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Sample records for bound fibrinogen films

  1. Time-dependent association between platelet-bound fibrinogen and the Triton X-100 insoluble cytoskeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Peerschke, E.I. )

    1991-02-01

    Previous studies indicated a correlation between the formation of EDTA-resistant (irreversible) platelet-fibrinogen interactions and platelet cytoskeleton formation. The present study explored the direct association of membrane-bound fibrinogen with the Triton X-100 insoluble cytoskeleton of aspirin-treated, gel-filtered platelets, activated but not aggregated with 20 mumol/L adenosine diphosphate (ADP) or 150 mU/mL human thrombin (THR) when bound fibrinogen had become resistant to dissociation by EDTA. Conversion of exogenous 125I-fibrinogen to fibrin was prevented by adding Gly-Pro-Arg and neutralizing THR with hirudin before initiating binding studies. After 60 minutes at 22 degrees C, the cytoskeleton of ADP-treated platelets contained 20% +/- 12% (mean +/- SD, n = 14) of membrane-bound 125I-fibrinogen, representing 10% to 50% of EDTA-resistant fibrinogen binding. The THR-activated cytoskeleton contained 45% +/- 15% of platelet bound fibrinogen, comprising 80% to 100% of EDTA-resistant fibrinogen binding. 125I-fibrinogen was not recovered with platelet cytoskeletons if binding was inhibited by the RGDS peptide, excess unlabeled fibrinogen, or disruption of the glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa complex by EDTA-treatment. Both development of EDTA-resistant fibrinogen binding and fibrinogen association with the cytoskeleton were time dependent and reached maxima 45 to 60 minutes after fibrinogen binding to stimulated platelets. Although a larger cytoskeleton formed after platelet stimulation with thrombin as compared with ADP, no change in cytoskeleton composition was noted with development of EDTA-resistant fibrinogen binding.

  2. Surface characterization and AFM imaging of mixed fibrinogen-surfactant films.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia; Gunning, A Patrick; Morris, Victor J; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-05-19

    This study describes the adsorption behavior of mixed protein/surfactant systems at the air-water interface: specifically fibrinogen and the fluorinated and hydrogenated surfactants (C(8)FONa, C(8)HONa, and C(12)HONa). Surface tension techniques and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been combined to investigate the adsorption behavior of these mixed systems. Interfacial rheology showed that fibrinogen has a low dilatational modulus at the air-water interface when compared to other proteins, suggesting the formation of a weak surface network. Fluorinated and hydrogenated surfactants severely decreased the dilatational modulus of the adsorbed fibrinogen film at the air-water interface. These measurements suggest the progressive displacement of fibrinogen from the air-water interface by both types of surfactants. However, in the case of fibrinogen/fluorinated surfactant systems, surface tension and dilatational rheology measurements suggest the formation of complexes with improved surface activity. AFM imaging of fibrinogen in the presence and absence of surfactants provided new information on the structure of mixed surface films, and revealed new features of the interaction of fibrinogen with hydrogenated and fluorinated surfactants. These studies suggest complexes formed between fibrinogen and fluorinated surfactants which are more surface active than fibrinogen, while the absence of interaction between fibrinogen and hydrogenated surfactants (C(8)HONa and C(12)HONa) results in compaction of the surface layer. PMID:21491854

  3. Immunological Identification of Fibrinogen in Dual-Component Protein Films by AFM Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Pranav; Rice, Zachary; Siedlecki, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    The success of long-term blood-contacting implanted devices is largely dependent upon the interaction of the blood components with the device biomaterial surface. The ability to study these interactions has been hindered by a lack of methods to measure single-molecule interactions in complex multi-protein environments similar to the environment found in-vivo. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in conjunction with gold nanolabels to detect the protein fibrinogen under aqueous conditions without the topographical clues usually necessary for high resolution visualization. BSA was patterned onto both muscovite mica and plasma-treated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates and these test substrates were subsequently backfilled with fibrinogen to yield a featureless protein layer. The fibrinogen in this dual protein layer was detected using high resolution AFM imaging following infusion of anti-fibrinogen conjugated with nanogold particles. This AFM immuno-detection technique will potentially be applicable to complex multi-component protein films adsorbed on clinically-relevant polymers used in medical devices. PMID:18294855

  4. Fibrinogen Brescia

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Stephen O.; Wyatt, Jane; Medicina, Daniela; Callea, Francesco; George, Peter M.

    2000-01-01

    The proposita suffered from liver cirrhosis and biopsy showed type 1 membrane-bound fiberglass inclusions. The hepatic inclusion bodies were weakly periodic acid-Schiff diastase-positive, and on immunoperoxidase staining reacted specifically with anti-fibrinogen antisera. Coagulation investigations revealed low functional and antigenic fibrinogen together with a prolonged thrombin time of 37 seconds (normal, 17 to 22 seconds) suggestive of a hypodysfibrinogenemia. DNA sequencing of all three fibrinogen genes showed a single heterozygous mutation of GGG (Gly)→CGG (Arg) at codon 284 of the γ-chain gene. However, examination of purified fibrinogen chains by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, and isoelectric focusing, failed to show any evidence of the mutant γBr chain in plasma fibrinogen. This finding was substantiated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, which showed only a normal γ (and Bβ) chain mass, but a large increase in the portion of their disialo isoforms. We speculate that misfolding of the variant protein causes hepatic retention and the subsequent hypofibrinogenemia, and that the functional defect (dysfibrinogenemia) results from hypersialylation of otherwise normal Bβ and γ chains consequent to the liver cirrhosis. These conclusions were supported by studies on six other family members with hypofibrinogenemia, and essentially normal clotting times, who were heterozygous for the γ284 Gly→Arg mutation. PMID:10880389

  5. Interaction of platelets, fibrinogen and endothelial cells with plasma deposited PEO-like films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhilu; Wang, Jin; Li, Xin; Tu, Qiufen; Sun, Hong; Huang, Nan

    2012-02-01

    For blood-contacting biomedical implants like retrievable vena cava filters, surface-based diagnostic devices or in vivo sensors, limiting thrombosis and cell adhesion is paramount, due to a decrease even failure in performance. Plasma deposited PEO-like films were investigated as surface modifications. In this work, mixed gas composed of tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (tetraglyme) vapor and oxygen was used as precursor. It was revealed that plasma polymerization under high ratio of oxygen/tetraglyme led to deposition of the films that had high content of ether groups. This kind of PEO-like films had good stability in phosphate buffer solution. In vitro hemocompatibility and endothelial cell (EC) adhesion revealed low platelet adhesion, platelet activation, fibrinogen adhesion, EC adhesion and proliferation on such plasma deposited PEO-like films. This made it a potential candidate for the applications in anti-fouling surfaces of blood-contacting biomedical devices.

  6. Synthesizing skyrmion bound pairs in Fe-Gd thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. C. T.; Chess, J. J.; Montoya, S. A.; Shi, X.; Tamura, N.; Mishra, S. K.; Fischer, P.; McMorran, B. J.; Sinha, S. K.; Fullerton, E. E.; Kevan, S. D.; Roy, S.

    2016-07-01

    We show that properly engineered amorphous Fe-Gd alloy thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy exhibit bound pairs of like-polarity, opposite helicity skyrmions at room temperature. Magnetic mirror symmetry planes present in the stripe phase, instead of chiral exchange, determine the internal skyrmion structure and the net achirality of the skyrmion phase. Our study shows that stripe domain engineering in amorphous alloy thin films may enable the creation of skyrmion phases with technologically desirable properties.

  7. Synthesizing skyrmion bound pairs in Fe-Gd thin films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, J. C. T.; Chess, J. J.; Montoya, S. A.; Shi, X.; Tamura, N.; Mishra, S. K.; Fischer, P.; McMorran, B. J.; Sinha, S. K.; Fullerton, E. E.; et al

    2016-07-11

    Here, we show that properly engineered amorphous Fe-Gd alloy thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy exhibit bound pairs of like-polarity, opposite helicity skyrmions at room temperature. Magnetic mirror symmetry planes present in the stripe phase, instead of chiral exchange, determine the internal skyrmion structure and the net achirality of the skyrmion phase. Our study shows that stripe domain engineering in amorphous alloy thin films may enable the creation of skyrmion phases with technologically desirable properties.

  8. A comparison of the fibrinogen receptor distribution on adherent platelets using both soluble fibrinogen and fibrinogen immobilized on gold beads.

    PubMed

    Estry, D W; Mattson, J C; Mahoney, G J; Oesterle, J R

    1991-04-01

    The distribution of fibrinogen receptors was determined on the surface of adherent platelets using both direct labeling with the ligand fibrinogen which was immobilized on gold particles (Fg-Au) and indirect immunogold (Ig-Au) labeling of bound soluble fibrinogen identified with a rabbit polyclonal anti-fibrinogen antibody. Two distinctly different patterns of labeling were obtained and appeared to depend on whether solid phase fibrinogen (Fg-Au) or soluble phase released fibrinogen were bound to the membrane receptor. The membrane-bound Fg-Au reorganized in patterns that closely mimicked the organization of the underlying cytoskeleton. In approximately 18% of the adherent platelets, Fg-Au was seen in channels or vesicle-like structures lying deep to the platelet surface suggesting internalization into the open canalicular system and/or endocytosis. The labeling pattern obtained when identifying the location of membrane-bound soluble released fibrinogen by Ig-Au was diffuse and lacked the organizational patterns characteristic of Fg-Au. Unlike the Fg-Au probe, early dendritic platelets were heavily labeled by the soluble phase fibrinogen using the Ig-Au technique. Although the label covered the entire exposed platelet membrane in fully spread platelets, labeling over the peripheral web was more dense than that over the intermediate or granulomere zone. The diffuse organization and heavier peripheral distributional pattern of the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (GP IIb-IIIa) receptor in fixed, adherent platelets, was also seen with the GP IIb-IIIa receptor-specific antibody AP-2. The binding of both the Fg-Au and Ig-Au were inhibited using the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) (93% and 98% inhibition, respectively), AP-2 (98% and 97%, respectively) and platelets from patients with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (GT) (99% and 98%, respectively). The data presented provides the first report that receptor reorganization, following binding of fibrinogen, appears to be related to

  9. Fibrinogen gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Fish, Richard J; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite

    2012-09-01

    The Aα, Bβ and γ polypeptide chains of fibrinogen are encoded by a three gene cluster on human chromosome four. The fibrinogen genes (FGB-FGA-FGG) are expressed almost exclusively in hepatocytes where their output is coordinated to ensure a sufficient mRNA pool for each chain and maintain an abundant plasma fibrinogen protein level. Fibrinogen gene expression is controlled by the activity of proximal promoters which contain binding sites for hepatocyte transcription factors, including proteins which influence fibrinogen transcription in response to acute-phase inflammatory stimuli. The fibrinogen gene cluster also contains cis regulatory elements; enhancer sequences with liver activities identified by sequence conservation and functional genomics. While the transcriptional control of this gene cluster is fascinating biology, the medical impetus to understand fibrinogen gene regulation stems from the association of cardiovascular disease risk with high level circulating fibrinogen. In the general population this level varies from about 1.5 to 3.5 g/l. This variation between individuals is influenced by genotype, suggesting there are genetic variants contributing to fibrinogen levels which reside in fibrinogen regulatory loci. A complete picture of how fibrinogen genes are regulated will therefore point towards novel sources of regulatory variants. In this review we discuss regulation of the fibrinogen genes from proximal promoters and enhancers, the influence of acute-phase stimulation, post-transcriptional regulation by miRNAs and functional regulatory variants identified in genetic studies. Finally, we discuss the fibrinogen locus in light of recent advances in understanding chromosomal architecture and suggest future directions for researching the mechanisms that control fibrinogen expression. PMID:22836683

  10. The effect of full/partial UV-irradiation of TiO2 films on altering the behavior of fibrinogen and platelets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang; Zhao, Ansha; Chen, Huiqing; Liao, Yuzhen; Yang, Ping; Sun, Hong; Huang, Nan

    2014-10-01

    Titanium oxide (TiO2) thin film is a potential candidate for the surface modification of blood-contacting devices. It has previously been reported that ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation could alter the biocompatibility of TiO2 films. However, the effect of UV-irradiated TiO2 films on blood compatibility has rarely been reported. This study attempts to determine: (1) whether UV-irradiation of TiO2 films enhances their blood compatibility, (2) the interaction between UV-irradiated TiO2 films, fibrinogen (Fgn), and platelets, especially how Fgn and platelets respond to the geometry of the partially UV-irradiated TiO2 film surface. Anatase TiO2 films were subjected to full and partial UV-irradiation. Full UV-irradiation improved the blood compatibility of TiO2 films by almost completely inhibiting the adhesion and activation of platelets, strongly suppressing the adsorption and conformational change of Fgn, and preventing the formation of fibrin fibers. Additionally, hemolysis was not observed. After partial UV-irradiation, the regions where Fgn adsorption was reduced (Fgn-dark regions) were formed at regions where UV-irradiation had occurred, but were extended in comparison with the UV-irradiated regions, which could be related to the generation and diffusion of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the UV-irradiated TiO2 surface. It is worthwhile to study how ROS altered the nature of TiO2 films, thereby enhancing their blood compatibility. Furthermore, platelets were found adhering to the Fgn-adsorbed regions (Fgn-bright regions) selectively, suggesting that the inhibition of platelet adhesion could be related to the suppression of Fgn adsorption on the UV-irradiated TiO2 surface. It was also noted that platelet surface coverage (Sp) was not linearly correlated with Fgn-bright region surface coverage (Sf), which indicated that the adhesion and spreading of platelets were regulated by both Sf and the geometry of Fgn. PMID:25172575

  11. Antiadhesive effect of fibrinogen: a safeguard for thrombus stability

    PubMed Central

    Lishko, Valeryi K.; Burke, Timothy; Ugarova, Tatiana

    2007-01-01

    The recruitment of phagocytic leukocytes to sites of vessel wall injury plays an important role in thrombus dissolution by proteases elaborated on their adhesion. However, leukocyte adhesion to the fibrin clot can be detrimental at the early stages of wound healing when hemostatic plug integrity is critical for preventing blood loss. Adhesion of circulating leukocytes to the insoluble fibrin(ogen) matrix is mediated by integrins and occurs in the presence of a high concentration of plasma fibrinogen. In this study, the possibility that soluble fibrinogen could protect fibrin from excessive adhesion of leukocytes was examined. Fibrinogen was a potent inhibitor of adhesion of U937 monocytoid cells and neutrophils to fibrin gel and immobilized fibrin(ogen). An investigation of the mechanism by which soluble fibrinogen exerts its influence on leukocyte adhesion indicated that it did not block integrins but rather associated with the fibrin(ogen) substrate. Consequently, leukocytes that engage fibrinogen molecules loosely bound to the surface of fibrin(ogen) matrix are not able to consolidate their grip on the substrate; subsequently, cells detach. This conclusion is based on the evidence obtained in adhesion studies using various cells and performed under static and flow conditions. These findings reveal a new role of fibrinogen in integrin-mediated leukocyte adhesion and suggest that this mechanism may protect the thrombus from premature dissolution. PMID:16849640

  12. Stimulation of fibrinogen synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes by fibrinogen degradation product fragment D.

    PubMed Central

    LaDuca, F M; Tinsley, L A; Dang, C V; Bell, W R

    1989-01-01

    The direct stimulation of fibrinogen biosynthesis by fibrinogen degradation produces (FDPs) was studied in rat hepatocyte cultures. Pure rat FDP fragment D (FDP-D) (Mr 90,000) and FDP fragment E (FDP-E) (Mr 40,000) and mixtures of the two (FDP-DE) were added to rat hepatocytes cultured in serum-free hormonally defined medium. Hydrocortisone (20 microM) significantly increased synthesis of fibrinogen, as determined by incorporation of [35S]methionine. FDP-D and FDP-E did not increase fibrinogen synthesis in the presence of hydrocortisone. However, hepatocytes cultured without hydrocortisone displayed increased fibrinogen synthesis (2.0- to 2.8-fold) with FDP-D (2.6-6.7 microM) but not with FDP-E (5.7 microM). At these FDP concentrations the synthesis of albumin, haptoglobin, and transferrin was not increased. FDP-D-induced fibrinogen synthesis was inhibited (greater than 90%) by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, indicating that the increase in [35S]methionine incorporation was from de novo protein synthesis. The role of FDP-D was further substantiated by showing that FDP-D, but not FDP-E, bound to the hepatocytes. These data indicate that FDP-D, but not FDP-E, directly and specifically stimulates fibrinogen synthesis in rat hepatocytes; this stimulation does not require any additional serum or protein cofactors. Images PMID:2813424

  13. Variations on Fibrinogen-Erythrocyte Interactions during Cell Aging

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Filomena A.; de Oliveira, Sofia; Freitas, Teresa; Gonçalves, Sónia; Santos, Nuno C.

    2011-01-01

    Erythrocyte hyperaggregation, a cardiovascular risk factor, is considered to be caused by an increase in plasma adhesion proteins, particularly fibrinogen. We have recently reported a specific binding between fibrinogen and an erythrocyte integrin receptor with a β3 or β3-like subunit. In this study we evaluate the influence of erythrocyte aging on the fibrinogen binding. By atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy measurements we found that increasing erythrocyte age, there is a decrease of the binding to fibrinogen by decreasing the frequency of its occurrence but not its force. This observation is reinforced by zeta-potential and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. We conclude that upon erythrocyte aging the number of fibrinogen molecules bound to each cell decreases significantly, due to the progressive impairment of the specific fibrinogen-erythrocyte receptor interaction. Knowing that younger erythrocytes bind more to fibrinogen, we could presume that this population is the main contributor to the cardiovascular diseases associated with increased fibrinogen content in blood, which could disturb the blood flow. Our data also show that the sialic acids exposed on the erythrocyte membrane contribute for the interaction with fibrinogen, possibly by facilitating its binding to the erythrocyte membrane receptor. PMID:21464904

  14. Iron modulates the alpha chain of fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G; Jacobsen, Wayne K

    2016-04-01

    Iron-bound fibrinogen has been noted to accelerate plasmatic coagulation in patients with divergent conditions involving upregulation of heme oxygenase activity, including hemodialysis, Alzheimer's disease, sickle cell anemia, and chronic migraine. Our goal was to determine if a site of iron-fibrinogen interaction was on the alpha chain. Using thrombelastography, we compared the coagulation kinetic profiles of plasma exposed to 0-10 µM ferric chloride after activation of coagulation with thrombin generated by contact activation of plasma with the plastic sample cup or by exposure to 1 µg/ml of Calloselasma rhodostoma venom (rich in ancrod activity), which causes coagulation via polymerization of alpha chain monomers. Venom mediated coagulation always occurred before thrombin activated thrombus formation, and ferric chloride always diminished the time of onset of coagulation and increased the velocity of clot growth. Iron enhances plasmatic coagulation kinetics by modulating the alpha chain of fibrinogen. PMID:26782808

  15. Fibrinogen adsorption onto 316L stainless steel, Nitinol and titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhijun; Filiaggi, M. J.; Dahn, J. R.

    2009-03-01

    Fibrinogen adsorption onto mechanically polished biomedical grade 316L stainless steel (316LSS), nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) and commercially pure titanium (CpTi) surfaces were studied by measurements of adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics using an ex-situ wavelength dispersive spectroscopy technique (WDS). Surface composition, roughness and wettability of these materials were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle (WCA) measurements. Adsorption isotherm results showed that surface protein concentration on these materials increased with increasing concentration of fibrinogen in phosphate buffer solution. The fibrinogen adsorption isotherms were modeled by both the monolayer Langmuir isotherm and the multilayer Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) isotherm. The results strongly suggest that fibrinogen forms multilayer structures on these materials when the concentration in solution is high. Complementary measurements on the absorbed fibrinogen films by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) support this view.

  16. Scaling of the Specific Heat of Bounded ^4He Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, S.; Gasparini, F. M.

    1998-03-01

    We report new measurements of the specific heat of a thick helium film confined between two silicon wafers(S. Mehta, W.Y. Yu, A. Petrou, J. Lipa, D. Bishop and F.M. Gasparini, Czechoslovak J. Phys. 46, 133(1996).). The latest data are for a 0.048μm thick film, which extend our earlier measurements on similar films(S. Mehta and F.M. Gasparini, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 2596(1997).) by a factor of 2. The latest experimental cell has the new oxide pattern, and has allowed us to make measurements into the superfluid region. When these data are analyzed to test predictions of correlation-length scaling(M.E. Fisher in Critical Phenomenon, Proc. 51^st) Enrico Fermi Summer School, Varenna, Italy, ed. M.S. Green (Academic Press, NY, 1971)., they collapse well onto the earlier data for ν=0.6705(L.S. Goldner and G. Ahlers, Phys. Rev. B45, 13129(1992).) both above and below T_λ. Some issues regarding scaling still remain near the heat capacity maximum. The experimental techniques used to obtain these data will also be discussed.

  17. The Semantics and Pragmatics of Translating Culture-Bound References in Film Dubbing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bendus, Maryana

    2012-01-01

    This work deals with a number of issues relating to the multifaceted phenomenon of audiovisual translation. The primary concern of the dissertation is with the evaluation of translation strategies of extralinguistic culture-bound references, in particular, in films dubbed from English (as the source language) into Ukrainian (as the target…

  18. Specific cell components of Bacteroides gingivalis mediate binding and degradation of human fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Lantz, M S; Allen, R D; Vail, T A; Switalski, L M; Hook, M

    1991-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis, which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in human periodontal diseases, has been shown to bind and degrade human fibrinogen. B. gingivalis strains bind fibrinogen reversibly and with high affinity and bind to a specific region of the fibrinogen molecule that appears to be located between the D and E domains (M. S. Lantz, R. D. Allen, P. Bounelis, L. M. Switalski, and M. Hook, J. Bacteriol. 172:716-726, 1990). We now report that human fibrinogen is bound and then degraded by specific B. gingivalis components that appear to be localized at the cell surface. Fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells occurred at 4, 22, and 37 degrees C. A functional fibrinogen-binding component (Mr, 150,000) was identified when sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized bacteria were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and probed with 125I-fibrinogen. Fibrinogen degradation did not occur at 4 degrees C but did occur at 22 and 37 degrees C. When bacteria and iodinated fibrinogen were incubated at 37 degrees C, two major fibrinogen fragments (Mr, 97,000 and 50,000) accumulated in incubation mixture supernatant fractions. Two major fibrinogen-degrading components (Mr, 120,000 and 150,000) have been identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in substrate-containing gels. Fibrinogen degradation by the Mr-120,000 and -150,000 proteases was enhanced by reducing agents, completely inhibited by N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone, and partially inhibited by n-ethyl maleimide, suggesting that these enzymes are thiol-dependent proteases with trypsinlike substrate specificity. The fibrinogen-binding component could be separated from the fibrinogen-degrading components by selective solubilization of bacteria in sodium deoxycholate. Images PMID:1987144

  19. Oxidation of the Ru(0001) surface covered by weakly bound, ultrathin silicate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmez, Emre; Anibal Boscoboinik, J.; Tenney, Samuel; Sutter, Peter; Shaikhutdinov, Shamil; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Bilayer silicate films grown on metal substrates are weakly bound to the metal surfaces, which allows ambient gas molecules to intercalate the oxide/metal interface. In this work, we studied the interaction of oxygen with Ru(0001) supported ultrathin silicate and aluminosilicate films at elevated O2 pressures (10- 5-10 mbar) and temperatures (450-923 K). The results show that the silicate films stay essentially intact under these conditions, and oxygen in the film does not exchange with oxygen in the ambient. O2 molecules readily penetrate the film and dissociate on the underlying Ru surface underneath. The silicate layer does however strongly passivate the Ru surface towards RuO2(110) oxide formation that readily occurs on bare Ru(0001) under the same conditions. The results indicate considerable spatial effects for oxidation reactions on metal surfaces in the confined space at the interface. Moreover, the aluminosilicate films completely suppress the Ru oxidation, providing some rationale for using crystalline aluminosilicates in anti-corrosion coatings.

  20. Development of polymer-bound fast-dissolving metformin buccal film with disintegrants.

    PubMed

    Haque, Shaikh Ershadul; Sheela, Angappan

    2015-01-01

    Fast-dissolving drug-delivery systems are considered advantageous over the existing conventional oral dosage forms like tablets, capsules, and syrups for being patient friendly. Buccal films are one such system responsible for systemic drug delivery at the desired site of action by avoiding hepatic first-pass metabolism. Metformin hydrochloride (Met), an antidiabetic drug, has poor bioavailability due to its high solubility and low permeability. The purpose of the study reported here was to develop a polymer-bound fast-dissolving buccal film of metformin to exploit these unique properties. In the study, metformin fast-dissolving films were prepared by the solvent-casting method using chitosan, a bioadhesive polymer. Further, starch, sodium starch glycolate, and microcrystalline cellulose were the disintegrants added to different ratios, forming various formulations (F1 to F7). The buccal films were evaluated for various parameters like weight variation, thickness, folding endurance, surface pH, content uniformity, tensile strength, and percentage of elongation. The films were also subjected to in vitro dissolution study, and the disintegration time was found to be less than 30 minutes for all formulations, which was attributed to the effect of disintegrants. Formulation F6 showed 92.2% drug release within 6 minutes due to the combined effect of sodium starch glycolate and microcrystalline cellulose. PMID:26491321

  1. Development of polymer-bound fast-dissolving metformin buccal film with disintegrants

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Shaikh Ershadul; Sheela, Angappan

    2015-01-01

    Fast-dissolving drug-delivery systems are considered advantageous over the existing conventional oral dosage forms like tablets, capsules, and syrups for being patient friendly. Buccal films are one such system responsible for systemic drug delivery at the desired site of action by avoiding hepatic first-pass metabolism. Metformin hydrochloride (Met), an antidiabetic drug, has poor bioavailability due to its high solubility and low permeability. The purpose of the study reported here was to develop a polymer-bound fast-dissolving buccal film of metformin to exploit these unique properties. In the study, metformin fast-dissolving films were prepared by the solvent-casting method using chitosan, a bioadhesive polymer. Further, starch, sodium starch glycolate, and microcrystalline cellulose were the disintegrants added to different ratios, forming various formulations (F1 to F7). The buccal films were evaluated for various parameters like weight variation, thickness, folding endurance, surface pH, content uniformity, tensile strength, and percentage of elongation. The films were also subjected to in vitro dissolution study, and the disintegration time was found to be less than 30 minutes for all formulations, which was attributed to the effect of disintegrants. Formulation F6 showed 92.2% drug release within 6 minutes due to the combined effect of sodium starch glycolate and microcrystalline cellulose. PMID:26491321

  2. Fibrinogen stability under surfactant interaction.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Itri, Rosangela; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-10-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), circular dichroism (CD), difference spectroscopy (UV-vis), Raman spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements have been performed in the present work to provide a quantitatively comprehensive physicochemical description of the complexation between bovine fibrinogen and the sodium perfluorooctanoate, sodium octanoate, and sodium dodecanoate in glycine buffer (pH 8.5). It has been found that sodium octanoate and dodecanoate act as fibrinogen destabilizer. Meanwhile, sodium perfluorooctanoate acts as a structure stabilizer at low molar concentration and as a destabilizer at high molar concentration. Fibrinogen's secondary structure is affected by all three studied surfactants (decrease in α-helix and an increase in β-sheet content) to a different extent. DSC and UV-vis revealed the existence of intermediate states in the thermal unfolding process of fibrinogen. In addition, SAXS data analysis showed that pure fibrinogen adopts a paired-dimer structure in solution. Such a structure is unaltered by sodium octanoate and perfluoroctanoate. However, interaction of sodium dodecanoate with the fibrinogen affects the protein conformation leading to a complex formation. Taken together, all results evidence that both surfactant hydrophobicity and tail length mediate the fibrinogen stability upon interaction. PMID:21722913

  3. Extraction, radioiodination, and in vivo catabolism of equine fibrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, C.P.; Hornof, W.J.; Kelly, A.B.; O'Brien, T.R.; DeNardo, S.J.

    1985-12-01

    Equine fibrinogen was isolated and aliquots were stored frozen at -70 C before radiolabeling with 125I (half-life = 60.2 days; gamma = 35 keV, using monochloroiodine reagent. Radioiodination efficiencies were 49% to 53%, resulting in a labeled product with 98% protein-bound activity and 91% clottable radioactivity. In 6 equine in vivo investigations, plasma half-lives of 125I-labeled fibrinogen were from 4.1 to 5.2 days, corresponding to a mean daily plasma elimination rate of approximately 15%.

  4. "Fibrinogen Tokyo II". An abnormal fibrinogen with an impaired polymerization site on the aligned DD domain of fibrin molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, M; Baba, M; Morimoto, K; Nakamikawa, C

    1983-01-01

    A hereditary dysfibrinogenemia associated with defective aggregation of fibrin monomers was found in a 39-yr-old female and in the members of her immediate family, who had all been asymptomatic. The abnormality was probably due to an impaired polymerization site exposed in the DD domain of two adjacent fibrin molecules, because plasmic fragment DD derived from the propositus' cross-linked fibrin bound far less tightly to insolubilized normal fragment E than that from the normal one. Its complementary polymerization site in the E domain of fibrin, which was exposed by thrombin cleavage, and the polymerization site in the D domain of fibrinogen, which was available without activation by thrombin, were both found to be normal. More anodal migration of the abnormal fragment DD than the normal one, as shown by immunoelectrophoresis, seemed to support our concept that the mutation most likely resides in the D domain of the abnormal fibrinogen molecule at or near a region closely related to the polymerization site that is exposed when two fibrin molecules are linearly aligned. The work of others on the polymerization of normal fibrin with different techniques yielded results consistent with our conclusions. We tentatively designate this type of abnormal fibrinogen "fibrinogen Tokyo II," but its possible identity with other abnormalities of fibrinogen reported heretofore is not excluded. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:6886002

  5. Adsorption and functionality of fibrinogen on triblock copolymer-coated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Stephen Moss

    To assess the influence of the surface microenvironment on the adsorption and biologic activity of fibrinogen, a series of poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(propylene oxide) triblock copolymers were adsorbed to solid, hydrophobic polystyrene-divinylbenzene beads. The copolymers, which were of the form PEOsb{b}PPOsb{a}PEOsb{b}, varied in their hydrophile/lipophile balances (HLB) due only to differences in their PEO chain length (5 to 129 EO units) as the hydrophobic PPO core segment was of fixed length (56 or 69 PO units). The surface coverage of copolymers was determined first and after exposing the beads to fibrinogen or to human plasma, the total amount of protein adsorbed to their surface was measured. The functionality of fibrinogen bound to copolymer-modified beads was assessed in terms of fibrin clot formation and by the adherence of macrophages (THP-1 tumor cells). Enzymatic processing was used to probe the surface orientation of fibrinogen. The copolymers appear to adsorb in an expanded fashion, a conclusion supported by surface pressure-area isotherms of the copolymers spread at the air-water interface. As compared to copolymer-free surfaces, protein adsorption decreases by up to 90% as the PEO chain length of the copolymers increases. The copolymer coatings appear to lower fibrinogen adsorption by limiting the available surface area. On surfaces coated with the hydrophobic versions of the copolymers, the biologic assays demonstrate that fibrinogen is as reactive/coagulable as for surfaces with saturated coverages of fibrin despite that these copolymer-coated surfaces have 60% less fibrinogen adsorbed to them. When adsorbed at the same low surface concentration in the absence of copolymer, fibrinogen is not active. Enzymatic processing of bound fibrinogen suggests that the presence of the copolymers promote the adsorption of the protein in end-on fashion. It is proposed here, that when adsorbed end-on, fibrinogen is functional because its reactive sites are

  6. Dissociation of bimolecular αIIbβ3-fibrinogen complex under a constant tensile force.

    PubMed

    Litvinov, Rustem I; Barsegov, Valeri; Schissler, Andrew J; Fisher, Andrew R; Bennett, Joel S; Weisel, John W; Shuman, Henry

    2011-01-01

    The regulated ability of integrin αIIbβ3 to bind fibrinogen plays a crucial role in platelet aggregation, adhesion, and hemostasis. Employing an optical-trap-based electronic force clamp, we studied the thermodynamics and kinetics of αIIbβ3-fibrinogen bond formation and dissociation under constant unbinding forces, mimicking the forces of physiologic blood shear on a thrombus. The distribution of bond lifetimes was bimodal, indicating that the αIIbβ3-fibrinogen complex exists in two bound states with different mechanical stability. The αIIbβ3 antagonist, abciximab, inhibited binding without affecting the unbinding kinetics, whereas Mn²(+) biased the αIIbβ3-fibrinogen complex to the strong bound state with reduced off-rate. The average bond lifetimes decreased exponentially with increasing pulling force from ∼5 pN to 50 pN, suggesting that in this force range the αIIbβ3-fibrinogen interactions are classical slip bonds. We found no evidence for catch bonds, which is consistent with the known lack of shear-enhanced platelet adhesion on fibrinogen-coated surfaces. Taken together, these data provide important quantitative and qualitative characteristics of αIIbβ3-fibrinogen binding and unbinding that underlie the dynamics of platelet adhesion and aggregation in blood flow. PMID:21190668

  7. Rapid extraction, radioiodination, and in vivo catabolism of 125I-labeled fibrinogen in the horse

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, C.P.; Hornof, W.J.; Kelly, A.B.; O'Brien, T.R.; DeNardo, S.J.

    1985-12-01

    Two methods were analyzed for the rapid extraction of equine fibrinogen from fresh plasma, using ammonium sulfate-sodium phosphate buffer. Fibrinogen from each of these 2 methods was then radiolabeled with 125I (half-life = 60.2 days, gamma = 35 keV), using monochloroiodine reagent. Mean protein-bound activity was 98.5% and mean clottable radioactivity was 94.1%. Radiolabeled fibrinogen administered IV to 15 horses had an overall mean (+/- SD) plasma half-life of 4.95 +/- 0.44 days.

  8. Bacteriophage lysin mediates the binding of streptococcus mitis to human platelets through interaction with fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ho Seong; Xiong, Yan Q; Mitchell, Jennifer; Seepersaud, Ravin; Bayer, Arnold S; Sullam, Paul M

    2010-01-01

    The binding of bacteria to human platelets is a likely central mechanism in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. We have previously found that platelet binding by Streptococcus mitis SF100 is mediated by surface components encoded by a lysogenic bacteriophage, SM1. We now demonstrate that SM1-encoded lysin contributes to platelet binding via its direct interaction with fibrinogen. Far Western blotting of platelets revealed that fibrinogen was the major membrane-associated protein bound by lysin. Analysis of lysin binding with purified fibrinogen in vitro confirmed that these proteins could bind directly, and that this interaction was both saturable and inhibitable. Lysin bound both the Aalpha and Bbeta chains of fibrinogen, but not the gamma subunit. Binding of lysin to the Bbeta chain was further localized to a region within the fibrinogen D fragment. Disruption of the SF100 lysin gene resulted in an 83+/-3.1% reduction (mean +/- SD) in binding to immobilized fibrinogen by this mutant strain (PS1006). Preincubation of this isogenic mutant with purified lysin restored fibrinogen binding to wild type levels. When tested in a co-infection model of endocarditis, loss of lysin expression resulted in a significant reduction in virulence, as measured by achievable bacterial densities (CFU/g) within vegetations, kidneys, and spleens. These results indicate that bacteriophage-encoded lysin is a multifunctional protein, representing a new class of fibrinogen-binding proteins. Lysin appears to be cell wall-associated through its interaction with choline. Once on the bacterial surface, lysin can bind fibrinogen directly, which appears to be an important interaction for the pathogenesis of endocarditis. PMID:20714354

  9. Photosensitive organized organic films in the light of bound electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekkat, Zouheir; Knoll, Wolfgang

    1997-01-01

    study of the electronic density distribution of these films show that a remarkable variation in the LBK structures' stability comes with a seemingly small change in the side-chain structure. All the structures described here, form thin films that can be very sensitively characterized, by using surface plasmons and guided optical waves as electromagnetic modes bound to an interface.

  10. Venous ulceration, fibrinogen and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of long and short-term venous hypertension upon lymph fibrinogen concentrations was studied in an attempt to explain the peri-capillary deposition of fibrin reported in patients with post-phlebitic syndromes. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of rats and human volunteers was also studied. Both long- and short-term venous hypertension were found to increase fibrinogen transport across the interstitial space by more than 600%. Not only was there evidence of fibrinolytic activity in the lymph but after long-term venous hypertension alpha 2 antiplasmin activity was also detectable. Skin biopsies from the venous hypertensive ankles showed deposition of interstitial fibrin. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of the rat was found to be delayed if the rats were given epsilon amino caproic acid but it could not be increased with stanozolol. In human subjects it was found that patients with lipodermatosclerosis had delayed clot clearance and retarded blood fibrinolytic activity when compared with normal volunteers and patients with uncomplicated varicose veins. The principle cause why tall men are more subject to ulcers than short men, Dr Young conceived to be then length of the column of blood in their veins; which by its pressure, renders the legs less able to recover when hurt by any violence. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:6742738

  11. Fibrinogen-Induced Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation and Adherence to Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo Bedran, Telma Blanca; Azelmat, Jabrane; Palomari Spolidorio, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, the predominant bacterial species associated with dental caries, can enter the bloodstream and cause infective endocarditis. The aim of this study was to investigate S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells induced by human fibrinogen. The putative mechanism by which biofilm formation is induced as well as the impact of fibrinogen on S. mutans resistance to penicillin was also evaluated. Bovine plasma dose dependently induced biofilm formation by S. mutans. Of the various plasma proteins tested, only fibrinogen promoted the formation of biofilm in a dose-dependent manner. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed the presence of complex aggregates of bacterial cells firmly attached to the polystyrene support. S. mutans in biofilms induced by the presence of fibrinogen was markedly resistant to the bactericidal effect of penicillin. Fibrinogen also significantly increased the adherence of S. mutans to endothelial cells. Neither S. mutans cells nor culture supernatants converted fibrinogen into fibrin. However, fibrinogen is specifically bound to the cell surface of S. mutans and may act as a bridging molecule to mediate biofilm formation. In conclusion, our study identified a new mechanism promoting S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells which may contribute to infective endocarditis. PMID:24222906

  12. Fibrinogen and catheter-directed thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Ross, Reagan L; Beck, Adam W

    2014-12-01

    Fibrinogen is a complex glycoprotein that is known to play a significant role in the process of thrombus formation and evolution, and has been linked to the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Given the importance of fibrinogen in these processes, it has been evaluated as a biomarker for atherosclerotic disease and as a marker during treatment for venous and arterial thrombosis. Here we describe the expansive role that fibrinogen plays in human physiology. PMID:26073829

  13. The development of radioimmunoassays for fibrinogen degradation products: fragments D and E.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Y B; Martin, M J; Landon, J; Chard, T

    1975-01-01

    Fibrinogen degradation products, fragment D (FgD) and fragment E (FgE) have been measured in human serum by specific radioimmunoassays. In addition, the appearance of a neoantigenic determinant on FgD, revealed when fibrinogen is degraded by plasmin has been utilized to develop a specific radioimmunoassay for FgD in plasma (FgDneo). The reagents and conditions used in each assay are described in detail. The mean specific activity was 144 muCi/mug for 125I-labelled FgE and 82 muCi/mug for 125I-labelled FgD. Separation of antibody bound and free antigen was achieved using second antibody. The detection limits of the FgE, FgD and FgDneo assays were 0.8, 1.0 and 6.2 ng/ml respectively. The specificity of each assay with respect to fibrinogen and its degradation fragments has been assessed. Fibrinogen and fragment X cross-reacted markedly in both the FgE and FgD assays, whereas the cross-reaction of fibrinogen was abolished in the FgDneo assay, while the cross-reaction of fragment X was 10%, indicating gradual emergence of the neoantigenic site during digestion of fibriogen. The sensitivity, precision, and specificity of the radioimmunoassay systems described have major advantages over the existing procedures for the measurement of fibrinogen degradation products. PMID:1201195

  14. Characterization of the fibrinogen binding domain of bacteriophage lysin from Streptococcus mitis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ho Seong; Sullam, Paul M

    2011-09-01

    The binding of bacteria to human platelets is a likely central mechanism in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. Platelet binding by Streptococcus mitis SF100 is mediated in part by a lysin encoded by the lysogenic bacteriophage SM1. In addition to its role in the phage life cycle, lysin mediates the binding of S. mitis to human platelets via its interaction with fibrinogen on the platelet surface. To better define the region of lysin mediating fibrinogen binding, we tested a series of purified lysin truncation variants for their abilities to bind this protein. These studies revealed that the fibrinogen binding domain of lysin is contained within the region spanned by amino acid residues 102 to 198 (lysin(102-198)). This region has no sequence homology to other known fibrinogen binding proteins. Lysin(102-198) bound fibrinogen comparably to full-length lysin and with the same selectivity for the fibrinogen Aα and Bβ chains. Lysin(102-198) also inhibited the binding in vitro of S. mitis to human fibrinogen and platelets. When assessed by platelet aggregometry, the disruption of the lysin gene in SF100 resulted in a significantly longer time to the onset of aggregation of human platelets than that of the parent strain. The preincubation of platelets with purified lysin(102-198) also delayed the onset of aggregation by SF100. These results indicate that the binding of lysin to fibrinogen is mediated by a specific domain of the phage protein and that this interaction is important for both platelet binding and aggregation by S. mitis. PMID:21690235

  15. Over 50 Years of Fibrinogen Concentrate.

    PubMed

    Costa-Filho, Rubens; Hochleitner, Gerald; Wendt, Michael; Teruya, Alexandre; Spahn, Donat R

    2016-03-01

    March 2013 represented the 50th anniversary of the first license granted for a fibrinogen concentrate. In this review, we look at the history of bleeding management that led to the development of fibrinogen concentrate, discuss its current use, and consider future developments for this product. PMID:26294722

  16. Over 50 Years of Fibrinogen Concentrate

    PubMed Central

    Hochleitner, Gerald; Wendt, Michael; Teruya, Alexandre; Spahn, Donat R.

    2015-01-01

    March 2013 represented the 50th anniversary of the first license granted for a fibrinogen concentrate. In this review, we look at the history of bleeding management that led to the development of fibrinogen concentrate, discuss its current use, and consider future developments for this product. PMID:26294722

  17. Fibrinogen

    MedlinePlus

    ... or secondary Hemophilia A Hemophilia B Placenta abruption - definition Update Date 1/27/2015 Updated by: Yi- ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  18. Influence of spacer length on heparin coupling efficiency and fibrinogen adsorption of modified titanium surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tebbe, David; Thull, Roger; Gbureck, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Background Chemical bonding of the drug onto surfaces by means of spacer molecules is accompanied with a reduction of the biological activity of the drug due to a constricted mobility since normally only short spacer molecule like aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APMS) are used for drug coupling. This work aimed to study covalent attachment of heparin to titanium(oxide) surfaces by varying the length of the silane coupling agent, which should affect the biological potency of the drug due to a higher mobility with longer spacer chains. Methods Covalent attachment of heparin to titanium metal and TiO2 powder was carried out using the coupling agents 3-(Trimethoxysilyl)-propylamine (APMS), N- [3-(Trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine (Diamino-APMS) and N1- [3-(Trimethoxy-silyl)-propyl]diethylenetriamine (Triamino-APMS). The amount of bound coupling agent and heparin was quantified photometrically by the ninhydrin reaction and the tolidine-blue test. The biological potency of heparin was determined photometrically by the chromogenic substrate Chromozym TH and fibrinogen adsorption to the modified surfaces was researched using the QCM-D (Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring) technique. Results Zeta-potential measurements confirmed the successful coupling reaction; the potential of the unmodified anatase surface (approx. -26 mV) shifted into the positive range (> + 40 mV) after silanisation. Binding of heparin results in a strongly negatively charged surface with zeta-potentials of approx. -39 mV. The retaining biological activity of heparin was highest for the spacer molecule Triamino-APMS. QCM-D measurements showed a lower viscosity for adsorbed fibrinogen films on heparinised surfaces by means of Triamino-APMS. Conclusion The remaining activity of heparin was found to be highest for the covalent attachment with Triamino-APMS as coupling agent due to the long chain of this spacer molecule and therefore the highest mobility of the drug. Furthermore, the

  19. Fibrinogen induces endothelial cell permeability

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Neetu; Roberts, Andrew M.; Dean, William L.; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2010-01-01

    Many cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disorders are accompanied by an increased blood content of fibrinogen (Fg), a high molecular weight plasma adhesion protein. Fg is a biomarker of inflammation and its degradation products have been associated with microvascular leakage. We tested the hypothesis that at pathologically high levels, Fg increases endothelial cell (EC) permeability through extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling and by inducing F-actin formation. In cultured ECs, Fg binding to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and to α5β1 integrin, caused phosphorylation of ERK. Subsequently, F-actin formation increased and coincided with formation of gaps between ECs, which corresponded with increased permeability of ECs to albumin. Our data suggest that formation of F-actin and gaps may be the mechanism for increased albumin leakage through the EC monolayer. The present study indicates that elevated un-degraded Fg may be a factor causing microvascular permeability that typically accompanies cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disorders. PMID:17849175

  20. Using Neutron Reflectometry to Discern the Structure of Fibrinogen Adsorption at the Stainless Steel/Aqueous Interface.

    PubMed

    Wood, Mary H; Browning, Kathryn L; Barker, Robert D; Clarke, Stuart M

    2016-06-23

    Neutron reflectometry has been successfully used to study adsorption on a stainless steel surface by means of depositing a thin steel film on silicon. The film was characterized using XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), TOF-SIMS (time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry), and GIXRD (grazing incidence X-ray diffraction), demonstrating the retention both of the austenitic phase and of the required composition for 316L stainless steel. The adsorption of fibrinogen from a physiologically-relevant solution onto the steel surface was studied using neutron reflectometry and QCM (quartz crystal microbalance) and compared to that on a deposited chromium oxide surface. It was found that the protein forms an irreversibly bound layer at low concentrations, with maximum protein concentration a distance of around 20 Å from the surface. Evidence for a further diffuse reversibly-bound layer forming at higher concentrations was also observed. Both the structure of the layer revealed by the neutron reflectometry data and the high water retention predicted by the QCM data suggest that there is a significant extent of protein unfolding upon adsorption. A lower extent of adsorption was seen on the chromium surfaces, although the adsorbed layer structures were similar, suggesting comparable adsorption mechanisms. PMID:27244444

  1. Energetics of thrombin-fibrinogen interaction.

    PubMed

    Hopfner, K P; Di Cera, E

    1992-11-24

    The kinetic mechanism of thrombin-fibrinogen interaction has been elucidated by steady-state measurements of synthetic substrate hydrolysis by human alpha-thrombin in the presence of human fibrinogen used as a competitive inhibitor and sucrose used as a viscogenic agent. Sucrose greatly affects the FKm for thrombin-fibrinogen interaction, without altering the intrinsic properties of the system. Under conditions of pH 7.5 and 0.1 M NaCl, fibrinogen behaves like a sticky substrate for thrombin, with acylation being comparable to dissociation in the temperature range 20-37 degrees C. In the same temperature range, deacylation is much faster than acylation. The van't Hoff enthalpy of binding for thrombin-fibrinogen interaction is -24 +/- 3 kcal/mol and the entropy is -55 +/- 11 cal mol-1 deg-1. A chemical compensation effect is present in the binding of fibrinogen and synthetic amide substrates to thrombin, with the delta H and delta G values being linked through a linear relationship. PMID:1445891

  2. An Electropolymerized Crystalline Film Incorporating Axially-Bound Metalloporphycenes: Remarkable Reversibility, Reproducibility, and Coloration Efficiency of Ruthenium(II/III)-Based Electrochromism.

    PubMed

    Abe, Masaaki; Futagawa, Hiroki; Ono, Toshikazu; Yamada, Teppei; Kimizuka, Nobuo; Hisaeda, Yoshio

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative electropolymeization of an axially bound, bithiophene-pyridine complex of ruthenium(III)-porphycene [Ru(TPrPc) (btp)2]PF6 (1) gives a submicrometer-thick, polymeric film on an ITO electrode with a crystalline morphology. The polymeric film, the first example of axially linked multimetalloporphycene coordination arrays, exhibits highly stable and reproducible electrochromic response with high electrochromic efficiency upon electrochemical control over the metal-centered electron transfer process (Ru(II)/Ru(III)). PMID:26569481

  3. Nitric oxide releasing material adsorbs more fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Lantvit, Sarah M; Barrett, Brittany J; Reynolds, Melissa M

    2013-11-01

    One mechanism of the failure of blood-contacting devices is clotting. Nitric oxide (NO) releasing materials are seen as a viable solution to the mediation of surface clotting by preventing platelet activation; however, NO's involvement in preventing clot formation extends beyond controlling platelet function. In this study, we evaluate NO's effect on factor XII (fibrinogen) adsorption and activation, which causes the initiation of the intrinsic arm of the coagulation cascade. This is done by utilizing a model plasticized poly(vinyl) chloride (PVC), N-diazeniumdiolate system and looking at the adsorption of fibrinogen, an important clotting protein, to these surfaces. The materials have been prepared in such a way to eliminate changes in surface properties between the control (plasticized PVC) and composite (NO-releasing) materials. This allows us to isolate NO release and determine the effect on the adsorption of fibrinogen, to the material surface. Surprisingly, it was found that an NO releasing material with a surface flux of 17.4 ± 0.5 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1) showed a significant increase in the amount of fibrinogen adsorbed to the material surface compared to one with a flux of 13.0 ± 1.6 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1) and the control (2334 ± 496, 226 ± 99, and 103 ±31% fibrinogen adsorbed of control, respectively). This study suggests that NO's role in controlling clotting is extended beyond platelet activation. PMID:23554300

  4. THE CONVERSION OF FIBRINOGEN TO FIBRIN

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Sidney; Katz, Sidney; Ferry, John D.

    1953-01-01

    1. Fibrin clots prepared in the absence of calcium can be dissolved in solutions of lithium chloride and bromide and sodium bromide and iodide, as well as of guanidine hydrochloride and urea. These salts do not denature fibrinogen under the same conditions of concentration, temperature, and time. Sedimentation experiments on the fibrin solutions show in each case a single sharp peak with a sedimentation constant close to that of fibrinogen. 2. At lower concentrations, these salts inhibit the clotting of fibrinogen by thrombin, but in the case of lithium bromide and sodium iodide, at least, allow an intermediate polymer to accumulate whose sedimentation constant is close to that of the polymer observed in systems inhibited by hexamethylene glycol or urea. PMID:13069679

  5. Role of fibrinogen in acute ischemic kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Sörensen-Zender, I; Rong, S; Susnik, N; Lange, J; Gueler, F; Degen, J L; Melk, A; Haller, H; Schmitt, R

    2013-09-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is associated with activation of the coagulation system and accumulation of blood clotting factors in the kidney. The aim of the present study was to examine the functional impact of fibrinogen on renal inflammation, damage, and repair in the context of I/R injury. In this study, we found that I/R was associated with a significant increase in the renal deposition of circulating fibrinogen. In parallel, I/R stress induced the de novo expression of fibrinogen in tubular epithelial cells, as reflected by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, and in situ hybridization. In vitro, fibrinogen expression was induced by oncostatin M and hyper-IL-6 in primary tubular epithelial cells, and fibrinogen-containing medium had an inhibitory effect on tubular epithelial cell adhesion and migration. Fibrinogen(+/-) mice showed similar survival as wild-type mice but better preservation in early postischemic renal function. In fibrinogen(-/-) mice, renal function and survival were significantly worse than in fibrinogen(+/-) mice. Renal transplant experiments revealed reduced expression of tubular damage markers and attenuated proinflammatory cytokine expression but increased inflammatory cell infiltrates and transforming growth factor-β expression in fibrinogen(-/-) isografts. These data point to heterogeneous effects of fibrinogen in renal I/R injury. While a complete lack of fibrinogen may be detrimental, partial reduction of fibrinogen in heterozygous mice can improve renal function and overall outcome. PMID:23804451

  6. Generation of soliton and bound soliton pulses in mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser using graphene film as saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, H.; Harun, S. W.; Anyi, C. L.; Muhammad, A. R.; Ahmad, F.; Tan, S. J.; Nor, R. M.; Zulkepely, N. R.; Ali, N. M.; Arof, H.

    2016-04-01

    We report an observation of soliton and bound-state soliton in passive mode-locked fibre laser employing graphene film as a passive saturable absorber (SA). The SA was fabricated from the graphene flakes, which were obtained from electrochemical exfoliation process. The graphene flakes was mixed with polyethylene oxide solution to form a polymer composite, which was then dried at room temperature to produce a film. The film was then integrated in a laser cavity by attaching it to the end of a fibre ferrule with the aid of index matching gel. The fibre laser generated soliton pulses with a 20.7 MHz repetition rate, 0.88 ps pulse width, 0.0158 mW average output power, 0.175 pJ pulse energy and 18.72 W peak power at the wavelength of 1564 nm. A bound soliton with pulse duration of ~1.04 ps was also obtained at the pump power of 110.85 mW by carefully adjusting the polarization of the oscillating laser. The formation of bound soliton is due to the direct pulse to pulse interaction. The results show that the proposed graphene-based SA offers a simple and cost efficient approach of generating soliton and bound soliton in mode-locked EDFL set-up.

  7. Group B Streptococcal Serine-Rich Repeat Proteins Promote Interaction With Fibrinogen and Vaginal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nai-Yu; Patras, Kathryn A.; Seo, Ho Seong; Cavaco, Courtney K.; Rösler, Berenice; Neely, Melody N.; Sullam, Paul M.; Doran, Kelly S.

    2014-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) can cause severe disease in susceptible hosts, including newborns, pregnant women, and the elderly. GBS serine-rich repeat (Srr) surface glycoproteins are important adhesins/invasins in multiple host tissues, including the vagina. However, exact molecular mechanisms contributing to their importance in colonization are unknown. We have recently determined that Srr proteins contain a fibrinogen-binding region (BR) and hypothesize that Srr-mediated fibrinogen binding may contribute to GBS cervicovaginal colonization. In this study, we observed that fibrinogen enhanced wild-type GBS attachment to cervical and vaginal epithelium, and that this was dependent on Srr1. Moreover, purified Srr1-BR peptide bound directly to host cells, and peptide administration in vivo reduced GBS recovery from the vaginal tract. Furthermore, a GBS mutant strain lacking only the Srr1 “latching” domain exhibited decreased adherence in vitro and decreased persistence in a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization, suggesting the importance of Srr–fibrinogen interactions in the female reproductive tract. PMID:24620021

  8. Fibrinogen reduction and coagulation in cardiac surgery: an investigational study.

    PubMed

    Gielen, Chantal L I; Grimbergen, Jos; Klautz, Robert J M; Koopman, Jaap; Quax, Paul H A

    2015-09-01

    Fibrinogen as precursor of fibrin plays an essential role in clot formation. There are three main mechanisms associated with a reduction in fibrinogen concentration during cardiac surgery: hemodilution, consumption, and degradation. Moreover, early fibrinogen degradation products (FgDPs) can interfere with normal fibrin formation of intact fibrinogen. The aim of this study was to determine the relative contributions of hemodilution, consumption, and degradation to fibrinogen loss in cardiac surgery and to evaluate the effects fibrinogen degradation products on blood clot formation in vitro. First, fibrin and fibrinogen concentrations, their degradation products, hematocrit, and albumin concentrations were compared in 10 patients before and after isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Second, ex-vivo fibrinogen supplementation experiments were performed. Finally, the effects of purified FgDPs on clotting time and clot firmness were established in vitro in whole blood by ROTEM. Fibrinogen plasma concentration decreased 30% during surgery. This drop appears to be mainly caused by hemodilution, as both hematocrit and albumin levels decreased and no relevant increase in D-dimer levels and FgDPs was observed. Furthermore, the coagulation profile normalized after addition of purified fibrinogen. Early FgDPs demonstrated a significant impact on in-vitro whole blood clotting. Although early FgDPs have a pronounced effect on blood clot formation in vitro and therefore may induce or enhance in vivo coagulopathy, the drop of fibrinogen concentration seen after CABG surgery (using tranexamic acid) is primarily caused by hemodilution. PMID:26083991

  9. Influence of fibrinogen and haematocrit on erythrocyte sedimentation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Holley, L; Woodland, N; Hung, W T; Cordatos, K; Reuben, A

    1999-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of haematocrit, fibrinogen concentration and fibrinogen availability (amount of fibrinogen per red blood cell) on erythrocyte sedimentation. The Westergren technique was applied to blood samples from 36 subjects and to their blood manipulated to haematocrits of 10, 20, 30 and 40%. Readings were taken every 10 minutes for 300 minutes. Previous studies indicate that erythrocyte sedimentation occurs in three phases. In this study, we show that haematocrit has little influence on either the rate of fall of particles in the first phase (m1) or the duration of the first phase. This is also true for fibrinogen availability and for fibrinogen concentration at low haematocrits. At high haematocrits m1 increases with fibrinogen concentration. The rate of fall of rouleaux during phase 2 (m2) and ESR60 both decrease exponentially with haematocrit and increase linearly with fibrinogen concentration. While m2 is more closely correlated to fibrinogen availability than to fibrinogen concentration or to haematocrit, this is not the case for ESR60. Thus haematocrit, fibrinogen concentration and fibrinogen availability are more important to the velocity of sedimentation in the second phase than to the sedimenting velocity during phase 1 or to the duration of phase 1. PMID:10690265

  10. Single-molecule surface studies of fibrinogen and DNA on semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xianhua

    environments with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Its interactions with fibrinogen proteins co-adsorbed on surfaces exhibit an interesting desorption effect. The photoelectric imaging of DNA adsorbed on silicon is studied in ultra-high vacuum. A contrast reversal is observed on Si (111) depending on different surface pretreatments, which we suggest is due to the surface states induced photoemission. Several semiconductor materials, including Si(100), Si (111), diamond-like carbon (DLC) films, single crystal diamond (SCD) (100), nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) films, silicon carbide (SiC) (0001), and graphene, are examined for biocompatibility in applications such as medical implants and biosensors. In conjunction with other studies in the literature, we suggest that DLC, NCD, and SiC are suitable for biosensor applications.

  11. Revealing fibrinogen monolayer conformations at different pHs: electrokinetic and colloid deposition studies.

    PubMed

    Nattich-Rak, Małgorzata; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Wasilewska, Monika; Sadowska, Marta

    2015-07-01

    Adsorption mechanism of human fibrinogen on mica at different pHs is studied using the streaming potential and colloid deposition measurements. The fibrinogen monolayers are produced by a controlled adsorption under diffusion transport at pH of 3.5 and 7.4. Initially, the electrokinetic properties of these monolayers and their stability for various ionic strength are determined. It is shown that at pH 3.5 fibrinogen adsorbs irreversibly on mica for ionic strength range of 4×10(-4) to 0.15 M. At pH 7.4, a partial desorption is observed for ionic strength below 10(-2) M. This is attributed to the desorption of the end-on oriented molecules whereas the side-on adsorbed molecules remain irreversibly bound at all ionic strengths. The orientation of molecules and monolayer structure is evaluated by the colloid deposition measurements involving negatively charged polystyrene latex microspheres, 820 nm in diameter. An anomalous deposition of negative latex particles on substrates exhibiting a negative zeta potential is observed. At pH 3.5 measurable deposition of latex is observed even at low ionic strength where the approach distance of latex particles exceeded 70 nm. At pH 7.4 this critical distance is 23 nm. This confirms that fibrinogen monolayers formed at both pHs are characterized by the presence of the side-on and end-on oriented molecules that prevail at higher coverage range. It is also shown that positive charge is located at the end parts of the αA chains of the adsorbed fibrinogen molecules. Therefore, it is concluded that the colloid deposition method is an efficient tool for revealing protein adsorption mechanisms at solid/electrolyte interfaces. PMID:25453169

  12. Effect of stress hormones on the expression of fibrinogen-binding receptors in platelets.

    PubMed

    Lam, Nicole Y-L; Rainer, Timothy H; Ng, Margaret H-L; Leung, Yonna; Cocks, Robert A

    2002-12-01

    Acute coagulopathy is a common clinical complication after trauma, and contributes to posttraumatic multiple organ failure. The phenomenon may be due to the effect of stress hormones on platelet adhesion molecule expression after trauma. Catecholamine levels correlate with injury severity scores and changes of L-selectin expression on leucocytes, whilst adrenaline (ADR) (epinephrine) alone also activates platelets. This study thus investigates the effects of ADR and noradrenaline (NOR) (norepinephrine) on platelets, at doses similar to those found in the plasma of normal and trauma subjects. Blood was taken from 19 healthy subjects and placed in tubes containing sodium citrate. Anti-platelet-bound fibrinogen monoclonal antibody was used to identify the activated platelets while anti-CD41 was used to identify platelets with and without activation. Five increasing concentrations of ADR and NOR (1, 3, 5, 10, 30 nmol/l) as well as one negative control (0.9% normal saline) and one positive control (10 micromol/l adenosine diphosphate/ADP) were prepared for the stimulation. A whole blood protocol was used in order to minimize any activation artefacts, which might be created by centrifugation. The percentage of platelets expressing fibrinogen receptors increased significantly with ADR and NOR even at the lowest dose (1 nmol/l) and continued to increase in a dose-dependent manner. Although the effect of ADR was greater than NOR in stimulating platelets to express fibrinogen receptors, the average number of fibrinogen receptors on each platelet was constant. ADR and NOR activated platelets to express fibrinogen receptors at doses that are similar to those found in the plasma of trauma patients. PMID:12458065

  13. Functional evaluation of an inherited abnormal fibrinogen: fibrinogen “Baltimore”

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Eugene A.; Shainoff, John R.; Vogel, Alfred; Jackson, Dudley P.

    1971-01-01

    The rate of clotting and the rate of development and degree of turbidity after addition of thrombin to plasma or purified fibrinogen from a patient with fibrinogen Baltimore was delayed when compared with normal, especially in the presence of low concentrations of thrombin. Optimal coagulation and development of translucent, rather than opaque, clots occurred at a lower pH with the abnormal fibrinogen than with normal. Development of turbidity during clotting of the abnormal plasma or fibrinogen was less than normal at each pH tested, but was maximal in both at approximately pH 6.4. The physical quality of clots formed from fibrinogen Baltimore was abnormal, as demonstrated by a decreased amplitude on thromboelastography. The morphologic appearance of fibrin strands formed from fibrinogen Baltimore by thrombin at pH 7.4 was abnormal when examined by phase contrast or electron microscopy, but those formed by thrombin at pH 6.4 or by thrombin and calcium chloride were similar to, though less compact, than normal fibrin. The periodicity of fibrin formed from fibrinogen Baltimore was similar to normal and was 231-233 Å. A study of the release of the fibrinopeptides from the patient's fibrinogen and its chromatographic subfractions verified the existence of both a normally behaving and a defective form of fibrinogen in the patient's plasma. The defective form differed from normal in three functionally different ways: (a) the rate of release of fibrinopeptides A and AP was slower than normal; (b) no visible clot formation accompanied either partial or complete release of the fibrinopeptides from the defective form in 0.3 M NaCl at pH 7.4; and (c) the defective component possessed a high proportion of phosphorylated, relative to nonphosphorylated, fibrinopeptide A, while the coagulable component contained very little of the phosphorylated peptide (AP). The high phosphate content of the defective component did not appear to be the cause of the abnormality, but may be the

  14. Studies of activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the luminal surface of adherent platelets. Paradoxical loss of luminal receptors when platelets adhere to high density fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Coller, B S; Kutok, J L; Scudder, L E; Galanakis, D K; West, S M; Rudomen, G S; Springer, K T

    1993-01-01

    The accessibility of activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the luminal surface of platelets adherent to damaged blood vessels or atherosclerotic plaques is likely to play a crucial role in subsequent platelet recruitment. To define better the factors involved in this process, we developed a functional assay to assess the presence of activated, luminal GPIIb/IIIa receptors, based on their ability to bind erythrocytes containing a high density of covalently coupled RGD-containing peptides (thromboerythrocytes). Platelets readily adhered to wells coated with purified type I rat skin collagen and the adherent platelets bound a dense lawn of thromboerythrocytes. With fibrinogen-coated wells, platelet adhesion increased as the fibrinogen-coating concentration increased, reaching a plateau at about 11 micrograms/ml. Thromboerythrocyte binding to the platelets adherent to fibrinogen showed a paradoxical response, increasing at fibrinogen coating concentrations up to approximately 4-6 micrograms/ml and then dramatically decreasing at higher fibrinogen-coating concentrations. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the morphology of platelets adherent to collagen was similar to that of platelets adherent to low density fibrinogen, with extensive filopodia formation and ruffling. In contrast, platelets adherent to high density fibrinogen showed a bland, flattened appearance. Immunogold staining of GPIIb/IIIa receptors demonstrated concentration of the receptors on the filopodia, and depletion of receptors on the flattened portion of the platelets. Thus, there is a paradoxical loss of accessible, activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the luminal surface of platelets adherent to high density fibrinogen. Two factors may contribute to this result: engagement of GPIIb/IIIa receptors with fibrinogen on the abluminal surface leading to the loss of luminal receptors, and loss of luminal filopodia that interact with thromboerythrocytes. These data provide insight into the differences

  15. Association Between γ′ Fibrinogen Levels and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Kristine S.; Madden, Theresa E.; Farrell, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The γ′ fibrinogen isoform produces clots that are stiffer and more resistant to breakdown than the more common fibrinogen isoform, γA. Increased levels of γ′ fibrinogen are associated with several forms of cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this cross-sectional study is to investigate the relationship between γ′ fibrinogen, an emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and inflammatory markers in subjects with a chronic inflammatory state. The 284 subjects for this study came from the Periodontitis and Vascular Events study, and γ′ fibrinogen and total fibrinogen in plasma were measured by ELISA. Information on patient demographics and health status, as well as levels of C-reactive protein, an inflammatory marker, have previously been collected for this study. The mean (SE) γ′ fibrinogen level in the subjects was 0.622 (0.017) mg/ml. Levels of γ′ fibrinogen were correlated with C-reactive protein (p = 0.006), with a one unit increase in C-reactive protein associated with a 1.9% increase in γ′ fibrinogen, after adjustment for potential confounders. Total fibrinogen was not correlated with γ′ fibrinogen in these subjects. The number of dental sites with evidence of tissue inflammation was also significantly associated with γ′ fibrinogen levels. These results provide an important step in the evolution of γ′ fibrinogen not only as a general risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but as a potentially useful biomarker for assessing a patient's inflammatory state and associated cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:21174007

  16. Fibrinogen is degraded and internalized during incubation with neutrophils, and fibrinogen products localize to electron lucent vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Richard; Jaffer, Mohamed A; Woodburne, Vivienne E; Sewell, Trevor; Kelly, Sharon L; Kirsch, Ralph E; Shephard, Enid G

    2002-01-01

    A biologically relevant relationship exists between neutrophils and coagulation processes. Several studies have focused on the ability of neutrophil proteases (both intracellular and membrane-associated) to degrade fibrinogen. The present study investigates the events following the interaction of activated neutrophils with soluble fibrinogen. During incubation of PMA-stimulated neutrophils with fibrinogen at 37 degrees C, fibrinogenolysis occurred, and degraded fibrinogen became associated with the neutrophil. Immunoelectron microscopy identified these fibrinogen products to be located within electron lucent vesicles, and not on the surface of the cell, suggesting that they are internalized. Although a specific interaction between fibrinogen and the neutrophil membrane might assist uptake, in the presence of physiological concentrations of fibrinogen, internalization occurred largely via a non-specific pinocytic process. Studies at low temperature revealed that both intact and degraded forms of fibrinogen can associate with neutrophils. The fibrinogen products detected intracellularly in experiments performed at 37 degrees C might represent uptake of degraded as well as intact forms of fibrinogen, the latter being rapidly degraded intracellularly. This route of fibrinogenolysis contributes minimally to the overall extent of the degradation process, the majority occurring extracellularly. Neutrophils thus possess a proteolytic mechanism for preventing accumulation of surface ligand, perhaps allowing them to evade the immunomodulatory effects of such ligands during inflammation. PMID:12023883

  17. Regulation of fibrinogen synthesis by plasmin-derived fragments of fibrinogen and fibrin: an indirect feedback pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, D G; Levy, B A; Adams, M A; Fuller, G M

    1982-01-01

    The effect of plasmin-derived fibrinogen fragments on the biosynthesis of fibrinogen was investigated in cultured monolayers of rat hepatocytes. Incubating the cells with several concentrations of either fibrinogen or fibrin fragment D or E had no effect on the synthesis and secretion of fibrinogen by these cells. However, if the fragments were incubated with isolated peripheral blood leukocytes, they caused these cells to secrete a factor that when added to the hepatocytes caused an increase in fibrinogen synthesis 4- to 6-fold over controls. Moreover, the hepatocyte-stimulating factor also affected the production of several other proteins produced by the hepatocyte. These results demonstrate that both fragments D and E can stimulate hepatic fibrinogen synthesis via an indirect leukocyte-mediated pathway. Images PMID:6461860

  18. Indications and Risks of Fibrinogen in Surgery and Trauma.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Donat R; Spahn, Gabriela H; Stein, Philipp

    2016-03-01

    Fibrinogen has a central role in coagulation. Following trauma and perioperatively, low fibrinogen levels have been found to be risk factors for exaggerated bleeding, transfusion needs, and adverse outcome. Conversely, treatment with exogenous fibrinogen in critically bleeding patients with low fibrinogen levels has been shown to decrease transfusion needs. Because following trauma and in many perioperative situations fibrinogen is the first coagulation "element" to become critically low, it appears reasonable to target fibrinogen in clinical coagulation algorithms aiming at early specific and goal-directed treatment. A low fibrinogen can be a low plasma concentration or a low functional fibrinogen as assessed by point-of-care techniques such as thromboelastography (TEG) or thromboelastometry (ROTEM). This review summarizes the evidence base for perioperative algorithm-based fibrinogen administration, including the exact thresholds for fibrinogen administration used in the different algorithms. Algorithm-based individualized goal-directed use of fibrinogen resulted in highly significant reduction in transfusion needs, adverse outcomes, in certain studies even mortality, and where investigated reduced costs, with high safety levels at the same time. Best evidence exists in cardiac surgery, followed by trauma, postpartum hemorrhage, and liver transplantation. The introduction of these concepts is highly demanding and requires a tremendous educational effort to familiarize all health care workers with the necessary knowledge and the skills of how to run TEG/ROTEM tests. Future research is needed to compare the efficacy, safety, and costs of different algorithms. This, however, should not prevent us from introducing these expedient point-of-care-based algorithms clinically today. PMID:26716503

  19. 21 CFR 864.7340 - Fibrinogen determination system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fibrinogen determination system. 864.7340 Section 864.7340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7340 Fibrinogen determination system. (a) Identification....

  20. 21 CFR 864.7340 - Fibrinogen determination system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fibrinogen determination system. 864.7340 Section 864.7340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7340 Fibrinogen determination system. (a) Identification....

  1. Chitosan-bound pyridinedicarboxylate Ni(II) and Fe(III) complex biopolymer films as waste water decyanidation agents.

    PubMed

    Adewuyi, Sheriff; Jacob, Julianah Modupe; Olaleye, Oluwatoyin Omolola; Abdulraheem, Taofiq Olanrewaju; Tayo, Jubril Ayopo; Oladoyinbo, Fatai Oladipupo

    2016-10-20

    Chitosan is a biopolymer with immense structural advantage for chemical and mechanical modifications to generate novel properties, functions and applications. This work depicts new pyridinedicarboxylicacid (PDC) crosslinked chitosan-metal ion films as veritable material for cyanide ion removal from aqueous solution. The PDC-crosslinked chitosan-metal films (PDC-Chit-Ni(II) and PDC-Chit-Fe(III)) were formed by complexing PDC-crosslinked chitosan film with anhydrous nickel(II) and iron(III) chloride salts respectively. The PDC-Chit and its metal films were characterized employing various analytical and spectroscopic techniques. The FT-IR, UV-vis and the XRD results confirm the presence of the metal ions in the metal coordinated PDC-crosslinked chitosan film. The surface morphological difference of PDC-Chit-Ni(II) film before and after decyanidation was explored with scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, the quantitative amount of nickel(II) and iron(III) present in the complex were determined using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer as 32.3 and 37.2μg/g respectively which portends the biopolymer film as a good complexing agent. Removal of cyanide from aqueous solution with PDC-Chit, PDC-Chit-Ni(II) and PDC-Chit-Fe(III) films was studied with batch equilibrium experiments. At equilibrium, decyanidation capacity (DC) followed the order PDC-Chit-Ni (II)≈PDC-Chit-Fe(III)>PDC-Chit. PDC-Chit-Ni(II) film gave 100% CN(-) removal within 40min decyanidation owing to favorable coordination geometry. PMID:27474675

  2. Conformational changes of fibrinogen in dispersed carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Jean; Khang, Dongwoo

    2012-01-01

    The conformational changes of plasma protein structures in response to carbon nanotubes are critical for determining the nanotoxicity and blood coagulation effects of carbon nanotubes. In this study, we identified that the functional intensity of carboxyl groups on carbon nanotubes, which correspond to the water dispersity or hydrophilicity of carbon nanotubes, can induce conformational changes in the fibrinogen domains. Also, elevation of carbon nanotube density can alter the secondary structures (ie, helices and beta sheets) of fibrinogen. Furthermore, fibrinogen that had been in contact with the nanoparticle material demonstrated a different pattern of heat denaturation compared with free fibrinogen as a result of a variation in hydrophilicity and concentration of carbon nanotubes. Considering the importance of interactions between carbon nanotubes and plasma proteins in the drug delivery system, this study elucidated the correlation between nanoscale physiochemical material properties of carbon nanotubes and associated structural changes in fibrinogen. PMID:22915854

  3. SBA-15 mesoporous silica free-standing thin films containing copper ions bounded via propyl phosphonate units - preparation and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskowski, Lukasz; Laskowska, Magdalena; Jelonkiewicz, Jerzy; Dulski, Mateusz; Wojtyniak, Marcin; Fitta, Magdalena; Balanda, Maria

    2016-09-01

    The SBA-15 silica thin films containing copper ions anchored inside channels via propyl phosphonate groups are investigated. Such materials were prepared in the form of thin films, with hexagonally arranged pores, laying rectilinear to the substrate surface. However, in the case of our thin films, their free standing form allowed for additional research possibilities, that are not obtainable for typical thin films on a substrate. The structural properties of the samples were investigated by X-ray reflectometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The molecular structure was examined by Raman spectroscopy supported by numerical simulations. Magnetic measurements (SQUID magnetometry and EPR spectroscopy) showed weak antiferromagnetic interactions between active units inside silica channels. Consequently, the pores arrangement was determined and the process of copper ions anchoring by propyl phosphonate groups was verified in unambiguous way. Moreover, the type of interactions between magnetic atoms was determined.

  4. Control of Fibrinogen Assembly by Changing a Polarity of Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Jaseung; Liu, Ying; Snow, Sara; Rambhia, Pooja; Koga, Tadanori; Rafailovich, Miriam; Galanakis, Dennis

    2009-03-01

    Thrombogenesis causes various problems associated with an interruption in the blood flow (e.g., myocardial and cerebral infarction), and a hindrance to use of blood-contact vascular biomaterials (e.g., hemodialysis and cardiopulmonary bypass) with long-term patency since undesired adsorption of blood components occurs on vessels or biomaterials, such as surface-induced thrombosis. we showed that this clotting procedure can be occurred on hydrophobic polymeric surfaces without thrombin cleavage. However, the fibrinogen fibers were not formed on the polar surface such as spun-cast polymer film with pyridine and phenol groups. We also found that αC domains play an important role in initiation of polymerization on surface. Therefore, molecular association was inhibited on the polar surfaces due to confinement of αC chains on the surfaces. These findings were directly applied to stent surface modification. The commercial stent consist of Co-Cr alloy forms undesired fiber formation. However, PS-r-PVPh (13% phenol) coated stent surfaces completely prevent fiber formation.

  5. Buckling of a stiff film bound to a compliant substrate—Part III:. Herringbone solutions at large buckling parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audoly, Basile; Boudaoud, Arezki

    We study the buckling of a compressed thin elastic film bonded to a compliant substrate. An asymptotic solution of the equations for a plate on an elastic foundation is obtained in the limit of large residual stress in the film. In this limit, the film's shape is given by a popular origami folding, the Miura-ori, and is composed of parallelograms connected by dihedral folds. This asymptotic solution corresponds to the herringbone patterns reported previously in experiments: the crests and valleys of the pattern define a set of parallel, sawtooth-like curves. The kink angle obtained when observing these crests and valleys from above are shown to be right angles under equi-biaxial loading, in agreement with the experiments. The absolute minimum of energy corresponds to a pattern with very slender parallelograms; in the experiments, the wavelength is instead selected by the history of applied load.

  6. Generation of silicon nanocrystals by damage free continuous wave laser annealing of substrate-bound SiOx films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke-Begemann, T.; Wang, N.; Peretzki, P.; Seibt, M.; Ihlemann, J.

    2015-09-01

    Silicon nanocrystals have been generated by laser induced phase separation in SiOx films. A continuous wave laser emitting at 405 nm is focused to a 6 μm diameter spot on 530 nm thick SiOx films deposited on fused silica substrates. Irradiation of lines is accomplished by focus scanning. The samples are investigated by atomic force microscopy, TEM, Raman spectroscopy, and photoluminescence measurements. At a laser power of 35 mW corresponding to an irradiance of about 1.2 × 105 W/cm2, the formation of Si-nanocrystals in the film without any deterioration of the surface is observed. At higher laser power, the central irradiated region is oxidized to SiO2 and exhibits some porous character, while the surface remains optically smooth, and nanocrystals are observed beside and beneath this oxidized region. Amorphous Si-nanoclusters are formed at lower laser power and around the lines written at high power.

  7. Can the Viscoelastic Parameter α-Angle Distinguish Fibrinogen from Platelet Deficiency and Guide Fibrinogen Supplementation?

    PubMed

    Solomon, Cristina; Schöchl, Herbert; Ranucci, Marco; Schlimp, Christoph J

    2015-08-01

    Viscoelastic tests such as thrombelastography (TEG, Haemoscope Inc., Niles, IL) and thromboelastometry (ROTEM, Tem International GmbH, Munich, Germany), performed in whole blood, are increasingly used at the point-of-care to characterize coagulopathic states and guide hemostatic therapy. An algorithm, based on a mono-analysis (kaolin-activated assay) approach, was proposed in the TEG patent (issued in 2004) where the α-angle and the maximum amplitude parameters are used to guide fibrinogen supplementation and platelet administration, respectively. Although multiple assays for both the TEG and ROTEM devices are now available, algorithms based on TEG mono-analysis are still used in many institutions. In light of more recent findings, we discuss here the limitations and inaccuracies of the mono-analysis approach. Research shows that both α-angle and maximum amplitude parameters reflect the combined contribution of fibrinogen and platelets to clot strength. Therefore, although TEG mono-analysis is useful for identifying a coagulopathic state, it cannot be used to discriminate between fibrin/fibrinogen and/or platelet deficits, respectively. Conversely, the use of viscoelastic methods where 2 assays can be run simultaneously, one with platelet inhibitors and one without, can effectively allow for the identification of specific coagulopathic states, such as insufficient fibrin formation or an insufficient contribution of platelets to clot strength. Such information is critical for making the appropriate choice of hemostatic therapy. PMID:26197367

  8. Thromboembolic events in patients with severe inherited fibrinogen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rottenstreich, Amihai; Lask, Avigal; Schliamser, Lilliana; Zivelin, Ariella; Seligsohn, Uri; Kalish, Yosef

    2016-08-01

    Inherited afibrinogenemia and hypofibrinogenemia are rare bleeding disorders characterized by markedly reduced levels of fibrinogen in blood. Thrombotic complications in these disorders have been rarely described. We performed a multicenter retrospective study and reviewed the occurrence of thrombotic complications among patients with inherited fibrinogen deficiency. Cases were identified during a review of medical records of all patients with inherited fibrinogen deficiency followed at three different university hospitals in Israel. Nine patients were included in this study: five were afibrinogenemic and four hypofibrinogenemic. There were seven thrombotic events, mostly venous, that occurred in four out of nine patients (44 %). All thrombotic events occurred in afibrinogenemic patients. Mean age at the time of thrombosis was 45 (range 28-61) years. Thrombophilic evaluation performed was negative in all cases. At the time of thrombosis in five out of seven (71.4 %) events, fibrinogen replacement therapy was concurrently given. Therapeutic approach was different among patients ranging from supportive therapy alone, antiplatelet agents and anticoagulant therapy with the concurrent administration of fibrinogen replacement therapy. This study discloses a high rate of thrombosis in patients with afibrinogenemia. Events were both venous and arterial and may be recurrent. Management is highly problematic due to the precarious balance between bleeding and thrombotic risk in these patients. Fibrinogen replacement therapy should be cautiously used in these patients as most thrombotic events followed the administration of fibrinogen replacement therapy. Larger cohorts are warranted to better characterize the best management strategy in these paradoxical events. PMID:26712130

  9. Ultrastructural and biochemical analysis of fibrinogen receptors on activated thrombocytes

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    The present studies have been concerned with the role of fibrinogen and its receptor, GP IIb/IIIa, during the activation and early aggregation of pigeon thrombocytes. Thrombocytes were surface labeled with {sup 125}I then separated on SDS-PAGE. Analysis by gel autoradiography revealed major bands at MW 145 kd and 98 kd, which corresponded to human GPIIb and GPIIIa. Immunologic similarity of the pigeon and human receptor components was established by dot blot analysis using polyclonal antibodies directed against human GPIIb and GPIIIa. Pigeon fibrinogen, isolated by plasma precipitation with PEG-1000 and purified over Sepharose 4B, was used to study receptor-ligand interaction. Separation of pigeon fibrinogen on SDS-PAGE resulted in three peptides having apparent MW of 62kd, 55kd, and 47kd which are comparable to human fibrinogen. Further similarity of human and pigeon fibrinogen was verified by immonodiffusion against an antibody specific for the human protein. The role of fibrinogen and its receptor in thrombocyte function was established by turbidimetric aggregation using thrombin as an agonist under conditions requiring Ca++ and fibrinogen.

  10. Location of the heme-Fe atoms within the profile structure of a monolayer of cytochrome c bound to the surface of an ultrathin lipid multilayer film.

    PubMed Central

    Pachence, J M; Fischetti, R F; Blasie, J K

    1989-01-01

    We have recently developed x-ray diffraction methods to derive the profile structure of ultrathin lipid multilayer films having one to five bilayers (e.g., Skita, V., W. Richardson, M. Filipkowski, A.F. Garito, and J.K. Blasie. 1987. J. Physique. 47:1849-1855). Furthermore, we have employed these techniques to determine the location of a monolayer of cytochrome c bound to the carboxyl group surface of various ultrathin lipid multilayer substrates via nonresonance x-ray diffraction (Pachence, J.M., and J.K. Blasie. 1987. Biophys. J. 52:735-747). Here an intense tunable source of x-rays (beam line X9-A at the National Synchrotron Light Source at the Brookhaven National Laboratory) was utilized to measure the resonance x-ray diffraction effect from the heme-Fe atoms within the cytochrome c molecular monolayer located on the carboxyl surface of a five monolayer arachidic acid film. Lamellar x-ray diffraction was recorded for energies above, below, and at the Fe K-absorption edge (E = 7,112 eV). An analysis of the resonance x-ray diffraction effect is presented, whereby the location of the heme-Fe atoms within the electron density profile of the cytochrome c/arachidic acid ultrathin multilayer film is indicated to +/- 3 A accuracy. PMID:2550089

  11. Homocysteine influences blood clot properties alone and in combination with total fibrinogen but not with fibrinogen γ' in Africans.

    PubMed

    Nienaber-Rousseau, Cornelie; de Lange, Zelda; Pieters, Marlien

    2015-06-01

    Simultaneously increased fibrinogen and homocysteine (Hcy) in blood are believed to elevate the risk of cardiovascular disease mortality. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms involved are unknown. We sought to determine whether Hcy or its genetic determinants influence blood clot properties alone or in combination with fibrinogen. In addition, we investigated, for the first time, the gamma prime (γ') isoform of fibrinogen with Hcy in relation to clot architecture and lysis. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms, Hcy and hemostatic variables, including clot lysis, determined with a global fibrinolytic assay [giving lag time, slope, maximum absorbance and clot lysis time (CLT)], were measured in 1867 healthy black South Africans and cross-sectionally analyzed. Increasing Hcy did not affect fiber cross-sectional area (maximum absorbance). However, it decreased the time needed to initiate the coagulation cascade and for fibrin fibers to grow (lag time), it increased the tempo of lateral aggregation (slope) and reduced CLT. None of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms measured had effects on clot properties. Combined effects were observed between Hcy and total fibrinogen in predicting CLT. Fibrinogen γ', which affected markers of the fibrinolytic assay, did not have conjoint effects with Hcy. We believe that there is value in recognizing the combined effects of Hcy and fibrinogen, but not its γ' isoform in relation to clot structure and lysis. The enhanced fibrinolysis rate observed in patients with low fibrinogen and high Hcy may have adverse consequences for health if it disturbs hemostasis and results in a bleeding tendency. PMID:25688462

  12. Identification and molecular characterisation of a fibrinogen binding protein from Streptococcus iniae.

    PubMed Central

    Baiano, Justice CF; Tumbol, Reiny A; Umapathy, Aarti; Barnes, Andrew C

    2008-01-01

    Background Binding of serum components by surface M-related proteins, encoded by the emm genes, in streptococci constitutes a major virulence factor in this important group of organisms. The present study demonstrates fibrinogen binding by S. iniae, a Lancefield non-typeable pathogen causing devastating fish losses in the aquaculture industry and an opportunistic pathogen of humans, and identifies the proteins involved and their encoding genes. Results Fibrinogen binding by S. iniae significantly reduced respiratory burst activity of barramundi peritoneal macrophages in primary cultures compared to BSA-treated or untreated controls, indicating a potentially important role for fibrinogen binding cell-surface proteins in avoiding phagocytic attack in fish. We describe a novel emm-like gene, simA, encoding a 57 kDa fibrinogen binding M-like protein in S. iniae. These SiM proteins and their corresponding tetrameric structures from some sequevar types (~230 kDa) bound fibrinogen in Western blots. simA was most closely related (32% identity) to the demA gene of S. dysgalactiae. Genome walking and sequencing determined the genetic organization of the simA region had similarities to the mgrC regulon in GCS and to S. uberis. Moreover, a putative multigene regulator, mgx was orientated in the opposite direction to the simA gene in common with S. uberis, but contrary to findings in GAS and GCS. In GAS, diversity among emm-genes and consequent diversity of their M-related proteins results in substantial antigenic variation. However, an extensive survey of S. iniae isolates from diverse geographic regions and hosts revealed only three variants of the gene, with one sequevar accounting for all but two of the 50 isolates analysed. Conclusion These proteins play a role in avoiding oxidative attack by phagocytic cells during infection of fish by S. iniae, but genetic diversity amongst these key surface proteins has not yet arisen. This lack of diversity coupled with a functional

  13. Human fibrinogen adsorption on positively charged latex particles.

    PubMed

    Zeliszewska, Paulina; Bratek-Skicki, Anna; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Cieśla, Michał

    2014-09-23

    Fibrinogen (Fb) adsorption on positively charged latex particles (average diameter of 800 nm) was studied using the microelectrophoretic and the concentration depletion methods based on AFM imaging. Monolayers on latex were adsorbed from diluted bulk solutions at pH 7.4 and an ionic strength in the range of 10(-3) to 0.15 M where fibrinogen molecules exhibited an average negative charge. The electrophoretic mobility of the latex after controlled fibrinogen adsorption was systematically measured. A monotonic decrease in the electrophoretic mobility of fibrinogen-covered latex was observed for all ionic strengths. The results of these experiments were interpreted according to the three-dimensional electrokinetic model. It was also determined using the concentration depletion method that fibrinogen adsorption was irreversible and the maximum coverage was equal to 0.6 mg m(-2) for ionic strength 10(-3) M and 1.3 mg m(-2) for ionic strength 0.15 M. The increase of the maximum coverage was confirmed by theoretical modeling based on the random sequential adsorption approach. Paradoxically, the maximum coverage of fibrinogen on positively charged latex particles was more than two times lower than the maximum coverage obtained for negative latex particles (3.2 mg m(-2)) at pH 7.4 and ionic strength of 0.15 M. This was interpreted as a result of the side-on adsorption of fibrinogen molecules with their negatively charged core attached to the positively charged latex surface. The stability and acid base properties of fibrinogen monolayers on latex were also determined in pH cycling experiments where it was observed that there were no irreversible conformational changes in the fibrinogen monolayers. Additionally, the zeta potential of monolayers was more positive than the zeta potential of fibrinogen in the bulk, which proves a heterogeneous charge distribution. These experimental data reveal a new, side-on adsorption mechanism of fibrinogen on positively charged surfaces and

  14. Structural basis for distinctive recognition of fibrinogen [gamma]C peptide by the platelet integrin [alpha][subscript IIb][beta]3

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, Timothy A.; Zhu, Jianghai; Xiao, Tsan

    2009-01-12

    Hemostasis and thrombosis (blood clotting) involve fibrinogen binding to integrin {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} on platelets, resulting in platelet aggregation. {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} binding fibrinogen via an Arg-Asp-Gly (RGD) motif in fibrinogen's {alpha} subunit. {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} also binds to fibrinogen; however, it does so via an unstructured RGD-lacking C-terminal region of the {gamma} subunit ({gamma}C peptide). These distinct modes of fibrinogen binding enable {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} and {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} to function cooperatively in hemostasis. In this study, crystal structures reveal the integrin {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3}-{gamma}C peptide interface, and, for comparison, integrin {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} bound to a lamprey {gamma}C primordial RGD motif. Compared with RGD, the GAKQAGDV motif in {gamma}C adopts a different backbone configuration and binds over a more extended region. The integrin metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) Mg{sup 2+} ion binds the {gamma}C Asp side chain. The adjacent to MIDAS (ADMIDAS) Ca{sup 2+} ion binds the {gamma}C C terminus, revealing a contribution for ADMIDAS in ligand binding. Structural data from this natively disordered {gamma}C peptide enhances our understanding of the involvement of {gamma}C peptide and integrin {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} in hemostasis and thrombosis.

  15. Non-Covalent Interaction of α2-Antiplasmin with Fibrin(ogen): Localization of α2-Antiplasmin Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Tsurupa, Galina; Yakovlev, Sergiy; McKee, Patrick; Medved, Leonid

    2010-01-01

    Covalent incorporation (cross-linking) of plasmin inhibitor α2-antiplasmin (α2-AP) into fibrin clots increases their resistance to fibrinolysis. We hypothesized that α2-AP may also interact non-covalently with fibrin prior to its covalent cross-linking. To test this hypothesis, we studied binding of α2-AP to fibrin(ogen) and its fragments by ELISA and Surface Plasmon Resonance. The experiments revealed that α2-AP binds to polymeric fibrin and surface-adsorbed fibrin(ogen) while no binding was observed with fibrinogen in solution. To localize the α2-AP-binding sites, we studied the interaction of α2-AP with the fibrin(ogen)-derived D1, D-D and E3 fragments, and the recombinant αC region and its constituents, αC-connector and αC-domain and its sub-domains, which together encompass practically the whole fibrin(ogen) molecule. In ELISA, α2-AP bound to immobilized D1, D-D, αC region, αC-domain and its C-terminal sub-domain. The binding was Lys-independent and was not inhibited by plasminogen or tPA. Furthermore, the affinity of α2-AP to D-D was significantly increased in the presence of plasminogen while that to the αC-domain remained unaffected. Altogether, these results indicate that the fibrin(ogen) D region and the C-terminal sub-domain of the αC-domain contain high affinity α2-AP-binding sites that are cryptic in fibrinogen and exposed in fibrin or adsorbed fibrinogen, and the presence of plasminogen facilitates interaction of α2-AP with the D regions. The discovered non-covalent interaction of α2-AP with fibrin may contribute to regulation of the initial stage of fibrinolysis and provide proper orientation of the cross-linking sites to facilitate covalent cross-linking of α2-AP to the fibrin clot. PMID:20687529

  16. Targeting the coagulation factor fibrinogen for arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Harini; Flick, Matthew J

    2011-09-01

    Fibrinogen is a provisional matrix protein of the coagulation system that following proteolytic cleavage by the protease thrombin polymerizes to form fibrin, the structural basis of the blood clot. Fibrin polymer formation at sites of vessel injury is critical to normal hemostasis. However, fibrin deposition within damaged tissues is also a common pathological feature of inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. Fibrin deposition has been readily detected along articular surfaces, within inflamed hyperplastic synovial tissue, and as a component of insoluble "rice bodies" within the synovial fluid of arthritic joints. Recent data has suggested that fibrin deposition within inflamed tissues is not simply a reflection of a disease process but rather actively contributes to disease pathogenesis. One mechanism that has been demonstrated to directly link fibrin(ogen) to the regulation of inflammation is the ability of fibrin(ogen) to serve as a ligand for cell-surface receptors, particularly integrins. Indeed, engagement of fibrin(ogen) by the leukocyte integrin receptor αMβ2 appears to be a common and fundamental event driving local inflammation. Recent studies have demonstrated that eliminating fibrin(ogen)-αMβ2 interactions can significantly limit the progression of multiple inflammatory diseases, including arthritis, without compromising the ability of fibrinogen to function in coagulation. These exciting findings have opened the door to new opportunities for targeting fibrinogen as an inflammatory mediator while leaving intact its hemostatic properties. PMID:21401516

  17. Hormonal regulation of fibrinogen synthesis in cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Grieninger, G; Plant, P W; Liang, T J; Kalb, R G; Amrani, D; Mosesson, M W; Hertzberg, K M; Pindyck, J

    1983-06-27

    Most of what was originally known of the effects of hormones on fibrinogen synthesis was based, as noted above, on experiments involving surgical removal of endocrine glands. Some caution should be exercised when using such in vivo experiments to derive the hormonal requirements of fibrinogen synthesis, however, since multiple hormonal alterations often occur in these animals. The development of a variety of ex vivo systems has allowed investigators to more carefully control the hepatocellular environment. The work of several laboratories, including our own, has now made it clear that hormones and other agents directly stimulate hepatocellular synthesis of fibrinogen. From the studies summarized here, using chick embryo hepatocytes as a model, several generalizations emerge: Fibrinogen synthesis may be considered to be a "constitutive" liver function, since hepatocytes cultured without serum, hormones or other macromolecular supplements synthesize this protein at a basal rate for several days. Addition of certain hormones (e.g. T3, dexamethasone, insulin), individually and in physiological concentrations, elicits an increase in fibrinogen production, varying with each agent in onset, dose, minimum exposure required and accompanying effects on the synthesis of other plasma proteins. Glucocorticoids and thyroid hormones are similar in the selectivity of their stimulation (neither affects albumin or transferrin synthesis) but differ in that thyroid hormones need to be present for just a short "triggering" period. The stimulation of fibrinogen synthesis by insulin occurs only following prolonged exposure to concentrations 10-times higher than the very low doses to which albumin synthesis responds rapidly. PMID:6307104

  18. Fibrinogen Substrate Recognition by Staphylocoagulase·(Pro)thrombin Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Panizzi, Peter; Friedrich, Rainer; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Richter, Klaus; Bock, Paul E.; Bode, Wolfram

    2008-01-01

    Thrombin generation and fibrinogen (Fbg) clotting are the ultimate proteolytic reactions in the blood coagulation pathway. Staphylocoagulase (SC), a protein secreted by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, activates prothrombin (ProT) without proteolysis. The SC·(pro)thrombin complex recognizes Fbg as a specific substrate, converting it directly into fibrin. The crystal structure of a fully active SC fragment containing residues 1–325 (SC-(1–325)) bound to human prethrombin 2 showed previously that SC inserts its Ile1-Val2 N terminus into the Ile16 pocket of prethrombin 2, inducing a functional active site in the cognate zymogen conformationally. Exosite I of α-thrombin, the Fbg recognition site, and proexosite I on ProT are blocked by domain 2 of SC-(1–325). In the present studies, active site-labeled fluorescent ProT analogs were used to quantitate Fbg binding to the SC-(1–325)·ProT complex. Fbg binding and cleavage are mediated by expression of a new Fbg-binding exosite on the SC-(1–325)·ProT complex, resulting in formation of an (SC-(1–325)·ProT)2·Fbg pentameric complex with a dissociation constant of 8–34 nM. In both crystal structures, the SC-(1–325)·(pre)thrombin complexes form dimers, with both pro-teinases/zymogens facing each other over a large U-shaped cleft, through which the Fbg substrate could thread. On this basis, a molecular model of the pentameric (SC-(1–325)·thrombin)2·Fbg encounter complex was generated, which explains the coagulant properties and efficient Fbg conversion. The results provide new insight into the mechanism that mediates high affinity Fbg binding and cleavage as a substrate of SC·(pro)thrombin complexes, a process that is central to the molecular pathology of S. aureus endocarditis. PMID:16230339

  19. Fibrinogen degradation by two neutral granulocyte proteinases. Influence of calcium on the generation of fibrinogen degradation products with anticlotting properties.

    PubMed

    Bingenhkeimer, C; Gramse, M; Egbring, R; Havemann, K

    1981-07-01

    Degradation of human fibrinogen by elastase-like proteinase, chymotrypsin-like proteinase and plasmin, was done in the presence and absence of calcium ions, respectively. The resulting fibrinogen degradation products were tested for their coagulant and anti-coagulant properties. The results show that 1. fibrinogenolysis is delayed in the presence of calcium ions. Higher enzyme concentrations are required to get unclottable split products when calcium ions are present. 2. The fibrinogen fragments obtained in the presence of calcium are different in their molecular weights and anticoagulant activities compared to those obtained in the absence of calcium ions. This effect of calcium is most striking during fibrinogen cleavage by chymotrypsin-like proteinase. Elastase and plasmin-induced fibrinogenolysis was substantially influenced by calcium only at a late degradation stage. PMID:6456216

  20. The – 148 C/T fibrinogen gene polymorphism and fibrinogen levels in ischaemic stroke: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    van Goor, M P J; Gomez-Garcia, E; Leebeek, F; Brouwers, G; Koudstaal, P; Dippel, D

    2005-01-01

    Design: A case–control study of patients with first ever ischaemic stroke, confirmed by computed tomography. Methods: Venous blood samples were collected for fibrinogen and routine coagulation tests one week after the stroke, and after three months in about half the patients. Population controls were age and sex matched. –148 C/T fibrinogen polymorphism was determined by polymerase chain reaction followed by digestion with restriction enzymes HindIII/AluI. Results: There were 124 patients and 125 controls, mean age 56 years (range 18 to 75); 34 patients (27%) and 41 controls (33%) were heterozygous for –148 C/T fibrinogen polymorphism; six patients (5%) and five controls (4%) had the T/T genotype. The odds ratio of ischaemic stroke associated with CC homozygotes v T carriers was 0.8 (95% confidence interval, 0.5 to 1.4). Relative risk for ischaemic stroke associated with fibrinogen levels in the highest quartile was 3.9 (1.9 to 8.4) at one week, decreasing to 1.4 (0.6 to 3.3) at three months. Conclusions: –148 C/T fibrinogen gene polymorphism was not a strong risk factor for ischaemic stroke. High fibrinogen levels early after acute stroke probably represent an acute phase response. PMID:15608011

  1. Crystal structure of the tetrameric fibrinogen-like recognition domain of fibrinogen C domain containing 1 (FIBCD1) protein.

    PubMed

    Shrive, Annette K; Moeller, Jesper B; Burns, Ian; Paterson, Jenny M; Shaw, Amy J; Schlosser, Anders; Sorensen, Grith L; Greenhough, Trevor J; Holmskov, Uffe

    2014-01-31

    The high resolution crystal structures of a recombinant fragment of the C-terminal fibrinogen-like recognition domain of FIBCD1, a vertebrate receptor that binds chitin, have been determined. The overall tetrameric structure shows similarity in structure and aggregation to the horseshoe crab innate immune protein tachylectin 5A. The high affinity ligand N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) binds in the S1 site, predominantly via the acetyl group with the oxygen and acetamide nitrogen hydrogen-bonded to the protein and the methyl group inserted into a hydrophobic pocket. The binding of the ManNAc pyranose ring differs markedly between the two independent subunits, but in all structures the binding of the N-acetyl group is conserved. In the native structure, a crystal contact results in one of the independent protomers binding the first GlcNAc of the Asn(340) N-linked glycan on the other independent protomer. In the ligand-bound structure this GlcNAc is replaced by the higher affinity ligand ManNAc. In addition, a sulfate ion has been modeled into the electron density at a location similar to the S3 binding site in L-ficolin, whereas in the native structure an acetate ion has been placed in the S1 N-acetyl binding site, and a sulfate ion has been placed adjacent to this site. These ion binding sites are ideally placed to receive the N-acetyl and sulfate groups of sulfated GalNAc residues of glycosaminoglycans such as chondroitin and dermatan sulfate. Together, these structures give insight into important determinants of ligand selectivity, demonstrating versatility in recognition and binding while maintaining conservation in N-acetyl and calcium binding. PMID:24293368

  2. A family of cell-adhering peptides homologous to fibrinogen C-termini

    SciTech Connect

    Levy-Beladev, Liron; Levdansky, Lilia; Gaberman, Elena; Friedler, Assaf; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Cell-adhesive sequences homologous to fibrinogen C-termini exist in other proteins. {yields} The extended homologous cell-adhesive C-termini peptides family is termed Haptides. {yields} In membrane-like environment random coiled Haptides adopt a helical conformation. {yields} Replacing positively charged residues with alanine reduces Haptides activity. -- Abstract: A family of cell-adhesive peptides homologous to sequences on different chains of fibrinogen was investigated. These homologous peptides, termed Haptides, include the peptides C{beta}, preC{gamma}, and C{alpha}E, corresponding to sequences on the C-termini of fibrinogen chains {beta}, {gamma}, and {alpha}E, respectively. Haptides do not affect cell survival and rate of proliferation of the normal cell types tested. The use of new sensitive assays of cell adhesion clearly demonstrated the ability of Haptides, bound to inert matrices, to mediate attachment of different matrix-dependent cell types including normal fibroblasts, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells. Here we present new active Haptides bearing homologous sequences derived from the C-termini of other proteins, such as angiopoietin 1 and 2, tenascins C and X, and microfibril-associated glycoprotein-4. The cell adhesion properties of all the Haptides were found to be associated mainly with their 11 N-terminal residues. Mutated preC{gamma} peptides revealed that positively charged residues account for their attachment effect. These results suggest a mechanism of direct electrostatic interaction of Haptides with the cell membrane. The extended Haptides family may be applied in modulating adhesion of cells to scaffolds for tissue regeneration and for enhancement of nanoparticulate transfection into cells.

  3. Prognostic significance of preoperative fibrinogen in patients with colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhen-Qiang; Han, Xiao-Na; Wang, Hai-Jiang; Tang, Yong; Zhao, Ze-Liang; Qu, Yan-Li; Xu, Rui-Wei; Liu, Yan-Yan; Yu, Xian-Bo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prognostic significance of preoperative fibrinogen levels in colon cancer patients. METHODS: A total of 255 colon cancer patients treated at the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University from June 1st 2005 to June 1st 2008 were enrolled in the study. All patients received radical surgery as their primary treatment method. Preoperative fibrinogen was detected by the Clauss method, and all patients were followed up after surgery. Preoperative fibrinogen measurements were correlated with a number of clinicopathological parameters using the Student t test and analysis of variance. Survival analyses were performed by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression modeling to measure 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). RESULTS: The mean preoperative fibrinogen concentration of all colon cancer patients was 3.17 ± 0.88 g/L. Statistically significant differences were found between preoperative fibrinogen levels and the clinicopathological parameters of age, smoking status, tumor size, tumor location, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, modified Glasgow prognostic scores (mGPS), white blood cell (WBC) count, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels. Univariate survival analysis showed that TNM stage, tumor cell differentiation grade, vascular invasion, mGPS score, preoperative fibrinogen, WBC, NLR, PLR and CEA all correlated with both OS and DFS. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and body mass index correlated only with OS. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that both OS and DFS of the total cohort, as well as of the stage II and III patients, were higher in the hypofibrinogen group compared to the hyperfibrinogen group (all P < 0.05). In contrast, there was no significant difference between OS and DFS in stage I patients with low or high fibrinogen levels. Cox regression analysis indicated preoperative fibrinogen levels, TNM stage, mGPS score, CEA, and

  4. Recombinant human fibrinogen and sulfation of the. gamma. prime chain

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, D.H.; Huang, S.; Chung, D.W.; Davie, E.W. ); Mulvihill, E.R. )

    1991-10-01

    Human fibrinogen and the homodimeric {gamma}{prime}-chain-containing variant have been expressed in BHK cells using cDNAs coding for the {alpha},{beta}, and {gamma} (or {gamma}{prime}) chains. The fibrinogens were secreted at levels greater than 4 {mu}g (mg of total cell protein){sup {minus}1}day{sup {minus}1} and were biologically active in clotting assays. Recombinant fibrinogen containing the {gamma}' chain incorporated {sup 35}SO{sub 4} into its chains during biosynthesis, while no incorporation occurred in the protein containing the {gamma} chain. The identity of the sulfated {gamma}{prime} chain was verified by its ability to form dimers during clotting. In addition, carboxypeptidase {Upsilon} digestion of the recombinant fibrinogen containing the {gamma}{prime} chain released 96% of the {sup 35}S label from the sulfated chain, and the radioactive material was identified as tyrosine O-sulfate. These results clarify previous findings of the sulfation of tyrosine in human fibrinogen.

  5. Aronia melanocarpa as a protector against nitration of fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Bijak, Michał; Saluk, Joanna; Antosik, Adam; Ponczek, Michał B; Żbikowska, Halina M; Borowiecka, Marta; Nowak, Paweł

    2013-04-01

    Fibrinogen (Fg) also known as coagulation factor I represents about 4% of the total human plasma proteins. The main function of Fg is its involvement in last phase of blood coagulation cascade, when thrombin-induced conversion of dissolved plasma fibrinogen into an insoluble fibrin clot occurs. The reaction of fibrinogen with peroxynitrite causes both structural modifications and changes of the biological properties of this plasma glycoprotein. Recently, there is an increased interest in the screening of natural products present in fruits, vegetables and herbs for their possible antioxidative activities. Therefore, the aim of our study was to estimate the effect of extract from berries of Aronia melanocarpa against nitrative and oxidative damage induced by peroxynitrite. The extract from A. melanocarpa (0.5-50 μg/ml) added to Fg 10 min before peroxynitrite (100 μM) significantly inhibited both the formation of the high molecular weight protein aggregates and nitration of Fg molecule. The extract also abolished peroxynitrite-induced inhibition of fibrinogen polymerization (by 95% at 50 μg/ml). The obtained results indicate that natural extract from berries of A. melanocarpa has protective effects against peroxynitrite-induced nitrative damage of plasma fibrinogen, and therefore may contribute in the prevention of peroxynitrite-related cardiovascular or inflammatory diseases. PMID:23357800

  6. A detailed consideration of a principal domain of vertebrate fibrinogen and its relatives.

    PubMed Central

    Doolittle, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    Vertebrate fibrinogen is a complex multidomained protein, the structure of which has been inferred mainly from electron microscopy and amino acid sequence studies. Among its most prominent features are two terminal globules, moieties that are mostly composed of the carboxyl-terminal two-thirds of the beta and gamma chains. Sequences homologous to the latter segments are found in several other animal proteins, always as the carboxyl-terminal contributions. An alignment of 15 amino acid sequences from various fibrinogens and related proteins has been used to make judgments about secondary structure. The nature of amino acids at each position in the alignment was used to distinguish alpha helices and beta structure on the one hand from loops and turns on the other, and the resulting assignments compared with predictions of secondary structure by other methods. Additionally, constraints imposed by the locations of cystines, carbohydrate attachment residues, and proteinase-sensitive points provided further insights into the general organization of the postulated secondary structures. Other ancillary data, including the effects of bound calcium and the locations of labeled or variant residues, were also considered. An intriguing similarity to a portion of the recently reported structure of a calcium-dependent lectin is noted. PMID:1304888

  7. The proteolytic action of Arvin on human fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Ewart, M. R.; Hatton, M. W. C.; Basford, J. M.; Dodgson, K. S.

    1970-01-01

    1. Human fibrinogen was subjected to proteolysis by enzyme preparations (clinical Arvin and IRC-50 Arvin) from the venom of Agkistrodon rhodostoma. 2. IRC-50 Arvin releases three peptides from fibrinogen, and these were identified as fibrinopeptides AP, AY and A. 3. The less purified `clinical' Arvin releases, in addition to fibrinopeptides AP, AY and A, small amounts of two heptapeptides derived from fibrinopeptides AP and A, probably because it contains another enzyme as well as Arvin. 4. No fibrinopeptide B is released by either Arvin preparation. 5. Thus, although Arvin is known to differ from `reptilase' from Bothrops jararaca in that it does not activate the enzyme that cross-links fibrin (fibrin-stabilizing factor), it is identical with reptilase with respect to the peptides that it liberates from fibrinogen. PMID:5529716

  8. Evaluation of a rapid method of determination of plasma fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Thomson, G W; McSherry, B J; Valli, V E

    1974-07-01

    An evaluation was made of a rapid semiautomated method of determining fibrinogen levels in bovine plasma. This method, the fibrometer method of Morse, Panek and Menga (8), is based on the principle that when thrombin is added to suitably diluted plasma the time of clotting is linearly related to the fibrinogen concentration. A standard curve prepared using bovine plasma had an r value of .9987 and analysis of variance showed there was no significant deviation from regression. A comparison of the fibrometer method and the biuret method of Ware, Guest and Seegers done on 158 bovine plasma samples showed good correlation between the two methods. It was concluded that the fibrometer method does measure bovine fibrinogen and has considerable merit for use in clinical diseases of cattle. PMID:4277474

  9. Biosynthesis, assembly and secretion of fibrinogen in cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, S; Oda, K; Ikehara, Y

    1988-01-01

    The biosynthesis, assembly and secretion of fibrinogen were investigated in cultured rat hepatocytes which were incubated with [35S]methionine. When initial rates of the synthesis of three fibrinogen subunits were compared, the A alpha-subunit was found to be synthesized significantly slower than the B beta- and gamma-subunits. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that the secreted fibrinogen contained different proportions of the newly synthesized subunits, depending upon the chase times. Radioactivity in the A alpha subunit, which initially had the highest level of the three, was rapidly decreased in parallel with the chase time. The gamma-subunit had an increasing amount of the radioactivity in the secreted molecule during the chase periods, whereas that in the B beta-subunit was gradually decreased at the later stages of chase. Analysis of intracellular components of fibrinogen confirmed that the nascent A alpha-subunit was most rapidly exhausted, and the gamma-subunit occupied the largest proportion among the non-assembled subunits at later stages of chase. Taken together, these results suggest that the synthesis of A alpha-subunit, which has the lowest rate, could be the rate-limiting step in the production and secretion of fibrinogen in cultured rat hepatocytes, in contrast with what has been proposed for human and rabbit fibrinogen, namely that the synthesis of B beta-subunit is the rate-limiting step. The results also indicate that there is a large intracellular pool of gamma-subunit. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3401211

  10. Fibrinogen and cellular adherability on differently treated titanium as implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fojt, Lukáš; Klapetek, Petr; Strašák, Luděk; Vetterl, Vladimír

    2012-02-01

    Adsorption of human plasma fibrinogen, osteoblasts, and fibroblasts on differently treated titanium samples as implants were examined in this study. Titanium samples were mechanically polished, chemically etched (with and without surface material loss), and grinded. The main goal of this study is to find the best surface treatment of titanium for its possible use as implants. Atomic force microscopy was used to evaluate the adsorption of human plasma fibrinogen onto the titanium samples. Cell counting was used to determine the adherability of osteoblasts and fibroblasts on the titanium samples. Our preliminary results show that the etched titanium surface with surface material loss is the best surface treatment used in our experiments.

  11. Effects of Fibrinogen on RBC Aggregation and Rouleux Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosov, Dmitry; Pan, Wenxiao; Caswell, Bruce; Gompper, Gerhard; Karniadakis, George

    2010-11-01

    We employ dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) to study human blood rheology. Specifically, using a multi-scale (MS-RBC) and low-dimensional model (LD-RBC) for modeling red blood cells (RBCs), we study the role of fibrinogen inter-cellular forces in the formation of rouleaux structures at low shear rates. In particular, both models verify that RBC aggregation into rouleaux determines non-Newtonian response and they also predict a non-zero yield stress whose value depends on the fibrinogen concentration.

  12. Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius recognize different sites on human fibrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, M.S.; Allen, R.D.; Bounelis, P.; Switalski, L.M.; Hook, M. )

    1990-02-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis and Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) intermedius have been implicated in the etiology of human periodontal diseases. These organisms are able to bind and degrade human fibrinogen, and these interactions may play a role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. In attempts to map the bacterial binding sites along the fibrinogen molecule, we have found that strains of B. gingivalis and B. intermedius, respectively, recognize spatially distant and distinct sites on the fibrinogen molecule. Isolated reduced and alkylated alpha-, beta-, and gamma-fibrinogen chains inhibited binding of 125I-fibrinogen to both Bacteroides species in a concentration-dependent manner. Plasmin fragments D and to some extent fragment E, however, produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of 125I-fibrinogen binding to B. intermedius strains but did not affect binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. gingivalis strains. Radiolabeled fibrinogen chains and fragments were compared with 125I-fibrinogen with respect to specificity and reversibility of binding to bacteria. According to these criteria, gamma chain most closely resembled the native fibrinogen molecule in behavior toward B. gingivalis strains and fragments D most closely resembled fibrinogen in behavior toward B. intermedius strains. The ability of anti-human fibrinogen immunoglobulin G (IgG) to inhibit binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. intermedius strains was greatly reduced by absorbing the IgG with fragments D. Absorbing the IgG with fragments D had no effect on the ability of the antibody to inhibit binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. gingivalis strains. A purified staphylococcal fibrinogen-binding protein blocked binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. intermedius strains but not to B. gingivalis strains.

  13. Interaction study of bioactive molecules with fibrinogen and human platelets determined by 1H NMR relaxation experiments.

    PubMed

    Bonechi, Claudia; Martini, Silvia; Rossi, Claudio

    2009-02-15

    In order to investigate the interaction processes between bioactive molecules and macromolecular receptors NMR methodology based on the analysis of selective and non-selective spin-lattice relaxation rate enhancements of ligand protons was used. The contribution from the bound ligand fraction to the observed relaxation rate in relation to macromolecular target concentration allowed the calculation of the normalized affinity index[A(I)(N)](L)(T) in which the effects of motional anisotropies and different proton densities have been removed. In this paper, we applied this methodology to investigate the affinity of epinephrine and isoproterenol towards two different systems: fibrinogen and platelets. PMID:19157885

  14. Influence of a constant magnetic field on the fibrinogen-fibrin system. [in blood coagulation process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matskevichene, V. B.; Platonova, A. T.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of a constant magnetic field with a strength of 2500 oersteds on the fibrinogen-fibrin system was studied in the organism of healthy rabbits with exposure times of 1 and 5 hours. The results obtained indicate disruptions in the stage of conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin and an increase in the amount of fibrinogen.

  15. Affinity purification and characterization of a fibrinogen-binding protein complex which protects mice against lethal challenge with Streptococcus equi subsp. equi.

    PubMed

    Meehan, M; Nowlan, P; Owen, P

    1998-04-01

    Cell-wall-associated proteins from Streptococcus equi subsp. equi, the causative agent of strangles, were analysed with a view to identifying a potential protective antigen. Preparations of these proteins, isolated from mutanolysin extracts of cell walls, were shown to contain one major high-M(r) protein species (apparent M(r) 220,000 and 550,000 when analysed by SDS-PAGE and gel-filtration chromatography, respectively). The high-M(r) protein bound horse fibrinogen and was purified under non-denaturing conditions using fibrinogen affinity chromatography. The fibrinogen-binding protein (FgBP) reacted with serum taken from horses recovering from strangles and protected mice against lethal challenge from S. equi subsp. equi. The sequence of the corresponding gene (fbp) was determined and shown to encode a mature protein (M(r) 54,597) with predicted coiled-coil structure. An FgBP truncate, lacking the C-terminal cell wall/membrane anchor domain, was overexpressed in and purified from Escherichia coli and was shown to behave in an analogous fashion to the wild-type product in terms of M(r) estimation, fibrinogen binding and seroreactivity. PMID:9579073

  16. Influence of matrix metalloproteinase-12 on fibrinogen level.

    PubMed

    Motterle, Anna; Xiao, Qingzhong; Kiechl, Stefan; Pender, Sylvia L F; Morris, Gareth E; Willeit, Johann; Caulfield, Mark J; Ye, Shu

    2012-02-01

    In vitro studies have shown that matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP12) can degrade fibrinogen, a clotting factor whose level predicts risk of advanced atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction. In this study, we found that mean plasma fibrinogen level was approximately 10-fold higher in MMP12 knockout mice than wildtype mice (p=0.0006). Differential allelic expression analysis of human MMP12 gene polymorphism rs17368582 in human vascular tissues showed an allele-specific effect on MMP12 expression, with one allele (T) having 1.6 fold higher expression level than the other allele (C) (p=0.0006). In a population cohort, we found that individuals homozygous for the MMP12 low expression allele had higher plasma fibrinogen levels (2.95 mg/mL compared with 2.61 mg/mL in other individuals, p=0.029) and increased risk of advanced atherosclerosis [odds ratio 6.3 (95% CI 1.9-20.8), p=0.003] and myocardial infarction [hazard ratio 5.6 (95% CI 1.7-18.3), p=0.005]. In summary, our study in mouse and humans provides in vivo evidence of an effect of MMP12 on fibrinogen level. PMID:22119538

  17. Fibrinogen and red blood cells in venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Maria M.; Walton, Bethany L.; Byrnes, James R.; Wolberg, Alisa S.

    2014-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, collectively termed venous thromboembolism (VTE), affect over 1 million Americans each year. VTE is triggered by inflammation and blood stasis leading to the formation of thrombi rich in fibrin and red blood cells (RBCs). However, little is known about mechanisms regulating fibrin and RBC incorporation into venous thrombi, or how these components mediate thrombus size or resolution. Both elevated circulating fibrinogen (hyperfibrinogenemia) and abnormal fibrin(ogen) structure and function, including increased fibrin network density and resistance to fibrinolysis, have been observed in plasmas from patients with VTE. Abnormalities in RBC number and/or function have also been associated with VTE risk. RBC contributions to VTE are thought to stem from their effects on blood viscosity and margination of platelets to the vessel wall. More recent studies suggest RBCs also express phosphatidylserine, support thrombin generation, and decrease fibrinolysis. RBC interactions with fibrin(ogen) and cells, including platelets and endothelial cells, may also promote thrombus formation. The contributions of fibrin(ogen) and RBCs to the pathophysiology of VTE warrants further investigation. PMID:24759140

  18. Evaluation of Fibrinogen Self-assembly: Role of its alphaC Region

    SciTech Connect

    J Koo; M Rafailovich; L Medved; G Tsurupa; B Kudryk; y Liu; D Galanakis

    2011-12-31

    Background: Exposure of cryptic, functional sites on fibrinogen upon its adsorption to hydrophobic surfaces of biomaterials has been linked to an inflammatory response and fibrosis. Such adsorption also induces ordered fibrinogen aggregation which is poorly understood. Objective: To investigate hydrophobic surface-induced fibrinogen aggregation. Methods: Contact and lateral force scanning probe microscopy, yielding topography, image dimensions and fiber elastic modulus measurements were used along with transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Fibrinogen aggregation was induced under non-enzymatic conditions by adsorption on a trioctyl-surface monolayer (trioctylmethylamine) grafted onto silica clay plates. Results: A more than one molecule thick coating was generated by adsorption on the plate from 100 to 200 {mu}g mL{sup -1} fibrinogen solutions, and three-dimensional networks formed from 4 mg mL{sup -1} fibrinogen incubated with uncoated or fibrinogen-coated plates. Fibrils appeared laterally assembled into branching and overlapping fibers whose heights from the surface ranged from approximately 3 to 740 nm. The elastic modulus of fibrinogen fibers was 1.55 MPa. No fibrils formed when fibrinogen lacking {alpha}C-domains was used as a coating or was incubated with intact fibrinogen-coated plates, or when the latter plates were sequentially incubated with anti-A{alpha}529-539 mAb and intact fibrinogen. When an anti-A{alpha}241-476 mAb was used instead, fine, long fibers formed. Similarly, sequential incubations of fibrinogen-coated plates with recombinant {alpha}C-domain (A{alpha}392-610 fragment) or {alpha}C-connector (A{alpha}221-372 fragment) and fibrinogen resulted in distinctly fine fiber networks. Conclusions: Adsorption-induced fibrinogen self-assembly is initiated by a more than one molecule-thick surface layer and eventuates in three-dimensional networks whose formation requires fibrinogen with intact {alpha}C-domains.

  19. Structural analysis of fibrinogen synthesized by cultured chicken hepatocytes in the presence or absence of dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Amrani, D L; Plant, P W; Pindyck, J; Mosesson, M W; Grieninger, G

    1983-03-30

    Hepatocyte monolayers, derived from chick embryos and cultured in chemically defined medium without hormones, synthesize and secrete fibrinogen that resembles chicken plasma fibrinogen immunochemically and structurally. Addition of a synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, to the cultured cells resulted in an appreciable and relatively selective increase in fibrinogen synthesis. Autoradiography of fibrinogen that had been metabolically labelled with [35S]methionine and then subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, unreduced or under disulfide-reducing conditions, revealed that only dimeric forms of fibrinogen, containing undegraded A alpha, B beta, and gamma chains, were secreted under stimulated and unstimulated culture conditions. PMID:6830818

  20. Outward Bound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outward Bound, Inc., Andover, MA.

    The Outward Bound concept was developed in Germany and Great Britain with the saving of human life as the ultimate goal. Courses are designed to help students discover their true physical and mental limits through development of skills including emergency medical aid, firefighting, search and rescue, mountaineering, and sailing. Five Outward Bound…

  1. Surface Assembly Configurations and Packing Preferences of Fibrinogen Mediated by the Periodicity and Alignment Control of Block Copolymer Nanodomains.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tian; Vora, Ankit; Mulcahey, Patrick J; Nanescu, Sonia E; Singh, Manpreet; Choi, Daniel S; Huang, Jeffrey K; Liu, Chi-Chun; Sanders, Daniel P; Hahm, Jong-In

    2016-08-23

    The ability to control the specific adsorption and packing behaviors of biomedically important proteins by effectively guiding their preferred surface adsorption configuration and packing orientation on polymeric surfaces may have utility in many applications such as biomaterials, medical implants, and tissue engineering. Herein, we investigate the distinct adhesion configurations of fibrinogen (Fg) proteins and the different organization behaviors between single Fg molecules that are mediated by the changes in the periodicity and alignment of chemically alternating nanodomains in thin films of polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) block copolymer (BCP). Specifically, the adsorption characteristics of individual Fg molecules were unambiguously resolved on four different PS-b-PMMA templates of dsa PS-b-PMMA, sm PS-b-PMMA, com PS-b-PMMA, and PS-r-PMMA. By direct visualization through high resolution imaging, the distinct adsorption and packing configurations of both isolated and interacting Fg molecules were determined as a function of the BCP template-specific nanodomain periodicity, domain alignment (random versus fully aligned), and protein concentration. The three dominant Fg adsorption configurations, SP∥, SP⊥, and TP, were observed and their occurrence ratios were ascertained on each PS-b-PMMA template. During surface packing, the orientation of the protein backbone was largely governed by the periodicity and alignment of the underlying PS-b-PMMA nanodomains whose specific direction was explicitly resolved relative to the polymeric nanodomain axis. The use of PS-b-PMMA with a periodicity much smaller than (and comparable to) the length of Fg led to a Fg scaffold with the protein backbone aligned parallel (and perpendicular) to the nanodomain major axis. In addition, we have successfully created fully Fg-decorated BCP constructs analogous to two-dimensional Fg crystals in which aligned protein molecules are arranged either side-on or end

  2. Fibrinogen blocks the autoactivation and thrombin-mediated activation of factor XI on dextran sulfate.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, C F; Colman, R W

    1992-01-01

    The intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation is activated when factor XIa, one of the three contact-system enzymes, is generated and then activates factor IX. Factor XI has been shown to be efficiently activated in vitro by surface-bound factor XIIa after factor XI is transported to the surface by its cofactor, high molecular weight kininogen (HK). However, individuals lacking any of the three contact-system proteins--namely, factor XII, prekallikrein, and HK--do not suffer from bleeding abnormalities. This mystery has led several investigators to search for an "alternate" activation pathway for factor XI. Recently, factor XI has been reported to be autoactivated on the soluble "surface" dextran sulfate, and thrombin was shown to accelerate the autoactivation. However, it was also reported that HK, the cofactor for factor XIIa-mediated activation of factor XI, actually diminishes the thrombin-catalyzed activation rate of factor XI. Nonetheless, it was suggested that thrombin was a more efficient activator than factor XIIa. In this report we investigated the effect of fibrinogen, the major coagulation protein in plasma, on the activation rate of factor XI. Fibrinogen, the preferred substrate for thrombin in plasma, virtually prevented autoactivation of factor XI as well as the thrombin-mediated activation of factor XI, while having no effect on factor XIIa-catalyzed activation. HK dramatically curtailed the autoactivation of factor XI in addition to the thrombin-mediated activation. These data indicate that factor XI would not be autoactivated in a plasma environment, and thrombin would, therefore, be unlikely to potentiate the activation. We believe that the "missing pathway" for factor XI activation remains an enigma that warrants further investigation. PMID:1454798

  3. Association between Plasma Fibrinogen Levels and Mortality in Acute-on-Chronic Hepatitis B Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhexin; Zhao, Ying; Feng, Limin; Feng, Guofang; Zhang, Juanwen; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure (AoCLF) is the most common type of liver failure and is associated with high mortality. Fibrinogen is critical in maintaining primary and secondary hemostasis. Therefore, we prospectively analyzed the association between fibrinogen and outcomes in AoCLF patients. Plasma fibrinogen was measured in 169 AoCLF, 173 chronic hepatitis B (CHB), and 171 healthy patients using a coagulation method. The predictive ability of fibrinogen for 3-month mortality in AoCLF patients was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Plasma fibrinogen was significantly lower in nonsurvivor AoCLF patients compared with survivor AoCLF, CHB, and control patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and area under the ROC curve of 1/fibrinogen predicting mortality in AoCLF patients were 66.7%, 72.5%, and 0.746 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.672–0.820, P < 0.001), and the fibrinogen cutoff value was 0.90 g/L. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, low fibrinogen was an independent factor predicting mortality (odds ratio: 0.304; 95% CI: 0.094–0.983; P = 0.047). Nonsurvivor AoCLF patients had significantly decreased fibrinogen levels, suggesting that low plasma fibrinogen may be a useful predictor of poor prognosis in AoCLF patients. PMID:25960593

  4. Prognostic Impact of Pretreatment Plasma Fibrinogen in Patients with Locally Advanced Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Daniel; Danilovic, Ivan; Seemann, Rudolf; Kornek, Gabriela; Engelmann, Johannes; Pillerstorff, Robert; Holawe, Simone; Psyrri, Amanda; Erovic, Boban M.; Farwell, Gregory; Perisanidis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to determine the prognostic significance of pretreatment plasma fibrinigen in patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OOSCC). Methods A cohort of 183 patients with locally advanced OOSCC receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy was retrospectively examined. Using ROC curve analysis, a pretreatment plasma fibrinogen cutoff value of 447mg/dL was determined. The primary endpoints were overall survival and recurrence-free survival. A secondary endpoint was to determine whether pretreatment plasma fibrinogen could predict treatment response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Cox regression models and Kaplan–Meier curves were used for survival analyses. Results Seventy-one patients had an elevated pretreatment plasma fibrinogen (fibrinogen >447mg/dL). Patients with high fibrinogen showed significantly higher pathologic stages after neoadjuvant treatment than those with low fibrinogen (p = 0.037). In univariate analysis, elevated fibrinogen was associated with poor overall survival (p = 0.005) and recurrence-free survival (p = 0.008) Multivariate analysis revealed that elevated fibrinogen remained an independent risk factor for death (hazard ratio 1.78, 95% CI 1.09–2.90, p = 0.021) and relapse (hazard ratio 1.78, 95% CI 1.11–2.86, p = 0.016). Conclusion Elevated pretreatment plasma fibrinogen is associated with lack of response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and reduced OS and RFS in patients with OOSCC. Thus, plasma fibrinogen may emerge as a novel prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target in OOSCC. PMID:27362659

  5. Fibrinogen and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment: a pilot prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Theocharis, IP

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the correlation, if any, between fibrinogen plasma levels (FPL) and the clinical features of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Methods: FPL were measured preoperatively in 33 patients with primary RRD. Patient characteristics and detachment features such as the numbers of breaks and the extent of the detachment were recorded; Results: No statistically significant correlation was found between FPL and the number of breaks. A statistically significant correlation was found between FPL and the extent of the RRD, even if the influence of the number of breaks was excluded. Conclusions: FPL correlate with retinal detachment extent, which implicates an acute inflammatory response to detachment traumatic phenomenon or a role of the fibrinogen molecule in retinal adhesiveness. PMID:20186280

  6. Analysis of the safety and pharmacodynamics of human fibrinogen concentrate in animals

    SciTech Connect

    Beyerle, Andrea; Nolte, Marc W.; Solomon, Cristina; Herzog, Eva; Dickneite, Gerhard

    2014-10-01

    Fibrinogen, a soluble 340 kDa plasma glycoprotein, is critical in achieving and maintaining hemostasis. Reduced fibrinogen levels are associated with an increased risk of bleeding and recent research has investigated the efficacy of fibrinogen concentrate for controlling perioperative bleeding. European guidelines on the management of perioperative bleeding recommend the use of fibrinogen concentrate if significant bleeding is accompanied by plasma fibrinogen levels less than 1.5–2.0 g/l. Plasma-derived human fibrinogen concentrate has been available for therapeutic use since 1956. The overall aim of the comprehensive series of non-clinical investigations presented was to evaluate i) the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic characteristics and ii) the safety and tolerability profile of human fibrinogen concentrate Haemocomplettan P® (RiaSTAP®). Pharmacodynamic characteristics were assessed in rabbits, pharmacokinetic parameters were determined in rabbits and rats and a safety pharmacology study was performed in beagle dogs. Additional toxicology tests included: single-dose toxicity tests in mice and rats; local tolerance tests in rabbits; and neoantigenicity tests in rabbits and guinea pigs following the introduction of pasteurization in the manufacturing process. Human fibrinogen concentrate was shown to be pharmacodynamically active in rabbits and dogs and well tolerated, with no adverse events and no influence on circulation, respiration or hematological parameters in rabbits, mice, rats and dogs. In these non-clinical investigations, human fibrinogen concentrate showed a good safety profile. This data adds to the safety information available to date, strengthening the current body of knowledge regarding this hemostatic agent. - Highlights: • A comprehensive series of pre-clinical investigations of human fibrinogen concentrate. • Human fibrinogen concentrate was shown to be pharmacodynamically active. • Human fibrinogen concentrate was well tolerated

  7. Neprilysin Inhibits Coagulation through Proteolytic Inactivation of Fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Burrell, Matthew; Henderson, Simon J.; Ravnefjord, Anna; Schweikart, Fritz; Fowler, Susan B.; Witt, Susanne; Hansson, Kenny M.; Webster, Carl I.

    2016-01-01

    Neprilysin (NEP) is an endogenous protease that degrades a wide range of peptides including amyloid beta (Aβ), the main pathological component of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We have engineered NEP as a potential therapeutic for AD but found in pre-clinical safety testing that this variant increased prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The objective of the current study was to investigate the effect of wild type NEP and the engineered variant on coagulation and define the mechanism by which this effect is mediated. PT and APTT were measured in cynomolgus monkeys and rats dosed with a human serum albumin fusion with an engineered variant of NEP (HSA-NEPv) as well as in control plasma spiked with wild type or variant enzyme. The coagulation factor targeted by NEP was determined using in vitro prothrombinase, calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) and fibrin formation assays as well as N-terminal sequencing of fibrinogen treated with the enzyme. We demonstrate that HSA-NEP wild type and HSA-NEPv unexpectedly impaired coagulation, increasing PT and APTT in plasma samples and abolishing fibrin formation from fibrinogen. This effect was mediated through cleavage of the N-termini of the Aα- and Bβ-chains of fibrinogen thereby significantly impairing initiation of fibrin formation by thrombin. Fibrinogen has therefore been identified for the first time as a substrate for NEP wild type suggesting that the enzyme may have a role in regulating fibrin formation. Reductions in NEP levels observed in AD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy may contribute to neurovascular degeneration observed in these conditions. PMID:27437944

  8. Neprilysin Inhibits Coagulation through Proteolytic Inactivation of Fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Burrell, Matthew; Henderson, Simon J; Ravnefjord, Anna; Schweikart, Fritz; Fowler, Susan B; Witt, Susanne; Hansson, Kenny M; Webster, Carl I

    2016-01-01

    Neprilysin (NEP) is an endogenous protease that degrades a wide range of peptides including amyloid beta (Aβ), the main pathological component of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have engineered NEP as a potential therapeutic for AD but found in pre-clinical safety testing that this variant increased prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The objective of the current study was to investigate the effect of wild type NEP and the engineered variant on coagulation and define the mechanism by which this effect is mediated. PT and APTT were measured in cynomolgus monkeys and rats dosed with a human serum albumin fusion with an engineered variant of NEP (HSA-NEPv) as well as in control plasma spiked with wild type or variant enzyme. The coagulation factor targeted by NEP was determined using in vitro prothrombinase, calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) and fibrin formation assays as well as N-terminal sequencing of fibrinogen treated with the enzyme. We demonstrate that HSA-NEP wild type and HSA-NEPv unexpectedly impaired coagulation, increasing PT and APTT in plasma samples and abolishing fibrin formation from fibrinogen. This effect was mediated through cleavage of the N-termini of the Aα- and Bβ-chains of fibrinogen thereby significantly impairing initiation of fibrin formation by thrombin. Fibrinogen has therefore been identified for the first time as a substrate for NEP wild type suggesting that the enzyme may have a role in regulating fibrin formation. Reductions in NEP levels observed in AD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy may contribute to neurovascular degeneration observed in these conditions. PMID:27437944

  9. FbsA-Driven Fibrinogen Polymerization: A Bacterial ``Deceiving Strategy''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierno, Matteo; Maravigna, Laura; Piazza, Roberto; Visai, Livia; Speziale, Pietro

    2006-01-01

    We show that FbsA, a cell wall protein of the bacterium Streptococcus agalactiae, promotes large-scale aggregation of human plasma fibrinogen, leading to the formation of a semiflexible polymerlike network. This extensive aggregation process takes place not only in solution, but also on FbsA-functionalized colloidal particles, and leads to the formation of a thick layer on the bacterial cell wall itself, which becomes an efficient mask against phagocytosis.

  10. Comparison of different methods to measure fibrinogen concentration in canine plasma with respect to their sensitivity towards the fibrinogen degradation products X, Y and D.

    PubMed

    Mischke, R; Menzel, D; Wolling, H

    2000-01-01

    In this study, fibrinogen measurements according to the Clauss method, photometric method and Jacobsson method have been investigated to find out how they are influenced by adding in vitro the purified canine fibrinogen degradation products (FDP) X, Y and D. Test results according to the Clauss method were found to be underestimated if the fragments X, Y and D were added while measurements according to the Jacobsson method turned out to underestimate the real fibrinogen concentration if the FDP Y and D were added. The Clauss method was particularly sensitive towards FDP. Results were considerably underestimated even with a quantity as little as 0.05 g FDP Y or FDP D/g fibrinogen (p < 0.05). The photometric method was only affected by FDP X leading to false high results. If FDP X was added, fibrinogen values were also overestimated with the Jacobsson method. Our results demonstrate that the photometric method is the most accurate. PMID:11014963

  11. Fibrinogen Degradation Products and Periodontitis: Deciphering the Connection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fibrinogen degradation products (e.g. D-dimer) arise from digested fibrin clots and fibrinogen. Elevated concentrations accompany activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis and indicate chronic inflammatory diseases. D-Dimer tests are a quick, noninvasive method to rule out abnormal clotting. Periodontitis strongly affects the haemostatic system and evokes a procoagulant state. Correlation of chronic periodontitis with early indicators of disease (biomarkers) might be useful. Aim The aim of the study was to examine whether the plasma D-dimer concentration reflects the progression of chronic periodontitis and the beneficial effect of periodontal therapy. Materials and Methods Forty randomly selected subjects were divided into four groups, Group I: 10 healthy subjects, Group II: 10 with mild periodontitis, Group III: 10 with moderate periodontitis, Group IV: 10 with severe periodontitis. After thorough dental and periodontal examination, 3 mL of venous blood was collected for measurement of fibrinogen degradation products. Results The patients with moderate and chronic periodontitis exhibited high concentrations of D-dimer (mean value 434.98–535.52 mcg/mL), whereas subjects with mild or no periodontitis exhibited values of 329.78–211.29 mcg/mL. Concentrations of D-dimer were significantly reduced after therapy of all classes of periodontitis. Conclusion Periodontal treatment can reduce amount of D-dimer in the plasma. A higher than normal concentration is observed in chronic periodontitis. PMID:26816985

  12. Identification of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions within the fibrinogen gene cluster for fibrinogen levels in three ethnically diverse populations.

    PubMed

    Jeff, Janina M; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Crawford, Dana C

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of plasma fibrinogen are associated with clot formation in the absence of inflammation or injury and is a biomarker for arterial clotting, the leading cause of cardiovascular disease. Fibrinogen levels are heritable with >50% attributed to genetic factors, however little is known about possible genetic modifiers that might explain the missing heritability. The fibrinogen gene cluster is comprised of three genes (FGA, FGB, and FGG) that make up the fibrinogen polypeptide essential for fibrinogen production in the blood. Given the known interaction with these genes, we tested 25 variants in the fibrinogen gene cluster for gene x gene and gene x environment interactions in 620 non-Hispanic blacks, 1,385 non-Hispanic whites, and 664 Mexican Americans from a cross-sectional dataset enriched with environmental data, the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). Using a multiplicative approach, we added cross product terms (gene x gene or gene x environment) to a linear regression model and declared significance at p < 0.05. We identified 19 unique gene x gene and 13 unique gene x environment interactions that impact fibrinogen levels in at least one population at p < 0.05. Over 90% of the gene x gene interactions identified include a variant in the rate-limiting gene, FGB that is essential for the formation of the fibrinogen polypeptide. We also detected gene x environment interactions with fibrinogen variants and sex, smoking, and body mass index. These findings highlight the potential for the discovery of genetic modifiers for complex phenotypes in multiple populations and give a better understanding of the interaction between genes and/or the environment for fibrinogen levels. The need for more powerful and robust methods to identify genetic modifiers is still warranted. PMID:25592583

  13. IDENTIFICATION OF GENE-GENE AND GENE-ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS WITHIN THE FIBRINOGEN GENE CLUSTER FOR FIBRINOGEN LEVELS IN THREE ETHNICALLY DIVERSE POPULATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Jeff, Janina M.; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Crawford, Dana C.

    2014-01-01

    Elevated levels of plasma fibrinogen are associated with clot formation in the absence of inflammation or injury and is a biomarker for arterial clotting, the leading cause of cardiovascular disease. Fibrinogen levels are heritable with >50% attributed to genetic factors, however little is known about possible genetic modifiers that might explain the missing heritability. The fibrinogen gene cluster is comprised of three genes (FGA, FGB, and FGG) that make up the fibrinogen polypeptide essential for fibrinogen production in the blood. Given the known interaction with these genes, we tested 25 variants in the fibrinogen gene cluster for gene × gene and gene × environment interactions in 620 non-Hispanic blacks, 1,385 non-Hispanic whites, and 664 Mexican Americans from a cross-sectional dataset enriched with environmental data, the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). Using a multiplicative approach, we added cross product terms (gene × gene or gene × environment) to a linear regression model and declared significance at p < 0.05. We identified 19 unique gene × gene and 13 unique gene × environment interactions that impact fibrinogen levels in at least one population at p <0.05. Over 90% of the gene × gene interactions identified include a variant in the rate-limiting gene, FGB that is essential for the formation of the fibrinogen polypeptide. We also detected gene × environment interactions with fibrinogen variants and sex, smoking, and body mass index. These findings highlight the potential for the discovery of genetic modifiers for complex phenotypes in multiple populations and give a better understanding of the interaction between genes and/or the environment for fibrinogen levels. The need for more powerful and robust methods to identify genetic modifiers is still warranted. PMID:25592583

  14. Linkage study of fibrinogen levels: the Strong Heart Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Best, Lyle G; North, Kari E; Li, Xia; Palmieri, Vittorio; Umans, Jason G; MacCluer, Jean; Laston, Sandy; Haack, Karin; Goring, Harald; Diego, Vincent P; Almasy, Laura; Lee, Elisa T; Tracy, Russell P; Cole, Shelley

    2008-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis involves both hemostatic and inflammatory mechanisms. Fibrinogen is associated with both risk of thrombosis and inflammation. A recent meta-analysis showed that risk of coronary heart disease may increase 1.8 fold for 1 g/L of increased fibrinogen, independent of traditional risk factors. It is known that fibrinogen levels may be influenced by demographic, environmental and genetic factors. Epidemiologic and candidate gene studies are available; but few genome-wide linkage studies have been conducted, particularly in minority populations. The Strong Heart Study has demonstrated an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease in the American Indian population, and therefore represents an important source for genetic-epidemiological investigations. Methods The Strong Heart Family Study enrolled over 3,600 American Indian participants in large, multi-generational families, ascertained from an ongoing population-based study in the same communities. Fibrinogen was determined using standard technique in a central laboratory and extensive additional phenotypic measures were obtained. Participants were genotyped for 382 short tandem repeat markers distributed throughout the genome; and results were analyzed using a variance decomposition method, as implemented in the SOLAR 2.0 program. Results Data from 3535 participants were included and after step-wise, linear regression analysis, two models were selected for investigation. Basic demographic adjustments constituted model 1, while model 2 considered waist circumference, diabetes mellitus and postmenopausal status as additional covariates. Five LOD scores between 1.82 and 3.02 were identified, with the maximally adjusted model showing the highest score on chromosome 7 at 28 cM. Genes for two key components of the inflammatory response, i.e. interleukin-6 and "signal transducer and activator of transcription 3" (STAT3), were identified within 2 and 8 Mb of this 1 LOD drop

  15. Effects of fibrinogens on phase transitions in lipid model membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, B A; Küçük, O; Kwaan, H C; Westerman, M P; Tracy, D; Lis, L J

    1994-06-24

    An abnormal fibrinogen that caused aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) in a patient with gangrene was examined by real-time X-ray diffraction to determine its effects on dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (POPE) phase transitions. Similar studies were done with normal fibrinogen and results were compared. Both types of fibrinogen slightly increased the L alpha-->HII phase transition temperature and the HII phase parameters for POPE, while neither fibrinogen significantly affected the order-disordered acyl chain transitions in the lipid bilayer phase. However, fibrinogen differentially influenced the bilayer unit cell parameter of the gel and disordered bilayer and the gel state ripple phase. These results can be interpreted as indicating that fibrinogen has little effect on the balance of gel and disordered acyl chains in the lipid bilayer, but may influence membrane functions dependent on non-bilayer phases. PMID:7923477

  16. Potential basis for regulation of the coordinately expressed fibrinogen genes: homology in the 5' flanking regions.

    PubMed Central

    Fowlkes, D M; Mullis, N T; Comeau, C M; Crabtree, G R

    1984-01-01

    The three chains of fibrinogen are encoded by three separate genes whose transcription is coordinately regulated. The breakdown of fibrinogen during the acute-phase reaction leads to a simultaneous increase in alpha-, beta-, and gamma-fibrinogen mRNA in the liver. In a search for the basis of this coordinate increase in transcription, we have determined the sequences of the regions surrounding the points of transcriptional initiation of the three rat fibrinogen genes, 1490 nucleotides upstream and 730 nucleotides downstream. Two unique regions of homology have been found. One region consists of 15 nucleotides that have a common 6-nucleotide core lying between -116 and -160; the other is approximately equal to 100 nucleotides long and is in the -165 to -472 region. In this region, the beta- and gamma-fibrinogen genes are approximately equal to 65% homologous. alpha-Fibrinogen has somewhat less homology with both beta- and gamma-fibrinogen. In addition, the beta-fibrinogen gene has 22 nucleotides at position -480 that are homologous to sequences that have been noted to occur in glucocorticosteroid-regulated genes in a similar position. We feel that these areas of conserved sequences play a role in the regulation of the transcription of fibrinogen. The fibrinogen chains are synthesized as precursor peptides, and the amino-terminal portion, the so-called signal peptide, is removed during the translocation of the peptide chain across the endoplasmic reticulum. We have determined those sequences that encode the signal peptides. Homology in the amino acid sequence between the rat and human signal peptides varies between 52% for alpha-fibrinogen and 66% for beta-fibrinogen. This homology implies that there has been strong selective pressure on this portion of these genes. PMID:6232608

  17. Nutritional status influences plasma fibrinogen concentration: evidence from the THUSA survey.

    PubMed

    James, S; Vorster, H H; Venter, C S; Kruger, H S; Nell, T A; Veldman, F J; Ubbink, J B

    2000-06-01

    Nutritional status and risk factors for chronic diseases, including plasma fibrinogen and its determinants, of Africans in the Northwest Province of South Africa, have been studied in a cross-sectional survey. A representative sample of 1854 "apparently healthy" African men and women volunteers aged 15 years and older was recruited from 37 randomly selected sites throughout the Province and stratified for level of urbanisation. Information was collected using validated and culture-sensitive questionnaires. Fasting blood samples were drawn, and all measurements were done with standardised methodology using appropriate equipment, procedures, and controls. Fibrinogen concentration was measured in citrated plasma with the method of Clauss, using the ACL200 automated system and the international fibrinogen standard. The results revealed a population with a high mean plasma fibrinogen (3.17+/-1.10 g/L for HIV-negative men and 3. 64+/-1.12 g/L for HIV-negative women). Factors known to influence plasma fibrinogen, such as age, gender, smoking habit, and physical activity, were also observed in this population. Young rural men and women had the lowest fibrinogen level. Nasal snuff taking and HIV infection did not influence fibrinogen concentration. Multivariate analyses revealed that lower plasma fibrinogen was associated with low to normal body mass index in women, and with dietary intakes compatible with prudent dietary guidelines in men and women (low intakes of animal protein; trans fatty acids and higher intakes of plant protein; dietary fibre, vitamin E, and iron, and a high dietary P/S ratio). Subjects in the higher quartiles of plasma fibrinogen had significantly lower iron, vitamin E, and vitamin B6 (women) status. Increases in fibrinogen were associated with significant increases in serum lipids. Both under- and overnutrition seem to be associated with high plasma fibrinogen. It is concluded that overall nutritional status, possibly in addition to specific

  18. Exposure of fibrinogen receptors in human platelets by surface proteolysis with elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Kornecki, E; Ehrlich, Y H; De Mars, D D; Lenox, R H

    1986-01-01

    Human platelets that were preincubated with porcine elastase aggregated spontaneously upon the addition of fibrinogen. Maximal aggregation to fibrinogen was observed with platelets pretreated with an elastase concentration of 111 micrograms/ml, and half-maximal aggregation occurred after treatment with 11 micrograms/ml elastase. Binding of radiolabeled fibrinogen to elastase-treated platelets was specific, saturable, and showed a single class of 48,400 +/- 9,697 fibrinogen-binding sites per platelet with a dissociation constant of 6.30 +/- 1.48 X 10(-7) M. ATP, apyrase, and the stimulators of platelet adenylate cyclase forskolin, prostaglandin E1, prostacyclin, and N6, 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic AMP did not inhibit the fibrinogen-induced aggregation of elastase-treated platelets. EDTA completely blocked the initiation of aggregation and reversed the fibrinogen-induced aggregation of elastase-treated platelets. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies directed against glycoproteins (GP) IIb and IIIa completely blocked the fibrinogen-induced aggregation of elastase-treated platelets. Immunoprecipitates with these antibodies obtained from detergent extracts of surface-radiolabeled, intact, and elastase-treated platelets contained the glycoproteins IIb and IIIa. We conclude that surface proteolysis by low concentrations of elastase can expose fibrinogen-binding sites associated with GPIIb and GPIIIa on the platelet surface, resulting in spontaneous aggregation upon the addition of fibrinogen. These findings may be relevant to hemostatic changes observed in patients with increased levels of circulating elastase. Images PMID:3005363

  19. Biochemical and structural analysis of the interaction between β-amyloid and fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Zamolodchikov, Daria; Berk-Rauch, Hanna E; Oren, Deena A; Stor, Daniel S; Singh, Pradeep K; Kawasaki, Masanori; Aso, Kazuyoshi; Strickland, Sidney; Ahn, Hyung Jin

    2016-08-25

    The majority of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) suffer from impaired cerebral circulation. Accumulating evidence suggests that fibrinogen, the main protein component of blood clots, plays an important role in this circulatory dysfunction in AD. Fibrinogen interacts with β-amyloid (Aβ), forming plasmin-resistant abnormal blood clots, and increased fibrin deposition is found in the brains of AD patients and mouse models. In this study, we investigated the biochemical and structural details of the Aβ-fibrinogen interaction. We identified the central region of Aβ42 as the most critical region for the interaction, which can be inhibited by specific antibodies against the central region of Aβ and by naturally occurring p3 peptides, Aβ17-40 and Aβ17-42. X-ray crystallographic analysis revealed that Aβ42 binding to fragment D of fibrinogen induced a structural change in the C-terminal region of the fibrinogen β-chain (β384-393). Furthermore, we identified an additional Aβ-binding site within the αC region of fibrinogen. Aβ binding to this αC region blocked plasmin-mediated fibrin cleavage at this site, resulting in the generation of increased levels of a plasmin-resistant fibrin degradation fragment. Overall, our study elucidates the Aβ-fibrinogen interaction and clarifies the mechanism by which Aβ-fibrinogen binding delays fibrinolysis by plasmin. These results may facilitate the development of effective therapeutics against the Aβ-fibrinogen interaction to treat cerebrovascular abnormalities in AD. PMID:27389717

  20. Fibrinogen variant B[beta]D432A has normal polymerization but does not bind knob 'B'

    SciTech Connect

    Bowley, Sheryl R.; Lord, Susan T.

    2009-10-23

    Fibrinogen residue B{beta}432Asp is part of hole 'b' that interacts with knob 'B,' whose sequence starts with Gly-His-Arg-Pro-amide (GHRP). Because previous studies showed B{beta}D432A has normal polymerization, we hypothesized that B{beta}432Asp is not critical for knob 'B' binding and that new knob-hole interactions would compensate for the loss of this Asp residue. To test this hypothesis, we solved the crystal structure of fragment D from B{beta}D432A. Surprisingly, the structure (rfD-B{beta}D432A+GH) showed the peptide GHRP was not bound to hole 'b.' We then re-evaluated the polymerization of this variant by examining clot turbidity, clot structure, and the rate of FXIIIa cross-linking. The turbidity and the rate of - dimer formation for B{beta}D432A were indistinguishable compared with normal fibrinogen. Scanning electron microscopy showed no significant differences between the clots of B{beta}D432A and normal, but the thrombin-derived clots had thicker fibers than clots obtained from batroxobin, suggesting that cleavage of FpB is more important than 'B:b' interactions. We conclude that hole 'b' and 'B:b' knob-hole binding per se have no influence on fibrin polymerization.

  1. Clotting of mammalian fibrinogens by papain: a re-examination.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, Russell F

    2014-10-28

    Papain has long been known to cause the gelation of mammalian fibrinogens. It has also been reported that papain-fibrin is insoluble in dispersing solvents like strong urea or sodium bromide solutions, similar to what is observed with thrombin-generated clots in the presence of factor XIIIa and calcium. In those old studies, both the gelation and subsequent clot stabilization were attributed to papain, although the possibility that the second step might be due to contaminating factor XIII in fibrinogen preparations was considered. I have revisited this problem in light of knowledge acquired over the past half-century about thiol proteases like papain, which mostly cleave peptide bonds, and transglutaminases like factor XIIIa that catalyze the formation of ε-lysyl-γ-glutamyl cross-links. Recombinant fibrinogen, inherently free of factor XIII and other plasma proteins, formed a stable gel when treated with papain alone. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the intermolecular cross-linking in papain-fibrin leads to γ-chain dimers, trimers, and tetramers, just as is the case with thrombin-factor XIIIa-stabilized fibrin. Mass spectrometry of bands excised from gels showed that the cross-linked material is quite different from what occurs with factor XIIIa, however. With papain, the cross-linking occurs between γ chains in neighboring protofibrils becoming covalently linked in a "head-to-tail" fashion by a transpeptidation reaction involving the α-amino group of γ-Tyr1 and a papain cleavage site at γ-Gly403 near the carboxy terminus, rather than by the (reciprocal) "tail-to-tail" manner that occurs with factor XIIIa and that depends on cross-links between γ-Lys406 and γ-Gln398. PMID:25283163

  2. Combined single cell AFM manipulation and TIRFM for probing the molecular stability of multilayer fibrinogen matrices

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, W.; Yermolenko, I.; Plochberger, B.; Camacho-Alanis, F.; Ros, A.; Ugarova, T.P.; Ros, R.

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of fibrinogen on various surfaces produces a nanoscale multilayer matrix, which strongly reduces the adhesion of platelets and leukocytes with implications for hemostasis and blood compatibility of biomaterials. The nonadhesive properties of fibrinogen matrices are based on their extensibility, ensuing the inability to transduce strong mechanical forces via cellular integrins and resulting in weak intracellular signaling. In addition, reduced cell adhesion may arise from the weaker associations between fibrinogen molecules in the superficial layers of the matrix. Such reduced stability would allow integrins to pull fibrinogen molecules out of the matrix with comparable or smaller forces than required to break integrin–fibrinogen bonds. To examine this possibility, we developed a method based on the combination of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, single cell manipulation with an atomic force microscope and microcontact printing to study the transfer of fibrinogen molecules out of a matrix onto cells. We calculated the average fluorescence intensities per pixel for wild-type HEK 293 (HEK WT) and HEK 293 cells expressing leukocyte integrin Mac-1 (HEK Mac-1) before and after contact with multilayered matrices of fluorescently labeled fibrinogen. For contact times of 500 s, HEK Mac-1 cells show a median increase of 57% of the fluorescence intensity compared to 6% for HEKWT cells. The results suggest that the integrin Mac-1-fibrinogen interactions are stronger than the intermolecular fibrinogen interactions in the superficial layer of the matrix. The low mechanical stability of the multilayer fibrinogen surface may contribute to the reduced cell adhesive properties of fibrinogen-coated substrates. We anticipate that the described method can be applied to various cell types to examine their integrin-mediated adhesion to the extracellular matrices with a variable protein composition. PMID:24239757

  3. Rapid measurement of fibrinogen concentration in whole blood using a steel ball coagulometer

    PubMed Central

    Schlimp, Christoph J.; Khadem, Anna; Klotz, Anton; Solomon, Cristina; Hochleitner, Gerald; Ponschab, Martin; Redl, Heinz; Schöchl, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fibrinogen plays a key role in hemostasis and is the first coagulation factor to reach critical levels in bleeding patients. Current European guidelines on the management of traumatic or perioperative bleeding recommend fibrinogen supplementation at specific threshold levels. Whole blood viscoelastic tests provide fast evaluation of fibrin deficits. Fast measurement of plasma fibrinogen concentration is not yet available. We investigated a method to rapidly determine whole blood fibrinogen concentration using standard Clauss assays and a steel ball coagulometer and provide an estimate of the “plasma-equivalent” fibrinogen concentration within minutes by adjustment of the measured whole blood fibrinogen concentration with a quickly measureable hemoglobin-derived hematocrit. METHODS The feasibility of this approach was tested with a Clauss assay using multiple porcine fresh blood samples obtained during in vivo bleeding, hemodilution, and after treatment with hemostatic therapy. Two different Clauss assays were then tested using multiple human volunteers’ blood samples diluted in vitro and supplemented with fibrinogen concentrate. Comparative measurements with fibrin-based thromboelastometry tests were performed. RESULTS Regression and Bland-Altman analyses of derived “plasma-equivalent” fibrinogen and measured plasma fibrinogen concentration was excellent in porcine and human blood samples, especially in the ranges relevant to traumatic or perioperative bleeding. CONCLUSION Fast whole blood fibrinogen measurements could be considered as an alternative to plasma fibrinogen measurement for acute bleeding management in trauma and perioperative care settings. Further studies are needed to prove this concept and determine the turnaround times for its clinical application in emergency departments and operating theaters. PMID:25742256

  4. Interactions between segmented polyurethane surfaces and the plasma protein fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Stupp, S I; Kauffman, J W; Carr, S H

    1977-03-01

    Surfaces of a segmented polyurethane were varied by casting on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and glass substrates, and were characterized through infrared-attenuated total-reflection spectroscopy (ATR). Surfaces cast on glass substrates showed a higher content of polyether segments, whereas those cast on PET contained a higher relative concentration of aromatic segments. Adsorption, and possible conformational changes of fibrinogen, were found to be more substantial on polymer surfaces having a higher content of polyether segments. It is concluded that the relatively good blood compatibility of segmented polyurethanes is partly due to the presence of peptide-like bonds on aromatic segments. PMID:140169

  5. Development of Ga-67 labeled DFO-DAS-fibrinogen conjugate as a thrombus imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, S

    1987-01-01

    A cluster method developed for labeling large molecular proteins with radioactive metal was applied for 67Ga-labeled fibrinogen. A large number of deferoxamine (DFO) was introduced to human fibrinogen using dialdehyde strarch (DAS) as a spacer-functional polymer. The synthesized DFO-DAS-fibrinogen mentioned above was easily labeled with GaCl3 (67Ga) solution (2 mCi/5 mg). The basic investigations found that 67Ga-DFO-DAS-fibrinogen was applicable to the diagnosis of thrombus, and clinical trials were carried out under the physician-sponsored IND. In our further investigation, improvement of the 67Ga-DFO-DAS-fibrinogen reagent was attempted to obtain high specific radioactivity. This was accomplished with the more familiar 67Ga citrate. From the results of a series of experiments, 67Ga-DFO-DAS-fibrinogen of a new composition labeled using 67Ga citrate with high specific radioactivity (2 mCi/3 mg) was prepared, and both reagents were evaluated as thrombus imaging agents from the chemical and biological aspects. The labeling efficiency and clottability of both 67Ga-DFO-DAS-fibrinogen conjugates were satisfactorily high, more than 95% and 80%, respectively. The biodistribution in rats showed that both 67Ga-DFO-DAS-fibrinogen conjugates were essentially the same. These results suggest that there are no significant differences between reagents. At present, the improved reagents are being supplied for the second clinical trials under physician-sponsored IND. PMID:3438481

  6. Fibrinogen synthesis in serum-free hepatocyte cultures: Stimulation by glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Grieninger, Gerd; Hertzberg, Kathe M.; Pindyck, Johanna

    1978-01-01

    Fibrinogen synthesis was investigated in cultures of chicken embryo hepatocytes initiated and maintained in chemically defined, serum-free medium. 11-Hydroxy glucocorticoids caused a 3-fold stimulation of fibrinogen synthesis. Half-maximal stimulation was achieved with 1 nM corticosterone or hydrocortisone, as compared with only 0.1 nM dexamethasone. Increased fibrinogen production in the presence of these glucocorticoids was characterized by a 4-hr delay in onset, a sensitivity to actinomycin D, and a requirement for the continuous presence of the steroid. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis permitted analysis of the simultaneous effects of glucocorticoids on the synthesis of more than 20 plasma proteins secreted in culture. The absence of an effect on the synthesis of most of these proteins was in sharp contrast to the 3-fold increase in fibrinogen production. Sera from a variety of animals also stimulated an increase in fibrinogen synthesis that was similar in degree but less specific than that due to glucocorticoids and that partially masked the response of the cells to the steroid hormones. The presence of an anticoagulant in the medium was found to be necessary for detection of the fibrinogen secreted in culture. Although insulin was routinely included in the chemically defined medium, the cells synthesized fibrinogen and responded to glucocorticoids in the absence of hormonal supplementation of the medium. These findings are consistent with the thesis that variations in glucocorticoid levels contribute to the regulation of fibrinogen production in the intact animal. Images PMID:281699

  7. Fibrinogen synthesis in serum-free hepatocyte cultures: stimulation by glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Grieninger, G; Hertzberg, K M; Pindyck, J

    1978-11-01

    Fibrinogen synthesis was investigated in cultures of chicken embryo hepatocytes initiated and maintained in chemically defined, serum-free medium. 11-Hydroxy glucocorticoids caused a 3-fold stimulation of fibrinogen synthesis. Half-maximal stimulation was achieved with 1 nM corticosterone or hydrocortisone, as compared with only 0.1 nM dexamethasone. Increased fibrinogen production in the presence of these glucocorticoids was characterized by a 4-hr delay in onset, a sensitivity to actinomycin D, and a requirement for the continuous presence of the steroid. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis permitted analysis of the simultaneous effects of glucocorticoids on the synthesis of more than 20 plasma proteins secreted in culture. The absence of an effect on the synthesis of most of these proteins was in sharp contrast to the 3-fold increase in fibrinogen production. Sera from a variety of animals also stimulated an increase in fibrinogen synthesis that was similar in degree but less specific than that due to glucocorticoids and that partially masked the response of the cells to the steroid hormones. The presence of an anticoagulant in the medium was found to be necessary for detection of the fibrinogen secreted in culture. Although insulin was routinely included in the chemically defined medium, the cells synthesized fibrinogen and responded to glucocorticoids in the absence of hormonal supplementation of the medium. These findings are consistent with the thesis that variations in glucocorticoid levels contribute to the regulation of fibrinogen production in the intact animal. PMID:281699

  8. 21 CFR 864.7320 - Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products assay. 864.7320 Section 864.7320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7320 Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation...

  9. 21 CFR 864.7320 - Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products assay. 864.7320 Section 864.7320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7320 Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation...

  10. C1q component of complement binds to fibrinogen and fibrin

    SciTech Connect

    Entwistle, R.A.; Furcht, L.T.

    1988-01-12

    The interaction of complement component C1q with fibrinogen and fibrin was studied by using a solid-phase direct binding assay. Scatchard analysis of radioiodinated fibrinogen binding to C1q indicated at least two high-affinity binding constants (Kd) calculated as 8.5 and 120 nM. In contrast, binding of radioiodinated fibrin to C1q showed only a single class of binding sites with a calculated Kd of 600 nM. Fibrinogen-C1q binding was shown to decrease as a function of increasing salt concentrations, indicating either the presence of charged amino acids in the binding sites or an ionic strength induced conformational dependency of the binding. In direct binding studies using isolated fragments of C1q, both the collagen-like domain of C1q and the globular domains of C1q were shown to bind fibrinogen, indicating at least one binding site for fibrinogen is located in each of the major domains of C1q. Addition of the thrombin-generated peptides of fibrinogen, fibrinopeptides A and B, enhanced C1q-fibrinogen binding, again indicating a complex binding interaction. These results indicate that C1q and fibrinogen are capable of high-affinity interactions that may serve to sequester these complexes in areas of tumors, immune complex deposition, or wounds.

  11. Binding of Efb from Staphylococcus aureus to fibrinogen blocks neutrophil adherence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In addition to its pivotal role in hemostasis, fibrinogen (Fg) and provisional fibrin matrices play important roles in inflammation and regulate innate immune responses by interacting with leukocytes. Efb (the extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein) is a secreted Staphylococcus aureus protein that...

  12. Introduction of an algorithm for ROTEM-guided fibrinogen concentrate administration in major obstetric haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mallaiah, S; Barclay, P; Harrod, I; Chevannes, C; Bhalla, A

    2015-02-01

    We compared blood component requirements during major obstetric haemorrhage, following the introduction of fibrinogen concentrate. A prospective study of transfusion requirements and patient outcomes was performed for 12 months to evaluate the major obstetric haemorrhage pathway using shock packs (Shock Pack phase). The study was repeated after the pathway was amended to include fibrinogen concentrate (Fibrinogen phase). The median (IQR [range]) number of blood components given was 8.0 (3.0-14.5 [0-32]) during the Shock Pack phase, and 3.0 (2.0-5.0 [0-26]) during the Fibrinogen phase (p = 0.0004). The median (IQR [range]) quantity of fibrinogen administered was significantly greater in the Shock Pack phase, 3.2 (0-7.1 [0-20.4]) g, than in the Fibrinogen phase, 0 (0-3.0 [0-12.4]) g, p = 0.0005. Four (9.5%) of 42 patients in the Shock Pack phase developed transfusion associated circulatory overload compared with none of 51 patients in the Fibrinogen phase (p = 0.038). Fibrinogen concentrate allows prompt correction of coagulation deficits associated with major obstetric haemorrhage, reducing the requirement for blood component therapy and the attendant risks of complications. PMID:25289791

  13. Fibrinogen adsorption mechanisms at the gold substrate revealed by QCM-D measurements and RSA modeling.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Katarzyna; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Cieśla, Michał

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption kinetics of fibrinogen at a gold substrate at various pHs was thoroughly studied using the QCM-D method. The experimental were interpreted in terms of theoretical calculations performed according to the random sequential adsorption model (RSA). In this way, the hydration functions and water factors of fibrinogen monolayers were quantitatively evaluated at various pHs. It was revealed that for the lower range of fibrinogen coverage the hydration function were considerably lower than previously obtained for the silica sensor [33]. The lower hydration of fibrinogen monolayers on the gold sensor was attributed to its higher roughness. However, for higher fibrinogen coverage the hydration functions for both sensors became identical exhibiting an universal behavior. By using the hydration functions, the fibrinogen adsorption/desorption runs derived from QCM-D measurements were converted to the Γd vs. the time relationships. This allowed to precisely determine the maximum coverage that varied between 1.6mgm(-2) at pH 3.5 and 4.5mgm(-2) at pH 7.4 (for ionic strength of 0.15M). These results agree with theoretical eRSA modeling and previous experimental data derived by using ellipsometry, OWLS and TIRF. Various fibrinogen adsorption mechanisms were revealed by exploiting the maximum coverage data. These results allow one to develop a method for preparing fibrinogen monolayers of well-controlled coverage and molecule orientation. PMID:26705826

  14. A study on human serum albumin influence on glycation of fibrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kielmas, Martyna; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Stefanowicz, Piotr

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •The glycation of fibrinogen was investigated by isotopic labeling method. •The potential glycation sites in fibrinogen were identified. •Human serum albumin (HSA) inhibits the glycation of fibrinogen. •The effect of HSA on fibrinogen glycation is sequence-dependent. -- Abstract: Although in vivo glycation proceeds in complex mixture of proteins, previous studies did not take in consideration the influence of protein–protein interaction on Maillard reaction. The aim of our study was to test the influence of human serum albumin (HSA) on glycation of fibrinogen. The isotopic labeling using [{sup 13}C{sub 6}] glucose combined with LC-MS were applied as tool for identification possible glycation sites in fibrinogen and for evaluation the effect of HSA on the glycation level of selected amino acids in fibrinogen. The obtained data indicate that the addition of HSA protects the fibrinogen from glycation. The level of glycation in presence of HSA is reduced by 30–60% and depends on the location of glycated residue in sequence of protein.

  15. Utility of plasma fibrinogen in the differential diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Liu, Rui; Wu, Di; Miao, Wei; Chen, Qian; Li, Yushu; Guan, Haixia

    2015-01-01

    Background: A study had reported that a low TSH level is associated with elevated plasma fibrinogen (FIB) levels. Our purpose was to investigate the role of FIB in the differential diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. Methods: The data of 104 patients with primary thyrotoxicosis at the First Hospital of China Medical University from July 2010 to March 2011 were analyzed and divided into three groups: 45 cases of subacute thyroiditis, 50 cases of Graves’ disease, and 9 cases of toxic multinodular goiter. The patients with subacute thyroiditis were followed up before and after the treatment. FIB levels of the three groups were compared. Results: There was no significant difference in serum TSH, FT3 and FT4 between the patients with three different causes of thyrotoxicosis (P > 0.05). The proportion of hyperfibrinogenemia in patients with subacute thyroiditis was 98%. The FIB levels of patients with subacute thyroiditis were significantly higher than those with Graves’ disease and toxic multinodular goiter (P < 0.05). Levels of ESR show a similar tendency. The FIB levels returned to normal with the remission of subacute thyroiditis. Conclusions: Elevated plasma fibrinogen is a common manifestation of the active phase of subacute thyroiditis. A FIB test can be used for the differential diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. We can anticipate the outcome of subacute thyroiditis through the dynamic changes of FIB. PMID:25785116

  16. Tigecycline Treatment Causes a Decrease in Fibrinogen Levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Zhou, Suming

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of tigecycline treatment on coagulation parameters, specifically fibrinogen, in patients with severe infections. We examined 20 cases of tigecycline-treated patients with severe infections, including hospital-acquired pneumonia, complicated intra-abdominal infections, complicated skin and soft tissue infections, and bloodstream infections. We monitored the relative markers of coagulation and renal and liver function before, during, and after treatment. Fibrinogen (FIB) levels decreased significantly after the use of tigecycline and normalized after the cessation of treatment. FIB levels significantly decreased in the patients treated with the recommended dose or a higher treatment dose. The FIB levels decreased more in the higher-treatment-dose group. There was no difference in the decrease in FIB levels or the FIB level recovery by age. Prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and thrombin time (TT) were prolonged after tigecycline use. The TT decreased after the cessation of treatment, and the PT and APTT also decreased but not to a significant level. There was no change in platelet, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), or creatinine (Cr) levels associated with treatment. The use of tigecycline was associated with decreased FIB levels, which returned to normal after the cessation of treatment. A high-dose treatment group showed greater decreases in FIB levels than did patients treated with the recommended dose. The decline in FIB was not related to patient age. The use of tigecycline was associated with prolonged PT, APTT, and TT. PMID:25547356

  17. Sensitive Immunoassays of Nitrated Fibrinogen in Human Biofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong; Du, Dan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hua; Qian, Weijun; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Smith, Richard D.; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-05-05

    Three new sandwich immunoassays for detection of nitrated biomarker have been established with potential applications in biomedical studies and clinical practice. In this study, nitrated human fibrinogen, a potential oxidative stress biomarker for several pathologies, was chosen as the target. To improve the sensitivity and overcome the interference caused by the complexity of human biofluids, we developed three sandwich strategies using various combinations of primary antibody and secondary antibody. All three strategies demonstrated high sensitivity and selectivity towards nitrated forms of fibrinogen in buffer, but their performances were dramatically reduced when tested with human plasma and serum samples. Systematically optimizations were carried out to investigate the effects of numerous factors, including sampling, coating, blocking, and immunoreactions. Our final optimization results indicate that two of these strategies retain sufficient sensitivity and selectivity for use as assays in human physiological samples. Specifically, detection limits reached the pM level and the linear response ranges were up to nM level with a correlation coefficient > 0.99. To our best knowledge, this is the first example of using an electrochemical immunoassay for a nitrated biomarker in a physiological fluid. This novel approach provides a rapid, sensitive, selective, cost efficient and robust bioassay for detection of oxidative stress in pathology and for clinical applications. Moreover, the sandwich strategies developed in this paper can be readily used to establish effective methods targeting other nitration biomarkers.

  18. Characterization of nanobodies binding human fibrinogen selected by E. coli display.

    PubMed

    Salema, Valencio; López-Guajardo, Ana; Gutierrez, Carlos; Mencía, Mario; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2016-09-20

    Abnormal levels of fibrinogen (Fib) in blood plasma are associated with several pathological conditions and hence methods for its detection in blood and body fluids are essential. Nanobodies (Nbs) or (VHHs) are single domain antibodies derived from camelids with excellent biophysical and antigen-binding properties, showing great promise in diagnostics and therapy. In this work, we select and characterize high affinity Nbs binding human Fib employing an E. coli cell surface display system based on the fusion of an immune library of VHH domains with the β-domain of Intimin. Bacteria displaying high-affinity Nbs against Fib were selected using magnetic cell sorting (MACS). Specific binding of the selected clones to Fib was confirmed by flow cytometry of E. coli bacteria, as well as by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with the purified Nbs. E. coli display also provided an excellent estimation of the affinity of the selected Nbs by flow cytometry analysis under equilibrium conditions, with equilibrium constant (KD) values very similar to those obtained by SPR analysis. Finally, pairwise epitope-scouting studies revealed that the selected Nbs bound distinct epitopes on Fib. The selected Nbs are promising diagnostic tools for determination of human Fib levels. PMID:27485813

  19. Fibrinogen-like protein 1, a hepatocyte derived protein is an acute phase reactant

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhilin; Ukomadu, Chinweike

    2008-01-25

    Fibrinogen-like protein 1 (FGL1) is a hepatocyte derived protein that is upregulated in regenerating rodent livers following partial hepatectomy. It has been implicated as a mitogen for liver cell proliferation. In this study, we show that recombinant human IL-6 induces FGL1 expression in Hep G2 cells in a pattern similar to those of acute phase reactants. Following induction of acute inflammation in rats by subcutaneous injection of turpentine oil, serum FGL1 levels are also enhanced. Although, a recent report suggests that FGL1 associates almost exclusively with the fibrin matrix, we report here that approximately 20% of the total plasma FGL1 remains free. The enhancement of FGL1 levels in vitro by IL-6 and its induction after turpentine oil injection suggest that it is an acute phase reactant. Its presence in bound and free forms in the blood also implies biological roles that extend beyond the proposed autocrine effect it has on hepatocytes during regeneration.

  20. Activation and enhancement of room-temperature ferromagnetism in Cu-doped anatase TiO₂ films by bound magnetic polaron and oxygen defects.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian-Yun; Bao, Shan-Hu; Lv, Yan-Hong; Jin, Ping

    2014-12-24

    Cu-doped anatase TiO2 films grown by magnetron sputtering at room temperature showed the unexpected observation of room-temperature ferromagnetism, which was enhanced or destroyed corresponding to low or high impurity concentration via vacuum annealing. On the basis of the analysis of composition and structure, the most important factor for activating ferromagnetism can be identified as the creation of grain boundary defects. In addition, oxygen defects can be the dominating factor for increasing the saturation moment of the 0.19 at. % Cu-doped TiO2 film from 0.564 to 26.41 emu/cm(3). These results help elucidate the origin of ferromagnetism and emphasize the role of oxygen defects for the application of ferromagnetic films. PMID:25437752

  1. Bipartite mRNA for chicken alpha-fibrinogen potentially encodes an amino acid sequence homologous to beta- and gamma-fibrinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Weissbach, L; Grieninger, G

    1990-01-01

    Overlapping cDNAs derived from the chicken alpha-fibrinogen mRNA have been sequenced, beginning from within the coding region for the signal peptide of this subunit and terminating within the poly(A) extension. The predicted size of chicken alpha-fibrinogen is 54,187 daltons, which is the smallest of any alpha chain reported; the oligopeptide repeats that characterize the central regions of the other alpha subunits were conspicuously absent. A further unexpected finding was the presence on the mRNA of a separate, long open reading frame (752 nucleotides), beginning 312 nucleotides downstream from the alpha-fibrinogen coding sequence and containing intron-like features near its 5' end. The protein sequence predicted from this second open reading frame lacks an initiating methionine but is homologous to the C-terminal regions of all known beta- and gamma-fibrinogens as well as the C termini of two nonfibrinogen proteins: cytotactin (tenascin), an extracellular matrix protein, and pT49, a putative protein specific to cytotoxic T cells. The intron-like features of the second open reading frame immediately precede the region of common homology, and the beginnings of the corresponding homologous segments in the beta- and gamma-fibrinogen sequences are marked by aligned intron positions. Based on these findings, it is proposed that fibrinogen gene evolution included a fusion of two distinct ancestral genes. PMID:2367530

  2. The lateral diffusion and fibrinogen induced clustering of platelet integrin αIIbβ3 reconstituted into physiologically mimetic GUVs.

    PubMed

    Gaul, Vinnie; Lopez, Sergio G; Lentz, Barry R; Moran, Niamh; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E

    2015-04-01

    Platelet integrin αIIbβ3 is a key mediator of platelet activation and thrombosis. Upon activation αIIbβ3 undergoes significant conformational rearrangement, inducing complex bidirectional signalling and protein recruitment leading to platelet activation. Reconstituted lipid models of the integrin can enhance our understanding of the structural and mechanistic details of αIIbβ3 behaviour away from the complexity of the platelet machinery. Here, a novel method of αIIbβ3 insertion into Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) is described that allows for effective integrin reconstitution unrestricted by lipid composition. αIIbβ3 was inserted into two GUV lipid compositions that seek to better mimic the platelet membrane. First, "nature's own", comprising 32% DOPC, 25% DOPE, 20% CH, 15% SM and 8% DOPS, intended to mimic the platelet cell membrane. Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy (FLCS) reveals that exposure of the integrin to the activators Mn(2+) or DTT does not influence the diffusion coefficient of αIIbβ3. Similarly, exposure to αIIbβ3's primary ligand fibrinogen (Fg) alone does not affect αIIbβ3's diffusion coefficient. However, addition of Fg with either activator reduces the integrin diffusion coefficient from 2.52 ± 0.29 to μm(2) s(-1) to 1.56 ± 0.26 (Mn(2+)) or 1.49 ± 0.41 μm(2) s(-1) (DTT) which is consistent with aggregation of activated αIIbβ3 induced by fibrinogen binding. The Multichannel Scaler (MCS) trace shows that the integrin-Fg complex diffuses through the confocal volume in clusters. Using the Saffman-Delbrück model as a first approximation, the diffusion coefficient of the complex suggests at least a 20-fold increase in the radius of membrane bound protein, consistent with integrin clustering. Second, αIIbβ3 was also reconstituted into a "raft forming" GUV with well defined liquid disordered (Ld) and liquid ordered (Lo) phases. Using confocal microscopy and lipid partitioning dyes, αIIbβ3 showed an affinity for

  3. Transversely bounded DFB lasers. [bounded distributed-feedback lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Evans, G.; Yeh, C.

    1975-01-01

    Bounded distributed-feedback (DFB) lasers are studied in detail. Threshold gain and field distribution for a number of configurations are derived and analyzed. More specifically, the thin-film guide, fiber, diffusion guide, and hollow channel with inhomogeneous-cladding DFB lasers are considered. Optimum points exist and must be used in DFB laser design. Different-modes feedback and the effects of the transverse boundaries are included. A number of applications are also discussed.

  4. The Primary Role of Fibrinogen-Related Proteins in Invertebrates Is Defense, Not Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Hanington, Patrick C.; Zhang, Si-Ming

    2010-01-01

    In vertebrates, the conversion of fibrinogen into fibrin is an essential process that underlies the establishment of the supporting protein framework required for coagulation. In invertebrates, fibrinogen-domain-containing proteins play a role in the defense response generated against pathogens; however, they do not function in coagulation, suggesting that this role has been recently acquired. Molecules containing fibrinogen motifs have been identified in numerous invertebrate organisms, and most of these molecules known to date have been linked to defense. Moreover, recent genome projects of invertebrate animals have revealed surprisingly high numbers of fibrinogen-like loci in their genomes, suggesting important and perhaps diverse functions of fibrinogen-like proteins in invertebrates. The ancestral role of molecules containing fibrinogen-related domains (FReDs) with immunity is the focus of this review, with emphasis on specific FReDs called fibrinogen-related proteins (FREPs) identified from the schistosome-transmitting mollusc Biomphalaria glabrata. Herein, we outline the range of invertebrate organisms FREPs can be found in, and detail the roles these molecules play in defense and protection against infection. PMID:21063081

  5. Quantitative Determination of Fibrinogen of Patients with Coronary Heart Diseases through Piezoelectric Agglutination Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qinghai; Hua, Xing; Fu, Weiling; Liu, Dongbo; Chen, Ming; Cai, Guoru

    2010-01-01

    Fibrinogen can transform fibrin through an agglutination reaction, finally forming fibrin polymer with grid structure. The density and viscosity of the reaction system changes drastically during the course of agglutination. In this research, we apply an independently-developed piezoelectric agglutination sensor to detect the fibrinogen agglutination reaction in patients with coronary heart diseases. The terminal judgment method of determining plasma agglutination reaction through piezoelectric agglutination sensor was established. In addition, the standard curve between plasma agglutination time and fibrinogen concentration was established to determinate fibrinogen content quantitatively. The results indicate the close correlation between the STAGO paramagnetic particle method and the method of piezoelectric agglutination sensor for the detection of Fibrinogen. The correlation coefficient was 0.91 (γ = 0.91). The determination can be completed within 10 minutes. The fibrinogen concentration in the coronary heart disease group was significantly higher than that of the healthy control group (P < 0.05). The results reveal that high fibrinogen concentration is closely correlated to the incurrence, development and prognosis of coronary heart diseases. Compared with other traditional methods, the method of piezoelectric agglutination sensor has some merits such as operation convenience, small size, low cost, quick detecting, good precision and the common reacting agents with paramagnetic particle method. PMID:22294917

  6. Thrombin and fibrinogen γ' impact clot structure by marked effects on intrafibrillar structure and protofibril packing.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Marco M; Macrae, Fraser L; Duval, Cédric; McPherson, Helen R; Bridge, Katherine I; Ajjan, Ramzi A; Ridger, Victoria C; Connell, Simon D; Philippou, Helen; Ariëns, Robert A S

    2016-01-28

    Previous studies have shown effects of thrombin and fibrinogen γ' on clot structure. However, structural information was obtained using electron microscopy, which requires sample dehydration. Our aim was to investigate the role of thrombin and fibrinogen γ' in modulating fibrin structure under fully hydrated conditions. Fibrin fibers were studied using turbidimetry, atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, and magnetic tweezers in purified and plasma solutions. Increased thrombin induced a pronounced decrease in average protofibril content per fiber, with a relatively minor decrease in fiber size, leading to the formation of less compact fiber structures. Atomic force microscopy under fully hydrated conditions confirmed that fiber diameter was only marginally decreased. Decreased protofibril content of the fibers produced by high thrombin resulted in weakened clot architecture as analyzed by magnetic tweezers in purified systems and by thromboelastometry in plasma and whole blood. Fibers produced with fibrinogen γ' showed reduced protofibril packing over a range of thrombin concentrations. High-magnification electron microscopy demonstrated reduced protofibril packing in γ' fibers and unraveling of fibers into separate protofibrils. Decreased protofibril packing was confirmed in plasma for high thrombin concentrations and fibrinogen-deficient plasma reconstituted with γ' fibrinogen. These findings demonstrate that, in fully hydrated conditions, thrombin and fibrinogen γ' have dramatic effects on protofibril content and that protein density within fibers correlates with strength of the fibrin network. We conclude that regulation of protofibril content of fibers is an important mechanism by which thrombin and fibrinogen γ' modulate fibrin clot structure and strength. PMID:26608329

  7. Adsorption Studies with AFM of Human Plasma Fibrinogen on Silicon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gause, Sheena; Kong, Wendy; Rowe

    2007-11-01

    Fibrinogen (FGN) plays an important role in the clotting of blood. Human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) is a protein that readily adsorbs on biomaterial surfaces. The purpose of this experiment was to use the Atomic Force Microscope to study the adsorption of HPF molecules or FGN onto several silicon surfaces with different orientations and resistivities. The size of the FGN molecules found to be somewhat different of Si(111), (100) and (110) were compared to the size of the FGN molecules in solution (45 nm in length, the end dynodes measures to be 6.5 nm in diameter, and the middle dynode measures to be 5 nm in diameter. For this study, the CPR (Thermo-microscope) Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) was used to observe the amount of fibrinogen molecules adsorbed by Si (111) with a resistance of .0281-.0261 φ cm, Si (111) with a resistance of 1 φ cm, Si (100), and Si (110) surfaces. In finding any single fibrinogen molecules, the appropriate image scans and measurements were taken. After collection and analysis of the data, it was found from AFM that the fibrinogen molecules found on Si (110) mostly resembled fibrinogen molecules found in solution. The other images showed that the fibrinogen molecules adsorbed on Silicon substrates is significantly greater (˜10-20 %) than those in solution.

  8. Fibrinogen Is at the Interface of Host Defense and Pathogen Virulence in Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ya-Ping; Flick, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    Fibrinogen not only plays a pivotal role in hemostasis but also serves key roles in antimicrobial host defense. As a rapidly assembled provisional matrix protein, fibrin(ogen) can function as an early line of host protection by limiting bacterial growth, suppressing dissemination of microbes to distant sites, and mediating host bacterial killing. Fibrinogen-mediated host antimicrobial activity occurs predominantly through two general mechanisms, namely, fibrin matrices functioning as a protective barrier and fibrin(ogen) directly or indirectly driving host protective immune function. The potential of fibrin to limit bacterial infection and disease has been countered by numerous bacterial species evolving and maintaining virulence factors that engage hemostatic system components within vertebrate hosts. Bacterial factors have been isolated that simply bind fibrinogen or fibrin, promote fibrin polymer formation, or promote fibrin dissolution. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic gram-positive bacterium, the causative agent of a wide range of human infectious diseases, and a prime example of a pathogen exquisitely sensitive to host fibrinogen. Indeed, current data suggest fibrinogen serves as a context-dependent determinant of host defense or pathogen virulence in Staphylococcus infection whose ultimate contribution is dictated by the expression of S. aureus virulence factors, the path of infection, and the tissue microenvironment. PMID:27056151

  9. Influence of Ficoll on urea induced denaturation of fibrinogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaranarayanan, Kamatchi; Meenakshisundaram, N.

    2016-03-01

    Ficoll is a neutral, highly branched polymer used as a molecular crowder in the study of proteins. Ficoll is also part of Ficoll-Paque used in biology laboratories to separate blood to its components (erythrocytes, leukocytes etc.,). Role of Ficoll in the urea induced denaturation of protein Fibrinogen (Fg) has been analyzed using fluorescence, circular dichroism, molecular docking and interfacial studies. Fluorescence studies show that Ficoll prevents quenching of Fg in the presence of urea. From the circular dichroism spectra, Fg shows conformational transition to random coil with urea of 6 M concentration. Ficoll helps to shift this denaturation concentration to 8 M and thus constraints by shielding Fg during the process. Molecular docking studies indicate that Ficoll interacts favorably with the protein than urea. The surface tension and shear viscosity analysis shows clearly that the protein is shielded by Ficoll.

  10. Mechanisms of fibrinogen-induced microvascular dysfunction during cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Lominadze, D.; Dean, W. L.; Tyagi, S. C.; Roberts, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Fibrinogen (Fg) is a high molecular weight plasma adhesion protein and a biomarker of inflammation. Many cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disorders are accompanied by increased blood content of Fg. Increased levels of Fg result in changes in blood rheological properties such as increases in plasma viscosity, erythrocyte aggregation, platelet thrombogenesis, alterations in vascular reactivity and compromises in endothelial layer integrity. These alterations exacerbate the complications in peripheral blood circulation during cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, diabetes and stroke. In addition to affecting blood viscosity by altering plasma viscosity and erythrocyte aggregation, growing experimental evidence suggests that Fg alters vascular reactivity and impairs endothelial cell layer integrity by binding to its endothelial cell membrane receptors and activating signalling mechanisms. The purpose of this review is to discuss experimental data, which demonstrate the effects of Fg causing vascular dysfunction and to offer possible mechanisms for these effects, which could exacerbate microcirculatory complications during cardiovascular diseases accompanied by increased Fg content. PMID:19723026

  11. Streptococcal M1 protein constructs a pathological host fibrinogen network

    PubMed Central

    Macheboeuf, Pauline; Buffalo, Cosmo; Fu, Chi-yu; Zinkernagel, Annelies S.; Cole, Jason N.; Johnson, John E.; Nizet, Victor; Ghosh, Partho

    2012-01-01

    M1 protein, a major virulence factor of the leading invasive strain of group A Streptococcus, is sufficient to induce toxic shock-like vascular leakage and tissue injury. These events are triggered by the formation of a complex between M1 and fibrinogen (Fg) that, unlike M1 or Fg alone, leads to neutrophil activation. Here we provide a structural explanation for the pathological properties of the M1-Fg complex. A conformationally dynamic coiled-coil dimer of M1 was found to organize four Fg molecules into a specific cross-like pattern. This pattern supported the construction of a supramolecular network that was required for neutrophil activation but was distinct from a fibrin clot. Disruption of this network into other supramolecular assemblies was not tolerated. These results have bearing on the pathophysiology of streptococcal toxic shock. PMID:21475196

  12. [Nerve anastomoses. Sutures or fibrinogenic glue? Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Boedts, D; Bouckaert, J I

    1984-01-01

    A comparative animal experiment was set up between two nerve anastomosis techniques, one by sealing nerve ends with a fibrinogen-thrombine glue and the other by classical perineural suturing. It was concluded that glueing nerve ends, from the surgical-technical point of view is a better method than suturing. It is an easy, time-sparing method which allows excellent coaptation of the severed nerves with minimal iatrogenic trauma. On the long run however some questions remain. There is the problem of induced fibrosis by using high doses of aprotinine and factor XIII at the site of the nerve junctions and on the other hand the influence of fibrinolysis in traumatized tissues, with early decrease of tensile strength at the junctions before nerve healing. So glued nerve ends should be completely free of tension, protected against secondary shearing forces, and also immobilization of the region is required. PMID:6385609

  13. 5-fluorouracil loaded fibrinogen nanoparticles for cancer drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Rejinold, N Sanoj; Muthunarayanan, M; Chennazhi, K P; Nair, S V; Jayakumar, R

    2011-01-01

    In this study, 5-flurouracil loaded fibrinogen nanoparticles (5-FU-FNPs) were prepared by two step coacervation method using calcium chloride as cross-linker. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized using DLS, SEM, AFM, FT-IR, TG/DTA and XRD studies. Particle size of 5-FU-FNPs was found to be 150-200 nm. The loading efficiency (LE) and in vitro drug release was studied using UV spectrophotometer. The LE of FNPs was found to be ∼90%. The cytotoxicity studies showed 5-FU-FNPs were toxic to MCF7, PC3 and KB cells while they are comparatively non toxic to L929 cells. Cellular uptake of Rhodamine 123 conjugated 5-FU-FNPs was also studied. Cell uptake studies demonstrated that the nanoparticles are inside the cells. These results indicated that FNPs could be useful for cancer drug delivery. PMID:20951162

  14. Generation of silicon nanocrystals by damage free continuous wave laser annealing of substrate-bound SiO{sub x} films

    SciTech Connect

    Fricke-Begemann, T. Ihlemann, J.; Wang, N.; Peretzki, P.; Seibt, M.

    2015-09-28

    Silicon nanocrystals have been generated by laser induced phase separation in SiO{sub x} films. A continuous wave laser emitting at 405 nm is focused to a 6 μm diameter spot on 530 nm thick SiO{sub x} films deposited on fused silica substrates. Irradiation of lines is accomplished by focus scanning. The samples are investigated by atomic force microscopy, TEM, Raman spectroscopy, and photoluminescence measurements. At a laser power of 35 mW corresponding to an irradiance of about 1.2 × 10{sup 5 }W/cm{sup 2}, the formation of Si-nanocrystals in the film without any deterioration of the surface is observed. At higher laser power, the central irradiated region is oxidized to SiO{sub 2} and exhibits some porous character, while the surface remains optically smooth, and nanocrystals are observed beside and beneath this oxidized region. Amorphous Si-nanoclusters are formed at lower laser power and around the lines written at high power.

  15. Fibrinogen-induced increased pial venular permeability in mice

    PubMed Central

    Muradashvili, Nino; Qipshidze, Natia; Munjal, Charu; Givvimani, Srikanth; Benton, Richard L; Roberts, Andrew M; Tyagi, Suresh C; Lominadze, David

    2012-01-01

    Elevated blood level of Fibrinogen (Fg) is commonly associated with vascular dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that at pathologically high levels, Fg increases cerebrovascular permeability by activating matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Fibrinogen (4 mg/mL blood concentration) or equal volume of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was infused into male wild-type (WT; C57BL/6J) or MMP-9 gene knockout (MMP9−/−) mice. Pial venular leakage of fluorescein isothiocyanate-bovine serum albumin to Fg or PBS alone and to topically applied histamine (10−5 mol/L) were assessed. Intravital fluorescence microscopy and image analysis were used to assess cerebrovascular protein leakage. Pial venular macromolecular leakage increased more after Fg infusion than after infusion of PBS in both (WT and MMP9−/−) mice but was more pronounced in WT compared with MMP9−/− mice. Expression of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) was less and plasmalemmal vesicle-associated protein-1 (PV-1) was greater in Fg-infused than in PBS-infused both mice groups. However, in MMP9−/− mice, VE-cadherin expression was greater and PV-1 expression was less than in WT mice. These data indicate that at higher levels, Fg compromises microvascular integrity through activation of MMP-9 and downregulation of VE-cadherin and upregulation of PV-1. Our results suggest that elevated blood level of Fg could have a significant role in cerebrovascular dysfunction and remodeling. PMID:21989482

  16. The impact of time-varying phosphorus doping on ZnMgO thin films and achievement of dominant acceptor-bound-exciton peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, S.; Nagar, S.; Gupta, S. K.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2014-03-01

    ZnO is a highly efficient and promising semiconductor material because of its large bandgap (3.37 eV) and exciton binding energy (60 meV). MgO also has a very high bandgap (7.8 eV), and the incorporation of Mg into ZnO can result in an alloy with a bandgap of more than 4 eV . We used plasma immersion ion implantation to dope phosphorus into Zn0.85Mg0.15O for achieving p-type ZnMgO. RF sputtering was used to deposit ZnMgO on a Si substrate. Phosphorus doping was conducted from 10 s to 70 s. Rapid thermal annealing of the samples was performed to remove any implantation defects. A highly dominant acceptor-bound-exciton peak was observed at 3.36 eV by photoluminescence measurements, which continued to dominate from low temperature to room temperature. Donor-bound acceptor and free-electron acceptor peaks were also observed at 3.24 eV and 3.28 eV, respectively.

  17. [Effect of fibrinogen on corrosion behavior of stainless steel in artificial blood solution].

    PubMed

    Guo, L; Liang, C; Guo, H; Chen, W

    2001-12-01

    The effect of fibrinogen on corrosion behavior of SUS316L and SUS317L stainless steel in artificial blood PBS solution has been investigated with electrochemical technology. The results showed that the corrosion potential (Ec) of stainless steel shifted negatively, the passivated current (ip) became less and the pitting corrosion potential (Eb) shifted negatively with the existence of fibrinogen in PBS. These indicate that samples become more sensitive to corrosion under this circumstance. SEM pictures demonstrated that stainless steel adsorbed fibrinogen on its surface. PMID:11791309

  18. Molecular Interactions of Human Plasminogen with Fibronectin-binding Protein B (FnBPB), a Fibrinogen/Fibronectin-binding Protein from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Pietrocola, Giampiero; Nobile, Giulia; Gianotti, Valentina; Zapotoczna, Marta; Foster, Timothy J; Geoghegan, Joan A; Speziale, Pietro

    2016-08-26

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal bacterium that has the ability to cause superficial and deep-seated infections. Like several other invasive pathogens, S. aureus can capture plasminogen from the human host where it can be converted to plasmin by host plasminogen activators or by endogenously expressed staphylokinase. This study demonstrates that sortase-anchored cell wall-associated proteins are responsible for capturing the bulk of bound plasminogen. Two cell wall-associated proteins, the fibrinogen- and fibronectin-binding proteins A and B, were found to bind plasminogen, and one of them, FnBPB, was studied in detail. Plasminogen captured on the surface of S. aureus- or Lactococcus lactis-expressing FnBPB could be activated to the potent serine protease plasmin by staphylokinase and tissue plasminogen activator. Plasminogen bound to recombinant FnBPB with a KD of 0.532 μm as determined by surface plasmon resonance. Plasminogen binding did not to occur by the same mechanism through which FnBPB binds to fibrinogen. Indeed, FnBPB could bind both ligands simultaneously indicating that their binding sites do not overlap. The N3 subdomain of FnBPB contains the full plasminogen-binding site, and this includes, at least in part, two conserved patches of surface-located lysine residues that were recognized by kringle 4 of the host protein. PMID:27387503

  19. Gallium nitrate induces fibrinogen flocculation: an explanation for its hemostatic effect?

    PubMed

    Bauters, A; Holt, D J; Zerbib, P; Rogosnitzky, M

    2013-12-01

    A novel hemostatic effect of gallium nitrate has recently been discovered. Our aim was to perform a preliminary investigation into its mode of action. Thromboelastography® showed no effect on coagulation but pointed instead to changes in fibrinogen concentration. We measured functional fibrinogen in whole blood after addition of gallium nitrate and nitric acid. We found that gallium nitrate induces fibrinogen precipitation in whole blood to a significantly higher degree than solutions of nitric acid alone. This precipitate is not primarily pH driven, and appears to occur via flocculation. This behavior is in line with the generally observed ability of metals to induce fibrinogen precipitation. Further investigation is required into this novel phenomenon. PMID:23959335

  20. Higher Fibrinogen Levels Predict Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, T.C.; Snell-Bergeon, J.K.; Maahs, D.M; Kinney, G.L.; Rewers, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim To determine whether fibrinogen levels predict independently progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC) in adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods Data from a prospective cohort - the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes Study - were evaluated. Fibrinogen levels at baseline were separated into quartiles. CAC was measured twice and averaged at baseline and at follow-up 2.4 ± 0.4 years later. CAC progressors were defined as participants whose square-root transformed CAC volume increased by ≥ 2.53 or development mm of clinical coronary artery disease during the follow-up period. Results Fibrinogen levels were higher in progressors than in non-progressors (276 ± 61 mg/dl versus 259 ± 61 mg/dl, p = 0.0003). CAC progression, adjusted for known cardiovascular risk factors, increased in the highest quartile. Conclusions Higher fibrinogen levels predict CAC progression in type 1 diabetes subjects, independent of standard cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:20079495

  1. Preparation and biocompatibility of electrospun poly( L-lactide-co-ɛ-caprolactone)/fibrinogen blended nanofibrous scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhengdong; Fu, Weiguo; Dong, Zhihui; Zhang, Xiangman; Gao, Bin; Guo, Daqiao; He, Hongbing; Wang, Yuqi

    2011-02-01

    Electrospun blended nanofibrous scaffolds were fabricated from an synthetic biodegradable polymer (poly(L-lactide-co-ɛ-caprolactone): PLCL; 8% solution) and a natural protein (fibrinogen; 100 mg/ml solution) with different volume ratios. Results showed that the blended scaffolds consisted of nanoscale fibers with mean diameters ranging from 224 to 450 nm. The deposition of the fibrinogen amino groups on the surfaces of the blended scaffolds was confirmed by XPS. The hydrophilicity of the blended scaffolds were improved with the fibrinogen content increasing in the blended system. Cell viability assay and SEM results showed that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) had progressive growth and well spread morphology on the blended scaffolds. This study demonstrated that electrospun PLCL/fibrinogen blended scaffolds have potential application in tissue engineering.

  2. Phosphorylation in vitro of human fibrinogen with casein kinase TS and characterization of phosphorylated sites

    SciTech Connect

    Heldin, P.

    1987-09-01

    Human fibrinogen was phosphorylated by casein kinase TS. The (/sup 32/P)phosphate incorporated varied between 0.5 and 1 mol of phosphate per mole of fibrinogen. The phosphate was localized to Ser523 and Ser590 and serine and threonine residues between amino acids 259 and 268 in the A alpha-chain. In addition, Thr416 and Ser420 were phosphorylated in the gamma'-chain, which is a variant of the gamma-chain, constituting 7-10% of the gamma-chain population. The functional significance of casein kinase TS-induced phosphorylation of fibrinogen remains unknown; however, a slight but consistent increase of the turbidity in a gelation assay was observed for phosphorylated compared to unphosphorylated fibrinogen.

  3. Scanning probe microscopy for the analysis of composite Ti/hydrocarbon plasma polymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choukourov, A.; Grinevich, A.; Slavinska, D.; Biederman, H.; Saito, N.; Takai, O.

    2008-03-01

    Composite Ti/hydrocarbon plasma polymer films with different Ti concentration were deposited on silicon by dc magnetron sputtering of titanium in an atmosphere of argon and hexane. As measured by Kelvin force microscopy and visco-elastic atomic force microscopy, respectively, surface potential and hardness increase with increasing Ti content. Adhesion force to silicon and to fibrinogen molecules was stronger for the Ti-rich films as evaluated from the AFM force-distance curves. Fibrinogen forms a very soft layer on these composites with part of the protein molecules embedded in the outermost region of the plasma polymer. An increase of the surface charge due to fibrinogen adsorption has been observed and attributed to positively charged αC domains of fibrinogen molecule.

  4. Free oscillation rheometry monitoring of haemodilution and hypothermia and correction with fibrinogen and factor XIII concentrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Haemodilution and hypothermia induce coagulopathy separately, but their combined effect on coagulation has not been widely studied. Fibrinogen concentrate can correct dilutional coagulopathy and has an additional effect when combined with factor XIII concentrate. However, their effect on dilutional coagulopathy concomitant with hypothermia has not been studied previously. Free oscillation rheometry – FOR (Reorox®) – is a novel viscoelastic haemostatic assay that has not been studied in this context before. Methods Blood from 10 healthy volunteers was diluted by 33% with hydroxyethyl starch or Ringer’s acetate solutions. Effects of fibrinogen added in vitro with and without factor XIII were studied at 33°C and 37°C. Coagulation velocity (coagulation time) and clot strength (elasticity) were assessed with FOR. Coagulation was initiated in vitro with thromboplastin alone, or thromboplastin plus a platelet inhibitor. Results Hydroxyethyl starch increased the coagulation time and decreased clot strength significantly more than Ringer’s acetate solution, both in the presence and absence of a platelet inhibitor. There was a significant interaction between haemodilution with hydroxyethyl starch and hypothermia, resulting in increased coagulation time. After addition of fibrinogen, coagulation time shortened and elasticity increased, with the exception of fibrinogen-dependent clot strength (i.e., elasticity in the presence of a platelet inhibitor) after hydroxyethyl starch haemodilution. Factor XIII had an additional effect with fibrinogen on fibrinogen-dependent clot strength in blood diluted with Ringer’s acetate solution. Hypothermia did not influence any of the coagulation factor effects. Conclusions Both haemodilution and mild hypothermia impaired coagulation. Coagulopathy was more pronounced after haemodilution with hydroxyethyl starch than with Ringer’s acetate. Addition of fibrinogen with factor XIII was unable to reverse hydroxyethyl

  5. Protein adsorption to polyethylene glycol modified liposomes from fibrinogen solution and from plasma.

    PubMed

    Price, M E; Cornelius, R M; Brash, J L

    2001-06-01

    Unmodified and polyethylene glycol (PEG) modified neutral and negatively charged liposomes were prepared by freeze-thaw and extrusion followed by chromatographic purification. The effects of PEG molecular weight (PEG 550, 2000, 5000), PEG loading (0-15 mol%), and liposome surface charge on fibrinogen adsorption were quantified using radiolabeling techniques. All adsorption isotherms increased monotonically over the concentration range 0-3 mg/ml and adsorption levels were low. Negatively charged liposomes adsorbed significantly more fibrinogen than neutral liposomes. PEG modification had no effect on fibrinogen adsorption to neutral liposomes. An inverse relationship was found between PEG loading of negatively charged liposomes and fibrinogen adsorption. PEGs of all three molecular weights at a loading of 5 mol% reduced fibrinogen adsorption to negatively charged liposomes. Protein adsorption from diluted plasma (10% normal strength) to four different liposome types (neutral, PEG-neutral, negatively charged, and PEG-negatively charged) was investigated using gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. The profiles of adsorbed proteins were similar on all four liposome types, but distinctly different from the profile of plasma itself, indicating a partitioning effect of the lipid surfaces. alpha2-macroglobulin and fibronectin were significantly enriched on the liposomes whereas albumin, transferrin, and fibrinogen were depleted compared to plasma. Apolipoprotein AI was a major component of the adsorbed protein layers. The blot of complement protein C3 adsorbed on the liposomes suggested that the complement system was activated. PMID:11406096

  6. Comparing the Effects of Lovastatin and Cornus Mas Fruit on Fibrinogen Level in Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Sedigheh; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Adelnia, Azadeh; Kazemi, Somayeh; Shamsi, Fatemeh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Atherosclerosis, which is a result of gradual deposition of lipids in the lower part of blood vessel endothelium, is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity around the world. It has been proved that some inflammatory blood markers such as fibrinogen can predict the risk for cardiovascular disease conditions, not only in cardiovascular patients, but also in those who do not have any manifestations of the atherosclerotic development. In this study, the effect of cornus mas l. was evaluated on fibrinogen of hypercholesterolemic rabbits and it was also compared with lovastatin drug. METHODS In this study, 25 New Zealand adult male rabbits were randomly divided into five groups of five. They were treated for 60 days by 5 different diets, namely basic, high cholesterol, regular plus 1 g/kgBW cornus mas L. powder, high cholesterol plus 1 g/kgBW cornus mas L. powder, and high cholesterol plus 10 mg/kgBW lovastatin. At the beginning and at the end of this period, blood samples were collected from the rabbits and their serum fibrinogen levels were measured. RESULTS Cornus mas L. powder and lovastatin significantly decreased fibrinogen levels in comparison with high cholesterol group (P < 0.05). Furthermore cornus mas L. powder could reduce the fibrinogen level more than lovastatin (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION The results indicated that consumption of cornus mas L. might be beneficial in atherosclerotic patients due to its reducing effects on fibrinogen. PMID:22577405

  7. Evaluation of the viability of /sup 111/In-abeled DTPA coupled to fibrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Layne, W.W.; Hnatowich, D.J.; Doherty, P.W.; Childs, R.L.; Lanteigne, D.; Ansell, J.

    1982-07-01

    In earlier work, DTPA has been covalently coupled to albumin via the cyclic anhydride of DTPA. Using fibrinogen, we have studied the effect of such coupling on protein viability by both an in vitro and an in vivo assay. Clotting time remained identical to that of the native protein whether the anhydride-to-protein molar ratio was 1:1 or 5:1. In vivo studies were done in dogs, with human fibrinogen labeled with /sup 125/I and /sup 111/In. Throughout 130 hr, blood clearances for the two tracers agreed whether with 1:1 or 5:1 coupling. In a dog model with a thrombogenic catheter, the clot-to-blood ratios for the two radiotracers agreed within experimental error. Finally, 1:1-coupled canine fibrinogen, labeled with /sup 111/In, was administered to dogs with a catheter in a jugular vein, and scintigrams at 24 hr clearly showed clotting along the length of the catheter. We conclude that fibrinogen, coupled to DTPA, retains its viability, behaving like radioiodinated fibrinogen in vivo, and /sup 111/In labeled fibrinogen looks promising as a clinical diagnostic agent.

  8. Electrospun fibrinogen: feasibility as a tissue engineering scaffold in a rat cell culture model.

    PubMed

    McManus, Michael C; Boland, Eugene D; Simpson, David G; Barnes, Catherine P; Bowlin, Gary L

    2007-05-01

    Fibrinogen has a well-established tissue engineering track record because of its ability to induce improved cellular interaction and scaffold remodeling compared to synthetic scaffolds. While the feasibility of electrospinning fibrinogen scaffolds of submicron diameter fibers and their mechanical properties have been demonstrated, in vitro cellular interaction has not yet been evaluated. The goal of this study was to demonstrate, based on cellular interaction and scaffold remodeling, that electrospun fibrinogen can be used successfully as a tissue engineering scaffold. Electrospun fibrinogen scaffolds were disinfected, seeded with neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts, and cultured for 2, 7, and 14 days. Cultures were treated to regulate scaffold degradation by either supplementing serum-containing media with aprotinin or crosslinking the scaffolds with glutaraldehyde vapor. Biocompatibility was assessed through a WST-1 cell proliferation assay. Postculture scaffolds were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and histology. Cell culture demonstrated that fibroblasts readily migrate into and remodel electrospun fibrinogen scaffolds with deposition of native collagen. Supplementation of culture media with different concentrations of aprotinin-modulated scaffold degradation in a predictable fashion, but glutaraldehyde vapor fixation was less reliable. Based on the observed cellular interactions, there is tremendous potential for electrospun fibrinogen as a tissue engineering scaffold. PMID:17120217

  9. How to Assess Fibrinogen Levels and Fibrin Clot Properties in Clinical Practice?

    PubMed

    Undas, Anetta

    2016-06-01

    Fibrin formed from fibrinogen is the main component of thrombi. Clot structure is characterized by fiber thickness and pore size, which differs within a given clot and between individuals. Plasma clot architecture is largely determined by the quantity and quality of fibrinogen. Plasma fibrinogen concentrations are most commonly measured in citrated plasma using the Clauss method. However, several factors, including instrument type and reagent, may affect results. Other approaches to express the ability of fibrinogen to clot involve prothrombin time-derived or clottable protein assays, while fibrinogen antigen levels in clinical settings are measured using immunological or precipitation assays. Fibrin clot permeability (reflected by the Darcy constant, K s) being proportional to a buffer volume percolating through a clot under a given hydrostatic pressure is now the most commonly used measure of clot structure. Low K s values indicating tightly packed fibrin structure have been shown to be associated with venous and arterial thrombotic complications, while high K s might contribute to bleeding disorders. The measurement of K s, however, is not standardized and validated. This review summarizes the current knowledge on practical aspects of the measurement of fibrinogen levels and K s in patients. PMID:27071050

  10. Role of Serum Fibrinogen Levels in Patients with Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Petrillo, Stefano; Berton, Alessandra; Spiezia, Filippo; Loppini, Mattia; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Although rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy is a frequent pathology of the shoulder, the real understanding of its aetiopathogenesis is still unclear. Several studies showed that RC tendinopathy is more frequent in patients with hyperglycemia, diabetes, obesity, or metabolic syndrome. This paper aims to evaluate the serum concentration of fibrinogen in patients with RC tears. Metabolic disorders have been related to high concentration of serum fibrinogen and the activity of fibrinogen has been proven to be crucial in the development of microvascular damage. Thus, it may produce progression of RC degeneration by reducing the vascular supply of tendons. We report the results of a cross-sectional frequency-matched case-control study comparing the serum concentration of fibrinogen of patients with RC tears with that of a control group of patients without history of RC tears who underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy. We choose to enrol in the control group patients with pathology of the lower limb with a likely mechanic, not metabolic, cause, different from tendon pathology. We found no statistically significant differences in serum concentration of fibrinogen when comparing patients with RC tears and patients who underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy (P = 0.5). Further studies are necessary to clarify the role of fibrinogen in RC disease. PMID:24817887

  11. The Internal Dynamics of Fibrinogen and Its Implications for Coagulation and Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Stephan; Schmid, Friederike; Settanni, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Fibrinogen is a serum multi-chain protein which, when activated, aggregates to form fibrin, one of the main components of a blood clot. Fibrinolysis controls blood clot dissolution through the action of the enzyme plasmin, which cleaves fibrin at specific locations. Although the main biochemical factors involved in fibrin formation and lysis have been identified, a clear mechanistic picture of how these processes take place is not available yet. This picture would be instrumental, for example, for the design of improved thrombolytic or anti-haemorrhagic strategies, as well as, materials with improved biocompatibility. Here, we present extensive molecular dynamics simulations of fibrinogen which reveal large bending motions centered at a hinge point in the coiled-coil regions of the molecule. This feature, likely conserved across vertebrates according to our analysis, suggests an explanation for the mechanism of exposure to lysis of the plasmin cleavage sites on fibrinogen coiled-coil region. It also explains the conformational variability of fibrinogen observed during its adsorption on inorganic surfaces and it is supposed to play a major role in the determination of the hydrodynamic properties of fibrinogen. In addition the simulations suggest how the dynamics of the D region of fibrinogen may contribute to the allosteric regulation of the blood coagulation cascade through a dynamic coupling between the a- and b-holes, important for fibrin polymerization, and the integrin binding site P1. PMID:26366880

  12. Aggregation efficiency of activated normal or fixed platelets in a simple shear field: effect of shear and fibrinogen occupancy.

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Z; Frojmovic, M M

    1994-01-01

    Shear rate can affect protein adsorption and platelet aggregation by regulating both the collision frequency and the capture efficiency (alpha). These effects were evaluated in well defined shear field in a micro-couette for shear rate G = 10 - 1000 s-1. The rate of protein binding was independent of G, shown for adsorption of albumin to latex beads and PAC1 to activated platelets. The initial aggregation rate for ADP-activated platelets in citrated platelet-rich plasma followed second order kinetics at the initial platelet concentrations between 20,000 and 60,000/microliters. alpha values, which dropped nearly fivefold for a 10-fold increase in G, were approximately proportional to G-1, contrary to a minor drop predicted by the theory that includes protein cross-bridging. Varying ADP concentration did not change alpha of maximally activated platelet subpopulations, suggesting that aggregation between unactivated and activated platelets is negligible. Directly blocking the unoccupied but activated GPIIb-IIIa receptors without affecting pre-bound Fg on "RGD"-activated, fixed platelets (AFP) by GRGDSP or Ro 43-5054 eliminated aggregation, suggesting that cross-bridging of GPIIb-IIIa on adjacent platelets by fibrinogen mediates aggregation. Alpha for AFP remained maximal (approximately 0.24) over 25-75% Fg occupancy, otherwise decreasing rapidly, with a half-maximum occurring at around 2% occupancy, suggesting that very few bound Fg were required to cause significant aggregation. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8075353

  13. Improved Endothelial Function of Endothelial Cell Monolayer on the Soft Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Film with Matrix-Bound Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hao; Hu, Mi; Zhang, He; Ren, Ke-Feng; Li, Bo-Chao; Li, Huan; Wang, Li-Mei; Lei, Wen-Xi; Ji, Jian

    2016-06-15

    Endothelialization on the vascular implants is of great importance for prevention of undesired postimplantation symptoms. However, endothelial dysfunction of regenerated endothelial cell (EC) monolayer has been frequently observed, leading to severe complications, such as neointimal hyperplasia, late thrombosis, and neoatherosclerosis. It has significantly impeded long-term success of the therapy. So far, very little attention has been paid on endothelial function of EC monolayer. Bioinspired by the microenvironment of the endothelium in a blood vessel, this study described a soft polyelectrolyte multilayer film (PEM) through layer-by-layer assembly of poly(l-lysine) (PLL) and hyaluronan (HA). The (PLL/HA) PEM was chemically cross-linked and further incorporated with vascular endothelial growth factor. It demonstrated that this approach could promote EC adhesion and proliferation, further inducing formation of EC monolayer. Further, improved endothelial function of the EC monolayer was achieved as shown with the tighter integrity, higher production of nitric oxide, and expression level of endothelial function related genes, compared to EC monolayers on traditional substrates with high stiffness (e.g., glass, tissue culture polystyrene, and stainless steel). Our findings highlighted the influence of substrate stiffness on endothelial function of EC monolayer, giving a new strategy in the surface design of vascular implants. PMID:27223460

  14. Platelet Glycoproteins and Fibrinogen in Recovery from Idiopathic Sudden Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Gorzelniak, Kerstin; Bremer, Alexis; Rudack, Claudia; Walter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background The pathomechanism and location of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) is unclear. In a previous case-control study, we found elevated fibrinogen concentrations and a higher prevalence of T allele carriers of the glycoprotein (Gp) Ia C807T polymorphism in ISSHL patients. Methodology 127 patients with ISSHL (mean age 53.3 years, 48.8% females), who underwent a standard therapy with high dose steroids, pentoxifyllin and sterofundine over 8 days were included. We examined the influence of GpIa genotype and fibrinogen (BclI-, A312-, HaeIII-) genotype and fibrinogen plasma levels on hearing recovery after 8 weeks (change from baseline: 0 dB  =  no recovery, >0 to 10 dB = moderate recovery, >10 dB = good recovery). In a subsample of 59 patients with ISSHL, we further studied the association of platelet glycoprotein GpIa, Ib and IIIa densities on hearing recovery as well as the possible effect-modification of platelet glycoproteins on hearing recovery by plasma fibrinogen. Results In univariate analysis, neither the GpIa genotype nor fibrinogen genotype (all p>0.1) but lower fibrinogen levels (p = 0.029), less vertigo (p = 0.002) and lower GpIIIa receptor density (p = 0.037, n = 59) were associated with hearing recovery. In multivariate analysis, fibrinogen significantly modified the effect of GPIa receptor density on good hearing recovery (effect-modification on multiplicative scale OR = 0.45 (95% confidence interval (0.21–0.94)), p = 0.03). GPIb receptor density below the mean was associated with a 2-fold increase in good hearing recovery both in patients with fibrinogen levels above (p = 0.04) as well as in patients with fibrinogen levels below the mean (p = 0.06). There was no indication for an effect-modification (p = 0.97). Conclusions The findings suggest a vascular/rheological origin of ISSHL with unique features of thrombosis in the inner ear artery that may include complex

  15. Feeding acutely stimulates fibrinogen synthesis in healthy young and elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Caso, Giuseppe; Mileva, Izolda; Kelly, Patricia; Ahn, Hongshik; Gelato, Marie C; McNurlan, Margaret A

    2009-11-01

    Fibrinogen is a positive acute-phase protein and its hepatic synthesis is enhanced following inflammation and injury. However, it is not clear whether fibrinogen synthesis is also responsive to oral nutrients and whether the response to a meal may be affected by age. Our aim in this study was to investigate the acute effect of oral feeding on fibrinogen synthesis in both young and elderly men and women. Fibrinogen synthesis was determined in 3 separate occasions from the incorporation of l[(2)H(5)]phenylalanine (43 mg/kg body weight) in 8 young (21-35 y) and 8 elderly (>60 y) participants following the ingestion of water (control), a complete liquid meal (15% protein, 30% fat, and 55% carbohydrate), or only the protein component of the meal. The ingestion of the complete meal enhanced fibrinogen fractional synthesis rates (FSR) by 17 +/- 6% in the young and by 38 +/- 10% in the elderly participants compared with the water meal (P < 0.02). A comparable stimulation of FSR occurred with only the protein component of the meal in both young (29 +/- 7%) and elderly participants (41 +/- 9%) compared with the water meal (P < 0.005). Similar results were obtained when fibrinogen synthesis was expressed as absolute synthesis rates (i.e. mg.kg(-1).d(-1)). The results demonstrate that fibrinogen synthesis is acutely stimulated after ingestion of a meal and that this effect can be reproduced by the protein component of the meal alone, both in young and elderly adults. PMID:19759246

  16. Association of serum calcium concentrations with fibrinogen and homocysteine in nondiabetic Korean subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Sun; Lee, Sung Won; Shin, Juyoung; Moon, Sung Dae; Han, Je Ho; Cha, Bong Yun; Kim, Eun Sook

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Considerable evidence shows that increased serum calcium levels are associated with metabolic disorders, cardiovascular disease, and increased mortality. This study investigated whether serum calcium, within a normal range, is significantly associated with serum fibrinogen and homocysteine, markers of increased cardiovascular disease risk in nondiabetic Korean subjects. A cross-sectional analysis was performed on 1096 subjects (mean age, 55.1 ± 11.1 years; 36.1% women) undergoing a general health checkup. Serum biochemistry was analyzed including serum albumin-corrected calcium (Cac), insulin resistance (IR, using homeostasis model assessment [HOMA]), fibrinogen, and homocysteine. Compared with patients within the lowest Cac quartile, those with higher Cac levels had increased fibrinogen and homocysteine levels as well as an increased proportion of smoking, dyslipidemia, and HOMA-IR. Correlation analyses revealed linear relationships for Cac with fibrinogen and homocysteine in both genders. After adjustment for confounding factors, serum Cac was significantly associated with high fibrinogen (odds ratio [OR] for the highest vs the lowest quartile = 1.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09–2.83, P = 0.02) and homocysteine (OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.07–3.11, P = 0.027). Multivariate regression models showed that Cac was linearly associated with fibrinogen (standardized β = 0.14, P < 0.001) and homocysteine (standardized β = 0.07, P = 0.009). High normal calcium concentrations were independently associated with increased levels of fibrinogen and homocysteine. Further investigation is needed to validate whether slightly increased calcium levels within the normal range indicate a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27310988

  17. Hydroxyl density affects the interaction of fibrinogen with silica nanoparticles at physiological concentration.

    PubMed

    Marucco, Arianna; Turci, Francesco; O'Neill, Luke; Byrne, Hugh J; Fubini, Bice; Fenoglio, Ivana

    2014-04-01

    An increasing interest in the interaction between blood serum proteins and nanoparticles has emerged over the last years. In fact, this process plays a key role in the biological response to nanoparticles. The behavior of proteins at the biofluid/material interface is driven by the physico-chemical properties of the surface. However, much research is still needed to gain insight into the process at a molecular level. In this study, the effect of silanol density on the interaction of fibrinogen at physiological concentrations with silica nanoparticle/flat surfaces has been studied. Silica nanoparticles and silica wafers were modified and characterized to obtain a set of samples with different silanols density. The interaction with fibrinogen has been studied by evaluating the extent of coverage (bicinchoninic acid assay) and the irreversibility of adsorption (shift of the ζ potential). To clarify the molecular mechanism of fibrinogen/surface interactions, confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy (nanoparticles) and atomic force microscopy (wafers) were used. Finally the effect of fibrinogen on the agglomeration of nanoparticles has been evaluated by Flow Particle Image Analysis. The data reported here show that a minimal variation in the state of the silica surface modifies the adsorption behavior of fibrinogen, which appears mediated by a competition between protein/protein and protein/surface interactions. By comparing the data obtained on nanoparticles and silicon-supported silica layers, we found that hydrophilicity increases the tendency of fibrinogen molecules to interact with the surface rather than with other molecules, thus inhibiting fibrinogen self-assembly. This study contributes to the knowledge of the processes occurring at the surface/biological fluids interface, needed for the design of new biocompatible materials. PMID:24491335

  18. Reduced Transfusion During OLT by POC Coagulation Management and TEG Functional Fibrinogen: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    De Pietri, Lesley; Ragusa, Francesca; Deleuterio, Annalisa; Begliomini, Bruno; Serra, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation are at high risk of bleeding complications. Several Authors have shown that thromboelastography (TEG)-based coagulation management and the administration of fibrinogen concentrate reduce the need for blood transfusion. Methods We conducted a single-center, retrospective cohort observational study (Modena Polyclinic, Italy) on 386 consecutive patients undergoing liver transplantation. We assessed the impact on resource consumption and patient survival after the introduction of a new TEG-based transfusion algorithm, requiring also the introduction of the fibrinogen functional thromboelastography test and a maximum amplitude of functional fibrinogen thromboelastography transfusion cutoff (7 mm) to direct in administering fibrinogen (2012-2014, n = 118) compared with a purely TEG-based algorithm previously used (2005-2011, n = 268). Results After 2012, there was a significant decrease in the use of homologous blood (1502 ± 1376 vs 794 ± 717 mL, P < 0.001), fresh frozen plasma (537 ± 798 vs 98 ± 375 mL, P < 0.001), and platelets (158 ± 280 vs 75 ± 148 mL, P < 0.005), whereas the use of fibrinogen increased (0.1 ± 0.5 vs 1.4 ± 1.8 g, P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in 30-day and 6-month survival between the 2 groups. Conclusions The implementation of a new coagulation management method featuring the addition of the fibrinogen functional thromboelastography test to the TEG test according to an algorithm which provides for the administration of fibrinogen has helped in reducing the need for transfusion in patients undergoing liver transplantation with no impact on their survival. PMID:27500243

  19. Feeding Acutely Stimulates Fibrinogen Synthesis in Healthy Young and Elderly Adults12

    PubMed Central

    Caso, Giuseppe; Mileva, Izolda; Kelly, Patricia; Ahn, Hongshik; Gelato, Marie C.; McNurlan, Margaret A.

    2009-01-01

    Fibrinogen is a positive acute-phase protein and its hepatic synthesis is enhanced following inflammation and injury. However, it is not clear whether fibrinogen synthesis is also responsive to oral nutrients and whether the response to a meal may be affected by age. Our aim in this study was to investigate the acute effect of oral feeding on fibrinogen synthesis in both young and elderly men and women. Fibrinogen synthesis was determined in 3 separate occasions from the incorporation of l[2H5]phenylalanine (43 mg/kg body weight) in 8 young (21–35 y) and 8 elderly (>60 y) participants following the ingestion of water (control), a complete liquid meal (15% protein, 30% fat, and 55% carbohydrate), or only the protein component of the meal. The ingestion of the complete meal enhanced fibrinogen fractional synthesis rates (FSR) by 17 ± 6% in the young and by 38 ± 10% in the elderly participants compared with the water meal (P < 0.02). A comparable stimulation of FSR occurred with only the protein component of the meal in both young (29 ± 7%) and elderly participants (41 ± 9%) compared with the water meal (P < 0.005). Similar results were obtained when fibrinogen synthesis was expressed as absolute synthesis rates (i.e. mg·kg−1·d−1). The results demonstrate that fibrinogen synthesis is acutely stimulated after ingestion of a meal and that this effect can be reproduced by the protein component of the meal alone, both in young and elderly adults. PMID:19759246

  20. Quantitative evaluation of interaction force of fibrinogen at well-defined surfaces with various structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weixin; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The effects of functional groups and structures at the surface of biomaterials on protein adsorption were examined using direct interaction force measurements. Three kinds of surface structures were evaluated: polymer brushes, self-assembled monolayers with low molecular weight compounds, and surfaces with conventional polymer coatings. These surfaces had various functional groups including phosphorylcholine (PC) group. The surface characterization demonstrated that surface wettability and flexibility depended on both the structure of the surface and the functional groups at the surface. The interactions of protein with these surfaces were evaluated by a force vs. distance curve using an atomic force microscope (AFM). We used fibrinogen as the protein, and the fibrinogen was immobilized on the surface of the AFM cantilever by a conventional technique. It was observed that the interaction force of fibrinogen was strongly related to surface hydrophobic nature and flexibility. That is, the interaction force increased with the increasing hydrophobic nature of the surface. The relationship between the amount of fibrinogen adsorbed on the surface and the interaction force showed good correlation in the range of fibrinogen adsorption from 0 to 250 ng/cm(2), that is, in a monolayered adsorption region. The interaction force decreased with increasing surface viscoelasticity. The most effective surface for preventing fibrinogen adsorption was the polymer brush surface with phosphorylcholine (PC) groups, that is, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) brush. The interaction force of this sample was less than 0.1 nN and the amount of fibrinogen adsorbed on the surface was minimal. It was found that the evaluation of protein adsorption based on the interaction force measurement is useful for low-protein adsorption surfaces. It was demonstrated that an extremely hydrophilic and flexible surface could weaken the protein interactions at the surface, resulting in

  1. Quantitation of platelet and fibrinogen-fibrin deposition on components of tissue valves (Ionescu-Shiley) in calves

    SciTech Connect

    Dewanjee, M.K.; Solis, E.; Lenker, J.; Tidwell, C.; Mackey, S.; Didisheim, P.; Kaye, M.P.

    1986-07-01

    With /sup 111/In-labeled platelets and /sup 125/I-labeled bovine fibrinogen, regional mapping of platelet and fibrinogen deposition on leaflets and sewing rings was obtained. Ten Holstein calves received 25-mm mitral valves (ISLM) and were killed 1, 14, and 30 days after implantation. Twenty-four hours before the calves were killed, 350 to 450 microCi of /sup 111/In-labeled platelets and 200 to 250 microCi of /sup 125/I-labeled bovine fibrinogen were administered intravenously. The components of the tissue valves, i.e., three leaflets and sewing rings, were separated. Each leaflet was cut into four sections: free edge, central zone, flexion zone, and attachment zone. From the radioactivity in blood, leaflet zones, sewing rings, area of leaflet zones, platelet count, and fibrinogen level in blood, the mean regional density of adherent platelets, fibrinogen-fibrin, and fibrinogen/platelet were calculated. The density of platelets and fibrinogen deposited on the components of the valves decreases with time postimplantation. The number of fibrinogen molecules per platelet is fivefold to 20-fold higher than that of the receptor concentration on platelets on leaflet zones, suggesting the heterogeneity of fibrinogen-fibrin in thrombus and components of the valve.

  2. Mineralization Potential of Electrospun PDO-Hydroxyapatite-Fibrinogen Blended Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Isaac A.; Madurantakam, Parthasarathy A.; McCool, Jennifer M.; Sell, Scott A.; Yang, Hu; Moon, Peter C.; Bowlin, Gary L.

    2012-01-01

    The current bone autograft procedure for cleft palate repair presents several disadvantages such as limited availability, additional invasive surgery, and donor site morbidity. The present preliminary study evaluates the mineralization potential of electrospun polydioxanone:nano-hydroxyapatite : fibrinogen (PDO : nHA : Fg) blended scaffolds in different simulated body fluids (SBF). Scaffolds were fabricated by blending PDO : nHA : Fg in the following percent by weight ratios: 100 : 0 : 0, 50 : 25 : 25, 50 : 50 : 0, 50 : 0 : 50, 0 : 0 : 100, and 0 : 50 : 50. Samples were immersed in (conventional (c), revised (r), ionic (i), and modified (m)) SBF for 5 and 14 days to induce mineralization. Scaffolds were characterized before and after mineralization via scanning electron microscopy, Alizarin Red-based assay, and modified burnout test. The addition of Fg resulted in scaffolds with smaller fiber diameters. Fg containing scaffolds also induced sheet-like mineralization while individual fiber mineralization was noticed in its absence. Mineralized electrospun Fg scaffolds without PDO were not mechanically stable after 5 days in SBF, but had superior mineralization capabilities which produced a thick bone-like mineral (BLM) layer throughout the scaffolds. 50 : 50 : 0 scaffolds incubated in either r-SBF for 5 days or c-SBF for 14 days produced scaffolds with high mineral content and individual-mineralized fibers. These mineralized scaffolds were still porous and will be further optimized as an effective bone substitute in future studies. PMID:22956956

  3. Increased concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and fibrinogen in individuals with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Iván G; Gutiérrez, César L; Alarcón, Marcelo L; Jaramillo, Julio C; Segovia, Fabián M; Leiva, Elba M; Mujica, Verónica E; Icaza, Gloria N; Díaz, Nora S; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is closely linked to a generalized metabolic disorder referred to as insulin resistance. Disturbances in the hemostasis and fibrinolytic systems are a feature of MS. The aim of this study was to determine the concentration levels of fibrinogen and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in a group of patients with MS with respect to a non-MS group, and to evaluate their possible relation with other risk factors in MS. The study was carried out in a total of 186 male and female non-smoking individuals aged 45-64 years, 93 with MS (ATP III criteria) and 93 without MS. Plasmatic levels of PAI-1 were measured by ELISA, and those of fibrinogen by the Claus method. The plasmatic levels of PAI-1 (men 49.2±19.8 vs. 35.0±12.2 ng/ml and women 42.0±19.7 vs. 31.6±14.6 ng/ml; p=0.0026) and fibrinogen (274.0±82.1 vs. 232.7±66.6 ng/ml; p=0.0002) were significantly higher in the MS group than in the non-MS group. PAI-1 was significantly associated with diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides and waist circumference. Fibrinogen was negatively associated with HDL-c. High plasmatic levels of PAI-1 and fibrinogen contribute to the cardiovascular risk that characterizes individuals with MS. PMID:21475821

  4. Fibrinogen-induced perivascular microglial clustering is required for the development of axonal damage in neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Davalos, Dimitrios; Kyu Ryu, Jae; Merlini, Mario; Baeten, Kim M.; Le Moan, Natacha; Petersen, Mark A.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Smirnoff, Dimitri S.; Bedard, Catherine; Hakozaki, Hiroyuki; Gonias Murray, Sara; Ling, Jennie B.; Lassmann, Hans; Degen, Jay L.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier disruption, microglial activation and neurodegeneration are hallmarks of multiple sclerosis. However, the initial triggers that activate innate immune responses and their role in axonal damage remain unknown. Here we show that the blood protein fibrinogen induces rapid microglial responses toward the vasculature and is required for axonal damage in neuroinflammation. Using in vivo two-photon microscopy, we demonstrate that microglia form perivascular clusters before myelin loss or paralysis onset and that, of the plasma proteins, fibrinogen specifically induces rapid and sustained microglial responses in vivo. Fibrinogen leakage correlates with areas of axonal damage and induces reactive oxygen species release in microglia. Blocking fibrin formation with anticoagulant treatment or genetically eliminating the fibrinogen binding motif recognized by the microglial integrin receptor CD11b/CD18 inhibits perivascular microglial clustering and axonal damage. Thus, early and progressive perivascular microglial clustering triggered by fibrinogen leakage upon blood-brain barrier disruption contributes to axonal damage in neuroinflammatory disease. PMID:23187627

  5. Blood coagulation protein fibrinogen promotes autoimmunity and demyelination via chemokine release and antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jae Kyu; Petersen, Mark A.; Murray, Sara G.; Baeten, Kim M.; Meyer-Franke, Anke; Chan, Justin P.; Vagena, Eirini; Bedard, Catherine; Machado, Michael R.; Coronado, Pamela E. Rios; Prod'homme, Thomas; Charo, Israel F.; Lassmann, Hans; Degen, Jay L.; Zamvil, Scott S.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity and macrophage recruitment into the central nervous system (CNS) are critical determinants of neuroinflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms that drive immunological responses targeted to the CNS remain largely unknown. Here we show that fibrinogen, a central blood coagulation protein deposited in the CNS after blood–brain barrier disruption, induces encephalitogenic adaptive immune responses and peripheral macrophage recruitment into the CNS leading to demyelination. Fibrinogen stimulates a unique transcriptional signature in CD11b+ antigen-presenting cells inducing the recruitment and local CNS activation of myelin antigen-specific Th1 cells. Fibrinogen depletion reduces Th1 cells in the multiple sclerosis model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II-dependent antigen presentation, CXCL10- and CCL2-mediated recruitment of T cells and macrophages, respectively, are required for fibrinogen-induced encephalomyelitis. Inhibition of the fibrinogen receptor CD11b/CD18 protects from all immune and neuropathologic effects. Our results show that the final product of the coagulation cascade is a key determinant of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:26353940

  6. Identification of fibrinogen-binding proteins of Aspergillus fumigatus using proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Gautam, Poonam; Pandit, Hrishikesh; Singh, Yogendra; Basir, Seemi Farhat; Madan, Taruna

    2012-03-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, the main etiological agent for various forms of human aspergillosis, gets access to the respiratory system of human host by inhalation of airborne conidia. These conidia possibly adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Among the ECM proteins involved in adherence, fibrinogen is thought to be crucial. Here, we studied whether A. fumigatus three-week culture filtrate (3wcf) proteins promote binding of A. fumigatus to ECM proteins and promote fungal growth. We observed that incubation of ECM with 3wcf proteins led to dose- and time-dependent increase in adherence of conidia to the ECM. In order to identify the catalogue of fibrinogen-binding A. fumigatus proteins, we carried out fibrinogen affinity blotting using two-dimensional gel electrophoresed 3wcf proteins. A total of 15 fibrinogen-binding protein spots corresponding to 7 unique proteins were identified in 3wcf using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF-TOF). Among these, 4 proteins, namely, beta-glucosidase, alpha-mannosidase, pectate lyase A and oryzin precursor were predicted to have cell wall or extracellular localization, whereas amidase family protein and two hypothetical proteins did not display the signal sequence. This study reports seven novel fibrinogen-binding proteins of A. fumigatus, some of which could be further explored for targeting the adhesion phenomenon as antifungal strategy. PMID:21870122

  7. Fibrinogen {alpha} genes: Conservation of bipartite transcripts and carboxy-terminal-extended {alpha} subunits in vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Cao, Y.; Hertzberg, K.M.; Grieninger, G.

    1995-11-01

    All three well-studied subunits of the clotting protein fibrinogen ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}) share N-terminal structural homologies, but until recently only the {beta} and {gamma} chains were recognized as having similar globular C-termini. With the discovery of an extra exon in the human fibrinogen {alpha} gene (exon VI), a minor form of the {alpha} subunit ({alpha}{sub E}) with an extended {beta}- and {gamma}-like C-terminus has been identified. In the present study, the polymerase chain reaction has been used to identify sequences that encode counterparts to {alpha}{sub E} in chicken, rabbit, rat, and baboon. The basic six-exon structure of the fibrinogen {alpha} genes is shown to be conserved among mammals and birds, as are the intron positions. Bipartite transcripts - still bearing an intron prior to the last exon - are found among the products of the various vertebrate fibrinogen {alpha} genes. The last exon represents the largest conserved segment of the gene and, in each species examined, encodes exactly 236 amino acids. The C-termini of these {alpha}{sub E} chains align without a single gap and are between 76 and 99% identical. Since the exon VI-encoded domain of {alpha}{sub E} is as well conserved as the corresponding regions of the {beta} and {gamma} chains, it follows that it is equally important and that {alpha}{sub E}-fibrinogen plays a vital, if as-yet unrecognized physiological role. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Spatially selective surface platforms for binding fibrinogen prepared by particle lithography with organosilanes

    PubMed Central

    Englade-Franklin, Lauren E.; Saner, ChaMarra K.; Garno, Jayne C.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce an approach based on particle lithography to prepare spatially selective surface platforms of organosilanes that are suitable for nanoscale studies of protein binding. Particle lithography was applied for patterning fibrinogen, a plasma protein that has a major role in the clotting cascade for blood coagulation and wound healing. Surface nanopatterns of mercaptosilanes were designed as sites for the attachment of fibrinogen within a protein-resistant matrix of 2-[methoxy(polyethyleneoxy)propyl] trichlorosilane (PEG-silane). Preparing site-selective surfaces was problematic in our studies, because of the self-reactive properties of PEG-organosilanes. Certain organosilanes presenting hydroxyl head groups will cross react to form mixed surface multi-layers. We developed a clever strategy with particle lithography using masks of silica mesospheres to protect small, discrete regions of the surface from cross reactions. Images acquired with atomic force microscopy (AFM) disclose that fibrinogen attached primarily to the surface areas presenting thiol head groups, which were surrounded by PEG-silane. The activity for binding anti-fibrinogen was further evaluated using ex situ AFM studies, confirming that after immobilization the fibrinogen nanopatterns retained capacity for binding immunoglobulin G. Studies with AFM provide advantages of achieving nanoscale resolution for detecting surface changes during steps of biochemical surface reactions, without requiring chemical modification of proteins or fluorescent labels. PMID:24427541

  9. Receptors for fibrinogen and aggregated beta 2-microglobulin detected in strains of group B streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Schönbeck, C; Björck, L; Kronvall, G

    1981-01-01

    Binding of radiolabeled human fibrinogen and aggregated beta-microglobulin was measured in 60 strains of beta-hemolytic group B streptococci. Positive fibrinogen binding was detected in seven of the strains. Six of the group B strains showed an uptake of aggregated beta 2-microglobulin. Four individual strains carried both receptors, indicating a positive correlation between their occurrence. Inhibition studies showed that fibrinogen competed sterically with beta 2-microglobulin binding. Receptors for both proteins were trypsin sensitive. The presence of receptors did not correlate with the serological type of the 49 group B strains tested. However, all seven type II strains were negative. No uptake of fibrinogen was noted in any of 40 group D strains tested. Binding structures for fibrinogen and aggregated beta 2-microglobulin detected in group B streptococci were similar to receptors for the same proteins in group A, C, and G streptococci in terms of mutual correlation and steric interference of binding. The occasional occurrence of these receptors also in group B strains might reflect a common origin of some types of surface proteins in gram-positive cocci. PMID:6164650

  10. Importance of fibrinogen in dilutional coagulopathy after neurosurgical procedures: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Shalini; Nair, Bijesh Ravindran; Vidyasagar, Ajay; Joseph, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The routine management of coagulopathy during surgery involves assessing haemoglobin, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and platelets. Correction of these parameters involves administration of blood, fresh frozen plasma and platelet concentrates. The study was aimed at identifying the most common coagulation abnormality during neurosurgical procedures and the treatment of dilutional coagulopathy with blood components. Methods: During 2 years period, all adult patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures who were transfused two or more units of red cells were prospectively evaluated for the presence of a coagulopathy. PT, aPTT, platelet count and fibrinogen levels were estimated before starting a component therapy. Results: After assessing PT, aPTT, platelet count and fibrinogen levels following two or more blood transfusions, thirty patients were found to have at least one abnormal parameter that required administration of a blood product. The most common abnormality was a low fibrinogen level, seen in 26 patients; this was the only abnormality in three patients. No patient was found to have an abnormal PT or aPTT without either the fibrinogen concentration or platelet count or both being low. Conclusion: Low fibrinogen concentration was the most common coagulation abnormality found after blood transfusions for neurosurgical procedures. PMID:27601735

  11. Bound states and the Bekenstein bound

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael

    2003-10-16

    We explore the validity of the generalized Bekenstein bound, S<= pi M a. We define the entropy S as the logarithm of the number of states which have energy eigenvalue below M and are localized to a flat space region of width alpha. If boundary conditions that localize field modes are imposed by fiat, then the bound encounters well-known difficulties with negative Casimir energy and large species number, as well as novel problems arising only in the generalized form. In realistic systems, however, finite-size effects contribute additional energy. We study two different models for estimating such contributions. Our analysis suggests that the bound is both valid and nontrivial if interactions are properly included, so that the entropy S counts the bound states of interacting fields.

  12. Mice expressing a mutant form of fibrinogen that cannot support fibrin formation exhibit compromised antimicrobial host defense

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Joni M.; Gorkun, Oleg V.; Raghu, Harini; Thornton, Sherry; Mullins, Eric S.; Palumbo, Joseph S.; Ko, Ya-Ping; Höök, Magnus; David, Tovo; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Degen, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin(ogen) is central to hemostasis and thrombosis and also contributes to multiple physiologic and pathologic processes beyond coagulation. However, the precise contribution of soluble fibrinogen vs insoluble fibrin matrices to vascular integrity, tissue repair, inflammation, and disease has been undefined and unapproachable. To establish the means to distinguish fibrinogen- and fibrin-dependent processes in vivo, FibAEK mice were generated that carry normal levels of circulating fibrinogen but lack the capacity for fibrin polymer formation due to a germ-line mutation in the Aα chain thrombin cleavage site. Homozygous FibAEK mice developed to term and exhibited postnatal survival superior to that of fibrinogen-deficient mice. Unlike fibrinogen-deficient mice, platelet-rich plasma from FibAEK mice supported normal platelet aggregation in vitro, highlighting that fibrinogenAEK retains the functional capacity to support interactions with platelets. Thrombin failed to release fibrinopeptide-A from fibrinogenAEK and failed to induce polymer formation with FibAEK plasma or purified fibrinogenAEK in 37°C mixtures regardless of incubation time. FibAEK mice displayed both an absence of fibrin polymer formation following liver injury, as assessed by electron microscopy, and a failure to generate stable occlusive thrombi following FeCl3 injury of carotid arteries. FibAEK mice exhibited a profound impediment in Staphylococcus aureus clearance following intraperitoneal infection similar to fibrinogen-deficient mice, yet FibAEK mice displayed a significant infection dose-dependent survival advantage over fibrinogen-deficient mice following peritonitis challenge. Collectively, these findings establish for the first time that fibrin polymer is the molecular form critical for antimicrobial mechanisms while simultaneously highlighting biologically meaningful contributions and functions of the soluble molecule. PMID:26228483

  13. Mice expressing a mutant form of fibrinogen that cannot support fibrin formation exhibit compromised antimicrobial host defense.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Joni M; Gorkun, Oleg V; Raghu, Harini; Thornton, Sherry; Mullins, Eric S; Palumbo, Joseph S; Ko, Ya-Ping; Höök, Magnus; David, Tovo; Coughlin, Shaun R; Degen, Jay L; Flick, Matthew J

    2015-10-22

    Fibrin(ogen) is central to hemostasis and thrombosis and also contributes to multiple physiologic and pathologic processes beyond coagulation. However, the precise contribution of soluble fibrinogen vs insoluble fibrin matrices to vascular integrity, tissue repair, inflammation, and disease has been undefined and unapproachable. To establish the means to distinguish fibrinogen- and fibrin-dependent processes in vivo, Fib(AEK) mice were generated that carry normal levels of circulating fibrinogen but lack the capacity for fibrin polymer formation due to a germ-line mutation in the Aα chain thrombin cleavage site. Homozygous Fib(AEK) mice developed to term and exhibited postnatal survival superior to that of fibrinogen-deficient mice. Unlike fibrinogen-deficient mice, platelet-rich plasma from Fib(AEK) mice supported normal platelet aggregation in vitro, highlighting that fibrinogen(AEK) retains the functional capacity to support interactions with platelets. Thrombin failed to release fibrinopeptide-A from fibrinogen(AEK) and failed to induce polymer formation with Fib(AEK) plasma or purified fibrinogen(AEK) in 37°C mixtures regardless of incubation time. Fib(AEK) mice displayed both an absence of fibrin polymer formation following liver injury, as assessed by electron microscopy, and a failure to generate stable occlusive thrombi following FeCl3 injury of carotid arteries. Fib(AEK) mice exhibited a profound impediment in Staphylococcus aureus clearance following intraperitoneal infection similar to fibrinogen-deficient mice, yet Fib(AEK) mice displayed a significant infection dose-dependent survival advantage over fibrinogen-deficient mice following peritonitis challenge. Collectively, these findings establish for the first time that fibrin polymer is the molecular form critical for antimicrobial mechanisms while simultaneously highlighting biologically meaningful contributions and functions of the soluble molecule. PMID:26228483

  14. Surface Induced Self-Assembly of Fibrinogen Fibers in the Absence of Thrombin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Jaseung; Rafailovich, Miriam; Galanakis, Dennis

    2009-03-01

    Wound healing is a complex process imitated by the formation of fibrin fibers that are involved in clot formation and fibroblast migration. Normally this process is triggered by thrombin cleavage of the E domain on the fibrinogen molecules, which allows them to spontaneously self-assemble into the fibers. Here we demonstrate that this process can also be initiated in the absence of thrombin. We show that by simply placing the proteins in contact with hydrocarbon functionalized clay surfaces, molecular reorientation occurs which allows fibers to form from the intact fibrinogen protein. Furthermore, using monoclonal antibodies, we determined which regions on the αC domains are involved in the formation of the new fibrinogen fibers. This allowed us to extend these findings to general hydrophobic surfaces, such as those presented by most hydrocarbon polymers. On the other hand, the carboxyl terminal part of the Aα chain, can interact with amine containing polymers, and suppress formation of the fibers.

  15. Social connectedness is associated with fibrinogen level in a human social network.

    PubMed

    Kim, David A; Benjamin, Emelia J; Fowler, James H; Christakis, Nicholas A

    2016-08-31

    Socially isolated individuals face elevated rates of illness and death. Conventional measures of social connectedness reflect an individual's perceived network and can be subject to bias and variation in reporting. In this study of a large human social network, we find that greater indegree, a sociocentric measure of friendship and familial ties identified by a subject's social connections rather than by the subject, predicts significantly lower concentrations of fibrinogen (a biomarker of inflammation and cardiac risk), after adjusting for demographics, education, medical history and known predictors of cardiac risk. The association between fibrinogen and social isolation, as measured by low indegree, is comparable to the effect of smoking, and greater than that of low education, a conventional measure of socioeconomic disadvantage. By contrast, outdegree, which reflects an individual's perceived connectedness, displays a significantly weaker association with fibrinogen concentrations. PMID:27559060

  16. Leg scanning with radioisotope-labeled fibrinogen in patients undergoing hip surgery

    SciTech Connect

    LeMoine, J.R.; Moser, K.M.

    1980-05-01

    To establish whether radioisotope-labeled fibrinogen leg scanning is of value in the context of hip surgery, we propsectively studied 21 consectuvie patients undergoing either total hip replacement (14) or open repair of a hip fracture (seven) with leg scans, contrast phlebography, and ventilation and perfusion lung scans. We found that in eight patients (38%), venous thromboembolism developed postoperatively. Agreement between phlebographic and leg scanning results was excellent. In no patient as venous thrombosis limited to the thigh on the operated-on side, a vital consideration in application of fibrinogen leg scanning to this patient population. Two patients had lung scan changes indicative of embolism; both had thrombi extending into thigh veins. Leg scanning with radioisotope-labeled fibrinogen appears to be a useful method for monitoring patients undergoing hip surgery, if the upper three counting points on the operated-on side are excluded.

  17. Cleavage of fibrinogen by proteinases elicits allergic responses through Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Millien, Valentine Ongeri; Lu, Wen; Shaw, Joanne; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Mak, Garbo; Roberts, Luz; Song, Li-Zhen; Knight, J Morgan; Creighton, Chad J; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B

    2013-08-16

    Proteinases and the innate immune receptor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are essential for expression of allergic inflammation and diseases such as asthma. A mechanism that links these inflammatory mediators is essential for explaining the fundamental basis of allergic disease but has been elusive. Here, we demonstrate that TLR4 is activated by airway proteinase activity to initiate both allergic airway disease and antifungal immunity. These outcomes were induced by proteinase cleavage of the clotting protein fibrinogen, yielding fibrinogen cleavage products that acted as TLR4 ligands on airway epithelial cells and macrophages. Thus, allergic airway inflammation represents an antifungal defensive strategy that is driven by fibrinogen cleavage and TLR4 activation. These findings clarify the molecular basis of allergic disease and suggest new therapeutic strategies. PMID:23950537

  18. A matrix lower bound

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, Joseph F.

    2002-02-04

    A matrix lower bound is defined that generalizes ideas apparently due to S. Banach and J. von Neumann. The matrix lower bound has a natural interpretation in functional analysis, and it satisfies many of the properties that von Neumann stated for it in a restricted case. Applications for the matrix lower bound are demonstrated in several areas. In linear algebra, the matrix lower bound of a full rank matrix equals the distance to the set of rank-deficient matrices. In numerical analysis, the ratio of the matrix norm to the matrix lower bound is a condition number for all consistent systems of linear equations. In optimization theory, the matrix lower bound suggests an identity for a class of min-max problems. In real analysis, a recursive construction that depends on the matrix lower bound shows that the level sets of continuously differential functions lie asymptotically near those of their tangents.

  19. FbsC, a Novel Fibrinogen-binding Protein, Promotes Streptococcus agalactiae-Host Cell Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Buscetta, Marco; Papasergi, Salvatore; Firon, Arnaud; Pietrocola, Giampiero; Biondo, Carmelo; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Midiri, Angelina; Romeo, Letizia; Teti, Giuseppe; Speziale, Pietro; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Beninati, Concetta

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus or GBS) is a common cause of invasive infections in newborn infants and adults. The ability of GBS to bind human fibrinogen is of crucial importance in promoting colonization and invasion of host barriers. We characterized here a novel fibrinogen-binding protein of GBS, designated FbsC (Gbs0791), which is encoded by the prototype GBS strain NEM316. FbsC, which bears two bacterial immunoglobulin-like tandem repeat domains and a C-terminal cell wall-anchoring motif (LPXTG), was found to be covalently linked to the cell wall by the housekeeping sortase A. Studies using recombinant FbsC indicated that it binds fibrinogen in a dose-dependent and saturable manner, and with moderate affinity. Expression of FbsC was detected in all clinical GBS isolates, except those belonging to the hypervirulent lineage ST17. Deletion of fbsC decreases NEM316 abilities to adhere to and invade human epithelial and endothelial cells, and to form biofilm in vitro. Notably, bacterial adhesion to fibrinogen and fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells were abolished following fbsC deletion in NEM316. Moreover, the virulence of the fbsC deletion mutant and its ability to colonize the brain were impaired in murine models of infection. Finally, immunization with recombinant FbsC significantly protected mice from lethal GBS challenge. In conclusion, FbsC is a novel fibrinogen-binding protein expressed by most GBS isolates that functions as a virulence factor by promoting invasion of epithelial and endothelial barriers. In addition, the protein has significant immunoprotective activity and may be a useful component of an anti-GBS vaccine. PMID:24904056

  20. Plasma Fibrinogen as a Biomarker for Mortality and Hospitalized Exacerbations in People with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Mannino, David M; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Lomas, David A.; Vestbo, Jorgen; Graham Barr, R.; Tetzlaff, Kay; Lowings, Michael; Rennard, Stephen I.; Snyder, Jeffrey; Goldman, Mitchell; Martin, Ubaldo J.; Merrill, Deborah; Martin, Amber L.; Simeone, Jason C.; Fahrbach, Kyle; Murphy, Brian; Leidy, Nancy; Miller, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010 the COPD Foundation established the COPD Biomarkers Qualification Consortium (CBQC) as a partnership between the Foundation, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the pharmaceutical industry to pool publicly-funded and industry data to develop innovative tools to facilitate the development and approval of new therapies for COPD. We present data from the initial project seeking regulatory qualification of fibrinogen as a biomarker for the stratification of COPD patients into clinical trials. Methods This analysis pooled data from 4 publicly-funded studies and 1 industry study into a common database resulting in 6376 individuals with spirometric evidence of COPD. We used a threshold of 350 mg/dL to determine high vs. low fibrinogen, and determined the subsequent risk of hospitalizations from exacerbations and death using Cox proportional hazards models. Results High fibrinogen levels at baseline were present in 2853 (44.7%) of individuals with COPD. High fibrinogen was associated with an increased risk of hospitalized COPD exacerbations within 12 months (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.64; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.39–1.93) among participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC), the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS), and the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE) study. High fibrinogen was associated with an increased risk of death within 36 months (HR: 1.94; 95% CI: 1.62–2.31) among all participants. Conclusions Fibrinogen levels ≥ 350 mg/dL identify COPD individuals at an increased risk of exacerbations and death and could be a useful biomarker for enriching clinical trials in the COPD population. PMID:25685850

  1. Histamine release and fibrinogen adsorption mediate acute inflammatory responses to biomaterial implants in humans

    PubMed Central

    Zdolsek, Johann; Eaton, John W; Tang, Liping

    2007-01-01

    Background Medical implants often fail as a result of so-called foreign body reactions during which inflammatory cells are recruited to implant surfaces. Despite the clinical importance of this phenomenon, the mechanisms involved in these reactions to biomedical implants in humans are not well understood. The results from animal studies suggest that both fibrinogen adsorption to the implant surface and histamine release by local mast cells are involved in biomaterial-mediated acute inflammatory responses. The purpose of this study was to test this hypothesis in humans. Methods Thirteen male medical student volunteers (Caucasian, 21–30 years of age) were employed for this study. To assess the importance of fibrinogen adsorption, six volunteers were implanted with polyethylene teraphthalate disks pre-coated with their own (fibrinogen-containing) plasma or (fibrinogen-free) serum. To evaluate the importance of histamine, seven volunteers were implanted with uncoated disks with or without prior oral administration of histamine receptor antagonists. The acute inflammatory response was estimated 24 hours later by measuring the activities of implant-associated phagocyte-specific enzymes. Results Plasma coated implants accumulated significantly more phagocytes than did serum coated implants and the recruited cells were predominantly macrophage/monocytes. Administration of both H1 and H2 histamine receptor antagonists greatly reduced the recruitment of macrophages/monocytes and neutrophils on implant surfaces. Conclusion In humans – as in rodents – biomaterial-mediated inflammatory responses involve at least two crucial events: histamine-mediated phagocyte recruitment and phagocyte accumulation on implant surfaces engendered by spontaneously adsorbed host fibrinogen. Based on these results, we conclude that reducing fibrinogen:surface interactions should enhance biocompatibility and that administration of histamine receptor antagonists prior to, and shortly after

  2. Changes in the fibrinogen-fibrin system following a 20-hour exposure of rabbits to a magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matskevichene, V. B.; Vitenson, T. M.

    1974-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of animals to a constant magnetic field resulted in a sharp increase in the amount of fibrinogen. The addition of EACA to the plasma of experimental rabbits as well as protamine sulfate caused an additional increase in the amount of fibrinogen. A 20-hour exposure was accompanied by phenomena of paralysis of the pelvic limbs and death of some of the animals.

  3. Preliminary studies of the effects of a Peruvian snake Bothrops pictus (jergon of the coast) venom upon fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Olascoaga, M E; Zavaleta, A; Marsh, N A

    1988-01-01

    Bothrops pictus (jergon of the coast) venom has a coagulant effect in vitro on both canine fibrinogen and on human and canine plasma, with a greater affinity for canine plasma. In vivo a single dose of venom produced partial defibrinogenation in conscious dogs, plasma fibrinogen being reduced to about 60% of control values after 6 hr. PMID:3188056

  4. An alternative pathway for fibrinolysis. I. The cleavage of fibrinogen by leukocyte proteases at physiologic pH.

    PubMed Central

    Plow, E F; Edgington, T S

    1975-01-01

    An alternative fibrinolytic system, active at physiological pH, is present in peripheral blood leukocytes. The fibrinolytic proteases localized predominantly in the leukocyte granules are capable of degrading both fibrinogen and fibrin, and plasmin activity does not contribute significantly to this proteolytic event. The specificity of the alternative fibrinolytic proteases for fibrinogen and the characteristics of the derivative cleavage fragments are clearly distinguishable from the classical plasmin system. The high molecular weight derivatives of fibrinogen, generated by the alternative system, under physiological conditions, are larger than the plasmin-generated X fragment, exhibit immunoelectrophoretic mobility comparable to native fibrinogen, and are not coagulable by thrombin. Analysis of the constituent polypeptide chains of the fragments reveals cleavage of the Aalpha, Bbeta, and gamma chains of fibrinogen. The lower molecular weight derivatives of fibrinogen, generated by the alternative system, are structurally distinct from previously described fibrinogen degradation products and exhibit potent anticoagulant activity. This anticoagulant activity can be attributed to interference with normal fibrin polymerization. The proteases of the alternative fibrinolytic systems are actively secreted by leukocytes when stimulated to undergo a nonlytic release reaction. These results provide direct evidence for a fibrinolytic system resident in leukocyte granules that is associated with the leukocyte release reaction and is capable of generating unique fibrinogen cleavage fragments. Images PMID:237938

  5. The fibrinogen γA/γ’ isoform does not promote acute arterial thrombosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Bethany L; Getz, Todd M; Bergmeier, Wolfgang; Lin, Feng-Chang; de Willige, Shirley Uitte; Wolberg, Alisa S

    2014-01-01

    Background Elevated plasma fibrinogen associates with arterial thrombosis in humans and promotes thrombosis in mice by increasing fibrin formation and thrombus fibrin content. Fibrinogen is composed of six polypeptide chains: (Aα, Bβ, and γ)2. Alternative splicing of the γ chain leads to a dominant form (γA/γA) and a minor species (γA/γ’). Epidemiologic studies have detected elevated γA/γ’ fibrinogen in patients with arterial thrombosis, suggesting this isoform promotes thrombosis. However, in vitro data show that γA/γ’ is anticoagulant due to its ability to sequester thrombin, and suggest its expression is upregulated in response to inflammatory processes. Objective To determine whether γA/γ’ fibrinogen is prothrombotic in vivo. Methods We separated γA/γA and γA/γ’ fibrinogen from human plasma-purified fibrinogen and determined effects on in vitro plasma clot formation, and in vivo thrombus formation and circulating thrombin-antithrombin complexes in mice. Results and Conclusions Both γA/γA and γA/γ’ fibrinogen were cleaved by murine and human thrombin and were incorporated into murine and human clots. When γA/γA or γA/γ’ was spiked into plasma, γA/γA increased the fibrin formation rate to a greater extent than γA/γ’. In mice, compared to controls, γA/γA infusion shortened the time to carotid artery occlusion, whereas γA/γ’ infusion did not. Additionally, γA/γ’ infusion led to lower levels of plasma thrombin-antithrombin complexes following arterial injury, whereas γA/γA infusion did not. These data suggest that γA/γ’ binds thrombin in vivo, and decreases prothrombotic activity. Together, these findings indicate that elevated levels of γA/γA fibrinogen promote arterial thrombosis in vivo, whereas γA/γ’ does not. PMID:24916154

  6. TEACHING COMPOSITION WITH FILM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COURSEN, HERBERT R., JR.

    A COMPOSITION PROGRAM DESIGNED TO GIVE UPWARD BOUND STUDENTS A FEELING OF SUCCESS WAS BASED ON FILMS WHICH THE STUDENTS VIEWED, DISCUSSED, AND WROTE ABOUT. THE FILMS FELL ROUGHLY INTO THE CATEGORIES OF SOCIAL PROBLEMS, POLITICS AND PROPAGANDA, AND ART AND MUSIC. FOLLOWING CLASS DISCUSSIONS, STUDENTS WERE REQUIRED MERELY TO "WRITE ABOUT THE FILM."…

  7. Impact of Preemptive Fibrinogen Concentrate on Transfusion Requirements in Liver Transplantation: A Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Sabate, A; Gutierrez, R; Beltran, J; Mellado, P; Blasi, A; Acosta, F; Costa, M; Reyes, R; Torres, F

    2016-08-01

    We hypothesized that preemptive fibrinogen administration to obtain an initial plasma level of 2.9 g/L would reduce transfusion requirements in liver transplantation. A randomized, multicenter, hemoglobin-stratified, double-blind, fibrinogen-versus-saline-controlled trial was conducted. The primary end point was the percentage of patients requiring red blood cells. We evaluated 51 patients allocated to fibrinogen and 48 allocated to saline; the primary end point was assessed using data for 92 patients because the electronic record forms were offline for three patients in the fibrinogen group and four in the saline group. We injected a median of 3.54 g fibrinogen preemptively in the fibrinogen group. Nine patients in the saline group (20.9%) required fibrinogen at graft reperfusion (compared with one patient [2.1%] in the fibrinogen group; p = 0.005). Blood was transfused to 52.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 42.5-63.3%) in the fibrinogen group and 42.74% (95% CI 28.3-57.2%) in the saline group (p = 0.217). Relative risk for blood transfusion was 0.80 (95% CI 0.57-1.13). Thrombotic events occurred in one patient (2.1%) and five patients (11.4%) in the fibrinogen and saline groups, respectively. Seven patients (14.6%) in the fibrinogen group and nine (20.3%) in the saline group required reoperation. Preemptive administration of fibrinogen concentrate did not influence transfusion requirements. PMID:26880105

  8. Effect of Fibrinogen on Platelet Reactivity Measured by the VerifyNow P2Y12 Assay.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolsky, A B; Laguta, P S; Guskova, E V; Yarovaya, E B; Titaeva, E V; Storozhilova, A N; Panchenko, E P

    2016-05-01

    The VerifyNow assay is based upon the ability of activated platelets to cross-link beads coated with fibrinogen. However, fibrinogen is an abundant protein of blood, and therefore it may affect test results by competing with fibrinogen of beads for binding to platelets. To test this assumption, we assessed the influence of artificial alteration of fibrinogen level in blood samples obtained from donors (n = 9) and patients on clopidogrel therapy (n = 8) on the results of the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay. Fibrinogen level was altered by adding to blood samples 1/10 volume of fibrinogen solution (10.56 g/liter) or corresponding buffer. Relative to baseline, addition of buffer significantly increased platelet reactivity, whereas addition of fibrinogen decreased it. Analysis of the relationship between change in platelet reactivity values (dBase and dPRU) and change in fibrinogen concentration (dFg) revealed strong negative correlations: dBase = -63.3 × dFg - 27.1 (r = -0.924, p < 0.0005) and dPRU = -54.4 × dFg - 21.8 (r = -0.764, p < 0.0005). Thus, the results of our experiments suggest that: (i) blood fibrinogen strongly influences results of the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay, and (ii) correcting for fibrinogen effect may be needed to improve the accuracy of the test in the measuring of antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel therapy. PMID:27297894

  9. Recovery of fibrinogen concentrate after intraosseous application is equivalent to the intravenous route in a porcine model of hemodilution

    PubMed Central

    Schlimp, Christoph J.; Solomon, Cristina; Keibl, Claudia; Zipperle, Johannes; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Öhlinger, Wolfgang; Redl, Heinz; Schöchl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fibrinogen concentrate is increasingly considered as a hemostatic agent for trauma patients experiencing bleeding. Placing a venous access is sometimes challenging during severe hemorrhage. Intraosseous access may be considered instead. Studies of intraosseous infusion of coagulation factor concentrates are limited. We investigated in vivo recovery following intraosseous administration of fibrinogen concentrate and compared the results with intravenous administration. METHODS This study was performed on 12 pigs (mean [SD] body weight, 34.1 [2.8] kg). Following controlled blood loss (35 mL/kg) and fluid replacement with balanced crystalloid solution, intraosseous (n = 6) administration of fibrinogen concentrate (80 mg per kilogram of bodyweight) in the proximal tibia was compared with intravenous (n = 6) administration of the same dose (fibrinogen infusion time approximately 5 minutes in both groups). The following laboratory parameters were assessed: blood cell count, prothrombin time index, activated partial thromboplastin time, and plasma fibrinogen concentration (Clauss assay). Coagulation status was also assessed by thromboelastometry. RESULTS All tested laboratory parameters were comparable between the intraosseous and intravenous groups at baseline, hemodilution, and 30 minutes after fibrinogen concentrate administration. In vivo recovery of fibrinogen was also similar in the two groups (89% [23%] and 91% [22%], respectively). There were no significant between-group differences in any of the thromboelastometric parameters. Histologic examination indicated no adverse effects on the tissue surrounding the intraosseous administration site. CONCLUSION This study suggests that intraosseous administration of fibrinogen concentrate results in a recovery of fibrinogen similar to that of intravenous administration. The intraosseous route of fibrinogen concentrate could be a valuable alternative in situations where intravenous access is not feasible or would

  10. Physical Uncertainty Bounds (PUB)

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, Diane Elizabeth; Preston, Dean L.

    2015-03-19

    This paper introduces and motivates the need for a new methodology for determining upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulations of engineered systems due to limited fidelity in the composite continuum-level physics models needed to simulate the systems. We show that traditional uncertainty quantification methods provide, at best, a lower bound on this uncertainty. We propose to obtain bounds on the simulation uncertainties by first determining bounds on the physical quantities or processes relevant to system performance. By bounding these physics processes, as opposed to carrying out statistical analyses of the parameter sets of specific physics models or simply switching out the available physics models, one can obtain upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulated quantities of interest.

  11. Asymptotic entropy bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael

    2016-07-01

    We show that known entropy bounds constrain the information carried off by radiation to null infinity. We consider distant, planar null hypersurfaces in asymptotically flat spacetime. Their focusing and area loss can be computed perturbatively on a Minkowski background, yielding entropy bounds in terms of the energy flux of the outgoing radiation. In the asymptotic limit, we obtain boundary versions of the quantum null energy condition, of the generalized Second Law, and of the quantum Bousso bound.

  12. Oleic acid-induced lung injury in rabbits: effect of fibrinogen depletion with Arvin

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, M.F.; Doerschuk, C.M.; Brumwell, M.L.; Belzberg, A.; Hogg, J.C.

    1988-03-01

    The role of fibrinogen in the evolution of the increased permeability after oleic acid-induced lung injury was studied in New Zealand White rabbits. Animals depleted of fibrinogen by treatment with Malayan pit viper venom were compared with untreated rabbits immediately and at 1 and 24 h after injury. The increased permeability to albumin and elevated extravascular lung water (EVLW) associated with lung injury returned to control values by 24 h in untreated animals. Fibrinogen-depleted animals had a higher mortality (10/25 vs. 2/17, P less than 0.02) and showed a greater immediate increase in permeability to albumin that returned to control values at 1 and 24 h after injury, as well as trends toward elevated blood-free dry lung weight and larger increases in EVLW that persisted for 24 h. These findings indicate that fibrinogen-related proteins play an important role in controlling the microvascular injury that is produced by oleic acid. However, when these proteins are depleted, other mechanisms partially control the leak at later stages of the repair process.

  13. Forced Unfolding of the Coiled-Coils of Fibrinogen by Single-Molecule AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andre; Litvinov, Rustem; Discher, Dennis; Weisel, John

    2007-03-01

    A blood clot needs to have the right degree of stiffness and plasticity for hemostasis, but the origin of these mechanical properties is unknown. Here we report the first measurements using single molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the forced unfolding of fibrinogen to begin addressing this problem. To generate longer reproducible curves than are possible using monomer, factor XIIIa cross-linked, single chain fibrinogen oligomers were used. When extended under force, these oligomers showed sawtooth shaped force-extension patterns characteristic of unfolding proteins with a peak-to-peak separation of approximately 26 nm, consistent with the independent unfolding of the coiled-coils. These results were then reproduced using a Monte Carlo simulation with parameters in the same range as those previously used for unfolding globular domains. In particular, we found that the refolding time was negligible on experimental time and force scales in contrast to previous work on simpler coiled-coils. We suggest that this difference may be due to fibrinogen's structurally and topologically more complex coiled-coils and that an interaction between the alpha C and central domains may be involved. These results suggest a new functional property of fibrinogen and that the coiled-coil is more than a passive structural element of this molecule.

  14. [Fixing of osteochondral fragments with fibrinogen glue. Clinical experiences (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H; Friedebold, G

    1981-08-01

    Small osteochondral fragments are well fixed with the fibrinogen glue. This method is really a progress in comparison with the traditional fixation by screws or K-wires. The fragments were revascularized early. This is demonstrated by 31 glued osteochondral fragments which healed well. The joints must be immobilized during a period of 3 weeks. PMID:6118021

  15. Clinical and Prognostic Significance of Preoperative Plasma Fibrinogen Levels in Patients with Operable Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaofei; Liu, Haixia; Li, Xiangyi; Ma, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Elevated plasma fibrinogen levels are associated with tumor progression and poor outcomes in different cancer patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical and prognostic value of preoperative plasma fibrinogen levels in patients with operable breast cancer. Methods Two hundred and twenty-three patients diagnosed with breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated in this study. Plasma fibrinogen levels were examined before treatment and analyzed along with patient clinicopathological parameters, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival(OS). Both univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the clinicopathological parameters associated with DFS and OS. Results Elevated preoperative plasma fibrinogen levels were directly associated with age of diagnose (≤47 vs. >47, p<0.001), menopause (yes vs. no, p<0.001), tumor size (T1&T2 vs.T3&T4, p = 0.033), tumor stage (Ⅰvs.Ⅱvs.Ⅲ, p = 0.034) and lymph node involvement (N = 0 vs. 1≤N≤3 vs. N≥4, p<0.001), but not with histological grade, molecular type and other Immunohistochemical parameters(ER, PR, HER2 and Ki-67). In a univariate survival analysis, tumor stage, tumor size, lymph node involvement (p<0.001/ p<0.001)and plasma fibrinogen (p<0.001/ p<0.001) levels were associated with disease-free and overall survival, but just lymph nodes involvement (p<0.001, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.6–5.3/ p = 0.006, HR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.4–7.3) and plasma fibrinogen levels (p = 0.006, HR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.4–8.3/ p = 0.002, HR = 10.1, 95% CI = 2.3–44.6) were associated with disease-free and overall survival in a multivariate survival analysis, respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrates that elevated preoperative plasma fibrinogen levels are associated with breast cancer progression and are independently associated with a poor prognosis in patients with operable breast cancer. PMID:26799214

  16. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  17. Bounding species distribution models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Jarnevich, C.S.; Esaias, W.E.; Morisette, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used. ?? 2011 Current Zoology.

  18. Causality and Tsirelson's bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Buhrman, H.; Massar, S.

    2005-11-15

    We study the properties of no-signaling correlations that cannot be reproduced by local measurements on entangled quantum states. We say that such correlations violate Tsirelson bounds. We show that if these correlations are obtained by some reversible unitary quantum evolution U, then U cannot be written in the product form U{sub A}xU{sub B}. This implies that U can be used for signaling and for entanglement generation. This result is completely general and in fact can be viewed as a characterization of Tsirelson bounds. We then show how this result can be used as a tool to study Tsirelson bounds and we illustrate this by rederiving the Tsirelson bound of 2{radical}(2) for the Clauser-Horn-Shimony-Holt inequality, and by deriving a new Tsirelson bound for qutrits.

  19. Can Plasma Fibrinogen Levels Predict Bleeding After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting?

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Alireza; Ghiasi, Mohammadsaeid; Aghaei, Aghdas; Khaleghparast, Shiva; Ghanbari, Behrooz; Bakhshandeh, Hooman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fibrinogen is the main biomarker for bleeding. To prevent excessive postoperative bleeding, it would be useful to identify high-risk patients before coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Objectives: In order to predicating bleeding after CABG, we sought to determine whether preoperative fibrinogen concentration was associated with the amount of bleeding following CABG. Patients and Methods: A total of 144 patients (mean age = 61.50 ± 9.42 years; 65.7% men), undergoing elective and isolated CABG, were included in this case-series study. The same anesthesia technique and medicines were selected for all the patients. In the ICU, the patients were assessed in terms of bleeding at 12 and 24 hours post-operation, amount of contingent blood products received, and relevant tests. Statistical tests were subsequently conducted to analyze the correlation between preoperative fibrinogen concentration and the amount of post-CABG bleeding. Results: The mean ± standard deviation of bleeding at 12 and 24 hours post-operation was 285.37 ± 280.27 and 499.31 ± 355.57 mL, respectively. The results showed that postoperative bleeding was associated with different factors whereas pre-anesthesia fibrinogen was not correlated with bleeding at 12 (P = 0.856) and 24 hours (P = 0.936) post-operation. There were correlations between the extra-corporal circulation time and bleeding at 12 hours post-operation (ρ = 0.231, P = 0.007) and bleeding at 24 hours post-operation (ρ = 0.218, P = 0.013). Conclusions: Preoperative assessment of plasma fibrinogen levels failed to predict post-CABG bleeding. PMID:25478546

  20. Cleavage of fibrinogen by the human neutrophil neutral peptide-generating protease.

    PubMed Central

    Wintroub, B U; Coblyn, J S; Kaempfer, C E; Austen, K F

    1980-01-01

    The human neutrophil peptide-generating protease, which generates a low molecular weight vasoactive peptide from a plasma protein substrate, is directly fibrinolytic and cleaves human fibrinogen in a manner distinct from plasmin. Fibrinogen was reduced from 340,000 Mr to derivatives of 270,000-325,000 Mr during interaction with the protease at enzyme-to-substrate ratios of 0.3 or 1.0 microgram/1.0 mg. The 310,000-325,000 Mr cleavage fragments exhibited prolonged thrombin-induced clotting activity but were able to be coagulated, whereas the 270,000-290,000 Mr fragments were not able to be coagulated. Anticoagulants were not generated at either enzyme dose. As analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in 4-30% gradient gels and 10% gels stained for protein and carbohydrate, the diminution to 310,000-325,000 Mr and the prolongation of thrombin-induced clotting time resulted from cleavage of the fibrinogen A alpha chain. The further decrease in size to 270,000-290,000 Mr was associated with B beta-chain and gamma-chain cleavage and an inability to form gamma-gamma dimers. The neutral peptide-generating protease, a distinct human neutrophil neutral protease with fibrinolytic and fibrinogenolytic activities comparable to those of plasmin on a weight basis, cleaves fibrinogen in a manner that is distinct from the action of plasmin, leukocyte elastase, and leukocyte granule extracts. It may be that the concerted action of this neutrophil protease to generate a vasoactive peptide and to digest fibrinogen and fibrin facilitates neutrophil movement through vascular and extravascular sites. Images PMID:7001479

  1. Relationship between Physical Activity and Plasma Fibrinogen Concentrations in Adults without Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Marcos, Manuel A.; Recio-Rodríguez, José I.; Patino-Alonso, Maria C.; Martinez-Vizcaino, Vicente; Martin-Borras, Carme; de-la-Cal-dela-Fuente, Aventina; Sauras-Llera, Ines; Sanchez-Perez, Alvaro; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the relationship between regular physical activity, as assessed by accelerometer and 7-day physical activity recall (PAR), and plasma fibrinogen concentrations. Methods A cross-sectional study in a previously established cohort of healthy subjects was performed. This study analyzed 1284 subjects who were included in the EVIDENT study (mean age 55.0±13.6 years; 60.90% women). Fibrinogen concentrations were measured in blood plasma. Physical activity was assessed with a 7-day PAR (metabolic equivalents (METs)/hour/week) and GT3X ActiGraph accelerometer (counts/minute) for 7 days. Results Physical exercise, which was evaluated with both an accelerometer (Median: 237.28 counts/minute) and 7-day PAR (Median: 8 METs/hour/week). Physical activity was negatively correlated with plasma fibrinogen concentrations, which was evaluated by counts/min (r = −0.100; p<0.001) and METs/hour/week (r = −0.162; p<0.001). In a multiple linear regression analysis, fibrinogen concentrations of the subjects who performed more physical activity (third tertile of count/minute and METs/hour/week) respect to subjects who performed less (first tertile), maintained statistical significance after adjustments for age and others confounders (β = −0.03; p = 0.046 and β = −0.06; p<0.001, respectively). Conclusions Physical activity, as assessed by accelerometer and 7-day PAR, was negatively associated with plasma fibrinogen concentrations. This relation is maintained in subjects who performed more exercise even after adjusting for age and other confounders. PMID:24498413

  2. Changes in fibrinogen availability and utilization in an animal model of traumatic coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Impaired haemostasis following shock and tissue trauma is frequently detected in the trauma setting. These changes occur early, and are associated with increased mortality. The mechanism behind trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC) is not clear. Several studies highlight the crucial role of fibrinogen in posttraumatic haemorrhage. This study explores the coagulation changes in a swine model of early TIC, with emphasis on fibrinogen levels and utilization of fibrinogen. Methods A total of 18 landrace pigs were anaesthetized and divided into four groups. The Trauma-Shock group (TS) were inflicted bilateral blast femoral fractures with concomitant soft tissue injury by a high-energy rifle shot to both hind legs, followed by controlled exsanguination. The Shock group (S) was exposed to shock by exsanguination, whereas a third group was exposed to trauma only (T). A fourth group (C) served as control. Physiological data, haematological measurements, blood gas analyses and conventional coagulation assays were recorded at baseline and repeatedly over 60 minutes. Thrombelastometry were performed by means of the tissue factor activated ExTEM assay and the platelet inhibiting FibTEM assay. Data were statistically analysed by repeated measurements analyses method. Results A significant reduction of fibrinogen concentration was observed in both the TS and S groups. INR increased significantly in the S group and differed significantly from the TS group. Maximum clot firmness (MCF) of the ExTEM assay was significantly reduced over time in both TS and S groups. In the FibTEM assay a significant shortening of the clotting time and an increase in MCF was observed in the TS group compared to the S group. Conclusion Despite a reduction in clotting capability measured by ExTEM MCF and a reduced fibrinogen concentration, extensive tissue trauma may induce an increased fibrin based clotting activity that attenuates the hypocoagulable tendency in exsanguinated animals. PMID

  3. Interaction of fibrinogen and albumin with titanium dioxide nanoparticles of different crystalline phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marucco, Arianna; Fenoglio, Ivana; Turci, Francesco; Fubini, Bice

    2013-04-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) are contained in different kinds of industrial products including paints, self-cleaning glasses, sunscreens. TiO2 is also employed in photocatalysis and it has been proposed for waste water treatment. Micrometric TiO2 is generally considered a safe material, while there is concern on the possible health effects of nanometric titania. Due to their small size NPs may migrate within the human body possibly entering in the blood stream. Therefore studies on the interaction of NPs with plasma proteins are needed. In fact, the interaction with proteins is believed to ultimately influences the NPs biological fate. Fibrinogen and albumin are two of the most abundant plasma proteins. They are involved in several important physiological functions. Furthermore, fibrinogen is known to trigger platelet adhesion and inflammation. For these reasons the study of the interaction between these protein and nanoparticles is an important step toward the understanding of the behavior of NPs in the body. In this study we investigated the interaction of albumin and fibrinogen with TiO2 nanoparticles of different crystal phases (rutile and anatase) using an integrated set of techniques. The amount of adsorbed fibrinogen and albumin for each TiO2 surface was investigated by using the bicinchoninic acid assay (BCA). The variation of the surface charge of the NP-protein conjugates respect to the naked NPs was used to indirectly estimate both surface coverage and reversibility of the adsorption upon dilution. Surface charge was monitored by measuring the ζ potential with a conventional electrophoretic light scattering (ELS) system. The extent of protein deformation was evaluated by Raman Spectroscopy. We found that both proteins adsorb irreversibly against electrostatic repulsion, likely undergoing conformational changes or selective orientation upon adsorption. The size of primary particles and the particles aggregation rather than the crystal phase modulate the

  4. Signal transduction pathways in erythrocyte nitric oxide metabolism under high fibrinogen levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldanha, Carlota; Freitas, T.; Lopez de Almeida, J. P.; Silva-Herdade, A.

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies show that the fibrinogen molecule modulates the metabolism of nitric oxide (NO) in erythrocyte. The in vitro induced hiperfibrinogenemia interferes in the metabolism of the NO in the erythrocyte in dependence of the phosphorylation degree of the band 3. The soluble form of fibrinogen binds into CD47 protein present in the erythrocyte membrane. The soluble thrombomodulin is an inflammatory marker that binds to the erythrocyte CD47 in a site with a sequence peptide known as 4N1K. A study done in vitro shows that when hiperfibrinogenemia was induced in the presence of the peptide 4N1K agonist of CD47 it were observed variations in the efflux of NO from erythrocyte and an increase in the concentrations of GSNO, peroxinitrite, nitrite and nitrate of the erythrocytes. The aim of this work was to study the influence of the peptide 4N1K, on the metabolism of NO in the erythrocyte under high fibrinogen concentration and in the presence of inhibitors of the status of phosphorylation of protein band 3. In this in vitro study, whole blood samples were harvested from healthy subjects and NO, peroxynitrite, nitrite, nitrate and S-nitro-glutathione (GSNO) were determined in presence of 4N1K, calpeptine, Syk inhibitor and under high fibrinogen concentrations. The results obtained in erythrocytes under high fibrinogen levels when 4N1K is present with the Syk inhibitor or with calpeptine, showed in relation to the control samples increased significant concentrations of efflux of NO and of peroxynitrite, nitrite, nitrate and GSNO. In conclusion it was verified that in the in vitro model of hiperfibrinogenemia the peptide 4N1K, agonist of CD47, induces mobilization of NO in the erythrocyte in dependence of the status of phosphorylation of protein band 3.

  5. The novel fibrinogen-binding protein FbsB promotes Streptococcus agalactiae invasion into epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gutekunst, Heike; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Reinscheid, Dieter J

    2004-06-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major cause of bacterial sepsis and meningitis in human newborns. The interaction of S. agalactiae with host proteins and the entry into host cells thereby represent important virulence traits of these bacteria. The present report describes the identification of the fbsB gene, encoding a novel fibrinogen-binding protein that plays a crucial role in the invasion of S. agalactiae into human cells. In Western blots and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) experiments, the FbsB protein was demonstrated to interact with soluble and immobilized fibrinogen. Binding studies showed the N-terminal 388 residues of FbsB and the Aalpha-subunit of human fibrinogen to recognize each other. By reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, the fbsB gene was shown to be cotranscribed with the gbs0851 gene in S. agalactiae. Deletion of the fbsB gene in the genome of S. agalactiae did not influence the binding of the bacteria to fibrinogen, suggesting that FbsB does not participate in the attachment of S. agalactiae to fibrinogen. In tissue culture experiments, however, the fbsB deletion mutant was severely impaired in its invasion into lung epithelial cells. Bacterial invasion could be reestablished by introducing the fbsB gene on a shuttle plasmid into the fbsB deletion mutant. Furthermore, treatment of lung epithelial cells with FbsB fusion protein blocked S. agalactiae invasion of epithelial cells in a dose-dependent fashion. These results suggest an important role of the FbsB protein in the overall process of host cell entry by S. agalactiae. PMID:15155657

  6. Fibrinogen Availability and Coagulation Function after Hemorrhage and Resuscitation in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Wenjun Z

    2011-01-01

    Hemorrhagic coagulopathy (without neurological injuries) constitutes 40% of injury-related death in civilian hospitals and on the battlefield, and the underlying contributing mechanisms remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of fibrinogen availability on coagulation function after hemorrhage in pigs. Sixteen crossbred commercial Yorkshire swine were randomized into the control group (group C) (n = 8) and hemorrhage group (group H) (n = 8). Hemorrhage was induced in group H by bleeding 35% of the estimated total blood volume, followed by resuscitation with lactated Ringer solution at three times the bled volume. Pigs in group C were not hemorrhaged or resuscitated. Blood samples were withdrawn at baseline, 15 min, 3 h, 6 h, and 24 h after hemorrhage and lactated Ringer (LR) resuscitation (H–LR). Coagulation was assessed by using thrombelastography. All baseline measurements were similar between groups C and H. Hemorrhage caused a decrease in mean arterial pressure and an increase in heart rate in group H, but LR resuscitation corrected these changes within 1 h. Compared to baseline values, fibrinogen concentrations in group H decreased at 15 min, 3 h and 6 h after H–LR, but increased to double that of the baseline value at 24 h; platelet counts decreased throughout the study; clot strength was decreased at 15 min, 3 h and 6 h, but returned to baseline value at 24 h after H–LR. Hemorrhage caused decreases in fibrinogen and platelets, and compromised clot strength. The rebound of fibrinogen at 24 h restored clot strength despite platelet deficit. These data suggest the potential compensatory role of fibrinogen in restoring coagulation function in vivo after hemorrhagic shock. PMID:21327301

  7. Immunohistochemical evaluation of tissue factor, fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers in canine gliomas.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Cristian; Pumarola, Martí; Blasco, Ester; Fernández, Francisco; Viu, Judit; Añor, Sònia

    2014-06-01

    In human gliomas, tissue factor (TF) is overexpressed, associated with the grade of malignancy and influences tumour biology. Intra-tumoural fibrin/fibrinogen deposition and activation of the fibrinolytic system also play a role in tumour cell proliferation and angiogenesis. The first aim of the present study was to investigate TF expression and the presence of fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers in canine glioma biopsies, graded according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumours of the central nervous system. The second aim was to investigate the occurrence of intravascular thrombosis (IVT) in canine gliomas, as a potential histological marker of glioma type or grade of malignancy. An immunohistochemical study using antibodies against TF, fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers was performed with 24 glioma samples, including 15 oligodendrogliomas, 6 astrocytomas and 3 mixed gliomas. Immunohistochemical data were statistically analysed to determine whether there was any relationship between glioma type and grade of malignancy. All gliomas were moderate to strongly positive for TF and the staining score was significantly higher (P = 0.04) in high-grade (III or IV) than in low-grade (II) gliomas. Intra-tumoural fibrin/fibrinogen deposition was detected in all tumour biopsies assessed, and D-dimers were detected in 17/24 gliomas. IVT was a frequent finding, but was not linked to a specific glioma type or malignancy grade. TF expression, fibrin/fibrinogen deposition, extravascular fibrinolytic system activation and IVT occur in canine gliomas. Canine glioma might be a suitable model for studying coagulation and fibrinolysis as potential therapeutic targets for human gliomas. PMID:24745770

  8. Fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations are critical for fibrin glue adherence in rat high-risk colon anastomoses

    PubMed Central

    Buen, Eliseo Portilla-de; Orozco-Mosqueda, Abel; Leal-Cortés, Caridad; Vázquez-Camacho, Gonzalo; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde; Alvarez-Villaseñor, Andrea Socorro; Macías-Amezcua, Michel Dassaejv; González-Ojeda, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fibrin glues have not been consistently successful in preventing the dehiscence of high-risk colonic anastomoses. Fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations in glues determine their ability to function as sealants, healers, and/or adhesives. The objective of the current study was to compare the effects of different concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin on bursting pressure, leaks, dehiscence, and morphology of high-risk ischemic colonic anastomoses using fibrin glue in rats. METHODS: Colonic anastomoses in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (weight, 250-350 g) treated with fibrin glue containing different concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin were evaluated at post-operative day 5. The interventions were low-risk (normal) or high-risk (ischemic) end-to-end colonic anastomoses using polypropylene sutures and topical application of fibrinogen at high (120 mg/mL) or low (40 mg/mL) concentrations and thrombin at high (1000 IU/mL) or low (500 IU/mL) concentrations. RESULTS: Ischemia alone, anastomosis alone, or both together reduced the bursting pressure. Glues containing a low fibrinogen concentration improved this parameter in all cases. High thrombin in combination with low fibrinogen also improved adherence exclusively in low-risk anastomoses. No differences were detected with respect to macroscopic parameters, histopathology, or hydroxyproline content at 5 days post-anastomosis. CONCLUSIONS: Fibrin glue with a low fibrinogen content normalizes the bursting pressure of high-risk ischemic left-colon anastomoses in rats at day 5 after surgery. PMID:24714834

  9. Association of Fibrinogen with Severity of Stable Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetic Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Li-Feng; Li, Xiao-Lin; Luo, Song-Hui; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Qing, Ping; Wu, Na-Qiong; Li, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background. Some studies have suggested a relation of plasma fibrinogen to the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, whether plasma fibrinogen can predict the presence and severity of CAD in patients with diabetes mellitus has not been determined. Methods. A total of consecutive 373 diabetic patients with typical angina pectoris who received coronary angiography were enrolled and classified into three groups by tertiles of Gensini score (GS, low group <8; intermediate group 8~28; high group >28). The relationship between fibrinogen and GS was evaluated. Results. There were correlations of fibrinogen with hemoglobin A1c, C-reactive protein, and GS (r = 0.17, r = 0.52, and r = 0.21, resp.; all P < 0.001). Area under the receivers operating characteristic curve of fibrinogen was 0.62 (95% CI 0.56–0.68, P < 0.001) for predicting a high GS. Multivariate analysis suggested that plasma fibrinogen was an independent predictor of a high GS for diabetic patients (OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.04–1.88, and P = 0.026) after adjusting for traditional risk factors of CAD. Conclusions. The present data indicated that plasma fibrinogen, a readily measurable systematic inflammatory marker, appeared to be an independent predictor for the severity of CAD in diabetic patients. PMID:24803720

  10. Retinoids stimulate fibrinogen production both in vitro (hepatocytes) and in vivo. Induction requires activation of the retinoid X receptor.

    PubMed

    Nicodeme, E; Nicaud, M; Issandou, M

    1995-10-01

    The in vitro effects of retinoids on fibrinogen synthesis were investigated in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes. In vivo effects were studied in the rat. In HepG2 cells, maximal stimulation (twofold) of fibrinogen secretion was obtained when cells were incubated in the presence of 1 mumol/L all-trans retinoic acid (T-RA) for 24 hours. A comparable increase was observed for both de novo fibrinogen synthesis and fibrinogen beta chain mRNA level. In primary cultures of human hepatocytes, treatment with 1 mumol/L T-RA for 72 hours also gave a twofold increase in fibrinogen production. Furthermore, rats treated for 6 days with 100 mg.kg-1.d-1 T-RA presented increased fibrinogen plasma levels (110%). A selective retinoic X receptor (RXR) agonist, 4-[1-3,5,5,8,8-pentamethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2-naphthyl)-ethenyl]benzoi c acid (3-methyl TTNEB), as well as 9-cis retinoic acid, a natural RXR ligand, mimicked the effects of T-RA on fibrinogen synthesis in vitro at lower concentrations. In contrast, a selective retinoic A receptor alpha (RAR alpha) agonist was a poor activator. The ED50 of the different retinoids on fibrinogen secretion by HepG2 cells was 25 nmol/L for T-RA, 4 nmol/L for 9-cis retinoic acid, 11 nmol/L for the synthetic RXR agonist, and > 500 nmol/L for the RAR alpha agonist. However, incubation of HepG2 cells with RXR agonist together with RAR alpha agonist resulted in a further increase in fibrinogen production. The secretion of two other acute-phase proteins, alpha-antichymotrypsin and caeruloplasmin, was also stimulated by retinoids in HepG2 cells but by a different regulatory mechanism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7583541

  11. Bound infragravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okihiro, Michele; Guza, R. T.; Seymour, R. J.

    1992-07-01

    Model predictions of bound (i.e., nonlinearly forced by and coupled to wave groups) infragravity wave energy are compared with about 2 years of observations in 8- to 13-m depths at Imperial Beach, California, and Barbers Point, Hawaii. Frequency-directional spectra of free waves at sea and swell frequencies, estimated with a small array of four pressure sensors, are used to predict the bound wave spectra below 0.04 Hz. The predicted total bound wave energy is always less than the observed infragravity energy, and the underprediction increases with increasing water depth and especially with decreasing swell energy. At most half, and usually much less, of the observed infragravity energy is bound. Bound wave spectra are also predicted with data from a single wave gage in 183-m depth at Point Conception, California, and the assumption of unidirectional sea and swell. Even with energetic swell, less than 10% of the total observed infragravity energy in 183-m depth is bound. Free waves, either leaky or edge waves, are more energetic than bound waves at both the shallow and deep sites. The low level of infragravity energy observed in 183-m depth compared with 8- to 13-m depths, with similarly moderate sea and swell energy, suggests that leaky (and very high-mode edge) waves contribute less than 10% of the infragravity energy in 8-13 m. Most of the free infragravity energy in shallow water is refractively trapped and does not reach deep water.

  12. The Dual Role of Fibrinogen as Inhibitor and Nucleator of Calcium Phosphate Phases: The Importance of Structure.

    PubMed

    Tsortos; Ohki; Zieba; Baier; Nancollas

    1996-01-15

    Constant composition and free drift methods have been used to investigate the abilities of human serum albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen to influence calcium phosphate precipitation. Both molecules inhibit hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystal growth when present in the solution phase. Fibrinogen, when immobilized at hydrophobicized germanium or silica surfaces, is able to nucleate calcium phosphate phases; at clean germanium or silica surfaces, it appears to be inactive. The apparent configuration of fibrinogen molecules at germanium or silica surfaces on which octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) was deposited probably exposes more negative sites for participation in nucleation. PMID:10479440

  13. The use of fibrinogen uptake test in screening for deep vein thrombosis in patients with hip fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Fauno, P.; Suomalainen, O.; Bergqvist, D.; Fredin, H.; Kettunen, K.; Soimakallio, S.; Cederholm, C.; Karjalainen, P.; Vissinger, H.; Justesen, T. )

    1990-11-01

    255 hip fracture patients were studied by {sup 125}I-fibrinogen uptake test and bilateral phlebography. We found the sensitivity of fibrinogen scanning to be 44% for the non-operated limb and 50% for the calves. The predictive value of a negative result was found to be 92% and 93% respectively. We conclude that the use of fibrinogen uptake test as single diagnosticum is not valid and can only be recommended in combination with phlebography when studying patient where the frequency of DVT is expected to be low.

  14. A Multi-Ethnic Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies in Over 100,000 Subjects Identifies 23 Fibrinogen-Associated Loci but no Strong Evidence of a Causal Association between Circulating Fibrinogen and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Huang, Jie; Chasman, Daniel; Naitza, Silvia; Dehghan, Abbas; Johnson, Andrew D; Teumer, Alexander; Reiner, Alex P; Folkersen, Lasse; Basu, Saonli; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Trompet, Stella; Mälarstig, Anders; Baumert, Jens; Bis, Joshua C.; Guo, Xiuqing; Hottenga, Jouke J; Shin, So-Youn; Lopez, Lorna M; Lahti, Jari; Tanaka, Toshiko; Yanek, Lisa R; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Wilson, James F; Navarro, Pau; Huffman, Jennifer E; Zemunik, Tatijana; Redline, Susan; Mehra, Reena; Pulanic, Drazen; Rudan, Igor; Wright, Alan F; Kolcic, Ivana; Polasek, Ozren; Wild, Sarah H; Campbell, Harry; Curb, J David; Wallace, Robert; Liu, Simin; Eaton, Charles B.; Becker, Diane M.; Becker, Lewis C.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Räikkönen, Katri; Widen, Elisabeth; Palotie, Aarno; Fornage, Myriam; Green, David; Gross, Myron; Davies, Gail; Harris, Sarah E; Liewald, David C; Starr, John M; Williams, Frances M.K.; Grant, P.J.; Spector, Timothy D.; Strawbridge, Rona J; Silveira, Angela; Sennblad, Bengt; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Franco, Oscar H; Hofman, Albert; van Dongen, Jenny; Willemsen, G; Boomsma, Dorret I; Yao, Jie; Jenny, Nancy Swords; Haritunians, Talin; McKnight, Barbara; Lumley, Thomas; Taylor, Kent D; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Grotevendt, Anne; Homuth, Georg; Völzke, Henry; Kocher, Thomas; Goel, Anuj; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Seedorf, Udo; Clarke, Robert; Steri, Maristella; Tarasov, Kirill V; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Stott, David J; Sattar, Naveed; Buckley, Brendan M; Rumley, Ann; Lowe, Gordon D; McArdle, Wendy L; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Song, Jaejoon; Boerwinkle, Eric; Folsom, Aaron R.; Rose, Lynda M.; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Teichert, Martina; Ikram, M Arfan; Mosley, Thomas H; Bevan, Steve; Dichgans, Martin; Rothwell, Peter M.; Sudlow, Cathie L M; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Chambers, John C.; Saleheen, Danish; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Danesh, John; Nelson, Christopher P; Erdmann, Jeanette; Reilly, Muredach P.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Schunkert, Heribert; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Ferrucci, Luigi; Eriksson, Johan G; Jacobs, David; Deary, Ian J; Soranzo, Nicole; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; de Geus, Eco JC; Tracy, Russell P.; Hayward, Caroline; Koenig, Wolfgang; Cucca, Francesco; Jukema, J Wouter; Eriksson, Per; Seshadri, Sudha; Markus, Hugh S.; Watkins, Hugh; Samani, Nilesh J; Wallaschofski, Henri; Smith, Nicholas L.; Tregouet, David; Ridker, Paul M.; Tang, Weihong; Strachan, David P.; Hamsten, Anders; O’Donnell, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Estimates of the heritability of plasma fibrinogen concentration, an established predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD), range from 34 to 50%. Genetic variants so far identified by genome-wide association (GWA) studies only explain a small proportion (< 2%) of its variation. Methods and Results We conducted a meta-analysis of 28 GWA studies, including more than 90,000 subjects of European ancestry, the first GWA meta-analysis of fibrinogen levels in 7 African Americans studies totaling 8,289 samples, and a GWA study in Hispanic-Americans totaling 1,366 samples. Evaluation for association of SNPs with clinical outcomes included a total of 40,695 cases and 85,582 controls for coronary artery disease (CAD), 4,752 cases and 24,030 controls for stroke, and 3,208 cases and 46,167 controls for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Overall, we identified 24 genome-wide significant (P<5×10−8) independent signals in 23 loci, including 15 novel associations, together accounting for 3.7% of plasma fibrinogen variation. Gene-set enrichment analysis highlighted key roles in fibrinogen regulation for the three structural fibrinogen genes and pathways related to inflammation, adipocytokines and thyrotrophin-releasing hormone signaling. Whereas lead SNPs in a few loci were significantly associated with CAD, the combined effect of all 24 fibrinogen-associated lead SNPs was not significant for CAD, stroke or VTE. Conclusion We identify 23 robustly associated fibrinogen loci, 15 of which are new. Clinical outcome analysis of these loci does not support a causal relationship between circulating levels of fibrinogen and CAD, stroke or VTE. PMID:23969696

  15. [Fibrinogen/fibrin-specific enzymes from copperhead (Agkistrodon halys halys) and cobra (Naja oxiana eichwald) snake venoms].

    PubMed

    Yunusova, E S; Sadykov, E S; Sultanalieva, N M; Shkinev, A V

    2016-03-01

    Ability of fractions of cobra's (Naja oxiana Eichwald) and copperhead snake's (Agkistrodon halys halys) venoms to hydrolyze fibrinogen/fibrin was studied. In cobra's snake a component with molecular mass of nearly 60 kDa was found to hydrolyze a-chain of fibrinogen but failed to hydrolyze casein/azocasein and fibrin. A fibrinogen-specific metalloproteinase, the enzyme was inhibited by EDTA. Cobra's venom reduced the mass of donor's fresh blood clots. The copperhead snake's venom and the fractions obtained by gel-filtration (HW-50) and ion exchange chromatography (DEAE-650) were found to hydrolyze casein/azocasein, a- and b-chains of fibrinogen/fibrin and donor's blood clots. The results from the study of the venom and proteolytically active fractions are the evidence for a thrombolytic potential in a copperhead snake's venom. PMID:27420616

  16. Associations of plasma fibrinogen levels with established cardiovascular disease risk factors, inflammatory markers, and other characteristics: individual participant meta-analysis of 154,211 adults in 31 prospective studies: the fibrinogen studies collaboration.

    PubMed

    Kaptoge, S; White, I R; Thompson, S G; Wood, A M; Lewington, S; Lowe, G D O; Danesh, J

    2007-10-15

    Long-term increases in plasma fibrinogen levels of 1 g/liter are associated with an approximate doubling of risk of major cardiovascular disease outcomes, but causality remains uncertain. To quantify cross-sectional associations of fibrinogen levels with established risk factors and other characteristics, the investigators combined individual data on 154,211 apparently healthy adults from 31 prospective studies conducted between 1967 and 2003, using a linear mixed model that included random effects at the cohort level. Fibrinogen levels increased with age and showed continuous, approximately linear relations with several risk markers and slightly curvilinear associations with log triglycerides, albumin, and tobacco and alcohol consumption. Female sex, Black ethnicity, lower socioeconomic status, and alcohol abstinence were each associated with modestly higher fibrinogen levels. Approximately one third of the variation in fibrinogen levels was explained by cohort, age, and sex. An additional 7% was explained by established risk factors (notably, positive associations with smoking and body mass index and an inverse association with high density lipoprotein cholesterol), and a further 10% was explained by inflammatory markers (notably, a positive association with C-reactive protein). The association with body mass index was twice as strong in women as in men, whereas the association with smoking was much stronger in men. These findings substantially advance understanding of the correlates and possible determinants of fibrinogen levels. PMID:17785713

  17. The association between fibrinogen reactivity to mental stress and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarino, Antonio Ivan; Hamer, Mark; Gaze, David; Collinson, Paul; Rumley, Ann; Lowe, Gordon; Steptoe, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Plasma fibrinogen is considered as a positive mediator between mental stress and cardiovascular disease because it is an acute-phase protein released in response to mental stress and a coagulation factor. However those three factors have never been studied together within a single integrated framework, using cardiac troponin T as a marker of cardiovascular risk. Methods 491 disease-free men and women aged 53–76 were tested for fibrinogen levels before, immediately after, and following recovery from standardized mental stress tasks. We measured plasma cardiac troponin T using a high-sensitivity assay (HS-CTnT) and coronary calcification using electron-beam dual-source computed tomography. Results The average fibrinogen concentration increased by 5.1% (s.d. = 7.3) in response to stress and then tended to return to baseline values. People with higher baseline fibrinogen values had smaller increases (blunted responses) following the stress task (P = 0.001), and people with higher stress responses showed better recovery (P < 0.001). In unadjusted analyses, higher baseline fibrinogen was associated with higher chances of having detectable HS-CTnT (P = 0.072) but, conversely, higher fibrinogen response was associated with lower chances of having detectable HS-CTnT (P = 0.007). The adjustment for clinical, inflammatory, and haemostatic factors, as well as for coronary calcification eliminated the effect of baseline fibrinogen, whereas the negative association between fibrinogen response and HS-CTnT remained robust: the odds of detectable HS-CTnT halved for each 10% increase in fibrinogen concentration due to stress (OR = 0.49, P = 0.007, 95% CI = 0.30–0.82). Conclusions Greater fibrinogen responses to mental stress are associated with lower likelihood of detectable high-sensitivity troponin T plasma concentration. A more dynamic fibrinogen response appears to be advantageous for cardiovascular health. PMID:26010862

  18. Post-translational oxidative modification of fibrinogen is associated with coagulopathy after traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    White, Nathan J; Wang, Yi; Fu, Xiaoyun; Cardenas, Jessica C; Martin, Erika J; Brophy, Donald F; Wade, Charles E; Wang, Xu; St John, Alexander E; Lim, Esther B; Stern, Susan A; Ward, Kevin R; López, José A; Chung, Dominic

    2016-07-01

    Victims of trauma often develop impaired blood clot formation (coagulopathy) that contributes to bleeding and mortality. Fibrin polymerization is one critical component of clot formation that can be impacted by post-translational oxidative modifications of fibrinogen after exposure to oxidants. In vitro evidence suggests that Aα-C domain methionine sulfoxide formation, in particular, can induce conformational changes that prevent lateral aggregation of fibrin protofibrils during polymerization. We used mass spectrometry of plasma from trauma patients to find that fibrinogen Aα-C domain methionine sulfoxide content was selectively-increased in patients with coagulopathy vs. those without coagulopathy. This evidence supports a novel linkage between oxidative stress, coagulopathy, and bleeding after injury. PMID:27105953

  19. Interfacial adsorption of fibrinogen and its inhibition by RGD peptide: a combined physical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Johanna; Salacinski, Henryk J.; Mu, Qingshan; Seifalian, Alex M.; Peel, Louise; Freeman, Neville; Holt, Cathy M.; Lu, Jian R.

    2004-07-01

    The Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide sequence is known as a cell recognition site for numerous adhesive proteins present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and in blood. Whilst surface immobilized RGD groups enhance cell attachment, RGD components present in solution can effectively inhibit cell attachment by competing with endogenous ligands for the same recognition site. In contrast to the widely reported binding to cell integrin, this study demonstrates a new RGD feature: its inhibitive effect on fibrinogen adsorption. Through a combined analysis of spectroscopic ellipsometry, neutron reflection and dual polarization interferometry, we show that the kinetic process of fibrinogen adsorption as a model pro-coagulant at the silica/solution interface and in the absence of any cells can be substantially reduced by the addition of RGD in solution and that the extent of the reduction is dependent on the relative concentration of RGD.

  20. Evaluation of a rapid method of determination of plasma fibrinogen in swine.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, M; McSherry, B J; Valli, V E

    1977-04-01

    An evaluation was made of a rapid semiautomated method for determining fibrinogen level in swine plasma. This method, referred to as thrombin time method or fibrometer method, is based on the principle that when thrombin is added to suitably diluted plasma, the time of clotting is linearly related to the fibrinogen concentration. The linear regression model for the standard curve prepared using swine plasma had an r value of 0.998. A comparison between the fibrometer and the Grannis methods done on 189 swine plasma samples showed good correlation between these two mehtods (r value 0.847). It was concluded that although the fibrometer method may not be as precise as the Grannis method, it would still be acceptable for clinical use in swine. PMID:861838

  1. Canine intracranial meningiomas: Immunohistochemical evaluation of tissue factor, fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers.

    PubMed

    Font, Cristina; de la Fuente, Cristian; Pumarola, Martí; Blasco, Ester; Fernández, Francisco; Viu, Judit; Añor, Sònia

    2015-12-01

    The haemostatic system influences angiogenesis, cell growth and metastasis in solid tumours. The aim of this study was to investigate tissue factor (TF) expression, fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimer deposition, as well as the occurrence of intravascular thrombosis (IVT) in canine intracranial meningiomas using immunohistochemistry. All but three (26/29) meningiomas expressed TF. TF immunolabelling was significantly higher in high-grade (grades II and III) than in low-grade (grade I) meningiomas. Fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimer deposits were detected in all meningiomas and staining scores were statistically different between different meningioma grades. IVT was detected in 19/29 specimens, but no statistical differences were observed between different malignancy grades. In conclusion, the haemostatic system may be involved in meningioma pathobiology and may be a potential therapeutic target for canine meningiomas, as also suggested for human meningiomas. PMID:26526524

  2. Fibrin Clot Structure and Mechanics Associated with Specific Oxidation of Methionine Residues in Fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Weigandt, Katie M.; White, Nathan; Chung, Dominic; Ellingson, Erica; Wang, Yi; Fu, Xiaoyun; Pozzo, Danilo C.

    2012-01-01

    Using a combination of structural and mechanical characterization, we examine the effect of fibrinogen oxidation on the formation of fibrin clots. We find that treatment with hypochlorous acid preferentially oxidizes specific methionine residues on the α, β, and γ chains of fibrinogen. Oxidation is associated with the formation of a dense network of thin fibers after activation by thrombin. Additionally, both the linear and nonlinear mechanical properties of oxidized fibrin gels are found to be altered with oxidation. Finally, the structural modifications induced by oxidation are associated with delayed fibrin lysis via plasminogen and tissue plasminogen activator. Based on these results, we speculate that methionine oxidation of specific residues may be related to hindered lateral aggregation of protofibrils in fibrin gels. PMID:23283239

  3. Films in Depth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrievogel, Paul A.; Prete, Anthony T.

    Bound in a slipcover rather than in signatures, this "book" is made up of thirteen separately bound booklets. The first booklet is an introduction to the use of film in the classroom both in teaching the filmic art and in increasing the visual literacy of students on the high school and early college levels. The twelve other booklets each treat a…

  4. The influence of glucocorticoid on the fibrinogen messenger RNA content of rat liver in vivo and in hepatocyte suspension culture.

    PubMed Central

    Princen, H M; Moshage, H J; de Haard, H J; van Gemert, P J; Yap, S H

    1984-01-01

    The plasma concentration of fibrinogen, one of the major acute-phase proteins produced by the liver, increases during the acute-phase response as a result of enhanced synthesis in liver. Since adrenal-cortical hormones have been thought to have a key role in the regulation of the fibrinogen synthesis, fibrinogen-polypeptide mRNA sequences were determined in the present study, by using a specific complementary-DNA probe, in RNA fractions obtained from rat hepatocytes exposed to glucocorticoids in vitro (hepatocyte suspension cultures) and in vivo. Maximal induction of the fibrinogen-polypeptide mRNA (to 400% of the control value) was found in vitro at 0.1 microM-dexamethasone after 9 h of incubation. The same magnitude of induction was obtained with 20 microM-cortisol or 60 microM-corticosterone. In contrast with the findings in vitro, no induction of the fibrinogen-polypeptide mRNA was observed in the liver at various times after injection of different doses of glucocorticoids into rats. These results suggest that more complex regulatory mechanisms are involved and that glucocorticoids are not the sole regulatory factors in vivo in the enhanced synthesis of fibrinogen during the acute-phase response. PMID:6547834

  5. Label-Free Quantitative Immunoassay of Fibrinogen in Alzheimer Disease Patient Plasma Using Fiber Optical Surface Plasmon Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jisoo; Kim, SeJin; Nguyen, Tan Tai; Lee, Renee; Li, Tiehua; Yun, Changhyun; Ham, Youngeun; An, Seong Soo A.; Ju, Heongkyu

    2016-05-01

    We present a real-time quantitative immunoassay to detect fibrinogen in the blood plasma of Alzheimer's disease patients using multimode fiber optical sensors in which surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was employed. Nanometer-thick bimetals including silver and aluminum were coated onto the core surface of the clad-free part (5 cm long) of the fiber for SPR excitation at the He-Ne laser wavelength of 632.8 nm. The histidine-tagged peptide was then coated on the metal surface to immobilize the fibrinogen antibody for the selective capture of fibrinogen among the proteins in the patient blood plasma. The SPR fiber optical sensor enabled quantitative detection of concentrations of fibrinogen from the different human patient blood at a detection limit of ˜20 ng/ml. We also observed a correlation in the fibrinogen concentration measurement between enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and our SPR fiber-based sensors. This suggests that the presented SPR fiber-based sensors that do not rely on the use of labels such as fluorophores can be used for a real-time quantitative assay of a specific protein such as fibrinogen in a human blood that is known to contain many other kinds of proteins together.

  6. Fibrinogen Concentrate Improves Survival During Limited Resuscitation of Uncontrolled Hemorrhagic Shock in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    White, Nathan J.; Wang, Xu; Liles, W. Conrad; Stern, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of fibrinogen concentrate, as a hemostatic agent, on limited resuscitation of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock. We use a swine model of hemorrhagic shock with free bleeding from a 4mm aortic tear to test the effect of adding a one-time dose of fibrinogen concentrate given at the onset of limited fluid resuscitation. Immature female swine were anesthetized and subjected to catheter hemorrhage and aortic tear to induce uniform hemorrhagic shock. Animals (N=7 per group) were then randomized to receive either; 1. No fluid resuscitation (Neg Control), 2. Limited resuscitation in the form of two boluses of 10ml/kg of 6% hydroxyethyl starch solution (HEX) given 30 minutes apart, or 3. The same fluid regimen with one dose of 120mg/kg fibrinogen concentrate given with the first HEX bolus (FBG). Animals were then observed for a total of 6 hours with aortic repair and aggressive resuscitation with shed blood taking place at 3 hours. Survival to 6 hours was significantly increased with FBG (7/8, 86%) vs. HEX (2/7, 29%), and Neg Control (0/7, 0%) (FBG vs. HEX, Kaplan Meier LR p=0.035). Intraperitoneal blood loss adjusted for survival time was increased in HEX (0.4ml/kg/min) when compared to FBG (0.1mg/kg/min, p=0.047) and Neg Control (0.1ml/kg/min, p=0.041). Systemic and cerebral hemodynamics also showed improvement with FBG vs. HEX. Fibrinogen concentrate may be a useful adjunct to decrease blood loss, improve hemodynamics, and prolong survival during limited resuscitation of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock. PMID:25337778

  7. The recombinant LIC10508 is a plasma fibronectin, plasminogen, fibrinogen and C4BP-binding protein of Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Gabriela H; Teixeira, Aline F; Fernandes, Luis G; de Souza, Gisele O; Kirchgatter, Karin; Romero, Eliete C; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Vieira, Monica L; Nascimento, Ana Lucia T O

    2016-03-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp. In this study, we report that the recombinant proteins LIC10507, LIC10508 and LIC10509 are recognized by confirmed leptospirosis serum samples at both phases of the disease. The recombinant rLIC10508 and rLIC10507 are plasminogen (PLG)-binding proteins, capable of generating plasmin in the presence of a PLG activator. The proteins bind to PLG in a dose-dependent and saturable manner, fulfilling host-ligand interaction. Furthermore, rLIC10508 interacts with fibrinogen (Fg), plasma fibronectin and C4b binding protein (C4BP). The binding of rLIC10508 to Fg decreases the fibrin clotting in a thrombin-catalyzed reaction. The incubation with 4 μM of protein promoted 40% inhibition upon clotting formation. C4BP bound to rLIC10508 retained its cofactor activity for factor I promoting the cleavage of C4b protein, which may reduce the membrane attack complex formation. Although these proteins have high amino acid sequence similarity, rLIC10508 is the most talented of the three, a behavior that might be explained by its unique putative 3D structure, whereas structures of rLIC10507 and rLIC10509 are very similar. Plasmin generation (rLIC10507 and rLIC10508), together with decreasing fibrin clot formation (rLIC10508) and impairment of the complement system (rLIC10508) may help the bacteria to overcome host defense, facilitating the infection process. PMID:26657108

  8. Equilibrium chain conformations of bound polymers at the polymer melt/solid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Mani; Jiang, Naisheng; Sendogdular, Levent; Endoh, Maya; Koga, Tadanori

    2014-03-01

    We report the equilibrium conformations of bound polymer chains formed on planar solids. In this study, bound polystyrene (PS) layers onto silicon (Si) substrates were used as a model system. Three 50 nm-thick PS thin films were prepared by using different film processes (i.e., spin coating, dip coating, and floating) following prolonged thermal annealing and subsequent solvent leaching. The structures of the bound layers on Si were then characterized by using x-ray reflectivity and atomic force microscopy. We found that the adsorption kinetics for the dip coating film is much longer than that for the spun cast film or the floating film. It was also found that all the bound PS layers are composed of two different nanoarchitectures: flattened chains that constitute the inner higher density region of the bound layers and loosely adsorbed polymer chains that form the outer bulk-like density region. We acknowledge the financial support from NSF Grant No. CMMI-084626.

  9. Bounding the Bogoliubov coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt

    2008-11-15

    While over the last century or more considerable effort has been put into the problem of finding approximate solutions for wave equations in general, and quantum mechanical problems in particular, it appears that as yet relatively little work seems to have been put into the complementary problem of establishing rigourous bounds on the exact solutions. We have in mind either bounds on parametric amplification and the related quantum phenomenon of particle production (as encoded in the Bogoliubov coefficients), or bounds on transmission and reflection coefficients. Modifying and streamlining an approach developed by one of the present authors [M. Visser, Phys. Rev. A 59 (1999) 427-438, (arXiv:quant-ph/9901030)], we investigate this question by developing a formal but exact solution for the appropriate second-order linear ODE in terms of a time-ordered exponential of 2x2 matrices, then relating the Bogoliubov coefficients to certain invariants of this matrix. By bounding the matrix in an appropriate manner, we can thereby bound the Bogoliubov coefficients.

  10. A meta-analysis of 120 246 individuals identifies 18 new loci for fibrinogen concentration.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Paul S; Chasman, Daniel I; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Chen, Ming-Huei; Huffman, Jennifer E; Steri, Maristella; Tang, Weihong; Teumer, Alexander; Marioni, Riccardo E; Grossmann, Vera; Hottenga, Jouke J; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Zhao, Jing Hua; Brody, Jennifer A; Kleber, Marcus E; Guo, Xiuqing; Wang, Jie Jin; Auer, Paul L; Attia, John R; Yanek, Lisa R; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Lahti, Jari; Venturini, Cristina; Tanaka, Toshiko; Bielak, Lawrence F; Joshi, Peter K; Rocanin-Arjo, Ares; Kolcic, Ivana; Navarro, Pau; Rose, Lynda M; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Riess, Helene; Mazur, Johanna; Basu, Saonli; Goel, Anuj; Yang, Qiong; Ghanbari, Mohsen; Willemsen, Gonneke; Rumley, Ann; Fiorillo, Edoardo; de Craen, Anton J M; Grotevendt, Anne; Scott, Robert; Taylor, Kent D; Delgado, Graciela E; Yao, Jie; Kifley, Annette; Kooperberg, Charles; Qayyum, Rehan; Lopez, Lorna M; Berentzen, Tina L; Räikkönen, Katri; Mangino, Massimo; Bandinelli, Stefania; Peyser, Patricia A; Wild, Sarah; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Wright, Alan F; Marten, Jonathan; Zemunik, Tatijana; Morrison, Alanna C; Sennblad, Bengt; Tofler, Geoffrey; de Maat, Moniek P M; de Geus, Eco J C; Lowe, Gordon D; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Sattar, Naveed; Binder, Harald; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Mcknight, Barbara; Huang, Jie; Jenny, Nancy S; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Qi, Lihong; Mcevoy, Mark G; Becker, Diane M; Starr, John M; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Hysi, Pirro G; Hernandez, Dena G; Jhun, Min A; Campbell, Harry; Hamsten, Anders; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Mcardle, Wendy L; Slagboom, P Eline; Zeller, Tanja; Koenig, Wolfgang; Psaty, Bruce M; Haritunians, Talin; Liu, Jingmin; Palotie, Aarno; Uitterlinden, André G; Stott, David J; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Polasek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Wilson, James F; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ferrucci, Luigi; Spector, Tim D; Eriksson, Johan G; Hansen, Torben; Deary, Ian J; Becker, Lewis C; Scott, Rodney J; Mitchell, Paul; März, Winfried; Wareham, Nick J; Peters, Annette; Greinacher, Andreas; Wild, Philipp S; Jukema, J Wouter; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hayward, Caroline; Cucca, Francesco; Tracy, Russell; Watkins, Hugh; Reiner, Alex P; Folsom, Aaron R; Ridker, Paul M; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Smith, Nicholas L; Strachan, David P; Dehghan, Abbas

    2016-01-15

    Genome-wide association studies have previously identified 23 genetic loci associated with circulating fibrinogen concentration. These studies used HapMap imputation and did not examine the X-chromosome. 1000 Genomes imputation provides better coverage of uncommon variants, and includes indels. We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 34 studies imputed to the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel and including ∼120 000 participants of European ancestry (95 806 participants with data on the X-chromosome). Approximately 10.7 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 1.2 million indels were examined. We identified 41 genome-wide significant fibrinogen loci; of which, 18 were newly identified. There were no genome-wide significant signals on the X-chromosome. The lead variants of five significant loci were indels. We further identified six additional independent signals, including three rare variants, at two previously characterized loci: FGB and IRF1. Together the 41 loci explain 3% of the variance in plasma fibrinogen concentration. PMID:26561523