Science.gov

Sample records for br2 reactor utilization

  1. Steady-State Thermal-Hydraulics Analyses for the Conversion of the BR2 Reactor to LEU

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, J. R.; Bergeron, A.; Dionne, B.; Van den Branden, G.; Kalcheva, S.; Sikik, E.; Koonen, E.

    2015-12-01

    BR2 is a research reactor used for radioisotope production and materials testing. It’s a tank-in-pool type reactor cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium and light water (Figure 1). The reactor core consists of a beryllium moderator forming a matrix of 79 hexagonal prisms in a hyperboloid configuration; each having a central bore that can contain a variety of different components such as a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Based on a series of tests, the BR2 operation is currently limited to a maximum allowable heat flux of 470 W/cm2 to ensure fuel plate integrity during steady-state operation and after a loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure accident.

  2. Optimization strategies for sustainable fuel cycle of the BR2 Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kalcheva, S.; Van Den Branden, G.; Koonen, E.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of the present study is to achieve a sustainable fuel cycle in a long term of reactor operation applying advanced in-core loading strategies. The optimization criteria concern mainly enhancement of nuclear safety by means of reactivity margins and minimization of the operational fuel cycle cost at a given (constant) power level and same or longer cycle length. An important goal is also to maintain the same or to improve the experimental performances. Current developments are focused on optimization of control rods localization; optimization of fresh and burnt fuel assemblies in-core distribution; optimization of azimuth and axial fuel burn up strategies, including fuel assembly rotating and flipping upside down. (authors)

  3. Oxidation mechanisms of CF2Br2 and CH2Br2 induced by air nonthermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Schiorlin, Milko; Marotta, Ester; Dal Molin, Marta; Paradisi, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation mechanisms in air nonthermal plasma (NTP) at room temperature and atmospheric pressure were investigated in a corona reactor energized by +dc, -dc, or +pulsed high voltage.. The two bromomethanes CF(2)Br(2) and CH(2)Br(2) were chosen as model organic pollutants because of their very different reactivities with OH radicals. Thus, they served as useful mechanistic probes: they respond differently to the presence of humidity in the air and give different products. By FT-IR analysis of the postdischarge gas the following products were detected and quantified: CO(2) and CO in the case of CH(2)Br(2), CO(2) and F(2)C ═ O in the case of CF(2)Br(2). F(2)C ═ O is a long-lived oxidation intermediate due to its low reactivity with atmospheric radicals. It is however removed from the NTP processed gas by passage through a water scrubber resulting in hydrolysis to CO(2) and HF. Other noncarbon containing products of the discharge were also monitored by FT-IR analysis, including HNO(3) and N(2)O. Ozone, an important product of air NTP, was never detected in experiments with CF(2)Br(2) and CH(2)Br(2) because of the highly efficient ozone depleting cycles catalyzed by BrOx species formed from the bromomethanes. It is concluded that, regardless of the type of corona applied, CF(2)Br(2) reacts in air NTP via a common intermediate, the CF(2)Br radical. The possible reactions leading to this radical are discussed, including, for -dc activation, charge exchange with O(2)(-), a species detected by APCI mass spectrometry. PMID:23190335

  4. European utilities requirements for future reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Roch, M.

    1996-12-31

    The prospect for future nuclear power plants has led the utilities of seven European countries to launch an effort to define the requirements that should be common to all utilities for the next reactors to be built in Europe. These requirements will ultimately be part of a four-volume document and will cover all aspects of a plant: performance, grid connection, codes and standards, materials, quality assurance, cost, and, of course, safety. The seven European countries - France, the United Kingdom, Germany, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, and Belgium - issued revision A of Vols 1 and 2 in Nov. 1994, which deal with all the general requirements, not specific to any design, originally issued in March 1994. Comments were requested from most of the nuclear utilities as well as from reactor vendors worldwide. This gave rise to an enormous number of comments, which were duly considered by the European Union. The relevant ones were incorporated into revision B of Vols. 1 and 2, which was issued in Nov 1995, the objective of this revision B being essentially to gain approval from the safety authorities. A particular aspect of the European approach resides in the fact that these European requirements will have to be discussed and agreed on by at least nine safety authorities, i.e., the authorities of the seven counties that launched revision B, plus the authorities of two newcomers, Finland and Sweden, which have just applied for European Union membership.

  5. Utility guidelines for reactor noise analysis: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, F.J.

    1987-02-01

    Noise analysis techniques have been extensively utilized to monitor the health and performance of nuclear power plant systems. However, few utilities have adequate programs to effectively utilize these techniques. These programs usually provide low-quality data, which can lead to misinterpretation and false alarms. The objective of this work is to provide utilities and noise analysts with guidelines for data acquisition, data analysis, and interpretation of noise analysis results for surveillance and diagnosis of reactor systems.

  6. Increasing Fuel Utilization of Breed and Burn Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Sanzo, Christian Diego

    Breed and Burn reactors (B&B), also referred to Traveling Wave Reactors, are fast spectrum reactors that can be fed indefinitely with depleted uranium only, once criticality is achieved without the need for fuel reprocessing. Radiation damage to the fuel cladding limits the fuel utilization of B&B reactors to ˜ 18-20% FIMA (Fissions of Initial Metal Atoms) -- the minimum burnup required for sustaining the B&B mode of operation. The fuel discharged from this type of cores contain ˜ 10% fissile plutonium. Such a high plutonium content poses environmental and proliferation concerns, but makes it possible to utilize the fuel for further energy production. The objectives of the research reported in this dissertation are to analyze the fuel cycle of B&B reactors and study new strategies to extend the fuel utilization beyond ˜ 18-20% FIMA. First, the B&B reactor physics is examined while recycling the fuel every 20% FIMA via a limited separation processing, using either the melt refining or AIROX dry processes. It was found that the maximum attainable burnup varies from 54% to 58% FIMA -- depending on the recycling process and on the fraction of neutrons lost via leakage and reactivity control. In Chapter 3 the discharge fuel characteristics of B&B reactors operating at 20% FIMA and 55% FIMA is analyzed and compared. It is found that the 20% FIMA reactor discharges a fuel with about ˜ 80% fissile plutonium over total plutonium content. Subsequently a new strategy of minimal reconditioning, called double cladding is proposed to extend the fuel utilization in specifically designed second-tier reactors. It is found that with this strategy it is possible to increase fuel utilization to 30% in a sodium fast reactor and up to 40% when a subcritical B&B core is driven by an accelerator-driven spallation neutron source. Lastly, a fuel cycle using Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) to reduce the plutonium content of discharged B&B reactors is analyzed. It was found that it is

  7. Plutonium and minor actinides utilization in Thorium molten salt reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Waris, Abdul; Aji, Indarta K.; Novitrian,; Kurniadi, Rizal; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-06-06

    FUJI-12 reactor is one of MSR systems that proposed by Japan. The original FUJI-12 design considers Th/{sup 233}U or Th/Pu as main fuel. In accordance with the currently suggestion to stay away from the separation of Pu and minor actinides (MA), in this study we evaluated the utilization of Pu and MA in FUJI-12. The reactor grade Pu was employed in the present study as a small effort of supporting THORIMS-NES scenario. The result shows that the reactor can achieve its criticality with the Pu and MA composition in the fuel of 5.96% or more.

  8. Plutonium and minor actinides utilization in Thorium molten salt reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waris, Abdul; Aji, Indarta K.; Novitrian, Kurniadi, Rizal; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-06-01

    FUJI-12 reactor is one of MSR systems that proposed by Japan. The original FUJI-12 design considers Th/233U or Th/Pu as main fuel. In accordance with the currently suggestion to stay away from the separation of Pu and minor actinides (MA), in this study we evaluated the utilization of Pu and MA in FUJI-12. The reactor grade Pu was employed in the present study as a small effort of supporting THORIMS-NES scenario. The result shows that the reactor can achieve its criticality with the Pu & MA composition in the fuel of 5.96% or more.

  9. Retrofittable Modifications to Pressurized Water Reactors for Improved Resource Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    This report summarizes work performed for the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency under BOA AC9NX707 (Task Order 80-02), as part of the Agency's continuing program on improved fuel utilization in light water reactors. The objective of the study was to investigate improvements in fuel management and design of water reactors (PWRs) that could potentially increase the utilization of natural uranium resources in a once-through fuel cycle (i.e., without using spent fuel reprocessing and recycle). For the present study, potential improvements were limited to retrofittable concepts, i.e., those which could be modifications to the reactor system or balance of plant. The potential improvements considered were not necessarily restricted to those which might be economical under current uranium ore prices or to those which might be acceptable to the nuclear industry at the present time. A six-month fuel cycle, for example, although technically possible, would be neither economical nor accept able to the industry at the present time. Although all potential improvements are not necessarily compatible with each other, the target objective was to seek a composite system of compatible improvements that, if possible, could increase uranium resource utilization by 30% or more. Economic factors, risks involved in the introduction, and potential licensing concerns are also addressed in the report.

  10. Analysis of the nuclear measurement program for an optimized BR2 core configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Van Den Branden, G.; Kalcheva, S.; Sikik, E.; Koonen, E.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the analysis of the results of the Nuclear Measurement Program (NMP) executed during the shut-down of cycle 05/2012 of the BR2 reactor. The aim of the NMP was to determine the properties of a reactor core load with a new configuration of the control rods and to evaluate/verify the predicted numerical results by MCNPX. The methods used for the interpretation of the measurement results include combinations of an analytical method for determination of the axial relative control rod efficiency and least square techniques. (authors)

  11. UWTOR-M, a stellarator power reactor utilizing modular coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sviatoslavsky, I. N.; Vansciver, S. W.; Kulcinski, G. I.

    1981-10-01

    The parametric considerations which led to the UWTOR-M reference design point are described. The design has 18 twisted coils utilizing a multipolarity of 3, a major radius of 24 m, a coil radius of 4.77 m and a plasma aspect ratio of 14. An assumed (ALPHA) of 5% was used. This configuration leads to a rotational transform on the edge of 1.125 giving favorable plasma physics conditions. The natural stellarator divertor is used for impurity control in conjunction with innovative high performance divertor targets. A unique blanket design which minimizes tritium inventory in the reactor is proposed. A scheme for servicing the first wall/blanket and other reactor components is described.

  12. Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility Requirements Document Small Modular Reactors Inclusion Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Loflin, Leonard; McRimmon, Beth

    2014-12-18

    This report summarizes a project by EPRI to include requirements for small modular light water reactors (smLWR) into the EPRI Utility Requirements Document (URD) for Advanced Light Water Reactors. The project was jointly funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report covers the scope and content of the URD, the process used to revise the URD to include smLWR requirements, a summary of the major changes to the URD to include smLWR, and how to use the URD as revised to achieve value on new plant projects.

  13. Zn2(TeO3)Br2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dong; Johnsson, Mats

    2008-01-01

    Single crystals of dizinc tellurium dibromide trioxide, Zn2(TeO3)Br2, were synthesized via a transport reaction in sealed evacuated silica tubes. The compound has a layered crystal structure in which the building units are [ZnO4Br] distorted square pyramids, [ZnO2Br2] distorted tetra­hedra, and [TeO3 E] tetra­hedra (E being the 5s 2 lone pair of Te4+) joined through sharing of edges and corners to form layers of no net charge. Bromine atoms and tellurium lone pairs protrude from the surfaces of each layer towards adjacent layers. This new compound Zn2(TeO3)Br2 is isostructural with the synthetic compounds Zn2(TeO3)Cl2, CuZn(TeO3)2, Co2(TeO3)Br2 and the mineral sophiite, Zn2(SeO3)Cl2. PMID:21202162

  14. Lifetime studies in H2/Br2 fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, G. G.; Frank, S. N.; Teherani, T. H.; Weedon, L. D.

    1984-09-01

    A fully computerized system has been set up for the life testing of H2 electrodes in 48 percent HBr, and of H2/Br2 fuel cells. Given a fuel cell design with dry H2 and no anolyte loop, the prime parameters influencing the operating lifetime are the hydrophobicity of the anode and the electrolyte transport property of the membrane. A systematic optimization of all the parameters has generated fuel cells that have operated for 10,000h at 2 A/sq in., with no significant degradation.

  15. Matrix isolation and computational study of isodifluorodibromomethane (F2CBr-Br): A route to Br2 formation in CF2Br2 photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Lisa; Kalume, Aimable; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Tarnovsky, Alexander; Reid, Scott A.

    2010-02-01

    The photolysis products of dibromodifluoromethane (CF2Br2) were characterized by matrix isolation infrared and UV/Visible spectroscopy, supported by ab initio calculations. Photolysis at wavelengths of 240 and 266 nm of CF2Br2:Ar samples (˜1:5000) held at ˜5 K yielded iso-CF2Br2 (F2CBrBr), a weakly bound isomer of CF2Br2, which is characterized here for the first time. The observed infrared and UV/Visible absorptions of iso-CF2Br2 are in excellent agreement with computational predictions at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level. Single point energy calculations at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ level on the B3LYP optimized geometries suggest that the isoform is a minimum on the CF2Br2 potential energy surface, lying some 55 kcal/mol above the CF2Br2 ground state. The energies of various stationary points on the CF2Br2 potential energy surface were characterized computationally; taken with our experimental results, these show that iso-CF2Br2 is an intermediate in the Br+CF2Br→CF2+Br2 reaction. The photochemistry of the isoform was also investigated; excitation into the intense 359 nm absorption band resulted in isomerization to CF2Br2. Our results are discussed in view of the rich literature on the gas-phase photochemistry of CF2Br2, particularly with respect to the existence of a roaming atom pathway leading to molecular products.

  16. Nuclear waste disposal utilizing a gaseous core reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paternoster, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of a gaseous core nuclear reactor designed to produce power to also reduce the national inventories of long-lived reactor waste products through nuclear transmutation was examined. Neutron-induced transmutation of radioactive wastes is shown to be an effective means of shortening the apparent half life.

  17. Spent fuel utilization in a compact traveling wave reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hartanto, Donny; Kim, Yonghee

    2012-06-06

    In recent years, several innovative designs of nuclear reactors are proposed. One of them is Traveling Wave Reactor (TWR). The unique characteristic of a TWR is the capability of breeding its own fuel in the reactor. The reactor is fueled by mostly depleted, natural uranium or spent nuclear fuel and a small amount of enriched uranium to initiate the fission process. Later on in the core, the reactor gradually converts the non-fissile material into the fissile in a process like a traveling wave. In this work, a TWR with spent nuclear fuel blanket was studied. Several parameters such as reactivity coefficients, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron generation lifetime, and fission power, were analyzed. The discharge burnup composition was also analyzed. The calculation is performed by a continuous energy Monte Carlo code McCARD.

  18. Matrix Isolation and Computational Study of iso-CF2Br2: a Route to Molecular Products in CF2Br2 Photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Lisa; Kalume, Aimable; Reid, Scott A.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Tarnovsky, Alexander

    2010-06-01

    The photolysis products of dibromodifluoromethane following selected wavelength laser irradiation were characterized by matrix isolation infrared and UV/Visible spectroscopy, supported by ab initio calculations. Photolysis at wavelengths of 240 and 266 nm of CF2Br2:Ar samples (1:5000) held at 5 K yielded iso-CF2Br2 (F2CBrBr), a weakly bound isomer of CF2Br2, which is characterized here for the first time. The observed infrared and UV/Visible absorptions of iso-CF2Br2 are in excellent agreement with computational predictions at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level. Single point energy calculations at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ level on the B3LYP optimized geometries show that the iso-form is a minimum on the CF2Br2 potential energy surface, lying some 55 kcal/mol above the CF2Br2 ground state. The energies of various stationary points on the CF2Br2 PES were characterized computationally; taken with our experimental results, these show that iso-CF2Br2 is an intermediate in the Br + CF2Br reaction leading to molecular products (CF2 + Br2). The photochemistry of the iso-form was also investigated; excitation into the intense 359 nm absorption band resulted in isomerization to CF2Br2. Our results are discussed in view of the rich literature on the gas-phase photochemistry of CF2Br2, particularly with respect to the existence of a roaming atom pathway leading to molecular products.

  19. Reactor technology assessment and selection utilizing systems engineering approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zolkaffly, Muhammed Zulfakar; Han, Ki-In

    2014-02-12

    The first Nuclear power plant (NPP) deployment in a country is a complex process that needs to consider technical, economic and financial aspects along with other aspects like public acceptance. Increased interest in the deployment of new NPPs, both among newcomer countries and those with expanding programs, necessitates the selection of reactor technology among commercially available technologies. This paper reviews the Systems Decision Process (SDP) of Systems Engineering and applies it in selecting the most appropriate reactor technology for the deployment in Malaysia. The integrated qualitative and quantitative analyses employed in the SDP are explored to perform reactor technology assessment and to select the most feasible technology whose design has also to comply with the IAEA standard requirements and other relevant requirements that have been established in this study. A quick Malaysian case study result suggests that the country reside with PWR (pressurized water reactor) technologies with more detailed study to be performed in the future for the selection of the most appropriate reactor technology for Malaysia. The demonstrated technology assessment also proposes an alternative method to systematically and quantitatively select the most appropriate reactor technology.

  20. Reactor technology assessment and selection utilizing systems engineering approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolkaffly, Muhammed Zulfakar; Han, Ki-In

    2014-02-01

    The first Nuclear power plant (NPP) deployment in a country is a complex process that needs to consider technical, economic and financial aspects along with other aspects like public acceptance. Increased interest in the deployment of new NPPs, both among newcomer countries and those with expanding programs, necessitates the selection of reactor technology among commercially available technologies. This paper reviews the Systems Decision Process (SDP) of Systems Engineering and applies it in selecting the most appropriate reactor technology for the deployment in Malaysia. The integrated qualitative and quantitative analyses employed in the SDP are explored to perform reactor technology assessment and to select the most feasible technology whose design has also to comply with the IAEA standard requirements and other relevant requirements that have been established in this study. A quick Malaysian case study result suggests that the country reside with PWR (pressurized water reactor) technologies with more detailed study to be performed in the future for the selection of the most appropriate reactor technology for Malaysia. The demonstrated technology assessment also proposes an alternative method to systematically and quantitatively select the most appropriate reactor technology.

  1. Liquid fuel molten salt reactors for thorium utilization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gehin, Jess C.; Powers, Jeffrey J.

    2016-04-08

    Molten salt reactors (MSRs) represent a class of reactors that use liquid salt, usually fluoride- or chloride-based, as either a coolant with a solid fuel (such as fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactors) or as a combined coolant and fuel with fuel dissolved in a carrier salt. For liquid-fuelled MSRs, the salt can be processed online or in a batch mode to allow for removal of fission products as well as introduction of fissile fuel and fertile materials during reactor operation. The MSR is most commonly associated with the 233U/thorium fuel cycle, as the nuclear properties of 233U combined with themore » online removal of parasitic absorbers allow for the ability to design a thermal-spectrum breeder reactor; however, MSR concepts have been developed using all neutron energy spectra (thermal, intermediate, fast, and mixed-spectrum zoned concepts) and with a variety of fuels including uranium, thorium, plutonium, and minor actinides. Early MSR work was supported by a significant research and development (R&D) program that resulted in two experimental systems operating at ORNL in the 1960s, the Aircraft Reactor Experiment and the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment. Subsequent design studies in the 1970s focusing on thermal-spectrum thorium-fueled systems established reference concepts for two major design variants: (1) a molten salt breeder reactor (MSBR), with multiple configurations that could breed additional fissile material or maintain self-sustaining operation; and (2) a denatured molten salt reactor (DMSR) with enhanced proliferation-resistance. T MSRs has been selected as one of six most promising Generation IV systems and development activities have been seen in fast-spectrum MSRs, waste-burning MSRs, MSRs fueled with low-enriched uranium (LEU), as well as more traditional thorium fuel cycle-based MSRs. This study provides an historical background of MSR R&D efforts, surveys and summarizes many of the recent development, and provides analysis comparing

  2. 87. ARAIII. GCRE reactor building (ARA608) Mechanical equipment room. Utility ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    87. ARA-III. GCRE reactor building (ARA-608) Mechanical equipment room. Utility air receiver, dryer, and compressor sit on their foundations prior to grouting. December 22, 1958. Ineel photo no. 58-6429. Photographer: Ken Mansfield. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. Optimized Battery-Type Reactor Primary System Design Utilizing Lead

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yong H.; Son, Hyoung M.; Lee, Il S.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    A number of small and medium size reactors are being developed worldwide as well as large electricity generation reactors for co-generation, district heating or desalination. The Seoul National University has started to develop 23 MWth BORIS (Battery Optimized Reactor Integral System) as a multi-purpose reactor. BORIS is an integral-type optimized fast reactor with an ultra long life core. BORIS is being designed to meet the Generation IV nuclear energy system goals of sustainability, safety, reliability and economics. Major features of BORIS include 20 consecutive years of operation without refueling; elimination of an intermediate heat transport loop and main coolant pump; open core without individual subassemblies; inherent negative reactivity feedback; and inherent load following capability. Its one mission is to provide incremental electricity generation to match the needs of developing nations and especially remote communities without major electrical grid connections. BORIS consists of a reactor module, heat exchanger, coolant module, guard vessel, reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS), secondary system, containment and the seismic isolation. BORIS is designed to generate 10 MWe with the resulting thermal efficiency of 45 %. BORIS uses lead as the primary system coolant because of the inherent safety of the material. BORIS is coupled with a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle as the secondary system to gain a high cycle efficiency in the range of 45 %. The reference core consists of 757 fuel rods without assembly with an active core height of 0.8 m. The BORIS core consists of single enrichment zone composed of a Pu-MA (minor actinides)-U-N fuel and a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel clad. This study is intended to set up appropriate reactor vessel geometry by performing thermal hydraulic analysis on RVACS using computational fluid dynamics codes; to examine the liquid metal coolant behavior along the subchannels; to find out whether the

  4. NEUTRON REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT UTILIZING ZIRCONIUM-BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Saller, H.A.; Keeler, J.R.; Szumachowski, E.R.

    1957-11-12

    This patent relates to clad fuel elements for use in neutronic reactors and is drawn to such a fuel element which consists of a core of fissionable material, comprised of an alloy of zirconium and U/sup 235/ enriched uranium, encased in a jacket of a binary zirconium-tin alloy in which the tin content ranges between 1 and 15% by weight.

  5. Bell column downtube, reactors utilizing same and related methods

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Terry D.; Bingham, Dennis N.; Benefiel, Bradley C.; Klinger, Kerry M.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2015-12-22

    Reactors for carrying out a chemical reaction, as well as related components, systems and methods are provided. In accordance with one embodiment, a reactor is provided that includes a furnace and a crucible positioned for heating by the furnace. A downtube is disposed at least partially within the interior crucible along an axis. At least one structure is coupled with the downtube and extends substantially across the cross-sectional area of the interior volume taken in a direction substantially perpendicular to the axis. A plurality of holes is formed in the structure enabling fluid flow therethrough. The structure coupled with the downtube may include a lower body portion and an upper body portion coupled with the lower body portion, wherein the plurality of holes is formed in the lower body portion adjacent to, and radially outward from, a periphery of the upper body portion.

  6. Self-Trapped Excitons in Orthorhombic SnBr2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Y.; Ohno, N.

    2001-08-01

    Luminescence properties of SnBr2 have been studied to reveal the photo-excited exciton relaxation process. Two types of luminescence with large Stokes shifts are found at low temperatures; the 2.2-eV luminescence band produced under the photo-excitation in the first exciton region, and the 2.5-eV luminescence band stimulated by photons with energies above the bandgap. The time-resolved photoluminescence measurements have revealed that the 2.2-eV luminescence comprises fast (1.2 μs) and slow (6.4 μs) exponential decay components, whereas the 2.5-eV luminescence shows the time dependence of I(t) ∝ t-0.9. These results suggest that the former band is attributed to the radiative decay of self-trapped excitons, and the latter band would originate from tunneling recombination of holes with the STEL as in the case of lead halides.

  7. Self-Trapped Excitons in Orthorhombic SnBr2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Y.; Ohno, N.

    Luminescence properties of SnBr2 have been studied to reveal the photo-excited exciton relaxation process. Two types of luminescence with large Stokes shifts are found at low temperatures; the 2.2-eV luminescence band produced under the photo-excitation in the first exciton region, and the 2.5-eV luminescence band stimulated by photons with energies above the bandgap. The time-resolved photoluminescence measurements have revealed that the 2.2-eV luminescence comprises fast (1.2 μs) and slow (6.4 μs) exponential decay components, whereas the 2.5-eV luminescence shows the time dependence of I(t)∞ t-0.9. These results suggest that the former band is attributed to the radiative decay of self-trapped excitons, and the latter band would originate from tunneling recombination of holes with the STEL as in the case of lead halides.

  8. U.S. Department of Energy Program of International Technical Cooperation for Research Reactor Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, D.; Manning, M.; Ellis, R.; Apt, K.; Flaim, S.; Sylvester, K.

    2004-10-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) has initiated collaborations with the national nuclear authorities of Egypt, Peru, and Romania for the purpose of advancing the commercial potential and utilization of their respective research reactors. Under its Office of International Safeguards ''Sister Laboratory'' program, DOE/NNSA has undertaken numerous technical collaborations over the past decade intended to promote peaceful applications of nuclear technology. Among these has been technical assistance in research reactor applications, such as neutron activation analysis, nuclear analysis, reactor physics, and medical radioisotope production. The current collaborations are intended to provide the subject countries with a methodology for greater commercialization of research reactor products and services. Our primary goal is the transfer of knowledge, both in administrative and technical issues, needed for the establishment of an effective business plan and utilization strategy for the continued operation of the countries' research reactors. Technical consultation, cooperation, and the information transfer provided are related to: identification, evaluation, and assessment of current research reactor capabilities for products and services; identification of opportunities for technical upgrades for new or expanded products and services; advice and consultation on research reactor upgrades and technical modifications; characterization of markets for reactor products and services; identification of competition and estimation of potential for market penetration; integration of technical constraints; estimation of cash flow streams; and case studies.

  9. Fluidized bed reactor utilizing a plate support and method of operating the reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.

    1984-10-09

    A bed support, and a fluidizing bed reactor incorporating the bed support, the bed support including a horizontal support surface with a centrally disposed conduit for removing tramp material and/or agglomerated material from the reactor. The horizontal support surface has fluidizing air source jet nozzles for directing pressurized air toward the area above the conduit. In a first embodiment, the conduit has downwardly diverging walls. In a second embodiment, the horizontal support surface further includes a bar grate having central fluidizing air source jet nozzles positioned within the conduit. The method of operating the fluidized bed reactor includes directing pressurized air at an angle to the horizontal support surface both for fluidizing the bed and for moving the tramp material and/or agglomerated material toward the conduit for removal from the reactor through the conduit.

  10. Physical adsorption and charge transfer of molecular Br2 on graphene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheyuan; Darancet, Pierre; Wang, Lei; Crowther, Andrew C; Gao, Yuanda; Dean, Cory R; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Hone, James; Marianetti, Chris A; Brus, Louis E

    2014-03-25

    We present a detailed study of gaseous Br2 adsorption and charge transfer on graphene, combining in situ Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). When graphene is encapsulated by hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) layers on both sides, in a h-BN/graphene/h-BN sandwich structure, it is protected from doping by strongly oxidizing Br2. Graphene supported on only one side by h-BN shows strong hole doping by adsorbed Br2. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determine the graphene charge density as a function of pressure. DFT calculations reveal the variation in charge transfer per adsorbed molecule as a function of coverage. The molecular adsorption isotherm (coverage versus pressure) is obtained by combining Raman spectra with DFT calculations. The Fowler-Guggenheim isotherm fits better than the Langmuir isotherm. The fitting yields the adsorption equilibrium constant (∼0.31 Torr(-1)) and repulsive lateral interaction (∼20 meV) between adsorbed Br2 molecules. The Br2 molecule binding energy is ∼0.35 eV. We estimate that at monolayer coverage each Br2 molecule accepts 0.09 e- from single-layer graphene. If graphene is supported on SiO2 instead of h-BN, a threshold pressure is observed for diffusion of Br2 along the (somewhat rough) SiO2/graphene interface. At high pressure, graphene supported on SiO2 is doped by adsorbed Br2 on both sides. PMID:24528378

  11. Development and transfer of fuel fabrication and utilization technology for research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Travelli, A.; Domagala, R.F.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Approximately 300 research reactors supplied with US-enriched uranium are currently in operation in about 40 countries, with a variety of types, sizes, experiment capabilities and applications. Despite the usefulness and popularity of research reactors, relatively few innovations in their core design have been made in the last fifteen years. The main reason can be better understood by reviewing briefly the history of research reactor fuel technology and enrichment levels. Stringent requirements on the enrichment of the uranium to be used in research reactors were considered and a program was launched to assist research reactors in continuing their operation with the new requirements and with minimum penalties. The goal of the new program, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, is to develop the technical means to utilize LEU instead of HEU in research reactors without significant penalties in experiment performance, operating costs, reactor modifications, and safety characteristics. This paper reviews briefly the RERTR Program activities with special emphasis on the technology transfer aspects of interest to this conference.

  12. Lunar Resource Utilization: Development of a Reactor for Volatile Extraction from Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie E.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.; Nayagam, Vedha

    2007-01-01

    The extraction and processing of planetary resources into useful products, known as In- Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), will have a profound impact on the future of planetary exploration. One such effort is the RESOLVE (Regolith and Environment Science, Oxygen and Lunar Volatiles Extraction) Project, which aims to extract and quantify these resources. As part of the first Engineering Breadboard Unit, the Regolith Volatiles Characterization (RVC) reactor was designed and built at the NASA Glenn Research Center. By heating and agitating the lunar regolith, loosely bound volatiles, such as hydrogen and water, are released and stored in the reactor for later analysis and collection. Intended for operation on a robotic rover, the reactor features a lightweight, compact design, easy loading and unloading of the regolith, and uniform heating of the regolith by means of vibrofluidization. The reactor performance was demonstrated using regolith simulant, JSC1, with favorable results.

  13. Utilization of the Philippine Research Reactor as a training facility for nuclear power plant operators

    SciTech Connect

    Palabrica, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Philippines has a 1-MW swimming-pool reactor facility operated by the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC). The reactor is light-water moderated and cooled, graphite reflected, and fueled with 90% enriched uranium. Since it became critical in 1963 it has been utilized for research, radioisotope production, and training. It was used initially in the training of PAEC personnel and other research institutions and universities. During the last few years, however, it has played a key role in training personnel for the Philippine Nuclear Power Project (PNPP).

  14. Spin-orbit relaxation of Br ((2)P(sub 1/2))

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. O.; Katapski, S. M.; Perram, G. P.; Roh, W. B.; Tate, R. F.

    Pulsed and steady-state photolysis experiments have been conducted to determine the rate coefficients for collisional deactivation of the spin-orbit excited state atomic bromine, Br ((2)P(sub 1/2)). Pulsed lifetime studies for quenching by Br2 and CO2 established absolute rate coefficients at room temperature of k(sub Br2) = 1.2 +/- 10(exp -12) and k(sub CO2) = 1.5 +/- 0.3 x 10(exp -11)/cc/molecule-s. Steady-state photolysis methods were used to determine the quenching rates for the rare gases, N2, O2, H2, D2, NO, NO2, N2O, SF6, CF4, CH4, CO, CO2, COS, SO2, H2S, HBr, HCl, and HI relative to that for Br2.

  15. Trapping molecular bromine: a one-dimensional bromobismuthate complex with Br2 as a linker.

    PubMed

    Adonin, S A; Gorokh, I D; Abramov, P A; Plyusnin, P E; Sokolov, M N; Fedin, V P

    2016-03-01

    The reaction between solid (NMP)n{[BiBr4]}n (1) (NMP = N-methylpyridinium) and Br2, generated in situ in HBr solution, results in the formation of (NMP)3[Bi2Br9]·Br2 (2). In the structure of 2, dibromine molecules connect discrete binuclear [Bi2Br9](3-) anions into an extended network. Complex 2 is thermally stable (up to 150 °C). PMID:26905232

  16. Multi-Reactor Transmutation Analysis Utility (MRTAU,alpha1): Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea Alfonsi; Samuel E. Bays; Cristian Rabiti; Steven J. Piet

    2011-02-01

    Multi-Reactor Transmutation Utility (MRTAU) is a general depletion/decay algorithm under development at INL to support quick assessment of off-normal fuel cycle scenarios of similar nature to well studied reactor and fuel cycle concepts for which isotopic and cross-section data exists. MRTAU has been used in the past for scoping calculations to determine actinide composition evolution over the course of multiple recycles in Light Water Reactor Mixed Oxide and Sodium cooled Fast Reactor. In these applications, various actinide partitioning scenarios of interest were considered. The code has recently been expanded to include fission product generation, depletion and isotopic evolution over multiple recycles. The capability was added to investigate potential partial separations and/or limited recycling technologies such as Melt-Refining, AIROX, DUPIC or other fuel recycle technology where the recycled fuel stream is not completely decontaminated of fission products prior to being re-irradiated in a subsequent reactor pass. This report documents the code's solution methodology and algorithm as well as its solution accuracy compared to the SCALE6.0 software suite.

  17. Laser-induced etching of titanium by Br2 and CCl3Br at 248 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyndall, George W.; Moylan, Christopher R.

    1990-06-01

    A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) has been used to study the KrF* excimer laser-induced etching of titanium by bromine-containing compounds. The experiment consists of focusing the pulsed UV laser beam at normal incidence onto the surface of a quartz crystal coated with 1 μm of polycrystalline titanium. The removal of titanium from the surface is monitored in real time by measuring the change in the frequency of the quartz crystal. The dependence of the etch rate on etchant pressure and laser fluence was measured and found to be consistent with a two-step etching mechanism. The initial step in the etching of titanium is reaction between the etchant and the surface to form the etch product between laser pulses. The etch product is subsequently removed from the surface during the laser pulse via a laser-induced thermal desorption process. The maximum etch rate obtained in this work was 6.2 Å-pulse-1, indicating that between two and three atomic layers of Ti can be removed per laser pulse. The energy required for desorption of the etch product is calculated to be 172 kJ-mole-1, which is consistent with the sublimation enthalpy of TiBr2 (168 kJ-mole-1). The proposed product in the etching of titanium by Br2 and CCl3Br is thus TiBr2. In the etching of Ti by Br2, formation of TiBr2 proceeds predominantly through the dissociative chemisorption of Br2. In the case of etching with CCl3Br, TiBr2 is formed via chemisorption of Br atoms produced in the gas-phase photodissociation of CCl3Br.

  18. Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor for Improved Resource Utilization: Part I - Survey of Potential Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.E.; Gurley, M.K.; Kirby, K.D.; Mitchell, W. III

    1981-09-15

    This document is an interim report under ACDA BOA AC9NX707, Task Order 80-03, which covers the evaluation of certain potential improvements in pressurized water reactor designs intended to enhance uranium fuel utilization. The objective of these evaluations is to seek advanced, non-retrofittable improvements that could possibly be commercialized by the end of the century, and, on the basis of a preliminary evaluation, to select compatible improvements for incorporation into a composite advanced pressurized water reactor concept. The principal areas of investigation include reduced parasitic absorption of neutrons (Task 1), reduced neutron leakage (Task 2), and alternative fuel design concepts (Task 3). To the extent possible, the advanced concept developed in an earlier study (Retrofittable Modifications to Pressurized Water Reactors for Improved Resource Utilization, SSA-128, October 1980) is used as a basis in developing the advanced composite concept. The reference design considered typical of present PWR commercial practice is the system described in RESAR-414, Reference Safety Analysis Report, Westinghouse Nuclear Energy Systems, October 1976.

  19. Preliminary study on weapon grade uranium utilization in molten salt reactor miniFUJI

    SciTech Connect

    Aji, Indarta Kuncoro; Waris, A.

    2014-09-30

    Preliminary study on weapon grade uranium utilization in 25MWth and 50MWth of miniFUJI MSR (molten salt reactor) has been carried out. In this study, a very high enriched uranium that we called weapon grade uranium has been employed in UF{sub 4} composition. The {sup 235}U enrichment is 90 - 95 %. The results show that the 25MWth miniFUJI MSR can get its criticality condition for 1.56 %, 1.76%, and 1.96% of UF{sub 4} with {sup 235}U enrichment of at least 93%, 90%, and 90%, respectively. In contrast, the 50 MWth miniFUJI reactor can be critical for 1.96% of UF{sub 4} with {sup 235}U enrichment of at smallest amount 95%. The neutron spectra are almost similar for each power output.

  20. Kinetics of the Br2-CH3CHO Photochemical Chain Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Shackelford, C. J.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    Time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy was employed in conjunction with laser flash photolysis of Br2 to study the kinetics of the two elementary steps in the photochemical chain reaction nBr2 + nCH3CHO + hv yields nCH3CBrO + nHBr. In the temperature range 255-400 K, the rate coefficient for the reaction Br((sup 2)P(sub 3/2)) + CH3CHO yields CH3CO + HBr is given by the Arrhenius expression k(sub 6)(T) = (1.51 +/- 0.20) x 10(exp -11) exp(-(364 +/- 41)/T)cu cm/(molecule.s). At 298 K, the reaction CH3CO + Br2 yields CH3CBrO + Br proceeds at a near gas kinetic rate, k(sub 7)(298 K) = (1.08 +/- 0.38) x 10(exp -10)cu cm/(molecule.s).

  1. Integrated biogas upgrading and hydrogen utilization in an anaerobic reactor containing enriched hydrogenotrophic methanogenic culture.

    PubMed

    Luo, Gang; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-11-01

    Biogas produced by anaerobic digestion, is mainly used in a gas motor for heat and electricity production. However, after removal of CO(2) , biogas can be upgraded to natural gas quality, giving more utilization possibilities, such as utilization as autogas, or distant utilization by using the existing natural gas grid. The current study presents a new biological method for biogas upgrading in a separate biogas reactor, containing enriched hydrogenotrophic methanogens and fed with biogas and hydrogen. Both mesophilic- and thermophilic anaerobic cultures were enriched to convert CO(2) to CH(4) by addition of H(2) . Enrichment at thermophilic temperature (55°C) resulted in CO(2) and H(2) bioconversion rate of 320 mL CH(4) /(gVSS h), which was more than 60% higher than that under mesophilic temperature (37°C). Different dominant species were found at mesophilic- and thermophilic-enriched cultures, as revealed by PCR-DGGE. Nonetheless, they all belonged to the order Methanobacteriales, which can mediate hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Biogas upgrading was then tested in a thermophilic anaerobic reactor under various operation conditions. By continuous addition of hydrogen in the biogas reactor, high degree of biogas upgrading was achieved. The produced biogas had a CH(4) content, around 95% at steady-state, at gas (mixture of biogas and hydrogen) injection rate of 6 L/(L day). The increase of gas injection rate to 12 L/(L day) resulted in the decrease of CH(4) content to around 90%. Further study showed that by decreasing the gas-liquid mass transfer by increasing the stirring speed of the mixture the CH(4) content was increased to around 95%. Finally, the CH(4) content around 90% was achieved in this study with the gas injection rate as high as 24 L/(L day). PMID:22615033

  2. Preliminary LEU fuel cycle analyses for the Belgian BR2 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Fuel cycle calculations have been performed with reference HEU fuel and LEU fuel using Cd wires or boron as burnable absorbers. The /sup 235/U content in the LEU element has increased 20% to 480g compared to the reference HEU element. The number of fuel plates has remained unchanged while the fuel meat thickness has increased to 0.76 mm from 0.51 mm. The LEU meat density is 5.1 Mg U/m/sup 3/. The reference fuel cycle was a 31 element core operating at 56 MW with a 19.8 day cycle length and eight fresh elements loaded per cycle. Comparable fuel cycle characteristics can be achieved using the proposed LEU fuel element with either Cd wires or boron burnable absorbers. The neutron flux for E/sub n/ > 1 eV changes very little (<5%) in LEU relative to HEU cores. Thermal flux reductions are 5 to 10% in non-fueled positions, and 20 to 30% in fuel elements.

  3. Estimation of steady-state and transcient power distributions for the RELAP analyses of the 1963 loss-of-flow and loss-of-pressure tests at BR2.

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.; Tzanos, C. P.

    2011-05-23

    To support the safety analyses required for the conversion of the Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) from highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, the simulation of a number of loss-of-flow tests, with or without loss of pressure, has been undertaken. These tests were performed at BR2 in 1963 and used instrumented fuel assemblies (FAs) with thermocouples (TC) imbedded in the cladding as well as probes to measure the FAs power on the basis of their coolant temperature rise. The availability of experimental data for these tests offers an opportunity to better establish the credibility of the RELAP5-3D model and methodology used in the conversion analysis. In order to support the HEU to LEU conversion safety analyses of the BR2 reactor, RELAP simulations of a number of loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure tests have been undertaken. Preliminary analyses showed that the conservative power distributions used historically in the BR2 RELAP model resulted in a significant overestimation of the peak cladding temperature during the transient. Therefore, it was concluded that better estimates of the steady-state and decay power distributions were needed to accurately predict the cladding temperatures measured during the tests and establish the credibility of the RELAP model and methodology. The new approach ('best estimate' methodology) uses the MCNP5, ORIGEN-2 and BERYL codes to obtain steady-state and decay power distributions for the BR2 core during the tests A/400/1, C/600/3 and F/400/1. This methodology can be easily extended to simulate any BR2 core configuration. Comparisons with measured peak cladding temperatures showed a much better agreement when power distributions obtained with the new methodology are used.

  4. Licensing for tritium production in a commercial light water reactor: A utility view

    SciTech Connect

    Chardos, J.S.; Sorensen, G.C.; Erickson, L.W.

    2000-07-01

    In a December 1995 Record of Decision for the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Tritium Supply and Recycling, the US Department of Energy (DOE) decided to pursue a dual-track approach to determine the preferred option for future production of tritium for the nuclear weapons stockpile. The two options to be pursued were (a) the Accelerator Production of Tritium and (b) the use of commercial light water reactors (CLWRs). DOE committed to select one of these two options as the primary means of tritium production by the end of 1998. The other option would continue to be pursued as a backup to the primary option. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) became involved in the tritium program in early 1996, in response to an inquiry from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for an expression of interest by utilities operating nuclear power plants (NPPs). In June 1996, TVA was one of two utilities to respond to a request for proposals to irradiate lead test assemblies (LTAs) containing tritium-producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs). TVA proposed that the LTAs be placed in Watts Bar NPP Unit 1 (WBN). TVA participated with DOE (the Defense Programs Office of CLWR Tritium Production), PNNL, and Westinghouse Electric Company (Westinghouse) in the design process to ensure that the TPBARs would be compatible with safe operation of WBN. Following US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issuance of a Safety Evaluation Report (SER) (NUREG-1607), TVA submitted a license amendment request to the NRC for approval to place four LTAs, containing eight TPBARs each, in WBN during the September 1997 refueling outage. In December 1998, DOE announced the selection of the CLWR program as the primary option for tritium production and identified the TVA WBN and Sequoyah NPP (SQN) Units 1 and 2 (SQN-1 and SQN-2, respectively) reactors as the preferred locations to perform tritium production. TVA will prepare license amendment requests for the three plants (WBN, SQN-1

  5. Caveats for poly(methimazolyl)borate chemistry: the novel inorganic heterocycles [H2C(mt)2BR2]Cl (mt = methimazolyl; BR2 = BH2, BH(mt), 9-BBN).

    PubMed

    Crossley, Ian R; Hill, Anthony F; Humphrey, Elizabeth R; Smith, Matthew K; Tshabang, Never; Willis, Anthony C

    2004-08-21

    Whilst frequently used for reactions of poly(methimazolyl)borates, dichloromethane is not an innocent solvent, but rather slowly forms heterocyclic salts [H(2)C(mt)(2)BR(2)]Cl, three examples of which (BR(2) = BH(2), BH(mt), 9-borabicyclononyl) have been structurally characterised to confirm the unprecedented B(NCS)(2)C connectivity. PMID:15306929

  6. Computations on the primary photoreaction of Br2 with CO2: stepwise vs concerted addition of Br atoms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kewei; Korter, Timothy M; Braiman, Mark S

    2015-04-01

    It was proposed previously that Br2-sensitized photolysis of liquid CO2 proceeds through a metastable primary photoproduct, CO2Br2. Possible mechanisms for such a photoreaction are explored here computationally. First, it is shown that the CO2Br radical is not stable in any geometry. This rules out a free-radical mechanism, for example, photochemical splitting of Br2 followed by stepwise addition of Br atoms to CO2-which in turn accounts for the lack of previously observed Br2+CO2 photochemistry in gas phases. A possible alternative mechanism in liquid phase is formation of a weakly bound CO2:Br2 complex, followed by concerted photoaddition of Br2. This hypothesis is suggested by the previously published spectroscopic detection of a binary CO2:Br2 complex in the supersonically cooled gas phase. We compute a global binding-energy minimum of -6.2 kJ mol(-1) for such complexes, in a linear geometry. Two additional local minima were computed for perpendicular (C2v) and nearly parallel asymmetric planar geometries, both with binding energies near -5.4 kJ mol(-1). In these two latter geometries, C-Br and O-Br bond distances are simultaneously in the range of 3.5-3.8 Å, that is, perhaps suitable for a concerted photoaddition under the temperature and pressure conditions where Br2 + CO2 photochemistry has been observed. PMID:25767936

  7. Manganese dioxide causes spurious gold values in flame atomic-absorption readings from HBr-Br2 digestions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    False readings, apparently caused by the presence of high concentrations of manganese dioxide, have been observed in our current flame atomic-absorption procedure for the determination of gold. After a hydrobromic acid (HBr)-bromine (Br2) leach, simply heating the sample to boiling to remove excess Br2 prior to extraction with methyl-isobutyl-ketone (MIBK) eliminates these false readings. ?? 1981.

  8. Bromine-rich Zinc Bromides: Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)5, Zn4Br8(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)3, and Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)2.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, David; Feldmann, Claus

    2016-06-20

    The bromine-rich zinc bromides Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)5 (1), Zn4Br8(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)3 (2), and Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)2 (3) are prepared by reaction of ZnBr2, 18-crown-6, and elemental bromine in the ionic liquid [MeBu3N][N(Tf)2] (N(Tf)2 = bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide). Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)5 (1) is formed instantaneously by the reaction. Even at room temperature, compound 1 releases bromine, which was confirmed by thermogravimetry (TG) and mass spectrometry (MS). The release of Br2 can also be directly followed by the color and density of the title compounds. With controlled conditions (2 weeks, 25 °C, absence of excess Br2) Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)5 (1) slowly releases bromine with conconcurrent generation of Zn4Br8(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)3 (2) (in ionic liquid) and Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)2 (3) (in inert oil). All bromine-rich zinc bromides contain voluminous uncharged (e.g., Zn3Br6(18-crown-6), Zn2Br4(18-crown-6)) or ionic (e.g., [Zn2Br3(18-crown-6)](+), [(Zn2Br6)×(Br2)2](2-)) building units with dibromine molecules between the Zn oligomers and partially interconnecting the Zn-containing building units. Due to the structural similarity, the bromine release is possible via crystal-to-crystal transformation with retention of the crystal shape. PMID:27281122

  9. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program summary, Project No. 669

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 1 of a safety evaluation report (SER), NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Program Summary,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER provides a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  10. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study of Br 2O and OBrO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Liang T.; Li, Zhuangjie

    2000-11-01

    Vibrational frequencies of gaseous Br 2O and OBrO were observed using the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. For the first time, bands at 629.0 cm -1 ( ν3) and 532.9 cm -1 ( ν1) were recorded for both Br-O asymmetric and symmetric stretching vibrations of gaseous Br 2O. Two fundamental vibrations were observed at 798.7 cm-1 (ν 1) and 846.3 cm-1 (ν 3) for the O 18BrO radical. In addition, two new peaks at 2333 cm -1 and 668 cm -1 were observed in a HOBr spectrum. They are tentatively assigned to the H-Br and Br-O stretching vibrations of a HOBr isomer on the basis of ab initio computational results.

  11. Nqrs Data for C26H35Br2CuP2 (Subst. No. 1603)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C26H35Br2CuP2 (Subst. No. 1603)

  12. Analysis of neutron flux distribution for the validation of computational methods for the optimization of research reactor utilization.

    PubMed

    Snoj, L; Trkov, A; Jaćimović, R; Rogan, P; Zerovnik, G; Ravnik, M

    2011-01-01

    In order to verify and validate the computational methods for neutron flux calculation in TRIGA research reactor calculations, a series of experiments has been performed. The neutron activation method was used to verify the calculated neutron flux distribution in the TRIGA reactor. Aluminium (99.9 wt%)-Gold (0.1 wt%) foils (disks of 5mm diameter and 0.2mm thick) were irradiated in 33 locations; 6 in the core and 27 in the carrousel facility in the reflector. The experimental results were compared to the calculations performed with Monte Carlo code MCNP using detailed geometrical model of the reactor. The calculated and experimental normalized reaction rates in the core are in very good agreement for both isotopes indicating that the material and geometrical properties of the reactor core are modelled well. In conclusion one can state that our computational model describes very well the neutron flux and reaction rate distribution in the reactor core. In the reflector however, the accuracy of the epithermal and thermal neutron flux distribution and attenuation is lower, mainly due to lack of information about the material properties of the graphite reflector surrounding the core, but the differences between measurements and calculations are within 10%. Since our computational model properly describes the reactor core it can be used for calculations of reactor core parameters and for optimization of research reactor utilization. PMID:20855215

  13. Electronic properties of PbCl2 and PbBr2 using Compton scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, G; Sharma, Y; Ahuja, B L

    2009-06-01

    We present the electron momentum densities of PbCl(2) and PbBr(2) using 661.65 keV gamma-rays from 20 Ci (137)Cs source. To supplement our experimental investigations, we also report energy bands, density of states, Mulliken's population and Compton profiles of PbCl(2) and PbBr(2) using linear combination of atomic orbitals within Hartree-Fock and density functional theories. The energy bands are also computed employing full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. Compton profiles are also analyzed in terms of equal-valence-electron-density scale. It shows that PbCl(2) is more covalent than PbBr(2), which is in agreement with the Mulliken's population analysis. It is seen that the Hartree-Fock and density functional theory based Compton line shapes show similar type of deviations from the experimental data. The luminescence properties of these halides are explained on the basis of energy band and density of states. PMID:19269187

  14. Dibromine Monoxide, Br2O: The Rotational Spectrum and Molecular Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Holger S. P.; Cohen, Edward A.

    1997-01-01

    The rotational spectra of (79)Br2O, (79)BrO(81)Br, and Br2O in their ground vibrational states as well as (79)BrO(81)Br in its v (sub 2) = 1 state have been studied in selected regions between 90 and 523 GHz. Transitions involving a large range of quantum numbers, 6 less than or equal to J less than or equal to 123 and 0 less than or equal to K (sub a) less than or equal to 12, have been observed permitting precise rotational and a large set of centrifugal distortion constants to be determined. All isotopic species as well as the excited state data were fit simultaneously. Ground-state effective and average structural parameters as well as an estimate of the equilibrium structure have been derived. The quartic distortion constants were used for a calculation of the harmonic force field. The complete quadrupole tensor has been determined. Its diagonalization reveals a largely covalent BrO bond with little pi-bonding. The derived properties of Br2O are compared with those of related compounds such as Cl2O, HOBR, and HOCl.

  15. Utilization of coal fly ash in solidification of liquid radioactive waste from research reactor.

    PubMed

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the potential utilization of fly ash was investigated as an additive in solidification process of radioactive waste sludge from research reactor. Coal formations include various percentages of natural radioactive elements; therefore, coal fly ash includes various levels of radioactivity. For this reason, fly ashes have to be evaluated for potential environmental implications in case of further usage in any construction material. But for use in solidification of radioactive sludge, the radiological effects of fly ash are in the range of radioactive waste management limits. The results show that fly ash has a strong fixing capacity for radioactive isotopes. Specimens with addition of 5-15% fly ash to concrete was observed to be sufficient to achieve the target compressive strength of 20 MPa required for near-surface disposal. An optimum mixture comprising 15% fly ash, 35% cement, and 50% radioactive waste sludge could provide the solidification required for long-term storage and disposal. The codisposal of radioactive fly ash with radioactive sludge by solidification decreases the usage of cement in solidification process. By this method, radioactive fly ash can become a valuable additive instead of industrial waste. This study supports the utilization of fly ash in industry and the solidification of radioactive waste in the nuclear industry. PMID:24638274

  16. Steady-State Thermal-Hydraulics Analyses for the Conversion of BR2 to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, J.; Bergeron, A.; Dionne, B.; Van den Branden, G; Kalcheva, S; Sikik, E; Koonen, E

    2015-01-01

    The code PLTEMP/ANL version 4.2 was used to perform the steady-state thermal-hydraulic analyses of the BR2 research reactor for conversion from Highly-Enriched to Low Enriched Uranium fuel (HEU and LEU, respectively). Calculations were performed to evaluate different fuel assemblies with respect to the onset of nucleate boiling (ONB), flow instability (FI), critical heat flux (CHF) and fuel temperature at beginning of cycle conditions. The fuel assemblies were characteristic of fresh fuel (0% burnup), highest heat flux (16% burnup), highest power (32% burnup) and highest burnup (46% burnup). Results show that the high heat flux fuel element is limiting for ONB, FI, and CHF, for both HEU and LEU fuel, but that the high power fuel element produces similar margin in a few cases. The maximum fuel temperature similarly occurs in both the high heat flux and high power fuel assemblies for both HEU and LEU fuel. A sensitivity study was also performed to evaluate the variation in fuel temperature due to uncertainties in the thermal conductivity degradation associated with burnup.

  17. Utilization of the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, Douglas L; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Meilleur, Flora; Jones, Amy; Bailey, William Barton; Vandergriff, David H

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses several aspects of the scientific utilization of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Topics to be covered will include: 1) HFIR neutron scattering instruments and the formal instrument user program; 2) Recent upgrades to the neutron scattering instrument stations at the reactor, and 3) eMod a new tool for addressing instrument modifications and providing configuration control and design process for scientific instruments at HFIR and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). There are 15 operating neutron instrument stations at HFIR with 12 of them organized into a formal user program. Since the last presentation on HFIR instruments at IGORR we have installed a Single Crystal Quasi-Laue Diffractometer instrument called IMAGINE; and we have made significant upgrades to HFIR neutron scattering instruments including the Cold Triple Axis Instrument, the Wide Angle Neutron Diffractometer, the Powder Diffractometer, and the Neutron Imaging station. In addition, we have initiated upgrades to the Thermal Triple Axis Instrument and the Bio-SANS cold neutron instrument detector system. All of these upgrades are tied to a continuous effort to maintain a high level neutron scattering user program at the HFIR. For the purpose of tracking modifications such as those mentioned and configuration control we have been developing an electronic system for entering instrument modification requests that follows a modification or instrument project through concept development, design, fabrication, installation, and commissioning. This system, which we call eMod, electronically leads the task leader through a series of questions and checklists that then identifies such things as ES&H and radiological issues and then automatically designates specific individuals for the activity review process. The system has been in use for less than a year and we are still working out some of the inefficiencies, but we believe that this will become a very

  18. Structures, molecular orbitals and UV-vis spectra investigations on Br2C6H4: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsang-Hsiu; Hsu, Chen-Shuo; Huang, Wen-Lin; Lo, Yih-Hsing

    2013-11-01

    The dibromobenzenes (1,2-, 1,3- and 1,4-Br2C6H4) have been studied by theoretical methods. The structures of these species are optimized and the structural characteristics are determined by density functional theory (DFT) and the second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) levels. The geometrical structures of Br2C6H4 show a little distortion of benzene ring due to the substitution of highly electronegativity of bromine atoms. The electronegativity of bromine atoms in 1,4-Br2C6H4 is predicted to be more negative than 1,2- and 1,3-Br2C6H4. In addition, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) of these Br2C6H4 are performed as well. The 1,4-Br2C6H4 is slightly more reactive than 1,2- and 1,3-Br2C6H4 because of its small HOMO-LUMO energy gap. The simulated UV-vis spectra are investigated by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) approach, which are in excellent agreement with the available experimental value. Our calculations show that a few of absorption features are between 140nm and 250nm, which is in ultraviolet C range, and the red shift of 1,3- and 1,4-Br2C6H4 are predicted. Moreover, the UV absorption features of these Br2C6H4 in water or methanol are predicted to be more intense than in gas phase due to solvent effect. PMID:23892349

  19. Utilization of the Recycle Reactor in Determining Kinetics of Gas-Solid Catalytic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paspek, Stephen C.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a laboratory scale reactor that determines the kinetics of a gas-solid catalytic reaction. The external recycle reactor construction is detailed with accompanying diagrams. Experimental details, application of the reactor to CO oxidation kinetics, interphase gradients, and intraphase gradients are discussed. (CS)

  20. Observations of Cl2, Br2, and I2 in coastal marine air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finley, B. D.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2008-11-01

    Cl2, Br2, and I2 were measured in coastal Pacific air from 2 to 29 January 2006. Air was sampled at 10 m over the sea surface near the end of Scripps Pier (La Jolla, California). The measurements were made using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization with tandem mass spectrometry (APCI/MS/MS). Over the course of this study, Cl2, Br2, and I2 levels ranged from below detection limits of 1.0, 0.5, and 0.2 ppt, respectively, to maxima of 26, 19, and 8 ppt, respectively. Mean dihalogen levels for the study period were 2.3 ± 1 ppt for Cl2, 2.3 ± 0.4 ppt for Br2, and 0.7 ± 0.1 ppt for I2 (expressed as geometric mean ±1 geometric standard error). The mixed dihalogens BrCl, ICl, and IBr had geometric mean levels below 0.3 ± 1 ppt and never exceeded their detection limits of 0.5 ppt. Consistent patterns of diurnal variability were observed for Cl2 and I2, with Cl2 maxima during daytime and I2 appearing almost exclusively at night. The detection of I2 appeared to be related to the passage of air over nearby kelp beds. The observed dihalogen levels suggest that (1) chlorine atom oxidation of hydrocarbons makes a significant contribution to the formation of ozone and (2) halogen atom oxidation of airborne mercury contributes to mercury deposition in polluted coastal air.

  1. A Compact Torus Fusion Reactor Utilizing a Continuously Generated Strings of CT's. The CT String Reactor, CTSR.

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, C W; Reisman, D B; McLean, H S; Thomas, J

    2007-05-30

    A fusion reactor is described in which a moving string of mutually repelling compact toruses (alternating helicity, unidirectional Btheta) is generated by repetitive injection using a magnetized coaxial gun driven by continuous gun current with alternating poloidal field. An injected CT relaxes to a minimum magnetic energy equilibrium, moves into a compression cone, and enters a conducting cylinder where the plasma is heated to fusion-producing temperature. The CT then passes into a blanketed region where fusion energy is produced and, on emergence from the fusion region, the CT undergoes controlled expansion in an exit cone where an alternating poloidal field opens the flux surfaces to directly recover the CT magnetic energy as current which is returned to the formation gun. The CT String Reactor (CTSTR) reactor satisfies all the necessary MHD stability requirements and is based on extrapolation of experimentally achieved formation, stability, and plasma confinement. It is supported by extensive 2D, MHD calculations. CTSTR employs minimal external fields supplied by normal conductors, and can produce high fusion power density with uniform wall loading. The geometric simplicity of CTSTR acts to minimize initial and maintenance costs, including periodic replacement of the reactor first wall.

  2. Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, Rebecca; Kszos, Lynn A

    2011-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews

  3. Thermal properties for the thermal-hydraulics analyses of the BR2 maximum nominal heat flux.

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.; Kim, Y. S.; Hofman, G. L.

    2011-05-23

    This memo describes the assumptions and references used in determining the thermal properties for the various materials used in the BR2 HEU (93% enriched in {sup 235}U) to LEU (19.75% enriched in {sup 235}U) conversion feasibility analysis. More specifically, this memo focuses on the materials contained within the pressure vessel (PV), i.e., the materials that are most relevant to the study of impact of the change of fuel from HEU to LEU. This section is regrouping all of the thermal property tables. Section 2 provides a summary of the thermal properties in form of tables while the following sections present the justification of these values. Section 3 presents a brief background on the approach used to evaluate the thermal properties of the dispersion fuel meat and specific heat capacity. Sections 4 to 7 discuss the material properties for the following materials: (i) aluminum, (ii) dispersion fuel meat (UAlx-Al and U-7Mo-Al), (iii) beryllium, and (iv) stainless steel. Section 8 discusses the impact of irradiation on material properties. Section 9 summarizes the material properties for typical operating temperatures. Appendix A elaborates on how to calculate dispersed phase's volume fraction. Appendix B shows the evolution of the BR2 maximum heat flux with burnup.

  4. Photolysis of Br2 in CCl4 studied by time-resolved X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qingyu; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Lo Russo, Manuela; Kim, Tae Kyu; Lorenc, Maciej; Cammarata, Marco; Bratos, Savo; Buslaps, Thomas; Honkimaki, Veijo; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Wulff, Michael

    2010-03-01

    A time-resolved X-ray solution scattering study of bromine molecules in CCl(4) is presented as an example of how to track atomic motions in a simple chemical reaction. The structures of the photoproducts are tracked during the recombination process, geminate and non-geminate, from 100 ps to 10 micros after dissociation. The relaxation of hot Br(2)(*) molecules heats the solvent. At early times, from 0.1 to 10 ns, an adiabatic temperature rise is observed, which leads to a pressure gradient that forces the sample to expand. The expansion starts after about 10 ns with the laser beam sizes used here. When thermal artefacts are removed by suitable scaling of the transient solvent response, the excited-state solute structures can be obtained with high fidelity. The analysis shows that 30% of Br(2)(*) molecules recombine directly along the X potential, 60% are trapped in the A/A' state with a lifetime of 5.5 ns, and 10% recombine non-geminately via diffusive motion in about 25 ns. The Br-Br distance distribution in the A/A' state peaks at 3.0 A. PMID:20164648

  5. Spin Excitations and Phonon Anomaly in Quasi-1D Spiral Magneti CuBr2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Wang, Chong; Yu, Daiwei; Wang, Lichen; Wang, Fa; Iida, Kazuki; Kamazawa, Kazuya; Wakimoto, Shuichi

    CuBr2 can be considered as a model quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) spin-1/2 magnet, in which the frustrating ferromagnetic nearest-neighbor and antiferromagnetic next-nearest-neighbor exchange interactions give rise to a cycloidal magnetic order below TN = 73 K. The removal of inversion symmetry by the magnetic order also makes the material a type-II multiferroic system with a remarkably simple crystal structure. Using time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy, we have determined the spin-wave as well as phonon spectra throughout the entire Brillouin zone. The spin-wave spectrum exhibits pronounced anisotropy and magnon damping, consistent with the material's quasi-1D nature and the non-colinear spin structure. The phonon spectrum exhibits dramatic discontinuities in the dispersion across the quasi-1D magnetic wave vector, indicative of strong magnetoelastic coupling and possibly of a spin-orbital texture that comes along with the spin correlations.

  6. Magnetic torque measurements of TPP[Fe(Pc)Br2]2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, M.; Torizuka, K.; Tajima, H.; Matsuda, M.; Yu, D. E. C.; Naito, T.; Inabe, T.; Hanasaki, N.

    2010-06-01

    Magnetic torque measurements of TPP[Fe(Pc)Br2]2 are reported. The torque curves for the magnetic field rotated within the ac plane exhibit a two-fold symmetry. The temperature dependences of the torque amplitudes divided by the square of the field strength (τφ=45/B2) exhibit a drastic field dependence below 12 K. This field dependence is attributable to the fluctuation in the spontaneous magnetization that appears below 4.5 K. The torque curves for the field rotated within the ab plane exhibit four-fold symmetry. The curves are sinusoidal above 18 K and exhibit saw-toothed shapes below ˜12 K and complicated shapes below 8 K. The complicated shapes suggest that both d-electrons and π-electrons form a magnetic order below 8 K.

  7. Photodissociation of Br2 molecules in an intense femtosecond laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Shian; Yang, Yan; Sun, Shengzhi; Wu, Hua; Li, Jing; Chen, Yuting; Jia, Tianqing; Wang, Zugeng; Kong, Fanao; Sun, Zhenrong

    2014-11-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the photodissociation process of Br2 molecules in the intense femtosecond laser field by a dc-sliced ion velocity map imaging technique. We show that four fragment ions B rn +(n =1 -4 ) are observed, and their kinetic energy increases while their angular distribution decreases with the increase of the charge number. We prove that the low (or high) charged fragment ions result from the photodissociation of the low (or high) charged parent ions. We explain the changes of the kinetic energy and angular distribution in these fragment ions by considering the potential energy curves of these parent ions that involve both the interaction of the Coulomb repulsive energy and chemical bonding energy. We also explain the experimental observation that the measured kinetic energy release in the experiment is much smaller than the theoretical calculation by enhanced ionization at a critical distance.

  8. Modelling of magnetic satellite intensity in the neutron diffraction of an incommensurate helical structure: NiBr 2 and Ni 0.91Fe 0.09Br 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, P.; Moore, M. W.; Wilkinson, C.; Ziebeck, K. R. A.

    1985-05-01

    We describe the application of a neutron multidetector diffractometer (D16, I.L.L.) to the study of the incommensurate helical magnetic structure of pure and Fe 2+-doped single crystals of NiBr 2. Use of the multidetector permits detailed mapping of satellite intensity around 003 M arising from three magnetic domains, from which the magnitude and direction of the helix propagation vector τ are deduced. τ moves from [110] (0.0138(5) Å -1) in NiBr 2 to [100] (0.0151(5) Å -1) in Ni 0.91 Fe 0.09Br 2. The measured intensity profiles in (2θ, ω, v space are fitted to model profiles constructed by superimposing profiles measured at 003 M in the collinear phase at 28 K on a ring with radius τ, and optimizing the weighting of intensity around the ring.

  9. Advanced Burner Reactor with Breed-and-Burn Thorium Blankets for Improved Economics and Resource Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, Ehud

    2015-11-04

    This study assesses the feasibility of designing Seed and Blanket (S&B) Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) to generate a significant fraction of the core power from radial thorium fueled blankets that operate on the Breed-and-Burn (B&B) mode without exceeding the radiation damage constraint of presently verified cladding materials. The S&B core is designed to maximize the fraction of neutrons that radially leak from the seed (or “driver”) into the subcritical blanket and reduce neutron loss via axial leakage. The blanket in the S&B core makes beneficial use of the leaking neutrons for improved economics and resource utilization. A specific objective of this study is to maximize the fraction of core power that can be generated by the blanket without violating the thermal hydraulic and material constraints. Since the blanket fuel requires no reprocessing along with remote fuel fabrication, a larger fraction of power from the blanket will result in a smaller fuel recycling capacity and lower fuel cycle cost per unit of electricity generated. A unique synergism is found between a low conversion ratio (CR) seed and a B&B blanket fueled by thorium. Among several benefits, this synergism enables the very low leakage S&B cores to have small positive coolant voiding reactivity coefficient and large enough negative Doppler coefficient even when using inert matrix fuel for the seed. The benefits of this synergism are maximized when using an annular seed surrounded by an inner and outer thorium blankets. Among the high-performance S&B cores designed to benefit from this unique synergism are: (1) the ultra-long cycle core that features a cycle length of ~7 years; (2) the high-transmutation rate core where the seed fuel features a TRU CR of 0.0. Its TRU transmutation rate is comparable to that of the reference Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) with CR of 0.5 and the thorium blanket can generate close to 60% of the core power; but requires only one sixth of the reprocessing and

  10. Bubbling bed catalytic hydropyrolysis process utilizing larger catalyst particles and smaller biomass particles featuring an anti-slugging reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Marker, Terry L; Felix, Larry G; Linck, Martin B; Roberts, Michael J

    2014-09-23

    This invention relates to a process for thermochemically transforming biomass or other oxygenated feedstocks into high quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. In particular, a catalytic hydropyrolysis reactor, containing a deep bed of fluidized catalyst particles is utilized to accept particles of biomass or other oxygenated feedstocks that are significantly smaller than the particles of catalyst in the fluidized bed. The reactor features an insert or other structure disposed within the reactor vessel that inhibits slugging of the bed and thereby minimizes attrition of the catalyst. Within the bed, the biomass feedstock is converted into a vapor-phase product, containing hydrocarbon molecules and other process vapors, and an entrained solid char product, which is separated from the vapor stream after the vapor stream has been exhausted from the top of the reactor. When the product vapor stream is cooled to ambient temperatures, a significant proportion of the hydrocarbons in the product vapor stream can be recovered as a liquid stream of hydrophobic hydrocarbons, with properties consistent with those of gasoline, kerosene, and diesel fuel. Separate streams of gasoline, kerosene, and diesel fuel may also be obtained, either via selective condensation of each type of fuel, or via later distillation of the combined hydrocarbon liquid.

  11. Remediation of Water Contaminated with an Azo Dye: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Utilizing an Inexpensive Photocatalytic Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumpus, John A.; Tricker, Jennifer; Andrzejewski, Ken; Rhoads, Heather; Tatarko, Matthew

    1999-12-01

    The construction and use of an inexpensive photocatalytic reactor that utilizes titanium dioxide as the photocatalyst for wastewater treatment is described. In these experiments and in supplementary material, students are made aware that a variety of techniques have been developed to treat wastewaters, including those generated by the chemical industry. Water contaminated with the azo dye Congo Red was selected as an example of how one might treat contaminated water from a textile manufacturing facility. These experiments emphasize that, in addition to product development, chemists must also be concerned with waste treatment. A summary of the theory of titanium dioxide-mediated photocatalysis is provided. The phenomenon of photosensitization is also discussed. The usefulness of Congo Red is summarized and a brief history of this dye is given. In addition to being inexpensive, the photocatalytic reactor described is easy to construct and uses a readily available low-wattage fluorescent light. An important feature of this reactor is that the heat generated by the light source is readily dissipated by the water undergoing treatment. Thus no special cooling apparatus is required. One of the most important aspects of this work is that it provides a wide variety of continuing research suggestions that would be suitable and readily accomplished in undergraduate departments and high school laboratories; even those where budgetary priorities are a major concern. Use of this reactor would also enable students to design systems to treat "real-world" wastes, including some that are generated in instructional laboratories.

  12. Utilization of non-weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium with breeding of the 233U isotope in the VVER reactors using thorium and heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshalkin, V. E.; Povyshev, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    A method for joint utilization of non-weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium in the thorium-uranium—plutonium oxide fuel of a water-moderated reactor with a varying water composition (D2O, H2O) is proposed. The method is characterized by efficient breeding of the 233U isotope and safe reactor operation and is comparatively simple to implement.

  13. Utilizing a Russian space nuclear reactor for a United States space mission: Systems integration issues

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, E.; Schaefer, E.; Polansky, G.; Lacy, J.; Bocharov, A.

    1993-09-30

    The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) has developed a cooperative relationship with several institutes of the former Soviet Union to evaluate Russian space hardware on a US spacecraft One component is the Topaz II Nuclear Power System; a built and flight qualified nuclear reactor that has yet to be tested in space. The access to the Topaz II reactor provides the NEPSTP with a rare opportunity; to conduct an early flight demonstration of nuclear electric propulsion at a relatively low cost. This opportunity, however, is not without challenges. Topaz II was designed to be compatible with Russian spacecraft and launch vehicles. It was manufactured and flight qualified by Russian techniques and standards and conforms to safety requirements of the former Soviet Union, not the United States. As it is desired to make minimal modifications to the Topaz II, integrating the reactor system with a United States spacecraft and launch vehicle presents an engineering challenge. This paper documents the lessons teamed regarding the integration of reactor based spacecraft and also some insight about integrating Russian hardware. It examines the planned integration flow along with specific reactor requirements that affect the spacecraft integration including American-Russian space system compatibility.

  14. The role of MgBr2 to enhance the ionic conductivity of PVA/PEDOT:PSS polymer composite

    PubMed Central

    Sheha, Eslam M.; Nasr, Mona M.; El-Mansy, Mabrouk K.

    2014-01-01

    A solid polymer electrolyte system based on poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and poly(3,4-Etylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) complexed with magnesium bromide (MgBr2) salt was prepared using solution cast technique. The ionic conductivity is observed to increase with increasing MgBr2 concentration. The maximum conductivity was found to be 9.89 × 10−6 S/cm for optimum polymer composite film (30 wt.% MgBr2) at room temperature. The increase in the conductivity is attributed to the increase in the number of ions as the salt concentration is increased. This has been proven by dielectric studies. The increase in conductivity is also attributable to the increase in the fraction of amorphous region in the electrolyte films as confirmed by their structural, thermal, electrical and optical properties. PMID:26199746

  15. Infrared fluorescence studies of electronic-to-vibrational energy transfer in a Br2:NO system. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hawks, M.R.

    1993-12-01

    Steady-state photolysis techniques were used to study electronic-to-vibrational energy transfer mechanisms from atomic bromine to nitric oxide. Molecular bromine was photodissociated by 488nm radiation to produce equal parts Br(2p(sub 1/2)) and Br(2p (sub 3/2)). Side fluorescence intensity from Br(2p (sub 1/2)) at 2.7 microns and from NO (v =1) and 2 around 5.3 microns measured as a function of bromine pressure and nitric oxide pressure. The branching ratio collisional transfer into the first and second states of NO was determined, and previously reported rates for quenching of NO by molecular bromine were verified. Nitric oxide, Bromine, E-V transfer, Infrared fluorescence, Photolysis.

  16. Utilization of Heavy Metal Molten Salts in the ARIES-RS Fusion Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Übeyli, Mustafa; Yapıcı, Hüseyin

    2008-09-01

    ARIES-RS is one of the major magnetic fusion energy reactor designs that uses a blanket having vanadium alloy structure cooled by lithium [1, 2]. It is a deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion driven reactor, having a fusion power of 2170 MW [1, 2]. This study presents the neutronic analysis of the ARIES-RS fusion reactor using heavy metal molten salts in which Li2BeF4 as the main constituent was mixed with increased mole fractions of heavy metal salt (ThF4 or UF4) starting by 2 mol.% up to 12 mol.%. Neutron transport calculations were carried out with the help of the SCALE 4.3 system by solving the Boltzmann transport equation with the XSDRNPM code in 238 neutron groups and a S 8- P 3 approximation. According to the numerical results, tritium self-sufficiency was attained for the coolants, Flibe with 2% UF4 or ThF4 and 4% UF4. In addition, higher energy multiplication values were found for the salt with UF4 compared to that with ThF4. Furthermore, significant amount of high quality nuclear fuel was produced to be used in external reactors.

  17. Computational fluid dynamic simulations of chemical looping fuel reactors utilizing gaseous fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Mahalatkar, K.; Kuhlman, J.; Huckaby, E.D.; O'Brien, T.

    2011-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamic(CFD) model for the fuel reactor of chemical looping combustion technology has been developed,withspecialfocusonaccuratelyrepresentingtheheterogeneous chemicalreactions.Acontinuumtwo-fluidmodelwasusedtodescribeboththegasandsolidphases. Detailedsub-modelstoaccountforfluid–particleandparticle–particleinteractionforceswerealso incorporated.Twoexperimentalcaseswereanalyzedinthisstudy(Son andKim,2006; Mattisonetal., 2001). SimulationswerecarriedouttotestthecapabilityoftheCFDmodeltocapturechangesinoutletgas concentrationswithchangesinnumberofparameterssuchassuperficialvelocity,metaloxide concentration,reactortemperature,etc.Fortheexperimentsof Mattissonetal.(2001), detailedtime varyingoutletconcentrationvalueswerecompared,anditwasfoundthatCFDsimulationsprovideda reasonablematchwiththisdata.

  18. Utilization of cobalt catalyst for high temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a fluidized bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabry, James C.

    The research determined that the improved heat transfer characteristics of a fluidized bed reactor (FBR) will allow the use of cobalt catalyst for high temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (HTFT). Cobalt was loaded onto a gamma alumina support, the catalyst was characterized using TPR, BET/BJH, XRD, and PSA to track changes in the catalyst morphology. The reactor was characterized to determine the minimum fluidization velocity and the maximum velocity prior to entering lean phase fluidization with pneumatic transport of the catalyst. The highest minimum fluidization velocity was found to be about 2800 sccm, there was no maximum velocity found for the reactor setup. Once characterized, the reactor was operated at pressures of 145, 217.6, and 290.1 psig, a syngas flow rate of 4000 sccm, and at temperatures of 330 and 350 °C. The optimal conditions found in this study were 330 °C and 217 psig. At these conditions CO conversion was 83.53 % for a single pass. Methane, CO2, and light gases (C2 -- C4) selectivities were at low rates of 31.43, 5.80, and 3.48 % respectively. Alcohol selectivity at these conditions was non-existent. The olefin and wax selectivities were the lowest of the data set at 7.05 and 3.18 % respectively. Liquid transportation fuels selectivity was the highest at 56.11 %.

  19. Modelling of magnetic satellite intensity in the neutron diffraction of an incommensurate helical structure: NiBr 2 and Ni 0.9Fe 0.1Br 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, P.; Moore, M. W.; Wilkinson, C.; Ziebeck, K. R. A.

    1986-02-01

    We describe the application of a neutron multidetector diffractometer (D16, ILL) to study the incommensurate helical magnetic structure of pure and Fe 2+ -doped single crystals of NiBr 2. Detailed mapping of satellite intensity around (0, 0, 3/2) yields the magnitude and direction of the helix propagation vector τ. τ moves from [110] in NiBr 2 to [100] in Ni 09Fe 0.1Br 2 with only a 5% increase in magnitude. The incommensurate-commensurate transition temperature is unchanged. The measured intensity profiles in (2ϑ, ω, v) space are fitted to model profiles constructed by superimposing profiles measured in the collinear phase at 28 K on a ring with radius τ, and optimizing the weighting of intensity around the ring. Based on the models optimized for these two crystals data from single detector instruments has been analysed for a range of Ni 1-xFe xBr 2 crystals and the magnetic phase diagram derived.

  20. A Kinetic Study of the Gas-Phase Reaction of OH with Br2

    PubMed Central

    Bryukov, Mikhail G.; Dellinger, Barry; Knyazev, Vadim D.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental, temperature-dependent kinetic study of the gas-phase reaction of the hydroxyl radical with molecular bromine (reaction 1) has been performed using a pulsed laser photolysis/pulsed-laser-induced fluorescence technique over a wide temperature range of 297 – 766 K, and at pressures between 6.68 and 40.29 kPa of helium. The experimental rate coefficients for reaction 1 demonstrate no correlation with pressure and exhibit a negative temperature dependence with a slight negative curvature in the Arrhenius plot. A non-linear least-squares fit with two floating parameters of the temperature dependent k1(T) data set using an equation of the form k1(T) = ATn yields the recommended expression k1(T) = 1.85×10−9T − 0.66 cm3 molecule−1 s−1 for the temperature dependence of the reaction 1 rate coefficient. The potential energy surface (PES) of reaction 1 was investigated using quantum chemistry methods. The reaction proceeds through formation of a weakly bound OH···Br2 complex and a PES saddle point with an energy below that of the reactants. Temperature dependence of the reaction rate coefficient was modeled using the RRKM method on the basis of the calculated PES. PMID:16854030

  1. Optimization of electrode characteristics for the Br-2/H-2 redox flow cell

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, MC; Cho, KT; Weber, AZ; Lin, GY; Nguyen, TV

    2014-10-17

    The Br-2/H-2 redox flow cell shows promise as a high-power, low-cost energy storage device. The effect of various aspects of material selection, processing, and assembly of electrodes on the operation, performance, and efficiency of the system is determined. In particular, (+) electrode thickness, cell compression, hydrogen pressure, and (-) electrode architecture are investigated. Increasing hydrogen pressure and depositing the (-) catalyst layer on the membrane instead of on the carbon paper backing layers have a large positive impact on performance, enabling a limiting current density above 2 A cm(-2) and a peak power density of 1.4 W cm(-2). Maximum energy efficiency of 79 % is achieved. In addition, the root cause of limiting-current behavior in this system is elucidated, where it is found that Br- reversibly adsorbs at the Pt (-) electrode for potentials exceeding a critical value, and the extent of Br- coverage is potential-dependent. This phenomenon limits maximum cell current density and must be addressed in system modeling and design. These findings are expected to lower system cost and enable higher efficiency.

  2. Electrically heated ex-reactor pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) simulations utilizing irradiated Zircaloy cladding. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Barner, J.O.; Fitzsimmons, D.E.

    1985-02-01

    In a program sponsored by the Fuel Systems Research Branch of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a series of six electrically heated fuel rod simulation tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The primary objective of these tests was to determine the susceptibility of irradiated pressurized-water reactor (PWR) Zircaloy-4 cladding to failures caused by pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). A secondary objective was to acquire kinetic data (e.g., ridge growth or relaxation rates) that might be helpful in the interpretation of in-reactor performance results and/or the modeling of PCMI. No cladding failures attributable to PCMI occurred during the six tests. This report describes the testing methods, testing apparatus, fuel rod diametral strain-measuring device, and test matrix. Test results are presented and discussed.

  3. Lunar electric power systems utilizing the SP-100 reactor coupled to dynamic conversion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harty, Richard B.; Durand, Richard E.; Mason, Lee S.

    1991-09-01

    An integration study was performed by coupling an SP-100 reactor to either a Brayton or Stirling power conversion subsystem. The application was for a surface power system to supply power requirements to a lunar base. A power level of 550 kWe was selected based on the NASA Space Exploration Initiative 90-day study. Reliability studies were initially performed to determine optimum power-conversion redundancy. This study resulted in selecting three operating engines and one standby unit. Integratiaon-design studies indicated that either the Brayton or Stirling power conversion subsystem could be integrated with the SP-100 reactor. The Stirling system had an integration advantage because of smaller piping size and fewer components. The Stirling engine, however, is more complex and heavier than the Brayton rotating unit, which tends to offset the Stirling integration advantage. From a performance consideration, the Brayton had a 9-percent mass advantage and the Stirling a 50-percent radiator-area advantage.

  4. Molten salt rolling bubble column, reactors utilizing same and related methods

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Terry D.; Benefiel, Bradley C.; Bingham, Dennis N.; Klinger, Kerry M.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2015-11-17

    Reactors for carrying out a chemical reaction, as well as related components, systems and methods are provided. In accordance with one embodiment, a reactor is provided that includes a furnace and a crucible positioned for heating by the furnace. The crucible may contain a molten salt bath. A downtube is disposed at least partially within the interior crucible along an axis. The downtube includes a conduit having a first end in communication with a carbon source and an outlet at a second end of the conduit for introducing the carbon material into the crucible. At least one opening is formed in the conduit between the first end and the second end to enable circulation of reaction components contained within the crucible through the conduit. An oxidizing material may be introduced through a bottom portion of the crucible in the form of gas bubbles to react with the other materials.

  5. The obesity-induced transcriptional regulator TRIP-Br2 mediates visceral fat endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Guifen; Kong, Hyerim Whang; Fang, Difeng; McCann, Maximilian; Yang, Xiuying; Du, Guanhua; Blüher, Matthias; Zhu, Jinfang; Liew, Chong Wee

    2016-01-01

    The intimate link between location of fat accumulation and metabolic disease risk and depot-specific differences is well established, but how these differences between depots are regulated at the molecular level remains largely unclear. Here we show that TRIP-Br2 mediates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced inflammatory responses in visceral fat. Using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we demonstrate that obesity-induced circulating factors upregulate TRIP-Br2 specifically in visceral fat via the ER stress pathway. We find that ablation of TRIP-Br2 ameliorates both chemical and physiological ER stress-induced inflammatory and acute phase response in adipocytes, leading to lower circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines. Using promoter assays, as well as molecular and pharmacological experiments, we show that the transcription factor GATA3 is responsible for the ER stress-induced TRIP-Br2 expression in visceral fat. Taken together, our study identifies molecular regulators of inflammatory response in visceral fat that—given that these pathways are conserved in humans—might serve as potential therapeutic targets in obesity. PMID:27109496

  6. The obesity-induced transcriptional regulator TRIP-Br2 mediates visceral fat endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Guifen; Kong, Hyerim Whang; Fang, Difeng; McCann, Maximilian; Yang, Xiuying; Du, Guanhua; Blüher, Matthias; Zhu, Jinfang; Liew, Chong Wee

    2016-01-01

    The intimate link between location of fat accumulation and metabolic disease risk and depot-specific differences is well established, but how these differences between depots are regulated at the molecular level remains largely unclear. Here we show that TRIP-Br2 mediates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced inflammatory responses in visceral fat. Using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we demonstrate that obesity-induced circulating factors upregulate TRIP-Br2 specifically in visceral fat via the ER stress pathway. We find that ablation of TRIP-Br2 ameliorates both chemical and physiological ER stress-induced inflammatory and acute phase response in adipocytes, leading to lower circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines. Using promoter assays, as well as molecular and pharmacological experiments, we show that the transcription factor GATA3 is responsible for the ER stress-induced TRIP-Br2 expression in visceral fat. Taken together, our study identifies molecular regulators of inflammatory response in visceral fat that-given that these pathways are conserved in humans-might serve as potential therapeutic targets in obesity. PMID:27109496

  7. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1963-09-10

    A breeder reactor is described, including a mass of fissionable material that is less than critical with respect to unmoderated neutrons and greater than critical with respect to neutrons of average energies substantially greater than thermal, a coolant selected from sodium or sodium--potassium alloys, a control liquid selected from lead or lead--bismuth alloys, and means for varying the quantity of control liquid in the reactor. (AEC)

  8. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1961-07-25

    A means is described for co-relating the essential physical requirements of a fission chain reaction in order that practical, compact, and easily controllable reactors can be built. These objects are obtained by employing a composition of fissionsble isotope and moderator in fluid form in which the amount of fissionsble isotcpe present governs the reaction. The size of the reactor is no longer a critical factor, the new criterion being the concentration of the fissionable isotope.

  9. A Compact Torus Fusion Reactor Utilizing a Continuously Generated String of CT's. The CT String Reactor, CTSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Charles W.; Reisman, David B.; McLean, Harry S.; Thomas, John

    2008-06-01

    A fusion reactor is described in which a moving string of mutually repelling compact toruses (alternating helicity, unidirectional Btheta) is generated by repetitive injection using a magnetized coaxial gun driven by continuous gun current with alternating poloidal field. An injected CT relaxes to a minimum magnetic energy equilibrium, moves into a compression cone, and enters a conducting cylinder where the plasma is heated to fusion-producing temperature. The CT then passes into a blanketed region where fusion energy is produced and, on emergence from the fusion region, the CT undergoes controlled expansion in an exit cone where an alternating poloidal field opens the flux surfaces to directly recover the CT magnetic energy as current which is returned to the formation gun. The CT String Reactor (CTSTR) reactor satisfies all the necessary MHD stability requirements and is based on extrapolation of experimentally achieved formation, stability, and plasma confinement. It is supported by extensive 2D, MHD calculations. CTSTR employs minimal external fields supplied by normal conductors, and can produce high fusion power density with uniform wall loading. The geometric simplicity of CTSTR acts to minimize initial and maintenance costs, including periodic replacement of the reactor first wall. 60 /proj/ads/abstracts/absload/springerxml.pl* /proj/ads/abstracts/sources/SPRINGER/files/JOU=10894/VOL=2008.27/ISU=3/ART=9121: total 28 28 10894_2007_Article_9121.xml.meta /proj/ads/abstracts/sources/SPRINGER/files/JOU=10894/VOL=2008.27/ISU=3/ART=9122: total 16 16 10894_2007_Article_9122.xml.meta /proj/ads/abstracts/sources/SPRINGER/files/JOU=10894/VOL=2008.27/ISU=3/ART=9123: total 12 12 10894_2007_Article_9123.xml.meta /proj/ads/abstracts/sources/SPRINGER/files/JOU=10894/VOL=2008.27/ISU=3/ART=9124: total 36 36 10894_2007_Article_9124.xml.meta /proj/ads/abstracts/sources/SPRINGER/files/JOU=10894/VOL=2008.27/ISU=3/ART=9125: total 32 32 10894_2007_Article_9125.xml.meta /proj

  10. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Roman, W.G.

    1961-06-27

    A pressurized water reactor in which automatic control is achieved by varying the average density of the liquid moderator-cooiant is patented. Density is controlled by the temperature and power level of the reactor ftself. This control can be effected by the use of either plate, pellet, or tubular fuel elements. The fuel elements are disposed between upper and lower coolant plenum chambers and are designed to permit unrestricted coolant flow. The control chamber has an inlet opening communicating with the lower coolant plenum chamber and a restricted vapor vent communicating with the upper coolant plenum chamber. Thus, a variation in temperature of the fuel elements will cause a variation in the average moderator density in the chamber which directly affects the power level of the reactor.

  11. Utilization of experimental integral data for the adjustment and uncertainty evaluation of reactor design quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Poenitz, W.P.; Collins, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    Biases and uncertainties of calculated reactor design quantities caused by errors and uncertainties of basic parameters, such as neutron cross sections, fission spectra parameters, and prompt and delayed neutron yields, are large, and in most cases, exceed reactor design requirements. Errors and uncertainties due to models and methods approximations contribute as well. An extensive data base, with presently /approximately/300 experimental integral values from 28 critical assemblies, has been assembled at Argonne National Laboratory in order to provide improvements and to investigate both sources of uncertainties. Generalized-least-squares fitting is being used. The available large data base permitted the investigation of the influence of specific input data, the constraints of the covariance information, the selection of parameters, and the reliability of the predictions. It is shown that reliable improvements of calculated quantities like enrichment, breeding ratio, sodium void, control rod worth, power distribution, and material worth can be made. Substantial reductions of the uncertainties of these quantities, which are caused by the uncertainties of the basic parameters, are obtained in most cases. The FFTF uranium-metal-core conversion is the first application of the present effort. 21 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Lunar electric power systems utilizing the SP-100 reactor coupled to dynamic conversion systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harty, R.B.; Durand, R.E.

    1993-03-01

    An integration study was performed by Rocketdyne under contract to NASA-LeRC. The study was concerned with coupling an SP-0100 reactor to either a Brayton or Stirling power conversion system. The application was for a surface power system to supply power requirements to a lunar base. A power level of 550 kWe was selected based on the NASA Space Exploration Initiative 90-day study. Reliability studies were initially performed to determine optimum power conversion redundancy. This study resulted in selecting three operating engines and one stand-by unit. Integration design studies indicated that either the Brayton or Stirling power conversion systems could be integrated with the PS-100 reactor. The Stirling system had an integration advantage because of smaller piping size and fewer components. The Stirling engine, however, is more complex and heavier than the Brayton rotating unit, which tends to off-set the Stirling integration advantage. From a performance consideration, the Brayton had a 9 percent mass advantage, and the Stirling had a 50 percent radiator advantage.

  13. Lunar electric power systems utilizing the SP-100 reactor coupled to dynamic conversion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harty, Richard B.; Durand, Richard E.

    1993-03-01

    An integration study was performed by Rocketdyne under contract to NASA-LeRC. The study was concerned with coupling an SP-0100 reactor to either a Brayton or Stirling power conversion system. The application was for a surface power system to supply power requirements to a lunar base. A power level of 550 kWe was selected based on the NASA Space Exploration Initiative 90-day study. Reliability studies were initially performed to determine optimum power conversion redundancy. This study resulted in selecting three operating engines and one stand-by unit. Integration design studies indicated that either the Brayton or Stirling power conversion systems could be integrated with the PS-100 reactor. The Stirling system had an integration advantage because of smaller piping size and fewer components. The Stirling engine, however, is more complex and heavier than the Brayton rotating unit, which tends to off-set the Stirling integration advantage. From a performance consideration, the Brayton had a 9 percent mass advantage, and the Stirling had a 50 percent radiator advantage.

  14. Lunar electric power systems utilizing the SP-100 reactor coupled to dynamic conversion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harty, Richard B.; Durand, Richard E.

    1993-01-01

    An integration study was performed by Rocketdyne under contract to NASA-LeRC. The study was concerned with coupling an SP-0100 reactor to either a Brayton or Stirling power conversion system. The application was for a surface power system to supply power requirements to a lunar base. A power level of 550 kWe was selected based on the NASA Space Exploration Initiative 90-day study. Reliability studies were initially performed to determine optimum power conversion redundancy. This study resulted in selecting three operating engines and one stand-by unit. Integration design studies indicated that either the Brayton or Stirling power conversion systems could be integrated with the PS-100 reactor. The Stirling system had an integration advantage because of smaller piping size and fewer components. The Stirling engine, however, is more complex and heavier than the Brayton rotating unit, which tends to off-set the Stirling integration advantage. From a performance consideration, the Brayton had a 9 percent mass advantage, and the Stirling had a 50 percent radiator advantage.

  15. REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Spitzer, L. Jr.

    1961-10-01

    Thermonuclear reactors, methods, and apparatus are described for controlling and confining high temperature plasma. Main axial confining coils in combination with helical windings provide a rotational transform that avoids the necessity of a figure-eight shaped reactor tube. The helical windings provide a multipolar helical magnetic field transverse to the axis of the main axial confining coils so as to improve the effectiveness of the confining field by counteracting the tendency of the more central lines of force in the stellarator tube to exchange positions with the magnetic lines of force nearer the walls of the tube. (AEC)

  16. Utilization of non-weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium with breeding of the {sup 233}U isotope in the VVER reactors using thorium and heavy water

    SciTech Connect

    Marshalkin, V. E. Povyshev, V. M.

    2015-12-15

    A method for joint utilization of non-weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium in the thorium–uranium—plutonium oxide fuel of a water-moderated reactor with a varying water composition (D{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O) is proposed. The method is characterized by efficient breeding of the {sup 233}U isotope and safe reactor operation and is comparatively simple to implement.

  17. Effective utilization of flue gases in raceway reactor with event-based pH control for microalgae culture.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, A; Mendoza, J L; Guzmán, J L; Berenguel, M; Acién, F G; Dormido, S

    2014-10-01

    This work addresses effective utilization of flue gases through the proper pH control in raceway reactors. The pH control problem has been addressed with an event-based control approach using a Generalized Predictive Controller (GPC) with actuator deadband. Applying this control strategy it is possible to reduce the control effort, and at the same time saving control resources. In the pH process case, the event-based controller with actuator deadband can be tuned to supply only necessary amount of CO2 to keep the pH close to its optimal value. On the other hand, the evaluated control algorithm significantly improves the pH control accuracy, what has a direct influence on biomass production. In order to test the performance of the event-based GPC controller, several experiments have been performed on a real raceway reactor. Additionally, several control performance indexes have been used to compare the analyzed technique with commonly used on/off controller. PMID:25113401

  18. Final Report on Utilization of TRU TRISO Fuel as Applied to HTR Systems Part I: Pebble Bed Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2011-03-01

    significant failure is to be expected for the reference fuel particle during normal operation. It was found, however, that the sensitivity of the coating stress to the CO production in the kernel was large. The CO production is expected to be higher in DB fuel than in UO2 fuel, but its exact level has a high uncertainty. Furthermore, in the fuel performance analysis transient conditions were not yet taken into account. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge burnup level, while retaining its inherent safety characteristics. Using generic pebble bed reactor cores, this task will perform physics calculations to evaluate the capabilities of the pebble bed reactor to perform utilization and destruction of LWR used-fuel transuranics. The task will use established benchmarked models, and will introduce modeling advancements appropriate to the nature of the fuel considered (high transuranic [TRU] content and high burn-up). Accomplishments of this work include: •Core analysis of a HTR-MODULE design loaded with Deep-Burn fuel. •Core analysis of a HTR-MODULE design loaded with Deep-Burn fuel and Uranium. •Core analysis of a HTR-MODULE design loaded with Deep-Burn fuel and Modified Open Cycle Components. •Core analysis of a HTR-MODULE design loaded with Deep-Burn fuel and Americium targets.

  19. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spitzer, L. Jr.

    1962-01-01

    The system conteraplates ohmically heating a gas to high temperatures such as are useful in thermonuclear reactors of the stellarator class. To this end the gas is ionized and an electric current is applied to the ionized gas ohmically to heat the gas while the ionized gas is confined to a central portion of a reaction chamber. Additionally, means are provided for pumping impurities from the gas and for further heating the gas. (AEC)

  20. The effects of CaCl2 and CaBr2 on the reproduction of Daphnia magna Straus.

    PubMed

    Mažuran, Neda; Hršak, Vladimir; Kovačević, Goran

    2015-06-01

    Concentrated CaCl2 and CaBr2 salt solutions of densities up to 2.3 kg L-1 are regularly used to control hydrostatic pressure in oil wells during special operations in the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil. Various concentrations of high density salts are frequently left in mud pits near the drilling site as waste, polluting fresh and ground waters by spillage and drainage. The toxic effects of these salts have already been observed. This study investigated the effects of CaCl2 and CaBr2 on water flea Daphnia magna Straus in a 21-day reproduction test. The three tested concentrations of CaCl2 (240, 481, and 1925 mg L-1) caused a significant dose-response decrease of reproduction (p<0.001). With CaBr2 (533 and 1066 mg L-1), only aborted eggs were produced, demonstrating the embryotoxicity of the substance. The results suggest that high concentrations of the tested chemicals are harmful to Daphnia's reproduction and could reduce its abundance. PMID:26110475

  1. Integrated Water Gas Shift Membrane Reactors Utilizing Novel, Non Precious Metal Mixed Matrix Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraris, John

    2013-09-30

    Nanoparticles of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks and other related hybrid materials were prepared by modifying published synthesis procedures by introducing bases, changing stoichiometric ratios, or adjusting reaction conditions. These materials were stable at temperatures >300 °C and were compatible with the polymer matrices used to prepare mixed- matrix membranes (MMMs). MMMs tested at 300 °C exhibited a >30 fold increase in permeability, compared to those measured at 35 °C, while maintaining H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity. Measurements at high pressure (up to 30 atm) and high temperature (up to 300 °C) resulted in an increase in gas flux across the membrane with retention of selectivity. No variations in permeability were observed at high pressures at either 35 or 300 °C. CO{sub 2}-induced plasticization was not observed for Matrimid®, VTEC, and PBI polymers or their MMMs at 30 atm and 300 °C. Membrane surface modification by cross-linking with ethanol diamine resulted in an increase in H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity at 35 °C. Spectrometric analysis showed that the cross-linking was effective to temperatures <150 °C. At higher temperatures, the cross-linked membranes exhibit a H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity similar to the uncross-linked polymer. Performance of the polybenzimidazole (PBI) hollow fibers prepared at Santa Fe Science and Technology (SFST, Inc.) showed increased flux o to a flat PBI membrane. A water-gas shift reactor has been built and currently being optimized for testing under DOE conditions.

  2. Theoretical studies on photoelectron and IR spectral properties of Br2.-(H2O)n clusters.

    PubMed

    Pathak, A K; Mukherjee, T; Maity, D K

    2007-07-28

    We report vertical detachment energy (VDE) and IR spectra of Br2.-.(H2O)n clusters (n=1-8) based on first principles electronic structure calculations. Cluster structures and IR spectra are calculated at Becke's half-and-half hybrid exchange-correlation functional (BHHLYP) with a triple split valence basis function, 6-311++G(d,p). VDE for the hydrated clusters is calculated based on second order Moller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) theory with the same set of basis function. On full geometry optimization, it is observed that conformers having interwater hydrogen bonding among solvent water molecules are more stable than the structures having double or single hydrogen bonded structures between the anionic solute, Br2.-, and solvent water molecules. Moreover, a conformer having cyclic interwater hydrogen bonded network is predicted to be more stable for each size hydrated cluster. It is also noticed that up to four solvent H2O units can reside around the solute in a cyclic interwater hydrogen bonded network. The excess electron in these hydrated clusters is localized over the solute atoms. Weighted average VDE is calculated for each size (n) cluster based on statistical population of the conformers at 150 K. A linear relationship is obtained for VDE versus (n+3)(-1/3) and bulk VDE of Br2.- aqueous solution is calculated as 10.01 eV at MP2 level of theory. BHHLYP density functional is seen to make a systematic overestimation in VDE values by approximately 0.5 eV compared to MP2 data in all the hydrated clusters. It is observed that hydration increases VDE of bromine dimer anion system by approximately 6.4 eV. Calculated IR spectra show that the formation of Br2.--water clusters induces large shifts from the normal O-H stretching bands of isolated water keeping bending modes rather insensitive. Hydrated clusters, Br2.-.(H2O)n, show characteristic sharp features of O-H stretching bands of water in the small size clusters. PMID:17672687

  3. Finding the Missing Stratospheric Br(sub y): A Global Modeling Study of CHBr3 and CH2Br2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Q.; Stolarski, R. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Nielsen, J. E.; Douglass, A. R.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Blake, D. R.; Atlas, E. L.; Ott, L. E.

    2010-01-01

    Recent in situ and satellite measurements suggest a contribution of 5 pptv to stratospheric inorganic bromine from short-lived bromocarbons. We conduct a modeling study of the two most important short-lived bromocarbons, bromoform (CHBr3) and dibromomethane (CH2Br2), with the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOS CCM) to account for this missing stratospheric bromine. We derive a "top-down" emission estimate of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 using airborne measurements in the Pacific and North American troposphere and lower stratosphere obtained during previous NASA aircraft campaigns. Our emission estimate suggests that to reproduce the observed concentrations in the free troposphere, a global oceanic emission of 425 Gg Br yr(exp -1) for CHBr3 and 57 Gg Br yr(exp -l) for CH2Br2 is needed, with 60% of emissions from open ocean and 40% from coastal regions. Although our simple emission scheme assumes no seasonal variations, the model reproduces the observed seasonal variations of the short-lived bromocarbons with high concentrations in winter and low concentrations in summer. This indicates that the seasonality of short-lived bromocarbons is largely due to seasonality in their chemical loss and transport. The inclusion of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 contributes 5 pptv bromine throughout the stratosphere. Both the source gases and inorganic bromine produced from source gas degradation (BrSLS) in the troposphere are transported into the stratosphere, and are equally important. Inorganic bromine accounts for half (2.5 pptv) of the bromine from the inclusion of CHBr3 and CHzBr2 near the tropical tropopause and its contribution rapidly increases to 100% as altitude increases. More than 85% of the wet scavenging of Br(sub y)(sup VSLS) occurs in large-scale precipitation below 500 hPa. Our sensitivity study with wet scavenging in convective updrafts switched off suggests that Br(sub y)(sup SLS) in the stratosphere is not sensitive to convection. Convective scavenging only

  4. Gas utilization in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Kugel, H.W.; Grisham, L.R.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1987-08-01

    Measurements of gas utilization in a test TFTR neutral beam injector have been performed to study the feasibility of running tritium neutral beams with existing ion sources. Gas consumption is limited by the restriction of 50,000 curies of T/sub 2/ allowed on site. It was found that the gas efficiency of the present long-pulse ion sources is higher than it was with previous short-pulse sources. Gas efficiencies were studied over the range of 35 to 55%. At the high end of this range the neutral fraction of the beam fell below that predicted by room temperature molecular gas flow. This is consistent with observations made on the JET injectors, where it has been attributed to beam heating of the neutralizer gas and a concomitant increase in conductance. It was found that a working gas isotope exchange from H/sub 2/ to D/sub 2/ could be accomplished on the first beam shot after changing the gas supply, without any intermediate preconditioning. The mechanism believed responsible for this phenomenon is heating of the plasma generator walls by the arc and a resulting thermal desorption of all previously adsorbed and implanted gas. Finally, it was observed that an ion source conditioned to 120 kV operation could produce a beam pulse after a waiting period of fourteen hours by preceding the beam extraction with several hi-pot/filament warm-up pulses, without any gas consumption. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. A Cancer Specific Cell-Penetrating Peptide, BR2, for the Efficient Delivery of an scFv into Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ki Jung; Sung, Bong Hyun; Shin, Ju Ri; Lee, Young Woong; Kim, Da Jung; Yang, Kyung Seok; Kim, Sun Chang

    2013-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have proven very effective as intracellular delivery vehicles for various therapeutics. However, there are some concerns about non-specific penetration and cytotoxicity of CPPs for effective cancer treatments. Herein, based on the cell-penetrating motif of an anticancer peptide, buforin IIb, we designed several CPP derivatives with cancer cell specificity. Among the derivatives, a 17-amino acid peptide (BR2) was found to have cancer-specificity without toxicity to normal cells. After specifically targeting cancer cells through interaction with gangliosides, BR2 entered cells via lipid-mediated macropinocytosis. Moreover, BR2 showed higher membrane translocation efficiency than the well-known CPP Tat (49–57). The capability of BR2 as a cancer-specific drug carrier was demonstrated by fusion of BR2 to a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) directed toward a mutated K-ras (G12V). BR2-fused scFv induced a higher degree of apoptosis than Tat-fused scFv in K-ras mutated HCT116 cells. These results suggest that the novel cell-penetrating peptide BR2 has great potential as a useful drug delivery carrier with cancer cell specificity. PMID:23776609

  6. Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Robert M.

    1976-10-05

    1. A neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch.

  7. The origin of the conductivity maximum in molten salts. II. SnCl2 and HgBr2.

    PubMed

    Aravindakshan, Nikhil P; Kuntz, Colin M; Gemmell, Kyle E; Johnson, Keith E; East, Allan L L

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of electrical conductivity maxima of molten salts versus temperature during orthobaric (closed-vessel) conditions is further examined via ab initio simulations. Previously, in a study of molten BiCl3, a new theory was offered in which the conductivity falloff at high temperatures is due not to traditional ion association, but to a rise in the activation energy for atomic ions hopping from counterion to counterion. Here this theory is further tested on two more inorganic melts which exhibit conductivity maxima: another high-conducting melt (SnCl2, σmax = 2.81 Ω(-1) cm(-1)) and a low-conducting one (HgBr2, σmax = 4.06 × 10(-4) Ω(-1) cm(-1)). First, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations were performed and again appear successful in reproducing the maxima for both these liquids. Second, analysis of the simulated liquid structure (radial distributions, species concentrations) was performed. In the HgBr2 case, a very molecular liquid like water, a clear Grotthuss chain of bromide transfers was observed in simulation when seeding the system with a HgBr(+) cation and HgBr3 (-) anion. The first conclusion is that the hopping mechanism offered for molten BiCl3 is simply the Grotthuss mechanism for conduction, applicable not just to H(+) ions, but also to halide ions in post-transition-metal halide melts. Second, it is conjectured that the conductivity maximum is due to rising activation energy in network-covalent (halide-bridging) melts (BiCl3, SnCl2, PbCl2), but possibly a falling Arrhenius prefactor (collision frequency) for molecular melts (HgBr2). PMID:27609001

  8. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) of Hg2 and Hg3 via dissociation of HgBr2 at 157 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skordoulis, C.; Sarantopoulou, E.; Spyrou, S. M.; Kosmidis, C.; Cefalas, A. C.

    1991-06-01

    Laser induced fluorescence of the mercury clusters Hg2 and Hg3 in the spectral range between 300 nm to 510 nm has been obtained from the dissociation of HgBr2 at 7.88 eV (157.5 nm) with an F2 molecular laser, together with fluorescence from mercury atomic transitions from highly excited states. The excitation process involves two photon absorption which dissociates the molecule at 15.76 eV total photon energy with the subsequent formation of the metallic clusters.

  9. An investigation on the structure, spectroscopy and thermodynamic aspects of Br2((-))(H2O)n clusters using a conjunction of stochastic and quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Naskar, Pulak; Chaudhury, Pinaki

    2016-06-28

    In this work we obtained global as well as local structures of Br2((-))(H2O)n clusters for n = 2 to 6 followed by the study of IR-spectral features and thermochemistry for the structures. The way adopted by us to obtain structures is not the conventional one used in most cases. Here we at first generated excellent quality pre-optimized structures by exploring the suitable empirical potential energy surface using stochastic optimizer simulated annealing. These structures are then further refined using quantum chemical calculations to obtain the final structures, and spectral and thermodynamic features. We clearly showed that our approach results in very quick and better convergence which reduces the computational cost and obviously using the strategy we are able to get one [i.e. global] or more than one [i.e. global and local(s)] energetically lower structures than those which are already reported for a given cluster size. Moreover, IR-spectral results and the evolutionary trends in interaction energy, solvation energy and vertical detachment energy for global structures of each size have also been presented to establish the utility of the procedure employed. PMID:27251059

  10. Impact of membrane characteristics on the performance and cycling of the Br-2-H-2 redox flow cell

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, MC; Cho, KT; Spingler, FB; Weber, AZ; Lin, GY

    2015-06-15

    The Br-2/H-2 redox flow cell shows promise as a high-power, low-cost energy storage device. In this paper, the effect of various aspects of material selection and processing of proton exchange membranes on the operation of the Br-2/H-2 redox flow cell is determined. Membrane properties have a significant impact on the performance and efficiency of the system. In particular, there is a tradeoff between conductivity and crossover, where conductivity limits system efficiency at high current density and crossover limits efficiency at low current density. The impact of thickness, pretreatment procedure, swelling state during cell assembly, equivalent weight, membrane reinforcement, and addition of a microporous separator layer on this tradeoff is assessed. NR212 (50 mu m) pretreated by soaking in 70 degrees C water is found to be optimal for the studied operating conditions. For this case, an energy efficiency of greater than 75% is achieved for current density up to 400 mA cm(-2), with a maximum obtainable energy efficiency of 88%. A cell with this membrane was cycled continuously for 3164 h. Membrane transport properties, including conductivity and bromine and water crossover, were found to decrease moderately upon cycling but remained higher than those for the as-received membrane. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of membrane characteristics on the performance and cycling of the Br2-H2 redox flow cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Michael C.; Cho, Kyu Taek; Spingler, Franz B.; Weber, Adam Z.; Lin, Guangyu

    2015-06-01

    The Br2/H2 redox flow cell shows promise as a high-power, low-cost energy storage device. In this paper, the effect of various aspects of material selection and processing of proton exchange membranes on the operation of the Br2/H2 redox flow cell is determined. Membrane properties have a significant impact on the performance and efficiency of the system. In particular, there is a tradeoff between conductivity and crossover, where conductivity limits system efficiency at high current density and crossover limits efficiency at low current density. The impact of thickness, pretreatment procedure, swelling state during cell assembly, equivalent weight, membrane reinforcement, and addition of a microporous separator layer on this tradeoff is assessed. NR212 (50 μm) pretreated by soaking in 70 °C water is found to be optimal for the studied operating conditions. For this case, an energy efficiency of greater than 75% is achieved for current density up to 400 mA cm-2, with a maximum obtainable energy efficiency of 88%. A cell with this membrane was cycled continuously for 3164 h. Membrane transport properties, including conductivity and bromine and water crossover, were found to decrease moderately upon cycling but remained higher than those for the as-received membrane.

  12. Molecular elimination of Br2 in photodissociation of CH2BrC(O)Br at 248 nm using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, He; Tsai, Po-Yu; Lin, King-Chuen; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Yan, Chi-Yu; Yang, Shu-Wei; Chang, A. H. H.

    2012-12-01

    The primary elimination channel of bromine molecule in one-photon dissociation of CH2BrC(O)Br at 248 nm is investigated using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy. By means of spectral simulation, the ratio of nascent vibrational population in v = 0, 1, and 2 levels is evaluated to be 1:(0.5 ± 0.1):(0.2 ± 0.1), corresponding to a Boltzmann vibrational temperature of 581 ± 45 K. The quantum yield of the ground state Br2 elimination reaction is determined to be 0.24 ± 0.08. With the aid of ab initio potential energy calculations, the obtained Br2 fragments are anticipated to dissociate on the electronic ground state, yielding vibrationally hot Br2 products. The temperature-dependence measurements support the proposed pathway via internal conversion. For comparison, the Br2 yields are obtained analogously from CH3CHBrC(O)Br and (CH3)2CBrC(O)Br to be 0.03 and 0.06, respectively. The trend of Br2 yields among the three compounds is consistent with the branching ratio evaluation by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus method. However, the latter result for each molecule is smaller by an order of magnitude than the yield findings. A non-statistical pathway so-called roaming process might be an alternative to the Br2 production, and its contribution might account for the underestimate of the branching ratio calculations.

  13. Fuel swelling and interaction layer formation in the SELENIUM Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) dispersion fuel plates irradiated at high power in BR2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.; Koonen, E.; Kuzminov, V.; Detavernier, C.

    2015-03-01

    In the framework of the SELENIUM project two full size flat fuel plates were produced with respectively Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) particles and irradiated in the BR2 reactor at SCK•CEN. Non-destructive analysis of the plates showed that the fuel swelling profiles of both SELENIUM plates were very similar to each other and none of the plates showed signs of pillowing or excessive swelling at the end of irradiation at the highest power position (local maximum 70% 235U). The microstructural analysis showed that the Si coated fuel has less interaction phase formation at low burn-up but at the highest burn-ups, defects start to develop on the IL-matrix interface. The ZrN coated fuel, shows a virtual absence of reaction between the U(Mo) and the Al, up to high fission densities after which the interaction layer formation starts and defects develop in the matrix near the U(Mo) particles. It was found and is confirmed by the SELENIUM (Surface Engineering of Low ENrIched Uranium-Molybdenum) experiment that there are two phenomena at play that need to be controlled: the formation of an interaction layer and swelling of the fuel. As the interaction layer formation occurs at the U(Mo)-matrix interface, applying a diffusion barrier (coating) at that interface should prevent the interaction between U(Mo) and the matrix. The U(Mo) swelling, observed to proceed at an accelerating rate with respect to fission density accumulation, is governed by linear solid state swelling and fission gas bubble swelling due to recrystallization of the fuel. The examination of the SELENIUM fuel plates clearly show that for the U(Mo) dispersion fuel to be qualified, the swelling rate at high burn-up needs to be reduced.

  14. Preliminary Study on Utilization of Carbon Dioxide as a Coolant of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor with MOX and Minor Actinides Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Fauzia, A. F.; Waris, A.; Novitrian

    2010-06-22

    High temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is an uranium oxide (UO2) fuel, graphite moderator and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW in thermal output and outlet coolant temperature of 950 deg. C. Instead of using helium gas, we have utilized carbon dioxide as a coolant in the present study. Beside that, uranium and plutonium oxide (mixed oxide, MOX) and minor actinides have been employed as a new fuel type of HTTR. Utilization of plutonium and minor actinide is one of the support system to non-proliferation issue in the nuclear development. The enrichment for uranium oxide has been varied of 6-20% with plutonium and minor actinides concentration of 10%. In this study, burnup period is 1100 days. The reactor cell calculation was performed by using SRAC 2002 code, with nuclear data library was derived from JENDL3.2. Reactor core calculation was done by using CITATION module. The result shows that HTTR can achieve its criticality condition with 14% of {sup 235}U enrichment.

  15. Preliminary Study on Utilization of Carbon Dioxide as a Coolant of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor with MOX and Minor Actinides Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauzia, A. F.; Waris, A.; Novitrian

    2010-06-01

    High temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is an uranium oxide (UO2) fuel, graphite moderator and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW in thermal output and outlet coolant temperature of 950° C. Instead of using helium gas, we have utilized carbon dioxide as a coolant in the present study. Beside that, uranium and plutonium oxide (mixed oxide, MOX) and minor actinides have been employed as a new fuel type of HTTR. Utilization of plutonium and minor actinide is one of the support system to non-proliferation issue in the nuclear development. The enrichment for uranium oxide has been varied of 6-20% with plutonium and minor actinides concentration of 10%. In this study, burnup period is 1100 days. The reactor cell calculation was performed by using SRAC 2002 code, with nuclear data library was derived from JENDL3.2. Reactor core calculation was done by using CITATION module. The result shows that HTTR can achieve its criticality condition with 14% of 235 U enrichment.

  16. Pathways for the OH + Br2 → HOBr + Br and HOBr + Br → HBr + BrO Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Qiu, Yudong; Schaefer, Henry F

    2016-02-11

    The OH radical reaction with Br2 and the subsequent reaction HOBr + Br are of exceptional importance to atmospheric chemistry and environmental chemistry. The entrance complex, transition state, and exit complex for both reactions have been determined using the coupled-cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations CCSD(T) with correlation consistent basis sets up to size cc-pV5Z and cc-pV5Z-PP. Coupled cluster effects with full triples (CCSDT) and full quadruples (CCSDTQ) are explicitly investigated. Scalar relativistic effects, spin-orbit coupling, and zero-point vibrational energy corrections are evaluated. The results from the all-electron basis sets are compared with those from the effective core potential (ECP) pseudopotential (PP) basis sets. The results are consistent. The OH + Br2 reaction is predicted to be exothermic 4.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol, compared to experiment, 3.9 ± 0.2 kcal/mol. The entrance complex HO···BrBr is bound by 2.2 ± 0.2 kcal/mol. The transition state lies similarly well below the reactants OH + Br2. The exit complex HOBr···Br is bound by 2.7 ± 0.6 kcal/mol relative to separated HOBr + Br. The endothermicity of the reaction HOBr + Br → HBr + BrO is 9.6 ± 0.7 kcal/mol, compared with experiment 8.7 ± 0.3 kcal/mol. For the more important reverse (exothermic) HBr + BrO reaction, the entrance complex BrO···HBr is bound by 1.8 ± 0.6 kcal/mol. The barrier for the HBr + BrO reaction is 6.8 ± 0.9 kcal/mol. The exit complex (Br···HOBr) for the HBr + BrO reaction is bound by 1.9 ± 0.2 kcal/mol with respect to the products HOBr + Br. PMID:26766412

  17. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  18. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  19. 100-kWe lunar/Mars surface power utilizing the SP-100 reactor with dynamic conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harty, Richard B.; Mason, Lee S.

    Results are presented from a study of the coupling of an SP-100 nuclear reactor with either a Stirling or Brayton power system, at the 100 kWe level, for a power generating system suitable for operation in the lunar and Martian surface environments. In the lunar environment, the reactor and primary coolant loop would be contained in a guard vessel to protect from a loss of primary loop containment. For Mars, all refractory components, including the reactor, coolant, and power conversion components will be contained in a vacuum vessel for protection against the CO2 environment.

  20. A possible role for acetylated intermediates in diaminopimelate and tabtoxinine-beta-lactam biosynthesis in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci BR2.024.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, L; Shaw, P D

    1997-01-01

    The deduced product of an open reading frame (ORF3) located in the tabtoxinine-beta-lactam (T beta L) biosynthetic region of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci BR2.024 (BR2.024) has significant sequence homology to the dapD products of other bacteria. dapD encodes L-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrodipicolinate succinyl coenzyme A succinyltransferase (THDPA-ST), an enzyme in the diaminopimelate (DAP) and lysine biosynthetic pathway. Complementation studies, in vitro transcription-translation experiments, and enzymatic assays indicated that ORF3 encodes a product with THDPA-ST activity in Escherichia coli dapD mutant beta 274. However, a BR2.024 mutant with an insert in ORF3 was prototrophic, and only basal THDPA-ST activity was detected in extracts of both parent and mutant. This finding suggested that ORF3 was not required for DAP biosynthesis and that it did not encode a product with THDPA-ST activity. The results of enzymatic studies, indicating that BR2.024 uses acetylated intermediates for DAP biosynthesis, are consistent with the hypothesis that BR2.024 does not need THDPA-ST for DAP biosynthesis. The ORF3 mutant produced reduced levels of tabtoxin, indicating that ORF3 may have a role in T beta L biosynthesis. We have named the gene tabB and have proposed a possible function for the gene product. PMID:9294453

  1. Spectroscopic identification of higher-order rare gas-dihalogen complexes with different geometries: He(2,3)...Br(2) and He(2,3)...ICl.

    PubMed

    Boucher, David S; Darr, Joshua P; Strasfeld, David B; Loomis, Richard A

    2008-12-25

    Rovibronic transitions of multiple conformers of the He(2)...(79)Br(2)(X, v'' = 0), He(3)...(79)Br(2)(X, v'' = 0), He(2)...I(35)Cl(X, v'' = 0), and He(3)...I(35)Cl(X, v'' = 0) complexes stabilized in a pulsed, supersonic expansion are observed in action spectra recorded in the B-X region of the dihalogens. In addition to features associated with He(2)...(79)Br(2) and He(2)...I(35)Cl complexes with the rare gas atoms localized in the toroidal potential well lying in a plane perpendicular to the dihalogen bond, those associated with a ground-state conformer that has one He atom localized in the toroidal potential and the other He atom localized in the linear well at the end of the dihalogen moiety are also identified. Transitions of at least three conformers of the He(3)...Br(2) complex and two conformers of the He(3)...ICl complex are also observed. The relative populations of the different conformers are found to depend on where along the supersonic expansion the spectra are recorded, and thus on the local temperature regime sampled. The He(2)...(79)Br(2) and He(2)...I(35)Cl conformers with one He atom in each well are found to be the more stable conformers. PMID:19053811

  2. Thermal-hydraulic aspects of flow inversion in a research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.S.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1986-11-01

    PARET, a neutronics and thermal-hydraulics computer code, has been modified to account for natural convection in a reactor core. The code was then used to analyze the flow inversion that occurs in a reactor with heat removal by forced convection in the downward direction after a pump failure. Typical results are shown for a number of parameters. Research reactors normally operating much above ten MW are predicted to experience nucleate boiling in the event of a flow inversion. Comparison with experimental results from the Belgian BR2 reactor indicated general agreement although nucleate boiling that was analytically predicted was not noted in the BR2 data.

  3. SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3: TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect

    E.M. Harpenau

    2010-11-15

    5098-LR-02-0 SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3 TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  4. Long-term storage facility for reactor compartments in Sayda Bay - German support for utilization of nuclear submarines in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, Dietmar; Voelzke, Holger; Weber, Wolfgang; Noack, Volker; Baeuerle, Guenther

    2007-07-01

    The German-Russian project that is part of the G8 initiative on Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction focuses on the speedy construction of a land-based interim storage facility for nuclear submarine reactor compartments at Sayda Bay near Murmansk. This project includes the required infrastructure facilities for long-term storage of about 150 reactor compartments for a period of about 70 years. The interim storage facility is a precondition for effective activities of decommissioning and dismantlement of almost all nuclear-powered submarines of the Russian Northern Fleet. The project also includes the establishment of a computer-assisted waste monitoring system. In addition, the project involves clearing Sayda Bay of other shipwrecks of the Russian navy. On the German side the project is carried out by the Energiewerke Nord GmbH (EWN) on behalf of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Labour (BMWi). On the Russian side the Kurchatov Institute holds the project management of the long-term interim storage facility in Sayda Bay, whilst the Nerpa Shipyard, which is about 25 km away from the storage facility, is dismantling the submarines and preparing the reactor compartments for long-term interim storage. The technical monitoring of the German part of this project, being implemented by BMWi, is the responsibility of the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM). This paper gives an overview of the German-Russian project and a brief description of solutions for nuclear submarine disposal in other countries. At Nerpa shipyard, being refurbished with logistic and technical support from Germany, the reactor compartments are sealed by welding, provided with biological shielding, subjected to surface treatment and conservation measures. Using floating docks, a tugboat tows the reactor compartments from Nerpa shipyard to the interim storage facility at Sayda Bay where they will be left on the on-shore concrete

  5. 100-kWe Lunar/Mars surface power utilizing the SP-100 reactor with dynamic conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Harty, R.B. ); Mason, L.S. )

    1993-01-15

    An integration study was performed coupling an SP-100 reactor with either a Brayton or Stirling power conversion subsystem. A power level of 100 kWe was selected for the study. The power system was to be compatible with both the lunar and Mars surface environment and require no site preparation. In addition, the reactor was to have integral shielding and be completely self-contained, including its own auxiliary power for start-up. Initial reliability studies were performed to determine power conversion redundancy and engine module size. Previous studies were used to select the power conversion optimum operating conditions (ratio of hot-side temperature to cold-side temperature). Results of the study indicated that either the Brayton or Stirling power conversion subsystems could be integrated with the SP-100 reactor for either a lunar or Mars surface power application. For the lunar environment, the reactor and primary coolant loop would be contained in a guard vessel to protect from a loss of primary loop containment. For the Mars environment, all refractory components including the reactor, primary coolant, and power conversion components would be contained in a vacuum vessel for protection against the CO[sub 2] environment. The vacuum would be maintained by an active ion pumping system. These active ion vacuum systems have no moving parts and have a long history of reliable operation.

  6. 100-kWe Lunar/Mars surface power utilizing the SP-100 reactor with dynamic conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harty, Richard B.; Mason, Lee S.

    1993-01-01

    An integration study was performed coupling an SP-100 reactor with either a Brayton or Stirling power conversion subsystem. A power level of 100 kWe was selected for the study. The power system was to be compatible with both the lunar and Mars surface environment and require no site preparation. In addition, the reactor was to have integral shielding and be completely self-contained, including its own auxiliary power for start-up. Initial reliability studies were performed to determine power conversion redundancy and engine module size. Previous studies were used to select the power conversion optimum operating conditions (ratio of hot-side temperature to cold-side temperature). Results of the study indicated that either the Brayton or Stirling power conversion subsystems could be integrated with the SP-100 reactor for either a lunar or Mars surface power application. For the lunar environment, the reactor and primary coolant loop would be contained in a guard vessel to protect from a loss of primary loop containment. For the Mars environment, all refractory components including the reactor, primary coolant, and power conversion components would be contained in a vacuum vessel for protection against the CO2 environment. The vacuum would be maintained by an active ion pumping system. These active ion vacuum systems have no moving parts and have a long history of reliable operation.

  7. Nonadiabatic quantum dynamics of Br 2 in solid Ar: A four-dimensional study of the B to C state predissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowski, A.; Kühn, O.

    2008-05-01

    Quantum dynamics simulations are performed for a diatomics-in-molecules based model of Br 2 in solid Ar which incorporates four nuclear degrees of freedom and four electronic states. The nuclear motions comprise two large amplitude coordinates describing the Br 2 bond distance and an effective symmetry-preserving matrix mode. Two symmetry-lowering harmonic modes are added in the spirit of linear vibronic coupling theory. Initiating the dynamics on the B state by means of an ultrafast laser pulse, nonadiabatic transitions to the two degenerate C states are monitored and the effect of vibrational preexcitation in the electronic ground state is investigated.

  8. CONVECTION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

    1960-03-22

    An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

  9. UO2 and PuO2 utilization in high temperature engineering test reactor with helium coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waris, Abdul; Aji, Indarta K.; Novitrian, Pramuditya, Syeilendra; Su'ud, Zaki

    2016-03-01

    High temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is one of high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) types which has been developed by Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The HTTR is a graphite moderator, helium gas coolant, 30 MW thermal output and 950 °C outlet coolant temperature for high temperature test operation. Original HTTR uses UO2 fuel. In this study, we have evaluated the use of UO2 and PuO2 in form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in HTTR. The reactor cell calculation was performed by using SRAC 2002 code, with nuclear data library was derived from JENDL3.2. The result shows that HTTR can obtain its criticality condition if the enrichment of 235U in loaded fuel is 18.0% or above.

  10. Synthesis of Bi4O5Br2 from reorganization of BiOBr and its excellent visible light photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Xie, Fangxia; Liu, Jianxin; Wang, Yawen; Wang, Yunfang; Zhang, Xiaochao; Fan, Caimei

    2016-06-14

    In this study, a novel visible-light-driven Bi4O5Br2 photocatalyst was successfully synthesized via the structure reorganization of BiOBr at room temperature using NH3·H2O as a structure-controlling agent. The obtained Bi4O5Br2 exhibited outstanding visible light activity and stability compared to BiOBr and P25 for the degradation of resorcinol. The physicochemical properties of Bi4O5Br2 were analyzed and calculated by modern characterization techniques and density functional theory (DFT). The results revealed that the excellent performance could be mainly attributed to the effect of O-richness on the electronic properties of Bi and Br atoms, unique morphology, high visible-light absorption capacity, and prominent oxidation ability of photo-induced holes. Radical trapping experiments demonstrated that h(+) and ˙OH radicals were the dominant active species. Moreover, a structure reorganization mechanism was proposed, revealing that ammonia and the water-steeping process both played important roles in the fabrication of Bi4O5Br2. We believe that this facile method could be extended to fabricate other three component Bi-O-Br nanostructure systems and help elucidate the relationship between BiOBr and BixOyBrz. PMID:27172325

  11. Ablation of TRIP-Br2, a regulator of fat lipolysis, thermogenesis and oxidative metabolism, prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Liew, Chong Wee; Boucher, Jeremie; Cheong, Jit Kong; Vernochet, Cecile; Koh, Ho-Jin; Mallol, Cristina; Townsend, Kristy; Langin, Dominique; Kawamori, Dan; Hu, Jiang; Tseng, Yu-Hua; Hellerstein, Marc K; Farmer, Stephen R; Goodyear, Laurie; Doria, Alessandro; Blüher, Matthias; Hsu, Stephen I-Hong; Kulkarni, Rohit N

    2013-02-01

    Obesity develops as a result of altered energy homeostasis favoring fat storage. Here we describe a new transcription co-regulator for adiposity and energy metabolism, SERTA domain containing 2 (TRIP-Br2, also called SERTAD2). TRIP-Br2-null mice are resistant to obesity and obesity-related insulin resistance. Adipocytes of these knockout mice showed greater stimulated lipolysis secondary to enhanced expression of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and β3-adrenergic (Adrb3) receptors. The knockout mice also have higher energy expenditure because of increased adipocyte thermogenesis and oxidative metabolism caused by upregulating key enzymes in their respective processes. Our data show that a cell-cycle transcriptional co-regulator, TRIP-Br2, modulates fat storage through simultaneous regulation of lipolysis, thermogenesis and oxidative metabolism. These data, together with the observation that TRIP-Br2 expression is selectively elevated in visceral fat in obese humans, suggests that this transcriptional co-regulator is a new therapeutic target for counteracting the development of obesity, insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia. PMID:23291629

  12. Expeditious synthesis of phenanthrenes via CuBr2-catalyzed coupling of terminal alkynes and N-tosylhydrazones derived from o-formyl biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; Shi, Yi; Zhou, Lei; Xiao, Qing; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jianbo

    2011-10-01

    A new method for the synthesis of phenanthrenes via ligand-free CuBr(2)-catalyzed coupling/cyclization of terminal alkynes with N-tosylhydrazones derived from o-formyl biphenyls has been developed. This new synthesis has wide range of functional group compatibility. PMID:21875127

  13. Utilization of moving bed biofilm reactor for industrial wastewater treatment containing ethylene glycol: kinetic and performance study.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Amir Hessam; Borghei, Seyed Mehdi; Samadyar, Hassan; Ghanbari, Bastam

    2014-01-01

    One of the requirements for environmental engineering, which is currently being considered, is the removal of ethylene glycol (EG) as a hazardous environmental pollutant from industrial wastewater. Therefore, in a recent study, a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) was applied at pilot scale to treat industrial effluents containing different concentrations of EG (600, 800, 1200, and 1800 mg L-1 ). The removal efficiency and kinetic analysis of the system were examined at different hydraulic retention times of 6, 8, 10, and 12 h as well as influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) ranged between values of 1000 and 3000mg L-1. In minimum and maximum COD Loadings, the MBBR showed 95.1% and 60.7% removal efficiencies, while 95.9% and 66.2% EG removal efficiencies were achieved in the lowest and highest EG concentrations. The results of the reactor modelling suggested compliance of the well-known modified Stover-Kincannon model with the system. PMID:24600890

  14. Measuring Neutron Spectrum at MIT Research Reactor Utilizing He-3 Bonner Cylinder Approach with an Unfolding Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leder, Alexander; Ricochet Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Ricochet experiment seeks to measure Coherent (neutral-current) Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering (CENNS) using dark matter style detectors placed near a neutrino source, possibly the MIT research reactor (MITR), which offers a high continuous neutrino flux at high energies. Currently, Ricochet is characterizing the backgrounds at MITR. The main background is the neutrons emitted simultaneously from the core. To characterize this background, we wrapped a Bonner cylinder around a 3He thermal neutron detector, whose data was then unfolded to produce a neutron energy spectrum across several orders of magnitude. We discuss the resulting spectrum as well its implications for deploying Ricochet in the future.

  15. Final Report on Utilization of TRU TRISO Fuel as Applied to HTR Systems Part II: Prismatic Reactor Cross Section Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent Descotes

    2011-03-01

    The deep-burn prismatic high temperature reactor is made up of an annular core loaded with transuranic isotopes and surrounded in the center and in the periphery by reflector blocks in graphite. This disposition creates challenges for the neutronics compared to usual light water reactor calculation schemes. The longer mean free path of neutrons in graphite affects the neutron spectrum deep inside the blocks located next to the reflector. The neutron thermalisation in the graphite leads to two characteristic fission peaks at the inner and outer interfaces as a result of the increased thermal flux seen in those assemblies. Spectral changes are seen at least on half of the fuel blocks adjacent to the reflector. This spectral effect of the reflector may prevent us from successfully using the two step scheme -lattice then core calculation- typically used for light water reactors. We have been studying the core without control mechanisms to provide input for the development of a complete calculation scheme. To correct the spectrum at the lattice level, we have tried to generate cross-sections from supercell calculations at the lattice level, thus taking into account part of the graphite surrounding the blocks of interest for generating the homogenised cross-sections for the full-core calculation. This one has been done with 2 to 295 groups to assess if increasing the number of groups leads to more accurate results. A comparison with a classical single block model has been done. Both paths were compared to a reference calculation done with MCNP. It is concluded that the agreement with MCNP is better with supercells, but that the single block model remains quite close if enough groups are kept for the core calculation. 26 groups seems to be a good compromise between time and accu- racy. However, some trials with depletion have shown huge variations of the isotopic composition across a block next to the reflector. It may imply that at least an in- core depletion for the

  16. A theoretical simulation of the resonant Raman spectroscopy of the H2O⋯Cl2 and H2O⋯Br2 halogen-bonded complexes.

    PubMed

    Franklin-Mergarejo, Ricardo; Rubayo-Soneira, Jesús; Halberstadt, Nadine; Janda, Kenneth C; Apkarian, V Ara

    2016-02-01

    The resonant Raman spectra of the H2O⋯Cl2 and H2O⋯Br2 halogen-bonded complexes have been studied in the framework of a 2-dimensional model previously used in the simulation of their UV-visible absorption spectra using time-dependent techniques. In addition to the vibrational progression along the dihalogen mode, a progression is observed along the intermolecular mode and its combination with the intramolecular one. The relative intensity of the inter to intramolecular vibrational progressions is about 15% for H2O⋯Cl2 and 33% for H2O⋯Br2. These results make resonant Raman spectra a potential tool for detecting the presence of halogen bonded complexes in condensed phase media such as clathrates and ice. PMID:26851921

  17. Utilization of cross-linked laccase aggregates in a perfusion basket reactor for the continuous elimination of endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Cabana, Hubert; Jones, J Peter; Agathos, Spiros N

    2009-04-15

    A perfusion basket reactor (BR) was developed for the continuous utilization of insolubilized laccase as cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs). The BR consisted of an unbaffled basket made of a metallic filtration module filled with CLEAs and continuously agitated by a 3-blade marine propeller. The agitation conditions influenced both the apparent laccase activity in the reactor and the stability of the biocatalyst. Optimal laccase activity was obtained at a rotational speed of 12.5 rps and the highest stability was reached at speeds of 1.7 rps or lower. The activity and stability of the biocatalyst were affected drastically upon the appearance of vortices in the reaction medium. This reactor was used for the continuous elimination of the endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) nonylphenol (NP), bisphenol A (BPA), and triclosan (TCS). Optimization of EDC elimination by laccase CLEAs as a function of temperature and pH was achieved by response surface methodology using a central composite factorial design. The optimal conditions of pH and temperature were, respectively, 4.8 and 40.3 degrees C for the elimination of p353NP (a branched isomer of NP), 4.7 and 48.0 degrees C for BPA, and 4.9 and 41.2 degrees C for TCS. Finally, the BR was used for the continuous elimination of these EDCs from a 5 mg L(-1) aqueous solution using 1 mg of CLEAs at pH 5 and room temperature. Our results showed that at least 85% of these EDCs could be eliminated with a hydraulic retention time of 325 min. The performances of the BR were quite stable over a 7-day period of continuous treatment. Furthermore, this system could eliminate the same EDCs from a 100 mg L(-1) solution. Finally, a mathematical model combining the Michaelis-Menten kinetics of the laccase CLEAs and the continuous stirred tank reactor behavior of the BR was developed to predict the elimination of these xenobiotics. PMID:19061241

  18. Kinetics of the Reactions of O((sup 3)P) and Cl((sup 2)P) with HBr and Br2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A laser flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique has been employed to study the kinetics of reactions (1)-(4) as a function of temperature. (1) O((sup 3)P) + Br2 yields BrO + Br((sup 2)P(sub 3/2)) at 255-350 K; (2) Cl((sup 2)P) + Br2 yields BrCl + Br((sup 2)P(sub 3/2)) at 298-401 K; (3) O((sup 3)P) + HBr yields OH + Br((sup 2)P(sub J)) at 250-402 K; (4) Cl((sup 2)P) + HBr yields HCl + Br((sup 2)P(sub J)) at 257-404 K. In all cases, the concentration of the excess reagent, i.e, HBr or Br2, was measured in situ in the slow flow system by UV-visible photometry. Heterogeneous dark reactions between XBr (X equals H or Br) and the photolytic precursors for Cl((sup 2)P) and O((sup 3)P) (Cl2 and O3, respectively) were avoided by injecting minimal amounts of precursor into the reaction mixture immediately upstream from the reaction zone. The following Arrhenius expressions summarize our results (errors are 2 sigma and represent precision only, units are cu cm/(molecule.s): k(sub 1) = (1.76 +/- 0.80) x 10(exp -11 exp[(40 +/- 100)/T]; k(sub 2) = (2.40 +/- 1.25) x 12(exp -10) exp[-(144 +/- 176)/T]; k(sub 3) = (5.11 +/- 2.82) x 10(exp -12) exp[-(1450 +/- 160)/T]; k(sub 4) = (2.25 +/- 0.56) x 10(exp -11) exp[-(400 +/- 80)/T]. The consistency (or lack thereof) of our results with those reported in previous kinetics and dynamics studies of reactions (1)-(4) is discussed.

  19. Pd(II)/CuBr2 catalysed keto α-C(sp3)-H benzoxylation of N,N-dialkylamides directed by o-hydroxy groups.

    PubMed

    Santra, Sourav Kumar; Banerjee, Arghya; Rajamanickam, Suresh; Khatun, Nilufa; Patel, Bhisma K

    2016-03-25

    A hydroxy group directed keto α-C(sp3)-H benzoxylation of amides, including N,N-dialkylamides and cyclic amides, has been accomplished involving ortho-hydroxy substrates possessing either an aldehydic or a keto methyl (-COCH3) group with a Pd(II)/CuBr2 catalytic combination. The carboxy group obtained via the in situ oxidation of -CHO or -COCH3 groups of ortho-hydroxy substrates then undergoes a cross-dehydrogenative coupling (CDC) with amides to furnish an α-benzoxylation product with concurrent aromatic ring bromination. PMID:26931492

  20. Generation, utilization, and transformation of cathode electrons for bioreduction of Fe(III)EDTA in a biofilm electrode reactor related to NOx removal from flue gas.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Xia, Yinfeng; Zhao, Jingkai; Liu, Nan; Li, Sujing; Zhang, Shihan

    2015-04-01

    A chemical absorption-biological reduction (CABR) integrated system, which employs iron chelate as a solvent, is under development for NOx removal from flue gas. Biofilm electrode reactor (BER) is deemed as a promising bioreactor to regenerate the iron chelate. Although it has been proved that BER can significantly enhance the bioreduction of Fe(III)EDTA, the bioelectrochemistry mechanism involved in the bioreduction of Fe(III)EDTA remains unknown. This work aims to explore this mechanism via the analysis of the generation, utilization, and transformation of cathode electrons in the BER. The results indicate that the generation of cathode electrons follows Faraday's law. The generated cathode electrons were used to produce H2 and directly reduce Fe(III)EDTA in the BER. Meanwhile, the produced H2 served as an electron donor for bioreduction of Fe(III)EDTA. The excess H2 product was transformed to simple organics, e.g., methanol by the hydrogen autotrophy of Pseudomonas under the inorganic and anaerobic conditions. Overall, this work revealed that the reduction of Fe(III)EDTA in the BER was enhanced by both direct electrochemical reduction and indirect bioreduction using H2 as an intermediate. It is also interesting that the excess H2 product was transformed to methanol for microbial metabolism and energy storage in the BER. PMID:25799265

  1. [UO2(NH3)5]Br2·NH3: synthesis, crystal structure, and speciation in liquid ammonia solution by first-principles molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Woidy, Patrick; Bühl, Michael; Kraus, Florian

    2015-04-28

    Pentaammine dioxido uranium(VI) dibromide ammonia (1/1), [UO2(NH3)5]Br2·NH3, was synthesized in the form of yellow crystals by the reaction of uranyl bromide, UO2Br2, with dry liquid ammonia. The compound crystallizes orthorhombic in space group Cmcm and is isotypic to [UO2(NH3)5]Cl2·NH3 with a = 13.2499(2), b = 10.5536(1), c = 8.9126(1) Å, V = 1246.29(3) Å(3) and Z = 4 at 123 K. The UO2(2+) cation is coordinated by five ammine ligands and the coordination polyhedron can be best described as pentagonal bipyramid. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are reported for [UO2(NH3)5](2+) in the gas phase and in liquid NH3 solution (using the BLYP density functional). According to free-energy simulations, solvation by ammonia has only a small effect on the uranyl-NH3 bond strength. PMID:25797497

  2. Effect of excess PbBr2 on photoluminescence spectra of CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite particles at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xin; Zhang, Kun; Li, Yanping; Yao, Li; Zhang, Yinfeng; Wang, Yilun; Zhai, Wenhao; Tao, Li; Du, Honglin; Ran, Guangzhao

    2016-02-01

    The organic-inorganic halide perovskites have promising applications in light-emitting devices besides solar cells. We here prepare CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite particles on SiO2 substrates and find that the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of the particles at room temperature has two peaks, locating at 529 and 549 nm, respectively, much different from that of the corresponding films prepared on the oxygen plasma-cleaned SiO2 substrates, which has a single peak. The double peaks have different temperature-dependence behaviors. By the x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analyses, excess PbBr2 is detected inside the particles. We deduce that such excess PbBr2 has introduced shallow level defects. It is concluded that band-to-band recombination and these defects result in the double-peaked feature of the PL spectra of CH3NH3PbBr3 particles at room temperature.

  3. Characterization of dapB, a gene required by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci BR2.024 for lysine and tabtoxinine-beta-lactam biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, L; Shaw, P D

    1997-01-01

    The dapB gene, which encodes L-2,3-dihydrodipicolinate reductase, the second enzyme of the lysine branch of the aspartic amino acid family, was cloned and sequenced from a tabtoxin-producing bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci BR2.024. The deduced amino acid sequence shared 60 to 90% identity to known dapB gene products from gram-negative bacteria and 19 to 21% identity to the dapB products from gram-positive bacteria. The consensus sequence for the NAD(P)H binding site [(V/I)(A/G)(V/I)XGXXGXXG)] and the proposed substrate binding site (HHRHK) were conserved in the polypeptide. A BR2.024 dapB mutant is a diaminopimelate auxotroph and tabtoxin negative. The addition of a mixture of L-,L-, D,D-, and meso-diaminopimelate to defined media restored growth but not tabtoxin production. Cloned DNA fragments containing the parental dapB gene restored the ability to grow in defined media and tabtoxin production to the dapB mutant. These results indicate that the dapB gene is required for both lysine and tabtoxin biosynthesis, thus providing the first genetic evidence that the biosynthesis of tabtoxin proceeds in part along the lysine biosynthetic pathway. These data also suggest that L-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrodipicolinate is a common intermediate for both lysine and tabtoxin biosynthesis. PMID:8990304

  4. M4Se 16Br 2 ( M = Nb, Ta), a new chain-like structure from progressive condensation of ( M2Se 4) groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenouilleau, P.; Meerschaut, A.; Guemas, L.; Rouxel, J.

    1987-02-01

    Nb 4Se 16Br 2 and Ta 4Se 16Br 2 crystallize in the monoclinic system, space group {P2 1}/{c} with a = 12.862(3)Å, b = 13.862(3) Å, c = 16.029(3) Å, β = 127.70(1)°, Z = 4 and a = 12.844(2) Å, b = 13.875(2) Å, c = 16.018(4) Å, β = 127.57(1)°, Z = 4, respectively. The structures were solved from 3182 and 2784 reflections, respectively, collected on a NONIUS CAD4 automatic diffractometer (Mo Kα radiation). The final R indexes are 0.030 and 0.033. The common structural type is based on the presence of four chains running in a direction parallel to the a axis. Along the chains four metal atoms are found; short and long M- M distances alternate in the sequence of three consecutive short bonds ( overlined(M-M) ˜- 3.1 Å) and one long ( overlined(M … M) ˜- 3.7 Å). The shortest bonds are associated with [ M4Se 12] groups built up from the condensation of three [ M2Se 4] units.

  5. A chopper system for shortening the duration of pulsed supersonic beams seeded with NO or Br2 down to 13 μs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Jessica; Rennick, Christopher J.; Softley, Timothy P.

    2015-05-01

    A chopper wheel construct is used to shorten the duration of a molecular beam to 13 μs. Molecular beams seeded with NO or with Br2 and an initial pulse width of ≥200 μs were passed through a spinning chopper wheel, which was driven by a brushless DC in vacuo motor at a range of speeds, from 3000 rpm to 80 000 rpm. The resulting duration of the molecular-beam pulses measured at the laser detection volume ranged from 80 μs to 13 μs and was the same for both NO and Br2. The duration is consistent with a simple analytical model, and the minimum pulse width measured is limited by the spreading of the beam between the chopper and the detection point as a consequence of the longitudinal velocity distribution of the beam. The setup adopted here effectively eliminates buildup of background gas without the use of a differential pumping stage, and a clean narrow pulse is obtained with low rotational temperature.

  6. Modeling and simulation of output power of a high-power He-SrBr2 laser by using multivariate adaptive regression splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliev, I. P.; Gocheva-Ilieva, S. G.

    2013-02-01

    Due to advancement in computing technology researchers are focusing onto novel predictive models and techniques for improving the design and performance of the devices. This study examines a recently developed high-powered SrBr2 laser excited in a nanosecond pulse longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge. Based on the accumulated experiment data, a new approach is proposed for determining the relationship between laser output power and basic laser characteristics: geometric design, supplied electric power, helium pressure, etc. Piece-wise linear and nonlinear statistical models have been built with the help of the flexible predictive MARS technique. It is shown that the best nonlinear MARS model containing second degree terms provides the best description of the examined data, demonstrating a coefficient of determination of over 99%. The resulting theoretical models are used to estimate and predict the experiment as well as to analyze the local behavior of the relationships between laser output power and input laser characteristics. The second order model is applied to the design and optimization of the laser in order to enhance laser generation.

  7. Low-dimensional charge transport of the ferroic NH 2(C 2H 5) 4CoCl 2Br 2 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkaczyk, S. W.; Kityk, I. V.; Rudyk, V.; Kapustianyk, V.

    2010-06-01

    DC-conductivity of the nanocomposites consisting of ferroic nanocrystals NH 2(C 2H 5) 4CoCl 2Br 2 (TEA-CCB) incorporated into the polymer PMMA matrices is investigated. The investigations are performed for different number of nanocrystallite chromophores and thickness of the samples. The thickness of the nanocomposite films was varied within 0.44-0.48 μm. The measurements were done at different temperatures and different applied voltages. As a dominant mechanism thermoemission was considered, which is determined by temperature of the samples.. The gold electrodes were used as principle electrodes. The observed phenomena were explained within a framework of hopping between the trapping levels and possible contribution of self-trapped excitons.

  8. Temperature dependence of Peierls–Hubbard phase transition in [Pd(cptn)2Br]Br2 studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosomi, Yuka; Yoshida, Shoji; Taninaka, Atsushi; Yoshida, Takefumi; Takaishi, Shinya; Takeuchi, Osamu; Yamashita, Masahiro; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2016-08-01

    The temperature dependence of the Peierls–Hubbard phase transition in [Pd(cptn)2Br]Br2 (cptn: 1R,2R-diaminocyclopentane) was directly observed using a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope. A short ligand without alkyl chains was used to form a rigid crystal lattice to reduce the effect of structural changes in the crystal with temperature. The hysteresis in the temperature dependence of the ratio between the areas of the charge density wave (CDW) state produced by the PdII–PdIV mixed-valence state and the Mott–Hubbard (MH) state with a PdIII-averaged valence state which is a characteristic of the first-order phase transition, was directly observed at the atomic scale. Pinning of the CDW phase by defects was observed below the critical temperature, suggesting the growth of the CDW phase with defects as nuclei.

  9. Multicapillary Flow Reactor: Synthesis of 1,2,5-Thiadiazepane 1,1-Dioxide Library Utilizing One-Pot Elimination and Inter-/Intramolecular Double aza-Michael Addition Via Microwave-Assisted, Continuous-Flow Organic Synthesis (MACOS)

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Farman; Zang, Qin; Javed, Salim; Zhou, Aihua; Knudtson, Christopher A.; Bi, Danse; Hanson, Paul R.; Organ, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    A microwave-assisted, continuous-flow organic synthesis (MACOS) protocol for the synthesis of functionalized 1,2,5-thiadiazepane 1,1-dioxide library, utilizing a one-pot elimination and inter-/intramolecular double aza-Michael addition strategy is reported. The optimized protocol in MACOS was utilized for scale-out and further extended for library production using a multicapillary flow reactor. A 50-member library of 1,2,5-thiadiazepane 1,1-dioxides was prepared on a 100- to 300-mg scale with overall yields between 50 and 80% and over 90 % purity determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy. PMID:24244871

  10. Anomalous low-temperature behavior of the Co dimers in the oxo-halide CoSb 2O 3Br 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugonin, Zuzana; Johnsson, Mats; Lidin, Sven; Wulferding, Dirk; Lemmens, Peter; Kremer, Reinhard K.

    2008-10-01

    We report the synthesis, crystal structure determination, magnetic and low-temperature structural properties of a new cobalt antimony oxo-bromide. CoSb 2O 3Br 2 crystallizes in the triclinic crystal system, space group P-1, with the following lattice parameters: a=5.306(3) Å, b=7.812(4) Å, c=8.0626(10) Å, α=88.54(3)°, β=82.17(3)°, γ=80.32(4)°, and Z=2. The crystal structure was solved from single crystal X-ray data and refined on F2, R1=3.08. The structure consists of layers made up by three building blocks, [CoO 4Br 2], [SbO 3Br], and [SbO 3] that are connected via edge- and corner-sharing so that structural Co-Co dimers are formed. The layers have no net charge and are only weakly connected by van der Waals forces to adjacent layers. Above ˜25 K the magnetic susceptibility is independent of the magnetic field and can be very well described by a Curie-Weiss law. Below 25 K the susceptibility passes through a maximum and decreases again that is typical for the onset of long-range antiferromagnetic correlations. Long-range antiferromagnetic ordering is observed below TN˜9 K indicating substantial inter-dimer exchange coupling between Co-Co dimers within the layers. However, according to the heat capacity results only a minute fraction of the entropy is associated with the long-range ordering transition. The phonon anomalies observed for T<6 K in Raman scattering and an anomaly in the specific heat point to a structural instability leading to a loss of inversion symmetry at lowest temperatures.

  11. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-07-14

    High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

  12. Utilization of 134Cs/137Cs in the environment to identify the reactor units that caused atmospheric releases during the Fukushima Daiichi accident

    PubMed Central

    Chino, Masamichi; Terada, Hiroaki; Nagai, Haruyasu; Katata, Genki; Mikami, Satoshi; Torii, Tatsuo; Saito, Kimiaki; Nishizawa, Yukiyasu

    2016-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power reactor units that generated large amounts of airborne discharges during the period of March 12–21, 2011 were identified individually by analyzing the combination of measured 134Cs/137Cs depositions on ground surfaces and atmospheric transport and deposition simulations. Because the values of 134Cs/137Cs are different in reactor units owing to fuel burnup differences, the 134Cs/137Cs ratio measured in the environment was used to determine which reactor unit ultimately contaminated a specific area. Atmospheric dispersion model simulations were used for predicting specific areas contaminated by each dominant release. Finally, by comparing the results from both sources, the specific reactor units that yielded the most dominant atmospheric release quantities could be determined. The major source reactor units were Unit 1 in the afternoon of March 12, 2011, Unit 2 during the period from the late night of March 14 to the morning of March 15, 2011. These results corresponded to those assumed in our previous source term estimation studies. Furthermore, new findings suggested that the major source reactors from the evening of March 15, 2011 were Units 2 and 3 and that the dominant source reactor on March 20, 2011 temporally changed from Unit 3 to Unit 2. PMID:27546490

  13. Utilization of (134)Cs/(137)Cs in the environment to identify the reactor units that caused atmospheric releases during the Fukushima Daiichi accident.

    PubMed

    Chino, Masamichi; Terada, Hiroaki; Nagai, Haruyasu; Katata, Genki; Mikami, Satoshi; Torii, Tatsuo; Saito, Kimiaki; Nishizawa, Yukiyasu

    2016-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power reactor units that generated large amounts of airborne discharges during the period of March 12-21, 2011 were identified individually by analyzing the combination of measured (134)Cs/(137)Cs depositions on ground surfaces and atmospheric transport and deposition simulations. Because the values of (134)Cs/(137)Cs are different in reactor units owing to fuel burnup differences, the (134)Cs/(137)Cs ratio measured in the environment was used to determine which reactor unit ultimately contaminated a specific area. Atmospheric dispersion model simulations were used for predicting specific areas contaminated by each dominant release. Finally, by comparing the results from both sources, the specific reactor units that yielded the most dominant atmospheric release quantities could be determined. The major source reactor units were Unit 1 in the afternoon of March 12, 2011, Unit 2 during the period from the late night of March 14 to the morning of March 15, 2011. These results corresponded to those assumed in our previous source term estimation studies. Furthermore, new findings suggested that the major source reactors from the evening of March 15, 2011 were Units 2 and 3 and that the dominant source reactor on March 20, 2011 temporally changed from Unit 3 to Unit 2. PMID:27546490

  14. POWER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.

    1958-07-01

    A fast nuclear reactor system ls described for producing power and radioactive isotopes. The reactor core is of the heterogeneous, fluid sealed type comprised of vertically arranged elongated tubular fuel elements having vertical coolant passages. The active portion is surrounded by a neutron reflector and a shield. The system includes pumps and heat exchangers for the primary and secondary coolant circuits. The core, primary coolant pump and primary heat exchanger are disposed within an irapenforate tank which is filled with the primary coolant, in this case a liquid metal such as Na or NaK, to completely submerge these elements. The tank is completely surrounded by a thick walled concrete shield. This reactor system utilizes enriched uranium or plutonium as the fissionable material, uranium or thorium as a diluent and thorium or uranium containing less than 0 7% of the U/sup 235/ isotope as a fertile material.

  15. Utilization of high-strength wastewater for the production of biogas as a renewable energy source using hybrid upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (HUASB) reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Shivayogimath, C.B.; Ramanujam, T.K.

    1998-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of distillery spentwash, a high-strength wastewater, was studied using a hybrid upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (HUASB) reactor for 240 days under ambient conditions. The HUASB reactor combined an open volume in the bottom two-thirds of the reactor for sludge blanket and polypropylene pall rings packing in the upper one-third of the reactor. The aim of the study was to achieve optimum biogas production and waste treatment. Using non-granular anaerobic sewage sludge as seed, the start-up of the HUASB reactor was successfully completed, with the production of active bacterial granules of 1--2 mm size, within 90 days. Examination of the bacterial granules under scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that Methanothrix like microorganisms were the dominant species besides Methanosarcina. An organic loading of 24 kg COD/m{sup 3}d at a low hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 6 hours was achieved with 82% reduction in COD. Biogas with high methane content (80%) was produced at these loadings. The specific biogas yield was 0.36 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg COD. Packing in the upper third of the reactor was very efficient as a gas-solid separator (GSS); and in addition it retained the biomass.

  16. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    King, L.D.P.

    1959-09-01

    A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

  17. Temperature induced changes on the structure and the dynamics of the ``tetrahedral'' glasses and melts of ZnCl2 and ZnBr2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yannopoulos, S. N.; Kalampounias, A. G.; Chrissanthopoulos, A.; Papatheodorou, G. N.

    2003-02-01

    Glassy, supercooled, and molten ZnCl2 and ZnBr2 have been studied by Raman spectroscopy over the broad temperature range -196 to 800 °C in an effort to follow in detail the structural changes caused by temperature variation. A systematic study has also been undertaken for the corresponding crystalline polymorphs showing that each material exists in only one crystalline phase if water traces are not present. The reduced isotropic and anisotropic Raman spectra of the ZnCl2 and ZnBr2 glasses and melts are isomorphous. Unusually drastic changes of the relative intensities of particular bands occur with temperature in the reduced isotropic spectra. A comparison between the spectral features of crystals, glasses, and melts has revealed that the network structure of the glasses and melts consists of ZnX4/2 (X=Br,Cl) tetrahedra bound to each other by apex- and edge-bridged halides. The substructure of the glass/melt is formed by mixing a variety of tetrahedra participating in "open," "cluster," and "chain" networks which are bound to each other by bridged halides. The boundaries of the substructure involve neutral or charged terminal halide bonds with zinc of an average threefold coordination. Temperature rise breaks up the substructure to smaller fragments, increases the number of terminal bonds, and rearranges the apex- and edge-bridging networks. The good glass-forming ability of the ZnX2 melts is attributed to the existence and mixing of the three topologically different networks within the substructure. Our data of ZnCl2 are in qualitative agreement with molecular dynamics simulations as regards the frequency distribution of vibrational modes. However, simulations are not able to correctly predict polarization properties in the glass and the melt. The low-frequency Raman spectra reveal the presence of the Boson peak in both glasses, which interestingly persists, well resolved, also into the normal liquid state above the melting point. The spectra in the region of the

  18. Mn-Promoted Co3O4/TiO2 as an efficient catalyst for catalytic oxidation of dibromomethane (CH2Br2).

    PubMed

    Mei, Jian; Zhao, Songjian; Huang, Wenjun; Qu, Zan; Yan, Naiqiang

    2016-11-15

    Brominated hydrocarbon is the typical pollutant in the exhaust gas from the synthesis process of Purified Terephthalic Acid (PTA), which may cause various environmental problems once emitted into atmosphere. Dibromomethane (DBM) was employed as the model compound in this study, and a series of TiO2-supported manganese and cobalt oxide catalysts with different Mn/Co molar ratio were prepared by the impregnation method and used for catalytic oxidation of DBM. It was found that the addition of Mn significantly enhanced the catalytic performance of Co/TiO2 catalyst. Among all the prepared catalysts, Mn(1)-Co/TiO2 (Mn/Co molar ratio was 1) catalyst exhibited the highest activity with T90 at about 325°C and good stability maintained for at least 30h at 500ppm DBM and 10% O2 at GHSV=60,000h(-1), and the final products in the reaction were COx, HBr and Br2, without the formation of Br-containing organics. The high activity and high stability might be attributed to the redox cycle (Co(2+)+Mn(4+)↔Co(3+)+Mn(3+)) over Mn-promoted Co3O4/TiO2 catalyst. Based on the results of in situ DRIFT studies and analysis of products, a plausible reaction mechanism for catalytic oxidation of DBM over Mn-Co/TiO2 catalysts was also proposed. PMID:27388418

  19. Behavior of BaBr2, BaI2, and BaCl2 at high pressure as analogs to SiO2.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, T. J.; Stackhouse, S.; Diamond, M. R.; Godwal, B. K.; Jeanloz, R.

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by the expectation that giant and supergiant planets likely contain rocky components in their cores, we study analogs of the archetypal rock constituent, SiO2. The crystal structures of SiO2 under ultra-high pressures, greater than feasible experimental conditions, are believed to be documented by the high pressure structural sequence of AX2 compounds. Experimental and theoretical work agree on a high pressure transition to the cotunnite (orthorhombic) phase, with first-principles theory predicting that SiO2 transforms to the cotunnite structure at 750 GPa. However, the existence of a postcotunnite (monoclinic) phase as the final high pressure polymorph, suggested by X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments on ambient pressure cotunnite-structured AX2 compounds (e.g. PbCl2, SnCl2), has been challenged by density-functional theory (DFT) computations. This disagreement could perhaps be due to sensitivity in diamond-anvil cell (DAC) experiments to pressure gradients; conversely, it could perhaps arise from limitations of DFT. This study further explores both the experimental and theoretical sides of this debate, with an aim to resolve this discrepancy. We present synchrotron XRD data on the AX2 compounds BaCl2, BaBr2, and BaI2, compressed up to 70 GPa at room temperature in a DAC. Here we compare our experimentally observed crystallography and equations of state with results from our DFT simulations.

  20. Novel Co(III)/Co(II) mixed valence compound [Co(bapen)Br2]2[CoBr4] (bapen = N,N‧-bis(3-aminopropyl)ethane-1,2-diamine): Synthesis, crystal structure and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolko, Lukáš; Černák, Juraj; Kuchár, Juraj; Miklovič, Jozef; Boča, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Green crystals of Co(III)/Co(II) mixed valence compound [Co(bapen)Br2]2[CoBr4] (bapen = N,N‧-bis(3-aminopropyl)ethane-1,2-diamine) were isolated from the aqueous system CoBr2 - bapen - HBr, crystallographically studied and characterized by elemental analysis and IR spectroscopy. Its ionic crystal structure is built up of [Co(bapen)Br2]+ cations and [CoBr4]2- anions. The Co(III) central atoms within the complex cations are hexacoordinated (donor set trans-N4Br2) with bromido ligands placed in the axial positions. The Co(II) atoms exhibit distorted tetrahedral coordination. Beside ionic forces weak Nsbnd H⋯Br intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions contribute to the stability of the structure. Temperature variable magnetic measurements confirm the S = 3/2 behavior with the zero-field splitting of an intermediate strength: D/hc = 8.7 cm-1.

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL COMPOSITION

    DOEpatents

    Thurber, W.C.

    1961-01-10

    Uranium-aluminum alloys in which boron is homogeneously dispersed by adding it as a nickel boride are described. These compositions have particular utility as fuels for neutronic reactors, boron being present as a burnable poison.

  2. Radiation Shielding Design and Orientation Considerations for a 1 kWe Heat Pipe Cooled Reactor Utilized to Bore Through the Ice Caps of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fensin, Michael L.; Elliott, John O.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Poston, David I.

    2006-01-01

    The goal in designing any space power system is to develop a system able to meet the mission requirements for success while minimizing the overall costs. The mission requirements for the this study was to develop a reactor (with Stirling engine power conversion) and shielding configuration able to fit, along with all the other necessary science equipment, in a Cryobot 3 m high with ~0.5 m diameter hull, produce 1 kWe for 5yrs, and not adversely affect the mission science by keeping the total integrated dose to the science equipment below 150 krad. Since in most space power missions the overall system mass dictates the mission cost, the shielding designs in this study incorporated Martian water extracted at the startup site in order to minimize the tungsten and LiH mass loading at launch. Different reliability and mass minimization concerns led to three design configuration evolutions. With the help of implementing Martian water and configuring the reactor as far from the science equipment as possible, the needed tungsten and LiH shield mass was minimized. This study further characterizes the startup dose and the necessary mission requirements in order to ensure integrity of the surface equipment during reactor startup phase.

  3. Radiation Shielding Design and Orientation Considerations for a 1 kWe Heat Pipe Cooled Reactor Utilized to Bore Through the Ice Caps of Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael L.; Elliott, John O.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Poston, David I.

    2006-01-20

    The goal in designing any space power system is to develop a system able to meet the mission requirements for success while minimizing the overall costs. The mission requirements for the this study was to develop a reactor (with Stirling engine power conversion) and shielding configuration able to fit, along with all the other necessary science equipment, in a Cryobot 3 m high with {approx}0.5 m diameter hull, produce 1 kWe for 5yrs, and not adversely affect the mission science by keeping the total integrated dose to the science equipment below 150 krad. Since in most space power missions the overall system mass dictates the mission cost, the shielding designs in this study incorporated Martian water extracted at the startup site in order to minimize the tungsten and LiH mass loading at launch. Different reliability and mass minimization concerns led to three design configuration evolutions. With the help of implementing Martian water and configuring the reactor as far from the science equipment as possible, the needed tungsten and LiH shield mass was minimized. This study further characterizes the startup dose and the necessary mission requirements in order to ensure integrity of the surface equipment during reactor startup phase.

  4. Regeneration of barium carbonate from barium sulphide in a pilot-scale bubbling column reactor and utilization for acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, J; Zvimba, J N; Swanepoel, H; Bologo, L T; Maree, J

    2012-01-01

    Batch regeneration of barium carbonate (BaCO(3)) from barium sulphide (BaS) slurries by passing CO(2) gas into a pilot-scale bubbling column reactor under ambient conditions was used to assess the technical feasibility of BaCO(3) recovery in the Alkali Barium Calcium (ABC) desalination process and its use for sulphate removal from high sulphate Acid Mine Drainage (AMD). The effect of key process parameters, such as BaS slurry concentration and CO(2) flow rate on the carbonation, as well as the extent of sulphate removal from AMD using the recovered BaCO(3) were investigated. It was observed that the carbonation reaction rate for BaCO(3) regeneration in a bubbling column reactor significantly increased with increase in carbon dioxide (CO(2)) flow rate whereas the BaS slurry content within the range 5-10% slurry content did not significantly affect the carbonation rate. The CO(2) flow rate also had an impact on the BaCO(3) morphology. The BaCO(3) recovered from the pilot-scale bubbling column reactor demonstrated effective sulphate removal ability during AMD treatment compared with commercial BaCO(3). PMID:22233912

  5. Thermionic reactor program - An overview.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, D. S.; Lynch, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    An overview of the AEC/NASA thermionic reactor program is presented with emphasis on the latest progress in this technology. The possible applications for utilization of thermionic reactors are reviewed and the joint AEC/NASA program approach to demonstrate thermionic technology is outlined. The thermionic reactor technology programs of France, West Germany, and the Soviet Union are highlighted.

  6. ELECTRONUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, E.O.; McMillan, E.M.; Alvarez, L.W.

    1960-04-19

    An electronuclear reactor is described in which a very high-energy particle accelerator is employed with appropriate target structure to produce an artificially produced material in commercial quantities by nuclear transformations. The principal novelty resides in the combination of an accelerator with a target for converting the accelerator beam to copious quantities of low-energy neutrons for absorption in a lattice of fertile material and moderator. The fertile material of the lattice is converted by neutron absorption reactions to an artificially produced material, e.g., plutonium, where depleted uranium is utilized as the fertile material.

  7. Computational fluid dynamics analyses of lateral heat conduction, coolant azimuthal mixing and heat transfer predictions in a BR2 fuel assembly geometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C. P.; Dionne, B.

    2011-05-23

    To support the analyses related to the conversion of the BR2 core from highly-enriched (HEU) to low-enriched (LEU) fuel, the thermal-hydraulics codes PLTEMP and RELAP-3D are used to evaluate the safety margins during steady-state operation (PLTEMP), as well as after a loss-of-flow, loss-of-pressure, or a loss of coolant event (RELAP). In the 1-D PLTEMP and RELAP simulations, conduction in the azimuthal and axial directions is not accounted. The very good thermal conductivity of the cladding and the fuel meat and significant temperature gradients in the lateral directions (axial and azimuthal directions) could lead to a heat flux distribution that is significantly different than the power distribution. To evaluate the significance of the lateral heat conduction, 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, using the CFD code STAR-CD, were performed. Safety margin calculations are typically performed for a hot stripe, i.e., an azimuthal region of the fuel plates/coolant channel containing the power peak. In a RELAP model, for example, a channel between two plates could be divided into a number of RELAP channels (stripes) in the azimuthal direction. In a PLTEMP model, the effect of azimuthal power peaking could be taken into account by using engineering factors. However, if the thermal mixing in the azimuthal direction of a coolant channel is significant, a stripping approach could be overly conservative by not taking into account this mixing. STAR-CD simulations were also performed to study the thermal mixing in the coolant. Section II of this document presents the results of the analyses of the lateral heat conduction and azimuthal thermal mixing in a coolant channel. Finally, PLTEMP and RELAP simulations rely on the use of correlations to determine heat transfer coefficients. Previous analyses showed that the Dittus-Boelter correlation gives significantly more conservative (lower) predictions than the correlations of Sieder-Tate and Petukhov. STAR-CD 3-D

  8. A theoretical simulation of the resonant Raman spectroscopy of the H2O⋯Cl2 and H2O⋯Br2 halogen-bonded complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin-Mergarejo, Ricardo; Rubayo-Soneira, Jesús; Halberstadt, Nadine; Janda, Kenneth C.; Apkarian, V. Ara

    2016-02-01

    The resonant Raman spectra of the H2O⋯Cl2 and H2O⋯Br2 halogen-bonded complexes have been studied in the framework of a 2-dimensional model previously used in the simulation of their UV-visible absorption spectra using time-dependent techniques. In addition to the vibrational progression along the dihalogen mode, a progression is observed along the intermolecular mode and its combination with the intramolecular one. The relative intensity of the inter to intramolecular vibrational progressions is about 15% for H2O⋯Cl2 and 33% for H2O⋯Br2. These results make resonant Raman spectra a potential tool for detecting the presence of halogen bonded complexes in condensed phase media such as clathrates and ice.

  9. Preparation and characterization of poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-grafted magnetic nanoparticles: Effects of the precursor concentration on polyol synthesis of Fe3O4 and [PMDETA]0/[CuBr2]0 ratios on SI-AGET ATRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liping; Zhou, Xuyang; Wei, Guyun; Lu, Xiaoduo; Wei, Weiping; Qiu, Jianhua

    2015-12-01

    Polymer brushes based on poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) have been successfully grafted from the surface of silica coated iron oxide (Fe3O4@SiO2) nanoparticles via surface-initiated activators generated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-AGET ATRP). The size of the nanoparticles could be adjusted from 7.3 to 9.6 nm by varying the precursor concentration of iron(III) acetylacetonate. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles possessed a highly crystalline structure, and the saturation magnetization of the as-prepared magnetite was strongly related to the particle size. Furthermore, the grafted PGMA content on the magnetic nanoparticles could be controlled by varying the ligand to transition metal ratio in a N,N,N‧,N″,N″-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (PMDETA)/CuBr2 catalyst system. The maximum grafted content was 23.1% at a ratio of [PMDETA]0/[CuBr2]0 = 2:1.

  10. HORIZONTAL BOILING REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the boiling water type are described wherein water serves both as the moderator and coolant. The reactor system consists essentially of a horizontal pressure vessel divided into two compartments by a weir, a thermal neutronic reactor core having vertical coolant passages and designed to use water as a moderator-coolant posltioned in one compartment, means for removing live steam from the other compartment and means for conveying feed-water and water from the steam compartment to the reactor compartment. The system further includes auxiliary apparatus to utilize the steam for driving a turbine and returning the condensate to the feed-water inlet of the reactor. The entire system is designed so that the reactor is self-regulating and has self-limiting power and self-limiting pressure features.

  11. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Ruano, W.J.

    1957-12-10

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which utilize elongited rod type fuel elements immersed in a liquid moderator and shows a design whereby control of the chain reaction is obtained by varying the amount of moderator or reflector material. A central tank for containing liquid moderator and fuel elements immersed therein is disposed within a surrounding outer tank providing an annular space between the two tanks. This annular space is filled with liquid moderator which functions as a reflector to reflect neutrons back into the central reactor tank to increase the reproduction ratio. Means are provided for circulating and cooling the moderator material in both tanks and additional means are provided for controlling separately the volume of moderator in each tank, which latter means may be operated automatically by a neutron density monitoring device. The patent also shows an arrangement for controlling the chain reaction by injecting and varying an amount of poisoning material in the moderator used in the reflector portion of the reactor.

  12. EPR studies of a new family of organic conductors: Dimethyl(ethylenedithio)diselenadithiafulvalene compounds (DMET)2X [X=PF6, BF4, Au(CN)2, I3, and AuBr2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanoda, Kazushi; Takahashi, Toshihiro; Kikuchi, Koichi; Saito, Kazuya; Ikemoto, Isao; Kobayashi, Keiji

    1989-03-01

    A new family of organic conductors dimethyl(ethylenedithio)diselenadithiafulvalene compounds (DMET)2X [X=PF6, BF4, Au(CN)2, I3, and AuBr2] has been investigated by means of EPR. In spite of the large variety of conductive behaviors ranging from insulator to metal, the spin susceptibility at higher temperatures was found to be quite similar in magnitude and in temperature dependence for all the salts (except the AuBr2 salt). Below 20-25 K, the first three salts are found to undergo phase transitions; the transitions in the BF4 and Au(CN)2 salts are clearly magnetic, i.e., an antiferromagnetic or spin-density-wave transition. In the PF6 salt, EPR properties suggest a possible spin-Peierls transition. The I3 and AuBr2 salts have no EPR anomaly in the measured temperature region. The difference in the EPR linewidth among these salts is well understood as a result of the variation of dimensionality, in the framework of the Elliott mechanism. The DMET family contains all the electronic features observed in the tetramethyltetrathiafulvalene, tetramethyl- tetraselenafulvalene and bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene families.

  13. High-Throughput Synthesis of Lignin Particles (∼30 nm to ∼2 μm) via Aerosol Flow Reactor: Size Fractionation and Utilization in Pickering Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Ago, Mariko; Huan, Siqi; Borghei, Maryam; Raula, Janne; Kauppinen, Esko I; Rojas, Orlando J

    2016-09-01

    An aerosol flow reactor was used for the first time for high-throughput, high yield synthesis of spherical lignin particles with given inherent hydrophilicity, depending on the precursor biomolecule. In situ fractionation via Berner type impactor afforded populations with characteristic sizes ranging from ∼30 nm to 2 μm. The as-produced, dry lignin particles displayed excellent mechanical integrity, even after redispersion under high shear in either mineral oil or water. They were effective in the stabilization of oil-in-water (O/W) Pickering emulsions with tunable droplet size, depending on the dimension of the lignin particles used for emulsification. The emulsion stability correlated with particle concentration as well as the respective lignin type. For the O/W emulsions stabilized with the more hydrophilic lignin particles, negligible changes in phase separation via Ostwald ripening and coalescence were observed over a period of time of more than two months. Together with the fact that the lignin particle concentrations used in emulsification were as low as 0.1%, our results reveal a remarkable ability to endow emulsified systems with high colloidal stability. Overall, we offer a new, high-yield, scalable nanomanufacturing approach to producing dry spherical lignin particles with size control and high production capacity. A number of emerging applications for these organic particles can be envisioned and, as a proof-of-concept, we illustrate here surfactant-free emulsification. PMID:27538013

  14. Nuclear reactor apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1978-01-01

    A lifting, rotating and sealing apparatus for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor core. This apparatus permits rotation of the plugs to provide under the plug refueling of a nuclear core. It also provides a means by which positive top core holddown can be utilized. Both of these operations are accomplished by means of the apparatus lifting the top core holddown structure off the nuclear core while stationary, and maintaining this structure in its elevated position during plug rotation. During both of these operations, the interface between the rotating member and its supporting member is sealingly maintained.

  15. 2D numerical modelling of the gas temperature in a high-temperature high-power strontium atom laser excited by nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in a He-SrBr2 mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2014-05-01

    Assuming axial symmetry and a uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed numerically for determination of the gas temperature in the case of a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in He-SrBr2 formed in a newly-designed large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge-free zone, in order to find the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. The model determines the gas temperature of a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1958-09-16

    Means are presenied for increasing the reproduction ratio of a gaphite- moderated neutronic reactor by diminishing the neutron loss due to absorption or capture by gaseous impurities within the reactor. This means comprised of a fluid-tight casing or envelope completely enclosing the reactor and provided with a valve through which the casing, and thereby the reactor, may be evacuated of atmospheric air.

  17. Heterometallic aggregates of copper(I) with metalloligand Sn(edt)2 (edt = ethane-1,2-dithiolate): syntheses and structures of [Sn(edt)2Cl(mu-I)(mu3-I)(CuPPh3)3], [Sn(edt)2(mu-Br)2(mu3-Br)2(CuPPh3)4], and [{Sn(edt)2}3(mu-OH)3Cu5(PPh3)8][PF6]2.

    PubMed

    Han, Yan-Gong; Xu, Chao; Duan, Taike; Wu, Fang-Hui; Zhang, Qian-Feng; Leung, Wa-Hung

    2009-09-21

    The treatment of a slurry of an equimolar mixture of [Sn(edt)(2)] (edt = ethane-1,2- dithiolate) and [Et(4)N]Cl.xH(2)O with CuI in the presence of PPh(3) gave a tetranuclear compound, [Sn(edt)(2)Cl(mu-I)(mu(3)-I)(CuPPh(3))(3)] (1), which consists of a rectangular-pyramidal [Sn(edt)(2)Cl](-) moiety ligated by three [Cu(PPh(3))](+) fragments via the sulfur atoms of the edt(2-) ligands. The treatment of a slurry of [Sn(edt)(2)] and excess [Et(4)N]Br with [Cu(MeCN)(4)][PF(6)] in the presence of PPh(3) afforded a pentanuclear compound, [Sn(edt)(2)(mu-Br)(2)(mu(3)-Br)(2)(CuPPh(3))(4)] (2), which comprises two [(CuPPh(3))(2)(mu-Br)](+) fragments symmetrically ligating an octahedral trans-[Sn(edt)(2)Br(2)](2-) moiety via the sulfur and bromide atoms. Reaction of [Sn(edt)(2)] with [Cu(MeCN)(4)][PF(6)] and PPh(3) in a mixed MeCN/CH(2)Cl(2) solution yielded a novel octanuclear compound, [{Sn(edt)(2)}(3)(mu-OH)(3)Cu(5)(PPh(3))(8)][PF(6)](2) (3), which may be described as a triangular [{Sn(edt)(2)}(3)(mu-OH)(3)](3-) core chelated by three [Cu(PPh(3))(2)](+) species and capped by two [Cu(PPh(3))](+) species. The luminescent properties of compounds 1, 2, and 3 were investigated in a CH(2)Cl(2) solution at room temperature. Upon excitation at lambda > 360 nm, these compounds are luminescent in CH(2)Cl(2) solution with emissions having maxima at 422, 515, and 494 nm, respectively. PMID:19746999

  18. Development of refined MCNPX-PARET multi-channel model for transient analysis in research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kalcheva, S.; Koonen, E.; Olson, A. P.

    2012-07-01

    Reactivity insertion transients are often analyzed (RELAP, PARET) using a two-channel model, representing the hot assembly with specified power distribution and an average assembly representing the remainder of the core. For the analysis of protected by the reactor safety system transients and zero reactivity feedback coefficients this approximation proves to give adequate results. However, a more refined multi-channel model representing the various assemblies, coupled through the reactivity feedback effects to the whole reactor core is needed for the analysis of unprotected transients with excluded over power and period trips. In the present paper a detailed multi-channel PARET model has been developed which describes the reactor core in different clusters representing typical BR2 fuel assemblies. The distribution of power and reactivity feedback in each cluster of the reactor core is obtained from a best-estimate MCNPX calculation using the whole core geometry model of the BR2 reactor. The sensitivity of the reactor response to power, temperature and energy distributions is studied for protected and unprotected reactivity insertion transients, with zero and non-zero reactivity feedback coefficients. The detailed multi-channel model is compared vs. simplified fewer-channel models. The sensitivities of transient characteristics derived from the different models are tested on a few reactivity insertion transients with reactivity feedback from coolant temperature and density change. (authors)

  19. Irradiation performance of (Th,Pu)O2 fuel under Pressurized Water Reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boer, B.; Lemehov, S.; Wéber, M.; Parthoens, Y.; Gysemans, M.; McGinley, J.; Somers, J.; Verwerft, M.

    2016-04-01

    This paper examines the in-pile safety performance of (Th,Pu)O2 fuel pins under simulated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) conditions. Both sol-gel and SOLMAS produced (Th,Pu)O2 fuels at enrichments of 7.9% and 12.8% in Pu/HM have been irradiated at SCK·CEN. The irradiation has been performed under PWR conditions (155 bar, 300 °C) in a dedicated loop of the BR-2 reactor. The loop is instrumented with flow and temperature monitors at inlet and outlet, which allow for an accurate measurement of the deposited enthalpy.

  20. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1963-06-11

    A fuel plate is designed for incorporation into control rods of the type utilized in high-flux test reactors. The fuel plate is designed so that the portion nearest the poison section of the control rod contains about one-half as much fissionable material as in the rest of the plate, thereby eliminating dangerous flux peaking in that portion. (AEC)

  1. Space reactor shielding fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, F. H.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication of space reactor neutron shielding by a melting and casting process utilizing lithium hydride is described. The first neutron shield fabricated is a large pancake shape 86 inches in diameter, containing about 1700 pounds of lithium hydride. This shield, fabricated by the unique melting and casting process, is the largest lithium hydride shield ever built.

  2. BOILING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Untermyer, S.

    1962-04-10

    A boiling reactor having a reactivity which is reduced by an increase in the volume of vaporized coolant therein is described. In this system unvaporized liquid coolant is extracted from the reactor, heat is extracted therefrom, and it is returned to the reactor as sub-cooled liquid coolant. This reduces a portion of the coolant which includes vaporized coolant within the core assembly thereby enhancing the power output of the assembly and rendering the reactor substantially self-regulating. (AEC)

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, F.

    1959-10-27

    A reactor in which at least a portion of the moderator is in the form of movable refractory balls is described. In addition to their moderating capacity, these balls may serve as carriers for fissionable material or fertile material, or may serve in a coolant capacity to remove heat from the reactor. A pneumatic system is used to circulate the balls through the reactor.

  4. Persistence of singlet fluctuations in the coupled spin tetrahedra system Cu2Te2O5Br2 revealed by high-field magnetization, 79Br NQR, and 125Te NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, S.-H.; Choi, K.-Y.; Berger, H.; Büchner, B.; Grafe, H.-J.

    2012-11-01

    We present high-field magnetization and 79Br nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies in the weakly coupled Cu2+ (S=1/2) tetrahedral system Cu2Te2O5Br2. The field-induced level crossing effects were observed by the magnetization measurements in a long-ranged magnetically ordered state which was confirmed by a strong divergence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate T1-1 at T0=13.5 K. In the paramagnetic state, T1-1 reveals an effective singlet-triplet spin gap much larger than that observed by static bulk measurements. Our results imply that the inter- and the intratetrahedral interactions compete, but at the same time they cooperate strengthening effectively the local intratetrahedral exchange couplings. We discuss that the unusual feature originates from the frustrated intertetrahedral interactions.

  5. 2D numerical modelling of gas temperature in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge excited in a high temperature gas-discharge tube for the high-power strontium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    An active volume scaling in bore and length of a Sr atom laser excited in a nanosecond pulse longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge is carried out. Considering axial symmetry and uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed by numerical methods for determination of gas temperature in a new large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge free zone, in order to find out the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. A 2D model (r, z) of gas temperature is developed by numerical methods for axial symmetry and uniform power input. The model determines gas temperature of nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  6. Research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.; Fox, G.J.

    1996-04-01

    There are currently 284 research reactors in operation, and 12 under construction around the world. Of the operating reactors, nearly two-thirds are used exclusively for research, and the rest for a variety of purposes, including training, testing, and critical assembly. For more than 50 years, research reactor programs have contributed greatly to the scientific and educational communities. Today, six of the world`s research reactors are being shut down, three of which are in the USA. With government budget constraints and the growing proliferation concerns surrounding the use of highly enriched uranium in some of these reactors, the future of nuclear research could be impacted.

  7. Labview utilities

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-09-30

    The software package provides several utilities written in LabView. These utilities don't form independent programs, but rather can be used as a library or controls in other labview programs. The utilities include several new controls (xcontrols), VIs for input and output routines, as well as other 'helper'-functions not provided in the standard LabView environment.

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

    1961-11-21

    A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

  9. REACTOR COOLING

    DOEpatents

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  10. WATER BOILER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    King, L.D.P.

    1960-11-22

    As its name implies, this reactor utilizes an aqueous solution of a fissionable element salt, and is also conventional in that it contains a heat exchanger cooling coil immersed in the fuel. Its novelty lies in the utilization of a cylindrical reactor vessel to provide a critical region having a large and constant interface with a supernatant vapor region, and the use of a hollow sleeve coolant member suspended from the cover assembly in coaxial relation with the reactor vessel. Cool water is circulated inside this hollow coolant member, and a gap between its outer wall and the reactor vessel is used to carry off radiolytic gases for recombination in an external catalyst chamber. The central passage of the coolant member defines a reflux condenser passage into which the externally recombined gases are returned and condensed. The large and constant interface between fuel solution and vapor region prevents the formation of large bubbles and minimizes the amount of fuel salt carried off by water vapor, thus making possible higher flux densities, specific powers and power densities.

  11. Cermet fuel reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, C.L.; Palmer, R.S.; Van Hoomissen, J.E.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Barner, J.O.

    1987-09-01

    Cermet fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high performance space power systems. The cermet fuel consists of tungsten-urania hexagonal fuel blocks characterized by high strength at elevated temperatures, a high thermal conductivity and resultant high thermal shock resistance. Key features of the cermet fueled reactor design are (1) the ability to achieve very high coolant exit temperatures, and (2) thermal shock resistance during rapid power changes, and (3) two barriers to fission product release - the cermet matrix and the fuel element cladding. Additionally, thre is a potential for achieving a long operating life because of (1) the neutronic insensitivity of the fast-spectrum core to the buildup of fission products and (2) the utilization of a high strength refractory metal matrix and structural materials. These materials also provide resistance against compression forces that potentially might compact and/or reconfigure the core. In addition, the neutronic properties of the refractory materials assure that the reactor remains substantially subcritical under conditions of water immersion. It is concluded that cermet fueled reactors can be utilized to meet the power requirements for a broad range of advanced space applications. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, Dennis; Butler, Carey; West, Nicole; Cole, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Institute for Scientific Research, Inc. (ISR) research program consist of: 1.Study core physics by adapting existing codes: MCNP4C - Monte Carlo code; COMBINE/VENTURE - diffusion theory; SCALE4 - Monte Carlo, with many utility codes. 2. Determine feasibility and study major design parameters: fuel selection, temperature and reflector sizing. 3. Study reactor kinetics: develop QCALC1 to model point kinetics; study dynamic behavior of the power release.

  13. Light-induced structural changes in (HgBr2)3(As4S4)2: An X-ray single-crystal diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoppi, M.; Bindi, L.; Rödl, T.; Pielnhofer, F.; Weihrich, R.; Pfitzner, A.; Bonazzi, P.

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the behaviour of the As4S4 molecule within a crystal-chemical environment differing from realgar, α-As4S4, and its high-temperature polymorph, β-As4S4, the effects of the light exposure on the structure of the (HgBr2)3(As4S4)2 adduct have been studied. Differently from the cases previously studied, the action of the light filtered using a 550 nm long-wavelength pass filter did not produce any evident effect on the unit-cell. On the other hand, employing the 440 nm long-wavelength pass filter, remarkable variations of the unit-cell parameters were observed. In particular, an increase of the a, c, and β, and a decrease of the b parameter, producing on the whole an expansion of the unit-cell volume, is observed as a function of the light exposure times. Structure refinements indicated that the increase of the unit-cell volume is to ascribe to the formation of an increasing fraction (up to 20%) of pararealgar-type replacing the realgar-type molecule. Further light-exposure did not cause any further increase of the lattice parameters. On the contrary, a decrease of the unit-cell volume occurred by keeping the crystal in the dark (46 days): due to the loss of the crystallinity, only the core of the crystal, less altered and with smaller unit-cell volume, contributes to the diffraction effects. Micro-Raman spectra were collected on crystals exposed to the above mentioned wavelength light for increasing times. The peak at 275(±1) cm-1 whose intensity increases as a function of the exposure time confirms the transition from a realgar- to a pararealgar-type molecule in the (HgBr2)3(As4S4)2 adduct. Relativistic DFT-GGA ab initio band structure calculations reveal a direct band gap of 2.04 eV and quite flat valence and conduction bands around the Fermi level. According to analyses of the atomic orbital contributions to the electronic band structures the highest occupied states are attributed to non-bonding p-states of As.

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.; Johnson, H.W.

    1961-04-01

    BS>A nuclear reactor incorporating fuel rods passing through a moderator and including tubes of a material of higher Thermal conductivity than the fuel in contact with the fuel is described. The tubes extend beyond the active portion of the reactor into contant with a fiuld coolant.

  15. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1958-04-22

    A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

  16. Compact heat and mass exchangers of the plate fin type in thermal sorption systems: Application in an absorption heat pump with the working pair CH3OH-LiBr/ZnBr2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Harry

    The possible application of Compact Heat and Mass Exchangers (CHME) in a gas fired Absorption Heat Pump (AHP) for domestic heating is studied. The above mentioned heat and mass exchangers are of the plate type. The space between the parallel and plain plates is filled up with corrugated plates of a certain height. The plain and finned plates are stacked and welded together. This gives a heat and mass exchanger which is very compact, expressed by a high area density (m2/m3). This leads to heat and mass transfer processes with small temperature and concentration differences. For testing purposes a pilot plant was built using the above type of components in order to test their heat and/or mass transfer performance. Only the generator is of the Shell And Tube (SAT) type. As the working pair, CH3OH - LiBr/ ZnBr2 was chosen, with the alcohol as the solvent and the salt mixture as the absorbent. This leads to sub atmospheric working pressures with only solvent in the vapor phase. Three series of experiments have been carried out, during which the input parameters were varied over a certain range. It is concluded that the plate fin CHMES are very suitable for application in an AHP for domestic heating purposes.

  17. A novel 3D Cu(I) coordination polymer based on Cu6Br2 and Cu2(CN)2 SBUs: in situ ligand formation and use as a naked-eye colorimetric sensor for NB and 2-NT.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiang-Feng; Li, Yang; Zhou, Rui-Sha; Hu, Tuo-Ping; Wen, Yan-Liang; Shao, Jia; Cui, Xiao-Bing

    2016-01-14

    A novel coordination polymer with the chemical formula [Cu4Br(CN)(mtz)2]n (mtz = 5-methyl tetrazole) (), has been synthesized under solvothermal conditions and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, powder X-ray diffraction and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Interestingly, the Cu(i), CN(-) and mtz(-) in compound are all generated from an in situ translation of the original precursors: Cu(2+), acetonitrile and 1-methyl-5-mercapto-1,2,3,4-tetrazole (Hmnt). The in situ ring-to-ring conversion of Hmnt into mtz(-) was found for the first time. Structural analysis reveals that compound is a novel 3D tetrazole-based Cu(i) coordination polymer, containing both metal halide cluster Cu6Br2 and metal pseudohalide cluster Cu2(CN)2 secondary building units (SBUs), which shows an unprecedented (3,6,10)-connected topology. Notably, a pseudo-porphyrin structure with 16-membered rings constructed by four mtz(-) anions and four copper(i) ions was observed in compound . The fluorescence properties of compound were investigated in the solid state and in various solvent emulsions, the results show that compound is a highly sensitive naked-eye colorimetric sensor for NB and 2-NT (NB = nitrobenzene and 2-NT = 2-nitrotoluene). PMID:26600452

  18. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  19. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

    1958-12-01

    A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

  20. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

    1962-10-23

    A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, H.L.

    1960-09-20

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising fissionable material dispersed in graphite blocks, helium filling the voids of the blocks and the spaces therebetween, and means other than the helium in thermal conductive contact with the graphite for removing heat.

  2. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hurwitz, H. Jr.; Brooks, H.; Mannal, C.; Payne, J.H.; Luebke, E.A.

    1959-03-24

    A reactor of the heterogeneous, liquid cooled type is described. This reactor is comprised of a central region of a plurality of vertically disposed elongated tubes surrounded by a region of moderator material. The central region is comprised of a central core surrounded by a reflector region which is surrounded by a fast neutron absorber region, which in turn is surrounded by a slow neutron absorber region. Liquid sodium is used as the primary coolant and circulates through the core which contains the fuel elements. Control of the reactor is accomplished by varying the ability of the reflector region to reflect neutrons back into the core of the reactor. For this purpose the reflector is comprised of moderator and control elements having varying effects on reactivity, the control elements being arranged and actuated by groups to give regulation, shim, and safety control.

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.

    1960-04-01

    A nuclear reactor is described consisting of blocks of graphite arranged in layers, natural uranium bodies disposed in holes in alternate layers of graphite blocks, and coolant tubes disposed in the layers of graphite blocks which do not contain uranium.

  4. REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  5. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  6. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  7. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Breden, C.R.; Dietrich, J.R.

    1961-06-20

    A water-soluble non-volatile poison may be introduced into a reactor to nullify excess reactivity. The poison is removed by passing a side stream of the water containing the soluble poison to an evaporation chamber. The vapor phase is returned to the reactor to decrease the concentration of soluble poison and the liquid phase is returned to increase the concentration of soluble poison.

  8. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: SPOUTED BED REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Spouted Bed Reactor (SBR) technology utilizes the unique attributes of the "spouting " fluidization regime, which can provide heat transfer rates comparable to traditional fluid beds, while providing robust circulation of highly heterogeneous solids, concurrent with very agg...

  9. A Computer Code for TRIGA Type Reactors.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-04-09

    Version 00 TRIGAP was developed for reactor physics calculations of the 250 kW TRIGA reactor. The program can be used for criticality predictions, power peaking predictions, fuel element burn-up calculations and data logging, and in-core fuel management and fuel utilization improvement.

  10. On reactor type comparisons for the next generation of reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Alesso, H.P.; Majumdar, K.C.

    1991-08-22

    In this paper, we present a broad comparison of studies for a selected set of parameters for different nuclear reactor types including the next generation. This serves as an overview of key parameters which provide a semi-quantitative decision basis for selecting nuclear strategies. Out of a number of advanced reactor designs of the LWR type, gas cooled type, and FBR type, currently on the drawing board, the Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR) seem to have some edge over other types of the next generation of reactors for the near-term application. This is based on a number of attributes related to the benefit of the vast operating experience with LWRs coupled with an estimated low risk profile, economics of scale, degree of utilization of passive systems, simplification in the plant design and layout, modular fabrication and manufacturing. 32 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. Research reactors - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE INSTRUMENT

    DOEpatents

    Mims, L.S.

    1961-08-22

    A multi-purpose instrument for measuring neutron flux, coolant flow rate, and coolant temperature in a nuclear reactor is described. The device consists essentially of a hollow thimble containing a heat conducting element protruding from the inner wall, the element containing on its innermost end an amount of fissionsble materinl to function as a heat source when subjected to neutron flux irradiation. Thermocouple type temperature sensing means are placed on the heat conducting element adjacent the fissionable material and at a point spaced therefrom, and at a point on the thimble which is in contact with the coolant fluid. The temperature differentials measured between the thermocouples are determinative of the neutron flux, coolant flow, and temperature being measured. The device may be utilized as a probe or may be incorporated in a reactor core. (AE C)

  13. Lighting Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with lighting utilization. Its objective is for the student to be able to outline the development of lighting use and conservation and identify major types and operating characteristics of lamps used in electric lighting. Some topics…

  14. BIOMASS UTILIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biomass utilization task consists of the evaluation of a biomass conversion technology including research and development initiatives. The project is expected to provide information on co-control of pollutants, as well as, to prove the feasibility of biomass conversion techn...

  15. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.; Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.M.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to neutronic reactors of the heterogeneous water cooled type, and in particular to a fuel element charging and discharging means therefor. In the embodiment illustrated the reactor contains horizontal, parallel coolant tubes in which the fuel elements are disposed. A loading cart containing a magnzine for holding a plurality of fuel elements operates along the face of the reactor at the inlet ends of the coolant tubes. The loading cart is equipped with a ram device for feeding fuel elements from the magazine through the inlot ends of the coolant tubes. Operating along the face adjacent the discharge ends of the tubes there is provided another cart means adapted to receive irradiated fuel elements as they are forced out of the discharge ends of the coolant tubes by the incoming new fuel elements. This cart is equipped with a tank coataining a coolant, such as water, into which the fuel elements fall, and a hydraulically operated plunger to hold the end of the fuel element being discharged. This inveation provides an apparatus whereby the fuel elements may be loaded into the reactor, irradiated therein, and unloaded from the reactor without stopping the fiow of the coolant and without danger to the operating personnel.

  16. METHOD OF OPERATING NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Untermyer, S.

    1958-10-14

    A method is presented for obtaining enhanced utilization of natural uranium in heavy water moderated nuclear reactors by charging the reactor with an equal number of fuel elements formed of natural uranium and of fuel elements formed of uranium depleted in U/sup 235/ to the extent that the combination will just support a chain reaction. The reactor is operated until the rate of burnup of plutonium equals its rate of production, the fuel elements are processed to recover plutonium, the depleted uranium is discarded, and the remaining uranium is formed into fuel elements. These fuel elements are charged into a reactor along with an equal number of fuel elements formed of uranium depleted in U/sup 235/ to the extent that the combination will just support a chain reaction, and reuse of the uranium is continued as aforesaid until it wlll no longer support a chain reaction when combined with an equal quantity of natural uranium.

  17. Microchannel Reactors for ISRU Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza, Susana; Makel, Darby B.; Blizman, Brandon; Ward, Benjamin J.

    2005-02-01

    Affordable planning and execution of prolonged manned space missions depend upon the utilization of local resources and the waste products which are formed in manned spacecraft and surface bases. Successful in-situ resources utilization (ISRU) will require component technologies which provide optimal size, weight, volume, and power efficiency. Microchannel reactors enable the efficient chemical processing of in situ resources. The reactors can be designed for the processes that generate the most benefit for each mission. For instance, propellants (methane) can be produced from carbon dioxide from the Mars atmosphere using the Sabatier reaction and ethylene can be produced from the partial oxidation of methane. A system that synthesizes ethylene could be the precursor for systems to synthesize ethanol and polyethylene. Ethanol can be used as a nutrient for Astrobiology experiments, as well as the production of nutrients for human crew (e.g. sugars). Polyethylene can be used in the construction of habitats, tools, and replacement parts. This paper will present recent developments in miniature chemical reactors using advanced Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and microchannel technology to support ISRU of Mars and lunar missions. Among other applications, the technology has been demonstrated for the Sabatier process and for the partial oxidation of methane. Microchannel reactors were developed based on ceramic substrates as well as metal substrates. In both types of reactors, multiple layers coated with catalytic material are bonded, forming a monolithic structure. Such reactors are readily scalable with the incorporation of extra layers. In addition, this reactor structure minimizes pressure drop and catalyst settling, which are common problems in conventional packed bed reactors.

  18. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-10-14

    A method is presented for loading and unloading rod type fuel elements of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, solld moderator, liquid cooled type. In the embodiment illustrated, the fuel rods are disposed in vertical coolant channels in the reactor core. The fuel rods are loaded and unloaded through the upper openings of the channels which are immersed in the coolant liquid, such as water. Unloading is accomplished by means of a coffer dam assembly having an outer sleeve which is placed in sealing relation around the upper opening. A radiation shield sleeve is disposed in and reciprocable through the coffer dam sleeve. A fuel rod engaging member operates through the axial bore in the radiation shield sleeve to withdraw the fuel rod from its position in the reactor coolant channel into the shield, the shield snd rod then being removed. Loading is accomplished in the reverse procedure.

  19. Catalytic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  20. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1958-07-15

    A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

  1. Bioconversion reactor

    DOEpatents

    McCarty, Perry L.; Bachmann, Andre

    1992-01-01

    A bioconversion reactor for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible.

  2. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Nicoll, D.

    1962-04-24

    A control system employed with a high pressure gas cooled reactor in which a control rod is positioned for upward and downward movement into the neutron field from a position beneath the reactor is described. The control rod is positioned by a coupled piston cylinder releasably coupled to a power drive means and the pressurized coolant is directed against the lower side of the piston. The coolant pressure is offset by a higher fiuid pressure applied to the upper surface of the piston and means are provided for releasing the higher pressure on the upper side of the piston so that the pressure of the coolant drives the piston upwardly, forcing the coupled control rod into the ncutron field of the reactor. (AEC)

  3. Bioconversion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P.L.; Bachmann, A.

    1992-02-25

    A bioconversion reactor is described for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible. 7 figs.

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Young, G.

    1963-01-01

    This patent covers a power-producing nuclear reactor in which fuel rods of slightly enriched U are moderated by heavy water and cooled by liquid metal. The fuel rods arranged parallel to one another in a circle are contained in a large outer closed-end conduit that extends into a tank containing the heavy water. Liquid metal is introduced into the large conduit by a small inner conduit that extends within the circle of fuel rods to a point near the lower closed end of the outer conduit. (AEC) Production Reactors

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  6. Non-equilibrium radiation nuclear reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, K.; Schneider, R. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An externally moderated thermal nuclear reactor is disclosed which is designed to provide output power in the form of electromagnetic radiation. The reactor is a gaseous fueled nuclear cavity reactor device which can operate over wide ranges of temperature and pressure, and which includes the capability of processing and recycling waste products such as long-lived transuranium actinides. The primary output of the device may be in the form of coherent radiation, so that the reactor may be utilized as a self-critical nuclear pumped laser.

  7. Hot Fuel Examination Facility's neutron radiography reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pruett, D.P.; Richards, W.J.; Heidel, C.C.

    1983-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-West is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho, and is operated by the University of Chicago for the United States Department of Energy in support of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, LMFBR. The Hot Fuel Examination Facility, HFEF, is one of several facilities located at the Argonne Site. HFEF comprises a large hot cell where both nondestructive and destructive examination of highly-irradiated reactor fuels are conducted in support of the LMFBR program. One of the nondestructive examination techniques utilized at HFEF is neutron radiography, which is provided by the NRAD reactor facility (a TRIGA type reactor) below the HFEF hot cell.

  8. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.; Marasco, J.A.

    1995-04-25

    A fluidized bed reactor system utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figs.

  9. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.; Marasco, Joseph A.

    1995-01-01

    A fluidized bed reactor system utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

  10. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.; Marasco, Joseph A.

    1996-01-01

    A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary and tertiary particulate phases, continuously introduced and removed simultaneously in the cocurrent and countercurrent mode, act in a role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Means for introducing and removing the sorbent phases include feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

  11. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.

    1993-01-01

    A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

  12. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.; Marasco, J.A.

    1996-02-27

    A fluidized bed reactor system is described which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary and tertiary particulate phases, continuously introduced and removed simultaneously in the cocurrent and countercurrent mode, act in a role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Means for introducing and removing the sorbent phases include feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figs.

  13. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.

    1993-12-14

    A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase is described. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figures.

  14. Sonochemical Reactors.

    PubMed

    Gogate, Parag R; Patil, Pankaj N

    2016-10-01

    Sonochemical reactors are based on the generation of cavitational events using ultrasound and offer immense potential for the intensification of physical and chemical processing applications. The present work presents a critical analysis of the underlying mechanisms for intensification, available reactor configurations and overview of the different applications exploited successfully, though mostly at laboratory scales. Guidelines have also been presented for optimum selection of the important operating parameters (frequency and intensity of irradiation, temperature and liquid physicochemical properties) as well as the geometric parameters (type of reactor configuration and the number/position of the transducers) so as to maximize the process intensification benefits. The key areas for future work so as to transform the successful technique at laboratory/pilot scale into commercial technology have also been discussed. Overall, it has been established that there is immense potential for sonochemical reactors for process intensification leading to greener processing and economic benefits. Combined efforts from a wide range of disciplines such as material science, physics, chemistry and chemical engineers are required to harness the benefits at commercial scale operation. PMID:27573503

  15. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1960-09-27

    A unit assembly is described for a neutronic reactor comprising a tube and plurality of spaced parallel sandwiches in the tube extending lengthwise thereof, each sandwich including a middle plate having a central opening for plutonium and other openings for fertile material at opposite ends of the plate.

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Weinberg, A.M.; Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1959-10-27

    BS>A reactor cooled by water, biphenyl, helium, or other fluid with provision made for replacing the fuel rods with the highest plutonium and fission product content without disassembling the entire core and for promptly cooling the rods after their replacement in order to prevent build-up of heat from fission product activity is described.

  17. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.; Babcock, Dale F.; Menegus, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  18. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  19. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Carleton, John T.

    1977-01-25

    A graphite-moderated nuclear reactor includes channels between blocks of graphite and also includes spacer blocks between adjacent channeled blocks with an axis of extension normal to that of the axis of elongation of the channeled blocks to minimize changes in the physical properties of the graphite as a result of prolonged neutron bombardment.

  20. Solid State Reactor Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, G.T.

    2004-03-10

    The Solid State Reactor (SSR) is an advanced reactor concept designed to take advantage of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) recently developed graphite foam that has enhanced heat transfer characteristics and excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, to provide an inherently safe, self-regulated, source of heat for power and other potential applications. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) program (Project No. 99-064) from August 1999 through September 30, 2002. The initial concept of utilizing the graphite foam as a basis for developing an advanced reactor concept envisioned that a suite of reactor configurations and power levels could be developed for several different applications. The initial focus was looking at the reactor as a heat source that was scalable, independent of any heat removal/power conversion process. These applications might include conventional power generation, isotope production and destruction (actinides), and hydrogen production. Having conducted the initial research on the graphite foam and having performed the scoping parametric analyses from neutronics and thermal-hydraulic perspectives, it was necessary to focus on a particular application that would (1) demonstrate the viability of the overall concept and (2) require a reasonably structured design analysis process that would synthesize those important parameters that influence the concept the most as part of a feasible, working reactor system. Thus, the application targeted for this concept was supplying power for remote/harsh environments and a design that was easily deployable, simplistic from an operational standpoint, and utilized the new graphite foam. Specifically, a 500-kW(t) reactor concept was pursued that is naturally load following, inherently safe, optimized via neutronic studies to achieve near-zero reactivity change with burnup, and proliferation resistant. These four major areas of research

  1. A fast spectrum dual path flow cermet reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Anghaie, S.; Feller, G.J. ); Peery, S.D.; Parsley, R.C. )

    1993-01-15

    A cermet fueled, dual path fast reactor for space nuclear propulsion applications is conceptually designed. The reactor utilizes an outer annulus core and an inner cylindrical core with radial and axial reflector. The dual path flow minimizes the impact of power peaking near the radial reflector. Basic neutronics and core design aspects of the reactor are discussed. The dual path reactor is integrated into a 25000 lbf thrust nuclear rocket.

  2. Experimental development of power reactor advanced controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.M.; Weng, C.K.; Lindsay, R.W.

    1992-06-01

    A systematic approach for developing and verifying advanced controllers with potential application to commercial nuclear power plants is suggested. The central idea is to experimentally demonstrate an advanced control concept first on an ultra safe research reactor followed by demonstration on a passively safe experimental power reactor and then finally adopt the technique for improving safety, performance, reliability and operability at commercial facilities. Prior to completing an experimental sequence, the benefits and utility of candidate advanced controllers should be established through theoretical development and simulation testing. The applicability of a robust optimal observer-based state feedback controller design process for improving reactor temperature response for a TRIGA research reactor, Liquid Metal-cooled Reactor (LMR), and a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is presented to illustrate the potential of the proposed experimental development concept.

  3. Experimental development of power reactor advanced controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.M. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Weng, C.K. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Lindsay, R.W. )

    1992-01-01

    A systematic approach for developing and verifying advanced controllers with potential application to commercial nuclear power plants is suggested. The central idea is to experimentally demonstrate an advanced control concept first on an ultra safe research reactor followed by demonstration on a passively safe experimental power reactor and then finally adopt the technique for improving safety, performance, reliability and operability at commercial facilities. Prior to completing an experimental sequence, the benefits and utility of candidate advanced controllers should be established through theoretical development and simulation testing. The applicability of a robust optimal observer-based state feedback controller design process for improving reactor temperature response for a TRIGA research reactor, Liquid Metal-cooled Reactor (LMR), and a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is presented to illustrate the potential of the proposed experimental development concept.

  4. Horizontal baffle for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Rylatt, John A.

    1978-01-01

    A horizontal baffle disposed in the annulus defined between the core barrel and the thermal liner of a nuclear reactor thereby physically separating the outlet region of the core from the annular area below the horizontal baffle. The horizontal baffle prevents hot coolant that has passed through the reactor core from thermally damaging apparatus located in the annulus below the horizontal baffle by utilizing the thermally induced bowing of the horizontal baffle to enhance sealing while accommodating lateral motion of the baffle base plate.

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to a reflector means for a neutronic reactor. A reflector comprised of a plurality of vertically movable beryllium control members is provided surrounding the sides of the reactor core. An absorber of fast neutrons comprised of natural uramum surrounds the reflector. An absorber of slow neutrons surrounds the absorber of fast neutrons and is formed of a plurality of beryllium blocks having natural uranium members distributcd therethrough. in addition, a movable body is positioned directly below the core and is comprised of a beryllium reflector and an absorbing member attached to the botiom thereof, the absorbing member containing a substance selected from the goup consisting of natural urantum and Th/sup 232/.

  6. REACTOR MONITORING

    DOEpatents

    Bugbee, S.J.; Hanson, V.F.; Babcock, D.F.

    1959-02-01

    A neutron density inonitoring means for reactors is described. According to this invention a tunnel is provided beneath and spaced from the active portion of the reactor and extends beyond the opposite faces of the activc portion. Neutron beam holes are provided between the active portion and the tunnel and open into the tunnel near the middle thereof. A carriage operates back and forth in the tunnel and is adapted to convey a neutron detector, such as an ion chamber, and position it beneath one of the neutron beam holes. This arrangement affords convenient access of neutron density measuring instruments to a location wherein direct measurement of neutron density within the piles can be made and at the same time affords ample protection to operating personnel.

  7. REACTOR UNLOADING

    DOEpatents

    Leverett, M.C.

    1958-02-18

    This patent is related to gas cooled reactors wherein the fuel elements are disposed in vertical channels extending through the reactor core, the cooling gas passing through the channels from the bottom to the top of the core. The invention is a means for unloading the fuel elements from the core and comprises dump values in the form of flat cars mounted on wheels at the bottom of the core structure which support vertical stacks of fuel elements. When the flat cars are moved, either manually or automatically, for normal unloading purposes, or due to a rapid rise in the reproduction ratio within the core, the fuel elements are permtted to fall by gravity out of the core structure thereby reducing the reproduction ratio or stopping the reaction as desired.

  8. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor including two rotatable plugs and a positive top core holddown structure. The top core holddown structure is divided into two parts: a small core cover, and a large core cover. The small core cover, and the upper internals associated therewith, are attached to the small rotating plug, and the large core cover, with its associated upper internals, is attached to the large rotating plug. By so splitting the core holddown structures, under-the-plug refueling is accomplished without the necessity of enlarging the reactor pressure vessel to provide a storage space for the core holddown structure during refueling. Additionally, the small and large rotating plugs, and their associated core covers, are arranged such that the separation of the two core covers to permit rotation is accomplished without the installation of complex lifting mechanisms.

  9. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-08-19

    A neuclear reactor is described of the heterogeneous type and employing replaceable tubular fuel elements and heavy water as a coolant and moderator. A pluraltty of fuel tubesa having their axes parallel, extend through a tank type pressure vessel which contatns the liquid moderator. The fuel elements are disposed within the fuel tubes in the reaetive portion of the pressure vessel during normal operation and the fuel tubes have removable plug members at each end to permit charging and discharging of the fuel elements. The fuel elements are cylindrical strands of jacketed fissionable material having helical exterior ribs. A bundle of fuel elements are held within each fuel tube with their longitudinal axes parallel, the ribs serving to space them apart along their lengths. Coolant liquid is circulated through the fuel tubes between the spaced fuel elements. Suitable control rod and monitoring means are provided for controlling the reactor.

  10. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-12-15

    A reactor which is particularly adapted tu serve as a heat source for a nuclear powered alrcraft or rocket is described. The core of this reactor consists of a porous refractory modera;or body which is impregnated with fissionable nuclei. The core is designed so that its surface forms tapered inlet and outlet ducts which are separated by the porous moderator body. In operation a gaseous working fluid is circulated through the inlet ducts to the surface of the moderator, enters and passes through the porous body, and is heated therein. The hot gas emerges into the outlet ducts and is available to provide thrust. The principle advantage is that tremendous quantities of gas can be quickly heated without suffering an excessive pressure drop.