides with an emission band in the photoluminescence spectra. The emission is attributed to the deep lithium acceptor and intrinsic point defects such as oxygen vacancies. Based on the combined Raman and PL results, we introduce a model of surface-bound LiO(2) defect sites, that is, the presence of Li(+)O(2)(-) superoxide. Accordingly, the observed Raman peaks at 735 cm(-1) and 1090 cm(-1) are assigned to Li-O and O-O vibrations of LiO(2). PMID:21433242

  6. Defect properties of Sb- and Bi-doped CuInSe2: The effect of the deep lone-pair s states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Sang; Yang, Ji-Hui; Ramanathan, Kannan; Wei, Su-Huai

    2014-12-01

    Bi or Sb doping has been used to make better material properties of polycrystalline Cu2(In,Ga)Se2 as solar cell absorbers, including the experimentally observed improved electrical properties. However, the mechanism is still not clear. Using first-principles method, we investigate the stability and electronic structure of Bi- and Sb-related defects in CuInSe2 and study their effects on the doping efficiency. Contrary to previous thinking that Bi or Sb substituted on the anion site, we find that under anion-rich conditions, the impurities can substitute on cation sites and are isovalent to In because of the formation of the impurity lone pair s states. When the impurities substitute for Cu, the defects act as shallow double donors and help remove the deep InCu level, thus resulting in the improved carrier life time. On the other hand, under anion-poor conditions, impurities at the Se site create amphoteric deep levels that are detrimental to the device performance.

  7. Defect properties of Sb- and Bi-doped CuInSe{sub 2}: The effect of the deep lone-pair s states

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Ji-Sang; Yang, Ji-Hui; Ramanathan, Kannan; Wei, Su-Huai

    2014-12-15

    Bi or Sb doping has been used to make better material properties of polycrystalline Cu{sub 2}(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} as solar cell absorbers, including the experimentally observed improved electrical properties. However, the mechanism is still not clear. Using first-principles method, we investigate the stability and electronic structure of Bi- and Sb-related defects in CuInSe{sub 2} and study their effects on the doping efficiency. Contrary to previous thinking that Bi or Sb substituted on the anion site, we find that under anion-rich conditions, the impurities can substitute on cation sites and are isovalent to In because of the formation of the impurity lone pair s states. When the impurities substitute for Cu, the defects act as shallow double donors and help remove the deep In{sub Cu} level, thus resulting in the improved carrier life time. On the other hand, under anion-poor conditions, impurities at the Se site create amphoteric deep levels that are detrimental to the device performance.

  8. Ab-initio studies on Li doping, Li-pairs, and complexes between Li and intrinsic defects in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidya, R.; Ravindran, P.; Fjellvâg, H.

    2012-06-01

    First-principles density functional calculations have been performed on Li-doped ZnO using all-electron projector augmented plane wave method. Li was considered at six different interstitial sites (Lii), including anti-bonding and bond-center sites and also in substitutional sites such as at Zn-site (Lizn) and at oxygen site (Lio) in the ZnO matrix. Stability of LiZn over Lii is shown to depend on synthetic condition, viz., LiZn is found to be more stable than Lii under O-rich conditions. Hybrid density functional calculations performed on LiZn indicate that it is a deep acceptor with (0/-) transition taking place at 0.74 eV above valence band maximum. The local vibrational frequencies for Li-dopants are calculated and compared with reported values. In addition, we considered the formation of Li-pair complexes and their role on electronic properties of ZnO. Present study suggests that at extreme oxygen-rich synthesis condition, a pair of acceptor type LiZn-complex is found to be stable over the compensating Lii + LiZn pair. The stability of complexes formed between Li impurities and various intrinsic defects is also investigated and their role on electronic properties of ZnO has been analyzed. We have shown that a complex between LiZn and oxygen vacancy has less formation energy and donor-type character and could compensate the holes generated by Li-doping in ZnO.

  9. Base-Pairing Energies of Proton-Bound Dimers and Proton Affinities of 1-Methyl-5-Halocytosines: Implications for the Effects of Halogenation on the Stability of the DNA i-Motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Wu, R. R.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2015-09-01

    (CCG)n•(CGG)n trinucleotide repeats have been found to be associated with fragile X syndrome, the most widespread inherited cause of mental retardation in humans. The (CCG)n•(CGG)n repeats adopt i-motif conformations that are preferentially stabilized by base-pairing interactions of noncanonical proton-bound dimers of cytosine (C+•C). Halogenated cytosine residues are one form of DNA damage that may be important in altering the structure and stability of DNA or DNA-protein interactions and, hence, regulate gene expression. Previously, we investigated the effects of 5-halogenation and 1-methylation of cytosine on the base-pairing energies (BPEs) using threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) techniques. In the present study, we extend our work to include proton-bound homo- and heterodimers of cytosine, 1-methyl-5-fluorocytosine, and 1-methyl-5-bromocytosine. All modifications examined here are found to produce a decrease in the BPEs. However, the BPEs of all of the proton-bound dimers examined significantly exceed those of Watson-Crick G•C, neutral C•C base pairs, and various methylated variants such that DNA i-motif conformations should still be preserved in the presence of these modifications. The proton affinities (PAs) of the halogenated cytosines are also obtained from the experimental data by competitive analysis of the primary dissociation pathways that occur in parallel for the proton-bound heterodimers. 5-Halogenation leads to a decrease in the N3 PA of cytosine, whereas 1-methylation leads to an increase in the N3 PA. Thus, the 1-methyl-5-halocytosines exhibit PAs that are intermediate.

  10. Dynamic modelling of spur gear pair and application of empirical mode decomposition-based statistical analysis for early detection of localized tooth defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parey, A.; El Badaoui, M.; Guillet, F.; Tandon, N.

    2006-06-01

    Gears are one of the most common and important machine components in many advanced machines. An improved understanding of vibration signal is required for the early detection of incipient gear failure to achieve high reliability. This paper mainly consists of two parts: in the first part, a 6-degree-of-freedom gear dynamic model including localized tooth defect has been developed. The model consists of a spur gear pair, two shafts, two inertias representing load and prime mover and bearings. The model incorporates the effects of time-varying mesh stiffness and damping, backlash, excitation due to gear errors and profile modifications. The second part consists of signal processing of simulated and experimental signals. Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is a method of breaking down a signal without leaving a time domain. The process is useful for analysing non-stationary and nonlinear signals. EMD decomposes a signal into some individual, nearly monocomponent signals, named as intrinsic mode function (IMF). Crest factor and kurtosis have been calculated of these IMFs. EMD pre-processed kurtosis and crest factor give early detection of pitting as compared to raw signal.

  11. Determination of free and reversibly bound sulphite in foods by reverse-phase, ion-pairing high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Warner, C R; Daniels, D H; Fitzgerald, M C; Joe, F L; Diachenko, G W

    1990-01-01

    The reaction of sulphite with formaldehyde to form hydroxymethylsulphonate (HMS), which is very stable under the controlled conditions of this assay, was used as the first step in an analytical procedure to determine foodborne sulphite. The effect of mobile-phase pH on the stability of HMS during high-performance liquid chromatography was studied. It was found that on-column HMS dissociation to formaldehyde and bisulphite increased with the pH of the mobile phase; therefore the relatively low pH 4.7, at which the dissociation of HMS was approximately 2%, was selected for the analysis. In addition, the release of sulphite from its reversibly bound forms in wine and other foods was examined as a function of the pH of the extraction medium by following the appearance of HMS formed from the reaction of the freed sulphite with formaldehyde. The rate of dissociation of the reversibly bound sulphite was relatively slow at pH 3 but very rapid at pH 7. This difference in kinetics was exploited to develop a procedure to determine free and reversibly bound sulphite in food. The method was challenged by post-reagent spiking studies, i.e. adding the sulphite spike after the food has been blended with the sulphite-protective formaldehyde solution but before proceeding with the remainder of the assay. An average recovery of 100% with a standard deviation of 5.2% (n = 45) was realized at levels of 5, 10 and 20 ppm by weight as sulphur dioxide. Recovery of the sulphite added as the bisulphite addition product of acetaldehyde, a model compound for reversibly bound sulphite, was 95%. PMID:2174807

  12. Transfer of a weakly bound electron in collisions of Rydberg atoms with neutral particles. II. Ion-pair formation and resonant quenching of the Rb(nl) and Ne(nl) States by Ca, Sr, and Ba atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Narits, A. A.; Mironchuk, E. S.; Lebedev, V. S.

    2013-10-15

    Electron-transfer processes are studied in thermal collisions of Rydberg atoms with alkaline-earth Ca(4s{sup 2}), Sr(5s{sup 2}), and Ba(6s{sup 2}) atoms capable of forming negative ions with a weakly bound outermost p-electron. We consider the ion-pair formation and resonant quenching of highly excited atomic states caused by transitions between Rydberg covalent and ionic terms of a quasi-molecule produced in collisions of particles. The contributions of these reaction channels to the total depopulation cross section of Rydberg states of Rb(nl) and Ne(nl) atoms as functions of the principal quantum number n are compared for selectively excited nl-levels with l Much-Less-Than n and for states with large orbital quantum numbers l = n - 1, n - 2. It is shown that the contribution from resonant quenching dominates at small values of n, and the ion-pair formation process begins to dominate with increasing n. The values and positions of the maxima of cross sections for both processes strongly depend on the electron affinity of an alkaline-earth atom and on the orbital angular momentum l of a highly excited atom. It is shown that in the case of Rydberg atoms in states with large l {approx} n - 1, the rate constants of ion-pair formation and collisional quenching are considerably lower than those for nl-levels with l Much-Less-Than n.

  13. Negative regulation of pPS10 plasmid replication: origin pairing by zipping-up DNA-bound RepA monomers.

    PubMed

    Gasset-Rosa, Fátima; Díaz-López, Teresa; Lurz, Rudi; Prieto, Alicia; Fernández-Tresguerres, M Elena; Giraldo, Rafael

    2008-05-01

    In many plasmid replicons of gram-negative bacteria, Rep protein dimers are transcriptional self-repressors of their genes, whereas monomers are initiators of DNA replication. Switching between both functions implies conformational remodelling of Rep, and is promoted by Rep binding to the origin DNA repeats (iterons) or chaperones. Rep proteins play another key role: they bridge together two iteron DNA stretches, found either on the same or on different plasmid molecules. These so-called, respectively, 'looped' and 'handcuffed' complexes are thought to be negative regulators of plasmid replication. Although evidence for Rep-dependent plasmid handcuffing has been found in a number of replicons, the structure of these Rep-DNA assemblies is still unknown. Here, by a combination of proteomics, electron microscopy, genetic analysis and modelling, we provide insight on a possible three-dimensional structure for two handcuffed arrays of the iterons found at the origin of pPS10 replicon. These are brought together in parallel register by zipping-up DNA-bound RepA monomers. We also present evidence for a distinct role of RepA dimers in DNA looping. This work defines a new regulatory interface in Rep proteins. PMID:18284592

  14. A FRET-based probe for epidermal growth factor receptor bound non-covalently to a pair of synthetic amphipathic helixes

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Reina E.; Kurokawa, Kazuo; Fujioka, Aki; Sharma, Alok; Mayer, Bruce J.; Matsuda, Michiyuki . E-mail: matsudam@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2005-07-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor plays a pivotal role in a variety of cellular functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and migration. To monitor the EGF receptor (EGFR) activity in living cells, we developed a probe for EGFR activity based on the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Previously, we developed a probe designated as Picchu (Phosphorylation indicator of the CrkII chimeric unit), which detects the tyrosine phosphorylation of the CrkII adaptor protein. We used a pair of synthetic amphipathic helixes, WinZipA2 and WinZipB1, to bind Picchu non-covalently to the carboxyl-terminus of the EGFR. Using this modified probe named Picchu-Z, the activity of EGFR was followed in EGF-stimulated Cos7 cells. We found that a high level of tyrosine phosphorylation of Picchu-Z probe remained after endocytosis until the point when the EGFR was translocated to the perinuclear region. These findings are in agreement with the previously reported 'signaling endosome' model. Furthermore, by pulse stimulation with EGF and by acute ablation of EGFR activity with AG1478, it was suggested that the phosphorylation of Picchu-Z probe, and probably the phosphorylation of EGFR also, underwent a rapid equilibrium ({tau} {sub 1/2} < 2 min) between the phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states in the presence of EGF.

  15. Activation and enhancement of room-temperature ferromagnetism in Cu-doped anatase TiO₂ films by bound magnetic polaron and oxygen defects.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian-Yun; Bao, Shan-Hu; Lv, Yan-Hong; Jin, Ping

    2014-12-24

    Cu-doped anatase TiO2 films grown by magnetron sputtering at room temperature showed the unexpected observation of room-temperature ferromagnetism, which was enhanced or destroyed corresponding to low or high impurity concentration via vacuum annealing. On the basis of the analysis of composition and structure, the most important factor for activating ferromagnetism can be identified as the creation of grain boundary defects. In addition, oxygen defects can be the dominating factor for increasing the saturation moment of the 0.19 at. % Cu-doped TiO2 film from 0.564 to 26.41 emu/cm(3). These results help elucidate the origin of ferromagnetism and emphasize the role of oxygen defects for the application of ferromagnetic films. PMID:25437752

  16. Defect identification in the AsGa family in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overhof, H.; Spaeth, J.-M.

    2005-09-01

    Ab initio total-energy calculations are presented for intrinsic defects in GaAs with a particular emphasis on hyperfine interactions in order to clarify the atomic structure of the various AsGa -related defects. For the AsGa-X2 defect complex the interpretation as an AsGa-VAs antisite-vacancy pair as was considered so far is challenged. An AsGa-GaAs antistructure pair is the most likely identification. It is also unlikely that the AsGa-X1 defect can be identified as a distant antistructure pair as was considered from magnetic resonance experiments. The theoretical results obtained for the isolated AsGa point defect agree with the experimental data reported for the defect identified as isolated AsGa and, with the exception of a small broadening of the nearest-neighbor lines and of a moderate splitting in the fifth shell, for the EL2 as well. We speculate that at room temperature the EL2 will be an isolated AsGa defect which lowers its symmetry attracting some other mobile defect at the low temperatures required to perform magnetic resonance experiments. We have calculated the binding energies of antisites bound to a distant shallow acceptor and the influence of the pairing on the hyperfine interactions. We show that this mechanism could explain the broadening of the nearest-neighbor lines but not the splitting in the fifth shell.

  17. Optical properties of radiation defect centers involving single and paired Mn{sup 2+} centers in CaF{sub 2}:Mn

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, K.; Sharma, J.; Mathur, V.K.; Barkyoumb, J.H.

    1995-06-15

    Optical evidence of paired Mn{sup 2+} centers has been observed in CaF{sub 2}:Mn by time-resolved laser spectroscopy. The paired Mn{sup 2+} center is associated with a peak shift of the Mn{sup 2+} emisssion towards longer wavelength and a faster component of decay of 500 {mu}s along with a slow decay of 48 ms due to a single Mn{sup 2+} ion. It appear that this center forms a Mn{sup 2+}-{ital F}-center-Mn{sup 2+} complex when the material is {gamma} irradiated. This complex is associated with a thermoluminescence peak near 360 {degree}C and an optical-absorption band near 300 nm. A conversion from a Mn{sup 2+}-{ital F}-center-Mn{sup 2+} complex to an {ital F}-center-Mn{sup 2+} complex is observed in phototransferred thermoluminescence and in photobleached optical-absorption spectra.

  18. Cooper Pairs in Insulators?!

    ScienceCinema

    James Valles

    2010-01-08

    Nearly 50 years elapsed between the discovery of superconductivity and the emergence of the microscopic theory describing this zero resistance state. The explanation required a novel phase of matter in which conduction electrons joined in weakly bound pairs and condensed with other pairs into a single quantum state. Surprisingly, this Cooper pair formation has also been invoked to account for recently uncovered high-resistance or insulating phases of matter. To address this possibility, we have used nanotechnology to create an insulating system that we can probe directly for Cooper pairs. I will present the evidence that Cooper pairs exist and dominate the electrical transport in these insulators and I will discuss how these findings provide new insight into superconductor to insulator quantum phase transitions. 

  19. Outward Bound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outward Bound, Inc., Andover, MA.

    The Outward Bound concept was developed in Germany and Great Britain with the saving of human life as the ultimate goal. Courses are designed to help students discover their true physical and mental limits through development of skills including emergency medical aid, firefighting, search and rescue, mountaineering, and sailing. Five Outward Bound…

  20. HIM-8 Binds to the X Chromosome Pairing Center and Mediates Chromosome-Specific Meiotic Synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Carolyn M.; Wong, Chihunt; Bhalla, Needhi; Carlton, Peter M.; Weiser, Pinky; Meneely, Philip M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The him-8 gene is essential for proper meiotic segregation of the X chromosomes in C. elegans. Here we show that loss of him-8 function causes profound X chromosome-specific defects in homolog pairing and synapsis. him-8 encodes a C2H2 zinc-finger protein that is expressed during meiosis and concentrates at a site on the X chromosome known as the meiotic pairing center (PC). A role for HIM-8 in PC function is supported by genetic interactions between PC lesions and him-8 mutations. HIM-8 bound chromosome sites associate with the nuclear envelope (NE) throughout meiotic prophase. Surprisingly, a point mutation in him-8 that retains both chromosome binding and NE localization fails to stabilize pairing or promote synapsis. These observations indicate that stabilization of homolog pairing is an active process in which the tethering of chromosome sites to the NE may be necessary but is not sufficient. PMID:16360035

  1. Defect states and exceptional point splitting in the band gaps of one-dimensional parity-time lattices.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-Feng

    2015-08-24

    We investigated defect states in band gaps of one-dimensional photonic lattices with delicate modulations of gain and loss that respect parity-time-symmetry (PT-symmetry), viz. n(z) = n*(-z). For the sake of generality, we employ not only periodic structures but also quasiperiodic structures, e.g. Fibonacci sequences, to construct aperiodic PT lattices. Differed from lossless systems for which the defect state is related to only one exceptional point (EP) of the S-matrix, we observed the splitting of one EP into a pair after the introduction of judiciously designed gain and loss in those PT systems, where the defect state enters a non-threshold broken symmetry phase bounded by the EP pair. Some interesting properties associated with defect states and EP splitting are demonstrated, such as enhanced spectral localization, double optical phase abrupt change, and wavelength sensitive reversion of unidirectional transparency. PMID:26368199

  2. Cooper Pair Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, James

    One of the recent advances in the field of the Superconductor to Insulator Transition (SIT) has been the discovery and characterization of the Cooper Pair Insulator phase. This bosonic insulator, which consists of localized Cooper pairs, exhibits activated transport and a giant magneto-resistance peak. These features differ markedly from the weakly localized transport that emerges as pairs break at a ``fermionic'' SIT. I will describe how our experiments on films nano-patterned with a nearly triangular array of holes have enabled us to 1) distinguish bosonic insulators from fermionic insulators, 2) show that Cooper pairs, rather than quasi-particles dominate the transport in the Cooper Pair insulator phase, 3) demonstrate that very weak, sub nano-meter thickness inhomogeneities control whether a bosonic or fermionic insulator forms at an SIT and 4) reveal that Cooper pairs disintegrate rather than becoming more tightly bound deep in the localized phase. We have also developed a method, using a magnetic field, to tune flux disorder reversibly in these films. I will present our latest results on the influence of magnetic flux disorder and random gauge fields on phenomena near bosonic SITs. This work was performed in collaboration with M. D. Stewart, Jr., Hung Q. Nguyen, Shawna M. Hollen, Jimmy Joy, Xue Zhang, Gustavo Fernandez, Jeffrey Shainline and Jimmy Xu. It was supported by NSF Grants DMR 1307290 and DMR-0907357.

  3. Applications of balanced pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, HuanHuan; Wang, JunFu; Huang, ZhaoYong

    2016-05-01

    Let $(\\mathscr{X}$, $\\mathscr{Y})$ be a balanced pair in an abelian category. We first introduce the notion of cotorsion pairs relative to $(\\mathscr{X}$, $\\mathscr{Y})$, and then give some equivalent characterizations when a relative cotorsion pair is hereditary or perfect. We prove that if the $\\mathscr{X}$-resolution dimension of $\\mathscr{Y}$ (resp. $\\mathscr{Y}$-coresolution dimension of $\\mathscr{X}$) is finite, then the bounded homotopy category of $\\mathscr{Y}$ (resp. $\\mathscr{X}$) is contained in that of $\\mathscr{X}$ (resp. $\\mathscr{Y}$). As a consequence, we get that the right $\\mathscr{X}$-singularity category coincides with the left $\\mathscr{Y}$-singularity category if the $\\mathscr{X}$-resolution dimension of $\\mathscr{Y}$ and the $\\mathscr{Y}$-coresolution dimension of $\\mathscr{X}$ are finite.

  4. Pick a Pair. Pancake Pairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Pat

    2005-01-01

    Cold February weather and pancakes are a traditional pairing. Pancake Day began as a way to eat up the foods that were abstained from in Lent--traditionally meat, fat, eggs and dairy products. The best-known pancake event is The Pancake Day Race in Buckinghamshire, England, which has been run since 1445. This column describes pairs of books that…

  5. Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Birth Defects: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What are birth defects? Birth defects are structural or functional abnormalities present ...

  6. Winning Pairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monsour, Florence

    2000-01-01

    Mentoring programs that pair experienced and first-time teachers are gaining prominence in supporting, developing, and retaining new teachers. The successful Beginning Teacher Assistance program at University of Wisconsin-River Falls was designed to give new K-12 teachers the opportunity for yearlong, structured support from mentor teachers. (MLH)

  7. Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  8. Control of VO•• ˜ TiT i ' dipole pairs as well as M gTi ″ defects on dielectric properties of Mg doped (Pb0.35Sr0.65)TiO3 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tao; Wang, Zongrong; Ma, Ning; Du, Piyi

    2016-01-01

    Mg doped (Pb0.35Sr0.65)TiO3 (PST) thin films were fabricated on indium tin oxide /glass substrates by the sol-gel technique. The formation of the PST phase and control of the magnesium doping on the microstructure, defect states, and dielectric properties of the thin film were investigated by means of XRD, SEM, AFM, XPS, and impedance analysis. Results showed that the oxygen vacancies and the associated Ti3+ ions formed as VO•• ˜ TiT i ' dipole pairs, and the dipole pairs were aligned opposite to the direction of the intrinsic dipole moments in the PST thin film. The amount of dipole pairs was strongly affected by the formed M gTi ″ in the thin film. The minimum amount of the dipole pairs appeared in the PST thin film with Mg doping content of 6% in molar ratio. The thin film with Mg doping content of 6% showed high permittivity due to low offset from VO•• ˜ TiT i ' dipole pairs and low dielectric loss due to low defect electrons generated in the thin film simultaneously. The formed M gTi ″ in the oxygen octahedral contributed lower response of the dipole moments to external electric field and resulted in lower tunability of the PST thin film with increasing Mg doping content. Controlled by the substitution of Mg2+ ions for Ti4+ ions and the induced VO•• ˜ TiT i ' dipole pairs, the optimal figure of merit was obtained in the PST thin film with Mg doping content of 6% with which the thin film possessed the smallest dielectric loss and still high tunability simultaneously.

  9. Sequential detection of web defects

    DOEpatents

    Eichel, Paul H.; Sleefe, Gerard E.; Stalker, K. Terry; Yee, Amy A.

    2001-01-01

    A system for detecting defects on a moving web having a sequential series of identical frames uses an imaging device to form a real-time camera image of a frame and a comparitor to comparing elements of the camera image with corresponding elements of an image of an exemplar frame. The comparitor provides an acceptable indication if the pair of elements are determined to be statistically identical; and a defective indication if the pair of elements are determined to be statistically not identical. If the pair of elements is neither acceptable nor defective, the comparitor recursively compares the element of said exemplar frame with corresponding elements of other frames on said web until one of the acceptable or defective indications occur.

  10. Soliton defects in one-gap periodic system and exotic supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arancibia, Adrián; Correa, Francisco; Jakubský, Vít; Mateos Guilarte, Juan; Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    2014-12-01

    By applying Darboux-Crum transformations to the quantum one-gap Lamé system, we introduce an arbitrary countable number of bound states into forbidden bands. The perturbed potentials are reflectionless and contain two types of soliton defects in the periodic background. The bound states with a finite number of nodes are supported in the lower forbidden band by the periodicity defects of the potential well type, while the pulse-type bound states in the gap have an infinite number of nodes and are trapped by defects of the compression modulations nature. We investigate the exotic nonlinear N =4 supersymmetric structure in such paired Schrödinger systems, which extends an ordinary N =2 supersymmetry and involves two bosonic generators composed from Lax-Novikov integrals of the subsystems. One of the bosonic integrals has a nature of a central charge and allows us to liaise the obtained systems with the stationary equations of the Korteweg-de Vries and modified Korteweg-de Vries hierarchies. This exotic supersymmetry opens the way for the construction of self-consistent condensates based on the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations and associated with them new solutions to the Gross-Neveu model. They correspond to the kink or kink-antikink defects of the crystalline background in dependence on whether the exotic supersymmetry is unbroken or spontaneously broken.

  11. Ear defects.

    PubMed

    Shonka, David C; Park, Stephen S

    2009-08-01

    The projection and exposure of the auricle make it particularly susceptible to actinic injury and thus to cutaneous malignancies. Auricular reconstruction is challenging because of its unique surface anatomy and undulating topography. This article organizes auricular defects into different categories based on anatomic location and extent of tissue loss, including skin-only defects, small composite defects, full-thickness defects involving or sparing the upper third of the ear, and total auricular loss. The authors share an algorithm for repair of the array of auricular defects. PMID:19698921

  12. Hamiltonian anomalies of bound states in QED

    SciTech Connect

    Shilin, V. I.; Pervushin, V. N.

    2013-10-15

    The Bound State in QED is described in systematic way by means of nonlocal irreducible representations of the nonhomogeneous Poincare group and Dirac's method of quantization. As an example of application of this method we calculate triangle diagram Para-Positronium {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. We show that the Hamiltonian approach to Bound State in QED leads to anomaly-type contribution to creation of pair of parapositronium by two photon.

  13. Immunoglobulin K light chain deficiency: A rare, but probably underestimated, humoral immune defect.

    PubMed

    Sala, Pierguido; Colatutto, Antonio; Fabbro, Dora; Mariuzzi, Laura; Marzinotto, Stefania; Toffoletto, Barbara; Perosa, Anna R; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Human immunoglobulin molecules are generated by a pair of identical heavy chains, which identify the immunoglobulin class, and a pair of identical light chains, Kappa or Lambda alternatively, which characterize the immunoglobulin type. In normal conditions, Kappa light chains represent approximately 2/3 of the light chains of total immunoglobulins, both circulating and lymphocyte surface bound. Very few cases of immunoglobulin Kappa or Lambda light chain defects have been reported. Furthermore, the genetic basis of this defect has been extensively explored only in a single case. We report a case of a patient suffering of serious recurrent bacterial infections, which was caused by a very rare form of immunoglobulin disorder, consisting of a pure defect of Kappa light chain. We evaluated major serum immunoglobulin concentrations, as well as total and free Kappa and Lambda light chain concentrations. Lymphocyte phenotyping was also performed and finally we tested the Kappa chain VJ rearrangement as well as the constant Kappa region sequence. Studies performed on VJ rearrangement showed a polyclonal genetic arrangement, whereas the gene sequencing for the constant region of Kappa chain showed a homozygous T to G substitution at the position 1288 (rs200765148). This mutation causes a substitution from Cys to Gly in the protein sequence and, therefore, determines the abnormal folding of the constant region of Kappa chain. We suggest that this defect could lead to an effective reduction of the variability of total antibody repertoire and a consequent defect of an apparently normal immunoglobulin response to common antigens. PMID:26853951

  14. Coloring with defect

    SciTech Connect

    Cowen, L.J.; Goddard, W.; Jesurum, C.E.

    1997-06-01

    An (ordinary vertex) coloring is a partition of the vertices of a graph into independent sets. The chromatic number is the minimum number of colors needed to produce such a partition. This paper considers a relaxation of coloring in which the color classes partition the vertices into subgraphs of degree at most d. d is called the defect of the coloring. A graph which admits a vertex coloring into k color classes, where each vertex is adjacent to at most d self-colored neighbors is said to be (k, d) colorable. We consider defective coloring on graphs of bounded degree, bounded genus, and bounded chromatic number, presenting complexity results and algorithms. For bounded degree graphs, a classic result of Lovasz yields a (k, [{Delta}/k]) coloring for graphs with E edges of maximum degree {Delta} in O({Delta}E) time. For graphs of bounded genus, (2, d), for d > 0 and (3,1)-coloring are proved NP-Complete, even for planar graphs. Results of easily can be transformed to (3,2) color any planar graph in linear time. We show that any toroidal graph is (3,2)- and (5, 1)-colorable, and quadratic-time algorithms are presented that find the colorings. For higher surfaces, we give a linear time algorithm to (3, {radical}12{gamma} + 6) color a graph of genus {gamma} > 2. It is also shown that any graph of genus {gamma} is ({radical}12{gamma}/(d + 1) + 6, d) colorable, and an O(d{radical}{gamma}E + V) algorithm is presented that finds the coloring. These bounds are within a constant factor of what is required for the maximum clique embeddable in the surface. Reductions from ordinary vertex coloring show that (k, d) coloring is NP-complete, and there exists an c > 0 such that no polynomial time algorithm can n{sup {epsilon}}-approximate the defective chromatic number unless P = NP. Most approximation algorithms to approximately color 3-colorable graphs can be extend to allow defects.

  15. HIM-8 binds to the X chromosome pairing center and mediateschromosome-specific meiotic synapsis

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Carolyn M.; Wong, Chihunt; Bhalla, Needhi; Carlton,Peter M.; Weiser, Pinky; Meneely, Philip M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-06-05

    The him-8 gene is essential for proper meiotic segregationof the X chromosomes in C. elegans. Herewe show that loss of him-8function causes profound X-chromosome-specific defects in homolog pairingand synapsis.him-8 encodes a C2H2 zinc finger protein that is expressedduring meiosis andconcentrates at a site on the X chromosome known as themeiotic Pairing Center (PC). A role for HIM-8 in PC function is supportedby genetic interactions between PC lesions and him-8 mutations.HIM-8-bound chromosome sites associate with the nuclear envelope (NE)throughout meiotic prophase. Surprisingly, a point mutation in him-8 thatretains both chromosome binding and NE localization fails to stabilizepairing or promote synapsis. These observations indicate thatstabilization of homolog pairing is an active process in which thetethering of chromosome sites to the NE may be necessary but is notsufficient.

  16. Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... with birth defects may need surgery or other medical treatments. Today, doctors can diagnose many birth defects in the womb. This enables them to treat or even correct some problems before the baby is born. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  17. Optical properties of complex defects created by Ag diffusion in ZnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monemar, B.; Holtz, P. O.; Gislason, H. P.; Magnea, N.; Uihlein, Ch.; Liu, P. L.

    1985-09-01

    Several complex defects in ZnTe created by Ag diffusion at a rather high doping level are studied by optical spectroscopy. In addition to the usual substitutional AgZn acceptor bound exciton (BE) at 2.3737 eV, a new prominent BE, S1, with a lowest energy of 2.3149 eV appears. This transition has a strong phonon coupling and corresponds to a neutral isoelectronic defect. Two electronic states at zero field are revealed by transmission data; a doublet at the lowest state (2.3149 eV) and a singlet at slightly higher energy (2.3155 eV). The electronic properties of the S1 BE are revealed by optical data, including the magneto-optical Zeeman spectra. The electronic structure can be understood as a consequence of a strong compressional axial local crystal field in combination with an electron-hole exchange interaction. It is further concluded that both carriers are bound to the complex defect by an attractive central-cell potential. The identity of the S1 defect as a pair of substitutional AgZn and interstitial Agi in the <111> direction is consistent with the trigonal symmetry observed in magneto-optical data. In addition to the S1 defect, several acceptorlike complex defects are created, of which S2 is a BE with its lowest electronic line at 2.3486 eV, and S3 similarly at 2.365 eV. These BE excitations give rise to several electronic levels both in the ground state (the acceptor hole) and in the excited state (the BE state). The complicated electronic structure can be explained by a combination of a low-symmetry crystal field and an exchange interaction. An identification of the defects S2 and S3 as composed of three atoms is suggested.

  18. Bounded link prediction in very large networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Wei; Pu, Cunlai; Xu, Zhongqi; Cai, Shimin; Yang, Jian; Michaelson, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Evaluating link prediction methods is a hard task in very large complex networks due to the prohibitive computational cost. However, if we consider the lower bound of node pairs' similarity scores, this task can be greatly optimized. In this paper, we study CN index in the bounded link prediction framework, which is applicable to enormous heterogeneous networks. Specifically, we propose a fast algorithm based on the parallel computing scheme to obtain all node pairs with CN values larger than the lower bound. Furthermore, we propose a general measurement, called self-predictability, to quantify the performance of similarity indices in link prediction, which can also indicate the link predictability of networks with respect to given similarity indices.

  19. Bound states and the Bekenstein bound

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael

    2003-10-16

    We explore the validity of the generalized Bekenstein bound, S<= pi M a. We define the entropy S as the logarithm of the number of states which have energy eigenvalue below M and are localized to a flat space region of width alpha. If boundary conditions that localize field modes are imposed by fiat, then the bound encounters well-known difficulties with negative Casimir energy and large species number, as well as novel problems arising only in the generalized form. In realistic systems, however, finite-size effects contribute additional energy. We study two different models for estimating such contributions. Our analysis suggests that the bound is both valid and nontrivial if interactions are properly included, so that the entropy S counts the bound states of interacting fields.

  20. A matrix lower bound

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, Joseph F.

    2002-02-04

    A matrix lower bound is defined that generalizes ideas apparently due to S. Banach and J. von Neumann. The matrix lower bound has a natural interpretation in functional analysis, and it satisfies many of the properties that von Neumann stated for it in a restricted case. Applications for the matrix lower bound are demonstrated in several areas. In linear algebra, the matrix lower bound of a full rank matrix equals the distance to the set of rank-deficient matrices. In numerical analysis, the ratio of the matrix norm to the matrix lower bound is a condition number for all consistent systems of linear equations. In optimization theory, the matrix lower bound suggests an identity for a class of min-max problems. In real analysis, a recursive construction that depends on the matrix lower bound shows that the level sets of continuously differential functions lie asymptotically near those of their tangents.

  1. Antihistamine Use in Early Pregnancy and Risk of Birth Defects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Mitchell, Allen A.; Werler, Martha M.; Yau, Wai-Ping; Hernández-Díaz, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported an association between use of specific antihistamines in early pregnancy and certain specific birth defects. Objective To test 16 previously-hypothesized associations between specific antihistamines and specific birth defects, and identify possible new associations. Methods We used 1998-2010 data from the Slone Epidemiology Center Birth Defects Study, a multicenter case-control surveillance program of birth defects in North America. Mothers were interviewed within six months of delivery about demographic, reproductive, medical, and behavioral factors, and details on use of prescription and non-prescription medications. We compared 1st trimester exposure to specific antihistamines between 13,213 infants with specific malformations and 6,982 non-malformed controls, using conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), with adjustment for potential confounders, including indication for use. Results Overall, 13.7% of controls were exposed to antihistamines during the 1st trimester. The most commonly-used medications were diphenhydramine (4.2%), loratadine (3.1%), doxylamine (1.9%), and chlorpheniramine (1.7%). Where estimates were stable, none supported the previously-hypothesized associations. Among over 100 exploratory comparisons of other specific antihistamine/defect pairs, 14 had ORs ≥1.5 of which 6 had 95% CI bounds excluding 1.0 before but not after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Conclusion Our findings do not provide meaningful support for previously-posited associations between antihistamines and major congenital anomalies; at the same time, we identified associations that had not been previously suggested. We suspect that previous associations may be chance findings in the context of multiple comparisons, a situation which may also apply to our new findings. PMID:24565715

  2. Physical Uncertainty Bounds (PUB)

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, Diane Elizabeth; Preston, Dean L.

    2015-03-19

    This paper introduces and motivates the need for a new methodology for determining upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulations of engineered systems due to limited fidelity in the composite continuum-level physics models needed to simulate the systems. We show that traditional uncertainty quantification methods provide, at best, a lower bound on this uncertainty. We propose to obtain bounds on the simulation uncertainties by first determining bounds on the physical quantities or processes relevant to system performance. By bounding these physics processes, as opposed to carrying out statistical analyses of the parameter sets of specific physics models or simply switching out the available physics models, one can obtain upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulated quantities of interest.

  3. Asymptotic entropy bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael

    2016-07-01

    We show that known entropy bounds constrain the information carried off by radiation to null infinity. We consider distant, planar null hypersurfaces in asymptotically flat spacetime. Their focusing and area loss can be computed perturbatively on a Minkowski background, yielding entropy bounds in terms of the energy flux of the outgoing radiation. In the asymptotic limit, we obtain boundary versions of the quantum null energy condition, of the generalized Second Law, and of the quantum Bousso bound.

  4. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  5. Bounding species distribution models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Jarnevich, C.S.; Esaias, W.E.; Morisette, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used. ?? 2011 Current Zoology.

  6. Causality and Tsirelson's bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Buhrman, H.; Massar, S.

    2005-11-15

    We study the properties of no-signaling correlations that cannot be reproduced by local measurements on entangled quantum states. We say that such correlations violate Tsirelson bounds. We show that if these correlations are obtained by some reversible unitary quantum evolution U, then U cannot be written in the product form U{sub A}xU{sub B}. This implies that U can be used for signaling and for entanglement generation. This result is completely general and in fact can be viewed as a characterization of Tsirelson bounds. We then show how this result can be used as a tool to study Tsirelson bounds and we illustrate this by rederiving the Tsirelson bound of 2{radical}(2) for the Clauser-Horn-Shimony-Holt inequality, and by deriving a new Tsirelson bound for qutrits.

  7. Semilocal defects

    SciTech Connect

    Preskill, J. )

    1992-11-15

    I analyze the interplay of gauge and global symmetries in the theory of topological defects. In a two-dimensional model in which both gauge symmetries and {ital exact} global symmetries are spontaneously broken, stable vortices may fail to exist even though magnetic flux is topologically conserved. Following Vachaspati and Achucarro, I formulate the condition that must be satisfied by the pattern of symmetry breakdown for finite-energy configurations to exist in which the conserved magnetic flux is spread out instead of confined to a localized vortex. If this condition is met, vortices are always unstable at sufficiently weak gauge coupling. I also describe the properties of defects in models with an accidental'' symmetry that is partially broken by gauge-boson exchange. In some cases, the spontaneously broken accidental symmetry is not restored inside the core of the defect. Then the structure of the defect can be analyzed using an effective field theory; the details of the physics responsible for the spontaneous symmetry breakdown need not be considered. Examples include domain walls and vortices that are classically unstable, but are stabilized by loop corrections, and magnetic monopoles that have an unusual core structure. Finally, I examine the general theory of the electroweak strings'' that were recently discussed by Vachaspati. These arise only in models with gauge-boson mixing,'' and can always end on magnetic monopoles. Cosmological implications are briefly discussed.

  8. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  9. Bound infragravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okihiro, Michele; Guza, R. T.; Seymour, R. J.

    1992-07-01

    Model predictions of bound (i.e., nonlinearly forced by and coupled to wave groups) infragravity wave energy are compared with about 2 years of observations in 8- to 13-m depths at Imperial Beach, California, and Barbers Point, Hawaii. Frequency-directional spectra of free waves at sea and swell frequencies, estimated with a small array of four pressure sensors, are used to predict the bound wave spectra below 0.04 Hz. The predicted total bound wave energy is always less than the observed infragravity energy, and the underprediction increases with increasing water depth and especially with decreasing swell energy. At most half, and usually much less, of the observed infragravity energy is bound. Bound wave spectra are also predicted with data from a single wave gage in 183-m depth at Point Conception, California, and the assumption of unidirectional sea and swell. Even with energetic swell, less than 10% of the total observed infragravity energy in 183-m depth is bound. Free waves, either leaky or edge waves, are more energetic than bound waves at both the shallow and deep sites. The low level of infragravity energy observed in 183-m depth compared with 8- to 13-m depths, with similarly moderate sea and swell energy, suggests that leaky (and very high-mode edge) waves contribute less than 10% of the infragravity energy in 8-13 m. Most of the free infragravity energy in shallow water is refractively trapped and does not reach deep water.

  10. Pseudopotential theory of interacting roton pairs in superfluid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedell, K.; Pines, D.; Zawadowski, A.

    1984-01-01

    A configuration-space pseudopotential, which is closely related to that used by Aldrich and Pines to describe the effective interaction between background particles in 3He and 4He, is constructed and used to calculate the roton-roton scattering amplitude. From that amplitude we obtain a theory that is completely congruent with the roton-liquid theory of Bedell, Pines, and Fomin. We calculate two-roton bound states, roton-liquid parameters, and roton lifetimes, as well as information about the hybridization of the two-roton bound state with excitations of higher and lower energy. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is obtained for the l=2 bound state at zero pair momentum, the roton lifetime, the roton contribution to the normal-fluid viscosity and the normal-fluid density, and the temperature variation of the roton energy. The effective roton-roton coupling parameters at large pair momentum are found to be an order of magnitude larger than those for small or vanishing pair momentum. At SVP we find that a substantial number of two-roton bound states of varying symmetry exist for pair momentum up to ~ 3 Å -1; at standard pressure, however the roton-roton interaction for momenta ~ 1 Å -1 is found to become repulsive, so that both the l=2 bound state at zero pair momentum and bound states at intermediate momenta are predicted to disappear under pressure.

  11. Bosonic pair creation and the Schiff-Snyder-Weinberg effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Q. Z.; Bauke, Heiko; Su, Q.; Keitel, C. H.; Grobe, R.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between different bound states in bosonic systems can lead to pair creation. We study this process in detail by solving the Klein-Gordon equation on space-time grids in the framework of time-dependent quantum field theory. By choosing specific external field configurations, two bound states can become pseudodegenerate, which is commonly referred to as the Schiff-Snyder-Weinberg effect. These pseudodegenerate bound states, which have complex energy eigenvalues, are related to the pseudo-Hermiticity of the Klein-Gordon Hamiltonian. In this work, the influence of the Schiff-Snyder-Weinberg effect on pair production is studied. A generalized Schiff-Snyder-Weinberg effect, where several pairs of pseudodegenerate states appear, is found in combined electric and magnetic fields. The generalized Schiff-Snyder-Weinberg effect likewise triggers pair creation. The particle number in these situations obeys an exponential growth law in time enhancing the creation of bosons, which cannot be found in fermionic systems.

  12. Bounding the Bogoliubov coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt

    2008-11-15

    While over the last century or more considerable effort has been put into the problem of finding approximate solutions for wave equations in general, and quantum mechanical problems in particular, it appears that as yet relatively little work seems to have been put into the complementary problem of establishing rigourous bounds on the exact solutions. We have in mind either bounds on parametric amplification and the related quantum phenomenon of particle production (as encoded in the Bogoliubov coefficients), or bounds on transmission and reflection coefficients. Modifying and streamlining an approach developed by one of the present authors [M. Visser, Phys. Rev. A 59 (1999) 427-438, (arXiv:quant-ph/9901030)], we investigate this question by developing a formal but exact solution for the appropriate second-order linear ODE in terms of a time-ordered exponential of 2x2 matrices, then relating the Bogoliubov coefficients to certain invariants of this matrix. By bounding the matrix in an appropriate manner, we can thereby bound the Bogoliubov coefficients.

  13. Validation of EMP bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, L.K.; Merewether, K.O.; Chen, K.C.; Jorgenson, R.E.; Morris, M.E.; Solberg, J.E.; Lewis, J.G.; Derr, W.

    1996-07-01

    Test data on canonical weapon-like fixtures are used to validate previously developed analytical bounding results. The test fixtures were constructed to simulate (but be slightly worse than) weapon ports of entry but have known geometries (and electrical points of contact). The exterior of the test fixtures exhibited exterior resonant enhancement of the incident fields at the ports of entry with magnitudes equal to those of weapon geometries. The interior consisted of loaded transmission lines adjusted to maximize received energy or voltage but incorporating practical weapon geometrical constraints. New analytical results are also presented for bounding the energies associated with multiple bolt joints and for bounding the exterior resonant enhancement of the exciting fields.

  14. Electron teleportation via Majorana bound states in a mesoscopic superconductor.

    PubMed

    Fu, Liang

    2010-02-01

    Zero-energy Majorana bound states in superconductors have been proposed to be potential building blocks of a topological quantum computer, because quantum information can be encoded nonlocally in the fermion occupation of a pair of spatially separated Majorana bound states. However, despite intensive efforts, nonlocal signatures of Majorana bound states have not been found in charge transport. In this work, we predict a striking nonlocal phase-coherent electron transfer process by virtue of tunneling in and out of a pair of Majorana bound states. This teleportation phenomenon only exists in a mesoscopic superconductor because of an all-important but previously overlooked charging energy. We propose an experimental setup to detect this phenomenon in a superconductor-quantum-spin-Hall-insulator-magnetic-insulator hybrid system. PMID:20366777

  15. Nonequilibrium and nonlinear defect states in microcavity-polariton condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting-Wei; Jheng, Shih-Da; Hsieh, Wen-Feng; Cheng, Szu-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The nonequilibrium and nonlinear defect modes (NNDMs), localized by a defect in a nonequilibrium microcavity-polariton condensate (MPC), are studied. There are three analytic solutions of NNDMs in a point defect: the bright NNDM, a bound state with two dark solitons for an attractive potential, and a gray soliton bound by a defect for a repulsive potential. We find that the stable NNDMs in a nonequilibrium MPC are the bright NNDM and gray soliton bound by a defect. The bright NNDM, which has the hyperbolic cotangent form, is a bright localized state existing in a uniform MPC. The bright NNDM is a unique state occurring in a nonequilibrium MPC that has pump-dissipation and repulsive-nonlinearity characters. No such state can exist in an equilibrium system with repulsive nonlinearity.

  16. Pairing forces in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    In this contribution, the author mentions some features of pairing forces that are unique to nuclei and cover some areas of major interest in nuclear structure research, that involve pairing. At the level of most nuclear structure studies, nuclei are treated as consisting of two kinds of fermions (protons and neutrons) in a valence space with rather few levels. These features give rise to unique aspects of pairing forces in nuclei: (1) n-p pairing in T = 0 as well as the usual T = 1 pairing that is characteristic of like fermions; (2) a need to correct pairing calculations for the (1/N) effects that can typically be neglected in superconducting solids. An issue of current concern is the nature of the pairing interaction: several recent studies suggest a need for a density dependent form of the pairing interaction. There is a good deal of feedback between the questions of accurate calculations of pairing interactions and the form and magnitude of the pairing interaction. Finally, the authors discuss some many-body wave functions that are a generalization of the BCS wave function form, and apply them to a calculation of energy level spacings in superdeformed rotational bands.

  17. Defects in conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billò, Marco; Gonçalves, Vasco; Lauria, Edoardo; Meineri, Marco

    2016-04-01

    We discuss consequences of the breaking of conformal symmetry by a flat or spherical extended operator. We adapt the embedding formalism to the study of correlation functions of symmetric traceless tensors in the presence of the defect. Two-point functions of a bulk and a defect primary are fixed by conformal invariance up to a set of OPE coefficients, and we identify the allowed tensor structures. A correlator of two bulk primaries depends on two cross-ratios, and we study its conformal block decomposition in the case of external scalars. The Casimir equation in the defect channel reduces to a hypergeometric equation, while the bulk channel blocks are recursively determined in the light-cone limit. In the special case of a defect of codimension two, we map the Casimir equation in the bulk channel to the one of a four-point function without defect. Finally, we analyze the contact terms of the stress-tensor with the extended operator, and we deduce constraints on the CFT data. In two dimensions, we relate the displacement operator, which appears among the contact terms, to the reflection coefficient of a conformal interface, and we find unitarity bounds for the latter.

  18. Matched-pair classification

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P

    2009-01-01

    Following an analogous distinction in statistical hypothesis testing, we investigate variants of machine learning where the training set comes in matched pairs. We demonstrate that even conventional classifiers can exhibit improved performance when the input data has a matched-pair structure. Online algorithms, in particular, converge quicker when the data is presented in pairs. In some scenarios (such as the weak signal detection problem), matched pairs can be generated from independent samples, with the effect not only doubling the nominal size of the training set, but of providing the structure that leads to better learning. A family of 'dipole' algorithms is introduced that explicitly takes advantage of matched-pair structure in the input data and leads to further performance gains. Finally, we illustrate the application of matched-pair learning to chemical plume detection in hyperspectral imagery.

  19. Computing Graphical Confidence Bounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezzacappa, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Approximation for graphical confidence bounds is simple enough to run on programmable calculator. Approximation is used in lieu of numerical tables not always available, and exact calculations, which often require rather sizable computer resources. Approximation verified for collection of up to 50 data points. Method used to analyze tile-strength data on Space Shuttle thermal-protection system.

  20. Effect of an external periodic potential on pairs of dissipative solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Wonkeun; Akhmediev, Nail; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2009-07-15

    We study dissipative soliton pair solutions of the complex cubic-quintic Ginzburg-Landau equation with periodic phase modulation term. The external modulation changes the soliton-pair time separation as well as their phase difference, without destroying the existing two-soliton bound state. Transitions between different stable forms of the pair occur in the form of bifurcations. Quite remarkably, two types of bound states may coexist, which leads to hysteresis loops when the modulation depth is varied.

  1. Vortex pairs on surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Koiller, Jair

    2009-05-06

    A pair of infinitesimally close opposite vortices moving on a curved surface moves along a geodesic, according to a conjecture by Kimura. We outline a proof. Numerical simulations are presented for a pair of opposite vortices at a close but nonzero distance on a surface of revolution, the catenoid. We conjecture that the vortex pair system on a triaxial ellipsoid is a KAM perturbation of Jacobi's geodesic problem. We outline some preliminary calculations required for this study. Finding the surfaces for which the vortex pair system is integrable is in order.

  2. Dynamics of a vortex pair in radial flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bannikova, E. Yu. Kontorovich, V. M. Reznik, G. M.

    2007-10-15

    The problem of vortex pair motion in two-dimensional radial flow is solved. Under certain conditions for flow parameters, the vortex pair can reverse its motion within a bounded region. The vortex-pair translational velocity decreases or increases after passing through the source/sink region, depending on whether the flow is diverging or converging, respectively. The rotational motion of a corotating vortex pair in a quiescent environment transforms into motion along a logarithmic spiral in radial flow. The problem may have applications in astrophysics and geophysics.

  3. Graphing and grafting graphene: Classifying finite topological defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockayne, Eric

    2012-03-01

    The structure of finite-area topological defects in graphene is described in terms of both the direct honeycomb lattice and its dual triangular lattice. Such defects are equivalent to cutting out a patch of graphene and replacing it with a different patch with the same number of dangling bonds. An important subset of these defects, bound by a closed loop of alternating 5- and 7-membered carbon rings, explains most finite-area topological defects that have been experimentally observed. Previously unidentified defects seen in scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images of graphene grown on SiC are identified as isolated divacancies or divacancy clusters.

  4. Geodesic defect anchoring on nematic shells.

    PubMed

    Mirantsev, Leonid V; Sonnet, André M; Virga, Epifanio G

    2012-08-01

    Nematic shells are colloidal particles coated with nematic liquid crystal molecules, which may freely glide and rotate on the colloid's surface while keeping their long axis on the local tangent plane. Molecular dynamics simulations on a nanoscopic spherical shell indicate that under appropriate adhesion conditions for the molecules on the equator, the equilibrium nematic texture exhibits at each pole a pair of +1/2 defects so close to one another to be treated as one +1 defect. Spirals connect the polar defects, though the continuum limit of the interaction potential would not feature any elastic anisotropy. A molecular averaging justifies an anchoring defect energy that feels the geodesics emanating from the defect. All our observations are explained by such a geodesic anchoring, which vanishes on flat manifolds. PMID:23005713

  5. Critical Schwinger Pair Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, Holger; Torgrimsson, Greger

    2016-03-01

    We investigate Schwinger pair production in spatially inhomogeneous electric backgrounds. A critical point for the onset of pair production can be approached by fields that marginally provide sufficient electrostatic energy for an off-shell long-range electron-positron fluctuation to become a real pair. Close to this critical point, we observe features of universality which are analogous to continuous phase transitions in critical phenomena with the pair-production rate serving as an order parameter: electric backgrounds can be subdivided into universality classes and the onset of pair production exhibits characteristic scaling laws. An appropriate design of the electric background field can interpolate between power-law scaling, essential Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless-type scaling, and a power-law scaling with log corrections. The corresponding critical exponents only depend on the large-scale features of the electric background, whereas the microscopic details of the background play the role of irrelevant perturbations not affecting criticality.

  6. Critical Schwinger Pair Production.

    PubMed

    Gies, Holger; Torgrimsson, Greger

    2016-03-01

    We investigate Schwinger pair production in spatially inhomogeneous electric backgrounds. A critical point for the onset of pair production can be approached by fields that marginally provide sufficient electrostatic energy for an off-shell long-range electron-positron fluctuation to become a real pair. Close to this critical point, we observe features of universality which are analogous to continuous phase transitions in critical phenomena with the pair-production rate serving as an order parameter: electric backgrounds can be subdivided into universality classes and the onset of pair production exhibits characteristic scaling laws. An appropriate design of the electric background field can interpolate between power-law scaling, essential Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless-type scaling, and a power-law scaling with log corrections. The corresponding critical exponents only depend on the large-scale features of the electric background, whereas the microscopic details of the background play the role of irrelevant perturbations not affecting criticality. PMID:26991162

  7. Pair contact process with diffusion of pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, F. L.; Dickman, Ronald; Fulco, U. L.

    2011-03-01

    The pair contact process (PCP) is a nonequilibrium stochastic model which, like the basic contact process (CP), exhibits a phase transition to an absorbing state. The two models belong to the directed percolation (DP) universality class, despite the fact that the PCP possesses infinitely many absorbing configurations whereas the CP has but one. The critical behavior of the PCP with hopping by particles (PCPD) is as yet unclear. Here we study a version of the PCP in which nearest-neighbor particle pairs can hop but individual particles cannot. Using quasistationary simulations for three values of the diffusion probability (D = 0.1, 0.5 and 0.9), we find convincing evidence of DP-like critical behavior.

  8. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  9. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-06-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  10. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the first month ... that she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In spina bifida, ...

  11. Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Risk • Symptoms & Diagnosis • Care & Treatment • Tools & Resources Web Booklets on Congenital Heart Defects These online publications ... to you or your child’s defect and concerns. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Web Booklet: ...

  12. Electron pairing without superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guanglei; Tomczyk, Michelle; Lu, Shicheng; Veazey, Joshua P; Huang, Mengchen; Irvin, Patrick; Ryu, Sangwoo; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Hellberg, C Stephen; Levy, Jeremy

    2015-05-14

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the first and best known superconducting semiconductor. It exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to that of high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. Despite sustained interest for 50 years, direct experimental insight into the nature of electron pairing in SrTiO3 has remained elusive. Here we perform transport experiments with nanowire-based single-electron transistors at the interface between SrTiO3 and a thin layer of lanthanum aluminate, LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances-paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical pairing field Bp of about 1-4 tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For magnetic fields below Bp, these resonances are insensitive to the applied magnetic field; for fields in excess of Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as 900 millikelvin, well above the superconducting transition temperature (about 300 millikelvin). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by a model involving an attractive Hubbard interaction that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity. PMID:25971511

  13. Electron pairing without superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guanglei; Tomczyk, Michelle; Lu, Shicheng; Veazey, Joshua P.; Huang, Mengchen; Irvin, Patrick; Ryu, Sangwoo; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Hellberg, C. Stephen; Levy, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the first and best known superconducting semiconductor. It exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to that of high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. Despite sustained interest for 50 years, direct experimental insight into the nature of electron pairing in SrTiO3 has remained elusive. Here we perform transport experiments with nanowire-based single-electron transistors at the interface between SrTiO3 and a thin layer of lanthanum aluminate, LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances--paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical pairing field Bp of about 1-4 tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For magnetic fields below Bp, these resonances are insensitive to the applied magnetic field; for fields in excess of Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as 900 millikelvin, well above the superconducting transition temperature (about 300 millikelvin). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by a model involving an attractive Hubbard interaction that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity.

  14. Electron pairing without superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Jeremy

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the first and best known superconducting semiconductor. It exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to that of high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. Despite sustained interest for 50 years, direct experimental insight into the nature of electron pairing in SrTiO3 has remained elusive. Here we perform transport experiments with nanowire-based single-electron transistors at the interface between SrTiO3 and a thin layer of lanthanum aluminate, LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances--paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical pairing field Bp of about 1-4 tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For magnetic fields below Bp, these resonances are insensitive to the applied magnetic field; for fields in excess of Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as 900 millikelvin, well above the superconducting transition temperature (about 300 millikelvin). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by a model involving an attractive Hubbard interaction that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity. Support from AFOSR, ONR, ARO, NSF, DOE and NSSEFF is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Universal bounds on current fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2016-05-01

    For current fluctuations in nonequilibrium steady states of Markovian processes, we derive four different universal bounds valid beyond the Gaussian regime. Different variants of these bounds apply to either the entropy change or any individual current, e.g., the rate of substrate consumption in a chemical reaction or the electron current in an electronic device. The bounds vary with respect to their degree of universality and tightness. A universal parabolic bound on the generating function of an arbitrary current depends solely on the average entropy production. A second, stronger bound requires knowledge both of the thermodynamic forces that drive the system and of the topology of the network of states. These two bounds are conjectures based on extensive numerics. An exponential bound that depends only on the average entropy production and the average number of transitions per time is rigorously proved. This bound has no obvious relation to the parabolic bound but it is typically tighter further away from equilibrium. An asymptotic bound that depends on the specific transition rates and becomes tight for large fluctuations is also derived. This bound allows for the prediction of the asymptotic growth of the generating function. Even though our results are restricted to networks with a finite number of states, we show that the parabolic bound is also valid for three paradigmatic examples of driven diffusive systems for which the generating function can be calculated using the additivity principle. Our bounds provide a general class of constraints for nonequilibrium systems.

  16. Isospin Mixing and the Continuum Coupling in Weakly Bound Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, N.; Nazarewicz, Witold; Ploszajczak, M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the near-threshold behavior of one-nucleon spectroscopic factors in mirror nuclei using the Gamow Shell Model, which simultaneously takes into account many-body correlations and continuum effects. We demonstrate that for weakly bound or unbound systems, the mirror symmetry-breaking effects are appreciable, and they manifest in large differences of spectroscopic factors in a mirror pair.

  17. The sine-Gordon model in the presence of defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avan, Jean; Doikou, Anastasia

    2013-01-01

    The sine-Gordon model in the presence of dynamical integrable defects is investigated. This is an application of the algebraic formulation introduced for integrable defects in earlier works. The quantities in involution as well as the associated Lax pairs are explicitly extracted. Integrability i also shown using certain sewing constraints, which emerge as suitable continuity conditions.

  18. Paired Straight Hearth Furnace

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goals are to design, develop, and evaluate the scalability and commercial feasibility of the PSH Paired Straight Hearth Furnace alternative ironmaking process.

  19. Bound charges and currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herczyński, Andrzej

    2013-03-01

    Bound charges and currents are among the conceptually challenging topics in advanced courses on electricity and magnetism. It may be tempting for students to believe that they are merely computational tools for calculating electric and magnetic fields in matter, particularly because they are usually introduced through abstract manipulation of integral identities, with the physical interpretation provided a posteriori. Yet these charges and currents are no less real than free charges and currents and can be measured experimentally. A simpler and more direct approach to introducing this topic, suggested by the ideas in the classic book by Purcell and emphasizing the physical origin of these phenomena, is proposed.

  20. Electronic structure of the 2.3149-eV complex defect in Ag-doped ZnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monemar, B.; Chen, W. M.; Holtz, P. O.; Gislason, H. P.

    1987-09-01

    A detailed analysis of magneto-optical Zeeman data for the dominating trigonal complex defect in Ag-diffused ZnTe, with a bound exciton (BE) at 2.3149 eV, is presented. The electronic structure of this BE can be explained in a satisfactory way assuming a neutral (isoelectronic) defect, where both electron and hole wave functions are rather localized, approximately leading to a triplet BE configuration at lowest energy. The strong 2.3149-eV line corresponds to a ``MS=+/-1'' doublet of this triplet. The electron is rather strongly localized, with an isotropic g value ge=+0.55, quite different from the value for shallow donors in ZnTe (ge=-0.40). This conclusion is also supported by the low value of the quadratic Zeeman shift rate for the MS=+/-1 doublet, C=3.5×10-3 meV/T2. The hole is also rather strongly localized, and is approximately spinlike, but with a strong residual angular momentum &=2.70, &=1.20, with reference to the trigonal defect axis. This is consistent with the assumed identity of the defect: a trigonal pair AgZn-Agi, where AgZn is a moderately deep substitutional acceptor, and Agi is a deep donor, presumably at a tetrahedral interstitial site.

  1. Population of the giant pairing vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, M.; Casten, R. F.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Clark, R. M.; Bucurescu, D.

    2016-03-01

    Background: The giant pairing vibration (GPV), a correlated two-nucleon mode in the second shell above the Fermi surface, has long been predicted and expected to be strongly populated in two-nucleon transfer cross sections similar to those of the normal pairing vibration. Recent experiments have provided evidence for this mode in ,15C14 but, despite sensitive studies, it has not been definitively identified in either Sn or Pb nuclei where pairing correlations are known to play a crucial role. Purpose: Our aim is to test whether features inherent to the mixing of bound and unbound levels might account for this and to study the effect in a simple and intuitively clear approach. Method: We study the mixing of unbound levels in a set of toy models that capture the essential physics of the GPV, along with a more realistic calculation including distorted-wave Born approximation transfer amplitudes. Results: The calculated (relative) cross section to populate a simulated GPV state is effectively low, compared to the case of bound levels with no widths Conclusions: The mixing turns out to be only a minor contributor to the weak population. Rather, the main reason is the melting of the GPV peak due to the width it acquires from the low orbital angular momentum single-particle states playing a dominant role in two-nucleon transfer amplitudes. This effect, in addition to a severe Q -value mismatch, may account for the elusive nature of this mode in (t ,p ) and (p ,t ) reactions.

  2. Electron Pairing Without Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Jeremy; Cheng, G.; Tomczyk, M.; Lu, S.; Veazey, J. P.; Huang, M.; Irvin, P.; Ryu, S.; Lee, H.; Eom, C.-B.; Hellberg, C. S.

    2015-03-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. We describe transport experiments with nanowire-based quantum dots localized at the interface between SrTiO3 and LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating of the quantum dot reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances--paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical magnetic field Bp 1-4 Tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For B Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as T = 900 mK, far above the superconducting transition temperature (Tc 300 mK). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by an attractive-U Hubbard model that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity. This work was supported by ARO MURI W911NF-08-1-0317 (J.L.), AFOSR MURI FA9550-10-1-0524 (C.-B.E., J.L.) and FA9550-12-1-0342 (C.-B.E.), and grants from the National Science Foundation DMR-1104191 (J.L.), DMR.

  3. Supernovae in paired galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazaryan, T. A.; Petrosian, A. R.; Hakobyan, A. A.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Kunth, D.; Mamon, G. A.; Turatto, M.; Aramyan, L. S.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the influence of close neighbor galaxies on the properties of supernovae (SNe) and their host galaxies using 56 SNe located in pairs of galaxies with different levels of star formation (SF) and nuclear activity. The mean distance of type II SNe from nuclei of hosts is greater by about a factor of 2 than that of type Ibc SNe. The distributions and mean distances of SNe are consistent with previous results compiled with the larger sample. For the first time it is shown that SNe Ibc are located in pairs with significantly smaller difference of radial velocities between components than pairs containing SNe Ia and II. We consider this as a result of higher star formation rate (SFR) of these closer systems of galaxies.

  4. Supersymmetry Approaches to the Bound States of the Generalized Woods-Saxon Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, H.; Sadeghi, J.

    Using the associated Jacobi differential equation, we obtain exactly bound states of the generalization of Woods-Saxon potential with the negative energy levels based on the analytic approach. According to the supersymmetry approaches in quantum mechanics, we show that these bound states by four pairs of the first-order differential operators, represent four types of the laddering equations. Two types of these supersymmetry structures, suggest the derivation of algebraic solutions by two different approaches for the bound states.

  5. A theoretical study of intrinsic point defects and defect clusters in magnesium aluminate spinel.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, C A; Smith, R; Kenny, S D; Murphy, S T; Grimes, R W; Ball, J A

    2009-07-01

    Point and small cluster defects in magnesium aluminate spinel have been studied from a first principles viewpoint. Typical point defects that occur during collision cascade simulations are cation anti-site defects, which have a small formation energy and are very stable, O and Mg split interstitials and vacancies. Isolated Al interstitials were found to be energetically unfavourable but could occur as part of a split Mg-Al pair or as a three atom-three vacancy Al 'ring' defect, previously observed in collision cascades using empirical potentials. The structure and energetics of the defects were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and the results compared to simulations using empirical fixed charge potentials. Each point defect was studied in a variety of supercell sizes in order to ensure convergence. It was found that empirical potential simulations significantly overestimate formation energies, but that the type and relative stability of the defects are well predicted by the empirical potentials both for point defects and small defect clusters. PMID:21828490

  6. A theoretical study of intrinsic point defects and defect clusters in magnesium aluminate spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, C. A.; Smith, R.; Kenny, S. D.; Murphy, S. T.; Grimes, R. W.; Ball, J. A.

    2009-07-01

    Point and small cluster defects in magnesium aluminate spinel have been studied from a first principles viewpoint. Typical point defects that occur during collision cascade simulations are cation anti-site defects, which have a small formation energy and are very stable, O and Mg split interstitials and vacancies. Isolated Al interstitials were found to be energetically unfavourable but could occur as part of a split Mg-Al pair or as a three atom-three vacancy Al 'ring' defect, previously observed in collision cascades using empirical potentials. The structure and energetics of the defects were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and the results compared to simulations using empirical fixed charge potentials. Each point defect was studied in a variety of supercell sizes in order to ensure convergence. It was found that empirical potential simulations significantly overestimate formation energies, but that the type and relative stability of the defects are well predicted by the empirical potentials both for point defects and small defect clusters.

  7. Schwinger pair production with ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, V.; Hebenstreit, F.; Oberthaler, M. K.; Berges, J.

    2016-09-01

    We consider a system of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice as a quantum simulator for electron-positron pair production in quantum electrodynamics (QED). For a setup in one spatial dimension, we investigate the nonequilibrium phenomenon of pair production including the backreaction leading to plasma oscillations. Unlike previous investigations on quantum link models, we focus on the infinite-dimensional Hilbert space of QED and show that it may be well approximated by experiments employing Bose-Einstein condensates interacting with fermionic atoms. Numerical calculations based on functional integral techniques give a unique access to the physical parameters required to realize QED phenomena in a cold atom experiment. In particular, we use our approach to consider quantum link models in a yet unexplored parameter regime and give bounds for their ability to capture essential features of the physics. The results suggest a paradigmatic change towards realizations using coherent many-body states for quantum simulations of high-energy particle physics phenomena.

  8. Pair correlations in neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Esbensen, H.

    1995-08-01

    We started a program to study the ground-state properties of heavy, neutron-rich nuclei using the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) approximation. This appears at present to be the most realistic approach for heavy nuclei that contain many loosely bound valence neutrons. The two-neutron density obtained in this approach can be decomposed into two components, one associated with the mean field and one associated with the pairing field. The latter has a structure that is quite similar to the pair-density obtained by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian for a two-neutron halo, which was studied earlier. This allows comparison of the HFB solutions against numerically exact solutions for two-neutron halos. This work is in progress. We intend to apply the HFB method to predict the ground-state properties of heavier, more neutron-rich nuclei that may be produced at future radioactive beam facilities.

  9. Bosonic topological phase in a paired superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazit, Snir; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2016-03-01

    We study an effective model of two interacting species of bosons in two dimensions, which is amenable to sign problem free Monte Carlo simulations. In addition to conventional ground states, we access a paired superfluid which is also a topological phase, protected by the remaining U (1 ) ×Z2 symmetry. This phase arises from the condensation of a composite object, the bound state of vortices and antivortices of one species, to a boson of the second species. We introduce a bulk response function, the Ising analog of the quantized Hall effect, to diagnose the topological phase. The interplay of broken symmetry and topology leads to interesting effects such as fractionally charged vortices in the paired superfluid. Possible extensions towards realistic models of cold atomic bosons are discussed.

  10. Multi-pair states in electron-positron pair creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöllert, Anton; Bauke, Heiko; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2016-09-01

    Ultra strong electromagnetic fields can lead to spontaneous creation of single or multiple electron-positron pairs. A quantum field theoretical treatment of the pair creation process combined with numerical methods provides a description of the fermionic quantum field state, from which all observables of the multiple electron-positron pairs can be inferred. This allows to study the complex multi-particle dynamics of electron-positron pair creation in-depth, including multi-pair statistics as well as momentum distributions and spin. To illustrate the potential benefit of this approach, it is applied to the intermediate regime of pair creation between nonperturbative Schwinger pair creation and perturbative multiphoton pair creation where the creation of multi-pair states becomes nonnegligible but cascades do not yet set in. Furthermore, it is demonstrated how spin and helicity of the created electrons and positrons are affected by the polarization of the counterpropagating laser fields, which induce the creation of electron-positron pairs.

  11. Constitutional and thermal defects in nickel aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Korzhavyi, P.A.; Abrikosov, I.A.; Johansson, B.

    1999-07-01

    The formation energies of intrinsic point defects and the interaction energies of possible defect pairs in NiAl are calculated from first principles within an order-N, locally self-consistent Green's function method in conjunction with the multipole electrostatic corrections to the atomic sphere approximation. The theory correctly reproduces the ground-state properties of the off-stoichiometric NiAl alloys. The constitutional defects (antisite Ni atoms in Ni-rich and Ni vacancies in Al-rich NiAl) are shown to form ordered structures in the ground state, in which the defects of the same kind tend to avoid each other at the shortest separation distance on their sublattice. A mean-field theory is applied to calculate the equilibrium concentrations of thermal defects. The statistics of thermal defects is interpreted in terms of dominant composition-conserving complex defects which are shown to be triple defects in Ni-rich and nearly stoichiometric NiAl. In the Al-rich region a novel thermal excitation dominates where two constitutional Ni vacancies are replaced by one antisite Al atom. The number of vacancies, as well as the total number of point defects decrease with temperature in Al-rich NiAl. The boundary between the two regions is treated analytically. The vacancy concentration exhibits a minimum in its temperature dependence at the boundary. Similar analysis is applied to study constitutional and thermal defects in Ni{sub 3}Al as a function of concentration is in excellent agreement with recent experimental data.

  12. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew; Wilks, Scott; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen; Baring, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top relativistic particle accelerators, ultrafast charged particle imaging systems and fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. In this presentation, using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show how to derive the theoretical maximum and minimum of f. These boundaries constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. Close agreement is shown with several dozens of published experimental data points and simulation results, helping to confirm the theory. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  13. Aerodynamics of intermittent bounds in flying birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobalske, Bret W.; Hearn, Jason W. D.; Warrick, Douglas R.

    2009-05-01

    Flap-bounding is a common flight style in small birds in which flapping phases alternate with flexed-wing bounds. Body lift is predicted to be essential to making this flight style an aerodynamically attractive flight strategy. To elucidate the contributions of the body and tail to lift and drag during the flexed-wing bound phase, we used particle image velocimetry (PIV) and measured properties of the wake of zebra finch ( Taeniopygia guttata, N = 5), flying at 6-10 m s-1 in a variable speed wind tunnel as well as flow around taxidermically prepared specimens ( N = 4) mounted on a sting instrumented with force transducers. For the specimens, we varied air velocity from 2 to 12 m s-1 and body angle from -15° to 50°. The wake of bounding birds and mounted specimens consisted of a pair of counter-rotating vortices shed into the wake from the tail, with induced downwash in the sagittal plane and upwash in parasagittal planes lateral to the bird. This wake structure was present even when the tail was entirely removed. We observed good agreement between force measures derived from PIV and force transducers over the range of body angles typically used by zebra finch during forward flight. Body lift:drag ( L: D) ratios averaged 1.4 in live birds and varied between 1 and 1.5 in specimens at body angles from 10° to 30°. Peak ( L: D) ratio was the same in live birds and specimens (1.5) and was exhibited in specimens at body angles of 15° or 20°, consistent with the lower end of body angles utilized during bounds. Increasing flight velocity in live birds caused a decrease in C L and C D from maximum values of 1.19 and 0.95 during flight at 6 m s-1 to minimum values of 0.70 and 0.54 during flight at 10 m s-1. Consistent with delta-wing theory as applied to birds with a graduated-tail shape, trimming the tail to 0 and 50% of normal length reduced L: D ratios and extending tail length to 150% of normal increased L: D ratio. As downward induced velocity is present in the

  14. Aerodynamics of intermittent bounds in flying birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobalske, Bret W.; Hearn, Jason W. D.; Warrick, Douglas R.

    Flap-bounding is a common flight style in small birds in which flapping phases alternate with flexed-wing bounds. Body lift is predicted to be essential to making this flight style an aerodynamically attractive flight strategy. To elucidate the contributions of the body and tail to lift and drag during the flexed-wing bound phase, we used particle image velocimetry (PIV) and measured properties of the wake of zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata, N = 5), flying at 6-10 m s- 1 in a variable speed wind tunnel as well as flow around taxidermically prepared specimens (N = 4) mounted on a sting instrumented with force transducers. For the specimens, we varied air velocity from 2 to 12 m s- 1 and body angle from -15∘ to 50∘. The wake of bounding birds and mounted specimens consisted of a pair of counterrotating vortices shed into the wake from the tail, with induced downwash in the sagittal plane and upwash in parasagittal planes lateral to the bird. This wake structure was present even when the tail was entirely removed. We observed good agreement between force measures derived from PIV and force transducers over the range of body angles typically used by zebra finch during forward flight. Body lift:drag (L:D) ratios averaged 1.4 in live birds and varied between 1 and 1.5 in specimens at body angles from 10∘ to 30∘. Peak (L:D) ratio was the same in live birds and specimens (1.5) and was exhibited in specimens at body angles of 15∘ or 20∘, consistent with the lower end of body angles utilized during bounds. Increasing flight velocity in live birds caused a decrease in CL and CD from maximum values of 1.19 and 0.95 during flight at 6 m s- 1 to minimum values of 0.70 and 0.54 during flight at 10 m s- 1. Consistent with delta-wing theory as applied to birds with a graduated-tail shape, trimming the tail to 0 and 50% of normal length reduced L:D ratios and extending tail length to 150% of normal increased L:D ratio. As downward induced velocity is present in the

  15. The Hg isoelectronic defect in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, J.; McGlynn, E. Henry, M. O.; Johnston, K.; Dunker, D.; Bayer, M.; Yakovlev, D. R.

    2013-11-21

    We report a study of the luminescence due to Hg in ZnO, concentrating on the main zero phonon line (ZPL) at 3.2766(1) eV and its associated phonon sidebands. For a sample implanted with radioactive {sup 192}Hg, the ZPL intensity, normalised to that of shallow bound exciton emission, is observed to decrease with an equivalent half-life of 4.5(1) h, very close to the 4.85(20) h half-life of {sup 192}Hg. ZnO implanted with stable Hg impurities produces the same luminescence spectrum. Temperature dependent measurements confirm that the zero phonon line is a thermalizing doublet involving one allowed and one largely forbidden transition from excited states separated by 0.91(1) meV to a common ground state. Uniaxial stress measurements show that the allowed transition takes place from an orbitally degenerate excited state to a non-degenerate ground state in a centre of trigonal (C{sub 3v}) symmetry while the magneto-optical properties are characteristic of electron-hole pair recombination at an isoelectronic defect. The doublet luminescence is assigned to bound exciton recombination involving exchange-split Γ{sub 5} and Γ{sub 1,2} excited states (using C{sub 6v} symmetry labels; Γ{sub 3} and Γ{sub 1,2} using C{sub 3v} labels) at isoelectronic Hg impurities substituting for Zn in the crystal. The electron and hole g values deduced from the magneto-optical data indicate that this Hg impurity centre in ZnO is hole-attractive.

  16. The Hg isoelectronic defect in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, J.; Johnston, K.; Dunker, D.; McGlynn, E.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Bayer, M.; Henry, M. O.

    2013-11-01

    We report a study of the luminescence due to Hg in ZnO, concentrating on the main zero phonon line (ZPL) at 3.2766(1) eV and its associated phonon sidebands. For a sample implanted with radioactive 192Hg, the ZPL intensity, normalised to that of shallow bound exciton emission, is observed to decrease with an equivalent half-life of 4.5(1) h, very close to the 4.85(20) h half-life of 192Hg. ZnO implanted with stable Hg impurities produces the same luminescence spectrum. Temperature dependent measurements confirm that the zero phonon line is a thermalizing doublet involving one allowed and one largely forbidden transition from excited states separated by 0.91(1) meV to a common ground state. Uniaxial stress measurements show that the allowed transition takes place from an orbitally degenerate excited state to a non-degenerate ground state in a centre of trigonal (C3v) symmetry while the magneto-optical properties are characteristic of electron-hole pair recombination at an isoelectronic defect. The doublet luminescence is assigned to bound exciton recombination involving exchange-split Γ5 and Γ1,2 excited states (using C6v symmetry labels; Γ3 and Γ1,2 using C3v labels) at isoelectronic Hg impurities substituting for Zn in the crystal. The electron and hole g values deduced from the magneto-optical data indicate that this Hg impurity centre in ZnO is hole-attractive.

  17. Pumping Electron-Positron Pairs from a Well Potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Liu, Jie; Fu, Li-Bin

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of very deep well potential, electrons will spontaneously occupy the empty embedded bound states and electron-positron pairs are created by means of a non-perturbative tunneling process. In this work, by slowly oscillating the width or depth, the population transfer channels are opened and closed periodically. We find and clearly show that by the non-synchronous ejections of particles, the saturation of pair number in a static super-critical well can be broken, and electrons and positrons can be pumped inexhaustibly from vacuum with a constant production rate. In the adiabatic limit, final pair number after a single cycle has quantized values as a function of the upper boundary of the oscillating, and the critical upper boundaries indicate the diving points of the bound states. PMID:27125998

  18. Pumping Electron-Positron Pairs from a Well Potential

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Liu, Jie; Fu, Li-bin

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of very deep well potential, electrons will spontaneously occupy the empty embedded bound states and electron-positron pairs are created by means of a non-perturbative tunneling process. In this work, by slowly oscillating the width or depth, the population transfer channels are opened and closed periodically. We find and clearly show that by the non-synchronous ejections of particles, the saturation of pair number in a static super-critical well can be broken, and electrons and positrons can be pumped inexhaustibly from vacuum with a constant production rate. In the adiabatic limit, final pair number after a single cycle has quantized values as a function of the upper boundary of the oscillating, and the critical upper boundaries indicate the diving points of the bound states. PMID:27125998

  19. Pumping Electron-Positron Pairs from a Well Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Liu, Jie; Fu, Li-Bin

    2016-04-01

    In the presence of very deep well potential, electrons will spontaneously occupy the empty embedded bound states and electron-positron pairs are created by means of a non-perturbative tunneling process. In this work, by slowly oscillating the width or depth, the population transfer channels are opened and closed periodically. We find and clearly show that by the non-synchronous ejections of particles, the saturation of pair number in a static super-critical well can be broken, and electrons and positrons can be pumped inexhaustibly from vacuum with a constant production rate. In the adiabatic limit, final pair number after a single cycle has quantized values as a function of the upper boundary of the oscillating, and the critical upper boundaries indicate the diving points of the bound states.

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW: O- bound small polarons in oxide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, O. F.

    2006-11-01

    Holes bound to acceptor defects in oxide crystals are often localized by lattice distortion at just one of the equivalent oxygen ligands of the defect. Such holes thus form small polarons in symmetric clusters of a few oxygen ions. An overview on mainly the optical manifestations of those clusters is given. The article is essentially divided into two parts: the first one covers the basic features of the phenomena and their explanations, exemplified by several paradigmatic defects; in the second part numerous oxide materials are presented which exhibit bound small polaron optical properties. The first part starts with summaries on the production of bound hole polarons and the identification of their structure. It is demonstrated why they show strong, wide absorption bands, usually visible, based on polaron stabilization energies of typically 1 eV. The basic absorption process is detailed with a fictitious two-well system. Clusters with four, six and twelve equivalent ions are realized in various oxide compounds. In these cases several degenerate optically excited polaron states occur, leading to characteristic final state resonance splittings. The peak energies of the absorption bands as well as the sign of the transfer energy depend on the topology of the clusters. A special section is devoted to the distinction between interpolaron and intrapolaron optical transitions. The latter are usually comparatively weak. The oxide compounds exhibiting bound hole small polaron absorptions include the alkaline earth oxides (e.g. MgO), BeO and ZnO, the perovskites BaTiO3 and KTaO3, quartz, the sillenites (e.g. Bi12TiO20), Al2O3, LiNbO3, topaz and various other materials. There are indications that the magnetic crystals NiO, doped with Li, and LaMnO3, doped with Sr, also show optical features caused by bound hole polarons. Beyond being elementary paradigms for the properties of small polarons in general, the defect species treated can be used to explain radiation and light

  1. Birth Defects Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... chromosomal disorder or heart defect in the baby. Second Trimester Screening Second trimester screening tests are completed between weeks 15 ... look for certain birth defects in the baby. Second trimester screening tests include a maternal serum screen ...

  2. Atrial septal defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coronary angiography (for patients over 35 years old) ECG Heart MRI Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) Treatment ASD may ... of the complications can be prevented with early detection. Alternative Names Congenital heart defect - ASD; Birth defect ...

  3. Protected Flux Pairing Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Matthew; Zhang, Wenyuan; Ioffe, Lev; Gershenson, Michael

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the coherent flux tunneling in a qubit containing two submicron Josephson junctions shunted by a superinductor (a dissipationless inductor with an impedance much greater than the resistance quantum). The two low energy quantum states of this device, 0 and 1, are represented by even and odd number of fluxes in the loop, respectively. This device is dual to the charge pairing Josephson rhombi qubit. The spectrum of the device, studied by microwave spectroscopy, reflects the interference between coherent quantum phase slips in the two junctions (the Aharonov-Casher effect). The time domain measurements demonstrate the suppression of the qubit's energy relaxation in the protected regime, which illustrates the potential of this flux pairing device as a protected quantum circuit. Templeton Foundation, NSF, and ARO.

  4. Facts about Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts about Birth Defects Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... having a baby born without a birth defect. Birth Defects Are Common Every 4 ½ minutes, a baby ...

  5. Bounds for Asian basket options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deelstra, Griselda; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vanmaele, Michèle

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we propose pricing bounds for European-style discrete arithmetic Asian basket options in a Black and Scholes framework. We start from methods used for basket options and Asian options. First, we use the general approach for deriving upper and lower bounds for stop-loss premia of sums of non-independent random variables as in Kaas et al. [Upper and lower bounds for sums of random variables, Insurance Math. Econom. 27 (2000) 151-168] or Dhaene et al. [The concept of comonotonicity in actuarial science and finance: theory, Insurance Math. Econom. 31(1) (2002) 3-33]. We generalize the methods in Deelstra et al. [Pricing of arithmetic basket options by conditioning, Insurance Math. Econom. 34 (2004) 55-57] and Vanmaele et al. [Bounds for the price of discrete sampled arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 185(1) (2006) 51-90]. Afterwards we show how to derive an analytical closed-form expression for a lower bound in the non-comonotonic case. Finally, we derive upper bounds for Asian basket options by applying techniques as in Thompson [Fast narrow bounds on the value of Asian options, Working Paper, University of Cambridge, 1999] and Lord [Partially exact and bounded approximations for arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Finance 10 (2) (2006) 1-52]. Numerical results are included and on the basis of our numerical tests, we explain which method we recommend depending on moneyness and time-to-maturity.

  6. Northwest Outward Bound Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Outward Bound School, Portland, OR.

    Instructor responsibilities, procedures for completing activities safely, and instructional methods and techniques are outlined to assist instructors in the Northwest Outward Bound School (Portland, Oregon) as they strive for teaching excellence. Information is organized into six chapters addressing: history and philosophy of Outward Bound; course…

  7. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; Gunzburger, Max Donald; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  8. Defect and solute properties in dilute Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloys from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaver, T. P. C.; Hepburn, D. J.; Ackland, G. J.

    2012-05-01

    We present results of an extensive set of first-principles density functional theory calculations of point defect formation, binding, and clustering energies in austenitic Fe with dilute concentrations of Cr and Ni solutes. A large number of possible collinear magnetic structures were investigated as appropriate reference states for austenite. We found that the antiferromagnetic single- and double-layer structures with tetragonal relaxation of the unit cell were the most suitable reference states and highlighted the inherent instabilities in the ferromagnetic states. Test calculations for the presence and influence of noncollinear magnetism were performed but proved mostly negative. We calculate the vacancy formation energy to be between 1.8 and 1.95 eV. Vacancy cluster binding was initially weak at 0.1 eV for divacancies but rapidly increased with additional vacancies. Clusters of up to six vacancies were studied and a highly stable octahedral cluster and stacking fault tetrahedron were found with total binding energies of 2.5 and 2.3 eV, respectively. The <100> dumbbell was found to be the most stable self-interstitial with a formation energy of between 3.2 and 3.6 eV and was found to form strongly bound clusters, consistent with other fcc metals. Pair interaction models were found to be capable of capturing the trends in the defect cluster binding energy data. Solute-solute interactions were found to be weak in general, with a maximal positive binding of 0.1 eV found for Ni-Ni pairs and maximum repulsion found for Cr-Cr pairs of -0.1 eV. Solute cluster binding was found to be consistent with a pair interaction model, with Ni-rich clusters being the most stable. Solute-defect interactions were consistent with Ni and Cr being modestly oversized and undersized solutes, respectively, which is exactly opposite to the experimentally derived size factors for Ni and Cr solutes in type 316 stainless steel and in the pure materials. Ni was found to bind to the vacancy and

  9. a Study of Two Electron Defect Systems in Alkali Halide Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chang Gang

    1993-01-01

    The structures of two electron defect systems in alkali halide crystals are studied. The systems which have been studied include: two electrons localized at an anion vacancy (F^'-centre); positronium self-trapped at an anion vacancy (Fe ^+-centre); positron self-trapped at a cation vacancy (F_{rm anti} -centre); positronium self-trapped at an interstice; and positronium in a Bloch state. An improved version of the extended-ion method which is based on the one electron Hartree-Fock approximation is used to perform these calculations. Its main feature is the exclusive use of floating 1s Gaussian functions as basis. For the multi-electron defect systems, the calculation of matrix elements of two electron interaction terms is a most difficult problem. We developed an effective approach to treat this interaction approximately. The correlation effect of defect electrons is partly accounted for by properly arranged Gaussian basis. The binding energy, thermal dissociation energy, and transition energy between ground state and excited state are calculated for F ^'-centres. A defect model with negative-U properties was introduced to interpret the deeply bound F^'-centre. Calculations of positron binding energies are made for Fe^+ -centres and F_{rm anti }-centres. In addition, we evaluate the angular correlation and lifetime of an annihilated electron-positron pair for Fe^+-centres, localized positronium and Bloch state positronium. The observed phenomena such as the transition of positronium from Bloch state to localized state, and the crystallographic effect are examined theoretically. The calculated results regarding various properties of crystals are in reasonably good agreement with experiment.

  10. Swelling Mechanisms of UO2 Lattices with Defect Ingrowths

    PubMed Central

    Günay, Seçkin D.

    2015-01-01

    The swelling that occurs in uranium dioxide as a result of radiation-induced defect ingrowth is not fully understood. Experimental and theoretical groups have attempted to explain this phenomenon with various complex theories. In this study, experimental lattice expansion and lattice super saturation were accurately reproduced using a molecular dynamics simulation method. Based on their resemblance to experimental data, the simulation results presented here show that fission induces only oxygen Frenkel pairs while alpha particle irradiation results in both oxygen and uranium Frenkel pair defects. Moreover, in this work, defects are divided into two sub-groups, obstruction type defects and distortion type defects. It is shown that obstruction type Frenkel pairs are responsible for both fission- and alpha-particle-induced lattice swelling. Relative lattice expansion was found to vary linearly with the number of obstruction type uranium Frenkel defects. Additionally, at high concentrations, some of the obstruction type uranium Frenkel pairs formed diatomic and triatomic structures with oxygen ions in their octahedral cages, increasing the slope of the linear dependence. PMID:26244777

  11. Swelling Mechanisms of UO2 Lattices with Defect Ingrowths.

    PubMed

    Günay, Seçkin D

    2015-01-01

    The swelling that occurs in uranium dioxide as a result of radiation-induced defect ingrowth is not fully understood. Experimental and theoretical groups have attempted to explain this phenomenon with various complex theories. In this study, experimental lattice expansion and lattice super saturation were accurately reproduced using a molecular dynamics simulation method. Based on their resemblance to experimental data, the simulation results presented here show that fission induces only oxygen Frenkel pairs while alpha particle irradiation results in both oxygen and uranium Frenkel pair defects. Moreover, in this work, defects are divided into two sub-groups, obstruction type defects and distortion type defects. It is shown that obstruction type Frenkel pairs are responsible for both fission- and alpha-particle-induced lattice swelling. Relative lattice expansion was found to vary linearly with the number of obstruction type uranium Frenkel defects. Additionally, at high concentrations, some of the obstruction type uranium Frenkel pairs formed diatomic and triatomic structures with oxygen ions in their octahedral cages, increasing the slope of the linear dependence. PMID:26244777

  12. Nonlocal spectroscopy of Andreev bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindele, J.; Baumgartner, A.; Maurand, R.; Weiss, M.; Schönenberger, C.

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally investigate Andreev bound states (ABSs) in a carbon nanotube quantum dot (QD) connected to a superconducting Nb lead (S). A weakly coupled normal metal contact acts as a tunnel probe that measures the energy dispersion of the ABSs. Moreover, we study the response of the ABS to nonlocal transport processes, namely, Cooper pair splitting and elastic co-tunnelling, which are enabled by a second QD fabricated on the same nanotube on the opposite side of S. We find an appreciable nonlocal conductance with a rich structure, including a sign reversal at the ground-state transition from the ABS singlet to a degenerate magnetic doublet. We describe our device by a simple rate equation model that captures the key features of our observations and demonstrates that the sign of the nonlocal conductance is a measure for the charge distribution of the ABS, given by the respective Bogoliubov-de Gennes amplitudes u and v.

  13. Donor-vacancy pairs in irradiated n-Ge: A searching look at the problem

    SciTech Connect

    Emtsev, Vadim; Oganesyan, Gagik

    2014-02-21

    The present situation concerning the identification of vacancy-donor pairs in irradiated n-Ge is discussed. The challenging points are the energy states of these defects deduced from DLTS spectra. Hall effect data seem to be at variance with some important conclusions drawn from DLTS measurements. Critical points of the radiation-produced defect modeling in n-Ge are highlighted.

  14. Defect production in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Kinoshita, C.

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  15. Topological defect lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knitter, Sebastian; Fatt Liew, Seng; Xiong, Wen; Guy, Mikhael I.; Solomon, Glenn S.; Cao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a topological defect to a regular photonic crystal defect cavity with anisotropic unit cell. Spatially localized resonances are formed and have high quality factor. Unlike the regular photonic crystal defect states, the localized resonances in the topological defect structures support powerflow vortices. Experimentally we realize lasing in the topological defect cavities with optical pumping. This work shows that the spatially inhomogeneous variation of the unit cell orientation adds another degree of freedom to the control of lasing modes, enabling the manipulation of the field pattern and energy flow landscape.

  16. Existence of best proximity pairs and equilibrium pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won Kyu; Lee, Kyoung Hee

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, using the fixed point theorem for Kakutani factorizable multifunctions, we shall prove new existence theorems of best proximity pairs and equilibrium pairs for free abstract economies, which include the previous fixed point theorems and equilibrium existence theorems.

  17. Postdevelopment defect evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Osamu; Kiba, Yukio; Ono, Yuko

    2001-08-01

    Reduction of defects after development is a critical issue in photolithography. A special category of post development defects is the satellite defect which is located in large exposed areas generally in proximity to large unexposed regions of photoresist. We have investigated the formation of this defect type on ESCAP and ACETAL DUV resists with and without underlying organic BARCs, In this paper, we will present AFM and elemental analysis data to determine the origin of the satellite defect. Imaging was done on a full-field Nikon 248nm stepper and resist processing was completed on a TEL CLEAN TRACK ACT 8 track. Defect inspection and review were performed on a KLA-Tencor and Hitachi SEM respectively. Results indicate that the satellite defect is generated on both BARC and resist films and defect counts are dependent on the dark erosion. Elemental analysis indicates that the defects are composed of sulfur and nitrogen compounds. We suspect that the defect is formed as a result of a reaction between PAG, quencher and TMAH. This defect type is removed after a DIW re-rinse.

  18. Complementarity reveals bound entanglement of two twisted photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.; Löffler, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate the detection of bipartite bound entanglement as predicted by the Horodecki's in 1998. Bound entangled states, being heavily mixed entangled quantum states, can be produced by incoherent addition of pure entangled states. Until 1998 it was thought that such mixing could always be reversed by entanglement distillation; however, this turned out to be impossible for bound entangled states. The purest form of bound entanglement is that of only two particles, which requires higher-dimensional (d > 2) quantum systems. We realize this using photon qutrit (d = 3) pairs produced by spontaneous parametric downconversion, that are entangled in the orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom, which is scalable to high dimensions. Entanglement of the photons is confirmed via a ‘maximum complementarity protocol’. This conceptually simple protocol requires only maximized complementary of measurement bases; we show that it can also detect bound entanglement. We explore the bipartite qutrit space and find that, also experimentally, a significant portion of the entangled states are actually bound entangled.

  19. Quantum conductance of carbon nanotubes with defects

    SciTech Connect

    Chico, L.; Benedict, L.X.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L. |

    1996-07-01

    We study the conductance of metallic carbon nanotubes with vacancies and pentagon-heptagon pair defects within the Landauer formalism. Using a tight-binding model and a Green{close_quote}s function technique to calculate the scattering matrix, we examine the one-dimensional to two-dimensional crossover in these systems and show the existence of metallic tube junctions in which the conductance is suppressed for symmetry reasons. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF). The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system. PMID:24089604

  1. Saturating the holographic entropy bound

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Freivogel, Ben; Leichenauer, Stefan

    2010-10-15

    The covariant entropy bound states that the entropy, S, of matter on a light sheet cannot exceed a quarter of its initial area, A, in Planck units. The gravitational entropy of black holes saturates this inequality. The entropy of matter systems, however, falls short of saturating the bound in known examples. This puzzling gap has led to speculation that a much stronger bound, S < or approx. A{sup 3/4}, may hold true. In this note, we exhibit light sheets whose entropy exceeds A{sup 3/4} by arbitrarily large factors. In open Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universes, such light sheets contain the entropy visible in the sky; in the limit of early curvature domination, the covariant bound can be saturated but not violated. As a corollary, we find that the maximum observable matter and radiation entropy in universes with positive (negative) cosmological constant is of order {Lambda}{sup -1} ({Lambda}{sup -2}), and not |{Lambda}|{sup -3/4} as had hitherto been believed. Our results strengthen the evidence for the covariant entropy bound, while showing that the stronger bound S < or approx. A{sup 3/4} is not universally valid. We conjecture that the stronger bound does hold for static, weakly gravitating systems.

  2. Nonuniversal BBN bounds on electromagnetically decaying particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Vivian; Serpico, Pasquale Dario

    2015-05-01

    In Poulin and Serpico [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 091101 (2015)] we recently argued that when the energy of a photon injected in the primordial plasma falls below the pair-production threshold the universality of the nonthermal photon spectrum from the standard theory of electromagnetic cascades onto a photon background breaks down. We showed that this could reopen or widen the parameter space for an exotic solution to the "lithium problem." Here we discuss another application, namely the impact that this has on nonthermal big bang nucleosynthesis constraints from He 4 , He 3 , and H 2 , using the parametric example of monochromatic photon injection of different energies. Typically, we find tighter bounds than those existing in the literature, up to more than 1 order of magnitude. As a consequence of the nonuniversality of the spectrum, the energy dependence of the photodissociation cross sections is important. We also compare the constraints obtained with current level and future reach of cosmic microwave background spectral distortion bounds.

  3. Using Defects in Materials to Store Energy: a Theoretical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, I.-Te; Bernardi, Marco

    We study the energy stored by defects in materials using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Leveraging experimental data to estimate the energy density of defects, expressed as the defect formation energy per unit volume (units of MJ/L) or weight (units of MJ/kg), we identify candidates for high energy density storage, including tungsten, diamond, graphite, silicon, and graphene. DFT calculations are applied to these materials to study the formation energy of vacancies, interstitials, and Frenkel pairs. Our results indicate that the energy density stored by defects in these materials, with experimentally accessible non-equilibrium defect concentrations, can be higher than that of common energy storage technologies such as lithium batteries and supercapacitors. We discuss storage of solar energy and electrical energy (through ion bombardment) using defects.

  4. Point Defects in Two-Dimensional Layered Semiconductors: Physics and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Joonki

    thermoelectric materials are thoroughly investigated. Point defects can potentially beat the undesired coupling, often term "thermoelectric Bermuda triangle", among electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and thermopower. The maximum thermoelectric performance is demonstrated with an intermediate density of defects when they beneficially and multi-functionally act as electron donors, as well as strongly energy-dependent electron and phonon scatterers. Therefore, this is a good example of how fundamental defect physics can be applied for practical devices toward renewable energy technology. Another interesting field of layered nanomaterials is on transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), sensational candidates for 2D semiconductor physics and applications. At the reduced dimensionality of 2D where a far stronger correlation between point defects and charge carriers is expected, it is studied how chalcogen vacancies alter optical properties of monolayer TMDs. A new, sub-bandgap broad emission lines as well as increase in the overall photoluminescence intensity at low temperatures are reported as a result of high quantum efficiency of excitons, i.e., bound electron-hole pairs, localized at defect sites. On electrical transport, both n- and p-type materials are needed to form junctions and support bipolar carrier conduction while typically only one type of doping is stable for a particular TMD. For example, MoS2 is natively n-type, thus the lack of p-type doping hampers the development of charge-splitting p-n junctions of MoS2. To address this issue, we demonstrate stable p-type conduction in MoS2 by substitutional Nb doping up to the degenerate level. Proof-of-concept, van der Waals p-n homo-junctions based on vertically stacked MoS2 layers are also fabricated which enable gate-tuneable current rectification. Various electronic devices fabricated are stable in ambient air even without additional treatment such as capping layer protection, thanks to the substitutionality nature

  5. Point Defects in Two-Dimensional Layered Semiconductors: Physics and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Joonki

    thermoelectric materials are thoroughly investigated. Point defects can potentially beat the undesired coupling, often term "thermoelectric Bermuda triangle", among electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and thermopower. The maximum thermoelectric performance is demonstrated with an intermediate density of defects when they beneficially and multi-functionally act as electron donors, as well as strongly energy-dependent electron and phonon scatterers. Therefore, this is a good example of how fundamental defect physics can be applied for practical devices toward renewable energy technology. Another interesting field of layered nanomaterials is on transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), sensational candidates for 2D semiconductor physics and applications. At the reduced dimensionality of 2D where a far stronger correlation between point defects and charge carriers is expected, it is studied how chalcogen vacancies alter optical properties of monolayer TMDs. A new, sub-bandgap broad emission lines as well as increase in the overall photoluminescence intensity at low temperatures are reported as a result of high quantum efficiency of excitons, i.e., bound electron-hole pairs, localized at defect sites. On electrical transport, both n- and p-type materials are needed to form junctions and support bipolar carrier conduction while typically only one type of doping is stable for a particular TMD. For example, MoS2 is natively n-type, thus the lack of p-type doping hampers the development of charge-splitting p-n junctions of MoS2. To address this issue, we demonstrate stable p-type conduction in MoS2 by substitutional Nb doping up to the degenerate level. Proof-of-concept, van der Waals p-n homo-junctions based on vertically stacked MoS2 layers are also fabricated which enable gate-tuneable current rectification. Various electronic devices fabricated are stable in ambient air even without additional treatment such as capping layer protection, thanks to the substitutionality nature

  6. Finding Bounded Rational Equilibria. Part 1; Iterative Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2004-01-01

    A long-running difficulty with conventional game theory has been how to modify it to accommodate the bounded rationality characterizing all real-world players. A recurring issue in statistical physics is how best to approximate joint probability distributions with decoupled (and therefore far more tractable) distributions. It has recently been shown that the same information theoretic mathematical structure, known as Probability Collectives (PC) underlies both issues. This relationship between statistical physics and game theory allows techniques and insights from the one field to be applied to the other. In particular, PC provides a formal model-independent definition of the degree of rationality of a player and of bounded rationality equilibria. This pair of papers extends previous work on PC by introducing new computational approaches to effectively find bounded rationality equilibria of common-interest (team) games.

  7. Probing Majorana Bound States in T-Shaped Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin-He; Cheng, Xiao; Wang, Chun-Rui; Gong, Wei-Jiang

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the transport properties of a pair of Majorana bound states in a T-shaped junction, where two normal leads are coupled with an identical Majorana bound state. Both the scattering matrix and the recursive Green function method show that the peak value of the differential conductance (Gpeak) in units of e2/h and the shot noise Fano factor in the zero bias limit (F0), which are measured at the same lead and zero temperature, satisfy a linear relation as F0 = 1 + Gpeak/2, independent of the magnitude or symmetry of the coupling strengths to the leads. Therefore, combined measurements of the differential conductance and shot noise in the T-shaped geometry can serve as a characteristic signature in probing Majorana bound states.

  8. Effective response theory for zero-energy Majorana bound states in three spatial dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Pedro L. e. S.; Teo, Jeffrey C. Y.; Ryu, Shinsei

    2015-05-01

    We propose a gravitational response theory for point defects (hedgehogs) binding Majorana zero modes in (3 + 1)-dimensional superconductors. Starting in 4 + 1 dimensions, where the point defect is extended into a line, a coupling of the bulk defect texture with the gravitational field is introduced. Diffeomorphism invariance then leads to an S U (2) 2 Kac-Moody current running along the defect line. The S U (2) 2 Kac-Moody algebra accounts for the non-Abelian nature of the zero modes in 3 + 1 dimensions. It is then shown to also encode the angular momentum density which permeates throughout the bulk between hedgehog-antihedgehog pairs.

  9. Fuzzy Logic Connectivity in Semiconductor Defect Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, S.S.; Kamowski, T.P.; Tobin, K.W.

    1999-01-24

    In joining defects on semiconductor wafer maps into clusters, it is common for defects caused by different sources to overlap. Simple morphological image processing tends to either join too many unrelated defects together or not enough together. Expert semiconductor fabrication engineers have demonstrated that they can easily group clusters of defects from a common manufacturing problem source into a single signature. Capturing this thought process is ideally suited for fuzzy logic. A system of rules was developed to join disconnected clusters based on properties such as elongation, orientation, and distance. The clusters are evaluated on a pair-wise basis using the fuzzy rules and are joined or not joined based on a defuzzification and threshold. The system continuously re-evaluates the clusters under consideration as their fuzzy memberships change with each joining action. The fuzzy membership functions for each pair-wise feature, the techniques used to measure the features, and methods for improving the speed of the system are all developed. Examples of the process are shown using real-world semiconductor wafer maps obtained from chip manufacturers. The algorithm is utilized in the Spatial Signature Analyzer (SSA) software, a joint development project between Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) and SEMATECH.

  10. Single-point position and transition defects in continuous time quantum walks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z. J.; Wang, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of continuous time quantum walks (CTQW) with both position and transition defects defined at a single point in the line. Analytical solutions of both traveling waves and bound states are obtained, which provide valuable insight into the dynamics of CTQW. The number of bound states is found to be critically dependent on the defect parameters, and the localized probability peaks can be readily obtained by projecting the state vector of CTQW on to these bound states. The interference between two bound states are also observed in the case of a transition defect. The spreading of CTQW probability over the line can be finely tuned by varying the position and transition defect parameters, offering the possibility of precision quantum control of the system. PMID:26323855

  11. Bounding the elliptic Mahler measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinner, Christopher

    1998-11-01

    We give a simple inequality relating the elliptic Mahler measure of a polynomial to the traditional Mahler measure (via the length of the polynomial). These bounds are essentially sharp. We also give the corresponding result for polynomials in several variables.

  12. Creation Dynamics of Bound States in Supercritical Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Krekora, P.; Cooley, K.; Su, Q.; Grobe, R.

    2005-08-12

    Using space-time resolved solutions to relativistic quantum field theory, we analyze the electron-positron creation process from vacuum in the long-time regime in which multiple pairs are produced. We find that for a supercritical potential of finite extension, the time dependence of the production rate of pairs is described by four distinct regimes that have their direct counterparts in the time evolved spatial density of the particles. These regimes include the shape-invariant birth process, an entanglement-induced reduction of interference, a recurrent Pauli suppression of pair production induced by electron-potential scattering, and finally a production halt associated with a population of supercritical and a partial population of subcritical bound states.

  13. Creation dynamics of bound States in supercritical fields.

    PubMed

    Krekora, P; Cooley, K; Su, Q; Grobe, R

    2005-08-12

    Using space-time resolved solutions to relativistic quantum field theory, we analyze the electron-positron creation process from vacuum in the long-time regime in which multiple pairs are produced. We find that for a supercritical potential of finite extension, the time dependence of the production rate of pairs is described by four distinct regimes that have their direct counterparts in the time evolved spatial density of the particles. These regimes include the shape-invariant birth process, an entanglement-induced reduction of interference, a recurrent Pauli suppression of pair production induced by electron-potential scattering, and finally a production halt associated with a population of supercritical and a partial population of subcritical bound states. PMID:16196767

  14. Adler Synchronization of Spatial Laser Solitons Pinned by Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulau, P. V.; McIntyre, C.; Noblet, Y.; Radwell, N.; Firth, W. J.; Colet, P.; Ackemann, T.; Oppo, G.-L.

    2012-05-01

    Defects due to growth fluctuations in broad-area semiconductor lasers induce pinning and frequency shifts of spatial laser solitons. The effects of defects on the interaction of two solitons are considered in lasers with frequency-selective feedback both theoretically and experimentally. We demonstrate frequency and phase synchronization of paired laser solitons as their detuning is varied. In both theory and experiment the locking behavior is well described by the Adler model for the synchronization of coupled oscillators.

  15. Adler synchronization of spatial laser solitons pinned by defects.

    PubMed

    Paulau, P V; McIntyre, C; Noblet, Y; Radwell, N; Firth, W J; Colet, P; Ackemann, T; Oppo, G-L

    2012-05-25

    Defects due to growth fluctuations in broad-area semiconductor lasers induce pinning and frequency shifts of spatial laser solitons. The effects of defects on the interaction of two solitons are considered in lasers with frequency-selective feedback both theoretically and experimentally. We demonstrate frequency and phase synchronization of paired laser solitons as their detuning is varied. In both theory and experiment the locking behavior is well described by the Adler model for the synchronization of coupled oscillators. PMID:23003255

  16. Domain Organization of Membrane-Bound Factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Lynch, Gillian C.; Ludtke, Steven; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2014-01-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) is the blood coagulation protein which when defective or deficient causes for hemophilia A, a severe hereditary bleeding disorder. Activated FVIII (FVIIIa) is the cofactor to the serine protease factor IXa (FIXa) within the membrane-bound Tenase complex, responsible for amplifying its proteolytic activity more than 100,000 times, necessary for normal clot formation. FVIII is composed of two noncovalently linked peptide chains: a light chain (LC) holding the membrane interaction sites and a heavy chain (HC) holding the main FIXa interaction sites. The interplay between the light and heavy chains (HCs) in the membrane-bound state is critical for the biological efficiency of FVIII. Here, we present our cryo-electron microscopy (EM) and structure analysis studies of human FVIII-LC, when helically assembled onto negatively charged single lipid bilayer nanotubes. The resolved FVIII-LC membrane-bound structure supports aspects of our previously proposed FVIII structure from membrane-bound two-dimensional (2D) crystals, such as only the C2 domain interacts directly with the membrane. The LC is oriented differently in the FVIII membrane-bound helical and 2D crystal structures based on EM data, and the existing X-ray structures. This flexibility of the FVIII-LC domain organization in different states is discussed in the light of the FVIIIa-FIXa complex assembly and function. PMID:23616213

  17. Multiprocessor switch with selective pairing

    SciTech Connect

    Gara, Alan; Gschwind, Michael K; Salapura, Valentina

    2014-03-11

    System, method and computer program product for a multiprocessing system to offer selective pairing of processor cores for increased processing reliability. A selective pairing facility is provided that selectively connects, i.e., pairs, multiple microprocessor or processor cores to provide one highly reliable thread (or thread group). Each paired microprocessor or processor cores that provide one highly reliable thread for high-reliability connect with a system components such as a memory "nest" (or memory hierarchy), an optional system controller, and optional interrupt controller, optional I/O or peripheral devices, etc. The memory nest is attached to a selective pairing facility via a switch or a bus

  18. Resonantly Enhanced Pair Production in a Simple Diatomic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillion-Gourdeau, François; Lorin, Emmanuel; Bandrauk, André D.

    2013-01-01

    A new mechanism for the production of electron-positron pairs from the interaction of a laser field and a fully ionized diatomic molecule in the tunneling regime is presented. When the laser field is turned off, the Dirac operator has resonances in both the positive and the negative energy continua while bound states are in the mass gap. When this system is immersed in a strong laser field, the resonances move in the complex energy plane: the negative energy resonances are pushed to higher energies while the bound states are Stark shifted [F. Fillion-Gourdeau , J. Phys. A 45, 215304 (2012)JPHAC50305-4470]. It is argued here that there is a pair production enhancement at the crossing of resonances by looking at a simple one-dimensional model: the nuclei are modeled simply by Dirac delta potential wells while the laser field is assumed to be static and of finite spatial extent. The average rate for the number of electron-positron pairs produced is evaluated and the results are compared to the one and zero nucleus cases. It is shown that positrons are produced by the resonantly enhanced pair production mechanism, which is analogous to the resonantly enhanced ionization of molecular physics. This phenomenon could be used to increase the number of pairs produced at low field strength, allowing the study of the Dirac vacuum.

  19. Upper bounds on the error probabilities and asymptotic error exponents in quantum multiple state discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Audenaert, Koenraad M. R.; Mosonyi, Milán

    2014-10-01

    We consider the multiple hypothesis testing problem for symmetric quantum state discrimination between r given states σ₁, …, σ{sub r}. By splitting up the overall test into multiple binary tests in various ways we obtain a number of upper bounds on the optimal error probability in terms of the binary error probabilities. These upper bounds allow us to deduce various bounds on the asymptotic error rate, for which it has been hypothesized that it is given by the multi-hypothesis quantum Chernoff bound (or Chernoff divergence) C(σ₁, …, σ{sub r}), as recently introduced by Nussbaum and Szkoła in analogy with Salikhov's classical multi-hypothesis Chernoff bound. This quantity is defined as the minimum of the pairwise binary Chernoff divergences min{sub jbound is actually achieved. It was known to be achieved, in particular, when the state pair that is closest together in Chernoff divergence is more than 6 times closer than the next closest pair. Our results improve on this in two ways. First, we show that the optimal asymptotic rate must lie between C/2 and C. Second, we show that the Chernoff bound is already achieved when the closest state pair is more than 2 times closer than the next closest pair. We also show that the Chernoff bound is achieved when at least r - 2 of the states are pure, improving on a previous result by Nussbaum and Szkoła. Finally, we indicate a number of potential pathways along which a proof (or disproof) may eventually be found that the multi-hypothesis quantum Chernoff bound is always achieved.

  20. Multiple origins of asteroid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.

    2016-01-01

    Rotationally fissioned asteroids produce unbound asteroid pairs that have very similar heliocentric orbits. Backward integration of their current heliocentric orbits provides an age of closest proximity that can be used to date the rotational fission event. Most asteroid pairs follow a predicted theoretical relationship between the primary spin period and the mass ratio of the two pair members that is a direct consequence of the YORP-induced rotational fission hypothesis. If the progenitor asteroid has strength, asteroid pairs may have higher mass ratios or faster rotating primaries. However, the process of secondary fission leaves the originally predicted trend unaltered. We also describe the characteristics of pair members produced by four alternative routes from a rotational fission event to an asteroid pair. Unlike direct formation from the event itself, the age of closest proximity of these pairs cannot generally be used to date the rotational fission event since considerable time may have passed.

  1. Light-induced defects in hybrid lead halide perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharia, Onise; Schneider, William

    One of the main challenges facing organohalide perovskites for solar application is stability. Solar cells must last decades to be economically viable alternatives to traditional energy sources. While some causes of instability can be avoided through engineering, light-induced defects can be fundamentally limiting factor for practical application of the material. Light creates large numbers of electron and hole pairs that can contribute to degradation processes. Using ab initio theoretical methods, we systematically explore first steps of light induced defect formation in methyl ammonium lead iodide, MAPbI3. In particular, we study charged and neutral Frenkel pair formation involving Pb and I atoms. We find that most of the defects, except negatively charged Pb Frenkel pairs, are reversible, and thus most do not lead to degradation. Negative Pb defects create a mid-gap state and localize the conduction band electron. A minimum energy path study shows that, once the first defect is created, Pb atoms migrate relatively fast. The defects have two detrimental effects on the material. First, they create charge traps below the conduction band. Second, they can lead to degradation of the material by forming Pb clusters.

  2. Stereo Pair, Honolulu, Oahu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Honolulu, on the island of Oahu, is a large and growing urban area. This stereoscopic image pair, combining a Landsat image with topography measured by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), shows how topography controls the urban pattern. This color image can be viewed in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing), or by downloading and printing the image pair, and viewing them with a stereoscope.

    Features of interest in this scene include Diamond Head (an extinct volcano near the bottom of the image), Waikiki Beach (just above Diamond Head), the Punchbowl National Cemetary (another extinct volcano, near the image center), downtown Honolulu and Honolulu harbor (image left-center), and offshore reef patterns. The slopes of the Koolau mountain range are seen in the right half of the image. Clouds commonly hang above ridges and peaks of the Hawaiian Islands, but in this synthesized stereo rendition appear draped directly on the mountains. The clouds are actually about 1000 meters (3300 feet) above sea level.

    This stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with a Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image collected at the same time as the SRTM flight. The topography data were used to create two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. The United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, provided the Landsat data.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the

  3. Stereo Pair, Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This stereoscopic image pair is a perspective view that shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north toward the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada Flintridge are also shown. The cluster of large buildings left of center, at the base of the mountains, is the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Data shown in this image can be used to predict both how wildfires spread over the terrain and how mudflows are channeled down the canyons.

    The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation, U. S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provided the image detail, and the Landsat Thematic Mapper provided the color. The United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, provided the Landsat data and the aerial photography. The image can be viewed in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing), or by downloading and printing the image pair, and viewing them with a stereoscope.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  4. Micrograph Defect Indentifier

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-10-11

    Micrograph image defect identifier is a computer code written in MATLAB to automatically detect defects on scanned image of thin film membrane samples employing three methods: global threshold, line detection and k-means segmentation. The results are segmented binary images of thin film with defects identified. Defect area fractions are also calculated. The users may use default functional variables calculated by program, or input preferred value from user’s experience. This will empower the user to processingmore » the image with more flexibility. MDI was designed to identify defects of thin films fabricated. It is also used in phase identification, porosity study on SEM, OM, TEM images. Different methods were applied in this software package: global threshold, line detection and k-means segmentation.« less

  5. Micrograph Defect Indentifier

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-10-11

    Micrograph image defect identifier is a computer code written in MATLAB to automatically detect defects on scanned image of thin film membrane samples employing three methods: global threshold, line detection and k-means segmentation. The results are segmented binary images of thin film with defects identified. Defect area fractions are also calculated. The users may use default functional variables calculated by program, or input preferred value from user’s experience. This will empower the user to processing the image with more flexibility. MDI was designed to identify defects of thin films fabricated. It is also used in phase identification, porosity study on SEM, OM, TEM images. Different methods were applied in this software package: global threshold, line detection and k-means segmentation.

  6. Equilibrium defects and concentrations in nickel aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, B.; Collins, G.S.

    1999-07-01

    Perturbed angular correlation of gamma rays was applied to determine properties of equilibrium defects in B2 NiAl near the stoichiometric composition. Point defects were detected through quadrupole interactions they induce at In probe atoms on the Al sublattice. Well-resolved signals were observed for probe atoms having zero, one or two Ni-vacancies (V{sub Ni}) in the first neighbor shell. The fractions of probes in different sites are analyzed using a thermodynamic model to determine defect properties as follows. The equilibrium high-temperature defect is determined to be the triple defect combination (two V{sub Ni} and one Ni-antisite atom) through the variation of the vacancy concentration with composition and not, for example, the Schottky vacancy pair. The binding enthalpy of V{sub Ni} with a probe atom was determined to be in the range 0.18--0.24 eV. Site fractions were measured for three samples having 50.03, 50.14 and 50.91 at.% Ni at temperatures up to 1300 C. Vacancy concentrations were deduced from the site fractions and binding enthalpy. The equilibrium constant for formation of the triple defect was determined as a function of temperature from the vacancy concentrations and sample compositions. The formation enthalpy was found to be in the range 1.65--1.83 eV, depending on the binding enthalpy. The formation entropy was found to be {minus}3.2(4)k{sub B}. The large, negative value of the formation entropy probably cannot be explained in terms of a binding entropy, and the authors speculate that triple defects harden the B2 lattice, perhaps by disrupting the well-known 1/3 {l{underscore}angle}111{r{underscore}angle} soft mode lattice instability in B2 and bcc materials.

  7. Electroweak boson pair production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Errede, S.M.

    1994-12-01

    Preliminary results from CDF and D{O} on W{gamma}, Z{gamma} and WW, WZ, ZZ boson pair production in {radical}s = 1.8 TeV {anti p}-p collisions from the 1992--93 collider run are presented. Direct limits on CP-conserving and CP-violating WW{gamma}, WWZ, ZZ{gamma} and Z{gamma}{gamma} anomalous couplings have been obtained. The results are consistent with Standard Model expectations. In the static limit, the direct experimental limits on WW{gamma} and ZZ{gamma} anomalous couplings are related to bounds on the higher-order static (transition) EM moments of the W(Z) bosons. Expectations from the on-going and future Tevatron collider runs are discussed.

  8. Bound polarons in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woggon, U.; Miller, D.; Kalina, F.; Gerlach, B.; Kayser, D.; Leonardi, K.; Hommel, D.

    2003-01-01

    Bound polarons are discrete, confined electronic states, spatially localized due to a local potential V(r) but sharing a common phonon state of the surrounding crystal. We study the energy states of polarons bound in a potential and determine the local optical absorption spectrum up to first-order time-dependent perturbation theory with respect to the electron-photon interaction. The model is applied to describe the optical properties of submonolayer CdSe insertions epitaxially grown between ZnSe layers. As a typical signature of bound polarons we found excited-state energies equidistantly separated by the LO phonon energy and with optical transition probabilities determined by the anisotropies in V(r).

  9. Unitarity bound for gluon shadowing

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Levin, E.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2009-06-15

    Although at small Bjorken x gluons originated from different nucleons in a nucleus overlap in the longitudinal direction, most of them are still well separated in the transverse plane and therefore cannot fuse. For this reason the gluon density in nuclei cannot drop at small x below a certain bottom bound, which we evaluated in a model independent manner assuming the maximal strength of gluon fusion. We also calculated gluon shadowing in the saturated regime using the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation and found the nuclear ratio to be well above the unitarity bound. The recently updated analysis of parton distributions in nuclei, including BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) data on high-p{sub T} hadron production at forward rapidities, led to strong gluon shadowing. Such strong shadowing and therefore the interpretation of the nuclear modification of the p{sub T} spectra in dA collisions at RHIC seem to be inconsistent with this unitarity bound.

  10. Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Douglas W

    2015-08-19

    The articulation of the notion of "frustrated Lewis pairs" (FLPs), which emerged from the discovery that H2 can be reversibly activated by combinations of sterically encumbered Lewis acids and bases, has prompted a great deal of recent activity. Perhaps the most remarkable consequence has been the development of FLP catalysts for the hydrogenation of a range of organic substrates. In the past 9 years, the substrate scope has evolved from bulky polar species to include a wide range of unsaturated organic molecules. In addition, effective stereoselective metal-free hydrogenation catalysts have begun to emerge. The mechanism of this activation of H2 has been explored, and the nature and range of Lewis acid/base combinations capable of effecting such activation have also expanded to include a variety of non-metal species. The reactivity of FLPs with a variety of other small molecules, including olefins, alkynes, and a range of element oxides, has also been developed. Although much of this latter chemistry has uncovered unique stoichiometric transformations, metal-free catalytic hydroamination, CO2 reduction chemistry, and applications in polymerization have also been achieved. The concept is also beginning to find applications in bioinorganic and materials chemistry as well as heterogeneous catalysis. This Perspective highlights many of these developments and discusses the relationship between FLPs and established chemistry. Some of the directions and developments that are likely to emerge from FLP chemistry in the future are also presented. PMID:26214241

  11. Pygmy stars: first pair.

    PubMed

    Zwicky, F

    1966-07-01

    The binary LP 101-15/16 having the proper motion of 1.62 seconds of arc per year has been studied with the prime-focus spectrograph of the 200-inch (508 cm) telescope. Indications are that LP 101-15/16 is the first pair of pygmy stars ever discovered. One of its components, LP 101-16, is probably a blue pygmy star which is at least four magnitudes fainter than the ordinary white dwarfs. Also, two of the Balmer lines in absorption appear to be displaced toward the red by amounts which indicate the existence of an Einstein gravitational red shift corresponding to about 1000 km sec-1. On the other hand LP 101-15 is red and shows an entirely new type of spectrum, which suggests that it may be a first representative of a type of red pygmy star which is 2.5 magnitudes fainter than the M-type dwarf stars of the main sequence. PMID:17730606

  12. Photoactive Spatial Proximity Probes for Binding Pairs with Epigenetic Marks

    PubMed Central

    Ezhov, Roman N.; Metzel, Greg A.; Mukhina, Olga A.; Musselman, Catherine A.; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.; Gustafson, Tiffany P.; Kutateladze, Andrei G.

    2014-01-01

    A new strategy for encoding polypeptide libraries with photolabile tags is developed. The photoassisted assay, based on conditional release of encoding tags only from bound pairs, can differentiate between peptides which have minor differences in a form of post-translational modifications with epigenetic marks. The encoding strategy is fully compatible with automated peptide synthesis. The encoding pendants are compact and do not perturb potential binding interactions. PMID:25197204

  13. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction as an agent to free the bound entangled states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Kapil K.; Pandey, S. N.

    2016-04-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the efficacy of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction to convert the bound entangled states into free entangled states. We consider the tripartite hybrid system as a pair of non interacting two qutrits initially prepared in bound entangled states and one auxiliary qubit. Here, we consider two types of bound entangled states investigated by Horodecki. The auxiliary qubit interacts with any one of the qutrit of the pair through DM interaction. We show that by tuning the probability amplitude of auxiliary qubit and DM interaction strength, one can free the bound entangled states, which can be further distilled. We use the reduction criterion to find the range of the parameters of probability amplitude of auxiliary qubit and DM interaction strength, for which the states are distillable. The realignment criterion and negativity have been used for detection and quantification of entanglement.

  14. Bounds for nonlocality distillation protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, Manuel

    2011-06-15

    Nonlocality can be quantified by the violation of a Bell inequality. Since this violation may be amplified by local operations, an alternative measure has been proposed--distillable nonlocality. The alternative measure is difficult to calculate exactly due to the double exponential growth of the parameter space. In this paper, we give a way to bound the distillable nonlocality of a resource by the solutions to a related optimization problem. Our upper bounds are exponentially easier to compute than the exact value and are shown to be meaningful in general and tight in some cases.

  15. Pairing phase transition: A finite-temperature relativistic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia Jie; Margueron, Jérôme; Long, Wen Hui; Van Giai, Nguyen

    2015-07-01

    Background: The relativistic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (RHFB) theory has recently been developed and it provides a unified and highly predictive description of both nuclear mean-field and pairing correlations. Ground-state properties of finite nuclei can accurately be reproduced without neglecting exchange (Fock) contributions. Purpose: Finite-temperature RHFB (FT-RHFB) theory has not yet been developed, leaving yet unknown its predictions for phase transitions and thermal excitations in both stable and weakly bound nuclei. Method: FT-RHFB equations are solved in a Dirac Woods-Saxon (DWS) basis considering two kinds of pairing interactions: finite or zero range. Such a model is appropriate for describing stable as well as loosely bound nuclei since the basis states have correct asymptotic behavior for large spatial distributions. Results: Systematic FT-RH(F)B calculations are performed for several semimagic isotopic/isotonic chains comparing the predictions of a large number of Lagrangians, among which are PKA1, PKO1, and DD-ME2. It is found that the critical temperature for a pairing transition generally follows the rule Tc=0.60 Δ (0 ) for a finite-range pairing force and Tc=0.57 Δ (0 ) for a contact pairing force, where Δ (0 ) is the pairing gap at zero temperature. Two types of pairing persistence are analyzed: type I pairing persistence occurs in closed subshell nuclei while type II pairing persistence can occur in loosely bound nuclei strongly coupled to the continuum states. Conclusions: This FT-RHFB calculation shows very interesting features of the pairing correlations at finite temperature and in finite systems such as pairing re-entrance and pairing persistence.

  16. Doping and defects by design: Ga2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lany, Stephan

    Density functional supercell calculations are widely employed to describe the defect physics in semiconductors and insulators. Due to a variety of challenges such as finite size effects for charged defects and the band gap error of DFT, results were often controversial in the past. With developments over the past decade, defect theory should hopefully be truly predictive, and be able to guide experimental efforts. The present work on n-type doping in Ga2O3 compares different potential doping routes via anion-site doping with F, and cation site doping with group IV elements (C, Si, Ge, Sn). The study addresses dopant solubility, electrical activity, and compensation by native defects, including non-equilibrium effects due to supersaturated dopant concentrations and the mechanism of dopant-defect pair formation. Supported by DOE-SC-BES as part of an Energy Frontier Research Center.

  17. Detection of oocyte perivitelline membrane-bound sperm: a tool for avian collection management

    PubMed Central

    Croyle, Kaitlin E.; Durrant, Barbara S.; Jensen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The success and sustainability of an avian breeding programme depend on managing productive and unproductive pairs. Given that each breeding season can be of immeasurable importance, it is critical to resolve pair fertility issues quickly. Such problems are traditionally diagnosed through behavioural observations, egg lay history and hatch rates, with a decision to re-pair generally taking one or more breeding seasons. In pairs producing incubated eggs that show little or no signs of embryonic development, determining fertility is difficult. Incorporating a technique to assess sperm presence on the oocyte could, in conjunction with behaviour and other data, facilitate a more timely re-pair decision. Detection of perivitelline membrane-bound (PVM-bound) sperm verifies successful copulation, sperm production and sperm functionality. Alternatively, a lack of detectable sperm, at least in freshly laid eggs, suggests no mating, lack of sperm production/function or sperm–oviduct incompatibility. This study demonstrated PVM-bound sperm detection by Hoechst staining in fresh to 24-day-incubated exotic eggs from 39 species representing 13 orders. However, a rapid and significant time-dependent loss of detectable PVM-bound sperm was observed following incubation of chicken eggs. The PCR detection of sperm in seven species, including two bacterially infected eggs, demonstrated that this method was not as reliable as visual detection using Hoechst staining. The absence of amplicons in visually positive PVMs was presumably due to large PVM size and low sperm count, resulting in DNA concentrations too low for standard PCR detection. In summary, this study demonstrated the feasibility and limitations of using PVM-bound sperm detection as a management tool for exotic avian species. We verified that sperm presence or absence on fluorescence microscopy can aid in the differentiation of fertile from infertile eggs to assist breeding managers in making prompt decisions for pair

  18. Lone pairs: an electrostatic viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anmol; Gadre, Shridhar R; Mohan, Neetha; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2014-01-16

    A clear-cut definition of lone pairs has been offered in terms of characteristics of minima in molecular electrostatic potential (MESP). The largest eigenvalue and corresponding eigenvector of the Hessian at the minima are shown to distinguish lone pair regions from the other types of electron localization (such as π bonds). A comparative study of lone pairs as depicted by various other scalar fields such as the Laplacian of electron density and electron localization function is made. Further, an attempt has been made to generalize the definition of lone pairs to the case of cations. PMID:24372481

  19. Methods for Identifying Pair Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Brendan; Caputo, Regina; Atwood, William; Ritz, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    The flux of very high energy gamma rays from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is attenuated via interactions with extragalactic background photons and is converted into e+e- pairs. With non-zero intergalactic magnetic fields, the electrons and positrons will deflect as they propagate and simultaneously lose energy by upscattering cosmic microwave background photons. "Pair halos," the visible consequences of these electromagnetic cascades, are faint and difficult to observe against their AGN counterparts. We investigate three methods for indirectly identifying pair halos, using a two-component approach to model the AGN core/halo image. We estimate each method's sensitivity by utilizing a new, detailed Monte Carlo pair-halo simulation.

  20. Controversies in kidney paired donation.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Sommer E; Montgomery, Robert A; Segev, Dorry L

    2012-07-01

    Kidney paired donation represented 10% of living kidney donation in the United States in 2011. National registries around the world and several separate registries in the United States arrange paired donations, although with significant variations in their practices. Concerns about ethical considerations, clinical advisability, and the quantitative effectiveness of these approaches in paired donation result in these variations. For instance, although donor travel can be burdensome and might discourage paired donation, it was nearly universal until convincing analysis showed that living donor kidneys can sustain many hours of cold ischemia time without adverse consequences. Opinions also differ about whether the last donor in a chain of paired donation transplants initiated by a nondirected donor should donate immediately to someone on the deceased donor wait-list (a domino or closed chain) or should be asked to wait some length of time and donate to start another sequence of paired donations later (an open chain); some argue that asking the donor to donate later may be coercive, and others focus on balancing the probability that the waiting donor withdraws versus the number of additional transplants if the chain can be continued. Other controversies in paired donation include simultaneous versus nonsimultaneous donor operations, whether to enroll compatible pairs, and interactions with desensitization protocols. Efforts to expand public awareness of and participation in paired donation are needed to generate more transplant opportunities. PMID:22732046

  1. Defect motion and annihilation in block copolymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Marcus; Li, Weihua

    2015-03-01

    Using self-consistent field theory and computer simulation of a soft, coarse-grained particle model we study defect motion and annihilation in thin films of lamella-forming block copolymers on neutral and chemically patterned substrates. By virtue of the strain-field mediated interactions, dislocation defects with opposite orientation move towards each other. This motion depends both on the thermodynamic, strain-field mediated driving force and the single-chain dynamics that is required to alter the morphology and reduce the distance between the defect cores. This interplay results in a qualitative dependence of the time evolution on the topology of the defect morphology. Upon collision of the defects, they either spontaneously annihilate or form a metastable, tight defect pair. In the latter case, a free-energy barrier has to be overcome to finally produce a defect-free structure. Computing the minimum free-energy path within self-consistent field theory we investigate the dependence of the free-energy barriers of defect motion and annihilation on incompatibility, strength of the chemical surface pattern, and defect morphology. European Union FP7 / GA No. 619793 CoLiSA.MMP.

  2. Exact Green's function of the reversible diffusion-influenced reaction for an isolated pair in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prüstel, Thorsten; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin

    2012-08-01

    We derive an exact Green's function of the diffusion equation for a pair of disk-shaped interacting particles in two dimensions subject to a backreaction boundary condition. Furthermore, we use the obtained function to calculate exact expressions for the survival probability and the time-dependent rate coefficient for the initially unbound pair and the survival probability of the bound state. The derived expressions will be of particular utility for the description of reversible membrane-bound reactions in cell biology.

  3. Pairs of promoter pairs in a web of transcription.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Craig D

    2016-08-30

    A new analysis has characterized a fundamental building block of complex transcribed loci. Constellations of core promoters can generally be reduced to pairs of divergent transcription units, where the distance between the pairs of transcription units correlates with constraints on genomic context, which in turn contribute to transcript fate. PMID:27573684

  4. Oxygen defects in GaAs: A hybrid functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colleoni, Davide; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Using hybrid density functional calculations, we address the structural properties, formation energies, and charge transition levels of a variety of oxygen defects in GaAs. The set of considered defects comprises the bridging O atom in a As-O-Ga configuration, interstitial O atoms in tetrahedral sites, and O atoms substitutional to either Ga (OGa) or As atoms (OAs). In addition, we consider an As vacancy containing two O atoms, for which the most stable configurations are found through the use of molecular dynamics simulations, and defect complexes involving a OAs defect bound to either one or two AsGa antisites, denoted AsGa-OAs and (AsGa)2-OAs , respectively. We find that the bridging O defect and the AsGa-OAs and (AsGa)2-OAs complexes are the most stable oxygen defects in GaAs. The actual occurrence of these defects is examined against two criteria. The first criterion concerns the stability against O dissociation and is evaluated via the calculation of dissociation energies. The second criterion involves the defect formation at thermodynamic equilibrium and is inferred from the comparison between the formation energy of the oxygen defect and that of its O-related dissociation product (bridging O defect). Both the AsGa-OAs and (AsGa)2-OAs complexes satisfy these criteria and are stable against O dissociation. Further analysis in cooled-down conditions leads us to dismiss the AsGa-OAs defect due to the more favorable bonding of two rather than one AsGa antisites. The conclusion that only the bridging O defect and the (AsGa)2-OAs complex are expected to occur is in accord with experimental observations.

  5. Wavelength dependent mask defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, Karen; Butt, Shahid; Burnham, Jay; Faure, Tom; Hibbs, Michael; Rankin, Jed; Thibault, David; Watts, Andrew

    2005-05-01

    For years there has been a mismatch between the photomask inspection wavelength and the usage conditions. While the non-actinic inspection has been a source for concern, there has been essentially no evidence that a defect "escaped" the mask production process due to the inspection mismatch. This paper will describe the discovery of one such defect, as well as the diagnostic and inspection techniques used to identify the location, analyze the composition, and determine the source of the printed wafer defect. Conventional mask inspection techniques revealed no defects, however an actinic Aerial Image Metrology System (AIMS) revealed a 1.5 mm region on the mask with up to 59% transmission reduction at 193 nm. Further diagnostics demonstrated a strong wavelength dependence which accounted for the near invisibility of the defect at I line (365 nm) or even DUV (248 nm) wavelengths, which had 0% and 5% respective transmission reductions. Using some creative imaging techniques via AIMS tool and modeling, the defect was deduced to have a three dimensional Gaussian absorption character, with total width approximately 1.5 mm. Several non-destructive diagnostic techniques were developed to determine the composition and location of the defect within the substrate. These results will be described in addition to identifying methods for ensuring product quality in the absence of actinic inspection.

  6. Defect Chemistry of Nanocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhuang

    2015-03-01

    Defects can rule the properties of a crystal. This effect is particularly intriguing in atom-thick materials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene, where electrons, excitons, phonons, and spin may strongly couple at the defect sites due to reduced dimensionality. In this talk, we will discuss our recent progress in fundamental understanding and molecular control of sp3 defects in sp2 carbon lattices, and their applications. An sp3 defect (tetrahedral bonding, diamond-like) is created by covalently attaching a functional group to the sp2 carbon lattice (trigonal planar, honeycomb-like) of a carbon nanotube or graphene. The beauty of this type of defect is its well-defined structure and chemical tunability at the molecular level. Our experimental results have unraveled a series of intriguing and surprising roles of defects. Specific examples will be given to illustrate how defects may be used to drive reaction propagation on sp2 carbon lattices, brighten carbon nanotube photoluminescence, and create selective chemical sensors.

  7. Loosely-Bound Diatomic Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfour, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses concept of covalent bonding as related to homonuclear diatomic molecules. Article draws attention to the existence of bound rare gas and alkaline earth diatomic molecules. Summarizes their molecular parameters and offers spectroscopic data. Strength and variation with distance of interatomic attractive forces is given. (Author/SA)

  8. Teacher Education in Outward Bound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Richard A.

    A series of Outward Bound programs and experiences was planned for El Paso County, Colorado, school teachers to increase their awareness of their personal characteristics, especially those that might enhance learning on the part of their students. Part of the planning for the program involved a survey of county high school teachers, counselors,…

  9. Wronskian Method for Bound States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple and straightforward method based on Wronskians for the calculation of bound-state energies and wavefunctions of one-dimensional quantum-mechanical problems. We explicitly discuss the asymptotic behaviour of the wavefunction and show that the allowed energies make the divergent part vanish. As illustrative examples we consider…

  10. Role of Topological Defects in the Phase Transition of the Three-Dimensional Heisenberg Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Manhot

    The role of topological point defects (hedgehogs) in the phase transition of the classical Heisenberg model in three dimensions is investigated by using Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations of the behavior of the defects near the phase transition show that the number density of defects increases sharply and defect pairs with separations comparable to the sample size begin to appear as the temperature is increased through the transition temperature. In simulations in a restricted ensemble in which spin configurations containing defects are not allowed, the system appears to remain ordered at all temperatures. Simulations in which the spin-spin interaction is set equal to zero and the number density of defects is controlled by varying a 'chemical potential' term indicate that the system is ordered if the number density of defect pairs is sufficiently small. These results show that topological defects play a crucial role in the three-dimensional Heisenberg transition in the sense that configurations containing defect pairs are necessary for the transition from the ferromagnetic to paramagnetic phase to occur. Such a conclusion is also consistent with a Renormalization Group study of the O(n) model, which suggests that topological defects should be explicitly taken into account for a correct description of the critical behavior in models including the three-dimensional Heisenberg model.

  11. Defect solitons in photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianke; Chen, Zhigang

    2006-02-01

    Nonlinear defect modes (defect solitons) and their stability in one-dimensional photonic lattices with focusing saturable nonlinearity are investigated. It is shown that defect solitons bifurcate out from every infinitesimal linear defect mode. Low-power defect solitons are linearly stable in lower bandgaps but unstable in higher bandgaps. At higher powers, defect solitons become unstable in attractive defects, but can remain stable in repulsive defects. Furthermore, for high-power solitons in attractive defects, we found a type of Vakhitov-Kolokolov (VK) instability which is different from the usual VK instability based on the sign of the slope in the power curve. Lastly, we demonstrate that in each bandgap, in addition to defect solitons which bifurcate from linear defect modes, there is also an infinite family of other defect solitons which can be stable in certain parameter regimes. PMID:16605473

  12. What Are Neural Tube Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Neural Tube Defects (NTDs): Condition Information Skip sharing on ... media links Share this: Page Content What are neural tube defects? Neural (pronounced NOOR-uhl ) tube defects ...

  13. Atrial Septal Defect (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Atrial Septal Defect KidsHealth > For Teens > Atrial Septal Defect Print A ... Care of Yourself What Is an Atrial Septal Defect? Having a doctor listen to your heart is ...

  14. Titania bound sodium titanate ion exchanger

    DOEpatents

    DeFilippi, Irene C. G.; Yates, Stephen Frederic; Shen, Jian-Kun; Gaita, Romulus; Sedath, Robert Henry; Seminara, Gary Joseph; Straszewski, Michael Peter; Anderson, David Joseph

    1999-03-23

    This invention is method for preparing a titania bound ion exchange composition comprising admixing crystalline sodium titanate and a hydrolyzable titanium compound and, thereafter drying the titania bound crystalline sodium titanate and subjecting the dried titania bound ion exchange composition to optional compaction and calcination steps to improve the physical strength of the titania bound composition.

  15. Equilibrium Configurations and Energetics of Point Defects in Two-Dimensional Colloidal Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Pertsinidis, Alexandros; Ling, X. S.

    2001-08-27

    We demonstrate a novel method of introducing point defects (mono- and divacancies) in a confined monolayer colloidal crystal by manipulating individual particles with optical tweezers. Digital video microscopy is used to study defect dynamics in real space and time. We verify the numerical predictions that the stable configurations of the defects have reduced symmetry compared to the triangular lattice and discover that in addition they are characterized by distinct topological arrangements of the particles in the defect core. Surprisingly, point defects are thermally excited into separated dislocations, from which we extract the dislocation pair potential.

  16. Initialization of a hole spin bound to an isoelectronic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Jean, Philippe; Ethier-Majcher, Gabriel; Francoeur, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    Hole spins are promising candidates for solid-state qubits because they interact weakly with nuclear spins, leading to long relaxation and coherence times. In this work, we demonstrate the ability to optically initialize a single hole spin bound to an isoelectronic center, which is an atomic defect formed from a small number of isovalent impurities in a semiconductor host. Using time-resolved magneto-photoluminescence of a positive trion bound to a Te dyad in ZnSe, we measured the degree of polarization of the emission under various conditions of excitation and magnetic field. Under non-resonant excitation, the trion emission is partially polarized and becomes completely unpolarized under a longitudinal magnetic field. In contrast, resonant excitation of the heavy-hole valence band of the ZnSe host leads to highly polarized emission, implying that the hole has been initialized in a known spin state.

  17. Performance Bounds on Two Concatenated, Interleaved Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Bruce; Dolinar, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    A method has been developed of computing bounds on the performance of a code comprised of two linear binary codes generated by two encoders serially concatenated through an interleaver. Originally intended for use in evaluating the performances of some codes proposed for deep-space communication links, the method can also be used in evaluating the performances of short-block-length codes in other applications. The method applies, more specifically, to a communication system in which following processes take place: At the transmitter, the original binary information that one seeks to transmit is first processed by an encoder into an outer code (Co) characterized by, among other things, a pair of numbers (n,k), where n (n > k)is the total number of code bits associated with k information bits and n k bits are used for correcting or at least detecting errors. Next, the outer code is processed through either a block or a convolutional interleaver. In the block interleaver, the words of the outer code are processed in blocks of I words. In the convolutional interleaver, the interleaving operation is performed bit-wise in N rows with delays that are multiples of B bits. The output of the interleaver is processed through a second encoder to obtain an inner code (Ci) characterized by (ni,ki). The output of the inner code is transmitted over an additive-white-Gaussian- noise channel characterized by a symbol signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) Es/No and a bit SNR Eb/No. At the receiver, an inner decoder generates estimates of bits. Depending on whether a block or a convolutional interleaver is used at the transmitter, the sequence of estimated bits is processed through a block or a convolutional de-interleaver, respectively, to obtain estimates of code words. Then the estimates of the code words are processed through an outer decoder, which generates estimates of the original information along with flags indicating which estimates are presumed to be correct and which are found to

  18. Pair Programming: Issues and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, Kim Man; Barnes, Kyle Atikus; Chan, Keith C. C.

    Pair programming, two programmers collaborating on design, coding and testing, has been a controversial focus of interest as Agile Software Development continues to grow in popularity both among academics and practitioners. As a result of the many investigations into the effectiveness of pair programming in the last decade, many have come to realize that there are many hard-to-control factors in pair programming in particular and in empirical software engineering in general. Because of these factors, the results of many pair programming experiments are not easy to replicate and the relative productivity of pair and solo programming are still not fully understood. So far, it has been concluded by previous studies that pair programming productivity can vary, but few have shown how and why this is the case. In this chapter, we discuss a number of challenging factors in the adoption of pair programming and present an approach to deal with them. We discuss how different factors may affect our experimental outcomes and improve experiment design to reveal how and why pair programming can be made productive, at least, in controlled situations.

  19. Assessment Strategies for Pair Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Jan Hendrik; Mentz, Elsa; Meyer, Lukas

    2009-01-01

    Although pair programming has proved its usefulness in teaching and learning programming skills, it is difficult to assess the individual roles and abilities of students whilst programming in pairs. (Note that within this manuscript, the term assessment refers to evaluating individual student performance.) Assessing only the outcomes of a pair…

  20. Transversely bounded DFB lasers. [bounded distributed-feedback lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Evans, G.; Yeh, C.

    1975-01-01

    Bounded distributed-feedback (DFB) lasers are studied in detail. Threshold gain and field distribution for a number of configurations are derived and analyzed. More specifically, the thin-film guide, fiber, diffusion guide, and hollow channel with inhomogeneous-cladding DFB lasers are considered. Optimum points exist and must be used in DFB laser design. Different-modes feedback and the effects of the transverse boundaries are included. A number of applications are also discussed.

  1. Dissociability of free and peptidyl-tRNA bound ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Surguchov, A P; Fominykch, E S; Lyzlova, L V

    1978-06-16

    The influence of peptidyl-tRNA on the dissociation of yeast 80 S ribosomes into subunits was studied. For this purpose temperature-sensitive (ts) suppressor strain of yeast Saccharomyces cervisiae carrying a defect in peptide chain termination was used. It was found that peptidyl-tRNA did not influence the dissociation of ribosomes either at high salt concentration or in the presence of dissociation factor (DF) from yeast. After dissociation of yeast ribosomes in 0.5 M KCl, peptidyl-tRNA remains bound to the 60 S subunit. Some characteristics of the termination process and release of nascent polypeptides from yeast ribosomes are discussed. PMID:355860

  2. Birth defects monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Klingberg, M.A.; Papier, C.M.; Hart, J.

    1983-01-01

    Population monitoring of birth defects provides a means for detecting relative changes in their frequency. Many varied systems have been developed throughout the world since the thalidomide tragedy of the early 1960s. Although it is difficult to pinpoint specific teratogenic agents based on rises in rates of a particular defect or a constellation of defects, monitoring systems can provide clues for hypothesis testing in epidemiological investigations. International coordination of efforts in this area resulted in the founding of the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Monitoring Systems (ICBDMS) in 1974. In this paper we will describe the functions and basic requirements of monitoring systems in general, and look at the development and activities of the ICBDMS. A review of known and suspected environmental teratogenic agents (eg, chemical, habitual, biological, physical, and nutritional) is also presented.

  3. Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment can include medicines, catheter procedures, surgery, and heart transplants. The treatment depends on the type of the defect, how severe it is, and a child's age, size, and general health. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  4. Automated Defect Classification (ADC)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-01-01

    The ADC Software System is designed to provide semiconductor defect feature analysis and defect classification capabilities. Defect classification is an important software method used by semiconductor wafer manufacturers to automate the analysis of defect data collected by a wide range of microscopy techniques in semiconductor wafer manufacturing today. These microscopies (e.g., optical bright and dark field, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, etc.) generate images of anomalies that are induced or otherwise appear on wafermore » surfaces as a result of errant manufacturing processes or simple atmospheric contamination (e.g., airborne particles). This software provides methods for analyzing these images, extracting statistical features from the anomalous regions, and applying supervised classifiers to label the anomalies into user-defined categories.« less

  5. Birth Defects (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & ... defects. Clefting can be surgically repaired after birth. Cerebral palsy usually isn't found until weeks to months ...

  6. Magnetic pair creation transparency in gamma-ray pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Story, Sarah A.; Baring, Matthew G. E-mail: baring@rice.edu

    2014-07-20

    Magnetic pair creation, γ → e {sup +} e {sup –}, has been at the core of radio pulsar paradigms and central to polar cap models of gamma-ray pulsars for over three decades. The Fermi gamma-ray pulsar population now exceeds 140 sources and has defined an important part of Fermi's science legacy, providing rich information for the interpretation of young energetic pulsars and old millisecond pulsars. Among the population characteristics well established is the common occurrence of exponential turnovers in their spectra in the 1-10 GeV range. These turnovers are too gradual to arise from magnetic pair creation in the strong magnetic fields of pulsar inner magnetospheres. By demanding insignificant photon attenuation precipitated by such single-photon pair creation, the energies of these turnovers for Fermi pulsars can be used to compute lower bounds for the typical altitude of GeV band emission. This paper explores such pair transparency constraints below the turnover energy and updates earlier altitude bound determinations that have been deployed in various Fermi pulsar papers. For low altitude emission locales, general relativistic influences are found to be important, increasing cumulative opacity, shortening the photon attenuation lengths, and also reducing the maximum energy that permits escape of photons from a neutron star magnetosphere. Rotational aberration influences are also explored, and are found to be small at low altitudes, except near the magnetic pole. The analysis presented in this paper clearly demonstrates that including near-threshold physics in the pair creation rate is essential to deriving accurate attenuation lengths and escape energies. The altitude bounds are typically in the range of 2-7 stellar radii for the young Fermi pulsar population, and provide key information on the emission altitude in radio quiet pulsars that do not possess double-peaked pulse profiles. The bound for the Crab pulsar is at a much higher altitude, with the

  7. Magnetic Pair Creation Transparency in Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, Sarah A.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic pair creation, γ → e + e -, has been at the core of radio pulsar paradigms and central to polar cap models of gamma-ray pulsars for over three decades. The Fermi gamma-ray pulsar population now exceeds 140 sources and has defined an important part of Fermi's science legacy, providing rich information for the interpretation of young energetic pulsars and old millisecond pulsars. Among the population characteristics well established is the common occurrence of exponential turnovers in their spectra in the 1-10 GeV range. These turnovers are too gradual to arise from magnetic pair creation in the strong magnetic fields of pulsar inner magnetospheres. By demanding insignificant photon attenuation precipitated by such single-photon pair creation, the energies of these turnovers for Fermi pulsars can be used to compute lower bounds for the typical altitude of GeV band emission. This paper explores such pair transparency constraints below the turnover energy and updates earlier altitude bound determinations that have been deployed in various Fermi pulsar papers. For low altitude emission locales, general relativistic influences are found to be important, increasing cumulative opacity, shortening the photon attenuation lengths, and also reducing the maximum energy that permits escape of photons from a neutron star magnetosphere. Rotational aberration influences are also explored, and are found to be small at low altitudes, except near the magnetic pole. The analysis presented in this paper clearly demonstrates that including near-threshold physics in the pair creation rate is essential to deriving accurate attenuation lengths and escape energies. The altitude bounds are typically in the range of 2-7 stellar radii for the young Fermi pulsar population, and provide key information on the emission altitude in radio quiet pulsars that do not possess double-peaked pulse profiles. The bound for the Crab pulsar is at a much higher altitude, with the putative detection

  8. Supernovae in paired host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazaryan, T. A.; Petrosian, A. R.; Hakobyan, A. A.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Kunth, D.; Mamon, G. A.; Turatto, M.; Aramyan, L. S.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the influence of close neighbor galaxies on the properties of supernovae (SNe) and their host galaxies using 56 SNe located in pairs of galaxies with different levels of star formation (SF) and nuclear activity. The mean distance of type II SNe from nuclei of hosts is greater by about a factor of 2 than that of type Ibc SNe. For the first time it is shown that SNe Ibc are located in pairs with significantly smaller difference of radial velocities between components than pairs containing SNe Ia and II. We consider this as a result of higher star formation rate (SFR) of these closer systems of galaxies. SN types are not correlated with the luminosity ratio of host and neighbor galaxies in pairs. The orientation of SNe with respect to the preferred direction toward neighbor galaxy is found to be isotropic and independent of kinematical properties of the galaxy pair.

  9. Property (RD) for Hecke Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirbisheh, Vahid

    2012-06-01

    As the first step towards developing noncommutative geometry over Hecke C ∗-algebras, we study property (RD) (Rapid Decay) for Hecke pairs. When the subgroup H in a Hecke pair ( G, H) is finite, we show that the Hecke pair ( G, H) has (RD) if and only if G has (RD). This provides us with a family of examples of Hecke pairs with property (RD). We also adapt Paul Jolissant's works in Jolissaint (J K-Theory 2:723-735, 1989; Trans Amer Math Soc 317(1):167-196, 1990) to the setting of Hecke C ∗-algebras and show that when a Hecke pair ( G, H) has property (RD), the algebra of rapidly decreasing functions on the set of double cosets is closed under holomorphic functional calculus of the associated (reduced) Hecke C ∗-algebra. Hence they have the same K 0-groups.

  10. Base pairing and base mis-pairing in nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H. J.; Rich, A.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years we have learned that DNA is conformationally active. It can exist in a number of different stable conformations including both right-handed and left-handed forms. Using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis we are able to discover not only additional conformations of the nucleic acids but also different types of hydrogen bonded base-base interactions. Although Watson-Crick base pairings are the predominant type of interaction in double helical DNA, they are not the only types. Recently, we have been able to examine mismatching of guanine-thymine base pairs in left-handed Z-DNA at atomic resolution (1A). A minimum amount of distortion of the sugar phosphate backbone is found in the G x T pairing in which the bases are held together by two hydrogen bonds in the wobble pairing interaction. Because of the high resolution of the analysis we can visualize water molecules which fill in to accommodate the other hydrogen bonding positions in the bases which are not used in the base-base interactions. Studies on other DNA oligomers have revealed that other types of non-Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding interactions can occur. In the structure of a DNA octamer with the sequence d(GCGTACGC) complexed to an antibiotic triostin A, it was found that the two central AT base pairs are held together by Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick base pairs. Similarly, the G x C base pairs at the ends are also Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick pairing. Hoogsteen base pairs make a modified helix which is distinct from the Watson-Crick double helix.

  11. Computing an upper bound on contact stress with surrogate duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Zhaocheng; Papadopoulos, Panayiotis

    2016-07-01

    We present a method for computing an upper bound on the contact stress of elastic bodies. The continuum model of elastic bodies with contact is first modeled as a constrained optimization problem by using finite elements. An explicit formulation of the total contact force, a fraction function with the numerator as a linear function and the denominator as a quadratic convex function, is derived with only the normalized nodal contact forces as the constrained variables in a standard simplex. Then two bounds are obtained for the sum of the nodal contact forces. The first is an explicit formulation of matrices of the finite element model, derived by maximizing the fraction function under the constraint that the sum of the normalized nodal contact forces is one. The second bound is solved by first maximizing the fraction function subject to the standard simplex and then using Dinkelbach's algorithm for fractional programming to find the maximum—since the fraction function is pseudo concave in a neighborhood of the solution. These two bounds are solved with the problem dimensions being only the number of contact nodes or node pairs, which are much smaller than the dimension for the original problem, namely, the number of degrees of freedom. Next, a scheme for constructing an upper bound on the contact stress is proposed that uses the bounds on the sum of the nodal contact forces obtained on a fine finite element mesh and the nodal contact forces obtained on a coarse finite element mesh, which are problems that can be solved at a lower computational cost. Finally, the proposed method is verified through some examples concerning both frictionless and frictional contact to demonstrate the method's feasibility, efficiency, and robustness.

  12. Computing an upper bound on contact stress with surrogate duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Zhaocheng; Papadopoulos, Panayiotis

    2016-04-01

    We present a method for computing an upper bound on the contact stress of elastic bodies. The continuum model of elastic bodies with contact is first modeled as a constrained optimization problem by using finite elements. An explicit formulation of the total contact force, a fraction function with the numerator as a linear function and the denominator as a quadratic convex function, is derived with only the normalized nodal contact forces as the constrained variables in a standard simplex. Then two bounds are obtained for the sum of the nodal contact forces. The first is an explicit formulation of matrices of the finite element model, derived by maximizing the fraction function under the constraint that the sum of the normalized nodal contact forces is one. The second bound is solved by first maximizing the fraction function subject to the standard simplex and then using Dinkelbach's algorithm for fractional programming to find the maximum—since the fraction function is pseudo concave in a neighborhood of the solution. These two bounds are solved with the problem dimensions being only the number of contact nodes or node pairs, which are much smaller than the dimension for the original problem, namely, the number of degrees of freedom. Next, a scheme for constructing an upper bound on the contact stress is proposed that uses the bounds on the sum of the nodal contact forces obtained on a fine finite element mesh and the nodal contact forces obtained on a coarse finite element mesh, which are problems that can be solved at a lower computational cost. Finally, the proposed method is verified through some examples concerning both frictionless and frictional contact to demonstrate the method's feasibility, efficiency, and robustness.

  13. Stereo Pair: Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This view of northern Patagonia, near El Cain, Argentina shows complexly eroded volcanic terrain, with basalt mesas, sinkholes, landslide debris, playas, and relatively few integrated drainage channels. Surrounding this site (but also extending far to the east) is a broad plateau capped by basalt, the Meseta de Somuncura. Here, near the western edge of the plateau, erosion has broken through the basalt cap in a variety of ways. On the mesas, water-filled sinkholes (lower left) are most likely the result of the collapse of old lava tubes. Along the edges of the mesas (several locations) the basalt seems to be sliding away from the plateau in a series of slices. Water erosion by overland flow is also evident, particularly in canyons where vegetation blankets the drainage channels (green patterns, bottom of image). However, overland water flow does not extend very far at any location. This entire site drains to local playas, some of which are seen here (blue). While the water can reach the playas and then evaporate, what becomes of the eroded rock debris? Wind might excavate some of the finer eroded debris, but the fate of much of the missing bedrock remains mysterious.

    This cross-eyed stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with an enhanced Landsat 7 satellite color image. The topography data are used to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. In doing so, each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The

  14. Stereo Pair, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This view of northern Patagonia, at Los Menucos, Argentina shows remnants of relatively young volcanoes built upon an eroded plain of much older and contorted volcanic, granitic, and sedimentary rocks. The large purple, brown, and green 'butterfly' pattern is a single volcano that has been deeply eroded. Large holes on the volcano's flanks indicate that they may have collapsed soon after eruption, as fluid molten rock drained out from under its cooled and solidified outer shell. At the upper left, a more recent eruption occurred and produced a small volcanic cone and a long stream of lava, which flowed down a gully. At the top of the image, volcanic intrusions permeated the older rocks resulting in a chain of small dark volcanic peaks. At the top center of the image, two halves of a tan ellipse pattern are offset from each other. This feature is an old igneous intrusion that has been split by a right-lateral fault. The apparent offset is about 6.6 kilometers (4 miles). Color, tonal, and topographic discontinuities reveal the fault trace as it extends across the image to the lower left. However, young unbroken basalt flows show that the fault has not been active recently.

    This cross-eyed stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with an enhanced Landsat 7satellite color image. The topography data are used to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. In doing so, each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive

  15. Acyclic colorings of graphs with bounded degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedorowicz, Anna; Sidorowicz, Elżbieta

    2016-07-01

    A $k$-colouring (not necessarily proper) of vertices of a graph is called {\\it acyclic}, if for every pair of distinct colours $i$ and $j$ the subgraph induced by the edges whose endpoints have colours $i$ and $j$ is acyclic. In the paper we consider some generalised acyclic $k$-colourings, namely, we require that each colour class induces an acyclic or bounded degree graph. Mainly we focus on graphs with maximum degree 5. We prove that any such graph has an acyclic $5$-colouring such that each colour class induces an acyclic graph with maximum degree at most 4. We prove that the problem of deciding whether a graph $G$ has an acyclic 2-colouring in which each colour class induces a graph with maximum degree at most 3 is NP-complete, even for graphs with maximum degree 5. We also give a linear-time algorithm for an acyclic $t$-improper colouring of any graph with maximum degree $d$ assuming that the number of colors is large enough.

  16. Modifications of the Griesmer bound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R. J.; Solomon, G.

    1991-01-01

    The Griesmer bound is a classical technique (developed in 1960) for estimating the minimum length n required for a binary linear code with a given dimension k and minimum distance d. In this article, a unified derivation of the Griesmer bound and two new variations on it are presented. The first variation deals with linear codes which contain the all-ones vector; such codes are quite common and are useful in practice because of their 'transparent' properties. The second variation deals with codes that are constrained to contain a word of weight greater than or equal to M. In both cases these constraints (the all-ones word or a word of high weight) can increase the minimum length of a code with given k and d.

  17. Muonic bound systems, virtual particles, and proton radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, U. D.

    2015-07-01

    The proton radius puzzle questions the self-consistency of theory and experiment in light muonic and electronic bound systems. Here we summarize the current status of virtual particle models as well as Lorentz-violating models that have been proposed in order to explain the discrepancy. Highly charged one-electron ions and muonic bound systems have been used as probes of the strongest electromagnetic fields achievable in the laboratory. The average electric field seen by a muon orbiting a proton is comparable to hydrogenlike uranium and, notably, larger than the electric field in the most advanced strong-laser facilities. Effective interactions due to virtual annihilation inside the proton (lepton pairs) and process-dependent corrections (nonresonant effects) are discussed as possible explanations of the proton size puzzle. The need for more experimental data on related transitions is emphasized.

  18. Bound states in coupled guides. II. Three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linton, C. M.; Ratcliffe, K.

    2004-04-01

    We compute bound-state energies in two three-dimensional coupled waveguides, each obtained from the two-dimensional configuration considered in paper I [J. Math. Phys. 45, 1359-1379 (2004)] by rotating the geometry about a different axis. The first geometry consists of two concentric circular cylindrical waveguides coupled by a finite length gap along the axis of the inner cylinder, and the second is a pair of planar layers coupled laterally by a circular hole. We have also extended the theory for this latter case to include the possibility of multiple circular windows. Both problems are formulated using a mode-matching technique, and in the cylindrical guide case the same residue calculus theory as used in paper I is employed to find the bound-state energies. For the coupled planar layers we proceed differently, computing the zeros of a matrix derived from the matching analysis directly.

  19. Discrete family of dissipative soliton pairs in mode-locked fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavyalov, Aleksandr; Iliew, Rumen; Egorov, Oleg; Lederer, Falk

    2009-05-01

    We numerically investigate the formation of soliton pairs (bound states) in mode-locked fiber ring lasers. In the distributed model (complex cubic-quintic Ginzburg-Landau equation) we observe a discrete family of soliton pairs with equidistantly increasing peak separation. This family was identified by two alternative numerical schemes and the bound state instability was disclosed by a linear stability analysis. Moreover, similar families of unstable bound state solutions have been found in a more realistic lumped laser model with an idealized saturable absorber (instantaneous response). We show that a stabilization of these bound states can be achieved when the finite relaxation time of the saturable absorber is taken into account. The domain of stability can be controlled by varying this relaxation time.

  20. Defect luminescence in oxides nanocrystals grown by laser assisted techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, J.; Soares, M. R. N.; Santos, N. F.; Holz, T.; Ben Sedrine, N.; Nico, C.; Fernandes, A. J. S.; Neves, A. J.; Costa, F. M.; Monteiro, T.

    2015-06-01

    Wide band gap oxides, such as ZnO, SnO2 and ZrO2, are functional materials with a wide range of applications in several important technological areas such as those including lighting, transparent electronics, sensors, catalysis and biolabeling. Recently, doping and co-doping of oxides with lanthanides have attracted a strong interest for lighting purposes, especially among them nanophosphors for bioassays. Tailoring the crystalline materials physical properties for such applications often requires a well-controlled incorporation of dopants in the material lattice and a comprehensive understanding of their role in the oxides matrices. These undoped or intentionally doped oxides have band gap energies exceeding 3.3 eV at room temperature and are known to exhibit optically active centers that span from the ultraviolet to the near infrared region. Typically, by using photon energy excitation above the materials band gap, high quality undoped materials display narrow emission lines near the band edge due to free and bound-exciton recombination, as well as shallow donor-acceptor recombination pairs. Additionally, broad emission bands are often observed in these wide band gap hosts, hampering some of the desired physical properties for further applications. Recognizing and understanding the role of the dopant-related defects when deliberately introduced in the oxide hosts, as well as their influence on the samples luminescence properties, constitutes a matter of exploitation by the scientific community worldwide. In this work, we investigate the luminescence properties of undoped and lanthanide doped oxide materials grown by laser assisted techniques. Laser assisted flow deposition (LAFD) and pulse laser ablation in liquids (PLAL) were used for the growth of ZnO, SnO2 and yttria stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) micro and nanocrystals with different morphologies, respectively. Regarding the YSZ host, trivalent lanthanide ions were optically activated by in-situ doping and co

  1. Semiclassical bounds in magnetic bottles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barseghyan, Diana; Exner, Pavel; Kovařík, Hynek; Weidl, Timo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the paper is to derive spectral estimates into several classes of magnetic systems. They include three-dimensional regions with Dirichlet boundary as well as a particle in ℝ3 confined by a local change of the magnetic field. We establish two-dimensional Berezin-Li-Yau and Lieb-Thirring-type bounds in the presence of magnetic fields and, using them, get three-dimensional estimates for the eigenvalue moments of the corresponding magnetic Laplacians.

  2. 78 FR 18326 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math Science... Upward Bound Math Science Annual Performance Report. OMB Control Number: 1840-NEW. Type of Review: New... under the regular Upward Bound (UB) and Upward Bound Math and Science (UBMS) Programs. The Department...

  3. Hunting η-bound nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machner, H.

    2010-09-01

    The η meson can be bound to atomic nuclei. Experimental search is discussed in the form of final state interaction for the reactions dp → 3Heη and dd → 4Heη. For the latter case tensor polarized deuterons were used in order to extract the s-wave strength. For both reactions complex scattering lengths are deduced: a3Heη = [± (10.7 ± 0.8+0.1-0.5) + i. (1.5 ± 2.6 +1.0-0.9)] fm and a4Heη = [±(3.1 ±0.5) + i. (0 ±0.5)] fm. In a two-nucleon transfer reaction under quasi-free conditions, p27 Al → 3HeX, was investigated. The system X can be the bound 25Mgotimesη at rest. When a possible decay of an intermediate N* (1535) is required, a highly significant bump shows up in the missing mass spectrum. The data give for a bound state a binding energy of 13.3 ±1.6 MeV and a width of σ = 4.4±1.3 MeV.

  4. Effects of stoichiometry on the defect clustering in uranium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ngayam-Happy, Raoul; Krack, Matthias; Pautz, Andreas

    2015-11-18

    This study addresses the on-going topic of point defects and point defect clusters in uranium dioxide. Molecular statics simulation using an extended pair potential model that accounts for disproportionation equilibrium as charge compensation has been applied to assess the effect of disproportionation on structural properties and clustering in non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. The defective structures are scanned in minute detail using a powerful and versatile analysing tool, called ASTRAM, developed in-house for the purpose. Unlike pair potential models ignoring disproportionation effects, our model reproduces volume changes observed experimentally in non-stoichiometric UO2-x and UO2+x. The oxygen defect energetics computed is in good agreement with data in the literature. The model is used to assess the clustering that occurs in bulk samples of non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. This study confirms the generation of split-interstitial clusters as the dominant defect type in non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. A new key mechanism for defect clustering in hyper-stoichiometric uranium dioxide is proposed that is based on the progressive aggregation of primitive blocks identified as 1-vacancy split-interstitial clusters. PMID:26471388

  5. Effects of stoichiometry on the defect clustering in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngayam-Happy, Raoul; Krack, Matthias; Pautz, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    This study addresses the on-going topic of point defects and point defect clusters in uranium dioxide. Molecular statics simulation using an extended pair potential model that accounts for disproportionation equilibrium as charge compensation has been applied to assess the effect of disproportionation on structural properties and clustering in non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. The defective structures are scanned in minute detail using a powerful and versatile analysing tool, called ASTRAM, developed in-house for the purpose. Unlike pair potential models ignoring disproportionation effects, our model reproduces volume changes observed experimentally in non-stoichiometric ~\\text{U}{{\\text{O}}\\text{2-\\text{x}}} and ~\\text{U}{{\\text{O}}\\text{2+x}} . The oxygen defect energetics computed is in good agreement with data in the literature. The model is used to assess the clustering that occurs in bulk samples of non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. This study confirms the generation of split-interstitial clusters as the dominant defect type in non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. A new key mechanism for defect clustering in hyper-stoichiometric uranium dioxide is proposed that is based on the progressive aggregation of primitive blocks identified as 1-vacancy split-interstitial clusters.

  6. Graphene nanoengineering and the inverse Stone-Thrower-Wales defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusk, Mark T.; Wu, David T.; Carr, Lincoln D.

    2010-04-01

    We analyze a fundamental building block for monolithic nanoengineering on graphene: the Inverse-Stone-Thrower-Wales (ISTW) defect. The ISTW is formed from a pair of joined pentagonal carbon rings placed between a pair of heptagonal rings; the well-known Stone-Thrower-Wales defect is the same arrangement, but with the heptagonal rather than pentagonal rings joined. When removed and passivated with hydrogen, the structure constitutes a molecule, diazulene, which may be viewed as the result of an ad-dimer defect on anthracene. Embedding diazulene in the honeycomb lattice, we study the effect of ad-dimers on planar graphene. Because the ISTW defect has yet to be experimentally identified, we examine several synthesis routes and find one for which the barrier is only slightly higher than that associated with adatom hopping on graphene. ISTW and STW defects may be viewed as fundamental building blocks for monolithic structures on graphene. We show how to construct extended defect domains on the surface of graphene in the form of blisters, bubbles, and ridges on a length scale as small as 2Å×7Å . Our primary tool in these studies is density functional theory.

  7. Ion Pair-π Interactions.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Kaori; Humbert-Droz, Marie; Letrun, Romain; Vauthey, Eric; Wesolowski, Tomasz A; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    We report that anion-π and cation-π interactions can occur on the same aromatic surface. Interactions of this type are referred to as ion pair-π interactions. Their existence, nature, and significance are elaborated in the context of spectral tuning, ion binding in solution, and activation of cell-penetrating peptides. The origin of spectral tuning by ion pair-π interactions is unraveled with energy-minimized excited-state structures: The solvent- and pH-independent red shift of absorption and emission of push-pull fluorophores originates from antiparallel ion pair-π attraction to their polarized excited state. In contrast, the complementary parallel ion pair-π repulsion is spectroscopically irrelevant, in part because of charge neutralization by intriguing proton and electron transfers on excited push-pull surfaces. With time-resolved fluorescence measurements, very important differences between antiparallel and parallel ion pair-π interactions are identified and quantitatively dissected from interference by aggregation and ion pair dissociation. Contributions from hydrogen bonding, proton transfer, π-π interactions, chromophore twisting, ion pairing, and self-assembly are systematically addressed and eliminated by concise structural modifications. Ion-exchange studies in solution, activation of cell-penetrating peptides in vesicles, and computational analysis all imply that the situation in the ground state is complementary to spectral tuning in the excited state; i.e., parallel rather than antiparallel ion pair-π interactions are preferred, despite repulsion from the push-pull dipole. The overall quite complete picture of ion pair-π interactions provided by these remarkably coherent yet complex results is expected to attract attention throughout the multiple disciplines of chemistry involved. PMID:26291550

  8. Shell closures, loosely bound structures, and halos in exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, G.; Singh, D.

    2013-04-15

    Inspired by the recent experiments indicating doubly magic nuclei that lie near the drip-line and encouraged by the success of our relativistic mean-field (RMF) plus state-dependent BCS approach to the description of the ground-state properties of drip-line nuclei, we develop this approach further, across the entire periodic table, to explore magic nuclei, loosely bound structures, and halo formation in exotic nuclei. In our RMF+BCS approach, the single-particle continuum corresponding to the RMF is replaced by a set of discrete positive-energy states for the calculations of pairing energy. Detailed analysis of the single-particle spectrum, pairing energies, and densities of the nuclei predict the unusual proton shell closures at proton numbers Z = 6, 14, 16, 34, and unusual neutron shell closures at neutron numbers N = 6, 14, 16, 34, 40, 70, 112. Further, in several nuclei like the neutron-rich isotopes of Ca, Zr, Mo, etc., the gradual filling of lowlying single-particle resonant state together with weakly bound single-particle states lying close to the continuum threshold helps accommodate more neutrons but with an extremely small increase in the binding energy. This gives rise to the occurrence of loosely bound systems of neutron-rich nuclei with a large neutron-to-proton ratio. In general, the halo-like formation, irrespective of the existence of any resonant state, is seen to be due to the large spatial extension of the wave functions for the weakly bound single-particle states with low orbital angular momentum having very small or no centrifugal barriers.

  9. Pairing Correlations at High Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hai-Liang; Dong, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yan; Fan, Ping; Yuan, Da-Qing; Zhu, Shen-Yun; Zhang, Huan-Qiao; Petrache, C. M.; Ragnarsson, I.; Carlsson, B. G.

    The pairing correcting energies at high spins in 161Lu and 138Nd are studied by comparing the results of the cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky (CNS) and cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky-Bogoliubov (CNSB) models. It is concluded that the Coriolis effect rather than the rotational alignment effect plays a major role in the reduction of the pairing correlations in the high spin region. Then we proposed an average pairing correction method which not only better reproduces the experimental data comparing with the CNS model but also enables a clean-cut tracing of the configurations thus the full-spin-range discussion on the various rotating bands.

  10. Pairing Properties of Superheavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2007-01-01

    Pairing properties of even-even superheavy N=184 isotones are studied within the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS approach. In the particle-hole channel we take the Skyrme energy density functional SLy4, while in the particle-particle channel we employ the seniority pairing force and zero-range delta-interactions with different forms of density dependence. We conclude that the calculated static fission trajectories weakly depend on the specific form of the delta-pairing interaction. We also investigate the impact of triaxiality on the inner fission barrier and find a rather strong Z dependence of the effect.