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Sample records for bow direction reversal

  1. Articulated coordination of the right arm underlies control of bow parameters and quick bow reversals in skilled cello bowing

    PubMed Central

    Verrel, Julius; Woollacott, Marjorie; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2014-01-01

    Stringed instrument bowing is a complex coordinative motor skill acquired though years of intense practice. We apply a novel “freezing” analysis to investigate how movement at different joints contributes to bow transport (movement amplitude), stabilization of bow parameters (angle, velocity) during bow movements, and quick reversals of bow direction (acceleration amplitude). Participants were ten advanced or professional cellists (19–32 years, at least 10 years of practice) and ten age-matched novice players. Arm and bow movements were recorded using 3D motion capture. To assess how performance depends on articulated use of the right arm, actual data were compared to surrogate data, generated by artificially removing movement at (“freezing”) individual joints in measured arm movements. This analysis showed that both elbow and shoulder significantly contribute to bow transport in experts, while only the shoulder contributed to bow transport in novices. Moreover, experts showed more strongly increased variability of bow parameters and reduced acceleration amplitudes at bow reversals for surrogate compared to actual movement data. This indicates that movement across joints was organized to reduce bow variability and achieve quick bow reversals. Corresponding effects were less pronounced or absent in the novices, in particular for the wrist and elbow. Our results demonstrate the importance of articulated use of the right arm and clarify the contribution of different joints in experts’ bowing performance. Moreover, they support theories of motor control and learning that propose exploitation of biomechanical degrees of freedom, in particular of distal joints, as a critical component in skilled motor performance. PMID:25191284

  2. Bows, Strings, and Bowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guettler, Knut

    It is to the credit of François Tourte (Paris, ca. 1747-1835) that modern bows give a more direct impact on the string than their predecessors. This feature is of utmost importance when applying off-string, bouncing techniques such as spiccato and ricochet, but even for a stroke such as martelé, where quick reduction of bow force is required during the attack. With Tourte's concave-cambered bow, the bow force increases rapidly when the bow stick is falling or pressed against the string. With the old concave or straight bows, more movement, and thus time, was required for establishing comparable bow force.

  3. UWB Bi-directional Bow-tie antenna loaded by rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lin; Sun, Kai; Xie, Ji-yang; Qiu, Yu-jie; Jiang, Xing

    2016-07-01

    Performances of bow-tie antennae can be improved by loading a ring. Specially, the distorted radiation patterns of the reference bow-tie antenna (RBA) at high frequencies become less distorted when a ring is added. That is due to the disciplined current flows trained by the ring. Furthermore, when more rings are loaded, which act as reflectors, higher directivities are obtained and, patterns become bi-directional. Antennae with no ring (RBA), one ring, two rings (three cases), three rings, and four rings are investigated. Research find that loading more rings means better directivity. The directivity of the RBA varies from 2.29 dB to 3.66 dB for the frequency band from 2.5 to 7.5 GHz while the directivity for the four-ring-loaded case varies from 4.27 dB to 7.61 dB in that frequency band.

  4. Zero-order bows in radially inhomogeneous spheres: direct and inverse problems.

    PubMed

    Adam, John A

    2011-10-01

    Zero-order ray paths are examined in radially inhomogeneous spheres with differentiable refractive index profiles. It is demonstrated that zero-order and sometimes twin zero-order bows can exist when the gradient of refractive index is sufficiently negative. Abel inversion is used to "recover" the refractive index profiles; it is therefore possible in principle to specify the nature and type of bows and determine the refractive index profile that induces them. This may be of interest in the field of rainbow refractometry and optical fiber studies. This ray-theoretic analysis has direct similarities with the phenomenon of "orbiting" and other phenomena in scattering theory and also in seismological, surface gravity wave, and gravitational "lensing" studies. For completeness these topics are briefly discussed in the appendixes; they may also be of pedagogic interest. PMID:22016245

  5. Pattern Switchable Antenna System Using Inkjet-Printed Directional Bow-Tie for Bi-Direction Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Seung-Hyun; Seo, Yunsik; Lim, Sungjoon

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a paper-based pattern switchable antenna system using inkjet-printing technology for bi-direction sensor applications. The proposed antenna system is composed of two directional bow-tie antennas and a switching network. The switching network consists of a single-pole-double-throw (SPDT) switch and a balun element. A double-sided parallel-strip line (DSPSL) is employed to convert the unbalanced microstrip mode to the balanced strip mode. Two directional bow-tie antennas have different radiation patterns because of the different orientation of the reflectors and antennas. It is demonstrated from electromagnetic (EM) simulation and measurement that the radiation patterns of the proposed antenna are successfully switched by the SPDT switch. PMID:26690443

  6. Pattern Switchable Antenna System Using Inkjet-Printed Directional Bow-Tie for Bi-Direction Sensing Applications.

    PubMed

    Eom, Seung-Hyun; Seo, Yunsik; Lim, Sungjoon

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a paper-based pattern switchable antenna system using inkjet-printing technology for bi-direction sensor applications. The proposed antenna system is composed of two directional bow-tie antennas and a switching network. The switching network consists of a single-pole-double-throw (SPDT) switch and a balun element. A double-sided parallel-strip line (DSPSL) is employed to convert the unbalanced microstrip mode to the balanced strip mode. Two directional bow-tie antennas have different radiation patterns because of the different orientation of the reflectors and antennas. It is demonstrated from electromagnetic (EM) simulation and measurement that the radiation patterns of the proposed antenna are successfully switched by the SPDT switch. PMID:26690443

  7. Violin bow vibrations.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin E

    2012-05-01

    The modal frequencies and bending mode shapes of a freely supported tapered violin bow are investigated by finite element analysis and direct measurement, with and without tensioned bow hair. Such computations are used with analytic models to model the admittance presented to the stretched bow hairs at the ends of the bow and to the string at the point of contact with the bow. Finite element computations are also used to demonstrate the influence of the lowest stick mode vibrations on the low frequency bouncing modes, when the hand-held bow is pressed against the string. The possible influence of the dynamic stick modes on the sound of the bowed instrument is briefly discussed. PMID:22559386

  8. Coordination in Fast Repetitive Violin-Bowing Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Schoonderwaldt, Erwin; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of coordination behavior in complex violin-bowing patterns involving simultaneous bow changes (reversal of bowing direction) and string crossings (changing from one string to another). Twenty-two violinists (8 advanced amateurs, 8 students with violin as major subject, and 6 elite professionals) participated in the experiment. We investigated the influence of a variety of performance conditions (specific bowing patterns, dynamic level, tempo, and transposition) and level of expertise on coordination behavior (a.o., relative phase and amplitude) and stability. It was found that the general coordination behavior was highly consistent, characterized by a systematic phase lead of bow inclination over bow velocity of about 15° (i.e., string crossings were consistently timed earlier than bow changes). Within similar conditions, a high individual consistency was found, whereas the inter-individual agreement was considerably less. Furthermore, systematic influences of performance conditions on coordination behavior and stability were found, which could be partly explained in terms of particular performance constraints. Concerning level of expertise, only subtle differences were found, the student and professional groups (higher level of expertise) showing a slightly higher stability than the amateur group (lower level of expertise). The general coordination behavior as observed in the current study showed a high agreement with perceptual preferences reported in an earlier study to similar bowing patterns, implying that complex bowing trajectories for an important part emerge from auditory-motor interaction. PMID:25207542

  9. Coordination in fast repetitive violin-bowing patterns.

    PubMed

    Schoonderwaldt, Erwin; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of coordination behavior in complex violin-bowing patterns involving simultaneous bow changes (reversal of bowing direction) and string crossings (changing from one string to another). Twenty-two violinists (8 advanced amateurs, 8 students with violin as major subject, and 6 elite professionals) participated in the experiment. We investigated the influence of a variety of performance conditions (specific bowing patterns, dynamic level, tempo, and transposition) and level of expertise on coordination behavior (a.o., relative phase and amplitude) and stability. It was found that the general coordination behavior was highly consistent, characterized by a systematic phase lead of bow inclination over bow velocity of about 15° (i.e., string crossings were consistently timed earlier than bow changes). Within similar conditions, a high individual consistency was found, whereas the inter-individual agreement was considerably less. Furthermore, systematic influences of performance conditions on coordination behavior and stability were found, which could be partly explained in terms of particular performance constraints. Concerning level of expertise, only subtle differences were found, the student and professional groups (higher level of expertise) showing a slightly higher stability than the amateur group (lower level of expertise). The general coordination behavior as observed in the current study showed a high agreement with perceptual preferences reported in an earlier study to similar bowing patterns, implying that complex bowing trajectories for an important part emerge from auditory-motor interaction. PMID:25207542

  10. Bowed Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossing, Thomas D.; Hanson, Roger J.

    In the next eight chapters, we consider some aspects of the science of bowed string instruments, old and new. In this chapter, we present a brief discussion of bowed strings, a subject that will be developed much more thoroughly in Chap. 16. Chapters 13-15 discuss the violin, the cello, and the double bass. Chapter 17 discusses viols and other historic string instruments, and Chap. 18 discusses the Hutchins-Schelleng violin octet.

  11. 29 GHz directly modulated 980 nm vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers with bow-tie shape transverse coupled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalir, Hamed; Koyama, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    A concept for the bandwidth enhancement of directly modulated vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) using a transverse-coupled-cavity (TCC) scheme is proposed, which enables us to tailor the modulation-transfer function. A bow-tie shaped oxide aperture forms the transverse-coupled cavity resulting in optical feedback to boost the modulation speed. While the bandwidth of conventional VCSELs is 9-10 GHz, the 3 dB-bandwidth of the TCC VCSEL is increased by a factor of 3 far beyond the relaxation-oscillation frequency. The maximum bandwidth is currently limited by the photo-detector used in the experiment. Clear 36 Gbps eye opening was attained with an extinction ratio of 4 dB.

  12. Direct observation of time reversal violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, J.

    2013-06-01

    A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique opportunity for a search of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and PHI, Factories. The two quantum effects of the first decay as a filtering measurement and the transfer of information to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of "in" and "out" states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system.

  13. Extraction of bowing parameters from violin performance combining motion capture and sensors.

    PubMed

    Schoonderwaldt, E; Demoucron, M

    2009-11-01

    A method is described for measurement of a complete set of bowing parameters in violin performance. Optical motion capture was combined with sensors for accurate measurement of the main bowing parameters (bow position, bow velocity, bow acceleration, bow-bridge distance, and bow force) as well as secondary control parameters (skewness, inclination, and tilt of the bow). In addition, other performance features (moments of on/off in bow-string contact, string played, and bowing direction) were extracted. Detailed descriptions of the calculations of the bowing parameters, features, and calibrations are given. The described system is capable of measuring all bowing parameters without disturbing the player, allowing for detailed studies of musically relevant aspects of bow control and coordination of bowing parameters in bowed-string instrument performance. PMID:19894846

  14. An illusion of reversed direction in hyperopes.

    PubMed

    Money, K E; Cheung, B S; Kirienko, N M

    1987-10-01

    If a subject who is sufficiently farsighted removes his corrective, positive, lenses and looks with one eye from a distance of one or a few meters, at a small lighted area such as the (continuously "on") indicator light of an electric toothbrush, razor, or smoke detector, and if a small object such as a pin is then moved slowly from above to below the subject's eyes (in a plane close to the eye), the subject will perceive the object moving normally from above to below until it encroaches on his view of the lighted area. The object will then be seen to encroach first on the bottom of the lighted area, and as the object continues to move down it will be seen to be moving up across the lighted area, exiting the lighted area at the top. Similarly, an object moved in front of the eye from the subject's left to his right will be seen by the subject to traverse the lighted area in the reverse direction, right to left, even though the subject moves the object himself. Also, while the object is in front of the lighted area, it is perceived as an upside down silhouette having surprisingly clear and sharp edges, and it appears to be located on the lighted area rather than close to the eye where it really is. PMID:3696931

  15. The supernumerary bows of the rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Peter; Ricard, Jean; Barckicke, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Everyone appreciate the mysterious beauty of a Rainbow picture. The primary bow shows red on the outer part and violet on the inner side. It is caused by light being refracted when entering a droplet of water, then reflected inside on the back of the droplet and refracted again when leaving it. The secondaty bow is seen outside the primary arc, and has the order of its colours reversed, with red on the inner side of the arc. The supernumerary bows are alternating faint bows on the inner side of the primary rainbow (and also outside the secondary rainbow). In this presentation, we will describe the present knowledge and the future perspectives A fully funded PhD Scholarship on this topic is open at the University of Granada. Picture = Contrast-enhanced photograph of a primary bow picture (prepared by Andrew Dunn).

  16. Diffusion properties of active particles with directional reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Großmann, R.; Peruani, F.; Bär, M.

    2016-04-01

    The diffusion properties of self-propelled particles which move at constant speed and, in addition, reverse their direction of motion repeatedly are investigated. The internal dynamics of particles triggering these reversal processes is modeled by a stochastic clock. The velocity correlation function as well as the mean squared displacement is investigated and, furthermore, a general expression for the diffusion coefficient for self-propelled particles with directional reversal is derived. Our analysis reveals the existence of an optimal, finite rotational noise amplitude which maximizes the diffusion coefficient. We comment on the relevance of these results with regard to biological systems and suggest further experiments in this context.

  17. Entropy Generation Across Earth's Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, George K.; McCarthy, Michael; Fu, Suiyan; Lee E. s; Cao, Jinbin; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Canu, Patrick; Dandouras, Iannis S.; Reme, Henri; Fazakerley, Andrew; Lin, Naiguo; Wilber, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Earth's bow shock is a transition layer that causes an irreversible change in the state of plasma that is stationary in time. Theories predict entropy increases across the bow shock but entropy has never been directly measured. Cluster and Double Star plasma experiments measure 3D plasma distributions upstream and downstream of the bow shock that allow calculation of Boltzmann's entropy function H and his famous H-theorem, dH/dt O. We present the first direct measurements of entropy density changes across Earth's bow shock. We will show that this entropy generation may be part of the processes that produce the non-thermal plasma distributions is consistent with a kinetic entropy flux model derived from the collisionless Boltzmann equation, giving strong support that solar wind's total entropy across the bow shock remains unchanged. As far as we know, our results are not explained by any existing shock models and should be of interests to theorists.

  18. Periodic reversal of direction allows Myxobacteria to swarm

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yilin; Kaiser, A. Dale; Jiang, Yi; Alber, Mark S.

    2009-01-01

    Many bacteria can rapidly traverse surfaces from which they are extracting nutrient for growth. They generate flat, spreading colonies, called swarms because they resemble swarms of insects. We seek to understand how members of any dense swarm spread efficiently while being able to perceive and interfere minimally with the motion of others. To this end, we investigate swarms of the myxobacterium, Myxococcus xanthus. Individual M. xanthus cells are elongated; they always move in the direction of their long axis; and they are in constant motion, repeatedly touching each other. Remarkably, they regularly reverse their gliding directions. We have constructed a detailed cell- and behavior-based computational model of M. xanthus swarming that allows the organization of cells to be computed. By using the model, we are able to show that reversals of gliding direction are essential for swarming and that reversals increase the outflow of cells across the edge of the swarm. Cells at the swarm edge gain maximum exposure to nutrient and oxygen. We also find that the reversal period predicted to maximize the outflow of cells is the same (within the errors of measurement) as the period observed in experiments with normal M. xanthus cells. This coincidence suggests that the circuit regulating reversals evolved to its current sensitivity under selection for growth achieved by swarming. Finally, we observe that, with time, reversals increase the cell alignment, and generate clusters of parallel cells. PMID:19164578

  19. DETAIL OF BOW FROM STARBOARD SIDE SHOWING ICEBREAKING BOW DESIGN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF BOW FROM STARBOARD SIDE SHOWING ICEBREAKING BOW DESIGN AND BOW THRUSTER. - U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Tenders, 180' Class, U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, 2100 Second Street Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  20. Maximum bow force revisited.

    PubMed

    Mores, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Schelleng [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 53, 26-41 (1973)], Askenfelt [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 86, 503-516 (1989)], Schumacher [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 1985-1998 (1994)], and Schoonderwaldt, Guettler, and Askenfelt [Acta Acust. Acust. 94, 604-622 (2008)] formulated-in different ways-how the maximum bow force relates to bow velocity, bow-bridge distance, string impedance, and friction coefficients. Issues of uncertainty are how to account for friction or for the rotational admittance of the strings. Related measurements at the respective transitions between regimes of Helmholtz motion and non-Helmholtz motion employ a variety of bowing machines and stringed instruments. The related findings include all necessary parameters except the friction coefficients, leaving the underlying models unconfirmed. Here, a bowing pendulum has been constructed which allows precise measurement of relevant bowing parameters, including the friction coefficients. Two cellos are measured across all strings for three different bow-bridge distances. The empirical data suggest that-taking the diverse elements of existing models as options-Schelleng's model combined with Schumacher's velocity term yields the best fit. Furthermore, the pendulum employs a bow driving mechanism with adaptive impedance which discloses that mentioned regimes are stable and transitions between them sometimes require a hysteresis on related parameters. PMID:27586745

  1. Demographic noise can reverse the direction of deterministic selection.

    PubMed

    Constable, George W A; Rogers, Tim; McKane, Alan J; Tarnita, Corina E

    2016-08-01

    Deterministic evolutionary theory robustly predicts that populations displaying altruistic behaviors will be driven to extinction by mutant cheats that absorb common benefits but do not themselves contribute. Here we show that when demographic stochasticity is accounted for, selection can in fact act in the reverse direction to that predicted deterministically, instead favoring cooperative behaviors that appreciably increase the carrying capacity of the population. Populations that exist in larger numbers experience a selective advantage by being more stochastically robust to invasions than smaller populations, and this advantage can persist even in the presence of reproductive costs. We investigate this general effect in the specific context of public goods production and find conditions for stochastic selection reversal leading to the success of public good producers. This insight, developed here analytically, is missed by the deterministic analysis as well as by standard game theoretic models that enforce a fixed population size. The effect is found to be amplified by space; in this scenario we find that selection reversal occurs within biologically reasonable parameter regimes for microbial populations. Beyond the public good problem, we formulate a general mathematical framework for models that may exhibit stochastic selection reversal. In this context, we describe a stochastic analog to [Formula: see text] theory, by which small populations can evolve to higher densities in the absence of disturbance. PMID:27450085

  2. Astrospheres and Stellar Bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Marle, Allard Jan

    2016-07-01

    As stars evolve, they deliver feedback to the surrounding medium in the form of stellar wind and radiation. These shape the surrounding matter, forming what is called an astrosphere, a sphere of influence in which the star dominates the morphology and composition of the surrounding medium. Astrospheres are fascinating objects. Because they are formed through the interaction between the stellar feedback and the interstellar gas, they can tell us a great deal about both. Furthermore, because they are shaped over time they provide us with a window into the past. This is of particular interest for the study of stellar evolution, because the astrosphere reflects changes in the properties of the stellar wind, which relate directly to the properties of the star. A special sub-class of astrospheres, the stellar bow shocks, occur when the progenitor star moves through the surrounding medium at supersonic speed. Because the properties of the bow shock relate directly to both the stellar wind and the interstellar medium, the shape and size of the bow shock can be used to determine these properties. Using state-of-the-art numerical codes, it is possible to simulate the interaction between the stellar wind and radiation and the interstellar medium. These results can then be compared to observations. They can also be used to predict the type of observations that are best suited to study these objects. In this fashion computational and observational astronomy can support each other in their efforts to gain a better understanding of stars and their environment.

  3. Dual polarity directions in basaltic-andesitic dykes—reversal record or self-reversed magnetization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebke, U.; Appel, E.; Neumann, U.; Ding, L.

    2012-08-01

    Rock magnetic analyses were performed on basaltic-andesitic dyke samples from the Lhasa Block, which were previously used for palaeomagnetic investigations of the India-Asia collision. The aim of the study is to prove whether antipodal directions separated in these samples represent different polarities of the Earth's magnetic field or a self-reversal magnetization. Reflected light microscopy, domain pattern observations and energy dispersive X-ray analyses revealed two generations of titanomagnetite (TM) grains, one consisting of large-sized (˜20 μm to more than 100 μm) and inhomogeneous Ti-poor TM, and another with small (smaller than ˜10 μm) and rather homogeneous Ti-rich TM grains. Partial thermoremant magnetization experiments and reflected light microscopy show that magnetostatic or superexchange interaction between these two phases is unlikely. Temperature dependence of saturation magnetization and low-temperature curves of isothermal remanent magnetization disprove a possible N-type behaviour of the samples. A self-reversal due to ionic reordering can be ruled out as it requires a high degree of oxidation of the Ti-rich TMs, which was not observed. In summary, a self-reversal magnetization is very unlikely in the studied dyke samples, and therefore the observed antipodal directions most probably represent a record of different polarity epochs of the Earth's magnetic field. This conclusion implies that the time of remanence acquisition in the studied dykes was sufficiently long to average out paleosecular variation, supporting the significance and reliability of the palaeomagnetic results.

  4. The Retarding Force on a Fan-Cart Reversing Direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurora, Tarlok S.; Brunner, Bernard J.

    2012-03-01

    In introductory physics, students learn that an object tossed upward has a constant downward acceleration while going up, at the highest point and while falling down. To demonstrate this concept, a self-propelled fan cart system is used on a frictionless track. A quick push is given to the fan cart and it is allowed to move away on a track under the opposing action of thrust produced by the fan. The cart moves away from the starting point, stops at some distance away and then reverses its motion. Students frequently predict the acceleration of the cart to be constant during the round trip motion. When an experiment was performed, it was found that the cart acceleration was not constant during the round trip. After ruling out any equipment problem, the cart motion was analyzed using Newton's laws with the inclusion of retarding forces. Results showed that the total retarding force was more significant than previously assumed, and it reversed direction during motion. This analysis seems to offer a reasonable explanation for the discrepancy between prediction and observation. In addition, students learned that the discrepancy was due to a real physical effect, and not an artifact of the equipment. This analysis offers a problem solving opportunity in introductory physics laboratory.

  5. The retarding force on a fan-cart reversing direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurora, Tarlok S.; Brunner, Bernard J.

    2011-01-01

    In introductory physics, students learn that an object tossed upward has a constant downward acceleration while going up, at the highest point and while falling down. To demonstrate this concept, a self-propelled fan cart system is used on a frictionless track. A quick push is given to the fan cart and it is allowed to move away on a track under the opposing action of thrust produced by the fan. The cart moves away from the starting point, stops at some distance away and then reverses its motion. Students frequently predict the acceleration of the cart to be constant during the round trip motion. When an experiment was performed, it was found that the cart acceleration was not constant during the round trip. After ruling out any equipment problem, the cart motion was analysed using Newton's laws with the inclusion of retarding forces. Results showed that the total retarding force was more significant than previously assumed, and it reversed direction during motion. This analysis seems to offer a reasonable explanation for the discrepancy between prediction and observation. In addition, students learned that the discrepancy was due to a real physical effect, and not an artefact of the equipment. This analysis offers a problem solving opportunity in the introductory physics laboratory.

  6. Direct Reversible Kidney Injury in Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Type 3.

    PubMed

    Malaga-Dieguez, Laura; Ming, Wu; Trachtman, Howard

    2015-08-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a hyperinflammatory disorder resulting from primary or secondary immune dysfunction. AKI is frequent in severe hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and has been attributed to multiorgan failure or the use of nephrotoxic drugs, but AKI is rarely considered a direct consequence of the disease process. We describe a child with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis type 3 who developed AKI requiring prolonged renal replacement therapy because of severe renal inflammation. There was massive infiltration of the renal parenchyma by activated macrophages and cytotoxic T cells, and acute tubular injury. The patient responded to high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone, which resulted in improvement of renal function and discontinuation of renal replacement therapy. This case confirms the occurrence of reversible AKI due to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis-induced activated macrophage infiltration of the renal parenchyma and inflammation. PMID:25858966

  7. 43. Bow thruster room. Bow thruster engine not used for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Bow thruster room. Bow thruster engine not used for powering hydraulics to boom as in some other tenders in same class. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter BRAMBLE, Waterfront at Lincoln Avenue, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI

  8. Testing bow shock models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrefay, Thamer; Meziane, Karim; Hamza, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Space plasmas studies of bow shock dynamics, given the fundamental transport role and impact natural transition boundaries, have continued to attract much interest. With the overwhelming availability of data collected by various space science missions, several empirical models have been put forward to account for the location of the Earth's bow shock. Various solar wind and IMF measured parameters are used to constrain the proposed models published in the literature. For each of these empirical models, the bow shock nose velocity, at the standoff distance, is computed; each of these velocities is then compared with the observed shock speed as determined from a multipoint measurement provided by the Cluster quartet. The present study reveals to what extent the model parameters used are significant and determinant, and suggests that some empirical models are more accurate than others are.

  9. Neptune inbound bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam; Lepping, Ronald P.

    1995-01-01

    Voyager 2 crossed the inbound or upstream Neptunian bow shock at 1430 spacecraft event time on August 24 in 1989 (Belcher et al., 1989). The plasma and magnetic field measurements allow us to study the solar wind interaction with the outermost gas giant. To fully utilize all of the spacecraft observations, an improved nonlinear least squares, 'Rankine-Hugoniot' magnetohydrodynamic shock-fitting technique has been developed (Szabo, 1994). This technique is applied to the Neptunian data set. We find that the upstream bow shock normal points nearly exactly toward the Sun consistent with any reasonable large-scale model of the bow shock for a near subsolar crossing. The shock was moving outward with a speed of 14 +/- 12 km/s. The shock can be characterized as a low beta, high Mach number, strong quasi-perpendicular shock. Finally, the shock microstructure features are resolved and found to scale well with theoretical expectations.

  10. Bow Shocks at Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, Andrew J.

    2009-11-01

    Comets provide a wonderful laboratory to study the interaction of a fast flowing plasma, the solar wind, with neutral gas from the comet. On ionization, the more massive newly-born cometary ions are assimilated into the solar wind flow, eventually causing its deceleration via this `mass loading'. One of the effects of this is the cometary bow shock. The exploration of comet Halley by an armada of spacecraft in 1986, as well as the in-situ exploration of comets Giacobini-Zinner (1985), Grigg-Skjellerup (1992) and Borrelly (2001), has revealed important results on the behavior of these weak shocks and showed that mass loading plays a key role. In 2014, the Rosetta mission will provide the first observations of the formation of the cometary bow shock as a comet, Churyumov-Gerasimenko, nears the Sun. Rosetta will also provide the first measurements of the collision-dominated near-nucleus region. Here, we briefly review what we know about cometary bow shocks, and we examine the prospects for Rosetta.

  11. Martian bow shock - PHOBOS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Lichtenegger, H.; Yeroshenko, Ye.; Sauer, K.; Luhmann, J. G.; Ong, M.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-05-01

    Data obtained with the Magma magnetometer on the subsolar passes of the Phobos spacecraft during its 3 elliptic orbits reveals a turbulent bow shock with a strong foot consistent with the reflection of solar wind protons. The bow shock lies at a subsolar distance of 1.47 + or - .03 R(M). The circular orbit phase of the mission reveals a bow shock with a highly varying location. The median terminator crossing lies at 2.72 Mars radii. The location of the bow shock in the terminator plane is sensitive to neither the EUV flux nor to planetary longitude.

  12. Direct observation of DNA overwinding by reverse gyrase

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Taisaku; Yogo, Katsunori; Furuike, Shou; Sutoh, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Reverse gyrase, found in hyperthermophiles, is the only enzyme known to overwind (introduce positive supercoils into) DNA. The ATP-dependent activity, detected at >70 °C, has so far been studied solely by gel electrophoresis; thus, the reaction dynamics remain obscure. Here, we image the overwinding reaction at 71 °C under a microscope, using DNA containing consecutive 30 mismatched base pairs that serve as a well-defined substrate site. A single reverse gyrase molecule processively winds the DNA for >100 turns. Bound enzyme shows moderate temperature dependence, retaining significant activity down to 50 °C. The unloaded reaction rate at 71 °C exceeds five turns per second, which is >102-fold higher than hitherto indicated but lower than the measured ATPase rate of 20 s−1, indicating loose coupling. The overwinding reaction sharply slows down as the torsional stress accumulates in DNA and ceases at stress of mere ∼5 pN⋅nm, where one more turn would cost only sixfold the thermal energy. The enzyme would thus keep DNA in a slightly overwound state to protect, but not overprotect, the genome of hyperthermophiles against thermal melting. Overwinding activity is also highly sensitive to DNA tension, with an effective interaction length exceeding the size of reverse gyrase, implying requirement for slack DNA. All results point to the mechanism where strand passage relying on thermal motions, as in topoisomerase IA, is actively but loosely biased toward overwinding. PMID:26023188

  13. Suprathermal ions observed upstream of the Venus bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, K. R.; Mccomas, D. J.; Russell, C. T.; Mihalov, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    Suprathermal ions with arrival directions quite distinct from those of the solar wind have been detected upstream of the Venus bow shock. The possibility that these events could be caused by instrumental or spacecraft effects or that they could be either solar wind disturbances, planetary pickup ions, or suprethermal ions upstream of the Venus bow shock is examined. It is concluded that they are consistent with upstream suprathermal ions associated with the bow shock that are observed downstream from the points of intersection of their extrapolated trajectories with the shock.

  14. Coordination of bowing and fingering in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Baader, Andreas P; Kazennikov, Oleg; Wiesendanger, Mario

    2005-05-01

    Playing string instruments implies motor skills including asymmetrical interlimb coordination. How special is musical skill as compared to other bimanually coordinated, non-musical skillful performances? We succeeded for the first time to measure quantitatively bimanual coordination in violinists playing repeatedly a simple tone sequence. A motion analysis system was used to record finger and bow trajectories for assessing the temporal structure of finger-press, finger-lift (left hand), and bow stroke reversals (right arm). The main results were: (1) fingering consisted of serial and parallel (anticipatory) mechanisms; (2) synchronization between finger and bow actions varied from -12 ms to 60 ms, but these 'errors' were not perceived. The results suggest that (1) bow-finger synchronization varied by about 50 ms from perfect simultaneity, but without impairing auditory perception; (2) the temporal structure depends on a number of combinatorial mechanisms of bowing and fingering. These basic mechanisms were observed in all players, including all amateurs. The successful biomechanical measures of fingering and bowing open a vast practical field of assessing motor skills. Thus, objective assessment of larger groups of string players with varying musical proficiency, or of professional string players developing movement disorders, may be helpful in music education. PMID:15820650

  15. AOTV bow shock location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desautel, D.

    1985-01-01

    Hypersonic bow-shock location and geometry are of central importance to the aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTVs), but they are difficult to predict for a given vehicle configuration. This paper reports experimental measurements of shock standoff distance for the 70 deg cone AOTV configuration in shock-tunnel-test flows at Mach numbers of 3.8 to 7.9 and for angles of attack from 0 deg to 20 deg. The controlling parameter for hypersonic bow-shock standoff distance (for a given forebody shape) is the mean normal-shock density ratio. Values for this parameter in the tests reported are in the same range as those of the drag-brake AOTV perigee regime. Results for standoff distance are compared with those previously reported in the literature for this AOTV configuration. It is concluded that the AOTV shock standoff distance for the conical configuration, based on frustrum (base) radius, is equivalent to that of a sphere with a radius about 35 percent greater than that of the cone; the distance is, therefore, much less than reported in previous studies. Some reasons for the discrepancies between the present and previous are advanced. The smaller standoff distance determined here implies there will be less radiative heat transfer than was previously expected.

  16. The earth's foreshock, bow shock, and magnetosheath

    SciTech Connect

    Onsager, T.G.; Thomsen, M.F. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies directly pertaining to the earth's foreshock, bow shock, and magnetosheath are reviewed, and some comparisons are made with data on other planets. Topics considered in detail include the electron foreshock, the ion foreshock, the quasi-parallel shock, the quasi-perpendicular shock, and the magnetosheath. Information discussed spans a broad range of disciplines, from large-scale macroscopic plasma phenomena to small-scale microphysical interactions. 184 refs.

  17. Enhancing complex network controllability by minimum link direction reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lvlin; Lao, Songyang; Small, Michael; Xiao, Yandong

    2015-07-01

    Controllability of complex networks has recently become one of the most popular research fields, but the importance of link direction for controllability has not been systematically considered. We propose a method to enhance controllability of a directed network by changing the direction of a small fraction of links while keeping the total number of links unchanged. The main idea of the method is to find candidate links based on the matching path. Extensive numerical simulation on many modeled networks demonstrates that this method is effective. Furthermore, we find that the nodes linked to candidate links have a distinct character, which provide us with a strategy to improve the controllability based on the local structure. Since the whole topology of many real networks is not visible and we only get some local structure information, this strategy is potentially more practical compared to those that demand complete topology information.

  18. A comparative review of bow shocks and magnetopauses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    Bow shock and magnetopauses formation is discussed. Plasma and magnetic field environments of all the planets from Mercury to Saturn were measured. It was found that all the planets have bow shocks and almost all have a magnetopause. Venus is the only planet with no measurable intrinsic magnetic field and the solar wind interacts directly with Venus' ionosphere. The bow shock characteristics depend on the changing solar wind conditions. The shape of a magnetopause or any obstacle to flow depends on the three dimensional pressure profile that it presents to the solar wind. Jupiter is unusual because of the considerable amount of plasma which is contained in its magnetosphere. Magnetopause boundaries in ecliptic plane projection are modelled by segments of ellipses, matched to straight lines for the magnetotool boundaries or parabolas. Specific properties of known planetary bow shocks and magnetopauses are reviewed.

  19. Analysis of the Giacobini-Zinner bow wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Bame, S. J.; Thomsen, M. F.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Richardson, I. G.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F. M.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Coplan, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    The cometary bow wave of P/Giacobini-Zinner has been analyzed using the complete set of ICE field and particle observations to determine if it is a shock. Changes in the magnetic field and plasma flow velocities from upstream to downstream have been analyzed to determine the direction of the normal and the propagation velocity of the bow wave. The velocity has then been compared with the fast magnetosonic wave speed upstream to derive the Mach number and establish whether it is supersonic, i.e., a shock, or subsonic, i.e., a large amplitude wave. The various measurements have also been compared with values derived from a Rankine-Hugoniot analysis. The results indicate that, inbound, the bow wave is a shock with M = 1.5. Outbound, a subsonic Mach number is obtained, however, arguments are presented that the bow wave is also likely to be a shock at this location.

  20. Direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into myocytes to reverse fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Naoto; Ieda, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The low regenerative capacity of adult human hearts has thus far limited the available therapeutic approaches for heart failure. Therefore, new therapies that can regenerate damaged myocardium and improve heart function are urgently needed. Although cell transplantation-based therapies may hold great potential, direct reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts, which represent more than half of the cells in the heart, into functional cardiomyocytes in situ may be an alternative strategy by which to regenerate the heart. We and others demonstrated that functional cardiomyocytes can be directly generated from fibroblasts by using several combinations of cardiac-enriched factors in mouse and human. In vivo gene delivery of cardiac reprogramming factors generates new cardiac muscle and improved heart function after myocardial infarction in mouse. This article reviews recent progress in cardiac reprogramming research and discusses the perspectives and challenges of this new technology for future regenerative therapy. PMID:24079415

  1. Propagation direction reversal of ionization zones in the transition between high and low current magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Lab for Materials Processing and Die & Mold Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China; Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720, USA; Yang, Yuchen; Liu, Jason; Liu, Lin; Anders, André

    2014-12-11

    Past research has revealed the propagation of dense, asymmetric ionization zones in both high and low current magnetron discharges. Here we report about the direction reversal of ionization zone propagation as observed with fast cameras. At high currents, zones move in the E B direction with velocities of 103 to 104 m/s. However at lower currents, ionization zones are observed to move in the opposite, the -E B direction, with velocities ~;; 103 m/s. It is proposed that the direction reversal is associated with the local balance of ionization and supply of neutrals in the ionization zone.

  2. Cytoplasmic streaming direction reverses in dividing Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Sikora, J; Wasik, A; Zajaczkowska, M

    1991-11-29

    Using the interference-contrast videomicroscopy the speed of cytoplasmic streaming was measured during the sequence of division stages in thigmotactically settled specimens of Paramecium bursaria. The speed of cytoplasmic flow gradually decreased during the first stages of binary fission and movement became indistinguishable at stage D(3). Almost at the same time cytoplasm started to move in the opposite direction, pushing or pulling the dividing micronucleus into the prospective posterior daughter cell and eventually stopped at stage D(5)-D(6). Further cell division events proceeded without detectable movement of cytoplasmic components. Cytoplasmic streaming in the normal interphase route was gradually restored in daughter cells about 30-40 min after cell separation. During the whole period of binary fission phagocytosis was arrested. Transportation and participation in the positioning of prospective micronuclei in daughter cells seems to be the main function of cytoplasmic streaming activity in cell division of Paramecium bursaria. The possible relationship between the stages of cytoskeleton transitions and the kinetics of cytoplasmic streaming associated with cell divison is discussed. PMID:23194845

  3. 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Models of Betelgeuse's Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, S.; Mackey, J.; Langer, N.

    2013-05-01

    Betelgeuse, the bright red supergiant (RSG) in Orion, is a runaway star. Its supersonic motion through the interstellar medium has resulted in the formation of a bow shock, a cometary structure pointing in the direction of motion. We present the first 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the formation and evolution of Betelgeuse's bow shock. We show that the bow shock morphology depends substantially on the growth timescale for Rayleigh-Taylor versus Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. We discuss our models in light of the recent Herschel, GALEX and VLA observations. If the mass in the bow shock shell is low (~few × 10-3 M⊙), as seems to be implied by the AKARI and Herschel observations, then Betelgeuse's bow shock is very young and is unlikely to have reached a steady state. The circular, smooth bow shock shell is consistent with this conclusion. We further discuss the implications of our results, in particular, the possibility that Betelgeuse may have only recently entered the RSG phase.

  4. Evaluation of Gravity Wave Effects on Bow Echo Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams-Selin, R.; Johnson, R. H.

    2012-12-01

    A numerical simulation of the 13 March 2003 bow echo over Oklahoma is used to evaluate bow echo development and its relationship with gravity wave generation. The research is also directed at an explanation of recent observations of surface pressure surges ahead of convective lines prior to the bowing process. Multiple fast-moving n = 1 gravity waves are generated in association with fluctuations in the first vertical mode of heating in the convective line, and each wave modifies the pre-system environment. The surface impacts of four such waves are observed in Oklahoma Mesonet data during this case. A slower gravity wave is also produced in the simulation, which is responsible for the pre-bowing pressure surge in the model. This gravity wave is generated by an increase in low-level microphysical cooling associated with strengthened rear-to-front flow and low-level downdrafts shortly before bowing. The low-level upward vertical motion associated with this wave, in conjunction with higher-frequency gravity waves generated by the multicellularity of the convective line, increases the immediate pre-system CAPE by approximately 250 J kg-1. Statistical methods are used to evaluate the significance of each vertical mode within the microphysical heating profile at the time of the pressure surge. The contribution of each microphysical process to the overall profile, particularly that of cooling by melting and evaporation, is also examined in an attempt to connect the processes generating the slower gravity wave with those producing bow echo development.

  5. How we broke the BOWS watermark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craver, Scott; Atakli, Idris; Yu, Jun

    2007-02-01

    From December 2005 to March of 2006, the Break Our Watermarking System (BOWS) contest challenged researchers to break an image watermark of unknown design. The attacked images had to possess a minimum quality level of 30 dB PSNR, and the winners would be those of highest average quality over three images. Our research team won this challenge, employing the strategy of reverse-engineering the watermark before any attempts to attack it in earnest. We determined the frequency transform, sub-band, and an exploitable quirk in the detector that made it sensitive to noise spikes. Of interest is our overall methodology of reverse-engineering through severe false alarms, and we introduce a new concept, "superrobustness," which despite its positive name is a security flaw.

  6. Direct Hydrogenation Magnesium Boride to Magnesium Borohydride: Demonstration of >11 Weight Percent Reversible Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Severa, Godwin; Ronnebro, Ewa; Jensen, Craig M.

    2010-11-16

    We here for the first time demonstrate direct hydrogenation of magnesium boride, MgB2, to magnesium borohydride, Mg(BH4)2 at 900 bar H2-pressures and 400°C. Upon 14.8wt% hydrogen release, the end-decomposition product of Mg(BH4)2 is MgB2, thus, this is a unique reversible path here obtaining >11wt% H2 which implies promise for a fully reversible hydrogen storage material.

  7. Reversals in Direct Numerical Simulations of the Geodynamo: a Statistical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meduri, D.; Wicht, J.; Schmitt, D.

    2013-12-01

    original Exponential fit of stable polarity intervals to a Gamma distribution. Statistical analyses of geomagnetic polarity epochs might be biased in the same way by reversal durations. The current development of mean-field dynamo models, based on helicity profiles directly retrieved from 3D geodynamo simulations, can play the key role of discriminating among different physical processes that produce the observed distribution profile of polarity intervals.

  8. Results from cascade thrust reverser noise and suppression experiments. [sound power level directivity and spectral characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, O. A.; Stone, J. R.; Friedman, R.

    1974-01-01

    Results from experimental work on model scale cascade reversers with cold airflow are presented. Sound power level directivity and spectral characteristics for cascade reversers are reported. Effect of cascade exit area ratio, vane profile shape, and emission arc are discussed. Model equivalent diameters varied from 3 to 5 inches, pressure ratios range from 1.15 to 3.0. Depending on the reverser type, acoustic power was proportional to the 4 1/2 to 6th power of ideal jet velocity. Reverser noise peaked at higher frequency and was more omnidirectional than nozzle-alone jet noise. Appreciable reduction in sideline noise was obtained from plane shields. Airfoil-vaned cascades were the most aerodynamically efficient and least noisy reversers. Scaling of cascade reverser data to example aircraft engines showed all cascades above the 95 PNdB sideline goal from STOL aircraft. However, the airfoil-vaned reverser has a good potential for meeting this goal for high-bypass (low pressure ratio) exhausts.

  9. Rare Etiology of Bow Hunter’s Syndrome and Systematic Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Vaibhav; Rawls, Ashley; Moore, Omar; Victorica, Benjamin; Khan, Sheema; Saravanapavan, Pradeepan; Midivelli, Sunitha; Raviraj, Prathap; Khanna, Anna; Bidari, Sharathchandra; Hedna, Vishnumurthy S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Bow Hunter’s Syndrome is a mechanical occlusion of the vertebral artery which leads to a reduction in blood flow in posterior cerebral circulation resulting in transient reversible symptomatic vertebrobasilar insufficiency. CASE DESCRIPTION We present a case of Bow Hunter’s syndrome in a 53-year-old male that occurred after the patient underwent surgical correction of a proximal left subclavian artery aneurysm. Shortly after the surgery, the patient began to complain of transient visual changes, presyncopal spells, and dizziness upon turning his head to the left. A transcranial doppler ultrasound confirmed the diagnosis of Bow Hunter’s syndrome. SYSTEMIC REVIEW We analyzed the data on 153 patients with Bow Hunter’s syndrome from the literature. An osteophyte was the most common cause of vertebral artery occlusion, and left vertebral artery was more commonly involved in patients with Bow Hunter’s syndrome. Dynamic angiography was the definitive imaging modality to confirm the diagnosis, and surgery was most successful in alleviating symptoms. CONCLUSION We believe that this is the first case of iatrogenic Bow Hunter’s syndrome after surgical intervention for an aneurysm repair, and the largest review of literature of Bow Hunter’s syndrome. Dynamic angiography is the gold standard for the diagnosis of Bow Hunter’s syndrome. Surgery should be considered as the primary treatment approach in these patients, especially those who have bony compression as the etiology. PMID:26301025

  10. Reversing the direction in a light-driven rotary molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruangsupapichat, Nopporn; Pollard, Michael M.; Harutyunyan, Syuzanna R.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2011-01-01

    Biological rotary motors can alter their mechanical function by changing the direction of rotary motion. Achieving a similar reversal of direction of rotation in artificial molecular motors presents a fundamental stereochemical challenge: how to change from clockwise to anticlockwise motion without compromising the autonomous unidirectional rotary behaviour of the system. A new molecular motor with multilevel control of rotary motion is reported here, in which the direction of light-powered rotation can be reversed by base-catalysed epimerization. The key steps are deprotonation and reprotonation of the photochemically generated less-stable isomers during the 360° unidirectional rotary cycle, with complete inversion of the configuration at the stereogenic centre. The ability to change directionality is an essential step towards mechanical molecular systems with adaptive functional behaviour.

  11. Comparison between direct and reverse electroporation of cells in situ: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Towhidi, Leila; Khodadadi, Delaram; Maimari, Nataly; Pedrigi, Ryan M; Ip, Henry; Kis, Zoltan; Kwak, Brenda R; Petrova, Tatiana W; Delorenzi, Mauro; Krams, Rob

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of the human genome has unveiled new fields of genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, which has produced paradigm shifts on how to study disease mechanisms, wherein a current central focus is the understanding of how gene signatures and gene networks interact within cells. These gene function studies require manipulating genes either through activation or inhibition, which can be achieved by temporarily permeabilizing the cell membrane through transfection to delivercDNAorRNAi. An efficient transfection technique is electroporation, which applies an optimized electric pulse to permeabilize the cells of interest. When the molecules are applied on top of seeded cells, it is called "direct" transfection and when the nucleic acids are printed on the substrate and the cells are seeded on top of them, it is termed "reverse" transfection. Direct transfection has been successfully applied in previous studies, whereas reverse transfection has recently gained more attention in the context of high-throughput experiments. Despite the emerging importance, studies comparing the efficiency of the two methods are lacking. In this study, a model for electroporation of cells in situ is developed to address this deficiency. The results indicate that reverse transfection is less efficient than direct transfection. However, the model also predicts that by increasing the concentration of deliverable molecules by a factor of 2 or increasing the applied voltage by 20%, reverse transfection can be approximately as efficient as direct transfection. PMID:27009275

  12. Some aspects of vocal fold bowing.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, S; Hirano, M; Chijiwa, K

    1994-05-01

    Bowing of the vocal fold frequently occurs in patients with vocal fold paralysis (VFP), those with sulcus vocalis, and those who have had laser surgery. Additionally, there are vocal folds that present bowing with no noticeable organic lesion. For the purpose of investigating the causes and mechanisms of vocal fold bowing, consecutive fiberscopic videorecordings of 127 patients with VFP, 33 with sulcus vocalis, 33 with laser surgery, and 33 with dysphonia having no clinically noticeable organic lesion were reviewed. Sixty-nine percent of the paralyzed vocal folds had bowing, and the occurrence of bowing was significantly related to the activity of the thyroarytenoid muscle as measured by electromyography. The cricothyroid activity had no significant relationship to vocal fold bowing. All vocal folds with sulcus presented with bowing. Thirty-five percent of the vocal folds that had had laser surgery had bowing. The extent of tissue removal was closely related to the occurrence of bowing. Twelve cases with no organic lesion had vocal fold bowing. Of these 12 patients, 8 were male and 9 were older than 60 years. Some aging process in the mucosa was presumed to be the cause of the bowing in this age group of patients without clinically noticeable organic lesions. Causes of vocal fold bowing in the younger group of patients without organic lesions were not determined in this study. PMID:8179251

  13. Gravity wave and microphysical effects on bow echo development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selin, Rebecca Denise Adams

    Numerical simulations of the 13 March 2003 bow echo over Oklahoma are used to evaluate bow echo development and its relationship with gravity wave generation and microphysical heating profile variations. The first part of the research is directed at an explanation of recent observations of surface pressure surges ahead of convective lines prior to the bowing process. Multiple fast-moving n = 1 gravity waves are generated in association with fluctuations in the first vertical mode of heating in the convective line. The surface impacts of four such waves are observed in Oklahoma mesonet data during this case. A slower gravity wave is also produced in the simulation, which is responsible for the pre-bowing pressure surge in the model. This gravity wave is generated by an increase in low-level microphysical cooling associated with an increase in rear-to-front flow and low-level downdrafts shortly before bowing. The wave moves ahead of the convective line and is manifested at the surface by a positive pressure surge ahead of the convective line. The low-level upward vertical motion associated with this wave, in conjunction with higher-frequency gravity waves generated by the multicellularity of the convective line, increases the immediate pre-system CAPE by approximately 250 J/kg-1. Two-dimensional heating profiles from this idealized, full-physics bow echo simulation are placed as a constant heat source in another simulation without moisture, to evaluate what type of gravity waves are produced by a heating profile from a given instance in time. A one-dimensional vertical mean heating profile is calculated from each two-dimensional profile, and a statistical method is used to evaluate the significance of each vertical mode. A number of gravity waves are produced in the dry simulation despite their vertical mode lacking statistical significance in the one-dimensional profile, suggesting that horizontal variations in the heating profile are important to consider

  14. Foreshock ions observed behind the Martian bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, R. A.; Yamauchi, M.; Winningham, J. D.; Lundin, R.; Sharber, J. R.; Nilsson, H.; Coates, A. J.

    2016-08-01

    The Mars Express Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms experiment contains ion and electron instruments for conducting plasma measurements. On January 23, 2012, during in-bound travel of Mars Express in the southern hemisphere of Mars from its dawn side toward periapsis at dusk, the plasma instruments measured foreshock-like ion beams extending from outside the bow shock and into the magnetosphere, continuing to a distance of about a proton gyroradius from the bow shock. These ion beams were mostly protons, were observed to have energies greater than solar wind protons, and were not gyrating, in agreement with reflections of the solar wind proton beam. Furthermore, in the foreshock region the ion energy gradually decreased toward the magnetosheath, in agreement with an acceleration by outward-directed electric field in the bowshock. The observations also suggest that this electric field exists even inside the magnetosheath within the distance of a proton gyroradius from the bow shock.

  15. Cell order in bacterial swarms arises from reversals of moving direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yilin; Jiang, Yi; Kaiser, Dale; Alber, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial swarms are a beautiful example of the emergent behavior of systems of self-propelled rods. In swarming rod-shaped bacteria cells move smoothly even though they are packed together in high density. Experimental evidence shows that long-distance signaling is not required for bacterial swarming. It naturally raises the question how a swarm develops its order. Using a biomechanical model, we show here that regular periodic reversals of gliding direction in general systems of self-propelled rod shaped bacteria can lead to the extensive ordering of cells. We also show that an optimal reversal period and an optimal cell shape exist for producing such order. Given the observations of reversing behavior in several bacterial species,we suggest that the capacity to swarm depends less on the motility engine employed by individual cells, but more on the behavioral algorithm that enhances the flow of densely packed cells near the swarming edge.

  16. Time-reversal asymmetry without local moments via directional scalar spin chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosur, Pavan

    Quantum phases of matter that violate time-reversal symmetry invariably develop local spin or orbital moments in the ground state. Here, a directional scalar spin chiral order (DSSCO) phase is introduced, that disrespects time-reversal symmetry but has no static moments. It can be obtained by melting the spin moments in a magnetically ordered phase but retaining residual broken time-reversal symmetry. Orbital moments are then precluded by the spatial symmetries of the spin rotation symmetric state. Interestingly, polar Kerr effect in the 3D DSSCO has the same symmetries as those observed experimentally in the pseudogap phase of several underdoped cuprates. Finally, it is shown that the DSSCO provides a phenomenological route for reconciling the results of Kerr effect and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments in the cuprates, with charge ordering tendencies - observed in X-ray diffraction studies - playing a crucial role. The so-called ''memory effect'' in the cuprates can be incorporated into this picture as well.

  17. Direct and reverse pollen-mediated gene flow between GM rice and red rice weed

    PubMed Central

    Serrat, X.; Esteban, R.; Peñas, G.; Català, M. M.; Melé, E.; Messeguer, J.

    2013-01-01

    Potential risks of genetically modified (GM) crops must be identified before their commercialization, as happens with all new technologies. One of the major concerns is the proper risk assessment of adventitious presence of transgenic material in rice fields due to cross-pollination. Several studies have been conducted in order to quantify pollen-mediated gene flow from transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) to both conventional rice and red rice weed (O. sativa f. spontanea) under field conditions. Some of these studies reported GM pollen-donor rice transferring GM traits to red rice. However, gene flow also occurs in the opposite direction, in a phenomenon that we have called reverse gene flow, resulting in transgenic seeds that have incorporated the traits of wild red rice. We quantified reverse gene flow using material from two field trials. A molecular analysis based on amplified fragment length polymorphisms was carried out, being complemented with a phenotypic identification of red rice traits. In both field trials, the reverse gene flow detected was greater than the direct gene flow. The rate of direct gene flow varied according to the relative proportions of the donor (GM rice) and receptor (red rice) plants and was influenced by wind direction. The ecological impact of reverse gene flow is limited in comparison with that of direct gene flow because non-shattered and non-dormant seeds would be obtained in the first generation. Hybrid seed would remain in the spike and therefore most of it would be removed during harvesting. Nevertheless, this phenomenon must be considered in fields used for elite seed production and in developing countries where farmers often keep some seed for planting the following year. In these cases, there is a higher risk of GM red rice weed infestation increasing from year to year and therefore a proper monitoring plan needs to be established.

  18. The player and the bowed string: coordination of bowing parameters in violin and viola performance.

    PubMed

    Schoonderwaldt, E

    2009-11-01

    An experiment was conducted with four violin and viola players, measuring their bowing performance using an optical motion capture system and sensors on the bow. The measurements allowed for a detailed analysis of the use and coordination of the main bowing parameters bow velocity, bow force, and bow-bridge distance. An analysis of bowing strategies in detache playing of notes of three durations (0.2, 2, and 4 s) at three dynamic levels (pp, mf, and f) on all four strings is presented, focusing on the "steady" part of the notes. The results revealed clear trends in the coordinated variations of the bowing parameters depending on the constraints of the task, reflecting a common behavior as well as individual strategies. Furthermore, there were clear indications that the players adapted the bowing parameters to the physical properties of the string and the instrument, respecting the limits of the playable control parameter space. PMID:19894847

  19. Orion Nebula and Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have found a bow shock around a very young star in the nearby Orion nebula, an intense star-forming region of gas and dust.

    A picture, from the Hubble Heritage team, is available at http://heritage.stsci.edu or http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/05 or http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . It was taken in February 1995 as part of the Hubble Orion Nebula mosaic by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    Named for the crescent-shaped wave a ship makes as it moves through water, a bow shock can form in space when two gas streams collide. In this case, the young star, LL Ori, emits a vigorous wind, a stream of charged particles moving rapidly outward from the star. Our own Sun has a less energetic version of this wind that is responsible for auroral displays on the Earth.

    The material spewed from LL Ori collides with slow-moving gas evaporating away from the center of the Orion nebula, located to the lower right of the image. The surface where the two winds collide is seen as the crescent-shaped bow shock.

    Unlike a water wave from a ship, this interstellar bow shock is three-dimensional. The filamentary emission has a distinct boundary on the side facing away from LL Ori, but is diffuse on the side closest to the star, a trait common to many bow shocks.

    A second, fainter bow shock can be seen around a star near the upper right-hand corner of the image. Astronomers have identified numerous shock fronts in this complex star-forming region and are using this data to understand the complex phenomena associated with star birth.

    The Orion nebula is a close neighbor in our Milky Way galaxy, at only 1,500 light-years from Earth. The filters used in this color composite represent oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen emissions.

  20. Direct Observation of Reversible Magnesium Ion Intercalation into a Spinel Oxide Host

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chunjoong; Phillips, Patrick J.; Key, Baris; Yi, Tanghong; Nordlund, Dennis; Yu, Young-Sang; Bayliss, Ryan D.; Han, Sang-Don; He, Meinan; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Burrell, Anthony K.; Klie, Robert F.; Cabana, Jordi

    2015-04-17

    Direct evidence of Mg2+ intercalation into a spinel-type Mn2O4 is provided. By com­bining tools with different sensitivities, from atomic-resolution X-ray spectro­scopy to bulk X-ray diffraction, it is demonstrated that Mg2+ reversibly occupies the tetrahedral sites of the spinel structure through the reduction of Mn when the electrochemical reaction is performed.

  1. Effects of bowing on perception of attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Osugi, Takayuki; Kawahara, Jun I

    2015-07-01

    Bowing is a greeting behavior. The present study examined the modulation effect of bowing on perception of attractiveness. In each trial, a portrait digitized from university yearbooks was presented on a computer screen. The portrait was mildly tilted toward participants to simulate a greeting bow (25-degree angle). Participants evaluated the subjective attractiveness of the face using a visual analog scale (0-100). The mean attractiveness judgment of the bowing portrait was significantly higher relative to that of the bending-backward or standing-still control conditions (Experiment 1). Additional control experiments revealed that alternative accounts relying on apparent spatial proximity and physical characteristics could not solely explain the effect of bowing (Experiment 2) and indicated that the effect was specific to objects perceived as faces (Experiment 3). Furthermore, observers' in-return bowing behavior did not reduce the bowing effect (Experiment 4), and bowing motion increased the ratings of subjective politeness and submissiveness (Experiment 5). Finally, tilting the 3D faces elicited the same effect from observers as did tilting the still photos (Experiment 6). These results suggest that a tilting motion of portraits (or images of face-like objects) mimicking bowing enhances perceived attractiveness, at least as measured in a culture familiar with greeting by bowing. PMID:25813741

  2. Acetylene is an active-site-directed, slow-binding, reversible inhibitor of Azotobacter vinelandii hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, M.R.; Arp, D.J.

    1987-10-06

    The inhibition of purified and membrane-bound hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii by dihydrogen-free acetylene was investigated. The inhibition was a time-dependent process which exhibited first-order kinetics. Both H/sub 2/ and CO protected against the inhibition by acetylene. K/sub protect(app)/ values of 0.41 and 24 ..mu..M were derived for these gases, respectively. Both H/sub 2/-oxidizing activity and the tritium exchange capacity of the purified enzyme were inhibited at the same rate by acetylene. Removal of acetylene reversed the inhibition for both the purified and the membrane-associated form of the enzyme. The purified hydrogenases from both Rhizobium japonicum and Alcaligenes eutrophus H16 were also inhibited by acetylene in a time-dependent fashion. These findings suggest that acetylene is an active-site-directed, slow-binding, reversible inhibitor of some membrane-bound hydrogenases from aerobic bacteria.

  3. Multispacecraft observations of diffuse ions upstream of Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, A.; Scholer, M.; Klecker, B.; Moebius, E.; Lucek, E.; Reme, H.

    We present observations of upstream ions at times of large separation distance between the Cluster spacecraft (~5000 km). On 18 February, 2003, during particulary quiet interplanetary conditions, the Cluster spacecraft were moving inbound through the foreshock region, where for more than 12 hours they simultaneously observed a continuous presence of a diffuse ion population. Using the HIA and CODIF sensors of the CIS plasma instrument onboard SC-1 and -3, we were able to directly measure the upstream ion density gradients in the energy range 10-32 keV in several energy bands. During this time period, the spacecraft distance from the bow shock parallel to the local magnetic field varies considerably (between 0 and 15 Re). The distance to the bow shock has been determined by using upstream magnetic field and plasma parameters and a bow shock model. We find up to 10 Re from the bow shock an exponential decrease of the upstream ion density, with an e-folding distance increasing from 3.1 to 5.6 Re at energies from 10 keV to 32 keV, respectively. From the e-folding distance the parallel diffusion coefficient and its energy dependence can be determined. At distances more than 10 Re the gradient is close to zero.

  4. Heteroatom-directed reverse Wacker oxidations. Synthesis of the reported structure of (-)-herbaric acid.

    PubMed

    Choi, Peter J; Sperry, Jonathan; Brimble, Margaret A

    2010-11-01

    A microwave-assisted chemoenzymatic resolution has been used to install the C3 stereocenter of the reported structure of the fungal metabolite herbaric acid in high enantiomeric excess. The synthesis and stereochemical assignment was accomplished using a completely regioselective anti-Markovnikov addition of water to vinylphthalide 3, achieved using a heteroatom-directed Wacker oxidation that proceeds with retention of stereochemistry. These results establish that so-called "reverse" Wacker oxidations are a viable alternative to hydroboration/oxidation procedures. PMID:20873747

  5. Reversal of Aberrant Cancer Methylome and Transcriptome upon Direct Reprogramming of Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Dashayini; Kong, Chiou Mee; Lai, Jason; Tay, Ling Lee; Yang, Henry; Wang, Xueying

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports on direct reprogramming of cancer cells (iPCs) which results in reduced tumorigenic potential has attributed the importance of epigenetics in tumorigenesis, but lacked genome-wide analysis. Here we describe successful generation of iPCs from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. Following reprogramming, they resembled embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells in pluripotency markers expression, gene expression patterns and in vitro differentiation ability. Genome-wide methylation analysis revealed that aberrantly methylated promoters which were mostly developmental-associated genes and tumor suppressors; as well as commonly upregulated genes in NSCLC i.e. KRT19 and S100P were reversed in iPCs upon reprogramming. Also, the reversal of oncogenes and tumor suppressors status were partially explainable by DNA methylation. These findings suggest that DNA methylation patterns explain the downstream transcriptional effects, which potentially caused the reduced tumorigenicity in iPCs, thus providing evidence that reprogramming reverses the aberrantly dysregulated genes in NSCLC both epigenetically and transcriptionally. PMID:22912920

  6. Direct real-space observation of nearly stochastic behavior in magnetization reversal process on a nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Im, M.-Y.; Kim, D.-H.; Lee, K.-D.; Fischer, P.; Shin, S.-C.

    2007-06-01

    We report a non-deterministic nature in the magnetization reversal of nanograins of CoCrPt alloy film. Magnetization reversal process of CoCrPt alloy film is investigated using high resolution soft X-ray microscopy which provides real space images with a spatial resolution of 15 nm. Domain nucleation sites mostly appear stochastically distributed within repeated hysteretic cycles, where the correlation increases as the strength of the applied magnetic field increases in the descending and ascending branches of the major hysteresis loop. In addition, domain configuration is mostly asymmetric with inversion of an applied magnetic field in the hysteretic cycle. Nanomagnetic simulation considering thermal fluctuations of the magnetic moments of the grains explains the nearly stochastic nature of the domain nucleation behavior observed in CoCrPt alloy film. With the bit size in high-density magnetic recording media approaching nanometer length scale, one of the fundamental and crucial issues is whether the domain nucleation during magnetization reversal process exhibits a deterministic behavior. Repeatability of local domain nucleation and deterministic switching behavior are basic and essential factors for achieving high performance in high-density magnetic recording [1-3]. Most experimental studies on this issue reported so far have been mainly performed by indirect probes through macroscopic hysteresis loop and Barkhausen pattern measurements, which provide the ensemble-average magnetization. Thus, they are inadequate to gain insight into the domain-nucleation behavior on a nanometer length scale during the magnetization reversal process [4-6]. Very recently, coherent X-ray speckle metrology, where the speckle pattern observed in reciprocal space acts as a fingerprint of the domain configurations, was adopted to investigate stochastic behavior in the magnetization reversal of a Co/Pt multilayer film [7,8]. However, no direct observation on the stochastic behavior of

  7. Specific and reversible DNA-directed self-assembly of oil-in-water emulsion droplets

    PubMed Central

    Hadorn, Maik; Boenzli, Eva; Sørensen, Kristian T.; Fellermann, Harold; Eggenberger Hotz, Peter; Hanczyc, Martin M.

    2012-01-01

    Higher-order structures that originate from the specific and reversible DNA-directed self-assembly of microscopic building blocks hold great promise for future technologies. Here, we functionalized biotinylated soft colloid oil-in-water emulsion droplets with biotinylated single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides using streptavidin as an intermediary linker. We show the components of this modular linking system to be stable and to induce sequence-specific aggregation of binary mixtures of emulsion droplets. Three length scales were thereby involved: nanoscale DNA base pairing linking microscopic building blocks resulted in macroscopic aggregates visible to the naked eye. The aggregation process was reversible by changing the temperature and electrolyte concentration and by the addition of competing oligonucleotides. The system was reset and reused by subsequent refunctionalization of the emulsion droplets. DNA-directed self-assembly of oil-in-water emulsion droplets, therefore, offers a solid basis for programmable and recyclable soft materials that undergo structural rearrangements on demand and that range in application from information technology to medicine. PMID:23175791

  8. On the peculiar shapes of some pulsar bow-shock nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandiera, Rino

    Pulsar bow-shock nebulae are pulsar-wind nebulae formed by the direct interaction of pulsar relativistic winds with the interstellar medium. The bow-shock morphology, well outlined in Hα for some objects, is an effect of the supersonic pulsar motion with respect to the ambient medium. However, in a considerable fraction of cases (e.g. the nebulae associated to PSR B2224+65, PSR B0740-28, PSR J2124-3358) clear deviations from the classical bow shock shape are observed. Such deviations are usually interpreted as due to ambient density gradients and/or to pulsar-wind anisotropies. Here I present a different interpretation, aiming at explaining deviations from the standard morphology as signs of the peculiar physical conditions present in these objects. Using dimensional arguments, I show that, unlike normal pulsar-wind nebulae, in pulsar bow-shock nebulae the mean free path of the highest-energy particles may be comparable with the bow-shock head. I then investigate whether this may affect the shape of the bow-shock; for instance, whether a conical bow shock (like that observed in the "Guitar", the nebula associated to PSR B2224+65) does really imply an ambient density gradient. Finally, I discuss some other possible signatures of these high-energy, long mean-free-path particles.

  9. The violin bow: taper, camber and flexibility.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin

    2011-12-01

    An analytic, small-deflection, simplified model of the modern violin bow is introduced to describe the bending profiles and related strengths of an initially straight, uniform cross-section, stick as a function of bow hair tension. A number of illustrative bending profiles (cambers) of the bow are considered, which demonstrate the strong dependence of the flexibility of the bow on longitudinal forces across the ends of the bent stick. Such forces are shown to be comparable in strength to critical buckling loads causing excessive sideways buckling unless the stick is very straight. Non-linear, large deformation, finite element computations extend the analysis to bow hair tensions comparable with and above the critical buckling strength of the straight stick. The geometric model assumes an expression for the taper of Tourte bows introduced by Vuillaume, which is re-examined and generalized to describe violin, viola and cello bows. A comparison is made with recently published measurements of the taper and bending profiles of a particularly fine bow by Kittel. PMID:22225065

  10. Multispacecraft observations of energetic ions upstream and downstream of the bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Moebius, E.; Kistler, L. M.; Klecker, B.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1989-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of energetic protons and alpha particles were obtained inside and outside of the magnetopause and upstream and downstream of the bow shock. In the magnetosheath, no gradient or streaming is found in the upstream direction. The present results are consistent with first-order Fermi acceleration at the bow shock and subsequent downstream convection, and exclude the possibility of a magnetospheric source for these particles.

  11. Accuracy details in realistic CFD modeling of an industrial centrifugal pump in direct and reverse modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páscoa, J. C.; Silva, F. J.; Pinheiro, J. S.; Martins, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    Numerical computation of the flowfield inside a pump is herein used as a numerical laboratory, subject to the limitations of modeling assumptions and to experimental verification. A numerical computation of the flow inside a real industrial centrifugal pump is performed that includes a very sophisticated geometry. Conversely to other computations, in this test case no simplification of the geometry was introduced. Numerical computations are obtained using Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. A detailed analysis of the turbulent flowstructure is performed for the design point and two off design conditions. Additional computations were performed in order to compare the numerical and experimental pump characteristics; these were obtained under normalized testing conditions. Further computations are presented for the pump working in reverse turbine mode (PAT). Detailed analyses of the flow allow a comparison of the internal flow losses when the pump is operating in direct and reverse mode. This is also useful to help in the selection of an adequate pump geometry that can work in both modes with best efficiency.

  12. Direct reversal of glucocorticoid resistance by AKT inhibition in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Piovan, Erich; Yu, Jiyang; Tosello, Valeria; Herranz, Daniel; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Da Silva, Ana Carolina; Sanchez-Martin, Marta; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Rigo, Isaura; Castillo, Mireia; Indraccolo, Stefano; Cross, Justin R; de Stanchina, Elisa; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Rowe, Jacob M; Tallman, Martin S; Basso, Giuseppe; Meijerink, Jules P; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Califano, Andrea; Ferrando, Adolfo A

    2013-12-01

    Glucocorticoid resistance is a major driver of therapeutic failure in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here, we identify the AKT1 kinase as a major negative regulator of the NR3C1 glucocorticoid receptor protein activity driving glucocorticoid resistance in T-ALL. Mechanistically, AKT1 impairs glucocorticoid-induced gene expression by direct phosphorylation of NR3C1 at position S134 and blocking glucocorticoid-induced NR3C1 translocation to the nucleus. Moreover, we demonstrate that loss of PTEN and consequent AKT1 activation can effectively block glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis and induce resistance to glucocorticoid therapy. Conversely, pharmacologic inhibition of AKT with MK2206 effectively restores glucocorticoid-induced NR3C1 translocation to the nucleus, increases the response of T-ALL cells to glucocorticoid therapy, and effectively reverses glucocorticoid resistance in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24291004

  13. Direct reversal of glucocorticoid resistance by AKT inhibition in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tosello, Valeria; Herranz, Daniel; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Da Silva, Ana Carolina; Sanchez-Martin, Marta; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Rigo, Isaura; Castillo, Mireia; Indraccolo, Stefano; Cross, Justin R; de Stanchina, Elisa; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Rowe, Jacob M; Tallman, Martin S; Basso, Giuseppe; Meijerink, Jules P; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Califano, Andrea; Ferrando, Adolfo A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Glucocorticoid resistance is a major driver of therapeutic failure in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here we identify the AKT1 kinase as a major negative regulator of the NR3C1 glucocorticoid receptor protein activity driving glucocorticoid resistance in T-ALL. Mechanistically, AKT1 impairs glucocorticoid-induced gene expression by direct phosphorylation of NR3C1 at position S134 and blocking glucocorticoid-induced NR3C1 translocation to the nucleus. Moreover, we demonstrate that loss of PTEN and consequent AKT1 activation can effectively block glucocorticoid induced apoptosis and induce resistance to glucocorticoid therapy. Conversely, pharmacologic inhibition of AKT with MK2206 effectively restores glucocorticoid-induced NR3C1 translocation to the nucleus, increases the response of T-ALL cells to glucocorticoid therapy and effectively reverses glucocorticoid resistance in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24291004

  14. Surface Plasmon-Coupled Directional Enhanced Raman Scattering by Means of the Reverse Kretschmann Configuration.

    PubMed

    Huo, Si-Xin; Liu, Qian; Cao, Shuo-Hui; Cai, Wei-Peng; Meng, Ling-Yan; Xie, Kai-Xin; Zhai, Yan-Yun; Zong, Cheng; Yang, Zhi-Lin; Ren, Bin; Li, Yao-Qun

    2015-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a unique analytical technique that provides fingerprint spectra, yet facing the obstacle of low collection efficiency. In this study, we demonstrated a simple approach to measure surface plasmon-coupled directional enhanced Raman scattering by means of the reverse Kretschmann configuration (RK-SPCR). Highly directional and p-polarized Raman scattering of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) was observed on a nanoparticle-on-film substrate at 46° through the prism coupler with a sharp angle distribution (full width at half-maximum of ∼3.3°). Because of the improved collection efficiency, the Raman scattering signal was enhanced 30-fold over the conventional SERS mode; this was consistent with finite-difference time-domain simulations. The effect of nanoparticles on the coupling efficiency of propagated surface plasmons was investigated. Possessing straightforward implementation and directional enhancement of Raman scattering, RK-SPCR is anticipated to simplify SERS instruments and to be broadly applicable to biochemical assays. PMID:26266494

  15. Modeling nonthermal emission from stellar bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, V.; López-Santiago, J.; Miceli, M.; Bonito, R.; de Castro, E.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Runaway O- and early B-type stars passing through the interstellar medium at supersonic velocities and characterized by strong stellar winds may produce bow shocks that can serve as particle acceleration sites. Previous theoretical models predict the production of high-energy photons by nonthermal radiative processes, but their efficiency is still debated. Aims: We aim to test and explain the possibility of emission from the bow shocks formed by runaway stars traveling through the interstellar medium by using previous theoretical models. Methods: We applied our model to AE Aurigae, the first reported star with an X-ray detected bow shock, to BD+43 3654, in which the observations failed in detecting high-energy emission, and to the transition phase of a supergiant star in the late stages of its life. Results: From our analysis, we confirm that the X-ray emission from the bow shock produced by AE Aurigae can be explained by inverse Compton processes involving the infrared photons of the heated dust. We also predict low high-energy flux emission from the bow shock produced by BD+43 3654, and the possibility of high-energy emission from the bow shock formed by a supergiant star during the transition phase from blue to red supergiant. Conclusions: Bow shocks formed by different types of runaway stars are revealed as a new possible source of high-energy photons in our neighborhood.

  16. Oxygen foreshock of Mars and its implication on ion acceleration in the bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Lundin, Rickard; Frahm, Rudy; Sauvaud, Jean-Andre; Holmstrom, Mats; Barabash, Stas

    2016-04-01

    Ion acceleration inside the bow shock is one of the poorly understood phenomena that has been observed for more than 30 years as the foreshock phenomena. While the Fermi-acceleration mechanism explains the diffuse component of foreshock ions, we still do not know the detailed mechanism that produces the discrete intense ions flowing along the local magnetic field direction (with and without gyration). One of the reasons for such difficulty is that majority of the bow shock study was performed for the Earth's case where Oxygen ions cannot be used to understand the acceleration mechanisms. The planetary oxygen ions that reach the Earth's bow shock have already been significantly accelerated, and are not adequate for such a study. In this sense the Martian bow shock is an ideal place to study the acceleration mechanisms leading to foreshock ions, although the nature of the bow shock is slightly different between the Earth and Mars (Yamauchi et al., 2011). On 21 September 2008, the Mars Express (MEX) Ion Mass Analyser (IMA) detected foreshock-like discrete distributions of oxygen ions at around 1 keV in the solar wind attached to the bow shock. This was the first time that a substantial amount of planetary oxygen was observed upstream of the bow shock. The oxygen energy increased from low energy (< 300 keV) inside the magnetosheath (or it should be called an extended bow shock) to nearly 2 keV at more than 2000 km from the bow shock. Foreshock-like protons are also observed but at a shifted location from the oxygen by about 1000 km, at a slightly higher energy, and flowing in a slightly different direction than the oxygen ions. Both protons and oxygen ions are flowing anti-sunward at different angles with respect to the solar wind direction. The observation is consistent with an electric potential barrier at the bow shock that simultaneously accelerates the planetary oxygen ions outward (to form the foreshock oxygen ions) and reflects a portion of the solar wind (to

  17. Interaction of interplanetary shocks and rotational discontinuities with the Earth`s bow shock

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, M.; Lee, L.C.

    1996-03-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) aspects of the interaction between the Earth`s bow show and interplanetary shocks or rotational discontinues are systematically studied in this paper by MHD simulations. The interplanetary shocks under consideration include forward fast shocks, reverse fast shocks, forward slow shocks, and a reverse slow shocks. As an incident forward shock transmits through the bow shock, a fast shock, a slow expansion wave, a slow shock, and a contact discontinuity are generated downstream of the bow shock. At the same time, the bow shock is modified and moves earthward. If the incident shock is a reverse shock, the generated fast shock becomes a fast expansion wave, and the bow shock moves away from the earth. The generated fast shock or fast expansion wave carries most of the total pressure variation. The contact discontinuity also carries a significant part of the pressure variation. The slow expansion wave and the slow shock are both generated with a small variation in plasma density and pressure but a large variation in magnetic field. When the solar wind Alfven Mach number is small, the density variations associated with the slow shock or slow expansion wave can be significant. Through the interaction between an incident rotational discontinuity and the bow shock, a plateau in the plasma density and thermal pressure is formed. The magnetic pressure is depressed accordingly anticorrelated with the thermal pressure. If the incident rotational discontinuity proprogates toward the Earth (Sun) in the solar wind frame, the leading (trailing) edge of the plateau consists of an intermediate shock or a time-dependent intermediate shock and a slow shock, while the trailing (leading) edge is mainly a slow shock. The generated structure with enhanced plasma density and thermal pressure and a depressed magnetic pressure agrees very well with the observed slow-mode structure in the magnetosheath. 45 refs., 12 fig.

  18. Viols and Other Historic Bowed String Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Murray; Campbell, Patsy

    While plucked strings have been used for musical purposes since at least the third millennium BCE, the idea of sounding a string by bowing it is a much more recent development. Bowed string instruments seem to have originated in Asia toward the end of the first millennium CE, and were in widespread use in Western Europe by the end of the eleventh century. For the next three centuries many different types of bowed instrument, with a bewildering variety of names, were in common use throughout Europe.

  19. 46 CFR 42.20-70 - Minimum bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minimum bow height. 42.20-70 Section 42.20-70 Shipping... Freeboards § 42.20-70 Minimum bow height. (a) The bow height defined as the vertical distance at the forward....68. (b) Where the bow height required in paragraph (a) of this section is obtained by sheer,...

  20. 46 CFR 42.20-70 - Minimum bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum bow height. 42.20-70 Section 42.20-70 Shipping... Freeboards § 42.20-70 Minimum bow height. (a) The bow height defined as the vertical distance at the forward....68. (b) Where the bow height required in paragraph (a) of this section is obtained by sheer,...

  1. 46 CFR 42.20-70 - Minimum bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum bow height. 42.20-70 Section 42.20-70 Shipping... Freeboards § 42.20-70 Minimum bow height. (a) The bow height defined as the vertical distance at the forward....68. (b) Where the bow height required in paragraph (a) of this section is obtained by sheer,...

  2. 46 CFR 42.20-70 - Minimum bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minimum bow height. 42.20-70 Section 42.20-70 Shipping... Freeboards § 42.20-70 Minimum bow height. (a) The bow height defined as the vertical distance at the forward....68. (b) Where the bow height required in paragraph (a) of this section is obtained by sheer,...

  3. 46 CFR 42.20-70 - Minimum bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minimum bow height. 42.20-70 Section 42.20-70 Shipping... Freeboards § 42.20-70 Minimum bow height. (a) The bow height defined as the vertical distance at the forward....68. (b) Where the bow height required in paragraph (a) of this section is obtained by sheer,...

  4. Direct binding with HDAC6 mediates the reversible recruitment of parkin to the centrosome

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qian; Ren, Yong; Feng, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), a microtubule-associated tubulin deacetylase, plays a significant role in the formation of protein aggregates in many neurodegenerative disorders. Parkin, a protein-ubiquitin E3 ligase linked to Parkinson’s disease, accumulates at the centrosome in a microtubule-dependent manner in response to proteasome inhibition. Here, we show that the centrosome recruitment of parkin was mediated by its direct binding to HDAC6 through multiple interaction domains. The tubulin deacetylase activity of HDAC6 was required for the accumulation of parkin as well as its dispersion upon the reversal of proteasome inhibition. The bidirectional movements of parkin required intact microtubule network and were dependent on dynein and kinesin 1, respectively. Tubulin deacetylation increases microtubule dynamicity and may thus facilitate microtubule-based trafficking of the parkin-HDAC6 complex. The results suggest that HDAC6 acts as a sensor of proteasome inhibition and directs the trafficking of parkin by utilizing different motor proteins. PMID:19036992

  5. Reverse transcriptase directs viral evolution in a deep ocean methane seep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, B. G.; Bagby, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Deep ocean methane seeps are sites of intense microbial activity, with complex communities fueled by aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophy. Methane consumption in these communities has a substantial impact on the global carbon cycle, yet little is known about their evolutionary history or their likely evolutionary trajectories in a warming ocean. As in other marine systems, viral predation and virally mediated horizontal gene transfer are expected to be major drivers of evolutionary change in these communities; however, the host cells' resistance to cultivation has impeded direct study of the viral population. We conducted a metagenomic study of viruses in the anoxic sediments of a deep methane seep in the Santa Monica Basin in the Southern California Bight. We retrieved 1660 partial viral genomes, tentatively assigning 1232 to bacterial hosts and 428 to archaea. One abundant viral genome, likely hosted by Clostridia species present in the sediment, was found to encode a diversity-generating retroelement (DGR), a module for reverse transcriptase-mediated directed mutagenesis of a distal tail fiber protein. While DGRs have previously been described in the viruses of human pathogens, where diversification of viral tail fibers permits infection of a range of host cell types, to our knowledge this is the first description of such an element in a marine virus. By providing a mechanism for massively broadening potential host range, the presence of DGRs in these systems may have a major impact on the prevalence of virally mediated horizontal gene transfer, and even on the phylogenetic distances across which genes are moved.

  6. Global Hybrid Simulations of the Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, N.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Russell, C. T.

    2005-08-01

    This paper summarizes recent results from global hybrid (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) simulations of bow shocks or waves associated with solar wind interaction with magnetic dipoles of various strength. By virtue of resolving ion temporal and spatial scales, global hybrid simulations account for collissionless dissipational processes at and upstream of the shock and their effects on the macrostructure of the bow shock, ion foreshock and the magnetosheath. The results demonstrate that as the level of magnetization increases and the dipole becomes a more effective obstacle, the quasi-perpendicular part of the bow shock forms first and that formation of quasi-parallel part of the bow shock is tied to the generation of oblique magnetosonic waves which steepen to form shocklets in the upstream region.

  7. Characterising the Canine Oral Microbiome by Direct Sequencing of Reverse-Transcribed rRNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, James E.; Larsen, Niels; Pennington, Andrea; Connolly, John; Wallis, Corrin; Rooks, David J.; Hall, Neil; McCarthy, Alan J.; Allison, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    PCR amplification and sequencing of phylogenetic markers, primarily Small Sub-Unit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes, has been the paradigm for defining the taxonomic composition of microbiomes. However, ‘universal’ SSU rRNA gene PCR primer sets are likely to miss much of the diversity therein. We sequenced a library comprising purified and reverse-transcribed SSU rRNA (RT-SSU rRNA) molecules from the canine oral microbiome and compared it to a general bacterial 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicon library generated from the same biological sample. In addition, we have developed BIONmeta, a novel, open-source, computer package for the processing and taxonomic classification of the randomly fragmented RT-SSU rRNA reads produced. Direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing revealed that 16S rRNA molecules belonging to the bacterial phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes, were most abundant in the canine oral microbiome (92.5% of total bacterial SSU rRNA). The direct rRNA sequencing approach detected greater taxonomic diversity (1 additional phylum, 2 classes, 1 order, 10 families and 61 genera) when compared with general bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons from the same sample, simultaneously provided SSU rRNA gene inventories of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, and detected significant numbers of sequences not recognised by ‘universal’ primer sets. Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes were found to be under-represented by PCR-based analysis of the microbiome, and this was due to primer mismatches and taxon-specific variations in amplification efficiency, validated by qPCR analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons from a mock community. This demonstrated the veracity of direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing for molecular microbial ecology. PMID:27276347

  8. Extremely rapid directional change during Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scardia, Giancarlo; Giaccio, Biagio; Liddicoat, Joseph C.; Nomade, Sebastien; Renne, Paul R.; Sprain, Courtney J.

    2014-11-01

    We report a palaeomagnetic investigation of the last full geomagnetic field reversal, the Matuyama-Brunhes (M-B) transition, as preserved in a continuous sequence of exposed lacustrine sediments in the Apennines of Central Italy. The palaeomagnetic record provides the most direct evidence for the tempo of transitional field behaviour yet obtained for the M-B transition. 40Ar/39Ar dating of tephra layers bracketing the M-B transition provides high-accuracy age constraints and indicates a mean sediment accumulation rate of about 0.2 mm yr-1 during the transition. Two relative palaeointensity (RPI) minima are present in the M-B transition. During the terminus of the upper RPI minimum, a directional change of about 180 ° occurred at an extremely fast rate, estimated to be less than 2 ° per year, with no intermediate virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) documented during the transit from the southern to northern hemisphere. Thus, the entry into the Brunhes Normal Chron as represented by the palaeomagnetic directions and VGPs developed in a time interval comparable to the duration of an average human life, which is an order of magnitude more rapid than suggested by current models. The reported investigation therefore provides high-resolution integrated palaeomagnetic and radioisotopic data that document the fine details of the anatomy and tempo of the M-B transition in Central Italy that in turn are crucial for a better understanding of Earth's magnetic field, and for the development of more sophisticated models that are able to describe its global structure and behaviour.

  9. Characterising the Canine Oral Microbiome by Direct Sequencing of Reverse-Transcribed rRNA Molecules.

    PubMed

    McDonald, James E; Larsen, Niels; Pennington, Andrea; Connolly, John; Wallis, Corrin; Rooks, David J; Hall, Neil; McCarthy, Alan J; Allison, Heather E

    2016-01-01

    PCR amplification and sequencing of phylogenetic markers, primarily Small Sub-Unit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes, has been the paradigm for defining the taxonomic composition of microbiomes. However, 'universal' SSU rRNA gene PCR primer sets are likely to miss much of the diversity therein. We sequenced a library comprising purified and reverse-transcribed SSU rRNA (RT-SSU rRNA) molecules from the canine oral microbiome and compared it to a general bacterial 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicon library generated from the same biological sample. In addition, we have developed BIONmeta, a novel, open-source, computer package for the processing and taxonomic classification of the randomly fragmented RT-SSU rRNA reads produced. Direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing revealed that 16S rRNA molecules belonging to the bacterial phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes, were most abundant in the canine oral microbiome (92.5% of total bacterial SSU rRNA). The direct rRNA sequencing approach detected greater taxonomic diversity (1 additional phylum, 2 classes, 1 order, 10 families and 61 genera) when compared with general bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons from the same sample, simultaneously provided SSU rRNA gene inventories of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, and detected significant numbers of sequences not recognised by 'universal' primer sets. Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes were found to be under-represented by PCR-based analysis of the microbiome, and this was due to primer mismatches and taxon-specific variations in amplification efficiency, validated by qPCR analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons from a mock community. This demonstrated the veracity of direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing for molecular microbial ecology. PMID:27276347

  10. Bow-shaped toroidal field coils

    SciTech Connect

    Bonanos, P.

    1981-05-01

    Design features of Bow-Shaped Toroidal Field Coils are described and compared with circular and D shaped coils. The results indicate that bow coils can produce higher field strengths, store more energy and be made demountable. The design offers the potential for the production of ultrahigh toroidal fields. Included are representative coil shapes and their engineering properties, a suggested structural design and an analysis of a specific case.

  11. Extended red objects and stellar-wind bow shocks in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, Remington O.; Povich, Matthew S.; Smith, Nathan; Babler, Brian L.; Meade, Marilyn R.; Rudolph, Alexander L.

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of infrared photometry on 39 extended red objects (EROs) in the Carina Nebula, observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Most EROs are identified by bright, extended 8.0 μm emission, which ranges from 10 arcsec to 40 arcsec in size, but our sample also includes four EROs identified by extended 24 μm emission. Of particular interest are nine EROs associated with late O- or early B-type stars and characterized by arc-shaped morphology, suggesting dusty, stellar-wind bow shocks. These objects are preferentially oriented towards the central regions of the Carina Nebula, suggesting that these bow shocks are generally produced by the interactions of OB winds with the bulk expansion of the H II region rather than high proper motion. We identify preferred regions of mid-infrared colour space occupied by our bow shock candidates, which also contain bow shock candidates in M17 and RCW 49 but are well separated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission or circumstellar discs. Colour cuts identify an additional 12 marginally resolved bow shock candidates, 10 of which are also associated with known late O or early B stars. H II region expansion velocities derived from bow shock candidate standoff distances are ˜10 km s-1, assuming typical H II region gas densities, comparable to expansion velocities derived from bow shocks in M17 and RCW 49. One candidate bow shock provides direct evidence of physical interaction between the massive stellar winds originating in the Trumpler 15 and Trumpler 14 clusters, supporting the conclusion that both clusters are at similar heliocentric distances.

  12. Planetary Embryo Bow Shocks as a Mechanism for Chondrule Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Christopher R.; Boley, Aaron C.; Morris, Melissa A.

    2016-02-01

    We use radiation hydrodynamics with direct particle integration to explore the feasibility of chondrule formation in planetary embryo bow shocks. The calculations presented here are used to explore the consequences of a Mars-size planetary embryo traveling on a moderately excited orbit through the dusty, early environment of the solar system. The embryo’s eccentric orbit produces a range of supersonic relative velocities between the embryo and the circularly orbiting gas and dust, prompting the formation of bow shocks. Temporary atmospheres around these embryos, which can be created via volatile outgassing and gas capture from the surrounding nebula, can non-trivially affect thermal profiles of solids entering the shock. We explore the thermal environment of solids that traverse the bow shock at different impact radii, the effects that planetoid atmospheres have on shock morphologies, and the stripping efficiency of planetoidal atmospheres in the presence of high relative winds. Simulations are run using adiabatic and radiative conditions, with multiple treatments for the local opacities. Shock speeds of 5, 6, and 7 km s-1 are explored. We find that a high-mass atmosphere and inefficient radiative conditions can produce peak temperatures and cooling rates that are consistent with the constraints set by chondrule furnace studies. For most conditions, the derived cooling rates are potentially too high to be consistent with chondrule formation.

  13. Channel Bow in Boiling Water Reactors - Hot Cell Examination Results and Correlation to Measured Bow

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.T.; Lin, Y.P.; Dubecky, M.A.; Mader, E.V.

    2007-07-01

    An increase in frequency of fuel channel-control blade interference has been observed in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) in recent years. Many of the channels leading to interference were found to bow towards the control blade in a manner that was inconsistent with the expected bow due to other effects. The pattern of bow appeared to indicate a new channel bow mechanism that differed from the predominant bow mechanism caused by differential growth due to fast-fluence gradients. In order to investigate this new type of channel bow, coupons from several channels with varying degrees of bow were returned to the GE Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) for Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE). This paper describes the characteristics of channel corrosion and hydrogen pickup observed, and relates the observations to the channel exposure level, control history, and measured channel bow. The channels selected for PIE had exposures in the range of 36-48 GWd/MTU and covered a wide range of measured bow. The coupons were obtained at 4 elevations from opposing channel sides adjacent and away from the control blade. The PIE performed on these coupons included visual examination, metallography, and hydrogen concentration measurements. A new mechanism of control-blade shadow corrosion-induced channel bow was found to correlate with differences in the extent of corrosion and corresponding differences in the hydrogen concentration between opposite sides of the channels. The increased corrosion on the control blade sides was found to be dependent on the level of control early in the life of the channel. The contributions of other potential factors leading to increased channel bow and channel-control blade interference are also discussed in this paper. (authors)

  14. Dielectric bow-tie nanocavity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qijing; Shu, Fang-Jie; Zou, Chang-Ling

    2013-12-15

    We propose a novel dielectric bow-tie (DBT) nanocavity consisting of two opposing tip-to-tip triangle semiconductor nanowires, whose end faces are coated by silver nanofilms. Based on the advantages of the dielectric slot and tip structures, and the high reflectivity of the silver mirror, light can be confined in this nanocavity with low loss. We demonstrate that at 4.5 K (300 K) around the resonance wavelength of 1550 nm, the mode excited in this nanocavity has a deep subwavelength mode volume of 2.8×10(-4) μm³ and a high quality factor of 4.9×10(4) (401.3), corresponding to an ultrahigh Purcell factor of 1.6×10(7) (1.36×10(5)). This DBT nanocavity may find applications for integrated nanophotonic circuits, such as high-efficiency single photon sources, thresholdless nanolasers, and strong coupling in cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. PMID:24322245

  15. Direct measurement of depletion and hydrodynamic forces in solutions of a reversible supramolecular polymer.

    PubMed

    Knoben, W; Besseling, N A M; Stuart, M A Cohen

    2007-05-22

    In this paper, the investigation of surface forces in semidilute solutions of a nonadsorbing hydrogen-bonded reversible supramolecular polymer is described. Colloidal probe atomic force microscopy was used for direct measurement of depletion forces. Hydrodynamic drag on the AFM cantilever with the colloidal probe was measured both far away from and close to the planar substrate surface. The results indicate that the presence of the depletion layer causes slip at the surfaces with a large apparent slip length. Our analysis explains how the presence of slip enables the measurement of (relatively weak) depletion forces in solutions with a high viscosity by significantly reducing the hydrodynamic forces. The range and magnitude of the measured depletion forces are qualitatively in agreement with previous experiments and theoretical predictions. Due to the relatively large experimental error, no quantitative conclusions can be drawn. Depletion-induced phase separation of suspensions of stearylated silica particles was also observed. Phase separation becomes more pronounced with increasing polymer concentration. PMID:17439251

  16. Direct Observation of Reversible Electronic Energy Transfer Involving an Iridium Center

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A cyclometalated iridium complex is reported where the core complex comprises naphthylpyridine as the main ligand and the ancillary 2,2′-bipyridine ligand is attached to a pyrene unit by a short alkyl bridge. To obtain the complex with satisfactory purity, it was necessary to modify the standard synthesis (direct reaction of the ancillary ligand with the chloro-bridged iridium dimer) to a method harnessing an intermediate tetramethylheptanolate-based complex, which was subjected to acid-promoted removal of the ancillary ligand and subsequent complexation. The photophysical behavior of the bichromophoric complex and a model complex without the pendant pyrene were studied using steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopies. Reversible electronic energy transfer (REET) is demonstrated, uniquely with an emissive cyclometalated iridium center and an adjacent organic chromophore. After excited-state equilibration is established (5 ns) as a result of REET, extremely long luminescence lifetimes of up to 225 μs result, compared to 8.3 μs for the model complex, without diminishing the emission quantum yield. As a result, remarkably high oxygen sensitivity is observed in both solution and polymeric matrices. PMID:24555716

  17. Predators reverse the direction of density dependence for juvenile salmon mortality.

    PubMed

    Ward, Darren M; Nislow, Keith H; Folt, Carol L

    2008-06-01

    The effect of predators on prey populations depends on how predator-caused mortality changes with prey population density. Predators can enforce density-dependent prey mortality and contribute to population stability, but only if they have a positive numerical or behavioral response to increased prey density. Otherwise, predator saturation can result in inversely density-dependent mortality, destabilizing prey populations and increasing extinction risk. Juvenile salmon and trout provide some of the clearest empirical examples of density-dependent mortality in animal populations. However, although juvenile salmon are very vulnerable to predators, the demographic effects of predators on juvenile salmon are unknown. We tested the interactive effects of predators and population density on the mortality of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) using controlled releases of salmon in natural streams. We introduced newly hatched juvenile salmon at three population density treatments in six study streams, half of which contained slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus), a common generalist predator (18 release sites in total, repeated over two summers). Sculpin reversed the direction of density dependence for juvenile salmon mortality. Salmon mortality was density dependent in streams with no sculpin, but inversely density dependent in streams where sculpin were abundant. Such predator-mediated inverse density dependence is especially problematic for prey populations suppressed by other factors, thereby presenting a fundamental challenge to persistence of rare populations and restoration of extirpated populations. PMID:18317816

  18. The Enzyme-Mediated Direct Reversal of a Dithymine Photoproduct in Germinating Endospores

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) repairs a special thymine dimer, 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, which is commonly called spore photoproduct, or SP, in germinating endospores. SP is the exclusive DNA photo-damaging product found in endospores; its generation and swift repair by SPL are responsible for the spores’ extremely high UV resistance. Early in vivo studies suggested that SPL utilizes a direct reversal strategy to repair SP in the absence of light. Recently, it has been established that SPL belongs to the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) superfamily. The enzymes in this superfamily utilize a tri-cysteine CXXXCXXC motif to bind a [4Fe-4S] cluster. The cluster provides an electron to the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to reductively cleave its C5′-S bond, generating a reactive 5′-deoxyadenosyl (5′-dA) radical. This 5′-dA radical abstracts the proR hydrogen atom from the C6 carbon of SP to initiate the repair process; the resulting SP radical subsequently fragments to generate a putative thymine methyl radical, which accepts a back-donated H atom to yield the repaired TpT. The H atom donor is suggested to be a conserved cysteine141 in B. subtilis SPL; the resulting thiyl radical likely interacts with a neighboring tyrosine99 before oxidizing the 5′-dA to 5′-dA radical and, subsequently, regenerating SAM. These findings suggest SPL to be the first enzyme in the large radical SAM superfamily (>44,000 members) to utilize a radical transfer pathway for catalysis; its study should shed light on the mechanistic understanding of the SAM regeneration process in other members of the superfamily. PMID:23799365

  19. Upstream particle events close to the bow shock and 200 earth radii upstream - ISEE-1 and ISEE-3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1980-01-01

    Two energetic particle events (28 keV - 145 keV) upstream of the earth's bow shock have been investigated with two identical experiments of the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland on ISEE-1 and ISEE-3. Close to the bow shock the particle distribution is more or less isotropic and indicates strong scattering of these particles in the upstream wave field. At ISEE-3 the particles move essentially scatter-free from the general bow shock direction. The temporal evolution of the particle bursts is discussed in terms of the interplanetary magnetic field topology and the scattering conditions.

  20. Sinogram bow-tie filtering in FBP PET reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Abella, M; Vaquero, J J; Soto-Montenegro, M L; Lage, E; Desco, M

    2009-05-01

    Low-pass filtering of sinograms in the radial direction is the most common practice to limit noise amplification in filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction of positron emission tomography studies. Other filtering strategies have been proposed to prevent the loss in resolution due to low-pass radial filters, although results have been diverse. Using the well-known properties of the Fourier transform of a sinogram, the authors defined a binary mask that matches the expected shape of the support region in the Fourier domain of the sinogram ("bow tie"). This mask was smoothed by a convolution with a ten-point Gaussian kernel which not only avoids ringing but also introduces a pre-emphasis at low frequencies. A new filtering scheme for FBP is proposed, comprising this smoothed bow-tie filter combined with a standard radial filter and an axial filter. The authors compared the performance of the bow-tie filtering scheme with that of other previously reported methods: Standard radial filtering, angular filtering, and stackgram-domain filtering. All the quantitative data in the comparisons refer to a baseline reconstruction using a ramp filter only. When using the smallest size of the Gaussian kernel in the stackgram domain, the authors achieved a noise reduction of 33% at the cost of degrading radial and tangential resolutions (14.5% and 16%, respectively, for cubic interpolation). To reduce the noise by 30%, the angular filter produced a larger degradation of contrast (3%) and tangential resolution (46% at 10 mm from the center of the field of view) and showed noticeable artifacts in the form of circular blurring dependent on the distance to the center of the field of view. For a similar noise reduction (33%), the proposed bow-tie filtering scheme yielded optimum results in resolution (gain in radial resolution of 10%) and contrast (1% increase) when compared with any of the other filters alone. Experiments with rodent images showed noticeable image quality

  1. Solar cycle variations in the neutral exosphere inferred from the location of the Venus bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Chou, E.; Luhmann, J. G.; Brace, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    Solar UV and EUV varies significantly during the solar cycle. Pioneer Venus can measure this variation both directly and indirectly. A direct measure of the EUV is obtained from the photoelectron current of the Langmuir probe when the spacecraft is in the solar wind. The indirect measure is by monitoring the location of the Venus bow shock. The UV and EUV both heat the upper atmosphere and ionize it. When solar activity is high, the upper atmosphere should be ionized more rapidly. This effect adds a greater number of planetary ions to the magnetosheath plasma as it flows by Venus. It is this increase in mass flow that causes the Venus bow shock to move away from its solar minimum location. Pioneer Venus has now monitored the location of the bow shock for an entire solar cycle. The bow shock location is well correlated with the variation in EUV flux as measured by the Langmuir probe. The bow shock is farther from Venus than expected from the sunspot number or 10.7 cm solar radio flux, indicating that solar UV radiation may be even stronger at the present time than would be predicted from the relationships determined during the previous solar cycle.

  2. An analytic treatment of the structure of the bow shock and magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhuang, H. C.; Russell, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical examination of the jump conditions of the bow shock is used to investigate the influence of the solar wind magnetic fields on the structure of the parameters behind the bow shock. Through the assumption that the average values of the parameters along the radial direction in the magnetosheath are equal to their values just behind the bow shock, the influence of the direction of the solar wind magnetic fields on the average structure of the magnetosheath is determined. From this assumption, a zero-order formula for the thickness of the magnetosheath is deduced which satisfies the boundary conditions and conservation laws of mass and momentum flux. The theoretical estimate of the thickness is compared with satellite observations to check the assumption and select the optimum value of the polytropic exponent of the plasma gas.

  3. Energetic interplanetary nucleon flux anisotropies - The effect of earth's bow shock and magnetosheath on sunward flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    Attention is given to the combined, average effects of the bow shock and magnetosheath on the diffusive flow of interplanetary nuclei. The observations presented show that differences between 'connected' and 'unconnected' data subsets are apparent from the beginning of the analysis. Through an investigation of the mean unconnected diffusive anisotropy (those fluxes least affected by the earth's bow shock and magnetosheath) it is confirmed that the cross-field transport of MeV energy nuclei in interplanetary space is statistically significant and in the direction expected from the large-scale particle flux gradients. The direction of particle flow relative to the IMF is then used to show that nucleon flow characteristics on connected IMF differ from those on unconnected IMF. A scenario for producing this difference is then presented. It is concluded that the inclusion of the bow shock connected information biases measurements of the flux anisotropies of MeV energy H.

  4. The return of the bow shock

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, K.; Fichtner, H. E-mail: hf@tp4.rub.de

    2014-02-10

    Recently, whether a bow shock ahead of the heliospheric stagnation region exists or not has been a topic of discussion. This was triggered by measurements indicating that the Alfvén speed and the speed of fast magnetosonic waves are higher than the flow speed of the local interstellar medium (LISM) relative to the heliosphere and resulted in the conclusion that either a bow wave or a slow magnetosonic shock might exist. We demonstrate here that including the He{sup +} component of the LISM yields both an Alfvén and fast magnetosonic wave speed lower than the LISM flow speed. Consequently, the scenario of a bow shock in front of the heliosphere, as modeled in numerous simulations of the interaction of the solar wind with the LISM, remains valid.

  5. Large amplitude MHD waves upstream of the Jovian bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Smith, C. W.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of large amplitude magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) waves upstream of Jupiter's bow shock are analyzed. The waves are found to be right circularly polarized in the solar wind frame which suggests that they are propagating in the fast magnetosonic mode. A complete spectral and minimum variance eigenvalue analysis of the data was performed. The power spectrum of the magnetic fluctuations contains several peaks. The fluctuations at 2.3 mHz have a direction of minimum variance along the direction of the average magnetic field. The direction of minimum variance of these fluctuations lies at approximately 40 deg. to the magnetic field and is parallel to the radial direction. We argue that these fluctuations are waves excited by protons reflected off the Jovian bow shock. The inferred speed of the reflected protons is about two times the solar wind speed in the plasma rest frame. A linear instability analysis is presented which suggests an explanation for many of the observed features of the observations.

  6. 1. View looking south on Montana Street. The Silver Bow ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View looking south on Montana Street. The Silver Bow County Courthouse (1910-1912) is on the left. - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  7. Direct CRISPR spacer acquisition from RNA by a natural reverse transcriptase-Cas1 fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Silas, Sukrit; Mohr, Georg; Sidote, David J; Markham, Laura M; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio; Bhaya, Devaki; Lambowitz, Alan M; Fire, Andrew Z

    2016-02-26

    CRISPR systems mediate adaptive immunity in diverse prokaryotes. CRISPR-associated Cas1 and Cas2 proteins have been shown to enable adaptation to new threats in type I and II CRISPR systems by the acquisition of short segments of DNA (spacers) from invasive elements. In several type III CRISPR systems, Cas1 is naturally fused to a reverse transcriptase (RT). In the marine bacterium Marinomonas mediterranea (MMB-1), we showed that a RT-Cas1 fusion protein enables the acquisition of RNA spacers in vivo in a RT-dependent manner. In vitro, the MMB-1 RT-Cas1 and Cas2 proteins catalyze the ligation of RNA segments into the CRISPR array, which is followed by reverse transcription. These observations outline a host-mediated mechanism for reverse information flow from RNA to DNA. PMID:26917774

  8. Direct integration of MEMS, dielectric pumping and cell manipulation with reversibly bonded gecko adhesive microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnat, S.; King, H.; Wasay, A.; Sameoto, D.; Hubbard, T.

    2016-09-01

    We present an approach to form a microfluidic environment on top of MEMS dies using reversibly bonded microfluidics. The reversible polymeric microfluidics moulds bond to the MEMS die using a gecko-inspired gasket architecture. In this study the formed microchannels are demonstrated in conjunction with a MEMS mechanical single cell testing environment for BioMEMS applications. A reversible microfluidics placement technique with an x-y and rotational accuracy of  ±2 µm and 1° respectively on a MEMS die was developed. No leaks were observed during pneumatic pumping of common cell media (PBS, sorbitol, water, seawater) through the fluidic channels. Thermal chevron actuators were successful operated inside this fluidic environment and a performance deviation of ~15% was measured compared to an open MEMS configuration. Latex micro-spheres were pumped using traveling wave di-electrophoresis and compared to an open (no-microfluidics) configuration with velocities of 24 µm s‑1 and 20 µm s‑1.

  9. 46 CFR 154.1870 - Bow and stern loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bow and stern loading. 154.1870 Section 154.1870 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1870 Bow and stern loading. (a) When the bow or stern loading...

  10. Influence of Additive and Multiplicative Structure and Direction of Comparison on the Reversal Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González-Calero, José Antonio; Arnau, David; Laserna-Belenguer, Belén

    2015-01-01

    An empirical study has been carried out to evaluate the potential of word order matching and static comparison as explanatory models of reversal error. Data was collected from 214 undergraduate students who translated a set of additive and multiplicative comparisons expressed in Spanish into algebraic language. In these multiplicative comparisons…

  11. Directional climate change and potential reversal of desertification in arid and semiarid ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to determine if long-term increases in precipitation can maintain grasslands susceptible to desertification, and initiate a reversal of historic regime shifts on desertified shrublands. Long-term trends in desertification were documented using vegetation maps beginning in 1858. The...

  12. The distant bow shock and magnetotail of Venus - Magnetic field and plasma wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Elphic, R. C.; Scarf, F. L.

    1981-01-01

    An examination of the magnetic field and plasma wave data obtained by the Pioneer Venus orbiter in the wake region behind Venus discloses a well developed bow shock whose location is similar to that observed on previous missions in contrast to the dayside bow shock. Venus also has a well developed magnetotail in which the field strenght is enhanced over magnetosheath values and in which the magnetic field is aligned approximately with the solar wind direction. The boundary between magnetosheath and magnetotail is also marked by a change in the plasma wave spectrum.

  13. Observations of low-energy electrons upstream of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasoner, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of electron fluxes with a lunar-based electron spectrometer when the moon was upstream of the earth have shown that a subset of observed fluxes are strongly controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field direction. The fluxes occur only when the IMF lines connect back to the earth's bow shock. Observed densities and temperatures were in the ranges 2-4 x 0,001/cu cm and 1.7-2.8 x 1,000,000 K. It is shown that these electrons can account for increases in effective solar wind electron temperatures on bow-shock connected field lines which have been observed previously by other investigators. It is further shown that if a model of the bow shock with an electrostatic potential barrier is assumed, the potential can be estimated to be 500 volts.

  14. Effects of the bow on social organization in Western North America.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    The bow more than doubled, likely tripled, the success of individuals bent on killing animal or human targets (Box ). The advent of this revolutionary technology generated different responses in western North America depending on subsistence and sociopolitical organization at the time of its arrival, roughly 2300 - 1300 B.P. Its effect was substantial in California and the Great Basin, particularly on group size, which in many places diminished as a consequence of the bow's reliability. The counter-intuitive result was to increase within group-relatedness enough to encourage intensification of plant resources, previously considered too costly. The bow rose to greatest direct economic importance with the arrival of the horse, and was put to most effective use by former Great Basin groups who maintained the family band system that had developed around intensive Great Basin plant procurement, adapting the same organization to a lifestyle centered on the equestrian pursuit of buffalo and warfare. PMID:23776048

  15. From the bow shock to the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, E. A.; Sedykh, P. A.

    We suggest a description of magnetospheric processes in the form of a model consisting of three blocks 1 Block of electric current generation in the bow shock where the solar wind energy converts to electric energy This current closes through the magnetosphere in the form of the dawn-dusk current The bow shock can be a sufficient source of power for supplying energy to substorm processes The direction of current behind the bow shock front depends on the sign of the IMF Bz-component Ponomarev et al 2000 2003 It is this current which sets convection in motion by an Ampere force Any change in external current through the magnetosphere causes a convection restructuring within a time on the order of the travel time of the magnetosonic wave from the magnetopause to the center of the system because the restructuring wave comes from both flanks 2 Block of gas pressure relief formation The combined action of convection and strong pitch-angle diffusion of electrons and protons is responsible for the formation of gas pressure distribution in the magnetosphere Kennel C F 1969 Ponomarev E A 1985 that is steady bulk currents The divergence of these bulk currents brings about a spatial distribution of field-aligned currents i e magnetospheric sources of ionospheric current systems The combined action leads also to the formation of particle precipitation regions in the form of an oval corresponding to the location of the auroral zone The nonstationary solution of this problem with time-dependent boundary conditions reproduces the

  16. The difference between the ion ramp structure of interplanetary and bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Oleksandr; Zastenker, Georgy; Nemecek, Zdenek; Safrankova, Jana; Prech, Lubomir; Pitna, Alexander

    Collisionless shocks play a significant role in the solar wind interaction with the planets, and their studies are important for understanding of physical processes in the vicinity of astrophysical objects. The main process that takes place at the collisionless shock is the redistribution of the energy of the directed plasma motion to the plasma thermalization and acceleration of a part of particles to high energies. The energy redistribution at the shock front is related to its structure because interactions with electromagnetic fields and waves act as particle collisions and form a magnetic field shock profile. It has been shown that the principal changes of magnetic and electric fields and electron moments take place on a scale comparable with the ion gyroradius. On the other hand, the time resolution of ion spectrometers prevents similar studies of the ion component. In the paper, we are analyzing differences in the ion structure of low-Mach number fast forward interplanetary shocks and bow shocks (as representatives of fast reverse shocks). The comparison is focused on the formation mechanism of both types of shocks and on a role that the ion gyromotion plays. The analysis is based on measurements of the BMSW solar wind monitor that provides the basic ion parameters with the 32 ms time resolution.

  17. Power aspects of processes in the bow shock region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedykh, Pavel

    Bow shock is a powerful transformer of the solar wind kinetic energy into the gas dynamic and electromagnetic energy. The solar wind energy also feeds the ion acceleration process, the generation of waves in the region of bow shock, and the energy necessary to build up the foreshock. A jump of the magnetic field tangential component at front crossing means that the front carries an electric current. The solar wind kinetic energy partly transforms to gas kinetic and electromagnetic energy during its passage through the bow shock front. The transition layer (magnetosheath) can use part of this energy for accelerating of plasma, but can conversely spend part its kinetic energy on the electric power generation, which afterwards may be used by the magnetosphere. Thereby, transition layer can be both consumer (sink) and generator (source) of electric power depending upon special conditions. The direction of the current behind the bow shock front depends on the sign of the IMF B _{z}-component. It is this electric current which sets convection of plasma in motion. The process of current penetration into the magnetosphere is two-step. First, a polarization field is formed that penetrates layer-by-layer into the magnetosphere. More exactly, a pulse corresponding to this field penetrates into the plasma. Then, if the system is inhomogeneous, the flow may redistribute the pressure so that gradients appearing in the plasma induce an electric current. In power terms, this electric current is required to maintain convection in the inhomogeneous system. Any change in the external current through the magnetosphere causes a convection restructuring within a time on the order of travel time of the magnetosonic wave from the magnetopause to the center of the system, because the restructuring wave comes from both flanks. Using the expressions obtained in this paper for normal components of the electric current, the flow of matter brought into the magnetosphere can be estimated. A

  18. Direct observation of the recovery of an antiferroelectric phase during polarization reversal of an induced ferroelectric phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hanzheng; Tan, Xiaoli

    2015-04-01

    Electric fields are generally known to favor the ferroelectric polar state over the antiferroelectric nonpolar state for their Coulomb interactions with dipoles in the crystal. In this paper, we directly image an electric-field-assisted ferroelectric-to-antiferroelectric phase transition during polarization reversal of the ferroelectric phase in polycrystalline P b0.99{N b0.02[(Zr0.57Sn0.43) 0.92T i0.08] 0.98}O3 . With the electric-field in situ transmission electron microscopy technique, such an unlikely phenomenon is verified to occur by both domain morphology change and electron-diffraction analysis. The slower kinetics of the phase transition, compared with ferroelectric polarization reversal, is suggested to contribute to this unusual behavior.

  19. A BOW SHOCK NEAR A YOUNG STAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope continues to reveal various stunning and intricate treasures that reside within the nearby, intense star-forming region known as the Great Nebula in Orion. One such jewel is the bow shock around the very young star, LL Ori, featured in this Hubble Heritage image. Named for the crescent-shaped wave made by a ship as it moves through water, a bow shock can be created in space when two streams of gas collide. LL Ori emits a vigorous solar wind, a stream of charged particles moving rapidly outward from the star. Our own Sun has a less energetic version of this wind that is responsible for auroral displays on the Earth. The material in the fast wind from LL Ori collides with slow-moving gas evaporating away from the center of the Orion Nebula, which is located to the lower right in this Heritage image. The surface where the two winds collide is the crescent-shaped bow shock seen in the image. Unlike a water wave made by a ship, this interstellar bow shock is a three-dimensional structure. The filamentary emission has a very distinct boundary on the side facing away from LL Ori, but is diffuse on the side closest to the star, a characteristic common to many bow shocks. A second, fainter bow shock can be seen around a star near the upper right-hand corner of the Heritage image. Astronomers have identified numerous shock fronts in this complex star-forming region and are using this data to understand the many complex phenomena associated with the birth of stars. This image was taken in February 1995 as part of the Hubble Orion Nebula mosaic. A close visitor in our Milky Way galaxy, the nebula is only 1,500 light-years from Earth. The filters used in this color composite represent oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen emissions. Image Credit: NASA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Acknowledgment: C. R. O'Dell (Vanderbilt University)

  20. Rapid and reversible knockdown of endogenous proteins by peptide-directed lysosomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xuelai; Jin, Wu Yang; Lu, Jie; Wang, Jin; Wang, Yu Tian

    2014-01-01

    Rapid and reversible methods for altering the level of endogenous proteins are critically important for studying biological systems and developing therapeutics. Here, we describe a membrane permeable targeting peptide-based method that rapidly and reversibly knocks down endogenous proteins through chaperone-mediated autophagy in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated the specificity, efficacy and generalizability of the method by showing efficient knockdown of various proteins including death associated protein kinase 1 (160kDa), scaffolding protein PSD-95 (95kDa) and α-synuclein (18kDa) with their respective targeting peptides in a dose-, time- and lysosomal activity-dependent manner in neuronal cultures. More significantly, we showed that when given systemically, the peptide system efficiently knocked down the targeted protein in the brain of intact rats. Our study provides a robust and convenient research tool to manipulate endogenous protein levels, and may also lead to the development of protein knockdown-based novel therapeutics for treating various human diseases. PMID:24464042

  1. Ultra low frequency waves at the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Farris, M. H.

    1995-01-01

    The Earth's bow shock is a bountiful generator of waves. Some of these waves have group velocities that exceed the solar wind velocity directed into the shock and can propagate upstream against the flow. Upstream whistlers observed close to one Hertz in the spacecraft frame have been seen many Earth radii upstream. A second whistler mode wave, called the precursor, propagates upstream along the shock normal but is phase standing in the solar wind flow. The damping of both whistler mode waves is consistent with Landau damping. At low Mach numbers the precursor is connected to the non-coplanarity component in the shock ramp. At higher Mach numbers the upstream waves cannot propagate upstream and ion reflection becomes more important in providing free energy for wave particle interactions. The non-coplanarity component is still present but it now initiates a downstream wave train. Generally the waves just downstream from the bow shock are left hand circularly polarized ion cyclotron waves propagating along the magnetic field at the Alfven velocity. When the upstream Mach number is high and the helium content of the plasma is high, mirror mode waves are observed.

  2. Energetic Electrons as Evidence for a Bow Shock at Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, Michaela; Russell, Christopher; Prettyman, Thomas; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Jia, Ying Dong; Chi, Peter; Joy, Steven

    2016-04-01

    In late June 2016 when Dawn was in its Survey orbit around Ceres, the +Z Phoswich scintillator aboard GRaND (Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector) recorded a solar energetic particle event superimposed with distinctive spikes in its counts. The spikes appeared as Dawn crossed into the southern hemisphere on the dayside of the planet and reappeared twice at the same location on consecutive orbits after the solar event had ceased. The spike pattern was absent from the measurements of the Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintillator. This suggests the radiation responsible for the bursts in the exterior phoswich scintillator and any of their by-products were fully absorbed by materials surrounding the BGO. The source particles causing the enhancements were likely swift electrons that penetrated directly into the phoswich or associated bremsstrahlung produced in surrounding materials. The phoswich detection threshold for electrons is 20 keV and energy deposition during spike events cut off at about 100 keV, providing an energy range for the electrons if the spikes are produced by bremsstrahlung. Electrons in planetary environments are known to reach such high energies via fast-Fermi acceleration at a bow shock. We investigate if the fast-Fermi acceleration process, which would imply a temporary bow shock at Ceres, can explain the energies and fluxes of the spikes detected by GRaND's +Z Phoswich scintillator.

  3. Bow shock formation in a complex plasma.

    PubMed

    Saitou, Y; Nakamura, Y; Kamimura, T; Ishihara, O

    2012-02-10

    A bow shock is observed in a two-dimensional supersonic flow of charged microparticles in a complex plasma. A thin conducting needle is used to make a potential barrier as an obstacle for the particle flow in the complex plasma. The flow is generated and the flow velocity is controlled by changing a tilt angle of the device under the gravitational force. A void, microparticle-free region, is formed around the potential barrier surrounding the obstacle. The flow is bent around the leading edge of the void and forms an arcuate structure when the flow is supersonic. The structure is characterized by the bow shock as confirmed by a polytropic hydrodynamic theory as well as numerical simulation. PMID:22401079

  4. Bow shock and magnetosheath waves at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Behannon, K. W.

    1975-01-01

    Mariner 10 measurements at the Mercury bow shock provide examples where the magnetic field is approximately parallel or perpendicular to the bow shock normal. Upstream of a broad irregular parallel shock, left hand circularly polarized waves are observed which cut off very sharply at approximately 4 Hz. Upstream of a perpendicular shock, right hand circularly polarized waves are observed which persist up to the Nyquist frequency of 12 Ha. Determination of the wave propagation vector as a function of frequency helps conclusively identify the waves as whistler mode waves propagating from the shock. The magnetosheath downstream of the parallel shock is disturbed more than that downstream of the perpendicular shock particularly below 1 Hz. In the latter case regular left hand polarized waves observed slightly above the proton gyrofrequency are identified as ion cyclotron waves with wavelength approximately 300 km which are Doppler shifted up to their observed frequency.

  5. An Investigation of the Flow Structure Upstream of Slowly Moving Blunt Bows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, T. Darton

    . Analysis of the shear layer structure suggests that the free surface separation mechanism is not analogous to boundary layer separation on a no-slip surface, but rather initiated by an accumulation of vorticity at the free surface. Experimental results support this conjecture. Solutions based on regular perturbation for small Froude numbers theory fail to predict far field wave behavior and this wave motion is determined from a singular perturbation of the regular asymptotic expansions above. Using ray theory, leading order wave phase and amplitude functions are derived and it is found that these functions predict experimentally observed trends near the bow only when the bow geometry is assumed to include the separation region. Finally, the flow inside the separation region is calculated numerically using finite difference methods. The separation region is approximated as a triangular cavity and in these calculations the vorticity stream function equations are solved using an algorithm based on the Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) and the Local Relaxation (LR) iteration schemes. Results from this model show that the vortical flow inside this region is caused by flow separation and not wave breaking.

  6. Radiological assessment of the femoral bowing in Japanese population

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaal, Ahmed Hamed Kassem; Yamamoto, Norio; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Takeuchi, Akihiko; Morsy, Ahmad Fawaz; Miwa, Shinji; Kajino, Yoshitomo; Rubio, Donnel A.; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Differences in the magnitude of bowing between races are well-known characteristics of the femur. Asian races have an increased magnitude of femoral bowing but most of the orthopedic implants designed for the femur do not match this exaggerated bowing. We calculated the sagittal and coronal femoral bowing in the Japanese population at different levels of the femur and addressed its surgical significance. Material and methods: We calculated the sagittal and coronal bowing of 132 Japanese femora using CT scan of the femur. A mathematical calculation of the radius of curvature at proximal, middle, and distal regions of the femur was used to determine the degree of femoral bowing. Results: Mean sagittal bowing of the femur was 581, 188, and 161 mm for the proximal, middle, and distal thirds of the femur and mean lateral bowing was 528, 5092, and 876 mm, respectively. Mean sagittal and coronal bowing for the whole femur was 175 and 2640 mm, respectively. No correlation was found between age, gender, length of femur, and the degree of bowing. Conclusion: Our study reveals that femoral bowing in the Japanese population is 175 mm in the sagittal plane and 2640 mm in the coronal plane; these values are greater than the femoral bowing in other ethnic groups studied in the literature. This may result in varying degrees of mismatch between the western-manufactured femoral intramedullary implants and the Japanese femur. We recommend that orthopedic surgeons to accurately perform preoperative evaluation of the femoral bowing to avoid potential malalignment, rotation, and abnormal stresses between the femur and implant. PMID:27163091

  7. A survey for Hα pulsar bow shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Brownsberger, Sasha; Romani, Roger W. E-mail: sashab@stanford.edu

    2014-04-01

    We report on a survey for Hα bow shock emission around nearby γ-detected energetic pulsars. This survey adds three Balmer-dominated neutron star bow shocks to the six previously confirmed examples. In addition to the shock around Fermi pulsar PSR J1741–2054, we now report Hα structures around two additional γ-ray pulsars, PSR J2030+4415 and PSR J1509–5850. These are the first known examples of Hα nebulae with pre-ionization halos. With new measurements, we show that a simple analytic model can account for the angular size and flux of the bow shocks' apices. The latter, in particular, provides a new pulsar probe and indicates large moments of inertia and smaller distances than previously assumed in several cases. In particular, we show that the re-measured PSR J0437–4715 shock flux implies I = (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10{sup 45}/(f {sub HI}sin i) g cm{sup 2}. We also derive a distance d ≈ 0.72 kpc for the γ-ray only pulsar PSR J2030+4415 and revised distances for PSRs J1959+2048 (1.4 kpc) and J2555+6535 (∼1 kpc), smaller than the conventional DM-estimated values. Finally, we report upper limits for 94 additional LAT pulsars. An estimate of the survey sensitivity indicates that for a warm neutral medium filling factor φ{sub WNM} ∼ 0.3 there should be a total of approximately nine Hα bow shocks in our LAT-targeted survey; given that seven such objects are now known, a much larger φ{sub WNM} seems problematic.

  8. Sulfur-tolerant redox-reversible anode material for direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenghao; Yang, Zhibin; Jin, Chao; Xiao, Guoliang; Chen, Fanglin; Han, Minfang

    2012-03-15

    A novel composite anode material consisting of K(2) NiF(4) -type structured Pr(0.8) Sr(1.2) (Co,Fe)(0.8) Nb(0.2) O(4+δ) (K-PSCFN) matrix with homogenously dispersed nano-sized Co-Fe alloy (CFA) has been obtained by annealing perovskite Pr(0.4) Sr(0.6) Co(0.2) Fe(0.7) Nb(0.1) O(3-δ) (P-PSCFN) in H(2) at 900 °C. The K-PSCFN-CFA composite anode is redox-reversible and has demonstrated similar catalytic activity to Ni-based cermet anode, excellent sulfur tolerance, remarkable coking resistance and robust redox cyclability. PMID:22318883

  9. Generation of Tandem Direct Duplications by Reversed-Ends Transposition of Maize Ac Elements

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Tandem direct duplications are a common feature of the genomes of eukaryotes ranging from yeast to human, where they comprise a significant fraction of copy number variations. The prevailing model for the formation of tandem direct duplications is non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR). Here we report the isolation of a series of duplications and reciprocal deletions isolated de novo from a maize allele containing two Class II Ac/Ds transposons. The duplication/deletion structures suggest that they were generated by alternative transposition reactions involving the termini of two nearby transposable elements. The deletion/duplication breakpoint junctions contain 8 bp target site duplications characteristic of Ac/Ds transposition events, confirming their formation directly by an alternative transposition mechanism. Tandem direct duplications and reciprocal deletions were generated at a relatively high frequency (∼0.5 to 1%) in the materials examined here in which transposons are positioned nearby each other in appropriate orientation; frequencies would likely be much lower in other genotypes. To test whether this mechanism may have contributed to maize genome evolution, we analyzed sequences flanking Ac/Ds and other hAT family transposons and identified three small tandem direct duplications with the structural features predicted by the alternative transposition mechanism. Together these results show that some class II transposons are capable of directly inducing tandem sequence duplications, and that this activity has contributed to the evolution of the maize genome. PMID:23966872

  10. Highly modular bow-tie gene circuits with programmable dynamic behaviour.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Laura; Angelici, Bartolomeo; Haefliger, Benjamin; Benenson, Yaakov

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic gene circuits often require extensive mutual optimization of their components for successful operation, while modular and programmable design platforms are rare. A possible solution lies in the 'bow-tie' architecture, which stipulates a focal component-a 'knot'-uncoupling circuits' inputs and outputs, simplifying component swapping, and introducing additional layer of control. Here we construct, in cultured human cells, synthetic bow-tie circuits that transduce microRNA inputs into protein outputs with independently programmable logical and dynamic behaviour. The latter is adjusted via two different knot configurations: a transcriptional activator causing the outputs to track input changes reversibly, and a recombinase-based cascade, converting transient inputs into permanent actuation. We characterize the circuits in HEK293 cells, confirming their modularity and scalability, and validate them using endogenous microRNA inputs in additional cell lines. This platform can be used for biotechnological and biomedical applications in vitro, in vivo and potentially in human therapy. PMID:25311543

  11. Highly modular bow-tie gene circuits with programmable dynamic behavior

    PubMed Central

    Prochazka, Laura; Angelici, Bartolomeo; Häfliger, Benjamin; Benenson, Yaakov

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic gene circuits often require extensive mutual optimization of their components for successful operation, while modular and programmable design platforms are rare. A possible solution lies in the “bow-tie” architecture, which stipulates a focal component - a “knot” - uncoupling circuits’ inputs and outputs, simplifying component swapping, and introducing additional layer of control. Here we construct, in cultured human cells, synthetic bow-tie circuits that transduce microRNA inputs into protein outputs with independently programmable logical and dynamic behavior. The latter is adjusted via two different knot configurations: a transcriptional activator causing the outputs to track input changes reversibly, and a recombinase-based cascade, converting transient inputs into permanent actuation. We characterize the circuits in HEK293 cells, confirming their modularity and scalability, and validate them using endogenous microRNA inputs in additional cell lines. This platform can be used for biotechnological and biomedical applications in vitro, in vivo, and potentially in human therapy. PMID:25311543

  12. Population genetic structure and direct observations reveal sex-reversed patterns of dispersal in a cooperative bird

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Xavier A; York, Jennifer E; Young, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Sex-biased dispersal is pervasive and has diverse evolutionary implications, but the fundamental drivers of dispersal sex biases remain unresolved. This is due in part to limited diversity within taxonomic groups in the direction of dispersal sex biases, which leaves hypothesis testing critically dependent upon identifying rare reversals of taxonomic norms. Here, we use a combination of observational and genetic data to demonstrate a rare reversal of the avian sex bias in dispersal in the cooperatively breeding white-browed sparrow weaver (Plocepasser mahali). Direct observations revealed that (i) natal philopatry was rare, with both sexes typically dispersing locally to breed, and (ii), unusually for birds, males bred at significantly greater distances from their natal group than females. Population genetic analyses confirmed these patterns, as (i) corrected Assignment index (AIc), FST tests and isolation-by-distance metrics were all indicative of longer dispersal distances among males than females, and (ii) spatial autocorrelation analysis indicated stronger within-group genetic structure among females than males. Examining the spatial scale of extra-group mating highlighted that the resulting ‘sperm dispersal’ could have acted in concert with individual dispersal to generate these genetic patterns, but gamete dispersal alone cannot account entirely for the sex differences in genetic structure observed. That leading hypotheses for the evolution of dispersal sex biases cannot readily account for these sex-reversed patterns of dispersal in white-browed sparrow weavers highlights the continued need for attention to alternative explanations for this enigmatic phenomenon. We highlight the potential importance of sex differences in the distances over which dispersal opportunities can be detected. PMID:25346189

  13. Contaminants of emerging concern in reverse osmosis brine concentrate from indirect/direct water reuse applications.

    PubMed

    Romeyn, Travis R; Harijanto, Wesley; Sandoval, Sofia; Delagah, Saied; Sharbatmaleki, Mohamadali

    2016-01-01

    Water shortage is becoming more common due to droughts and global population increases resulting in the increasing popularity of water reuse to create new water sources. Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane systems are popular in these applications since they can produce drinking water quality effluent. Unfortunately, RO systems have the drawback of generating concentrate streams that contain contaminants rejected by the membrane including chemicals of emerging concern (CECs). CECs are chemicals such as hormones, steroids, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products that are used for their intended purpose and then released into wastewater. CECs are believed to be detrimental to aquatic wildlife health and pose an unknown human health risk. This research gathered the existing knowledge on CEC presence in concentrate, available proven concentrate treatment methods, their CEC removal abilities, and current CEC regulations. It was found that 127 CECs have been measured in RO concentrate with 100 being detected at least once. The most potent treatment process available is UV/H2O2 as it offers the highest removal rates for the widest range of chemicals. The less expensive process of ozone/biologically activated carbon offers slightly lower removal abilities. This comprehensive report will provide the groundwork for better understanding, regulating and treating concentrate stream CECs. PMID:26819378

  14. 46 CFR 45.69 - Correction for bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Correction for bow height. 45.69 Section 45.69 Shipping... § 45.69 Correction for bow height. (a) The minimum summer freeboard of all manned vessels must be.../1640) inches—actual bow height (2) For vessels having a length greater than 550 feet, (341.6—0.227...

  15. 46 CFR 45.69 - Correction for bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Correction for bow height. 45.69 Section 45.69 Shipping... § 45.69 Correction for bow height. (a) The minimum summer freeboard of all manned vessels must be.../1640) inches—actual bow height (2) For vessels having a length greater than 550 feet, (341.6—0.227...

  16. 46 CFR 45.69 - Correction for bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Correction for bow height. 45.69 Section 45.69 Shipping... § 45.69 Correction for bow height. (a) The minimum summer freeboard of all manned vessels must be.../1640) inches—actual bow height (2) For vessels having a length greater than 550 feet, (341.6—0.227...

  17. 46 CFR 45.69 - Correction for bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Correction for bow height. 45.69 Section 45.69 Shipping... § 45.69 Correction for bow height. (a) The minimum summer freeboard of all manned vessels must be.../1640) inches—actual bow height (2) For vessels having a length greater than 550 feet, (341.6—0.227...

  18. 46 CFR 45.69 - Correction for bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Correction for bow height. 45.69 Section 45.69 Shipping... § 45.69 Correction for bow height. (a) The minimum summer freeboard of all manned vessels must be.../1640) inches—actual bow height (2) For vessels having a length greater than 550 feet, (341.6—0.227...

  19. Directed evolution of DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase and reverse transcriptase activity in a single polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jennifer L; Loakes, David; Jaroslawski, Szymon; Too, Kathleen; Holliger, Philipp

    2006-08-18

    DNA polymerases enable key technologies in modern biology but for many applications, native polymerases are limited by their stringent substrate recognition. Here we describe short-patch compartmentalized self-replication (spCSR), a novel strategy to expand the substrate spectrum of polymerases in a targeted way. spCSR is based on the previously described CSR, but unlike CSR only a short region (a "patch") of the gene under investigation is diversified and replicated. This allows the selection of polymerases under conditions where catalytic activity and processivity are compromised to the extent that full self-replication is inefficient. We targeted two specific motifs involved in substrate recognition in the active site of DNA polymerase I from Thermus aquaticus (Taq) and selected for incorporation of both ribonucleotide- (NTP) and deoxyribonucleotide-triphosphates (dNTPs) using spCSR. This allowed the isolation of multiple variants of Taq with apparent dual substrate specificity. They were able to synthesize RNA, while still retaining essentially wild-type (wt) DNA polymerase activity as judged by PCR. One such mutant (AA40: E602V, A608V, I614M, E615G) was able to incorporate both NTPs and dNTPs with the same catalytic efficiency as the wt enzyme incorporates dNTPs. AA40 allowed the generation of mixed RNA-DNA amplification products in PCR demonstrating DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase as well as reverse transcriptase activity within the same polypeptide. Furthermore, AA40 displayed an expanded substrate spectrum towards other 2'-substituted nucleotides and was able to synthesize nucleic acid polymers in which each base bore a different 2'-substituent. Our results suggest that spCSR will be a powerful strategy for the generation of polymerases with altered substrate specificity for applications in nano- and biotechnology and in the enzymatic synthesis of antisense and RNAi probes. PMID:16859707

  20. Direct and reversible hydrogenation of CO2 to formate by a bacterial carbon dioxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Schuchmann, K; Müller, V

    2013-12-13

    Storage and transportation of hydrogen is a major obstacle for its use as a fuel. An increasingly considered alternative for the direct handling of hydrogen is to use carbon dioxide (CO2) as an intermediate storage material. However, CO2 is thermodynamically stable, and developed chemical catalysts often require high temperatures, pressures, and/or additives for high catalytic rates. Here, we present the discovery of a bacterial hydrogen-dependent carbon dioxide reductase from Acetobacterium woodii directly catalyzing the hydrogenation of CO2. We also demonstrate a whole-cell system able to produce formate as the sole end product from dihydrogen (H2) and CO2 as well as syngas. This discovery opens biotechnological alternatives for efficient CO2 hydrogenation either by using the isolated enzyme or by employing whole-cell catalysis. PMID:24337298

  1. Active current sheets and hot flow anomalies in Mercury's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Sundberg, T.; Raines, J. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2012-12-01

    Hot flow anomalies (HFAs) represent a subset of heliospheric current sheets interacting with planetary bow shocks. They are typically formed when the normal component of the motional (convective) electric field is directed toward the embedded current sheet on at least one side. The core region of an HFA contains hot and highly deflected ion flows and rather low and turbulent magnetic field. In this talk, we report the first observations of HFA-like events at Mercury. Using the data from the orbital phase of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, we identify a representative ensemble of active current sheets magnetically connected to Mercury's bow shock. We show that some of these events exhibit unambiguous signatures of HFAs similar to those observed at other planets, and present their key physical characteristics. Our analysis suggests that Mercury's bow shock does not only mediate the flow of supersonic solar wind plasma but also provides conditions for local particle acceleration and heating as predicted by previous numerical simulations. Together with earlier studies of HFA activity at Earth, Venus, and Saturn, our results confirm that hot flow anomalies could be a common property of planetary bow shocks.

  2. CPR methodology with new steady-state criterion and more accurate statistical treatment of channel bow

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, S.; Bieli, R.; Bergmann, U. C.

    2012-07-01

    An overview is given of existing CPR design criteria and the methods used in BWR reload analysis to evaluate the impact of channel bow on CPR margins. Potential weaknesses in today's methodologies are discussed. Westinghouse in collaboration with KKL and Axpo - operator and owner of the Leibstadt NPP - has developed an optimized CPR methodology based on a new criterion to protect against dryout during normal operation and with a more rigorous treatment of channel bow. The new steady-state criterion is expressed in terms of an upper limit of 0.01 for the dryout failure probability per year. This is considered a meaningful and appropriate criterion that can be directly related to the probabilistic criteria set-up for the analyses of Anticipated Operation Occurrences (AOOs) and accidents. In the Monte Carlo approach a statistical modeling of channel bow and an accurate evaluation of CPR response functions allow the associated CPR penalties to be included directly in the plant SLMCPR and OLMCPR in a best-estimate manner. In this way, the treatment of channel bow is equivalent to all other uncertainties affecting CPR. Emphasis is put on quantifying the statistical distribution of channel bow throughout the core using measurement data. The optimized CPR methodology has been implemented in the Westinghouse Monte Carlo code, McSLAP. The methodology improves the quality of dryout safety assessments by supplying more valuable information and better control of conservatisms in establishing operational limits for CPR. The methodology is demonstrated with application examples from the introduction at KKL. (authors)

  3. Curvature and bow of bulk GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foronda, Humberto M.; Romanov, Alexey E.; Young, Erin C.; Roberston, Christian A.; Beltz, Glenn E.; Speck, James S.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the bow of free standing (0001) oriented hydride vapor phase epitaxy grown GaN substrates and demonstrate that their curvature is consistent with a compressive to tensile stress gradient (bottom to top) present in the substrates. The origin of the stress gradient and the curvature is attributed to the correlated inclination of edge threading dislocation (TD) lines away from the [0001] direction. A model is proposed and a relation is derived for bulk GaN substrate curvature dependence on the inclination angle and the density of TDs. The model is used to analyze the curvature for commercially available GaN substrates as determined by high resolution x-ray diffraction. The results show a close correlation between the experimentally determined parameters and those predicted from theoretical model.

  4. On the shape and motion of the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziane, K.; Alrefay, T. Y.; Hamza, A. M.

    2014-04-01

    Multipoint-measurements by the magnetic field Cluster-FGM (Flux Gate Magnetometer) are used to determine the local shock normal, and in turn allow the study of shock location shape and the velocity of the Earth's bow shock. The shock crossings cover orbits in which the spacecraft separation is of the order of ~600 km or less. A data selection of 133 bow shock crossings, ranging from quasi-steady perpendicular to moderately noisy oblique geometries, have been analyzed using a standard timing analysis. Prior to applying the timing technique, the magnetic field fluctuations, when present, are suppressed using low band-pass filtering. The present study contributes to similar studies conducted in the past and available in the literature through the inclusion of a larger data set. The shock standoff distance is determined conjointly with a paraboloid model and the results from a timing analysis. A statistical study reveals a standoff distance well in agreement with the standard gas dynamics model prediction for high Mach number MA. We have also found that for about half the crossings, the timing shock normals agree, within 11°, with a conic-based shock model. Our results strongly indicate that the motion of the shock is predominantly along the Sun-Earth direction; a departure from this direction is not related to the shock-crossing location. Shock velocities below ~80 km/s satisfactorily follow a nearly Gaussian distribution with zero mean and a standard deviation of ~42 km/s. Finally, we show that high speed motions are correlated with sharp increases in the solar wind upstream ram pressure, and are consistent with gas dynamics model predictions.

  5. Direct observation of individual Barkhausen avalanches in nucleation-mediated magnetization reversal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Shin, Sung-Chul

    2009-11-01

    We report the scaling behavior of Barkhausen avalanches [H. Barkhausen, Z. Phys. 20, 401 (1919).] along the hysteresis loop of a CoCrPt alloy film with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy for every field step of 200 Oe. Individual Barkhausen avalanches are directly observed via soft x-ray microscopy with a spatial resolution of 15 nm. The Barkhausen avalanches exhibit a power-law scaling behavior, where the scaling exponent of the power-law distribution drastically changes from 1±0.04 to 1.47±0.03 as the applied field approaches the coercivity of the CoCrPt film. We infer that this is due to the coupling of adjacent domains.

  6. Confirming Time-reversal Symmetry of a Directed Percolation Phase Transition in a Model of Neutral Evolutionary Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordway, Stephen; King, Dawn; Bahar, Sonya

    Reaction-diffusion processes, such as branching-coalescing random walks, can be used to describe the underlying dynamics of nonequilibrium phase transitions. In an agent-based, neutral model of evolutionary dynamics, we have previously shown that our system undergoes a continuous, nonequilibrium phase transition, from extinction to survival, as various system parameters were tuned. This model was shown to belong to the directed percolation (DP) universality class, by measuring the critical exponents corresponding to correlation length ξ⊥, correlation time ξ| |, and particle density β. The fourth critical exponent that defines the DP universality class is β', which measures the survival probability of growth from a single seed organism. Since DP universality is theorized to have time-reversal symmetry, it is assumed that β = β '. In order to confirm the existence of time-reversal symmetry in our model, we evaluate the system growth from a single asexually reproducing organism. Importantly, the critical exponent β' could be useful for comparison to experimental studies of phase transitions in biological systems, since observing growth of microbial populations is significantly easier than observing death. This research was supported by funding from the James S. McDonnell Foundation.

  7. Reverse-directional explosive crystallization of microstructures in transparent film on absorbing substrate by a multipulse femtosecond radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshin, A. S.; Pronin, I. P.; Zhigaliny, O. M.; Presniakov, M. Yu.; Khmelenin, D. N.; Mishina, E. D.; Emel'yanov, V. I.

    2015-12-01

    The crystallization in a transparent precursor of a perovskite ferroelectric film deposited on an absorbing platinized silicon substrate initiated by multipulse femtosecond sharply focused laser beam of near-infrared spectral range is studied by transmission electron microscopy. Time dependences of the shapes of crystallized areas point to initiation of explosive crystallization with a seed on the opposite side of a heat source localized in a platinum interface layer. The radius of the crystalized semispheres varies from 150 to 900 nm, with maximal crystallization velocity up to 1.2 cm/s. Reverse direction of the spherical wave front propagation regarding to a heat source is explained in terms of the developed model based on thermal stress-induced modification of the activation energy.

  8. Stable, polymer-directed and SPION-nucleated magnetic amphiphilic block copolymer nanoprecipitates with readily reversible assembly in magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Giardiello, Marco; Hatton, Fiona L; Slater, Rebecca A; Chambon, Pierre; North, Jocelyn; Peacock, Anita K; He, Tao; McDonald, Tom O; Owen, Andrew; Rannard, Steve P

    2016-03-24

    The formation of inorganic-organic magnetic nanocomposites using reactive chemistry often leads to a loss of super-paramagnetisim when conducted in the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles. We present here a low energy and chemically-mild process of co-nanoprecipitation using SPIONs and homopolymers or amphiphilic block copolymers, of varying architecture and hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance, which efficiently generates near monodisperse SPION-containing polymer nanoparticles with complete retention of magnetism, and highly reversible aggregation and redispersion behaviour. When linear and branched block copolymers with inherent water-solubility are used, a SPION-directed nanoprecipitation mechanism appears to dominate the nanoparticle formation presenting new opportunities for tailoring and scaling highly functional systems for a range of applications. PMID:26973155

  9. Direct measurement of oxygen consumption rates from attached and unattached cells in a reversibly sealed, diffusionally isolated sample chamber

    PubMed Central

    Strovas, Timothy J.; McQuaide, Sarah C.; Anderson, Judy B.; Nandakumar, Vivek; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Burgess, Lloyd W.; Holl, Mark R.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen consumption is a fundamental component of metabolic networks, mitochondrial function, and global carbon cycling. To date there is no method available that allows for replicate measurements on attached and unattached biological samples without compensation for extraneous oxygen leaking into the system. Here we present the Respiratory Detection System, which is compatible with virtually any biological sample. The RDS can be used to measure oxygen uptake in microliter-scale volumes with a reversibly sealed sample chamber, which contains a porphyrin-based oxygen sensor. With the RDS, one can maintain a diffusional seal for up to three hours, allowing for the direct measurement of respiratory function of samples with fast or slow metabolic rates. The ability to easily measure oxygen uptake in small volumes with small populations or dilute samples has implications in cell biology, environmental biology, and clinical diagnostics. PMID:21546993

  10. Direct observation of solid-state reversed transformation from crystals to quasicrystals in a Mg alloy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Fang; Yang, Zhi-Qing; Ye, Heng-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Phase transformation of quasicrystals is of interest in various fields of science and technology. Interestingly, we directly observed unexpected solid-state epitaxial nucleation and growth of Zn 6 Mg 3 Y icosahedral quasicrystals in a Mg alloy at about 573 K which is about 300 K below the melting point of Zn 6 Mg 3 Y, in contrast to formation of quasicrystals through solidification that was usually found in many alloys. Maximizing local packing density of atoms associated with segregation of Y and Zn in Mg adjacent to Mg/Zn 3 MgY interfaces triggered atomic rearrangement in Mg to form icosahedra coupled epitaxially with surface distorted icosahedra of Zn 3 MgY, which plays a critical role in the nucleation of icosahedral clusters. A local Zn:Mg:Y ratio close to 6:3:1, corresponding to a valence electron concentration of about 2.15, should have been reached to trigger the formation of quasicrystals at Mg/Zn 3 MgY interfaces. The solid-state icosahedral ordering in crystals opens a new window for growing quasicrystals and understanding their atomic origin mechanisms. Epitaxial growth of quasicrystals onto crystals can modify the surface/interface structures and properties of crystalline materials. PMID:26066096

  11. Direct observation of solid-state reversed transformation from crystals to quasicrystals in a Mg alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Fang; Yang, Zhi-Qing; Ye, Heng-Qiang

    2015-06-01

    Phase transformation of quasicrystals is of interest in various fields of science and technology. Interestingly, we directly observed unexpected solid-state epitaxial nucleation and growth of Zn6Mg3Y icosahedral quasicrystals in a Mg alloy at about 573 K which is about 300 K below the melting point of Zn6Mg3Y, in contrast to formation of quasicrystals through solidification that was usually found in many alloys. Maximizing local packing density of atoms associated with segregation of Y and Zn in Mg adjacent to Mg/Zn3MgY interfaces triggered atomic rearrangement in Mg to form icosahedra coupled epitaxially with surface distorted icosahedra of Zn3MgY, which plays a critical role in the nucleation of icosahedral clusters. A local Zn:Mg:Y ratio close to 6:3:1, corresponding to a valence electron concentration of about 2.15, should have been reached to trigger the formation of quasicrystals at Mg/Zn3MgY interfaces. The solid-state icosahedral ordering in crystals opens a new window for growing quasicrystals and understanding their atomic origin mechanisms. Epitaxial growth of quasicrystals onto crystals can modify the surface/interface structures and properties of crystalline materials.

  12. Controlled metal-semiconductor sintering/alloying by one-directional reverse illumination

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1993-01-01

    Metal strips deposited on a top surface of a semiconductor substrate are sintered at one temperature simultaneously with alloying a metal layer on the bottom surface at a second, higher temperature. This simultaneous sintering of metal strips and alloying a metal layer on opposite surfaces of the substrate at different temperatures is accomplished by directing infrared radiation through the top surface to the interface of the bottom surface with the metal layer where the radiation is absorbed to create a primary hot zone with a temperature high enough to melt and alloy the metal layer with the bottom surface of the substrate. Secondary heat effects, including heat conducted through the substrate from the primary hot zone and heat created by infrared radiation reflected from the metal layer to the metal strips, as well as heat created from some primary absorption by the metal strips, combine to create secondary hot zones at the interfaces of the metal strips with the top surface of the substrate. These secondary hot zones are not as hot as the primary hot zone, but they are hot enough to sinter the metal strips to the substrate.

  13. Direct observation of solid-state reversed transformation from crystals to quasicrystals in a Mg alloy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Fang; Yang, Zhi-Qing; Ye, Heng-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Phase transformation of quasicrystals is of interest in various fields of science and technology. Interestingly, we directly observed unexpected solid-state epitaxial nucleation and growth of Zn6Mg3Y icosahedral quasicrystals in a Mg alloy at about 573 K which is about 300 K below the melting point of Zn6Mg3Y, in contrast to formation of quasicrystals through solidification that was usually found in many alloys. Maximizing local packing density of atoms associated with segregation of Y and Zn in Mg adjacent to Mg/Zn3MgY interfaces triggered atomic rearrangement in Mg to form icosahedra coupled epitaxially with surface distorted icosahedra of Zn3MgY, which plays a critical role in the nucleation of icosahedral clusters. A local Zn:Mg:Y ratio close to 6:3:1, corresponding to a valence electron concentration of about 2.15, should have been reached to trigger the formation of quasicrystals at Mg/Zn3MgY interfaces. The solid-state icosahedral ordering in crystals opens a new window for growing quasicrystals and understanding their atomic origin mechanisms. Epitaxial growth of quasicrystals onto crystals can modify the surface/interface structures and properties of crystalline materials. PMID:26066096

  14. Stable, polymer-directed and SPION-nucleated magnetic amphiphilic block copolymer nanoprecipitates with readily reversible assembly in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardiello, Marco; Hatton, Fiona L.; Slater, Rebecca A.; Chambon, Pierre; North, Jocelyn; Peacock, Anita K.; He, Tao; McDonald, Tom O.; Owen, Andrew; Rannard, Steve P.

    2016-03-01

    The formation of inorganic-organic magnetic nanocomposites using reactive chemistry often leads to a loss of super-paramagnetisim when conducted in the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles. We present here a low energy and chemically-mild process of co-nanoprecipitation using SPIONs and homopolymers or amphiphilic block copolymers, of varying architecture and hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance, which efficiently generates near monodisperse SPION-containing polymer nanoparticles with complete retention of magnetism, and highly reversible aggregation and redispersion behaviour. When linear and branched block copolymers with inherent water-solubility are used, a SPION-directed nanoprecipitation mechanism appears to dominate the nanoparticle formation presenting new opportunities for tailoring and scaling highly functional systems for a range of applications.The formation of inorganic-organic magnetic nanocomposites using reactive chemistry often leads to a loss of super-paramagnetisim when conducted in the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles. We present here a low energy and chemically-mild process of co-nanoprecipitation using SPIONs and homopolymers or amphiphilic block copolymers, of varying architecture and hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance, which efficiently generates near monodisperse SPION-containing polymer nanoparticles with complete retention of magnetism, and highly reversible aggregation and redispersion behaviour. When linear and branched block copolymers with inherent water-solubility are used, a SPION-directed nanoprecipitation mechanism appears to dominate the nanoparticle formation presenting new opportunities for tailoring and scaling highly functional systems for a range of applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional experimental details, NMR spectra, GPC chromatograms, kinetics experiments, graphs of nanopreciptate aggregation and cycling studies and SPION characterisation. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00788k

  15. Mach 5 bow shock control by a nanosecond pulse surface dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Nishihara, M.; Takashima, K.; Rich, J. W.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2011-06-15

    Bow shock perturbations in a Mach 5 air flow, produced by low-temperature, nanosecond pulse, and surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), are detected by phase-locked schlieren imaging. A diffuse nanosecond pulse discharge is generated in a DBD plasma actuator on a surface of a cylinder model placed in air flow in a small scale blow-down supersonic wind tunnel. Discharge energy coupled to the actuator is 7.3-7.8 mJ/pulse. Plasma temperature inferred from nitrogen emission spectra is a few tens of degrees higher than flow stagnation temperature, T = 340 {+-} 30 K. Phase-locked Schlieren images are used to detect compression waves generated by individual nanosecond discharge pulses near the actuator surface. The compression wave propagates upstream toward the baseline bow shock standing in front of the cylinder model. Interaction of the compression wave and the bow shock causes its displacement in the upstream direction, increasing shock stand-off distance by up to 25%. The compression wave speed behind the bow shock and the perturbed bow shock velocity are inferred from the Schlieren images. The effect of compression waves generated by nanosecond discharge pulses on shock stand-off distance is demonstrated in a single-pulse regime (at pulse repetition rates of a few hundred Hz) and in a quasi-continuous mode (using a two-pulse sequence at a pulse repetition rate of 100 kHz). The results demonstrate feasibility of hypersonic flow control by low-temperature, repetitive nanosecond pulse discharges.

  16. Evolution of bow-tie architectures in biology.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Tamar; Mayo, Avraham E; Tlusty, Tsvi; Alon, Uri

    2015-03-01

    Bow-tie or hourglass structure is a common architectural feature found in many biological systems. A bow-tie in a multi-layered structure occurs when intermediate layers have much fewer components than the input and output layers. Examples include metabolism where a handful of building blocks mediate between multiple input nutrients and multiple output biomass components, and signaling networks where information from numerous receptor types passes through a small set of signaling pathways to regulate multiple output genes. Little is known, however, about how bow-tie architectures evolve. Here, we address the evolution of bow-tie architectures using simulations of multi-layered systems evolving to fulfill a given input-output goal. We find that bow-ties spontaneously evolve when the information in the evolutionary goal can be compressed. Mathematically speaking, bow-ties evolve when the rank of the input-output matrix describing the evolutionary goal is deficient. The maximal compression possible (the rank of the goal) determines the size of the narrowest part of the network-that is the bow-tie. A further requirement is that a process is active to reduce the number of links in the network, such as product-rule mutations, otherwise a non-bow-tie solution is found in the evolutionary simulations. This offers a mechanism to understand a common architectural principle of biological systems, and a way to quantitate the effective rank of the goals under which they evolved. PMID:25798588

  17. Auditory perception of note transitions in simulated complex bowing patterns.

    PubMed

    Schoonderwaldt, Erwin; Demoucron, Matthias; Altenmüller, Eckart; Leman, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Recent motion-capture measurements of violin bowing revealed an interesting coordination behavior in fast repetitive bowing patterns involving bow changes and string crossings; bow changes were consistently lagging behind string crossings, and the relative timing appeared to be an integral part of the bow-movement patterns. The aim of the current study was to investigate if there might be a perceptual explanation for the observed coordination behavior. For this purpose a virtual violin was used, controlled by simulated bowing gestures. A simplified coordination model is presented, which was implemented to allow real-time control of complex bowing patterns. This synthesis approach was employed in a perceptual experiment in which the participants were asked to optimize the sound by adjusting a slider controlling the main coordination parameters. It was found that the resulting coordination patterns were similar to those observed in performance, implying that complex bowing trajectories for an important part emerge from auditory-motor interaction. Further analysis of the responses shed light on temporal and spatial constraints of the simulated gestures associated with the note transitions. The results raise interesting questions with regard to auditory-motor interaction in complex instrumental control gestures. PMID:23742380

  18. Evolution of Bow-Tie Architectures in Biology

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Tamar; Mayo, Avraham E.; Tlusty, Tsvi; Alon, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Bow-tie or hourglass structure is a common architectural feature found in many biological systems. A bow-tie in a multi-layered structure occurs when intermediate layers have much fewer components than the input and output layers. Examples include metabolism where a handful of building blocks mediate between multiple input nutrients and multiple output biomass components, and signaling networks where information from numerous receptor types passes through a small set of signaling pathways to regulate multiple output genes. Little is known, however, about how bow-tie architectures evolve. Here, we address the evolution of bow-tie architectures using simulations of multi-layered systems evolving to fulfill a given input-output goal. We find that bow-ties spontaneously evolve when the information in the evolutionary goal can be compressed. Mathematically speaking, bow-ties evolve when the rank of the input-output matrix describing the evolutionary goal is deficient. The maximal compression possible (the rank of the goal) determines the size of the narrowest part of the network—that is the bow-tie. A further requirement is that a process is active to reduce the number of links in the network, such as product-rule mutations, otherwise a non-bow-tie solution is found in the evolutionary simulations. This offers a mechanism to understand a common architectural principle of biological systems, and a way to quantitate the effective rank of the goals under which they evolved. PMID:25798588

  19. 75 FR 52304 - MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... Forest Service MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Saratoga, Wyoming. The... is for an update on projects proposed for funding, and selection of some projects. DATES: The...

  20. 75 FR 39201 - MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... Forest Service MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Steamboat Springs, Colorado... Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose of...

  1. 46 CFR 154.355 - Bow and stern loading piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bow and stern loading piping. 154.355 Section 154.355 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Ship Arrangements § 154.355 Bow and...

  2. [Posterior iris bowing after accommodation--elucidation of the etiology of pigment dispersion syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ueda, J; Sawaguchi, S; Watanabe, J; Shirakashi, M; Abe, H

    1997-02-01

    Recent advancements in imaging the anterior segment structures using the ultrasound biomicro scope (UBM) have proven the involvement of posterior iris bowing due to reverse pupillary block as the cause of pigment dispersion syndrome. In this report, we examined whether the posterior iris bowing occurs even in normal eyes following accommodation, and whether the degree of iris concavity tends to be greater in myopic eyes than in emmetropic eyes. The subjects were normal eyes with sufficient accommodation power, i.e. 5 myopic eyes with less than-5 diopter reflection, 5 emmetropic eyes within +/- 1 dioptor reflection, respectively. We obtained UBM images of the iris at 4 portions before and after accommodation, and measured the degree of posterior iris bowing. We found that almost all data shift posteriorly after accommodation, and that the iris concavity is more distinct in myopic eyes than in emmetropic eyes both before and after accommodation (before: p = 0.0004, after: p < 0.0001). From these results, we confirmed that iris concavity after accommodation occurs in normal eyes but not enough for iridozonular contact, and that pigment dispersion syndrome results from augmented iris concavity owing to pre-existing factors such as iris flexibility, myopia, and sufficient accommodation power. PMID:9124102

  3. Study and comparison of the parameters of five hot flow anomalies at a bow shock front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakov, A. Yu.; Vaisberg, O. L.

    2016-03-01

    Five hot flow anomalies ( HFA) recorded by the Tail Probe of the INTERBALL satellite in 1996 are analyzed in present work. For the five chosen events the authors determined the characteristics of current sheets whose interaction with the bow shock front led to formation of an HFA, as well as the directions of external electric fields and the directions of motion of these HFAs over a shock front. The analysis of plasma convection in an HFA body is carried out; the average velocities of plasma motion in the HFA are determined in a coordinate system linked with the normal to a current layer and with the normal to the bow shock. According to the character of plasma convection in an HFA body, these five events may be divided into two types, which also differ in the direction of the motion over the front of the bow shock. In the first-type HFAs, the convection of plasma has a component directed from the intermediate region confirming its identification as a source of energy for the formation of an HFA. In the second-type HFAs, plasma motion from the intermediate region in leading and trailing parts is less expressed. This fact, as well as the great variation of peculiar velocities in the body of anomalies, allowed the assumption that second-type anomalies are nonstationary. Evidence is presented that the anomalies considered in the paper are bordered with shocks formed in solar wind passing a large-scale, decelerated body of heated plasma.

  4. The Influence of the Martian Bow Shock on Heavy Planetary Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Liemohn, M. W.; Stenberg, G.; Nilsson, H.; Ramstad, R.; Fraenz, M.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the extent of Mars' exosphere and the large gyroradii of some heavy planetary ions, it is expected that some atmospheric ions will encounter the bow shock. However, the effect that the bow shock has on these heavy ions is relatively unstudied. Mars Express (MEX) ion data is examined to determine whether significant differences exist in the velocity space distributions of energetic planetary ions inside and outside of the shock. To allow for determination of the solar wind motional electric field (Esw) using Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) magnetometer data, the study is focused on the time interval from early 2004 to late 2006 when MEX and MGS overlapped. For each 192 second measurement, an average velocity is assigned to heavy ions at high energies (> 2 keV). The possibility that there is turbulence in the magnetosheath altering the paths of heavy pickup ions will be tested by comparing flight directions relative to the direction of Esw in the magnetosheath to flight directions relative to the Esw direction upstream of the bow shock.

  5. Study of the relation between Pc 3 micropulsations and magnetosheath fluctuations and of the multisatellite, multimeasurement investigation of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The structure and direction of bow shock waves and the occurence of Pc 3, 4 micropulsations were investigated. An observational description is given of a quasi-parallel structure in a plasma parameter regime. The use of approximation to estimate the thickness of thin, nearly perpendicular bow shocks at supralaminar Mach numbers is discussed. The pattern of energies of backstreaming protons in the foreshock are predicted.

  6. Direct observation of λ-DNA molecule reversal movement within microfluidic channels under electric field with single molecule imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fengyun, Yang; Kaige, Wang; Dan, Sun; Wei, Zhao; Hai-qing, Wang; Xin, He; Gui-ren, Wang; Jin-tao, Bai

    2016-07-01

    The electrodynamic characteristics of single DNA molecules moving within micro-/nano-fluidic channels are important in the design of biomedical chips and bimolecular sensors. In this study, the dynamic properties of λ-DNA molecules transferring along the microchannels driven by the external electrickinetic force were systemically investigated with the single molecule fluorescence imaging technique. The experimental results indicated that the velocity of DNA molecules was strictly dependent on the value of the applied electric field and the diameter of the channel. The larger the external electric field, the larger the velocity, and the more significant deformation of DNA molecules. More meaningfully, it was found that the moving directions of DNA molecules had two completely different directions: (i) along the direction of the external electric field, when the electric field intensity was smaller than a certain threshold value; (ii) opposite to the direction of the external electric field, when the electric field intensity was greater than the threshold electric field intensity. The reversal movement of DNA molecules was mainly determined by the competition between the electrophoresis force and the influence of electro-osmosis flow. These new findings will theoretically guide the practical application of fluidic channel sensors and lab-on-chips for precisely manipulating single DNA molecules. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61378083), the International Cooperation Foundation of the National Science and Technology Major Project of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2011DFA12220), the Major Research Plan of National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91123030), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province of China (Grant Nos. 2010JS110 and 2013SZS03-Z01).

  7. 3D hybrid simulations of the interaction of a magnetic cloud with a bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turc, L.; Fontaine, D.; Savoini, P.; Modolo, R.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the interaction of a magnetic cloud (MC) with a planetary bow shock using hybrid simulations. It is the first time to our knowledge that this interaction is studied using kinetic simulations which include self-consistently both the ion foreshock and the shock wave dynamics. We show that when the shock is in a quasi-perpendicular configuration, the MC's magnetic structure in the magnetosheath remains similar to that in the solar wind, whereas it is strongly altered downstream of a quasi-parallel shock. The latter can result in a reversal of the magnetic field north-south component in some parts of the magnetosheath. We also investigate how the MC affects in turn the outer parts of the planetary environment, i.e., from the foreshock to the magnetopause. We find the following: (i) The decrease of the Alfvén Mach number at the MC's arrival causes an attenuation of the foreshock region because of the weakening of the bow shock. (ii) The foreshock moves along the bow shock's surface, following the rotation of the MC's magnetic field. (iii) Owing to the low plasma beta, asymmetric flows arise inside the magnetosheath, due to the magnetic tension force which accelerates the particles in some parts of the magnetosheath and slows them down in others. (iv) The quasi-parallel region forms a depression in the shock's surface. Other deformations of the magnetopause and the bow shock are also highlighted. All these effects can contribute to significantly modify the solar wind/magnetosphere coupling during MC events.

  8. Observation of Motion of Bowed Strings and Resonant Strings in Violin Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutani, Akihiro

    2013-10-01

    The motion of a bowed string and a resonant string of a violin were simultaneously observed for the first time. The results of the direct observation of string motion in double stops and harmonics are also presented. The importance of the resonance was experimentally demonstrated from these observations. It is suggested that players should take account of the resonance and ideal Helmholtz motion in violin performances.

  9. Transcranial direct current stimulation reverses neurophysiological and behavioural effects of focal inhibition of human pharyngeal motor cortex on swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Vasant, Dipesh H; Mistry, Satish; Michou, Emilia; Jefferson, Samantha; Rothwell, John C; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2014-01-01

    The human cortical swallowing system exhibits bilateral but functionally asymmetric representation in health and disease as evidenced by both focal cortical inhibition (pre-conditioning with 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation; rTMS) and unilateral stroke, where disruption of the stronger (dominant) pharyngeal projection alters swallowing neurophysiology and behaviour. Moreover, excitatory neurostimulation protocols capable of reversing the disruptive effects of focal cortical inhibition have demonstrated therapeutic promise in post-stroke dysphagia when applied contralaterally. In healthy participants (n = 15, 8 males, mean age (±SEM) 35 ± 9 years), optimal parameters of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) (anodal, 1.5 mA, 10 min) were applied contralaterally after 1 Hz rTMS pre-conditioning to the strongest pharyngeal projection. Swallowing neurophysiology was assessed in both hemispheres by intraluminal recordings of pharyngeal motor-evoked responses (PMEPs) to single-pulse TMS as a measure of cortical excitability. Swallowing behaviour was examined using a pressure-based reaction time protocol. Measurements were made before and for up to 60 min post intervention. Subjects were randomised to active or sham tDCS after 1 Hz rTMS on separate days and data were compared using repeated measures ANOVA. Active tDCS increased PMEPs bilaterally (F1,14 = 7.4, P = 0.017) reversing the inhibitory effects of 1 Hz rTMS in the pre-conditioned hemisphere (F1,14 = 10.1, P = 0.007). Active tDCS also enhanced swallowing behaviour, increasing the number of correctly timed challenge swallows compared to sham (F1,14 = 6.3, P = 0.025). Thus, tDCS to the contralateral pharyngeal motor cortex reverses the neurophysiological and behavioural effects of focal cortical inhibition on swallowing in healthy individuals and has therapeutic potential for dysphagia rehabilitation. PMID:24247983

  10. Offset semi-parabolic nanoantenna made of a photonic crystal parabolic mirror and a plasmonic bow-tie antenna.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Haroldo T

    2014-10-10

    In a parabolic mirror, light coming parallel to the antenna passes through its focal point. In this work, a waveguide feeds a semi-parabolic photonic crystal mirror and the emerging beam feeds a bow-tie antenna placed at the mirror's focal point-it is shown that the antenna system can not only feed a bow-tie antenna (producing a localized moderately high electric field) but also produces a directional radiation beam. The semi-parabolic mirror is also modified to reduce reflection back to the feeding waveguide. PMID:25322381

  11. Decay of the cometary bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, M. K.; Dryer, M.

    1985-12-01

    Cooling processes will weaken the bow shock that is expected to form when the solar wind plasma encounters a gassy comet. As the supersonic wind penetrates the comet's outer coma, accreting freshly ionized cometary atoms and molecules, it needs a shock to adjust to the inner subsonic conditions. The cometary ions, implanted in the plasma stream, are accelerated by the associated fields and take up much of the decrease in streaming energy. The subsonic flow in comets is distinguished by strong cooling, effected primarily through ion-molecule reactions between the energetic implanted ions and the neutral gas coma. It is argued here that such cooling can cause complete decay of the shock's flanks, as probed by the International Cometary Explorer spacecraft at comet Giacobini-Zinner.

  12. Radiographic characteristics of lower-extremity bowing in children.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Jugesh I; Grissom, Leslie E; Harcke, H Theodore

    2003-01-01

    Lower-extremity bowing is common in infants and children and can result from a variety of conditions. At radiography, developmental bowing shows varus angulation centered at the knee, "metaphyseal beaking," thickening of the medial tibial cortices, and tilted ankle joints. Tibia vara (Blount disease) demonstrates genu varum and depression of the proximal tibia medially. Congenital bowing manifests as posteromedial bowing with cortical thickening along the concavity of the curvature and, in some cases, diaphyseal broadening. In rickets, radiographic changes occur primarily at sites of rapid growth and are predominantly metaphyseal, with widening of the zone of provisional calcification. Achondroplasia is characterized by shortening and thickening of the long bones with metaphyseal flaring and cupping. In neurofibromatosis, there may be anterolateral bowing of the tibia, and there is often focal narrowing and intramedullary sclerosis or cystic change at the apex of the angulation. The tibia is typically involved at the junction of the middle and distal thirds. Osteogenesis imperfecta demonstrates bowing from softening due to osteoporosis and multiple fractures and typically involves the entire skeleton. In camptomelic dysplasia, lower-extremity bowing is associated with a short trunk, short limbs, and deficiencies in pelvic bone development. Recognition of these pathologic conditions is important for differentiating those that will resolve spontaneously from those that require surgery or other treatment. PMID:12853662

  13. Optimization of bow shape for a non ballast water ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van He, Ngo; Ikeda, Yoshiho

    2013-09-01

    In this research, a commercial CFD code "Fluent" was applied to optimization of bulbous bow shape for a non ballast water ships (NBS). The ship was developed at the Laboratory of the authors in Osaka Prefecture University, Japan. At first, accuracy of the CFD code was validated by comparing the CFD results with experimental results at towing tank of Osaka Prefecture University. In the optimizing process, the resistances acting on ships in calm water and in regular head waves were defined as the object function. Following features of bulbous bow shapes were considered as design parameters: volume of bulbous bow, height of its volume center, angle of bow bottom, and length of bulbous bow. When referring to the computed results given by the CFD like resistance, pressure and wave pattern made by ships in calm water and in waves, an optimal bow shape for ships was discovered by comparing the results in the series of bow shapes. In the computation on waves, the ship is in fully captured condition because shorter waves, λ/ L pp <0.6, are assumed.

  14. Suprathermal Electrons at Saturn's Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, A.; Sulaiman, A. H.; Sergis, N.; Stawarz, L.; Fujimoto, M.; Coates, A. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-07-01

    The leading explanation for the origin of galactic cosmic rays is particle acceleration at the shocks surrounding young supernova remnants (SNRs), although crucial aspects of the acceleration process are unclear. The similar collisionless plasma shocks frequently encountered by spacecraft in the solar wind are generally far weaker (lower Mach number) than these SNR shocks. However, the Cassini spacecraft has shown that the shock standing in the solar wind sunward of Saturn (Saturn's bow shock) can occasionally reach this high-Mach number astrophysical regime. In this regime Cassini has provided the first in situ evidence for electron acceleration under quasi-parallel upstream magnetic conditions. Here we present the full picture of suprathermal electrons at Saturn's bow shock revealed by Cassini. The downstream thermal electron distribution is resolved in all data taken by the low-energy electron detector (CAPS-ELS, <28 keV) during shock crossings, but the higher energy channels were at (or close to) background. The high-energy electron detector (MIMI-LEMMS, >18 keV) measured a suprathermal electron signature at 31 of 508 crossings, where typically only the lowest energy channels (<100 keV) were above background. We show that these results are consistent with the theory in which the “injection” of thermal electrons into an acceleration process involves interaction with whistler waves at the shock front, and becomes possible for all upstream magnetic field orientations at high Mach numbers like those of the strong shocks around young SNRs. A future dedicated study will analyze the rare crossings with evidence for relativistic electrons (up to ˜1 MeV).

  15. Structural changes in cuticles on violin bow hair caused by wear.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    A bow with horse tail hair is used to play the violin. New and worn-out bow hairs were observed by atomic force microscopy. The cuticles of the new bow hair were already damaged by bleach and delipidation, however the worn-out bow hairs were much more damaged and broken off by force, which relates to wearing out. PMID:20139598

  16. Simultaneous direct identification of genital microorganisms in voided urine using multiplex PCR-based reverse line blot assays.

    PubMed

    McKechnie, Michelle L; Kong, Fanrong; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to develop and evaluate sensitive methods that would allow simultaneous direct identification of multiple potential pathogens in clinical specimens for diagnosis and epidemiological studies, using a multiplex PCR-based reverse line blot assay. We have previously developed assays suitable for detection of bacterial respiratory and systemic pathogens. In this chapter we describe, in detail, a method developed to identify 14 genital microorganisms, for use in epidemiological studies of genital infection or colonization, using first voided urine specimens. The 14 urogenital pathogens or putative pathogens studied were Trichomonas vaginalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, N. meningitidis, Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma parvum, U. urealyticum, Mycoplasma hominis, M. genitalium, Gardnerella vaginalis, Haemophilus influenzae, herpes simplex virus 1 and 2, and adenovirus. Two species-specific primer pairs and probes were designed for each target. The method was validated using a reference strain or a well-characterized clinical isolate of each target organism. In a clinical study among men attending sexual health clinics in Sydney, we used the assay to compare rates of detection of the 14 organisms in men with urethritis with those in asymptomatic controls and found the method to be sensitive, specific, convenient, and relatively inexpensive. PMID:23104293

  17. Optical Properties of Titania Coatings Prepared by Inkjet Direct Patterning of a Reverse Micelles Sol-Gel Composition.

    PubMed

    Schmiedova, Veronika; Dzik, Petr; Vesely, Michal; Zmeskal, Oldrich; Morozova, Magdalena; Kluson, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Thin layers of titanium dioxide were fabricated by direct inkjet patterning of a reverse micelles sol-gel composition onto soda-lime glass plates. Several series of variable thickness samples were produced by repeated overprinting and these were further calcined at different temperatures. The resulting layers were inspected by optical and scanning electronic microscopy and their optical properties were investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry in the range of 200-1000 nm. Thus the influence of the calcination temperature on material as well as optical properties of the patterned micellar titania was studied. The additive nature of the deposition process was demonstrated by a linear dependence of total thickness on the number of printed layers without being significantly affected by the calcination temperature. The micellar imprints structure of the titania layer resulted into significant deviation of measured optical constants from the values reported for bulk titania. The introduction of a void layer into the ellipsometric model was found necessary for this particular type of titania and enabled correct ellipsometric determination of layer thickness, well matching the thickness values from mechanical profilometry. PMID:26274944

  18. Enhancing Autophagy with Drugs or Lung-directed Gene Therapy Reverses the Pathological Effects of Respiratory Epithelial Cell Proteinopathy.

    PubMed

    Hidvegi, Tunda; Stolz, Donna B; Alcorn, John F; Yousem, Samuel A; Wang, Jieru; Leme, Adriana S; Houghton, A McGarry; Hale, Pamela; Ewing, Michael; Cai, Houming; Garchar, Evelyn Akpadock; Pastore, Nunzia; Annunziata, Patrizia; Kaminski, Naftali; Pilewski, Joseph; Shapiro, Steven D; Pak, Stephen C; Silverman, Gary A; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Perlmutter, David H

    2015-12-11

    Recent studies have shown that autophagy mitigates the pathological effects of proteinopathies in the liver, heart, and skeletal muscle but this has not been investigated for proteinopathies that affect the lung. This may be due at least in part to the lack of an animal model robust enough for spontaneous pathological effects from proteinopathies even though several rare proteinopathies, surfactant protein A and C deficiencies, cause severe pulmonary fibrosis. In this report we show that the PiZ mouse, transgenic for the common misfolded variant α1-antitrypsin Z, is a model of respiratory epithelial cell proteinopathy with spontaneous pulmonary fibrosis. Intracellular accumulation of misfolded α1-antitrypsin Z in respiratory epithelial cells of the PiZ model resulted in activation of autophagy, leukocyte infiltration, and spontaneous pulmonary fibrosis severe enough to elicit functional restrictive deficits. Treatment with autophagy enhancer drugs or lung-directed gene transfer of TFEB, a master transcriptional activator of the autophagolysosomal system, reversed these proteotoxic consequences. We conclude that this mouse is an excellent model of respiratory epithelial proteinopathy with spontaneous pulmonary fibrosis and that autophagy is an important endogenous proteostasis mechanism and an attractive target for therapy. PMID:26494620

  19. Reversed-Polarity Synthesis of Diaryl Ketones through Palladium-Catalyzed Direct Arylation of 2-Aryl-1,3-dithianes

    PubMed Central

    Yucel, Baris; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    An umpolung approach to the synthesis of diaryl ketones has been developed based on in situ generation of acyl anion equivalents and their catalytic arylation. This method entails the base promoted palladium catalyzed direct C–H arylation of 2 The resulting 2,2-diaryl-1,3-dithianes with aryl bromides. Use of MN(SiMe3)2 (M=Li, Na) base results in reversible deprotonation of the weakly acidic dithiane. In the presence of a Pd(NiXantphos)-based catalyst and aryl bromide, cross-coupling of the metallated 2-aryl-1,3-dithiane takes place under mild conditions (2 h at rt) with yields as high as 96%. The resulting 2,2-diaryl-1,3-dithianes were converted into diaryl ketones by either molecular iodine, N-bromo succinimide (NBS) or Selectfluor in the presence of water. The dithiane arylation/hydrolysis can be performed in a one-pot procedure to yield a good to excellent yields. This method is suitable for rapid and large-scale synthesis of diaryl ketones. A one-pot preparation of anti-cholesterol drug fenofibrate (TriCor®) has been achieved on 10.0 mmol scale in 86% yield. PMID:26185491

  20. Interplanetary magnetic field control of the Mars bow shock - Evidence for Venuslike interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T. L.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Lichtenegger, H.; Riedler, W.; Russell, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    The Mars bow shock location and shape have been determined by examining the Phobos spacecraft magnetometer data. Observations show that the position of the terminator bow shock varies with interplanetary magnetic field orientation in the same way as at Venus. The shock is farthest from Mars in the direction of the interplanetary electric field, consistent with the idea that mass loading plays an important role in the solar wind interaction with Mars. The shock cross section at the terminator plane is asymmetric and is controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field. The shock is farther from Mars during solar maximum. Thus the solar wind interaction with Mars appears to be Venuslike, with a magnetic moment too small to affect significantly the solar wind interaction.

  1. Ion distributions in the Earth's foreshock upstream from the bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of suprathermal and energetic ion distributions are found upstream from shocks. Some distributions, such as field-aligned beams, are generated directly at the shock either through reflection processes or through leakage from the hotter downstream region. Other distributions, such as intermediate distributions, evolve from these parent distributions through wave-particle interactions. This paper reviews our current understanding of the creation and evolution of suprathermal distributions at shocks. Examples of suprathermal ion distributions are taken from observations at the Earth's bow shock. Particular emphasis is placed on the creation of field-aligned beams and specularly reflected ion distributions and on the evolution of these distributions in the Earth's ion foreshock. However, the results from this heavily studied region are applicable to interplanetary shocks, bow shocks at other planets, and comets.

  2. MAVEN observations of gyrotropic electron distributions upstream of Mars bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziane, Karim; McFadden, James; Hamza, A. M.; Mazelle, Christian; Jakosky, Bruce; Mitchell, David; Halekas, Jasper; Espley, Jared; Connerney, J. E. D.

    2016-07-01

    Recent observations upstream from the Martian bow shock by the MAVEN Solar Wind Electron Analyzer (SWEA) experiment are presented. Flux enhancements of electrons with energies 70-400 eV are always observed when MAVEN spacecraft is magnetically connected to the shock. A detailed examination of the pitch angle distribution shows that the enhanced fluxes are associated with electrons moving away from Mars. In the full 3-D angular distribution, the electrons appear in an 'annulus' centered along the IMF direction. Moreover, the gyrotropic character is observed over a large range of shock geometry from quasi-parallel to quasi-perpendicular. These signatures in the electron distribution function strongly suggest that the reflection off the shock is the main mechanism for the production of Martian foreshock electrons. A quantitative analysis of electron distributions is carried out in order to probe the characteristics of the Martian bow shock.

  3. Diffuse ions produced by electromagnetic ion beam instabilities. [in earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.; Leroy, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of the electromagnetic ion beam instability driven by the reflected ion component backstreaming away from the earth's bow shock into the foreshock region is studied by means of computer simulation. The linear and quasi-linear stages of the instability are found to be in good agreement with known results for the resonant mode propagating parallel to the beam along the magnetic field and with theory developed in this paper for the nonresonant mode, which propagates antiparallel to the beam direction. The quasi-linear stage, which produces large amplitude delta B approximately B, sinusoidal transverse waves and 'intermediate' ion distributions, is terminated by a nonlinear phase in which strongly nonlinear, compressive waves and 'diffuse' ion distributions are produced. Additional processes by which the diffuse ions are accelerated to observed high energies are not addressed. The results are discussed in terms of the ion distributions and hydromagnetic waves observed in the foreshock of the earth's bow shock and of interplanetary shocks.

  4. The propagation and growth of whistler mode waves generated by electron beams in earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokar, R. L.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    In this study, the propagation and growth of whistler mode waves generated by electron beams within earth's bow shock is investigated using a planar model for the bow shock and a model electron distribution function. Within the shock, the model electron distribution function possesses a field-aligned T greater than T beam that is directed toward the magnetosheath. Waves with frequencies between about 1 and 100 Hz with a wide range of wave normal angles are generated by the beam via Landau and anomalous cyclotron resonances. However, because the growth rate is small and because the wave packets traverse the shock quickly, these waves do not attain large amplitudes. Waves with frequencies between about 30 and 150 Hz with a wide range of wave normal angles are generated by the beam via the normal cyclotron resonance. The ray paths for most of these waves are directed toward the solar wind although some wave packets, due to plasma convection travel transverse to the shock normal. These wave packets grow to large amplitudes because they spend a long time in the growth region. The results suggest that whistler mode noise within the shock should increase in amplitude with increasing upstream theta sub Bn. The study provides an explanation for the origin of much of the whistler mode turbulence observed at the bow shock.

  5. Laser vibrometry measurements of vibration and sound fields of a bowed violin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gren, Per; Tatar, Kourosh; Granström, Jan; Molin, N.-E.; Jansson, Erik V.

    2006-04-01

    Laser vibrometry measurements on a bowed violin are performed. A rotating disc apparatus, acting as a violin bow, is developed. It produces a continuous, long, repeatable, multi-frequency sound from the instrument that imitates the real bow-string interaction for a 'very long bow'. What mainly differs is that the back and forward motion of the real bow is replaced by the rotating motion with constant velocity of the disc and constant bowing force (bowing pressure). This procedure is repeatable. It is long lasting and allows laser vibrometry techniques to be used, which measure forced vibrations by bowing at all excited frequencies simultaneously. A chain of interacting parts of the played violin is studied: the string, the bridge and the plates as well as the emitted sound field. A description of the mechanics and the sound production of the bowed violin is given, i.e. the production chain from the bowed string to the produced tone.

  6. Low-energy particles at the bow shock, magnetopause, and outer magnetosphere of Saturn

    SciTech Connect

    Maclennan, C.G.; Lanzerotti, L.J.; Krimigis, S.M.; Lepping, R.P.

    1983-11-01

    Low-energy electron (>22 keV) and protons (> or approx. =30 keV) measured by the Low-Energy Charged Particle Experiment (LECP) during the encounters of the two Voyager spacecraft with Saturn are described. The characteristics of the dayside bow shock, magnetopause, and outer magnetosphere are emphasized. Only one crossing of the Saturian bow shock was observed inbound during the Voyager 1 encounter, whereas five crossings of the bow shock were identified during the Voyager 2 approach to the planet. During several of these bow shock crossings, low energy protons were observed to be streaming from the direction of the dawnside of the magnetosphere. In the magnetosheath the protons were observed to be oriented primarily with pitch angles of approx.90/sup 0/. Prior to the inbound magnetopause crossings (as defined by the magnetometer experiment on Voyager), the low-energy protons and electrons were observed to increase in intensity. Further, during Voyager 2 encounter, an increase in the proton and electron fluxes accompanied a change in orientation of the magnetosheath magnetioc field from one with a vertical component opposite to the planetary field to one with a vertical component in the direction of the planetary field. Examination of the flux distributions of the protons suggests that the magnetopuase was moving inward with a lower limit speed of approx.10 km/s during the Voyager 2 approach to the planet. The observed average subsolar magnetopause position at the time of Voyager 2 encounter was 18.5 R/sub S/, whereas during the Voyager 1 encounter it was considerably more extended, at 23.5 R/sub S/.

  7. Understanding the Impact of Reverse Transfer Students on Community Colleges. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 106.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Barbara K., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This issue describes an enrollment pattern emerging in higher education--students who are matriculated at, or have graduated from, a four-year college who then transfer to a two-year school, a process labeled "reverse transfer." The following articles are included: (1) "What Do We Know about Reverse Transfer Students?" (Barbara K. Townsend and…

  8. A new technique to characterize CT scanner bow-tie filter attenuation and applications in human cadaver dosimetry simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Shi, Jim Q.; Zhang, Da; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob; Xu, X. George

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a noninvasive technique for directly measuring the CT bow-tie filter attenuation with a linear array x-ray detector. Methods: A scintillator based x-ray detector of 384 pixels, 307 mm active length, and fast data acquisition (model X-Scan 0.8c4-307, Detection Technology, FI-91100 Ii, Finland) was used to simultaneously detect radiation levels across a scan field-of-view. The sampling time was as short as 0.24 ms. To measure the body bow-tie attenuation on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 CT scanner, the x-ray tube was parked at the 12 o’clock position, and the detector was centered in the scan field at the isocenter height. Two radiation exposures were made with and without the bow-tie in the beam path. Each readout signal was corrected for the detector background offset and signal-level related nonlinear gain, and the ratio of the two exposures gave the bow-tie attenuation. The results were used in the GEANT4 based simulations of the point doses measured using six thimble chambers placed in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans at 100 or 120 kV, helical pitch at 1.375, constant or variable tube current, and distinct x-ray tube starting angles. Results: Absolute attenuation was measured with the body bow-tie scanned at 80–140 kV. For 24 doses measured in six organs of the cadaver, the median or maximum difference between the simulation results and the measurements on the CT scanner was 8.9% or 25.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The described method allows fast and accurate bow-tie filter characterization.

  9. 15. PORT SIDE OF FLYBRIDGE WING, LOOKING TOWARDS BOW AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. PORT SIDE OF FLYBRIDGE WING, LOOKING TOWARDS BOW AT SHIP'S CONTROLS AND IN BACKGROUND IS COMPASS. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  10. Geology and sediment accumulation rates at Carrie Bow Cay, Belize

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, Eugene A.; Hudson, J. Harold; Halley, Robert B.; Lidz, Barbara H.; Robbin, Daniel M.; Macintyre, Ian G.

    1982-01-01

    Two other rotary cores were drilled landward of the reef crest. One was drilled on the reef flat to a depth of 8.8 m, and the other was drilled on the southwest tip of Carrie Bow Cay to a depth of 17.7 m. Both cores encountered essentially uncemented carbonate reef sands with some coral rubble. Of the four rotary cores, only the Carrie Bow Cay core encountered Pleistocene bedrock. Radiocarbon dating of a large head of Siderastrea siderea, growing on bedrock from the Carrie Bow Cay core at a depth of 15.04 m below sea level, gave an age of 6960±110 years. The leached calcitic coralline bedrock, at a depth of 15.7 m below sea level in the Carrie Bow Cay core, contained root marks, and iron staining indicative of subaerial exposure.

  11. 15. Detail, northeast facade, operator's bow window and tower, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail, northeast facade, operator's bow window and tower, showing knee braces carried on stone ancons used to support eaves, view to northwest, 90mm lens. - Southern Pacific Depot, 559 El Camino Real, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  12. 17. DECK ABOVE CO'S STATEROOM, LOOKING TOWARDS BOW AT DECK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DECK ABOVE CO'S STATEROOM, LOOKING TOWARDS BOW AT DECK ABOVE PILOT HOUSE. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  13. 18. DECK ABOVE PILOT HOUSE, LOOKING TOWARDS BOW, SHOWING DETAIL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DECK ABOVE PILOT HOUSE, LOOKING TOWARDS BOW, SHOWING DETAIL, OF MAST. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  14. 3. VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING BOW END OF VESSEL 37, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING BOW END OF VESSEL 37, STERN OF VESSEL 38 WITH COLLAPSING LIVING QUARTERS TO RIGHT Susan Kardas, photographer, November 1984 - Shooters Island, Ships Graveyard, Vessel No. 37, Newark Bay, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  15. DETAIL VIEW, WINDOW BOW IN EAST WALL. (NOTE THE OPENING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW, WINDOW BOW IN EAST WALL. (NOTE THE OPENING FOR THE CRYPTOPORTICUS TO THE BOW’S RIGHT. THIS EXTERIOR FEATURE EXTENDS BENEATH THE NORTH TERRACE - The Woodlands, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. 6. VIEW OF BOW OF VESSEL FROM STARBOARD SIDE, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF BOW OF VESSEL FROM STARBOARD SIDE, SHOWING DOCKING CREW PREPARING TO REMOVE FOREFOOT FROM VESSEL'S STEM IN ORDER TO DRAW VESSEL OFF LIFT DOCK - Bugeye "Louise Travers", Intersection of Routes 2 & 4, Solomons, Calvert County, MD

  17. 19. DETAIL VIEW OF SKIFF BOW WITH OAK STEM AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. DETAIL VIEW OF SKIFF BOW WITH OAK STEM AND FRAMES PLANKED IN CEDAR USING COPPER CLINCH NAILS. TRANSOM OF SECOND SKIFF CAN BE SEEN BACKGROUND. - Lowell's Boat Shop, 459 Main Street, Amesbury, Essex County, MA

  18. BIOASSAY-DIRECT FRACTIONATION OF 1-NITROPYRENE METABOLITES: GENERATION OF MUTAGRAMS BY COUPLING REVERSE-PHASE HPLC WITH MICROSUSPENSION MUTAGENICITY ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have performed bioassay-direct fractionation of a model complex mixture (rabbit lung S9-generated metabolites of 14 C-radiolabeled 1-nitropyrene) by assaying reverse-phase HPLC fractions using two microsuspension mutagenicity assays. orward-mutation assay measuring mutation at...

  19. 76. The Silver Bow County Courthouse, 19101912, at West Granite ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. The Silver Bow County Courthouse, 1910-1912, at West Granite and Montana Streets, was designed by Link and Haire. The building has a dressed sandstone foundation, brick walls, and sandstone trim, parapet and columns. It was used as a barracks for the State militia when the city was placed under martial law following the dynamiting of the Old Miners' Union Hall in September, 1914. - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  20. Mercury's bow shock and foreshock waves observed by Messenger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cano, X.; Le, G.; Boardsen, S.; Chi, P.; Slavin, J. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2013-09-01

    The region upstream from a planetary bow shock is a natural plasma laboratory containing a variety of wave particle phenomena. The study of foreshocks other than the Earth's is important for extending our understanding of collisionless shocks and foreshock physics since the bow shock strength varies with heliocentric distance from the Sun, and the sizes of the bow shocks are different at different planets. Mercury's bow shock is unique in our solar system as it is produced by moderate Mach number and low plasma beta solar wind blowing over a small magnetized body with a predominately radial interplanetary magnetic field. We use Messenger high resolution (20 samples per second) magnetic field data to study Mercury's bow shock structure, and the characteristics of ultra low frequency waves observed at the foreshock. Bow shock profiles depend on the upstream Mach number, on shock geometry with respect to the upstream magnetic field, and on the plasma beta. Mercury's bow shock is weaker than Earth's with a Mach number MA ˜ 3, and is 10 times smaller. Thus, a more laminar shock is expected and a less complex foreshock may develop. A preliminary study has shown the existence of at least three types of waves: 1) whistler waves at frequencies near 2 Hz; 2) waves with frequencies ~ 0.1 Hz; 3) fluctuations with broad spectral peaks centered at ~ 0.6 Hz. Whistler waves propagate at angles up to 30 degrees, and lower frequency waves are more parallel propagating. We investigate wave properties such as polarization, ellipticity and compressibility. We also discuss wave origin and evolution. While whistler waves may be generated at the bow shock, the origin of lower frequency waves can be attributed to local generation by kinetic ion-ion instabilities. Due to the small scale size of Mercury's foreshock it is possible that waves suffer less steepening than at Earth.

  1. Thermo-plastic analysis of a bowed sodium pump shaft

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, E.O.

    1989-03-01

    A hollow sodium pump shaft was found to have a residual bow sufficient to cause unacceptable vibrations. Investigations suggested that the bow was caused by a sodium overfill event while the pump was shut down and the shaft was not turning. A rising sodium level with natural convection effects could result in local heating of the shaft. Even though the shaft may be essentially free, a local one-sided thermal loading may cause thermal stresses and plastic stains sufficient to give a residual bow when the thermal load is removed. A series of elastic-plastic analyses were carried out to assess the likelihood of the proposed mechanism's causing the residual bow. A special purpose computer program modelled the shaft as a Bernoulli beam. Isotropic hardening was evaluated by successive approximation. For each case studied, a loading sequence was followed by an assumed elastic unloading step, and the thermal loading zone was assumed small compared to the shaft length. These simplifying assumptions allowed parameterization of several variables--yield stress, thermal loading magnitude, extent of the heated zone around the shaft circumference, temperature distribution around the circumference, and shaft unrestrained/restrained conditions. Although the magnitude of the residual bow is not centered with the solution using mean parameters of this study, it is possible that a one-sided combination of parameter values did exist and that such a condition caused the bow under the proposed mechanism. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  2. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation temporarily reverses age-associated cognitive decline and functional brain activity changes.

    PubMed

    Meinzer, Marcus; Lindenberg, Robert; Antonenko, Daria; Flaisch, Tobias; Flöel, Agnes

    2013-07-24

    The rising proportion of elderly people worldwide will yield an increased incidence of age-associated cognitive impairments, imposing major burdens on societies. Consequently, growing interest emerged to evaluate new strategies to delay or counteract cognitive decline in aging. Here, we assessed immediate effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (atDCS) on cognition and previously described detrimental changes in brain activity attributable to aging. Twenty healthy elderly adults were assessed in a crossover sham-controlled design using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and concurrent transcranial DCS administered to the left inferior frontal gyrus. Effects on performance and task-related brain activity were evaluated during overt semantic word generation, a task that is negatively affected by advanced age. Task-absent resting-state fMRI (RS-fMRI) assessed atDCS-induced changes at the network level independent of performance. Twenty matched younger adults served as controls. During sham stimulation, task-related fMRI demonstrated that enhanced bilateral prefrontal activity in older adults was associated with reduced performance. RS-fMRI revealed enhanced anterior and reduced posterior functional brain connectivity. atDCS significantly improved performance in older adults up to the level of younger controls; significantly reduced task-related hyperactivity in bilateral prefrontal cortices, the anterior cingulate gyrus, and the precuneus; and induced a more "youth-like" connectivity pattern during RS-fMRI. Our results provide converging evidence from behavioral analysis and two independent functional imaging paradigms that a single session of atDCS can temporarily reverse nonbeneficial effects of aging on cognition and brain activity and connectivity. These findings may translate into novel treatments to ameliorate cognitive decline in normal aging in the future. PMID:23884951

  3. Magnetosheath filamentary structures formed by ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, N.; Sibeck, D.; Gutynska, O.; Trattner, K. J.

    2014-04-01

    Results from 2.5-D electromagnetic hybrid simulations show the formation of field-aligned, filamentary plasma structures in the magnetosheath. They begin at the quasi-parallel bow shock and extend far into the magnetosheath. These structures exhibit anticorrelated, spatial oscillations in plasma density and ion temperature. Closer to the bow shock, magnetic field variations associated with density and temperature oscillations may also be present. Magnetosheath filamentary structures (MFS) form primarily in the quasi-parallel sheath; however, they may extend to the quasi-perpendicular magnetosheath. They occur over a wide range of solar wind Alfvénic Mach numbers and interplanetary magnetic field directions. At lower Mach numbers with lower levels of magnetosheath turbulence, MFS remain highly coherent over large distances. At higher Mach numbers, magnetosheath turbulence decreases the level of coherence. Magnetosheath filamentary structures result from localized ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock and the injection of energetic ions into the magnetosheath. The localized nature of ion acceleration is tied to the generation of fast magnetosonic waves at and upstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The increased pressure in flux tubes containing the shock accelerated ions results in the depletion of the thermal plasma in these flux tubes and the enhancement of density in flux tubes void of energetic ions. This results in the observed anticorrelation between ion temperature and plasma density.

  4. Magnetosheath Filamentary Structures Formed by Ion Acceleration at the Quasi-Parallel Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidi, N.; Sibeck, D.; Gutynska, O.; Trattner, K. J.

    2014-01-01

    Results from 2.5-D electromagnetic hybrid simulations show the formation of field-aligned, filamentary plasma structures in the magnetosheath. They begin at the quasi-parallel bow shock and extend far into the magnetosheath. These structures exhibit anticorrelated, spatial oscillations in plasma density and ion temperature. Closer to the bow shock, magnetic field variations associated with density and temperature oscillations may also be present. Magnetosheath filamentary structures (MFS) form primarily in the quasi-parallel sheath; however, they may extend to the quasi-perpendicular magnetosheath. They occur over a wide range of solar wind Alfvénic Mach numbers and interplanetary magnetic field directions. At lower Mach numbers with lower levels of magnetosheath turbulence, MFS remain highly coherent over large distances. At higher Mach numbers, magnetosheath turbulence decreases the level of coherence. Magnetosheath filamentary structures result from localized ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock and the injection of energetic ions into the magnetosheath. The localized nature of ion acceleration is tied to the generation of fast magnetosonic waves at and upstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The increased pressure in flux tubes containing the shock accelerated ions results in the depletion of the thermal plasma in these flux tubes and the enhancement of density in flux tubes void of energetic ions. This results in the observed anticorrelation between ion temperature and plasma density.

  5. Investigation of hot Flow Anomaly structure observed near the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakov, A. Yu.; Vaisberg, O. L.

    2012-02-01

    The work is dedicated to investigation of Hot Flow Anomaly (HFA), formed at the front of Earth's bows hock. Using Interball-Tail data we estimated orientation of the current sheet that was a cause of the anomaly. From the ion energy-time spectrogram we divided the anomaly into several regions. The motional electric fields near the HFA were estimated with 3D model of Earth's bow shock. In accordance with previous investigations of HFA's formation conditions these fields were directed towards the current sheet on both sides of it. We also provided the picture of HFA's motion along the bow shock and calculated its speed. Analyzing ions' bulk velocities within the HFA we found that the anomaly is expanding. This conclusion was supported by estimation of thermal and magnetic pressure balance. Ion energy-time spectrogram shows that anomaly is a complicated structure consisting of two parts—leading and trailing. Comparison of ion velocity distributions, magnetic field data and ion energy-time spectrogram provides better understanding of the phenomena and indicated the region that is the source of thermal and convective energy inside HFA.

  6. Two-point observations of solar wind beam deceleration upstream the Earth bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbar, Jaroslav; Nemecek, Zdenek; Safrankova, Jana; Prech, Lubomir; Jelinek, Karel

    2015-04-01

    The ion energy distribution in front of the bow shock is often strongly non-Maxwellian. It can contain a large portion (up to 10 %) of energetic particles streaming in different directions than the original solar wind beam. The solar wind speed is thus computed as weighted averages of the speeds of all populations covered by the measured distribution. The moments computed from this distribution indicate a decrease of the solar wind speed in such cases and, based on these moments, the solar wind deceleration upstream the bow shock was reported. Nevertheless, we have found that there are cases, when the solar wind beam itself is undoubtedly decelerated in the foreshock region. In the present paper, we demonstrate several examples of two-point observations of closely-separated THEMIS spacecraft in front of the bow shock. One spacecraft is located in the solar wind while the other is in the foreshock and observes also reflected and accelerated particles. The speed computed as the moment of the distribution is lower than that in the solar wind but the separation of the solar wind beam reveals its deceleration as well. The paper discusses possible physical processes leading to this deceleration.

  7. Field-aligned ion beams upstream of the earth's bow shock Evidence for a magnetosheath source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.

    1983-01-01

    High time resolution ISEE-1 and -2 observations of upstream field-aligned ion beams at several crossings of the earth's bow shock indicate that some beams are due to high energy magnetosheath particles leaking through the shock into the upstream region. The distribution immediately downstream of these oblique shocks consists of a 'core' of directly transmitted, slightly heated ions, plus a crescent-shaped, high-velocity distribution, centered roughly on the magnetic field in the direction toward the upstream region, with a fairly well defined low velocity cutoff.

  8. Theory of 2 omegape radiation induced by the bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Wu, C. S.; Vinas, A. F.-; Reiner, M. J.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1994-12-01

    A new radiation emission mechanism is proposed to explain electomagnetic radiation observed at twice the electron plasma frequency, 2 omegape, in the upstream region of the Earth's bow shock. This radiation had its origin at the electron foreshock boundary where energetic electron beams and intense narrow-band Langmiur waves are observed. The proposed emission mechanism results from the interaction of the electron beam and Langmuir waves that are backscattered off thermal ions. This interaction is described by a nonlinear dispersion equation which incorporates an effect owing to electron trajectory modulation by the backscattered Langmuir waves. Subsequent analysis of the dispersion equation reveals two important consequences. First, a long-wavelength electrostatic quasi-mode with frequency at 2 omegape is excited, and second, the quasi-mode and the electomagnetic mode are nonlinearly coupled. The implication is that, when the excited 2 omegape quasi-mode propagates in an inhomgeneous medium with slightly decreasing density, the quasi-mode can be converted directly into an electromagnetic mode. Hense the electomagnetic radiation at twice the plasma frequency is generated. Numerical solutions of the dispersion equation with the choice of parameters that describe physical characteristics of the electron foreshock are presented, which illustrates the viability of the new mechanism.

  9. Measurement of bow tie profiles in CT scanners using a real-time dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, Bruce R.; Evans, Joshua D.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Dohatcu, Andreea C.; Politte, David G.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Several areas of computed tomography (CT) research require knowledge about the intensity profile of the x-ray fan beam that is introduced by a bow tie filter. This information is considered proprietary by CT manufacturers, so noninvasive measurement methods are required. One method using real-time dosimeters has been proposed in the literature. A commercially available dosimeter was used to apply that method, and analysis techniques were developed to extract fan beam profiles from measurements. Methods: A real-time ion chamber was placed near the periphery of an empty CT gantry and the dose rate versus time waveform was recorded as the x-ray source rotated about the isocenter. In contrast to previously proposed analysis methods that assumed a pointlike detector, the finite-size ion chamber received varying amounts of coverage by the collimated x-ray beam during rotation, precluding a simple relationship between the source intensity as a function of fan beam angle and measured intensity. A two-parameter model for measurement intensity was developed that included both effective collimation width and source-to-detector distance, which then was iteratively solved to minimize the error between duplicate measurements at corresponding fan beam angles, allowing determination of the fan beam profile from measured dose-rate waveforms. Measurements were performed on five different scanner systems while varying parameters such as collimation, kVp, and bow tie filters. On one system, direct measurements of the bow tie profile were collected for comparison with the real-time dosimeter technique. Results: The data analysis method for a finite-size detector was found to produce a fan beam profile estimate with a relative error between duplicate measurement intensities of <5%. It was robust over a wide range of collimation widths (e.g., 1–40 mm), producing fan beam profiles that agreed with a relative error of 1%–5%. Comparison with a direct measurement technique on

  10. IRC -10414: a bow-shock-producing red supergiant star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Menten, K. M.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Langer, N.; Mackey, J.; Kraus, A.; Meyer, D. M.-A.; Kamiński, T.

    2014-01-01

    Most runaway OB stars, like the majority of massive stars residing in their parent clusters, go through the red supergiant (RSG) phase during their lifetimes. Nonetheless, although many dozens of massive runaways were found to be associated with bow shocks, only two RSG bow-shock-producing stars, Betelgeuse and μ Cep, are known to date. In this paper, we report the discovery of an arc-like nebula around the late M-type star IRC -10414 using the SuperCOSMOS H-alpha Survey. Our spectroscopic follow-up of IRC -10414 with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) showed that it is a M7 supergiant, which supports previous claims on the RSG nature of this star based on observations of its maser emission. This was reinforced by our new radio- and (sub)millimetre-wavelength molecular line observations made with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment 12-m telescope and the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope, respectively. The SALT spectrum of the nebula indicates that its emission is the result of shock excitation. This finding along with the arc-like shape of the nebula and an estimate of the space velocity of IRC -10414 (≈70 ± 20 km s-1) imply the bow shock interpretation for the nebula. Thus, IRC -10414 represents the third case of a bow-shock-producing RSG and the first one with a bow shock visible at optical wavelengths. We discuss the smooth appearance of the bow shocks around IRC -10414 and Betelgeuse and propose that one of the necessary conditions for stability of bow shocks generated by RSGs is the ionization of the stellar wind. Possible ionization sources of the wind of IRC -10414 are proposed and discussed.

  11. Large scale motions of Neptune's bow shock: Evidence for control of the shock position by the rotation phase of Neptune's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Smith, Charles W.; Kurth, William S.; Gurnett, Donald A.; Moses, Stewart L.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager 2 spacecraft observed high levels of Langmuir waves before the inbound crossing of Neptune's bow shock, thereby signifying magnetic connection of the bow shock. The Langmuir waves occurred in multiple bursts throughout two distinct periods separated by an 85 minute absence of wave activity. The times of onsets, peaks, and disappearances of the waves were used together with the magnetic field directions and spacecraft position, to perform a 'remote-sensing' analysis of the shape and location of Neptune's bow shock prior to the inbound bow shock crossing. The bow shock is assumed to have a parabolidal shape with a nose location and flaring parameter determined independently for each wave event. The remote-sensing analysis give a shock position consistent with the time of the inbound shock crossing. The flaring parameter of the shock remains approximately constant throughout each period of wave activity but differs by a factor of 10 between the two periods. The absence of waves between two periods of wave activity coincides with a large rotation of the magnetic field and a large increase in the solar wind ram pressure' both these effects lead to magnetic disconnection of the spacecraft from shock. The planetwards motion of the shock's nose from 38.5 R(sub N) to 34.5 R(sub N) during the second time period occurred while the solar wind ram pressure remained constant to within 15 percent. This second period of planetwards motion of the shock is therefore strong evidence for Neptune's bow shock moving in response to the rotation of Neptune's oblique, tilted magnetic dipole. Normalizing the ram pressure, the remotely-sensed shock moves sunwards during the first wave period and planetwards in the second wave period. The maximum standoff distance occurs while the dipole axis is close to being perpendicular to the Sun-Neptune direction. The remote-sensing analysis provides strong evidence that the location of Neptune's bow shock is controlled by Neptune's rotation

  12. Lateralization of horizontal semicircular canal canalolithiasis and cupulopathy using bow and lean test and head-roll test.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Hee; Kim, Yong Gyu; Shin, Jung Eun; Yang, Young Soo; Im, Donghyuk

    2016-10-01

    Accurate lateralization is important to improve treatment outcomes in horizontal semicircular canal (HSCC) benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). To determine the involved side in HSCC-BPPV, the intensity of nystagmus has been compared in a head-roll test (HRT) and the direction of nystagmus was evaluated in a bow and lean test (BLT). The aim of this study is to compare the results of a BLT with those of a HRT for lateralization of HSCC-canalolithiasis and cupulopathy (heavy cupula and light cupula), and evaluate treatment outcomes in patients with HSCC-canalolithiasis. We conducted retrospective case reviews in 66 patients with HSCC-canalolithiasis and 63 patients with HSCC-cupulopathy. The affected side was identified as the direction of bowing nystagmus on BLT in 55 % (36 of 66) of patients with canalolithiasis, which was concordant with the HRT result in 67 % (24 of 36) of cases (concordant group). Lateralization was determined by comparison of nystagmus intensity during HRT in 30 patients who did not show bowing or leaning nystagmus. The remission rate after the first treatment was 71 % (17 of 24) in the concordant group and 45 % (5 of 11) in the discordant group. Both bowing and leaning nystagmus were observed in all patients with cupulopathy, and the side of the null plane was identified as the affected side. In conclusion, bowing and/or leaning nystagmus were observed in only 55 % of patients with HSCC-canalolithiasis, and the first treatment based on the result of BLT alone was effective in only 45 % of the patients in whom the BLT and HRT were discordant, which may suggest that the usefulness of BLT in lateralizing the HSCC-canalolithiasis may be limited. PMID:26758464

  13. Numerical simulations of Mach stem formation via intersecting bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, E. C.; Frank, A.; Hartigan, P.; Yirak, K.

    2015-12-01

    Hubble Space Telescope observations show bright knots of Hα emission within outflowing young stellar jets. Velocity variations in the flow create secondary bow shocks that may intersect and lead to enhanced emission. When the bow shocks intersect at or above a certain critical angle, a planar shock called a Mach stem is formed. These shocks could produce brighter Hα emission since the incoming flow to the Mach stem is parallel to the shock normal. In this paper we report first results of a study using 2-D numerical simulations designed to explore Mach stem formation at the intersection of bow shocks formed by hypersonic "bullets" or "clumps". Our 2-D simulations show how the bow shock shapes and intersection angles change as the adiabatic index γ changes. We show that the formation or lack of a Mach stem in our simulations is consistent with the steady-state Mach stem formation theory. Our ultimate goal, which is part of an ongoing research effort, is to characterize the physical and observational consequences of bow shock intersections including the formation of Mach stems.

  14. Simplified Habit Reversal Treatment for Chronic Hair Pulling in Three Adolescents: A Clinical Replication with Direct Observation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, John T.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Long, Ethan S.; Elliott, Amy J.; Lumley, Vicki A.

    1998-01-01

    Three developmentally normal adolescents with chronic hair pulling were treated with a simplified habit-reversal procedure consisting of awareness training, competing response training, and parental social support. Treatment resulted in immediate reduction to near-zero levels of hair pulling with one to three booster sessions. Results were…

  15. Maskless direct laser writing with visible light: Breaking through the optical resolving limit with cooperative manipulations of nonlinear reverse saturation absorption and thermal diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jingsong; Wang, Rui

    2014-03-28

    In this work, the resolving limit of maskless direct laser writing is overcome by cooperative manipulation from nonlinear reverse saturation absorption and thermal diffusion, where the nonlinear reverse saturation absorption can induce the formation of below diffraction-limited energy absorption spot, and the thermal diffusion manipulation can make the heat quantity at the central region of energy absorption spot propagate along the thin film thickness direction. The temperature at the central region of energy absorption spot transiently reaches up to melting point and realizes nanolithography. The sample “glass substrate/AgInSbTe” is prepared, where AgInSbTe is taken as nonlinear reverse saturation absorption thin film. The below diffraction-limited energy absorption spot is simulated theoretically and verified experimentally by near-field spot scanning method. The “glass substrate/Al/AgInSbTe” sample is prepared, where the Al is used as thermal conductive layer to manipulate the thermal diffusion channel because the thermal diffusivity coefficient of Al is much larger than that of AgInSbTe. The direct laser writing is conducted by a setup with a laser wavelength of 650 nm and a converging lens of NA=0.85, the lithographic marks with a size of about 100 nm are obtained, and the size is only about 1/10 the incident focused spot. The experimental results indicate that the cooperative manipulation from nonlinear reverse saturation absorption and thermal diffusion is a good method to realize nanolithography in maskless direct laser writing with visible light.

  16. The existence and nature of the interstellar bow shock

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi; Strumik, M.; Ratkiewicz, R.; Grygorczuk, J.

    2013-12-20

    We report a new diagnosis of two different states of the local interstellar medium (LISM) near our solar system by using a sensitivity study constrained by several distinct and complementary observations of the LISM, solar wind, and inner heliosphere. Assuming the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) He flow parameters for the LISM, we obtain a strength of ∼2.7 ± 0.2 μG and a direction pointing away from galactic coordinates (28, 52) ± 3° for the interstellar magnetic field as a result of fitting Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 in situ plasma measurements and IBEX energetic neutral atoms ribbon. When using Ulysses parameters for the LISM He flow, we recently reported the same direction but with a strength of 2.2 ± 0.1 μG. First, we notice that with Ulysses He flow, our solution is in the expected hydrogen deflection plane (HDP). In contrast, for the IBEX He flow, the solution is ∼20° away from the corresponding HDP plane. Second, the long-term monitoring of the interplanetary H I flow speed shows a value of ∼26 km s{sup –1} measured upwind from the Doppler shift in the strong Lyα sky background emission line. All elements of the diagnosis seem therefore to support Ulysses He flow parameters for the interstellar state. In that frame, we argue that reliable discrimination between superfast, subfast, or superslow states of the interstellar flow should be based on most existing in situ and remote observations used together with global modeling of the heliosphere. For commonly accepted LISM ionization rates, we show that a fast interstellar bow shock should be standing off upstream of the heliopause.

  17. PBS process optimization for bow-wake phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Y.; Lee, Y. I.; Kim, W. S.

    1996-07-01

    We have performed a design experiments to optimize our PBS Process related to bow_wake problem with critical Poly,Metal layers. In pattern dependent geometry as like dog_bone pattern or along feature edge of large clear window (swelling), it happened bow_wake(call:dog bone) phenomena of feature distorted in PBS resist processing. We have investigated the effects of independent factors as like resist thickness, high dose, developer concentration, process factors(bias, exhaust, humidity, flow), post overlapping step optimization, media dispense method through binary or uniary(flat fan spray) nozzle(Developer system A, B, C,). Finally, We have concluded that the bow_wake problems were related to the developer media dispense way by chemical dispense method (uniary, binary), media supply differences(pump, air pressured) and process optimization.

  18. Bow and stern waves triggered by the Moon's shadow boat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. Y.; Sun, Y. Y.; Kakinami, Y.; Chen, C. H.; Lin, C. H.; Tsai, H. F.

    2011-09-01

    It has been predicted that the Moon's shadow, the cooling region, sweeping over the Earth's atmosphere with a supersonic speed could trigger bow waves since 1970. The longest total solar eclipse within next hundred years occurring on 22 July 2009 sweeps over the Eastern Asia region during the noontime period. An analysis of the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is applied to study ionospheric TEC (total electron content) derived from ground-based GPS receivers in Taiwan and Japan. We not only find the feature of the predicted bow wave but also the stern wave on the equator side of the eclipse path, as well as the stern wake right behind the Moon's shadow boat. The bow and stern waves are formed by acoustic gravity waves of periods about 3 and/or 5 minutes traveling equatorward with a phase speed of about 100 m/s in the ionosphere.

  19. Omohyoid muscle transposition for the treatment of bowed vocal fold.

    PubMed

    Kojima, H; Hirano, S; Shoji, K; Omori, K; Honjo, I

    1996-07-01

    Imperfect glottal closure is usually the most important factor causing dysphonia in patients with bowing of the vocal folds. We have performed laryngeal framework surgery, which allows the medialization of the vocal folds from the outside without creating any scar tissue on them. Over the past 6 years, however, we encountered three cases with marked bowing of the vocal folds that could not be cured by laryngeal framework surgery alone. We used an open laryngeal procedure in these cases, even though such procedures had been considered contraindicated in the treatment of hoarseness. After performing a laryngofissure, we made a small pocket beneath the vocal fold mucosa at the anterior commissure. The superiorly based omohyoid muscle flap was then transposed into the mucosal pocket and sutured to the vocal process. This procedure should be considered an option in treating highly bowed vocal folds. PMID:8678430

  20. EVAPORATION OF ICY PLANETESIMALS DUE TO BOW SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Miura, Hitoshi; Nagasawa, Makiko; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2013-02-20

    We present the novel concept of evaporation of planetesimals as a result of bow shocks associated with planetesimals orbiting with supersonic velocities relative to the gas in a protoplanetary disk. We evaluate the evaporation rates of the planetesimals based on a simple model describing planetesimal heating and evaporation by the bow shock. We find that icy planetesimals with radius {approx}>100 km evaporate efficiently even outside the snow line in the stage of planetary oligarchic growth, where strong bow shocks are produced by gravitational perturbations from protoplanets. The obtained results suggest that the formation of gas giant planets is suppressed owing to insufficient accretion of icy planetesimals onto the protoplanet within the {approx}<5 AU disk region.

  1. Electrostatic waves in the bow shock at Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, S.L.; Coroniti, F.V.; Kennel, C.F.; Scarf, F.L. ); Bagenal, F. ); Lepping, R.P. ); Quest, K.B. ); Kurth, W.S. )

    1989-10-01

    Electrostatic emissions measured by the Voyager 2 plasma wave detector (PWS) during the inbound crossing of the Uranian bow shock are shown to differ in some aspects from the waves measured during bow shock crossings at Jupiter and Saturn. The wave amplitudes in the foot of the bow shock at Uranus are in general much lower than those detected at the other out planets due to the unusually enhanced solar wind ion temperature during the crossing. This reduces the effectiveness of wave-particle interactions in heating the incoming electrons. Strong wave emissions are observed in the shock ramp that possibly arise from currents producing a Buneman mode instability. Plasma instrument (PLS) and magnetometer (MAG) measurements reveal a complicated shock structure reminiscent of computer simulations of high-Mach number shocks when the effects of anomalous resistivity are reduced, and are consistent with high ion temperatures restricting the growth of electrostatic waves.

  2. Bow and Oblique Shock Formation in Soap Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ildoo; Mandre, Shreyas; Sane, Aakash

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, soap films have been exploited primarily to approximate two-dimensional flows while their three-dimensional character is relatively unattended. An example of the three-dimensional character of the flow in a soap film is the observed Marangoni shock wave when the flow speed exceeds the wave speed. In this study, we investigated the formation of bow and oblique shocks in soap films generated by wedges with different deflection angles. When the wedge deflection angle is small and the film flows fast, oblique shocks are observed. When the oblique shock cannot exists, bow shock is formed upstream the wedge. We characterized the oblique shock angle as a function of the wedge deflection angle and the flow speed, and we also present the criteria for transition between bow and oblique Marangoni shocks in soap films.

  3. Formation of ion acoustic solitary waves upstream of the earth's bow shock. [in solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pangia, M. J.; Lee, N. C.; Parks, G. K.

    1985-01-01

    The turbulent plasma development of Lee and Parks is applied to the solar wind approaching the earth's bow shock region. The ponderomotive force contribution is due to ion acoustic waves propagating in the direction of the ambient magnetic field. In this case, the envelope of the ion acoustic wave is shown to satisfy the cubic Schroedinger equation. Modulational instabilities exist for waves in the solar wind, thereby predicting the generation of solitary waves. This analysis further identifies that the ion acoustic waves which exhibit this instability have short wavelengths.

  4. The electromagnetic ion beam instability upstream of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Gosling, J. T.; Forslund, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    The linear theory of the electromagnetic ion beam instability for arbitrary angles of propagation has been studied. The parameters considered in the theory are typical of the solar wind upstream of the earth's bow shock when a 'reflected' proton beam is present. Maximum growth occurs for propagation parallel to the ambient magnetic field B, but this instability also displays significant growth at wave-vectors oblique to B. Oblique, unstable modes seem to be the likely source of the compressive magnetic fluctuations recently observed in conjunction with the 'diffuse' ion population. An energetic ion beam does not directly give rise to linear growth of either ion acoustic or whistler mode instabilities.

  5. Site-directed antisense oligonucleotide decreases the expression of amyloid precursor protein and reverses deficits in learning and memory in aged SAMP8 mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V B; Farr, S A; Flood, J F; Kamlesh, V; Franko, M; Banks, W A; Morley, J E

    2000-12-01

    beta amyloid protein (Abeta) is a 40-43 amino acid peptide derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP). Abeta has been implicated as a cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mice with spontaneous or transgenic overexpression of APP show the histologic hallmarks of AD and have impairments in learning and memory. We tested whether antisense phosphorothiolated oligonucleotides (AO) directed at the Abeta region of the APP gene given with or without antibody directed at Abeta could reverse the elevated protein levels of APP and the behavioral impairments seen in SAMP8 mice, a strain which spontaneously overexpresses APP. We found that intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of antibody with either of two AOs directed at the midregion of Abeta improved acquisition and retention in a footshock avoidance paradigm, whereas two AOs directed more toward the C-terminal, a random AO, and vehicle were without effect. Three injections of the more potent AO given without antibody reduced APP protein levels by 43-68% in the amygdala, septum, and hippocampus. These results show that AO directed at the Abeta region of APP can reduce APP levels in the brain and reverse deficits in learning and memory. PMID:11150636

  6. [Forensic medical characteristics of the injuries inflicted by modern sport bow].

    PubMed

    Babakhanian, R V; Isakov, V D; Gusev, N Iu; Lebedev, V N

    2006-01-01

    Modern bows are classified as representatives of darts. Construction characteristics of bows and arrows, damage to experimental cotton targets from shooting distance of 1-15 m are described. PMID:16826840

  7. HIGH-TEMPERATURE PROCESSING OF SOLIDS THROUGH SOLAR NEBULAR BOW SHOCKS: 3D RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATIONS WITH PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, A. C.; Morris, M. A.; Desch, S. J.

    2013-10-20

    A fundamental, unsolved problem in solar system formation is explaining the melting and crystallization of chondrules found in chondritic meteorites. Theoretical models of chondrule melting in nebular shocks have been shown to be consistent with many aspects of thermal histories inferred for chondrules from laboratory experiments; but, the mechanism driving these shocks is unknown. Planetesimals and planetary embryos on eccentric orbits can produce bow shocks as they move supersonically through the disk gas, and are one possible source of chondrule-melting shocks. We investigate chondrule formation in bow shocks around planetoids through three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. A new radiation transport algorithm that combines elements of flux-limited diffusion and Monte Carlo methods is used to capture the complexity of radiative transport around bow shocks. An equation of state that includes the rotational, vibrational, and dissociation modes of H{sub 2} is also used. Solids are followed directly in the simulations and their thermal histories are recorded. Adiabatic expansion creates rapid cooling of the gas, and tail shocks behind the embryo can cause secondary heating events. Radiative transport is efficient, and bow shocks around planetoids can have luminosities ∼few× 10{sup –8} L{sub ☉}. While barred and radial chondrule textures could be produced in the radiative shocks explored here, porphyritic chondrules may only be possible in the adiabatic limit. We present a series of predicted cooling curves that merit investigation in laboratory experiments to determine whether the solids produced by bow shocks are represented in the meteoritic record by chondrules or other solids.

  8. Directly observed reversible shape changes and hemoglobin stratification during centrifugation of human and Amphiuma red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Joseph F; Inoué, Shinya

    2006-02-21

    This paper describes changes that occur in human and Amphiuma red blood cells observed during centrifugation with a special microscope. Dilute suspensions of cells were layered, in a centrifuge chamber, above an osmotically matched dense solution, containing Nycodenz, Ficoll, or Percoll (Pharmacia) that formed a density gradient that allowed the cells to slowly settle to an equilibrium position. Biconcave human red blood cells moved downward at low forces with minimum wobble. The cells oriented vertically when the force field was increased and Hb sedimented as the lower part of each cell became bulged and assumed a "bag-like" shape. The upper centripetal portion of the cell became thinner and remained biconcave. These changes occurred rapidly and were completely reversible upon lowering the centrifugal force. Bag-shaped cells, upon touching red cells in rouleau, immediately reverted to biconcave disks as they flipped onto a stack. Amphiuma red cells displayed a different type of reversible stratification and deformation at high force fields. Here the cells became stretched, with the nucleus now moving centrifugally, the Hb moving centripetally, and the bottom of the cells becoming thinner and clear. Nevertheless, the distribution of the marginal bands at the cells' rim was unchanged. We conclude that centrifugation, per se, while changing a red cell's shape and the distribution of its intracellular constituents, does so in a completely reversible manner. Centrifugation of red cells harboring altered or missing structural elements could provide information on shape determinants that are still unexplained. PMID:16477016

  9. Total wrist arthrodesis using bowed crossed K-wires.

    PubMed

    Minami, A; Kato, H; Iwasaki, N

    1999-08-01

    A method of total wrist arthrodesis using a combination of autogenous iliac crest bone graft and "bowed" crossed Kirschner wires is described. The method of bowing the K-wires results in a compressive force on the iliac bone graft. This technique resulted in bony union of 22 wrists in 20 patients. The mean time to union was 12 weeks (range, 8-14 weeks). There were no major postoperative complications. The advantages of this technique are its simplicity, versatility, and reliability which mean that special internal fixation devices are not needed. PMID:10473146

  10. Transient bow shock around a cylinder in a supersonic dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, John K.; Merlino, Robert L.

    2013-07-15

    Visual observations of the formation of a bow shock in the transient supersonic flow of a dusty plasma incident on a biased cylinder are presented. The bow shock formed when the advancing front of a streaming dust cloud was reflected by the obstacle. After its formation, the density jump of the bow shock increased as it moved upstream of the obstacle. A physical picture for the formation of the electrohydrodynamic bow shock is discussed.

  11. Statistical analysis of diffuse ion events upstream of the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trattner, K. J.; Mobius, E.; Scholer, M.; Klecker, B.; Hilchenbach, M.; Luehr, H.

    1994-01-01

    A statistical study of diffuse energetic ion events and their related waves upstream of the Earth's bow shock was performed using data from the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/Ion Release Module (AMPTE/IRM) satellite over two 5-month periods in 1984 and 1985. The data set was used to test the assumption in the self-consistent model of the upstream wave and particle populations by Lee (1982) that the particle acceleration through hydromagnetic waves and the wave generation are directly coupled. The comparison between the observed wave power and the wave power predicted on the observed energetic particle energy density and solar wind parameters results in a high correlation coefficient of about 0.89. The intensity of diffuse ions falls off approximately exponentially with the distance upstream from the bow shock parallel to the magnetic field with e-folding distances which vary from approximately 3.3 R(sub E) to approximately 11.7 R(sub E) over the energy range from 10 keV/e to 67.3 keV/e for both protons and alpha particles. After normalizing the upstream particle densities to zero bow shock distance by using these exponential variations, a good correlation (0.7) of the density of the diffuse ions with the solar wind density was found. This supports the suggestion that the solar wind is the source of the diffuse ions. Furthermore, the spectral slope of the diffuse ions correlates well with the solar wind velocity component in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (0.68 and 0.66 for protons and alpha particles) which concurs with the notion that the solar wind plays an important role in the acceleration of the upstream particles.

  12. 77 FR 19661 - City of Broken Bow, OK; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission City of Broken Bow, OK; Notice of Technical Conference March 21, 2012. Take.... Forest Service on November 16, 2007 for the Broken Bow Re-Regulation Dam Hydroelectric Project No. 12470.... Forest Service's Hochatown Office, Route 4, Broken Bow, OK 74728. All local, state, and federal...

  13. Jupiter's magnetopause, bow shock, and 10-hour modulated magnetosheath: Voyagers 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Burlaga, L. F.; Klein, L. W.

    1980-01-01

    Fine scale magnetic field data from the Voyager 1 and 2 magnetopause and bow shock crossings at Jupiter were analyzed. Explicit models of the dawnside magnetopause and bow shock in Jupiter's orbital plane employ an axisymmetric parabola and hyperbola, respectively, and are determined separately for the encounters. A new phenomenon was discovered in the magnetosheath. It is manifested as (5 or) 10 hour quasi-periodic modulation of the direction of the magnetic field in the outbound magnetosheath, predominantly in the northward (N) and southward (S) directions. It was seen to occur during both encounters and appears most evident in Voyager 2 outbound observations, probably due to the extreme tailward extent of the Voyager 2 trajectory through the magnetosheath. The durations of the N to and from S transitions range from tens of minutes to approximately 3 hours. The directional variation of the field during these transitions is fairly well restricted to a plane parallel to the local model magnetopause location. These signatures may be due to magnetosheath field line draping modulated by the large scale motion of the magnetospheric plasma disk.

  14. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  15. Estimation of bowing in hetero-epitaxial GaN-on-sapphire substrate at elevated temperatures by X-ray diffraction rocking curve measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aida, Hideo; Kim, Seong-woo; Suzuki, Toshimasa

    2015-02-01

    A new approach to estimate bowing in hetero-epitaxial films-on-single crystalline substrate at elevated temperatures using X-ray diffraction (XRD) rocking curve measurement is proposed. To demonstrate the new approach, GaN-on-sapphire substrate was subjected to XRD rocking curve measurements for sapphire (0 0 0 6) reflections with various incident X-ray slit widths and temperatures ranging from 25 to 800 °C. It was found that the FWHM increased linearly with the slit width of the incident X-ray when substrates exhibited bowing, and the degree of the broadening effect of the FWHM with slit width reflected the extent of substrate bowing. An accurate estimation of the bowing was demonstrated with every measurement up to 800 °C, quantifying not only the extent of bowing but also the change in its direction from convex to concave with increasing ambient temperature. This approach is theoretically applicable for all types of single crystalline substrates with hetero-epitaxial films, and would enable us to provide useful feedback on the optimization of epitaxial growth process conditions.

  16. The Contemplative Bow in Teaching and Learning Pastoral Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppel, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    This article elucidates theoretical underpinnings for the use of one's self in the pastoral theological classroom. The contemplative bow is developed as a capacious metaphor to describe appropriate self use and its necessary importance in the teaching and learning of pastoral arts in a theological curriculum. Central to the argument is the…

  17. A Study of Uranus' Bow Shock Motions Using Langmuir Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue, S.; Cairns, I. H.; Smith, C. W.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    During the Voyager 2 flyby of Uranus, strong electron plasma oscillations (Langmuir waves) were detected by the plasma wave instrument in the 1.78-kHz channel on January 23-24, 1986, prior to the inbound bow shock crossing. Langmuir waves are excited by energetic electrons streaming away from the bow shock. The goal of this work is to estimate the location and motion of Uranus' bow shock using Langmuir wave data, together with the spacecraft positions and the measured interplanetary magnetic field. The following three remote sensing analyses were performed: the basic remote sensing method, the lag time method, and the trace-back method. Because the interplanetary magnetic field was highly variable, the first analysis encountered difficulties in obtaining a realistic estimation of Uranus' bow shock motion. In the lag time method developed here, time lags due to the solar wind's finite convection speed are taken into account when calculating the shock's standoff distance. In the new trace-back method, limits on the standoff distance are obtained as a function of time by reconstructing electron paths. Most of the results produced by the latter two analyses are consistent with predictions based on the standard theoretical model and the measured solar wind plasma parameters. Differences between our calculations and the theoretical model are discussed.

  18. 36. VIEW OF VESSEL IN DRYDOCK FROM OFF PORT BOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. VIEW OF VESSEL IN DRYDOCK FROM OFF PORT BOW Note by Robert S. Douglas written on back of original print: 'ALABAMA taken in drydock in Mobile 1966 all 10 photos this size.' Original 5'x5' photograph taken by Robert S. Douglas, 1966 - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  19. 20. FROM DECK ABOVE CREW'S BERTHING, LOOKING TOWARDS THE BOW, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. FROM DECK ABOVE CREW'S BERTHING, LOOKING TOWARDS THE BOW, SHOWING WINCH FIDLY, STACK, AND UPPER DECKS. TO EITHER SIDE OF THE FIDLY IS A RHI (RIGID HULL INFLATABLE) AND CRANES. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE LUPINE, U.S. Coast Guard Station Rockland, east end of Tillson Avenue, Rockland, Knox County, ME

  20. 18. FROM DECK ABOVE CO'S STATEROOM, LOOKING TOWARDS BOW, AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. FROM DECK ABOVE CO'S STATEROOM, LOOKING TOWARDS BOW, AT DECK ABOVE PILOT HOUSE AND BEYOND IS MAST. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE LUPINE, U.S. Coast Guard Station Rockland, east end of Tillson Avenue, Rockland, Knox County, ME

  1. 41. AUGUST 9, 1948 BOW STARBOARD VIEW. TAKEN SOON AFTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. AUGUST 9, 1948 BOW STARBOARD VIEW. TAKEN SOON AFTER COMMISSIONING INTO U.S. COAST GUARD. NOTE ORIGINAL CRANE AND HOISTING MECHANISM AND TWO ADDITIONAL PILES (SPUDS) THAT DROPPED INTO THE MUD BOTTOM TO STEADY THE VESSEL WHILE WORKING. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE PINE, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, South Broad Street, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  2. 16. Detail, northeast facade, operator's bow window and tower; note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Detail, northeast facade, operator's bow window and tower; note condition of slates on tower skirt roof, missing section of gutter at left side of skirt roof, missing window panes; note also knee braces carried on masonry ancons; view to southwest, 90mm lens. - Southern Pacific Depot, 559 El Camino Real, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  3. 41. BOW SPACES (YN OFFICES, AYN OFFICES & DECK SHOP, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. BOW SPACES (YN OFFICES, AYN OFFICES & DECK SHOP, LAUNDRY & BOS'N STORES), WITH HATCH TO PAINT LOCKER AT LEFT. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  4. Threequarter view of port bow of White Holly (WLM 543) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Three-quarter view of port bow of White Holly (WLM 543) on left, White Sage (WLM 544) on right. Note differences between the two. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HOLLY, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, 4640 Urquhart Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

  5. Application of Bow-tie methodology to improve patient safety.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Zhaleh; Ravaghi, Hamid; Abbasi, Mohsen; Delgoshaei, Bahram; Esfandiari, Somayeh

    2016-05-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to apply Bow-tie methodology, a proactive risk assessment technique based on systemic approach, for prospective analysis of the risks threatening patient safety in intensive care unit (ICU). Design/methodology/approach - Bow-tie methodology was used to manage clinical risks threatening patient safety by a multidisciplinary team in the ICU. The Bow-tie analysis was conducted on incidents related to high-alert medications, ventilator associated pneumonia, catheter-related blood stream infection, urinary tract infection, and unwanted extubation. Findings - In total, 48 potential adverse events were analysed. The causal factors were identified and classified into relevant categories. The number and effectiveness of existing preventive and protective barriers were examined for each potential adverse event. The adverse events were evaluated according to the risk criteria and a set of interventions were proposed with the aim of improving the existing barriers or implementing new barriers. A number of recommendations were implemented in the ICU, while considering their feasibility. Originality/value - The application of Bow-tie methodology led to practical recommendations to eliminate or control the hazards identified. It also contributed to better understanding of hazard prevention and protection required for safe operations in clinical settings. PMID:27142951

  6. 20. DECK ABOVE CREW'S BERTHING, LOOKING TOWARDS THE BOW, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DECK ABOVE CREW'S BERTHING, LOOKING TOWARDS THE BOW, SHOWING BOAT WINCH IN FOREGROUND, BEHIND IT IS THE FIDLY AND TO EITHER SIDE OF THE FIDLY IS A RHI (RIGID HULL INFLATABLE). - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  7. Significance of torsion modes in bowed-string dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inacio, Octavio; Antunes, Jose; Henrique, Luis

    2002-11-01

    Several aspects of bowed-string dynamics are still inadequately clarified. The importance of torsion modes on the motion regimes is one such issue. Experiments involving torsion are difficult and most of the results available pertain to numerical simulations. The authors' approach differs from previous efforts in two main aspects: (1) the development of a computational method distinct from the wave-propagation approach pioneered by McIntyre, Schumacher, and Woodhouse and (2) an extensive and systematic analysis of the coupling between torsion and transverse motions is performed. The numerical simulations are based on a modal representation of the unconstrained string and a computational approach for friction that enables accurate representations of the stick-slip forces and of the string dynamics, in both time and space. Many relevant aspects of the bowed-string can be readily implemented, including string inharmonic behavior, finite bow-width, and torsion effects. Concerning the later aspect, a realistic range of the torsional to transverse wave-speed ratio is investigated, for several values of the bow velocity and normal force. Results suggest that torsion modes can effect both transient durations and steady state regimes, in particular when the above-mentioned ratio is <4. Gut strings should then be particularly prone to torsion effects.

  8. 25. VIEW OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) FROM OFF PORT BOW; VESSEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) FROM OFF PORT BOW; VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON STATION IN GULF OF MEXICO WITH MOTOR BOAT TIED AT STERN Original 4-3/4'x6-3/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  9. 23. VIEW FROM STARBOARD BOW OF ALABAMA AS 'ALABAMIAN.' Uncopyrighted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW FROM STARBOARD BOW OF ALABAMA AS 'ALABAMIAN.' Uncopyrighted 3-1/2'x5-5/8' postcard; image taken on station in Gulf of Mexico, c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  10. 4. DETAIL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH, ACROSS HULL NEAR BOW END, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH, ACROSS HULL NEAR BOW END, TOP OF FORWARD STARBOARD CARGO HATCH IN FOREGROUND, OPENING FOR PORT HATCH BEYOND Edward Larrabee, photographer, November 1984 - Shooters Island, Ships Graveyard, Vessel No. 54, Newark Bay, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY