Science.gov

Sample records for bounded expected delay

  1. Bounds for the cumulative conditional expectation function

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández, M.; González-López, V. A.

    2015-03-10

    We introduce the concept of cumulative conditional expectation function. This is a quantity that provides statistical support for making decisions in applied problems. The goal of this paper is to find an analytical expression for upper and lower bounds of this function, assuming stochastic dependence types as being the underlying random structure.

  2. The Online Expectations of College-Bound Juniors and Seniors. E-Expectations Report, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noel-Levitz, Inc, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Noel-Levitz, OmniUpdate, CollegeWeekLive, and NRCCUA[R] (National Research Center for College & University Admissions) conducted a survey of 2,000 college-bound juniors and seniors about their expectations for college Web sites, mobile usage, e-mail, and social media. Among the findings: (1) More than 50 percent of students said the Web played a…

  3. Bounded rational expectations and the stability of interest rate policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Orlando; Mendes, Diana A.; Mendes, Vivaldo M.

    2008-06-01

    The New Keynesian model has recently been subject to two serious criticisms: the model cannot produce plausible inflation and output dynamics following a monetary shock, and the stability of its dynamics suffers from indeterminacy. The procedures that have been proposed to eliminate these two shortcomings fall into two categories: the introduction of some sort of backward price indexation into the standard model and/or other forms of stickiness (like sticky information); and the adoption of some form of policy rule that completely offsets the effects of forward looking dynamics in the optimization process. In this paper we do not eradicate forward looking behavior from the dynamics of the New Keynesian model, neither do we impose some form of backward price indexation. We assume that private economic agents have forward looking behavior and that they do try to optimize with all available information; the only novelty is that they are allowed to make small mistakes near the rational expectations equilibrium, in a fully deterministic setup. These “near rational” or “bounded rational” expectations show that the dynamics of the model with active interest rate rules is much richer than the simple problem of local indeterminacy as is usually found in the literature.

  4. Focusing Your E-Recruitment Efforts to Meet the Expectations of College-Bound Students. E-Expectations 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noel-Levitz, Inc, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Early in 2010, the E-Expectations research group surveyed more than 1,000 college-bound high school students, polling them on their online behaviors and expectations, as well as other key enrollment-related topics. Highlights of the study include: (1) 1 in 4 students reported removing a school from their prospective list because of a bad…

  5. Bounded Linear Stability Analysis - A Time Delay Margin Estimation Approach for Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ishihara, Abraham K.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje Srinlvas; Bakhtiari-Nejad, Maryam

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating time delay margin for model-reference adaptive control of systems with almost linear structured uncertainty. The bounded linear stability analysis method seeks to represent the conventional model-reference adaptive law by a locally bounded linear approximation within a small time window using the comparison lemma. The locally bounded linear approximation of the combined adaptive system is cast in a form of an input-time-delay differential equation over a small time window. The time delay margin of this system represents a local stability measure and is computed analytically by a matrix measure method, which provides a simple analytical technique for estimating an upper bound of time delay margin. Based on simulation results for a scalar model-reference adaptive control system, both the bounded linear stability method and the matrix measure method are seen to provide a reasonably accurate and yet not too conservative time delay margin estimation.

  6. Improved delay-range-dependent stability analysis of a time-delay system with norm bounded uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Dey, Rajeeb; Ghosh, Sandip; Ray, Goshaidas; Rakshit, Anjan; Balas, Valentina Emilia

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents improved robust delay-range-dependent stability analysis of an uncertain linear time-delay system following two different existing approaches - (i) non-delay partitioning (NDP) and (ii) delay partitioning (DP). The derived criterion (for both the approaches) proposes judicious use of integral inequality to approximate the uncertain limits of integration arising out of the time-derivative of Lyapunov-Krasovskii (LK) functionals to obtain less conservative results. Further, the present work compares both the approaches in terms of relative merits as well as highlights tradeoff for achieving higher delay bound and (or) reducing number of decision variables without losing conservatism in delay bound results. The analysis and discussion presented in the paper are validated by considering relevant numerical examples. PMID:26190503

  7. Learning monopolies with delayed feedback on price expectations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Akio; Szidarovszky, Ferenc

    2015-11-01

    We call the intercept of the price function with the vertical axis the maximum price and the slope of the price function the marginal price. In this paper it is assumed that a monopolistic firm has full information about the marginal price and its own cost function but is uncertain on the maximum price. However, by repeated interaction with the market, the obtained price observations give a basis for an adaptive learning process of the maximum price. It is also assumed that the price observations have fixed delays, so the learning process can be described by a delayed differential equation. In the cases of one or two delays, the asymptotic behavior of the resulting dynamic process is examined, stability conditions are derived. Three main results are demonstrated in the two delay learning processes. First, it is possible to stabilize the equilibrium which is unstable in the one delay model. Second, complex dynamics involving chaos, which is impossible in the one delay model, can emerge. Third, alternations of stability and instability (i.e., stability switches) occur repeatedly.

  8. A new hierarchy of upper and lower bounds on expectation values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, U.; Stolze, J.

    1981-03-01

    Upper and lower bounds are constructe for expectation values of functions of a real random variable with derivatives up to order N+1 which are alternately negative and positive over the whole range of interest. The bounds are given by quadrature formulas with weights and abscissas determined by the first N+1 moments of the underlying probability distribution. Application to a simple disordered phonon system yields sharp bounds on the specific heat.

  9. Stochastic resonance in a tumor-immune system subject to bounded noises and time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most recent approaches in cancer therapy. A mathematical model of tumor-immune interaction, subject to a periodic immunotherapy treatment (imitated by a periodic signal), correlative and bounded stochastic fluctuations and time delays, is investigated by numerical simulations for its signal power amplification (SPA). Within the tailored parameter regime, the synchronous response of tumor growth to the immunotherapy, stochastic resonance (SR), versus both the noises and delays is obtained. The details are as follows (i) the peak values of SPA versus the noise intensity (A) in the proliferation term of tumor cells decrease as the frequency of periodic signal increases, i.e. an increase of the frequency restrains the SR; (ii) an increase of the amplitude of periodic signal restrains the SR versus A, but boosts up the SR versus the noise intensity B in the immune term; (iii) there is an optimum cross-correlated degree between the two bounded noises, at which the system exhibits the strongest SR versus the delay time τα(the reaction time of tumor cell population to their surrounding environment constraints); (iv) upon increasing the delay time τα, double SR versus the delay time τβ (the time taken by both the tumor antigen identification and tumor-stimulated proliferation of effectors) emerges. These results may be helpful for an immunotherapy treatment for the sufferer.

  10. Delayed birth of distillable entanglement in the evolution of bound entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Derkacz, Lukasz; Jakobczyk, Lech

    2010-08-15

    The dynamical creation of entanglement between three-level atoms coupled to the common vacuum is investigated. For the class of bound entangled initial states, we show that the dynamics of closely separated atoms generates stationary distillable entanglement of asymptotic states. We also find that the effect of delayed sudden birth of distillable entanglement occurs in the case of atoms separated by a distance comparable with the radiation wavelength.

  11. Transitions induced by cross-correlated bounded noises and time delay in a genotype selection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pei; Ning, Li Juan

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical investigation of occurrence of transitions in a genotype selection model with time delay, where two bounded noises are cross-correlated. Stationary probability distribution (SPD) function is obtained. It is found that: the multiplicative bounded noise can facilitate the gene separation and it plays a constructive role in the genetic selection progress, while the additive bounded noise suppresses the gene separation. The strong correlation between noises gives a big chance to one type haploid out of the group. Besides, what is more interesting is that the correlation time τ can induce a new transitions (i.e., the curve of the SPD changes from unimodal to bimodal, and then to four peaks as the correlation time τ increases).

  12. Adaptive fuzzy predictive sliding control of uncertain nonlinear systems with bound-known input delay.

    PubMed

    Khazaee, Mostafa; Markazi, Amir H D; Omidi, Ehsan

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a new Adaptive Fuzzy Predictive Sliding Mode Control (AFP-SMC) is presented for nonlinear systems with uncertain dynamics and unknown input delay. The control unit consists of a fuzzy inference system to approximate the ideal linearization control, together with a switching strategy to compensate for the estimation errors. Also, an adaptive fuzzy predictor is used to estimate the future values of the system states to compensate for the time delay. The adaptation laws are used to tune the controller and predictor parameters, which guarantee the stability based on a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional. To evaluate the method effectiveness, the simulation and experiment on an overhead crane system are presented. According to the obtained results, AFP-SMC can effectively control the uncertain nonlinear systems, subject to input delays of known bound. PMID:26524958

  13. Stability and Hopf bifurcation for a business cycle model with expectation and delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangdong; Cai, Wenli; Lu, Jiajun; Wang, Yangyang

    2015-08-01

    According to rational expectation hypothesis, the government will take into account the future capital stock in the process of investment decision. By introducing anticipated capital stock into an economic model with investment delay, we construct a mixed functional differential system including delay and advanced variables. The system is converted to the one containing only delay by variable substitution. The equilibrium point of the system is obtained and its dynamical characteristics such as stability, Hopf bifurcation and its stability and direction are investigated by using the related theories of nonlinear dynamics. We carry out some numerical simulations to confirm these theoretical conclusions. The results indicate that both capital stock's anticipation and investment lag are the certain factors leading to the occurrence of cyclical fluctuations in the macroeconomic system. Moreover, the level of economic fluctuation can be dampened to some extent if investment decisions are made by the reasonable short-term forecast on capital stock.

  14. Scrolling toward Enrollment: Web Site Content and the E-Expectations of College-Bound Seniors. E-Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noel-Levitz, Inc, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Communicating with prospective students has undergone a profound transformation in the past ten years. Campus marketing--like marketing for any organization--had to adapt first to the Internet and e-mail and now to new social media formats like social networking and blogging. A recent survey of 1,000 college-bound seniors, however, shows that…

  15. Harder than Expected: Increased Conflict in Clearly Disadvantageous Delayed Choices in a Computer Game

    PubMed Central

    Leiberg, Susanne; Goschke, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    When choosing between immediate and temporally delayed goods, people sometimes decide disadvantageously. Here, we aim to provide process-level insight into differences between individually determined advantageous and disadvantageous choices. Participants played a computer game, deciding between two different rewards of varying size and distance by moving an agent towards the chosen reward. We calculated individual models of advantageous choices and characterized the decision process by analyzing mouse movements. The larger amount of participants’ choices was classified as advantageous and the disadvantageous choices were biased towards choosing sooner/smaller rewards. The deflection of mouse movements indicated more conflict in disadvantageous choices compared with advantageous choices when the utilities of the options differed clearly. Further process oriented analysis revealed that disadvantageous choices were biased by a tendency for choice-repetition and an undervaluation of the value information in favour of the delay information, making rather simple choices harder than could be expected from the properties of the decision situation. PMID:24260192

  16. The Mobile Browsing Behaviors and Expectations of College-Bound High School Students. An E-Expectations Trend Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noel-Levitz, Inc, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The last decade marked a dramatic change in the college search experience as students flocked to the Internet as their primary tool for researching colleges. Institutions had to transform their recruitment efforts to keep up with the online demands and expectations of prospective students. The proliferation of smartphones is transforming the…

  17. BCDP: Budget constrained and delay-bounded placement for hybrid roadside units in vehicular ad hoc networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Huang, Chuanhe; Liu, Qin

    2014-01-01

    In vehicular ad hoc networks, roadside units (RSUs) placement has been proposed to improve the the overall network performance in many ITS applications. This paper addresses the budget constrained and delay-bounded placement problem (BCDP) for roadside units in vehicular ad hoc networks. There are two types of RSUs: cable connected RSU (c-RSU) and wireless RSU (w-RSU). c-RSUs are interconnected through wired lines, and they form the backbone of VANETs, while w-RSUs connect to other RSUs through wireless communication and serve as an economical extension of the coverage of c-RSUs. The delay-bounded coverage range and deployment cost of these two cases are totally different. We are given a budget constraint and a delay bound, the problem is how to find the optimal candidate sites with the maximal delay-bounded coverage to place RSUs such that a message from any c-RSU in the region can be disseminated to the more vehicles within the given budget constraint and delay bound. We first prove that the BCDP problem is NP-hard. Then we propose several algorithms to solve the BCDP problem. Simulation results show the heuristic algorithms can significantly improve the coverage range and reduce the total deployment cost, compared with other heuristic methods. PMID:25436656

  18. BCDP: Budget Constrained and Delay-Bounded Placement for Hybrid Roadside Units in Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Huang, Chuanhe; Liu, Qin

    2014-01-01

    In vehicular ad hoc networks, roadside units (RSUs) placement has been proposed to improve the the overall network performance in many ITS applications. This paper addresses the budget constrained and delay-bounded placement problem (BCDP) for roadside units in vehicular ad hoc networks. There are two types of RSUs: cable connected RSU (c-RSU) and wireless RSU (w-RSU). c-RSUs are interconnected through wired lines, and they form the backbone of VANETs, while w-RSUs connect to other RSUs through wireless communication and serve as an economical extension of the coverage of c-RSUs. The delay-bounded coverage range and deployment cost of these two cases are totally different. We are given a budget constraint and a delay bound, the problem is how to find the optimal candidate sites with the maximal delay-bounded coverage to place RSUs such that a message from any c-RSU in the region can be disseminated to the more vehicles within the given budget constraint and delay bound. We first prove that the BCDP problem is NP-hard. Then we propose several algorithms to solve the BCDP problem. Simulation results show the heuristic algorithms can significantly improve the coverage range and reduce the total deployment cost, compared with other heuristic methods. PMID:25436656

  19. Cosmological bounds to the variation of the Higgs vacuum expectation value: BBN constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civitarese, O.; Moliné, M. A.; Mosquera, M. E.

    2010-11-01

    We calculate the dependence of the deuterium binding energy upon the Higgs vacuum expectation value (v), by using different effective nucleon-nucleon potentials, and set constraints on the time variation of the Higgs vacuum expectation value from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. The analysis is based on the calculation of the abundances of primordial D, 4He and 7Li. Results are consistent with variations of v/Λ in the early universe, within 6σ if all available data on primordial abundances are considered in the analysis.

  20. Sliding Mode Control for Delayed T-S Fuzzy Neural Network with Norm-Bounded Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Mo, Wei

    In this paper, we consider the sliding mode control of delayed T-S fuzzy neural network with normbounded uncertainties. Based on the Lyapunov-Krasovskii stability theory, we originally research the sliding mode control method for T-S fuzzy neural network with time delay on the basis of the linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). A numerical example is given to validate the effectiveness of our method.

  1. Factors Associated with Delayed Childbearing: From the Voices of Expectant Latina Adults and Teens in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, M. Antonia; Ralph, Lauren; Minnis, Alexandra M.; Arons, Abigail; Marchi, Kristen S.; Lehrer, Jocelyn A.; Braveman, Paula A.; Brindis, Claire D.

    2010-01-01

    There has been limited research on the protective factors that help Latinas delay childbearing until adulthood. In-depth interviews were conducted with 65 pregnant Latina teenage and adult women in California who were about to have their first child. Lack of or inconsistent birth control use as teens was attributed to wanting or ambivalence toward

  2. Factors Associated with Delayed Childbearing: From the Voices of Expectant Latina Adults and Teens in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, M. Antonia; Ralph, Lauren; Minnis, Alexandra M.; Arons, Abigail; Marchi, Kristen S.; Lehrer, Jocelyn A.; Braveman, Paula A.; Brindis, Claire D.

    2010-01-01

    There has been limited research on the protective factors that help Latinas delay childbearing until adulthood. In-depth interviews were conducted with 65 pregnant Latina teenage and adult women in California who were about to have their first child. Lack of or inconsistent birth control use as teens was attributed to wanting or ambivalence toward…

  3. Seasonal life history trade-offs in two leafwing butterflies: Delaying reproductive development increases life expectancy.

    PubMed

    McElderry, Robert M

    2016-04-01

    Surviving inhospitable periods or seasons may greatly affect fitness. Evidence of this exists in the prevalence of dormant stages in the life cycles of most insects. Here I focused on butterflies with distinct seasonal morphological types (not a genetic polymorphism) in which one morphological type, or form, delays reproduction until favorable conditions return, while the other form develops in an environment that favors direct reproduction. For two butterflies, Anaea aidea and A. andria, I tested the hypothesis that the development of each seasonal form involves a differential allocation of resources to survival at eclosion. I assayed differences in adult longevity among summer and winter forms in either a warm, active environment or a cool, calm environment. Winter form adults lived 40 times longer than summer form but only in calm, cool conditions. The magnitude of this difference provided compelling evidence that the winter form body plan and metabolic strategy (i.e. resource conservatism) favor long term survival. This research suggests that winter form adults maintain lowered metabolic rate, a common feature of diapause, to conserve resources and delay senescence while overwintering. PMID:26868721

  4. Reperfusion options in ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients with expected delays.

    PubMed

    Larson, David M; Henry, Timothy D

    2008-09-01

    Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) is the optimal reperfusion strategy for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients when performed in a timely manner by experienced providers. Unfortunately, only 25% of US hospitals have percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) capability. Transfer for PPCI has also been shown to improve outcomes if transfer times are short and PCI can be performed within 90 minutes. However, many STEMI patients cannot be transferred in a timely fashion because of long distances, adverse weather, or process-of-care delays. Recent data support strategies that combine fibrinolysis with transfer for PCI under these circumstances. The critical issue that is still debated is the timing of PCI (immediate vs delayed vs rescue). The significance of time to reperfusion to mortality is important but less critical for PCI than for fibrinolysis, but time still matters. To optimize time to reperfusion for STEMI patients, all hospitals need to have predetermined protocols in place based on hospital characteristics and proximity to a catheterization laboratory. PMID:18715539

  5. Hemodynamic segmentation of brain perfusion images with delay and dispersion effects using an expectation-maximization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chia-Feng; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chang, Feng-Chi; Huang, Shang-Ran; Chou, Yen-Chun; Wu, Yu-Te

    2013-01-01

    Automatic identification of various perfusion compartments from dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance brain images can assist in clinical diagnosis and treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. The principle of segmentation methods was based on the clustering of bolus transit-time profiles to discern areas of different tissues. However, the cerebrovascular diseases may result in a delayed and dispersed local perfusion and therefore alter the hemodynamic signal profiles. Assessing the accuracy of the segmentation technique under delayed/dispersed circumstance is critical to accurately evaluate the severity of the vascular disease. In this study, we improved the segmentation method of expectation-maximization algorithm by using the results of hierarchical clustering on whitened perfusion data as initial parameters for a mixture of multivariate Gaussians model. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to evaluate the performance of proposed method under different levels of delay, dispersion, and noise of signal profiles in tissue segmentation. The proposed method was used to classify brain tissue types using perfusion data from five normal participants, a patient with unilateral stenosis of the internal carotid artery, and a patient with moyamoya disease. Our results showed that the normal, delayed or dispersed hemodynamics can be well differentiated for patients, and therefore the local arterial input function for impaired tissues can be recognized to minimize the error when estimating the cerebral blood flow. Furthermore, the tissue in the risk of infarct and the tissue with or without the complementary blood supply from the communicating arteries can be identified. PMID:23894386

  6. TB Treatment Delays in Odisha, India: Is It Expected Even after These Many Years of RNTCP Implementation?

    PubMed Central

    Ilangovan, Kumaravel; Nagaraja, Sharath Burugina; Ananthakrishnan, Ramya; Jacob, Anil G.; Tripathy, Jaya Prasad; Tamang, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Background In India, the Revised National TB Control Programme (RNTCP) envisages initiation of TB treatment within seven days of diagnosis among smear-positive patients. After nearly two decades of RNTCP implementation, treatment delays are usually not expected. Objectives To determine the proportion of sputum smear-positive TB patients who were initiated on treatment after seven days and their associated risk factors. Methods The study was conducted in Cuttack and Rayagada districts of Odisha. It was a retrospective cohort study that involves review of TB treatment registers and laboratory registers for 2013. Results Among 1,800 pulmonary TB (PTB) patients, 1,074 (60%) had been initiated on treatment within seven days of diagnosis, 721 (40%) had been initiated on treatment more than seven days, and 354 (20%) had delays of more than 15 days. The mean duration between TB diagnosis and treatment initiation was 21 days with a range of 8–207 days (median = 14 days). Odds of treatment delay of more than seven days were 4.9 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.3-6.6) among those who had been previously treated, 6.2 times (95% CI 1.3-29.7) among those infected with HIV, and 1.8 times (95% CI 1.1-2.9) among those diagnosed outside district DMC. Conclusion Delay in initiation of TB treatment occurred in majority of the smear-positive patients. The RNTCP should focus on core areas of providing quality TB services with time-tested strategies. To have real-time monitoring mechanisms for diagnosed smear-positive TB patients is expected to be the way forward. PMID:25928294

  7. Necessary conditions for a maximum likelihood estimate to become asymptotically unbiased and attain the Cramer-Rao lower bound. Part I. General approach with an application to time-delay and Doppler shift estimation.

    PubMed

    Naftali, E; Makris, N C

    2001-10-01

    Analytic expressions for the first order bias and second order covariance of a general maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) are presented. These expressions are used to determine general analytic conditions on sample size, or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), that are necessary for a MLE to become asymptotically unbiased and attain minimum variance as expressed by the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB). The expressions are then evaluated for multivariate Gaussian data. The results can be used to determine asymptotic biases. variances, and conditions for estimator optimality in a wide range of inverse problems encountered in ocean acoustics and many other disciplines. The results are then applied to rigorously determine conditions on SNR necessary for the MLE to become unbiased and attain minimum variance in the classical active sonar and radar time-delay and Doppler-shift estimation problems. The time-delay MLE is the time lag at the peak value of a matched filter output. It is shown that the matched filter estimate attains the CRLB for the signal's position when the SNR is much larger than the kurtosis of the expected signal's energy spectrum. The Doppler-shift MLE exhibits dual behavior for narrow band analytic signals. In a companion paper, the general theory presented here is applied to the problem of estimating the range and depth of an acoustic source submerged in an ocean waveguide. PMID:11681372

  8. What to Expect from the Virtual Seismologist: Delay Times and Uncertainties of Initial Earthquake Alerts in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Y.; Cua, G. B.; Clinton, J. F.; Racine, R.; Meier, M.; Cauzzi, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Virtual Seismologist (VS) method is a Bayesian approach to regional network-based earthquake early warning (EEW) originally formulated by Cua and Heaton (2007). Implementation of VS into real-time EEW codes has been an on-going effort of the Swiss Seismological Service at ETH Zürich since 2006, with support from ETH Zürich, various European projects, and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). VS is one of three EEW algorithms that form the basis of the California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN) ShakeAlert system, a USGS-funded prototype end-to-end EEW system that could potentially be implemented in California. In Europe, VS is currently operating as a real-time test system in Switzerland, western Greece and Istanbul. As part of the on-going EU project REAKT (Strategies and Tools for Real-Time Earthquake Risk Reduction), VS installations in southern Italy, Romania, and Iceland are planned or underway. The possible use cases for an EEW system will be determined by the speed and reliability of earthquake source parameter estimates. A thorough understanding of both is therefore essential to evaluate the usefulness of VS. For California, we present state-wide theoretical alert times for hypothetical earthquakes by analyzing time delays introduced by the different components in the VS EEW system. Taking advantage of the fully probabilistic formulation of the VS algorithm we further present an improved way to describe the uncertainties of every magnitude estimate by evaluating the width and shape of the probability density function that describes the relationship between waveform envelope amplitudes and magnitude. We evaluate these new uncertainty values for past seismicity in California through off-line playbacks and compare them to the previously defined static definitions of uncertainty based on real-time detections. Our results indicate where VS alerts are most useful in California and also suggest where most effective improvements to the VS EEW system can be made.

  9. Salivary Alpha Amylase and Cortisol Levels in Children with Global Developmental Delay and Their Relation with the Expectation of Dental Care and Behavior during the Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    dos Santos, Marcio Jose Possari; Bernabe, Daniel Galera; Nakamune, Ana Claudia de Melo Stevanato; Perri, Silvia Helena Venturoli; de Aguiar, Sandra Maria Herondina Coelho Avila; de Oliveira, Sandra Helena Penha

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the alpha-amylase (sAA) and cortisol levels in children with Global developmental delay (GDD) before and after dental treatment and its association with the children's behavior during treatment. The morning salivary cortisol levels and activity of sAA of 33 children with GDD were evaluated before and after…

  10. Salivary Alpha Amylase and Cortisol Levels in Children with Global Developmental Delay and Their Relation with the Expectation of Dental Care and Behavior during the Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    dos Santos, Marcio Jose Possari; Bernabe, Daniel Galera; Nakamune, Ana Claudia de Melo Stevanato; Perri, Silvia Helena Venturoli; de Aguiar, Sandra Maria Herondina Coelho Avila; de Oliveira, Sandra Helena Penha

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the alpha-amylase (sAA) and cortisol levels in children with Global developmental delay (GDD) before and after dental treatment and its association with the children's behavior during treatment. The morning salivary cortisol levels and activity of sAA of 33 children with GDD were evaluated before and after

  11. Picosecond dynamics of free and bound excitons in doped diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barjon, J.; Valvin, P.; Brimont, C.; Lefebvre, P.; Brinza, O.; Tallaire, A.; Achard, J.; Jomard, F.; Pinault-Thaury, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of the free-exciton capture by boron acceptors and phosphorus donors in diamond is observed in the picosecond range by time-resolved photoluminescence experiments at low temperature. The formation of boron-bound excitons is observed with a delay of 410 ps after the formation of free excitons. For phosphorus, this delay is 120 ps. This is the result of the free-exciton capture by B0 and P0 impurities. The lifetimes of boron- and phosphorus-bound excitons are measured and found to be equal to 270 and 70 ps, respectively. These values are about four orders of magnitude shorter than for the same impurities in silicon. Ei being the ionization energy of dopants, these results scale well with the Ei4 dependence of the Auger recombination rate expected for bound excitons in indirect band-gap semiconductors.

  12. Sliding of a 43S ribosomal complex from the recognized AUG codon triggered by a delay in eIF2-bound GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Terenin, Ilya M; Akulich, Kseniya A; Andreev, Dmitry E; Polyanskaya, Sofya A; Shatsky, Ivan N; Dmitriev, Sergey E

    2016-02-29

    During eukaryotic translation initiation, 43S ribosomal complex scans mRNA leader unless an AUG codon in an appropriate context is found. Establishing the stable codon-anticodon base-pairing traps the ribosome on the initiator codon and triggers structural rearrangements, which lead to Pi release from the eIF2-bound GTP. It is generally accepted that AUG recognition by the scanning 43S complex sets the final point in the process of start codon selection, while latter stages do not contribute to this process. Here we use translation reconstitution approach and kinetic toe-printing assay to show that after the 48S complex is formed on an AUG codon, in case GTP hydrolysis is impaired, the ribosomal subunit is capable to resume scanning and slides downstream to the next AUG. In contrast to leaky scanning, this sliding is not limited to AUGs in poor nucleotide contexts and occurs after a relatively long pause at the recognized AUG. Thus, recognition of an AUG per se does not inevitably lead to this codon being selected for initiation of protein synthesis. Instead, it is eIF5-induced GTP hydrolysis and Pi release that irreversibly trap the 48S complex, and this complex is further stabilized by eIF5B and 60S joining. PMID:26717981

  13. Sliding of a 43S ribosomal complex from the recognized AUG codon triggered by a delay in eIF2-bound GTP hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Terenin, Ilya M.; Akulich, Kseniya A.; Andreev, Dmitry E.; Polyanskaya, Sofya A.; Shatsky, Ivan N.; Dmitriev, Sergey E.

    2016-01-01

    During eukaryotic translation initiation, 43S ribosomal complex scans mRNA leader unless an AUG codon in an appropriate context is found. Establishing the stable codon–anticodon base-pairing traps the ribosome on the initiator codon and triggers structural rearrangements, which lead to Pi release from the eIF2-bound GTP. It is generally accepted that AUG recognition by the scanning 43S complex sets the final point in the process of start codon selection, while latter stages do not contribute to this process. Here we use translation reconstitution approach and kinetic toe-printing assay to show that after the 48S complex is formed on an AUG codon, in case GTP hydrolysis is impaired, the ribosomal subunit is capable to resume scanning and slides downstream to the next AUG. In contrast to leaky scanning, this sliding is not limited to AUGs in poor nucleotide contexts and occurs after a relatively long pause at the recognized AUG. Thus, recognition of an AUG per se does not inevitably lead to this codon being selected for initiation of protein synthesis. Instead, it is eIF5-induced GTP hydrolysis and Pi release that irreversibly trap the 48S complex, and this complex is further stabilized by eIF5B and 60S joining. PMID:26717981

  14. Further improved stability criteria for uncertain T-S fuzzy systems with time-varying delay by (m,N)-delay-partitioning approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Luo, Wen-Pin; Wang, Yong-Hu; Cheng, Jun

    2015-11-01

    This paper mainly focuses on the robust stability criteria for uncertain T-S fuzzy systems with time-varying delay by (m,N)-delay-partitioning approach. A modified augmented LKF is established by partitioning the delay in all integral terms. Via taking into account of (i) the relationship between each subinterval and time-varying delay and (ii) the independent upper bounds of the delay derivative in the various delay intervals, some new results on tighter bounding inequalities such as Peng-Park׳s integral inequality and Free-Matrix-based integral inequality are introduced to effectively reduce the enlargement in bounding the derivative of LKF as much as possible, therefore, significant less conservative results can be expected in terms of es and LMIs, which can be solved efficiently with the Matlab LMI toolbox. Furthermore, it is worth mentioning that, when the delay-partitioning number m is fixed, the conservatism is gradually reduced with the increase of another delay-partitioning number N, but without increasing any computing burden. Finally, two numerical examples are included to show that the proposed method is less conservative than existing ones. PMID:26365365

  15. On Stability of Linear Time-Delay Systems with Multiple Time-Varying Delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gwang-Seok; Choi, Ho-Lim

    In this letter, delay-dependent stability criterion for linear time-delay systems with multiple time varying delays is proposed by employing the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional approach and integral inequality. By the N-segmentation of delay length, we obtain less conservative results on the delay bounds which guarantee the asymptotic stability of the linear time-delay systems with multiple time varying delays. Simulation results show that the proposed stability criteria are less conservative than several other existing criteria.

  16. -delayed proton emission branches in 43Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Pomorski, M.; Miernik, K.; Dominik, W.; Janas, Z.; Pfutzner, M.; Bingham, C. R.; Czyrkowski, H.; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Darby, Iain; Dabrowski, Ryszard; Ginter, T. N.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Kusmierz, W.; Liddick, Sean; Rajabali, M. M.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Stolz, A.

    2011-01-01

    The + decay of very neutron-deficient 43Cr was studied by means of an imaging time projection chamber that allowed recording tracks of charged particles. Events of -delayed emission of one, two, and three protons were clearly identified. The absolute branching ratios for these channels were determined to be (81 4)%, (7.1 0.4)%, and (0.08 0.03)%, respectively. 43Cr is thus established as the second case in which the -3p decay occurs. Although the feeding to the proton-bound states in 43V is expected to be negligible, the large branching ratio of (12 4)% for decays without proton emission is found.

  17. Exceeding Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, John

    2011-01-01

    Awareness of expectations is so important in the facilities business. The author's experiences has taught him that it is essential to understand how expectations impact people's lives as well as those for whom they provide services for every day. This article presents examples and ideas that will provide insight and ideas to help educators…

  18. Great Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1993-01-01

    Inside one Washington, DC, elementary school, Principal John Pannell has high hopes for his students and an expansive school vision. Malcolm X School compensates for disorder outside by clearly inculcating rules and behavior expectations. Children in school uniforms daily repeat a motto promoting Malcolm X as a school of love allowing no hitting,…

  19. Further improved stability criteria for uncertain T-S fuzzy systems with interval time-varying delay by delay-partitioning approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Luo, Wenpin; Cheng, Jun; Wang, Yonghu

    2015-09-01

    This paper focuses on further improved stability criteria for uncertain T-S fuzzy systems with interval time-varying delay by a delay-partitioning approach. A modified augmented Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF) is established by partitioning the delay in all integral terms. Then some tighter bounding inequalities, i.e., Peng-Park׳s integral inequality (reciprocally convex approach) and the Free-Matrix-Based integral inequality (which yields less conservative stability criteria than the use of Wirtinger-based inequality does) are introduced to reduce the enlargement in bounding the derivative of LKF as much as possible, therefore, less conservative results can be expected in terms of es and LMIs. Finally, a numerical example is included to show that the proposed methods are less conservative than existing ones. PMID:26073644

  20. Delayed ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    Ejaculatory incompetence; Sex - delayed ejaculation; Retarded ejaculation; Anejaculation ... include: Religious background that makes the person view sex as sinful Lack of attraction for a partner ...

  1. Delay-range-dependent chaos synchronization approach under varying time-lags and delayed nonlinear coupling.

    PubMed

    Zaheer, Muhammad Hamad; Rehan, Muhammad; Mustafa, Ghulam; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2014-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel state feedback delay-range-dependent control approach for chaos synchronization in coupled nonlinear time-delay systems. The coupling between two systems is esteemed to be nonlinear subject to time-lags. Time-varying nature of both the intrinsic and the coupling delays is incorporated to broad scope of the present study for a better-quality synchronization controller synthesis. Lyapunov-Krasovskii (LK) functional is employed to derive delay-range-dependent conditions that can be solved by means of the conventional linear matrix inequality (LMI)-tools. The resultant control approach for chaos synchronization of the master-slave time-delay systems considers non-zero lower bound of the intrinsic as well as the coupling time-delays. Further, the delay-dependent synchronization condition has been established as a special case of the proposed LK functional treatment. Furthermore, a delay-range-dependent condition, independent of the delay-rate, has been provided to address the situation when upper bound of the delay-derivative is unknown. A robust state feedback control methodology is formulated for synchronization of the time-delay chaotic networks against the L2 norm bounded perturbations by minimizing the L2 gain from the disturbance to the synchronization error. Numerical simulation results are provided for the time-delay chaotic networks to show effectiveness of the proposed delay-range-dependent chaos synchronization methodologies. PMID:25440951

  2. Modeling delay in genetic networks: From delay birth-death processes to delay stochastic differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Azencott, Robert; Ott, William; Bennett, Matthew R.; Josić, Krešimir

    2014-05-28

    Delay is an important and ubiquitous aspect of many biochemical processes. For example, delay plays a central role in the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks as it stems from the sequential assembly of first mRNA and then protein. Genetic regulatory networks are therefore frequently modeled as stochastic birth-death processes with delay. Here, we examine the relationship between delay birth-death processes and their appropriate approximating delay chemical Langevin equations. We prove a quantitative bound on the error between the pathwise realizations of these two processes. Our results hold for both fixed delay and distributed delay. Simulations demonstrate that the delay chemical Langevin approximation is accurate even at moderate system sizes. It captures dynamical features such as the oscillatory behavior in negative feedback circuits, cross-correlations between nodes in a network, and spatial and temporal information in two commonly studied motifs of metastability in biochemical systems. Overall, these results provide a foundation for using delay stochastic differential equations to approximate the dynamics of birth-death processes with delay.

  3. Modeling delay in genetic networks: From delay birth-death processes to delay stochastic differential equations

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Azencott, Robert; Bennett, Matthew R.; Josić, Krešimir; Ott, William

    2014-01-01

    Delay is an important and ubiquitous aspect of many biochemical processes. For example, delay plays a central role in the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks as it stems from the sequential assembly of first mRNA and then protein. Genetic regulatory networks are therefore frequently modeled as stochastic birth-death processes with delay. Here, we examine the relationship between delay birth-death processes and their appropriate approximating delay chemical Langevin equations. We prove a quantitative bound on the error between the pathwise realizations of these two processes. Our results hold for both fixed delay and distributed delay. Simulations demonstrate that the delay chemical Langevin approximation is accurate even at moderate system sizes. It captures dynamical features such as the oscillatory behavior in negative feedback circuits, cross-correlations between nodes in a network, and spatial and temporal information in two commonly studied motifs of metastability in biochemical systems. Overall, these results provide a foundation for using delay stochastic differential equations to approximate the dynamics of birth-death processes with delay. PMID:24880267

  4. New delay dependent stability criteria for recurrent neural networks with interval time-varying delay.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiongfen; Ren, Quanhong; Xie, Xuemei

    2014-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the delay dependent stability criteria for a class of static recurrent neural networks with interval time-varying delay. By choosing an appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and employing a delay partitioning method, the less conservative condition is obtained. Furthermore, the LMIs-based condition depend on the lower and upper bounds of time delay. Finally, a numerical example is also designated to verify the reduced conservatism of developed criteria. PMID:24908560

  5. Routing on Delay Tolerant Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Michael; Kranakis, Evangelos; Krizanc, Danny; Narayanan, Lata

    Delay (or disruption) tolerant sensor networks may be modeled as Markovian evolving graphs [1]. We present experimental evidence showing that considering multiple (possibly not shortest) paths instead of one fixed (greedy) path can decrease the expected time to deliver a packet on such a network by as much as 65 per cent depending on the probability that an edge exists in a given time interval. We provide theoretical justification for this result by studying a special case of the Markovian evolving grid graph. We analyze a natural algorithm for routing on such networks and show that it is possible to improve the expected time of delivery by up to a factor of two depending upon the probability of an edge being up during a time step and the relative positions of the source and destination. Furthermore we show that this is optimal, i.e., no other algorithm can achieve a better expected running time. As an aside, our results give high probability bounds for Knuth’s toilet paper problem [11].

  6. A novel approach to delay-fractional-dependent stability criterion for linear systems with interval delay.

    PubMed

    An, Jiyao; Li, Zhiyong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2014-03-01

    This paper considers the problem of delay-fractional-dependent stability analysis of linear systems with interval time-varying state delay. By developing a delay variable decomposition approach, both the information of the variable dividing subinterval delay, and the information of the lower and upper bound of delay can be taken into full consideration. Then a new delay-fractional-dependent stability criterion is derived without involving any direct approximation in the time-derivative of the Lyapunov-Krasovskii (LK) functional via some suitable Jensen integral inequalities and convex combination technique. The merits of the proposed result lie in less conservatism, which are realized by choosing different Lyapunov matrices in the variable delay subintervals and estimating the upper bound of some cross term in LK functional more exactly. At last, two well-known numerical examples are employed to show the effectiveness and less conservatism of the proposed method. PMID:24388211

  7. Developmental delay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrition support is essential for the care of the child with developmental delay. After a thorough evaluation, an individualized intervention plan that accounts for the child’s nutrition status, feeding ability, and medical condition may be determined. Nutrition assessments may be performed at leas...

  8. Delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Since puberty is a long ongoing developmental process with significant individual and population differences in timing, the definition of delayed puberty for a given individual needs to rest on simple, though arbitrary criteria based on epidemiological data. Although several genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal maturation cascade have been characterized recently from familial or sporadic cases of primitive isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, many genes regulating puberty onset remain undetermined. In case of delayed puberty and/or primary amenorrhea, a complete clinical examination including a detailed past history will evaluate the development of secondary sex characteristics, verify the association with a growth delay and look for specific indicative features pertaining to the etiological diagnosis. This clinical check-up completed if necessary with biological, ultrasonographic, radiological and genetic investigations will try to determine which girls will have a permanent sexual infantilism of gonadal, hypophyseal or hypothalamic origin, which girls will undergo spontaneous but delayed puberty and which girls have primary amenorrhea with developed secondary sex characteristics. Therapeutic attitude will have to integrate etiological factors, statural prognosis, bone mass preservation and psychological factors. PMID:22846526

  9. Time Discretisation and Rate of Convergence for the Optimal Control of Continuous-Time Stochastic Systems with Delay

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Markus Nappo, Giovanna

    2008-04-15

    We study a semi-discretisation scheme for stochastic optimal control problems whose dynamics are given by controlled stochastic delay (or functional) differential equations with bounded memory. Performance is measured in terms of expected costs. By discretising time in two steps, we construct a sequence of approximating finite-dimensional Markovian optimal control problems in discrete time. The corresponding value functions converge to the value function of the original problem, and we derive an upper bound on the discretisation error or, equivalently, a worst-case estimate for the rate of convergence.

  10. Delay-dependent global exponential robust stability for delayed cellular neural networks with time-varying delay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pin-Lin

    2013-11-01

    This paper investigates a class of delayed cellular neural networks (DCNN) with time-varying delay. Based on the Lyapunov-Krasovski functional and integral inequality approach (IIA), a uniformly asymptotic stability criterion in terms of only one simple linear matrix inequality (LMI) is addressed, which guarantees stability for such time-varying delay systems. This LMI can be easily solved by convex optimization techniques. Unlike previous methods, the upper bound of the delay derivative is taken into consideration, even if larger than or equal to 1. It is proven that results obtained are less conservative than existing ones. Four numerical examples illustrate efficacy of the proposed methods. PMID:23870320

  11. Corrections of stratified tropospheric delays in SAR interferometry: Validation with global atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doin, Marie-Pierre; Lasserre, Cécile; Peltzer, Gilles; Cavalié, Olivier; Doubre, Cécile

    2010-05-01

    The main limiting factor on the accuracy of Interferometric SAR measurements (InSAR) comes from phase propagation delays through the troposphere. The delay can be divided into a stratified component, which correlates with the topography and often dominates the tropospheric signal, and a turbulent component. We use Global Atmospheric Models (GAM) to estimate the stratified phase delay and delay-elevation ratio at epochs of SAR acquisitions, and compare them to observed phase delay derived from SAR interferograms. Three test areas are selected with different geographic and climatic environments and with large SAR archive available. The Lake Mead, Nevada, USA is covered by 79 ERS1/2 and ENVISAT acquisitions, the Haiyuan Fault area, Gansu, China, by 24 ERS1/2 acquisitions, and the Afar region, Republic of Djibouti, by 91 Radarsat acquisitions. The hydrostatic and wet stratified delays are computed from GAM as a function of atmospheric pressure P, temperature T, and water vapor partial pressure e vertical profiles. The hydrostatic delay, which depends on ratio P/T, varies significantly at low elevation and cannot be neglected. The wet component of the delay depends mostly on the near surface specific humidity. GAM predicted delay-elevation ratios are in good agreement with the ratios derived from InSAR data away from deforming zones. Both estimations of the delay-elevation ratio can thus be used to perform a first order correction of the observed interferometric phase to retrieve a ground motion signal of low amplitude. We also demonstrate that aliasing of daily and seasonal variations in the stratified delay due to uneven sampling of SAR data significantly bias InSAR data stacks or time series produced after temporal smoothing. In all three test cases, the InSAR data stacks or smoothed time series present a residual stratified delay of the order of the expected deformation signal. In all cases, correcting interferograms from the stratified delay removes all these biases. We quantify the standard error associated with the correction of the stratified atmospheric delay. It varies from one site to another depending on the prevailing atmospheric conditions, but remains bounded by the standard deviation of the daily fluctuations of the stratified delay around the seasonal average. Finally we suggest that the phase delay correction can potentially be improved by introducing a non-linear dependence to the elevation derived from GAM.

  12. Corrections of stratified tropospheric delays in SAR interferometry: Validation with global atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doin, M.-P.; Lasserre, C.; Peltzer, G.; Cavalié, O.; Doubre, C.

    2009-09-01

    The main limiting factor on the accuracy of Interferometric SAR measurements (InSAR) comes from phase propagation delays through the troposphere. The delay can be divided into a stratified component, which correlates with the topography and often dominates the tropospheric signal, and a turbulent component. We use Global Atmospheric Models (GAM) to estimate the stratified phase delay and delay-elevation ratio at epochs of SAR acquisitions, and compare them to observed phase delay derived from SAR interferograms. Three test areas are selected with different geographic and climatic environments and with large SAR archive available. The Lake Mead, Nevada, USA is covered by 79 ERS1/2 and ENVISAT acquisitions, the Haiyuan Fault area, Gansu, China, by 24 ERS1/2 acquisitions, and the Afar region, Republic of Djibouti, by 91 Radarsat acquisitions. The hydrostatic and wet stratified delays are computed from GAM as a function of atmospheric pressure P, temperature T, and water vapor partial pressure e vertical profiles. The hydrostatic delay, which depends on ratio P/ T, varies significantly at low elevation and cannot be neglected. The wet component of the delay depends mostly on the near surface specific humidity. GAM predicted delay-elevation ratios are in good agreement with the ratios derived from InSAR data away from deforming zones. Both estimations of the delay-elevation ratio can thus be used to perform a first order correction of the observed interferometric phase to retrieve a ground motion signal of low amplitude. We also demonstrate that aliasing of daily and seasonal variations in the stratified delay due to uneven sampling of SAR data significantly bias InSAR data stacks or time series produced after temporal smoothing. In all three test cases, the InSAR data stacks or smoothed time series present a residual stratified delay of the order of the expected deformation signal. In all cases, correcting interferograms from the stratified delay removes all these biases. We quantify the standard error associated with the correction of the stratified atmospheric delay. It varies from one site to another depending on the prevailing atmospheric conditions, but remains bounded by the standard deviation of the daily fluctuations of the stratified delay around the seasonal average. Finally we suggest that the phase delay correction can potentially be improved by introducing a non-linear dependence to the elevation derived from GAM.

  13. Time delay in molecular photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockett, P.; Frumker, E.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.

    2016-05-01

    Time-delays in the photoionization of molecules are investigated. As compared to atomic ionization, the time-delays expected from molecular ionization present a much richer phenomenon, with a strong spatial dependence due to the anisotropic nature of the molecular scattering potential. We investigate this from a scattering theory perspective, and make use of molecular photoionization calculations to examine this effect in representative homonuclear and hetronuclear diatomic molecules, nitrogen and carbon monoxide. We present energy and angle-resolved maps of the Wigner delay time for single-photon valence ionization, and discuss the possibilities for experimental measurements.

  14. Bound states and the Bekenstein bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael

    2004-02-01

    We explore the validity of the generalized Bekenstein bound, S leq piMa. We define the entropy S as the logarithm of the number of states which have energy eigenvalue below M and are localized to a flat space region of width a. If boundary conditions that localize field modes are imposed by fiat, then the bound encounters well-known difficulties with negative Casimir energy and large species number, as well as novel problems arising only in the generalized form. In realistic systems, however, finite-size effects contribute additional energy. We study two different models for estimating such contributions. Our analysis suggests that the bound is both valid and nontrivial if interactions are properly included, so that the entropy S counts the bound states of interacting fields.

  15. Bound states and the Bekenstein bound

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael

    2003-10-16

    We explore the validity of the generalized Bekenstein bound, S<= pi M a. We define the entropy S as the logarithm of the number of states which have energy eigenvalue below M and are localized to a flat space region of width alpha. If boundary conditions that localize field modes are imposed by fiat, then the bound encounters well-known difficulties with negative Casimir energy and large species number, as well as novel problems arising only in the generalized form. In realistic systems, however, finite-size effects contribute additional energy. We study two different models for estimating such contributions. Our analysis suggests that the bound is both valid and nontrivial if interactions are properly included, so that the entropy S counts the bound states of interacting fields.

  16. Planning for the Future: An Investigation of Work-Bound Rural Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Bryan C.; Meece, Judith L.; Byun, Soo-yong; Farmer, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the postsecondary educational and occupational expectations of work-bound rural youth. Three groups of work-bound youth were identified (work-bound, work-bound with future educational plans, and work-bound but unsure/undecided about postsecondary education), and each group was compared to college-bound…

  17. Improved delay-range-dependent robust stability for uncertain systems with interval time-varying delay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pin-Lin

    2014-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the improved delay-range-dependent stability and robust stability criteria for linear systems with time-varying delay and norm-bounded uncertainties. In order to obtain much less conservative criteria, a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF), which makes use of the information of both the lower and upper bounds of the interval time-varying delay, is proposed to derive new stability criteria. By using delayed decomposition approach (DDA), a tighter upper bound of the derivative of Lyapunov functional can be obtained, and thus the proposed criteria give results with less conservatism compared with some previous ones. The resulting criteria have advantages over some previous ones in that it involves fewer matrix variables but has less conservatism, which are established theoretically. We show, by four well known examples, that our result overcomes the previous allowable maximum admissible upper bound (MAUB) of the time-delay and it is less conservative than the previous results having a relatively small upper bound in the derivative of time delay. PMID:25294004

  18. Delaying obsolescence.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Rob

    2015-04-01

    This paper argues that those who emphasise that designers and engineers need to plan for obsolescence are too conservative. Rather, in addition to planning for obsolescence, designers and engineers should also think carefully about what they could do in order delay obsolescence. They should so this by thinking about the design itself, thinking of ways in which products could be useful and appealing for longer before becoming obsolete, as well thinking about the wider context in terms of the marketing of products, and also the social and legal. The paper also considers objections that these suggestions are unrealistically idealistic, failing to recognise the economic realities. I respond to these objections appealing to research in advertising, psychology, cognitive linguistics, philosophy, history, and economics, as well as drawing on the Statement of Ethical Principles developed by the Royal Academy of Engineering and the Engineering Council. PMID:24792878

  19. Chernoff's bound forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grendar, Marian; Grendar, Marian

    2003-03-01

    Chernoff's bound binds a tail probability (ie. Pr(X ⩾ a), where a ⩾ EX). Assuming that the distribution of X is Q, the logarithm of the bound is known to be equal to the value of relative entropy (or minus Kullback-Leibler distance) for I-projection P̂ of Q on a set H ≜ {P : EPX = a}. Here, Chernoff's bound is related to Maximum Likelihood on exponential form and consequently implications for the notion of complementarity are discussed. Moreover, a novel form of the bound is proposed, which expresses the value of the Chernoff's bound directly in terms of the I-projection (or generalized I-projection).

  20. A matrix lower bound

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, Joseph F.

    2002-02-04

    A matrix lower bound is defined that generalizes ideas apparently due to S. Banach and J. von Neumann. The matrix lower bound has a natural interpretation in functional analysis, and it satisfies many of the properties that von Neumann stated for it in a restricted case. Applications for the matrix lower bound are demonstrated in several areas. In linear algebra, the matrix lower bound of a full rank matrix equals the distance to the set of rank-deficient matrices. In numerical analysis, the ratio of the matrix norm to the matrix lower bound is a condition number for all consistent systems of linear equations. In optimization theory, the matrix lower bound suggests an identity for a class of min-max problems. In real analysis, a recursive construction that depends on the matrix lower bound shows that the level sets of continuously differential functions lie asymptotically near those of their tangents.

  1. Expectation and conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coster, Adelle C. F.; Alstrm, Preben

    2001-02-01

    We present a dynamical model that embodies both classical and instrumental conditioning paradigms in the same framework. The model is based on the formation of expectations of stimuli and of rewards. The expectations of stimuli are formed in a recurrent process called expectation learning in which one activity pattern evokes another. The expectation of rewards or punishments (motivation) is modelled using reinforcement learning.

  2. Physical Uncertainty Bounds (PUB)

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, Diane Elizabeth; Preston, Dean L.

    2015-03-19

    This paper introduces and motivates the need for a new methodology for determining upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulations of engineered systems due to limited fidelity in the composite continuum-level physics models needed to simulate the systems. We show that traditional uncertainty quantification methods provide, at best, a lower bound on this uncertainty. We propose to obtain bounds on the simulation uncertainties by first determining bounds on the physical quantities or processes relevant to system performance. By bounding these physics processes, as opposed to carrying out statistical analyses of the parameter sets of specific physics models or simply switching out the available physics models, one can obtain upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulated quantities of interest.

  3. Potentials and bound states

    SciTech Connect

    Buell, W.F. ); Shadwick, B.A. )

    1995-03-01

    We discuss several quantum mechanical potential problems, focusing on those which highlight commonly held misconceptions about the existence of bound states. We present a proof, based on the variational principle, that certain one dimensional potentials always support at least one bound state, regardless of the potential's strength. We examine arguments concerning the existence of bound states based on the uncertainty principle and demonstrate, by explicit calculations, that such arguments must be viewed with skepticism.

  4. Finite time stabilization of delayed neural networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leimin; Shen, Yi; Ding, Zhixia

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the problem of finite time stabilization for a class of delayed neural networks (DNNs) is investigated. The general conditions on the feedback control law are provided to ensure the finite time stabilization of DNNs. Then some specific conditions are derived by designing two different controllers which include the delay-dependent and delay-independent ones. In addition, the upper bound of the settling time for stabilization is estimated. Under fixed control strength, discussions of the extremum of settling time functional are made and a switched controller is designed to optimize the settling time. Finally, numerical simulations are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the obtained results. PMID:26264170

  5. HiggsBounds: Confronting arbitrary Higgs sectors with exclusion bounds from LEP and the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtle, P.; Brein, O.; Heinemeyer, S.; Weiglein, G.; Williams, K. E.

    2010-01-01

    HiggsBounds is a computer code that tests theoretical predictions of models with arbitrary Higgs sectors against the exclusion bounds obtained from the Higgs searches at LEP and the Tevatron. The included experimental information comprises exclusion bounds at 95% C.L. on topological cross sections. In order to determine which search topology has the highest exclusion power, the program also includes, for each topology, information from the experiments on the expected exclusion bound, which would have been observed in case of a pure background distribution. Using the predictions of the desired model provided by the user as input, HiggsBounds determines the most sensitive channel and tests whether the considered parameter point is excluded at the 95% C.L. HiggsBounds is available as a Fortran 77 and Fortran 90 code. The code can be invoked as a command line version, a subroutine version and an online version. Examples of exclusion bounds obtained with HiggsBounds are discussed for the Standard Model, for a model with a fourth generation of quarks and leptons and for the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with and without CP-violation. The experimental information on the exclusion bounds currently implemented in HiggsBounds will be updated as new results from the Higgs searches become available.

  6. Switching control and time-delay identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi; Li, Xiang; Qin, Zhi-Chang; Zhong, Shun; Sun, J. Q.

    2014-12-01

    The unknown time delay makes the control design a difficult task. When the lower and upper bounds of an unknown time delay of dynamical systems are specified, one can design a supervisory control that switches among a set of controls designed for the sampled time delays in the given range so that the closed-loop system is stable and the control performance is maintained at a desirable level. In this paper, we propose to design a supervisory control to stabilize the system first. After the supervisory control converges, we start an algorithm to identify the unknown time delay, either on-line or off-line, with the known control being implemented. Examples are shown to demonstrate the stabilization and identification for linear time invariant and periodic systems with a single control time delay.

  7. Bounding species distribution models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Jarnevich, C.S.; Esaias, W.E.; Morisette, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used. ?? 2011 Current Zoology.

  8. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  9. Causality and Tsirelson's bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Buhrman, H.; Massar, S.

    2005-11-15

    We study the properties of no-signaling correlations that cannot be reproduced by local measurements on entangled quantum states. We say that such correlations violate Tsirelson bounds. We show that if these correlations are obtained by some reversible unitary quantum evolution U, then U cannot be written in the product form U{sub A}xU{sub B}. This implies that U can be used for signaling and for entanglement generation. This result is completely general and in fact can be viewed as a characterization of Tsirelson bounds. We then show how this result can be used as a tool to study Tsirelson bounds and we illustrate this by rederiving the Tsirelson bound of 2{radical}(2) for the Clauser-Horn-Shimony-Holt inequality, and by deriving a new Tsirelson bound for qutrits.

  10. The Power of Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Neal

    2008-01-01

    Principals want teachers to do more than profess high expectations for their students. Principals want teachers to have the knowledge and skills to realize their expectations for students by using strategies that increase students' attention to their achievement and responsibilities for learning. Current expectancy literature states that teachers…

  11. Expecting the Best

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPaula, John

    2010-01-01

    Educational expectations are psychological constructs that change over time and can be altered or influenced by various factors. The concept of educational expectations refers to how much schooling students realistically believe that they will complete. These expectations are eventually raised or lowered as students see others like themselves…

  12. Measuring Information-Transfer Delays

    PubMed Central

    Wibral, Michael; Pampu, Nicolae; Priesemann, Viola; Siebenhühner, Felix; Seiwert, Hannes; Lindner, Michael; Lizier, Joseph T.; Vicente, Raul

    2013-01-01

    In complex networks such as gene networks, traffic systems or brain circuits it is important to understand how long it takes for the different parts of the network to effectively influence one another. In the brain, for example, axonal delays between brain areas can amount to several tens of milliseconds, adding an intrinsic component to any timing-based processing of information. Inferring neural interaction delays is thus needed to interpret the information transfer revealed by any analysis of directed interactions across brain structures. However, a robust estimation of interaction delays from neural activity faces several challenges if modeling assumptions on interaction mechanisms are wrong or cannot be made. Here, we propose a robust estimator for neuronal interaction delays rooted in an information-theoretic framework, which allows a model-free exploration of interactions. In particular, we extend transfer entropy to account for delayed source-target interactions, while crucially retaining the conditioning on the embedded target state at the immediately previous time step. We prove that this particular extension is indeed guaranteed to identify interaction delays between two coupled systems and is the only relevant option in keeping with Wiener’s principle of causality. We demonstrate the performance of our approach in detecting interaction delays on finite data by numerical simulations of stochastic and deterministic processes, as well as on local field potential recordings. We also show the ability of the extended transfer entropy to detect the presence of multiple delays, as well as feedback loops. While evaluated on neuroscience data, we expect the estimator to be useful in other fields dealing with network dynamics. PMID:23468850

  13. Measuring information-transfer delays.

    PubMed

    Wibral, Michael; Pampu, Nicolae; Priesemann, Viola; Siebenhühner, Felix; Seiwert, Hannes; Lindner, Michael; Lizier, Joseph T; Vicente, Raul

    2013-01-01

    In complex networks such as gene networks, traffic systems or brain circuits it is important to understand how long it takes for the different parts of the network to effectively influence one another. In the brain, for example, axonal delays between brain areas can amount to several tens of milliseconds, adding an intrinsic component to any timing-based processing of information. Inferring neural interaction delays is thus needed to interpret the information transfer revealed by any analysis of directed interactions across brain structures. However, a robust estimation of interaction delays from neural activity faces several challenges if modeling assumptions on interaction mechanisms are wrong or cannot be made. Here, we propose a robust estimator for neuronal interaction delays rooted in an information-theoretic framework, which allows a model-free exploration of interactions. In particular, we extend transfer entropy to account for delayed source-target interactions, while crucially retaining the conditioning on the embedded target state at the immediately previous time step. We prove that this particular extension is indeed guaranteed to identify interaction delays between two coupled systems and is the only relevant option in keeping with Wiener's principle of causality. We demonstrate the performance of our approach in detecting interaction delays on finite data by numerical simulations of stochastic and deterministic processes, as well as on local field potential recordings. We also show the ability of the extended transfer entropy to detect the presence of multiple delays, as well as feedback loops. While evaluated on neuroscience data, we expect the estimator to be useful in other fields dealing with network dynamics. PMID:23468850

  14. Organically bound tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Diabate, S.; Strack, S. )

    1993-12-01

    Tritium released into the environment may be incorporated into organic matter. Organically bound tritium in that case will show retention times in organisms that are considerably longer than those of tritiated water which has significant consequences on dose estimates. This article reviews the most important processes of organically bound tritium production and transport through food networks. Metabolic reactions in plant and animal organisms with tritiated water as a reaction partner are of great importance in this respect. The most important production process, in quantitative terms, is photosynthesis in green plants. The translocation of organically bound tritium from the leaves to edible parts of crop plants should be considered in models of organically bound tritium behavior. Organically bound tritium enters the human body on several pathways, either from the primary producers (vegetable food) or at a higher tropic level (animal food). Animal experiments have shown that the dose due to ingestion of organically bound tritium can be up to twice as high as a comparable intake of tritiated water in gaseous or liquid form. In the environment, organically bound tritium in plants and animals is often found to have higher specific tritium concentrations than tissue water. This is not due to some tritium enrichment effects but to the fact that no equilibrium conditions are reached under natural conditions. 66 refs.

  15. Colorado Outward Bound School River Rafters' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leachman, Mark

    Instructional sequences, safety rules, duties of crew members, and procedures for Colorado Outward Bound School river rafting trips are summarized in this manual. Designed to acquaint instructors with the duties expected of them on the trips, the information in the manual is presented in outline form and is intended for those with prior river…

  16. The expected perimeter in Eden and related growth processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouch, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    Following Richardson and using results of Kesten on first-passage percolation, we obtain an upper bound on the expected perimeter in an Eden growth process. Using results of the author from a problem in statistical mechanics, we show that the average perimeter of the lattice animals resulting from a very natural family of "growth histories" does not obey a similar bound.

  17. A Superintendent's High Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascopella, Angela

    2009-01-01

    This article profiles Wanda Bamberg, superintendent of the Aldine (Texas) Independent School District. Bamberg is used to high expectations regardless of the circumstances. She is a firecracker of sorts who talks much and expects much from her staff members, teachers, and students, who are mostly at-risk, Black and Hispanic, and economically…

  18. Reflections on Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santini, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a teachers reflections on the matter of student expectations. Santini begins with a common understanding of the "Pygmalion effect" from research projects conducted in earlier years that intimated "people's expectations could influence other people in the world around them." In the world of deaf…

  19. Validation of EMP bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, L.K.; Merewether, K.O.; Chen, K.C.; Jorgenson, R.E.; Morris, M.E.; Solberg, J.E.; Lewis, J.G.; Derr, W.

    1996-07-01

    Test data on canonical weapon-like fixtures are used to validate previously developed analytical bounding results. The test fixtures were constructed to simulate (but be slightly worse than) weapon ports of entry but have known geometries (and electrical points of contact). The exterior of the test fixtures exhibited exterior resonant enhancement of the incident fields at the ports of entry with magnitudes equal to those of weapon geometries. The interior consisted of loaded transmission lines adjusted to maximize received energy or voltage but incorporating practical weapon geometrical constraints. New analytical results are also presented for bounding the energies associated with multiple bolt joints and for bounding the exterior resonant enhancement of the exciting fields.

  20. Reward expectations in honeybees

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The study of expectations of reward helps to understand rules controlling goal-directed behavior as well as decision making and planning. I shall review a series of recent studies focusing on how the food gathering behavior of honeybees depends upon reward expectations. These studies document that free-flying honeybees develop long-term expectations of reward and use them to regulate their investment of energy/time during foraging. Also, they present a laboratory procedure suitable for analysis of neural substrates of reward expectations in the honeybee brain. I discuss these findings in the context of individual and collective foraging, on the one hand, and neurobiology of learning and memory of reward. PMID:20585498

  1. Expected performance of m-solution backtracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper derives upper bounds on the expected number of search tree nodes visited during an m-solution backtracking search, a search which terminates after some preselected number m problem solutions are found. The search behavior is assumed to have a general probabilistic structure. The results are stated in terms of node expansion and contraction. A visited search tree node is said to be expanding if the mean number of its children visited by the search exceeds 1 and is contracting otherwise. It is shown that if every node expands, or if every node contracts, then the number of search tree nodes visited by a search has an upper bound which is linear in the depth of the tree, in the mean number of children a node has, and in the number of solutions sought. Also derived are bounds linear in the depth of the tree in some situations where an upper portion of the tree contracts (expands), while the lower portion expands (contracts). While previous analyses of 1-solution backtracking have concluded that the expected performance is always linear in the tree depth, the model allows superlinear expected performance.

  2. Time delays in flight simulator visual displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, D. F.

    1980-01-01

    It is pointed out that the effects of delays of less than 100 msec in visual displays on pilot dynamic response and system performance are of particular interest at this time because improvements in the latest computer-generated imagery (CGI) systems are expected to reduce CGI displays delays to this range. Attention is given to data which quantify the effects of display delays in the range of 0-100 msec on system stability and performance, and pilot dynamic response for a particular choice of aircraft dynamics, display, controller, and task. The conventional control system design methods are reviewed, the pilot response data presented, and data for long delays, all suggest lead filter compensation of display delay. Pilot-aircraft system crossover frequency information guides compensation filter specification.

  3. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Lawrence C; Mulhall, John P

    2015-11-01

    Delayed orgasm/anorgasmia defined as the persistent or recurrent difficulty, delay in, or absence of attaining orgasm after sufficient sexual stimulation, which causes personal distress. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia are associated with significant sexual dissatisfaction. A focused medical history can shed light on the potential etiologies, which include medications, penile sensation loss, endocrinopathies, penile hyperstimulation, and psychological etiologies. Unfortunately, there are no excellent pharmacotherapies for delayed orgasm/anorgasmia, and treatment revolves largely around addressing potential causative factors and psychotherapy. PMID:26439762

  4. Impact of psychotherapist expectations on client outcomes.

    PubMed

    Connor, Dana R; Callahan, Jennifer L

    2015-09-01

    Recent investigations have implicated client expectations of psychotherapy as a strong predictor of premature termination; however, there is reason to believe psychotherapist expectations may also impact client outcomes. This study sought to address this gap in the literature by examining the association of psychotherapists' expectations to clients' psychotherapy outcomes, including termination status. Participants were 54 current and recent trainee psychotherapists at a Southern public university, who completed delay discounting measures to assess their expectations of the effectiveness of psychotherapy. Data were also drawn from 300 adult clients who had received at least 2 sessions of individual psychotherapy from the participating psychotherapists of this study, and had previously completed the Outcome Questionnaire 45.2 prior to each individual therapy session. Psychotherapists were found to hold significantly higher expectations for client improvement than anticipated, based on existing literature, and these high expectations were found to be positively correlated with clinically significant change in clients. Moreover, psychotherapists' expectations were found to explain 7.3% of the explainable variance in whether or not clients experienced clinically significant change during psychotherapy. Implications for improving client retention and treatment outcome are discussed. PMID:25961371

  5. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  6. Behavior, Expectations and Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Jr, Murray; Rashotte, Lisa Slattery

    2010-01-01

    We predict effects of behavior patterns and status on performance expectations and group inequality using an integrated theory developed by Fisek, Berger and Norman (1991). We next test those predictions using new experimental techniques we developed to control behavior patterns as independent variables. In a 10-condition experiment, predictions…

  7. Great Expectations. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Kelley

    Based on Charles Dickens' novel "Great Expectations," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand the differences between totalitarianism and democracy; and a that a writer of a story considers theme, plot, characters, setting, and point of view. The main activity of the lesson involves students working in groups to…

  8. Parenting with High Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timperlake, Benna Hull; Sanders, Genelle Timperlake

    2014-01-01

    In some ways raising deaf or hard of hearing children is no different than raising hearing children; expectations must be established and periodically tweaked. Benna Hull Timperlake, who with husband Roger, raised two hearing children in addition to their deaf daughter, Genelle Timperlake Sanders, and Genelle, now a deaf professional, share their…

  9. Maintaining High Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Roger; Williams, Sherry

    2014-01-01

    Author and husband, Roger Williams, is hearing and signs fluently, and author and wife, Sherry Williams, is deaf and uses both speech and signs, although she is most comfortable signing. As parents of six children--deaf and hearing--they are determined to encourage their children to do their best, and they always set their expectations high. They…

  10. Grade Expectations: Redux

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miley, William M.; Gonsalves, Sonia

    2004-01-01

    We surveyed undergraduate students taking upper level psychology courses about their course and grade expectations as an extension of the work of Gaultney and Cann (2001) with introductory psychology students. More students believed success in a course was measured by good grades rather than by mastery of new material. They wanted effort to play a…

  11. Reactor shutdown delays medical procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2008-01-01

    A longer-than-expected maintenance shutdown of the Canadian nuclear reactor that produces North America's entire supply of molybdenum-99 - from which the radioactive isotopes technetium-99 and iodine-131 are made - caused delays to the diagnosis and treatment of thousands of seriously ill patients last month. Technetium-99 is a key component of nuclear-medicine scans, while iodine-131 is used to treat cancer and other diseases of the thyroid. Production eventually resumed, but only after the Canadian government had overruled the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), which was still concerned about the reactor's safety.

  12. Genetic enhancements and expectations.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, K

    2009-07-01

    Some argue that genetic enhancements and environmental enhancements are not importantly different: environmental enhancements such as private schools and chess lessons are simply the old-school way to have a designer baby. I argue that there is an important distinction between the two practices--a distinction that makes state restrictions on genetic enhancements more justifiable than state restrictions on environmental enhancements. The difference is that parents have no settled expectations about genetic enhancements. PMID:19567693

  13. Speech and language delay in children.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Maura R

    2011-05-15

    Speech and language delay in children is associated with increased difficulty with reading, writing, attention, and socialization. Although physicians should be alert to parental concerns and to whether children are meeting expected developmental milestones, there currently is insufficient evidence to recommend for or against routine use of formal screening instruments in primary care to detect speech and language delay. In children not meeting the expected milestones for speech and language, a comprehensive developmental evaluation is essential, because atypical language development can be a secondary characteristic of other physical and developmental problems that may first manifest as language problems. Types of primary speech and language delay include developmental speech and language delay, expressive language disorder, and receptive language disorder. Secondary speech and language delays are attributable to another condition such as hearing loss, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, physical speech problems, or selective mutism. When speech and language delay is suspected, the primary care physician should discuss this concern with the parents and recommend referral to a speech-language pathologist and an audiologist. There is good evidence that speech-language therapy is helpful, particularly for children with expressive language disorder. PMID:21568252

  14. Blog life: Entropy Bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Peter

    2008-06-01

    Who is the blog written by? Peter Steinberg is a nuclear physicist at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York, US. He is acting project manager of the PHOBOS experiment, which used Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to search for unusual events produced during collisions between gold nuclei. He is also involved with the PHENIX experiment, which seeks to discover a new state of matter known as the quark-gluon plasma. In addition to his own blog Entropy Bound, Steinberg is currently blogging on a website that was set up last year to publicize the involvement of US scientists with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  15. CGI delay compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    Computer-generated graphics in real-time helicopter simulation produces objectionable scene-presentation time delays. In the flight simulation laboratory at Ames Research Center, it has been determined that these delays have an adverse influence on pilot performance during aggressive tasks such as nap-of-the-earth (NOE) maneuvers. Using contemporary equipment, computer-generated image (CGI) time delays are an unavoidable consequence of the operations required for scene generation. However, providing that magnitide distortions at higher frequencies are tolerable, delay compensation is possible over a restricted frequency range. This range, assumed to have an upper limit of perhaps 10 or 15 rad/sec, conforms approximately to the bandwidth associated with helicopter handling qualities research. A compensation algorithm is introduced here and evaluated in terms of tradeoffs in frequency responses. The algorithm has a discrete basis and accommodates both a large, constant transport delay interval and a periodic delay interval, as associated with asynchronous operations.

  16. Delay and periodicity.

    PubMed

    Yanchuk, S; Perlikowski, P

    2009-04-01

    Systems with time delay play an important role in modeling of many physical and biological processes. In this paper we describe generic properties of systems with time delay, which are related to the appearance and stability of periodic solutions. In particular, we show that delay systems generically have families of periodic solutions, which are reappearing for infinitely many delay times. As delay increases, the solution families overlap leading to increasing coexistence of multiple stable as well as unstable solutions. We also consider stability issue of periodic solutions with large delay by explaining asymptotic properties of the spectrum of characteristic multipliers. We show that the spectrum of multipliers can be split into two parts: pseudocontinuous and strongly unstable. The pseudocontinuous part of the spectrum mediates destabilization of periodic solutions. PMID:19518326

  17. VARIABLE TIME DELAY MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Clemensen, R.E.

    1959-11-01

    An electrically variable time delay line is described which may be readily controlled simuitaneously with variable impedance matching means coupied thereto such that reflections are prevented. Broadly, the delay line includes a signal winding about a magnetic core whose permeability is electrically variable. Inasmuch as the inductance of the line varies directly with the permeability, the time delay and characteristic impedance of the line both vary as the square root of the permeability. Consequently, impedance matching means may be varied similariy and simultaneously w:th the electrically variable permeability to match the line impedance over the entire range of time delay whereby reflections are prevented.

  18. Dynamics with Expectations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glance, Natalie Sandrine

    The study of dynamics with expectations is relevant whenever the entities or "agents" comprising a complex system take into account possible future states when making decisions in the present. Goal-seeking agents form plans to achieve their ends based on their knowledge of causes, their memory of the past, their predictions for the future, as well as on their biases and their beliefs. A dynamical formulation of agent interactions requires a different approach when the behavior of the entities depends on their beliefs and knowledge as well as on the rules governing the evolution of the system. The agents' predictions for the future must enter explicitly into the dynamical rules governing the evolution of the system. This thesis examines the behavior of two dynamical systems in particular. The first, referred to as a computational ecosystem, is composed of a collection of processes, or agents, that compete among themselves for limited resources. The analytical tools of nonlinear dynamics and the modern-day aid of numerical integration via computer are employed to map out the behavioral regimes of the system first when the external environment changes over time, and second when the individual agents incorporate expectations about the future into their decisions. In the second part, a system composed of interacting agents whose individual goals conflict with the overall good of the group is studied both analytically and through computer simulations. It is shown how spontaneous cooperation can be achieved if the agents take into account their expectations about the future when making their choices in the present. Further, the system can remain trapped in a metastable state for long periods of time; eventually, rare large fluctuations occur due to uncertain information that can cause a transition to the global equilibrium. The effects of ultrametric group structure and diversity on the dynamics of cooperation are also elucidated. Specifically, it is seen how the interplay between evolving group structure and the number of agents cooperating introduces new dynamical pathways to cooperation.

  19. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Silvia; Bean, Rachel; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-01

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, ns, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z*=1078±11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1σ to R=1.734±0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: γα<0.39 and γi<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  20. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-15

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, n{sub s}, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z{sub *}=1078{+-}11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1{sigma} to R=1.734{+-}0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: {epsilon}{sub {alpha}}<0.39 and {epsilon}{sub i}<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  1. Further results on delay-range-dependent stability with additive time-varying delay systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pin-Lin

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, new conditions for the delay-range-dependent stability analysis of time-varying delay systems are proposed in a Lyapunov-Krasovskii framework. Time delay is considered to be time-varying and has lower and upper bounds. A new method is first presented for a system with two time delays, integral inequality approach (IIA) used to express relationships among terms of Leibniz-Newton formula. Constructing a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional includes information belonging to a given range; new delay-range-dependent criterion is established in term of linear matrix inequality (LMI). The advantage of that criterion lies in its simplicity and less conservative. This paper also presents a new result of stability analysis for continuous systems with two additive time-variant components representing a general class of delay with strong application background in network-based control systems. Resulting criteria are then expressed in terms of convex optimization with LMI constraints, allowing for use of efficient solvers. Finally, three numerical examples show these methods reducing conservatism and improving maximal allowable delay. PMID:24210689

  2. Stability of uncertain impulsive complex-variable chaotic systems with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Song

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the robust exponential stabilization of uncertain impulsive complex-variable chaotic delayed systems is considered with parameters perturbation and delayed impulses. It is assumed that the considered complex-variable chaotic systems have bounded parametric uncertainties together with the state variables on the impulses related to the time-varying delays. Based on the theories of adaptive control and impulsive control, some less conservative and easily verified stability criteria are established for a class of complex-variable chaotic delayed systems with delayed impulses. Some numerical simulations are given to validate the effectiveness of the proposed criteria of impulsive stabilization for uncertain complex-variable chaotic delayed systems. PMID:26096956

  3. Time delay in simple one-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, W.; Kiers, K. A.

    1992-06-01

    The time delay or the time advance in the scattering of simple one-dimensional systems can be evaluated in a straightforward manner for certain potential models. It is found that when the interacting potential is attractive and has a strength such that it nearly supports an additional bound state, the time delay at small scattering energy is very large. On the other hand, if the potential supports a bound state with nearly zero binding energy, the time advance near threshold is anomalously large. The behavior of a wave packet scattering from the double delta-function potential is also investigated.

  4. Wind effects on bounding flight.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    The effects of the wind on the energy expenditure of bounding flight and on the travelling speed are dealt with. For this purpose, a mathematical model of bounding flight in moving air is developed. Introducing an appropriate non-dimensionalization, results and findings of generally valid nature are derived. It is shown that bounding flight yields a flight mechanical advantage in headwinds when compared with continuous flapping flight. This is because the minimum energy expenditure is lower and the associated travelling speed is higher. The body lift in the bound phase has an advantageous influence. The effects of tailwinds yield less differences between bounding flight and continuous flapping flight. PMID:22981923

  5. Digital time delay

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

  6. Lyth bound revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qing-Guo

    2015-06-01

    Imposing that the excursion distance of the inflaton in field space during inflation be less than the Planck scale, we derive an upper bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio at the cosmic microwave background scales, i.e., r*,max , in the general canonical single-field slow-roll inflation model, in particular, the model with non-negligible running of the spectral index αs and/or the running of running βs. We find that r*,max≃7 ×10-4 for ns=0.9645 without running and running of running, and r*,max is significantly relaxed to the order of O (10-2˜10-1) in the inflation model with αs and/or βs˜+O (10-2) which are marginally preferred by the Planck 2015 data.

  7. Further improvement on delay-range-dependent stability results for linear systems with interval time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pin-Lin

    2013-11-01

    This paper provides an improved delay-range-dependent stability criterion for linear systems with interval time-varying delays. No model transformation and no slack matrix variable are introduced. Furthermore, overly bounding for some cross term is avoided. The resulting criterion has advantages over some previous ones in that it involves fewer matrix variables but has less conservatism, which is established theoretically. Finally, two numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed results. PMID:23906738

  8. Finite-time robust stabilization of uncertain delayed neural networks with discontinuous activations via delayed feedback control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leimin; Shen, Yi; Sheng, Yin

    2016-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the finite-time robust stabilization of delayed neural networks (DNNs) in the presence of discontinuous activations and parameter uncertainties. By using the nonsmooth analysis and control theory, a delayed controller is designed to realize the finite-time robust stabilization of DNNs with discontinuous activations and parameter uncertainties, and the upper bound of the settling time functional for stabilization is estimated. Finally, two examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results. PMID:26878721

  9. Beyond my wildest expectations.

    PubMed

    Nester, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    With support from my parents, I fulfilled their and my expectations of graduating from college and becoming a scientist. My scientific career has focused on two organisms, Bacillus subtilis and Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and two experimental systems, aromatic amino acid synthesis and DNA transfer in bacteria and plants. Studies on B. subtilis emphasized the genetics and biochemistry of aromatic amino acid synthesis and the characterization of competence in DNA transformation. I carried out both as a postdoc at Stanford with Josh Lederberg. At the University of Washington, I continued these studies and then investigated how Agrobacterium transforms plant cells. In collaboration, Milt Gordon, Mary-Dell Chilton, and I found that this bacterium could transfer a piece of its plasmid into plant cells and thereby modify their properties. This discovery opened up a host of intriguing questions that we have tried to answer over the last 35 years. PMID:25208299

  10. The use of delay in multitrack production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Alexander U.

    2003-04-01

    Delay, inevitable whenever sound propagates through space, is too often the bane of the acoustician's practice. An audible echo generally relegates a music performance hall-no matter how beautiful it otherwise might sound-to the lowest status. Multitrack music production on the other hand, with its aggressive use of overdubbing, editing, and signal processing, is not bound by those rules of time and space which determine the sound of a hall. In the recording studio, where music is synthesized for playback over loudspeakers, the delay is employed as a powerful, multipurpose tool. It is not avoided. It is in fact embraced. Echoes are used on purpose, strategically, to enhance the loudspeaker listening experience. Moreover, the humble delay is the basis for many nonecho effects. Flanging, chorus, and pitch shifting are delay-based effects regularly used in audio engineering practice. This paper discusses some of the more common delay-based effects, reviewing their technical structure, the psychoacoustic motivation behind them, and the musical value they create.

  11. Great expectations: what do patients expect and how can expectations be managed?

    PubMed

    Newton, J T; Cunningham, S J

    2013-06-01

    Patients' expectations of their treatment are a key determinant in their satisfaction with treatment. Expectations may encompass not only notions of the outcome of treatment, but also the process of treatment. This article explores the processes by which expectations are formed, differences in expectations across patient groups, and the psychopathology of individuals with unrealistic expectations of treatment manifest in body dysmorphic disorder. PMID:23794691

  12. Person perception and the bounded rationality of social judgment.

    PubMed

    Wright, J C; Dawson, V L

    1988-11-01

    In this article, we develop a bounded rationality view of the relation between person perception and social behavior. Two theses of this approach are that behaviors vary in their significance to observers, and that observers pursue bounded rather than global utility in forming personality impressions. Observers are expected to be sensitive to targets' overall behavioral tendencies and to the variability of their behavior across situations, but both sensitivities are bounded, being greater for behaviors that directly affect observers' outcomes. In two investigations involving extensive hourly and 6-s observations, we examined the bounded utility of people's impressions of personality, demonstrating how impression accuracy is linked to the significance of behaviors. Observers were sensitive to the organization of aggressive behaviors, but less sensitive to the organization of withdrawn behaviors, even when the consistency of those behaviors was comparable. The results clarify the relation between people's inferential shortcomings in laboratory paradigms and the bounded utility of person perception in the natural environment. PMID:3210145

  13. Is Fusion Inhibited for Weakly Bound Nuclei?

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, J.; Munhoz, M.; Szanto, E.M.; Carlin, N.; Added, N.; Suaide, A.A.; de Moura, M.M.; Liguori Neto, R.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Canto, L.F.

    1997-01-01

    Complete fusion of light radioactive nuclei is predicted to be hindered at near-barrier energies. This feature is investigated in the case of the least bound stable nuclei. Evaporation residues resulting from the {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 9}Be and {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 12}C fusion reactions have been measured in order to study common features in reactions involving light weakly bound nuclei. The experimental excitation functions revealed that the fusion cross section is significantly smaller than the total reaction cross section and also smaller than the fusion cross section expected from the available systematics. A clear correlation between the fusion probability and nucleon (cluster) separation energy has been established.The results suggest that the breakup process has a strong influence on the hindrance of the fusion cross section. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Bound anionic states of adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic Computer Center in Gdansk (TASK) and at the Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the U.S. DOE OBER and located at PNNL, which is operated by Battelle for the US DOE. The MSCF resources were available through a Computational Grand Challenge Application grant. The experimental material in this paper (K.H.B.) is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CHE-0517337.

  15. Expectations and speech intelligibility.

    PubMed

    Babel, Molly; Russell, Jamie

    2015-05-01

    Socio-indexical cues and paralinguistic information are often beneficial to speech processing as this information assists listeners in parsing the speech stream. Associations that particular populations speak in a certain speech style can, however, make it such that socio-indexical cues have a cost. In this study, native speakers of Canadian English who identify as Chinese Canadian and White Canadian read sentences that were presented to listeners in noise. Half of the sentences were presented with a visual-prime in the form of a photo of the speaker and half were presented in control trials with fixation crosses. Sentences produced by Chinese Canadians showed an intelligibility cost in the face-prime condition, whereas sentences produced by White Canadians did not. In an accentedness rating task, listeners rated White Canadians as less accented in the face-prime trials, but Chinese Canadians showed no such change in perceived accentedness. These results suggest a misalignment between an expected and an observed speech signal for the face-prime trials, which indicates that social information about a speaker can trigger linguistic associations that come with processing benefits and costs. PMID:25994710

  16. New standard exceeds expectations

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, M.J. )

    1993-08-01

    The new ASTM environmental due diligence standard is delivering far more than expected when it was conceived in 1990. Its use goes well beyond the relatively narrow legal liability protection that was the primary goal in its development. The real estate industry, spearheaded by the lending community, was preoccupied with environmental risk and liability. Lenders throughout the concept's evolution have been at the forefront in defining environmental due diligence. The lender liability rule is intended to protect property owners from CERCLA liability for property they own or companies they manage (for example, as a result of foreclosure). The new site assessment standard increasingly is considered a benchmark for prudent environmental due diligence in the interest of risk management, not legal liability. The focus on risk management, including collateral devaluation and corporate credit risk, are becoming dominant areas of policy focus in the lending industry. Lenders now are revising their policies to incorporate transactions beyond issues of real estate, in which a company's economic viability and ability to service debt could be impacted by an environmental problem unrelated to property transfers.

  17. Sociology of Low Expectations

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Gabrielle; Williams, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Social scientists have drawn attention to the role of hype and optimistic visions of the future in providing momentum to biomedical innovation projects by encouraging innovation alliances. In this article, we show how less optimistic, uncertain, and modest visions of the future can also provide innovation projects with momentum. Scholars have highlighted the need for clinicians to carefully manage the expectations of their prospective patients. Using the example of a pioneering clinical team providing deep brain stimulation to children and young people with movement disorders, we show how clinicians confront this requirement by drawing on their professional knowledge and clinical expertise to construct visions of the future with their prospective patients; visions which are personalized, modest, and tainted with uncertainty. We refer to this vision-constructing work as recalibration, and we argue that recalibration enables clinicians to manage the tension between the highly optimistic and hyped visions of the future that surround novel biomedical interventions, and the exigencies of delivering those interventions in a clinical setting. Drawing on work from science and technology studies, we suggest that recalibration enrolls patients in an innovation alliance by creating a shared understanding of how the “effectiveness” of an innovation shall be judged. PMID:26527846

  18. Delay-dependent condition for absolute stability of Lurie control systems with multiple time delays and nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jiuwen; Zhong, Shouming; Hu, Yuanyuan

    2008-02-01

    The absolute stability of Lurie system with multiple time delays and nonlinearities is considered in this paper. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, using the descriptor system approach and the method of decomposing matrices, a novel delay-dependent sufficient condition for the absolute stability of Lurie system is derived and expressed in the form of the linear matrix inequality (LMI). The maximum upper bound of the allowable delay is obtained by solving a convex optimization problem. A numerical example shows that the result obtained in this paper improved the estimate of the stability limit over some existing results.

  19. Delayed emergence after anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tzabazis, Alexander; Miller, Christopher; Dobrow, Marc F; Zheng, Karl; Brock-Utne, John G

    2015-06-01

    In most instances, delayed emergence from anesthesia is attributed to residual anesthetic or analgesic medications. However, delayed emergence can be secondary to unusual causes and present diagnostic dilemmas. Data from clinical studies is scarce and most available published material is comprised of case reports. In this review, we summarize and discuss less common and difficult to diagnose reasons for delayed emergence and present cases from our own experience or reference published case reports/case series. The goal is to draw attention to less common reasons for delayed emergence, identify patient populations that are potentially at risk and to help anesthesiologists identifying a possible cause why their patient is slow to wake up. PMID:25912729

  20. How prior expectations shape multisensory perception.

    PubMed

    Gau, Remi; Noppeney, Uta

    2016-01-01

    The brain generates a representation of our environment by integrating signals from a common source, but segregating signals from different sources. This fMRI study investigated how the brain arbitrates between perceptual integration and segregation based on top-down congruency expectations and bottom-up stimulus-bound congruency cues. Participants were presented audiovisual movies of phonologically congruent, incongruent or McGurk syllables that can be integrated into an illusory percept (e.g. "ti" percept for visual «ki» with auditory /pi/). They reported the syllable they perceived. Critically, we manipulated participants' top-down congruency expectations by presenting McGurk stimuli embedded in blocks of congruent or incongruent syllables. Behaviorally, participants were more likely to fuse audiovisual signals into an illusory McGurk percept in congruent than incongruent contexts. At the neural level, the left inferior frontal sulcus (lIFS) showed increased activations for bottom-up incongruent relative to congruent inputs. Moreover, lIFS activations were increased for physically identical McGurk stimuli, when participants segregated the audiovisual signals and reported their auditory percept. Critically, this activation increase for perceptual segregation was amplified when participants expected audiovisually incongruent signals based on prior sensory experience. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the lIFS combines top-down prior (in)congruency expectations with bottom-up (in)congruency cues to arbitrate between multisensory integration and segregation. PMID:26419391

  1. Vernier Delay Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, W.B.

    1984-10-01

    This module will accept differential ECL pulses from the auxiliary rear panel or NIM level pulses from the front panel. The pulses are produced at the output with a fixed delay that is software programmable in steps of 0.1 ns over the range of 0.1 to 10.5 ns. Multiple outputs are available at the front panel. Minimum delay through the module is 9 ns.

  2. Time delay spectrum conditioner

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Norman R.

    1980-01-01

    A device for delaying specified frequencies of a multiple frequency laser beam. The device separates the multiple frequency beam into a series of spatially separated single frequency beams. The propagation distance of the single frequency beam is subsequently altered to provide the desired delay for each specific frequency. Focusing reflectors can be utilized to provide a simple but nonadjustable system or, flat reflectors with collimating and focusing optics can be utilized to provide an adjustable system.

  3. Delayed "Choice" quantum eraser

    PubMed

    Kim; Yu; Kulik; Shih; Scully

    2000-01-01

    We report a delayed "choice" quantum eraser experiment of the type proposed by Scully and Druhl (where the "choice" is made randomly by a photon at a beam splitter). The experimental results demonstrate the possibility of delayed determination of particlelike or wavelike behavior via quantum entanglement. The which-path or both-path information of a quantum can be marked or erased by its entangled twin even after the registration of the quantum. PMID:11015820

  4. Delayed voice communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Stanley G.; Reagan, Marcum L.

    2013-10-01

    We present results from simulated deep-space exploration missions that investigated voice communication with significant time delays. The simulations identified many challenges: confusion of sequence, blocked calls, wasted crew time, impaired ability to provide relevant information to the other party, losing track of which messages have reached the other party, weakened rapport between crew and ground, slow response to rapidly changing situations, and reduced situational awareness. These challenges were met in part with additional training; greater attention and foresight; longer, less frequent transmissions; meticulous recordkeeping and timekeeping; and specific alerting and acknowledging calls. Several simulations used both delayed voice and text messaging. Text messaging provided a valuable record of transmissions and allowed messages to be targeted to subsets of the flight and ground crew, but it was a poor choice for high-workload operators such as vehicle drivers and spacewalkers. Even with the foregoing countermeasures, delayed voice communication is difficult. Additional aids such as automatic delay timers and voice-to-text transcription would help. Tests comparing delays of 50 and 300 s unexpectedly revealed that communicating with the shorter delay was just as challenging as with the longer one.

  5. What Do Expectant Mothers Know about Neonatal Jaundice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogunfowora, Olusoga B.; Adefuye, Peter O.; Fetuga, Musili B.

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal jaundice (NNJ) is a common disorder worldwide and many affected babies become brain-damaged due to delay in seeking medical consultation. In order to assess the awareness and knowledge of expectant mothers about NNJ, women who registered for antenatal care at a tertiary health facility in the South-western part of Nigeria were…

  6. Great Expectations: Temporal Expectation Modulates Perceptual Processing Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vangkilde, Signe; Coull, Jennifer T.; Bundesen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    In a crowded dynamic world, temporal expectations guide our attention in time. Prior investigations have consistently demonstrated that temporal expectations speed motor behavior. We explore effects of temporal expectation on "perceptual" speed in three nonspeeded, cued recognition paradigms. Different hazard rate functions for the cue-stimulus…

  7. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; Gunzburger, Max Donald; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  8. Northwest Outward Bound Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Outward Bound School, Portland, OR.

    Instructor responsibilities, procedures for completing activities safely, and instructional methods and techniques are outlined to assist instructors in the Northwest Outward Bound School (Portland, Oregon) as they strive for teaching excellence. Information is organized into six chapters addressing: history and philosophy of Outward Bound; course…

  9. Bounds for Asian basket options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deelstra, Griselda; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vanmaele, Michèle

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we propose pricing bounds for European-style discrete arithmetic Asian basket options in a Black and Scholes framework. We start from methods used for basket options and Asian options. First, we use the general approach for deriving upper and lower bounds for stop-loss premia of sums of non-independent random variables as in Kaas et al. [Upper and lower bounds for sums of random variables, Insurance Math. Econom. 27 (2000) 151-168] or Dhaene et al. [The concept of comonotonicity in actuarial science and finance: theory, Insurance Math. Econom. 31(1) (2002) 3-33]. We generalize the methods in Deelstra et al. [Pricing of arithmetic basket options by conditioning, Insurance Math. Econom. 34 (2004) 55-57] and Vanmaele et al. [Bounds for the price of discrete sampled arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 185(1) (2006) 51-90]. Afterwards we show how to derive an analytical closed-form expression for a lower bound in the non-comonotonic case. Finally, we derive upper bounds for Asian basket options by applying techniques as in Thompson [Fast narrow bounds on the value of Asian options, Working Paper, University of Cambridge, 1999] and Lord [Partially exact and bounded approximations for arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Finance 10 (2) (2006) 1-52]. Numerical results are included and on the basis of our numerical tests, we explain which method we recommend depending on moneyness and time-to-maturity.

  10. Metabolism of organically bound tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    The classic methodology for estimating dose to man from environmental tritium ignores the fact that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs may be directly assimilated in the bound compartment of tissues without previous oxidation. We propose a four-compartment model consisting of a free body water compartment, two organic compartments, and a small, rapidly metabolizing compartment. The utility of this model lies in the ability to input organically bound tritium in foodstuffs directly into the organic compartments of the model. We found that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs can increase cumulative total body dose by a factor of 1.7 to 4.5 times the free body water dose alone, depending on the bound-to-loose ratio of tritium in the diet. Model predictions are compared with empirical measurements of tritium in human urine and tissue samples, and appear to be in close agreement. 10 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  11. On Time Delay Margin Estimation for Adaptive Control and Optimal Control Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents methods for estimating time delay margin for adaptive control of input delay systems with almost linear structured uncertainty. The bounded linear stability analysis method seeks to represent an adaptive law by a locally bounded linear approximation within a small time window. The time delay margin of this input delay system represents a local stability measure and is computed analytically by three methods: Pade approximation, Lyapunov-Krasovskii method, and the matrix measure method. These methods are applied to the standard model-reference adaptive control, s-modification adaptive law, and optimal control modification adaptive law. The windowing analysis results in non-unique estimates of the time delay margin since it is dependent on the length of a time window and parameters which vary from one time window to the next. The optimal control modification adaptive law overcomes this limitation in that, as the adaptive gain tends to infinity and if the matched uncertainty is linear, then the closed-loop input delay system tends to a LTI system. A lower bound of the time delay margin of this system can then be estimated uniquely without the need for the windowing analysis. Simulation results demonstrates the feasibility of the bounded linear stability method for time delay margin estimation.

  12. Downhole delay assembly for blasting with series delay

    DOEpatents

    Ricketts, Thomas E.

    1982-01-01

    A downhole delay assembly is provided which can be placed into a blasthole for initiation of explosive in the blasthole. The downhole delay assembly includes at least two detonating time delay devices in series in order to effect a time delay of longer than about 200 milliseconds in a round of explosions. The downhole delay assembly provides a protective housing to prevent detonation of explosive in the blasthole in response to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device. There is further provided a connection between the first and second time delay devices. The connection is responsive to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device and initiates the second detonating time delay device. A plurality of such downhole delay assemblies are placed downhole in unfragmented formation and are initiated simultaneously for providing a round of explosive expansions. The explosive expansions can be used to form an in situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles.

  13. Measuring Alcohol Expectancies in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Karen A.; Gerend, Mary A.; Miller, Brenda A.

    2006-01-01

    Beliefs about the consequences of using alcohol, alcohol expectancies, are powerful predictors of underage drinking. The Alcohol Expectancies Questionnaire-Adolescent form (AEQ-A) has been widely used to measure expectancies in youth. Despite its broad use, the factor structure of the AEQ-A has not been firmly established. It is also not known…

  14. A numerical study of bench blast row delay timing and its influence on percent-cast

    SciTech Connect

    Preece, D.S.

    1993-11-01

    The computer program, DMC (Distinct Motion Code), which was developed for simulating the rock motion associated with blasting, has been used to study the influence of row delay timing on rock motion. The numerical simulations correspond with field observations in that very short delays (< 50ms) and very long delays (> 300ms) produce a lower percent-cast than a medium delay (100 to 200 ms). The DMC predicted relationship between row delay timing and percent-cast is more complex than expected with a dip in the curve where the optimum timing might be expected. More study is required to gain a full understanding of this phenomenon.

  15. New Stabilization for Dynamical System with Two Additive Time-Varying Delays

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Chen, Xiaozhou

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a new delay-dependent stabilization criterion for systems with two additive time-varying delays. The novel functional is constructed, a tighter upper bound of the derivative of the Lyapunov functional is obtained. These results have advantages over some existing ones because the combination of the delay decomposition technique and the reciprocally convex approach. Two examples are provided to demonstrate the less conservatism and effectiveness of the results in this paper. PMID:24701159

  16. TIME DELAY AND ACCRETION DISK SIZE MEASUREMENTS IN THE LENSED QUASAR SBS 0909+532 FROM MULTIWAVELENGTH MICROLENSING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hainline, Laura J.; Morgan, Christopher W.; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Landaal, Zachary D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy; Goicoechea, L. J.; Shalyapin, V. N.

    2013-09-01

    We present three complete seasons and two half-seasons of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) r-band photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasar SBS 0909+532 from the U.S. Naval Observatory, as well as two seasons each of SDSS g-band and r-band monitoring from the Liverpool Robotic Telescope. Using Monte Carlo simulations to simultaneously measure the system's time delay and model the r-band microlensing variability, we confirm and significantly refine the precision of the system's time delay to {Delta}t{sub AB} = 50{sub -4}{sup +2} days, where the stated uncertainties represent the bounds of the formal 1{sigma} confidence interval. There may be a conflict between the time delay measurement and a lens consisting of a single galaxy. While models based on the Hubble Space Telescope astrometry and a relatively compact stellar distribution can reproduce the observed delay, the models have somewhat less dark matter than we would typically expect. We also carry out a joint analysis of the microlensing variability in the r and g bands to constrain the size of the quasar's continuum source at these wavelengths, obtaining log {l_brace}(r{sub s,r}/cm)[cos i/0.5]{sup 1/2}{r_brace} = 15.3 {+-} 0.3 and log {l_brace}(r{sub s,g}/cm)[cos i/0.5]{sup 1/2}{r_brace} = 14.8 {+-} 0.9, respectively. Our current results do not formally constrain the temperature profile of the accretion disk but are consistent with the expectations of standard thin disk theory.

  17. Stability of Nonlinear Systems with Unknown Time-varying Feedback Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunodkar, Apurva A.; Akella, Maruthi R.

    2013-12-01

    This paper considers the problem of stabilizing a class of nonlinear systems with unknown bounded delayed feedback wherein the time-varying delay is 1) piecewise constant 2) continuous with a bounded rate. We also consider application of these results to the stabilization of rigid-body attitude dynamics. In the first case, the time-delay in feedback is modeled specifically as a switch among an arbitrarily large set of unknown constant values with a known strict upper bound. The feedback is a linear function of the delayed states. In the case of linear systems with switched delay feedback, a new sufficiency condition for average dwell time result is presented using a complete type Lyapunov-Krasovskii (L-K) functional approach. Further, the corresponding switched system with nonlinear perturbations is proven to be exponentially stable inside a well characterized region of attraction for an appropriately chosen average dwell time. In the second case, the concept of the complete type L-K functional is extended to a class of nonlinear time-delay systems with unknown time-varying time-delay. This extension ensures stability robustness to time-delay in the control design for all values of time-delay less than the known upper bound. Model-transformation is used in order to partition the nonlinear system into a nominal linear part that is exponentially stable with a bounded perturbation. We obtain sufficient conditions which ensure exponential stability inside a region of attraction estimate. A constructive method to evaluate the sufficient conditions is presented together with comparison with the corresponding constant and piecewise constant delay. Numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the theoretical results of this paper.

  18. Bounding the elliptic Mahler measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinner, Christopher

    1998-11-01

    We give a simple inequality relating the elliptic Mahler measure of a polynomial to the traditional Mahler measure (via the length of the polynomial). These bounds are essentially sharp. We also give the corresponding result for polynomials in several variables.

  19. Resignation Syndrome: Catatonia? Culture-Bound?

    PubMed Central

    Sallin, Karl; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Evers, Kathinka; Engström, Ingemar; Hjern, Anders; Petrovic, Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Resignation syndrome (RS) designates a long-standing disorder predominately affecting psychologically traumatized children and adolescents in the midst of a strenuous and lengthy migration process. Typically a depressive onset is followed by gradual withdrawal progressing via stupor into a state that prompts tube feeding and is characterized by failure to respond even to painful stimuli. The patient is seemingly unconscious. Recovery ensues within months to years and is claimed to be dependent on the restoration of hope to the family. Descriptions of disorders resembling RS can be found in the literature and the condition is unlikely novel. Nevertheless, the magnitude and geographical distribution stand out. Several hundred cases have been reported exclusively in Sweden in the past decade prompting the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare to recognize RS as a separate diagnostic entity. The currently prevailing stress hypothesis fails to account for the regional distribution and contributes little to treatment. Consequently, a re-evaluation of diagnostics and treatment is required. Psychogenic catatonia is proposed to supply the best fit with the clinical presentation. Treatment response, altered brain metabolism or preserved awareness would support this hypothesis. Epidemiological data suggests culture-bound beliefs and expectations to generate and direct symptom expression and we argue that culture-bound psychogenesis can accommodate the endemic distribution. Last, we review recent models of predictive coding indicating how expectation processes are crucially involved in the placebo and nocebo effect, delusions and conversion disorders. Building on this theoretical framework we propose a neurobiological model of RS in which the impact of overwhelming negative expectations are directly causative of the down-regulation of higher order and lower order behavioral systems in particularly vulnerable individuals. PMID:26858615

  20. Strong Expectations Cancel Locality Effects: Evidence from Hindi

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Samar; Vasishth, Shravan; Srinivasan, Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Expectation-driven facilitation (Hale, 2001; Levy, 2008) and locality-driven retrieval difficulty (Gibson, 1998, 2000; Lewis & Vasishth, 2005) are widely recognized to be two critical factors in incremental sentence processing; there is accumulating evidence that both can influence processing difficulty. However, it is unclear whether and how expectations and memory interact. We first confirm a key prediction of the expectation account: a Hindi self-paced reading study shows that when an expectation for an upcoming part of speech is dashed, building a rarer structure consumes more processing time than building a less rare structure. This is a strong validation of the expectation-based account. In a second study, we show that when expectation is strong, i.e., when a particular verb is predicted, strong facilitation effects are seen when the appearance of the verb is delayed; however, when expectation is weak, i.e., when only the part of speech “verb” is predicted but a particular verb is not predicted, the facilitation disappears and a tendency towards a locality effect is seen. The interaction seen between expectation strength and distance shows that strong expectations cancel locality effects, and that weak expectations allow locality effects to emerge. PMID:25010700

  1. Interferometric Propagation Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Radar interferometry based on (near) exact repeat passes has lately been used by many groups of scientists, worldwide, to achieve state of the art measurements of topography, glacier and ice stream motion, earthquake displacements, oil field subsidence, lava flows, crop-induced surface decorrelation, and other effects. Variations of tropospheric and ionospheric propagation delays limit the accuracy of all such measurements. We are investigating the extent of this limitation, using data from the Shuttle radar flight, SIR-C, which is sensitive to the troposphere, and the Earth Resources Satellites, ERS-1/2, which are sensitive to both the troposphere and the ionosphere. We are presently gathering statistics of the delay variations over selected, diverse areas to determine the best accuracy possible for repeat track interferometry. The phases of an interferogram depend on both the topography of the scene and variations in propagation delay. The delay variations can be caused by movement of elements in the scene, by changes in tropospheric water vapor and by changes of the charge concentrations in the ionosphere. We plan to separate these causes by using the data from a third satellite visit (three-pass interferometry). The figure gives the geometry of the three-pass observations. The page of the figure is taken to be perpendicular to the spacecraft orbits. The three observational locations are marked on the figure, giving baselines B-12 and B-13, separated by the angle alpha. These parameters are almost constant over the whole scene. However, each pixel has an individual look angle, theta, which is related to the topography, rho is the slant range. A possible spurious time delay is shown. Additional information is contained in the original.

  2. Expectancy effects in caffeine research.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L; White, B; Krietsch, K; Steele, G

    1990-01-01

    The impact of expectancy on the experience of caffeine-related symptoms was investigated by randomly assigning subjects to an expectancy or nonexpectancy instructional condition. Subjects were administered the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and a Symptom Questionnaire prior to and 45 minutes after receiving their designated instructional set and ingesting a cellulose-filled gelatin capsule which ostensibly was filled with caffeine. Results revealed that a significant expectancy effect existed on five Symptom Questionnaire items. PMID:2341204

  3. Bionic Control of Cheetah Bounding with a Segmented Spine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunlei; Wang, Shigang

    2016-01-01

    A cheetah model is built to mimic real cheetah and its mechanical and dimensional parameters are derived from the real cheetah. In particular, two joints in spine and four joints in a leg are used to realize the motion of segmented spine and segmented legs which are the key properties of the cheetah bounding. For actuating and stabilizing the bounding gait of cheetah, we present a bioinspired controller based on the state-machine. The controller mainly mimics the function of the cerebellum to plan the locomotion and keep the body balance. The haptic sensor and proprioception system are used to detect the trigger of the phase transition. Besides, the vestibular modulation could perceive the pitching angle of the trunk. At last, the cerebellum acts as the CPU to operate the information from the biological sensors. In addition, the calculated results are transmitted to the low-level controller to actuate and stabilize the cheetah bounding. Moreover, the delay feedback control method is employed to plan the motion of the leg joints to stabilize the pitching motion of trunk with the stability criterion. Finally, the cyclic cheetah bounding with biological properties is realized. Meanwhile, the stability and dynamic properties of the cheetah bounding gait are analyzed elaborately. PMID:27065749

  4. Bionic Control of Cheetah Bounding with a Segmented Spine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunlei; Wang, Shigang

    2016-01-01

    A cheetah model is built to mimic real cheetah and its mechanical and dimensional parameters are derived from the real cheetah. In particular, two joints in spine and four joints in a leg are used to realize the motion of segmented spine and segmented legs which are the key properties of the cheetah bounding. For actuating and stabilizing the bounding gait of cheetah, we present a bioinspired controller based on the state-machine. The controller mainly mimics the function of the cerebellum to plan the locomotion and keep the body balance. The haptic sensor and proprioception system are used to detect the trigger of the phase transition. Besides, the vestibular modulation could perceive the pitching angle of the trunk. At last, the cerebellum acts as the CPU to operate the information from the biological sensors. In addition, the calculated results are transmitted to the low-level controller to actuate and stabilize the cheetah bounding. Moreover, the delay feedback control method is employed to plan the motion of the leg joints to stabilize the pitching motion of trunk with the stability criterion. Finally, the cyclic cheetah bounding with biological properties is realized. Meanwhile, the stability and dynamic properties of the cheetah bounding gait are analyzed elaborately. PMID:27065749

  5. Passivity and Passification of Memristor-Based Recurrent Neural Networks With Additive Time-Varying Delays.

    PubMed

    Rakkiyappan, Rajan; Chandrasekar, Arunachalam; Cao, Jinde

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new design scheme for the passivity and passification of a class of memristor-based recurrent neural networks (MRNNs) with additive time-varying delays. The predictable assumptions on the boundedness and Lipschitz continuity of activation functions are formulated. The systems considered here are based on a different time-delay model suggested recently, which includes additive time-varying delay components in the state. The connection between the time-varying delay and its upper bound is considered when estimating the upper bound of the derivative of Lyapunov functional. It is recognized that the passivity condition can be expressed in a linear matrix inequality (LMI) format and by using characteristic function method. For state feedback passification, it is verified that it is apathetic to use immediate or delayed state feedback. By constructing a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and employing Jensen's inequality and reciprocal convex combination technique together with a tighter estimation of the upper bound of the cross-product terms derived from the derivatives of the Lyapunov functional, less conventional delay-dependent passivity criteria are established in terms of LMIs. Moreover, second-order reciprocally convex approach is employed for deriving the upper bound for terms with inverses of squared convex parameters. The model based on the memristor with additive time-varying delays widens the application scope for the design of neural networks. Finally, pertinent examples are given to show the advantages of the derived passivity criteria and the significant improvement of the theoretical approaches. PMID:25415991

  6. Delay Analysis of Networked Control Systems Based on 100 M Switched Ethernet

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    For the delay may degrade the performance of networked control systems, networked control systems based on 100 M switched Ethernet are proposed in this paper. According to the working principle of Ethernet switch, the formulas of the upper bound delay of the single-level switched Ethernet and the multiple-level switched Ethernet are deduced by the timing diagram method, and the values of the upper bound delay are also given. The key factors that influence the upper bound delay of switched Ethernet are analyzed; then, the characteristics of the upper bound delay are presented, which show that the delay induced by the single-level 100 M switched Ethernet has little effect on the performance of control systems, while the delay induced by the multiple-level 100 M switched Ethernet may meet the time requirements of all classes of control systems if the numbers of levels and the numbers of nodes connecting to switches are set properly. Finally, the performance of networked control systems is simulated by TrueTime, and the results further show the feasibility and superiority of 100 M switched Ethernet based networked control systems without modification of the network protocols. PMID:25003152

  7. Delay analysis of networked control systems based on 100 M switched Ethernet.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming

    2014-01-01

    For the delay may degrade the performance of networked control systems, networked control systems based on 100 M switched Ethernet are proposed in this paper. According to the working principle of Ethernet switch, the formulas of the upper bound delay of the single-level switched Ethernet and the multiple-level switched Ethernet are deduced by the timing diagram method, and the values of the upper bound delay are also given. The key factors that influence the upper bound delay of switched Ethernet are analyzed; then, the characteristics of the upper bound delay are presented, which show that the delay induced by the single-level 100 M switched Ethernet has little effect on the performance of control systems, while the delay induced by the multiple-level 100 M switched Ethernet may meet the time requirements of all classes of control systems if the numbers of levels and the numbers of nodes connecting to switches are set properly. Finally, the performance of networked control systems is simulated by TrueTime, and the results further show the feasibility and superiority of 100 M switched Ethernet based networked control systems without modification of the network protocols. PMID:25003152

  8. Delay Tracking of Spread-Spectrum Signals for Indoor Optical Ranging

    PubMed Central

    Salido-Monzú, David; Martín-Gorostiza, Ernesto; Lázaro-Galilea, José Luis; Martos-Naya, Eduardo; Wieser, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Delay tracking of spread-spectrum signals is widely used for ranging in radio frequency based navigation. Its use in non-coherent optical ranging, however, has not been extensively studied since optical channels are less subject to narrowband interference situations where these techniques become more useful. In this work, an early-late delay-locked loop adapted to indoor optical ranging is presented and analyzed. The specific constraints of free-space infrared channels in this context substantially differ from those typically considered in radio frequency applications. The tracking stage is part of an infrared differential range measuring system with application to mobile target indoor localization. Spread-spectrum signals are used in this context to provide accurate ranging while reducing the effect of multipath interferences. The performance of the stage regarding noise and dynamic errors is analyzed and validated, providing expressions that allow an adequate selection of the design parameters depending on the expected input signal characteristics. The behavior of the stage in a general multipath scenario is also addressed to estimate the multipath error bounds. The results, evaluated under realistic conditions corresponding to an 870 nm link with 25 MHz chip-rate, built with low-cost up-to-date devices, show that an overall error below 6% of a chip time can be achieved. PMID:25490585

  9. Delay tracking of spread-spectrum signals for indoor optical ranging.

    PubMed

    Salido-Monzú, David; Martín-Gorostiza, Ernesto; Lázaro-Galilea, José Luis; Martos-Naya, Eduardo; Wieser, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Delay tracking of spread-spectrum signals is widely used for ranging in radio frequency based navigation. Its use in non-coherent optical ranging, however, has not been extensively studied since optical channels are less subject to narrowband interference situations where these techniques become more useful. In this work, an early-late delay-locked loop adapted to indoor optical ranging is presented and analyzed. The specific constraints of free-space infrared channels in this context substantially differ from those typically considered in radio frequency applications. The tracking stage is part of an infrared differential range measuring system with application to mobile target indoor localization. Spread-spectrum signals are used in this context to provide accurate ranging while reducing the effect of multipath interferences. The performance of the stage regarding noise and dynamic errors is analyzed and validated, providing expressions that allow an adequate selection of the design parameters depending on the expected input signal characteristics. The behavior of the stage in a general multipath scenario is also addressed to estimate the multipath error bounds. The results, evaluated under realistic conditions corresponding to an 870 nm link with 25 MHz chip-rate, built with low-cost up-to-date devices, show that an overall error below 6% of a chip time can be achieved. PMID:25490585

  10. Ramsey spectroscopy of bound atomic states with extreme-ultraviolet laser harmonics.

    PubMed

    Liontos, I; Cavalieri, S; Corsi, C; Eramo, R; Kaziannis, S; Pirri, A; Sali, E; Bellini, M

    2010-03-15

    We report the experimental measurement of Ramsey interference fringes in the single-photon excitation to a high-lying bound state of atomic argon by pairs of phase-locked, time-delayed, extreme UV high-order-harmonic pulses at 87 nm. High-visibility Ramsey fringes are observed for delays larger than 100 ps, thus demonstrating a potential resolving power >10(5) at this wavelength. PMID:20237614

  11. Delayed enrollment and College Plans: is There a Postponement Penalty?

    PubMed

    Niu, Sunny; Tienda, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Using a representative longitudinal survey of Texas high school seniors who graduated in 2002, we investigate how college postponement is associated with four-year college expectations and attendance-focusing both on the length of delay and the pathway to the postsecondary system. Like prior studies, we show that family background and student academic achievement explains the negative association between delay and college expectations and that these factors, along with two-year college entry pathway, largely accounted for the negative association between postponement and enrollment at a four-year institution in 2006. Although delays of one year or longer are associated with significantly lower odds of attending a baccalaureate-granting institution four years after high school, the longest delays do not incur the most severe enrollment penalties. PMID:23606758

  12. Early developmental delays: neuropsychological sequelae and subsequent diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Perna, Robert; Loughan, Ashlee

    2012-01-01

    Developmental delay is a frequent diagnosis given to young children when developmental milestones are not met in an age-expected time frame. Research on early delays in speech and motor milestones is unclear regarding possible long-term cognitive functioning. The purpose of this study was to investigate the neuropsychological profile of children who suffered early developmental delays in speech or motor function. Participants (N = 60) completed the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition, Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-Second Edition, Wisconsin Card-Sorting Test, Children's Memory Test (CMT), the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System, and the Child Behavior Checklist/Youth Self-Report. The Delay group had a significantly lower Full-Scale IQ (FSIQ), and when controlling for IQ (analysis of covariance), the Delay group had significantly lower scores on measures of immediate and delayed visual memory skills (CMT). Group scores were not significantly different for any other tests. Neither group had any test scores significantly below FSIQ, a finding suggesting developmental delays may subsequently lead to weaknesses but not impairments. Results appear to support the resiliency of the young brain. Chi-square analysis showed the Delay group was more likely to subsequently be diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) but not learning disorders. Data appear to suggest that early developmental delays may place children as risk for ADHD and perhaps visual memory weaknesses, though not clear impairments. PMID:23428279

  13. Making Your High Expectations Stick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Every teacher starts the school year with great expectations for an orderly classroom. An experienced educator has probably tried various approaches to maintain order and create a classroom environment where every student feels comfortable contributing. To let the students know how much is really expected of them, teachers should not simply state…

  14. Increasing Expectations for Student Effort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Karen Maitland; Schilling, Karl L.

    1999-01-01

    States that few higher education institutions have publicly articulated clear expectations of the knowledge and skills students are to attain. Describes gap between student and faculty expectations for academic effort. Reports that what is required in students' first semester appears to play a strong role in shaping the time investments made in…

  15. Sibling Status Effects: Adult Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskett, Linda Musun

    1985-01-01

    This study attempted to determine what expectations or beliefs adults might hold about a child based on his or her sibling status alone. Ratings on 50 adjective pairs for each of three sibling status types, only, oldest, and youngest child, were assessed in relation to adult expectations, birth order, and parental status of rater. (Author/DST)

  16. Mean square delay dependent-probability-distribution stability analysis of neutral type stochastic neural networks.

    PubMed

    Muralisankar, S; Manivannan, A; Balasubramaniam, P

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to investigate the mean square delay dependent-probability-distribution stability analysis of neutral type stochastic neural networks with time-delays. The time-delays are assumed to be interval time-varying and randomly occurring. Based on the new Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and stochastic analysis approach, a novel sufficient condition is obtained in the form of linear matrix inequality such that the delayed stochastic neural networks are globally robustly asymptotically stable in the mean-square sense for all admissible uncertainties. Finally, the derived theoretical results are validated through numerical examples in which maximum allowable upper bounds are calculated for different lower bounds of time-delay. PMID:25862099

  17. Robust Stochastic Stability of Discrete-Time Markovian Jump Neural Networks with Leakage Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalidass, Mathiyalagan; Su, Hongye; Rathinasamy, Sakthivel

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a robust analysis approach to stochastic stability of the uncertain Markovian jumping discrete-time neural networks (MJDNNs) with time delay in the leakage term. By choosing an appropriate Lyapunov functional and using free weighting matrix technique, a set of delay dependent stability criteria are derived. The stability results are delay dependent, which depend on not only the upper bounds of time delays but also their lower bounds. The obtained stability criteria are established in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) which can be effectively solved by some standard numerical packages. Finally, some illustrative numerical examples with simulation results are provided to demonstrate applicability of the obtained results. It is shown that even if there is no leakage delay, the obtained results are less restrictive than in some recent works.

  18. Stability of the steady state of delay-coupled chaotic maps on complex networks.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaofeng; Guan, Shuguang; Wang, Xingang; Lai, C-H

    2008-05-01

    We study the stability of the steady state of coupled chaotic maps with randomly distributed time delays evolving on a random network. An analysis method is developed based on the peculiar mathematical structure of the Jacobian of the steady state due to time-delayed coupling, which enables us to relate the stability of the steady state to the locations of the roots of a set of lower-order bound equations. For delta -distributed time delays (or fixed time delay), we find that the stability of the steady state is determined by the maximum modulus of the roots of a set of algebraic equations, where the only nontrivial coefficient in each equation is one of the eigenvalues of the normalized adjacency matrix of the underlying network. For general distributed time delays, we find a necessary condition for the stable steady state based on the maximum modulus of the roots of a bound equation. When the number of links is large, the nontrivial coefficients of the bound equation are just the probabilities of different time delays. Our study thus establishes the relationship between the stability of the steady state and the probability distribution of time delays, and provides a better way to investigate the influence of the distributed time delays in coupling on the global behavior of the systems. PMID:18643147

  19. Time-Delay Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinto, Massimo; Dhurandhar, Sanjeev V.

    2014-08-01

    Equal-arm detectors of gravitational radiation allow phase measurements many orders of magnitude below the intrinsic phase stability of the laser injecting light into their arms. This is because the noise in the laser light is common to both arms, experiencing exactly the same delay, and thus cancels when it is differenced at the photo detector. In this situation, much lower level secondary noises then set the overall performance. If, however, the two arms have different lengths (as will necessarily be the case with space-borne interferometers), the laser noise experiences different delays in the two arms and will hence not directly cancel at the detector. In order to solve this problem, a technique involving heterodyne interferometry with unequal arm lengths and independent phase-difference readouts has been proposed. It relies on properly time-shifting and linearly combining independent Doppler measurements, and for this reason it has been called time-delay interferometry (TDI). This article provides an overview of the theory, mathematical foundations, and experimental aspects associated with the implementation of TDI. Although emphasis on the application of TDI to the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission appears throughout this article, TDI can be incorporated into the design of any future space-based mission aiming to search for gravitational waves via interferometric measurements. We have purposely left out all theoretical aspects that data analysts will need to account for when analyzing the TDI data combinations.

  20. Precise estimation of tropospheric path delays with GPS techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    Tropospheric path delays are a major source of error in deep space tracking. However, the tropospheric-induced delay at tracking sites can be calibrated using measurements of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. A series of experiments has demonstrated the high sensitivity of GPS to tropospheric delays. A variety of tests and comparisons indicates that current accuracy of the GPS zenith tropospheric delay estimates is better than 1-cm root-mean-square over many hours, sampled continuously at intervals of six minutes. These results are consistent with expectations from covariance analyses. The covariance analyses also indicate that by the mid-1990s, when the GPS constellation is complete and the Deep Space Network is equipped with advanced GPS receivers, zenith tropospheric delay accuracy with GPS will improve further to 0.5 cm or better.

  1. Dissipation Bounds All Steady-State Current Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Gingrich, Todd R; Horowitz, Jordan M; Perunov, Nikolay; England, Jeremy L

    2016-03-25

    Near equilibrium, small current fluctuations are described by a Gaussian distribution with a linear-response variance regulated by the dissipation. Here, we demonstrate that dissipation still plays a dominant role in structuring large fluctuations arbitrarily far from equilibrium. In particular, we prove a linear-response-like bound on the large deviation function for currents in Markov jump processes. We find that nonequilibrium current fluctuations are always more likely than what is expected from a linear-response analysis. As a small-fluctuations corollary, we derive a recently conjectured uncertainty bound on the variance of current fluctuations. PMID:27058064

  2. Bounded limit for the Monte Carlo point-flux-estimator

    SciTech Connect

    Grimesey, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    In a Monte Carlo random walk the kernel K(R,E) is used as an expected value estimator at every collision for the collided flux phi/sub c/ r vector,E) at the detector point. A limiting value for the kernel is derived from a diffusion approximation for the probability current at a radius R/sub 1/ from the detector point. The variance of the collided flux at the detector point is thus bounded using this asymptotic form for K(R,E). The bounded point flux estimator is derived. (WHK)

  3. Sudden ionospheric delay decorrelation and its impact on WAAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, L.; Komjathy, A.; Boulat, B.; Mannucci, A.

    2002-01-01

    In the absence of selective availability, the ionosphere represents the largest source of positioning error for single-frequency users of the GPS. In differential GPS systems such as the Wide Angle Augmentation System, vertical ionospheric delays are modeled at regularly-spaced intervals in latitude and longitude. The broadcast bound on the error at each of these points is designated the grid ionospheric vertical erorr (GIVE). A critical integrity requirement of WAAS is that the broadcast GIVE bounds residual error with a very high degree of confidence.

  4. Search for quasi bound ? mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machner, H.

    2015-04-01

    The search for a quasi bound ? meson in atomic nuclei is reviewed. This tentative state is studied theoretically as well as experimentally. The theory starts from elastic ? nucleon scattering which is derived from production data within some models. From this interaction the ? nucleus interaction is derived. Model calculations predict binding energies and widths of the quasi bound state. Another method is to derive the ? nucleus interaction from excitation functions of ? production experiments. The s wave interaction is extracted from such data via final state interaction (FSI) theorem. We give the derivation of s wave amplitudes in partial wave expansion and in helicity amplitudes and their relation to observables. Different experiments extracting the FSI are discussed as are production experiments. So far only three experiments give evidence for the existence of the quasi bound state: a pion double charge exchange experiment, an effective mass measurement, and a transfer reaction at recoil free kinematics with observation of the decay of the state.

  5. Assessing delay discounting in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Suzanne H.

    2014-01-01

    Delay discounting (also intertemporal choice or impulsive choice) is the process by which delayed outcomes, such as delayed food delivery, are valued less than the same outcomes delivered immediately or with a shorter delay. This process is of interest because many psychopathologies, including substance dependence, pathological gambling, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder, are characterized by heightened levels of delay discounting. Some of these disorders are heritable, and data indicate that delay discounting also has a genetic component. To identify the genes underlying the delay discounting decision-making process and genetic correlates of heightened discounting, researchers have used mouse models. This unit describes a protocol for generating delay discounting behavior in mice and discusses analysis techniques for such behavior. PMID:24510779

  6. Tank 41H bounding uranium enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Cavin, W.S.

    1994-07-12

    The intent of this document is to combine data from salt samples and historical process information to bound the uranium (U-235) enrichment which could be expected in the upper portion of the salt in Tank 41H. This bounding enrichment will be used in another document to establish a nuclear safety basis for initial salt removal operations. During the processing period of interest (4/82-4/87), waste was fed to the 2H Evaporator from Tank 43H, and the evaporator bottoms were sent to Tank 41H where the bottoms were allowed to cool (resulting in the formation of salt deposits in the tank). As Tank 41H was filled with concentrate, the supernate left after salt formation was recycled back to Tank 43H and reprocessed through the evaporator along with any additional waste which had been added to Tank 43H. As Tank 41 H filled with salt, this recycle took place with increasing frequency because it took less time to fill the decreased volume with evaporator concentrate. By determining which of the sampled waste tanks were receiving fresh waste from the canyons at the time the tanks were sampled (from published transfer records), it was possible to deduce which samples were likely representative of fresh canyon waste. The processing that was being carried out in the Separation canyons when these tanks were sampled, should be comparable to the processing while Tank 41H was being filled.

  7. Delaying the International Spread of Pandemic Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ben S; Pitman, Richard J; Edmunds, W. John; Gay, Nigel J

    2006-01-01

    Background The recent emergence of hypervirulent subtypes of avian influenza has underlined the potentially devastating effects of pandemic influenza. Were such a virus to acquire the ability to spread efficiently between humans, control would almost certainly be hampered by limited vaccine supplies unless global spread could be substantially delayed. Moreover, the large increases that have occurred in international air travel might be expected to lead to more rapid global dissemination than in previous pandemics. Methods and Findings To evaluate the potential of local control measures and travel restrictions to impede global dissemination, we developed stochastic models of the international spread of influenza based on extensions of coupled epidemic transmission models. These models have been shown to be capable of accurately forecasting local and global spread of epidemic and pandemic influenza. We show that under most scenarios restrictions on air travel are likely to be of surprisingly little value in delaying epidemics, unless almost all travel ceases very soon after epidemics are detected. Conclusions Interventions to reduce local transmission of influenza are likely to be more effective at reducing the rate of global spread and less vulnerable to implementation delays than air travel restrictions. Nevertheless, under the most plausible scenarios, achievable delays are small compared with the time needed to accumulate substantial vaccine stocks. PMID:16640458

  8. Bounds on negativity of superpositions

    SciTech Connect

    Ou Yongcheng; Fan Heng

    2007-08-15

    For pure bipartite superposed states, the entanglement quantified by negativity is studied. If the entanglement is quantified by concurrence, we show that two pure states with high fidelity to one another have nearly the same entanglement. We deduce an inequality in which the concurrence is known to be a continuous function in infinite dimensions. The main result of this paper is to give the bounds on the negativity of a bipartite state in terms of the entanglement of the states being superposed. These bounds may be used in estimating the entanglement of a given state.

  9. Bounds for nonlocality distillation protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, Manuel

    2011-06-15

    Nonlocality can be quantified by the violation of a Bell inequality. Since this violation may be amplified by local operations, an alternative measure has been proposed--distillable nonlocality. The alternative measure is difficult to calculate exactly due to the double exponential growth of the parameter space. In this paper, we give a way to bound the distillable nonlocality of a resource by the solutions to a related optimization problem. Our upper bounds are exponentially easier to compute than the exact value and are shown to be meaningful in general and tight in some cases.

  10. Patient expectations of dental services. Image affects expectations, and expectations affect perceived service quality.

    PubMed

    Clow, K E; Fischer, A K; O'Bryan, D

    1995-01-01

    The authors construct a theoretical model of the antecedents of expectations for dental services by analyzing survey responses from 240 dental patients. The patients' image of the dentist, tangible cues, situational factors, and patient satisfaction with prior service encounters have the greatest influence on expectations of service, whereas marketing variables, such as price and advertising, appear to have no effect. PMID:10152791

  11. Signal functions in delayed reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Lattal, Kennon A.

    1984-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted with pigeons to examine the role of the signal in delay-of-reinforcement procedures. In the first, a blackout accompanying a period of nonreinforcement increased key-peck response rates maintained by immediate reinforcement. The effects of dissociating the blackout from the delay interval were examined in the second experiment. In three conditions, blackouts and unsignaled delays were negatively correlated or occurred randomly with respect to one another. A signaled delay and an unsignaled delay that omitted the blackouts were studied in two other conditions. All delay-of-reinforcement conditions generally produced response rates lower than those produced by immediate reinforcement. Signaled delays maintained higher response rates than did any of the various unsignaled-delay conditions, with or without dissociated blackouts. The effects of these latter conditions did not differ systematically from one another. The final experiment showed that response rates varied as a function of the frequency with which a blackout accompanied delay intervals. By eliminating a number of methodological difficulties present in previous delay-of-reinforcement experiments, these results suggest the importance of the signal in maintaining responding during delay-of-reinforcement procedures and, conversely, the importance of the delay interval in decreasing responding. PMID:16812387

  12. Further improvement on delay-range-dependent robust absolute stability for Lur'e uncertain systems with interval time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pin-Lin

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates improved delay-range-dependent robust absolute stability criteria for a class of Lur'e uncertain systems with interval time-varying delays. By using delayed decomposition approach (DDA), a tighter upper bound of the derivative of Lyapunov functional can be obtained, and thus the proposed criteria give results with less conservatism compared with some previous ones. An integral inequality approach (IIA) is proposed to reduce the conservativeness in computing the allowable maximum admissible upper bound (MAUB) of the time-delay. The developed stability condition is expressed in terms of linear matrix inequality (LMI) that manipulates fewer decision variables and requires reduced computational load. Finally, three numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed stability criteria. PMID:26234802

  13. Programmable Differential Delay Circuit With Fine Delay Adjustment

    DOEpatents

    DeRyckere, John F.; Jenkins, Philip Nord; Cornett, Frank Nolan

    2002-07-09

    Circuitry that provides additional delay to early arriving signals such that all data signals arrive at a receiving latch with same path delay. The delay of a forwarded clock reference is also controlled such that the capturing clock edge will be optimally positioned near quadrature (depending on latch setup/hold requirements). The circuitry continuously adapts to data and clock path delay changes and digital filtering of phase measurements reduce errors brought on by jittering data edges. The circuitry utilizes only the minimum amount of delay necessary to achieve objective thereby limiting any unintended jitter. Particularly, this programmable differential delay circuit with fine delay adjustment is designed to allow the skew between ASICS to be minimized. This includes skew between data bits, between data bits and clocks as well as minimizing the overall skew in a channel between ASICS.

  14. Physical activity extends life expectancy

    Cancer.gov

    Leisure-time physical activity is associated with longer life expectancy, even at relatively low levels of activity and regardless of body weight, according to a study by a team of researchers led by the NCI.

  15. What Employers Expect of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Roberts T.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the expectations held by employers for graduates in a world of global competition and rapid change, and discusses why preparation for work and for higher education now require the same academic standards. (EV)

  16. Performance Bounds on Two Concatenated, Interleaved Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Bruce; Dolinar, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    A method has been developed of computing bounds on the performance of a code comprised of two linear binary codes generated by two encoders serially concatenated through an interleaver. Originally intended for use in evaluating the performances of some codes proposed for deep-space communication links, the method can also be used in evaluating the performances of short-block-length codes in other applications. The method applies, more specifically, to a communication system in which following processes take place: At the transmitter, the original binary information that one seeks to transmit is first processed by an encoder into an outer code (Co) characterized by, among other things, a pair of numbers (n,k), where n (n > k)is the total number of code bits associated with k information bits and n k bits are used for correcting or at least detecting errors. Next, the outer code is processed through either a block or a convolutional interleaver. In the block interleaver, the words of the outer code are processed in blocks of I words. In the convolutional interleaver, the interleaving operation is performed bit-wise in N rows with delays that are multiples of B bits. The output of the interleaver is processed through a second encoder to obtain an inner code (Ci) characterized by (ni,ki). The output of the inner code is transmitted over an additive-white-Gaussian- noise channel characterized by a symbol signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) Es/No and a bit SNR Eb/No. At the receiver, an inner decoder generates estimates of bits. Depending on whether a block or a convolutional interleaver is used at the transmitter, the sequence of estimated bits is processed through a block or a convolutional de-interleaver, respectively, to obtain estimates of code words. Then the estimates of the code words are processed through an outer decoder, which generates estimates of the original information along with flags indicating which estimates are presumed to be correct and which are found to be erroneous. From the perspective of the present method, the topic of major interest is the performance of the communication system as quantified in the word-error rate and the undetected-error rate as functions of the SNRs and the total latency of the interleaver and inner code. The method is embodied in equations that describe bounds on these functions. Throughout the derivation of the equations that embody the method, it is assumed that the decoder for the outer code corrects any error pattern of t or fewer errors, detects any error pattern of s or fewer errors, may detect some error patterns of more than s errors, and does not correct any patterns of more than t errors. Because a mathematically complete description of the equations that embody the method and of the derivation of the equations would greatly exceed the space available for this article, it must suffice to summarize by reporting that the derivation includes consideration of several complex issues, including relationships between latency and memory requirements for block and convolutional codes, burst error statistics, enumeration of error-event intersections, and effects of different interleaving depths. In a demonstration, the method was used to calculate bounds on the performances of several communication systems, each based on serial concatenation of a (63,56) expurgated Hamming code with a convolutional inner code through a convolutional interleaver. The bounds calculated by use of the method were compared with results of numerical simulations of performances of the systems to show the regions where the bounds are tight (see figure).

  17. Combined expectancies: electrophysiological evidence for the adjustment of expectancy effects

    PubMed Central

    Mattler, Uwe; van der Lugt, Arie; Münte, Thomas F

    2006-01-01

    Background When subjects use cues to prepare for a likely stimulus or a likely response, reaction times are facilitated by valid cues but prolonged by invalid cues. In studies on combined expectancy effects, two cues can independently give information regarding two dimensions of the forthcoming task. In certain situations, cueing effects on one dimension are reduced when the cue on the other dimension is invalid. According to the Adjusted Expectancy Model, cues affect different processing levels and a mechanism is presumed which is sensitive to the validity of early level cues and leads to online adjustment of expectancy effects at later levels. To examine the predictions of this model cueing of stimulus modality was combined with response cueing. Results Behavioral measures showed the interaction of cueing effects. Electrophysiological measures of the lateralized readiness potential (LRP) and the N200 amplitude confirmed the predictions of the model. The LRP showed larger effects of response cues on response activation when modality cues were valid rather than invalid. N200 amplitude was largest with valid modality cues and invalid response cues, medium with invalid modality cues, and smallest with two valid cues. Conclusion Findings support the view that the validity of early level expectancies modulates the effects of late level expectancies, which included response activation and response conflict in the present study. PMID:16674805

  18. Wronskian Method for Bound States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple and straightforward method based on Wronskians for the calculation of bound-state energies and wavefunctions of one-dimensional quantum-mechanical problems. We explicitly discuss the asymptotic behaviour of the wavefunction and show that the allowed energies make the divergent part vanish. As illustrative examples we consider…

  19. Loosely-Bound Diatomic Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfour, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses concept of covalent bonding as related to homonuclear diatomic molecules. Article draws attention to the existence of bound rare gas and alkaline earth diatomic molecules. Summarizes their molecular parameters and offers spectroscopic data. Strength and variation with distance of interatomic attractive forces is given. (Author/SA)

  20. Adaptive Phase Delay Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    There are several experimental setups involving rotating machinery that require some form of synchronization. The adaptive phase delay generator (APDG) the Bencic-1000 is a flexible instrument that allows the user to generate pulses synchronized to the rising edge of a tachometer signal from any piece of rotating machinery. These synchronized pulses can vary by the delay angle, pulse width, number of pulses per period, number of skipped pulses, and total number of pulses. Due to the design of the pulse generator, any and all of these parameters can be changed independently, yielding an unparalleled level of versatility. There are two user interfaces to the APDG. The first is a LabVIEW program that has the advantage of displaying all of the pulse parameters and input signal data within one neatly organized window on the PC monitor. Furthermore, the LabVIEW interface plots the rpm of the two input signal channels in real time. The second user interface is a handheld portable device that goes anywhere a computer is not accessible. It consists of a liquid-crystal display and keypad, which enable the user to control the unit by scrolling through a host of command menus and parameter listings. The APDG combines all of the desired synchronization control into one unit. The experimenter can adjust the delay, pulse width, pulse count, number of skipped pulses, and produce a specified number of pulses per revolution. Each of these parameters can be changed independently, providing an unparalleled level of versatility when synchronizing hardware to a host of rotating machinery. The APDG allows experimenters to set up quickly and generate a host of synchronizing configurations using a simple user interface, which hopefully leads to faster results.

  1. Vehicle barrier with access delay

    DOEpatents

    Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

    2013-09-03

    An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

  2. [Delayed posthypoxic leukoencephalopathy: case reports].

    PubMed

    Okuda, Shiho; Ueno, Masao; Hayakawa, Michiko; Araki, Manabu; Kanda, Fumio; Takano, Shin

    2012-01-01

    Delayed posthypoxic leukoencephalopathy (DPL) is a rare and less well known complication of hypoxic brain injury. Although it is well known that anoxic or hypoxic injury produces acute neurologic deficits, DPL typically manifests days to weeks after apparent recovery from an obtunded state, and patients with DPL demonstrate cognitive impairment, high brain dysfunction, parkinsonism, or psychosis. MRI findings of the brain demonstrate deep white matter abnormalities. We report 2 cases of DPL after hypoxia due to benzodiazepine overdose. Both of our patients had normal arylsulfatase A activity. Although DPL is seen in carbon monoxide poisoning, pseudodeficiency of arylsulfatase A activity, or drug overdose with heroin or morphine, there are only some previous studies of DPL caused by an overdose with benzodiazepine. It is unclear whether neurotoxicity from the drug in addition to hypoxia alone is involved, however, it is important to note that overdose of common drugs as sleeping medicine can cause DPL. Since DPL may often be misdiagnosed and be subjected to unnecessary treatments, it is also important to understand its unique clinical course and MRI findings. With prompt recognition of DPL, we expect that more cases of DPL caused by overdose with benzodiazepine will be diagnosed, because benzodiazepine overdoses are common. PMID:22989903

  3. [Delayed endolymphatic hydrops].

    PubMed

    Giannoni, B; Pagnini, P; Vannucchi, P

    1998-08-01

    Delayed Endolymphatic Hydrops (DEH) is a disease entity that must be distinguished from idiopathic endolymphatic hydrops (Ménière's disease). Idiopathic hydrops is characterized by the following symptoms: 1) vertigo often accompanied by nausea and vomiting; 2) tinnitus; 3) hearing loss, usually fluctuating; and 4) sensation of pressure or fullness in the affected ear. Idiopathic hydrops most commonly occurs in middle-aged patients, usually between 30 and 50 years. It may involve one or both ears and usually exibits fluctuating hearing loss and episodic vertigo, although one symptom may precede the other by months or years. It is rare for Ménière's disease to present with a severe sensorineural hearing loss. Delayed Endolymphatic Hydrops was first described, under the name of "unilateral deafness with subsequent vertigo", by Wolfson and Lieberman and Nadol et al.; this was later confirmed by other authors. The disease is characterized by a profound sensorineural hearing loss in one ear, found to have been present in most cases from early childhood, due to an unknown cause, trauma or viral infections. After a prolonged period (usually many years) patients with DEH experience the onset of episodic vertigo from the deaf ear (Ipsilateral Delayed Endolymphatic Hydrops) or develop a fluctuating hearing loss and/or episodic vertigo in the opposite ear, previously with normal hearing (Controlateral Delayed Endolymphatic Hydrops). Vestibular symptoms are identical to those of Ménière's disease: in fact there is evidence that endolymphatic hydrops in the previously damaged ear or in the previously normal ear represents at least part of the labyrinthine pathology. Histopathology studies recently conducted on temporal bones of subjects affected with controlateral DEH show pathologic changes in the deaf ears similar to those found in viral labyrinthitis, whereas pathologic changes in the hearing ears resemble those known to occur in Ménière's disease. Medical treatment has not been found to be effective in patients with DEH, but it must be the first choice of treatment especially in controlateral forms of the disease. So far, surgical intervention has been demonstrated to give the best results; either conservative or more radical, depending on the type of DEH. Pharmacological labyrinthectomy with ototoxic drugs could be the therapy of choice in the future. In this paper we review the literature in order to summarize the clinical features and criteria for diagnosing DEH, we also report histopathologic findings and pathogenetic hypotheses formulated for this syndrome. Moreover, we discuss the best therapeutic approach for the ipsilateral and controlateral variants of DEH. PMID:10205936

  4. Titania bound sodium titanate ion exchanger

    DOEpatents

    DeFilippi, Irene C. G.; Yates, Stephen Frederic; Shen, Jian-Kun; Gaita, Romulus; Sedath, Robert Henry; Seminara, Gary Joseph; Straszewski, Michael Peter; Anderson, David Joseph

    1999-03-23

    This invention is method for preparing a titania bound ion exchange composition comprising admixing crystalline sodium titanate and a hydrolyzable titanium compound and, thereafter drying the titania bound crystalline sodium titanate and subjecting the dried titania bound ion exchange composition to optional compaction and calcination steps to improve the physical strength of the titania bound composition.

  5. Complex network synchronization of chaotic systems with delay coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Theesar, S. Jeeva Sathya Ratnavelu, K.

    2014-03-05

    The study of complex networks enables us to understand the collective behavior of the interconnected elements and provides vast real time applications from biology to laser dynamics. In this paper, synchronization of complex network of chaotic systems has been studied. Every identical node in the complex network is assumed to be in Lur’e system form. In particular, delayed coupling has been assumed along with identical sector bounded nonlinear systems which are interconnected over network topology.

  6. Raising Expectations for Mathematics Instruction in California: Algebra and beyond. Policy and Practice Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitter, Catherine; O'Day, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    As expectations for students to meet high academic standards have risen over the past two decades, so have the expectations for students to complete, and excel in, more rigorous mathematics courses. Once a course reserved only for the college-bound, algebra is now a graduation requirement for all California students as well as an early "gateway"…

  7. Viewing Majorana Bound States by Rabi Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Liang, Qi-Feng; Yao, Dao-Xin; Hu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    We propose to use Rabi oscillation as a probe to view the fractional Josepshon relation (FJR) associated with Majorana bound states (MBSs) expected in one-dimensional topological superconductors. The system consists of a quantum dot (QD) and an rf-SQUID with MBSs at the Josephson junction. Rabi oscillations between energy levels formed by MBSs are induced by ac gate voltage controlling the coupling between QD and MBS when the photon energy proportional to the ac frequency matches gap between quantum levels formed by MBSs and QD. As a manifestation of the Rabi oscillation in the whole system involving MBSs, the electron occupation on QD oscillates with time, which can be measured by charge sensing techniques. With Floquet theorem and numerical analysis we reveal that from the resonant driving frequency for coherent Rabi oscillation one can directly map out the FJR cos(πΦ/Φ0) as a signature of MBSs, with Φ the magnetic flux through SQUID and Φ0 = hc/2e the flux quantum. The present scheme is expected to provide a clear evidence for MBSs under intensive searching. PMID:26153250

  8. Viewing Majorana Bound States by Rabi Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi; Liang, Qi-Feng; Yao, Dao-Xin; Hu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    We propose to use Rabi oscillation as a probe to view the fractional Josepshon relation (FJR) associated with Majorana bound states (MBSs) expected in one-dimensional topological superconductors. The system consists of a quantum dot (QD) and an rf-SQUID with MBSs at the Josephson junction. Rabi oscillations between energy levels formed by MBSs are induced by ac gate voltage controlling the coupling between QD and MBS when the photon energy proportional to the ac frequency matches gap between quantum levels formed by MBSs and QD. As a manifestation of the Rabi oscillation in the whole system involving MBSs, the electron occupation on QD oscillates with time, which can be measured by charge sensing techniques. With Floquet theorem and numerical analysis we reveal that from the resonant driving frequency for coherent Rabi oscillation one can directly map out the FJR cos(πΦ/Φ0) as a signature of MBSs, with Φ the magnetic flux through SQUID and Φ0 = hc/2e the flux quantum. The present scheme is expected to provide a clear evidence for MBSs under intensive searching. PMID:26153250

  9. Broken Expectations: Violation of Expectancies, Not Novelty, Captures Auditory Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vachon, Francois; Hughes, Robert W.; Jones, Dylan M.

    2012-01-01

    The role of memory in behavioral distraction by auditory attentional capture was investigated: We examined whether capture is a product of the novelty of the capturing event (i.e., the absence of a recent memory for the event) or its violation of learned expectancies on the basis of a memory for an event structure. Attentional capture--indicated…

  10. Sharp bounds on the radius of relativistic charged spheres: Guilfoyle's stars saturate the Buchdahl-Andréasson bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, José P. S.; Zanchin, Vilson T.

    2015-07-01

    Buchdahl, by imposing a few reasonable physical assumptions on matter, i.e., its density is a nonincreasing function of the radius and the fluid is a perfect fluid, and on the configuration, such as the exterior is the Schwarzschild solution, found that the radius r0 to mass m ratio of a star would obey the bound {{r}0}/m≥slant 9/4, the Buchdahl bound. He also noted that the bound was saturated by the Schwarzschild interior solution, i.e., the solution with {{ρ }m}(r)=constant, where {{ρ }m}(r) is the energy density of the matter at r, when the central central pressure blows to infinity. Generalizations of this bound in various forms have been studied. An important generalization was given by Andréasson, by including electrically charged matter and imposing a different set of conditions, namely, p+2{{p}T}≤slant {{ρ }m}, where p is the radial pressure and pT the tangential pressure. His bound is sharp and given by {{r}0}/m≥slant 9/{{(1+\\sqrt{1+3 {{q}2}/r02})}2}, the Buchdahl-Andréasson bound, with q being the total electric charge of the star. For q = 0 one recovers the Buchdahl bound. However, following Andréasson's proof, the configuration that saturates the Buchdahl bound is an uncharged shell, rather than the Schwarzschild interior solution. By extension, the configurations that saturate the electrically charged Buchdahl-Andréasson bound are charged shells. One could expect then, in turn, that there should exist an electrically charged equivalent to the interior Schwarzschild limit. We find here that this equivalent is provided by the equation {{ρ }m}(r)+{{Q}2}(r)/(8π {{r}4})=constant, where Q(r) is the electric charge at r. This equation was put forward by Cooperstock and de la Cruz, and Florides, and realized in Guilfoyle's stars. When the central pressure goes to infinity, Guilfoyle's stars are configurations that also saturate the Buchdahl-Andréasson bound. A proof in Buchdahl's manner, such that these configurations are the limiting configurations of the bound, remains to be found.

  11. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Volk; Keith Wisecarver

    2003-09-26

    Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking.

  12. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Volk; Keith Wisecarver

    2004-09-26

    Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking.

  13. Bounding the heat trace of a Calabi-Yau manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiset, Marc-Antoine; Walcher, Johannes

    2015-09-01

    The SCHOK bound states that the number of marginal deformations of certain two-dimensional conformal field theories is bounded linearly from above by the number of relevant operators. In conformal field theories defined via sigma models into Calabi-Yau manifolds, relevant operators can be estimated, in the point-particle approximation, by the low-lying spectrum of the scalar Laplacian on the manifold. In the strict large volume limit, the standard asymptotic expansion of Weyl and Minakshisundaram-Pleijel diverges with the higher-order curvature invariants. We propose that it would be sufficient to find an a priori uniform bound on the trace of the heat kernel for large but finite volume. As a first step in this direction, we then study the heat trace asymptotics, as well as the actual spectrum of the scalar Laplacian, in the vicinity of a conifold singularity. The eigenfunctions can be written in terms of confluent Heun functions, the analysis of which gives evidence that regions of large curvature will not prevent the existence of a bound of this type. This is also in line with general mathematical expectations about spectral continuity for manifolds with conical singularities. A sharper version of our results could, in combination with the SCHOK bound, provide a basis for a global restriction on the dimension of the moduli space of Calabi-Yau manifolds.

  14. Flight parameter estimation using time delay and intersensor multipath delay measurements from a small aperture acoustic array.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kam W

    2013-07-01

    A ground-based acoustic sensor array can be used to estimate the complete set of flight parameters of a jet aircraft or other airborne source of broadband sound in transit by measuring the differential time of arrival (DTOA), or the time delay, of the direct path signal at each sensor pair of the array over a sufficiently long period of time. This paper studies the possibility of using intersensor multipath delay measurements to improve the precision of the flight parameter estimates for a small aperture array, without increasing the array's intersensor spacing or the observation time for more time delay measurements. Intersensor multipath delay is defined as the DTOA of the direct path signal at one sensor and the ground-reflected path signal at another sensor. The flight parameter estimation algorithm is formulated and a simplified Cramer-Rao lower bound error analysis is presented, which shows that the standard deviations in the flight parameter estimates are greatly reduced when intersensor multipath delay measurements are used together with time delay measurements. The effectiveness of the proposed flight parameter estimation method for small aperture arrays is verified using both simulated and real data. PMID:23862781

  15. 78 FR 18326 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math Science... Upward Bound Math Science Annual Performance Report. OMB Control Number: 1840-NEW. Type of Review: New... under the regular Upward Bound (UB) and Upward Bound Math and Science (UBMS) Programs. The Department...

  16. BOUNDS ON BLACK HOLE SPINS

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Ruth A.

    2009-05-01

    Beam powers and black hole masses of 48 extended radio sources are combined to obtain lower bounds on the spins and magnetic field strengths of supermassive black holes. This is done in the context of the models of Blandford and Znajek (the 'BZ' model) and Meier; a parameterization for bounds in the context of other models is suggested. The bounds obtained for very powerful classical double radio sources in the BZ model are consistent with black hole spins of order unity for sources at high redshift. The black hole spins are largest for the highest redshift sources and decrease for sources at lower redshift; the sources studied have redshifts between zero and two. Lower-power radio sources associated with central dominant galaxies may have black hole spins that are significantly less than one. Combining this analysis with other results suggests that the maximum values of black hole spin associated with powerful radio galaxies decline from values of order unity at a redshift of 2 to values of order 0.7 at a redshift of zero, falling roughly as {radical}(()1+z), while lower power radio sources have spin values that range from about 0.1 to 0.8. These black hole spin values decrease if the data are considered in the context of the Meier model rather than the BZ model.

  17. Soviet delays raise prices

    SciTech Connect

    Young, I.

    1992-01-15

    The breakup of the Soviet Union is causing massive disruptions to methanol exports. The changeover to a Commonwealth of independent States has created logistical problems which have led some shipments of Russian methanol to be cancelled and delayed other deliveries by up to two weeks. In recent years the Soviet Union has exported 700,000 m.t./year-900,000 m.t./year of methanol, mainly to Western Europe. The product is made at 750,000-m.t./year plants at Tomsk and Gubakha in Russia and transported by rail for shipment from the ports of Ventspils, Latvia, on the Baltic Sea and Yuzhnyy in Ukraine, on the Black Sea. The exports were handled by state export agency Soyuzagrochim, mainly under contract to West European traders and consumers in areas like Scandinavia and France.

  18. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1984-08-07

    Polybismaleimides prepared by delayed curing of bis-imides having the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the --(CH.sub.2).sub.n -- group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine.

  19. Stability analysis of fuzzy Markovian jumping Cohen-Grossberg BAM neural networks with mixed time-varying delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathy, R.; Balasubramaniam, P.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the robust stability of uncertain fuzzy Markovian jumping Cohen-Grossberg BAM neural networks with discrete and distributed time-varying delays. A new delay-dependent stability condition is derived under uncertain switching probabilities by Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model. Based on the linear matrix inequality (LMI) technique, upper bounds for the discrete and distributed delays are calculated using the LMI toolbox in MATLAB. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Great Expectations and New Beginnings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Frances A.

    2009-01-01

    Great Expectation and New Beginnings is a prenatal family support program run by the Family, Infant, and Preschool Program (FIPP) in North Carolina. FIPP has developed an evidence-based integrated framework of early childhood intervention and family support that includes three primary components: providing intervention in everyday family

  1. Primary expectations of secondary metabolites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant secondary metabolites (e.g., phenolics) are important for human health, in addition to the organoleptic properties they impart to fresh and processed foods. Consumer expectations such as appearance, taste, or texture influence their purchasing decisions. Thorough identification of phenolic com...

  2. Children's Judgments of Expected Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlottmann, Anne; Anderson, Norman H.

    1994-01-01

    Expected value judgments of 5- through 10-year-olds were studied by having children view roulette-type games and make judgments of how happy a puppet playing the game would be. Even the youngest children showed some understanding of probability dependence, with children under eight using an additive integration rule and children eight and older…

  3. Career Expectations of Accounting Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elam, Dennis; Mendez, Francis

    2010-01-01

    The demographic make-up of accounting students is dramatically changing. This study sets out to measure how well the profession is ready to accommodate what may be very different needs and expectations of this new generation of students. Non-traditional students are becoming more and more of a tradition in the current college classroom.…

  4. Undergraduates' Perceptions of Employer Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPre, Carrie; Williams, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Research conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) indicates that employers across industries seek similar skills in job applicants; yet employers often report finding these desired skills lacking in new hires. This study closes the gap in understanding between employer expectations and student perceptions regarding…

  5. Great Expectations and New Beginnings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Frances A.

    2009-01-01

    Great Expectation and New Beginnings is a prenatal family support program run by the Family, Infant, and Preschool Program (FIPP) in North Carolina. FIPP has developed an evidence-based integrated framework of early childhood intervention and family support that includes three primary components: providing intervention in everyday family…

  6. Metaphors As Storehouses of Expectation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beavis, Allan K.; Thomas, A. Ross

    1996-01-01

    Explores how metaphors are used to identify and store some expectations that structure schools' interactions and communications. Outlines a systems-theoretical view of schools derived from Niklas Luhmann's social theories. Illustrates how the metaphors identified in an earlier study provide material contexts for identifying and storing structures…

  7. Just What Do You Expect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Philip R.

    1990-01-01

    Boards should clearly establish what is expected of the university president, including the six elements of good leadership: tolerance of freedom, tolerance of uncertainty, the ability to integrate motives and efforts into a meaningful aggregate, the ability to persuade, the ability to represent the institution, and influence with superiors. (MSE)

  8. Privacy Expectations in Online Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pure, Rebekah Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Advances in digital networked communication technology over the last two decades have brought the issue of personal privacy into sharper focus within contemporary public discourse. In this dissertation, I explain the Fourth Amendment and the role that privacy expectations play in the constitutional protection of personal privacy generally, and…

  9. Expected value of information and decision making in HTA.

    PubMed

    Eckermann, Simon; Willan, Andrew R

    2007-02-01

    Decision makers within a jurisdiction facing evidence of positive but uncertain incremental net benefit of a new health care intervention have viable options where no further evidence is anticipated to:(1)adopt the new intervention without further evidence;(2)adopt the new intervention and undertake a trial; or(3)delay the decision and undertake a trial.Value of information methods have been shown previously to allow optimal design of clinical trials in comparing option (2) against option (1), by trading off the expected value and cost of sample information. However, this previous research has not considered the effect of cost of reversal on expected value of information in comparing these options. This paper demonstrates that, where a new intervention is adopted, the expected value of information is reduced under optimal decision making with costs of reversing decisions. Further, the paper shows that comparing expected net gain of optimally designed trials for option (2) vs (1) conditional on cost of reversal, and (3) vs (1) conditional on opportunity cost of delay allow systematic identification of an optimal decision strategy and trial design. PMID:16981193

  10. [Delayed deltoid-pectoral flap].

    PubMed

    Zapater, E; Ferrandis, E; Vendrell, J B

    2002-01-01

    Delayed flaps include surgical techniques performed in order to diminish the blood supply of a flap before placing it at the definitive location. The purpose is to improve the irrigation of the distal region of the flap. Three cases of head and neck reconstructions with delayed deltopectoral flaps are reported. Literature about anatomic and physiologic phenomenon occurred during the delay period is reviewed, as well as the different surgical techniques described to delay a flap. We think that the deltopectoral flap remains an adequate technique, being indicated when the reconstruction is impossible with local flaps. That is the case of defects or irradiated regions. In our opinion, if the deltoid region of the flap is necessary to the reconstruction it is recommended to delay the flap, to increase the probability of complete survival at the distal region. In our cases the delay period has been one week, obtaining a complete survival of the flap in all of them. PMID:12462920

  11. Lower bound for quantum phase estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Bessen, Arvid J.

    2005-04-01

    We obtain a query lower bound for quantum algorithms solving the phase estimation problem. Our analysis generalizes existing lower-bound approaches to the case where the oracle Q is given by controlled powers Q{sup p} of Q, as it is, for example, in Shor's order-finding algorithm. In this setting we will prove a {omega}(log 1/{epsilon}) lower bound for the number of applications of Q{sup p{sub 1}}, Q{sup p{sub 2}},.... This bound is tight due to a matching upper bound. We obtain the lower bound using a technique based on frequency analysis.

  12. Causal entropy bound for a spacelike region.

    PubMed

    Brustein, R; Veneziano, G

    2000-06-19

    The identification of a causal-connection scale motivates us to propose a new covariant bound on entropy within a generic spacelike region. This "causal entropy bound," scaling as sqrt[EV], and thus lying around the geometric mean of Bekenstein's S/ER and holographic S/A bounds, is checked in various "critical" situations. In the case of limited gravity, Bekenstein's bound is the strongest while naive holography is the weakest. In the case of strong gravity, our bound and Bousso's holographic bound are stronger than Bekenstein's, while naive holography is too tight, and hence typically wrong. PMID:10991034

  13. Causal Entropy Bound for a Spacelike Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brustein, R.; Veneziano, G.

    2000-06-01

    The identification of a causal-connection scale motivates us to propose a new covariant bound on entropy within a generic spacelike region. This ``causal entropy bound,'' scaling as EV, and thus lying around the geometric mean of Bekenstein's S/ER and holographic S/A bounds, is checked in various ``critical'' situations. In the case of limited gravity, Bekenstein's bound is the strongest while naive holography is the weakest. In the case of strong gravity, our bound and Bousso's holographic bound are stronger than Bekenstein's, while naive holography is too tight, and hence typically wrong.

  14. Current switch has built-in time delay: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jesch, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Switch concept provides simple means of achieving electromechanical time delay function. Unit consists of reed-type circuit breaker enclosed by copper tubing with electromagnetic coil wound around tubing and entire assembly mounted on insulating platform. Characteristics are affected only by geometry of system so device is expected to be very stable.

  15. PRECISION TIME-DELAY CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1959-03-17

    A tine-delay circuit which produces a delay time in d. The circuit a capacitor, an te back resistance, connected serially with the anode of the diode going to ground. At the start of the time delay a negative stepfunction is applied to the series circuit and initiates a half-cycle transient oscillatory voltage terminated by a transient oscillatory voltage of substantially higher frequency. The output of the delay circuit is taken at the junction of the inductor and diode where a sudden voltage rise appears after the initiation of the higher frequency transient oscillations.

  16. Robust state estimation for uncertain neural networks with time-varying delay.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Feng, Gang; Cao, Jinde

    2008-08-01

    The robust state estimation problem for a class of uncertain neural networks with time-varying delay is studied in this paper. The parameter uncertainties are assumed to be norm bounded. Based on a new bounding technique, a sufficient condition is presented to guarantee the existence of the desired state estimator for the uncertain delayed neural networks. The criterion is dependent on the size of the time-varying delay and on the size of the time derivative of the time-varying delay. It is shown that the design of the robust state estimator for such neural networks can be achieved by solving a linear matrix inequality (LMI), which can be easily facilitated by using some standard numerical packages. Finally, two simulation examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed approach. PMID:18701365

  17. A time delay controller for magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youcef-Toumi, K.; Reddy, S.

    1991-01-01

    The control of systems with unknown dynamics and unpredictable disturbances has raised some challenging problems. This is particularly important when high system performance needs to be guaranteed at all times. Recently, the Time Delay Control has been suggested as an alternative control scheme. The proposed control system does not require an explicit plant model nor does it depend on the estimation of specific plant parameters. Rather, it combines adaptation with past observations to directly estimate the effect of the plant dynamics. A control law is formulated for a class of dynamic systems and a sufficient condition is presented for control systems stability. The derivation is based on the bounded input-bounded output stability approach using L sub infinity function norms. The control scheme is implemented on a five degrees of freedom high speed and high precision magnetic bearing. The control performance is evaluated using step responses, frequency responses, and disturbance rejection properties. The experimental data show an excellent control performance despite the system complexity.

  18. Hopes and expectations with GREGOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneer, F.

    2012-11-01

    This contribution to the series of GREGOR inauguration articles addresses the history of the GREGOR telescope. It was obvious since a long time that the study of the atmospheric dynamics on the Sun needs telescopes with a large aperture. So the first plans to replace the 40 years old Gregory-Coudé Telescope, with its 45 cm primary mirror, by a large, 1.5-meter telescope date back to 1997. After a positive review of the project by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in 2000, the large financial support started in 2000. Unfortunately, the new technology of the Cesic mirrors was not yet ripe to produce the large primary mirror with this light-weight material. So, the project was much delayed. After recollecting for the reader several dates, I also go through some properties of GREGOR. I recall the aims of the project and discuss difficulties and ways to realise the intentions.

  19. The Delayed Stress Syndrome: A Pathological Delayed Grief Reaction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widdison, Harold A.; Salisbury, Howard G.

    1990-01-01

    Social and psychological problems displayed by Vietnam veterans have been classified as "Delayed Stress Syndrome." Grief theory provides model that helps explain reactions. Failure to resolve grief can result in delayed reactions. Vietnam experience was replete with significant traumatic losses; many were not resolved. Some Vietnam veterans later…

  20. Efficient rejection-based simulation of biochemical reactions with stochastic noise and delays.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Vo Hong; Priami, Corrado; Zunino, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new exact stochastic rejection-based simulation algorithm for biochemical reactions and extend it to systems with delays. Our algorithm accelerates the simulation by pre-computing reaction propensity bounds to select the next reaction to perform. Exploiting such bounds, we are able to avoid recomputing propensities every time a (delayed) reaction is initiated or finished, as is typically necessary in standard approaches. Propensity updates in our approach are still performed, but only infrequently and limited for a small number of reactions, saving computation time and without sacrificing exactness. We evaluate the performance improvement of our algorithm by experimenting with concrete biological models. PMID:25296793

  1. Efficient rejection-based simulation of biochemical reactions with stochastic noise and delays

    SciTech Connect

    Thanh, Vo Hong; Priami, Corrado; Zunino, Roberto

    2014-10-07

    We propose a new exact stochastic rejection-based simulation algorithm for biochemical reactions and extend it to systems with delays. Our algorithm accelerates the simulation by pre-computing reaction propensity bounds to select the next reaction to perform. Exploiting such bounds, we are able to avoid recomputing propensities every time a (delayed) reaction is initiated or finished, as is typically necessary in standard approaches. Propensity updates in our approach are still performed, but only infrequently and limited for a small number of reactions, saving computation time and without sacrificing exactness. We evaluate the performance improvement of our algorithm by experimenting with concrete biological models.

  2. The future is risky: discounting of delayed and uncertain outcomes.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Marianna; El-Deredy, Wael

    2013-03-01

    The world is full of choices where outcomes are both delayed and probabilistic. Whilst the delay discounting framework provides a platform for examining the relationship between dimensions of time and probability, the majority of research has considered these factors in isolation, or made assumptions about their equivalence. In order to address these issues, we present a novel measurement approach for assessing the discounting of delayed and uncertain outcomes. We conducted two experiments which compared discounting on three types of delay discounting task (standard, uncertain outcome, and uncertain amount) and examined the robustness of using a delayed and uncertain outcome's certainty equivalent relative to its expected value as a method for measuring discount rates. Both experiments demonstrated that discounting is best modelled by a hyperbolic function that describes subjective values relative to their certain equivalents. Moreover, when modelled this way, clear differences emerged between the different aspects of uncertainty (outcome vs. amount) dependent on whether outcomes were delayed gains or losses. This was true for both group and individual delay discounting data, as well as for both outcomes that were uncertain with respect to whether they would occur or not and outcomes that were uncertain with respect to what their magnitude would be when they occurred. PMID:23201372

  3. Apparent enrichment of organically bound tritium in rivers explained by the heritage of our past.

    PubMed

    Eyrolle-Boyer, Frédérique; Boyer, Patrick; Claval, David; Charmasson, Sabine; Cossonnet, Catherine

    2014-10-01

    The global inventory of naturally produced tritium (3H) is estimated at 2.65 kg, whereas more than 600 kg have been released during atmospheric nuclear tests (NCRP, 1979; UNSCEAR, 2000) constituting the main source of artificial tritium throughout the Anthropocene. The behaviour of this radioactive isotope in the environment has been widely studied since the 1950s, both through laboratory experiments and, more recently, through field observations (e.g., Cline, 1953; Kirchmann et al., 1979; Daillant et al., 2004; McCubbin et al., 2001; Kim et al., 2012). In its "free" forms, [i.e. 3H gas or 3H hydride (HT); methyl 3H gas (CH3T); tritiated H2O or 3H-oxide (HTO); and Tissue Free Water 3H (TFWT)], tritium closely follows the water cycle. However, 3H bound with organic compounds, mainly during the basic stages of photosynthesis or through weak hydrogen links, is less exchangeable with water, which explains its persistence in the carbon cycle as re underlined recently by Baglan et al. (2013), Jean-Batiste and Fourré (2013), Kim et al. (2013a,b). In this paper, we demonstrate that terrestrial biomass pools, historically contaminated by global atmospheric fallout from nuclear testing, have constituted a significant delayed source of organically bound tritium (OBT) for aquatic systems, resulting in an apparent enrichment of OBT as compared to HTO. This finding helps to explain concentration factors (tritium concentration in biota/concentration in water) greater than 1 observed in areas that are not directly affected by industrial radioactive wastes, and thus sheds light on the controversies regarding tritium 'bioaccumulation'. Such apparent enrichment of OBT is expected to be more pronounced in the Northern Hemisphere where fallout was most significant, depending on the nature and biodegradability of terrestrial biomass at the regional scale. We further believe that OBT transfers from the continent to oceans have been sufficient to affect tritium concentrations in coastal marine biota (i.e., near river inputs). Our findings demonstrate that the persistence of terrestrial organic (3)H explains imbalances between organically bound tritium and free (3)H in most river systems in particular those not impacted by releases from nuclear facilities. PMID:24956583

  4. Treatment expectancy among psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Collins, J; Hyer, L

    1986-07-01

    Treatment expectation (TE) is an important variable in treatment outcome. This study addressed two issues: The relationship of TE to treatment outcome and an identification of background and treatment variables most related to TE. As part of a cooperative study at 18 Veterans Administration Medical Centers on 79 general psychiatric wards, psychiatric inpatients were given the Veterans Adjustment Scale (VETS), and a significant other was mailed a Personal Adjustment and Role Skills Scale (PARS) at admission and 3 months after discharge. A Treatment Expectation measure was obtained from the VETS Scale at admission. Background and treatment factors also were obtained. Selected analyses controlled for the effects of patient input characteristics allowing for better outcome measures. Analyses also were cross validated. Results show that TE is related to treatment outcome and that a coterie of background and treatment variables are related to TE. Three factors especially influence TE-age, high vigor, and less alienation. PMID:3745453

  5. Stability Analysis of Uncertain Switched Delay Systems: A Time-Varying Lyapunov Function Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ganji; Luo, Shixian; Chen, Wu-Hua

    Exponential stability for switched systems with uncertain parameters and time-varying delay is considered in this paper. The parametric uncertainties are assumed to be time-varying and norm-bounded. By introducing a novel piecewise time-varying Lyapunov function and using Razumikhin techniques, some linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) stability criteria are derived to guarantee the exponential stability of the switched delay systems. A numerical example is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Effects of the gaseous and liquid water content of the atmosphere on range delay and Doppler frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flock, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    When high precision is required for range measurement on Earth space paths, it is necessary to correct as accurately as possible for excess range delays due to the dry air, water vapor, and liquid water content of the atmosphere. Calculations based on representative values of atmospheric parameters are useful for illustrating the order of magnitude of the expected delays. Range delay, time delay, and phase delay are simply and directly related. Doppler frequency variations or noise are proportional to the time rate of change of excess range delay. Tropospheric effects were examined as part of an overall consideration of the capability of precision two way ranging and Doppler systems.

  7. Bound potassium in muscle II.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Z

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were performed to decide between the alternatives a) the ionized K+ is in a dissolved state in the muscle water, or b) a part of the muscle potassium is in a "bound' state. Sartorius muscles of Rana esculenta were put into glicerol for about one hour at 0-2 degrees C. Most of muscle water came out, but most of muscle potassium remained in the muscles. In contrast to this: from muscle in heat rigor more potassium was released due to glicerol treating than from the intact ones. 1. Supposition a) is experimentally refuted. 2. Supposition b) corresponds to the experimental results. PMID:6969511

  8. Error bounds in cascading regressions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlinger, M.R.; Troutman, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Cascading regressions is a technique for predicting a value of a dependent variable when no paired measurements exist to perform a standard regression analysis. Biases in coefficients of a cascaded-regression line as well as error variance of points about the line are functions of the correlation coefficient between dependent and independent variables. Although this correlation cannot be computed because of the lack of paired data, bounds can be placed on errors through the required properties of the correlation coefficient. The potential meansquared error of a cascaded-regression prediction can be large, as illustrated through an example using geomorphologic data. ?? 1985 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  9. Entropy bounds and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Stephen D. H.

    2004-07-01

    Entropy bounds render quantum corrections to the cosmological constant Λ finite. Under certain assumptions, the natural value of Λ is of order the observed dark energy density ~10-10 eV4, thereby resolving the cosmological constant problem. We note that the dark energy equation of state in these scenarios is w≡p/ρ=0 over cosmological distances, and is strongly disfavored by observational data. Alternatively, Λ in these scenarios might account for the diffuse dark matter component of the cosmological energy density. Permanent address: Institute of Theoretical Science and Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403.

  10. Removal of bound metal fasteners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, R. F.

    1981-04-01

    This project explored the removal of bound metal fasteners through the use of ultrasonically assisted wrenches. Two wrenches were designed, fabricated and tested. Previous studies had indicated an increase in thread tension for a given torque application under the influence of ultrasonics. Based on this, the loosening of seized and corroded fasteners with the aid of ultrasonics was explored. Experimental data confirmed our prior analysis of the torque-tension relationship under the influence of ultrasonics; however, our progress did not satisfy the requirements necessary to loosen seized studs in a shipyard environment.

  11. Voronoi Diagrams Without Bounding Boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, E. T. K.

    2015-10-01

    We present a technique for presenting geographic data in Voronoi diagrams without having to specify a bounding box. The method restricts Voronoi cells to points within a user-defined distance of the data points. The mathematical foundation of the approach is presented as well. The cell clipping method is particularly useful for presenting geographic data that is spread in an irregular way over a map, as for example the Dutch dialect data displayed in Figure 2. The automatic generation of reasonable cell boundaries also makes redundant a frequently used solution to this problem that requires data owners to specify region boundaries, as in Goebl (2010) and Nerbonne et al (2011).

  12. Delay Adjusted Incidence Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This Infographic shows the National Cancer Institute SEER Incidence Trends. The graphs show the Average Annual Percent Change (AAPC) 2002-2011. For Men, Thyroid: 5.3*,Liver & IBD: 3.6*, Melanoma: 2.3*, Kidney: 2.0*, Myeloma: 1.9*, Pancreas: 1.2*, Leukemia: 0.9*, Oral Cavity: 0.5, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: 0.3*, Esophagus: -0.1, Brain & ONS: -0.2*, Bladder: -0.6*, All Sites: -1.1*, Stomach: -1.7*, Larynx: -1.9*, Prostate: -2.1*, Lung & Bronchus: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -3/0*. For Women, Thyroid: 5.8*, Liver & IBD: 2.9*, Myeloma: 1.8*, Kidney: 1.6*, Melanoma: 1.5, Corpus & Uterus: 1.3*, Pancreas: 1.1*, Leukemia: 0.6*, Brain & ONS: 0, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: -0.1, All Sites: -0.1, Breast: -0.3, Stomach: -0.7*, Oral Cavity: -0.7*, Bladder: -0.9*, Ovary: -0.9*, Lung & Bronchus: -1.0*, Cervix: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -2.7*. * AAPC is significantly different from zero (p<.05). Rates were adjusted for reporting delay in the registry. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  13. Delayed carotid wallstent shortening

    PubMed Central

    Garriboli, L.; Jannello, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) has been demonstrated to be safe and an acceptable alternative to surgery. Stent malpositioning can occur during the maneuvers of delivering; technical errors can lead to proximal or distal slipping of the stent that needs the placement of additional pieces. Presentation of Case We describe the case of a postoperative dislocation of a carotid stent that happened 1 year after placement. After the first ultrasound control confirmed the correct position of the Stent the following one, executed 9 months later, showed a severe restenosis due to a proximal dislocation of the stent. The problem was solved with the positioning of a further one more distally. Discussion We observe the possibility of Carotid Wallstent shortening during the implant due to an incorrect placement or sizing, but a delayed displacement is a rare complication that, we highlight, can occur after CAS and that needs to be considered at the moment of the preoperative planning. Conclusion After CAS a closed ultrasound follow up is advisable for a long time in order to detect unexpected complications. PMID:25635600

  14. Delayed unlatching mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M.

    2015-05-19

    In various embodiments an apparatus is presented for securing a structure such as a door, window, hatch, or gate that moves between an open and a closed position relative to a fixed structure to provide or deny access to a compartment, a room, an outdoor area, or a facility. Various embodiments provide a delay in opening the closure of sufficient duration to frustrate a rapid activation that might be desired by a person who is attempting to pass through the closure for some illicit purpose. Typically, hydraulics are used to activate the apparatus and no electrical energy or electronic signals are employed. In one embodiment, a plurality of actuations of a hand lever operates a hydraulic pump that moves a locking bolt from a first position in which a locking bolt is engaged with a recess in the fixed structure (preventing opening of a gate) to a second position in which the locking bolt is disengaged from the recess to permit opening of the gate.

  15. Linear rotary optical delay lines.

    PubMed

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2014-05-19

    I present several classes of analytical and semi-analytical solutions for the design of high-speed rotary optical delay lines that use a combination of stationary and rotating curvilinear reflectors. Detailed analysis of four distinct classes of optical delay lines is presented. Particularly, I consider delay lines based on a single rotating reflector, a single rotating reflector and a single stationary reflector, two rotating reflectors, and two rotating reflectors and a single stationary reflector. I demonstrate that in each of these cases it is possible to design an infinite variety of the optical delay lines featuring linear dependence of the optical delay on the rotation angle. This is achieved via shape optimization of the rotating and stationary reflector surfaces. Moreover, in the case of two rotating reflectors a convenient spatial separation of the incoming and outgoing beams is possible. For the sake of example, all the blades presented in this paper are chosen to fit into a circle of 10 cm diameter and these delay lines feature in excess of 600 ps of optical delay. Finally, two prototypes of rotary delay lines were fabricated using CNC machining, and their optical properties are characterized. PMID:24921303

  16. Delayed Auditory Feedback and Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfordresher, Peter Q.; Dalla Bella, Simone

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that timing of rhythm production is disrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF), and that disruption varies with delay length. We tested the hypothesis that disruption depends on the state of the movement trajectory at the onset of DAF. Participants tapped isochronous rhythms at a rate specified by a metronome while hearing DAF…

  17. High resolution digital delay timer

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  18. Delayed Reinforcement of Operant Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattal, Kennon A.

    2010-01-01

    The experimental analysis of delay of reinforcement is considered from the perspective of three questions that seem basic not only to understanding delay of reinforcement but also, by implication, the contributions of temporal relations between events to operant behavior. The first question is whether effects of the temporal relation between…

  19. Robust synchronization of an array of coupled stochastic discrete-time delayed neural networks.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinling; Wang, Zidong; Liu, Yurong; Liu, Xiaohui

    2008-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the robust synchronization problem for an array of coupled stochastic discrete-time neural networks with time-varying delay. The individual neural network is subject to parameter uncertainty, stochastic disturbance, and time-varying delay, where the norm-bounded parameter uncertainties exist in both the state and weight matrices, the stochastic disturbance is in the form of a scalar Wiener process, and the time delay enters into the activation function. For the array of coupled neural networks, the constant coupling and delayed coupling are simultaneously considered. We aim to establish easy-to-verify conditions under which the addressed neural networks are synchronized. By using the Kronecker product as an effective tool, a linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach is developed to derive several sufficient criteria ensuring the coupled delayed neural networks to be globally, robustly, exponentially synchronized in the mean square. The LMI-based conditions obtained are dependent not only on the lower bound but also on the upper bound of the time-varying delay, and can be solved efficiently via the Matlab LMI Toolbox. Two numerical examples are given to demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed synchronization scheme. PMID:19000962

  20. 75 FR 45628 - Delayed Update of the HHS Poverty Guidelines for the Remainder of 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Delayed Update of the HHS Poverty Guidelines for the Remainder of... delayed update of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) poverty guidelines for the remainder of 2010, and until the 2011 poverty guidelines are published, which is expected to occur in...

  1. Inoculation against Forgetting: Advantages of Immediate versus Delayed Initial Testing Due to Superior Verbatim Accessibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pansky, Ainat

    2012-01-01

    In this study, potential benefits of early memory testing were examined in terms of "inoculating" eyewitness memory against forgetting. As predicted by fuzzy trace theory (e.g., Reyna & Titcomb, 1997), a larger testing advantage in the delayed recall of event details was expected after immediate testing than after delayed testing because of the…

  2. Endurance bounds of aerial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Aaron M.; Kroninger, Christopher M.

    2014-06-01

    Within the past few years micro aerial vehicles (MAVs) have received much more attention and are starting to proliferate into military as well as civilian roles. However, one of the major drawbacks for this technology currently, has been their poor endurance, usually below 10 minutes. This is a direct result of the inefficiencies inherent in their design. Often times, designers do not consider the various components in the vehicle design and match their performance to the desired mission for the vehicle. These vehicles lack a prescribed set of design guidelines or empirically derived design equations which often limits their design to selection of commercial off-the-shelf components without proper consideration of their affect on vehicle performance. In the current study, the design space for different vehicle configurations has been examined including insect flapping, avian flapping, rotary wing, and fixed wing, and their performance bounds are established. The propulsion system typical of a rotary wing vehicle is analyzed to establish current baselines for efficiency of vehicles at this scale. The power draw from communications is analyzed to determine its impact on vehicle performance. Finally, a representative fixed wing MAV is examined and the effects of adaptive structures as a means for increasing vehicle endurance and range are examined. This paper seeks to establish the performance bounds for micro air vehicles and establish a path forward for future designs so that efficiency may be maximized.

  3. A dipole-bound dianion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skurski, Piotr; Simons, Jack

    2000-04-01

    The possibility of binding two electrons by the dipole potential of a molecule was examined earlier by us using model potentials. That study suggested that large dipole moments ?=qR and large charge separation distances R (or equivalently large charges q) would be required to achieve binding two electrons. For example, even with a charge q=1.5 a.u. which might be achieved using di- or tri-valent cations, a dipole moment exceeding 15.922 D is needed. The presence of inner-shell electrons even further increases the value of ? that is required because the dipole-bound electrons' orbital must be orthogonal to and excluded from such inner shells. In the present work, we discuss our efforts to find a real molecule that can actually bind two electrons to a single dipole site. Numerical results are presented for the mono- and dianions of a double 5-member carbon ring system substituted with a Ca atom and three superhalogen -PF5 groups. The dianion of this molecule is found to be geometrically stable and to have a vertical electron detachment energy of ca. 0.8 eV. Its two excess electrons occupy the same fully symmetric a1 molecular orbital localized at the electropositive Ca end of the neutral system as is routinely observed in dipole-bound monoanions. Although our final candidate is chemically unusual, it is hoped that our predictions about it will encourage others to search for more synthetically tractable alternatives.

  4. Observational Bounds on Cosmic Doomsday

    SciTech Connect

    Shmakova, Marina

    2003-07-11

    Recently it was found, in a broad class of models, that the dark energy density may change its sign during the evolution of the universe. This may lead to a global collapse of the universe within the time t{sub c} {approx} 10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} years. Our goal is to find what bounds on the future lifetime of the universe can be placed by the next generation of cosmological observations. As an example, we investigate the simplest model of dark energy with a linear potential V({phi}) = V{sub 0}(1 + {alpha}{phi}). This model can describe the present stage of acceleration of the universe if {alpha} is small enough. However, eventually the field {phi} rolls down, V({phi}) becomes negative, and the universe collapses. The existing observational data indicate that the universe described by this model will collapse not earlier than t{sub c} {approx_equal} 10 billion years from the present moment. We show that the data from SNAP and Planck satellites may extend the bound on the ''doomsday'' time to tc 40 billion years at the 95% confidence level.

  5. Observational bounds on cosmic doomsday

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallosh, Renata; Kratochvil, Jan; Linde, Andrei; Linder, Eric V.; Shmakova, Marina

    2003-10-01

    Recently it was found, in a broad class of models, that the dark energy density may change its sign during the evolution of the universe. This may lead to a global collapse of the universe within the time tc ~ 1010 1011 years. Our goal is to find what bounds on the future lifetime of the universe can be placed by the next generation of cosmological observations. As an example, we investigate the simplest model of dark energy with a linear potential V(phi) = V0(1 + alphaphi). This model can describe the present stage of acceleration of the universe if alpha is small enough. However, eventually the field phi rolls down, V(phi) becomes negative, and the universe collapses. The existing observational data indicate that the universe described by this model will collapse not earlier than tc gtrsim 10 billion years from the present moment. We show that the data from SNAP and Planck satellites may extend the bound on the `doomsday' time to tc gtrsim 40 billion years at the 95% confidence level.

  6. Boosting equal time bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Dennis D.; Hoyer, Paul; Järvinen, Matti

    2012-05-01

    We present an explicit and exact boost of a relativistic bound state defined at equal time of the constituents in the Born approximation (lowest order in ℏ). To this end, we construct the Poincaré generators of QED and QCD in D=1+1 dimensions, using Gauss’ law to express A0 in terms of the fermion fields in A1=0 gauge. We determine the fermion-antifermion bound states in the Born approximation as eigenstates of the time and space translation generators P0 and P1. The boost operator is combined with a gauge transformation so as to maintain the gauge condition A1=0 in the new frame. We verify that the boosted state remains an eigenstate of P0 and P1 with appropriately transformed eigenvalues and determine the transformation law of the equal-time, relativistic wave function. The shape of the wave function is independent of the center-of-mass momentum when expressed in terms of a variable which is quadratically related to the distance x between the fermions. As a consequence, the Lorentz contraction of the wave function is ∝1/(E-V(x)) and thus depends on x via the linear potential V(x).

  7. Time-Delay Estimation in Dispersed Spectrum Cognitive Radio Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocak, Fatih; Celebi, Hasari; Gezici, Sinan; Qaraqe, Khalid A.; Arslan, Huseyin; Poor, H. Vincent

    2010-12-01

    Time-delay estimation is studied for cognitive radio systems, which facilitate opportunistic use of spectral resources. A two-step approach is proposed to obtain accurate time-delay estimates of signals that occupy multiple dispersed bands simultaneously, with significantly lower computational complexity than the optimal maximum likelihood (ML) estimator. In the first step of the proposed approach, an ML estimator is used for each band of the signal in order to estimate the unknown parameters of the signal occupying that band. Then, in the second step, the estimates from the first step are combined in various ways in order to obtain the final time-delay estimate. The combining techniques that are used in the second step are called optimal combining, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) combining, selection combining, and equal combining. It is shown that the performance of the optimal combining technique gets very close to the Cramer-Rao lower bound at high SNRs. These combining techniques provide various mechanisms for diversity combining for time-delay estimation and extend the concept of diversity in communications systems to the time-delay estimation problem in cognitive radio systems. Simulation results are presented to evaluate the performance of the proposed estimators and to verify the theoretical analysis.

  8. Cardinality bounds for triangulations with bounded minimum angle

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.A.

    1994-05-01

    We consider bounding the cardinality of an arbitrary triangulation with smallest angle {alpha}. We show that if the local feature size (i.e. distance between disjoint vertices or edges) of the triangulation is within a constant factor of the local feature size of the input, then N < O(1/{alpha})M, where N is the cardinality of the triangulation and M is the cardinality of any other triangulation with smallest angle at least {alpha}. Previous results had an O(1/{alpha}{sup 1/{alpha}}) dependence. Our O(1/{alpha}) dependence is tight for input with a large length to height ratio, in which triangles may be oriented along the long dimension.

  9. Using kriging to bound satellite ranging errors due to the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanch, Juan

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) has the potential to become the primary navigational aid for civilian aircraft, thanks to satellite based augmentation systems (SBAS). SBAS systems, including the United State's Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS), provide corrections and hard bounds on the user errors. The ionosphere is the largest and least predictable source of error. The only ionospheric information available to WAAS is a set of range delay measurements taken at reference stations. From this data, the master station must compute a real time estimate of the ionospheric delay and a hard error bound valid for any user. The variability of the ionospheric behavior has caused the confidence bounds corresponding to the ionosphere to be very large in WAAS. These ranging bounds translate into conservative bounds on user position error. These position error bounds (called protection levels) have values of 30 to 50 meters. Since these values fluctuate near the maximum tolerable limit, WAAS is not always available. In order to increase the availability of WAAS, we must decrease the confidence bounds corresponding to ionospheric uncertainty while maintaining integrity. In this work, I present an ionospheric estimation algorithm based on kriging. I first introduce a simple model of the Vertical Ionospheric Delay that captures both the deterministic behavior and the random behavior of the ionosphere. Under this model, the kriging method is optimal. More importantly kriging provides an estimation variance that can be translated into an error bound. However, this method must be modified for three reasons; first, the state of the ionosphere is unknown and can only be estimated through real time measurements; second, because of bandwidth constraints, the user cannot receive all the measurements and third there is noise in the measurements. I will show how these three obstacles can be overcome. The algorithm presented here provides a reduction in the error bound corresponding to the ionospheric delay that results in up to a 40% reduction in Vertical Protection Levels across the United States. This is achieved without any changes in the hardware and without significantly increasing the complexity of the algorithm.

  10. Expectations for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassberg, John C.

    2005-11-01

    This article presents a sampling of the author's expectations for the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the areas of research, development and application. The primary focus of the discussion herein is related to the non-linear transonic flow regime, and more specifically, for calculations about commercial transport aircraft. However, many of these topics are pertinent to all flow field regimes and aircraft designs. The underlying goal is to enable the automation of multi-disciplinary design processes, which utilize state-of-the-art numerical simulation methods. These include issues pertaining to accuracy, robustness, efficiency, ease-of-use, uncertainty requirements and other challenges.

  11. Conical-Domain Model for Estimating GPS Ionospheric Delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Lawrence; Komjathy, Attila; Mannucci, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The conical-domain model is a computational model, now undergoing development, for estimating ionospheric delays of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals. Relative to the standard ionospheric delay model described below, the conical-domain model offers improved accuracy. In the absence of selective availability, the ionosphere is the largest source of error for single-frequency users of GPS. Because ionospheric signal delays contribute to errors in GPS position and time measurements, satellite-based augmentation systems (SBASs) have been designed to estimate these delays and broadcast corrections. Several national and international SBASs are currently in various stages of development to enhance the integrity and accuracy of GPS measurements for airline navigation. In the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) of the United States, slant ionospheric delay errors and confidence bounds are derived from estimates of vertical ionospheric delay modeled on a grid at regularly spaced intervals of latitude and longitude. The estimate of vertical delay at each ionospheric grid point (IGP) is calculated from a planar fit of neighboring slant delay measurements, projected to vertical using a standard, thin-shell model of the ionosphere. Interpolation on the WAAS grid enables estimation of the vertical delay at the ionospheric pierce point (IPP) corresponding to any arbitrary measurement of a user. (The IPP of a given user s measurement is the point where the GPS signal ray path intersects a reference ionospheric height.) The product of the interpolated value and the user s thin-shell obliquity factor provides an estimate of the user s ionospheric slant delay. Two types of error that restrict the accuracy of the thin-shell model are absent in the conical domain model: (1) error due to the implicit assumption that the electron density is independent of the azimuthal angle at the IPP and (2) error arising from the slant-to-vertical conversion. At low latitudes or at mid-latitudes under disturbed conditions, the accuracy of SBAS systems based upon the thin-shell model suffers due to the presence of complex ionospheric structure, high delay values, and large electron density gradients. Interpolation on the vertical delay grid serves as an additional source of delay error. The conical-domain model permits direct computation of the user s slant delay estimate without the intervening use of a vertical delay grid. The key is to restrict each fit of GPS measurements to a spatial domain encompassing signals from only one satellite. The conical domain model is so named because each fit involves a group of GPS receivers that all receive signals from the same GPS satellite (see figure); the receiver and satellite positions define a cone, the satellite position being the vertex. A user within a given cone evaluates the delay to the satellite directly, using (1) the IPP coordinates of the line of sight to the satellite and (2) broadcast fit parameters associated with the cone. The conical-domain model partly resembles the thin-shell model in that both models reduce an inherently four-dimensional problem to two dimensions. However, unlike the thin-shell model, the conical domain model does not involve any potentially erroneous simplifying assumptions about the structure of the ionosphere. In the conical domain model, the initially four-dimensional problem becomes truly two-dimensional in the sense that once a satellite location has been specified, any signal path emanating from a satellite can be identified by only two coordinates; for example, the IPP coordinates. As a consequence, a user s slant-delay estimate converges to the correct value in the limit that the receivers converge to the user s location (or, equivalently, in the limit that the measurement IPPs converge to the user s IPP).

  12. National Airspace System Delay Estimation Using Weather Weighted Traffic Counts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterji, Gano B.; Sridhar, Banavar

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of National Airspace System performance, which is usually measured in terms of delays resulting from the application of traffic flow management initiatives in response to weather conditions, volume, equipment outages and runway conditions, is needed both for guiding flow control decisions during the day of operations and for post operations analysis. Comparison of the actual delay, resulting from the traffic flow management initiatives, with the expected delay, based on traffic demand and other conditions, provides the assessment of the National Airspace System performance. This paper provides a method for estimating delay using the expected traffic demand and weather. In order to identify the cause of delays, 517 days of National Airspace System delay data reported by the Federal Aviation Administration s Operations Network were analyzed. This analysis shows that weather is the most important causal factor for delays followed by equipment and runway delays. Guided by these results, the concept of weather weighted traffic counts as a measure of system delay is described. Examples are given to show the variation of these counts as a function of time of the day. The various datasets, consisting of aircraft position data, enroute severe weather data, surface wind speed and visibility data, reported delay data and number of aircraft handled by the Centers data, and their sources are described. The procedure for selecting reference days on which traffic was minimally impacted by weather is described. Different traffic demand on each reference day of the week, determined by analysis of 42 days of traffic and delay data, was used as the expected traffic demand for each day of the week. Next, the method for computing the weather weighted traffic counts using the expected traffic demand, derived from reference days, and the expanded regions around severe weather cells is discussed. It is shown via a numerical example that this approach improves the dynamic range of the weather weighted traffic counts considerably. Time histories of these new weather weighted traffic counts are used for synthesizing two statistical features, six histogram features and six time domain features. In addition to these enroute weather features, two surface weather features of number of major airports in the United States with high mean winds and low mean visibility are also described. A least squares procedure for establishing a functional relation between the features, using combinations of these features, and system delays is explored using 36 days of data. Best correlations between the estimated delays using the functional relation and the actual delays provided by the Operations Network are obtained with two different combinations of features: 1) six time domain features of weather weighted traffic counts plus two surface weather features, and 2) six histogram features and mean of weather weighted traffic counts along with the two surface weather features. Correlation coefficient values of 0.73 and 0.83 were found in these two instances.

  13. Noise further expresses exponential decay for globally exponentially stable time-varying delayed neural networks.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Song; Yang, Qiqi; Shen, Yi

    2016-05-01

    This paper shows that the globally exponentially stable neural network with time-varying delay and bounded noises may converge faster than those without noise. And the influence of noise on global exponential stability of DNNs was analyzed quantitatively. By comparing the upper bounds of noise intensity with coefficients of global exponential stability, we could deduce that noise is able to further express exponential decay for DNNs. The upper bounds of noise intensity are characterized by solving transcendental equations containing adjustable parameters. In addition, a numerical example is provided to illustrate the theoretical result. PMID:26907861

  14. Adaptive Control of Nonlinear Time-varying Delay Systems with Unknown Control Gain Signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiuqin; Zhang, Tianping

    Based on the principle of sliding mode control and the property of Nussbaum-type functions, an adaptive neural control scheme is proposed for a class of MIMO nonlinear time delay systems with unknown function control gains. By utilizing the integral-type Lyapunov function and Young's inequality, the restriction of the control gains and the assumption of time-varying delay uncertainties are relaxed. By choosing appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals, unknown time-varying delay uncertainties are compensated for. By theoretical analysis, the closed-loop control system is proved to be semi-globally uniformly ultimately bounded.

  15. Primary Care Clinician Expectations Regarding Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Melinda M.; Bond, Lynne A.; Howard, Alan; Sarkisian, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Expectations regarding aging (ERA) in community-dwelling older adults are associated with personal health behaviors and health resource usage. Clinicians' age expectations likely influence patients' expectations and care delivery patterns; yet, limited research has explored clinicians' age expectations. The Expectations Regarding Aging…

  16. Higgs Mass Triviality Bounds on F(4) Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klomfass, Markus

    In order to accurately describe the cutoff dependence of the Higgs mass triviality bound, the varphi ^4 theory is formulated on an F_4 lattice which preserves Lorentz invariance to a higher degree than the commonly used hypercubic lattice. We solve this model non-perturbatively by evaluating the linked cluster expansion through 12th order following the approach of Luscher and Weisz. The results are continued across the transition line into the broken phase by integrating the perturbative renormalization group equations. In the Goldstone phase, the renormalized coupling never exceeds 2/3 of the tree level unitarity bound when Lambda /m_{R}>= 2. Our results confirm recent Monte Carlo data and we obtain as an upper bound for the Higgs mass m_{R }/f_pi=2.45(7) at Lambda/m_{R }=2. Attempting to produce a heavier Higgs on the lattice, additional four-derivative terms are introduced in the naive action which serve to parameterize the leading order cutoff effects. Using a cluster reflection algorithm of the Swendsen-Wang-Wolff type, we simulate this action on an F_4 lattice in a region where the region where the effects of the new terms are expected to be maximal. As an upper bound we now obtain M _sigma/f_pi~ 2.8, an increase of about 20% compared to the simplest non-linear action. Despite triviality, the scalar sector may thus not be weakly interacting.

  17. Deformation invariant bounding spheres for dynamic active constraints in surgery.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, Stuart A; Rodriguez Y Baena, Ferdinando

    2014-04-01

    Active constraints are collaborative robot control strategies, which can be used to guide a surgeon or protect delicate tissue structures during robot-assisted surgery. Tissue structures of interest often move and deform throughout a surgical intervention, and therefore, dynamic active constraints, which adapt and conform to these changes, are required. A fundamental element of an active constraint controller is the computation of the geometric relationship between the constraint geometry and the surgical instrument. For a static active constraint, there are a variety of computationally efficient methods for computing this relative configuration; however, for a dynamic active constraint, it becomes significantly more challenging. Deformation invariant bounding spheres are a novel bounding volume formulation, which can be used within a hierarchy to allow efficient proximity queries within dynamic active constraints. These bounding spheres are constructed in such a way that as the surface deforms, they do not require time-consuming rebuilds or updates, rather they are implicitly updated and continue to represent the underlying geometry as it changes. Experimental results show that performing proximity queries with deformation invariant bounding sphere hierarchies is faster than common methods from the literature when the deformation rate is within the range expected from conventional imaging systems. PMID:24622983

  18. 77 FR 3751 - Extension of Deadlines; Upward Bound Program (Regular Upward Bound (UB))

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... Bound Program (Regular Upward Bound (UB)) notice on December 19, 2011 (76 FR 78621). DATES: Deadline for... notice in the Federal Register (76 FR 78621) inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY... Extension of Deadlines; Upward Bound Program (Regular Upward Bound (UB)) AGENCY: Office of...

  19. Performance Bounds of Quaternion Estimators.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yili; Jahanchahi, Cyrus; Nitta, Tohru; Mandic, Danilo P

    2015-12-01

    The quaternion widely linear (WL) estimator has been recently introduced for optimal second-order modeling of the generality of quaternion data, both second-order circular (proper) and second-order noncircular (improper). Experimental evidence exists of its performance advantage over the conventional strictly linear (SL) as well as the semi-WL (SWL) estimators for improper data. However, rigorous theoretical and practical performance bounds are still missing in the literature, yet this is crucial for the development of quaternion valued learning systems for 3-D and 4-D data. To this end, based on the orthogonality principle, we introduce a rigorous closed-form solution to quantify the degree of performance benefits, in terms of the mean square error, obtained when using the WL models. The cases when the optimal WL estimation can simplify into the SWL or the SL estimation are also discussed. PMID:25643416

  20. Urinary ascites secondary to delayed diagnosis of laparoscopic bladder injury

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mandeel, Hazem; Qassem, Abeer

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of urinary ascites in a young woman secondary to unrecognized bladder injury during gynaecologic laparoscopic surgery. Delayed diagnosis occurred due to the absence of expected changes in serum biochemistry, which made the diagnosis of urinoma less likely. High suspicion of bladder injury following laparoscopic surgery should be present in patients with ill-defined symptoms even if no biochemical changes are seen. The case demonstrates important points in relation to the consequences of delayed diagnosis as well as overview on detection and prevention of such injury. PMID:20814512

  1. A lower bound for routing on a completely connected optical communication parallel computer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.A.; Jerrum, M.; MacKenzie, P.D.

    1993-08-03

    The task of routing a 2-relation on an n-processor completely connected optical communication parallel computer (OCPC) is considered. A lower bound is presented that applies to any randomized distributed algorithm for this task: specifically, it is shown that the expected number of steps required to route a 2-relation is {Omega}({radical} log log n) in the worst case. For comparison, the best upper bound known is O(log log n).

  2. Integrals, Expectation-Values and Entropy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, Arthur Randall

    1982-03-01

    The maximum entropy principle, one of the cornerstones of equilibrium statistical mechanics, has been introduced into probability theory by E. T. JAYNES as part of a rational strategy for making plausible inferences from incomplete information. The conventional maximum entropy formalism, involving the familiar machinery of partition functions, is practically the same in both classical and quantum mechanical formulations of statistical mechanics. The present work undertakes to extend the maximum entropy principle to a generalized abstract formulation of probability theory, encompassing the familiar classical and quantal models as well as certain more exotic models uncovered by G. W. MACKEY in his axiomatization of quantum mechanics--the so-called quantum logics. In this more general approach, the conventional machinery of partition functions is not available. Instead, one makes use of a family of conditional entropy functions. In its dependence on the constraint conditions, the conditional entropy enjoys concavity and monotonicity properties analogous to those of the phenomenological entropy in equilibrium thermodynamics. The new formalism is able to take in stride the possibility that the constraints, although consistent, may fail to determine a unique maximum entropy state (probability distribution). Examples which demonstrate this possibility are readily constructed in both classical and quantal models of probability theory. One observes that, in the convex set of states compatible with the constraints, there is none of greatest entropy; typically this happens at or beyond a "barrier" where the conventional partition function becomes singular. Such examples should not simply be dismissed as "pathological"; they may perhaps have interesting physical interpretations (e.g., turbulence, disorder, chaos). In carrying out the above program it is essential to recognize that the expectation-values of an unbounded observable (real random variable) need not be finite: they may be infinite or indeterminate. A generalized convexity theory which allows, roughly speaking, for the inclusion of such "points at infinity" is developed in a mathematical appendix. As an interesting sidelight, a novel expression is obtained for the quantum mechanical expectation-value, related to the theory of quadratic forms; the conventional trace formula is generally valid only for bounded observables.

  3. Great expectations: teaching ethics to medical students in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Kevin Gary; Fellingham, Robyn

    2014-12-01

    Many academic philosophers and ethicists are appointed to teach ethics to medical students. We explore exactly what this task entails. In South Africa the Health Professions Council's curriculum for training medical practitioners requires not only that students be taught to apply ethical theory to issues and be made aware of the legal and regulatory requirements of their profession, it also expects moral formation and the inculcation of professional virtue in students. We explore whether such expectations are reasonable. We defend the claim that physicians ought to be persons of virtuous character, on the grounds of the social contract between society and the profession. We further argue that since the expectations of virtue of health care professionals are reasonable, it is also sound reasoning to expect ethics teachers to try to inculcate such virtues in their students, so far as this is possible. Furthermore, this requires of such teachers that they be suitable role models of ethical practice and virtue, themselves. We claim that this applies to ethics teachers who are themselves not members of the medical profession, too, even though they are not bound by the same social contract as doctors. We conclude that those who accept employment as teachers of ethics to medical students, where as part of their contractual obligation they are expected to inculcate moral values in their students, ought to be prepared to accept their responsibility to be professionally ethical, themselves. PMID:23409954

  4. Motor Activity Improves Temporal Expectancy

    PubMed Central

    Fautrelle, Lilian; Mareschal, Denis; French, Robert; Addyman, Caspar; Thomas, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Certain brain areas involved in interval timing are also important in motor activity. This raises the possibility that motor activity might influence interval timing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed interval timing in healthy adults following different types of training. The pre- and post-training tasks consisted of a button press in response to the presentation of a rhythmic visual stimulus. Alterations in temporal expectancy were evaluated by measuring response times. Training consisted of responding to the visual presentation of regularly appearing stimuli by either: (1) pointing with a whole-body movement, (2) pointing only with the arm, (3) imagining pointing with a whole-body movement, (4) simply watching the stimulus presentation, (5) pointing with a whole-body movement in response to a target that appeared at irregular intervals (6) reading a newspaper. Participants performing a motor activity in response to the regular target showed significant improvements in judgment times compared to individuals with no associated motor activity. Individuals who only imagined pointing with a whole-body movement also showed significant improvements. No improvements were observed in the group that trained with a motor response to an irregular stimulus, hence eliminating the explanation that the improved temporal expectations of the other motor training groups was purely due to an improved motor capacity to press the response button. All groups performed a secondary task equally well, hence indicating that our results could not simply be attributed to differences in attention between the groups. Our results show that motor activity, even when it does not play a causal or corrective role, can lead to improved interval timing judgments. PMID:25806813

  5. A theoretical account of cognitive effects in delay discounting

    PubMed Central

    Kurth-Nelson, Zeb; Bickel, Warren; Redish, A. David

    2012-01-01

    Although delay discounting, the attenuation of the value of future rewards, is a robust finding, the mechanism of discounting is not known. We propose a potential mechanism for delay discounting such that discounting emerges from a search process trying to determine what rewards will be available in the future. In this theory, the delay dependence of the discounting of future expected rewards arises from three assumptions. First, that evaluation of outcomes involves a search process. Second, that value is assigned to an outcome proportionally to how easy it is to find. Third, that outcomes that are less delayed are typically easier for the search process to find. By relaxing this third assumption (for example, by assuming that episodically cued outcomes are easier to find), our model suggests that it is possible to dissociate discounting from delay. Our theory thereby explains the empirical result that discounting is slower to episodically-imagined outcomes, because these outcomes are easier for the search process to find. Additionally, the theory explains why improving cognitive resources such as working memory slows discounting, by improving searches and thereby making rewards easier to find. The three assumptions outlined here are likely to be instantiated during deliberative decision-making, but unlikely in habitual decision-making. We model two simple implementations of this theory and show that they unify empirical results about the role of cognitive function in delay discounting, and make new neural, behavioral, and pharmacological predictions. PMID:22487035

  6. Quasar optical variability: searching for interband time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachev, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The main purpose of this paper is to study time delays between the light variations in different wavebands for a sample of quasars. Measuring a reliable time delay for a large number of quasars may help constraint the models of their central engines. The standard accretion disk irradiation model predicts a delay of the longer wavelengths behind the shorter ones, a delay that depends on the fundamental quasar parameters. Since the black hole masses and the accretion rates are approximately known for the sample we use, one can compare the observed time delays with the expected ones. Methods: We applied the interpolation cross-correlation function (ICCF) method to the Giveon et al. sample of 42 quasars, monitored in two (B and R) colors, to find the time lags represented by the ICCF peaks. Different tests were performed to assess the influence of photometric errors, sampling, etc., on the final result. Results: We found that most of the objects show a delay in the red light curve behind the blue one (a positive lag), which on average for the sample is about +4 days (+3 for the median), although the scatter is significant. These results are broadly consistent with the reprocessing model, especially for the well-sampled objects. The normalized time-lag deviations do not seem to correlate significantly with other quasar properties, including optical, radio, or X-ray measurables. On the other hand, many objects show a clear negative lag, which, if real, may have important consequences for the variability models.

  7. A theoretical account of cognitive effects in delay discounting.

    PubMed

    Kurth-Nelson, Zeb; Bickel, Warren; Redish, A David

    2012-04-01

    Although delay discounting, the attenuation of the value of future rewards, is a robust finding, the mechanism of discounting is not known. We propose a potential mechanism for delay discounting such that discounting emerges from a search process that is trying to determine what rewards will be available in the future. In this theory, the delay dependence of the discounting of future expected rewards arises from three assumptions. First, that the evaluation of outcomes involves a search process. Second, that the value is assigned to an outcome proportionally to how easy it is to find. Third, that outcomes that are less delayed are typically easier for the search process to find. By relaxing this third assumption (e.g. by assuming that episodically-cued outcomes are easier to find), our model suggests that it is possible to dissociate discounting from delay. Our theory thereby explains the empirical result that discounting is slower to episodically-imagined outcomes, because these outcomes are easier for the search process to find. Additionally, the theory explains why improving cognitive resources such as working memory slows discounting, by improving searches and thereby making rewards easier to find. The three assumptions outlined here are likely to be instantiated during deliberative decision-making, but are unlikely in habitual decision-making. We model two simple implementations of this theory and show that they unify empirical results about the role of cognitive function in delay discounting, and make new neural, behavioral, and pharmacological predictions. PMID:22487035

  8. Synchronization criteria of discrete-time complex networks with time-varying delays and parameter uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, P; Jarina Banu, L

    2014-06-01

    This paper is pertained with the synchronization problem for an array of coupled discrete-time complex networks with the presence of both time-varying delays and parameter uncertainties. The time-varying delays are considered both in the network couplings and dynamical nodes. By constructing suitable Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and utilizing convex reciprocal lemma, new synchronization criteria for the complex networks are established in terms of linear matrix inequalities. Delay-partitioning technique is employed to incur less conservative results. All the results presented here not only depend upon lower and upper bounds of the time-delay, but also the number of delay partitions. Numerical simulations are rendered to exemplify the effectiveness and applicability of the proposed results. PMID:24808929

  9. New results on stability analysis for time-varying delay systems with non-linear perturbations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pin-Lin

    2013-05-01

    The problem of stability for linear time-varying delay systems under nonlinear perturbation is discussed, with delay assumed as time-varying. Delay decomposition approach allows information of the delayed plant states to be fully considered. A less conservative delay-dependent robust stability condition is derived, using integral inequality approach to express the relationship of Leibniz-Newton formula terms in the within the framework of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Merits of the proposed results lie in lesser conservatism, which are realized by choosing different Lyapunov matrices in the decomposed integral intervals and estimating the upper bound of some cross term more exactly. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness and lesser conservatism of the proposed method. PMID:23294851

  10. Bounds on halo-particle interactions from interstellar calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chivukula, Sekhar R.; Cohen, Andrew G.; Dimopoulos, Savas; Walker, Terry P.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that the existence of neutral interstellar clouds constrains the interaction of any particulate dark-matter candidate with atomic hydrogen to be quite small. Even for a halo particle of mass 1 PeV (10 to the 6 GeV), it is shown that the cross section with hydrogen must be smaller than the typical atomic cross section that is expected for a positively charged particle bound to an electron. The argument presented is that if the clouds are in equilibrium, then the rate at which energy is deposited by collisions with dark-matter particles must be smaller than the rate at which the cloud can cool. This argument is used to constrain the interaction cross section of dark matter with hydrogen. Remarks are made on the general viability of charged dark matter. Comments are also made on a bound which derives from the dynamical stability of the halo.

  11. 78 FR 59422 - Delayed Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Delayed Applications AGENCY: Office of Hazardous Materials Safety, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: List of... Paquet, Director, Office of Hazardous Materials Special Permits and Approvals, Pipeline and...

  12. Short baseline phase delay interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, C. D.

    1987-01-01

    The high precision of the phase delay data type allows angular navigation accuracy on relatively short baselines to compete with the angular accuracy achieved with long baseline group delay measurements. Differential phase delay observations of close quasar pairs on both a 5.9-km baseline (DSS 12-DSS 13) and a 253-km baseline (DSS 13-Owens Valley Radio Observatory) have been performed to study the potential navigational precision and accuracy of the short baseline interferometry. As a first step toward demonstration of a connected element system at Goldstone, the DSS 12-DSS 13 baseline was operated coherently, distributing a common frequency reference via a recently installed fiber optic cable. The observed phase delay residuals of about 10 psec or less on both baselines appear to be dominated by short term troposphere fluctuations, and correspond to navigational accuracies of well below 50 nrad for the 253-km baseline. Additional experiments will be required to probe the full range of systematic errors.

  13. Group delay in indefinite media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guoding; Su, Lei; Pan, Tao; Zang, Taocheng

    2008-10-01

    We present here a theoretical analysis of the group delay for a light beam transmitted through indefinite media, for which not all of the principal elements of the permittivity and permeability tensors have the same sign. When the permittivity and permeability tensors are not simultaneously diagonalizable, but rather there is an angle (called axis angle) between two tensors’ corresponding principal axes, it is found that the axis angle, slab's thickness, incident angle and frequency of light have considerable influences on the group delay. When these parameters mentioned above are varied, a transmitted light pulse in such media can experience a positive or negative group delay and hence a subluminal or superluminal propagation. The results might be helpful for the development of delay lines and the control of the dispersive effects for systems.

  14. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Volk Jr; Keith Wisecarver

    2005-10-01

    Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking. The following deliverables are scheduled from the two projects of the three-year JIP: (1) A novel method for enhancing liquid yields from delayed cokers and data that provide insight as to the optimum temperature to remove hydrogen sulfide from furnace gases. (2) An understanding of what causes foaming in coker drums and ways to minimize sulfur in the produced liquids. (3) An understanding of the HES impacts resulting from hot spots, poor drainage, and settling. (4) A screening model to quantify how other feedstocks and/or a combination of feedstocks will behave in a refinery, and kinetic/optimization models that can represent virtually any delayed coking unit across a wide range of process conditions and feedstocks. Primarily graduate students, post-Doctoral Research Associates and faculty members, will conduct the research in this project.

  15. Delayed Recovery from Anaesthesia in a Patient with Optimised Hypothyroidism and Incidental Hypokalemia

    PubMed Central

    Laheri, Vandana V; Waigankar, Tejasi; Wagh, Charchill

    2015-01-01

    Delayed recovery/awakening/ emergence can occur under anaesthesia and is multifactorial, could be drug or non drug related. Similarly, we report a case of delayed recovery in a 68-year-old patient, for laparoscopic cholecystectomy, a known case of hypertension, bronchial asthma and hypothyroidism. Preoperatively, she was optimised for her medical disorders; however, she had delayed recovery from general anaesthesia. The delayed recovery, often, would be expected in a case of hypothyroidism, however in our patient it was found to be associated with inadvertent hypokalemia PMID:25738065

  16. Delayed presentation of anorectal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Shandip Kumar; Kanojia, Ravi P.; Wakhlu, Ashish; Rawat, J. D.; Kureel, S. N.; Tandon, R. K.

    2008-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Delayed management of anorectal malformation (ARM) increases the surgical and functional complications for the patient. We defined “delayed presentation of ARM” and reviewed our patients with ARM to find out the incidence and causes of delayed presentation. Materials and Methods: Patients satisfying the criteria of “delayed presentation of ARM” were involved. Detailed information of each patient including the mode of presentation, associated anomalies, plan of management and follow-up was obtained from the hospital records. Results: Between 2003 and 2006, 43 patients satisfied our criteria of “delayed presentation of ARM”. There were 21 males and 22 females. Seventeen of these males presented with low-type ARM. Eleven of them were managed by a single-stage procedure. These “delayed presenters” had to live with constipation, inadequate weight gain and parental anxiety for a greater time. Analysis of the outcomes showed more functional complications in patients who had undergone failed perineal surgery previously. In females with low ARM, the procedure of choice was anterior sagittal anorectoplasty (ASARP). Single stage surgery provides good outcomes for most of low type of ARMs. High-type ARMs in males and females were managed by a staged procedure. Conclusion: “Delayed presentation of ARM” is a major group of ARM in our setup. The management and results of their treatment are not different from those of the early presenters. The most common cause of delayed ARM is wrong advice given by the health care providers followed by inadequate treatment elsewhere. Corrective surgeries taking second attempt in perineum always produces poor outcomes. PMID:20011470

  17. Tunable silicon CROW delay lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morichetti, Francesco; Canciamilla, Antonio; Torregiani, Matteo; Ferrari, Carlo; Melloni, Andrea; Martinelli, Mario

    2010-05-01

    Tunable coupled resonator optical waveguides (CROWs) are powerful and versatile devices that can be used to dynamically control the delay of optical data streams on chip. In this contribution we show that CROW delay lines fabricated on a silicon on insulator (SOI) platform are suitable for applications in the emerging scenario of optical systems at 100 Gbit/s. Issues concerning technology, design, limits and applications of SOI CROWs are discussed. The performances of silicon CROW delay lines activated by thermal tuning are compared to those of glass CROW in terms of power consumption, thermal crosstalk and reconfiguration speed. The continuous delay of 10-ps long optical pulses by 8 bit length is demonstrated by using a silicon CROW with a bandwidth of 87 GHz and made of 12 RRs. At 100 Gbit/s this structure provides comparable figures of merit (fractional delay of 0.75 bit/RR and fractional loss of 0.7 dB per bit-delay) of state-of-the art glass CROW operating at 10 Gbit/s, yet the area of the latter being three order of magnitude larger. The compatibility of silicon CROW with the emerging 100 Gbit/s systems is demonstrated by showing error-free phase-preserving propagation of a 100 Gbit/s return-to-zero (RZ) polarization-division-multiplexing (PolDM) differential quaternary phase shit keying (DQPSK) signal dynamically delayed by the CROW. It is also demonstrated that a silicon CROW can be used in a PolDM system to introduce a polarization selective delay in order to optimize the time interleaving of the two orthogonally polarized data streams.

  18. On mild and strong solutions of fractional differential equations with delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasem, Sayyedah A.; Ibrahim, Rabha W.; Siri, Zailan

    2015-10-01

    In this note, we shall introduce the generalized concept of resolvent of fractional order, in the sense of Caputo derivative. This study deals with the existence and uniqueness of bounded m- solutions (type mild) for fractional integro-differential equations with fractional resolvent and unbounded delay. We show that under some conditions, the mild solution is strongly solution.

  19. Exponential Stability for Neutral Stochastic Markov Systems With Time-Varying Delay and Its Applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huabin; Shi, Peng; Lim, Cheng-Chew; Hu, Peng

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the exponential stability in p th( p > 1 )-moment for neutral stochastic Markov systems with time-varying delay is studied. The derived stability conditions comprise two forms: 1) the delay-independent stability criteria which are obtained by establishing an integral inequality and 2) the delay-dependent stability criteria which are captured by using the theory of the functional differential equations. As its applications, the obtained stability results are used to investigate the exponential stability in p th( p > 1 )-moment for the neutral stochastic neural networks with time-varying delay and Markov switching, and the globally exponential adaptive synchronization for the neutral stochastic complex dynamical systems with time-varying delay and Markov switching, respectively. On the delay-independent criteria, sufficient conditions are given in terms of M -matrix and thus are easy to check. The delay-dependent criteria are presented in the forms of the algebraic inequalities, and the least upper bound of the time-varying delay is also provided. The primary advantages of these obtained results over some recent and similar works are that the differentiability or continuity of the delay function is not required, and that the difficulty stemming from the presence of the neutral item and the Markov switching is overcome. Three numerical examples are provided to examine the effectiveness and potential of the theoretic results obtained. PMID:27187938

  20. Basin stability in delayed dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Siyang; Lin, Wei; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    Basin stability (BS) is a universal concept for complex systems studies, which focuses on the volume of the basin of attraction instead of the traditional linearization-based approach. It has a lot of applications in real-world systems especially in dynamical systems with a phenomenon of multi-stability, which is even more ubiquitous in delayed dynamics such as the firing neurons, the climatological processes, and the power grids. Due to the infinite dimensional property of the space for the initial values, how to properly define the basin’s volume for delayed dynamics remains a fundamental problem. We propose here a technique which projects the infinite dimensional initial state space to a finite-dimensional Euclidean space by expanding the initial function along with different orthogonal or nonorthogonal basis. A generalized concept of basin’s volume in delayed dynamics and a highly practicable calculating algorithm with a cross-validation procedure are provided to numerically estimate the basin of attraction in delayed dynamics. We show potential applicabilities of this approach by applying it to study several representative systems of biological or/and physical significance, including the delayed Hopfield neuronal model with multistability and delayed complex networks with synchronization dynamics.

  1. Basin stability in delayed dynamics.

    PubMed

    Leng, Siyang; Lin, Wei; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Basin stability (BS) is a universal concept for complex systems studies, which focuses on the volume of the basin of attraction instead of the traditional linearization-based approach. It has a lot of applications in real-world systems especially in dynamical systems with a phenomenon of multi-stability, which is even more ubiquitous in delayed dynamics such as the firing neurons, the climatological processes, and the power grids. Due to the infinite dimensional property of the space for the initial values, how to properly define the basin's volume for delayed dynamics remains a fundamental problem. We propose here a technique which projects the infinite dimensional initial state space to a finite-dimensional Euclidean space by expanding the initial function along with different orthogonal or nonorthogonal basis. A generalized concept of basin's volume in delayed dynamics and a highly practicable calculating algorithm with a cross-validation procedure are provided to numerically estimate the basin of attraction in delayed dynamics. We show potential applicabilities of this approach by applying it to study several representative systems of biological or/and physical significance, including the delayed Hopfield neuronal model with multistability and delayed complex networks with synchronization dynamics. PMID:26907568

  2. Analytical applications for delayed neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Eccleston, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical formulations that describe the time dependence of neutron populations in nuclear materials contain delayed-neutron dependent terms. These terms are important because the delayed neutrons, even though their yields in fission are small, permit control of the fission chain reaction process. Analytical applications that use delayed neutrons range from simple problems that can be solved with the point reactor kinetics equations to complex problems that can only be solved with large codes that couple fluid calculations with the neutron dynamics. Reactor safety codes, such as SIMMER, model transients of the entire reactor core using coupled space-time neutronics and comprehensive thermal-fluid dynamics. Nondestructive delayed-neutron assay instruments are designed and modeled using a three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code. Calculations on high-burnup spent fuels and other materials that contain a mix of uranium and plutonium isotopes require accurate and complete information on the delayed-neutron periods, yields, and energy spectra. A continuing need exists for delayed-neutron parameters for all the fissioning isotopes.

  3. Basin stability in delayed dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Siyang; Lin, Wei; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Basin stability (BS) is a universal concept for complex systems studies, which focuses on the volume of the basin of attraction instead of the traditional linearization-based approach. It has a lot of applications in real-world systems especially in dynamical systems with a phenomenon of multi-stability, which is even more ubiquitous in delayed dynamics such as the firing neurons, the climatological processes, and the power grids. Due to the infinite dimensional property of the space for the initial values, how to properly define the basin’s volume for delayed dynamics remains a fundamental problem. We propose here a technique which projects the infinite dimensional initial state space to a finite-dimensional Euclidean space by expanding the initial function along with different orthogonal or nonorthogonal basis. A generalized concept of basin’s volume in delayed dynamics and a highly practicable calculating algorithm with a cross-validation procedure are provided to numerically estimate the basin of attraction in delayed dynamics. We show potential applicabilities of this approach by applying it to study several representative systems of biological or/and physical significance, including the delayed Hopfield neuronal model with multistability and delayed complex networks with synchronization dynamics. PMID:26907568

  4. Measurement of Delayed Neutron Production in a Tungsten Spallation Neutron Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahurin, Robert; Greene, Geoffery; Majewski, Jarek; Smith, Hillary; Wilburn, W. Scott; Bowman, David; Penttila, Seppo; Barron, Libertad; Snow, W. Michael

    2008-04-01

    We use neutron reflectometry to determine the contribution of delayed neutrons to the spallation spectrum at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The delayed neutron fraction is 1.1(1)x10-4 in conformance with rough theoretical expectations. Within the accuracy of the measurement, the delayed neutrons have the same spectrum as the prompt neutrons and display no time structure on the order of ˜100 ms. While this measurement describes the delayed neutron production from a Tungsten spallation neutron target, it provides guidance for the expected delayed neutron production in other targets including the Mercury target at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source.

  5. Improved results on delay-interval-dependent robust stability criteria for uncertain neutral-type systems with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pin-Lin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of delay-interval-dependent robust stability and stabilization of a class of linear uncertain neutral-type systems with time-varying delay. By constructing a candidate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF), that takes into account the delay-range information appropriately, less conservative robust stability criteria are proposed in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) to compute the maximum allowable upper bounds (MAUB) for the delay-interval within which the uncertain neutral-type system under consideration remains asymptotically stable. The verifiable stabilizability conditions and memoryless state feedback control design are stated. Finally, numerical examples are also designated to demonstrate the effectiveness and reduced conservatism of the developed results. PMID:26724971

  6. Thermodynamic law from the entanglement entropy bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chanyong

    2016-04-01

    From black hole thermodynamics, the Bekenstein bound has been proposed as a universal thermal entropy bound. It has been further generalized to an entanglement entropy bound which is valid even in a quantum system. In a quantumly entangled system, the non-negativity of the relative entropy leads to the entanglement entropy bound. When the entanglement entropy bound is saturated, a quantum system satisfies the thermodynamicslike law with an appropriately defined entanglement temperature. We show that the saturation of the entanglement entropy bound accounts for a universal feature of the entanglement temperature proportional to the inverse of the system size. In addition, we show that the deformed modular Hamiltonian under a global quench also satisfies the generalized entanglement entropy boundary after introducing a new quantity called the entanglement chemical potential.

  7. WHO expectation and industry goals.

    PubMed

    Vandersmissen, W

    2001-02-01

    It is expected the world's vaccine market will show a robust growth over the next few years, yet this growth will predominantly come from introduction of new vaccines in industrialised countries. Economic market forces will increasingly direct vaccine sales and vaccine development towards the needs of markets with effective purchasing power. Yet the scientific and technological progress that drives the development of such innovative vaccines holds the promise of applicability for vaccines that are highly desirable for developing countries. Corrective measures that take into account economic and industrial reality must be considered to span the widening gap between richer and poorer countries in terms of availability and general use of current and recent vaccines. Such measures must help developing countries to get access to future vaccines for diseases that predominantly or exclusively affect them, but for which the poor economic prospects do not provide a basis for the vaccine industry to undertake costly research and development programmes. Recent initiatives such as GAVI, including the establishment of a reliable, guaranteed purchase fund, could provide a solution to the problem. PMID:11166883

  8. Prediction of Weather Related Center Delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, Kulkarni; Banavar, Sridhar

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents results of an initial study of relations between national delay, center level delays and weather. The results presented in the paper indicate: (a) the methodology used for estimating the delay at the national level can be extended to estimate delays caused by a center and delays experienced by a center, (b)delays caused by a center can be predicted using that center's Weather Impacted Traffic Index (WITI) whereas delays experienced by a center are best predicted using WITI of that center and that of a few prominent centers (c) there is differential impact of weather of different centers on center delays.

  9. A Search for Gravitationally Bound Cloud Cores within the CMZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehret, Elizabeth; Battersby, Cara

    2016-01-01

    In general, current star formation theories successfully model the rate at which stars are forming throughout our Galaxy as well as others, with the star formation rate (SFR) in a given region being proportional to the amount of gas above a threshold density. The Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) of our Galaxy is an excellent place to test these models. It is home to the highest amount of dense, molecular gas within our Galaxy-and yet, the SFR within this region is an order of magnitude lower than would be expected using current star formation models. This project utilizes data taken from the SMA Legacy Survey of the CMZ, in a search for gravitationally bound structures within three small gas clouds near the Galactic Center, as well as the 1.6 degree cloud. Dense gas structures are detected using H2CO-a dense gas tracer, and 1.3mm cold, dust continuum. These regions are catalogued using dendrograms to identify which structures have continuous and significant H2CO emission. Gravitationally bound candidates were identified by deriving each structure's virial ratio. Within the three clouds near the GC, 40 structures were catalogued, with one structure that was found to be gravitationally bound. Very large virial ratios are the result of large H2CO line widths, possibly due to a high degree of tidal compression. This analysis is also performed on the 1.6 degree cloud, in a region with two suspected bound cores. One of these two cores is close to virial equilibrium and likely gravitationally bound, thus providing support for the use of this method on other clouds within the CMZ. This work supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  10. Behavioral reactions reflecting differential reward expectations in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Cromwell, H C; Tremblay, L; Hollerman, J R; Hikosaka, K; Schultz, W

    2001-10-01

    Learning theory emphasizes the importance of expectations in the control of instrumental action. This study investigated the variation of behavioral reactions toward different rewards as an expression of differential expectations of outcomes in primates. We employed several versions of two basic behavioral paradigms, the spatial delayed response task and the delayed reaction task. These tasks are commonly used in neurobiological studies of working memory, movement preparation, and event expectation involving the frontal cortex and basal ganglia. An initial visual instruction stimulus indicated to the animal which one of several food or liquid rewards would be delivered after each correct behavioral response, or whether or not a reward could be obtained. We measured the reaction times of the operantly conditioned arm movement necessary for obtaining the reward, and the durations of anticipatory licking prior to liquid reward delivery as a Pavlovian conditioned response. The results showed that both measures varied depending on the reward predicted by the initial instruction. Arm movements were performed with significantly shorter reaction times for foods or liquids that were more preferred by the animal than for less preferred ones. Still larger differences were observed between rewarded and unrewarded trials. An interesting effect was found in unrewarded trials, in which reaction times were significantly shorter when a highly preferred reward was delivered in the alternative rewarded trials of the same trial block as compared to a less preferred reward. Anticipatory licks preceding the reward were significantly longer when highly preferred rather than less preferred rewards, or no rewards, were predicted. These results demonstrate that behavioral reactions preceding rewards may vary depending on the predicted future reward and suggest that monkeys differentially expect particular outcomes in the presently investigated tasks. PMID:11685405

  11. Some Improved Nonperturbative Bounds for Fermionic Expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Martin

    2016-06-01

    We reconsider the Gram-Hadamard bound as it is used in constructive quantum field theory and many body physics to prove convergence of Fermionic perturbative expansions. Our approach uses a recursion for the amplitudes of the expansion, discovered in a model problem by Djokic (2013). It explains the standard way to bound the expansion from a new point of view, and for some of the amplitudes provides new bounds, which avoid the use of Fourier transform, and are therefore superior to the standard bounds for models like the cold interacting Fermi gas.

  12. A violation of the covariant entropy bound?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Ali; Mathur, Samir D.

    2015-04-01

    Several arguments suggest that the entropy density at high energy density ρ should be given by the expression s =K √{ρ /G } , where K is a constant of order unity. On the other hand the covariant entropy bound requires that the entropy on a light sheet be bounded by A /4 G , where A is the area of the boundary of the sheet. We find that in a suitably chosen cosmological geometry, the above expression for s violates the covariant entropy bound. We consider different possible explanations for this fact, in particular, the possibility that entropy bounds should be defined in terms of volumes of regions rather than areas of surfaces.

  13. Entropy bounds for charged and rotating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gour, Gilad

    2003-08-01

    It was shown in a previous work that, for systems in which the entropy is an extensive function of the energy and volume, the Bekenstein and the holographic entropy bounds predict new results. In this paper, we go further and derive improved upper bounds to the entropy of extensive charged and rotating systems. Furthermore, it is shown that for charged and rotating systems (including non-extensive ones), the total energy that appears in both the Bekenstein entropy bound (BEB) and the causal entropy bound (CEB) can be replaced by the internal energy of the system. In addition, we propose possible corrections to the BEB and the CEB.

  14. Changing expectancies: cognitive mechanisms and context effects.

    PubMed

    Wiers, Reinout W; Wood, Mark D; Darkes, Jack; Corbin, William R; Jones, Barry T; Sher, Kenneth J

    2003-02-01

    This article presents the proceedings of a symposium at the 2002 RSA Meeting in San Francisco, organized by Reinout W. Wiers and Mark D. Wood. The symposium combined two topics of recent interest in studies of alcohol expectancies: cognitive mechanisms in expectancy challenge studies, and context-related changes of expectancies. With increasing recognition of the substantial role played by alcohol expectancies in drinking, investigators have begun to develop and evaluate expectancy challenge procedures as a potentially promising new prevention strategy. The two major issues addressed in the symposium were whether expectancy challenges result in changes in expectancies that mediate intervention (outcome relations), and the influence of simulated bar environments ("bar labs," in which challenges are usually done) on expectancies. The presentations were (1) An introduction, by Jack Darkes; (2) Investigating the utility of alcohol expectancy challenge with heavy drinking college students, by Mark D. Wood; (3) Effects of an expectancy challenge on implicit and explicit expectancies and drinking, by Reinout W. Wiers; (4) Effects of graphic feedback and simulated bar assessments on alcohol expectancies and consumption, by William R. Corbin; (5) Implicit alcohol associations and context, by Barry T Jones; and (6) A discussion by Kenneth J. Sher, who pointed out that it is important not only to study changes of expectancies in the paradigm of an expectancy challenge but also to consider the role of changing expectancies in natural development and in treatments not explicitly aimed at changing expectancies. PMID:12605068

  15. Smoking Outcome Expectancies among College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Thomas H.; Baker, Timothy B.

    Alcohol expectancies have been found to predict later onset of drinking among adolescents. This study examined whether the relationship between level of alcohol use and expectancies is paralleled with cigarette smoking, and attempted to identify the content of smoking expectancies. An instrument to measure the subjective expected utility of

  16. Output feedback stabilization for time-delay nonlinear interconnected systems using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Hua, C; Guan, X

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, dynamic output feedback control problem is investigated for a class of nonlinear interconnected systems with time delays. Decentralized observer independent of the time delays is first designed. Then, we employ the bounds information of uncertain interconnections to construct the decentralized output feedback controller via backstepping design method. Based on Lyapunov stability theory, we show that the designed controller can render the closed-loop system asymptotically stable with the help of the changing supplying function idea. Furthermore, the corresponding decentralized control problem is considered under the case that the bounds of uncertain interconnections are not precisely known. By employing the neural network approximation theory, we construct the neural network output feedback controller with corresponding adaptive law. The resulting closed-loop system is stable in the sense of semiglobal boundedness. The observers and controllers constructed in this paper are independent of the time delays. Finally, simulations are done to verify the effectiveness of the theoretic results obtained. PMID:18390312

  17. Adaptive neural control for a class of strict-feedback nonlinear systems with state time delays.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sung Jin; Park, Jin Bae; Choi, Yoon Ho

    2009-07-01

    This brief proposes a simple control approach for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems with unknown time delays in strict-feedback form. That is, the dynamic surface control technique, which can solve the "explosion of complexity" problem in the backstepping design procedure, is extended to nonlinear systems with unknown time delays. The unknown time-delay effects are removed by using appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals, and the uncertain nonlinear terms generated by this procedure as well as model uncertainties are approximated by the function approximation technique using neural networks. In addition, the bounds of external disturbances are estimated by the adaptive technique. From the Lyapunov stability theorem, we prove that all signals in the closed-loop system are semiglobally uniformly bounded. Finally, we present simulation results to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:19447725

  18. Control of friction oscillator by Lyapunov redesign based on delayed state feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhicong; Wang, Qi; Gao, Haiping

    2009-04-01

    The stability and boundedness of mechanical system have been one of important research topics. In this paper ultimate boundedness of a dry friction oscillator, belonging to nonsmooth mechanical system, is investigated by proposing a controller design method. Firstly a sufficient condition of the stability for the nominal system with delayed state feedback is derived by constructing a Lyapunov-Krasovskii function. The delayed feedback gain matrix is calculated by applying linear matrix inequality method. Secondly on the basis of the delayed state feedback, a continuous function is designed by Lyapunov redesign to ensure that the solutions of the friction oscillator system are ultimately bounded under the overall control. Moreover, the ultimate bound can be adjusted in practice by choosing appropriate parameter. Accordingly friction-induced vibration or instability can be controlled effectively. Numerical results show that the proposed method is valid.

  19. A Discounting Framework for Choice With Delayed and Probabilistic Rewards

    PubMed Central

    Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel

    2005-01-01

    When choosing between delayed or uncertain outcomes, individuals discount the value of such outcomes on the basis of the expected time to or the likelihood of their occurrence. In an integrative review of the expanding experimental literature on discounting, the authors show that although the same form of hyperbola-like function describes discounting of both delayed and probabilistic outcomes, a variety of recent findings are inconsistent with a single-process account. The authors also review studies that compare discounting in different populations and discuss the theoretical and practical implications of the findings. The present effort illustrates the value of studying choice involving both delayed and probabilistic outcomes within a general discounting framework that uses similar experimental procedures and a common analytical approach. PMID:15367080

  20. Dynamic Scheduling of Pigeons for Delay Constrained Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiazhen; Li, Jiang; Burge, Legand

    Information collection in the disaster area is an important application of pigeon networks - a special type of delay tolerant networks (DTN). The aim of this paper is to explore highly efficient dynamic scheduling strategies of pigeons for such applications. The upper bound of traffic that can be supported under the deadline constraints for the basic on-demand strategy is given through the analysis. Based on the analysis, a waiting based packing strategy is introduced. Although the latter strategy could not change the maximum traffic rate that a pigeon can support, it improves the efficiency of the pigeon largely. The analytical results are verified by the simulations.

  1. Expected geoneutrino signal at JUNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strati, Virginia; Baldoncini, Marica; Callegari, Ivan; Mantovani, Fabio; McDonough, William F.; Ricci, Barbara; Xhixha, Gerti

    2015-12-01

    Constraints on the Earth's composition and on its radiogenic energy budget come from the detection of geoneutrinos. The Kamioka Liquid scintillator Antineutrino Detector (KamLAND) and Borexino experiments recently reported the geoneutrino flux, which reflects the amount and distribution of U and Th inside the Earth. The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) neutrino experiment, designed as a 20 kton liquid scintillator detector, will be built in an underground laboratory in South China about 53 km from the Yangjiang and Taishan nuclear power plants, each one having a planned thermal power of approximately 18 GW. Given the large detector mass and the intense reactor antineutrino flux, JUNO aims not only to collect high statistics antineutrino signals from reactors but also to address the challenge of discriminating the geoneutrino signal from the reactor background. The predicted geoneutrino signal at JUNO is terrestrial neutrino unit (TNU), based on the existing reference Earth model, with the dominant source of uncertainty coming from the modeling of the compositional variability in the local upper crust that surrounds (out to approximately 500 km) the detector. A special focus is dedicated to the 6° × 4° local crust surrounding the detector which is estimated to contribute for the 44% of the signal. On the basis of a worldwide reference model for reactor antineutrinos, the ratio between reactor antineutrino and geoneutrino signals in the geoneutrino energy window is estimated to be 0.7 considering reactors operating in year 2013 and reaches a value of 8.9 by adding the contribution of the future nuclear power plants. In order to extract useful information about the mantle's composition, a refinement of the abundance and distribution of U and Th in the local crust is required, with particular attention to the geochemical characterization of the accessible upper crust where 47% of the expected geoneutrino signal originates and this region contributes the major source of uncertainty.

  2. Expected geoneutrino signal at JUNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strati, Virginia; Baldoncini, Marica; Callegari, Ivan; Mantovani, Fabio; McDonough, William F.; Ricci, Barbara; Xhixha, Gerti

    2015-12-01

    Constraints on the Earth's composition and on its radiogenic energy budget come from the detection of geoneutrinos. The Kamioka Liquid scintillator Antineutrino Detector (KamLAND) and Borexino experiments recently reported the geoneutrino flux, which reflects the amount and distribution of U and Th inside the Earth. The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) neutrino experiment, designed as a 20 kton liquid scintillator detector, will be built in an underground laboratory in South China about 53 km from the Yangjiang and Taishan nuclear power plants, each one having a planned thermal power of approximately 18 GW. Given the large detector mass and the intense reactor antineutrino flux, JUNO aims not only to collect high statistics antineutrino signals from reactors but also to address the challenge of discriminating the geoneutrino signal from the reactor background. The predicted geoneutrino signal at JUNO is terrestrial neutrino unit (TNU), based on the existing reference Earth model, with the dominant source of uncertainty coming from the modeling of the compositional variability in the local upper crust that surrounds (out to approximately 500 km) the detector. A special focus is dedicated to the 6 4 local crust surrounding the detector which is estimated to contribute for the 44% of the signal. On the basis of a worldwide reference model for reactor antineutrinos, the ratio between reactor antineutrino and geoneutrino signals in the geoneutrino energy window is estimated to be 0.7 considering reactors operating in year 2013 and reaches a value of 8.9 by adding the contribution of the future nuclear power plants. In order to extract useful information about the mantle's composition, a refinement of the abundance and distribution of U and Th in the local crust is required, with particular attention to the geochemical characterization of the accessible upper crust where 47% of the expected geoneutrino signal originates and this region contributes the major source of uncertainty.

  3. Delays in Human-Computer Interaction and Their Effects on Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kohrs, Christin; Angenstein, Nicole; Brechmann, André

    2016-01-01

    The temporal contingency of feedback is an essential requirement of successful human-computer interactions. The timing of feedback not only affects the behavior of a user but is also accompanied by changes in psychophysiology and neural activity. In three fMRI experiments we systematically studied the impact of delayed feedback on brain activity while subjects performed an auditory categorization task. In the first fMRI experiment, we analyzed the effects of rare and thus unexpected delays of different delay duration on brain activity. In the second experiment, we investigated if users can adapt to frequent delays. Therefore, delays were presented as often as immediate feedback. In a third experiment, the influence of interaction outage was analyzed by measuring the effect of infrequent omissions of feedback on brain activity. The results show that unexpected delays in feedback presentation compared to immediate feedback stronger activate inter alia bilateral the anterior insular cortex, the posterior medial frontal cortex, the left inferior parietal lobule and the right inferior frontal junction. The strength of this activation increases with the duration of the delay. Thus, delays interrupt the course of an interaction and trigger an orienting response that in turn activates brain regions of action control. If delays occur frequently, users can adapt, delays become expectable, and the brain activity in the observed network diminishes over the course of the interaction. However, introducing rare omissions of expected feedback reduces the system’s trustworthiness which leads to an increase in brain activity not only in response to such omissions but also following frequently occurring and thus expected delays. PMID:26745874

  4. Delay Independent Criterion for Multiple Time-delay Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. J.; Liu, K. F. R.; Yeh, K.; Chen, C. W.; Chung, P. Y.

    Based on the fuzzy Lyapunov method, this work addresses the stability conditions for nonlinear systems with multiple time delays to ensure the stability of building structure control systems. The delay independent conditions are derived via the traditional Lyapunov and fuzzy Lyapunov methods for multiple time-delay systems as approximated by the Tagagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy model. The fuzzy Lyapunov function is defined as a fuzzy blending of quadratic Lyapunov functions. A parallel distributed compensation (PDC) scheme is utilized to construct a global fuzzy logic control (FLC) by blending all linear local state feedback controllers in the controller design procedure. Furthermore, the H infinity performance and robustness of the design for modeling errors also need to be considered in the stability conditions.

  5. Dynamic Properties of the Solow Model with Bounded Technological Progress and Time-to-Build Technology

    PubMed Central

    Sodini, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a time-to-build technology in a Solow model with bounded technological progress. Our analysis shows that the system may be asymptotically stable, or it can produce stability switches and Hopf bifurcations when time delay varies. The direction and the stability criteria of the bifurcating periodic solutions are obtained by the normal form theory and the center manifold theorem. Numerical simulations confirms the theoretical results. PMID:24782674

  6. Computation of wall bounded flows with heat transfer in the framework of SRS approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritskevich, M. S.; Garbaruk, A. V.; Menter, F. R.

    2014-12-01

    A detailed assessment of Scale Adaptive Simulation (SAS) and Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (IDDES) is performed for prediction of heat transfer for several wall bounded flow. For that purpose a zero pressure gradient boundary layer, a backward facing step, and a thermal mixing in a T-Junction test cases are considered. The results, obtained with the use of ANSYS-FLUENT, show that both approaches are capable to predict both mean and RMS velocity and temperature with sufficient accuracy.

  7. Robust asymptotic stability of fuzzy Markovian jumping genetic regulatory networks with time-varying delays by delay decomposition approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, P.; Sathy, R.

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, the robust asymptotic stability problem is considered for a class of fuzzy Markovian jumping genetic regulatory networks with uncertain parameters and switching probabilities by delay decomposition approach. The purpose of the addressed stability analysis problem is to establish an easy-to-verify condition under which the dynamics of the true concentrations of the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein is asymptotically stable irrespective of the norm-bounded modeling errors. A new Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF) is constructed by nonuniformly dividing the delay interval into multiple subinterval, and choosing proper functionals with different weighting matrices corresponding to different subintervals in the LKFs. Employing these new LKFs for the time-varying delays, a new delay-dependent stability criterion is established with Markovian jumping parameters by T-S fuzzy model. Note that the obtained results are formulated in terms of linear matrix inequality (LMI) that can efficiently solved by the LMI toolbox in Matlab. Numerical examples are exploited to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed design procedures.

  8. The bound β-decay of the free neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schön, J.; Paul, S.; Emmerich, R.; Engels, R.; Faestermann, T.; Fierlinger, P.; Gabriel, M.; Gutsmied, E.; Hartmann, F. J.; Hertenberger, R.; McAndrew, J.; Röhrmoser, A.; Ruschel, S.; Schott, W.; Schubert, U.; Trautner, A.; Udem, T.; Ulrich, A.

    2012-09-01

    An experiment to measure the bound β-decay of the neutron into a hydrogen atom and an electron anti-neutrino is described. Observation of such a decay would open an alternative pathway to physics beyond the Standard Model, in particular right-handed current admixtures in the weak interaction as well as the handedness of the neutrino. The experiment is planned at the through-going beam tube SR6 at the FRM2 high-flux reactor in Garching. Although the branching ratio of this decay is expected to be only 4 . 10-6 of the normal neutron β-decay [1], a sufficient decay rate due to the high flux of neutrons available for the experiment is expected. Simulations have shown that the measurement is feasible, with proper shielding being the critical factor. The experimental setup is currently being studied, testing different detection techniques for H(2s) at the TUM.

  9. Widely tunable optical delay generator.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, K; Wiatrek, A; Bersch, C; Onishchukov, G; Leuchs, G; Schneider, T

    2010-11-01

    We propose and demonstrate a method for quasi storage of light based on periodic spectral filtering realized in the time domain by amplitude modulation using frequency-to-time conversion. The delay can be tuned in a wide range by changing the frequency of an electrical modulation signal. In our experiments, the delay of single 2.5 ps pulses varied by 66 pulse widths. The technique works equally well for more complex optical data packets. Contrary to known approaches, the method has a very large spectral bandwidth and can be implemented by either fiber or integrated solutions using existing technologies. Because of the large bandwidth, fractional delays up to several tens of thousands of pulse widths can be achieved potentially for subpicosecond pulses, which is a tremendous value regarding the implementation simplicity. PMID:21042360

  10. Adaptation to delayed auditory feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, D. I.; Lackner, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Delayed auditory feedback disrupts the production of speech, causing an increase in speech duration as well as many articulatory errors. To determine whether prolonged exposure to delayed auditory feedback (DAF) leads to adaptive compensations in speech production, 10 subjects were exposed in separate experimental sessions to both incremental and constant-delay exposure conditions. Significant adaptation occurred for syntactically structured stimuli in the form of increased speaking rates. After DAF was removed, aftereffects were apparent for all stimulus types in terms of increased speech rates. A carry-over effect from the first to the second experimental session was evident as long as 29 days after the first session. The use of strategies to overcome DAF and the differences between adaptation to DAF and adaptation to visual rearrangement are discussed.

  11. UWB delay and multiply receiver

    DOEpatents

    Dallum, Gregory E.; Pratt, Garth C.; Haugen, Peter C.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2013-09-10

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) delay and multiply receiver is formed of a receive antenna; a variable gain attenuator connected to the receive antenna; a signal splitter connected to the variable gain attenuator; a multiplier having one input connected to an undelayed signal from the signal splitter and another input connected to a delayed signal from the signal splitter, the delay between the splitter signals being equal to the spacing between pulses from a transmitter whose pulses are being received by the receive antenna; a peak detection circuit connected to the output of the multiplier and connected to the variable gain attenuator to control the variable gain attenuator to maintain a constant amplitude output from the multiplier; and a digital output circuit connected to the output of the multiplier.

  12. Outward Bound: An Innovative Patient Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stich, Thomas F.; Gaylor, Michael S.

    A 1975 Dartmouth Outward Bound Mental Health Project, begun with a pilot project for disturbed adolescents, has evolved into an ongoing treatment option in three separate clinical settings for psychiatric patients and recovering alcoholics. Outward Bound consists of a series of prescribed physical and social tasks where the presence of stress,…

  13. A cosmological upper bound on superpartner masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Ruderman, Joshua T.; Volansky, Tomer

    2015-02-01

    If some superpartners were in thermal equilibrium in the early universe, and if the lightest superpartner is a cosmologically stable gravitino, then there is a powerful upper bound on the scale of the superpartner masses. Typically the bound is below tens of TeV, often much lower, and has similar parametrics to the WIMP miracle.

  14. Constrained bounds on measures of entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Animesh; Flammia, Steven T.; Shaji, Anil; Caves, Carlton M.

    2007-06-15

    Entanglement measures constructed from two positive, but not completely positive, maps on density operators are used as constraints in placing bounds on the entanglement of formation, the tangle, and the concurrence of 4N mixed states. The maps are the partial transpose map and the phi map introduced by Breuer [H.-P. Breuer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 080501 (2006)]. The norm-based entanglement measures constructed from these two maps, called negativity and phi negativity, respectively, lead to two sets of bounds on the entanglement of formation, the tangle, and the concurrence. We compare these bounds and identify the sets of 4N density operators for which the bounds from one constraint are better than the bounds from the other. In the process, we present a derivation of the already known bound on the concurrence based on the negativity. We compute bounds on the three measures of entanglement using both the constraints simultaneously. We demonstrate how such doubly constrained bounds can be constructed. We discuss extensions of our results to bipartite states of higher dimensions and with more than two constraints.

  15. Are the Right Students "Upward Bound?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Kelly

    2007-01-01

    Congress created Upward Bound in 1964 with the goal of preparing more low-income students for college. A few months later, it created a second college-preparation program, Talent Search. The pair of programs formed the foundation of TRIO, which now includes six outreach and support programs for disadvantaged students and veterans. Upward Bound's…

  16. Triplet lifetime and delayed fluorescence of azulene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kray, Hans-Joachim; Nickel, Bernhard

    1980-11-01

    With solutions of azulene (Az) and fluoranthene (Fl) in isopentane a delayed fluorescence (DF) S 2(Az) → S 0(Az), resulting from hetero-triplet—triplet annihilation T 1(Az) + T 1(Fl) → S 2(Az) + S 0(Fl), can be observed. From the time-dependence of this DF after laser flash excitation the triplet lifetime of azulene can be calculated. The triplet lifetime has been determined in the temperature range from 131 K to 201 K. The temperature-dependence of the triplet lifetime is explained by thermally activated intersystem crossing (ISC) T 1 ⇝ S 1, followed by internal conversion S 1 ⇝ S 0; the corresponding activation energy approximately equals the difference of the excitation energies of S 1 and T 1. The extrapolated low-temperature value of the triplet lifetime (48 ± 2) μs. The quantum efficiency of the ISC S 1 ⇝ T 1 is estimated to be of the order of magnitude of 4 × 10 -6, and for the quantum efficiency of the ISC S 2 ⇝ T 1 an upper bound of 0.04 is obtained. The experimental conditions for the observation of the phosphorescence T 1 ⇝ S 0 and the E-type DF S 1 → S 0 are discussed.

  17. Ignition Delay Associated with a Strained Strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerk, T. J.; Karagozian, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    Ignition processes associated with two adjacent fuel-oxidizer interferences bounding a strained fuel strip are explored here using single-step activation energy asymptotics. Calculations are made for constant as well as temporally decaying strain fields. There possible models of ignition are determined: one in which the two interfaces ignite independently as diffusion flames; one in which the two interfaces ignite dependently and in which ignition occurs to form a single , premixed flame at very high strain rates before ignition is completely prevented. In contrast to a single, isolated interface in which ignition can be prevented by overmatching heat production with heat convection due to strain, ignition of a strained fuel strip can also be prevented if the finite extend of fuel is diluted by oxidizer more quickly than heat production can cause a positive feedback thermal runaway. These behaviors are dependent on the relative sizes of timescales associated with species and heat diffusion, with convection due to strain, and with the chemical reaction. The result here indicate that adjacent, strained species interfaces may ignite quite differently in nature from ignition of a single, strained intrface and that their interdependence should be considered as the interfaces are brought closer together in complex strain fields. Critical strain rates leading to complete ignition delay are found to be considerably smaller for the fuel strip than those for single interfaces as the fuel strip is made thin in comparison to diffusion and chemical length scales.

  18. Reductive transformation of bound trinitrophenyl residues and free TNT during a bioremediation process analyzed by immunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Achtnich, C.; Pfortner, P.; Weller, M.G.; Niessner, R.; Lenke, H.; Knackmuss, H.J.

    1999-10-01

    To follow the fate of bound metabolites of TNT in soil, a synthetic trinitrophenyl residue covalently linked to humic acids was used as model compound. A selective monoclonal antibody was able to detect chemical changes of the nitro groups of the bound residues. The general possibility of reductive transformations of nitro groups of bound molecules and the reduction rates should be determined. In comparison to the reduction of free TNT and its metabolites, the reductive transformation of the bound trinitrophenyl residue was delayed, and the transformation rate was considerably slower. Trinitrophenyl residues also could be detected by the immunoassay in humic acids extracted from TNT contaminated soil. The reductive transformation of these trinitrophenyl residues started after the reduction of free TNT. At the end of the treatment, small amounts of these residues were still detectable indicating that some of these structures were not completely reduced during the process. From present results one can conclude that the further reduction of nitro groups of bound metabolites requires a prolonged anaerobic treatment. Not only the monitoring of free nitroaromatic compounds is recommended during the bioremediation process but also the measurement of bound residues to determine the optimal conditions and duration of the treatment.

  19. 49 CFR 236.563 - Delay time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Delay time. 236.563 Section 236.563 Transportation... Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.563 Delay time. Delay time of automatic... requirements of § 236.24 shall take into consideration the delay time....

  20. 49 CFR 236.563 - Delay time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Delay time. 236.563 Section 236.563 Transportation... Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.563 Delay time. Delay time of automatic... requirements of § 236.24 shall take into consideration the delay time....

  1. 49 CFR 236.563 - Delay time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Delay time. 236.563 Section 236.563 Transportation... Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.563 Delay time. Delay time of automatic... requirements of § 236.24 shall take into consideration the delay time....

  2. 49 CFR 236.563 - Delay time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Delay time. 236.563 Section 236.563 Transportation... Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.563 Delay time. Delay time of automatic... requirements of § 236.24 shall take into consideration the delay time....

  3. 49 CFR 236.563 - Delay time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Delay time. 236.563 Section 236.563 Transportation... Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.563 Delay time. Delay time of automatic... requirements of § 236.24 shall take into consideration the delay time....

  4. Entropy Bounds for Hierarchical Molecular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dehmer, Matthias; Borgert, Stephan; Emmert-Streib, Frank

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we derive entropy bounds for hierarchical networks. More precisely, starting from a recently introduced measure to determine the topological entropy of non-hierarchical networks, we provide bounds for estimating the entropy of hierarchical graphs. Apart from bounds to estimate the entropy of a single hierarchical graph, we see that the derived bounds can also be used for characterizing graph classes. Our contribution is an important extension to previous results about the entropy of non-hierarchical networks because for practical applications hierarchical networks are playing an important role in chemistry and biology. In addition to the derivation of the entropy bounds, we provide a numerical analysis for two special graph classes, rooted trees and generalized trees, and demonstrate hereby not only the computational feasibility of our method but also learn about its characteristics and interpretability with respect to data analysis. PMID:18769487

  5. Covariant entropy bound and loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2008-09-15

    We examine Bousso's covariant entropy bound conjecture in the context of radiation filled, spatially flat, Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models. The bound is violated near the big bang. However, the hope has been that quantum gravity effects would intervene and protect it. Loop quantum cosmology provides a near ideal setting for investigating this issue. For, on the one hand, quantum geometry effects resolve the singularity and, on the other hand, the wave function is sharply peaked at a quantum corrected but smooth geometry, which can supply the structure needed to test the bound. We find that the bound is respected. We suggest that the bound need not be an essential ingredient for a quantum gravity theory but may emerge from it under suitable circumstances.

  6. SHARP ENTRYWISE PERTURBATION BOUNDS FOR MARKOV CHAINS

    PubMed Central

    THIEDE, ERIK; VAN KOTEN, BRIAN; WEARE, JONATHAN

    2015-01-01

    For many Markov chains of practical interest, the invariant distribution is extremely sensitive to perturbations of some entries of the transition matrix, but insensitive to others; we give an example of such a chain, motivated by a problem in computational statistical physics. We have derived perturbation bounds on the relative error of the invariant distribution that reveal these variations in sensitivity. Our bounds are sharp, we do not impose any structural assumptions on the transition matrix or on the perturbation, and computing the bounds has the same complexity as computing the invariant distribution or computing other bounds in the literature. Moreover, our bounds have a simple interpretation in terms of hitting times, which can be used to draw intuitive but rigorous conclusions about the sensitivity of a chain to various types of perturbations. PMID:26491218

  7. New bounds on isotropic Lorentz violation

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Carone; Marc Sher; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2006-09-19

    Violations of Lorentz invariance that appear via operators of dimension four or less are completely parameterized in the Standard Model Extension (SME). In the pure photonic sector of the SME, there are nineteen dimensionless, Lorentz-violating parameters. Eighteen of these have experimental upper bounds ranging between 10{sup -11} and 10{sup -32}; the remaining parameter, ktr, is isotropic and has a much weaker bound of order 10{sup -4}. In this Brief Report, we point out that ktr gives a significant contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron and find a new upper bound of order 10{sup -8}. With reasonable assumptions, we further show that this bound may be improved to 10{sup -14} by considering the renormalization of other Lorentz-violating parameters that are more tightly constrained. Using similar renormalization arguments, we also estimate bounds on Lorentz violating parameters in the pure gluonic sector of QCD.

  8. Time-delay cosmography: increased leverage with angular diameter distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, I.; Komatsu, E.; Suyu, S. H.; Huterer, D.

    2016-04-01

    Strong lensing time-delay systems constrain cosmological parameters via the so-called time-delay distance and the angular diameter distance to the lens. In previous studies, only the former information was used in forecasting cosmographic constraints. In this paper, we show that the cosmological constraints improve significantly when the latter information is also included. Specifically, the angular diameter distance plays a crucial role in breaking the degeneracy between the curvature of the Universe and the time-varying equation of state of dark energy. Using a mock sample of 55 bright quadruple lens systems based on expectations for ongoing/future imaging surveys, we find that adding the angular diameter distance information to the time-delay distance information and the Planck's measurements of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies improves the constraint on the constant equation of state by 30%, on the time variation in the equation of state by a factor of two, and on the Hubble constant in the flat ΛCDM model by a factor of two. Therefore, previous forecasts for the statistical power of time-delay systems were overly pessimistic, i.e., time-delay systems are more powerful than previously appreciated.

  9. Delay equations and radiation damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicone, C.; Kopeikin, S. M.; Mashhoon, B.; Retzloff, D. G.

    2001-06-01

    Starting from delay equations that model field retardation effects, we study the origin of runaway modes that appear in the solutions of the classical equations of motion involving the radiation reaction force. When retardation effects are small, we argue that the physically significant solutions belong to the so-called slow manifold of the system and we identify this invariant manifold with the attractor in the state space of the delay equation. We demonstrate via an example that when retardation effects are no longer small, the motion could exhibit bifurcation phenomena that are not contained in the local equations of motion.

  10. Variable Delay Testing Using ONE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishac, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of long and changing propagation delays on the performance of TCP file transfers. Tests are performed with machines that emulate communication from a low/medium-earth satellite to Earth by way of a geosynchronous satellite. As a result of these tests, we find that TCP is fairly robust to varying delays given a high enough TCP timer granularity. However, performance degrades noticeably for larger file transfers when a finer timer granularity is used. Such results have also been observed in previous simulations by other researchers, and thus, this work serves as an extension of those results.

  11. An Adaptive Loss-Aware Flow Control Scheme for Delay-Sensitive Applications in OBS Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hongkyu; Choi, Jungyul; Mo, Jeonghoon; Kang, Minho

    Optical Burst Switching (OBS) is one of the most promising switching technologies for next generation optical networks. As delay-sensitive applications such as Voice-over-IP (VoIP) have recently become popular, OBS networks should guarantee stringent Quality of Service (QoS) requirements for such applications. Thus, this paper proposes an Adaptive Loss-aware Flow Control (ALFC) scheme, which adaptively decides on the burst offset time based on loss-rate information delivered from core nodes for assigning a high priority to delay-sensitive application traffic. The proposed ALFC scheme also controls the upper-bounds of the factors inducing delay and jitter for guaranteeing the delay and jitter requirements of delay-sensitive application traffic. Moreover, a piggybacking method used in the proposed scheme accelerates the guarantee of the loss, delay, and jitter requirements because the response time for flow control can be extremely reduced up to a quarter of the Round Trip Time (RTT) on average while minimizing the signaling overhead. Simulation results show that our mechanism can guarantee a 10-3 loss-rate under any traffic load while offering satisfactory levels of delay and jitter for delay-sensitive applications.

  12. The range of time delay and the global stability of the equilibrium for an IVGTT model.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaxu; Wang, Minghu; De Gaetano, Andrea; Palumbo, Pasquale; Panunzi, Simona

    2012-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus has become a prevalent disease in the world. Diagnostic protocol for the onset of diabetes mellitus is the initial step in the treatments. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) has been considered as the most accurate method to determine the insulin sensitivity and glucose effectiveness. It is well known that there exists a time delay in insulin secretion stimulated by the elevated glucose concentration level. However, the range of the length of the delay in the existing IVGTT models are not fully discussed and thus in many cases the time delay may be assigned to a value out of its reasonable range. In addition, several attempts had been made to determine when the unique equilibrium point is globally asymptotically stable. However, all these conditions are delay-independent. In this paper, we discuss the range of the time delay and provide easy-to-check delay-dependent conditions for the global asymptotic stability of the equilibrium point for a recent IVGTT model through Liapunov function approach. Estimates of the upper bound of the delay for global stability are given in corollaries. In addition, the numerical simulation in this paper is fully incorporated with functional initial conditions, which is natural and more appropriate in delay differential equation systems. PMID:22123436

  13. Bound-free Spectra for Diatomic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.

    2012-01-01

    It is now recognized that prediction of radiative heating of entering space craft requires explicit treatment of the radiation field from the infrared (IR) to the vacuum ultra violet (VUV). While at low temperatures and longer wavelengths, molecular radiation is well described by bound-bound transitions, in the short wavelength, high temperature regime, bound-free transitions can play an important role. In this work we describe first principles calculations we have carried out for bound-bound and bound-free transitions in N2, O2, C2, CO, CN, NO, and N2+. Compared to bound ]bound transitions, bound-free transitions have several particularities that make them different to deal with. These include more complicated line shapes and a dependence of emission intensity on both bound state diatomic and atomic concentrations. These will be discussed in detail below. The general procedure we used was the same for all species. The first step is to generate potential energy curves, transition moments, and coupling matrix elements by carrying out ab initio electronic structure calculations. These calculations are expensive, and thus approximations need to be made in order to make the calculations tractable. The only practical method we have to carry out these calculations is the internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction (icMRCI) method as implemented in the program suite Molpro. This is a widely used method for these kinds of calculations, and is capable of generating very accurate results. With this method, we must first of choose which electrons to correlate, the one-electron basis to use, and then how to generate the molecular orbitals.

  14. Office Employment Expectations of Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brower, Edward B.

    1971-01-01

    This study was designed to determine (1) the office employment expectations of white and nonwhite business education students and (2) the effect of various factors on office employment expectations. (Author)

  15. What to Expect After Coronary Angioplasty

    MedlinePlus

    ... Before What to Expect During What To Expect After What Are the Risks Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Cardiac Catheterization Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Stents Send a link to NHLBI to someone ...

  16. Local Effects of Delayed Food

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Michael; Baum, William M.

    2007-01-01

    Five pigeons were trained on a procedure in which seven concurrent variable-interval schedules arranged seven different food-rate ratios in random sequence in each session. Each of these components lasted for 10 response-produced food deliveries, and components were separated by 10-s blackouts. We varied delays to food (signaled by blackout)…

  17. Delayed School Entry in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyi, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Since 1997 Uganda has seen a large increase in school enrolment. Despite this increased enrolment, universal education has remained elusive. Many children enrol in school, but not at the recommended age, and they drop out before completing school. This article focuses on one of these problems--delayed school entry. What household factors are…

  18. Match-bounded String Rewriting Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geser, Alfons; Hofbauer, Dieter; Waldmann, Johannes

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a new class of automated proof methods for the termination of rewriting systems on strings. The basis of all these methods is to show that rewriting preserves regular languages. To this end, letters are annotated with natural numbers, called match heights. If the minimal height of all positions in a redex is h+1 then every position in the reduct will get height h+1. In a match-bounded system, match heights are globally bounded. Using recent results on deleting systems, we prove that rewriting by a match-bounded system preserves regular languages. Hence it is decidable whether a given rewriting system has a given match bound. We also provide a sufficient criterion for the abence of a match-bound. The problem of existence of a match-bound is still open. Match-boundedness for all strings can be used as an automated criterion for termination, for match-bounded systems are terminating. This criterion can be strengthened by requiring match-boundedness only for a restricted set of strings, for instance the set of right hand sides of forward closures.

  19. Bounds on invisible Higgs boson decays extracted from LHC ttH production data.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ning; Khechadoorian, Zepyoor; Whiteson, Daniel; Tait, Tim M P

    2014-10-10

    We present an upper bound on the branching fraction of the Higgs boson to invisible particles by recasting a CMS Collaboration search for stop quarks decaying to tt + E(T)(miss). The observed (expected) bound, BF(H → inv.) < 0.40(0.65) at 95% C.L., is the strongest direct limit to date, benefiting from a downward fluctuation in the CMS data in that channel. In addition, we combine this new constraint with existing published constraints to give an observed (expected) bound of BF(H → inv.) < 0.40(0.40) at 95% C.L., and we show some of the implications for theories of dark matter which communicate through the Higgs portal. PMID:25375702

  20. Employer Expectations from a Business Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakaya, Fahri; Karakaya, Fera

    1996-01-01

    In a survey, 80 businesses, mostly small, ranked 13 educational attributes expected of college students with a business education. Factor analysis shows four distinct skill areas expected from an ideal business education program: research, interpersonal, basic, and quantitative skills. In general, employers expect to hire well-rounded students,…

  1. 7 CFR 760.636 - Expected revenue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Expected revenue. 760.636 Section 760.636 Agriculture... SPECIAL PROGRAMS INDEMNITY PAYMENT PROGRAMS Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payments Program § 760.636 Expected revenue. The expected revenue for each crop on a farm is: (a) For each insurable crop,...

  2. 7 CFR 760.636 - Expected revenue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Expected revenue. 760.636 Section 760.636 Agriculture... SPECIAL PROGRAMS INDEMNITY PAYMENT PROGRAMS Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payments Program § 760.636 Expected revenue. The expected revenue for each crop on a farm is: (a) For each insurable crop,...

  3. 10 CFR 63.304 - Reasonable expectation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reasonable expectation. 63.304 Section 63.304 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Postclosure Public Health and Environmental Standards § 63.304 Reasonable expectation. Reasonable expectation means...

  4. Are Grade Expectations Rational? A Classroom Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Belayet; Tsigaris, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    This study examines students' expectations about their final grade. An attempt is made to determine whether students form expectations rationally. Expectations in economics, rational or otherwise, carry valuable information and have important implications in terms of both teaching effectiveness and the role of grades as an incentive structure…

  5. Global synchronization in arrays of coupled Lurie systems with both time-delay and hybrid coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Song, Aiguo; Fei, Shumin; Wang, Ting

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose and study an array of coupled delayed Lurie systems with hybrid coupling, which is composed of constant coupling, state delay coupling, and distributed delay coupling. Together with Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional method and Kronecker product properties, two novel synchronization criteria are presented within linear matrix inequalities based on generalized convex combination, in which these conditions are heavily dependent on the upper and lower bounds of state delay and distributed one. Through adjusting inner coupling matrix parameters in the derived results, we can realize the designing and applications of the addressed systems by referring to Matlab LMI Toolbox. The efficiency and applicability of the proposed criteria can be demonstrated by three numerical examples with simulations.

  6. Containment consensus with measurement noises and time-varying communication delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feng; Wang, Zheng-Jie; Fan, Ning-Jun

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we consider the containment consensus control problem for multi-agent systems with measurement noises and time-varying communication delays under directed networks. By using stochastic analysis tools and algebraic graph theory, we prove that the followers can converge to the convex hull spanned by the leaders in the sense of mean square if the allowed upper bound of the time-varying delays satisfies a certain sufficient condition. Moreover, the time-varying delays are asymmetric for each follower agent, and the time-delay-dependent consensus condition is derived. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained theoretical results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11102019), the Aeronautical Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 2013ZC72006), and the Research Foundation of Beijing Institute of Technology, China.

  7. Search for eta '(958)-nucleus Bound States by (p,d) Reaction at GSI and FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, H.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Brinkmann, K.-T.; Friedrich, S.; Geissel, H.; Gellanki, J.; Guo, C.; Gutz, E.; Haettner, E.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Higashi, Y.; Hirenzaki, S.; Hornung, C.; Igarashi, Y.; Ikeno, N.; Itahashi, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Jido, D.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kanungo, R.; Knoebel, R.; Kurz, N.; Metag, V.; Mukha, I.; Nagae, T.; Nagahiro, H.; Nanova, M.; Nishi, T.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Rappold, C.; Reiter, M. P.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Scheidenberger, C.; Simon, H.; Sitar, B.; Strmen, P.; Sun, B.; Suzuki, K.; Szarka, I.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, Y. K.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Watanabe, Y. N.; Weick, H.; Widmann, E.; Winfield, J. S.; Xu, X.; Yamakami, H.; Zhao, J.

    The mass of the {\\eta}' meson is theoretically expected to be reduced at finite density, which indicates the existence of {\\eta}'-nucleus bound states. To investigate these states, we perform missing-mass spectroscopy for the (p, d) reaction near the {\\eta}' production threshold. The overview of the experimental situation is given and the current status is discussed.

  8. Lightweight Distance Bounding Protocol against Relay Attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Seok; Cho, Kookrae; Yum, Dae Hyun; Hong, Sung Je; Lee, Pil Joong

    Traditional authentication protocols are based on cryptographic techniques to achieve identity verification. Distance bounding protocols are an enhanced type of authentication protocol built upon both signal traversal time measurement and cryptographic techniques to accomplish distance verification as well as identity verification. A distance bounding protocol is usually designed to defend against the relay attack and the distance fraud attack. As there are applications to which the distance fraud attack is not a serious threat, we propose a streamlined distance bounding protocol that focuses on the relay attack. The proposed protocol is more efficient than previous protocols and has a low false acceptance rate under the relay attack.

  9. Pattern Search Algorithms for Bound Constrained Minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert Michael; Torczon, Virginia

    1996-01-01

    We present a convergence theory for pattern search methods for solving bound constrained nonlinear programs. The analysis relies on the abstract structure of pattern search methods and an understanding of how the pattern interacts with the bound constraints. This analysis makes it possible to develop pattern search methods for bound constrained problems while only slightly restricting the flexibility present in pattern search methods for unconstrained problems. We prove global convergence despite the fact that pattern search methods do not have explicit information concerning the gradient and its projection onto the feasible region and consequently are unable to enforce explicitly a notion of sufficient feasible decrease.

  10. Bounds on dark matter in solar orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.D.; Lau, E.L.; Taylor, A.H.; Dicus, D.A.; Teplitz, D.C.; Texas Univ., Austin; Maryland Univ., College Park )

    1989-07-01

    The possibility is considered that a spherical distribution of dark matter (DM), matter not visible with current instruments, is trapped in the sun's gravitational field. Bounds are placed from the motion of Uranus and Neptune, on the amount of DM that could be so trapped within the radius of those planets' orbits, as follows: from the Voyager 2, Uranus-flyby data new, more accurate ephemeris values are generated. Trapped DM mass is bounded by noting that such a distribution would increase the effective mass of the sun as seen by the outer planets and by using the new ephemeris values to bound such an increase. 34 refs.

  11. New bounding and decomposition approaches for MILP investment problems: Multi-area transmission and generation planning under policy constraints

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Munoz, F. D.; Hobbs, B. F.; Watson, J. -P.

    2016-02-01

    A novel two-phase bounding and decomposition approach to compute optimal and near-optimal solutions to large-scale mixed-integer investment planning problems is proposed and it considers a large number of operating subproblems, each of which is a convex optimization. Our motivating application is the planning of power transmission and generation in which policy constraints are designed to incentivize high amounts of intermittent generation in electric power systems. The bounding phase exploits Jensen’s inequality to define a lower bound, which we extend to stochastic programs that use expected-value constraints to enforce policy objectives. The decomposition phase, in which the bounds are tightened, improvesmore » upon the standard Benders’ algorithm by accelerating the convergence of the bounds. The lower bound is tightened by using a Jensen’s inequality-based approach to introduce an auxiliary lower bound into the Benders master problem. Upper bounds for both phases are computed using a sub-sampling approach executed on a parallel computer system. Numerical results show that only the bounding phase is necessary if loose optimality gaps are acceptable. But, the decomposition phase is required to attain optimality gaps. Moreover, use of both phases performs better, in terms of convergence speed, than attempting to solve the problem using just the bounding phase or regular Benders decomposition separately.« less

  12. Delayed Neutron and Delayed Photon Characteristics from Photofission of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Dore, D.; Berthoumieux, E.; Leprince, A.; Ridikas, D.

    2011-12-13

    Delayed neutron (DN) and delayed photon (DP) emissions from photofission reactions play an important role for applications involving nuclear material detection and characterization. To provide new, accurate, basic nuclear data for evaluations and data libraries, an experimental programme of DN and DP measurements has been undertaken for actinides with bremsstrahlung endpoint energy in the giant resonance region ({approx}15 MeV). In this paper, the experimental setup and the data analysis method will be described. Experimental results for DN and DP characteristics will be presented for {sup 232}Th, {sup 235,238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu. Finally, an example of an application to study the contents of nuclear waste packages will be briefly discussed.

  13. Separate valuation subsystems for delay and effort decision costs.

    PubMed

    Prévost, Charlotte; Pessiglione, Mathias; Météreau, Elise; Cléry-Melin, Marie-Laure; Dreher, Jean-Claude

    2010-10-20

    Decision making consists of choosing among available options on the basis of a valuation of their potential costs and benefits. Most theoretical models of decision making in behavioral economics, psychology, and computer science propose that the desirability of outcomes expected from alternative options can be quantified by utility functions. These utility functions allow a decision maker to assign subjective values to each option under consideration by weighting the likely benefits and costs resulting from an action and to select the one with the highest subjective value. Here, we used model-based neuroimaging to test whether the human brain uses separate valuation systems for rewards (erotic stimuli) associated with different types of costs, namely, delay and effort. We show that humans devalue rewards associated with physical effort in a strikingly similar fashion to those they devalue that are associated with delays, and that a single computational model derived from economics theory can account for the behavior observed in both delay discounting and effort discounting. However, our neuroimaging data reveal that the human brain uses distinct valuation subsystems for different types of costs, reflecting in opposite fashion delayed reward and future energetic expenses. The ventral striatum and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex represent the increasing subjective value of delayed rewards, whereas a distinct network, composed of the anterior cingulate cortex and the anterior insula, represent the decreasing value of the effortful option, coding the expected expense of energy. Together, these data demonstrate that the valuation processes underlying different types of costs can be fractionated at the cerebral level. PMID:20962229

  14. Alpha Oscillatory Dynamics Index Temporal Expectation Benefits in Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Wilsch, Anna; Henry, Molly J; Herrmann, Björn; Maess, Burkhard; Obleser, Jonas

    2015-07-01

    Enhanced alpha power compared with a baseline can reflect states of increased cognitive load, for example, when listening to speech in noise. Can knowledge about "when" to listen (temporal expectations) potentially counteract cognitive load and concomitantly reduce alpha? The current magnetoencephalography (MEG) experiment induced cognitive load using an auditory delayed-matching-to-sample task with 2 syllables S1 and S2 presented in speech-shaped noise. Temporal expectation about the occurrence of S1 was manipulated in 3 different cue conditions: "Neutral" (uninformative about foreperiod), "early-cued" (short foreperiod), and "late-cued" (long foreperiod). Alpha power throughout the trial was highest when the cue was uninformative about the onset time of S1 (neutral) and lowest for the late-cued condition. This alpha-reducing effect of late compared with neutral cues was most evident during memory retention in noise and originated primarily in the right insula. Moreover, individual alpha effects during retention accounted best for observed individual performance differences between late-cued and neutral conditions, indicating a tradeoff between allocation of neural resources and the benefits drawn from temporal cues. Overall, the results indicate that temporal expectations can facilitate the encoding of speech in noise, and concomitantly reduce neural markers of cognitive load. PMID:24488943

  15. Prior expectations facilitate metacognition for perceptual decision.

    PubMed

    Sherman, M T; Seth, A K; Barrett, A B; Kanai, R

    2015-09-01

    The influential framework of 'predictive processing' suggests that prior probabilistic expectations influence, or even constitute, perceptual contents. This notion is evidenced by the facilitation of low-level perceptual processing by expectations. However, whether expectations can facilitate high-level components of perception remains unclear. We addressed this question by considering the influence of expectations on perceptual metacognition. To isolate the effects of expectation from those of attention we used a novel factorial design: expectation was manipulated by changing the probability that a Gabor target would be presented; attention was manipulated by instructing participants to perform or ignore a concurrent visual search task. We found that, independently of attention, metacognition improved when yes/no responses were congruent with expectations of target presence/absence. Results were modeled under a novel Bayesian signal detection theoretic framework which integrates bottom-up signal propagation with top-down influences, to provide a unified description of the mechanisms underlying perceptual decision and metacognition. PMID:25973773

  16. Analytical Properties of Credibilistic Expectation Functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Watada, Junzo

    2014-01-01

    The expectation function of fuzzy variable is an important and widely used criterion in fuzzy optimization, and sound properties on the expectation function may help in model analysis and solution algorithm design for the fuzzy optimization problems. The present paper deals with some analytical properties of credibilistic expectation functions of fuzzy variables that lie in three aspects. First, some continuity theorems on the continuity and semicontinuity conditions are proved for the expectation functions. Second, a differentiation formula of the expectation function is derived which tells that, under certain conditions, the derivative of the fuzzy expectation function with respect to the parameter equals the expectation of the derivative of the fuzzy function with respect to the parameter. Finally, a law of large numbers for fuzzy variable sequences is obtained leveraging on the Chebyshev Inequality of fuzzy variables. Some examples are provided to verify the results obtained. PMID:24723800

  17. Coulomb Bound States of Strongly Interacting Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrebi, M. F.; Gullans, M. J.; Bienias, P.; Choi, S.; Martin, I.; Firstenberg, O.; Lukin, M. D.; Büchler, H. P.; Gorshkov, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    We show that two photons coupled to Rydberg states via electromagnetically induced transparency can interact via an effective Coulomb potential. This interaction gives rise to a continuum of two-body bound states. Within the continuum, metastable bound states are distinguished in analogy with quasibound states tunneling through a potential barrier. We find multiple branches of metastable bound states whose energy spectrum is governed by the Coulomb potential, thus obtaining a photonic analogue of the hydrogen atom. Under certain conditions, the wave function resembles that of a diatomic molecule in which the two polaritons are separated by a finite "bond length." These states propagate with a negative group velocity in the medium, allowing for a simple preparation and detection scheme, before they slowly decay to pairs of bound Rydberg atoms.

  18. Bound phenolics in foods, a review.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Estrada, Beatriz A; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A; Serna-Saldívar, Sergio O

    2014-01-01

    Among phytochemicals, phenolic compounds have been extensively researched due to their diverse health benefits. Phenolic compounds occur mostly as soluble conjugates and insoluble forms, covalently bound to sugar moieties or cell wall structural components. Absorption mechanisms for bound phenolic compounds in the gastrointestinal tract greatly depend on the liberation of sugar moieties. Food processes such as fermentation, malting, thermoplastic extrusion or enzymatic, alkaline and acid hydrolyses occasionally assisted with microwave or ultrasound have potential to release phenolics associated to cell walls. Different kinds of wet chemistry methodologies to release and detect bound phenolic have been developed. These include harsh heat treatments, chemical modifications or biocatalysis. New protocols for processing and determining phenolics in food matrices must be devised in order to release bound phenolics and for quality control in the growing functional food industry. PMID:24444905

  19. Gravitation, Thermodynamics, and the Bound on Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    The anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT) correspondence implies that small perturbations of a black hole correspond to small deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium in a dual field theory. For gauge theories with an Einstein gravity dual, the AdS/CFT correspondence predicts a universal value for the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density, ?/s = 1/4?. It was conjectured recently that all fluids conform to the lower bound: ?/s ? 1/4?. This conjectured bound has been the focus of much recent attention. However, despite the flurry of research in this field we still lack a proof for the general validity of the bound. In this essay we show that this mysterious bound is actually a direct outcome of the interplay between gravity, quantum theory, and thermodynamics.

  20. Gravitation, thermodynamics, and the bound on viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2009-10-01

    The anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT) correspondence implies that small perturbations of a black hole correspond to small deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium in a dual field theory. For gauge theories with an Einstein gravity dual, the AdS/CFT correspondence predicts a universal value for the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density, ?/s = 1/4 ?. It was conjectured recently that all fluids conform to the lower bound ?/s ? 1/4 ?. This conjectured bound has been the focus of much recent attention. However, despite the flurry of research in this field we still lack a proof for the general validity of the bound. In this essay we show that this mysterious bound is actually a direct outcome of the interplay between gravity, quantum theory, and thermodynamics.

  1. Quantum union bounds for sequential projective measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jingliang

    2015-11-01

    We present two quantum union bounds for sequential projective measurements. These bounds estimate the disturbance accumulation and probability of outcomes when the measurements are performed sequentially. These results are based on a trigonometric representation of quantum states and should have wide application in quantum information theory for information-processing tasks such as communication and state discrimination, and perhaps even in the analysis of quantum algorithms.

  2. Dynamic optimization problems with bounded terminal conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, A. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Bounded terminal conditions of nonlinear optimization problems are converted to equality terminal conditions via Valentine's device. In so doing, additional unknown parameters are introduced into the problem. The transformed problems can still be easily solved using the sequential gradient-restoration algorithm (SGRA) via a simple augmentation of the unknown parameter vector pi. Three example problems with bounded terminal conditions are solved to verify this technique.

  3. Hamiltonian anomalies of bound states in QED

    SciTech Connect

    Shilin, V. I.; Pervushin, V. N.

    2013-10-15

    The Bound State in QED is described in systematic way by means of nonlocal irreducible representations of the nonhomogeneous Poincare group and Dirac's method of quantization. As an example of application of this method we calculate triangle diagram Para-Positronium {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. We show that the Hamiltonian approach to Bound State in QED leads to anomaly-type contribution to creation of pair of parapositronium by two photon.

  4. Elastic scattering with weakly bound projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Figueira, J. M.; Abriola, D.; Arazi, A.; Capurro, O. A.; Marti, G. V.; Martinez Heinmann, D.; Pacheco, A. J.; Testoni, J. E.; Barbara, E. de; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Padron, I.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.

    2007-02-12

    Possible effects of the break-up channel on the elastic scattering threshold anomaly has been investigated. We used the weakly bound 6,7Li nuclei, which is known to undergo break-up, as projectiles in order to study the elastic scattering on a 27Al target. In this contribution we present preliminary results of these experiments, which were analyzed in terms of the Optical Model and compared with other elastic scattering data using weakly bound nuclei as projectile.

  5. Delay locked loop integrated circuit.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2007-10-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Delay Locked Loop (DLL) integrated circuit (IC). The DLL was developed and tested as a stand-alone IC test chip to be integrated into a larger application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), the Quadrature Digital Waveform Synthesizer (QDWS). The purpose of the DLL is to provide a digitally programmable delay to enable synchronization between an internal system clock and external peripherals with unknown clock skew. The DLL was designed and fabricated in the IBM 8RF process, a 0.13 {micro}m CMOS process. It was designed to operate with a 300MHz clock and has been tested up to 500MHz.

  6. Time delay and distance measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B. (Inventor); Sun, Xiaoli (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for measuring time delay and distance may include providing an electromagnetic radiation carrier frequency and modulating one or more of amplitude, phase, frequency, polarization, and pointing angle of the carrier frequency with a return to zero (RZ) pseudo random noise (PN) code. The RZ PN code may have a constant bit period and a pulse duration that is less than the bit period. A receiver may detect the electromagnetic radiation and calculate the scattering profile versus time (or range) by computing a cross correlation function between the recorded received signal and a three-state RZ PN code kernel in the receiver. The method also may be used for pulse delay time (i.e., PPM) communications.

  7. Synchronization by small time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruessner, G.; Cheang, S.; Jensen, H. J.

    2015-02-01

    Synchronization is a phenomenon observed in all of the living and in much of the non-living world, for example in the heart beat, Huygens' clocks, the flashing of fireflies and the clapping of audiences. Depending on the number of degrees of freedom involved, different mathematical approaches have been used to describe it, most prominently integrate-and-fire oscillators and the Kuramoto model of coupled oscillators. In the present work, we study a very simple and general system of smoothly evolving oscillators, which continue to interact even in the synchronized state. We find that under very general circumstances, synchronization generically occurs in the presence of a (small) time delay. Strikingly, the synchronization time is inversely proportional to the time delay.

  8. Women's Retirement Expectations: How Stable Are They?

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Melissa A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, we examine between- and within-person differences in expected retirement age as a key element of the retirement planning process. The expectation typologies of 1,626 women born between 1923 and 1937 were classified jointly on the basis of specificity and consistency. Methods Latent class analysis was used to determine retirement expectation patterns over a 7-year span. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were employed to estimate the effects of demographic and status characteristics on the likelihood of reporting 4 distinct longitudinal patterns of retirement expectations. Results Substantial heterogeneity in reports of expected retirement age between and within individuals over the 7-year span was found. Demographic and status characteristics, specifically age, race, marital status, job tenure, and recent job change, sorted respondents into different retirement expectation patterns. Conclusions The frequent within-person fluctuations and substantial between-person heterogeneity in retirement expectations indicate uncertainty and variability in both expectations and process of expectation formation. Variability in respondents' reports suggests that studying retirement expectations at multiple time points better captures the dynamics of preretirement planning. PMID:19176483

  9. Rapid Expectation Adaptation during Syntactic Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Alex B.; Jaeger, T. Florian; Farmer, Thomas A.; Qian, Ting

    2013-01-01

    When we read or listen to language, we are faced with the challenge of inferring intended messages from noisy input. This challenge is exacerbated by considerable variability between and within speakers. Focusing on syntactic processing (parsing), we test the hypothesis that language comprehenders rapidly adapt to the syntactic statistics of novel linguistic environments (e.g., speakers or genres). Two self-paced reading experiments investigate changes in readers’ syntactic expectations based on repeated exposure to sentences with temporary syntactic ambiguities (so-called “garden path sentences”). These sentences typically lead to a clear expectation violation signature when the temporary ambiguity is resolved to an a priori less expected structure (e.g., based on the statistics of the lexical context). We find that comprehenders rapidly adapt their syntactic expectations to converge towards the local statistics of novel environments. Specifically, repeated exposure to a priori unexpected structures can reduce, and even completely undo, their processing disadvantage (Experiment 1). The opposite is also observed: a priori expected structures become less expected (even eliciting garden paths) in environments where they are hardly ever observed (Experiment 2). Our findings suggest that, when changes in syntactic statistics are to be expected (e.g., when entering a novel environment), comprehenders can rapidly adapt their expectations, thereby overcoming the processing disadvantage that mistaken expectations would otherwise cause. Our findings take a step towards unifying insights from research in expectation-based models of language processing, syntactic priming, and statistical learning. PMID:24204909

  10. Premenstrual symptoms and smoking-related expectancies.

    PubMed

    Pang, Raina D; Bello, Mariel S; Stone, Matthew D; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Huh, Jimi; Monterosso, John; Haselton, Martie G; Fales, Melissa R; Leventhal, Adam M

    2016-06-01

    Given that prior research implicates smoking abstinence in increased premenstrual symptoms, tobacco withdrawal, and smoking behaviors, it is possible that women with more severe premenstrual symptoms have stronger expectancies about the effects of smoking and abstaining from smoking on mood and withdrawal. However, such relations have not been previously explored. This study examined relations between premenstrual symptoms experienced in the last month and expectancies that abstaining from smoking results in withdrawal (i.e., smoking abstinence withdrawal expectancies), that smoking is pleasurable (i.e., positive reinforcement smoking expectancies), and smoking relieves negative mood (i.e., negative reinforcement smoking expectancies). In a cross-sectional design, 97 non-treatment seeking women daily smokers completed self-report measures of smoking reinforcement expectancies, smoking abstinence withdrawal expectancies, premenstrual symptoms, mood symptoms, and nicotine dependence. Affect premenstrual symptoms were associated with increased negative reinforcement smoking expectancies, but not over and above covariates. Affect and pain premenstrual symptoms were associated with increased positive reinforcement smoking expectancies, but only affect premenstrual symptoms remained significant in adjusted models. Affect, pain, and water retention premenstrual symptoms were associated with increased smoking abstinence withdrawal expectancies, but only affect premenstrual symptoms remained significant in adjusted models. Findings from this study suggest that addressing concerns about withdrawal and alternatives to smoking may be particularly important in women who experience more severe premenstrual symptoms, especially affect-related changes. PMID:26869196

  11. Method for calcining delayed coke

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.

    1981-02-17

    Delayed petroleum coke is calcined in an internally-fired vertical shaft kiln. A downwardly-moving bed of green coke is preheated in the top of the kiln by rising combustion gases, then heat soaked at calcining temperatures in the intermediate section of the kiln, and finally cooled by recycle gas moving upwardly from the lower part of the kiln. Partially cooled calcined coke is recovered from the bottom of the kiln.

  12. Delayed recombination and standard rulers

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Galli, Silvia; Silk, Joseph I.; Verde, Licia

    2009-02-15

    Measurements of baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in galaxy surveys have been recognized as a powerful tool for constraining dark energy. However, this method relies on the knowledge of the size of the acoustic horizon at recombination derived from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy measurements. This estimate is typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme; additional radiation sources can delay recombination altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from CMB and BAO data. In this paper we quantify the effect of delayed recombination on the determination of dark energy parameters from future BAO surveys such as the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph. We find the impact to be small but still not negligible. In particular, if recombination is nonstandard (to a level still allowed by CMB data), but this is ignored, future surveys may incorrectly suggest the presence of a redshift-dependent dark energy component. On the other hand, in the case of delayed recombination, adding to the analysis one extra parameter describing deviations from standard recombination does not significantly degrade the error bars on dark energy parameters and yields unbiased estimates. This is due to the CMB-BAO complementarity.

  13. A Global Stability Analysis of a Class of Nolinear Time-Delay Systems Using Continued Fraction Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Joon-Young

    We consider a class of nonlinear time delay systems with time-varying delays, and achieve a time delay independent sufficient condition for the global asymptotic stability. The sufficient condition is proved by constructing a continued fraction that represents the lower and upper bound variations of the system trajectory along the current of time, and showing that the continued fraction converges to the equilibrium point of the system. The simulation results show the validity of the sufficient condition, and illustrate that the sufficient condition is a close approximation to the unknown necessary and sufficient condition for the global asymptotic stability.

  14. Impulsive control for a Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model with time-delay and its application to chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shi-Guo; Yu, Si-Min

    2009-09-01

    A control approach where the fuzzy logic methodology is combined with impulsive control is developed for controlling some time-delay chaotic systems in this paper. We first introduce impulses into each subsystem with delay of the Takagi-Sugeno (TS) fuzzy IF-THEN rules and then present a unified TS impulsive fuzzy model with delay for chaos control. Based on the new model, a simple and unified set of conditions for controlling chaotic systems is derived by the Lyapunov-Razumikhin method, and a design procedure for estimating bounds on control matrices is also given. Several numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of this method.

  15. Expected and unexpected imaging features after oesophageal cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sonavane, S; Watts, J; Terry, N; Singh, S P

    2014-08-01

    Oesophageal cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Various surgical procedures are performed for oesophageal malignancies. The advancement in surgical technique as well as post-surgical care has significantly reduced the complication rate. However, various complications may still occur either immediately (infection, aspiration, anastomotic leak, ischaemic necrosis, fistulae, chylothorax) or late after surgery (strictures, tumour recurrence, fistulae, delayed emptying). The palliative treatment options of radiotherapy and stent placement may also be accompanied by complications, such as radiation necrosis, stricture, and stent ingrowth by the tumour. This review presents the expected post-surgical appearance as well as various complications after surgical and non-surgical treatments of oesophageal cancer. PMID:24857676

  16. Unexploded Ordnance in an Expectant Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Howell, Christopher M; Sontgerath, Joseph S; Simonet, Luke B

    2016-03-01

    Retained unexploded ordnance is only one of the numerous potential threats to coalition forces while deployed in the theater of operations. Though rare, these are also very real dangers for personnel involved with patient care and movement. Principles of management include determination of device type with plain film radiography, minimizing rotational and vibratory movement, and strategic isolation of the patient from the hospital facility, hospital personnel, and other patients. Early identification of this threat, as well as early involvement of the Explosive Ordnance Disposal team is paramount to safe and successful management. We present a case of a deceased patient in the expectant triage category with a delayed identification of retained unexploded ordnance during postmortem preparation. PMID:26926759

  17. Stochastic sampled-data control for state estimation of time-varying delayed neural networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae H; Park, Ju H; Kwon, O M; Lee, S M

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the state estimation problem for neural networks with a time-varying delay. Unlike other studies, the sampled-data with stochastic sampling is used to design the state estimator using a novel approach that divides the bounding of the activation function into two subintervals. To fully use the sawtooth structure characteristics of the sampling input delay, a discontinuous Lyapunov functional is proposed based on the extended Wirtinger inequality. The desired estimator gain can be characterized in terms of the solution to linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Finally, the proposed method is applied to two numerical examples to show the effectiveness of our result. PMID:23727440

  18. Stochastic dynamic output feedback stabilization of uncertain stochastic state-delayed systems.

    PubMed

    Karimi, H R; Maralani, P Jabehdar; Moshiri, B

    2006-04-01

    This paper addresses the problem of stochastic dynamic output feedback (SDOF) stabilization for a class of stochastic continuous-time state-delayed systems with norm-bounded nonlinear uncertainties. The aim is to design a linear, delayless, and SDOF control for all admissible uncertainties. The designed control ensures stochastically exponentially stability in the mean square, independent of the deterministic time delay. Using the Finsler's lemma, the necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of such a control are proposed in terms of certain linear matrix inequalities. These results are illustrated with a simple example to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed design approach. PMID:16649566

  19. Can Large Time Delays Observed in Light Curves of Coronal Loops Be Explained in Impulsive Heating?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionello, Roberto; Alexander, Caroline E.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Linker, Jon A.; Mikić, Zoran

    2016-02-01

    The light curves of solar coronal loops often peak first in channels associated with higher temperatures and then in those associated with lower temperatures. The delay times between the different narrowband EUV channels have been measured for many individual loops and recently for every pixel of an active region observation. The time delays between channels for an active region exhibit a wide range of values. The maximum time delay in each channel pair can be quite large, i.e., >5000 s. These large time delays make-up 3%–26% (depending on the channel pair) of the pixels where a trustworthy, positive time delay is measured. It has been suggested that these time delays can be explained by simple impulsive heating, i.e., a short burst of energy that heats the plasma to a high temperature, after which the plasma is allowed to cool through radiation and conduction back to its original state. In this paper, we investigate whether the largest observed time delays can be explained by this hypothesis by simulating a series of coronal loops with different heating rates, loop lengths, abundances, and geometries to determine the range of expected time delays between a set of four EUV channels. We find that impulsive heating cannot address the largest time delays observed in two of the channel pairs and that the majority of the large time delays can only be explained by long, expanding loops with photospheric abundances. Additional observations may rule out these simulations as an explanation for the long time delays. We suggest that either the time delays found in this manner may not be representative of real loop evolution, or that the impulsive heating and cooling scenario may be too simple to explain the observations, and other potential heating scenarios must be explored.

  20. Stock Market Expectations of Dutch Households

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Michael; van Rooij, Maarten; Winter, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Despite its importance for the analysis of life-cycle behavior and, in particular, retirement planning, stock ownership by private households is poorly understood. Among other approaches to investigate this puzzle, recent research has started to elicit private households’ expectations of stock market returns. This paper reports findings from a study that collected data over a two-year period both on households’ stock market expectations (subjective probabilities of gains or losses) and on whether they own stocks. We document substantial heterogeneity in financial market expectations. Expectations are correlated with stock ownership. Over the two years of our data, stock market prices increased, and expectations of future stock market price changes also increased, lending support to the view that expectations are influenced by recent stock gains or losses. PMID:23997423

  1. Inoculation against forgetting: advantages of immediate versus delayed initial testing due to superior verbatim accessibility.

    PubMed

    Pansky, Ainat

    2012-11-01

    In this study, potential benefits of early memory testing were examined in terms of "inoculating" eyewitness memory against forgetting. As predicted by fuzzy trace theory (e.g., Reyna & Titcomb, 1997), a larger testing advantage in the delayed recall of event details was expected after immediate testing than after delayed testing because of the decline in accessibility of verbatim traces over time. However, memory for only the gist of these details was expected to be relatively stable over time, resulting in a smaller (if any) effect of the timing of interpolated testing. After viewing a target event, participants were questioned about event items immediately, after a 24-hr delay, or after a 48-hr delay and were free to respond at either the gist or the verbatim level. Verbatim memory for event details was tested 72 hr after the event. As expected, immediate interpolated testing improved verbatim memory performance on the final test more than delayed testing did, yielding a larger testing effect. Furthermore, the effect of the timing of interpolated testing on the magnitude of the testing effect was mediated by verbatim accessibility at interpolated testing. In contrast, memory for only the gist of event details was unaffected by the timing of interpolated testing, both on the interpolated test and on the final test. The findings highlight the role of declining verbatim memory over time in accounting for the advantage of immediate over delayed interpolated testing in inoculating eyewitness memory against forgetting of detailed information. PMID:22582965

  2. 78 FR 43270 - List of Applications Delayed

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration List of Applications Delayed AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: List of applications delayed more than 180... Hazardous Materials Special Permits ] and Approvals, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety...

  3. Expectant fathers at risk for couvade.

    PubMed

    Clinton, J F

    1986-01-01

    A repeated measures survey design was used to monitor the physical and emotional health of 81 expectant fathers at lunar month intervals throughout their partners' pregnancy and the early postpartum period. The data set consisted of 515 repeated measures. The backward elimination regression procedure was used to identify six factors that partially explained health events experienced by expectant fathers: affective involvement in pregnancy, number of previous children, income, ethnic identity, perceived stress, and recent health prior to expectant fatherhood. PMID:3638609

  4. Increasing hope by addressing clients' outcome expectations.

    PubMed

    Swift, Joshua K; Derthick, Annie O

    2013-09-01

    Addressing clients' outcome expectations is an important clinical process that can lead to a strong therapeutic alliance, more positive treatment outcomes, and decreased rates of premature termination from psychotherapy. Five interventions designed to foster appropriate outcome expectations are discussed, including presenting a convincing treatment rationale, increasing clients' faith in their therapists, expressing faith in clients, providing outcome education, and comparing progress with expectations. Clinical examples and research support are provided for each. PMID:24000836

  5. Great Expectations. What the President Expects of the PR Director and What You Should Expect in Return.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, James L.

    1980-01-01

    A college president has a right to expect competence, loyalty, knowledge of the president, sensitivity, new ideas, contingency plans, a knowledge of higher education, effective management, partisanship, and hard work from his/her public relations officer. In return, that officer should expect respect, support, reward, and status in decision…

  6. Delayed feedback control requires an internal forward model.

    PubMed

    Volkinshtein, Dmitry; Meir, Ron

    2011-07-01

    Biological motor control provides highly effective solutions to difficult control problems in spite of the complexity of the plant and the significant delays in sensory feedback. Such delays are expected to lead to non trivial stability issues and lack of robustness of control solutions. However, such difficulties are not observed in biological systems under normal operating conditions. Based on early suggestions in the control literature, a possible solution to this conundrum has been the suggestion that the motor system contains within itself a forward model of the plant (e.g., the arm), which allows the system to 'simulate' and predict the effect of applying a control signal. In this work, we formally define the notion of a forward model for deterministic control problems, and provide simple conditions that imply its existence for tasks involving delayed feedback control. As opposed to previous work which dealt mostly with linear plants and quadratic cost functions, our results apply to rather generic control systems, showing that any controller (biological or otherwise) which solves a set of tasks, must contain within itself a forward plant model. We suggest that our results provide strong theoretical support for the necessity of forward models in many delayed control problems, implying that they are not only useful, but rather, mandatory, under general conditions. PMID:21796403

  7. DSS range delay calibrations: Current performance level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spradlin, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    A means for evaluating Deep Space Station (DSS) range delay calibration performance was developed. Inconsistencies frequently noted in these data are resolved. Development of the DSS range delay data base is described. The data base is presented with comments regarding apparent discontinuities. Data regarding the exciter frequency dependence of the delay values are presented. The improvement observed in the consistency of current DSS range delay calibration data over the performance previously observed is noted.

  8. Encryption with synchronized time-delayed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kye, Won-Ho; Choi, Muhan; Kim, Chil-Min; Park, Young-Jai

    2005-04-01

    We propose a new communication scheme that uses time-delayed chaotic systems with delay time modulation. In this method, the transmitter encodes a message as an additional modulation of the delay time and then the receiver decodes the message by tracking the delay time. We demonstrate our communication scheme in a system of coupled logistic maps. Also we discuss the error of the transferred message due to an external noise and present its correction method.

  9. Delayed q-deformed logistic map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrimali, Manish Dev; Banerjee, Subhashish

    2013-11-01

    The delay logistic map with two types of q-deformations: Tsallis and Quantum-group type are studied. The stability of the logistic map and its bifurcation scheme is analyzed as a function of the deformation and delay parameters. Chaos is suppressed in a certain region of deformation and delay parameter space. By introducing delay, the steady state in one type of deformation is maintained while chaotic behavior is recovered in another type.

  10. Error bounds from extra precise iterative refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Demmel, James; Hida, Yozo; Kahan, William; Li, Xiaoye S.; Mukherjee, Soni; Riedy, E. Jason

    2005-02-07

    We present the design and testing of an algorithm for iterative refinement of the solution of linear equations, where the residual is computed with extra precision. This algorithm was originally proposed in the 1960s [6, 22] as a means to compute very accurate solutions to all but the most ill-conditioned linear systems of equations. However two obstacles have until now prevented its adoption in standard subroutine libraries like LAPACK: (1) There was no standard way to access the higher precision arithmetic needed to compute residuals, and (2) it was unclear how to compute a reliable error bound for the computed solution. The completion of the new BLAS Technical Forum Standard [5] has recently removed the first obstacle. To overcome the second obstacle, we show how a single application of iterative refinement can be used to compute an error bound in any norm at small cost, and use this to compute both an error bound in the usual infinity norm, and a componentwise relative error bound. We report extensive test results on over 6.2 million matrices of dimension 5, 10, 100, and 1000. As long as a normwise (resp. componentwise) condition number computed by the algorithm is less than 1/max{l_brace}10,{radical}n{r_brace} {var_epsilon}{sub w}, the computed normwise (resp. componentwise) error bound is at most 2 max{l_brace}10,{radical}n{r_brace} {center_dot} {var_epsilon}{sub w}, and indeed bounds the true error. Here, n is the matrix dimension and w is single precision roundoff error. For worse conditioned problems, we get similarly small correct error bounds in over 89.4% of cases.

  11. Upper bounds on superpartner masses from upper bounds on the Higgs boson mass.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, M E; Casas, J A; Delgado, A

    2012-01-13

    The LHC is putting bounds on the Higgs boson mass. In this Letter we use those bounds to constrain the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) parameter space using the fact that, in supersymmetry, the Higgs mass is a function of the masses of sparticles, and therefore an upper bound on the Higgs mass translates into an upper bound for the masses for superpartners. We show that, although current bounds do not constrain the MSSM parameter space from above, once the Higgs mass bound improves big regions of this parameter space will be excluded, putting upper bounds on supersymmetry (SUSY) masses. On the other hand, for the case of split-SUSY we show that, for moderate or large tanβ, the present bounds on the Higgs mass imply that the common mass for scalars cannot be greater than 10(11)  GeV. We show how these bounds will evolve as LHC continues to improve the limits on the Higgs mass. PMID:22324671

  12. Dynamic pricing of network goods with boundedly rational consumers.

    PubMed

    Radner, Roy; Radunskaya, Ami; Sundararajan, Arun

    2014-01-01

    We present a model of dynamic monopoly pricing for a good that displays network effects. In contrast with the standard notion of a rational-expectations equilibrium, we model consumers as boundedly rational and unable either to pay immediate attention to each price change or to make accurate forecasts of the adoption of the network good. Our analysis shows that the seller's optimal price trajectory has the following structure: The price is low when the user base is below a target level, is high when the user base is above the target, and is set to keep the user base stationary once the target level has been attained. We show that this pricing policy is robust to a number of extensions, which include the product's user base evolving over time and consumers basing their choices on a mixture of a myopic and a "stubborn" expectation of adoption. Our results differ significantly from those that would be predicted by a model based on rational-expectations equilibrium and are more consistent with the pricing of network goods observed in practice. PMID:24367101

  13. Dynamic pricing of network goods with boundedly rational consumers

    PubMed Central

    Radner, Roy; Radunskaya, Ami; Sundararajan, Arun

    2014-01-01

    We present a model of dynamic monopoly pricing for a good that displays network effects. In contrast with the standard notion of a rational-expectations equilibrium, we model consumers as boundedly rational and unable either to pay immediate attention to each price change or to make accurate forecasts of the adoption of the network good. Our analysis shows that the seller’s optimal price trajectory has the following structure: The price is low when the user base is below a target level, is high when the user base is above the target, and is set to keep the user base stationary once the target level has been attained. We show that this pricing policy is robust to a number of extensions, which include the product’s user base evolving over time and consumers basing their choices on a mixture of a myopic and a “stubborn” expectation of adoption. Our results differ significantly from those that would be predicted by a model based on rational-expectations equilibrium and are more consistent with the pricing of network goods observed in practice. PMID:24367101

  14. Home Visitation Assessing Progress, Managing Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daro, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Early intervention efforts to promote healthy child development have long been a central feature of social service and public health reforms. Today, prenatal care, well-baby visits, and assessments to detect possible developmental delays are commonplace in most communities. Recently, child abuse prevention advocates have applied a developmental…

  15. 34 CFR 303.10 - Developmental delay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Developmental delay. 303.10 Section 303.10 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.10 Developmental delay. Developmental delay, when...

  16. 34 CFR 303.10 - Developmental delay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Developmental delay. 303.10 Section 303.10 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.10 Developmental delay. Developmental delay, when...

  17. 34 CFR 303.10 - Developmental delay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Developmental delay. 303.10 Section 303.10 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.10 Developmental delay. Developmental delay, when...

  18. 34 CFR 303.10 - Developmental delay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Developmental delay. 303.10 Section 303.10 Education... DISABILITIES General Purpose, Eligibility, and Other General Provisions § 303.10 Developmental delay. As used in this part, “developmental delay,” when used with respect to an individual residing in a State,...

  19. 34 CFR 303.10 - Developmental delay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Developmental delay. 303.10 Section 303.10 Education... DISABILITIES General Purpose, Eligibility, and Other General Provisions § 303.10 Developmental delay. As used in this part, “developmental delay,” when used with respect to an individual residing in a State,...

  20. Direct-reading group-delay measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trowbridge, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Technique for measuring modulation signal retardation in microwave components gives direct plot of dependence of delay time on carrier frequency. Recorder sensitivity can be adjusted to give convenient scale factor for group delay. From family of such recordings, it is possible to observe changes in group delay due to temperature, mechanical stress, and other factors.

  1. Contingency Tracking during Unsignaled Delayed Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keely, Josue; Feola, Tyler; Lattal, Kennon A.

    2007-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted with rats in which responses on one lever (labeled the functional lever) produced reinforcers after an unsignaled delay period that reset with each response during the delay. Responses on a second, nonfunctional, lever did not initiate delays, but, in the first and third experiments, such responses during the last…

  2. Contingency Tracking during Unsignaled Delayed Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keely, Josue; Feola, Tyler; Lattal, Kennon A.

    2007-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted with rats in which responses on one lever (labeled the functional lever) produced reinforcers after an unsignaled delay period that reset with each response during the delay. Responses on a second, nonfunctional, lever did not initiate delays, but, in the first and third experiments, such responses during the last

  3. Prescription stimulant expectancies in recreational and medical users: results from a preliminary expectancy questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Looby, Alison; Earleywine, Mitch

    2009-01-01

    Given the rise of prescription stimulant misuse, examination of effect expectancies could prove helpful. The Prescription Stimulant Expectancy Questionnaire (PSEQ) was designed to explore positive and negative prescription stimulant-related expectancies. In 2006, 157 participants nationwide completed an Internet survey of prescription stimulant use, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms, and expectancies. Multiple regressions demonstrate that positive, but not negative expectancies, predicted frequency of use. Recreational and medical users were classified by hierarchical cluster analysis. Recreational users reported fewer positive and negative expectancies than medical users. Implications and limitations are discussed. Future research is warranted on prescription stimulant expectancies and the utility of the PSEQ. PMID:19938932

  4. Bounding polynomial entanglement measures for mixed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriques, Samuel; Datta, Nilanjana; Love, Peter

    2014-07-01

    We generalize the notion of the best separable approximation (BSA) and best W-class approximation (BWA) to arbitrary pure-state entanglement measures, defining the best zero-E approximation (BEA). We show that for any polynomial entanglement measure E, any mixed state ρ admits at least one "S decomposition," i.e., a decomposition in terms of a mixed state on which E is equal to zero, and a single additional pure state with (possibly) nonzero E. We show that the BEA is not, in general, the optimal S decomposition from the point of view of bounding the entanglement of ρ and describe an algorithm to construct the entanglement-minimizing S decomposition for ρ and place an upper bound on E (ρ). When applied to the three-tangle, the cost of the algorithm is linear in the rank d of the density matrix and has an accuracy comparable to a steepest-descent algorithm whose cost scales as d8logd. We compare the upper bound to a lower-bound algorithm given by C. Eltschka and J. Siewert [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 020502 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.020502] for the three-tangle and find that on random rank-2 three-qubit density matrices, the difference between the upper and lower bounds is 0.14 on average. We also find that the three-tangle of random full-rank three-qubit density matrices is less than 0.023 on average.

  5. Revisiting cosmological bounds on radiative neutrino lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Montanino, Daniele; Serpico, Pasquale D.

    2007-09-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments and direct bounds on absolute masses constrain neutrino mass differences to fall into the microwave energy range, for most of the allowed parameter space. As a consequence of these recent phenomenological advances, older constraints on radiative neutrino decays based on diffuse background radiations and assuming strongly hierarchical masses in the eV range are now outdated. We thus derive new bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer instrument on board the Cosmic Background Explorer. The lower bound on the lifetime is between a fewx10{sup 19} s and {approx}5x10{sup 20} s, depending on the neutrino mass ordering and on the absolute mass scale. However, due to phase space limitations, the upper bound in terms of the effective magnetic moment mediating the decay is not better than {approx}10{sup -8} Bohr magnetons. We also comment about possible improvements of these limits, by means of recent diffuse infrared photon background data. We compare these bounds with preexisting limits coming from laboratory or astrophysical arguments. We emphasize the complementarity of our results with others available in the literature.

  6. Universal bounds in even-spin CFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qualls, Joshua D.

    2015-12-01

    We prove using invariance under the modular S- and ST -transformations that every unitary two-dimensional conformal field theory (CFT) having only even-spin primary operators (with no extended chiral algebra and with right- and left-central charges c, tilde{c}>1 ) contains a primary operator with dimension Δ1 satisfying 0<{\\varDelta}_1bounds, we discuss how to extend our methods to bound higher conformal dimensions before deriving lower and upper bounds on the number of primary operators in a given energy range. Using the AdS3/CFT2 dictionary, the bound on Δ1 proves the lightest massive excitation in appropriate theories of 3D matter and gravity with cosmological constant Λ < 0 can be no heavier than 1/8{G}_N+O(√{-\\varLambda}) ; the bounds on the number of operators are related via AdS/CFT to the entropy of states in the dual gravitational theory. In the flat-space approximation, the limiting mass is exactly that of the lightest BTZ black hole.

  7. Computations of entropy bounds: Multidimensional geometric methods

    SciTech Connect

    Makaruk, H.E.

    1998-02-01

    The entropy bounds for constructive upper bound on the needed number-of-bits for solving a dichotomy is represented by the quotient of two multidimensional solid volumes. For minimization of this upper bound exact calculation of the volume of this quotient is needed. Three methods for exact computing of the volume of a given nD volume are presented: (1) general method for calculation any nD volume by slicing it into volumes of decreasing dimension is presented; (2) a method applying appropriate curvilinear coordinate system is described for volume bounded by symmetrical curvilinear hypersurfaces (spheres, cones, hyperboloids, ellipsoids, cylinders, etc.); and (3) an algorithm for dividing any nD complex into simplices and computing of the volume of the simplices is presented, supplemented by a general formula for calculation of volume of an nD simplex. These mathematical methods enable exact calculation of volume of any complicated multidimensional solids. The methods allow for the calculation of the minimal volume and lead to tighter bounds on the needed number-of-bits.

  8. Bound residues: environmental solution or future problem?

    PubMed

    Barraclough, Declan; Kearney, Theresa; Croxford, Andy

    2005-01-01

    The paper examines the issue of bound residues from the viewpoint of the risk assessment procedures employed for environmental protection. It considers, on one hand, the evidence that such residues are so tightly bound to soil organic matter as to be essentially unavailable; and on the other, the perspective that we should not be loading up the environment with compounds whose future behaviour and release we cannot predict. Existing knowledge of the mechanisms by which residues bind to soil organic matter suggests that release will be closely dependent on soil organic matter breakdown. Simple models of organic matter turnover suggest that the release following single applications of individual compounds will be very slow; but the significance of releases following repeated application over many years of a number of compounds needs to be investigated further. Applying environmental risk assessment techniques is complicated by the difficulty in identifying parent molecules and potential metabolites in the bound residue fraction. The paper concludes that for single additions of individual compounds, bound residues probably do represent an environmental solution. But the long-term significance of bound residues formed from multiple additions of a number of compounds is less clear. The paper recommends that future work should emphasise the biological significance of such residues and their release. PMID:15327859

  9. Conformational phases of membrane bound cytoskeletal filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quint, David A.; Grason, Gregory; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2013-03-01

    Membrane bound cytoskeletal filaments found in living cells are employed to carry out many types of activities including cellular division, rigidity and transport. When these biopolymers are bound to a membrane surface they may take on highly non-trivial conformations as compared to when they are not bound. This leads to the natural question; What are the important interactions which drive these polymers to particular conformations when they are bound to a surface? Assuming that there are binding domains along the polymer which follow a periodic helical structure set by the natural monomeric handedness, these bound conformations must arise from the interplay of the intrinsic monomeric helicity and membrane binding. To probe this question, we study a continuous model of an elastic filament with intrinsic helicity and map out the conformational phases of this filament for various mechanical and structural parameters in our model, such as elastic stiffness and intrinsic twist of the filament. Our model allows us to gain insight into the possible mechanisms which drive real biopolymers such as actin and tubulin in eukaryotes and their prokaryotic cousins MreB and FtsZ to take on their functional conformations within living cells.

  10. Parent Perceptions of the Anticipated Needs and Expectations for Support for Their College-Bound Students with Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Julie Q.; Sansosti, Frank J.; Hadley, Wanda M.

    2009-01-01

    Many students with Asperger's Syndrome have the cognitive ability and specific interests to be successful academically at the college level. However, these students often have difficulties navigating social systems, and higher education presents great challenges. The purpose of this study was to explore parent perceptions regarding the: (a)…

  11. Research of population with impulsive perturbations based on dynamics of a neutral delay equation and ecological quality system

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Jiang, He

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the global behaviors of a nonlinear autonomous neutral delay differential population model with impulsive perturbation. This model may be suitable for describing the dynamics of population with long larval and short adult phases. It is shown that the system may have global stability of the extinction and positive equilibria, or grow without being bounded under some conditions. PMID:26858570

  12. Irrational Expectations in the Job Search Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liptak, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses expectations held by client beginning a job search. Describes Ellis's Rational-Emotive Therapy, designed to teach clients to think rationally prior to the job search. Assesses various irrational beliefs surrounding the job search. Concludes that clients can be taught to combat irrational expectations. (Author/BHK)

  13. Rising Tides: Faculty Expectations of Library Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicol, Erica Carlson; O'English, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Looking at 2003-2009 LibQUAL+ responses at research-oriented universities in the United States, faculty library users report a significant and consistent rise in desires and expectations for library-provided online tools and websites, even as student user groups show declining or leveling expectations. While faculty, like students, also report

  14. Work Expectations in Brazilian and Belgian Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amorim, Maria Alice

    Expectation theory, developed during the 1930s and 1940s, explains human behavior in terms of interaction between person and situation characteristics, as they are perceived by the individual. This study is centered on the expectations of Belgian and Brazilian undergraduates about their first professional job. Recent research about work…

  15. Teacher Expectations and the Able Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee-Corbin, Hilary

    1994-01-01

    Two middle school teachers and two students in each of the teacher's classes were assessed for field dependence-independence (FDI). The teachers were interviewed about their students. Found that one teacher had higher expectations and one had lower expectations for the student who had the same FDI orientation as the teacher than for the student…

  16. The Expectant Reader in Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Lois Josephs; McCormick, Kathleen

    1986-01-01

    Offers a method of using reader response theory that emphasizes the expectations about a text and how those expectations are fulfilled or deflated. Specifically, students read traditional fables, fairy tales, and parables, and compare them to contemporary works such as Kafka's "Metamorphosis" and Marquez's "The Very Old Man With Enormous Wings."

  17. Raising Expectations is Aim of New Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2010-01-01

    Researchers and policymakers agree that teachers' expectations of what their students can do can become self-fulfilling prophecies for children's academic performance. Yet while the "soft bigotry of low expectations" has become an education catchphrase, scholars and advocates are just beginning to explore whether it is possible to prevent such…

  18. International Variations in Measuring Customer Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Philip J.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of customer expectations of library service quality and SERVQUAL as a measurement tool focuses on two studies: one that compared a survey of Chinese university students' expectations of service quality to New Zealand students; and one that investigated national culture as a source of attitudes to customer service. (Author/LRW)

  19. Teacher and Parent Expectations for Kindergarten Readiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Michael D.; White, Barzanna

    Based upon the view that children learn better if their parents' and teachers' expectations are closely aligned, this study compared expectations of teachers and parents for school readiness skills and preparation required for entry into public school. A Likert rating scale was completed by 25 kindergarten/early childhood teachers and 104 parents…

  20. Middle School Students' Expectations about Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore-Thomas, Cheryl; Lent, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    Although counseling expectations have been studied in late adolescent and adult samples, little is known about younger adolescents' openness to counseling and perceptions of the counseling process. In this study, 329 middle school students completed the Expectations About Counseling Questionnaire-Brief Form (Tinsley, 1982). An exploratory factor…

  1. Framing expectations in early HIV cure research

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Karine; Henderson, Gail E.; Margolis, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Language used to describe clinical research represents a powerful opportunity to educate volunteers. In the case of HIV cure research there is an emerging need to manage expectations by using the term ‘experiment’. Cure experiments are proof-of-concept studies designed to evaluate novel paradigms to reduce persistent HIV-1 reservoirs, without any expectation of medical benefit. PMID:25280965

  2. Grief Experiences and Expectance of Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojtkowiak, Joanna; Wild, Verena; Egger, Jos

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is generally viewed as an unexpected cause of death. However, some suicides might be expected to a certain extent, which needs to be further studied. The relationships between expecting suicide, feeling understanding for the suicide, and later grief experiences were explored. In total, 142 bereaved participants completed the Grief

  3. Raising Expectations is Aim of New Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2010-01-01

    Researchers and policymakers agree that teachers' expectations of what their students can do can become self-fulfilling prophecies for children's academic performance. Yet while the "soft bigotry of low expectations" has become an education catchphrase, scholars and advocates are just beginning to explore whether it is possible to prevent such

  4. Employer Expectations of Students Attending Job Fairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palomares, Amber

    2000-01-01

    Reports on a survey about employer expectations of students attending job fairs, including how students should conduct themselves and dress. More than one-third indicated they expect students to be knowledgeable about their company. According to respondents, lack of clear career objectives accounts for the most common mistake made by students.…

  5. Parents' Role in Adolescents' Educational Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimkute, Laura; Hirvonen, Riikka; Tolvanen, Asko; Aunola, Kaisa; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the extent to which mothers' and fathers' expectations for their offspring's future education, their level of education, and adolescents' academic achievement predict adolescents' educational expectations. To investigate this, 230 adolescents were examined twice while they were in comprehensive school (in the 7th and 9th…

  6. Teaching Rational Expectations at 'A' Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beachill, Bob

    1987-01-01

    Explains the economic concept of Rational Expectations (RE) and demonstrates how it can be introduced to British 'A' level students. Illustrates the implications of RE for the Cobweb and Augmented Phillips Curve market models. Outlines some attractions and limitations of rational expectations. (Author/DH)

  7. Icelandic and American Students' Expectations about Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aegisdottir, Stefania; Gerstein, Lawrence H.

    2000-01-01

    The Expectations about Counseling-Brief Form was administered to 261 Icelandic and 225 American undergraduates. Results of a multivariate analysis of covariance reveal that Icelanders had higher expectations about counselor expertise than did Americans. Results are discussed in terms of counselor roles and functions and the role of help seeking in…

  8. Trends in Life Expectancy in Wellbeing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perenboom, R. J. M.; Van Herten, L. M.; Boshuizen, H. C.; Van Den Bos, G. A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: This paper describes and discusses trends in life expectancy in wellbeing between 1989 and 1998. Methods: Data on wellbeing by the Bradburn Affect Balance Scale is obtained from the Netherlands Continuous Health Interview Surveys for the calendar years from 1989 to 1998. Using Sullivan's method, life expectancy in wellbeing is…

  9. Dissonant Feedback about Achievement and Teachers' Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bognar, Carl J.

    1982-01-01

    Investigates impact of achievement test results (N=285) on 13 sixth-grade teachers' expectations using hypotheses from cognitive dissonance theory. Shows teacher expectations changed very little as a result of feedback, and test results for both under- and overestimated students were rejected. (AH)

  10. What nurses want. Different generations. Different expectations.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jan

    2005-03-01

    Younger nurses have different career expectations than their older colleagues. They seek a balanced lifestyle with reasonable work hours, demand to use the latest technology and expect to be vocal members of the care team. If a hospital disappoints, they are quick to change jobs. How do you accommodate them without alienating veteran staff members? PMID:15828541

  11. The Expectant Reader in Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Lois Josephs; McCormick, Kathleen

    1986-01-01

    Offers a method of using reader response theory that emphasizes the expectations about a text and how those expectations are fulfilled or deflated. Specifically, students read traditional fables, fairy tales, and parables, and compare them to contemporary works such as Kafka's "Metamorphosis" and Marquez's "The Very Old Man With Enormous Wings."…

  12. What Respondents Really Expect from Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolar, Tomaz; Kolar, Iztok

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of falling response rates in telephone surveys. To better understand and maintain respondent goodwill, concepts of psychological contract and respondent expectations are introduced and explored. Results of the qualitative study show that respondent expectations are not only socially contingent but also…

  13. Grief Experiences and Expectance of Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojtkowiak, Joanna; Wild, Verena; Egger, Jos

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is generally viewed as an unexpected cause of death. However, some suicides might be expected to a certain extent, which needs to be further studied. The relationships between expecting suicide, feeling understanding for the suicide, and later grief experiences were explored. In total, 142 bereaved participants completed the Grief…

  14. Rising Tides: Faculty Expectations of Library Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicol, Erica Carlson; O'English, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Looking at 2003-2009 LibQUAL+ responses at research-oriented universities in the United States, faculty library users report a significant and consistent rise in desires and expectations for library-provided online tools and websites, even as student user groups show declining or leveling expectations. While faculty, like students, also report…

  15. Intentions and Expectations in Differential Residential Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelson, William; And Others

    1973-01-01

    This paper summarizes intentions and expectations in differential residential selection among families who had chose to move. Wives appear at face value to assess alternatives in the selection process rationally, to be aware of limitations in housing and location they will experience, and to have expectations about behavioral changes consistant…

  16. High-temperature superconductive delay lines and filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, W. G.; Withers, R. S.; Hamm, J. M.; Anderson, Alfredo C.; Oates, D. E.; Mankiewich, P. M.; O'Malley, M. L.; Bonetti, R. R.; Williams, A. E.; Newman, N.

    1992-04-01

    Passive microwave devices are expected to be among the first devices made from high-temperature superconductors to be inserted into system applications outside of a laboratory environment. The deposition and patterning of YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) thin films has progressed sufficiently that a variety of high-quality passive microwave devices can now be fabricated on LaAlO3 substrates. Demonstrated microwave devices include tapped-delay-line transversal filters with multigigahertz bandwidths, untapped delay lines, and narrowband (2% or less) microstrip filters. Potential system applications at operating temperatures of 77 K and below are discussed. The YBCO microwave devices described here demonstrate the potential performance advantages that superconducting thin-film devices offer for high-frequency, wide-bandwidth, high-performance analog signal processing systems.

  17. A stochastic delay differential model of cerebral autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Panunzi, Simona; D'Orsi, Laura; Iacoviello, Daniela; De Gaetano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models of the cardiovascular system and of cerebral autoregulation (CAR) have been employed for several years in order to describe the time course of pressures and flows changes subsequent to postural changes. The assessment of the degree of efficiency of cerebral auto regulation has indeed importance in the prognosis of such conditions as cerebro-vascular accidents or Alzheimer. In the quest for a simple but realistic mathematical description of cardiovascular control, which may be fitted onto non-invasive experimental observations after postural changes, the present work proposes a first version of an empirical Stochastic Delay Differential Equations (SDDEs) model. The model consists of a total of four SDDEs and two ancillary algebraic equations, incorporates four distinct delayed controls from the brain onto different components of the circulation, and is able to accurately capture the time course of mean arterial pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity signals, reproducing observed auto-correlated error around the expected drift. PMID:25830915

  18. Equilibrium and Disequilibrium Dynamics in Cobweb Models with Time Delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Luca; Guerrini, Luca; Sodini, Mauro

    2015-06-01

    This paper aims to study price dynamics in two different continuous time cobweb models with delays close to [Hommes, 1994]. In both cases, the stationary equilibrium may be not representative of the long-term dynamics of the model, since it is possible to observe endogenous and persistent fluctuations (supercritical Hopf bifurcations) even if a deterministic context without external shocks is considered. In the model in which markets are in equilibrium every time, we show that the existence of time delays in the expectations formation mechanism may cause chaotic dynamics similar to those obtained in [Hommes, 1994] in a discrete time context. From a mathematical point of view, we apply the Poincaré-Lindstedt perturbation method to study the local dynamic properties of the models. In addition, several numerical experiments are used to investigate global properties of the systems.

  19. Price regulation and relative delays in generic drug adoption.

    PubMed

    Costa-Font, Joan; McGuire, Alistair; Varol, Nebibe

    2014-12-01

    Increasing the adoption of generic drugs has the potential to improve static efficiency in a health system without harming pharmaceutical innovation. However, very little is known about the timing of generic adoption and diffusion. No prior study has empirically examined the differential launch times of generics across a comprehensive set of markets, or more specifically the delays in country specific adoption of generics relative to the first country of (generic) adoption. Drawing on data containing significant country and product variation across a lengthy time period (1999-2008), we use duration analysis to examine relative delays, across countries, in the adoption of generic drugs. Our results suggest that price regulation has a significant effect on reducing the time to launch of generics, with faster adoption in higher priced markets. The latter result is dependent on the degree of competition and the expected market size. PMID:25200940

  20. A Stochastic Delay Differential Model of Cerebral Autoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Panunzi, Simona; DOrsi, Laura; Iacoviello, Daniela; De Gaetano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models of the cardiovascular system and of cerebral autoregulation (CAR) have been employed for several years in order to describe the time course of pressures and flows changes subsequent to postural changes. The assessment of the degree of efficiency of cerebral auto regulation has indeed importance in the prognosis of such conditions as cerebro-vascular accidents or Alzheimer. In the quest for a simple but realistic mathematical description of cardiovascular control, which may be fitted onto non-invasive experimental observations after postural changes, the present work proposes a first version of an empirical Stochastic Delay Differential Equations (SDDEs) model. The model consists of a total of four SDDEs and two ancillary algebraic equations, incorporates four distinct delayed controls from the brain onto different components of the circulation, and is able to accurately capture the time course of mean arterial pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity signals, reproducing observed auto-correlated error around the expected drift. PMID:25830915

  1. Expectancy set, self-reported expectancies and predispositional traits: predicting interest in violence and erotica.

    PubMed

    George, W H; Dermen, K H; Nochajski, T H

    1989-11-01

    To investigate the role of alcohol expectancies in predicting postdrinking behavior, two studies were conducted. In Study 1, an instrument assessing alcohol expectancies was devised for later use in prediction. Factor analyses with split-sample validation confirmed 3 factors (11 total items): disinhibition, aggression and sexuality. In Study 2, expectancies, Buss-Durkee hostility and Mosher sex-guilt were assessed in a preexperimental questionnaire session. In a subsequent drink administration session, an expectancy set manipulation led subjects to expect alcohol or to expect tonic. To assess postdrinking behavior, interest in violent, erotic and violent-erotic materials was measured unobtrusively using an ad lib slide-viewing task. Consistent with the hypotheses, expectancies in conjunction with trait hostility significantly predicted violence viewing and violent-erotica viewing for expect alcohol, but not expect tonic controls. Moreover, after variance due to hostility was accounted for, expectancies predicted violence viewing significantly and violent-erotica viewing marginally. These findings provide modest support for the proposition that preexisting alcohol expectancies mediate between the effects of expectancy set and postdrinking behaviors. Once activated by perceived alcohol ingestion, these expectancies can shape postdrinking behaviors. The findings also underscore the need for further experimentation aimed at clarifying the interrelationships between alcohol expectancies and expectancy set. PMID:2586107

  2. Preliminary Results on the Experimental Investigation of the Structure Functions of Bound Nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Bodek, Arie

    2015-09-01

    We present preliminary results on an experimental study of the nuclear modification of the longitudinal (sL) and transverse (sT ) structure functions of nucleons bound in nuclear targets. The origin of these modifications (commonly referred as as the EMC effect) is not fully understood. Our measurements of R= sL=sT for nuclei (RA) and for deuterium (RD) indicate that nuclear modifications of the structure functions of bound nucleons are different for the longitudinal and transverse structure functions, and that contrary to expectation from several theoretical models, RA < RD.

  3. ADHD and Delay Aversion: The Influence of Non-Temporal Stimulation on Choice for Delayed Rewards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antrop, Inge; Stock, Pieter; Verte, Sylvie; Wiersema, Jan Roelt; Baeyens, Dieter; Roeyers, Herbert

    2006-01-01

    Background: Delay aversion, the motivation to escape or avoid delay, results in preference for small immediate over large delayed rewards. Delay aversion has been proposed as one distinctive psychological process that may underlie the behavioural symptoms and cognitive deficits of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Furthermore, the…

  4. Controllability of Nonlinear Fractional Delay Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirmala, R. Joice; Balachandran, K.; Rodríguez-Germa, L.; Trujillo, J. J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper is concerned with controllability of nonlinear fractional delay dynamical systems with delay in state variables. The solution representations of fractional delay differential equations have been established by using the Laplace transform technique and the Mittag-Leffler function. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the controllability criteria of linear fractional delay systems are established. Further sufficient condition for the controllability of nonlinear fractional delay dynamical system are obtained by using the fixed point argument. Examples and numerical simulation are presented to illustrate the results.

  5. Delaying Orthostatic Syncope With Mental Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Nandu; Roessler, Andreas; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Steptoe, Andrew

    2012-07-01

    At orthostatic vasovagal syncope there appears to be a sudden withdrawl of sympathetic activity. As mental challenge activates the sympathetic system, we hypothesized that doing mental arithmetic in volunteers driven to the end point of their cardiovascular stability may delay the onset of orthostatic syncope. We investigated this in healthy male subjects. Each subject underwent a head up tilt (HUT) + graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) up to presyncope session (control) to determine the orthostatic tolerance time, OTT (Time from HUT commencement to development of presyncopal symptoms/signs). Once the tolerance time was known, a randomized crossover protocol was used: either 1) Repeat HUT + LBNP to ensure reproducibility of repeated run or 2) HUT + LBNP run but with added mental challenge (two min before the expected presyncope time). Test protocols were separated by two weeks. Our studies on five male test subjects indicate that mental challenge improves orthostatic tolerance significantly. Additional mental loading could be a useful countermeasure to alleviate the orthostatic responses of persons, particularly in those with histories of dizziness on standing up, or to alleviate hypotension that frequently occurs during hemodialysis or on return to earth from the spaceflight environment of microgravity.

  6. Modeling of SAW Delay Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2007-01-01

    Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace vehicles requires rugged sensors having reduced volume, mass, and power that can be used to measure a variety of phenomena. Wireless systems are preferred when retro-fitting sensors onto existing vehicles. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices are capable of sensing: temperature, pressure, strain, chemical species, mass loading, acceleration, and shear stress. SAW technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, and extremely low power. To aid in the development of SAW sensors for IVHM applications, a first order model of a SAW Delay line has been created.

  7. Photothermally induced delayed tissue death.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jeffrey M; Shaco-Levy, Ruthy; Feuermann, Daniel; Huleihil, Mahmoud; Mizrahi, Solly

    2006-01-01

    We report pronounced delayed tissue death in photothermal surgery performed on the livers of live healthy rats with highly concentrated sunlight (ultrabright noncoherent light). Exposure times and power levels were selected to produce immediate necroses of the order of hundreds of cubic millimeters. Pathology reveals that lesion volumes increase by up to a factor of 5 within approximately 24 h after surgery, and then stabilize. Islands of viable cells can persist within damaged tissue, in the immediate vicinity of blood vessels, but also necrose within about 48 h. PMID:16822049

  8. Bounds on tensor wave and twisted inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, Sudhakar; Sami, M.; Ward, John

    2010-11-15

    We study the bounds on tensor wave in a class of twisted inflation models, where D(4+2k)-branes are wrapped on cycles in the compact manifold and wrap the Kaluza-Klein direction in the corresponding effective field theory. While the lower bound is found to be analogous to that in type IIB models of brane inflation, the upper bound turns out to be significantly different. This is argued for a range of values for the parameter g{sub s}M satisfying the self-consistency relation and the WMAP data. Further, we observe that the wrapped D8-brane appears to be the most attractive from a cosmological perspective.

  9. Laboratory bounds on electron Lorentz violation

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, Brett

    2010-07-01

    Violations of Lorentz boost symmetry in the electron and photon sectors can be constrained by studying several different high-energy phenomenon. Although they may not lead to the strongest bounds numerically, measurements made in terrestrial laboratories produce the most reliable results. Laboratory bounds can be based on observations of synchrotron radiation, as well as the observed absences of vacuum Cerenkov radiation (e{sup {+-}{yields}e{+-}+{gamma}}) and photon decay ({gamma}{yields}e{sup +}+e{sup -}). Using measurements of synchrotron energy losses at LEP and the survival of TeV photons, we place new bounds on the three electron Lorentz-violation coefficients c{sub (TJ)}, at the 3x10{sup -13} to 6x10{sup -15} levels.

  10. Bounds on Neutrino Non-Standard Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique

    2010-03-30

    We review the present model independent bounds on neutrino non-standard interactions both at neutrino production and detection and in its interactions with matter. For matter non-standard interactions the direct bounds are rather weak. However, matter non-standard interactions are related by gauge invariance to the production and detection ones as well as to flavour changing processes involving charged leptons. Taking into account these relations much stronger bounds of at least O(10{sup -2}) can be derived unless significant fine tunings are implemented. Testing non-standard interactions at this level at future neutrino oscillation facilities is challenging but still feasible at very ambitious proposals such as the Neutrino Factory.

  11. Bound water in Kevlar 49 fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Garza, R.G.; Pruneda, C.O.; Morgan, R.J.

    1981-04-01

    From elemental analyses, thermogravimetric-mass spectroscopy studies and re-evaluation of previous water diffusion studies in Kevlar 49 fibers it is concluded that these fibers can contain two types of sorbed moisture. The fibers can absorb up to approx. 6 wt % loosely bound water with an activation energy for outgassing by desorption of 6 kcal/mole. This loosely bound water is a direct result of the presence of Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ impurities and the perturbations they induce on the packing of the rod-like poly (p-phenylene terephthalamide) macromolecules. Kevlar 49 fibers also inherently contain up to 30 wt % additional water which is tightly bound within the crystal lattice. This water exhibits an activation energy for outgassing by diffusion of approx. 40 kcal/mole and is only evolved from the fiber in significant quantities at t > 350/sup 0/C over a period of hours.

  12. Equivalence principle and bound kinetic energy.

    PubMed

    Hohensee, Michael A; Müller, Holger; Wiringa, R B

    2013-10-11

    We consider the role of the internal kinetic energy of bound systems of matter in tests of the Einstein equivalence principle. Using the gravitational sector of the standard model extension, we show that stringent limits on equivalence principle violations in antimatter can be indirectly obtained from tests using bound systems of normal matter. We estimate the bound kinetic energy of nucleons in a range of light atomic species using Green's function Monte Carlo calculations, and for heavier species using a Woods-Saxon model. We survey the sensitivities of existing and planned experimental tests of the equivalence principle, and report new constraints at the level of between a few parts in 10(6) and parts in 10(8) on violations of the equivalence principle for matter and antimatter. PMID:24160587

  13. Better Bounds on Online Unit Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehmsen, Martin R.; Larsen, Kim S.

    Unit Clustering is the problem of dividing a set of points from a metric space into a minimal number of subsets such that the points in each subset are enclosable by a unit ball. We continue work initiated by Chan and Zarrabi-Zadeh on determining the competitive ratio of the online version of this problem. For the one-dimensional case, we develop a deterministic algorithm, improving the best known upper bound of 7/4 by Epstein and van Stee to 5/3. This narrows the gap to the best known lower bound of 8/5 to only 1/15. Our algorithm automatically leads to improvements in all higher dimensions as well. Finally, we strengthen the deterministic lower bound in two dimensions and higher from 2 to 13/6.

  14. Covalently bound lipids in keratinizing epithelia.

    PubMed

    Chang, F; Swartzendruber, D C; Wertz, P W; Squier, C A

    1993-07-25

    Covalently bound lipids have been identified and compared in keratinizing porcine epithelia including epidermis and oral epithelium from palate and gingiva. Stratum corneum was isolated by tryptic digestion, and after extensive extraction of lipids using a series of chloroform-methanol mixtures, the residual tissue was subjected to alkaline hydrolysis to release covalently bound lipids. The lipids so released were analyzed by quantitative thin-layer chromatography. Stratum corneum from each of the three anatomical sites contained omega-hydroxyceramides, omega-hydroxyacids and fatty acids. In epidermal stratum corneum the total covalently bound lipids represented 2.4% of the dry weight of the tissue, but in the oral epithelia this figure was consistently lower: 0.24% in palatal stratum corneum and 0.20% in gingival stratum corneum. Transmission electron microscopy before and after lipid extraction confirms the presence of a lipid envelope in epidermal stratum corneum and demonstrates the absence of this structure in oral stratum corneum. PMID:8334143

  15. Experimental bound entanglement through a Pauli channel

    PubMed Central

    Amselem, Elias; Sadiq, Muhammad; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics of a quantum systems when affected by noise is one of the biggest challenges for quantum technologies. The general Pauli error channel is an important lossless channel for quantum communication. In this work we consider the effects of a Pauli channel on a pure four-qubit state and simulate the Pauli channel experimentally by studying the action on polarization encoded entangled photons. When the noise channel acting on the photons is correlated, a set spanned by four orthogonal bound entangled states can be generated. We study this interesting case experimentally and demonstrate that products of Bell states can be brought into a bound entangled regime. We find states in the set of bound entangled states which experimentally violate the CHSH inequality while still possessing a positive partial transpose. PMID:23752651

  16. Effects of Sexual Expectancies on Early Sexualized Behavior Among Urban Minority Youth

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Ian W.; Traube, Dorian E.; Schrager, Sheree M.; Levine, Brooklyn; Alicea, Stacey; Watson, Janet L.; Miranda, Ana; McKay, Mary M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effects of different types of sexual expectancies on early sexual behavior among racial/ethnic minority young adolescents. African American and Latino participants between 11 and 13 years old were recruited through schools and community-based agencies in the South Bronx, New York (N = 223). Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to predict early sexual behavior outcomes, which include engagement in sexual possibility situations, kissing, and sexual touching. The moderating effect of gender was examined using multiplicative interaction terms. Higher expectations categorized as personal/parental and romantic/peer expectancies related to the negative consequences of sexual intercourse decreased the odds of engagement in early sexual behavior; whereas higher academic/career and sexual health expectancies did not. Gender moderated the relationships between personal/parental expectancies and engagement in sexual possibility situations and romantic/peer expectancies and kissing. Social workers formulating sexual health promotion and HIV prevention programs for racial/ethnic minority young adolescents should focus on personal/parental and romantic/peer expectancies in favor of negative expectancies regarding academic/career achievement, pregnancy, and HIV. Social work interventions to delay sexual debut should include a family-based component and should be sensitive to gender differences in sexual expectancies. PMID:22461958

  17. Effects of Sexual Expectancies on Early Sexualized Behavior Among Urban Minority Youth.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Ian W; Traube, Dorian E; Schrager, Sheree M; Levine, Brooklyn; Alicea, Stacey; Watson, Janet L; Miranda, Ana; McKay, Mary M

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effects of different types of sexual expectancies on early sexual behavior among racial/ethnic minority young adolescents. African American and Latino participants between 11 and 13 years old were recruited through schools and community-based agencies in the South Bronx, New York (N = 223). Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to predict early sexual behavior outcomes, which include engagement in sexual possibility situations, kissing, and sexual touching. The moderating effect of gender was examined using multiplicative interaction terms. Higher expectations categorized as personal/parental and romantic/peer expectancies related to the negative consequences of sexual intercourse decreased the odds of engagement in early sexual behavior; whereas higher academic/career and sexual health expectancies did not. Gender moderated the relationships between personal/parental expectancies and engagement in sexual possibility situations and romantic/peer expectancies and kissing. Social workers formulating sexual health promotion and HIV prevention programs for racial/ethnic minority young adolescents should focus on personal/parental and romantic/peer expectancies in favor of negative expectancies regarding academic/career achievement, pregnancy, and HIV. Social work interventions to delay sexual debut should include a family-based component and should be sensitive to gender differences in sexual expectancies. PMID:22461958

  18. General upper bounds on the runtime of parallel evolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Lässig, Jörg; Sudholt, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    We present a general method for analyzing the runtime of parallel evolutionary algorithms with spatially structured populations. Based on the fitness-level method, it yields upper bounds on the expected parallel runtime. This allows for a rigorous estimate of the speedup gained by parallelization. Tailored results are given for common migration topologies: ring graphs, torus graphs, hypercubes, and the complete graph. Example applications for pseudo-Boolean optimization show that our method is easy to apply and that it gives powerful results. In our examples the performance guarantees improve with the density of the topology. Surprisingly, even sparse topologies such as ring graphs lead to a significant speedup for many functions while not increasing the total number of function evaluations by more than a constant factor. We also identify which number of processors lead to the best guaranteed speedups, thus giving hints on how to parameterize parallel evolutionary algorithms. PMID:24195490

  19. Cosmological bounds on open FLRW solutions of Massive Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, S.~H.; Mendonça, E.~L.; Pinho, S.~S.~A.; Jesus, J.~F.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we analysed some cosmological bounds concerning an open FLRW solution of massive gravity. The constraints from recent observational H(z) data are found and the best fit values for the cosmological parameters are in agreement with the ΛCDM model, and also point to a nearly open spatial curvature, as expected from the model. The graviton mass dependence with the constant parameters α3 and α4, related to the additional lagrangians terms of the model, are also analysed, and we obtain a strong dependence on such parameters, although the condition m_g≃ H_0(-1) seems dominant for a large range of the parameters α3 and α4.

  20. Chaos in coherence modulation: bifurcations of an oscillator generating optical delay fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Larger, Laurent; Lee, Min Won; Goedgebuer, Jean-Pierre; Elflein, Wilhelm; Erneux, Thomas

    2001-08-01

    A new chaos generator is described that produces chaotic fluctuations of the optical-path difference in a coherence modulator driven electrically by a nonlinear delayed-feedback loop. Numerical simulations and experimental results are reported. A closed branch of periodic solutions bounded by a forward and a reverse Hopf bifurcation is observed for the first time, to our knowledge, for this type of nonlinear dynamical system. {copyright} 2001 Optical Society of America

  1. OUTWARD BOUND IN THE MAINSTREAM OF AMERICAN EDUCATION, A SYNOPSIS OF SIX OUTWARD BOUND MAINSTREAM PROJECTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outward Bound, Inc., Andover, MA.

    A SYNOPSIS IS OFFERED OF SIX DIFFERENT OUTWARD-BOUND PROGRAMS, EACH OF WHICH IS AN ADAPTATION OF THE BASIC OUTWARD-BOUND PHILOSOPHY OF HAVING YOUNG PEOPLE RECOGNIZE FOR THEMSELVES THEIR PHYSICAL, EMOTIONAL, AND SPIRITUAL CAPABILITIES SO THAT THEY WILL DEVELOP A STRONG SENSE OF SELF-RELIANCE AND INNER STRENGTH. THE ADAMS COUNTY, COLORADO,…

  2. Time-domain nature of group delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Wu; Feng, Zheng-He

    2015-10-01

    The characteristic of group delay is analyzed based on an electronic circuit, and its time-domain nature is studied with time-domain simulation and experiment. The time-domain simulations and experimental results show that group delay is the delay of the energy center of the amplitude-modulated pulse, rather than the propagation delay of the electromagnetic field. As group velocity originates from the definition of group delay and group delay is different from the propagation delay, the superluminality or negativity of group velocity does not mean the superluminal or negative propagation of the electromagnetic field. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB329002) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61371012).

  3. Precise delay measurement through combinatorial logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Gary R. (Inventor); Chen, Yuan (Inventor); Sheldon, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A high resolution circuit and method for facilitating precise measurement of on-chip delays for FPGAs for reliability studies. The circuit embeds a pulse generator on an FPGA chip having one or more groups of LUTS (the "LUT delay chain"), also on-chip. The circuit also embeds a pulse width measurement circuit on-chip, and measures the duration of the generated pulse through the delay chain. The pulse width of the output pulse represents the delay through the delay chain without any I/O delay. The pulse width measurement circuit uses an additional asynchronous clock autonomous from the main clock and the FPGA propagation delay can be displayed on a hex display continuously for testing purposes.

  4. Irreversibility for All Bound Entangled States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong; Horodecki, Michał; Horodecki, Ryszard; Synak-Radtke, Barbara

    2005-11-01

    We derive a new inequality for entanglement for a mixed four-partite state. Employing this inequality, we present a one-shot lower bound for entanglement cost and prove that entanglement cost is strictly larger than zero for any entangled state. We demonstrate that irreversibility occurs in the process of formation for all nondistillable entangled states. In this way we solve a long standing problem of how “real” is entanglement of bound entangled states. Using the new inequality we also prove the impossibility of local cloning of a known entangled state.

  5. Quantum Kolmogorov complexity and bounded quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyadera, Takayuki

    2011-04-01

    The effect of bounded quantum memory in a primitive information protocol has been examined using the quantum Kolmogorov complexity as a measure of information. We employed a toy two-party protocol in which Bob, by using a bounded quantum memory and an unbounded classical memory, estimates a message that was encoded in qubits by Alice in one of the bases X or Z. Our theorem gave a nontrivial effect of the memory boundedness. In addition, a generalization of the uncertainty principle in the presence of quantum memory has been obtained.

  6. The Lovasz bound and some generalizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R. J.; Rodemich, E. R.; Rumsey, H. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The zero error capacity of a discrete memoryless channel is defined as the largest rate at which information can be transmitted over the channel with zero error probability. One channel with five inputs and outputs whose zero capacity remained unsolved until very recently is considered. An extremely powerful and general technique phased in terms of graph theory, for studying combinatorial packing problems is presented. In particular, Delsarte's linear programming bound for cliques in association schemes appears as a special case of the Lovasz bound.

  7. Generalized mutual information and Tsirelson's bound

    SciTech Connect

    Wakakuwa, Eyuri; Murao, Mio

    2014-12-04

    We introduce a generalization of the quantum mutual information between a classical system and a quantum system into the mutual information between a classical system and a system described by general probabilistic theories. We apply this generalized mutual information (GMI) to a derivation of Tsirelson's bound from information causality, and prove that Tsirelson's bound can be derived from the chain rule of the GMI. By using the GMI, we formulate the 'no-supersignalling condition' (NSS), that the assistance of correlations does not enhance the capability of classical communication. We prove that NSS is never violated in any no-signalling theory.

  8. Surface-Bound Soft Matter Gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Genzer,J.; Bhat, R.

    2008-01-01

    This feature article describes the progress realized over the past half century in the field of surface-bound gradient structures created on or from soft materials (oligomers and/or polymers), or those enabling the study of the behavior of soft materials. By highlighting our work in the field and accounting for the contribution of other groups, we emphasize the exceptional versatility of gradient assemblies in facilitating fast screening of physicochemical phenomena, acting as 'recording media' for monitoring a process, and playing a key role in the design and fabrication of surface-bound molecular and macromolecular motors capable of directing a transport phenomenon.

  9. Learning within bounds and dream sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geszti, T.; Pazmandi, F.

    1987-12-01

    In a bounded-synapses version of Hopfield's model (1984) for neural networks the quasienergy of a given memory, which is approximately equal to the depth of the corresponding energy well is calculated exactly by treating the change of a synaptic strength on learning as a random walk within bounds. Attractors corresponding to stored memories are found to be considerably flattened before serious retrieval errors arise. This allows dream sleep to be interpreted as random recall and relearning of fresh strong memories, in order to stack them on top of weak incidental memory imprints of a day.

  10. NN*(1440) quasi-bound states

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Lu; Zou Bingsong; Shen Pengnian; Zhang Yingjie

    2011-10-21

    Inspired by a recent observation of a narrow resonance-like structure around 2360 MeV in the pn {yields} d{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} cross section, we investigate the possibility of forming NN*(1440) quasi-bound state by meson exchange potential. With parameters of the t-channel {pi}, {sigma}, {rho} and {omega} exchanges determined by relevant NN scattering and N*(1440) decay processes, it is found that a NN*(1440) quasi-bound state with the same quantum numbers as the deuteron can be formed with binding energy about 20 MeV.

  11. A note on BPS vortex bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Izquierdo, A.; Garcia Fuertes, W.; Mateos Guilarte, J.

    2016-02-01

    In this note we investigate bound states, where scalar and vector bosons are trapped by BPS vortices in the Abelian Higgs model with a critical ratio of the couplings. A class of internal modes of fluctuation around cylindrically symmetric BPS vortices is characterized mathematically, analyzing the spectrum of the second-order fluctuation operator when the Higgs and vector boson masses are equal. A few of these bound states with low values of quantized magnetic flux are described fully, and their main properties are discussed.

  12. Proof of a quantum Bousso bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael; Casini, Horacio; Fisher, Zachary; Maldacena, Juan

    2014-08-01

    We prove the generalized covariant entropy bound, ΔS≤(A-A')/4Gℏ, for light-sheets with initial area A and final area A'. The entropy ΔS is defined as a difference of von Neumann entropies of an arbitrary state and the vacuum, with both states restricted to the light-sheet under consideration. The proof applies to free fields, in the limit where gravitational backreaction is small. We do not assume the null energy condition. In regions where it is violated, we find that the bound is protected by the defining property of light-sheets: that their null generators are nowhere expanding.

  13. Upper bounds on the photon mass

    SciTech Connect

    Accioly, Antonio; Helayeel-Neto, Jose; Scatena, Eslley

    2010-09-15

    The effects of a nonzero photon rest mass can be incorporated into electromagnetism in a simple way using the Proca equations. In this vein, two interesting implications regarding the possible existence of a massive photon in nature, i.e., tiny alterations in the known values of both the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron and the gravitational deflection of electromagnetic radiation, are utilized to set upper limits on its mass. The bounds obtained are not as stringent as those recently found; nonetheless, they are comparable to other existing bounds and bring new elements to the issue of restricting the photon mass.

  14. Quantum Kolmogorov complexity and bounded quantum memory

    SciTech Connect

    Miyadera, Takayuki

    2011-04-15

    The effect of bounded quantum memory in a primitive information protocol has been examined using the quantum Kolmogorov complexity as a measure of information. We employed a toy two-party protocol in which Bob, by using a bounded quantum memory and an unbounded classical memory, estimates a message that was encoded in qubits by Alice in one of the bases X or Z. Our theorem gave a nontrivial effect of the memory boundedness. In addition, a generalization of the uncertainty principle in the presence of quantum memory has been obtained.

  15. Positive alcohol expectancies and drinking behavior: the influence of expectancy strength and memory accessibility.

    PubMed

    Palfai, T; Wood, M D

    2001-03-01

    College student drinkers (N = 314) participated in a health survey in which they (a) completed an alcohol-related memory association task (expectancy accessibility measure), (b) rated their positive expectancies about alcohol use (expectancy strength measure), and (c) reported their level of alcohol involvement. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that both expectancy accessibility and expectancy strength predicted frequency of alcohol use and alcohol-related problems. Moreover, moderational analyses showed that the association between expectancy strength and frequency of alcohol use was greater for those who generated more alcohol responses on the expectancy association task. These findings suggest that the outcome association measure and Likert scale ratings of expectancies may assess distinct properties of expectancy representations, which may have independent and interactive effects on different aspects of drinking behavior. PMID:11255940

  16. Bounding the states of systems with unknown-but-bounded disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Wei K.; Parlos, Alexander G.; Verghese, George C.

    1990-01-01

    Control systems with hard constraints on certain variables are characterized, in an analytical review of recent investigations based on an unknown-but-bounded description of magnitude uncertainties. Hard-constraint problems typically arise in the design of controllers for potentially hazardous systems such as nuclear power plants. Consideration is given to norm bounds based on matrix measures, extensions of Schweppe's (1968) ellipsoid bounds, and set-theoretic regulator design. The performance of these approaches is evaluated by means of numerical simulations involving a third-order nonlinear steam-boiler model; the results are presented in graphs, and it is found that ellipsoid bounds are tightest in the general case, but that box bounds are even tighter for linear systems with Metzler system matrices.

  17. Time-delay feedback control in a delayed dynamical chaos system and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Guang; Deng, Cun-Bing

    2011-01-01

    The feedback control of a delayed dynamical system, which also includes various chaotic systems with time delays, is investigated. On the basis of stability analysis of a nonautonomous system with delays, some simple yet less conservative criteria are obtained for feedback control in a delayed dynamical system. Finally, the theoretical result is applied to a typical class of chaotic Lorenz system and Chua circuit with delays. Numerical simulations are also given to verify the theoretical results.

  18. GENERAL: Synchronization of time-delay chaotic systems on small-world networks with delayed coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Wei; Wang, Ying-Hai

    2009-04-01

    By using the well-known Ikeda model as the node dynamics, this paper studies synchronization of time-delay systems on small-world networks where the connections between units involve time delays. It shows that, in contrast with the undelayed case, networks with delays can actually synchronize more easily. Specifically, for randomly distributed delays, time-delayed mutual coupling suppresses the chaotic behaviour by stabilizing a fixed point that is unstable for the uncoupled dynamical system.

  19. Cross delay line sensor characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, Israel J; Remelius, Dennis K; Tiee, Joe J; Buck, Steven E; Whittemore, Stephen R; Thompson, David C; Shirey, Robert

    2010-01-01

    There exists a wealth of information in the scientific literature on the physical properties and device characterization procedures for complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS), charge coupled device (CCD) and avalanche photodiode (APD) format detectors. Numerous papers and books have also treated photocathode operation in the context of photomultiplier tube (PMT) operation for either non imaging applications or limited night vision capability. However, much less information has been reported in the literature about the characterization procedures and properties of photocathode detectors with novel cross delay line (XDL) anode structures. These allow one to detect single photons and create images by recording space and time coordinate (X, Y & T) information. In this paper, we report on the physical characteristics and performance of a cross delay line anode sensor with an enhanced near infrared wavelength response photocathode and high dynamic range micro channel plate (MCP) gain (> 10{sup 6}) multiplier stage. Measurement procedures and results including the device dark event rate (DER), pulse height distribution, quantum and electronic device efficiency (QE & DQE) and spatial resolution per effective pixel region in a 25 mm sensor array are presented. The overall knowledge and information obtained from XDL sensor characterization allow us to optimize device performance and assess capability. These device performance properties and capabilities make XDL detectors ideal for remote sensing field applications that require single photon detection, imaging, sub nano-second timing response, high spatial resolution (10's of microns) and large effective image format.

  20. Cross delay line sensor characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Israel J.; Remelius, Dennis K.; Tiee, Joe J.; Buck, Steven E.; Whittemore, Stephen R.; Thompson, David C.; Shirey, Robert

    2010-04-01

    There exists a wealth of information in the scientific literature on the physical properties and device characterization procedures for complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS), charge coupled device (CCD) and avalanche photodiode (APD) format detectors. Numerous papers and books have also treated photocathode operation in the context of photomultiplier tube (PMT) operation for either non imaging applications or limited night vision capability. However, much less information has been reported in the literature about the characterization procedures and properties of photocathode detectors with novel cross delay line (XDL) anode structures. These allow one to detect single photons and create images by recording space and time coordinate (X, Y & T) information. In this paper, we report on the physical characteristics and performance of a cross delay line anode sensor with an enhanced near infrared wavelength response photocathode and high dynamic range micro channel plate (MCP) gain (> 106 ) multiplier stage. Measurement procedures and results including the device dark event rate (DER), pulse height distribution, quantum and electronic device efficiency (QE & DQE) and spatial resolution per effective pixel region in a 25 mm sensor array are presented. The overall knowledge and information obtained from XDL sensor characterization allow us to optimize device performance and assess capability. These device performance properties and capabilities make XDL detectors ideal for remote sensing field applications that require single photon detection, imaging, sub nano-second timing response, high spatial resolution (10's of microns) and large effective image format.ÿ

  1. PRECISION TIME-DELAY GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Carr, B.J.; Peckham, V.D.

    1959-06-16

    A precision time-delay generator circuit with low jitter is described. The first thyratron has a series resonant circuit and a diode which is connected to the second thyratron. The first thyratron is triggered at the begin-ning of a time delay and a capacitor is discharged through the first thyratron and the diode, thereby, triggering the second thyratron. (T.R.H.) l6l9O The instrument described can measure pressures between sea level and 300,000 ft. The pressure- sensing transducer of the instrument is a small cylindrical tube with a thin foil of titanium-tritium fastened around the inside of the tube. Output is a digital signal which can be used for storage or telemetering more conveniently than an analog signal. (W.D.M.) l6l9l An experimental study was made on rolling contacts in the temperature range of 550 to 1000 deg F. Variables such as material composition, hardness, and operating conditions were investigated in a rolling test stand. Ball bearing tests were run to determine the effect of design parameters, bearing materials, lubricants, and operating conditions. (auth)

  2. The standardized mortality ratio and life expectancy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S P; Hardy, R J; Wen, C P

    1992-04-01

    This paper develops a theoretical relation between the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and the expected years of life and establishes a regression equation for easy conversion between these two statistics. The mathematical expression of the derived relation is an approximation, requiring an assumption of constant age-specific mortality ratios. It underestimates the "true" value calculated based on life table technique when the age-specific mortality ratios increase with age. This equation provides a conservative method to estimate the expected years of life for cohort mortality studies and facilitates an assessment of the impact of work-related factors on the length of life of the worker. It also allows one to convert the SMR to life expectancy in smaller studies whose sole objective is to determine the SMR in a working population. A 1% decrease (or increase) in the standardized mortality ratio will result in 0.1373 years increased (or decreased) life expectancy based on white male data for the US population. Furthermore, with data from 14 large oil refinery and chemical worker cohorts of white males, the "derived" expected years of life based on the regression equation closely predicts the corresponding value calculated using a standard life table technique. This statistical equation is expected to have practical applications when used in conjunction with the SMR to provide an approximate measure of life expectancy, a term and statistic familiar to most lay people. PMID:1595682

  3. Patient Expectations of Acupuncture in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hapke, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Background: Expectations for treatment have been associated with outcomes. Expectations in acupuncture treatment have rarely been addressed, and due to the unique concerns of pregnancy and childbirth, obstetric patients merit special attention. Primary Study Objective: Assess treatment expectations of acupuncture clinic patients treated for obstetric and related concerns. Methods/Design: Descriptive follow-up involving a patient-completed survey; chief treatment concern and number of treatment sessions were validated against patient records. Participants: Of 265 former clinic patients, 137 (51.7%) completed the internet survey. Main Outcome Measures: Self-reported demographic variables; responses to open-ended questions on treatment expectations; general treatment variables. Results: Using standard qualitative data analytic strategies, we identified five major treatment expectations, for example, affecting labor and delivery, benefiting the whole system, and treating specific symptoms. Limitations: Retrospective method and recall bias may have influenced reported expectations. Conclusion: Obstetric acupuncture patients' expectations overlap with other subgroups in terms of symptom treatment. They also indicate a distinct interest in taking an active role in childbirth and in replacing conventional interventions, warranting further inquiry into obstetric acupuncture effects and safety in childbearing women. PMID:25105071

  4. Expected degree for RNA secondary structure networks.

    PubMed

    Clote, Peter

    2015-01-15

    Consider the network of all secondary structures of a given RNA sequence, where nodes are connected when the corresponding structures have base pair distance one. The expected degree of the network is the average number of neighbors, where average may be computed with respect to the either the uniform or Boltzmann probability. Here, we describe the first algorithm, RNAexpNumNbors, that can compute the expected number of neighbors, or expected network degree, of an input sequence. For RNA sequences from the Rfam database, the expected degree is significantly less than the constrained minimum free energy structure, defined to have minimum free energy (MFE) over all structures consistent with the Rfam consensus structure. The expected degree of structural RNAs, such as purine riboswitches, paradoxically appears to be smaller than that of random RNA, yet the difference between the degree of the MFE structure and the expected degree is larger than that of random RNA. Expected degree does not seem to correlate with standard structural diversity measures of RNA, such as positional entropy and ensemble defect. The program RNAexpNumNbors is written in C, runs in cubic time and quadratic space, and is publicly available at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAexpNumNbors. PMID:25382310

  5. Neurobiology of placebo effects: expectations or learning?

    PubMed

    Pecia, Marta; Stohler, Christian S; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2014-07-01

    Contemporary learning theories suggest that conditioning is heavily dependent on the processing of prediction errors, which signal a discrepancy between expected and observed outcomes. This line of research provides a framework through which classical theories of placebo effects, expectations and conditioning, can be reconciled. Brain regions related to prediction error processing [anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), orbitofrontal cortex or the nucleus accumbens] overlap with those involved in placebo effects. Here we examined the possibility that the magnitude of objective neurochemical responses to placebo administration would depend on individual expectation-effectiveness comparisons. We show that such comparisons and not expectations per se predict behavioral placebo responses and placebo-induced activation of -opioid receptor-mediated neurotransmission in regions relevant to error detection (e.g. ACC). Expectations on the other hand were associated with greater -opioid system activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex but not with greater behavioral placebo responses. The results presented aid the elucidation of molecular and neural mechanisms underlying the relationship between expectation-effectiveness associations and the formation of placebo responses, shedding light on the individual differences in learning and decision making. Expectation and outcome comparisons emerge as a cognitive mechanism that beyond reward associations appears to facilitate the formation and sustainability of placebo responses. PMID:23887819

  6. Tonal expectations influence early pitch processing.

    PubMed

    Marmel, Frédéric; Perrin, Fabien; Tillmann, Barbara

    2011-10-01

    The present study investigated the ERP correlates of the influence of tonal expectations on pitch processing. Participants performed a pitch discrimination task between penultimate and final tones of melodies. These last two tones were a repetition of the same musical note, but penultimate tones were always in tune whereas final tones were slightly out of tune in half of the trials. The pitch discrimination task allowed us to investigate the influence of tonal expectations in attentive listening and, for penultimate tones, without being confounded by decisional processes (occurring on final tones). Tonal expectations were manipulated by a tone change in the first half of the melodies that changed their tonality, hence changing the tonal expectedness of penultimate and final tones without modifying them acoustically. Manipulating tonal expectations with minimal acoustic changes allowed us to focus on the cognitive expectations based on listeners' knowledge of tonal structures. For penultimate tones, tonal expectations modulated processing within the first 100 msec after onset resulting in an Nb/P1 complex that differed in amplitude between tonally related and less related conditions. For final tones, out-of-tune tones elicited an N2/P3 complex and, on in-tune tones only, tonal manipulation elicited an ERAN/RATN-like negativity overlapping with the N2. Our results suggest that cognitive tonal expectations can influence pitch perception at several steps of processing, starting with early attentional selection of pitch. PMID:21265601

  7. Primary Care Clinician Expectations Regarding Aging

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Melinda M.; Bond, Lynne A.; Howard, Alan; Sarkisian, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Expectations regarding aging (ERA) in community-dwelling older adults are associated with personal health behaviors and health resource usage. Clinicians’ age expectations likely influence patients’ expectations and care delivery patterns; yet, limited research has explored clinicians’ age expectations. The Expectations Regarding Aging Survey (ERA-12) was used to assess (a) age expectations in a sample of primary care clinicians practicing in the United States and (b) clinician characteristics associated with ERA-12 scores. Design and Methods: This study was a cross-sectional survey of primary care clinicians affiliated with 5 practice-based research networks, October 2008 to June 2009. A total of 374 of the 1,510 distributed surveys were returned (24.8% response rate); 357 analyzed. Mean respondent age was 48.6 years (SD = 11.6; range 23–87 years); 88.0% physicians, 96.0% family medicine, 94.9% White, and 61.9% male. Results: Female clinicians reported higher ERA-12 scores; clinicians’ age expectations decreased with greater years in practice. Among the clinicians, higher ERA-12 scores were associated with higher clinician ratings of the importance of and personal skill in administering preventive counseling and the importance of delivering preventive services. Agreement with individual ERA-12 items varied widely. Implications: Unrealistically high or low ERA could negatively influence the quality of care provided to patients and patients’ own age expectations. Research should examine the etiology of clinicians’ age expectations and their association with older adult diagnoses and treatment. Medical education must incorporate strategies to promote clinician attitudes that facilitate successful patient aging. PMID:21430129

  8. Uncertainty inequalities among frequency moments and radial expectation values: Applications to atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, J. C.; Bouvrie, P. A.; Antolín, J.

    2012-04-01

    Rigorous and universal bounds on frequency moments of one-particle densities in terms of radial expectation values in the conjugate space are obtained. The results, valid for any d-dimensional quantum-mechanical system, are derived by using Rényi-like position-momentum inequalities in an information-theoretical framework. Especially interesting are the upper bounds on the Dirac exchange and Thomas-Fermi kinetic energies, as well as the disequilibrium or self-similarity of both position and momentum distributions. A variety of bounds for these functionals in a given space are known, but most usually in terms of quantities defined within the same space. Very few results including a density functional on one space, and expectation values on the conjugate one, are found in the literature. A pioneering bound on the disequilibrium in terms of the kinetic energy is improved in this work. A numerical study of the aforementioned relationships is carried out for atomic systems in their ground state. Some results are given in terms of relevant physical quantities, including the kinetic and electron-nucleus attraction energies, the diamagnetic susceptibility and the height of the peak of the Compton profile, among others.

  9. Opinion formation with upper and lower bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Ryosuke; Martin, Arnaud

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the opinion formation with upper and lower bounds. We formulate the binary exchange of opinions between two peoples under the second (or political) party using the relativistic inelastic-Boltzmann-Vlasov equation with randomly perturbed motion. In this paper, we discuss the relativistic effects on the opinion formation of peoples from the standpoint of the relativistic kinetic theory.

  10. Logistics Handbook, 1976. Colorado Outward Bound School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Outward Bound School, Denver.

    Logistics, a support mission, is vital to the successful operation of the Colorado Outward Bound School (COBS) courses. Logistics is responsible for purchasing, maintaining, transporting, and replenishing a wide variety of items, i.e., food, mountaineering and camping equipment, medical and other supplies, and vehicles. The Logistics coordinator…

  11. Book Selection, Collection Development, and Bounded Rationality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews previously proposed schemes of classical rationality in book selection, describes new approaches to rational choice behavior, and presents a model of book selection based on bounded rationality in a garbage can decision process. The role of tacit knowledge and symbolic content in the selection process are also discussed. (102 references)…

  12. Mentoring College Bound High School Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowrer-Popiel, Elizabeth

    This article examines causes of the high rate of attrition of college freshmen during the first few weeks of school and describes a plan for mentorships between successful college students and college-bound secondary seniors prior to entrance into college. In discussing the challenges facing freshmen, the article suggests that they suffer stress

  13. College Bound Seniors, 1974-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Entrance Examination Board, New York, NY.

    Some one million college bound students, who were high school seniors during 1974-75 previously participated in the College Board's Admissions Testing Program (ATP), which included the Scholarship Aptitude Test (SAT), the Test of Standard Written English, the Student Descriptive Questionnaire, and the ATP Achievement Tests. These tests created a…

  14. Lifetime of a Chemically Bound Helium Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Lundell, Jan; Gerber, R. Benny; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The rare-gas atoms are chemically inert, to an extent unique among all elements. This is due to the stable electronic structure of the atoms. Stable molecules with chemically bound rare-gas atoms are, however, known. A first such compound, XePtF6, W2S prepared in 1962 and since then a range of molecules containing radon, xenon and krypton have been obtained. Most recently, a first stable chemically bound compound of argon was prepared, leaving neon and helium as the only elements for which stable chemically bound molecules are not yet known. Electronic structure calculations predict that a metastable species HHeF exists, but significance of the result depends on the unknown lifetime. Here we report quantum dynamics calculations of the lifetime of HHeF, using accurate interactions computed from electronic structure theory. HHeF is shown to disintegrate by tunneling through energy barriers into He + HF and H + He + F the first channel greatly dominating. The lifetime of HHeF is more than 120 picoseconds, that of DHeF is 14 nanoseconds. The relatively long lifetimes are encouraging for the preparation prospects of this first chemically bound helium compound.

  15. College Bound? Make the Right Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Jenna Ashley

    2009-01-01

    "College Bound? Make the Right Choices" is the Pope Center's latest tool for improving colleges and universities "from the bottom up" through better choices. Its purpose is to help high school students and their parents become smarter purchasers of higher education. This booklet by Jenna Ashley Robinson helps young people think through what they…

  16. Multipartite purification protocols: Upper and optimal bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, Alastair; Pachos, Jiannis K.

    2007-06-15

    A method for producing an upper bound for all multipartite purification protocols is devised, based on knowing the optimal protocol for purifying bipartite states. When applied to a range of noise models, both local and correlated, the optimality of certain protocols can be demonstrated for a variety of graph and valence bond states.

  17. Explicit Finite Difference Methods for the Delay Pseudoparabolic Equations

    PubMed Central

    Amirali, I.; Amiraliyev, G. M.; Cakir, M.; Cimen, E.

    2014-01-01

    Finite difference technique is applied to numerical solution of the initial-boundary value problem for the semilinear delay Sobolev or pseudoparabolic equation. By the method of integral identities two-level difference scheme is constructed. For the time integration the implicit rule is being used. Based on the method of energy estimates the fully discrete scheme is shown to be absolutely stable and convergent of order two in space and of order one in time. The error estimates are obtained in the discrete norm. Some numerical results confirming the expected behavior of the method are shown. PMID:24688392

  18. Health expectancy and the problem of substitute morbidity.

    PubMed

    Van de Water, H P

    1997-12-29

    During the past century, the developed world has not only witnessed a dramatic increase in life expectancy (ageing), but also a concomitant rise in chronic disease and disability. Consequently, the tension between 'living longer' on the one hand and health-related 'quality of life' on the other has become an increasingly important health policy problem. The paper deals with two consequences of this so-called epidemiological transition in population health. The first one concerns the question of how--given the impressive changes--population health can be measured in an adequate and policy relevant present-day fashion. The second one is the so-called phenomenon of 'substitute morbidity and mortality': more and more acute fatal diseases are replaced by non-fatal delayed degenerative diseases like dementia and arthritis. How the phenomenon of substitute morbidity and mortality affects the development of population health is illustrated with the epidemiological transitions, worldwide shifts in the main causes of death, assumptions used in models, adverse consequences of medical technologies and some results from intervention trials. Substitute morbidity and mortality may thwart our disease-specific expectations of interventions and asks for a shift to a 'total population health' perspective when judging potential health gains of interventions. Better understanding of the dynamics that underly the changes in population health is necessary. Implications for data collections are more emphasis on morbidity data and their relation with mortality, more longitudinal studies, stricter requirements for intervention trials and more use of modelling as a tool. A final recommendation is the promotion of integrative measures of population health. For the latter several results are presented suggesting that, although the amount of morbidity and disability is growing with an increasing life expectancy, this is mild unhealthiness in particular. This finding supports the 'dynamic equilibrium' theory. In absolute numbers, however, the burden of disease will continue to increase with further ageing of the population. PMID:9460066

  19. Aging and memory for expected and unexpected objects in real-world settings.

    PubMed

    Mäntylä, T; Bäckman, L

    1992-11-01

    Adult age differences in the consistency effect were examined in 3 experiments. The consistency effect refers to items inconsistent with expectations being better remembered than items consistent with expectations. Younger and older adults walked into an office room and viewed objects that varied in their consistency with expectation. Immediate and delayed recognition tests on item information (i.e., distractors were defined by their semantic identity) revealed that both age groups recognized unexpected items better than expected items. However, when recognition of token information was requested (i.e., distractors were defined by their physical appearance), younger adults, in contrast to older adults, exhibited consistency effects. Also, under divided attention, young adults revealed the same pattern of data as did elderly adults under full attention. The results are discussed in terms of capacity-related differences in distinctive encoding. PMID:1447553

  20. What to Expect Before a Heart Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter. What To Expect Before a Heart Transplant The Heart Transplant Waiting List Patients who are eligible for a ... cardiac rehab after the transplant. Contact With the Transplant Center During the Wait Patients on the waiting ...