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Sample records for brady scientist mentor

  1. Memories of John N. Brady: scientist, mentor and friend.

    PubMed

    Pise-Masison, Cynthia A; Marriott, Susan J

    2009-01-01

    Friends and colleagues remember John N. Brady, Ph.D., Chief of the Virus Tumor Biology Section of the Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, who died much too young at the age of 57 on April 27, 2009 of colon cancer. John grew up in Illinois and received his Ph.D. with Dr. Richard Consigli at Kansas State University studying the molecular structure of polyomavirus. In 1984 John came to the National Institutes of Health as a Staff Fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Norman Salzman, Laboratory of Biology of Viruses NIAID, where he was among the first to analyze SV40 transcription using in vitro transcription systems and to analyze regulatory sequences for SV40 late transcription. He then trained with Dr. George Khoury in the Laboratory of Molecular Virology NCI, where he identified SV40 T-antigen as a transcriptional activator protein. His research interests grew to focus on the human retroviruses: human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), analyzing how interactions between these viruses and the host cell influence viral gene regulation, viral pathogenesis and viral transformation. His research also impacted the fields of eukaryotic gene regulation and tumor suppressor proteins. John is survived by his wife, Laraine, and two sons, Matt and Kevin. PMID:19454030

  2. Memories of John N. Brady: scientist, mentor and friend

    PubMed Central

    Pise-Masison, Cynthia A; Marriott, Susan J

    2009-01-01

    Friends and colleagues remember John N. Brady, Ph.D., Chief of the Virus Tumor Biology Section of the Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, who died much too young at the age of 57 on April 27, 2009 of colon cancer. John grew up in Illinois and received his Ph.D. with Dr. Richard Consigli at Kansas State University studying the molecular structure of polyomavirus. In 1984 John came to the National Institutes of Health as a Staff Fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Norman Salzman, Laboratory of Biology of Viruses NIAID, where he was among the first to analyze SV40 transcription using in vitro transcription systems and to analyze regulatory sequences for SV40 late transcription. He then trained with Dr. George Khoury in the Laboratory of Molecular Virology NCI, where he identified SV40 T-antigen as a transcriptional activator protein. His research interests grew to focus on the human retroviruses: human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), analyzing how interactions between these viruses and the host cell influence viral gene regulation, viral pathogenesis and viral transformation. His research also impacted the fields of eukaryotic gene regulation and tumor suppressor proteins. John is survived by his wife, Laraine, and two sons, Matt and Kevin. PMID:19454030

  3. Mentoring among scientists: Implications of interpersonal relationships within a formal mentoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Maughan, B. D.

    2006-07-01

    Mentoring is an established strategy for learning that has its root in antiquity. Most, if not all, successful scientists and engineers had an effective mentor at some point in their career. In the context of scientists and engineers, mentoring has been undefined. Reports addressing critical concerns regarding the future of science and engineering in the U.S. mention the practice of mentoring a priori, leaving organizations without guidance in its application. Preliminary results from this study imply that formal mentoring can be effective when properly defined and operationalized. Recognizing the uniqueness of the individual in a symbiotic mentor-protege relationship significantly influences a protege's learning experience which carries repercussions into their career intentions. The mentor-protege relationship is a key factor in succession planning and preserving and disseminating critical information and tacit knowledge essential to the development of leadership in the science and technological industry. (authors)

  4. Mentoring Among Scientists: Implications of Interpersonal Relationships within a Formal Mentoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan D. Maughan

    2006-11-01

    Mentoring is an established strategy for learning that has its root in antiquity. Most, if not all, successful scientists and engineers had an effective mentor at some point in their career. In the context of scientists and engineers, mentoring has been undefined. Reports addressing critical concerns regarding the future of science and engineering in the U.S. mention the practice of mentoring a priori, leaving organizations without guidance in its application. Preliminary results from this study imply that formal mentoring can be effective when properly defined and operationalized. Recognizing the uniqueness of the individual in a symbiotic mentor-protégé relationship significantly influences a protégé’s learning experience which carries repercussions into their career intentions. The mentor-protégé relationship is a key factor in succession planning and preserving and disseminating critical information and tacit knowledge essential to the development of leadership in the science and technological industry.

  5. CURE Scholar Spotlight - Dr. Brady

    Cancer.gov

    Donita C. Brady, a Research Associate Senior at the Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke University, is investigating the role that copper plays in cell growth and tumor biology. Inspired by her mentor Christopher Counter, a cancer biolog

  6. Mentors, networks, and resources for early career female atmospheric scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. G.; Avallone, L. M.; Edwards, L. M.; Thiry, H.; Ascent

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric Science Collaborations and Enriching NeTworks (ASCENT) is a workshop series designed to bring together early career female scientists in the field of atmospheric science and related disciplines. ASCENT is a multi-faceted approach to retaining these junior scientists through the challenges in their research and teaching career paths. During the workshop, senior women scientists discuss their career and life paths. They also lead seminars on tools, resources and methods that can help early career scientists to be successful. Networking is a significant aspect of ASCENT, and many opportunities for both formal and informal interactions among the participants (of both personal and professional nature) are blended in the schedule. The workshops are held in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, home of a high-altitude atmospheric science laboratory - Storm Peak Laboratory, which also allows for nearby casual outings and a pleasant environment for participants. Near the conclusion of each workshop, junior and senior scientists are matched in mentee-mentor ratios of two junior scientists per senior scientist. An external evaluation of the three workshop cohorts concludes that the workshops have been successful in establishing and expanding personal and research-related networks, and that seminars have been useful in creating confidence and sharing resources for such things as preparing promotion and tenure packages, interviewing and negotiating job offers, and writing successful grant proposals.

  7. Mentoring early-career scientists for HIV research careers.

    PubMed

    Kahn, James S; Greenblatt, Ruth M

    2009-04-01

    Mentoring is important for early-career HIV researchers; it is key for work satisfaction, productivity, workforce diversity, and retention of investigators in a variety of research settings. Establishment of multidisciplinary research projects often is accomplished through mentoring. The work of early-career HIV investigators frequently requires networks of collaborators, and networking is regularly facilitated by mentors. A structured mentoring program that avoids unnecessary conflicts or time burdens and connects early-career investigators with senior mentors from different disciplines may stimulate new networking possibilities and lead to effective collaborations among investigators with different skills and perspectives. Effective mentoring by focused mentors will likely contribute to the skills and networks of investigators necessary for the next generation of HIV investigators. PMID:19246671

  8. Thinking and Behaving Like Scientists: Perceptions of Undergraduate Science Interns and Their Faculty Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kardash, CarolAnne M.; Edwards, Ordene V.

    2012-01-01

    We examined undergraduate research experiences (UREs) participants' and their faculty mentors' beliefs about the professional practices and dispositions of research scientists. In Study 1, 63 science interns and their mentors rated Merton's ("J Legal Political Sociol," 1:115-126, 1942) norms and Mitroff's ("Am Sociol Rev," 39 (August):579-595,…

  9. Successful Latina Scientists and Engineers: Their Lived Mentoring Experiences and Career Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Miguel, Anitza M.; Kim, Mikyong Minsun

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing a phenomenological perspective and method, this study aimed to reveal the lived career mentoring experiences of Latinas in science and engineering and to understand how selected Latina scientists and engineers achieved high-level positions. Our in-depth interviews revealed that (a) it is important to have multiple mentors for Latinas'…

  10. INTRODUCTION: David Sherrington as a mentor of young scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbart, Paul M.

    2008-08-01

    How deeply honoured I am to have the opportunity to express my thoughts at this delightful celebration of David's achievements, so far, in his remarkable career. I have been asked to center my remarks on David's contributions to the mentoring and professional development of scientists early in their careers. This is a topic that I am more than happy to reflect on, because it gives me the opportunity to recall the exciting period I spent as one of David's postgraduate students at Imperial College in the early 1980s. It also gives me the chance to publicly express my gratitude to David for the opportunities he created for me at that time, as well as for the interest and care he has shown in my career and well-being ever since, as we have met up and exchanged news and ideas around the world: in New Mexico and Colorado, in Cancun, Paris and Trieste, at numerous March Meetings of the American Physical Society and, of course in London, Oxford, and my home town, Champaign-Urbana, location of the University of Illinois. I have been a member of David's circle for 25 years now, and I would like to tell you a little about how this came to be. Not because of what this says about me, but, rather, because of what it tells you about David and the rich generosity of his spirit and effort when it comes to supporting the underdog. I was indeed one such underdog—and that's putting it charitably—when I first met David in September of 1982, not long before the academic year was to begin. I had heard about the exciting circle of physical and mathematical ideas swirling around the spin glass question during the previous year, which I had spent at the University of California's Los Angeles campus, through an opportunity kindly arranged, as it happens, by Sam Edwards. But I was eager to return to the UK for postgraduate studies and to work on spin glasses, so I simply showed up at David's Imperial College office, unannounced (if I remember correctly). And with his characteristic

  11. Interactivity Between Proteges and Scientists in an Electronic Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnett, Cara; Wildemuth, Barbara M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2006-01-01

    Interactivity is defined by Henri (1992) as a three-step process involving communication of information, a response to this information, and a reply to that first response. It is a key dimension of computer-mediated communication, particularly in the one-on-one communication involved in an electronic mentoring program. This report analyzes the…

  12. INTRODUCTION: David Sherrington as a mentor of young scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbart, Paul M.

    2008-08-01

    How deeply honoured I am to have the opportunity to express my thoughts at this delightful celebration of David's achievements, so far, in his remarkable career. I have been asked to center my remarks on David's contributions to the mentoring and professional development of scientists early in their careers. This is a topic that I am more than happy to reflect on, because it gives me the opportunity to recall the exciting period I spent as one of David's postgraduate students at Imperial College in the early 1980s. It also gives me the chance to publicly express my gratitude to David for the opportunities he created for me at that time, as well as for the interest and care he has shown in my career and well-being ever since, as we have met up and exchanged news and ideas around the world: in New Mexico and Colorado, in Cancun, Paris and Trieste, at numerous March Meetings of the American Physical Society and, of course in London, Oxford, and my home town, Champaign-Urbana, location of the University of Illinois. I have been a member of David's circle for 25 years now, and I would like to tell you a little about how this came to be. Not because of what this says about me, but, rather, because of what it tells you about David and the rich generosity of his spirit and effort when it comes to supporting the underdog. I was indeed one such underdog—and that's putting it charitably—when I first met David in September of 1982, not long before the academic year was to begin. I had heard about the exciting circle of physical and mathematical ideas swirling around the spin glass question during the previous year, which I had spent at the University of California's Los Angeles campus, through an opportunity kindly arranged, as it happens, by Sam Edwards. But I was eager to return to the UK for postgraduate studies and to work on spin glasses, so I simply showed up at David's Imperial College office, unannounced (if I remember correctly). And with his characteristic

  13. Lived Experiences and Perceptions on Mentoring among Latina Scientists and Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Miguel, Anitza M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to reveal the lived mentoring experiences of Latinas in science and engineering. The study also sought to understand how Latina scientists and engineers achieved high-level positions within their organizations and the impediments they encountered along their professional journey. The theoretical framework…

  14. Division of Nuclear Physics Mentoring Award Talk: Progress in Mentoring of Young Scientists in Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoennessen, Michael

    2012-10-01

    The future of nuclear physics depends on attracting and retaining bright students. Several initiatives have begun to address issues related to successful recruiting and retention on various levels. Examples for undergraduate students, graduate students, post-docs, and faculty include the Conference Experience for Undergraduates at DNP meetings, the APS/AAPT Conference on Graduate Education, the NSF requirement for a post-doctoral mentoring plan, and the AAPT/AAS/APS New Faculty Workshops, respectively. In addition to these organized efforts, each member of the community can and should contribute to portraying nuclear physics as the exciting field that it is.

  15. Multicultural Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen-Sommerville, Lenola

    1994-01-01

    Describes the mentoring relationship between George Washington Carver and Henry Agard Wallace who later became a great scientist and Vice President of the United States. Explains what mentoring is and discusses classroom implications for mentoring. (PR)

  16. Steps towards equal gender representation: TANDEMplusIDEA - an international mentoring and personal development scheme for female scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefli, Bettina; Breuer, Elke

    2010-05-01

    TANDEMplusIDEA was a European mentoring programme conducted by the technical universities RWTH Aachen, Imperial College London, ETH Zurich and TU Delft between 2007 and 2010 to achieve more gender equality in science. Given the continuing underrepresentation of women in science and technology and the well-known structural and systematic disadvantages in male-dominated scientific cultures, the main goal of this programme was to promote excellent female scientists through a high-level professional and personal development programme. Based on the mentoring concept of the RWTH Aachen, TANDEMplusIDEA was the first mentoring programme for female scientists realized in international cooperation. As a pilot scheme funded by the 6th Framework Programme of the European Commission, the scientific evaluation was an essential part of the programme, in particular in view of the development of a best practice model for international mentoring. The participants of this programme were female scientists at an early stage of their academic career (postdoc or assistant professor) covering a wide range of science disciplines, including geosciences. This transdisciplinarity as well as the international dimension of the programme have been identified by the participants as one of the keys of success of the programme. In particular, the peer-mentoring across discipline boarders proved to have been an invaluable component of the development programme. This presentation will highlight some of the main findings of the scientific evaluation of the programme and focus on some additional personal insights from the participants.

  17. Geothermal vegetable dehydration at Brady`s Hot Springs, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.

    1994-07-01

    This article describes the utilization of the Brady`s Springs geothermal resource for heat generation used in the food dehydration process. This geothermal system is located in the Forty-Mile Desert area of Nevada. Geothermal Food Processors, Inc. of Reno, Nevada started construction of the geothermal vegetable dehydration plant in 1978, and the plant started operations in 1979. The industrial process of vegetable dehydration at the plant is described. In July of 1992, the Brady`s Springs geothermal system began being used for power generation by the Brady`s Hot Springs geothermal power plant, operated by Oxbow Power Services, Inc. As a result, the water levels in the food processing plant wells have dropped below usable levels and the geothermal brine is now being supplied by the Oxbow power plant.

  18. Persistence of African American Men in Science: Exploring the Influence of Scientist Identity, Mentoring, and Campus Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Breonte Stephan

    The scant literature on persistence of African American males in science typically takes a deficits-based approach to encapsulate the myriad reasons this population is so often underrepresented. Scientist Identity, Mentoring, and Campus Climate have, individually, been found to be related to the persistence of African American students. However, the unified impact of these three variables on the persistence of African American students with science interests has not been evaluated, and the relationship between the variables, the students' gender, and markers of academic achievement have not been previously investigated. The current study takes a strengths-based approach to evaluating the relationship between Scientist Identity, Mentoring, and Campus climate with a population of African American students with science interests who were studying at six Minority Serving Institutions and Predominantly White Institutions in the Southern United States. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine the impact of Scientist Identity, Mentoring, and Campus Climate on Intention to Persist of African American males. The results indicate that Scientist Identity predicts Intention to Persist, and that gender, academic performance, and institution type moderate the relationship between Scientist Identity and Intention to Persist. These results lend credence to the emerging notion that, for African American men studying science, generating a greater depth and breadth of understanding of the factors that lead to persistence will aid in the development of best practices for supporting persistence among this perpetually underrepresented population.

  19. Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cesarone, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    This column summarizes resources relating to the mentoring of beginning teachers by more experienced teachers, including resources from the ERIC database, published books, and resources from selected Web sites. As noted in the Spring 2004 issue of this journal, this column has changed from the "ERIC/EECE Report" to the "ECAP Report," with the…

  20. Mentoring, Gender, and Publication among Social, Natural, and Physical Scientists. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Linda; Ward, Kathryn B.

    Research has identified mentoring as a critical factor in the entry and survival of women and minorities in the social, natural, and physical sciences where they are underrepresented. Much research and many change-oriented programs in higher education have assumed that the presence of mentors is sufficient to ensure equitable access to scientific…

  1. Strengthening the Network of Mentored, Underrepresented Minority Scientists and Leaders to Reduce HIV-Related Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Yzette A.; Willis, Leigh A.; Castellanos, Ted; Dominguez, Ken; Fitzpatrick, Lisa; Miller, Kim S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We reviewed data for the Minority HIV/AIDS Research Initiative (MARI), which was established in 2003 to support underrepresented minority scientists performing HIV prevention research in highly affected communities. Methods. MARI was established at the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control as a program of competitively awarded, mentored grants for early career researchers conducting HIV prevention research in highly affected racial/ethnic and sexual minority communities. We have described progress from 2003 to 2013. Results. To date, MARI has mentored 27 scientist leaders using low-cost strategies to enhance the development of effective HIV prevention interventions. These scientists have (1) developed research programs in disproportionately affected communities of color, (2) produced first-authored peer-reviewed scientific and programmatic products (including articles and community-level interventions), and (3) obtained larger, subsequent funding awards for research and programmatic work related to HIV prevention and health disparities work. Conclusions. The MARI program demonstrates how to effectively engage minority scientists to conduct HIV prevention research and reduce racial/ethnic investigator disparities and serves as a model for programs to reduce disparities in other public health areas in which communities of color are disproportionately affected. PMID:24134360

  2. Global Science Share: Connecting young scientists from developing countries with science writing mentors to strengthen and widen the international science community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenkopf, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Collaborative science in which scientists are able to form research questions based on the current body of scientific knowledge and get feedback from colleagues on their ideas and work is essential for pushing science forward. However, not all scientists are able to fully participate in the international science community. Scientists from developing countries can face barriers to communicating with the international community due to, among other issues: fewer scientists in their home country, difficulty in getting language-specific science writing training, fewer established pre-existing international collaborations and networks, and sometimes geographic isolation. These barriers not only result in keeping individual scientists from contributing their ideas, but they also slow down the progress of the scientific enterprise for everyone. Global Science Share (http://globalscienceshare.org/) is a new project, entering its pilot phase in Fall 2012, which will work to reduce this disparity by connecting young scientists and engineers from developing countries seeking to improve their technical writing with other scientists and engineers around the world via online collaborations. Scientist-volunteers act as mentors and are paired up with mentees according to their academic field and writing needs. The mentors give feedback and constructive technical and editorial criticisms on mentees' submitted pieces of writing through a four-step email discussion. Mentees gain technical writing skills, as well as make international connections with other scientists and engineers in fields related to their own. Mentors also benefit by gaining new international scientific colleagues and honing their own writing skills through their critiques. The Global Science Share project will begin its pilot phase by first inviting Mongolian science students to apply as mentees this fall. This abstract will introduce the Global Science Share program, present a progress report from its first

  3. The Navigator: Role of the Cultural Mentor in Ensuring the Evolution of Diverse STEM Scientists and Researchers in the 21st Century and Beyond.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolman, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Have you ever been lost? Knowing where you want to go yet unsure how to get there? In today's contemporary society you deploy the use of a navigator or navigation system. This is also one role of the cultural mentor in ensuring diverse students complete with excellence and success their route to research and education. The responsibilities of the cultural mentor are broad and the opportunity to expand one's own personal and professional success in science and society is immense. There remains a critical need and challenge to increase the representation of underrepresented people in the sciences. To address this challenge a navigational mentoring approach was developed centered on the incorporation of traditional knowledge into modern research and education. The approach incorporates defining cultural/personal choices for a STEM vocation, developing science research with a "purpose", and refining leadership. The model incorporates a mentor's personal oral histories and experiences in education, research and life. The goal is to ensure the next generation of scientists and researchers are more diverse, highly educated, experienced and leadership orientated by the time they complete STEM programs - then by the time they are our age, have our level of education and experience.

  4. Mentoring Student Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, James; Kadooka, Mary Ann; Nassir, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The Hawai'i Student Teacher Astronomical Research (HI STAR) program and the Hawai'i Center for Advancing ystemic Heliophysics Education (HI CAHED) programs enable middle school and high school students to undertake genuine scientific research. We have found that even students this young can contribute to the scientific community. We will present an overview of the program, metrics of our success, examples of student research, example student projects, and elements that we believe have contributed to our students' outstanding success.

  5. A Matrix Mentoring Model That Effectively Supports Clinical and Translational Scientists and Increases Inclusion in Biomedical Research: Lessons From the University of Utah.

    PubMed

    Byington, Carrie L; Keenan, Heather; Phillips, John D; Childs, Rebecca; Wachs, Erin; Berzins, Mary Anne; Clark, Kim; Torres, Maria K; Abramson, Jan; Lee, Vivian; Clark, Edward B

    2016-04-01

    Physician-scientists and scientists in all the health professions are vital members of the U.S. biomedical workforce, but their numbers at academic health centers are declining. Mentorship has been identified as a key component in retention of faculty members at academic health centers. Effective mentoring may promote the retention of clinician-scientists in the biomedical workforce. The authors describe a holistic institutional mentoring program to support junior faculty members engaged in clinical and translational science at the University of Utah. The clinical and translational scholars (CATS) program leverages the resources of the institution, including the Center for Clinical and Translational Science, to augment departmental resources to support junior faculty investigators and uses a multilevel mentoring matrix that includes self, senior, scientific, peer, and staff mentorship. Begun in the Department of Pediatrics, the program was expanded in 2013 to include all departments in the school of medicine and the health sciences. During the two-year program, scholars learn management essentials and have leadership training designed to develop principal investigators. Of the 86 program participants since fiscal year 2008, 92% have received extramural awards, 99% remain in academic medicine, and 95% remain at the University of Utah. The CATS program has also been associated with increased inclusion of women and underrepresented minorities in the institutional research enterprise. The CATS program manifests institutional collaboration and coordination of resources, which have benefited faculty members and the institution. The model can be applied to other academic health centers to support and sustain the biomedical workforce. PMID:26650676

  6. A Matrix Mentoring Model That Effectively Supports Clinical and Translational Scientists and Increases Inclusion in Biomedical Research: Lessons From the University of Utah

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Heather; Phillips, John D.; Childs, Rebecca; Wachs, Erin; Berzins, Mary Anne; Clark, Kim; Torres, Maria K.; Abramson, Jan; Lee, Vivian; Clark, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Physician–scientists and scientists in all the health professions are vital members of the U.S. biomedical workforce, but their numbers at academic health centers are declining. Mentorship has been identified as a key component in retention of faculty members at academic health centers. Effective mentoring may promote the retention of clinician–scientists in the biomedical workforce. The authors describe a holistic institutional mentoring program to support junior faculty members engaged in clinical and translational science at the University of Utah. The clinical and translational scholars (CATS) program leverages the resources of the institution, including the Center for Clinical and Translational Science, to augment departmental resources to support junior faculty investigators and uses a multilevel mentoring matrix that includes self, senior, scientific, peer, and staff mentorship. Begun in the Department of Pediatrics, the program was expanded in 2013 to include all departments in the school of medicine and the health sciences. During the two-year program, scholars learn management essentials and have leadership training designed to develop principal investigators. Of the 86 program participants since fiscal year 2008, 92% have received extramural awards, 99% remain in academic medicine, and 95% remain at the University of Utah. The CATS program has also been associated with increased inclusion of women and underrepresented minorities in the institutional research enterprise. The CATS program manifests institutional collaboration and coordination of resources, which have benefited faculty members and the institution. The model can be applied to other academic health centers to support and sustain the biomedical workforce. PMID:26650676

  7. Training and Mentoring the Next Generation of Scientists and Engineers to Secure Continuity and Successes of the US DOE's Environmental Remediation Efforts - 13387

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, L.

    2013-07-01

    The DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) oversees one of the largest and most technically challenging cleanup programs in the world. The mission of DOE-EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. Since 1995, Florida International University's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) has supported the DOE-EM mission and provided unique research capabilities to address some of these highly technical and difficult challenges. This partnership has allowed FIU-ARC to create a unique infrastructure that is critical for the training and mentoring of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) students and has exposed many STEM students to 'hands-on' DOE-EM applied research, supervised by the scientists and engineers at ARC. As a result of this successful partnership between DOE and FIU, DOE requested FIU-ARC to create the DOE-FIU Science and Technology Workforce Development Initiative in 2007. This innovative program was established to create a 'pipeline' of minority STEM students trained and mentored to enter DOE's environmental cleanup workforce. The program was designed to help address DOE's future workforce needs by partnering with academic, government and private companies (DOE contractors) to mentor future minority scientists and engineers in the research, development, and deployment of new technologies and processes addressing DOE's environmental cleanup challenges. Since its inception in 2007, the program has trained and mentored 78 FIU STEM minority students. Although, the program has been in existence for only five years, a total of 75 internships have been conducted at DOE National Laboratories, DOE sites, DOE Headquarters and field offices, and DOE contractors. Over 85 DOE Fellows have participated in the Waste Management Symposia since 2008 with a total of 68 student posters and 7 oral presentations given at WM. The DOE Fellows

  8. A tribute to Dr Willem J. Kolff: innovative inventor, physician, scientist, bioengineer, mentor, and significant contributor to modern cardiovascular surgical and anesthetic practice.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Theodore H

    2013-06-01

    Dr Willem J. Kolff was surely one of the greatest inventors/physicians/scientists/bioengineers of the last few hundred years. He was knighted (Commander of the Order of Oranje-Nassau) in 1970 by Queen Juliana of the Netherlands. In 1990, Life magazine published a list of its own 100 most important figures of the 20th century. Kolff stood in 99th place as the Father of Artificial Organs. Dr Kolff forged a path of innovative thinking and creativity that has had a huge impact on the quality of human life. His contributions to the development of the artificial kidney and dialysis, the heart-lung machine, the membrane oxygenator, potassium arrest of the heart, the AH, mechanical cardiac assistance, and other artificial organs, and his support and mentoring of hundreds to thousands of anesthesiologists, surgeons, and bioengineers throughout the world, have had a significant impact on anesthesiology and the medical community. PMID:23562671

  9. Citizen Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    The Harvard Forest Schoolyard Ecology Program provides teachers and students with the opportunity and materials to participate in regionally focused ecological studies under the guidance of a mentor scientist working on a similar study. The Harvard Forest is part of a national network of ecological research sites known as the Long Term Ecological…

  10. Joseph v. Brady: Synthesis Reunites What Analysis Has Divided

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Travis

    2012-01-01

    Joseph V. Brady (1922-2011) created behavior-analytic neuroscience and the analytic framework for understanding how the external and internal neurobiological environments and mechanisms interact. Brady's approach offered synthesis as well as analysis. He embraced Findley's approach to constructing multioperant behavioral repertoires that found…

  11. Mentoring, Mentors and Proteges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peper, John B.

    This paper reports on research into the concept of mentoring from many educational perspectives, based on six papers presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association in April 1994. The paper notes that mentoring is a slippery concept, without a precise operational definition; definitions used in the six papers are…

  12. Joseph V. Brady: Synthesis Reunites What Analysis Has Divided

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Travis

    2012-01-01

    Joseph V. Brady (1922–2011) created behavior-analytic neuroscience and the analytic framework for understanding how the external and internal neurobiological environments and mechanisms interact. Brady's approach offered synthesis as well as analysis. He embraced Findley's approach to constructing multioperant behavioral repertoires that found their way into designing environments for astronauts as well as studying drug effects on human social behavior in microenvironments. Brady created translational neurobehavioral science before such a concept existed. One of his most lasting contributions was developing a framework for ethical decision making to protect the rights of the people who participate in scientific research. PMID:23450040

  13. Creating More Effective Mentors: Mentoring the Mentor.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Monica; Johnson, Mallory

    2016-09-01

    Given the diversity of those affected by HIV, increasing diversity in the HIV biomedical research workforce is imperative. A growing body of empirical and experimental evidence supports the importance of strong mentorship in the development and success of trainees and early career investigators in academic research settings, especially for mentees of diversity. Often missing from this discussion is the need for robust mentoring training programs to ensure that mentors are trained in best practices on the tools and techniques of mentoring. Recent experimental evidence shows improvement in mentor and mentee perceptions of mentor competency after structured and formalized training on best practices in mentoring. We developed a 2-day "Mentoring the Mentors" workshop at UCSF to train mid-level and senior HIV researchers from around the country [recruited mainly from Centers for AIDS Research (CFARs)] on best practices, tools and techniques of effective mentoring. The workshop content was designed using principles of Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) and included training specifically geared towards working with early career investigators from underrepresented groups, including sessions on unconscious bias, microaggressions, and diversity supplements. The workshop has been held three times (September 2012, October 2013 and May 2015) with plans for annual training. Mentoring competency was measured using a validated tool before and after each workshop. Mentoring competency skills in six domains of mentoring-specifically effective communication, aligning expectations, assessing understanding, fostering independence, addressing diversity and promoting development-all improved as assessed by a validated measurement tool for participants pre- and -post the "Mentoring the Mentors" training workshops. Qualitative assessments indicated a greater awareness of the micro-insults and unconscious bias experienced by mentees of diversity and a commitment to improve awareness and

  14. [Mentoring Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Way of America, Alexandria, VA.

    This document contains the National One to One Mentoring Partnership kit, designed to help users better understand what mentoring is and how they can support it in its many variations. The National One to One Mentoring Partnership is described as a new coalition mobilized to provide mentoring opportunities to youth, with the goal of giving every…

  15. The Scientific Mentor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodia, Becky

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the Cornell Science Challenge, an annual science fair held at Olin Hall at Weill Medical College of Cornell University. This science fair features seventh graders from East Middle School in New York who have been mentored for three months by actual scientists (graduate students, faculty members, laboratory technicians, and…

  16. Mentoring Special Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, Keith E.; Edwards, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Mentorship is critical for career development. Members of special populations are at increased risk of information shortfalls and advice that is not framed with cultural sensitivity. Special knowledge and skills are needed to successfully mentor members of ethnic minority and other special populations. Midlevel and senior scientists need…

  17. Lighting the fire with mentoring relationships.

    PubMed

    Hadidi, Niloufar Niakosari; Lindquist, Ruth; Buckwalter, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Mentoring provides fuel to advance nursing science and ensure a growing cadre of career nurse scientists. With the demand for well-prepared nursing faculty in the area of academic geriatrics, mentoring by expert faculty provides an optimal opportunity for retention and growth of junior faculty. Reflecting on 2 years of a mentoring relationship in the Hartford Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity (BAGNC) postdoctoral scholar program, the BAGNC Claire M. Fagin Fellowship, the authors describe the desired attributes of mentoring relationships that were beneficial to the career of the mentored junior faculty member and were satisfying to the mentors. From the perspective of mentors and mentee, the authors describe the stages of a mentoring relationship and the ingredients of this transforming experience, as well as barriers, challenges, rewards, and lessons learned. PMID:23778045

  18. 37. Photocopy of photograph (from Brady Handy Collection, Library of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Photocopy of photograph (from Brady Handy Collection, Library of Congress, #BH 8234-48) Photographer unknown, ca. 1910 SOUTH FRONT FROM THE WEST (4 x 5 negative, 8 x 10 print) - Patent Office Building, Bounded by Seventh, Ninth, F & G Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. Pioneer in Behavioral Pharmacology: A Tribute to Joseph V. Brady

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, James E.

    2008-01-01

    The contributions of Joseph V. Brady to behavioral pharmacology span more than 50 years and range from early studies using the Estes-Skinner ("conditioned emotional response") procedure to examine drug effects and various physiological processes in experimental animals to the implementation of mobile methadone treatment services and to small group…

  20. Principal Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that school leaders, throughout all stages of their careers, can benefit from a mentoring system in which a seasoned leader helps the protege combine theory and practice with experience. This research roundup reviews works that provide support for principal mentoring and share strategies for establishing mentoring…

  1. Cultivating Mentors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Rick; Cody, Heather Heim

    1995-01-01

    Describes the Mayo Minority Scholars Program, which helps American Indian and other minority students become doctors, medical faculty, or biomedical researchers by matching them with appropriate mentors. Relates the authors' perspectives and experiences as mentor and student. Includes program and contact information. (JAT)

  2. [Mentoring program].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, N

    2001-11-01

    Due to drastic changes in the business environment and prolonged recession, stress management practices in business organizations have been encountering two kinds of problems: budget cuts and difficulties in the delivery of services. The feasibility of mentoring programs to cope with these two problems is discussed. Through an extensive review of the literature, it becomes clear that mentoring programs have the following features and advantages; (1) One to one relationship between elder mentor and younger protégé has a favorable effect on the both mentor and protégé's mental health. (2) Formal mentoring programs are widely used in the U.S. for the prevention of juvenile delinquency, professional education, and human resource development in business settings. (3) Mentoring programs, in general, are practiced with the cooperation of kindred volunteers and professionals who monitor the mentor-protégé relationships. (4) Since a mentoring program utilizes a wide range of human resources in work organizations, it is able to overcome the "budget and delivery" problems. Further discussions are about the comparison with listener programs as well as the relationship with the total human resource management system. PMID:11802451

  3. Strengthening Self-efficacy through Supportive Mentoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haacker, R.

    2015-12-01

    The geosciences have had a chronic problem of underrepresentation of students from diverse ethnic, cultural, gender and socio-economic backgrounds. As a community we need to strengthen our support of young scientists from all backgrounds to sustain their enthusiasm and ensure their success in our field. Investing in mentoring programs that empower students and young professionals is one of the best ways to do so. The Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research and Science (SOARS) program, now entering its 20th year, has successfully developed and tested several mentoring models. The personalized, caring and consistent support is one of the key elements of the program's success; since its inception, 90% of SOARS participants have entered graduate school, research or science related careers after graduation. Many of our alumni who are now faculty apply the same mentoring strategies to build self-esteem and perseverance in their students. This presentation will cover the design and implementation of our four mentoring strategies, and provide insights on potential challenges, training aspects and impact assessment. The mentoring strategies include: 1) Multi-faceted, long-term mentoring of undergraduate and graduate students from diverse backgrounds. 2) Empowering advanced students to serve as peer mentors and role models. 3) Training faculty and professional scientists from all backgrounds to become mentors who are aware of diversity issues. 4) Providing mentor training for partner programs and laboratories. All four strategies have contributed to the creation of a mentoring culture in the geosciences.

  4. STS-78 Mission Specialist Charles E. Brady suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-78 Mission Specialist Charles E. Brady Jr. is donning his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. A spaceflight rookie, Brady was selected by NASA to join the astronaut corps in March 1992; he is a medical doctor who also is a commander in the U.S. Navy. Along with six fellow crew members, he will depart the O&C in a short while and head for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff during a two-and-a-half hour launch window opening at 10:49 a.m. EDT, June 20. STS-78 will be an extended duration flight during which extensive research will be conducted in the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS) located in the payload bay.

  5. Klotho protein lowered in senile patients with brady sinus arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Wei; Zheng, Ernv; Zhang, Wei; Su, Xianming

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the correlationship between brady sinus arrhythmia and the levels of serum klotho protein in aged. Methods: 104 patients over 75 years old with brady sinus arrhythmia (experiment group) were enrolled, including 34 cases of sinus arrest, 43 cases of sinus bradycardia and 25 cases of atrioventricular block. 109 patients over 75 years old without brady sinus arrhymia were chosen as control group. All subjects were monitored by Holter. The levels of serum klotho protein were detected and compared among three groups. The correlation between the frequency of sinus arrest and the levels of serum klotho protein was analyzed simultaneously. Results: The levels of serum klotho protein in experiment group were lower than that in control group (P<0.01); the sinus arrest frequency was negatively correlated with the levels of serum klotho protien. The levels of serum klotho protein in patients with sinus arrest were lower than that with sinus bradycardia and atrioventricularblock (P<0.05). But there was no significant difference between sinus bradycardia group and atrioventricular block group. Conclusion: The levels of serum klotho protein may reflect the function of sinoatrial node and could be used as an index to estimate the function of sinoatrial node. PMID:26550342

  6. Bridging the Gap Between Scientists and Classrooms: Scientist Engagement in the Expedition Earth and Beyond Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W. L.; Willis, K. J.; Runco, S.

    2012-03-01

    The Expedition Earth and Beyond Program bridges the gap between scientists and classrooms. Scientists work with students as mentors, participate in student presentations, and interact with students through distance learning events.

  7. ARM Mentor Selection Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2015-10-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program was created in 1989 with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop several highly instrumented ground stations to study cloud formation processes and their influence on radiative transfer. In 2003, the ARM Program became a national scientific user facility, known as the ARM Climate Research Facility. This scientific infrastructure provides for fixed sites, mobile facilities, an aerial facility, and a data archive available for use by scientists worldwide through the ARM Climate Research Facility—a scientific user facility. The ARM Climate Research Facility currently operates more than 300 instrument systems that provide ground-based observations of the atmospheric column. To keep ARM at the forefront of climate observations, the ARM infrastructure depends heavily on instrument scientists and engineers, also known as lead mentors. Lead mentors must have an excellent understanding of in situ and remote-sensing instrumentation theory and operation and have comprehensive knowledge of critical scale-dependent atmospheric processes. They must also possess the technical and analytical skills to develop new data retrievals that provide innovative approaches for creating research-quality data sets. The ARM Climate Research Facility is seeking the best overall qualified candidate who can fulfill lead mentor requirements in a timely manner.

  8. ARM Lead Mentor Selection Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2013-03-13

    The ARM Climate Research Facility currently operates more than 300 instrument systems that provide ground-based observations of the atmospheric column. To keep ARM at the forefront of climate observations, the ARM infrastructure depends heavily on instrument scientists and engineers, also known as Instrument Mentors. Instrument Mentors must have an excellent understanding of in situ and remote-sensing instrumentation theory and operation and have comprehensive knowledge of critical scale-dependent atmospheric processes. They also possess the technical and analytical skills to develop new data retrievals that provide innovative approaches for creating research-quality data sets.

  9. Mentoring Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Susan

    2010-01-01

    As the author demonstrates, whenever preservice or beginning teachers observe a veteran teacher in action, the veteran serves as a mentor, in the sense that the experienced teacher is modeling the practices that can influence the newcomer. In this article, the author reminds educators about the importance of formative assessments, not just of the…

  10. The vascular surgeon-scientist: a 15-year report of the Society for Vascular Surgery Foundation/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-mentored Career Development Award Program.

    PubMed

    Kibbe, Melina R; Dardik, Alan; Velazquez, Omaida C; Conte, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Foundation partnered with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 1999 to initiate a competitive career development program that provides a financial supplement to surgeon-scientists receiving NIH K08 or K23 career development awards. Because the program has been in existence for 15 years, a review of the program's success has been performed. Between 1999 and 2013, 41 faculty members applied to the SVS Foundation program, and 29 from 21 different institutions were selected as awardees, resulting in a 71% success rate. Three women (10%) were among the 29 awardees. Nine awardees (31%) were supported by prior NIH F32 or T32 training grants. Awardees received their K award at an average of 3.5 years from the start of their faculty position, at the average age of 39.8 years. Thirteen awardees (45%) have subsequently received NIH R01 awards and five (17%) have received Veterans Affairs Merit Awards. Awardees received their first R01 at an average of 5.8 years after the start of their K award at the average age of 45.2 years. The SVS Foundation committed $9,350,000 to the Career Development Award Program. Awardees subsequently secured $45,108,174 in NIH and Veterans Affairs funds, resulting in a 4.8-fold financial return on investment for the SVS Foundation program. Overall, 23 awardees (79%) were promoted from assistant to associate professor in an average of 5.9 years, and 10 (34%) were promoted from associate professor to professor in an average of 5.2 years. Six awardees (21%) hold endowed professorships and four (14%) have secured tenure. Many of the awardees hold positions of leadership, including 12 (41%) as division chief and two (7%) as vice chair within a department of surgery. Eight (28%) awardees have served as president of a regional or national society. Lastly, 47 postdoctoral trainees have been mentored by recipients of the SVS Foundation Career Development

  11. Mentoring and Its Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaston, Joy S.; Jackson, Jerlando F. L.

    This paper explores the topic of mentoring and its practical implications. Mentoring requirements have changed over time. Today's mentors are influential people who significantly help others reach major life goals. Mentoring has to address broad, dynamic goals in today's society. Benefits for mentors can include enhanced self-esteem, rejuvenated…

  12. Faculty as Mentors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagowski, Jeanne M.; Vick, James W.

    1995-01-01

    The nature of mentoring and the role of faculty in mentoring college students are discussed, and some guiding principles in the mentoring relationship are outlined. These address the quality of communication between mentor and student, the mentor's role as sounding board and knowledgeable reference, understanding one's own limitations, helping…

  13. Mentoring in Parallel Universes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton-Hall, Margaret

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the mentoring relationship the author established with students, and determines how her experiences and the mentoring she received from her professors influenced her mentoring practices with her own graduate students. Confirms the dynamic nature of the mentoring process, and notes how her mentors influenced her practices but also…

  14. Mentoring and the Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullough Jr., Robert V.; Draper, Roni Jo

    2004-01-01

    Drawing on data from nine secondary school mentor teachers, the authors explore the emotional aspects of mentoring. Embracing a view of 'cool' professionalism, the mentors hid from their interns the intensity and complexity of their work as mentors. The authors argue that to maximize the value of mentoring neophyte teachers should be given a…

  15. Semen A Altshuler: scientist, mentor, teacher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochelaev, Boris I.

    2011-10-01

    International Conference `Resonances in Condensed Matter' is devoted to 100 years of the birthday of the Corresponding member of Academy of Sciences of the USSR, Professor of the Kazan University Semen Alexandrovich Altshuler (1911-1983). He is well known by pioneer works on EPR, the prediction and grounds for an existence of the neutron magnetic moment, the prediction and the theory of the acoustic paramagnetic resonance, and as a founder of the Kazan scientific school `Magnetic radiospectroscopy of condensed matter' (with E K Zavoiskii and B M Kozyrev)

  16. Csaba Horvath - Scholar, Scientist, Mentor, Friend

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, Lois; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-09-01

    At Farbwerke Hoechst, Csaba did research and development work on the surface chemistry of organic pigment dyes and learned about the practical aspects of surface chemistry. During his doctoral research, Csaba invented and developed porous-layer open tubular columns which offers remarkable advantages over wall-coated OTC, e.g., a higher loadability and the ability to use all retention mechanisms afforded by adsorption. He also prepared surface-treated beads, an approach that he used later in the context of HPLC. Working with S.R. Lipsky on the development of analytical methodologies for lunar samples, searching for trace compounds which could show the presence of life on the moon in a distant past, he imagined applying to LC the same principles that he had used earlier in GC, and built the first instrument for high pressure liquid chromatography. Very early, he understood the potential of this new separation method to revolutionize biochemistry and molecular biology. Working for Picker-Nuclear, Csaba developed the first commercial instrument for HPLC, which was also the first instrument to use microbore HPLC columns (for ion-exchange separations of biological compounds). From the beginning, Csaba focused his interests on the separation of samples of biological origin, becoming the pioneer of modern bioanalytical chemistry. He devoted considerable attention to the development of the theory and applications of reversed-phase liquid chromatography, the most widely applied chromatographic method of analysis, pioneered the use of displacement chromatography for preparative HPLC, and innumerable applications of HPLC to the separation of samples of biological origin. He developed the solvophobic theory of retention in RPLC, the use of entropy-enthalpy compensation in the study of retention mechanisms, and the fundamentals of electrochromatography. The importance of his spearheading HPLC, RPLC, and their applications in the life sciences, fields in which these new methods are leading to countless breakthroughs, is such that his contributions will remain among the major scientific achievemetns of the 20th century.

  17. Mentor Policy and the Quality of Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polikoff, Morgan S.; Desimone, Laura M.; Porter, Andrew C.; Hochberg, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring is a common form of support for beginning teachers. State and district mentoring policies vary along a number of dimensions, yet policymakers have little evidence to draw on in designing effective mentoring programs. We use quantitative and qualitative data from a study of beginning middle school mathematics teachers in 10 districts to…

  18. Mentoring. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scallan-Berl, Patricia; Moguil, Leslie; Nyman, Sessy I.; Mercado, Miriam Mercado

    2003-01-01

    This workshop presents information on mentoring relationships within child care settings. Articles are: (1) "Mentoring Teachers...A Partnership in Learning" (Patricia Scallan-Berl); (2) "The Potential Gains of Peer Mentoring among Children" (Leslie Moguil); (3) "Mentoring Advocates in the Context of Early Childhood Education" (Sessy Nyman); and…

  19. Promise and Limits of Mentoring in Academic Science: A Look at Research on Impact and Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Linda; Ward, Kathryn

    2000-01-01

    Considers the importance of mentoring in physical, chemical, and social sciences research. Discusses the mentoring program of the Association for Women in Science (AWIS) which focuses on helping women and minority scientists. Describes mentoring as "typically an asymmetrical power relation but it is not entirely unidimensional in flow of sources."…

  20. The development, implementation, and assessment of an innovative faculty mentoring leadership program.

    PubMed

    Tsen, Lawrence C; Borus, Jonathan F; Nadelson, Carol C; Seely, Ellen W; Haas, Audrey; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L

    2012-12-01

    Effective mentoring is an important component of academic success. Few programs exist to both improve the effectiveness of established mentors and cultivate a multispecialty mentoring community. In 2008, in response to a faculty survey on mentoring, leaders at Brigham and Women's Hospital developed the Faculty Mentoring Leadership Program as a peer learning experience for midcareer and senior faculty physician and scientist mentors to enhance their skills and leadership in mentoring and create a supportive community of mentors. A planning group representing key administrative, educational, clinical, and research mentorship constituencies designed the nine-month course.Participants met monthly for an hour and a half during lunchtime. Two cofacilitators engaged the diverse group of 16 participants in interactive discussions about cases based on the participants' experiences. While the cofacilitators discussed with the participants the dyadic mentor-mentee relationship, they specifically emphasized the value of engaging multiple mentors and establishing mentoring networks. In response to postsession and postcourse (both immediately and after six months) self-assessments, participants reported substantive gains in their mentoring confidence and effectiveness, experienced a renewed sense of enthusiasm for mentoring, and took initial steps to build a diverse network of mentoring relationships.In this article, the authors describe the rationale, design, implementation, assessment, and ongoing impact of this innovative faculty mentoring leadership program. They also share lessons learned for other institutions that are contemplating developing a similar faculty mentoring program. PMID:23095917

  1. "Biomedical Workforce Diversity: The Context for Mentoring to Develop Talents and Foster Success Within the 'Pipeline'".

    PubMed

    McGee, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Like all biomedical research fields, AIDS research needs the broadest diversity of experiences and perspectives among researchers in the field if creative advancements are to be achieved. Mentors and mentoring are the most important vehicles by which the talents of young scientists are developed. However, mentoring as a teaching and learning paradigm is very complex and idiosyncratic, and often inadvertently fails to provide the same quality and quantity of opportunity to aspiring scientists who are 'different' from those doing the mentoring. This article provides a theoretical and practical framework for understanding how differences of race, ethnicity, gender, skin color, social status and other identifiable characteristics can play into scientific development during mentoring 'within the pipeline'. It also serves as a foundation upon which mentoring in AIDS is considered by subsequent papers in this series. Finally, it goes beyond mentoring to propose systematic coaching as an effective complement to research mentoring to promote success, especially for individuals from underrepresented groups. PMID:27424004

  2. Mentoring in surgical training.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Prem; Narra, Maruthi; Woo, Henry

    2015-04-01

    Surgical mentors have helped trainees develop fulfilling and academically productive careers, while supervisors are formally assigned to impart skills and oversee training. This paper reviews the comparative roles of the supervisor and mentor and how they overlap, while exploring the impact of the 'unknown' mentor. While the supervisor's role in directing the student is formally recognized, the mentee will personally select a mentor who successfully models the career and life balance to which the mentee aspires. The unknown mentor is known only to the mentee. The mentee's commitment to communicating with both mentor and supervisor is crucial to success. Better processes can be used to guide the mentor relationship. Confusion between the two roles - mentor and supervisor - is due to their complementary nature as well as an overlap in roles. Both remain essential to the growth and development of the surgical trainee. The unknown mentor could give detached advice and guidance to the student, while acting as a positive role model. PMID:25649003

  3. Why Mentor? Linking Mentor Teachers' Motivations to Their Mentoring Conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ginkel, Gisbert; Verloop, Nico; Denessen, Eddie

    2016-01-01

    Current mentoring models for teacher preparation and induction emphasize the need to engage novice teachers' learning through collaborative professional learning communities. Mentors in such communities are expected to engage in joint knowledge construction with novices, and to be "co-thinkers" who enact a developmental view of…

  4. R and R for Mentors: Renewal and Reaffirmation for Mentors as Benefits from the Mentoring Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Nancy H.

    1995-01-01

    Examines what mentors reap from the mentoring experience and why they volunteer in the first place. Investigates elementary and secondary school mentors and the link between mentoring and Erikson's theory relating to the generativity stage in adult development. (JOW)

  5. REM sleep-related brady-arrhythmia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Wim; Willems, Rik; Pevernagie, Dirk; Buyse, Bertien

    2007-09-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep-related brady-arrhythmia syndrome is a cardiac rhythm disorder characterised by asystoles lasting several seconds during REM sleep in otherwise healthy individuals. In contrast to arrhythmias associated with obstructive sleep apnea, REM sleep-related sinus arrests and atrioventricular (AV) blocks are not associated with episodes of apnea or hypopnea. In literature, only few cases have been published, suggesting that the prevalence of this nighttime rhythm disorder is very rare. In this paper, we report two new cases of REM sleep-related sinus arrests and one case of REM sleep-related total AV block. To explore the underlying mechanism, an analysis of heart rate variability was performed. In a matched control population, we observed a significant lower low-to-high frequency (LF/HF) ratio in slow wave sleep as compared to REM sleep (2.04 +/- 1.2 vs 4.55 +/- 1.82, respectively [Mann-Whitney U test p < 0.01]), demonstrating a global increase in sympathetic activity during REM. When using the same technique in two of three patients with REM-related arrhythmias, the shift to an increased LF/HF ratio from slow wave sleep to REM sleep tended to be lower. This may reflect an increased vagal activity (HF component) during REM sleep in these subjects. We, therefore, hypothesise that, in our patients with REM sleep-related arrhythmias, the overall dominance of sympathetic activity during REM is present but to a lesser extent and temporarily switches into vagal dominance when the bursts of REMs occur. As it was still unclear whether these REM sleep-related asystoles needed to be paced, we compared our treatment and these of previously reported cases with the current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines for implantation of cardiac pacemakers. PMID:17375344

  6. Mentoring, Policy and Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Gary

    2007-01-01

    In this policy brief, former P/PV President Gary Walker asks, "Is mentoring now a durable part of American social policy? If so, is this unalloyed good news?" Adapted from an article that first appeared in "The Handbook of Youth Mentoring" (DuBois and Karcher, ed. 2005), the brief reflects on the impact and appeal of mentoring, addresses various…

  7. Mentoring Women Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Cheryl A.; Salsberry, Trudy A.

    2005-01-01

    This review of the literature focuses first on the common reasons for the need for mentoring (professional development, changing roles, principal shortage, under representation of women, and barriers) and continues with a definition and description of mentoring. Finally, the current status of mentoring is summarized followed by a discussion of the…

  8. The Mentor Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vujovich, Lisa

    This document presents materials to assist individuals responsible for coordinating mentor programs at career academies and materials to assist mentors. Section 1, which is addressed to coordinators, contains guidelines pertaining to the following aspects of planning and implementing mentor programs: policies and procedures; budgeting and funding;…

  9. Cabrillo College Mentor Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabrillo Coll., Aptos, CA.

    This document details the goals and characteristics of the faculty Mentor Program at Cabrillo Community College (California). The program is designed to facilitate the orientation and adaptation of new faculty members to the role of community college instructor. Experienced faculty members act as mentors to new tenure-track faculty. Mentors are…

  10. Mentoring and Leadership Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dziczkowski, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Today's technology-based society and the vast influx of new information make leadership development a necessity. Many of the world's finest and most successful leaders have trusted mentors. Mentoring has emerged as a means to cultivate the leadership skills of current and future leaders. Mentoring has a rich history and harbors immense…

  11. Creating Community through Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Deborah E.; Travick-Jackson, Cecelia

    2006-01-01

    This research studies a doctoral program that includes a cohort component. Candidates engage in active learning and in the skill of mentoring. Research on peer mentoring has shown to support graduate students as they progress in their study (Luna & Cullen, 1998). Analysis of the data found themes relating to mentoring and community: candidates…

  12. The Mentor as Partner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Chip R.

    2000-01-01

    It takes a special kind of mentor to establish a work environment in which people are ready and able to withstand changes, such as downsizing and reorganization. Mentoring is a learning partnership, and the mentor's main gifts are learning, advice, feedback, focus, and support. (JOW)

  13. Writing with Mentors (DVD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorfman, Lynne; Cappelli, Rose

    2010-01-01

    When learning how to write well, there is nothing more powerful than examining the work of the writers we admire. Real writers need mentors--those writers who inspire us and demonstrate through their style and craft how we, too, can be successful writers. In "Writing with Mentors", Lynne Dorfman and Rose Cappelli, authors of "Mentor Texts" and…

  14. Mentoring New Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Kathleen; Greenwood, Anita

    2007-01-01

    Most experienced high school science teachers are asked at some point to serve as a mentor to a novice teacher. While mentor-training programs have been established in many states, they often only focus on how the mentor can help new science teachers understand and negotiate the school culture, such as how the school runs and where supplies are…

  15. Mentoring Phases and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Georgia T.

    1997-01-01

    Data from 178 proteges supported Kram's model of mentoring phases: initiation, cultivation, separation, and redefinition. Data from 82 current and 69 former proteges were compared to those from 93 who were never mentored. Mentees had better career outcomes, organizational socialization, and job satisfaction; those not mentored had slightly higher…

  16. Mentoring and research misconduct: an analysis of research mentoring in closed ORI cases.

    PubMed

    Wright, David E; Titus, Sandra L; Cornelison, Jered B

    2008-09-01

    We are reporting on how involved the mentor was in promoting responsible research in cases of research misconduct. We reviewed the USPHS misconduct files of the Office of Research Integrity. These files are created by Institutions who prosecute a case of possible research misconduct; ORI has oversight review of these investigations. We explored the role of the mentor in the cases of trainee research misconduct on three specific behaviors that we believe mentors should perform with their trainee: (1) review source data, (2) teach specific research standards and (3) minimize stressful work situations. We found that almost three quarters of the mentors had not reviewed the source data and two thirds had not set standards. These two behaviors are positively correlated. We did not see convincing evidence in the records that mentors were causing stress, but it was apparent in the convicted trainees' confessions that over 50% experienced some kind of stress. Secondary data, while not created for this research purpose, allows us to look at concrete research behaviors that are otherwise not very researchable. We believe it is important for mentors and institutions to devote more attention to teaching mentors about the process of education and their responsibilities in educating the next generation of scientists. This becomes a critical issue for large research groups who need to determine who is in charge educating, supervising and assuring data integrity. PMID:18615274

  17. Evaluating virtual STEM mentoring programs: The SAGANet.org experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, S. M.; Walker, S. I.; Miller, E.; Anbar, M.; Kacar, B.; Forrester, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Many school districts within the United States continue to seek new ways of engaging students within Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. SAGANet.org, a web-based 501c3 Astrobiology outreach initiative, works with a number of schools, partnering K-12 students and their families with professional scientist mentors from around the world to teach and inspire students using virtual technology platforms. Current programs include two mentoring partnerships: pairing scientist-mentors with at-risk youth at the Pittsburg Community School in Pittsburg CA, and pairing scientist-mentors with families from the Kyrene del Cielo Elementary School in Chandler AZ. These programs represent two very different models for utilizing the virtual media platform provided by SAGANet.org to engage K-12 students and their families in STEM. For the former, scientists mentor the students of the Pittsburg School as part of the formal in-class curriculum. For the latter, scientists work with K-5 students and their families through Cielo's Science & Engineering Discovery Room to develop a science project as part of an informal learning experience that is independent of the formal curriculum. In this presentation, we (1) discuss the challenges and successes of engaging these two distinct audiences through virtual media, (2) present the results of how these two very-different mentoring partnership impact K-12 students science self-efficacy, interest in science, and STEM career awareness, and (3) share the impact of the mentoring experience on the mentor's confidence and self-efficacy with communicating science to the public.

  18. Mentoring for retention and advancement in the multigenerational clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Laudicina, R J

    2001-01-01

    Retention of recent graduates and other laboratory practitioners in the workplace will play a key role in addressing current and projected shortages of clinical laboratory scientists (CLS) and technicians (CLT). In addition, with overrepresentation of the aging Baby Boomer generation in laboratory supervisory and management positions, it is crucial not only to retain younger practitioners, but to prepare them for assuming these important functions in the future. Mentoring, a practice commonly employed in other professions, is widely considered to be useful in employee retention and career advancement. Mentoring has probably been used in the clinical laboratory profession, but has not been well documented. In the clinical laboratory environment, potential mentors are in the Veteran and Baby Boomer generations, and new practitioners who could benefit from mentoring are in Generation X. Generational differences among these groups may present challenges to the use of mentoring. This article will attempt to provide a better understanding of generational differences and show how mentoring can be applied in the setting of the clinical laboratory in order to increase retention and promote career advancement of younger practitioners. A panel of five laboratory managers provided examples of mentoring strategies. Definitions, benefits, and examples of mentoring are addressed in the accompanying article, "Passing the Torch: Mentoring the Next Generation of Laboratory Professionals". PMID:15633495

  19. A case of ‘tachy-brady syndrome’: What is the mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Namboodiri, Narayanan; Bohora, Shomu; Ajitkumar, Valaparambil K.; Tharakan, Jaganmohan A.

    2016-01-01

    A young male presented with incessant narrow QRS tachycardia and left ventricular dysfunction. 24-Holter monitoring revealed multiple episodes of sustained and nonsustained episodes of tachycardia with prolonged sinus pauses at termination. The analysis of the electrocardiogram, followed by an invasive electrophysiological study, suggested an unusual mechanism for this tachy-brady syndrome. PMID:27134445

  20. Mentoring for Protege Character Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moberg, Dennis J.

    2008-01-01

    As role models, mentors serve as moral exemplars to their proteges. Yet, since the mentoring literature gives scant attention to the mentor's role in protege moral education, mentors are largely unwitting participants in this process. Grounded in research from moral psychology and philosophy, this article provides guidance to mentors who want to…

  1. Medical Scientists

    MedlinePlus

    ... scientists typically have a Ph.D., usually in biology or a related life science. Some medical scientists ... specialize in this field seek to understand the biology of aging and investigate ways to improve the ...

  2. Doctoral training of African scientists.

    PubMed

    Doumbo, O K; Krogstad, D J

    1998-02-01

    There are two principal rationales for doctoral training of African scientists in health: 1) these scientists are essential for the nations of sub-Saharan Africa to define and implement their own health priorities, and 2) the research they perform is essential for development. However, this training is difficult because of its expense (> $20,000 per year), because many developed country mentors are unaware of the realities of research in sub-Saharan Africa, and because major differences in salary provide a financial disincentive to return. We describe a training strategy that reduces attrition because it is linked to the investigators' responsibilities before and after training, and to home country priorities. This strategy requires a close relationship between the developing country (on-site) and developed country (off-site) mentors, with joint participation in the selection and funding process, followed by course work and short-term, independent projects off-site that lead to a thesis project in the developing country, and subsequently to a defined professional position in the developing country after completion of the doctoral degree. For this strategy to succeed, the developed country mentor must have both field experience and investigative expertise; the developing country mentor must have an understanding of modern biology, as well as clinical and epidemiologic experience. In addition, we would like to emphasize that the long-term retention of these talented, highly-trained individuals requires a similar long-term commitment by their developed country mentors, well beyond the short term of most research funding. PMID:9502592

  3. The role of mentoring in academic career progression: a cross-sectional survey of the Academy of Medical Sciences mentoring scheme.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Amy C; Eady, Nigel Aj; Wessely, Simon C

    2014-04-16

    Summary OBJECTIVES: To describe a successful mentoring scheme designed for mid-career clinician scientists and to examine factors associated with mentee report of positive career impact. PMID:24739382

  4. The Earth Science Women's Network: The Principles That Guide Our Mentoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. S.; Steiner, A. L.; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN) began informally in 2002 as a way for six early career female atmospheric chemists to stay in contact and support each other. Twelve years later (2014), the ESWN formally became a non-profit organization with over 2000 members. The ESWN includes scientists from all disciplines of the geosciences with members located in over 50 countries. The ESWN is dedicated to career development, peer mentoring and community building for women in the geosciences. The mentoring philosophy of ESWN has evolved to include five main principles: 1.) Support community-driven mentoring, 2.) Encourage diverse mentoring approaches for diverse individuals, 3.) Facilitate mentoring across career phases, 4.) Promote combined personal and professional mentoring, 5.) Champion effective mentoring in a safe space. Surveys of ESWN members report gains in areas that are often considered barriers to career advancement, including recognition that they are not alone, new understanding of obstacles faced by women in science, and access to professional resources.

  5. A narrative inquiry into novice science mentor teachers' mentoring practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseem, Samina

    Many teacher education programs hire new mentors every year to work with their student teacher population. The literature about teacher mentoring suggests the importance of relevant and ongoing professional development (PD) for teacher mentors at all levels. However, it is much more commonly the case that most teacher mentors volunteer and do not have access to PD. Past research about mentoring provides a descriptive sense of the practices of experienced mentors, especially within a PD context, but little is known about how novice mentors, who are mentoring for the first or the second time, with no prior PD related to mentoring articulate their work as mentors. Using the telling form of narrative inquiry, my study documented how four novice science mentors (NSMs) who had no prior mentoring-related PD articulated the work of mentoring through the stories they told about their past experiences as learners and teachers. The term learner included experiences that the NSMs had before school through K-12 and in their teacher education programs. The experiences as a teacher referred to NSMs' in-service experiences -- teaching, coaching, and mentoring (if any). Each NSM was interviewed once a month for a period of five months. The interviews captured experiences of the NSMs since their childhood to present day experiences as teachers to summarize the experiences that informed their current mentoring practices; to document salient mentoring practices they employed; to identify sources and factors that shaped those practices, and to understand mentoring from mentor teachers' perspectives. Clandinin and Connelly's (2000) three commonplaces (temporality- sociality- place ) framework was used for structuring interview questions and analyzing data. The NSMs employed number of practices discussed in the literature. The study found that the most influential life experiences were upbringing, student teaching, teaching, prior mentoring, and coaching. By taking temporality into

  6. Inspiring the next generation of physician-scientists.

    PubMed

    Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2015-08-01

    As academic physician-scientists, one of the most important things we do is mentor young trainee-scientists. There obviously is no one right way to mentor or a set of rules one can follow; it's a very personal matter, and very much depends on one's personality. For much of my career, I gave very little thought as to how I mentored my trainees or to whether I was any good at it. Like many investigators, perhaps, I was just too busy with the daily activities of research to consider how I was guiding my students. Here, I take a look back and reflect on my experiences as a mentor and the factors that I believe contribute to the success of trainees as independent scientists. PMID:26237039

  7. Inspiring the next generation of physician-scientists

    PubMed Central

    Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    As academic physician-scientists, one of the most important things we do is mentor young trainee-scientists. There obviously is no one right way to mentor or a set of rules one can follow; it’s a very personal matter, and very much depends on one’s personality. For much of my career, I gave very little thought as to how I mentored my trainees or to whether I was any good at it. Like many investigators, perhaps, I was just too busy with the daily activities of research to consider how I was guiding my students. Here, I take a look back and reflect on my experiences as a mentor and the factors that I believe contribute to the success of trainees as independent scientists. PMID:26237039

  8. Mentors. The President's Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Margaret E.

    This report describes the role of a mentor of young people and a summer program providing mentors for high school students. For two summers, with the help of the Commonwealth Fund, several hundred young New Yorkers were chosen from among high school juniors with little hope of finding a summer job to enroll in a program sponsored by Hunter College…

  9. Supporting Music Teacher Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaffini, Erin Dineen

    2015-01-01

    While much discussion and research is focused on the importance of music teacher mentors for preservice teachers and novice in-service music educators, little discussion has been devoted to the topic of how we, as members of the music education profession, can support the role of music teacher mentors. This article explores some of the benefits…

  10. Principal Mentoring. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Robert J.

    To help new principals succeed, school districts are capitalizing on senior administrators' expertise by adding mentor programs to the practical training programs for beginning principals. This digest examines the nature of mentorships and discusses how they can prepare principals for the next stage of their careers. Although mentoring has existed…

  11. Ms. Mentor Unmasked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Paula

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Emily Toth, who writes the monthly "Ms. Mentor" academic advice column in the "Chronicle of Higher Education" and teaches in the English department at Louisiana State University, in Baton Rouge. She is the author of "Ms. Mentor's Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia" (1997), "Inside Peyton Place: The Life…

  12. An IT Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruse, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author features the IT Mentor Program at the Carlos Rosario International Career Center in Northeast Washington, D.C., which was implemented by the center's workforce director, Claudia Lujan, and under the support and direction of its founder and executive director, Sonia Gutierrez. The program pairs students with mentors to…

  13. Managing Mentoring Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IUME Briefs, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Some programs for helping at-risk youth achieve excellent results, while others do not. One reason for program success can be proper management. Mentoring is a promising strategy for helping at-risk youth. Planners who want to create effective mentoring programs should look at the implementation experiences of other youth programs. Evaluations…

  14. Mentoring: A Collegial Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruzeiro, Patricia A.; Morgan, Robert L.

    This paper describes the Entry Year Assistance Program (EYAP), a mentoring program for novice teachers, offered by the School of Education at Chadron State College (Nebraska). The program supports beginning teachers who are geographically isolated in Nebraska's panhandle. A discussion of the theoretical basis for teacher mentoring includes…

  15. Developing the next generation of nurse scientists.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Patricia V; Hall, Lynne A

    2015-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate nursing research internship program in which students are engaged in research with a faculty mentor. Since 2002, more than 130 undergraduate nursing students have participated. Interns coauthored publications, presented papers and posters at conferences, and received awards. This highly successful program provides a model that can be easily replicated to foster the development of future nurse scientists. PMID:25581434

  16. Developing Mentors: An Analysis of Shared Mentoring Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower-Phipps, Laura; Klecka, Cari Van Senus; Sature, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how experienced teachers share and articulate effective mentoring practices can guide efforts to prepare quality mentors. This qualitative study focused on mentoring practices within a teacher-designed student-teaching program conceptualized while the mentor teachers within the program were students in a graduate-level mentoring…

  17. Developing Effective Mentoring Relationships: Strategies from the Mentor's Viewpoint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Tammy D.; Poteet, Mark L.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how mentoring is being increasingly used by companies as a means of fostering employee learning and development. Presents the results of a qualitative study that investigated the characteristics that the ideal mentor should possess, and ways that both mentors and proteges can make mentoring relationships most effective. (Author/GCP)

  18. Capturing Mentor Teachers' Reflective Moments during Mentoring Dialogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crasborn, Frank; Hennissen, Paul; Brouwer, Niels; Korthagen, Fred; Bergen, Theo

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of the current study is to capture differential frequencies of mentor teachers' reflective moments, as indicators of different levels of consciousness in mentor teachers' use and acquisition of supervisory skills during mentoring dialogues. For each of the 30 participants, two mentoring dialogues were analyzed: one before and one…

  19. Concept analysis of mentoring.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of a concept analysis is to examine the structure and function of a concept by defining its attributes and internal structure. Concept analysis can clarify an overused or vague concept and promote mutual understanding by providing a precise operational definition. Mentoring is a concept more fully used by other fields, such as business, than in nursing and may not always translate well for use in nursing. Therefore, clarifying the meaning of the existing concept of mentoring and developing an operational definition for use in nursing are aims of this concept analysis. Mentoring is broadly based and concentrates on developing areas such as career progression, scholarly achievements, and personal development. Mentoring relationships are based around developing reciprocity and accountability between each partner. Mentoring is seen related to transition in practice, role acquisition, and socialization, as a way to support new colleagues. Mentorship is related to nurses' success in nursing practice linked to professionalism, nursing quality improvement, and self-confidence. PMID:24042140

  20. The ubiquitous ostracode Darwinula stevensoni (Brady and Robertson, 1870), redescription of the species and lectotype designation.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sohn, I.G.

    1987-01-01

    Darwinula stevensoni (Brady and Robertson 1870) is the type species of Darwinula, the ubiquitous living and fossil nonmarine nominate genus of the Darwinulidae and the Darwinulacea. To date, the additional families Darwinuloididae (fossil), Microdarwinulidae (living and fossil), Panxianidae (fossil), and Suchonellidae (fossil) have been referred to the Darwinulacea. A type specimen for D. stevensoni has not been previously designated. In order to stabilize the species, a lectotype is selected from the type series in the Brady collection at The Hancock Museum, Newcastle upon Tyne. The species is redescribed and reillustrated based on the study of the carapace of a paralectotype and also of valves and appendages of specimens from both England and the United States. Living species of Darwinula have a cosmopolitan distribution in fresh and brackish water. Fossil Darwinulacea, documented in the Carboniferous, serve as indicators of continental Paleozoic to Holocene deposits. - Author

  1. E-Mentoring Interaction Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenear, Phoebe E.

    2007-01-01

    Little research has been conducted on electronic mentoring. Several traditional mentoring models exist; however, due to the novelty of the research area, no theoretical e-mentoring models appear in the literature. Using Moore's Theory of Transactional Distance as the theoretical framework, this research compared mentor-protege interaction,…

  2. A Mentor's Mentor: Remembering Harold Guetzkow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Targ, Harry

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the important ways in which Harold Guetzkow mentored his student, helping him to develop conceptual and methodological skills and to become a rigorous thinker. While the path was sometimes difficult and stressful, the intellectual skills transmitted from Harold Guetzkow were vital to the teaching and research skills of his…

  3. Mentor/Protege Interactions and the Role of Mentor Training within a Novice Teacher Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menegat, Gilan M.

    2010-01-01

    Many individuals transition into teaching positions without the benefit of effective professional mentoring. This study was conducted to better understand the interactions in which mentors and proteges engage and to inform future design of mentor support for novice teachers. The research examined mentor/protege interactions within a year long…

  4. How Assigned Faculty Mentors View Their Mentoring Relationships: An Interview Study of Mentors in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobie, Sharon; Smith, Sherilyn; Robins, Lynne

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study of 29 physician mentors reports their perspectives on mentoring medical students in a well-respected medical school's formal, assigned, longitudinal mentoring program that has a curricular component in the second year. Using a phenomenologic inductive approach, common themes identified centered on mentors' relationships with…

  5. A trait based approach to defining valued mentoring qualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendall, E.

    2012-12-01

    Graduate training in the sciences requires strong personal interactions among faculty, senior lab members and more junior members. Within the lab-group setting we learn to frame problems, to conduct research and to communicate findings. The result is that individual scientists are partly shaped by a few influential mentors. We have all been influenced by special relationships with mentors, and on reflection we may find that certain qualities have been especially influential in our career choices. In this presentation I will discuss favorable mentoring traits as determined from an informal survey of scientists in varying stages of careers and from diverse backgrounds. Respondents addressed questions about traits they value in their mentors in several categories: 1) personal qualities such as approachability, humor and encouragement; background including gender, ethnicity, and family status; 2) scientific qualities including discipline or specialization, perceived stature in discipline, seniority, breadth of perspective, and level of expectations; and 3) community-oriented qualities promoted by mentors, such as encouraging service contributions and peer-mentoring within the lab group. The results will be compared among respondents by gender, ethnicity, stage of career, type of work, and subdiscipline within the broadly defined Biogeoscience community. We hope to contribute to the growing discussion on building a diverse and balanced scientific workforce.

  6. One More Legacy of Paul F. Brandwein: Creating Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fort, Deborah C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the influence of Paul F. Brandwein, author, scientist, teacher and mentor, publisher, humanist, and environmentalist, on gifted youngsters who later became scientists, based primarily on information gathered from surveys completed by 25 of his students and one colleague. It also traces his profound interactions with science…

  7. Does Mentoring Matter? A Multidisciplinary Meta-Analysis Comparing Mentored and Non-Mentored Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Eby, Lillian T.; Allen, Tammy D.; Evans, Sarah C.; Ng, Thomas; DuBois, David

    2008-01-01

    The study of mentoring has generally been conducted within disciplinary silos with a specific type of mentoring relationship as a focus. The purpose of this article is to quantitatively review the three major areas of mentoring research (youth, academic, workplace) to determine the overall effect size associated with mentoring outcomes for protégés. We also explored whether the relationship between mentoring and protégé outcomes varied by the type of mentoring relationship (youth, academic, workplace). Results demonstrate that mentoring is associated with a wide range of favorable behavioral, attitudinal, health-related, relational, motivational, and career outcomes, although the effect size is generally small. Some differences were also found across type of mentoring. Generally, larger effect sizes were detected for academic and workplace mentoring compared to youth mentoring. Implications for future research, theory, and applied practice are provided. PMID:19343074

  8. Scientists want more children.

    PubMed

    Ecklund, Elaine Howard; Lincoln, Anne E

    2011-01-01

    Scholars partly attribute the low number of women in academic science to the impact of the science career on family life. Yet, the picture of how men and women in science--at different points in the career trajectory--compare in their perceptions of this impact is incomplete. In particular, we know little about the perceptions and experiences of junior and senior scientists at top universities, institutions that have a disproportionate influence on science, science policy, and the next generation of scientists. Here we show that having fewer children than wished as a result of the science career affects the life satisfaction of science faculty and indirectly affects career satisfaction, and that young scientists (graduate students and postdoctoral fellows) who have had fewer children than wished are more likely to plan to exit science entirely. We also show that the impact of science on family life is not just a woman's problem; the effect on life satisfaction of having fewer children than desired is more pronounced for male than female faculty, with life satisfaction strongly related to career satisfaction. And, in contrast to other research, gender differences among graduate students and postdoctoral fellows disappear. Family factors impede talented young scientists of both sexes from persisting to research positions in academic science. In an era when the global competitiveness of US science is at risk, it is concerning that a significant proportion of men and women trained in the select few spots available at top US research universities are considering leaving science and that such desires to leave are related to the impact of the science career on family life. Results from our study may inform university family leave policies for science departments as well as mentoring programs in the sciences. PMID:21850232

  9. A Call for Training the Trainers: Focus on Mentoring to Enhance Diversity in Mental Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Twamley, Elizabeth W.; Cardenas, Veronica; Lebowitz, Barry; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    There is a widening disparity between the proportion of ethnic minority Americans in the population and the number of researchers from these minority groups. One major obstacle in this arena relates to a dearth of mentors for such trainees. The present academic settings are not optimal for development and sustenance of research mentors, especially for mentees from underrepresented minority ethnic groups. Mentoring skills can and should be evaluated and enhanced. Universities, medical schools, and funding agencies need to join hands and implement national- and local-level programs to help develop and reward mentors of junior scientists from ethnic minority groups. PMID:19246662

  10. Part 1: An Overview of Mentoring Practices and Mentoring Benefits.

    PubMed

    Jakubik, Louise D; Eliades, Aris B; Weese, Meghan M

    2016-01-01

    Mentoring has been proposed as a solution for retention and succession planning in nursing; however, there is a lack of information about "how to" mentor based on evidence. This seven-part leadership series will provide a deep dive into evidence-based mentoring practices and associated mentoring benefits for staff nurses and the organizations in which they work. Part 1 of this series provides an overview of the origins and evolution of mentoring, related definitions, and evidence-based mentoring practices and benefits. PMID:27019941

  11. John Archibald Wheeler: A study of mentoring in modern physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Terry M.

    This dissertation has two objectives. The first objective is to determine where best to situate the study of mentoring (i.e. the 'making of scientists') on the landscape of the history of science and science studies. This task is accomplished by establishing mentoring studies as a link between the robust body of literature dealing with Research Schools and the emerging scholarship surrounding the development, dispersion, and evolution of pedagogy in the training of twentieth century physicists. The second, and perhaps more significant and novel objective, is to develop a means to quantitatively assess the mentoring workmanship of scientific craftsmen who preside over the final stages of preparation when apprentices are transformed into professional scientists. The project builds upon a 2006 Master's Thesis that examined John Archibald Wheeler's work as a mentor of theoretical physicists at Princeton University in the years 1938--1976. It includes Wheeler's work as a mentor at the University of Texas and is qualitatively and quantitatively enhanced by virtue of the author having access to five separate collections with archival holdings of John Wheeler's papers and correspondence, as well as having access to thirty one tape recorded interviews that feature John Wheeler as either the interviewee or a prominent subject of discussion. The project also benefited from the opportunity to meet with and gather background information from a number of John Wheeler's former colleagues and students. Included in the dissertation is a content analysis of the acknowledgements in 949 Ph.D. dissertations, 122 Master's Theses, and 670 Senior Theses that were submitted during Wheeler's career as an active mentor. By establishing a census of the students of the most active mentors at Princeton and Texas, it is possible to tabulate the publication record of these apprentice groups and obtain objective measures of mentoring efficacy. The dissertation concludes by discussing the wider

  12. Passing the Torch: Mentoring and Developmental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatzberg-Smith, Kathleen

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the benefits of mentor relationships for both the protege and the mentor. Suggests that experienced developmental educators mentor colleagues new to the field and that developmental students be encouraged to find and cultivate mentoring relationships. (DMM)

  13. Mentoring in neurology: filling the residency gap in academic mentoring.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul R; Marsh, Elisabeth B

    2014-03-11

    Effective academic mentoring significantly affects a physician's choice of career, academic productivity, and professional trajectory. The mentoring relationship is necessary for the continued success of medical training. It is critical to cultivate a climate in which mentoring can thrive. In order to improve the quality and outcomes of mentoring, we must adopt a comprehensive plan. There are interventions at every level of training that will ensure that the current cohort of neurologists receives the requisite expertise needed to flourish and inspire future trainees. Professional organizations must articulate a comprehensive vision of mentoring. Institutions must create an infrastructure to support mentors. Mentors should work in active partnerships with their mentees to forge sustained, productive relationships. Mentees must actively contribute to their own mentoring. Proper mentorship will ensure a bright future for academic neurology. PMID:24616198

  14. Mentors' Ethical Perceptions: Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapira-Lishchinsky, Orly

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study attempts to describe mentors' perceptions of their ethical dilemmas, the derived mentor roles, and the ethical guidelines suggested by mentors, with reference to previous studies exploring the mentors' multifaceted roles. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 60 mentors participated in a two-phase study: the mentors were…

  15. When Email and Mentoring Unite: The Implementation of a Nationwide Electronic Mentoring Program--MentorNet, the National Electronic Industrial Mentoring Network for Women in Engineering and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Single, Peg Boyle; Muller, Carol B.

    Electronic mentoring (e-mentoring) programs are providing unprecedented opportunities for establishing mentoring relationships. E-mentoring is the merger of mentoring with electronic communications and links mentors with proteges independent of geography or scheduling constraints. In this case study, the authors apply a model of structured…

  16. Playing Scientist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    Engaging students in the study of genetics is essential to building a deep understanding of heredity, a core idea in the life sciences (NRC 2012). By integrating into the curriculum the stories of famous scientists who studied genetics (e.g., Mendel, Franklin, Watson, and Crick), teachers remind their students that science is a human endeavor.…

  17. Astronaut Richard M. Linnehan prepares to draw blood from astronaut Charles J. Brady.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-78 ONBOARD VIEW --- Astronaut Richard M. Linnehan prepares to draw blood from astronaut Charles J. Brady. The two mission specialists ultimately joined three other NASA astronauts and two international payload specialists for almost 17-days of research in the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS-1) Science Module in the Space Shuttle Columbias cargo bay. Part of a battery of metabolic studies, blood draws, along with fecal and urine samples of each crew member, are used to measure calcium loss and to determine how and where this loss occurs during spaceflight.

  18. Volunteer Mentor Training and Support: Three Perspectives Regarding the Knowledge and Abilities Needed for Effective Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Leslie G.

    2013-01-01

    A key factor in mentoring effectiveness and satisfaction is ensuring that mentor preparation training and ongoing support address needed mentor knowledge and abilities (MKAs). Knowing how to mentor is different from knowing what mentoring involves or knowing mentoring policies and procedures. Ideally, mentor training incorporates both the…

  19. Effective Mentoring: A Case for Training Mentors for Novice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagen, Linda; Bowie, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    Mentoring has been used in many professional-development settings to support individuals new to a profession. In particular, mentors are used in education and nursing to support new professionals who must meet the demands of a new position while managing the stresses of a new environment. When a mentor is asked to support a new professional, the…

  20. Mentoring Together: A Literature Review of Group Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huizing, Russell L.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have shown the benefits of mentoring in both personal and professional growth. It would seem that group mentoring would only enhance those benefits. This work represents a literature review of peer-reviewed articles and dissertations that contribute to the theory and research of group mentoring. This work reviews the articles that…

  1. Successful Mentoring for New Agents: Dedicated Mentors Make the Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Bruce P.; Smith, Keith L.

    1992-01-01

    In a survey of 58 mentors and 57 proteges who participated in the mentoring system for the Ohio Extension Service to determine their satisfaction with the program, 90 percent of the mentors and 70 percent of the proteges indicated a successful experience. (JOW)

  2. Critical Issues in Mentoring and Mentoring Program for Beginning Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganser, Tom; Bainer, Deborah L.; Bendixen-Noe, Mary; Brock, Barbara L.; Stinson, Anne D'Antonio; Giebelhaus, Carmen; Runyon, Charles Kent

    This collection of papers identifies critical issues in mentoring and mentoring programs. Paper 1, "Support Behaviors Among Teachers in Authentic Settings" (Deborah L. Bainer), discusses the following issues: (1) mentoring is just one of the types of support behaviors needed and practiced by teachers in elementary schools; (2) support networks…

  3. REFORMA/UCLA Mentor Program: A Mentoring Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauler, Sandra

    Although mentoring dates back to Greek mythology, the concept continues to thrive in today's society. Mentoring is a strategy that successful people have known about for centuries. The REFORMA/UCLA Mentor Program has made use of this strategy since its inception in November 1985 at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the…

  4. Enhancement of Mentor Selection Using the Ideal Mentor Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Gail L.

    2003-01-01

    Developed and validated the Ideal Mentor Scale (IMS), a new measure designed to help graduate students consider the qualities they as individuals most value in a potential mentor. Found that two universal qualities were central to students' definitions of a mentor: communication skills and provision of feedback. Three individual differences…

  5. The Mantle of a Mentor: The Mentor's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemberger, Dorothy

    The study described in this paper was conducted to examine mentoring from the mentor teachers' perspective and describe what it means to be a teacher leader in a profession long characterized as egalitarian. Three paths are followed in an effort to understand the mentor's perspective: (1) the current vacuum in instructional leadership; (2) the…

  6. Mentoring Trainee Teachers: How Can Mentors Use Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Tim

    2009-01-01

    This review explores ways in which the mentors of trainee teachers can use research as a means of questioning, understanding and improving their own practices. The first part presents an overview of empirical and theoretical research into mentoring relationships. The second part presents four ways in which mentors might engage with this…

  7. Campus Corps Therapeutic Mentoring: Making a Difference for Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddock, Shelly; Weiler, Lindsey; Krafchick, Jennifer; Zimmerman, Toni S.; McLure, Merinda; Rudisill, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    College student mentors are increasingly mentoring at-risk youth, yet little is known about the benefits that college students derive from their experience mentoring within the context of a service-learning course. This qualitative study used focus groups to examine college students' experiences as participants in a unique program, Campus…

  8. How Mentor Principals Interpret the Mentoring Process Using Metaphors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schechter, Chen; Firuz, Florit

    2015-01-01

    The study focused on how principal mentors perceived the mentoring process by means of the metaphors they used to represent it. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 18 principal mentors. Findings were analysed qualitatively, generating themes as an inductive process, grounded in the various metaphors articulated by participants.…

  9. Mentoring First Year Police Constables: Police Mentors' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Mark A.; McKenzie, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Mentoring as a tool for the support and development of novices in many organisations has been considered a putative success. Nevertheless, the literature reveals a paucity of reporting of the mentoring strategies used within the policing profession within Australia. This paper aims to focus on what mentoring is and how it is deployed from…

  10. Mentors' Perceptions on the Post Mentoring Relationships in Academic Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdem, Ferda; Ömüris, Ece

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study aims to reveal the new period of the relationships between the mentors and mentees who continue to work in the same academic organization after the mentoring relationship terminates. The findings of this study that was conducted in a small group of mentors who cultivated multiple mentees show that the separation phase did…

  11. Mentoring Human Performance - 12480

    SciTech Connect

    Geis, John A.; Haugen, Christian N.

    2012-07-01

    Although the positive effects of implementing a human performance approach to operations can be hard to quantify, many organizations and industry areas are finding tangible benefits to such a program. Recently, a unique mentoring program was established and implemented focusing on improving the performance of managers, supervisors, and work crews, using the principles of Human Performance Improvement (HPI). The goal of this mentoring was to affect behaviors and habits that reliably implement the principles of HPI to ensure continuous improvement in implementation of an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) within a Conduct of Operations framework. Mentors engaged with personnel in a one-on-one, or one-on-many dialogue, which focused on what behaviors were observed, what factors underlie the behaviors, and what changes in behavior could prevent errors or events, and improve performance. A senior management sponsor was essential to gain broad management support. A clear charter and management plan describing the goals, objectives, methodology, and expected outcomes was established. Mentors were carefully selected with senior management endorsement. Mentors were assigned to projects and work teams based on the following three criteria: 1) knowledge of the work scope; 2) experience in similar project areas; and 3) perceived level of trust they would have with project management, supervision, and work teams. This program was restructured significantly when the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) and the associated funding came to an end. The program was restructured based on an understanding of the observations, attributed successes and identified shortfalls, and the consolidation of those lessons. Mentoring the application of proven methods for improving human performance was shown effective at increasing success in day-to-day activities and increasing confidence and level of skill of supervisors. While mentoring program effectiveness is difficult to

  12. Mentoring matters: creating, connecting, empowering.

    PubMed

    McKinley, Mary G

    2004-01-01

    In the current chaotic healthcare environment, growth and development of nursing staff is essential to maintain quality outcomes. The purpose of this article is to highlight the concept of mentoring, explain the benefits of mentoring in fostering the development of novice nurses, and present a primer for how advanced practice nurses could implement a mentoring relationship. A three-step mentoring process of reflecting, reframing, and resolving is described with examples of implementation of these steps. PMID:15461037

  13. Virtual Mentoring of Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe music teachers' perceptions of the benefits and challenges they experienced as virtual mentors of preservice music teachers. Each mentor was assigned a cohort of preservice teachers who were enrolled in an elementary general music methods course. Cohorts observed their mentor's teaching via Skype. Mentors…

  14. A Training Guide for Mentors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smink, Jay

    This guide, which is intended as a primer for program coordinators responsible for managing and implementing mentor programs, explains what content should be included in mentoring programs and how that content should be organized to maintain volunteers' interest in mentoring. Discussed in section 1 are the following topics: job description for…

  15. Mentoring and Tutoring by Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodlad, Sinclair, Ed.

    This book provides an international, current account of the developments of mentoring and tutoring by students in tertiary and secondary education. Included are research reviews, case studies of mature projects, and ideas for new uses of student tutoring and mentoring. Chapter titles are as follows: "Students as Tutors and Mentors" (Sinclair…

  16. Selecting Mentors for Principalship Interns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geismar, Thomas J.; Morris, John D.; Lieberman, Mary G.

    2000-01-01

    An instrument for helping select mentors for principal interns was developed, using six clusters of basic, high- performing principal competencies and five clusters of mentoring traits. Based on a sample of 91 Broward County (Florida) principals, this method revealed important insights into identifying appropriate mentors for prospective…

  17. CARES: Mentoring through University Outreach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergerson, Amy Aldous; Petersen, Kari K.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether a university outreach program featuring peer mentoring and offering a social support network can impact college-going aspirations. Study participants were middle school students of color and low SES students and their university student mentors. Purposeful selection was used to identify six mentors and six proteges and…

  18. Cinematic Perspectives on Organizational Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Properly conceived and conducted, organizational mentoring can bestow benefits on the suppliant, the mentor and the firm. If prospective protégés assess the context of a mentoring relationship before they enter into one, they can enjoy a bonding experience that facilitates psychological satisfaction and furthers professional advancement. The movie…

  19. Statistical mentoring at early training and career stages

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.; Hamada, Michael S.; Moore, Leslie M.; Wendelberger, Joanne R.

    2016-06-27

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), statistical scientists develop solutions for a variety of national security challenges through scientific excellence, typically as members of interdisciplinary teams. At LANL, mentoring is actively encouraged and practiced to develop statistical skills and positive career-building behaviors. Mentoring activities targeted at different career phases from student to junior staff are an important catalyst for both short and long term career development. This article discusses mentoring strategies for undergraduate and graduate students through internships as well as for postdoctoral research associates and junior staff. Topics addressed include project selection, progress, and outcome; intellectual and social activitiesmore » that complement the student internship experience; key skills/knowledge not typically obtained in academic training; and the impact of such internships on students’ careers. Experiences and strategies from a number of successful mentorships are presented. Feedback from former mentees obtained via a questionnaire is incorporated. As a result, these responses address some of the benefits the respondents received from mentoring, helpful contributions and advice from their mentors, key skills learned, and how mentoring impacted their later careers.« less

  20. What Teaching Teaches: Mentoring and the Performance Gains of Mentors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Katie E.; Vala, Martin

    2009-05-01

    A peer mentoring program was added to an introductory chemistry course at a large university. The introductory chemistry course prepares students with little or no previous chemistry background to enter the mainstream general chemistry sequence and is part lecture and part small-group problem-solving. Faculty instructors are responsible for the lecture while peer mentors handle the group problem-solving portion. Peer mentors, recruited from previous introductory chemistry course, are chosen for their knowledge of the material and their helpfulness in group activities. While a number of studies on peer mentoring have reported the benefits to the mentored students, the present study looks at the benefits to the mentors. Grade enhancement in the main-stream general chemistry sequence, withdrawal rates, and number of additional chemistry courses taken by the mentors have been compared to under-prepared students who took the introductory chemistry course but did not serve as mentors and well-prepared students who did not need the introductory chemistry course. Our results show that mentors earned higher grades, withdrew from chemistry courses at a lower rate, and took more courses in chemistry than their counterparts. The enhanced achievement and retention of the mentors in chemistry suggests that programs that encourage under-prepared students to mentor are worthwhile endeavors.

  1. Combined geological and surface geochemical methods discover Agaritta and Brady Creek fields, Concho County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, D.F.; Burson, K.R.; Thompson, C.K. ); Brown, J.J. )

    1992-04-01

    From December 1987 to March 1991, 25 prospects in the lower King Sandstone (Upper Pennsylvanian Cisco) play in Concho County, Texas, were tested by several operators. They used combinations of subsurface geology, reconnaissance airborne gas sensing, surface radiometrics, soil magnetic susceptibility, and soil gas hydrocarbon measurements to define prospects. Six new King Sandstone field discoveries or extensions and three deeper pay Goen Limestone field discoveries resulted in a 36% exploratory success rate. The total exploration and development cost was approximately $0.67 per bbl of proven producing oil reserves. As examples, the authors present the discovery of Brady Creek and Agaritta fields. Agaritta field is one of the two largest of the new field discoveries with estimated proven producing recoverable reserves of 6,000,000 BO. Its discovery was based on a combination of (1) airborne hydrocarbon sensing, (2) interstitial soil gas hydrocarbon data, (3) soil magnetic susceptibility measurements, and (4) surface potassium and uranium concentrations measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. Interstitial soil gas hydrocarbon anomalies combined with soil magnetic susceptibility anomalies provided the best detailed surface guidance to Agaritta field. These were supported locally by radiometric anomalies. The Brady Creek field is interpreted to be a possible crevasse splay deposit. The Aggaritta field is interpreted to be a point bar deposit. Both fields are stratigraphic traps.

  2. Mentoring Peer Mentors: Mentor Education and Support in the Composition Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, E. Shelley

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author argues that teaching assistant (TA) peer mentoring programs need more formal support through well-articulated programmatic structures and through multifaceted mentor education that includes time for theorizing, practice, and reflection. In support of that claim, the author draws on mentoring scholarship as well as…

  3. Mentoring New Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetzlaff, Judie A.; Wagstaff, Imelda

    1999-01-01

    Describes an approach to mentoring new teachers in California's Conejo Valley Unified School District that addresses five phases of new teacher development, explaining that, although it is not as structured nor comprehensive an approach as the California Formative Assessment and Support System for Teachers (CFASST), it has clearly demonstrated…

  4. Thoughts on Teacher Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lataille, Louise M.

    2005-01-01

    Teacher mentoring programs have existed for only about a generation, but they are making a difference in the lives of young, not so young, and beginning or transitioning teachers. The prevailing financial crunch, increasing student enrollments, and escalating rates of teacher retirements are among current challenges facing all school systems.…

  5. Mentoring Latino School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magdaleno, Kenneth R.

    2006-01-01

    With the increasing number of Latina and Latino students in California schools, the need was clear for a mentoring program that not only increased the growth rate, but also supported the retention rate of Latina and Latino school superintendents and educational leaders. Such leaders are most often perceived by Latina and Latino students as…

  6. Mentoring Emotionally Sensitive Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.; Self, Elizabeth

    Mentoring individuals who are gifted, talented, and creative, but somewhat emotionally sensitive is a challenging and provocative arena. Several reasons individuals experience heightened sensitivity include: lack of nurturing, abuse, alcoholism in the family, low self-esteem, unrealistic parental expectations, and parental pressure to achieve.…

  7. Mentoring Faculty of Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Delar K.; Stoloff, David L.

    Minorities are underrepresented in the departments of education at institutions of higher learning. This underrepresentation is due to more attractive opportunities in other fields, rigorous promotion and tenure requirements, and isolation of minority professors. This paper asserts that cultivation of mentoring relationships between senior members…

  8. Peer Mentoring Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashman, Marinda; Colvin, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Because students starting college are not always prepared to succeed, colleges and universities frequently offer courses designed to help students who need remediation in mathematics, reading, and writing. At Utah Valley University (UVU), peer mentors are integrated into the University Student Success course to help first-year students learn the…

  9. The Rewards of Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green-Powell, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of knowledge exists which describes the rewards and importance of mentors in the professional development of young men and women, particularly with relation to their interactions in professional and organizational settings. Research in both educational settings and the workplace indicates that students and employees alike are more…

  10. Parent Mentor Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voluntary Interdistrict Coordinating Council, St. Louis, MO.

    Legal action opposing school segregation in St. Louis (Missouri) in the 1970s resulted in a plan to facilitate student transfer and transportation. The Parent Mentor Program was established to help parents acquire skills to work effectively with their children's schools. Through the program, parents are put in touch with other parents who are…

  11. Teacher Mentoring and Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sean

    2002-01-01

    This article briefly reviews research supporting the value of teacher mentoring programs for beginning and experienced teachers and reports on implementation efforts including Cincinnati's Peer Assistance and Evaluation Program, the Rhode Island Teachers & Technology Initiative, and programs at the University of Texas-El Paso and Iowa State…

  12. National CARES Mentoring Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Martin L.

    2013-01-01

    Harsh and cruel experiences have led many of our young to believe that they are alone in the world and that no one cares. In this article, Martin L Mitchell introduces us to the "National CARES Mentoring Movement" founded by Susan L.Taylor. This movement provides young people with role models who help shape their positive development.…

  13. Principal Mentoring: An Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Never before has the need for effective mentoring programs for principals been more urgent. Record student enrollment, an anticipated retirement of about 40 percent of principals, and a shrinking pool of those who aspire to be principals have brought about a shortage of principals and an alarming lack of qualified applicants. This research roundup…

  14. Mentoring Alex Bick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dieterle, Ed

    2005-01-01

    On February 10, 2004, Alex Bick contacted Chris Dede, the Timothy E. Wirth Professor of Learning Technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, seeking a mentor for his work to determine whether handheld computers regularly carried by high school students generally affect academic achievement. At the time, Bick was a 10th grader…

  15. Mentoring Special Youth Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britner, Preston A.; Balcazar, Fabricio E.; Blechman, Elaine A.; Blinn-Pike, Lynn; Larose, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Whereas mentoring programs are well received as support services, very little empirical research has been conducted to assess the effectiveness of these programs to meet the diverse needs of different special populations of youth. Potentially useful theoretical orientations (attachment, parental acceptance-rejection, social support, adult…

  16. Sustainable Scientists

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Evan

    2008-12-31

    Scientists are front and center in quantifying and solving environmental problems. Yet, as a spate of recent news articles in scientific journals point out, much can be done to enhance sustainability within the scientific enterprise itself, particularly by trimming the energy use associated with research facilities and the equipment therein (i,ii,iii, iv). Sponsors of research unwittingly spend on the order of $10 billion each year on energy in the U.S. alone, and the underlying inefficiencies drain funds from the research enterprise while causing 80 MT CO2-equivalent greenhouse-gas emissions (see Box). These are significant sums considering the opportunity costs in terms of the amount of additional research that could be funded and emissions that could be reduced if the underlying energy was used more efficiently. By following commercially proven best practices in facility design and operation, scientists--and the sponsors of science--can cost-effectively halve these costs, while doing their part to put society on alow-carbon diet.

  17. Mentoring Scaffoldings: Do They Promote College Access?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis, University of Southern California, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes what is known and what is not known about mentoring programs focused on youth and related to college-going. Several aspects of mentoring are reviewed so that the concept and some program variations--such as peer and adult mentors, informal and formal mentoring, compensated and uncompensated mentoring, one-to-one and group…

  18. 48 CFR 519.7006 - Mentor firms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mentor firms. 519.7006... PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS GSA Mentor-Protégé Program 519.7006 Mentor firms. (a) Mentors must be... plan as required by FAR 19.7 - Small business mentors are exempted; or (2) A small business...

  19. 48 CFR 519.7006 - Mentor firms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mentor firms. 519.7006... PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS GSA Mentor-Protégé Program 519.7006 Mentor firms. (a) Mentors must be... plan as required by FAR 19.7 - Small business mentors are exempted; or (2) A small business...

  20. 48 CFR 519.7006 - Mentor firms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mentor firms. 519.7006... PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS GSA Mentor-Protégé Program 519.7006 Mentor firms. (a) Mentors must be... plan as required by FAR 19.7 - Small business mentors are exempted; or (2) A small business...

  1. 48 CFR 519.7006 - Mentor firms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mentor firms. 519.7006... PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS GSA Mentor-Protégé Program 519.7006 Mentor firms. (a) Mentors must be... plan as required by FAR 19.7 - Small business mentors are exempted; or (2) A small business...

  2. 48 CFR 519.7006 - Mentor firms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mentor firms. 519.7006... PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS GSA Mentor-Protégé Program 519.7006 Mentor firms. (a) Mentors must be... plan as required by FAR 19.7 - Small business mentors are exempted; or (2) A small business...

  3. Teacher Mentoring as Professional Development. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huling, Leslie; Resta, Virginia

    Teacher mentoring programs have increased dramatically since the early 1980s as a vehicle to support and retain novice teachers. However, researchers and facilitators of mentoring programs are recognizing that mentors also derive substantial benefits from the mentoring experience. This digest examines research on how mentoring contributes to the…

  4. Girls' Success: Mentoring Guide for Life Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Mentoring girls is a challenge. Girls will come to mentors with hard questions and great hope. Mentoring is about building trust over a long period of time. If a mentor cares about the girls and follows through with the promises that he or she makes to them, a mentor will be successful in helping them to improve their lives. This "Guide" serves as…

  5. Mentoring: Sea Change or Athene's Deceit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hapeshi, Demetris; Gulam, William; Ahmed, Jalil; Zulfiqar, Mohsin

    1999-01-01

    Four case studies of mentor/student relationships show an organic model of mentoring among black educators in the United Kingdom that is an alternate to common conceptions of mentoring. This self-selecting and race-specific type of mentoring is not generally acknowledged or studied, but is related to classical types of mentoring in antiquity. (SLD)

  6. Coaching the Mentor: Facilitating Reflection and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Stephen P.; Brobeck, Sonja R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the process of coaching a mentor of experienced teachers. In particular, we sought to determine if coaching would help a mentor to compare her espoused beliefs about mentoring to her mentoring behaviors and possibly resolve any dissonance. The mentor and coach (the co-researchers) participated in a platform…

  7. Bullying, mentoring, and patient care.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Dorothea

    2014-05-01

    The literature suggests that acts of bullying are a root cause of new nurses leaving their units or the profession entirely and have the potential to worsen the nursing shortage. As an effective way to address bullying in the perioperative setting, mentoring benefits the nursing profession. Mentoring can have a direct influence on nurses' longevity in a health care organization, thereby strengthening the nursing workforce. Magnet-designated hospitals support the importance of mentor-mentee relationships for positive employee retention and positive recruitment outcomes. One of the most important tasks that a mentor should undertake is that of a role model. Establishing a culture of mentoring requires authentic leadership, genuine caring and respect for employees, and open communication. The entire nursing profession benefits from a culture of mentoring, as do the patients and families who receive care. PMID:24766920

  8. Successfully Mentoring Tomorrows' Geoscience Leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocerino, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Geological Society of America (GSA) has been running a successful mentor program for the last fifteen years. Each year approximately 1500 students and 400 mentors take part in one of five programs that are run in various formats; including small-scale regional programs that offer a low student-to-mentor ratio, large scale luncheon programs that are driven by student questions and receptions that feature presentations along with a Q&A session. The mentor volunteers-from private and public businesses and government agencies-represent a broad range of backgrounds, education, and experience. The students connect with these mentors to discuss their current scholarly pursuits and/or their future employment. Both mentors and students leave these events expressing feelings of personal and professional growth, and historically several students find full or part time work as a result of these programs each year.

  9. Mentoring Faculty in Academic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pololi, Linda; Knight, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss an alternative structure and a broader vision for mentoring of medical faculty. While there is recognition of the need for mentoring for professional advancement in academic medicine, there is a dearth of research on the process and outcomes of mentoring medical faculty. Supported by the literature and our experience with both formal dyadic and group peer mentoring programs as part of our federally funded National Center of Leadership in Academic Medicine, we assert that a group peer, collaborative mentoring model founded on principles of adult education is one that is likely to be an effective and predictably reliable form of mentoring for both women and men in academic medicine. PMID:16117759

  10. Multilevel approach to mentoring in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonine, K. E.; Dontsova, K.; Pavao-Zuckerman, M.; Paavo, B.; Hogan, D.; Oberg, E.; Gay, J.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation focuses on different types of mentoring for students participating in Research Experiences for Undergraduates programs with examples, including some new approaches, from The Environmental and Earth Systems Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program at Biosphere 2. While traditional faculty mentors play essential role in students' development as researchers and professionals, other formal and informal mentoring can be important component of the REU program and student experiences. Students receive mentoring from program directors, coordinators, and on site undergraduate advisors. While working on their research projects, REU students receive essential support and mentoring from undergraduate and graduate students and postdoctoral scientists in the research groups of their primary mentors. Cohort living and group activities give multiple opportunities for peer mentoring where each student brings their own strengths and experiences to the group. Biosphere 2 REU program puts strong emphasis on teaching students to effectively communicate their research to public. In order to help REUs learn needed skills the outreach personnel at Biosphere 2 mentor and advise students both in groups and individually, in lecture format and by personal example, on best outreach approaches in general and on individual outreach projects students develop. To further enhance and strengthen outreach mentoring we used a novel approach of blending cohort of REU students with the Cal Poly STAR (STEM Teacher And Researcher) Program fellows, future K-12 STEM teachers who are gaining research experience at Biosphere 2. STAR fellows live together with the REU students and participate with them in professional development activities, as well as perform research side by side. Educational background and experiences gives these students a different view and better preparation and tools to effectively communicate and adapt science to lay audiences, a challenge commonly facing

  11. Mentoring the entrepreneur.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C K

    1998-01-01

    Increasingly, nurse administrators are experiencing less of match between what they want in their careers and what contemporary health care organizations have to offer them, pursuing instead a variety of entrepreneurial ventures. The decision to strike out on one's own must consider current performance strengths and weaknesses, tolerance for uncertainty and potential opportunities for business development. Working with a mentor is one way to assure that the right questions about this important life decision have been asked and answered. PMID:9505699

  12. Pathways to URM Retention: IBP's Professional Development and Mentoring Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Ricciardi, L.; Detrick, L.; Siegfried, D.; Fauver, A.; Ithier-Guzman, W.; Thomas, S. H.; Valaitis, S.

    2013-05-01

    As a not for profit organization, the Institute for Broadening Participation (IBP) hosts a variety of initiatives designed to increase the retention of underrepresented minority (URM) students pursuing pathways in STEM. IBP also assists with formative program evaluation design and implementation to help strengthen URM recruitment and retention elements. Successful initiatives include virtual and face-to-face components that bring together URM students with established URM and other scientists in academia, government and industry. These connections provide URMs with mentoring, networking opportunities, and professional skill development contributing to an improved retention rate of URM students. IBP's initiatives include the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative (NASA OSSI), Pathways to Ocean Science and Engineering, and the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S) in Earth System Science (ESS) Professional Development Program. The NASA OSSI recruits and facilitates student engagement in NASA education and employment opportunities. Pathways to Ocean Science connects and supports URM students with Ocean Science REU programs and serves as a resource for REU program directors. Pathways to Engineering has synthesized mentoring resources into an online mentoring manual for URM students that has been extensively vetted by mentoring experts throughout the country. The mentoring manual, which is organized by roles, provides undergraduates, graduates, postdocs, faculty and project directors with valuable resources. MS PHD'S, one of IBP's longest running and most successful initiatives, focuses on increasing the retention rate of URM students receiving advanced degrees in ESS. The program addresses barriers to retention in ESS including isolation, lack of preparation and professional development, and lack of mentoring. Program activities center on peer-to-peer community building, professional development exercises, networking experiences, one

  13. Deriving competencies for mentors of clinical and translational scholars.

    PubMed

    Abedin, Zainab; Biskup, Ewelina; Silet, Karin; Garbutt, Jane M; Kroenke, Kurt; Feldman, Mitchell D; McGee, Richard; Fleming, Michael; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2012-06-01

    Although the importance of research mentorship has been well established, the role of mentors of junior clinical and translational science investigators is not clearly defined. The authors attempt to derive a list of actionable competencies for mentors from a series of complementary methods. We examined focus groups, the literature, competencies derived for clinical and translational scholars, mentor training curricula, mentor evaluation forms and finally conducted an expert panel process in order to compose this list. These efforts resulted in a set of competencies that include generic competencies expected of all mentors, competencies specific to scientists, and competencies that are clinical and translational research specific. They are divided into six thematic areas: (1) Communication and managing the relationship, (2) Psychosocial support, (3) Career and professional development, (4) Professional enculturation and scientific integrity, (5) Research development, and (6) Clinical and translational investigator development. For each thematic area, we have listed associated competencies, 19 in total. For each competency, we list examples that are actionable and measurable. Although a comprehensive approach was used to derive this list of competencies, further work will be required to parse out how to apply and adapt them, as well future research directions and evaluation processes. PMID:22686206

  14. Mentoring: dentistry's fountain of youth.

    PubMed

    Certosimo, Fred

    2014-01-01

    A mentor's principal purpose is to help develop the qualities that another individual (protégé or mentee) needs to attain his or her professional goals. Mentors provide their protege with knowledge, advice, counsel, support, and the opportunity to better position themselves to attain success in the dental profession. They help their mentee's "learn the ropes" and attain the wisdom only a seasoned veteran can pass along about the fundamental assumptions and values of a profession's culture. Mentoring is not a science, but an art-it is often important not merely knowing what to say, but how and when to say it. The mentor and the mentee have different professional goals, and to compound the relationship, both present with varied life experiences and in many cases, from diverse cultures. Wise mentors must be sensitive to the individuality of their protege and offer wisdom, judgment, resilience, and independence in a custom-tailored manner. Lastly, mentoring is not professional therapy and counseling. Mentors are different from role models. However, despite the many opportunities and potential setbacks, if done properly, the benefits of the mentoring relationship can last a lifetime for both the mentor and the mentee. PMID:25080671

  15. Mentoring: dentistry's fountain of youth.

    PubMed

    Certosimo, Fred

    2014-09-01

    A mentor's principal purpose is to help develop the qualities that another individual (protégé or mentee) needs to attain his or her professional goals. Mentors provide their protégés with knowledge, advice, counsel, support, and the opportunity to better position themselves to attain success in the dental profession. They help their mentees "learn the ropes" and attain the wisdom only a seasoned veteran can pass along about the fundamental assumptions and values of a profession's culture. Mentoring is not a science, but an art--it is often important not merely knowing what to say, but how and when to say it. The mentor and the mentee have different professional goals and, to compound the relationship, both present with varied life experiences and, in many cases, from diverse cultures. Wise mentors must be sensitive to the individuality of their protégés and offer wisdom, judgment, resilience, and independence in a custom-tailored manner. Lastly, mentoring is not professional therapy and counseling. Mentors are different from role models. However, despite the many opportunities and potential setbacks, if done properly, the benefits of the mentoring relationship can last a lifetime for both the mentor and the mentee. PMID:25306827

  16. The Role of Early Career Scientists Working in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keys, Philip M.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports on the strategies that regional science teachers found useful when early career scientists--tertiary science students were employed as peer mentors in their science classroom with indigenous and non-indigenous Year 7-10 students. Teachers engaged in a participatory action research to define the role of the early career…

  17. Youth Mentoring Relationships in Context: Mentor Perceptions of Youth, Environment, and the Mentor Role

    PubMed Central

    Lakind, Davielle; Atkins, Marc; Eddy, J. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Youth mentoring is primarily understood as a relationship between mentor and mentee, yet mentors often enter into home, school, and other community settings associated with youth they serve, and interact regularly with other people in mentees’ lives. Understanding how and why mentors negotiate their role as they do remains underexplored, especially in relation to these environmental elements. This qualitative study drew on structured interviews conducted with professional mentors (N = 9) serving youth at risk for adjustment problems to examine how mentors’ perceptions of their mentees and mentee environments informed their sense of how they fulfilled the mentoring role. Mentors commonly characterized problems youth displayed as byproducts of adverse environments, and individual-level strengths as existing “in spite of” environmental inputs. Perceptions of mentees and their environments informed mentors’ role conceptualizations, with some mentors seeing themselves as antidotes to environmental adversity. Mentors described putting significant time and effort into working closely with other key individuals as well as one-on-one with mentees because they identified considerable environmental need; however, extra-dyadic facets of their roles were far less clearly defined or supported. They described challenges associated with role overload and opaque role boundaries, feeling unsupported by other adults in mentees’ lives, and frustrated by the prevalence of risks. Community-based mentoring represents a unique opportunity to connect with families, but mentors must be supported around the elements of their roles that extend beyond mentor-mentee relationships in order to capitalize more fully on the promise of the intervention. PMID:25866427

  18. Uncovering Contents of Mentor Teachers' Interactive Cognitions during Mentoring Dialogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennissen, Paul; Crasborn, Frank; Brouwer, Niels; Korthagen, Fred; Bergen, Theo

    2010-01-01

    In the context of developing mentor teachers' use of supervisory skills, two consecutive studies were conducted, using stimulated recall. Firstly, with eight participants, an instrument was developed to categorize contents of interactive cognitions. Secondly, with 30 participants, the instrument was applied to uncover contents of mentor teachers'…

  19. The Impact of Mentor Education: Does Mentor Education Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulvik, Marit; Sunde, Eva

    2013-01-01

    To gain a deeper understanding of mentor preparation, which is still an underdeveloped area, the current paper focuses on a formal mentor education programme offered to teachers in secondary school at a university in Norway. The research questions in this qualitative study examine why teachers participate in the programme, how they perceive the…

  20. Mentoring Prospective Principals: Determinants of Productive Mentor-Mentee Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schechter, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Mentoring contributes to prospective principals' growth, easing their transition from the role of teacher to that of administrator. This article reports findings from a study aimed at examining the determinant factors affecting the mentor-mentee relationship in a uniquely designed principal preparation program in New York City. The study…

  1. Colorblind Mentoring? Exploring White Faculty Mentoring of Students of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Dorian L.; Winkle-Wagner, Rachelle; Luedke, Courtney L.

    2015-01-01

    In this critical multisite case study we examined the concept of colorblind mentoring. Using Bonilla-Silva's Colorblind Racism Frames, we sought to understand White faculty members' perspectives on their mentoring of Students of Color. The findings revealed that White faculty members often engage with students from a "colorblind…

  2. Integrating Mentoring with Curriculum: Mentor Leadership Programs for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Student "Mentor" and "Leadership" Programs impact the climate and culture of schools. Students are capable of outstanding leadership when given the opportunities and constructs to be successful. The evidence is clear that those schools that embrace student leadership and mentor programs have more positive events, activities,…

  3. Mentoring Female Entrepreneurs: A Mentors' Training Intervention Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarri, Katerina K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of a mentor training intervention for experienced entrepreneurs in order to support and advise new and early stage female entrepreneurs in an attempt to enrich the limited literature of empirical data in the area of mentor training intervention assessment.…

  4. From Mentoring to Co-Mentoring: Establishing Collaborative Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochan, Frances K.; Trimble, Susan B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a collaborative mentoring relationship between a graduate student and the director of a university laboratory school, which grew as they became college professors. The mentoring relationship provides opportunities for them to develop dispositions and abilities that are important in strengthening their capacities to grow personally and…

  5. Mentoring as Professional Development: "Growth for Both" Mentor and Mentee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Teachers need professional development to keep current with teaching practices, although costs for extensive professional development can be prohibitive across an education system. Mentoring provides one way for embedding cost-effective professional development. This mixed-method study includes surveying mentor teachers ("n" = 101) on a…

  6. Learning to Be a More Effective Research Mentor for Your Trainees: Undergraduates to Post-docs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Eric; Mathieu, R.; Pfund, C.; Branchaw, J.; UW-Madison Research Mentor Training Development Team

    2010-01-01

    How do you effectively mentor individuals at different stages of their careers? Can you learn to become a more effective mentor through training? Does one size fit all? Are you ready to address the NSF's new requirement about mentoring post-docs in your next proposal? For many academics, typical answers to these questions include, "I try to make adjustments based on the trainee, but I don't have a specific plan” "Yeah, I'd better start thinking about that” and "There's training?” Scientists often are not trained for their crucial role of mentoring the next generation. The University of Wisconsin-Madison has developed, field tested, and publically released research mentor training materials for several STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) disciplines, including astronomy, to help fill this gap and improve the educational experience and ultimate success of research trainees at several career stages, from high school students to post-doctoral scholars. While initially aimed at the mentoring of undergraduate researchers at research extensive institutions, the topics are broad enough (e.g., expectations, communication, understanding, diversity, ethics, independence) to be applicable to mentoring in a wide range of project-based educational activities. Indeed, these materials have been modified, only modestly, to prepare graduate students and undergraduates to mentor high school students. In this session, we will describe the UW-Madison research mentor training seminar and illustrate how the training can be adapted and implemented. We will introduce an interactive "shopping cart” style website which allows users to obtain the materials and instructions on how to run the program at their institution. Most of the session will be devoted to an interactive implementation of elements of research mentor training using small discussion groups. Participants will experience the training seminar in practice, come face-to-face with some common mentoring

  7. Becoming a More Effective Research Mentor for Your Trainees: Undergraduates to Post-docs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Eric J.; Mathieu, R.; Pfund, C.; Branchaw, J.; UW-Madison Research Mentor Training Development Team

    2010-05-01

    How do you effectively mentor individuals at different stages of their careers? Can you learn to become a more effective mentor through training? Does one size fit all? Are you ready to address the NSF's new requirement about mentoring post-docs in your next proposal? For many academics, typical answers to these questions include, "I try to make adjustments based on the trainee, but I don't have a specific plan” "Yeah, I'd better start thinking about that” and "There's training?” Scientists often are not trained for their crucial role of mentoring the next generation. The University of Wisconsin-Madison has developed, field tested, and publicly released research mentor training materials for several STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) disciplines, including astronomy, to help fill this gap and improve the educational experience and ultimate success of research trainees at several career stages, from high school students to post-doctoral scholars. While initially aimed at the mentoring of undergraduate researchers at research extensive institutions, the topics are broad enough (e.g., expectations, communication, understanding, diversity, ethics, independence) to be applicable to mentoring in a wide range of project-based educational activities. Indeed, these materials have been modified, only modestly, to prepare graduate students and undergraduates to mentor high school students. In this session, we will describe the UW-Madison research mentor training seminar and illustrate how the training can be adapted and implemented. We will introduce an interactive "shopping cart” style website which allows users to obtain the materials and instructions on how to run the program at their institution. Most of the session will be devoted to an interactive implementation of elements of research mentor training using small discussion groups. Participants will experience the training seminar in practice, come face-to-face with some common mentoring

  8. Rejuvenating clinician-scientist training.

    PubMed

    Ambati, Balamurali K; Cahoon, Judd

    2014-03-01

    Clinician-scientists are becoming increasingly rare in medicine as a whole, but especially in ophthalmology. There is a structural gap between MD-PhD training and K-series awards where interested candidates go through residency and fellowship without any structured research exposure or involvement. Furthermore, the success rate of the MD-PhD and K awards leaves much to be desired. The authors propose a redeployment of training resources to reconfigure residency and fellowship training programs for interested candidates with sufficient additional time for a credible research project, augmented salary, and sound mentoring. Opportunities for research training in nontraditional pathways to diversify skill sets and build interdisciplinary teams also would be a prime objective of this novel "Learn-and-Earn" approach. PMID:24681976

  9. Mentoring in the Art Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Denise; Mitchell, Timothy; Taylor, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Mentoring in classrooms allows teachers the opportunity to be motivational tools in the lives of students while operating as role models. The current research shows that mentoring in the art classroom provides stimulation and the momentum to students who are less motivated with creative assignments. The first part of this study looks at the…

  10. Re-Thinking Mentoring Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kealy, William A.; Mullen, Carol A.

    In this paper, the authors view mentorship not as the traditional one-to-one relationship between mentor and mentee, but "from the next scale up" as a large systematic collection of mentor-mentee pairs. This concept, borrowed from the graphic arts and called "macro-mentorship," is adopted as a means for obtaining new insights about traditional…

  11. Mentoring. Information Capsule. Volume 0603

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Christie

    2006-01-01

    Mentoring is a structured one-on-one relationship between an adult and youth that focuses on the needs of the youth, providing him or her with support, guidance, and assistance. This information capsule summarizes research findings on the impact of mentoring on factors such as academic achievement, social behaviors, attitudes, drug and alcohol…

  12. Rural Alaska Mentoring Project (RAMP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cash, Terry

    2011-01-01

    For over two years the National Dropout Prevention Center (NDPC) at Clemson University has been supporting the Lower Kuskokwim School District (LKSD) in NW Alaska with their efforts to reduce high school dropout in 23 remote Yup'ik Eskimo villages. The Rural Alaska Mentoring Project (RAMP) provides school-based E-mentoring services to 164…

  13. About Empire State College Mentors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, A. Paul, Jr.; Adamson, Judith

    This document reports demographic information about mentors, the faculty of Empire State College (ESC), a new, nontraditional college without a campus of the State University of New York. Results show ESC mentors statistically like any faculty, though perhaps more oriented to private education than most state college faculties and more varied in…

  14. Developing Peer Mentoring through Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Ralph; Jaugietis, Zarni

    2011-01-01

    Peer mentoring programs are an important component in the strategy to enhance the first year undergraduate experience. The operation of these programs needs to be informed by evidence as to their effectiveness. In this article we report on a six-year study of the development of a peer mentoring program in which feedback is used to improve program…

  15. Cross-Race Faculty Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Christine A.; Lincoln, Yvonna S.

    2005-01-01

    There are many synonyms for the word "mentor": coach, guide, role model, peer advisor, and sponsor, among others. The plethora of terms would suggest that we know something about this role, but most of the research on mentoring has been conducted in business and industry rather than in education. In fact, junior and senior faculty and…

  16. Mentor Program Provides STEM Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-alim, Jamaal

    2011-01-01

    The ACE Mentor Program provides early career exposure, mentoring, and scholarships to high school students in an attempt to encourage them to enter one of the three fields that make up the ACE acronym: (1) architecture; (2) construction; and (3) engineering. Founded in 1993 by longtime engineering consultant Charles Thornton, the program is…

  17. Executive Mentoring: Myths, Issues, Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertz, Norma; And Others

    Mentoring is defined as the process of developing people in organizations. Successful mentoring occurs when top-level executives teach selected junior persons the rules of the game; provide opportunities for them to demonstrate their skill; challenge them; give them critical performance feedback; and sponsor them into higher level positions. This…

  18. A Protege's Guide to Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Susan

    1994-01-01

    Faculty participation in NASSP's Mentoring and Coaching program has positively influenced student-faculty relations in the Department of Educational Leadership at Florida State University. Proteges can arrange successful mentorships if they clarify needs and expectations, are time-conscious, respect and appreciate their mentors, maintain a dialog,…

  19. Mentoring: Contemporary Principles and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bey, Theresa M., Ed.; Holmes, C. Thomas, Ed.

    In the spirit of educational reform efforts, an initiative exists to restructure the education of teachers through collaborative action, using mentoring to build alliances. This monograph, based on contemporary principles and issues of mentoring, presents ways to conceptualize the professional preparation and development of teachers. Following a…

  20. From Traditional to Virtual Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, James J.; Olinger, Jennifer

    The tradition of a mentoring relationship is embedded in a personal/business relationship between a wise teacher and someone who needs to learn a trade. Learning sessions have occurred over the years in many types of settings, including one-on-one mentoring, conferences, meetings, telephone, and fax. As society looks to technology as a vital…

  1. Mentoring Program Practices and Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Amy W.; Sullivan, Judith A.

    1995-01-01

    Philadelphia's Sponsor-a-Scholar program pairs high school students with adults who guide them in preparing for the future. The program shows that there is little certainty about what constitutes best practice; that the complex task of mentoring requires a gamut of skills; and that support services for both mentors and proteges are essential. (SK)

  2. PUENTE Project: The Mentor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maestas-Flores, Margarita; Chavez, Mauro

    This manual was developed for individuals serving as mentors in Evergreen Valley College's PUENTE Project, a program which integrates the skills of an English teacher, a Hispanic counselor, and Hispanic professionals/mentors into a team structure in an attempt to assist Hispanic students in making academic improvements, to build self-confidence,…

  3. An Exploration of the Relationships between Mentor Recruitment, the Implementation of Mentoring, and Mentors' Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasser-Abu Alhija, Fadia; Fresko, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Mentoring of new teachers is generally examined from the viewpoint of the mentees. In the present study, mentoring is explored based on reports from mentors within the context of the Israeli induction program. Recruitment variables (selection and training) were examined in relation to mentoring implementation (frequency, initiation, regularity,…

  4. Mentors Providing Challenge and Support: Integrating Concepts from Teacher Mentoring in Education and Organizational Mentoring in Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Rajashi

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews and critiques the literature on mentoring functions and roles in education and business to inform the use of mentoring as a developmental tool in both fields. Specifically, in an effort to expand the current notions of the different mentor roles, this review synthesizes studies exploring teacher mentoring in schools and…

  5. Developing a Scientist: A retrospective look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Gail; Taylor, Amy; Forrester, Jennifer H.

    2011-08-01

    Although one of the goals of science education is to educate and nurture the next generation of scientists and engineers, there is limited research that investigates the pathway from childhood to becoming a scientist. This study examined the reflections of 37 scientists and engineers about their in- and out-of-school experiences as well as their memories of significant people who may have influenced their careers. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted and the interview transcripts were analyzed for potential influences on career decisions. Analysis showed several commonalities in participants' reported experiences that influenced career decisions in science and engineering. Informal advising and mentoring by teachers and family members were noted as important. Across participants, tinkering, building models, and exploring science independently in and out of school were viewed as factors that influenced interests in science and engineering. Implications of these results for formal and informal educational programs are discussed.

  6. College Women Mentoring Adolescent Girls: The Relationship between Mentor Peer Support and Mentee Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Jenna H.; Lawrence, Edith C.; Peugh, James

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effectiveness of peer support for college women mentors who engaged in one-to-one and group mentoring with at-risk adolescent girls. Using data from 162 mentoring pairs, results suggested that mentor support positively predicted mentees' self-reported improvement after a year of mentoring. An examination of…

  7. Evidence of Mentor Learning and Development: An Analysis of New Zealand Mentor/Mentee Professional Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langdon, Frances J.

    2014-01-01

    While studies have shown that mentoring is essential to the development of new teachers, fewer investigations have examined what mentors learn about themselves and about mentoring through this role. In this study, the conversations between 13 mentors and their mentees were analysed, along with mentor self-evaluations and focus group data, over two…

  8. Looking for Professor Right: Mentee Selection of Mentors in a Formal Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Amani; Treleaven, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    Finding a suitable mentor is crucial to the success of mentoring relationships. In the mentoring literature, however, there is conflicting evidence about the best ways to support the pairing process in organisational mentoring programs. This paper presents a detailed analysis of the pairing process in an academic mentoring program that has…

  9. College Student Mentors and Latino Youth: A Qualitative Study of the Mentoring Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoche, Lisa L.; Zamboanga, Byron L.

    2006-01-01

    This phenomenological study describes the meaning of mentoring relationships from the perspectives of six purposefully selected mentors involved in the Latino Achievement Mentoring Program (LAMP), and investigates underlying themes regarding the mentors' relationships. Clusters of themes pertaining to the mentors' relationship with the mentee, the…

  10. Career Benefits Associated with Mentoring for Mentors: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Rajashi; Reio, Thomas G., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Mentoring has been studied extensively as it is linked to protege career development and growth. Recent mentoring research is beginning to acknowledge however that mentors also can accrue substantial benefits from mentoring. A meta-analysis was conducted where the provision of career, psychosocial and role modeling mentoring support were…

  11. Connecting Theory and Practice in Mentor Preparation: Mentoring for the Improvement of Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Sylvia Yee Fan; Choi, Pik Lin

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the theory-and-practice connection model in mentor preparation in the context of two mentor preparation programmes in Hong Kong. The 30- and the 60-hour mentoring support development (MSD) programmes share a common conceptualization of mentoring--with the improvement of teaching and learning as the core of mentoring--yet they…

  12. E-Mentoring for New Principals: A Case Study of a Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Erin D.

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive case study includes both new principals and their mentor principals engaged in e-mentoring activities. This study examines the components of a school district's mentoring program in order to make sense of e-mentoring technology. The literature review highlights mentoring practices in education, and also draws upon e-mentoring…

  13. The UCSC Institute for Scientist & Engineer Educators: Supporting Multi-Level STEM Workforce Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Mark; Castori, Pam

    2014-01-01

    The Institute for Scientist & Engineer Educators (ISEE) is a national effort to improve STEM education and workforce development by transforming how the next generation of scientists and engineers teach and mentor. Housed at the University of California, Santa Cruz, ISEE is the legacy of the educational side of the Center for Adaptive Optics…

  14. The Benefits of Mentoring for Female Lawyers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Jean E.

    2001-01-01

    A study of 512 Canadian lawyers included 231 women (66% had mentors). Mentors influenced women's success in terms of earnings, promotions, procedural justice, social integration, and career satisfaction. Females with male mentors earned significantly more; females with male mentors had more satisfaction, less work-nonwork conflict, and more…

  15. Mentoring Student-Teacher Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heung-Ling, Yip

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated dimensions in the mentoring relationships that foster or impede the mentoring process between four kindergarten principals and four student teachers in Hong Kong. Findings support the view that relationship building is critical in the mentoring process. Dimensions that may sustain an effective mentoring relationship appear…

  16. Forming the Mentor-Mentee Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A positive mentor-mentee relationship is essential for the mentee's development of teaching practices. As mentors can hold the balance of power in the relationship with preservice teachers, how do mentors develop positive mentor-mentee relationships? This multi-case study involved: (a) written responses from over 200 teachers involved in a…

  17. Identifying Mentors' Observations for Providing Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mentors' feedback can assist preservice teachers' development; yet feedback tends to be variable from one mentor to the next. What do mentors observe for providing feedback? In this study, 24 mentors observed a final-year preservice teacher through a professionally video-recorded lesson and provided written notes for feedback. They observed the…

  18. Supporting Mentors. Technical Assistance Packet #6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jucovy, Linda

    This technical assistance packet is intended as a guide for those who develop programs in support of mentors of youth. It offers guidance to help mentors build trusting relationships with their mentees, and, ultimately, contribute to positive outcomes for the children and youth in the mentoring program. Successful mentoring programs provide…

  19. A Model for Mentoring University Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumpkin, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Operational characteristics for successful mentoring programs of new university faculty include clarity of purpose of the program, methods for matching mentors and proteges, mentor training, mentor-protege relationship building, and program effectiveness assessment. Strengths of formal, informal, peer, group or consortia, intra-departmental,…

  20. Understanding E-Mentoring in Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Carol B.

    2009-01-01

    As new forms of electronic communication have emerged with increasing speed in recent years, opportunities for online learning, including mentoring, have taken on many new dimensions. Mentoring relationships now almost always extend beyond traditional face-to-face mentoring, and mentoring programs supported by technological advances have developed…

  1. HeLIN Pilot Mentoring Scheme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brice, Anne; Brown, Cathryn; Hickman, Marie; Thorburn, Lis

    2002-01-01

    Describes a pilot mentoring program at the Health Libraries and Information Network (HeLIN) at the University of Oxford that was designed to increase understanding of mentoring for continuing professional and personal development; to investigate existing mentoring schemes; to incorporate a program for accreditation of mentors; and to evaluate the…

  2. Opening Doors: Mentoring on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper describes the computerized mentoring program of Project DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) at the University of Washington. Introductory material notes the origins of the mentoring concept and the value of DO-IT mentors to their proteges. The program centers on providing mentoring via the Internet…

  3. Selecting and Retaining Teacher Mentors. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullinix, Bonnie B.

    This digest examines considerations and strategies for selecting and retaining teacher mentors, suggesting that the degree to which mentors are meaningfully engaged in the mentoring process may have a significant impact on a program's success. Strategies for recruiting mentors range from opportunistic appointment to promoting self-nomination to…

  4. Virtual Mentoring: Developing Global Leaders for Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohlson, Matthew; Froman, Russell

    2012-01-01

    CAMP (Collegiate Achievement Mentoring Program) Gator is a leadership-mentoring program in which collegiate student leaders serve as mentors to at-risk K-12 students. In addition, partnerships with Cisco and Franklin Covey Education have provided the program with the technology resources to conduct "virtual leadership mentoring" sessions with…

  5. A Developmental Model of Research Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revelo, Renata A.; Loui, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    We studied mentoring relationships between undergraduate and graduate students in a summer undergraduate research program, over three years. Using a grounded theory approach, we created a model of research mentoring that describes how the roles of the mentor and the student can change. Whereas previous models of research mentoring ignored student…

  6. Evaluating a nurse mentor preparation programme.

    PubMed

    Gray, Olivia; Brown, Donna

    Following the introduction of a regional nurse mentor preparation programme, research was undertaken within a health and social care trust to explore both the trainee mentors' and their supervisors' perception of this new programme. A qualitative study involving focus groups was undertaken. The focus groups comprised a total of twelve participants including five trainee mentors and seven supervisors (experienced mentors) who had recently completed a mentor preparation programme. Data were analysed using Braun and Clarke's thematic analysis. Three themes were identified from the data: personal investment (including the emotional impact of mentoring) contextual perceptions (environmental factors such as time) and intellectual facets (related to personal and professional growth). Comprehensive preparation for mentors appears to be effective in developing mentors with the ability to support nursing students in practice. However, further study is required to explore how to support mentors to balance the demands of the mentoring role with the delivery of patient care. PMID:26911167

  7. Combined geological and surface geochemical methods discovered Agaritta and Brady Creek Fields, Concho County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, D.F.; Burson, K.R.; Thompson, C.K. ); Brown, J.J. )

    1993-07-01

    From December 1987 to March 1991, 25 prospects in the lower King sand (Upper Pennsylvanian Cisco) play in Concho County, Texas, were tested by several operators. They used combinations of subsurface geology, reconnaissance airborne gas sensing, surface radiometrics, soil magnetic susceptibility, and soil-gas hydrocarbon measurements to define prospects. Six new King sand discoveries or extensions and three deeper Goen discoveries resulted in a 36% exploratory success rate. The total exploration and development cost was approximately $0.67/bbl of proven producing oil reserves. Final locations for the discovery wells on each of the nine successful prospects were selected primarily on the basis of combined subsurface geology and surface geochemical data. As examples, we present information about the discovery of Brady Creek and Agaritta fields. Agaritta field is one of the two largest of the new-field discoveries, with estimated proven producing recoverable reserves of 6 million bbl of oil. Its discovery was based on a combination of (1) regional subsurface geologic projection, (2) airborne hydrocarbon sensing, (3) interstitial soil-gas hydrocarbon data, (4) soil magnetic-susceptibility measurements, and (5) surface potassium and uranium concentrations measured by gamma-ray spectrometry.

  8. Seasonal growth and lipid storage of the circumglobal, subantarctic copepod, Neocalanus tonsus (Brady)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohman, Mark D.; Bradford, Janet M.; Jillett, John B.

    1989-09-01

    Neocalanus tonsus (Brady) was sampled between October 1984 and September 1985 in the upper 1000 m of the water column off southeastern New Zealand. The apparent spring growth increment of copepodid stage V (CV) differed depending upon the constituent considered: dry mass increased 208 μg, carbon 162 μg, wax esters 143 μg, but nitrogen only 5 μg. Sterols and phospholipids remained relatively constant over this interval. Wax esters were consistently the dominant lipid class present in CV's, increasing seasonally from 57 to 90% of total lipids. From spring to winter, total lipid content of CV's increased from 22 to 49% of dry mass. Nitrogen declined from 10.9 to 5.4% of CV dry mass as storage compounds (wax esters) increased in importance relative to structural compounds. Egg lipids were 66% phospholipids. Upon first appearance of males and females in deep water in winter, lipid content and composition did not differ from co-occuring CV's, confirming the importance of lipids rather than particulate food as an energy source for deep winter reproduction of this species. Despite contrasting life histories, N. tonsus and subarctic Pacific Neocalanus plumchrus CV's share high lipid content, a predominance of wax esters over triacylglycerols as storage lipids, and similar wax ester fatty acid and fatty alcohol composition.

  9. Twelve tips for developing effective mentors.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Subha; Gruppen, Larry; Kachur, Elizabeth Krajic

    2006-08-01

    Mentoring is often identified as a crucial step in achieving career success. However, not all medical trainees or educators recognize the value of a mentoring relationship. Since medical educators rarely receive training on the mentoring process, they are often ill equipped to face challenges when taking on major mentoring responsibilities. This article is based on half-day workshops presented at the 11th Ottawa International Conference on Medical Education in Barcelona on 5 July 2004 and the annual meeting of the Association of American Medical Colleges in Boston on 10 November 2004 as well as a review of literature. Thirteen medical faculty participated in the former and 30 in the latter. Most participants held leadership positions at their institutions and mentored trainees as well as supervised mentoring programs. The workshops reviewed skills of mentoring and strategies for designing effective mentoring programs. Participants engaged in brainstorming and interactive discussions to: (a) review different types of mentoring programs; (b) discuss measures of success and failure of mentoring relationships and programs; and (c) examine the influence of gender and cultural differences on mentoring. Participants were also asked to develop an implementation plan for a mentoring program for medical students and faculty. They had to identify student and faculty mentoring needs, and describe methods to recruit mentors as well as institutional reward systems to encourage and support mentoring. PMID:16973451

  10. Mentoring for 2000 and beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, K. M.; Farrance, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Today, more than 40 percent of the United States workforce are women. However, only a small percentage of working women are employed in science or engineering fields. The numbers of women in engineering and math professions have actually decreased since 1984. Last year, a mentoring program was created at NASA Ames Research Center aimed at encouraging young girls to stay in school, increasing their self confidence and helping them perform better academically. Teachers at the Ronald McNair Intermediate School matched fifth through eighth grade students with women engineers at NASA Ames. Results from a year-end survey submitted by the mentees indicated that the program was successful in achieving its first-year goals; more than one student reported that she felt 'really special' because of her mentor's efforts. The NASA Ames Mentor program has continued into the 1992-93 academic year with both returning mentor/mentee pairs and new participants.

  11. Enhancing nursing students' education by coaching mentors.

    PubMed

    Huggins, David

    2016-04-01

    To address some of the recommendations of the Willis Commission ( Royal College of Nursing 2012 ), and in response to local evaluation of mentor and nursing student experiences, the University of East Anglia has implemented a project to teach mentors coaching skills. The aim is to enhance mentor support of nursing students during practice placements and improve student learning in practice. This article describes the project and discusses the similarities and differences between mentoring and coaching. It shows how coaching has reduced the 'burden' of mentoring by reducing mentors' workloads, and has helped students to take responsibility for identifying learning needs and delivering supervised patient care. PMID:27032286

  12. Development of a monitoring protocol to enhance mentoring in the IRIS REU site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubenthal, M.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Colella, H.

    2013-12-01

    Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) sites pair interns with scientists expected to oversee and guide an intern's scientific research, and assist in the development of skills, knowledge, and connections that will enhance the intern's professional and personal growth. This aspect of REU sites is generally recognized as a powerful, yet complicated, component that has a strong influence on the overall success of the intern's experience. Evaluations indicate that the quality and consistency of mentoring in REU sites can be highly variable. Traditional strategies to influence mentorship generally include reading lists or short trainings at the beginning of the summer. The efficacy of these approaches is questionable. As a result many REU Site facilitators are deeply interested in the question 'How can REU programs challenge scientists to raise their participation to the level of (truly) mentoring?' The Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) REU site is developing a 13-item rubric measuring research skills, and a protocol of training and intern-mentor meetings to discuss progress. The goal of the intervention is to both increase the extent to which the mentoring relationship is centered on the intern, and to enable interns and mentors to feel more effective monitoring interns' personal/professional growth. This intervention was piloted in 2011, refined, and fully implemented in 2012. During the initial week of the program, interns assess their skills, complete the rubric independently, and discuss the completed rubric with their mentor. Midway through the summer interns and mentors each review the rubric and assess the intern's skills. The intern-mentor pairs then meet to collaborate and complete the rubric together. Finally, in the last week of the program, interns and mentors independently assess the intern's skills and complete the rubric, and the pairs again meet to discuss and negotiate these independent assessments. Survey data from 2012

  13. Learning to Become a More Effective Research or Inquiry-based Project Mentor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, E. J.; Pfund, C.; Mathieu, R.; Branchaw, J.

    2010-08-01

    How effective of a mentor are you? Have you thought much about this question? Have you participated in training to become a better mentor? For many academics, the typical three answers are "pretty good, I think ... why wouldn't I be?!"; "I am right now while reading this;" "Uh, no." The University of Wisconsin-Madison has developed a program called Research Mentor Training to help train scientists in myriad STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) disciplines, including astronomy, for their crucial role of mentoring the next generation. Most of the field testing to date has focused on graduate students, post-docs, academic staff, and faculty mentoring undergraduate students who are participating in summer research experiences. The materials have proven quite effective in other areas as well, with only modest modifications. For example, several faculty cohorts concentrating on mentoring graduate students and post-docs have completed the training. In addition, the materials are used to prepare graduate students and undergraduates to mentor high school students. The preferred venue for the mentor training program is a seminar meeting one hour per week for 8 to 9 weeks, plus readings and outside activities, including mentoring a student. However, the structure is flexible, and some meaningful learning can occur in a single 90-minute interactive workshop like the one presented at the 2009 ASP annual meeting, "Science Education and Outreach: Forging a Path to the Future." All of the materials, including case studies, facilitator notes and guidelines, plus reading lists, are available online for no charge (http://researchmentortraining.org). Users can select pre-built curricula, or they can customize a package using a "shopping cart" interface.

  14. The Legacy of Marin Mersenne: The Search for Primal Order and the Mentoring of Young Minds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the pivotal roles that Marin Mersenne played--as a recreational mathematician in search of prime number patterns and as a mentor to young mathematicians and scientists. His work is used as an example for today's mathematics teachers in encouraging students to work together and creating environments that foster success for…

  15. Key issues in mentoring in HIV prevention and mental health for new investigators from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Andrew D; Stoff, David M

    2009-04-01

    We examine the challenges and barriers to quality mentoring for new investigators from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups and propose solutions for establishing a robust pipeline of early-career scientists who are well equipped to conduct research on disparities in HIV and mental health. In addition, we review contributions to this special supplement on mentoring and advocate a multilevel strategy that targets funding agencies, academic and research institutions, mentors, and mentees to enhance the diversity of the nation's scientific workforce and ensure that the public health system benefits from innovations derived from the optimal use of existing human capital. PMID:19246661

  16. Key Issues in Mentoring in HIV Prevention and Mental Health for New Investigators From Underrepresented Racial/Ethnic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Stoff, David

    2009-01-01

    We examine the challenges and barriers to quality mentoring for new investigators from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups and propose solutions for establishing a robust pipeline of early-career scientists who are well equipped to conduct research on disparities in HIV and mental health. In addition, we review contributions to this special supplement on mentoring and advocate a multilevel strategy that targets funding agencies, academic and research institutions, mentors, and mentees to enhance the diversity of the nation's scientific workforce and ensure that the public health system benefits from innovations derived from the optimal use of existing human capital. PMID:19246661

  17. Science mentor program at Mission Hill Junior High School

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlquist, K.

    1994-12-31

    Science graduate students from the University of California at Santa Cruz mentor a class of 7th graders from the Mission Hill Junior High School. The program`s purpose is: (1) to create a scientific learning community where scientists interact at different levels of the educational hierarchy; (2) to have fun in order to spark interest in science; and (3) to support girls and minority students in science. A total of seven mentors met with the students at least once a week after school for one quarter to tutor and assist with science fair projects. Other activities included a field trip to a university earth science lab, judging the science fair, and assisting during laboratory exercises. Graduate students run the program with minimal organization and funding, communicating by electronic mail. An informal evaluation of the program by the mentors has concluded that the most valuable and effective activities have been the field trip and assisting with labs. The actual {open_quotes}mentor meetings{close_quotes} after school did not work effectively because they had a vaguely defined purpose and the kids did not show up regularly to participate. Future directions include redefining ourselves as mentors for the entire school instead of just one class and better coordinating our activities with the teachers` curriculum. We will continue to assist with the labs and organize formal tutoring for students having problems with math and science. Finally, we will arrange more activities and field trips such as an amateur astronomy night. We will especially target girls who attended the {open_quotes}Expanding Your Horizons{trademark} in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering{close_quotes} career day for those activities.

  18. Righting Rewritings of the Myth of Mentor: A Critical Perspective on Career Guidance Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colley, Helen

    2001-01-01

    Explores the use of Homer's "Odyssey" as a source of definitions and legitimations of many current accounts of mentoring. Identifies an emerging discourse of mentoring which exerts control not only over the young people being mentored, but also over career guidance staff expected to act as mentors in new Personal Adviser roles. (Contains 92…

  19. Adapting Mentoring to Individual Differences in Novice Teacher Learning: The Mentor's Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ginkel, Gisbert; Oolbekkink, Helma; Meijer, Paulien C.; Verloop, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Being adaptive to the individual novice teacher is considered a condition for effective teacher mentoring. The aims of this study are therefore to explore (1) mentoring activities through which mentors intend to adapt to the individual novice teacher and (2) characteristics of adaptive mentors. Information was collected through on-site,…

  20. Mentor Service Themes Emergent in a Holistic, Undergraduate Peer-Mentoring Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Elijah G.; Thomas, Earl E.; Disch, William B.

    2014-01-01

    Little research has focused carefully on the means by which peer mentors foster development in undergraduate protégés. Two faculty members developed a holistic, peer-mentoring project in which 26 upperclassmen mentored 74 underclassmen at a midsize, 4-year institution. Mentor journal notes, open-ended protégé responses, and participant…

  1. Differences of Mentoring Experiences across Grade Span among Principals, Mentors, and Mentees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frels, Rebecca K.; Zientek, Linda Reichwein; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed research study was to examine mentoring experiences specific to grade span through the perspective of principals, mentors, and mentees. An instrument containing items on demographics, administrative support, and mentoring program components was administered to first-year teachers (n = 998), mentors (n = 791), and…

  2. So You Want to Be a Mentor? An Analysis of Mentor Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyre, Dwuena C.; Gaudet, Cyndi H.; McNeese, Mary Nell

    2016-01-01

    As the need for mentors continues to expand in order to meet organizational and programmatic needs, so does the need for quality mentoring. Although sometimes an immediate need for quantity may foreshadow quality, this should not be the case when utilizing mentoring to achieve goals. Faculty mentor competencies are analyzed to demonstrate the…

  3. Mentor Principals' Perceptions about a Mentoring Program for Aspiring Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Steven Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the perceptions of principals who serve as mentors for an internship program for aspiring principals at East Tennessee State University. Each mentor was interviewed to gather information about the internship program, the benefits of mentoring in the program, and what the mentors may have learned about their…

  4. E-mentoring: Using Computer Mediated Communication To Enhance the Mentoring Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierema, Laura L.; Merriam, Sharan B.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a definition of e-mentoring and an exploration of its potential for enhancing mentoring relationships from technical and social perspectives. Considers benefits of and barriers to e-mentoring and describes strategies for establishing an e-mentoring relationship. Includes Internet resources. (EV)

  5. The Relationship between Short-Term Mentoring Benefits and Long-Term Mentor Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eby, Lillian T.; Durley, Jaime R.; Evans, Sarah C.; Ragins, Belle Rose

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about the short- and long-term benefits mentors gain from their mentoring relationships. This study examined the extent to which short-term proximal benefits reported by mentors (improved job performance, recognition by others, rewarding experience, and loyal base of support) predicted the long-term distal outcomes of mentor career…

  6. The Effect of Mentor Intervention Style in Novice Entrepreneur Mentoring Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Jean, Etienne; Audet, Josee

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine whether mentor intervention styles influence benefits gained by novice entrepreneurs through their mentoring relationship. An empirical study conducted with 360 mentees who had received mentoring services shows that an intervention style which combines a maieutic approach with mentor involvement produced the…

  7. Demystifying Gender Differences in Mentoring: Theoretical Perspectives and Challenges for Future Research on Gender and Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Angela M.; Cady, Steven; Foxon, Marguerite J.

    2006-01-01

    Issues of gender and mentoring are explored through several theoretical lenses--similarity-attraction paradigm, power dependence, social exchange, biological, and psychological theories--to provide a more comprehensive view of mentoring from a gender-based perspective. Issues related to gender and mentoring presented in past mentoring research and…

  8. The Perspectives and Experiences of Hong Kong Preschool Teacher Mentors: Implications for Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yuen-ling

    2009-01-01

    Little research has been done on the choices of mentors when they are offered a comprehensive range of roles. The mentors in this study were in their first attempt as mentors and did not have an assigned "role". They were involved in a mentoring course that sought to facilitate the placement of in-service teachers and school-institute…

  9. Initial Characteristics and Mentoring Satisfaction of College Women Mentoring Youth: Implications for Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foukal, Martha D.; Lawrence, Edith C.; Williams, Joanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Being a youth mentor is popular among college students, yet little is known about how their initial characteristics are related to mentoring satisfaction. Survey data from college women enrolled in a youth mentoring program (n = 158) and a comparison group (n = 136) were analyzed to determine how initial characteristics of youth mentors (a) differ…

  10. The Mentoring Guidebook: A Practical Manual for Designing and Managing a Mentoring Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crockett, Lib; Smink, Jay

    Mentoring at-risk students has become one of the fastest growing and frequently used strategies across the nation to help young people. This document examines the structure and implementation of mentoring programs. Chapter 1 discusses mentoring as an appropriate and effective strategy. The mentoring relationship is examined, natural versus planned…