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1

Clathria (Thalysias) (Poecilosclerida: Demospongiae: Porifera) from Brazil:
New species and redescription of Clathria (Thalysias) basiarenacea (Boury-Esnault, 1973).
 

PubMed

The subgenus Clathria (Thalysias) Duchassaing & Michelotti, 1864 has 97 valid species, of which 27 are recorded in the Atlantic Ocean. However, only three species are known from Brazil so far. Here we provide the redescription of Clathria (Thalysias) basiarenacea (Boury- Esnault, 1973), based on the discovery of new characters (additional category of auxiliary styles, and details of spicules), and describe a new species of Clathria (Thalysias) repens sp. nov., that differs from sister species in having a live orange color, a massively encrusting repent growth form with lamellate folds and anastomosed projections, and three categories of structural styles, of which the two auxiliary styles have microspined heads. We also invalidate the record of Clathria (Thalysias) procera (Ridley, 1884) for Brazil.  PMID:25544467

Galindo, Helcy; Hooper, John N A; Pinheiro, Ulisses

2014-01-01

2

Organic geochemistry of oils from Oil Spring and Florence oil field near Canon City, Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Oil Spring is an oil seep located approximately 6 miles north of Ca?on City, Colorado. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the oil from Oil Spring and the oil from nearby Florence oil field share a common source. Bulk and molecular geochemical analyses show that the oil seep is most likely derived from a group of geochemically similar Cretaceous source rocks including the Carlile Shale, Greenhorn Limestone, Graneros Shale, and the Mowry Shale. The Florence oil is derived from the Sharon Springs Member of the Upper Cretaceous Pierre Shale.

Lillis, P.G.; Dolan, Michael P.; Warden, Augusta; King, J.D.

1998-01-01

3

Classroom in the Oil Fields.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a petroleum production program created in Bradford, Pennsylvania, by oil company executives and local educators to answer the need of the regional oil industry for trained manpower. Discusses the need for the program, the search for qualified teachers, funding, and how one student feels about the program. (CT)

Hammond, Jeanne

1980-01-01

4

OIL AND GAS FIELD EMISSIONS SURVEY  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of an oil and gas field emissions survey. The production segment of the oil and gas industry has been identified as a source category that requires the development of more reliable emissions inventory methodologies. The overall purpose of the project was ...

5

Azerbaijan field to step up oil flow  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that a unit of Pennzoil Co., Houston, is scheduled to operate a development program that could more than double oil production from Guneshli field off Azerbaijan in the southern Caspian Sea. Under agreements signed in Baku, Pennzoil Caspian Corp., Ramco Energy Ltd. of Aberdeen, Scotland, and state oil company Azerneft will have exclusive right to jointly develop the field. Partners' shares and other project details are to be laid out in the final development plan, expected by yearend.

Not Available

1992-10-19

6

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List  

EIA Publications

Provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and gas fields in the United States for use in conjunction with the Energy Information Administration’s proved reserves estimation and allied analytical programs. Other federal and state government agencies, as well as industry, also use it as the standard for domestic field identification.

2014-01-01

7

Giant oil field decline rates and their influence on world oil production  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most important contributors to the world's total oil production are the giant oil fields. Using a comprehensive database of giant oil field production, the average decline rates of the world's giant oil fields are estimated. Separating subclasses was necessary, since there are large differences between land and offshore fields, as well as between non-OPEC and OPEC fields. The evolution

Mikael Höök; Robert Hirsch; Kjell Aleklett

2009-01-01

8

Remediation of oil field wastes  

SciTech Connect

Treatment and disposal of drilling muds and hazardous wastes has become a growing concern in the oil and gas industry. Further, past practices involving improper disposal require considerable research and cost to effectively remediate contaminated soils. This paper investigates two case histories describing the treatments employed to handle the liquid wastes involved. Both case histories describe the environmentally safe cleanup operations that were employed. 1 ref., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Peters, R.W.; Wentz, C.A.

1990-01-01

9

Crude oil from the Novoportovsk field  

SciTech Connect

Development of the Novoportovsk field has encountered a number of difficulties due to severe climatic conditions, distance from refining centers, complexity of the geologic structure, and inadequate information of the physicochemical and commercial characteristics of crudes from this field. They report on a study of the physicochemical properties of oil samples taken from different depths in this field, with the aim of establishing the feasibility of manufacturing various products from these crudes.

Krylova, S.M.; Demidenko, K.A.; Kaminskii, E.F.; Minaev, V.Z.; Dinkov, A.V.

1987-07-01

10

Venezuela slates second oil field revival round  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that Venezuela will accept bids under a second round next year from private foreign and domestic companies for production contracts to operate marginal active as well as inactive oil fields. The first such round came earlier this year, involving about 55 other marginal, inactive fields. It resulted in two contractors signed with domestic and foreign companies. It represented the first time since nationalization of the petroleum industry in Venezuela in 1976 that private companies were allowed to produce oil in the country. A public bid tender was expected at presstime last week.

Not Available

1992-12-07

11

Saving diesel fuel in the oil field  

Microsoft Academic Search

Describes how diesel electric SCR (silicon controlled rectifier) drilling rigs are helping drillers save fuel expense in the oil fields, along with other energy conservation methods. Compares SCR to conventional drilling rigs. Points out that on conventional rigs, diesel engines drive rig components directly, while on the SCR electric rigs, diesel engines turn a.c. electric generators which supply energy to

Elder

1982-01-01

12

Field evaluations of marine oil spill bioremediation.  

PubMed Central

Bioremediation is defined as the act of adding or improving the availability of materials (e.g., nutrients, microorganisms, or oxygen) to contaminated environments to cause an acceleration of natural biodegradative processes. The results of field experiments and trials following actual spill incidents have been reviewed to evaluate the feasibility of this approach as a treatment for oil contamination in the marine environment. The ubiquity of oil-degrading microorganisms in the marine environment is well established, and research has demonstrated the capability of the indigenous microflora to degrade many components of petroleum shortly after exposure. Studies have identified numerous factors which affect the natural biodegradation rates of oil, such as the origin and concentration of oil, the availability of oil-degrading microorganisms, nutrient concentrations, oxygen levels, climatic conditions, and sediment characteristics. Bioremediation strategies based on the application of fertilizers have been shown to stimulate the biodegradation rates of oil in aerobic intertidal sediments such as sand and cobble. The ratio of oil loading to nitrogen concentration within the interstitial water has been identified to be the principal controlling factor influencing the success of this bioremediation strategy. However, the need for the seeding of natural environments with hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria has not been clearly demonstrated under natural environmental conditions. It is suggested that bioremediation should now take its place among the many techniques available for the treatment of oil spills, although there is still a clear need to set operational limits for its use. On the basis of the available evidence, we have proposed preliminary operational guidelines for bioremediation on shoreline environments. PMID:8801437

Swannell, R P; Lee, K; McDonagh, M

1996-01-01

13

Development of a mature giant offshore oil field  

SciTech Connect

The Teak field, a mature oil field offshore southeast Trinidad, has produced 266 million bbl oil since 1972. Production is from Pliocene sandstone reservoirs in a complexly faulted anticline. This paper summarizes the history and geology of Teak field, describes its oil-producing reservoirs, and discusses the mature-field development strategy used since 1988, including case histories of two 1989 development prospects.

Lantz, J.R.; Ali, N. (Amoco Production Co. (US))

1991-04-01

14

Oil field water handling: qualitative separation equals theory plus judgment  

SciTech Connect

One of the most prevalent problems in oil field operations is the coproduction of oil and formation water, and the resulting problem of qualitative separation of water and oil. This article discusses the separation and handling of oil field brines. Oil dispersions can be cleaned up by a variety of devices which use gravity as the principal separating mechanism. Acceptable practices for disposing of oil-field brine produced with the crude oil include: injection into permeable underground formations containing saline water; reuse for supplementary recovery operations; and deoiling treatment acceptable for ocean disposal.

Bradley, B.W.

1985-10-14

15

Assessment of remaining recoverable oil in selected major oil fields of the San Joaquin Basin, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed an estimate of volumes of technically recoverable, conventional oil that could eventually be added to reserves in nine selected major oil fields in the San Joaquin Basin in central California. The mean total volume of potential oil reserves that might be added in the nine fields using improved oil-recovery technologies was estimated to be about 6.5 billion barrels of oil.

Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Cook, Troy A.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Gautier, Donald L.; Klett, Timothy R.; Verma, Mahendra K.; Ryder, Robert T.; Attanasi, Emil D.; Freeman, Philip A.; Le, Phoung A.

2012-01-01

16

A model of peak production in oil fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We developed a model for oil production on the basis of simple physical considerations. The model provides a basic understanding of Hubbert's empirical observation that the production rate for an oil-producing region reaches its maximum when approximately half the recoverable oil has been produced. According to the model, the oil production rate at a large field must peak before drilling peaks. We use the model to investigate the effects of several drilling strategies on oil production. Despite the model's simplicity, predictions for the timing and magnitude of peak production match data on oil production from major oil fields throughout the world.

Abrams, Daniel M.; Wiener, Richard J.

2010-01-01

17

Geology of the Tambaredjo oil field, Suriname  

SciTech Connect

After the initial discovery in the sixties of oil below the coastal plain of Suriname (S. America), the State Oil Company of Suriname started production of the unique Tambaredjo field in 1982. The heavy, biodegraded oil (14-16[degrees] API) is produced under compaction drive, from the Paleocene T-sand (average thickness 5 m) at a depth of about 300 m. More than 300 wells have been drilled in an area of about 200 km[sup 2]. High resolution seismics makes it possible to correlate units down to 2 m thick. This dense network of bore holes is very suitable for geological correlations and 3D modeling. The T-sand reservoir consists of angular, medium to coarse grained unconsolidated sands with interfingering clays and lignites. The sands are deposited on a well cemented erosional Cretaceous basement. The reservoir is sealed by locally continuous clays. The oil is trapped in structural highs created by syn-sedimentary rejuvenated basement faults. The depositional environment of the T-sand ranges from fluviatile to deltaic. Frequent avulsion and synsedimentary faulting created a highly compartmented reservoir. Although interconnectedness of the sand bodies is high, clay smears and silting out of the edges confine reservoir compartments. The best genetic sand units such as channel fills or mouth bar deposits hardly correlate over more than a few hundred meters. The Tambaredjo oil field offers an unique opportunity to study the detailed sedimentology and petroleum geology of a fluvio-deltaic transitional realm on the passive margin along the Guiana coast.

Dronkert, H. (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)); Wong, T.E. (Geological Survey of the Netherlands, Haarlem (Netherlands))

1993-02-01

18

Oil and gas field code master list, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This document contains data collected through October 1993 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the United States. Other Federal and State government agencies, as well as industry, use the EIA Oil and Gas Field Code Master List as the standard for field identification. A machine-readable version of the Oil and Gas Field Code Master List is available from the National Technical Information Service.

Not Available

1993-12-16

19

OPTIMAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING OF OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS FIELD  

E-print Network

OPTIMAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING OF OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS FIELD INFRASTRUCTURE UNDER COMPLEX FISCAL Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract The optimal development planning of offshore oil and gas fields has received, well drilling schedule and production profiles of oil, water and gas in each time period. The model can

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

20

Gullfaks oil field - From challenge to success  

SciTech Connect

The giant Gullfaks oil field was discovered in 1978. The field contains oil reserves in excess of 1.3 billion bbl. The field is located in the northeastern past of Block 34/10 in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea. Gullfaks represents the shallowest structural element of the Tampen Spur and was formed during the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous as a sloping high with a westerly structural dip gradually decreasing toward the east. The major north-south-striking faults, with easterly sloping fault planes, divided the field into several rotated fault blocks. Central and eastern parts of the structure have been eroded by the Early Cretaceous transgression. The reservoir sandstones are comprised of the Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous as a sloping high with a westerly structural dip gradually decreasing toward the east. The major north-south-striking faults, with easterly sloping fault planes, divided the field into several rotated fault blocks. Central and eastern parts of the structure have been eroded by the Early Cretaceous transgression. The reservoir sandstones are comprised of the Middle Jurassic delta-deposited Brent Group, the Lower Jurassic shallow-marine sandstones of the Cook Formation, and the Lower Jurassic shallow-marine sandstones of the Cook Formation, and the Lower Jurassic fluvial channel and delta-plain deposits of the Statfjord Formation. The presence of gas in the post-Jurassic section and a variable water depth have complicated seismic interpretation. However, the improved quality of the 1985 three dimensional seismic survey and deliberate deepening of the development wells have resulted in a more accurate and complete structural interpretation. The Brent reserves in the western part of the field currently are being developed by the Gullfaks A and B platforms. The eastern part of the field is developed by a third platform, Gulflaks C. Water injection is the major drive mechanism maintaining reservoir pressure above the bubble point.

Carlsen, H.; Nygaard, O. (Statoil A.S., Stavanger (Norway))

1990-09-01

21

New Ohio oil and gas pools and fields map series  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ohio has not had an updated oil and gas fields map since 1974. Since then, significant development of fields has taken place and numerous new fields and pools have been discovered and developed. The Ohio Divisions of Geological Survey and Oil and Gas recently completed work for the U.S. Department of Energy to document all major gas plays and 80%

M. T. Baranoski; R. A. Riley; L. H. Wickstrom

1996-01-01

22

The Long March of the Chinese Giant Oil Fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over 70% of China's domestic oil production is obtained from nine giant oilfields. Understanding the behaviour of these fields is essential to both domestic oil production and future Chinese oil imports. This study utilizes decline curves and depletion rate analysis to create some future production outlooks for the Chinese giants. Based on our study, we can only conclude that China's

Mikael Höök; Tang Xu; Pang Xiongqi; Kjell Aleklett

23

Analyses of 800 crude oils from United States oil fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

The quality and related characteristics of crude oils produced and marketed throughout the United States is of both theoretical and practical interest to producers, refiners, marketers, and consumers as well as to state and federal agencies. The Bartlesville (Oklahoma) Energy Technology Center (BETC), a part of the U.S. Department of Energy, analyzes crude oils from around the world and this

H. J. Coleman; E. M. Shelton; D. T. Nichols; C. J. Thompson

1978-01-01

24

Landslide oil field, San Joaquin Valley, California  

SciTech Connect

The Landslide field, located at the southern margin of the San Joaquin basin, was discovered in 1985 by a partnership headed by Channel Exploration Company, on a farm out from Tenneco Oil Company. Initial production from the Tenneco San Emidio 63X-30 was 2064 BOPD, making landslide one of the largest onshore discoveries in California during the past decade. Current production is 7100 BOPD from a sandstone reservoir at 12,500 ft. Fifteen wells have been drilled in the field, six of which are water injectors. Production from the Landslide field occurs from a series of upper Miocene Stevens turbidite sandstones that lie obliquely across an east-plunging structural nose. These turbidite sandstones were deposited as channel-fill sequences within a narrowly bounded levied channel complex. Both the Landslide field and the larger Yowlumne field, located 3 mi to the northwest, comprise a single channel-fan depositional system that developed in the restricted deep-water portion of the San Joaquin basin. Information from the open-hole logs, three-dimensional surveys, vertical seismic profiles, repeat formation tester data, cores, and pressure buildup tests allowed continuous drilling from the initial discovery to the final waterflood injector, without a single dry hole. In addition, the successful application of three-dimensional seismic data in the Landslide development program has helped correctly image channel-fan anomalies in the southern Maricopa basin, where data quality and severe velocity problems have hampered previous efforts. New exploration targets are currently being evaluated on the acreage surrounding the Landslide discovery and should lead to an interesting new round of drilling activity in the Maricopa basin.

Collins, B.P.; March, K.A.; Caballero, J.S.; Stolle, J.M.

1988-03-01

25

Method of determining interwell oil field fluid saturation distribution  

DOEpatents

A method of determining the oil and brine saturation distribution in an oil field by taking electrical current and potential measurements among a plurality of open-hole wells geometrically distributed throughout the oil field. Poisson's equation is utilized to develop fluid saturation distributions from the electrical current and potential measurement. Both signal generating equipment and chemical means are used to develop current flow among the several open-hole wells.

Donaldson, Erle C. (Bartlesville, OK); Sutterfield, F. Dexter (Bartlesville, OK)

1981-01-01

26

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1990  

SciTech Connect

This is the ninth annual edition of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It reflects data collected through October 1990 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the United States. There are 54,963 field records in this year's Oil and Gas Field Code Master List (FCML). This amounts to 467 more than in last year's report. As it is maintained by EIA, the Master List includes: Field records for each state and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides;field records for each alias field name; fields crossing state boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective state naming authorities.

Not Available

1991-01-04

27

China emphasizes energy savings in oil-field production operations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Though it is an important source of energy, an oil field is also a major energy consumer. In the last few years, much effort has been directed toward more rational and efficient utilization of energy in most Chinese oil fields, with considerable success. In 1980, for instance, there was a 0.89% increase in production over the previous year, and a

L. Bin; M. Chengwu

1983-01-01

28

Coreflood assay using extremophile microorganisms for recovery of heavy oil in Mexican oil fields.  

PubMed

A considerable portion of oil reserves in Mexico corresponds to heavy oils. This feature makes it more difficult to recover the remaining oil in the reservoir after extraction with conventional techniques. Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) has been considered as a promising technique to further increase oil recovery, but its application has been developed mainly with light oils; therefore, more research is required for heavy oil. In this study, the recovery of Mexican heavy oil (11.1°API and viscosity 32,906 mPa s) in a coreflood experiment was evaluated using the extremophile mixed culture A7, which was isolated from a Mexican oil field. Culture A7 includes fermentative, thermophilic, and anaerobic microorganisms. The experiments included waterflooding and MEOR stages, and were carried out under reservoir conditions (70°C and 9.65 MPa). MEOR consisted of injections of nutrients and microorganisms followed by confinement periods. In the MEOR stages, the mixed culture A7 produced surface-active agents (surface tension reduction 27 mN m?¹), solvents (ethanol, 1738 mg L?¹), acids (693 mg L?¹), and gases, and also degraded heavy hydrocarbon fractions in an extreme environment. The interactions of these metabolites with the oil, as well as the bioconversion of heavy oil fractions to lighter fractions (increased alkanes in the C?-C?? range), were the mechanisms responsible for the mobility and recovery of heavy oil from the porous media. Oil recovery by MEOR was 19.48% of the residual oil in the core after waterflooding. These results show that MEOR is a potential alternative to heavy oil recovery in Mexican oil fields. PMID:22704814

Castorena-Cortés, Gladys; Roldán-Carrillo, Teresa; Reyes-Avila, Jesús; Zapata-Peñasco, Icoquih; Mayol-Castillo, Martha; Olguín-Lora, Patricia

2012-10-01

29

Plans to revive oil fields in Venezuela on track  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the three operating units of Venezuela's state owned oil company Petroleos de Venezuela SA which will begin receiving bids Feb. 28 from companies interested in operating 55 inactive oil fields in nine producing areas of Venezuela. Francisco Pradas, Pdvsa executive in charge of the program, the the company expects 88 companies or combines of foreign and domestic private companies to participate in the bidding. The program, announced last year, aims to reactivate production in marginal oil fields. It will involve the first direct participation by private companies in Venezuela's oil production since nationalization in 1976.

Not Available

1992-02-24

30

Assessment of remaining recoverable oil in selected major oil fields of the Permian Basin, Texas and New Mexico  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed an estimate of technically recoverable, conventional oil in selected oil fields in the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeastern New Mexico. The mean total volume of potential additional oil resources that might be added using improved oil-recovery technologies was estimated to be about 2.7 billion barrels of oil.

Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Cook, Troy A.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Gautier, Donald L.; Klett, Timothy R.; Verma, Mahendra K.; Ryder, Robert T.; Attanasi, Emil D.; Freeman, Philip A.; Le, Phoung A.

2012-01-01

31

The role of oil-to-oil correlation in the development of the Safah field, Oman  

SciTech Connect

The Safah field, located in northwestern Oman, is a large carbonate reservoir on a gently dipping structural nose. To date, more than 90 wells have been drilled in the field, which is operated by Occidental (Chevron share 35%). The Lower Cretaceous Shuaiba Formation limestone forms the reservoir. Differences in the productivity of the wells in the Safah field is controlled by depositional and diagenetic processes that produced differences in the character of the carbonate. To better understand the distribution of the reservoir rocks in the field, oil-to-oil correlation studies, involving samples from the first 35 wells in the field, were done in 1986 and 1988. Peak height ratios from gas chromatograms were plotted on star diagrams and used for the correlation. Three different oil groups were found in the field. The presence of three different oils in what was thought to be a continuous reservoir implied that some barriers to oil mixing are present. Subsequent drilling revealed several areas in the field that may be parts of these barriers. In these areas, which often occur within a few hundred meters of good producing wells, the top of porosity is often very low and the reservoir is of very poor quality. These characteristics may be attributable to either lateral facies changes or diagenetic differences. By indicating these barriers to oil mixing occur in the field, geochemical analysis may prove useful for locating areas in the field which may be less desirable to develop.

Lindberg, F.A.; Ahmed, A.S.; Bluhm, C.T. (Chevron Overseas Petroleum Inc., San Ramon, CA (USA))

1990-05-01

32

FOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA.  

E-print Network

FOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA. William J. Reed #3; JUNE, 1999. Abstract A probability distribution derived from percolation theory is #12;tted to large datasets on the sizes of forest forest #12;res and oil #12;elds as percolation phenomena as well as suggesting the consideration of a new

Reed, W.J.

33

Oil and Gas field code master list 1995  

SciTech Connect

This is the fourteenth annual edition of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It reflects data collected through October 1995 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the US. The Field Code Index, a listing of all field names and the States in which they occur, ordered by field code, has been removed from this year`s publications to reduce printing and postage costs. Complete copies (including the Field Code Index) will be available on the EIA CD-ROM and the EIA World-Wide Web Site. Future editions of the complete Master List will be available on CD-ROM and other electronic media. There are 57,400 field records in this year`s Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. As it is maintained by EIA, the Master List includes the following: field records for each State and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides; field records for each alias field name (see definition of alias below); and fields crossing State boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective State naming authorities. Taking into consideration the double-counting of fields under such circumstances, EIA identifies 46,312 distinct fields in the US as of October 1995. This count includes fields that no longer produce oil or gas, and 383 fields used in whole or in part for oil or gas Storage. 11 figs., 6 tabs.

NONE

1995-12-01

34

Tengiz oil field, Kazakstan: A carbonate platform and supergiant field  

SciTech Connect

The Tengiz oil field was discovered in 1979 on the northeastern shore of the Caspian Sea in western Kazakstan. The Carboniferous and Devonian age carbonate reservoir is more than 2000 in, thick, 270 km[sup 2] in area extent and buried to a depth of 4000 m (13,120 ft.). The oil column exceeds 1450 m in length and is highly overpressured. The Tengiz reservoir resembles a modem day constructional-type carbonate platform in size, shape and lithofacies. The top of the platform is relatively flat, except for structural highs along the northern, eastern and southern platform margins that developed during post-depositional down-faulting of the platform interior. The platform edge is a depositional escarpment along which subsequent faulting has occurred. Debris-slope conglomerates, shed off the platform during growth, surround the platform escarpment. Bashkirian age ootitic, crinoidal, algal grainstones comprise the upper 100 m of the platform and overlie 350 m of Serpukhovian and Okskian age brachiopodal, crinoidal, algal packstones. Lithofacies are a really widespread and show little variation in composition and stratigraphic thickness across the entire platform. Depositional cycle thicknesses are less than 5 meters for the Bashkirian grainstones and up to 30 meters for the Serpukhovian/Oksky packstones. Lagoonal and reefal lithofacies have not been identified in core to date. Porosity is highly variable and includes interparticle, moldic, channel, vuggy and fracture pore types. Solid bitumen is present in much of the pore space. Secondary porosity formed both before and after bitumen precipitation. Production logs and core data reveal that zones with secondary porosity provide fluid entry into the wellbore.

Wood, W.R. (Chevron Overseas Petroleum, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States)); Garber, R.A. (Chevron USA, Midland, TX (United States))

1996-01-01

35

Tengiz oil field, Kazakstan: A carbonate platform and supergiant field  

SciTech Connect

The Tengiz oil field was discovered in 1979 on the northeastern shore of the Caspian Sea in western Kazakstan. The Carboniferous and Devonian age carbonate reservoir is more than 2000 in, thick, 270 km{sup 2} in area extent and buried to a depth of 4000 m (13,120 ft.). The oil column exceeds 1450 m in length and is highly overpressured. The Tengiz reservoir resembles a modem day constructional-type carbonate platform in size, shape and lithofacies. The top of the platform is relatively flat, except for structural highs along the northern, eastern and southern platform margins that developed during post-depositional down-faulting of the platform interior. The platform edge is a depositional escarpment along which subsequent faulting has occurred. Debris-slope conglomerates, shed off the platform during growth, surround the platform escarpment. Bashkirian age ootitic, crinoidal, algal grainstones comprise the upper 100 m of the platform and overlie 350 m of Serpukhovian and Okskian age brachiopodal, crinoidal, algal packstones. Lithofacies are a really widespread and show little variation in composition and stratigraphic thickness across the entire platform. Depositional cycle thicknesses are less than 5 meters for the Bashkirian grainstones and up to 30 meters for the Serpukhovian/Oksky packstones. Lagoonal and reefal lithofacies have not been identified in core to date. Porosity is highly variable and includes interparticle, moldic, channel, vuggy and fracture pore types. Solid bitumen is present in much of the pore space. Secondary porosity formed both before and after bitumen precipitation. Production logs and core data reveal that zones with secondary porosity provide fluid entry into the wellbore.

Wood, W.R. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States); Garber, R.A. [Chevron USA, Midland, TX (United States)

1996-12-31

36

Largest US oil and gas fields, August 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Largest US Oil and Gas Fields is a technical report and part of an Energy Information Administration (EIA) series presenting distributions of US crude oil and natural gas resources, developed using field-level data collected by EIA`s annual survey of oil and gas proved reserves. The series` objective is to provide useful information beyond that routinely presented in the EIA annual report on crude oil and natural gas reserves. These special reports also will provide oil and gas resource analysts with a fuller understanding of the nature of US crude oil and natural gas occurrence, both at the macro level and with respect to the specific subjects addressed. The series` approach is to integrate EIA`s crude oil and natural gas survey data with related data obtained from other authoritative sources, and then to present illustrations and analyses of interest to a broad spectrum of energy information users ranging from the general public to oil and gas industry personnel.

Not Available

1993-08-06

37

Repair wind field in oil contaminated areas with SAR images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we compared the normalized radar cross section in the cases of oil spill, biogenic slicks, and clean sea areas with image samples made from 11-pixel NRCS average, and determined their thresholds of the NRCS of the synthetic aperture radar. The results show that the thresholds of oil and biogenic slicks exhibit good consistency with the corresponding synthetic aperture radar images. In addition, we used the normalized radar cross section of clean water from adjacent patches of oil or biogenic slicks areas to replace that of oil or biogenic slicks areas, and retrieve wind field by CMOD5.n and compare wind velocity mending of oil and biogenic slicks areas with Weather Research and Forecasting modeled data, from which the root mean squares of wind speed (wind direction) inversion are 0.89 m/s (20.26°) and 0.88 m/s (7.07°), respectively. Therefore, after the occurrence of oil spill or biogenic slicks, the real wind field could be repaired using the method we introduced in this paper. We believe that this method could improve the accuracy in assessment of a real wind field on medium and small scales at sea, and enhance effectively the monitoring works on similar oil or biogenic slicks incidents at sea surface.

Guo, Jie; He, Yijun; Long, Xiao; Hou, Chawei; Liu, Xin; Meng, Junmin

2014-12-01

38

Oil and gas field code master list 1994  

SciTech Connect

This is the thirteenth annual edition of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It reflects data collected through October 1994 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the United States. The master field name spellings and codes are to be used by respondents when filing the following Department of Energy (DOE) forms: Form EIA-23, {open_quotes}Annual Survey of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves,{close_quotes} filed by oil and gas well operators (field codes are required from larger operators only); Forms FERC 8 and EIA-191, {open_quotes}Underground Gas Storage Report,{close_quotes} filed by natural gas producers and distributors who operate underground natural gas storage facilities. Other Federal and State government agencies, as well as industry, use the EIA Oil and Gas Field Code Master List as the standard for field identification. A machine-readable version of the Oil and Gas Field Code Master List is available from the National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161, (703) 487-4650. In order for the Master List to be useful, it must be accurate and remain current. To accomplish this, EIA constantly reviews and revises this list. The EIA welcomes all comments, corrections, and additions to the Master List. All such information should be given to the EIA Field Code Coordinator at (214) 953-1858. EIA gratefully acknowledges the assistance provides by numerous State organizations and trade associations in verifying the existence of fields and their official nomenclature.

Not Available

1995-01-01

39

Oil and gas field code master list 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1997 is the sixteenth annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the US. It is updated with field information collected through October 1997. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry. As a result of their widespread adoption they have in effect become a national standard. The use of field names and codes listed in this publication is required on survey forms and other reports regarding field-specific data collected by EIA. There are 58,366 field records in this year`s FCML, 437 more than last year. The FCML includes: field records for each State and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides; field records for each alias field name (definition of alias is listed); fields crossing State boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective State naming authorities. This report also contains an Invalid Field Record List of 4 records that have been removed from the FCML since last year`s report. These records were found to be either technically incorrect or to represent field names which were never recognized by State naming authorities.

NONE

1998-02-01

40

Laboratory studies of oil spill bioremediation; toward understanding field behavior  

SciTech Connect

Oil spill remediation aims to enhance the natural process of microbial hydrocarbon biodegradation. The microbial foundations have been studied throughout this century, but the focus of most of this work has been on the degradation of well defined compounds by well defined microbial species. This paper addresses laboratory studies on crude oil biodegradation by microbial consortia obtained from oiled beaches in Prince William Sound, Alaska following the spill from the Exxon Valdez. It demonstrates that oil degradation is indeed likely to be nitrogen-limited in Prince William Sound, the different molecular classes in crude oil that are subjected to biodegradation, the identification of conserved species in the oil that can be used for assessing biodegradation and bioremediation in the field, the effectiveness of fertilizers in stimulating sub-surface biodegradation, the role of the olephilic fertilizer Inipol EAP22, and the identification of the oil-degrading microorganisms in Prince William Sound. Together, these laboratory studies provided guidance and important insights into the microbial phenomena underlying the successful bioremediation of the oiled shorelines.

Prince, R.C.; Hinton, S.M.; Elmendorf, D.L.; Lute, J.R.; Grossman, M.J.; Robbins, W.K.; Hsu, Chang S.; Richard, B.E.; Haith, C.E.; Senius, J.D.; Minak-Bernero, V.; Chianelli, R.R. [Exxon Research and Engineering Co., Annandale, NJ (United States); Bragg, J.R. [Exxon Production Research Co., Houston, TX (United States); Douglas, G.S. [Battelle Ocean Sciences, Duxbury, MA (United States)

1993-12-31

41

Field development options for a waterflooded heavy-oil reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Battrum Unit 4 is a moderately heavy-oil reservoir in Saskatchewan producing under waterflood from a thin sand. This paper describes a history match of previous field behavior and systematically analyzes through the use of numerical simulation the potential benefits to production of further waterflooding (with and without infill drilling), steamflooding, and horizontal drilling. It is found that the remaining oil recovery potential of a steamflood with horizontal well is significantly higher than that of any of the waterflood options.

Kasraie, M. (Petroleum Recovery Inst., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Sammon, P.H. (Computer Modelling Group, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Jespersen, P.J. (Sceptre Resources Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (United States))

1993-09-01

42

[Production of oil-processing compounds by microorganisms from the Daqing oil field, China].  

PubMed

Twenty pure cultures isolated from formation waters of the Daqing oil field were studied with respect to their capacity to produce surface-active compounds in media with individual hydrocarbons, lower alcohols, and fatty acids. Aerobic saprotrophic bacteria belonging to the genera Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Rhodococcus, Dietzia, Kocuria, Gordonia, Cellulomonas, Clavibacter, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter decreased the surface tension of cultivation media from 55-63 to 28-44 mN/m. Strains of Bacillus cereus, Rhodococcus ruber, and Bacillus licheniformis produced biosurfactants most actively. Bacteria of the genera Rhodococcus, Dietzia, Kocuria, and Gordonia produced exopolysaccharides in media with hydrocarbons. Culture liquids of the strains of R. ruber and B. licheniformis exhibited oil-releasing effect. Thus, the Daqing oil field is inhabited by aerobic bacteria capable of producing effective oil-releasing agents. PMID:12751245

Nazina, T N; Sokolova, D Sh; Grigor'ian, A A; Xue, Y F; Beliaev, S S; Ivanov, M V

2003-01-01

43

Reservoir microseismicity at the Ekofisk Oil Field  

SciTech Connect

A triaxial, downhole geophone was deployed within the Ekofisk oil reservoir for monitoring ambient microseismicity as a test to determine if microearthquake signals generated from discrete shear failure of the reservoir rock could be detected. The results of the test were positive. During 104 hours of monitoring, 572 discrete events were recorded which have been identified as shear-failure microearthquakes. Reservoir microseismicity was detected at large distances (1000 m) from the monitor borehole and at rates (> 5 events per hour) which may allow practical characterization of the reservoir rock and overburden deformation induced by reservoir pressure changes.

Rutledge, J.T.; Fairbanks, T.D. [Nambe Geophysical, Inc., Santa Fe, NM (United States); Albright, J.N. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Boade, R.R. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Dangerfield, J.; Landa, G.H. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Tananger (Norway)

1994-07-01

44

Crude oil from the Samgori field  

SciTech Connect

This article analyzes the chemical composition and physical properties of petroleum from the Georgian SSR. The crude oil is light in color, light in distillation range, low-viscosity, and medium-wax, with low contents of resin-asphaltene compounds, sulfur, and metals. This petroleum is characterized by its high content of naphtha cuts with low sulfur contents, low octane numbers (owing to the high contents of paraffin hydrocarbons), and low contents of aromatics. It is determined that the best flow plan for processing the crude is either a fuel scheme or a fuel/lube scheme, depending on the specific product demands.

Dorogochinskaya, V.A.; Manovyan, A.K.; Shigapova, A.K.; Shul'zhenko, E.D.; Varshaver, V.P.

1984-04-01

45

Measuring marine oil spill extent by Markov Random Fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill of the Gulf of Mexico in the spring of 2010 was the largest accidental marine oil spill in the history of the petroleum industry. An immediate request, after the accident, was to detect the oil slick and to measure its extent: SAR images were the obvious tool to be employed for the task. This paper presents a processing scheme based on Markov Random Fields (MRF) theory. MRF theory describes the global information by probability terms involving local neighborhood representations of the SAR backscatter data. The random degradation introduced by speckle noise is dealt with a pre-processing stage which applies a nonlinear diffusion filter. Spatial context attributes are structured by the Bayes equation derived from a Maximum-A-Posteriori (MAP) estimation. The probability terms define an objective function of a MRF model whose goal is to detect contours and fine structures. The markovian segmentation problem is solved with a numerical optimization method. The scheme was applied to an Envisat/ASAR image over the Gulf of Mexico of May 9, 2010, when the oil spill was already fully developed. The final result was obtained with 51 recursion cycles, where, at each step, the segmentation consists of a 3-class label field (open sea and two oil slick thicknesses). Both the MRF model and the parameters of the stochastic optimization procedure will be provided, together with the area measurement of the two kinds of oil slick.

Moctezuma, Miguel; Parmiggiani, Flavio; Lopez Lopez, Ludwin

2014-10-01

46

Oil-field equipment in Romania. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The Industry Sector Analyses (I.S.A.) for oil field equipment contains statistical and narrative information on projected market demand, end-users, receptivity of Romanian consumers to U.S. products, the competitive situation - Romanian production, total import market, U.S. market position, foreign competition, and competitive factors, and market access - Romanian tariffs, non-tariff barriers, standards, taxes and distribution channels. The I.S.A. provides the United States industry with meaningful information regarding the Romanian market for oil field equipment.

Tinis, R.

1991-09-01

47

Geology and regional setting of Kuparuk Oil Field, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

The Kuparuk oil field is located on the Alaskan Arctic plain in the Colville-Prudhoe basin, 10 to 30 mi (16 to 48 km) west of the Prudhoe Bay field. The 24/sup 0/ API crude is similar in type to that in the Permo-Triassic reservoirs in the Prudhoe Bay field; however, it is from the Lower Cretaceous Kuparuk Formation. This reservoir is located in a basin between the Colville and Prudhoe highs. The origin of the oil is believed to be predominantly Lower sequence formations with migration occurring possibly via the Prudhoe Bay field. The dominant trapping mechanism is stratigraphic pinch-out and truncation of the reservoir at a local unconformity along the southern and western flanks of a southeast-plunging antiform. Structural dip closure exists along the northern and eastern flanks. The reservoir sandstones occur within sequences which become cleaner and coarser upward, and are thought to be shallow marine in origin with a provenance to the northeast. They are interpreted to be infrarift sediments on what is now a passive, Atlantic-type continental margin. Two of the four major lithostratigraphic units mapped within the Kuparuk Formation exhibit good reservoir characteristics and extend over an area in excess of 200 mi/sup 2/ (518 km/sup 2/). The cumulative net pay in the Kuparuk field ranges up to 90 ft, and the estimate of movable oil-in-place is 4.4 billion stock tank bbl. There is no gas cap. The field exhibits a variable oil-water contact ranging from -6,530 ft (-1,990 m) in the southeast to -6,700 ft (-2,042 m) in the north. After secondary waterflooding, the potential recoverable reserves are estimated to be about 1.0 to 1.5 billion stock tank bbl. Kuparuk field, therefore, ranks as one of the largest oil fields in the United States.

Carman, G.J.; Hardwick, P.

1983-06-01

48

Tar Creek study, Sargent oil field, Santa Clara County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Field work in the Tar Creek area of Sargent oil field was performed June 26 to 28, 2000. The Santa Clara County study area is located in Sections, 30, 31, and 32, Township 11 South, Range 4 East, M.D.B&M; and in Sections 25 and 36, Township 11 South, Range 3 East, M.D.B.&M., north and south of Tar Creek, west of Highway 101. The work was a cooperative effort of the California Department of Conservation's Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources (DOGGR), California Geological Survey (CGS), and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The purpose of the project was to map the stratigraphy and geologic structure (David Wagner, CGS); sample oil for age dating (Les Magoon, USGS); and search for undocumented wells plus conduct a GPS survey of the area (Bill Fedasko, J.P. Carnahan, and Ross Brunetti, DOGGR)

Wagner, David L.; Fedasko, Bill; Carnahan, J.R.; Brunetti, Ross; Magoon, Leslie B.; Lillis, Paul G.; Lorenson, Thomas D.; Stanley, Richard G.

2002-01-01

49

Pyrolysis of oil shales of the Turov field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The results of investigations of the chemical composition, properties, and thermotechnical characteristics of the technological sample of oil shales of the Turov field of Belarus have been given. The results of experimental works on shale pyrolysis on laboratory setups in stationary and moving beds for obtaining high-calorific energy carriers have been shown.

Falyushin, P. L.; Dobrego, K. V.; Kraiko, V. M.; Anufrieva, E. V.

2011-05-01

50

Oil  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The first site, offered by the Institute of Petroleum, is called Fossils into Fuel (1). It describes how oil and gas are formed and processed, as well as offering short quizzes on each section. The second site (2) is maintained by the Department of Energy. Visitors can learn about the history of oil use, how itâÂÂs found and extracted, and more. The next site, called Picture an Oil Well (3), is a one-page illustration and description of the workings of an oil well, offered by the California Department of Conservation. The fourth site, hosted by the Minerals Management Service, is called Stacey Visits an Offshore Oil Rig (4). It tells the story of a girl taking a field trip on an offshore oil rig and what she finds when sheâÂÂs there. The Especially for Kids Web site (5) is presented by NOAA and explores facts about the effects of oil spills. Kids can do experiments, get help writing a report, find further information on the provided additional links, and more. From the Environmental Protection Agency, the sixth site is called Oil Spill Program (6), and it also delves into the topic of oil spills. It provides information about the EPA's program for preventing, preparing for, and responding to oil spills that occur in and around inland waters of the United States. The next site, offered by How Stuff Works.com, is called How Oil Refining Works (7). Descriptions of crude oil, fractional distillation, chemical processing, and more is presented in a succinct but informative way. The last site is from The Center for Subsurface Modeling (CSM) of the Texas Institute for Computational and Applied Mathematics and is called CSMâÂÂs Picture Gallery (8). After clicking the Gallery link, visitors will find animations and images that represent CSMâÂÂs work such as oil spill simulations, discontinuous galerkin, the tyranny of scale, contaminant remediation, etc.

Brieske, Joel A.

2002-01-01

51

Reverse osmosis process successfully converts oil field brine into freshwater  

SciTech Connect

A state-of-the-art process in the San Ardo oil field converted produced brine into freshwater. The conversion process used chemical clarification, softening, filtration, and reverse osmosis (RO). After extensive testing resolved RO membrane fouling problems, the pilot plant successfully handled water with about 7,000 mg/l. of total dissolved solids, 250 mg/l. silica, and 170 mg/l. soluble oil. The treated water complies with the stringent California drinking water standard. The paper describes water reclamation, the San Ardo process, stability, reverse osmosis membrane fouling, membranes at high pH, water quality, and costs.

Tao, F.T.; Curtice, S.; Hobbs, R.D.; Sides, J.L.; Wieser, J.D. (Texaco Inc., Bellaire, TX (United States)); Dyke, C.A.; Tuohey, D. (Texaco Inc., Beacon, NY (United States)); Pilger, P.F. (Texaco E and P Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

1993-09-20

52

Giant oil fields of the Gulf Coast area  

SciTech Connect

The 134 giant fields in the Gulf Coastal area contain 29% of the total giant-field reserves. Cumulative production is 32% of the giant-field cumulative total and 20% of the United States cumulative production. Eighty-nine of the giant fields are offshore with 22% of the reserves, 11 fields are in east Texas with 24% of the reserves, and 1 field is in Florida with 1% of the reserves. In 106 of the giant fields the primary producing interval is Cenozoic with 65% of the reserves, and in 28 giant fields the producing interval is Mesozoic with 35% of the reserves. The primary producing interval is Mesozoic with 35% of the reserves. The primary producing interval in 124 giant fields consists of clastics with 91% of the reserves, in 7 fields the primary lithology is carbonates with 6% of the reserves, and in 3 giant fields the lithology is mixed clastics and carbonates. A total of 127 fields are in structural traps with all of the reserves, 4 fields are stratigraphic traps (3%) with 18% of the reserves, and 3 fields are combination traps with 1% of the reserves. Over 50 of the giant oil fields in structural traps are salt domes. The most prevalent types of giant fields in the Gulf Coastal area are onshore structural traps with Cenozoic clastics as the primary producing intervals.

Haeberle, F.R.

1993-09-01

53

Strategies for field application of foams in heavy oil reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Steam-based processes in heavy oil reservoirs that are not stabilized by gravity have poor vertical and areal conformance. This is because gases are more mobile within the pore space than liquids and steam tends to override or channel through oil in a formation. The steam-foam process which consists of adding surfactant with or without non-condensible gas to the injected steam, was developed to improve the sweep efficiency of steam drive and cyclic steam processes. The foam-forming components injected with the steam stabilize the liquid lamellae and cause some of the steam to exist as a discontinuous phase. The steam mobility (gas relative permeability) is thereby reduced resulting in an increased pressure gradient in the steam-swept region, to divert steam to the unheated interval and displace the heated oil better. The propagation of surfactant in the reservoir is determined by its thermal stability, adsorption, precipitation, and oil partitioning behaviour. The propagation of the foam is determined by the mechanisms that generate and destroyfoam in the reservoir, including gas and liquid velocities, condensation and evaporation, non-condensible gas, and the presence of oil. Strategies were developed to minimize the chemical requirements for generating effective steam-foams. Economic steam-foam processes requires that surfactant losses are minimized, foam propagation and foam stability is maximized at surfactant concentrations lower than has hereto been used in the field. This paper, based on laboratory finding and field experience, discusses the important considerations which affect the efficient application of steam-foam in the field.

Isaacs, E.E.; Ivory, J.; Law, D.H.S. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton (Canada)

1995-12-31

54

Archaeoglobus fulgidus Isolated from Hot North Sea Oil Field Waters  

PubMed Central

A hyperthermophilic sulfate reducer, strain 7324, was isolated from hot (75°C) oil field waters from an oil production platform in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea. It was enriched on a complex medium and isolated on lactate with sulfate. The cells were nonmotile, irregular coccoid to disc shaped, and 0.3 to 1.0 ?m wide. The temperature for growth was between 60 and 85°C with an optimum of 76°C. Lactate, pyruvate, and valerate plus H2 were utilized as carbon and energy sources with sulfate as electron acceptor. Lactate was completely oxidized to CO2. The cells contained an active carbon monoxide dehydrogenase but no 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activity, indicating that lactate was oxidized to CO2 via the acetyl coenzyme A/carbon monoxide dehydrogenase pathway. The cells produced small amounts of methane simultaneously with sulfate reduction. F420 was detected in the cells which showed a blue-green fluorescence at 420 nm. On the basis of morphological, physiological, and serological features, the isolate was classified as an Archaeoglobus sp. Strain 7324 showed 100% DNA-DNA homology with A. fulgidus Z, indicating that it belongs to the species A. fulgidus. Archaeoglobus sp. has been selectively enriched and immunomagnetically captured from oil field waters from three different platforms in the North Sea. Our results show that strain 7324 may grow in oil reservoirs at 70 to 85°C and contribute to hydrogen sulfide formation in this environment. Images PMID:16349231

Beeder, Janiche; Nilsen, Roald Kåre; Rosnes, Jan Thomas; Torsvik, Terje; Lien, Torleiv

1994-01-01

55

Geologic control of natural marine hydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field, California  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL Geologic control of natural marine hydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field geology and gas-phase (methane) seepage for the Coal Oil Point (COP) seep field, one of the world's largest and best-studied marine oil and gas seep fields, located over a producing hydrocarbon reservoir

Luyendyk, Bruce

56

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30

57

Earthquakes in the oil field at Rangely, Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Seven years of seismic data recorded at the Uinta Basin Observatory were searched for earthquakes originating near an oil field at Rangely, Colorado, located 65 km ESE of the observatory. Changes in the number of earthquakes recorded per year appear to correlate with changes in the quantity of fluid injected per year. Between November 1962 and January 1970, 976 earthquakes were detected near the oil field by the UBO station; 320 earthquakes were larger than magnitude 1. Richter magnitudes are estimated from both S-wave and P-wave measurements and a method based on the duration of the seismic signal is used to estimate the magnitude of the larger shocks. The two largest shocks had magnitudes of 3.4 and 3.3. The total seismic energy released was l0l7 ergs. During this same period the energy used for water injection, measured at the wellhead, was 1021 ergs.

Gibbs, James F.; Healy, John H.; Raleigh, C. Barry; Coakley, John M.

1972-01-01

58

Niger delta oil production, reserves, field sizes assessed  

SciTech Connect

The article presents tables and figures showing the reserve estimates and production histories of the 252 fields in the Niger delta, then makes forecasts of the likelihood of discoveries above a given size. The paper discusses oil reserves, development programs, drilling and 3D seismic surveying, secondary and tertiary EOR, reserve incentives, production facilities, capital spending required, Nigerian export blends, and the trend in these blends.

Thomas, D. [Thomas and Associates, Hastings (United Kingdom)

1995-11-13

59

Sulfide mineralization and magnetization, Cement oil field, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geochemical, petrographic, and rock-magnetic studies were undertaken to investigate possible sources for reported positive aeromagnetic anomalies over the Cement oil field, Oklahoma. Ferrimagnetic pyrrhotite (monoclinic, Fe7S8 ), intergrown with more-abundant, nonmagnetic pyrite (FeS2), is present in well-cutting, core, and quarry samples at Cement, and it is the only identified source of possible enhanced magnetization in rocks over the field. Magnetite, found only in well cuttings from Cement, is contamination from drilling. Magnetite was considered previously by others to be the source of magnetic anomalies at Cement.

Reynolds, Richard L.; Fishman, Neil S.; Webring, Michael W.; Wanty, Richard B.; Goldhaber, Martin B.

1989-01-01

60

Plans for first oil production revived in two Sudanese fields  

SciTech Connect

A Vancouver, British Columbia, independent and its Sudanese partner have filed a development plan with the government of Sudan to produce an initial 40,000 b/d from Heglig and Unity oil fields in Sudan. Arakis Energy Corp., and the private Sudanese company State Petroleum Corp. (SPC) want to begin the first commercial hydrocarbon production in the destitute, war torn country. They are picking up where Chevron Corp. left off after years of grappling with an ambitious, costly - and ultimately futile - effort to export crude-oil from Sudan. After finding almost 300 million bbl of oil in Sudan during the early 1980s, Chevron scuttled a $2 billion project to export 50,000 b/d of Sudanese crude in 1986. It drilled 90 wells and sank more than $1 billion into the project. But it dropped the plan, citing the 1986 collapse of oil prices and concerns over security after repeated guerrilla attacks delayed work. The paper details the project.

Not Available

1993-05-03

61

Geochemical Specific Characters of the Oil and the Origin of the Oil and Gas Fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is generally assumed that the fluid regime of the basement of ancient platforms is not associated with that of the sedimentary cover. This assumption is mainly due to the substantial time gap between the formation of the crystalline and sedimentary rocks as well as the evolutionary differences between the thermal regime of the interior and the redox potentials of fluid systems. The presence of loosely aggregated zones filled with salt-water solutions, oil or gas in the upper basement is explained by downward fluid flows from sedimentary rocks through tectonic faults into the disintegrated crystalline rocks. The formation of such zones is believed to be due to the crustal stratification due to Earth's pulsation, periodic variations of its rotational rate, hydrogenic deconsolidation, burial of the post-Early Proterozoic disintegration zones, etc. This pattern suggests that the matter and energy exchange between the Earth's spheres in the late stages of the platform development could only take place with the help of magmatic melts and the associated fluids during the tectonomagmatic cycles of the Earth's crust transformation. Gas and liquid hydrocarbon components mainly occur in crystalline basement rocks of ancient platforms penetrated to a depth of more than 3000 m due to deep degassing processes. The traces of the upward migration of fluids are sealed in the geological sequence, including the sedimentary cover, within secondary inclusions of rocks and minerals. The fluids are complex, reduced, multicomponent systems that transport lithophilous, chalcophilous and siderophilous elements. The presence of microelements in the bituminous phase of inclusions indicates that metals mainly occur in the complexes containing organic ligands. During the evolution of the fluid systems under new pressure and temperature conditions, low-solubility substances were separated out of the fluid to form hard bitumen, and the lighter components migrated into the overlying fractured and porous rocks. The high metal content of carbonaceous substances and their compositional variations governed by homogenisation temperatures of the inclusions suggest that they are not the products of the decomposition of oil fields. The constant presence of uranium in the fluid and its differentiation products allows the tracing of the systems' migration ways from the crystalline basement to oil-saturated reservoir zones of the sedimentary cover The known geochemical properties of bitumen and oil - high platinum content, specific distributions of rare earth elements, that are not characteristic of the upper crust formations, as well as 143Nd/144Nd and 87Sr/86Sr isotopic compounds, which are out of balance with the organic matter of sedimentary rocks - suggest that hydrocarbons are accumulated in the presence of cooling high-alkalinity mafite-ultramafite intrusions. This logically corresponds to the distribution of seismic anomalies and magnetic and gravity fields in the consolidated crust below the various petroleum fields (for example, South Tatarstan and Nepsky arches of the Romashkino and Verkhne-Chonskoye oil fields). The acquired geochemical and thermodynamic characteristics of the reduced fluids and their differentiation products from the crystalline basement and the sedimentary cover of the southern Siberian and eastern East European platforms indicate that these were formed outside of the sedimentary cover and that the migration was directed upwards. The analysis of the magmatic evolution on platforms reveals its alkaline trend due to the impeded degassing of magmatic sources at depth and the inflow of new doses of alkaline fluids or melts into them. Further evolution of the zones of partial melting of the substratum led, in the authors' view, to the generation of oil-forming fluids and their transportation into the Earth's upper crust. Their interaction with the surrounding rocks in turn led to the formation of oil accumulations. Thus, oil is the product of the interaction of deep, reduced fluids. Oil, graphite of the Archaean crystalline complexes a

Gottikh, Rimma; Pisotskiy, Bogdan; Plotnikova, Irina

2010-05-01

62

Genesis and formation oil and gas fields (Azerbaijan)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The large amount of material of HC isotope composition of over 330 samples allow to restore the history of oil and gas deposits formation within the South-Caspian Depression. Maps of isotope composition changes according to area extent, as well as graphs of HC distribution depending upon stratigraphic age, including rocks, graphs of isotope composition change on sampling depth were compiled for HC study and oil-gas deposits formation. Comparison of mud volcanoes gases, oil and gas fields, gas-hydrates and bottom sediments were conducted. Gases genesis according to M. Shoelle and A. James methodic were studied. Model of area paleoconstruction was studied. Two stages of formation were distinguished as a result of gases study of various forms of their manifestation (gases of mud volcanoes, oil and gas fields, gas hydrate, bottom sediments) as well as isotope gases composition distribution in area of extent including stratigraphic age of deposits, depth of sampling and application of M. Shoelle and A. James. There were determined basic ways of HC migration as well as estimated oil-gas content prospective. The first stage has begun in the underlying PS deposits and continued up to PS deposits. At this stage one various kind of tectonic fluctuations can observed. The second stage of HC formation has started from PS and characterised with a change of geodynamic conditions in region. Avalanche sedimentation, predominance of descending movements over ascending ones promoted the accumulation of thick sediments in PS age. As a result of sediments accumulation and tectonic processes (down warping) in the deep-seated basin led to the complication of thermobaric conditions in the sedimentary series. The studied chemical and HC gases isotope composition showed that basic source of oil and gas formation is located in the deep areas of central and near-flank parts of depression. HC migration has mainly occurred upward. Study of HC migration trend in time and area as well as areas of generation etc. allows to reveal some structures where there is evidence of HC accumulation with large and gigantic reserves.

Poletayev, Alexander

2010-05-01

63

A reservoir management study of a mature oil field  

E-print Network

Oil saturations calculated by computer. . 40 5. 4 Oil saturation calculated by hand 41 5. 5 Calculation of residual oil saturanon. . 44 6. 1 Volumetric study results. . . . . . . 45 6. 2 Cumulative oil production (STB). . 7. 1 Replacement well... versus Nz 7. 4 Bubble map of total oil produced to 12/94 7. 5 Historical water/oil ratio . . . 65 . . 66 8. 1 Oil viscosity at 110 degrees F versus API gravity . . . . . . . . . . 75 8. 2 Oil viscosity versus temperature. 75 8. 3 Oil/water contact...

Peruzzi, Tave

1995-01-01

64

[Pilot test on oil field wastewater biotreatment with thermophilic microorganisms].  

PubMed

The thermophilic microorganisms (50-60 degrees C) are introduced and the contact oxidation technology is adopted to treat with the high temperature effluents from an oil field in this paper, which solves a problem that the effluents need to be cooled in routine biotreatment. The results of the pilot test show that the HRT of the biotreatment system adjusted to 8-18h can make CODCr of the effluents stable at 175-263mg/L and oil content under 10mg/L on condition that the temperature of the influents keeps at 60-65 degrees C, CODCr 300-590mg/L and the quality of the oil wastewater is greatly fluctuant. Flocculating process, then, can effectively flocculate and precipitate the suspending and residual chroma pollutant from the effluents of biotreatment and CODCr in the effluents of flocculating process can reduce to 136-229mg/L. And CODCr even reduces to under 150mg/L after flowing by sand and activated carbon filtration equipments. Under the high temperature condition, furthermore, combined stuffing is an ideal carrier for the thermophilic microorganisms. PMID:15515943

Li, Da-ping; He, Xiao-hong; Tian, Chong-min; Wang, Xiao-mei; Peng, Shi-qun; Wang, Chun-ming

2004-07-01

65

Applications of water-soluble polymers in the oil field  

SciTech Connect

Water-soluble polymers commonly used in the oil field are reviewed. The properties of guar, guar derivatives, cellulose derivatives, xanthan gum, locust bean gum, starches, and synthetic polymers, especially polyacrylamides, are discussed and related to chemical structures of the polymers. Original data comparing polymer solution viscosity properties under identical conditions are presented. These data include effect of polymer concentration on solution viscosity, temperature effect on solution viscosity, viscosity in acidic solution, and polymer solution viscosity in the presence of a hemicellulase enzyme. 105 refs.

Chatterji, J.; Borchardt, J.K.

1981-11-01

66

Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus Isolated from North Sea Oil Field Reservoir Water  

PubMed Central

Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus ST22 was isolated from produced water of a North Sea oil field, on mineral medium with H(inf2)-CO(inf2) as the sole source of carbon and energy. The isolate grew at 17 to 62(deg)C, with an optimum at 60(deg)C. The pH range was 4.9 to 9.8, with optimal growth at pH 5.1 to 5.9; these characteristics reflected its habitat. Strain ST22 was quickly identified and distinguished from the type strain by immunoblotting. PMID:16535247

Nilsen, R. K.; Torsvik, T.

1996-01-01

67

Relationship between lithofacies and reservoir quality in giant oil field: Long Beach unit, Wilmington field, California  

SciTech Connect

Long Beach unit is part of the giant Wilmington oil field, Los Angeles basin. Detailed examination of six cores totaling more than 1500 m, 900 core-plug porosity and permeability measurements, and 85 grain size analyses from the major producing interval (the more than 300-m thick Range zone) provided an excellent data set for relating reservoir quality to lithofacies.

Slatt, R.M.

1989-04-01

68

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies would result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30

69

Motion, deformation and break-up of aqueous drops in oils under high electric field strengths  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the chemical and oil industries, high electrostatic fields have been applied to separate aqueous drops from an oil phase by electrocoalescence. However, very high electrostatic fields can also cause disintegration of aqueous drops which is detrimental to the overall efficiency of the electrocoalescence process. The limit above which an electrostatic field can deform and break up the drops instead

John S Eow; Mojtaba Ghadiri

2003-01-01

70

FIELD TEST KIT FOR CHARACTERIZING OIL-BRINE EFFLUENTS FROM OFFSHORE DRILLING PLATFORMS  

EPA Science Inventory

This research program was initiated to evaluate test methods for characterizing oil-brine effluents from offshore oil production platforms and to package and deliver a field test kit for on-site oil-brine analyses. After an initial laboratory evaluation and selection of test meth...

71

Genomic and Genotoxic Responses to Controlled Weathered-Oil Exposures Confirm and Extend Field  

E-print Network

Studies on Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on Native Killifish Whitney Pilcher1 , Scott Miles2 To understand the ecotoxicological impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, field studies provide a context of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on Native Killifish. PLoS ONE 9(9): e106351. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0106351

Whitehead, Andrew

72

Examination of eastern oil shale disposal problems - the Hope Creek field study  

SciTech Connect

A field-based study of problems associated with the disposal of processed Eastern oil shale was initiated in mid-1983 at a private research site in Montgomery County, Kentucky. The study (known as the Hope Creek Spent Oil Shale Disposal Project) is designed to provide information on the geotechnical, revegetation/reclamation, and leachate generation and composition characteristics of processed Kentucky oil shales. The study utilizes processed oil shale materials (retorted oil shale and reject raw oil shale fines) obtained from a pilot plant run of Kentucky oil shale using the travelling grate retort technology. Approximately 1000 tons of processed oil shale were returned to Kentucky for the purpose of the study. The study, composed of three components, is described. The effort to date has concentrated on site preparation and the construction and implementation of the field study research facilities. These endeavors are described and the project direction in the future years is defined.

Koppenaal, D.W.; Kruspe, R.R.; Robl, T.L.; Cisler, K.; Allen, D.L.

1985-02-01

73

Detection of Virgin Olive Oil Adulteration Using Low Field Unilateral NMR  

PubMed Central

The detection of adulteration in edible oils is a concern in the food industry, especially for the higher priced virgin olive oils. This article presents a low field unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for the detection of the adulteration of virgin olive oil that can be performed through sealed bottles providing a non-destructive screening technique. Adulterations of an extra virgin olive oil with different percentages of sunflower oil and red palm oil were measured with a commercial unilateral instrument, the profile NMR-Mouse. The NMR signal was processed using a 2-dimensional Inverse Laplace transformation to analyze the transverse relaxation and self-diffusion behaviors of different oils. The obtained results demonstrated the feasibility of detecting adulterations of olive oil with percentages of at least 10% of sunflower and red palm oils. PMID:24469355

Xu, Zheng; Morris, Robert H.; Bencsik, Martin; Newton, Michael I.

2014-01-01

74

PVTX characteristics of oil inclusions from Asmari formation in Kuh-e-Mond heavy oil field in Iran  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Incorporating PVT properties and compositional evolution of oil inclusions into reservoir engineering simulator protocols can enhance understanding of oil accumulation, reservoir charge history, and migration events. Microthermometry and volumetric analysis have proven to be useful tools in compositional reconstitution and PT studies of oil inclusions and were used to determine composition, thermodynamic conditions, physical properties, and gas-to-oil ratios of heavy oil samples from Asmari carbonate reservoir in Kuh-e-Mond heavy oil field in Iran. PVT properties were predicted using a PVT black-oil model, and an acceptable agreement was observed between the experiments and the simulations. Homogenization temperatures were determined using microthermometry techniques in dolomite and calcite cements of the Asmari Formation, as well. Based on the homogenization temperature data, the undersaturated hydrocarbon mixture prior to formation of the gas cap migrated with a higher gas-to-oil ratio from a source rock. According to the oil inclusion data, the onset of carbonate cementation occurred at temperatures above 45 °C and that cementation was progressive through burial diagenesis. PVT black-oil simulator results showed that the reservoir pressure and temperature were set at 100 bar and 54 °C during the initial stages of oil migration. Compositional modeling implies that primary and secondary cracking in source rocks were responsible for retention of heavy components and migration of miscible three-phase flow during hydrocarbon evolution. The PT evolution of the petroleum inclusions indicates changes in thermodynamic properties and mobility due to phenomena such as cracking, mixing, or/and transport at various stages of oil migration.

Shariatinia, Zeinab; Haghighi, Manouchehr; Shafiei, Ali; Feiznia, Sadat; Zendehboudi, Sohrab

2014-12-01

75

Chemically bonded phosphate ceramic sealant formulations for oil field applications  

DOEpatents

A sealant for an oil or geothermal well capable of setting within about 3 to about 6 hours at temperatures less than about 250.degree. F. for shallow wells less than about 10,000 feet and deep wells greater than about 10,000 feet having MgO present in the range of from about 9.9 to about 14.5%, KH.sub.2PO.sub.4 present in the range of from about 29.7 to about 27.2%, class C fly ash present in the range of from about 19.8 to about 36.3%, class F fly ash present in the range of from about 19.8 to about 0%, boric acid or borax present in the range of from about 0.39 to about 1.45%, and water present in the range of from about 20.3 to about 21.86% by weight of the sealant.A method of sealing wells is disclosed as are compositions for very high temperature wells is disclosed as is a composition for treating oil field wastes.

Wagh, Arun S. (Naperville, IL); Jeong, Seung-Young (Taejon, KR); McDaniel, Richard (Crest Hill, IL)

2008-10-21

76

A novel associating polymer for oil field water clarification application  

SciTech Connect

A cationic hydrophobically associating terpolymer, C-RAM, based on methacrylamidopropyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (C), t=octyl acrylamide (R), and acrylamide (Am) has been synthesized by an inverse emulsion polymerization technique. The finished product shows good stability, high total solids, and high molecular weight at low viscosity. This product has been developed primarily for oily water clarification in the oil field. Factors affecting product performance such as charge density, hydrophobe level, molecular weight, reaction conditions, and inverting surfactants have been investigated and optimized. Extended full scale Wemco plant test results show that this product can produce cleaner water at two to three times lower treat rate than currently used products. The plant filter backwash frequency is also significantly reduced thus resulting in a lower maintenance cost of the water treating plant.

Yang, H.W.; Pacansky, T.J.; Jacques, D.M.

1988-05-01

77

Alkanes in benthic organisms from the Buccaneer oil field  

SciTech Connect

About 200 g per day of alkanes are present in brine discharged from each of two production platforms in the Buccaneer oil field in the NW Gulf of Mexico. These alkanes disperse rapidly in the water column, so that seawater concentrations of petroleum alkanes in this region are generally very low. They can be taken up to some extent by plankton, fish, and barnacles, but the petroleum alkane concentrations in these organisms are also relatively low. The largest pool of petroleum alkanes is in the surficial sediments, where concentrations of up to 25 ppM are observed, with concentration gradients extending more than 20 m from the production platforms. Organisms are examined which are exposed to these sediments and, for comparison, other specimens from control sites around structures from which there are no discharges.

Middleditch, B.S.; Basile, B.

1980-06-01

78

Evidence for a palaeo-oil column and alteration of residual oil in a gas-condensate field: Integrated oil inclusion and experimental results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the Phuong Dong gas condensate field, Cuu Long Basin, Vietnam, hydrocarbon inclusions in quartz trapped a variety of petroleum fluids in the gas zone. Based on the attributes of the oil inclusion assemblages (fluorescence colour of the oil, bubble size, presence of bitumen), the presence of a palaeo-oil column is inferred prior to migration of gas into the reservoir. When a palaeo-oil column is displaced by gas, a residual volume fraction of oil remains in pores. If the gas does not completely mix with the oil, molecular partitioning between the residual oil and the new gas charge may change the composition and properties of the residual oil (gas stripping or gas washing). To simulate this phenomenon in the laboratory, we sealed small amounts of crude oil (42 and 30 °API) and excess pure gas (methane, ethane, or propane) in fused silica capillary capsules (FSCCs), with and without water. These mixtures were characterized with the same methods used to characterize the fluid inclusions, heating and cooling stage microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, synchrotron FT-IR, and Raman spectroscopy. At room temperature, mixtures of ethane and propane with the 30 °API oil formed a new immiscible fluorescent liquid phase with colour that is visually more blue than the initial oil. The fluorescence of the original oil phase shifted to yellow or disappeared with formation of semi-solid residues. The blue-shift of the fluorescence of the immiscible phases and strong CH stretching bands in FT-IR spectra are consistent with stripping of hydrocarbon molecules from the oil. In experiments in FSCCs with water solid residues are common. At elevated temperature, reproducing geologic reservoir conditions, the fluorescence changes and therefore the molecular fractionation are enhanced. However, the precipitation of solid residues is responsible of more complex changes. Mixing experiments with the 42 °API oil do not form a new immiscible hydrocarbon liquid although the fluorescence displays a similar yellow shift when gas is added. Solid residues rarely form in mixtures with 42 °API oil. FT-IR spectra suggest that the decrease of fluorescence intensity of the original oil at short wavelengths to be due to the partitioning of low molecular weight aromatic molecules into the vapour phase and/or the new immiscible liquid phase. The decrease of fluorescence intensity at long wavelengths appears to be due to loss of high molecular weight aromatics during precipitation of solid residues by desorption of aromatics and resins from asphaltenes. Desorption of low molecular weight aromatics and resins from asphaltenes during precipitation can also increase the fluorescence intensity at short wavelengths of the residual oil. Water clearly affects the precipitation of semi-solid residues from the oil phase of the lowest API gravity oil. The change of hydrocarbon phase(s) in UV-visible fluorescence and FT-IR enclosed within the FSCCs were compared with the fluorescence patterns of natural fluid inclusions at Phuong Dong gas condensate field. The experimental results support the concept of gas-washing of residual oil and are consistent with the oil inclusion attributes from the current gas zone at Phuong Dong field. The hydrocarbon charge history of the fractured granite reservoir is interpreted to result from the trapping of residual oil after drainage of a palaeo-oil column by gas.

Bourdet, Julien; Burruss, Robert C.; Chou, I.-Ming; Kempton, Richard; Liu, Keyu; Hung, Nguyen Viet

2014-10-01

79

Tax effects upon oil field development in Venezuela  

E-print Network

Important reforms have been made to the oil sector tax code in Venezuela. Given its diversity of oil resources, there was a concern that some resources were not being exploited because of the structure of the tax code. ...

Manzano, Osmel

2000-01-01

80

Unusual high acidity oils from the Great Palogue Field, Melut Basin, Sudan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crude oils produced from the Great Palogue Field in the Melut Basin, Sudan display unusually high total acid number values (TAN, up to 10.4mg KOH\\/g oil). This field was discovered in 2002 and produces oils of highly variable (15–31°) API gravity. The main production comes from the Paleogene Samma and Yabus Formations, with the Upper Cretaceous Melut Formation being a

Lirong Dou; Dingsheng Cheng; Maowen Li; Kunye Xiao; Buqing Shi; Zhi Li

2008-01-01

81

The floating oil pool - A unique trapping mechanism at Kern River field  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geologic reevaluation of the giant Kern River field, a 4 billion bbl oil accumulation, suggests a nontrapping oil emplacement mechanism not previously described in the literature. The field produces 12-14° API oil from a shallow, thick sequence of stacked fluvial sands situated across a homocline that dips 4-5° southwest. Migration of hydrocarbons generated in deeply buried Miocene shales ended in

E. J. Kodl; J. C. Eacman

1990-01-01

82

Oil field effluent water treatment for safe disposal by electroflotation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The separation of finely dispersed oil from oil–water emulsion was carried out in an electroflotation cell which has a set of perforated aluminium electrodes. The effect of operating parameters on the performance of batch cell were examined. The parameters investigated are pH, voltage, oil concentration, flotation time, and salinity. The batch experiments have been conducted to optimize electrical input in

Rupesh M. Bande; B. Prasad; I. M. Mishra; Kailas L. Wasewar

2008-01-01

83

CUMULATIVE IMPACTS OF OIL FIELDS ON NORTHERN ALASKAN LANDSCAPES (JOURNAL VERSION)  

EPA Science Inventory

Proposed further developments on Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain raise questions about cumulative effects on arctic tundra ecosystems of development of multiple large oil fields. Maps of historical changes to the Prudhoe Bay Oil Field show indirect impacts can lag behind planned de...

84

Air injection project breathes fire into aging West Hackberry oil field  

Microsoft Academic Search

Amoco, the DOE and LSU seek more oil from Gulf Coast salt dome fields with air injection technique. The West Hackberry Field in Louisiana is a water-driven reservoir. By injecting air into the high-pressure, high-temperature reservoir rock, the water is backed down, allowing the oil to drain off the steeply dipped rock.

Duey

1996-01-01

85

Air injection project breathes fire into aging West Hackberry oil field  

SciTech Connect

Amoco, the DOE and LSU seek more oil from Gulf Coast salt dome fields with air injection technique. The West Hackberry Field in Louisiana is a water-driven reservoir. By injecting air into the high-pressure, high-temperature reservoir rock, the water is backed down, allowing the oil to drain off the steeply dipped rock.

Duey, R.

1996-02-01

86

Crude oil bioremediation field experiment in the Sea of Japan.  

PubMed

Experimental bioremediation of crude oil was conducted for approximately 3 months in the intertidal zone of the Sea of Japan, Hyogo Prefecture. Artificial mixtures of weathered Arabian light crude oil and sand taken from the experimental site were wrapped in polyester net envelopes. The envelopes were placed in drum-shaped acrylic vessels with perforated sides to facilitate seawater exchange. The vessels were laid in the intertidal area. Slow release nitrogen and phosphorus synthetic fertilizer granules were added to the oil-sand mixtures in three different amounts. Some oil-sand mixtures were unfertilized controls. The oil-sand mixtures were periodically sampled and changes in the composition of the residual oils were monitored. Oil samples were subjected to gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry for analysis of some representative semi-volatile aliphatic and aromatic compounds. All values for each analyte were normalized against that of hopane to evaluate the extent of oil biodegradation. Significant increases in the concentrations of both nitrogen and phosphorus were found in the fertilized sections in accordance with the amounts of added fertilizers. Although significant natural attenuation of oil was observed in the unfertilized sections, fertilization stimulated the degradation rate of the oil in the early stage of the experimental term. The extent of the oil biodegradation increased as the amount of added fertilizer increased. However, the final degradation efficiencies for each oil component in the fertilized sections were not significantly different from those in the unfertilized sections, and the degradation of each oil component had almost ceased after 6 weeks. We conclude that excessive amounts of macronutrients are required to accelerate oil biodegradation and that fertilization is only effective in the early stages. PMID:12787600

Maki, Hideaki; Hirayama, Noriko; Hiwatari, Takehiko; Kohata, Kunio; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Watanabe, Masataka; Yamasaki, Fumio; Furuki, Masakazu

2003-01-01

87

Microseismic monitoring of the Chaveroo oil field, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Microseismicity was monitored in the Chaveroo oil field in southeastern New Mexico during, and for 5 weeks following, a pressurized stimulation of a well being prepared as an injector for a water flood operation. Three-thousand barrels of water were injected into the reservoir over a 5.5-hour period. Little seismicity was detected during the stimulation. Intermittent monitoring over a 5-week period following the injection indicated detectable seismicity occurring with activity levels varying in time. The most active period recorded occurred just after production resumed in the immediate area of the monitor well. Mapping the microearthquakes using the hodogram technique indicates the events occur along linear trends which corroborate known structural trends of the field. Seismicity trends were defined both parallel and perpendicular to the regionally defined maximum horizontal stress direction. Seventy-three good quality events were recorded, in a cumulative 24 hour period, from which structures were mapped up to 3000 ft from the monitor well. 13 refs., 9 figs.

Rutledge, J.T.; Albright, J.N.

1990-02-06

88

Basement reservoir in Zeit Bay oil field, Gulf of Suez  

SciTech Connect

Fractured basement, one of the most important reservoirs of Zeit Bay field, contains nearly one-third of oil in place of the field. The flow rates per well vary from 700 to 9,000 BOPD. Due to its well-established production potential, 60% of the wells for the development of the field were drilled down to basement. The Zeit Bay basement consists of granitic rocks of pegmatitic to coarse porphyritic texture and has equal proportions of alkali feldspars. Dykes of various compositions are present, traversing the granite at different intervals. Dykes include aplite, microsyenite, diabase and lamprophyre. The last two pertain to the post-granitic dykes of late Proterozoic age. The main granitic pluton is related to one of the final stages of the tectonic-magmatic cycle of the Arabo-Nubian shield. The Zeit Bay area was a significant paleohigh until the Miocene, hence its structural picture is very complicated due to the impact of different tectonic movements from the late Precambrian to Cenozoic. The resulting structural elements were carefully investigated and statistically analyzed to decipher the influence of various tectonic events. The presence of high porosity in some intervals and low porosity in others could be tied to the presence of new fractures and the nature of cementing minerals. The relation of mineralized fractures and their depths lead to zonation of porous layers in the granitic pluton. Diagenetic processes on the granitic body and the alteration/resedimentation of the diagenetic products controlled the magnitude and amplitude of the porosity layers. A model has been constructed to illustrate the changes in the primary rock texture and structure with sequential diagenetic processes, taking into consideration the fracture distribution and their opening affinities as related to their depths.

Zahran, I.; Askary, S.

1988-02-01

89

Basement reservoir in Zeit Bay oil field, Gulf of Suez  

SciTech Connect

Fractured basement, one of the most important reservoirs of Zeit Bay field, contains nearly one-third of oil in place of the field. The flow rates per well vary from 700 to 9,000 BOPD. Due to its well-established production potential, 60% of the wells for the development of the field were drilled down to basement. The Zeit Bay basement consist of granitic rocks of pegmatitic to coarse porphyritic texture and has equal proportions of alkali feldspars. Dykes of various compositions are present, traversing the granite at different intervals. Dykes include aplite, microsyenite, diabase and lamprophyre. The last two pertain to the post-granitic dykes of later Proterozoic age. The main granitic luton is related to one of the final stages of the tectonic-magmatic cycle of the Arabo-Nubian sheild. The Zeit Bay area was a significant paleohigh until the Miocene, hence its structural picture is very complicated due to the impact of different tectonic movements from the late Precambrian to Cenozoic. The resulting structural elements were carefully investigated and statistically analyzed to decipher the influence of various tectonic events. The presence of high porosity in some intervals and low porosity in others could be tied to the presence of new fractures and the nature of cementing minerals. The relation of mineralized fractures and their depths lead to zonation of porous layers in the granitic pluton. Diagenetic processes on the granitic body and the alternation/resedimentation of the diagenetic products controlled the magnitude and amplitude of the porosity layers.

Zahran, I.; Askary, S.

1988-01-01

90

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California. This is realized through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It is hoped that the successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively insufficient because of several producability problems which are common in SBC reservoir; inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves.

City of Long Beach; David K.Davies and Associates; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California

1999-06-25

91

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies will result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs.

Scott Hara

2001-06-27

92

INCREASED OIL RECOVERY FROM MATURE OIL FIELDS USING GELLED POLYMER TREATMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of a three-year research program aimed at reducing barriers to the widespread use of gelled polymer treatments by (1) developing methods to predict gel behavior during placement in matrix rock and fractures, (2) determining the persistence of permeability reduction after gel placement, and (3) developing methods to design production well treatments to control water production. The work focused on the gel system composed of polyacrylamide and chromium acetate. The molar mass of the polymer was about six million. Chromium(III) acetate reacted and formed crosslinks between polymer molecules. The crosslinked polymer molecules, or pre-gel aggregates, combine and grow to eventually form a 3-dimensional gel. A fundamental study to characterize the formation and growth of pre-gel aggregates was conducted. Two methods, flow field-flow fractionation (FFFF) and multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) were used. Studies using FFFF were inconclusive. Data taken using MALLS showed that at the gel time the average molar mass of gel aggregates increased by a factor of about three while the average size increase was approximately 50%. Increased acetate concentration in the gelant increases the gel time. The in situ performance of an added-acetate system was investigated to determine the applicability for in-depth treatments. Increased acetate concentrations delayed the development of increased flow resistance during gelant injection in short sandpacks. The development of increased flow resistance (in situ gelation) was extended from 2 to 34 days by increasing the acetate-to-chromium ratio from 38 to 153. In situ gelation occurred at a time that was approximately 22% of the bulk gelation time. When carbonate rocks are treated with gel, chromium retention in the rock may limit in-depth treatment. Chromium retention due to precipitation was investigated by flowing chromium acetate solutions through carbonate rock. Chromium precipitated faster in the rocks than in beaker experiments at similar conditions. A mathematical model previously developed fit the precipitation data reasonably well. The stability of gels when subjected to stress was investigated by experiments with gels placed in tubes and in laboratory-scale fractures. Rupture pressures for gels placed in small diameter tubes were correlated with the ratio of tube length to tube ID. In fractures, fluid leakoff from the fracture to adjacent matrix rock affected gel formation and gel stability in a positive way. Disproportionate permeability reduction (DPR) was studied in unconsolidated sandpacks and in Berea sandstone cores. A conceptual model was developed to explain the presence of DPR. The effect of a pressure gradient, imposed by injection of oil or brine, on the permeability of gel-treated cores was investigated. DPR increased significantly as the pressure gradient was decreased. The magnitude of the pressure gradient had a much larger effect on water permeability than on oil permeability.

G.P. Willhite; D.W. Green; C.S. McCool

2003-05-01

93

Copper removal from oil-field brine by coprecipitation.  

PubMed

The present study aims at investigation of copper removal from oil-field brine by coprecipitation process. The produced brine containing heavy metals is usually returned to the reservoir for water flooding or is discarded to the surroundings. Therefore, surface waters or underground waters may be polluted due to probable contact to these discarded waters. Removal experiments were carried out at room temperature in a bench-scale crystallizer equipped with a draft tube. In order to gain an insight into the influence of soluble compounds in the industrial natural brine on the precipitation process, some comparative experiments were performed both on a sample of natural brine and on a synthetic simulated brine in the absence of natural impurities. A metal removal practice by coprecipitation of copper through CaCO(3) precipitates induced by reaction of Na(2)CO(3) and CaCl(2) reduced the copper concentration (Cu(2+)) from 0.27 ppm in the synthetic brine to 0.06 ppm. This removal of 78% required only 1g of precipitate per 0.15 mg copper metal. Analysis of the experimental results suggested that about 5% of the copper removal from the synthetic brine was through the mechanism of incorporation into the crystal lattice, and around 95% was through the adsorption on the crystal faces. PMID:19157701

Khosravi, Jafar; Alamdari, Abdolmohammad

2009-07-30

94

Uncertainty of oil field GHG emissions resulting from information gaps: a Monte Carlo approach.  

PubMed

Regulations on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from liquid fuel production generally work with incomplete data about oil production operations. We study the effect of incomplete information on estimates of GHG emissions from oil production operations. Data from California oil fields are used to generate probability distributions for eight oil field parameters previously found to affect GHG emissions. We use Monte Carlo (MC) analysis on three example oil fields to assess the change in uncertainty associated with learning of information. Single factor uncertainties are most sensitive to ignorance about water-oil ratio (WOR) and steam-oil ratio (SOR), resulting in distributions with coefficients of variation (CV) of 0.1-0.9 and 0.5, respectively. Using a combinatorial uncertainty analysis, we find that only a small number of variables need to be learned to greatly improve on the accuracy of MC mean. At most, three pieces of data are required to reduce bias in MC mean to less than 5% (absolute). However, the parameters of key importance in reducing uncertainty depend on oil field characteristics and on the metric of uncertainty applied. Bias in MC mean can remain after multiple pieces of information are learned, if key pieces of information are left unknown. PMID:25110115

Vafi, Kourosh; Brandt, Adam R

2014-09-01

95

Production and Evaluation of Biodiesel from Field Pennycress (Thlaspi Arvense L.) Oil  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Field pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.) oil is evaluated for the first time as a potential feedstock for biodiesel production. Biodiesel was obtained in 82 wt % yield by a standard transesterification procedure with methanol and sodium methoxide catalyst at 60 deg C and an alcohol to oil ratio of 6:1...

96

Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2011 Oil Field Spill Containment System  

E-print Network

PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2011 Oil Field Spill Containment System Overview Fluids associated with Oil and Gas drilling and fracturing operations must be contained at well to contain spills but their mats are very expensive, difficult to install, and most importantly, not leak

Demirel, Melik C.

97

Energy Conservation and Efficiency Improvement for the Electric Motors Operating in U.S. Oil Fields  

E-print Network

energy use in the U.S. is comparable to all auto energy use. Electric motors are the largest users of energy in all mineral extraction activities. In oil fields, electric motors drive the pumping units used for lifting the oil and water to the surface...

Ula, S.; Cain, W.; Nichols, T.

98

Petroleum, oil field waters, and authigenic mineral assemblages: Are they in metastable equilibrium in hydrocarbon reservoirs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the presence of carboxylic acids and carboxylate anions in oil field waters is commonly attributed to the thermal maturation of kerogen or bacterial degradation of hydrocarbons during water-washing of petroleum in relatively shallow reservoirs, they may have also been produced in deeper reservoirs by the hydrolysis of hydrocarbons in petroleum at the oil-water interface. To test this hypothesis, calculations

H. C. Helgeson; A. M. Knox; C. E. Owens; E. L. Shock

1993-01-01

99

Subzone Redevelopment of the Long Beach Unit, Wilmington Oil Field: A Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

A major program of infill subzone redevelopment to improve vertical waterflood conformance has been successful in materially improving oil recovery performance in the Long Beach Unit of the Wilmington oil field, CA. The well completions in individual subzones or layers will result in greatly improved future reservoir management opportunities through individual subzone or layer monitoring and control.

J. A. Robertson; J. A. Blesener

1987-01-01

100

Subzone redevelopment of the Long Beach Unit, Wilmington oil field: A case study  

SciTech Connect

A major program of infill subzone redevelopment to improve vertical waterflood conformance has been successful in materially improving oil recovery performance in the Long Beach Unit of the Wilmington oil field, CA. The well completions in individual subzones or layers will result in greatly improved future reservoir management opportunities through individual subzone or layer monitoring and control.

Robertson, J.A.; Blesener, J.A.; Hoo, S.S.

1987-10-01

101

Geology and geothermal origin of Grant Canyon and Bacon Flat Oil Fields, Railroad Valley, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Eastern Nevada's Grant Canyon and Bacon Flat oil fields show strong evidence of formation in a still-active, moderate-temperature geothermal system. Modern manifestations of this system include unusually elevated oil-reservoir temperature at shallow depth, 116-122[degrees]C at 1.1-1.6 km, and dilute Na-HCO[sub 3]Cl thermal waters directly associated with hot oil. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions indicate that these thermal waters are meteoric in origin, but were probably recharged prior to the Holocene (before 10 ka). The waters apparently ascended to oil-reservoir elevations after deep heating in response to the normal regional thermal gradient; there is no evidence for a modern magmatic heat source. The beginning of oil-reservoir evolution at both fields is recorded by late-stage, fracture-filling quartz in the vuggy, brecciated, Paleozoic dolostone reservoir rocks. Oil and aqueous solutions were trapped as fluid inclusions in the quartz at temperatures comparable to those now prevailing in the reservoirs. Present day and fluid-inclusion temperatures define essentially coincident isothermal profiles through and beneath the oil-reservoir interval, a phenomenon consistent with near-constant convective heat transfer since inception of the geothermal system. Some basin and range oil fields have arisen as valuable byproducts of actively circulating geothermal systems and blending this concept into current exploration stratigies could hasten discovery of the 100 mbbl fields many geologists believe remain to be found in this region. 100 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

Hulen, J.B. (Univ. of Utah Research Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Goff, F. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)); Ross, J.R. (Apache Corporation, Denver, CO (United States)); Bortz, L.C. (Advantage Resources, Denver, CO (United States)); Bereskin, S.R. (Terra Tek, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

1994-04-01

102

An Analysis of the Distribution and Economics of Oil Fields for Enhanced Oil Recovery-Carbon Capture and Storage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rising carbon dioxide emissions contributing to climate change has lead to the examination of potential ways to mitigate the environmental impact. One such method is through the geological sequestration of carbon (CCS). Although there are several different forms of geological sequestration (i.e. Saline Aquifers, Oil and Gas Reservoirs, Unminable Coal Seams) the current projects are just initiating the large scale-testing phase. The lead entry point into CCS projects is to combine the sequestration with enhanced oil recovery (EOR) due to the improved economic model as a result of the oil recovery and the pre-existing knowledge of the geological structures. The potential scope of CCS-EOR projects throughout the continental United States in terms of a systematic examination of individual reservoir storage potential has not been examined. Instead the majority of the research completed has centered on either estimating the total United States storage potential or the potential of a single specific reservoir. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between oil recovery, carbon dioxide storage and cost during CCS-EOR. The characteristics of the oil and gas reservoirs examined in this study from the Nehring Oil and Gas Database were used in the CCS-EOR model developed by Sean McCoy to estimate the lifting and storage costs of the different reservoirs throughout the continental United States. This allows for an examination of both technical and financial viability of CCS-EOR as an intermediate step for future CCS projects in other geological formations. One option for mitigating climate change is to store industrial CO2 emissions in geologic reservoirs as part of a process known as carbon capture and storage (CCS). There is general consensus that large-scale deployment of CCS would best be initiated by combining geologic sequestration with enhanced oil recovery (EOR), which can use CO2 to improve production from declining oil fields. Revenues from the produced oil could help offset the current high costs of CCS. The cumulative potential of CCS-EOR in the continental U.S. has been evaluated in terms of both CO2 storage capacity and additional oil production. This thesis examines the same potential, but on a reservoir-by-reservoir basis. Reservoir properties from the Nehring Oil and Gas Database are used as inputs to a CCS-EOR model developed by McCoy (YR) to estimate the storage capacity, oil production and CCS-EOR costs for over 10,000 oil reservoirs located throughout the continental United States. We find that 86% of the reservoirs could store ?1 y or CO2 emissions from a single 500 MW coal-fired power plant (i.e., 3 Mtons CO2). Less than 1% of the reservoirs, on the other hand, appear capable of storing ?30 y of CO2 emissions from a 500 MW plan. But these larger reservoirs are also estimated to contain 48% of the predicted additional oil that could be produced through CCS-EOR. The McCoy model also predicts that the reservoirs will on average produce 4.5 bbl of oil for each ton of sequestered CO2, a ratio known as the utilization factor. This utilization factor is 1.5 times higher that arrived at by the U.S. Department of Energy, and leads to a cumulative production of oil for all the reservoirs examined of ˜183 billion barrels along with a cumulative storage capacity of 41 Mtons CO2. This is equivalent to 26.5 y of current oil consumption by the nation, and 8.5 y of current coal plant emissions.

Hall, Kristyn Ann

103

Programed oil generation of the Zubair Formation, Southern Iraq oil fields: results from Petromod software modeling and geochemical analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

1D petroleum system modeling was performed on wells in each of four oil fields in South Iraq, Zubair (well Zb-47), Nahr Umr\\u000a (well NR-9), West Qurna (well WQ-15 and 23), and Majnoon (well Mj-8). In each of these fields, deposition of the Zubair Formation\\u000a was followed by continuous burial, reaching maximum temperatures of 100°C (equivalent to 0.70%Ro) at depths of

Thamer Khazal Al-Ameri; Janet Pitman; Madhat E. Naser; John Zumberge; Hiba Adil Al-Haydari

104

Field aided characterization of a sandstone reservoir: Arroyo Grande Oil Field, California, USA  

SciTech Connect

The Arroyo Grande Oil Field in Central California has been productive since 1905 from the miopliocene Edna member of the Pismo formation. The Edna member is a massive poorly consolidated sandstone unit with an average porosity of 0.2 and a permeability of 1000-5000 md; the producing levels are shallow, 100 to 500 m from the ground surface. Excellent surface exposures of the same formation along road cuts across the field and above the reservoir provide an opportunity to study reservoir rocks at the surface and to relate fracture and permeability distribution obtained from cores to folds and faults observed in outcrops. We mapped in outcrops the major structures of the oil field and determine the statistical distribution and orientation of small faults (deformation bands) that have been observed both in cores and outcrop. The relation between deformation bands and major structures has also been characterized with detailed mapping. By using synthetic logs it is possible to determine the log signature of structural heterogeneities such as deformation bands in sandstone; these faults cause a neutron porosity drop respect to the host rock in the order of 1-4%. Image analysis has been used to determine the petrophysical properties of the sandstone in outcrop and in cores; permeability is three orders of magnitude lower in faults than in the host rock and capillary pressure is 1-2 orders of magnitude larger in faults than in the host rock. Faults with tens of meters offsets are associated with an high density of deformation bands (10 to 250 m{sup -1}) and with zones of cement precipitation up to 30 m from the fault. By combining well and field data, we propose a structural model for the oil field in which high angle reverse faults with localized deformation bands control the distribution of the hydrocarbons on the limb of a syncline, thereby explaining the seemingly unexpected direction of slope of the top surface of the reservoir which was inferred by well data only.

Antonellini, M.; Aydin, A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1995-08-01

105

Detailed layer studies in the East Wilmington oil field  

SciTech Connect

Recent detailed studies have been made of the Pliocene and upper Miocene sequences in the East Wilmington oil field. Roughly 1,200 vertical ft of section (Ranger Zone) were evaluated in fault blocks VI and VII. The sequence was broken into 40 to 50 correlatable units (sub-subzones) based on electric logs. Twelve horizons (subzones) were used to guide the correlation work and aid in the construction of true stratigraphic logs. The TST logs were used to make many north-south and east-west cross sections. This provided good loop control for correlations. Over eight hundred wells were evaluated in this way. Structure maps, isochore maps, and percent sand maps were constructed. The primary purpose of this work was to determine the net pay for the Ranger zone. This work has found excellent secondary applications including definition of flow units, clarification of stratigraphic sequencing, and depositional history. The depositional history involved the sedimentation and transport of lobed deposits and sheet or draped deposits. The Upper Miocene sands are intercalated with shales and siltstone. These thin turbidites are reasonably wide spread and show some lenticularity but not the lobate lenticularity that is common in the Pliocene sands. The Pliocene section is dominated by large lobate fans. These lenticular depositional units show much about sediment transport. The lobes lie laterally between each other with each successive lob filling the low area adjacent to or between the earlier lobes. Balancing of the deposited sand results. Knowledge of the lobed nature of the sands and specific localized characteristics helps in the design of injection programs that will greatly improve the sweep efficiencies.

Clarke, D.D. (City of Long Beach, CA (United States))

1991-02-01

106

Enhancement of the TORIS data base of Appalachian basin oil fields. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System, or TORIS, was developed by the Department of Energy in the early 1980s with a goal of accounting for 70% of the nation`s original oil in place (OOIP). More than 3,700 oil reservoirs were included in TORIS, but coverage in the Appalachian basin was poor. This TORIS enhancement project has two main objectives: to increase the coverage of oil fields in the Appalachian basin; and to evaluate data for reservoirs currently in TORIS, and to add, change or delete data as necessary. Both of these objectives have been accomplished. The geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia have identified 113 fields in the Appalachian basin to be included in TORIS that collectively contained 80% of the original oil in place in the basin. Furthermore, data in TORIS at the outset of the project was checked and additional data were added to the original 20 TORIS oil fields. This final report is organized into four main sections: reservoir selection; evaluation of data already in TORIS; industry assistance; and data base creation and validation. Throughout the report the terms pool and reservoir may be used in reference to a single zone of oil accumulation and production within a field. Thus, a field is composed of one or more pools at various stratigraphic levels. These pools or reservoirs also are referred to as pay sands that may be individually named sandstones within a formation or group.

NONE

1996-01-31

107

Inversion of field-scale partitioning tracer response for characterizing oil saturation distribution: a streamline approach  

E-print Network

through 13 production wells. We first determined the permeability distribution in the field by matching conservative tracer responses and then matched partitioning tracer responses to determine oil saturation distribution. The results of our work agree...

Iliassov, Pavel Alexandrovich

2012-06-07

108

37. SAR2, SHOWING OIL CIRCUIT BREAKERS (ABOVE) AND GENERATOR FIELD ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

37. SAR-2, SHOWING OIL CIRCUIT BREAKERS (ABOVE) AND GENERATOR FIELD COIL CONTROL RHEOSTATS (BELOW). SCE negative no. 10331, November 1, 1923. Photograph by G. Haven Bishop. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

109

The space-time structure of oil and gas field growth in a complex depositional system  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Shortly after the discovery of an oil and gas field, an initial estimate is usually made of the ultimate recovery of the field. With the passage of time, this initial estimate is almost always revised upward. The phenomenon of the growth of the expected ultimate recovery of a field, which is known as "field growth," is important to resource assessment analysts for several reasons. First, field growth is the source of a large part of future additions to the inventory of proved reserves of crude oil and natural gas in most petroliferous areas of the world. Second, field growth introduces a large negative bias in the forecast of the future rates of discovery of oil and gas fields made by discovery process models. In this study, the growth in estimated ultimate recovery of oil and gas in fields made up of sandstone reservoirs formed in a complex depositional environment (Frio strand plain exploration play) is examined. The results presented here show how the growth of oil and gas fields is tied directly to the architectural element of the shoreline processes and tectonics that caused the deposition of the individual sand bodies hosting the producible hydrocarbon. ?? 1994 Oxford University Press.

Drew, L.J.; Mast, R.F.; Schuenemeyer, J.H.

1994-01-01

110

IMPROVED APPROACHES TO DESIGN OF POLYMER GEL TREATMENTS IN MATURE OIL FIELDS: FIELD DEMONSTRATION IN DICKMAN FIELD, NESS COUNTY, KANSAS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of the one-year project entitled ''Improved Approaches to Design of Polymer Gel Treatments in Mature Oil Fields: Field Demonstration in Dickman Field, Ness County, Kansas''. The project was a 12-month collaboration of Grand Mesa Operating Company (a small independent), TIORCO Inc. (a company focused on improved recovery technology) and the University of Kansas. The study undertook tasks to determine an optimum polymer gel treatment design in Mississippian reservoirs, demonstrate application, and evaluate the success of the program. The project investigated geologic and engineering parameters and cost-effective technologies required for design and implementation of effective polymer gel treatment programs in the Mississippian reservoir in the Midcontinent. The majority of Mississippian production in Kansas occurs at or near the top of the Mississippian section just below the regional sub-Pennsylvanian unconformity and karst surface. Dickman Field with the extremely high water cuts and low recovery factors is typical of Mississippian reservoirs. Producibility problems in these reservoirs include inadequate reservoir characterization, drilling and completion design problems, and most significantly extremely high water cuts and low recovery factors that place continued operations at or near their economic limits. Geologic, geophysical and engineering data were integrated to provide a technical foundation for candidate selection and treatment design. Data includes core, engineering data, and 3D seismic data. Based on technical and economic considerations a well was selected for gel-polymer treatment (Grand Mesa Operating Company Tilley No.2). The treatment was not successful due to the small amount of polymer that could be injected. Data from the initial well and other candidates in the demonstration area was analyzed using geologic, geophysical and engineering data. Based on the results of the treatment and the integrated reservoir characterization it was determined that a second polymer-gel treatment could not be justified. The Mississippian reservoir at Dickman Field is much more complex than originally anticipated with numerous reservoir compartments and potential attic oil beneath the irregular Mississippian karst. It appears that remaining oil in place could be best recovered using improved oil recovery techniques such as target infill drilling and horizontal wells.

Ronald Fowler

2004-11-30

111

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The hope is that successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs, including: (1) Development of three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic reservoir simulation models--thermal or otherwise--to aid in reservoir management of the steamflood and post-steamflood phases and subsequent development work. (2) Development of computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid reservoir surveillance and operations. (3) Perform detailed studies of the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (4) Testing and proposed application of a novel alkaline-steam well completion technique for the containment of the unconsolidated formation sands and control of fluid entry and injection profiles. (5) Installation of a 2100 ft, 14 inch insulated, steam line beneath a harbor channel to supply steam to an island location. (6) Testing and proposed application of thermal recovery technologies to increase oil production and reserves: (a) Performing pilot tests of cyclic steam injection and production on new horizontal wells. (b) Performing pilot tests of hot water-alternating-steam (WAS) drive in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Perform a pilot steamflood with the four horizontal injectors and producers using a pseudo steam-assisted gravity-drainage (SAGD) process. (8) Advanced reservoir management, through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring and evaluation.

Unknown

2001-08-08

112

Update on cavern disposal of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes.  

SciTech Connect

Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. Argonne National Laboratory has previously evaluated the feasibility, legality, risk and economics of disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes, other than NORM waste, in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste, other than NORM waste, is occurring at four Texas facilities, in several Canadian facilities, and reportedly in Europe. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns as well. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, a review of federal regulations and regulations from several states indicated that there are no outright prohibitions against NORM disposal in salt caverns or other Class II wells, except for Louisiana which prohibits disposal of radioactive wastes or other radioactive materials in salt domes. Currently, however, only Texas and New Mexico are working on disposal cavern regulations, and no states have issued permits to allow cavern disposal of NORM waste. On the basis of the costs currently charged for cavern disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal in caverns is likely to be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

Veil, J. A.

1998-09-22

113

An overview of giant oil and gas fields of the decade: 1978-1988  

SciTech Connect

Scientific studies and projections of future world energy demand indicate that although alternate-energy fuel sources must be actively pursued and developed, there must be adequate petroleum supplies to bridge the gap. For the international petroleum industry, the years covered by this conference, 1978-1988, were complex. They were years of boom and bust. The world's energy consciousness was boosted sharply by the effects of the 1979 Iranian revolution and the resulting embargo that sent world oil prices to record heights. Global petroleum exploration soon surged, leading to the industry's all-time drilling high in 1981. Then came the oil price collapse in 1985, and the following years were characterized by falling oil prices and drastic budget cuts for exploration and development. Although exploration dropped sharply, there was a steady flow of giant oil and gas field discoveries. Using the giant field designation criteria of 500 million bbl of oil recoverable for fields in Asiatic Russia, North Africa, and the Middle East; 100 million bbl of oil recoverable for the fields in the remainder of the world; and 3 tcf and 1 tcf of gas reserves recoverable for the same areas, respectively, it is estimated that at least 182 oil and gas fields containing an estimated 140 billion BOE were discovered in 46 countries during the years covered by this conference. Today, exploration is slowly gaining momentum in all types of petroleum provinces-intensely explored, partially explored, moderately explored, and essentially unexplored - and as long as exploration continues in whatever area of the world, there will always be opportunities to find giant oil and gas fields.

Halbouty, M.T. (Michel T. Halbouty Energy Co., Houston, TX (USA))

1990-09-01

114

Oil Spill Prevention Response and Cleanup: Google Earth Virtual Field Trip Activity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this well thought out virtual field trip your students will learn about oil spill prevention response and cleanup methods at various sites in Alaska. It is an excellent activity to teach students about policy and procedures needed to make oil transportation safe. In addition, it is a great science activity to learn about the microbiology methods behind cleaning up oil spills. The 2008 ATEEC Fellows Institute brought 18 community college and high school instructors from the environmental sciences to Alaska. They created virtual field trips using Google Earth. Learn from the experts in this interactive tour complete with video offering expert insight into the world of the oil industry. In this well thought out Google Earth virtual field trip you will learn about oil spill prevention response and cleanup methods at various sites in Alaska highlighting the Alyeska Marine Terminal. An excellent activity to teach students about policy and procedures needed to make oil transportation safe. In addition it is a great science activity to learn about the microbiology methods behind cleaning up oil spills. An excellent teachers guide is included as well. This resource is free to download. Users must first create a login with ATEEC's website to access the file.

2013-06-24

115

Complete Moment Tensor Determination of Induced Seismicity in Unconventional and Conventional Oil/Gas Fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Induced seismicity occurs both in conventional oil/gas fields due to production and water injection and in unconventional oil/gas fields due to hydraulic fracturing. Source mechanisms of these induced earthquakes are of great importance for understanding their causes and the physics of the seismic processes in reservoirs. Previous research on the analysis of induced seismic events in conventional oil/gas fields assumed a double couple (DC) source mechanism. However, recent studies have shown a non-negligible percentage of a non-double-couple (non-DC) component of source moment tensor in hydraulic fracturing events (Šílený et al., 2009; Warpinski and Du, 2010; Song and Toksöz, 2011). In this study, we determine the full moment tensor of the induced seismicity data in a conventional oil/gas field and for hydrofrac events in an unconventional oil/gas field. Song and Toksöz (2011) developed a full waveform based complete moment tensor inversion method to investigate a non-DC source mechanism. We apply this approach to the induced seismicity data from a conventional gas field in Oman. In addition, this approach is also applied to hydrofrac microseismicity data monitored by downhole geophones in four wells in US. We compare the source mechanisms of induced seismicity in the two different types of gas fields and explain the differences in terms of physical processes.

Gu, C.; Li, J.; Toksoz, M. N.

2013-12-01

116

The Tengiz oil field, Pri-Caspian basin, USSR, a super giant of the '80s  

SciTech Connect

The supergiant Tengiz oil field, located near the southeastern edge of the Pri-Caspian basin is one of the most important new discoveries made in the last decade. The Tengiz oil field occurs in a desert climate on the edge of the Caspian Sea and experiences extreme temperature variations along with other harsh environmental conditions. The structure was first identified by seismic surveys in 1975 when it became possible to map the base of thick Permian salt. The first exploration well was drilled on the top of the pre-salt structure in 1979 and encountered important oil-bearing carbonates. The drilling of additional appraisal wells and the acquisition of three-dimensional seismic with improved seismic velocities contributed to the development of the Tengiz seismic-geologic model and confirmed the presence of a super-giant oil accumulation. The amplitude of the structure is approximately 1,000 m and covers an area of 400 mi{sup 2}. The oil column exceeds 1,500 m without having encountered an oil-water contact. Proven plus probable reserves are estimated to exceed 18 billion bbl. Oil production rates up to 8,000 bbl/day per well have been experienced. The reservoir rocks, which range from Upper Devonian to Middle Carboniferous, are comprised of biohermal and nodular limestones and characterized by variable porosity and permeability. The best reservoir quality is attributed to widespread fractures, vugs, and solution cavities that supplement the primary porosity. Recrystallization and healed fractures with substantial amounts of solid bitumen are observed throughout the reservoir. The reservoir pressure is abnormally high. The oil gravity is approximately 45{degree} API and the sulfur content is low. There is no gas cap on the Tengiz field, and the oil is highly undersaturated. The associated gas contains a high percentage of H{sub 2}S, which must be considered in field development.

Lisovsky, N.N.; Gogonenkov, G.N.; Petzuukha, Y.A. (Ministry of Oil and Gas, Moscow (USSR))

1990-05-01

117

Seed oil development of pennycress under field conditions  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Pennycress (Thlaspi sp) has been targeted as a potential oilseed for the biofuels industry. Its seeds contain ~36% oil, where erucic acid is the major fatty acid presented with 38.1%. Additionally, the physical proprieties of the methyl esters are in the range to satisfy the needs of the biodiesel m...

118

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: oil field or wilderness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The second session of the 100th Congress will see continued debate over the prospect of oil and gas drilling on a 19-million-acre expanse of mountains and tundra known as the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The arctic refuge, most of which lies above the Arctic Circle, is larger than any refuges in the lower 48 states. Because of its size,

Spitler

1987-01-01

119

Reservoir Characterization of Plover Lake Heavy-Oil Field  

Microsoft Academic Search

Enhanced production of heavy oil from the Cretaceous and Mississippian sands of Eastern Alberta and Western Saskatchewan presents many challenges - requiring a more complete description of lithology, porosity, permeability and changes in reservoir fluid composition and physical properties. Our reservoir projects near Plover Lake, Saskatchewan seek to produce reservoir models that are consistent with all available data including well

Larry Lines; Joan Embleton; Mathew Fay; Steve Larter; Tony Settari; Bruce Palmiere; Carl Reine; Douglas Schmitt

120

Petroleum geology of Giant oil and gas fields in Turpan Basin Xinjiang China  

SciTech Connect

Turpan Basin is the smallest and the last development basin in three big basins of Xinjiang autonomous region, P.R. China. Since April, 1989, the Shanshan oilfield was discovered, the Oinling, Wenjisang, Midang, Baka, Qiudong and North Putaogou fields were discovered. In 1994, the crude oil productivity of Turpan Basin was a Million tons, with an estimated output of 3 million tons per year by 1995; obviously a key oil productive base in the west basins of China, Tarim, Jungar, Chaidam, Hexi, Erduos and Sichuan Basins. The Turpan Basin is an intermontane basin in a eugeosyncline foldbelt of the north Tianshan Mountains. The oil and gas was produced from the payzone of the Xishanyao, Sanjianfang and Qiketai Formatiosn of the Middle Jurassic series. The geochemical characteristics of the crude oil and gas indicate they derive from the Middle to Lower Jurassic coal series, in which contains the best oil-prone source rocks in the basin.

Boliang, Hu; Jiajing, Yang, [Lanzhou, Gansu (China)

1995-08-01

121

Evidence of hydrocarbon contamination from the Burgan oil field, Kuwait: interpretations from thermal remote sensing data.  

PubMed

The paper presents the application of thermal remote sensing for mapping hydrocarbon polluted sites. This has been achieved by mono-window algorithm for land surface temperature (LST) measurements, using multi-date band 6 data of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM). The emissivity, transmittance and mean atmospheric temperature were used as critical factors to estimate LST. The changes in the surface emissivity due to oil pollution alter the apparent temperature, which was used as a recognition element to map out oil polluted surfaces. The LST contrast was successfully used to map spatial distribution of hydrocarbon pollution in the Burgan Oil field area of Kuwait. The methodology can be positively used to detect waste dumping, oil spills in oceans and ports, besides environmental management of oil pollution at or near the land surface. PMID:17291680

ud Din, Saif; Al Dousari, Ahmad; Literathy, Peter

2008-03-01

122

Oil, gas field growth projections: Wishful thinking or reality?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The observed `field growth' for the period from 1992 through 1996 with the US Geological Survey's (USGS) predicted field growth for the same period are compared. Known field recovery of field size is defined as the sum of past cumulative field production and the field's proved reserves. Proved reserves are estimated quantities of hydrocarbons which geologic and engineering data demonstrate with reasonable certainty to recoverable from known fields under existing economic and operating conditions. Proved reserve estimates calculated with this definition are typically conservative. The modeling approach used by the USGS to characterize `field growth phenomena' is statistical rather that geologic in nature.

Attanasi, E.D.; Mast, R.F.; Root, D.H.

1999-01-01

123

Isolation and characterization of Klebsiella oxytoca strain degrading crude oil from a Tunisian off-shore oil field.  

PubMed

A facultatively anaerobic, Gram-negative, mesophilic, moderately halotolerant, non-motile, and non-sporulated bacterium, designated strain BSC5 was isolated from an off-shore "Sercina" oil field, located near the Kerkennah island, Tunisia. Yeast extract was not required for growth. Phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain BSC5 revealed that it was related to members of the genus Klebsiella, being most closely related to the type strain of K. oxytoca (99% sequence similarity). Strain BSC5 was capable of using aerobically the crude oil as substrate growth. The growth of strain BSC5 on crude oil was followed by measuring the OD(600 nm) and by enumeration of viable cells at different culture's time. GC-MS analysis showed that strain BSC5 was capable of degrading a wide range of aliphatic hydrocarbons from C(13) to C(30) . The biodegradation rate for n -alkanes reached 44% and 75%, after 20 and 45 days of incubation, respectively. Addition of the synthetic surfactant, Tween 80, accelerated the crude oil degradation. The biodegradation rate for n -alkanes reached 61% and 98%, after 20 and 45 days of incubation, respectively. Moreover, three aromatic compounds, p -hydroxybenzoate, protocatechuate and gentisate, were metabolized completely by strain BSC5 after 24 h, under aerobic conditions. PMID:22144124

Chamkha, Mohamed; Trabelsi, Yosra; Mnif, Sami; Sayadi, Sami

2011-12-01

124

Genomic and genotoxic responses to controlled weathered-oil exposures confirm and extend field studies on impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on native killifish.  

PubMed

To understand the ecotoxicological impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, field studies provide a context for ecological realism but laboratory-based studies offer power for connecting biological effects with specific causes. As a complement to field studies, we characterized genome-wide gene expression responses of Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) to oil-contaminated waters in controlled laboratory exposures. Transcriptional responses to the highest concentrations of oiled water in the laboratory were predictive of field-observed responses that coincided with the timing and location of major oiling. The transcriptional response to the low concentration (? 10-fold lower than the high concentration) was distinct from the high concentration and was not predictive of major oiling in the field. The high concentration response was characterized by activation of the molecular signaling pathway that facilitates oil metabolism and oil toxicity. The high concentration also induced DNA damage. The low concentration invoked expression of genes that may support a compensatory response, including genes associated with regulation of transcription, cell cycle progression, RNA processing, DNA damage, and apoptosis. We conclude that the gene expression response detected in the field was a robust indicator of exposure to the toxic components of contaminating oil, that animals in the field were exposed to relatively high concentrations that are especially damaging to early life stages, and that such exposures can damage DNA. PMID:25208076

Pilcher, Whitney; Miles, Scott; Tang, Song; Mayer, Greg; Whitehead, Andrew

2014-01-01

125

Genomic and Genotoxic Responses to Controlled Weathered-Oil Exposures Confirm and Extend Field Studies on Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on Native Killifish  

PubMed Central

To understand the ecotoxicological impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, field studies provide a context for ecological realism but laboratory-based studies offer power for connecting biological effects with specific causes. As a complement to field studies, we characterized genome-wide gene expression responses of Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) to oil-contaminated waters in controlled laboratory exposures. Transcriptional responses to the highest concentrations of oiled water in the laboratory were predictive of field-observed responses that coincided with the timing and location of major oiling. The transcriptional response to the low concentration (?10-fold lower than the high concentration) was distinct from the high concentration and was not predictive of major oiling in the field. The high concentration response was characterized by activation of the molecular signaling pathway that facilitates oil metabolism and oil toxicity. The high concentration also induced DNA damage. The low concentration invoked expression of genes that may support a compensatory response, including genes associated with regulation of transcription, cell cycle progression, RNA processing, DNA damage, and apoptosis. We conclude that the gene expression response detected in the field was a robust indicator of exposure to the toxic components of contaminating oil, that animals in the field were exposed to relatively high concentrations that are especially damaging to early life stages, and that such exposures can damage DNA. PMID:25208076

Pilcher, Whitney; Miles, Scott; Tang, Song; Mayer, Greg; Whitehead, Andrew

2014-01-01

126

Livestock poisoning from oil field drilling fluids, muds and additives  

SciTech Connect

The use and potential toxicity of various components of oil well drilling fluids, muds and additives are presented. Many components are extremely caustic resulting in rumenitis. Solvent and petroleum hydrocarbon components may cause aspiration pneumonia and rumen dysfunction. Some additives cause methemoglobinemia. The most frequently encountered heavy metals are lead, chromium, arsenic, lithium and copper. Considerations for investigating livestock poisoning cases and several typical cases are reviewed.

Edwards, W.C.; Gregory, D.G. (Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater (Unites States))

1991-10-01

127

Process and economic model of in-field heavy oil upgrading using aqueous pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect

A process and economic model for aqueous pyrolysis in-field upgrading of heavy oil has been developed. The model has been constructed using the ASPEN PLUS chemical process simulator. The process features cracking of heavy oil at moderate temperatures in the presence of water to increase oil quality and thus the value of the oil. Calculations with the model indicate that for a 464 Mg/day (3,000 bbl/day) process, which increases the oil API gravity of the processed oil from 13.5{degree} to 22.4{degree}, the required value increase of the oil would need to be at least $2.80/Mg{center_dot}{degree}API($0.40/bbl{center_dot}{degree}API) to make the process economically attractive. This level of upgrading has been demonstrated in preliminary experiments with candidate catalysts. For improved catalysts capable of having the coke make and increasing the pyrolysis rate, a required price increase for the oil as low as $1.34/Mg{center_dot}{degree}API ($0.21/bbl{center_dot}{degree}API)has been calculated.

Thorsness, C. B., LLNL

1997-01-21

128

Intelligent fiber sensing system for the oil field area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Optical Fiber strain sensor using fiber Bragg grating are poised to play a major role in structural health from military to civil engineering. Fiber Bragg Grating sensor is a practical type of fiber optic sensors. Its measurement is encoded with the wavelength of the optical signal reflected from fiber Bragg grating. The method of measuring the absolute optical wavelength is a critical component of the fiber optic sensing system. To reliably detect very small changes in the environment at the sensor, the interrogation system must provide accurate and repeatable wavelength measurements. Energy sources are increasingly scarce in the world. Getting oil from the oil-wells has become more and more difficult. Therefore, new technology to monitor the oil-well condition has become extremely important. The traditional electrical sensor system is no longer useful because of the down-hole's high temperature and high pressure environment. The optical fiber sensing system is the first choice to monitor this condition. This system will reduce the cost and increase the productivity. In the high pressure and high temperature environment, the traditional packed fiber grating pressure-temperature sensor will be no longer reliability. We have to find a new fiber grating temperature-pressure sensor element and the interrogation system. In this work we use the very narrow bandwidth birefringent fiber grating as the sensing element. We obtain the interrogation system has 0.1 pm resolution.

Sun, Wenju; Ma, Linping

2010-08-01

129

Observed oil and gas field size distributions: A consequence of the discovery process and prices of oil and gas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

If observed oil and gas field size distributions are obtained by random samplings, the fitted distributions should approximate that of the parent population of oil and gas fields. However, empirical evidence strongly suggests that larger fields tend to be discovered earlier in the discovery process than they would be by random sampling. Economic factors also can limit the number of small fields that are developed and reported. This paper examines observed size distributions in state and federal waters of offshore Texas. Results of the analysis demonstrate how the shape of the observable size distributions change with significant hydrocarbon price changes. Comparison of state and federal observed size distributions in the offshore area shows how production cost differences also affect the shape of the observed size distribution. Methods for modifying the discovery rate estimation procedures when economic factors significantly affect the discovery sequence are presented. A primary conclusion of the analysis is that, because hydrocarbon price changes can significantly affect the observed discovery size distribution, one should not be confident about inferring the form and specific parameters of the parent field size distribution from the observed distributions. ?? 1988 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

Drew, L.J.; Attanasi, E.D.; Schuenemeyer, J.H.

1988-01-01

130

Observed oil and gas field size distributions: a consequence of the discovery process and prices of oil and gas  

SciTech Connect

If observed oil and gas field size distributions are obtained by random samplings, the fitted distributions should approximate that of the parent population of oil and gas fields. However, empirical evidence strongly suggests that larger fields tend to be discovered earlier in the discovery process than they would be by random sampling. Economic factors also can limit the number of small fields that are developed and reported. This paper examines observed size distributions in state and federal waters of offshore Texas. Results of the analysis demonstrate how the shape of the observable size distributions change with significant hydrocarbon price changes. Comparison of state and federal observed size distributions in the offshore area shows how production cost differences also affect the shape of the observed size distribution. Methods for modifying the discovery rate estimation procedures when economic factors significantly affect the discovery sequence are presented. A primary conclusion of the analysis is that, because hydrocarbon price changes can significantly affect the observed discovery size distribution, one should not be confident about inferring the form and specific parameters of the parent field size distribution from the observed distributions.

Drew, L.J.; Attanasi, E.D.; Schuenemeyer, J.H.

1988-11-01

131

Reservoir Model of the Jacksonburg-Stringtown Oil Field; Northwestern West Virginia: Potential for Miscible Carbon Dioxide Enhanced Oil Recovery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Located in northwestern West Virginia, the Jacksonburg-Stringtown field has produced over 22 million barrels of oil (MMBO) since its discovery in 1895. The primary producing interval within the field is the Late Devonian Gordon Stray. Log analysis shows this formation to represent an estuarine depositional system. Four subunits within the formation are defined based on depositional framework: barrier sand, central bay shale, estuarine channels, and fluvial channel subunits. RHOmaa/Umaa lithological composition plots support the conclusion of a marine-influenced estuarine depositional framework. Structural and isopach maps generated with data from 73 local wells reveal a northeast-southwest trending sand deposit of 15-35 foot thickness, which is interpreted as the depocenter for the incised valley of the Gordon Stray. Analysis of formation horizon maps shows that the reservoir is synclinal and, as a result, contains a stratigraphic trap as opposed to the more common structural traps found in the immediate area. Porosity and pore-feet distribution maps indicate high porosity regions in southern regions of the field and high pore volume in northern areas. A miscible CO2 flood model estimates that an additional 7.3 MMBO could be recovered from the high porosity regions in the southern half of the field. The Jacksonburg-Stringtown field is well-suited for enhanced oil recovery and/or geologic CO2 sequestration.

Bergerud, Blake

132

An Efficient Multiperiod MINLP Model for Optimal Planning of Offshore Oil and Gas Field Infrastructure  

E-print Network

1 An Efficient Multiperiod MINLP Model for Optimal Planning of Offshore Oil and Gas Field model for offshore oilfield development problem that is fairly generic and can be extended to include the fields and FPSOs, well drilling schedule and production rates of these three components in each time

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

133

Field performance of a laser fluorosensor for the detection of oil spills  

Microsoft Academic Search

An airborne laser fluorosensor is described that was designed to detect and identify targets by means of the characteristic fluorescence emission spectrum. The first field trials of the sensor over marine oil and dye spills are reported. A correlation technique has been developed that, when applied to the data collected during these field trials, clearly differentiated among dye, the two

R. A. ONeil; L. Buja-Bijunas; D. M. Rayner

1980-01-01

134

Aspects of reservoir geology and production behavior of Sirikit Oil Field, Thailand  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sirikit oil field, onshore Thailand, lies within an intracratonic, half-graben basin that was subsequently deformed by sinistral strike-slip movement. The 8-km thick Tertiary basin-fill includes the fluvial-deltaic Lan Krabu Formation, which contains two main oil reservoirs (K and L sands). This formation intertongues with lacustrine claystones (Chum Saeng Formation) that form stratigraphic seals to both reservoirs. The geology of

D. J. Flint; D. J. Stewart; T. Hyde; E. C. A. Gevers

1988-01-01

135

Methodology For Establishment Of The Radiation Control System At The Karachaganak Oil Gas-Condensate Field  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a At the present time radiological contamination by natural radionuclides of industrial platforms of oil-fields is well-known,\\u000a but far from being resolved problem for many countries. Problem as a whole has gained an environmental-technological value.\\u000a The solution of the problem given requires an introduction at the oil-and-gas production facilities of the complex measures\\u000a on normalization of radiation - ecological conditions, decrease

S. V. Reznikov; K. K. Kadyrzhanov; A. Zh. Tuleushev; Zh. N. Marabaev; S. N. Lukashenko; V. P. Solodukhin; I. V. Kazachevskiy; T. I. Ageyeva

136

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: oil field or wilderness  

SciTech Connect

The second session of the 100th Congress will see continued debate over the prospect of oil and gas drilling on a 19-million-acre expanse of mountains and tundra known as the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The arctic refuge, most of which lies above the Arctic Circle, is larger than any refuges in the lower 48 states. Because of its size, the area supports a broad range of linked ecosystems. Of particular concern is the 1.5-million-acre coastal plain, which may be targeted for development. The coastal plain provides a home, at least part of the year, to Alaska's porcupine caribou. The coastal plain also supports many other forms of wildlife-including the wolf, arctic fox, brown bear, polar bear, and arctic peregrine falcon, which is listed as a threatened species. The potential effects of drilling projects extend beyond loss of wildlife; they include desecration of the land itself. Although few members of Congress deny the value of protecting the amazing variety of life on the coastal plain, some insist that limited drilling could be conducted without destroying crucial habitat. Last July, the department tentatively divided some of the targeted lands among native corporations in preparation for leasing to oil companies. In response to what was felt to be an attempt to overstep congressional authority, the House passed HR 2629, banning this kind of land deal without congressional approval. In essence, the measure reiterated congressional authority provided by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) of 1980. This act mandated the study of environmental threats and oil potential by the Department of Interior, while putting the ANWR coastal plain off-limits to development without an explicit congressional directive.

Spitler, A.

1987-11-01

137

Effects of the Erika oil spill on the common starfish Asterias rubens, evaluated by field and laboratory studies.  

E-print Network

1 1 Effects of the Erika oil spill on the common starfish Asterias rubens, evaluated by field number: + 33 2 98 49 86 34 Fax: + 32 2 98 49 86 45 Abstract Impacts of the ,,Erika oil spill by these contaminants. Keywords: Asterias rubens; Erika oil spill; Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; biomarkers; growth

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

138

Methane-forming bacteria of oil-fields  

SciTech Connect

Pure cultures of the methanogenic bacteria, Methanobacterium bryantii and M. formicicum have been isolated, for the first time from oil deposits and their morphological, physiological and biochemical properties studied. All strains grow of H/sub 2//CO/sub 2/ and two of the three M. formicicum also utilize formate as a role source of carbon and energy. In no case could methanol, acetate, methylamine or glucose serve as an energy source for these autotrophs. All strains were resistant to penicillin and streptomycin and neither sulfate or sulfide inhibited their growth. Medium salinity inhibited the growth of M. bryantii but not that of M. formicicum.

Laurinavichus, K.S.; Obraztsova, A.Ya.; Belyaev, S.S.; Ivanov, M.V.

1983-03-01

139

[Efficiency and characteristic of biological activated carbon fluidized bed for oil-field wastewater treatment].  

PubMed

In order to find method to improve biodegradation of oil-field wastewater, the biological activated carbon fluidized bed (BAC-FB) process for oil-field wastewater treatment in aerobic condition is studied. The results show that the process demonstrated highest removal rate with hull activated carbon (AC) as carrier and carrier concentration of 15%. The optimized HRT of the process is 5 h. COD, UV254, UV410, organic acid and organic compounds (GC/MS) were detected as the index to indicate the efficiency of oil-field wastewater treatment by this process. The results show that the removal rate of COD range from 25% to 45%. The average removal rate of UV254, UV410, organic acid is 85.9%, 73.6%, 51.5% respectively. The removal rate of oil content is almost 100%. However, alkane is difficult to remove from wastewater. Furthermore, high concentration inorganic materials such as calcium, chlorine were found to accumulate on activated carbon during treatment process, which is harm to adsorption and biodegradation of organic compound. High temperature of oil-field wastewater is also one of factors to inhibit adsorption and biodegradation of organic compound. PMID:16850833

Li, An-jie; Liu, Hong; Wang, Wen-yan; Quan, Xiang-chun; Zhang, Dan; Li, Zong-liang

2006-05-01

140

The Tengis oil field, Pri-Caspian basin, USSR - A super giant of the 1980s  

SciTech Connect

The super giant Tengiz oil field, located near the southeastern edge of the Pri-Caspian basin, is one of the most important new discoveries in the world made in the last decade. The field is in a desert climate on the edge of the Caspian Sea and experiences extreme temperature variations along with other harsh environmental conditions. The structure was first identified by seismic surveys in 1975 when it became possible to map the base of thick Permian salt. The first exploration well was drilled on the top of the presalt structure in 1979 and encountered important oil-bearing carbonates. The drilling of additional appraisal wells and the acquisition of three-dimensional seismic with improved seismic velocities led to the development of the Tengiz seismic-geologic model and confirmed the presence of a super giant oil accumulation. The amplitude of the structure is approximately 1,000 m and covers an area of 400 km{sup 2} . The oil column exceeds 1,500 m without having encountered an oil-water contact. The total original oil and gas in place of the Tengiz field are estimated at 25 billion bbl of oil and 46 tcf of associated gas. Oil production rates up to 8,000 bbl/day per well have been experienced. The reservoir rocks, which range in age from Upper Devonian to Middle Carboniferous, are comprised of biohermal and nodular limestones and characterized by variable porosity and permeability. The best reservoir quality is attributed to widespread fractures, vugs, and solution cavities that supplement the primary porosity. Recrystallization and healed fractures with substantial amounts of solid bitumen are observed throughout the reservoir. The reservoir pressure is abnormally high. The oil gravity is approximately 45{degree} API and the sulfur content is low. There is no gas cap on the Tengiz field, and the oil is highly undersaturated. The associated gas contains a high percentage of H{sub 2}S, which must be considered in field development.

Petzoukha, Y.A. (Ministry of Petroleum Industry, Moscow (USSR))

1990-09-01

141

CO/sub 2/ recovery of heavy oil: the Wilmington field test  

SciTech Connect

Champlin Petroleum Co.'s pilot test of the CO/sub 2/, immiscible drive oil recovery process has been in continuous operation for 26 mo. in the Wilmington field, Tar Zone, Fault Block III reservoir. First CO/sub 2/ injection was in March 1981. The pilot, containing 1700 acre-ft (2.1 x 106 cu m) includes 4 injection wells and 3 producers. The reservoir is an unconsolidated sandstone at 2500 ft containing 920 bbl/acre-ft (0.12 cu m/cu m) of 14 API crude oil. This is the first test of immiscible CO/sub 2/ tertiary oil recovery in a late life waterflood reservoir. Through May 1, 1983, 1.5 billion cu ft (42.5 x 106 cu m) of CO/sub 2/ have been injected intermittently with water. Each of 3 producing wells have shown stimulated oil response with production rates showing a 7-fold increase.

Saner, W.B.; Patton, J.T.

1983-01-01

142

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

SciTech Connect

Salt caverns can be formed in underground salt formations incidentally as a result of mining or intentionally to create underground chambers for product storage or waste disposal. For more than 50 years, salt caverns have been used to store hydrocarbon products. Recently, concerns over the costs and environmental effects of land disposal and incineration have sparked interest in using salt caverns for waste disposal. Countries using or considering using salt caverns for waste disposal include Canada (oil-production wastes), Mexico (purged sulfates from salt evaporators), Germany (contaminated soils and ashes), the United Kingdom (organic residues), and the Netherlands (brine purification wastes). In the US, industry and the regulatory community are pursuing the use of salt caverns for disposal of oil-field wastes. In 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a regulatory determination exempting wastes generated during oil and gas exploration and production (oil-field wastes) from federal hazardous waste regulations--even though such wastes may contain hazardous constituents. At the same time, EPA urged states to tighten their oil-field waste management regulations. The resulting restrictions have generated industry interest in the use of salt caverns for potentially economical and environmentally safe oil-field waste disposal. Before the practice can be implemented commercially, however, regulators need assurance that disposing of oil-field wastes in salt caverns is technically and legally feasible and that potential health effects associated with the practice are acceptable. In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. It investigated regulatory issues; the types of oil-field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location considerations; and disposal operations, closure and remediation issues. It determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could, from technical and legal perspectives, be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, ANL subsequently conducted a preliminary risk assessment on the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in salt caverns. The methodology for the risk assessment included the following steps: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing contaminant toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and estimating human cancer and noncancer risks. To estimate exposure routes and pathways, four postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (for noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the EPA target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results lead to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-10

143

Hydro geochemistry Study of Yamama formation water in southern Iraqi oil Fields, Migration,Diagensis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Yamama Formation (Lower Cretaceous) form one of the main oil reservoir in southern Iraq, the present study deals with the general physical and chemical characteristics of Yamama formation water in selected oil fields - southern Iraq. Via the collecting the available water analysis data in in selected 10 wells in southern Iraqi oil fields, Well Logs, as well as, the technical final well reports. The task of this study is to illustrate the chemical and physical variation among the study oil wells, and their relation with the depositional environment, the grading of temperature and pressure, the reason behind of over pressure phenomenon, besides the delineation of oil migration and water reservoir movement direction. The study confirms the occurrences of two types of formation water; the first one is the connate water, which is brine, hypersaline, and marine in nature reflects the possibility of hydrocarbon accumulations. And the second is mixing water reflects the mixing of original marine water with percolating meteoric water for various degree. Regarding the hydrochemical ratios, the direction of water movement and oil migration is from northeast toward west and south west starting from Messan oil Fields, moreover, the secondary migration of oil is in the same direction. The western migration of oil and water attributed to the enhancement of porosity and permeability in this direction, which in turn means the possibility of finding new stratigraphic traps in this direction mainly western of Nasiriya and Garraf areas. The relationship between depositional environment and diagenetic processes in one hand, and the sediment logical units; tidal lime granular unit revealed the occurrences of khidar al-may which extends up to Al-Managish in Kuwait and Nahar Umar - Majnoon, Nasiriya - Abu Amood, as well as the clayey units represented by isolated and semi isolated lagoonal deposits. Based on the ionic ratios in AlZubair, Nahar Umer and Al-Kifil oil fields, outer shelf clay units was identified as zones extends from Kumait - Halfaia - Noor. This study also showed the major role of diagenetic processes such as dissolution and low dolomitization in granular units in changing the chemical composition of Yamama Formation water under study. The ionic ratios and concentration pointed out the occurrences of many sub-basins within the Yamama main basin. The present study showed the movement of formation water is from the centre of the basin toward the periphery, furthermore, the sulphate index clarify the increases in hydrocarbone preservation toward east and northeast direction. .

Ali, A. A.; SOC Team

2013-05-01

144

FIELD MANUAL FOR OIL SPILLS IN COLD CLIMATES  

EPA Science Inventory

This manual documents the state-of-the-art response techniques as of early 1979. The manual has been divided into two basic parts: A field manual and supporting data. The field manual consists of a set of matrices that summarizes applicable techniques for various conditions. The ...

145

Tertiary development of heavy oil sands through thermal stimulation in the Wilmington Oil Field, California: A geological perspective  

SciTech Connect

In 1995, a DOE cost share project was initiated to extend thermal recovery in the Tar Zone, Fault Block 11 of the West Wilmington Oil Field, California. The project involved the collection of old oil well data and the construction of a modern digital data base in order to develop a deterministic geological model. The plan was to rigorously define the geology such that horizontal wells could be accurately placed within the sands containing heavy oil to facilitate gravity drainage. A detailed deterministic geological model was constructed using a state of the art 3D mapping and modeling package. Beginning in July, 1995, five observation wells were drilled. Data inconsistencies were revealed when core hole OB2-003 was drilled. It was discovered that the data used to make the maps was corrupted; as a result, the predicted coring point was missed by more than 20'. Significant modifications to the data base were required due to inaccurate subsidence corrections in the original data set. Horizontal wells were then laid out based on the revised data and the geological model was completely reconstructed. Detailed cross sections extracted from the model were use for geosteering. These cross sections proved to be highly accurate and five more wells are now planned for the target sands. This detailed deterministic model will be further refined and combined with our geostatistical mode for geological control in an advanced reservoir simulator. If successful, the thermal stimulation project will be expanded to other fault blocks.

Clarke, D.D. (Department of Oil Properties, Long Beach, CA (United States)); Henry, M.J.; Strehle, R.W. (Dept. of Oil Properties, Long Beach, CA (United States))

1996-01-01

146

Tertiary development of heavy oil sands through thermal stimulation in the Wilmington Oil Field, California: A geological perspective  

SciTech Connect

In 1995, a DOE cost share project was initiated to extend thermal recovery in the Tar Zone, Fault Block 11 of the West Wilmington Oil Field, California. The project involved the collection of old oil well data and the construction of a modern digital data base in order to develop a deterministic geological model. The plan was to rigorously define the geology such that horizontal wells could be accurately placed within the sands containing heavy oil to facilitate gravity drainage. A detailed deterministic geological model was constructed using a state of the art 3D mapping and modeling package. Beginning in July, 1995, five observation wells were drilled. Data inconsistencies were revealed when core hole OB2-003 was drilled. It was discovered that the data used to make the maps was corrupted; as a result, the predicted coring point was missed by more than 20`. Significant modifications to the data base were required due to inaccurate subsidence corrections in the original data set. Horizontal wells were then laid out based on the revised data and the geological model was completely reconstructed. Detailed cross sections extracted from the model were use for geosteering. These cross sections proved to be highly accurate and five more wells are now planned for the target sands. This detailed deterministic model will be further refined and combined with our geostatistical mode for geological control in an advanced reservoir simulator. If successful, the thermal stimulation project will be expanded to other fault blocks.

Clarke, D.D. [Department of Oil Properties, Long Beach, CA (United States); Henry, M.J.; Strehle, R.W. [Dept. of Oil Properties, Long Beach, CA (United States)

1996-12-31

147

Rapid subsidence over oil fields measured by SAR interferometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Lost Hills and Belridge oilfields are in the San Joaquin Valley, California. The major oil reservoir is high porosity and low permeability diatomite. Extraction of large volumes from shallow depths causes reduction in pore pressure and subsequent compaction, forming a surface subsidence bowl. We measure this subsidence from space using interferometric analysis of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) data collected by the European Space Agency Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS-1 and ERS-2). Maximum subsidence rates are as high as 40 mm in 35 days or >400 mm/yr, measured from interferograms with time separations ranging from one day to 26 months. The 8- and 26-month interferograms contain areas where the subsidence gradient exceeds the measurement possible with ERS SAR, but shows increased detail in areas of less rapid subsidence. Synoptic mapping of subsidence distribution from satellite data powerfully complements ground-based techniques, permits measurements where access is difficult, and aids identification of underlying causes.

Fielding, Eric J.; Blom, Ronald G.; Goldstein, Richard M.

148

Field experiments of multi-channel oceanographic fluorescence lidar for oil spill and chlorophyll- a detection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Multi-channel Oceanographic Fluorescence Lidar (MOFL), with a UV excitation at 355 nm and multiple receiving channels at typical wavelengths of fluorescence from oil spills and chlorophyll- a (Chl- a), has been developed using the Laser-induced Fluorescence (LIF) technique. The sketch of the MOFL system equipped with a compact multi-channel photomultiplier tube (MPMT) is introduced in the paper. The methods of differentiating the oil fluorescence from the background water fluorescence and evaluating the Chl- a concentration are described. Two field experiments were carried out to investigate the field performance of the system, i.e., an experiment in coastal areas for oil pollution detection and an experiment over the Yellow Sea for Chl- a monitoring. In the coastal experiment, several oil samples and other fluorescence substances were used to analyze the fluorescence spectral characteristics for oil identification, and to estimate the thickness of oil films at the water surface. The experiment shows that both the spectral shape of fluorescence induced from surface water and the intensity ratio of two channels ( I 495/ I 405) are essential to determine oil-spill occurrence. In the airborne experiment, MOFL was applied to measure relative Chl- a concentrations in the upper layer of the ocean. A comparison of relative Chl- a concentration measurements by MOFL and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) indicates that the two datasets are in good agreement. The results show that the MOFL system is capable of monitoring oil spills and Chl- a in the upper layer of ocean water.

Li, Xiaolong; Zhao, Chaofang; Ma, Youjun; Liu, Zhishen

2014-08-01

149

Programed oil generation of the Zubair Formation, Southern Iraq oil fields: Results from Petromod software modeling and geochemical analysis  

USGS Publications Warehouse

1D petroleum system modeling was performed on wells in each of four oil fields in South Iraq, Zubair (well Zb-47), Nahr Umr (well NR-9), West Qurna (well WQ-15 and 23), and Majnoon (well Mj-8). In each of these fields, deposition of the Zubair Formation was followed by continuous burial, reaching maximum temperatures of 100??C (equivalent to 0. 70%Ro) at depths of 3,344-3,750 m of well Zb-47 and 3,081. 5-3,420 m of well WQ-15, 120??C (equivalent to 0. 78%Ro) at depths of 3,353-3,645 m of well NR-9, and 3,391-3,691. 5 m of well Mj-8. Generation of petroleum in the Zubair Formation began in the late Tertiary, 10 million years ago. At present day, modeled transformation ratios (TR) indicate that 65% TR of its generation potential has been reached in well Zb-47, 75% TR in well NR-9 and 55-85% TR in West Qurna oil field (wells WQ-15 and WQ-23) and up to 95% TR in well Mj-8, In contrast, younger source rocks are immature to early mature (<20% TR), whereas older source rocks are mature to overmature (100% TR). Comparison of these basin modeling results, in Basrah region, are performed with Kifle oil field in Hilla region of western Euphrates River whereas the Zubair Formation is immature within temperature range of 65-70??C (0. 50%Ro equivalent) with up to 12% (TR = 12%) hydrocarbon generation efficiency and hence poor generation could be assessed in this last location. The Zubair Formation was deposited in a deltaic environment and consists of interbedded shales and porous and permeable sandstones. In Basrah region, the shales have total organic carbon of 0. 5-7. 0 wt%, Tmax 430-470??C and hydrogen indices of up to 466 with S2 = 0. 4-9. 4 of kerogen type II & III and petroleum potential of 0. 4-9. 98 of good hydrocarbon generation, which is consistent with 55-95% hydrocarbon efficiency. These generated hydrocarbons had charged (in part) the Cretaceous and Tertiary reservoirs, especially the Zubair Formation itself, in the traps formed by Alpine collision that closed the Tethys Ocean between Arabian and Euracian Plates and developed folds in Mesopotamian Basin 15-10 million years ago. These traps are mainly stratigraphic facies of sandstones with the shale that formed during the deposition of the Zubair Formation in transgression and regression phases within the main structural folds of the Zubair, Nahr Umr, West Qurna and Majnoon Oil fields. Oil biomarkers of the Zubair Formation Reservoirs are showing source affinity with mixed oil from the Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous strata, including Zubair Formation organic matters, based on presentation of GC and GC-MS results on diagrams of global petroleum systems. ?? 2010 Saudi Society for Geosciences.

Al-Ameri, T. K.; Pitman, J.; Naser, M.E.; Zumberge, J.; Al-Haydari, H. A.

2011-01-01

150

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2004-03-05

151

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2003-09-04

152

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2003-06-04

153

[The phylogenetic diversity of aerobic organotrophic bacteria from the Dagan high-temperature oil field].  

PubMed

The distribution and species diversity of aerobic organotrophic bacteria in the Dagan high-temperature oil field (China), which is exploited via flooding, have been studied. Twenty-two strains of the most characteristic thermophilic and mesophilic aerobic organotrophic bacteria have been isolated from the oil stratum. It has been found that, in a laboratory, the mesophilic and thermophilic isolates grow in the temperature, pH, and salinity ranges characteristic of the injection well near-bottom zones or of the oil stratum, respectively, and assimilate a wide range of hydrocarbons, fatty acids, lower alcohols, and crude oil, thus exhibiting adaptation to the environment. Using comparative phylogenetic 16S rRNA analysis, the taxonomic affiliation of the isolates has been established. The aerobic microbial community includes gram-positive bacteria with a high and low G+C content of DNA, and gamma and beta subclasses of Proteobacteria. The thermophilic bacteria belong to the genera Geobacillus and Thermoactinomyces, and the mesophilic strains belong to the genera Bacillus, Micrococcus, Cellulomonas, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter. The microbial community of the oil stratum is dominated by known species of the genus Geobacillus (G. subterraneus, G. stearothermophilus, and G. thermoglucosidasius) and a novel species "Geobacillus jurassicus." A number of novel thermophilic oil-oxidizing bacilli have been isolated. PMID:16119855

Nazina, T N; Sokolova, D Sh; Shestakova, N M; Grigor'ian, A A; Mikha?lova, E M; Babich, T L; Lysenko, A M; Turova, T P; Poltaraus, A B; Feng, Tsin'syan; Ni, Fangtian; Beliaev, S S

2005-01-01

154

FIELD MANUAL FOR PLUNGING WATER JET USE IN OIL SPILL CLEANUP  

EPA Science Inventory

The use of plunging water jets can often make possible the control (and, as a consequence, the cleanup) of spilled oil and other floating pollutants in currents too swift for conventional equipment. This short, illustrated manual provides practical information for field and plann...

155

Preliminary Technical and Legal Evaluation of Disposing of Nonhazardous Oil Field Waste into Salt Caverns  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an initial evaluation of the suitability, feasibility, and legality of using salt caverns for disposal of nonhazardous oil field wastes. Given the preliminary and general nature of this report, we recognize that some of our findings and conclusions maybe speculative and subject to change upon further research on this topic.

Ayers, Robert C.; Caudle, Dan; Elcock, Deborah; Raivel, Mary; Veil, John; and Grunewald, Ben

1999-01-21

156

FIELD DESCRIPTION Water Oil/Tar Sediment Tissue STUDYNAME Study Name X X X X  

E-print Network

FIELD DESCRIPTION Water Oil/Tar Sediment Tissue STUDYNAME Study Name X X X X QCBATCH Laboratory analysis Group ID X X X X EXSAMPID Investigator's sample identifier X X X X SAMPDATE Date sample collected as YYYYMMDD X X X X SAMPTIME Time sample collected as HH:MM X X X X SITEID Site identifier X X X X STUDYID

157

Dissolved methane distributions and air-sea flux in the plume of a massive seep field, Coal Oil Point, California  

E-print Network

Dissolved methane distributions and air-sea flux in the plume of a massive seep field, Coal Oil in the plume of a massive seep field, Coal Oil Point, California, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L22603, doi:10.1029/2007GL031344. 1. Introduction [2] Natural marine hydrocarbon seeps are important sources of methane

Washburn, Libe

158

Rapid assessment of redevelopment potential in marginal oil fields, application to the cut bank field  

E-print Network

involving numerous wells, and different production and completion practices. The most accurate way to estimate infill potential is to conduct a detailed integrated reservoir study, which is often time-consuming and expensive for operators of marginal oil...

Chavez Ballesteros, Luis Eladio

2005-02-17

159

Application of electrical submersible pumps in heavy crude oil in Boscan Field  

SciTech Connect

During recent years optimization of artificial lift methods has been applied in the oil industry, in order to evaluate the effect on oil well production and to establish a company`s optimal investment policies. Higher costs on new artificial lifting equipment and facilities for new fields have created the necessity to review the latest available technology of different lifting methods and specially that related to electrical submersible pumps (ESP). Few studies in the area of heavy crude oil production optimization using ESP as a lifting method have been published. This paper discusses the results of an ESP pilot project performed in 24 wells in Boscan field, and analyzes the performance of the equipment and its application range. The ESP equipment was installed in completions at depths ranging from 7000 to 9000 feet, with a 10{degrees}API gravity crude and bottomhole temperature of 180{degrees}F. It was concluded that despite a reduction of the pump`s efficiency, the ESP equipment does qualify as a good alternative lifting method for heavy oil production. It is also possible to obtain higher production rates. The results obtained in this pilot project, confirm that submersible pumps are an alternative method for lifting heavy crude oil from relatively deep reservoirs.

Bortolin, L.L. [Maraven S.A., Lagunillas (Venezuela)

1995-12-31

160

CO/sub 2/ recovery of heavy oil: Wilmington field test  

SciTech Connect

Champlin Petroleum Co.'s pilot test of the CO/sub 2/ immiscible-drive oil recovery process has been in continuous operation for 50 months in the Wilmington field, Tar zone, Fault Block III Unit reservoir. First CO/sub 2/ injection was in March 1981. The pilot, containing 1,700 acre-ft (2.1 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/) includes four injection wells and three producers. The reservoir is an unconsolidated sandstone at 2,500 ft (762 m) that contained 920 bbl/acre-ft (0.12 m/sup 3//m/sup 3/) of 14/sup 0/API (0.97-g/cm/sup 3/) crude oil at the start of the CO/sub 2/ pilot. This is the first test of immiscible CO/sub 2/ tertiary oil recovery in a late-life waterflood reservoir. Cumulative water injection before start of the CO/sub 2/ pilot was three PV's. Through May 1, 1985, 2.1 Bcf (60 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/) of produced and purchased CO/sub 2/ had been injected intermittently with water. Cumulative purchased CO/sub 2/ through May 1, 1985, was 1.5 Bcf (42.5 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/). Each of the three producing wells has shown stimulated oil response with production rates increasing an average of seven-fold. One producing well, converted from a former water-injection well, produced 100% water for 5 months after first CO/sub 2/ injection. The well has since steadily increased in production to over 40 B/D (6.4 m/sup 3//d) of oil. All produced oil is considered incremental oil since the pre-CO/sub 2/-flood oil rates were essentially at the economic limit and the wells would soon have been plugged and abandoned.

Saner, W.B.; Patton, J.T.

1986-07-01

161

Low-Salinity Waterflooding to Improve Oil Recovery - Historical Field Evidence  

SciTech Connect

Waterflooding is by far the most widely applied method of improved oil recovery. Crude oil/brine/rock interactions can lead to large variations in the displacement efficiency of wa-terfloods. Laboratory water-flood tests and single-well tracer tests have shown that injection of dilute brine can increase oil recovery, but work designed to test the method on a field scale has not yet been undertaken. Historical waterflood records could unintentionally provide some evidence of improved recovery from waterflooding with lower salinity brine. Nu-merous fields in the Powder River basin of Wyoming have been waterflooded using low salinity brine (about 500 ppm) obtained from the Madison limestone or Fox Hills sandstone. Three Minnelusa formation fields in the basin were identified as potential candidates for waterflood comparisons based on the salinity of the connate and injection water. Historical pro-duction and injection data for these fields were obtained from the public record. Field waterflood data were manipulated to be displayed in the same format as laboratory coreflood re-sults. Recovery from fields using lower salinity injection wa-ter was greater than that using higher salinity injection wa-ter—matching recovery trends for laboratory and single-well tests.

Eric P. Robertson

2007-11-01

162

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Annual report, March 30, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in a portion of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, by implementing advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Based on the knowledge and experience gained with this project, these technologies are intended to be extended to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, and, through technology transfer, will be available to increase heavy oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The project involves implementing thermal recovery in the southern half of the Fault Block II-A Tar zone. The existing steamflood in Fault Block II-A has been relatively inefficient due to several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery efficiency and reduce operating costs.

NONE

1997-09-01

163

Sisterhood in the oil field: informal support networks, gender roles and adaptation among women in the Oklahoma oil field  

SciTech Connect

The petroleum drilling industry exhibits a number of definitive characteristics, which combined with the most recent boom/bust drilling cycle, affect women in much the same manner as factors commonly associated with the eroding of women's social and economic positions within modernizing societies. Recognizing that modernization has a negative impact on women, this study focuses on strategies of adaptation employed by women associated both directly and indirectly with the petroleum drilling industry in an oil boom/bust town in western Oklahoma. Utilizing the traditional techniques of ethnographic interview and participant observation, it was shown that informal support networks formed by women enhanced women's adaptation by extending their resource base beyond the nuclear family and encouraging solidarity. Gender-based division of labor was also modified by western energy development. Boom times facilitated a rigid division of labor that gave way to a more flexible arrangement during bust times without a concomitant change in gender-based ideology. This was accounted for by differences in the rates of change for the underlying habits and values associated with the public and private sectors.

Walsh, A.C.

1988-01-01

164

Immunomagnetically Captured Thermophilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria from North Sea Oil Field Waters  

PubMed Central

Immunomagnetic beads (IMB) were used to recover thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria from oil field waters from oil production platforms in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea. IMB coated with polyclonal antibodies against whole-cell antigens of the thermophilic Thermodesulfobacterium mobile captured strains GFA1, GFA2, and GFA3. GFA1 was serologically and morphologically identical to T. mobile. GFA2 and GFA3 were spore forming and similar to the Desulfotomaculum strains T90A and T93B previously isolated from North Sea oil field waters by a classical enrichment procedure. Western blots (immunoblots) of whole cells showed that GFA2, GFA3, T90A, and T93B are different serotypes of the same Desulfotomaculum species. Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) against T. mobile type strain cells were produced and used as capture agents on IMB. These MAb, named A4F4, were immunoglobulin M; they were specific to T. mobile and directed against lipopolysaccharides. The prevailing cells immunocaptured with MAb A4F4 were morphologically and serologically similar to T. mobile type strain cells. T. mobile was not detected in these oil field waters by classical enrichment procedures. Furthermore, extraction with antibody-coated IMB allowed pure strains to be isolated directly from primary enrichment cultures without prior time-consuming subculturing and consecutive transfers to selective media. Images PMID:16348693

Christensen, Bjørn; Torsvik, Terje; Lien, Torleiv

1992-01-01

165

Kinetics of lead and copper removal from oil-field brine by potential sorption.  

PubMed

The present study investigates the kinetics of lead and copper removal from oil-field brine by potential sorption. A population balance equation, coupled with a mass balance equation, was used in the estimation of kinetic parameters. Metal removal was performed by potential sorption of lead and copper through CaCO3 precipitates induced by the reaction of Na2CO3 and CaCl2. The oil-field brine was selected from an oil well in Gachsaran, Iran. The crystal size distribution of the solid phase was measured by dynamic laser scattering analyzer, and the liquor phase was analyzed using atomic adsorption. The morphology of calcium carbonate particles was illustrated using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the presence of copper and lead decreases the average size distribution of calcium carbonate particles by influencing the kinetic parameters. Lead and copper concentrations were reduced from 2.911 to 0.127 ppm (95.63% removal) and 0.476 to 0.025 ppm (94.74% removal), respectively, in exchange for 12 g CaCO3 consumption per 100 ml oil-field brine. PMID:25521137

Nourafkan, E; Asachi, M; Marandi, R

2014-01-01

166

Brine contamination of shallow ground water and streams in the Brookhaven Oil Field, Lincoln County, Mississippi  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A hydrologic investigation to define areas of brine contamination in shallow freshwater aquifers commonly used for streams that drain the Brookhaven Oil Field, was conducted from October 1983 to September 1984. The Brookhaven Oil Field covers approximately 15 sq mi in northwestern Lincoln County, Mississippi. Since 1943, disposal of approximately 544.2 million barrels of brine pumped from the oil producing zone (lower part of the Tuscaloosa Formation) has contaminated the Citronelle aquifer, the Hattiesburg aquifers, and streams that drain the oil field. Approximately 5 sq mi of the shallow Citronelle aquifer contain water with chloride concentrations higher than normal for this area ( > 20 mg/L). Brine contamination has moved from the source laterally through the Citronelle aquifer to discharge into nearby streams and vertically into the underlying Hattiesburg aquifers. Contamination is most noticeable in Shaws Creek when streamflow originates primarily from groundwater inflow (approximately 87% of the time during the study). Additional study is required to define contaminant plumes, rates of groundwater movement and geohydrochemical reactions between the contaminant and aquifer materials. These data would allow accurate predictions of location, extent and degree of contamination in the study area. (Author 's abstract)

Kalkhoff, S.J.

1986-01-01

167

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through September 2000, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on improving core analysis techniques, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post steamflood projects. Work was discontinued on the stochastic geologic model and developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Tar II-A Zone so the project team could use the 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model to provide alternatives for the Tar II-A post steamflood operations and shale compaction studies. The project team spent the fourth quarter 2000 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and the Tar V horizontal well steamflood pilot. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being evaluated.

Scott Hara

2001-05-07

168

Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin: reservoir characterization for improved well completion and oil recovery  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Bluefield Field is the largest oil-producing area in the Unita basin of northern Utah. The field inclucdes over 300 wells and has produced 137 Mbbl oil and 177 bcf gas from fractured Paleocene-Eocene lacustrine and fluvial deposits of the Green River and Wasatch (Colton) formations. Oil and gas are produced at depths of 10 500-13 000 ft (3330-3940 m), with the most prolific reservoirs existing in over-pressured sandstones of the Colton Formation and the underlying Flagstaff Member of the lower Green River Formation. Despite a number of high-recovery wells (1-3 MMbbl), overall field recovery remains low, less than 10% original oil in place. This low recovery rate is interpreted to be at least partly a result of completion practices. Typically, 40-120 beds are perforated and stimulated with acid (no proppant) over intervals of up to 3000 ft (900 m). Little or no evaluation of individual beds is performed, preventing identification of good-quality reservoir zones, water-producing zones, and thief zones. As a result, detailed understanding of Bluebell reservoirs historically has been poor, inhibiting any improvements in recovery strategies. A recent project undertaken in Bluebell field as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Class 1 (fluvial-deltaic reservoir) Oil Demonstration program has focused considerable effort on reservoir characterization. This effort has involved interdisciplinary analysis of core, log, fracture, geostatistical, production, and other data. Much valuable new information on reservoir character has resulted, with important implications for completion techniques and recovery expectations. Such data should have excellent applicability to other producing areas in the Uinta Basin withi reservoirs in similar lacustrine and related deposits.Bluebell field is the largest oil-producing area in the Uinta basin of northern Utah. The field includes over 300 wells and has produced 137 MMbbl oil and 177 bcf gas from fractured Paleocene-Eocene lacustrine and fluvial deposits of the Green River and Wasatch (Colton) formations. Oil and gas are produced at depths of 10,500-13,000 ft (3330-3940 m), with the most prolific reservoirs existing in over-pressured sandstones of the Colton Formation and the underlying Flagstaff Member of the lower Green River Formation. Despite a number of high-recovery wells (1-3 MMbbl), overall field recovery remains low, less than 10% original oil in place. This low recovery rate is interpreted to be at least partly a result of completion practices. Typically, 40-120 beds are perforated and stimulated with acid (no proppant) over intervals of up to 3000 ft (900 m). Little or no evaluation of individual beds is performed, preventing identification of good-quality reservoir zones, water-producing zones, and thief zones. As a result, detailed understanding of Bluebell reservoirs historically has been poor, inhibiting any improvements in recovery strategies. A recent project undertaken in Bluebell field as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Class 1 (fluvial-deltaic reservoir) Oil Demonstration program has focused considerable effort on reservoir characterization. This effort has involved interdisciplinary analysis of core, log, fracture, geostatistical, production, and other data. Much valuable new information on reservoir character has resulted, with important implications for completion techniques and recovery expectations. Such data should have excellent applicability to other producing areas in the Uinta basin with reservoirs in similar lacustrine and related deposits.

Montgomery, S.L.; Morgan, C.D.

1998-01-01

169

Increasing Heavy Oil Reservers in the Wilmington Oil field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, Scott [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)

1997-05-05

170

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. Summary of Technical Progress

Scott Hara

1997-08-08

171

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

1998-03-03

172

Sulfate-reducing bacteria release barium and radium from naturally occurring radioactive material in oil-field barite  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Scale and sludge deposits formed during oil production can contain elevated levels of Ra, often coprecipitated with barium sulfate (barite). The potential for sulfate-reducing bacteria to release 226 Ra and Ba (a Ra analog) from oil-field barite was evaluated. The concentration of dissolved Ba increased when samples containing pipe scale, tank sludge, or oil-field brine pond sediment were incubated with sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio sp., Str LZKI, isolated from an oil-field brine pond. However, Ba release was not stoichiometric with sulfide production in oil-field samples, and <0.1% of the Ba was released. Potential for the release of 226Ra was demonstrated, and the 226 Ra release associated with sulfate-reducing activity was predictable from the amount of Ba released. As with Ba, only a fraction of the 226Ra expected from the amount of sulfide produced was released, and most of the Ra remained associated with the solid material.

Phillips, E.J.P.; Landa, E.R.; Kraemer, T.; Zielinski, R.

2001-01-01

173

Cost effective modular unit for cleaning oil and gas field waste water  

SciTech Connect

Problems of environmental control involving conservation of water resources are vital for the development of giant oil and gas condensate fields near Caspian Sea (Russia) characterized by water shortages. One of the urgent tasks of oil production industry is to use all field waste water consisting of underground, processing and rain water. It was necessary to construct a new highly effective equipment which could be used in local waste water treatment. Now we have at our disposal a technology and equipment to meet the requirements to the treated water quality. Thus we have installed a modular unit of 100 m{sup 3}/a day capacity to clean waste water from oil products, suspended matter and other organic pollutants at Orenburg oil and gas condensate field, Russia. The unit provides with a full treatment of produced water and comprises a settling tank with adhesive facility, the number of sorption filters, Trofactor bioreactors and a disinfecting facility. The equipment is fitted into three boxes measuring 9 x 3.2 x 2.7 in each. The equipment is simple in design that enables to save money, time and space. Sorption filters, bioreactors as well as the Trofactor process are a part of know-how. While working on the unit construction we applied well known methods of settling and sorption. The process of mechanic cleaning is undergoing in the following succession: (1) the gravitational separation in a settling tank where the floated film oil products are constantly gathered and the sediment is periodically taken away, (2) the settled water treatment in sorption Filters of a special kind.

Zinberg, M.B.; Nenasheva, M.N.; Gafarov, N.A.

1996-12-31

174

Determination of hexaconazole in field samples of an oil palm plantation.  

PubMed

In oil palm plantations, the fungicide hexaconazole is used to control Ganoderma infection that threatens to destroy or compromisethe palm. The application of hexaconazole is usually through soil drenching, trunk injection, or a combination of these two methods. It is therefore important to have a method to determine the residual amount of hexaconazole in the field such as in samples of water, soil, and leaf to monitor the use and fate of the fungicide in oil palm plantations. This study on the behaviour of hexaconazole in oil palm agro-environment was carried out at the UKM-MPOB Research Station, Bangi Lama, Selangor. Three experimental plots in this estate with 7-year-old Dura x Pisifera (DxP) palms were selected for the field trial. One plot was sprayed with hexaconazole at the manufacturer's recommended dosage, one at double the recommended dosage, and the third plot was untreated control. Hexaconazole residues in the soil, leaf, and water were determined before and after fungicide treatment. Soil samples were randomly collected from three locations at different depths (0-50 cm) and soil collected fromthe same depth were bulked together. Soil, water, and palm leaf were collected at -1 (day before treatment), 0 (day of treatment), 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 70, 90, and 120 days after treatment. Hexaconazole was detected in soil and oil palm leaf, but was not detected in water from the nearby stream. PMID:22851367

Muhamad, Halimah; Zainol, Maznah; Sahid, Ismail; Abu Seman, Idris

2012-08-01

175

Geology and reservoir characteristics of carbonate buildup in giant Bu Hasa oil field, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bu Hasa field in Abu Dhabi was the first giant oil field in the Arabian Gulf to produce from the Lower Cretaceous Shuaiba Formation (Aptian). The field has a productive area of about 155,673 c (63,047 ha.) and 12.6 billion bbl of oil reserves. The formation is composed mainly of rudistid and algal sediments, rudistid mounds having overlain and built

Alsharhan

1987-01-01

176

Oil fields and new plays in the Rioni foreland basin, Republic of Georgia  

SciTech Connect

The Rioni Basin in West Georgia is an Oligocene foredeep that evolved into a Miocene to Pliocene foreland basin, north of the Achara-Trialeti thrust belt and south of the Greater Caucasus. It extends to the west into the Black Sea. A large number of exploration wildcats have been drilled onshore since the nineteenth century and have led to the discovery of three fields. Exploration was prompted by seeps and restricted to frontal ramp anticlines mapped at surface. No wells have been drilled offshore. Supsa (discovered 1889) contains 29 MMbbl oil in clastic Sarmatian reservoirs. The field has around 50 wells but less than 0.5 MMbbl have been produced. Shromisubani (discovered 1973) contains oil within Maeotian and Pontian clastic reservoirs, Chaladidi oil within Upper Cretaceous chalk. Despite this long and apparently intensive exploration effort, several factors make the basin an exciting target for field redevelopment and further exploration. The quality of existing seismic is very poor both on-and offshore. Reinterpretation of the structure of the fold and thrust belt has suggested the presence of new targets and plays which may be imaged by modern seismic methods. In addition, due to problems associated with central planning, discovered fields have not been optimally developed or even fully appraised. The application of new technology, geological interpretation and investment promises to delineate substantial remaining reserves even after more than one hundred years of exploration.

Robinson, A.G.; Griffith, E.T. (JKX Oil and Gas, Guildford (United Kingdom)); Sargeant, J. (RES-Source Limited, Banchory (United Kingdom))

1996-01-01

177

Oil fields and new plays in the Rioni foreland basin, Republic of Georgia  

SciTech Connect

The Rioni Basin in West Georgia is an Oligocene foredeep that evolved into a Miocene to Pliocene foreland basin, north of the Achara-Trialeti thrust belt and south of the Greater Caucasus. It extends to the west into the Black Sea. A large number of exploration wildcats have been drilled onshore since the nineteenth century and have led to the discovery of three fields. Exploration was prompted by seeps and restricted to frontal ramp anticlines mapped at surface. No wells have been drilled offshore. Supsa (discovered 1889) contains 29 MMbbl oil in clastic Sarmatian reservoirs. The field has around 50 wells but less than 0.5 MMbbl have been produced. Shromisubani (discovered 1973) contains oil within Maeotian and Pontian clastic reservoirs, Chaladidi oil within Upper Cretaceous chalk. Despite this long and apparently intensive exploration effort, several factors make the basin an exciting target for field redevelopment and further exploration. The quality of existing seismic is very poor both on-and offshore. Reinterpretation of the structure of the fold and thrust belt has suggested the presence of new targets and plays which may be imaged by modern seismic methods. In addition, due to problems associated with central planning, discovered fields have not been optimally developed or even fully appraised. The application of new technology, geological interpretation and investment promises to delineate substantial remaining reserves even after more than one hundred years of exploration.

Robinson, A.G.; Griffith, E.T. [JKX Oil and Gas, Guildford (United Kingdom); Sargeant, J. [RES-Source Limited, Banchory (United Kingdom)

1996-12-31

178

Mechanisms of immiscible CO/sub 2/ injection in heavy oil reservoirs, Wilmington Field, CA  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of simulation studies made to investigate the mechanisms of immiscible CO/sub 2/ injection in heavy oil reservoirs. The studies were undertaken to assist in the design and monitoring of two projects implemented in the Wilmington Field, Los Angeles County, California. An equation-of-state compositional simulator was used in these studies. The equation-of-state was adjusted to match saturation pressures and swelling data from the laboratory. Simulation runs were then made to investigate the effect of various parameters on the process. The paper relates the various simulator studies to the Long Beach Oil Development Company (LBOD) project in the Tar Zone, Fault Block V and the Xtra Energy project in the Ranger Zone; Fault Block I of the Wilmington Field. Both projects use the same source of gas which is approximately 82% CO/sub 2/ and 18% N/sub 2/.

Spivak, A.; Chima, C.M.

1984-04-01

179

Truncated shifted pareto distribution in assessing size distribution of oil and gas fields  

SciTech Connect

The truncated shifted Pareto (TSP) distribution, a variant of the two-parameter Pareto distribution, in which one parameter is added to shift the distribution right and left and the right-hand side is truncated, is used to model size distributions of oil and gas fields for resource assessment. Assumptions about limits to the left-hand and right-hand side reduce the number of parameters to two. The TSP distribution has advantages over the more customary lognormal distribution because it has a simple analytic expression, allowing exact computation of several statistics of interest, has a J-shape, and has more flexibility in the thickness of the right-hand tail. Oil field sizes from the Minnelusa play in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, are used as a case study. Probability plotting procedures allow easy visualization of the fit and help the assessment.

Houghton, J.C.

1988-11-01

180

Use of the truncated shifted Pareto distribution in assessing size distribution of oil and gas fields  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The truncated shifted Pareto (TSP) distribution, a variant of the two-parameter Pareto distribution, in which one parameter is added to shift the distribution right and left and the right-hand side is truncated, is used to model size distributions of oil and gas fields for resource assessment. Assumptions about limits to the left-hand and right-hand side reduce the number of parameters to two. The TSP distribution has advantages over the more customary lognormal distribution because it has a simple analytic expression, allowing exact computation of several statistics of interest, has a "J-shape," and has more flexibility in the thickness of the right-hand tail. Oil field sizes from the Minnelusa play in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, are used as a case study. Probability plotting procedures allow easy visualization of the fit and help the assessment. ?? 1988 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

Houghton, J.C.

1988-01-01

181

Flexible Riser and Mooring System Develops Small Oil Fields in the North Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on the flexible riser and mooring system (FRAMS) which provides a technically straightforward, commercially attractive method of developing small oil fields. A passively moored 60,000-deadweight-ton (60,000-DWT) tanker with deck-mounted equipment provides a swivelless well fluid and injection water path from and to the wellheads. The system can be disconnected rapidly in severe weather.

A. M. Thompson; G. A. A. H. Holmes; P. J. Benstead

1991-01-01

182

Formation of seep bubble plumes in the Coal Oil Point seep field  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fate of marine seep gases (transport to the atmosphere or dissolution, and either bacterial oxidation or diffusion to\\u000a the atmosphere) is intimately connected with bubble and bubble-plume processes, which are strongly size-dependent. Based on\\u000a measurements with a video bubble measurement system in the Coal Oil Point seep field in the Santa Barbara Channel, California,\\u000a which recorded the bubble-emission size

Ira Leifer; Daniel Culling

2010-01-01

183

Palaeo-carbonate seep structures above an oil reservoir, Gryphon Field, Tertiary, North Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Petrographic and geochemical analyses performed on a North Sea core from the Gryphon Field reveal the presence of palaeo-degassing features surrounded by injected sandstones in the Eocene interval. The injected sandstones are oil-stained and poorly cemented by carbonate and quartz. 18O isotope analyses indicate that carbonate cementation occurred during shallow burial (likely less than about 300 m). Depleted 13C (around -30‰

Adriano Mazzini; D. Duranti; R. Jonk; J. Parnell; B. T. Cronin; A. Hurst; M. Quine

2003-01-01

184

Disposal of NORM-Contaminated Oil Field Wastes in Salt Caverns  

SciTech Connect

In 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, asked Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to conduct a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW) into salt caverns. That study concluded that disposal of NOW into salt caverns is feasible and legal. If caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they can be a suitable means of disposing of NOW (Veil et al. 1996). Considering these findings and the increased U.S. interest in using salt caverns for NOW disposal, the Office of Fossil Energy asked Argonne to conduct further research on the cost of cavern disposal compared with the cost of more traditional NOW disposal methods and on preliminary identification and investigation of the risks associated with such disposal. The cost study (Veil 1997) found that disposal costs at the four permitted disposal caverns in the United States were comparable to or lower than the costs of other disposal facilities in the same geographic area. The risk study (Tomasko et al. 1997) estimated that both cancer and noncancer human health risks from drinking water that had been contaminated by releases of cavern contents were significantly lower than the accepted risk thresholds. Since 1992, DOE has funded Argonne to conduct a series of studies evaluating issues related to management and disposal of oil field wastes contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). Included among these studies were radiological dose assessments of several different NORM disposal options (Smith et al. 1996). In 1997, DOE asked Argonne to conduct additional analyses on waste disposal in salt caverns, except that this time the wastes to be evaluated would be those types of oil field wastes that are contaminated by NORM. This report describes these analyses. Throughout the remainder of this report, the term ''NORM waste'' is used to mean ''oil field waste contaminated by NORM''.

Blunt, D.L.; Elcock, D.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Viel, J.A.; and Williams, G.P.

1999-01-21

185

Aneth oil field, giant carbonate stratigraphic trap, Paradox basin, Utah, U. S. A  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Aneth oil field (approximately 400 million bbl original primary reserves) occurs within an isolated southeast-northwest-trending Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) algal carbonate bank buildup located approximately 25 mi (40 km) basinward of the main carbonate shelf of the Paradox basin in Utah. Desmoinesian deposition was strongly cyclic, with as many as 30 main evaporite-carbonate cycles recognized. The Aneth algal bank is part

Petterson

1991-01-01

186

Aneth oil field carbonate mound reservoir - Organic-rich mudbank origin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Aneth oil field (approximately 400 million bbl ultimate recovery) occurs within an isolated southeast-northwest-trending Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) algal carbonate bank buildup located approximately 25 mi (40 km) basinward of the main carbonate shelf of the Paradox basin in Utah. Desmoinesian deposition was strongly cyclic, with as many as 30 main evaporite-carbonate cycles recognized. The Aneth algal bank is part of

1989-01-01

187

Phylogenetic Diversity of Aerobic Saprotrophic Bacteria Isolated from the Daqing Oil Field  

Microsoft Academic Search

A diverse and active microbial community in the stratal waters of the Daqing oil field (China), which is exploited with the use of water-flooding, was found to contain aerobic chemoheterotrophic bacteria (including hydrocarbon-oxidizing ones) and anaerobic fermentative, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic bacteria. The aerobic bacteria were most abundant in the near-bottom zones of injection wells. Twenty pure cultures of aerobic saprotrophic

T. N. Nazina; A. A. Grigor'yan; Yan-Fen Xue; D. Sh. Sokolova; E. V. Novikova; T. P. Tourova; A. B. Poltaraus; S. S. Belyaev; M. V. Ivanov

2002-01-01

188

Mechanisms of Immiscible CO2 Injection in Heavy Oil Reservoirs, Wilmington Field, CA  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the results of simulation studies made to investigate the mechanisms of immiscible COâ injection in heavy oil reservoirs. The studies were undertaken to assist in the design and monitoring of two projects implemented in the Wilmington Field, Los Angeles County, California. An equation-of-state compositional simulator was used in these studies. The equation-of-state was adjusted to match saturation

Allan Spivak; C. M. Chima

1984-01-01

189

Prospects for use of bimetal pipes in field oil and gas pipelines of West Siberia  

Microsoft Academic Search

A possibility of applying bimetal pipes, with cladding layers of X13 and X18H10T steels, in the oil fields of Western Siberia\\u000a is studied. It is shown that the low pitting resistance of the cladding layers of bimetals, which are currently produced by\\u000a the pack rolling method, is the central problem. It can be solved by the use of electroslag cladding,

I. I. Reformatskaya; V. V. Zav’yalov; I. G. Rodionova; A. N. Podobaev; I. I. Ashcheulova

2000-01-01

190

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

SciTech Connect

In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. Argonne determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, Argonne subsequently conducted a preliminary evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in domal salt caverns. Steps used in this evaluation included the following: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing contaminant toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and calculating human cancer and noncancer risk estimates. Five postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (referring to noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results led to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-05

191

Geological history and petroleum system of the Mittelplate oil field, Northern Germany  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The geological history of Germany’s largest and most productive petroleum accumulation, the Mittelplate oil field in Schleswig-Holstein (Northern Germany), is reconstructed by simulating the structural and thermal evolution along a 2D cross-section. The Mittelplate field is located at the western flank of the Büsum salt dome at the transition from the Schleswig-Holstein mainland to the German North Sea Sector. Organic geochemical data confirm the Lower Jurassic Posidonia Shale to be the predominant oil source rock in the Schleswig-Holstein area. The studied section is characterized by salt walls and salt domes built up by Permian evaporites. Reconstruction of the structural and thermal evolution of the Mittelplate field by means of basin modelling reveals the dominating influence of salt dynamics on the entire petroleum system: The development of secondary rim-synclines during salt rise provided accommodation space for the deposition of the Posidonia Shale as well as the deltaic Middle Jurassic reservoir sandstones. The rise of the nearby Oldenswort salt wall controlled the timing of maturation and petroleum generation during Cenozoic times. Hydrocarbon migration from the Posidonia Shale into the reservoirs occurred up-dip from the deeper subsiding rim-syncline into the structural trap with the Middle Jurassic reservoir sandstones pinching out at the flank of the Büsum salt dome. Along the modelled 2D section the field’s recent temperature field and its complex reservoir architecture are reconstructed.

Grassmann, S.; Cramer, B.; Delisle, G.; Messner, J.; Winsemann, J.

2005-12-01

192

Souring in low-temperature surface facilities of two high-temperature Argentinian oil fields.  

PubMed

Produced waters from the Barrancas and Chihuido de la Salina (CHLS) fields in Argentina had higher concentrations of sulfate than were found in the injection waters, suggesting that the formation waters in these reservoirs had a high sulfate concentration and that sulfate-reducing bacteria were inactive downhole. Incubation of produced waters with produced oil gave rapid reduction of sulfate to sulfide (souring) at 37 °C, some at 60 °C, but none at 80 °C. Alkylbenzenes and alkanes served as electron donor, especially in incubations with CHLS oil. Dilution with water to decrease the ionic strength or addition of inorganic phosphate did not increase souring at 37 or 60 °C. These results indicate that souring in these reservoirs is limited by the reservoir temperature (80 °C for the Barrancas and 65-70 °C for the CHLS field) and that souring may accelerate in surface facilities where the oil-water mixture cools. As a result, significant sulfide concentrations are present in these surface facilities. The activity and presence of chemolithotrophic Gammaproteobacteria of the genus Thiomicrospira, which represented 85% of the microbial community in a water plant in the Barrancas field, indicated reoxidation of sulfide and sulfur to sulfate. The presence of these bacteria offers potential for souring control by microbial oxidation in aboveground facilities, provided that formation of corrosive sulfur can be avoided. PMID:24903813

Agrawal, Akhil; An, Dongshan; Cavallaro, Adriana; Voordouw, Gerrit

2014-09-01

193

Depositional environments of Upper Triassic sandstones, El Borma oil field, southwestern Tunisia  

SciTech Connect

El Borma oil field in southwestern Tunisia is located on the Algerian border and produces from five Upper Triassic sandstone reservoirs at depths ranging from 2,300 to 2,400 m. The 250 km{sup 2} field has recoverable reserves of 770 mm bbl of equivalent oil. Reservoir sandstones rest unconformably on south-dipping Lower Devonian clastic deposits. Silurian shale represents the major oil source rock and the field is capped by 550 m of shale, carbonate, and evaporite. Hercynian, topography below the reservoir sandstones comprises an 18 km wide, northeast-oriented paleovalley. Each of the four lower reservoir sandstones, bounded by a lower scour surface and a basal lag deposit, is commonly discontinuous and separated by lenticular shale beds. These 5 to 15 m thick sandstones display in channels flowing to the northeast. The overlying 12 m thick transgressive marine dolomitic shale contains carbonized bivalves and is capped by a paleosoil with root structures and siderite cement indicating subaerial exposure. The clay-rich and locally bioturbated uppermost reservoir sandstone was probably deposited in a tidally influenced estuary. Overall, the Upper Triassic reservoirs at El Borma consists of valley-fill estuary deposits that were formed during transgression of the sea from the northeast.

Bentahar, H.; Ethridge, F.G. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (United States))

1991-03-01

194

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through June 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Third Quarter 2001 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 to September 2001 to increase production and injection. This work will continue through 2001 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being addressed in 2001.

Scott Hara

2001-11-01

195

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through September 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Fourth Quarter 2001 performing routine well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood and Tar V pilot steamflood projects. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 through November 2001 to increase production and injection. In December, water injection well FW-88 was plug and abandoned and replaced by new well FW-295 into the ''D'' sands to accommodate the Port of Long Beach at their expense. Well workovers are planned for 2002 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The steamflood operation in the Tar V pilot project is mature and profitable. Recent production performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that were being addressed in 2001. As the fluid production is hot, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001.

Scott Hara

2002-01-31

196

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through March 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Second Quarter 2001 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project. The Tar II-A steamflood reservoirs have been operated over fifteen months at relatively stable pressures, due in large part to the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase in January 1999. Starting in the Fourth Quarter 2000, the project team has ramped up activity to increase production and injection. This work will continue through 2001 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being addressed in 2001. Much of the second quarter was spent writing DOE annual and quarterly reports to stay current with contract requirements.

Scott Hara

2001-05-08

197

Recent glacial events in the Norwegian North Sea - implications towards a better understanding of charging/leakage of oil fields and its impact oil exploration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent drilling and appraisal on the Southern Utsira High, Norwegian North Sea, has proved several large oil/gas discoveries, including the giant Johan Sverdrup, Edvard Grieg, Draupne, Ragnarrock and Apollo oil fields, making this a prolific petroleum area. The Southern Utsira High contains a variety of hydrocarbon density fluids found at several stratigraphic levels illustrating the compartmentalized nature of accumulations and charge history. The Southern Utsira High has been in a position to receive an oil/gas charge for a considerable period of time, with the basin towards the west most likely generating petroleum from early Eocene (50M Mabp) to its maximum present day burial depth. However, reservoir temperatures on the Southern Utsira High are just above the threshold for biodegradation (80°C). The Southern Utsira High oils are non-biodegraded suggesting that the majority of the oil charged relatively late - ca.3 million years ago to present day. The effects of the glaciation on the filling history of the Southern Utsira High are currently being assessed. It is clear that several erosional surfaces in the Pliocene can be identified, as well as glacial channels and moraine deposits, indicating that significant deposition and erosion occurred in the last five million years. Importantly, the effects of glacial rebound mean that the Southern Utsira High more than likely underwent tilting and possible leakage, not just once, but several times in the last 1 million years. The effects of tilting/leakage of geological areas on oil migration have been recognized by several authors. However, the detailed integration of geological mapping and geochemical evidence has not previously been published. The implications of a detailed assessment of tilting of a ''high' through time are; 1) opening up areas where oil migration is thought to be high risk or impossible; 2) identify possible paleo-oil columns aiding the de-risking of discovery appraisal strategies. The evidence of tilting/leakage of oil accumulations through time can be recognized in several oil fields on the Utsira High. The giant Johan Sverdrup discovery oil columns contain paleo-OWC, residual oil zones/paleo-oil columns, and oil shows considerably deeper than the current OWC or residual oil columns. Lundin has performed detailed mapping of the seabed and water column in the Alvheim/Utsira High areas in order to identify areas of gas leakage and its geological manifestations on the seabed and ultimately resulting in the collection of high quality samples. Results shows that gas leakage is prominent over the Alvheim and Utsira High areas and the implications of this to oil exploration will be discussed. In summary, Lundin's approach to oil migration is to better understand the fluid/gas movement throughout the whole basin through time. The talk will focus on the role of glaciations on the timing of charge from the South Viking Graben, fill-spill directions on the Southern Utsira High, the effects of late tilting/leakage on the charge/re-distribution of oil, and seabed / water column characterization and sampling. All placed in the context of oil exploration.

Stoddart, Daniel

2014-05-01

198

Methanotrophy in a Paleoproterozoic oil field ecosystem, Zaonega Formation, Karelia, Russia.  

PubMed

Organic carbon rich rocks in the c. 2.0 Ga Zaonega Formation (ZF), Karelia, Russia, preserve isotopic characteristics of a Paleoproterozoic ecosystem and record some of the oldest known oil generation and migration. Isotopic data derived from drill core material from the ZF show a shift in ?(13) C(org) from c. -25‰ in the lower part of the succession to c. -40‰ in the upper part. This stratigraphic shift is a primary feature and cannot be explained by oil migration, maturation effects, or metamorphic overprints. The shift toward (13) C-depleted organic matter (?(13) C(org) < -25‰) broadly coincides with lithological evidence for the generation of oil and gas in the underlying sediments and seepage onto the sea floor. We propose that the availability of thermogenic CH(4) triggered the activity of methanotrophic organisms, resulting in the production of anomalously (13) C-depleted biomass. The stratigraphic shift in ?(13) C(org) records the change from CO(2) -fixing autotrophic biomass to biomass containing a significant contribution from methanotrophy. It has been suggested recently that this shift in ?(13) C(org) reflects global forcing and progressive oxidation of the Earth. However, the lithologic indication for local thermogenic CH(4) , sourced within the oil field, is consistent with basinal methanotrophy. This indicates that regional/basinal processes can also explain the ?(13) C(org) negative isotopic shift observed in the ZF. PMID:23009699

Qu, Y; Crne, A E; Lepland, A; van Zuilen, M A

2012-11-01

199

A field experiment to assess impact of chemically dispersed oil on Arabian Gulf corals  

SciTech Connect

Field experiments were conducted on a coral reef at Jurayd Island (Saudi Arabia) in the Arabian Gulf to study the effects of chemically dispersed oil on local corals. Portions of the reef were exposed to predetermined concentrations of oil alone, dispersant alone, and oil-plus-dispersant mixtures. Areas of the reef not exposed to any of the toxicants were used as controls. Arabian Light Crude and Corexit 9527 dispersant were the test toxicants. Two series of experiments were conducted beginning in September 1981, one with a 24-hour exposure period and the other with a 5-day (120-hour) exposure period. Corals were stained for growth rate studies and extensively photographed to document any observed effects. Corals were examined for biological impacts immediately after the exposures, and then at 3-month intervals for 1 year. Water temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and hydrocarbon content were recorded during the exposure periods. Coral growth appeared unaffected by exposure to the toxicants. Some Acropora species corals exposed to dispersed oil for 5 days exhibited delayed effects, which became apparent during the relatively cold winter season.

Le Gore, R.S.; Cuddeback, J.E.; Hofmann, J.E.; Marszalek, D.S.

1983-03-01

200

Structure of pre-Caspian depression and major oil and gas fields of the region  

SciTech Connect

As a single unified depression, the pre-Caspian basin has been formed from Paleozoic to Cenozoic time. The basin is superimposed on two large pre-Permian depressions. On the Astrakhan-Aktyubinsk zone of uplifts between them is found sharply reduced Carboniferous and Devonian sections. Modern structural plan clearly displays two major structural stages: Subsalt (Paleozoic) and post (post-Kungurian). The post-salt stage is characterized by wide development of salt dome tectonics. It corresponds with its own petroliferous stage containing numerous, mostly small oil accumulations in terrigenous Mesozoic reservoirs. Large recent discoveries-Astrakhan condensate, Karachaganak and Kanazhol-Sinelnikov oil/condensate, Tengiz oil, and other fields-are associated with the Subsalt Paleozoic complex ranging from Lower Permian to the top of Upper Devonian. The Subsalt stage has its own regularities in hydrocarbon phase differentiation; large reserves concentration; dominantly productive carbonates with various reservoirs; and presence of structural, depositional, and erosional factors controlling formation of oil and gas traps. The paper describes major distributional features of the various arc-and-type Permian and Carboniferous formations, which in conjunction with Subsalt paleotemperature data and geochemistry of organic matter represents a basis for the forecast of new discoveries.

Krylov, N.A. (Amoco Production Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Avrov, V.P. (Igirgi, Moscow (USSR)); Lisovsky, N.N.

1991-03-01

201

Residual-oil-saturation-technology test, Bell Creek Field, Montana. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A field test was conducted of the technology available to measure residual oil saturation following waterflood secondary oil recovery processes. The test was conducted in a new well drilled solely for that purpose, located immediately northwest of the Bell Creek Micellar Polymer Pilot. The area where the test was conducted was originally drilled during 1968, produced by primary until late 1970, and was under line drive waterflood secondary recovery until early 1976, when the area was shut in at waterflood depletion. This report presents the results of tests conducted to determine waterflood residual oil saturation in the Muddy Sandstone reservoir. The engineering techniques used to determine the magnitude and distribution of the remaining oil saturation included both pressure and sidewall cores, conventional well logs (Dual Laterolog - Micro Spherically Focused Log, Dual Induction Log - Spherically Focused Log, Borehole Compensated Sonic Log, Formation Compensated Density-Compensated Neutron Log), Carbon-Oxygen Logs, Dielectric Logs, Nuclear Magnetism Log, Thermal Decay Time Logs, and a Partitioning Tracer Test.

Not Available

1981-06-01

202

Field test of acoustic logs for measuring porosity and oil saturation in a mature waterflood in the Wilmington field, CA  

SciTech Connect

A field test was carried out in the Wilmington Field, CA to assess the effectiveness of multi-pole acoustic logs to measure porosity and oil saturation through casing in sands waterflooded for over 40 years. The field test was also designed to assess the production potential of selectively recompleting wells in high water cut areas. The multi-pole acoustic logs offer a promising new method for reservoir characterization, depletion monitoring, and optimizing the recomplete and redrill potential of existing wells. The Department of Energy (DOE) is co-funding a multi-year study to refine the acoustic log analyses, to improve reservoir characterization, and to evaluate the cost effectiveness of various recomplete methods.

Moos, D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Hara, S.; Phillips, C.; Hooks, A.; Tagbor, K.

1995-12-31

203

A Fuzzy Feed-Forward/Feedback Control System for a Three-Phase Oil Field Centrifuge.  

SciTech Connect

A set of fuzzy controllers was designed and applied to a commercial three-phase oil field centrifuge. This centrifuge is essentially a one of a kind unit. It is used to recover oil from tank bottoms and oil field and/or refinery sludge. It is unique because it can separate oily emulsions into three separate phases, oil, water, and solids, in one operation. The centrifuge is a large but portable device. It is moved form site to site and is used to separate a large variety of waste emulsions. The centrifuge feedstock varies significantly from site to site and often varies significantly during the daily operation. In this application, fuzzy logic was used on a class of problems not easily solved by classical control techniques. The oil field centrifuge is a highly nonlinear system, with a time varying input. We have been unable to develop a physical-mathematical model of the portion of the centrifuge operation that actually separates the oil, water, and solids. For this portion of the operation we developed a fuzzy feedback control system that modeled a skilled operator's knowledge and actions as opposed to the physical model of the centrifuge itself. Because of the variable feed we had to develop a feed-forward controller that would sense and react to feed changes prior to the time that the actual change reached the centrifuge separation unit. This portion of the control system was also a fuzzy controller designed around the knowledge of a skilled operator. In addition to the combined feed-forward and feedback control systems, we developed a soft-sensor that was used to determine the value of variables needed for the feed-forward control system. These variables could not actually be measured but were calculated from the measurement of other variables. The soft-sensor was developed with a combination of a physical model of the feed system and a skilled operator's expert knowledge. Finally the entire control system is tied together with a fuzzy-SPC (Statistical Process Control) filter, used to filter process and instrument noise and a fuzzy conflict resolution code used to keep the feed-forward and feedback control systems working well together.

Parkinson, W. J. (William Jerry),; Smith, R. E. (Ronald E.); Mortensen, F. N. (Fred N.); Wantuck, P. J. (Paul J.); Ross, Timothy J.; Jamshidi, Mohammad; Miller, N. (Neal)

2002-01-01

204

Geologic Sequestration of CO2 in a Depleted Oil Reservoir: A Field Demonstration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in geologic formations is the most direct carbon management strategy for long-term removal of anthropogenic CO2 from the atmosphere, and is likely to be needed for continuation of the US fossil fuel-based economy and high standard of living. Subsurface injection of CO2 into depleted oil reservoirs is a carbon sequestration strategy that might prove to be both cost effective and environmentally safe. However, there are significant R&D gaps that need to be addressed prior to sequestration of CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs, including the need of coupled physicochemical processes involving CO2, water, oil and reservoir rock, better estimates of the capacity of reservoir for long-term sequestration and ultimate fate of injected CO2, and improved geophysical monitoring technologies for accurately determining the presence and location of injected CO2. Our project is part of the DOE Carbon Sequestration program and it is directed at predicting and monitoring the migration and ultimate fate of CO2 after injection in a depleted oil reservoir. We utilize computer simulations of multiphase oil-brine-CO2 flow in the reservoir, laboratory measurements of geochemical brine-rock reactions, and geophysical surveys to monitor CO2 plume migration after injection. A principal component of this project is characterization and validation of predicted CO2 migration and fate through a field demonstration experiment. The reservoir under investigation is part of the West Pearl Queen field in southeastern New Mexico. Geologic modeling and numerical flow simulations (ECLIPSE code) have been used to study the feasibility of injection, and these techniques were used to help in designing geophysical monitoring studies to track the injected plume. Long-term static brine-rock reactions and short-term brine-CO2-oil flow through tests were performed to better understand the likely geochemical reactions that might be influence CO2 sequestration or injection. Results include identification of gypsum precipitation at high CO2 gas pressures and permeability-porosity measurements of the reservoir. Baseline geophysical surveys are in progress, with CO2 injection at the field site to begin immediately afterwards. Preliminary results of lab tests, computer simulations and geophysical imaging will be presented.

Westrich, H. R.; Zhang, D.; Grigg, R. B.

2002-12-01

205

Focal mechanism determination of induced microearthquakes in an oil field using full waveforms from shallow and deep seismic networks  

E-print Network

A new, relatively high frequency, full waveform matching method was used to study the focal mechanisms of small, local earthquakes induced in an oil field, which are monitored by a sparse near-surface network and a deep ...

Li, Junlun

206

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through June 2002, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V post-steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the Third Quarter 2002, the project team essentially completed implementing the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project developed in March 2002 and is proceeding with additional related work. The project team has completed developing laboratory research procedures to analyze the sand consolidation well completion technique and will initiate work in the fourth quarter. The Tar V pilot steamflood project terminated hot water injection and converted to post-steamflood cold water injection on April 19, 2002. Proposals have been approved to repair two sand consolidated horizontal wells that sanded up, Tar II-A well UP-955 and Tar V well J-205, with gravel-packed inner liner jobs to be performed next quarter. Other well work to be performed next quarter is to convert well L-337 to a Tar V water injector and to recomplete vertical well A-194 as a Tar V interior steamflood pattern producer. Plans have been approved to drill and complete well A-605 in Tar V in the first quarter 2003. Plans have been approved to update the Tar II-A 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and run sensitivity cases to evaluate the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Well work related to the Tar II-A accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan began in March 2002 with oil production increasing from 1009 BOPD in the first quarter to 1145 BOPD in the third quarter. Reservoir pressures have been increased during the quarter from 88% to 91% hydrostatic levels in the ''T'' sands and from 91% to 94% hydrostatic levels in the ''D'' sands. Well work during the quarter is described in the Reservoir Management section. The post-steamflood production performance in the Tar V pilot project has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations and the loss of a horizontal producer a second time to sand inflow that are being addressed in the fourth quarter. As the fluid production temperatures exceeded 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and converted to cold water injection on April 19, 2002.

Scott Hara

2002-11-08

207

Effect of leachability on environmental risk assessment for naturally occurring radioactive materials in petroleum oil fields.  

PubMed

Elevated concentrations of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), including 238U, 232Th, and their progeny found in underground geologic deposits, are often encountered during crude oil recovery. Radium, the predominant radionuclide brought to the surface with the crude oil and produced water, co-precipitates with barium in the form of complex compounds of sulfates, carbonates, and silicates found in sludge and scale. These NORM deposits are highly stable and very insoluble under ambient conditions at the earth's surface. However, the co-precipitated radium matrix is not thermodynamically stable at reducing conditions which may enable a fraction of the radium to eventually be released to the environment. Although the fate of radium in uranium mill tailings has been studied extensively, the leachability of radium from crude oil NORM deposits exposed to acid-rain and other aging processes is generally unknown. The leachability of radium from NORM contaminated soil collected at a contaminated oil field in eastern Kentucky was determined using extraction fluids having wide range of pH reflecting different extreme environmental conditions. The average 226Ra concentration in the samples of soil subjected to leachability testing was 32.56 Bq g(-1) +/- 0.34 Bq g(-1). The average leaching potential of 226Ra observed in these NORM contaminated soil samples was 1.3% +/- 0.46% and was independent of the extraction fluid. Risk assessment calculations using the family farm scenario show that the annual dose to a person living and working on this NORM contaminated soil is mainly due to external gamma exposure and radon inhalation. However, waterborne pathways make a non-negligible contribution to the dose for the actual resident families living on farmland with the type of residual NORM contamination due to crude oil recovery operations. PMID:10647985

Rajaretnam, G; Spitz, H B

2000-02-01

208

Hydrocarbon-water interactions during brine migration: Evidence from hydrocarbon inclusions in calcite cements from Danish North Sea oil fields  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Crude oils in primary and secondary fluid inclusions in calcite from fractures in seven offshore oil fields associated with diapiric salt structures in the Danish sector of the North Sea were analyzed by capillary column gas chromatography and compared with crude oils produced from the same reservoirs. Oils from fluid inclusions in all fields show evidence of biodegradation (decreased n-C17/pristane and n-C18/phytane ratios and loss of n-C7, 2-methyl hexane, and 3-methyl hexane relative to methyl cyclohexane) and water washing (absence of benzene and depletion of toluene). Some oils in inclusions are extremely enriched in C6 and C7 cyclic alkanes suggesting that these samples contain hydrocarbons exsolved from ascending, hotter formation waters. Compared to inclusion oils the produced oils are less biodegraded, but are water washed, indicating that both types of oil interacted with large volumes of formation water. The carbon isotopic composition of the calcite host of the fluid inclusions in the Dagmar and Skjold fields is as light as -16.5%. PDB and the sulfur isotopic composition of pyrite in and adjacent to the calcite veins in the Skjold field is as light as -39.6%. CDT, indicating that biodegradation of the oils was a source of some of the carbon in the calcite and sulfate reduction was the source of sulfur for the pyrite. The evidence for microbial degradation of petroleum is consistent with present-day reservoir temperatures (65??-96??C) but is not consistent with previous estimates of the temperatures of calcite vein filling (95??-130??C) which are much higher than the temperatures of known occurrences of biodegraded oil. ?? 1990.

Jensenius, J.; Burruss, R.C.

1990-01-01

209

Increased Oil Production and Reserves from Improved Completion Techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase oil production and reserves in the Uinta Basin by demonstrating improved completion techniques. Low productivity of Uinta Basin wells is caused by gross production intervals of several thousand feet that contain perforated thief zones, water-bearing zones, and unperforated oil-bearing intervals. Geologic and engineering characterization and computer simulation of the Green River and Wasatch Formations in the Bluebell field will determine reservoir heterogeneities related to fractures and depositional trends. This will be followed by drilling and recompletion of several wells to demonstrate improved completion techniques based on the reservoir characterization. Transfer of the project results will be an ongoing component of the project.

Morgan, C.D.

1997-12-31

210

Increased Oil Production and Reserves from Improved Completion Techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase oil production and reserves in the Uinta Basin by demonstrating improved completion techniques. Low productivity of Uinta Basin wells is caused by gross production intervals of several thousand feet that contain perforated thief zones, water-bearing zones, and non-perforated oil-bearing intervals. Geologic and engineering characterization and computer simulation of the Green River and Wasatch Formations in the Bluebell field will determine reservoir heterogeneities related to fractures and depositional trends. This will be followed by drilling and recompletion of several wells to demonstrate improved completion techniques based on the reservoir characterization. Transfer of the project results will be an ongoing component of the project.

Deo, Milind D.; Morgan, Craig D.

1999-11-01

211

A fuzzy control system for a three-phase oil field centrifuge  

SciTech Connect

The three-phase centrifuge discussed here is an excellent device for cleaning up oil field and refinery wastes. These wastes are typically composed of hydrocarbons, water, and solids. This technology converts waste, which is often classified as hazardous, into salable oil, reusable water, and solids that can be placed in landfills. No secondary waste is produced. A major problem is that only one person can set up and run the equipment well enough to provide an optimal cleanup. Demand for this technology has far exceeded a one-man operation. The solution to this problem is an intelligent control system that can replace a highly skilled operator so that several centrifuges can be operated at different locations at the same time.

Parkinson, W.J.; Smith, R.E.; Wantuck, P.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Miller, N. [Centech Inc., Casper, WY (United States)

1998-12-31

212

Sedimentation, zoning of reservoir rocks in W. Siberian basin oil fields  

SciTech Connect

A line pattern of well cluster spacing was chosen in western Siberia because of taiga, marshes, etc., on the surface. The zoning of the oil pools within productive Upper Jurassic J[sub 3] intervals is complicated. This is why until the early 1990s almost each third well drilled in the Shaimsky region on the western edge of the West Siberian basin came up dry. The results of development drilling would be much better if one used some sedimentological relationships of zoning of the reservoir rocks within the oil fields. These natural phenomena are: Paleobasin bathymetry; Distances from the sources of the clastic material; and Proximity of the area of deposition. Using the diagram in this article, one can avoid drilling toward areas where the sandstone pinch out, area of argillization of sand-stones, or where the probability of their absence is high.

Kliger, J.A. (Enforce Energy Corp., New York, NY (United States))

1994-02-07

213

Chemical comparison and acute toxicity of water accommodated fraction (WAF) of source and field collected Macondo oils from the Deepwater Horizon spill.  

PubMed

Two Source oils and five field collected oil residues from the Deepwater Horizon incident were chemically characterized. Water accommodated fractions (WAFs) of the Source oils and two of the field-weathered oils were prepared to evaluate the impact of natural weathering on the chemical composition and the acute toxicity of the WAFs. Toxicity test species representing different tropic levels were used (the primary producer Skeletonema costatum (algae) and the herbivorous copepod Acartia tonsa). The results suggest that the potential for acute toxicity is higher in WAFs from non-weathered oils than WAFs from the field weathered oils. The Source oils contained a large fraction of soluble and bioavailable components (such as BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, xylenes) and naphthalene), whereas in the surface collected oils these components were depleted by dissolution into the water column as the oil rose to the surface and by evaporative loss after reaching the sea surface. PMID:25534626

Faksness, Liv-Guri; Altin, Dag; Nordtug, Trond; Daling, Per S; Hansen, Bjørn Henrik

2015-02-15

214

Disposal of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns -- Legality, technical feasibility, economics, and risk  

SciTech Connect

Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, there are no fatal flaws that would prevent a state regulatory agency from approaching cavern disposal of NORM. On the basis of the costs charged by caverns currently used for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal caverns could be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

Veil, J.A.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G.P.

1998-07-01

215

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through December 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the First Quarter 2002, the project team developed an accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and began implementing the associated well work in March. The Tar V pilot steamflood project will be converted to post-steamflood cold water injection in April 2002. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Most of the 2001 well work resulted in maintaining oil and gross fluid production and water injection rates. Reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are at 88% and 91% hydrostatic levels, respectively. Well work during the first quarter and plans for 2002 are described in the Reservoir Management section. The steamflood operation in the Tar V pilot project is mature and profitable. Recent production performance has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that have been addressed during this quarter. As the fluid production temperatures were beginning to exceed 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and will be converted to cold water injection next quarter.

Scott Hara

2002-04-30

216

For the first 15 years of my life, I lived in the shadow of the oil and gas fields of South Louisiana and became accustomed to the oil indus-  

E-print Network

For the first 15 years of my life, I lived in the shadow of the oil and gas fields of South Louisiana and became accustomed to the oil indus- try and the people involved in this business. I of this world. My father worked for Humble Oil (which was acquired later by Exxon) and we moved from place

Stephens, Jacqueline

217

Gas injection may have triggered earthquakes in the Cogdell oil field, Texas  

PubMed Central

Between 1957 and 1982, water flooding was conducted to improve petroleum production in the Cogdell oil field north of Snyder, TX, and a contemporary analysis concluded this induced earthquakes that occurred between 1975 and 1982. The National Earthquake Information Center detected no further activity between 1983 and 2005, but between 2006 and 2011 reported 18 earthquakes having magnitudes 3 and greater. To investigate these earthquakes, we analyzed data recorded by six temporary seismograph stations deployed by the USArray program, and identified 93 well-recorded earthquakes occurring between March 2009 and December 2010. Relocation with a double-difference method shows that most earthquakes occurred within several northeast–southwest-trending linear clusters, with trends corresponding to nodal planes of regional focal mechanisms, possibly indicating the presence of previously unidentified faults. We have evaluated data concerning injection and extraction of oil, water, and gas in the Cogdell field. Water injection cannot explain the 2006–2011 earthquakes, especially as net volumes (injection minus extraction) are significantly less than in the 1957–1982 period. However, since 2004 significant volumes of gases including supercritical CO2 have been injected into the Cogdell field. The timing of gas injection suggests it may have contributed to triggering the recent seismic activity. If so, this represents an instance where gas injection has triggered earthquakes having magnitudes 3 and larger. Further modeling studies may help evaluate recent assertions suggesting significant risks accompany large-scale carbon capture and storage as a strategy for managing climate change. PMID:24191019

Gan, Wei; Frohlich, Cliff

2013-01-01

218

Microbiology to help solve our energy needs: methanogenesis from oil and the impact of nitrate on the oil-field sulfur cycle.  

PubMed

Our society depends greatly on fossil fuels, and the environmental consequences of this are well known and include significant increases of the CO(2) concentration in the earth's atmosphere. Although microbiology has traditionally played only a minor role in fossil-fuel extraction, two novel key discoveries indicate that this may change. First, the realization that oil components can be converted to methane and CO(2) by methanogenic consortia in the absence of electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, sulfate) explains how much of the world's oil has been biodegraded in situ. In addition to inorganic nutrients, only water is needed for these methanogenic conversions. Hence, continued methanogenic biodegradation may have shaped the heavy-oil reservoirs that are so prevalent today. The potential to exploit these reactions, for example, by in situ gasification, is currently being actively investigated. Second, injection of nitrate in oil and gas fields can lower sulfide concentrations. High sulfide concentrations, caused by the action of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), are associated with increased risk of corrosion, reservoir plugging (through precipitated sulfides), and human safety. Nitrate injection into an oil field stimulates subsurface heterotrophic nitrate-reducing bacteria (hNRB) and nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB). Nitrite, formed by these NRB by partial reduction of nitrate, is a strong and specific SRB inhibitor. Nitrate injection has, therefore, promise in positively controlling the oil-field sulfur cycle. There is now more interest in and potential to apply petroleum microbiology than there has been in the past, allowing microbiologists to contribute to a sustainable energy future. PMID:18378604

Grigoryan, Alexander; Voordouw, Gerrit

2008-03-01

219

Exposures and cancer incidence near oil fields in the Amazon basin of Ecuador  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES—To examine environmental exposure and incidence and mortality of cancer in the village of San Carlos surrounded by oil fields in the Amazon basin of Ecuador.?METHODS—Water samples of the local streams were analyzed for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs). A preliminary list of potential cancer cases from 1989 to 1998 was prepared. Cases were compared with expected numbers of cancer morbidity and mortality registrations from a Quito reference population.?RESULTS—Water analysis showed severe exposure to TPHs by the residents. Ten patients with cancer were diagnosed while resident in the village of San Carlos. An overall excess for all types of cancer was found in the male population (8 observed v 3.5 expected) with a risk 2.26 times higher than expected (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.97 to 4.46). There was an overall excess of deaths for all types of cancer (6 v 1.6 expected) among the male population 3.6 times higher than the reference population (95% CI 1.31 to 7.81).?CONCLUSIONS—The observed excess of cancer might be associated with the pollution of the environment by toxic contaminants coming from the oil production.???Keywords: cancer; oil; Amazon; Ecuador PMID:11452046

San, S; Armstrong, B; Cordoba, J; Stephens, C

2001-01-01

220

Pressure boosting technology recovers reserves in low pressure oil and gas fields  

SciTech Connect

Fragmentation of reservoirs or production from different zones often results in oil or gas wells having different flowing wellhead pressures (FWHP). In many fields, the wells flow to a manifold, then the oil and gas is transported by pipeline to a processing plant. Production from the low-pressure (LP) wells is often restricted because of the backpressure imposed by the high-pressure (HP) wells or by the transportation pipeline. To minimize the production restrictions from LP wells, HP wells are usually choked down and their high energy is thus wasted through the choke. A team of engineers from CALTEC, the oil and gas division of BHR Group, have developed a system which harnesses the energy from HP wells to boost production from LP wells. The system is called WELLCOM, short for WELL COMmingling system. This patented system has won the 1998 British Royal Society Esso Energy award for an outstanding contribution to the advancement of science or engineering or technology that leads to a more efficient mobilization, conservation, or use of energy sources.

Sarshar, M.M.

1999-01-01

221

Integration of geological, geochemical, and geophysical spatial data of the Cement oil field, Oklahoma, test site  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Measurement pertaining to geology, geochemistry, and geophysics of the Cement oil field, Oklahoma, test site were collected employing both airborne sensors and ground-based data collection. The measurements include: (1) airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (supplying bismuth 214, thalium 208, and potassium 40 gamma-ray intensities); (2) aeromagnetic survey data; (3) multi-frequency airborne resistivity survey data (supplying apparent electrical resistivity of near surface materials); (4) gravity data; (5) geological and topographic maps; and (6) image data from Landsat MSS and U-2 photography.

Termain, Patricia A.; Donovan, Terrence J.; Chavez, Pat S.

1980-01-01

222

Applying the Aramid Joined v-belt high torque, low speed oil field pumping units  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the successful application of Aramid fiber-reinforced Torque Team Plus Joined Vbelts to low speed; (8-20 rpm) high torque, up to (320,000 in-lb); 100% belt driven oil field pumping units. Also discussed is a comparison in operating efficiency over gear or chain units, reduced initial expense, and lower overall maintenance effort. The Aramid reinforced Joined V-belts were applied to a double reduction drive (68-142:1 ratio) eliminating gear or chain reducers. Pumping units range in size from 57,000 in-lb to 320,000 in-lb.

Stork, D.; Watson, J.

1982-11-01

223

Investigation of ginkgo biloba leave extracts as corrosion and Oil field microorganism inhibitors.  

PubMed

Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgoaceae), originating from China, now distributes all over the world. Wide application of Ginkgo biloba extracts is determined by the main active substances, flavonoids and terpenoids, which indicates its extracts suitable to be used as an effective corrosion inhibitor. The extracts of Ginkgo biloba leave have been investigated on the corrosion inhibition of Q235A steel with weight loss and potentiodynamic polarisation techniques. The inhibition efficiency of the extracts varies with extract concentration. The extracts inhibit corrosion mainly by adsorption mechanism. Potentiodynamic polarisation studies show that extracts are mixed type inhibitors. The antibacterial activity of the extracts against oil field microorganism (SRB, IB and TGB) was also investigated. PMID:23651921

Chen, Gang; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Jingrui; Zhou, Rui; Meng, Zuchao; Zhang, Jie

2013-01-01

224

Investigation of ginkgo biloba leave extracts as corrosion and Oil field microorganism inhibitors  

PubMed Central

Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgoaceae), originating from China, now distributes all over the world. Wide application of Ginkgo biloba extracts is determined by the main active substances, flavonoids and terpenoids, which indicates its extracts suitable to be used as an effective corrosion inhibitor. The extracts of Ginkgo biloba leave have been investigated on the corrosion inhibition of Q235A steel with weight loss and potentiodynamic polarisation techniques. The inhibition efficiency of the extracts varies with extract concentration. The extracts inhibit corrosion mainly by adsorption mechanism. Potentiodynamic polarisation studies show that extracts are mixed type inhibitors. The antibacterial activity of the extracts against oil field microorganism (SRB, IB and TGB) was also investigated. PMID:23651921

2013-01-01

225

Electric field alignment of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) in silicone oil: impact on electrical properties.  

PubMed

This work aims to study how the magnitude, frequency, and duration of an AC electric field affect the orientation of two kinds of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) dispersed in silicone oil that differ by their surface charge density and aspect ratio. In both cases, the electric field alignment occurs in two steps: first, the NFC makes a gyratory motion oriented by the electric field; second, NFC interacts with itself to form chains parallel to the electric field lines. It was also observed that NFC chains become thicker and longer when the duration of application of the electric field is increased. In-situ dielectric properties have shown that the dielectric constant of the medium increases in comparison to the randomly dispersed NFC (when no electric field is applied). The optimal parameters of alignment were found to be 5000 Vpp/mm and 10 kHz for a duration of 20 min for both kinds of NFC. The highest increase in dielectric constant was achieved with NFC oxidized for 5 min (NFC-O-5 min) at the optimum conditions mentioned above. PMID:24848447

Kadimi, Amal; Benhamou, Karima; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Magnin, Albert; Dufresne, Alain; Kaddami, Hamid; Raihane, Mustapha

2014-06-25

226

Planktonic nitrate-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria in some western Canadian oil field waters  

Microsoft Academic Search

  Oil fields that use water flooding to enhance oil recovery may become sour because of the production of H2S from the reduction of sulfate by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The addition of nitrate to produced waters can stimulate\\u000a the activities of nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) and control sulfide production. Many previous studies have focused on chemolithotrophic\\u000a bacteria that can use thiosulfate or

RE Eckford; PM Fedorak

2002-01-01

227

Petrophysical evidence for the nature of vertical permeability barriers: Temple Ave. Fault, Wilmington Oil Field, Long Beach, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Temple Avenue fault is a north-trending east-dipping normal fault that dissects the north flank of the Wilmington anticline in the Wilmington Oil field. The fault involves sediments of the Repetto Formation (lower Pliocene) and the Puente Formation (upper Miocene). Oil\\/water contact structural maps indicate that the fault acts as a permeability barrier. Well B-756-I was drilled across the Temple

H. Camacho; J. C. Sample

1996-01-01

228

A surface vitrinite reflectance anomaly related to Bell Creek oil field, Montana, U.S.A.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Vitrinite reflectance measurements from surface samples of mudrock and coal show anomalously high values over the Bell Creek oil field. The average vitrinite reflectance (Rm) increases to a maximum of 0.9 percent over the field against background values of about 0.3 percent. The Rm anomaly coincides with a geochemical anomaly indicated by diagenetic magnetite in surface rocks and a geobiologic anomaly indicated by ethane-consuming bacteria. These samples were taken from the Upper Cretaceous Hell Creek and Paleocene Fort Union Formations which form an essentially conformable sequence. The depositional environment is similar in both formations, and we expect little variation in the source and composition of the organic matter. The surface R m should be approximately constant because of a uniform thermal history across the field. Temperature studies over local oil fields with similar geology suggest the expected thermal anomaly would be less than 10?C (50?F), which is too small to account for the significantly higher rank over the field. Coal clinkers are rare in the vicinity of Bell Creek and an Rm anomaly caused by burning of the thin, discontinuous coal seams is unlikely. The limited topographic relief, less than 305 m (1,000 ft), over the shallow-dipping homoclinal structure and the poor correlation between Rm and sample locality elevation (r = -0.2) indicate that the Rm anomaly is not due to burial, deformation and subsequent erosion. We conjecture that activity by petroleum-metabolizing bacteria is a possible explanation of the Rm anomaly. Microseepage from oil reservoirs supports large colonies of these organisms, some of which can produce enzymes that can cleave hydrocarbon side-chains on the kerogen molecule. The loss of these side chains causes condensation of the ring structures (Stach and others, 1982) and consequently increases its reflectance. These data indicate that vitrinite reflectance may be a useful tool to explore for stratigraphic traps in the Powder River Basin. Further, the large variation of R across the Bell Creek area suggests that vitrinite reflectance data from surface samples should be interpreted with caution.

Barker, C.E.; Dalziel, M.C.; Pawlewicz, M.J.

1983-01-01

229

Oil reserves at Tengiz field reported as 2. 5 billion tons  

SciTech Connect

The unusual announcement (reserve figures are normally considered a state secret) occurred during a press conference in Moscow announcing the petrochemical joint venture with Occidental Petroleum and three other Western companies (Montedison and Enichem of Italy and Marubeni of Japan). If the estimates are accurate (it is unknown if the figure refers to total or recoverable reserves), this makes Tengiz not only one of the largest petroleum deposits in the USSR, but in the world. Whether this potential can be developed is still unclear. The Tengiz field was discovered in late 1979 and has been characterized by Soviet experts as one of the most complex and difficult to produce in the entire USSR. The reservoir rocks are of relatively poor quality, and being fissured limestones pose unusual drilling problems. The oil is also quite deep, at 4500-5500 meters. Other development problems arise in the anomalously great reservoir pressure and the high hydrogen sulfide and gas condensate content of the associated gas, which requires the construction of a gas processing facility, to be built nearby at Karaton. The harsh physical environment and the lack of infrastructure (the field is located in salt flats on the edge of the Caspian Sea) also hinder development. The Tengizneftegaz production association was officially established in 1985, but has yet to process any gas or produce any oil.

Sagers, M.J.

1987-11-01

230

Magnetic forward models of Cement oil field, Oklahoma, based on rock magnetic, geochemical, and petrologic constraints  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Magnetic forward models of the Cement oil field, Oklahoma, were generated to assess the possibility that ferrimagnetic pyrrhotite related to hydrocarbon seepage in the upper 1 km of Permian strata contributes to aeromagnetic anomalies at Cement. Six bodies having different magnetizations were constructed for the magnetic models. Total magnetizations of the bodies of highest pyrrhotite content range from about 3 ?? 10-3 to 56 ?? 10-3 A/m in the present field direction and yield magnetic anomalies (at 120 m altitude) having amplitudes of less than 1 nT to ~6 to 7 nT, respectively. Numerous assumptions were made in the generation of the models, but nevertheless, the results suggest that pyrrhotite, formed via hydrocarbon reactions and within a range of concentrations estimated at Cement, is capable of causing magnetic anomalies. -from Authors

Reynolds, R.L.; Webring, M.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Tuttle, M.

1990-01-01

231

Analysis of gravity anomaly over coral-reef oil field: Wilfred Pool, Sullivan County, Indiana  

SciTech Connect

To compare the measured and theoretical gravity anomaly of a typical coral-reef oil field, data were collected from the wilfred Pool, Sullivan County, Indiana. Densities of available core samples from the field were determined and the anomaly was calculated, taking into account the lateral and vertical variation of density and the geologic structure known from core studies and drilling-log records of lithologic types penetrated by the wells. Comparison of the theoretical and actual anomalies indicated a rough correspondence except for several sharp negative anomalies on the flanks of the measured gravity anomaly. Further studies indicated that the negative anomalies are possibly due to fluvial erosion that produced, on the surface of the youngest Pennsylvanian sediments, channels which were later filled with glacial till of lower density than the sediments. 13 figures.

Dana, S.W.

1980-03-01

232

3-D reservoir characterization of the House Creek oil field, Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This CD-ROM is intended to serve a broad audience. An important purpose is to explain geologic and geochemical factors that control petroleum production from the House Creek Field. This information may serve as an analog for other marine-ridge sandstone reservoirs. The 3-D slide and movie images are tied to explanations and 2-D geologic and geochemical images to visualize geologic structures in three dimensions, explain the geologic significance of porosity/permeability distribution across the sandstone bodies, and tie this to petroleum production characteristics in the oil field. Movies, text, images including scanning electron photomicrographs (SEM), thin-section photomicrographs, and data files can be copied from the CD-ROM for use in external mapping, statistical, and other applications.

Higley, Debra K.; Pantea, Michael P.; Slatt, Roger M.

1997-01-01

233

Additional Reserve Recovery Using New Polymer Treatment on High Water Oil Ratio Wells in Alameda Field, Kingman County, Kansas  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Flooding process, like a polymer treatment, as a tertiary (enhanced) oil recovery process can be a very good solution based on the condition of this field and its low cost compared to the drilling of new wells. It is an improved water flooding method in which high molecular-weight (macro-size molecules) and water-soluble polymers are added to the injection water to improve the mobility ratio by enhancing the viscosity of the water and by reducing permeability in invaded zones during the process. In other words, it can improve the sweep efficiency by reducing the water mobility. This polymer treatment can be performed on the same active oil producer well rather than on an injector well in the existence of strong water drive in the formation. Some parameters must be considered before any polymer job is performed such as: formation temperature, permeability, oil gravity and viscosity, location and formation thickness of the well, amount of remaining recoverable oil, fluid levels, well productivity, water oil ratio (WOR) and existence of water drive. This improved oil recovery technique has been used widely and has significant potential to extend reservoir life by increasing the oil production and decreasing the water cut. This new technology has the greatest potential in reservoirs that are moderately heterogeneous, contain moderately viscous oils, and have adverse water-oil mobility ratios. For example, many wells in Kansas's Arbuckle formation had similar treatments and we have seen very effective results. In addition, there were previous polymer treatments conducted by Texaco in Alameda Field on a number of wells throughout the Viola-Simpson formation in the early 70's. Most of the treatments proved to be very successful.

James Spillane

2005-10-01

234

Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia  

E-print Network

) using Kulin oil (21 'API oil Irom Indonesia). ' The same effect of production acceleration was observed in these experiments and steam injectivity was improved with the addition of propane to the steam. Rivero and Mamora (2002) conducted several steam... studies of steam-propane and enriched gas injection for the Minas light crude oil. ' With steam-propane injection no improvement on production and oil recovery was obtained. Enriched gas injection increase the oil recovery in 13'/o, (74'/o OOIP with 5...

Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

2003-01-01

235

CO2 Storage and Enhanced Oil Recovery: Bald Unit Test Site, Mumford Hills Oil Field, Posey County, Indiana  

SciTech Connect

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) carried out a small-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in a sandstone within the Clore Formation (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) in order to gauge the large-scale CO2 storage that might be realized from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) of mature Illinois Basin oil fields via miscible liquid CO2 flooding. As part of the MGSC�������¢����������������s Validation Phase (Phase II) studies, the small injection pilot test was conducted at the Bald Unit site within the Mumford Hills Field in Posey County, southwestern Indiana, which was chosen for the project on the basis of site infrastructure and reservoir conditions. Geologic data on the target formation were extensive. Core analyses, porosity and permeability data, and geophysical logs from 40 wells were used to construct cross sections and structure contour and isopach maps in order to characterize and define the reservoir architecture of the target formation. A geocellular model of the reservoir was constructed to improve understanding of CO2 behavior in the subsurface. At the time of site selection, the Field was under secondary recovery through edge-water injection, but the wells selected for the pilot in the Bald Unit had been temporarily shut-in for several years. The most recently shut-in production well, which was surrounded by four nearby shut-in production wells in a five-spot pattern, was converted to CO2 injection for this pilot. Two additional wells outside the immediate five-spot pattern, one of which was an active producer, were instrumented to measure surface temperature and pressure. The CO2 injection period lasted from September 3, 2009, through December 14, 2010, with one three-month interruption caused by cessation of CO2 deliveries due to winter weather. Water was injected into the CO2 injection well during this period. A total of 6,300 tonnes (6,950 tons) of CO2 were injected into the reservoir at rates that generally ranged from 18 to 32 tonnes (20 to 35 tons) per day. The CO2 injection bottomhole pressure generally remained at 8.3 to 9.0 MPag (1,200 to 1,300 psig). The CO2 injection was followed by continued monitoring for nine months during post-CO2 water injection. A monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) program was designed to determine the fate of injected CO2. Extensive periodic sampling and analysis of brine, groundwater, and produced gases began before CO2 injection and continued through the monitored waterflood periods. Samples were gathered from production wells and three newly installed groundwater monitoring wells. Samples underwent geochemical and isotopic analyses to reveal any CO2-related changes. Groundwater and kinetic modeling and mineralogical analysis were also employed to better understand the long-term dynamics of CO2 in the reservoir. No CO2 leakage into groundwater was detected, and analysis of brine and gas chemistry made it possible to track the path of plume migration and infer geochemical reactions and trapping of CO2. Cased-hole logging did not detect any CO2 in the near-wellbore region. An increase in CO2 concentration was first detected in February 2010 from the gas present in the carboy during brine sampling; however, there was no appreciable gas volume associated with the detection of CO2. The first indication of elevated gas rates from the commingled gas of the pilot�������¢����������������s production wells occurred in July 2010 and reached a maximum of 0.36 tonnes/day (0.41 tons/day) in September 2010. An estimated 27 tonnes (30 tons) of CO2 were produced at the surface from the gas separator at the tank battery from September 3, 2009, through September 11, 2011, representing 0.5% of the injected CO2. Consequently, 99.5%

Frailey, Scott M.; Krapac, Ivan G.; Damico, James R.; Okwen, Roland T.; McKaskle, Ray W.

2012-03-30

236

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through March 1999, project work has been completed related to data preparation, basic reservoir engineering, developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model, and a rock-log model, well drilling and completions, and surface facilities. Work is continuing on the stochastic geologic model, developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Fault Block IIA Tar (Tar II-A) Zone, and operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction. Thermal-related formation compaction is a concern of the project team due to observed surface subsidence in the local area above the steamflood project. Last quarter on January 12, the steamflood project lost its inexpensive steam source from the Harbor Cogeneration Plant as a result of the recent deregulation of electrical power rates in California. An operational plan was developed and implemented to mitigate the effects of the two situations. Seven water injection wells were placed in service in November and December 1998 on the flanks of the Phase 1 steamflood area to pressure up the reservoir to fill up the existing steam chest. Intensive reservoir engineering and geomechanics studies are continuing to determine the best ways to shut down the steamflood operations in Fault Block II while minimizing any future surface subsidence. The new 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulator model is being used to provide sensitivity cases to optimize production, steam injection, future flank cold water injection and reservoir temperature and pressure. According to the model, reservoir fill up of the steam chest at the current injection rate of 28,000 BPD and gross and net oil production rates of 7,700 BPD and 750 BOPD (injection to production ratio of 4) will occur in October 1999. At that time, the reservoir should act more like a waterflood and production and cold water injection can be operated at lower net injection rates to be determined. Modeling runs developed this quarter found that varying individual well injection rates to meet added production and local pressure problems by sub-zone could reduce steam chest fill-up by up to one month.

Scott Hara

2000-02-18

237

Time-lapse Measurements of Scholte Wave Velocity Over a Compacting Oil Field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Acquisition of time-lapse seismic data over producing oil and gas fields is a proven method for optimizing hydrocarbon production. Most current data have been acquired using towed-streamer seismic vessels but new systems incorporating permanent Ocean Bottom Cable (OBC) systems are gaining in popularity, both as a way to achieve better repeatability and also to reduce the cost of acquiring many time-lapse repeats of the baseline survey. Over the last three years, more than seven repeat data sets have been acquired at the permanent OBC system installed (by the operator, BP) over the Valhall oil field located offshore Norway. This system contains ~2400 four-component receiver stations that are recorded using a dense areal shot grid ("carpet" shoot) that provides high fold and has delivered excellent time-lapse signals starting from the first repeat occurring just three months after the baseline. Time-lapse OBC data are conventionally used to measure amplitude and velocity changes of body wave reflections (PP and PS) but other measurements are also possible. In particular, Scholte waves are strongly visible on records acquired everywhere in the field on appropriately processed data and, given the high fold (because of the dense shots), Scholte wave velocity and anisotropy time-lapse changes obtained with both hydrophone and geophone sensors are accurately and robustly estimated. The resulting shallow velocity maps are very sensitive to the seabed strains and show large velocity changes overlying deep production. Also, reconstruction of compressional "head wave" velocity difference measurements and vertically propagating shear wave shallow time-lapse statics produce maps that resemble the Scholte wave maps, with differences that reflect the physics of the propagation modes and effective fold. A reservoir model that includes deep reservoir volume changes together with appropriate geomechanical properties in the overburden and a shallow conversion of strain to velocity is used to successfully predict the measured velocity changes. The strain/velocity conversion requires asymmetry between crack opening and closing as well as velocity hysteresis and, in fact, the measurements provide an excellent laboratory for testing fracture-model/velocity conversion on in-situ rocks. After calibration, the model together with the data can constrain both volume changes in the reservoir, for making drilling decisions as well as the overburden geomechanical rock properties model, which itself is used for well- path selection and facilities decisions. Scholte wave velocity measurements can also be made using an oil platform as a "passive" source, removing the need for a conventional source near the seafloor. Finally, these measurements might be applicable on time- lapse controlled source measurements of greater generality in a wider geophysical context wherever an accurate measurement of a time-varying surface strain is desired.

Wills, P. B.; Hatchell, P. J.

2007-12-01

238

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

Through December 1999, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar (Tar II-A) Zone. Work is continuing on improving core analysis techniques, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post steamflood project. Work was discontinued on the stochastic geologic model and developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Tar II-A Zone in order to focus the remaining time on using the 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model to provide alternatives for the Tar II-A post steamflood operations and shale compaction studies. Thermal-related formation compaction is a concern of the project team due to observed surface subsidence in the local area above the Tar II-A steamflood project. On January 12, 1999, the steamflood project lost its inexpensive steam source from the Harbor Cogeneration Plant as a result of the recent deregulation of electrical power rates in California. An operational plan was developed and implemented to mitigate the effects of the two situations by injecting cold water into the flanks of the steamflood. The purpose of flank injection has been to increase and subsequently maintain reservoir pressures at a level that would fill-up the steam chests in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands before they can collapse and cause formation compaction and to prevent the steam chests from reoccurring. A new 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model was used to provide operations with the necessary water injection rates and allowable production rates by well to minimize future surface subsidence and to accurately project reservoir steam chest fill-up by October 1999. A geomechanics study and a separate reservoir simulation study have been performed to determine the possible indicators of formation compaction, the temperatures at which specific indicators are affected and the projected temperature profiles in the over and underburden shales over a ten year period following steam injection. It was believed that once steam chest fill-up occurred, the reservoir would act more like a waterflood and production and cold water injection could be operated at lower Injection to production ratios (I/P) and net injection rates. In mid-September 1999, net water injection was reduced substantially in the ''D'' sands following steam chest fill-up. This caused reservoir pressures to plummet about 100 psi within six weeks. Starting in late-October 1999, net ''D'' sand injection was increased and reservoir pressures have slowly increased back to steam chest fill-up pressures as of the end of March 2000. When the ''T'' sands reached fill-up, net ''T'' sand injection was lowered only slightly and reservoir pressures stabilized. A more detailed discussion of the operational changes is in the Reservoir Management section of this report. A reservoir pressure monitoring program was developed as part of the poststeamflood reservoir management plan. This bi-monthly sonic fluid level program measures the static fluid levels in all idle wells an average of once a month. The fluid levels have been calibrated for liquid and gas density gradients by comparing a number of them with Amerada bomb pressures taken within a few days. This data allows engineering to respond quickly to rises or declines in reservoir pressure by either increasing injection or production or idling production. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current thermal operations in the Wilm

Scott Hara

2000-12-06

239

Modeling surface deformation due to CO2 injection at an enhanced oil recovery field in Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Geodesy Laboratory at the University of South Florida has operated 3 C-GPS stations at an enhanced oil recovery field in Texas since October 2011. Our GPS sites recorded vertical uplift during the injection phase when the reservoir was initially pressurized, and localized subsidence in phase with reservoir pressure after oil extraction started. In this study, we use analytical and numerical models to better understand the small-scale surface deformation observed by GPS due to CO2 injection. First, we use an analytical model of a pressurized horizontal circular crack in an elastic half-space to fit the surface deformation data. Then, constrained by the analytical modeling results, we develop a poroelastic Finite Element Model (FEM) to investigate the influence of reservoir geometry and overlying stratigraphy on surface displacement. A sensitivity study is carried out to understand the effects of realistic geometry and material properties on surface deformation. Our preliminary results show that a poroelastic FEM can explain the location-dependant time delay between the injection and surface response.

Yang, Q.; Abdollahzadeh, M.; Dixon, T. H.; Malservisi, R.; Hosseini, S.

2013-12-01

240

Increased Oil Production and Reserves from Improved Completion Techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to increase oil production and reserves by the use of improved reservoir characterization and completion techniques in the Uinta Basin, Utah. To accomplish this objective, a two-year geologic and engineering characterization of the Bluebell field was conducted. The study evaluated surface and subsurface data, currently used completion techniques, and common production problems. It was determined that advanced case- and open-hole logs could be effective in determining productive beds and that stage-interval (about 500 ft [150 m] per stage) and bed-scale isolation completion techniques could result in improved well performance. In the first demonstration well (Michelle Ute well discussed in the previous technical report), dipole shear anisotropy (anisotropy) and dual-burst thermal decay time (TDT) logs were run before and isotope tracer log was run after the treatment. The logs were very helpful in characterizing the remaining hydrocarbon potential in the well. But, mechanical failure resulted in a poor recompletion and did not result in a significant improvement in the oil production from the well.

Deo, M.D.; Morgan, C.D.

1999-04-28

241

Identification of novel bicyclic alkanes from steroid precursors in crude oils from Kelamayi oil field of China  

SciTech Connect

A novel series of bicyclic alkanes in the C/sub 19/-C/sub 22/ range has been discovered in a number of crude oils from a variety of sources. Evidence is provided from laboratory studies to demonstrate that there is a correlation between these bicyclic alkanes and steranes, suggesting in turn that both series of compounds are actually derived from sterol precursors. These bicyclic alkanes appear to be resistant to the effects of biodegradation which in turn enhances their concentration in biodegraded oils following removal of other less resistant compounds. The value of this stability is demonstrated in the correlation of an oil and seep from the Anadarko Basin. The seep is biodegraded such that all regular steranes are removed leaving only rearranged steranes compared with an oil where all steranes are intact. The bicyclic alkane distributions are similar for both samples demonstrating their potential for correlation purposes. The effect of maturation on these components was not evaluated in detail in this particular study.

Zhusheng, J.; Philp, R.P.; Lewis, C.A.

1988-02-01

242

In situ-segregated production of oil and water - a production method with environmental merit: Field application  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes field implementation of a new production method, the water drain-age-production system for oilfields with bottom water coning problems. The method enhances the production rate of water-free oil while eliminating hydrocarbon contamination of produced water. The new method was used in a Wilcox sand in North Louisiana to resolve the problem of excessive water cuts experienced in conventional wells. Typically, for a conventional well in this area, a water problem would develop in 60-90 days after the beginning of oil production. The excessive water cut would cause a reduction of the oil rate from 35 BOPD initially to 12 BOPD with 97% water cut. In this application a new well was drilled through the oil and water columns and dual-completed in both zones. The water-drainage completion (gravel packed) was isolated from the oil completion with a packer and 3-1/2 inches tubing. A downhole progressive cavity pump lifts the water in the tubing, while the formation pressure drives the water-free oil up the annulus between the tubing and 711 casing. To date, after 12 months of production, the oil production rate is averaging 45 BOPD, water-free. Mathematical modeling was used to help in the design of the completion. Shown in this paper is a computer-generated analysis of the drainage-production system`s performance. The analysis helped to determine the oil and water rates and geometry of the well`s completion. Chemical analysis of water produced in the new method shows minimal contamination with polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), 11 parts per billion. This is an over 50-fold reduction compared to PAR contamination of water produced conventionally. Also, no contamination with oil and Grease was measured with a detection limit of 2 mg/1.

Swisher, M.D.; Wojtanowicz, A.K.

1995-12-01

243

Biogeochemical evidence for subsurface hydrocarbon occurrence, Recluse oil field, Wyoming; preliminary results  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Anomalously high manganese-to-iron ratios occurring in pine needles and sage leaves over the Recluse oil field, Wyoming, suggest effects of petroleum microseepage on the plants. This conclusion is supported by iron and manganese concentrations in soils and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in rock samples. Seeping hydrocarbons provided reducing conditions sufficient to enable divalent iron and manganese to be organically complexed or adsorbed on solids in the soils. These bound or adsorped elements in the divalent state are essential to plants, and the plants readily assimilate them. The magnitude of the plant anomalies, combined with the supportive isotopic and chemical evidence confirming petroleum leakage, makes a strong case for the use of plants as a biogeochemical prospecting tool.

Dalziel, Mary C.; Donovan, Terrence J.

1980-01-01

244

Optimization of operation conditions for extracting lithium ions from calcium chloride-type oil field brine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Al(OH)3 was prepared to extract lithium ions from calcium chloride-type oil field brine. The influences of four factors, namely temperature, Al3+/Li+ molar ratio, OH-/Al3+ molar ratio, and contact time between Al(OH)3 and the brine, on the yield of lithium ions were investigated. It is found that their optimal values are 35°C, 4.5, 2.6, and 6 h, respectively. In the course of the experiment, the apparent pH value was observed. The results reveal that the apparent pH value has no remarkable influence on the yield of lithium ions. Meanwhile, the effects of the concentrations of calcium ions and magnesium ions in the brine on lithium recovery were studied. The results indicate that calcium ions have minor negative influence on the yield of lithium ions under optimal conditions, and magnesium ions slightly influence the yield of lithium ions.

Yang, Hong-jun; Li, Qing-hai; Li, Bing; Guo, Feng-qin; Meng, Qing-fen; Li, Wu

2012-04-01

245

Comparison of soft computing techniques for a three-phase oil field centrifuge.  

SciTech Connect

In this work we compare fuzzy techniques to neural network techniques for building a soft sensor for a three-phase oil field centrifuge. The soft sensor is used in a feed-forward control system that augments a feedback control system. Two approaches were used to develop the soft sensor. The first approach was to use a fuzzy rule based system based upon the experience of an expert operator. The expert operator's experience was supplemented using a computer model of the system. The second approach was to use a neural network to build the inverse of the computer model. The pros and cons of both techniques are discussed. KEYWORDS: fuzzy logic, neural networks, soft sensor, soft computing

Smith, R. E. (Ronald E.); Parkinson, w; Miller, N. (Neal)

2002-01-01

246

Studies on oil palm trunks as sources of infection in the field.  

PubMed

Diseases of oil palm caused by Ganoderma boninense are of major economic importance in much of South-East Asia. This paper describes results from an ongoing field trial concerning the spread of the pathogen from artificially inoculated trunks used to simulate spread from windrowed trunks. Three planting distances for bait seedlings revealed that the closer the seedling was planted to the source of inoculum the sooner it succumbed to the disease. However, infection only occurred when the trunks were mounded (covered with soil), and seedlings planted around uncovered trunks (at any distance) have showed no symptoms of disease to date. Isolates are being collected from infected plants and molecular analysis is being undertaken to give more information on the spread of the pathogen. PMID:15750740

Flood, J; Keenan, L; Wayne, S; Hasan, Y

2005-01-01

247

PISCES field chemical emission measurement program: Recent emission results from oil-fired power plants  

SciTech Connect

Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) mandated that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) evaluate emissions and health risks associated with 189 hazardous air pollutants emitted from the stacks of electric utility steam generating stations. EPA is currently proceeding with the electric utility study and expects to summarize its findings in a report to Congress in 1995. In anticipation of the CAAA, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) initiated the Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emission Studies (PISCES) research program. The PISCES program has sampled over a range of fuels, boiler configurations, flue gas desulfurization systems, and NO{sub x} control technologies. This paper highlights some of the recent results and issues from field sampling programs at utility oil-fired power plant sites.

Chu, P. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States); McDannel, M. [Carnot, Tustin, CA (United States); Behrens, G. [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

1995-09-01

248

A new generation of electromagnetic and ultrasonic techniques for subsurface evaluation of oil field tubulars  

SciTech Connect

In the past few years, corrosion and mechanical fatigue have been becoming a more visible issue in the oil and gas industry. The issue of lost profits from lost production and the cost and liability resulting from failure has overcome the obvious concern of simple mechanical integrity. A new generation of tool designs have been developed for in-situ evaluation of well casings. These designs along with improvements to existing designs have just recently been introduced to address some of the limitations in subsurface well casing evaluation. These new hardware developments and interpretation techniques can now provide unpredecented accuracy for evaluating downhole tubular conditions. This paper reviews four recent designs while discussing the principals of measurement and offering actual field data in several comparisons. The four designs include: Electromagnetic: AC Types, DC Types, Casing Potential Profiling; Ultrasonic: Ultrasonic Thickness Types. An interpretation technique using sequential measurements to predict and manage for corrosion problems is also presented.

Lewis, R.G.

1988-01-01

249

Investigating electrokinetics application for in-situ inorganic oil field scale control  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oil well scale formation and deposition is an expensive problem and could be a nightmare for any production engineer if the rate of deposition is rapid as in the case of North Sea oil fields. Inorganic scales accumulate in surface and subsurface equipment causing a reduction in oil production and severe damage for production equipment. The major components of most oil field scale deposits are BaSO4, CaSO4 and SrSO4, which are formed due to incompatible mixing of reservoir formation water and sea water flooded in secondary enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes. This work focuses on BaSO4 scale as it is one of the toughest scale components to be removed either by chemical means or mechanical means. Scale control methods usually involve complicated treatment using chemical dissolution methods as primary attempt and mechanical scrapping or jetting methods in case of failure of the chemical means. In this work, we devised a novel in-situ scale control method benefiting from the application of direct current (DC) which involves some of the electrokinetic (EK) phenomena. The applications of EK has been proved in our laboratories yielding high efficiency in capturing barium and separating it from sulfate before reaching the production well, thus preventing deposition in the production wellbore or wellbore formation. This objective was evaluated in our lab designed EK apparatus in three parts. In part-1, an 18.5 cm unconsolidated sand core was used which produced inconsistent results. This problem was overcome in part-2, where the porous media involved 46 cm consolidated sandcore. This also partly fulfilled the purpose of upscaling. In part-3, the porous media was extended to a 100 cm spatial distance between the injection and production wells. For all the experiments the reservoir models were made of 125 µm uniform sand particles and followed a final consolidation pressure of 30 psi. The EK-reservoir model contains 2 basic junctions; one of them injecting a 500 ppm SO4 2- solution, representing sulfate rich sea water and the other injecting a 500 ppm Ba2+ solution representing divalent cations rich in formation water and an outlet for water production. In part-1, there were 4 locations for the electrodes, while in part-2 and part-3 there were 5 electrode locations distributed along the spatial distance. Salinity of injection and formation water was varied within a range of 0 to 40,000 ppm. The flow rates of injection and formation water were constant throughout each experiment. In part-1 experiments, the flow rate was 1 ml/min, in part-2 this was increased to 2 ml/min, finally in part-3 this was further increased to 4.3 ml/min. 2 V/cm voltage gradient was applied for all of the experiments. On a real time basis the current, pressure, temperature, and pH of production water were all monitored. Finally, solid samples with scale deposits within were collected from different locations of the flow tubes. To be analyzed using an ICP-MS. The results have demonstrated up to 90% scale mitigation by the application of EK. In addition, there was pressure reduction in the flow tube, which could be justified due to chlorine gas generation at the locations sides creating a stimulation effect due to increased acidity. The observations from this study concluded that the application of EK will attribute to the production efficiency due to less scaling and reducing corrosion of surface equipment. This will attempt to demonstrate the world's first promising technique that could be used to replace expensive solutions which require well closure and incur production interruption loss. However, it is recommended that further extensive studies need to be done to confirm the results and finally design a pilot scale project to validate the lab work.

Hashaykeh, Manal A. I. Albadawi

250

The role of active and ancient geothermal systems in evolution of Grant Canyon oil field, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Since discovery in 1983, the Grant Canyon field has been among the most prolific oil producers (on a per-well basis) in the US. Production through June 1990 was 12,935,630 bbl of oil, principally from two wells which in tandem have consistently yielded more than 6,000 bbl of oil per day. The field is hosted by highly porous Devonian dolomite breccia loosely cemented with hydrothermal quartz. Results of fluid-inclusion and petrographic research in progress at Grant Canyon suggest that paleogeothermal and perhaps currently circulating geothermal systems may have played a major role in oil-reservoir evolution. For example, as previously reported, the breccia-cementing quartz hosts primary aqueous, aqueous/oil, and oil fluid inclusions which were trapped at about 120C (average homogenization temperature) and document initial oil migration and entrapment as droplets or globules dispersed in dilute (< 2.2 wt.% equivalent NaCl) aqueous solutions. Additional evidence of geothermal connection is that the horst-block trap at Grant Canyon is top and side sealed by valley-fill clastic and volcanic rocks which are locally hydrothermally altered and calcite flooded. These secondary seals are enhanced by disseminated, solid asphaltic residues locally accounting for 23% (volume) of the rock. Current reservoir temperatures at Grant Canyon (120C) and the adjacent Bacon Flat field (171C) attest to vigorous contemporary geothermal activity. Based on results of the authors' Grant Canyon work to date, they suggest that active and paleohydrothermal systems could be viable petroleum exploration targets in otherwise favorable terrain elsewhere in the Basin and Range.

Hulen, J.B. (Univ. of Utah Research Inst., Salt Lake City (United States)); Bereskin, S.R. (Terra Tek, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Bortz, L.C.

1991-06-01

251

Degradation of Phenanthrene by Bacterial Strains Isolated from Soil in Oil Refinery Fields in Korea  

Microsoft Academic Search

The degradation of phenanthrene, a model PAH compound, by microorganisms either in the mixed culture or individual strain, isolated from oil-contaminated soil in oil refinery vicinity sites, was examined. The effects of pH, temperature, initial concentration of phenanthrene, and the addition of carbon sources on biodegradation potential were also investigated. Results showed that soil samples collected from four oil refinery

JEONG-DONG KIM; SU-HYEUN SHIM; CHOUL-GYUN LEE

2005-01-01

252

Time lapse seismic observations and effects of reservoir compressibility at Teal South oil field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the original ocean-bottom time-lapse seismic studies was performed at the Teal South oil field in the Gulf of Mexico during the late 1990's. This work reexamines some aspects of previous work using modern analysis techniques to provide improved quantitative interpretations. Using three-dimensional volume visualization of legacy data and the two phases of post-production time-lapse data, I provide additional insight into the fluid migration pathways and the pressure communication between different reservoirs, separated by faults. This work supports a conclusion from previous studies that production from one reservoir caused regional pressure decline that in turn resulted in liberation of gas from multiple surrounding unproduced reservoirs. I also provide an explanation for unusual time-lapse changes in amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) data related to the compaction of the producing reservoir which, in turn, changed an isotropic medium to an anisotropic medium. In the first part of this work, I examine regional changes in seismic response due to the production of oil and gas from one reservoir. The previous studies primarily used two post-production ocean-bottom surveys (Phase I and Phase II), and not the legacy streamer data, due to the unavailability of legacy prestack data and very different acquisition parameters. In order to incorporate the legacy data in the present study, all three post-stack data sets were cross-equalized and examined using instantaneous amplitude and energy volumes. This approach appears quite effective and helps to suppress changes unrelated to production while emphasizing those large-amplitude changes that are related to production in this noisy (by current standards) suite of data. I examine the multiple data sets first by using the instantaneous amplitude and energy attributes, and then also examine specific apparent time-lapse changes through direct comparisons of seismic traces. In so doing, I identify time-delays that, when corrected for, indicate water encroachment at the base of the producing reservoir. I also identify specific sites of leakage from various unproduced reservoirs, the result of regional pressure blowdown as explained in previous studies; those earlier studies, however, were unable to identify direct evidence of fluid movement. Of particular interest is the identification of one site where oil apparently leaked from one reservoir into a "new" reservoir that did not originally contain oil, but was ideally suited as a trap for fluids leaking from the neighboring spill-point. With continued pressure drop, oil in the new reservoir increased as more oil entered into the reservoir and expanded, liberating gas from solution. Because of the limited volume available for oil and gas in that temporary trap, oil and gas also escaped from it into the surrounding formation. I also note that some of the reservoirs demonstrate time-lapse changes only in the "gas cap" and not in the oil zone, even though gas must be coming out of solution everywhere in the reservoir. This is explained by interplay between pore-fluid modulus reduction by gas saturation decrease and dry-frame modulus increase by frame stiffening. In the second part of this work, I examine various rock-physics models in an attempt to quantitatively account for frame-stiffening that results from reduced pore-fluid pressure in the producing reservoir, searching for a model that would predict the unusual AVO features observed in the time-lapse prestack and stacked data at Teal South. While several rock-physics models are successful at predicting the time-lapse response for initial production, most fail to match the observations for continued production between Phase I and Phase II. Because the reservoir was initially overpressured and unconsolidated, reservoir compaction was likely significant, and is probably accomplished largely by uniaxial strain in the vertical direction; this implies that an anisotropic model may be required. Using Walton's model for anisotropic unconsolidated sand, I successfully mod

Islam, Nayyer

253

Application of advanced reservoir characterization to increase the efficiency of a thermal steam drive in the Wilmington Oil Field, California  

SciTech Connect

A reservoir characterization project is in progress to increase heavy oil reserves in the Tar Zone, Fault Block II, Wilmington Oil Field, California. The goal is to economically and efficiently expand the existing steamflood to the southern portion of Fault Block II. The problems to be addressed include: inadequate characterization of the heterogenous turbidite geology, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distributions of the remaining oil. These problems have contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam oil ratios and early steam breakthrough. Traditional, detailed reservoir characterization work has been performed on over 600 wells within the Tar Zone, Fault Block II. Vertical and lateral extent has been defined for 16 horizons. The scattered data from these wells has been compiled and incorporated into a three-dimensional visualization software package. The layered model will be used as a {open_quotes}framework{close_quotes} for the generation of a number of stochastic geological models. New data will be acquired to further define the southern area. These models and their analyses will be integrated into thermal reservoir simulations. Project expansion will be dependent on this work. The project partners are the City of Long Beach, Tidelands Oil Production Company, the University of Southern California and David K. Davies and Associates. The Department of Energy has agreed to co-fund the work.

Phillips, C. [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States); Henry, M.J.; Clarke, D.D.; Strehle, R.S. [Dept. of Oil Properties, Long Beach, CA (United States); Lee, C. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1995-04-01

254

Sequence stratigraphic-structural analysis of the East Midlands Carboniferous oil field, UK: Implications for fluvial reservoir models  

Microsoft Academic Search

The integration of seismic, well log and core data from, the Scampton North and Welton oil fields, Lincolnshire, UK, has enabled the development of a sequence stratigraphic-structural model for late Namurian and early Westphalian fluvial reservoirs. The tectonic and sequence stratigraphic setting is remarkably similar to that in the Southern North Sea which extends more than 250 km to the

J. F. Aitken; D. G. Quirk

1996-01-01

255

Isotopic and chemical data from carbonate cements in surface rocks over and near four Oklahoma oil fields  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Carbonate cements in outcropping sandstones overlying the Doyle, Fox-Graham, Velma, and part of Wheeler oil fields, Oklahoma, were analyzed for their C13/ 12, 018/016, iron, and manganese compositions. The peculiar areal distribution of the values obtained is interpreted to be the direct result of hydrocarbon microseepage.

Henry, Mitchell E.; Donovan, Terrence J.

1978-01-01

256

FIELD STUDIES ON USBM AND TOSCO II RETORTED OIL SHALES: VEGETATION, MOISTURE, SALINITY, AND RUNOFF, 1977-1980  

EPA Science Inventory

Field studies were initiated in 1973 to investigate the vegetative stabilization of processed oil shales and to follow moisture and soluble salt movement within the soil/shale profile. Research plots with two types of retorted shales (TOSCO II and USBM) with leaching and soil cov...

257

Simulation studies of a horizontal well producing from a thin oil-rim reservoir in the SSB1 field, Malaysia  

E-print Network

Three-dimensional simulation studies have been carried out to investigate the performance of a horizontal well producing from a thin oil-rim reservoir, X3/X4 in the SSBI field, Malaysia. A heterogeneous model was used which honored the reservoir...

Abdul Hakim, Hazlan

1995-01-01

258

Draft Genome Sequences of Three Smithella spp. Obtained from a Methanogenic Alkane-Degrading Culture and Oil Field Produced Water  

PubMed Central

Two draft genomes affiliated with Smithella spp. were obtained from a methanogenic alkane-degrading enrichment culture by single-cell sorting and metagenome contig binning, and a third was obtained by single-cell sorting of oil field produced water. Two genomes contained putative assABC genes encoding alkylsuccinate synthase, indicating genetic potential for fumarate activation of alkanes. PMID:25342693

Tan, BoonFei; de Araújo e Silva, Renata; Rozycki, Trent; Nesbø, Camilla

2014-01-01

259

Strontium isotopic evolution of oil-field waters from carbonate reservoir rocks in Bindley field, central Kansas, U.S.A  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oil-field waters produced from Mississippian carbonate reservoir rocks in Bindley field, Kansas had an average salinity of about 42.8 mg\\/l. They were enriched in Ca, Sr, Na, K, Rb, and Li and depleted in Mg relative to sea water at the same level of either Cl or Br concentration. The average abundances of different elements are as follows: Na--13,460 mg\\/l,

S. Chaudhuri; V. Broedel; N. Clauer

1987-01-01

260

Spatial analysis in a Markov random field framework: The case of burning oil wells in Kuwait  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper discusses a modeling approach for spatial-temporal prediction of environmental phenomena using classified satellite images. This research was prompted by the analysis of change and landscape redistribution of petroleum residues formed from the residue of the burning oil wells in Kuwait (1991). These surface residues have been termed ``tarcrete'' (El-Baz etal. 1994). The tarcrete forms a thick layer over sand and desert pavement covering a significant portion of south-central Kuwait. The purpose of this study is to develop a method that utilizes satellite images from different time steps to examine the rate-of-change of the oil residue deposits and determine where redistribution is are likely to occur. This problem exhibits general characteristics of environmental diffusion and dispersion phenomena so a theoretical framework for a general solution is sought. The use of a lagged-clique, Markov random field framework and entropy measures is deduced to be an effective solution to satisfy the criteria of determination of time-rate-of-change of the surface deposits and to forecast likely locations of redistribution of dispersed, aggraded residues. The method minimally requires image classification, the determination of time stationarity of classes and the measurement of the level of organization of the state-space information derived from the images. Analysis occurs at levels of both the individual pixels and the system to determine specific states and suites of states in space and time. Convergence of the observed landscape disorder with respect to an analytical maximum provide information on the total dispersion of the residual system.

Dezzani, Raymond J.; Al-Dousari, Ahmad

261

Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain  

SciTech Connect

Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

Ernest A. Mancini

2006-05-31

262

Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain  

SciTech Connect

Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

Ernest A. Mancini

2003-12-31

263

Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, reporting period March--August 1991; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, reporting period October--December 1990  

SciTech Connect

Activities of DOE's Oil Implementation Task Force for the period March--August 1991 are reviewed. Contracts for fields projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery are discussed, with a list of related publications given. Enhanced recovery processes covered include chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery, and microbial recovery.

Not Available

1991-10-01

264

Brine Contamination of Ground Water and Streams in the Baxterville Oil Field Area, Lamar and Marion Counties, Mississippi  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A hydrologic investigation to define the extent of brine contamination in ground water and streams in the Baxterville oil field area was conducted from October 1984 through November 1985. The 260-square-mile study area includes the Baxterville oil field (approximately 12.5 square miles) in southwestern Lamar and southeastern Marion Counties, Mississippi. Since 1944, disposal of more than 1 billion barrels of brine pumped from the oil- producing zones has contaminated (increased chloride to greater than background concentrations) parts of the Citronelle and shallow Miocene aquifers and some streams that drain the oil field. Many domestic wells have been abandoned because of the presence of substantial quantities of brine in the ground water. Brine has moved laterally through the shallowest aquifers and discharged into Clear Creek and its tributaries. Although the presence of brine in surface water was greatest during periods of low flow when streamflow originated primarily from ground-water inflow, brine was also detected during high-flow periods when streamflow consisted largely of precipitation runoff.

Kalkhoff, Stephen J.

1993-01-01

265

Reduction in natural hydrocarbon seepage from the offshore south Ellwood field near Coal Oil Point, California, due to oil production  

SciTech Connect

Prolific natural gas seepage, a significant air pollution source in Santa Barbara County, occurs offshore from Coal Oil Point, near Santa Barbara. Seepage rates are quantified by measuring the acoustic return of sonar sources from the gas bubbles rising through the water column, and by measuring the dissolved concentrations of hydrocarbons downcurrent from the gas seep vents. In 1995 we digitally recorded 3.5 kHz data in the same location as a 1972-1973 survey. Comparison of the data suggests a substantial reduction in natural seepage within one mile of Platform Holly since oil production began in 1972 from the Monterey Formation reservoir, which is the source of the gas. Dissolved concentrations of hydrocarbons were measured in the ocean 2-6 miles downcurrent from Platform Holly in an area where concentrations were previously measured in a 1981 SNIFFER survey. The dissolved propane concentrations in 1995 had a peak value of 7 ppm, whereas in 1981 the peak value was 65 ppm. A reduction in natural gas seepage rate is also indicated by the 60% decline in the amount of seep gas captured by a seep containment device located one mile east of Platform Holly. The reduction in gas seepage rate may be attributed to a 40% reduction in subsurface reservoir pressure under Platform Holly that resulted from withdrawal of 43 MMBO and a similar volume of water from the Monterey Formation since 1972.

Hornafius, J.S.; Luyendyk, B.P.; Quigley, D.; Trial, A. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)) (and others)

1996-01-01

266

Reduction in natural hydrocarbon seepage from the offshore south Ellwood field near Coal Oil Point, California, due to oil production  

SciTech Connect

Prolific natural gas seepage, a significant air pollution source in Santa Barbara County, occurs offshore from Coal Oil Point, near Santa Barbara. Seepage rates are quantified by measuring the acoustic return of sonar sources from the gas bubbles rising through the water column, and by measuring the dissolved concentrations of hydrocarbons downcurrent from the gas seep vents. In 1995 we digitally recorded 3.5 kHz data in the same location as a 1972-1973 survey. Comparison of the data suggests a substantial reduction in natural seepage within one mile of Platform Holly since oil production began in 1972 from the Monterey Formation reservoir, which is the source of the gas. Dissolved concentrations of hydrocarbons were measured in the ocean 2-6 miles downcurrent from Platform Holly in an area where concentrations were previously measured in a 1981 SNIFFER survey. The dissolved propane concentrations in 1995 had a peak value of 7 ppm, whereas in 1981 the peak value was 65 ppm. A reduction in natural gas seepage rate is also indicated by the 60% decline in the amount of seep gas captured by a seep containment device located one mile east of Platform Holly. The reduction in gas seepage rate may be attributed to a 40% reduction in subsurface reservoir pressure under Platform Holly that resulted from withdrawal of 43 MMBO and a similar volume of water from the Monterey Formation since 1972.

Hornafius, J.S.; Luyendyk, B.P.; Quigley, D.; Trial, A. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31

267

Strontium isotopic signatures of oil-field waters: Applications for reservoir characterization  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The 87Sr/86Sr compositions of formation waters that were collected from 71 wells producing from a Pennsylvanian carbonate reservoir in New Mexico display a well-defined distribution, with radiogenic waters (up to 0.710129) at the updip western part of the reservoir, grading downdip to less radiogenic waters (as low as 0.708903 to the east. Salinity (2800-50,000 mg/L) displays a parallel trend; saline waters to the west pass downdip to brackish waters. Elemental and isotopic data indicate that the waters originated as meteoric precipitation and acquired their salinity and radiogenic 87Sr through dissolution of Upper Permian evaporites. These meteoric-derived waters descended, perhaps along deeply penetrating faults, driven by gravity and density, to depths of more than 7000 ft (2100 m). The 87 Sr/86Sr and salinity trends record influx of these waters along the western field margin and downdip flow across the field, consistent with the strong water drive, potentiometric gradient, and tilted gas-oil-water contacts. The formation water 87Sr/86Sr composition can be useful to evaluate subsurface flow and reservoir behavior, especially in immature fields with scarce pressure and production data. In mature reservoirs, Sr Sr isotopes can be used to differentiate original formation water from injected water for waterflood surveillance. Strontium isotopes thus provide a valuable tool for both static and dynamic reservoir characterization in conjunction with conventional studies using seismic, log, core, engineering, and production data. Copyright ??2004. The American Association of Petroleum Geologist. All rights reserved.

Barnaby, R.J.; Oetting, G.C.; Gao, G.

2004-01-01

269

Aerobic biodegradation process of petroleum and pathway of main compounds in water flooding well of Dagang oil field.  

PubMed

Aerobic biodegradation of crude oil and its pathways were investigated via in vitro culture and GC-MS analysis in water flooding wells of Dagang oil field. The in vitro aerobic culture lasted 90 days when 99.0% of n-alkanes and 43.03-99.9% of PAHs were degraded and the biomarkers and their ratios were changed. The spectra of components in the residual oil showed the similar biodegradation between aerobic process of 90 days and degradation in reservoir which may last for some millions years, and the potential of serious aerobic biodegradation of petroleum in reservoir. 24 Metabolites compounds were separated and identified from aerobic culture, including fatty acid, naphthenic acid, aromatic carboxylic acid, unsaturated acid, alcohols, ketones and aldehydes. The pathways of alkanes and aromatics were proposed, which suggests that oxidation of hydrocarbon to organic acid is an important process in the aerobic biodegradation of petroleum. PMID:23867530

Cai, Minmin; Yao, Jun; Yang, Huaijun; Wang, Ruixia; Masakorala, Kanaji

2013-09-01

270

Analysis of Data from a Downhole Oil/Water Separator Field Trial in East Texas  

SciTech Connect

Downhole oil/water separator (DOWS) technology is available to separate oil from produced water at the bottom of an oil well. Produced water can be injected directly to a disposal formation rather than lifting it to the surface, treating it there, and reinjecting it. Because of a lack of detailed performance data on DOWS systems, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided funding to secure DOWS performance data. A large U.S. oil and gas operator offered to share its data with Argonne National Laboratory. This report summarizes data from the DOWS installation in eastern Texas.

Veil, John A.; Layne, Arthur Langhus

2001-04-19

271

A procedure to estimate the parent population of the size of oil and gas fields as revealed by a study of economic truncation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An estimation technique has been derived to predict the number of small fields in a geologic play or basin. Historically, many small oil and gas fields went unreported because they were not economical. This led to an underestimation of the number of undiscovered small fields. A study of the distributions of reported oil and gas fields in well-explored areas suggests that the large fields when grouped into log base 2 size classes are geometrically distributed. Further, the number of small fields reported is a function of the cost of exploration and development. Thus, the population field-size distribution is conjectured to be log geometric in form. ?? 1983 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

Schuenemeyer, J.H.; Drew, L.J.

1983-01-01

272

Mining machinery/equipment/parts/services. Oil and gas field equipment/machinery/parts/supplies (Brazil). Oil and gas field machinery, November 1990. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The Brazilian market for oil and gasfield machinery reached approximately $938 million in 1989, of which about $86 million were supplied by imports. The market may reach $2.6 billion by 1993, if indeed the Government of Brazil approves an annual investment plan of $3.5 billion, as proposed by PETROBRAS, the state owned and operated oil and gas production monopoly. According to reports by the Ministry of Economy, investments by PETROBRAS rose from .37% of GDP in 1989 to .41% in 1990. It is predicted that during the next five years its investments will average .56% of GDP. Currently, PETROBRAS imports only about 10% of its equipment needs, but this is expected to more than double by 1993 as a result of a recently adopted procurement policy which calls for purchasing the best available equipment worldwide, at the most favorable price.

Not Available

1990-11-01

273

IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN  

SciTech Connect

Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates are undertaking a focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling and an integrated field demonstration project at Womack Hill Oil Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The principal research efforts for Year 3 of the project have been recovery technology analysis and recovery technology evaluation. The research focus has primarily been on well test analysis, 3-D reservoir simulation, microbial core experiments, and the decision to acquire new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field area. Although Geoscientific Reservoir Characterization and 3-D Geologic Modeling have been completed and Petrophysical and Engineering Characterization and Microbial Characterization are essentially on schedule, a no-cost extension until September 30, 2003, has been granted by DOE so that new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field can be acquired and interpreted to assist in the determination as to whether Phase II of the project should be implemented.

Ernest A. Mancini

2003-05-20

274

Modified vegetation indices for Ganoderma disease detection in oil palm from field spectroradiometer data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High resolution field spectroradiometers are important for spectral analysis and mobile inspection of vegetation disease. The biggest challenges in using this technology for automated vegetation disease detection are in spectral signatures pre-processing, band selection and generating reflectance indices to improve the ability of hyperspectral data for early detection of disease. In this paper, new indices for oil palm Ganoderma disease detection were generated using band ratio and different band combination techniques. Unsupervised clustering method was used to cluster the values of each class resultant from each index. The wellness of band combinations was assessed by using Optimum Index Factor (OIF) while cluster validation was executed using Average Silhouette Width (ASW). 11 modified reflectance indices were generated in this study and the indices were ranked according to the values of their ASW. These modified indices were also compared to several existing and new indices. The results showed that the combination of spectral values at 610.5nm and 738nm was the best for clustering the three classes of infection levels in the determination of the best spectral index for early detection of Ganoderma disease.

Shafri, Helmi Z. M.; Anuar, M. Izzuddin; Saripan, M. Iqbal

2009-10-01

275

Probing Asphaltene Aggregation in Native Crude Oils with Low-Field NMR  

SciTech Connect

We show that low-field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and diffusion experiments can be used to study asphaltene aggregation directly in crude oils. Relaxation was found to be multiexponential, reflecting the composition of a complex fluid. Remarkably, the relaxation data for samples with different asphaltene concentrations can be collapsed onto each other by a simple rescaling of the time dimension with a concentration-dependent factor {zeta}, whereas the observed diffusion behavior is unaffected by asphaltene concentration. We interpret this finding in terms of a theoretical model that explains the enhanced relaxation by the transitory entanglement of solvent hydrocarbons within asphaltene clusters and their subsequent slowed motion and diffusion within the cluster. We relate the measured scaling parameters {zeta} to cluster sizes, which we find to be on the order of 2.2-4.4 nm for an effective sphere diameter. These sizes are in agreement with the typical values reported in the literature as well as with the small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments performed on our samples.

Zielinski, Lukasz; Saha, Indrajit; Freed, Denise E.; Hrlimann, Martin D.; Liu, Yongsheng (BU-M); (Schlumberger-Doll)

2010-04-13

276

Degradation of phenanthrene by bacterial strain isolated from soil in oil refinery fields in Shanghai China.  

PubMed

A bacterial strain Pseudomonas stutzeri ZP2 was identified with phenanthrene-degrading ability based on Gram staining, oxydase reaction, biochemical tests, FAME analysis, G+C content and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. It is the first time that P. stutzeri is reported to process the capability for phenanthrene degradation. The strain was isolated from soil samples contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-containing waste from an oil refinery field in Shanghai, China. Strain P sp. ZP2 can utilize naphthalene, phenanthrene and Tween 80 as its sole carbon source and can degrade phenanthrene very fast, 6 days for 96% phenanthrene at 250 ppm concentration. The optimal growth conditions of strain ZP2 was determined to be at pH 8.0, 37 degrees C, respectively. The results also indicate that strain ZP2 can remove more than 90% of phenanthrene at any concentrations ranged from 250 to 1000 ppm in 6 days. It suggests that strain ZP2 can endure high concentrations of phenanthrene. Besides, the effects of non-ionic surfactants such as Brij 30, Triton X100 and Tween 80, on the phenanthrene degradation were examined. Therefore, this strain may find great application in bioremediation practices. PMID:18930349

Zhao, He-Ping; Wu, Qing-Sheng; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Xue-Tao; Gao, Hong-Wen

2009-05-30

277

Costs for off-site disposal of nonhazardous oil field wastes: Salt caverns versus other disposal methods  

SciTech Connect

According to an American Petroleum Institute production waste survey reported on by P.G. Wakim in 1987 and 1988, the exploration and production segment of the US oil and gas industry generated more than 360 million barrels (bbl) of drilling wastes, more than 20 billion bbl of produced water, and nearly 12 million bbl of associated wastes in 1985. Current exploration and production activities are believed to be generating comparable quantities of these oil field wastes. Wakim estimates that 28% of drilling wastes, less than 2% of produced water, and 52% of associated wastes are disposed of in off-site commercial facilities. In recent years, interest in disposing of oil field wastes in solution-mined salt caverns has been growing. This report provides information on the availability of commercial disposal companies in oil-and gas-producing states, the treatment and disposal methods they employ, and the amounts they charge. It also compares cavern disposal costs with the costs of other forms of waste disposal.

Veil, J.A.

1997-09-01

278

Scales of geological heterogeneity of a deep-water sand giant oil field  

SciTech Connect

To understand the levels of accuracy that can be placed upon different scales of reservoir description, turbidite intervals in part of the giant Wilmington oil field, California, have been numerically described at four scales of heterogeneity. The degree of accuracy of the description, in terms of real geologic variability, is found to diminish with increasing scale. At the microscale (grains and pores) and mesoscale (near well bore), the following flow units, listed in order of decreasing reservoir quality, were defined by relating various geologic and petrophysical properties: thick-bedded sand, thin-bedded sand, and shale. Mutual relationships among the geologic and petrophysical properties are a result of primary depositional processes. At the macroscale (interwell), shale beds are laterally continuous over long distances and probably isolate individual sands by acting as vertical permeability barriers. Petrophysical properties, such as permeability, vary between wells within an order of magnitude of measured values. The relationships among petrophysical properties and geologic properties established at the single-well scale are sometimes but not always predictable between wells. At the megascale (field wide), the turbidites were placed within the context of Vail's integrated sequence stratigraphy model, Walker's progradational submarine fan model, and Mutti's turbidite systems model to illustrate that there is not a unique interpretation when the overall size of a depositional system is larger than that of the data grid. At this scale, petrophysical properties are averaged over a large stratigraphic interval so that there is very little interwell predictability; however, the primary depositional control on gross petrophysical properties is maintained.

Slatt, R.M. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Plano, TX (USA)); Phillips, S. (ARCO Alaska, Inc., Anchorage (USA)); Boak, J.M. (Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (USA)); Lagoe, M.B. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

1990-05-01

279

ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTERIZATION OF GEOKINETICS' IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING TECHNOLOGY: FIELD AND ANALYTICAL DATA APPENDICES  

EPA Science Inventory

Air emissions and water effluents from true in-situ oil shale retorting were physically, chemically and biologically characterized by sampling of Geokinetics Retort No. 17, a pilot-scale unit which produced 30 barrels of crude shale oil per day during testing from July 16 to July...

280

Simulation studies of steam-propane injection for the Hamaca heavy oil field  

E-print Network

Simulation studies were performed to evaluate a novel technology, steam-propane injection, for the heavy Hamaca crude oil. The oil has a gravity of 9.3?API and a viscosity of 25,000 cp at 50?C. Two types of simulation studies were performed: a...

Venturini, Gilberto Jose

2002-01-01

281

Late diagenetic indicators of buried oil and gas: II, Direct detection experiment at Cement and Garza oil fields, Oklahoma and Texas, using enhanced LANDSAT I and II images  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Cement oil field, Oklahoma, was a test site for an experiment designed to evaluate LANDSAT's capability to detect an alteration zone in surface rocks caused by hydrocarbon microseepage. Loss of iron and impregnation of sandstone by carbonate cements and replacement of gypsum by calcite are the major alteration phenomena at Cement. The bedrock alterations are partially masked by unaltered overlying beds, thick soils, and dense natural and cultivated vegetation. Interpreters biased by detailed ground truth were able to map the alteration zone subjectively using a magnified, filtered, and sinusoidally stretched LANDSAT composite image; other interpreters, unbiased by ground truth data, could not duplicate that interpretation. Similar techniques were applied at a secondary test site (Garza oil field, Texas), where similar alterations in surface rocks occur. Enhanced LANDSAT images resolved the alteration zone to a biased interpreter and some individual altered outcrops could be mapped using higher resolution SKYLAB color and conventional black and white aerial photographs suggesting repeat experiments with LANDSAT C and D.

Donovan, Terrence J.; Termain, Patricia A.; Henry, Mitchell E.

1979-01-01

282

Water in oil emulsion droplet size characterization using a pulsed field gradient with diffusion editing (PFG-DE) NMR technique.  

PubMed

This paper describes a proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, pulsed field gradient with diffusion editing (PFG-DE), to quantify drop size distributions of brine/crude oil emulsions. The drop size distributions obtained from this technique were compared to results from the traditional pulsed field gradient (PFG) technique. The PFG-DE technique provides both transverse relaxation (T2) and drop size distributions simultaneously. In addition, the PFG-DE technique does not assume a form of the drop size distribution. An algorithm for the selection of the optimal parameters to use in a PFG-DE measurement is described in this paper. The PFG-DE technique is shown to have the ability to resolve drop size distributions when the T2 distribution of the emulsified brine overlaps either the crude oil or the bulk brine T2 distribution. Finally, the PFG-DE technique is shown to have the ability to resolve a bimodal drop size distribution. PMID:17716679

Aichele, Clint P; Flaum, Mark; Jiang, Tianmin; Hirasaki, George J; Chapman, Walter G

2007-11-15

283

LANDSAT Study of Alteration Aureoles in Surface Rocks Overlying Petroleum Deposits. [Cement and Davenport oil fields, Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. A series of low altitude underflight remote sensing experiments were flown at Cement and Davenport oil fields, Oklahoma. An experimental algorithm which employs a sinusoidal stretch of brightness values was developed and applied to a January 1973 scene (bands 4, 5, and 6) of Cement. The results, although not spectacular, are extremely encouraging and for the first time demonstrate that the alteration anomaly at Cement may be defined through enhanced LANDSAT images.

Donovan, T. J. (principal investigator)

1975-01-01

284

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 86, quarter ending March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Summaries are presented for 37 enhanced oil recovery contracts being supported by the Department of Energy. The projects are grouped into gas displacement methods, thermal recovery methods, geoscience technology, reservoir characterization, and field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes. Each summary includes the objectives of the project and a summary of the technical progress, as well as information on contract dates, size of award, principal investigator, and company or facility doing the research.

NONE

1997-05-01

285

Organic geochemistry of oils and condensates in the Kekeya Field, Southwest Depression of the Tarim Basin (China) 1 Geological Survey of Canada contribution No. 1998014. 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study shows that the oils and condensates in the Kekeya Field in the Tarim Basin, NW China, belong to a single family, most likely derived from marine shale source rocks deposited under oxic–suboxic conditions with mixed terrigenous and algal–bacterial organic inputs. The maturity data clearly indicate that the paraffinic condensates were not formed by thermal cracking of oil during

Maowen Li; Renzi Lin; Yongsheng Liao; Lloyd R Snowdon; Peirong Wang; Peilong Li

1999-01-01

286

Occurrence of oil and gas fields and source rock transformation in the west Siberian basin and Barents Sea platform  

SciTech Connect

The West Siberian and Barents Sea basins contain the largest demonstrated reserves of gas in the world (more than 33 trilion m[sup 3]) and very large recoverable reserves of oil (about 19 billion tons). The main productive reservoirs are of the Jurassic and Cretaceous and are composed of marine and alluvial sandstones. Major gas fields of the West Siberian basin are located north of the Arctic Circle, from which they extend into the Yamal Peninsula and offshore into the Kara Sea. Oil fields of the basin are found mainly in the middle Ob region. Only one giant gas-condensate field has been found in the Barents Sea; however, this area has excellent potential for gas-condensate discoveries in the future. Both basins contain Kimmeridgian-Tithonian black-shale formations, which are prolific oil source rocks. In the Barents Sea basin, Kimmeridgian black shales contain 7 to 9% of organic carbon; total pyrolysis yield ranges from 5.3 to 84.2 mg HC/g rock, and hydrogen index ranges from 270 to 630 mg HC/g TOC. Our pyrolysis data and basin modeling (GALO version) indicate that the realization of the initial petroleum potential in the Shtokmanov field area has not begun because the volume of generated oil (about 8 mg HC/g TOC) is insufficient to start expulsion (threshold of expulsion is equal to 96 mg HC/g TOC). The Bazhenov Formation shales in the central part of the West Siberian basin are characterized by extremely high values of pyrolysis measurements. The organic carbon content ranges from 10 to 25%; the residual petroleum potential varies from 50 to 190 mg HC/g rock; the maturity typically corresponds to the oil window zone; and the amount of expelled hydrocarbons ranges from 40 to 60 mg HC/g rock. The expulsion of oil commenced 90 to 35 m.y. In the northern part of the West Siberian basin, the Bazhenov shales are lean source rocks.

Lopatin, N. (Institute of Geochemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation))

1993-09-01

287

Investigation of Diospyros Kaki L.f husk extracts as corrosion inhibitors and bactericide in oil field  

PubMed Central

Background Hydrochloric acid is used in oil-well acidizing commonly for improving the crude oil production of the low-permeable reservoirs, while it is a great challenge for the metal instruments involved in the acidification. Developing natural products as oilfield chemicals is a straight way to find less expensive, green and eco-friendly materials. The great plant resources in Qin-ling and Ba-shan Mountain Area of Shannxi Province enable the investigating of new green oil field chemicals. Diospyros Kaki L.f (persimmon), a famous fruit tree is widely planted in Qin-ling and Ba-shan Mountain Area of Shaanxi Province. It has been found that the crude persimmon extracts are complex mixtures containing vitamins, p-coumaric acid, gallic acid, catechin, flavonoids, carotenoids and condensed tannin and so on, which indicates the extracts of persimmon husk suitable to be used as green and eco-friendly corrosion inhibitors. Findings Extracts of persimmon husk were investigated, by using weight loss and potentiodynamic polarisation techniques, as green and eco-friendly corrosion inhibitors of Q235A steel in 1M HCl. The inhibition efficiency of the extracts varied with extract concentration from 10 to 1,000 mg/L. There are some synergistic effects between the extracts and KI, KSCN and HMTA. Potentiodynamic polarization studies indicate that extracts are mixed-type inhibitors. Besides, the extracts were screened for antibacterial activity against oil field microorganisms, and they showed good to moderate activity against SRB, IB and TGB. Conclusions The inhibition efficiency of the extracts varied with extract concentration from 10 to 1,000 mg/L, and the highest reaches to 65.1% with the con concentration of 1,000 mg/L WE. KI, KSCN and HMTA they can enhance the IE of WE effectively to 97.3% at most, but not effective for KI and KSCN to AE. Tafel polarisation measurements indicate the extracts behave as mixed type inhibitor. Investigation of the antibacterial activity against oil field microorganism showed the extracts can inhibit SRB, IB and TGB with moderate to highly efficiency under 1,000 mg/L, which makes extracts potential to be used as bifunctional oil field chemicals. PMID:23816431

2013-01-01

288

Sand remobilization enhanced complexity to mounded geometry, Early Tertiary deep water sand reservoirs, Balder Oil Field North Sea  

SciTech Connect

Sand remobilization played a major role in generating the high relief mounded geometries that trap oil in the early Tertiary reservoirs at Balder Field in Norwegian North Sea blocks 25/10 and 25/11. The thick massive submarine-fan sandstones were shed from the East Shetland Platform and deposited from high density turbidity currents. These thick massive sandstones lie in the distal portions of the fan system on the northwestern margin of the Utsira High. An intricate interaction between deposition and soft sediment deformation processes generated the complex cluster of thick mounded sand geometries comprising the Balder oil field. Slumping, sliding and sand remobilization with associated sand injections into overlying shales were the dominant deformation processes that mainly occurred during the early Eocene. The field is comprised of three reservoirs, the Paleocene Heimdal and Hermod Formations and the Early Eocene Balder Formation. The sandstones, which have excellent reservoir properties, share a common pressure system and oil-water contact. This is probably related to the soft-sediment deformation and associated sand injections establishing cross-stratal communication.

Bergslien, D.; Rye-Larsen, M.; Jenssen, A.I. (Esso Norge AS, Forus (Norway))

1996-01-01

289

Sand remobilization enhanced complexity to mounded geometry, Early Tertiary deep water sand reservoirs, Balder Oil Field North Sea  

SciTech Connect

Sand remobilization played a major role in generating the high relief mounded geometries that trap oil in the early Tertiary reservoirs at Balder Field in Norwegian North Sea blocks 25/10 and 25/11. The thick massive submarine-fan sandstones were shed from the East Shetland Platform and deposited from high density turbidity currents. These thick massive sandstones lie in the distal portions of the fan system on the northwestern margin of the Utsira High. An intricate interaction between deposition and soft sediment deformation processes generated the complex cluster of thick mounded sand geometries comprising the Balder oil field. Slumping, sliding and sand remobilization with associated sand injections into overlying shales were the dominant deformation processes that mainly occurred during the early Eocene. The field is comprised of three reservoirs, the Paleocene Heimdal and Hermod Formations and the Early Eocene Balder Formation. The sandstones, which have excellent reservoir properties, share a common pressure system and oil-water contact. This is probably related to the soft-sediment deformation and associated sand injections establishing cross-stratal communication.

Bergslien, D.; Rye-Larsen, M.; Jenssen, A.I. [Esso Norge AS, Forus (Norway)

1996-12-31

290

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through September 2000, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional

Scott Hara

2001-01-01

291

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through March 1999, project work has been completed related to data preparation, basic reservoir engineering, developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic

Scott Hara

2000-01-01

292

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through March 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional

Scott Hara

2001-01-01

293

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through June 2002, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional

Scott Hara

2002-01-01

294

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington Oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Quarterly report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., California using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The technologies include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, S.

1996-08-05

295

Increasing heavy oil reservers in the Wilmington oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies, technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, S. [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)], Casteel, J. [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)

1997-05-11

296

Salvaging dipmeters using an oil field {open_quotes}Dinosaur{close_quotes}  

SciTech Connect

Although state-of-the-art methods such as 3-D seismic and formation imaging tools are widely used, the advantages of the old standard dipmeter should not be dismissed. Seismic dip is subject to velocity errors, and formation imagers cannot be run in all borehole conditions. The dipmeter offers a relatively low cost, highly effective alternative for defining geologic features. The 60{double_prime}= 100{prime} scale playback of the raw dipmeter data may be an oil field {open_quotes}dinosaur,{close_quotes} but it is also the key to assessing the reliability of a dipmeter. This playback should be used to determine CORRELATION QUALITY, critical to the accuracy of any dipmeter. Computer computation of the raw dipmeter data does not always yield reliable dip information, particularly when dipmeters are run under adverse hole conditions or in complex geology. This data can be often salvaged by optical correlation of the 60{close_quote} playback - the process of manually correlating raw dipmeter resistivity curves to determine the attitude of bedding planes in the subsurface. Problems such as tool noise, tool pulls, and poor pad contact compromise data quality. These problems can be recognized and compensated for using optical correlation. Finally, at the 60{double_prime} scale many formation textures and structural characteristics visible on the formation imaging logs are also discernible on the standard dipmeter traces. We will offer many Gulf Coast examples and some hands-on demonstrations using the 60{double_prime} data, and show improved tadpole plots which result from optical correlation.

Breimayer, A.R.P.; Puzio, L.B. [Terradip, Houston, TX (United States)

1996-09-01

297

Field Instruments for Real Time In-Situ Crude Oil Concentration Measurements  

E-print Network

The Texas Water Resources Institute awarded a Mill Scholarship to M.C. Sterling, Jr in 2002. This project describes five sensors for rapid monitoring of crude oil concentrations in an aquatic system. These measurements are critical for monitoring...

Fuller, C. B.; Bonner, J. S.; Page, C. A.; Arrambide, G.; Sterling Jr., M. C.; Ojo, T.

298

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III  

SciTech Connect

This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

2001-08-07

299

Fuzzy SPC filter for a feed-forward control system for a three-phase oil field centrifuge.  

SciTech Connect

In this work we describe a signal filter for a feed-forward controller based on the application of fuzzy logic combined with statistical process control (SPC), The feed-forward controller is for a three-phase oil field centrifuge. The centrifuge system is used to separate meta-stable three-phase emulsions consisting of oil and water stabilized by solids. These emulsions are considered to be unusable wastes and must be disposed of in an environmentally acceptable manner. The centrifuge is capable of turning these wastes into clean saleable oil, water that can be reused in an operating process or re-injected into oil wells and, solids that can be disposed of in landfills. The feed-forward controller is used for feed disturbance rejection. It works in conjunction with and, is capable of over-riding the actions of, a feedback controller. The measured feed variables for the feed-forward controller each exhibit reasonably large random fluctuations. It is therefore quite important to use a signal filter that truly recognizes the difference between random noise and a 'caused' event, in order to prevent overriding a perfectly good correction from the feedback controller.

Parkinson, W. J. (William Jerry),; Smith, R. E. (Ronald E.); Mortensen, F. N. (Fred N.); Wantuck, P. J. (Paul J.); Jamshidi, Mohammad; Ross, Timothy J.

2002-01-01

300

Open-source LCA tool for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from crude oil production using field characteristics.  

PubMed

Existing transportation fuel cycle emissions models are either general and calculate nonspecific values of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from crude oil production, or are not available for public review and auditing. We have developed the Oil Production Greenhouse Gas Emissions Estimator (OPGEE) to provide open-source, transparent, rigorous GHG assessments for use in scientific assessment, regulatory processes, and analysis of GHG mitigation options by producers. OPGEE uses petroleum engineering fundamentals to model emissions from oil and gas production operations. We introduce OPGEE and explain the methods and assumptions used in its construction. We run OPGEE on a small set of fictional oil fields and explore model sensitivity to selected input parameters. Results show that upstream emissions from petroleum production operations can vary from 3 gCO2/MJ to over 30 gCO2/MJ using realistic ranges of input parameters. Significant drivers of emissions variation are steam injection rates, water handling requirements, and rates of flaring of associated gas. PMID:23634761

El-Houjeiri, Hassan M; Brandt, Adam R; Duffy, James E

2013-06-01

301

Fully coupled modeling of seabed subsidence and reservoir compaction of North Sea oil fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

  \\u000a This paper focuses on the aspects of fully coupled continuum modeling of multiphase poroelasticity applied to the three-dimensional\\u000a numerical simulations of the Ekofisk oil reservoir in the North Sea (56°29?–34?N, 03°10?–14?E). A systematic presentation\\u000a is chosen to present the methodology behind fully coupled, continuum modeling. First, a historical review of the subsidence\\u000a phenomena above an oil and gas reservoir

Roland W. Lewis; Axel Makurat; William K. S. Pao

2003-01-01

302

Using ??87Sr values to identify sources of salinity to a freshwater aquifer, Greater Aneth Oil Field, Utah, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Salinity increases in water from the freshwater Navajo aquifer in the Aneth area have been documented in recent years. Previous studies during the 1980s in the Aneth area suggested that brines associated with oil production and their subsequent re-injection were the probable source of salinity in the Navajo aquifer. Differences in the delta strontium-87 (??87Sr) composition of ground-water samples from southeastern Utah were used to determine if oil-field brine or water from the upper Paleozoic aquifer is a plausible source of salinity to the Navajo aquifer. The ??87Sr values of the oil-field brine samples (mean = -0.95???, range = -1.06 to -0.19???, n = 5) are substantially more negative than the values in water samples from wells completed in the Navajo aquifer (mean = 0.73, range= -0.85 to 2.02???, n = 48), indicating that oil-field brine is not a source of salinity. The ??87Sr values in water samples from wells completed in the upper Paleozoic aquifer (mean = 0.80???, range = 0.34 to 1.10???, n = 4) are similar to the mean isotopic composition of the more saline water from the Navajo aquifer. The ??87Sr values in water from the Navajo aquifer confirm that two distinct flow areas are present. Mixing models using the ??87Sr values and Sr concentrations of non-saline water from the Navajo aquifer and saline water from the upper Paleozoic aquifer indicate that water from the upper Paleozoic aquifer is a plausible source of saline water to the Navajo aquifer. Most Navajo aquifer wells that contain water with a ??87Sr signature similar to water from the upper Paleozoic aquifer are located within or adjacent to an area where the hydraulic gradient is favorable for upward movement of water from the upper Paleozoic aquifer into the Navajo aquifer. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.

Naftz, D.L.; Peterman, Z.E.; Spangler, L.E.

1997-01-01

303

[The role of mutation of gene cyp1A1 and benzapilene in cytogenetic changes of urinary tract epitheliocytes in oil industry workers employed in the oil fields of the North of West Siberia].  

PubMed

The examination of 477 oil industry workers and office personnel (control) employed in the oil fields of the North of Tomsk and Tyumen regions has detected increased number of epithelyocytes with micronuclei and an elevated urine level ofbenzapilene in workers employed in oil production. Especially pronounced changes of the above parameters were observed in men with mutant alleles Val of CYP1A1 gene. An enhanced mutation process in oil production workers may be due to a resultant action of different factors on human genome. Involved may be both mutagens and factors of comutagenic nature. The results obtained in this study suggest a conclusion about urgent need of introduction of new scientifically validated criteria of selection of personnel for oil production in the North of the West Siberia. Health examination of the applicants must include genotyping. PMID:22448487

Il'inskikh, N N; Il'inskikh, E N; Il'inskikh, I N; Iamkovaia, E V

2011-01-01

304

Peculiarities of the geologic structure of gigantic gas fields of the western Siberian oil and gas province  

SciTech Connect

The Western Siberian Oil and Gas Province is a unique one regarding the concentration of natural gas resources in Mesozoic terrigenous formations. Discovery of gigantic natural gas fields makes it possible to provide high level of gas production for future prospects. The USSR has enormous potential possibilities for discoveries of new natural gas fields onshore, as well as offshore. At present, three gigantic gas fields have been developed, namely Medvezhie, Urongoi, and Yamburg. The first one has been in operation for 18 years. In the Mesozoic section, three productive complexes can be noticed: Upper Cretaceous, Lower Cretaceous, and Jurassic. The Upper Cretaceous production complex is mostly explored, with unique gas resources containing mainly methane having been discovered. The Lower Cretaceous production complex is characterized by considerable lithofaceous uniformity of reservoirs. Gas pools of this complex contain considerable quantities of condensate quite often having oil rims. The Jurassic production complex, which is characterized by its complicated structure and considerable changeability of the filtration properties, is less studied. Study of the geological structural peculiarities of the gigantic gas fields of Western Siberia gives us the possibility to find new approval for the development and exploration of gas fields.

Belyi, N.

1991-03-01

305

Mining machinery/equipment/parts/services. Oil and gas field equipment/machinery/parts/supplies (Trinidad and Tobago). Oil and gas field equipment and supplies, June 1991. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

Faced with declining crude oil production, the government of Trinidad and Tobago has launched an array of energy-related work programs through which it hopes to both restore or increase production levels and squeeze out more domestic value. This new activity in the energy sector is expected to result in a substantial increase in purchases of oil and gas field and refinery equipment and services over the near to medium term (especially for tubular goods and fittings), with major growth expected long-term in all categories if the exploration campaigns are successful. The United States is the dominant supplier in the highly price-competitive market with a 65 percent market share; the only category in which the U.S. faces significant competition is tubular goods and fittings.

Not Available

1991-06-01

306

Sources of aeromagnetic anomalies over Cement oil field (Oklahoma), Simpson oil field (Alaska), and the Wyoming-Idaho-Utah thrust belt  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geochemical and rock magnetic studies, undertaken to determine the causes of magnetic anomalies have revealed different magnetic sources developed under different sedimentologic, geochemical, and structural settings. Results show that abiologic and biologic mechanisms can generate different magnetic sulfide minerals in zones of sulfide hydrocarbon seepage. More commonly, sulfidic seepage could either diminish magnetization by replacement of detrital magnetic minerals with nonmagnetic sulfide minerals, or it would have no effect on magnetization if such detrital minerals were originally absent. An important negative result is the absence of abundant secondary (diagenetic) magnetite in the seepage environments. Although secondary magnetite occurs in some biodegraded crude oils, concentrations of such magnetite capable of producing aeromagnetic anomalies have not been documented. -from Authors

Reynolds, R.L.; Fishman, N.S.; Hudson, M.R.

1991-01-01

307

Biomarker responses in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) exposed to produced water from a North Sea oil field: laboratory and field assessments.  

PubMed

Biological markers of produced water (PW) exposure were studied in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in both laboratory and field experiments, using authentic PW from a North Sea oil field. In the laboratory study, the PW exposure yielded significantly elevated levels of metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkylphenols (APs) in bile even at the lowest exposure dose (0.125% PW). Other biomarkers (hepatic CYP1A induction and DNA adduct formation) responded at 0.25% and 0.5% PW concentrations. In the field study, bile metabolite markers and hepatic CYP1A were clearly increased in fish caged close to the PW outfall. Induction of plasma vitellogenin was not found in laboratory or field exposures, suggesting that the levels of oestrogen agonists (such as APs) might not have been sufficient to elicit induction, under the present conditions. The applicability of the biomarkers for use in water column biomonitoring programs is discussed. PMID:22070981

Sundt, Rolf C; Ruus, Anders; Jonsson, Henrik; Skarphéðinsdóttir, Halldóra; Meier, Sonnich; Grung, Merete; Beyer, Jonny; Pampanin, Daniela M

2012-01-01

308

The effect of an oil drilling operation on the trace metal concentrations in offshore bottom sediments of the Campos Basin oil field, SE Brazil.  

PubMed

The concentrations of Al, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni, Cr, Ba, V, Sn and As in offshore bottom sediments from the Bacia de Campos oil field, SE Brazil, were measured at the beginning and at 7 months after completion of the drilling operation. Concentrations of Al, Fe, Ba, Cr, Ni and Zn were significantly higher closer to the drilling site compared to stations far from the site. Average concentrations of Al, Cu, and in particular of Ni, were significantly higher at the end of the drilling operation than at the beginning. Comparison between drilling area sediments with control sediments of the continental platform, however, showed no significant difference in trace metal concentrations. Under the operation conditions of this drilling event, the results show that while changes in some trace metal concentrations do occur during drilling operations, they are not significantly large to be distinguished from natural variability of the local background concentrations. PMID:12222892

Rezende, C E; Lacerda, L D; Ovalle, A R C; Souza, C M M; Gobo, A A R; Santos, D O

2002-07-01

309

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. This is the sixth quarterly technical progress report for the project. Through September 1996, the project continues to make good progress but is slightly behind schedule. Estimated costs are on budget for the work performed to date. Technical achievements accomplished during the quarter include placing the first two horizontal wells on production following cyclic steam stimulation, completing several draft technical reports and preparing presentations on the deterministic geologic model, steam channel crossing and horizontal well drilling for technical transfer. Cyclic steam injection into the first two horizontal wells was completed in June 1996 and initial oil production from the project began the same month. Work has commenced on the stochastic geologic and reservoir simulation models. High temperature core work and reservoir tracer work will commence in the First Quarter 1997.

Hara, S. [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)

1996-12-01

310

Excito-repellency of essential oils against an Aedes aegypti (L.) field population in Thailand.  

PubMed

An investigation of the behavioral responses of Aedes aegypti (= Stegomyia aegypti) to various concentrations of essential oils (2.5, 5, and 10%) extracted from hairy basil (Ocimum americanum Linn), ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe), lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus Stapf), citronella grass (Cymbopogon nardus Rendle), and plai (Zingiber cassumunar Roxb) were performed using an excito-repellency test chamber. Results showed that Ae. aegypti exhibited varying levels of escape response in both the contact and noncontact chambers in response to different essential oils. The magnitude of the behaviors changed in a dose-response fashion depending on the percent volume to volume concentration of oil used. A 2.5% concentration of hairy basil oil produced a significantly greater escape response compared to the other extracts at the same concentration (P< 0.05). Oils of ginger, lemongrass, and citronella produced stronger irritant and repellent responses at the median 5% concentration compared to the lowest and highest concentrations. There was marked suppression of escape for both contact and noncontact tests using 10% concentrations of hairy basil, lemongrass, and citronella, with high knockdown for all three oils after 30 min. Hairy basil and lemongrass had the highest insecticidal activity to Ae. aegypti, with LC50 values of 6.3 and 6.7 percent, respectively. We conclude that the essential oils from native plants tested, and likely many other extracts found in plants, have inherent repellent and irritant qualities that should to be screened and optimized for their behavior-modifying properties against Ae. aegypti and other biting arthropods of public health and pest importance. PMID:24820563

Boonyuan, Wasana; Grieco, John P; Bangs, Michael J; Prabaripai, Atchariya; Tantakom, Siripun; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap

2014-06-01

311

Application of Rosenbrock search technique to reduce the drilling cost of a well in Bai-Hassan oil field  

SciTech Connect

The powerful Rosenbrock search technique, which optimizes both the search directions using the Gram-Schmidt procedure and the step size using the Fibonacci line search method, has been used to optimize the drilling program of an oil well drilled in Bai-Hassan oil field in Kirkuk, Iran, using the twodimensional drilling model of Galle and Woods. This model shows the effect of the two major controllable variables, weight on bit and rotary speed, on the drilling rate, while considering other controllable variables such as the mud properties, hydrostatic pressure, hydraulic design, and bit selection. The effect of tooth dullness on the drilling rate is also considered. Increasing the weight on the drill bit with a small increase or decrease in ratary speed resulted in a significant decrease in the drilling cost for most bit runs. It was found that a 48% reduction in this cost and a 97-hour savings in the total drilling time was possible under certain conditions.

Aswad, Z.A.R.; Al-Hadad, S.M.S.

1983-03-01

312

Control of hydrogen sulfide production in oil fields by managing microbial communities through nitrate or nitrite addition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nitrate or nitrite injection into oil reservoirs during water flooding has the potential to control biological souring, the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Souring control is essential because sulfide is toxic, sulfide precipitates can plug reservoir formations, souring lowers crude oil value, and SRB induce corrosion. Nitrate and nitrite can stimulate heterotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing bacteria (hNRB) and nitrate- or nitrite-reducing, sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NRSOB). Nitrite also inhibits SRB activity by blocking the sulfate reduction pathway. Continuous up-flow packed-bed bioreactors were inoculated with produced water from the Coleville oil field to establish sulfide-producing biofilms similar to those found in sour reservoirs. Nitrate or nitrite addition to bioreactors indicated that the dose required for hNRB or NR-SOB to control souring depended on the concentration of oil organics. Either mechanism mediates the net removal of oil organics (lactate) with nitrate or nitrite, with lower doses of nitrate required due to its greater oxidative power. Microbial community analysis by reverse sample genome probing (RSGP) revealed that NR-SOB mediated sulfide removal at low nitrate or nitrite concentrations when lactate was still available to SRB and the redox potential was low. At high nitrate doses hNRB oxidized lactate directly, produced nitrite and maintained a high redox potential, thus excluding SRB activity. Facultatively chemolithotrophic Campylobacter sp. strains were isolated from the bioreactors and incorporated into RSGP analyses, revealing their dominance in both NR-SOB- and hNRB-containing communities. The metabolic flexibility of these strains may confer a competitive advantage over obligate chemolithotrophs like Thiomicrospira sp. strain CVO or hNRB that do not have NR-SOB activity like newly isolated Thauera sp. and Rhodobacter sp. strains. A single high dose of nitrite resulted in immediate inhibition of SRB that was independent of hNRB or NR-SOB. Examination of corrosion coupons following bioreactor experiments revealed that nitrite inhibition was the only mechanism that prevented both souring and corrosion. Sulfide elimination by hNRB or NR-SOB resulted in increased pitting corrosion in the region of greatest microbial activity. These findings are instructive for designing souring control treatments and improve understanding of oil field microbial communities.

Hubert, Casey R. J.

313

Eos modeling and reservoir simulation study of bakken gas injection improved oil recovery in the elm coulee field, Montana  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin is one of the most productive liquid-rich unconventional plays. The Bakken Formation is divided into three members, and the Middle Bakken Member is the primary target for horizontal wellbore landing and hydraulic fracturing because of its better rock properties. Even with this new technology, the primary recovery factor is believed to be only around 10%. This study is to evaluate various gas injection EOR methods to try to improve on that low recovery factor of 10%. In this study, the Elm Coulee Oil Field in the Williston Basin was selected as the area of interest. Static reservoir models featuring the rock property heterogeneity of the Middle Bakken Member were built, and fluid property models were built based on Bakken reservoir fluid sample PVT data. By employing both compositional model simulation and Todd-Longstaff solvent model simulation methods, miscible gas injections were simulated and the simulations speculated that oil recovery increased by 10% to 20% of OOIP in 30 years. The compositional simulations yielded lower oil recovery compared to the solvent model simulations. Compared to the homogeneous model, the reservoir model featuring rock property heterogeneity in the vertical direction resulted in slightly better oil recovery, but with earlier CO2 break-through and larger CO2 production, suggesting that rock property heterogeneity is an important property for modeling because it has a big effect on the simulation results. Long hydraulic fractures shortened CO2 break-through time greatly and increased CO 2 production. Water-alternating-gas injection schemes and injection-alternating-shut-in schemes can provide more options for gas injection EOR projects, especially for gas production management. Compared to CO2 injection, separator gas injection yielded slightly better oil recovery, meaning separator gas could be a good candidate for gas injection EOR; lean gas generated the worst results. Reservoir simulations also indicate that original rock properties are the dominant factor for the ultimate oil recovery for both primary recovery and gas injection EOR. Because reservoir simulations provide critical inputs for project planning and management, more effort needs to be invested into reservoir modeling and simulation, including building enhanced geologic models, fracture characterization and modeling, and history matching with field data. Gas injection EOR projects are integrated projects, and the viability of a project also depends on different economic conditions.

Pu, Wanli

314

Occurrence of oil in the Austin Chalk at Van field, Van Zandt County, Texas: A unique geologic setting  

SciTech Connect

The Austin Chalk is buried to a depth of only 2,100-2,500 ft and has retained primary microporosity unlike the typical deep fractured chalk reservoirs. The Van structure is a complexly faulted domal anticline created by salt intrusion and is approximately 2,000 ft higher than surrounding structures in the area. A major northwest-dipping fault acts as the primary trapping mechanism. The field has produced 0.5 billion BO from thick Woodbine sands since its discovery in 1929. Occurrence of oil in the Austin Chalk has been known since the field discovery, but prior completions were low rate oil producers. Recent development of a large fracture stimulation technique has resulted in increased production rates of up to 300 BOPD. The Austin Chalk reservoir limits were determined by isopaching feet of minimum productive resistivity having porosity above a cutoff value. The resistivity/porosity isopach showed a direct correlation between Austin Chalk productivity and the Austin Chalk structure and faulting pattern. Structural evidence along with oil typing indicate that the oil in the Austin Chalk has migrated upward along fault planes and through fault juxtaposition from the Woodbine sands 200 ft below the Austin Chalk. Thin-section and scanning electron microscopy work performed on conventional cores showed that the Van Austin Chalk formation is a very fine grained limestone composed primarily of coccoliths. Various amounts of detrital illite clay are present in the coccolith matrix. All effective porosity is micro-intergranular and ranges from 15 to 35%. Based on the core analyses, the main porosity reducing agent and therefore control on reservoir quality is the amount of detrital clay present filling the micropores. Permeability is very low with values ranging from 0.01 to 1.5 md. There is no evidence of significant natural fractures in the core. Artificial fractures are therefore required to create the permeability needed to sustain commercial production rates.

Lowe, J.T.; Carrington, D.B. (Unocal Corp., Houston, TX (USA))

1990-09-01

315

Oil field souring control by nitrate-reducing Sulfurospirillum spp. that outcompete sulfate-reducing bacteria for organic electron donors.  

PubMed

Nitrate injection into oil reservoirs can prevent and remediate souring, the production of hydrogen sulfide by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Nitrate stimulates nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) and heterotrophic nitrate-reducing bacteria (hNRB) that compete with SRB for degradable oil organics. Up-flow, packed-bed bioreactors inoculated with water produced from an oil field and injected with lactate, sulfate, and nitrate served as sources for isolating several NRB, including Sulfurospirillum and Thauera spp. The former coupled reduction of nitrate to nitrite and ammonia with oxidation of either lactate (hNRB activity) or sulfide (NR-SOB activity). Souring control in a bioreactor receiving 12.5 mM lactate and 6, 2, 0.75, or 0.013 mM sulfate always required injection of 10 mM nitrate, irrespective of the sulfate concentration. Community analysis revealed that at all but the lowest sulfate concentration (0.013 mM), significant SRB were present. At 0.013 mM sulfate, direct hNRB-mediated oxidation of lactate by nitrate appeared to be the dominant mechanism. The absence of significant SRB indicated that sulfur cycling does not occur at such low sulfate concentrations. The metabolically versatile Sulfurospirillum spp. were dominant when nitrate was present in the bioreactor. Analysis of cocultures of Desulfovibrio sp. strain Lac3, Lac6, or Lac15 and Sulfurospirillum sp. strain KW indicated its hNRB activity and ability to produce inhibitory concentrations of nitrite to be key factors for it to successfully outcompete oil field SRB. PMID:17308184

Hubert, Casey; Voordouw, Gerrit

2007-04-01

316

Floating production platforms and their applications in the development of oil and gas fields in the South China Sea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper studies the current available options for floating production platforms in developing deepwater oil fields and the potential development models of future oil and gas exploration in the South China Sea. A detailed review of current deepwater platforms worldwide was performed through the examples of industry projects, and the pros and cons of each platform are discussed. Four types of platforms are currently used for the deepwater development: tension leg platform, Spar, semi-submersible platform, and the floating production system offloading. Among these, the TLP and Spar can be used for dry tree applications, and have gained popularity in recent years. The dry tree application enables the extension of the drilling application for fixed platforms into floating systems, and greatly reduces the cost and complexity of the subsea operation. Newly built wet tree semi-submersible production platforms for ultra deepwater are also getting their application, mainly due to the much needed payload for deepwater making the conversion of the old drilling semi-submersible platforms impossible. These platforms have been used in different fields around the world for different environments; each has its own advantages and disadvantages. There are many challenges with the successful use of these floating platforms. A lot of lessons have been learned and extensive experience accumulated through the many project applications. Key technologies are being reviewed for the successful use of floating platforms for field development, and potential future development needs are being discussed. Some of the technologies and experience of platform applications can be well used for the development of the South China Sea oil and gas field.

Zhang, Dagang; Chen, Yongjun; Zhang, Tianyu

2014-03-01

317

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., California using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. This is the third quarterly technical progress report for the project. Significant technical achievements accomplished include the drilling of four horizontal wells (two producers and two steam injectors) utilizing a new and lower cost drilling program, the drilling of five observation wells to monitor the horizontal steamflood pilot, the installation of a subsurface harbor channel crossing for delivering steam to an island location, and a geochemical study of the scale minerals being created in the wellbore. Cyclic steam injection into the two horizontal injection wells began in mid-December 1995 utilizing the new 2400 ft steam line under the Cerritos channel and the wells will be placed on production in May. Cyclic steam injection into the two horizontal producers will start in May. Work on the basic reservoir engineering is expected to be completed in March 1996. The deterministic geologic model was improved to add eight layers to the previous ten.

Hara, S.

1996-05-06

318

Development and field testing of a Light Aircraft Oil Surveillance System (LAOSS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental device consisting of a conventional TV camera with a low light level photo image tube and motor driven polarized filter arrangement was constructed to provide a remote means of discriminating the presence of oil on water surfaces. This polarized light filtering system permitted a series of successive, rapid changes between the vertical and horizontal components of reflected polarized skylight and caused the oil based substances to be more easily observed and identified as a flashing image against a relatively static water surface background. This instrument was flight tested, and the results, with targets of opportunity and more systematic test site data, indicate the potential usefulness of this airborne remote sensing instrument.

Burns, W.; Herz, M. J.

1976-01-01

319

Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, December 1990--February 1991; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, April--June 1990  

SciTech Connect

The Oil Implementation Task Force was appointed to implement the US DOE's new oil research program directed toward increasing domestic oil production by expanded research on near- or mid-term enhanced oil recovery methods. An added priority is to preserve access to reservoirs that have the largest potential for oil recovery, but that are threatened by the large number of wells abandoned each year. This report describes the progress of research activities in the following areas: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery; resource assessment; microbial technology; geoscience technology; and environmental technology. (CK)

Tiedemann, H.A. (ed.) (USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (USA))

1991-03-01

320

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 87  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 30 research projects are summarized in this report. Title of the project, contract number, company or university, award amount, principal investigators, objectives, and summary of technical progress are given for each project. Enhanced oil recovery projects include chemical flooding, gas displacement, and thermal recovery. Most of the research projects though are related to geoscience technology and reservoir characterization.

NONE

1997-10-01

321

A Multifrequency Polarimetric SAR Processing Chain to Observe Oil Fields in the Gulf of Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Ad- ministration, multiplatform synthetic aperture radar (SAR) im- agery is being used to aid posthurricane and postaccident response efforts in the Gulf of Mexico, such as in the case of the recent Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The main areas of interest related to such disasters are the

Maurizio Migliaccio; Ferdinando Nunziata; Antonio Montuori; Xiaofeng Li; William G. Pichel

2011-01-01

322

Electromagnetic oil field mapping for improved process monitoring and reservoir characterization: A poster presentation  

SciTech Connect

This report is a permanent record of a poster paper presented by the authors at the Third International Reservoir Characterization Technical Conference in Tulsa, Oklahoma on November 3--5, 1991. The subject is electromagnetic (EM) techniques that are being developed to monitor oil recovery processes to improve overall process performance. The potential impact of EM surveys is very significant, primarily in the areas of locating oil, identifying oil inside and outside the pattern, characterizing flow units, and pseudo-real time process control to optimize process performance and efficiency. Since a map of resistivity alone has little direct application to these areas, an essential part of the EM technique is understanding the relationship between the process and the formation resistivity at all scales, and integrating this understanding into reservoir characterization and simulation. First is a discussion of work completed on the core scale petrophysics of resistivity changes in an oil recovery process; a steamflood is used as an example. A system has been developed for coupling the petrophysics of resistivity with reservoir simulation to simulate the formation resistivity structure arising from a recovery process. Preliminary results are given for an investigation into the effect of heterogeneity and anisotropy on the EM technique, as well as the use of the resistivity simulator to interpret EM data in terms of reservoir and process parameters. Examples illustrate the application of the EM technique to improve process monitoring and reservoir characterization.

Waggoner, J.R.; Mansure, A.J.

1992-02-01

323

Electrical heating of oil reservoirs; Numerical simulation and field test results  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the development of a numerical model designed to simulate EOR by in-situ electric heating. The paper includes the results of validation tests vs. analytical solutions, comparisons of oil production and energy consumption for different electrode schemes, and the results of simulations of the Rio Panon, Brazil, pilot test.

Pizzarro, J.O.S. (Petrobras, Bahia (BR)); Trevisan, O.V. (Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil))

1990-10-01

324

Application of Denaturing High-Performance Liquid Chromatography for Monitoring Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Oil Fields  

PubMed Central

Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) participate in microbially induced corrosion (MIC) of equipment and H2S-driven reservoir souring in oil field sites. Successful management of industrial processes requires methods that allow robust monitoring of microbial communities. This study investigated the applicability of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) targeting the dissimilatory sulfite reductase ß-subunit (dsrB) gene for monitoring SRB communities in oil field samples from the North Sea, the United States, and Brazil. Fifteen of the 28 screened samples gave a positive result in real-time PCR assays, containing 9 × 101 to 6 × 105 dsrB gene copies ml?1. DHPLC and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) community profiles of the PCR-positive samples shared an overall similarity; both methods revealed the same samples to have the lowest and highest diversity. The SRB communities were diverse, and different dsrB compositions were detected at different geographical locations. The identified dsrB gene sequences belonged to several phylogenetic groups, such as Desulfovibrio, Desulfococcus, Desulfomicrobium, Desulfobulbus, Desulfotignum, Desulfonatronovibrio, and Desulfonauticus. DHPLC showed an advantage over DGGE in that the community profiles were very reproducible from run to run, and the resolved gene fragments could be collected using an automated fraction collector and sequenced without a further purification step. DGGE, on the other hand, included casting of gradient gels, and several rounds of rerunning, excising, and reamplification of bands were needed for successful sequencing. In summary, DHPLC proved to be a suitable tool for routine monitoring of the diversity of SRB communities in oil field samples. PMID:23793633

Nyyssönen, Mari; Bomberg, Malin; Laitila, Arja; Simell, Jaakko; Kapanen, Anu; Juvonen, Riikka

2013-01-01

325

Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

In 2002, Gnomon, Inc., entered into a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for a project entitled, Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming (DE-FC26-02NT15445). This project, funded through DOE’s Preferred Upstream Management Practices grant program, examined cultural resource management practices in two major oil- and gas-producing areas, southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming (Figure 1). The purpose of this project was to examine how cultural resources have been investigated and managed and to identify more effective management practices. The project also was designed to build information technology and modeling tools to meet both current and future management needs. The goals of the project were described in the original proposal as follows: Goal 1. Create seamless information systems for the project areas. Goal 2. Examine what we have learned from archaeological work in the southeastern New Mexico oil fields and whether there are better ways to gain additional knowledge more rapidly or at a lower cost. Goal 3. Provide useful sensitivity models for planning, management, and as guidelines for field investigations. Goal 4. Integrate management, investigation, and decision- making in a real-time electronic system. Gnomon, Inc., in partnership with the Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office (WYSHPO) and Western GeoArch Research, carried out the Wyoming portion of the project. SRI Foundation, in partnership with the New Mexico Historic Preservation Division (NMHPD), Statistical Research, Inc., and Red Rock Geological Enterprises, completed the New Mexico component of the project. Both the New Mexico and Wyoming summaries concluded with recommendations how cultural resource management (CRM) processes might be modified based on the findings of this research.

Eckerle, William; Hall, Stephen

2005-12-30

326

Assessment of the potential environmental fate and effects of oil-field discharge waters containing {sup 226}radium  

SciTech Connect

The naturally occurring radionuclide, radium-226, has been detected in oil production waters in all regions of the country. A produced water discharge into the Loch Katrina wetland in Park County, WY was investigated with respect to the transport and fate of radium in surface waters. The 866-acre Loch Katrina wetland complex is sustained primarily by oil-field produced waters and provides habitat for many species of aquatic birds. While the short-term benefits of this discharge are indisputable, the long-term hazards posed by the transport of radium from deep aquifers to surface waters are not well understood. Guidelines regulating the management of radium-contaminated sediments in receiving waters or settling ponds in Wyoming have yet to be established. The purpose of this study was to provide information to regional regulatory agencies and the oil and gas industry in the development of guidelines and procedures for managing radium and other naturally occurring radioactive materials. The authors will report the results of the sampling survey of produced waters, sediment and biota performed in the Loch Katrina wetland complex in Wyoming.

Herrera, A.W.; Hill, S.L.; Bergman, H.L. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Zoology and Physiology

1994-12-31

327

Caribou distribution during the post-calving period in relation to infrastructure in the Prudhoe Bay oil field, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

There is concern that caribou (Rangifer tarandus) may avoid roads and facilities (i.e., infrastructure) in the Prudhoe Bay oil field (PBOF) in northern Alaska, and that this avoidance can have negative effects on the animals. We quantified the relationship between caribou distribution and PBOF infrastructure during the post-calving period (mid-June to mid-August) with aerial surveys from 1990 to 1995. We conducted four to eight surveys per year with complete coverage of the PBOF. We identified active oil field infrastructure and used a geographic information system (GIS) to construct ten 1 km wide concentric intervals surrounding the infrastructure. We tested whether caribou distribution is related to distance from infrastructure with a chi-squared habitat utilization-availability analysis and log-linear regression. We considered bulls, calves, and total caribou of all sex/age classes separately. The habitat utilization-availability analysis indicated there was no consistent trend of attraction to or avoidance of infrastructure. Caribou frequently were more abundant than expected in the intervals close to infrastructure, and this trend was more pronounced for bulls and for total caribou of all sex/age classes than for calves. Log-linear regression (with Poisson error structure) of numbers of caribou and distance from infrastructure were also done, with and without combining data into the 1 km distance intervals. The analysis without intervals revealed no relationship between caribou distribution and distance from oil field infrastructure, or between caribou distribution and Julian date, year, or distance from the Beaufort Sea coast. The log-linear regression with caribou combined into distance intervals showed the density of bulls and total caribou of all sex/age classes declined with distance from infrastructure. Our results indicate that during the post-calving period: 1) caribou distribution is largely unrelated to distance from infrastructure; 2) caribou regularly use habitats in the PBOF; 3) caribou often occur close to infrastructure; and 4) caribou do not appear to avoid oil field infrastructure.

Cronin, M.A.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Durner, G.M.; Noel, L.E.; McDonald, T.L.; Ballard, W.B.

1998-01-01

328

Increased Oil Production and Reserves from Improved Completion Techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah, Class I  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to increase oil production and reserves by the use of improved reservoir characterization and completion techniques in the Unita Basin Utah. To accomplish this objective, a two-year geologic and engineering characterization of the Bluebell field was conducted. The study evaluated surface and subsurface data, currently used completion techniques, and common production problems. It was determined that advanced case- and open-hole logs could be effective in determining productive beds and that staged-interval (about 500 ft [150 m] per stage) and bed-scale isolation completion techniques could result in improved well performance.

Morgan, Craig D.; Gwynn, Wallace; Deo, Milind D.; Jarrard, Richard; Curtice, Richard; Morris, Thomas H.; Smouse, DeForrest; Tripp, Carol N.

2000-01-20

329

Jurassic Bazhenov Unit in the Salym oil field, West Siberia - An excellent source rock and fractured shale reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Jurassic Bazhenov Unit covers approximately 1 million km{sup 2} of West Siberia and is an excellent source rock. This Unit has proved to be a prolific shale reservoir in 14 local highs with the Salym oil field the major discovery. More than 300 wells have been drilled to date in this area, covering approximately 5800 km{sup 2}. The Bazhenov formation is composed of calcerous, organic-rich mudstone and siliceous hale lithofacies. Producing capacities of individual wells range from a few barrels daily to a maximum of 1000 bbl/day, and occasionally reaching 10,000 bbl/day. On average the porosity is 6.1%. The rock matrix is virtually impermeable and oil flow occurs via various types of fractures. All production is water free. The initial formation pressure ranges from normal hydrostatic to abnormally high, reaching 4060 and 6525 psi, respectively, at 2800 m depth. The temperature ranges from 180 to 280{degree} at depths from 2750 to 2950 m. The oil density varies between 30 and 46{degree} API, and the sulfur content ranges from 0.08 to 0.48%. The range of CO{sub 2} content in the associated gas is between 0.2 and 11.5%. Material of marine origin was the precursor organic matter of the kerogen for the Bazhenov Unit. The organic carbon content is high, ranging from 5 to 7% and occasionally reaching 15-20%. These are type II kerogens. The Bazhenov source rocks generate in situ high quality paraffin-base oils.

Petzoukha, Y.; Rovenskaya, A.; Zonn, M.; Kononkov, A. (Institute of Geology and Exploration of Fossil Fuels (Russian Federation))

1991-03-01

330

Isolation and Characterization of Methanothermobacter crinale sp. nov., a Novel Hydrogenotrophic Methanogen from the Shengli Oil Field?†  

PubMed Central

Syntrophic acetate oxidation coupled with hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis is an alternative methanogenic pathway in certain thermophilic anaerobic environments such as high-temperature oil reservoirs and thermophilic biogas reactors. In these environments, the dominant thermophilic methanogens were generally related to uncultured organisms of the genus Methanothermobacter. Here we isolated two representative strains, Tm2T and HMD, from the oil sands and oil production water in the Shengli oil field in the People's Republic of China. The type strain, Tm2T, was nonmotile and stained Gram positive. The cells were straight to slightly curved rods (0.3 ?m in width and 2.2 to 5.9 ?m in length), but some of them possessed a coccal shape connecting with the rods at the ends. Strain Tm2T grew with H2-CO2, but acetate is required. Optimum growth of strain Tm2T occurred in the presence of 0.025 g/liter NaCl at pH 6.9 and a temperature of 65°C. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 40.1 mol% ± 1.3 mol% (by the thermal denaturation method) or 41.1 mol% (by high-performance liquid chromatography). Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that Tm2T was most closely related to Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus ?HT and Methanothermobacter wolfeii VKM B-1829T (both with a sequence similarity of 96.4%). Based on these phenotypic and phylogenic characteristics, a novel species was proposed and named Methanothermobacter crinale sp. nov. The type strain is Tm2T (ACCC 00699T = JCM 17393T). PMID:21705537

Cheng, Lei; Dai, Lirong; Li, Xia; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Yahai

2011-01-01

331

Investigation of high-temperature, igneous-related hydraulic fracturing as a reservoir control in the Blackburn and Grant Canyon/Bacon Flat oil fields, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Research in progress to evaluate natural, igenous-related hydrothermal fracturing as a reservoir control in two eastern Nevada oil fields has revealed evidence of a far more comprehensive role for moderate- to high-temperature hydrothermal systems in Basin-and-Range oil-reservoir evolution. Fluid-inclusion and petrographic studies have shown that (now) oil-bearing dolomite breccias of the Blackburn field (Pine Valley, Eureka County) were formed when overpressured, magmatically-heated, high-temperature (>350{degrees}C) hydrothermal brines explosively ruptured their host rocks; similar studies of texturally identical breccias of the Grant Canyon/Bacon Flat field (Railroad Valley, Nye County) so far do not support such an explosive origin. At Grant Canyon, however, hydrothermal, breccia-cementing quartz hosts primary oil, aqueous/oil, and aqueous fluid inclusions (homogenization temperature = 120{degrees}C) which document a direct geothermal connection for oil migration and entrapment. Moreover, at both Blackburn and Grant Canyon/Bacon Flat, the oil reservoirs are top- and side-sealed by hydrothermally altered Tertiary ignimbrites and epiclastic rocks. Contemporary geothermal activity is also apparent at grant Canyon/Bacon Flat, where subsurface water temperatures reach 171{degrees}C, and at Blackburn, above which a petroleum-providing hot spring issues at a temperature of 90{degrees}C. We suggest that in the Basin and Range province, hydrothermal systems may have: (1) matured oil from otherwise submature source rocks; (2) transported oil to ultimate entrapment sites by convection in moderate-to high-temperature fluids; and (3) sealed reservoir traps through hydrothermal alteration of overlying Tertiary caprocks. 69 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Hulen, J.B.

1991-01-01

332

Orgin and significance of geochemical variability among oils and gas-condensates in the Tiger Shoal Field, northern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Geochemical data placed in geological context is key to understanding the processes controlling the variability of oils and gas-condensates in the Tiger Shoal Field, northern Gulf of Mexico. Thermal maturity at generation and phase partitioning are the principal processes accounting for variability in the bulk and molecular properties of the oils and gas-condensates. Quantification of the extent that these processes altered the oils and gas-condensates between fault blocks and among individual sands permits: (1) documentation of the most effective migration conduits, (2) inference of deeper or shallower pay zones, (3) and assessment of vertical and lateral fluid connectivity. Calibration of bulk to molecular properties will permit rapid assessment of the type and extent of alteration using basic parameters such as API gravity and gas oil ratio (GOR). Upon mass balancing with initial reserves data, a detailed risking scheme for remaining prospects within the field can be formulated.

Kelley, P.A.; Imbus, S.W. [Texaco E& P Technology, Houston, TX (United States); McKeever, S.R. [Texaco E& P Inc., New Orleans, LA (United States)

1995-12-31

333

Bacterial Community Dynamics and Hydrocarbon Degradation during a Field-Scale Evaluation of Bioremediation on a Mudflat Beach Contaminated with Buried Oil  

PubMed Central

A field-scale experiment with a complete randomized block design was performed to study the degradation of buried oil on a shoreline over a period of almost 1 year. The following four treatments were examined in three replicate blocks: two levels of fertilizer treatment of oil-treated plots, one receiving a weekly application of liquid fertilizer and the other treated with a slow-release fertilizer; and two controls, one not treated with oil and the other treated with oil but not with fertilizer. Oil degradation was monitored by measuring carbon dioxide evolution and by chemical analysis of the oil. Buried oil was degraded to a significantly greater extent in fertilized plots, but no differences in oil chemistry were observed between the two different fertilizer treatments, although carbon dioxide production was significantly higher in the oil-treated plots that were treated with slow-release fertilizer during the first 14 days of the experiment. Bacterial communities present in the beach sediments were profiled by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments and 16S rRNA amplified by reverse transcriptase PCR. Similarities between the DGGE profiles were calculated, and similarity matrices were subjected to statistical analysis. These analyses showed that although significant hydrocarbon degradation occurred both in plots treated with oil alone and in the plots treated with oil and liquid fertilizer, the bacterial community structure in these plots was, in general, not significantly different from that in the control plots that were not treated with oil and did not change over time. In contrast, the bacterial community structure in the plots treated with oil and slow-release fertilizer changed rapidly, and there were significant differences over time, as well as between blocks and even within plots. The differences were probably related to the higher concentrations of nutrients measured in interstitial water from the plots treated with slow-release fertilizer. Bacteria with 16S rRNA sequences closely related (>99.7% identity) to Alcanivorax borkumensis and Pseudomonas stutzeri sequences dominated during the initial phase of oil degradation in the plots treated with slow-release fertilizer. Field data were compared to the results of previous laboratory microcosm experiments, which revealed significant differences. PMID:15128509

Röling, Wilfred F. M.; Milner, Michael G.; Jones, D. Martin; Fratepietro, Francesco; Swannell, Richard P. J.; Daniel, Fabien; Head, Ian M.

2004-01-01

334

Geologic Sequestration of CO2 in a Depleted Oil Reservoir: A Field Demonstration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in geologic formations is the most direct carbon management strategy for long-term removal of anthropogenic CO2 from the atmosphere, and is likely to be needed for continuation of the US fossil fuel-based economy and high standard of living. Subsurface injection of CO2 into depleted oil reservoirs is a carbon sequestration strategy that might prove to be

H. R. Westrich; D. Zhang; R. B. Grigg

2002-01-01

335

Case report: Profound neurobehavioral deficits in an oil field worker overcome by hydrogen sulfide  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 24-year-old oil well tester was rendered semiconscious by hydrogen sulfide (H2S). He received oxygen and was hospitalized but released in 30 minutes. The next day, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and incontinence of urine and stool led to rehospitalization. These problems and leg shaking, dizziness, sweating, trouble sleeping, and nightmares prevented his return to work. A physical examination, chest x-ray, and

KAYE H. KILBURN

1993-01-01

336

Reservoir characteristics of two minter oil sands based on continuous core, E-logs, and geochemical data: Bee Brake field, East-Central Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

The Bee Brake field area, located in township 4N/6E and 4N/7E in Concordia Parish, has been one of the more prolific oil-producing areas in east-central Louisiana. Production decline in various fields, however, has sparked interest in the economic feasibility of locating and producing the remaining bypassed oil in the lower Wilcox. For this purpose, the Angelina BBF No. 1 well was drilled, and a 500-ft conventional core and a complete suite of state-of-the-are wireline logs were recovered. Production tests were run on the Minter interval of interest. The 16-ft Minter interval (6742-6758 ft depth), bounded at its top and base by lignite seams, consists of an upper 4-ft oil sand (Bee Brake) and a lower 3-ft oil sand (Angelina). The oil sands are separated by approximately 5 ft of thinly laminated silty shale and 4 ft of very fine-grained silty sandstone. Detailed sedimentologic and petrographic descriptions of the Minter interval provide accurate facies determinations of this lower delta-plain sequence. Petrophysical evaluation, combining core plug and modern electric-log data show differences between reservoir quality of the Bee Brake and Angelina sands. This data will also be useful for correlating and interpolating old electric logs. Organic geochemistry of the oil, lignites, and shales provides insight as to the source of the Minter oils and the sourcing potential of the lignites.

Echols, J.B.; Goddard, D.A.; Bouma, A. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States))

1993-09-01

337

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management.  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period April - June 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the `Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist`. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with a pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to convert shear wave velocity measured through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius and ultra-short radius lateral recompletions as well as other techniques.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don [City of Long Beach (United States); Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nauyen, John [Tidelands Oil Production Co. (United States); Moos, Dan [Stanford University (United States); Tagbor, Kwasi [MPI (United States)

1997-07-28

338

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period October - December 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the "Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist". The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with cased-hole logging tools. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to translate measurements through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius lateral recompletions as well as other recompletion techniques such as the sand consolidation through steam injection.

Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

1998-01-26

339

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management.  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period July - September 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the `Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist`. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with a pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to convert shear wave velocity measured through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius and ultra-short radius lateral recompletions as well as other techniques.

Koerner, R.; Clarke, D. [Long Beach, City of, Dept, of Oil Properties, CA (United States); Walker, S.; Phillips, C.; Nguyen, J. [Tidelands Oil Production Company, Long Beach, CA (United States); Moos, D. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Tagbor, K. [Magnetic Pulse, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-10-21

340

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period January - March 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the "Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist". The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with cased-hole logging tools. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to translate measurements through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius lateral recompletions as well as other recompletion techniques such as the sand consolidation through steam injection.

Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

1998-04-22

341

Thermal and mass history of Fairway Field in east Texas: Implication for geothermal energy development in an oil and gas setting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fairway Field is an oil field operated by Hunt Oil Company located in East Texas near the town of Poynor, Texas in Henderson County. The field was discovered in 1960 and is still producing today with the field life projected beyond 2015 (Webster et al., 2008). Hunt Oil Company granted access to over 2,900 open-hole well logs and pressure surveys for this research project. This thermal and mass history of production from a major hydrocarbon field is an especially rare opportunity, as oil and gas companies in Texas are generally not required to share pressure survey data with regulatory agencies, and thus these types of data are not typically available to the research community. This data set, coupled with fluid production and injection data, provides an opportunity to analyze temperature variations associated with fluid migration and field development as a function of time. Fairway Field was determined to have an average conductive heat flow value of 69 +/- 6 mW/m2. Using fluid production volumes, heat loss was determined to be -1.7 x 1017 Joules which represents a thermal recovery factor of -6.2% for the James Limestone Formation in Fairway Field. Given the fact that the field has been in development for over 50 years and has not exhibited a decrease but an increase in reservoir temperatures (+20 °F over 54 years), Fairway Field illustrates that sedimentary basins have considerable potential for geothermal development. An increased availability of pressure survey temperature data and fluid data from oil and gas companies provides a better understanding of such dynamic geothermal systems, helps evaluate the working life of a field, and is a tool for assessing development risk associated with future geothermal energy development in such settings.

Kweik, Ramsey Sharif

342

Strontium isotope systematics of mixing groundwater and oil-field brine at Goose Lake in northeastern Montana, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Groundwater, surface water, and soil in the Goose Lake oil field in northeastern Montana have been affected by Cl?-rich oil-field brines during long-term petroleum production. Ongoing multidisciplinary geochemical and geophysical studies have identified the degree and local extent of interaction between brine and groundwater. Fourteen samples representing groundwater, surface water, and brine were collected for Sr isotope analyses to evaluate the usefulness of 87Sr/86Sr in detecting small amounts of brine. Differences in Sr concentrations and 87Sr/86Sr are optimal at this site for the experiment. Strontium concentrations range from 0.13 to 36.9 mg/L, and corresponding 87Sr/86Sr values range from 0.71097 to 0.70828. The local brine has 168 mg/L Sr and a 87Sr/86Sr value of 0.70802. Mixing relationships are evident in the data set and illustrate the sensitivity of Sr in detecting small amounts of brine in groundwater. The location of data points on a Sr isotope-concentration plot is readily explained by an evaporation-mixing model. The model is supported by the variation in concentrations of most of the other solutes.

Peterman, Zell E.; Thamke, Joanna N.; Futa, Kiyoto; Preston, Todd

2012-01-01

343

An integrated approach to seismic stimulation of oil reservoirs: laboratory, field and theoretical results from DOE/industry collaborations.  

SciTech Connect

It has been observed repeatedly that low-frequency (10-500 Hz) seismic stress waves can enhance oil production from depleted reservoirs . Until recently, the majority of these observations have been anecdotal or at the proof-of-concept level. The physics coupling stress waves to multiphase fluid flow behavior in porous media is still poorly understood, even though numerous underlying physical mechanisms have been proposed to explain the observations . Basic research on the phenomenon is being conducted through a U .S. Department of Energy funded collaboration between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the University of California at Berkeley, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the U .S . oil and gas industry . The project has focused on three main areas of research: (1) laboratory core flow experiments, (2) field seismic monitoring of downhole stimulation tests, and (3) theoretical modeling of the coupled stress/flow phenomenon . The major goal is to obtain a comprehensive scientific understanding of the seismic stimulation phenomenon so that field application technologies can be improved. Initial developments and experimental results in all three research focus areas confirm historic observations that the stimulated flow phenomenon is real and that a fundamental scientific understanding can be obtained through continued research . Examples of project results and developments are presented here.

Roberts, P. M. (Peter M.); Majer, Ernest Luther; Lo, W. C. (Wei-Cheng); Sposito, Garrison,; Daley, T. M. (Thomas M.)

2003-01-01

344

Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian “Clinton” sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test (“Huff-n-Puff”) was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a “Clinton”-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day “soak” period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the “Clinton” sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent, gradual flashout of the CO2 within the reservoir during the ensuing monitored production period; and (D) a large amount of CO2 continually off-gassed from wellhead oil samples collected as late as 3½ months after injection. After the test well was returned to production, it produced 174 bbl of oil during a 60-day period (September 22 to November 21, 2008), which represents an estimated 58 percent increase in incremental oil production over preinjection estimates of production under normal, conditions. The geologic model was used in a reservoir simulation model for a 700-acre model area and to design a pilot to test the model. The model was designed to achieve a 1-year response time and a five-year simulation period. The reservoir simulation modeling indicated that the injection wells could enhance oil production and lead to an additional 20 percent recovery in the pilot area over a five-year period. The base case estimated that by injecting 500 MCF per day of CO2 into each of the four corner wells, 26,000 STBO would be produced by the central producer over the five-year period. This would compare to 3,000 STBO if a new well were drilled without the benefit of CO2 injection. This study has added significant knowledge to the reservoir characterization of the “Clinton” in the ECOF and succeeded in identifying a range on CO2-EOR potential. However, additional data on fluid properties (PVT and swelling test), fractures (oriented core and microseis), and reservoir characteristics (relative permeability, capillary pressure, and wet ability) are needed to further narrow the uncertainties and refine the reservoir model and simulation. After collection of this data and refinement of the model and simulation, it is recommended that a larger scale cyclic- CO2 injection test be conducted to better determine the efficacy of CO2-EOR in the “Clinton” reservoir in the ECOF.

Riley, Ronald; Wicks, John; Perry, Christopher

2009-12-30

345

Performance of horizontal wells in a thin oil zone between a gas cap and an aquifer, Immortelle Field, Trinidad  

SciTech Connect

Six horizontal wells have been drilled in the Immortelle Field, offshore Trinidad since August 1994. The Immortelle horizontal well program was aimed to develop a 48-ft oil column overlain by a large gas cap and underlain by an aquifer. A key challenge in the selection of horizontal well targets was to maximize exposure to good quality pay sands while staying within a 10-ft true vertical depth window, to delay potential gas or water coning. Undulations in the horizontal section need to be minimized to facilitate passage of wire-wrapped sand screens during well completion. Production logging and early production data indicate that the horizontal well program has been highly successful, in spite of some uncertainties in reservoir characteristics. Multidisciplinary teamwork has been the key to finding real-time solutions of the problems encountered during drilling and production. Field performance monitoring and reservoir modeling work continue to provide guidance in current operations and in planning additional development of the reservoir.

Thakur, S.C.; Bally, K.; Therry, D.; Simon, L. [Amoco E& P Sector, Houston, TX (United States)

1996-12-31

346

Geology and reservoir characteristics of carbonate buildup in giant Bu Hasa oil field, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates  

SciTech Connect

Bu Hasa field in Abu Dhabi was the first giant oil field in the Arabian Gulf to produce from the Lower Cretaceous Shuaiba Formation (Aptian). The field has a productive area of about 155,673 c (63,047 ha.) and 12.6 billion bbl of oil reserves. The formation is composed mainly of rudistid and algal sediments, rudistid mounds having overlain and built up the topography of an algal platform. The position and elevation of the platform edge, combined with rising eustatic sea level, created a tendency toward both vertical and lateral growth, and regulated the form and distribution of the rudist accumulation. The Shuaiba Formation has good reservoir quality ranging in porosity from 18-25% and with average permeability exceeding 100 md. Nine reservoir units (A-I), classified by their porosity, permeability, and lithology, can be clearly defined from the logs. Eleven main lithofacies have been defined in the Shuaiba from detailed core descriptions. These lithofacies were deposited in three main phases. The earliest phase consisted of chalky mud-supported sediment with some algal colonies, followed by a middle phase characterized by a thick algal platform. During this stage of deposition, a shallow-water carbonate platform developed over the south and central part of the field, grading into deeper, open-marine sedimentation toward the north. The late phase was characterized by rudistid buildups (mainly caprinids and caprotinids). The growth of the thick algal platform in the south and central areas controlled the initial distribution of the main rudistid buildup; toward the north, small rudistid reefs are sparsely developed and present only in the latest stage on high-energy shoals. 12 figures, 1 table.

Alsharhan, A.S.

1987-10-01

347

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Environmental assessment of deep-water sponge fields in relation to oil and gas  

E-print Network

-water sponges to test for the presence of oil-degrading taxa and thus any inherent adaptations to cope with oil-water sponge belt species (e.g. Geodia barretti, G. macandrewi, G. atlantica, and G. phlegraei) for CARD-FISH

Henderson, Gideon

348

Reservoir simulation of co2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery in Tensleep Formation, Teapot Dome field  

E-print Network

Teapot Dome field is located 35 miles north of Casper, Wyoming in Natrona County. This field has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy to implement a field-size CO2 storage project. With a projected storage of 2.6 million tons of carbon...

Gaviria Garcia, Ricardo

2006-04-12

349

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this quarterly report was to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period April - June 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the ''Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist''. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott

1999-11-09

350

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period January - March 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the "Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist". The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology.

Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; Dwasi Tagbor; John Nguygen; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

1997-04-10

351

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period July - September 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the ''Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist''. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology.

Clarke, Don; Koerner, Roy; Moos, Dan; Nguyen, John; Phillips, Chris; Tagbor, Kwasi; Walker, Scott

1999-11-09

352

Brief history of fiber optic sensing in the oil field industry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of fiber optic sensing in the oil and gas industry has greatly expanded over the past two decades. Since the first optical fiber-based pressure sensor was installed in a well in 1993, the industry has sought to use fiber sensing technology to monitor in-well parameters. Through the years, optical fiber sensing has been used in an increasing number of applications as technical advances have opened the door for new measurements. Today, fiber optic sensors are used routinely to measure temperature throughout the wellbore. Optical sensors also provide pressure measurements at key locations within the well. These measurements are used to verify the integrity of the well, provide feedback during well completion operations, including the actuation of downhole valves, and to monitor the production or injection process. Other sensors, such as seismic monitors and flowmeters, use fiber sensing technology to make in-well measurements. Various optical sensing techniques are used to make these measurements, including Bragg grating, Raman scattering, and coherent Rayleigh scattering. These measurements are made in harsh environments, which require rugged designs for optical cable systems and instrumentation systems. Some of these applications have operating temperatures of 572°F (300°C), and other applications can have pressures in excess of 20,000 psi (1,379 bar). This paper provides a historical perspective on the use of fiber optic sensing in the oil and gas industry from industry firsts to current applications.

Baldwin, Christopher S.

2014-06-01

353

Silica phase changes: Diagenetic agent for oil entrapment, Lost Hills field, California  

SciTech Connect

The siliceous shales of the Monterey Group are the primary development target at Lost Hills. Silica phase changes have influenced the distribution and entrapment of hydrocarbons. With increasing temperature, opal A phase diatomite is converted to opal CT and finally quartz phase rock. All phases are low in permeability. The opal A diatomite is characteristically high in oil saturation and productive saturation. Productivity from this phase is dependent on structural position and fieldwide variations in oil viscosity and biodegradation. The deeper chert reservoir coincides with the opal CT to quartz phase transition. Porosity is again reduced in this transition, but saturations in the quartz phase rocks increase. Tests in the chert reservoir indicate a single, low-permeability system, suggesting the importance of matric contribution. resistivity and porosity in the diatomite, and resistivity and velocity in the chert, are the physical properties which best reflect saturation. Methods exploiting these properties (FMS, BHTV, borehole, and surface shear wave studies) should be helpful in further characterizing the reservoirs and identifying future pay.

Julander, D.R.; Szymanski, D.L. (Chevron USA, Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States))

1991-02-01

354

Geothermal test hints at oil potential in eastern Arizona volcanic field  

SciTech Connect

A recently drilled geothermal well, funded by the US Department of Energy and the Arizona Department of Commerce, has provided information about the geology of east-central Arizona and west-central New Mexico. Tonto Drilling Services in cooperation with New Mexico State University completed the well, the 1 Alpine-Federal, at a total depth of 4,505 ft. The well is located among volcanic rocks in the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest about 6 miles north of the town of Alpine and 6.2 miles west of the Arizona-New Mexico line. The well was drilled to determine the hot dry rock geothermal potential of Precambrian rocks. The operator expected to penetrate Precambrian at about 4,200 ft, but the hole was still in Permian rocks at that depth and was in a mafic dike that intruded the Permian rocks at the total depth of 4,505 ft. The hole did show that Cretaceous and Permian strata contain potentially important source rocks for oil and gas that are apparently unaffected by nearby volcanism. These potential oil source rocks are the focus of this article.

Rauzi, S.L. (Arizona Geological Survey, Tucson, AZ (United States))

1993-01-03

355

Paclobutrazol treatment as a potential strategy for higher seed and oil yield in field-grown camelina sativa L. Crantz  

PubMed Central

Background Camelina (Camelina sativa L. Crantz) is a non-food oilseed crop which holds promise as an alternative biofuel energy resource. Its ability to grow in a variety of climatic and soil conditions and minimal requirements of agronomical inputs than other oilseed crops makes it economically viable for advanced biofuel production. We designed a study to investigate the effect of paclobutrazol [2RS, 3RS)-1-(4-Chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)pentan-3-ol] (PBZ), a popular plant growth regulator, on the seed and oil yield of Camelina sativa (cv. Celine). Results A field-based micro-trial setup was established in a randomized block design and the study was performed twice within a span of five months (October 2010 to February 2011) and five different PBZ treatments (Control: T0; 25 mg l-1: T1; 50 mg l-1: T2; 75 mg l-1: T3; 100 mg l-1: T4; 125 mg l-1: T5) were applied (soil application) at the time of initiation of flowering. PBZ at 100 mg l-1 concentration (T4) resulted in highest seed and oil yield by 80% and 15%, respectively. The seed yield increment was mainly due to enhanced number of siliques per plant when compared to control. The PBZ - treated plants displayed better photosynthetic leaf gas exchange characteristics, higher chlorophyll contents and possessed dark green leaves which were photosynthetically active for a longer period and facilitated higher photoassimilation. Conclusion We report for the first time that application of optimized PBZ dose can be a potential strategy to achieve higher seed and oil yield from Camelina sativa that holds great promise as a biofuel crop in future. PMID:22410213

2012-01-01

356

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes activities that have taken place in the last six (6) months (January 2005-June 2005) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields, New Mexico and Wyoming'' DE-FC26-02NT15445. This project examines the practices and results of cultural resource investigation and management in two different oil and gas producing areas of the United States: southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The project evaluates how cultural resource investigations have been conducted in the past and considers how investigation and management could be pursued differently in the future. The study relies upon full database population for cultural resource inventories and resources and geomorphological studies. These are the basis for analysis of cultural resource occurrence, strategies for finding and evaluating cultural resources, and recommendations for future management practices. Activities can be summarized as occurring in either Wyoming or New Mexico. Gnomon as project lead, worked in both areas.

Peggy Robinson

2005-07-01

357

An integrated remediation/redevelopment approach for a 31-acre site with oil field drilling waste sumps  

SciTech Connect

The TCL Site is a 240-acre State Superfund site located in the Port of Long Beach in Wilmington, California. In order to provide intermodal capabilities for an existing import/export facility, an expedited remediation and redevelopment program was pursued for a 31-acre portion of the site. About 75% of this 31-acre project parcel was covered with sumps containing oil field drilling wastes (i.e., drilling muds). Through intensive and ongoing interactions with the regulating agencies, the site was brought through the final site assessment, risk assessment, feasibility study and remedial action plan processes in about 18 months. The remedy selected included physical stabilization of very low strength sump materials; capping with a low permeability soil layer and several feet of import soil; and provisions for the removal of oil and water which might be expressed from the sump materials during consolidation under the newly placed cap and fill. Construction of the remedial elements of the project were completed in September of 1994. Construction of the new commercial surface facilities has been completed, and it is operating.

Bellomo, A.J.; Watson, T.L. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Universal City, CA (United States); McMillan, J.; Warfel, L. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

1995-11-01

358

Petrophysical evidence for the nature of vertical permeability barriers: Temple Ave. Fault, Wilmington Oil Field, Long Beach, California  

SciTech Connect

The Temple Avenue fault is a north-trending east-dipping normal fault that dissects the north flank of the Wilmington anticline in the Wilmington Oil field. The fault involves sediments of the Repetto Formation (lower Pliocene) and the Puente Formation (upper Miocene). Oil/water contact structural maps indicate that the fault acts as a permeability barrier. Well B-756-I was drilled across the Temple Ave. fault in the Repetto Formation. The throw of the fault in this well ranges from 15 to 17 meters (50 to 56 feet). The Repetto Formation is composed of interbeded sands and shales. Sixty five samples were collected from and around the fault zone. Preliminary XRD analysis of bulk and clay fractions show that authigenic clay minerals (<2 [mu]m) represent between 1 to 2% of the sediments. Clay minerals are mostly smectite (5-7%) and a Fe-illite (15-30%); chlorite and kaolinite are also present. The authigenic illite content appears to increase around the fault zone. Diagenetic conversion of Ca-rich feldspars to smectite is suggested by an inverse correlation of their abundances. Calcite is present in the majority of the samples (4-8%), but a significant increase in the carbonate content (14-16%) occurs along the fault. Ongoing SEM and isotope analysis will aid in the determination of the origin and nature of the changes in the mineralogy that contribute to form a permeability barrier.

Camacho, H.; Sample, J.C. (California State Univ., Long Beach, CA (United States))

1996-01-01

359

Petrophysical evidence for the nature of vertical permeability barriers: Temple Ave. Fault, Wilmington Oil Field, Long Beach, California  

SciTech Connect

The Temple Avenue fault is a north-trending east-dipping normal fault that dissects the north flank of the Wilmington anticline in the Wilmington Oil field. The fault involves sediments of the Repetto Formation (lower Pliocene) and the Puente Formation (upper Miocene). Oil/water contact structural maps indicate that the fault acts as a permeability barrier. Well B-756-I was drilled across the Temple Ave. fault in the Repetto Formation. The throw of the fault in this well ranges from 15 to 17 meters (50 to 56 feet). The Repetto Formation is composed of interbeded sands and shales. Sixty five samples were collected from and around the fault zone. Preliminary XRD analysis of bulk and clay fractions show that authigenic clay minerals (<2 {mu}m) represent between 1 to 2% of the sediments. Clay minerals are mostly smectite (5-7%) and a Fe-illite (15-30%); chlorite and kaolinite are also present. The authigenic illite content appears to increase around the fault zone. Diagenetic conversion of Ca-rich feldspars to smectite is suggested by an inverse correlation of their abundances. Calcite is present in the majority of the samples (4-8%), but a significant increase in the carbonate content (14-16%) occurs along the fault. Ongoing SEM and isotope analysis will aid in the determination of the origin and nature of the changes in the mineralogy that contribute to form a permeability barrier.

Camacho, H.; Sample, J.C. [California State Univ., Long Beach, CA (United States)

1996-12-31

360

Increased reserves through horizontal drilling in a mature waterflood, Long Beach unit, Wilmington Oil Field, California  

SciTech Connect

Ranger Zone development started in 1965. A waterflood was initiated from the start using a staggered line-drive pattern. Infill drilling in the early 1980s and again in the 1990s revealed bypassed oil in the upper Ranger Fo sand. Detailed studies of the aerial extent of the remaining oil resulted in drilling 17 horizontal wells to recover these reserves. The Fo target sand thickness is 20 to 50 feet. Well courses are between 10 and 15 feet below the top of the Fo with lengths varying from 800 to 1,000 feet. The success of the Fo drilling program has prompted expansion of horizontal drilling into thin-bedded sand units. Well lengths have increased to between 1,500 and 1,800 feet with structural trend used to advantage. Where needed, probes are designed to penetrate the target sand before setting intermediate casing. The drilling program has been extended into bilateral horizontal completions. Geosteering with MWD/GR and a 2 MHz dual propagation resistivity tool is used to the casing point. In the completion interval, only the MWD/GR tool is used and a drillpipe conveyed E-log is run afterward to confirm expected resistivities. Despite the many well penetrations in the Ranger Zone, structural control is only fair. Accuracy of MWD data is generally low and geosteering is done by TVD log correlation. With a recovery factor of over 30 percent in Ranger West, from approximately 800 wells drilled in the last 30 years, the horizontal drilling program targeting bypassed reserves has brought new life to this mature reservoir.

Berman, B.H. (Thums Long Beach Co., Long Beach, CA (United States))

1996-01-01

361

Increased reserves through horizontal drilling in a mature waterflood, Long Beach unit, Wilmington Oil Field, California  

SciTech Connect

Ranger Zone development started in 1965. A waterflood was initiated from the start using a staggered line-drive pattern. Infill drilling in the early 1980s and again in the 1990s revealed bypassed oil in the upper Ranger Fo sand. Detailed studies of the aerial extent of the remaining oil resulted in drilling 17 horizontal wells to recover these reserves. The Fo target sand thickness is 20 to 50 feet. Well courses are between 10 and 15 feet below the top of the Fo with lengths varying from 800 to 1,000 feet. The success of the Fo drilling program has prompted expansion of horizontal drilling into thin-bedded sand units. Well lengths have increased to between 1,500 and 1,800 feet with structural trend used to advantage. Where needed, probes are designed to penetrate the target sand before setting intermediate casing. The drilling program has been extended into bilateral horizontal completions. Geosteering with MWD/GR and a 2 MHz dual propagation resistivity tool is used to the casing point. In the completion interval, only the MWD/GR tool is used and a drillpipe conveyed E-log is run afterward to confirm expected resistivities. Despite the many well penetrations in the Ranger Zone, structural control is only fair. Accuracy of MWD data is generally low and geosteering is done by TVD log correlation. With a recovery factor of over 30 percent in Ranger West, from approximately 800 wells drilled in the last 30 years, the horizontal drilling program targeting bypassed reserves has brought new life to this mature reservoir.

Berman, B.H. [Thums Long Beach Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)

1996-12-31

362

Measurement of ²²?Ra in soil from oil field: advantages of ?-ray spectrometry and application to the IAEA-448 CRM.  

PubMed

The analytical performance of gamma-ray spectrometry for the measurement of (226)Ra in TENORM (Technically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) soil was investigated by the IAEA. Fast results were obtained for characterization and certification of a new TENORM Certified Reference Material (CRM), identified as IAEA-448 (soil from oil field). The combined standard uncertainty of the gamma-ray spectrometry results is of the order of 2-3% for massic activity measurement values ranging from 16500 Bq kg(-1) to 21500 Bq kg(-1). Methodologies used for the production and certification of the IAEA-448 CRM are presented. Analytical results were confirmed by alpha spectrometry. The "t" test showed agreement between alpha and gamma results at 95% confidence level. PMID:24332337

Ceccatelli, A; Katona, R; Kis-Benedek, G; Pitois, A

2014-05-01

363

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five subcontractors that have taken place during the second six months (July 1, 2003-December 31, 2003) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Although Gnomon and all five subcontractors completed tasks during these six months, most of the technical experimental work was conducted by the subcontractor, SRI Foundation (SRIF). SRIF created a sensitivity model for the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico that rates areas as having a very good chance, a good chance, or a very poor chance of containing cultural resource sites. SRIF suggested that the results of the sensitivity model might influence possible changes in cultural resource management (CRM) practices in the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico.

Peggy Robinson

2004-01-01

364

Leaching of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from oil shale processing waste deposit: a long-term field study.  

PubMed

The leaching behavior of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from an oil shale processing waste deposit was monitored during 2005-2009. Samples were collected from the deposit using a special device for leachate sampling at field conditions without disturbance of the upper layers. Contents of 16 priority PAHs in leachate samples collected from aged and fresh parts of the deposit were determined by GC-MS. The sum of the detected PAHs in leachates varied significantly throughout the study period: 19-315 ?g/l from aged spent shale, and 36-151 ?g/l from fresh spent shale. Among the studied PAHs the low-molecular weight compounds phenanthrene, naphthalene, acenaphthylene, and anthracene predominated. Among the high-molecular weight PAHs benzo[a]anthracene and pyrene leached in the highest concentrations. A spent shale deposit is a source of PAHs that could infiltrate into the surrounding environment for a long period of time. PMID:24631927

Jefimova, Jekaterina; Irha, Natalya; Reinik, Janek; Kirso, Uuve; Steinnes, Eiliv

2014-05-15

365

Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plan (Phase II)  

SciTech Connect

The principal research efforts for Phase II of the project were drilling an infill well strategically located in Section 13, T. 10 N., R. 2 W., of the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, and obtaining fresh core from the upper Smackover reservoir to test the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in this field. The Turner Land and Timber Company 13-10 No. 1 well was successfully drilled and tested at a daily rate of 132 barrels of oil in Section 13. The well has produced 27,720 barrels of oil, and is currently producing at a rate of 60 barrels of oil per day. The 13-10 well confirmed the presence of 175,000 barrels of attic (undrained) oil in Section 13. As predicted from reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation, the top of the Smackover reservoir in the 13-10 well is structurally high to the tops of the Smackover in offsetting wells, and the 13-10 well has significantly more net pay than the offsetting wells. The drilling and testing of the 13-10 well showed that the eastern part of the field continues to have a strong water drive and that there is no need to implement a pressure maintenance program in this part of the Womack Hill Field at this time. The success achieved in drilling and testing the 13-10 infill well demonstrates the benefits of building a geologic model to target areas in mature fields that have the potential to contain undrained oil, thus increasing the productivity and profitability of these fields. Microbial cultures that grew at 90 C and converted ethanol to acid were recovered from fresh cuttings from the Smackover carbonate reservoir in an analogous field to the Womack Hill Field in southwest Alabama; however, no viable microorganisms were found in the Smackover cores recovered from the drilling of the 13-10 well in Womack Hill Field. Further evaluation is, therefore, required prior to implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the Womack Hill Field.

Ernest A. Mancini; Joe Benson; David Hilton; David Cate; Lewis Brown

2006-05-29

366

Petroleum source rock identification of United Kingdom Atlantic Margin oil fields and the Western Canadian Oil Sands using Platinum, Palladium, Osmium and Rhenium: Implications for global petroleum systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study demonstrates that petroleum and source rocks are enriched in Pt and Pd to the ppb level, and that the 187Os/ 188Os composition coupled with the Pt/Pd value permits the fingerprinting of petroleum to its source. Oils from the United Kingdom Atlantic Margin (sourced from the Upper Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Fm.) as well as source rock samples have been analysed for Pt and Pd. When the Pt/Pd value is compared with 187Os/ 188Os (calculated at the time of oil generation; Os g) the values from both the known source and the oils are similar, demonstrating that they can be used as an oil to source fingerprinting tool. This inorganic petroleum fingerprinting tool is particularly important in heavily biodegraded petroleum systems where traditional fingerprinting techniques (e.g. biomarkers) are severely hampered, e.g. the world's largest oil sand deposit, the West Canadian Oil Sands (WCOS). This has caused the source of the WCOS to be hotly debated, with no present day consensus between inputs from potential source units e.g. Exshaw and Gordondale Fms. 187Os/ 188Os and Pt/Pd fingerprinting of the oil sands shows that the majority of the petroleum have similar 187Os/ 188Os and Pt/Pd values, supporting the hypothesis of one principal source. Analysis of the potential source rocks establishes that the principal source of the oil sands to be from the Jurassic Gordondale Fm., with a minor Exshaw Fm. input. Thus, the combination of previously pioneered Re-Os petroleum geochronology with 187Os/ 188Os and Pt/Pd values of petroleum permits both a temporal and spatial understanding of petroleum systems.

Finlay, Alexander J.; Selby, David; Osborne, Mark J.

2012-01-01

367

Evaluating the reliability and sensitivity of the Kerr electro-optic field mapping measurements with high-voltage pulsed transformer oil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Transformer oil is the most widely used dielectric liquid for high voltage insulation. Measurements of the electric field distribution in high voltage pulsed transformer oil are of both practical and theoretical interests. Due to its low Kerr constant, previous electro-optic measurements with transformer oil rely on a technique called ac modulation, which works only for dc steady-state electric field mapping. With the help of a high-sensitivity charge-coupled device, we directly measure the Kerr electro-optic effect between parallel electrodes in transformer oil stressed by high voltage pulses. This work aims at demonstrating the reliability and evaluating the sensitivity of the measurements for three cases with identical electrodes: space-charge free, uniform electric field in the mid-region of the gap; space-charge free, non-uniform fringing electric field; and space charge distorted electric field in the mid-region of the gap. Future directions to improve accuracy by identifying and handling various sources of error and noise are suggested.

Zhang, X.; Nowocin, J. K.; Zahn, M.

2013-08-01

368

U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-Model application to a field test  

SciTech Connect

A one-time 2-hour emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) injection in a fast flowing aquifer decreased U discharge to a stream for over a year. Using a comprehensive biogeochemical model developed in the companion article based on microcosm tests, we approximately matched the observed acetate, nitrate, Fe, U, and sulfate concentrations, and described the major evolution trends of multiple microbial functional groups in the field test. While the lab-determined parameters were generally applicable in the field-scale simulation, the EVO hydrolysis rate constant was estimated to be an order of magnitude greater in the field than in the microcosms. The model predicted substantial biomass (sulfate reducers) and U(IV) accumulation near the injection wells and along the side boundaries of the treatment zone where electron donors (long-chain fatty acids) from the injection wells met electron acceptors (sulfate) from the surrounding environment. While EVO retention and hydrolysis characteristics were expected to control treatment longevity, modeling results indicated that electron acceptors such as sulfate may not only compete for electrons but also play a conducive role in degrading complex substrates and enhancing U(VI) reduction and immobilization. As a result, the spacing of the injection wells could be optimized for effective sustainable bioremediation.

Tang, Guoping [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Parker, Jack C [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

2013-01-01

369

Three-dimensional seismic full waveform inversion of ocean bottom cable data from the Valhall oil field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the past few years, the ability to reconstruct accurate 3D velocity models by full waveform inversion (FWI) has been shown by the academic research and the oil industry. In this study, we present a massively parallel algorithm for 3D seismic FWI together with an application to the ocean bottom cable (OBC) data from the Valhall oil field (North Sea). To achieve a computational efficiency and a flexible algorithm, we design a process, which can combine various forward modelling engines (such as finite-difference or finite-element methods) in time or frequency domains and an inversion core formulated in the frequency domain. Our algorithm relies on two key features: (1) the parametrizations of the subsurface for the seismic modeling and the inversion are uncoupled, that allows to interface different modeling engines with the inversion, and to consider target-oriented imaging. (2) Two nested levels of parallelism, by source distribution and domain decomposition, are implemented for the optimization of the performances of the scheme with respect to the computational platform, the dimensions of the model and the acquisition geometry. We present an application of our algorithm to OBC data recorded in the Valhall oil field. A total of 49 954 air-gun sources and 2 302 receivers located at the sea-floor (70 m depth) are used in this seismic experiment. The dimensions of the inverted target are 9.6 x 16.6 x 4.8 km. For the forward modelling, we adopt a finite-difference method in time to solve the acoustic wave equation, and monochromatic solutions are extracted from time signals. For the inversion, three overlapping groups of frequencies, [3.5 - 4], [4 - 5] and [5 - 7] Hz, respectively, are inverted successively to build a P-wave velocity model from the hydrophone component. The algorithm is performed on a IBM Blue Gene computer, by combining source distribution and domain decomposition over several hundreds of processors. The final FWI model exhibits remarkable structures, which are consistent with previous studies: paleo-channels below the sea-floor, low velocity and fractured zones in depths, probably related to accumulation of gas, and deep reflectors below the reservoir level. Comparison between the inverted model and a well log of vertical velocity possibly reveals the footprint of the anisotropy.

Etienne, V.; Hu, G.; Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

2012-04-01

370

Measuring ignitability for in situ burning of oil spills weathered under Arctic conditions: from laboratory studies to large-scale field experiments.  

PubMed

This paper compares the ignitability of Troll B crude oil weathered under simulated Arctic conditions (0%, 50% and 90% ice cover). The experiments were performed in different scales at SINTEF's laboratories in Trondheim, field research station on Svalbard and in broken ice (70-90% ice cover) in the Barents Sea. Samples from the weathering experiments were tested for ignitability using the same laboratory burning cell. The measured ignitability from the experiments in these different scales showed a good agreement for samples with similar weathering. The ice conditions clearly affected the weathering process, and 70% ice or more reduces the weathering and allows a longer time window for in situ burning. The results from the Barents Sea revealed that weathering and ignitability can vary within an oil slick. This field use of the burning cell demonstrated that it can be used as an operational tool to monitor the ignitability of oil spills. PMID:21714974

Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Brandvik, Per Johan

2011-08-01

371

Enhanced oil recovery using oxidized crude oil  

SciTech Connect

Enhanced recovery of oil from oil fields is effected by making use of an inexpensive surface-active agent formed by oxidizing a portion of crude oil with an aqueous solution of sodium hypochlorite at a temperature of 20/sup 0/-180/sup 0/ C. The oxidized crude can be injected in the field in admixture with non-oxidized crude or with water as a micro-emulsion.

Wauguier, J.P.; Boulet, R.; Cuiec, L.; Sillion, B.; Vacher, Ch.

1984-09-25

372

High temperature annealing of fission tracks in fluorapatite, Santa Fe Springs oil field, Los Angeles Basin, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Annealing of fission tracks is a kinetic process dependent primarily on temperature and to a laser extent on time. Several kinetic models of apatite annealing have been proposed. The predictive capabilities of these models for long-term geologic annealing have been limited to qualitative or semiquantitative at best, because of uncertainties associated with (1) the extrapolation of laboratory observations to geologic conditions, (2) the thermal histories of field samples, and (3) to some extent, the effect of apatite composition on reported annealing temperatures. Thermal history in the Santa Fe Springs oil field, Los Angeles Basin, California, is constrained by an exceptionally well known burial history and present-day temperature gradient. Sediment burial histories are continuous and tightly constrained from about 9 Ma to present, with an important tie at 3.4 Ma. No surface erosion and virtually no uplift were recorded during or since deposition of these sediments, so the burial history is simple and uniquely defined. Temperature gradient (???40??C km-1) is well established from oil-field operations. Fission-track data from the Santa Fe Springs area should thus provide one critical field test of kinetic annealing models for apatite. Fission-track analysis has been performed on apatites from sandstones of Pliocene to Miocene age from a deep drill hole at Santa Fe Springs. Apatite composition, determined by electron microprobe, is fluorapatite [average composition (F1.78Cl0.01OH0.21)] with very low chlorine content [less than Durango apatite; sample means range from 0.0 to 0.04 Cl atoms, calculated on the basis of 26(O, F, Cl, OH)], suggesting that the apatite is not unusually resistant to annealing. Fission tracks are preserved in these apatites at exceptionally high present-day temperatures. Track loss is not complete until temperatures reach the extreme of 167-178??C (at 3795-4090 m depth). The temperature-time annealing relationships indicated by the new data from Santa Fe Springs conflict with predictions based on previously published, commonly used, kinetic annealing models for apatite. Work is proceeding on samples from another area of the basin that may resolve this discrepancy.

Naeser, Nancy D.; Crowley, Kevin D.; McCulloh, Thane H.; Reaves, Chris M.

1990-01-01

373

Essential oils as potential adulticides against two populations of Aedes aegypti, the laboratory and natural field strains, in Chiang Mai province, northern Thailand.  

PubMed

Essential oils derived from five plant species, celery (Apium graveolens), caraway (Carum carvi), zedoary (Curcuma zedoaria), long pepper (Piper longum), and Chinese star anise (Illicium verum), were subjected to investigation of adulticidal activity against mosquito vectors. Two populations of Aedes aegypti, the laboratory and natural field strains, collected in Chiang Mai province, northern Thailand were tested in pyrethroid-susceptibility bioassays. The results revealed that the natural field strain of A. aegypti was resistant to permethrin, with mortality rates ranging from 51 to 66%. A mild susceptibility, with mortality rates ranging from 82 to 88%, was observed in the natural field strain of A. aegypti exposed to lambdacyhalothrin, which suggested that this strain was tolerant and might be resistant to this insecticide. However, laboratory-reared A. aegypti exposed to discriminating dosages of permethrin and lambdacyhalothrin induced 100% mortality in all cases, thus indicating complete susceptibility of this strain to these insecticides. The adulticidal activity determined by topical application revealed that all five essential oils exerted a promising adulticidal efficacy against both laboratory and natural field strains of A. aegypti. Although the laboratory strain was slightly more susceptible to these essential oils than the natural field strain, no statistically significant difference was observed. Moreover, comparison of the adulticidal activity indicated that the performance of these essential oils against the two strains of A. aegypti was similar. The highest potential was established from caraway, followed by zedoary, celery, long pepper, and Chinese star anise, with an LC(50) in the laboratory strain of 5.44, 5.94, 5.96, 6.21, and 8.52 microg/mg female, respectively, and 5.54, 6.02, 6.14, 6.35, and 8.83 microg/mg female, respectively, in the field strain. These promising essential oils are, therefore, an alternative in developing and producing mosquito adulticides as an effective measure used in controlling and eradicating mosquito vectors. PMID:16738885

Chaiyasit, Dana; Choochote, Wej; Rattanachanpichai, Eumporn; Chaithong, Udom; Chaiwong, Prasong; Jitpakdi, Atchariya; Tippawangkosol, Pongsri; Riyong, Doungrat; Pitasawat, Benjawan

2006-11-01

374

Study on detailed geological modelling for fluvial sandstone reservoir in Daqing oil field  

SciTech Connect

Guided by the sedimentation theory and knowledge of modern and ancient fluvial deposition and utilizing the abundant information of sedimentary series, microfacies type and petrophysical parameters from well logging curves of close spaced thousands of wells located in a large area. A new method for establishing detailed sedimentation and permeability distribution models for fluvial reservoirs have been developed successfully. This study aimed at the geometry and internal architecture of sandbodies, in accordance to their hierarchical levels of heterogeneity and building up sedimentation and permeability distribution models of fluvial reservoirs, describing the reservoir heterogeneity on the light of the river sedimentary rules. The results and methods obtained in outcrop and modem sedimentation studies have successfully supported the study. Taking advantage of this method, the major producing layers (PI{sub 1-2}), which have been considered as heterogeneous and thick fluvial reservoirs extending widely in lateral are researched in detail. These layers are subdivided into single sedimentary units vertically and the microfacies are identified horizontally. Furthermore, a complex system is recognized according to their hierarchical levels from large to small, meander belt, single channel sandbody, meander scroll, point bar, and lateral accretion bodies of point bar. The achieved results improved the description of areal distribution of point bar sandbodies, provide an accurate and detailed framework model for establishing high resolution predicting model. By using geostatistic technique, it also plays an important role in searching for enriched zone of residual oil distribution.

Zhao Hanqing; Fu Zhiguo; Lu Xiaoguang [Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development, Daqing (China)

1997-08-01

375

Maps showing geology, oil and gas fields and geological provinces of Africa  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The CD-ROM was compiled according to the methodology developed by the U.S. Geological Survey's World Energy Project . The goal of the project was to assess the undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and gas resources of the world and report these results by the year 2000. A worldwide series of geologic maps, published on CD-ROMs, was released by the U.S. Geological Survey's World Energy Project during 1997 - 2000. Specific details of the data sources and map compilation are given in the metadata files on this CD-ROM. These maps were compiled using Environmental Systems Research Institute Inc. (ESRI) ARC/INFO software. Political boundaries and cartographic representations on this map are shown (with permission) from ESRI's ArcWorld 1:3M digital coverage: they have no political significance and are displayed as general reference only. Portions of this database covering the coastline and country boundaries contain proprietary property of ESRI. (Copyright 1992 and 1996, Environmental Systems Research Institute Inc. All rights reserved.)

Persits, Feliks M.; Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Tuttle, Michele L.; Charpentier, R.R.; Brownfield, M.E.; Takahashi, Kenneth

1997-01-01

376

Merging basic science and applied reservoir characterization research: An effective approach for assisting industry in field optimization for incremental recovery of oil and gas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a dual approach of basic research and applied field-optimization studies, Bureau geoscientists are helping industry maximize the recovery of oil and gas in stratigraphically complex reservoirs. Basic research on reservoir architecture is supported by two industrial associates programs that are evaluating siliciclastic reservoirs (Characterization of Heterogeneity Style and Permeability Structure in a Sequence Stratigraphic Framework in Fluvial-Deltaic Reservoirs) and

R. A. Levey; T. Noel; S. P. Dutton

1995-01-01

377

Essential oils as potential adulticides against two populations of Aedes aegypti , the laboratory and natural field strains, in Chiang Mai province, northern Thailand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Essential oils derived from five plant species, celery (Apium graveolens), caraway (Carum carvi), zedoary (Curcuma zedoaria), long pepper (Piper longum), and Chinese star anise (Illicium verum), were subjected to investigation of adulticidal activity against mosquito vectors. Two populations of Aedes aegypti, the laboratory and natural field strains, collected in Chiang Mai province, northern Thailand were tested in pyrethroid-susceptibility bioassays. The

Dana Chaiyasit; Wej Choochote; Eumporn Rattanachanpichai; Udom Chaithong; Prasong Chaiwong; Atchariya Jitpakdi; Pongsri Tippawangkosol; Doungrat Riyong; Benjawan Pitasawat

2006-01-01

378

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 82, quarterly report, January--March 1995  

SciTech Connect

This document consists of a list of projects supporting work on oil recovery programs. A publications list and index of companies and institutions is provided. The remaining portion of the document provides brief descriptions on projects in chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery, geoscience, resource assessment, and reservoir class field demonstrations.

NONE

1996-06-01

379

GREEN RIVER AIR QUALITY MODEL DEVELOPMENT: METEOROLOGICAL DATA - AUGUST 1980 FIELD STUDY IN THE PICEANCE CREEK BASIN OIL SHALE RESOURCES AREA  

EPA Science Inventory

Special meteorological and air quality studies were conducted during August 1980 in the Piceance Creek Basin oil shale resource area of Northwestern Colorado as part of the EPA-sponsored Green River Ambient Model Assessment program. The objective of the limited field program was ...

380

Locating earthquakes in west Texas oil fields using 3-D anisotropic velocity models  

SciTech Connect

Earthquakes within the War-Wink gas field, Ward County, Texas, that have been located with a 1-D velocity model occur near the edges and top of a naturally occurring overpressured zone. Because the War-Wink field is a structurally controlled anticline with significant velocity anisotropy associated with the overpressured zone and finely layered evaporites, the authors have attempted to re-locate earthquakes using a 3-D anisotropic velocity model. Preliminary results with this model give the unsatisfactory result that many earthquakes previously located at the top of the overpressured zone (3-3.5 km) moved into the evaporites (1-1.5 km) above the field. They believe that this result could be caused by: (1) aliasing the velocity model; or (2) problems in determining the correct location minima when several minima exist. They are currently attempting to determine which of these causes is more likely for the unsatisfactory result observed.

Hua, Fa; Doser, D.; Baker, M. (Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1993-02-01

381

Field investigation on the toxicity of Alaska North Slope crude oil (ANSC) and dispersed ANSC crude to Gulf killifish, Eastern oyster and white shrimp.  

PubMed

A field investigation was conducted on a Louisiana Spartina alterniflora shoreline to evaluate the toxic effects of crude oil (Alaska North Slope crude oil, ANSC) and dispersed oil (ANSC + dispersant Corexit 9,500) on three aquatic species indigenous to the Gulf of Mexico: Fundulus grandis (Gulf killifish), Crassostrea virginica (Eastern oyster), and Litopenaeus setiferus (white shrimp). Results indicated that total hydrocarbons concentration value in oiled treatments decreased rapidly in 3h and were below 1 ppm at 24h after initial treatment. Corexit 9,500 facilitated more ANSC fractions to dissolve and disperse into the water column. L. setiferus showed short-term sensitivity to the ANSC and ANSC + 9,500 at 30 ppm. However, most test organisms (>83%) of each species survived well after 24h exposure to the treatments. Laboratory tests conducted concurrent with the field investigation indicated that concentrations of crude oil higher than 30 ppm were required for any significant toxic effect on the juvenile organisms tested. PMID:16098561

Liu, B; Romaire, R P; Delaune, R D; Lindau, C W

2006-01-01

382

Integration of Well & Core Data of Carbonate Reservoirs with Surface Seismic in Garraf Oil Field, Southern Iraq  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Garraf Field is situated in Southern Iraq in Nasiriya area, is located in Mesopotamian basin. The carbonate facies are dominant in main reservoirs in Garraf field (Mishrif and Yammama Formations) which is Cretaceous in age. The structure of the reservoir in this field are low relief gentle anticlinal structure aligned in NW to SE direction, and No fault were observed and interpreted in 3D seismic section. 3D seismic survey by Iraqi Oil Exploration Company No 2 was successfully conducted on the Garraf field at 2008-2009 using recording system SERCEL 408UL and Vibrators Nomad 65. Bin size: 25*25, Fold: 36, SP Interval: 50m, Lines Interval: 300m, 3 wells were drilled Ga (1, 2, 3) and it used for seismic to well tie in Petrel. Data analysis was conducted for each reservoirs for Lithological and sedimentological studies were based on core and well data .The study showed That the Mishrif Formation deposited in a broad carbonate platform with shallowing upward regressive succession and The depositional environment is extending from outer marine to shallow middle-inner shelf settings with restricted lagoons as supported by the present of Miliolid fossils. The fragmented rudist biostromes accumulated in the middle shelf. No rudist reef is presence in the studied cores. While the Major sequences are micritic limestone of lagoonal and oolitic/peloidal grainstone sandy shoal separated by mudstone of Yamama formation. Sedimentation feature are seen on seismic attributes and it is help for understanding of sedimentation environment and suitable structure interpretation. There is good relationship between Acustic Impedance and porosity, Acustic Impedance reflects porosity or facies change of carbonate rather than fluid content. Data input used for 3D Modeling include 3D seismic and AI data, petrophysical analysis, core and thin section description. 3D structure modeling were created base on the geophysical data interpretation and Al analysis. Data analysis for Al data were run as secondary input for 3D properties modeling.

Mhuder, J. J.; Muhlhl, A. A.; Basra Geologiests

2013-05-01

383

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 89  

SciTech Connect

Summaries are presented for the DOE contracts related to supported research for thermal recovery of petroleum, geoscience technology, and field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes. Data included for each project are: title, contract number, principal investigator, research organization, beginning date, expected completion date, amount of award, objectives of the research, and summary of technical progress.

NONE

1998-04-01

384

Seismic Illumination Analysis in Poor Oil & Gas Field Data by Using Focal Beam Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The area underneath shallow gas cloud is an area where the image of subsurface data is generally poor. This distorted image underneath gas zones usually contains precious information of hydrocarbon accumulation. Previously, we analyse the factors contribute to poor subsurface seismic image underneath the gas cloud model and use focal beam technique to understand subsurface illumination information. Encourage by model-based success, we shift our focus to data-based application by applying the focal beam technique into a real field data. The results from this field were analyse in term of resolution function and amplitude versus ray parameter (AVP) imprint for different reflector depth, followed by acquisition analysis on the surface level. For this purpose, a velocity data of a field located in Malay Basin was built before applying the focal beam calculation. We will demonstrate that by using focal beam analysis for this field, we will able to obtain good imaging particularly for target reflector at 2000ms, 4000ms and 6000ms depth, provided the full 3D acquisition geometry was used during focal beam application.

Latiff, A. H. Abdul; Ghosh, D. P.; Harith, Z. Z. Tuan

2014-03-01

385

Collecting field pennycress germplasm in Colorado and characterization of oil and root variation  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Field pennycress (Thlaspi arvense) has been identified as a possible source of biodiesel that may perform better in colder climates than other biodiesel fuels. A germplasm collection of the species is being maintained by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use in research, education, and crop imp...

386

Field Pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.) Oil: A Promising Source of Biodiesel.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Field pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L., FP) is a winter annual species of the mustard family (Brassicaceae) that is widely distributed throughout temperate North America and which can serve in a winter rotational cycle with conventional crops, thus not displacing existing agricultural production or ne...

387

Competitive Oxidation of Volatile Fatty Acids by Sulfate- and Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria from an Oil Field in Argentina? †  

PubMed Central

Acetate, propionate, and butyrate, collectively referred to as volatile fatty acids (VFA), are considered among the most important electron donors for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and heterotrophic nitrate-reducing bacteria (hNRB) in oil fields. Samples obtained from a field in the Neuquén Basin, western Argentina, had significant activity of mesophilic SRB, hNRB, and nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB). In microcosms, containing VFA (3 mM each) and excess sulfate, SRB first used propionate and butyrate for the production of acetate, which reached concentrations of up to 12 mM prior to being used as an electron donor for sulfate reduction. In contrast, hNRB used all three organic acids with similar kinetics, while reducing nitrate to nitrite and nitrogen. Transient inhibition of VFA-utilizing SRB was observed with 0.5 mM nitrite and permanent inhibition with concentrations of 1 mM or more. The addition of nitrate to medium flowing into an upflow, packed-bed bioreactor with an established VFA-oxidizing SRB consortium led to a spike of nitrite up to 3 mM. The nitrite-mediated inhibition of SRB led, in turn, to the transient accumulation of up to 13 mM of acetate. The complete utilization of nitrate and the incomplete utilization of VFA, especially propionate, and sulfate indicated that SRB remained partially inhibited. Hence, in addition to lower sulfide concentrations, an increase in the concentration of acetate in the presence of sulfate in waters produced from an oil field subjected to nitrate injection may indicate whether the treatment is successful. The microbial community composition in the bioreactor, as determined by culturing and culture-independent techniques, indicated shifts with an increasing fraction of nitrate. With VFA and sulfate, the SRB genera Desulfobotulus, Desulfotignum, and Desulfobacter as well as the sulfur-reducing Desulfuromonas and the NR-SOB Arcobacter were detected. With VFA and nitrate, Pseudomonas spp. were present. hNRB/NR-SOB from the genus Sulfurospirillum were found under all conditions. PMID:18502934

Grigoryan, Aleksandr A.; Cornish, Sabrina L.; Buziak, Brenton; Lin, Shiping; Cavallaro, Adriana; Arensdorf, Joseph J.; Voordouw, Gerrit

2008-01-01

388

Constitutive models for the Etchegoin Sands, Belridge Diatomite, and overburden formations at the Lost Hills oil field, California  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development of constitutive material models for the overburden formations, reservoir formations, and underlying strata at the Lost Hills oil field located about 45 miles northwest of Bakersfield in Kern County, California. Triaxial rock mechanics tests were performed on specimens prepared from cores recovered from the Lost Hills field, and included measurements of axial and radial stresses and strains under different load paths. The tested intervals comprise diatomaceous sands of the Etchegoin Formation and several diatomite types of the Belridge Diatomite Member of the Monterey Formation, including cycles both above and below the diagenetic phase boundary between opal-A and opal-CT. The laboratory data are used to drive constitutive parameters for the Extended Sandler-Rubin (ESR) cap model that is implemented in Sandia's structural mechanics finite element code JAS3D. Available data in the literature are also used to derive ESR shear failure parameters for overburden formations. The material models are being used in large-scale three-dimensional geomechanical simulations of the reservoir behavior during primary and secondary recovery.

FOSSUM,ARLO F.; FREDRICH,JOANNE T.

2000-04-01

389

Field Laboratory in the Osage Reservation -- Determination of Status of Oil and Gas Operations  

SciTech Connect

Microsoft EXCEL and Lotus 1-2-3 spreadsheets have been programmed to perform calculations as reservoir data is entered. These program were developed by BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. personnel for use in the Field Laboratory in the Osage Reservation project. This spreadsheet will also assist Native American Tribe members in evaluation of the petroleum resource on the Osage Mineral Estate, Osage County, Oklahoma and independent operators to evaluate petroleum reservoirs on and off of the Osage Mineral Estate.

Carroll, Herb; Johnson, W.I.

1999-04-27

390

Geology of oil fields and future exploration potential in west African Aptian Salt basin  

SciTech Connect

The Aptian Salt basin of west Africa, extends from Equatorial Guinea southward to Angola, contains recoverable reserves estimated at nearly 4 billion BOE, and is current producing 600,000 BOPD. The basin developed as a result of tensional forces between west Africa and South America initiated at the end of the Jurassic. The prospective sedimentary sequences ranged in age from Early Cretaceous (uppermost Jurassic in places) to Holocene and is divided by the Aptian transgressive sand and salt into a pre-salt, nonmarine, syn-rift sequence and a post-salt, marine, post-rift sequence. Both the pre- and post-salt sequences contain several successful exploration plays, the most prolific of which are the Early Cretaceous nonmarine sandstone fields in tilted fault blocks of Gabon and Cabinda; Early Cretaceous carbonate buildups on the margins of basement highs in Cabinda; Early Cretaceous transgressive marine sandstone fields in anticlines draped over basement highs in Gabon; Late Cretaceous shallow marine sandstone and carbonate fields in salt-related structures in the Congo, Zaire, Cabinda, and Angola; Late Cretaceous dolomites in structural/stratigraphic traps in Angola; Late Cretaceous/early Tertiary deltaic/estuarine sandstone traps formed by salt movement in Gabon, Cabinda, and angola; and Tertiary marine turbidite fields in Cabinda and Angola. Despite the exploration success in these trends, much of the basin is under or poorly explored. The major problems for exploration are the poor quality of seismic definition beneath the salt, which makes it difficult to predict pre-salt structure and stratigraphy, and the importance of a stratigraphic element in many of the post-salt traps, also difficult to detect on seismic.

Bignell, R.D.; Edwards, A.D.

1987-05-01

391

An efficient and user friendly investment optimization system for large scale oil field development  

E-print Network

investment problem, yet such an approach is frequently overlooked in practical applications to the field development process. The reasons for the decision maker's reluctance to use mathematical program- ming techniques comes from the following facts: 1... for a decision maker's reluctance to use mathematical programming techniques can be summarized as follows: 1) Existing approaches tend to oversimplify the problem mathematically to obtain optimal solutions within limited computational resources...

Ding, Zixuan

1992-01-01

392

Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama. Final report, March 1996--September 1998  

SciTech Connect

This project was designed to analyze the structure of Mesozoic and Tertiary strata in Gilbertown Field and adjacent areas to suggest ways in which oil recovery can be improved. The Eutaw Formation comprises 7 major flow units and is dominated by low-resistivity, low-contrast play that is difficult to characterize quantitatively. Selma chalk produces strictly from fault-related fractures that were mineralized as warm fluid migrated from deep sources. Resistivity, dipmeter, and fracture identification logs corroborate that deformation is concentrated in the hanging-wall drag zones. New area balancing techniques were developed to characterize growth strata and confirm that strain is concentrated in hanging-wall drag zones. Curvature analysis indicates that the faults contain numerous fault bends that influence fracture distribution. Eutaw oil is produced strictly from footwall uplifts, whereas Selma oil is produced from fault-related fractures. Clay smear and mineralization may be significant trapping mechanisms in the Eutaw Formation. The critical seal for Selma reservoirs, by contrast, is where Tertiary clay in the hanging wall is juxtaposed with poorly fractured Selma chalk in the footwall. Gilbertown Field can be revitalized by infill drilling and recompletion of existing wells. Directional drilling may be a viable technique for recovering untapped oil from Selma chalk. Revitalization is now underway, and the first new production wells since 1985 are being drilled in the western part of the field.

Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Carroll, R.E.; Groshong, R.H.; Jin, G.

1998-12-01

393

Simulation of the migration and transformation of petroleum pollutants in the soils of the Loess plateau: a case study in the Maling oil field of northwestern China.  

PubMed

We developed a coupled water-oil simulation model to simulate the migration and transformation of petroleum-derived contaminants in the soil of the Xifeng oil field. To do so, we used the HYDRUS-2D model, which simulates the diffusion, adsorption or desorption, and microbial degradation of petroleum-derived hydrocarbons in the soil-water system. The saturated soil hydraulic conductivity of petroleum-derived pollutants was 0.05 cm?day(-1), which is about 1 to 2 % of the soil moisture permeability coefficient. Our numerical simulation results show that spilled crude oil was mainly concentrated in the surface horizons of the soil. The organic pollutant concentration tended to be highest nearest to the pollution source. The pollutant migration was generally concentrated within the top 20 to 30 cm of the soil, with the maximum concentration in the top 5 cm of the soil. With passing time, the pollutant accumulation increased and the adsorption and degradation functions reached a dynamic balance with the input rate at depths greater than 30 cm below the soil surface. The oil-derived pollutants totaled 50 to 100 mg?kg(-1) under the dynamic balance condition, which occurred after 20 to 30 years. The petroleum-derived pollutant concentration in the loess soil was inversely correlated with the horizontal distance from the oil well, and the concentration decreased greatly at a distance greater than 40 m from the well. PMID:23494194

Pan, Feng; Ma, Jinzhu; Wang, Yunquan; Zhang, Yali; Chen, Lihua; Edmunds, W Mike

2013-10-01

394

Diversity and abundance of n-alkane degrading bacteria in the near surface soils of a Chinese onshore oil and gas field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Alkane degrading bacteria have long been used as an important biological indicator for oil and gas prospecting, but their ecological characteristics in hydrocarbon microseep habitats are still poorly understood. In this study, the diversity and abundance of n-alkane degrading bacterial community in the near surface soils of a Chinese onshore oil and gas field were investigated using molecular techniques. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses in combination with cloning and sequencing of alkB genes revealed that trace amount of volatile hydrocarbons migrated from oil and gas reservoirs caused a shift of the n-alkane degrading bacterial community from Gram-positive bacteria (Mycobacterium and Rhodococcus) to Gram-negative genotypes (Alcanivorax and Acinetobacter). Real-time PCR results furthermore showed that the abundance of alkB genes increased substantially in the surface soils underlying oil and gas reservoirs even though only low or undetectable concentrations of hydrocarbons were measured in these soils due to efficient microbial degradation. Our findings broadened the knowledge on the ecological characteristics of alkane degrading community in hydrocarbon microseeps and may provide a new approach for microbial prospecting for oil and gas (MPOG).

Xu, K.; Tang, Y.; Ren, C.; Zhao, K.; Sun, Y.

2012-10-01

395

Diversity and abundance of n-alkane-degrading bacteria in the near-surface soils of a Chinese onshore oil and gas field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Alkane-degrading bacteria have long been used as an important biological indicator for oil and gas prospecting, but their ecological characteristics in hydrocarbon microseep habitats are still poorly understood. In this study, the diversity and abundance of n-alkane-degrading bacterial community in the near-surface soils of a Chinese onshore oil and gas field were investigated using molecular techniques. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses in combination with cloning and sequencing of alkB genes revealed that Gram-negative genotypes (Alcanivorax and Acinetobacter) dominated n-alkane-degrading bacterial communities in the near-surface soils of oil and gas reservoirs, while the dominant microbial communities were Gram-positive bacteria (Mycobacterium and Rhodococcus) in background soil. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results furthermore showed that the abundance of alkB genes increased substantially in the surface soils above oil and gas reservoirs even though only low or undetectable concentrations of hydrocarbons were measured in these soils. The results of this study implicate that trace amounts of volatile hydrocarbons migrate from oil and gas reservoirs, and likely result in the changes of microbial communities in the near-surface soil.

Xu, K.; Tang, Y.; Ren, C.; Zhao, K.; Sun, Y.

2013-03-01

396

Sequence stratigraphic-structural analysis of the East Midlands Carboniferous oil field, UK: Implications for fluvial reservoir models  

SciTech Connect

The integration of seismic, well log and core data from, the Scampton North and Welton oil fields, Lincolnshire, UK, has enabled the development of a sequence stratigraphic-structural model for late Namurian and early Westphalian fluvial reservoirs. The tectonic and sequence stratigraphic setting is remarkably similar to that in the Southern North Sea which extends more than 250 km to the east. Closer onshore well spacing, supplemented with coal exploration borehole data, provides an excellent analogue for new Carboniferous Southern North Sea developments and prospects. The reservoirs comprise medium-grained, low sinuosity fluvial aggradational packages within a coal-bearing, fluvio-deltaic depositional environment. Although major active faults occur within the Namurian, tectonic activity had ceased by the start of the Westphalian which has a tramline-like appearance on seismic. The reservoirs are poorly interconnected as a consequence of small-scale faults and extensive shale baffles, which have resulted in considerable production problems, accentuated by an initial poor reservoir correlation. Palynology has proven to be highly imprecise, consequently, the use of seismic picks as chronostratigraphic markers combined with the coal stratigraphy from British Coal boreholes and the application of sequence stratigraphic, concepts has enabled a more precise reservoir correlation to be made.

Aitken, J.F.; Quirk, D.G. (Oxford Brookes Univ., Oxford (United Kingdom))

1996-01-01

397

Sequence stratigraphic-structural analysis of the East Midlands Carboniferous oil field, UK: Implications for fluvial reservoir models  

SciTech Connect

The integration of seismic, well log and core data from, the Scampton North and Welton oil fields, Lincolnshire, UK, has enabled the development of a sequence stratigraphic-structural model for late Namurian and early Westphalian fluvial reservoirs. The tectonic and sequence stratigraphic setting is remarkably similar to that in the Southern North Sea which extends more than 250 km to the east. Closer onshore well spacing, supplemented with coal exploration borehole data, provides an excellent analogue for new Carboniferous Southern North Sea developments and prospects. The reservoirs comprise medium-grained, low sinuosity fluvial aggradational packages within a coal-bearing, fluvio-deltaic depositional environment. Although major active faults occur within the Namurian, tectonic activity had ceased by the start of the Westphalian which has a tramline-like appearance on seismic. The reservoirs are poorly interconnected as a consequence of small-scale faults and extensive shale baffles, which have resulted in considerable production problems, accentuated by an initial poor reservoir correlation. Palynology has proven to be highly imprecise, consequently, the use of seismic picks as chronostratigraphic markers combined with the coal stratigraphy from British Coal boreholes and the application of sequence stratigraphic, concepts has enabled a more precise reservoir correlation to be made.

Aitken, J.F.; Quirk, D.G. [Oxford Brooke