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Sample records for bowel transplant model

  1. Multivisceral and Small Bowel Transplantation at Shiraz Organ Transplant Center

    PubMed Central

    Nikeghbalian, S.; Mehdi, S. H.; Aliakbarian, M.; Kazemi, K.; Shamsaeefar, A.; Bahreini, A.; Mansoorian, M. R.; Malekhosseini, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multivisceral transplantations were initially done in animal models to understand the immunological effects. Later on, in human beings, it has been considered a salvage procedure for unresectable complex abdominal malignancies. With advancement in surgical techniques, availability of better immunosuppressive drugs, and development of better post-operative management protocols, outcomes have been improved after these complex surgical procedures. Objective: To analyze and report results of multivisceral, modified multivisceral, and small bowel transplantations done at Shiraz Organ Transplant Center, Shiraz, southern Iran. Methods: Medical records of all patients who underwent multivisceral, modified multivisceral, and small bowel transplants were retrospectively analyzed. Results: There were 18 patients. The most common indications for the procedure in our series were unresectable carcinoma of pancreas followed by short bowel syndrome. 10 patients were alive after a median follow-up of 8.7 (range: 3–32) months. The remaining 8 patients died post-operatively, mostly from septicemia. Conclusion: Multivisceral and small bowel transplantations are promising treatments for complex abdominal pathologies. PMID:25013680

  2. Nutrition and small bowel transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mercer, David F; Iverson, Angie K; Culwell, Karley A

    2014-10-01

    Intestinal transplantation is indicated for patients with intractable intestinal failure, especially when life-threatening complications of parenteral nutrition (PN) occur. The rates of 1- and 5-year graft survival range from 65%–80% and 40%–50% across differing age ranges, with adult recipients generally performing better. Despite nutrition being so central to intestinal transplantation, there are little published literature and essentially no data from clinical trials. In this review, we critically examine published manuscripts in an attempt to draw common themes between various transplant programs, covering experimental physiologic data, published nutrition protocols, and common postoperative management issues. We conclude that the well-established intestinal graft in a healthy state absorbs key nutrients adequately to wean off PN and that the wide variation in practice across different programs suggests that different approaches can equally lead to success. PMID:25606643

  3. Where are we at with short bowel syndrome and small bowel transplant

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Baris Dogu

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal failure can be defined as the critical reduction of functional gut mass below the minimal amount necessary for adequate digestion and absorption to satisfy body nutrient and fluid requirements in adults or children. Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by a state of malabsorption following extensive resection of the small bowel. SBS may occur after resection of more than 50% and is certain after resection of more than 70% of the small intestine, or if less than 100 cm of small bowel is left. Several treatment modalities other than total parenteral nutrition, including hormones (recombinant human growth hormone, glucagon-like peptide-2) and tailoring surgeries (Bianchi procedure, serial transverse enteroplasty), had been proposed, however these were either experimental or inefficient. Small bowel transplant is a rather new approach for SBS. The once feared field of solid organ transplantation is nowadays becoming more and more popular, even in developing countries. This is partially secondary to the developments in immunosuppressive strategy. In this regard, alemtuzumab deserves special attention. There are more complex surgeries, such as multivisceral transplantation, for multi-organ involvement including small bowel. This latter technique is relatively new when compared to small bowel transplant, and is performed in certain centers worldwide. In this review, an attempt is made to give an insight into small bowel syndrome, small bowel transplantation, and related issues. PMID:24175201

  4. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The gut bacterial microbiome, particularly its role in disease and inflammation, has gained international attention with the successful use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection. This success has led to studies exploring the role of FMT in other conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal system that have multifactorial etiologies. A shift in gut microbial composition in genetically susceptible individuals, an altered immune system, and environmental factors are all hypothesized to have a role in the pathogenesis of IBD. While numerous case reports and cohort studies have described the use of FMT in patients with IBD over the last 2 decades, the development of new sequencing techniques and results from 2 recent randomized, controlled trials have allowed for a better understanding of the relationship between the microbiome and the human host. However, despite these efforts, knowledge remains limited and the role of FMT in the management of IBD remains uncertain. Further investigation is necessary before FMT joins the current armamentarium of treatment options in clinical practice. PMID:27493597

  5. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Joanna; Grinspan, Ari

    2016-06-01

    The gut bacterial microbiome, particularly its role in disease and inflammation, has gained international attention with the successful use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection. This success has led to studies exploring the role of FMT in other conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal system that have multifactorial etiologies. A shift in gut microbial composition in genetically susceptible individuals, an altered immune system, and environmental factors are all hypothesized to have a role in the pathogenesis of IBD. While numerous case reports and cohort studies have described the use of FMT in patients with IBD over the last 2 decades, the development of new sequencing techniques and results from 2 recent randomized, controlled trials have allowed for a better understanding of the relationship between the microbiome and the human host. However, despite these efforts, knowledge remains limited and the role of FMT in the management of IBD remains uncertain. Further investigation is necessary before FMT joins the current armamentarium of treatment options in clinical practice. PMID:27493597

  6. Non-transplant surgery for short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Millar, Alastair J W

    2013-10-01

    The goal of any treatment programme for short bowel syndrome SBS is to achieve nutritional enteral autonomy. This must begin with conservation of as much bowel as possible from the time of first presentation. Frequent causes of the short bowel syndrome are intestinal atresia, necrotizing enterocolitis, midgut volvulus, extended intestinal aganglionosis, 'vanished gut' often associated with gastroschisis and occasionally catastrophic trauma. Atresia is more amenable to successful surgery than other causes, except when associated with gastroschisis. Intrinsic dysmotility has a poor prognosis. Intestinal lengthening procedures are only indicated if there is sufficient bowel dilatation. Extended intestinal aganglionosis is rarely amenable to any form of non-transplant surgery. Options available are to conserve bowel, close stomas early (use all available bowel to the maximum or even re-feed stoma effluent into the distal unused bowel), release adhesions causing obstruction, resect strictures, taper or excise localized dilatations and finally address dilated bowel with lengthening and tailoring operations. These procedures aim to improve effective peristalsis, thereby reducing bacterial overgrowth and improving nutrient contact with enteral mucosa to maximize absorption and intestinal adaptation. The Bianchi longitudinal splicing operation and the serial transverse enteroplasty operations have stood the test of time in providing considerable improvement in enteral nutritional autonomy in around 60% of cases. In SBS without dilatation attempts at 'mechanically' delaying transit (nipple valves, reversed bowel segments, colon interposition) have had inconsistent outcomes. Growing neomucosa and lengthening bowel by longitudinal stretch are still experimental. PMID:23982389

  7. [Indications and results of small bowel transplantation in adults].

    PubMed

    Joly, Francisca; Panis, Yves

    2012-02-01

    immunosuppression to control rejection. By 1990, the development of tacrolimus-based immunosuppression, as well as improved surgical techniques, the increased array of potent immunosuppressive medications, infection prophylaxis, and better patient selection helped to improve actuarial graft and patient survival rates for all types of intestine transplantation. In adult intestinal transplantation, three kinds of graft can be proposed: isolated small bowel, combined liver and small bowel, and multivisceral transplantation. In isolated small bowel transplantation, the length of the graft ranges between 1.5 and 2 meters, but depends on the size of the recipient (and the abdominal cavity volume, which is reduced). The graft is anastomosed with the recipient's duodenum or remnant proximal jejunum. the distal part of the small bowel graft is on a temporary stoma, in order to allow biopsies for early detection of rejection. Vascular anastomoses are usually performed directly on the aorta for the superior mesenteric artery and either the recipient's portal vein or vena cava for the donor superior mesenteric vein. In combined liver and intestinal transplantation, one venous anastomosis is avoided because the graft is in one piece. Finally, one specificity of this transplantation is the fact that it usually concerns patients with numerous previous abdominal operations and with total or subtotal enterectomy. Thus, the residual abdominal cavity is usually very small, and this can be a major problem for graft insertion. For this reason, abdominal closure is performed with a temporary prosthesis, because even cutaneous closure remains impossible if a compartment syndrome is to be avoided. PMID:23420959

  8. In vitro allograft irradiation prevents graft-versus-host disease in small-bowel transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.K.; Schraut, W.H.

    1985-04-01

    In small-bowel transplantation, the transfer of large numbers of donor lymphocytes with the intestinal allograft may provoke a lethal graft-versus-host reaction. The effectiveness of allograft irradiation in vitro as a method of preventing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was studied in a rat model of small-bowel transplantation, with the Lewis----Lewis X Brown Norway F1 hybrid strain combination. Cold harvested small-bowel allografts were irradiated immediately prior to heterotopic or orthotopic transplantation. Animals that had received heterotopic allografts irradiated with 0, 250, or 500 rad all died of GVHD after 14.4 +/- 3.0, 15.0 +/- 1.3, and 14.2 +/- 1.9 days, respectively. None of the animals that had received allografts treated with 1000 rad developed clinical or pathologic evidence of GVHD, however, and all survived for more than 6 months (P less than 0.001). Allograft function was studied in animals that underwent orthotopic transplantation. Recipients of nonirradiated orthotopic allografts all died of GVHD after 14.0 +/- 0.7 days, whereas recipients of allografts irradiated with 1000 rad all survived for more than 5 months (P less than 0.001). After 120 days, weight gain (51.8 +/- 11.7%), serum albumin (3.9 +/- 0.7 g/dl), serum triglycerides (67.0 +/- 24.3 mg/dl), CBC, and differential in these animals were not statistically different from those in either age-matched isograft recipients or normal animals, and when the rats were sacrificed, irradiated allografts showed no changes suggestive of radiation injury. These results indicate that irradiation of small-bowel allografts in vitro prevents development of GVHD, and that this can be achieved at a dose which does not cause injury to or malfunction of the allograft.

  9. Segmental reversal of the small bowel as an alternative to intestinal transplantation in patients with short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Panis, Y; Messing, B; Rivet, P; Coffin, B; Hautefeuille, P; Matuchansky, C; Rambaud, J C; Valleur, P

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reports the results of segmental reversal of the small bowel on parenteral nutrition dependency in patients with very short bowel syndrome. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Segmental reversal of the small bowel could be seen as an acceptable alternative to intestinal transplantation in patients with very short bowel syndrome deemed to be dependent on home parenteral nutrition. METHODS: Eight patients with short bowel syndrome underwent, at the time of intestinal continuity restoration, a segmental reversal of the distal (n = 7) or proximal (n = 1) small bowel. The median length of the remnant small bowel was 40 cm (range, 25 to 70 cm), including a median length of reversed segment of 12 cm (range, 8 to 15 cm). Five patients presented with jejunotransverse anastomosis, and one each with jejunorectal, jejuno left colonic, or jejunocaecal anastomosis with left colostomy. RESULTS: There were no postoperative deaths. Three patients were reoperated early for wound dehiscence, acute cholecystitis, and sepsis of unknown origin. Three patients experienced transient intestinal obstruction, which was treated conservatively. Median follow-up was 35 months (range, 2 to 108 months). One patient died of pulmonary embolism 7 months postoperatively. By the end of follow-up, three patients were on 100% oral nutrition, one had fluid and electrolyte infusions only, and, in the four other patients, parenteral nutrition regimen was reduced to four (range of 3 to 5) cyclic nocturnal infusions per week. Parenteral nutrition cessation was obtained in 3 of 5 patients at 1 years and in 3 of 3 patients at 4 years. CONCLUSION: Segmental reversal of the small bowel could be proposed as an alternative to intestinal transplantation in patients with short bowel syndrome before the possible occurrence of parenteral nutrition-related complications, because weaning for parenteral nutrition (four patients) or reduction of the frequency of infusions (four patients) was observed in the

  10. A Review of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in the Setting of Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nannegari, Veena; Roque, Saenz; Quera, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Although inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) rarely arises in the setting of solid organ transplantation, IBD has a higher incidence in this setting than in the general population and poses challenging management issues. The most common association is hepatic orthotopic transplant for primary sclerosing cholangitis. This article discusses IBD in the setting of liver transplantation, including both the development of de novo IBD and the evolution of preexisting IBD posttransplant, as well as management considerations in addressing colorectal cancer risk in this patient population.

  11. Ileal nutritional function after one-stage orthotopic ileum transplantation in the growing pig: reversal of lethal short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, M; Kuusanmäki, P; Halttunen, J

    1996-05-01

    Intestinal isolation is associated with hypoplasia of defunctioned mucosa and reduction in the segmental absorption, whereas the presence of luminal nutrition is essential for the expression of the ileal adaptive response after proximal small bowel resection. On the other hand, intensive postoperative graft monitoring is obligatory because of the disastrous consequences of small bowel graft rejection. Thus, the authors sought to develop an experimental ileum transplantation model that provided immediate graft placement in bowel continuity, together with readily available graft monitoring connection through a proximal Roux-en-Y enterostomy. Four groups of pigs were prepared: RESTX (n = 9), proximal 50% small bowel resection with simultaneous orthotopic ileum autotransplantation; RES (n = 7), proximal 50% small bowel resection; NONRES (n = 6), transection; and SB (n = 5), short bowel. Early (1 to 4 weeks) and long-term (5 to 12 weeks) studies of animal growth, nutritional status, disaccharide absorption, water and electrolyte balances, and liver function were performed after ileum autotransplantation (IAT) in relation to small intestine of variable length with undivided mesentery (intact neural and lymphatic connections). The perioperative transplantation mortality rate remained at about 10%. Reasons not related to the transplantation procedure accounted for the late complication rate of 38%. In the ileum autotransplantation (RESTX) group, weight gain was recovered 2 to 3 weeks after transplantation, and the mean weight reached the preoperative level at 5 weeks. The SB pigs underwent progressive weight loss. The transection (NONRES) and proximal resection (RES) animals gained weight at similar rates. IAT had no effect on the plasma protein concentrations. Proximal resection, with or without IAT, was associated with depressed plasma cholesterol contents in the early period. Plasma cholesterol levels amended long-term, after both IAT and proximal resection. IAT

  12. Small bowel preservation for intestinal transplantation: a review.

    PubMed

    Roskott, Anne Margot C; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B; Dijkstra, Gerard; Koudstaal, Lyan G; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Ploeg, Rutger J

    2011-02-01

    Intestinal transplantation has become the therapy of choice for patients with intestinal failure and life-threatening complications from total parenteral nutrition. Results, however, remain inferior as compared with other transplant types with the quality of the organ graft as the most important factor of outcome after transplantation. The intestine is extremely sensitive to ischemia. Unfortunately, a relatively long ischemic preservation period is inevitable. The current standard in organ preservation [cold storage (CS) with University of Wisconsin solution] was developed for kidney/liver preservation and is suboptimal for the intestinal graft despite good results for other organs. This review aimed at appraising the results from the use of previously applied and recently developed preservation solutions and techniques to identify key areas for improvement. As the studies available do not reveal the most effective method for intestinal preservation, an optimal strategy will result from a synergistic effect of different vital elements identified from a review of published material from the literature. A key factor is the composition of the solution using a low-viscosity solution to facilitate washout of blood, including amino acids to improve viability, impermeants and colloids to prevent edema, and buffer for pH-homeostasis. Optimizing conditions include a vascular flush before CS and luminal preservation. The most effective composition of the luminal solution and a practical, clinically applicable optimal technique are yet to reach finality. Short-duration oxygenated arterial and/or luminal perfusion have to be considered. Thus, a tailor-made approach to luminal preservation solution and technique need further investigation in transplant models and the human setting to develop the ultimate technique meeting the physiologic demands of the intestinal graft during preservation. PMID:21083772

  13. Herpes simplex colitis in a child with combined liver and small bowel transplant.

    PubMed

    Delis, S; Kato, T; Ruiz, P; Mittal, N; Babinski, L; Tzakis, A

    2001-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has been a rare cause of gastrointestinal (GI) infection, especially in immunocompromised patients. A variety of GI sites may be involved; however, only three reported cases of HSV colitis have been documented in the literature. To our knowledge, this is the first report of HSV colitis in a small bowel transplant recipient. PMID:11560759

  14. Management of intestinal failure in inflammatory bowel disease: Small intestinal transplantation or home parenteral nutrition?

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Elizabeth; Allan, Philip; Ramu, Amrutha; Vaidya, Anil; Travis, Simon; Lal, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease and Crohn’s disease in particular, is a common cause of intestinal failure. Current therapeutic options include home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. For most patients, home intravenous therapy including parenteral nutrition, with a good probability of long-term survival, is the favoured choice. However, in selected patients, with specific features that may shorten survival or complicate home parenteral nutrition, intestinal transplantation presents a viable alternative. We present survival, complications, quality of life and economic considerations that currently influence individualised decision-making between home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. PMID:24696601

  15. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in patients with small bowel transplantation: Single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Sait Murat; Kılınç, Selçuk; Kebapçı, Eyüp; Tuğmen, Cem; Gürkan, Alp; Baran, Maşallah; Kurtulmuş, Yusuf; Ölmez, Mustafa; Karaca, Cezmi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy on the prevention of acute rejection and graft vs host disease following small bowel transplantation. METHODS: In our transplantation center, 6 isolated intestinal transplants have been performed with MSC therapy since 2009. The primary reasons for transplants were short gut syndrome caused by surgical intestine resection for superior mesenteric artery thrombosis (n = 4), Crohn’s disease (n = 1) and intestinal aganglionosis (n = 1). Two of the patients were children. At the time of reperfusion, the first dose of MSCs cultured from the patient’s bone marrow was passed into the transplanted intestinal artery at a dose of 1000000 cells/kg. The second and third doses of MSCs were given directly into the mesenteric artery through the arterial anastomosis using an angiography catheter on day 15 and 30 post-transplant. RESULTS: The median follow-up for these patients was 10.6 mo (min: 2 mo-max: 30 mo). Three of the patients developed severe acute rejection. One of these patients did not respond to bolus steroid therapy. Although the other two patients did respond to anti-rejection treatment, they developed severe fungal and bacterial infections. All of these patients died in the 2nd and 3rd months post-transplant due to sepsis. The remaining patients who did not have acute rejection had good quality of life with no complications observed during the follow-up period. In addition, their intestinal grafts were functioning properly in the 13th, 25th and 30th month post-transplant. The patients who survived did not encounter any problems related to MSC transplantation. CONCLUSION: Although this is a small case series and not a randomized study, it is our opinion that small bowel transplantation is an effective treatment for intestinal failure, and MSC therapy may help to prevent acute rejection and graft vs host disease following intestinal transplantation. PMID:25009395

  16. Xenogeneic lung transplantation models

    PubMed Central

    Burdorf, Lars; Azimzadeh, Agnes M.; Pierson, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Study of lung xenografts has proven useful to understand the remaining barriers to successful transplantation of other organ xenografts. In this chapter, the history and current status of lung xenotransplantation will be briefly reviewed and two different experimental models, the ex vivo porcine-to-human lung perfusion and the in vivo xenogeneic lung transplantation, will be presented. We will focus on the technical details of these lung xenograft models in sufficient detail, list the needed materials and mention analysis techniques to allow others to adopt them with minimal learning curve. PMID:22565996

  17. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Improves the Quality of Life in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yao; Zhu, Weiming; Gong, Jianfeng; Guo, Dong; Gu, Lili; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. To determine the effect of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) on quality of life (QoL) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods. Fourteen IBD patients, including 11 Ulcerative colitis (UC) and 3 Crohn's disease (CD), were treated with FMT via colonoscopy or nasojejunal tube infusion. QoL was measured by IBD Questionnaire (IBDQ). Disease activity and IBDQ were evaluated at enrollment and four weeks after treatment. Patients' attitude concerning the treatment was also investigated. Results. One patient was excluded due to intolerance. All the other patients finished the study well. Mean Mayo score in UC patients decreased significantly (5.80 ± 1.87 versus 1.50 ± 1.35, P < 0.01). Mean IBDQ scores of both UC and CD patients increased (135.50 ± 27.18 versus 177.30 ± 20.88, P = 0.00063, and 107.33 ± 9.45 versus 149.00 ± 20.07, P = 0.024) four weeks after fecal microbiota transplantation. There was no correlation between the IBDQ score and Mayo score before and after FMT. Patients refused to take FMT as treatment repeatedly in a short time. Conlusions. Fecal microbiota transplantation improves quality of life significantly in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26146498

  18. The Surgical Approach to Short Bowel Syndrome – Autologous Reconstruction versus Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rege, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a state of malabsorption resulting from massive small bowel resection leading to parenteral nutrition (PN) dependency. Considerable advances have been achieved in the medical and surgical management of SBS over the last few decades. Methods This review discusses in detail the surgical approach to SBS. Results Widespread use of PN enables long-term survival in patients with intestinal failure but at the cost of PN-associated life-threatening complications including catheter-associated blood stream infection, venous thrombosis, and liver disease. The goal of management of intestinal failure due to SBS is to enable enteral autonomy and wean PN by means of a multi-disciplinary approach. Availability of modified enteral feeding formulas have simplified nutrition supplementation in SBS patients. Similarly, advances in the medical field have made medications like growth hormone and glucagon-like peptide (GLP2) available to improve water and nutrient absorption as well as to enable achieving enteral autonomy. Autologous gastrointestinal reconstruction (AGIR) includes various techniques which manipulate the bowel surgically to facilitate the bowel adaptation process and restoration of enteral nutrition. Ultimately, intestinal transplantation can serve as the last option for the cure of intestinal failure when selectively applied. Conclusion SBS continues to be a challenging medical problem. Best patient outcomes can be achieved through an individualized plan, using various AGIR techniques to complement each other, and intestinal transplantation as a last resort for cure. Maximum benefit and improved outcomes can be achieved by caring for SBS patients at highly specialized intestinal rehabilitation centers. PMID:26288592

  19. Blockade of the B7-CD28 pathway by CTLA4-Ig counteracts rejection and prolongs survival in small bowel transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kurlberg, G; Haglind, E; Schön, K; Törnqvist, H; Lycke, N

    2000-03-01

    Allograft rejection involves T-cell activation, requiring T-cell receptor interactions with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and costimulatory signals delivered through the B7-CD28 pathway. We evaluated the effect of blocking this pathway on graft rejection and survival, in a rat experimental model of small bowel transplantation. Heterotopic small bowel transplantation was performed between PVG donor rats and DA recipient rats. The recipient animals were treated with CTLA4-Ig or irrelevant immunoglobulin (Ig)G as control and followed for 18, 30 or 90 days. The survival rate and degree of inflammation and accumulation of CD4+ T cells and macrophages were determined in the transplanted bowels. We found that administration of CTLA4-Ig significantly improved the survival rate compared to control rats: after 30 days 73% of the treated rats had survived and at 90 days 5/8 rats were still living, whereas in the control group only 2/8 rats had survived. The grafts showed preserved mucosal structure with only a mild degree of subacute inflammation and the accumulation of CD4+ T cells and macrophages was noticeably reduced in treated animals as compared to control rats. Necrosis was extensive in control rats, whereas CTLA4-Ig treated animals had grafts with at least some preserved villus morphology and no necrotic tissue. Although small bowel transplantation has proven exceptionally difficult, in this study we have shown that CTLA4-Ig treatment may provide a promising strategy to prevent rejection and induce long term tolerance and graft survival. PMID:10736090

  20. Recurrence of autoimmune liver disease and inflammatory bowel disease after pediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 10% of children with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and 30% of those with sclerosing cholangitis (SC) require liver transplantation (LT). LT is indicated in patients who present with fulminant hepatic failure (ie, with encephalopathy) and in those who develop end-stage liver disease despite treatment. After LT, recurrent AIH is reported in approximately 30% of patients and recurrent SC in up to 50%. Diagnosis of recurrence is based on biochemical abnormalities, seropositivity for autoantibodies, interface hepatitis on histology, steroid dependence, and, for SC, presence of cholangiopathy. Recurrence of SC after LT is often associated with poorly controlled inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recurrence may even appear years after LT; therefore, steroid-based immunosuppression should be maintained at a higher dose than that used for patients transplanted for nonautoimmune liver diseases. Although the impact of recurrent disease on graft function is controversial, it seems that in pediatric LT recipients recurrence of AIH or SC is associated with compromised graft survival. Exacerbation of preexistent IBD may be observed after LT for SC or AIH, and IBD appears to have a more aggressive course than before LT. In addition, IBD can develop de novo following LT. Liver Transplantation 22 1275-1283 2016 AASLD. PMID:27257963

  1. Primate models in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Douglas J; Kirk, Allan D

    2013-09-01

    Large animal models have long served as the proving grounds for advances in transplantation, bridging the gap between inbred mouse experimentation and human clinical trials. Although a variety of species have been and continue to be used, the emergence of highly targeted biologic- and antibody-based therapies has required models to have a high degree of homology with humans. Thus, the nonhuman primate has become the model of choice in many settings. This article will provide an overview of nonhuman primate models of transplantation. Issues of primate genetics and care will be introduced, and a brief overview of technical aspects for various transplant models will be discussed. Finally, several prominent immunosuppressive and tolerance strategies used in primates will be reviewed. PMID:24003248

  2. Ethics of emerging technologies and their transition to accepted practice: intestinal transplant for short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cummings, C L; Mercurio, M R

    2012-10-01

    Parental counseling becomes complex when considering the use of emerging technologies, especially if it is unclear whether the level of evidence is sufficient to transform the proposed therapy into accepted practice. This paper addresses ethical issues underlying medical decision-making and counseling in the setting of emerging treatments, when long-term outcomes are still in the process of being fully validated. We argue that the ethical transition of emerging technologies, ideally from ethically impermissible to permissible, to obligatory, depends primarily on two factors: outcome data (or prognosis) and treatment feasibility. To illustrate these points, we will use intestinal transplant for short bowel syndrome (SBS) as a specific example. After reviewing the data, this paper will identify the ethical justifications for both comfort care only and intestinal transplant in patients with ultra SBS, and argue that both are ethically permissible, but neither is obligatory. The approach outlined will not only be valuable as ultra SBS outcomes data continue to change, but will also be applicable to other novel therapies as they emerge in perinatal medicine. PMID:23014383

  3. Modulating the microbiota in inflammatory bowel diseases: prebiotics, probiotics or faecal transplantation?

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Kristin A; Boesmans, Leen; Boets, Eef

    2014-11-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are the two major phenotypes of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) which constitute a spectrum of chronic, debilitating diseases characterised by a relapsing inflammation of the intestinal mucosal lining. Evidence from a variety of disciplines implicates the intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis of idiopathic IBD and their complications, including pouchitis. Many studies have reported a dysbiosis in IBD, characterised by a decrease in diversity, a decreased abundance of some dominant commensal members (such as Clostridium IV and XIVa) and an increase in detrimental bacteria (such as sulphate reducing bacteria and Escherichia coli). Therapies such as prebiotics and probiotics aim to selectively manipulate the intestinal microbiota and have been evaluated as an attractive therapeutic option with few side effects. The multispecies product VSL#3 was found effective in preventing and maintaining remission in pouchitis, whereas both VSL#3 and E. coli Nissle were effective in maintaining remission in UC. A more drastic approach to restore the composition of the microbiota and correct the underlying imbalance is a faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). FMT has been successfully applied to treat patients with even recalcitrant Clostridium difficile infection. Particularly in UC, the majority of studies suggest that FMT may be an effective treatment option although the evidence is still limited. It is anticipated that our increasing knowledge on the composition and function of the intestinal microbiota components will allow in the future for a better selection of highly performing bacteria with specific functions required for specific benefits. PMID:24969143

  4. Small bowel transplantation complicated by cytomegalovirus tissue invasive disease without viremia.

    PubMed

    Avsar, Yesim; Cicinnati, Vito R; Kabar, Iyad; Wolters, Heiner; Anthoni, Christoph; Schmidt, Hartmut H J; Beckebaum, Susanne

    2014-06-01

    We report on a small bowel transplant patient, donor/recipient seropositive (D+/R+) for cytomegalovirus (CMV), with a clinical course complicated by CMV disease. Anti-CMV prophylaxis was given for 100 days. Immunosuppression consisted of alemtuzumab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. Five months posttransplant, CMV tissue invasive disease of the upper gastrointestinal tract was evident without the presence of viremia, tested by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Complete viral load suppression was achieved with intravenous ganciclovir, followed by valganciclovir for secondary prophylaxis. Mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone were discontinued. Shortly thereafter the patient presented with recurrent CMV and candida esophagitis. While on ganciclovir and caspofungin, the patient developed CMV tissue invasive disease of the ileal graft, with persistent absence of viremia. Foscarnet and CMV immunoglobulin were added. Viral load declined to undetectable levels; however, clinical improvement did not occur due to occurrence of graft rejection. Despite infliximab and high dose prednisolone, graft rejection was progressive, requiring surgical explantation of the graft. This case highlights the importance of additional diagnostic tools such as endoscopy including PCR analysis of tissue samples. Extension of primary antiviral prophylaxis interval up to 6 months and prolonged retreatment for recurrent CMV disease may be useful to avoid severe CMV-related complications. PMID:24703746

  5. Elevated ST2 Distinguishes Incidences of Pediatric Heart and Small Bowel Transplant Rejection.

    PubMed

    Mathews, L R; Lott, J M; Isse, K; Lesniak, A; Landsittel, D; Demetris, A J; Sun, Y; Mercer, D F; Webber, S A; Zeevi, A; Fischer, R T; Feingold, B; Turnquist, H R

    2016-03-01

    Elevated serum soluble (s) suppressor of tumorigenicity-2 is observed during cardiovascular and inflammatory bowel diseases. To ascertain whether modulated ST2 levels signify heart (HTx) or small bowel transplant (SBTx) rejection, we quantified sST2 in serially obtained pediatric HTx (n = 41) and SBTx recipient (n = 18) sera. At times of biopsy-diagnosed HTx rejection (cellular and/or antibody-mediated), serum sST2 was elevated compared to rejection-free time points (1714 ± 329 vs. 546.5 ± 141.6 pg/mL; p = 0.0002). SBTx recipients also displayed increased serum sST2 during incidences of rejection (7536 ± 1561 vs. 2662 ± 543.8 pg/mL; p = 0.0347). Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that serum sST2 > 600 pg/mL could discriminate time points of HTx rejection and nonrejection (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.724 ± 0.053; p = 0.0003). ROC analysis of SBTx measures revealed a similar discriminative capacity (AUC = 0.6921 ± 0.0820; p = 0.0349). Quantitative evaluation of both HTx and SBTx biopsies revealed that rejection significantly increased allograft ST2 expression. Pathway and Network Analysis of biopsy data pinpointed ST2 in the dominant pathway modulated by rejection and predicted tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-1β as upstream activators. In total, our data indicate that alloimmune-associated pro-inflammatory cytokines increase ST2 during rejection. They also demonstrate that routine serum sST2 quantification, potentially combined with other biomarkers, should be investigated further to aid in the noninvasive diagnosis of rejection. PMID:26663613

  6. Any Future for Fecal Microbiota Transplantation as Treatment Strategy for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases?

    PubMed

    Kump, Patrizia; Högenauer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a novel therapeutic procedure aiming at restoring a normal intestinal microbiota by application of fecal microorganisms from a healthy subject into the gastrointestinal tract of a patient. FMT is the most effective treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (CDI). These infections also occur in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), where case series demonstrated a successful treatment of CDI by FMT in 83-92% of patients. The effect of FMT on the activity of IBD has mainly been investigated in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, including 3 randomized controlled trials. So far, 2 randomized controlled trials showed a superiority of FMT compared to placebo in inducing remission in UC, while 1 study found no significant difference to placebo. The variation in response to FMT between these studies as well as in the uncontrolled trials might be explained by many differences in the way of FMT application, patient pretreatment and patient and donor selection. The data for the use of FMT in Crohn's disease and pouchitis are sparse; currently, no conclusion can be drawn regarding the effectiveness of FMT in these indications. It needs to be noted that cases of IBD activation after FMT have been reported. So far, FMT can only be recommended to be used for the treatment of concomitant CDI in IBD in clinical practice. For treating IBD irrespective of CDI, FMT should be only used in clinical trials. Current forms of FMT, especially protocols using repeated application, are very time and personnel consuming. Future trends are the use of defined stable microbiota preparations, in particular oral preparations, which will enable better and larger controlled trails for investigating FMT in IBD. PMID:27548724

  7. Recombinant HLA-G as Tolerogenic Immunomodulant in Experimental Small Bowel Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    von Websky, Martin W.; Kitamura, Koji; Ludwig-Portugall, Isis; Kurts, Christian; von Laffert, Maximilian; LeMaoult, Joel; Carosella, Edgardo D.; Abu-Elmagd, Kareem; Kalff, Joerg C.; Schäfer, Nico

    2016-01-01

    The non-classical MHC I paralogue HLA-G is expressed by cytotrophoblast cells and implicated with fetomaternal tolerance by downregulating the maternal adaptive and innate immune response against the fetus. HLA-G expression correlates with favorable graft outcome in humans and recently promising immunosuppressive effects of therapeutic HLA-G in experimental transplantation (skin allograft acceptance) were shown. Consequently, we examined this novel therapeutic approach in solid organ transplantation. In this study, therapeutic recombinant HLA-G5 was evaluated for the first time in a solid organ model of acute rejection (ACR) after orthotopic intestinal transplantation (ITX). Allogenic ITX was performed in rats (Brown Norway to Lewis) with and without HLA-G treatment. It was found that HLA-G treatment significantly reduced histologically proven ACR at both an early and late postoperative timepoint (POD 4/7), concomitant to a functionally preserved graft contractility at POD 7. Interestingly, graft infiltration by myeloperoxidase+ cells was significantly reduced at POD7 by HLA-G treatment. Moreover, HLA-G treatment showed an effect on the allogenic T-cell immune response as assessed by flow cytometry: The influx of recipient-derived CD8+ T-cells into the graft mesenteric lymphnodes at POD7 was significantly reduced while CD4+ populations were not affected. As a potential mechanism of action, an induction of T-reg populations in the mesenteric lymphnodes was postulated, but flow cytometric analysis of classical CD4+/CD25+/FoxP3+Treg-cells showed no significant alteration by HLA-G treatment. The novel therapeutic approach using recombinant HLA-G5 reported herein demonstrates a significant immunosuppressive effect in this model of allogenic experimental intestinal transplantation. This effect may be mediated via inhibition of recipient-derived CD8+ T-cell populations either directly or by induction of non-classical Treg populations. PMID:27404095

  8. [An experimental model of hepatointestinal transplant in the pig with clinical applications].

    PubMed

    López Santamaría, M; Gámez, M; Murcia, J; Bueno, J; Paz, J A; Canser, E; Reinoso, F; Muñoz, J; Lobato, R; Martínez, L; de Miguel, E; Polanco, I; Jara, P; Tovar, J

    1996-10-01

    A model of experimental hepatointestinal transplant in pigs, with clinical applications is presented. Ten animals received a graft composed by the liver and the full length of the small bowel. Two pigs died during the transplant and in eight the surgical procedure was well tolerated with a good revascularization of the grafts. The coagulation parameters were normal after the transplant and only minor biochemical disturbances were found. The main difficulties of the surgical technique are related with the poor tolerance of the pig to the portal and caval clamping, and the close relationships of the duodenum, pancreas and distal colon, produced by the 360 degrees anti-clockwise bowel rotation around the mesenteric vessels. Clamping the supraceliac aorta during the implant of the graft keeps the animal hemodynamically stable and makes unnecessary the use of the more complicated veno venous shunt. PMID:9131980

  9. Establishment of a novel extracorporeal bowel model to study luminal approaches to treat inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Breitrück, Anne; Sparmann, Gisela; Mitzner, Steffen; Kerkhoff, Claus

    2013-11-01

    We have established an extracorporeal bowel model system for the analysis of early events in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and therapeutic applications. This model consists of an intestinal segment that is cannulated and perfused in situ, allowing the investigation of cellular responses of apical mucosa cells on luminal applied substances. Short-term treatment with iodoacetamide mimicked experimental intestinal inflammation in IBD, as indicated by histological alterations such as hemorrhage, hyperemia and loss of regular crypt architecture, as well as enhanced expression of cytokines (e.g. IL-6, IL-10 and MCP-1) compared with control segments perfused with media. Perfusion of therapeutic agents (e.g. dexamethasone or Mutaflor) in the small intestine segment significantly reduced the features of early inflammation that are induced by iodoacetamide. Moreover, similar data were obtained for Resormin(®), a montmorillonite-illite mixed-layer mineral (smectite), indicating that smectites might be a newly identified therapeutic option for IBD. In summary, this model could provide novel insights into epithelial injury as well as genesis of IBD and, therefore, be useful in testing the therapeutic potential of compounds for IBD therapy. PMID:24046362

  10. Influence of Previous Inflammatory Bowel Disease on the Outcome of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Matched-Pair Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rabian, Florence; Porcher, Raphael; Sicre de Fontbrune, Flore; Lioure, Bruno; Laplace, Anne; Nguyen, Stephanie; Tabrizi, Reza; Vigouroux, Stephane; Tomowiak, Cécile; Maillard, Nathalie; Suarez, Felipe; Delage, Jeremy; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Socié, Gérard

    2016-09-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are associated with increased risk of hematologic malignancies. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) could be a curative strategy in this setting, but has been thought to be associated with increased nonrelapse mortality (NRM). We conducted a national French retrospective analysis of patients with IBD who underwent allogeneic HSCT for hematologic malignancies and were matched with 3 controls according to recipient, donor, and transplant characteristics. Between 2004 and 2015, 18 patients with IBD underwent allogeneic HSCT. With a median follow-up of 33 months for the patients with IBD and 57 months for controls, the cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 39% for the patients with IBD and 40% for controls (hazard ratio [HR], 1.10; P = .82). The cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD at 48 months was 52% for the patients with IBD and 43% for controls (HR, 0.92; P = .89). Nonrelapse mortality at 48 months was 19% for the patients with IBD and 11% for controls (HR, 4.93; P = .067). Overall survival at 48 months was 59% for the patients with IBD and 60% for matched controls (HR, 1.35; P = .56). In conclusion, IBD should not be considered a contraindication for transplantation, and its impact on comorbidity indexes should be reduced. PMID:27246370

  11. A renal transplantation model for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, S A H; Naqvi, S A A; Zafar, M N; Hussain, Z; Hashmi, A; Hussain, M; Akhtar, S F; Ahmed, E; Aziz, T; Sultan, G; Sultan, S; Mehdi, S H; Lal, M; Ali, B; Mubarak, M; Faiq, S M

    2011-11-01

    The estimated incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Pakistan is 100 per million population. Paucity and high costs of renal replacement therapy allows only 10% to get dialysis and 4-5% transplants. Our center, a government organization, started a dialysis and transplant program in 1980s where all services were provided free of charge to all patients. It was based on the concept of community government partnership funded by both partners. The guiding principles were equity, transparency, accountability and development of all facilities under one roof. This partnership has sustained itself for 30 years with an annual budget of $25 million in 2009. Daily 600 patients are dialyzed and weekly 10-12 receive transplants. One- and 5-year graft survival of 3000 transplants is 92% and 85%, respectively. The institute became a focus of transplantation in Pakistan and played a vital role in the campaign against transplant tourism and in promulgation of transplant law of 2007, and also helped to increase altruistic transplants in the country. This model emphasizes that in developing countries specialized centers in government sector are necessary for transplantation to progress and community support can make it available to the common man. PMID:21883911

  12. Solid Organ Transplantation in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD): Analysis of Transplantation Outcome and IBD Activity in a Large Single Center Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzler, Fabian; Friedrich, Matthias; Stallhofer, Johannes; Schönermarck, Ulf; Fischereder, Michael; Habicht, Antje; Karbalai, Nazanin; Wolf, Christiane; Angelberger, Marianne; Olszak, Torsten; Beigel, Florian; Tillack, Cornelia; Göke, Burkhard; Zachoval, Reinhart; Denk, Gerald; Guba, Markus; Rust, Christian; Grüner, Norbert; Brand, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently, limited data of the outcome of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in patients after solid organ transplantation (SOT) are available. We aimed to analyze effects of SOT on the IBD course in a large IBD patient cohort. Methods Clinical data from 1537 IBD patients were analyzed for patients who underwent SOT (n = 31) between July 2002 and May 2014. Sub-analyses included SOT outcome parameters, IBD activity before and after SOT, and efficacy of IBD treatment. Results 4.74% of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 0.84% of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) underwent SOT (p = 2.69 x 10−6, UC vs. CD). 77.4% of patients with SOT underwent liver transplantation (LTx) with tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive therapy after SOT. All LTx were due to primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) or PSC overlap syndromes. Six patients (19.4%) required renal transplantation and one patient (3.2%) heart transplantation. A survival rate of 83.9% after a median follow-up period of 103 months was observed. Before SOT, 65.0% of patients were in clinical remission and 5 patients received immunosuppressive therapy (16.1%). After SOT, 61.0% of patients were in remission (p = 1.00 vs. before SOT) and 29.0% required IBD-specific immunosuppressive or anti-TNF therapy (p = 0.54 vs. before SOT). 42.9% of patients with worsening of IBD after SOT were at higher risk of needing steroid therapy for increased IBD activity (p = 0.03; relative risk (RR): 10.29; 95% CI 1.26–84.06). Four patients (13.0%) needed anti-TNF therapy after SOT (response rate 75%). Conclusions SOT was more common in UC patients due to the higher prevalence of PSC-related liver cirrhosis in UC. Despite mainly tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive regimens, outcome of SOT and IBD was excellent in this cohort. In this SOT cohort, concomitant immunosuppressive therapy due to IBD was well tolerated. PMID:26288187

  13. The characterization of a rabbit model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, D.; Savage, F.; Sams, V.; Boulos, P.

    1995-01-01

    The absence of a simple, clinically relevant, animal model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) hampers research into this disease. In this study, colitis was induced in rabbits by intracolonic installation of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNB) in 25% ethanol. Rabbits were killed from zero hours to 6 weeks and their colons examined. Rabbits were examined by endoscopy at weekly intervals. A single dose of TNB in ethanol produced dose dependent inflammation and ulceration, which at its optimum (40 mg) resulted in cobblestoning, strictures, and bowel wall thickening. The damage score at endoscopy was consistent with the score on macroscopic examination of the colon. Histopathological features of inflammation and ulceration observed in all animals that received 40 mg TNB included crypt abscesses, ulceration, crypt architectural distortion and, occasionally, granulomas and pseudopolyps. These changes, which are similar to those observed in IBD, persisted for 6 weeks. No lasting abnormalities were observed in control animals treated with TNB in saline, with ethanol alone, or with saline only. Histopathological similarity and the prolonged duration of inflammation, compared to other models, make this a suitable model for investigating inflammation in the colon. Furthermore, the model is accessible to endoscopy which adds to its value in experimental studies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7547433

  14. Spontaneous and transgenic rodent models of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Jurjus, Abdo

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder with many different putative influences mediating disease onset, severity, progression and diminution. Spontaneous natural IBD is classically expressed as Crohn's Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC) commonly found in primates; lymphoplasmocytic enteritis, eosinophilic gastritis and colitis, and ulcerative colitis with neuronal hyperplasia in dogs; and colitis in horses. Spontaneous inflammatory bowel disease has been noted in a number of rodent models which differ in genetic strain background, induced mutation, microbiota influences and immunopathogenic pathways. Histological lesions in Crohn's Disease feature noncaseating granulomatous inflammation while UC lesions typically exhibit ulceration, lamina propria inflammatory infiltrates and lack of granuloma development. Intestinal inflammation caused by CD and UC is also associated with increased incidence of intestinal neoplasia. Transgenic murine models have determined underlying etiological influences and appropriate therapeutic targets in IBD. This literature review will discuss current opinion and findings in spontaneous IBD, highlight selected transgenic rodent models of IBD and discuss their respective pathogenic mechanisms. It is very important to provide accommodation of induced putative deficits in activities of daily living and to assess discomfort and pain levels in the face of significant morbidity and/or mortality in these models. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome) and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis, and evaluating ways in which they influence disease expression represent potential investigative approaches with the greatest potential for new discoveries. PMID:26155200

  15. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models for Studying Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Takahito; Himuro, Hidetomo; Okada, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition that is mediated by very complex mechanisms controlled by genetic, immune, and environmental factors. More than 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse strains have been established since 1993 for studying IBD. Although mouse models cannot fully reflect human IBD, they have provided significant contributions for not only understanding the mechanism, but also developing new therapeutic means for IBD. Indeed, 20 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models carry the susceptibility genes identified in human IBD, and the functions of some other IBD susceptibility genes have also been dissected out using mouse models. Cutting-edge technologies such as cell-specific and inducible knockout systems, which were recently employed to mouse IBD models, have further enhanced the ability of investigators to provide important and unexpected rationales for developing new therapeutic strategies for IBD. In this review article, we briefly introduce 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models that spontaneously develop intestinal inflammation. PMID:26387641

  16. Ex-vivo Resection and Small-Bowel Auto-transplantation for the Treatment of Tumors at the Root of the Mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Nikeghbalian, S.; Aliakbarian, M.; Kazemi, K.; Shamsaeefar, A. R.; Mehdi, S. H.; Bahreini, A.; Malek-Hosseini, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tumors involving the root of the mesentery are generally regarded as “unresectable” with conventional surgical techniques. Resection with conventional surgery may end in life-threatening complications in these patients. Ex-vivo resection and auto-transplantation avoids excessive bleeding and prevents ischemic related damage to the small intestine and other organs. Objective: To share our experience of ex-vivo resection of the tumors with involvement of small bowel mesentery followed by small bowel auto-transplantation. Methods: In this study, medical records of all the patients who underwent ex-vivo resection and auto-transplantation at our center were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The most common indication for the procedure in our series was locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Our survival rate was 50% with a mean±SD follow-up of 10.1±9.8 (range: 0–26) months. Causes of early in-hospital mortality were multi-organ failure, sepsis, and cerebrovascular accident. Recurrence of disease was noted in one patient while one patient developed hepatic metastasis after 20 months of surgery. Conclusion: Ex-vivo resection of the tumor and auto-transplantation is the surgical treatment of choice for the locally advanced abdominal tumors involving the root of the mesentery. PMID:25184032

  17. Comparison of experimental mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, Soo Youn; Cho, Kyung-Ah; Kang, Jihee Lee; Kim, Kwang Ho; Woo, So-Youn

    2014-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is multifactorial and involves immunological, environmental and genetic factors. Although there are no animal models that effectively mimic human IBD, experimental models allow us to analyze the mechanisms of chronic intestinal inflammation. IBD can be induced in mice by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or by a 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)‑ethanol enema, which evoke immune responses and colitis. In this study, in order to compare the mechanisms of inflammatory response in mice, 3 distinct models of IBD were established: 2% TNBS-induced acute colitis, 4% DSS-induced acute colitis and 2% DSS-induced chronic colitis. In addition, to evaluate the effects of TNBS on inflammasome activation, we used caspase-1 knockout (KO) mice. Changes in both body weight and survival became prominent after day 1 in the 2% TNBS‑induced colitis model, and after day 5 in the 4% DSS-induced colitis model. The TNBS- and DSS-treated mice, but not the caspase-1 KO mice, showed a massive bowel edema and disruption of epithelial cells. The level of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) was increased in all tested tissues of the TNBS- and DSS-treated groups, apart from the basal membrane (BM) in the DSS-induced colitis groups and the lamina propria (LP) in the DSS-induced chronic colitis group. We further analyzed different subsets of CD4(+) T cells in LP and found that the levels of interferon (IFN)γ‑secreting (IFNγ(+)), IL-17‑secreting (IL-17(+)), but not those of IL-4-secreting (IL-4(+)) T cells increased upon treatment with TNBS or DSS. In addition, discrepancies between the histopathologies of wild-type and caspase-1 KO mice indicated that the pathogenesis of IBD may be associated with the inflammasome pathway responses mediated by caspase‑1 in TNBS‑induced colitis. PMID:24285285

  18. Ten-Year Experience With Bowel Transplantation at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital.

    PubMed

    Chang, H K; Kim, S Y; Kim, J I; Kim, S I; Whang, J K; Choi, J Y; Park, J M; Jung, E S; Rha, S E; Kim, D G; Moon, I S; Lee, M D

    2016-03-01

    A retrospective review of intestinal transplantation (ITx) at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital was made by collecting clinical data over the past 10 years. Fifteen consecutive cases from 2004 were analyzed. Five children and 10 adults (6 months to 69 years of age) were included. Primary diseases in adults included 4 mesenteric vessel thromboses, 2 strangulations, and 1 each of visceral myopathy, malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), mesenteric lymphangiectasis, and injury. Pediatric cases involved 2 Hirschsprung disease, 2 visceral myopathy, and 1 necrotizing enterocolitis. Three of 7 stomas were closed using a serial transverse enteroplasty procedure before transplantation. The ITx were performed using 3 living-donor Itx, 12 deceased-donor ITx, 14 isolated Itx, and 1 modified multivisceral transplantation. Daclizumab, basiliximab, alemtusumab, or basiliximab with rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) was used for the induction; tacrolimus monotherapy was used as the basic maintenance immunosuppressant; and m-TOR inhibitor was used for renal dysfunction patients. Seven cases of acute cellular rejection were treated with rATG. Three cases of antibody-mediated rejection were treated with rituximab alone or with rituximab and bortezomib combination. There were 4 cases of early mortality within 6 months after Itx. Causes of death were declamping shock, cardiac tamponade with acute cellular rejection, dysmotility, and sepsis. Surgical complications consisted of 1 feeding jejunostomy displacement, and a minor leakage at a colo-colostomy site. One-year survival of the patient and graft was 73.33% (Kaplan-Meier survival curve). Although the total number of ITx is small, its social impact has been remarkable in changing the related laws and reimbursement policy in Korea. PMID:27109981

  19. Intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation following small bowel transplantation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, D.; Hurlbut, D.; Zhong, R.; Wang, P.Z.; Chen, H.F.; Garcia, B.; Behme, R.; Stiller, C.; Duff, J. )

    1991-08-01

    In addition to its role in absorbing nutrients, the intestinal mucosa provides an important barrier against toxins and bacteria in the bowel lumen. The present study evaluated gut barrier function following orthotopic (in continuity) intestinal grafting in rats. Graft histology, intestinal permeability, and bacterial translocation to the grafted mesenteric lymph nodes, the host's liver, and the host's spleen were assessed on the 3rd, 5th, and 7th postoperative days. The study group received no immunosuppression after allotransplantation. The two control groups included rats with isografts and rats with cyclosporine-treated allografts. On the 7th POD, the study animals had moderate transmural inflammation due to rejection, with normal histology in the isografts and CsA-treated allografts; increased intestinal permeability, measured by urinary excretion of oral 51Cr-EDTA (P less than 0.01); and increased number of bacteria in the MLN and spleen (P less than 0.05). The number of bacteria in the MLN and spleen of the study group positively correlated with the changes in intestinal permeability (P less than 0.05). Rejection of the orthotopic intestinal graft leads to increased intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation from the lumen of the graft to the host's reticuloendothelial system. Measures to improve gut barrier function and antibiotic therapy during rejection episodes may help reduce the incidence of septic complications after intestinal grafting.

  20. Serial Transverse Enteroplasty Enhances Intestinal Function in a Model of Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Robert W.; Javid, Patrick J.; Oh, Jung-Tak; Andreoli, Steven; Kim, Heung Bae; Fauza, Dario; Jaksic, Tom

    2006-01-01

    Objective/Summary Background Data: Serial transverse enteroplasty (STEP) is a new intestinal lengthening procedure that has been shown to clinically increase bowel length. This study examined the impact of the STEP procedure upon intestinal function in a model of short bowel syndrome. Methods: Young pigs (n = 10) had a reversed segment of bowel interposed to induce bowel dilatation. Five pigs underwent a 90% bowel resection with a STEP procedure on the remaining dilated bowel while 5 served as controls and had a 90% bowel resection without a STEP procedure. Determinations of nutritional status, absorptive capacity, and bacterial overgrowth were conducted 6 weeks after resection. Statistical comparisons were made by 2-sample t test (significance at P < 0.05). Results: The STEP procedure lengthened the bowel from 105.2 ± 7.7 cm to 152.2 ± 8.3 cm (P < 0.01). The STEP animals showed improved weight retention compared with controls (mean, −0.5% ± 1.8% body weight versus −17.6% ± 1.5%, P < 0.001). Intestinal carbohydrate absorption, as measured by d-Xylose absorption and fat absorptive capacity as measured by serum vitamin D and triglyceride levels, were increased in the STEP group versus controls. Serum citrulline, a marker of intestinal mucosal mass, was significantly elevated in the STEP pigs compared with controls. None of the STEP animals but 4 of 5 control animals were noted to have gram-negative bacterial overgrowth in the proximal bowel. Conclusions: STEP improves weight retention, nutritional status, intestinal absorptive capacity, and serum citrulline levels in a porcine short bowel model. A salutary effect upon bacterial overgrowth was also noted. These data support the use of this operation in short bowel syndrome. PMID:16432355

  1. Short bowel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... feeding is not supplying enough nutrients Small bowel transplantation in some cases Outlook (Prognosis) The condition may ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  2. Emerging Piglet Models of Neonatal Short Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lim, David W; Turner, Justine M; Wales, Paul W

    2015-08-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a growing problem in the human neonatal population. In infants, SBS is the leading cause of intestinal failure, the state of being unable to absorb sufficient nutrients for growth and development. Neonates with SBS are dependent on long-term parenteral nutrition therapy, but many succumb to the complications of sepsis and liver disease. Research in neonatal SBS is challenged by the ethical limits of studying sick human neonates and the heterogeneous nature of the disease process. Outcomes in SBS vary depending on residual intestinal anatomy, intestinal length, patient age, and exposure to nutrition therapies. The neonatal piglet serves as an appropriate translational model of the human neonate because of similarities in gastrointestinal ontogeny, physiological maturity, and adaptive processes. Re-creating the disease process in a piglet model presents a unique opportunity for researchers to discover novel insights and therapies in SBS. Emerging piglet models of neonatal SBS now represent the entire spectrum of disease seen in human infants. This review aims to contextualize these emerging piglet models within the context of SBS as a heterogeneous disease. We first explore the factors that account for SBS heterogeneity and then explore the suitability of the neonatal piglet as an appropriate translational animal model. We then examine differences between the emerging piglet models of neonatal SBS and how these differences affect their translational potential to human neonates with SBS. PMID:25293943

  3. The Mongolian gerbil as a model for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Eva-Maria; Martin, Myriam; Bleich, André; Klos, Andreas

    2010-06-01

    Mongolian gerbils are used as biomedical research models for a variety of diseases and are in some cases suited better than other rodents for basic research and therapeutic studies. The aim of this study was to establish and characterize a dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced model in gerbils for the human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and to utilize them for a therapeutic study in vivo. Four concentrations (0.5%, 1%, 2% and 4%) of DSS were administered via drinking water for 7 days; based on these results, a concentration of 3% DSS was given for 9 days in a second approach. Fluid uptake and general clinical condition were assessed daily using a clinical score. Caecum and colon were scored histologically. Fluid uptake was affected by addition of DSS to the drinking water. First clinical symptoms were observed at day 4 of DSS treatment with a considerable increase in clinical score parameters only in gerbils receiving 2% or 4% DSS. Histologically, ulceration and inflammation were observed predominantly in the caecum of gerbils treated with at least 1% DSS; reproducible inflammation in the colon required at least 2% DSS. Using 3% DSS for 9 days, considerably more inflammation was induced in the colon, comparable with lesions usually observed in the mouse model. Using an optimized protocol, DSS treatment induces reproducibly typhlocolitis in Mongolian gerbils, rendering them as a useful model for IBD. PMID:20113376

  4. A mouse model of in utero transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nijagal, Amar; Le, Tom; Wegorzewska, Marta; Mackenzie, Tippi C

    2011-01-01

    The transplantation of stem cells and viruses in utero has tremendous potential for treating congenital disorders in the human fetus. For example, in utero transplantation (IUT) of hematopoietic stem cells has been used to successfully treat patients with severe combined immunodeficiency. In several other conditions, however, IUT has been attempted without success. Given these mixed results, the availability of an efficient non-human model to study the biological sequelae of stem cell transplantation and gene therapy is critical to advance this field. We and others have used the mouse model of IUT to study factors affecting successful engraftment of in utero transplanted hematopoietic stem cells in both wild-type mice and those with genetic diseases. The fetal environment also offers considerable advantages for the success of in utero gene therapy. For example, the delivery of adenoviral, adeno-associated viral, retroviral, and lentiviral vectors into the fetus has resulted in the transduction of multiple organs distant from the site of injection with long-term gene expression. in utero gene therapy may therefore be considered as a possible treatment strategy for single gene disorders such as muscular dystrophy or cystic fibrosis. Another potential advantage of IUT is the ability to induce immune tolerance to a specific antigen. As seen in mice with hemophilia, the introduction of Factor IX early in development results in tolerance to this protein. In addition to its use in investigating potential human therapies, the mouse model of IUT can be a powerful tool to study basic questions in developmental and stem cell biology. For example, one can deliver various small molecules to induce or inhibit specific gene expression at defined gestational stages and manipulate developmental pathways. The impact of these alterations can be assessed at various timepoints after the initial transplantation. Furthermore, one can transplant pluripotent or lineage specific progenitor

  5. The Iranian model of living renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi-Mazdeh, Mitra

    2012-09-01

    Organ shortage for transplantation remains a worldwide serious problem for kidney patients with end-stage renal failure, and several countries have tried different models to address this issue. Iran has 20 years of experience with one such model that involves the active role of the government and charity foundations. Patients with a desperate demand for a kidney have given rise to a black market of brokers and other forms of organ commercialism only accessible to those with sufficient financial resources. The current Iranian model has enabled most of the Iranian kidney transplant candidates, irrespective of socioeconomic class, to have access to kidney transplantation. The Iranian government has committed a large budget through funding hospital and staff at the Ministry of Health and Medical Education by supporting the brain death donation (BDD) program or redirecting part of the budget of living unrelated renal donation (LURD) to the BDD program. It has been shown that it did not prevent the development and progression of a BDD program. However, the LURD program is characterized by several controversial procedures (e.g., confrontation of donor and recipient at the end of the evaluation procedure along with some financial interactions) that should be ethically reviewed. Operational weaknesses such as the lack of a registration system and long-term follow-up of the donors are identified as the 'Achilles heel of the model'. PMID:22673884

  6. Transplant services

    MedlinePlus

    ... an option for patients with short bowel or short gut syndrome or advanced liver disease, or who must receive all nutrients through a feeding line. See: Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) Kidney transplant is an option for someone ...

  7. Donor chimera model for tolerance induction in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, F; Peppelenbosch, M; Dashty, M

    2013-05-01

    Tolerance induction is the basis of a successful transplantation with the goal being the re-establishment of homeostasis after transplantation. Non-autograft transplantation disrupts this maintenance drastically which would be avoided by administration of a novel procedure. At present, the blood group antigens and the genotypes of the donor and recipient are cross-matched before transplantation combined with a drug regimen that confers general immunosuppression. But the 'specific' unresponsiveness of the recipient to the donor organ, implied by 'tolerance', is not achieved in this process. This article introduces the 'donor chimera model' via the concept of the 'closed transplantation loop' approach for tolerance induction which seeks to limit the use of immunosuppressive therapy after transplantation. PMID:23354322

  8. Difficulties, guidelines and review of developing an acute rejection model after rat intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Andres, Ane Miren; Santamaria, Monica; Hernandez-Oliveros, Francisco; Guerra, Laura; Lopez, Sergio; Stringa, Pablo; Vallejo, Maria Teresa; Largo, Carlota; Encinas, Jose Luis; Garcia de Las Heras, Maria Soledad; Lopez-Santamaria, Manuel; Tovar, Juan Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Experimental small bowel transplantation (SBT) in rats has been proven to be a useful tool for the study of ischemia-reperfusion and immunological aspects related to solid organ transplantation. However, the model is not completely refined, specialized literature is scarce and complex technical details are typically omitted or confusing. Most studies related to acute rejection (AR) use the orthotopic standard, with small sample sizes due to its high mortality, whereas those studying chronic rejection (CR) use the heterotopic standard, which allows longer term survival but does not exactly reflect the human clinical scenario. Various animal strains have been used, and the type of rejection and the timing of its analysis differ among authors. The double purpose of this study was to develop an improved unusual AR model of SBT using the heterotopic technique, and to elaborate a guide useful to implement experimental models for studying AR. We analyzed the model's technical details and expected difficulties in overcoming the learning curve for such a complex microsurgical model, identifying the potential problem areas and providing a step-by-step protocol and reference guide for future surgeons interested in the topic. We also discuss the historic and more recent options in the literature. PMID:27102447

  9. Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Faro, Albert; Weymann, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Despite improvement in median life expectancy and overall health, some children with cystic fibrosis (CF) progress to end-stage lung or liver disease and become candidates for transplant. Transplants for children with CF hold the promise to extend and improve the quality of life, but barriers to successful long-term outcomes include shortage of suitable donor organs; potential complications from the surgical procedure and immunosuppressants; risk of rejection and infection; and the need for lifelong, strict adherence to a complex medical regimen. This article reviews the indications and complications of lung and liver transplantation in children with CF. PMID:27469184

  10. A rabbit model for mucosal immunity in the bowel. II. Local cellular reactivity to virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, A J; Holmes, M J

    1990-01-01

    An animal model was used to examine local and systemic cellular reactivity against virus infection of bowel mucosa. Firstly, existing techniques for extracting lymphoid cells from the dispersed populations of the bowel mucosa were adapted for use in rabbits and viable lymphocytes were isolated from the lapine ileal mucosa in numbers suitable for assay. Lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL) showed a strong blastogenic response to T-cell mitogens but intra-epithelial lymphocytes (IEL) responded poorly, even in the presence of splenic accessory cells. Next, chronically isolated ileal loops in rabbits were infected with parainfluenzavirus type 3 (PI-3) and isolates from the organized and dispersed lymphoid tissues associated with infected ileal mucosae and those from systemic lymphoid sites were used in in vitro assays of virus-specific lympho-proliferation. A T-cell-mediated immune response against PI-3 was mounted in lymphoid tissues associated with the infected loops, appearing first in loop Peyer's patches (PP) at Day 4 and in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and lamina propriae at Day 7 after infection. The response in PP had waned by 21 days but was sustained in the other sites for at least 42 days. Epithelial lymphocytes were consistently anergic and there was no evidence of specific reactivity at systemic lymphoid sites or elsewhere in the bowel. Thus, a highly localized T-cell-mediated response was sustained, not only in organized lymphoid tissues but also in the bowel wall itself, following infection with a novel antigen. PMID:2155872

  11. Bowel retraining

    MedlinePlus

    ... be used by people to help improve their bowel movements. Conditions that it may help include: Fecal incontinence ... includes several steps to help you have regular bowel movements. Most people are able to have regular bowel ...

  12. Systematic review and validation of prognostic models in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Matthew; Lewsey, James D; Sharpin, Carlos; Gimson, Alexander; Rela, Mohammed; van der Meulen, Jan H P

    2005-07-01

    A model that can accurately predict post-liver transplant mortality would be useful for clinical decision making, would help to provide patients with prognostic information, and would facilitate fair comparisons of surgical performance between transplant units. A systematic review of the literature was carried out to assess the quality of the studies that developed and validated prognostic models for mortality after liver transplantation and to validate existing models in a large data set of patients transplanted in the United Kingdom (UK) and Ireland between March 1994 and September 2003. Five prognostic model papers were identified. The quality of the development and validation of all prognostic models was suboptimal according to an explicit assessment tool of the internal, external, and statistical validity, model evaluation, and practicality. The discriminatory ability of the identified models in the UK and Ireland data set was poor (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve always smaller than 0.7 for adult populations). Due to the poor quality of the reporting, the methodology used for the development of the model could not always be determined. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that currently available prognostic models of mortality after liver transplantation can have only a limited role in clinical practice, audit, and research. PMID:15973726

  13. A Pre-Clinical Canine Model for Composite Tissue Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mathes, David W.; Noland, Marie; Graves, Scott; Schlenker, Robert; Miwongtum, Tiffany; Storb, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    The feasibility of composite tissue allografts (CTA) has been demonstrated by the successful transplantation of the hand, abdomen and face. However, the survival of these transplants is dependent on immunosupression. Our laboratory is interested in achieving tolerance in order to decrease the risks associated with the use of chronic immunosuppression. The purpose of this experiment was to develop a large animal model for CTA. Four canine flaps were auto-transplanted to examine the use of a myocutaneous rectus flap based on the deep inferior epigastric vessels. Five CTA transplants were performed between Dog Leukocyte Antigen (DLA) identical littermates without any therapy. The allografts were followed clinically and underwent routine biopsies. The anatomic dissections and auto-transplants were all successful and revealed that the flap could be divided into two separate components. Skin is routinely perfused by the superficial epigastric artery. Rectus muscle is perfused by the deep inferior epigastrc system. This allows the allografts to be transplanted as muscle, skin or with both components based on the external iliac artery and veins. The DLA-identical littermates rejected the allografts in 15 to 30 days. This study demonstrates the versatility of the myocutaneous rectus flap for use in canines as composite tissue allograft models. PMID:20108180

  14. The role of experimental models in developing new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Holschneider, Daniel P; Bradesi, Sylvie; Mayer, Emeran A

    2011-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by chronic, recurrent abdominal pain and altered bowel habits and is currently defined by symptom criteria and the absence of detectable organic disease. The underlying pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. Despite considerable efforts by the scientific community and the pharmaceutical industry to develop novel pharmacological treatments aimed at chronic visceral pain, the traditional approach to identifying and evaluating novel drugs for this target have largely failed to translate into effective IBS treatments. However, several novel drugs aimed at normalizing bowel movements have produced clinical effects, not only on the primary target, but also on pain and discomfort. While some of the commonly used experimental animal models for the pain dimension of IBS have some face and construct validity, the predictive validity of most of the models is either unknown, or has been disappointing. A reverse translational approach is proposed, which is based on identification and characterization of brain endophenotypes in patients, followed by translation of these endophenotypes for pharmacological studies in rodent models. PMID:21309671

  15. Murine corneal transplantation: a model to study the most common form of solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao-Tang; Tajfirouz, Deena A; Stuart, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most common form of organ transplantation in the United States with between 45,000 and 55,000 procedures performed each year. While several animal models exist for this procedure and mice are the species that is most commonly used. The reasons for using mice are the relative cost of using this species, the existence of many genetically defined strains that allow for the study of immune responses, and the existence of an extensive array of reagents that can be used to further define responses in this species. This model has been used to define factors in the cornea that are responsible for the relative immune privilege status of this tissue that enables corneal allografts to survive acute rejection in the absence of immunosuppressive therapy. It has also been used to define those factors that are most important in rejection of such allografts. Consequently, much of what we know concerning mechanisms of both corneal allograft acceptance and rejection are due to studies using a murine model of corneal transplantation. In addition to describing a model for acute corneal allograft rejection, we also present for the first time a model of late-term corneal allograft rejection. PMID:25490741

  16. A novel rabbit model for studying RPE transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Lidan; Sun, Dawei; Zhang, Zhongyu; Jiao, Wanqiu; Rizzolo, Lawrence J.; Peng, Shaomin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this project is to develop a model of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) transplantation that permits extensive and reliable analysis of the transplants. Methods Cultures of newborn rabbit RPE were evaluated by morphology, electrophysiology and the expression of zonula occludens-1, cytokeratin and a melanocyte marker (S-100). Cells labeled with 5,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFDA-SE) were transplanted into the subretinal space of rabbits using a 30 gauge needle without making a conjunctival flap or sclerotomy. The transplants were examined by fundus photography, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and angiography. At two months the retina was examined histochemically. Results A one minute incubation at 37°C with 20μM CFDA-SE did not affect morphology or the expression of marker proteins. In co-culture, the labeled cells integrated into monolayers that developed a normal transepithelial electrical resistance of 400-450 Ωcm2. Dye was not transferred from labeled to non-labeled RPE cells. Transplanted RPE was detectable for at least 2 months. Angiography demonstrated an intact blood retinal barrier. The normal morphology of the retina and lack of debris in the subretinal space, suggested the transplanted RPE was functional. Conclusions Primary cultures of newborn rabbit RPE were highly differentiated even when labeled with CFDA-SE. Labeled cells could be followed long-term in vitro and in vivo. This model can examine how culture and transplantation protocols affect the reformation of a functional RPE monolayer. The similar size of rabbit and human eyes will facilitate the translation of these protocols to the bedside. PMID:18502985

  17. Brain-gut interaction in irritable bowel syndrome: new findings of a multicomponent disease model.

    PubMed

    Schmulson, M J

    2001-02-01

    Knowledge on the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome has evolved, beginning with disturbances in motility to visceral hypersensitivity, and ultimately to alterations in brain-gut bi-directional communication, where neurotransmitters such as serotonin play a key role. Recently, a multicomponent disease model that integrates all these alterations was proposed. This model is divided into physiological, cognitive, emotional and behavioral components that explain the gastrointestinal as well as the constitutional symptoms. In recent years there has been an explosion of research together with new developments in pharmacological treatments for IBS that support each component of this model. This review presents recent data in favor of these alterations in IBS. PMID:11347592

  18. Butyrate production from dietary fibre and protection against large bowel cancer in a rat model.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, A; Gibson, P R; Young, G P

    1993-01-01

    Butyrate slows the growth of cancer cells cultured in vitro. To determine the relevance of the fermentative production of butyrate in vivo, colonic butyrate concentrations were manipulated by feeding different dietary fibres and were related to tumour development in the rat dimethylhydrazine model of large bowel cancer. It has previously been shown that guar gum and oat bran, while highly fermentable, are associated with low butyrate levels in the distal colon, while wheat bran causes significantly higher concentrations. Diets containing these fibres (nominally 10% w:w) were administered for 3 weeks before, for 10 weeks during, and for 20 weeks after dimethylhydrazine administration, after which animals were killed and examined for tumours. Significantly fewer tumours were seen in the rats fed wheat bran compared with those fed guar or oat bran, and the total tumour mass was lowest in rats fed wheat bran. Rats on a 'no added fibre diet' had an intermediate tumour mass. Regression analysis, performed regardless of dietary group, showed that the concentration in stools of butyrate but not of acetate or stool volume, correlated significantly (and negatively) with tumour mass. These findings indicate that fibre which is associated with high butyrate concentrations in the distal large bowel is protective against large bowel cancer, while soluble fibres that do not raise distal butyrate concentrations, are not protective. Thus, butyrate production in vivo does bear a significant relationship to suppression of tumour formation. PMID:8386131

  19. Multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled trial of extract of Japanese herbal medicine Daikenchuto to prevent bowel dysfunction after adult liver transplantation (DKB 14 Study)

    PubMed Central

    Kaido, Toshimi; Shimamura, Tsuyoshi; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Sadamori, Hiroshi; Shirabe, Ken; Yamamoto, Michio; Uemoto, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial will aim to determine the ability of an extract (TJ-100) of Daikenchuto (traditional Japanese herbal medicine; Kampo) to prevent bowel dysfunction in at least 110 patients after liver transplantation (LT). Methods and analysis The following co-primary end points will be evaluated on postoperative day 7: total oral and enteral caloric intake, abdominal distension and abdominal pain. The secondary end points will comprise sequential changes of total oral and enteral caloric intake after LT, sequential changes in numeric rating scales for abdominal distension and pain, elapsed time to the first postoperative passage of stool, quality of life assessment using the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale score (Japanese version), postoperative liver function, liver regeneration rate, incidence of bacteraemia and bacterial strain, trough level of immunosuppressants, occurrence of acute cellular rejection, discharge or not within 2 months after LT, sequential changes of portal venous flow to the graft and ascites discharge. The two arms of the study will comprise 55 patients per arm. Ethics and dissemination The study has been conducted according to the CONSORT statement. All participants signed a written consent form, and the study has been approved by the institutional review board of each participating institute and conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki of 1996. The findings will be disseminated through scientific and professional conferences, and in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number The DKB 14 Study was registered in the University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trial Registration (UMIN-CTR), Japan (registration number: UMIN000014326) during 2014. PMID:26419681

  20. Effectiveness of trimebutine maleate on modulating intestinal hypercontractility in a mouse model of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Long, Yanqin; Liu, Ying; Tong, Jingjing; Qian, Wei; Hou, Xiaohua

    2010-06-25

    Trimebutine maleate, which modulates the calcium and potassium channels, relieves abdominal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. However, its effect on postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome is not clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of trimebutine maleate on modulating colonic hypercontractility in a mouse model of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome. Mice infected up to 8 weeks with T. spiralis underwent abdominal withdrawal reflex to colorectal distention to evaluate the visceral sensitivity at different time points. Tissues were examined for histopathology scores. Colonic longitudinal muscle strips were prepared in the organ bath under basal condition or to be stimulated by acetylcholine and potassium chloride, and consecutive concentrations of trimebutine maleate were added to the bath to record the strip responses. Significant inflammation was observed in the intestines of the mice infected 2 weeks, and it resolved in 8 weeks after infection. Visceral hyperalgesia and colonic muscle hypercontractility emerged after infection, and trimebutine maleate could effectively reduce the colonic hyperreactivity. Hypercontractility of the colonic muscle stimulated by acetylcholine and high K(+) could be inhibited by trimebutine maleate in solution with Ca(2+), but not in Ca(2+) free solution. Compared with 8-week postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome group, 2-week acute infected strips were much more sensitive to the stimulators and the drug trimebutine maleate. Trimebutine maleate was effective in reducing the colonic muscle hypercontractility of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome mice. The findings may provide evidence for trimebutine maleate to treat postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome patients effectively. PMID:20371236

  1. Small Bowel Obstruction—Who Needs an Operation? A Multivariate Prediction Model

    PubMed Central

    Eiken, Patrick W.; Bannon, Michael P.; Heller, Stephanie F.; Lohse, Christine M.; Huebner, Marianne; Sarr, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Proper management of small bowel obstruction (SBO) requires a methodology to prevent nontherapeutic laparotomy while minimizing the chance of overlooking strangulation obstruction causing intestinal ischemia. Our aim was to identify preoperative risk factors associated with strangulating SBO and to develop a model to predict the need for operative intervention in the presence of an SBO. Our hypothesis was that free intraperitoneal fluid on computed tomography (CT) is associated with the presence of bowel ischemia and need for exploration. Methods We reviewed 100 consecutive patients with SBO, all of whom had undergone CT that was reviewed by a radiologist blinded to outcome. The need for operative management was confirmed retrospectively by four surgeons based on operative findings and the patient’s clinical course. Results Patients were divided into two groups: group 1, who required operative management on retrospective review, and group 2 who did not. Four patients who were treated nonoperatively had ischemia or died of malignant SBO and were then included in group 1; two patients who had a nontherapeutic exploration were included in group 2. On univariate analysis, the need for exploration (n = 48) was associated (p < 0.05) with a history of malignancy (29% vs. 12%), vomiting (85% vs. 63%), and CT findings of either free intraperitoneal fluid (67% vs. 31%), mesenteric edema (67% vs. 37%), mesenteric vascular engorgement (85% vs. 67%), small bowel wall thickening (44% vs. 25%) or absence of the “small bowel feces sign” (so-called fecalization) (10% vs. 29%). Ischemia (n = 11) was associated (p < 0.05 each) with peritonitis (36% vs. 1%), free intraperitoneal fluid (82% vs. 44%), serum lactate concentration (2.7 ± 1.6 vs. 1.3 ± 0.6 mmol/l), mesenteric edema (91% vs. 46%), closed loop obstruction (27% vs. 2%), pneumatosis intestinalis (18% vs. 0%), and portal venous gas (18% vs. 0%). On multivariate analysis, free intraperitoneal fluid [odds ratio

  2. Bowel Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Bowel Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... rectal worse. Back to Side Effects Print | Understanding Prostate Cancer Research Faces of Prostate Cancer About PCF Take ...

  3. Bowel incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    Uncontrollable passage of feces; Loss of bowel control; Fecal incontinence; Incontinence - bowel ... and weaken, leading to diarrhea and stool leakage. Fecal impaction . It is usually caused by chronic constipation. ...

  4. Insufficient evidence for association of NOD2/CARD15 or other inflammatory bowel disease–associated markers on GVHD incidence or other adverse outcomes in T-replete, unrelated donor transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Yume; Al-Lehibi, Abed; Gorbe, Elizabeth; Li, Ellen; Haagenson, Michael; Wang, Tao; Spellman, Stephen; Lee, Stephanie J.

    2010-01-01

    Previous European studies suggest NOD2/CARD15 and interleukin-23 receptor (IL-23R) donor or recipient variants are associated with adverse clinical outcomes in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We reexamined these findings as well as the role of another inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) susceptibility gene (immunity-related GTPase family, M [IRGM]) on transplantation outcomes in 390 US patients and their matched unrelated donors, accrued between 1995 and 2004. Patients received T-replete grafts with mostly myeloablative conditioning regimens. Multivariate analyses were performed for overall survival, disease-free survival, transplantation-related mortality, relapse, and acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. Of 390 pairs, NOD2/CARD15 variant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found in 14% of donors and 17% of recipients. In 3% both donor and recipient had a mutant SNP. Thirteen percent of donors and 16% of recipients had variant IL23R SNPs, with 3% having both donor and recipient variants. Twenty-three percent of both donors and recipients had variant IRGM SNPs. None of the 3 IBD-associated alleles showed a statistically significant association with any adverse clinical outcomes. Our results do not support an association between the 3 IBD-associated SNPs and adverse outcomes after matched unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantations in US patients. PMID:20177049

  5. Compensating the transplant professional: time for a model change.

    PubMed

    Abouljoud, M; Whitehouse, S; Langnas, A; Brown, K

    2015-03-01

    Compensation models for physicians are currently based primarily on the work relative value unit (wRVU) that rewards productivity by work volume. The value-based payment structure soon to be ushered in by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services rewards clinical quality and outcomes. This has prompted changes in wRVU value for certain services that will result in reduced payment for specialty procedures such as transplantation. To maintain a stable and competent workforce and achieve alignment between clinical activity, growth imperatives, and cost effectiveness, compensation of transplant physicians must evolve toward a matrix of measures beyond the procedure-based activity. This personal viewpoint proposes a redesign of transplant physician compensation plans to include the "virtual RVU" to recognize and reward meaningful clinical integration defined as hospital-physician commitment to specified and measurable metrics for current non-RVU-producing activities. Transplantation has been a leader in public outcomes reporting and is well suited to meet the challenges ahead that can only be overcome with a tight collaboration and alignment between surgeons, other physicians, support staff, and their respective institution and leadership. PMID:25693472

  6. Human Liver Transplantation As A Model To Study HCV Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael G.; Rosen, Hugo R.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a leading etiology of liver cancer and cause for liver transplantation. Although new therapies have improved the rates of sustained response, a large proportion of patients (~50%) fail to respond to antiviral treatment, thus remaining at risk for disease progression. While chimpanzees have been used to study HCV biology and treatments, their cost is quite high and their use is strictly regulated; indeed, the NIH no longer supports the breeding of chimpanzees for study. The development of HCV therapies has been hindered by the relative paucity of small animal models to study HCV pathogenesis. This review presents the strengths of the human liver transplant, highlighting the advances derived from this model, including insights into viral kinetics and quasispecies, viral receptor binding and entry, innate and adaptive immunity. Moreover, consideration is made of current and emerging antiviral therapeutic approaches based on translational research results. PMID:19877210

  7. Assaying macrophage activity in a murine model of inflammatory bowel disease using fluorine-19 MRI.

    PubMed

    Kadayakkara, Deepak K; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Young, Won-Bin; Ahrens, Eric T

    2012-04-01

    Macrophages have an important role in the pathogenesis of most chronic inflammatory diseases. A means of non-invasively quantifying macrophage migration would contribute significantly towards our understanding of chronic inflammatory processes and aid the evaluation of novel therapeutic strategies. We describe the use of a perfluorocarbon tracer reagent and in vivo (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify macrophage burden longitudinally. We apply these methods to evaluate the severity and three-dimensional distribution of macrophages in a murine model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). MRI results were validated by histological analysis, immunofluorescence and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Selective depletion of macrophages in vivo was also performed, further validating that macrophage accumulation of perfluorocarbon tracers was the basis of (19)F MRI signals observed in the bowel. We tested the effects of two common clinical drugs, dexamethasone and cyclosporine A, on IBD progression. Whereas cyclosporine A provided mild therapeutic effect, unexpectedly dexamethasone enhanced colon inflammation, especially in the descending colon. Overall, (19)F MRI can be used to evaluate early-stage inflammation in IBD and is suitable for evaluating putative therapeutics. Due to its high macrophage specificity and quantitative ability, we envisage (19)F MRI having an important role in evaluating a wide range of chronic inflammatory conditions mediated by macrophages. PMID:22330343

  8. The Inflammatory Bowel Disease Specialty Medical Home: A New Model of Patient-centered Care.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Miguel D; McAnallen, Sandra E; Greer, Julia B; Perkins, Stephen E; Ramalingam, S; Szigethy, Eva

    2016-08-01

    New models of health care have emerged over the past decade. Accountable care organizations and patient-centered medical homes are designed to improve the patient experience, enhance health care quality, and decrease cost. These models have been developed in the primary care domain and have yet to be tested in specialty care. Certain chronic diseases require principal care by a specialist or health care team. The specialty medical home would provide patient-centered care for specific populations of patients whose health care derives from a single chronic disease. This article defines the parameters for a specialty medical home and provides a specific payer-provider experience for the comprehensive care of an inflammatory bowel disease population. PMID:27135486

  9. A Review on Chemical-Induced Inflammatory Bowel Disease Models in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Puneet Kaur; Singh, Kavinder; Singh, Nirmal

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are a set of chronic, idiopathic, immunological and relapsing inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract referred to as inflammatory bowel disorder (IBD). Although the etiological factors involved in the perpetuation of IBD remain uncertain, development of various animal models provides new insights to unveil the onset and the progression of IBD. Various chemical-induced colitis models are widely used on laboratory scale. Furthermore, these models closely mimic morphological, histopathological and symptomatical features of human IBD. Among the chemical-induced colitis models, trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis, oxazolone induced-colitis and dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis models are most widely used. TNBS elicits Th-1 driven immune response, whereas oxazolone predominantly exhibits immune response of Th-2 phenotype. DSS-induced colitis model also induces changes in Th-1/Th-2 cytokine profile. The present review discusses the methodology and rationale of using various chemical-induced colitis models for evaluating the pathogenesis of IBD. PMID:25177159

  10. Loss of neutral ceramidase increases inflammation in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Ashley J.; Wu, Bill X.; Jenkins, Russell W.; Sticca, Jonathan A.; Kawamori, Toshihiko; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Obeid, Lina M.

    2012-01-01

    Sphingolipids are emerging as important mediators of immune and inflammatory responses. We have previously demonstrated that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and its synthetic enzyme sphingosine kinase-1 (SK1) play an important role in inflammatory bowel disease. S1P generation is dependent on SK phosphorylation of sphingosine. Generation of sphingosine results only from the breakdown of ceramide by ceramidases (CDase). In this study, we set out to determine the role of neutral CDase (nCDase) in S1P generation and inflammatory bowel disease. To this end, we established nCDase expression is increased in patients with ulcerative colitis. Using the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis model, we determined nCDase activity increased in colon epithelium, but not submucosa, in wild-type (WT) mice. Following DSS, ceramide levels were elevated in colon epithelium from WT and nCDase−/− mice, while S1P levels were significantly elevated only in the epithelium of nCDase−/− mice. Similarly, cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) levels were significantly elevated only in the epithelium of nCDase−/− mice. Neutral CDase−/− mice also exhibited higher endotoxin levels in circulation, as well as higher circulating levels of S1P. This increase in S1P in nCDase−/− mice was accompanied by a marked leukocytosis, most notably circulating neutrophils and lymphocytes. Taken together these data demonstrate that loss of nCDase results in an unexpected increase in S1P generation in inflammation, and suggests that nCDase may actually protect against inflammation. PMID:22940715

  11. Preclinical modeling of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation - advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Stolfi, Jessica L; Pai, Chien-Chun S; Murphy, William J

    2016-05-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which was first successfully performed in the 1950s, remains a critical therapeutic modality for treatment of a diverse array of diseases, including a multitude of hematological malignancies, autoimmune disorders, amyloidosis and inherited genetic hematological disorders. Although great advances have been made in understanding and application of this therapy, significant complications still exist, warranting further investigation. Of critical importance, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), in both acute and chronic forms, remains a major complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, responsible for both the development of chronic illness and morbidity, as well as mortality. Use of an appropriate preclinical model may provide significant insight into the mechanistic pathways leading to the development and progression of graft-versus-host disease, as well as cancer in general. However, existing preclinical modeling systems exhibit significant limitations, and development of models that recapitulate the complex and comprehensive clinical scenario and provide a tool by which therapeutic intervention may be developed and assessed is of utmost importance. Here, we review the present status of the field of graft-versus-host disease research. We discuss and summarize the preclinical models currently in use, as well as their advantages and limitations. PMID:26640088

  12. Arterial hypertension due to fructose ingestion: model based on intermittent osmotic fluid trapping in the small bowel

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Based on recently reported data that fructose ingestion is linked to arterial hypertension, a model of regulatory loops involving the colon role in maintenance of fluid and sodium homeostasis is proposed. In normal digestion of hyperosmolar fluids, also in cases of postprandial hypotension and in patients having the "dumping" syndrome after gastric surgery, any hyperosmolar intestinal content is diluted by water taken from circulation and being trapped in the bowel until reabsorption. High fructose corn sirup (HFCS) soft drinks are among common hyperosmolar drinks. Fructose is slowly absorbed through passive carrier-mediated facilitated diffusion, along the entire small bowel, thus preventing absorption of the trapped water for several hours. Here presented interpretation is that ingestion of hyperosmolar HFCS drinks due to a transient fluid shift into the small bowel increases renin secretion and sympathetic activity, leading to rise in ADH and aldosterone secretions. Their actions spare water and sodium in the large bowel and kidneys. Alteration of colon absorption due to hormone exposure depends on cell renewal and takes days to develop, so the momentary capacity of sodium absorption in the colon depends on the average aldosterone and ADH exposure during few previous days. This inertia in modulation of the colon function can make an individual that often takes HFCS drinks prone to sodium retention, until a new balance is reached with an expanded ECF pool and arterial hypertension. In individuals with impaired fructose absorption, even a higher risk of arterial hypertension can be expected. PMID:20579372

  13. Humanized mice as a model to study human hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Anne; Taylor, Stephen E; Decottignies, Wittnee; Berges, Bradford K

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation has the potential to treat a variety of human diseases, including genetic deficiencies, immune disorders, and to restore immunity following cancer treatment. However, there are several obstacles that prevent effective HSC transplantation in humans. These include finding a matched donor, having a sufficient number of cells for the transplant, and the potency of the cells in the transplant. Ethical issues prevent effective research in humans that could provide insight into ways to overcome these obstacles. Highly immunodeficient mice can be transplanted with human HSCs and this process is accompanied by HSC homing to the murine bone marrow. This is followed by stem cell expansion, multilineage hematopoiesis, long-term engraftment, and functional human antibody and cellular immune responses. As such, humanized mice serve as a model for human HSC transplantation. A variety of conditions have been analyzed for their impact on HSC transplantation to produce humanized mice, including the type and source of cells used in the transplant, the number of cells transplanted, the expansion of cells with various protocols, and the route of introduction of cells into the mouse. In this review, we summarize what has been learned about HSC transplantation using humanized mice as a recipient model and we comment on how these models may be useful to future preclinical research to determine more effective ways to expand HSCs and to determine their repopulating potential in vivo. PMID:23962058

  14. A Dirichlet process mixture model for survival outcome data: assessing nationwide kidney transplant centers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lili; Shi, Jingchunzi; Shearon, Tempie H; Li, Yi

    2015-04-15

    Mortality rates are probably the most important indicator for the performance of kidney transplant centers. Motivated by the national evaluation of mortality rates at kidney transplant centers in the USA, we seek to categorize the transplant centers based on the mortality outcome. We describe a Dirichlet process model and a Dirichlet process mixture model with a half-cauchy prior for the estimation of the risk-adjusted effects of the transplant centers, with strategies for improving the model performance, interpretability, and classification ability. We derive statistical measures and create graphical tools to rate transplant centers and identify outlying groups of centers with exceptionally good or poor performance. The proposed method was evaluated through simulation and then applied to assess kidney transplant centers from a national organ failure registry. PMID:25620744

  15. Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gore, Richard M; Silvers, Robert I; Thakrar, Kiran H; Wenzke, Daniel R; Mehta, Uday K; Newmark, Geraldine M; Berlin, Jonathan W

    2015-11-01

    Small bowel obstruction and large bowel obstruction account for approximately 20% of cases of acute abdominal surgical conditions. The role of the radiologist is to answer several key questions: Is obstruction present? What is the level of the obstruction? What is the cause of the obstruction? What is the severity of the obstruction? Is the obstruction simple or closed loop? Is strangulation, ischemia, or perforation present? In this presentation, the radiologic approach to and imaging findings of patients with known or suspected bowel obstruction are presented. PMID:26526435

  16. Travel for transplantation in iran: pros and cons regarding Iranian model.

    PubMed

    Ossareh, Shahrzad; Broumand, Behrooz

    2015-04-01

    Transplant tourism is one of the main unacceptable aspects of medical tourism, implicating travel to another country to receive an allograft. Organ shortages in wealthier countries have persuaded patients to preclude organ waiting lists and travel to other countries for getting organs especially kidneys. On the other hand, in many countries, there is no transplant program, and hemodialysis is expensive. Hence, patients with end-stage kidney disease may have to travel to get a kidney allograft for the sake of their lives. In Iran, a legal compensated and regulated living unrelated donor kidney transplant program has been adopted since 1988, in which recipients are matched with liveunrelated donors through the Iran Kidney Foundation and the recipients are compensated dually by the government and the recipient. In this model regulations were adopted to prevent transplant tourism: foreigners were not allowed to receive a kidney from Iranian donors or donate a kidney to Iranian patients; however, they could be transplanted from donors of their own nationality, after full medical workup, with the authorization of the Ministry of Health. This was first considered as a humanitarian assistance to patients of the countries with no transplant program and limited and low quality dialysis. However, the policy of "foreign nationality transplant" gradually established a spot where residents of many countries, where living-unrelated donor transplant was illegal, could bring their donors and be transplanted mainly in private hospitals, with high incentives for the transplant teams. By June 2014, six hundred eight foreign nationality kidney transplants were authorized by Ministry of Health for citizens for 17 countries. In this review, we examine the negative aspects of transplant for foreign citizens in Iran and the reasons that changed "travel for transplant" to "transplant tourism " in our country and finally led us to stop the program after more than 10 years. PMID:25894134

  17. Helicobacter hepaticus infection in mice: Models for understanding lower bowel inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fox, JG; Ge, Z; Whary, MT; Erdman, SE; Horwitz, BH

    2014-01-01

    Pioneering work in the 1990’s first linked a novel microaerobic bacterium, Helicobacter hepaticus, with active chronic hepatitis and IBD in several murine models. Targeted H. hepaticus infection experiments subsequently demonstrated its ability to induce colitis, colorectal cancer, and extra-intestinal diseases in a number of mouse strains with defects in immune function and/or regulation. Helicobacter hepaticus is now widely utilized as a model system to dissect how intestinal microbiota interact with the host to produce both inflammatory and tolerogenic responses. This model has been used to make important advances in understanding factors that regulate both acquired and innate immune response within the intestine. Further, it has been an effective tool to help define the function of regulatory T cells, including their ability to directly inhibit the innate inflammatory response to gut microbiota. The complete genomic sequence of H. hepaticus has advanced the identification of several virulence factors and aided in the elucidation of H. hepaticus pathogenesis. Delineating targets of H. hepaticus virulence factors could facilitate novel approaches to treating microbially induced lower bowel inflammatory diseases. PMID:20944559

  18. Stress-Induced Visceral Pain: Toward Animal Models of Irritable-Bowel Syndrome and Associated Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, Rachel D.; O’Mahony, Siobhain M.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Visceral pain is a global term used to describe pain originating from the internal organs, which is distinct from somatic pain. It is a hallmark of functional gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable-bowel syndrome (IBS). Currently, the treatment strategies targeting visceral pain are unsatisfactory, with development of novel therapeutics hindered by a lack of detailed knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Stress has long been implicated in the pathophysiology of visceral pain in both preclinical and clinical studies. Here, we discuss the complex etiology of visceral pain reviewing our current understanding in the context of the role of stress, gender, gut microbiota alterations, and immune functioning. Furthermore, we review the role of glutamate, GABA, and epigenetic mechanisms as possible therapeutic strategies for the treatment of visceral pain for which there is an unmet medical need. Moreover, we discuss the most widely described rodent models used to model visceral pain in the preclinical setting. The theory behind, and application of, animal models is key for both the understanding of underlying mechanisms and design of future therapeutic interventions. Taken together, it is apparent that stress-induced visceral pain and its psychiatric comorbidities, as typified by IBS, has a multifaceted etiology. Moreover, treatment strategies still lag far behind when compared to other pain modalities. The development of novel, effective, and specific therapeutics for the treatment of visceral pain has never been more pertinent. PMID:25762939

  19. Challenges in animal modelling of mesenchymal stromal cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Chinnadurai, Raghavan; Ng, Spencer; Velu, Vijayakumar; Galipeau, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) for the treatment of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis is of translational interest. Safety of MSC therapy has been well demonstrated in early phase clinical trials but efficacy in randomized clinical trials needs to be demonstrated. Understanding MSC mechanisms of action to reduce gut injury and inflammation is necessary to improve current ongoing and future clinical trials. However, two major hurdles impede the direct translation of data derived from animal experiments to the clinical situation: (1) limitations of the currently available animal models of colitis that reflect human inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The etiology and progression of human IBD are multifactorial and hence a challenge to mimic in animal models; and (2) Species specific differences in the functionality of MSCs derived from mice versus humans. MSCs derived from mice and humans are not identical in their mechanisms of action in suppressing inflammation. Thus, preclinical animal studies with murine derived MSCs cannot be considered as an exact replica of human MSC based clinical trials. In the present review, we discuss the therapeutic properties of MSCs in preclinical and clinical studies of IBD. We also discuss the challenges and approaches of using appropriate animal models of colitis, not only to study putative MSC therapeutic efficacy and their mechanisms of action, but also the suitability of translating findings derived from such studies to the clinic. PMID:25944991

  20. Modeling the Chagas’ disease after stem cell transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvão, Viviane; Miranda, José Garcia Vivas

    2009-04-01

    A recent model for Chagas’ disease after stem cell transplantation is extended for a three-dimensional multi-agent-based model. The computational model includes six different types of autonomous agents: inflammatory cell, fibrosis, cardiomyocyte, proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor- α, Trypanosoma cruzi, and bone marrow stem cell. Only fibrosis is fixed and the other types of agents can move randomly through the empty spaces using the three-dimensional Moore neighborhood. Bone marrow stem cells can promote apoptosis in inflammatory cells, fibrosis regression and can differentiate in cardiomyocyte. T. cruzi can increase the number of inflammatory cells. Inflammatory cells and tumor necrosis factor- α can increase the quantity of fibrosis. Our results were compared with experimental data giving a fairly fit and they suggest that the inflammatory cells are important for the development of fibrosis.

  1. Bowel Movement

    MedlinePlus

    A bowel movement is the last stop in the movement of food through your digestive tract. Your stool passes out ... rectum and anus. Another name for stool is feces. It is made of what is left after ...

  2. Mechanical Bowel Preparation Does Not Affect Anastomosis Healing in an Experimental Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Piroglu, Isılay; Tulgar, Serkan; Thomas, David Terence; Cakiroglu, Basri; Piroglu, Mustafa Devrim; Bozkurt, Yasin; Gergerli, Ruken; Ates, Nagihan Gozde

    2016-01-01

    Background Mechanical bowel preparation before colorectal surgery is commonly performed, but its benefits are controversial. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of mechanical bowel preparation on healing of colonic anastomosis and tissue strength. Material/Methods After institutional review board approval, 20 adult Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into 2 groups of 10 animals each. Mechanical bowel preparation including sodium phosphate was performed on the experimental group via a feeding tube, whereas no bowel preparation procedures were performed on the control group. Transverse colon resection and anastomosis were performed on all rats under general anaesthesia. On postoperative day 5, re-laparotomy was performed and the anastomotic areas were resected. Animals were killed, after which bursting pressure and tissue hydroxyproline concentrations were measured, histopathological examination was performed, and we evaluated and compared the results. Results There were no differences between control and experimental groups in bursting pressure, tissue hydroxyproline concentrations, or histopathological examination results (P>0.05). Conclusions Our study demonstrated no significant difference between bursting pressures, tissue hydroxyproline levels, or modified wound healing score at postoperative day 5 between rats undergoing and not undergoing mechanical bowel preparation. Mechanical bowel preparation is not essential for healing or strength of colonic anastomosis in rats. PMID:26725402

  3. Stress-Related Alterations of Visceral Sensation: Animal Models for Irritable Bowel Syndrome Study

    PubMed Central

    Mulak, Agata; Taché, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Stressors of different psychological, physical or immune origin play a critical role in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome participating in symptoms onset, clinical presentation as well as treatment outcome. Experimental stress models applying a variety of acute and chronic exteroceptive or interoceptive stressors have been developed to target different periods throughout the lifespan of animals to assess the vulnerability, the trigger and perpetuating factors determining stress influence on visceral sensitivity and interactions within the brain-gut axis. Recent evidence points towards adequate construct and face validity of experimental models developed with respect to animals' age, sex, strain differences and specific methodological aspects such as non-invasive monitoring of visceromotor response to colorectal distension as being essential in successful identification and evaluation of novel therapeutic targets aimed at reducing stress-related alterations in visceral sensitivity. Underlying mechanisms of stress-induced modulation of visceral pain involve a combination of peripheral, spinal and supraspinal sensitization based on the nature of the stressors and dysregulation of descending pathways that modulate nociceptive transmission or stress-related analgesic response. PMID:21860814

  4. Comparison of Listing Strategies for Allosensitized Heart Transplant Candidates Requiring Transplant at High Urgency: A Decision Model Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Feingold, Brian; Webber, Steven A.; Bryce, Cindy L.; Park, Seo Young; Tomko, Heather E.; Comer, Diane M.; Mahle, William T.; Smith, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Allosensitized children who require a negative prospective crossmatch have a high risk of death awaiting heart transplantation. Accepting the first suitable organ offer, regardless of the possibility of a positive crossmatch, would improve waitlist outcomes but it is unclear whether it would result in improved survival at all times after listing, including post-transplant. We created a Markov decision model to compare survival after listing with a requirement for a negative prospective donor cell crossmatch (WAIT) versus acceptance of the first suitable offer (TAKE). Model parameters were derived from registry data on status 1A (highest urgency) pediatric heart transplant listings. We assumed no possibility of a positive crossmatch in the WAIT strategy and a base-case probability of a positive crossmatch in the TAKE strategy of 47%, as estimated from cohort data. Under base-case assumptions TAKE showed an incremental survival benefit of 1.4 years over WAIT. In multiple sensitivity analyses, including variation of the probability of a positive crossmatch from 10-100%, TAKE was consistently favored. While model input data were less well suited to comparing survival when awaiting transplantation across a negative virtual crossmatch, our analysis suggest that taking the first suitable organ offer under these circumstances may also be favored. PMID:25612495

  5. The single-staff model for bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Giles, K; Winslow, M N; Vaughan, W P

    1994-11-01

    This paper will demonstrate the advantages of pursuing an integrated model of care that utilizes one staff of caregivers in one facility for all phases of patient care from the time of patient evaluation through the time the patient returns to the care of his or her primary physician. We took the opportunity afforded by the development of a new program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, the Bone Marrow Transplantation (BMT) Program, to reconsider as many variables as possible in an attempt to develop a model of care that would represent the best of all worlds, i.e., high levels of quality of care, quality of life, staff job enrichment, patient convenience, operational efficiency, and cost reduction. PMID:10140894

  6. [Selective bowel decontamination].

    PubMed

    Szántó, Zoltán; Pulay, István; Kotsis, Lajos; Dinka, Tibor

    2006-04-01

    Infective complications play major role in mortality of high risk patients demanding intensive care. Selective Bowel Decontamination prevents endogenous infections by reducing the number of potentially pathogen microbes (aerobic bacteria, fungi) in the oropharynx and gastrointestinal tract, saving anaerobic bacteria. It had been used 20 years ago for the first time. Authors survey it's literature ever since. Selective Bowel Decontamination is performed by the mixture of antibiotics and antimycotic drug, administered orally in hydrogel, and suspension form in nasojejunal tube. The number of Gram negative optional aerobic bacteria and fungi decrease significantly in the gut, and the microbial translocation is following this tendency. Foreign authors achieved good results in acute necrotizing pancreatitis, after liver transplant, in polytrauma, in serious burn and in haematological malignancies. According to the literature Selective Bowel Decontamination shows advantages in selected groups of high risk surgical patients. In some studies the administration took few months, but the minimum time was one week. There was no report of increasing MRSA appearance. Regular bacteriological sampling is highly recommended in order to recognize any new antibiotic resistance in time. PMID:16711371

  7. Neuroprotective effects of systemic cerebral endothelial cell transplantation in a rat model of cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jong-Hyun; Na, Joo-Young; Lee, Min-Cheol; Choi, Kang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Kil; Min, Jung-Joon; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Hyung-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC)/D3 cells, which are from a stable clonal cell line of human immortalized cerebral endothelial cells, were intra-arterially transplanted through the common carotid artery in a rat model of photochemical-induced cerebral ischemia. Their therapeutic effects on infarct size, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, and outcome were examined. The hCMEC/D3 cells were genetically modified with the firefly luciferase gene for in vivo imaging post-transplantation. Transplanted hCMEC/D3 cells were identified in the infarcted brain by bioluminescence imaging at 1 day after transplantation. Compared with the control group, the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group showed reduced infarct size on day 3, reduced Evans blue dye leakage on day 1 indicating decreased BBB breakdown, and early recovery from Rotarod test neurological deficits. The hCMEC/D3-transplanted group also showed decreased levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, which were inversely correlated with TIMP-1 levels on post-transplantation days 1 and 3. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β were markedly diminished in the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group compared with controls. The systemically transplanted cells selectively migrated and integrated into the ischemically lesioned area, which accelerated neurological recovery. This new cerebral endothelial cell-based therapy may hold promise for clinical trials in patients with ischemic stroke. PMID:27347342

  8. Neuroprotective effects of systemic cerebral endothelial cell transplantation in a rat model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jong-Hyun; Na, Joo-Young; Lee, Min-Cheol; Choi, Kang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Kil; Min, Jung-Joon; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Hyung-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC)/D3 cells, which are from a stable clonal cell line of human immortalized cerebral endothelial cells, were intra-arterially transplanted through the common carotid artery in a rat model of photochemical-induced cerebral ischemia. Their therapeutic effects on infarct size, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, and outcome were examined. The hCMEC/D3 cells were genetically modified with the firefly luciferase gene for in vivo imaging post-transplantation. Transplanted hCMEC/D3 cells were identified in the infarcted brain by bioluminescence imaging at 1 day after transplantation. Compared with the control group, the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group showed reduced infarct size on day 3, reduced Evans blue dye leakage on day 1 indicating decreased BBB breakdown, and early recovery from Rotarod test neurological deficits. The hCMEC/D3-transplanted group also showed decreased levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, which were inversely correlated with TIMP-1 levels on post-transplantation days 1 and 3. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β were markedly diminished in the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group compared with controls. The systemically transplanted cells selectively migrated and integrated into the ischemically lesioned area, which accelerated neurological recovery. This new cerebral endothelial cell-based therapy may hold promise for clinical trials in patients with ischemic stroke. PMID:27347342

  9. Investigation of pulmonary involvement in inflammatory bowel disease in an experimental model of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Bunyamin; Songur, Yıldıran; Songur, Necla; Aksu, Oğuzhan; Senol, Altug; Ciris, I. Metin; Sutcu, Recep

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may also involve various extra-intestinal organs. Clinical studies have found asymptomatic/symptomatic pulmonary involvement in 1% to 6% of patients with IBD. The present study histopathologically investigated pulmonary involvement in an experimental model of colitis in order to demonstrate pulmonary tissue involvement in IBD and to expose potential etiological factors. It also explored the relation between inflammation and tissue concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Methods: The study comprised 24 male Wistar albino rats. The rats were divided into four groups of six rats each. Acute colitis was induced in two separate groups using either the dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) or trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) method, while the other two groups were used as controls for each model of colitis. Wallace scoring was used for macroscopic assessment of colitis, and the lungs were histopathologically examined. Concentrations of VEGF and TNF-α in pulmonary tissue were measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Results: The number of animals that had alveolar hemorrhage was significantly higher in the TNBS-induced colitis and DSS-induced colitis groups compared to their own control groups (p = 0.015 and p = 0.015, respectively). VEGF and TNF-α concentrations in pulmonary tissues were significantly increased in both the TNBS colitis and DSS colitis groups compared to their own control groups (p = 0.002 and p = 0.004, respectively; and p = 0.002 and p = 0.002, respectively). Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that significant and serious histopathological changes directly associated with colitis occur in the lungs in IBD. PMID:27539446

  10. Faecal microbiota transplantation-A clinical view.

    PubMed

    Mattner, J; Schmidt, F; Siegmund, B

    2016-08-01

    Faecal microbiota transplantation has gained increasing attention over the last decade as various phenotypes could be transferred from a donor to a recipient in different animal models. Clinically, however, the sole indication with evidence from a randomized placebo controlled trial is refractory Clostridium difficile infection. Despite revealing successful clinical outcomes, questions concerning regulatory affairs, the identification of the best donor, the optimal mixture of the transplant as well as the preferred route of administration remain to be clarified even for this indication. Initiated by the idea that alterations in the composition of the intestinal microbiota are associated with intestinal inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease, several studies investigated whether faecal microbiota transplantation would be an equally suitable approach for these devastating disorders. Indeed, the available data indicate changes in the microbiota composition following faecal microbial transplantation depending on the degree of intestinal inflammation. Furthermore, first data even provide evidence that the transplantation of an "optimized" microbiota induces clinical remission in ulcerative colitis. However, despite these intriguing results it needs to be considered that not only "a cure of inflammation", but also risk factors and phenotypes including obesity can be transferred via faecal microbiota transplantation. Thus, a deeper understanding of the impact of a distinct microbiota composition is required before "designing" the optimal faecal microbiota transplant. PMID:26924753

  11. National Survey of Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Center Personnel, Infrastructure and Models of Care Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Majhail, Navneet S.; Mau, Lih-Wen; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Payton, Tammy; Eckrich, Michael; Joffe, Steven; Lee, Stephanie J.; LeMaistre, Charles F.; LeRademacher, Jennifer; Loberiza, Fausto; Logan, Brent; Parsons, Susan K.; Repaczki-Jones, Ramona; Robinett, Pam; Rizzo, J Douglas; Murphy, Elizabeth; Denzen, Ellen M.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a complex procedure that requires availability of adequate infrastructure, personnel and resources at transplant centers. We conducted a national survey of transplant centers in the United States to obtain data on their personnel, infrastructure and care delivery models. A 42-item web-based survey was administered to medical directors of transplant centers in the US that reported any allogeneic HCT to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) in 2011. The response rate for the survey was 79% for adult programs (85/108 centers) and 82% for pediatric programs (54/66 centers). For describing results, we categorized centers into groups with similar volumes based on 2010 total HCT activity (adult centers 9 categories, pediatric centers 6 categories). We observed considerable variation in available resources, infrastructure, personnel and care delivery models among adult and pediatric transplant centers. Characteristics varied substantially among centers with comparable transplant volumes. Transplant centers may find these data helpful in assessing their present capacity and use them to evaluate potential resource needs for personnel, infrastructure and care delivery and in planning for growth. PMID:25840337

  12. National Survey of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Center Personnel, Infrastructure, and Models of Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Majhail, Navneet S; Mau, Lih-Wen; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Payton, Tammy; Eckrich, Michael; Joffe, Steven; Lee, Stephanie J; LeMaistre, Charles F; LeRademacher, Jennifer; Loberiza, Fausto; Logan, Brent; Parsons, Susan K; Repaczki-Jones, Ramona; Robinett, Pam; Rizzo, J Douglas; Murphy, Elizabeth; Denzen, Ellen M

    2015-07-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a complex procedure that requires availability of adequate infrastructure, personnel, and resources at transplantation centers. We conducted a national survey of transplantation centers in the United States to obtain data on their personnel, infrastructure, and care delivery models. A 42-item web-based survey was administered to medical directors of transplantation centers in the United States that reported any allogeneic HCT to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research in 2011. The response rate for the survey was 79% for adult programs (85 of 108 centers) and 82% for pediatric programs (54 of 66 centers). For describing results, we categorized centers into groups with similar volumes based on 2010 total HCT activity (adult centers, 9 categories; pediatric centers, 6 categories). We observed considerable variation in available resources, infrastructure, personnel, and care delivery models among adult and pediatric transplantation centers. Characteristics varied substantially among centers with comparable transplantation volumes. Transplantation centers may find these data helpful in assessing their present capacity and use them to evaluate potential resource needs for personnel, infrastructure, and care delivery and in planning for growth. PMID:25840337

  13. Increased VGLUT3 involved in visceral hyperalgesia in a rat model of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chang-Qing; Duan, Li-Ping; Qiao, Pei-Tang; Zhao, Li; Guo, Li-Li

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the activity of vesicular glutamate transporter-3 (VGLUT3) in a visceral hyperalgesia rat model of irritable bowel syndrome, and the role of mast cells (MCs). METHODS: Transient intestinal infection was induced by oral administration of Trichinella spiralis larvae in rats. On the 100th day post-infection (PI), the rats were divided into an acute cold restraint stress (ACRS) group and a non-stressed group. Age-matched untreated rats served as controls. The abdominal withdrawal reflex was used to measure the visceromotor response to colorectal distension (CRD). The expression levels of VGLUT3 in peripheral and central neurons were analyzed by immunofluorescence and western blotting. RESULTS: VGLUT3 expression in the L6S1 dorsal root ganglion cells was significantly higher in the PI group than in the control group (0.32 ± 0.009 vs 0.22 ± 0.008, P < 0.01), and there was no significant difference in the expression of VGLUT3 between MC-deficient rats and their normal wild-type littermates. Immunofluorescence showed that the expression levels of VGLUT3 in PI + ACRS rats were enhanced in the prefrontal cortex of the brain compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: VGLUT3 is involved in the pathogenesis of visceral hyperalgesia. Coexpression of c-fos, 5-hydroxytryptamine and VGLUT3 after CRD was observed in associated neuronal pathways. Increased VGLUT3 induced by transient intestinal infection was found in peripheral nerves, and was independent of MCs. Moreover, the expression of VGLUT3 was enhanced in the prefrontal cortex in rats with induced infection and stress. PMID:25780293

  14. Reproduction and Growth in a Murine Model of Early Life-Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Eniko; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Wetsel, William C; MacIver, Nancie J; Hale, Laura P

    2016-01-01

    Studies in transgenic murine models have provided insight into the complexity underlying inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a disease hypothesized to result from an injurious immune response against intestinal microbiota. We recently developed a mouse model of IBD that phenotypically and histologically resembles human childhood-onset ulcerative colitis (UC), using mice that are genetically modified to be deficient in the cytokines TNF and IL-10 ("T/I" mice). Here we report the effects of early life onset of colon inflammation on growth and reproductive performance of T/I mice. T/I dams with colitis often failed to get pregnant or had small litters with pups that failed to thrive. Production was optimized by breeding double homozygous mutant T/I males to females homozygous mutant for TNF deficiency and heterozygous for deficiency of IL-10 ("T/I-het" dams) that were not susceptible to spontaneous colon inflammation. When born to healthy (T/I-het) dams, T/I pups initially gained weight similarly to wild type (WT) pups and to their non-colitis-susceptible T/I-het littermates. However, their growth curves diverged between 8 and 13 weeks, when most T/I mice had developed moderate to severe colitis. The observed growth failure in T/I mice occurred despite a significant increase in their food consumption and in the absence of protein loss in the stool. This was not due to TNF-induced anorexia or altered food consumption due to elevated leptin levels. Metabolic studies demonstrated increased consumption of oxygen and water and increased production of heat and CO2 in T/I mice compared to their T/I-het littermates, without differences in motor activity. Based on the clinical similarities of this early life onset model of IBD in T/I mice to human IBD, these results suggest that mechanisms previously hypothesized to explain growth failure in children with IBD require re-evaluation. The T/I mouse model may be useful for further investigation of such mechanisms and for development

  15. Reproduction and Growth in a Murine Model of Early Life-Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Eniko; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Wetsel, William C.; MacIver, Nancie J.; Hale, Laura P.

    2016-01-01

    Studies in transgenic murine models have provided insight into the complexity underlying inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a disease hypothesized to result from an injurious immune response against intestinal microbiota. We recently developed a mouse model of IBD that phenotypically and histologically resembles human childhood-onset ulcerative colitis (UC), using mice that are genetically modified to be deficient in the cytokines TNF and IL-10 (“T/I” mice). Here we report the effects of early life onset of colon inflammation on growth and reproductive performance of T/I mice. T/I dams with colitis often failed to get pregnant or had small litters with pups that failed to thrive. Production was optimized by breeding double homozygous mutant T/I males to females homozygous mutant for TNF deficiency and heterozygous for deficiency of IL-10 (“T/I-het” dams) that were not susceptible to spontaneous colon inflammation. When born to healthy (T/I-het) dams, T/I pups initially gained weight similarly to wild type (WT) pups and to their non-colitis-susceptible T/I-het littermates. However, their growth curves diverged between 8 and 13 weeks, when most T/I mice had developed moderate to severe colitis. The observed growth failure in T/I mice occurred despite a significant increase in their food consumption and in the absence of protein loss in the stool. This was not due to TNF-induced anorexia or altered food consumption due to elevated leptin levels. Metabolic studies demonstrated increased consumption of oxygen and water and increased production of heat and CO2 in T/I mice compared to their T/I-het littermates, without differences in motor activity. Based on the clinical similarities of this early life onset model of IBD in T/I mice to human IBD, these results suggest that mechanisms previously hypothesized to explain growth failure in children with IBD require re-evaluation. The T/I mouse model may be useful for further investigation of such mechanisms and for

  16. A model for assessment and referral of clients with bowel symptoms in community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Deepa; McManus, Alexandra; Emmerton, Lynne M; Parsons, Richard W; Jiwa, Moyez

    2016-04-01

    Background To expedite diagnosis of serious bowel disease, efforts are required to signpost patients with high-risk symptoms to appropriate care. Community pharmacies are a recognized source of health advice regarding bowel symptoms. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of a validated self-administered questionnaire, Jodi Lee Test (JLT), for detection, triage, and referral of bowel symptoms suggestive of carcinoma, in pharmacies. Method 'Usual Practice' was monitored for 12 weeks in 21 pharmacies in Western Australia, documenting outcomes for 84 clients presenting with bowel symptoms. Outcome measures were: acceptance of verbal advice from the pharmacist; general practitioner consultation; and diagnosis. Trial of the JLT involved staff training in the research protocol and monitoring of outcomes for 80 recruited clients over 20 weeks. Utility of the JLT was assessed by post-trial survey of pharmacy staff. Results Significantly more referrals were made by staff using the JLT than during Usual Practice: 30 (38%) vs 17 (20%). Clients' acceptance of referrals was also higher for the intervention group (40% vs 6%). Two-thirds of pharmacy staff agreed that the JLT could be incorporated into pharmacy practice, and 70% indicated they would use the JLT in the future. Conclusion A pre-post design was considered more appropriate than a randomized control trial due to an inability to match pharmacies. Limitations of this study were: lack of control over adherence to the study protocol by pharmacy staff; no direct measure of client feedback on the JLT; and loss to follow-up. The JLT was effective in prompting decision-making by pharmacy staff and inter-professional care between pharmacies and general practice, in triage of clients at risk of bowel cancer. PMID:26700973

  17. Nonhuman Primate Models of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus for Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Liang; He, Yayi

    2014-01-01

    Islet transplantation is an attractive treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Animal models of diabetes mellitus (DM) contribute a lot to the experimental studies of islet transplantation and to evaluations of isolated islet grafts for future clinical applications. Diabetic nonhuman primates (NHPs) represent the suitable models of DMs to better evaluate the effectiveness of islet transplantation, to assess new strategies for controlling blood glucose (BG), relieving immune rejection, or prolonging islet survival, and eventually to translate the preclinical data into tangible clinical practice. This review introduces some NHP models of DM, clarifies why and how the models should be used, and elucidates the usefulness and limitations of the models in islet transplantation. PMID:25389531

  18. [Analysis of contractual incentives for kidney transplants in Brazil using the principal-agent model].

    PubMed

    Costa, Cassia Kely Favoretto; Balbinotto, Giácomo; Sampaio, Luciano Menezes Bezerra

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article was to analyze contractual incentives for kidney transplants in Brazil based on the principal-agent model. The approach assumes that the Brazilian Ministry of Health is the principal and the public hospitals accredited by the National Transplant System are the agent. The Ministry of Health's welfare depends on measures taken by hospitals in kidney uptake. Hospitals allocate administrative, financial, and management efforts to conduct measures in kidney donation, removal, uptake, and transplantation. Hospitals may choose the levels of effort that are consistent with the payments and incentives received in relation to transplantation costs. The solution to this type of problem lies in structuring an optimal incentives contract, which requires aligning the interests of both parties involved in the transplantation system. PMID:27626647

  19. Developing Statistical Models to Assess Transplant Outcomes Using National Registries: The Process in the United States.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Jon J; Salkowski, Nicholas; Kim, S Joseph; Zaun, David; Xiong, Hui; Israni, Ajay K; Kasiske, Bertram L

    2016-02-01

    Created by the US National Organ Transplant Act in 1984, the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) is obligated to publicly report data on transplant program and organ procurement organization performance in the United States. These reports include risk-adjusted assessments of graft and patient survival, and programs performing worse or better than expected are identified. The SRTR currently maintains 43 risk adjustment models for assessing posttransplant patient and graft survival and, in collaboration with the SRTR Technical Advisory Committee, has developed and implemented a new systematic process for model evaluation and revision. Patient cohorts for the risk adjustment models are identified, and single-organ and multiorgan transplants are defined, then each risk adjustment model is developed following a prespecified set of steps. Model performance is assessed, the model is refit to a more recent cohort before each evaluation cycle, and then it is applied to the evaluation cohort. The field of solid organ transplantation is unique in the breadth of the standardized data that are collected. These data allow for quality assessment across all transplant providers in the United States. A standardized process of risk model development using data from national registries may enhance the field. PMID:26814440

  20. Sparse Modeling Reveals miRNA Signatures for Diagnostics of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Degenhardt, Frauke; Szymczak, Silke; Du, Zhipei; Elsharawy, Abdou; Keller, Andreas; Schreiber, Stefan; Franke, Andre

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) still remains a clinical challenge and the most accurate diagnostic procedure is a combination of clinical tests including invasive endoscopy. In this study we evaluated whether systematic miRNA expression profiling, in conjunction with machine learning techniques, is suitable as a non-invasive test for the major IBD phenotypes (Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC)). Based on microarray technology, expression levels of 863 miRNAs were determined for whole blood samples from 40 CD and 36 UC patients and compared to data from 38 healthy controls (HC). To further discriminate between disease-specific and general inflammation we included miRNA expression data from other inflammatory diseases (inflammation controls (IC): 24 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 23 multiple sclerosis, 38 pancreatitis and 45 sarcoidosis cases) as well as 70 healthy controls from previous studies. Classification problems considering 2, 3 or 4 groups were solved using different types of penalized support vector machines (SVMs). The resulting models were assessed regarding sparsity and performance and a subset was selected for further investigation. Measured by the area under the ROC curve (AUC) the corresponding median holdout-validated accuracy was estimated as ranging from 0.75 to 1.00 (including IC) and 0.89 to 0.98 (excluding IC), respectively. In combination, the corresponding models provide tools for the distinction of CD and UC as well as CD, UC and HC with expected classification error rates of 3.1 and 3.3%, respectively. These results were obtained by incorporating not more than 16 distinct miRNAs. Validated target genes of these miRNAs have been previously described as being related to IBD. For others we observed significant enrichment for IBD susceptibility loci identified in earlier GWAS. These results suggest that the proposed miRNA signature is of relevance for the etiology of IBD. Its diagnostic value

  1. Enterogenesis in a clinically feasible model of mechanical small-bowel lengthening

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Ariel U.; Sun, Xiaoyi; El-Sawaf, Mohammed; Haxhija, Emir Q.; Brei, Diann; Luntz, Jonathan; Yang, Hua; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent work indicates that mechanical force induces small-bowel growth, although methods reported do not have direct clinical application. We report a clinically feasible technique of enterogenesis and describe intestinal function in this model. Methods Using a pig model (n = 11), we stretched isolated small intestinal segments mechanically for 7 days in vivo with an intraluminal device. Control segments were not stretched. Morphology, histology, and epithelial proliferation were assessed. Absorption and epithelial barrier function were examined in an Ussing chamber. Results Stretch segments were significantly longer than Control segments and had nearly 2-fold greater surface area (P < .001). Mucosal thickness was much greater in Stretch than Control segments (772 ± 134 vs. 647 ± 75 μm, P = .02). Although villus height was reduced in Stretch and Control segments (353 ± 76 vs. 324 ± 76 μm, P = .6) versus native jejunum (522 ± 87, P < .0005), crypt depth was increased dramatically in Stretch (450 ± 95 μm) versus Control segments (341 ± 64, P = .005). This observation was accompanied by a 2-fold increase in cellular proliferation (26.3 ± 3.8 vs 12.1 ± 6.6 % bromodeoxyuridine+, P < .05). Barrier function was intact ([3H]-mannitol permeation, 0.16 ± 0.08%, vs native jejunum, 0.17 ± 0.08%, P = .81). Glucose-mediated sodium transport was similar in Stretch versus native jejunum segments (60.0 ± 23.5 vs 82.3 ± 47.3 μA/ cm2, P = .31), as was carbachol-induced chloride transport (82.4 ± 72.2 vs 57.2 ± 33.4 μA/cm2, P = .54) and alanine absorption (16.46 ± 12.94 vs 23.53 ± 21.31 μA/cm2, P = .53). Conclusions Mechanical stretching induces small intestinal growth, while maintaining function. Epithelial architecture does change, such that a decrease in villus height is offset by a marked increase in crypt depth and a 2-fold increase in epithelial proliferation. Epithelial barrier and absorptive functions remain intact. The device described may

  2. Renal Transplantation by Automatic Anastomotic Device in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Lo Monte, Attilio Ignazio; Damiano, Giuseppe; Palumbo, Vincenzo Davide; Spinelli, Gabriele; Buscemi, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    Automatic vascular staplers for vascular anastomoses in kidney transplantation may dramatically reduce the operative time and, in particular, warm ischemia time, thus increasing the outcome of transplantation. Ten pigs underwent kidney auto-transplantation by automatic anastomotic device. Kidneys were collected by laparotomy with selective ligations at the renal hilum and perfused with cold storage solution. To overcome the shortage in length of renal hilum, a tract of the internal jugular vein was harvested to increase the length of the vessels. The anastomoses were totally performed by the use of the anastomotic device. On 10 kidney transplants, nine were successful and no complications occurred. Renal resistive indexes showed a slight increase in the immediate postoperative period returning normal at 10 days of follow-up. We demonstrated the possibility to perform renal vascular anastomoses by means of an automatic anastomotic device. This instrument developed for coronary bypass surgery by virtue of the small caliber of the vessels could be adopted on a larger scale for renal transplantation. The reduced warm ischemia time needed for anastomosis may help to achieve a better outcome for the graft and expand the pool of marginal donors in renal transplantation. PMID:25900063

  3. SPECT of Transplanted Islets of Langerhans by Dopamine 2 Receptor Targeting in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Willekens, Stefanie M A; van der Kroon, Inge; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Boerman, Otto C; van den Broek, Sebastiaan A M W; Brom, Maarten; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation can be a more permanent treatment for type 1 diabetes compared to daily insulin administration. Quantitative and longitudinal noninvasive imaging of viable transplanted islets might help to further improve this novel therapy. Since islets express dopamine 2 (D2) receptors, they could be visualized by targeting this receptor. Therefore, the D2 receptor antagonist based tracer [(125/123)I][IBZM] was selected to visualize transplanted islets in a rat model. BZM was radioiodinated, and the labeling was optimized for position 3 of the aromatic ring. [(125)I]-3-IBZM was characterized in vitro using INS-1 cells and isolated islets. Subsequently, 1,000 islets were transplanted in the calf muscle of WAG/Rij rats and SPECT/CT images were acquired 6 weeks after transplantation. Finally, the graft containing muscle was dissected and analyzed immunohistochemically. Oxidative radioiodination resulted in 3 IBZM isomers with different receptor affinities. The use of 0.6 mg/mL chloramine-T hydrate resulted in high yield formation of predominantly [(125)I]-3-IBZM, the isomer harboring the highest receptor affinity. The tracer showed D2 receptor mediated binding to isolated islets in vitro. The transplant could be visualized by SPECT 6 weeks after transplantation. The transplants could be localized in the calf muscle and showed insulin and glucagon expression, indicating targeting of viable and functional islets in the transplant. Radioiodination was optimized to produce high yields of [(125)I]-3-IBZM, the isomer showing optimal D2R binding. Furthermore, [(123)I]IBZM specifically targets the D2 receptors on transplanted islets. In conclusion, this tracer shows potential for noninvasive in vivo detection of islets grafted in the muscle by D2 receptor targeting. PMID:26607139

  4. Living with Bowel Control Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Living with Bowel Control Problems Resources Bowel Control Awareness Campaign Home Resources for Health Care Providers ... Living with Bowel Control Problems Living with Bowel Control Problems Living with a bowel control problem can ...

  5. Extrahepatic islet transplantation with microporous polymer scaffolds in syngeneic mouse and allogeneic porcine models

    PubMed Central

    Gibly, Romie F.; Zhang, Xiaomin; Graham, Melanie L.; Hering, Bernhard J.; Kaufman, Dixon B.; Lowe, William L.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2011-01-01

    Intraportal transplantation of islets has successfully treated select patients with type 1 diabetes. However, intravascular infusion and the intrahepatic site contribute to significant early and late islet loss, yet a clinical alternative has remained elusive. We investigated non-encapsulating, porous, biodegradable polymer scaffolds as a vehicle for islet transplantation into extrahepatic sites, using syngeneic mouse and allogeneic porcine models. Scaffold architecture was modified to enhance cell infiltration leading to re-vascularization of the islets with minimal inflammatory response. In the diabetic mouse model, 125 islets seeded on scaffolds implanted into the epididymal fat pad restored normoglycemia within an average of 1.95 days and transplantation of only 75 islets required 12.1 days. Increasing the pore size to increase islet-islet interactions did not significantly impact islet function. The porcine model was used to investigate early islet engraftment. Increasing the islet seeding density led to a greater mass of engrafted islets, though the efficiency of islet survival decreased. Transplantation into the porcine omentum provided greater islet engraftment than the gastric submucosa. These results demonstrate scaffolds support murine islet transplantation with high efficiency, and feasibility studies in large animals support continued pre-clinical studies with scaffolds as a platform to control the transplant microenvironment. PMID:21959005

  6. Autologous adult bone marrow stem cell transplantation in an animal model of huntington's disease: behavioral and morphological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lescaudron, Laurent; Unni, Divya; Dunbar, Gary L

    2003-07-01

    We investigated the effects of autologous bone marrow stem cell transplantation in a rat model of Huntington's Disease. Thirteen days after bilateral quinolinic lesions (QA), bone marrow was implanted into the damaged striatum. The ability of the transplants to reverse QA-induced cognitive deficits in the radial-arm water maze (RAWM) was examined. The transplants significantly reduced working memory deficits. Most of the transplanted cells appeared quite primitive. Because only a few cells expressed neural phenotypes, we suggest that the release of growth factors by the transplants allowed surviving cells within the caudate to function more efficiently and to facilitate other compensatory responses. PMID:12881187

  7. Detecting inflammation and fibrosis in bowel wall with photoacoustic imaging in a Crohn's disease animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Johnson, Laura A.; Hu, Jack; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Higgins, Peter D. R.; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease affecting 700,000 people in the United States. This condition may cause obstructing intestinal narrowings (strictures) due to inflammation, fibrosis (deposition of collagen), or a combination of both. Utilizing the unique strong optical absorption of hemoglobin at 532 nm and collagen at 1370 nm, this study investigated the feasibility of non-invasively characterizing intestinal strictures using photoacoustic imaging (PAI). Three normal controls, ten pure inflammation and 9 inflammation plus fibrosis rat bowel wall samples were imaged. Statistical analysis of the PA measurements has shown the capability of discriminating the purely inflammatory from mixed inflammatory and fibrotic strictures.

  8. Assessment and Planning for a Pediatric Bilateral Hand Transplant Using 3-Dimensional Modeling: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Jorge A; Gralewski, Kevin; McAndrew, Christine; Rehman, Mohamed A; Chang, Benjamin; Levin, L Scott

    2016-03-01

    Children are not typically considered for hand transplantation for various reasons, including the difficulty of finding an appropriate donor. Matching donor-recipient hands and forearms based on size is critically important. If the donor's hands are too large, the recipient may not be able to move the fingers effectively. Conversely, if the donor's hands are too small, the appearance may not be appropriate. We present an 8-year-old child evaluated for a bilateral hand transplant following bilateral amputation. The recipient forearms and model hands were modeled from computed tomography imaging studies and replicated as anatomic models with a 3-dimensional printer. We modified the scale of the printed hand to produce 3 proportions, 80%, 100% and 120%. The transplant team used the anatomical models during evaluation of a donor for appropriate match based on size. The donor's hand size matched the 100%-scale anatomical model hand and the transplant team was activated. In addition to assisting in appropriate donor selection by the transplant team, the 100%-scale anatomical model hand was used to create molds for prosthetic hands for the donor. PMID:26810827

  9. Short- and long-term effects of small bowel resection: a unique histological study in a piglet model of short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Fantini, Prue M; Thomas, Sarah L; Wilson, Guineva; Taylor, Russell G; Sourial, Magdy; Bines, Julie E

    2011-02-01

    If we are to develop successful interventions to improve clinical outcomes for short bowel syndrome patients we require (1) knowledge of changes within the epithelial population following small bowel resection (SBR) and (2) an idea of when these changes occur to inform on the timing of potential interventions aimed at enhancing the adaptive response. The aim of this study was to produce a temporal map of epithelial changes within the crypt and villus at early and late adaptation phases. Four-week-old piglets underwent a 75% SBR or sham operation and were studied at 2, 4 and 6 weeks post-operation to allow analysis of early and late adaptation responses. Piglets received polymeric infant formula (PIF). Immunohistochemistry with specific cell markers was used to quantitate intestinal cell types and the total cell numbers. Changes within the crypt were temporally dependent on an early significant increase in enterocytes and proliferative cells not sustained at 6 weeks. Goblet cell numbers were increased at all time points. Despite a significant increase in total villus cell numbers at 6 weeks there was no change in specific cell types. We observed two distinct phases of cellular change following SBR. An early increase in enterocytes and proliferative cells was not reflected in increased weight gain indicating the early increase represents immature enterocytes. Interventions aimed at increasing differentiation of the rapidly changing crypt population would allow for an earlier increase in absorption. PMID:21249379

  10. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of infant short bowel syndrome: translational relevance and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Ney, Denise M.; Sigalet, David L.; Vegge, Andreas; Burrin, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal failure (IF), due to short bowel syndrome (SBS), results from surgical resection of a major portion of the intestine, leading to reduced nutrient absorption and need for parenteral nutrition (PN). The incidence is highest in infants and relates to preterm birth, necrotizing enterocolitis, atresia, gastroschisis, volvulus, and aganglionosis. Patient outcomes have improved, but there is a need to develop new therapies for SBS and to understand intestinal adaptation after different diseases, resection types, and nutritional and pharmacological interventions. Animal studies are needed to carefully evaluate the cellular mechanisms, safety, and translational relevance of new procedures. Distal intestinal resection, without a functioning colon, results in the most severe complications and adaptation may depend on the age at resection (preterm, term, young, adult). Clinically relevant therapies have recently been suggested from studies in preterm and term PN-dependent SBS piglets, with or without a functional colon. Studies in rats and mice have specifically addressed the fundamental physiological processes underlying adaptation at the cellular level, such as regulation of mucosal proliferation, apoptosis, transport, and digestive enzyme expression, and easily allow exogenous or genetic manipulation of growth factors and their receptors (e.g., glucagon-like peptide 2, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor 1, epidermal growth factor, keratinocyte growth factor). The greater size of rats, and especially young pigs, is an advantage for testing surgical procedures and nutritional interventions (e.g., PN, milk diets, long-/short-chain lipids, pre- and probiotics). Conversely, newborn pigs (preterm or term) and weanling rats provide better insights into the developmental aspects of treatment for SBS in infants owing to their immature intestines. The review shows that a balance among practical, economical, experimental, and ethical constraints will determine the

  11. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of infant short bowel syndrome: translational relevance and challenges.

    PubMed

    Sangild, Per T; Ney, Denise M; Sigalet, David L; Vegge, Andreas; Burrin, Douglas

    2014-12-15

    Intestinal failure (IF), due to short bowel syndrome (SBS), results from surgical resection of a major portion of the intestine, leading to reduced nutrient absorption and need for parenteral nutrition (PN). The incidence is highest in infants and relates to preterm birth, necrotizing enterocolitis, atresia, gastroschisis, volvulus, and aganglionosis. Patient outcomes have improved, but there is a need to develop new therapies for SBS and to understand intestinal adaptation after different diseases, resection types, and nutritional and pharmacological interventions. Animal studies are needed to carefully evaluate the cellular mechanisms, safety, and translational relevance of new procedures. Distal intestinal resection, without a functioning colon, results in the most severe complications and adaptation may depend on the age at resection (preterm, term, young, adult). Clinically relevant therapies have recently been suggested from studies in preterm and term PN-dependent SBS piglets, with or without a functional colon. Studies in rats and mice have specifically addressed the fundamental physiological processes underlying adaptation at the cellular level, such as regulation of mucosal proliferation, apoptosis, transport, and digestive enzyme expression, and easily allow exogenous or genetic manipulation of growth factors and their receptors (e.g., glucagon-like peptide 2, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor 1, epidermal growth factor, keratinocyte growth factor). The greater size of rats, and especially young pigs, is an advantage for testing surgical procedures and nutritional interventions (e.g., PN, milk diets, long-/short-chain lipids, pre- and probiotics). Conversely, newborn pigs (preterm or term) and weanling rats provide better insights into the developmental aspects of treatment for SBS in infants owing to their immature intestines. The review shows that a balance among practical, economical, experimental, and ethical constraints will determine the

  12. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of infant short bowel syndrome: Translational relevance and challenges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intestinal failure (IF), due to short bowel syndrome (SBS), results from surgical resection of a major portion of the intestine, leading to reduced nutrient absorption and need for parenteral nutrition (PN). The incidence is highest in infants and relates to preterm birth, necrotizing enterocolitis,...

  13. Effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-pretreated neuron stem cell transplantation on Alzheimer’s disease model mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Yu, Ying; Cai, Hongliu

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common case of dementia and its possible therapies, such as neuron stem cell (NSC) transplantation therapy, have been studied for years. In order to improve NSC transplantation effects, we were inspired to pretreat NSC using brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) before transplantation. The AD mouse model was constructed and effects of BDNF+NSC transplant group and traditional NSC transplant group were compared using the four indicators: conditions of learning and memory ability recovery tested by Morris Water Maze (MWM), number of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, expression of synaptophysin, and number of acetylcholinesterase (ACHE)-positive fibers detected by chemical staining. Results showed all the four indicators were significantly lower in the AD model group than the control group (P < 0.05). Traditional NSC transplantation could improve these indicators to some extent but still possessed significant differences from the control group (P < 0.05). Especially, the BDNF+NSC transplant group showed significant improvements in the four indicators when compared with the AD model group (P < 0.05). Taken these data together, BDNF pretreatment improved the NSC transplantation effects, showing advantages over the traditional NSC transplantation. Our study could facilitate the application of stem cell transplantation therapy to AD treatment. PMID:26885166

  14. A kidney transplantation model in a low-resource country: an experience from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Syed Adibul Hasan; Naqvi, Syed Ali Anwar; Zafar, Mirza Naqi; Akhtar, Syed Fazal

    2013-05-01

    Pakistan is a low-resource country with a population of 185 million where expenditure on health is 1.3% of the gross national product. The estimated incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is 100 per million of the population. The paucity and high costs of renal replacement therapy render more than 90% of the ESRD population disenfranchised from replacement therapy. Our center, which is a government sector organization, established as an integrated dialysis and living related renal transplant program in the 1980s, where all services were provided free of cost to all patients with life-long follow-up care including medications. The model was based on a concept of community/government partnership where the contributions to funds vary between 40% and 60% for each partner. The model has been self sustaining for 25 years, with an annual budget of $28 million in 2010. Presently, over 600 patients are dialyzed each day and each week, 7-10 patients have received live related transplants. The overall 1- and 5-year graft survival rate of 3150 transplants is 92% and 85%, respectively. Free dialysis and transplantation established our institute as a focus of transplantation in the country. This model therefore allowed the institute to have a vital role in the campaign against transplant tourism and in the promulgation of the transplant law. It shows that in low-resource countries, specialized centers in the government sector can, with community support, provide high-quality ESRD care to the disenfranchised population. PMID:25018989

  15. Dietary polydextrose prevents inflammatory bowel disease in trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid model of rat colitis.

    PubMed

    Witaicenis, Aline; Fruet, Andréa C; Salem, Letícia; Di Stasi, Luiz C

    2010-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multifactorial intestinal disorder that involves interactions among the immune system, genetic susceptibility, and environmental factors, especially the bacterial flora. Polydextrose, a polysaccharide constituted by 90% nondigestible and nonabsorbable soluble fibers, has several physiological effects consistent with those of dietary fibers, including proliferation of colon microflora. Because sulfasalazine presents serious side effects through long-term use at high doses, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the preventative effect of polydextrose on trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced intestinal inflammation and its effects on the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of sulfasalazine. Results indicated that polydextrose and its association with sulfasalazine present an anti-inflammatory effect that reduces myeloperoxidase activity, counteracts glutathione content, and promotes reductions in lesion extension and colonic weight/length ratio. PMID:21091252

  16. Emergency liver transplant in patient with Child-Pugh class C cirrhosis and strangulated umbilical hernia.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Abhideep; Daga, Sachin; Goyal, Neerav; Ramaswamy, Vasudevan Karisangal; Agarwal, Shaleen; Pareek, Shishir; Ray, Ramdip; Wadhawan, Manav; Gupta, Subash

    2013-02-01

    The authors report the case of a patient who presented with small bowel obstruction while awaiting liver transplant for Child-Pugh class C cirrhosis. He underwent emergency liver transplant with resection of the small bowel after the obstruction did not improve with conservative management. The authors believe this is the first case of successful emergency liver transplant with resection of the small bowel in a patient with decompensated Child-Pugh class C liver cirrhosis and strangulated umbilical hernia. This case suggests the possibility of improved outcomes of emergency hernia repair in patients with liver cirrhosis when small bowel resection is combined with liver transplant. PMID:23190414

  17. Population pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic modelling of mycophenolic acid in paediatric renal transplant recipients in the early post-transplant period

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Min; Fukuda, Tsuyoshi; Cox, Shareen; de Vries, Marij T; Hooper, David K; Goebel, Jens; Vinks, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK−PD) model for mycophenolic acid (MPA) in paediatric renal transplant recipients in the early post-transplant period. Methods A total of 214 MPA plasma concentrations−time data points from 24 patients were available for PK model development. In 17 out of a total of 24 patients, inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) enzyme activity measurements (n = 97) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were available for PK−PD modelling. The PK−PD model was developed using non-linear mixed effects modelling sequentially by 1) developing a population PK model and 2) incorporating IMPDH activity into a PK−PD model using post hoc Bayesian PK parameter estimates. Covariate analysis included patient demographics, co-medication and clinical laboratory data. Non-parametric bootstrapping and prediction-corrected visual predictive checks were performed to evaluate the final models. Results A two compartment model with a transit compartment absorption best described MPA PK. A non-linear relationship between dose and MPA exposure was observed and was described by a power function in the model. The final population PK parameter estimates (and their 95% confidence intervals) were CL/F, 22 (14.8, 25.2) l h−1 70 kg−1; Vc/F, 45.4 (29.6, 55.6) l; Vp/F, 411 (152.6, 1472.6)l; Q/F, 22.4 (16.0, 32.5) l h−1; Ka, 2.5 (1.45, 4.93) h−1. Covariate analysis in the PK study identified body weight to be significantly correlated with CL/F. A simplified inhibitory Emax model adequately described the relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity. The final population PK−PD parameter estimates (and their 95% confidence intervals) were: E0, 3.45 (2.61, 4.56) nmol h−1 mg−1 protein and EC50, 1.73 (1.16, 3.01) mg l−1. Emax was fixed to 0. There were two African-American patients in our study cohorts and both had low IMPDH baseline activities (E0) compared

  18. STAT3 accelerates uterine epithelial regeneration in a mouse model of decellularized uterine matrix transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Takehiro; Hirota, Yasushi; Saito-Fujita, Tomoko; Matsuo, Mitsunori; Egashira, Mahiro; Matsumoto, Leona; Haraguchi, Hirofumi; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Furukawa, Katsuko S.; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Osuga, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Although a close connection between uterine regeneration and successful pregnancy in both humans and mice has been consistently observed, its molecular basis remains unclear. We here established a mouse model of decellularized uterine matrix (DUM) transplantation. Resected mouse uteri were processed with SDS to make DUMs without any intact cells. DUMs were transplanted into the mouse uteri with artificially induced defects, and all the uterine layers were recovered at the DUM transplantation sites within a month. In the regenerated uteri, normal hormone responsiveness in early pregnancy was observed, suggesting the regeneration of functional uteri. Uterine epithelial cells rapidly migrated and formed a normal uterine epithelial layer within a week, indicating a robust epithelial-regenerating capacity. Stromal and myometrial regeneration occurred following epithelial regeneration. In ovariectomized mice, uterine regeneration of the DUM transplantation was similarly observed, suggesting that ovarian hormones are not essential for this regeneration process. Importantly, the regenerating epithelium around the DUM demonstrated heightened STAT3 phosphorylation and cell proliferation, which was suppressed in uteri of Stat3 conditional knockout mice. These data suggest a key role of STAT3 in the initial step of the uterine regeneration process. The DUM transplantation model is a powerful tool for uterine regeneration research. PMID:27358915

  19. Changes in the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a model for diffusion of medical technology

    PubMed Central

    Gratwohl, Alois; Schwendener, Alvin; Baldomero, Helen; Gratwohl, Michael; Apperley, Jane; Niederwieser, Dietger; Frauendorfer, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Background Innovations in hematology spread rapidly. Factors affecting the speed of introduction, international diffusion, and durability of use of innovations are, however, poorly understood. Design and Methods We used data on 251,106 hematopoietic stem cell transplants from 591 teams in 36 European countries to analyze the increase and decrease in such transplants for breast cancer and chronic myeloid leukemia and the replacement of bone marrow by peripheral blood as the source of stem cells as processes of diffusion. Regression analyses were used to measure the quantitative impact of defined macro- and microeconomic factors, to look for significant associations (t-test), and to describe the coefficient of determination or explanatory content (R2). Results Gross national income per capita, World Bank category, team density, team distribution, team size, team experience and, team innovator status were all significantly associated with some or all of the changes. The analyses revealed different patterns of associations and a wide range of explanatory content. Macro- and micro-economic factors were sufficient to explain the increase of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants in general (R2 = 78.41%) and for chronic myeloid leukemia in particular (R2 = 79.39%). They were insufficient to explain the changes in stem cell source (R2 =26.79% autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplants; R2 = 9.67% allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants) or the decreases in hematopoietic stem cell transplants (R2 =10.22% breast cancer; R2=33.17% chronic myeloid leukemia). Conclusions The diffusion of hematopoietic stem cell transplants is more complex than previously thought. Availability of resources, evidence, external regulations and, expectations were identified as key determinants. These data might serve as a model for diffusion of medical technology in general. PMID:20378578

  20. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells prevents memory impairment in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Takuya; Kamimura, Naomi; Yokota, Takashi; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Iuchi, Katsuya; Lee, Hyunjin; Takami, Shinya; Akashiba, Hiroki; Shitaka, Yoshitsugu; Ueda, Masayuki; Katsura, Ken-Ichiro; Kimura, Kazumi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2015-04-24

    Stem cell transplantation therapy is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of ischemic stroke, and several beneficial aspects have been reported. Similarly, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), stem cell therapy is expected to provide an efficient therapeutic approach. Indeed, the intracerebral transplantation of stem cells reduced amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and rescued memory deficits in AD model mice. Here, we show that intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMCs) improves cognitive function in two different AD mouse models, DAL and APP mice, and prevents neurodegeneration. GFP-positive BMMCs were isolated from tibiae and femurs of 4-week-old mice and then transplanted intravenously into DAL and APP mice. Transplantation of BMMCs suppressed neuronal loss and restored memory impairment of DAL mice to almost the same level as in wild-type mice. Transplantation of BMMCs to APP mice reduced Aβ deposition in the brain. APP mice treated with BMMCs performed significantly better on behavioral tests than vehicle-injected mice. Moreover, the effects were observed even with transplantation after the onset of cognitive impairment in DAL mice. Together, our results indicate that intravenous transplantation of BMMCs has preventive effects against the cognitive decline in AD model mice and suggest a potential therapeutic effect of BMMC transplantation therapy. PMID:25698614

  1. Immune Reconstitution and Graft-Versus-Host Reactions in Rat Models of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zinöcker, Severin; Dressel, Ralf; Wang, Xiao-Nong; Dickinson, Anne M.; Rolstad, Bent

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) extends the lives of thousands of patients who would otherwise succumb to hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemias and lymphomas, aplastic anemia, and disorders of the immune system. In alloHCT, different immune cell types mediate beneficial graft-versus-tumor (GvT) effects, regulate detrimental graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), and are required for protection against infections. Today, the “good” (GvT effector cells and memory cells conferring protection) cannot be easily separated from the “bad” (GvHD-causing cells), and alloHCT remains a hazardous medical modality. The transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells into an immunosuppressed patient creates a delicate environment for the reconstitution of donor blood and immune cells in co-existence with host cells. Immunological reconstitution determines to a large extent the immune status of the allo-transplanted host against infections and the recurrence of cancer, and is critical for long-term protection and survival after clinical alloHCT. Animal models continue to be extremely valuable experimental tools that widen our understanding of, for example, the dynamics of post-transplant hematopoiesis and the complexity of immune reconstitution with multiple ways of interaction between host and donor cells. In this review, we discuss the rat as an experimental model of HCT between allogeneic individuals. We summarize our findings on lymphocyte reconstitution in transplanted rats and illustrate the disease pathology of this particular model. We also introduce the rat skin explant assay, a feasible alternative to in vivo transplantation studies. The skin explant assay can be used to elucidate the biology of graft-versus-host reactions, which are known to have a major impact on immune reconstitution, and to perform genome-wide gene expression studies using controlled combinations of minor and major histocompatibility between the donor and the recipient

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Sciatic Nerve Repair and Hindlimb Transplant Model

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Damon S.; Wimmers, Eric G.; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Grahammer, Johanna; Christensen, Joani M.; Brat, Gabriel A.; Wu, Lehao W.; Sarhane, Karim A.; Lopez, Joseph; Wallner, Christoph; Furtmüller, Georg J.; Yuan, Nance; Pang, John; Sarkar, Kakali; Lee, W. P. Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of local and intravenous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration to augment neuroregeneration in both a sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and rat hindlimb transplant model. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were harvested and purified from Brown-Norway (BN) rats. Sciatic nerve transections and repairs were performed in three groups of Lewis (LEW) rats: negative controls (n = 4), local MSCs (epineural) injection (n = 4), and systemic MSCs (intravenous) injection (n = 4). Syngeneic (LEW-LEW) (n = 4) and allogeneic (BN-LEW) (n = 4) hindlimb transplants were performed and assessed for neuroregeneration after local or systemic MSC treatment. Rats undergoing sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and treated with either local or systemic injection of MSCs had significant improvement in the speed of recovery of compound muscle action potential amplitudes and axon counts when compared with negative controls. Similarly, rats undergoing allogeneic hindlimb transplants treated with local injection of MSCs exhibited significantly increased axon counts. Similarly, systemic MSC treatment resulted in improved nerve regeneration following allogeneic hindlimb transplants. Systemic administration had a more pronounced effect on electromotor recovery while local injection was more effective at increasing fiber counts, suggesting different targets of action. Local and systemic MSC injections significantly improve the pace and degree of nerve regeneration after nerve injury and hindlimb transplantation. PMID:27510321

  3. Bone and cartilage repair by transplantation of induced pluripotent stem cells in murine joint defect model.

    PubMed

    Uto, Sakura; Nishizawa, Satoru; Takasawa, Yutaka; Asawa, Yukiyo; Fujihara, Yuko; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of cartilage regenerative medicine has been an important issue in the clinical field, because cartilage has the poor ability of self-repair. Currently, tissue engineering using autologous chondrocytes has risen, but we should investigate more appropriate cell sources that can be obtained without any quantitative limitation. In this study, we focused on induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, in which the ethical hurdle does not seem higher than that of embryonic stem cells. Mouse iPS cells were transplanted into the mouse joint defect model of the knee. Strains of the transplants and hosts were arranged to be either closest (homology 75% in genetic background) or identical (100%). For transplantation, we embedded the iPS cells within the collagen hydrogel in order to obtain the effective administration of the cells into defects, which induced the differentiation of the iPS cells. At 8 weeks of transplantation, although the iPS cells with a 75% homology to the host in the genetic background tended to form teratoma, those of 100% showed a joint regeneration. GFP immunohistochemistry proved that the transplanted iPS cells were responsible for the bone and cartilage repair. Taking these results together, the iPS cells are regarded as a promising cell source for the cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:24389404

  4. Immunomodulatory Effects of Mixed Hematopoietic Chimerism: Immune Tolerance in Canine Model of Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nash;, Richard A.; Yunosov;, Murad; Abrams;, Kraig; Hwang;, Billanna; Castilla-Llorente;, Cristina; Chen;, Peter; Farivar;, Alexander S.; Georges;, George E.; Hackman;, Robert C.; Lamm;, Wayne J.E.; Lesnikova;, Marina; Ochs;, Hans D.; Randolph-Habecker;, Julie; Ziegler;, Stephen F.; Storb;, Rainer; Storer;, Barry; Madtes;, David K.; Glenny;, Robb; Mulligan, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term survival after lung transplantation is limited by acute and chronic graft rejection. Induction of immune tolerance by first establishing mixed hematopoietic chimerism (MC) is a promising strategy to improve outcomes. In a preclinical canine model, stable MC was established in recipients after reduced-intensity conditioning and hematopoietic cell transplantation from a DLA-identical donor. Delayed lung transplantation was performed from the stem cell donor without pharmacological immunosuppression. Lung graft survival without loss of function was prolonged in chimeric (n=5) vs. nonchimeric (n=7) recipients (p≤0.05, Fisher’s test). There were histological changes consistent with low grade rejection in 3/5 of the lung grafts in chimeric recipients at ≥1 year. Chimeric recipients after lung transplantation had a normal immune response to a T-dependent antigen. Compared to normal dogs, there were significant increases of CD4+INFγ+, CD4+IL-4+ and CD8+ INFγ+ T-cell subsets in the blood (p <0.0001 for each of the 3 T-cell subsets). Markers for regulatory T-cell subsets including foxP3, IL10 and TGFβ were also increased in CD3+ T cells from the blood and peripheral tissues of chimeric recipients after lung transplantation. Establishing MC is immunomodulatory and observed changes were consistent with activation of both the effector and regulatory immune response. PMID:19422333

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Sciatic Nerve Repair and Hindlimb Transplant Model.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Damon S; Wimmers, Eric G; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Grahammer, Johanna; Christensen, Joani M; Brat, Gabriel A; Wu, Lehao W; Sarhane, Karim A; Lopez, Joseph; Wallner, Christoph; Furtmüller, Georg J; Yuan, Nance; Pang, John; Sarkar, Kakali; Lee, W P Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of local and intravenous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration to augment neuroregeneration in both a sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and rat hindlimb transplant model. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were harvested and purified from Brown-Norway (BN) rats. Sciatic nerve transections and repairs were performed in three groups of Lewis (LEW) rats: negative controls (n = 4), local MSCs (epineural) injection (n = 4), and systemic MSCs (intravenous) injection (n = 4). Syngeneic (LEW-LEW) (n = 4) and allogeneic (BN-LEW) (n = 4) hindlimb transplants were performed and assessed for neuroregeneration after local or systemic MSC treatment. Rats undergoing sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and treated with either local or systemic injection of MSCs had significant improvement in the speed of recovery of compound muscle action potential amplitudes and axon counts when compared with negative controls. Similarly, rats undergoing allogeneic hindlimb transplants treated with local injection of MSCs exhibited significantly increased axon counts. Similarly, systemic MSC treatment resulted in improved nerve regeneration following allogeneic hindlimb transplants. Systemic administration had a more pronounced effect on electromotor recovery while local injection was more effective at increasing fiber counts, suggesting different targets of action. Local and systemic MSC injections significantly improve the pace and degree of nerve regeneration after nerve injury and hindlimb transplantation. PMID:27510321

  6. Kidney transplantation process in Brazil represented in business process modeling notation.

    PubMed

    Peres Penteado, A; Molina Cohrs, F; Diniz Hummel, A; Erbs, J; Maciel, R F; Feijó Ortolani, C L; de Aguiar Roza, B; Torres Pisa, I

    2015-05-01

    Kidney transplantation is considered to be the best treatment for people with chronic kidney failure, because it improves the patients' quality of life and increases their length of survival compared with patients undergoing dialysis. The kidney transplantation process in Brazil is defined through laws, decrees, ordinances, and resolutions, but there is no visual representation of this process. The aim of this study was to analyze official documents to construct a representation of the kidney transplantation process in Brazil with the use of business process modeling notation (BPMN). The methodology for this study was based on an exploratory observational study, document analysis, and construction of process diagrams with the use of BPMN. Two rounds of validations by specialists were conducted. The result includes the kidney transplantation process in Brazil representation with the use of BPMN. We analyzed 2 digital documents that resulted in 2 processes with 45 total of activities and events, 6 organizations involved, and 6 different stages of the process. The constructed representation makes it easier to understand the rules for the business of kidney transplantation and can be used by the health care professionals involved in the various activities within this process. Construction of a representation with language appropriate for the Brazilian lay public is underway. PMID:26036495

  7. Osteochondral allograft transplantation in cartilage repair: Graft storage paradigm, translational models, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Bugbee, William D; Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L; Görtz, Simon; Amiel, David; Sah, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of articular cartilage injury and disease has become an increasingly relevant part of orthopaedic care. Articular cartilage transplantation, in the form of osteochondral allografting, is one of the most established techniques for restoration of articular cartilage. Our research efforts over the last two decades have supported the transformation of this procedure from experimental "niche" status to a cornerstone of orthopaedic practice. In this Kappa Delta paper, we describe our translational and clinical science contributions to this transformation: (1) to enhance the ability of tissue banks to process and deliver viable tissue to surgeons and patients, (2) to improve the biological understanding of in vivo cartilage and bone remodeling following osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation in an animal model system, (3) to define effective surgical techniques and pitfalls, and (4) to identify and clarify clinical indications and outcomes. The combination of coordinated basic and clinical studies is part of our continuing comprehensive academic OCA transplant program. Taken together, the results have led to the current standards for OCA processing and storage prior to implantation and also novel observations and mechanisms of the biological and clinical behavior of OCA transplants in vivo. Thus, OCA transplantation is now a successful and increasingly available treatment for patients with disabling osteoarticular cartilage pathology. PMID:26234194

  8. The effects of interferon-alpha/beta in a model of rat heart transplantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, A. D.; Klein, J. B.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Ogden, L. L. 2nd; Gray, L. A. Jr

    1992-01-01

    Interferons have multiple immunologic effects. One such effect is the activation of expression of cell surface antigens. Interferon alpha/beta enhance expression of class I but not class II histocompatibility antigens. Contradictory information has been published regarding the effect of interferon-alpha/beta administration in patients with kidney transplantation. In a model of rat heart transplantation we demonstrated that administration of interferon-alpha/beta accelerated rejection in a dose-dependent fashion in the absence of maintenance cyclosporine. Animals treated with maintenance cyclosporine had evidence of increased rejection at 20 days that was resolved completely at 45 days with cyclosporine alone.

  9. Intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Palla, Viktoria-Varvara; Karaolanis, Georgios; Pentazos, Panagiotis; Ladopoulos, Alexios; Papageorgiou, Evaggelos

    2015-06-01

    Short bowel syndrome is a clinical entity that includes loss of energy, fluid, electrolytes or micronutrient balance because of inadequate functional intestinal length. This case report demonstrates the case of a woman who compensated for short bowel syndrome through intestinal adaptation, which is a complex process worthy of further investigation for the avoidance of dependence on total parenteral nutrition and of intestinal transplantation in such patients. PMID:26206429

  10. Pregnancy is a model for tumors, not transplantation.

    PubMed

    Beaman, Kenneth D; Jaiswal, Mukesh K; Katara, Gajendra K; Kulshreshta, Arpita; Pamarthy, Sahithi; Ibrahim, Safaa; Kwak-Kim, Joanne; Gilman-Sachs, Alice

    2016-07-01

    Nearly 65 years have passed since Peter Medawar posed the following question: "How does the pregnant mother contrive to nourish within itself, for many weeks or months, a fetus that is an antigenically foreign body." Now, understanding of reproductive immunology has demonstrated that the HLA antigens in the placenta are non-classical and do not induce rejection. In the placenta and in tumors, 50% or more of the cells are cells of the immune system and were once thought to be primed and ready for killing tumors or the "fetal transplant" but these cells are not potential killers but abet the growth of either the tumor or the placenta. We believe that these cells are there to create an environment, which enhances either placental or tumor growth. By examining the similarities of the placenta's and tumor's immune cells, novel mechanisms to cause tumors to be eliminated can be devised. PMID:27293114

  11. Transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, Emma M; Game, David S; Lechler, Robert I

    2014-12-01

    Although transplantation has been a standard medical practice for decades, marked morbidity from the use of immunosuppressive drugs and poor long-term graft survival remain important limitations in the field. Since the first solid organ transplant between the Herrick twins in 1954, transplantation immunology has sought to move away from harmful, broad-spectrum immunosuppressive regimens that carry with them the long-term risk of potentially life-threatening opportunistic infections, cardiovascular disease, and malignancy, as well as graft toxicity and loss, towards tolerogenic strategies that promote long-term graft survival. Reports of "transplant tolerance" in kidney and liver allograft recipients whose immunosuppressive drugs were discontinued for medical or non-compliant reasons, together with results from experimental models of transplantation, provide the proof-of-principle that achieving tolerance in organ transplantation is fundamentally possible. However, translating the reconstitution of immune tolerance into the clinical setting is a daunting challenge fraught with the complexities of multiple interacting mechanisms overlaid on a background of variation in disease. In this article, we explore the basic science underlying mechanisms of tolerance and review the latest clinical advances in the quest for transplantation tolerance. PMID:24213880

  12. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using 211At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model

    SciTech Connect

    Orozco, Johnnie J.; Back, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Balkin, Ethan R.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Frayo, Shani; Hylarides, Mark; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.

    2013-05-15

    Anti-CD45 Radioimmunotherapy using an Alpha-Emitting Radionuclide 211At Combined with Bone Marrow Transplantation Prolongs Survival in a Disseminated Murine Leukemia Model ABSTRACT Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using antibodies (Ab) labeled primarily with beta-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse.

  13. A rat model of liver transplantation with a steatotic donor liver after cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiucheng; Fan, Hongkai; Xiong, Rihui; Jiang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to establish a rat liver transplantation model with a steatotic donor liver after cardiac death, reflecting clinical conditions. Rats were fed a high-fat diet for 8 weeks to establish the fatty liver model. This model simulates liver steatosis caused by various factors before clinical donation after cardiac death. A pneumothorax was created in the donor rat to induce hypoxia and cardiac arrest before incising the liver. This simulated the processes of hypoxia and cardiac arrest caused by withdrawal of treatment in actual clinical situations. The harvested cardiac death donor liver was then transplanted using the Kamada technique. Donor operative time was 45.7 ± 4.2 min; cardiac arrest time, 9 ± 0.8 min; recipient surgery time, 40.3 ± 4.9 min; and no-liver time, 15 ± 2.5 min. Of 40 liver-transplanted rats, 2 died within 24 h, with a surgical success rate of 95%. The transaminase levels on post-transplantation days 1, 3, 5, and 7 were 835.4 ± 71.33 U/L, 1334.5 ± 102.13 U/L, 536.4 ± 65.52 U/L, and 218.2 ± 36.77 U/L, respectively. This rat liver transplantation model with a steatotic donor liver after cardiac death could improve the simulation of the pathophysiological processes of clinical donation after cardiac death, and could be used as a reliable and stable animal model. PMID:26629068

  14. Alterations of Colonic Contractility in an Interleukin-10 Knockout Mouse Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hyung; Kwon, Joong Goo; Kim, Sun Joo; Song, Dae Kyu; Lee, Seok Guen; Kim, Eun Su; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byung Ik; Kim, Dae Hwan; Sin, Jeong-Im; Kim, Tae Wan; Song, In Hwan; Park, Kyung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Inflammatory bowel disease is commonly accompanied by colonic dysmotility and causes changes in intestinal smooth muscle contractility. In this study, colonic smooth muscle contractility in a chronic inflammatory condition was investigated using smooth muscle tissues prepared from interleukin-10 knockout (IL-10−/−) mice. Methods Prepared smooth muscle sections were placed in an organ bath system. Cholinergic and nitrergic neuronal responses were observed using carbachol and electrical field stimulation with L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME). The expression of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) networks, muscarinic receptors, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was observed via immunofluorescent staining. Results The spontaneous contractility and expression of ICC networks in the proximal and distal colon was significantly decreased in IL-10−/− mice compared to IL-10+/+ mice. The contractility in response to carbachol was significantly decreased in the proximal colon of IL-10−/− mice compared to IL-10+/+ mice, but no significant difference was found in the distal colon. In addition, the expression of muscarinic receptor type 2 was reduced in the proximal colon of IL-10−/− mice. The nictric oxide-mediated relaxation after electrical field stimulation was significantly decreased in the proximal and distal colon of IL-10−/− mice. In inflamed colon, the expression of nNOS decreased, whereas the expression of iNOS increased. Conclusions These results suggest that damage to the ICC network and NOS system in the proximal and distal colon, as well as damage to the smooth muscle cholinergic receptor in the proximal colon may play an important role in the dysmotility of the inflamed colon. PMID:25537671

  15. MODEL OF COLONIC INFLAMMATION: IMMUNE MODULATORY MECHANISMS IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Wendelsdorf, Katherine; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Hontecillas, Raquel; Eubank, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is an immunoinflammatory illness of the gut initiated by an immune response to bacteria in the microflora. The resulting immunopathogenesis leads to lesions in epithelial lining of the colon through which bacteria may infiltrate the tissue causing recurring bouts of diarrhea, rectal bleeding, and mal-nutrition. In healthy individuals such immunopathogenesis is avoided by the presence of regulatory cells that inhibit the inflammatory pathway. Highly relevant to the search for treatment strategies is the identification of components of the inflammatory pathway that allow regulatory mechanisms to be overridden and immunopathogenesis to proceed. In vitro techniques have identified cellular interactions involved in inflammation-regulation crosstalk. However, tracing immunological mechanisms discovered at the cellular level confidently back to an in vivo context of multiple, simultaneous interactions has met limited success. To explore the impact of specific interactions, we have constructed a system of 29 ordinary differential equations representing different phenotypes of T-cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, and epithelial cells as they move and interact with bacteria in the lumen, lamina propria, and lymphoid tissue of the colon. Simulations revealed the positive inflammatory feedback loop formed by inflammatory M1 macrophage activation of T-cells as a driving force underlying the immunopathology of IBD. Furthermore, strategies that remove M1 from the site of infection, by either i) increasing its potential to switch to a regulatory M2 phenotype or ii) increasing the rate of reversion (for M1 and M2 alike) to a resting state, cease immunopathogenesis even as bacteria are eliminated by other inflammatory cells. Based on these results, we identify macrophages and their mechanisms of plasticity as key targets for mucosal inflammation intervention strategies. In addition, we propose that the primary mechanism behind the association of

  16. Intestinal lengthening for short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jon; Sudan, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Our recommendation at this time is that surgical bowel lengthening be considered in any chronically PN-dependent patient when there is substantial bowel dilation, regardless of remnant bowel length. Timing is determined when maximal adaptation has been achieved or when the rate of progression in enteral calories is slow and hampered by bacterial overgrowth. Currently, it seems premature to recommend primary STEP in all patients in whom surgical lengthening is considered, but it is certainly technically easier than the Bianchi procedure. These procedures are clearly indicated in patients experiencing life-threatening complications of PN, but careful selection of patients without evidence of hepatic decompensation is important. Patients with advanced liver disease are poor candidates for lengthening and should be referred for intestinal transplantation instead. PMID:18953809

  17. Questions and Answers for Transplant Candidates about Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) and Pediatric End-Stage ....

    MedlinePlus

    ... needs a liver transplant most urgently. The MELD (Model for End Stage Liver Disease) is used for ... and the PELD (Pediatric End Stage Liver Disease Model) is used for patients age 11 and younger. ...

  18. Fetal progenitor cell transplantation treats methylmalonic aciduria in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Nicole E.; Pennell, Samuel D.; Wood, Leonie R.; Pitt, James J.; Allen, Katrina J.; Peters, Heidi L.

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fetal cells were transplanted into a methylmalonic acid mouse model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell engraftment was detected in liver, spleen and bone marrow. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biochemical disease correction was measured in blood samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A double dose of 5 million cells (1 week apart) proved more effective. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher levels of engraftment may be required for greater disease correction. -- Abstract: Methylmalonic aciduria is a rare disorder caused by an inborn error of organic acid metabolism. Current treatment options are limited and generally focus on disease management. We aimed to investigate the use of fetal progenitor cells to treat this disorder using a mouse model with an intermediate form of methylmalonic aciduria. Fetal liver cells were isolated from healthy fetuses at embryonic day 15-17 and intravenously transplanted into sub-lethally irradiated mice. Liver donor cell engraftment was determined by PCR. Disease correction was monitored by urine and blood methylmalonic acid concentration and weight change. Initial studies indicated that pre-transplantation sub-lethal irradiation followed by transplantation with 5 million cells were suitable. We found that a double dose of 5 million cells (1 week apart) provided a more effective treatment. Donor cell liver engraftment of up to 5% was measured. Disease correction, as defined by a decrease in blood methylmalonic acid concentration, was effected in methylmalonic acid mice transplanted with a double dose of cells and who showed donor cell liver engraftment. Mean plasma methylmalonic acid concentration decreased from 810 {+-} 156 (sham transplanted) to 338 {+-} 157 {mu}mol/L (double dose of 5 million cells) while mean blood C3 carnitine concentration decreased from 20.5 {+-} 4 (sham transplanted) to 5.3 {+-} 1.9 {mu}mol/L (double dose of 5 million cells). In conclusion, higher levels of engraftment may

  19. Large bowel resection - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100089.htm Large bowel resection - Series To use the sharing features ... 6 out of 6 Normal anatomy Overview The large bowel [large intestine or the colon] is part ...

  20. Irritable bowel syndrome - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may be a lifelong condition. You may be suffering from cramping and loose stools, diarrhea, ... Ferri FF. Irritable bowel syndrome. In: Ferri FF, ed. Ferri's ... . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015:pages 669-70. What I ...

  1. Transplantation of Reprogrammed Embryonic Stem Cells Improves Visual Function in a Mouse Model for Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan-Kai; Tosi, Joaquin; Kasanuki, Jennifer Mie; Chou, Chai Lin; Kong, Jian; Parmalee, Nancy; Wert, Katherine J.; Allikmets, Rando; Lai, Chi-Chun; Chien, Chung-Liang; Nagasaki, Takayuki; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2010-01-01

    Background To study whether C57BL/6J-Tyrc−2j/J (C2J) mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells can differentiate into retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro and then restore retinal function in a model for retinitis pigmentosa: Rpe65rd12/Rpe65rd12 C57BL6 mice. Methods Yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-labeled C2J ES cells were induced to differentiate into RPE-like structures on PA6 feeders. RPE-specific markers are expressed from differentiated cells in vitro. After differentiation, ES cell-derived RPE-like cells were transplanted into the subretinal space of postnatal day 5 Rpe65rd12/Rpe65rd12 mice. Live imaging of YFP-labeled C2J ES cells demonstrated survival of the graft. Electroretinograms (ERGs) were performed on transplanted mice to evaluate the functional outcome of transplantation. Results RPE-like cells derived from ES cells sequentially express multiple RPE-specific markers. After transplantation, YFP-labeled cells can be tracked with live imaging for as long as 7 months. Although more than half of the mice were complicated with retinal detachments or tumor development, one fourth of the mice showed increased electroretinogram responses in the transplanted eyes. Rpe65rd12/Rpe65rd12 mice transplanted with RPE-like cells showed significant visual recovery during a 7-month period, whereas those injected with saline, PA6 feeders, or undifferentiated ES cells showed no rescue. Conclusions ES cells can differentiate, morphologically, and functionally, into RPE-like cells. Based on these findings, differentiated ES cells have the potential for the development of new therapeutic approaches for RPE-specific diseases such as certain forms of retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration. Nevertheless, stringent control of retinal detachment and teratoma development will be necessary before initiation of treatment trials. PMID:20164818

  2. Cartilage repair in transplanted scaffold-free chondrocyte sheets using a minipig model.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Goro; Sato, Masato; Yamato, Masayuki; Mitani, Genya; Kutsuna, Toshiharu; Nagai, Toshihiro; Ito, Satoshi; Ukai, Taku; Kobayashi, Miyuki; Kokubo, Mami; Okano, Teruo; Mochida, Joji

    2012-05-01

    Lacking a blood supply and having a low cellular density, articular cartilage has a minimal ability for self-repair. Therefore, wide-ranging cartilage damage rarely resolves spontaneously. Cartilage damage is typically treated by chondrocyte transplantation, mosaicplasty or microfracture. Recent advances in tissue engineering have prompted research on techniques to repair articular cartilage damage using a variety of transplanted cells. We studied the repair and regeneration of cartilage damage using layered chondrocyte sheets prepared on a temperature-responsive culture dish. We previously reported achieving robust tissue repair when covering only the surface layer with layered chondrocyte sheets when researching partial-thickness defects in the articular cartilage of domestic rabbits. The present study was an experiment on the repair and regeneration of articular cartilage in a minipig model of full-thickness defects. Good safranin-O staining and integration with surrounding tissues was achieved in animals transplanted with layered chondrocyte sheets. However, tissue having poor safranin-O staining-not noted in the domestic rabbit experiments-was identified in some of the animals, and the subchondral bone was poorly repaired in these. Thus, although layered chondrocyte sheets facilitate articular cartilage repair, further investigations into appropriate animal models and culture and transplant conditions are required. PMID:22369960

  3. Contribution of large animal models to the development of clinical intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pirenne, J

    1999-01-01

    The intestine has long been seen as a "forbidden" organ to transplant and even nowadays it remains the most challenging abdominal organ to transplant. Large animal experiments have been pivotal, first in developing reproducible and clinically applicable surgical techniques for transplanting the intestine and second, in revealing the unique physiological, immunological, and microbiological challenge that intestinal transplantation (ITx) represents. More recently, large animal models have been used to test new immunosuppressive drugs (FK 506) that have been then successfully used clinically. ITx is no more an experimental endeavor and survival figures of about 70% can be reached at one year, justifying routine application of ITx to patients who do not tolerate total parenteral nutrition. However, ITx remains in 1999 an "unfinished product" and further research will need to be done to allow wider application of ITx to patients without total parenteral nutrition (TPN) related complications. Further research will focus on the following aspects: (1) refined understanding of the factors accounting for the high immunogenicity of the intestine; (2) development of immunomodulatory strategies to reduce graft immunogenicity and to induce specific hyporesponsiveness; (3) development of new immunosuppressants, and their usage in combination, to act more specifically on the immune response, and at the price of less toxicity; (4) development of surgical alternatives to alleviate the organ shortage: graft size reduction, live related ITx. Importantly these questions will need to be addressed in clinically relevant animal models before they are applied to man. PMID:10427786

  4. Therapeutic effects of mouse bone marrow-derived clonal mesenchymal stem cells in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Seok; Yi, Tac-Ghee; Park, Jong-Min; Han, Young Min; Kim, Jun-Hyung; Shin, Dong-Hee; Tak, Seon Ji; Lee, Kyuheon; Lee, Youn Sook; Jeon, Myung-Shin; Hahm, Ki-Baik; Song, Sun U; Park, Seok Hee

    2015-11-01

    Mouse bone marrow-derived clonal mesenchymal stem cells (mcMSCs), which were originated from a single cell by a subfractionation culturing method, are recognized as new paradigm for stem cell therapy featured with its homogenous cell population. Next to proven therapeutic effects against pancreatitis, in the current study we demonstrated that mcMSCs showed significant therapeutic effects in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced experimental colitis model supported with anti-inflammatory and restorative activities. mcMSCs significantly reduced the disease activity index (DAI) score, including weight loss, stool consistency, and intestinal bleeding and significantly increased survival rates. The pathological scores were also significantly improved with mcMSC. We have demonstrated that especial mucosal regeneration activity accompanied with significantly lowered level of apoptosis as beneficiary actions of mcMSCs in UC models. The levels of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-17 were all significantly concurrent with significantly repressed NF-κB activation compared to the control group and significantly decreased infiltrations of responsible macrophage and neutrophil. Conclusively, our findings provide the rationale that mcMSCs are applicable as a potential source of cell-based therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases, especially contributing either to prevent relapse or to accelerate healing as solution to unmet medical needs in IBD therapy. PMID:26566304

  5. Adult zebrafish intestine resection: a novel model of short bowel syndrome, adaptation, and intestinal stem cell regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Schall, K. A.; Holoyda, K. A.; Grant, C. N.; Levin, D. E.; Torres, E. R.; Maxwell, A.; Pollack, H. A.; Moats, R. A.; Frey, M. R.; Darehzereshki, A.; Al Alam, D.; Lien, C.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of significant intestinal length from congenital anomaly or disease may lead to short bowel syndrome (SBS); intestinal failure may be partially offset by a gain in epithelial surface area, termed adaptation. Current in vivo models of SBS are costly and technically challenging. Operative times and survival rates have slowed extension to transgenic models. We created a new reproducible in vivo model of SBS in zebrafish, a tractable vertebrate model, to facilitate investigation of the mechanisms of intestinal adaptation. Proximal intestinal diversion at segment 1 (S1, equivalent to jejunum) was performed in adult male zebrafish. SBS fish emptied distal intestinal contents via stoma as in the human disease. After 2 wk, S1 was dilated compared with controls and villus ridges had increased complexity, contributing to greater villus epithelial perimeter. The number of intervillus pockets, the intestinal stem cell zone of the zebrafish increased and contained a higher number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells after 2 wk of SBS. Egf receptor and a subset of its ligands, also drivers of adaptation, were upregulated in SBS fish. Igf has been reported as a driver of intestinal adaptation in other animal models, and SBS fish exposed to a pharmacological inhibitor of the Igf receptor failed to demonstrate signs of intestinal adaptation, such as increased inner epithelial perimeter and BrdU incorporation. We describe a technically feasible model of human SBS in the zebrafish, a faster and less expensive tool to investigate intestinal stem cell plasticity as well as the mechanisms that drive intestinal adaptation. PMID:26089336

  6. Bowel perforation detection using metabolic fluorescent chlorophylls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jung Hyun; Jo, Young Goun; Kim, Jung Chul; Choi, Sujeong; Kang, Hoonsoo; Kim, Yong-Chul; Hwang, In-Wook

    2016-03-01

    Thus far, there have been tries of detection of disease using fluorescent materials. We introduce the chlorophyll derivatives from food plants, which have longer-wavelength emissions (at >650 nm) than those of fluorescence of tissues and organs, for detection of bowel perforation. To figure out the possibility of fluorescence spectroscopy as a monitoring sensor of bowel perforation, fluorescence from organs of rodent models, intestinal and peritoneal fluids of rodent models and human were analyzed. In IVIS fluorescence image of rodent abdominal organ, visualization of perforated area only was possible when threshold of image is extremely finely controlled. Generally, both perforated area of bowel and normal bowel which filled with large amount of chlorophyll derivatives were visualized with fluorescence. The fluorescence from chlorophyll derivatives penetrated through the normal bowel wall makes difficult to distinguish perforation area from normal bowel with direct visualization of fluorescence. However, intestinal fluids containing chlorophyll derivatives from food contents can leak from perforation sites in situation of bowel perforation. It may show brighter and longer-wavelength regime emissions of chlorophyll derivatives than those of pure peritoneal fluid or bioorgans. Peritoneal fluid mixed with intestinal fluids show much brighter emissions in longer wavelength (at>650 nm) than those of pure peritoneal fluid. In addition, irrigation fluid, which is used for the cleansing of organ and peritoneal cavity, made of mixed intestinal and peritoneal fluid diluted with physiologic saline also can be monitored bowel perforation during surgery.

  7. Wharton's jelly transplantation improves neurologic function in a rat model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tian; Yang, Bo; Li, Dongpeng; Ma, Shanshan; Tian, Yi; Qu, Ruina; Zhang, Wenjin; Zhang, Yanting; Hu, Kai; Guan, Fangxia; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), which can lead to disability, dysfunction, and even death, is a prominent health problem worldwide. Effective therapy for this serious and debilitating condition is needed. Human umbilical cord matrix, known as Wharton's jelly (WJ), provides a natural, interface scaffold that is enriched in mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, we tested the efficacy of WJ tissue transplantation in a weight drop model of TBI in rats. WJ tissue was cultured and transplanted into the injury site 24h after TBI. The modified neurologic severity score, body weight, brain edema, and lesion volume were evaluated at various time points after TBI. Cognitive behavior was assessed by the novel object recognition test and the Morris water maze test. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the perilesional brain area was measured at day 14 after TBI. We found that WJ tissue transplantation lessened TBI-induced brain edema (day 3), reduced lesion volume (day 28), improved neurologic function (days 21 to 28), and promoted memory and cognitive recovery. Additionally, expression of BDNF mRNA and protein was higher in WJ tissue-treated rats than in sham-operated or vehicle-treated rats. These data suggest that WJ tissue transplantation can reduce TBI-induced brain injury and may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of TBI. PMID:25638565

  8. Protective effect of aqueous extract of Bombax malabaricum DC on experimental models of inflammatory bowel disease in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Jagtap, A G; Niphadkar, P V; Phadke, A S

    2011-05-01

    There is little evidence regarding role of B. malabaricum in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); though it is clinically employed as a constituent of a polyherbal preparation for IBD. To establish its role as a monotherapy for IBD, preliminary phytochemical screening of aqueous extract of B. malabaricum (AEBM) was undertaken. Subsequently, its protective effect in indomethacin and iodoacetamide induced colitis in rats (45, 90, 180, 270 mg/kg) and acetic acid induced colitis in mice (65, 130, 250, 500 mg/kg) was assessed. AEBM (270 mg/kg) in indomethacin and iodoacetamide induced colitis significantly reduced the ulcer score and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. AEBM/500 mg/kg dose/significantly reduced the ulcer score and MPO activity in acetic acid induced colitis. The extract (270 mg/kg in rats and 500 mg/kg in mice) was found to be comparable with prednisolone (10 mg/kg) and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) (100 mg/kg) used as standard treatments. AEBM provided reduction in edema of the intestinal tissues, ulcer protection and lowering of MPO activity in a dose dependent manner. AEBM (500 mg/kg) significantly reduced colonic and serum TNF-alpha level when compared with the positive control in acetic acid induced colitis model. The results suggest a protective role of AEBM in IBD. PMID:21615058

  9. The Implications of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Therapies in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Clinical Aspects and Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Balmus, Ioana Miruna; Ciobica, Alin; Trifan, Anca; Stanciu, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by alternating phases of clinical relapse and remission. The etiology of IBD remains largely unknown, although a combination of patient's immune response, genetics, microbiome, and environment plays an important role in disturbing intestinal homeostasis, leading to development and perpetuation of the inflammatory cascade in IBD. As chronic intestinal inflammation is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS and RNS), oxidative and nitrosative stress has been proposed as one of the major contributing factor in the IBD development. Substantial evidence suggests that IBD is associated with an imbalance between increased ROS and decreased antioxidant activity, which may explain, at least in part, many of the clinical pathophysiological features of both CD and UC patients. Hereby, we review the presently known oxidant and antioxidant mechanisms involved in IBD-specific events, the animal models used to determine these specific features, and also the antioxidant therapies proposed in IBD patients. PMID:26831601

  10. Budesonide loaded nanoparticles with pH-sensitive coating for improved mucosal targeting in mouse models of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Ali, H; Weigmann, B; Neurath, M F; Collnot, E M; Windbergs, M; Lehr, C-M

    2014-06-10

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of budesonide loaded nanocarriers for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). First, budesonide was encapsulated in poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles by an oil in water (O/W) emulsion technique. A second batch of the same nanoparticles was additionally coated with a pH-sensitive methyl-methacrylate-copolymer. The particle sizes of the plain and the coated PLGA were 200±10.1nm and ~240±14.7nm, respectively. As could be shown in vitro, the pH-sensitive coating prevented premature drug release at acidic pH and only releases the drug at neutral to slightly alkaline pH. The efficacy of both coated and plain nanoparticle formulations was assessed in different acute and chronic colitis mouse models, also in comparison to an aqueous solution of the drug. The dose was always the same (0.168mg/kg). It was found that delivery by coated PLGA nanoparticles alleviated the induced colitis significantly better than by plain PLGA particles, which was already more effective than treatment with the same dose of the free drug. These data further corroborate the potential of polymeric nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery to the inflamed intestinal mucosa, and that this concept can still be further improved regarding the oral route of administration by implementing pH-dependent drug release characteristics. PMID:24685705

  11. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; ...

  12. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity, nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; Umbilical ...

  13. Future Economics of Liver Transplantation: A 20-Year Cost Modeling Forecast and the Prospect of Bioengineering Autologous Liver Grafts.

    PubMed

    Habka, Dany; Mann, David; Landes, Ronald; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    During the past 20 years liver transplantation has become the definitive treatment for most severe types of liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma, in both children and adults. In the U.S., roughly 16,000 individuals are on the liver transplant waiting list. Only 38% of them will receive a transplant due to the organ shortage. This paper explores another option: bioengineering an autologous liver graft. We developed a 20-year model projecting future demand for liver transplants, along with costs based on current technology. We compared these cost projections against projected costs to bioengineer autologous liver grafts. The model was divided into: 1) the epidemiology model forecasting the number of wait-listed patients, operated patients and postoperative patients; and 2) the treatment model forecasting costs (pre-transplant-related costs; transplant (admission)-related costs; and 10-year post-transplant-related costs) during the simulation period. The patient population was categorized using the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. The number of patients on the waiting list was projected to increase 23% over 20 years while the weighted average treatment costs in the pre-liver transplantation phase were forecast to increase 83% in Year 20. Projected demand for livers will increase 10% in 10 years and 23% in 20 years. Total costs of liver transplantation are forecast to increase 33% in 10 years and 81% in 20 years. By comparison, the projected cost to bioengineer autologous liver grafts is $9.7M based on current catalog prices for iPS-derived liver cells. The model projects a persistent increase in need and cost of donor livers over the next 20 years that's constrained by a limited supply of donor livers. The number of patients who die while on the waiting list will reflect this ever-growing disparity. Currently, bioengineering autologous liver grafts is cost prohibitive. However, costs will decline rapidly with the introduction of new manufacturing

  14. Establishment of a dual-color fluorescence tracing orthotopic transplantation model of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Wang, Xiaoping; Wu, Hao; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Mingao; Wang, Roushu; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Luyao; Meng, Qiao; Song, Ranran; Zhuang, Zhixiang; Huang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Different experimental models of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have been used to investigate the biological mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis and its progression. However, previous studies have highlighted the difficulty of distinguishing between the tumor cells and stroma in experimental models of HCC. Therefore the aim of the present study was to establish a red‑green dual‑color fluorescence tracing orthotopic transplantation model of HCC, and investigate its practical values. Stable high red fluorescent protein (RFP)‑expressing HepG2 human hepatoma cells and Hepa1‑6 mice hepatoma cells were injected into the right liver lobe of green fluorescent protein‑expressing nude mice. The growth and metastasis of the tumors were visualized using a whole‑body in vivo fluorescence imaging system in real time. HCC tissues were extracted from tumor‑bearing mice, and cut into 5‑µm serial frozen slices. The organizational structure of the transplanted tumors was observed under a microscope. A dual‑color fluorescence tracing orthotopic transplantation tumor model of HCC was successfully established with a success rate of 100%. The growth and metastasis of the tumors were visualized at each stage of development in the tumor‑bearing mice. Tumor cells with red fluorescence and host cells with green fluorescence were identified to merge in the reconstruction region of tumor tissue. The invasion, migration, and cell fusion between tumor and host cells was observed clearly. The dual‑color fluorescence tracing orthotopic transplantation model of HCC was determined to be a stable and reliable method for tracking tumor progression. Mutual interactions between hepatoma cells and host tissues may be observed directly using this model, further elucidating the development of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26647736

  15. Transplantation of melanocytes obtained from the skin ameliorates apomorphine-induced abnormal behavior in rodent hemi-parkinsonian models.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Masato; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Diaz-Corrales, Francisco J; Higashi, Youichirou; Namba, Masayoshi; Ogawa, Norio

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosinase, which catalyzes both the hydroxylation of tyrosine and consequent oxidation of L-DOPA to form melanin in melanocytes, is also expressed in the brain, and oxidizes L-DOPA and dopamine. Replacement of dopamine synthesis by tyrosinase was reported in tyrosine hydroxylase null mice. To examine the potential benefits of autograft cell transplantation for patients with Parkinson's disease, tyrosinase-producing cells including melanocytes, were transplanted into the striatum of hemi-parkinsonian model rats or mice lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine. Marked improvement in apomorphine-induced rotation was noted at day 40 after intrastriatal melanoma cell transplantation. Transplantation of tyrosinase cDNA-transfected hepatoma cells, which constitutively produce L-DOPA, resulted in marked amelioration of the asymmetric apomorphine-induced rotation in hemi-parkinsonian mice and the effect was present up to 2 months. Moreover, parkinsonian mice transplanted with melanocytes from the back skin of black newborn mice, but not from albino mice, showed marked improvement in the apomorphine-induced rotation behavior up to 3 months after the transplantation. Dopamine-positive signals were seen around the surviving transplants in these experiments. Taken together with previous studies showing dopamine synthesis and metabolism by tyrosinase, these results highlight therapeutic potential of intrastriatal autograft cell transplantation of melanocytes in patients with Parkinson's disease. PMID:23776585

  16. Assessment of Inflammation in an Acute on Chronic Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Ultrasound Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Machtaler, Steven; Knieling, Ferdinand; Luong, Richard; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ultrasound (US) molecular imaging has shown promise in assessing inflammation in preclinical, murine models of inflammatory bowel disease. These models, however, initiated acute inflammation on previously normal colons, in contrast to patients where acute exacerbations are often in chronically inflamed regions. In this study, we explored the potential of dual P- and E-selectin targeted US imaging for assessing acute inflammation on a murine quiescent chronic inflammatory background. Methods: Chronic colitis was induced using three cycles of 4% DSS in male FVB mice. Acute inflammation was initiated 2 weeks after the final DSS cycle through rectal administration of 1% TNBS. Mice at different stages of inflammation were imaged using a small animal ultrasound system following i.v. injection of microbubbles targeted to P- and E-selectin. In vivo imaging results were correlated with ex vivo immunofluorescence and histology. Results: Induction of acute inflammation resulted in an increase in the targeted US signal from 5.5 ± 5.1 arbitrary units (a.u.) at day 0 to 61.0 ± 45.2 a.u. (P < 0.0001) at day 1, 36.3 ± 33.1 a.u. at day 3, returning to levels similar to control at day 5. Immunofluorescence showed significant increase in the percentage of P- and E-selectin positive vessels at day 1 (P-selectin: 21.0 ± 7.1% of vessels; P < 0.05; E-selectin: 16.4 ±3.7%; P < 0.05) compared to day 0 (P-selectin: 10.3 ± 5.7%; E-selectin: 7.3 ± 7.0%). Conclusions: Acute inflammation can be accurately measured in a clinically relevant murine model of chronic IBD using ultrasound molecular imaging with a dual P- and E- selectin-targeted contrast agent. PMID:26379784

  17. The role of a murine transplantation model of atherosclerosis regression in drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Feig, Jonathan E; Quick, John S

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death worldwide. To date, the use of statins to lower LDL levels has been the major intervention used to delay or halt disease progression. These drugs have an incomplete impact on plaque burden and risk, however, as evidenced by the substantial rates of myocardial infarctions that occur in large-scale clinical trials of statins. Thus, it is hoped that by understanding the factors that lead to plaque regression, better approaches to treating atherosclerosis may be developed. A transplantation-based mouse model of atherosclerosis regression has been developed by allowing plaques to form in a model of human atherosclerosis, the apoE-deficient mouse, and then placing these plaques into recipient mice with a normolipidemic plasma environment. Under these conditions, the depletion of foam cells occurs. Interestingly, the disappearance of foam cells was primarily due to migration in a CCR7-dependent manner to regional and systemic lymph nodes after 3 days in the normolipidemic (regression) environment. Further studies using this transplant model demonstrated that liver X receptor and HDL are other factors likely to be involved in plaque regression. In conclusion, through the use of this transplant model, the process of uncovering the pathways regulating atherosclerosis regression has begun, which will ultimately lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:19333880

  18. CD47 Blockade Reduces Ischemia Reperfusion Injury and Improves Outcomes in a Rat Kidney Transplant Model

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yiing; Manning, Pamela T.; Jia, Jianluo; Gaut, Joseph P.; Xiao, Zhen-yu; Capoccia, Ben J.; Chen, Chun-Cheng; Hiebsch, Ronald R.; Upadhya, Gundumi; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour; Frazier, William A.; Chapman, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) significantly contributes to delayed graft function and inflammation leading to graft loss. IRI is exacerbated by the thrombospondin-1/CD47 system through inhibition of nitric oxide signaling. We postulate that CD47 blockade and prevention of nitric oxide inhibition reduces IRI in organ transplantation. Methods We used a syngeneic rat renal transplantation model of IRI with bilaterally nephrectomized recipients to evaluate the effect of a CD47 monoclonal antibody (CD47mAb) on IRI. Donor kidneys were flushed with CD47mAb OX101 or an isotype-matched control immunoglobulin and stored at 4°C in UW solution for 6 hours prior to transplantation. Results CD47mAb perfusion of donor kidneys resulted in marked improvement in post-transplant survival, lower levels of serum creatinine, BUN, phosphorus and magnesium and less histologic evidence of injury. In contrast, control groups did not survive more than 5 days, had increased biochemical indicators of renal injury and exhibited severe pathological injury with tubular atrophy and necrosis. Recipients of CD47mAb-treated kidneys showed decreased levels of plasma biomarkers of renal injury including cystatin C, osteopontin, TIMP1, β2-microglobulin, VEGF-A and clusterin compared to the control group. Furthermore, laser Doppler assessment showed higher renal blood flow in the CD47mAb-treated kidneys. Conclusions These results provide strong evidence for the use of CD47 antibody-mediated blockade to reduce IRI and improve organ preservation for renal transplantation. PMID:24983310

  19. Studying mast cells in peripheral tolerance by using a skin transplantation model.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Victor C; Le Mercier, Isabelle; Nowak, Elizabeth C; Noelle, Randolph J

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) play an important role in both inflammatory and immunosuppressive responses [1]. The importance of MCs in maintaining peripheral tolerance was discovered in a FoxP3(+) regulatory T-cell (Treg)-mediated skin transplant model [2]. MCs can directly mediate tolerance by releasing anti-inflammatory mediators (reviewed in ref. 3) or by interacting with other immune cells in the graft. Here we will present protocols used to study the role of MCs in peripheral tolerance with the emphasis on how MCs can regulate T-cell functionality. First we will introduce the skin transplant model followed by reconstitution of mast cell-deficient mice (B6.Cg-Kit (W-sh) ). This includes the preparation of MCs from the bone marrow. Finally the methods used to study the influence of MCs on T-cell responses and Treg functionality will be presented by modulating the balance between tolerance and inflammation. PMID:25388268

  20. Mouse model of alloimmune-induced vascular rejection and transplant arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Enns, Winnie; von Rossum, Anna; Choy, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Vascular rejection that leads to transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) is the leading representation of chronic heart transplant failure. In TA, the immune system of the recipient causes damage of the arterial wall and dysfunction of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. This triggers a pathological repair response that is characterized by intimal thickening and luminal occlusion. Understanding the mechanisms by which the immune system causes vasculature rejection and TA may inform the development of novel ways to manage graft failure. Here, we describe a mouse aortic interposition model that can be used to study the pathogenic mechanisms of vascular rejection and TA. The model involves grafting of an aortic segment from a donor animal into an allogeneic recipient. Rejection of the artery segment involves alloimmune reactions and results in arterial changes that resemble vascular rejection. The basic technical approach we describe can be used with different mouse strains and targeted interventions to answer specific questions related to vascular rejection and TA. PMID:26066300

  1. Jejunum is preferable for construction of a Bianchi bowel-lengthening procedure in swine short bowel.

    PubMed

    Buie, W D; Thurston, O G; vanAerde, J E; Aherne, F X; Thomson, A B; Fedorak, R N

    1993-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of a Bianchi bowel-lengthening procedure performed in residual ileum and jejunum of a 75% short bowel model. Eighteen female piglets underwent a 75% mid small bowel resection. After a 6-week period, animal weights were similar and pigs were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: (1) a control group receiving no further therapy; (2) a group receiving a Bianchi procedure in the residual jejunal segment; and (3) a group receiving a Bianchi procedure in the residual ileal segment. All were followed for a further 12 weeks. Jejunal Bianchi-treated short bowel animals demonstrated a greater final weight gain (78.8 +/- 4.9 kg) compared with nontreated short bowel (63.0 +/- 6.6 kg) and ileal Bianchi-treated short bowel groups (69.3 +/- 6.9 kg) in addition to a larger jejunal diameter. The increased weight gain in the jejunal Bianchi-treated group was not a consequence of initial bowel length, food intake, changes in bowel length, digestibility of nitrogen or fat, or nutritional status. Furthermore, kinetic constants for D-glucose absorption following 18 weeks of short-bowel syndrome demonstrated a lowered glucose maximal transport rate (Vmax) in animals with nontreated short bowel compared with sham-operated controls. Additionally, jejunal and ileal glucose Vmax was further lowered in the presence of a Bianchi procedure. We conclude that: (1) during short-bowel syndrome, body weight gain was significantly higher in animals when the Bianchi procedure was performed in jejunum; (2) the short-bowel syndrome decreased intestinal glucose absorption; and (3) the Bianchi procedure itself further impaired glucose transport. PMID:8429461

  2. Transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal tissue in two primate models of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Hiroshi; Mandai, Michiko; Matsushita, Keizo; Kuwahara, Atsushi; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Nakano, Tokushige; Assawachananont, Juthaporn; Kimura, Toru; Saito, Koichi; Terasaki, Hiroko; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Sasai, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Masayo

    2016-01-01

    Retinal transplantation therapy for retinitis pigmentosa is increasingly of interest due to accumulating evidence of transplantation efficacy from animal studies and development of techniques for the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells into retinal tissues or cells. In this study, we aimed to assess the potential clinical utility of hESC-derived retinal tissues (hESC-retina) using newly developed primate models of retinal degeneration to obtain preparatory information regarding the potential clinical utility of these hESC-retinas in transplantation therapy. hESC-retinas were first transplanted subretinally into nude rats with or without retinal degeneration to confirm their competency as a graft to mature to form highly specified outer segment structure and to integrate after transplantation. Two focal selective photoreceptor degeneration models were then developed in monkeys by subretinal injection of cobalt chloride or 577-nm optically pumped semiconductor laser photocoagulation. The utility of the developed models and a practicality of visual acuity test developed for monkeys were evaluated. Finally, feasibility of hESC-retina transplantation was assessed in the developed monkey models under practical surgical procedure and postoperational examinations. Grafted hESC-retina was observed differentiating into a range of retinal cell types, including rod and cone photoreceptors that developed structured outer nuclear layers after transplantation. Further, immunohistochemical analyses suggested the formation of host–graft synaptic connections. The findings of this study demonstrate the clinical feasibility of hESC-retina transplantation and provide the practical tools for the optimization of transplantation strategies for future clinical applications. PMID:26699487

  3. Stem cell transplantation in neurological diseases: improving effectiveness in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Adami, Raffaella; Scesa, Giuseppe; Bottai, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Neurological diseases afflict a growing proportion of the human population. There are two reasons for this: first, the average age of the population (especially in the industrialized world) is increasing, and second, the diagnostic tools to detect these pathologies are now more sophisticated and can be used on a higher percentage of the population. In many cases, neurological disease has a pharmacological treatment which, as in the case of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Epilepsy, and Multiple Sclerosis can reduce the symptoms and slow down the course of the disease but cannot reverse its effects or heal the patient. In the last two decades the transplantation approach, by means of stem cells of different origin, has been suggested for the treatment of neurological diseases. The choice of slightly different animal models and the differences in methods of stem cell preparation make it difficult to compare the results of transplantation experiments. Moreover, the translation of these results into clinical trials with human subjects is difficult and has so far met with little success. This review seeks to discuss the reasons for these difficulties by considering the differences between human and animal cells (including isolation, handling and transplantation) and between the human disease model and the animal disease model. PMID:25364724

  4. A model to examine the validity of the 6-month abstinence criterion for liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yates, W R; Martin, M; LaBrecque, D; Hillebrand, D; Voigt, M; Pfab, D

    1998-04-01

    Six months of abstinence from alcohol is a commonly used criterion for liver transplantation eligibility for patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. There is limited evidence to document the validity of this criterion with regard to risk of alcoholism relapse. Ninety-one patients with alcoholic cirrhosis were interviewed for relapse risk using the High Risk Alcoholism Relapse (HRAR) Scale. The HRAR model can be used to predict relapse risk independent of duration of sobriety and therefore can be used to examine the validity of the 6 months of abstinence criteria in this clinical population. The two methods demonstrated poor to fair agreement. Agreement was highest with a cutoff allowing a 5% 6-month relapse risk when 79% agreement (c = 0.56) was demonstrated between the two methods. Using the 6-month abstinence criterion alone disallows a significant number of candidates who have a low relapse risk based on their HRAR score. The validity of the 6-month abstinence criterion is supported somewhat by comparison with the HRAR model. However, use of the 6-month abstinence criterion alone forces a significant number of patients with a low relapse risk by HRAR to wait for transplant listing. A relapse risk model based on an estimate of alcoholism severity in addition to duration of sobriety may more accurately select patients who are most likely to benefit from liver transplantation. PMID:9581661

  5. Latitude, sunshine, and human lactase phenotype distributions may contribute to geographic patterns of modern disease: the inflammatory bowel disease model.

    PubMed

    Szilagyi, Andrew; Leighton, Henry; Burstein, Barry; Xue, Xiaoqing

    2014-01-01

    Countries with high lactase nonpersistence (LNP) or low lactase persistence (LP) populations have lower rates of some "western" diseases, mimicking the effects of sunshine and latitude. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ie, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is putatively also influenced by sunshine. Recent availability of worldwide IBD rates and lactase distributions allows more extensive comparisons. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent to which modern day lactase distributions interact with latitude, sunshine exposure, and IBD rates. National IBD rates, national distributions of LP/LNP, and population-weighted average national annual ultraviolet B exposure were obtained, estimated, or calculated from the literature. Negative binomial analysis was used to assess the relationship between the three parameters and IBD rates. Analyses for 55 countries were grouped in three geographic domains, ie, global, Europe, and non-Europe. In Europe, both latitude and ultraviolet B exposure correlate well with LP/LNP and IBD. In non-Europe, latitude and ultraviolet B exposure correlate weakly with LP/LNP, but the latter retains a more robust correlation with IBD. In univariate analysis, latitude, ultraviolet B exposure, and LP/LNP all had significant relationships with IBD. Multivariate analysis showed that lactase distributions provided the best model of fit for IBD. The model of IBD reveals the evolutionary effects of the human lactase divide, and suggests that latitude, ultraviolet B exposure, and LP/LNP mimic each other because LP/LNP follows latitudinal directions toward the equator. However, on a large scale, lactase patterns also follow lateral polarity. The effects of LP/LNP in disease are likely to involve complex interactions. PMID:24971037

  6. Changes in Enteric Neurons of Small Intestine in a Rat Model of Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Fei, Guijun; Fang, Xiucai; Yang, Xilin; Sun, Xiaohong; Qian, Jiaming; Wood, Jackie D; Ke, Meiyun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Physical and/or emotional stresses are important factors in the exacerbation of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Several lines of evidence support that a major impact of stress on the gastrointestinal tract occurs via the enteric nervous system. We aimed to evaluate histological changes in the submucosal plexus (SMP) and myenteric plexus (MP) of the distal ileum in concert with the intestinal motor function in a rat model of IBS with diarrhea. Methods The rat model was induced by heterotypic chronic and acute stress (CAS). The intestinal transit was measured by administering powdered carbon by gastric gavage. Double immunohistochemical fluorescence staining with whole-mount preparations of SMP and MP of enteric nervous system was used to assess changes in expression of choline acetyltransferase, vasoactive intestinal peptide, or nitric oxide synthase in relation to the pan neuronal marker, anti-Hu. Results The intestinal transit ratio increased significantly from control values of 50.8% to 60.6% in the CAS group. The numbers of enteric ganglia and neurons in the SMP were increased in the CAS group. The proportions of choline acetyltransferase- and vasoactive intestinal peptide-immunoreactive neurons in the SMP were increased (82.1 ± 4.3% vs. 76.0 ± 5.0%, P = 0.021; 40.5 ± 5.9% vs 28.9 ± 3.7%, P = 0.001), while nitric oxide synthase-immunoreactive neurons in the MP were decreased compared with controls (23.3 ± 4.5% vs 32.4 ± 4.5%, P = 0.002). Conclusions These morphological changes in enteric neurons to CAS might contribute to the dysfunction in motility and secretion in IBS with diarrhea. PMID:26645247

  7. The effect of therapeutic drugs used in inflammatory bowel disease on the incidence and growth of colonic cancer in the dimethylhydrazine rat model.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A. E.; Patterson, F.; Crouch, R.

    1992-01-01

    An increased incidence of colonic cancer is associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Sulphasalazine, metronidazole and more recently, modified forms of 5-aminosalicylic acid are used for maintenance therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. In a series of experiments, we used the 1,2-dimethylhydrazine animal model of colonic cancer in conjunction with these drugs, to study the effect on the development of colon cancer. Inbred male Wistar rats were divided into groups receiving orally: metronidazole 18 mg Kg-1 dy-1; sulphasalazine 60 mg Kg-1 dy-1; 5-aminosalicylic acid 30 and 60 mg Kg-1 dy-1 and olsalazine 60 mg Kg-1 dy-1 administered daily. Half of each group also received weekly injections of DMH 40 mg Kg-1. Metronidazole, sulphasalazine and 30 mg Kg-1 dy-1 5-aminosalicylic acid were co-carcinogenic, increasing either the number of cancers or tumour size. In contrast 60 mg Kg-1 dy-1 5-aminosalicylic acid inhibited tumour size and olsalazine had no effect. These results may have a bearing on long term maintenance therapy in inflammatory bowel disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1358165

  8. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  9. Directly auto-transplanted mesenchymal stem cells induce bone formation in a ceramic bone substitute in an ectopic sheep model

    PubMed Central

    Boos, Anja M; Loew, Johanna S; Deschler, Gloria; Arkudas, Andreas; Bleiziffer, Oliver; Gulle, Heinz; Dragu, Adrian; Kneser, Ulrich; Horch, Raymund E; Beier, Justus P

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Bone tissue engineering approaches increasingly focus on the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). In most animal transplantation models MSC are isolated and expanded before auto cell transplantation which might be critical for clinical application in the future. Hence this study compares the potential of directly auto-transplanted versus in vitro expanded MSC with or without bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) to induce bone formation in a large volume ceramic bone substitute in the sheep model. MSC were isolated from bone marrow aspirates and directly auto-transplanted or expanded in vitro and characterized using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and RT-PCR analysis before subcutaneous implantation in combination with BMP-2 and β-tricalcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (β-TCP/HA) granules. Constructs were explanted after 1 to 12 weeks followed by histological and RT-PCR evaluation. Sheep MSC were CD29+, CD44+ and CD166+ after selection by Ficoll gradient centrifugation, while directly auto-transplanted MSC-populations expressed CD29 and CD166 at lower levels. Both, directly auto-transplanted and expanded MSC, were constantly proliferating and had a decreasing apoptosis over time in vivo. Directly auto-transplanted MSC led to de novo bone formation in a heterotopic sheep model using a β-TCP/HA matrix comparable to the application of 60 μg/ml BMP-2 only or implantation of expanded MSC. Bone matrix proteins were up-regulated in constructs following direct auto-transplantation and in expanded MSC as well as in BMP-2 constructs. Up-regulation was detected using immunohistology methods and RT-PCR. Dense vascularization was demonstrated by CD31 immunohistology staining in all three groups. Ectopic bone could be generated using directly auto-transplanted or expanded MSC with β-TCP/HA granules alone. Hence BMP-2 stimulation might become dispensable in the future, thus providing an attractive, clinically feasible approach to bone tissue engineering. PMID

  10. Uterus transplantation model in sheep with heterotopic whole graft and aorta and cava anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Pinto, I M; Tryphonopoulos, P; Avison, D L; Nishida, S; Tekin, A; Santiago, S; Tzakis, A G

    2013-06-01

    Uterine transplantation in the sheep model has been described as a partial or whole orthotopic graft from a living donor with vascular anastomoses. As an alternative to surrogate pregnancy or adoption uterus transplantation might be indicated for cases of infertility of uterine origin. The main complications might be rejection and thrombosis. The objective of this work was to develop a model of whole uterus transplantation that was applicable to the human setting, using grafts obtained from brain-dead donors, and suitable for immunologic and viability follow-up with a reduced risk of thrombosis. Two donors and 1 recipient were operated. The first graft was used for an anatomic study; the second was used for transplantation. The donor operation consisted of an en bloc harvest of the uterus, adnexa, and proximal vagina with the distal aorta and cava. After harvest the donor sheep was humanely killed. In the recipient ewe, heterotopic implantation was performed in the lower abdomen. An End-to-side anastomoses of aorta and cava were performed below the recipient's renal vessels. A cutaneous vaginal stoma was performed in the right lower quadrant. The recipient ewe was humanely killed for an autopsy study. The anatomy of uterine veins of the ewe differs from the human. The uterine and ovarian veins join, forming the utero-ovarian vein, which drains at the confluence of the common iliac to the cava. En bloc harvesting allows for rapid graft preparation, with vascular cuffs easily anastomosed with a low risk of thrombosis. The vaginal stoma seems appropriate to facilitate follow-up and graft biopsy. This approach can be a suitable experimental model applicable to humans using grafts from brain-dead donors. PMID:23769047

  11. Transplantation of tissue-engineered human corneal endothelium in cat models

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiya; Zhao, Jun; Wen, Qian; Hu, Xiuzhong; Yu, Haoze; Shi, Weiyun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the performance of reconstructed tissue-engineered human corneal endothelium (TE-HCE) by corneal transplantation in cat models. Methods TE-HCE reconstruction was performed by culturing 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labeled monoclonal HCE cells on denuded amniotic membranes (dAMs) in 20% fetal bovine serum-containing Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium/Ham’s Nutrient Mixture F12 (1:1) medium and 5% CO2 at 37 °C on a 24-well culture plate. The reconstructed TE-HCE was transplanted into cat corneas via lamellar keratoplasty with all of the endothelium and part of Descemet’s membrane stripped. Postsurgical corneas were monitored daily with their histological properties examined during a period of 104 days after transplantation. Results The reconstructed TE-HCE at a density of 3,413.33±111.23 cells/mm2 in average established intense cell-cell and cell-dAM junctions. After lamellar keratoplasty surgery, no obvious edema was found in TE-HCE-transplanted cat corneas, which were transparent throughout the monitoring period. In contrast, intense corneal edema developed in dAM-transplanted cat corneas, which were turbid. The corneal thickness gradually decreased to 751.33±11.37 μm on day 104 after TE-HCE transplantation, while that of dAM eye was over 1,000 μm in thickness during the monitoring period. A monolayer of endothelium consisting of TE-HCE-originated cells at a density of 2,573.33±0.59 cells/mm2 attached tightly to the surface of remnant Descemet’s membrane over 104 days; this was similar to the normal eye control in cell density. Conclusions The reconstructed TE-HCE was able to function as a corneal endothelium equivalent and restore corneal function in cat models. PMID:23441111

  12. A review of the efficacy of dietary polyphenols in experimental models of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Martin, Derek A; Bolling, Bradley W

    2015-06-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis presently have no cure and are treated with anti-inflammatory drugs or monoclonal antibodies targeting pro-inflammatory cytokines. A variety of rodent models have been used to model chronic and acute colitis. Dietary polyphenols in foods and botanicals are of considerable interest for prevention and treatment of colitis. Many dietary polyphenols have been utilized for prevention of colitis in rodent models. Berries, green tea polyphenols, curcumin, and stilbenes have been the most extensively tested polyphenols in rodent models of colitis. The majority of polyphenols tested have inhibited colitis in rodents, but increasing doses of EGCG and green tea, isoflavones, flaxseed, and α-mangostin have exacerbated colitis. Few studies have examined combination of polyphenols or other bioactives for inhibition of colitis. Translating polyphenol doses used in rodent models of colitis to human equivalent doses reveals that supplemental doses are most likely required to inhibit colitis from a single polyphenol treatment. The ability to translate polyphenol treatments in rodent models is likely to be limited by species differences in xenobiotic metabolism and microbiota. Given these limitations, data from polyphenols in rodent models suggests merit for pursuing additional clinical studies for prevention of colitis. PMID:25986932

  13. Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 ameliorates experimental colitis by modulating intestinal permeability, the inflammatory response and clinical signs in a faecal transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Souza, Éricka L; Elian, Samir D; Paula, Laís M; Garcia, Cristiana C; Vieira, Angélica T; Teixeira, Mauro M; Arantes, Rosa M; Nicoli, Jacques R; Martins, Flaviano S

    2016-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are a group of inflammatory conditions of the gut that include ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Probiotics are live micro-organisms that may be used as adjuvant therapy for patients with IBD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prophylactic ingestion of Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) in a murine model of colitis. For induction of colitis, mice were given a 3.5 % dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) solution for 7 days in drinking water. EcN administration to mice subjected to DSS-induced colitis resulted in significant reduction in clinical and histopathological signs of disease and preservation of intestinal permeability. We observed reduced inflammation, as assessed by reduced levels of neutrophils, eosinophils, chemokines and cytokines. We observed an increase in the number of regulatory T-cells in Peyer's patches. Germ-free mice received faecal content from control or EcN-treated mice and were then subjected to DSS-induced colitis. We observed protection from colitis in animals that were colonized with faecal content from EcN-treated mice. These results suggest that preventative oral administration of EcN or faecal microbiota transplantation with EcN-containing microbiota ameliorates DSS-induced colitis by modifying inflammatory responsiveness to DSS. PMID:26758971

  14. Heart transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... 10 years. Alternative Names Cardiac transplant; Transplant - heart; Transplantation - heart Images Heart, section through the middle Heart, ... 28. Bernstein D. Pediatric heart and heart-lung transplantation. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton ...

  15. Hair Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Hair Transplants What are hair transplants? In punch transplanting, a plug containing hair ... What should first be done before considering a hair transplant? Before the procedure, an ASDS doctor will ...

  16. A novel model for post-transplant obliterative airway disease reveals angiogenesis from the pulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Dutly, Andre E; Andrade, Cristiano F; Verkaik, Ryan; Kugathasan, Lakshmi; Trogadis, Judy; Liu, Mingyao; Waddell, Thomas K; Stewart, Duncan J; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2005-02-01

    We present a novel animal model for post-transplant obliterative airway disease in which the donor trachea is implanted into the recipient's lung parenchyma. Although this procedure is technically more challenging than the heterotopic model of implantation into a subcutaneous pouch, it has several important advantages some of which are the appropriate local environment and the possibility of local immunosuppressive therapy after transtracheal gene, cell or drug delivery. This model has revealed new insights into angiogenic potential of the pulmonary circulation. PMID:15643984

  17. Transplantation of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells in the EAE mouse model of MS.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Shoval, Yonit; Barhum, Yael; Sadan, Ofer; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Ben-Zur, Tali; Lev, Nirit; Benkler, Chen; Hod, Moshe; Melamed, Eldad; Offen, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Stem cell-based regenerative medicine raises great hope for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are being tested in clinical trials. Bone marrow is the traditional source of human MSCs, but human term placenta appears to be an excellent alternative because of its availability, without ethical issues. In this study, the therapeutic effect of human placental MSCs (PL-MSCs) was evaluated in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the mice model of MS. EAE mice were transplanted intra-cerebrally with PL-MSCs or with the vehicle saline 5 or 10 days after first MOG injection. The mice were monitored for a month after therapy. A daily EAE score revealed a decrease in disease severity in the transplanted animals when compared to saline. Survival was significantly higher in the transplanted animals. In vitro experiments demonstrated that conditioned media from LPS-activated astrocytes stimulated PL-MSCs to express the gene TNF-α-stimulated gene/protein 6 (TSG-6). The same mRNA expression was obtained when PL-MSCs were exposed to TNF-α or IL1-β. These results demonstrate that PL-MSCs have a therapeutic effect in the EAE mice model. We assume that this effect is caused by reduction of the anti-inflammatory protein, TSG-6, of the inflammatory damage. PMID:22638856

  18. Development of a predictive model of Crohn’s disease proximal small bowel involvement in capsule endoscopy evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-Pinto, Eduardo; Cardoso, Helder; Rosa, Bruno; Santos-Antunes, João; Rodrigues, Susana; Marques, Margarida; Lopes, Susana; Albuquerque, Andreia; Carvalho, Pedro; Moreira, Maria; Cotter, José; Macedo, Guilherme

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: One of the indications for capsule endoscopy (CE) is the detection of proximal small bowel (SB) involvement in Crohn's disease (CD) patients. Our aim was to assess clinical, laboratory and endoscopic predictors associated with proximal SB involvement in CD patients submitted to CE. Patients and methods: Retrospective multicenter study in which Lewis score (LS) was systematically determined in 190 CE of patients diagnosed with CD between 2003 and 2014. Results: Significant inflammatory activity (LS > 135) was present in 23 % of the patients in the first tertile and in 31 % of the patients in the second tertile. Albumin, haemoglobin, and total proteins were significantly lower in patients with a LS > 790 compared to patients with a LS < 135, while white blood cell counts and C-reactive protein were significantly higher. In the univariable analysis, a higher risk for proximal SB involvement at CE was associated with ileal involvement at ileocolonoscopy (OR 2.858, P = 0.006), higher platelets levels (OR 1.005, P = 0.004) and significant weight loss (OR 2.450, P = 0.006). In logistic regression, ileal involvement at ileocolonoscopy (OR 6.817, P = 0.003), stricturing behavior (OR 8.653, P = 0.011) and significant weight loss (OR 3.629, P = 0.028) were independently associated with proximal SB involvement at CE. Considering the ROC curve of this model, a cut-off > 0.249 predicts proximal SB involvement with 90 % sensitivity and 40 % specificity (AUROC 0.732). Conclusions: One-third of patients had proximal SB involvement. Predictive factors were significant weight loss, stricturing behaviour, and ileal involvement at ileocolonoscopy. These data help to select CD patients that benefit the most from performing a CE. PMID:27556069

  19. CXCL9 and CXCL10 accelerate acute transplant rejection mediated by alloreactive memory T cells in a mouse retransplantation model

    PubMed Central

    ZHUANG, JIAWEI; SHAN, ZHONGGUI; MA, TENG; LI, CHUN; QIU, SHUIWEI; ZHOU, XIAOBIAO; LIN, LIANFENG; QI, ZHONGQUAN

    2014-01-01

    C-X-C motif chemokine ligand (CXCL) 9 and CXCL10 play key roles in the initiation and development of acute transplant rejection. Previously, higher levels of RANTES expression and secretion were demonstrated in retransplantation or T-cell memory-transfer models. In the present study, the effect of the chemokines, CXCL9 and CXCL10, were investigated in a mouse retransplantation model. BALB/c mice were used as donors, while C57BL/6 mice were used as recipients. In the experimental groups, a heterotopic heart transplantation was performed six weeks following skin grafting. In the control groups, a heterotopic heart transplantation was performed without skin grafting. Untreated mice served as blank controls. The mean graft survival time of the heterotopic heart transplantations was 7.7 days in the experimental group (n=6), as compared with 3.25 days in the control group (n=6; P<0.001). On day three following cardiac transplantation, histological evaluation of the grafts revealed a higher International Society for Heart & Lung Transplantation grade in the experimental group as compared with the control group. In addition, gene expression and serum concentrations of CXCL9, CXCL10, interferon-γ, and interleukin-2 were markedly higher in the experimental group when compared with the control group. Differences between the levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10 in the pre- and post-transplant mice indicated that the chemokines may serve as possible biomarkers to predict acute rejection. The results of the present study demonstrated that CXCL9 and CXCL10 play a critical role in transplantation and retransplantation. High levels of these cytokines during the pre-transplant period may lead to extensive acute rejection. Thus, the observations enhance the understanding of the mechanism underlying the increased expression and secretion of CXCL9 and CXCL10 by alloreactive memory T cells. PMID:24944628

  20. Intrahepatic Tissue Implantation Represents a Favorable Approach for Establishing Orthotopic Transplantation Hepatocellular Carcinoma Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Bingfeng; Gao, Xianjun; Zhang, Ti; Du, Zhi; Wu, Chenxuan; Yin, HaiFang

    2016-01-01

    Mouse models are commonly used for studying hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) biology and exploring new therapeutic interventions. Currently three main modalities of HCC mouse models have been extensively employed in pre-clinical studies including chemically induced, transgenic and transplantation models. Among them, transplantation models are preferred for evaluating in vivo drug efficacy in pre-clinical settings given the short latency, uniformity in size and close resemblance to tumors in patients. However methods used for establishing orthotopic HCC transplantation mouse models are diverse and fragmentized without a comprehensive comparison. Here, we systemically evaluate four different approaches commonly used to establish HCC mice in preclinical studies, including intravenous, intrasplenic, intrahepatic inoculation of tumor cells and intrahepatic tissue implantation. Four parameters—the latency period, take rates, pathological features and metastatic rates—were evaluated side-by-side. 100% take rates were achieved in liver with intrahepatic, intrasplenic inoculation of tumor cells and intrahepatic tissue implantation. In contrast, no tumor in liver was observed with intravenous injection of tumor cells. Intrahepatic tissue implantation resulted in the shortest latency with 0.5cm (longitudinal diameter) tumors found in liver two weeks after implantation, compared to 0.1cm for intrahepatic inoculation of tumor cells. Approximately 0.1cm tumors were only visible at 4 weeks after intrasplenic inoculation. Uniform, focal and solitary tumors were formed with intrahepatic tissue implantation whereas multinodular, dispersed and non-uniform tumors produced with intrahepatic and intrasplenic inoculation of tumor cells. Notably, metastasis became visible in liver, peritoneum and mesenterium at 3 weeks post-implantation, and lung metastasis was visible after 7 weeks. T cell infiltration was evident in tumors, resembling the situation in HCC patients. Our study

  1. Intrahepatic Tissue Implantation Represents a Favorable Approach for Establishing Orthotopic Transplantation Hepatocellular Carcinoma Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Rao, Quan; You, Abin; Guo, Zhenglong; Zuo, Bingfeng; Gao, Xianjun; Zhang, Ti; Du, Zhi; Wu, Chenxuan; Yin, HaiFang

    2016-01-01

    Mouse models are commonly used for studying hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) biology and exploring new therapeutic interventions. Currently three main modalities of HCC mouse models have been extensively employed in pre-clinical studies including chemically induced, transgenic and transplantation models. Among them, transplantation models are preferred for evaluating in vivo drug efficacy in pre-clinical settings given the short latency, uniformity in size and close resemblance to tumors in patients. However methods used for establishing orthotopic HCC transplantation mouse models are diverse and fragmentized without a comprehensive comparison. Here, we systemically evaluate four different approaches commonly used to establish HCC mice in preclinical studies, including intravenous, intrasplenic, intrahepatic inoculation of tumor cells and intrahepatic tissue implantation. Four parameters--the latency period, take rates, pathological features and metastatic rates--were evaluated side-by-side. 100% take rates were achieved in liver with intrahepatic, intrasplenic inoculation of tumor cells and intrahepatic tissue implantation. In contrast, no tumor in liver was observed with intravenous injection of tumor cells. Intrahepatic tissue implantation resulted in the shortest latency with 0.5 cm (longitudinal diameter) tumors found in liver two weeks after implantation, compared to 0.1cm for intrahepatic inoculation of tumor cells. Approximately 0.1cm tumors were only visible at 4 weeks after intrasplenic inoculation. Uniform, focal and solitary tumors were formed with intrahepatic tissue implantation whereas multinodular, dispersed and non-uniform tumors produced with intrahepatic and intrasplenic inoculation of tumor cells. Notably, metastasis became visible in liver, peritoneum and mesenterium at 3 weeks post-implantation, and lung metastasis was visible after 7 weeks. T cell infiltration was evident in tumors, resembling the situation in HCC patients. Our study

  2. Spectral analysis of bowel sounds in intestinal obstruction using an electronic stethoscope

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Siok Siong; Tan, Yih Kai

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the value of bowel sounds analysis using an electronic stethoscope to support a clinical diagnosis of intestinal obstruction. METHODS: Subjects were patients who presented with a diagnosis of possible intestinal obstruction based on symptoms, signs, and radiological findings. A 3M™ Littmann® Model 4100 electronic stethoscope was used in this study. With the patients lying supine, six 8-second recordings of bowel sounds were taken from each patient from the lower abdomen. The recordings were analysed for sound duration, sound-to-sound interval, dominant frequency, and peak frequency. Clinical and radiological data were reviewed and the patients were classified as having either acute, subacute, or no bowel obstruction. Comparison of bowel sound characteristics was made between these subgroups of patients. In the presence of an obstruction, the site of obstruction was identified and bowel calibre was also measured to correlate with bowel sounds. RESULTS: A total of 71 patients were studied during the period July 2009 to January 2011. Forty patients had acute bowel obstruction (27 small bowel obstruction and 13 large bowel obstruction), 11 had subacute bowel obstruction (eight in the small bowel and three in large bowel) and 20 had no bowel obstruction (diagnoses of other conditions were made). Twenty-five patients received surgical intervention (35.2%) during the same admission for acute abdominal conditions. A total of 426 recordings were made and 420 recordings were used for analysis. There was no significant difference in sound-to-sound interval, dominant frequency, and peak frequency among patients with acute bowel obstruction, subacute bowel obstruction, and no bowel obstruction. In acute large bowel obstruction, the sound duration was significantly longer (median 0.81 s vs 0.55 s, P = 0.021) and the dominant frequency was significantly higher (median 440 Hz vs 288 Hz, P = 0.003) when compared to acute small bowel obstruction. No significant

  3. Small bowel radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Antes, G.; Eggemann, F.

    1987-01-01

    This book deals mainly with technique, experiences and results of the biphasic small bowel enema (enteroclysis) with barium and methyl cellulose. The method allows the evaluation of both morphology and function of the small bowel. The introduction describes the examination technique, basic patterns, interpretation and indications, while the atlas shows a broad spectrum of small bowel diseases (Crohn's disease, other inflammatory diseases, tumors, motility disorders, obstructions and malformations). The possibilities of small bowel radiology are demonstrated with reference to clinical findings and differential diagnoses.

  4. Neurons derived from transplanted neural stem cells restore disrupted neuronal circuitry in a mouse model of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Abematsu, Masahiko; Tsujimura, Keita; Yamano, Mariko; Saito, Michiko; Kohno, Kenji; Kohyama, Jun; Namihira, Masakazu; Komiya, Setsuro; Nakashima, Kinichi

    2010-01-01

    The body’s capacity to restore damaged neural networks in the injured CNS is severely limited. Although various treatment regimens can partially alleviate spinal cord injury (SCI), the mechanisms responsible for symptomatic improvement remain elusive. Here, using a mouse model of SCI, we have shown that transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) together with administration of valproic acid (VPA), a known antiepileptic and histone deacetylase inhibitor, dramatically enhanced the restoration of hind limb function. VPA treatment promoted the differentiation of transplanted NSCs into neurons rather than glial cells. Transsynaptic anterograde corticospinal tract tracing revealed that transplant-derived neurons reconstructed broken neuronal circuits, and electron microscopic analysis revealed that the transplant-derived neurons both received and sent synaptic connections to endogenous neurons. Ablation of the transplanted cells abolished the recovery of hind limb motor function, confirming that NSC transplantation directly contributed to restored motor function. These findings raise the possibility that epigenetic status in transplanted NSCs can be manipulated to provide effective treatment for SCI. PMID:20714104

  5. Irritable bowel syndrome: a microbiome-gut-brain axis disorder?

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Paul J; Cryan, John F; Dinan, Timothy G; Clarke, Gerard

    2014-10-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is an extremely prevalent but poorly understood gastrointestinal disorder. Consequently, there are no clear diagnostic markers to help diagnose the disorder and treatment options are limited to management of the symptoms. The concept of a dysregulated gut-brain axis has been adopted as a suitable model for the disorder. The gut microbiome may play an important role in the onset and exacerbation of symptoms in the disorder and has been extensively studied in this context. Although a causal role cannot yet be inferred from the clinical studies which have attempted to characterise the gut microbiota in IBS, they do confirm alterations in both community stability and diversity. Moreover, it has been reliably demonstrated that manipulation of the microbiota can influence the key symptoms, including abdominal pain and bowel habit, and other prominent features of IBS. A variety of strategies have been taken to study these interactions, including probiotics, antibiotics, faecal transplantations and the use of germ-free animals. There are clear mechanisms through which the microbiota can produce these effects, both humoral and neural. Taken together, these findings firmly establish the microbiota as a critical node in the gut-brain axis and one which is amenable to therapeutic interventions. PMID:25339800

  6. Irritable bowel syndrome: A microbiome-gut-brain axis disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Paul J; Cryan, John F; Dinan, Timothy G; Clarke, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is an extremely prevalent but poorly understood gastrointestinal disorder. Consequently, there are no clear diagnostic markers to help diagnose the disorder and treatment options are limited to management of the symptoms. The concept of a dysregulated gut-brain axis has been adopted as a suitable model for the disorder. The gut microbiome may play an important role in the onset and exacerbation of symptoms in the disorder and has been extensively studied in this context. Although a causal role cannot yet be inferred from the clinical studies which have attempted to characterise the gut microbiota in IBS, they do confirm alterations in both community stability and diversity. Moreover, it has been reliably demonstrated that manipulation of the microbiota can influence the key symptoms, including abdominal pain and bowel habit, and other prominent features of IBS. A variety of strategies have been taken to study these interactions, including probiotics, antibiotics, faecal transplantations and the use of germ-free animals. There are clear mechanisms through which the microbiota can produce these effects, both humoral and neural. Taken together, these findings firmly establish the microbiota as a critical node in the gut-brain axis and one which is amenable to therapeutic interventions. PMID:25339800

  7. The need for a new animal model for chronic rejection after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    De Vleeschauwer, S; Vanaudenaerde, B; Vos, R; Meers, C; Wauters, S; Dupont, L; Van Raemdonck, D; Verleden, G

    2011-11-01

    The single most important cause of late mortality after lung transplantation is obliterative bronchiolitis (OB), clinically characterized by a decrease in lung function and morphologically by characteristic changes. Recently, new insights into its pathogenesis have been acquired: risk factors have been identified and the use of azithromycin showed a dichotomy with at least 2 different phenotypes of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). It is clear that a good animal model is indispensable to further dissect and unravel the pathogenesis of BOS. Many animal models have been developed to study BOS but, so far, none of these models truly mimics the human situation. Looking at the definition of BOS, a good animal model implies histological OB lesions, possibility to measure lung function, and airway inflammation. This review sought to discuss, including pros and cons, all potential animal models that have been developed to study OB/BOS. It has become clear that a new animal model is needed; recent developments using an orthotopic mouse lung transplantation model may offer the answer because it mimics the human situation. The genetic variants among this species may open new perspectives for research into the pathogenesis of OB/BOS. PMID:22099823

  8. Development of a transplantable glioma tumour model from genetically engineered mice: MRI/MRS/MRSI characterisation.

    PubMed

    Ciezka, Magdalena; Acosta, Milena; Herranz, Cristina; Canals, Josep M; Pumarola, Martí; Candiota, Ana Paula; Arús, Carles

    2016-08-01

    The initial aim of this study was to generate a transplantable glial tumour model of low-intermediate grade by disaggregation of a spontaneous tumour mass from genetically engineered models (GEM). This should result in an increased tumour incidence in comparison to GEM animals. An anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (OA) tumour of World Health Organization (WHO) grade III was obtained from a female GEM mouse with the S100β-v-erbB/inK4a-Arf (+/-) genotype maintained in the C57BL/6 background. The tumour tissue was disaggregated; tumour cells from it were grown in aggregates and stereotactically injected into C57BL/6 mice. Tumour development was followed using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), while changes in the metabolomics pattern of the masses were evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging (MRS/MRSI). Final tumour grade was evaluated by histopathological analysis. The total number of tumours generated from GEM cells from disaggregated tumour (CDT) was 67 with up to 100 % penetrance, as compared to 16 % in the local GEM model, with an average survival time of 66 ± 55 days, up to 4.3-fold significantly higher than the standard GL261 glioblastoma (GBM) tumour model. Tumours produced by transplantation of cells freshly obtained from disaggregated GEM tumour were diagnosed as WHO grade III anaplastic oligodendroglioma (ODG) and OA, while tumours produced from a previously frozen sample were diagnosed as WHO grade IV GBM. We successfully grew CDT and generated tumours from a grade III GEM glial tumour. Freezing and cell culture protocols produced progression to grade IV GBM, which makes the developed transplantable model qualify as potential secondary GBM model in mice. PMID:27324642

  9. Uterine transplantation.

    PubMed

    Brännström, Mats; Racho El-Akouri, Randa; Wranning, Caiza Almén

    2003-08-15

    Uterine factor infertility is either due to congenital malformation or acquired. Most women with uterine factor infertility have no chance to become genetic mothers, except by the use of gestational surrogacy. The logical but radical approach for treatment would be replacement of the unfunctional or absent uterus. Uterine transplantation could allow these women to become both genetic and gestational mothers. The present work reviews the existing literature on the history and recent development around this topic. We also briefly describe a newly developed model for heterotopic uterine transplantation in the mouse, in which pregnancies have been accomplished. Some specific issues that are required to be solved prior any further attempts to transplant the uterus in humans are also addressed. PMID:12860325

  10. Transplantation models to characterize the mechanisms of stem cell-induced islet regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bell, Gillian I; Seneviratne, Ayesh K; Nasri, Grace N; Hess, David A

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes our current knowledge regarding the isolation human bone marrow-derived progenitor cells for the paracrine stimulation of islet regeneration after transplantation into immunodeficient mouse models of diabetes. By using high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH(hi) ) activity, a conserved function in multiple stem cell lineages, a mixed population of hematopoietic, endothelial, and mesenchymal progenitor cells can be efficiently purified using flow cytometry. We describe in vitro approaches to characterize and expand these distinct cell types. Importantly, these cell types can be transplanted into immunodeficient mice rendered beta-cell deficient by streptozotocin (STZ) treatment, in order monitor functional recovery from hyperglycemia and to characterize endogenous islet regeneration via paracrine mechanisms. Herein, we provide detailed protocols for: (1) isolation and characterization of ALDH(hi) cells for the establishment of hematopoietic and multipotent-stromal progenitor lineages; (2) intravenous and intrapancreatic transplantation of human stem cell subtypes for the quantification of glycemic recovery in STZ-treated immunodeficient mice; and (3) immunohistochemical characterization of islet recovery via the stimulation of islet neogenic, beta-cell proliferative, and islet revascularization programs. Collectively, these systems can be used to support the pre-clinical development of human progenitor cell-based therapies to treat diabetes via islet regeneration. PMID:24510790

  11. Constitutive JAK3 activation induces lymphoproliferative syndromes in murine bone marrow transplantation models

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Melanie G.; Kharas, Michael G.; Werneck, Miriam B.; Bras, Séverine Le; Moore, Sandra A.; Ball, Brian; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Rodig, Scott J.; Aster, Jon C.; Lee, Benjamin H.; Cantor, Harvey; Merlio, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase JAK3 plays a well-established role during normal lymphocyte development and is constitutively phosphorylated in several lymphoid malignancies. However, its contribution to lymphomagenesis remains elusive. In this study, we used the newly identified activating JAK3A572V mutation to elucidate the effect of constitutive JAK3 signaling on murine lymphopoiesis. In a bone marrow transplantation model, JAK3A572V induces an aggressive, fatal, and transplantable lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by the expansion of CD8+TCRαβ+CD44+CD122+Ly-6C+ T cellsthat closely resemble an effector/memory T-cell subtype. Compared with wild-type counterparts, these cells show increased proliferative capacities in response to polyclonal stimulation, enhanced survival rates with elevated expression of Bcl-2, and increased production of interferon-γ (IFNγ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), correlating with enhanced cytotoxic abilities against allogeneic target cells. Of interest, the JAK3A572V disease is epidermotropic and produces intraepidermal microabscesses. Taken together, these clinical features are reminiscent of those observed in an uncommon but aggressive subset of CD8+ human cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs). However, we also observed a CD4+ CTCL-like phenotype when cells are transplanted in an MHC-I–deficient background. These data demonstrate that constitutive JAK3 activation disrupts T-cell homeostasis and induces lymphoproliferative diseases in mice. PMID:19139084

  12. Transplants of neurosphere cell suspensions from aged mice are functional in the mouse model of Parkinson's.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Kelly K; Kirkham, David L; Doering, Laurie C

    2005-09-28

    Neural stem cell therapy has the potential to treat neurodegenerative disorders. For Parkinson's disease (PD), the goal is to enhance the dopamine system sufficiently to restore the control of movement and motor activities. In consideration of autologous stem cell therapy for PD, it will be necessary to propagate the cells in most cases from aged brain tissue. We isolated cells from the subventricular zone (SVZ) in the brains of 1-year-old enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice and generated neurospheres in culture. Neurospheres yielding high numbers of neurons and astrocytes "de novo" were selected and cryopreserved before evaluating the efficacy of neurosphere cell suspensions transplanted to the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of PD. In mice unilaterally lesioned with 6-OHDA, transplants of neurosphere cell suspensions to the striatum yielded astrocytes and tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons that reduced or reversed the drug-induced behavioral circling response to amphetamine and apomorphine. Control mice without the cell suspensions showed no change in the motor behavior. Our results indicate that the SVZ in the aged mouse brain contains cells that can be expanded in the form of neurospheres, cryopreserved, re-expanded and then transplanted into the damaged dopamine system to generate functional cell progeny that offset the motor disturbances in the nigrostriatal system. PMID:16140285

  13. Fecal Microbiota Transplant Restores Mucosal Integrity in a Murine Model of Burn Injury.

    PubMed

    Kuethe, Joshua W; Armocida, Stephanie M; Midura, Emily F; Rice, Teresa C; Hildeman, David A; Healy, Daniel P; Caldwell, Charles C

    2016-06-01

    The gut microbiome is a community of commensal organisms that are known to play a role in nutrient production as well as gut homeostasis. The composition of the gut flora can be affected by many factors; however, the impact of burn injury on the microbiome is not fully known. Here, we hypothesized that burn-induced changes to the microbiome would impact overall colon health. After scald-burn injury, cecal samples were analyzed for aerobic and anaerobic colony forming units, bacterial community, and butyrate levels. In addition, colon and total intestinal permeabilities were determined. These parameters were further determined in a germ-reduced murine model. Following both burn injury and germ reduction, we observed decreases in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, increased colon permeability and no change to small intestinal permeability. After burn injury, we further observed a significant decrease in the butyrate producing bacteria R. Gnavus, C. Eutactus, and Roseburia species as well as decreases in colonic butyrate. Finally, in mice that underwent burn followed by fecal microbiota transplant, bacteria levels and mucosal integrity were restored. Altogether our data demonstrate that burn injury can alter the microbiome leading to decreased butyrate levels and increased colon permeability. Of interest, fecal microbiota transplant treatment was able to ameliorate the burn-induced changes in colon permeability. Thus, fecal transplantation may represent a novel therapy in restoring colon health after burn injury. PMID:26682948

  14. Treatment with tetrahydrobiopterin overcomes brain death-associated injury in a murine model of pancreas transplantation.

    PubMed

    Oberhuber, R; Ritschl, P; Fabritius, C; Nguyen, A-V; Hermann, M; Obrist, P; Werner, E R; Maglione, M; Flörchinger, B; Ebner, S; Resch, T; Pratschke, J; Kotsch, K

    2015-11-01

    Brain death (BD) has been associated with an immunological priming of donor organs and is thought to exacerbate ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Recently, we showed that the essential nitric oxide synthase co-factor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) abrogates IRI following experimental pancreas transplantation. We therefore studied the effects of BD in a murine model of syngeneic pancreas transplantation and tested the therapeutic potential of BH4 treatment. Compared with sham-operated controls, donor BD resulted in intragraft inflammation reflected by induced IL-1ß, IL-6, VCAM-1, and P-selectin mRNA expression levels and impaired microcirculation after reperfusion (p < 0.05), whereas pretreatment of the BD donor with BH4 significantly improved microcirculation after reperfusion (p < 0.05). Moreover, BD had a devastating impact on cell viability, whereas BH4-treated grafts showed a significantly higher percentage of viable cells (p < 0.001). Early parenchymal damage in pancreatic grafts was significantly more pronounced in organs from BD donors than from sham or non-BD donors (p < 0.05), but BH4 pretreatment significantly ameliorated necrotic lesions in BD organs (p < 0.05). Pretreatment of the BD donor with BH4 resulted in significant recipient survival (p < 0.05). Our data provide novel insights into the impact of BD on pancreatic isografts, further demonstrating the potential of donor pretreatment strategies including BH4 for preventing BD-associated injury after transplantation. PMID:26104062

  15. Model of End-Stage Liver Disease Score and Derived Variants Lack Prognostic Ability after Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kaltenborn, Alexander; Salinas, Ricardo; Jäger, Mark D; Lehner, Frank; Sakirow, Larissa; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Schrem, Harald

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The model of end-stage liver disease (MELD) score is currently used for donor liver allocation in many regions. The objective of this retrospective study was to assess the MELD score and its diverse variants as prognostic models for mortality after liver transplantation. MATERIAL AND METHODS An analysis of 454 consecutive adult liver transplants since the introduction of MELD-based donor liver allocation was conducted. Eight different MELD score variants were investigated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to calculate the sensitivity, specificity, and overall model correctness of the investigated scores as a predictive model. The Brier score was used for the prediction of model accuracy and calculated as described before. Study endpoints were 90-day mortality and long-term patient mortality. RESULTS A 90-day mortality of 15.4% (n=69) and long-term mortality of 25% (n=112) were observed. All investigated models fail to reach relevant areas under the ROC curve greater than 0.700 for the prediction of mortality after liver transplantation. All calculated Brier scores were greater than 0.25, indicating a significant lack of model discrimination and calibration of the investigated scores. CONCLUSIONS A prognostic model for the prediction of outcome after transplantation still needs to be identified and should allow weighing urgency against utility in liver transplantation. PMID:26242315

  16. Myocardial regeneration by transplantation of modified endothelial progenitor cells expressing SDF-1 in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Schuh, Alexander; Kroh, Andreas; Konschalla, Simone; Liehn, Elisa A; Sobota, Radoslav M; Biessen, Erik AL; Bot, Ilze; Sönmez, Tolga Taha; Schober, Andreas; Marx, Nikolaus; Weber, Christian; Sasse, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Cell based therapy has been shown to attenuate myocardial dysfunction after myocardial infarction (MI) in different acute and chronic animal models. It has been further shown that stromal-cell derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) facilitates proliferation and migration of endogenous progenitor cells into injured tissue. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of exogenously applied and endogenously mobilized cells in a regenerative strategy for MI therapy. Lentivirally SDF-1α-infected endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were injected after 90 min. of ligation and reperfusion of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) intramyocardial and intracoronary using a new rodent catheter system. Eight weeks after transplantation, echocardiography and isolated heart studies revealed a significant improvement of LV function after intramyocardial application of lentiviral with SDF-1 infected EPCs compared to medium control. Intracoronary application of cells did not lead to significant differences compared to medium injected control hearts. Histology showed a significantly elevated rate of apoptotic cells and augmented proliferation after transplantation of EPCs and EPCs + SDF-1α in infarcted myocardium. In addition, a significant increased density of CD31+ vessel structures, a lower collagen content and higher numbers of inflammatory cells after transplantation of SDF-1 transgenic cells were detectable. Intramyocardial application of lentiviral-infected EPCs is associated with a significant improvement of myocardial function after infarction, in contrast to an intracoronary application. Histological results revealed a significant augmentation of neovascularization, lower collagen content, higher numbers of inflammatory cells and remarkable alterations of apoptotic/proliferative processes in infarcted areas after cell transplantation. PMID:22288686

  17. Transplantation of human skin microbiota in models of atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Myles, Ian A.; Williams, Kelli W; Reckhow, Jensen D; Jammeh, Momodou L; Pincus, Nathan B; Sastalla, Inka; Saleem, Danial; Stone, Kelly D; Datta, Sandip K

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by reduced barrier function, reduced innate immune activation, and susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus. Host susceptibility factors are suggested by monogenic disorders associated with AD-like phenotypes and can be medically modulated. S. aureus contributes to AD pathogenesis and can be mitigated by antibiotics and bleach baths. Recent work has revealed that the skin microbiome differs significantly between healthy controls and patients with AD, including decreased Gram-negative bacteria in AD. However, little is known about the potential therapeutic benefit of microbiome modulation. To evaluate whether parameters of AD pathogenesis are altered after exposure to different culturable Gram-negative bacteria (CGN) collected from human skin, CGN were collected from healthy controls and patients with AD. Then, effects on cellular and culture-based models of immune, epithelial, and bacterial function were evaluated. Representative strains were evaluated in the MC903 mouse model of AD. We found that CGN taken from healthy volunteers but not from patients with AD were associated with enhanced barrier function, innate immunity activation, and control of S. aureus. Treatment with CGN from healthy controls improved outcomes in a mouse model of AD. These findings suggest that a live-biotherapeutic approach may hold promise for treatment of patients with AD. PMID:27478874

  18. An Extraperitoneal Technique for Murine Heterotopic Cardiac Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nowocin, A K; Brown, K; Edwards, L A; Meader, L; Hill, J I; Wong, W

    2015-09-01

    The mouse heterotopic cardiac transplantation model has been used extensively by investigators in the field of organ transplantation to study the rejection process, test new antirejection treatments, tolerance induction protocols or to understand basic immunological principles. Due to its extensive use, any small refinement of the technique would have a major impact on replacement, reduction and refinement (commonly known as the 3Rs). Here, we describe a novel approach to refine this model. The donor aorta and pulmonary artery are anastomosed peripherally to the femoral artery and vein of the recipient, respectively. The technical success rate is comparable to the conventional abdominal site, but it avoids a laparotomy and handling of the bowels making it less invasive method. As a result, recipients recover faster and require less postoperative analgesia. It is a major refinement under one of the 3Rs and would represent an advance in animal welfare in scientific research. PMID:25997384

  19. Transplantation of human neural stem cells restores cognition in an immunodeficient rodent model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Haus, Daniel L; López-Velázquez, Luci; Gold, Eric M; Cunningham, Kelly M; Perez, Harvey; Anderson, Aileen J; Cummings, Brian J

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans can result in permanent tissue damage and has been linked to cognitive impairment that lasts years beyond the initial insult. Clinically effective treatment strategies have yet to be developed. Transplantation of human neural stem cells (hNSCs) has the potential to restore cognition lost due to injury, however, the vast majority of rodent TBI/hNSC studies to date have evaluated cognition only at early time points, typically <1month post-injury and cell transplantation. Additionally, human cell engraftment and long-term survival in rodent models of TBI has been difficult to achieve due to host immunorejection of the transplanted human cells, which confounds conclusions pertaining to transplant-mediated behavioral improvement. To overcome these shortfalls, we have developed a novel TBI xenotransplantation model that utilizes immunodeficient athymic nude (ATN) rats as the host recipient for the post-TBI transplantation of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derived NSCs and have evaluated cognition in these animals at long-term (≥2months) time points post-injury. We report that immunodeficient ATN rats demonstrate hippocampal-dependent spatial memory deficits (Novel Place, Morris Water Maze), but not non-spatial (Novel Object) or emotional/anxiety-related (Elevated Plus Maze, Conditioned Taste Aversion) deficits, at 2-3months post-TBI, confirming that ATN rats recapitulate some of the cognitive deficits found in immunosufficient animal strains. Approximately 9-25% of transplanted hNSCs survived for at least 5months post-transplantation and differentiated into mature neurons (NeuN, 18-38%), astrocytes (GFAP, 13-16%), and oligodendrocytes (Olig2, 11-13%). Furthermore, while this model of TBI (cortical impact) targets primarily cortex and the underlying hippocampus and generates a large lesion cavity, hNSC transplantation facilitated cognitive recovery without affecting either lesion volume or total spared cortical or hippocampal

  20. Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaser, Arthur; Zeissig, Sebastian; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Insights into inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are advancing rapidly owing to immunologic investigations of a plethora of animal models of intestinal inflammation, ground-breaking advances in the interrogation of diseases that are inherited as complex genetic traits, and the development of culture-independent methods to define the composition of the intestinal microbiota. These advances are bringing a deeper understanding to the genetically determined interplay between the commensal microbiota, intestinal epithelial cells, and the immune system and the manner in which this interplay might be modified by relevant environmental factors in the pathogenesis of IBD. This review examines these interactions and, where possible, potential lessons from IBD-directed, biologic therapies that may allow for elucidation of pathways that are central to disease pathogenesis in humans. PMID:20192811

  1. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  2. Adoptive Transfer of Dendritic Cells Expressing Fas Ligand Modulates Intestinal Inflammation in a Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Edelmarie Rivera; Isidro, Raymond A; Cruz, Myrella L; Marty, Harry; Appleyard, Caroline B

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic relapsing inflammatory conditions of unknown cause and likely result from the loss of immunological tolerance, which leads to over-activation of the gut immune system. Gut macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are essential for maintaining tolerance, but can also contribute to the inflammatory response in conditions such as IBD. Current therapies for IBD are limited by high costs and unwanted toxicities and side effects. The possibility of reducing intestinal inflammation with DCs genetically engineered to over-express the apoptosis-inducing FasL (FasL-DCs) has not yet been explored. Objective Investigate the immunomodulatory effect of administering FasL-DCs in the rat trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) model of acute colitis. Methods Expression of FasL on DCs isolated from the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) of normal and TNBS-colitis rats was determined by flow cytometry. Primary rat bone marrow DCs were transfected with rat FasL plasmid (FasL-DCs) or empty vector (EV-DCs). The effect of these DCs on T cell IFNγ secretion and apoptosis was determined by ELISPOT and flow cytometry for Annexin V, respectively. Rats received FasL-DCs or EV-DCs intraperitoneally 96 and 48 hours prior to colitis induction with TNBS. Colonic T cell and neutrophil infiltration was determined by immunohistochemistry for CD3 and myeloperoxidase activity assay, respectively. Macrophage number and phenotype was measured by double immunofluorescence for CD68 and inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase. Results MLN dendritic cells from normal rats expressed more FasL than those from colitic rats. Compared to EV-DCs, FasL-DCs reduced T cell IFNγ secretion and increased T cell apoptosis in vitro. Adoptive transfer of FasL-DCs decreased macroscopic and microscopic damage scores and reduced colonic T cells, neutrophils, and proinflammatory macrophages when compared to EV-DC adoptive transfer. Conclusion FasL-DCs are effective at treating colonic

  3. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Therapies and Gut Function in a Colitis Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Nahidi, Lily; Leach, Steven T.; Mitchell, Hazel M.; Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Lemberg, Daniel A.; Munday, John S.; Huinao, Karina; Day, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is a well-established approach to the management of Crohn's disease. Aim. To determine effects of EEN upon inflammation and gut barrier function in a colitis mouse model. Methods. Interleukin-10-deficient mice (IL-10−/−) were inoculated with Helicobacter trogontum and then treated with EEN, metronidazole, hydrocortisone, or EEN and metronidazole combination. Blood and tissue were collected at 2 and 4 weeks with histology, mucosal integrity, tight junction integrity, inflammation, and H. trogontum load evaluated. Results. H. trogontum induced colitis in IL-10−/− mice with histological changes in the cecum and colon. Elevated mucosal IL-8 mRNA in infected mice was associated with intestinal barrier dysfunction indicated by decreased transepithelial electrical resistance and mRNA of tight junction proteins and increased short-circuit current, myosin light chain kinase mRNA, paracellular permeability, and tumor necrosis factor-α and myeloperoxidase plasma levels (P < 0.01 for all comparisons). EEN and metronidazole, but not hydrocortisone, treatments restored barrier function, maintained gut barrier integrity, and reversed inflammatory changes along with reduction of H. trogontum load (versus infected controls P < 0.05). Conclusion. H. trogontum infection in IL-10−/− mice induced typhlocolitis with intestinal barrier dysfunction. EEN and metronidazole, but not hydrocortisone, modulate barrier dysfunction and reversal of inflammatory changes. PMID:24027765

  4. Contribution of Large Pig for Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion and Transplantation Studies: The Preclinical Model

    PubMed Central

    Giraud, S.; Favreau, F.; Chatauret, N.; Thuillier, R.; Maiga, S.; Hauet, T.

    2011-01-01

    Animal experimentation is necessary to characterize human diseases and design adequate therapeutic interventions. In renal transplantation research, the limited number of in vitro models involves a crucial role for in vivo models and particularly for the porcine model. Pig and human kidneys are anatomically similar (characterized by multilobular structure in contrast to rodent and dog kidneys unilobular). The human proximity of porcine physiology and immune systems provides a basic knowledge of graft recovery and inflammatory physiopathology through in vivo studies. In addition, pig large body size allows surgical procedures similar to humans, repeated collections of peripheral blood or renal biopsies making pigs ideal for medical training and for the assessment of preclinical technologies. However, its size is also its main drawback implying expensive housing. Nevertheless, pig models are relevant alternatives to primate models, offering promising perspectives with developments of transgenic modulation and marginal donor models facilitating data extrapolation to human conditions. PMID:21403881

  5. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Or if a kid sees his or her parents fighting and begins to feel worried — that's stress, too. A kid in this situation can learn ... 1 • 2 • 3 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON ... Bowel Disease Five Steps for Fighting Stress Are Your Bowels Moving? What's a Fart? Your ...

  6. [Treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Gomollón, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    In addition to immunosuppressive drugs and anti-TNF, there are a number of new options in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. Vedolizumab has been approved by the FDA and EMA and has demonstrated utility both in the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), even in anti-TNF refractory patients. Other monoclonal antibodies with different targets such as PF-005447659 (antiMAd-CAM1), ustekinumab (anti-IL23/IL12) or MEDI2070 (anti-IL23) have shown promising results in distinct clinical scenarios. Mongersen (antisense oligonucleotide anti-Smad7) and oznimod (an SP-1 modulator) are new alternatives with proven efficacy in clinical trials in CD and UC, respectively. Some data suggest that faecal microbiota transplantation could be efficacious in individual patients, although controlled data do not show clear differences with placebo. Autologous stem-cell transplantation has shown long-term efficacy in "ultra-refractory" CD. The number of possible treatments is constantly increasing, and future research should focus both on the selection of the most appropriate treatment for any given patient and on comparative trials between options. PMID:26520192

  7. Comparison of Peritoneal Adhesion Formation in Bowel Retraction by Cotton Towels Versus the Silicone Lap Pak Device in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Brian G.; Ruben, Dawn S.; Renz, Wolfgang; Santillan, Antonio; Kubisen, Steven J.; Harmon, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Manipulation of cotton operating room towels within the abdominal cavity in open abdominal surgery has been associated with the formation of peritoneal adhesions. In a rabbit model, the use of standard cotton operating room towels is compared to the Lap Pak, a silicone bowel-packing device, to determine the potential for reducing the risk of adhesions. Methods: Thirty rabbits were randomly assigned to 3 groups. The rabbits underwent a sham surgery with incision only (n = 10), placement of operating room towels (n = 10), or placement of a Lap Pak (n = 10). After 14 days, the rabbits were sacrificed and the peritoneal cavity explored for adhesions. The number, tenacity, ease of dissection, and density of adhesions were recorded, and the adhesions quantitatively graded using a Modified Hopkins Adhesion scoring system. Results: The operating room towel group had an average adhesion score of 2.5, and 8 (80%) rabbits developed adhesions. The sham group had an average adhesion score of 0.3 and one rabbit (10%) developed adhesions. The Lap Pak group had an average adhesion score of 0.2 and 1 rabbit (10%) developed adhesions. The frequency and severity of adhesions in the operating room towel group were significantly greater from that of the baseline sham group. There was no significant difference between the Lap Pak and sham groups. Conclusions: In this rabbit laparotomy model, the use of the Lap Pak to retract the bowels resulted in significantly fewer adhesions compared to cotton operating room towels. Lap Pak may be beneficial for bowel packing in general abdominal surgeries. PMID:22096614

  8. Dual Islet Transplantation Modeling of the Instant Blood-Mediated Inflammatory Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Martin, BM; Samy, KP; Lowe, MC; Thompson, PW; Cano, J; Farris, AB; Song, M; Dove, CR; Leopardi, FV; Strobert, EA; Jenkins, JB; Collins, BH; Larsen, CP; Kirk, AD

    2015-01-01

    Islet xenotransplantation is a potential treatment for diabetes without the limitations of tissue availability. Although successful experimentally, early islet loss remains substantial and attributed to an instant blood mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR). This syndrome of islet destruction has been incompletely defined and characterization in pig-to-primate models has been hampered by logistical and statistical limitations of large animal studies. To further investigate IBMIR, we developed a novel in vivo dual islet transplant model to precisely characterize IBMIR as proof-of-concept that this model can serve to properly control experiments comparing modified xenoislet preparations. Wild-type (WT) and α1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout (GTKO) neonatal porcine islets (NPIs) were studied in non-immunosuppressed rhesus macaques. Inert polyethylene microspheres served as a control for the effects of portal embolization. Digital analysis of immunohistochemistry targeting IBMIR mediators was performed at one and 24 hours after intraportal islet infusion. Early findings observed in transplanted islets include complement and antibody deposition, and infiltration by neutrophils, macrophages, and platelets. Insulin, complement, antibody, neutrophils, macrophages, and platelets were similar between GTKO and WT islets, with increasing macrophage infiltration at 24 hours in both phenotypes. This model provides an objective and internally controlled study of distinct islet preparations and documents the temporal histology of IBMIR. PMID:25702898

  9. Neuroprotective Effect of Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cell Transplantation in a Long-Term Model of Periventricular Leukomalacia

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Daniel J.; van Blitterswijk, Marka; Chandran, Siddharthan

    2009-01-01

    Perinatal white matter injury, or periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), is the most common cause of brain injury in premature infants and is the leading cause of cerebral palsy. Despite increasing numbers of surviving extreme premature infants and associated long-term neurological morbidity, our understanding and treatment of PVL remains incomplete. Inflammation- or ischemia/hypoxia-based rodent models, although immensely valuable, are largely restricted to reproducing short-term features of up to 3 weeks after injury. Given the long-term sequelae of PVL, there is a need for subchronic models that will enable testing of putative neuroprotective therapies. Here, we report long term characterization of a neonatal inflammation-induced rat model of PVL. We show bilateral ventriculomegaly, inflammation, reactive astrogliosis, injury to pre-oligodendrocytes, and neuronal loss 8 weeks after injury. We demonstrate neuroprotective effects of oligodendrocyte precursor cell transplantation. Our findings present a subchronic model of PVL and highlight the tissue protective effects of oligodendrocyte precursor cell transplants that demonstrate the potential of cell-based therapy for PVL. PMID:19850891

  10. Animal models of ex vivo lung perfusion as a platform for transplantation research

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kevin; Bobba, Christopher; Ghadiali, Samir; Jr, Don Hayes; Black, Sylvester M; Whitson, Bryan A

    2014-01-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a powerful experimental model for isolated lung research. EVLP allows for the lungs to be manipulated and characterized in an external environment so that the effect of specific ventilation/perfusion variables can be studied independent of other confounding physiologic contributions. At the same time, EVLP allows for normal organ level function and real-time monitoring of pulmonary physiology and mechanics. As a result, this technique provides unique advantages over in vivo and in vitro models. Small and large animal models of EVLP have been developed and each of these models has their strengths and weaknesses. In this manuscript, we provide insight into the relative strengths of each model and describe how the development of advanced EVLP protocols is leading to a novel experimental platform that can be used to answer critical questions in pulmonary physiology and transplant medicine. PMID:24977117

  11. Animal models of ex vivo lung perfusion as a platform for transplantation research.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Kevin; Bobba, Christopher; Ghadiali, Samir; Hayes, Don; Black, Sylvester M; Whitson, Bryan A

    2014-05-20

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a powerful experimental model for isolated lung research. EVLP allows for the lungs to be manipulated and characterized in an external environment so that the effect of specific ventilation/perfusion variables can be studied independent of other confounding physiologic contributions. At the same time, EVLP allows for normal organ level function and real-time monitoring of pulmonary physiology and mechanics. As a result, this technique provides unique advantages over in vivo and in vitro models. Small and large animal models of EVLP have been developed and each of these models has their strengths and weaknesses. In this manuscript, we provide insight into the relative strengths of each model and describe how the development of advanced EVLP protocols is leading to a novel experimental platform that can be used to answer critical questions in pulmonary physiology and transplant medicine. PMID:24977117

  12. Improved prediction of tacrolimus concentrations early after kidney transplantation using theory-based pharmacokinetic modelling

    PubMed Central

    Størset, Elisabet; Holford, Nick; Hennig, Stefanie; Bergmann, Troels K; Bergan, Stein; Bremer, Sara; Åsberg, Anders; Midtvedt, Karsten; Staatz, Christine E

    2014-01-01

    Aims The aim was to develop a theory-based population pharmacokinetic model of tacrolimus in adult kidney transplant recipients and to externally evaluate this model and two previous empirical models. Methods Data were obtained from 242 patients with 3100 tacrolimus whole blood concentrations. External evaluation was performed by examining model predictive performance using Bayesian forecasting. Results Pharmacokinetic disposition parameters were estimated based on tacrolimus plasma concentrations, predicted from whole blood concentrations, haematocrit and literature values for tacrolimus binding to red blood cells. Disposition parameters were allometrically scaled to fat free mass. Tacrolimus whole blood clearance/bioavailability standardized to haematocrit of 45% and fat free mass of 60 kg was estimated to be 16.1 l h−1 [95% CI 12.6, 18.0 l h−1]. Tacrolimus clearance was 30% higher (95% CI 13, 46%) and bioavailability 18% lower (95% CI 2, 29%) in CYP3A5 expressers compared with non-expressers. An Emax model described decreasing tacrolimus bioavailability with increasing prednisolone dose. The theory-based model was superior to the empirical models during external evaluation displaying a median prediction error of −1.2% (95% CI −3.0, 0.1%). Based on simulation, Bayesian forecasting led to 65% (95% CI 62, 68%) of patients achieving a tacrolimus average steady-state concentration within a suggested acceptable range. Conclusion A theory-based population pharmacokinetic model was superior to two empirical models for prediction of tacrolimus concentrations and seemed suitable for Bayesian prediction of tacrolimus doses early after kidney transplantation. PMID:25279405

  13. A Human-Mouse Chimeric Model of Obliterative Bronchiolitis after Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jianmin; Zhu, Xuehai; George, M. Patricia; Myerburg, Michael M.; Stoner, Michael W.; Pilewski, Joseph W.; Duncan, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis is a frequent, morbid, and usually refractory complication of lung transplantation. Mechanistic study of obliterative bronchiolitis would be aided by development of a relevant model that uses human immune effector cells and airway targets. Our objective was to develop a murine chimera model that mimics obliterative bronchiolitis of lung allograft recipients in human airways in vivo. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were adoptively transferred to immunodeficient mice lacking activity of T, B, and NK cells, with and without concurrent transplantations of human small airways dissected from allogeneic cadaveric lungs. Chimerism with human T cells occurred in the majority of recipient animals. The chimeric T cells became highly activated, rapidly infiltrated into the small human airway grafts, and caused obliterative bronchiolitis. In contrast, airways implanted into control mice that did not also receive human peripheral blood mononuclear cell transfers remained intact. In vitro proliferation assays indicated that the chimeric T cells had enhanced specific proliferative responses to donor airway alloantigens. This model confirms the critical role of T cells in development of obliterative bronchiolitis among human lung allograft recipients and provides a novel and easily implemented mechanism for detailed, reductionist in vivo studies of human T-cell responses to allogeneic human small airways. PMID:21801868

  14. Effect of Astragaloside IV on Neural Stem Cell Transplantation in Alzheimer's Disease Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Haiyan, Hu; Rensong, Yang; Guoqin, Jin; Xueli, Zhang; Huaying, Xia; Yanwu, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy is a promising treatment strategy for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanism underlying the maintenance of renewal and replacement capabilities of endogenous progenitor cells or engrafted stem cells in a pathological environment remains elusive. To investigate the effect of astragaloside IV (ASI) on the proliferation and differentiation of the engrafted neural stem cells (NSCs), we cultured NSCs from the hippocampus of E14 rat embryos, treated the cells with ASI, and then transplanted the cells into the hippocampus of rat AD models. In vitro experimentation showed that 10−5 M ASI induced NSCs to differentiate into β-tubulin III+ and GFAP+ cells. NSCs transplantation into rat AD models resulted in improvements in learning and memory, especially in the ASI-treated groups. ASI treatment resulted in an increase in the number of β-tubulin III+ cells in the hippocampus. Further investigation showed that ASI inhibited PS1 expression in vitro and in vivo. The high-dose ASI downregulated the Notch intracellular domain, whereas the low-dose ASI increased Notch-1 and NICD. In conclusion, ASI treatment resulted in improvements in learning and memory of AD models by promoting NSC proliferation and differentiation partly through the Notch signal pathway. PMID:27034688

  15. Insights from computational modeling in inflammation and acute rejection in limb transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Dolores; Starzl, Ravi; Hackl, Hubert; Barclay, Derek; Hautz, Theresa; Zelger, Bettina; Brandacher, Gerald; Lee, W P Andrew; Eberhart, Nadine; Vodovotz, Yoram; Pratschke, Johann; Pierer, Gerhard; Schneeberger, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Acute skin rejection in vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA) is the major obstacle for wider adoption in clinical practice. This study utilized computational modeling to identify biomarkers for diagnosis and targets for treatment of skin rejection. Protein levels of 14 inflammatory mediators in skin and muscle biopsies from syngeneic grafts [n = 10], allogeneic transplants without immunosuppression [n = 10] and allografts treated with tacrolimus [n = 10] were assessed by multiplexed analysis technology. Hierarchical Clustering Analysis, Principal Component Analysis, Random Forest Classification and Multinomial Logistic Regression models were used to segregate experimental groups. Based on Random Forest Classification, Multinomial Logistic Regression and Hierarchical Clustering Analysis models, IL-4, TNF-α and IL-12p70 were the best predictors of skin rejection and identified rejection well in advance of histopathological alterations. TNF-α and IL-12p70 were the best predictors of muscle rejection and also preceded histopathological alterations. Principal Component Analysis identified IL-1α, IL-18, IL-1β, and IL-4 as principal drivers of transplant rejection. Thus, inflammatory patterns associated with rejection are specific for the individual tissue and may be superior for early detection and targeted treatment of rejection. PMID:24926998

  16. Behavioral outcome measures used for human neural stem cell transplantation in rat stroke models

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Matthew B.; Han, Dong Y.; Sawaf, Abdullah Al; Krishnaney-Davison, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, leading to the development of various stroke models to test new treatments, most commonly in the rat. Human stroke trials focus on disability, related primarily to neurological deficits. To better model the clinical application of these treatments, many behavioral tests have been developed using the rat stroke model. We performed a systematic review of all the behavioral outcome measures used in published studies of human neural stem cell transplantation in rat stroke models. The reviewed tests include motor, sensory, cognitive, activity, and combination tests. For each test, we give a brief description, trace the origin of the test, and discuss test performance in the reviewed studies. We conclude that while many behavioral tests are available for this purpose, there does not appear to be consensus on an optimal testing strategy. PMID:22053257

  17. Future Economics of Liver Transplantation: A 20-Year Cost Modeling Forecast and the Prospect of Bioengineering Autologous Liver Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Habka, Dany; Mann, David; Landes, Ronald; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    During the past 20 years liver transplantation has become the definitive treatment for most severe types of liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma, in both children and adults. In the U.S., roughly 16,000 individuals are on the liver transplant waiting list. Only 38% of them will receive a transplant due to the organ shortage. This paper explores another option: bioengineering an autologous liver graft. We developed a 20-year model projecting future demand for liver transplants, along with costs based on current technology. We compared these cost projections against projected costs to bioengineer autologous liver grafts. The model was divided into: 1) the epidemiology model forecasting the number of wait-listed patients, operated patients and postoperative patients; and 2) the treatment model forecasting costs (pre-transplant-related costs; transplant (admission)-related costs; and 10-year post-transplant-related costs) during the simulation period. The patient population was categorized using the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. The number of patients on the waiting list was projected to increase 23% over 20 years while the weighted average treatment costs in the pre-liver transplantation phase were forecast to increase 83% in Year 20. Projected demand for livers will increase 10% in 10 years and 23% in 20 years. Total costs of liver transplantation are forecast to increase 33% in 10 years and 81% in 20 years. By comparison, the projected cost to bioengineer autologous liver grafts is $9.7M based on current catalog prices for iPS-derived liver cells. The model projects a persistent increase in need and cost of donor livers over the next 20 years that’s constrained by a limited supply of donor livers. The number of patients who die while on the waiting list will reflect this ever-growing disparity. Currently, bioengineering autologous liver grafts is cost prohibitive. However, costs will decline rapidly with the introduction of new manufacturing

  18. Induction of transplantation tolerance in non-human primate preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Douglas A; Dhanireddy, Kiran; Bruno, David; Kirk, Allan D

    2005-01-01

    Short-term outcomes following organ transplantation have improved considerably since the availability of cyclosporine ushered in the modern era of immunosuppression. In spite of this, many of the current limitations to progress in the field are directly related to the existing practice of relatively non-specific immunosuppression. These include increased risks of opportunistic infection and cancer, and toxicity associated with long-term immunosuppressive drug exposure. In addition, long-term graft loss continues to result in part from a failure to adequately control the anti-donor immune response. The development of a safe and reliable means of inducing tolerance would ameliorate these issues and improve the lives of transplant recipients, yet given the improving clinical standard of care, the translation of new therapies has become appropriately more cautious and dependent on increasingly predictive preclinical models. While convenient and easy to use, rodent tolerance models have not to date been reliably capable of predicting a therapy's potential efficacy in humans. Non-human primates possess an immune system that more closely approximates that found in humans, and have served as a more rigorous preclinical testing ground for novel therapies. Prior to clinical adaptation therefore, tolerance regimens should be vetted in non-human primates to ensure that there is sufficient potential for efficacy to justify the risk of its application. PMID:16147537

  19. Combined Microencapsulated Islet Transplantation and Revascularization of Aortorenal Bypass in a Diabetic Nephropathy Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    He, Yunqiang; Xu, Ziqiang; Fu, Hongxing; Chen, Bin; Wang, Silu; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao; Cai, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Revascularization of aortorenal bypass is a preferred technique for renal artery stenosis (RAS) in diabetic nephropathy (DN) patients. Restenosis of graft vessels also should be considered in patients lacking good control of blood glucose. In this study, we explored a combined strategy to prevent the recurrence of RAS in the DN rat model. Methods. A model of DN was established by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Rats were divided into 4 groups: SR group, MIT group, Com group, and the untreated group. The levels of blood glucose and urine protein were measured, and changes in renal pathology were observed. The expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in graft vessels was assessed by immunohistochemical staining. Histopathological staining was performed to assess the pathological changes of glomeruli and tubules. Results. The levels of urine protein and the expression of MCP-1 in graft vessels were decreased after islet transplantation. The injury of glomerular basement membrane and podocytes was significantly ameliorated. Conclusions. The combined strategy of revascularization and microencapsulated islet transplantation had multiple protective effects on diabetic nephropathy, including preventing atherosclerosis in the graft vessels and alleviating injury to the glomerular filtration barrier. This combined strategy may be helpful for DN patients with RAS. PMID:27119088

  20. Transplant services

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine if you meet the criteria for organ transplantation. Most types of organ transplants have guidelines detailing ... you may have. References Herman M, Keaveny AP. Organ transplantation. In: Walsh D, Caraceni AT, Fainsinger R, et ...

  1. Lung Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Lung Transplant? A lung transplant is surgery to remove a person's diseased lung ... a healthy lung from a deceased donor. Lung transplants are used for people who are likely to ...

  2. Kidney transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections Side effects from medicines used to prevent transplant rejection Loss of transplanted kidney ... tries to destroy it. In order to avoid rejection, almost all kidney transplant recipients must take medicines that suppress their immune ...

  3. Heart transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... have symptoms. You must take drugs that prevent transplant rejection for the rest of your life. You will ... heart transplant. The main problem, as with other transplants, is rejection. If rejection can be controlled, survival increases to ...

  4. Effects of ischemic preconditioning in a pig model of large-for-size liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Antonio José Gonçalves; Tannuri, Ana Cristina Aoun; Belon, Alessandro Rodrigo; Guimarães, Raimundo Renato Nunes; Coelho, Maria Cecília Mendonça; de Oliveira Gonçalves, Josiane; Serafini, Suellen; de Melo, Evandro Sobroza; Tannuri, Uenis

    2015-01-01

    : Ischemia-reperfusion injury in this model of large-for-size liver transplantation could be partially attenuated by ischemic preconditioning. PMID:25789522

  5. Bioengineering a 3D integumentary organ system from iPS cells using an in vivo transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Ryoji; Ishimaru, Junko; Sugawara, Ayaka; Toyoshima, Koh-Ei; Ishida, Kentaro; Ogawa, Miho; Sakakibara, Kei; Asakawa, Kyosuke; Kashiwakura, Akitoshi; Oshima, Masamitsu; Minamide, Ryohei; Sato, Akio; Yoshitake, Toshihiro; Takeda, Akira; Egusa, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    The integumentary organ system is a complex system that plays important roles in waterproofing, cushioning, protecting deeper tissues, excreting waste, and thermoregulation. We developed a novel in vivo transplantation model designated as a clustering-dependent embryoid body transplantation method and generated a bioengineered three-dimensional (3D) integumentary organ system, including appendage organs such as hair follicles and sebaceous glands, from induced pluripotent stem cells. This bioengineered 3D integumentary organ system was fully functional following transplantation into nude mice and could be properly connected to surrounding host tissues, such as the epidermis, arrector pili muscles, and nerve fibers, without tumorigenesis. The bioengineered hair follicles in the 3D integumentary organ system also showed proper hair eruption and hair cycles, including the rearrangement of follicular stem cells and their niches. Potential applications of the 3D integumentary organ system include an in vitro assay system, an animal model alternative, and a bioengineered organ replacement therapy. PMID:27051874

  6. Bioengineering a 3D integumentary organ system from iPS cells using an in vivo transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Ryoji; Ishimaru, Junko; Sugawara, Ayaka; Toyoshima, Koh-ei; Ishida, Kentaro; Ogawa, Miho; Sakakibara, Kei; Asakawa, Kyosuke; Kashiwakura, Akitoshi; Oshima, Masamitsu; Minamide, Ryohei; Sato, Akio; Yoshitake, Toshihiro; Takeda, Akira; Egusa, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The integumentary organ system is a complex system that plays important roles in waterproofing, cushioning, protecting deeper tissues, excreting waste, and thermoregulation. We developed a novel in vivo transplantation model designated as a clustering-dependent embryoid body transplantation method and generated a bioengineered three-dimensional (3D) integumentary organ system, including appendage organs such as hair follicles and sebaceous glands, from induced pluripotent stem cells. This bioengineered 3D integumentary organ system was fully functional following transplantation into nude mice and could be properly connected to surrounding host tissues, such as the epidermis, arrector pili muscles, and nerve fibers, without tumorigenesis. The bioengineered hair follicles in the 3D integumentary organ system also showed proper hair eruption and hair cycles, including the rearrangement of follicular stem cells and their niches. Potential applications of the 3D integumentary organ system include an in vitro assay system, an animal model alternative, and a bioengineered organ replacement therapy. PMID:27051874

  7. Large bowel resection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... large bowel). You may also have had a colostomy . ... have diarrhea. You may have problems with your colostomy. ... protect it if needed. If you have a colostomy, follow care instructions from your provider. Sitting on ...

  8. Small bowel resection

    MedlinePlus

    Small intestine surgery; Bowel resection - small intestine; Resection of part of the small intestine; Enterectomy ... her hand inside your belly to feel the intestine or remove the diseased segment. Your belly is ...

  9. Are Your Bowels Moving?

    MedlinePlus

    ... how to prevent accidents in the future. continue Diarrhea Diarrhea means you have to move your bowels often, ... eat or if you're taking certain medicines. Diarrhea also can happen when you don't wash ...

  10. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgical procedures that create a loop of small intestine where excess bacteria can grow. An example is a Billroth II type of stomach removal ( gastrectomy ). Some cases of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) Symptoms The most common symptoms are: Abdominal ...

  11. Daily bowel care program

    MedlinePlus

    ... a brain or spinal cord injury. People with multiple sclerosis also have problems with their bowels. Symptoms may ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap 17. Read More Multiple sclerosis Recovering after stroke Patient Instructions Constipation - self-care ...

  12. Haploidentical In Utero Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Improves Phenotype and Can Induce Tolerance for Postnatal Same Donor Transplants in the Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Model

    PubMed Central

    Peranteau, William H.; Heaton, Todd E.; Gu, Yu-Chen; Volk, Susan W.; Bauer, Thomas R.; Alcorn, Keith; Tuschong, Laura M.; Johnson, Mark P.; Hickstein, Dennis D.; Flake, Alan W.

    2009-01-01

    In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCT) has been shown in the murine model to achieve low levels of allogeneic chimerism and associated donor specific tolerance permissive for minimal conditioning postnatal hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT). In this pilot study, we investigate IUHCT in the canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD) model. Haploidentical IUHCT resulted in stable low level donor cell chimerism in all dogs that could be analyzed by sensitive detection methodology (4 of 10) through 18 months of follow up. In the two CLAD recipients, low level chimerism resulted in amelioration and complete reversal of the CLAD phenotype respectively. Six recipients of IUHCT (5 carriers and 1 CLAD) subsequently received postnatal HSCT from the same haploidentical prenatal donor following minimal conditioning with 10 mg/kg Busulfan. Chimerism in 2 of 5 CLAD carriers that received HSCT increased from <1% pre-HSCT to sustained levels of 35 – 45%. Control animals receiving postnatal haploidentical HSCT without IUHCT had no detectable donor chimerism. These results demonstrate that haploidentical IUHCT in the CLAD model; 1) can result in low level donor chimerism that in CLAD dogs can prevent the lethal phenotype; and 2) can result in donor specific tolerance that can facilitate postnatal minimal conditioning HSCT. PMID:19203720

  13. In vivo model of wound healing based on transplanted tissue-engineered skin.

    PubMed

    Geer, David J; Swartz, Daniel D; Andreadis, Stelios T

    2004-01-01

    Advances in understanding the complex process of wound healing and development of novel growth factor and gene therapies would benefit from models that mimic closely the physiology of human wounds. To this end, we developed a hybrid wound-healing model based on human tissue-engineered skin transplanted onto athymic mice. Grafted tissues were infiltrated with mouse mesenchymal cells as native and foreign dermal regions fused together. Immunohistochemical staining for human involucrin revealed that the transplanted epithelium maintained its human origin, whereas the dermis was infiltrated by numerous mouse fibroblasts and blood vessels. Grafted tissues were wounded with a 4-mm punch to create full-thickness excisional wounds. At 1 and 2 weeks, the tissues were excised and assessed for reepithelialization, differentiation, and neovascularization. Interestingly, the average rate of keratinocyte migration (120 microm/day) was similar to migration rates observed in human subjects and significantly lower than migration in mouse epidermis. Immunohistochemical staining for keratin 10, laminin, and involucrin revealed a normal pattern of differentiation in the neoepidermis. Neovascularization was significantly elevated in the granulation tissue at 1 week and subsided to the level of unwounded tissue at 2 weeks postwounding. Our data suggest that skin equivalents grafted to a mouse model may serve as a realistic model of human wound regeneration. Because skin equivalents can be prepared with patient cells and genetically modified to stimulate or suppress gene expression, this model may be ideal for addressing mechanistic questions and evaluating the efficacy of biomaterials and gene therapeutics for promoting wound healing. PMID:15363158

  14. Embryonic Chicken Transplantation is a Promising Model for Studying the Invasive Behavior of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandran, Aparna; McKeown, Sonja J.; Woods, Briannyn L.; Prithviraj, Prashanth; Cebon, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition is a hallmark event in the metastatic cascade conferring invasive ability to tumor cells. There are ongoing efforts to replicate the physiological events occurring during mobilization of tumor cells in model systems. However, few systems are able to capture these complex in vivo events. The embryonic chicken transplantation model has emerged as a useful system to assess melanoma cells including functions that are relevant to the metastatic process, namely invasion and plasticity. The chicken embryo represents an accessible and economical 3-dimensional in vivo model for investigating melanoma cell invasion as it exploits the ancestral relationship between melanoma and its precursor neural crest cells. We describe a methodology that enables the interrogation of melanoma cell motility within the developing avian embryo. This model involves the injection of melanoma cells into the neural tube of chicken embryos. Melanoma cells are labeled using fluorescent tracker dye, Vybrant DiO, then cultured as hanging drops for 24 h to aggregate the cells. Groups of approximately 700 cells are placed into the neural tube of chicken embryos prior to the onset of neural crest migration at the hindbrain level (embryonic day 1.5) or trunk level (embryonic day 2.5). Chick embryos are reincubated and analyzed after 48 h for the location of melanoma cells using fluorescent microscopy on whole mounts and cross-sections of the embryos. Using this system, we compared the in vivo invasive behavior of epithelial-like and mesenchymal-like melanoma cells. We report that the developing embryonic microenvironment confers motile abilities to both types of melanoma cells. Hence, the embryonic chicken transplantation model has the potential to become a valuable tool for in vivo melanoma invasion studies. Importantly, it may provide novel insights into and reveal previously unknown mediators of the metastatic steps of invasion and dissemination in melanoma

  15. A Prognostic Model Predicting Autologous Transplantation Outcomes in Children, Adolescents and Young Adults with Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Satwani, Prakash; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Carreras, Jeanette; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Cashen, Amanda; Chen, Andy I.; Cohen, Jonathon B.; Costa, Luciano J.; Dandoy, Christopher; Fenske, Timothy S.; Freytes, César O.; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Gale, Robert Peter; Ghosh, Nilanjan; Hertzberg, Mark S.; Hayashi, Robert J.; Kamble, Rummurti T.; Kanate, Abraham S.; Keating, Armand; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Marks, David I.; Nishihori, Taiga; Olsson, Richard F.; Prestidge, Tim D.; Rolon, Juliana Martinez; Savani, Bipin N.; Vose, Julie M.; Wood, William A.; Inwards, David J.; Bachanova, Veronika; Smith, Sonali M.; Maloney, David G.; Sureda, Anna; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AutoHCT) is a potentially curative treatment modality for relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). However, no large studies have evaluated pre-transplant factors predictive of outcomes of AutoHCT in children, adolescents and young adults (CAYA, age <30 years). In a retrospective study, we analyzed 606 CAYA patients (median age 23 years) with relapsed/refractory HL who underwent AutoHCT between 1995–2010. The probabilities of progression free survival (PFS) at 1, 5 and 10 years were 66% (95% CI: 62–70), 52% (95% CI: 48–57) and 47% (95% CI: 42–51), respectively. Multivariate analysis for PFS demonstrated that at the time of AutoHCT patients with Karnofsky/Lansky score ≥90, no extranodal involvement and chemosensitive disease had significantly improved PFS. Patients with time from diagnosis to first relapse of <1 year had a significantly inferior PFS. A prognostic model for PFS was developed that stratified patients into low, intermediate and high-risk groups, predicting for 5-year PFS probabilities of 72% (95% CI: 64–80), 53% (95% CI: 47–59) and 23% (95% CI: 9–36), respectively. This large study identifies a group of CAYA patients with relapsed/refractory HL who are at high risk for progression after AutoHCT. Such patients should be targeted for novel therapeutic and/or maintenance approaches post-AutoHCT. PMID:26237164

  16. Autologous apoptotic cells preceding transplantation enhance survival in lethal murine graft-versus-host models

    PubMed Central

    Florek, Mareike; Sega, Emanuela I.; Leveson-Gower, Dennis B.; Baker, Jeanette; Müller, Antonia M. S.; Schneidawind, Dominik; Meyer, Everett

    2014-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is induced by alloreactivity of donor T cells toward host antigens presented on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Apoptotic cells are capable of inducing tolerance by altering APC maturation. Apoptosis can be induced by extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP). We demonstrate that the use of ECP as a prophylaxis prior to conditioning significantly improves survival (P < .0001) after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) by inhibiting the initiation phase of acute GVHD in a murine BMT model. ECP-treated autologous splenocytes resulted in immune tolerance in the host, including reduced dendritic cell activation with decreased nuclear factor-κB engagement, increased regulatory T-cell (Treg) numbers with enhanced expression of cytolytic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, potentiating their suppressive function. The protective effect required host production of interleukin-10 and host Tregs. Conventional T cells that entered this tolerant environment experienced reduced proliferation, as well as a reduction of tissue homing and expression of activation markers. The induction of this tolerant state by ECP was obviated by cotreatment with lipopolysaccharide, suggesting that the inflammatory state of the recipient prior to treatment would play a role in potential clinical translation. The use of prophylactic ECP may provide an alternative and safe method for immunosuppression in the bone marrow transplant setting. PMID:25030062

  17. Autologous apoptotic cells preceding transplantation enhance survival in lethal murine graft-versus-host models.

    PubMed

    Florek, Mareike; Sega, Emanuela I; Leveson-Gower, Dennis B; Baker, Jeanette; Müller, Antonia M S; Schneidawind, Dominik; Meyer, Everett; Negrin, Robert S

    2014-09-11

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is induced by alloreactivity of donor T cells toward host antigens presented on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Apoptotic cells are capable of inducing tolerance by altering APC maturation. Apoptosis can be induced by extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP). We demonstrate that the use of ECP as a prophylaxis prior to conditioning significantly improves survival (P < .0001) after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) by inhibiting the initiation phase of acute GVHD in a murine BMT model. ECP-treated autologous splenocytes resulted in immune tolerance in the host, including reduced dendritic cell activation with decreased nuclear factor-κB engagement, increased regulatory T-cell (Treg) numbers with enhanced expression of cytolytic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, potentiating their suppressive function. The protective effect required host production of interleukin-10 and host Tregs. Conventional T cells that entered this tolerant environment experienced reduced proliferation, as well as a reduction of tissue homing and expression of activation markers. The induction of this tolerant state by ECP was obviated by cotreatment with lipopolysaccharide, suggesting that the inflammatory state of the recipient prior to treatment would play a role in potential clinical translation. The use of prophylactic ECP may provide an alternative and safe method for immunosuppression in the bone marrow transplant setting. PMID:25030062

  18. An in vivo model of double-unit cord blood transplantation that correlates with clinical engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Eldjerou, Lamis K.; Chaudhury, Sonali; Baisre-de Leon, Ada; He, Mai; Arcila, Maria E.; Heller, Glenn; O'Reilly, Richard J.; Moore, Malcolm A.

    2010-01-01

    Double-unit cord blood transplantation (DCBT) appears to enhance engraftment despite sustained hematopoiesis usually being derived from a single unit. To investigate DCBT biology, in vitro and murine models were established using cells from 39 patient grafts. Mononuclear cells (MNCs) and CD34+ cells from each unit alone and in DCB combination were assessed for colony-forming cell and cobblestone area-forming cell potential, and multilineage engraftment in NOD/SCID/IL2R-γnull mice. In DCB assays, the contribution of each unit was measured by quantitative short tandem repeat region analysis. There was no correlation between colony-forming cell (n = 10) or cobblestone area-forming cell (n = 9) numbers and clinical engraftment, and both units contributed to DCB cocultures. In MNC transplantations in NOD/SCID/IL2R-γnull mice, each unit engrafted alone, but MNC DCBT demonstrated single-unit dominance that correlated with clinical engraftment in 18 of 21 cases (86%, P < .001). In contrast, unit dominance and clinical correlation were lost with CD34+ DCBT (n = 11). However, add-back of CD34− to CD34+ cells (n = 20) restored single-unit dominance with the dominant unit correlating not with clinical engraftment but also with the origin of the CD34− cells in all experiments. Thus, unit dominance is an in vivo phenomenon probably associated with a graft-versus-graft immune interaction mediated by CD34− cells. PMID:20587781

  19. Administration of a DPP-IV Inhibitor Enhances the Intestinal Adaptation in a Mouse Model of Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Okawada, Manabu; Holst, Jens J.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-2(GLP-2) induces small intestine mucosal epithelial cell (EC) proliferation; and may have benefit for patients suffering from short bowel syndrome (SBS). However, GLP-2 is rapidly inactivated in vivo by dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV). Therefore, we hypothesized that selectively inhibiting DPPIV would prolong the circulating life of GLP-2 and lead to increased intestinal adaptation after development of SBS. Methods 8-week old C57BL/6J mice underwent a 50% proximal small bowel resection and were treated with either sitagliptin, a DPPIV-inhibitor (DPPIV-I), starting 1 day before surgery versus placebo. DPPIV-I efficacy was assessed 3 days after resection, including intestinal morphology, EC apoptosis and EC proliferation. Adaptive mechanisms were assessed with quantitative real-time PCR, and plasma bioactive GLP-2 was measured by radioimmunoassay. RESULT Body weight loss and peripheral blood glucose levels did not change compared to SBS controls. DPPIV-I treatment led to significant increases in villus height and crypt depth. DPPIV-I treatment did not significantly change EC apoptosis rates, but significantly increased crypt EC proliferation versus placebo-SBS controls. DPPIV-I treatment markedly increased mRNA expression of β-catenin and c-myc in ileal mucosa. Plasma GLP-2 levels significantly increased(~40.9%) in DPPIV-I-SBS mice. Conclusions DPPIV- I treatment increased SBS adaptation, and may potentially be useful for SBS patients. PMID:21719060

  20. Short Bowel Syndrome and Intestinal Failure in Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Limketkai, Berkeley N; Parian, Alyssa M; Shah, Neha D; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. Despite the availability of powerful immunosuppressants, many patients with Crohn's disease still require one or more intestinal resections throughout the course of their disease. Multiple resections and a progressive reduction in bowel length can lead to the development of short bowel syndrome, a form of intestinal failure that compromises fluid, electrolyte, and nutrient absorption. The pathophysiology of short bowel syndrome involves a reduction in intestinal surface area, alteration in the enteric hormonal feedback, dysmotility, and related comorbidities. Most patients will initially require parenteral nutrition as a primary or supplemental source of nutrition, although several patients may eventually wean off nutrition support depending on the residual gut anatomy and adherence to medical and nutritional interventions. Available surgical treatments focus on reducing motility, lengthening the native small bowel, or small bowel transplantation. Care of these complex patients with short bowel syndrome requires a multidisciplinary approach of physicians, dietitians, and nurses to provide optimal intestinal rehabilitation, nutritional support, and improvement in quality of life. PMID:26818425

  1. Development of a new auxiliary heterotopic partial liver transplantation technique using a liver cirrhosis model in minipigs: Preliminary report of eight transplants

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JUN-JING; NIU, JIAN-XIANG; YUE, GEN-QUAN; ZHONG, HAI-YAN; MENG, XING-KAI

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a new auxiliary heterotopic partial liver transplantation (AHPLT) technique in minipigs using a model of liver cirrhosis. Based on our previous study, 14 minipigs were induced to cirrhosis by administration of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) through intraperitoneal injection. All of the cirrhotic animals were utilized as recipients. The donor’s liver was placed on the recipient’s splenic bed, and the anastomosis was performed as follows: end-to-end anastomosis between the donor’s portal vein and the recipient’s splenic vein, end-to-side anastomosis between the donor’s suprahepatic vena cava and the recipient’s suprahepatic vena cava, and end-to-end anastomosis between the donor’s hepatic artery and the recipient’s splenic artery. The common bile duct of the donor was intubated and bile was collected with an extracorporeal bag. Vital signs, portal vein pressure (PVP), hepatic venous pressure (HVP) and portal vein pressure gradient (PVPG) were monitored throughout the transplantation. All 8 minipigs that developed liver cirrhosis were utilized to establish the new AHPLT; 7 cases survived. Following the surgical intervention, the PVP and PVPG of the recipients were lower than those prior to the operation (P<0.05), whereas the PVP and PVPG of the donors increased significantly compared to those of the normal animals (P<0.05). A new operative technique for AHPLT has been successfully described herein using a model of liver cirrhosis. PMID:22969983

  2. Serial transverse enteroplasty for short bowel syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Bae; Lee, Patricia W; Garza, Jennifer; Duggan, Christopher; Fauza, Dario; Jaksic, Tom

    2003-06-01

    The patient is a 2-year-old boy born with gastroschisis and midgut volvulus that left him dependent on total parenteral nutrition (TPN). At 11 months of age, a Bianchi procedure was performed increasing the total length of bowel from 72 cm to 130 cm. Although he appeared to have sufficient bowel length, he continued to have malabsorption and could only tolerate 10% of his caloric requirement enterally. A barium study found significant dilatation of the lengthened small bowel. At 23 months, we performed a novel bowel lengthening procedure that we have reported previously in an animal model. The serial transverse enteroplasty (STEP) operation increased the 83 cm of dilated and previously lengthened bowel to 147 cm, making the total small bowel length 200 cm. The patient tolerated the procedure well and began to have semisolid bowel movements. Small intestinal absorptive capacity measured by D-xylose absorption showed a substantial increase from 5 to 12 mg/dL (normal range, >20), implying improved but not completely normal small bowel function. This case shows that the STEP procedure increases intestinal length, can be used after a prior Bianchi, and may result in improved intestinal absorptive capacity. The STEP procedure should be considered a surgical option for children with short bowel syndrome. PMID:12778385

  3. Transplantation of neural differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells into the cochlea of an auditory-neuropathy guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong-Bum; Cho, Hyong-Ho; Jang, Sujeong; Jeong, Han-Seong; Park, Jong-Seong

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of transplanted neural differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in a guinea pig model of auditory neuropathy. In this study, hMSCs were pretreated with a neural-induction protocol and transplanted into the scala tympani of the guinea pig cochlea 7 days after ouabain injury. A control model was made by injection of Hanks balanced salt solution alone into the scala tympani of the guinea pig cochlea 7 days after ouabain injury. We established the auditory neuropathy guinea pig model using 1 mM ouabain application to the round window niche. After application of ouabain to the round window niche, degeneration of most spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) without the loss of hair cells within the organ of Corti and increasing the auditory brain responses (ABR) threshold were found. After transplantation of neural differentiated hMSCs, the number of SGNs was increased, and some of the SGNs expressed immunoreactivity with human nuclear antibody under confocal laser scanning microscopy. ABR results showed mild hearing recovery after transplantation. Based on an auditory neuropathy animal model, these findings suggest that it may be possible to replace degenerated SGNs by grafting stem cells into the scala tympani. PMID:21468255

  4. A synthesis of transplant experiments and ecological niche models suggests that range limits are often niche limits.

    PubMed

    Lee-Yaw, Julie A; Kharouba, Heather M; Bontrager, Megan; Mahony, Colin; Csergő, Anna Mária; Noreen, Annika M E; Li, Qin; Schuster, Richard; Angert, Amy L

    2016-06-01

    Global change has made it important to understand the factors that shape species' distributions. Central to this area of research is the question of whether species' range limits primarily reflect the distribution of suitable habitat (i.e. niche limits) or arise as a result of dispersal limitation. Over-the-edge transplant experiments and ecological niche models are commonly used to address this question, yet few studies have taken advantage of a combined approach for inferring the causes of range limits. Here, we synthesise results from existing transplant experiments with new information on the predicted suitability of sites based on niche models. We found that individual performance and habitat suitability independently decline beyond range limits across multiple species. Furthermore, inferences from transplant experiments and niche models were generally concordant within species, with 31 out of 40 cases fully supporting the hypothesis that range limits are niche limits. These results suggest that range limits are often niche limits and that the factors constraining species' ranges operate at scales detectable by both transplant experiments and niche models. In light of these findings, we outline an integrative framework for addressing the causes of range limits in individual species. PMID:27111656

  5. Bone Marrow Transplantation Alters the Tremor Phenotype in the Murine Model of Globoid-Cell Leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Adarsh S.; Wozniak, David F.; Farber, Nuri B.; Dearborn, Joshua T.; Fowler, Stephen C.; Sands, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Tremor is a prominent phenotype of the twitcher mouse, an authentic genetic model of Globoid-Cell Leukodystrophy (GLD, Krabbe’s disease). In the current study, the tremor was quantified using a force-plate actometer designed to accommodate low-weight mice. The actometer records the force oscillations caused by a mouse’s movements, and the rhythmic structure of the force variations can be revealed. Results showed that twitcher mice had significantly increased power across a broad band of higher frequencies compared to wildtype mice. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT), the only available therapy for GLD, worsened the tremor in the twitcher mice and induced a measureable alteration of movement phenotype in the wildtype mice. These data highlight the damaging effects of conditioning radiation and BMT in the neonatal period. The behavioral methodology used herein provides a quantitative approach for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions for Krabbe’s disease. PMID:24013457

  6. Gut microbial diversity is reduced and is associated with colonic inflammation in a piglet model of short bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lapthorne, Susan; Pereira-Fantini, Prue M.; Fouhy, Fiona; Wilson, Guineva; Thomas, Sarah L.; Dellios, Nicole L.; Scurr, Michelle; O’Sullivan, Orla; Ross, R. Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Cotter, Paul D.; Bines, Julie E.

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Following small bowel resection (SBR), the luminal environment is altered, which contributes to clinical manifestations of short bowel syndrome (SBS) including malabsorption, mucosal inflammation and bacterial overgrowth. However, the impact of SBR on the colon has not been well-defined. The aims of this study were to characterize the colonic microbiota following SBR and to assess the impact of SBR on mucosal inflammation in the colon. Results Analysis of the colonic microbiota demonstrated that there was a significant level of dysbiosis both two and six weeks post-SBR, particularly in the phylum Firmicutes, coupled with a decrease in overall bacterial diversity in the colon. This decrease in diversity was associated with an increase in colonic inflammation six weeks post-surgery. Methods Female (4-week old) piglets (5−6/group) received a 75% SBR, a transection (sham) or no surgery. Compositional analysis of the colonic microbiota was performed by high-throughput sequencing, two- and six-weeks post-surgery. The gene expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-18 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the colonic mucosa was assessed by qRT-PCR and the number of macrophages and percentage inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) staining in the colonic epithelium were quantified by immunohistochemistry. Conclusions SBR significantly decreased the diversity of the colonic microbiota and this was associated with an increase in colonic mucosal inflammation. This study supports the hypothesis that SBR has a significant impact on the colon and that this may play an important role in defining clinical outcome. PMID:23549027

  7. Pre-transplant antibody screening and anti-CD154 costimulation blockade promote long-term xenograft survival in a pig-to-primate kidney transplant model

    PubMed Central

    Higginbotham, Laura; Mathews, Dave; Breeden, Cynthia A.; Song, Mingqing; Farris, Alton Brad; Larsen, Christian P.; Ford, Mandy L.; Lutz, Andrew J.; Tector, Matthew; Newell, Kenneth A.; Tector, A. Joseph; Adams, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Xenotransplantation has the potential to alleviate the organ shortage that prevents many patients with end-stage renal disease from enjoying the benefits of kidney transplantation. Despite significant advances in other models, pig-to-primate kidney xenotransplantation has met limited success. Preformed anti-pig antibodies are an important component of the xenogeneic immune response. To address this, we screened a cohort of 34 rhesus macaques for anti-pig antibody levels. We then selected animals with both low and high titers of anti-pig antibodies to proceed with kidney transplant from galactose-α1,3-galactose knockout/CD55 transgenic pig donors. All animals received T-cell depletion followed by maintenance therapy with costimulation blockade (either anti-CD154 mAb or belatacept), mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid. The animal with the high titer of anti-pig antibody rejected the kidney xenograft within the first week. Low-titer animals treated with anti-CD154 antibody, but not belatacept exhibited prolonged kidney xenograft survival (>133 and >126 vs. 14 and 21 days, respectively). Long-term surviving animals treated with the anti-CD154-based regimen continue to have normal kidney function and preserved renal architecture without evidence of rejection on biopsies sampled at day 100. This description of the longest reported survival of pig-to-non-human primate kidney xenotransplantation, now >125 days, provides promise for further study and potential clinical translation. PMID:25847130

  8. A novel model for studies of blood-mediated long-term responses to cellular transplants

    PubMed Central

    Lindblom, Susanne; Hong, Jaan; Nilsson, Bo; Korsgren, Olle; Ronquist, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Aims Interaction between blood and bio-surfaces is important in many medical fields. With the aim of studying blood-mediated reactions to cellular transplants, we developed a whole-blood model for incubation of small volumes for up to 48 h. Methods Heparinized polyvinyl chloride tubing was cut in suitable lengths and sealed to create small bags. Multiple bags, with fresh venous blood, were incubated attached to a rotating wheel at 37°C. Physiological variables in blood were monitored: glucose, blood gases, mono- and divalent cations and chloride ions, osmolality, coagulation (platelet consumption, thrombin-antithrombin complexes (TAT)), and complement activation (C3a and SC5b-9), haemolysis, and leukocyte viability. Results Basic glucose consumption was high. Glucose depletion resulted in successive elevation of extracellular potassium, while sodium and calcium ions decreased due to inhibition of energy-requiring ion pumps. Addition of glucose improved ion balance but led to metabolic acidosis. To maintain a balanced physiological environment beyond 6 h, glucose and sodium hydrogen carbonate were added regularly based on analyses of glucose, pH, ions, and osmotic pressure. With these additives haemolysis was prevented for up to 72 h and leukocyte viability better preserved. Despite using non-heparinized blood, coagulation and complement activation were lower during long-term incubations compared with addition of thromboplastin and collagen. Conclusion A novel whole-blood model for studies of blood-mediated responses to a cellular transplant is presented allowing extended observations for up to 48 h and highlights the importance of stringent evaluations and adjustment of physiological conditions. PMID:25322825

  9. Cell Sheet Transplantation for Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Pidial, Laetitia; Camilleri, Sophie; Bellucci, Alexandre; Casanova, Amaury; Viel, Thomas; Tavitian, Bertrand; Cellier, Christophe; Clement, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Extended esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is highly responsible for esophageal stricture. We conducted a comparative study in a porcine model to evaluate the effectiveness of adipose tissue-derived stromal cell (ADSC) double cell sheet transplantation. Methods Twelve female pigs were treated with 5 cm long hemi-circumferential ESD and randomized in two groups. ADSC group (n = 6) received 4 double cell sheets of allogenic ADSC on a paper support membrane and control group (n = 6) received 4 paper support membranes. ADSC were labelled with PKH-67 fluorophore to allow probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopie (pCLE) monitoring. After 28 days follow-up, animals were sacrificed. At days 3, 14 and 28, endoscopic evaluation with pCLE and esophagography were performed. Results One animal from the control group was excluded (anesthetic complication). Animals from ADSC group showed less frequent alimentary trouble (17% vs 80%; P = 0.08) and higher gain weight on day 28. pCLE demonstrated a compatible cell signal in 4 animals of the ADSC group at day 3. In ADSC group, endoscopy showed that 1 out of 6(17%) animals developed a severe esophageal stricture comparatively to 100% (5/5) in the control group; P = 0.015. Esophagography demonstrated a decreased degree of stricture in the ADSC group on day 14 (44% vs 81%; P = 0.017) and day 28 (46% vs 90%; P = 0.035). Histological analysis showed a decreased fibrosis development in the ADSC group, in terms of surface (9.7 vs 26.1 mm²; P = 0.017) and maximal depth (1.6 vs 3.2 mm; P = 0.052). Conclusion In this model, transplantation of allogenic ADSC organized in double cell sheets after extended esophegeal ESD is strongly associated with a lower esophageal stricture’s rate. PMID:26930409

  10. INTESTINAL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Tzakis, Andreas G.; Todo, Satoru; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation is often the only alternative form of treatment for patients dependent on total parenteral nutrition for survival. Although a limited number of intestinal transplantations have been performed, results with FK 506 immunosuppression are comparable to those for other organ transplants. The impact of successful intestinal transplantation on gastroenterology will likely be similar to the impact of kidney and liver transplantation on nephrology and hepatology. PMID:7515221

  11. Surgical management and autologous intestinal reconstruction in short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hommel, Matthijs J; van Baren, Robertine; Haveman, Jan Willem

    2016-04-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a serious condition with considerable morbidity and mortality. When treatment with parenteral nutrition fails and life-threatening complications occur, autologous intestinal reconstruction (AIR) should be considered before intestinal transplantation (ITx). Single or combined ITx should be reserved for patients with severe liver disease and as last resort in the treatment of SBS. Longitudinal intestinal lengthening and tailoring (LILT) has proven its value in AIR, but its availability depends on the expertise of the surgeons. Serial transverse enteroplasty (STEP) has similar success rates as LILT and fewer patients progress to ITx. STEP is also applicable at small bowel dilatation in ultra-short bowel syndrome. The scope may be widened when duodenal dilatation can be treated as well. Spiral intestinal lengthening and tailoring (SILT) is a promising alternative. More research is needed to confirm these findings. Therefore we suggest an international data registry for all intestinal lengthening procedures. PMID:27086890

  12. Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and DMEM administration in a 3NP rat model of Huntington's disease: morphological and behavioral outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rossignol, Julien; Boyer, Cécile; Lévèque, Xavier; Fink, Kyle D; Thinard, Reynald; Blanchard, Frédéric; Dunbar, Gary L; Lescaudron, Laurent

    2011-03-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may offer a viable treatment for Huntington's disease (HD). We tested the efficacy of MSC transplants to reduce deficits in a 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP) rat model of HD. Five groups of rats (Sham, 3NP, 3NP+vehicle, 3NP+TP(low), 3NP+TP(high)), were given PBS or 3NP intraperitoneally, twice daily for 42 days. On day 28, rats in all groups except Sham and 3NP, received intrastriatal injections of either 200,000 MSCs (TP(low)), 400,000 (TP(high)) MSCs or DMEM (VH, the vehicle for transplantation). MSCs survived 72 days without inducing a strong inflammatory response from the striatum. Behavioral sparing was observed on tests of supported-hindlimb-retraction, unsupported-hindlimb-retraction, visual paw placement and stepping ability for 3NP+TP(low) rats and on the unsupported-hindlimb-retraction and rotarod tasks for 3NP+VH rats. Relative to 3NP controls, all treated groups were protected from 3NP-induced enlargement of the lateral ventricles. In vitro, MSCs expressed transcripts for numerous neurotrophic factors. In vivo, increased striatal labeling in BDNF, collagen type-I and fibronectin (but not GDNF or CNTF) was observed in the brains of MSC-transplanted rats but not in DMEM-treated rats. In addition, none of the transplanted MSCs expressed neural phenotypes. These findings suggest that factors other than neuronal replacement underlie the behavioral sparing observed in 3NP rats after MSC transplantation. PMID:21070819

  13. [Small-Bowel Cancer].

    PubMed

    Kagaya, Yuka; Sakamoto, Hirotsugu; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2016-05-01

    Diagnosis of small-bowel cancer has become easier thanks to the development of both balloon-assisted endoscopy and capsule endoscopy. Balloon-assisted endoscopy allows not only for observation of the deep intestine but also for biopsies and for establishing a histological diagnosis. Although endoscopic diagnosis is reported to improve the prognosis of small-bowel cancer by early detection, it is still difficult and the prognosis in general is poor. Surgery and chemotherapy protocols for this disease are similar to those for colon cancer. At present, the response rate to chemotherapy for small-bowel cancer is low. There is an urgent need in this patient population to establish a new diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm using balloon-assisted endoscopy and capsule endoscopy. PMID:27210079

  14. [Research progress of fecal microbiota transplantation].

    PubMed

    Dai, Ting; Tang, Tongyu

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal microbial ecosystem is the most complex and the largest micro-ecosystem of the mammals. The use of antibiotics can lead to a lot of major changes of the flora, making the intestinal flora damaged and impacted, even developing Clostridium difficile infection. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) as a special organ transplant therapy, which can rebuild the intestinal flora, has raised the clinical concerns. It has been used in the refractory Clostridium difficile, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, and some non-intestinal diseases related to the metabolic disorders. But this method of treatment has not become a normal treatment, and many clinicians and patients can not accept it. This paper reviews relevant literature in terms of origin, indications, mechanism, production process, current situation and future research, and provide a reference for the clinical application of the treatment of fecal microbiota transplantation. PMID:26211780

  15. Noninvasive evaluation of the vascular response to transplantation of alginate encapsulated islets using the dorsal skin-fold model.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Rahul; Arora, Rajan P; Alexander, Michael; White, Sean M; Lamb, Morgan W; Foster, Clarence E; Choi, Bernard; Lakey, Jonathan R T

    2014-01-01

    Alginate encapsulation reduces the risk of transplant rejection by evading immune-mediated cell injury and rejection; however, poor vascular perfusion results in graft failure. Since existing imaging models are incapable of quantifying the vascular response to biomaterial implants after transplantation, in this study, we demonstrate the use of in vivo laser speckle imaging (LSI) and wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) to monitor the microvascular environment surrounding biomaterial implants. The vascular response to two islet-containing biomaterial encapsulation devices, alginate microcapsules and a high-guluronate alginate sheet, was studied and compared after implantation into the mouse dorsal window chamber (N = 4 per implant group). Images obtained over a 14-day period using LSI and WiFI were analyzed using algorithms to quantify blood flow, hemoglobin oxygen saturation and vascular density. Using our method, we were able to monitor the changes in the peri-implant microvasculature noninvasively without the use of fluorescent dyes. Significant changes in blood flow, hemoglobin oxygen saturation and vascular density were noted as early as the first week post-transplant. The dorsal window chamber model enables comparison of host responses to transplanted biomaterials. Future experiments will study the effect of changes in alginate composition on the vascular and immune responses. PMID:24176195

  16. Noninvasive evaluation of the vascular response to transplantation of alginate encapsulated islets using the dorsal skin-fold model

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Rahul; Arora, Rajan P.; Alexander, Michael; White, Sean M.; Lamb, Morgan W.; Foster, Clarence E.; Choi, Bernard; Lakey, Jonathan R.T.

    2014-01-01

    Alginate encapsulation reduces the risk of transplant rejection by evading immune-mediated cell injury and rejection; however, poor vascular perfusion results in graft failure. Since existing imaging models are incapable of quantifying the vascular response to biomaterial implants after transplantation, in this study, we demonstrate the use of in vivo laser speckle imaging (LSI) and wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) to monitor the microvascular environment surrounding biomaterial implants. The vascular response to two islet-containing biomaterial encapsulation devices, alginate microcapsules and a high-guluronate alginate sheet, was studied and compared after implantation into the mouse dorsal window chamber (N = 4 per implant group). Images obtained over a 14-day period using LSI and WiFI were analyzed using algorithms to quantify blood flow, hemoglobin oxygen saturation and vascular density. Using our method, we were able to monitor the changes in the peri-implant microvasculature non-invasively without the use of fluorescent dyes. Significant changes in blood flow, hemoglobin oxygen saturation and vascular density were noted as early as the first week post-transplant. The dorsal window chamber model enables comparison of host responses to transplanted biomaterials. Future experiments will study the effect of changes in alginate composition on the vascular and immune responses. PMID:24176195

  17. The Need to Handicap the Recipient's Native Liver in the Rat Model of Heterotopic Auxiliary Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Praet, Marleen; De Hemptinne, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    In the rat model of heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation (HALTx), the opinion varies on whether and how the recipient's native liver should be handicapped. To avoid atrophy of the transplanted organ, in this study, two different handicaps were evaluated and their effects on post-operative animal survival and liver biology are described. With a sole portacaval shunt (group 1) all rats survived longer than 3 months. An additional handicap of the liver with either a 68% partial hepatectomy (68% PH) (group 2), or both a 68% PH and a common bile duct ligation (CBDL) (group 3) led to a 100% mortality within 2 days after surgery. When an auxiliary liver was transplanted to the rats handicapped with a 68% PH (group 4), serum Bilirubin and ALAT values were significantly lower than those handicapped with both a 68% PH and a CBDL (group 5). Autopsy and histology of the long-term survivors revealed the atrophy of the engrafted livers and the regeneration of the native livers in group 4, whereas it showed the opposite in group 5. Thus the various manipulations of the native liver do influence differently the post-transplant animal survival, serum liver biochemistry and the outcome of the engrafted liver in this rat model of HALTx. PMID:10468113

  18. In vivo identification, survival, and functional efficacy of transplanted hepatocytes in acute liver failure mice model by FISH using Y-chromosome probe.

    PubMed

    Krishna Vanaja, D; Sivakumar, B; Jesudasan, R A; Singh, L; Janardanasarma, M K; Habibullah, C M

    1998-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has excited much interest in lending temporary metabolic support to a failing liver following acute liver injury. The exact site from which they act and the clinical, biochemical, and histological changes in the recipient body following hepatocyte transplantation is yet to be worked out. The present study is an attempt to delineate location and function of transplanted hepatocytes and also the overall survival of these cells with a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique using a Y-chromosome-specific probe in a carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced mice model of fulminant hepatic failure. Fifty-five syngenic adult Swiss female mice of approximately the same age and body weight were divided into three groups. Group-1 (n = 15), which received mineral oil, served as a negative control. Group-II (n = 15) received CCl4 (3 mL/kg) 40% vol/vol in mineral oil, by gavage served as positive control for hepatic failure. Group-III (n = 25) received intrasplenic transplantation of syngenic single cell suspension of hepatocytes in Hanks medium, after 30 h of CCl4 administration. Male Swiss adult mice (n = 15) served as donors of hepatocytes. The overall survival of animals in groups I to III was 100, 0, and 70%, respectively, by 2 wk of the study period. Transplanted hepatocytes were identified by Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) staining and confirmed with a FISH technique using the Y-chromosome probe. The majority of exogenously transplanted hepatocytes were found in the liver and spleen sections even after 1 wk of hepatocyte transplantation. Transplanted cells were mostly found to be translocated into the sinusoids of the liver. Transplanted hepatocytes were found to be beneficial as a temporary liver support in a failing liver, significantly improving the survival of the animals. In the present study, the FISH technique was used to unequivocally distinguish the transplanted cells from the host, and thus describes a model for studying the

  19. A new rat model of auxiliary partial heterotopic liver transplantation with liver dual arterial blood supply

    PubMed Central

    QIAO, JIANLIANG; HAN, CHUNLEI; ZHANG, JUNJING; WANG, ZHIYONG; MENG, XINGKAI

    2015-01-01

    Auxiliary partial heterotopic liver transplantation (APHLT) with portal vein arterialization is a valuable procedure to be considered in the treatment of patients with acute liver failure and metabolic liver diseases. The aim of this study was to develop a new rat model of APHLT with liver dual arterial blood supply (LDABS). A total of 20 rats were used. The donor liver was resected, and the celiac trunk was reserved. Left and medial hepatic lobes accounting for 70% of the liver mass were removed en bloc and the suprahepatic caval vein was ligated simultaneously. Thus, 30% of the donor liver was obtained as the graft. Sleeve anastomosis of the graft portal vein and splenic artery were performed after narrowing the portal vein lumen through suturing. The right kidney of the recipient was removed, and sleeve anastomosis was performed between the celiac trunk of the graft and the right renal artery of the recipient. In addition, end-to-end anastomosis was performed between the infrahepatic caval vein of the graft and the right renal vein of the recipient. Following the reperfusion of the graft, the blood flow of the arterialized portal vein was controlled within the physiological range through suturing and narrowing under monitoring with an ultrasonic flowmeter. The bile duct of the graft was implanted into the duodenum of the recipient through an internal stent catheter. A 70% section of the native liver (left and medial hepatic lobes) was resected using bloodless hepatectomy. The mean operative duration was 154.5±16.4 min, and the warm and cold ischemia times of the graft were 8.1±1.1 min and 64.5±6.6 min, respectively. The blood flow of the arterialized portal vein to the graft was 1.8±0.3 ml/min/g liver weight. The success rate of model establishment (waking with post-surgical survival of >24 h) was 70% (7/10). Following successful model establishment, all rats survived 7 days post-surgery (100%; 7/7). The graft was found to be soft in texture and bright red

  20. State of deceased donor transplantation in India: A model for developing countries around the world.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Georgi; Vijayan, Madhusudan; Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Shroff, Sunil; Amalorpavanathan, Joseph; Yuvaraj, Anand; Nair, Sanjeev; Sundarrajan, Saravanan

    2016-06-24

    Renal replacement therapy (RRT) resources are scarce in India, with wide urban-rural and interstate disparities. The burden of end-stage renal disease is expected to increase further due to increasing prevalence of risk factors like diabetes mellitus. Renal transplantation, the best RRT modality, is increasing in popularity, due to improvements made in public education, the deceased donor transplantation (DDT) programme and the availability of free and affordable transplant services in government hospitals and certain non-governmental philanthropic organizations. There are about 120000 haemodialysis patients and 10000 chronic peritoneal dialysis patients in India, the majority of them waiting for a donor kidney. Shortage of organs, lack of transplant facilities and high cost of transplant in private facilities are major barriers for renal transplantation in India. The DDT rate in India is now 0.34 per million population, among the lowest in the world. Infrastructural development in its infancy and road traffic rules not being strictly implemented by the authorities, have led to road traffic accidents being very common in urban and rural India. Many patients are declared brain dead on arrival and can serve as potential organ donors. The DDT programme in the state of Tamil Nadu has met with considerable success and has brought down the incidence of organ trade. Government hospitals in Tamil Nadu, with a population of 72 million, provide free transplantation facilities for the underprivileged. Public private partnership has played an important role in improving organ procurement rates, with the help of trained transplant coordinators in government hospitals. The DDT programmes in the southern states of India (Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Pondicherry) are advancing rapidly with mutual sharing due to public private partnership providing vital organs to needy patients. Various health insurance programmes rolled out by the governments in the southern states are effective in

  1. State of deceased donor transplantation in India: A model for developing countries around the world

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Georgi; Vijayan, Madhusudan; Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Shroff, Sunil; Amalorpavanathan, Joseph; Yuvaraj, Anand; Nair, Sanjeev; Sundarrajan, Saravanan

    2016-01-01

    Renal replacement therapy (RRT) resources are scarce in India, with wide urban-rural and interstate disparities. The burden of end-stage renal disease is expected to increase further due to increasing prevalence of risk factors like diabetes mellitus. Renal transplantation, the best RRT modality, is increasing in popularity, due to improvements made in public education, the deceased donor transplantation (DDT) programme and the availability of free and affordable transplant services in government hospitals and certain non-governmental philanthropic organizations. There are about 120000 haemodialysis patients and 10000 chronic peritoneal dialysis patients in India, the majority of them waiting for a donor kidney. Shortage of organs, lack of transplant facilities and high cost of transplant in private facilities are major barriers for renal transplantation in India. The DDT rate in India is now 0.34 per million population, among the lowest in the world. Infrastructural development in its infancy and road traffic rules not being strictly implemented by the authorities, have led to road traffic accidents being very common in urban and rural India. Many patients are declared brain dead on arrival and can serve as potential organ donors. The DDT programme in the state of Tamil Nadu has met with considerable success and has brought down the incidence of organ trade. Government hospitals in Tamil Nadu, with a population of 72 million, provide free transplantation facilities for the underprivileged. Public private partnership has played an important role in improving organ procurement rates, with the help of trained transplant coordinators in government hospitals. The DDT programmes in the southern states of India (Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Pondicherry) are advancing rapidly with mutual sharing due to public private partnership providing vital organs to needy patients. Various health insurance programmes rolled out by the governments in the southern states are effective in

  2. Cyclosporine pharmacokinetics in pancreas transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Munda, R; Schroeder, T J; Pedersen, S A; Clardy, C W; Wadhwa, N K; Myre, S A; Stephens, G W; Pesce, A J; Alexander, J W; First, M R

    1988-04-01

    Ten CsA pharmacokinetic studies were performed on five pancreas transplant recipients to determine proper doses and dosing intervals. These cadaver pancreas transplants were performed with exocrine ductal drainage into the urinary tract through a bladder anastomosis in four cases and into the bowel in one case. Four CsA pharmacokinetic studies were performed on diabetic renal transplant recipients and an additional six studies were performed while with pancreas transplant patients taking metoclopramide in an effort to enhance absorption of CsA. Mean CsA dose was 3.7 mg/kg/dose (range 2.1 to 7.5 mg/kg/dose). All patients but one were on twice daily dosing intervals yielding an average daily dose of 7.4 mg/kg/d. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were used. The adequacy of a 1-, 2-, or 3-exponential model was determined by breakpoint analysis of the log concentration v time curve using the F statistic. The terminal rate constant was calculated by nonlinear regression analysis. The AUC and AUMC were calculated by the trapezoidal method with exponential extrapolation and these were used to calculate the MRT and Vdss. The unknown fractional absorption, F, was used to correct the oral data. The average CsA concentration maximum (Cmax) was 528 ng/mL with an average time to maximum concentration (Tmax) of 4.7 hours, a mean residence time of 7.75 hours, with a Vdss/%F of 9.61 L/kg in the pancreas transplant recipients. Additional studies of six patients receiving metoclopramide with CsA revealed an average Cmax of 723 ng/mL, an average Tmax of 2.3 hours, an average MRT of 6.08 hours, and an average Vdss/%F of 5.7% L/kg. These results indicate that coexistent gastroparesis in diabetic recipients of either pancreatic or renal transplants may result in reduced bioavailability of CsA. PMID:3284095

  3. Hair transplantation.

    PubMed

    Avram, Marc R

    2012-12-01

    Hair transplantation is a purely dermatologic surgical procedure that dermatologists should be able to perform in appropriate candidates with hair loss. Hair transplantation techniques performed in the 1960s through the 1990s utilized large grafts that created an unfortunate public image of unnatural-appearing transplanted hair. Over the last 15 years, hair transplantation has been performed using follicular units to create consistently natural-looking transplanted hair in both men and women. This article provides an overview of candidate selection and state-of-the-art techniques for performing hair transplantation. PMID:23409484

  4. Embryonic stem cells derived neuron transplantation recovery in models of parkinsonism in relation to severity of the disorder in rats.

    PubMed

    Haobam, Reena; Tripathy, Debasmita; Kaidery, Navneet A; Mohanakumar, Kochupurackal P

    2015-04-01

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)- and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced hemi-parkinsonism was investigated in relation to the severity of the disorder in terms of behavioral disability and nigral neuronal loss and recovery regarding the number of stem cell-derived neurons transplanted in the striatum. Intra-median forebrain bundle infusion of the parkinsonian neurotoxins and intra-striatal transplantation of differentiated embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were carried out by rat brain stereotaxic surgery. The severity of the disease was determined using the number of amphetamine- or apomorphine-induced rotations, striatal dopamine levels as estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-electrochemistry, and the number of surviving tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Rats that received unilateral infusion of 6-OHDA or MPP(+) responded with dose-dependent, unilateral bias in turning behavior when amphetamine or apomorphine was administered. Rotational asymmetry in both models correlated significantly well with the loss in the number of nigral dopaminergic neurons and striatal dopamine depletion. Transplantation of 2×10(5) differentiated murine ESCs revealed remarkably similar kinds of recovery in both animal models. The survival of the grafted dopaminergic cells in the striatum was better in animals with low-severity parkinsonism, but poor in the animals with severe parkinsonism. Amphetamine-induced rotational recovery correlated positively with an increasing number of cells transplanted in animals with uniform nigral neuronal lesion. These results suggest that disease severity is an important factor for determining the number of cells to be transplanted in parkinsonian rats for desirable recovery, which may be true in clinical conditions too. PMID:25546608

  5. Subretinal transplantation of putative retinal pigment epithelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells in rat retinal degeneration model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Un Chul; Cho, Myung Soo; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Sang Jin; Ku, Seung-Yup; Choi, Young Min; Moon, Shin Yong

    2011-01-01

    Objective To differentiate the human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in the defined culture condition and determine its therapeutic potential for the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. Methods The embryoid bodies were formed from hESCs and attached on the matrigel coated culture dishes. The neural structures consisting neural precursors were selected and expanded to form rosette structures. The mechanically isolated neural rosettes were differentiated into pigmented cells in the media comprised of N2 and B27. Expression profiles of markers related to RPE development were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining. Dissociated putative RPE cells (105 cells/5 µL) were transplanted into the subretinal space of rat retinal degeneration model induced by intravenous sodium iodate injection. Animals were sacrificed at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after transplantation, and immnohistochemistry study was performed to verify the survival of the transplanted cells. Results The putative RPE cells derived from hESC showed characteristics of the human RPE cells morphologically and expressed molecular markers and associated with RPE fate. Grafted RPE cells were found to survive in the subretinal space up to 4 weeks after transplantation, and the expression of RPE markers was confirmed with immunohistochemistry. Conclusion Transplanted RPE cells derived from hESC in the defined culture condition successfully survived and migrated within subretinal space of rat retinal degeneration model. These results support the feasibility of the hESC derived RPE cells for cell-based therapies for retinal degenerative disease. PMID:22384445

  6. Embryonic Stem Cells Derived Neuron Transplantation Recovery in Models of Parkinsonism in Relation to Severity of the Disorder in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Haobam, Reena; Tripathy, Debasmita; Kaidery, Navneet A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)- and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced hemi-parkinsonism was investigated in relation to the severity of the disorder in terms of behavioral disability and nigral neuronal loss and recovery regarding the number of stem cell–derived neurons transplanted in the striatum. Intra-median forebrain bundle infusion of the parkinsonian neurotoxins and intra-striatal transplantation of differentiated embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were carried out by rat brain stereotaxic surgery. The severity of the disease was determined using the number of amphetamine- or apomorphine-induced rotations, striatal dopamine levels as estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-electrochemistry, and the number of surviving tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Rats that received unilateral infusion of 6-OHDA or MPP+ responded with dose-dependent, unilateral bias in turning behavior when amphetamine or apomorphine was administered. Rotational asymmetry in both models correlated significantly well with the loss in the number of nigral dopaminergic neurons and striatal dopamine depletion. Transplantation of 2×105 differentiated murine ESCs revealed remarkably similar kinds of recovery in both animal models. The survival of the grafted dopaminergic cells in the striatum was better in animals with low-severity parkinsonism, but poor in the animals with severe parkinsonism. Amphetamine-induced rotational recovery correlated positively with an increasing number of cells transplanted in animals with uniform nigral neuronal lesion. These results suggest that disease severity is an important factor for determining the number of cells to be transplanted in parkinsonian rats for desirable recovery, which may be true in clinical conditions too. PMID:25546608

  7. Validation of the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease Score Criteria in Urgent Liver Transplantation for Acute Flare Up of Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Chen; Lee, Ching-Song; Wang, Yu-Chao; Cheng, Chih-Hsien; Wu, Tsung-Han; Lee, Chen-Fang; Soong, Ruey-Shyang; Chang, Ming-Ling; Wu, Ting-Jung; Chou, Hong-Shiue; Chan, Kun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute flare up of hepatitis B in noncirrhotic liver with rapid liver function deterioration is a critical condition. This flare up of hepatitis B may be subsided under medical treatments, otherwise urgent liver transplantation is needed. However, the necessity of urgent liver transplantation is hard to decide. In this institute, the indications of urgent liver transplantation for acute flare up of hepatitis B in noncirrhotic liver were settled according to the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores: once upon MELD scores ≥35 (criterion 1) or MELD score < 35 at beginning and increased in the subsequent 1 to 2 weeks (criterion 2). This study was to examine whether MELD score criteria for liver transplantation were valid in such an urgent condition. Eighty-three patients having acute flare up of hepatitis B virus with total bilirubin ≥17.5 mg/dL were included in this study. Among 83 patients, 20 patients met criterion 1. Five patients were transplanted and 15 patients died of liver failure with a median survival of 17 days. Fifty-one patients met criterion 2. Nineteen were transplanted, 30 patients died of liver failure with a median survival of 23.5 days, and 2 patients recovered from this critical condition. The other 12 patients did not meet criteria 1 and 2, and urgent liver transplantation was spared although 5 patients needed liver transplantation in subsequent 2 to 3 months. Therefore, the sensitivity of MELD score criteria for urgent liver transplantation was 100% and specificity was 85.7%. In conclusion, determination of urgent liver transplantation for hepatitis B with acute liver failure is crucial. MELD score criteria are valid to make a decision of urgent liver transplantation for hepatitis B patients with acute flare up and liver failure. PMID:27258492

  8. Validation of the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease Score Criteria in Urgent Liver Transplantation for Acute Flare Up of Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Chen; Lee, Ching-Song; Wang, Yu-Chao; Cheng, Chih-Hsien; Wu, Tsung-Han; Lee, Chen-Fang; Soong, Ruey-Shyang; Chang, Ming-Ling; Wu, Ting-Jung; Chou, Hong-Shiue; Chan, Kun-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Acute flare up of hepatitis B in noncirrhotic liver with rapid liver function deterioration is a critical condition. This flare up of hepatitis B may be subsided under medical treatments, otherwise urgent liver transplantation is needed. However, the necessity of urgent liver transplantation is hard to decide. In this institute, the indications of urgent liver transplantation for acute flare up of hepatitis B in noncirrhotic liver were settled according to the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores: once upon MELD scores ≥35 (criterion 1) or MELD score < 35 at beginning and increased in the subsequent 1 to 2 weeks (criterion 2). This study was to examine whether MELD score criteria for liver transplantation were valid in such an urgent condition. Eighty-three patients having acute flare up of hepatitis B virus with total bilirubin ≥17.5 mg/dL were included in this study. Among 83 patients, 20 patients met criterion 1. Five patients were transplanted and 15 patients died of liver failure with a median survival of 17 days. Fifty-one patients met criterion 2. Nineteen were transplanted, 30 patients died of liver failure with a median survival of 23.5 days, and 2 patients recovered from this critical condition. The other 12 patients did not meet criteria 1 and 2, and urgent liver transplantation was spared although 5 patients needed liver transplantation in subsequent 2 to 3 months. Therefore, the sensitivity of MELD score criteria for urgent liver transplantation was 100% and specificity was 85.7%. In conclusion, determination of urgent liver transplantation for hepatitis B with acute liver failure is crucial. MELD score criteria are valid to make a decision of urgent liver transplantation for hepatitis B patients with acute flare up and liver failure. PMID:27258492

  9. Osteoarthritis prevention and meniscus regeneration induced by transplantation of mesenchymal stem cell sheet in a rat meniscal defect model

    PubMed Central

    QI, YIYING; CHEN, GUANGNAN; FENG, GANG

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is a potential therapy for meniscus regeneration. However, when using single cell suspension injection, there is frequently a significant loss of cells, with only a small percentage of cells remaining at the target site. This issue may be solved with the use of MSC sheets. In the present study, we investigated whether the use of MSC sheets were able to regenerate the meniscus effectively in a rat meniscectomized model. The anterior half of the medial meniscus in 10 rats was excised and an MSC sheet was transplanted in the MSC sheet treatment group, while untreated rats served as the control. After 4 and 8 weeks, the knee joints were examined by gross and histological observation. Histological observation revealed that the anterior portion of meniscus was similar to the native tissue, showing typical fibrochondrocytes surrounded by richer extracellular matrix in the MSC sheet group. In addition, predominant collagen-rich matrix bridging the interface was observed and the neo-meniscus integrated well with its host meniscus. Furthermore, degenerative changes of tibial plateau and femoral condyle occurred in the two groups. MSC sheet transplantation alleviated the degenerative changes efficiently. In conclusion, transplantation of MSC sheets may efficiently promote meniscus regeneration, as well as inhibit the progression of osteoarthritis in knee joints. PMID:27347022

  10. Neural stem cell transplantation enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Gu, Guo-Jun; Shen, Xing; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Gang-Min; Wang, Pei-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, especially a defect in mitochondrial biogenesis, is an early and prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies demonstrated that the number of mitochondria is significantly reduced in susceptible hippocampal neurons from AD patients. Neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation in AD-like mice can compensate for the neuronal loss resulting from amyloid-beta protein deposition. The effects of NSC transplantation on mitochondrial biogenesis and cognitive function in AD-like mice, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we injected NSCs or vehicle into 12-month-old amyloid precursor protein (APP)/PS1 transgenic mice, a mouse model of AD-like pathology. The effects of NSC transplantation on cognitive function, the amount of mitochondrial DNA, the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors and mitochondria-related proteins, and mitochondrial morphology were investigated. Our results show that in NSC-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-NSC) mice, the cognitive function, number of mitochondria, and expression of mitochondria-related proteins, specifically the mitochondrial fission factors (dynamin-related protein 1 [Drp1] and fission 1 [Fis1]) and the mitochondrial fusion factor optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), were significantly increased compared with those in age-matched vehicle-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-Veh) mice, whereas the expression of mitochondrial fusion factors mitofusion 1 (Mfn1) and Mfn2 was significantly decreased. These data indicate that NSC transplantation may enhance mitochondria biogenesis and further rescue cognitive deficits in AD-like mice. PMID:25582749

  11. Adipose-derived stromal cell autologous transplantation ameliorates pulmonary arterial hypertension induced by shunt flow in rat models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Liu, Ruifang; Cao, Guangqing; Sun, Hourong; Wang, Xuping; Wu, Shuming

    2011-06-01

    Hyperkinetic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) severely influences the success of operation for congenital heart disease and deteriorates the prognosis of disease. Adipose-derived stromal cell (ADSC) is a good alternative multipotent stem cell for regeneration medicine. PAH rat models were established by arteriovenous shunt and ADSCs were isolated, cultured, and labeled in vitro. Twelve weeks after shunt operation, rats received an injection of 5 × 10(7) ADSCs. Two weeks after transplantation, hemodynamic abnormality induced by the shunt flow and the hypertrophy of right ventricle were reversed, which was confirmed by invasive measurement and echocardiography examination. The PAH rats receiving cell transplantation demonstrated decreased remodeling of small arteries in the lung; immunohistochemistry analysis showed augmented expression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and increased number of pulmonary small arteries. Western blot and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction indicated that the protein and mRNA levels of HGF and endothelial nitric oxide synthase increased, respectively, in the lung after cell transplantation. Our results suggested that ADSC transplantation can ameliorate PAH induced by shunt flow by enhancing the expression of HGF and subsequently promoting angiogenesis in the injured lung tissue. PMID:20828291

  12. Primordial Follicle Transplantation within Designer Biomaterial Grafts Produce Live Births in a Mouse Infertility Model

    PubMed Central

    Kniazeva, E.; Hardy, A. N.; Boukaidi, S. A.; Woodruff, T. K.; Jeruss, J. S.; Shea, L. D.

    2015-01-01

    The gonadotoxic effects of chemotherapy and radiation may result in premature ovarian failure in premenopausal oncology patients. Although autotransplantation of ovarian tissue has led to successful live births, reintroduction of latent malignant cells inducing relapse is a significant concern. In this report, we investigated the design of biomaterial grafts for transplantation of isolated ovarian follicles as a means to preserve fertility. Primordial and primary ovarian follicles from young female mice were extracted and encapsulated into biomaterials for subsequent transplantation into adult mice. Among the formulations tested, aggregated follicles encapsulated within fibrin had enhanced survival and integration with the host tissue following transplantation relative to the fibrin-alginate and fibrin-collagen composites. All mice transplanted with fibrin-encapsulated follicles resumed cycling, and live births were achieved only for follicles transplanted within VEGF-loaded fibrin beads. The extent to which these procedures reduce the presence of metastatic breast cancer cells among the isolated follicles was evaluated, with significantly reduced numbers of cancer cells present relative to intact ovaries. This ability to obtain live births by transplanting isolated primordial and primary follicles, while also reducing the risk of re-seeding disease relative to ovarian tissue transplantation, may ultimately provide a means to preserve fertility in premenopausal oncology patients. PMID:26633657

  13. Primordial Follicle Transplantation within Designer Biomaterial Grafts Produce Live Births in a Mouse Infertility Model.

    PubMed

    Kniazeva, E; Hardy, A N; Boukaidi, S A; Woodruff, T K; Jeruss, J S; Shea, L D

    2015-01-01

    The gonadotoxic effects of chemotherapy and radiation may result in premature ovarian failure in premenopausal oncology patients. Although autotransplantation of ovarian tissue has led to successful live births, reintroduction of latent malignant cells inducing relapse is a significant concern. In this report, we investigated the design of biomaterial grafts for transplantation of isolated ovarian follicles as a means to preserve fertility. Primordial and primary ovarian follicles from young female mice were extracted and encapsulated into biomaterials for subsequent transplantation into adult mice. Among the formulations tested, aggregated follicles encapsulated within fibrin had enhanced survival and integration with the host tissue following transplantation relative to the fibrin-alginate and fibrin-collagen composites. All mice transplanted with fibrin-encapsulated follicles resumed cycling, and live births were achieved only for follicles transplanted within VEGF-loaded fibrin beads. The extent to which these procedures reduce the presence of metastatic breast cancer cells among the isolated follicles was evaluated, with significantly reduced numbers of cancer cells present relative to intact ovaries. This ability to obtain live births by transplanting isolated primordial and primary follicles, while also reducing the risk of re-seeding disease relative to ovarian tissue transplantation, may ultimately provide a means to preserve fertility in premenopausal oncology patients. PMID:26633657

  14. Short Bowel Syndrome: A Review of Management Options

    PubMed Central

    Seetharam, Prasad; Rodrigues, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    Extensive resection of the intestinal tract frequently results in inadequate digestion and/or absorption of nutrients, a condition known as short bowel syndrome (SBS). This challenging condition demands a dedicated multidisciplinary team effort to overcome the morbidity and mortality in these patients. With advances in critical care management, more and more patients survive the immediate morbidity of massive intestinal resection to present with SBS. Several therapies, including parenteral nutrition (PN), bowel rehabilitation and surgical procedures to reconstruct bowel have been used in these patients. Novel dietary approaches, pharmacotherapy and timely surgical interventions have all added to the improved outcome in these patients. However, these treatments only partially correct the underlying problem of reduced bowel function and have limited success resulting in 30% to 50% mortality rates. However, increasing experience and encouraging results of intestinal transplantation has added a new dimension to the management of SBS. Literature available on SBS is exhaustive but inconclusive. We conducted a review of scientific literature and electronic media with search terms 'short bowel syndrome, advances in SBS and SBS’ and attempted to give a comprehensive account on this topic with emphasis on the recent advances in its management. PMID:21727727

  15. Benign small bowel tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J M; Melvin, D B; Gray, G; Thorbjarnarson, B

    1975-01-01

    The clinical record and histologic sections of 84 cases of benign small bowel tumor are reviewed. Manifestations of systemic diseases, congenital anomalies, and lesions of either the ileocecal valve or periampullary region were excluded. In the same time span there were 96 small bowel malignancies. Clinical presentation, pathologic findings, management and result are compared to the collected published experience of about 2000 cases. There were 36 leiomyomas, 22 lipomas, 9 angiomas, 6 neurofibromas and 4 fibromas. Thirty-six men and 48 women were affected; the majority in their fifth and sixth decade. Seventy-eight were operative and 6 autopsy diagnoses. The most common symptom was obstruction (42%) followed by hemorrhage (34%) and pain (22%), relative frequency differing for the various specific tumors. There were rarely significant physical findings. A diagnosis of small bowel tumor was made radiologically in 30 patients. Because of the nonspecificity of other signs and symptoms, an acute awareness of the possibility of small bowel tumor is mandatory for preoperative anticipation of the diagnosis. Local resection was performed in all with no deaths or significant postoperative complications. PMID:1078626

  16. Development and Validation of Predictive Models of Cardiac Mortality and Transplantation in Resynchronization Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo Arrais; Pereira, Francisca Tatiana Moreira; Abreu, José Sebastião; Lima, José Wellington O.; Monteiro, Marcelo de Paula Martins; Rocha Neto, Almino Cavalcante; Goés, Camilla Viana Arrais; Farias, Ana Gardênia P.; Rodrigues Sobrinho, Carlos Roberto Martins; Quidute, Ana Rosa Pinto; Scanavacca, Maurício Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background 30-40% of cardiac resynchronization therapy cases do not achieve favorable outcomes. Objective This study aimed to develop predictive models for the combined endpoint of cardiac death and transplantation (Tx) at different stages of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Methods Prospective observational study of 116 patients aged 64.8 ± 11.1 years, 68.1% of whom had functional class (FC) III and 31.9% had ambulatory class IV. Clinical, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic variables were assessed by using Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier curves. Results The cardiac mortality/Tx rate was 16.3% during the follow-up period of 34.0 ± 17.9 months. Prior to implantation, right ventricular dysfunction (RVD), ejection fraction < 25% and use of high doses of diuretics (HDD) increased the risk of cardiac death and Tx by 3.9-, 4.8-, and 5.9-fold, respectively. In the first year after CRT, RVD, HDD and hospitalization due to congestive heart failure increased the risk of death at hazard ratios of 3.5, 5.3, and 12.5, respectively. In the second year after CRT, RVD and FC III/IV were significant risk factors of mortality in the multivariate Cox model. The accuracy rates of the models were 84.6% at preimplantation, 93% in the first year after CRT, and 90.5% in the second year after CRT. The models were validated by bootstrapping. Conclusion We developed predictive models of cardiac death and Tx at different stages of CRT based on the analysis of simple and easily obtainable clinical and echocardiographic variables. The models showed good accuracy and adjustment, were validated internally, and are useful in the selection, monitoring and counseling of patients indicated for CRT. PMID:26559987

  17. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Pancreas Transplantation Some patients with type 1 diabetes have ... weigh the potential benefits and risks. Benefits of Pancreas Transplants You may be able to maintain a ...

  18. Lung transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/pubmed/20675678 . Kotloff RM, Keshavjee S. Lung transplantation. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst MD, et ... 58. Solomon M, Grasemann H, Keshavjee S. Pediatric lung transplantation. Pediatr Clin North Am . 2010; 57(2):375- ...

  19. Kidney transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... series References Barry JM, Conlin MJ. In: Renal transplantation. Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Kidney Transplantation Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  20. Liver transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... series References Keefe EB. Hepatic failure and liver transplantation. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ... 2011:chap 157. Martin P, Rosen HR. Liver transplantation. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. ...

  1. Pancreas transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver cells, where it can be used as fuel. In people with type 1 diabetes , the pancreas ... and kidney for the rest of your life. Alternative Names Transplant - pancreas; Transplantation - pancreas Images Endocrine glands ...

  2. Hair transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... this procedure: Scarring Unnatural-looking tufts of new hair growth It is possible that the transplanted hair will ... Most hair transplants result in excellent hair growth within several ... may be needed to create best results. The replaced hairs are ...

  3. Organ Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... donors to recipients to reduce the risk of transplant rejection. Rejection happens when your immune system attacks the new organ. If you have a transplant, you must take drugs the rest of your ...

  4. Generation of a novel, multi-stage, progressive, and transplantable model of plasma cell neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Takashi; Hatlen, Megan A.; Lossos, Chen; Ndiaye-Lobry, Delphine; Deblasio, Anthony; Murata, Kazunori; Fleisher, Martin; Cortizas, Elena M.; Verdun, Ramiro E.; Petrini, John; Nimer, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell neoplasm with an extremely variable clinical course. Animal models are needed to better understand its pathophysiology and for preclinical testing of potential therapeutic agents. Hematopoietic cells expressing the hypermorphic Rad50s allele show hematopoietic failure, which can be mitigated by the lack of a transcription factor, Mef/Elf4. However, we find that 70% of Mef−/−Rad50s/s mice die from multiple myeloma or other plasma cell neoplasms. These mice initially show an abnormal plasma cell proliferation and monoclonal protein production, and then develop anemia and a decreased bone mineral density. Tumor cells can be serially transplanted and according to array CGH and whole exome sequencing, the pathogenesis of plasma cell neoplasms in these mice is not linked to activation of a specific oncogene, or inactivation of a specific tumor suppressor. This model recapitulates the systemic manifestations of human plasma cell neoplasms, and implicates cooperativity between the Rad50s and Mef/Elf4 pathways in initiating myelomagenic mutations that promote plasma cell transformation. PMID:26961797

  5. Pediatric Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Ariel U.; Neaga, Andreea; West, Brady; Safran, Jared; Brown, Pamela; Btaiche, Imad; Kuzma-O'Reilly, Barbara; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine predictors of survival and of weaning off parenteral nutrition (PN) in pediatric short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients. Summary Background Data: Pediatric SBS carries extensive morbidity and high mortality, but factors believed to predict survival or weaning from PN have been based on limited studies. This study reviews outcomes of a large number of SBS infants and identifies predictors of success. Methods: Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis was conducted on 80 pediatric SBS patients. Primary outcome was survival; secondary outcome was ability to wean off PN. Nonsignificant covariates were eliminated. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Over a mean of 5.1 years of follow-up, survival was 58 of 80 (72.5%) and 51 weaned off PN (63.8%). Cholestasis (conjugated bilirubin ≥2.5 mg/dL) was the strongest predictor of mortality (relative risk [RR] 22.7, P = 0.005). Although absolute small bowel length was only slightly predictive, percentage of normal bowel length (for a given infant's gestational age) was strongly predictive of mortality (if <10% of normal length, RR of death was 5.7, P = 0.003) and of weaning PN (if ≥10% of normal, RR of weaning PN was 11.8, P = 0.001). Presence of the ileocecal valve (ICV) also strongly predicted weaning PN (RR 3.9, P < 0.0005); however, ICV was not predictive of survival. Conclusions: Cholestasis and age-adjusted small bowel length are the major predictors of mortality in pediatric SBS. Age-adjusted small bowel length and ICV are the major predictors of weaning from PN. These data permit better prediction of outcomes of pediatric SBS, which may help to direct future management of these challenging patients. PMID:16135926

  6. Evaluation of stem cell reserve using serial bone marrow transplantation and competitive repopulation in a murine model of chronic hemolytic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Maggio-Price, L.; Wolf, N.S.; Priestley, G.V.; Pietrzyk, M.E.; Bernstein, S.E.

    1988-09-01

    Serial transplantation and competitive repopulation were used to evaluate any loss of self-replicative capacity of bone marrow stem cells in a mouse model with increased and persistent hemopoietic demands. Congenic marrows from old control and from young and old mice with hereditary spherocytic anemia (sphha/sphha) were serially transplanted at 35-day intervals into normal irradiated recipients. Old anemic marrow failed or reverted to recipient karyotype at a mean of 3.5 transplants, and young anemic marrow reverted at a mean of 4.0 transplants, whereas controls did so at a mean of 5.0 transplants. In a competitive assay in which a mixture of anemic and control marrow was transplanted, the anemic marrow persisted to 10 months following transplantation; anemic marrow repopulation was greater if anemic marrow sex matched with the host. It is possible that lifelong stress of severe anemia decreases stem cell reserve in the anemic sphha/sphha mouse marrow. However, marginal differences in serial transplantation number and the maintenance of anemic marrow in a competition assay would suggest that marrow stem cells, under prolonged stress, are capable of exhibiting good repopulating and self-replicating abilities.

  7. A medaka model of cancer allowing direct observation of transplanted tumor cells in vivo at a cellular-level resolution.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Maruyama, Kouichi; Takenaka, Hikaru; Furukawa, Takako; Saga, Tsuneo

    2009-08-18

    The recent success with small fish as an animal model of cancer with the aid of fluorescence technique has attracted cancer modelers' attention because it would be possible to directly visualize tumor cells in vivo in real time. Here, we report a medaka model capable of allowing the observation of various cell behaviors of transplanted tumor cells, such as cell proliferation and metastasis, which were visualized easily in vivo. We established medaka melanoma (MM) cells stably expressing GFP and transplanted them into nonirradiated and irradiated medaka. The tumor cells were grown at the injection sites in medaka, and the spatiotemporal changes were visualized under a fluorescence stereoscopic microscope at a cellular-level resolution, and even at a single-cell level. Tumor dormancy and metastasis were also observed. Interestingly, in irradiated medaka, accelerated tumor growth and metastasis of the transplanted tumor cells were directly visualized. Our medaka model provides an opportunity to visualize in vivo tumor cells "as seen in a culture dish" and would be useful for in vivo tumor cell biology. PMID:19666513

  8. A medaka model of cancer allowing direct observation of transplanted tumor cells in vivo at a cellular-level resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Maruyama, Kouichi; Takenaka, Hikaru; Furukawa, Takako; Saga, Tsuneo

    2009-01-01

    The recent success with small fish as an animal model of cancer with the aid of fluorescence technique has attracted cancer modelers' attention because it would be possible to directly visualize tumor cells in vivo in real time. Here, we report a medaka model capable of allowing the observation of various cell behaviors of transplanted tumor cells, such as cell proliferation and metastasis, which were visualized easily in vivo. We established medaka melanoma (MM) cells stably expressing GFP and transplanted them into nonirradiated and irradiated medaka. The tumor cells were grown at the injection sites in medaka, and the spatiotemporal changes were visualized under a fluorescence stereoscopic microscope at a cellular-level resolution, and even at a single-cell level. Tumor dormancy and metastasis were also observed. Interestingly, in irradiated medaka, accelerated tumor growth and metastasis of the transplanted tumor cells were directly visualized. Our medaka model provides an opportunity to visualize in vivo tumor cells “as seen in a culture dish” and would be useful for in vivo tumor cell biology. PMID:19666513

  9. Organ Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... have to wait a long time for an organ transplant. Doctors must match donors to recipients to reduce the risk of transplant rejection. Rejection happens when your immune system attacks the new organ. If you have a transplant, you must take ...

  10. Telmisartan attenuates colon inflammation, oxidative perturbations and apoptosis in a rat model of experimental inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Arab, Hany H; Al-Shorbagy, Muhammad Y; Abdallah, Dalaal M; Nassar, Noha N

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has indicated the implication of angiotensin II in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) via its proinflammatory features. Telmisartan (TLM) is an angiotensin II receptor antagonist with marked anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions that mediated its cardio-, reno- and hepatoprotective actions. However, its impact on IBD has not been previously explored. Thus, we aimed to investigate the potential alleviating effects of TLM in tri-nitrobenezene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats. Pretreatment with TLM (10 mg/kg p.o.) attenuated the severity of colitis as evidenced by decrease of disease activity index (DAI), colon weight/length ratio, macroscopic damage, histopathological findings and leukocyte migration. TLM suppressed the inflammatory response via attenuation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity as a marker of neutrophil infiltration besides restoration of interleukin-10 (IL-10). TLM also suppressed mRNA and protein expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 and mRNA of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) proinflammatory genes with concomitant upregulation of PPAR-γ. The alleviation of TLM to colon injury was also associated with inhibition of oxidative stress as evidenced by suppression of lipid peroxides and nitric oxide (NO) besides boosting glutathione (GSH), total anti-oxidant capacity (TAC) and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). With respect to apoptosis, TLM downregulated the increased mRNA, protein expression and activity of caspase-3. It also suppressed the elevation of cytochrome c and Bax mRNA besides the upregulation of Bcl-2. Together, these findings highlight evidences for the beneficial effects of TLM in IBD which are mediated through modulation of colonic inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. PMID:24831514

  11. Chronic Psychological Stress Disrupted the Composition of the Murine Colonic Microbiota and Accelerated a Murine Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yohei; Arase, Sohei; Nagaoka, Noriko; Kawai, Mitsuhisa; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The effect of psychological stress on the gastrointestinal microbiota is widely recognized. Chronic psychological stress may be associated with increased disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, but the relationships among psychological stress, the gastrointestinal microbiota, and the severity of colitis is not yet fully understood. Here, we examined the impact of 12-week repeated water-avoidance stress on the microbiota of two inbred strains of T cell receptor alpha chain gene knockout mouse (background, BALB/c and C57BL/6) by means of next-generation sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. In both mouse strains, knockout of the T cell receptor alpha chain gene caused a loss of gastrointestinal microbial diversity and stability. Chronic exposure to repeated water-avoidance stress markedly altered the composition of the colonic microbiota of C57BL/6 mice, but not of BALB/c mice. In C57BL/6 mice, the relative abundance of genus Clostridium, some members of which produce the toxin phospholipase C, was increased, which was weakly positively associated with colitis severity, suggesting that expansion of specific populations of indigenous pathogens may be involved in the exacerbation of colitis. However, we also found that colitis was not exacerbated in mice with a relatively diverse microbiota even if their colonic microbiota contained an expanded phospholipase C-producing Clostridium population. Exposure to chronic stress also altered the concentration of free immunoglobulin A in colonic contents, which may be related to both the loss of bacterial diversity in the colonic microbiota and the severity of the colitis exacerbation. Together, these results suggest that long-term exposure to psychological stress induces dysbiosis in the immunodeficient mouse in a strain-specific manner and also that alteration of microbial diversity, which may be related to an altered pattern of immunoglobulin secretion in the gastrointestinal tract, might play a crucial role in the

  12. Chronic Psychological Stress Disrupted the Composition of the Murine Colonic Microbiota and Accelerated a Murine Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yohei; Arase, Sohei; Nagaoka, Noriko; Kawai, Mitsuhisa; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The effect of psychological stress on the gastrointestinal microbiota is widely recognized. Chronic psychological stress may be associated with increased disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, but the relationships among psychological stress, the gastrointestinal microbiota, and the severity of colitis is not yet fully understood. Here, we examined the impact of 12-week repeated water-avoidance stress on the microbiota of two inbred strains of T cell receptor alpha chain gene knockout mouse (background, BALB/c and C57BL/6) by means of next-generation sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. In both mouse strains, knockout of the T cell receptor alpha chain gene caused a loss of gastrointestinal microbial diversity and stability. Chronic exposure to repeated water-avoidance stress markedly altered the composition of the colonic microbiota of C57BL/6 mice, but not of BALB/c mice. In C57BL/6 mice, the relative abundance of genus Clostridium, some members of which produce the toxin phospholipase C, was increased, which was weakly positively associated with colitis severity, suggesting that expansion of specific populations of indigenous pathogens may be involved in the exacerbation of colitis. However, we also found that colitis was not exacerbated in mice with a relatively diverse microbiota even if their colonic microbiota contained an expanded phospholipase C-producing Clostridium population. Exposure to chronic stress also altered the concentration of free immunoglobulin A in colonic contents, which may be related to both the loss of bacterial diversity in the colonic microbiota and the severity of the colitis exacerbation. Together, these results suggest that long-term exposure to psychological stress induces dysbiosis in the immunodeficient mouse in a strain-specific manner and also that alteration of microbial diversity, which may be related to an altered pattern of immunoglobulin secretion in the gastrointestinal tract, might play a crucial role in the

  13. Combined model of the EBMT score modified model and the HCT-CI improves the stratification of high-risk patients undergoing unmanipulated haploidentical blood and marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Jun; Wang, Hong-Tao; Xu, Lan-Ping; Wang, Yu; Liu, Kai-Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Dai-Hong; Chen, Huan; Chen, Yu-Hong; Wang, Feng-Rong; Han, Wei-; Sun, Yu-Qian; Yan, Chen-Hua; Tang, Fei-Fei; Mo, Xiao-Dong; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-09-01

    Both European Group for blood and marrow transplantation risk score (EBMT score modified model) and hematopoietic cell transplantation comorbidity index (HCT-CI) are suitable for evaluating patients undergoing unmanipulated haploidentical blood and marrow transplantation (HBMT), while the predictive capacity of the combined model following haploidentical transplantation is still unknown. In this study, we calculated and validated 322 consecutive unmanipulated HBMT patients. Patients in groups with HCT-CI scores of 0 or 1-2 exhibited similar overall survival (OS), non-relapse mortality (NRM), and relapse rates, independent of their EBMT score modified model. In the group in which patients' HCT-CI scores were ≥3, patients with high EBMT score modified model showed lower OS (p = 0.003) and higher NRM (p = 0.001) than did patients with low EBMT score. In conclusion, this combined model can be used to predict outcomes and may improve the stratification of high-risk patients following unmanipulated HBMT. PMID:26857549

  14. Enhanced Ghrelin Levels and Hypothalamic Orexigenic AgRP and NPY Neuropeptide Expression in Models of Jejuno-Colonic Short Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Laura; Billiauws, Lore; Stan-Iuga, Bogdan; Ribeiro-Parenti, Lara; Jarry, Anne-Charlotte; Cavin, Jean-Baptiste; Cluzeaud, Françoise; Mayeur, Camille; Thomas, Muriel; Freund, Jean-Noël; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Le Gall, Maude; Bado, André; Joly, Francisca; Le Beyec, Johanne

    2016-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients developing hyperphagia have a better outcome. Gastrointestinal endocrine adaptations help to improve intestinal functions and food behaviour. We investigated neuroendocrine adaptations in SBS patients and rat models with jejuno-ileal (IR-JI) or jejuno-colonic (IR-JC) anastomosis with and without parenteral nutrition. Circulating levels of ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1, and GLP-2 were determined in SBS rat models and patients. Levels of mRNA for proglucagon, PYY and for hypothalamic neuropeptides were quantified by qRT-PCR in SBS rat models. Histology and immunostaining for Ki67, GLP-1 and PYY were performed in SBS rats. IR-JC rats, but not IR-JI, exhibited significantly higher crypt depths and number of Ki67-positive cells than sham. Fasting and/or postprandial plasma ghrelin and PYY concentrations were higher, or tend to be higher, in IR-JC rats and SBS-JC patients than in controls. Proglucagon and Pyy mRNA levels were significantly enhanced in IR-JC rats. Levels of mRNA coding hypothalamic orexigenic NPY and AgRP peptides were significantly higher in IR-JC than in sham rats. We demonstrate an increase of plasma ghrelin concentrations, major changes in hypothalamic neuropeptides levels and greater induction of PYY in SBS-JC rats and patients suggesting that jejuno-colonic continuity creates a peculiar environment promoting further gut-brain adaptations. PMID:27323884

  15. Enhanced Ghrelin Levels and Hypothalamic Orexigenic AgRP and NPY Neuropeptide Expression in Models of Jejuno-Colonic Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gillard, Laura; Billiauws, Lore; Stan-Iuga, Bogdan; Ribeiro-Parenti, Lara; Jarry, Anne-Charlotte; Cavin, Jean-Baptiste; Cluzeaud, Françoise; Mayeur, Camille; Thomas, Muriel; Freund, Jean-Noël; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Le Gall, Maude; Bado, André; Joly, Francisca; Le Beyec, Johanne

    2016-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients developing hyperphagia have a better outcome. Gastrointestinal endocrine adaptations help to improve intestinal functions and food behaviour. We investigated neuroendocrine adaptations in SBS patients and rat models with jejuno-ileal (IR-JI) or jejuno-colonic (IR-JC) anastomosis with and without parenteral nutrition. Circulating levels of ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1, and GLP-2 were determined in SBS rat models and patients. Levels of mRNA for proglucagon, PYY and for hypothalamic neuropeptides were quantified by qRT-PCR in SBS rat models. Histology and immunostaining for Ki67, GLP-1 and PYY were performed in SBS rats. IR-JC rats, but not IR-JI, exhibited significantly higher crypt depths and number of Ki67-positive cells than sham. Fasting and/or postprandial plasma ghrelin and PYY concentrations were higher, or tend to be higher, in IR-JC rats and SBS-JC patients than in controls. Proglucagon and Pyy mRNA levels were significantly enhanced in IR-JC rats. Levels of mRNA coding hypothalamic orexigenic NPY and AgRP peptides were significantly higher in IR-JC than in sham rats. We demonstrate an increase of plasma ghrelin concentrations, major changes in hypothalamic neuropeptides levels and greater induction of PYY in SBS-JC rats and patients suggesting that jejuno-colonic continuity creates a peculiar environment promoting further gut-brain adaptations. PMID:27323884

  16. Effects of Adoptive Transfer of Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells on Allograft Survival in Organ Transplantation Models: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Juan; Guo, Yingjia; Li, Shengfu; Long, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To dissect the efficacy of Tol-DC therapy with or without IS in multiple animal models of transplantation. Methods and Results. PubMed, Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for reviews published up to April 2015. Six systematic reviews and a total of 61 articles were finally included. Data were grouped by organ transplantation models and applied to meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis shows that Tol-DC therapy successfully prolonged allograft survival to varying extents in all except the islet transplantation models and with IS drugs further prolonged the survival of heart, skin, and islet allografts in mice, but not of heart allografts in rats. Compared with IS drugs alone, Tol-DC therapy with IS extended islet allograft survival in rats but failed to influence the survival of skin, small intestine, and heart allografts in rats or of heart and skin allografts in mice. Conclusion. Tol-DC therapy significantly prolonged multiple allograft survival and further prolonged survival with IS. However, standardized protocols for modification of Tol-DC should be established before its application in clinic. PMID:27547767

  17. A prognostic model predicting autologous transplantation outcomes in children, adolescents and young adults with Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Satwani, P; Ahn, K W; Carreras, J; Abdel-Azim, H; Cairo, M S; Cashen, A; Chen, A I; Cohen, J B; Costa, L J; Dandoy, C; Fenske, T S; Freytes, C O; Ganguly, S; Gale, R P; Ghosh, N; Hertzberg, M S; Hayashi, R J; Kamble, R T; Kanate, A S; Keating, A; Kharfan-Dabaja, M A; Lazarus, H M; Marks, D I; Nishihori, T; Olsson, R F; Prestidge, T D; Rolon, J M; Savani, B N; Vose, J M; Wood, W A; Inwards, D J; Bachanova, V; Smith, S M; Maloney, D G; Sureda, A; Hamadani, M

    2015-11-01

    Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AutoHCT) is a potentially curative treatment modality for relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). However, no large studies have evaluated pretransplant factors predictive of outcomes of AutoHCT in children, adolescents and young adults (CAYA, age <30 years). In a retrospective study, we analyzed 606 CAYA patients (median age 23 years) with relapsed/refractory HL who underwent AutoHCT between 1995 and 2010. The probabilities of PFS at 1, 5 and 10 years were 66% (95% confidence interval (CI): 62-70), 52% (95% CI: 48-57) and 47% (95% CI: 42-51), respectively. Multivariate analysis for PFS demonstrated that at the time of AutoHCT patients with Karnofsky/Lansky score ⩾90, no extranodal involvement and chemosensitive disease had significantly improved PFS. Patients with time from diagnosis to first relapse of <1 year had a significantly inferior PFS. A prognostic model for PFS was developed that stratified patients into low-, intermediate- and high-risk groups, predicting for 5-year PFS probabilities of 72% (95% CI: 64-80), 53% (95% CI: 47-59) and 23% (95% CI: 9-36), respectively. This large study identifies a group of CAYA patients with relapsed/refractory HL who are at high risk of progression after AutoHCT. Such patients should be targeted for novel therapeutic and/or maintenance approaches post-AutoHCT. PMID:26237164

  18. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Eliminates Clostridium difficile in a Murine Model of Relapsing Disease

    PubMed Central

    Seekatz, Anna M.; Theriot, Casey M.; Molloy, Caitlyn T.; Wozniak, Katherine L.; Bergin, Ingrid L.

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is of particular concern among health care-associated infections. The role of the microbiota in disease recovery is apparent given the success of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for recurrent CDI. Here, we present a murine model of CDI relapse to further define the microbiota recovery following FMT. Cefoperazone-treated mice were infected with C. difficile 630 spores and treated with vancomycin after development of clinical disease. Vancomycin treatment suppressed both C. difficile colonization and cytotoxin titers. However, C. difficile counts increased within 7 days of completing treatment, accompanied by relapse of clinical signs. The administration of FMT immediately after vancomycin cleared C. difficile and decreased cytotoxicity within 1 week. The effects of FMT on the gut microbiota community were detectable in recipients 1-day posttransplant. Conversely, mice not treated with FMT remained persistently colonized with high levels of C. difficile, and the gut microbiota in these mice persisted at low diversity. These results suggest that full recovery of colonization resistance against C. difficile requires the restoration of a specific community structure. PMID:26169276

  19. Photoacoustic imaging of angiogenesis in a subcutaneous islet transplant site in a murine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Pawlick, Rena; Bruni, Antonio; Rafiei, Yasmin; Pepper, Andrew R.; Gala-Lopez, Boris; Choi, Min; Malcolm, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J.; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2016-06-01

    Islet transplantation (IT) is an established clinical therapy for select patients with type-1 diabetes. Clinically, the hepatic portal vein serves as the site for IT. Despite numerous advances in clinical IT, limitations remain, including early islet cell loss posttransplant, procedural complications, and the inability to effectively monitor islet grafts. Hence, alternative sites for IT are currently being explored, with the subcutaneous space as one potential option. When left unmodified, the subcutaneous space routinely fails to promote successful islet engraftment. However, when employing the previously developed subcutaneous "deviceless" technique, a favorable microenvironment for islet survival and function is established. In this technique, an angiocatheter was temporarily implanted subcutaneously, which facilitated angiogenesis to promote subsequent islet engraftment. This technique has been employed in preclinical animal models, providing a sufficient means to develop techniques to monitor functional aspects of the graft such as angiogenesis. Here, we utilize photoacoustic imaging to track angiogenesis during the priming of the subcutaneous site by the implanted catheter at 1 to 4 weeks postcatheter. Quantitative analysis on vessel densities shows gradual growth of vasculature in the implant position. These results demonstrate the ability to track angiogenesis, thus facilitating a means to optimize and assess the pretransplant microenvironment.

  20. A new microvascular model for noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the transplanted kidney.

    PubMed

    Haug, C E; Shapiro, J I; Chan, L; Weil, R

    1988-03-01

    The cellular biology of graft rejection is not well understood. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy is a new noninvasive technique for the measurement of intracellular pH and relative amounts of phosphorus-containing compounds, such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), inorganic phosphate, phosphocreatine, and sugar phosphates, in any tissue from which a clear signal can be obtained. Biochemical analysis of such precision, without the need for tissue destruction, represents an unusual opportunity for analysis of in vivo cellular metabolism under varying conditions, including graft rejection. 31P NMR study of intra-abdominal viscera has not been feasible in most laboratories without laparotomy because of signal interference from abdominal wall muscle. In this study, to eliminate this interference, a rat kidney was transplanted to the groin, where it could be serially studied without overlying skeletal muscle. This new vascular technique was successful in 11 of 11 attempts and maintained normal serum creatinines in 10 chronic survivors after removal of both native kidneys. The 31P NMR spectroscopic signal from the groin kidney is clear and highly reproducible. This new microvascular model will make it possible to carry out noninvasive long-term spectroscopic studies that could potentially identify a reliable marker for allograft rejection. PMID:3278404

  1. Transplantation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells improves cardiac contractile function and electrical stability in a rat myocardial infarction model.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Milan; Fujita, Daiki; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Ichikawa, Hinako; Izawa, Atsushi; Hirose, Masamichi; Kashihara, Toshihide; Yamada, Mitsuhiko; Takahashi, Masafumi; Ikeda, Uichi; Shiba, Yuji

    2015-04-01

    The transplantation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) improves cardiac contractility after myocardial infarction (MI); however, little is known about the electrophysiological consequences of transplantation. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether the transplantation of ADSCs increases or decreases the incidence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT) in a rat model of MI. MI was induced experimentally by permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending artery of Lewis rats. ADSCs were harvested from GFP-transgenic rats, and were cultured until passage four. ADSCs (10×10(6)) resuspended in 100μL saline or pro-survival cocktail (PSC), which enhances cardiac graft survival, were injected directly into syngeneic rat hearts 1week after MI. The recipients of ADSCs suspended in PSC had a larger graft area compared with those receiving ASDCs suspended in saline at 1week post-transplantation (number of graft cells/section: 148.7±10.6 vs. 22.4±3.4, p<0.05, n=5/group). Thereafter, all ADSC recipients were transplanted with ASDCs in PSC. ADSCs were transplanted into infarcted hearts, and the mechanical and electrophysiological functions were assessed. Echocardiography revealed that ADSC recipients had improved contractile function compared with those receiving PSC vehicle (fractional shortening: 21.1±0.9 vs. 14.1±1.2, p<0.05, n≥12/group). Four weeks post-transplantation, VT was induced via in vivo programmed electrical stimulation. The recipients of ADSCs showed a significantly lower incidence of induced VT compared with the control (31.3% vs. 83.3%, p<0.05, n≥12/group). To understand the electrical activity following transplantation, we performed ex vivo optical mapping using a voltage sensitive dye, and found that ADSC transplantation decreased conduction velocity and its dispersion in the peri-infarct area. These results suggest that ADSC transplantation improved cardiac mechanical and electrophysiological functions in subacute MI. PMID

  2. Oral Delivery of Particulate Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 and All-Trans Retinoic Acid Reduces Gut Inflammation in Murine Models of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Thomas F.; Hammer, Laura; Furtado, Stacia; Mathiowitz, Edith; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Mangano, Katia; Auci, Dominick L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: We investigated oral delivery of transforming growth factor beta 1 [TGFβ]- and all-trans retinoic acid [ATRA]-loaded microspheres as therapy for gut inflammation in murine models of inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]. Methods: ATRA and TGFβ were separately encapsulated in poly [lactic-co-glycolic] acid or polylactic acid microspheres [respectively]. TGFβ was encapsulated using proprietary phase-inversion nanoencapsulation [PIN®] technology. Results: PIN® particles provided sustained release of bioactive protein for at least 4 days and were stable for up to 52 weeks when stored at either 40C or -200C. In the SCID mouse CD4 + CD25- T cell transfer model of IBD, oral treatment starting at disease onset prevented weight loss, significantly reduced average disease score [~ 50%], serum amyloid A levels [~ 5-fold], colon weight-to-length ratio [~ 50%], and histological score [~ 5-fold]. Conclusions: Both agents given together outperformed either separately. Highest TGFβ doses and most frequent dose schedule were most effective. Activity was associated with a significant increase [45%] in Foxp3 expression by colonic lamina propria CD4+ CD25+ T-cells. Activity was also demonstrated in dextran sulphate sodium-induced colitis. The data support development of the combination product as a novel, targeted immune based therapy for treatment for IBD. PMID:25987350

  3. Pharmacokinetic modeling of enterohepatic circulation of mycophenolic acid in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Colom, Helena; Lloberas, Núria; Andreu, Franc; Caldés, Ana; Torras, Joan; Oppenheimer, Federico; Sanchez-Plumed, Jaime; Gentil, Miguel A; Kuypers, Dirk R; Brunet, Mercè; Ekberg, Henrik; Grinyó, Josep M

    2014-06-01

    Several factors contribute to mycophenolic acid (MPA) between-patient variability. Here we characterize the metabolic pathways of MPA and quantify the effect of combining genetic polymorphism of multidrug-resistant-associated protein-2, demographics, biochemical covariates, co-medication (cyclosporine (CsA) vs. macrolides), and renal function on MPA, 7-O-MPA-glucuronide (MPAG), and acyl-glucuronide (AcMPAG) disposition, in renal transplant recipients, after mycophenolate mofetil. Complete pharmacokinetic profiles from 56 patients (five occasions) were analyzed. Enterohepatic circulation was modeled by transport of MPAG to the absorption site. This transport significantly decreased with increasing CsA trough concentrations (CtroughCsA). MPAG and AcMPAG plasma clearances significantly decreased with renal function. No significant influence of multidrug-resistant-associated protein-2 C24T single-nucleotide polymorphism was found. The model adequately predicted the increase in MPAG/AcMPAG exposures in CsA and macrolide patients with decreased renal function. This resulted in higher MPA exposures in macrolide patients versus CsA patients, and increased MPA exposures with renal function from 25 to 10 ml/min, in macrolide patients, owing to enhanced MPAG enterohepatic circulation. Lower-percentage enterohepatic circulation occurred with higher CtroughCsA and renal function values. The lack of MPA protein-binding modeling did not permit evaluation of the impact of renal function and CtroughCsA on MPA exposures in CsA patients. Thus, dose tailoring of covariates is recommended for target MPA exposure. PMID:24402086

  4. Transplantation of human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells promotes neurological recovery in an intracerebral hemorrhage rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Honglong; Zhang, Hongri; Yan, Zhongjie; Xu, Ruxiang

    2016-06-24

    Human amniotic membrane mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) have recently been suggested as ideal candidate stem cells for cell-based therapy. Many studies have reported the therapeutic effects of hAMSCs in numerous disease models. However, no studies have used hAMSCs to treat intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). In the present study, we examined the therapeutic potential of hAMSCs in a rat model of ICH, and characterized the possible mechanisms of action. Adult male Wistar rats were subjected to ICH by intrastriatal injection of VII collagenase, and then were intracerebrally administered hAMSCs, fibroblasts, or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 24 h after ICH. Compared with the fibroblasts and the PBS control, hAMSCs treatment significantly promoted neurological recovery, and reduced the numbers of ED1(+) activated microglia, as well as myeloperoxidase (MPO(+)), and caspase-3(+) cells in the brain injury model. In addition, hAMSCs treatment significantly increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the injured brain, and promoted neurogenesis and angiogenesis, compared with the fibroblasts and the PBS control. The transplanted hAMSCs survived for at least 27 days and were negative for β-tubulin III and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Taken together, the results suggest that hAMSCs treatment significantly promotes neurological recovery in rats after ICH. The mechanism of action could be mediated by inhibition of inflammation and apoptosis, increasing neurotrophic factor expression, and promotion of neurogenesis and angiogenesis. Thus, hAMSCs are candidate stem cells for the treatment of ICH. PMID:27188654

  5. Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation response plays an important role in host survival, and it also leads to acute and chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, bowel diseases, allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis and various neurodegenerative diseases. During the course of inflammation, the ROS level increases. In addition to ROS, several inflammatory mediators produced at the site lead to numerous cell-mediated damages. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, is a chronic intestinal disorder resulting from a dysfunctional epithelial, innate and adaptive immune response to intestinal microorganisms. The methods involving indomethacin-induced enterocolitis in rats with macroscopic changes of IBD, myeloperoxidase assay, microscopic (histologic) characters and biochemical parameters are discussed. PMID:26939275

  6. Five Years Survival of Patients After Liver Transplantation and Its Effective Factors by Neural Network and Cox Poroportional Hazard Regression Models

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Bahareh; Pourahmad, Saeedeh; Bahreini, Amin; Nikeghbalian, Saman; Mehrdad, Goli

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transplantation is the only treatment for patients with liver failure. Since the therapy imposes high expenses to the patients and community, identification of effective factors on survival of such patients after transplantation is valuable. Objectives: The current study attempted to model the survival of patients (two years old and above) after liver transplantation using neural network and Cox Proportional Hazards (Cox PH) regression models. The event is defined as death due to complications of liver transplantation. Patients and Methods: In a historical cohort study, the clinical findings of 1168 patients who underwent liver transplant surgery (from March 2008 to march 2013) at Shiraz Namazee Hospital Organ Transplantation Center, Shiraz, Southern Iran, were used. To model the one to five years survival of such patients, Cox PH regression model accompanied by three layers feed forward artificial neural network (ANN) method were applied on data separately and their prediction accuracy was compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC). Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the survival probabilities in different years. Results: The estimated survival probability of one to five years for the patients were 91%, 89%, 85%, 84%, and 83%, respectively. The areas under the ROC were 86.4% and 80.7% for ANN and Cox PH models, respectively. In addition, the accuracy of prediction rate for ANN and Cox PH methods was equally 92.73%. Conclusions: The present study detected more accurate results for ANN method compared to those of Cox PH model to analyze the survival of patients with liver transplantation. Furthermore, the order of effective factors in patients’ survival after transplantation was clinically more acceptable. The large dataset with a few missing data was the advantage of this study, the fact which makes the results more reliable. PMID:26500682

  7. Improvement of Neurological Dysfunctions in Aphakia Mice, a Model of Parkinson’s Disease, after Transplantation of ES Cell-Derived Dopaminergic Neuronal Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sangmi; Moon, Jisook; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by selective death of the substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons, and previously we have shown that aphakia mice, which harbor spontaneous Pitx3 gene mutation, show specific degeneration of the substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons accompanied by behavioral deficits that is reversed by L-DOPA treatment or transplantation of dopaminergic neural precursors. Here, we describe transplantation of dopaminergic neural precursors to a mouse model of PD, an aphakia mouse, followed by behavioral analyses of transplanted mice. PMID:25173391

  8. Testing the validity of a receptor kinetic model via TcNGA functional imaging of liver transplant recipients. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stadalnik, R.C.

    1993-03-25

    The author had accomplished the expertise for I-125-HSA plasma volume, galactose clearance for determination of hepatic plasma flow as well as finalizing the kinetic model. They have just completed modifying the microscale Scatchard assay for greater precision of receptor measurement using only 5--10 mg of liver tissue. In addition, he determined during the past year that the most practical method and clinically reasonable measurement of liver volume was to measure the transplanted liver in vivo using Tc-NGA images in the anterior, posterior, and right lateral projections, using the method of Rollo and DeLand. Direct measurement of liver weight obtained during transplant operation was not reliable due to variability of fluid retention in the donor liver secondary to ischemia, preservation fluid, etc., which thereby did not reflect an accurate liver weight which is needed in the kinetic analysis comparison, i.e., V{sub h} (hepatic plasma volume).

  9. Irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beck, E; Hurwitz, B

    1992-12-01

    1. Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional disorder of the lower intestinal tract affecting approximately 10% of the population and causing a wide range of symptoms. 2. Most cases of irritable bowel syndrome can be diagnosed in general practice on the basis of the presenting history and clinical examination but some patients may need to be referred to a gastro-enterologist for further assessment including sigmoidoscopy and barium enema. 3. The clinical picture may include symptoms of abdominal pain and/or distension and altered bowel habit. Nausea, dyspepsia, gynaecological or bladder symptoms are also common. About a third of patients may give a family history of recurrent abdominal pain. 4. Clinical signs include general anxiety, scars on the abdomen (from previous laparotomies for severe abdominal pain), a palpable and tender left colon or generalized abdominal tenderness, and loud borborygmi. 5. Absolute indications for a specialist assessment are: weight loss rectal bleeding onset of symptoms after the age of 40 a mass. Even in the absence of any of these findings referral is frequently necessary to allay patient anxiety and reinforce the diagnosis. 6. Blood tests are usually non-contributory. Stool specimens should be sent if diarrhoea is a feature. 7. A full explanation emphasizing the benign and often recurrent nature of the condition should be given to help patients understand the nature of their symptoms. Only after review of lifestyle and advice about diet have been provided should drug therapy be tried. PMID:1345152

  10. Allogeneic Transplantation of Periodontal Ligament-Derived Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Sheets in Canine Critical-Size Supra-Alveolar Periodontal Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Tsumanuma, Yuka; Iwata, Takanori; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro; Washio, Kaoru; Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Azusa; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that induces the destruction of tooth-supporting tissues, followed by tooth loss. Although several approaches have been applied to periodontal regeneration, complete periodontal regeneration has not been accomplished. Tissue engineering using a combination of cells and scaffolds is considered to be a viable alternative strategy. We have shown that autologous transplantation of periodontal ligament-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (PDL-MSC) sheets regenerates periodontal tissue in canine models. However, the indications for autologous cell transplantation in clinical situations are limited. Therefore, this study evaluated the safety and efficacy of allogeneic transplantation of PDL-MSC sheets using a canine horizontal periodontal defect model. Canine PDL-MSCs were labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and were cultured on temperature-responsive dishes. Three-layered cell sheets were transplanted around denuded root surfaces either autologously or allogeneically. A mixture of β-tricalcium phosphate and collagen gel was placed on the bone defects. Eight weeks after transplantation, dogs were euthanized and subjected to microcomputed tomography and histological analyses. RNA and DNA were extracted from the paraffin sections to verify the presence of EGFP at the transplantation site. Inflammatory markers from peripheral blood sera were quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Periodontal regeneration was observed in both the autologous and the allogeneic transplantation groups. The allogeneic transplantation group showed particularly significant regeneration of newly formed cementum, which is critical for the periodontal regeneration. Serum levels of inflammatory markers from peripheral blood sera showed little difference between the autologous and allogeneic groups. EGFP amplicons were detectable in the paraffin sections of the allogeneic group. These results suggest

  11. Allogeneic Transplantation of Periodontal Ligament-Derived Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Sheets in Canine Critical-Size Supra-Alveolar Periodontal Defect Model.

    PubMed

    Tsumanuma, Yuka; Iwata, Takanori; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro; Washio, Kaoru; Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Azusa; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that induces the destruction of tooth-supporting tissues, followed by tooth loss. Although several approaches have been applied to periodontal regeneration, complete periodontal regeneration has not been accomplished. Tissue engineering using a combination of cells and scaffolds is considered to be a viable alternative strategy. We have shown that autologous transplantation of periodontal ligament-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (PDL-MSC) sheets regenerates periodontal tissue in canine models. However, the indications for autologous cell transplantation in clinical situations are limited. Therefore, this study evaluated the safety and efficacy of allogeneic transplantation of PDL-MSC sheets using a canine horizontal periodontal defect model. Canine PDL-MSCs were labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and were cultured on temperature-responsive dishes. Three-layered cell sheets were transplanted around denuded root surfaces either autologously or allogeneically. A mixture of β-tricalcium phosphate and collagen gel was placed on the bone defects. Eight weeks after transplantation, dogs were euthanized and subjected to microcomputed tomography and histological analyses. RNA and DNA were extracted from the paraffin sections to verify the presence of EGFP at the transplantation site. Inflammatory markers from peripheral blood sera were quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Periodontal regeneration was observed in both the autologous and the allogeneic transplantation groups. The allogeneic transplantation group showed particularly significant regeneration of newly formed cementum, which is critical for the periodontal regeneration. Serum levels of inflammatory markers from peripheral blood sera showed little difference between the autologous and allogeneic groups. EGFP amplicons were detectable in the paraffin sections of the allogeneic group. These results suggest that

  12. Bioluminescence imaging of transplanted human endothelial colony-forming cells in an ischemic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Zhao, Zhen; Wang, Chao; Wang, Cong-Xiao; Li, Pei-Cheng; Qian, Cheng; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic strokes are devastating events responsible for high mortality and morbidity worldwide each year. Endothelial colony-forming cell (ECFC) therapy holds promise for stroke treatment; however, grafted ECFCs need to be monitored better understand their biological behavior in vivo, so as to evaluate their safety and successful delivery. The objectives of this study are to visualize the fate of infused human cord blood derived ECFCs via bioluminescence imaging (BLI) in an ischemic stroke mouse model and to determine the therapeutic effects of ECFC transplantation. ECFCs derived from human umbilical cord blood were infected with lentivirus carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and firefly luciferase (Luc2) double fusion reporter gene. Labeled ECFCs were grafted into a photothrombotic ischemic stroke mouse model via intra-arterial injection though the left cardiac ventricle. The homing of infused cells and functional recovery of stroke mice were evaluated using BLI, neurological scoring, and immunohistochemistry. Significantly, BLI signals were highest in the brain on day 1 and decreased steadily until day 14. GFP-positive cells were also found surrounding infarct border zones in brain sections using immunohistochemical staining, suggesting that ECFCs properly homed to the ischemic brain tissue. Using a modified neurological severity score assay and histological analysis of brain slices with CD31 immunostaining in brain tissue, double cortin analysis, and the TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, we demonstrated functional restoration, improved angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and decreased apoptosis in ischemic mice after ECFC infusion. Collectively, our data support that ECFCs may be a promising therapeutic agent for stroke. PMID:27038754

  13. Infections Following Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Arnow, Paul M.

    1991-01-01

    The epidemiology of infections associated with orthotopic liver transplantation is summarized herein, and approaches to prophylaxis are outlined. Infection is a major complication following orthotopic liver transplantation, and more than half of transplant recipients develop at least one infection. The risk of infection is highest in the first month after transplantation, and the most common pathogens are bacteria and cytomegalovirus (CMV). Bacterial infections usually occur in the first month, arise in the abdomen, and are caused by aerobes. The peak incidence of CMV infection is late in the first month and early in the second month after transplantationn. CMV syndromes include fever and neutropenia, hepatitis, pneumonitis, gut ulceration, and disseminated infection. Other significant problems are Candida intraabdominal infection, Herpes simplex mucocutaneous infection or hepatitis, adenovirus hepatitis, and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Prophylaxis of infection in liver transplant recipients has not been well-studied. Several different regimens of parenteral, oral absorbable, and/or oral non-absorbable antibiotics active against bacteria and yeast have been used at various centers, but no randomized controlled trials have been conducted. Selective bowel decontamination appears to be a promising approach to the prevention of bacterial and Candida infections, while oral acyclovir may be a relatively convenient and effective agent for CMV prophylaxis. PMID:1650245

  14. Overview of pediatric short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Duro, Debora; Kamin, Daniel; Duggan, Christopher

    2008-08-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a malabsorptive state occuring as a result of surgical resection or congenital disease of a significant portion of the small intestine . The amount of resection or remaining bowel generally dictates the degree of malabsorption and consequentely the need for specialized enteral nutrition or parenteral nutrition (PN). Intestinal failure in the context of SBS is defined as a dependence on PN to maintain minimal energy and fluid requirement for growth in children. Common causes of SBS in infants and children include necrotizing enterocolitis, midgut volvulus, intestinal atresia, and gastroschisis. Early identification of patients at risk for long-term PN dependency is the first step toward avoiding severe complications. Close monitoring of nutritional status, steady and early introduction of enteral nutrition, and aggressive prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of infections such as central venous catheter sepsis and bacterial overgrowth can significantly improve the prognosis. Intestinal transplantation is an emerging treatment that may be considered when intestinal failure is irreversible and children are experiencing serious complications related to TPN administration. PMID:18667916

  15. Lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, José Eduardo; Werebe, Eduardo de Campos; Carraro, Rafael Medeiros; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga; Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Abdalla, Luis Gustavo; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lung transplantation is a globally accepted treatment for some advanced lung diseases, giving the recipients longer survival and better quality of life. Since the first transplant successfully performed in 1983, more than 40 thousand transplants have been performed worldwide. Of these, about seven hundred were in Brazil. However, survival of the transplant is less than desired, with a high mortality rate related to primary graft dysfunction, infection, and chronic graft dysfunction, particularly in the form of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. New technologies have been developed to improve the various stages of lung transplant. To increase the supply of lungs, ex vivo lung reconditioning has been used in some countries, including Brazil. For advanced life support in the perioperative period, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and hemodynamic support equipment have been used as a bridge to transplant in critically ill patients on the waiting list, and to keep patients alive until resolution of the primary dysfunction after graft transplant. There are patients requiring lung transplant in Brazil who do not even come to the point of being referred to a transplant center because there are only seven such centers active in the country. It is urgent to create new centers capable of performing lung transplantation to provide patients with some advanced forms of lung disease a chance to live longer and with better quality of life. PMID:26154550

  16. A combined omics approach to evaluate the effects of dietary curcumin on colon inflammation in the Mdr1a(-/-) mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Janine M; Barnett, Matthew P G; Dommels, Yvonne E M; Brewster, Diane; Butts, Christine A; McNabb, Warren C; Laing, William A; Roy, Nicole C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide insight into how curcumin reduces colon inflammation in the Mdr1a(-/-) mouse model of human inflammatory bowel disease using a combined transcriptomics and proteomics approach. Mdr1a(-/-) and FVB control mice were randomly assigned to an AIN-76A (control) diet or AIN-76A+0.2% curcumin. At 21 or 24weeks of age, colonic histological injury score (HIS) was determined, colon mRNA transcript levels were assessed using microarrays and colon protein expression was measured using 2D gel electrophoresis and LCMS protein identification. Colonic HIS of Mdr1a(-/-) mice fed the AIN-76A diet was higher (P<.001) than FVB mice fed the same diet; the curcumin-supplemented diet reduced colonic HIS (P<.05) in Mdr1a(-/-) mice. Microarray and proteomics analyses combined with new data analysis tools, such as the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis regulator effects analysis, showed that curcumin's antiinflammatory activity in Mdr1a(-/-) mouse colon may be mediated by activation of α-catenin, which has not previously been reported. We also show evidence to support curcumin's action via multiple molecular pathways including reduced immune response, increased xenobiotic metabolism, resolution of inflammation through decreased neutrophil migration and increased barrier remodeling. Key transcription factors and other regulatory molecules (ERK, FN1, TNFSF12 and PI3K complex) activated in inflammation were down-regulated by dietary intervention with curcumin. PMID:26437580

  17. Demonstration of clonable alloreactive host T cells in a primate model for bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Reisner, Y.; Ben-Bassat, I.; Douer, D.; Kaploon, A.; Schwartz, E.; Ramot, B.

    1986-06-01

    The phenomenon of marrow rejection following supralethal radiochemotherapy was explained in the past mainly by non-T-cell mechanisms known to be resistant to high-dose irradiation. In the present study a low but significant number of radiochemoresistant-clonable T cells was found in the peripheral blood and spleen of Rhesus monkeys following the cytoreductive protocol used for treatment of leukemia patients prior to bone marrow transplantation. More than 95% of the clonable cells are concentrated in the spleen 5 days after transplant. The cells possess immune memory as demonstrated by the generation of alloreactive-specific cytotoxicity. The present findings suggest that host-versus-graft activity may be mediated by alloreactive T cells. It is hoped that elimination of such cells prior to bone marrow transplantation will increase the engraftment rate of HLA-nonidentical marrow in leukemia patients.

  18. From Child-Pugh to Model for End-Stage Liver Disease: Deciding Who Needs a Liver Transplant.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sheela S; Civan, Jesse M

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews the historical evolution of the liver transplant organ allocation policy and the indications/contraindications for liver transplant, and provides an overview of the liver transplant evaluation process. The article is intended to help internists determine whether and when referral to a liver transplant center is indicated, and to help internists to counsel patients whose initial evaluation at a transplant center is pending. PMID:27095638

  19. [History of organ transplantation in the field of pediatric surgery in Japan].

    PubMed

    Inomata, Yukihiro

    2014-11-01

    In Japan, liver transplantation was first attempted 50 years ago, around the same time as the development of pediatric surgery. In 1989, clinical liver transplantation in Japan started with a living related-donor transplantation in a boy with biliary atresia. In the early years, the majority of recipients were children worldwide, which is why pediatric surgeons played a major role in the establishment of liver transplantation in Japan. From 1998, most of the indications for pediatric patients needing liver transplantation have been covered by governmental health insurance. Since that year, the annual number of pediatric liver transplantations, mainly living-donor transplantations, has remained stable at around 130. Biliary atresia is still the most common indication, but others like metabolic disease and hepatoblastoma have been increasing. Deceased-donor liver transplantation started in 1999 in Japan, but pediatric donors are very rare. Intestinal transplantation in Japan also started in a pediatric patient with short bowel syndrome in 1996. Deceased-donor intestinal transplantation is also performed, but the number of those on the waiting list for bowel transplantations in Japan has been very limited, probably due to financial constraints and relatively poor long-term results. With the change in the Organ Transplant Law in 2010, organ donations in Japan have increased slightly. Cadaveric split-liver transplantation has the potential to expand the benefit to pediatric recipients. A universal system for the long-term follow-up of pediatric recipients should be established to manage their transition to adulthood. PMID:25702514

  20. Transplanted Neural Progenitor Cells from Distinct Sources Migrate Differentially in an Organotypic Model of Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ngalula, Kapinga P.; Cramer, Nathan; Schell, Michael J.; Juliano, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Brain injury is a major cause of long-term disability. The possibility exists for exogenously derived neural progenitor cells to repair damage resulting from brain injury, although more information is needed to successfully implement this promising therapy. To test the ability of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) obtained from rats to repair damaged neocortex, we transplanted neural progenitor cell suspensions into normal and injured slice cultures of the neocortex acquired from rats on postnatal day 0–3. Donor cells from E16 embryos were obtained from either the neocortex, including the ventricular zone (VZ) for excitatory cells, ganglionic eminence (GE) for inhibitory cells or a mixed population of the two. Cells were injected into the ventricular/subventricular zone (VZ/SVZ) or directly into the wounded region. Transplanted cells migrated throughout the cortical plate with GE and mixed population donor cells predominately targeting the upper cortical layers, while neocortically derived NPCs from the VZ/SVZ migrated less extensively. In the injured neocortex, transplanted cells moved predominantly into the wounded area. NPCs derived from the GE tended to be immunoreactive for GABAergic markers while those derived from the neocortex were more strongly immunoreactive for other neuronal markers such as MAP2, TUJ1, or Milli-Mark. Cells transplanted in vitro acquired the electrophysiological characteristics of neurons, including action potential generation and reception of spontaneous synaptic activity. This suggests that transplanted cells differentiate into neurons capable of functionally integrating with the host tissue. Together, our data suggest that transplantation of neural progenitor cells holds great potential as an emerging therapeutic intervention for restoring function lost to brain damage. PMID:26500604

  1. Biodistribution and in vivo efficacy of genetically modified human mesenchymal stem cells systemically transplanted into a mouse bone fracture model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jin Wook; Park, Ki Dae; Choi, Youngju; Baek, Dae Hyun; Cho, Wan-Seob; Choi, Mina; Park, Jae Hyun; Choi, Kyoung Suk; Kim, Hyung Soo; Yoo, Tae Moo

    2013-08-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have generated a great deal of interest in clinical application due to their ability to undergo multi-lineage differentiation. Recently, ex vivo genetic modification of hMSCs was attempted to increase their differentiation potential. The present study was conducted to evaluate the biodistribution and in vivo efficacy of genetically modified hMSCs. To accomplish this, Runx2, which is a key transcription factor associated with osteoblast differentiation, was transduced into hMSCs using lentiviral vectors expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) or luciferase. Here, we developed an experimental fracture in mice femur to investigate the effects of Runx2-transduced hMSCs on bone healing and migration into injury site. We conducted bio-luminescence imaging (BLI) using luciferase-tagged vector and quantitative real-time PCR using GFP probe to investigate the biodistribution of Runx2-transduced hMSCs in the fracture model. The biodistribution of hMSC cells in the fractured femur was observed at 14 days post-transplantation upon both BLI imaging and real-time PCR. Moreover, the fractured mice transplanted with Runx2-transduced hMSCs showed superior bone healing when compared to mock-transduced hMSC and MRC5 fibroblasts which were used as control. These data suggested that transplanted genetically modified hMSCs systemically migrate to the fractured femur, where they contribute to bone formation in vivo. PMID:23615814

  2. Signaling through three chemokine receptors triggers the migration of transplanted neural precursor cells in a model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mikhal E; Fainstein, Nina; Lavon, Iris; Ben-Hur, Tamir

    2014-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multifocal disease, and precursor cells need to migrate into the multiple lesions in order to exert their therapeutic effects. Therefore, cell migration is a crucial element in regenerative processes in MS, dictating the route of delivery, when cell transplantation is considered. We have previously shown that inflammation triggers migration of multi-potential neural precursor cells (NPCs) into the white matter of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) rodents, a widely used model of MS. Here we investigated the molecular basis of this attraction. NPCs were grown from E13 embryonic mouse brains and transplanted into the lateral cerebral ventricles of EAE mice. Transplanted NPC migration was directed by three tissue-derived chemokines. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α, monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1 and hepatocyte growth factor were expressed in the EAE brain and specifically in microglia and astrocytes. Their cognate receptors, CXCR4, CCR2 or c-Met were constitutively expressed on NPCs. Selective blockage of CXCR4, CCR2 or c-Met partially inhibited NPC migration in EAE brains. Blocking all three receptors had an additive effect and resulted in profound inhibition of NPC migration, as compared to extensive migration of control NPCs. The inflammation-triggered NPC migration into white matter tracts was dependent on a motile NPC phenotype. Specifically, depriving NPCs from epidermal growth factor (EGF) prevented the induction of glial commitment and a motile phenotype (as indicated by an in vitro motility assay), hampering their response to neuroinflammation. In conclusion, signaling via three chemokine systems accounts for most of the inflammation-induced, tissue-derived attraction of transplanted NPCs into white matter tracts during EAE. PMID:25086214

  3. A Comparison between splenic fossa and subhepatic fossa auxiliary partial heterotopic liver transplantation in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Ai, Lemin; Liang, Xiao; Wang, Zhifei; Shen, Jie; Yu, Feiyan; Xie, Limei; Pan, Yongming; Lin, Hui

    2016-06-01

    To test the alternative possible locations for the placement of a liver graft and the relevant surgical technique issues, we developed a porcine model of auxiliary partial heterotopic liver transplantation (APHLT) and evaluated the difference between 2 styles of liver transplantation, either subhepatic fossa or splenic fossa APHLT, by comparing survival and biochemical indexes. Thirty-eight miniature pigs were randomly divided into 2 groups. A left hemihepatic graft without the middle hepatic vein (HV) was procured from the living donor. In group A (n = 9), an 8 mm diameter polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft approximately 2.5 cm long was connected to the left HV while another PTFE graft of the same size was connected to the left portal vein (PV). The liver graft was implanted in the right subhepatic fossa following splenectomy and right nephrectomy. In group B (n = 10), a PTFE graft of the same size was connected to the left HV while the liver graft was implanted in the splenic fossa following splenectomy and left nephrectomy. Survival rate and complications were observed at 2 weeks after transplantation. Data were collected from 5 animals in group A and 6 animals in group B that survived longer than 2 weeks. The liver function and renal function of the recipients returned to normal at 1 week after surgery in both groups. Eighty-eight percent (14/16) of the PTFE grafts remained patent at 2 weeks after surgery, but 44% of the PTFE grafts (7/16) developed mural thrombus. No significant differences in the survival rate and biochemistry were found between the 2 groups. In conclusion, the splenic fossa APHLT can achieve beneficial outcomes similar to the subhepatic fossa APHLT in miniature pigs, although it also has a high morbidity rate due to hepatic artery thrombosis, PV thrombosis, and PTEF graft mural thrombus formation. Liver Transplantation 22 812-821 2016 AASLD. PMID:26785299

  4. Gamma-Irradiated Sterile Cornea for Use in Corneal Transplants in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Junko; Heflin, Thomas; Zambrano, Andrea; Pan, Qing; Meng, Huan; Wang, Jiangxia; Stark, Walter J.; Daoud, Yassine J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Gamma irradiated corneas in which the donor keratocytes and endothelial cells are eliminated are effective as corneal lamellar and glaucoma patch grafts. In addition, gamma irradiation causes collagen cross inking, which stiffens collagen fibrils. This study evaluated gamma irradiated corneas for use in corneal transplantations in a rabbit model comparing graft clarity, corneal neovascularization, and edema. Methods: Penetrating keratoplasty was performed on rabbits using four types of corneal grafts: Fresh cornea with endothelium, gamma irradiated cornea, cryopreserved cornea, and fresh cornea without endothelium. Slit lamp examination was performed at postoperative week (POW) one, two, and four. Corneal clarity, edema, and vascularization were graded. Confocal microscopy and histopathological evaluation were performed. A P < 0.05 was statistically significant. Results: For all postoperative examinations, the corneal clarity and edema were statistically significantly better in eyes that received fresh cornea with endothelium compared to the other three groups (P < 0.05). At POW 1, gamma irradiated cornea scored better than the cryopreserved and fresh cornea without endothelium groups in clarity (0.9 vs. 1.5 and 2.6, respectively), and edema (0.6 vs. 0.8 and 2.0, respectively). The gamma irradiated corneas, cryopreserved corneas and the fresh corneas without endothelium, developed haze and edema after POW 2. Gamma irradiated cornea remained statistically significantly clearer than cryopreserved and fresh cornea without endothelium during the observation period (P < 0.05). Histopathology indicated an absence of keratocytes in gamma irradiated cornea. Conclusion: Gamma irradiated corneas remained clearer and thinner than the cryopreserved cornea and fresh cornea without endothelium. However, this outcome is transient. Gamma irradiated corneas are useful for lamellar and patch grafts, but cannot be used for penetrating keratoplasty. PMID:26180475

  5. Photodynamic therapy of a transplanted pancreatic cancer model using meta-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC).

    PubMed Central

    Mikvy, P.; Messman, H.; MacRobert, A. J.; Pauer, M.; Sams, V. R.; Davies, C. L.; Stewart, J. C.; Bown, S. G.

    1997-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to treat, even for tumours localized to the pancreas. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a non-thermal technique for producing localized tissue necrosis with light after prior administration of a photosensitizing drug and it could have a role in the local treatment of these cancers. We studied PDT in a transplanted cancer in the hamster pancreas using the photosensitizer mTHPC (meta-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin). Fluorescence microscopy showed maximum levels of mTHPC in normal pancreas 2-4 days after sensitization and in tumour at 4-5 days. For PDT, animals were given 0.1 or 0.3 mg kg(-1) mTHPC and the tumour was treated at laparotomy 2 or 4 days later with red light (50 J at 650 nm, continuous or fractionated) delivered via a single fibre touching the tumour surface. The maximum zone of tumour necrosis (seen 3 days after PDT) was 8.7 mm in diameter with continuous irradiation, increasing to 12.4 mm with light fractionation (four equal fractions with 3 min between fractions). The main complication was sealed duodenal perforation, seen in 3 of 16 animals, probably due to inadequate shielding of the duodenum from the light. The duodenal problems seen in hamsters are unlikely to cause trouble in the much thicker human duodenum. PDT tumour necrosis in this animal model has now been shown with a range of photosensitizers, but mTHPC is attractive as it is likely to produce the largest volumes of necrosis around each treatment point with short light exposure times. This technique could have a role in the treatment of localized cancers of the pancreas in patients unsuitable for surgery and can now be considered for preliminary clinical trials. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9310235

  6. Fecal microbiota transplantation: in perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shaan; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Petrof, Elaine O.

    2016-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in understanding the role of the human gut microbiome to elucidate the therapeutic potential of its manipulation. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is the administration of a solution of fecal matter from a donor into the intestinal tract of a recipient in order to directly change the recipient’s gut microbial composition and confer a health benefit. FMT has been used to successfully treat recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. There are preliminary indications to suggest that it may also carry therapeutic potential for other conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26929784

  7. Fecal microbiota transplantation: in perspective.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shaan; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Petrof, Elaine O

    2016-03-01

    There has been increasing interest in understanding the role of the human gut microbiome to elucidate the therapeutic potential of its manipulation. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is the administration of a solution of fecal matter from a donor into the intestinal tract of a recipient in order to directly change the recipient's gut microbial composition and confer a health benefit. FMT has been used to successfully treat recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. There are preliminary indications to suggest that it may also carry therapeutic potential for other conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26929784

  8. Immunosuppressive therapy for kidney transplantation in adults: a systematic review and economic model.

    PubMed Central

    Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Snowsill, Tristan; Haasova, Marcela; Coelho, Helen; Crathorne, Louise; Cooper, Chris; Mujica-Mota, Ruben; Peters, Jaime; Varley-Campbell, Jo; Huxley, Nicola; Moore, Jason; Allwood, Matt; Lowe, Jenny; Hyde, Chris; Hoyle, Martin; Bond, Mary; Anderson, Rob

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND End-stage renal disease is a long-term irreversible decline in kidney function requiring renal replacement therapy: kidney transplantation, haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. The preferred option is kidney transplantation, followed by immunosuppressive therapy (induction and maintenance therapy) to reduce the risk of kidney rejection and prolong graft survival. OBJECTIVES To review and update the evidence for the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of basiliximab (BAS) (Simulect(®), Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd) and rabbit anti-human thymocyte immunoglobulin (rATG) (Thymoglobulin(®), Sanofi) as induction therapy, and immediate-release tacrolimus (TAC) (Adoport(®), Sandoz; Capexion(®), Mylan; Modigraf(®), Astellas Pharma; Perixis(®), Accord Healthcare; Prograf(®), Astellas Pharma; Tacni(®), Teva; Vivadex(®), Dexcel Pharma), prolonged-release tacrolimus (Advagraf(®) Astellas Pharma), belatacept (BEL) (Nulojix(®), Bristol-Myers Squibb), mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) (Arzip(®), Zentiva; CellCept(®), Roche Products; Myfenax(®), Teva), mycophenolate sodium (MPS) (Myfortic(®), Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd), sirolimus (SRL) (Rapamune(®), Pfizer) and everolimus (EVL) (Certican(®), Novartis) as maintenance therapy in adult renal transplantation. METHODS Clinical effectiveness searches were conducted until 18 November 2014 in MEDLINE (via Ovid), EMBASE (via Ovid), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (via Wiley Online Library) and Web of Science (via ISI), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects and Health Technology Assessment (The Cochrane Library via Wiley Online Library) and Health Management Information Consortium (via Ovid). Cost-effectiveness searches were conducted until 18 November 2014 using a costs or economic literature search filter in MEDLINE (via Ovid), EMBASE (via Ovid), NHS Economic Evaluation Database (via Wiley Online Library), Web of Science (via ISI

  9. Comparison of seven liver allocation models with respect to lives saved among patients on the liver transplant waiting list.

    PubMed

    Magder, Laurence S; Regev, Arie; Mindikoglu, Ayse L

    2012-04-01

    The patients with end-stage liver disease (ESLD) on the liver transplant waiting list are prioritized for transplant based on the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score. We developed and used an innovative approach to compare MELD to six proposed alternatives with respect to waiting list mortality. Our analysis was based on United Network for Organ Sharing data of patients with ESLD on the waiting list between January 2006 and June 2009. We compared six allocation models to MELD. Two models were based on reweighting the variables used by MELD: an "updated" MELD, and ReFit MELD. Four models also included serum sodium: MESO, MeldNa, UKELD, and ReFit MELDNa. We estimated that UKELD and the updated MELD would result in significantly fewer lives saved. There were no significant differences between the other models. Our new approach can supplement standard methods to provide insight into the relative performance of liver allocation models in reducing waiting list mortality. Our analysis suggests that UKELD and the updated MELD score would not be optimal for reducing waiting list mortality in the United States. PMID:22299756

  10. Introduction of a Framework for Dynamic Knowledge Representation of the Control Structure of Transplant Immunology: Employing the Power of Abstraction with a Solid Organ Transplant Agent-Based Model

    PubMed Central

    An, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Agent-based modeling has been used to characterize the nested control loops and non-linear dynamics associated with inflammatory and immune responses, particularly as a means of visualizing putative mechanistic hypotheses. This process is termed dynamic knowledge representation and serves a critical role in facilitating the ability to test and potentially falsify hypotheses in the current data- and hypothesis-rich biomedical research environment. Importantly, dynamic computational modeling aids in identifying useful abstractions, a fundamental scientific principle that pervades the physical sciences. Recognizing the critical scientific role of abstraction provides an intellectual and methodological counterweight to the tendency in biology to emphasize comprehensive description as the primary manifestation of biological knowledge. Transplant immunology represents yet another example of the challenge of identifying sufficient understanding of the inflammatory/immune response in order to develop and refine clinically effective interventions. Advances in immunosuppressive therapies have greatly improved solid organ transplant (SOT) outcomes, most notably by reducing and treating acute rejection. The end goal of these transplant immune strategies is to facilitate effective control of the balance between regulatory T cells and the effector/cytotoxic T-cell populations in order to generate, and ideally maintain, a tolerant phenotype. Characterizing the dynamics of immune cell populations and the interactive feedback loops that lead to graft rejection or tolerance is extremely challenging, but is necessary if rational modulation to induce transplant tolerance is to be accomplished. Herein is presented the solid organ agent-based model (SOTABM) as an initial example of an agent-based model (ABM) that abstractly reproduces the cellular and molecular components of the immune response to SOT. Despite its abstract nature, the SOTABM is able to qualitatively reproduce acute

  11. Elevated calprotectin levels reveal bowel inflammation in spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cypers, H; Varkas, G; Beeckman, S; Debusschere, K; Vogl, T; Roth, J; Drennan, M B; Lavric, M; Foell, D; Cuvelier, C A; De Vos, M; Delanghe, J; Van den Bosch, F; Elewaut, D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Microscopic bowel inflammation is present in up to 50% of patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) and is associated with more severe disease. Currently no reliable biomarkers exist to identify patients at risk. Calprotectin is a sensitive marker of neutrophilic inflammation, measurable in serum and stool. Objectives To assess whether serum and faecal calprotectin in addition to C-reactive protein (CRP) can be used to identify patients with SpA at risk of microscopic bowel inflammation. Methods Serum calprotectin and CRP were measured in 125 patients with SpA. In 44 of these patients, faecal samples were available for calprotectin measurement. All 125 patients underwent an ileocolonoscopy to assess the presence of microscopic bowel inflammation. Results Microscopic bowel inflammation was present in 53 (42.4%) patients with SpA. Elevated serum calprotectin and CRP were independently associated with microscopic bowel inflammation. Faecal calprotectin was also significantly higher in patients with microscopic bowel inflammation. Patients with CRP and serum calprotectin elevated had a frequency of bowel inflammation of 64% vs 25% in patients with low levels of both. When either CRP or serum calprotectin was elevated, the risk was intermediate (40%) and measuring faecal calprotectin provided further differentiation. Hence we suggest a screening approach where initially serum calprotectin and CRP are assessed and, if necessary, faecal calprotectin. The model using this scenario provided an area under the ROC curve of 74.4% for detection of bowel inflammation. Conclusions Calprotectin measurements in stool and serum, in addition to CRP, may provide a promising strategy to identify patients with SpA at risk of bowel inflammation and could play a role in overall patient stratification. PMID:26698844

  12. New model for cardiomyocyte sheet transplantation using a virus-cell fusion technique

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yuto; Tomotsune, Daihachiro; Takizawa, Sakiko; Yue, Fengming; Nagai, Mika; Yokoyama, Tadayuki; Hirashima, Kanji; Sasaki, Katsunori

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To facilitate close contacts between transplanted cardiomyocytes and host skeletal muscle using cell fusion mediated by hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) and tissue maceration. METHODS: Cardiomyocytes (1.5 × 106) from fetal rats were first cultured. After proliferation, some cells were used for fusion with adult muscle fibers using HVJ-E. Other cells were used to create cardiomyocyte sheets (area: about 3.5 cm2 including 2.1 × 106 cells), which were then treated with Nile blue, separated, and transplanted between the latissimus dorsi and intercostal muscles of adult rats with four combinations of HVJ-E and/or NaOH maceration: G1: HVJ-E(+), NaOH(+), Cardiomyocytes(+); G2: HVJ-E(-), NaOH(+), Cardiomyocytes(+); G3: HVJ-E(+), NaOH(-), Cardiomyocytes(+); G4: HVJ-E(-), NaOH(-), Cardiomyocytes(-). At 1 and 2 wk after transplantation, the four groups were compared by detection of beating domains, motion images using moving target analysis software, action potentials, gene expression of MLC-2v and Mesp1 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, hematoxylin-eosin staining, and immunostaining for cardiac troponin and skeletal myosin. RESULTS: In vitro cardiomyocytes were fused with skeletal muscle fibers using HVJ-E. Cardiomyocyte sheets remained in the primary transplanted sites for 2 wk. Although beating domains were detected in G1, G2, and G3 rats, G1 rats prevailed in the number, size, motion image amplitudes, and action potential compared with G2 and G3 rats. Close contacts were only found in G1 rats. At 1 wk after transplantation, the cardiomyocyte sheets showed adhesion at various points to the myoblast layer in the latissimus dorsi muscle. At 2 wk after transplantation, close contacts were seen over a broad area. Part of the skeletal muscle sarcoplasma seemed to project into the myocardiocyte plasma and some nuclei appeared to share both sarcoplasmas. CONCLUSION: The present results show that close contacts were acquired and facilitated

  13. Modulation of enteric neurons by interleukin-6 and corticotropin-releasing factor contributes to visceral hypersensitivity and altered colonic motility in a rat model of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Maria M; O'Halloran, Ken D; Rae, Mark G; Dinan, Timothy G; O'Malley, Dervla

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The search for effective therapeutic strategies for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is hampered by an incomplete understanding of its underlying pathophysiology. Stress and altered plasma cytokine profiles indicative of immune activation are characteristic of the disorder. The neuromodulatory effects of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and corticotropin-releasing factor receptor (CRFR) 1 in visceral pain and stress-induced defecation in the Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat model of IBS were investigated. Sprague Dawley and WKY rats were administered anti-IL-6 receptor antibodies (xIL-6R, 0.5 mg kg−1 i.p) with or without the CRFR1 antagonist antalarmin (10 mg kg−1 i.p). Post-intervention, the pain threshold to colorectal distension and stress-induced faecal output were compared and changes in colonic mucosal protein expression were investigated. The neuro-stimulatory effects of IBS plasma on the myenteric plexus is mediated by IL-6, IL-8 and CRF. The stimulatory effects of these soluble factors on myenteric neuron excitability and colonic contractility were additive. Moreover, inhibition of IL-6 and CRF1 receptors in vivo in the WKY IBS rat model normalized stress-induced defecation (P < 0.01) and visceral pain sensitivity (P < 0.001) with associated changes in protein expression of the tight junction proteins occludin and claudin 2, the visceral pain-associated T-type calcium channel CaV3.2 and intracellular signalling molecules STAT3, SOCS3 and ERK1/2. These studies demonstrate the additive effects of immune and stress factors on myenteric neuronal excitability. Moreover, combined targeting of peripheral IL-6 and CRF1 receptors is effective in alleviating IBS-like symptoms in the WKY rat. Thus, crosstalk between stress and immune factors during IBS flares may underlie symptom exacerbation. PMID:25260633

  14. Carrageenan Gum and Adherent Invasive Escherichia coli in a Piglet Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Impact on Intestinal Mucosa-associated Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Munyaka, Peris M; Sepehri, Shadi; Ghia, Jean-Eric; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) including Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic conditions characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation. Adherent invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) pathotype has been increasingly implicated in the etiopathogenesis of IBD. In a 21-day study, we investigated the effects of AIEC strain UM146 inoculation on microbiota profile of the ileal, cecal, ascending and descending colon in a pig model of experimental colitis. Carrageenan gum (CG) was used to induce colitis in weaner piglets whereas AIEC strain UM146 previously isolated from a CD patient was included to investigate a cause or consequence effect in IBD. Treatments were: (1) control; (2) CG; (3) AIEC strain UM146; and (4) CG+UM146. Pigs in groups 2 and 4 received 1% CG in drinking water from day 1 of the study while pigs in groups 3 and 4 were inoculated with UM146 on day 8. Following euthanization on day 21, tissue mucosal scrapings were collected and used for DNA extraction. The V4 region of bacterial 16S rRNA gene was then subjected to Illumina sequencing. Microbial diversity, composition, and the predicted functional metagenome were determined in addition to short chain fatty acids profiles in the digesta and inflammatory cytokines in the intestinal tissue. CG-induced colitis decreased bacterial species richness and shifted community composition. At the phylum level, an increase in Proteobacteria and Deferribacteres and a decrease in Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were observed in CG and CGUM146 compared to control and UM146. The metabolic capacity of the microbiome was also altered in CG and CGUM146 compared to UM146 and control in the colon. We demonstrated that CG resulted in bacterial dysbiosis and shifted community composition similar to what has been previously observed in IBD patients. However, AIEC strain UM146 alone did not cause any clear changes compared to CG or control in our experimental IBD pig model. PMID:27092122

  15. Carrageenan Gum and Adherent Invasive Escherichia coli in a Piglet Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Impact on Intestinal Mucosa-associated Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Munyaka, Peris M.; Sepehri, Shadi; Ghia, Jean-Eric; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) including Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic conditions characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation. Adherent invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) pathotype has been increasingly implicated in the etiopathogenesis of IBD. In a 21-day study, we investigated the effects of AIEC strain UM146 inoculation on microbiota profile of the ileal, cecal, ascending and descending colon in a pig model of experimental colitis. Carrageenan gum (CG) was used to induce colitis in weaner piglets whereas AIEC strain UM146 previously isolated from a CD patient was included to investigate a cause or consequence effect in IBD. Treatments were: (1) control; (2) CG; (3) AIEC strain UM146; and (4) CG+UM146. Pigs in groups 2 and 4 received 1% CG in drinking water from day 1 of the study while pigs in groups 3 and 4 were inoculated with UM146 on day 8. Following euthanization on day 21, tissue mucosal scrapings were collected and used for DNA extraction. The V4 region of bacterial 16S rRNA gene was then subjected to Illumina sequencing. Microbial diversity, composition, and the predicted functional metagenome were determined in addition to short chain fatty acids profiles in the digesta and inflammatory cytokines in the intestinal tissue. CG-induced colitis decreased bacterial species richness and shifted community composition. At the phylum level, an increase in Proteobacteria and Deferribacteres and a decrease in Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were observed in CG and CGUM146 compared to control and UM146. The metabolic capacity of the microbiome was also altered in CG and CGUM146 compared to UM146 and control in the colon. We demonstrated that CG resulted in bacterial dysbiosis and shifted community composition similar to what has been previously observed in IBD patients. However, AIEC strain UM146 alone did not cause any clear changes compared to CG or control in our experimental IBD pig model. PMID:27092122

  16. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Emeran A.

    2013-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman presents with a 7-month history of recurrent, crampy pain in the left lower abdominal quadrant, bloating with abdominal distention, and frequent, loose stools. She reports having had similar but milder symptoms since childhood. She spends long times in the bathroom because she is worried about uncontrollable discomfort and fecal soiling if she does not completely empty her bowels before leaving the house. She feels anxious and fatigued and is frustrated that her previous physician did not seem to take her distress seriously. Physical examination is unremarkable except for tenderness over the left lower quadrant. How should her case be evaluated and treated? PMID:18420501

  17. Five-year update on the mouse model of orthotopic lung transplantation: Scientific uses, tricks of the trade, and tips for success

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xue; Li, Wenjun; Lai, Jiaming; Okazaki, Mikio; Sugimoto, Seiichiro; Yamamoto, Sumiharu; Wang, Xingan; Gelman, Andrew E.; Kreisel, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    It has been 5 years since our team reported the first successful model of orthotopic single lung transplantation in the mouse. There has been great demand for this technique due to the obvious experimental advantages the mouse offers over other large and small animal models of lung transplantation. These include the availability of mouse-specific reagents as well as knockout and transgenic technology. Our laboratory has utilized this mouse model to study both immunological and non-immunological mechanisms of lung transplant physiology while others have focused on models of chronic rejection. It is surprising that despite our initial publication in 2007 only few other laboratories have published data using this model. This is likely due to the technical complexity of the surgical technique and perioperative complications, which can limit recipient survival. As two of the authors (XL and WL) have a combined experience of over 2500 left and right single lung transplants, this review will summarize their experience and delineate tips and tricks necessary for successful transplantation. We will also describe technical advances made since the original description of the model. PMID:22754663

  18. Optimal Bowel Preparation for Video Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun Joo; Moon, Jeong Seop; Shim, Ki-Nam

    2016-01-01

    During video capsule endoscopy (VCE), several factors, such as air bubbles, food material in the small bowel, and delayed gastric and small bowel transit time, influence diagnostic yield, small bowel visualization quality, and cecal completion rate. Therefore, bowel preparation before VCE is as essential as bowel preparation before colonoscopy. To date, there have been many comparative studies, consensus, and guidelines regarding different kinds of bowel cleansing agents in bowel preparation for small bowel VCE. Presently, polyethylene glycol- (PEG-) based regimens are given primary recommendation. Sodium picosulphate-based regimens are secondarily recommended, as their cleansing efficacy is less than that of PEG-based regimens. Sodium phosphate as well as complementary simethicone and prokinetics use are considered. In this paper, we reviewed previous studies regarding bowel preparation for small bowel VCE and suggested optimal bowel preparation of VCE. PMID:26880894

  19. Optimal Bowel Preparation for Video Capsule Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun Joo; Moon, Jeong Seop; Shim, Ki-Nam

    2016-01-01

    During video capsule endoscopy (VCE), several factors, such as air bubbles, food material in the small bowel, and delayed gastric and small bowel transit time, influence diagnostic yield, small bowel visualization quality, and cecal completion rate. Therefore, bowel preparation before VCE is as essential as bowel preparation before colonoscopy. To date, there have been many comparative studies, consensus, and guidelines regarding different kinds of bowel cleansing agents in bowel preparation for small bowel VCE. Presently, polyethylene glycol- (PEG-) based regimens are given primary recommendation. Sodium picosulphate-based regimens are secondarily recommended, as their cleansing efficacy is less than that of PEG-based regimens. Sodium phosphate as well as complementary simethicone and prokinetics use are considered. In this paper, we reviewed previous studies regarding bowel preparation for small bowel VCE and suggested optimal bowel preparation of VCE. PMID:26880894

  20. Experimental uterus transplantation.

    PubMed

    Johannesson, Liza; Enskog, Anders

    2014-11-01

    Today, most causes of infertility are successfully treated. Yet there is still a subgroup of female infertility affecting around 4%, which so far is untreatable because of an absolute uterine factor. To acquire motherhood, these women are today referred to either adoption or surrogacy. Research in the field of uterus transplantation has been evaluated in different animal models for decades and has presently reached a human clinical application as a possible treatment for absolute uterine factor infertility. Organ transplantation is no longer reserved to those with a life-threatening disease and neither is organ transplantation together with concurrent immunosuppression prohibiting pregnancy. Uterus transplantation involves four parties - recipient, donor, partner of recipient and future child - and is a subject of ethical controversies. PMID:25193068

  1. Continuum of therapy in progressive renal diseases (from predialysis to transplantation): analysis of a new organizational model.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giuseppe; Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara; Mezza, Elisabetta; Burdese, Manuel; Rosetti, Maura; Guarena, Cesare; Messina, Maria; Pacitti, Alfonso; Thea, Alessandra; Malfi, Bernardo; Soragna, Giorgio; Gai, Massimo; Mangiarotti, Giovanni; Jeantet, Alberto; Segoloni, Giuseppe Paolo

    2004-09-01

    In the aging of Western populations, decreased mortality is counterbalanced by an increase in morbidity, particularly involving chronic diseases such as most renal diseases. The price of the successful care of chronic conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases or diabetes, is a continuous increase in new dialysis patients. However, the increased survival of patients on chronic renal replacement therapies poses new challenges to nephrologists and calls for new models of care. Since its split from internal medicine, nephrology has seen a progressive trend toward super specialization and the differentiation into at least 3 major branches (nephrology, dialysis, and transplantation), following a path common to several other fields of internal medicine. The success in the care of chronic patients is owed not only to a careful technical prescription, but also to the ability to teach self-care and attain compliance; this requires good medical practice and a sound patient-physician relationship. In this context, the usual models of care may fail to provide adequate coordination and, despite valuable single elements, could end up as an orchestra without a conductor. We propose an integrated model of care oriented to the type of patient (tested in our area especially for diabetic patients): the patient is followed-up by the same team from the first signs of renal disease to eventual dialysis or transplantation. This model offers an interesting alternative both for patients, who usually seek continuity of care, and for nephrologists who prefer a holistic and integrated patient-physician approach. PMID:15490421

  2. Optimising the expansion of the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program

    PubMed Central

    Cenin, Dayna R; St John, James; Slevin, Terry; Ledger, Melissa J; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s) To estimate the impact of various expansion scenarios of the National Bowel Cancer Screening program (NBSCP) on the number of bowel cancer deaths prevented. Impact of the expansion scenarios on colonoscopy demand was also investigated. Design MISCAN-Colon, a well-established, validated computer simulation model for bowel cancer screening, was adjusted to reflect the Australian situation. In July 2013, we simulated the effects of screening over a 50 year period, starting in 2006. The model parameters included participation rates for screening and follow up, cancerous and pre-cancerous lesion identification rates, bowel cancer incidence, mortality and the outcomes of the NBCSP. Five implementation scenarios, based on biennial screening using an immunochemical faecal occult blood test, were developed and modelled. A sensitivity analysis that increased screening participation to 60% was also conducted. Setting/ Participants Australian residents aged 50 to 74 years Main outcome measures Impact and comparison of five implementation scenarios on the number of bowel cancer deaths prevented and demand for colonoscopy. Results In its current state, MISCAN-Colon calculated that the NBCSP should prevent 35,169 bowel cancer deaths in the coming 40 years. Accelerating the expansion of the program to achieve biennial screening by 2020, more than 70,000 deaths would be prevented. If complete implementation of biennial screening resulted in a corresponding increase in participation to 60%, the number of deaths prevented increased across all scenarios. Conclusion(s) The findings strongly support the need for rapid implementation of the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program. Compared to the current situation, achieving biennial screening by 2020 could result in 100% more bowel cancer deaths being prevented (approximately 35,000) in the coming 40 years. PMID:25332032

  3. Pulmonary transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R D; Pasque, M K

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: More than 2700 lung transplants have been performed since the initial clinical success in 1983. The evolution in the techniques of lung transplantation and patient management and the effects on results are reviewed. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Improvements in donor management, lung preservation, operative techniques, immunosuppression management, infection prophylaxis and treatment, rejection surveillance, and long-term follow-up have occurred in the decade following the first clinically successful lung transplant. A wider spectrum of diseases and patients treated with lung transplant have accentuated the shortage of suitable lung donors. The organ shortage has led to the use of marginal donors and a limited experience using living, related donors. METHODS: Changes in techniques and patient selection and management are reviewed and controversial issues and problems are highlighted. RESULTS: One-year survival of greater than 90% for single-lung transplant recipients and greater than 85% for bilateral lung transplant recipients have been achieved. Complications caused by airway complications has been reduced greatly. Obliterative bronchiolitis develops in 20% to 50% of long-term survivors and is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality after the first year after transplant. CONCLUSIONS: Lung transplantation has evolved into an effective therapy for a wide variety of causes of end-stage lung disease. Wider applicability requires solutions to the problems of donor shortage and development of obliterative bronchiolitis. Images Figure 1. PMID:7826157

  4. Transplant rejection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wood K, Shankar S, Mittal S. Concepts and challenges in organ transplantation. In: Rich RR, Fleisher TA, Shearer WT, et ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Organ Transplantation Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  5. Intestine Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... intestine segment, most intestine transplants involve a whole organ from a deceased donor. In addition, most intestine transplants are performed in ... blood before surgery. I am looking for ... allocation About UNOS Being a living donor Calculator - CPRA Calculator - KDPI Calculator - LAS Calculator - MELD ...

  6. Irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Enck, Paul; Aziz, Qasim; Barbara, Giovanni; Farmer, Adam D; Fukudo, Shin; Mayer, Emeran A; Niesler, Beate; Quigley, Eamonn M M; Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; Schemann, Michael; Schwille-Kiuntke, Juliane; Simren, Magnus; Zipfel, Stephan; Spiller, Robin C

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disease with a high population prevalence. The disorder can be debilitating in some patients, whereas others may have mild or moderate symptoms. The most important single risk factors are female sex, younger age and preceding gastrointestinal infections. Clinical symptoms of IBS include abdominal pain or discomfort, stool irregularities and bloating, as well as other somatic, visceral and psychiatric comorbidities. Currently, the diagnosis of IBS is based on symptoms and the exclusion of other organic diseases, and therapy includes drug treatment of the predominant symptoms, nutrition and psychotherapy. Although the underlying pathogenesis is far from understood, aetiological factors include increased epithelial hyperpermeability, dysbiosis, inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, epigenetics and genetics, and altered brain-gut interactions. IBS considerably affects quality of life and imposes a profound burden on patients, physicians and the health-care system. The past decade has seen remarkable progress in our understanding of functional bowel disorders such as IBS that will be summarized in this Primer. PMID:27159638

  7. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Enck, Paul; Aziz, Qasim; Barbara, Giovanni; Farmer, Adam D.; Fukudo, Shin; Mayer, Emeran A.; Niesler, Beate; Quigley, Eamonn M. M.; Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; Schemann, Michael; Schwille-Kiuntke, Juliane; Simren, Magnus; Zipfel, Stephan; Spiller, Robin C.

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disease with a high population prevalence. The disorder can be debilitating in some patients, whereas others may have mild or moderate symptoms. The most important single risk factors are female sex, younger age and preceding gastrointestinal infections. Clinical symptoms of IBS include abdominal pain or discomfort, stool irregularities and bloating, as well as other somatic, visceral and psychiatric comorbidities. Currently, the diagnosis of IBS is based on symptoms and the exclusion of other organic diseases, and therapy includes drug treatment of the predominant symptoms, nutrition and psychotherapy. Although the underlying pathogenesis is far from understood, aetiological factors include increased epithelial hyperpermeability, dysbiosis, inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, epigenetics and genetics, and altered brain–gut interactions. IBS considerably affects quality of life and imposes a profound burden on patients, physicians and the health-care system. The past decade has seen remarkable progress in our understanding of functional bowel disorders such as IBS that will be summarized in this Primer. PMID:27159638

  8. Postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Giovanni; Cremon, Cesare; Pallotti, Francesca; De Giorgio, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2009-04-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain and changes in bowel habits, not sustained by structural changes. There is now consistent evidence indicating that IBS may be the adverse outcome of an acute episode of infectious gastroenteritis, the so-called postinfectious (PI) IBS. The infectious agents involved in the development of PI-IBS include pathogenic bacteria, parasites, and viruses. Abdominal pain and diarrhea are the most common symptoms of PI-IBS. Several studies identified a number of risk factors increasing the susceptibility for PI-IBS development. These include the virulence of the pathogen, the severity, and duration of the acute enteritis, younger age, female sex, and psychological disturbances. Several mucosal abnormalities in the colon or ileum of patients who develop PI-IBS have been described. These changes include increased mucosal permeability, an increased amount of intraepithelial lymphocytes, lamina propria T cells, and mast cells, as well as serotonin-containing enteroendocrine cells. The mediators released by these activated cells may evoke enteric nervous system responses, excite sensory afferent pathways, and induce visceral hyperalgesia. Little is known about the prognosis of PI-IBS, although it is likely better than that of nonspecific IBS. There is little evidence about a specific treatment for PI-IBS. Although probiotics and antibiotics may be promising in the prevention of PI-IBS, the efficacy of these treatments should be assessed in an ad hoc designed study. PMID:19300138

  9. Intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rege, Aparna; Sudan, Debra

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal transplantation has now emerged as a lifesaving therapeutic option and standard of care for patients with irreversible intestinal failure. Improvement in survival over the years has justified expansion of the indications for intestinal transplantation beyond the original indications approved by Center for Medicare and Medicaid services. Management of patients with intestinal failure is complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach to accurately select candidates who would benefit from rehabilitation versus transplantation. Significant strides have been made in patient and graft survival with several advancements in the perioperative management through timely referral, improved patient selection, refinement in the surgical techniques and better understanding of the immunopathology of intestinal transplantation. The therapeutic efficacy of the procedure is well evident from continuous improvements in functional status, quality of life and cost-effectiveness of the procedure. This current review summarizes various aspects including current practices and evidence based recommendations of intestinal transplantation. PMID:27086894

  10. Transplant psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Potts, S G

    2009-12-01

    Transplant units increasingly recognise a need for assistance from psychiatrists and psychologists in the assessment and management of potential transplant recipients and live donors. This arises from the various known associations between mental disorder and the need for transplantation; the intensifying requirement to select carefully among the potential recipients and donors of scarce human organs; and the drive to maximise transplant outcomes by optimising all aspects of treatment after surgery. There is good evidence that careful, protocol-guided selection among potential candidates for transplantation with alcoholic liver disease helps ensure outcomes at least as good as for other forms of liver disease. The evidence base in other areas is less robust, but the principles guiding the psychiatric assessment are broadly the same. There is an increasing need for psychiatric assessment of potential live organ donors, in order to minimise the risks they run, and in the case of altruistic donation this is now mandatory in UK law. PMID:21152475

  11. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive action of an orally available nociceptin receptor agonist SCH 221510 in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Sobczak, Marta; Mokrowiecka, Anna; Cygankiewicz, Adam I; Zakrzewski, Piotr K; Sałaga, Maciej; Storr, Martin; Kordek, Radzisław; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Krajewska, Wanda M; Fichna, Jakub

    2014-03-01

    The nociceptin receptors (NOPs) are expressed in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract on muscle cell membranes and neurons, as well as the immune cells that infiltrate the mucosa. The involvement of NOPs in the pathophysiology of GI inflammation has been suggested, but due to the lack of selective NOP agonists, it never fully elucidated. Our aim was to characterize the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effect of the NOP agonist, SCH 221510 [3-endo-8-[bis(2-methylphenyl)methyl]-3-phenyl-8-azabicyclo [3.2.1]octan-3-ol], as a potential therapeutic strategy in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The anti-inflammatory action of SCH 221510 was determined after intraperitoneal, oral, and intracolonic administration of SCH 221510 (0.1-3.0 mg/kg once or twice daily) in mice treated with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). Antinociceptive action of SCH 221510 was evaluated in the mouse model of mustard oil (MO)-induced abdominal pain. Relative NOP mRNA expression was assessed in patients with IBD using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We found that the expression of NOP mRNA was significantly decreased in patients with IBD. The administration (0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg i.p. twice daily and 3 mg/kg p.o. twice daily) of SCH 221510 attenuated TNBS colitis in mice. This effect was blocked by a selective NOP antagonist [J-113397 [(±)-1-[(3R*,4R*)-1-(cyclooctylmethyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-4-piperidinyl]-3-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one

  12. Transplanting intact donor tissue enhances dopamine cell survival and the predictability of motor improvements in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fricker, Rosemary A; Kuiper, Jan Herman; Gates, Monte A

    2012-01-01

    Primary cell transplantation is currently the gold standard for cell replacement in Parkinson's disease. However, the number of donors needed to treat a single patient is high, and the functional outcome is sometimes variable. The present work explores the possibility of enhancing the viability and/or functionality of small amounts of ventral mesencephalic (VM) donor tissue by reducing its perturbation during preparation and implantation. Briefly, unilaterally lesioned rats received either: (1) an intact piece of half an embryonic day 13 (E13) rat VM; (2) dissociated cells from half an E13 rat VM; or (3) no transplant. D-amphetamine- induced rotations revealed that animals receiving pieces of VM tissue or dissociated cells showed significant improvement in ipsilateral rotation 4 weeks post transplantation. By 6 weeks post transplantation, animals receiving pieces of VM tissue showed a trend for further improvement, while those receiving dissociated cells remained at their 4 week scores. Postmortem cell counts showed that the number of dopaminergic neurons in dissociated cell transplants was significantly lower than that surviving in transplants of intact tissue. When assessing the correlation between the number of dopamine cells in each transplant, and the improvement in rotation bias in experimental animals, it was shown that transplants of whole pieces of VM tissue offered greater predictability of graft function based on their dopamine cell content. Such results suggest that maintaining the integrity of VM tissue during implantation improves dopamine cell content, and that the dopamine cell content of whole tissue grafts offers a more predictable outcome of graft function in an animal model of Parkinson's disease. PMID:23056602

  13. The mitochondria-targeted anti-oxidant MitoQ decreases ischemia-reperfusion injury in a murine syngeneic heart transplant model

    PubMed Central

    Dare, Anna J.; Logan, Angela; Prime, Tracy A.; Rogatti, Sebastian; Goddard, Martin; Bolton, Eleanor M.; Bradley, J. Andrew; Pettigrew, Gavin J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Saeb-Parsy, Kourosh

    2015-01-01

    Background Free radical production and mitochondrial dysfunction during cardiac graft reperfusion is a major factor in post-transplant ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury, an important underlying cause of primary graft dysfunction. We therefore assessed the efficacy of the mitochondria-targeted anti-oxidant MitoQ in reducing IR injury in a murine heterotopic cardiac transplant model. Methods Hearts from C57BL/6 donor mice were flushed with storage solution alone, solution containing the anti-oxidant MitoQ, or solution containing the non–anti-oxidant decyltriphenylphosphonium control and exposed to short (30 minutes) or prolonged (4 hour) cold preservation before transplantation. Grafts were transplanted into C57BL/6 recipients and analyzed for mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production, oxidative damage, serum troponin, beating score, and inflammatory markers 120 minutes or 24 hours post-transplant. Results MitoQ was taken up by the heart during cold storage. Prolonged cold preservation of donor hearts before IR increased IR injury (troponin I, beating score) and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial DNA damage, protein carbonyls, and pro-inflammatory cytokine release 24 hours after transplant. Administration of MitoQ to the donor heart in the storage solution protected against this IR injury by blocking graft oxidative damage and dampening the early pro-inflammatory response in the recipient. Conclusions IR after heart transplantation results in mitochondrial oxidative damage that is potentiated by cold ischemia. Supplementing donor graft perfusion with the anti-oxidant MitoQ before transplantation should be studied further to reduce IR-related free radical production, the innate immune response to IR injury, and subsequent donor cardiac injury. PMID:26140808

  14. Modeling intraspecific adaptation of Abies sachalinensis to local altitude and responses to global warming, based on a 36-year reciprocal transplant experiment

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Wataru; Goto, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    Intraspecific adaptation in Abies sachalinensis was examined using models based on long-term monitoring data gathered during a reciprocal transplant experiment with eight seed source populations and six transplantation sites along an altitudinal gradient. The consequence of local adaptation was evaluated by testing the home-site advantage for upslope and downslope transplants at five ages. The populations’ fitness-linked trait was set as their productivity (tree height × survival rate) at each age. The effects of global warming were evaluated on the basis of the 36-year performance of downslope transplants. Evidence was found for adaptive genetic variation affecting both height and survival from an early age. Increasing the distance between seed source and planting site significantly reduced productivity for both upslope and downslope transplantation, demonstrating the existence of a significant home-site advantage. The decrease in productivity was most distinct for upslope transplantations, indicating strong local adaptation to high altitudes. Global warming is predicted to increase the productivity of high-altitude populations. However, owing to their existing local adaptation, all tested populations exhibited lower productivity under warming than demes that were optimal for the new climate. These negative predictions should be considered when planning the management of locally adapted plant species such as A. sachalinensis. PMID:25568044

  15. The Paracrine Effect of Transplanted Human Amniotic Epithelial Cells on Ovarian Function Improvement in a Mouse Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Primary Ovarian Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiaofen; Guo, Yuna; Wang, Qian; Xu, Minhua; Zhang, Qiuwan; Li, Ting; Lai, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    Human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) transplantation via tail vein has been reported to rescue ovarian function in mice with chemotherapy-induced primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). To test whether intraperitoneally transplanted hAECs could induce therapeutic effect and to characterize the paracrine effect of transplanted hAECs, we utilized a chemotherapy induced mice model of POI and investigated the ability of hAECs and conditioned medium collected from cultured hAECs (hAECs-CM) to restore ovarian function. We found that transplantation of hAECs or hAECs-CM either 24 hours or 7 days after chemotherapy could increase follicle numbers and partly restore fertility. By PCR analysis of recipient mice ovaries, the presence of SRY gene was only detected in mice transplanted with male hAECs 24 hours following chemotherapy. Further, the gene expression level of VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 in the ovaries decreased, although VEGFA increased 2 weeks after chemotherapy. After treatment with hAECs or hAEC-CM, the expression of both VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 increased, consistent with the immunohistochemical analysis. In addition, both hAECs and hAECs-CM treatment enhanced angiogenesis in the ovaries. The results suggested that hAECs-CM, like hAECs, could partly restore ovarian function, and the therapeutic function of intraperitoneally transplanted hAECs was mainly induced by paracrine-mediated ovarian protection and angiogenesis. PMID:26664408

  16. Transplantation of subventricular zone neural precursors induces an endogenous precursor cell response in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Lalitha; Daley, Brian F; Paumier, Katrina L; Collier, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Realistically, future stem cell therapies for neurological conditions including Parkinson’s disease (PD) will most probably entail combination treatment strategies, involving both the stimulation of endogenous cells and transplantation. Therefore, this study investigates these two modes of neural precursor cell (NPC) therapy in concert in order to determine their interrelationships in a rat PD model. Human placental alkaline phosphatase (hPAP) labeled NPCs were transplanted unilaterally into host rats which were subsequently infused ipsilaterally with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The reaction of host NPCs to the transplantation and 6-OHDA was tracked by bromodeoxyuridine labeling. Two weeks after transplantation, in animals transplanted with NPCs, we found evidence of elevated host subventricular zone NPC proliferation, neurogenesis, and migration to the graft site. In these animals, we also observed a significant preservation of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and substantia nigra TH cell number. We have seen no evidence that neuroprotection is a product of DA neuron replacement by NPC-derived cells. Rather, the NPCs expressed glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), sonic hedgehog (Shh) and stromal cell derived factor 1 alpha (SDF1α) providing a molecular basis for the observed neuroprotection and endogenous NPC response to transplantation. In summary, our data suggests plausible synergy between exogenous and endogenous NPC actions, and that NPC implantation before the 6-OHDA insult can create a host microenvironment conducive to stimulation of endogenous NPCs, and protection of mature nigral neurons. PMID:19399899

  17. A transplantable TH-MYCN transgenic tumor model in C57Bl/6 mice for preclinical immunological studies in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kroesen, Michiel; Nierkens, Stefan; Ansems, Marleen; Wassink, Melissa; Orentas, Rimas J; Boon, Louis; den Brok, Martijn H; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Adema, Gosse J

    2014-03-15

    Current multimodal treatments for patients with neuroblastoma (NBL), including anti-disialoganglioside (GD2) monoclonal antibody (mAb) based immunotherapy, result in a favorable outcome in around only half of the patients with advanced disease. To improve this, novel immunocombinational strategies need to be developed and tested in autologous preclinical NBL models. A genetically well-explored autologous mouse model for NBL is the TH-MYCN model. However, the immunobiology of the TH-MYCN model remains largely unexplored. We developed a mouse model using a transplantable TH-MYCN cell line in syngeneic C57Bl/6 mice and characterized the immunobiology of this model. In this report, we show the relevance and opportunities of this model to study immunotherapy for human NBL. Similar to human NBL cells, syngeneic TH-MYCN-derived 9464D cells endogenously express the tumor antigen GD2 and low levels of MHC Class I. The presence of the adaptive immune system had little or no influence on tumor growth, showing the low immunogenicity of the NBL cells. In contrast, depletion of NK1.1+ cells resulted in enhanced tumor outgrowth in both wild-type and Rag1(-/-) mice, showing an important role for NK cells in the natural anti-NBL immune response. Analysis of the tumor infiltrating leukocytes ex vivo revealed the presence of both tumor associated myeloid cells and T regulatory cells, thus mimicking human NBL tumors. Finally, anti-GD2 mAb mediated NBL therapy resulted in ADCC in vitro and delayed tumor outgrowth in vivo. We conclude that the transplantable TH-MYCN model represents a relevant model for the development of novel immunocombinatorial approaches for NBL patients. PMID:24038106

  18. Ultrastructural changes of the intracellular surfactant pool in a rat model of lung transplantation-related events

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, involved in primary graft dysfunction following lung transplantation, leads to inactivation of intra-alveolar surfactant which facilitates injury of the blood-air barrier. The alveolar epithelial type II cells (AE2 cells) synthesize, store and secrete surfactant; thus, an intracellular surfactant pool stored in lamellar bodies (Lb) can be distinguished from the intra-alveolar surfactant pool. The aim of this study was to investigate ultrastructural alterations of the intracellular surfactant pool in a model, mimicking transplantation-related procedures including flush perfusion, cold ischemia and reperfusion combined with mechanical ventilation. Methods Using design-based stereology at the light and electron microscopic level, number, surface area and mean volume of AE2 cells as well as number, size and total volume of Lb were determined in a group subjected to transplantation-related procedures including both I/R injury and mechanical ventilation (I/R group) and a control group. Results After I/R injury, the mean number of Lb per AE2 cell was significantly reduced compared to the control group, accompanied by a significant increase in the luminal surface area per AE2 cell in the I/R group. This increase in the luminal surface area correlated with the decrease in surface area of Lb per AE2. The number-weighted mean volume of Lb in the I/R group showed a tendency to increase. Conclusion We suggest that in this animal model the reduction of the number of Lb per AE2 cell is most likely due to stimulated exocytosis of Lb into the alveolar space. The loss of Lb is partly compensated by an increased size of Lb thus maintaining total volume of Lb per AE2 cell and lung. This mechanism counteracts at least in part the inactivation of the intra-alveolar surfactant. PMID:21669009

  19. Efficient liver repopulation of transplanted hepatocyte prevents cirrhosis in a rat model of hereditary tyrosinemia type I

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ludi; Shao, Yanjiao; Li, Lu; Tian, Feng; Cen, Jin; Chen, Xiaotao; Hu, Dan; Zhou, Yan; Xie, Weifen; Zheng, Yunwen; Ji, Yuan; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali; Hui, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type I (HT1) is caused by a deficiency in the enzyme fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (Fah). Fah-deficient mice and pigs are phenotypically analogous to human HT1, but do not recapitulate all the chronic features of the human disorder, especially liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Rats as an important model organism for biomedical research have many advantages over other animal models. Genome engineering in rats is limited till the availability of new gene editing technologies. Using the recently developed CRISPR/Cas9 technique, we generated Fah−/− rats. The Fah−/− rats faithfully represented major phenotypic and biochemical manifestations of human HT1, including hypertyrosinemia, liver failure, and renal tubular damage. More importantly, the Fah−/− rats developed remarkable liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, which have not been observed in Fah mutant mice or pigs. Transplantation of wild-type hepatocytes rescued the Fah−/− rats from impending death. Moreover, the highly efficient repopulation of hepatocytes in Fah−/− livers prevented the progression of liver fibrosis to cirrhosis and in turn restored liver architecture. These results indicate that Fah−/− rats may be used as an animal model of HT1 with liver cirrhosis. Furthermore, Fah−/− rats may be used as a tool in studying hepatocyte transplantation and a bioreactor for the expansion of hepatocytes. PMID:27510266

  20. Efficient liver repopulation of transplanted hepatocyte prevents cirrhosis in a rat model of hereditary tyrosinemia type I.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ludi; Shao, Yanjiao; Li, Lu; Tian, Feng; Cen, Jin; Chen, Xiaotao; Hu, Dan; Zhou, Yan; Xie, Weifen; Zheng, Yunwen; Ji, Yuan; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali; Hui, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type I (HT1) is caused by a deficiency in the enzyme fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (Fah). Fah-deficient mice and pigs are phenotypically analogous to human HT1, but do not recapitulate all the chronic features of the human disorder, especially liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Rats as an important model organism for biomedical research have many advantages over other animal models. Genome engineering in rats is limited till the availability of new gene editing technologies. Using the recently developed CRISPR/Cas9 technique, we generated Fah(-/-) rats. The Fah(-/-) rats faithfully represented major phenotypic and biochemical manifestations of human HT1, including hypertyrosinemia, liver failure, and renal tubular damage. More importantly, the Fah(-/-) rats developed remarkable liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, which have not been observed in Fah mutant mice or pigs. Transplantation of wild-type hepatocytes rescued the Fah(-/-) rats from impending death. Moreover, the highly efficient repopulation of hepatocytes in Fah(-/-) livers prevented the progression of liver fibrosis to cirrhosis and in turn restored liver architecture. These results indicate that Fah(-/-) rats may be used as an animal model of HT1 with liver cirrhosis. Furthermore, Fah(-/-) rats may be used as a tool in studying hepatocyte transplantation and a bioreactor for the expansion of hepatocytes. PMID:27510266

  1. Complete rat spinal cord transection as a faithful model of spinal cord injury for translational cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lukovic, Dunja; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Lopez-Mocholi, Eric; Rodriguez-Jiménez, Francisco Javier; Jendelova, Pavla; Sykova, Eva; Oria, Marc; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Erceg, Slaven

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in neural loss and consequently motor and sensory impairment below the injury. There are currently no effective therapies for the treatment of traumatic SCI in humans. Various animal models have been developed to mimic human SCI. Widely used animal models of SCI are complete or partial transection or experimental contusion and compression, with both bearing controversy as to which one more appropriately reproduces the human SCI functional consequences. Here we present in details the widely used procedure of complete spinal cord transection as a faithful animal model to investigate neural and functional repair of the damaged tissue by exogenous human transplanted cells. This injury model offers the advantage of complete damage to a spinal cord at a defined place and time, is relatively simple to standardize and is highly reproducible. PMID:25860664

  2. THREE YEARS CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH INTESTINAL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Elmagd, Kareem; Todo, Satoru; Tzakis, Andreas; Reyes, Jorge; Nour, Bakr; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Fung, John J.; Demetris, Anthony; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND After the successful evolution of hepatic transplantation during the last decade, small bowel and multivisceral transplantation remains the sole elusive achievement for the next era of transplant surgeons. Until recently, and for the last thirty years, the results of the sporadic attempts of intestinal transplantation worldwide were discouraging because of unsatisfactory graft and patient survival. The experimental and clinical demonstration of the superior therapeutic efficacy of FK 506, a new immunosuppressive drug, ushered in the current era of small bowel and multivisceral transplantation with initial promising results. STUDY DESIGN Forty-three consecutive patients with short bowel syndrome, intestinal insufficiency, or malignant tumors with or without associated liver disease, were given intestinal (n=15), hepatic and intestinal (n=21), or multivisceral allografts that contained four or more organs (n=7). Treatment was with FK 506 based immunosuppression. The ascending and right transverse colon were included with the small intestine in 13 of the 43 grafts, almost evenly distributed between the three groups. RESULTS After six to 39 months, 30 of the 43 patients are alive, 29 bearing grafts. The most rapid convalescence and resumption of diet, as well as the highest three month patient survival (100 percent) and graft survival (88 percent) were with the isolated intestinal procedure. However, this advantage was slowly eroded during the first two postoperative years, in part because the isolated intestine was more prone to rejection. By the end of this time, the best survival rate (86 percent) was with the multivisceral procedure. With all three operations, most of the patients were able to resume diet and discontinue parenteral alimentation, and in the best instances, the quality of life approached normal. However, the surveillance and intensity of care required for these patients for the first year, and in most instances thereafter, was very high

  3. Exogenous Lipocalin 2 Ameliorates Acute Rejection in a Mouse Model of Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, M. I.; Schwelberger, H. G.; Brendel, K. A.; Feurle, J.; Andrassy, J.; Kotsch, K.; Regele, H.; Pratschke, J.; Maier, H. T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) is rapidly produced by damaged nephron epithelia and is one of the most promising new markers of renal injury, delayed graft function and acute allograft rejection (AR); however, the functional importance of Lcn2 in renal transplantation is largely unknown. To understand the role of Lcn2 in renal AR, kidneys from Balb/c mice were transplanted into C57Bl/6 mice and vice versa and analyzed for morphological and physiological outcomes of AR at posttransplantation days 3, 5, and 7. The allografts showed a steady increase in intensity of interstitial infiltration, tubulitis and periarterial aggregation of lymphocytes associated with a substantial elevation in serum levels of creatinine, urea and Lcn2. Perioperative administration of recombinant Lcn2:siderophore:Fe complex (rLcn2) to recipients resulted in functional and morphological amelioration of the allograft at day 7 almost as efficiently as daily immunosuppression with cyclosporine A (CsA). No significant differences were observed in various donor–recipient combinations (C57Bl/6 wild‐type and Lcn2−/−, Balb/c donors and recipients). Histochemical analyses of the allografts showed reduced cell death in recipients treated with rLcn2 or CsA. These results demonstrate that Lcn2 plays an important role in reducing the extent of kidney AR and indicate the therapeutic potential of Lcn2 in transplantation. PMID:26595644

  4. Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Fu, Nancy; Wong, Titus

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is now the leading cause of nosocomial infection. There has been an upsurge of CDI in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD patients with CDI have increased morbidity and mortality. The establishment, proliferation, and recurrence of CDI in IBD patients form a complex interplay of microbial, environmental, and host-susceptibility factors. Different risk factors have been found predisposing IBD patients to CDI. Vancomycin performs better than metronidazole in treating IBD patients with CDI. Fecal microbiota transplantation continues to be a very effective therapy. New therapeutic modalities such as vaccinations and bile salts are currently being investigated. PMID:27137789

  5. Short bowel syndrome in children: surgical and medical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Coletta, Riccardo; Khalil, Basem A; Morabito, Antonino

    2014-10-01

    The main cause of intestinal failure in children is due to short bowel syndrome (SBS) resulting from congenital or acquired intestinal lesions. From the first lengthening procedure introduced by Bianchi, the last three decades have seen lengthening procedures established as fundamental components of multidisciplinary intestinal rehabilitation programs. Debate on indications and timing of the procedures is still open leaving SBS surgical treatment a great challenge. However, enteral autonomy is possible only with an individualized approach remembering that each SBS patient is unique. Current literature on autologous gastrointestinal reconstruction technique was reviewed aiming to assess a comprehensive pathway in SBS non-transplant management. PMID:25459014

  6. Does stress induce bowel dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Ming; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Kao, John Y

    2014-08-01

    Psychological stress is known to induce somatic symptoms. Classically, many gut physiological responses to stress are mediated by the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. There is, however, a growing body of evidence of stress-induced corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) release causing bowel dysfunction through multiple pathways, either through the HPA axis, the autonomic nervous systems, or directly on the bowel itself. In addition, recent findings of CRF influencing the composition of gut microbiota lend support for the use of probiotics, antibiotics, and other microbiota-altering agents as potential therapeutic measures in stress-induced bowel dysfunction. PMID:24881644

  7. A component of polysaccharide peptidoglycan complex on Lactobacillus induced an improvement of murine model of inflammatory bowel disease and colitis-associated cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, S; Hara, T; Nagaoka, M; Mike, A; Mitsuyama, K; Sako, T; Yamamoto, M; Kado, S; Takada, T

    2009-09-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signals play key roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We previously described that both intact cells and a cell wall-derived polysaccharide-peptidoglycan complex (PSPG) in a strain of lactobacillus [Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS)] inhibited IL-6 production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) isolated from murine IBD. Diets with LcS improve murine IBD by suppression of IL-6 synthesis in LPMCs. Moreover, LcS supplementation with fermented milk ameliorates disease activity in patients with active ulcerative colitis. Here, we focused on the specific roles of PSPG in LcS concerning their anti-inflammatory actions. PSPG derived from LcS, and no other strain of lactobacilli, inhibited IL-6 production in LPS-stimulated murine IBD LPMCs. Purified PSPG-I from LcS inhibited IL-6 synthesis in LPS-stimulated murine IBD LPMCs through the inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB. The anti-IL-6 action of LcS PSPG was abrogated by masking with monoclonal anti-PSPG-I. Furthermore, PSPG-I-negative L. casei strains (PSPG-I-negative mutant LcS: LC(DeltaPSPG-I), L. casei ATCC 334) did not inhibit IL-6 production. Finally, we confirmed the effects of PSPG-I on LcS in the models of both IBD and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). In the IBD model, ingestion of LcS improved ileitis and inhibited activation of IL-6/STAT3 signaling, while ingestion of the LC(DeltaPSPG-I) strain did not. In the CAC model, treatment with LcS, but not the LC(DeltaPSPG-I) strain, showed tumour-suppressive effects with an inhibition of IL-6 production in the colonic mucosa. These results suggested that a specific polysaccharide component in an L. casei strain plays a crucial role in its anti-inflammatory actions in chronic intestinal inflammatory disorders. PMID:19740306

  8. Mesenteric Microcirculatory Dysfunctions and Translocation of Indigenous Bacteria in a Rat Model of Strangulated Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zanoni, Fernando Luiz; Benabou, Simon; Greco, Karin Vicente; Moreno, Ana Carolina Ramos; Cruz, José Walber Miranda Costa; Filgueira, Fernando Paranaiba; Martinez, Marina Baquerizo; de Figueiredo, Luiz Francisco Poli; Silva, Maurício Rocha e; Sannomiya, Paulina

    2009-01-01

    PRUPOSE Bacterial translocation has been shown to occur in critically ill patients after extensive trauma, shock, sepsis, or thermal injury. The present study investigates mesenteric microcirculatory dysfunctions, the bacterial translocation phenomenon, and hemodynamic/metabolic disturbances in a rat model of intestinal obstruction and ischemia. METHODS Anesthetized (pentobarbital 50 mg/kg, i.p.) male Wistar rats (250–350 g) were submitted to intestinal obstruction or laparotomy without intestinal obstruction (Sham) and were evaluated 24 hours later. Bacterial translocation was assessed by bacterial culture of the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), liver, spleen, and blood. Leukocyte-endothelial interactions in the mesenteric microcirculation were assessed by intravital microscopy, and P-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 expressions were quantified by immunohistochemistry. Hematocrit, blood gases, lactate, glucose, white blood cells, serum urea, creatinine, bilirubin, and hepatic enzymes were measured. RESULTS About 86% of intestinal obstruction rats presented positive cultures for E. coli in samples of the mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, and spleen, and 57% had positive hemocultures. In comparison to the Sham rats, intestinal obstruction induced neutrophilia and increased the number of rolling (~2-fold), adherent (~5-fold), and migrated leukocytes (~11-fold); this increase was accompanied by an increased expression of P-selectin (~2-fold) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (~2-fold) in the mesenteric microcirculation. Intestinal obstruction rats exhibited decreased PaCO2, alkalosis, hyperlactatemia, and hyperglycemia, and increased blood potassium, hepatic enzyme activity, serum urea, creatinine, and bilirubin. A high mortality rate was observed after intestinal obstruction (83% at 72 h vs. 0% in Sham rats). CONCLUSION Intestinal obstruction and ischemia in rats is a relevant model for the in vivo study of mesenteric microcirculatory dysfunction

  9. A new simplified volume-loaded heterotopic rabbit heart transplant model with improved techniques and a standard operating procedure

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Zheng, Jun; Pan, Xu-Dong; Li, Bing; Zhang, Jin-Wei; Wang, Long-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Background The classic non-working (NW) heterotopic heart transplant (HTX) model in rodents had been widely used for researches related to immunology, graft rejection, evaluation of immunosuppressive therapies and organ preservation. But unloaded models are considered not suitable for some researches. Accordingly, We have constructed a volume-loaded (VL) model by a new and simple technique. Methods Thirty male New Zealand White rabbits were randomly divided into two groups, group NW with 14 rabbits and group VL with 16 rabbits, which served as donors and recipients. We created a large and nonrestrictive shunt to provide left heart a sufficient preload. The donor superior vena cave and ascending aorta (AO) were anastomosed to the recipient abdominal aorta (AAO) and inferior vena cava (IVC), respectively. Results No animals suffered from paralysis, pneumonia and lethal bleeding. Recipients’ mortality and morbidity were 6.7% (1/15) and 13.3% (2/15), respectively. The cold ischemia time in group VL is slight longer than that in group NW. The maximal aortic velocity (MAV) of donor heart was approximately equivalent to half that of native heart in group VL. Moreover, the similar result was achieved in the parameter of late diastolic mitral inflow velocity between donor heart and native heart in group VL. The echocardiography (ECHO) showed a bidirectional flow in donor SVC of VL model, inflow during diastole and outflow during systole. PET-CT imaging showed the standard uptake value (SUV) of allograft was equal to that of native heart in both groups on the postoperative day 3. Conclusions We have developed a new VL model in rabbits, which imitates a native heart hemodynamically while only requiring a minor additional procedure. Surgical technique is simple compared with currently used HTX models. We also developed a standard operating procedure that significantly improved graft and recipient survival rate. This study may be useful for investigations in transplantation

  10. Investigation of immunological approaches to enhance engraftment in a 1 Gy TBI canine haematopoietic stem cell transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sandra; Altmann, Simone; Brandt, Bettina; Adam, Carsten; Riebau, Franziska; Vogel, Heike; Weirich, Volker; Hilgendorf, Inken; Storb, Rainer; Freund, Mathias; Junghanss, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Objective Stable mixed haematopoietic chimerism can be established in a canine stem cell transplantation model using a conditioning consisting of total body irradiation (TBI, 2Gy) and postgrafting immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and cyclosporin (CSA). Reduction of TBI had resulted in graft rejection in this model previously. We investigated whether postgrafting stimulation of donor T-cells against recipient’s haematopoietic antigens or graft augmentation with donor monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC) promote engraftment following 1Gy TBI. Methods All dogs received dog leukocyte-antigen-identical bone marrow transplantation. Dogs were conditioned with either 2Gy of TBI (group 1) or 1Gy of TBI followed by repetitive recipient haematopoietic cell lysate vaccinations (group 2) or graft augmentation with MoDC (group 3). Immunosuppression consisted of CSA and MMF. Results In group 1 four animals remained stable chimeras >wk110, and 3 rejected their grafts (wk10, wk14, wk16). All dogs in groups 2 and 3 rejected their graft (median: wk 10 and 11, respectively). Peak chimerism and engraftment duration was shorter in the 1Gy groups (p<0.05) compared to group 1. Conclusion Neither postgrafting vaccination nor graft augmentation with MoDC were effective in supporting durable engraftment. Additional modifications are neccessary to improve potential strategies aimed at establishment of early tissue specific graft-versus-host reactions. PMID:19100524

  11. Facial Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Russo, Jack E; Genden, Eric M

    2016-08-01

    Reconstruction of severe facial deformities poses a unique surgical challenge: restoring the aesthetic form and function of the face. Facial transplantation has emerged over the last decade as an option for reconstruction of these defects in carefully selected patients. As the world experience with facial transplantation grows, debate remains regarding whether such a highly technical, resource-intensive procedure is warranted, all to improve quality of life but not necessarily prolong it. This article reviews the current state of facial transplantation with focus on the current controversies and challenges, with particular attention to issues of technique, immunology, and ethics. PMID:27400850

  12. [Heart transplantation].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Norihide; Matsuda, Hikaru

    2005-11-01

    While nearly 4,000 patients undergo heart transplantation (HTx) every year in the world, only 27 HTx were performed since February, 1999, because of very strict Organ Transplantation Law in Japan. All were treated with triple immunosuppressive regimen. Although two patients died of infection 4 months and 4 years after HTx, respectively, 23 were discharged and 16 returned to work or go to school. New immunosuppressive drugs, such as sirolimus and everolimus, treatment of presensitized patients before transplantation using cyclophosphamide and intravenous globulin infusion, compact implantable left ventricular assist supports and the future of pediatric HTx in Japan are discussed. PMID:16277260

  13. The history of organ donation and transplantation in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ghods, Ahad J

    2014-03-01

    The first kidney transplant in Iran was performed in 1967, and this was the first organ transplant in countries that are current members of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation. In 1988, in response to the long waiting list at the Iranian Ministry of Health for kidney transplant, a state-regulated living-unrelated donor kidney transplant program was adopted. By 1999, the kidney transplant waiting list in Iran was eliminated. In 1989, a fatwa (religious approval) from the Supreme Religious Leader was obtained that recognized brain death and allowed deceased-donor organ transplant. Subsequently, transplant centers began performing deceased-donor kidney, liver, and heart transplants. In 2000, the Brain Death and Organ Transplantation Act was passed by the Iranian parliament, legalizing deceased-donor organ transplant. The transplant team at Shiraz began performing more deceased-donor kidney and liver transplants and became a successful deceased-donor organ transplant model in the country. By the end of 2012, there were 34166 kidney (including 4436 deceased-donor) and 2021 liver (including 1788 deceased-donor), 482 heart, 147 pancreas, 63 lung, and several intestine and multiorgan transplants performed in Iran. In 2011, there were 2771 solid-organ transplants performed in Iran (37 transplants per million population), and Iran ranked as number 33 among the 50 most active countries worldwide. In 2011 and 2012, Iran was ahead of all country members of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation in performing deceased-donor kidney and liver transplants. PMID:24635790

  14. Inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Szigethy, Eva; McLafferty, Laura; Goyal, Alka

    2010-04-01

    This article reviews the etiology, clinical characteristics, and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and associated psychological sequelae in children and adolescents with this lifelong disease. Pediatric-onset IBD, consisting of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, has significant medical morbidity and in many young persons is also associated with psychological and psychosocial challenges. Depression and anxiety are particularly prevalent and have a multifaceted etiology, including IBD-related factors such as cytokines and steroids used to treat IBD and psychosocial stress. A growing number of empirically supported interventions, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, hypnosis, and educational resources, help youth and their parents cope with IBD as well as the psychological and psychosocial sequelae. While there is convincing evidence that such interventions can help improve anxiety, depression, and health-related quality of life, their effects on IBD severity and course await further study. PMID:20478501

  15. Inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Szigethy, Eva; McLafferty, Laura; Goyal, Alka

    2011-08-01

    This article reviews the etiology, clinical characteristics, and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and associated psychological sequelae in children and adolescents with this lifelong disease. Pediatric-onset IBD, consisting of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, has significant medical morbidity and in many young persons is also associated with psychological and psychosocial challenges. Depression and anxiety are particularly prevalent and have a multifaceted etiology, including IBD-related factors such as cytokines and steroids used to treat IBD and psychosocial stress. A growing number of empirically supported interventions, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, hypnosis, and educational resources, help youth and their parents cope with IBD as well as the psychological and psychosocial sequelae. While there is convincing evidence that such interventions can help improve anxiety, depression, and health-related quality of life, their effects on IBD severity and course await further study. PMID:21855713

  16. The Role of Lysophosphatidic Acid on Airway Epithelial Cell Denudation in a Murine Heterotopic Tracheal Transplant Model

    PubMed Central

    Tando, Yukiko; Ota, Chiharu; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Kamata, Satoshi; Yamaya, Mutsuo; Kano, Kuniyuki; Okudaira, Shinichi; Aoki, Junken; Kubo, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic rejection is the major leading cause of morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation. Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB), a fibroproliferative disorder of the small airways, is the main manifestation of chronic lung allograft rejection. However, there is currently no treatment for the disease. We hypothesized that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) participates in the progression of OB. The aim of this study was to reveal the involvement of LPA on the lesion of OB. Methods Ki16198, an antagonist specifically for LPA1 and LPA3, was daily administered into the heterotopic tracheal transplant model mice at the day of transplantation. At days 10 and 28, the allografts were isolated and evaluated histologically. The messenger RNA levels of LPAR in microdissected mouse airway regions were assessed to reveal localization of lysophosphatidic acid receptors. The human airway epithelial cell was used to evaluate the mechanism of LPA-induced suppression of cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Results The administration of Ki16198 attenuated airway epithelial cell loss in the allograft at day 10. Messenger RNAs of LPA1 and LPA3 were detected in the airway epithelial cells of the mice. Lysophosphatidic acid inhibited the attachment of human airway epithelial cells to the ECM and induced cell detachment from the ECM, which was mediated by LPA1 and Rho-kinase pathway. However, Ki16198 did not prevent obliteration of allograft at day 28. Conclusions The LPA signaling is involved in the status of epithelial cells by distinct contribution in 2 different phases of the OB lesion. This finding suggests a role of LPA in the pathogenesis of OB. PMID:27500235

  17. Abate Cytochrome C induced apoptosome to protect donor liver against ischemia reperfusion injury on rat liver transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Zhuonan; Lian, Peilong; Wu, Xiaojuan; Shi, Baoxu; Zhuang, Maoyou; Zhou, Ruiling; Zhao, Rui; Zhao, Zhen; Guo, Sen; Ji, Zhipeng; Xu, Kesen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Aim of this study is to protect donor liver against ischemia-reperfusion injury by abating Cytochrome C induced apoptosome on rat model. Methods: A total of 25 clean SD inbred male rats were used in this research. The rats in ischemia-reperfusion injury group (I/R group, n=5) were under liver transplantation operation; rats in dichloroacetate diisopropylamine group (DADA group, n=5) were treated DADA before liver transplantation; control group (Ctrl group, n=5); other 10 rats were used to offer donor livers. Results: In DADA therapy group, Cytochrome C expression in donor hepatocellular cytoplasm was detected lower than that in I/R group. And the Cytochrome C induced apoptosome was also decreased in according to the lower expressions of Apaf-1 and Caspase3. Low level of cleaved PARP expression revealed less apoptosis in liver tissue. The morphology of donor liver mitochondria in DADA group was observed to be slightly edema but less than I/R group after operation 12 h. The liver function indexes of ALT and AST in serum were tested, and the results in DADA group showed it is significantly lower than I/R group after operation 12 h. The inflammation indexes of IL-6 and TNF-α expressions in DADA group were significantly lower than that in I/R group after operation 24 h. Conclusion: The dichloroacetate diisopropylamine treatment could protect the hepatocellular mitochondria in case of the spillage of Cytochrome C induced apoptosome, and protect the liver against ischemia-reperfusion injury. Thus, it may be a method to promote the recovery of donor liver function after transplantation. PMID:27186297

  18. Neural stem/progenitor cells differentiate into oligodendrocytes, reduce inflammation, and ameliorate learning deficits after transplantation in a mouse model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Koutsoudaki, Paraskevi N; Papastefanaki, Florentia; Stamatakis, Antonios; Kouroupi, Georgia; Xingi, Evangelia; Stylianopoulou, Fotini; Matsas, Rebecca

    2016-05-01

    The central nervous system has limited capacity for regeneration after traumatic injury. Transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) has been proposed as a potential therapeutic approach while insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) has neuroprotective properties following various experimental insults to the nervous system. We have previously shown that NPCs transduced with a lentiviral vector for IGF-I overexpression have an enhanced ability to give rise to neurons in vitro but also in vivo, upon transplantation in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Here we studied the regenerative potential of NPCs, IGF-I-transduced or not, in a mouse model of hippocampal mechanical injury. NPC transplantation, with or without IGF-I transduction, rescued the injury-induced spatial learning deficits as revealed in the Morris Water Maze. Moreover, it had beneficial effects on the host tissue by reducing astroglial activation and microglial/macrophage accumulation while enhancing generation of endogenous oligodendrocyte precursor cells. One or two months after transplantation the grafted NPCs had migrated towards the lesion site and in the neighboring myelin-rich regions. Transplanted cells differentiated toward the oligodendroglial, but not the neuronal or astrocytic lineages, expressing the early and late oligodendrocyte markers NG2, Olig2, and CNPase. The newly generated oligodendrocytes reached maturity and formed myelin internodes. Our current and previous observations illustrate the high plasticity of transplanted NPCs which can acquire injury-dependent phenotypes within the host CNS, supporting the fact that reciprocal interactions between transplanted cells and the host tissue are an important factor to be considered when designing prospective cell-based therapies for CNS degenerative conditions. GLIA 2016;64:763-779. PMID:26712314

  19. Prenatal Intestinal Obstruction Affects the Myenteric Plexus and Causes Functional Bowel Impairment in Fetal Rat Experimental Model of Intestinal Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Khen-Dunlop, Naziha; Sarnacki, Sabine; Victor, Anais; Grosos, Celine; Menard, Sandrine; Soret, Rodolphe; Goudin, Nicolas; Pousset, Maud; Sauvat, Frederique; Revillon, Yann; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Neunlist, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Background Intestinal atresia is a rare congenital disorder with an incidence of 3/10 000 birth. About one-third of patients have severe intestinal dysfunction after surgical repair. We examined whether prenatal gastrointestinal obstruction might effect on the myenteric plexus and account for subsequent functional disorders. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied a rat model of surgically induced antenatal atresia, comparing intestinal samples from both sides of the obstruction and with healthy rat pups controls. Whole-mount preparations of the myenteric plexus were stained for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Quantitative reverse transcription PCR was used to analyze mRNAs for inflammatory markers. Functional motility and permeability analyses were performed in vitro. Phenotypic studies were also performed in 8 newborns with intestinal atresia. In the experimental model, the proportion of nNOS-immunoreactive neurons was similar in proximal and distal segments (6.7±4.6% vs 5.6±4.2%, p = 0.25), but proximal segments contained a higher proportion of ChAT-immunoreactive neurons (13.2±6.2% vs 7.5±4.3%, p = 0.005). Phenotypic changes were associated with a 100-fold lower concentration-dependent contractile response to carbachol and a 1.6-fold higher EFS-induced contractile response in proximal compared to distal segments. Transcellular (p = 0.002) but not paracellular permeability was increased. Comparison with controls showed that modifications involved not only proximal but also distal segments. Phenotypic studies in human atresia confirmed the changes in ChAT expression. Conclusion Experimental atresia in fetal rat induces differential myenteric plexus phenotypical as well as functional changes (motility and permeability) between the two sides of the obstruction. Delineating these changes might help to identify markers predictive of motility dysfunction and to define guidelines for post-surgical care. PMID:23667464

  20. Pancreas transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... pancreas from a donor into a person with diabetes. Pancreas transplants give the person a chance to ... used as fuel. In people with type 1 diabetes , the pancreas does not make enough, or sometimes ...

  1. Lung transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases that may require a lung transplant are: Cystic fibrosis Damage to the arteries of the lung because ... BC; Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pulmonary Therapies Committee; ... Therapies Committee. Cystic fibrosis pulmonary guidelines: ...

  2. Transplant rejection

    MedlinePlus

    Abbas AK, Lichtman AH, Pillai S. Transplantation immunology. In: Abbas AK, Lichtman AH, Pillai S, eds. Cellular and Molecular Immunology. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 17. Adams AB, ...

  3. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    The pancreas is a gland behind your stomach and in front of your spine. It produces the juices that ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. A pancreas transplant is surgery to place a healthy pancreas ...

  4. Intestine Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... with any one product nor does UNOS assume responsibility for any error, omissions or other discrepancies. Share this: Was this information helpful? Talk to your doctor The process of being admitted and preparing for transplant surgery ...

  5. Hepatocyte Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mitry, Ragai R; Hughes, Robin D; Dhawan, Anil

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation (HTx) has been developed for use in liver-based metabolic disorders and in acute liver failure. Worldwide, there are around 80 patients that have been transplanted with hepatocytes. Almost all reported studies prove feasibility and safety of the procedure with short- to medium-term success. Availability of good quality hepatocytes (HCs) is the main limiting factor, and therefore alternative sources of cells such as stem cells are being investigated. Other limiting factors include cell engraftment, survival, and function of transplanted cells. It remains to be seen if progress in HTx research can overcome these hurdles leading to the wider use of the technique as an alternative to liver transplantation in the future. PMID:25755322

  6. Liver transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Risks for any anesthesia are: Problems breathing Reactions to medications Risks for any surgery are: Bleeding Heart attack or stroke Infection Liver transplant surgery and management after surgery carry major risks. There is ...

  7. Liver Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... patient who has poor kidney function is on dialysis. The PELD score is calculated based on the ... example, a person who had cirrhosis caused by long-term alcohol abuse resumes drinking after the transplant. Recurrence ...

  8. Corneal transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... clear outer lens on the front of the eye. A corneal transplant is surgery to replace the cornea with tissue ... years. Rejection can sometimes be controlled with steroid eye drops. Other ... are: Bleeding Cataracts Infection of the eye Glaucoma ( ...

  9. Successful function of autologous iPSC-derived dopamine neurons following transplantation in a non-human primate model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hallett, Penelope J; Deleidi, Michela; Astradsson, Arnar; Smith, Gaynor A; Cooper, Oliver; Osborn, Teresia M; Sundberg, Maria; Moore, Michele A; Perez-Torres, Eduardo; Brownell, Anna-Liisa; Schumacher, James M; Spealman, Roger D; Isacson, Ole

    2015-03-01

    Autologous transplantation of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons is a potential clinical approach for treatment of neurological disease. Preclinical demonstration of long-term efficacy, feasibility, and safety of iPSC-derived dopamine neurons in non-human primate models will be an important step in clinical development of cell therapy. Here, we analyzed cynomolgus monkey (CM) iPSC-derived midbrain dopamine neurons for up to 2 years following autologous transplantation in a Parkinson's disease (PD) model. In one animal, with the most successful protocol, we found that unilateral engraftment of CM-iPSCs could provide a gradual onset of functional motor improvement contralateral to the side of dopamine neuron transplantation, and increased motor activity, without a need for immunosuppression. Postmortem analyses demonstrated robust survival of midbrain-like dopaminergic neurons and extensive outgrowth into the transplanted putamen. Our proof of concept findings support further development of autologous iPSC-derived cell transplantation for treatment of PD. PMID:25732245

  10. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... rcom ing any disease, especially inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). There can be many causes of inadequate nutrition in children and adolescents with IBD. First, a child’s appetite may decrease during a “ ...

  11. Protective effects of heat-killed Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis BF3, isolated from the intestine of chum salmon, in a murine model of DSS-induced inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Toru; Hirano, Shino; Yokota, Yasushi; Takahashi, Hajime; Kimura, Bon; Kuda, Takashi; Eto, Tadashi; Kato, Michiko

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered an etiological factor responsible for several symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In vitro anti-inflammatory activities of heat-killed Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis BF3 have been reported. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effect of these cells was examined using a dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced murine IBD model. Administration of heat-killed L. lactis BF3 via drinking water suppressed the IBD symptoms, such as shortening of colon length, damage to the colon mucosa as observed under the microscope, and spleen enlargement. This result suggests that heat-killed L. lactis BF3 has the potential to treat IBD. PMID:27508115

  12. Protective effects of heat-killed Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis BF3, isolated from the intestine of chum salmon, in a murine model of DSS-induced inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    NAKATA, Toru; HIRANO, Shino; YOKOTA, Yasushi; TAKAHASHI, Hajime; KIMURA, Bon; KUDA, Takashi; ETO, Tadashi; KATO, Michiko

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered an etiological factor responsible for several symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In vitro anti-inflammatory activities of heat-killed Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis BF3 have been reported. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effect of these cells was examined using a dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced murine IBD model. Administration of heat-killed L. lactis BF3 via drinking water suppressed the IBD symptoms, such as shortening of colon length, damage to the colon mucosa as observed under the microscope, and spleen enlargement. This result suggests that heat-killed L. lactis BF3 has the potential to treat IBD. PMID:27508115

  13. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Transplantation Can Normalize Thyroid Function in a Cystinosis Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Gaide Chevronnay, H P; Janssens, V; Van Der Smissen, P; Rocca, C J; Liao, X H; Refetoff, S; Pierreux, C E; Cherqui, S; Courtoy, P J

    2016-04-01

    Hypothyroidism is the most frequent and earliest endocrine complication in cystinosis, a multisystemic lysosomal storage disease caused by defective transmembrane cystine transporter, cystinosin (CTNS gene). We recently demonstrated in Ctns(-/-) mice that altered thyroglobulin biosynthesis associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress, combined with defective lysosomal processing, caused hypothyroidism. In Ctns(-/-) kidney, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation provides long-term functional and structural protection. Tissue repair involves transfer of cystinosin-bearing lysosomes from HSCs differentiated as F4/80 macrophages into deficient kidney tubular cells, via tunneling nanotubes that cross basement laminae. Here we evaluated the benefit of HSC transplantation for cystinotic thyroid and investigated the underlying mechanisms. HSC engraftment in Ctns(-/-) thyroid drastically decreased cystine accumulation, normalized the TSH level, and corrected the structure of a large fraction of thyrocytes. In the thyroid microenvironment, HSCs differentiated into a distinct, mixed macrophage/dendritic cell lineage expressing CD45 and major histocompatibility complex II but low CD11b and F4/80. Grafted HSCs closely apposed to follicles and produced tunneling nanotube-like extensions that crossed follicular basement laminae. HSCs themselves further squeezed into follicles, allowing extensive contact with thyrocytes, but did not transdifferentiate into Nkx2.1-expressing cells. Our observations revealed significant differences of basement lamina porosity between the thyroid and kidney and/or intrinsic macrophage invasive properties once in the thyroid microenvironment. The contrast between extensive thyrocyte protection and low HSC abundance at steady state suggests multiple sequential encounters and/or remanent impact. This is the first report demonstrating the potential of HSC transplantation to correct thyroid disease and supports a major multisystemic benefit of stem

  14. Berberine Improves Intestinal Motility and Visceral Pain in the Mouse Models Mimicking Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS-D) Symptoms in an Opioid-Receptor Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Qiuhui; Fichna, Jakub; Zheng, Lijun; Wang, Kesheng; Yu, Zhen; Li, Yongyu; Li, Kun; Song, Aihong; Liu, Zhongchen; Song, Zhenshun; Kreis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Berberine and its derivatives display potent analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activity. Here we aimed at characterizing the mechanism of action of berberine in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and cortical neurons using animal models and in vitro tests. Methods The effect of berberine was characterized in murine models mimicking diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) symptoms. Then the opioidantagonists were used to identify the receptors involved. Furthermore, the effect of berberineon opioid receptors expression was established in the mouse intestine and rat fetal cortical neurons. Results In mouse models, berberine prolonged GI transit and time to diarrhea in a dose-dependent manner, and significantly reduced visceral pain. In physiological conditions the effects of berberine were mediated by mu- (MOR) and delta- (DOR) opioidreceptors; hypermotility, excessive secretion and nociception were reversed by berberine through MOR and DOR-dependent action. We also found that berberine increased the expression of MOR and DOR in the mouse bowel and rat fetal cortical neurons. Conclusion Berberine significantly improved IBS-D symptoms in animal models, possibly through mu- and delta- opioid receptors. Berberine may become a new drug candidate for the successful treatment of IBS-D in clinical conditions. PMID:26700862

  15. Interleukin-2 and syngeneic bone marrow transplantation in a murine fibrosarcoma model.

    PubMed

    Ho, S P; Stebler, B; Ershler, W B

    1991-04-01

    Mice received interleukin-2 (IL-2) either before and after, or just after intravenous inoculation of syngeneic fibrosarcoma cells. Fewer pulmonary tumor colonies were observed in those animals treated with IL-2, and the best results were observed when IL-2 was administered prior to tumor inoculation. When mice were lethally irradiated and reconstituted with tumor-contaminated bone marrow, IL-2 treatment was also associated with fewer tumor lung colonies. IL-2 may prove to be a useful adjuvant therapy, particularly in the setting of autologous bone marrow transplantation when the infused marrow is contaminated with tumor cells. PMID:1873353

  16. Cardiac preservation is enhanced in a heterotopic rat transplant model by supplementing the nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, D J; Oz, M C; Koga, S; Taha, Z; Broekman, M J; Marcus, A J; Liao, H; Naka, Y; Brett, J; Cannon, P J

    1994-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a novel biologic messenger with diverse effects but its role in organ transplantation remains poorly understood. Using a porphyrinic microsensor, the first direct measurements of coronary vascular and endocardial NO production were made. NO was measured directly in the effluent of preserved, heterotopically transplanted rat hearts stimulated with L-arginine and bradykinin; NO concentrations fell from 2.1 +/- 0.4 microM for freshly explanted hearts to 0.7 +/- 0.2 and 0.2 +/- 0.08 microM for hearts preserved for 19 and 38 h, respectively. NO levels were increased by SOD, suggesting a role for superoxide-mediated destruction of NO. Consistent with these data, addition of the NO donor nitroglycerin (NTG) to a balanced salt preservation solution enhanced graft survival in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with 92% of hearts supplemented with NTG surviving 12 h of preservation versus only 17% in its absence. NTG similarly enhanced preservation of hearts stored in University of Wisconsin solution, the clinical standard for preservation. Other stimulators of the NO pathway, including nitroprusside, L-arginine, or 8-bromoguanosine 3',5' monophosphate, also enhanced graft survival, whereas the competitive NO synthase antagonist NG-monomethyl-L-arginine was associated with poor preservation. Likely mechanisms whereby supplementation of the NO pathway enhanced preservation included increased blood flow to the reperfused graft and decreased graft leukostasis. NO was also measured in endothelial cells subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation and detected based on its ability to inhibit thrombin-mediated platelet aggregation and serotonin release. NO became undetectable in endothelial cells exposed to hypoxia followed by reoxygenation and was restored to normoxic levels on addition of SOD. These studies suggest that the NO pathway fails during preservation/transplantation because of formation of oxygen free radicals during reperfusion, which quench available NO

  17. The chick/quail transplantation model: discovery of the isthmic organizer center.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Mallart, Rosa-Magda

    2005-09-01

    This paper summarizes chick/quail transplantation experiments performed in the INSERM U106 by Alvarado-Mallart's group from 1989 to 2002. First, it will present the various steps leading us to demonstrate that, at stage 10 of Hamburger and Hamilton, the avian neuroepithelium is still competent to change its fate influenced by environmental inductive factors and that these factors emanate from the cerebellar neuroepithelium; then, it will be briefly reported, experiments aimed to characterize the genetic cascade involved in the formation of the midbrain/hindbrain boundary and the specification of the meso-isthmic-cerebellar domain. PMID:16111542

  18. Meniscus transplantation.

    PubMed

    Frank, Rachel M; Cole, Brian J

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the structure and function of the meniscus is critical to understanding its role in overall knee joint function. Injury to, or removal of, meniscal tissue may be associated with articular cartilage wear, knee instability, and, ultimately, the progression of osteoarthritis. While every effort is made for preserving and/or repairing damaged meniscal tissue, in some cases, the meniscus is not amenable to repair after injury. For appropriately indicated patients with symptomatic meniscal deficiency, meniscus allograft transplantation is an excellent surgical solution aimed at reducing pain and improving function. Indications for meniscus allograft transplantation are limited, and concomitant procedures such as osteotomy for malalignment, ligamentous, and/or articular cartilage restoration may be necessary in order to ensure an optimal result following meniscus allograft transplantation. Surgical techniques for meniscus allograft transplantation are variable and include soft-tissue fixation versus bone plug fixation versus bone bridge fixation. Outcomes following meniscus allograft transplantation are generally good to excellent, though reoperation rates are relatively high. The purpose of this article is to provide a concise review of recently published data on meniscus allograft transplantation, with a focus on recent outcomes studies. PMID:26431702

  19. Lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplantation may be the only intervention that can prolong survival and improve quality of life for those individuals with advanced lung disease who are acceptable candidates for the procedure. However, these candidates may be extremely ill and require ventilator and/or circulatory support as a bridge to transplantation, and lung transplantation recipients are at risk of numerous post-transplant complications that include surgical complications, primary graft dysfunction, acute rejection, opportunistic infection, and chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD), which may be caused by chronic rejection. Many advances in pre- and post-transplant management have led to improved outcomes over the past decade. These include the creation of sound guidelines for candidate selection, improved surgical techniques, advances in donor lung preservation, an improving ability to suppress and treat allograft rejection, the development of prophylaxis protocols to decrease the incidence of opportunistic infection, more effective therapies for treating infectious complications, and the development of novel therapies to treat and manage CLAD. A major obstacle to prolonged survival beyond the early post-operative time period is the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), which is the most common form of CLAD. This manuscript discusses recent and evolving advances in the field of lung transplantation. PMID:23710330

  20. Differential expression of cytoprotective and apoptotic genes in an ischaemia-reperfusion isolated organ perfusion model of the transplanted kidney.

    PubMed

    Waller, Helen L; Harper, Simon J F; Hosgood, Sarah A; Bagul, Atul; Kay, Mark D; Kaushik, Monika; Yang, Bin; Bicknell, Gareth R; Nicholson, Michael L

    2007-07-01

    The optimal kidney preservation system and methods to ameliorate reperfusion injury are major factors in accomplishing successful graft function following transplantation. Ischaemia and reperfusion lead to cellular stress and the adaptive response may include the activation of genes involved in cellular protection and/or cell death by apoptosis. We investigated the expression of cytoprotective heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic Bax after 6 h isolated organ perfusion in porcine kidneys that had been given 10 and 40 min warm ischaemic time. The level of HO-1 was shown to be significantly higher in the 10-min warm ischaemic group compared with 40-min group (0.90 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.83 +/- 0.03; P = 0.002). The levels of HO-1 showed a significant positive correlated with parameters of renal function, creatinine clearance, and renal blood flow and urine output (AUC; r = 0.8042, P = 0.03; r = 0.6028, P = 0.04; r = 0.6055, P = 0.04), demonstrating a possible protective role of this gene in this model of renal transplantation. PMID:17639610

  1. Influence of intra-articular administration of trichostatin a on autologous osteochondral transplantation in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Hou, Huacheng; Zheng, Ke; Wang, Guanghu; Ikegawa, Shiro; Zheng, Minghao; Gao, Xiang; Qin, Jinzhong; Teng, Huajian; Jiang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Autologous osteochondral transplantation (AOT) is a method for articular cartilage repair. However, several disadvantages of this method have been reported, such as transplanted cartilage degeneration and the lack of a connection between the grafted and adjacent cartilage tissues. To evaluate the effect of intra-articular administration of trichostatin A (TSA) on AOT, we conducted a case control study in a rabbit model. International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) macroscopic scores, the modified O'Driscoll histology scores, and real-time PCR were utilized to evaluate the results. At 4 weeks, both macroscopic and histological assessments showed that there was no significant difference between the TSA and control groups. However, the mean macroscopic and histological scores for the TSA-treated group were significantly higher than the scores for the control group at 12 weeks. TSA was shown to directly reduce collagen type II (COL2), aggrecan, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain with thrombospondin motifs 5 (ADAMTS-5) expression and to simultaneously repress the upregulation of MMP-3, MMP-9, and MMP-13 levels induced by interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in chondrocytes. In conclusion, TSA protects AOT grafts from degeneration, which may provide a benefit in the repair of articular cartilage injury. PMID:25866784

  2. One-year results from cryopreserved mitral allograft transplantation into the tricuspid position in a sheep experimental model.

    PubMed

    Mokracek, A; Canadyova, J; Simunkova, Z; Fiala, R; Hmirak, M; Sulda, M; Burkert, J; Tintera, J; Kobylka, P; Spatenka, J

    2015-01-01

    Mitral allografts are still used only exceptionally in the mitral or tricuspid position. The main indication remains infectious endocarditis of atrioventricular valves for its flexibility and low risk of infection. The aim of our study was to evaluate 1-year results of mitral allografts transplantation into the tricuspid position in a sheep model. Mitral allografts were processed, cryopreserved, and transplanted into the tricuspid position anatomically (Group I - 11 animals) or antianatomically (Group II - 8 animals). All survivors (4 from Group I, and 3 from Group II) were checked at 3, 6, and 12 months by echocardiography with the exception of one survivor from Group II (which was examinated only visually). Examination throughout follow-up included for mitral allograft regurgitation and annuli dilatation. At postmortem, the papillary muscles were healed and firmly anchored to the right ventricular wall in all subjects. Transventricular fixation of the papillary muscles with buttressed sutures was proven to be a stable, reproducible, and safe method for anchoring mitral allograft leaflets. There were no significant differences between the two implantation methods. Annulus support of mitral allografts might be very useful in this type of operation and could prevent annular dilatation. PMID:26047374

  3. Moderate swimming suppressed the growth and metastasis of the transplanted liver cancer in mice model: with reference to nervous system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q-B; Zhang, B-H; Zhang, K-Z; Meng, X-T; Jia, Q-A; Zhang, Q-B; Bu, Y; Zhu, X-D; Ma, D-N; Ye, B-G; Zhang, N; Ren, Z-G; Sun, H-C; Tang, Z-Y

    2016-08-01

    Physical activity has been shown to suppress tumor initiation and progression. The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) is closely related to movement and exhibits antitumor properties. However, whether the suppressive effects of physical activity on tumors was mediated by the nervous system via increased DA level remains unknowns. Here we show that regular moderate swimming (8 min/day, 9 weeks) raised DA levels in the prefrontal cortex, serum and tumor tissue, suppressed growth, reduced lung metastasis of transplanted liver cancer, and prolonged survival in a C57BL/6 mouse model, while overload swimming (16 and 32 min/day, 9 weeks) had the opposite effect. In nude mice that were orthotopically implanted with human liver cancer cell lines, DA treatment significantly suppressed growth and lung metastasis by acting on the D2 receptor (DR2). Furthermore, DR2 blockade attenuated the suppressive effect of moderate swimming on liver cancer. Both moderate swimming and DA treatment suppressed the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1)-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of transplanted liver cancer cells. At the molecular level, DR2 signaling inhibited extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation and expression of TGF-β1 in vitro. Together, these findings demonstrated a novel mechanism by which the moderate exercise suppressed liver cancer through boosting DR2 activity, while overload exercise had the opposite effect, highlighting the possible importance of the dopaminergic system in tumor growth and metastasis of liver cancer. PMID:26686088

  4. Development and Preclinical Application of an Immunocompetent Transplant Model of Basal Breast Cancer with Lung, Liver and Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Hoenerhoff, Mark; Hixon, Julie A.; Durum, Scott K.; Qiu, Ting-hu; He, Siping; Burkett, Sandra; Liu, Zi-Yao; Swanson, Steven M.; Green, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer that is associated with a poor prognosis and for which no targeted therapies currently exist. In order to improve preclinical testing for TNBC that relies primarily on using human xenografts in immunodeficient mice, we have developed a novel immunocompetent syngeneic murine tumor transplant model for basal-like triple-negative breast cancer. The C3(1)/SV40-T/t-antigen (C3(1)/Tag) mouse mammary tumor model in the FVB/N background shares important similarities with human basal-like TNBC. However, these tumors or derived cell lines are rejected when transplanted into wt FVB/N mice, likely due to the expression of SV40 T-antigen. We have developed a sub-line of mice (designated REAR mice) that carry only one copy of the C3(1)/Tag-antigen transgene resulting from a spontaneous transgene rearrangement in the original founder line. Unlike the original C3(1)/Tag mice, REAR mice do not develop mammary tumors or other phenotypes observed in the original C3(1)/Tag transgenic mice. REAR mice are more immunologically tolerant to SV40 T-antigen driven tumors and cell lines in an FVB/N background (including prostate tumors from TRAMP mice), but are otherwise immunologically intact. This transplant model system offers the ability to synchronously implant the C3(1)/Tag tumor-derived M6 cell line or individual C3(1)/Tag tumors from various stages of tumor development into the mammary fat pads or tail veins of REAR mice. C3(1)/Tag tumors or M6 cells implanted into the mammary fat pads spontaneously metastasize at a high frequency to the lung and liver. M6 cells injected by tail vein can form brain metastases. We demonstrate that irradiated M6 tumor cells or the same cells expressing GM-CSF can act as a vaccine to retard tumor growth of implanted tumor cells in the REAR model. Preclinical studies performed in animals with an intact immune system should more authentically replicate treatment responses in

  5. Development and Preclinical Application of an Immunocompetent Transplant Model of Basal Breast Cancer with Lung, Liver and Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Aprelikova, Olga; Tomlinson, Christine C; Hoenerhoff, Mark; Hixon, Julie A; Durum, Scott K; Qiu, Ting-Hu; He, Siping; Burkett, Sandra; Liu, Zi-Yao; Swanson, Steven M; Green, Jeffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer that is associated with a poor prognosis and for which no targeted therapies currently exist. In order to improve preclinical testing for TNBC that relies primarily on using human xenografts in immunodeficient mice, we have developed a novel immunocompetent syngeneic murine tumor transplant model for basal-like triple-negative breast cancer. The C3(1)/SV40-T/t-antigen (C3(1)/Tag) mouse mammary tumor model in the FVB/N background shares important similarities with human basal-like TNBC. However, these tumors or derived cell lines are rejected when transplanted into wt FVB/N mice, likely due to the expression of SV40 T-antigen. We have developed a sub-line of mice (designated REAR mice) that carry only one copy of the C3(1)/Tag-antigen transgene resulting from a spontaneous transgene rearrangement in the original founder line. Unlike the original C3(1)/Tag mice, REAR mice do not develop mammary tumors or other phenotypes observed in the original C3(1)/Tag transgenic mice. REAR mice are more immunologically tolerant to SV40 T-antigen driven tumors and cell lines in an FVB/N background (including prostate tumors from TRAMP mice), but are otherwise immunologically intact. This transplant model system offers the ability to synchronously implant the C3(1)/Tag tumor-derived M6 cell line or individual C3(1)/Tag tumors from various stages of tumor development into the mammary fat pads or tail veins of REAR mice. C3(1)/Tag tumors or M6 cells implanted into the mammary fat pads spontaneously metastasize at a high frequency to the lung and liver. M6 cells injected by tail vein can form brain metastases. We demonstrate that irradiated M6 tumor cells or the same cells expressing GM-CSF can act as a vaccine to retard tumor growth of implanted tumor cells in the REAR model. Preclinical studies performed in animals with an intact immune system should more authentically replicate treatment responses in

  6. American Society of Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials in Transplantation September 13, 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and its Transplantation & Immunology Research Network ... Learn More Donate Donate Donate to the American Society of Transplantation Advertisement member spotlight View all Joanna ...

  7. Meniscal allograft transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Meniscus transplant; Surgery - knee - meniscus transplant; Surgery - knee - cartilage; Arthroscopy - knee - meniscus transplant ... you are a good candidate for a meniscus transplant, x-rays of your knee are usually taken ...

  8. An Unusual Case of Small Bowel Volvulus

    PubMed Central

    Manjunath, Srinidhi; Balasubramanya, Kanakapura Srinivasamurthy; Nanjaiah, Basavaraju

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel volvulus is a rare and life threatening surgical emergency. Nearly 75% of volvulus occurs in colon and 25% occurs in small bowel. Small bowel volvulus is abnormal twisting of bowel loops around the axis of its own mesentry leading to twisting and occlusion of mesenteric vessels causing intestinal obstruction, venous engorgement, gangrene and perforation. Small bowel volvulus is more common in neonates and young adults and very rare in adults. We are reporting a first case of small bowel volvulus and gangrene caused by herniation of ovarian cyst through mesenteric defect and twisting of small bowel around the axis of ovarian cyst leading to closed loop obstruction, small bowel volvulus and gangrene. Outcome of the disease is mainly based on the early diagnosis and intervention. Mortality is about 5.8 - 8% in nongangrenous SBV which increases drastically to 20 – 100% in gangrenous bowel. PMID:26676224

  9. Liver transplantation in Germany.

    PubMed

    Tacke, Frank; Kroy, Daniela C; Barreiros, Ana Paula; Neumann, Ulf P

    2016-08-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a well-accepted procedure for end-stage liver disease in Germany. In 2015, 1489 patients were admitted to the waiting list (including 1308 new admissions), with the leading etiologies being fibrosis and cirrhosis (n = 349), alcoholic liver disease (n = 302), and hepatobiliary malignancies (n = 220). Organ allocation in Germany is regulated within the Eurotransplant system based on urgency as expressed by the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. In 2015, only 894 LTs (n = 48 from living donors) were performed at 23 German transplant centers, reflecting a shortage of organs. Several factors may contribute to the low number of organ donations. The German transplant legislation only accepts donation after brain death (not cardiac death), whereas advances in neurosurgery and a more frequently requested "palliative care" approach render fewer patients suitable as potential donors. The legislation further requires the active consent of the donor or first-degree relatives before donation. Ongoing debates within the German transplant field address the optimal management of patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and cholangiocarcinoma and measures to increase living donor transplantations. As a result of irregularities at mainly 4 German transplant centers that were exposed in 2012, guiding principles updated by the German authorities have since implemented strict rules (including internal and external auditing, the 8-eyes principle, mandatory repeated testing for alcohol consumption) to prohibit any manipulations in organ allocation. In conclusion, we will summarize important aspects on the management of LT in Germany, discuss legal and organizational aspects, and highlight challenges mainly related to the relative lack of organ donations, increasing numbers of extended criteria donors, and the peculiarities of the recipient patients. Liver Transplantation 22 1136-1142 2016 AASLD. PMID:27082951

  10. Neonatal bone marrow transplantation prevents bone pathology in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type I

    PubMed Central

    Pievani, Alice; Azario, Isabella; Antolini, Laura; Shimada, Tsutomu; Patel, Pravin; Remoli, Cristina; Rambaldi, Benedetta; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Riminucci, Mara; Biondi, Andrea; Tomatsu, Shunji

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal bone marrow transplantation (BMT) could offer a novel therapeutic opportunity for genetic disorders by providing sustainable levels of the missing protein at birth, thus preventing tissue damage. We tested this concept in mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS IH; Hurler syndrome), a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-l-iduronidase. MPS IH is characterized by a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, including severe progressive skeletal abnormalities. Although BMT increases the life span of patients with MPS IH, musculoskeletal manifestations are only minimally responsive if the timing of BMT delays, suggesting already irreversible bone damage. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that transplanting normal BM into newborn MPS I mice soon after birth can prevent skeletal dysplasia. We observed that neonatal BMT was effective at restoring α-l-iduronidase activity and clearing elevated glycosaminoglycans in blood and multiple organs. At 37 weeks of age, we observed an almost complete normalization of all bone tissue parameters, using radiographic, microcomputed tomography, biochemical, and histological analyses. Overall, the magnitude of improvements correlated with the extent of hematopoietic engraftment. We conclude that BMT at a very early stage in life markedly reduces signs and symptoms of MPS I before they appear. PMID:25298037

  11. Neonatal bone marrow transplantation prevents bone pathology in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type I.

    PubMed

    Pievani, Alice; Azario, Isabella; Antolini, Laura; Shimada, Tsutomu; Patel, Pravin; Remoli, Cristina; Rambaldi, Benedetta; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Riminucci, Mara; Biondi, Andrea; Tomatsu, Shunji; Serafini, Marta

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal bone marrow transplantation (BMT) could offer a novel therapeutic opportunity for genetic disorders by providing sustainable levels of the missing protein at birth, thus preventing tissue damage. We tested this concept in mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS IH; Hurler syndrome), a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-l-iduronidase. MPS IH is characterized by a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, including severe progressive skeletal abnormalities. Although BMT increases the life span of patients with MPS IH, musculoskeletal manifestations are only minimally responsive if the timing of BMT delays, suggesting already irreversible bone damage. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that transplanting normal BM into newborn MPS I mice soon after birth can prevent skeletal dysplasia. We observed that neonatal BMT was effective at restoring α-l-iduronidase activity and clearing elevated glycosaminoglycans in blood and multiple organs. At 37 weeks of age, we observed an almost complete normalization of all bone tissue parameters, using radiographic, microcomputed tomography, biochemical, and histological analyses. Overall, the magnitude of improvements correlated with the extent of hematopoietic engraftment. We conclude that BMT at a very early stage in life markedly reduces signs and symptoms of MPS I before they appear. PMID:25298037

  12. Diabetes Is Reversed in a Murine Model by Marginal Mass Syngeneic Islet Transplantation Using a Subcutaneous Cell Pouch Device

    PubMed Central

    Pepper, Andrew R.; Pawlick, Rena; Gala-Lopez, Boris; MacGillivary, Amanda; Mazzuca, Delfina M.; White, David J. G.; Toleikis, Philip M.; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2015-01-01

    Background Islet transplantation is a successful β-cell replacement therapy for selected patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Although high rates of early insulin independence are achieved routinely, long-term function wanes over time. Intraportal transplantation is associated with procedural risks, requires multiple donors, and does not afford routine biopsy. Stem cell technologies may require potential for retrievability, and graft removal by hepatectomy is impractical. There is a clear clinical need for an alternative, optimized transplantation site. The subcutaneous space is a potential substitute, but transplantation of islets into this site has routinely failed to reverse diabetes. However, an implanted device, which becomes prevascularized before transplantation, may alter this equation. Methods Syngeneic mouse islets were transplanted subcutaneously within Sernova Corp's Cell Pouch (CP). All recipients were preimplanted with CPs 4 weeks before diabetes induction and transplantation. After transplantation, recipients were monitored for glycemic control and glucose tolerance. Results Mouse islets transplanted into the CP routinely restored glycemic control with modest delay and responded well to glucose challenge, comparable to renal subcapsular islet grafts, despite a marginal islet dose, and normoglycemia was maintained until graft explantation. In contrast, islets transplanted subcutaneously alone failed to engraft. Islets within CPs stained positively for insulin, glucagon, and microvessels. Conclusions The CP is biocompatible, forms an environment suitable for islet engraftment, and offers a potential alternative to the intraportal site for islet and future stem cell therapies. PMID:26308506

  13. Enhanced Efficacy of Human Brain-Derived Neural Stem Cells by Transplantation of Cell Aggregates in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun Sil; Hwang, Onyou; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis; Chun, Young Il

    2014-01-01

    Objective Neural tissue transplantation has been a promising strategy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, transplantation has the disadvantages of low-cell survival and/or development of dyskinesia. Transplantation of cell aggregates has the potential to overcome these problems, because the cells can extend their axons into the host brain and establish synaptic connections with host neurons. In this present study, aggregates of human brain-derived neural stem cells (HB-NSC) were transplanted into a PD animal model and compared to previous report on transplantation of single-cell suspensions. Methods Rats received an injection of 6-OHDA into the right medial forebrain bundle to generate the PD model and followed by injections of PBS only, or HB-NSC aggregates in PBS into the ipsilateral striatum. Behavioral tests, multitracer (2-deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]-FDG) and [18F]-N-(3-fluoropropyl)-2-carbomethoxy-3-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane ([18F]-FP-CIT) microPET scans, as well as immunohistochemical (IHC) and immunofluorescent (IF) staining were conducted to evaluate the results. Results The stepping test showed significant improvement of contralateral forelimb control in the HB-NSC group from 6-10 weeks compared to the control group (p<0.05). [18F]-FP-CIT microPET at 10 weeks posttransplantation demonstrated a significant increase in uptake in the HB-NSC group compared to pretransplantation (p<0.05). In IHC and IF staining, tyrosine hydroxylase and human β2 microglobulin (a human cell marker) positive cells were visualized at the transplant site. Conclusion These results suggest that the HB-NSC aggregates can survive in the striatum and exert therapeutic effects in a PD model by secreting dopamine. PMID:25535514

  14. Outcomes of bowel program in spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic bowel dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ozisler, Zuhal; Koklu, Kurtulus; Ozel, Sumru; Unsal-Delialioglu, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine gastrointestinal problems associated with neurogenic bowel dysfunction in spinal cord injury patients and to assess the efficacy of bowel program on gastrointestinal problems and the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. Fifty-five spinal cord injury patients were included in this study. A bowel program according to the characteristics of neurogenic bowel dysfunction was performed for each patient. Before and after bowel program, gastrointestinal problems (constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, incontinence, abdominal pain, abdominal distension, loss of appetite, hemorrhoids, rectal bleeding and gastrointestinal induced autonomic dysreflexia) and bowel evacuation methods (digital stimulation, oral medication, suppositories, abdominal massage, Valsalva maneuver and manual evacuation) were determined. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was used to assess the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. At least one gastrointestinal problem was identified in 44 (80%) of the 55 patients before bowel program. Constipation (56%, 31/55) and incontinence (42%, 23/55) were the most common gastrointestinal problems. Digital rectal stimulation was the most common method for bowel evacuation, both before (76%, 42/55) and after (73%, 40/55) bowel program. Oral medication, enema and manual evacuation application rates were significantly decreased and constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, abdominal distention, and abdominal pain rates were significantly reduced after bowel program. In addition, mean neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was decreased after bowel program. An effective bowel program decreases the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction and reduces associated gastrointestinal problems in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26330842

  15. Evaluation of existing limited sampling models for busulfan kinetics in children with beta thalassaemia major undergoing bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, P; Chandy, M; Krishnamoorthy, R; Srivastava, A

    2001-11-01

    Busulfan pharmacokinetic parameters are useful in predicting the outcome of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Standard pharmacokinetic measurements require multiple blood samples. Various limited sampling models (LSM) have been proposed for reducing the sample number required for these measurements, essentially for patients with malignant disorders undergoing BMT. This study was undertaken to evaluate the existing LSM for busulfan pharmacokinetics to find out the most suitable method for patients with thalassaemia major undergoing BMT. Busulfan levels in plasma samples were analysed by HPLC. The AUC calculated by non-compartmental analysis using the program 'TOPFIT' was compared with previously published LSMs. Our seven sample pharmacokinetic data for AUC calculation was compared with the published LSMs. The three sample models suggested by Chattergoon et al and Schuler et al showed significant agreement with AUC TOPFIT (R(2) = 0.98 and 0.94, respectively) in our clinical context. Other models resulted in significant over or under representation of observed values (Vassal's model R(2) = 0.61; Chattergoon's two sample model R(2) = 0.84; four sample model R(2) = 0.83; Schuler's two sample model R(2) = 0.79). By these data the three sample LSM proposed by Chattergoon et al and Schuler et al are suitable for calculation of the AUC in patients with thalassaemia major undergoing BMT conditioned with oral busulfan. PMID:11781641

  16. Age Is the Only Predictor of Poor Bowel Preparation in the Hospitalized Patient

    PubMed Central

    McNabb-Baltar, Julia; Dorreen, Alastair; Al Dhahab, Hisham; Fein, Michael; Xiong, Xin; O' Byrne, Mike; Ait, Imene; Martel, Myriam; Barkun, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    We examine the impact of key variables on the likelihood of inpatient poor bowel preparation for colonoscopy. Records of inpatients that underwent colonoscopy at our institution between January 2010 and December 2011 were retrospectively extracted. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were fitted to assess the effect of clinical variables on the odds of poor preparation. Tested predictors included age; gender; use of narcotics; heavy medication burden; comorbidities; history of previous abdominal surgery; neurological disorder; product used for bowel preparation, whether or not the bowel regimen was given as split or standard dose; and time of endoscopy. Overall, 244 patients were assessed including 83 (34.0%, 95% CI: 28.1–39.9%) with poor bowel preparation. Cecal intubation was achieved in 81.1% of patients (95% CI: 76.2–86.0%). When stratified by quality of bowel preparation, cecal intubation was achieved in only 65.9% (95% CI: 60.0–71.9%) of patients with poor bowel preparation and 89.9% (95% CI: 86.1–93.7%) of patient with good bowel preparation. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, only advancing age was an independent predictor of poor bowel preparation (OR = 1.026, CI: 1.006 to 1.045, and p = 0.008). Age is the only independent predictor of poor bowel preparation amongst hospitalized patients.

  17. Age Is the Only Predictor of Poor Bowel Preparation in the Hospitalized Patient.

    PubMed

    McNabb-Baltar, Julia; Dorreen, Alastair; Al Dhahab, Hisham; Fein, Michael; Xiong, Xin; O' Byrne, Mike; Ait, Imene; Martel, Myriam; Barkun, Alan N

    2016-01-01

    We examine the impact of key variables on the likelihood of inpatient poor bowel preparation for colonoscopy. Records of inpatients that underwent colonoscopy at our institution between January 2010 and December 2011 were retrospectively extracted. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were fitted to assess the effect of clinical variables on the odds of poor preparation. Tested predictors included age; gender; use of narcotics; heavy medication burden; comorbidities; history of previous abdominal surgery; neurological disorder; product used for bowel preparation, whether or not the bowel regimen was given as split or standard dose; and time of endoscopy. Overall, 244 patients were assessed including 83 (34.0%, 95% CI: 28.1-39.9%) with poor bowel preparation. Cecal intubation was achieved in 81.1% of patients (95% CI: 76.2-86.0%). When stratified by quality of bowel preparation, cecal intubation was achieved in only 65.9% (95% CI: 60.0-71.9%) of patients with poor bowel preparation and 89.9% (95% CI: 86.1-93.7%) of patient with good bowel preparation. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, only advancing age was an independent predictor of poor bowel preparation (OR = 1.026, CI: 1.006 to 1.045, and p = 0.008). Age is the only independent predictor of poor bowel preparation amongst hospitalized patients. PMID:27446828

  18. Inflammatory bowel disease: Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Zhen; Li, Yong-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, is characterized by chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation. It has been a worldwide health-care problem with a continually increasing incidence. It is thought that IBD results from an aberrant and continuing immune response to the microbes in the gut, catalyzed by the genetic susceptibility of the individual. Although the etiology of IBD remains largely unknown, it involves a complex interaction between the genetic, environmental or microbial factors and the immune responses. Of the four components of IBD pathogenesis, most rapid progress has been made in the genetic study of gut inflammation. The latest internationally collaborative studies have ascertained 163 susceptibility gene loci for IBD. The genes implicated in childhood-onset and adult-onset IBD overlap, suggesting similar genetic predispositions. However, the fact that genetic factors account for only a portion of overall disease variance indicates that microbial and environmental factors may interact with genetic elements in the pathogenesis of IBD. Meanwhile, the adaptive immune response has been classically considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of IBD, as new studies in immunology and genetics have clarified that the innate immune response maintains the same importance in inducing gut inflammation. Recent progress in understanding IBD pathogenesis sheds lights on relevant disease mechanisms, including the innate and adaptive immunity, and the interactions between genetic factors and microbial and environmental cues. In this review, we provide an update on the major advances that have occurred in above areas. PMID:24415861

  19. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) varies depending on the criteria used to diagnose it, but it ranges from about 5% to 20%. IBS is associated with abnormal gastrointestinal motor function and enhanced visceral perception, as well as psychosocial and genetic factors. People with IBS often have other bodily and psychiatric symptoms, and have an increased likelihood of having unnecessary surgery compared with people without IBS. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments in people with IBS? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 18 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5HT3 receptor antagonists (alosetron and ramosetron); 5HT4 receptor agonists (tegaserod); antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs]); antispasmodics (including peppermint oil); cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT); hypnotherapy; soluble and insoluble fibre supplementation; and loperamide. PMID:21718578

  20. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) varies depending on the criteria used to diagnose it, but it ranges from about 5% to 20%. IBS is associated with abnormal gastrointestinal motor function and enhanced visceral perception, as well as psychosocial and genetic factors. People with IBS often have other bodily and psychiatric symptoms, and have an increased likelihood of having unnecessary surgery compared with people without IBS. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments in people with IBS? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 27 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5HT3 receptor antagonists (alosetron and ramosetron), 5HT4 receptor agonists (tegaserod), antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs]), antispasmodics (including peppermint oil), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), hypnotherapy, loperamide, and soluble and insoluble fibre supplementation. PMID:22296841

  1. Preparing the bowel for colonoscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Abubakar, K; Goggin, N; Gormally, S; Durnin, M; Drumm, B

    1995-01-01

    Bowel preparation methods for total colonoscopy in children generally involve whole gut irrigation with electrolyte lavage solutions, which in most children will require hospitalisation for nasogastric tube administration. The aim of the study was to determine the efficacy of oral bisacodyl combined with a single phosphate enema as a bowel preparation regimen in children. In an open prospective trial, 30 children (aged 18 months-15 years) were given oral bisacodyl on each morning of the two days before colonoscopy. The children were maintained on a normal diet. A phosphate enema was administered on the morning of the procedure. The adequacy of bowel preparation was graded as grade I if no faecal material was encountered, grade II if small amounts of faecal material were present in scattered locations, and grade III if there was poor preparation with faecal material precluding satisfactory visualisation of the bowel mucosa. Eight children (26.6%) had minor abdominal cramps when taking bisacodyl, but all had a previous history of similar pain. Five children (16.6%), all under 5 years of age, cried during the administration of phosphate enema. Bowel preparation was considered excellent (grade I) in 26 (86.6%) and good (grade II) in four (13.3%). In all patients adequate visualisation of the bowel mucosa was obtained. Oral bisacodyl combined with a single phosphate enema provides an ideal method of preparing the bowel for total colonoscopy. This preparation allows colonoscopy to be carried out as a day case procedure in children while maintaining them on a normal diet. PMID:8554368

  2. Transplantation of Achilles Tendon Treated With Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 Promotes Meniscus Regeneration in a Rat Model of Massive Meniscal Defect

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Nobutake; Muneta, Takeshi; Koga, Hideyuki; Katagiri, Hiroki; Otabe, Koji; Okuno, Makiko; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Kobayashi, Eiji; Matsumoto, Kenji; Saito, Hirohisa; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study was undertaken to examine whether bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7) induces ectopic cartilage formation in the rat tendon, and whether transplantation of tendon treated with BMP-7 promotes meniscal regeneration. Additionally, we analyzed the relative contributions of host and donor cells on the healing process after tendon transplantation in a rat model. Methods BMP-7 was injected in situ into the Achilles tendon of rats, and the histologic findings and gene profile were evaluated. Achilles tendon injected with 1 μg of BMP-7 was transplanted into a meniscal defect in rats. The regenerated meniscus and articular cartilage were evaluated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Achilles tendon from LacZ-transgenic rats was transplanted into the meniscal defect in wild-type rats, and vice versa. Results Injection of BMP-7 into the rat Achilles tendon induced the fibrochondrocyte differentiation of tendon cells and changed the collagen gene profile of tendon tissue to more closely approximate meniscal tissue. Transplantation of the rat Achilles tendon into a meniscal defect increased meniscal size. The rats that received the tendon treated with BMP-7 had a meniscus matrix that exhibited increased Safranin O and type II collagen staining, and showed a delay in articular cartilage degradation. Using LacZ-transgenic rats, we determined that the regeneration of the meniscus resulted from contribution from both donor and host cells. Conclusion Our findings indicate that BMP-7 induces ectopic cartilage formation in rat tendons. Transplantation of Achilles tendon treated with BMP-7 promotes meniscus regeneration and prevents cartilage degeneration in a rat model of massive meniscal defect. Native cells in the rat Achilles tendon contribute to meniscal regeneration. PMID:23897174

  3. Neoplasia in adoptively immunosuppressed rats. A possible model for tumorigenesis in transplant recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsch, S.E.; Cook, E.P.

    1983-07-01

    An extremely high incidence of malignant tumors was observed in groups of rats that had previously been exposed to whole body irradiation, grafted with allogeneic tissue, and injected with lymphocytes capable of specifically suppressing the rejection of the grafted tissue. Neoplasia in these adoptively immunosuppressed rats had features in common with that in therapeutically immunosuppressed transplant recipients. Increased tumor incidence could not be accounted for on the basis of the effects of whole body irradiation or failure of immune surveillance, nor could it be a direct effect of lymphoid tissue stimulation. It is suggested that cell mediated suppressor responses play a critical role in tumorigenesis. The mechanism of this is not simply direct stimulation of lymphoid tissue proliferation.

  4. Serotonin neuron transplants exacerbate L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Thomas; Carta, Manolo; Winkler, Christian; Björklund, Anders; Kirik, Deniz

    2007-07-25

    Clinical trials in patients with Parkinson's disease have shown that transplants of fetal mesencephalic dopamine neurons can form a new functional innervation of the host striatum, but the clinical benefits have been highly variable: some patients have shown substantial recovery in motor function, whereas others have shown no improvement and even a worsening in the 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinetic side effects. Differences in the composition of the grafted cell preparation may contribute to these discrepancies. In particular, the number of serotonin neurons contained in the graft can vary greatly depending on the dissection of the fetal tissue. Importantly, serotonin neurons have the ability to store and release dopamine, formed from exogenously administered L-DOPA. Here, we have evaluated the effect of transplants containing serotonin neurons, or a mixture of dopamine and serotonin neurons, on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned animals. As expected, dopamine neuron-rich grafts induced functional recovery, accompanied by a 60% reduction in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia that developed gradually over the first 10 weeks. Rats with serotonin-rich grafts with few dopamine neurons, in contrast, showed a progressive worsening of their L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias over time, and no functional improvement. The antidyskinetic effect of dopamine-rich grafts was independent of the number of serotonin neurons present. We conclude that serotonin neurons in the grafts are likely to have a detrimental effect on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias in cases in which the grafts contain no or few dopamine neurons. PMID:17652591

  5. THEMES OF LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Starzl, Thomas E.; Fung, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Liver transplantation was the product of 5 interlocking themes. These began in 1958-59 with canine studies of then theoretical hepatotrophic molecules in portal venous blood (Theme I) and with the contemporaneous parallel development of liver and multivisceral transplant models (Theme II). Further Theme I investigations showed that insulin was the principal, although not the only, portal hepatotrophic factor. In addition to resolving long-standing controversies about the pathophysiology of portacaval shunt, the hepatotrophic studies blazed new trails in the regulation of liver size, function, and regeneration. They also targeted inborn metabolic errors (e.g. familial hyperlipoproteinemia) whose palliation by portal diversion presaged definitive correction with liver replacement. Clinical use of the Theme II transplant models depended on multiple drug immunosuppression (Theme III, Immunology), guided by an empirical algorithm of pattern recognition and therapeutic response. Successful liver replacement was first accomplished in 1967 with azathioprine, prednisone, and ALG. With this regimen, the world’s longest surviving liver recipient is now 40 years postoperative. Incremental improvements in survival outcome occurred (Theme IV) when azathioprine was replaced by cyclosporine (1979) which was replaced in turn by tacrolimus (1989). However, the biologic meaning of alloengraftment remained enigmatic until multilineage donor leukocyte microchimerism was discovered in 1992 in long surviving organ recipients. Seminal mechanisms were then identified (clonal exhaustion-deletion and immune ignorance) that linked organ engraftment and the acquired tolerance of bone marrow transplantation and eventually clarified the relationship of transplantation immunology to the immunology of infections, neoplasms, and autoimmune disorders. With this insight, better strategies of immunosuppression have evolved. As liver and other kinds of organ transplantation became accepted as

  6. Themes of liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Starzl, Thomas E; Fung, John J

    2010-06-01

    Liver transplantation was the product of five interlocking themes. These began in 1958-1959 with canine studies of then theoretical hepatotrophic molecules in portal venous blood (Theme I) and with the contemporaneous parallel development of liver and multivisceral transplant models (Theme II). Further Theme I investigations showed that insulin was the principal, although not the only, portal hepatotrophic factor. In addition to resolving long-standing controversies about the pathophysiology of portacaval shunt, the hepatotrophic studies blazed new trails in the regulation of liver size, function, and regeneration. They also targeted inborn metabolic errors (e.g., familial hyperlipoproteinemia) whose palliation by portal diversion presaged definitive correction with liver replacement. Clinical use of the Theme II transplant models depended on multiple drug immunosuppression (Theme III, Immunology), guided by an empirical algorithm of pattern recognition and therapeutic response. Successful liver replacement was first accomplished in 1967 with azathioprine, prednisone, and antilymphoid globulin. With this regimen, the world's longest surviving liver recipient is now 40 years postoperative. Incremental improvements in survival outcome occurred (Theme IV) when azathioprine was replaced by cyclosporine (1979), which was replaced in turn by tacrolimus (1989). However, the biologic meaning of alloengraftment remained enigmatic until multilineage donor leukocyte microchimerism was discovered in 1992 in long-surviving organ recipients. Seminal mechanisms were then identified (clonal exhaustion-deletion and immune ignorance) that linked organ engraftment and the acquired tolerance of bone marrow transplantation and eventually clarified the relationship of transplantation immunology to the immunology of infections, neoplasms, and autoimmune disorders. With this insight, better strategies of immunosuppression have evolved. As liver and other kinds of organ transplantation

  7. Nutritional management of infants with short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Jacqueline J; Kocoshis, Samuel A

    2007-04-01

    The prevalence of short bowel syndrome appears to be increasing because of more aggressive surgical and medical approaches to the management of neonatal intraabdominal catastrophies. Hence, a large cohort of neonates with intestinal failure occupies neonatal intensive care units, requiring chronic total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in hopes that the residual bowel will adapt, thereby permitting weaning of TPN. Alternatively, when there is no hope for adaptation, these infants are maintained on TPN in hopes that they will grow to a size and state of general health satisfactory for either isolated intestinal transplant when liver function is preserved or combined liver-intestinal transplantation when the liver is irreparably damaged. Thus, it is imperative to provide enough parenteral nutrition to facilitate growth while minimizing TPN constituents predisposing to liver damage. Liver disease associated with intestinal failure (IFALD) seems to occur due to a variety of host factors combined with deleterious components of TPN. Host factors include an immature bile secretory mechanism, bile stasis due to fasting, and repeated septic episodes resulting in endotoxemia. Many constituents of TPN are associated with liver damage. Excessive glucose may result in fatty liver and/or hepatic fibrosis, excessive protein may lead to reduced bile flow, and phytosterols present in intravenous lipid may produce direct oxidant damage to the liver or may impede cholesterol synthesis and subsequent bile acid synthesis. Parenteral strategies employed to minimize TPN damage include reducing glucose infusion rates, reducing parenteral protein load, and reducing parenteral lipid load. Furthermore, preliminary studies suggest that fish oil-based lipid solutions may have a salutary effect on IFALD. Ultimately, provision of enteral nutrition is imperative for preventing or reversing IFALD as well as facilitating bowel adaptation. While studies of trophic hormones are ongoing, the most reliable

  8. A new immuno-, dystrophin-deficient model, the NSG-mdx(4Cv) mouse, provides evidence for functional improvement following allogeneic satellite cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arpke, Robert W; Darabi, Radbod; Mader, Tara L; Zhang, Yu; Toyama, Akira; Lonetree, Cara-Lin; Nash, Nardina; Lowe, Dawn A; Perlingeiro, Rita C R; Kyba, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Transplantation of a myogenic cell population into an immunodeficient recipient is an excellent way of assessing the in vivo muscle-generating capacity of that cell population. To facilitate both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplantations of muscle-forming cells in mice, we have developed a novel immunodeficient muscular dystrophy model, the NSG-mdx(4Cv) mouse. The IL2Rg mutation, which is linked to the Dmd gene on the X chromosome, simultaneously depletes NK cells and suppresses thymic lymphomas, issues that limit the utility of the SCID/mdx model. The NSG-mdx(4Cv) mouse presents a muscular dystrophy of similar severity to the conventional mdx mouse. We show that this animal supports robust engraftment of both pig and dog muscle mononuclear cells. The question of whether satellite cells prospectively isolated by flow cytometry can confer a functional benefit upon transplantation has been controversial. Using allogeneic Pax7-ZsGreen donors and NSG-mdx(4Cv) recipients, we demonstrate definitively that as few as 900 FACS-isolated satellite cells can provide functional regeneration in vivo, in the form of an increased mean maximal force-generation capacity in cell-transplanted muscles, compared to a sham-injected control group. These studies highlight the potency of satellite cells to improve muscle function and the utility of the NSG-mdx(4Cv) model for studies on muscle regeneration and Duchenne muscular dystrophy therapy. PMID:23606600

  9. The Morphofunctional Effect of the Transplantation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Predegenerated Peripheral Nerve in Chronic Paraplegic Rat Model via Spinal Cord Transection

    PubMed Central

    Buzoianu-Anguiano, Vinnitsa; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; García-Vences, Elisa; Caballero-Chacón, Sara; Guizar-Sahagún, Gabriel; Chavez-Sanchez, Luis; Grijalva, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) is limited by poor axonal and cellular regeneration as well as the failure to replace damaged myelin. Employed separately, both the transplantation of the predegenerated peripheral nerve (PPN) and the transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been shown to promote the regrowth and remyelination of the damaged central axons in SCI models of hemisection, transection, and contusion injury. With the aim to test the effects of the combined transplantation of PPN and BMSC on regrowth, remyelination, and locomotor function in an adult rat model of spinal cord (SC) transection, 39 Fischer 344 rats underwent SC transection at T9 level. Four weeks later they were randomly assigned to traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) without treatment, TSCI + Fibrin Glue (FG), TSCI + FG + PPN, and TSCI + FG + PPN + BMSCs. Eight weeks after, transplantation was carried out on immunofluorescence and electron microscope studies. The results showed greater axonal regrowth and remyelination in experimental groups TSCI + FG + PPN and TSCI + FG + PPN + BMSCs analyzed with GAP-43, neuritin, and myelin basic protein. It is concluded that the combined treatment of PPN and BMSCs is a favorable strategy for axonal regrowth and remyelination in a chronic SC transection model. PMID:26634157

  10. [Irritable bowel syndrome in adolescence].

    PubMed

    Shimada, A; Takano, M

    1992-11-01

    We studied seventy patients, 23 males and 47 females with irritable bowel syndrome in adolescence aged 13-19 yrs, who visited the department of psychosomatic medicine in Takano Hospital during about six year period of April, 1986-July, 1992. Takano Hospital is a coloproctological center in Kumamoto. In the clinical pattern of adolescent patients with irritable bowel syndrome the "gas" pattern was dominant (51.4%). Patients with the gas pattern have severe symptoms of flatus, fullness, rumbling sound and abdominal pain as well as bowel dysfunction, constipation and diarrhea in a classroom. Next, the diarrheal pattern occurred in 20.0%. Diarrheal patients complained of frequent bowel movements and retention feelings before attending school. Recurrent abdominal pain-like pattern was found in 7.1% patients. Clinical symptoms in the adolescent patients seem to derived from a mental tension and stress in a close classroom or before attending school. Many adolescenct patients (67.1%) with irritable bowel syndrome are embarrassed in school-maladjustment; leaving class early, late coming, a long absence, and a withdrawal. PMID:1363122

  11. Kidney transplantation after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Yang; Liu, Hang; Liu, Wei; Li, Han; Zhang, Xiao-Dong

    2016-08-01

    Kidney transplantation after liver transplantation (KALT) offers longer survival and a better quality of life to liver transplantation recipients who develop chronic renal failure. This article aimed to discuss the efficacy and safety of KALT compared with other treatments. The medical records of 5 patients who had undergone KALT were retrospectively studied, together with a literature review of studies. Three of them developed chronic renal failure after liver transplantation because of calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-induced nephrotoxicity, while the others had lupus nephritis or non-CNI drug-induced nephrotoxicity. No mortality was observed in the 5 patients. Three KALT cases showed good prognoses, maintaining a normal serum creatinine level during entire follow-up period. Chronic rejection occurred in the other two patients, and a kidney graft was removed from one of them. Our data suggested that KALT is a good alternative to dialysis for liver transplantation recipients. The cases also indicate that KALT can be performed with good long-term survival. PMID:27498586

  12. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inflammatory Bowel Disease? Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Symptoms include abdominal ... become pregnant? Women with ulcerative colitis and inactive Crohn’s disease are as likely to become pregnant as women ...

  13. The Role of Animal Models in the Study of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and GvHD: A Historical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Boieri, Margherita; Shah, Pranali; Dressel, Ralf; Inngjerdingen, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is the only therapeutic option for many hematological malignancies, but its applicability is limited by life-threatening complications, such as graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). The last decades have seen great advances in the understanding of BMT and its related complications; in particular GvHD. Animal models are beneficial to study complex diseases, as they allow dissecting the contribution of single components in the development of the disease. Most of the current knowledge on the therapeutic mechanisms of BMT derives from studies in animal models. Parallel to BMT, the understanding of the pathophysiology of GvHD, as well as the development of new treatment regimens, has also been supported by studies in animal models. Pre-clinical experimentation is the basis for deep understanding and successful improvements of clinical applications. In this review, we retrace the history of BMT and GvHD by describing how the studies in animal models have paved the way to the many advances in the field. We also describe how animal models contributed to the understanding of GvHD pathophysiology and how they are fundamental for the discovery of new treatments. PMID:27625651

  14. The Role of Animal Models in the Study of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and GvHD: A Historical Overview.

    PubMed

    Boieri, Margherita; Shah, Pranali; Dressel, Ralf; Inngjerdingen, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is the only therapeutic option for many hematological malignancies, but its applicability is limited by life-threatening complications, such as graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). The last decades have seen great advances in the understanding of BMT and its related complications; in particular GvHD. Animal models are beneficial to study complex diseases, as they allow dissecting the contribution of single components in the development of the disease. Most of the current knowledge on the therapeutic mechanisms of BMT derives from studies in animal models. Parallel to BMT, the understanding of the pathophysiology of GvHD, as well as the development of new treatment regimens, has also been supported by studies in animal models. Pre-clinical experimentation is the basis for deep understanding and successful improvements of clinical applications. In this review, we retrace the history of BMT and GvHD by describing how the studies in animal models have paved the way to the many advances in the field. We also describe how animal models contributed to the understanding of GvHD pathophysiology and how they are fundamental for the discovery of new treatments. PMID:27625651

  15. Abdominal Wall Transplantation: Skin as a Sentinel Marker for Rejection.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, U A; Vrakas, G; Sawitzki, B; Macedo, R; Reddy, S; Friend, P J; Giele, H; Vaidya, A

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal wall transplantation (AWTX) has revolutionized difficult abdominal closure after intestinal transplantation (ITX). More important, the skin of the transplanted abdominal wall (AW) may serve as an immunological tool for differential diagnosis of bowel dysfunction after transplant. Between August 2008 and October 2014, 29 small bowel transplantations were performed in 28 patients (16 male, 12 female; aged 41 ± 13 years). Two groups were identified: the solid organ transplant (SOT) group (n = 15; 12 ITX and 3 modified multivisceral transplantation [MMVTX]) and the SOT-AWTX group (n = 14; 12 ITX and 2 MMVTX), with the latter including one ITX-AWTX retransplantation. Two doses of alemtuzumab were used for induction (30 mg, 6 and 24 h after reperfusion), and tacrolimus (trough levels 8-12 ng/mL) was used for maintenance immunosuppression. Patient survival was similar in both groups (67% vs. 61%); however, the SOT-AWTX group showed faster posttransplant recovery, better intestinal graft survival (79% vs. 60%), a lower intestinal rejection rate (7% vs. 27%) and a lower rate of misdiagnoses in which viral infection was mistaken and treated as rejection (14% vs. 33%). The skin component of the AW may serve as an immune modulator and sentinel marker for immunological activity in the host. This can be a vital tool for timely prevention of intestinal graft rejection and, more important, avoidance of overimmunosuppression in cases of bowel dysfunction not related to graft rejection. PMID:26713513

  16. Influence of cell preparation and target location on the behavioral recovery after striatal transplantation of fetal dopaminergic neurons in a primate model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Redmond, D E; Vinuela, A; Kordower, J H; Isacson, O

    2008-01-01

    Surgeries involving transplantation of fetal dopamine (DA) neurons into the caudate-putamen of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have been performed in various clinical trials to examine a potential restoration of motor function. The absence of studies in non-human primates to define the best transplantation protocols have lead to the use of a broad variety of techniques that potentially could have a major impact on the clinical outcome. The effects of using different cell and tissue preparation, and surgical targets, remain unknown. For this purpose, 20 St. Kitts African Green Monkeys (AFG) rendered parkinsonian by i.m. injection of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) were balanced into 4 groups and unilaterally grafted in the (a) caudate or (b) putamen with fetal ventral mesencephalic (VM) tissue as (c) solid pieces or as a (d) cell suspension. By 9 months post-transplantation all animals showed significant and similar behavioral improvement as determined by a UPDRS based PD scale. Postmortem analyses showed that VM transplants survived in all animals. They were located in both surgical target sites, producing a broad DA reinnervation of the targeted nuclei that could also extend to the non-grafted nucleus on the ipsilateral side. Although no differences between groups were found in survival of DA neurons or degree of DA reinnervation, there was a significant correlation between striatal reinnervation and behavioral recovery only in animals transplanted in the putamen surgical target. Additionally, there was in general a stronger glial reaction to solid grafts than to cell suspensions. These studies provide data for the optimal time course, cell preparation and surgical targets for systematic examinations of both potential benefits and side effects of dopamine neuron cell transplantation in primate models of PD. PMID:17920901

  17. Mouth cancer in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Giagkou, E; Christodoulou, D K; Katsanos, K H

    2016-05-01

    Mouth cancer is a major health problem. Multiple risk factors for developing mouth cancer have been studied and include history of tobacco and alcohol abuse, age over 40, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, human papilloma virus infection (HPV), nutritional deficiencies, chronic irritation, and existence or oral potentially malignant lesions such as leukoplakia and lichen planus. An important risk factor for mouth cancer is chronic immunosuppression and has been extensively reported after solid organ transplantation as well as HIV-infected patients. Diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not yet considered as a risk factor for oral cancer development. However, a significant number of patients with IBD are receiving immunosuppressants and biological therapies which could represent potential oral oncogenic factors either by direct oncogenic effect or by continuous immunosuppression favoring carcinogenesis, especially in patients with HPV(+) IBD. Education on modifiable risk behaviors in patients with IBD is the cornerstone of prevention of mouth cancer. Oral screening should be performed for all patients with IBD, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or a biologic. PMID:26671147

  18. A Multistep, Consensus-Based Approach to Organ Allocation in Liver Transplantation: Toward a "Blended Principle Model".

    PubMed

    Cillo, U; Burra, P; Mazzaferro, V; Belli, L; Pinna, A D; Spada, M; Nanni Costa, A; Toniutto, P

    2015-10-01

    Since Italian liver allocation policy was last revised (in 2012), relevant critical issues and conceptual advances have emerged, calling for significant improvements. We report the results of a national consensus conference process, promoted by the Italian College of Liver Transplant Surgeons (for the Italian Society for Organ Transplantation) and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver, to review the best indicators for orienting organ allocation policies based on principles of urgency, utility, and transplant benefit in the light of current scientific evidence. MELD exceptions and hepatocellular carcinoma were analyzed to construct a transplantation priority algorithm, given the inequity of a purely MELD-based system for governing organ allocation. Working groups of transplant surgeons and hepatologists prepared a list of statements for each topic, scoring their quality of evidence and strength of recommendation using the Centers for Disease Control grading system. A jury of Italian transplant surgeons, hepatologists, intensivists, infectious disease specialists, epidemiologists, representatives of patients' associations and organ-sharing organizations, transplant coordinators, and ethicists voted on and validated the proposed statements. After carefully reviewing the statements, a critical proposal for revising Italy's current liver allocation policy was prepared jointly by transplant surgeons and hepatologists. PMID:26274338

  19. Propagation of Neuronal Damage to Embryonic Grafts Transplanted in the Hippocampus of Murine Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sadallah, Mohcene; Labat-Gest, Vivien; Tempia, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, characterized by the presence of two principal hallmarks-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The primary cause of the majority of AD cases is not known. Likewise, the mechanisms underlying the propagation of the pathology from affected tissue to neighboring healthy neurons are largely unknown, but knowledge about them could be helpful to design strategies aimed at halting the progression of the disease. To throw light on the mechanisms of propagation of neuronal damage to healthy tissue, wild-type (WT) hippocampal solid tissue chunks derived from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive embryos were grafted into the hippocampus of 6-month-old WT and 3xTg-AD mice, a triple-transgenic mouse model that exhibits both amyloid-beta (Aβ) and tau protein pathology. The histological and morphological alterations of the grafted tissues were assessed 3 months post-transplantation. Tissues grafted in 3xTg-AD hosts, compared to those grafted in WT recipients, presented a significant decrease in neurite outgrowth (35.4%) and dendritic spine density (41.3%), mainly due to a reduction of stubby and thin-shaped spines. Moreover, some cells of the tissue transplanted in 3xTg-AD hosts accumulated intracellular amyloid peptide deposits similar to the cells of the host. Furthermore, the immunohistochemical examination of reactive astrocytes and microglia revealed the presence of more inflammation in the grafted tissues hosted in 3xTg-AD compared to WT recipients. These results show a propagation of neuronal damage to initially healthy embryonic grafts, validating this methodology for future studies on the mechanisms of the progression of AD pathology to surrounding regions. PMID:26540615

  20. Modeling of a three-source perfusion and blood oxygenation sensor for transplant monitoring using multilayer Monte Carlo code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibey, Bennett L.; Lee, Seungjoon; Ericson, M. Nance; Wilson, Mark A.; Cote, Gerard L.

    2004-06-01

    A Multi-Layer Monte Carlo (MLMC) model was developed to predict the results of in vivo blood perfusion and oxygenation measurement of transplanted organs as measured by an indwelling optical sensor. A sensor has been developed which uses three-source excitation in the red and infrared ranges (660, 810, 940 nm). In vitro data was taken using this sensor by changing the oxygenation state of whole blood and passing it through a single-tube pump system wrapped in bovine liver tissue. The collected data showed that the red signal increased as blood oxygenation increased and infrared signal decreased. The center wavelength of 810 nanometers was shown to be quite indifferent to blood oxygenation change. A model was developed using MLMC code that sampled the wavelength range from 600-1000 nanometers every 6 nanometers. Using scattering and absorption data for blood and liver tissue within this wavelength range, a five-layer model was developed (tissue, clear tubing, blood, clear tubing, tissue). The theoretical data generated from this model was compared to the in vitro data and showed good correlation with changing blood oxygenation.

  1. Lung Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... years. Their conditions are so severe that other treatments, such as medicines or breathing devices, no longer work. Lung transplants most often are used to treat people who have severe COPD Cystic fibrosis Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency Pulmonary ...

  2. Heart Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  3. Transplant production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For field pepper (Capsicum spp.) production, plants can be established from direct seed or transplants depending on the location and cultural practices for the specific pepper type grown. Direct seeding can result in slow, variable, and reduced plant stands due to variations in soil temperature, wat...

  4. Etiology and pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease--environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Andus, T; Gross, V

    2000-01-01

    Environmental factors play an important role in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease. There is a strong and consistent association between smoking and Crohn's disease, and between nonsmoking and ulcerative colitis. Despite extensive research, the exact pathophysiological mechanisms for these associations remain unclear. In spite of this, some clinical trials with nicotine-patches showed beneficial effects for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Associations of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis with other environmental factors are weaker like the association with use of oral contraceptives or those less well investigated such as the association with childhood hygiene. Most studies suggesting a potential pathogenetic role of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis or an effect of tuberculostatic therapy in Crohn's disease could not be reproduced by others. Perinatal or childhood infections by viruses like measles are heavily debated, but not proven to be causal for inflammatory bowel disease. Coagulation disorders have been described as protecting from inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting hypercoagulability to be a pathogenetic factor. Some studies described that appendectomy may prevent the onset of ulcerative colitis in man and mice. Other environmental factors such as hydrogen sulfide, tonsillectomy, diet, blood transfusions, and Listeria also require confirmation. There are, however, convincing data from genetic animal models and twin studies that environmental factors as the intestinal bacterial flora interact with susceptible hosts to cause inflammatory bowel disease. Inflammatory bowel diseases have multifactorial etiologies, which require a differentiated approach for treatment and prevention. PMID:10690583

  5. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Mutations Affecting the Interleukin-10 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Glocker, Erik-Oliver; Kotlarz, Daniel; Boztug, Kaan; Gertz, E. Michael; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Noyan, Fatih; Perro, Mario; Diestelhorst, Jana; Allroth, Anna; Murugan, Dhaarini; Hätscher, Nadine; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Sauer, Martin; Kreipe, Hans; Lacher, Martin; Nustede, Rainer; Woellner, Cristina; Baumann, Ulrich; Salzer, Ulrich; Koletzko, Sibylle; Shah, Neil; Segal, Anthony W.; Sauerbrey, Axel; Buderus, Stephan; Snapper, Scott B.; Grimbacher, Bodo; Klein, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND The molecular cause of inflammatory bowel disease is largely unknown. METHODS We performed genetic-linkage analysis and candidate-gene sequencing on samples from two unrelated consanguineous families with children who were affected by early-onset inflammatory bowel disease. We screened six additional patients with early-onset colitis for mutations in two candidate genes and carried out functional assays in patients’ peripheral-blood mononuclear cells. We performed an allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in one patient. RESULTS In four of nine patients with early-onset colitis, we identified three distinct homozygous mutations in genes IL10RA and IL10RB, encoding the IL10R1 and IL10R2 proteins, respectively, which form a heterotetramer to make up the interleukin-10 receptor. The mutations abrogate interleukin-10–induced signaling, as shown by deficient STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) phosphorylation on stimulation with interleukin-10. Consistent with this observation was the increased secretion of tumor necrosis factor α and other proinflammatory cytokines from peripheral-blood mononuclear cells from patients who were deficient in IL10R subunit proteins, suggesting that interleukin-10–dependent “negative feedback” regulation is disrupted in these cells. The allogeneic stem-cell transplantation performed in one patient was successful. CONCLUSIONS Mutations in genes encoding the IL10R subunit proteins were found in patients with early-onset enterocolitis, involving hyperinflammatory immune responses in the intestine. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation resulted in disease remission in one patient. PMID:19890111

  6. Small Bowel Imaging: an Update.

    PubMed

    Rimola, Jordi; Panés, Julián

    2016-07-01

    Bowel imaging had experienced relevant technical advances during the last decade. The developments in the field of cross-sectional imaging had a particular impact on the assessment of Crohn's disease. The purpose of this manuscript is to provide a review of the main progress of cross-sectional imaging in the assessment of Crohn's disease and other small bowel diseases with relevance in clinical practice and in research. Also, we outline the technical advances, trends, and potential contributions of new technological cross-sectional imaging improvements that may have potential impact and contribution in the near future. PMID:27315216

  7. A computer simulation model of the cost-effectiveness of routine Staphylococcus aureus screening and decolonization among lung and heart-lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Clancy, C J; Bartsch, S M; Nguyen, M H; Stuckey, D R; Shields, R K; Lee, B Y

    2014-06-01

    Our objective was to model the cost-effectiveness and economic value of routine peri-operative Staphylococcus aureus screening and decolonization of lung and heart-lung transplant recipients from hospital and third-party payer perspectives. We used clinical data from 596 lung and heart-lung transplant recipients to develop a model in TreeAge Pro 2009 (Williamsport, MA, USA). Sensitivity analyses varied S. aureus colonization rate (5-15 %), probability of infection if colonized (10-30 %), and decolonization efficacy (25-90 %). Data were collected from the Cardiothoracic Transplant Program at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Consecutive lung and heart-lung transplant recipients from January 2006 to December 2010 were enrolled retrospectively. Baseline rates of S. aureus colonization, infection and decolonization efficacy were 9.6 %, 36.7 %, and 31.9 %, respectively. Screening and decolonization was economically dominant for all scenarios tested, providing more cost savings and health benefits than no screening. Savings per case averted (2012 $US) ranged from $73,567 to $133,157 (hospital perspective) and $10,748 to $16,723 (third party payer perspective), varying with the probability of colonization, infection, and decolonization efficacy. Using our clinical data, screening and decolonization led to cost savings per case averted of $240,602 (hospital perspective) and averted 6.7 S. aureus infections (4.3 MRSA and 2.4 MSSA); 89 patients needed to be screened to prevent one S. aureus infection. Our data support routine S. aureus screening and decolonization of lung and heart-lung transplant patients. The economic value of screening and decolonization was greater than in previous models of other surgical populations. PMID:24500598

  8. Allogeneic Transplantation of Müller-Derived Retinal Ganglion Cells Improves Retinal Function in a Feline Model of Ganglion Cell Depletion.

    PubMed

    Becker, Silke; Eastlake, Karen; Jayaram, Hari; Jones, Megan F; Brown, Robert A; McLellan, Gillian J; Charteris, David G; Khaw, Peng T; Limb, G Astrid

    2016-02-01

    Human Müller glia with stem cell characteristics (hMGSCs) have been shown to improve retinal function upon transplantation into rat models of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) depletion. However, their translational potential may depend upon successful engraftment and improvement of retinal function in experimental models with anatomical and functional features resembling those of the human eye. We investigated the effect of allogeneic transplantation of feline Müller glia with the ability to differentiate into cells expressing RGC markers, following ablation of RGCs by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA). Unlike previous observations in the rat, transplantation of hMGSC-derived RGCs into the feline vitreous formed aggregates and elicited a severe inflammatory response without improving visual function. In contrast, allogeneic transplantation of feline MGSC (fMGSC)-derived RGCs into the vitrectomized eye improved the scotopic threshold response (STR) of the electroretinogram (ERG). Despite causing functional improvement, the cells did not attach onto the retina and formed aggregates on peripheral vitreous remnants, suggesting that vitreous may constitute a barrier for cell attachment onto the retina. This was confirmed by observations that cellular scaffolds of compressed collagen and enriched preparations of fMGSC-derived RGCs facilitated cell attachment. Although cells did not migrate into the RGC layer or the optic nerve, they significantly improved the STR and the photopic negative response of the ERG, indicative of increased RGC function. These results suggest that MGSCs have a neuroprotective ability that promotes partial recovery of impaired RGC function and indicate that cell attachment onto the retina may be necessary for transplanted cells to confer neuroprotection to the retina. Significance: Müller glia with stem cell characteristics are present in the adult human retina, but they do not have regenerative ability. These cells, however, have potential for

  9. Allogeneic Transplantation of Müller-Derived Retinal Ganglion Cells Improves Retinal Function in a Feline Model of Ganglion Cell Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Silke; Eastlake, Karen; Jayaram, Hari; Jones, Megan F.; Brown, Robert A.; McLellan, Gillian J.; Charteris, David G.; Khaw, Peng T.

    2016-01-01

    Human Müller glia with stem cell characteristics (hMGSCs) have been shown to improve retinal function upon transplantation into rat models of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) depletion. However, their translational potential may depend upon successful engraftment and improvement of retinal function in experimental models with anatomical and functional features resembling those of the human eye. We investigated the effect of allogeneic transplantation of feline Müller glia with the ability to differentiate into cells expressing RGC markers, following ablation of RGCs by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA). Unlike previous observations in the rat, transplantation of hMGSC-derived RGCs into the feline vitreous formed aggregates and elicited a severe inflammatory response without improving visual function. In contrast, allogeneic transplantation of feline MGSC (fMGSC)-derived RGCs into the vitrectomized eye improved the scotopic threshold response (STR) of the electroretinogram (ERG). Despite causing functional improvement, the cells did not attach onto the retina and formed aggregates on peripheral vitreous remnants, suggesting that vitreous may constitute a barrier for cell attachment onto the retina. This was confirmed by observations that cellular scaffolds of compressed collagen and enriched preparations of fMGSC-derived RGCs facilitated cell attachment. Although cells did not migrate into the RGC layer or the optic nerve, they significantly improved the STR and the photopic negative response of the ERG, indicative of increased RGC function. These results suggest that MGSCs have a neuroprotective ability that promotes partial recovery of impaired RGC function and indicate that cell attachment onto the retina may be necessary for transplanted cells to confer neuroprotection to the retina. Significance Müller glia with stem cell characteristics are present in the adult human retina, but they do not have regenerative ability. These cells, however, have potential for

  10. Hyperinfection strongyloidiasis in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2014-01-01

    Strongyloidiasis is infection caused by the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis. Chronic uncomplicated strongyloidiasis is known to occur in immunocompetent individuals while hyperinfection and dissemination occurs in selective immunosuppressed hosts particularly those on corticosteroid therapy. We report two cases of hyperinfection strongyloidiasis in renal transplant recipients and document endoscopic and pathological changes in the involved small bowel. One patient presented with features of dehydration and malnutrition while another developed ileal obstruction and strangulation, requiring bowel resection. Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy showed erythematous and thickened duodenal mucosal folds. Histopathological examination of duodenal biopsies revealed S. stercoralis worms, larvae and eggs embedded in mucosa and submucosa. Wet mount stool preparation showed filariform larvae of S. stercoralis in both cases. Patients were managed with anthelmintic therapy (ivermectin/albendazole) and concurrent reduction of immunosuppression. Both patients had uneventful recovery. Complicated strongyloidiasis should be suspected in immunocompromised hosts who present with abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhoea, particularly in endemic areas. PMID:25150235

  11. Intestinal microbiota transplant - current state of knowledge.

    PubMed

    Leszczyszyn, Jarosław Jerzy; Radomski, Marek; Leszczyszyn, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has induced a lot scientific interest and hopes for the last couple of years. FMT has been approved as a treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis. Highly sophisticated molecular DNA identification methods have been used to assess the healthy human microbiome as well as its disturbances in several diseases. The metabolic and immunologic functions of the microbiome have become more clear and understandable. A lot of pathological changes, such as production of short-chain fatty acids or components of the inflammatory cascade, caused by changes in microbiome diversity, variability and richness have been observed among patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases, irritable bowel syndrome, type 2 diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis. The published clinical results are encouraging, but still there is huge demand for FMT controlled clinical trials. PMID:27407273

  12. Hyperinfection strongyloidiasis in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2014-01-01

    Strongyloidiasis is infection caused by the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis. Chronic uncomplicated strongyloidiasis is known to occur in immunocompetent individuals while hyperinfection and dissemination occurs in selective immunosuppressed hosts particularly those on corticosteroid therapy. We report two cases of hyperinfection strongyloidiasis in renal transplant recipients and document endoscopic and pathological changes in the involved small bowel. One patient presented with features of dehydration and malnutrition while another developed ileal obstruction and strangulation, requiring bowel resection. Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy showed erythematous and thickened duodenal mucosal folds. Histopathological examination of duodenal biopsies revealed S. stercoralis worms, larvae and eggs embedded in mucosa and submucosa. Wet mount stool preparation showed filariform larvae of S. stercoralis in both cases. Patients were managed with anthelmintic therapy (ivermectin/albendazole) and concurrent reduction of immunosuppression. Both patients had uneventful recovery. Complicated strongyloidiasis should be suspected in immunocompromised hosts who present with abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhoea, particularly in endemic areas. PMID:25150235

  13. Excretion of ciprofloxacin into the large bowel of the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Ramon, J; Dautrey, S; Farinoti, R; Carbon, C; Rubinstein, E

    1996-01-01

    The intestinal elimination of ciprofloxacin in the large bowel was studied in a rabbit model. Segments from the cecum, colon, and sigmoid colon along with their intact blood vessels were isolated and perfused, and their contents were collected over a 90-min period following the administration of a single parenteral dose of 27 mg of ciprofloxacin per kg of body weight. The elimination rates of ciprofloxacin were 0.126 +/- 0.084 micrograms.min-1.cm-2 in the cecum and 0.264 +/- 0.126, 0.11 +/- 0.07, and 0.21 +/- 0.141 micrograms.min-1.cm-2 in the proximal colon, distal colon, and sigmoid colon, respectively. The calculated fraction of ciprofloxacin eliminated in the large bowel was 3% of the parenteral dose administered. The elimination pattern of ciprofloxacin in the large bowel may explain the unusual activity of this fluoroquinolone in modifying the colonic flora. PMID:8787870

  14. Amelioration of non-motor dysfunctions after transplantation of human dopamine neurons in a model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lelos, M.J.; Morgan, R.J.; Kelly, C.M.; Torres, E.M.; Rosser, A.E.; Dunnett, S.B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) display cognitive and neuropsychiatric dysfunctions, especially with disease progression. Although these impairments have been reported to impact more heavily upon a patient's quality of life than any motor dysfunctions, there are currently no interventions capable of adequately targeting these non-motor deficits. Objectives Utilizing a rodent model of PD, we investigated whether cell replacement therapy, using intrastriatal transplants of human-derived ventral mesencephalic (hVM) grafts, could alleviate cognitive and neuropsychiatric, as well as motor, dysfunctions. Methods Rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions to the medial forebrain bundle were tested on a complex operant task that dissociates motivational, visuospatial and motor impairments sensitive to the loss of dopamine. A subset of lesioned rats received intrastriatal hVM grafts of ~ 9 weeks gestation. Post-graft, rats underwent repeated drug-induced rotation tests and were tested on two versions of the complex operant task, before post-mortem analysis of the hVM tissue grafts. Results Post-graft behavioural testing revealed that hVM grafts improved non-motor aspects of task performance, specifically visuospatial function and motivational processing, as well as alleviating motor dysfunctions. Conclusions We report the first evidence of human VM cell grafts alleviating both non-motor and motor dysfunctions in an animal model of PD. This intervention, therefore, is the first to improve cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms long-term in a model of PD. PMID:26851542

  15. Busulfan in infants to adult hematopoietic cell transplant recipients: A population pharmacokinetic model for initial and Bayesian dose personalization

    PubMed Central

    McCune, Jeannine S.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Baker, K. Scott; Gamis, Alan S.; Holford, Nicholas H.G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Personalizing intravenous (IV) busulfan doses to a target plasma concentration at steady state (Css) is an essential component of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We sought to develop a population pharmacokinetic model to predict IV busulfan doses over a wide age spectrum (0.1 – 66 years) that accounts for differences in age and body size. Experimental design A population pharmacokinetic model based on normal fat mass and maturation based on post-menstrual age was built from 12,380 busulfan concentration-time points obtained after IV busulfan administration in 1,610 HCT recipients. Subsequently, simulation results of the initial dose necessary to achieve a target Css with this model were compared with pediatric-only models. Results A two-compartment model with first-order elimination best fit the data. The population busulfan clearance was 12.4 L/h for an adult male with 62kg normal fat mass (equivalent to 70kg total body weight). Busulfan clearance, scaled to body size – specifically normal fat mass, is predicted to be 95% of the adult clearance at 2.5 years post-natal age. With a target Css of 770 ng/mL, a higher proportion of initial doses achieved the therapeutic window with this age- and size-dependent model (72%) compared to dosing recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (57%) or the European Medicines Agency (70%). Conclusion This is the first population pharmacokinetic model developed to predict initial IV busulfan doses and personalize to a target Css over a wide age spectrum, ranging from infants to adults. PMID:24218510

  16. Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of the evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of islet transplantation alone (ITA) in non-uremic patients with type 1 DM who have severe hypoglycemia and uncontrolled diabetes (brittle diabetics). Results In a health technology assessment from Alberta, Guo et al. (2003) stated that limited evidence from the Edmonton series suggested that islet cell transplantation (ITA) (using the Edmonton Protocol) is effective in 1) controlling labile diabetes and 2) protecting against unrecognized hypoglycemia in highly selected patients in the short term. This conclusion by Guo et al. (2003) was based on the results of 11/17 insulin independent patients who were followed up for a median of 20.4 months in the trial by Ryan et al. (2002). In contrast, Paty et al. (2002) concluded that glucagon and epinephrine responses and hypoglycemic symptom recognition were not improved by islet transplantation in patients receiving the procedure in Edmonton, despite prolonged insulin independence and near-normal glycemic control. Paty et al. (2002) (a member of the Edmonton team) examined 7 ITA recipients, 7 type 1 DM patients (nonITA), and 7 nondiabetic control patients. The follow-up for most studies was short. It was suggested that the modifications to the conventional ITA approaches, including the steroid free immunosuppressive regimen, islet preparation in xenoproteins free media and transplantation of fresh islets from multiple donors were associated with improved success. The effects of ITA on beta cell function (secretion of insulin) look promising, however, the effects of ITA on pancreatic alpha cell function (secretion of counter-regulatory hormones such as glucagon and epinephrine) in long standing type 1 diabetes remain unclear. The most important barriers to more widespread islet transplantation using the Edmonton protocol are the availability of sufficient donor organs and the

  17. Effects of stem cell transplantation on cognitive decline in animal models of Alzheimer’s disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Peng, Weijun; Zhang, Chunhu; Sheng, Chenxia; Huang, Wei; Wang, Yang; Fan, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), an irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease, causes characteristic cognitive impairment, and no curative treatments are currently available. Stem cell transplantation offers a powerful tool for the treatment of AD. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of data from controlled studies to study the impact of stem cell biology and experimental design on learning and memory function following stem cell transplantation in animal models of AD. A total of 58 eligible controlled studies were included by searching PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science up to April 13, 2015. Meta-analysis showed that stem cell transplantation could promote both learning and memory recovery. Stratified meta-analysis was used to explore the influence of the potential factors on the estimated effect size, and meta-regression analyses were undertaken to explore the sources of heterogeneity for learning and memory function. Publication bias was assessed using funnel plots and Egger’s test. The present review reinforces the evidence supporting stem cell transplantation in experimental AD. However, it highlights areas that require well-designed and well-reported animal studies. PMID:26159750

  18. In utero transplantation of adult bone marrow decreases perinatal lethality and rescues the bone phenotype in the knockin murine model for classical, dominant osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Panaroni, Cristina; Gioia, Roberta; Lupi, Anna; Besio, Roberta; Goldstein, Steven A; Kreider, Jaclynn; Leikin, Sergey; Vera, Juan Carlos; Mertz, Edward L; Perilli, Egon; Baruffaldi, Fabio; Villa, Isabella; Farina, Aurora; Casasco, Marco; Cetta, Giuseppe; Rossi, Antonio; Frattini, Annalisa; Marini, Joan C; Vezzoni, Paolo; Forlino, Antonella

    2009-07-01

    Autosomal dominant osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) caused by glycine substitutions in type I collagen is a paradigmatic disorder for stem cell therapy. Bone marrow transplantation in OI children has produced a low engraftment rate, but surprisingly encouraging symptomatic improvements. In utero transplantation (IUT) may hold even more promise. However, systematic studies of both methods have so far been limited to a recessive mouse model. In this study, we evaluated intrauterine transplantation of adult bone marrow into heterozygous BrtlIV mice. Brtl is a knockin mouse with a classical glycine substitution in type I collagen [alpha1(I)-Gly349Cys], dominant trait transmission, and a phenotype resembling moderately severe and lethal OI. Adult bone marrow donor cells from enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transgenic mice engrafted in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic tissues differentiated to trabecular and cortical bone cells and synthesized up to 20% of all type I collagen in the host bone. The transplantation eliminated the perinatal lethality of heterozygous BrtlIV mice. At 2 months of age, femora of treated Brtl mice had significant improvement in geometric parameters (P < .05) versus untreated Brtl mice, and their mechanical properties attained wild-type values. Our results suggest that the engrafted cells form bone with higher efficiency than the endogenous cells, supporting IUT as a promising approach for the treatment of genetic bone diseases. PMID:19414862

  19. Neoplasms of the Small Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Howard; Crichlow, Robert W.; Caplan, Howard S.

    1974-01-01

    Small bowel tumors are unusual lesions exhibiting nonspecific clinical features often diagnosed at an advanced stage. In the cases studied at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania nearly all the 32 patients with malignancies were symptomatic whereas in the 34 patients with benign lesions the condition was discovered as an incidental finding in about half of the patients. Weight loss, palpable mass or anemia usually indicated malignancy. Small bowel radiography was the most useful diagnostic aid in the present series. While the etiology of these lesions is unknown, villous adenomas probably bear a relationship to carcinoma. The association between chronic regional enteritis and small bowel tumors is unestablished but suggestive. An analysis of reported series reveals a disproportionate incidence of additional primary tumors in patients with small bowel neoplasms. Surgical extirpation is indicated for curative treatment. In the present series, resection in hope of cure was carried out in 25 of 32 malignant tumors resulting in eight five-year survivals. One of these latter lived nine years with disseminated malignant carcinoid reflecting the occasional indolent course of this tumor. PMID:4842978

  20. Imaging for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Morris, Melanie S; Chu, Daniel I

    2015-12-01

    Multiple imaging modalities exist for inflammatory bowel disease. This article explores the use of plain radiographs, contrast radiologic imaging, computed tomography, MRI, ultrasound, and capsule endoscopy. History, technique, indications for use, limitations, and future directions are discussed for each modality. PMID:26596919

  1. Anti-aging Effect of Transplanted Amniotic Membrane Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Premature Aging Model of Bmi-1 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chunfeng; Jin, Jianliang; Lv, Xianhui; Tao, Jianguo; Wang, Rong; Miao, Dengshun

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether transplanted amniotic membrane mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) ameliorated the premature senescent phenotype of Bmi-1-deficient mice, postnatal 2-day-old Bmi-1−/− mice were injected intraperitoneally with the second-passage AMSCs from amniotic membranes of β-galactosidase (β-gal) transgenic mice or wild-type (WT) mice labeled with DiI. Three reinjections were given, once every seven days. Phenotypes of 5-week-old β-gal+ AMSC-transplanted or 6-week-old DiI+ AMSC-transplanted Bmi-1−/− mice were compared with vehicle-transplanted Bmi-1−/− and WT mice. Vehicle-transplanted Bmi-1−/− mice displayed growth retardation and premature aging with decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis; a decreased ratio and dysmaturity of lymphocytic series; premature osteoporosis with reduced osteogenesis and increased adipogenesis; redox imbalance and DNA damage in multiple organs. Transplanted AMSCs carried Bmi-1 migrated into multiple organs, proliferated and differentiated into multiple tissue cells, promoted growth and delayed senescence in Bmi-1−/− transplant recipients. The dysmaturity of lymphocytic series were ameliorated, premature osteoporosis were rescued by promoting osteogenesis and inhibiting adipogenesis, the oxidative stress and DNA damage in multiple organs were inhibited by the AMSC transplantation in Bmi-1−/− mice. These findings indicate that AMSC transplantation ameliorated the premature senescent phenotype of Bmi-1-deficient mice and could be a novel therapy to delay aging and prevent aging-associated degenerative diseases. PMID:26370922

  2. Reconstruction of Auto-Tissue-Engineered Lamellar Cornea by Dynamic Culture for Transplantation: A Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Haoyun; Wang, Xiaoran; Xiao, Jianhui; Duan, Hucheng; Li, Naiyang; Li, Chaoyang; Wan, Pengxia; Liu, Ying; Song, Yiyue; Zhou, Chenjing; Huang, Zheqian; Wang, Zhichong

    2014-01-01

    To construct an auto-tissue-engineered lamellar cornea (ATELC) for transplantation, based on acellular porcine corneal stroma and autologous corneal limbal explants, a dynamic culture process, which composed of a submersion culture, a perfusion culture and a dynamic air-liquid interface culture, was performed using appropriate parameters. The results showed that the ATELC-Dynamic possessed histological structure and DNA content that were similar to native lamellar cornea (NLC, p>0.05). Compared to NLC, the protein contents of zonula occludens-1, desmocollin-2 and integrin β4 in ATELC-Dynamic reached 93%, 89% and 73%, respectively. The basal cells of ATELC-Dynamic showed a better differentiation phenotype (K3−, P63+, ABCG2+) compared with that of ATELC in static air-lift culture (ATELC-Static, K3+, P63−, ABCG2−). Accordingly, the cell-cloning efficiency of ATELC-Dynamic (9.72±3.5%) was significantly higher than that of ATELC-Static (2.13±1.46%, p<0.05). The levels of trans-epithelial electrical resistance, light transmittance and areal modulus variation in ATELC-Dynamic all reached those of NLC (p>0.05). Rabbit lamellar keratoplasty showed that the barrier function of ATELC-Dynamic was intact, and there were no signs of epithelial shedding or neovascularization. Furthermore, the ATELC-Dynamic group had similar optical properties and wound healing processes compared with the NLC group. Thus, the sequential dynamic culture process that was designed according to corneal physiological characteristics could successfully reconstruct an auto-lamellar cornea with favorable morphological characteristics and satisfactory physiological function. PMID:24705327

  3. Reconstruction of auto-tissue-engineered lamellar cornea by dynamic culture for transplantation: a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zheng; Zhou, Qiang; Duan, Haoyun; Wang, Xiaoran; Xiao, Jianhui; Duan, Hucheng; Li, Naiyang; Li, Chaoyang; Wan, Pengxia; Liu, Ying; Song, Yiyue; Zhou, Chenjing; Huang, Zheqian; Wang, Zhichong

    2014-01-01

    To construct an auto-tissue-engineered lamellar cornea (ATELC) for transplantation, based on acellular porcine corneal stroma and autologous corneal limbal explants, a dynamic culture process, which composed of a submersion culture, a perfusion culture and a dynamic air-liquid interface culture, was performed using appropriate parameters. The results showed that the ATELC-Dynamic possessed histological structure and DNA content that were similar to native lamellar cornea (NLC, p>0.05). Compared to NLC, the protein contents of zonula occludens-1, desmocollin-2 and integrin β4 in ATELC-Dynamic reached 93%, 89% and 73%, respectively. The basal cells of ATELC-Dynamic showed a better differentiation phenotype (K3-, P63+, ABCG2+) compared with that of ATELC in static air-lift culture (ATELC-Static, K3+, P63-, ABCG2-). Accordingly, the cell-cloning efficiency of ATELC-Dynamic (9.72±3.5%) was significantly higher than that of ATELC-Static (2.13±1.46%, p<0.05). The levels of trans-epithelial electrical resistance, light transmittance and areal modulus variation in ATELC-Dynamic all reached those of NLC (p>0.05). Rabbit lamellar keratoplasty showed that the barrier function of ATELC-Dynamic was intact, and there were no signs of epithelial shedding or neovascularization. Furthermore, the ATELC-Dynamic group had similar optical properties and wound healing processes compared with the NLC group. Thus, the sequential dynamic culture process that was designed according to corneal physiological characteristics could successfully reconstruct an auto-lamellar cornea with favorable morphological characteristics and satisfactory physiological function. PMID:24705327

  4. Attitudes toward organ donation and transplantation. A model for understanding reactions to medical procedures after death.

    PubMed

    Sanner, M

    1994-04-01

    The main purpose of this study was to reach a deeper understanding of factors influencing the attitudes toward organ donation and other procedures with the dead body. From a survey of 400 inhabitants of Uppsala, a city in the middle of Sweden, concerning attitudes toward transplantation issues, 38 individuals with different attitudes toward donation of their own organs were selected for follow-up interviews. From the interviews, more than 600 statements concerning motives and reactions to medical procedures with the dead body were listed. These statements were summarized in 20 motive categories, in which 17 the nature of the motives were negative to organ donation and three promoting such a procedure. The categories were then analyzed and interpreted within a frame of reference of psychodynamic defense theory. In several cases it was possible to relate them to common death anxiety defenses. Six different motive complexes were extracted. These are called (1) illusion of lingering life; (2) protection of the value of the individual; (3) distrust, anxiety and alienation; (4) respecting the limits set by Nature or God; (5) altruism; and (6) rationality. Individuals not willing to donate their own organs were judged as either (a) reacting out of strenthened death anxiety defenses, or (b) as having a special outlook on life, where the idea of what is 'natural' was emphasized. The adverse reactions of the positive attitude group were seen as initial reactions perceived as derivations of common death anxiety defenses and weakened when confronted with altruistic and fact-stressing arguments. In the 'undecided group' of 14 persons, 11 arrived at a definite opinion. Seven decided for organ donation when their mistaken beliefs were corrected or when they took time to work through their initial uneasiness, while 4 persons actually were clearly negative. Three still remained uncertain. The stability of these attitudes seems to be high, often being experienced as a part of one

  5. Anti-Leukocyte Function-Associated Antigen 1 Therapy in a Nonhuman Primate Renal Transplant Model of Costimulation Blockade-Resistant Rejection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D J; Lo, D J; Leopardi, F; Song, M; Turgeon, N A; Strobert, E A; Jenkins, J B; Wang, R; Reimann, K A; Larsen, C P; Kirk, A D

    2016-05-01

    Costimulation blockade with the fusion protein belatacept provides a desirable side effect profile and improvement in renal function compared with calcineurin inhibition in renal transplantation. This comes at the cost of increased rates of early acute rejection. Blockade of the integrin molecule leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) has been shown to be an effective adjuvant to costimulation blockade in a rigorous nonhuman primate (NHP) model of islet transplantation; therefore, we sought to test this combination in an NHP renal transplant model. Rhesus macaques received belatacept maintenance therapy with or without the addition of LFA-1 blockade, which was achieved using a murine-derived LFA-1-specific antibody TS1/22. Additional experiments were performed using chimeric rhesus IgG1 (TS1/22R1) or IgG4 (TS1/22R4) variants, each engineered to limit antibody clearance. Despite evidence of proper binding to the target molecule and impaired cellular egress from the intravascular space indicative of a therapeutic effect similar to prior islet studies, LFA-1 blockade failed to significantly prolong graft survival. Furthermore, evidence of impaired protective immunity against cytomegalovirus was observed. These data highlight the difficulties in translating treatment regimens between organ models and suggest that the primarily vascularized renal model is more robust with regard to belatacept-resistant rejection than the islet model. PMID:26602755

  6. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms in childhood irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects a large number of children throughout the world. The symptom expression of IBS is heterogeneous, and several factors which may be interrelated within the IBS biopsychosocial model play a role. These factors include visceral hyperalgesia, intestinal permeability...

  7. [Percutaneous Nephrolithotripsy for Renal Transplant Lithiasis: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Oida, Takeshi; Kanemitsu, Toshiyuki; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Fujimoto, Nobumasa; Koide, Takuo

    2016-02-01

    A 54-year-old man was introduced to our hospital for follow-up examinations after renal transplantation. At the initial visit, a 25 mm renal transplant stone was noted, which had enlarged to 32 mm at an examination 1 year later. We first attempted transurethral lithotripsy (TUL), but failed due to ureteral stricture. However, we could completely remove the stone in 2 sessions of percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL). The incidence of urinary lithiasis after renal transplantation ranges from 0.17-1.8%, for which PNL and TUL are frequently used. Although considered to be accompanied with risks of bleeding, bowel injury, and renal dysfunction, PNL is effective for urinary lithiasis after renal transplantation. TUL is less invasive, but access may be difficult when the ureter has an unusual course or ureteral stricture exists, as in our patient. PMID:27018408

  8. Transplantation of human induced cerebellar granular-like cells improves motor functions in a novel mouse model of cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Tongming; Tang, Hailiang; Shen, Yiwen; Tang, Qisheng; Chen, Luping; Wang, Zhifu; Zhou, Ping; Xu, Feng; Zhu, Jianhong

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-based reparative approaches have been applied to cerebellum-related disorders during the last two decades. Direct lineage reprogramming of human fibroblasts into functional granular neurons holds great promise for biomedical applications such as cerebellum regeneration and cellbased disease modeling. In the present study, we showed that a combination of Ascl1, Sox2 and OCT4, in a culture subsequently treated with secreted factors (BMP4, Wnt3a and FGF8b), was capable of converting human fibroblasts from the scalp tissue of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) into functional human induced cerebellar granular-like cells (hiCGCs). Morphological analysis, immunocytochemistry, gene expression and electrophysiological analysis were performed to identify the similarity of induced neuronal cells to human cerebellum granular cells. Our strategy improved the efficiency for hiCGCs induction, which gave the highest conversion efficiency 12.30±0.88%, and Ath1+/Tuj1+ double positive cells to 5.56±0.80%. We transplanted hiCGCs into the cerebellum of NmycTRE/TRE: tTS mice, a novel mouse model of cerebellar ataxia, and demonstrated that the hiCGCs were able to survive, migrate, proliferate and promote mild functional recovery after been grafted into cerebellum. PMID:27158363

  9. The short-bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, J M

    1995-06-01

    Patients with a short bowel have usually had a bowel resection for Crohn's disease. Two types of short-bowel patient can be distinguished: those with a jejunostomy and those with their jejunum anastomosed to a functioning colon. Both types of patient have problems with macronutrient absorption, although those with a colon experience fewer problems because some energy from unabsorbed carbohydrate is salvaged in the colon. Patients with a jejunostomy have problems with large stomal losses of water, sodium and magnesium, whereas those with a jejuno-colic anastomosis rarely have problems with water and electrolyte absorption. Patients with a jejunostomy 100-200 cm from the duodeno-jejunal flexure ('absorbers') usually absorb more from the diet than they pass through the stoma and therefore require oral electrolyte or nutrient supplements. Those with a residual jejunal length of less than 100 cm usually secrete more from the stoma than they take in orally ('secretors') and therefore require long-term parenteral fluid or nutrient supplements. A high output resulting from a jejunostomy is treated by reducing the oral intake of hypotonic fluid, administering a sipped glucose-saline solution and, often, by giving drugs that reduce intestinal motility (most effective in absorbers) or gastrointestinal secretions (most effective in secretors). Gallstones are common both in short-bowel patients with and in those without a colon (45%), and calcium oxalate renal stones occur in the former (25%). However, it is now possible to provide adequate nutrition and fluid supplements for most patients with a short bowel, and the prospects for the rehabilitation of such patients are good. PMID:7552632

  10. Vitamin D and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ardesia, Marco; Ferlazzo, Guido; Fries, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been recognized as an environmental risk factor for Crohn's disease since the early 80s. Initially, this finding was correlated with metabolic bone disease. Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels have been repeatedly reported in inflammatory bowel diseases together with a relationship between vitamin D status and disease activity. Subsequently, low serum vitamin D levels have been reported in various immune-related diseases pointing to an immunoregulatory role. Indeed, vitamin D and its receptor (VDR) are known to interact with different players of the immune homeostasis by controlling cell proliferation, antigen receptor signalling, and intestinal barrier function. Moreover, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D is implicated in NOD2-mediated expression of defensin-β2, the latter known to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (IBD1 gene), and several genetic variants of the vitamin D receptor have been identified as Crohn's disease candidate susceptibility genes. From animal models we have learned that deletion of the VDR gene was associated with a more severe disease. There is a growing body of evidence concerning the therapeutic role of vitamin D/synthetic vitamin D receptor agonists in clinical and experimental models of inflammatory bowel disease far beyond the role of calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. PMID:26000293

  11. Vitamin D and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ardesia, Marco; Ferlazzo, Guido; Fries, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been recognized as an environmental risk factor for Crohn's disease since the early 80s. Initially, this finding was correlated with metabolic bone disease. Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels have been repeatedly reported in inflammatory bowel diseases together with a relationship between vitamin D status and disease activity. Subsequently, low serum vitamin D levels have been reported in various immune-related diseases pointing to an immunoregulatory role. Indeed, vitamin D and its receptor (VDR) are known to interact with different players of the immune homeostasis by controlling cell proliferation, antigen receptor signalling, and intestinal barrier function. Moreover, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D is implicated in NOD2-mediated expression of defensin-β2, the latter known to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (IBD1 gene), and several genetic variants of the vitamin D receptor have been identified as Crohn's disease candidate susceptibility genes. From animal models we have learned that deletion of the VDR gene was associated with a more severe disease. There is a growing body of evidence concerning the therapeutic role of vitamin D/synthetic vitamin D receptor agonists in clinical and experimental models of inflammatory bowel disease far beyond the role of calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. PMID:26000293

  12. Inflammatory responses in a new mouse model of prolonged hepatic cold ischemia followed by arterialized orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiu-Da; Gao, Feng; Ke, Bibo; Zhai, Yuan; Lassman, Charles R; Tsuchihashi, Sei-Ichiro; Farmer, Douglas G; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W

    2005-10-01

    The current models of liver ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) in mice are largely limited to a warm ischemic component. To investigate the mechanism of hepatic "cold" IRI, we developed and validated a new mouse model of prolonged cold preservation followed by syngeneic orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Two hundred and forty-three OLTs with or without rearterialization and preservation in University of Wisconsin solution at 4 degrees C were performed in Balb/c mice. The 14-day survivals in the nonarterialized OLT groups were 92% (11/12), 82% (9/11), and 8% (1/12) after 1-hour, 6-hour and 24-hour preservation, respectively. In contrast, hepatic artery reconstruction after 1-hour, 6-hour, and 24-hour preservation improved the outcome as evidenced by 2-week survival of 100% (12/12), 100% (10/10), and 33% (4/12), respectively, and diminished hepatocellular damage (serum alanine aminotransferase /histology). Moreover, 24-hour (but not 1-h) cold preservation of rearterialized OLTs increased hepatic CD4+ T-cell infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 2, interferon-gamma) production, as well as enhanced local apoptosis, and Toll-like receptor 4/caspase 3 expression. These cardinal features of hepatic IRI validate the model. In conclusion, we have developed and validated a new mouse model of IRI in which hepatic artery reconstruction was mandatory for long-term animal survival after prolonged (24-h) OLT preservation. With the availability of genetically manipulated mouse strains, this model should provide important insights into the mechanism of antigen-independent hepatic IRI and help design much needed refined therapeutic means to combat hepatic IRI in the clinics. PMID:16184555

  13. Chronic Rejection Pathology after Orthotopic Lung Transplantation in Mice: The Development of a Murine BOS Model and Its Drawbacks

    PubMed Central

    De Vleeschauwer, Stéphanie; Jungraithmayr, Wolfgang; Wauters, Shana; Willems, Stijn; Rinaldi, Manuela; Vaneylen, Annemie; Verleden, Stijn; Willems-Widyastuti, Anna; Bracke, Ken; Brusselle, Guy; Verbeken, Erik; Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Verleden, Geert; Vanaudenaerde, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Almost all animal models for chronic rejection (CR) after lung transplantation (LTx) fail to resemble the human situation. It was our attempt to develop a representative model of CR in mice. Orthotopic LTx was performed in allografts receiving daily immunosuppression with steroids and cyclosporine. Controls included isografts and mice only undergoing thoracotomy (SHAM). Allografts were sacrificed 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 or 12 weeks after LTx. Pulmonary function was measured repeatedly in the 12w allografts, isografts and SHAM mice. Histologically, all allografts demonstrated acute rejection (AR) around the blood vessels and airways two weeks after LTx. This decreased to 50–75% up to 10 weeks and was absent after 12 weeks. Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) lesions were observed in 25–50% of the mice from 4–12 weeks. Isografts and lungs of SHAM mice were normal after 12 weeks. Pulmonary function measurements showed a decline in FEV0.1, TLC and compliance in the allografts postoperatively (2 weeks) with a slow recovery over time. After this initial decline, lung function of allografts increased more than in isografts and SHAM mice indicating that pulmonary function measurement is not a good tool to diagnose CR in a mouse. We conclude that a true model for CR, with clear OB lesions in about one third of the animals, but without a decline in lung function, is possible. This model is an important step forward in the development of an ideal model for CR which will open new perspectives in unraveling CR pathogenesis and exploring new treatment options. PMID:22238655

  14. Intestinal Failure: Adaptation, Rehabilitation, and Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Shishira; Tandon, Parul; Meka, Krishna; Rivas, John M; Jevenn, Andrea; Kuo, Ning-Tsu; Steiger, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal failure (IF) is a state in which the nutritional demands are not met by the gastrointestinal absorptive surface. A majority of IF cases are associated with short-bowel syndrome, which is a result of malabsorption after significant intestinal resection for numerous reasons, some of which include Crohn's disease, vascular thrombosis, and radiation enteritis. IF can also be caused by obstruction, dysmotility, and congenital defects. Recognition and management of IF can be challenging, given the complex nature of this condition. This review discusses the management of IF with a focus on intestinal rehabilitation, parenteral nutrition, and transplantation. PMID:26974760

  15. Before the Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Devices About Organ Allocation Getting on the List Financing a Transplant Waiting for your Transplant About the ... Types Being a Living Donor About the Operation Financing Living Donation Home / Before The Transplant Organ Facts ...

  16. International Transplant Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Register for the 25th Annual ITNS Symposium The International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS) cordially invites transplant nurses ... Barriers (PDF) This pocket guide, developed by the International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS), provides an overview of ...

  17. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... allo-transplantation?" For each pancreatic islet allo-transplant infusion, researchers use specialized enzymes to remove islets from ... in a lab. Transplant patients typically receive two infusions with an average of 400,000 to 500, ...

  18. BMSCs transplantation improves cognitive impairment via up-regulation of hippocampal GABAergic system in a rat model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Long, Q; Hei, Y; Luo, Q; Tian, Y; Yang, J; Li, J; Wei, L; Liu, W

    2015-12-17

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) transplantation can ameliorate cognitive impairment in chronic ischemic brain injury, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. It is considered that the hippocampus holds the capabilities of memory consolidation and spatial navigation, and the gamma amino butyric acid (GABA)ergic system plays an important role in the control of learning and memory processes. Herein, we investigated whether transplantation of BMSCs could improve cognitive impairment via regulating the hippocampal GABAergic system in a rat model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Animals treated with permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO) (a rat model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion) received intravenous injections of BMSCs or saline as experimental group and control group I, the sham-operated rats received intravenous injections of BMSCs or saline as the sham group and control group II. Four weeks later, the Morris Water Maze was employed to evaluate the cognitive changes of each group, immunohistochemistry and western blotting was used to investigate the GABAergic system expression including GABA, glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) or GABA(B) receptor 1 (GABA(B)R1) in the hippocampus. Our results showed that the 2VO model presented decreased capacities of learning and memory and down-regulated the expression of GABA, GAD67 or GABA(B)R1 in the hippocampal CA1 subfield in comparison to the sham group (P<0.05), while administration of BMSCs (experimental group) manifested increased performances of learning sessions and probe tasks, as well as up-regulated expression of GABA, GAD67 or GABA(B)R1 compared with the control group I (P<0.05). Collectively, these findings suggest that transplantation of BMSCs is capable of improving cognitive impairment via up-regulating the hippocampal GABAergic system in a rat model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Hence, BMSCs transplantation could serve as an

  19. Nucleus pulposus cells expressing hBMP7 can prevent the degeneration of allogenic IVD in a canine transplantation model.