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Sample records for brachiaria brizantha pasture

  1. Performance of sheep grazing in pastures of Brachiaria decumbens, Brachiaria brizantha, Panicum maximum, and Andropogon gayanus with different protodioscin concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gracindo, Cristiane Vinhaes; Louvandini, Helder; Riet-Correa, Franklin; Barbosa-Ferreira, Marcos; Castro, Márcio Botelho de

    2014-06-01

    Brachiaria spp. are the most important grasses for ruminants in central-western Brazil. However, the use of these pastures is limited by their toxicity due to steroidal saponins. This experiment was conducted for 60 days to demonstrate the resistance of sheep raised on Brachiaria spp. pastures to steroidal saponin poisoning. The experiment was composed by 48 animals randomly divided into four groups (n = 12). Among them, 32 4- to 5-month-old castrated male crossbred Santa Inês sheep, originating from flocks that had been grazing on Brachiaria spp. for more than three consecutive years, and 16 were non-adapted (naïve) sheep from flocks that never had prior contact with pastures of Brachiaria spp. were randomly divided into four groups. Each of the four experimental groups was composed by eight adapted and four non-adapted animals. The four experimental groups were introduced into paddocks, each of which contained a single grass: either Brachiaria decumbens, Brachiaria brizantha, Panicum maximum, or Andropogon gayanus. The addition of the naïve sheep to the groups was designed to detect pastures' toxicity to naïve sheep and to adjust the stocking rate to optimize the use of forage. The weight gains of sheep grazing on B. decumbens, B. brizantha, and P. maximum were similar; however, the A. gayanus group showed lower weight gains compared with the other groups (P < 0.05). The mean serum activities of γ-glutamyltransferase in the sheep grazing on B. decumbens were higher than those in the sheep from the other groups. No significant differences among the groups were found in aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine, albumin, or total protein serum concentrations. No clinical signs were observed in the adapted sheep in any of the pastures. Of the four non-adapted sheep introduced into the B. decumbens pasture, two showed clinical signs of steroidal saponin poisoning, and one died. No clinical signs were observed in the non-adapted sheep in the other pastures

  2. Ingestive Behavior of Heifers Supplemented with Glycerin in Substitution of Corn on Brachiaria brizantha Pasture

    PubMed Central

    Facuri, L. M. A. M.; Silva, R. R.; da Silva, F. F.; de Carvalho, G. G. P.; Sampaio, C. B.; Mendes, F. B. L.; Lisboa, M. M.; Barroso, D. S.; Carvalho, V. M.; Pereira, M. M. S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the ingestive behavior of crossbred heifers finished on a Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu pasture receiving four levels of glycerin in their supplementation. Thirty-six crossbred heifers with average initial weight of 264.83±3.83 kg and 20 months of age were distributed into a completely randomized design with four treatments and nine replications: control (0%), 4.82%, 10.12%, and 15.56% glycerin in the dry matter. The grazing time reduced linearly (p<0.05), whereas the time spent on activities like rumination, idleness, trough and total chewing time were quadratically affected (p<0.05). Bite rate and number of bites/day were quadratically influenced (p<0.05). The number of bites/swallowed cud and the number of bites/minute, however, increased linearly (p<0.05). Although the time spent on each cud and number of chews per cud were not affected (p>0.05). The number of rumination periods reduced linearly (p<0.05), whereas the number of grazing, idle and trough periods, and the times per grazing, idle, rumination and trough periods were quadratically affected (p<0.05). The feed and rumination efficiencies of the dry matter, non-fibrous carbohydrates, pasture dry matter and concentrate were quadratically affected (p>0.05) whereas the feed efficiency of neutral detergent fiber reduced linearly (p<0.05). Addition of glycerin in substitution of corn in supplements for animals managed on pastures does not influenced feed intake, but reduces the grazing time and increases the idle time. The supplementation also improves feed and rumination efficiencies. PMID:25358318

  3. Somatic Embryogenesis and Plant Regeneration of Brachiaria brizantha.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Glaucia B; Carneiro, Vera T C; Dusi, Diva M A; Martinelli, Adriana P

    2016-01-01

    The genus Brachiaria (Trin.) Griseb. belongs to the family Poaceae, order Poales, class Monocotyledonae. In Brachiaria brizantha (Hochst. ex A. Rich.) Stapf., embryogenic callus can be induced from seeds from apomictic plants, which results in high frequency somatic embryo development and plant regeneration. We report here a detailed protocol for callus induction from apomictic seed; followed by in vitro morphogenesis (somatic embryo and bud differentiation), plant regeneration, and acclimatization in the greenhouse. Important details regarding the positioning of seeds for callus induction and precautions to avoid endophytic contamination and the occurrence of albino plants are presented. PMID:26619875

  4. Abnormal meiosis in tetraploid genotypes of Brachiaria brizantha (Poaceae) induced by colchicine: its implications for breeding.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Bonato, A B; Ferrari Felismino, M; Souza Kaneshima, A M; Pessim, C; Calisto, V; Suely Pagliarini, M; Borges do Valle, C

    2009-01-01

    Meiotic behavior was analyzed in 6 progenies from 3 artificially induced tetraploid (2n = 4x = 36) sexual genotypes (C31, C41, and C48) of the normally apomictic Brachiaria brizantha (Hochst. ex A. Rich.) Stapf., syn. Urochloa brizantha (Hochst. ex A. Rich.) R. Webster. These are key plants to allow intraspecific hybridization of this important forage species, widely used for pastures in the tropics. The percentage of abnormal cells among the plants ranged from 39.8% to 63.2%. In the single plant derived from C48, only the common meiotic abnormalities typical of polyploids were observed, while in plants derived from C31 and C41, a distinct behavior was found. In the majority of cells of those plants, the chromosomes remained scattered in the cytoplasm in the first division, without forming a metaphase plate. This abnormality blocked chromosome movements at anaphase I. Several micronuclei of various sizes were formed and, after the occurrence of an irregular first cytokinesis, the meiocytes progressed normally to the second division, generating polyads with unbalanced microspores. Pollen viability was not correlated with meiotic abnormalities. The importance of these findings to the Brachiaria breeding program is discussed. The sexual progeny of C48 seems most suitable as female parents to be used in intra- and interspecific hybridization. PMID:19433904

  5. Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography-High-Resolution Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Based Metabolomics Reveals Key Differences between Brachiaria decumbens and B. brizantha, Two Similar Pastures with Different Toxicities.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Andy J; Hussain, Syeda M; Pecio, Łukasz; Kowalczyk, Mariusz; Herling, Valdo R; Stochmal, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Several species of Brachiaria (Poaceae) currently cover extensive grazing areas in Brazil, providing valuable source of feed for a large cattle population. However, numerous cases of toxicity outbreaks in livestock have raised concerns on safety of using these plants, especially B. decumbens. In this study, chemometric analysis of ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HR-QTOF-MS) data has for the first time uncovered qualitative and quantitative differences between metabolomes of toxic B. decumbens and nontoxic B. brizantha. The steroidal saponin protoneodioscin was established as the main biomarker for B. decumbens when compared to B. brizantha, and therefore the key explanation for their phytochemical differentiation. Quantification of protodioscin in both plants showed no significant differences; consequently, the idea that this compound is solely responsible for toxicity outbreaks must be discarded. Instead, we propose that the added occurrence of its stereoisomer, protoneodioscin, in B. decumbens, can be considered as the probable cause of these events. Interestingly, the greatest concentrations of saponins for both species were reached during winter (B. decumbens = 53.6 ± 5.1 mg·g(-1) dry weight (D.W.); B. brizantha = 25.0 ± 1.9 mg·g(-1) D.W.) and spring (B. decumbens = 49.4 ± 5.0 mg·g(-1) D.W.; B. brizantha = 27.9 ± 1.4 mg·g(-1) D.W.), although in the case of B. decumbens these values do not vary significantly among seasons. PMID:27192362

  6. Foamy macrophages in the liver of cattle fed Brachiaria brizantha hay.

    PubMed

    Torres, Márcia Bersane Araújo de Medeiros; Coelho, Kunie Iabuki Rabello

    2003-06-01

    Liver and lymph nodes injuries characterized by clusters of foamy macrophages, some of them containing birefringent crystals, were observed in cattle fed on Brachiaria brizantha hay. The cattle were from an experimental group poisoned with Senecio brasiliensis known to cause hepatic fibrosis and hepatocyte megalocytosis. One of the animals developed photosensitivity but the exact cause wasn't determined since both plants were fed. The foamy macrophages were present from the 30th d of feeding. Early appearance of these lesions may be particular to the animal specie used or due to the presence of both toxic plants. PMID:12776798

  7. Correspondence analysis evaluation of linear nutrient distribution in root tips of the tropical forage Brachiaria brizantha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Prozesky, V. M.; Przybylowicz, W. J.; Mayer, J. E.

    2001-07-01

    The technique of correspondence analysis was applied to a set of data obtained from X-ray elemental analysis by nuclear microscopy. Hydroponic experiments simulating tropical acid soil conditions were carried out to determine possible mechanisms of Al-toxicity stress on specific varieties of the genus Brachiaria. In particular the species Brachiaria brizantha was tested for gradient variation along the central cylinder of selected root tips. Single-point irradiations by nuclear microscopy gave some indication of a possible trace element profile gradient along the root axis. To be able to extrapolate the possible correlation and trace elemental concentrations gradients to a more confident level, this nuclear microscopy data obtained was analysed by correspondence analysis. A clear gradient on the plot of the first two axes of the correspondence analysis was found. The correlation of Ca and Cu as well as that of K and Cl were established.

  8. Performance of Nellore heifers, forage mass, and structural and nutritional characteristics of Brachiaria brizantha grass in integrated production systems.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Caroline Carvalho; Villela, Severino Delmar Junqueira; de Almeida, Roberto Giolo; Alves, Fabiana Villa; Behling-Neto, Arthur; Martins, Paulo Gustavo Macedo de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate production, nutritive value and carrying capacity of piatã grass (Brachiaria brizantha cv. BRS Piatã), and performance of Nellore heifers in agrosilvopastoral systems (ASPS) with three eucalyptus (Eucalyptus urograndis) tree densities, during winter, spring, summer, and fall. Three integrated systems were evaluated: ASPS-1 (357 trees ha(-1)), ASPS-2 (227 trees ha(-1)), and CON (5 trees ha(-1)). In each system, two sward heights were evaluated: short and tall. A total of 80 11-month-old Nellore heifers were randomly allocated in a randomized split-plot block, 3 × 2 factorial. Greater dry matter availability was observed on CON pastures during the fall season. Greater percentage of leaf lamina was detected on ASPS-1 with short sward height and greater during summer, compared with other seasons. A greater forage production was observed between tree rows and for tall sward height. Spring was the season with less forage nutritive value. Average daily gain was greater during summer and fall. Gain per hectare and stocking rate were greater on CON system and on ASPS-2. Pastures with short sward height had greater gain per hectare and stocking rate. Agrosilvopastoral systems with intermediate tree density seem to be a good choice for producers willing to diversify their revenue sources without decreasing animal production. PMID:24043417

  9. Evidence for biological nitrification inhibition in Brachiaria pastures

    PubMed Central

    Subbarao, G. V.; Nakahara, K.; Hurtado, M. P.; Ono, H.; Moreta, D. E.; Salcedo, A. F.; Yoshihashi, A. T.; Ishikawa, T.; Ishitani, M.; Ohnishi-Kameyama, M.; Yoshida, M.; Rondon, M.; Rao, I. M.; Lascano, C. E.; Berry, W. L.; Ito, O.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrification, a key process in the global nitrogen cycle that generates nitrate through microbial activity, may enhance losses of fertilizer nitrogen by leaching and denitrification. Certain plants can suppress soil-nitrification by releasing inhibitors from roots, a phenomenon termed biological nitrification inhibition (BNI). Here, we report the discovery of an effective nitrification inhibitor in the root-exudates of the tropical forage grass Brachiaria humidicola (Rendle) Schweick. Named “brachialactone,” this inhibitor is a recently discovered cyclic diterpene with a unique 5-8-5-membered ring system and a γ-lactone ring. It contributed 60–90% of the inhibitory activity released from the roots of this tropical grass. Unlike nitrapyrin (a synthetic nitrification inhibitor), which affects only the ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) pathway, brachialactone appears to block both AMO and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase enzymatic pathways in Nitrosomonas. Release of this inhibitor is a regulated plant function, triggered and sustained by the availability of ammonium (NH4+) in the root environment. Brachialactone release is restricted to those roots that are directly exposed to NH4+. Within 3 years of establishment, Brachiaria pastures have suppressed soil nitrifier populations (determined as amoA genes; ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing archaea), along with nitrification and nitrous oxide emissions. These findings provide direct evidence for the existence and active regulation of a nitrification inhibitor (or inhibitors) release from tropical pasture root systems. Exploiting the BNI function could become a powerful strategy toward the development of low-nitrifying agronomic systems, benefiting both agriculture and the environment. PMID:19805171

  10. Selection of reference genes for quantitative real-time PCR expression studies in the apomictic and sexual grass Brachiaria brizantha

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Érica Duarte; Alves-Ferreira, Márcio; Guimarães, Larissa Arrais; da Silva, Felipe Rodrigues; Carneiro, Vera Tavares de Campos

    2009-01-01

    Background Brachiaria brizantha is an important forage grass. The occurrence of both apomictic and sexual reproduction within Brachiaria makes it an interesting system for understanding the molecular pathways involved in both modes of reproduction. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) has emerged as an important technique to compare expression profile of target genes and, in order to obtain reliable results, it is important to have suitable reference genes. In this work, we evaluated eight potential reference genes for B. brizantha qRT-PCR experiments, isolated from cDNA ovary libraries. Vegetative and reproductive tissues of apomictic and sexual B. brizantha were tested to validate the reference genes, including the female gametophyte, where differences in the expression profile between sexual and apomictic plants must occur. Results Eight genes were selected from a cDNA library of ovaries of B. brizantha considering the similarity to reference genes: EF1 (elongation factor 1 alpha), E1F4A (eukaryotic initiation factor 4A), GAPDH (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), GDP (glyceroldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), SUCOA (succinyl-CoA ligase), TUB (tubulin), UBCE (ubiquitin conjugating enzyme), UBI (ubiquitin). For the analysis, total RNA was extracted from 22 samples and raw Ct data after qRT-PCR reaction was analyzed for primer efficiency and for an overall analysis of Ct range among the different samples. Elongation factor 1 alpha showed the highest expression levels, whereas succinyl-CoA ligase showed the lowest within the chosen set of samples. GeNorm application was used for evaluation of the best reference genes, and according to that, the least stable genes, with the highest M values were tubulin and succinyl-CoA ligase and the most stable ones, with the lowest M values were elongation factor 1 alpha and ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, when both reproductive and vegetative samples were tested. For ovaries and spikelets of both sexual and apomictic B. brizantha

  11. Indirect measurements of Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu fermentable cell wall sugars for second generation biofuels production.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Results of a study conducted to evaluate the possibility of using IVDMD values of B. brizantha cv. Marandu to predict cell wall sugars that would be available in a biorefinery for ethanol production are reported. The study was conducted based on the similarity between rumen enzymes and those used i...

  12. Expressed sequence-tag analysis of ovaries of Brachiaria brizantha reveals genes associated with the early steps of embryo sac differentiation of apomictic plants.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Erica Duarte; Guimarães, Larissa Arrais; de Alencar Dusi, Diva Maria; da Silva, Felipe Rodrigues; Martins, Natália Florencio; do Carmo Costa, Marcos Mota; Alves-Ferreira, Márcio; de Campos Carneiro, Vera Tavares

    2012-02-01

    In apomixis, asexual mode of plant reproduction through seeds, an unreduced megagametophyte is formed due to circumvented or altered meiosis. The embryo develops autonomously from the unreduced egg cell, independently of fertilization. Brachiaria is a genus of tropical forage grasses that reproduces sexually or by apomixis. A limited number of studies have reported the sequencing of apomixis-related genes and a few Brachiaria sequences have been deposited at genebank databases. This work shows sequencing and expression analyses of expressed sequence-tags (ESTs) of Brachiaria genus and points to transcripts from ovaries with preferential expression at megasporogenesis in apomictic plants. From the 11 differentially expressed sequences from immature ovaries of sexual and apomictic Brachiaria brizantha obtained from macroarray analysis, 9 were preferentially detected in ovaries of apomicts, as confirmed by RT-qPCR. A putative involvement in early steps of Panicum-type embryo sac differentiation of four sequences from B. brizantha ovaries: BbrizHelic, BbrizRan, BbrizSec13 and BbrizSti1 is suggested. Two of these, BbrizSti1 and BbrizHelic, with similarity to a gene coding to stress induced protein and a helicase, respectively, are preferentially expressed in the early stages of apomictic ovaries development, especially in the nucellus, in a stage previous to the differentiation of aposporous initials, as verified by in situ hybridization. PMID:22068439

  13. Expression analyses of Brachiaria brizantha genes encoding ribosomal proteins BbrizRPS8, BbrizRPS15a, and BbrizRPL41 during development of ovaries and anthers.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Ana Luiza Machado; Dusi, Diva Maria de Alencar; Alves, Elizangela Ribeiro; Rodrigues, Júlio Carlyle Macedo; Gomes, Ana Cristina Menezes Mendes; Carneiro, Vera Tavares de Campos

    2013-04-01

    Brachiaria brizantha is a forage grass of the Poaceae family. Introduced from Africa, it is largely used for beef cattle production in Brazil. Brachiaria reproduces sexually or asexually by apomixis, and development of biotechnological tools for gene transfer is being researched to support the breeding programs. The molecular bases of reproduction have not yet been fully elucidated; it is known that gametophyte formation and main reproductive events occur inside the anthers and ovaries. There is therefore much interest in identifying genes expressed in these organs and their corresponding upstream regulatory sequences. In this work we characterized three cDNA from ovaries of B. brizantha plants (CL 09, CL10, and CL21) which show similarity in databases with genes encoding ribosomal proteins S8, S15a, and L41 and were named BbrizRPS8, BbrizRPS15a, and BbrizRPL41, respectively. These clones show higher expression in ovaries, anthers and roots, mitotically active tissues, when compared to leaves of B. brizantha. Localization of transcripts of BbrizRPS8, BbrizRPS15a, and BbrizRPL41 was investigated in the reproductive organs, ovaries, and anthers, from the beginning of development up to maturity. Their activity was higher in early stages of anther development, while expression was detected in all developmental stages in the ovaries, except for BbrizS15a, which was detected only in synergids of apomictic plants. PMID:22833119

  14. Death of pastures syndrome: tissue changes in Urochloa hybrida cv. Mulato II and Urochloa brizantha cv. Marandu.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Júnior, N G; Ariano, A P R; Silva, I V

    2016-07-11

    The quality of forage production is a prerequisite to raising livestock. Therefore, income losses in this activity, primarily cattle raising, can result in the impossibility of economic activity. Through the qualitative and quantitative anatomical study of Urochloa hybrida cv. Mulato II and U. brizantha cv. Marandu, we searched for descriptions and compared changes in the individual vegetative body from populations with death syndrome pastures (DPS). Specimens were collected at different physiological stages from farms in northern Mato Grosso. After collection, the individuals were fixed in FAA50 and stored in 70% alcohol. Histological slides were prepared from the middle third of the sections of roots, rhizomes, and leaves, and the proportions and characteristics of tissues were evaluated in healthy, intermediate, and advanced stages of DPS. Changes were compared between cultivars. With the advancement of the syndrome, the following changes were observed: a more marked decrease in the length of roots in U. hybrida; disorganization of the cortical region of the roots and rhizome cultivars; fungal hyphae in roots and aerenchyma formation in U. hybrida; a decrease in sclerenchyma fiber proportions in roots and leaves; sclerification of the epidermis of U. brizantha rhizomes; and an increase in pericyclic fibers in U. hybrida. Furthermore, there was a decrease in the volume of epidermal cells of the abaxial face of the leaves of both cultivars, with a greater reduction in U. hybrida; a gradual decrease in thickness in the midrib of leaves similar to leaf mesophyll; conduction system obstructions; partial or total cell lysis in roots and rhizomes affected by the syndrome. Obstructions in sieve tube element and companion cells, and sometimes obstruction in xylem vessel elements. The evolution of DPS in cultivars was similar, but there were variations, arising probably from the physiological response to stress, such as aerenchyma formation in the root and increased

  15. The Damage Capacity of Mahanarva spectabilis (Distant, 1909) (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) Adults on Brachiaria ruziziensis Pasture

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Tiago Teixeira; Auad, Alexander Machado; Fonseca, Marcy das Graças; Souza Sobrinho, Fausto; Ribeiro dos Santos, Dayane; da Silva, Sandra Elisa Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the damage caused by adult Mahanarva spectabilis (Distant, 1909) (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) on Brachiaria ruziziensis (Germain & Evard) under field conditions. A total of 0, 4, 8, 12, or 16 M. spectabilis adults per plot were maintained for 6 days. Thereafter, the insects were removed from the plant, and the following parameters were evaluated: chlorophyll content, damage score, dry as well as fresh weights, percentage of shoots' dry matter, and the forage's ability to regrow. The chlorophyll content was significantly reduced; the damage score and percentage of dry matter in plants increased depending on the increased insect infestation density after 6 days of exposure. In contrast, no change was observed on the B. ruziziensis fresh and dry weights as well as the regrowth capacity depending on the M. spectabilis infestation densities. Attacks by 8 adult M. spectabilis per clump of B. ruziziensis with an average of 80 tillers for 6 days were sufficient to reduce the chlorophyll content and the functional plant loss index. This density can be a reference for spittlebug integrated management in Brachiaria. PMID:24453825

  16. The damage capacity of Mahanarva spectabilis (Distant, 1909) (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) adults on Brachiaria ruziziensis pasture.

    PubMed

    Resende, Tiago Teixeira; Auad, Alexander Machado; Fonseca, Marcy das Graças; Souza Sobrinho, Fausto; dos Santos, Dayane Ribeiro; da Silva, Sandra Elisa Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the damage caused by adult Mahanarva spectabilis (Distant, 1909) (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) on Brachiaria ruziziensis (Germain & Evard) under field conditions. A total of 0, 4, 8, 12, or 16 M. spectabilis adults per plot were maintained for 6 days. Thereafter, the insects were removed from the plant, and the following parameters were evaluated: chlorophyll content, damage score, dry as well as fresh weights, percentage of shoots' dry matter, and the forage's ability to regrow. The chlorophyll content was significantly reduced; the damage score and percentage of dry matter in plants increased depending on the increased insect infestation density after 6 days of exposure. In contrast, no change was observed on the B. ruziziensis fresh and dry weights as well as the regrowth capacity depending on the M. spectabilis infestation densities. Attacks by 8 adult M. spectabilis per clump of B. ruziziensis with an average of 80 tillers for 6 days were sufficient to reduce the chlorophyll content and the functional plant loss index. This density can be a reference for spittlebug integrated management in Brachiaria. PMID:24453825

  17. Changes in nutrient dynamics throughout water transfers in a Tropical Forest and Pasture of Rondonia, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccolo, M. D.; Neill, C.; Krusche, A.; Laclau, J. P.; Cerri, C. C.

    2006-12-01

    The clearing of tropical forest in the Brazilian Amazon for cattle pasture since the 70s is a globally important land use change that has consequences for soil biogeochemical cycles. Generally, five to ten years after deforestation, pastures become degraded due to inadequate management practices. Development of strategies for restoration of low productivity pastures constitutes the main goal for Rondônia state. We analyzed the concentrations of the main nutrient of the biogeochemical cycles in three representative land uses at Fazenda Nova Vida, in central Rondônia (10o30'S, 62o30'W). The treatments were: (1) native forest; (2) pasture dominated by the forage grass Brachiaria brizantha but containing some weeds, under non- intensive management and; (3) a section of the same pasture that was subjected to tilling, replanting and fertilization (NPK + micronutrients) to eliminate weeds and improve grass productivity. Water samples from rain, throughfall, overland flow, tension lysimeter and zero-tension lysimeter (1.0 m soil depth), were collected during the rainy seasons from January to May of 2002 and 2003. The concentrations of C (DOC and DIC), inorganic-N (NH4+, NO3- and NO2-), Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, SO42- and Cl- were measured in all treatments. Rain water was dominated by the nutrients (NH4+, Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Cl-) and DOC. Forest throughfall was enriched in most of the elements. Concentrations of elements in the overland flow showed higher variations in the pasture and in the plowed pasture, however samples were not collected in forest. Soil solution waters (tension lysimeter) and lysimeter waters (zero-tension lysimeter) too had higher variations for elements concentrations in all treatments. Forest clearing for pasture and pasture submitted to tillage practices profoundly influence soil properties and, consequently, the nutrient availability in soil profiles. The soil solution composition may be indicative of altered patterns of nutrient availability in this

  18. Spatial Simulation of the Dynamics of Establishment of Secondary Forest in Abandoned Pasture in the Central Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebel, K. T.; Riha, S. J.; Rondon, M. A.; Feldpausch, T. R.; Fernandes, E. C.

    2001-05-01

    In the Amazon, approximately 35 million hectares of primary forest that was converted to pasture is now being abandoned. This represents about 70% of all pastureland that was previously established. The dynamics of reconversion of this land to secondary forest is of interest because the length of time required for pasture to convert to secondary forest will impact net primary productivity and the amount of carbon being stored on abandoned pastures. In addition, the length of time required for pasture to convert to secondary forest may depend on the size of the pasture, whether it is surrounded by primary or secondary forest, and on pasture productivity at the time of abandonment. Pasture productivity at the time of abandonment will depend primarily on the age structure of the pasture grasses and on weediness, which are influenced by grazing and fire history. Also, an understanding of the dynamics of conversion of pastureland to forest can serve as the basis for management strategies to inhibit pasture conversion. A spatial, dynamic model of the conversion of pasture to secondary forest was developed using the PCRaster Dynamic Modeling Package. This software provides a computer language specially developed for modeling temporal and spatial processes in a GIS, and is well suited for the development of ecological, dynamic models. The model of pasture conversion is implemented for the central Amazon. We assume that succession involves only three plant types: pasture grass, weeds and woody plants. The pasture grass is parameterized for Brachiaria (brizantha, humidicola), the weeds for Borreria and Rolandra, and the woody plants for Vismia spp. The model uses a 1m x 1m grid and 2-month time step. Each initial plant and each surviving propagule is referred to as a plant and only occupies one grid cell. A number of values are calculated for each grid cell for each time-step. These include whether vegetation is present and, if so, which species, the age of the species, the

  19. Evaluation of solar exposure on the experimental intoxication by Brachiaria decumbens in sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-six five-month-old lambs originated from flocks with no previous contact with Brachiaria spp. pastures were divided into three groups. Two groups (GS and GSB) were fed daily with fresh harvested Brachiaria decumbens ad libitum. GS was kept in an area with solar exposure and GSB was kept in st...

  20. Production and economic potentials of cattle in pasture-based systems of the western Amazon region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rueda, B L; Blake, R W; Nicholson, C F; Fox, D G; Tedeschi, L O; Pell, A N; Fernandes, E C M; Valentim, J F; Carneiro, J C

    2003-12-01

    Our objectives were to evaluate strategies to improve productivity and economic returns from beef and dual-purpose cattle systems based on data collected on one dual-purpose (Bos taurus x Bos indicus) and two beef (Nellore) cattle farms in the western Amazon region of Brazil. Forage chemical composition and digestion rates of carbohydrate fractions of grazed Brachiaria decumbens and Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu grasses and Pueraria phaseoloides (tropical kudzu) legume were measured monthly during a 9-mo period from the end of one dry season to the end of the subsequent rainy season. Measurements of milk and growth responses to grazing these forages were used to predict animal productivity responses to dietary nutrient availability throughout an annual cycle. The ME available for gain in our simulations was always more limiting than metabolizable protein. The predicted ME available for gain was 0.50 kg/d for steers grazing B. brizantha and 0.40 kg/d for finishing steers grazing B. decumbens. Grasses contained more NDF and neutral detergent insoluble protein and less ME (P < 0.05) in the rainiest months than in the less rainy season, which resulted in 20% less predicted weight gain by growing steers (P < 0.05). Supplementation with sorghum grain was required to increase milk production and growth by 25 or 50% per animal, respectively, but this strategy was less profitable than current forage-only diets. Greater productivity of land and labor from higher stocking indicated greater net margins for beef production, but not for milk. This study suggested that more intensive beef production by judicious fertilization of grass-legume pastures and greater stocking density is the preferable strategy for owners of these cattle systems to improve economic returns under current conditions. It also might help decrease the motivation for additional forest clearing. PMID:14677847

  1. Phytotoxic substance with allelopathic activity in Brachiaria decumbens.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ai; Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi

    2015-05-01

    The grass Brachiaria decumbens becomes naturalized and quickly dominant in non-native areas. It was hypothesized that phytotoxic substances of plants may contribute to the domination and invasion of the plants. However, no potent phytotoxic substance has been reported in B. decumbens. Therefore, we searched for phytotoxic substances with allelopathic activity in this species. An aqueous methanol extract of B. decumbens inhibited the growth of roots and shoots of cress (Lepidium sativum), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), timothy (Phleum pratense) and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) seedlings. The extract was then purified using chromatographic methods and a phytotoxic substance with allelopathic activity was isolated and identified by spectral analysis as (6R,9S)-3-oxo-α-ionol. These results suggest that this compound may contribute to the allelopathic effect caused by the B. decumbens extract and may be in part responsible for the invasion and domination of B. decumbens. Two other Brachiaria species, B. brizantha and a Brachiaria hybrid were also confirmed to contain (6R,9S)-3-oxo-α-ionol. Therefore, this compound may play an important role in the phytotoxicity of the Brachiaria species. PMID:26058152

  2. Study of the nutrient distribution in root tips of the tropical forage Brachiaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, C. A.; Wenzl, P.; Mayer, J.; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, J.; Przybylowicz, W. J.; Prozesky, V. M.

    1997-07-01

    A Brachiaria breeding project is being conducted at CIAT, Colombia to combine acid soil adaptation of B. decumbens with other favourable traits of Brachiaria species that are less adapted to acid soils. Micro-PIXE was applied to investigate nutrient uptake and distribution in root tips of different species grown in hydroponic culture under control and simulated acid soil stress conditions. Different sample measurement approaches were evaluated, including: (1) linear scans with single point measurements along the root axis; (2) mapping of whole root tips; and (3) mapping of root cross sections. Different tissue types could be distinguished on the base of differences in nutrient concentrations and/or Al stress. Al, if supplied under nutrient stress conditions, increased P accumulation in the central vascular tissue of the meristematic and elongation zone of B. decumbens and B. brizantha. Furthermore, a negative correlation was found between Al and Cl accumulation in the root cap of B. decumbens.

  3. Chromosomal distribution and evolution of abundant retrotransposons in plants: gypsy elements in diploid and polyploid Brachiaria forage grasses.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fabíola Carvalho; Guyot, Romain; do Valle, Cacilda Borges; Chiari, Lucimara; Techio, Vânia Helena; Heslop-Harrison, Pat; Vanzela, André Luís Laforga

    2015-09-01

    Like other eukaryotes, the nuclear genome of plants consists of DNA with a small proportion of low-copy DNA (genes and regulatory sequences) and very abundant DNA sequence motifs that are repeated thousands up to millions of times in the genomes including transposable elements (TEs) and satellite DNA. Retrotransposons, one class of TEs, are sequences that amplify via an RNA intermediate and reinsert into the genome, are often the major fraction of a genome. Here, we put research on retrotransposons into the larger context of plant repetitive DNA and genome behaviour, showing features of genome evolution in a grass genus, Brachiaria, in relation to other plant species. We show the contrasting amplification of different retroelement fractions across the genome with characteristics for various families and domains. The genus Brachiaria includes both diploid and polyploid species, with similar chromosome types and chromosome basic numbers x = 6, 7, 8 and 9. The polyploids reproduce asexually and are apomictic, but there are also sexual species. Cytogenetic studies and flow cytometry indicate a large variation in DNA content (C-value), chromosome sizes and genome organization. In order to evaluate the role of transposable elements in the genome and karyotype organization of species of Brachiaria, we searched for sequences similar to conserved regions of TEs in RNAseq reads library produced in Brachiaria decumbens. Of the 9649 TE-like contigs, 4454 corresponded to LTR-retrotransposons, and of these, 79.5 % were similar to members of the gypsy superfamily. Sequences of conserved protein domains of gypsy were used to design primers for producing the probes. The probes were used in FISH against chromosomes of accesses of B. decumbens, Brachiaria brizantha, Brachiaria ruziziensis and Brachiaria humidicola. Probes showed hybridization signals predominantly in proximal regions, especially those for retrotransposons of the clades CRM and Athila, while elements of Del and Tat

  4. Effects of Different Treatments of Pasture Restoration on Soil Trace Gas Emissions in the Cerrados of Central Brazil

    EPA Science Inventory

    Planted pastures ( mainly Brachiaria spp) are the most extensive land use in the cerrado (savannas of central Brazil) with an area of approximately 50 x 10(6) ha. The objective of the study was to assess the effects of pasture restoration on the N dynamics ( net N mineralization/...

  5. [Photosensitization in cattle grazing on pastures of Brahciaria decumbens Stapf infested with Pithomyces chartarum (Berk. & Curt.) M.B. Ellis].

    PubMed

    Andrade, S O; da Silva Lopes, H O; de Almeida Barros, M; Leite, G G; Dias, S M; Saueressig, M; Nobre, D; Temperini, J A

    1978-01-01

    Aspects of photosensitization in bovines grazing on pastures of Brachiaria decumbens Stapf infested with Pithomyces chartarum (Berk. & Curt.) M.B. Ellis infested all pastures 45(2):117-136, 1978. This paper reports experimental studies on photosensitization in bovines grazing on different pastures of Brachiaria decumbens Stapf in the "Cerrados" region (Planaltina, DF). Climatic conditions, zinc content and occurence of fungi on pastures were investigated. Pithomyces chartarum (Berk. & Curt.) M.B. Ellis infested all pastures examined. Photosensitization was observed in one animal maintained on a pasture of B. decumbens formed with seeds from Australia. Clinical and necropsy data were similar to those related in literature for sporidesmin-intoxicated animals. An isolate of P. chartarum and samples of bovine bile were assayed for sporidesmin presence. PMID:573108

  6. Queensland Pastures

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... Local graziers hope for good long-term responses in pasture growth from the heavy rains. These images and maps from the Multi-angle Imaging ... for atmospheric scattering and absorption effects, and uses plant canopy structural models to determine the partitioning of solar ...

  7. SOIL FLUXES OF CO2, CO, NO AND N2O FROM AN OLD-PASTURE AND FROM NATIVE SAVANNA IN BRAZIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared fluxes of CO2, CO, NO and N2O, soil microbial biomass, and N-mineralization rates in a 20-year old Brachiaria pasture and a native cerrado area (savanna in Central Brazil). In order to assess the spatial variability of CO2 fluxes, we tested the relation between elect...

  8. Characterizing Herbivore Resistance Mechanisms: Spittlebugs on Brachiaria spp. as an Example

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, Soroush; Sotelo, Guillermo; Cardona, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    Plants can resist herbivore damage through three broad mechanisms: antixenosis, antibiosis and tolerance1. Antixenosis is the degree to which the plant is avoided when the herbivore is able to select other plants2. Antibiosis is the degree to which the plant affects the fitness of the herbivore feeding on it1.Tolerance is the degree to which the plant can withstand or repair damage caused by the herbivore, without compromising the herbivore's growth and reproduction1. The durability of herbivore resistance in an agricultural setting depends to a great extent on the resistance mechanism favored during crop breeding efforts3. We demonstrate a no-choice experiment designed to estimate the relative contributions of antibiosis and tolerance to spittlebug resistance in Brachiaria spp. Several species of African grasses of the genus Brachiaria are valuable forage and pasture plants in the Neotropics, but they can be severely challenged by several native species of spittlebugs (Hemiptera: Cercopidae)4.To assess their resistance to spittlebugs, plants are vegetatively-propagated by stem cuttings and allowed to grow for approximately one month, allowing the growth of superficial roots on which spittlebugs can feed. At that point, each test plant is individually challenged with six spittlebug eggs near hatching. Infestations are allowed to progress for one month before evaluating plant damage and insect survival. Scoring plant damage provides an estimate of tolerance while scoring insect survival provides an estimate of antibiosis. This protocol has facilitated our plant breeding objective to enhance spittlebug resistance in commercial brachiariagrases5. PMID:21712800

  9. Characterizing herbivore resistance mechanisms: spittlebugs on Brachiaria spp. as an example.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Soroush; Sotelo, Guillermo; Cardona, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    Plants can resist herbivore damage through three broad mechanisms: antixenosis, antibiosis and tolerance(1). Antixenosis is the degree to which the plant is avoided when the herbivore is able to select other plants(2). Antibiosis is the degree to which the plant affects the fitness of the herbivore feeding on it(1).Tolerance is the degree to which the plant can withstand or repair damage caused by the herbivore, without compromising the herbivore's growth and reproduction(1). The durability of herbivore resistance in an agricultural setting depends to a great extent on the resistance mechanism favored during crop breeding efforts(3). We demonstrate a no-choice experiment designed to estimate the relative contributions of antibiosis and tolerance to spittlebug resistance in Brachiaria spp. Several species of African grasses of the genus Brachiaria are valuable forage and pasture plants in the Neotropics, but they can be severely challenged by several native species of spittlebugs (Hemiptera: Cercopidae)(4).To assess their resistance to spittlebugs, plants are vegetatively-propagated by stem cuttings and allowed to grow for approximately one month, allowing the growth of superficial roots on which spittlebugs can feed. At that point, each test plant is individually challenged with six spittlebug eggs near hatching. Infestations are allowed to progress for one month before evaluating plant damage and insect survival. Scoring plant damage provides an estimate of tolerance while scoring insect survival provides an estimate of antibiosis. This protocol has facilitated our plant breeding objective to enhance spittlebug resistance in commercial brachiariagrases(5). PMID:21712800

  10. Pasture Fallowing Fact Sheet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pasture fallowing is the practice of leaving pastures ungrazed for a period to encourage grass reseeding and increase pasture diversity. Fallowing may have negative effects as well, by reducing legume cover and allowing thistles and other invasive weeds to increase. We looked at the effects of fallo...

  11. Pastures and biodiversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farmers often plant monocultures or simple grass-legume mixtures in their pastures. Increased biodiversity in pastures may be one tool to improve sustainability and productivity. This fact sheet addresses some common questions regarding biodiversity in pastures. Very broadly, biodiversity refers to ...

  12. Pasture diversity and management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the economic importance of pastures in the northeastern United States, not much is known about their ecology, including taxonomic and functional diversity. This factsheet presents results from a 1998-2005 survey of pastures on 44 farms from Maine to Maryland. Pastures are quite diverse; the ...

  13. Pasture diversity and management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scientists at the USDA-ARS Pasture Systems and Watershed Management Research Unit have been collecting pasture plant biodiversity data for over ten years and across the northeastern United States. We have identified more than three hundred species of vascular plants. The average pasture in this regi...

  14. Hepatic photosensitization in buffaloes intoxicated by Brachiaria decumbens in Minas Gerais state, Brazil.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, C H S; Barbosa, J D; Oliveira, C M C; Bastianetto, E; Melo, M M; Haraguchi, M; Freitas, L G L; Silva, M X; Leite, R C

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the study of hepatogenous photosensitization in buffaloes during two outbreaks provoked by ingestion of Brachiaria decumbens in Minas Gerais state, Brazil. Ten young buffaloes in outbreak 1 and seven buffaloes in outbreak 2 were intoxicated by B. decumbens. Nine clinically healthy buffaloes raised under the same conditions as the sick animals served as the control group. All animals were subjected to clinical examination, and serum was collected to measure gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), direct bilirubin (DB), indirect bilirubin (IB) and total bilirubin (TB) as indicators of liver function and urea and creatinine as indicators of renal function. Histopathology of liver fragments from five different animals was carried out. During the outbreaks and every two months for one year, samples of grass from paddocks where the animals got sick were collected for quantitative evaluation of the saponin protodioscin, combined with observations of pasture characteristics and daily rainfall. Clinical signs included apathy, weight loss, restlessness, scar retraction of the ears and intense itching at the skin lesions, mainly on the rump, the tail head, neck and hindlimbs, similar to the signs observed in other ruminants. Only the GGT enzyme presented significantly different (P < 0.01) serum levels between intoxicated animals (n = 17) and healthy animals (n = 9), indicating liver damage in buffaloes bred in B. decumbens pastures. Microscopy of the liver showed foamy macrophages and lesions of liver disease associated with the presence of crystals in the bile ducts, which have also been found in sheep and cattle poisoned by grasses of the genus Brachiaria. During the outbreaks, protodioscin levels were higher than 3%, and shortly after, these levels were reduced to less than 0.80%, suggesting a hepatic injury etiology. The outbreaks took place at the beginning of the rainy season, and there was a positive

  15. Managing Intensively Grazed Pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forage production during periods of summer drought can be increased by including additional species in the pasture mixture, especially if those species have desirable attributes such as improved water use efficiency or deep root systems. Conversion of plowed fields to pasture also has the potential ...

  16. Priming and temperature limits for germination of dispersal units of Urochloa brizantha (Stapf) Webster cv. basilisk.

    PubMed

    Nakao, E A; Cardoso, V J M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of priming treatments on the upper and lower thermal limits for germination of Urochloa brizantha cv. basilisk, and testing the hypothesis that pré-imbibition affect thermal parameters of the germination. Pre-imbibed seeds both in distilled water (0 MPa) and PEG 6000 solution (-0.5 MPa) were put to germinate in different temperatures. It is suggested that U. brizantha seeds have low response to priming when they were placed to germinate in medium where water is not limiting. The response of U. brizantha seeds to priming is dependent on the temperature and water potential conditions at which the seeds are pre-imbibed, as well as on the germination temperature. The optimum temperature for germination of U. brizantha shift toward warmer temperatures in primed seeds. Priming effect was more pronounced at temperatures closer to the upper and lower limit for germination, but probably that response cannot be accounted for changes in the thermal time constant (θT(g)) and ceiling temperature (Tc(g)). Otherwise, a decrease in the base temperature (Tb) was observed in primed seeds, suggesting that the Tb distribution in U. brizantha seeds is influenced by priming. PMID:25945643

  17. Plant physiology for profitable pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A basic question of pasture-based livestock production is whether producers should manage pastures on the basis of what is best for the animal or what is best for the plant. Given that pastures are the principal and most economical source of feed, producers should carefully consider how they manage...

  18. Pasture seed banks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In our surveys of northeastern pastures, we found the equivalent of more than 8 million seeds per acre in the surface soil (the top four inches) from the seed bank study. These seeds came from 58 species of plants. The annual forbs (all broadleaf plants with the exception of legumes and trees) domin...

  19. Pasture Research Summaries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our goal is to develop diverse, stable, and persistent forage and pasture lands that provide a permanent cover and protect the natural resource base for future generations. Research on forage-livestock systems seeks to improve the productivity, sustainability, and profitability of northeastern forag...

  20. Phosphorus, carbon- and nitrogen interactions in productive and degraded tropical pastures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberson, A.; Hegglin, D. D.; Nesper, M.; Rao, I.; Fonte, S.; Ramirez, B.; Velasquez, J.; Tamburini, F.; Bünemann, E. K.; Frossard, E.

    2011-12-01

    Pastures are the main land use in deforested areas of tropical South America. The highly weathered soils of these regions usually have low total and available phosphorus (P) contents. Low P availability can strongly limit plant and animal productivity and other soil ecosystem functions. Most introduced pastures of Brachiaria spp. are grass-alone (GA) while some are grass-legume (GL) pastures. The majority of the introduced pastures, particularly the grass-alone are at some state of degradation (GD). Pasture degradation induces severe loss of plant biomass production, with drastic ecological and economic implications. Although the importance of P deficiency in pasture degradation has been recognized, the knowledge generated on stoichiometry of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and P along pathways of the nutrient cycles of pastures, with different botanical composition and productivity, has been very limited. We will present results of a case study realized during 2010 to 2011 in the forest margins agro-ecosystem of the department of Caquetá, Colombia. Our objectives were to determine: i) whether P availability is lower in degraded compared to productive pastures, and ii) whether the introduction of legumes in the pasture increases P availability through enhanced biological P cycling through plant growth, plant litter decomposition and the soil microbial biomass; and iii) whether pasture types (GA vs GL) and the state of pasture degradation affect the C:N:P ratios in nutrient pools of the soil-plant system. An on-farm study was conducted on nine farms in the department of Caquetá, Colombia. On every farm three different pasture types were studied: degraded grass alone pastures (GD), productive grass-alone pastures (GA) and productive grass-legume pastures (GL). Basic soil characteristics and indicators on soil P status, microbial P cycling, plant biomass production, plant litter deposition and nutrient concentrations in plant tissue were determined. Analysis of P, C and N

  1. Waterlogging-induced changes in root architecture of germplasm accessions of the tropical forage grass Brachiaria humidicola

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Juan Andrés; Jiménez, Juan de la Cruz; Rao, Idupulapati M.

    2014-01-01

    Waterlogging is one of the major factors limiting the productivity of pastures in the humid tropics. Brachiaria humidicola is a forage grass commonly used in zones prone to temporary waterlogging. Brachiaria humidicola accessions adapt to waterlogging by increasing aerenchyma in nodal roots above constitutive levels to improve oxygenation of root tissues. In some accessions, waterlogging reduces the number of lateral roots developed from main root axes. Waterlogging-induced reduction of lateral roots could be of adaptive value as lateral roots consume oxygen supplied from above ground via their parent root. However, a reduction in lateral root development could also be detrimental by decreasing the surface area for nutrient and water absorption. To examine the impact of waterlogging on lateral root development, an outdoor study was conducted to test differences in vertical root distribution (in terms of dry mass and length) and the proportion of lateral roots to the total root system (sum of nodal and lateral roots) down the soil profile under drained or waterlogged soil conditions. Plant material consisted of 12 B. humidicola accessions from the gene bank of the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, Colombia. Rooting depth was restricted by 21 days of waterlogging and confined to the first 30 cm below the soil surface. Although waterlogging reduced the overall proportion of lateral roots, its proportion significantly increased in the top 10 cm of the soil. This suggests that soil flooding increases lateral root proliferation of B. humidicola in the upper soil layers. This may compensate for the reduction of root surface area brought about by the restriction of root growth at depths below 30 cm. Further work is needed to test the relative efficiency of nodal and lateral roots for nutrient and water uptake under waterlogged soil conditions. PMID:24876299

  2. The effect of ensiling and haymaking on the concentrations of steroidal saponin in two Brachiaria grass species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brachiaria (signalgrass) is now the most widely used tropical grass genus in Central and South America. However, Brachiaria spp. can cause hepatogenous photosensitization in livestock. Steroidal saponins, specifically protodioscin, present in Brachiaria spp. may be responsible for liver injury and s...

  3. Independence of resistance in Brachiaria spp. to nymphs or to adult spittlebugs (Hemiptera: Cercopidae): implications for breeding for resistance.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Cesar; Miles, John W; Zuñiga, Edier; Sotelo, Guillermo

    2010-10-01

    Both nymphal and adult spittlebugs (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) cause serious economic damage to susceptible brachiariagrass [genus Brachiaria (Trin.) Griseb], pastures in tropical America. Both life stages are xylem feeders: nymphs feed primarily on roots and stems, whereas the adults feed mainly on foliage. Numerous interspecific brachiariagrass hybrids with high levels of antibiosis resistance to nymphs of several important spittlebug species have been obtained. Recent studies revealed major inconsistencies between reaction to nymphs and reaction to adults on the same host genotype. Because both insect life stages can cause severe economic damage on susceptible brachiariagrass pastures, a cultivar development strategy must take into account resistance to both life stages. To assess the degree of association between resistance to spittlebug nymphs and to adult feeding, we tested 164 hybrids and six check genotypes for resistance to both life stages of three spittlebug species: Aeneolamia varia (F.), Aeneolamia reducta (Lallemand), and Zulia carbonaria (Lallemand). Most hybrids tested were classified as resistant to nymphs. On the contrary, for all three species, the overall mean damage score of the 164 hybrids did not differ from the mean score of the susceptible checks. None of the hybrids was classified as resistant to adult feeding damage. Correlations between percentage nymph survival and adult damage scores were consistently low (r = 0.0104-0.0191). Correlations between nymphal and adult damage scores were also low (0.109-0.271), suggesting that resistances to the different life stages are largely independent. Chi-square analyses comparing frequency distributions of responses of the 164 breeding hybrids to nymphs or adults confirmed essential genetic independence of these two traits. We conclude that attention to improving genetic resistance specifically to adult feeding damage is warranted. PMID:21061990

  4. Phenotypic characteristics for discrimination between advanced genotypes of Brachiaria ruziziensis.

    PubMed

    Rezende, B A; Ribeiro, C B; Teixeira, D H L; Gonçalves, F M A; Souza Sobrinho, F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use multivariate methods and Pearson and partial correlations to disregard phenotypic characteristics that contribute little to differentiation between Brachiaria ruziziensis genotypes. Eighty-one genotypes of B. ruziziensis were assessed in completely randomized blocks with three replications. Ten phenotypic characteristics were assessed: plant height, leaf length, leaf width, sheath length, length of the flower stem, length of the inflorescence axis, number of racemes per inflorescence, length of the basal raceme, number of spikelets per basal raceme, and width of the rachis. The best traits for differentiation between genotypes were determined by assessing relative contribution to diversity, canonical variables, as well as Pearson and partial correlations. Four canonical variables were found to account for 57% of the overall variation, while plant height, sheath length, and number of racemes per inflorescence were considered traits that could potentially be disregarded in future assessments. PMID:27051034

  5. CHEMICAL AND BACTERIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF PASTURE RUNOFF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural background characteristics and grazing cattle both influence the chemical and bacteriological quality of pasture runoff in south central Nebraska. The chemical quality of runoff from unstocked grassland was poorer than that from grazed pasture. The chemical quality of pas...

  6. Guide to Managing Pasture Water: Streamside Buffers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Properly managed pasture water not only provides high-quality water which promotes healthy and productive livestock, but also contributes to maintaining water quality downstream. Riparian (streamside) areas serve as a transition between upland pastures and waterways. In other words, they link pastur...

  7. Pasture quality variation throughout the grazing season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is important for dairy producers and their nutritionists to have an idea of the nutritional quality of the pasture they are providing to their cows. This article uses data gathered from several on-going pasture research projects to demonstrate how pasture quality varies during the grazing season,...

  8. Stocking Rates for Horse Pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decision on which stocking rate to graze a horse pasture is critical, particularly if the forage is expected to meet the nutrient needs of the horses. Challenges and management for targeting the optimum stocking rate, defined as the stocking rate that allows forage consumption to approximately equ...

  9. Weather and plant age affect the levels of steroidal saponin and Pithomyces chartarum spores in Brachiaria grass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brachiaria species are cultivated worldwide in tropical and subtropical climates as the main forage source for ruminants. Numerous tropical and warm-season grasses cause hepatogenous photosensitization, among them several species of Brachiaria. Steroidal saponins present in these plants may be respo...

  10. Pasture improvement in Spanish Dehesas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo Vilanova, M.; González López, F.

    2009-04-01

    In the south-west of the Iberian Peninsula, the dehesa is a widespread agro-silvo-pastoral land use system, characterized by a grassland with a disperse cover of oak trees and shrubs, where the main production is extensive livestock combined with agriculture and forestry. Many years of inappropriate management of dehesas (deforestation, overgrazing, excessive agricultural activities, etc.) has led to the degradation of vegetation and soils in extensive areas, causing reductions in biomass and biodiversity, affecting the permanence of plants and causing important losses of palatable species. As there is growing interest in these wooded rangeland ecosystems due to their economic importance and high environmental value, the recovery of the original pasture biodiversity and the increase of productivity, together with the conservation of the environment, are the main goals in these areas of low productive potential, degraded and subject to soil erosion. Soil and climate conditions have a great influence on grassland production, with rainfall producing strong seasonal and interannual variations. These natural pastures, mainly composed of summer withering annual species, reach maximum productions in spring and register low values in autumn, slowing down in winter. During the summer dry season, the wilting pastures can offer a good forage for animals. Autochthonous annual legumes play an important role because they are well adapted to local edaphic and climatic conditions and produce hard seeds which germinate in autumn. This helps them to survive the frequent droughts and offer a high quality forage, which is a valuable complement to other pasture plants with lower protein content. Therefore, for several decades, legume seeding combined with the application of phosphate fertilizer has been the most common strategy used to improve pastures in SW Spain, where dehesas cover an area of about four million hectares. This paper examines the whole process of pasture improvement

  11. Sward characteristics and performance of dairy cows in organic grass-legume pastures shaded by tropical trees.

    PubMed

    Paciullo, D S C; Pires, M F A; Aroeira, L J M; Morenz, M J F; Maurício, R M; Gomide, C A M; Silveira, S R

    2014-08-01

    The silvopastoral system (SPS) has been suggested to ensure sustainability in animal production systems in tropical ecosystems. The objective of this study was to evaluate pasture characteristics, herbage intake, grazing activity and milk yield of Holstein×Zebu cows managed in two grazing systems (treatments): SPS dominated by a graminaceous forage (Brachiaria decumbens) intercropped with different leguminous herbaceous forages (Stylosanthes spp., Pueraria phaseoloides and Calopogonium mucunoides) and legume trees (Acacia mangium, Gliricidia sepium and Leucaena leucocephala), and open pasture (OP) of B. decumbens intercropped only with Stylosanthes spp. Pastures were managed according to the rules for organic cattle production. The study was carried out by following a switch back format with 12 cows, 6 for each treatment, over 3 experimental years. Herbage mass was similar (P>0.05) for both treatments, supporting an average stocking rate of 1.23 AU/ha. Daily dry matter intake did not vary (P>0.05) between treatments (average of 11.3±1.02 kg/cow per day, corresponding to 2.23±0.2% BW). Milk yield was higher (P0.05) in subsequent years. The highest (P0.05) milk yields. Low persistence of Stylosanthes guianensis was observed over the experimental period, indicating that the persistence of forage legumes under grazing could be improved using adapted cultivars that have higher annual seed production. The SPS and a diversified botanical composition of the pasture using legume species mixed with grasses are recommended for organic milk production. PMID:24703358

  12. Cycling and loss of nutrients in pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pastures are fundamentally different than croplands. When cropland is harvested, large amounts of plant nutrients are removed so relatively large rates of nutrients are often needed. In pasture, most of the nutrients harvested by livestock are returned. The proportion of nutrients returned by livest...

  13. Pasture Plants of the Northeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This factsheet contains summary information about the most common plant species encountered in northeastern pastures. Some information, such as plant size and flowering time, comes from standard reference works. Information on frequency and abundance in northeastern pastures is derived from an eight...

  14. PASTURE PLANT COMMUNITIES IN THE NORTHEAST

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pastures are important to the economy of the northeastern United States, but we still don't know much about their ecology. One of the areas where we need more information is in understanding how environment affects the success of forage and weedy species in pastures. We surveyed 44 farms from Maryla...

  15. Soil carbon cycling in pasture systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon accumulation in soil under pastures occurs to various degrees depending upon management and length of time. This presentation describes research results on soil carbon sequestration under pastures from the southeastern USA to help inform the scientific basis for development of a protocol to ...

  16. Advantages of pasture-based milk products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent research has focused on determining the biologically active compounds naturally occurring in milk from pasture-fed cows and evaluating the impact of processing on these compounds. This research addresses one of the critical goals of the Northeast Pasture Consortium to “summarize conjugated li...

  17. Multiple spindles and cellularization during microsporogenesis in an artificially induced tetraploid accession of Brachiaria ruziziensis (Gramineae).

    PubMed

    Risso-Pascotto, Claudicéia; Pagliarini, Maria Suely; do Valle, Cacilda Borges

    2005-01-01

    The genus Brachiaria is characterized by a majority of polyploid accessions--mainly tetraploid--and apomictic reproduction. Sexuality is found among diploids. To overcome incompatibility barriers, accessions with the same ploidy level are necessarily used in hybridization. Thus, sexual diploid accessions were tetraploidized to be used as female genitors. This paper reports microsporogenesis in an artificially induced tetraploid accession of Brachiaria ruziziensis. Chromosome pairing at diakinesis ranged from univalents to tetravalents, with predominance of bivalents. Irregular chromosome segregation was frequent in both meiotic divisions. During the first division, multiple spindles showing different arrangements were recorded. The spindle position determined the plane of first cytokinesis and the number of chromosomes determined the size of the cell. Meiotic products were characterized by polyads with spores of different sizes. Pollen sterility was estimated at 61.38%. The limitations of using this accession in the breeding program are discussed. PMID:15365762

  18. New Developments in Grasses for Pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New forage varieties with improved traits are an essential component of best management practices for livestock agriculture. This paper discusses new varieties of several cool-season forage grasses used for pasture production....

  19. Plant Species Diversity and Pasture Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farmers face many challenges in pasture management, such as evolving agri-environmental schemes to protect natural resources, and need new management techniques to remain sustainable. Ecological research indicates that increased plant biodiversity benefits ecosystem functions such as primary product...

  20. Characterization of fungi from ruminal fluid of beef cattle with different ages and raised in tropical lignified pastures.

    PubMed

    Abrão, Flávia Oliveira; Duarte, Eduardo Robson; Freitas, Cláudio Eduardo Silva; Vieira, Edvaldo Alves; Geraseev, Luciana Castro; da Silva-Hughes, Alice Ferreira; Rosa, Carlos Augusto; Rodrigues, Norberto Mario

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the aerobic rumen mycobiota from three age groups of Nelore beef cattle reared extensively on lignified pasture. The experiment was randomized and sampled 50 steers, 50 cows, and 50 calves grazed on Brachiaria spp. pasture during the dry season. Rumen fluid in all animals was aromatic, slightly viscous, and greenish-brown in color. Microscopic examination revealed monocentric and polycentric anaerobic fungi in similar proportions (P > 0.05) in the rumen fluid of cows and steers. However, these microorganisms were not identified in any of the samples from calves. In culture exams, aerobic filamentous population was significantly higher for rumen fluid of cows compared to the other two groups. Microculture and rDNA sequence analyses showed Aspergillus spp. as the most frequent aerobic fungus among the isolates from the three bovine groups evaluated. Biochemical profiles were determined by the growth level of yeast isolates with 44 nutrient sources. Ten different yeast profiles were obtained, and yeast isolates from cow ruminal fluid showed ability to catabolize greater diversity of carbon and nitrogen sources. The differences in the fungal populations observed in this study could be explained by microbial and physiological interactions existing in the ruminal ecosystem of each age bovine group. The present study showed the fungal population of the rumen related with differences among age of cattle raised in lignified pastures. Metabolic capabilities of mycelial fungi or yeast identified in this study may be employed in new probiotics or microbial additives for different bovine categories. PMID:24962597

  1. Studies of pasture production in Extremadura (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo Vilanova, M.; González López, F.; Paredes Galán, J.; Prieto Macías, P. M.; Blanco, V. Maya

    2009-04-01

    The region of Extremadura covers more than four million hectares in the South West of Spain, with dehesas occupying almost 1.5 million hectares of its surface. This agro-silvo-pastoral land use system constitutes the most recommendable model for extensive exploitation in Mediterranean areas in which the semiarid climate and the poor, shallow soils are constraints on any other type of agricultural use. It is characterized by a grassland with a disperse cover of oak trees and shrubs, where the main production is extensive livestock combined with agriculture and forestry. The pastures are the basis for animal breeding in the dehesas being these ecosystems of great economic, social as well as environmental value in the southwestern Iberian Peninsula. These facts justify the investigation on pasture improvement and the study on spatial and temporal variations of pasture production in the whole region. Pasture production is quite variable, highly determined by soil and climate conditions. Rainfall variability produces large seasonal and annual variations, with the highest production in spring, low production in autumn and very scarce in winter. During summer, while pastures are wilting, hard seeds stay latent in the soil and gradually germinate in consecutive months. But variability of pasture production in such a heterogeneous ecosystem does not only depend on edaphic and climate conditions, but also on other factors, such as grazing management, improvement measures, fertilization, exploitation infrastructures, stocking rates, etc. The present study, carried out in the framework of the "Montado/Dehesa" INTERREG project, aimed to sample pasture production in Extremadura, in order to provide a large amount of real data for determining the influence of the different factors involved, which will constitute the basis for the developement of a production model. The latter will be integrated into a tool helping to decide on the best practice of dehesa management. Pastures were

  2. Carbon budgets for an irrigated intensively grazed dairy pasture and an unirrigated winter-grazed pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, John E.; Laubach, Johannes; Barthel, Matti; Fraser, Anitra; Phillips, Rebecca L.

    2016-05-01

    Intensification of pastoral agriculture is occurring rapidly across New Zealand, including increasing use of irrigation and fertiliser application in some regions. While this enables greater gross primary production (GPP) and livestock grazing intensity, the consequences for the net ecosystem carbon budget (NECB) of the pastures are poorly known. Here, we determined the NECB over one year for an irrigated, fertilised and rotationally grazed dairy pasture and a neighbouring unirrigated, unfertilised, winter-grazed pasture. Primary terms in the NECB calculation were: net ecosystem production (NEP), biomass carbon removed by grazing cows and carbon (C) input from their excreta. Annual NEP was measured using the eddy-covariance method. Carbon removal was estimated with plate-meter measurements calibrated against biomass collections, pre- and post-grazing. Excreta deposition was calculated from animal feed intake. The intensively managed pasture gained C (NECB = 103 ± 42 g C m-2 yr-1) but would have been subject to a non-significant C loss if cattle excreta had not been returned to the pasture. The unirrigated pasture was C-neutral (NECB = -13 ± 23 g C m-2 yr-1). While annual GPP of the former was almost twice that of the latter (2679 vs. 1372 g C m-2 yr-1), ecosystem respiration differed by only 68 % between the two pastures (2271 vs. 1352 g C m-2 yr-1). The ratio of GPP to the total annual water input of the irrigated pasture was 37 % greater than that of the unirrigated pasture, i.e. the former used the water input more efficiently than the latter to produce biomass. The NECB results agree qualitatively with those from many other eddy-covariance studies of grazed grasslands, but they seem to be at odds with long-term carbon-stock studies of other New Zealand pastures.

  3. 1. South approach to the horse pasture store, looking north; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. South approach to the horse pasture store, looking north; U.S. Highway 58 (toward Martinsville) is in the foreground - Horsepasture Store, U.S. Route 58 & State Route 687, Horse Pasture, Henry County, VA

  4. DO GRAZING CATTLE SEEK NUTRITIONALLY SUPERIOR PORTIONS OF PASTURES?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the hypothesis that grazing cattle will most often frequent nutritionally superior portions of large pastures. Forage quantity/quality characteristics were mapped among three pastures and cattle grazing patterns subsequently tracked with GPS collars. Cattle preferred locations...

  5. Fact Sheet: Accurately measuring forage yield in pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farmers have a few options for measuring pasture yield. These include pasture rulers, plate meters, and electronic gauges. Pasture rulers simply measure canopy height and assume that forage yield is directly related to height. Plate meters improve accuracy by measuring compressed height. Electronic ...

  6. Fact Sheet: Ten Questions about Pastures and Biodiversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditionally, pasture management has emphasized balancing the quantity and quality of forage for livestock production. Thus, producers have often planted single species or simple grass-legume mixtures in their pastures. Today, producers face new challenges in pasture management, including sustainab...

  7. PLANT SPECIES DIVERSITY, ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION, AND PASTURE MANAGEMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grassland farmers face new challenges in pasture management including improving sustainability, reducing inputs of fertilizers and pesticides, and protecting soil resources. Managing plant diversity within and among pastures may be one tool to aid producers in meeting these new challenges. Pasture e...

  8. Nitrous Oxide and Methane Emissions from Grazed Pasture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contribution of nitrous oxide and methane to the atmosphere from grazed pastures in the eastern U.S. is not well known. Small, vented chambers have been deployed periodically since May 2005 in a rotationally-grazed pasture in central Pennsylvania. Since locations in pastures where livestock uri...

  9. Fact Sheet: Soil Carbon Sequestration in Pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sequestration of carbon as soil organic matter is one way to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and lower the potential for global climate change. Cultivation typically caused the loss of 20 to 50% the native soil organic matter. Establishing pasture on former croplands is expected to a...

  10. Exploiting the Potential Differences in Pasture Grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperate grasses grown for pasture in Wisconsin exhibit a range of chemical and physical characteristics that influence their utilization by grazing cattle. Potential intake of all grasses declines with maturity due to decreasing cell wall digestiblity, but the leaves and stems of orchardgrass and...

  11. Measuring Carbon Sequestration in Pasture Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conversion of croplands to pasture can greatly increase sequestration of carbon in soil organic matter, removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and helping to reduce the impacts of climate change. The measurement of soil carbon, and its limitations, could impact future carbon credit programs. ...

  12. Nutrient management on pasture and haylands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient management on pastures is a critical part of maintaining and improving their ability to provide key ecosystem services including forage and fuel production, clean air and water, and climate mitigation. Our objective was to determine the scientific underpinning for purported benefits of nutr...

  13. Measuring and budgeting available forage in pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We modeled two farms that differed in size, grazing management, and feeding strategy. We first modeled the optimal management and performance conditions for each farm with the assumption that forage on pasture was measured accurately and budgeted optimally. We also established an economically optimu...

  14. Characterization of resistance to adult spittlebugs (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) in Brachiaria spp.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Lina M; Cardona, César; Miles, John W; Sotelo, Guillermo

    2013-08-01

    Nymphs and adults of several spittlebug (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) species are key pests of forage brachiariagrasses (Brachiaria spp.) in tropical America. To support current breeding programs, a series of experiments aimed at characterizing the mechanisms of resistance to adult feeding damage were carried out. Five genotypes were used: two susceptible checks (CIAT 0606 and CIAT 0654) and three nymph-resistant genotypes (CIAT 36087, CIAT 6294, and SX01NO/0102). Test insects were Aeneolamia varia (F.), A. reducta (Lallemand), and Zulia carbonaria (Lallemand). The nymph-resistant genotypes showed tolerance to all spittlebug species tested. Tolerance in these genotypes can be classified as only moderate given the extent of losses (60-80%) caused by both female and male adults. None of the nymph-resistant genotypes had antibiotic effects on adults feeding on foliage. The results also indicated that antixenosis for feeding is not a plausible explanation for lower damage scores and less biomass losses in resistant genotypes. The fact that adult longevity (usually 8 d) was not affected when the adults were forced to feed on roots of a genotype with strong antibiotic resistance to nymphs is regarded as additional evidence that resistances to nymphs and to adults in Brachiaria are largely independent. PMID:24020305

  15. Soil carbon under perennial pastures; benchmarking the influence of pasture age and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orgill, Susan E.; Spoljaric, Nancy; Kelly, Georgina

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports baseline soil carbon stocks from a field survey of 19 sites; 8 pairs/triplet in the Monaro region of New South Wales. Site comparisons were selected by the Monaro Farming Systems group to demonstrate the influence of land management on soil carbon, and included: nutrient management, liming, pasture age and cropping history. Soil carbon stocks varied with parent material and with land management. The fertilised (phosphorus) native perennial pasture had a greater stock of soil carbon compared with the unfertilised site; 46.8 vs 40.4 Mg.C.ha to 0.50 m. However, the introduced perennial pasture which had been limed had a lower stock of soil carbon compared with the unlimed site; 62.8 vs 66.7 Mg.C.ha to 0.50 m. There was a greater stock of soil carbon under two of the three younger (<10 yr old) perennial pastures compared with older (>35 yr old) pastures. Cropped sites did not have lower soil carbon stocks at all sites; however, this survey was conducted after three years of above average annual rainfall and most sites had been cropped for less than three years. At all sites more than 20% of the total carbon stock to 0.50 m was in the 0.30 to 0.50 m soil layer highlighting the importance of considering this soil layer when investigating the implications of land management on soil carbon. Our baseline data indicates that nutrient management may increase soil carbon under perennial pastures and highlights the importance of perennial pastures for soil carbon sequestration regardless of age.

  16. Testing the Amazon savannization hypothesis: fire effects on invasion of a neotropical forest by native cerrado and exotic pasture grasses

    PubMed Central

    Silvério, Divino V.; Brando, Paulo M.; Balch, Jennifer K.; Putz, Francis E.; Nepstad, Daniel C.; Oliveira-Santos, Claudinei; Bustamante, Mercedes M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in climate and land use that interact synergistically to increase fire frequencies and intensities in tropical regions are predicted to drive forests to new grass-dominated stable states. To reveal the mechanisms for such a transition, we established 50 ha plots in a transitional forest in the southwestern Brazilian Amazon to different fire treatments (unburned, burned annually (B1yr) or at 3-year intervals (B3yr)). Over an 8-year period since the commencement of these treatments, we documented: (i) the annual rate of pasture and native grass invasion in response to increasing fire frequency; (ii) the establishment of Brachiaria decumbens (an African C4 grass) as a function of decreasing canopy cover and (iii) the effects of grass fine fuel on fire intensity. Grasses invaded approximately 200 m from the edge into the interiors of burned plots (B1yr: 4.31 ha; B3yr: 4.96 ha) but invaded less than 10 m into the unburned plot (0.33 ha). The probability of B. decumbens establishment increased with seed availability and decreased with leaf area index. Fine fuel loads along the forest edge were more than three times higher in grass-dominated areas, which resulted in especially intense fires. Our results indicate that synergies between fires and invasive C4 grasses jeopardize the future of tropical forests. PMID:23610179

  17. Influence of topography on density of grassland passerines in pastures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renfrew, R.B.; Ribic, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    Pastures provide substantial habitat for grassland birds of management concern in the Driftless Area of southwestern Wisconsin. The rolling topography in this region is characterized by lowland valleys surrounded by relatively steep and often wooded slopes which are set apart from more expansive treeless uplands. We hypothesized that there would be lower densities of area sensitive grassland passerines in lowland grasslands compared to upland grasslands because of their preference for larger more open grasslands. To test this hypothesis and assess how well pasture area and vegetation structure predicted grassland passerine density compared to upland/lowland status, we conducted point counts of birds in 60 pastures in May-June 1997 and 1998. Upland pastures generally supported greater densities of grassland passerines than lowland pastures. Densities of Savannah sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis) and bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) were significantly higher in upland pastures than in lowland pastures. Grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum) density was significantly higher on uplands in one of the study years. The density of eastern meadowlark (Sturnella magna), western meadowlark (S. neglecta) and sedge wren (Cistothorus platensis) did not differ significandy between uplands and lowlands. Grassland passerine density was also predicted by pasture size and vegetation structure. Densities of bobolink and grasshopper sparrow were higher in larger pastures. Bobolink and Savannah sparrow occurred on pastures with greater vegetation height-density and less bare ground; bobolink also preferred shallower litter depths. Lowland pastures supported grassland bird species of management concern and should not be neglected. However, we recommend that pasture management for grassland passerines in areas of variable topography favor relatively large upland pastures that will contain higher densities of species of management concern.

  18. New pasture plants intensify invasive species risk

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Don A.; Catford, Jane A.; Barney, Jacob N.; Hulme, Philip E.; Inderjit; Martin, Tara G.; Pauchard, Aníbal; Pyšek, Petr; Richardson, David M.; Riley, Sophie; Visser, Vernon

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural intensification is critical to meet global food demand, but intensification threatens native species and degrades ecosystems. Sustainable intensification (SI) is heralded as a new approach for enabling growth in agriculture while minimizing environmental impacts. However, the SI literature has overlooked a major environmental risk. Using data from eight countries on six continents, we show that few governments regulate conventionally bred pasture taxa to limit threats to natural areas, even though most agribusinesses promote taxa with substantial weed risk. New pasture taxa (including species, subspecies, varieties, cultivars, and plant-endophyte combinations) are bred with characteristics typical of invasive species and environmental weeds. By introducing novel genetic and endophyte variation, pasture taxa are imbued with additional capacity for invasion and environmental impact. New strategies to prevent future problems are urgently needed. We highlight opportunities for researchers, agribusiness, and consumers to reduce environmental risks associated with new pasture taxa. We also emphasize four main approaches that governments could consider as they build new policies to limit weed risks, including (i) national lists of taxa that are prohibited based on environmental risk; (ii) a weed risk assessment for all new taxa; (iii) a program to rapidly detect and control new taxa that invade natural areas; and (iv) the polluter-pays principle, so that if a taxon becomes an environmental weed, industry pays for its management. There is mounting pressure to increase livestock production. With foresight and planning, growth in agriculture can be achieved sustainably provided that the scope of SI expands to encompass environmental weed risks. PMID:25368175

  19. Uele River, Cleared Pasture Lands, Zaire, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In this view of the Uele River and cleared pasturelands in Zaire (3.5N, 27.0E), the distinctive dendritic drainage pattern of the region becomes obvious. Cleared pasture lands shown as light green, contrasts with the dark green of the remaining closed conopy forests. The remnant woodlands along the streams indicates the intricate drainage network of this hilly region. Scattered vegetation free spots show the deep red tropical soils.

  20. New pasture plants intensify invasive species risk.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Don A; Catford, Jane A; Barney, Jacob N; Hulme, Philip E; Inderjit; Martin, Tara G; Pauchard, Aníbal; Pyšek, Petr; Richardson, David M; Riley, Sophie; Visser, Vernon

    2014-11-18

    Agricultural intensification is critical to meet global food demand, but intensification threatens native species and degrades ecosystems. Sustainable intensification (SI) is heralded as a new approach for enabling growth in agriculture while minimizing environmental impacts. However, the SI literature has overlooked a major environmental risk. Using data from eight countries on six continents, we show that few governments regulate conventionally bred pasture taxa to limit threats to natural areas, even though most agribusinesses promote taxa with substantial weed risk. New pasture taxa (including species, subspecies, varieties, cultivars, and plant-endophyte combinations) are bred with characteristics typical of invasive species and environmental weeds. By introducing novel genetic and endophyte variation, pasture taxa are imbued with additional capacity for invasion and environmental impact. New strategies to prevent future problems are urgently needed. We highlight opportunities for researchers, agribusiness, and consumers to reduce environmental risks associated with new pasture taxa. We also emphasize four main approaches that governments could consider as they build new policies to limit weed risks, including (i) national lists of taxa that are prohibited based on environmental risk; (ii) a weed risk assessment for all new taxa; (iii) a program to rapidly detect and control new taxa that invade natural areas; and (iv) the polluter-pays principle, so that if a taxon becomes an environmental weed, industry pays for its management. There is mounting pressure to increase livestock production. With foresight and planning, growth in agriculture can be achieved sustainably provided that the scope of SI expands to encompass environmental weed risks. PMID:25368175

  1. Chromosome numbers and meiotic analysis in the pre-breeding of Brachiaria decumbens (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Ricci, Gléia Cristina Laverde; De Souza-Kaneshima, Alice Maria; Felismino, Mariana Ferrari; Mendes-Bonato, Andrea Beatriz; Pagliarini, Maria Suely; Do Valle, Cacilda Borges

    2011-08-01

    A total of 44 accessions of Brachiaria decumbens were analysed for chromosome count and meiotic behaviour in order to identify potential progenitors for crosses. Among them, 15 accessions presented 2n = 18; 27 accessions, 2n = 36; and 2 accessions, 2n = 45 chromosomes. Among the diploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities was low, ranging from 0.82% to 7.93%. In the 27 tetraploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities ranged from 18.41% to 65.83%. The most common meiotic abnormalities were related to irregular chromosome segregation, but chromosome stickiness and abnormal cytokinesis were observed in low frequency. All abnormalities can compromise pollen viability by generating unbalanced gametes. Based on the chromosome number and meiotic stability, the present study indicates the apomictic tetraploid accessions that can act as male genitor to produce interspecific hybrids with B. ruziziensis or intraspecific hybrids with recently artificially tetraploidized accessions. PMID:21869477

  2. A Parthenogenesis Gene Candidate and Evidence for Segmental Allopolyploidy in Apomictic Brachiaria decumbens

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Margaret; Heffelfinger, Christopher; Bernal, Diana; Quintero, Constanza; Zapata, Yeny Patricia; Perez, Juan Guillermo; De Vega, Jose; Miles, John; Dellaporta, Stephen; Tohme, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Apomixis, asexual reproduction through seed, enables breeders to identify and faithfully propagate superior heterozygous genotypes by seed without the disadvantages of vegetative propagation or the expense and complexity of hybrid seed production. The availability of new tools such as genotyping by sequencing and bioinformatics pipelines for species lacking reference genomes now makes the construction of dense maps possible in apomictic species, despite complications including polyploidy, multisomic inheritance, self-incompatibility, and high levels of heterozygosity. In this study, we developed saturated linkage maps for the maternal and paternal genomes of an interspecific Brachiaria ruziziensis (R. Germ. and C. M. Evrard) × B. decumbens Stapf. F1 mapping population in order to identify markers linked to apomixis. High-resolution molecular karyotyping and comparative genomics with Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv provided conclusive evidence for segmental allopolyploidy in B. decumbens, with strong preferential pairing of homologs across the genome and multisomic segregation relatively more common in chromosome 8. The apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR) was mapped to a region of reduced recombination on B. decumbens chromosome 5. The Pennisetum squamulatum (L.) R.Br. PsASGR-BABY BOOM-like (psASGR–BBML)-specific primer pair p779/p780 was in perfect linkage with the ASGR in the F1 mapping population and diagnostic for reproductive mode in a diversity panel of known sexual and apomict Brachiaria (Trin.) Griseb. and P. maximum Jacq. germplasm accessions and cultivars. These findings indicate that ASGR–BBML gene sequences are highly conserved across the Paniceae and add further support for the postulation of the ASGR–BBML as candidate genes for the apomictic function of parthenogenesis. PMID:27206716

  3. A Parthenogenesis Gene Candidate and Evidence for Segmental Allopolyploidy in Apomictic Brachiaria decumbens.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Margaret; Heffelfinger, Christopher; Bernal, Diana; Quintero, Constanza; Zapata, Yeny Patricia; Perez, Juan Guillermo; De Vega, Jose; Miles, John; Dellaporta, Stephen; Tohme, Joe

    2016-07-01

    Apomixis, asexual reproduction through seed, enables breeders to identify and faithfully propagate superior heterozygous genotypes by seed without the disadvantages of vegetative propagation or the expense and complexity of hybrid seed production. The availability of new tools such as genotyping by sequencing and bioinformatics pipelines for species lacking reference genomes now makes the construction of dense maps possible in apomictic species, despite complications including polyploidy, multisomic inheritance, self-incompatibility, and high levels of heterozygosity. In this study, we developed saturated linkage maps for the maternal and paternal genomes of an interspecific Brachiaria ruziziensis (R. Germ. and C. M. Evrard) × B. decumbens Stapf. F1 mapping population in order to identify markers linked to apomixis. High-resolution molecular karyotyping and comparative genomics with Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv provided conclusive evidence for segmental allopolyploidy in B. decumbens, with strong preferential pairing of homologs across the genome and multisomic segregation relatively more common in chromosome 8. The apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR) was mapped to a region of reduced recombination on B. decumbens chromosome 5. The Pennisetum squamulatum (L.) R.Br. PsASGR-BABY BOOM-like (psASGR-BBML)-specific primer pair p779/p780 was in perfect linkage with the ASGR in the F1 mapping population and diagnostic for reproductive mode in a diversity panel of known sexual and apomict Brachiaria (Trin.) Griseb. and P. maximum Jacq. germplasm accessions and cultivars. These findings indicate that ASGR-BBML gene sequences are highly conserved across the Paniceae and add further support for the postulation of the ASGR-BBML as candidate genes for the apomictic function of parthenogenesis. PMID:27206716

  4. Low phosphorus tolerance mechanisms: phosphorus recycling and photosynthate partitioning in the tropical forage grass, Brachiaria hybrid cultivar Mulato compared with rice.

    PubMed

    Nanamori, Masahito; Shinano, Takuro; Wasaki, Jun; Yamamura, Takuya; Rao, Idupulapati M; Osaki, Mitsuru

    2004-04-01

    The Brachiaria hybrid cv. Mulato is well adapted to low-fertility acid soils deficient in phosphorus (P). To study the grassy forage's mechanisms for tolerating low P supply, we compared it with rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Kitaake). We tested by using nutrient solution cultures, and quantified the effects of P deficiency on the enzymatic activities of phosphohydrolases and on carbon metabolism in P-deficient leaves. While P deficiency markedly induced activity of phosphohydrolases in both crops, the ratio of inorganic phosphorus to total P in leaves was greater in Brachiaria hybrid. Phosphorus deficiency in leaves also markedly influenced the partitioning of carbon in both crops. In the Brachiaria hybrid, compared with rice, the smaller proportion of (14)C partitioned into sugars and the larger proportion into amino acids and organic acids in leaves coincided with decreased levels of sucrose and starch. Hence, in P-deficient leaves of the Brachiaria hybrid, triose-P was metabolized into amino acids or organic acids. Results thus indicate that the Brachiaria hybrid, compared with rice, tolerates low P supply to leaves by enhancing sugar catabolism and by inducing the activity of several phosphohydrolases. This apparently causes rapid P turnover and enables the Brachiaria hybrid to use P more efficiently. PMID:15111721

  5. Development and validation of microsatellite markers for Brachiaria ruziziensis obtained by partial genome assembly of Illumina single-end reads

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brachiaria ruziziensis is one of the most important forage species planted in the tropics. The application of genomic tools to aid the selection of superior genotypes can provide support to B. ruziziensis breeding programs. However, there is a complete lack of information about the B. ruziziensis genome. Also, the availability of genomic tools, such as molecular markers, to support B. ruziziensis breeding programs is rather limited. Recently, next-generation sequencing technologies have been applied to generate sequence data for the identification of microsatellite regions and primer design. In this study, we present a first validated set of SSR markers for Brachiaria ruziziensis, selected from a de novo partial genome assembly of single-end Illumina reads. Results A total of 85,567 perfect microsatellite loci were detected in contigs with a minimum 10X coverage. We selected a set of 500 microsatellite loci identified in contigs with minimum 100X coverage for primer design and synthesis, and tested a subset of 269 primer pairs, 198 of which were polymorphic on 11 representative B. ruziziensis accessions. Descriptive statistics for these primer pairs are presented, as well as estimates of marker transferability to other relevant brachiaria species. Finally, a set of 11 multiplex panels containing the 30 most informative markers was validated and proposed for B. ruziziensis genetic analysis. Conclusions We show that the detection and development of microsatellite markers from genome assembled Illumina single-end DNA sequences is highly efficient. The developed markers are readily suitable for genetic analysis and marker assisted selection of Brachiaria ruziziensis. The use of this approach for microsatellite marker development is promising for species with limited genomic information, whose breeding programs would benefit from the use of genomic tools. To our knowledge, this is the first set of microsatellite markers developed for this important species

  6. Hepatogenous photosensitization of ruminants by Brachiaria decumbens and panicum dichotomiflorum in the absence of sporidesmin: lithogenic saponins may be responsible.

    PubMed

    Meagher, L P; Wilkins, A L; Miles, C O; Collin, R G; Fagliari, J J

    1996-08-01

    As part of a study of plants involved in crystal-associated hepatogenous photosensitization diseases, samples of Brachiaria decumbens and Panicum dichotomiflorum on which cattle and goats had recently been photosensitized were analyzed. The level of saponins associated with these photosensitization outbreaks were determined by GC-MS. Only low levels of Pithomyces chartarum spores were present on the B decumbens, and all isolates obtained failed to produce sporidesmin. PMID:8829344

  7. Pasture monitoring at a farm scale with the USDA-NRCS pasture condition score system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pasture Condition Score (PCS) system, developed by the USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), is an assessment tool for pastureland enrolled in conservation programs. Ten indicators of vegetation and soils status are rated on a 1 to 5 scale and summed to give an aggregate score, whi...

  8. Perennial Forage Kochia for Increased Production of Winter Grazed Pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grazing forage kochia (Kochia prostrata) during fall/winter has improved livestock health and reduced winter feeding costs. The objectives of this study were to compare forage production/quality and livestock performance of traditional winter pastures versus pastures with forage kochia. Two kochia...

  9. Pasture growth and decomposition under continuous and rotational grazing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Past research has shown that grazing management can affect both pasture growth and litter decomposition. The objective of this study was to compare forage appearance (growth) and forage disappearance (decomposition) on both continuous and rotational grazed beef cattle pasture in Ohio. Data was colle...

  10. Productivity, botanical composition, and nutritive value of commercial pasture mixtures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pastures in the northeastern USA often are planted to mixtures of grasses and legumes. There is limited public sector information on the performance of commercial forage mixtures. We evaluated a range of commercial pasture mixtures to determine if the number of species in a mixture affected yield an...

  11. Lake-dredged material for beef cattle pasture establishment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbonatic lake-dredged materials can be used as soil amendments (lime and fertilizer) for early establishment of bahiagrass in beef cattle pastures in Florida. Some of the indirect benefits of the liming effects of this material for pastures include enhancing nutrient availability, nitrification, n...

  12. EFFECTS OF LIVESTOCK PASTURING ON NONPOINT SURFACE RUNOFF

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project was initiated to evaluate the effects of livestock pasturing in the humid regions of the United States on the quality of nonpoint surface runoff. Three pasturing regimes which are more commonly practiced in the corn belt states were evaluated to determine their poten...

  13. Influence of transient flooding on methane fluxes from subtropical pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seasonally flooded subtropical pastures are major methane (CH4) sources, where transient flooding drives episodic and high-magnitude emissions from the underlying landscape. Understanding the mechanisms that drive these patterns is needed to better understand pasture CH4 emissions and their response...

  14. Pasture condition scoring at the whole-farm scale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Producers need monitoring and assessment tools to aid in pasture management. The Pasture Condition Score (PCS) system was developed by the USDA-NRCS as a monitoring and management tool. Information is lacking, however, on how PCS results vary within and among grazing seasons and within and among far...

  15. 2. Overall view of the horse pasture store from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Overall view of the horse pasture store from the east; U.S. Highway 58 runs from left to right across the view, while Route 687 rices into the distance at the left - Horsepasture Store, U.S. Route 58 & State Route 687, Horse Pasture, Henry County, VA

  16. 5. East and north (rear) elevations of the horse pasture ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. East and north (rear) elevations of the horse pasture store, looking southwest; the store's two outbuildings can ben seen at the right of the view - Horsepasture Store, U.S. Route 58 & State Route 687, Horse Pasture, Henry County, VA

  17. 4. West and south elevations of the horse pasture store, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. West and south elevations of the horse pasture store, looking northeast; a "Greenhouse" structure can be seen extending to the west of the store at the left of the view - Horsepasture Store, U.S. Route 58 & State Route 687, Horse Pasture, Henry County, VA

  18. Ruminal motility of stocker cattle grazed on winter wheat pasture.

    PubMed

    Horn, G W; Frost, D F

    1982-10-01

    A 2-yr study was conducted to determine whether bloat of stocker cattle grazing winter wheat pasture is a primary bloat or a secondary bloat as a result of reduced ruminal motility. Amplitude (mm Hg) and frequency of ruminal contractions (contractions/min) of steers were measured before and after the steers were placed on wheat pasture, and at about weekly intervals during the pasture grazing periods. Implantable pressure transducers and water-filled balloon cannulas were used to measure ruminal motility. During the first year, amplitude of contractions increased (P less than .005) during grazing of wheat pasture (i.e., 20.5 vs 6.7 and 21.6 vs 12.9, respectively, for steers with implanted pressure transducers and water-filled balloon cannulas). Frequency of ruminal contractions of steers on wheat pasture was not decreased (P greater than .05). In the second year, amplitudes of ruminal contractions of steers on wheat pasture ranged from 11.0 to 33.5, and were either similar or greater (P less than .05) than the mean for the pre- and post-wheat pasture period (16.5). Frequencies of ruminal contractions that ranged from 1.66 to 1.80 were observed on four dates during the pasture grazing period, and were decreased (P less than .05) as compared with the mean for the pre- and post-wheat pasture period (2.43). However, the reduced frequencies were not accompanied by reduced (P greater than .05) amplitude x frequency of contractions. The data indicate that ruminal motility is not decreased in stocker cattle grazing winter wheat pasture. PMID:7142058

  19. Biodiversity on Swedish pastures: estimating biodiversity production costs.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Fredrik Olof Laurentius

    2009-01-01

    This paper estimates the costs of producing biological diversity on Swedish permanent grasslands. A simple model is introduced where biodiversity on pastures is produced using grazing animals. On the pastures, the grazing animals create a sufficient grazing pressure to lead to an environment that suits many rare and red-listed species. Two types of pastures are investigated: semi-natural and cultivated. Biological diversity produced on a pasture is estimated by combining a biodiversity indicator, which measures the quality of the land, with the size of the pasture. Biodiversity is, in this context, a quantitative measure where a given quantity can be produced either by small area with high quality or a larger area with lower quality. Two areas in different parts of Sweden are investigated. Box-Cox transformations, which provide flexible functional forms, are used in the empirical analysis and the results indicate that the biodiversity production costs differ between the regions. The major contribution of this paper is that it develops and tests a method of estimating biodiversity production costs on permanent pastures when biodiversity quality differs between pastures. If the method were to be used with cost data, that were more thoroughly collected and covered additional production areas, biodiversity cost functions could be estimated and used in applied policy work. PMID:18079049

  20. Perspectives on pasture versus indoor feeding of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Wilhelm

    2016-01-15

    The dairy industry in many regions of the world has moved towards a high-input/high-output system maximising annual milk production per cow, primarily through increasing concentrate-based total mixed rations fed indoors year round, as opposed to allowing cows to feed on pasture. Pasture-based dairy systems in regions like New Zealand and Ireland are oriented towards maximum milk yield per unit of pasture, which has led to Holstein strains that are 50 to 100 kg lighter, exhibit a higher body condition score, and produce roughly half the annual amount of milk as compared to their Holstein counterparts kept in confinement in North America and Europe. Freedom from hunger might not be guaranteed when high-yielding dairy cows are kept on pasture without any supplemental feed, but at the same time no access to pasture can be considered an animal welfare concern, because pasturing is generally beneficial to the animals' health. On pasture, lighter-weight dairy cows with a medium milk production potential have proven to be superior with regard to feed efficiency and fertility. The year-round indoor feeding of high-yielding dairy cows with total mixed rations containing substantial amounts of human-edible crops from arable land puts global food security at risk and fails to utilise the evolutionary advantages of ruminants. PMID:26010136

  1. Crop and pasture response to climate change.

    PubMed

    Tubiello, Francesco N; Soussana, Jean-François; Howden, S Mark

    2007-12-11

    We review recent research of importance to understanding crop and pasture plant species response to climate change. Topics include plant response to elevated CO(2) concentration, interactions with climate change variables and air pollutants, impacts of increased climate variability and frequency of extreme events, the role of weeds and pests, disease and animal health, issues in biodiversity, and vulnerability of soil carbon pools. We critically analyze the links between fundamental knowledge at the plant and plot level and the additional socio-economic variables that determine actual production and trade of food at regional to global scales. We conclude by making recommendations for current and future research needs, with a focus on continued and improved integration of experimental and modeling efforts. PMID:18077401

  2. Production potential of warm-season annual pastures in rotation with corn silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Warm-season grasses can provide a pasture resource and give relief to cool-season pastures during the hot summer months when cool-season pasture production declines. Increased pasture availability is especially important for organic producers because of the newly defined grazing requirement for org...

  3. [Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Estimation Models for Pasture Quality].

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei-wei; Gong, Cai-lan; Hu, Yong; Wei, Yong-lin; Li, Long; Liu, Feng-yi; Meng, Peng

    2015-10-01

    Crude protein (CP), crude fat (CFA) and crude fiber (CFI) are key indicators for evaluation of the quality and feeding value of pasture. Hence, identification of these biological contents is an essential practice for animal husbandry. As current approaches to pasture quality estimation are time-consuming and costly, and even generate hazardous waste, a real-time and non-destructive method is therefore developed in this study using pasture canopy hyperspectral data. A field campaign was carried out in August 2013 around Qinghai Lake in order to obtain field spectral properties of 19 types of natural pasture using the ASD Field Spec 3, a field spectrometer that works in the optical region (350-2 500 nm) of the electromagnetic spectrum. In additional to the spectral data, pasture samples were also collected from the field and examined in laboratory to measure the relative concentration of CP (%), CFA (%) and CFI (%). After spectral denoising and smoothing, the relationship of pasture quality parameters with the reflectance spectrum, the first derivatives of reflectance (FDR), band ratio and the wavelet coefficients (WCs) was analyzed respectively. The concentration of CP, CFA and CFI of pasture was found closely correlated with FDR with wavebands centered at 424, 1 668, and 918 nm as well as with the low-scale (scale = 2, 4) Morlet, Coiflets and Gassian WCs. Accordingly, the linear, exponential, and polynomial equations between each pasture variable and FDR or WCs were developed. Validation of the developed equations indicated that the polynomial model with an independent variable of Coiflets WCs (scale = 4, wavelength =1 209 nm), the polynomial model with an independent variable of FDR, and the exponential model with an independent variable of FDR were the optimal model for prediction of concentration of CP, CFA and CFI of pasture, respectively. The R2 of the pasture quality estimation models was between 0.646 and 0.762 at the 0.01 significance level. Results suggest

  4. Spectrometry of pasture condition and biogeochemistry in the central Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asner, Gregory P.; Townsend, Alan R.; Bustamante, Mercedes M. C.

    Regional analyses of Amazon cattle pasture biogeochemistry are difficult due to the complexity of human, edaphic, biotic and climatic factors and persistent cloud cover in satellite observations. We developed a method to estimate key biophysical properties of Amazon pastures using hyperspectral reflectance data and photon transport inverse modeling. Remote estimates of live and senescent biomass were strongly correlated with plant-available forms of soil phosphorus and calcium. These results provide a basis for monitoring pasture condition and biogeochemistry in the Amazon Basin using spaceborne hyperspectral sensors.

  5. Spectrometry of Pasture Condition and Biogeochemistry in the Central Amazon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asner, Gregory P.; Townsend, Alan R.; Bustamante, Mercedes M. C.

    1999-01-01

    Regional analyses of Amazon cattle pasture biogeochemistry are difficult due to the complexity of human, edaphic, biotic and climatic factors and persistent cloud cover in satellite observations. We developed a method to estimate key biophysical properties of Amazon pastures using hyperspectral reflectance data and photon transport inverse modeling. Remote estimates of live and senescent biomass were strongly correlated with plant-available forms of soil phosphorus and calcium. These results provide a basis for monitoring pasture condition and biogeochemistry in the Amazon Basin using spaceborne hyperspectral sensors.

  6. Greenhouse gas emission from cattle urine deposition in pasture under tropical conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancebo Mazzetto, Andre; Simões Barneze, Arlete; Josefine Feigl, Brigitte; Clemente Cerri, Carlos; Willem van Groenigen, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Animal production systems are important sources of greenhouse gases (GHG), especially methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Brazilian beef production is almost exclusively (more than 90%) pasture-based, and most GHG emissions from this system originate from urine patches. GHG emissions from urine patches have been extensively studied in temperate climates, but not for tropical conditions. Here we examined the driving factors of N2O emission from urine patches (U treatment) in the tropics, as well as the role of the nitrification inhibitor DCD (dicyandiamide - U+DCD treatment) in mitigating emissions. We measured the emission of CH4 and N2O from beef cattle urine (360 kg N ha-1) in Rondônia state (Brazil, tropical climate), during two different seasons (winter and summer), with and without the application of DCD (10 kg ha-1). We hypothesized that the high temperature and periodical rainfall can decrease GHG emissions from urine patches through accelerating mineralization of urine-N. The cumulative emissions during winter were 10.8 and 39.2 mg N-N2O m-2 (U and U+DCD treatment, respectively), and 126.2 and 129.5 mg N-N2O m-2 during summer (U and U+DCD treatment, respectively). No effects of DCD were detected in summer, but DCD retarded the main peak of N2O emission. Otherwise, during winter U+DCD treatment had the higher cumulative N2O emission (p≤0.05). The emission factors determined were 0.08 and 0.13% (winter U and U+DCD, respectively) and 0.38 and 0.37% (summer U and U+DCD, respectively), significantly lower than the IPCC default value of 1%. We hypothesize that biological nitrification inhibition (BNI) is the main reason for such low emission factors, since Brachiaria grasses naturally inhibits the nitrification process. In this situation the use of DCD is not recommended. The fast decomposition of DCD in warmer climates leads to a short-term effect in nitrification inhibition. The excess of N due to DCD decomposition can trigger a priming-effect, increasing

  7. Screening for resistance to adult spittlebugs (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) in Brachiaria spp.: methods and categories of resistance.

    PubMed

    López, Francisco; Cardona, Cesar; Miles, John W; Sotelo, Guillermo; Montoya, James

    2009-06-01

    Both nymphal and adult stages of several species of spittlebugs (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) are key economic pests of brachiariagrasses (Brachiaria spp.) in tropical America. Progress has been made in the characterization and development of antibiosis resistance to nymphs in brachiariagrasses. Essentially no attention has been given to screening germplasm for resistance to adults. To support current breeding programs, a series of experiments was conducted to develop a methodology to screen for adult damage and to study categories of resistance to adult feeding damage. Six host brachiariagrass genotypes were used: two susceptible checks (CIAT 0606 and CIAT 0654) and four nymph-resistant genotypes (CIAT 6294, CIAT 36062, CIAT 36087, and SX01NO/0102). Test insects were Aeneolamia varia (F.) and Zulia carbonaria (Lallemand). None of the nymph-resistant genotypes was antibiotic to adults. All four nymph-resistant genotypes showed tolerance to A. varia and Z. carbonaria feeding damage. The levels of tolerance to adults of Z. carbonaria, a larger, more aggressive species, were lower. Of the four nymph-resistant genotypes, only CIAT 6294 and CIAT 36087 showed some tolerance to Z. carbonaria expressed as lower leaf damage scores, less chlorophyll loss, and lower functional plant loss indices. The fact that a genotype like SX01NO/0102, which is highly antibiotic to nymphs, is susceptible to adult damage suggests that mechanisms of resistance to the two spittlebug life stages may be independent. Results of these studies suggest a need to incorporate routine screening for tolerance to adult feeding damage as an additional selection criterion in the breeding scheme. PMID:19610452

  8. Fertile transgenic Brachiaria ruziziensis (ruzigrass) plants by particle bombardment of tetraploidized callus.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, Genki; Gondo, Takahiro; Suenaga, Kazuhiro; Akashi, Ryo

    2012-03-15

    We have produced transgenic plants of the tropical forage crop Brachiaria ruziziensis (ruzigrass) by particle bombardment-mediated transformation of multiple-shoot clumps and embryogenic calli. Cultures of multiple-shoot clumps and embryogenic calli were induced on solidified MS medium supplemented with 0.5mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2mg/L 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) or 4mg/L 2,4-D and 0.2mg/L BAP, respectively. Both cultures were bombarded with a vector containing an herbicide resistance gene (bar) as a selectable marker and the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. Sixteen hours after bombardment, embryogenic calli showed a significantly higher number of transient GUS expression spots per plate and callus than multiple-shoot clumps, suggesting that embryogenic callus is the more suitable target tissue. Following bombardment and selection with 10mg/L bialaphos, herbicide-resistant embryogenic calli regenerated shoots and roots in vitro, and mature transgenic plants have been raised in the greenhouse. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA gel blot analysis verified that the GUS gene was integrated into the genome of the two regenerated lines. In SacI digests, the two transgenic lines showed two or five copies of GUS gene fragments, respectively, and integration at different sites. Histochemical analysis revealed stable expression in roots, shoots and inflorescences. Transgenic plants derived from diploid target callus turned out to be sterile, while transgenics from colchicine-tetraploidized callus were fertile. PMID:22236981

  9. 75 FR 7153 - National Organic Program; Access to Pasture (Livestock)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-17

    ..., NOP published an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR) (71 FR 19131) seeking input on: (1... the ``National Organic Program (NOP)--Access to Pasture (Livestock)'' proposed rule (73 FR 63584)....

  10. Pasture-scale measurement of methane emissions of grazing cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying methane emission of cattle grazing on southern Great Plains pastures using micrometeorology presents several challenges. Cattle are elevated, mobile point sources of methane, so that knowing their location in relation to atmospheric methane concentration measurements becomes critical. St...

  11. GENERAL OVERVIEW, LOOKING EAST, FROM RECLAIMED PASTURE TO 8750 PIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL OVERVIEW, LOOKING EAST, FROM RECLAIMED PASTURE TO 8750 PIT WITH STRIPPING AND RECLAMATION ACTIVITY ONGOING SIDE BY SIDE. - Drummond Coal Company Cedrum Mine, 8750 Pit, County Road 124, Townley, Walker County, AL

  12. VIEW OF RIDING STABLE AND PASTURE FROM ENTRANCE ROAD, PART ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF RIDING STABLE AND PASTURE FROM ENTRANCE ROAD, PART TWO OF PANORAMA, FACING NORTHEAST - Overhills, Fort Bragg Military Reservation, Approximately 15 miles NW of Fayetteville, Overhills, Harnett County, NC

  13. View east of the irrigation ditch in the upslope pasture ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View east of the irrigation ditch in the upslope pasture above the ranch core. The ditch flows toward the eastern barbed wire fenceline in the background. - Tassi Ranch, Tassi Springs, Littlefield, Mohave County, AZ

  14. 1. Distant view, showing bridge in context with agricultural (pastures ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Distant view, showing bridge in context with agricultural (pastures and cornfields) setting; looking southeast. - Eureka Bridge, Spanning Yellow River (Moved to City Park, Castalia), Frankville, Winneshiek County, IA

  15. West wing, west elevation, seen entirety from the pasture at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West wing, west elevation, seen entirety from the pasture at the west edge of state park property. (recreation of HABS No. CA-38-P152-1). - Vallejo Adobe, Adobe Road at Casa Grande, Petaluma, Sonoma County, CA

  16. 8. OBLIQUE VIEW OF WALKER BRIDGE FROM PASTURE SOUTH OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. OBLIQUE VIEW OF WALKER BRIDGE FROM PASTURE SOUTH OF THE KLAMATH RIVER; FACING NORTHEAST. - Walker Bridge, Spanning Klamath River and connecting Highway 96 and Walker Road, Klamath River, Siskiyou County, CA

  17. 4. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF WALKER BRIDGE FROM IRRIGATED PASTURE BETWEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF WALKER BRIDGE FROM IRRIGATED PASTURE BETWEEN THE KLAMATH RIVER AND WALKER ROAD; FACING WEST. - Walker Bridge, Spanning Klamath River and connecting Highway 96 and Walker Road, Klamath River, Siskiyou County, CA

  18. Energy content of tropical grasses and legumes grown for bioenergy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biomass samples of the tropical grasses Brachiaria brizantha (Hochst. ex A. Rich.) Staph, Brachiaria humidicola (Rendle) Schweick, Brachiaria decumbens Staph, Panicum maximum Jacq., Pennistetum alopecuroides (L.) Spreng and three species of the tropical legume Stylosanthes grown in Mato Grosso do Su...

  19. Determination of pasture quality using airborne hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullanagari, R. R.; Kereszturi, G.; Yule, Ian J.; Irwin, M. E.

    2015-10-01

    Pasture quality is a critical determinant which influences animal performance (live weight gain, milk and meat production) and animal health. Assessment of pasture quality is therefore required to assist farmers with grazing planning and management, benchmarking between seasons and years. Traditionally, pasture quality is determined by field sampling which is laborious, expensive and time consuming, and the information is not available in real-time. Hyperspectral remote sensing has potential to accurately quantify biochemical composition of pasture over wide areas in great spatial detail. In this study an airborne imaging spectrometer (AisaFENIX, Specim) was used with a spectral range of 380-2500 nm with 448 spectral bands. A case study of a 600 ha hill country farm in New Zealand is used to illustrate the use of the system. Radiometric and atmospheric corrections, along with automatized georectification of the imagery using Digital Elevation Model (DEM), were applied to the raw images to convert into geocoded reflectance images. Then a multivariate statistical method, partial least squares (PLS), was applied to estimate pasture quality such as crude protein (CP) and metabolisable energy (ME) from canopy reflectance. The results from this study revealed that estimates of CP and ME had a R2 of 0.77 and 0.79, and RMSECV of 2.97 and 0.81 respectively. By utilizing these regression models, spatial maps were created over the imaged area. These pasture quality maps can be used for adopting precision agriculture practices which improves farm profitability and environmental sustainability.

  20. Open pasture, silvopasture, and sward herbage maturity effects on nutritive value and fermentation characteristics of cool-season pasture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Appalachian USA, growing forages within woodlots offers promise of increased farm productivity. A synchronized, temporal understanding of open (OP) and silvopasture (SP) nutritive characteristics is essential for grazing system development. We examined pasture type nutritive value relationships w...

  1. Spatiotemporal moisture dynamics in a prairie pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Amber; Ireson, Andrew; Helgason, Warren

    2016-04-01

    For most practical applications, soil moisture estimates are needed at field scale, integrated over the root zone. We present here results from a field study in a pasture site in Saskatchewan, Canada. We combine observations of point scale soil moisture content from an array of neutron probes with continuous, field scale, shallow soil moisture content observations from the COSMOS instrument. The neutron probe data provide insights into the spatial variability of soil moisture processes, which is highly significant at this site. In particular, we find that the field comprises non-participating profiles, where infiltration, change in storage and drainage are minimal, and dynamic profiles, where these processes are highly dynamic. This strongly affects the relationship between the spatial mean vs standard deviation of moisture content, with important implications for upscaling of point scale observations to field scale. The COSMOS performs well, but only captures changes in water content to a depth of around 20 cm, meaning that upscaling with depth is required to produce a field scale, root zone integrated estimation of soil moisture content. We compare three upscaling approaches.

  2. Sublethal effects of antibiosis resistance on the reproductive biology of two spittlebug (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) species affecting Brachiaria spp.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Paola A; Miller, María F; Cardona, Cesar; Miles, John W; Sotelo, Guillermo; Montoya, James

    2008-04-01

    Several greenhouse experiments were used to measure how high levels of antibiosis resistance to nymphs in two interspecific Brachiaria (brachiariagrass) hybrids affect life history parameters of the spittlebugs Aeneolamia varia (F.) and Zulia carbonaria (Lallemand), two of the most important spittlebug (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) species affecting Brachiaria production in Colombia. The A. varia-resistant hybrid CIAT 36062, the Z. carbonaria-resistant hybrid SX01NO/0102, and the susceptible accession CIAT 0654 were used to compare the effect of all possible combinations of food sources for nymphs and adults. Calculation of growth indexes showed a significant impact of antibiosis resistance on the biology of immature stages of both species. Median survival times of adults feeding on resistant genotypes did not differ from those recorded on the susceptible genotype, suggesting that factors responsible for high mortality of nymphs in the resistant hybrids did not affect adult survival. Rearing nymphs of A. varia on CIAT 36062 and of Z. carbonaria on SX01NO/0102 had deleterious sublethal effects on the reproductive biology of resulting adult females. It is concluded that high nymphal mortality and subsequent sublethal effects of nymphal antibiosis on adults should have a major impact on the demography of the two spittlebug species studied. PMID:18459425

  3. CO2 balance of an intensively grazed temperate pasture during pasture renewal via cultivation or direct drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, Susanna; Mudge, Paul; Wall, Aaron; Campbell, Dave; Schipper, Louis

    2015-04-01

    The management practice of pasture renewal (PR, also referred to as 'restoration') of permanent pastures offers the opportunity to replace low producing pasture, remove weeds and pests, improve drainage, and introduce improved pasture varieties, thereby increasing pasture production. PR can consist of a range of practices including spraying existing pasture with herbicide, followed by direct drilling or full cultivation (ploughing). Although PR is common in some farming systems, little is known about the impact of PR of permanent pastures on soil C and CO2 dynamics. Here we report on the CO2 balance following four PR events of intensively grazed permanent pastures in temperate New Zealand. Three events of PR followed the same method which included two herbicide sprays and a full cultivation (CULT). PR events took place in either spring or autumn, which meant soil moisture conditions varied greatly between PR events. For the fourth PR event, pasture was sprayed only once, and was not cultivated but instead seeds were directly drilled (DD) into the sprayed-off pasture. Chambers and the eddy covariance technique were used to measure the CO2 exchange before, during and after PR. In addition to the direct loss of CO2 measured during the PR events, we also quantified the 'net impact of PR' which we defined as the difference between net CO2 exchange of the pasture that underwent PR and that of an undisturbed pasture which served as a control. This way, we also accounted for the temporary lack of photosynthetic carbon inputs when plants were absent during the PR events. Both the rate of direct CO2 respiratory losses and the 'net impact of PR' appeared highly dependent on soil moisture status, with the lowest rate of loss measured under severe drought conditions and the highest rate of loss measured in spring when ample moisture was present. Because the rate of CO2 loss did not decrease over time during PR, the longer the soil was bare, the more CO2 was lost. The duration

  4. The motivation of dairy cows for access to pasture.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Gemma L; Rutter, S Mark; East, Martyn; Sinclair, Liam A

    2013-07-01

    Several factors influence whether dairy cattle prefer to be indoors or at pasture, including weather conditions and milk yield, but it is unclear how motivated cows are for access to pasture. One way to measure motivation is to require the animal to work (e.g., walk different distances) for access to a resource. This study investigated whether pasture access located 60, 140, or 260m from the indoor housing would affect the proportion of time dairy cows spent at pasture. Thirty-two Holstein-Friesian dairy cows were used during the study, which took place in the United Kingdom from May to July 2010. The experiment consisted of four 18-d experimental periods, with 8 cows in each period, which were further divided into 2 groups of 4 cows. Following a training period, the cows were randomly allocated to distances of 60, 140, or 260m to pasture over three 4-d measurement periods. A video camera was used to record time spent indoors and outdoors 24h/d, and manual behavior observations (0700 to 2200h) took place 6 times during each period to record how the cows spent their time in each location. The video data showed that cows spent, on average, 57.8% (±3.44) of their time outside (either at pasture or on the track). One-sample t-tests revealed that this value was different from 0% (t=16.80), 50% (t=2.26), and 100% (t=-12.28). Analysis of the percentage time spent outside revealed that distance did not influence nighttime pasture use (2100 to 0430h; F2,8=0.16; 81.0% vs. 81.0% vs. 76.7%, for 60m vs. 140m vs. 260m, respectively). In contrast, during the day (0700 to 2100h; from behavior observations), time spent at pasture declined as distance increased; that is, cows spent more time at pasture when they had to walk 60m (F2,80=10.09) than when they had to walk 140 or 260m (45.3% vs. 27.4% vs. 21.2%, respectively). Time spent at pasture decreased on rainy days (y=-1.0672x + 59.646, R(2)=0.09, n=48d), but the indoor temperature-humidity index (THI), the outdoor THI, and body

  5. Improvement of natural pastures using liquid organic fertilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghambashidze, Giorgi; Gabedava, Giorgi; Abuladze, Paata

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays natural pastures remains the main source to supply livestock with fresh feed material in Georgia. Due to that common pasturelands are under continues grazing pressure and normally no measures are taken in order to improve pasture productivity and to protect soil from erosion. Unregulated stocking rate leads to overutilization of natural pastures causing reduction in productivity and soil fertility. It is especially evident in arid regions, where bare soil after removal of vegetation dries out and is subject to wind erosion. In many areas even with regulated stocking rate plant available soil nutrient pool is already diminished and vegetation cannot be recovered easily after grazing. Therefore it is essential to improve soil fertility, which provide adequate amount of nutrients to plants to regenerate. Ongoing study aims to compare effect of different types of organic fertilizers on natural pastures in combination with pasture rotation scheme in order to maintain soil fertility and prepare the basis for its gradual improvement. Initial results shows positive impact of liquid organic fertilizers which increased aboveground biomass production by 200-300 kg per hectare.

  6. Factors affecting pasture intake and total dry matter intake in grazing dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, O P; Smith, T R

    2000-10-01

    We investigated the most relevant variables for estimating pasture intake and total dry matter (DM) intake in grazing dairy cows using 27 previously published studies. Variables compared were pasture allowance, days in milk, amount of forage, amount of concentrate and total supplementation, pasture allowance and supplementation interaction, fat-corrected milk, body weight (BW), metabolic BW, daily change in BW, percentage of legumes in pasture, neutral detergent fiber (NDF) contents of pasture, and NDF in pasture selected. The variables were selected using stepwise regression analysis for total DM intake and pasture DM intake. Variables selected in the total DM intake regression equation (R2 = 0.95) were pasture allowance, total supplementation, interaction of pasture allowance and supplementation, fat-corrected milk, BW, daily change in BW, percentage of legumes and pasture NDF content. Pasture DM intake regression equation (R2 = 0.90) was similar to total DM intake equation, but supplementation coefficient was negative, showing substitution effect in supplementing grazing cows. The intake of NDF as a percentage of BW was higher than 1.3% when considering NDF content of the pasture allowance. Low pasture allowance groups had values higher than 1.3%. PMID:11049073

  7. Dryland pasture and crop conditions as seen by HCMM. [Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, W. D. (Principal Investigator); Harlan, J. C.; Blanchard, B. J.

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The soil moisture difference between the flight lines was partly due to water-holding capacity differences of the two soil types. Fields along the east flight line were in clay; while along the west flight line, the soil was sandy loam which holds less moisture. Due to differences in the amount of green material, the pastures were wetter than the wheat fields. Most of the pastures average from 40-80% green material, while wheat averages from 90-100% green material. A large amount of green material transpired more water and depleted the soil water content faster than dead vegetation. Visicorder data found temperature differences between the rangeland and winter wheat fields. Pasture had a larger percentage of dead material with different thermal properties than live vegetation, and surface temperature was primarily dependent on insolation. Dead material transpired less, but warms up faster than wheat fields.

  8. Greener Pastures in Northern Queensland, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    After a 19 month rainfall deficiency, heavy rainfall during January 2004 brought drought relief to much of northern Queensland. Local graziers hope for good long-term responses in pasture growth from the heavy rains. These images and maps from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) portray part of Australia's Mitchell Grasslands bioregion before summer rainfall, on October 18, 2003 (left) and afterwards, on February 7, 2004 (right).

    The top pair of images are natural color views from MISR's nadir camera. The green areas in the post-rainfall image highlight the growth of vegetation. The middle panels show the reflectivity of the surface over the photosynthetically active region (PAR) of visible light (400 - 700 nm), expressed as a directional-hemispherical reflectance (DHR-PAR), or albedo. That portion of the radiation that is not reflected back to the atmosphere or space is absorbed by either the vegetation or the soil. The fraction of PAR radiation absorbed by green vegetation, known as FPAR, is shown in the bottom panels. FPAR is one of the quantities that establishes the photosynthetic and carbon uptake efficiency of live vegetation. MISR's FPAR product makes use of aerosol retrievals to correct for atmospheric scattering and absorption effects, and uses plant canopy structural models to determine the partitioning of solar radiation. Both of these aspects are facilitated by the multiangular nature of the MISR measurements.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbits 20397 and 22028. The panels cover an area of about 290 kilometers x 228 kilometers, and utilize data from blocks 106 to 108 within World Reference System-2 path 96.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA

  9. Brachiaria ruziziensis responses to different fertilization doses and to the attack of Mahanarva spectabilis (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) nymphs and adults.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Daniela de Melo; Auad, Alexander Machado; Fonseca, Marcy das Graças; Leite, Melissa Vieira

    2014-01-01

    Cropping practices are necessary in order to help reduce the population of pest insect, such as the induction of resistance through fertilization. Therefore, this study aimed to assess alterations on the production and quality of Brachiaria ruziziensis when receiving the fertilization composed by the macronutrients NPK and/or exposed to the attack of Mahanarva spectabilis nymphs and adults. B. ruziziensis plants were fertilized according to the recommendation (R), half of the recommended fertilization (H), or non-fertilization (C). They were also exposed to different M. spectabilis nymph and adult densities. The damage, regrowth, and bromatological components were evaluated. The fertilization treatment promoted a higher M. spectabilis nymph survival on B. ruziziensis; however, it reduced the damage caused by the forage exposed to nymphs and adults of pest insect, and it did not alter the quality of the signal grass. Moreover, the fertilization treatment enabled forage recovery, even when exposed to 5 nymphs or 10 spittlebug adults. PMID:24578645

  10. Brachiaria ruziziensis Responses to Different Fertilization Doses and to the Attack of Mahanarva spectabilis (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) Nymphs and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Daniela de Melo; Auad, Alexander Machado; Fonseca, Marcy das Graças; Leite, Melissa Vieira

    2014-01-01

    Cropping practices are necessary in order to help reduce the population of pest insect, such as the induction of resistance through fertilization. Therefore, this study aimed to assess alterations on the production and quality of Brachiaria ruziziensis when receiving the fertilization composed by the macronutrients NPK and/or exposed to the attack of Mahanarva spectabilis nymphs and adults. B. ruziziensis plants were fertilized according to the recommendation (R), half of the recommended fertilization (H), or non-fertilization (C). They were also exposed to different M. spectabilis nymph and adult densities. The damage, regrowth, and bromatological components were evaluated. The fertilization treatment promoted a higher M. spectabilis nymph survival on B. ruziziensis; however, it reduced the damage caused by the forage exposed to nymphs and adults of pest insect, and it did not alter the quality of the signal grass. Moreover, the fertilization treatment enabled forage recovery, even when exposed to 5 nymphs or 10 spittlebug adults. PMID:24578645

  11. Antibiosis and tolerance to five species of spittlebug (Homoptera: Cercopidae) in Brachiaria spp.: implications for breeding for resistance.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Cesar; Fory, Paola; Sotelo, Guillermo; Pabon, Alejandro; Diaz, Giovanna; Miles, John W

    2004-04-01

    Several genera and species of spittlebugs (Homoptera: Cercopidae) are economic pests of Brachiaria spp. grasses in tropical America. To support current breeding programs aimed at obtaining multiple spittlebug resistance, we undertook a series of studies on antibiosis and tolerance as possible mechanisms of resistance to five major spittlebug species affecting Brachiaria spp. in Colombia: Aeneolamia varia (F.), Aeneolamia reducta (Lallemand), Zulia carbonaria (Lallemand), Zulia pubescens (F.), and Mahanarva trifissa (Jacobi). Four host genotypes, well known for their reaction to A. varia attack, were used to compare their resistance to other spittlebug species: CIAT 0654 and CIAT 0606 (susceptible) and CIAT 6294 and CIAT 36062 (resistant). CIAT 0654 and CIAT 36062 were used in antibiosis studies. Tolerance studies were conducted with CIAT 0654, CIAT 6294, and CIAT 36062. Sixty-five hybrid-derived clones were used to identify levels of multiple resistance to three spittlebug species. The levels of antibiosis resistance in CIAT 36062 clearly differed by spittlebug species and were classified as follows: very high for M. trifissa, high for A. varia and A. reducta, moderate for Z. pubescens, and absent for Z. carbonaria. Our results suggest the presence of true tolerance to Z. carbonaria in CIAT 6294 and CIAT 36062, true tolerance to Z. pubescens in CIAT 6294 and a combination of tolerance and antibiosis as mechanisms of resistance to Z. pubescens in CIAT 36062. Of the 65 hybrid clones tested with A. varia, A. reducta, and Z. carbonaria, 15 combined resistance to two species and three showed antibiosis resistance to all three spittlebug species. PMID:15154493

  12. Effect of mineral supplementation on the performance by stocker cattle grazing winter wheat pasture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the efficacy of mineral supplementing stocker cattle grazing wheat pasture, 2 experiments were conducted. In Exp 1, 72 steer and heifer calves (avg BW = 228 kg) were randomly assigned to 12, 4.9-ha pastures on November 12 at 1.2 calves/ha (4 pastures), and February 5 at 2.5 calves/ha (8...

  13. Effects of pasture renovation on hydrology, nutrient runoff, and forage yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proper pasture management is important in promoting optimal forage growth and reducing runoff and nutrient loss. Pasture renovation was performed prior to manure application (poultry litter or swine slurry) on different pasture soils and rainfall simulations were conducted to identify the effects o...

  14. Regionalized levels of soil phosphorus and phosphorus saturation in beef cattle pastures with and without grazing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Available soil phosphorus (P) in various agro-ecosystems is regulated by climate, soil type, vegetation, and management practices. Available soil P in bahiagrass beef cattle pastures were compared with rhizoma peanut pastures and bermudagrass pastures. For each location, the pain plot was represente...

  15. Ecosystem carbon-water interactions of tropical pasture and afforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S.; Eugster, W.; Buchmann, N.

    2010-12-01

    Despite the importance of tropical ecosystems for global carbon and water cycling, eddy covariance flux measurements in the tropics are still scarce and globally underrepresented within FLUXNET. In addition, previous studies have been predominantly conducted in tropical forests with only very few observations, often unpublished, from other tropical land-use types like pastures, croplands and savannas. As recently emphasized by global synthesis activities, C4 dominated ecosystems account for more than 20 % of terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) but represent less than 20 site-years of data within FLUXNET. Consequently, an expansion of observations for tropical C4 ecosystems is needed to understand their role in the global carbon and water cycling. We have performed comparative eddy covariance measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapour fluxes in a tropical pasture and an adjacent, young afforestation in Panama from 2007 to 2009. Our results show a larger intra-annual variability of CO2 and H2O fluxes at the pasture compared to the afforestation. In addition, the tropical pasture was more sensitive to water limitations and seasonal drought. Moreover, observed differences in water use efficiency (WUE) between both ecosystems tend to become smaller after the establishment phase of the afforestation. Our results highlight the role of land management on ecosystem carbon and water fluxes in the tropics. Implications of our results for further research and synthesis activities will be discussed.

  16. Utilization of Pasture and Forages by Ruminants: A Historical Perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pastures, forages and grasslands dominate the landscape across the United States and support a large ruminant population that supplies the nation with value-added animal products. An historical perspective is presented of the innovations as they occurred in the Journal of Animal Science over the pas...

  17. Using lake dredged material to enhance pasture establishment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cow-calf (Bos taurus) industry in subtropical United States and other parts of the world depends almost totally on grazed pastures. Establishment of complete, uniform stand of bahiagrass in a short time period is vital economically. Domestic wastewater sludge or sewage sludge, composted urban pl...

  18. Reestablishing Chicory into Multi-Species Perennial Pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) has the potential to provide abundant, high quality forage during periods of drought stress, but poor persistence limits its usefulness in permanent pasture. This experiment compared the ability of three seeding methods to reestablish chicory into a grazed multi-specie...

  19. Heifer growth performance from fall-oat pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall-grown oat has shown promise as an emergency fall forage option, or to extend the grazing season in Wisconsin. Our objectives for this project were: i) to assess the pasture productivity and forage characteristics of 2 fall-grown oat cultivars (Ogle and ForagePlus; OG and FP, respectively) using...

  20. Leveraging the beneficial compounds of organic and pasture milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Much discussion has arisen over the possible benefits of organic food, including milk. Organic milk comes from cows that are on pasture during the growing season, and would be expected to contain some compounds that are not found in animals receiving conventional feed, or at higher concentrations. ...

  1. Sediment carbon concentration and transport from small pastured watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the current emphasis on the role of carbon in the environment, agricultural systems and their impacts on the carbon cycle are important parts of the overall issue. Pasture systems and carbon that is transported attached to sediment has been addressed at the North Appalachian Experimental Waters...

  2. Utilization of Pasture Seed Mixtures in the Northeast USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Terms such as “plant species diversity” and “species mixture complexity” are used to describe and quantify characteristics of plant communities found in pastures, and have drawn increased attention from the scientific community. Livestock producers use many methods to alter these characteristics in...

  3. SOIL PHOSPHOROUS SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION IN PASTURES RECEIVING POULTRY LITTER APPLICATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmentally-based P management strategies could be improved by delineating management zones incorporating the effects of landscape position on soil morphology, hydrology, and soil P distribution. Three farm pasture sites in SW Missouri receiving long-term poultry litter applications were sampled...

  4. Cattle use patterns of riparian pastures in northeastern Oregon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock use of riparian areas has been fraught with controversy, with some arguing that livestock should be excluded while others emphasize the benefits of controlled grazing. Our study was designed to 1) characterize the nature of cattle grazing in riparian pastures, 2) determine intensity and s...

  5. Grazing management effects on pasture productivity – extent of grazing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    How does grazing using the “take half – leave half” rule actually affect annual pasture productivity? Is residue height a concern when mature grasses are mob grazed, a management alternative to grazing at a vegetative stage? A range of grazing management systems was implemented at the U.S. Dairy For...

  6. New Genomic Resources for Pasture and Range Grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the initial requirements of utilizing genomic approaches in plant improvements is the availability of DNA sequence information. Toward the goal of generating sequence information for forage and pasture grasses, we are developing EST libraries from orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata) and sever...

  7. Evaluating Pasture Grasses: Fescues and Other Freaks of Nature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis Huds.) has excellent potential for grazing-based dairy and beef systems in Wisconsin, but producer awareness of this temperate grass is lacking. Previous research established that its intake potential is comparable or superior to other pasture grasses, and winter-ha...

  8. Canopy-Coverage Method Compares Pasture and Prairie

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantzen, Paul G.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the procedures used by a high school biology class in an ecological study related to the degeneration of grasslands. The canopy-coverage method of vegetational analysis was used to compare a low-grade, over-grazed pasture with a nearby high-quality prairie. An interpretation of the results is also presented. (JR)

  9. Comparison of Two Pasture Growth Models of Differing Complexity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two pasture growth models that share many common features but differ in model complexity have been developed for incorporation into the Integrated Farm System Model (IFSM). Major differences between models include the explicit representation of roots in the more complex model, and their effects on c...

  10. Nutritive value in relation to plant species diversity of pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Planting forage mixtures may benefit pasture herbage production; however, changes in botanical composition could cause unstable nutritive value. Data from two grazing studies and a farm survey were used to examine how plant species diversity influenced herbage nutritive value. In one grazing study,...

  11. Distribution of cattle grazing in a northeastern Oregon riparian pasture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock grazing of a northeastern Oregon riparian pasture was monitored using high-frequency GPS tracking of cattle and high-resolution aerial photography. Tracking collars recorded positions, velocity, date, and time at 1-sec intervals. Areas where animals rested and moved were identified and re...

  12. Fact Sheet: Tapping into the pasture seed bank

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A seed bank is a reserve of dormant seeds in the soil that enables some types of plants to re-establish themselves after a drastic disturbance of the established vegetation. In some ways it forms a “memory” for the pasture, a record of its vegetation history. To explore that history, we visited seve...

  13. Soil nitrogen and carbon impacts of raising chickens on pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryals, R.; Leach, A.; Tang, J.; Hastings, M. G.; Galloway, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    Chicken is the most consumed meat in the US, and production continues to intensify rapidly around the world. Chicken manure from confined feeding operations is typically applied in its raw form to nearby croplands, resulting in hotspots of soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. Pasture-raised chicken is an alternative to industrial production and is growing in popularity with rising consumer demand for more humanely raised protein sources. In this agricultural model, manure is deposited directly onto grassland soils where it is thought to increase pools of soil carbon and nitrogen. The fate of manure nitrogen from pasture-raised chicken production remains poorly understood. We conducted a controlled, replicated experiment on a permaculture farm in Charlottesville, Virginia (Timbercreek Organics) in which small chicken coops (10 ft x 12 ft) were moved daily in a pasture. We measured manure deposition rates, soil inorganic nitrogen pools, soil moisture, and soil N2O and CO2 emissions. Measurements were made for the 28-day pasture life of three separate flocks of chickens in the spring, summer, and fall. Each flock consisted of approximately 200-300 chickens occupying three to five coops (~65 chickens/coop). Measurements were also made in paired ungrazed control plots. Manure deposition rates were similar across flocks and averaged 1.5 kgdrywt ha-1 during the spring grazing event and 4.0 kgdrywt ha-1 during the summer and fall grazing events. Manure deposition was relatively constant over the four weeks pasture-lifetime of the chickens. Compared to control plots, grazed areas exhibited higher soil N2O and CO2 fluxes. The magnitude of these fluxes diminished significantly over the four-week span. Soil gas fluxes significantly increased following rainfall events. For a given rainfall event, higher fluxes were observed from transects that were grazed more recently. Soil gaseous reactive nitrogen losses were less in this pasture system compared to cultivated field amended

  14. Eastern Gamagrass Management for Pastures in the Mid-Atlantic Region: I. Animal Performance and Pasture Productivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eastern gamagrass [Tripsacum dactyloides (L.) L.] is a native, warm-season perennial grass with potential as pasture for the eastern USA, but its value has not been well studied. The objective of this 4-yr experiment was to estimate forage mass (FM) for eastern gamagrass (EG) that maximizes steer pe...

  15. Forages and pastures symposium: fungal endophytes of tall fescue and perennial ryegrass: pasture friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Young, C A; Hume, D E; McCulley, R L

    2013-05-01

    Tall fescue [Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) Darbysh. syn. Festuca arundinacea Schreb.] and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) are important perennial forage grasses utilized throughout the moderate- to high-rainfall temperate zones of the world. These grasses have coevolved with symbiotic fungal endophytes (Epichloë/Neotyphodium spp.) that can impart bioactive properties and environmental stress tolerance to the grass compared with endophyte-free individuals. These endophytes have proven to be very important in pastoral agriculture in the United States, New Zealand, and Australia, where forage grasses are the principal feed for grazing ruminants. In this review, we describe the biology of these grass-endophyte associations and implications for the livestock industries that are dependent on these forages. Endophyte alkaloid production is put in context with endophyte diversity, and we illustrate how this has facilitated utilization of grasses infected with different endophyte strains that reduce livestock toxicity issues. Utilization of tall fescue and use of perennial ryegrass in the United States, New Zealand, and Australia are compared, and management strategies focused predominantly on the success of endophyte-infected perennial ryegrass in New Zealand and Australia are discussed. In addition, we consider the impact of grass-endophyte associations on the sustainability of pasture ecosystems and their likely response to future changes in climate. PMID:23307839

  16. [Morphological and molecular identification of Prosapia simulans (Walker) (Hemiptera: Cercopidae), and screening and mechanisms of resistance to this spittlebug in Brachiaria hybrids].

    PubMed

    Castro, Ulises; Cardona, Cesar; Vera-Graziano, Jorge; Miles, John; Garza-Garcia, Ramón

    2007-01-01

    Prosapia simulans (Walker) is an important spittlebug species that attacks forage grasses of the genus Brachiaria (Trin.) Griseb. from Mexico to Colombia. This, and several other species of spittlebugs, cause important economic losses to the livestock production industry. Development of resistant cultivars is regarded as the best method of control. In the present study we used taxonomic keys, dissection of male genitalia and RAPD-PCR patterns to reconfirm the identity of P. simulans specimens collected in Colombia and Mexico. We were able to reconfirm that P. simulans occurs as a pest of Brachiaria from Mexico to Colombia. We also studied the levels and mechanisms of resistance present in 34 Brachiaria hybrids developed by CIAT. Infestations were made with six eggs per plant. We used 10 replications (plants) per genotype in a completely randomized design. Seven hybrids were found to be susceptible, 16 showed intermediate resistance and 11 were resistant. Antibiosis was the mechanism of resistance expressed in resistant hybrids as well as in the resistant checks CIAT 6294 and CIAT 36062. Tolerance was absent. The genotypes BRX 4402 and CIAT 0606 were classified as highly susceptible. PMID:17934620

  17. Controlling runoff from subtropical pastures has differential effects on nitrogen and phosphorus loads.

    PubMed

    Bohlen, Patrick J; Villapando, Odi R

    2011-01-01

    A 4-yr (2005-2008) study was conducted to evaluate the potential of pasture water management for controlling nutrient losses in surface runoff in the Northern Everglades. Two pasture water management treatments were investigated on Bahia grass ( Flüggé) pastures: reduced flow and unobstructed flow. The reduced flow treatment was applied to four of eight 20.23-ha pastures by installing water control structures in pasture drainage ditches with flashboards set at a predetermined height. Four other pastures received the unobstructed-flow treatment, in which surface runoff exited pastures unimpeded. Automated instruments measured runoff volume and collected surface water samples for nutrient analysis. In analyzing data for before-after treatment analysis, the 2005 results were removed because of structural failure in water control structures and the 2007 results were removed because of drought conditions. Pasture water retention significantly reduced annual total nitrogen (TN) loads, which were 11.28 kg ha and 6.28 kg ha, respectively, in pastures with unobstructed and reduced flow. Total phosphorus (TP) loads were 27% lower in pastures with reduced flow than in pastures with unobstructed flow, but this difference was not statistically significant. Concentrations of available soil P were significantly greater in pastures with reduced flow. Pasture water retention appears to be an effective approach for reducing runoff volume and TN loads from cattle pastures in the Northern Everglades, but the potential to reduce TP loads may be diminished if higher water table conditions cause increased P release from soils, which could result in higher P concentration in surface runoff. PMID:21546685

  18. Pasture Drought Insurance Based on NDVI and SAVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escribano Rodríguez, J. A.; Tarquis, A. M.; Hernandez Díaz-Ambrona, C. G.

    2012-04-01

    Drought is a complex phenomenon, which is difficult to define. The term is used to refer to deficiency in rainfall, soil moisture, vegetation greenness, ecological conditions or socio economic conditions, and different drought types can be inferred. In this study, drought is considered as a period when the pasture growth is low in regard to long-term average conditions. The extensive livestock production is based on the natural resources available. The good management practices concurs the maximum livestock nutrition needs with the maximum pasture availability. Therefore, early drought detection and impact assessment on the amount of pasture biomass are important in several areas in Spain, whose economy strongly depends on livestock production. The use of remote sensing data presents a number of advantages when determining drought impact on vegetation. The information covers the whole of a territory and the repetition of images provides multi-temporal measurements. In addition, vegetation indexes, being NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index) and SAVI (soil-adjusted vegetation index) the most common ones, obtainedfrom satellite data allow areas affected by droughts to be identified. These indices are being used for estimation of vegetation photosynthesis activity and monitoring drought. The present study shows the application of these vegetation indices for pasture drought monitoring in three places in Spain and their correlation with several field measurements. During 2010 and 2011 three locations, El Cubo de Don Sancho (Salamanca), Trujillo (Cáceres) and Pozoblanco (Córdoba), were selected and a periodic pasture monitoring and botanic composition were achieved. Daily precipitation, temperature and monthly soil water content were measurement as well as fresh and dry pasture weight. At the same time, remote sensing images were capture by DEIMOS-1 of the chosen places.This satellite is based on the concept Microsat-100 from Surrey. It is conceived for

  19. Pasture trees in tropical México: the effect of soil nutrients on seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sáanchez, José Luis

    2006-06-01

    Environment and seedling community under isolated trees in pastures are different from those in the open pasture. The effect of the pasture trees on the soil nutrients and on the seedling growth were investigated. Seven isolated trees and eight plots were selected in two pastures of 12-yr and 32-yr old derived from a lowland rain forest with nutrient-rich soil at Los Tuxtlas, Mexico. The soil concentrations of total N, P Bray, K+, Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+, plus others physical and chemical characteristics, were compared between the pasture trees and the open-pasture. An experiment was done to test the hypothesis that soil from under the pasture trees was better for seedling growth than soil from the open pasture. Seedlings of two native tree species and two domesticated species were grown in soil from the two different sites in a shade-house. The dry weight of the shoot and root/shoot ratio were compared. Only total N, P and Na+ differed slightly in concentrations between the sites, but did not promote more seedling biomass. It seems that the soil at this location is sufficiently nutrient-rich even in the open pastures and over-ride any effect of the pasture trees on nutrient availability. PMID:18494306

  20. Rumen conditions that predispose cattle to pasture bloat.

    PubMed

    Majak, W; Howarth, R E; Cheng, K J; Hall, J W

    1983-08-01

    Rumen contents from the dorsal sac were examined before alfalfa ingestion to determine factors that predispose cattle to pasture bloat. Chlorophyll concentration, buoyancy of particulate matter, and rates of gas production were significantly higher in cattle that subsequently bloated than in those that did not. Higher chlorophyll in bloat cases indicated accumulation of suspended chloroplast particles in the dorsal sac, perhaps due to increased buoyancy of the particulate matter. The higher fermentation rates (in the presence of glucose) suggested that the latent capacity for gas production was due to microbial colonization of suspended feed particles. Chlorophyll 4 h after feeding was also higher in bloated as compared to unbloated animals. In short, the microbial colonization and retention of particulate matter provided active inocula for promoting rapid legume digestion. Consequently, gas production was enhanced when feeding commenced, but the fermentation gases were trapped by the buoyant, frothy ingesta, resulting in the condition of pasture bloat. PMID:6619348

  1. Influence of transient flooding on methane fluxes from subtropical pastures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Samuel D.; Gomez-Casanovas, Nuria; Walter, M. Todd; Boughton, Elizabeth H.; Bernacchi, Carl J.; DeLucia, Evan H.; Groffman, Peter M.; Keel, Earl W.; Sparks, Jed P.

    2016-03-01

    Seasonally flooded subtropical pastures are major methane (CH4) sources, where transient flooding drives episodic and high-magnitude emissions from the underlying landscape. Understanding the mechanisms that drive these patterns is needed to better understand pasture CH4 emissions and their response to global change. We investigated belowground CH4 dynamics in relation to surface fluxes using laboratory water table manipulations and compared these results to field-based eddy covariance measurements to link within-soil CH4 dynamics to ecosystem fluxes. Ecosystem CH4 fluxes lag flooding events, and this dynamic was replicated in laboratory experiments. In both cases, peak emissions were observed during water table recession. Flooding of surface organic soils and precipitation driven oxygen pulses best explained the observed time lags. Precipitation oxygen pulses likely delay CH4 emissions until groundwater dissolved oxygen is consumed, and emissions were temporally linked to CH4 production in surface soil horizons. Methane accumulating in deep soils did not contribute to surface fluxes and is likely oxidized within the soil profile. Methane production rates in surface organic soils were also orders of magnitude higher than in deep mineral soils, suggesting that over longer flooding regimes CH4 produced in deep horizons is not a significant component of surface emissions. Our results demonstrate that distinct CH4 dynamics may be stratified by depth and flooding of surface organic soils drives CH4 fluxes from subtropical pastures. These results suggest that small changes in pasture water table dynamics can drive large changes in CH4 emissions if surface soils remain saturated over longer time scales.

  2. Soil fertility management on natural pastures in Eastern Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghambashidze, Giorgi; Jolokhava, Tamar; Kenchiashvili, Naira; Tarkhnishvili, Maia

    2015-04-01

    The development of livestock production in Georgia is mainly based on productivity of natural common pasturelands as it is the cheapest way to keep animals. Therefore it is crucial to manage those pastures in order to supply domestic animals with adequate amount of green grass during whole grazing season. The problems associated with poor grassland management is especially evident under limited rainfall conditions. Usually farmers do not consider suitability of existing stocking rates with pasture productivity leading to overutilization of pastureland causing reduction of palatable plant species and total grass cover stimulating soil erosion processes, which deflates soil nutrients and soil organic matter. Intensification of negative processes may result in loss of soil fertility and poor grass regrowth capacities. Current study aims to evaluate existing grazing system on a selected plots from common pasturelands in Eastern Georgia and to develop a proper soil fertility management plan accepted in organic agriculture taking into account local soil-climatic conditions, pasture vegetation stand and its richness with palatable plant species.

  3. How many adults of Mahanarva spectabilis (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) should be used for screening Brachiaria ruziziensis (Poales: Poaceae) resistance?

    PubMed

    Resende, T T; Auad, A M; Fonseca, M G

    2014-02-01

    This study determined the number of spittlebug adults, Mahanarva spectabilis Distant (Hemiptera: Cercopidae), that should be used in selection tests of the forage grass, Brachiaria ruziziensis (Germain and Evrard). In this study, 0, 1, 2, 4, or 8 M. spectabilis adults were kept in plants for 4 or 8 d per experimental plot. After these periods, the insects were removed from the plants and chlorophyll content, damage score, dry weight, fresh weight, and percent dry matter of shoots were evaluated. Chlorophyll content decreased significantly with higher density of M. spectabilis in plants exposed to the pest for 4 or 8 d. Plants that were exposed to eight spittlebugs for 8 d showed a approximately 60% loss of chlorophyll content. When the forage was infested with eight adults for 4 d, the average damage score was 3 (50% of the leaf area was affected). The damage score and fresh and dry weights of the forage did not change depending on the exposure time of the plants to the spittlebugs. The percentage of dry matter of the plants infested was higher with the increase insect density and exposure time for all densities. Thus, the minimum recommended number is eight M. spectabilis adults for 4 d in resistance tests of B. ruziziensis to this pest species. PMID:24665725

  4. Effect of stocking rate on milk and pasture productivity and supplementary feed use for spring calving pasture fed dairy systems.

    PubMed

    Patton, D; Pierce, K M; Horan, B

    2016-07-01

    The productivity of grazing systems is primarily limited by the scale and efficiency of systems applied to the grazable land platform adjacent to the milking parlor. The objective of this study was to compare forage production, utilization and quality, milk production, and requirement for supplementary feeds for 2 different grazing platform stocking rate (GPSR) treatments over 4 yr. Animals were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 GPSR treatments: high-closed (HC; 3.1 cows/ha) and high-open (HO; 4.5 cows/ha), which were designed to represent alternative GPSR in a post-European Union milk quota, spring calving, pasture-based milk production system. Animal production data were analyzed using Proc MIXED of SAS with GPSR, year, and parity included as fixed effects in the final model. Within a seasonal spring calving grazing system, at high GPSR and offering moderate amounts of additional supplements based on pasture supply deficits, both systems produced more milk and fat plus protein per hectare in comparison with Irish commercial dairy farms. Although requiring additional supplementation, increased GPSR resulted in increased milk production per hectare but also in an increased requirement for concentrate and forage supplementation during lactation. No significant influence of GPSR was found on body weight and body condition score or reproductive performance during the 4-yr study period. In addition, GPSR also had no effect on pasture production, utilization, or quality during the study period. The strategic use of additional supplements with restricted pasture availability at higher GPSR maintained milk production per cow and significantly increased milk production per hectare. PMID:27108176

  5. Pasture Management Strategies for Sequestering Soil Carbon - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Franzluebbers, Alan J.

    2006-03-15

    Pasturelands account for 51 of the 212 Mha of privately held grazing land in the USA. Tall fescue is the most important cool-season perennial forage for many beef cattle producers in the humid region of the USA. A fungal endophyte, Neotyphodium coenophialum, infects the majority of tall fescue stands with a mutualistic association. Ergot alkaloids produced by the endophyte have negative impacts on cattle performance. However, there are indications that endophyte infection of tall fescue is a necessary component of productive and persistent pasture ecology. The objectives of this research were to characterize and quantify changes in soil organic carbon and associated soil properties under tall fescue pastures with and without endophyte infection of grass. Pastures with high endophyte infection had greater concentration of soil organic carbon, but lower concentration of biologically active soil carbon than pastures with low endophyte infection. A controlled experiment suggested that endophyte-infected leaf tissue may directly inhibit the activity of soil microorganisms. Carbon forms of soil organic matter were negatively affected and nitrogen forms were positively affected by endophyte addition to soil. The chemical compounds in endophyte-infected tall fescue (ergot alkaloids) that are responsible for animal health disorders were found in soil, suggesting that these chemicals might be persistent in the environment. Future research is needed to determine whether ergot alkaloids or some other chemicals are responsible for increases in soil organic matter. Scientists will be able to use this information to better understand the ecological impacts of animals grazing tall fescue, and possibly to identify and cultivate other similar associations for improving soil organic matter storage. Another experiment suggested that both dry matter production and soil microbial activity could be affected by the endophyte. Sampling of the cumulative effects of 20 years of tall fescue

  6. Carbon fluxes of Kobresia pygmaea pastures on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babel, Wolfgang; Biermann, Tobias; Falge, Eva; Ingrisch, Johannes; Leonbacher, Jürgen; Schleuss, Per; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Ma, Yaoming; Miehe, Georg; Foken, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    With an approximate cover of 450,000 km² on the Tibetan Plateau (TP), the Cyperaceae Kobresia pygmaea forms he world's largest alpine ecosystem. This species, especially adapted to grazing pressure, grows to a height of only 2-6 cm and can be found in an altitudinal range of 4000 to 5960 m a.s.l. A special characteristic of this ecosystem is the stable turf layer, which is built up from roots and plays a significant role in protecting soil from erosion. This is of great importance since soils on the TP store 2.5 % of the global soil organic carbon stocks. The aim of the investigation was the study of the carbon storage and the impact of human-induced land use change on these Kobresia pygmaea pastures. We therefore applied eddy-covariance measurements and modelling as a long-term control of the fluxes between the atmosphere and the pastures and 13C labelling for the investigation of flux partitioning, and chamber measurements to investigate the degradation of the pastures. Combining CO2 budgets observed in 2010 with eddy-covariance measurements and relative partitioning of carbon fluxes estimated with 13C labelling enabled us to characterise the C turnover for the vegetation period with absolute fluxes within the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum. These results revealed that this ecosystem indeed stores a great amount of C in below-ground pools, especially in the root turf layer. To further investigate the importance of the root layer, the experiments in 2012 focused on flux measurements over the different surface types which make up the heterogeneity of the Kobresia pygmaea pastures and might result from degradation due to extensive grazing. The three surface types investigated with a LiCOR long-term monitoring chamber system include Kobresia pygmaea with intact turf layer (IRM), a surface type where the turf layer is still present but the vegetation is sparse and mainly consists of Cryptogam crusts (DRM) and finally areas without the turf layer (BS). According to

  7. Breeding objectives for sheep should be customised depending on variation in pasture growth across years.

    PubMed

    Rose, G; Mulder, H A; Thompson, A N; van der Werf, J H J; van Arendonk, J A M

    2015-08-01

    Breeding programmes for livestock require economic weights for traits that reflect the most profitable animal in a given production system, which affect the response in each trait after selection. The profitability of sheep production systems is affected by changes in pasture growth as well as grain, meat and wool prices between seasons and across years. Annual pasture growth varies between regions within Australia's Mediterranean climate zone from low growth with long periods of drought to high growth with shorter periods of drought. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess whether breeding objectives need to be adapted for regions, depending on how reliable the pasture growth is across years. We modelled farms with Merino sheep bred for wool and meat in 10 regions in Western Australia. Across these 10 regions, mean annual pasture growth decreased, and the CV of annual pasture growth increased as pasture growth for regions became less reliable. We calculated economic values for nine traits, optimising management across 11 years, including variation for pasture growth and wool, meat and grain prices between and within years from 2002 to 2012. These economic values were used to calculate responses to selection for each trait for the 10 regions. We identified two potential breeding objectives, one for regions with low or high reliability and the other for regions with medium reliability of pasture growth. Breeding objectives for high or low pasture growth reliability had more emphasis on live weight traits and number of lambs weaned. Breeding objectives for medium reliability of pasture growth had more emphasis on decreasing fibre diameter. Relative economic weights for fleece weight did not change across the regions. Regions with low or high pasture reliability had similar breeding objectives and response to selection, because the relationship between the economic values and CV of pasture growth were not linear for live weight traits and the number of

  8. Digestible energy content of pasture species in growing European wild boar (Sus scrofa L.).

    PubMed

    Quijada, R P; Bitsch, N I; Hodgkinson, S M

    2012-06-01

    The objectives were to determine the apparent energy digestibility of six pasture species frequently grazed by European wild boar (Sus scrofa L.) and to estimate the digestible energy (DE) consumption from pasture by grazing wild boar. Seven diets were prepared; a base diet (BD) which did not contain any pasture species, diets D1 to D5 which included 75% of the BD and 25% of the dried pasture species Lolium perenne (D1), Festuca arundinacea (D2), Agrostis capillaris (D3), Bromus staminius (D4) or Trifolium repens (D5) and D6 which contained 85% BD and 15% dried Plantago lanceolata. Seven purebred European wild boar (initial liveweight 24.4 ± 0.8 kg, average ± SEM) were given access to the diets following a Latin Square design. The animals received each diet for eight days, with faecal sampling on days 6, 7 and 8. The total apparent DE consumption from pasture by grazing wild boar was estimated using previously collected pasture consumption data from wild boar. The digestibility coefficients and DE contents of the pasture species ranged from 0.29 to 0.65, and 5.8 to 12.6 MJ/kg DM respectively, with L. perenne and P. lanceolata having the greatest digestibility coefficients and DE contents. The wild boar were estimated to satisfy between 52% and 142% of their maintenance energy requirements through pasture consumption. Grazing wild boar are able to utilise an important proportion of the energy present in pasture species. PMID:21575078

  9. Biomass estimation to support pasture management in Niger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schucknecht, A.; Meroni, M.; Kayitakire, F.; Rembold, F.; Boureima, A.

    2015-04-01

    Livestock plays a central economic role in Niger, but it is highly vulnerable due to the high inter-annual variability of rain and hence pasture production. This study aims to develop an approach for mapping pasture biomass production to support activities of the Niger Ministry of Livestock for effective pasture management. Our approach utilises the observed spatiotemporal variability of biomass production to build a predictive model based on ground and remote sensing data for the period 1998-2012. Measured biomass (63 sites) at the end of the growing season was used for the model parameterisation. The seasonal cumulative Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (CFAPAR), calculated from 10-day image composites of SPOT-VEGETATION FAPAR, was computed as a phenology-tuned proxy of biomass production. A linear regression model was tested aggregating field data at different levels (global, department, agro-ecological zone, and intersection of agro-ecological and department units) and subjected to a cross validation (cv) by leaving one full year out. An increased complexity (i.e. spatial detail) of the model increased the estimation performances indicating the potential relevance of additional and spatially heterogeneous agro-ecological characteristics for the relationship between herbaceous biomass at the end of the season and CFAPAR. The model using the department aggregation yielded the best trade-off between model complexity and predictive power (R2 = 0.55, R2cv = 0.48). The proposed approach can be used to timely produce maps of estimated biomass at the end of the growing season before ground point measurements are made available.

  10. Response of resistant and susceptible Brachiaria spp. genotypes to simultaneous infestation with multiple species of spittlebugs (Hemiptera: Cercopidae).

    PubMed

    Pabón, Alejandro; Cardona, Cesar; Miles, John W; Sotelo, Guillermo

    2007-12-01

    The response of one susceptible and three resistant Brachiaria spp. (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) genotypes to individual or combined attacks by nymphs of Aeneolamia varia (F.), Aeneolamia reducta (Lallemand), Zulia carbonaria (Lallemand), and Zulia pubescens (F.) was studied. We assessed the effect of infesting plants of the susceptible check BRX 44-02 and of the A. varia-resistant genotypes CIAT 6294 and CIAT 36062 with A. varia, Z. carbonaria, or Z. pubescens either alone or in two-species combinations. In a second trial, we studied the performance of BRX 44-02, CIAT 6294, and the multiple resistant clone SX01NO/0102 exposed to individual or combined attack by A. reducta and Z. carbonaria. In a third trial, we compared the response of BRX 44-02, CIAT 6294, and CIAT 36062 to individual A. varia, Z. carbonaria, or Z. pubescens attack as opposed to a combined three-species attack. Plant damage scores and percentage of nymphal survival were recorded in all three trials. Data on percentage of survival indicated that competition between and among spittlebug species occurs. However, we found no evidence of interaction between species competition and different levels of resistance to spittlebug. Rather, host genotype reactions conformed to previously known categories of resistance regardless of the presence of more than one spittlebug species. Resistance rather than competition seems to have been the overriding factor determining nymph survival and resistance expression (damage scores) in these experiments. Our results corroborate the need to develop brachiariagrass genotypes with multiple resistance to spittlebugs. PMID:18232408

  11. Effects of biostimulation and nutritional supplementation on pubertal age and pregnancy rates of Nelore heifers (Bos indicus) in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, C M G; Oliveira Filho, B D; Gambarini, M L; Viu, M A O; Lopes, D T; Sousa, A P F

    2009-07-01

    To determine effects of biostimulation (BIO) and dietary supplementation (BIO+S) on pubertal age and pregnancy rates, Nelore heifers (n=392) were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups (n=98/group). All animals were in tropical environmental conditions, in the middle-west region of Brazil, grazing in pastures of Brachiaria brizantha, cv. Marandu; Panicum Maximum, cv. Tanzânia and Brachiaria humidícula. The heifers of the BIO group were kept in the presence of bulls while being maintained on pasture; the animals in the BIO+S group were kept in the presence of bulls while being managed on pasture and were fed a diet with greater energy and protein content to produce 0.49 kg of BW gain/day; the animals in control group (the NBIO) were kept away from bulls and under pasture conditions; and the animals in the NBIO+S group were kept away from bulls, were maintained on pasture, and were fed the same diet as the BIO+S group. Heifers were bred at 22-23 months of age, and pregnancy diagnosis was made 45 days after the end of the breeding season. There were differences (P<0.05) between groups regarding pubertal heifers up to 19 months (NPH), final body weight (FBW) and pregnancy rates (P<0.01), with an advantage for the animals in the BIO and BIO+S groups. Although the effect of a diet with greater protein and energy content was not clear in this experiment, the exposure of heifers to a male during the prepubertal period decreased age at the first breeding season, resulting in a significant reduction in age of first pregnancy in Nelore heifers kept under extensive management systems in a tropical environment. PMID:18805660

  12. ESTIMATION OF FORAGE NITROGEN CONCENTRATION AND IN VITRO DRY MATTER DIGESTIBILITY OF GRASS PASTURES USING PLANT CANOPY HYPERSPECTRAL REFLECTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Timely assessment of forage nitrogen (N) concentration and in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD) during the growing season can help livestock managers make decisions for adjusting stocking rate and managing pastures. Nondestructive measurements of pasture canopy hyperspectral reflectance may pro...

  13. Management of tall fescue pastures and nutrients in a Southern Piedmont environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pastures have replaced row-crop agriculture in many parts of the Southern Piedmont in response to soil and water conservation needs where tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb) is a common pasture grass. However, nutrient losses from livestock manure and/or poultry fertilization can contribute to ...

  14. SOIL SEED BANK COMPOSITION IN PASTURES OF DIVERSE MIXTURES OF TEMPERATE FORAGES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed banks may contribute useful or weedy species that fill gaps in pastures. In a previous study, pastures planted to complex mixtures of forages had fewer weedy species in the aboveground vegetation. In this study, we relate changes in the species composition of the seed bank to changes in the abo...

  15. Dispersal and post-dispersal predation of Italian ryegrass seed in unimproved pasture.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dispersal and post-dispersal predation of Italian ryegrass seed in unimproved pasture. Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) can be a productive and high-quality cool-season forage, but is considered a weed in some pastures. Italian ryegrass does not form a persistent seed bank and needs to prod...

  16. Quantifying phosphorus levels in landscapes associated with Bahiagrass-based pastures and beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relatively little information exists regarding possible magnitudes of P losses from grazed pastures. Whether or not P losses from grazed pastures are significantly greater than background losses and how these losses are affected by soil, forage management, or stocking density are not well understood...

  17. Perennial Forage Kochia for Improved Productivity of Grass Dominated Winter Grazing Pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grazing forage kochia (Kochia prostrata) during fall/winter has been shown to improve livestock health and reduce winter feeding costs. The objectives of this study were to compare the differences of traditional winter pastures versus pastures with forage kochia. Fifty mature, pregnant, Black Angu...

  18. Soil seed bank community structure of pastures and hayfields on an organic farm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the composition of seed banks in pasture soils would help farmers anticipate and manage for weed problems. We characterized the soil seed bank in eight pastures and hayfields [two alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and two predominantly grass hayfields; two recently established and two perma...

  19. Incorporating A Total Mixed Ration into Pasture-Based Dairy Systems: The Best of Both Worlds?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pastures containing multiple plant species have been shown to have greater plant productivity than pasture planted with a single plant species. However, it has not been determined whether this increase in plant productivity translates into increased animal productivity. Therefore, a study was design...

  20. Yield, Root Growth and Soil Water Content of Drought-Stressed Pasture Mixtures Containing Chicory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) is a deep-rooted forb that has increasingly been investigated for inclusion in pasture mixtures because of its reported drought tolerance and high productivity during summer months. This study examined how adding chicory to pasture mixtures impacted forage yield, root ...

  1. Assessment of Prior Grazing Experiences on Adaption to Pasture and Performance of Dairy Heifers.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate how previous grazing experience affects animal behavior on pasture. Animal behavior was monitored in 32 Holstein (n = 21) and Holstein-Jersey (n = 11) yearlings. Two heifer groups (n = 8 per group) had been exposed to pasture from August through October 20...

  2. Relationship between residual feed intake, performance, and carcass parameters of pasture finished cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2009 and 2010, Angus-crossbred steers (n = 39) were used to evaluate the relationship between residual feed intake (RFI), pasture-finishing performance and carcass parameters. During RFI determinations prior to pasture finishing initiation in mid-April, animals were fed an alfalfa hay cube diet....

  3. High biomass removal limits carbon sequestration potential of mature temperate pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decades of plowing have depleted organic carbon stocks in many agricultural soils. Conversion of plowed fields to pasture has the potential to reverse this process, recapturing organic matter that was lost under more intensive cropping systems. Temperate pastures in the northeast USA are highly prod...

  4. Assessing the land resource capacity for pasture-based dairy farming in the Northeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research has demonstrated that pasture-based dairy farming can offer many potential benefits for farmer incomes, animal welfare, and environmental quality. However, a common criticism of pasture-based dairies is that relative to confinement production, they produce less milk per acre of farmland, so...

  5. Allocating fresh pasture during the afternoon enhances daily weight gains… what about milk yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research conducted in Argentina, US, Australia and Europe has shown significant variations in chemical composition of pasture throughout the day, which results in an increase in pasture digestibility and energy concentration as the day progresses. Cattle have adapted their grazing patterns during th...

  6. Influence of land-use change on near-surface hydrological processes: Undisturbed forest to pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germer, Sonja; Neill, Christopher; Krusche, Alex V.; Elsenbeer, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    SummarySoil compaction that follows the clearing of tropical forest for cattle pasture is associated with lower soil hydraulic conductivity and increased frequency and volume of overland flow. We investigated the frequency of perched water tables, overland flow and stormflow in an Amazon forest and in an adjacent 25-year-old pasture cleared from the same forest. We compared the results with the frequencies of these phenomena estimated from comparisons of rainfall intensity and soil hydraulic conductivity. The frequency of perched water tables based on rainfall intensity and soil hydraulic conductivity was expected to double in pasture compared with forest. This corresponded closely with an approximate doubling of the frequency of stormflow and overland flow in pasture. In contrast, the stormflow volume in pasture increased 17-fold. This disproportional increase of stormflow resulted from overland flow generation over large areas of pasture, while overland flow generation in the forest was spatially limited and was observed only very near the stream channel. In both catchments, stormflow was generated by saturation excess because of perched water tables and near-surface groundwater levels. Stormflow was occasionally generated in the forest by rapid return flow from macropores, while slow return flow from a continuous perched water table was more common in the pasture. These results suggest that deforestation for pasture alters fundamental mechanisms of stormflow generation and may increase runoff volumes over wide regions of Amazonia.

  7. Monitoring Pasture Production in Mamawatu, New Zealand, Using Proba-V Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuohy, Mike; Mansion, Valentin

    2015-12-01

    The Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) was calculated from Proba-V data over 18 months (S10) and 12 months (S5). These values were compared with pasture biomass as measured by weekly farm rides on a 4WD towing the Rapid Pasture Meter. Trends in the data were well matched, especially during the summer and after rain in autumn.

  8. Seed bank characterization of pastures and hayfields of the University of New Hampshire Organic Dairy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Buried seed in pasture soils are often reservoirs of weedy plants. The seed bank was characterized in pastures and hayfields with different management histories at the University of New Hampshire Organic Research Dairy. Three hayfields [two of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and one grass] and five pas...

  9. THE SALEM ROAD STUDY: RESTORATION OF DEGRADED LAND WITH PASTURE - SOIL QUALITY AND CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pasture management is of importance to the understanding of agronomic and animal productivity, soil quality, greenhouse gas emissions, and environmental quality. Pastures have the potential to serve as a significant sink for C sequestered in soil organic matter. Efficient utilization of N is of co...

  10. Land use intensity trajectories on Amazonian pastures derived from Landsat time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufin, Philippe; Müller, Hannes; Pflugmacher, Dirk; Hostert, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Monitoring changes in land use intensity of grazing systems in the Amazon is an important prerequisite to study the complex political and socio-economic forces driving Amazonian deforestation. Remote sensing offers the potential to map pasture vegetation over large areas, but mapping pasture conditions consistently through time is not a trivial task because of seasonal changes associated with phenology and data gaps from clouds and cloud shadows. In this study, we tested spectral-temporal metrics derived from intra-annual Landsat time series to distinguish between grass-dominated and woody pastures. The abundance of woody vegetation on pastures is an indicator for management intensity, since the duration and intensity of land use steer secondary succession rates, apart from climate and soil conditions. We used the developed Landsat-based metrics to analyze pasture intensity trajectories between 1985 and 2012 in Novo Progresso, Brazil, finding that woody vegetation cover generally decreased after four to ten years of grazing activity. Pastures established in the 80s and early 90s showed a higher fraction of woody vegetation during their initial land use history than pastures established in the early 2000s. Historic intensity trajectories suggested a trend towards more intensive land use in the last decade, which aligns well with regional environmental policies and market dynamics. This study demonstrates the potential of dense Landsat time series to monitor land-use intensification on Amazonian pastures.

  11. Management effects on the distribution of soil characteristics of two pasture types in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pastures of native prairie and winter wheat are among the primary resources used to graze cattle in central Oklahoma. These pastures are subject to numerous stressors that affect land condition including grazing, climate, soil fertility, and farming operations. Understanding responses of soil charac...

  12. Timing and rate of Chaparral treatment affects tall fescue seedhead development and pasture plant densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The herbicide Chaparral™ has been shown to suppress seedhead development in tall fescue (Neotyphodium coenophialum) pastures and reduce the symptoms of tall fescue toxicosis in cattle. However, little is known about the logistics of herbicide treatment on tall fescue pastures. The objective of thi...

  13. Tall fescue management: Pasture and cattle responses to endophyte and fertilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yearling heifers grazing tall fescue pastures had greatest performance in winter and spring on endophyte-free and novel endophyte associations, because of high forage quality and lack of ergot alkaloids produced by a common “wild” tall fescue-endophyte association. Pasture and cattle responses were...

  14. THE EFFECTS OF PASTURE FALLOWING ON THE SEED BANK AND FORAGE SPECIES COMPOSITION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fallowing, the practice of leaving a pasture ungrazed during the growing season, is sometimes used as a tool for improving pasture quality by allowing grasses to reseed naturally. Fallowing has been shown to provide benefits in New Zealand, but has been adopted on rotationally-stocked farms in the n...

  15. Monitoring runoff from cattle-grazed pastures for a phosphorus loss quantification tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loss from agriculture persists as a water quality impairment issue. For dairy farms, nutrients can be lost from cropland, pastures, barnyards, and outdoor cattle lots. We monitored N and P loss in runoff from dairy and beef grazed pastures for two years in southwest W...

  16. Comparing pasture c sequestration estimates from eddy covariance and soil cores

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperate pastures in the northeast USA are highly productive and could act as significant sinks for soil organic carbon (SOC). However, soils under mature pastures are often considered to have reached equilibrium such that no further sequestration of SOC is expected. This study quantified changes i...

  17. Development of a quantitative pasture phosphorus management tool using the SWAT model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pasture Phosphorus Management (PPM) Calculator allows conservation planners to predict phosphorus loss from pastures in eastern Oklahoma. The computer based tool is a vastly simplified interface for the popular, yet complicated Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). PPM Calculator allows users...

  18. Countermeasures for pasture-associated laminitis in ponies and horses.

    PubMed

    Harris, Patricia; Bailey, Simon R; Elliott, Jonathan; Longland, Annette

    2006-07-01

    Laminitis occurs throughout the world in horses and ponies and has major welfare implications. It is obviously important to be able to recognize and treat the condition in its early stages so that pain and suffering are kept to a minimum. However, ideally it would be preferred to be able to recommend certain interventions/countermeasures that avoid or prevent the condition from occurring in the first place. Because pasture-associated laminitis occurs with grass consumption, one obvious way to avoid the condition is to prevent access to pasture and to feed forage alternatives that are known to be low in rapidly fermentable material. For the majority of horses, total restriction is not always a viable or desired option for financial, welfare, and health reasons. It also may not be necessary for those animals that are not predisposed to laminitis. This review discusses the possible countermeasures that could be considered now and in the future in the following 7 key areas: 1) Identifying animals predisposed to the condition; 2) Limiting development of insulin resistance; 3) Avoiding high intakes of rapidly fermentable material; 4) Preventing/reducing the formation and absorption of the various "triggering factors"; 5) Reducing/preventing oxidative damage; 6) Preventing/reducing matrix metalloproteinase activity; and 7) Preventing changes in blood flow. It is unfortunate that little or no hard data exist at present on effective countermeasures, only mechanistic evidence for avoiding risk factors. However, there is much to gain, and research in this area is urgently required. PMID:16772514

  19. Heavy metal levels of pasture grasses in metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luilo, G. B.; Othman, O. C.

    2003-05-01

    Urban agriculture is becoming an important lucrative activity in Dar es Salaam City even though the city is subject to traffic and industrial pollution pressures. Poor planning has left only limited spaces, particularly road reserves, for cultivation and foraging animals. While there is increasing road traffic no study bas been conducted determine levels of trace metals in pasture grasses. This study, therefore, reports on the levels of cadmium, manganese, lead and zinc of cynodon grasses in road vicinity in the city. Results show that the trace metal levels (ppm ± SDE) in Cynodon grass species were: Cd (0.24 ± 0.06-2.58 ± 0.15), Mn (41.5 ± 13.6-345.0 ± 124.3), Pb (1.15 ± 0.64-25.53 ± 1.29) and Zn (25.97 ± 3.69-95.36 ± 19.61). The mean levels of lead and zinc varied exponentially with distance off the road up to 15 m distance. Lead and zinc levels correlated with average daily traffic in the roads while cadmium and manganese did not. This suggests that lead and zinc in grasses owe their sources from the passing motor vehicles in agreement with other reported studies. It is recommended that pasture grasses in road vicinities must not be used for foraging dairy cattle and goats for public health reasons.

  20. Spatial and temporal variation in mined land pastures

    SciTech Connect

    Teutsch, C.D.; Collins, M.; Ditsch, D.C.; Johns, J.; Larson, B.; Turner, W.; Hamilton, T.; May, C.; Clay, L.

    1998-12-31

    Kentucky has large areas of reclaimed surface mined land that could provide grazing for livestock. Research is needed to define optimum stocking densities and to determine the sustainability of such grazing systems for this region. A long-term field study was initiated in 1997 on 151 ha of reclaimed land near Chavies, KY to assess spatial and temporal variation under grazing with stocking densities of 0, 0.28, 0.42, or 0.83 beef cow/calf pairs/ha. Global Positioning System and GIS technologies were employed to interpolate surface maps of the site using 11,000 points. Herbage and soil samples were collected around permanent markers systematically placed over the entire area at a density of 1 per 0.4 ha. Elevation ranged from 295 to 371 m and pasture slope ranged from 0 to 57{degree} with a mean of 13{degree}. Biomass density in late April ranged from 0 to 2500 kg/ha and was lowest at the highest stocking density, where grazing activity was highest. Spring-born calves averaged 240 kg at weaning. Cow weight and body condition score at the end of the grazing season was reduced at the highest stocking density and suggests that the highest stocking density may be excessive for mined land pastures in this region.

  1. Carbon fluxes of Kobresia pygmaea pastures on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foken, T.; Biermann, T.; Babel, W.; Ma, Y.

    2013-12-01

    With an approximate cover of 450,000 km2 on the Tibetan Plateau (TP), the Cyperaceae Kobresia pygmaea forms he world's largest alpine ecosystem. This species, especially adapted to grazing pressure, grows to a height of only 2-6 cm and can be found in an altitudinal range of 4000 to 5960 m a.s.l. A special characteristic of this ecosystem is the stable turf layer, which is built up from roots and plays a significant role in protecting soil from erosion. This is of great importance since soils on the TP store 2.5 % of the global soil organic carbon stocks. The aim of the investigation was the study of the carbon storage and the impact of human-induced land use change on these Kobresia pygmaea pastures. We therefore applied eddy-covariance measurements and modelling as a long-term control of the fluxes between the atmosphere and the pastures and 13C labelling for the investigation of flux partitioning, and chamber measurements to investigate the degradation of the pastures. Combining CO2 budgets observed in 2010 with eddy-covariance measurements and relative partitioning of Carbon fluxes estimated with 13C labelling enabled us to characterise the C turnover for the vegetation period with absolute fluxes within the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum. These results revealed that this ecosystem indeed stores a great amount of C in below-ground pools, especially in the root turf layer. To further investigate the importance of the root layer, the experiments in 2012 focused on flux measurements over the different surface types which make up the heterogeneity of the Kobresia pygmaea pastures and might result from degradation due to extensive grazing. The three surface types investigated with a LiCOR long-term monitoring chamber system include Kobresia pygmaea with intact turf layer (IRM), a surface type where the turf layer is still present but the vegetation is sparse and mainly consists of Cryptogam crusts (DRM) and finally areas without the turf layer (BS). According to

  2. Prevalence and concentration of Salmonella and Campylobacter in the processing environment of small-scale pastured broiler farms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A growing niche in the locally grown food movement is the small scale production of broiler chickens using the pasture-raised poultry production model. Little research exists that focuses on Salmonella and Campylobacter contamination in the environment associated with on-farm processing of pasture-r...

  3. Grazing management effects on sediment, phosphorus, and pathogen loading of streams in cool-season grass pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erosion and precipitation runoff from pastures may lead to degradation of surface water. A two-year grazing study was conducted to quantify effects of grazing management on sediment, phosphorus (P), and pathogen loading of streams in cool-season grass pastures. Six adjoining 12.1-ha pastures bisecte...

  4. The effectiveness of faecal removal methods of pasture management to control the cyathostomin burden of donkeys

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The level of anthelmintic resistance within some cyathostomin parasite populations has increased to the level where sole reliance on anthelmintic-based control protocols is not possible. Management-based nematode control methods, including removal of faeces from pasture, are widely recommended for use in association with a reduction in anthelmintic use to reduce selection pressure for drug resistance; however, very little work has been performed to quantitatively assess the effectiveness of such methods. Methods We analysed data obtained from 345 donkeys at The Donkey Sanctuary (Devon, UK), managed under three different pasture management techniques, to investigate the effectiveness of faeces removal in strongyle control in equids. The management groups were as follows: no removal of faeces from pasture, manual, twice-weekly removal of faeces from pasture and automatic, twice-weekly removal of faeces from pasture (using a mechanical pasture sweeper). From turn-out onto pasture in May, monthly faecal egg counts were obtained for each donkey and the dataset subjected to an auto regressive moving average model. Results There was little to no difference in faecal egg counts between the two methods of faecal removal; both resulted in significantly improved cyathostomin control compared to the results obtained from the donkeys that grazed pasture from which there was no faecal removal. Conclusions This study represents a valuable and unique assessment of the effectiveness of the removal of equine faeces from pasture, and provides an evidence base from which to advocate twice-weekly removal of faeces from pasture as an adjunct for equid nematode control. Widespread adoption of this practice could substantially reduce anthelmintic usage, and hence reduce selection pressure for nematode resistance to the currently effective anthelmintic products. PMID:24460700

  5. Grazing Soybean to Increase Voluntary Cow Traffic in a Pasture-based Automatic Milking System

    PubMed Central

    Clark, C. E. F.; Horadagoda, A.; Kerrisk, K. L.; Scott, V.; Islam, M. R.; Kaur, R.; Garcia, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    Pasture-based automatic milking systems (AMS) require cow traffic to enable cows to be milked. The interval between milkings can be manipulated by strategically allocating pasture. The current experiment investigated the effect of replacing an allocation of grazed pasture with grazed soybean (Glycine max) with the hypothesis that incorporating soybean would increase voluntary cow traffic and milk production. One hundred and eighty mixed age, primiparous and multiparous Holstein-Friesian/Illawarra cows were randomly assigned to two treatment groups (n = 90/group) with a 2×2 Latin square design. Each group was either offered treatments of kikuyu grass (Pennisetum clandestinum Hoach ex Chiov.) pasture (pasture) or soybean from 0900 h to 1500 h during the experimental period which consisted of 2 periods of 3 days following 5 days of training and adaptation in each period with groups crossing over treatments after the first period. The number of cows trafficking to each treatment was similar together with milk yield (mean ≈18 L/cow/d) in this experiment. For the cows that arrived at soybean or pasture there were significant differences in their behaviour and consequently the number of cows exiting each treatment paddock. There was greater cow traffic (more cows and sooner) exiting pasture allocations. Cows that arrived at soybean stayed on the allocation for 25% more time and ate more forage (8.5 kg/cow/d/allocation) relative to pasture (4.7 kg/cow/d/allocation). Pasture cows predominantly replaced eating time with rumination. These findings suggest that replacing pasture with alternative grazeable forages provides no additional incentive to increase voluntary cow traffic to an allocation of feed in AMS. This work highlights the opportunity to increase forage intakes in AMS through the incorporation of alternative forages. PMID:25049970

  6. Objective indicators of pasture degradation from spectral mixture analysis of Landsat imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Eric A.; Asner, Gregory P.; Stone, Thomas A.; Neill, Christopher; Figueiredo, Ricardo O.

    2008-03-01

    Degradation of cattle pastures is a management concern that influences future land use in Amazonia. However, "degradation" is poorly defined and has different meanings for ranchers, ecologists, and policy makers. Here we analyze pasture degradation using objective scalars of photosynthetic vegetation (PV), nonphotosynthetic vegetation (NPV), and exposed soil (S) derived from Landsat imagery. A general, probabilistic spectral mixture model decomposed satellite spectral reflectance measurements into subpixel estimates of PV, NPV, and S covers at ranches in western and eastern Amazonia. Most pasture management units at all ranches fell along a single line of decreasing PV with increasing NPV and S, which could be considered a degradation continuum. The ranch with the highest stocking densities and most intensive management had greater NPV and S than a less intensively managed ranch. The number of liming, herbiciding, and disking treatments applied to each pasture management unit was positively correlated with NPV and negatively correlated with PV. Although these objective scalars revealed signs of degradation, intensive management kept exposed soil to <40% cover and maintained economically viable cattle production over several decades. In ranches with few management inputs, the high PV cover in young pastures declined with increasing pasture age, while NPV and S increased, even where grazing intensity was low. Both highly productive pastures and vigorous regrowth of native vegetation cause high PV values. Analysis of spectral properties holds promise for identifying areas where grazing intensity has exceeded management inputs, thus increasing coverage of senescent foliage and exposed soil.

  7. Unexpected changes in soil phosphorus dynamics along pasture chronosequences in the humid tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Alan R.; Asner, Gregory P.; Cleveland, Cory C.; Lefer, Margaret E.; Bustamante, Mercedes M. C.

    2002-10-01

    Phosphorus (P) is widely believed to limit plant growth and organic matter storage in a large fraction of the world's lowland tropical rain forests. We investigated how the most common land use change in such forests, conversion to cattle pasture, affects soil P fractions along pasture chronosequences in the central Brazilian Amazon and in southwestern Costa Rica. Our sites represent a broad range in rainfall, soil type, management strategies, and total soil P (45.2-1228.0 μg P/g soil), yet we found some unexpected and at times quite similar changes in soil P in all sites. In the Brazilian sites, where rainfall is relatively low and pasture management is more intense than in the Costa Rican sites, significant losses in total soil P and soil organic carbon (SOC) were seen with pasture age on already P-deficient Oxisol and Entisol soils. However, P losses were from inorganic soil P fractions, while organic forms of soil P remained constant or increased with pasture age, despite the declines in SOC. In Costa Rica, SOC remained constant across the Oxisol sites and increased from forest to pasture on the Mollisols, while soil organic P increased with pasture age in both sequences.

  8. Assessing effects of climate change and adaptation strategies on irrigated pastures using DAISY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagimoto, Y.; Cuenca, R. H.

    2013-12-01

    The DAISY ecological model was applied for the flood-irrigated cool-season pastures in the Upper Klamath Basin, Oregon to study 1) the current condition of the pastures in the semi-arid environment, 2) effects of projected climate change, and 3) effects of introducing white clover and a sprinkler system as a potential adaptation strategy. The calibrated model indicated that productivity of the cool-season pastures was limited primarily by nitrogen (N) availability and temperature. The results of our scenario analysis indicated that the projected climate change would increase seasonal forage production (YF) and crop water use (AET) due to longer and warmer growing season. This study also found that introduction of white clover would significantly increase YF without changing AET by improving N availability due to increased nutrients deposition by cattle and increased symbiotic N fixation by white clover. In consequence, the mixed pasture could significantly improve water use efficiency (YF/AET) and, therefore the adaptability of the pasture in an area with high value water. Installing sprinkler system to the mixed pasture would increase YF by increasing net N input by increasing N mineralization and reducing denitrification. Furthermore, upgraded irrigation systems could increase water availability of the area during growing season by releasing significant amount of subsurface water to nearby surface water pools. This study demonstrated that ecological models such as DAISY can be a useful tool to model pasture systems and assess effects of projected climate changes and adaptation strategies.

  9. Reviving wood-pastures for biodiversity and people: A case study from western Estonia.

    PubMed

    Roellig, Marlene; Sutcliffe, Laura M E; Sammul, Marek; von Wehrden, Henrik; Newig, Jens; Fischer, Joern

    2016-03-01

    Wood-pastures are associated with high cultural and biodiversity values in Europe. However, due to their relatively low productivity, large areas of wood-pastures have been lost over the last century. In some areas, incentive schemes have been developed to revive wood-pastures. We investigated the effects of one such scheme in western Estonia. We compared the structure of grazed wood-pastures (old and restored) to those of abandoned wood-pastures and ungrazed forest stands to explore the effects of management, and conducted interviews with 24 farmers to investigate their motivations to carry out the management. We found a positive influence of active management on the semi-open structure of wood-pastures. Financial support was vital for management, but personal values related to tradition also played an important role. The interviewees differed widely in their range of motivations, suggesting that other strategies in addition to financial incentives would further improve the management of wood-pastures in the region. PMID:26458391

  10. Conversion of Grazed Pastures to Energy Cane as a Biofuel Feedstock Alters Soil GHG Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Casanovas, N.; DeLucia, N.; Bernacchi, C.; DeLucia, E. H.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in land use profoundly affect climate through variations in soil Greenhouse Gas (GHG) exchange. The need for alternative energies is accelerating land use change as marginal land or managed ecosystems are being converted to highly productive second-generation bioenergy crops such as energy cane (Saccharum spp. L). Although the deployment of energy cane is a promising strategy to meet global bioenergy industry demands, few studies have investigated soil GHG fluxes in these crops and sub-tropical low-intensity grazing pasture (bahiagrass, Paspalum notatum L., as forage for cattle, Bos taurus L.) with which they are competing for land. Here, we showed that soil N2O fluxes in bioenergy crops were higher (>250%) than those observed in pastures following fertilization when soil moisture and temperature were high. In the absence of recent fertilization, the N2O source strength in energy cane and pasture sites was similar. Under drier and cooler soil conditions, both pastures and bioenergy crops were weak sources of N2O even when energy cane plots were recently fertilized. Soils on grazed pastures were sources of CH4 during the wet season but became sinks under drier, colder conditions. Energy cane plantations were weak sources of CH4 over a complete wet-dry seasonal cycle. The heterotrophic component of soil respiration was larger (139-155%) in pastures than in energy cane crops, suggesting lower decomposition of SOC in bioenergy crops. In terms of global warming potential, grazed pastures were stronger (120-150%) soil GHG emitters than energy cane crops over a complete wet-dry seasonal cycle. Moreover, pastures became a substantial source of GHG emitters when including estimates of CH4 flux from cattle. Our results suggest that the conversion of pasture to energy cane will be beneficial in relation to GHGs emitted from soils and cattle. Improved understanding of land use impact on soil GHG dynamics will provide valuable information for decision makers debating

  11. More Stable Productivity of Semi Natural Grasslands than Sown Pastures in a Seasonally Dry Climate

    PubMed Central

    Ospina, Sonia; Rusch, Graciela M.; Pezo, Danilo; Casanoves, Fernando; Sinclair, Fergus L.

    2012-01-01

    In the Neotropics the predominant pathway to intensify productivity is generally thought to be to convert grasslands to sown pastures, mostly in monoculture. This article examines how above-ground net primary productivity (ANPP) in semi-natural grasslands and sown pastures in Central America respond to rainfall by: (i) assessing the relationships between ANPP and accumulated rainfall and indices of rainfall distribution, (ii) evaluating the variability of ANPP between and within seasons, and (iii) estimating the temporal stability of ANPP. We conducted sequential biomass harvests during 12 periods of 22 days and related those to rainfall. There were significant relationships between ANPP and cumulative rainfall in 22-day periods for both vegetation types and a model including a linear and quadratic term explained 74% of the variation in the data. There was also a significant correlation between ANPP and the number of rainfall events for both vegetation types. Sown pastures had higher ANPP increments per unit rainfall and higher ANPP at the peak of the rainy season than semi-natural grasslands. In contrast, semi-natural grasslands showed higher ANPP early in the dry season. The temporal stability of ANPP was higher in semi-natural grasslands than in the sown pastures in the dry season and over a whole annual cycle. Our results reveal that, contrary to conventional thinking amongst pasture scientists, there appears to be no increase in ANPP arising from replacing semi-natural grasslands with sown pastures under prevailing pasture management practices in seasonally dry climates, while the temporal distribution of ANPP is more even in semi-natural grasslands. Neither sown pastures nor semi-natural grasslands are productive towards the end of the dry season, indicating the potential importance of the widespread practice of retaining tree cover in pastures. PMID:22590506

  12. Cadmium concentrations in new zealand pastures: relationships to soil and climate variables.

    PubMed

    Reiser, René; Simmler, Michael; Portmann, Denise; Clucas, Lynne; Schulin, Rainer; Robinson, Brett

    2014-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a nonessential element that occurs at above-background concentrations in many New Zealand (NZ) soils. Most of this Cd is due to the historical application of single superphosphate that was made from Nauru phosphate rock containing between 400 and 600 mg Cd kg P. Pasture Cd uptake exacerbates the entry of Cd into animal products. We sought to determine the critical environmental factors affecting Cd uptake in NZ pastures and to calculate the likely Cd intake of sheep and cattle. We tested 69 pastures throughout NZ for a range of variables, including Cd. Soil Cd and pasture Cd were positively correlated with soil P and soil concentrations of other elements found in phosphate fertilizers. We found that no single environmental variable adequately predicted pasture Cd uptake. Nevertheless, pseudo-total soil Cd and Cd extracted using a 0.05 mol L Ca(NO) solution were positively correlated with pasture Cd. Although soil pH, soil Fe, and soil Cd provided an excellent predictor of the Ca(NO)-extractable soil Cd fraction, regression models explained just 38% of the variation of the Cd concentration in pasture grasses. Incorporating the effect of pasture species composition is a crucial next step in improving these models. A calculation of the likely exposure to Cd of sheep and cattle revealed that no pastures tested resulted in sheep and cattle ingesting Cd at a rate that would result in breaching muscle-tissue food standards. For offal products, which the NZ meat industry does not sell for human consumption, food safety standards exceedence was calculated in a few cases. PMID:25602820

  13. [Control of gastrointestinal helminthiasis in pasture-reared lambs].

    PubMed

    Chroust, K

    1997-03-01

    Two sheep herds kept in different geographic conditions with spring lambing by the end of March and April (herd No. 1: 400 ewes, 600 metres above sea level; herd No. 2: 450 ewes, 300 metres above sea level) were examined. The dynamics of gastrointestinal nematode and Moniezia spp. cestode egg counts in samples taken regularly every 4 to 5 weeks was studied during the year 1995 with the intention to verify the system of effective control of these helminth infections under pasture conditions of lamb rearing. In ewes a significant rise in gastrointestinal nematode egg counts was proved during the lambing season, "spring rise phenomenon", and during the summer pasture until autumn months with maximum EPG values reaching 150 (Figs. 1 and 2). In lambs that started grazing at 1 to 4 weeks of age, the excretion steeply rose to maximum EPG values 350 and 290, respectively, after 4 to 5 weeks of grazing (Figs. 1 and 2). In order to control these rising infections, ewes were treated with antihelmintic albendazol by the end of February (herd No. 1) and in March (herd No. 2) and lambs during the first or third decade of July. This anthelmintic treatment significantly lowered egg excretion to EPG values lower than 30 in ewes and 50 or 60, respectively, in lambs. Later, during the summer and autumn months, a mild rise of egg counts was found in lambs. These maxima were liquidated anthelmintis treatment in both herds in late autumn months and it also lowered helminth infections to minimum during winter months (EPG values lower than 50). The excretion of Moniezia spp. eggs had the same dynamics as that gastrointestinal nematodes. Values of lamb infection prevalence reached 21% in herd No. 1 and 29% in herd No. 2. Anthelmintic treatment during July controlled cestode findings in lambs. Albendazol (Vermitan susp. 2.5%), dosed 5 mg/kg of body weight, proved highly effective in the control of gastrointestinal nematodes and Moniezia spp. cestodes. PMID:9182393

  14. Reduced deep soil water uptake through forest conversion to pasture in Amazonia

    SciTech Connect

    Jipp, P.H.; Nepstad, D.C. Woods Hole Research Center, MA )

    1993-06-01

    Forests of eastern Amazonia are being replaced by pastures and secondary forests. We measured soil water storage and flux in adjacent forest and pasture ecosystems using Time Domain Reflectometry sensors installed in the walls of deep (9-m) shafts. The forest withdrew 597+/-25 mm of soil water stored below 1 m depth during the 1991 dry season (Jun-Dec), 1.7 times more than the pasture. Uptake from the bottom of the forest soil profile continued even after rainfall resumed in early 1992. The hydrologic impacts of tropical deforestation may be most severe for evergreen forests with deep rooting zones in areas of seasonal drought.

  15. Long-term effects of municipal sewage on soils and pastures.

    PubMed

    van de Graaff, Robert H M; Suter, Helen C; Lawes, Sophy J

    2002-01-01

    Land application of municipal wastewater is widely practised worldwide as a means of treating wastes and obtaining a benefit from the water and nutrients by growing pastures, trees, and sometimes edible crops such as vegetables, fruit and fibre, etc. Irrigation of pastures by treated and untreated sewage near Melbourne, Australia, for more than a century has increased heavy metals concentrations in the soil, but appears not to have increased their concentrations in the herbage and in animal tissues of animals grazed on these pastures. There seem to be sound reasons why this practice may be sustainable. PMID:12046671

  16. C storage in Amazonia pastures, effects of age, climate and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, Katja; Stahl, Clement; Blanfort, Vincent; Fontaine, Sebstien; Burban, Benoit; Darsonville, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The Amazonian region is one of the major C storing areas, with 36-60% of ecosystem C being stored in forest soils. During last decades, more than 15% of Amazonian tropical forest has been converted to pastures. A number of studies provide evidence that soil C stocks of topsoil (0-20 cm) can be higher in grasslands than in native forests after more than 20 years after conversion (e.g. Don et al 2011). As for younger pastures (< 20 years old), results are less evident, showing either an increase or decrease of in topsoil C stock. The absence of a clear pattern was mostly explained due to conjoined changes following deforestation, such as climate conditions and pasture management. Accordingly, the question remains whether tropical permanent pastures can restore soil C stocks after deforestation and what is the capacity of tropical pastures to initiate a recurrent C storage. Pastures are largely affected by agricultural practices, influencing their carbon balance, in interaction with climate effect. In the past 10 years two major droughts (in 2005 and 2010 [2]) were reported for the Amazonian area. A better insight on effects of climatic variability and agricultural management on carbon storage is, thus, valuable to improve/maintain C storage of pastures in tropical regions. Here we like to assess whether tropical permanent pastures i) can restore soil C stocks after deforestation; ii) and to what extend and iii) which role play management practices with respect to climate variability to maintain a recurrent C storage. To establish reliable estimates of soil C storage in Amazonian region, the net C balance of pastures and native forests was quantified by two independent and complementary studies in French Guiana: a chronosequence study including a soil inventory of soil C stocks (0-100 cm depth) in 24 pastures of various ages (i.e. 0 to 42 yrs after deforestation) and 4 native forests, and 5 years of eddy covariance flux measurements (EC) for a young intensively used

  17. A Case Study of Behaviour and Performance of Confined or Pastured Cows During the Dry Period

    PubMed Central

    Black, Randi A.; Krawczel, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Pasture and freestall systems offer benefits and consequences during lactation but have not been investigated during the dry period. The effect of pasture or confined systems during the dry period on behaviour and milk quality was investigated. Freestall housing resulted in more resting behaviour and less locomotor activity during the dry period compared to pastured cows. At calving, freestall housed cows performed fewer lying bouts and less locomotor activity compared to pastured cows. Pasture resulted in less aggression around feeding but high respiration rates during peak heat times. Pasture during the dry period altered lying behavior, reduced feed bunk aggression and increased heat stress behaviors. Abstract The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of the dry cow management system (pasture or confined) on: (1) lying behaviour and activity; (2) feeding and heat stress behaviours; (3) intramammary infections, postpartum. Non-lactating Holstein cows were assigned to either deep-bedded, sand freestalls (n = 14) or pasture (n = 14) using rolling enrollment. At dry-off, cows were equipped with an accelerometer to determine daily lying time (h/d), lying bouts (bouts/d), steps (steps/d) and divided into periods: far-off (60 to 15 d prepartum), close-up (14 to 1 d prepartum), calving (calving date) and postpartum (1 to 14 d postpartum). Respiration rates were recorded once weekly from dry off to calving from 1300 to 1500 h. Feeding displacements were defined as one cow successfully displacing another from the feed bunk and were recorded once per week during the 2 h period, immediately after feeding at 800 h. Pastured cows were fed a commercial dry cow pellet during far-off and total mixed ration during close-up, with free access to hay and grazing. Freestall housed cows were fed a total mixed ration at far-off and close-up. Cows housed in freestalls were moved to a maternity pen with a mattress at commencement of labour. Pastured cows

  18. FORAGES AND PASTURES SYMPOSIUM: Improving efficiency of production in pasture- and range-based beef and dairy systems.

    PubMed

    Mulliniks, J T; Rius, A G; Edwards, M A; Edwards, S R; Hobbs, J D; Nave, R L G

    2015-06-01

    Despite overall increased production in the last century, it is critical that grazing production systems focus on improving beef and dairy efficiency to meet current and future global food demands. For livestock producers, production efficiency is essential to maintain long-term profitability and sustainability. This continued viability of production systems using pasture- and range-based grazing systems requires more rapid adoption of innovative management practices and selection tools that increase profitability by optimizing grazing management and increasing reproductive performance. Understanding the genetic variation in cow herds will provide the ability to select cows that require less energy for maintenance, which can potentially reduce total energy utilization or energy required for production, consequently improving production efficiency and profitability. In the United States, pasture- and range-based grazing systems vary tremendously across various unique environments that differ in climate, topography, and forage production. This variation in environmental conditions contributes to the challenges of developing or targeting specific genetic components and grazing systems that lead to increased production efficiency. However, across these various environments and grazing management systems, grazable forage remains the least expensive nutrient source to maintain productivity of the cow herd. Beef and dairy cattle can capitalize on their ability to utilize these feed resources that are not usable for other production industries. Therefore, lower-cost alternatives to feeding harvested and stored feedstuffs have the opportunity to provide to livestock producers a sustainable and efficient forage production system. However, increasing production efficiency within a given production environment would vary according to genetic potential (i.e., growth and milk potential), how that genetic potential fits the respective production environment, and how the grazing

  19. Salinity tolerance of foxtail barley (Hordeum jubatum) and desirable pasture grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Greenhouse studies were conducted to determine the relative salinity tolerance of foxtail barley and seven desirable pasture grasses. Grass species were reed canarygrass, timothy, altai wildrye, tall fescue, tall wheatgrass, orchardgrass, creeping meadow foxtail, and foxtail barley. Grasses were e...

  20. Stocker performance and production in mixed tall fescue-bermudagrass pastures of the Southern Piedmont USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stocker performance and production from mixed cool- and warm-season perennial pastures are important determinants of agricultural sustainability that can be influenced by management. We evaluated the factorial combination of three sources of nutrient application (inorganic only, organic + inorganic...

  1. Afforestation or intense pasturing improve the ecological and economic value of abandoned tropical farmlands

    PubMed Central

    Knoke, Thomas; Bendix, Jörg; Pohle, Perdita; Hamer, Ute; Hildebrandt, Patrick; Roos, Kristin; Gerique, Andrés; Sandoval, María L.; Breuer, Lutz; Tischer, Alexander; Silva, Brenner; Calvas, Baltazar; Aguirre, Nikolay; Castro, Luz M.; Windhorst, David; Weber, Michael; Stimm, Bernd; Günter, Sven; Palomeque, Ximena; Mora, Julio; Mosandl, Reinhard; Beck, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing demands for livelihood resources in tropical rural areas have led to progressive clearing of biodiverse natural forests. Restoration of abandoned farmlands could counter this process. However, as aims and modes of restoration differ in their ecological and socio-economic value, the assessment of achievable ecosystem functions and benefits requires holistic investigation. Here we combine the results from multidisciplinary research for a unique assessment based on a normalization of 23 ecological, economic and social indicators for four restoration options in the tropical Andes of Ecuador. A comparison of the outcomes among afforestation with native alder or exotic pine, pasture restoration with either low-input or intense management and the abandoned status quo shows that both variants of afforestation and intense pasture use improve the ecological value, but low-input pasture does not. Economic indicators favour either afforestation or intense pasturing. Both Mestizo and indigenous Saraguro settlers are more inclined to opt for afforestation. PMID:25425182

  2. Treatment of pastures with diflubenzuron suppresses Horn Fly, Haematobia irritans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae) development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diflubenzuron is an insect growth regulator labeled for application to pastures and rangeland to suppress grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acrididae) populations. Livestock are permitted access to land immediately after treatment. We hypothesized that the development and survivorship of horn fly Haematobia ...

  3. Effects on ground-water quality from irrigating pasture with sewage effluent near Lakeland, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichenbaugh, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    Since 1969 an average of 25,000 gpd of domestic secondary-treated effluent has been used to supplement irrigation of 30 acres of grazed pasture north of Lakeland, Florida. Monitor wells were contructed near the effluent-irrigated pasture. The water table in the surficial aquifer under the pasture varied from 1.0 to 3.3 feet below land surface. Total nitrogen was less than 20 percent of the effluent content after percolating 8 feet; no increase in nitrogen was detected 20 feet below the surface, or in down-gradient ground water. There was no evidence of phosphorus or carbon contamination of ground water. Low numbers of bacteria (generally coliform) were noted in some samples from nine wells. Four wells sampled contained bacteria of probable fecal origin. Low-rate application of the effluent to the pasture apparently has had little effect on the soil and ground water. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. The janthitrems: fluorescent tremorgenic toxins produced by Penicillium janthinellum isolates from ryegrass pastures.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, R T; Latch, G C; Keogh, R G

    1980-01-01

    New tremorgenic mycotoxins named janthitrem A, B, and C (molecular weights 601, 585, and 569, respectively) were produced by more than half of 21 Penicillium janthinellum isolates obtained from ryegrass pastures involved in ryegrass staggers outbreaks in sheep. PMID:7356319

  5. Afforestation or intense pasturing improve the ecological and economic value of abandoned tropical farmlands.

    PubMed

    Knoke, Thomas; Bendix, Jörg; Pohle, Perdita; Hamer, Ute; Hildebrandt, Patrick; Roos, Kristin; Gerique, Andrés; Sandoval, María L; Breuer, Lutz; Tischer, Alexander; Silva, Brenner; Calvas, Baltazar; Aguirre, Nikolay; Castro, Luz M; Windhorst, David; Weber, Michael; Stimm, Bernd; Günter, Sven; Palomeque, Ximena; Mora, Julio; Mosandl, Reinhard; Beck, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing demands for livelihood resources in tropical rural areas have led to progressive clearing of biodiverse natural forests. Restoration of abandoned farmlands could counter this process. However, as aims and modes of restoration differ in their ecological and socio-economic value, the assessment of achievable ecosystem functions and benefits requires holistic investigation. Here we combine the results from multidisciplinary research for a unique assessment based on a normalization of 23 ecological, economic and social indicators for four restoration options in the tropical Andes of Ecuador. A comparison of the outcomes among afforestation with native alder or exotic pine, pasture restoration with either low-input or intense management and the abandoned status quo shows that both variants of afforestation and intense pasture use improve the ecological value, but low-input pasture does not. Economic indicators favour either afforestation or intense pasturing. Both Mestizo and indigenous Saraguro settlers are more inclined to opt for afforestation. PMID:25425182

  6. Pasture intake and milk production of dairy cows rotationally grazing on multi-species swards.

    PubMed

    Roca-Fernández, A I; Peyraud, J L; Delaby, L; Delagarde, R

    2016-09-01

    Increasing plant species diversity has been proposed as a means for enhancing annual pasture productivity and decreasing seasonal variability of pasture production facing more frequent drought scenarios due to climate change. Few studies have examined how botanical complexity of sown swards affects cow performance. A 2-year experiment was conducted to determine how sward botanical complexity, from a monoculture of ryegrass to multi-species swards (MSS) (grasses-legumes-forb), affect pasture chemical composition and nutritive value, pasture dry matter (DM) intake, milk production and milk solids production of grazing dairy cows. Five sward species: perennial ryegrass (L as Lolium), white clover and red clover (both referred to as T as Trifolium because they were always sown together), chicory (C as Cichorium) and tall fescue (F as Festuca) were assigned to four grazing treatments by combining one (L), three (LT), four (LTC) or five (LTCF) species. Hereafter, the LT swards are called mixed swards as a single combination of ryegrass and clovers, whereas LTC and LTCF swards are called MSS as a combination of at least four species from three botanical families. The experimental area (8.7 ha) was divided into four block replicates with a mineral nitrogen fertilisation of 75 kg N/ha per year for each treatment. In total, 13 grazing rotations were carried out by applying the same grazing calendar and the same pasture allowance of 19 kg DM/cow per day above 4 cm for all treatments. Clover represented 20% of DM for mixed and MSS swards; chicory represented 30% of DM for MSS and tall fescue represented 10% of DM for LTCF swards. Higher milk production (+1.1 kg/day) and milk solids production (+0.08 kg/day) were observed for mixed swards than for ryegrass swards. Pasture nutritive value and pasture DM intake were unaffected by the inclusion of clover. Pasture DM, organic matter and NDF concentrations were lower for MSS than for mixed swards. Higher milk production (+0.8 kg

  7. A Case Study of Behaviour and Performance of Confined or Pastured Cows During the Dry Period.

    PubMed

    Black, Randi A; Krawczel, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of the dry cow management system (pasture or confined) on: (1) lying behaviour and activity; (2) feeding and heat stress behaviours; (3) intramammary infections, postpartum. Non-lactating Holstein cows were assigned to either deep-bedded, sand freestalls ( n = 14) or pasture ( n = 14) using rolling enrollment. At dry-off, cows were equipped with an accelerometer to determine daily lying time (h/d), lying bouts (bouts/d), steps (steps/d) and divided into periods: far-off (60 to 15 d prepartum), close-up (14 to 1 d prepartum), calving (calving date) and postpartum (1 to 14 d postpartum). Respiration rates were recorded once weekly from dry off to calving from 1300 to 1500 h. Feeding displacements were defined as one cow successfully displacing another from the feed bunk and were recorded once per week during the 2 h period, immediately after feeding at 800 h. Pastured cows were fed a commercial dry cow pellet during far-off and total mixed ration during close-up, with free access to hay and grazing. Freestall housed cows were fed a total mixed ration at far-off and close-up. Cows housed in freestalls were moved to a maternity pen with a mattress at commencement of labour. Pastured cows calved in pasture. After calving, all cows were commingled in a pen identical to the freestall housing treatment. Cows housed in freestalls laid down for longer during far-off and close-up periods, had fewer lying bouts during the calving period and took fewer steps throughout the study period when compared to pastured cows. Freestall housed cows experienced more displacements after feeding than did pastured cows. Respiration rates increased with an increasing temperature humidity index, more in pastured cows than in freestall housed cows. Pastured cows altered their lying behaviour and activity, suggesting a shift in time budget priorities between pastured and confined dry cows. Pastured cows also experienced less aggression

  8. Biogeochemical Changes Associated With Conversion of Grazed Pastures to Plantation Forests in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, N. A.; Tate, K. R.; Ross, D. J.; Parfitt, R.; Parshotam, A.; Halliday, J.; McMurtrie, R.

    2001-05-01

    Since the 1930s, large areas of marginally productive pasture and/or scrubland have been converted to plantation forests dominated by Pinus radiata. In the 1990s, up to 100,000 hectares of new plantings occurred each year, many into land used previously for pasture. Current plantation forest area is about 1.7 million hectares. This land-use change impacts many biogeochemical and hydrological processes, and plays an important role in several current environmental issues. Conversion of pasture to plantation forests increases evapotranspiration, and can reduce streamflow and regional water availability. However, afforestation also stabilizes pasture soils that would be highly erodible when covered with pasture vegetation. Soil temperatures are also lower in plantation forests than in pasture, influencing carbon and nitrogen cycling rates. Because of differences in plant litter quality and distribution of carbon inputs to the soil, afforestation often leads to a reduction in soil pH, lower soil carbon turnover rates, lower net N mineralization, lower total mineral soil N, and reduced numbers of soil invertebrates (particularly earthworms). At many sites, these changes can lead to a reduction in mineral soil C stocks, with the reduction sometimes greater than the C accumulated in the forest floor. High N availability associated with pastures can often lead to N leaching losses when tree seedlings are established and uptake of N by pasture grasses inhibited by e.g. herbicide application. We discuss the ability of ecosystem models to simulate these complex biogeochemical changes associated with afforestation, the potential importance of forest management on these changes, and the implications for key environmental issues such as the rate of carbon sequestration in Kyoto forests and decreased emissions of agricultural trace gases.

  9. Tree water use and rainfall partitioning in a mature poplar-pasture system.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Escobar, A.; Edwards, W. R. N.; Morton, R. H.; Kemp, P. D.; Mackay, A. D.

    2000-01-01

    Traditionally, poplars (Populus) have been planted to control erosion on New Zealand's hill-slopes, because of their capacity to dry out and bind together the soil, by reducing effective rainfall and increasing evapotranspiration and soil strength. However, the effect of widely spaced poplars on the partitioning of soil water and rainfall has not been reported. This study determined rainfall partitioning for 18 mid-spring days in a mature P. deltoides (Bart. ex Marsh, Clone I78)-pasture association (37 stems per hectare, unevenly spaced at 16.4 +/- 0.4 m) and compared it with a traditional open pasture system in grazed areas of a hill environment. Tree transpiration was measured by the heat pulse technique. A time-driven mathematical model was used to set a zero offset, adjust anomalous values and describe simultaneous sap velocity time courses of trees. The model showed that daylight sap flow velocities can be represented with a nonlinear Beta function (R(2) > 0.98), and differences in the parameters representing the initiation, duration and conformation of the sap velocity can be tested statistically to discern tree transpiration differences during the day. Evapotranspiration was greater for the poplar-pasture association than for the open pasture (2.7-3.0 versus 2.2 mm day(-1)). The tree canopy alone contributed 0.92 mm day(-1) as transpiration and 1.37 mm day(-1) as interception, whereas evapotranspiration of the pasture understory was only 0.4-0.6 mm day(-1). Despite the higher water use of the poplar-pasture association, soil water in the 0-300 mm soil stratum was higher than, or similar to, that of the open pasture. Tree shading decreased evapotranspiration and pasture accumulation under the trees. PMID:12651477

  10. Unexprected Changes in Soil Phosphorus Dynamics Following Tropical Deforestation to Cattle Pasture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Alan R.; Asner, Gregory P.; Cleveland, Cory C.; Lefer, Margaret E.; Bustamante, Mercedes M. C.

    2001-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is widely believed to limit plant growth and organic matter storage in a large fraction of the world's lowland tropical rainforests. We investigated how the most common land use change in such forests, conversion to cattle pasture, affects soil P fractions along forest to pasture chronosequences in the central Brazilian Amazon and in southwestern Costa Rica. Our sites represent a broad range in rainfall, soil type, management strategies, and total soil P (45.2 - 1228.0 microng P / g soil), yet we found some unexpected and at times strikingly similar changes in soil P in all sites. In the Brazilian sites, where rainfall is relatively low and pasture management is more intense than in the Costa Rican sites, significant losses in total soil P and soil organic carbon (SOC) were seen with pasture age on both fine-textured oxisol and highly sandy entisol soils. However, P losses were largely from occluded, inorganic soil P fractions, while organic forms of soil P remained constant or increased with pasture age, despite the declines in SOC. In Costa Rica, SOC remained constant across the oxisol sites and increased from forest to pasture on the mollisols, while total soil P increased with pasture age in both sequences. The increases in total soil P were largely due to changes in organic P; occluded soil P increased only slightly in the mollisols, and remained unchanged in the older oxisols. We suggest that changes in the composition and/or the primary limiting resources of the soil microbial community may drive the changes in organic P. We also present a new conceptual model for changes in soil P following deforestation to cattle pasture.

  11. How to determine the GHG budget of a pasture field with grazing animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, Christof; Neftel, Albrecht; Felber, Raphael

    2016-04-01

    Up to now the scientific investigation and description of the agriculture related greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange has been largely separated into (i) direct animal related and (ii) ecosystem area related processes and measurement methods. An overlap of the two usually separated topics occurs for grazed pastures, where direct animal and pasture area emissions are relevant. In the present study eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements on the field scale were combined with a source location attribution (footprint) model and with GPS position measurements of the individual animals. The experiment was performed on a pasture field in Switzerland under a rotational full grazing regime with dairy cows. The exchange fluxes of CH4, CO2, and N2O were measured simultaneously over the entire year. The observed CH4 emission fluxes correlated well with the presence of cows in the flux footprint. When converted to average emission per cow, the results agreed with published values from respiration chamber experiments with similar cows. For CO2 a sophisticated partitioning algorithm was applied to separate the pasture and animal contributions, because both were in the same order of magnitude. The N2O exchange fully attributable to the pasture soil showed considerable and continuous emissions through the entire seasonal course mainly modulated by soil moisture and temperature. The resulting GHG budget shows that the largest GHG effect of the pasture system was due to enteric CH4 emissions followed by soil N2O emissions, but that the carbon storage change was affected by a much larger uncertainty. The results demonstrate that the EC technique in combination with animal position information allows to consistently quantify the exchange of all three GHG on the pasture and to adequately distinguish between direct animal and diffuse area sources (and sinks). Yet questions concerning a standardized attribution of animal related emissions to the pasture GHG budget still need to be resolved.

  12. Seasonal variability of CO2 and H2O fluxes in tropical pasture and afforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S.; Eugster, W.; Buchmann, N.

    2011-12-01

    Tropical ecosystems play an important role for the global carbon and water cycle. However, eddy covariance flux measurements in the tropics are still scarce and previous studies have been predominantly conducted in tropical forests. With ongoing deforestation, the tropics are increasingly influenced by agroecosystems and pastures but only few observations have covered these land-use types so far. Comparative eddy covariance measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapour fluxes were performed in a tropical pasture and an adjacent afforestation site in Sardinilla, Panama from 2007 to 2009. We observed a larger seasonal variability of ecosystem CO2 and H2O fluxes at the pasture compared to the afforestation site, which was largely related to the rooting depth of grasses versus trees. Radiation and soil moisture were the main environmental controls of these fluxes in both ecosystems. The pasture ecosystem was more sensitive to water limitations by seasonal drought and in addition, periodical overgrazing significantly contributed to persisting carbon losses from the pasture. Substantial carbon sequestration was found at the afforestation site and was in agreement with independent assessments of biomass and soil inventories. In contrast to the largely differing carbon budgets, the afforestation of tropical pasture only marginally increased total annual evapotranspiration in Sardinilla. Our results clearly indicate the potential for carbon sequestration of tropical afforestation but also highlight the risk of carbon losses from pasture ecosystems in a seasonal tropical climate. Predicted increases in precipitation variability will very likely impact the seasonal variability of CO2 and H2O fluxes in Panama, in particular of pasture ecosystems. At the end of this talk, the overall significance of seasonality in tropical ecosystems will be discussed.

  13. Limitations of Vegetation Indices For Detecting Pasture Degradation: A Case Study of Montane Pastoral Systems in Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddy, I. M. S.; Gergel, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Grazing is the most extensive land use on Earth. Widespread consequences of overgrazing pastures include long-term decreases in plant biomass and limited recovery of vegetation. Remotely-sensed vegetation indices linked to biomass (e.g. NDVI) are routinely used to monitor pasture health over broad areas to track pasture degradation and recovery over time. Unfortunately, overgrazing can impact vegetation in various other ways not easily evaluated using satellite imagery, such as by altering species composition. Furthermore, the response of vegetation to grazing may be influenced by underlying terrain and topographic gradients. We examined multi-decadal trends in pasture condition in Kyrgyzstan, a country where pasture degradation is of serious concern. Using a chronosequence of Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery, we compared fifteen-year trends in NDVI with contemporary field-based measurements of pasture health in thirty 1-km 2 sites. Multivariate regression was used to discern the relationship between long-term NDVI trends and pasture health in pastures of differing terrain (areas of varying topographic wetness index and solar insolation). Preliminary results suggest that pasture degradation can be correlated with either positive or negative changes in NDVI depending upon the topographic position of the pasture. Furthermore, terrain characteristics explained a considerable portion of the observed variance in NDVI trends across the region. Improving our understanding of grazing impacts in montane systems is critical given their vulnerability to impending climate change.

  14. Grazing alters the net C sink strength and the net global warming potential of a subtropical pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Casanovas, N.; DeLucia, N.; DeLucia, E. H.; Boughton, E. H.; Keel, E.; Bernacchi, C.

    2014-12-01

    Grazing profoundly affects climate by altering the exchange of greenhouse gases (GHG; CO2 and CH4) between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Little is known about how this disturbance affects the GHG exchange from subtropical pastures although they account for a substantial portion of global grazing lands. Here, we investigated how cattle grazing affect net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and CH4 emissions in subtropical semi-native pasture using the eddy covariance technique. Soil moisture was greater under grazed than ungrazed pastures but soil temperature was similar between treatments. By removing aboveground biomass, grazing reduced gross primary productivity (GPP, 16%). While ungrazed pastures had higher GPP than grazed pastures, they also had higher ecosystem respiration (Re, 20%) along with higher heterotrophic respiration. As a result, annual sums of NEE were similar in grazed and ungrazed pastures and both systems were net sinks for CO2 (-86 ± 5 gC m-2 yr-1 in grazed pasture, and -76 ± 6 gC m-2 yr-1 in ungrazed pasture). Including C removal by grazers in the C budget, grazing reduced the C sink strength (250%) and grazed pasture became a net source of C to the atmosphere. Increased soil wetness and CH4 production from enteric ruminant fermentation enhanced net ecosystem CH4 emissions (16%) in grazed than in ungrazed pastures. The net global warming potential (GWP) was higher (34%) in grazed than in ungrazed pastures, but both systems were net sources of GHGs when accounting for the radiative forcing of CH4. Our results suggest that grazing reduces the net C sink strength and increases the net GWP of subtropical pastures. Improved understanding of how grazing affects ecosystem GHG fluxes is essential to predicting the role of pastures on the global C cycle.

  15. Effect of Afforestation and Reforestation of Pastures on the Activity and Population Dynamics of Methanotrophic Bacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brajesh K.; Tate, Kevin R.; Kolipaka, Gokul; Hedley, Carolyn B.; Macdonald, Catriona A.; Millard, Peter; Murrell, J. Colin

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effect of afforestation and reforestation of pastures on methane oxidation and the methanotrophic communities in soils from three different New Zealand sites. Methane oxidation was measured in soils from two pine (Pinus radiata) forests and one shrubland (mainly Kunzea ericoides var. ericoides) and three adjacent permanent pastures. The methane oxidation rate was consistently higher in the pine forest or shrubland soils than in the adjacent pasture soils. A combination of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and stable isotope probing (SIP) analyses of these soils revealed that different methanotrophic communities were active in soils under the different vegetations. The C18 PLFAs (signature of type II methanotrophs) predominated under pine and shrublands, and C16 PLFAs (type I methanotrophs) predominated under pastures. Analysis of the methanotrophs by molecular methods revealed further differences in methanotrophic community structure under the different vegetation types. Cloning and sequencing and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the particulate methane oxygenase gene (pmoA) from different samples confirmed the PLFA-SIP results that methanotrophic bacteria related to type II methanotrophs were dominant in pine forest and shrubland, and type I methanotrophs (related to Methylococcus capsulatus) were dominant in all pasture soils. We report that afforestation and reforestation of pastures caused changes in methane oxidation by altering the community structure of methanotrophic bacteria in these soils. PMID:17574997

  16. Soil carbon dynamics in pastures and forests of the eastern Amazon

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, E.A.; Nepstad, D.C.; Trumbore, S.E. Univ. of California, Irvine )

    1993-06-01

    There is a dearth of information on below-ground C budgets of tropical forests and the ecosystems that are replacing them. Mean flux of CO[sub 2] from the soil surface was 0.29 and 0.14 g C m[sup [minus]2] h[sup [minus]1] in primary forests and degraded pastures, respectively, near Paragominas, Brazil. Litterfall and fine root inputs were about two times greater in forests than pastures. The [sup 14]C and [sup 13]C contents of SOM and CO[sub 2] in a pasture cleared in 1975 show that much of the labile forest SOM has been lost and little new C has been added by pasture vegetation. A preliminary estimate of the cumulative net C loss from the pasture soil is 2.7 kg C m[sup [minus]2] (about 10% of the forest soil C inventory), and it is still losing about 0.09 kg C m[sup [minus]2] yr[sup [minus]1]. Most of the soil C turnover occurs near the surface, but most of the long-term C storage occurs below 1 m in these oxisols. About 10% of the soil C at depth has a mean residence time of years to decades and is input by the deep roots of trees in this seasonally droughty region. Grasses have fewer deep roots, and about 1/3 of the total C lost from pasture soil was from below 1 m depth.

  17. Young restored forests increase seedling recruitment in abandoned pastures in the Southern Atlantic rainforest.

    PubMed

    Leitão, Flora H M; Marques, Marcia C M; Ceccon, Eliane

    2010-12-01

    Planting seedlings is a common technique for abandoned pastures restoration in the tropics, supposedly by increasing the seedling recruitment and accelerating succession. In this study we evaluated the role of a young restored forest (one year old) in enhancing seedling establishment from two sources (seed rain and seed bank), in the Atlantic Rainforest region in Southern Brazil. We compared abandoned pasture, young restored forest and old-growth forest with respect to the seedlings recruited from different sources, by monitoring 40 permanent plots (0.5 m x 0.5 m) over 20 months. From the three studied areas a total of 392 seedlings of 53 species were recruited. Species were mainly herbaceous (85%), pioneers (88%), zoochorous (51%) and small-seeded species (60%). Seedling recruitment from the seed bank (density and species richness) was higher and dominated by herbaceous species in the abandoned pasture and in the young restored forest; on the other hand, the recruitment of woody species from seed rain was more pronounced in the old-growth forest. The young restored forest increased the species richness of woody seedlings recruitment from the seed bank (two-fold) and from seed rain (three-fold) compared to the abandoned pasture. Also, the seedling density in young restored forest was still higher than abandoned pastures (seed bank: four times; seed rain: ten times). Our results show that even young restored areas enhance the establishment of woody species and should be considered an important step for pasture restoration. PMID:21246991

  18. Effect of afforestation and reforestation of pastures on the activity and population dynamics of methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brajesh K; Tate, Kevin R; Kolipaka, Gokul; Hedley, Carolyn B; Macdonald, Catriona A; Millard, Peter; Murrell, J Colin

    2007-08-01

    We investigated the effect of afforestation and reforestation of pastures on methane oxidation and the methanotrophic communities in soils from three different New Zealand sites. Methane oxidation was measured in soils from two pine (Pinus radiata) forests and one shrubland (mainly Kunzea ericoides var. ericoides) and three adjacent permanent pastures. The methane oxidation rate was consistently higher in the pine forest or shrubland soils than in the adjacent pasture soils. A combination of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and stable isotope probing (SIP) analyses of these soils revealed that different methanotrophic communities were active in soils under the different vegetations. The C18 PLFAs (signature of type II methanotrophs) predominated under pine and shrublands, and C16 PLFAs (type I methanotrophs) predominated under pastures. Analysis of the methanotrophs by molecular methods revealed further differences in methanotrophic community structure under the different vegetation types. Cloning and sequencing and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the particulate methane oxygenase gene (pmoA) from different samples confirmed the PLFA-SIP results that methanotrophic bacteria related to type II methanotrophs were dominant in pine forest and shrubland, and type I methanotrophs (related to Methylococcus capsulatus) were dominant in all pasture soils. We report that afforestation and reforestation of pastures caused changes in methane oxidation by altering the community structure of methanotrophic bacteria in these soils. PMID:17574997

  19. Dental pathology in conventionally fed and pasture managed dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Fadden, A N; Poulsen, K P; Vanegas, J; Mecham, J; Bildfell, R; Stieger-Vanegas, S M

    2016-01-01

    Healthy teeth are important in the first stages of digestion for dairy cattle, yet little is known about bovine dental disease. This study aimed to investigate dental pathology of dairy cattle in two parts. First dairy cattle cadaver heads (n=11) were examined at the time of culling. Second, the authors performed oral exams in cattle fed a total mixed ration (TMR) (n=200) and pasture-based (n=71) grazing cattle. Cadaver heads were imaged using radiography and computed tomography before gross dissection to study dental anatomy and pathology. The most prevalent dental abnormalities were excessive transverse ridging of the occlusal surface, the presence of diastemas and third molar dental overgrowths (M3DO) in cadaver heads. Average thickness of subocclusal dentine ranged from 3.5 mm to 5.8 mm in cheek teeth but was >10 mm in maxillary teeth with M3DO. Radiographic findings were compared with oral examinations in live cattle. Prevalence of M3DO upon oral examination was 19 per cent and 28 per cent in herds of cattle fed a TMR diet and 0 per cent in a herd of grazing cattle. Dental abnormalities are prevalent in dairy cattle but due to thin subocclusal dentine in the cheek teeth, established equine dental treatment methodology is not appropriate for bovine cheek teeth with the exception of those that have developed M3DO. PMID:26700105

  20. Sedimentation in Goose Pasture Tarn, 1965-2005, Breckenridge, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, John G.; Char, Stephen J.; Linhart, Samuel M.; Stephens, V. Cory; O'Neill, Gregory B.

    2006-01-01

    Goose Pasture Tarn, a 771-acre-foot reservoir in Summit County, Colorado, is the principal domestic water-storage facility for the Town of Breckenridge and collects runoff from approximately 42 square miles of the upper Blue River watershed. In the 40 years since the reservoir was constructed, deltaic deposits have accumulated at the mouths of two perennial streams that provide most of the inflow and sediment to the reservoir. The Blue River is a low-gradient braided channel and transports gravel- to silt-size sediment. Indiana Creek is a steep-gradient channel that transports boulder- to silt-size sediment. Both deltas are composed predominantly of gravel, sand, and silt, but silt has been deposited throughout the reservoir. In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Town of Breckenridge, began a study to determine the volume of accumulated sediment in Goose Pasture Tarn, the long-term sedimentation rate for the reservoir, and the particle-size and chemical characteristics of the sediment. Exposed delta deposits occupied 0.91 acre and had an estimated volume of 0.6 acre-foot in 2005. Aerial photographic analysis indicated both the Blue River and Indiana Creek deltas grew rapidly during time intervals that included larger-than-average annual flood peaks on the Blue River. Sediment-transport relations could not be developed for the Blue River or Indiana Creek because of minimal streamflow and infrequently observed sediment transport during the study; however, suspended-sediment loads ranged from 0.02 to 1.60 tons per day in the Blue River and from 0.06 to 1.55 tons per day in Indiana Creek. Bedload as a percentage of total load ranged from 9 to 27 percent. New reservoir stage-area and stage-capacity relations were developed from bathymetric and topographic surveys of the reservoir bed. The original 1965 reservoir bed topography and the accumulated sediment thickness were estimated from a seismic survey and manual probing. The surface area of Goose

  1. Thermal radiation absorbed by dairy cows in pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Roberto Gomes; Guilhermino, Magda Maria; de Morais, Débora Andréia E. Façanha

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the present paper was to assess a method for estimating the thermal radiation absorbed by dairy cows (0.875 Holstein-0.125 Guzerath) on pasture. A field test was conducted with 472 crossbred dairy cows in three locations of a tropical region. The following environmental data were collected: air temperature, partial vapour pressure, wind speed, black globe temperature, ground surface temperature and solar radiation. Average total radiation absorbed by animals was calculated as {R_{abs}} = 640.0 ± 3.1 W.{m^{ - 2}} . Absorbed short-wave radiation (solar direct, diffuse and reflected) averaged 297.9 ± 2.7 W m-2; long wave (from the sky and from terrestrial surfaces) averaged 342.1 ± 1.5 W m-2. It was suggested that a new environmental measurement, the effective radiant heat load (ERHL), could be used to assess the effective mean radiant temperature ( {T_{mr}^* } ) . Average T_{mr}^* was 101.4 ± 1.2°C, in contrast to the usual mean radiant temperature, {T_{mr}} = 65.1 ± 0.5° C . Estimates of T_{mr}^* were considered as more reliable than those of T mr in evaluating the thermal environment in the open field, because T mr is almost totally associated only with long wave radiation.

  2. High intensity, short duration rotational grazing on reclaimed cool season tall fescue/legume pastures: II. Forage production, soil and plant tissue comparisons between grazed and ungrazed pastures

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.E.; Erickson, W.R.; Bonine, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    The Midway Mine is located 50 miles south of Kansas City, Kansas straddling the border of Kansas and Missouri. The Pittsburg & Midway Coal Mining Co. mined the area until 1989, when the mine was closed and reclaimed. Approximately 3,750 acres were topsoiled and revegetated with a cool season tall fescue/legume pasture. High intensity, short duration rotational grazing has become the preferred management practice on these pastures. This study evaluated soil and vegetation data collected on 1,250 acres of pasture which was grazed by about 550 cow/calf units. Ongoing monitoring programs are evaluating the effects of rotational grazing. Soil testing includes macro-nutrients, micro-nutrients and microbial activity. Plant tissue analyses monitor levels of principal macro-nutrients and micro-nutrients. Vegetation monitoring consists of measuring forage production. Results were contrasted between pregrazing and postgrazing, and grazed and ungrazed pasture. Agronomic data from the grazed versus ungrazed treatments documented the following results: (1) higher levels of plant tissue nitrate, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sodium and sulfur; (2) higher microbial activity; (3) similar levels of soil nitrate, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sodium and sulfur; and (4) increased biomass production.

  3. Mapping of macro and micro nutrients of mixed pastures using airborne AisaFENIX hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullanagari, R. R.; Kereszturi, Gábor; Yule, I. J.

    2016-07-01

    On-farm assessment of mixed pasture nutrient concentrations is important for animal production and pasture management. Hyperspectral imaging is recognized as a potential tool to quantify the nutrient content of vegetation. However, it is a great challenge to estimate macro and micro nutrients in heterogeneous mixed pastures. In this study, canopy reflectance data was measured by using a high resolution airborne visible-to-shortwave infrared (Vis-SWIR) imaging spectrometer measuring in the wavelength region 380-2500 nm to predict nutrient concentrations, nitrogen (N) phosphorus (P), potassium (K), sulfur (S), zinc (Zn), sodium (Na), manganese (Mn) copper (Cu) and magnesium (Mg) in heterogeneous mixed pastures across a sheep and beef farm in hill country, within New Zealand. Prediction models were developed using four different methods which are included partial least squares regression (PLSR), kernel PLSR, support vector regression (SVR), random forest regression (RFR) algorithms and their performance compared using the test data. The results from the study revealed that RFR produced highest accuracy (0.55 ⩽ R2CV ⩽ 0.78; 6.68% ⩽ nRMSECV ⩽ 26.47%) compared to all other algorithms for the majority of nutrients (N, P, K, Zn, Na, Cu and Mg) described, and the remaining nutrients (S and Mn) were predicted with high accuracy (0.68 ⩽ R2CV ⩽ 0.86; 13.00% ⩽ nRMSECV ⩽ 14.64%) using SVR. The best training models were used to extrapolate over the whole farm with the purpose of predicting those pasture nutrients and expressed through pixel based spatial maps. These spatially registered nutrient maps demonstrate the range and geographical location of often large differences in pasture nutrient values which are normally not measured and therefore not included in decision making when considering more effective ways to utilized pasture.

  4. Consequence of forest-to-pasture conversion on CH4 fluxes in the Brazilian Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steudler, Paul A.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Feigl, Brigitte J.; Neill, Christopher; Piccolo, Marisa C.; Cerri, Carlos C.

    1996-08-01

    Methane (CH4) fluxes between soils and the atmosphere were measured in two tropical forest-to-pasture chronosequences in the state of Rondônia, Brazil. Forest soils always consumed atmospheric CH4 with maximum uptake rates in the dry season. Pasture soils consumed atmospheric CH4 during the dry season, but at lower rates than those in the forests. When soil moisture increased in the pasture soils, they became a source of CH4 to the atmosphere. Integrated over the year, forest soils were a net sink of approximately 470 mg CH4-C/m2, while pastures were a net source of about 270 mg CH4-C/m2. Thus forest-to-pasture conversion resulted in a net source of CH4 from the soil of about 1 g CH4/m2/yr. The total pasture-related CH4 release for the entire Brazilian Amazon increased from 0.8 Tg CH4 in 1970 to about 2.5 Tg CH4 in 1990, with a maximum of 3.1 Tg CH4/yr in 1988. Soils accounted for a small part (about 5%) of the total CH4 release from the basin, while biomass burning and cattle emissions accounted for 95%. The average rate of increase in CH4 emission from pastures was about 0.2 Tg CH4/yr between 1975 and 1988. This represents between 12% and 14% of the global average rate of change in tropospheric CH4 content for this time period.

  5. Importance of molehill disturbances for invasion by Bunias orientalis in meadows and pastures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiełtyk, Piotr; Mirek, Zbigniew

    2015-04-01

    Small-scale soil disturbances by fossorial animals can change physical and biotic conditions in disturbed patches and influence spatial and temporal dynamics, and the composition of plant communities. They create regeneration niches and colonization openings for native plants and, according to the intermediate disturbance hypothesis, they are expected to increase plant community diversity. However, it also has been reported that increased disturbance resource availability and decreased competition with native species may result in the invasion of communities by alien plant species, as predicted by the fluctuating resources theory of invasibility. In this study, we investigated the importance of European mole disturbances for the invasion of semi-natural fresh meadows and pastures by the alien plant, Bunias orientalis, which has mainly spread throughout Central Europe on anthropogenically disturbed sites. We hypothesized that the invader, being particularly well adapted to anthropogenic disturbances, enters into dense vegetation of meadows and pastures mainly on mole mounds. To assess the seedling recruitment of B. orientalis in relation to disturbance, we counted the number of seedlings that emerged on molehills and control plots in meadows and pastures. The establishment of juvenile (0-1 year) rosette plants on and off molehills was surveyed on 5 × 5 m plots. In accordance with our hypothesis, mole disturbances were found to serve as a gateway for B. orientalis by which the invader may colonize semi-natural grasslands. The seedlings of the species emerged almost solely on molehills and the young rosettes were established predominantly on mole mounds. Although the seedling density did not differ significantly between the meadows and pastures, the number of established plants in the pastures was considerably higher. We suggest that the invasion by B. orientalis in pastures may be facilitated by vegetative regeneration following root fragmentation by sheep pasturing.

  6. Effects of herbage intake on goat performance in the mediterranean type natural pastures.

    PubMed

    Hakyemez, Basri H; Gokkus, Ahmet; Savas, Turker; Yurtman, Ismail Y

    2009-02-01

    This study aimed at identifying changes in natural pastures during the grazing season and investigating the effects of these changes on pasture feeding potential for high yielding dairy goats. During the study, 12 dairy goats were grazed on a 1.5 ha natural pasture for three months from April to June in 2003, 2004 and 2005. The goats were fed 0.5 kg/day of concentrate as a supplement during the grazing season. Botanical composition, herbage production and intake, crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acid detergent fiber (ADF) contents of the pasture were determined. Live weight, milk yield, milk dry matter (DM) and fat content of the goats were monitored. The data were analyzed using a linear model, which evaluated the effects of grazing seasons in each year. Based on the three-year average, 87% of pasture was herbaceous plants and the remaining was shrubs in DM basis with Cistus creticus, Quercus ithaburensis, Pistacia atlantica and Asparagus acutifolius being the major shrub species. The herbage yield in June was significantly lower than in other months in all years (P = 0.001). In all experimental years, the CP content of the pasture decreased but the structural carbohydrates increased as the grazing season proceeded. While live weight was not affected by grazing periods except for 2004 (P = 0.001), milk yield significantly decreased with advancing grazing period (P = 0.001). The results of the present study indicate that natural pasture has a supportive effect in April and May on the milk yield of lactating goats which are in mid-lactation, and suggested that supplementary feeding is required in consecutive grazing periods. PMID:20163465

  7. Monitoring pasture variability: optical OptRx(®) crop sensor versus Grassmaster II capacitance probe.

    PubMed

    Serrano, João M; Shahidian, Shakib; Marques da Silva, José Rafael

    2016-02-01

    Estimation of pasture productivity is an important step for the farmer in terms of planning animal stocking, organizing animal lots, and determining supplementary feeding needs throughout the year. The main objective of this work was to evaluate technologies which have potential for monitoring aspects related to spatial and temporal variability of pasture green and dry matter yield (respectively, GM and DM, in kg/ha) and support to decision making for the farmer. Two types of sensors were evaluated: an active optical sensor ("OptRx(®)," which measures the NDVI, "Normalized Difference Vegetation Index") and a capacitance probe ("GrassMaster II" which estimates plant mass). The results showed the potential of NDVI for monitoring the evolution of spatial and temporal patterns of vegetative growth of biodiverse pasture. Higher NDVI values were registered as pasture approached its greatest vegetative vigor, with a significant fall in the measured NDVI at the end of Spring, when the pasture began to dry due to the combination of higher temperatures and lower soil moisture content. This index was also effective for identifying different plant species (grasses/legumes) and variability in pasture yield. Furthermore, it was possible to develop calibration equations between the capacitance and the NDVI (R(2) = 0.757; p < 0.01), between capacitance and GM (R(2) = 0.799; p < 0.01), between capacitance and DM (R(2) =0.630; p < 0.01), between NDVI and GM (R(2) = 0.745; p < 0.01), and between capacitance and DM (R(2) = 0.524; p < 0.01). Finally, a direct relationship was obtained between NDVI and pasture moisture content (PMC, in %) and between capacitance and PMC (respectively, R(2) = 0.615; p < 0.01 and R(2) = 0.561; p < 0.01) in Alentejo dryland farming systems. PMID:26812951

  8. Pasture BMP effectiveness using an HRU-based subarea approach in SWAT.

    PubMed

    Sheshukov, Aleksey Y; Douglas-Mankin, Kyle R; Sinnathamby, Sumathy; Daggupati, Prasad

    2016-01-15

    Many conservation programs have been established to motivate producers to adopt best management practices (BMP) to minimize pasture runoff and nutrient loads, but a process is needed to assess BMP effectiveness to help target implementation efforts. A study was conducted to develop and demonstrate a method to evaluate water-quality impacts and the effectiveness of two widely used BMPs on a livestock pasture: off-stream watering site and stream fencing. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was built for the Pottawatomie Creek Watershed in eastern Kansas, independently calibrated at the watershed outlet for streamflow and at a pasture site for nutrients and sediment runoff, and also employed to simulate pollutant loads in a synthetic pasture. The pasture was divided into several subareas including stream, riparian zone, and two grazing zones. Five scenarios applied to both a synthetic pasture and a whole watershed were simulated to assess various combinations of widely used pasture BMPs: (1) baseline conditions with an open stream access, (2) an off-stream watering site installed in individual subareas in the pasture, and (3) stream or riparian zone fencing with an off-stream watering site. Results indicated that pollutant loads increase with increasing stocking rates whereas off-stream watering site and/or stream fencing reduce time cattle spend in the stream and nutrient loads. These two BMPs lowered organic P and N loads by more than 59% and nitrate loads by 19%, but TSS and sediment-attached P loads remained practically unchanged. An effectiveness index (EI) quantified impacts from the various combinations of off-stream watering sites and fencing in all scenarios. Stream bank contribution to pollutant loads was not accounted in the methodology due to limitations of the SWAT model, but can be incorporated in the approach if an amount of bank soil loss is known for various stocking rates. The proposed methodology provides an adaptable framework for

  9. Combining multi-spectral proximal sensors and digital cameras for monitoring grazed tropical pastures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handcock, R. N.; Gobbett, D. L.; González, L. A.; Bishop-Hurley, G. J.; McGavin, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    Timely and accurate monitoring of pasture biomass and ground-cover is necessary in livestock production systems to ensure productive and sustainable management of forage for livestock. Interest in the use of proximal sensors for monitoring pasture status in grazing systems has increased, since such sensors can return data in near real-time, and have the potential to be deployed on large properties where remote sensing may not be suitable due to issues such as spatial scale or cloud cover. However, there are unresolved challenges in developing calibrations to convert raw sensor data to quantitative biophysical values, such as pasture biomass or vegetation ground-cover, to allow meaningful interpretation of sensor data by livestock producers. We assessed the use of multiple proximal sensors for monitoring tropical pastures with a pilot deployment of sensors at two sites on Lansdown Research Station near Townsville, Australia. Each site was monitored by a Skye SKR-four-band multi-spectral sensor (every 1 min), a digital camera (every 30 min), and a soil moisture sensor (every 1 min), each operated over 18 months. Raw data from each sensor were processed to calculate a number of multispectral vegetation indices. Visual observations of pasture characteristics, including above-ground standing biomass and ground cover, were made every 2 weeks. A methodology was developed to manage the sensor deployment and the quality control of the data collected. The data capture from the digital cameras was more reliable than the multi-spectral sensors, which had up to 63 % of data discarded after data cleaning and quality control. We found a strong relationship between sensor and pasture measurements during the wet season period of maximum pasture growth (January to April), especially when data from the multi-spectral sensors were combined with weather data. RatioNS34 (a simple band ratio between the near infrared (NIR) and lower shortwave infrared (SWIR) bands) and rainfall since 1

  10. Ecosystem services from converted land: the importance of tree cover in Amazonian pastures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrett, Kirsten; Valentim, Judson; Turner, B. L., II

    2013-01-01

    Deforestation is responsible for a substantial fraction of global carbon emissions and changes in surface energy budgets that affect climate. Deforestation losses include wildlife and human habitat, and myriad forest products on which rural and urban societies depend for food, fiber, fuel, fresh water, medicine, and recreation. Ecosystem services gained in the transition from forests to pasture and croplands, however, are often ignored in assessments of the impact of land cover change. The role of converted lands in tropical areas in terms of carbon uptake and storage is largely unknown. Pastures represent the fastest-growing form of converted land use in the tropics, even in some areas of rapid urban expansion. Tree biomass stored in these areas spans a broad range, depending on tree cover. Trees in pasture increase carbon storage, provide shade for cattle, and increase productivity of forage material. As a result, increasing fractional tree cover can provide benefits land managers as well as important ecosystem services such as reducing conversion pressure on forests adjacent to pastures. This study presents an estimation of fractional tree cover in pasture in a dynamic region on the verge of large-scale land use change. An appropriate sampling interval is established for similar studies, one that balances the need for independent samples of sufficient number to characterize a pasture in terms of fractional tree cover. This information represents a useful policy tool for government organizations and NGOs interested in encouraging ecosystem services on converted lands. Using high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery, fractional tree cover in pasture is quantified for the municipality of Rio Branco, Brazil. A semivariogram and devolving spatial resolution are employed to determine the coarsest sampling interval that may be used, minimizing effects of spatial autocorrelation. The coarsest sampling interval that minimizes spatial dependence was about 22 m. The