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Sample records for bovine pigmented ciliary

  1. Adenocarcinoma of the pigmented ciliary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Sukeda, Aoi; Mori, Taisuke; Suzuki, Shigenobu; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pigmented ciliary epithelium is an exceptionally rare eye tumour, with only a few cases reported to date. We encountered such a case in a 50-year-old woman who reported seeing floaters in her right eye. Fundus examination and MRI revealed an elevated lesion located in the ciliary body compressing the lens. The ciliary body was resected under the diagnosis of ciliary adenoma. On histological examination, the tumour exhibited epithelial features with glandular formation and moderate nuclear pleomorphism. The tumour invaded the subepithelial stroma of the ciliary body. Immunohistochemical findings were positive for cytokeratin OSCAR, AE1/AE3, CK7, EMA, S100, Melan A, HMB45, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. PMID:25015166

  2. Primary adenocarcinoma of pigmented ciliary epithelium in a phthisical eye.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jaya B; Proia, Alan D; Mruthyunjaya, Prithvi; Sharma, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of adenocarcinoma of the pigmented ciliary epithelium arising in a phthisical eye. A 92-year-old man who initially presented with severe ocular pain had calcification extending from the posterior pole to ciliary body on B-scan ultrasonography to a degree not previously reported. We highlight the importance of screening for intraocular neoplasms in adults with a long-standing phthisical eye. PMID:26597037

  3. Na(+-) Cl(-)- and HCO3(-)-dependent base uptake in the ciliary body pigment pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Butler, G A; Chen, M; Stegman, Z; Wolosin, J M

    1994-09-01

    Segments of whole ciliary body dissected from Dutch belted rabbits were incubated for 60 min at 36 degrees C in a 30 microM Ca2+ Ringer's. The inner limiting membrane with its adherent non-pigmented epithelium then was mechanically removed from the surface. The newly-exposed viable layer of pigmented cells was then loaded with the fluorescent probe 2'-7'-bis (carboxymethyl)-5(6) carboxyfluorescein by incubating the segments for 45 min at RT with the cell permeable acetoxymethoxy form of the dye. These loaded tissues were perfused in a flow-through chamber, mounted on the heated stage of a microscope equipped for quantitative epifluorescence, and the intracellular pH (pHi) of small groups of cells was derived from the ratio of emission intensities generated by excitations at 490 and 440 nm, respectively. In N[2-hydroxyethyl] piperazine-N"-[2 ethane sulfonic acid](Hepes)-buffered Ringer's the intracellular pH was 7.23 +/- 0.21 (+/- S.D., n = 20). Replacement of 28 mM Hepes by 28 mM HCO3-/5% CO2 led to a 0.14 +/- 0.04 increase in pHi. This increase required the presence of Na+ and Cl- and was inhibited by 0.2 mM diisothiocyanatostilbene-2-2'-disulfonic acid. These observations as well as characteristic pHi, responses to the removal or introduction of Na+ or Cl- indicated the presence in the pigmented cells of a Na(+)- and Cl(-)-dependent HCO3- transporter responsible for base uptake. PMID:7821379

  4. Defining the proteome of human iris, ciliary body, retinal pigment epithelium, and choroid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pingbo; Kirby, David; Dufresne, Craig; Chen, Yan; Turner, Randi; Ferri, Sara; Edward, Deepak P; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Semba, Richard D

    2016-04-01

    The iris is a fine structure that controls the amount of light that enters the eye. The ciliary body controls the shape of the lens and produces aqueous humor. The retinal pigment epithelium and choroid (RPE/choroid) are essential in supporting the retina and absorbing light energy that enters the eye. Proteins were extracted from iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid tissues of eyes from five individuals and fractionated using SDS-PAGE. After in-gel digestion, peptides were analyzed using LC-MS/MS on an Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer. In iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid, we identified 2959, 2867, and 2755 nonredundant proteins with peptide and protein false-positive rates of <0.1% and <1%, respectively. Forty-three unambiguous protein isoforms were identified in iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid. Four "missing proteins" were identified in ciliary body based on ≥2 proteotypic peptides. The mass spectrometric proteome database of the human iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid may serve as a valuable resource for future investigations of the eye in health and disease. The MS proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PXD001424 and PXD002194. PMID:26834087

  5. Voltage-activated currents recorded from rabbit pigmented ciliary body epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Fain, G L; Farahbakhsh, N A

    1989-01-01

    1. The whole-cell recording mode of the patch-clamp technique was used to investigate the presence of voltage-activated currents in the isolated pigmented cells from the rabbit ciliary body epithelium grown in culture. 2. In Ringer solution with composition similar to that of the rabbit aqueous humour, depolarizing voltage steps activated a transient inward current and a delayed outward current, while hyperpolarization elicited an inwardly rectified current. 3. The depolarization-activated inward current was mainly carried by Na+ and was blocked by submicromolar concentrations of tetrodotoxin. This current in many cells was sufficiently large to produce a regenerative Na+ spike. 4. The depolarization-activated outward current was carried by K+ and blocked by external TEA and Ba2+. Its activation appeared to be Ca2(+)-independent. 5. The hyperpolarization-activated inward current was almost exclusively carried by K+ and was blocked by Ba2+ and Cs+. For large hyperpolarizations below -120 mV, this current exhibited a biphasic activation with a fast transient peak followed by a slower sag, that appeared to be due to K+ depletion. 6. The voltage-dependent K+ conductances probably act to stabilize the cell membrane resting potential and may also play a role in ion transport. The function of the Na(+)-dependent inward current is unclear, but it may permit the electrically coupled epithelial cells of the ciliary body to conduct propagated action potentials. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2621623

  6. Force-inhibiting effect of Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 2A inhibitors on bovine ciliary muscle.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Minori; Takeya, Kosuke; Miyazu, Motoi; Yoshida, Akitoshi; Takai, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Ciliary muscle is a smooth muscle characterized by a rapid response to muscarinic receptor stimulation and sustained contraction. Although it is evident that these contractions are Ca2+-dependent, detailed molecular mechanisms are still unknown. In order to elucidate the role of Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in ciliary muscle contraction, we examined the effects of okadaic acid and other PP2A inhibitors on contractions induced by carbachol (CCh) and ionomycin in bovine ciliary muscle strips (BCM). Okadaic acid inhibited ionomycin-induced contraction, while it did not cause significant changes in CCh-induced contraction. Fostriecin showed similar inhibitory effects on the contraction of BCM. On the other hand, rubratoxin A inhibited both ionomycin- and CCh-induced contractions. These results indicated that PP2A was involved at least in ionomycin-induced Ca2+-dependent contraction, and that BCM had a unique regulatory mechanism in CCh-induced contraction. PMID:26727726

  7. Inhibitory Action Of Novel Hydrogen Sulfide Donors On Bovine Isolated Posterior Ciliary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni-Chitnis, Madhura; Njie-Mbye, Ya Fatou; Mitchell, Leah; Robinson, Jenaye; Whiteman, Mathew; Wood, Mark E.; Opere, Catherine A.; Ohia, Sunny E.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the inhibitory effect of novel H2S donors, AP67 and AP72 on isolated bovine posterior ciliary arteries (PCAs) under conditions of tone induced by an adrenoceptor agonist. Furthermore, we examined the possible mechanisms underlying the AP67- and AP72-induced relaxations. Isolated bovine PCA were set up for measurement of isometric tension in organ baths containing oxygenated Krebs solution. The relaxant action of H2S donors was studied on phenylephrine-induced tone in the absence or presence of enzyme inhibitors for the following pathways: cyclooxygenase (COX); H2S; nitric oxide and the ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel. The H2S donors, NaHS (1 nM - 10 μM), AP67 (1 nM - 10 μM) and AP72 (10 nM -1 μM) elicited a concentration-dependent relaxation of phenylephrine-induced tone in isolated bovine PCA. While the COX inhibitor, flurbiprofen (3 μM) blocked significantly (p < 0.05) the inhibitory response elicited by AP67, it had no effect on relaxations induced by NaHS and AP72. Both aminooxyacetic acid (30 μM) and propargylglycine (1 mM), enzyme inhibitors of H2S biosynthesis caused significant (p < 0.05) rightward shifts in the concentration-response curve to AP67 and AP72. Furthermore, the KATP channel antagonist, glibenclamide (300 μM) and the NO synthase inhibitor, L-NAME (100 μM) significantly attenuated (p < 0.05) the relaxation effect induced by AP67 and AP72 on PCA. We conclude that H2S donors can relax pre-contracted isolated bovine PCA, an effect dependent on endogenous production of H2S. The inhibitory action of only AP67 on pre-contracted PCA may involve the production of inhibitory endogenous prostanoids. Furthermore, the observed inhibitory action of H2S donors on PCA may depend on the endogenous biosynthesis of NO and by an action of KATP channels. PMID:25845295

  8. Membrane carbonic anhydrase (IV) and ciliary epithelium. Carbonic anhydrase activity is present in the basolateral membranes of the non-pigmented ciliary epithelium of rabbit eyes.

    PubMed

    Matsui, H; Murakami, M; Wynns, G C; Conroy, C W; Mead, A; Maren, T H; Sears, M L

    1996-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) lower intraocular pressure by reducing aqueous flow. It has been thought that this pharmacologic reduction of aqueous flow is mediated by the ciliary epithelium, but it is not known whether this cellular action is effected by inhibition of the membranal (CA IV) and/or cytosolic (CA II) carbonic anhydrases of the ciliary epithelium. The isolated ciliary epithelial bilayer maintains its anatomic and functional polarity and generates a transepithelial potential difference (TEP) in an Ussing type chamber. Depletion of HCO3-, accomplished either with an HCO3(-)-free solution bathing the epithelial bilayer, or, with addition of freely permeant CAIs to HCO3(-)-containing media, (from either the PE or NPE side of the bilayer) depolarizes the preparation. Addition of CAIs to an HCO3(-)-depleted preparation has no further effect, indicating the specific action of the CAIs. The CAI, 2-p-NH2 benzenesulfonamido-1,3,4,-thiadiazole-5-SO2NH2, linked to polybutadiene maleic acid yields an impermeant polymer of 20000 Da with no loss of activity. At 45 microM this impermeant polymer caused a 60% increase in the SCC, seen only when the compound was applied to the NPE side of the bilayer. This latter result indicates an effect from inhibition of CA IV in the basolateral membranes of the NPE. Thus there are probably two different cellular actions of CAIs upon the ciliary epithelium to reduce aqueous inflow, cytoplasmic and membranal. The action of NPE basolateral membranal CA IV is probably linked to the chloride/bicarbonate exchanger. PMID:8795459

  9. Pharmacological actions of the slow release hydrogen sulfide donor GYY4137 on phenylephrine-induced tone in isolated bovine ciliary artery.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Madhura Kulkarni; Njie-Mbye, Ya Fatou; Opere, Catherine A; Wood, Mark E; Whiteman, Matthew; Ohia, Sunny E

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a colorless gas characterized by its pungent odor of rotten eggs has been reported to elicit relaxation effects on basal and pre-contracted non-ocular smooth muscles of several mammalian species. In the present study, we investigated the pharmacological actions of a H2S donor, GYY4137 on isolated bovine posterior ciliary artery after contraction with the adrenergic receptor agonist, phenylephrine. Furthermore, we studied the underlying mechanism of inhibitory action of GYY4137 on the posterior ciliary arteries. Isolated bovine posterior ciliary arteries were mounted in oxygenated organ baths and changes in isometric tension were measured with a Grass FT03 transducer connected to a recorder using a Grass Polyview Software. The relaxant actions of GYY4137 on phenylephrine pre-contracted arteries were observed in the absence and presence of an inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase, flurbiprofen. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of GYY4137 were studied in the absence or presence of inhibitors/activators of biosynthetic enzymes for H2S and nitric oxide production, as well as specific ion channel blockers. In the concentration range, 100 nM to 100 μM, GYY4137 elicited a concentration-dependant relaxation of phenylephrine-induced tone in isolated posterior ciliary arteries, with IC50 value of 13.4 ± 1.9 μM (n = 6). The cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, flurbiprofen, significantly (p < 0.01) enhanced the relaxation induced by GYY4137 yielding IC50 value of 0.13 ± 0.08 μM (n = 6). Both the inhibitors of cystathionine β-synthase (aminooxyacetic acid, AOAA, 30 μM) and cystathionine γ-lyase (propargylglycine, PAG, 1 mM) caused significant (p < 0.05) rightward shifts in the concentration-response curve to GYY4137. Furthermore, the KATP channel antagonist, glibenclamide (100 μM) significantly (p < 0.01) attenuated the relaxant action induced by GYY4137 on bovine ciliary artery. Conversely, the activator of cystathionine β-synthase, SAM (100 μM) and an

  10. Examination of signalling pathways involved in muscarinic responses in bovine ciliary muscle using YM-254890, an inhibitor of the Gq/11 protein

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, F; Miyazu, M; Yoshida, A; Naruse, K; Takai, A

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: In the ciliary muscle, the tonic component of the contraction produced by cholinergic agonists is highly dependent on Ca2+ provided by influx through non-selective cation channels (NSCCs) opened by stimulation of M3 muscarinic receptors. We examined effects of YM-254890 (YM), a Gq/11-specific inhibitor, on contraction, NSCC currents and [Ca2+]i elevation induced by carbachol (CCh). Experimental approach: Isometric tension was recorded from ciliary muscle bundles excised from bovine eyes. In ciliary myocytes dispersed with collagenase and cultured for 1–5 days, whole-cell currents were recorded by voltage clamp and the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i was monitored using the Fluo-4 fluorophore. Existence and localization of M3 receptors and the α subunit of Gq/11 (Gαq/11) were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy using AlexaFluor-conjugated antibodies. Key results: Both phasic and tonic components of contractions evoked by 2 μM CCh were inhibited by YM (3–10 μM) in a dose-dependent manner. In the cultured cells, CCh (0.05–10 μM) evoked an NSCC current as well as an elevation of the [Ca2+]i. Both initial and sustained phases of these CCh-evoked responses were abolished by YM (3–10 μM). Immunostaining of the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane of ciliary myocytes revealed a dense distribution of M3 receptors and Gαq/11. Conclusions and implications: The tonic as well as phasic component of the ciliary muscle contraction appears to be under control of signals conveyed by a Gq/11-coupled pathway. YM is a useful tool to assess whether Gq/11 is involved in a signal transduction system. PMID:18536740

  11. Foxg1-Cre Mediated Lrp2 Inactivation in the Developing Mouse Neural Retina, Ciliary and Retinal Pigment Epithelia Models Congenital High Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Obry, Antoine; Santin, Mathieu D.; Ben-Yacoub, Sirine; Pâques, Michel; Amsellem-Levera, Sabine; Bribian, Ana; Simonutti, Manuel; Augustin, Sébastien; Debeir, Thomas; Sahel, José Alain; Christ, Annabel; de Castro, Fernando; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Cosette, Pascal; Kozyraki, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Myopia is a common ocular disorder generally due to increased axial length of the eye-globe. Its extreme form high myopia (HM) is a multifactorial disease leading to retinal and scleral damage, visual impairment or loss and is an important health issue. Mutations in the endocytic receptor LRP2 gene result in Donnai-Barrow (DBS) and Stickler syndromes, both characterized by HM. To clearly establish the link between Lrp2 and congenital HM we inactivated Lrp2 in the mouse forebrain including the neural retina and the retinal and ciliary pigment epithelia. High resolution in vivo MRI imaging and ophthalmological analyses showed that the adult Lrp2-deficient eyes were 40% longer than the control ones mainly due to an excessive elongation of the vitreal chamber. They had an apparently normal intraocular pressure and developed chorioretinal atrophy and posterior scleral staphyloma features reminiscent of human myopic retinopathy. Immunomorphological and ultrastructural analyses showed that increased eye lengthening was first observed by post-natal day 5 (P5) and that it was accompanied by a rapid decrease of the bipolar, photoreceptor and retinal ganglion cells, and eventually the optic nerve axons. It was followed by scleral thinning and collagen fiber disorganization, essentially in the posterior pole. We conclude that the function of LRP2 in the ocular tissues is necessary for normal eye growth and that the Lrp2-deficient eyes provide a unique tool to further study human HM. PMID:26107939

  12. Ciliary body (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... that encircles the lens. The ciliary body contains smooth muscle fibers called ciliary muscles that help to control the shape of the lens. Towards the posterior surface of the lens there are ciliary processes which ...

  13. Isolation and characterization of a spontaneously immortalized bovine retinal pigmented epithelial cell line

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Retinal Pigmented Epithelium (RPE) is juxtaposed with the photoreceptor outer segments of the eye. The proximity of the photoreceptor cells is a prerequisite for their survival, as they depend on the RPE to remove the outer segments and are also influenced by RPE cell paracrine factors. RPE cell death can cause a progressive loss of photoreceptor function, which can diminish vision and, over time, blindness ensues. Degeneration of the retina has been shown to induce a variety of retinopathies, such as Stargardt's disease, Cone-Rod Dystrophy (CRD), Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), Fundus Flavimaculatus (FFM), Best's disease and Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD). We have cultured primary bovine RPE cells to gain a further understanding of the mechanisms of RPE cell death. One of the cultures, named tRPE, surpassed senescence and was further characterized to determine its viability as a model for retinal diseases. Results The tRPE cell line has been passaged up to 150 population doublings and was shown to be morphologically similar to primary cells. They have been characterized to be of RPE origin by reverse transcriptase PCR and immunocytochemistry using the RPE-specific genes RPE65 and CRALBP and RPE-specific proteins RPE65 and Bestrophin. The tRPE cells are also immunoreactive to vimentin, cytokeratin and zonula occludens-1 antibodies. Chromosome analysis indicates a normal diploid number. The tRPE cells do not grow in suspension or in soft agar. After 3H thymidine incorporation, the cells do not appear to divide appreciably after confluency. Conclusion The tRPE cells are immortal, but still exhibit contact inhibition, serum dependence, monolayer growth and secrete an extra-cellular matrix. They retain the in-vivo morphology, gene expression and cell polarity. Additionally, the cells endocytose exogenous melanin, A2E and purified lipofuscin granules. This cell line may be a useful in-vitro research model for retinal maculopathies. PMID:19413901

  14. Apical and basal membrane ion transport mechanisms in bovine retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Joseph, D P; Miller, S S

    1991-04-01

    1. Intracellular voltage recordings using conventional and double-barrelled chloride-selective microelectrodes have been used to identify several transport mechanisms at the apical and basolateral membranes of the isolated bovine retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid preparation. Intracellular recordings were obtained from two cell populations, melanotic (pigmented) and amelanotic (non-pigmented). The electrical properties of these two populations are practically identical. For melanotic cells the average apical resting membrane potential (VA) is -61 +/- 2 mV (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 49 cells, thirty-three eyes). For these cells the ratio of apical to basolateral membrane resistance (a) was 0.22 +/- 0.02. The mean transepithelial voltage and resistance were 6 +/- 1 mV and 138 +/- 7 omega cm2, respectively. 2. The apical membrane, which faces the distal retina, contains a Ba(2+)-inhibitable K+ conductance and a ouabain-inhibitable, electrogenic Na(+)-K+ pump. In addition it contains a bumetanide-sensitive mechanism, the putative Na(+)-K(+)-Cl- cotransporter. The basolateral membrane contains a DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid)-inhibitable chloride channel. The relative conductances of the apical and basolateral membranes to K+ and Cl- are TK approximately 0.9 and TCl approximately 0.7, respectively. 3. The ouabain-induced fast phase of apical membrane depolarization (0-30 s) was used to calculate the equivalent resistances of the apical (RA) and basolateral (RB) cell membranes, as well as the paracellular or shunt resistance (RS). They are: 3190 +/- 400, 17920 +/- 2730 and 2550 +/- 200 omega (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 9 tissues), respectively. From these data the equivalent electromotive forces (EMF) at the apical (EA) and basolateral (EB) membranes were also calculated. They are: -69 +/- 5.0 and -24 +/- 5.0 mV, respectively. 4. Intracellular Cl- activity (aiCl) was measured using double-barreled ion-selective microelectrodes. In the steady state

  15. Mechanism of ciliary disassembly.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yinwen; Meng, Dan; Zhu, Bing; Pan, Junmin

    2016-05-01

    As motile organelles and sensors, cilia play pivotal roles in cell physiology, development and organ homeostasis. Ciliary defects are associated with a class of cilia-related diseases or developmental disorders, termed ciliopathies. Even though the presence of cilia is required for diverse functions, cilia can be removed through ciliary shortening or resorption that necessitates disassembly of the cilium, which occurs normally during cell cycle progression, cell differentiation and in response to cellular stress. The functional significance of ciliary resorption is highlighted in controlling the G1-S transition during cell cycle progression. Internal or external cues that trigger ciliary resorption initiate signaling cascades that regulate several downstream events including depolymerization of axonemal microtubules, dynamic changes in actin and the ciliary membrane, regulation of intraflagellar transport and posttranslational modifications of ciliary proteins. To ensure ciliary resorption, both the active disassembly of the cilium and the simultaneous inhibition of ciliary assembly must be coordinately regulated. PMID:26869233

  16. Amelanotic Irido-Ciliary Ring Melanoma: A Clinicopathological Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Hassan A.; Modi, Yasha S.; Plesec, Thomas P.; Singh, Arun D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of an amelanotic irido-ciliary ring melanoma. Design Interventional case report. Results A 44-year-old male was followed for asymptomatic amelanotic iris nevus of the right eye that was noted to have a localized ciliary body mass with ring extension along the trabecular meshwork. Fine needle aspiration biopsy was consistent with malignant melanoma. The patient underwent enucleation and remains disease free at 9 years of follow-up. Histopathology revealed malignant melanoma involving the iris and ciliary body with a 360-degree extension along the trabecular meshwork. The tumor was composed of a mixture of spindled and epithelioid cells with scant pigmentation. Conclusions Amelanotic irido-ciliary ring melanoma with growth along the trabecular meshwork is a rare form of uveal melanoma that could present as an inconspicuous amelanotic iris mass. PMID:27239456

  17. Human airway ciliary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kristin; Knowles, Michael R.; Davis, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Airway cilia depend on precise changes in shape to transport the mucus gel overlying mucosal surfaces. The ciliary motion can be recorded in several planes using video microscopy. However, cilia are densely packed, and automated computerized systems are not available to convert these ciliary shape changes into forms that are useful for testing theoretical models of ciliary function. We developed a system for converting planar ciliary motions recorded by video microscopy into an empirical quantitative model, which is easy to use in validating mathematical models, or in examining ciliary function, e.g., in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The system we developed allows the manipulation of a model cilium superimposed over a video of beating cilia. Data were analyzed to determine shear angles and velocity vectors of points along the cilium. Extracted waveforms were used to construct a composite waveform, which could be used as a standard. Variability was measured as the mean difference in position of points on individual waveforms and the standard. The shapes analyzed were the end-recovery, end-effective, and fastest moving effective and recovery with mean (± SE) differences of 0.31(0.04), 0.25(0.06), 0.50(0.12), 0.50(0.10), μm, respectively. In contrast, the same measures for three different PCD waveforms had values far outside this range. PMID:23144323

  18. Hyperoxia-induced ciliary loss and oxidative damage in an in vitro bovine model: The protective role of antioxidant vitamins E and C

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shmgani, Hanady S.; Moate, Roy M.; Sneyd, J. Robert; Macnaughton, Peter D.; Moody, A. John

    2012-12-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new bovine bronchial model for studying hyperoxia-induced cilia loss is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperoxia-induced cilia loss was associated with increased sloughing of cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperoxia led to higher epithelial glutathione levels, evidence of oxidative stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperoxia led to increased DNA damage (Comet), and lipid peroxidation (TBARS). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vitamins C and E partially protected against hyperoxia-induced cilia loss. -- Abstract: Although elevated oxygen fraction is used in intensive care units around the world, pathological changes in pulmonary tissue have been shown to occur with prolonged exposure to hyperoxia. In this work a bovine bronchus culture model has been successfully used to evaluate the effects of hyperoxia on ciliated epithelium in vitro. Samples were cultured using an air interface method and exposed to normoxia, 21% O{sub 2} or hyperoxia, 95% O{sub 2}. Cilial coverage was assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Tissue damage (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH, in the medium), lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS), DNA damage (comet assay), protein oxidation (OxyBlot kit) and antioxidant status (total glutathione) were used to assess whether the hyperoxia caused significant oxidative stress. Hyperoxia caused a time-dependent decline (t{sub Vulgar-Fraction-One-Half} = 3.4 d compared to 37.1 d under normoxia) in cilial coverage (P < 0.0001). This was associated with a significant increase in the number of cells (2.80 {+-} 0.27 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} compared to 1.97 {+-} 0.23 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} ml{sup -1} after 6 d), many apparently intact, in the medium (P < 0.05); LDH release (1.06 {+-} 0.29 compared to 0.83 {+-} 0.36 {mu}mol min{sup -1} g{sup -1} after 6 d; P < 0.001); lipid peroxidation (352 {+-} 16 versus 247 {+-} 11 {mu}mol MDA g{sup -1} for hyperoxia and

  19. Hyperoxia-induced ciliary loss and oxidative damage in an in vitro bovine model: the protective role of antioxidant vitamins E and C.

    PubMed

    Al-Shmgani, Hanady S; Moate, Roy M; Sneyd, J Robert; Macnaughton, Peter D; Moody, A John

    2012-12-14

    Although elevated oxygen fraction is used in intensive care units around the world, pathological changes in pulmonary tissue have been shown to occur with prolonged exposure to hyperoxia. In this work a bovine bronchus culture model has been successfully used to evaluate the effects of hyperoxia on ciliated epithelium in vitro. Samples were cultured using an air interface method and exposed to normoxia, 21% O(2) or hyperoxia, 95% O(2). Cilial coverage was assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Tissue damage (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH, in the medium), lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS), DNA damage (comet assay), protein oxidation (OxyBlot kit) and antioxidant status (total glutathione) were used to assess whether the hyperoxia caused significant oxidative stress. Hyperoxia caused a time-dependent decline (t(½)=3.4d compared to 37.1d under normoxia) in cilial coverage (P<0.0001). This was associated with a significant increase in the number of cells (2.80 ± 0.27 × 10(6) compared to 1.97 ± 0.23 × 10(6)ml(-1) after 6d), many apparently intact, in the medium (P<0.05); LDH release (1.06 ± 0.29 compared to 0.83 ± 0.36 μmol min(-1)g(-1) after 6d; P<0.001); lipid peroxidation (352 ± 16 versus 247 ± 11 μmol MDA g(-1) for hyperoxia and normoxia, respectively); % tail DNA (18.7 ± 2.2 versus 11.1 ± 1.5); protein carbonyls (P<0.05); and total glutathione (229 ± 20 μmol g(-1) versus 189 ± 15 μmol g(-1)). Vitamins E (10(-7)M) and C (10(-6) or 10(-7)M) alone or in combination (10(-7)M and 10(-6)M, respectively) had a significant protective effect on the hyperoxia-induced reduction in percentage cilial coverage (P<0.05). In conclusion, hyperoxia caused damage to cultured bovine bronchial epithelium and denudation of cilia. The antioxidant vitamins E and C significantly protected against hyperoxia-induced cilia loss. PMID:23142230

  20. Primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed Central

    Le Mauviel, L.

    1991-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia represents a group of heritable disorders of cilia and sperm affecting between 1 in 15,000 and 1 in 30,000 persons. Those affected lack measurable mucociliary clearance and suffer the constant misery of rhinorrhea and chronic productive cough. Because mucociliary clearance constitutes one of the respiratory system's major lines of defense, these patients are vulnerable to chronic sinusitis, bronchitis, pneumonia, and otitis media. Left untreated, these problems may progress to bronchiectasis, found frequently in adult patients, or pulmonary hypertension with eventual cor pulmonale. Screening for this disorder includes some simple and inexpensive methods as well as more exotic techniques requiring special camera equipment and an electron microscope to make a definitive diagnosis. Physiotherapy techniques can be taught to patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia and go a long way toward making up for the lack of mucociliary clearance. Vigorous bronchopulmonary toilet and palliative measures may enable these patients to enjoy relatively normal lives. PMID:1949776

  1. Diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia*

    PubMed Central

    Olm, Mary Anne Kowal; Caldini, Elia Garcia; Mauad, Thais

    2015-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disorder of ciliary structure or function. It results in mucus accumulation and bacterial colonization of the respiratory tract which leads to chronic upper and lower airway infections, organ laterality defects, and fertility problems. We review the respiratory signs and symptoms of PCD, as well as the screening tests for and diagnostic investigation of the disease, together with details related to ciliary function, ciliary ultrastructure, and genetic studies. In addition, we describe the difficulties in diagnosing PCD by means of transmission electron microscopy, as well as describing patient follow-up procedures. PMID:26176524

  2. Ciliary photoreceptors in the cerebral eyes of a protostome larva

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Eyes in bilaterian metazoans have been described as being composed of either ciliary or rhabdomeric photoreceptors. Phylogenetic distribution, as well as distinct morphologies and characteristic deployment of different photopigments (ciliary vs. rhabdomeric opsins) and transduction pathways argue for the co-existence of both of these two photoreceptor types in the last common bilaterian ancestor. Both receptor types exist throughout the Bilateria, but only vertebrates are thought to use ciliary photoreceptors for directional light detection in cerebral eyes, while all other invertebrate bilaterians studied utilize rhabdomeric photoreceptors for this purpose. In protostomes, ciliary photoreceptors that express c-opsin have been described only from a non-visual deep-brain photoreceptor. Their homology with vertebrate rods and cones of the human eye has been hypothesized to represent a unique functional transition from non-visual to visual roles in the vertebrate lineage. Results To test the hypothesis that protostome cerebral eyes employ exclusively rhabdomeric photoreceptors, we investigated the ultrastructure of the larval eyes in the brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. We show that these pigment-cup eyes consist of a lens cell and a shading pigment cell, both of which are putative photoreceptors, deploying a modified, enlarged cilium for light perception, and have axonal connections to the larval brain. Our investigation of the gene expression patterns of c-opsin, Pax6 and otx in these eyes confirms that the larval eye spots of brachiopods are cerebral eyes that deploy ciliary type photoreceptors for directional light detection. Interestingly, c-opsin is also expressed during early embryogenesis in all potential apical neural cells, becoming restricted to the anterior neuroectoderm, before expression is initiated in the photoreceptor cells of the eyes. Coincident with the expression of c-opsin in the presumptive neuroectoderm, we found that middle

  3. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Michael R; Zariwala, Maimoona; Leigh, Margaret

    2016-09-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessive genetically heterogeneous disorder of motile cilia with chronic otosinopulmonary disease and organ laterality defects in ∼50% of cases. The prevalence of PCD is difficult to determine. Recent diagnostic advances through measurement of nasal nitric oxide and genetic testing has allowed rigorous diagnoses and determination of a robust clinical phenotype, which includes neonatal respiratory distress, daily nasal congestion, and wet cough starting early in life, along with organ laterality defects. There is early onset of lung disease in PCD with abnormal airflow mechanics and radiographic abnormalities detected in infancy and early childhood. PMID:27514592

  4. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Jason; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Noone, Peadar G

    2016-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of cilia structure, function, and biogenesis leading to chronic infections of the respiratory tract, fertility problems and disorders of organ laterality. The diagnosis can be challenging, using traditional tools such as characteristic clinical features, ciliary functional and ultra-structural defects; newer screening tools such as nasal nitric oxide levels and genetic testing add to the diagnostic algorithm. There are thirty-two known PCD causing genes, and in the future, comprehensive genetic testing may screen young infants prior to developing symptoms thus improving survival. Therapies include surveillance of pulmonary function and microbiology, in addition to airway clearance, antibiotics and ideally, early referral to bronchiectasis centers. As with CF, standardized care at specialized centers using a multidisciplinary approach likely improves outcomes. In conjunction with the CF foundation, the PCD foundation, and with lead investigators and clinicians, is developing a network of PCD clinical centers to coordinate the effort in North America and Europe. As the network grows, care and knowledge will improve. PMID:25826585

  5. Primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Jason; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Noone, Peadar G

    2015-04-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of cilia structure, function, and biogenesis leading to chronic infections of the respiratory tract, fertility problems, and disorders of organ laterality. The diagnosis can be challenging, using traditional tools such as characteristic clinical features, ciliary function, and ultrastructural defects and newer screening tools such as nasal nitric oxide levels and genetic testing add to the diagnostic algorithm. There are 32 known PCD-causing genes, and in the future, comprehensive genetic testing may screen young infants before developing symptoms, thus improving survival. Therapies include surveillance of pulmonary function and microbiology, in addition to airway clearance, antibiotics, and early referral to bronchiectasis centers. As with cystic fibrosis (CF), standardized care at specialized centers using a multidisciplinary approach likely improves outcomes. In conjunction with the CF foundation, the PCD foundation, with experienced investigators and clinicians, is developing a network of PCD clinical centers to coordinate the effort in North America and Europe. As the network grows, clinical care and knowledge will improve. PMID:25826585

  6. Mitochondrial "movement" and lens optics following oxidative stress from UV-B irradiation: cultured bovine lenses and human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) as examples.

    PubMed

    Bantseev, Vladimir; Youn, Hyun-Yi

    2006-12-01

    Mitochondria provide energy generated by oxidative phosphorylation and at the same time play a central role in apoptosis and aging. As a byproduct of respiration, the electron transport chain is known to be the major intracellular site for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Exposure to solar and occupational ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and thus production of ROS and subsequent cell death, has been implicated in a large spectrum of skin and ocular pathologies, including cataract. Retinal pigment epithelial cell apoptosis generates photoreceptor dysfunction and ultimately visual impairment. The purpose of this article was to characterize in vitro changes following oxidative stress with UV-B radiation in (a) ocular lens optics and cellular function in terms of mitochondrial dynamics of bovine lens epithelium and superficial cortical fiber cells and (b) human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells. Cultured bovine lenses and confluent cultures of ARPE-19 cells were irradiated with broadband UV-B radiation at energy levels of 0.5 and 1.0 J/cm(2). Lens optical function (spherical aberration) was monitored daily up to 14 days using an automated laser scanning system that was developed at the University of Waterloo. This system consists of a single collimated scanning helium-neon laser source that projects a thin (0.05 mm) laser beam onto a plain mirror mounted at 45 degrees on a carriage assembly. This mirror reflects the laser beam directly up through the scanner table surface and through the lens under examination. A digital camera captures the actual position and slope of the laser beam at each step. When all steps have been made, the captured data for each step position is used to calculate the back vertex distance for each position and the difference in that measurement between beams. To investigate mitochondrial movement, the mitochondria-specific fluorescent dye Rhodamine 123 was used. Time series were acquired with a Zeiss 510 (configuration Meta

  7. Optimal ciliary beating patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilfan, Andrej; Osterman, Natan

    2011-11-01

    We introduce a measure for energetic efficiency of single or collective biological cilia. We define the efficiency of a single cilium as Q2 / P , where Q is the volume flow rate of the pumped fluid and P is the dissipated power. For ciliary arrays, we define it as (ρQ) 2 / (ρP) , with ρ denoting the surface density of cilia. We then numerically determine the optimal beating patterns according to this criterion. For a single cilium optimization leads to curly, somewhat counterintuitive patterns. But when looking at a densely ciliated surface, the optimal patterns become remarkably similar to what is observed in microorganisms like Paramecium. The optimal beating pattern then consists of a fast effective stroke and a slow sweeping recovery stroke. Metachronal waves lead to a significantly higher efficiency than synchronous beating. Efficiency also increases with an increasing density of cilia up to the point where crowding becomes a problem. We finally relate the pumping efficiency of cilia to the swimming efficiency of a spherical microorganism and show that the experimentally estimated efficiency of Paramecium is surprisingly close to the theoretically possible optimum.

  8. How Is Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Treated? Unfortunately, no treatment is available yet to ... line the airways.) Thus, treatment for primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) focuses on which symptoms and complications you ...

  9. Primary ciliary dyskinesia in Amish communities.

    PubMed

    Lie, Hauw; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Helms, Cynthia; Bowcock, Anne M; Carson, John L; Brown, David E; Hazucha, Milan J; Forsen, James; Molter, David; Knowles, Michael R; Leigh, Margaret W; Ferkol, Thomas W

    2010-06-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia is an autosomal recessive multigenic disease that results in impaired mucociliary clearance. We have diagnosed 9 subjects with primary ciliary dyskinesia from geographically dispersed Amish communities, on the basis of clinical characteristics and ciliary ultrastructural defects. Despite consanguinity, affected individuals had evidence of genetic heterogeneity. PMID:20350728

  10. Primary ciliary dyskinesia in Amish communities

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Hauw; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Helms, Cynthia; Bowcock, Anne M; Carson, John L; Brown, David E; Hazucha, Milan J; Forsen, James; Molter, David; Knowles, Michael R; Leigh, Margaret W; Ferkol, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive multigenic disease that results in impaired mucociliary clearance. We have diagnosed 9 subjects with primary ciliary dyskinesia from geographically dispersed Amish communities, based on clinical characteristics and ciliary ultrastructural defects. Despite consanguinity, affected individuals had evidence of genetic heterogeneity. PMID:20350728

  11. Anterior Segment Scleral Fluorescein Angiography in the Evaluation of Ciliary Body Neoplasm: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Marvasti, Amir H.; Berry, Jesse; Sibug, Maria E. Saber; Kim, Jonathan W.; Huang, Alex S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anterior segment tumors can be difficult to detect until tumor growth is substantial enough to cause local signs or symptoms. Earlier detection may result in improved outcomes, particularly the ability to option for globe-conserving therapy. Multiple diagnostic modalities such as ultrasound or optical coherence tomography exist to aid for earlier detection of ciliary body tumors, but they also have limitations. Here we describe the potential for scleral angiography as an adjunctive modality to assist in evaluating anterior segment ciliary body tumors. Case Presentations A 61-year-old Caucasian male and a 57-year-old Hispanic female presented for ciliary body tumor evaluation. The Caucasian male notably had abnormal scleral, episcleral, and conjunctival vessels in the affected eye. Scleral angiography was performed in both cases with the abnormal vasculature highlighted in the Caucasian male. The Hispanic female did not demonstrate abnormal scleral angiographic patterns. Notably, the Caucasian male also had regions of abnormal scleral angiography arising in locations of otherwise normal appearing sclera. Both patients had the affected eyes enucleated. Histology of the enucleated eyes demonstrated a ciliary body melanoma in the Caucasian male associated with abnormal vascular and tumor infiltration of the scleral bed. The Hispanic female had a pigmented ciliary body adenoma without involvement of the scleral bed. Conclusion With limited sample size, scleral angiography has the potential to detect abnormal scleral vascular patterns in otherwise normal appearing sclera in cases of ciliary body tumor with scleral vascular invasion. PMID:26889157

  12. Structural Studies of Ciliary Components

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Naoko; Taschner, Michael; Engel, Benjamin D.; Lorentzen, Esben

    2012-01-01

    Cilia are organelles found on most eukaryotic cells, where they serve important functions in motility, sensory reception, and signaling. Recent advances in electron tomography have facilitated a number of ultrastructural studies of ciliary components that have significantly improved our knowledge of cilium architecture. These studies have produced nanometer‐resolution structures of axonemal dynein complexes, microtubule doublets and triplets, basal bodies, radial spokes, and nexin complexes. In addition to these electron tomography studies, several recently published crystal structures provide insights into the architecture and mechanism of dynein as well as the centriolar protein SAS-6, important for establishing the 9-fold symmetry of centrioles. Ciliary assembly requires intraflagellar transport (IFT), a process that moves macromolecules between the tip of the cilium and the cell body. IFT relies on a large 20-subunit protein complex that is thought to mediate the contacts between ciliary motor and cargo proteins. Structural investigations of IFT complexes are starting to emerge, including the first three‐dimensional models of IFT material in situ, revealing how IFT particles organize into larger train-like arrays, and the high-resolution structure of the IFT25/27 subcomplex. In this review, we cover recent advances in the structural and mechanistic understanding of ciliary components and IFT complexes. PMID:22683354

  13. Skin Pigment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professional Version Pigment Disorders Overview of Skin Pigment Albinism Vitiligo Hyperpigmentation Melasma Melanin is the brown pigment ... dark-skinned people produce the most. People with albinism have little or no melanin and thus their ...

  14. An assay for clogging the ciliary pore complex distinguishes mechanisms of cytosolic and membrane protein entry

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Daisuke; Dishinger, John F; Kee, H Lynn; Pinskey, Justine M; Allen, Ben L; Verhey, Kristen J

    2014-01-01

    Summary As a cellular organelle, the cilium contains a unique protein composition [1, 2]. Entry of both membrane [3–5] and cytosolic components [6–8] is tightly regulated by gating mechanisms at the cilium base, however, the mechanistic details of ciliary gating are largely unknown. We previously proposed that entry of cytosolic components is regulated by mechanisms similar to those of nuclear transport and is dependent on nucleoporins (NUPs) which comprise a ciliary pore complex (CPC) [6, 9]. To investigate ciliary gating mechanisms, we developed a system to clog the pore by inhibiting NUP function via forced dimerization. We targeted NUP62, a component of the central channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) [10], for forced dimerization by tagging it with the homodimerizing Fv domain. As proof of principle, we show that forced dimerization of NUP62-Fv attenuated active transport of bovine serum albumin into the nuclear compartment and of the kinesin-2 motor KIF17 into the ciliary compartment. Using the pore clogging technique, we find that forced dimerization of NUP62 attenuated the gated entry of cytosolic proteins but did not affect entry of membrane proteins or diffusional entry of small cytosolic proteins. We propose a model in which active transport of cytosolic proteins into both nuclear and ciliary compartments requires functional NUPs of the central pore whereas lateral entry of membrane proteins utilizes a different mechanism that is likely specific to each organelle’s limiting membrane. PMID:25264252

  15. PRIMARY CILIARY DYSKINESIA: DIAGNOSTIC AND PHENOTYPIC FEATURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disease characterized by abnormalities in ciliary structure/function. We hypothesized that the major clinical and biologic phenotypic markers of the disease could be evaluated by studying a cohort of subjects suspected of having PCD. ...

  16. Congenital Heart Disease and Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Mike John; Shapiro, Adam J; Kennedy, Marcus Peter

    2016-03-01

    Through the better understanding of the genetics and clinical associations of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD), an autosomal recessive disorder of ciliary motility and mucociliary clearance, the association between PCD and heterotaxic congenital heart disease (CHD) has been established. In parallel, research into the cause of CHD has elucidated further the role of ciliary function on the development of normal cardiovascular structure. Increased awareness by clinicians regarding this elevated risk of PCD in patients with CHD will allow for more comprehensive screening and identification of cases in this high-risk group with earlier diagnosis leading to improved health outcomes. PMID:26545972

  17. Genetic defects in ciliary structure and function.

    PubMed

    Zariwala, Maimoona A; Knowles, Michael R; Omran, Heymut

    2007-01-01

    Cilia, hair-like structures extending from the cell membrane, perform diverse biological functions. Primary (genetic) defects in the structure and function of sensory and motile cilia result in multiple ciliopathies. The most prominent genetic abnormality involving motile cilia (and the respiratory tract) is primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). PCD is a rare, usually autosomal recessive, genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by sino-pulmonary disease, laterality defects, and male infertility. Ciliary ultrastructural defects are identified in approximately 90% of PCD patients and involve the outer dynein arms, inner dynein arms, or both. Diagnosing PCD is challenging and requires a compatible clinical phenotype together with tests such as ciliary ultrastructural analysis, immunofluorescent staining, ciliary beat assessment, and/or nasal nitric oxide measurements. Recent mutational analysis demonstrated that 38% of PCD patients carry mutations of the dynein genes DNAI1 and DNAH5. Increased understanding of the pathogenesis will aid in better diagnosis and treatment of PCD. PMID:17059358

  18. Methods for Studying Ciliary Import Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Takao, Daisuke; Verhey, Kristen J

    2016-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are microtubule-based organelles that play important roles in human health by contributing to cellular motility as well as sensing and responding to environmental cues. Defects in cilia formation and function cause a broad class of human genetic diseases called ciliopathies. To carry out their specialized functions, cilia contain a unique complement of proteins that must be imported into the ciliary compartment. In this chapter, we describe methods to measure the permeability barrier of the ciliary gate by microinjection of fluorescent proteins and dextrans of different sizes into ciliated cells. We also describe a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) assay to measure the entry of ciliary proteins into the ciliary compartment. These assays can be used to determine the molecular mechanisms that regulate the formation and function of cilia in mammalian cells. PMID:27514912

  19. Genetics Home Reference: primary ciliary dyskinesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... internal organs, and the inability to have children (infertility). The signs and symptoms of this condition are ... individuals. Primary ciliary dyskinesia can also lead to infertility. Vigorous movements of the flagella are necessary to ...

  20. Analysis of Axonemal Assembly During Ciliary Regeneration in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Emily L; Sale, Winfield S; Alford, Lea M

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an outstanding model genetic organism for study of assembly of cilia. Here, methods are described for synchronization of ciliary regeneration in Chlamydomonas to analyze the sequence in which ciliary proteins assemble. In addition, the methods described allow analysis of the mechanisms involved in regulation of ciliary length, the proteins required for ciliary assembly, and the temporal expression of genes encoding ciliary proteins. Ultimately, these methods can contribute to discovery of conserved genes that when defective lead to abnormal ciliary assembly and human disease. PMID:27514926

  1. Pigmented casts.

    PubMed

    Miteva, Mariya; Romanelli, Paolo; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented casts have been reported with variable frequency in scalp biopsies from alopecia areata, trichotillomania, chemotherapy-induced alopecia and postoperative (pressure induced) alopecia. Their presence and morphology in other scalp disorders has not been described. The authors assessed for the presence and morphology of pigmented casts in 308 transversely bisected scalp biopsies from nonscarring and scarring alopecia, referred to the Department of Dermatology, University of Miami within a year. The pigmented casts were present in 21 of 29 cases of alopecia areata (72%), 7 of 7 cases of trichotillomania (100%), 1 case of friction alopecia, 4 of 28 cases of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (14%), and 4 of 4 cases of dissecting cellulitis (100%). They did not show any distinguishing features except for the morphology in trichotillomania, which included twisted, linear (zip), and "button"-like pigment aggregation. The linear arrangement was found also in friction alopecia and dissecting cellulitis. Pigmented casts in the hair canals of miniaturized/vellus hairs was a clue to alopecia areata. Pigmented casts can be observed in biopsies of different hair disorders, but they are not specific for the diagnosis. Horizontal sections allow to better assess their morphology and the follicular level of presence of pigmented casts, which in the context of the other follicular findings may be a clue to the diagnosis. PMID:23823025

  2. The Emerging Genetics of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Omran, Heymut; Ferkol, Thomas W.

    2011-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive, rare, genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by oto-sino-pulmonary disease together with situs abnormalities (Kartagener syndrome) owing to abnormal ciliary structure and function. Most patients are currently diagnosed with PCD based on the presence of defective ciliary ultrastructure. However, diagnosis often remains challenging due to variability in the clinical phenotype and ciliary ultrastructural changes. Some patients with PCD have normal ciliary ultrastructure, which further confounds the diagnosis. A genetic test for PCD exists but is of limited value because it investigates only a limited number of mutations in only two genes. The genetics of PCD is complicated owing to the complexity of axonemal structure that is highly conserved through evolution, which is comprised of multiple proteins. Identifying a PCD-causing gene is challenging due to locus and allelic heterogeneity. Despite genetic heterogeneity, multiple tools have been used, and there are 11 known PCD-causing genes. All of these genes combined explain approximately 50% of PCD cases; hence, more genes need to be identified. This review briefly describes the current knowledge regarding the genetics of PCD and focuses on the methodologies used to identify novel PCD-causing genes, including a candidate gene approach using model organisms, next-generation massively parallel sequencing techniques, and the use of genetically isolated populations. In conclusion, we demonstrate the multipronged approach that is necessary to circumvent challenges due to genetic heterogeneity to uncover genetic causes of PCD. PMID:21926394

  3. Guinea Pig Ciliary Muscle Development

    PubMed Central

    Pucker, Andrew D.; Carpenter, Ashley R.; McHugh, Kirk M.; Mutti, Donald O.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop a method for quantifying guinea pig ciliary muscle volume (CMV) and to determine its relationship to age and ocular biometric measurements. Methods Six albino guinea pigs eyes were collected at each of five ages (n=30 eyes). Retinoscopy and photography were used to document refractive error, eye size, and eye shape. Serial sections through the excised eyes were made and then labeled with an α-smooth muscle actin antibody. The CM was then visualized with an Olympus BX51 microscope, reconstructed with Stereo Investigator (MBF Bioscience) and analyzed using Neurolucida Explorer (MBF Bioscience). Full (using all sections) and partial (using a subset of sections) reconstruction methods were used to determine CMV. Results There was no significant difference between the full and partial volume determination methods (P = 0.86). The mean CMV of the 1, 10, 20, 30, and 90-day old eyes was 0.40 ± 0.16 mm3, 0.48 ± 0.13 mm3, 0.67 ± 0.15 mm3, 0.86 ± 0.35 mm3, and 1.09 ± 0.63 mm3, respectively. CMV was significantly correlated with log age (P = 0.001), ocular length (P = 0.003), limbal circumference (P = 0.01), and equatorial diameter (P = 0.003). It was not correlated with refractive error (P = 0.73) or eye shape (P = 0.60). Multivariate regression determined that biometric variables were not significantly associated with CMV after adjustment for age. Conclusions Three-dimensional reconstruction was an effective means of determining CMV. These data provide evidence that CM growth occurs with age in tandem with eye size in normal albino guinea pigs. Additional work is needed to determine the relationship between CMV and abnormal ocular growth. PMID:24901488

  4. Ciliary motion modeling, and dynamic multicilia interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gueron, Shay; Liron, Nadav

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a rigorous and accurate modeling tool for ciliary motion. The hydrodynamics analysis, originally suggested by Lighthill (1975), has been modified to remove computational problems. This approach is incorporated into a moment-balance model of ciliary motion in place of the previously used hydrodynamic analyses, known as Resistive Force Theory. The method is also developed to include the effect of a plane surface at the base of the cilium, and the effect of the flow fields produced by neighboring cilia. These extensions were not possible with previous work using the Resistive Force Theory hydrodynamics. Performing reliable simulations of a single cilium as well as modeling multicilia interactions is now possible. The result is a general method which could now be used for detailed modeling of the mechanisms for generating ciliary beat patterns and patterns of metachronal interactions in arrays of cilia. A computer animation technique was designed and applied to display the results. PMID:19431847

  5. Ciliary locomotion in presence of boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Saikat; Um, Soong Ho; Jung, Sunghwan

    2010-11-01

    Micro-organisms in nature navigate through a variety of fluidic geometries and chemical conditions. We investigate the effect of confined spaces in nature by introducing Paramecium Multimicronucleatum in two different configurations: a capillary tube & a wavy PDMS channel. Paramecium swims by creating the metachronal waves due to ciliary beating. The influence of the walls on Paramecia is characterized by measuring the velocity and observing the ciliary beating pattern. Theoretically, we also model the system by solving the stream-function with a pressure gradient. The theoretical and experimental observations are compared and conclusions are drawn about the change in the swimming characteristics as compared to free swimming without the boundaries.

  6. Automated identification of abnormal respiratory ciliary motion in nasal biopsies.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Shannon P; Zahid, Maliha J; Durkin, John R; Francis, Richard J; Lo, Cecilia W; Chennubhotla, S Chakra

    2015-08-01

    Motile cilia lining the nasal and bronchial passages beat synchronously to clear mucus and foreign matter from the respiratory tract. This mucociliary defense mechanism is essential for pulmonary health, because respiratory ciliary motion defects, such as those in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) or congenital heart disease, can cause severe sinopulmonary disease necessitating organ transplant. The visual examination of nasal or bronchial biopsies is critical for the diagnosis of ciliary motion defects, but these analyses are highly subjective and error-prone. Although ciliary beat frequency can be computed, this metric cannot sensitively characterize ciliary motion defects. Furthermore, PCD can present without any ultrastructural defects, limiting the use of other detection methods, such as electron microscopy. Therefore, an unbiased, computational method for analyzing ciliary motion is clinically compelling. We present a computational pipeline using algorithms from computer vision and machine learning to decompose ciliary motion into quantitative elemental components. Using this framework, we constructed digital signatures for ciliary motion recognition and quantified specific properties of the ciliary motion that allowed high-throughput classification of ciliary motion as normal or abnormal. We achieved >90% classification accuracy in two independent data cohorts composed of patients with congenital heart disease, PCD, or heterotaxy, as well as healthy controls. Clinicians without specialized knowledge in machine learning or computer vision can operate this pipeline as a "black box" toolkit to evaluate ciliary motion. PMID:26246169

  7. Phosphoinositides Regulate Ciliary Protein Trafficking to Modulate Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Elle C.; Garcia, Galo; Abedin, Monika; Schurmans, Stéphane; Inoue, Takanari; Reiter, Jeremy F.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Primary cilia interpret vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signals. Why cilia are essential for signaling is unclear. One possibility is that some forms of signaling require a distinct membrane lipid composition, found at cilia. We found that the ciliary membrane contains a particular phosphoinositide, PI(4)P, whereas a different phosphoinositide, PI(4,5)P2, is restricted to the membrane of the ciliary base. This distribution is created by Inpp5e, a ciliary phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase. Without Inpp5e, ciliary PI(4,5)P2 levels are elevated and Hh signaling is disrupted. Inpp5e limits the ciliary levels of inhibitors of Hh signaling, including Gpr161 and the PI(4,5)P2-binding protein Tulp3. Increasing ciliary PI(4,5)P2 levels or conferring the ability to bind PI(4)P on Tulp3 increases the ciliary localization of Tulp3. Lowering Tulp3 in cells lacking Inpp5e reduces ciliary Gpr161 levels and restores Hh signaling. Therefore, Inpp5e regulates ciliary membrane phosphoinositide composition, and Tulp3 reads out ciliary phosphoinositides to control ciliary protein localization, enabling Hh signaling. PMID:26305592

  8. Automated identification of abnormal respiratory ciliary motion in nasal biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Shannon P.; Zahid, Maliha J.; Durkin, John R.; Francis, Richard J.; Lo, Cecilia W.; Chennubhotla, S. Chakra

    2016-01-01

    Motile cilia lining the nasal and bronchial passages beat synchronously to clear mucus and foreign matter from the respiratory tract. This mucociliary defense mechanism is essential for pulmonary health, because respiratory ciliary motion defects, such as those in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) or congenital heart disease, can cause severe sinopulmonary disease necessitating organ transplant. The visual examination of nasal or bronchial biopsies is critical for the diagnosis of ciliary motion defects, but these analyses are highly subjective and error-prone. Although ciliary beat frequency can be computed, this metric cannot sensitively characterize ciliary motion defects. Furthermore, PCD can present without any ultrastructural defects, limiting the use of other detection methods, such as electron microscopy. Therefore, an unbiased, computational method for analyzing ciliary motion is clinically compelling. We present a computational pipeline using algorithms from computer vision and machine learning to decompose ciliary motion into quantitative elemental components. Using this framework, we constructed digital signatures for ciliary motion recognition and quantified specific properties of the ciliary motion that allowed high-throughput classification of ciliary motion as normal or abnormal. We achieved >90% classification accuracy in two independent data cohorts composed of patients with congenital heart disease, PCD, or heterotaxy, as well as healthy controls. Clinicians without specialized knowledge in machine learning or computer vision can operate this pipeline as a “black box” toolkit to evaluate ciliary motion. PMID:26246169

  9. A safe method of ciliary sulcus fixation of foldable intraocular lens using a ciliary sulcus guide.

    PubMed

    Can, Ertuğrul; Gül, Adem; Birinci, Hakkı

    2016-08-01

    To describe a novel technique for implantation of intraocular lens in the absence of capsular support using a ciliary sulcus guide. Based on the anatomic knowledge of the ciliary sulcus and the sclera, a new instrument was developed to pierce the needle safely through the ciliary sulcus and sclera. While the foldable lens is stored inside the cartridge, the leading haptic is sutured with a cow-hitch knot. The needle is then inserted into the ciliary sulcus guide. The tip of the guide is inserted from the corneal incision and proceeded under the iris to touch and fit the ciliary sulcus. The needle is pushed from back side. The needle comes out at precise point at the sclera. Implantation of the lens was performed through a 2.8 mm clear cornea incision using the injector. The trailing haptic is tied after implantation, and then the same procedure is performed at the opposite side. We performed this technique to 15 aphakic eyes without sufficient capsular support. There was no bleeding or other intraoperative complication. All the points coming out the sclera were between 2 and 2.5 mm from the limbus. The ab interno technique for scleral fixation of IOL is quicker, easier and less traumatic then ab externo techniques. A new ciliary sulcus guide which is usable with both straight and curved needles eliminates the blind maneuvers of ab interno technique and makes this technique more safe and precise. PMID:26439372

  10. The ciliary transitional zone and nephrocystins.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Dai; Yokoyama, Takahiko

    2012-02-01

    Loss of cilia and ciliary protein causes various abnormalities (called ciliopathy), including situs inversus, renal cystic diseases, polydactyly and dysgenesis of the nervous system. Renal cystic diseases are the most frequently observed symptoms in ciliopathies. Cilia are microtubule-based organelles with the following regions: a ciliary tip, shaft, transitional zone and basal body/mother centriole. Joubert syndrome (JBTS), Meckel Gruber syndrome (MKS) and Nephronophthisis (NPHP) are overlapping syndromes. Recent studies show that JBST and MKS responsible gene products are localized in the transitional zone of the cilia, where they function as a diffusion barrier, and control protein sorting and ciliary membrane composition. Nephrocystins are gene products of NPHP responsible genes, and at least 11 genes have been identified. Although some nephrocystins interact with JBST and MKS proteins, proteomic analysis suggests that they do not form a single complex. Localization analysis reveals that nephrocystins can be divided into two groups. Group I nephrocystins are localized in the transitional zone, whereas group II nephrocystins are localized in the Inv compartment. Homologs of group I nephrocystins, but not group II nephrocystins, have been reported in C. reinhardtii and C. elegans. In this review, we summarize the structure of the ciliary base of C. reinhardtii, C. elegans and mammalian primary cilia, and discuss function of nephrocystins. We also propose a new classification of nephrocystins. PMID:22169048

  11. Calcium stone lithoptysis in promary ciliary dyskinesia

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: An association between lithoptysis and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) has not been previously reported. However, reports of lithoptysis from 2 older patients (>60 yr) prompted a study of this association. METHODS: We performed a prospective study of all PCD patients...

  12. Birthmarks - pigmented

    MedlinePlus

    ... its own appearance: Cafe-au-lait spots are light tan, the color of coffee with milk. Moles are small clusters of colored skin cells. Mongolian spots (also called Mongolian blue ... dark or light skin Growth of hair from pigmented skin Skin ...

  13. Photoreceptor Sensory Cilium: Traversing the Ciliary Gate

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Hemant

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are antenna-like extensions of the plasma membrane found in nearly all cell types. In the retina of the eye, photoreceptors develop unique sensory cilia. Not much was known about the mechanisms underlying the formation and function of photoreceptor cilia, largely because of technical limitations and the specific structural and functional modifications that cannot be modeled in vitro. With recent advances in microscopy techniques and molecular and biochemical approaches, we are now beginning to understand the molecular basis of photoreceptor ciliary architecture, ciliary function and its involvement in human diseases. Here, I will discuss the studies that have revealed new knowledge of how photoreceptor cilia regulate their identity and function while coping with high metabolic and trafficking demands associated with processing light signal. PMID:26501325

  14. Diagnostic Methods in Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Jane S; Paff, Tamara; Goggin, Patricia; Haarman, Eric

    2016-03-01

    Diagnosing primary ciliary dyskinesia is difficult. With no reference standard, a combination of tests is needed; most tests require expensive equipment and specialist scientists. We review the advances in diagnostic testing over the past hundred years, with emphasis on recent advances. We particularly focus on use of high-speed video analysis, transmission electron microscopy, nasal nitric oxide and genetic testing. We discuss the international efforts that are in place to advance the evidence base for diagnostic tests. PMID:26362507

  15. Force-response considerations in ciliary mechanosensation.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Andrew; Hopfer, Ulrich

    2007-08-15

    Considerable experimental evidence indicates that the primary, nonmotile cilium is a mechanosensory organelle in several epithelial cell types. As the relationship between cellular responses and nature and magnitude of applied forces is not well understood, we have investigated the effects of exposure of monolayers of renal collecting duct chief cells to orbital shaking and quantified the forces incident on cilia. An exposure of 24 h of these cells to orbital shaking resulted in a decrease of amiloride-sensitive sodium current by approximately 60% and ciliary length by approximately 30%. The sensitivity of the sodium current to shaking was dependent on intact cilia. The drag force on cilia due to induced fluid flow during orbital shaking was estimated at maximally 5.2x10(-3) pN at 2 Hz, approximately 4 times that of thermal noise. The major structural feature of cilia contributing to their sensitivity appears to be ciliary length. As more than half of the total drag force is exerted on the ciliary cap, one function of the slender stalk may be to expose the cap to greater drag force. Regardless, the findings indicate that the cilium is a mechanosensory organelle with a sensitivity much lower than previously recognized. PMID:17526573

  16. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: cytological and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Greenstone, M; Rutman, A; Dewar, A; Mackay, I; Cole, P J

    1988-05-01

    Thirty patients with functional and/or morphological abnormalities of respiratory tract cilia were identified. The diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia was based on observed abnormalities of ciliary ultrastructure or beating in vitro (beat pattern, beat frequency or percentage of motile cilia). Beat frequency and motility indices approached the normal range in some cases and suggests that the term 'immotile cilia syndrome' is not appropriate. Morphological abnormalities were most commonly due to deficiency of dynein arms, affecting the outer arms (n = 7), inner arms (n = 3) or both (n = 10). Examples of radial spoke and microtubular defects were also identified but in seven subjects ciliary ultrastructure was normal. In six patients paired samples of nasal and bronchial cilia were obtained and showed consistent abnormalities of motility and ultrastructure. Adenosine triphosphate and adenosine triphosphatase did not restore in vitro motility when added to dynein deficient cilia. The clinical picture was of life-long sinusitis and recurrent bronchial infection but the spectrum was broader than that encompassed by Kartagener's triad (dextrocardia, sinusitis and bronchiectasis). Fourteen patients had normal cardiac situs and definite or highly suggestive evidence of bronchiectasis was present in only 17 patients. Radiological evidence of sinusitis was common but absence of frontal sinuses was not universal. Chronic serous otitis media was a frequent finding but deafness was rarely profound. Fertility problems were common but were not universal in female subjects. Lung function testing revealed evidence of airflow obstruction but this was mild in most cases. PMID:2975807

  17. Genetics and Biology of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Horani, Amjad; Ferkol, Thomas W; Dutcher, Susan K.; Brody, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ciliopathies are a growing class of disorders caused by abnormal ciliary axonemal structure and function. Our understanding of the complex genetic and functional phenotypes of these conditions has rapidly progressed. Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) remains the sole genetic disorder of motile cilia dysfunction. However, unlike many Mendelian genetic disorders, PCD is not caused by mutations in a single gene or locus, but rather, autosomal recessive mutation in one of many genes that lead to a similar phenotype. The first reported PCD mutations, more than a decade ago, identified genes encoding known structural components of the ciliary axoneme. In recent years, mutations in genes encoding novel cytoplasmic and regulatory proteins have been discovered. These findings have provided new insights into the functions of the motile cilia, and a better understanding of motile cilia disease. Advances in genetic tools will soon allow more precise genetic testing, mandating that clinicians must understand the genetic basis of PCD. Here, we review genetic mutations, their biological impact on cilia structure and function, and the implication of emerging genetic diagnostic tools. PMID:26476603

  18. Gated entry into the ciliary compartment.

    PubMed

    Takao, Daisuke; Verhey, Kristen J

    2016-01-01

    Cilia and flagella play important roles in cell motility and cell signaling. These functions require that the cilium establishes and maintains a unique lipid and protein composition. Recent work indicates that a specialized region at the base of the cilium, the transition zone, serves as both a barrier to entry and a gate for passage of select components. For at least some cytosolic proteins, the barrier and gate functions are provided by a ciliary pore complex (CPC) that shares molecular and mechanistic properties with nuclear gating. Specifically, nucleoporins of the CPC limit the diffusional entry of cytosolic proteins in a size-dependent manner and enable the active transport of large molecules and complexes via targeting signals, importins, and the small G protein Ran. For membrane proteins, the septin protein SEPT2 is part of the barrier to entry whereas the gating function is carried out and/or regulated by proteins associated with ciliary diseases (ciliopathies) such as nephronophthisis, Meckel–Gruber syndrome and Joubert syndrome. Here, we discuss the evidence behind these models of ciliary gating as well as the similarities to and differences from nuclear gating. PMID:26472341

  19. Cellular Mechanisms of Ciliary Length Control

    PubMed Central

    Keeling, Jacob; Tsiokas, Leonidas; Maskey, Dipak

    2016-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are evolutionarily conserved, membrane-bound, microtubule-based organelles on the surface of most eukaryotic cells. They play important roles in coordinating a variety of signaling pathways during growth, development, cell mobility, and tissue homeostasis. Defects in ciliary structure or function are associated with multiple human disorders called ciliopathies. These diseases affect diverse tissues, including, but not limited to the eyes, kidneys, brain, and lungs. Many processes must be coordinated simultaneously in order to initiate ciliogenesis. These include cell cycle, vesicular trafficking, and axonemal extension. Centrioles play a central role in both cell cycle progression and ciliogenesis, making the transition between basal bodies and mitotic spindle organizers integral to both processes. The maturation of centrioles involves a functional shift from cell division toward cilium nucleation which takes place concurrently with its migration and fusion to the plasma membrane. Several proteinaceous structures of the distal appendages in mother centrioles are required for this docking process. Ciliary assembly and maintenance requires a precise balance between two indispensable processes; so called assembly and disassembly. The interplay between them determines the length of the resulting cilia. These processes require a highly conserved transport system to provide the necessary substances at the tips of the cilia and to recycle ciliary turnover products to the base using a based microtubule intraflagellar transport (IFT) system. In this review; we discuss the stages of ciliogenesis as well as mechanisms controlling the lengths of assembled cilia. PMID:26840332

  20. Clinical genetics and pathobiology of ciliary chondrodysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Schmidts, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Ciliary chondrodysplasias represent a heterogenous group of rare, nearly exclusively autosomal recessively inherited developmental conditions. While the skeletal phenotype, mainly affecting limbs, ribs and sometimes the craniofacial skeleton, is predominant, extraskeletal disease affecting the kidneys, liver, heart, eyes and other organs and tissues is observed inconsistently. Significant lethality, resulting from cardiorespiratory failure due to thoracic constriction as well as from renal and hepatic insufficiency or primary cardiac failure due to congenital heart disease, is observed with these conditions. The underlying genetic defects as well as developmental biology and cell biology work undertaken using animal model systems, suggest that these rare conditions result from ciliary malfunction. The skeletal phenotype is believed to result from imbalances in the hedgehog signaling pathway that normally occurs in functional cilia in chondrocytes. Although phenotypes have been historically distinguished based on clinical features into short-rib polydactyly syndrome, Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy, Mainzer-Saldino syndrome, Sensenbrenner syndrome (cranioectodermal dysplasia), oral-facial-digital syndrome and Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, recent research suggests that there is significant genetic as well as phenotypic overlap between the conditions. This review discusses ciliary chondrodysplasias from phenotypic hallmarks to clinical management and summarizes progress in identification of the underlying molecular mechanisms as well as potential future therapeutic perspectives. PMID:25506500

  1. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Your skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or ...

  2. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia in Mice Lacking the Novel Ciliary Protein Pcdp1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lance; Campagna, Dean R.; Pinkus, Jack L.; Mulhern, Howard; Wyatt, Todd A.; Sisson, Joseph H.; Pavlik, Jacqueline A.; Pinkus, Geraldine S.; Fleming, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) results from ciliary dysfunction and is commonly characterized by sinusitis, male infertility, hydrocephalus, and situs inversus. Mice homozygous for the nm1054 mutation develop phenotypes associated with PCD. On certain genetic backgrounds, homozygous mutants die perinatally from severe hydrocephalus, while mice on other backgrounds have an accumulation of mucus in the sinus cavity and male infertility. Mutant sperm lack mature flagella, while respiratory epithelial cilia are present but beat at a slower frequency than wild-type cilia. Transgenic rescue demonstrates that the PCD in nm1054 mutants results from the loss of a single gene encoding the novel primary ciliary dyskinesia protein 1 (Pcdp1). The Pcdp1 gene is expressed in spermatogenic cells and motile ciliated epithelial cells. Immunohistochemistry shows that Pcdp1 protein localizes to sperm flagella and the cilia of respiratory epithelial cells and brain ependymal cells in both mice and humans. This study demonstrates that Pcdp1 plays an important role in ciliary and flagellar biogenesis and motility, making the nm1054 mutant a useful model for studying the molecular genetics and pathogenesis of PCD. PMID:18039845

  3. Treatment recommendations in Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Polineni, Deepika; Davis, Stephanie D; Dell, Sharon D

    2016-03-01

    Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare heterogenic disorder leading to significant respiratory morbidity. Health-care providers who treat PCD must familiarize themselves with recommended treatment strategies. However, most of the treatments recommended in PCD have been extrapolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis literature. Mainstays of therapy are reviewed in detail, and should include at a minimum: regular airway clearance, routine microbiological surveillance, antibiotic treatment for pulmonary exacerbation, and health vaccinations. This review summarizes both medical and surgical pulmonary treatment considerations, as well as recommendations for the integration of non-pulmonary subspecialty care in the management of PCD. PMID:26586601

  4. The role of ciliary trafficking in Hedgehog receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jynho; Hsia, Elaine Y. C.; Brigui, Amira; Plessis, Anne; Beachy, Philip A.; Zheng, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Defects in the biogenesis of or transport through primary cilia affect Hedgehog protein signaling, and many Hedgehog pathway components traffic through or accumulate in cilia. The Hedgehog receptor, Patched, negatively regulates the activity and ciliary accumulation of Smoothened, a seven transmembrane protein that is essential for transducing the Hedgehog signal. We found that this negative regulation of Smoothened required the ciliary localization of Patched, as specified either by its own cytoplasmic tail or by provision of heterologous ciliary localization signals. Surprisingly, given that Hedgehog binding promotes the exit of Patched from the cilium, we observed that an altered form of Patched that is retained in the cilium nevertheless responded to Hedgehog, resulting in Smoothened activation. Our results indicate that, whereas ciliary localization of Patched is essential for suppression of Smoothened activation, the primary event enabling Smoothened activation is binding of Hedgehog to Patched, and Patched ciliary removal is secondary. PMID:26038600

  5. Photosensitivity of 10-substituted visual pigment analogues: detection of a specific secondary opsin-retinal interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, R S; Crescitelli, F; Denny, M; Matsumoto, H; Asato, A E

    1986-11-01

    The photosensitivities of the bovine rhodopsin and gecko pigment 521 analogues regenerated from C-10-substituted analogues of 11-cis- and 9-cis-retinals were determined by two different methods. A similar reactivity trend was noted for both pigment systems as revealed in the photosensitivity of the gecko pigments and relative quantum yields of the bovine analogues. The 10-fluoro-11-cis photopigments had a photosensitivity less than, but approaching, that of the native (11-cis) visual pigment while the 10-fluoro-9-cis photopigments had a much lower photosensitivity than the parent 9-cis regenerated pigment. The results are interpreted in terms of recently described models of rhodopsin architecture and of the primary molecular reaction of visual pigments to light. The unusually low photoreactivity of the 10-fluoro-9-cis pigment molecule is viewed as the result of a regiospecific hydrogen-bonding interaction of the electronegative fluorine atom to the opsin. PMID:2948555

  6. Recent advances in primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Kazuhiko; Kitano, Masako; Ishinaga, Hajime; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Ogawa, Satoru; Nakatani, Kaname; Masuda, Sawako; Nagao, Mizuho; Fujisawa, Takao

    2016-06-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disease inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The prevalence of PCD is estimated to be 1 in 20,000 live births. Congenital abnormality of the primary cilia results in situs inversus in 50% of patients. Decreased function of motile cilia causes chronic rhinosinusitis, otitis media with effusion, bronchiectasis and infertility. Cases with situs inversus are considered to show "Kartagener's syndrome", and diagnosis is not difficult. However, in cases without situs inversus, the diagnosis is much more troublesome. PCD without situs inversus is thus probably underdiagnosed. Prolonged chronic cough represents an important symptom that is seen in most patients. The diagnosis of PCD requires the presence of the characteristic clinical phenotypes and either: (1) specific ciliary ultrastructural defects identified by transmission electron microscopy in biopsy samples of respiratory epithelium; or (2) identification of mutation in one of the genes known to be associated with PCD. Nasal nitric oxide concentration is extremely low in PCD, and this could be useful for screening of the disease. At present, no fundamental therapies are available for PCD. Diagnosis in the early stages is important to prevent progression of bronchiectasis and deterioration of lung function by guidance for daily life, immunization, cessation of smoking and prompt therapy at the time of respiratory tract infection. Since PCD is inherited in an autosomal-recessive manner, genetic counseling is necessary after definite diagnosis. PMID:26527516

  7. Fungal Aflatoxins Reduce Respiratory Mucosal Ciliary Function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Robert J; Workman, Alan D; Carey, Ryan M; Chen, Bei; Rosen, Phillip L; Doghramji, Laurel; Adappa, Nithin D; Palmer, James N; Kennedy, David W; Cohen, Noam A

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins secreted by Aspergillus flavus, which can colonize the respiratory tract and cause fungal rhinosinusitis or bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. A. flavus is the second leading cause of invasive aspergillosis worldwide. Because many respiratory pathogens secrete toxins to impair mucociliary immunity, we examined the effects of acute exposure to aflatoxins on airway cell physiology. Using air-liquid interface cultures of primary human sinonasal and bronchial cells, we imaged ciliary beat frequency (CBF), intracellular calcium, and nitric oxide (NO). Exposure to aflatoxins (0.1 to 10 μM; 5 to 10 minutes) reduced baseline (~6-12%) and agonist-stimulated CBF. Conditioned media (CM) from A. fumigatus, A. niger, and A. flavus cultures also reduced CBF by ~10% after 60 min exposure, but effects were blocked by an anti-aflatoxin antibody only with A. flavus CM. CBF reduction required protein kinase C but was not associated with changes in calcium or NO. However, AFB2 reduced NO production by ~50% during stimulation of the ciliary-localized T2R38 receptor. Using a fluorescent reporter construct expressed in A549 cells, we directly observed activation of PKC activity by AFB2. Aflatoxins secreted by respiratory A. flavus may impair motile and chemosensory functions of airway cilia, contributing to pathogenesis of fungal airway diseases. PMID:27623953

  8. Fetal calf serum-mediated inhibition of neurite growth from ciliary ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Davis, G E; Skaper, S D; Manthorpe, M; Moonen, G; Varon, S

    1984-01-01

    Embryonic chick ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons cultured in fetal calf serum-containing medium have been previously reported to extend neurites on polyornithine (PORN) substrata precoated with a neurite-promoting factor (PNPF) from rat schwannoma-conditioned medium. On PORN substrata alone, however, no neuritic growth occurred. This was interpreted as evidence that PORN was an incompetent substratum for ciliary neuritic growth. In this study, we now find that an untreated PORN substratum allows neuritic growth in serum-free defined medium. When PNPF was added to PORN, a more rapid and extensive neuritic response occurred. After 5 hr of culture, a 60% neuritic response occurred on PNPF/PORN, whereas no neurons initiated neurites until 10-12 hr on PORN. The inhibitory effect of fetal calf serum noted above on PORN could be obtained in part by pretreating the substratum with serum for 1 hr. Maximal inhibitory effects in the PORN pretreatment were achieved after 30 min and were not further improved by treatments up to 4 hr. Bovine serum albumin was also found to inhibit neurite growth on PORN to about 60% of the inhibition obtained by an equivalent amount of serum protein. Fetal calf serum was shown to cause a 15% reduction in the percentage of neurons bearing neurites after its addition to 18-hr serum-free PORN cultures and to cause statistically significant reductions in neurite lengths measured 2 hr later. PMID:6481819

  9. Effects of ouabain and furosemide on transepithelial electrical parameters of the isolated shark ciliary epithelium.

    PubMed

    Wiederholt, M; Zadunaisky, J A

    1987-08-01

    Sections of the ciliary epithelium of adult sharks (Squalus acanthias) were mounted in Ussing-type chambers (area 0.2 cm2) for measurements of transepithelial potential difference (PD), short circuit current (SCC) and calculation of transepithelial resistance (R). In 15 preparations PD was aqueous side negative (-0.51 +/- 0.12 mV; SCC 18.3 +/- 2.5 microA cm-2; R 30.7 +/- 3.1 Ohm cm2). However, in 15 other preparations incubated in identical Ringer's solution PD was aqueous side positive (0.53 +/- 0.09 mV; SCC -19.6 +/- 2.3 microA cm-2; R 27.9 +/- 2.8 Ohm cm2). 10(-5) M ouabain or 10(-4) M furosemide were applied either to the aqueous or blood side of the isolated ciliary epithelium at transepithelial negative or positive PD. When the transepithelial PD was positive on the aqueous side ouabain decreased PD and SCC within 15 to 45 min. When the spontaneous PD was negative both PD and SCC decreased when ouabain was applied to the blood side. When the drug was given to the aqueous side a biphasic response (first stimulation, then inhibition) of PD and SCC was observed. Furosemide when given to the blood side (with aqueous side PD positive) or to the aqueous side (with aqueous side PD negative) decreased PD and SCC. However, a transient stimulation of both electrical parameters was observed when furosemide was applied to either the blood side (with aqueous side PD negative) or to the aqueous side (with aqueous side PD positive). The polarity and magnitude of PD and SCC probably depend on the relative activity of sodium and chloride pumps across the cell membranes of the non-pigmented and/or pigmented cell layer. However, additional transport mechanisms cannot be excluded. PMID:3038770

  10. On metachronism in ciliary systems: a model describing the dependence of the metachronal wave properties on the intrinsic ciliary parameters.

    PubMed

    Gheber, L; Priel, Z

    1990-01-01

    A mathematical model is proposed to explain the dependence of the direction and the length of the metachronal wave on parameters that characterize the ciliary beat, the dimensions of the cilia, and the geometry of their arrangement on the ciliated surface. The metachronal wave is decomposed into two mutually perpendicular components, which are chosen in such a way that the direction of one of them is in the direction of the effective stroke. The magnitudes of the two components are determined by using the concept of the time of delay between adjacent cilia. The properties of the metachronal wave are then calculated as a function of the ciliary parameters. The results obtained with the present model predict that the direction of the wave propagation is strongly dependent on the type of metachronism in the direction of the effective stoke and the polarization in time and in space of the ciliary beat. The metachronal wavelength is found to depend on four parameters: the ciliary length, the angle of the arc projected on the cell surface by the ciliary tip during the recovery stroke, the degree of asymmetry of ciliary beat, and the portion of the cycle occupied by the pause. The metachronal wavelength is also found to be only weakly dependent on the ciliary frequency. At this stage there exists relatively little experimental information with which to characterize fully the metachronal properties of ciliary systems. Even when only partial information exists, the model allows prediction, to within a certain range, of the direction of the wave propagation. It also suggests a possible mechanism for the influence of changes in environmental conditions on wave direction and wavelength. In several cases in which full information does exist, good agreement between the experimental findings and the predictions of the model is found. According to this model it will be worthwhile to invest more effort in measuring the time and space polarization of ciliary beating and times of

  11. Ciliary fluid transport enhanced by viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hanliang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Motile cilia encounter complex, non-Newtonian fluids as they beat to gain self-propulsion of cells, transport fluids, and mix particles. Recently there have been many studies on swimming in complex fluids, both experimentally and theoretically. However the role of the non-Newtonian fluid in the ciliary transport system remains largely unknown. Here we use a one-way-coupled immersed boundary method to evaluate the impacts of viscoelastic fluid (Oldroyd-B fluid) on the fluid transport generated by an array of rabbit tracheal cilia beating in a channel at low Reynolds number. Our results show that the viscoelasticity could enhance the fluid transport generated by the rabbit tracheal cilia beating pattern and the flow is sensitive to the Deborah number in the range we investigate.

  12. Ciliary Ectosomes: transmissions from the cell's antenna

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Christopher R.; Rosenbaum, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    The cilium is the site of function for a variety of membrane receptors, enzymes and signal transduction modules critical to a spectrum of cellular processes. Through targeted transport and selective gating mechanisms, the cell localizes specific proteins to the cilium that equip it for the role of sensory antenna. This capacity of the cilium to serve as a specialized compartment where specific proteins can be readily concentrated for sensory reception also makes it an ideal organelle to employ for the regulated emission of specific biological material and information. In this review, we present and discuss an emerging body of evidence centered on ciliary ectosomes - bioactive vesicles released from the surface of the cilium. PMID:25618328

  13. Diagnosis and management of primary ciliary dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Jane S; Burgess, Andrea; Mitchison, Hannah M; Moya, Eduardo; Williamson, Michael; Hogg, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an inherited autosomal-recessive disorder of motile cilia characterised by chronic lung disease, rhinosinusitis, hearing impairment and subfertility. Nasal symptoms and respiratory distress usually start soon after birth, and by adulthood bronchiectasis is invariable. Organ laterality defects, usually situs inversus, occur in ∼50% of cases. The estimated prevalence of PCD is up to ∼1 per 10 000 births, but it is more common in populations where consanguinity is common. This review examines who to refer for diagnostic testing. It describes the limitations surrounding diagnosis using currently available techniques and considers whether recent advances to genotype patients with PCD will lead to genetic testing and screening to aid diagnosis in the near future. It discusses the challenges of monitoring and treating respiratory and ENT disease in children with PCD. PMID:24771309

  14. Neuronal ciliary signaling in homeostasis and disease

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jill A.; Mykytyn, Kirk

    2012-01-01

    Primary cilia are a class of cilia that are typically solitary, immotile appendages present on nearly every mammalian cell type. Primary cilia are believed to perform specialized sensory and signaling functions that are important for normal development and cellular homeostasis. Indeed, primary cilia dysfunction is now linked to numerous human diseases and genetic disorders. Collectively, primary cilia disorders are termed as ciliopathies and present with a wide range of clinical features, including cystic kidney disease, retinal degeneration, obesity, polydactyly, anosmia, intellectual disability, and brain malformations. Although significant progress has been made in elucidating the functions of primary cilia on some cell types, the precise functions of most primary cilia remain unknown. This is particularly true for primary cilia on neurons throughout the mammalian brain. This review will introduce primary cilia and ciliary signaling pathways with a focus on neuronal cilia and their putative functions and roles in human diseases. PMID:20544253

  15. Primary ciliary dyskinesia and associated sensory ciliopathies

    PubMed Central

    Horani, Amjad; Ferkol, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disease of motile cilia, which belongs to a group of disorders resulting from dysfunction of cilia, collectively known as ciliopathies. Insights into the genetics and phenotypes of PCD have grown over the last decade, in part propagated by the discovery of a number of novel cilia-related genes. These genes encode proteins that segregate into structural axonemal, regulatory, as well as cytoplasmic assembly proteins. Our understanding of primary (sensory) cilia has also expanded, and an ever-growing list of diverse conditions has been linked to defective function and signaling of the sensory cilium. Recent multicenter clinical and genetic studies have uncovered the heterogeneity of motile and sensory ciliopathies, and in some cases, the overlap between these conditions. In this review, we will describe the genetics and pathophysiology of ciliopathies in children, focusing on PCD, review emerging genotype-phenotype relationships, and diagnostic tools available for the clinician. PMID:26967669

  16. Ciliary Extracellular Vesicles: Txt Msg Organelles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Barr, Maureen M

    2016-04-01

    Cilia are sensory organelles that protrude from cell surfaces to monitor the surrounding environment. In addition to its role as sensory receiver, the cilium also releases extracellular vesicles (EVs). The release of sub-micron sized EVs is a conserved form of intercellular communication used by all three kingdoms of life. These extracellular organelles play important roles in both short and long range signaling between donor and target cells and may coordinate systemic responses within an organism in normal and diseased states. EV shedding from ciliated cells and EV-cilia interactions are evolutionarily conserved phenomena, yet remarkably little is known about the relationship between the cilia and EVs and the fundamental biology of EVs. Studies in the model organisms Chlamydomonas and Caenorhabditis elegans have begun to shed light on ciliary EVs. Chlamydomonas EVs are shed from tips of flagella and are bioactive. Caenorhabditis elegans EVs are shed and released by ciliated sensory neurons in an intraflagellar transport-dependent manner. Caenorhabditis elegans EVs play a role in modulating animal-to-animal communication, and this EV bioactivity is dependent on EV cargo content. Some ciliary pathologies, or ciliopathies, are associated with abnormal EV shedding or with abnormal cilia-EV interactions. Until the 21st century, both cilia and EVs were ignored as vestigial or cellular junk. As research interest in these two organelles continues to gain momentum, we envision a new field of cell biology emerging. Here, we propose that the cilium is a dedicated organelle for EV biogenesis and EV reception. We will also discuss possible mechanisms by which EVs exert bioactivity and explain how what is learned in model organisms regarding EV biogenesis and function may provide insight to human ciliopathies. PMID:26983828

  17. Ciliary extracellular vesicles: Txt msg orgnlls

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Barr, Maureen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are sensory organelles that protrude from cell surfaces to monitor the surrounding environment. In addition to its role as sensory receiver, the cilium also releases extracellular vesicles (EVs). The release of sub-micron sized EVs is a conserved form of intercellular communication used by all three kingdoms of life. These extracellular organelles play important roles in both short and long range signaling between donor and target cells and may coordinate systemic responses within an organism in normal and diseased states. EV shedding from ciliated cells and EV-cilia interactions are evolutionarily conserved phenomena, yet remarkably little is known about the relationship between the cilia and EVs and the fundamental biology of EVs. Studies in the model organisms Chlamydomonas and C. elegans have begun to shed light on ciliary EVs. Chlamydomonas EVs are shed from tips of flagella and are bioactive. C. elegans EVs are shed and released by ciliated sensory neurons in an intraflagellar transport (IFT)-dependent manner. C. elegans EVs play a role in modulating animal-to-animal communication, and this EV bioactivity is dependent on EV cargo content. Some ciliary pathologies, or ciliopathies, are associated with abnormal EV shedding or with abnormal cilia-EV interactions, suggest the cilium may be an important organelle as an EV donor or as an EV target. Until the past few decades, both cilia and EVs were ignored as vestigial or cellular junk. As research interest in these two organelles continues to gain momentum, we envision a new field of cell biology emerging. Here, we propose that the cilium is a dedicated organelle for EV biogenesis and EV reception. We will also discuss possible mechanisms by which EVs exert bioactivity and explain how what is learned in model organisms regarding EV biogenesis and function may provide insight to human ciliopathies. PMID:26983828

  18. Canine ocular tumors following ciliary body ablation with intravitreal gentamicin.

    PubMed

    Duke, Felicia D; Strong, Travis D; Bentley, Ellison; Dubielzig, Richard R

    2013-03-01

    Iridociliary tumors are the second most common primary ocular tumor in dogs and are usually benign. A review of the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin (COPLOW) database in 2009 suggested a potential correlation between malignant iridociliary epithelial tumors and ciliary body ablation by intravitreal gentamicin injection for the treatment of glaucoma. The purpose of this case series was to determine whether there is evidence of such a correlation in the COPLOW collection. Mining of the COPLOW database revealed that a significant number (39.5%) of canine globes with a history of ciliary body ablation were subsequently diagnosed with primary ocular tumors at enucleation, most commonly iridociliary epithelial tumors and melanocytic tumors. It is possible that neoplasia was present but unrecognized at the time of ciliary body ablation. These tumors had a higher than expected incidence of malignancy. These cases underscore the importance of reserving ciliary body ablation with gentamicin for disease-free eyes. PMID:22812389

  19. Unexpected Roles for Ciliary Kinesins and Intraflagellar Transport Proteins.

    PubMed

    Pooranachandran, Niedharsan; Malicki, Jarema J

    2016-06-01

    Transport of proteins in the ciliary shaft is driven by microtubule-dependent motors, kinesins. Prior studies suggested that the heterotrimeric ciliary kinesin may be dispensable for certain aspects of transport in specialized cilia of vertebrate photoreceptor cells. To test this possibility further, we analyzed the mutant phenotype of the zebrafish kif3a gene, which encodes the common motor subunit of heterotrimeric ciliary kinesins. Cilia are absent in all organs examined, leading to the conclusion that kif3a is indispensable for ciliogenesis in all cells, including photoreceptors. Unexpectedly, kif3a function precedes ciliogenesis as ciliary basal bodies are mispositioned in mutant photoreceptors. This phenotype is much less pronounced in intraflagellar transport (IFT) mutants and reveals that kif3a has a much broader role than previously assumed. Despite the severity of their basal body phenotype, kif3a mutant photoreceptors survive longer compared to those in IFT mutants, which display much weaker basal body mispositioning. This effect is absent in kif3a;IFT double mutants, indicating that IFT proteins have ciliary transport-independent roles, which add to the severity of their photoreceptor phenotype. kif3a is dispensable for basal body docking in otic vesicle sensory epithelia and, surprisingly, short cilia form in mechanosensory cristae even in the absence of kif3a In contrast to Kif3a, the functions of the Kif3c-related protein, encoded by the kif3c-like (kif3cl) gene, and the homodimeric ciliary kinesin, kif17, are dispensable for photoreceptor morphogenesis. These studies demonstrate unexpected new roles for both ciliary heterotrimeric kinesins and IFT particle genes and clarify the function of kif17, the homodimeric ciliary kinesin gene. PMID:27038111

  20. The absorbance spectrum and photosensitivity of a new synthetic "visual pigment" based on 4-hydroxyretinal.

    PubMed

    Kito, Y; Partridge, J C; Seidou, M; Narita, K; Hamanaka, T; Michinomae, M; Sekiya, N; Yoshihara, K

    1992-01-01

    The firefly squid, Watasenia scintillans, is the only animal known to possess a visual pigment in which the chromophore is 4-hydroxyretinal. This paper describes the absorbance spectrum and some properties of a synthetic "A4" visual pigment generated from bovine opsin and 4-hydroxyretinal. The absorbance spectrum of this pigment is compared with (a) bovine rhodopsin and (b) a rhodopsin template with the same lambda max as the synthetic visual pigment. The A4 pigment is shown to have an absorbance spectrum that is almost identical to that of a rhodopsin template. It is also shown that the photosensitivity and thermal stability of the A4 pigment, dispersed in detergent micelles, is essentially similar to that of rhodopsin. PMID:1386953

  1. Oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction. Possible role in airway disease

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, W.J.; Martin, W.J. 2d.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of reactive species of oxygen on the airway are not well known. This study examined the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the structure and function of the airway epithelium. Tracheal rings were prepared from 200 g male rats. Damage to the airway epithelium was assayed by monitoring the ciliary beat frequency, the release of 51Cr, and histology. H2O2 at concentrations of 1.0 mM and above caused a very rapid decrease in ciliary beat frequency. After ten minutes' exposure to 1.0 mM, the ciliary beat frequency was 72 +/- 20 percent of control. Release of 51Cr was a less sensitive measure with significant release occurring after four hours of exposure to ciliotoxic concentrations of H2O2. Histologic changes were not evident within the experimental time period. All toxic effects of H2O2 were completely blocked by catalase. This study shows that H2O2 causes a rapid decline in ciliary activity and suggests that oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction could play a role in the pathogenesis of airway disease. The ciliary beat frequency provides a sensitive, physiologically relevant parameter for the in vitro study of these diseases.

  2. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or unhealthy, it affects melanin production. Some pigmentation disorders affect just patches of ...

  3. Uni-directional ciliary membrane protein trafficking by a cytoplasmic retrograde IFT motor and ciliary ectosome shedding

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Muqing; Ning, Jue; Hernandez-Lara, Carmen I; Belzile, Olivier; Wang, Qian; Dutcher, Susan K; Liu, Yanjie; Snell, William J

    2015-01-01

    The role of the primary cilium in key signaling pathways depends on dynamic regulation of ciliary membrane protein composition, yet we know little about the motors or membrane events that regulate ciliary membrane protein trafficking in existing organelles. Recently, we showed that cilium-generated signaling in Chlamydomonas induced rapid, anterograde IFT-independent, cytoplasmic microtubule-dependent redistribution of the membrane polypeptide, SAG1-C65, from the plasma membrane to the periciliary region and the ciliary membrane. Here, we report that the retrograde IFT motor, cytoplasmic dynein 1b, is required in the cytoplasm for this rapid redistribution. Furthermore, signaling-induced trafficking of SAG1-C65 into cilia is unidirectional and the entire complement of cellular SAG1-C65 is shed during signaling and can be recovered in the form of ciliary ectosomes that retain signal-inducing activity. Thus, during signaling, cells regulate ciliary membrane protein composition through cytoplasmic action of the retrograde IFT motor and shedding of ciliary ectosomes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05242.001 PMID:25688564

  4. Oral pigmentation: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sreeja, C.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Vijayalakshmi, D.; Devi, M.; Aesha, I.; Vijayabanu, B.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations. PMID:26538887

  5. Overview of plant pigments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorophylls, carotenoids, flavonoids and betalains are four major classes of biological pigments produced in plants. Chlorophylls are the primary pigments responsible for plant green and photosynthesis. The other three are accessary pigments and secondary metabolites that yield non-green colors and...

  6. An international registry for primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Werner, Claudius; Lablans, Martin; Ataian, Maximilian; Raidt, Johanna; Wallmeier, Julia; Große-Onnebrink, Jörg; Kuehni, Claudia E; Haarman, Eric G; Leigh, Margaret W; Quittner, Alexandra L; Lucas, Jane S; Hogg, Claire; Witt, Michal; Priftis, Kostas N; Yiallouros, Panayiotis; Nielsen, Kim G; Santamaria, Francesca; Ückert, Frank; Omran, Heymut

    2016-03-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder leading to chronic upper and lower airway disease. Fundamental data on epidemiology, clinical presentation, course and treatment strategies are lacking in PCD. We have established an international PCD registry to realise an unmet need for an international platform to systematically collect data on incidence, clinical presentation, treatment and disease course.The registry was launched in January 2014. We used internet technology to ensure easy online access using a web browser under www.pcdregistry.eu. Data from 201 patients have been collected so far. The database is comprised of a basic data form including demographic and diagnostic information, and visit forms designed to monitor the disease course.To establish a definite PCD diagnosis, we used strict diagnostic criteria, which required two to three diagnostic methods in addition to classical clinical symptoms. Preliminary analysis of lung function data demonstrated a mean annual decline of percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 0.59% (95% CI 0.98-0.22).Here, we present the development of an international PCD registry as a new promising tool to advance the understanding of this rare disorder, to recruit candidates for research studies and ultimately to improve PCD care. PMID:26659107

  7. A Numerical Study of Muco-Ciliary Transport under the condition of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayathilake, Pahala Gedara; Lee, Wan Lung; Le, Duc Vinh; Lee, Heow Pueh; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2012-11-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a disease due to the defects in motile cilia. A two-dimensional numerical model based on the immersed boundary method coupled with the projection method is used for a preliminary study of the flow physics of muco-ciliary transport of human respiratory tract under PCD conditions. The effects of the cilia beating amplitude, cilia beat pattern (CBP), cilia beat frequency (CBF), immotile cilia, and uncoordinated beating of cilia on mucus transport are investigated. As expected, the mucus velocity decreases as the beating amplitude and CBF decrease. The windscreen wiper motion and rigid rod motion, which are two abnormal CBPs owing to PCD, would greatly reduce the mucus transport. The mucus velocity decreases rather linearly if the number of uniformly distributed immotile cilia increases. The results further show that the mucus velocity would be slightly reduced when the uniformly distributed immotile cilia are rearranged as a cluster of immotile cilia. Furthermore, if the half of the cilia are immotile and uniformly distributed, the incoordination between motile cilia would not significantly affect the mucus velocity.

  8. PACRG, a protein linked to ciliary motility, mediates cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Loucks, Catrina M; Bialas, Nathan J; Dekkers, Martijn P J; Walker, Denise S; Grundy, Laura J; Li, Chunmei; Inglis, P Nick; Kida, Katarzyna; Schafer, William R; Blacque, Oliver E; Jansen, Gert; Leroux, Michel R

    2016-07-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from nearly all mammalian cell types. Motile cilia generate fluid flow, whereas nonmotile (primary) cilia are required for sensory physiology and modulate various signal transduction pathways. Here we investigate the nonmotile ciliary signaling roles of parkin coregulated gene (PACRG), a protein linked to ciliary motility. PACRG is associated with the protofilament ribbon, a structure believed to dictate the regular arrangement of motility-associated ciliary components. Roles for protofilament ribbon-associated proteins in nonmotile cilia and cellular signaling have not been investigated. We show that PACRG localizes to a small subset of nonmotile cilia in Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting an evolutionary adaptation for mediating specific sensory/signaling functions. We find that it influences a learning behavior known as gustatory plasticity, in which it is functionally coupled to heterotrimeric G-protein signaling. We also demonstrate that PACRG promotes longevity in C. elegans by acting upstream of the lifespan-promoting FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and likely upstream of insulin/IGF signaling. Our findings establish previously unrecognized sensory/signaling functions for PACRG and point to a role for this protein in promoting longevity. Furthermore, our work suggests additional ciliary motility-signaling connections, since EFHC1 (EF-hand containing 1), a potential PACRG interaction partner similarly associated with the protofilament ribbon and ciliary motility, also positively regulates lifespan. PMID:27193298

  9. Stages of Ciliogenesis and Regulation of Ciliary Length

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Prachee; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2012-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are highly conserved eukaryotic microtubule-based organelles that protrude from the surface of most mammalian cells. These structures require large protein complexes and motors for distal addition of tubulin and extension of the ciliary membrane. In order for ciliogenesis to occur, coordination of many processes must take place. An intricate concert of cell cycle regulation, vesicular trafficking, and ciliary extension must all play out with accurate timing to produce a cilium. Here, we review the stages of ciliogenesis as well as regulation of the length of the assembled cilium. Regulation of ciliogenesis during cell cycle progression centers on centrioles, from which cilia extend upon maturation into basal bodies. Centriole maturation involves a shift from roles in cell division to cilium nucleation via migration to the cell surface and docking at the plasma membrane. Docking is dependent on a variety of proteinaceous structures, termed distal appendages, acquired by the mother centriole. Ciliary elongation by the process of intraflagellar transport (IFT) ensues. Direct modification of ciliary structures, as well as modulation of signal transduction pathways, play a role in maintenance of the cilium. All of these stages are tightly regulated to produce a cilium of the right size at the right time. Finally, we discuss the implications of abnormal ciliogenesis and ciliary length control in human disease as well as some open questions. PMID:22178116

  10. Avalanche-like behavior in ciliary import

    PubMed Central

    Ludington, William B.; Wemmer, Kimberly A.; Lechtreck, Karl F.; Witman, George B.; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2013-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are microtubule-based organelles that protrude from the cell body. Ciliary assembly requires intraflagellar transport (IFT), a motile system that delivers cargo from the cell body to the flagellar tip for assembly. The process controlling injections of IFT proteins into the flagellar compartment is, therefore, crucial to ciliogenesis. Extensive biochemical and genetic analyses have determined the molecular machinery of IFT, but these studies do not explain what regulates IFT injection rate. Here, we provide evidence that IFT injections result from avalanche-like releases of accumulated IFT material at the flagellar base and that the key regulated feature of length control is the recruitment of IFT material to the flagellar base. We used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of IFT proteins in live cells to quantify the size and frequency of injections over time. The injection dynamics reveal a power-law tailed distribution of injection event sizes and a negative correlation between injection size and frequency, as well as rich behaviors such as quasiperiodicity, bursting, and long-memory effects tied to the size of the localized load of IFT material awaiting injection at the flagellar base, collectively indicating that IFT injection dynamics result from avalanche-like behavior. Computational models based on avalanching recapitulate observed IFT dynamics, and we further show that the flagellar Ras-related nuclear protein (Ran) guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) gradient can in theory act as a flagellar length sensor to regulate this localized accumulation of IFT. These results demonstrate that a self-organizing, physical mechanism can control a biochemically complex intracellular transport pathway. PMID:23431147

  11. Feline ocular tumors following ciliary body ablation with intravitreal gentamicin.

    PubMed

    Duke, Felicia D; Strong, Travis D; Bentley, Ellison; Dubielzig, Richard R

    2013-07-01

    Practitioners approach chemical ciliary body ablation (CBA) in cats with caution. In 1994, an academic letter proposed a potential link between intraocular gentamicin injections for glaucoma and the appearance of ocular tumors in cats (Veterinary and Comparative Ophthalmology, 4, 1994, 166). There is an historic perceived risk for the development of feline ocular post-traumatic sarcoma following gentamicin ciliary body ablation, and many clinicians refrain from chemical ablation in cats for this reason. A recent study discussed the possibility of a correlation between intravitreal gentamicin and tumor promotion in dogs (Veterinary Ophthalmology, 16, 2013, 159). We searched the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin (COPLOW) database for cases of cats diagnosed with ocular tumors following ciliary body ablation. Of eight cases with historic gentamicin injection, five had malignant tumors: three post-traumatic sarcomas and two melanomas. PMID:23701585

  12. Morphologic Indication for Proprioception in the Human Ciliary Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Flügel-Koch, Cassandra; Neuhuber, Winfried L.; Kaufman, Paul L.; Lütjen-Drecoll, Elke

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To search for proprioceptive nerve terminals in human ciliary muscle. Methods In 48 human donor eyes, histologic and ultrathin sections cut in different planes and wholemounts of the ciliary muscle were studied. Immunohistochemical staining with antibodies against pan-neuronal antigens and antigens reported as markers for sensory terminals in other organs was performed. Results Among the markers for proprioceptive terminals, only calretinin was present in the ciliary body. Calretinin-immunoreactive (IR) nerve terminals surrounded the posterior and reticular ciliary muscle tips and their elastic tendons. Terminals in that region contained mitochondria and neurofilaments. At the anterior tips larger terminals with numerous membrane-filled vesicles were located between the muscle fibers. The most elaborate network of calretinin-IR nerve fibers was present in the ground plate covering the circular muscle portion. Here calretinin-IR neurons with morphologic features of mechanoreception were present. Within the circular muscle portion numerous calretinin-IR ganglion cells were found. Their processes were connected to the calretinin-IR network but also surrounded ciliary muscle cells and NADPH-diaphorase-positive ganglion cells. Conclusions These morphologic findings indicate that there are proprioreceptors in the ciliary muscle that morphologically and presumably functionally differ at different locations. At the posterior muscle tips, the receptors could measure stretch of the tendons, whereas the large receptor organs located at the anterior muscle tips morphologically resemble mechanoreceptors measuring shear stress. The presence of the numerous intrinsic nerve cells indicates that contraction of the circular muscle portion can be modulated locally via a self-contained reflex arc. PMID:19578020

  13. Alcohol-induced ciliary dysfunction targets the outer dynein arm

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Pavlik, Jacqueline; Fox, Laura; Scarbrough, Chasity; Sale, Winfield S.; Sisson, Joseph H.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse results in an increased incidence of pulmonary infection, in part attributable to impaired mucociliary clearance. Analysis of motility in mammalian airway cilia has revealed that alcohol impacts the ciliary dynein motors by a mechanism involving altered axonemal protein phosphorylation. Given the highly conserved nature of cilia, it is likely that the mechanisms for alcohol-induced ciliary dysfunction (AICD) are conserved. Thus we utilized the experimental advantages offered by the model organism, Chlamydomonas, to determine the precise effects of alcohol on ciliary dynein activity and identify axonemal phosphoproteins that are altered by alcohol exposure. Analysis of live cells or reactivated cell models showed that alcohol significantly inhibits ciliary motility in Chlamydomonas via a mechanism that is part of the axonemal structure. Taking advantage of informative mutant cells, we found that alcohol impacts the activity of the outer dynein arm. Consistent with this finding, alcohol exposure results in a significant reduction in ciliary beat frequency, a parameter of ciliary movement that requires normal outer dynein arm function. Using mutants that lack specific heavy-chain motor domains, we have determined that alcohol impacts the β- and γ-heavy chains of the outer dynein arm. Furthermore, using a phospho-threonine-specific antibody, we determined that the phosphorylation state of DCC1 of the outer dynein arm-docking complex is altered in the presence of alcohol, and its phosphorylation correlates with AICD. These results demonstrate that alcohol targets specific outer dynein arm components and suggest that DCC1 is part of an alcohol-sensitive mechanism that controls outer dynein arm activity. PMID:25595647

  14. The accommodative ciliary muscle function is preserved in older humans

    PubMed Central

    Tabernero, Juan; Chirre, Emmanuel; Hervella, Lucia; Prieto, Pedro; Artal, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Presbyopia, the loss of the eye’s accommodation capability, affects all humans aged above 45–50 years old. The two main reasons for this to happen are a hardening of the crystalline lens and a reduction of the ciliary muscle functionality with age. While there seems to be at least some partial accommodating functionality of the ciliary muscle at early presbyopic ages, it is not yet clear whether the muscle is still active at more advanced ages. Previous techniques used to visualize the accommodation mechanism of the ciliary muscle are complicated to apply in the older subjects, as they typically require fixation stability during long measurement times and/or to have an ultrasound probe directly in contact with the eye. Instead, we used our own developed method based on high-speed recording of lens wobbling to study the ciliary muscle activity in a small group of pseudophakic subjects (around 80 years old). There was a significant activity of the muscle, clearly able to contract under binocular stimulation of accommodation. This supports a purely lenticular-based theory of presbyopia and it might stimulate the search for new solutions to presbyopia by making use of the remaining contraction force still presented in the aging eye. PMID:27151778

  15. The accommodative ciliary muscle function is preserved in older humans.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, Juan; Chirre, Emmanuel; Hervella, Lucia; Prieto, Pedro; Artal, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Presbyopia, the loss of the eye's accommodation capability, affects all humans aged above 45-50 years old. The two main reasons for this to happen are a hardening of the crystalline lens and a reduction of the ciliary muscle functionality with age. While there seems to be at least some partial accommodating functionality of the ciliary muscle at early presbyopic ages, it is not yet clear whether the muscle is still active at more advanced ages. Previous techniques used to visualize the accommodation mechanism of the ciliary muscle are complicated to apply in the older subjects, as they typically require fixation stability during long measurement times and/or to have an ultrasound probe directly in contact with the eye. Instead, we used our own developed method based on high-speed recording of lens wobbling to study the ciliary muscle activity in a small group of pseudophakic subjects (around 80 years old). There was a significant activity of the muscle, clearly able to contract under binocular stimulation of accommodation. This supports a purely lenticular-based theory of presbyopia and it might stimulate the search for new solutions to presbyopia by making use of the remaining contraction force still presented in the aging eye. PMID:27151778

  16. SUMOylation regulates ciliary localization of olfactory signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Jeremy C.; Joiner, Ariell M.; Zhang, Lian; Iñiguez-Lluhí, Jorge; Martens, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cilia are evolutionarily conserved organelles found on many mammalian cell types, including neuronal populations. Although neuronal cilia, including those on olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), are often delineated by localization of adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3, also known as ADCY3), the mechanisms responsible for targeting integral membrane proteins are largely unknown. Post-translational modification by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins plays an important role in protein localization processes such as nuclear–cytosolic transport. Here, we identified through bioinformatic analysis that adenylyl cyclases harbor conserved SUMOylation motifs, and show that AC3 is a substrate for SUMO modification. Functionally, overexpression of the SUMO protease SENP2 prevented ciliary localization of AC3, without affecting ciliation or cilia maintenance. Furthermore, AC3-SUMO mutants did not localize to cilia. To test whether SUMOylation is sufficient for cilia entry, we compared localization of ANO2, which possesses a SUMO motif, and ANO1, which lacks SUMOylation sites and does not localize to cilia. Introduction of SUMOylation sites into ANO1 was not sufficient for ciliary entry. These data suggest that SUMOylation is necessary but not sufficient for ciliary trafficking of select constituents, further establishing the link between ciliary and nuclear import. PMID:25908845

  17. The role of ClC-3 in volume-activated chloride currents and volume regulation in bovine epithelial cells demonstrated by antisense inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liwei; Chen, Lixin; Jacob, Tim J C

    2000-01-01

    A chloride current with mild outward rectification was induced in the native bovine non-pigmented ciliary epithelial (NPCE) cells by a 23 % hypotonic solution. The current showed no or little inactivation at depolarized steps. ATP blocked 88 and 61 % of the outward and inward components of the volume-activated chloride current (ICl,vol) with an IC50 of 5.3 and 9.6 mm, respectively. The volume-activated chloride current was decreased and the activation of the current was delayed by inhibiting endogenous ClC-3 expression using a ClC-3 antisense oligonucleotide. The inhibition of the current as a function of antisense concentration was asymptotic with a maximum about 60 %. The remaining current was probably not derived from ClC-3 and was inhibited by ATP. ClC-3 expression in the bovine NPCE cells was verified by immunofluorescence studies. ClC-3 immunofluorescence was distributed throughout the cells but with the predominant location within the nucleus. The expression of ClC-3 protein was diminished by the ClC-3 antisense oligonucleotide with the greatest diminution occurring in the nuclear region. The size of the volume-activated chloride current was positively correlated with the ClC-3 immunofluorescence level. Regulatory volume decrease of the NPCE cells was reduced by ClC-3 antisense oligonucleotide. We conclude that endogenous ClC-3 is associated with the volume-activated chloride current and is involved in cell volume regulation, but that it can only contribute towards a proportion of the current in NPCE cells. The nuclear predominance of ClC-3 immunofluorescence in NPCE cells, the absence of basal activity of chloride current and the marked pharmacological differences between IClC-3 and ICl,vol argue against ClC-3 being the only, or even the main, volume-activated chloride channel in NPCE cells. PMID:10747184

  18. Gene Expression and Functional Annotation of the Human Ciliary Body Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Sarah F.; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; Bossers, Koen; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; Essing, Anke H. W.; Nagtegaal, Martijn; van der Spek, Peter J.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The ciliary body (CB) of the human eye consists of the non-pigmented (NPE) and pigmented (PE) neuro-epithelia. We investigated the gene expression of NPE and PE, to shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the most important functions of the CB. We also developed molecular signatures for the NPE and PE and studied possible new clues for glaucoma. Methods We isolated NPE and PE cells from seven healthy human donor eyes using laser dissection microscopy. Next, we performed RNA isolation, amplification, labeling and hybridization against 44×k Agilent microarrays. For microarray conformations, we used a literature study, RT-PCRs, and immunohistochemical stainings. We analyzed the gene expression data with R and with the knowledge database Ingenuity. Results The gene expression profiles and functional annotations of the NPE and PE were highly similar. We found that the most important functionalities of the NPE and PE were related to developmental processes, neural nature of the tissue, endocrine and metabolic signaling, and immunological functions. In total 1576 genes differed statistically significantly between NPE and PE. From these genes, at least 3 were cell-specific for the NPE and 143 for the PE. Finally, we observed high expression in the (N)PE of 35 genes previously implicated in molecular mechanisms related to glaucoma. Conclusion Our gene expression analysis suggested that the NPE and PE of the CB were quite similar. Nonetheless, cell-type specific differences were found. The molecular machineries of the human NPE and PE are involved in a range of neuro-endocrinological, developmental and immunological functions, and perhaps glaucoma. PMID:23028713

  19. Ion transport in pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W.; Oancea, Elena V.

    2014-01-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system,, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis. PMID:25034214

  20. Ciliary body and choroidal melanomas treated by proton beam irradiation. Histopathologic study of eyes

    SciTech Connect

    Seddon, J.M.; Gragoudas, E.S.; Albert, D.M.

    1983-09-01

    Proton beam irradiation resulted in clinical and/or histopathological regression of large ciliary body and choroidal melanomas in three eyes. Enucleations were performed 6 1/2 weeks, five months, and 11 months after irradiation for angle-closure glaucoma from total retinal detachment, increase in retinal detachment, and neovascular glaucoma, respectively. A direct relationship was found between the length of the interval from irradiation to enucleation and the degree of histologic changes. Vascular changes in the tumors included endothelial cell swelling and decreased lumen size, basement membrane thickening, collapse of sinusoidal vessels, and thrombosis of vessels. Although apparently unaltered tumor cells remained, degenerative changes occurred in some melanoma cells, including lipid vacuoles in cytoplasm, pyknotic nuclei, and balloon cell formation. Patchy areas of necrosis and proteinaceous exudate were present. Pigment-laden macrophages were found near tumor vessels and all had a substantial chronic inflammatory infiltrate. The effect of proton beam irradiation on tumor vessels probably plays an important role in uveal melanoma regression.

  1. Control of the ciliary beat by cyclic nucleotides in intact cortical sheets from Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Munenori; Kurahashi, Shotaro; Kamachi, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2004-12-01

    The locomotor behavior of Paramecium depends on the ciliary beat direction and beat frequency. Changes in the ciliary beat are controlled by a signal transduction mechanism that follows changes in the membrane potential. These events take place in cilia covered with a ciliary membrane. To determine the effects of second messengers in the cilia, cortical sheets were used with intact ciliary membrane as a half-closed system in which each cilium is covered with a ciliary membrane with an opening to the cell body. Cyclic nucleotides and their derivatives applied from an opening to the cell body affected the ciliary beat. cAMP and 8-Br-cAMP increased the beat frequency and the efficiency of propulsion and acted antagonistically to the action of Ca(2+). cGMP and 8-Br-cGMP increased the efficiency of propulsion accompanying clear metachronal waves but decreased the beat frequency. These results indicate that the cyclic nucleotides affect target proteins in the ciliary axonemes surrounded by the ciliary membrane without a membrane potential and increase the efficiency of propulsion of the ciliary beat. In vitro phosphorylation of isolated ciliary axonemes in the presence of cyclic nucleotides and their derivatives revealed that the action of cAMP was correlated with the phosphorylation of 29-kDa and 65-kDa proteins and that the action of cGMP was correlated with the phosphorylation of a 42-kDa protein. PMID:15613797

  2. Photolysis of caged calcium in cilia induces ciliary reversal in Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed

    Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2003-04-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration controls both the pattern and frequency of ciliary and flagellar beating in eukaryotes. In Paramecium, it is widely accepted that the reversal of the direction of ciliary beating (ciliary reversal) is induced by an increase in intra-ciliary Ca(2+) levels. Despite this, the Ca(2+)-sensitive region of the cilium that initiates ciliary reversal has not been clearly identified. We injected caged calcium into living P. caudatum cells and applied ultraviolet (UV) light to portions of the injected cells to raise artificially the intracellular Ca(2+) level ([Ca(2+)](i)). UV application to the upper ciliary region above the basal body induced ciliary reversal in injected cells. Furthermore, UV application to the tips of cilia induced weak ciliary reversal. Larger areas of photolysis in the cilium gave rise to greater angles of ciliary reversal. These results strongly suggest that the Ca(2+)-sensitive region for ciliary reversal is distributed all over the cilium, above the basal body. PMID:12604576

  3. Pigment-protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Siegelman, H W

    1980-01-01

    The photosynthetically-active pigment protein complexes of procaryotes and eucaryotes include chlorophyll proteins, carotenochlorophyll proteins, and biliproteins. They are either integral components or attached to photosynthetic membranes. Detergents are frequently required to solubilize the pigment-protein complexes. The membrane localization and detergent solubilization strongly suggest that the pigment-protein complexes are bound to the membranes by hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic interactions of proteins are characterized by an increase in entropy. Their bonding energy is directly related to temperature and ionic strength. Hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, a relatively new separation procedure, can furnish an important method for the purification of pigment-protein complexes. Phycobilisome purification and properties provide an example of the need to maintain hydrophobic interactions to preserve structure and function.

  4. [A rare case of primary ciliary dyskinesia with heterotaxy].

    PubMed

    Quintela, Cátia; Meireles, Cláudia; Bettencourt, Maria João; Ribeirinho, Augusto; Bentes, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia is an autosomal recessive disease with a clinical history of upper and lowers respiratory infections, rhinosinusitis and bronquitis associated with complete or partial situs inversus. The authors present a 78 -year -old male caucasian patient with rhinosinusitis, lower respiratory tract infection and dyspnea, chronic otitis with hearing deficit and infertility followed in Gastroenterology for dyspepsia and constipation. The radiological studies revealed agenesis of right frontal sinus; bronchial wall thickening; bronchiectasis; cecum and ascending colon located on the left and small bowel occupies right side of abdomen. He had no immunodeficiency, allergies, cystic fibrosis and others. We concluded primary ciliary dyskinesia with heterotaxy. For the rarity of this case we decided to present it. PMID:19145394

  5. Up to date on primary ciliary dyskinesia in children.

    PubMed

    Pifferi, Massimo; Di Cicco, Maria; Piras, Martina; Cangiotti, Angela M; Saggese, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a congenital, clinically and ultrastructurally heterogeneous disease due to abnormal structure and/or function of cilia, with impaired mucociliary transport leading to several respiratory disorders. PCD can be diagnosed by the combination of thorough clinical examination with functional and ultrastructural analysis of the cilia. This paper shows progresses in PCD diagnosis obtained by ciliogenesis in culture evaluation of ciliated respiratory cells and by genetic analysis of mutations in candidate genes. Moreover, since to date no specific treatments are available to correct the ciliary dysfunction, the paper shows the proper therapeutical approach by the use of respiratory physiotherapy and regular exercise to favour airways clearance, by antibiotics administration to control acute airway infections. Macrolides administration as antiinflammatory option is suggested. PMID:23973004

  6. Handedness and situs inversus in primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    McManus, I C; Martin, N; Stubbings, G F; Chung, E M K; Mitchison, H M

    2004-12-22

    ... The limbs on the right side are stronger. [The] cause may be ... [that] ... motion, and abilities of moving, are somewhat holpen from the liver, which lieth on the right side. (Sir Francis Bacon, Sylva sylvarum (1627).)Fifty per cent of people with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) (also known as immotile cilia syndrome or Siewert-Kartagener syndrome) have situs inversus, which is thought to result from absent nodal ciliary rotation and failure of normal symmetry breaking. In a study of 88 people with PCD, only 15.2% of 46 individuals with situs inversus, and 14.3% of 42 individuals with situs solitus, were left handed. Because cerebral lateralization is therefore still present, the nodal cilia cannot be the primary mechanism responsible for symmetry breaking in the vertebrate body. Intriguingly, one behavioural lateralization, wearing a wrist-watch on the right wrist, did correlate with situs inversus. PMID:15615683

  7. Dissociated ciliary ganglion neurons in vitro: survival and synapse formation.

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, R; Berg, D K

    1977-01-01

    Normally, about half of the ciliary ganglion neurons in 8-day-old chick embryos die before day 14 in ovo. However, when dissociated ciliary ganglion neurons were prepared from either 8- or 14-day-old embryos and grown in cell culture with skeletal myotubes, essentially all of the neurons survived for at least 3 weeks. Many of the neurons formed functional synapses on myotubes under these conditions; some neuromuscular synapses could be detected as early as 20 hr after addition of the ganglion cells to muscle cultures. In contrast, most neurons from 8-day embryos survived for only a few days when grown alone on either polyornithine- or collagen-coated dishes. These results suggest that neurons destined to die in ovo can be rescued when grown in cell culture with myotubes and that under these conditions the neurons develop and express differentiated properties. Images PMID:270756

  8. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  9. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-09-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  10. Quantification of the ciliary muscle and crystalline lens interaction during accommodation with synchronous OCT imaging.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Marco; de Freitas, Carolina; Williams, Siobhan; Hernandez, Victor M; Cabot, Florence; Yesilirmak, Nilufer; Alawa, Karam; Chang, Yu-Cherng; Yoo, Sonia H; Gregori, Giovanni; Parel, Jean-Marie; Manns, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    Two SD-OCT systems and a dual channel accommodation target were combined and precisely synchronized to simultaneously image the anterior segment and the ciliary muscle during dynamic accommodation. The imaging system simultaneously generates two synchronized OCT image sequences of the anterior segment and ciliary muscle with an imaging speed of 13 frames per second. The system was used to acquire OCT image sequences of a non-presbyopic and a pre-presbyopic subject accommodating in response to step changes in vergence. The image sequences were processed to extract dynamic morphological data from the crystalline lens and the ciliary muscle. The synchronization between the OCT systems allowed the precise correlation of anatomical changes occurring in the crystalline lens and ciliary muscle at identical time points during accommodation. To describe the dynamic interaction between the crystalline lens and ciliary muscle, we introduce accommodation state diagrams that display the relation between anatomical changes occurring in the accommodating crystalline lens and ciliary muscle. PMID:27446660

  11. Myristoylated CIL-7 regulates ciliary extracellular vesicle biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Julie E; Silva, Malan; Nguyen, Ken C Q; Hellen, Elizabeth; Kern, Andrew D; Hall, David H; Barr, Maureen M

    2015-08-01

    The cilium both releases and binds to extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs may be used by cells as a form of intercellular communication and mediate a broad range of physiological and pathological processes. The mammalian polycystins (PCs) localize to cilia, as well as to urinary EVs released from renal epithelial cells. PC ciliary trafficking defects may be an underlying cause of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD), and ciliary-EV interactions have been proposed to play a central role in the biology of PKD. In Caenorhabditis elegans and mammals, PC1 and PC2 act in the same genetic pathway, act in a sensory capacity, localize to cilia, and are contained in secreted EVs, suggesting ancient conservation. However, the relationship between cilia and EVs and the mechanisms generating PC-containing EVs remain an enigma. In a forward genetic screen for regulators of C. elegans PKD-2 ciliary localization, we identified CIL-7, a myristoylated protein that regulates EV biogenesis. Loss of CIL-7 results in male mating behavioral defects, excessive accumulation of EVs in the lumen of the cephalic sensory organ, and failure to release PKD-2::GFP-containing EVs to the environment. Fatty acylation, such as myristoylation and palmitoylation, targets proteins to cilia and flagella. The CIL-7 myristoylation motif is essential for CIL-7 function and for targeting CIL-7 to EVs. C. elegans is a powerful model with which to study ciliary EV biogenesis in vivo and identify cis-targeting motifs such as myristoylation that are necessary for EV-cargo association and function. PMID:26041936

  12. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: From diagnosis to molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Paff, Tamara; Daniels, Johannes M.A.; Pals, Gerard; Haarman, Eric G.

    2014-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder affecting motile cilia. This can lead to neonatal respiratory distress, early onset upper and lower airway infections, laterality abnormalities and sub- or infertility. Although disease progression shows large individual variability, all adult patients eventually develop extensive bronchiectasis. As in cystic fibrosis, early diagnosis and frequent follow-up with microbiological control is the best therapeutic strategy, as other treatment options are lacking. PCD is underdiagnosed and diagnosed late due to clinical unawareness, limited availability of diagnostic tests and difficult interpretation of test results. Diagnosis is currently based on a combination of assessment of ciliary motion and ultrastructure by high-speed video microscopy and electron microscopy, respectively. As nasal nitric oxide is low in almost all PCD patients, these measurements can be used for screening. Although there are 26 PCD genes known so far, the genetic basis of the disease has not been unraveled in an estimated 30–40% of patients. However, the rapid discovery of novel PCD genes in recent years is expected to enable accurate genetic characterization of most patients in the near future. Large-scale use of next-generation sequencing and the availability of large ciliary proteomic and transcriptomic databases accelerate the identification of novel PCD genes, especially those that play a key role in cytoplasmic assembly of ciliary ultrastructural components. These genetic advances are revolutionizing the process of obtaining a molecular diagnosis for PCD as we speak and may ultimately lead to an increased understanding of ciliogenesis and function, providing novel handles for therapeutic interventions in PCD patients.

  13. Mesectodermal leiomyoma of the ciliary body: case report.

    PubMed Central

    White, V; Stevenson, K; Garner, A; Hungerford, J

    1989-01-01

    The clinical, light microscopical, and electron microscopical features of a mesectodermal leiomyoma of the ciliary body are presented. This exceptionally rare and apparently benign tumour is considered to be of neural crest origin. In the case described the tumour cells were seen to contain thin filaments with focal densities and conspicuous numbers of mitochondria, and smooth muscle protein was demonstrated by immunohistochemical means. Images PMID:2920150

  14. Physiological flow of Carreau fluid due to ciliary motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, S.; Munim, A.; Shaheen, A.; Hussain, S.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we have explained the ciliary motion of a Carreau fluid inside a symmetrical channel with ciliated walls. Carreau fluid equations for the two dimensional channel are interpreted by employing the low Reynolds number and long wave-length approximations. The analytical series solutions are found by employing the Homotopy perturbation method. Solutions are presented through graphs. The results for the distinct values of the constants are described by generating graphs of velocity, pressure gradient, pressure rise and stream lines.

  15. Carotenoid binding to proteins: Modeling pigment transport to lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Reszczynska, Emilia; Welc, Renata; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Trebacz, Kazimierz; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2015-10-15

    Carotenoid pigments play numerous important physiological functions in human organism. Very special is a role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the retina of an eye and in particular in its central part, the macula lutea. In the retina, carotenoids can be directly present in the lipid phase of the membranes or remain bound to the protein-pigment complexes. In this work we address a problem of binding of carotenoids to proteins and possible role of such structures in pigment transport to lipid membranes. Interaction of three carotenoids, beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin with two proteins: bovine serum albumin and glutathione S-transferase (GST) was investigated with application of molecular spectroscopy techniques: UV-Vis absorption, circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Interaction of pigment-protein complexes with model lipid bilayers formed with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine was investigated with application of FTIR, Raman imaging of liposomes and electrophysiological technique, in the planar lipid bilayer models. The results show that in all the cases of protein and pigment studied, carotenoids bind to protein and that the complexes formed can interact with membranes. This means that protein-carotenoid complexes are capable of playing physiological role in pigment transport to biomembranes. PMID:26361975

  16. Analysis of the ciliary/flagellar beating of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Foster, Kenneth W

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic flagella and cilia are alternative names, for the slender cylindrical protrusions of a cell (240nm diameter, approximately 12,800nm-long in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) that propel a cell or move fluid. Cilia are extraordinarily successful complex organelles abundantly found in animals performing many tasks. They play a direct or developmental role in the sensors of fluid flow, light, sound, gravity, smells, touch, temperature, and taste in mammals. The failure of cilia can lead to hydrocephalus, infertility, and blindness. However, in spite of their large role in human function and pathology, there is as yet no consensus on how cilia beat and perform their many functions, such as moving fluids in brain ventricles and lungs and propelling and steering sperm, larvae, and many microorganisms. One needs to understand and analyze ciliary beating and its hydrodynamic interactions. This chapter provides a guide for measuring, analyzing, and interpreting ciliary behavior in various contexts studied in the model system of Chlamydomonas. It describes: (1) how cilia work as self-organized beating structures (SOBSs), (2) the overlaid control in the cilia that optimizes the SOBS to achieve cell dispersal, phototaxis steering, and avoidance of obstacles, (3) the assay of a model intracellular signal processing system that responds to multiple external and internal inputs, choosing mode of behavior and then controlling the cilia, (4) how cilia sense their environment, and (5) potentially an assay of ciliary performance for toxicology or medical assessment. PMID:20409788

  17. Skin pigmentation evaluation in broilers fed natural and synthetic pigments.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, M P; Hirschler, E M; Sams, A R

    2005-01-01

    Broiler carcass skin color is important in the United States and Mexico. This study evaluated the use of natural and synthetic pigments in broiler diets at commercial levels. Birds were fed natural or synthetic pigments at low or high levels, simulating US and Mexican commercial practices. Skin color was measured during live production (3 to 7 wk of age) and after slaughter and chilling. The natural pigments had consistently greater skin b* values (yellowness) than the synthetic pigments. The high levels produced greater skin b* values than the low levels, regardless of source. The synthetic pigments had a slower increase in skin b* but reached the same level as the natural low by 7 wk. There was no difference in skin a* values (redness) due to pigment source or level or the age of the bird. By 7 wk, all pigment sources approached plateau levels in the blood, but the synthetic pigment diet produced higher blood levels of yellow and red pigments than the natural pigment diets. Processing intensified skin yellowness and reduced skin redness. These data suggest that although synthetic pigments might have been absorbed better than natural ones, natural pigments were more efficient at increasing skin yellowness and there were only small differences between high and low levels for each pigment source. This finding may allow reduction in pigment use and feed cost to achieve the same skin acceptance by the consumer. PMID:15685954

  18. The molecular mechanism for the spectral shifts between vertebrate ultraviolet- and violet-sensitive cone visual pigments.

    PubMed Central

    Cowing, Jill A; Poopalasundaram, Subathra; Wilkie, Susan E; Robinson, Phyllis R; Bowmaker, James K; Hunt, David M

    2002-01-01

    The short-wave-sensitive (SWS) visual pigments of vertebrate cone photoreceptors are divided into two classes on the basis of molecular identity, SWS1 and SWS2. Only the SWS1 class are present in mammals. The SWS1 pigments can be further subdivided into violet-sensitive (VS), with lambda(max) (the peak of maximal absorbance) values generally between 400 and 430 nm, and ultraviolet-sensitive (UVS), with a lambda(max)<380 nm. Phylogenetic evidence indicates that the ancestral pigment was UVS and that VS pigments have evolved separately from UVS pigments in the different vertebrate lineages. In this study, we have examined the mechanism of evolution of VS pigments in the mammalian lineage leading to present day ungulates (cow and pig). Amino acid sequence comparisons of the UVS pigments of teleost fish, amphibia, reptiles and rodents show that site 86 is invariably occupied by Phe but is replaced in bovine and porcine VS pigments by Tyr. Using site-directed mutagenesis of goldfish UVS opsin, we have shown that a Phe-86-->Tyr substitution is sufficient by itself to shift the lambda(max) of the goldfish pigment from a wild-type value of 360 nm to around 420 nm, and the reverse substitution of Tyr-86-Phe into bovine VS opsin produces a similar shift in the opposite direction. The substitution of this single amino acid is sufficient to account therefore for the evolution of bovine and porcine VS pigments. The replacement of Phe with polar Tyr at site 86 is consistent with the stabilization of Schiff-base protonation in VS pigments and the absence of protonation in UVS pigments. PMID:12099889

  19. Regulatory pathways for the stimulation of canine tracheal ciliary beat frequency by bradykinin.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, L B; Miller, I F; Yeates, D B

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of bradykinin, a potent inflammatory nanopeptide, on tracheal ciliary beat frequency in vivo were investigated using barbiturate-anaesthetized beagles. Tracheal ciliary beat frequency was measured using heterodyne mode correlation analysis laser light scattering, a technique that does not require surgical intervention. 2. Aerosolized 10(-5) M-bradykinin in 0.9% saline administered for 3 min to eight barbiturate-anaesthetized beagles stimulated tracheal ciliary beat frequency from the baseline of 5.3 +/- 0.1 Hz to a maximum of 16.6 +/- 2.0 Hz, 8 min after aerosol delivery, and ciliary beat frequency remained above baseline for the following 35 min. 3. Intravenously injected hexamethonium bromide, ipratropium bromide or indomethacin did not change baseline tracheal ciliary beat frequency. That down-regulation of ciliary beat frequency below baseline values was not observed with either the neural or the cyclooxygenase blocking agents suggests that neither of these pathways is involved in the maintenance of the observed basal ciliary beat frequency. 4. Bradykinin-induced stimulation of tracheal ciliary beat frequency is blocked by hexamethonium bromide, ipratropium bromide or indomethacin. These data suggest that the stimulation of ciliary beat frequency by bradykinin acts through both cellular cyclooxygenase and parasympathetic pathways in series. PMID:1972192

  20. Biology of pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, F.

    1981-01-01

    The many factors involved in the normal pigmentation of human skin are highly complex involving anatomic, biochemical, and genetic aspects of melanocytes in the skin and the influence of UV light and various hormones on the melanocytes. It is probably more than just coincidence that the melanocytes, which are of neurogenic origin, are so responsive to several trophic hormones produced in the brain. Understanding of the various factors involved in the normal pigmentary process is crucial to explaining the many alterations and anomalies in human pigmentation.

  1. Colour morph of a probable queen angelfish Holacanthus ciliaris from Dry Tortugas, Florida.

    PubMed

    Feeley, M W; Luiz, O J; Zurcher, N

    2009-07-01

    An unusual colour morph of a probable Holacanthus ciliaris was observed in Dry Tortugas, Florida, which can possibly be explained by recessive homozygosity, however, further testing is necessary. This variation of H. ciliaris has previously only been described at St Paul's Rocks, Mid-Atlantic Ridge. PMID:20735563

  2. GPs Meet Rare Lung Disorders Task Force factsheet: primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    de Benedictis, Fernando M

    2015-06-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disease of abnormalities of ciliary structure and function. The result is impaired mucociliary clearance, causing a variety of respiratory symptoms, and likely progression to bronchiectasis in most cases. Situs anomalies are present in nearly 50% of cases. PMID:26306119

  3. Raman microscope and quantum yield studies on the primary photochemistry of A2-visual pigments.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, B; Mathies, R A; Pardoen, J A; Lugtenburg, J

    1987-01-01

    The 77-K resonance Raman vibrational spectrum of intact goldfish rod photoreceptors containing 3,4-dehydro (A2) retinal is dominated by scattering from the 9-cis component of the steady state at all excitation wavelengths. Intact goldfish photoreceptors were regenerated with an A1-retinal chromophore to determine whether this behavior is caused by the protein or the chromophore. The resulting Raman spectrum was typical of an A1-pigment exhibiting significant scattering from all three components of the steady state: rhodopsin, bathorhodopsin, and isorhodopsin. Furthermore, regeneration of bovine opsin with A2-retinal produces a characteristic "A2-Raman spectrum" that is dominated by scattering from the 9-cis pigment. We conclude that the differences between the Raman spectra of the A1-and A2-pigments are caused by some intrinsic difference in the photochemical properties of the retinal chromophores. To quantitate these observations, the 77-K adsorption spectra and the photochemical quantum yields (phi) of the native A2-goldfish and the regenerated A2-bovine pigments were measured. In the goldfish A2-pigment, the value of phi 4 (9-cis----trans) is 0.05; phi 3 (trans----9-cis) is 0.10; and phi 2 (trans----11-cis) is 0.35. By contrast, in the bovine A1-pigment, these quantum yields are 0.10, 0.053, and 0.50, respectively. The reduced value of phi 4 and the increased value of phi 3 in the goldfish pigment confirms that the 9-cis isomer is photochemically more stable in A2-pigments. PMID:3676440

  4. The hydrolethalus syndrome protein HYLS-1 regulates formation of the ciliary gate

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qing; Zhang, Yingyi; Schouteden, Clementine; Zhang, Yuxia; Zhang, Qing; Dong, Jinhong; Wonesch, Veronika; Ling, Kun; Dammermann, Alexander; Hu, Jinghua

    2016-01-01

    Transition fibres (TFs), together with the transition zone (TZ), are basal ciliary structures thought to be crucial for cilium biogenesis and function by acting as a ciliary gate to regulate selective protein entry and exit. Here we demonstrate that the centriolar and basal body protein HYLS-1, the C. elegans orthologue of hydrolethalus syndrome protein 1, is required for TF formation, TZ organization and ciliary gating. Loss of HYLS-1 compromises the docking and entry of intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles, ciliary gating for both membrane and soluble proteins, and axoneme assembly. Additional depletion of the TF component DYF-19 in hyls-1 mutants further exacerbates TZ anomalies and completely abrogates ciliogenesis. Our data support an important role for HYLS-1 and TFs in establishment of the ciliary gate and underline the importance of selective protein entry for cilia assembly. PMID:27534274

  5. Biometry of the ciliary muscle during dynamic accommodation assessed with OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Marco; Hernandez, Victor; de Freitas, Carolina; Manns, Fabrice; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2014-02-01

    Little is known about the structural changes of the ciliary muscle with age and how it may contribute to presbyopia. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used to perform ciliary muscle biometry at different age and accommodative states with low resolution and speed. Dynamic imaging and accurate biometry of the ciliary muscle requires high-speed, high-resolution and correction of the OCT image distortions. We integrate an existing custom-made Spectral Domain OCT (SD-OCT) platform working at 840nm for biometry of the human eye with a SD-OCT system working at 1325nm that enables high-speed and high-resolution transscleral imaging of the ciliary muscle dynamically during accommodation and we developed an algorithm to provide corrected thickness measurements of the ciliary muscle.

  6. Methods for Studying Ciliary-Mediated Chemoresponse in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Megan Smith; Van Houten, Judith L

    2016-01-01

    Paramecium is a useful model organism for the study of ciliary-mediated chemical sensing and response. Here we describe ways to take advantage of Paramecium to study chemoresponse.Unicellular organisms like the ciliated protozoan Paramecium sense and respond to chemicals in their environment (Van Houten, Ann Rev Physiol 54:639-663, 1992; Van Houten, Trends Neurosci 17:62-71, 1994). A thousand or more cilia that cover Paramecium cells serve as antennae for chemical signals, similar to ciliary function in a large variety of metazoan cell types that have primary or motile cilia (Berbari et al., Curr Biol 19(13):R526-R535, 2009; Singla V, Reiter J, Science 313:629-633, 2006). The Paramecium cilia also produce the motor output of the detection of chemical cues by controlling swimming behavior. Therefore, in Paramecium the cilia serve multiple roles of detection and response.We present this chapter in three sections to describe the methods for (1) assaying populations of cells for their behavioral responses to chemicals (attraction and repulsion), (2) characterization of the chemoreceptors and associated channels of the cilia using proteomics and binding assays, and (3) electrophysiological analysis of individual cells' responses to chemicals. These methods are applied to wild type cells, mutants, transformed cells that express tagged proteins, and cells depleted of gene products by RNA Interference (RNAi). PMID:27514921

  7. Clinical spectrum of primary ciliary dyskinesia in childhood.

    PubMed

    Fretzayas, Andrew; Moustaki, Maria

    2016-02-01

    Although the triad of bronchiectasis, sinusitis and situs inversus was first described by Kartagener in 1933, the clinical spectrum of primary ciliary dyskinesia is still under investigation. Heterotaxy defects as well as upper and lower respiratory tract symptoms are the main manifestations in childhood. It is now recognized that situs inversus is encountered in only half of patients. The first lower respiratory symptoms may be present from infancy as neonatal respiratory distress. The most common lower airway manifestations are chronic wet cough, recurrent pneumonia and therapy resistant wheezing. Patients are at risk of developing bronchiectasis which may even be the presenting finding due to delayed diagnosis. Upper respiratory tract infections such as nasal congestion, nasal drainage and recurrent sinusitis as well as otologic manifestations such as otitis media or otorrhea with conductive hearing loss are also often encountered. It seems that the type of ciliary ultrastructure defects and the involved mutated genes are associated to some extent to the clinical profile. The disease, even in nowadays, is not recognized at an early age and the primary care clinician should have knowledge of its clinical spectrum in order to select appropriately the children who need further investigation for the diagnosis of this disorder. PMID:26862502

  8. Clinical spectrum of primary ciliary dyskinesia in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Fretzayas, Andrew; Moustaki, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Although the triad of bronchiectasis, sinusitis and situs inversus was first described by Kartagener in 1933, the clinical spectrum of primary ciliary dyskinesia is still under investigation. Heterotaxy defects as well as upper and lower respiratory tract symptoms are the main manifestations in childhood. It is now recognized that situs inversus is encountered in only half of patients. The first lower respiratory symptoms may be present from infancy as neonatal respiratory distress. The most common lower airway manifestations are chronic wet cough, recurrent pneumonia and therapy resistant wheezing. Patients are at risk of developing bronchiectasis which may even be the presenting finding due to delayed diagnosis. Upper respiratory tract infections such as nasal congestion, nasal drainage and recurrent sinusitis as well as otologic manifestations such as otitis media or otorrhea with conductive hearing loss are also often encountered. It seems that the type of ciliary ultrastructure defects and the involved mutated genes are associated to some extent to the clinical profile. The disease, even in nowadays, is not recognized at an early age and the primary care clinician should have knowledge of its clinical spectrum in order to select appropriately the children who need further investigation for the diagnosis of this disorder. PMID:26862502

  9. Ciliary disturbances in syndromal and non-syndromal obesity

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Tamar I.; van Haelst, Mieke M.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an increasing global health problem. Although it is mainly thought to be due to the changing obesogenic environment, the genetic contribution has been estimated between 40–70%. A number of genes have been identified that cause obesity in animals as well as in humans. Rare highly penetrant monogenic forms of obesity can cause both syndromal and non-syndromal forms of obesity. Bardet-Biedl syndrome and Alström syndrome are well known monogenic obesity syndromes caused by primary cilia defects. The pathogenesis of the obesity phenotype in these disorders is however not fully understood. Disturbance of the appetite regulation system, abnormalities in body composition and decreased energy expenditure have been suggested to cause obesity in these ciliopathies. There are currently 19 known genes associated with Bardet-Biedl syndrome and one Alström syndrome gene. Although ciliopathy genes have been described primarily in these syndromal obesity disorders, non-syndromal obesity may also result from disturbed cilia function. There are multiple genes associated with both obesity and ciliary function. Here we provide an overview of the current knowledge of the clinical, pathophysiological and genetic aspects of obesity in patients with ciliary defects.

  10. Automatic analysis of ciliary beat frequency using optical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figl, Michael; Lechner, Manuel; Werther, Tobias; Horak, Fritz; Hummel, Johann; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) can be a useful parameter for diagnosis of several diseases, as e.g. primary ciliary dyskinesia. (PCD). CBF computation is usually done using manual evaluation of high speed video sequences, a tedious, observer dependent, and not very accurate procedure. We used the OpenCV's pyramidal implementation of the Lukas-Kanade algorithm for optical flow computation and applied this to certain objects to follow the movements. The objects were chosen by their contrast applying the corner detection by Shi and Tomasi. Discrimination between background/noise and cilia by a frequency histogram allowed to compute the CBF. Frequency analysis was done using the Fourier transform in matlab. The correct number of Fourier summands was found by the slope in an approximation curve. The method showed to be usable to distinguish between healthy and diseased samples. However there remain difficulties in automatically identifying the cilia, and also in finding enough high contrast cilia in the image. Furthermore the some of the higher contrast cilia are lost (and sometimes found) by the method, an easy way to distinguish the correct sub-path of a point's path have yet to be found in the case where the slope methods doesn't work.

  11. Nephrocystin proteins NPHP5 and Cep290 regulate BBSome integrity, ciliary trafficking and cargo delivery

    PubMed Central

    Barbelanne, Marine; Hossain, Delowar; Chan, David Puth; Peränen, Johan; Tsang, William Y.

    2015-01-01

    Proper functioning of cilia, hair-like structures responsible for sensation and locomotion, requires nephrocystin-5 (NPHP5) and a multi-subunit complex called the Bardet–Biedl syndrome (BBS)ome, but their precise relationship is not understood. The BBSome is involved in the trafficking of membrane cargos to cilia. While it is known that a loss of any single subunit prevents ciliary trafficking of the BBSome and its cargos, the mechanisms underlying ciliary entry of this complex are not well characterized. Here, we report that a transition zone protein NPHP5 contains two separate BBS-binding sites and interacts with the BBSome to mediate its integrity. Depletion of NPHP5, or expression of NPHP5 mutant missing one binding site, specifically leads to dissociation of BBS2 and BBS5 from the BBSome and loss of ciliary BBS2 and BBS5 without compromising the ability of the other subunits to traffic into cilia. Depletion of Cep290, another transition zone protein that directly binds to NPHP5, causes additional dissociation of BBS8 and loss of ciliary BBS8. Furthermore, delivery of BBSome cargos, smoothened, VPAC2 and Rab8a, to the ciliary compartment is completely disabled in the absence of single BBS subunits, but is selectively impaired in the absence of NPHP5 or Cep290. These findings define a new role of NPHP5 and Cep290 in controlling integrity and ciliary trafficking of the BBSome, which in turn impinge on the delivery of ciliary cargo. PMID:25552655

  12. Control of ciliary motility by Ca sup 2+ : Integration of Ca sup 2+ -dependent functions and targets for Ca sup 2+ action

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    To identify functions that regulate Ca{sup 2+}-induced ciliary reversal in Paramecium, mutants defective in terminating depolarization-induced backward swimming were selected. Six independent recessive mutations (k-shy) comprising two complementation groups, k-shyA and k-shyB, were identified. All mutants exhibited prolonged backward swimming in depolarizing solutions. Voltage clamp studies revealed that mutant Ca{sup 2+} current amplitudes were reduced, but could be restored to wild type levels by EGTA injection. The recovery of the mutant Ca{sup 2+} current from Ca{sup 2+}-dependent inactivation, and the decay of the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent Na{sup +} currents after depolarization were slow in k-shy compared to wild type. To identify protein targets of Ca{sup 2+} action, ciliary proteins that interact with calmodulin (CaM) were characterized. With a {sup 125}I-CaM blot assay, several CaM-binding proteins were identified including axonemal, soluble, and membrane-bound polypeptides. Competitive displacement studies with unlabeled Paramecium CaM, bovine CaM, and troponinC suggested that both protein types bind CaM with high affinity and specificity. To examine the presence of CaM-binding sites in intact axonemes, a filtration binding assay was developed.

  13. A Unifying Concept of Uveal Pigment Cell Distribution and Dissemination Based on an Animal Model: Insights into Ocular Melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Christoph; Wackernagel, Werner; Grinninger, Petra; Mayer, Christoph; Schwab, Katharina; Langmann, Gerald; Richtig, Erika; Wedrich, Andreas; Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer; Zalaudek, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Pigmented cells are derived from neural crest cells, which migrate along the peripheral nerve sheets into their specific final region. During their migration, cells progressively acquire pigment-producing capabilities, maturation, and the shape of melanocytes. These insights, along with specific clinical characteristics of melanocytic nevi, have led to new concepts of cutaneous, periocular, and iris nevogenesis. To further elucidate the specific ocular embryogenic melanoblast distribution and dissemination - that could explain the distinct distribution of uveal melanocytic neoplasms - we investigated the ocular pigmentation of dogs affected by a specific mutation called Merle, which results in either pigment- (wild type) or non-pigment- (mutated type) producing cells. Based on our observations, we propose a unifying concept of uveal pigment cell distribution and dissemination, which postulates melanoblast migration and maturation following the trigeminal V1 branch and, later, their entrance into the eye along the ciliary nerves and their finest iris branches. Our concept provides an explanation not only for the specific distribution of ocular melanocytic lesions, including uveal and iris nevi, but also for the different locations depending on the metastatic potential of the ocular melanoma. Though speculative, the higher metastatic potential of posterior uveal melanomas compared to iris melanomas may be related to a less differentiated stage in the maturation of migrating melanocytes in the posterior segment compared to the anterior segment of the eye. However, there is a need of further studies focusing on cell differentiation markers of melanocytes at different locations in the eye. PMID:27002320

  14. The green-absorbing Drosophila Rh6 visual pigment contains a blue-shifting amino acid substitution that is conserved in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, Ernesto; Farrell, David M; Zheng, Lijun; Phistry, Meridee; Bagg, Eve E; Britt, Steven G

    2009-02-27

    The molecular mechanisms that regulate invertebrate visual pigment absorption are poorly understood. Through sequence analysis and functional investigation of vertebrate visual pigments, numerous amino acid substitutions important for this adaptive process have been identified. Here we describe a serine/alanine (S/A) substitution in long wavelength-absorbing Drosophila visual pigments that occurs at a site corresponding to Ala-292 in bovine rhodopsin. This S/A substitution accounts for a 10-17-nm absorption shift in visual pigments of this class. Additionally, we demonstrate that substitution of a cysteine at the same site, as occurs in the blue-absorbing Rh5 pigment, accounts for a 4-nm shift. Substitutions at this site are the first spectrally significant amino acid changes to be identified for invertebrate pigments sensitive to visible light and are the first evidence of a conserved tuning mechanism in vertebrate and invertebrate pigments of this class. PMID:19126545

  15. Freeze-etching studies on the ciliary necklace in the rat and chick.

    PubMed Central

    Breipohl, W; Mendoza, A S; Miragall, F

    1980-01-01

    The existence of a ciliary necklace in kinocilia, atypical cilia and mature and differentiating sensory cilia is described in rat and chicken. In addition to parallel horizontally oriented rows of the ciliary necklace, irregular forms of intramembranous particle (IMP) aggregations are also described. The function of the ciliary necklace is discussed, special attention being given to the appearance of circular rows of IMP prior to the outgrowth of olfactory cilia and to the existence of dynein arms in these. Evidence is provided for the motility of olfactory cilia in the chick. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:7429968

  16. Intraocular electro-optic lens with ciliary muscle controlled accommodation.

    PubMed

    Doornaert, Dries; Glorieux, Christ; De Gersem, Herbert; Puers, Robert; Spileers, Werner; Blanckaert, Johan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a concept is proposed of an intraocular lens implant with electro-optic accommodation of a variable-focus hybrid liquid-crystal-based lens. The dioptric strength of the lens is electronically controlled by a signal that is derived from the change of inductance of a sensing coil due to a marker implanted in the nearby contracting or decontracting ciliary muscle. Analytical, numerical and experimental results are reported on the dependency of the frequency of a Colpitts oscillator circuit on the location of a nearby conductive marker. A concept is also reported on the use as an electro-optic lens of a device based on a liquid crystal in planar alignment, which is held between a flat and a curved window coated with optically transparent and electrically conductive layers. PMID:24110406

  17. Investigation of ciliary propulsion of Tetrahymena Pyriformis in viscous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Ilyong; Lyubich, Eva; Valles, James

    2014-03-01

    Recent experiments by our group showed that the ciliated protist Paramecium Caudatumswims with a constant propulsive force in solutions with viscosities 1 < η/ ηw<7 where ηw is the viscosity of water. Measurements of the geometry of its helical swimming trajectory combined with high speed video of the ciliary motion provided insight into this behavior. Using a phenomenological model we found that the body cilia beating frequency decreases while the beating angle remains roughly constant to produce the constant propulsive force dependence on viscosity. In this talk, we present studies of another ciliated protozoa, Tetrahymena Pyriformis to determine whether the behavior of Paramecium is general. Preliminary results indicate that Tetrahymena Pyriformis also swims with a nearly constant propulsive force with increasing viscosity. Investigations similar to those performed on Paramecium are underway and the latest results will be presented. This work was supported by NSF PHY0750360 and at the NHMFL by NSF DMR-0084173

  18. Genotypic Variation for Salinity Tolerance in Cenchrus ciliaris L.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dakheel, Abdullah J.; Hussain, M. Iftikhar

    2016-01-01

    Scarcity of irrigation water and increasing soil salinization has threatened the sustainability of forage production in arid and semi-arid region around the globe. Introduction of salt-tolerant perennial species is a promising alternative to overcome forage deficit to meet future livestock needs in salt-affected areas. This study presents the results of a salinity tolerance screening trial which was carried out in plastic pots buried in the open field for 160 buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris L.) accessions for three consecutive years (2003–2005). The plastic pots were filled with sand, organic, and peat moss mix and were irrigated with four different quality water (EC 0, 10, 15, and 20 dS m−1). The results indicate that the average annual dry weights (DW) were in the range from 122.5 to 148.9 g/pot in control; 96.4–133.8 g/pot at 10 dS m−1; 65.6–80.4 g/pot at 15 dS m−1, and 55.4–65.6 g/pot at 20 dS m−1. The highest DW (148.9 g/pot) was found with accession 49 and the lowest with accession 23. Principle component analysis shows that PC-1 contributed 81.8% of the total variability, while PC-2 depicted 11.7% of the total variation among C. ciliaris accessions for DW. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed that a number of accessions collected from diverse regions could be grouped into a single cluster. Accessions 3, 133, 159, 30, 23, 142, 141, 95, 49, 129, 124, and 127 were stable, salt tolerant, and produced good dry biomass yield. These accessions demonstrate sufficient salinity tolerance potential for promotion in marginal lands to enhance farm productivity and reduce rural poverty. PMID:27516762

  19. Genotypic Variation for Salinity Tolerance in Cenchrus ciliaris L.

    PubMed

    Al-Dakheel, Abdullah J; Hussain, M Iftikhar

    2016-01-01

    Scarcity of irrigation water and increasing soil salinization has threatened the sustainability of forage production in arid and semi-arid region around the globe. Introduction of salt-tolerant perennial species is a promising alternative to overcome forage deficit to meet future livestock needs in salt-affected areas. This study presents the results of a salinity tolerance screening trial which was carried out in plastic pots buried in the open field for 160 buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris L.) accessions for three consecutive years (2003-2005). The plastic pots were filled with sand, organic, and peat moss mix and were irrigated with four different quality water (EC 0, 10, 15, and 20 dS m(-1)). The results indicate that the average annual dry weights (DW) were in the range from 122.5 to 148.9 g/pot in control; 96.4-133.8 g/pot at 10 dS m(-1); 65.6-80.4 g/pot at 15 dS m(-1), and 55.4-65.6 g/pot at 20 dS m(-1). The highest DW (148.9 g/pot) was found with accession 49 and the lowest with accession 23. Principle component analysis shows that PC-1 contributed 81.8% of the total variability, while PC-2 depicted 11.7% of the total variation among C. ciliaris accessions for DW. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed that a number of accessions collected from diverse regions could be grouped into a single cluster. Accessions 3, 133, 159, 30, 23, 142, 141, 95, 49, 129, 124, and 127 were stable, salt tolerant, and produced good dry biomass yield. These accessions demonstrate sufficient salinity tolerance potential for promotion in marginal lands to enhance farm productivity and reduce rural poverty. PMID:27516762

  20. Raman Spectroscopy of Microbial Pigments

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid nondestructive technique providing spectroscopic and structural information on both organic and inorganic molecular compounds. Extensive applications for the method in the characterization of pigments have been found. Due to the high sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy for the detection of chlorophylls, carotenoids, scytonemin, and a range of other pigments found in the microbial world, it is an excellent technique to monitor the presence of such pigments, both in pure cultures and in environmental samples. Miniaturized portable handheld instruments are available; these instruments can be used to detect pigments in microbiological samples of different types and origins under field conditions. PMID:24682303

  1. Septins 2, 7 and 9 and MAP4 colocalize along the axoneme in the primary cilium and control ciliary length

    PubMed Central

    Ghossoub, Rania; Hu, Qicong; Failler, Marion; Rouyez, Marie-Christine; Spitzbarth, Benjamin; Mostowy, Serge; Wolfrum, Uwe; Saunier, Sophie; Cossart, Pascale; JamesNelson, W.; Benmerah, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Summary Septins are a large, evolutionarily conserved family of GTPases that form hetero-oligomers and interact with the actin-based cytoskeleton and microtubules. They are involved in scaffolding functions, and form diffusion barriers in budding yeast, the sperm flagellum and the base of primary cilia of kidney epithelial cells. We investigated the role of septins in the primary cilium of retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells, and found that SEPT2 forms a 1:1:1 complex with SEPT7 and SEPT9 and that the three members of this complex colocalize along the length of the axoneme. Similar to observations in kidney epithelial cells, depletion of cilium-localized septins by siRNA-based approaches inhibited ciliogenesis. MAP4, which is a binding partner of SEPT2 and controls the accessibility of septins to microtubules, was also localized to the axoneme where it appeared to negatively regulate ciliary length. Taken together, our data provide new insights into the functions and regulation of septins and MAP4 in the organization of the primary cilium and microtubule-based activities in cells. PMID:23572511

  2. Rod Visual Pigment Optimizes Active State to Achieve Efficient G Protein Activation as Compared with Cone Visual Pigments*

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Keiichi; Imamoto, Yasushi; Maeda, Ryo; Yamashita, Takahiro; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Most vertebrate retinas contain two types of photoreceptor cells, rods and cones, which show different photoresponses to mediate scotopic and photopic vision, respectively. These cells contain different types of visual pigments, rhodopsin and cone visual pigments, respectively, but little is known about the molecular properties of cone visual pigments under physiological conditions, making it difficult to link the molecular properties of rhodopsin and cone visual pigments with the differences in photoresponse between rods and cones. Here we prepared bovine and mouse rhodopsin (bvRh and mRh) and chicken and mouse green-sensitive cone visual pigments (cG and mG) embedded in nanodiscs and applied time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to compare their Gt activation efficiencies. Rhodopsin exhibited greater Gt activation efficiencies than cone visual pigments. Especially, the Gt activation efficiency of mRh was about 2.5-fold greater than that of mG at 37 °C, which is consistent with our previous electrophysiological data of knock-in mice. Although the active state (Meta-II) was in equilibrium with inactive states (Meta-I and Meta-III), quantitative determination of Meta-II in the equilibrium showed that the Gt activation efficiency per Meta-II of bvRh was also greater than those of cG and mG. These results indicated that efficient Gt activation by rhodopsin, resulting from an optimized active state of rhodopsin, is one of the causes of the high amplification efficiency of rods. PMID:24375403

  3. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia: An Update on New Diagnostic Modalities and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Haver, Kenan; Casey, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic condition affecting approximately 1 in 15,000–20,000 individuals, and the majority of cases exhibit an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. However, genetic heterogenicity is seen in PCD and reflects the complexity of ciliary structure and biogenesis. There have been many recent advances in the diagnosis and management of PCD in the last few years, including advanced genetic sequencing, nasal nitric oxide assay, and ciliary motility tests. This article focuses on the ultrastructure and pathophysiology of ciliary dyskinesias, along with a review of clinical features, screening, and diagnostic tests. It also reflects upon the diagnostic challenge caused by the diverse clinical presentation, which will be of great value to pediatricians for considering PCD in their differential list, henceforth leading to early recognition and management, along with awareness of the recent advances in the field of genetics and other techniques for diagnosis of this condition. PMID:24963453

  4. Measurement of ciliary flow generated on the surface of tracheal lumen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyota, Koki; Ueno, Hironori; Ishikawa, Takuji; Numayama-Tsuruta, Keiko; Imai, Yohsuke; Omori, Toshihiro; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2012-11-01

    Although we consistently take air with virus and bacteria, these harmful substances are trapped on the surface of tracheal lumen and transported toward larynx from the trachea and bronchi by effective ciliary motion and swallowed it (clearance function). However, the 3-dimensional flow field generated by inhomogeneously distributed ciliary cells are largely unknown. In this study, we first succeeded to measure the ciliated cells' density by staining actin of the epithelial cells and tubulin of the cilia, respectively. Second, we analyzed the ciliary motion by labeling the tip of cilia with fluorescent particles, and tracking their movements to understand the mechanism of the flow generation. Last, in order to clarify the flow field induced by the ciliary motion, we measured the motion of tracer particles on the surface of tracheal epithelial cells by a confocal micro-PTV system. The results show that the mean velocity and the velocity disturbance decayed rapidly as the height from the epithelial cells were increased.

  5. Effect of azelastine on sulphur dioxide induced impairment of ciliary motility in airway epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Tamaoki, J; Chiyotani, A; Sakai, N; Takeyama, K; Konno, K

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--The effect of azelastine on airway mucociliary transport function was studied by measuring ciliary motility of human bronchial epithelium in vitro with a photoelectric method. METHOD--Bronchial epithelial cells were obtained by fibreoptic bronchoscopy, mounted in a Rose chamber, and perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution. The preparations were placed on a microscope stage equipped with an illuminator, and the variations of light intensity caused by ciliary beating were detected by a photometer. RESULTS--The addition of azelastine to the perfusate increased ciliary beat frequency (CBF) in a dose dependent manner without ciliary discoordination. The mean (SE) maximal increase from the baseline value and the concentration required to produce a half maximal effect were 27.0 (4.2)% and 9.2 x 10(-6) mol/l, respectively. Exposure of the cells to the perfusate containing 3 ppm sulphur dioxide rapidly decreased CBF by 59.2 (5.0)%, and was accompanied by a reduction in intracellular cyclic AMP levels from 38.1 (4.3) to 10.1 (2.4) pmol/mg protein. This effect was prevented by pretreatment of cells with azelastine in a dose dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS--Azelastine not only stimulates ciliary motility of airway epithelium and hence mucociliary transport function, but may also protect against sulphur dioxide induced ciliary dysfunction, probably by inhibiting intracellular cyclic AMP loss. PMID:8322244

  6. Perivascular Epithelioid Cell Tumor Arising from Ciliary Body Treated by Local Resection

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Hiroshi; Usui, Yoshihiko; Nagao, Toshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Aims Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) is a mesenchymal neoplasm originating from perivascular myoid cells. We report a case of PEComa arising from the ciliary body. Methods Case report. Results A 13-year-old girl was referred to our department with a clinical diagnosis of ciliary body melanoma in her right eye. Her visual acuity was 20/600 OD. Slit-lamp examination revealed a brown tumor behind the iris. The ocular fundus could not be observed due to a cataract. Ultrasonography depicted an oval mass approximately 10 mm in diameter at the ciliary body. The tumor was successfully treated by local resection, and the patient's visual acuity improved to 20/20. Histopathological and immunohistochemical findings of the excised tumor were compatible with the diagnosis of PEComa of the ciliary body. No local recurrence of the tumor was observed for over 4 years after surgery. Conclusion A very rare case of PEComa of the ciliary body was successfully treated by local resection, with favorable visual outcome and no recurrence for several years. PEComa can be differentiated from other ciliary body tumors by immunohistochemical study.

  7. Picking up speed: advances in the genetics of primary ciliary dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Horani, Amjad; Brody, Steven L; Ferkol, Thomas W

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal ciliary axonemal structure and function are linked to the growing class of genetic disorders collectively known as ciliopathies, and our understanding of the complex genetics and functional phenotypes of these conditions has rapidly expanded. While progress in genetics and biology has uncovered numerous cilia-related syndromes, primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) remains the sole genetic disorder of motile cilia dysfunction. The first disease-causing mutation was described just thirteen years ago, and since that time the pace of gene discovery has quickened. These mutations separate into genes that encode axonemal motor proteins, structural and regulatory elements, and cytoplasmic proteins that are involved in assembly and preassembly of ciliary elements. These findings have yielded novel insights into the processes involved in ciliary assembly, structure, and function, which will allow us to better understand the clinical manifestations of primary ciliary dyskinesia. Moreover, advances in techniques for genetic screening and sequencing are improving diagnostic approaches. In this manuscript, we will describe the structure, function, and emerging genetics of respiratory cilia, review the genotype-phenotype relationships of motor ciliopathies, and explore the implications of recent discoveries for diagnostic testing for primary ciliary dyskinesia. PMID:24192704

  8. Quantification of the ciliary muscle and crystalline lens interaction during accommodation with synchronous OCT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Marco; de Freitas, Carolina; Williams, Siobhan; Hernandez, Victor M.; Cabot, Florence; Yesilirmak, Nilufer; Alawa, Karam; Chang, Yu-Cherng; Yoo, Sonia H.; Gregori, Giovanni; Parel, Jean-Marie; Manns, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Two SD-OCT systems and a dual channel accommodation target were combined and precisely synchronized to simultaneously image the anterior segment and the ciliary muscle during dynamic accommodation. The imaging system simultaneously generates two synchronized OCT image sequences of the anterior segment and ciliary muscle with an imaging speed of 13 frames per second. The system was used to acquire OCT image sequences of a non-presbyopic and a pre-presbyopic subject accommodating in response to step changes in vergence. The image sequences were processed to extract dynamic morphological data from the crystalline lens and the ciliary muscle. The synchronization between the OCT systems allowed the precise correlation of anatomical changes occurring in the crystalline lens and ciliary muscle at identical time points during accommodation. To describe the dynamic interaction between the crystalline lens and ciliary muscle, we introduce accommodation state diagrams that display the relation between anatomical changes occurring in the accommodating crystalline lens and ciliary muscle. PMID:27446660

  9. ICK is essential for cell type-specific ciliogenesis and the regulation of ciliary transport

    PubMed Central

    Chaya, Taro; Omori, Yoshihiro; Kuwahara, Ryusuke; Furukawa, Takahisa

    2014-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are formed and maintained by intraflagellar transport (IFT) and play important roles in sensing and moving across species. At the distal tip of the cilia/flagella, IFT complexes turn around to switch from anterograde to retrograde transport; however, the underlying regulatory mechanism is unclear. Here, we identified ICK localization at the tip of cilia as a regulator of ciliary transport. In ICK-deficient mice, we found ciliary defects in neuronal progenitor cells with Hedgehog signal defects. ICK-deficient cells formed cilia with mislocalized Hedgehog signaling components. Loss of ICK caused the accumulation of IFT-A, IFT-B, and BBSome components at the ciliary tips. In contrast, overexpression of ICK induced the strong accumulation of IFT-B, but not IFT-A or BBSome components at ciliary tips. In addition, ICK directly phosphorylated Kif3a, while inhibition of this Kif3a phosphorylation affected ciliary formation. Our results suggest that ICK is a Kif3a kinase and essential for proper ciliogenesis in development by regulating ciliary transport at the tip of cilia. PMID:24797473

  10. Systematic discovery of novel ciliary genes through functional genomics in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Choksi, Semil P.; Babu, Deepak; Lau, Doreen; Yu, Xianwen; Roy, Sudipto

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based hair-like organelles that play many important roles in development and physiology, and are implicated in a rapidly expanding spectrum of human diseases, collectively termed ciliopathies. Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), one of the most prevalent of ciliopathies, arises from abnormalities in the differentiation or motility of the motile cilia. Despite their biomedical importance, a methodical functional screen for ciliary genes has not been carried out in any vertebrate at the organismal level. We sought to systematically discover novel motile cilia genes by identifying the genes induced by Foxj1, a winged-helix transcription factor that has an evolutionarily conserved role as the master regulator of motile cilia biogenesis. Unexpectedly, we find that the majority of the Foxj1-induced genes have not been associated with cilia before. To characterize these novel putative ciliary genes, we subjected 50 randomly selected candidates to a systematic functional phenotypic screen in zebrafish embryos. Remarkably, we find that over 60% are required for ciliary differentiation or function, whereas 30% of the proteins encoded by these genes localize to motile cilia. We also show that these genes regulate the proper differentiation and beating of motile cilia. This collection of Foxj1-induced genes will be invaluable for furthering our understanding of ciliary biology, and in the identification of new mutations underlying ciliary disorders in humans. PMID:25139857

  11. Defects in ciliary localization of Nek8 is associated with cystogenesis.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Melissa L; Galtseva, Alevtina; Manning, Danielle K; Beier, David R; Rosenblum, Norman D; Quarmby, Lynne M

    2008-03-01

    Mutations in the human NIMA (Never in Mitosis gene A)-related kinase 8 (Nek8) are associated with a rare form of the juvenile renal cystic disease, nephronophthisis type 9, and mutations in murine Nek8 cause renal cysts in jck mice. Cystogenesis involves dysfunctional ciliary signaling, and we have previously reported that Nek8 localizes to the primary cilium in mouse kidney epithelial cells. We now report that in developing mouse kidney, Nek8 is detected in the cilia of a subset of ureteric-bud-derived tubules at embryonic day (E)15.5. An increasing proportion of ureteric-bud-derived tubules express ciliary Nek8 until E18.5. Postnatal day 1 and 7 Nek8 is observed with equal frequency in both ureteric-bud and non-ureteric-bud-derived tubules. To investigate the cell biological consequences of kinase-deficient and jck mutant forms of Nek8, we transiently expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged constructs in vitro. Mutations in the kinase and C-terminal domains of Nek8 adversely affected ciliary targeting but did not affect ciliogenesis or ciliary length. Consistent with these in vitro observations, kidneys from homozygous jck mice revealed reduced ciliary expression of Nek8 compared with kidneys from heterozygous (unaffected) mice. These data indicate that the ciliary localization of Nek8 in a subset of ureteric-bud-derived kidney tubules is essential for maintaining the integrity of those tubules in the mammalian kidney. PMID:18189147

  12. Nonphotosynthetic Pigments as Potential Biosignatures

    PubMed Central

    Cockell, Charles S.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous work on possible surface reflectance biosignatures for Earth-like planets has typically focused on analogues to spectral features produced by photosynthetic organisms on Earth, such as the vegetation red edge. Although oxygenic photosynthesis, facilitated by pigments evolved to capture photons, is the dominant metabolism on our planet, pigmentation has evolved for multiple purposes to adapt organisms to their environment. We present an interdisciplinary study of the diversity and detectability of nonphotosynthetic pigments as biosignatures, which includes a description of environments that host nonphotosynthetic biologically pigmented surfaces, and a lab-based experimental analysis of the spectral and broadband color diversity of pigmented organisms on Earth. We test the utility of broadband color to distinguish between Earth-like planets with significant coverage of nonphotosynthetic pigments and those with photosynthetic or nonbiological surfaces, using both 1-D and 3-D spectral models. We demonstrate that, given sufficient surface coverage, nonphotosynthetic pigments could significantly impact the disk-averaged spectrum of a planet. However, we find that due to the possible diversity of organisms and environments, and the confounding effects of the atmosphere and clouds, determination of substantial coverage by biologically produced pigments would be difficult with broadband colors alone and would likely require spectrally resolved data. Key Words: Biosignatures—Exoplanets—Halophiles—Pigmentation—Reflectance spectroscopy—Spectral models. Astrobiology 15, 341–361. PMID:25941875

  13. Nonphotosynthetic pigments as potential biosignatures.

    PubMed

    Schwieterman, Edward W; Cockell, Charles S; Meadows, Victoria S

    2015-05-01

    Previous work on possible surface reflectance biosignatures for Earth-like planets has typically focused on analogues to spectral features produced by photosynthetic organisms on Earth, such as the vegetation red edge. Although oxygenic photosynthesis, facilitated by pigments evolved to capture photons, is the dominant metabolism on our planet, pigmentation has evolved for multiple purposes to adapt organisms to their environment. We present an interdisciplinary study of the diversity and detectability of nonphotosynthetic pigments as biosignatures, which includes a description of environments that host nonphotosynthetic biologically pigmented surfaces, and a lab-based experimental analysis of the spectral and broadband color diversity of pigmented organisms on Earth. We test the utility of broadband color to distinguish between Earth-like planets with significant coverage of nonphotosynthetic pigments and those with photosynthetic or nonbiological surfaces, using both 1-D and 3-D spectral models. We demonstrate that, given sufficient surface coverage, nonphotosynthetic pigments could significantly impact the disk-averaged spectrum of a planet. However, we find that due to the possible diversity of organisms and environments, and the confounding effects of the atmosphere and clouds, determination of substantial coverage by biologically produced pigments would be difficult with broadband colors alone and would likely require spectrally resolved data. PMID:25941875

  14. Comparative chromatography of chloroplast pigment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandolfo, M.; Sherma, J.; Strain, H. H.

    1969-01-01

    Methods for isolation of low concentration pigments of the cocklebur species are described. The methods entail two step chromatography so that the different sorption properties of the various pigments in varying column parameters can be utilized. Columnar and thin layer methods are compared. Many conditions influence separability of the chloroplasts.

  15. New directions in phthalocyanine pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Diep VO

    1994-01-01

    Phthalocyanines have been used as a pigment in coatings and related applications for many years. These pigments are some of the most stable organic pigments known. The phthalo blue and green pigments have been known to be ultraviolet (UV) stable and thermally stable to over 400 C. These phthalocyanines are both a semiconductor and photoconductor, exhibiting catalytic activity and photostabilization capability of polymers. Many metal free and metallic phthalocyanine derivatives have been prepared. Development of the new classes of phthalocyanine pigment could be used as coating on NASA spacecraft material such as glass to decrease the optical degradation from UV light, the outside of the space station modules for UV protection, and coating on solar cells to increase lifetime and efficiency.

  16. [INHERITANCE OF EPIDERMIS PIGMENTATION IN SUNFLOWER ACHENES].

    PubMed

    Gorohivets, N A; Vedmedeva, E V

    2016-01-01

    Inheritance of epidermis pigmentation in the pericarp of sunflower seeds was studied. Inheritance of pigmentation was confirmed by three alleles Ew (epidermis devoid of pigmentation), Estr (epidermal pigmentation in strips), Edg (solid pigmentation). Dominance of the lack of epidermis pigmentation over striped epidermis and striped epidermis over solid pigmentation was established. It was shown that the striped epidermis pigmentation and the presence of testa layer are controlled by two genes, expression of which is independent from each other. Yellowish hypodermis was discovered in the sample I2K2218, which is inherited monogenically dominantly. PMID:27281924

  17. RPE and neuronal differentiation of allotransplantated porcine ciliary epithelium-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Guduric-Fuchs, Jasenka; Chen, Wing; Price, Henrietta; Archer, Desmond B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Cell replacement has the potential to be applied as a therapeutic strategy in retinal degenerative diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) for which no adequate pharmacological and surgical treatments are currently available. Although controversial, the use of ciliary epithelium (CE)-derived cells is supported by evidence showing their differentiation into retinal phenotypes. This study examines the differentiation potential of porcine CE-derived cells in vitro and their survival, migration, morphological characteristics, and immunohistochemical phenotype in vivo, upon transplantation into the subretinal space of normal pigs. Methods Cells were isolated from the CE of postnatal pigs and were grown in a suspension sphere culture. Differentiation was assessed in vitro after exposure to laminin and the addition of serum. For transplantation, CE-derived spheres were dissociated, labeled with CM-DiI vital dye, and the cells were injected subretinally into one eye of eight week-old allorecipients. The eyes were examined at eight days and at two and four weeks after transplantation. Results Cells positive for neuronal and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) markers were detected by immunohistochemistry in differentiation cultures. Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT–PCR) revealed upregulation of neuronal markers after in vitro differentiation. CM-DiI dye-labeled CE-derived cells dissociated from primary spheres survived for up to four weeks after transplantation in vivo. Some of the surviving cells migrated distantly from the injection site. Large clusters of transplanted cells integrated into the RPE layer and multilayered RPE-like structures positive for RPE65 were often observed. Grafted cells were also identified in the neuroretina where 5%–10% were positive for recoverin, protein kinase C alpha (PKCα), and calbindin. Conclusions The efficient conversion to an RPE-like phenotype suggests that CE

  18. Natural pigments and sacred art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelekian, Lena, ,, Lady

    2010-05-01

    Since the dawn of mankind, cavemen has expressed himself through art. The earliest known cave paintings date to some 32,000 years ago and used 4 colours derived from the earth. These pigments were iron oxides and known as ochres, blacks and whites. All pigments known by the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans and Renaissance man were natural and it was not until the 18th century that synthetic pigments were made and widely used. Until that time all art, be it sacred or secular used only natural pigments, of which the preparation of many have been lost or rarely used because of their tedious preparation. As a geologist, a mineralogist and an artist specializing in iconography, I have been able to rediscover 89 natural pigments extracted from minerals. I use these pigments to paint my icons in the traditional Byzantine manner and also to restore old icons, bringing back their glamour and conserving them for years to come. The use of the natural pigments in its proper way also helps to preserve the traditional skills of the iconographer. In the ancient past, pigments were extremely precious. Many took an exceedingly long journey to reach the artists, and came from remote countries. Research into these pigments is the work of history, geography and anthropology. It is an interesting journey in itself to discover that the blue aquamarines came from Afghanistan, the reds from Spain, the greens Africa, and so on. In this contribution I will be describing the origins, preparation and use of some natural pigments, together with their history and provenance. Additionally, I will show how the natural pigments are used in the creation of an icon. Being a geologist iconographer, for me, is a sacrement that transforms that which is earthly, material and natural into a thing of beauty that is sacred. As bread and wine in the Eucharist, water during baptism and oil in Holy Union transmit sanctification to the beholder, natural pigments do the same when one considers an icon. The

  19. [Sepsis caused by pigmented and no pigmented Chromobacterium violaceum].

    PubMed

    Guevara, Armando; Salomón, Marlly; Oliveros, María; Guevara, Esmirna; Guevara, Milarys; Medina, Laida

    2007-10-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum sepsis is rare but associated with a high mortality rate. We report a fatal case of C. violaceum sepsis in a 6 years old Venezuelan indian boy. Clinical manifestations were fever and swelling in the right inguinal region. The initial diagnosis was an appendicular plastron. Appendicectomy was performed and during surgery a right psoas abscess was identified that resulted culture positive for pigmented C. violaceum. Blood cultures were positive for a pigmented and non pigmented C. violaceum strain. Imipenem and amikacin were administered despite of which the child died 9 days after hospital admission. PMID:17989847

  20. [Morpho-functional characteristics of lens ciliary body as a key mechanism of accommodation in human eye].

    PubMed

    Svetlova, O V; Makarov, F N; Kotliar, K E; Zaseeva, M V; Koshits, I N

    2003-01-01

    With the aid of ophthalmological, morphological, biomechanical and regulation theory methods the inconsistency of prevalent concepts on the functional interpretation of morphological structure of ciliary zonule was demonstrated and the scheme of functioning of its elements matching clinical and physiological observations was proposed. The role of anterior and posterior portions of ciliary zonule appears to be functionally essential and consistent with accommodation mechanism proposed by Helmholtz, while the role of cilioequatorial fibers of ciliary zonule is functionally auxiliary. Morphological and constructive peculiarities of ciliary zonule structure confirm the validity of Helmholtz concepts of accommodation mechanism. PMID:12942818

  1. Conserved Genetic Interactions between Ciliopathy Complexes Cooperatively Support Ciliogenesis and Ciliary Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Rachel V.; Li, Chunmei; Kennedy, Julie K.; Ashrafi, Kaveh; Blacque, Oliver E.; Leroux, Michel R.; Reiter, Jeremy F.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding cilia proteins cause human ciliopathies, diverse disorders affecting many tissues. Individual genes can be linked to ciliopathies with dramatically different phenotypes, suggesting that genetic modifiers may participate in their pathogenesis. The ciliary transition zone contains two protein complexes affected in the ciliopathies Meckel syndrome (MKS) and nephronophthisis (NPHP). The BBSome is a third protein complex, affected in the ciliopathy Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS). We tested whether mutations in MKS, NPHP and BBS complex genes modify the phenotypic consequences of one another in both C. elegans and mice. To this end, we identified TCTN-1, the C. elegans ortholog of vertebrate MKS complex components called Tectonics, as an evolutionarily conserved transition zone protein. Neither disruption of TCTN-1 alone or together with MKS complex components abrogated ciliary structure in C. elegans. In contrast, disruption of TCTN-1 together with either of two NPHP complex components, NPHP-1 or NPHP-4, compromised ciliary structure. Similarly, disruption of an NPHP complex component and the BBS complex component BBS-5 individually did not compromise ciliary structure, but together did. As in nematodes, disrupting two components of the mouse MKS complex did not cause additive phenotypes compared to single mutants. However, disrupting both Tctn1 and either Nphp1 or Nphp4 exacerbated defects in ciliogenesis and cilia-associated developmental signaling, as did disrupting both Tctn1 and the BBSome component Bbs1. Thus, we demonstrate that ciliary complexes act in parallel to support ciliary function and suggest that human ciliopathy phenotypes are altered by genetic interactions between different ciliary biochemical complexes. PMID:26540106

  2. Ciliary abnormalities in senescent human fibroblasts impair proliferative capacity.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Loretta; Prosser, Suzanna L; Cuffe, Sandra; Morrison, Ciaran G

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cells senesce in culture after a finite number of divisions indefinitely arresting their proliferation. DNA damage and senescence increase the cellular number of centrosomes, the 2 microtubule organizing centers that ensure bipolar mitotic spindles. Centrosomes also provide the basal body from which primary cilia extend to sense and transduce various extracellular signals, notably Hedgehog. Primary cilium formation is facilitated by cellular quiescence a temporary cell cycle exit, but the impact of senescence on cilia is unknown. We found that senescent human fibroblasts have increased frequency and length of primary cilia. Levels of the negative ciliary regulator CP110 were reduced in senescent cells, as were levels of key elements of the Hedgehog pathway. Hedgehog inhibition reduced proliferation in young cells with increased cilium length accompanying cell cycle arrest suggesting a regulatory function for Hedgehog in primary ciliation. Depletion of CP110 in young cell populations increased ciliation frequencies and reduced cell proliferation. These data suggest that primary cilia are potentially novel determinants of the reduced cellular proliferation that initiates senescence. PMID:25486364

  3. Genetics, diagnosis, and future treatment strategies for primary ciliary dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, M. Leigh Anne; Noone, Peadar G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous recessive disorder resulting in chronic oto-sino-pulmonary disease. While PCD is estimated to occur in 1 in 20,000 individuals, fewer than 1,000 patients in the US have a well-established diagnosis. Areas Covered We provide an overview of the clinical manifestations of PCD, describe the evolution of diagnostic methods, and critique the literature on management of PCD. Expert Opinion Although interest in clinical studies in non-CF bronchiectasis has increased in recent years, some of whom enroll patients with PCD, the literature regarding therapy for PCD as a distinct entity is lacking, as the numbers are small, and there have been no sub-analyses published. However, with improved screening and diagnostic methods, the development of clinical and research consortiums, and actively enrolling registries of PCD patients, the environment is conducive to perform longitudinal studies of disease course and therapeutic studies to alter that course. PMID:26998415

  4. PICADAR: a diagnostic predictive tool for primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Behan, Laura; Dimitrov, Borislav D; Kuehni, Claudia E; Hogg, Claire; Carroll, Mary; Evans, Hazel J; Goutaki, Myrofora; Harris, Amanda; Packham, Samantha; Walker, Woolf T; Lucas, Jane S

    2016-04-01

    Symptoms of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) are nonspecific and guidance on whom to refer for testing is limited. Diagnostic tests for PCD are highly specialised, requiring expensive equipment and experienced PCD scientists. This study aims to develop a practical clinical diagnostic tool to identify patients requiring testing.Patients consecutively referred for testing were studied. Information readily obtained from patient history was correlated with diagnostic outcome. Using logistic regression, the predictive performance of the best model was tested by receiver operating characteristic curve analyses. The model was simplified into a practical tool (PICADAR) and externally validated in a second diagnostic centre.Of 641 referrals with a definitive diagnostic outcome, 75 (12%) were positive. PICADAR applies to patients with persistent wet cough and has seven predictive parameters: full-term gestation, neonatal chest symptoms, neonatal intensive care admittance, chronic rhinitis, ear symptoms, situs inversus and congenital cardiac defect. Sensitivity and specificity of the tool were 0.90 and 0.75 for a cut-off score of 5 points. Area under the curve for the internally and externally validated tool was 0.91 and 0.87, respectively.PICADAR represents a simple diagnostic clinical prediction rule with good accuracy and validity, ready for testing in respiratory centres referring to PCD centres. PMID:26917608

  5. Vortical ciliary flows actively enhance mass transport in reef corals

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Orr H.; Fernandez, Vicente I.; Garren, Melissa; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Debaillon-Vesque, François P.; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Vardi, Assaf; Stocker, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The exchange of nutrients and dissolved gasses between corals and their environment is a critical determinant of the growth of coral colonies and the productivity of coral reefs. To date, this exchange has been assumed to be limited by molecular diffusion through an unstirred boundary layer extending 1–2 mm from the coral surface, with corals relying solely on external flow to overcome this limitation. Here, we present direct microscopic evidence that, instead, corals can actively enhance mass transport through strong vortical flows driven by motile epidermal cilia covering their entire surface. Ciliary beating produces quasi-steady arrays of counterrotating vortices that vigorously stir a layer of water extending up to 2 mm from the coral surface. We show that, under low ambient flow velocities, these vortices, rather than molecular diffusion, control the exchange of nutrients and oxygen between the coral and its environment, enhancing mass transfer rates by up to 400%. This ability of corals to stir their boundary layer changes the way that we perceive the microenvironment of coral surfaces, revealing an active mechanism complementing the passive enhancement of transport by ambient flow. These findings extend our understanding of mass transport processes in reef corals and may shed new light on the evolutionary success of corals and coral reefs. PMID:25192936

  6. Constitutive expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor in mouse hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Severi, Ilenia; Carradori, Maria Rita; Lorenzi, Teresa; Amici, Adolfo; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a potent survival molecule for a large number of neuronal and glial cells in culture; its expression in glial cells is strongly upregulated after a variety of nerve tissue injuries. Exogenously administered CNTF produces an anorectic effect via activation of hypothalamic neurons and stimulates neurogenesis in mouse hypothalamus. To determine whether CNTF is produced endogenously in the hypothalamus, we sought cellular sources and examined their distribution in adult mouse hypothalamus by immunohistochemistry. CNTF immunoreactivity (IR) was predominantly detected in the ependymal layer throughout the rostrocaudal extension of the third ventricle, where numerous ependymocytes and tanycytes exhibited specific staining. Some astrocytes in the grey matter of the anterior hypothalamus and in the median eminence of the hypothalamic tuberal region were also positive. Stimulation of cells bearing CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) induces specific activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signalling system. Treatment with recombinant CNTF and detection of the nuclear expression of phospho-STAT3 (P-STAT3) showed that CNTF-producing ependymal cells and tanycytes were intermingled with, or very close to, P-STAT3-positive, CNTFRα-bearing cells. A fraction of CNTF-producing ependymal cells and tanycytes and some median eminence astrocytes also exhibited P-STAT3 IR. Thus, in normal adult mice the ependyma of the third ventricle is both a source of and a target for CNTF, which may play hitherto unknown roles in hypothalamic function in physiological conditions. PMID:22458546

  7. PICADAR: a diagnostic predictive tool for primary ciliary dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Behan, Laura; Dimitrov, Borislav D.; Kuehni, Claudia E.; Hogg, Claire; Carroll, Mary; Evans, Hazel J.; Goutaki, Myrofora; Harris, Amanda; Packham, Samantha; Walker, Woolf T.

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) are nonspecific and guidance on whom to refer for testing is limited. Diagnostic tests for PCD are highly specialised, requiring expensive equipment and experienced PCD scientists. This study aims to develop a practical clinical diagnostic tool to identify patients requiring testing. Patients consecutively referred for testing were studied. Information readily obtained from patient history was correlated with diagnostic outcome. Using logistic regression, the predictive performance of the best model was tested by receiver operating characteristic curve analyses. The model was simplified into a practical tool (PICADAR) and externally validated in a second diagnostic centre. Of 641 referrals with a definitive diagnostic outcome, 75 (12%) were positive. PICADAR applies to patients with persistent wet cough and has seven predictive parameters: full-term gestation, neonatal chest symptoms, neonatal intensive care admittance, chronic rhinitis, ear symptoms, situs inversus and congenital cardiac defect. Sensitivity and specificity of the tool were 0.90 and 0.75 for a cut-off score of 5 points. Area under the curve for the internally and externally validated tool was 0.91 and 0.87, respectively. PICADAR represents a simple diagnostic clinical prediction rule with good accuracy and validity, ready for testing in respiratory centres referring to PCD centres. PMID:26917608

  8. Ciliary abnormalities in senescent human fibroblasts impair proliferative capacity

    PubMed Central

    Breslin, Loretta; Prosser, Suzanna L; Cuffe, Sandra; Morrison, Ciaran G

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cells senesce in culture after a finite number of divisions indefinitely arresting their proliferation. DNA damage and senescence increase the cellular number of centrosomes, the 2 microtubule organizing centers that ensure bipolar mitotic spindles. Centrosomes also provide the basal body from which primary cilia extend to sense and transduce various extracellular signals, notably Hedgehog. Primary cilium formation is facilitated by cellular quiescence a temporary cell cycle exit, but the impact of senescence on cilia is unknown. We found that senescent human fibroblasts have increased frequency and length of primary cilia. Levels of the negative ciliary regulator CP110 were reduced in senescent cells, as were levels of key elements of the Hedgehog pathway. Hedgehog inhibition reduced proliferation in young cells with increased cilium length accompanying cell cycle arrest suggesting a regulatory function for Hedgehog in primary ciliation. Depletion of CP110 in young cell populations increased ciliation frequencies and reduced cell proliferation. These data suggest that primary cilia are potentially novel determinants of the reduced cellular proliferation that initiates senescence. PMID:25486364

  9. Systemic administration of ciliary neurotrophic factor induces cachexia in rodents.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, J T; Seniuk, N A; Richardson, P M; Gauldie, J; Roder, J C

    1994-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has previously been shown to promote the survival of several classes of neurons and glial. We report here that in addition to its effects on the nervous system, CNTF can induce potent effects in extra-neural tissues. Implantation of C6 glioma cells engineered to secrete CNTF either subcutaneously or into the peritoneal cavity of adult mice, or systemic injections of purified rat or human recombinant CNTF, resulted in a rapid syndrome of weight loss resulting in death over a period of 7-10 d. This weight loss could not be explained by a reduction in food intake and involved losses of both fat and skeletal muscle. CNTF also induced the synthesis of acute phase proteins such as haptoglobin. Implantation of C6 lines expressing a nonsecreted form of CNTF, or the parental C6 line itself, did not result in wasting effects. Analysis of this CNTF-induced wasting indicates similarities with the previously described cachectins, tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 6, and leukemia inhibitory factor, but does not involve the induction of these cytokines. Images PMID:8201002

  10. Ciliary motility activity measurement using a dense optical flow algorithm.

    PubMed

    Parrilla, Eduardo; Armengot, Miguel; Mata, Manuel; Cortijo, Julio; Riera, Jaime; Hueso, José L; Moratal, David

    2013-01-01

    Persistent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections have been associated with the exacerbation of chronic inflammatory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This virus infects the respiratory epithelium, leading to chronic inflammation, and induces the release of mucins and the loss of cilia activity, two factors that determine mucus clearance and the increase in sputum volume. In this study, an automatic method has been established to determine the ciliary motility activity from cell cultures by means of optical flow computation, and has been applied to 136 control cultures and to 144 RSV-infected cultures. The control group presented an average of cell surface with cilia motility per field of 41 ± 15 % (mean ± standard deviation), while the infected group presented a 11 ± 5 %, t-Student p<0.001. The cutoff value to classify a infected specimen was <17.89 % (sensitivity 0.94, specificity 0.93). This methodology has proved to be a robust technique to evaluate cilia motility in cell cultures. PMID:24110720

  11. Die Pigmente der antiken Malerei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riederer, J.

    1982-02-01

    Scientific analysis of painted antique objects provides us with information about the pigments used in earlier periods of history. Beginning in prehistoric times, coloured earths and minerals were used exclusively until the 3rd millenium B.C. when an extensive production of artificial pigments started. Following Egyptian Blue, a potassium copper chloride, cobalt blue, and a cobalt aluminium oxide was invented but used only over a short period, until it was reinvented 200 years ago. In the Greecian and Roman times the palette was considerably enlarged by the use of other coloured minerals and artificially prepared pigments.

  12. 77 FR 20319 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 93 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Correction In proposed rule...

  13. 78 FR 73993 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, and 98 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Corrections In rule document 2013-28228 appearing...

  14. Interactions of membrane potential and cations in regulation of ciliary activity in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Machemer, H

    1976-10-01

    Ciliary activity in Paramecium was investigated in different external solutions using techniques of voltage clamp and high frequency cinematography. An increase in the external concentration of K, Ca or Mg ions decreased the resting potential. It had no effect on ciliary activity. When the membrane potential was fixed, an increase in external Ca or Mg and, to a lesser extent, an increase in K concentration, raised the frequency of normal beating or decreased the frequency of reversed beating of the cilia. Similar effects resulted from membrane hyperpolarization with constant ionic conditions. Increase in concentration of Ca, but not of Mg or K, enhanced hyperpolarization-induced augmentation of ciliary frequency. Increase in Ca concentration also specifically augmented the delayed increase in inward current during rapid hyperpolarizing clamp. The results support the view that [Ca]i regulates the frequency and direction of ciliary beating. It is suggested that the insensitivity of the ciliary motor system to elevations of the external concentrations of ions results from compensation of their effects on [Ca]i. Depolarization itself appears to increase [Ca]i while elevation of the external ion concentrations at a fixed membrane potential appears to decrease [Ca]i. PMID:1003088

  15. Calcium regulates independently ciliary beat and cell contraction in Paramecium cells.

    PubMed

    Iwadate, Yoshiaki; Nakaoka, Yasuo

    2008-08-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration is a well-known signal regulator for various physiological activities. In many cases, Ca(2+) simultaneously regulates individual functions in single cells. How can Ca(2+) regulate these functions independently? In Paramecium cells, the contractile cytoskeletal network and cilia are located close to each other near the cell surface. Cell body contraction, ciliary reversal, and rises in ciliary beat frequency are regulated by intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. However, they are not always triggered simultaneously. We injected caged calcium into Paramecium caudatum cells and continuously applied weak ultraviolet light to the cells to slowly increase intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. The cell bodies began to contract just after the start of ultraviolet light application, and the degree of contraction increased gradually thereafter. On the other hand, cilia began to reverse 1.4s after the start of ultraviolet application and reversed completely within 100ms. Ciliary beat frequency in the reverse direction was significantly higher than in the normal direction. These results indicate that cell body contraction is regulated by Ca(2+) in a dose-dependent manner in living P. caudatum. On the other hand, ciliary reversal and rise in ciliary beat frequency are triggered by Ca(2+) in an all-or-none manner. PMID:18179819

  16. Beyond the mucus escalator: Complex ciliary hydrodynamics in disease and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawroth, Janna; Guo, Hanliang; John, Dabiri; Kanso, Eva; McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Cilia are microscopic, hair-like structures lining external and internal body surfaces where they interact with fluids. The main function of motile cilia is often described as that of a ``mucus escalator'', i.e., a homogeneous ciliary carpet moving along layer of mucus along the surface to transport food, germ cells, debris, or pathogens. Accordingly, the performance of ciliary systems is usually measured in terms of a single metric, transport velocity, or its presumed proxy, ciliary beat frequency. We challenge this simple view through the observation that both healthy and diseased biological systems exhibit a variety of cilia morphologies, beat patterns, and arrangements, resulting in complex flow patterns and transport phenomena that cannot be reduced to a single parameter. Here we present two case studies. In one system, the ciliated surface creates two distinct flow regimes for first trapping and then sheltering potential symbiont bacteria for further biochemical screening. In the other system, chronic disease induces a misalignment of ciliary beat, leading to a pathological transition from uniform mucus transport to a pattern of stagnation and circulation. These studies suggest that (a), we need to develop a wider range of metrics for describing ciliary transport in biological and clinical contexts, and (b), engineered ciliated systems exploiting a variety of design parameters could provide novel ways of manipulating fluids at the microscale.

  17. Effect of nitric oxide compounds on monkey ciliary muscle in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gabelt, B’Ann T.; Kaufman, Paul L.; Rasmussen, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of various nitric oxide compounds and their inhibitors on monkey ciliary muscle contraction in vitro were investigated in both the longitudinal and circular vectors. The responses to nitric oxide compounds in carbachol precontracted ciliary muscle consisted of an initial relaxation often followed by recovery to near carbachol precontracted levels while the compound was still present. Sodium nitroprusside produced the greatest relaxation responses (nearly 100% relaxation in both vectors at 10−3 M). The highest concentrations of isosorbide dinitrate (10−4 M) and L-arginine (10−3 M) produced relaxation responses of approximately 50% in both vectors. 8-Bromo cyclic GMP produced the smallest relaxation responses (25–35%). Nitric oxide synthase inhibition enhanced carbachol contraction up to 20% in the longitudinal but not the circular vector. Phosphodiesterase inhibition did not further enhance the relaxation response to L-arginine. Guanylate cyclase inhibition partially attenuated the relaxation response to sodium nitroprusside. Nitric oxide generating compounds were effective in relaxing precontracted monkey ciliary muscle in vitro. Endogenous production of nitric oxide is likely involved in the regulation of the contractile response in monkey ciliary muscle. Nitric oxide generating compounds may have potential value in therapeutic areas where modulation of ciliary muscle tension is desirable. PMID:21147103

  18. Swimming Speed of Larval Snail Does Not Correlate with Size and Ciliary Beat Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kit Yu Karen; Jiang, Houshuo; Padilla, Dianna K.

    2013-01-01

    Many marine invertebrates have planktonic larvae with cilia used for both propulsion and capturing of food particles. Hence, changes in ciliary activity have implications for larval nutrition and ability to navigate the water column, which in turn affect survival and dispersal. Using high-speed high-resolution microvideography, we examined the relationship between swimming speed, velar arrangements, and ciliary beat frequency of freely swimming veliger larvae of the gastropod Crepidula fornicata over the course of larval development. Average swimming speed was greatest 6 days post hatching, suggesting a reduction in swimming speed towards settlement. At a given age, veliger larvae have highly variable speeds (0.8–4 body lengths s−1) that are independent of shell size. Contrary to the hypothesis that an increase in ciliary beat frequency increases work done, and therefore speed, there was no significant correlation between swimming speed and ciliary beat frequency. Instead, there are significant correlations between swimming speed and visible area of the velar lobe, and distance between centroids of velum and larval shell. These observations suggest an alternative hypothesis that, instead of modifying ciliary beat frequency, larval C. fornicata modify swimming through adjustment of velum extension or orientation. The ability to adjust velum position could influence particle capture efficiency and fluid disturbance and help promote survival in the plankton. PMID:24367554

  19. Transition fibre protein FBF1 is required for the ciliary entry of assembled intraflagellar transport complexes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing; Xu, Qingwen; Zhang, Yuxia; Li, Yujie; Zhang, Qing; Hu, Zeng; Harris, Peter C; Torres, Vicente E; Ling, Kun; Hu, Jinghua

    2013-01-01

    Sensory organelle cilia have critical roles in mammalian embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) machinery is required for the assembly and maintenance of cilia. Yet, how this large complex passes through the size-dependent barrier at the ciliary base remains enigmatic. Here we report that FBF1, a highly conserved transition fibre protein, is required for the ciliary import of assembled IFT particles at the ciliary base. We cloned dyf-19, the Caenorhabditis elegans homologue of human FBF1, in a whole-genome screen for ciliogenesis mutants. DYF-19 localizes specifically to transition fibres and interacts directly with the IFT-B component DYF-11/IFT54. Although not a structural component of transition fibres, DYF-19 is required for the transit of assembled IFT particles through the ciliary base. Furthermore, we found that human FBF1 shares conserved localization and function with its worm counterpart. We conclude that FBF1 is a key functional transition fibre component that actively facilitates the ciliary entry of assembled IFT machinery. PMID:24231678

  20. Fiber optic laser light scattering measurement of ciliary function of the fallopian tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbert, Sheridan A.; Lim, Kap; Lee, Wylie I.

    1990-07-01

    A fiber-optic laser light-scattering system (FLS) for measuring ciliary function was evaluated by means of three sets of in vitro experiments. First, FLS performance was compared to that of a previously proven benchtop laser system (BLS). Using tissue excised from rabbit fallopian tubes, ciliary beat frequency (CBF) of each sample was measured with FLS and BLS. Paired CBF measurements showed excellent correlation between the two systems (r =0.93). Second, the FLS was used to evaluate the dependency of CBF on temperature (T) by using tissue sampies of rabbit oviductal fimbna. Regression analysis of CBF vs T showed a linear relationship over the range of 18-37°C for both individual samples (r =0.98) and pooled data from all experiments (r = 0.84). Fmally, the relalionship between CBF and ciliary ovum transport rate (TR) was tested by using T to modulate CBF of rabbit fimbria, in vitro. The relationship was linear over the range of CBF from 10 to 30 Hz (r2 = 0.83). At 37°C, CBF = 31+/-1 Hz, and TR = O.12+/-.02 mm/sec. equal to ovum transport rate in situ. The FLS is a valuable tool for characterizing ciliary activity and thus ovum transport function. Owing to the fact that ciliary dyskinesia resulting from disease of the fallopian tube is associated with infeitility, the FLS may be useful to acquire data important to the clinical evaluation of fallopian tube function and female infertility.

  1. Mutations in axonemal dynein assembly factor DNAAF3 cause primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Mitchison, Hannah M; Schmidts, Miriam; Loges, Niki T; Freshour, Judy; Dritsoula, Athina; Hirst, Rob A; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Blau, Hannah; Al Dabbagh, Maha; Olbrich, Heike; Beales, Philip L; Yagi, Toshiki; Mussaffi, Huda; Chung, Eddie M K; Omran, Heymut; Mitchell, David R

    2012-04-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia most often arises from loss of the dynein motors that power ciliary beating. Here we show that DNAAF3 (also known as PF22), a previously uncharacterized protein, is essential for the preassembly of dyneins into complexes before their transport into cilia. We identified loss-of-function mutations in the human DNAAF3 gene in individuals from families with situs inversus and defects in the assembly of inner and outer dynein arms. Knockdown of dnaaf3 in zebrafish likewise disrupts dynein arm assembly and ciliary motility, causing primary ciliary dyskinesia phenotypes that include hydrocephalus and laterality malformations. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii PF22 is exclusively cytoplasmic, and a PF22-null mutant cannot assemble any outer and some inner dynein arms. Altered abundance of dynein subunits in mutant cytoplasm suggests that DNAAF3 (PF22) acts at a similar stage as other preassembly proteins, for example, DNAAF2 (also known as PF13 or KTU) and DNAAF1 (also known as ODA7 or LRRC50), in the dynein preassembly pathway. These results support the existence of a conserved, multistep pathway for the cytoplasmic formation of assembly competent ciliary dynein complexes. PMID:22387996

  2. Distribution of melanopsin positive neurons in pigmented and albino mice: evidence for melanopsin interneurons in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Valiente-Soriano, Francisco J.; García-Ayuso, Diego; Ortín-Martínez, Arturo; Jiménez-López, Manuel; Galindo-Romero, Caridad; Villegas-Pérez, Maria Paz; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta; Vugler, Anthony A.; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Here we have studied the population of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) in adult pigmented and albino mice. Our data show that although pigmented (C57Bl/6) and albino (Swiss) mice have a similar total number of ipRGCs, their distribution is slightly different: while in pigmented mice ipRGCs are more abundant in the temporal retina, in albinos the ipRGCs are more abundant in superior retina. In both strains, ipRGCs are located in the retinal periphery, in the areas of lower Brn3a+RGC density. Both strains also contain displaced ipRGCs (d-ipRGCs) in the inner nuclear layer (INL) that account for 14% of total ipRGCs in pigmented mice and 5% in albinos. Tracing from both superior colliculli shows that 98% (pigmented) and 97% (albino) of the total ipRGCs, become retrogradely labeled, while double immunodetection of melanopsin and Brn3a confirms that few ipRGCs express this transcription factor in mice. Rather surprisingly, application of a retrograde tracer to the optic nerve (ON) labels all ipRGCs, except for a sub-population of the d-ipRGCs (14% in pigmented and 28% in albino, respectively) and melanopsin positive cells residing in the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ) of the retina. In the CMZ, between 20% (pigmented) and 24% (albino) of the melanopsin positive cells are unlabeled by the tracer and we suggest that this may be because they fail to send an axon into the ON. As such, this study provides the first evidence for a population of melanopsin interneurons in the mammalian retina. PMID:25477787

  3. Yolk pigments of the Mexican leaf frog.

    PubMed

    Marinetti, G V; Bagnara, J T

    1983-02-25

    Eggs of the Mexican leaf frog contain blue and yellow pigments identified as biliverdin and lutein, respectively. Both pigments are bound to proteins that occur in crystalline form in the yolk platelet. The major blue pigment is biliverdin IX alpha. The eggs vary in color from brilliant blue to pale yellow-green depending on the amount of each pigment. These pigments may provide protective coloration to the eggs. PMID:6681678

  4. Eph and Ephrin function in dispersal and epithelial insertion of pigmented immunocytes in sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Krupke, Oliver A; Zysk, Ivona; Mellott, Dan O; Burke, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie directional cell migration are incompletely understood. Eph receptors usually guide migrations of cells by exclusion from regions expressing Ephrin. In sea urchin embryos, pigmented immunocytes are specified in vegetal epithelium, transition to mesenchyme, migrate, and re-enter ectoderm, distributing in dorsal ectoderm and ciliary band, but not ventral ectoderm. Immunocytes express Sp-Eph and Sp-Efn is expressed throughout dorsal and ciliary band ectoderm. Interfering with expression or function of Sp-Eph results in rounded immunocytes entering ectoderm but not adopting a dendritic form. Expressing Sp-Efn throughout embryos permits immunocyte insertion in ventral ectoderm. In mosaic embryos, immunocytes insert preferentially in ectoderm expressing Sp-Efn. We conclude that Sp-Eph signaling is necessary and sufficient for epithelial insertion. As well, we propose that immunocytes disperse when Sp-Eph enhances adhesion, causing haptotactic movement to regions of higher ligand abundance. This is a distinctive example of Eph/Ephrin signaling acting positively to pattern migrating cells. PMID:27474796

  5. Eph and Ephrin function in dispersal and epithelial insertion of pigmented immunocytes in sea urchin embryos

    PubMed Central

    Krupke, Oliver A; Zysk, Ivona; Mellott, Dan O; Burke, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie directional cell migration are incompletely understood. Eph receptors usually guide migrations of cells by exclusion from regions expressing Ephrin. In sea urchin embryos, pigmented immunocytes are specified in vegetal epithelium, transition to mesenchyme, migrate, and re-enter ectoderm, distributing in dorsal ectoderm and ciliary band, but not ventral ectoderm. Immunocytes express Sp-Eph and Sp-Efn is expressed throughout dorsal and ciliary band ectoderm. Interfering with expression or function of Sp-Eph results in rounded immunocytes entering ectoderm but not adopting a dendritic form. Expressing Sp-Efn throughout embryos permits immunocyte insertion in ventral ectoderm. In mosaic embryos, immunocytes insert preferentially in ectoderm expressing Sp-Efn. We conclude that Sp-Eph signaling is necessary and sufficient for epithelial insertion. As well, we propose that immunocytes disperse when Sp-Eph enhances adhesion, causing haptotactic movement to regions of higher ligand abundance. This is a distinctive example of Eph/Ephrin signaling acting positively to pattern migrating cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16000.001 PMID:27474796

  6. Unlocking the bovine genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The draft genome sequence of cattle (Bos taurus) has now been analyzed by the Bovine Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium and the Bovine HapMap Consortium, which together represent an extensive collaboration involving more than 300 scientists from 25 different countries. ...

  7. Bovine viral diarrhea viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections with bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) result in significant economic losses for beef and dairy producers worldwide. BVDV is actually an umbrella term for two species of viruses, BVDV1 and BVDV2, within the Pestivirus genus of the Flavivirus family. While denoted as a bovine pathogen...

  8. Ammonia excretion in mytilid mussels is facilitated by ciliary beating.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, J; Himmerkus, N; Holland, N; Sartoris, F J; Bleich, M; Tresguerres, M

    2016-08-01

    The excretion of nitrogenous waste products in the form of ammonia (NH3) and ammonium (NH4 (+)) is a fundamental process in aquatic organisms. For mytilid bivalves, little is known about the mechanisms and sites of excretion. This study investigated the localization and the mechanisms of ammonia excretion in mytilid mussels. An Rh protein was found to be abundantly expressed in the apical cell membrane of the plicate organ, which was previously described as a solely respiratory organ. The Rh protein was also expressed in the gill, although at significantly lower concentrations, but was not detectable in mussel kidney. Furthermore, NH3/NH4 (+) was not enriched in the urine, suggesting that kidneys are not involved in active NH3/NH4 (+) excretion. Exposure to elevated seawater pH of 8.5 transiently reduced NH3/NH4 (+) excretion rates, but they returned to control values following 24 h acclimation. These mussels had increased abundance of V-type H(+)-ATPase in the apical membranes of plicate organ cells; however, NH3/NH4 (+) excretion rates were not affected by the V-type H(+)-ATPase specific inhibitor concanamycin A (100 nmol l(-1)). In contrast, inhibition of ciliary beating with dopamine and increased seawater viscosity significantly reduced NH3 excretion rates under control pH (8.0). These results suggest that NH3/NH4 (+) excretion in mytilid mussels takes place by passive NH3 diffusion across respiratory epithelia via the Rh protein, facilitated by the water current produced for filter feeding, which prevents accumulation of NH3 in the boundary layer. This mechanism would be energy efficient for sessile organisms, as they already generate water currents for filter feeding. PMID:27489216

  9. Quantitative optical coherence tomography imaging of intermediate flow defect phenotypes in ciliary physiology and pathophysiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Brendan K.; Gamm, Ute A.; Jonas, Stephan; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Choma, Michael A.

    2015-03-01

    Cilia-driven fluid flow is a critical yet poorly understood aspect of pulmonary physiology. Here, we demonstrate that optical coherence tomography-based particle tracking velocimetry can be used to quantify subtle variability in cilia-driven flow performance in Xenopus, an important animal model of ciliary biology. Changes in flow performance were quantified in the setting of normal development, as well as in response to three types of perturbations: mechanical (increased fluid viscosity), pharmacological (disrupted serotonin signaling), and genetic (diminished ciliary motor protein expression). Of note, we demonstrate decreased flow secondary to gene knockdown of kif3a, a protein involved in ciliogenesis, as well as a dose-response decrease in flow secondary to knockdown of dnah9, an important ciliary motor protein.

  10. Primary ciliary dyskinesia with complex abnormalities including cleavage of B‐subfibers

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Mitsuko; Arimura, Ken; Takeyama, Kiyoshi; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko; Tamaoki, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A 25‐year‐old Japanese woman suffered from repeated respiratory tract infections. Because of her characteristic medical history and imaging findings, we suspected primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and performed a transbronchial biopsy. The biopsy revealed complex abnormalities of the ciliary structure including cleavage of the B‐subfibers observed by transmission electron microscopy analysis and the complete loss of ciliary motion by video analysis. Genetic examinations to diagnose PCD have progressed in recent years. However, in this case, the well‐known genetic mutations in causal genes of PCD were not detected via whole‐exome sequencing of the blood. Cleavage of the B‐subfibers in patients with PCD has never been reported. This case appears to be the first report of this PCD subtype in humans. PMID:27081490

  11. Chibby promotes ciliary vesicle formation and basal body docking during airway cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael C; Li, Feng-Qian; Cyge, Benjamin; Arashiro, Takeshi; Brechbuhl, Heather M; Chen, Xingwang; Siller, Saul S; Weiss, Matthew A; O'Connell, Christopher B; Love, Damon; Westlake, Christopher J; Reynolds, Susan D; Kuriyama, Ryoko; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi

    2014-10-13

    Airway multiciliated epithelial cells play crucial roles in the mucosal defense system, but their differentiation process remains poorly understood. Mice lacking the basal body component Chibby (Cby) exhibit impaired mucociliary transport caused by defective ciliogenesis, resulting in chronic airway infection. In this paper, using primary cultures of mouse tracheal epithelial cells, we show that Cby facilitates basal body docking to the apical cell membrane through proper formation of ciliary vesicles at the distal appendage during the early stages of ciliogenesis. Cby is recruited to the distal appendages of centrioles via physical interaction with the distal appendage protein CEP164. Cby then associates with the membrane trafficking machinery component Rabin8, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small guanosine triphosphatase Rab8, to promote recruitment of Rab8 and efficient assembly of ciliary vesicles. Thus, our study identifies Cby as a key regulator of ciliary vesicle formation and basal body docking during the differentiation of airway ciliated cells. PMID:25313408

  12. Primary ciliary dyskinesia with complex abnormalities including cleavage of B-subfibers.

    PubMed

    Orimo, Keisuke; Kondo, Mitsuko; Arimura, Ken; Takeyama, Kiyoshi; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko; Tamaoki, Jun

    2016-04-01

    A 25-year-old Japanese woman suffered from repeated respiratory tract infections. Because of her characteristic medical history and imaging findings, we suspected primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and performed a transbronchial biopsy. The biopsy revealed complex abnormalities of the ciliary structure including cleavage of the B-subfibers observed by transmission electron microscopy analysis and the complete loss of ciliary motion by video analysis. Genetic examinations to diagnose PCD have progressed in recent years. However, in this case, the well-known genetic mutations in causal genes of PCD were not detected via whole-exome sequencing of the blood. Cleavage of the B-subfibers in patients with PCD has never been reported. This case appears to be the first report of this PCD subtype in humans. PMID:27081490

  13. Semi-Automatic Extraction Algorithm for Images of the Ciliary Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Chiu-Yen; Richdale, Kathryn; Sinnott, Loraine T.; Ernst, Lauren E.; Bailey, Melissa D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To development and evaluate a semi-automatic algorithm for segmentation and morphological assessment of the dimensions of the ciliary muscle in Visante™ Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography images. Methods Geometric distortions in Visante images analyzed as binary files were assessed by imaging an optical flat and human donor tissue. The appropriate pixel/mm conversion factor to use for air (n = 1) was estimated by imaging calibration spheres. A semi-automatic algorithm was developed to extract the dimensions of the ciliary muscle from Visante images. Measurements were also made manually using Visante software calipers. Interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and Bland-Altman analyses were used to compare the methods. A multilevel model was fitted to estimate the variance of algorithm measurements that was due to differences within- and between-examiners in scleral spur selection versus biological variability. Results The optical flat and the human donor tissue were imaged and appeared without geometric distortions in binary file format. Bland-Altman analyses revealed that caliper measurements tended to underestimate ciliary muscle thickness at 3 mm posterior to the scleral spur in subjects with the thickest ciliary muscles (t = 3.6, p < 0.001). The percent variance due to within- or between-examiner differences in scleral spur selection was found to be small (6%) when compared to the variance due to biological difference across subjects (80%). Using the mean of measurements from three images achieved an estimated ICC of 0.85. Conclusions The semi-automatic algorithm successfully segmented the ciliary muscle for further measurement. Using the algorithm to follow the scleral curvature to locate more posterior measurements is critical to avoid underestimating thickness measurements. This semi-automatic algorithm will allow for repeatable, efficient, and masked ciliary muscle measurements in large datasets. PMID:21169877

  14. Reactivated triton-extracted models o paramecium: modification of ciliary movement by calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Naito, Y; Kaneko, H

    1972-05-01

    Triton-extracted models of Paramecium were reactivated to swim in solutions of adenosine triphosphate and magnesium ions. The cilia beat in the normal direction (toward the rear) when the calcium ion concentration was less than 10-(6)M, and they beat in the "reversed" direction (toward the front) when calcium ion concentration was raised above 10-(6)M. These results support the proposal that ciliary reversal, hence backward swimming, of live paramecia is mediated by an increased cytoplasmic calcium concentration around the ciliary system by calcium-dependent membrane responses to external stimuli. PMID:5032354

  15. Ciliary subcompartments: how are they established and what are their functions?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeongmi; Chung, Yun Doo

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are conserved subcellular organelles with diverse sensory and developmental roles. Recently, they have emerged as crucial organelles whose dysfunction causes a wide spectrum of disorders called ciliopathies. Recent studies on the pathological mechanisms underlying ciliopathies showed that the ciliary compartment is further divided into subdomains with specific roles in the biogenesis, maintenance and function of cilia. Several conserved sets of molecules that play specific roles in each subcompartment have been discovered. Here we review recent progress on our understanding of ciliary subcompartments, especially focusing on the molecules required for their structure and/or function. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(7): 380-387] PMID:25936781

  16. Ciliary kinematics of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in Complex Fluids: Role of viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Arvind; Qin, Boyang; Arratia, Paulo

    2014-11-01

    The motility behavior of microorganisms can be significantly affected by the rheology of their fluidic environment. Guided by our experiments on the swimming gait of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in viscoelastic fluids, we focus on ciliary waveforms in Newtonian fluids and systematically study the effect of increasing viscosity. We find that the beat frequency as well as the wave speed are both strongly influenced by fluid viscosity. Interestingly, ciliary waveforms at low viscosity show a larger influence of the cell body than waveforms at higher viscosity. We use slender body theory and principal component analysis to elucidate the role of fluid viscosity in regulating the kinematics of the swimming process.

  17. Encapsulating betalains from Opuntia ficus-indica fruits by ionic gelation: Pigment chemical stability during storage of beads.

    PubMed

    Otálora, María Carolina; Carriazo, José Gregorio; Iturriaga, Laura; Osorio, Coralia; Nazareno, Mónica Azucena

    2016-07-01

    Betalain encapsulation was performed by ionic gelation as a stabilization strategy for these natural pigments. Betalains were extracted from purple cactus fruits and encapsulated in calcium-alginate and in combination of calcium alginate and bovine serum albumin. Beads were characterised by scanning electron microscopy and thermal analysis using differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry. Moisture sorption isotherms were determined. Bead morphology was affected by matrix composition. Pigments storage stability was evaluated at different equilibrium relative humidity and temperatures. Pigment composition of beads was determined by HPLC-MS-MS and degradation products were also analysed after storage; betalamic acid being the major one. Both types of matrices protected the encapsulated pigments, being their storage stability better at low relative humidity than that of the non-encapsulated control material. Antiradical activities of beads were proportional to remaining betalain contents. At high relative humidity, there was no protection and low storage stability was observed in the samples. PMID:26920307

  18. Multiple pigmented basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Shoji, T; Lee, J; Hong, S H; Oh, C H; Kim, W K; Bhawan, J

    1998-04-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common of all skin cancers and the most prevalent one among Caucasians. Rarely, these tumors are seen in other races. We report a 77-year-old Korean woman who presented with multiple darkly pigmented enlarging nodules on her scalp, face, trunk, and extremities. The patient had first noted a 6-mm pigmented lesion on her left eyebrow 10 years previously. Since then, other lesions had appeared in many locations on her body. She had been otherwise healthy and without a history of exposure to arsenic or radiation. There was no family history of skin cancer, xeroderma pigmentosum, or basal cell nevus syndrome. On physical examination, multiple darkly pigmented dome-shaped papules and nodules were present on her scalp, face, right forearm, lower abdomen, and inguinal areas. They ranged in size from 0.5 mm to 2 cm. The larger ones showed central ulceration. Multiple biopsy specimens from different sites showed pigmented basal cell carcinomas. Clinically, there was no evidence of nevus sebaceus, xeroderma pigmentosum, basal cell nevus syndrome, or immunodeficiency. Clinical workup including chest radiography, abdominal ultrasound, bone scan, and brain computerized axial tomography scan did not demonstrate primary or secondary tumors. The results of serologic and hematologic tests were also within normal limits. This is an unusual case report of multiple pigmented basal cell carcinomas in an Asian woman without any predisposing risk factors. PMID:9557792

  19. Exogenous pigment in Peyer's patches

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, N.A.; Crocker, P.R.; Smith, A.P.; Levison, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Dark brown granular pigment was found consistently in macrophages in the deep aspect of adult Peyer's patches. Tissue sections from intestinal resections of 35 patients with a variety of pathologic diagnoses and of seven postmortem cases with no evidence of gastrointestinal disease were examined for the presence of this pigment. It was found in all patients over the age of 6 years (34 cases) but was not found in any children below that age (eight cases). Scanning electron microscopy with secondary and backscattered electron imaging and x-ray energy spectroscopy were performed on routine histologic sections. The pigmented macrophages contained aluminum and silicon, diffusely present throughout the cytoplasm, and numerous discrete foci of titanium. Pigment containing these same elements has also been found around dilated submucosal lymphatics, in mesenteric lymph nodes, and in some transmural inflammatory aggregates of Crohn's disease. The pigment probably is derived from the diet and actively taken up by Peyer's patches, which are able to incorporate inert particulate matter.

  20. Pigment Analysis of Chloroplast Pigment-Protein Complexes in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Eskins, Kenneth; Duysen, Murray E.; Olson, Linda

    1983-01-01

    Pigment-protein complexes separated from wheat (Triticum aestivum L. selection ND96-25 by two gel electrophoresis techniques were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography for chlorophylls and carotenoids. The two techniques are compared, and pigment analyses are given for the major reaction centers and light-harvesting complexes. Reaction centers contain mostly chlorophyll a, carotene, and lutein, whereas light-harvesting complexes contain chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, lutein, and neoxanthin. The amounts of violaxanthin are variable. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16662906

  1. Microprobe analysis of chlorpromazine pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, T.L.; McCormack, K.M.; Ingram, P.; Kaplan, D.L.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    We describe the histochemical, ultrastructural, and microanalytical features of a skin biopsy specimen obtained from a patient with chlorpromazine pigmentation. Golden-brown pigment granules were present in the dermis, predominantly in a perivascular arrangement. The granules stained positively with the Fontana-Masson stain for silver-reducing substances and negatively with Perl's stain for iron. Electron microscopy revealed dense inclusion bodies in dermal histiocytes, pericytes, endothelial cells, and Schwann cells, as well as lying free in the extracellular matrix. These ''chlorpromazine bodies'' were quite dense even in unosmicated, unstained ultrathin sections, indicating that the pigmentation is related, at least in part, to the inclusions. Microprobe analysis of the chlorpromazine bodies revealed a striking peak for sulfur, which strongly suggests the presence of the drug or its metabolite within these inclusions.

  2. Pigmented Porokeratosis. A Further Variant?

    PubMed

    Tan, Tracy S P; Tallon, Ben

    2016-03-01

    Porokeratosis is a clonal disorder of keratinization characterized by the presence of the cornoid lamella. A number of variants of porokeratosis have been described, based on the clinical features and histologic features of the lesions. The authors present a case of porokeratosis with prominent melanocytic hyperplasia, which was biopsied to clinically exclude melanoma. The authors retrospectively studied cases of porokeratosis to look for the presence of melanocytic hyperplasia. Melanocytic hyperplasia was identified in 8 of 31 cases (25.8%). All of the cases except the index case were clinically nonpigmented but arose in solar damaged skin. This case represents a distinct variant of porokeratosis, and the authors propose the designation pigmented porokeratosis. Melanocytic hyperplasia is a benign condition, and it is important that this is not histologically confused with melanoma in situ, particularly in a context of clinically pigmented lesion. Increased recognition of pigmented porokeratosis is essential to avoid an erroneous diagnosis of melanoma in situ. PMID:26894774

  3. Ciliary transition zone activation of phospho-Tctex-1 controls ciliary resorption, S-phase entry and fate of neural progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aiqun; Saito, Masaki; Chuang, Jen-Zen; Tseng, Yun-Yu; Dedesma, Carlos; Tomizawa, Kazuhito; Kaitsuka, Taku; Sung, Ching-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are displayed during the G0/G1 phase of many cell types. Cilia are reabsorbed as cells prepare to re-enter the cell cycle, but the causal and molecular link between these two cellular events remains unclear. We show that phospho(T94)Tctex-1 is recruited to ciliary transition zones prior to S-phase entry and plays a pivotal role in both ciliary disassembly and cell cycle progression. Tctex-1’s role in S-phase entry, however, is dispensable in non-ciliated cells. Exogenously added phosphomimic Tctex-1 T94E accelerates cilium disassembly and S-phase entry. These results support a model in which the cilia act as a brake to prevent cell cycle progression. Mechanistic studies show the involvement of actin dynamics in Tctex-1 regulated cilium resorption. Phospho(T94)Tctex-1 is also selectively enriched at the ciliary transition zones of cortical neural progenitors, and plays a key role in controlling G1 length, cell cycle entry, and fate determination of these cells during corticogenesis. PMID:21394082

  4. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: prospects for new therapies, building on the experience in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Amirav, Israel; Cohen-Cymberknoh, Malena; Shoseyov, David; Kerem, Eitan

    2009-06-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disease associated with abnormal ciliary structure and function, leading to impaired mucociliary clearance, an important primary innate defense mechanism that protects the lungs. Drugs that can effectively treat PCD should overcome the defect in ciliary function and increase the mucociliary clearance. However, there are currently no therapeutic strategies that correct the inborn error of ciliary dysfunction to restore mucociliary clearance. It is unclear if osmolar agents like hypertonic saline or mannitol, therapies that increase the respiratory surface hydration like ion-channel regulators, or therapies aimed at reducing inflammation or mucus production, or softening the mucus will be effective in PCD. Many of these modalities are used in cystic fibrosis, yet no evidence exists to support their routine use in PCD. Newer genetic modifiers show an exciting potential for personalized medication, combining selection of patients with a common genetic mutation and a drug treatment that has been specifically designed to overcome that mutation, and will greatly enhance the therapeutic arsenal for PCD. This review summarizes current and future prospects for these therapeutic options. PMID:19410203

  5. RECONSTITUTION OF METACHRONAL WAVES IN CILIATED CORTICAL SHEETS OF PARAMECIUM - ASYMMETRY OF THE CILIARY MOVEMENTS

    PubMed

    Okamoto; Nakaoka

    1994-07-01

    In conditions in which ciliated cortical sheets prepared from detergent-extracted Paramecium multimicronucleatum cells adhered to glass coverslips on a microscope stage, perfusion of a reactivation medium containing ATP plus cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP generated metachronal waves. An analysis of the ciliary movements that generate these metachronal waves yielded the following results. During the generation of metachronal waves, there were phase differences in the ciliary orientation of adjacent cilia in the direction of wave propagation. Addition of cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP increased the rotational angular velocities during the effective stroke of ciliary beating, but did not increase the rotational angular velocity of the recovery stroke. When the ATP concentration in the cyclic GMP reactivation medium was increased, the rotational angular velocity during the effective stroke rose steeply and saturated at 0.8 mmol l-1 ATP, whereas that during the recovery stroke rose gradually. Addition of cyclic nucleotides caused a single cilium isolated from neighbouring cilia on the cortical sheet to incline almost parallel to the cortical surface during the recovery stroke. Addition of cyclic GMP increased the amplitude of bending of cilia detached from the cortical sheet. From these results, it was concluded that increases in the asymmetrical movement of individual cilia, caused by the addition of cyclic nucleotides, create the ciliary interaction that generates the metachronal waves. PMID:9317363

  6. Molecular basis for CPAP-tubulin interaction in controlling centriolar and ciliary length.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangdong; Ramani, Anand; Soni, Komal; Gottardo, Marco; Zheng, Shuangping; Ming Gooi, Li; Li, Wenjing; Feng, Shan; Mariappan, Aruljothi; Wason, Arpit; Widlund, Per; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Poser, Ina; Deng, Haiteng; Ou, Guangshuo; Riparbelli, Maria; Giuliano, Callaini; Hyman, Anthony A; Sattler, Michael; Gopalakrishnan, Jay; Li, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Centrioles and cilia are microtubule-based structures, whose precise formation requires controlled cytoplasmic tubulin incorporation. How cytoplasmic tubulin is recognized for centriolar/ciliary-microtubule construction remains poorly understood. Centrosomal-P4.1-associated-protein (CPAP) binds tubulin via its PN2-3 domain. Here, we show that a C-terminal loop-helix in PN2-3 targets β-tubulin at the microtubule outer surface, while an N-terminal helical motif caps microtubule's α-β surface of β-tubulin. Through this, PN2-3 forms a high-affinity complex with GTP-tubulin, crucial for defining numbers and lengths of centriolar/ciliary-microtubules. Surprisingly, two distinct mutations in PN2-3 exhibit opposite effects on centriolar/ciliary-microtubule lengths. CPAP(F375A), with strongly reduced tubulin interaction, causes shorter centrioles and cilia exhibiting doublet- instead of triplet-microtubules. CPAP(EE343RR) that unmasks the β-tubulin polymerization surface displays slightly reduced tubulin-binding affinity inducing over-elongation of newly forming centriolar/ciliary-microtubules by enhanced dynamic release of its bound tubulin. Thus CPAP regulates delivery of its bound-tubulin to define the size of microtubule-based cellular structures using a 'clutch-like' mechanism. PMID:27306797

  7. The Interaction of CCDC104/BARTL1 with Arl3 and Implications for Ciliary Function

    PubMed Central

    Lokaj, Mandy; Kösling, Stefanie K.; Koerner, Carolin; Lange, Sven M.; van Beersum, Sylvia E.C.; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Roepman, Ronald; Horn, Nicola; Ueffing, Marius; Boldt, Karsten; Wittinghofer, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cilia are small antenna-like cellular protrusions critical for many developmental signaling pathways. The ciliary protein Arl3 has been shown to act as a specific release factor for myristoylated and farnesylated ciliary cargo molecules by binding to the effectors Unc119 and PDE6δ. Here we describe a newly identified Arl3 binding partner, CCDC104/CFAP36. Biochemical and structural analyses reveal that the protein contains a BART-like domain and is called BARTL1. It recognizes an LLxILxxL motif at the N-terminal amphipathic helix of Arl3, which is crucial for the interaction with the BART-like domain but also for the ciliary localization of Arl3 itself. These results seem to suggest a ciliary role of BARTL1, and possibly link it to the Arl3 transport network. We thus speculate on a regulatory mechanism whereby BARTL1 aids the presentation of active Arl3 to its GTPase-activating protein RP2 or hinders Arl3 membrane binding in the area of the transition zone. PMID:26455799

  8. [Ciliary epithelium and topical decongestants: how to minimize the undesirable events?].

    PubMed

    Laberko, E L; Zlobina, N V; Radtsig, E Yu; Bogomil'sky, M R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of the combination of 0.1% xylometazoline with seawater (Rinomaris, "Jadran", Croatia) on the state and functional activity of the ciliary epithelium of the nasal cavity. The results of the study confirm the safety of this treatment and the possibility of its application in routine clinical practice. PMID:25588494

  9. Complete mitogenomes of King angelfish (Holacanthus passer) and Queen angelfish (Holacanthus ciliaris) (Teleostei: Pomacanthidae).

    PubMed

    Shen, Kang-Ning; Chang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Ching-Hung; Hsiao, Chung-Der

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we used the next-generation sequencing method to deduce two complete mitogenomes of King angelfish (Holacanthus passer) and Queen angelfish (Holacanthus ciliaris) for the first time. The assembled mitogenome consists of 16,620 bp in H. passer and 16,606 bp in H. ciliaris, showing 95% identities each other. Both mitogenomes follow the typical vertebrate arrangement, including 13 protein coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs genes, and a non-coding control region of D-loop. D-loop contains 903 bp in H. passer and 888 bp in H. ciliaris and locates between tRNA-Pro and tRNA-Phe. The overall GC content is 45.8% for H. passer and 46.2% for H. ciliaris. Complete mitogenomes of King angelfish and Queen angelfish deduced in this study provide essential and important DNA molecular data for further phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis for marine angelfish. PMID:26119118

  10. Molecular basis for CPAP-tubulin interaction in controlling centriolar and ciliary length

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiangdong; Ramani, Anand; Soni, Komal; Gottardo, Marco; Zheng, Shuangping; Ming Gooi, Li; Li, Wenjing; Feng, Shan; Mariappan, Aruljothi; Wason, Arpit; Widlund, Per; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Poser, Ina; Deng, Haiteng; Ou, Guangshuo; Riparbelli, Maria; Giuliano, Callaini; Hyman, Anthony A.; Sattler, Michael; Gopalakrishnan, Jay; Li, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Centrioles and cilia are microtubule-based structures, whose precise formation requires controlled cytoplasmic tubulin incorporation. How cytoplasmic tubulin is recognized for centriolar/ciliary-microtubule construction remains poorly understood. Centrosomal-P4.1-associated-protein (CPAP) binds tubulin via its PN2-3 domain. Here, we show that a C-terminal loop-helix in PN2-3 targets β-tubulin at the microtubule outer surface, while an N-terminal helical motif caps microtubule's α-β surface of β-tubulin. Through this, PN2-3 forms a high-affinity complex with GTP-tubulin, crucial for defining numbers and lengths of centriolar/ciliary-microtubules. Surprisingly, two distinct mutations in PN2-3 exhibit opposite effects on centriolar/ciliary-microtubule lengths. CPAPF375A, with strongly reduced tubulin interaction, causes shorter centrioles and cilia exhibiting doublet- instead of triplet-microtubules. CPAPEE343RR that unmasks the β-tubulin polymerization surface displays slightly reduced tubulin-binding affinity inducing over-elongation of newly forming centriolar/ciliary-microtubules by enhanced dynamic release of its bound tubulin. Thus CPAP regulates delivery of its bound-tubulin to define the size of microtubule-based cellular structures using a ‘clutch-like' mechanism. PMID:27306797

  11. PACS-1 Mediates Phosphorylation-Dependent Ciliary Trafficking of the CNG Channel in Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Paul M.; Zhang, Lian; Thomas, Gary; Martens, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    Impaired ciliary protein transport in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) leads to anosmia, and is a newly recognized clinical manifestation of a class of human disorders called ciliopathies. Surprisingly little is known regarding the mechanisms controlling trafficking to this unique neuronal compartment. Here, we show a novel role for phosphofurin acidic cluster-sorting protein 1 (PACS-1) in the ciliary trafficking of the olfactory CNG channel. PACS-1 is an intracellular sorting protein that mediates its effects through the binding of acidic clusters on cargo protein. This interaction is dependent on CK2 phosphorylation of both PACS-1 and its cargo. We show that CNGB1b contains two putative PACS-1 binding sites, which are phosphorylated by the serine/threonine protein kinase, CK2. Additionally, we show that PACS-1 is expressed in OSNs and interacts in complex with the CNG channel. CK2 inhibition in native OSNs causes a loss of CNG channel from cilia and subsequent olfactory dysfunction, while adenoviral expression of mutant PACS-1 causes similar mislocalization. These results provide a mechanism for the subunit-dependent ciliary trafficking of the CNG channel and offer insight into the mechanisms of ciliary transport. PMID:19710307

  12. Ciliary muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity during manual tracking of a moving visual target.

    PubMed

    Domkin, Dmitry; Forsman, Mikael; Richter, Hans O

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown an association of visual demands during near work and increased activity of the trapezius muscle. Those studies were conducted under stationary postural conditions with fixed gaze and artificial visual load. The present study investigated the relationship between ciliary muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity across individuals during performance of a natural dynamic motor task under free gaze conditions. Participants (N=11) tracked a moving visual target with a digital pen on a computer screen. Tracking performance, eye refraction and trapezius muscle activity were continuously measured. Ciliary muscle contraction force was computed from eye accommodative response. There was a significant Pearson correlation between ciliary muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity on the tracking side (0.78, p<0.01) and passive side (0.64, p<0.05). The study supports the hypothesis that high visual demands, leading to an increased ciliary muscle contraction during continuous eye-hand coordination, may increase trapezius muscle tension and thus contribute to the development of musculoskeletal complaints in the neck-shoulder area. Further experimental studies are required to clarify whether the relationship is valid within each individual or may represent a general personal trait, when individuals with higher eye accommodative response tend to have higher trapezius muscle activity. PMID:26746010

  13. Characterization of a putative acetylcholine receptor in chick ciliary ganglion neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Stollberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to the main immunogenic region on the alpha subunit of acetylcholine receptors in muscle and electric organ recognize membrane components in chick brain and ciliary ganglia that are candidates for the neuronal receptor. The component in chick brain has been purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. It specifically binds nicotine but not alpha-bungarotoxin, and can be affinity labeled with (/sup 3/H)bromoacetylcholine. The cross-reacting component in ciliary ganglion neurons is concentrated in synaptic membrane, and can be modulated by exposure of the cells to cholinergic ligands in culture. The cross-reacting component in ciliary ganglion neurons is an integral membrane component that binds concanavalin A, and it is distinct from the alpha-bungarotoxin binding component. The acetylcholine receptor function in these neurons can be locked by affinity alkylation with bromoacetylcholine, indicating similarity in this respect to receptors from muscle and electric organ. Antisera raised against the partially purified component from chick brain also block receptor function on ciliary ganglion neurons. The subcellular distribution of the ganglion component in culture is assessed, and it is shown that approximately 2/3 of the cross-reacting components are intracellular; the majority of these seem not to be destined for insertion into the plasma membrane.

  14. Medicago ciliaris growing in Tunisian soils is preferentially nodulated by Sinorhizobium medicae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variation in growth of Medicago ciliaris was recorded across soils from five different regions in Tunisia that represented different soil types and climatic zones. In four of these soils (Mateur, Enfidha, Rhayet and Soliman) this variation appeared to be related to the nodule number on the roots of ...

  15. Bug22 influences cilium morphology and the post-translational modification of ciliary microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Mendes Maia, Teresa; Gogendeau, Delphine; Pennetier, Carole; Janke, Carsten; Basto, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cilia and flagella are organelles essential for motility and sensing of environmental stimuli. Depending on the cell type, cilia acquire a defined set of functions and, accordingly, are built with an appropriate length and molecular composition. Several ciliary proteins display a high degree of conservation throughout evolution and mutations in ciliary genes are associated with various diseases such as ciliopathies and infertility. Here, we describe the role of the highly conserved ciliary protein, Bug22, in Drosophila. Previous studies in unicellular organisms have shown that Bug22 is required for proper cilia function, but its exact role in ciliogenesis has not been investigated yet. Null Bug22 mutant flies display cilia-associated phenotypes and nervous system defects. Furthermore, sperm differentiation is blocked at the individualization stage, due to impaired migration of the individualization machinery. Tubulin post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as polyglycylation, polyglutamylation or acetylation, are determinants of microtubule (MT) functions and stability in centrioles, cilia and neurons. We found defects in the timely incorporation of polyglycylation in sperm axonemal MTs of Bug22 mutants. In addition, we found that depletion of human Bug22 in RPE1 cells resulted in the appearance of longer cilia and reduced axonemal polyglutamylation. Our work identifies Bug22 as a protein that plays a conserved role in the regulation of PTMs of the ciliary axoneme. PMID:24414207

  16. Mutations in axonemal dynein assembly factor DNAAF3 cause primary ciliary dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Mitchison, Hannah M.; Schmidts, Miriam; Loges, Niki T.; Freshour, Judy; Dritsoula, Athina; Hirst, Rob A.; O’Callaghan, Christopher; Blau, Hannah; Dabbagh, Maha Al; Olbrich, Heike; Beales, Philip L.; Yagi, Toshiki; Mussaffi, Huda; Chung, Eddie M.K.; Omran, Heymut; Mitchell, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD) most often arises from loss of the dynein motors that power ciliary beating. Here we show that PF22/DNAAF3, a previously uncharacterized protein, is essential for the preassembly of dyneins into complexes prior to their transport into cilia. We identified loss-of-function mutations in the human DNAAF3 gene in patients from families with situs inversus and defects in assembly of inner and outer dynein arms. Zebrafish dnaaf3 knockdown likewise disrupts dynein arm assembly and ciliary motility, causing PCD phenotypes including hydrocephalus and laterality malformations. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii PF22 is exclusively cytoplasmic, and a null mutant fails to assemble outer and some inner dynein arms. Altered abundance of dynein subunits in mutant cytoplasm suggests PF22/DNAAF3 acts at a similar stage to other preassembly proteins, PF13/KTU and ODA7/LRRC50, in the dynein preassembly pathway. These results support the existence of a conserved multi-step pathway for cytoplasmic formation of assembly-competent ciliary dynein complexes. PMID:22387996

  17. Superresolution Pattern Recognition Reveals the Architectural Map of the Ciliary Transition Zone

    PubMed Central

    Tony Yang, T.; Su, Jimmy; Wang, Won-Jing; Craige, Branch; Witman, George B.; Bryan Tsou, Meng-Fu; Liao, Jung-Chi

    2015-01-01

    The transition zone (TZ) of primary cilia serves as a diffusion barrier to regulate ciliogenesis and receptor localization for key signaling events such as sonic hedgehog signaling. Its gating mechanism is poorly understood due to the tiny volume accommodating a large number of ciliopathy-associated molecules. Here we performed stimulated emission depletion (STED) imaging of collective samples and recreated superresolved relative localizations of eight representative species of ciliary proteins using position averages and overlapped with representative electron microscopy (EM) images, defining an architectural foundation at the ciliary base. Upon this framework, transmembrane proteins TMEM67 and TCTN2 were accumulated at the same axial level as MKS1 and RPGRIP1L, suggesting that their regulation roles for tissue-specific ciliogenesis occur at a specific level of the TZ. CEP290 is surprisingly localized at a different axial level bridging the basal body (BB) and other TZ proteins. Upon this molecular architecture, two reservoirs of intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles, correlating with phases of ciliary growth, are present: one colocalized with the transition fibers (TFs) while the other situated beyond the distal edge of the TZ. Together, our results reveal an unprecedented structural framework of the TZ, facilitating our understanding in molecular screening and assembly at the ciliary base. PMID:26365165

  18. BBS4 and BBS5 show functional redundancy in the BBSome to regulate the degradative sorting of ciliary sensory receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingwen; Zhang, Yuxia; Wei, Qing; Huang, Yan; Li, Yan; Ling, Kun; Hu, Jinghua

    2015-01-01

    Cilia harbor sensory receptors for various signaling cascades critical for vertebrate development. However, the mechanisms underlying the ciliary homeostasis of sensory receptors remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that BBS-4 and BBS-5, two distinct BBSome components, show unexpected functional redundancy in the context of cilia in C. elegans. BBS-4 directly interacts with BBS-5 and the interaction can be disrupted by a conserved mutation identified in human BBS4. Surprisingly, we found that BBS-4 and BBS-5 act redundantly in the BBSome to regulate the ciliary removal, rather than the ciliary entry or retrograde IFT transport, of various sensory receptors. Further analyses indicate that co-depletion of BBS-4 and BBS-5 disrupts the lysosome-targeted degradative sorting of ciliary sensory receptors. Moreover, mammalian BBS4 and BBS5 also interact directly and coordinate the ciliary removal of polycystin 2. Hence, we reveal a novel and highly conserved role for the BBSome in fine-tuning ciliary signaling by regulating the ciliary removal of sensory receptors for lysosomal degradation. PMID:26150102

  19. A role for the ciliary marginal zone in the melanopsin-dependent intrinsic pupillary light reflex.

    PubMed

    Semo, Ma'ayan; Gias, Carlos; Ahmado, Ahmad; Vugler, Anthony

    2014-02-01

    Maintenance of pupillary constriction in light-adapted rodents has traditionally been thought to involve a reflex between retina, brain and iris, with recent work identifying the melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) as the major conduits for retinal input to the brain. There is also a less well-understood phenomenon whereby the iris of some mammals, including mice, will constrict to light when either the eye, or the iris itself is physically isolated from the brain. The intrinsic pupillary light reflex (iPLR) is the term given to pupil constriction in the absence of retinal input to the brain. Here, using an intraocular axotomy approach, we show that the iPLR in conscious mice spans a dynamic range over 3 log units of irradiance. This iPLR response is absent in melanopsin knockout (MKO) mice and can be significantly inhibited by atropine. Immunohistochemistry for cfos and melanopsin, in combination with light exposure revealed a population of small ipRGCs in the retinal ciliary marginal zone (CMZ), which remain responsive to light in axotomised mice. We report that damage to the CMZ in a novel in vitro preparation removes a significant component of the iPLR response, while a detailed immunohistochemical analysis of the CMZ in wildtype mice revealed a melanopsin-rich plexus, which was consistently most intense in nasal retina. There were clear examples of melanopsin-positive, direct retino-ciliary projections, which appear to emanate from Brn3b negative, M1 type ipRGCs. These cells are clustered along the melanopsin-rich plexus nasally and may channel ipRGC signals from retina into the iris via ciliary body. Comparison between wildtype and MKO mice reveals that the ciliary body is also weakly stained for melanopsin. Our results show that the full extent of iPLR in mice requires cholinergic neurotransmission and intact signalling at the CMZ/ciliary body. This response may be mediated to some extent by ipRGCs, which send

  20. CCDC65 Mutation Causes Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia with Normal Ultrastructure and Hyperkinetic Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Horani, Amjad; Brody, Steven L.; Ferkol, Thomas W.; Shoseyov, David; Wasserman, Mollie G.; Ta-shma, Asaf; Wilson, Kate S.; Bayly, Philip V.; Amirav, Israel; Cohen-Cymberknoh, Malena; Dutcher, Susan K.; Elpeleg, Orly; Kerem, Eitan

    2013-01-01

    Background Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disorder characterized by impaired ciliary function, leading to chronic sinopulmonary disease. The genetic causes of PCD are still evolving, while the diagnosis is often dependent on finding a ciliary ultrastructural abnormality and immotile cilia. Here we report a novel gene associated with PCD but without ciliary ultrastructural abnormalities evident by transmission electron microscopy, but with dyskinetic cilia beating. Methods Genetic linkage analysis was performed in a family with a PCD subject. Gene expression was studied in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and human airway epithelial cells, using RNA assays and immunostaining. The phenotypic effects of candidate gene mutations were determined in primary culture human tracheobronchial epithelial cells transduced with gene targeted shRNA sequences. Video-microscopy was used to evaluate cilia motion. Results A single novel mutation in CCDC65, which created a termination codon at position 293, was identified in a subject with typical clinical features of PCD. CCDC65, an orthologue of the Chlamydomonas nexin-dynein regulatory complex protein DRC2, was localized to the cilia of normal nasal epithelial cells but was absent in those from the proband. CCDC65 expression was up-regulated during ciliogenesis in cultured airway epithelial cells, as was DRC2 in C. reinhardtii following deflagellation. Nasal epithelial cells from the affected individual and CCDC65-specific shRNA transduced normal airway epithelial cells had stiff and dyskinetic cilia beating patterns compared to control cells. Moreover, Gas8, a nexin-dynein regulatory complex component previously identified to associate with CCDC65, was absent in airway cells from the PCD subject and CCDC65-silenced cells. Conclusion Mutation in CCDC65, a nexin-dynein regulatory complex member, resulted in a frameshift mutation and PCD. The affected individual had altered cilia beating patterns, and no detectable

  1. Regulation of ciliary reversal in triton-extracted Paramecium by calcium and cyclic adenosine monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Nakaoka, Y; Ooi, H

    1985-08-01

    A Triton-extracted model of Paramecium swims forwards when the Ca2+ concentration in the reactivation medium containing ATP is below 10(-6) M and swims backwards when Ca2+ concentration is above 10(-6) M. We found that cAMP (adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphoric acid) inhibited Ca-induced backward swimming of the model and caused forward swimming even when the [Ca2+] was above 10(-6) M. This effect of cAMP was abolished by an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In order to study the possible role of phosphorylation in the regulation of ciliary orientation, ATP in the reactivation medium was replaced by an ATP analogue, ARP gamma S (adenosine 5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate), which irreversibly thiophosphorylates proteins. In ATP gamma S medium, the model ceased both swimming and ciliary beating, but the orientation of cilia was dependent on [Ca2+]. At low [Ca2+], cilia were perpendicular to the cell surface and, with increase in [Ca2+], their orientation gradually changed towards the cell anterior. Such a change in ciliary orientation corresponds roughly to the change in the swimming direction observed in ATP medium. The ciliary orientation towards the anterior of the cell in ATP gamma S medium at high [Ca2+] was maintained when [Ca2+] was decreased. In contrast, in ATP medium, the swimming direction was reversibly changed with changes in [Ca2+]. These results suggest that the ciliary orientation is regulated not only by Ca2+ but also by cAMP, probably via protein phosphorylation. PMID:3003129

  2. Effects of preganglionic denervation and postganglionic axotomy on acetylcholine receptors in the chick ciliary ganglion

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The regulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in chick ciliary ganglia was examined by using a radiolabeled anti-AChR mAb to quantitate the amount of receptor in ganglion detergent extracts after preganglionic denervation or postganglionic axotomy. Surgical transection of the preganglionic input to the ciliary ganglion in newly hatched chicks caused a threefold reduction in the total number of AChRs within 10 d compared with that present in unoperated contralateral control ganglia. Surgical transection of both the choroid and ciliary nerves emerging from the ciliary ganglion in newly hatched chicks to establish postganglionic axotomy led to a nearly 10-fold reduction in AChRs within 5 d compared with unoperated contralateral ganglia. The declines were specific since they could not be accounted for by changes in ganglionic protein or by decreases in neuronal survival or size. Light microscopy revealed no gross morphological differences between neurons in operated and control ganglia. A second membrane component of cholinergic relevance on chick ciliary ganglion neurons is the alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-Bgt)-binding component. The alpha-Bgt-binding component also declined in number after either postganglionic axotomy or preganglionic denervation, but appeared to do so with a more rapid time course than did ganglionic AChRs. The results imply that cell-cell interactions in vivo specifically regulate both the number of AChRs and the number of alpha-Bgt-binding components in the ganglion. Regulation of these neuronal cholinergic membrane components clearly differs from that previously described for muscle AChRs. PMID:3667699

  3. Ciliary beating recovery in deficient human airway epithelial cells after lentivirus ex vivo gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Chhin, Brigitte; Negre, Didier; Merrot, Olivier; Pham, Jacqueline; Tourneur, Yves; Ressnikoff, Denis; Jaspers, Martine; Jorissen, Mark; Cosset, François-Loïc; Bouvagnet, Patrice

    2009-03-01

    Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia is a heterogeneous genetic disease that is characterized by cilia dysfunction of the epithelial cells lining the respiratory tracts, resulting in recurrent respiratory tract infections. Despite lifelong physiological therapy and antibiotics, the lungs of affected patients are progressively destroyed, leading to respiratory insufficiency. Recessive mutations in Dynein Axonemal Intermediate chain type 1 (DNAI1) gene have been described in 10% of cases of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. Our goal was to restore normal ciliary beating in DNAI1-deficient human airway epithelial cells. A lentiviral vector based on Simian Immunodeficiency Virus pseudotyped with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Glycoprotein was used to transduce cultured human airway epithelial cells with a cDNA of DNAI1 driven by the Elongation Factor 1 promoter. Transcription and translation of the transduced gene were tested by RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. Human airway epithelial cells that were DNAI1-deficient due to compound heterozygous mutations, and consequently had immotile cilia and no outer dynein arm, were transduced by the lentivirus. Cilia beating was recorded and electron microscopy of the cilia was performed. Transcription and translation of the transduced DNAI1 gene were detected in human cells treated with the lentivirus. In addition, immotile cilia recovered a normal beat and outer dynein arms reappeared. We demonstrated that it is possible to obtain a normalization of ciliary beat frequency of deficient human airway epithelial cells by using a lentivirus to transduce cells with the therapeutic gene. This preliminary step constitutes a conceptual proof that is indispensable in the perspective of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia's in vivo gene therapy. This is the first time that recovery of cilia beating is demonstrated in this disease. PMID:19300481

  4. Ciliary Beating Recovery in Deficient Human Airway Epithelial Cells after Lentivirus Ex Vivo Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chhin, Brigitte; Negre, Didier; Merrot, Olivier; Pham, Jacqueline; Tourneur, Yves; Ressnikoff, Denis; Jaspers, Martine; Jorissen, Mark; Cosset, François-Loïc; Bouvagnet, Patrice

    2009-01-01

    Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia is a heterogeneous genetic disease that is characterized by cilia dysfunction of the epithelial cells lining the respiratory tracts, resulting in recurrent respiratory tract infections. Despite lifelong physiological therapy and antibiotics, the lungs of affected patients are progressively destroyed, leading to respiratory insufficiency. Recessive mutations in Dynein Axonemal Intermediate chain type 1 (DNAI1) gene have been described in 10% of cases of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. Our goal was to restore normal ciliary beating in DNAI1–deficient human airway epithelial cells. A lentiviral vector based on Simian Immunodeficiency Virus pseudotyped with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Glycoprotein was used to transduce cultured human airway epithelial cells with a cDNA of DNAI1 driven by the Elongation Factor 1 promoter. Transcription and translation of the transduced gene were tested by RT–PCR and western blot, respectively. Human airway epithelial cells that were DNAI1–deficient due to compound heterozygous mutations, and consequently had immotile cilia and no outer dynein arm, were transduced by the lentivirus. Cilia beating was recorded and electron microscopy of the cilia was performed. Transcription and translation of the transduced DNAI1 gene were detected in human cells treated with the lentivirus. In addition, immotile cilia recovered a normal beat and outer dynein arms reappeared. We demonstrated that it is possible to obtain a normalization of ciliary beat frequency of deficient human airway epithelial cells by using a lentivirus to transduce cells with the therapeutic gene. This preliminary step constitutes a conceptual proof that is indispensable in the perspective of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia's in vivo gene therapy. This is the first time that recovery of cilia beating is demonstrated in this disease. PMID:19300481

  5. Clofazimine-induced Hair Pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Philip, Mariam; Samson, Joan Felicita; Simi, Puthenveedu Salahudeen

    2012-07-01

    A 45-year-old man was treated with WHO multibacillary multidrug therapy for borderline leprosy and high dose daily Clofazimine for lepra reaction. Along with the expected side effect of skin pigmentation, the patient also noticed darkening of previously grey hair. This colour persisted eight months after completing multibacillary multidrug therapy. PMID:23180930

  6. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  7. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725 Food... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  8. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  9. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in food-contact materials....

  10. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  11. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  12. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  13. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  14. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  15. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  16. Generation of retinal pigment epithelial cells from human embryonic stem cell-derived spherical neural masses.

    PubMed

    Cho, Myung Soo; Kim, Sang Jin; Ku, Seung-Yup; Park, Jung Hyun; Lee, Haksup; Yoo, Dae Hoon; Park, Un Chul; Song, Seul Ae; Choi, Young Min; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2012-09-01

    Dysfunction and loss of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are major pathologic changes observed in various retinal degenerative diseases such as aged-related macular degeneration. RPE generated from human pluripotent stem cells can be a good candidate for RPE replacement therapy. Here, we show the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) toward RPE with the generation of spherical neural masses (SNMs), which are pure masses of hESCs-derived neural precursors. During the early passaging of SNMs, cystic structures arising from opened neural tube-like structures showed pigmented epithelial morphology. These pigmented cells were differentiated into functional RPE by neuroectodermal induction and mechanical purification. Most of the differentiated cells showed typical RPE morphologies, such as a polygonal-shaped epithelial monolayer, and transmission electron microscopy revealed apical microvilli, pigment granules, and tight junctions. These cells also expressed molecular markers of RPE, including Mitf, ZO-1, RPE65, CRALBP, and bestrophin. The generated RPE also showed phagocytosis of isolated bovine photoreceptor outer segment and secreting pigment epithelium-derived factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. Functional RPE could be generated from SNM in our method. Because SNMs have several advantages, including the capability of expansion for long periods without loss of differentiation capability, easy storage and thawing, and no need for feeder cells, our method for RPE differentiation may be used as an efficient strategy for generating functional RPE cells for retinal regeneration therapy. PMID:22683799

  17. Availability and Utilization of Pigments from Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Begum, Hasina; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Khatoon, Helena; Shariff, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    Microalgae are the major photosynthesizers on earth and produce important pigments that include chlorophyll a, b and c, β-carotene, astaxanthin, xanthophylls, and phycobiliproteins. Presently, synthetic colorants are used in food, cosmetic, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical industries. However, due to problems associated with the harmful effects of synthetic colorants, exploitation of microalgal pigments as a source of natural colors becomes an attractive option. There are various factors such as nutrient availability, salinity, pH, temperature, light wavelength, and light intensity that affect pigment production in microalgae. This paper reviews the availability and characteristics of microalgal pigments, factors affecting pigment production, and the application of pigments produced from microalgae. The potential of microalgal pigments as a source of natural colors is enormous as an alternative to synthetic coloring agents, which has limited applications due to regulatory practice for health reasons. PMID:25674822

  18. The force of contraction of the human ciliary muscle during accommodation

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    1. Apparatus has been designed to alter the shape of the human lens by tensile forces applied to the zonular fibres indirectly through the ciliary body. The changes in dioptric power of the lens for monochromatic sodium light were measured at the same time. Simultaneous serial photography, and direct measurement enabled one to relate a change in shape of the lens to the change in dioptric power. Subsequently, the same lens was isolated and spun around its antero-posterior polar axis and high speed photography recorded its changing profile. 2. By comparing the changes in lens profile due to zonular tension and centrifugal force respectively, the force developed in the zonule for a given change in the shape of the lens could be calculated. Changes in dioptric power associated with those of shape can thus be related directly to the force of contraction of the ciliary muscle necessary to reduce the initial tension of the zonule in the unaccommodated state. 3. The force of contraction of the ciliary muscle as measured by radial force exerted through the zonule and the change in dioptric power of the lens were not linearly related. The relationship is more exactly expressed by the equation [Formula: see text] where D = amplitude of accommodation in dioptres (m-1), FCB = force of contraction of the ciliary muscle as measured by changes in tension of the zonule (N), Kdf = dioptric force coefficient and is constant for a given age (m-1N-½ × 102·5). This coefficient is 0·41 at 15 yr and 0·07 at 45 yr of age. 4. In youth for maximum accommodation (10-12 D) the force is approximately 1·0 × 10-2 N while to produce sufficient accommodation for near vision (3·5 D) the force is less than 0·05 × 10-2 N. 5. After the age of 30 yr the force of contraction of the ciliary muscle necessary to produce maximum accommodation rises steadily to about 50 yr of age and thereafter probably falls slightly. At about 50 yr of age the ciliary muscle is some 50% more powerful than in youth

  19. Measuring Changes in Ciliary Muscle Thickness with Accommodation in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lossing, Laura Ashley; Sinnott, Loraine T.; Kao, Chiu-Yen; Richdale, Kathryn; Bailey, Melissa D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop a measurement protocol for changes in the shape and size of the ciliary muscle with accommodation using the Zeiss Visante™ Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomographer (AS-OCT) and to determine the test-retest repeatability of these measurements. Methods Subjects were 25 adults ages 23–28 years. The ciliary muscle was imaged at two visits with the Visante™ while accommodative response was monitored during imaging using the PowerRefractor. Ciliary muscle thickness was measured at 1 mm (CMT1), 2 mm (CMT2), and 3 mm (CMT3) posterior to the scleral spur and at the point of maximal thickness (CMTMAX). Thickness was measured at these locations while subjects viewed a target at distance and at a 4.00-D accommodative stimulus. Outcome measures were the change in thickness between distance and the 4.00-D stimulus and the change in thickness per diopter of accommodative response (PowerRefractor). Finally, the repeatability measurements between visit 1 and visit 2 were determined with a Bland-Altman analysis. Results The statistically significant modeled changes in ciliary muscle thickness were as follows: CMTMAX = 69.2 μm (4.00-D stimulus) and 18.1 μm (per diopter of accommodation); CMT1 = 45.2 μm (4.00-D stimulus) and 12.3 μm (per diopter of accommodation); and CMT3 = −45.9 μm (4.00-D stimulus) and −12.0 μm (per diopter of accommodation); p < 0.0001 for all. Conclusions The combination of the Visante™ and the PowerRefractor is a feasible tool for measuring thickening of ciliary muscle at more anterior locations and thinning at more posterior locations during accommodation. We noted a wide range of accommodative responses during the time of image capture in this study indicating that the most accurate estimates of the change in ciliary muscle dimensions with accommodation may be obtained by using accommodative response rather than stimulus values and by using measurements taken simultaneously with image capture. PMID:22504328

  20. Edinger-Westphal and pharmacologically stimulated accommodative refractive changes and lens and ciliary process movements in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ostrin, Lisa A; Glasser, Adrian

    2007-02-01

    During accommodation, the refractive changes occur when the ciliary muscle contracts, releasing resting zonular tension and allowing the lens capsule to mold the lens into an accommodated form. This results in centripetal movement of the ciliary processes and lens edge. The goal of this study was to understand the relationship between accommodative refractive changes, ciliary process movements and lens edge movements during Edinger-Westphal (EW) and pharmacologically stimulated accommodation in adolescent rhesus monkeys. Experiments were performed on one eye each of three rhesus monkeys with permanent indwelling electrodes in the EW nucleus of the midbrain. EW stimulated accommodative refractive changes were measured with infrared photorefraction, and ciliary process and lens edge movements were measured with slit-lamp goniovideography on the temporal aspect of the eye. Images were recorded on the nasal aspect for one eye during EW stimulation. Image analysis was performed off-line at 30 Hz to determine refractive changes and ciliary body and lens edge movements during EW stimulated accommodation and after carbachol iontophoresis to determine drug induced accommodative movements. Maximum EW stimulated accommodation was 7.36+/-0.49 D and pharmacologically stimulated accommodation was 14.44+/-1.21 D. During EW stimulated accommodation, the ciliary processes and lens edge moved centripetally linearly by 0.030+/-0.001 mm/D and 0.027+/-0.001 mm/D, with a total movement of 0.219+/-0.034 mm and 0.189+/-0.023 mm, respectively. There was no significant nasal/temporal difference in ciliary process or lens edge movements. 30-40 min after pharmacologically stimulated accommodation, the ciliary processes moved centripetally a total of 0.411+/-0.048 mm, or 0.030+/-0.005 mm/D, and the lens edge moved centripetally 0.258+/-0.014 mm, or 0.019+/-0.003 mm/D. The peaks and valleys of the ciliary processes moved by similar amounts during both supramaximal EW and pharmacologically

  1. Holographic films from carotenoid pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toxqui-López, S.; Lecona-Sánchez, J. F.; Santacruz-Vázquez, C.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2014-02-01

    Carotenoids pigments presents in pineapple can be more than just natural dyes, which is one of the applications that now at day gives the chemical industry. In this research shown that can be used in implementing of holographic recording Films. Therefore we describe the technique how to obtain this kind of pigments trough spay drying of natural pineapple juice, which are then dissolved with water in a proportion of 0.1g to 1mL. The obtained sample is poured into glass substrates using the gravity method, after a drying of 24 hours in laboratory normal conditions the films are ready. The films are characterized by recording transmission holographic gratings (LSR 445 NL 445 nm) and measuring the diffraction efficiency holographic parameter. This recording material has good diffraction efficiency and environmental stability.

  2. Cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gaitan-Gaona, Francisco; Said, Mirra C; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman presented with a 3 cm black, ulcerated nodule located on the skin of the upper abdomen, just below the breast. The lesion was painful to the touch, but the patient reported no other associated symptoms and was otherwise healthy. A 4-mm punch biopsy of the affected skin was obtained and the histological diagnosis was cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma. PMID:27136637

  3. Nanoscience of an ancient pigment.

    PubMed

    Johnson-McDaniel, Darrah; Barrett, Christopher A; Sharafi, Asma; Salguero, Tina T

    2013-02-01

    We describe monolayer nanosheets of calcium copper tetrasilicate, CaCuSi(4)O(10), which have strong near-IR luminescence and are amenable to solution processing methods. The facile exfoliation of bulk CaCuSi(4)O(10) into nanosheets is especially surprising in view of the long history of this material as the colored component of Egyptian blue, a well-known pigment from ancient times. PMID:23215240

  4. The solvent action of sodium hypochlorite on bovine tendon collagen, bovine pulp, and bovine gingiva.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Asai, K; Fujita, H; Nakazato, H; Nishimura, Y; Furuse, Y; Sahashi, E

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimum temperature and concentration of sodium hypochlorite solution required to dissolve bovine tendon collagen, pulp, and gingiva. The 10% concentration of sodium hypochlorite solution at 37 degrees C was found to be most effective in dissolving bovine tendon collagen, pulp, and gingiva. Sodium hypochlorite solution was more effective in dissolving bovine pulp or tendon collagen than in dissolving bovine gingiva. PMID:3862046

  5. Fabrication and Manipulation of Ciliary Microrobots with Non-reciprocal Magnetic Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangwon; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Jeonghun; Nelson, Bradley J.; Zhang, Li; Choi, Hongsoo

    2016-07-01

    Magnetically actuated ciliary microrobots were designed, fabricated, and manipulated to mimic cilia-based microorganisms such as paramecia. Full three-dimensional (3D) microrobot structures were fabricated using 3D laser lithography to form a polymer base structure. A nickel/titanium bilayer was sputtered onto the cilia part of the microrobot to ensure magnetic actuation and biocompatibility. The microrobots were manipulated by an electromagnetic coil system, which generated a stepping magnetic field to actuate the cilia with non-reciprocal motion. The cilia beating motion produced a net propulsive force, resulting in movement of the microrobot. The magnetic forces on individual cilia were calculated with various input parameters including magnetic field strength, cilium length, applied field angle, actual cilium angle, etc., and the translational velocity was measured experimentally. The position and orientation of the ciliary microrobots were precisely controlled, and targeted particle transportation was demonstrated experimentally.

  6. IFT27 links the BBSome to IFT for maintenance of the ciliary signaling compartment.

    PubMed

    Eguether, Thibaut; San Agustin, Jovenal T; Keady, Brian T; Jonassen, Julie A; Liang, Yinwen; Francis, Richard; Tobita, Kimimasa; Johnson, Colin A; Abdelhamed, Zakia A; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2014-11-10

    Vertebrate hedgehog signaling is coordinated by the differential localization of the receptors patched-1 and Smoothened in the primary cilium. Cilia assembly is mediated by intraflagellar transport (IFT), and cilia defects disrupt hedgehog signaling, causing many structural birth defects. We generated Ift25 and Ift27 knockout mice and show that they have structural birth defects indicative of hedgehog signaling dysfunction. Surprisingly, ciliary assembly is not affected, but abnormal hedgehog signaling is observed in conjunction with ciliary accumulation of patched-1 and Smoothened. Similarly, Smoothened accumulates in cilia on cells mutated for BBSome components or the BBS binding protein/regulator Lztfl1. Interestingly, the BBSome and Lztfl1 accumulate to high levels in Ift27 mutant cilia. Because Lztfl1 mutant cells accumulate BBSome but not IFT27, it is likely that Lztfl1 functions downstream of IFT27 to couple the BBSome to the IFT particle for coordinated removal of patched-1 and Smoothened from cilia during hedgehog signaling. PMID:25446516

  7. IFT27 Links the BBSome to IFT for Maintenance of the Ciliary Signaling Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Eguether, Thibaut; San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Keady, Brian T.; Jonassen, Julie A.; Liang, Yinwen; Francis, Richard; Tobita, Kimimasa; Johnson, Colin A.; Abdelhamed, Zakia A.; Lo, Cecilia W.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrate hedgehog signaling is coordinated by the differential localization of the receptors patched-1 and smoothened in the primary cilium. Cilia assembly is mediated by intraflagellar transport (IFT) and cilia defects disrupt hedgehog signaling, causing many structural birth defects. We generated Ift25 and Ift27 knockout mice and show they have structural birth defects indicative of hedgehog signaling dysfunction. Surprisingly ciliary assembly is not affected, but abnormal hedgehog signaling is observed in conjunction with ciliary accumulation of patched-1 and smoothened. Similarly smoothened accumulates in cilia on cells mutated for BBSome components or the BBS binding protein/regulator Lztfl1. Interestingly, the BBSome and Lztfl1 accumulate to high levels in Ift27 mutant cilia. Since Lztfl1 mutant cells accumulate BBSome but not IFT27 it is likely that Lztfl1 functions downstream of IFT27 to couple the BBSome to the IFT particle for coordinated removal of patched-1 and smoothened from cilia during hedgehog signaling. PMID:25446516

  8. Evidence for Two Extremes of Ciliary Motor Response in a Single Swimming Microorganism

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ilyong; Powers, Thomas R.; Valles, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Because arrays of motile cilia drive fluids for a range of processes, the versatile mechano-chemical mechanism coordinating them has been under scrutiny. The protist Paramecium presents opportunities to compare how groups of cilia perform two distinct functions, swimming propulsion and nutrient uptake. We present how the body cilia responsible for propulsion and the oral-groove cilia responsible for nutrient uptake respond to changes in their mechanical environment accomplished by varying the fluid viscosity over a factor of 7. Analysis with a phenomenological model of trajectories of swimmers made neutrally buoyant with magnetic forces combined with high-speed imaging of ciliary beating reveal that the body cilia exert a nearly constant propulsive force primarily by reducing their beat frequency as viscosity increases. By contrast, the oral-groove cilia beat at a nearly constant frequency. The existence of two extremes of motor response in a unicellular organism prompts unique investigations of factors controlling ciliary beating. PMID:24411242

  9. Regulation of ciliary motility by membrane potential in Paramecium: a role for cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Bonini, N M; Gustin, M C; Nelson, D L

    1986-01-01

    The membrane potential of Paramecium controls the frequency and direction of the ciliary beat, thus determining the cell's swimming behavior. Stimuli that hyperpolarize the membrane potential increase the ciliary beat frequency and therefore increase forward swimming speed. We have observed that 1) drugs that elevate intracellular cyclic AMP increased swimming speed 2-3-fold, 2) hyperpolarizing the membrane potential by manipulation of extracellular cations (e.g., K+) induced both a transient increase in, and a higher sustained level of cyclic AMP compared to the control, and 3) the swimming speed of detergent-permeabilized cells in MgATP was stimulated 2-fold by the addition of cyclic AMP. Our results suggest that the membrane potential can regulate intracellular cAMP in Paramecium and that control of swimming speed by membrane potential may in part be mediated by cAMP. PMID:2427226

  10. Calcium and microtubule sliding in ciliary axonemes isolated from Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed

    Mogami, Y; Takahashi, K

    1983-05-01

    Microtubule sliding was induced in axonemes obtained from isolated cilia of Paramecium caudatum when they were exposed to a reactivating solution containing ATP after mild treatment with trypsin. Over a very wide range of concentrations (1 nM-4 mM), Ca2+ in the reactivating solution had no effect on the proportion of axonemes that disintegrated as the result of microtubule sliding. Also, the velocity of sliding, determined by cinematography, and the polarity of the direction of sliding-force generation, determined by electron microscopy with regards to the base-to-tip axis of the cilium, were not affected by Ca2+. The results indicate that the Ca sensitivity, which is responsible for the ciliary reversal response, was removed from the axoneme, possibly as the result of trypsin treatment. It is thus unlikely that Ca sensitivity is attributable to the basic sliding machinery that powers ciliary movement. PMID:6885936