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Sample records for brain images obtained

  1. Value of obtaining renal images following brain scintigraphy with technetium-99m glucoheptonate

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Rodriguez, A.A.; Spicer, M.J.; Jackson, R.E.; Byrd, B.F.; Turnbull, G.L.

    1986-08-01

    The value of adding an extra view of the kidneys immediately following brain imaging with Tc-99m glucoheptonate was investigated in a two-year retrospective study at our institution. Between October 1982 and October 1984, 561 individuals underwent Tc-99m glucoheptonate brain imaging with the added renal view. Twenty-nine of these individuals (5.2%) demonstrated renal abnormalities. The abnormal renal findings were clinically correlated in 24 of these persons. Sixteen (67%) of these 24 individuals were unaware of any renal abnormality. Useful information can be obtained from renal images incidental to brain imaging at no added expense or radiation exposure to the patient, and at a minimal cost in time to the imaging clinic.

  2. Influences of reconstruction and attenuation correction in brain SPECT images obtained by the hybrid SPECT/CT device: evaluation with a 3-dimensional brain phantom

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, Mana; Yamashita, Yasuo; Akamatsu, Go; Tsutsui, Yuji; Ohya, Nobuyoshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to evaluate the influences of reconstruction and attenuation correction on the differences in the radioactivity distributions in 123I brain SPECT obtained by the hybrid SPECT/CT device. Methods: We used the 3-dimensional (3D) brain phantom, which imitates the precise structure of gray matter, white matter and bone regions. It was filled with 123I solution (20.1 kBq/mL) in the gray matter region and with K2HPO4 in the bone region. The SPECT/CT data were acquired by the hybrid SPECT/CT device. SPECT images were reconstructed by using filtered back projection with uniform attenuation correction (FBP-uAC), 3D ordered-subsets expectation-maximization with uniform AC (3D-OSEM-uAC) and 3D OSEM with CT-based non-uniform AC (3D-OSEM-CTAC). We evaluated the differences in the radioactivity distributions among these reconstruction methods using a 3D digital phantom, which was developed from CT images of the 3D brain phantom, as a reference. The normalized mean square error (NMSE) and regional radioactivity were calculated to evaluate the similarity of SPECT images to the 3D digital phantom. Results: The NMSE values were 0.0811 in FBP-uAC, 0.0914 in 3D-OSEM-uAC and 0.0766 in 3D-OSEM-CTAC. The regional radioactivity of FBP-uAC was 11.5% lower in the middle cerebral artery territory, and that of 3D-OSEM-uAC was 5.8% higher in the anterior cerebral artery territory, compared with the digital phantom. On the other hand, that of 3D-OSEM-CTAC was 1.8% lower in all brain areas. Conclusion: By using the hybrid SPECT/CT device, the brain SPECT reconstructed by 3D-OSEM with CT attenuation correction can provide an accurate assessment of the distribution of brain radioactivity.

  3. Brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a survey of the various imaging tools with examples of the different diseases shown best with each modality. It includes 100 case presentations covering the gamut of brain diseases. These examples are grouped according to the clinical presentation of the patient: headache, acute headache, sudden unilateral weakness, unilateral weakness of gradual onset, speech disorders, seizures, pituitary and parasellar lesions, sensory disorders, posterior fossa and cranial nerve disorders, dementia, and congenital lesions.

  4. Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Racine, Eric; Bar-Ilan, Ofek; Illes, Judy

    2007-01-01

    Advances in neuroscience are increasingly intersecting with issues of ethical, legal, and social interest. This study is an analysis of press coverage of an advanced technology for brain imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging, that has gained significant public visibility over the past ten years. Discussion of issues of scientific validity and interpretation dominated over ethical content in both the popular and specialized press. Coverage of research on higher order cognitive phenomena specifically attributed broad personal and societal meaning to neuroimages. The authors conclude that neuroscience provides an ideal model for exploring science communication and ethics in a multicultural context. PMID:17330151

  5. Brain imaging and brain function

    SciTech Connect

    Sokoloff, L.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a survey of the applications of imaging studies of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism to the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Contributors review imaging techniques and strategies for measuring regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism, for mapping functional neural systems, and for imaging normal brain functions. They then examine the applications of brain imaging techniques to the study of such neurological and psychiatric disorders as: cerebral ischemia; convulsive disorders; cerebral tumors; Huntington's disease; Alzheimer's disease; depression and other mood disorders. A state-of-the-art report on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and central nervous system rounds out the book's coverage.

  6. [Brain metastases imaging].

    PubMed

    Delmaire, C; Savatovsky, J; Boulanger, T; Dhermain, F; Le Rhun, E; Météllus, P; Gerber, S; Carsin-Nicole, B; Petyt, G

    2015-02-01

    The therapeutic management of brain metastases depends upon their diagnosis and characteristics. It is therefore imperative that imaging provides accurate diagnosis, identification, size and localization information of intracranial lesions in patients with presumed cerebral metastatic disease. MRI exhibits superior sensitivity to CT for small lesions identification and to evaluate their precise anatomical location. The CT-scan will be made only in case of MRI's contraindication or if MRI cannot be obtained in an acceptable delay for the management of the patient. In clinical practice, the radiologic metastasis evaluation is based on visual image analyses. Thus, a particular attention is paid to the imaging protocol with the aim to optimize the diagnosis of small lesions and to evaluate their evolution. The MRI protocol must include: 1) non-contrast T1, 2) diffusion, 3) T2* or susceptibility-weighted imaging, 4) dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion, 5) FLAIR with contrast injection, 6) T1 with contrast injection preferentially using the 3D spin echo images. The role of the nuclear medicine imaging is still limited in the diagnosis of brain metastasis. The Tc-sestamibi brain imaging or PET with amino acid tracers can differentiate local brain metastasis recurrence from radionecrosis but still to be evaluated. PMID:25649387

  7. Modern Brain Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Ramon F.; Cha, Soonmee

    2015-01-01

    The imaging and clinical management of patients with brain tumor continue to evolve over time and now heavily rely on physiologic imaging in addition to high-resolution structural imaging. Imaging remains a powerful noninvasive tool to positively impact the management of patients with brain tumor. This article provides an overview of the current state-of-the art clinical brain tumor imaging. In this review, we discuss general magnetic resonance (MR) imaging methods and their application to the diagnosis of, treatment planning and navigation, and disease monitoring in patients with brain tumor. We review the strengths, limitations, and pitfalls of structural imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging techniques, MR spectroscopy, perfusion imaging, positron emission tomography/MR, and functional imaging. Overall this review provides a basis for understudying the role of modern imaging in the care of brain tumor patients. PMID:25977902

  8. Imaging the Working Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swithenby, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    Very sensitive SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) detectors are used in the technique known as magnetoencephalography to provide dynamic images of the brain. This can help our fundamental understanding of the way the brain works and may be of particular use in treating disorders such as epilepsy. (Author/MKR)

  9. Brain imaging in dementia.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Guendalina; Zamboni, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging has contributed significantly to the understanding of different dementia syndromes. Over the past 20 years these imaging techniques have been increasingly used for clinical characterisation and differential diagnosis, and to provide insight into the effects on functional capacity of the brain, patterns of spatial distribution of different dementia syndromes and their natural history and evolution over time. Brain imaging is also increasingly used in clinical trials, as part of inclusion criteria and/or as a surrogate outcome measure. Here we review all the relatively specific findings that can be identified with different MRI and PET techniques in each of the most frequent dementing disorders. PMID:26933232

  10. Distribution and binding of 18F-labeled and 125I-labeled analogues of ACI-80, a prospective molecular imaging biomarker of disease: a whole hemisphere post mortem autoradiography study in human brains obtained from Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Spenger, Christian; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Gulya, Károly; Kása, Péter; Jahan, Mahabuba; Jia, Zhisheng; Weber, Urs; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas; Willbold, Dieter; Halldin, Christer

    2012-01-01

    One of the major pathological landmarks of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases is the presence of amyloid deposits in the brain. The early non-invasive visualization of amyloid is a major objective of recent diagnostic neuroimaging approaches, including positron emission tomography (PET), with an eye on follow-up of disease progression and/or therapy efficacy. The development of molecular imaging biomarkers with binding affinity to amyloid in the brain is therefore in the forefront of imaging biomarker and radiochemistry research. Recently, a dodecamer peptide (amino acid sequence=QSHYRHISPAQV; denominated D1 or ACI-80) was identified as a prospective ligand candidate, binding with high ex vivo affinity to L-Aβ-amyloid (K(d): 0.4 μM). In order to assess the ligand's capacity to visualize amyloid in Alzheimer's disease (AD), two (125)I labeled and three (18)F labeled analogues of the peptide were synthesized and tested in post mortem human autoradiography experiments using whole hemisphere brain slices obtained from deceased AD patients and age matched control subjects. The (18)F-labeled radioligands showed more promising visualization capacity of amyloid that the (125)I-labeled radioligands. In the case of each (18)F radioligands the grey matter uptake in the AD brains was significantly higher than that in control brains. Furthermore, the grey matter: white matter uptake ratio was over ~2, the difference being significant for each (18)F-radioligands. The regional distribution of the uptake of the various radioligands systematically shows a congruent pattern between the high uptake regions and spots in the autoradiographic images and the disease specific signals obtained in adjacent or identical brain slices labeled with histological, immunohistochemical or autoradiographic stains for amyloid deposits or activated astrocytes. The present data, using post mortem human brain autoradiography in whole hemisphere human brains obtained from deceased

  11. BrainImageJ

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Yi-Ren; Shiffman, Smadar; Brosnan, Thomas J.; Links, Jonathan M.; Beach, Leu S.; Judge, Nicholas S.; Xu, Yirong; Kelkar, Uma V.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2001-01-01

    The Human Brain Project consortium continues to struggle with effective sharing of tools. To facilitate reuse of its tools, the Stanford Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory (SPNL) has developed BrainImageJ, a new software framework in Java. The framework consists of two components—a set of four programming interfaces and an application front end. The four interfaces define extension pathways for new data models, file loaders and savers, algorithms, and visualization tools. Any Java class that implements one of these interfaces qualifies as a BrainImageJ plug-in—a self-contained tool. After automatically detecting and incorporating new plug-ins, the application front end transparently generates graphical user interfaces that provide access to plug-in functionality. New plug-ins interoperate with existing ones immediately through the front end. BrainImageJ is used at the Stanford Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory to develop image-analysis algorithms and three-dimensional visualization tools. It is the goal of our development group that, once the framework is placed in the public domain, it will serve as an interlaboratory platform for designing, distributing, and using interoperable tools. PMID:11522764

  12. Brain Imaging: Applications in Psychiatry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreasen, Nancy C.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses various brain imaging techniques, including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, measurement of regional cerebral blood flow, single photo emission tomography, and position emission tomography. Describes the uses of these techniques in helping to understand brain functioning. (TW)

  13. Imaging the Alzheimer Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ashford, J. Wesson; Salehi, Ahmad; Furst, Ansgar; Bayley, Peter; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Jack, Clifford R.; Sabri, Osama; Adamson, Maheen M.; Coburn, Kerry L.; Olichney, John; Schuff, Norbert; Spielman, Daniel; Edland, Steven D.; Black, Sandra; Rosen, Allyson; Kennedy, David; Weiner, Michael; Perry, George

    2013-01-01

    This supplement to the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease contains more than half of the chapters from The Handbook of Imaging the Alzheimer Brain, which was first presented at the International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease in Paris, in July, 2011. While the Handbook contains 27 chapters that are modified articles from 2009, 2010, and 2011 issues of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, this supplement contains the 31 new chapters of that book and an introductory article drawn from the introductions to each section of the book. The Handbook was designed to provide a multilevel overview of the full field of brain imaging related to Alzheimer's disease (AD). The Handbook, as well as this supplement, contains both reviews of the basic concepts of imaging, the latest developments in imaging, and various discussions and perspectives of the problems of the field and promising directions. The Handbook was designed to be useful for students and clinicians interested in AD as well as scientists studying the brain and pathology related to AD. PMID:21971448

  14. Functional Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this analysis is to review a spectrum of functional brain imaging technologies to identify whether there are any imaging modalities that are more effective than others for various brain pathology conditions. This evidence-based analysis reviews magnetoencephalography (MEG), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), positron emission tomography (PET), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for the diagnosis or surgical management of the following conditions: Alzheimer’s disease (AD), brain tumours, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis (MS), and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive, degenerative, neurologic condition characterized by cognitive impairment and memory loss. The Canadian Study on Health and Aging estimated that there will be 97,000 incident cases (about 60,000 women) of dementia (including AD) in Canada in 2006. In Ontario, there will be an estimated 950 new cases and 580 deaths due to brain cancer in 2006. Treatments for brain tumours include surgery and radiation therapy. However, one of the limitations of radiation therapy is that it damages tissue though necrosis and scarring. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not distinguish between radiation effects and resistant tissue, creating a potential role for functional brain imaging. Epilepsy is a chronic disorder that provokes repetitive seizures. In Ontario, the rate of epilepsy is estimated to be 5 cases per 1,000 people. Most people with epilepsy are effectively managed with drug therapy; but about 50% do not respond to drug therapy. Surgical resection of the seizure foci may be considered in these patients, and functional brain imaging may play a role in localizing the seizure foci. Multiple sclerosis is a progressive, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). The cause of MS is unknown; however, it is thought to be

  15. SOFIA Observatory Obtains 'First Light' Images

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA, successfully obtained its "First Light"" images during an overnight flight May 26. Scientists are now processing the data gathered...

  16. Imaging the Gambling Brain.

    PubMed

    Balodis, I M; Potenza, M N

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies examining the neurobiological basis of gambling disorder (GD) have increased over the past decade. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies during appetitive cue and reward processing tasks demonstrate altered functioning in frontostriatal brain areas, including the ventral striatum and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Findings suggest differences in how the anticipation and outcome of rewards are processed in individuals with GD. Future research requires larger sample sizes and should include appropriate clinical reference groups. Overall, studies to date highlight a common pathophysiology between substance-based addictions and GD, the latter offering a unique condition in which to examine nonchemical factors in addiction. PMID:27503450

  17. Fueling and imaging brain activation

    PubMed Central

    Dienel, Gerald A

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic signals are used for imaging and spectroscopic studies of brain function and disease and to elucidate the cellular basis of neuroenergetics. The major fuel for activated neurons and the models for neuron–astrocyte interactions have been controversial because discordant results are obtained in different experimental systems, some of which do not correspond to adult brain. In rats, the infrastructure to support the high energetic demands of adult brain is acquired during postnatal development and matures after weaning. The brain's capacity to supply and metabolize glucose and oxygen exceeds demand over a wide range of rates, and the hyperaemic response to functional activation is rapid. Oxidative metabolism provides most ATP, but glycolysis is frequently preferentially up-regulated during activation. Underestimation of glucose utilization rates with labelled glucose arises from increased lactate production, lactate diffusion via transporters and astrocytic gap junctions, and lactate release to blood and perivascular drainage. Increased pentose shunt pathway flux also causes label loss from C1 of glucose. Glucose analogues are used to assay cellular activities, but interpretation of results is uncertain due to insufficient characterization of transport and phosphorylation kinetics. Brain activation in subjects with low blood-lactate levels causes a brain-to-blood lactate gradient, with rapid lactate release. In contrast, lactate flooding of brain during physical activity or infusion provides an opportunistic, supplemental fuel. Available evidence indicates that lactate shuttling coupled to its local oxidation during activation is a small fraction of glucose oxidation. Developmental, experimental, and physiological context is critical for interpretation of metabolic studies in terms of theoretical models. PMID:22612861

  18. Fueling and imaging brain activation.

    PubMed

    Dienel, Gerald A

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic signals are used for imaging and spectroscopic studies of brain function and disease and to elucidate the cellular basis of neuroenergetics. The major fuel for activated neurons and the models for neuron-astrocyte interactions have been controversial because discordant results are obtained in different experimental systems, some of which do not correspond to adult brain. In rats, the infrastructure to support the high energetic demands of adult brain is acquired during postnatal development and matures after weaning. The brain's capacity to supply and metabolize glucose and oxygen exceeds demand over a wide range of rates, and the hyperaemic response to functional activation is rapid. Oxidative metabolism provides most ATP, but glycolysis is frequently preferentially up-regulated during activation. Underestimation of glucose utilization rates with labelled glucose arises from increased lactate production, lactate diffusion via transporters and astrocytic gap junctions, and lactate release to blood and perivascular drainage. Increased pentose shunt pathway flux also causes label loss from C1 of glucose. Glucose analogues are used to assay cellular activities, but interpretation of results is uncertain due to insufficient characterization of transport and phosphorylation kinetics. Brain activation in subjects with low blood-lactate levels causes a brain-to-blood lactate gradient, with rapid lactate release. In contrast, lactate flooding of brain during physical activity or infusion provides an opportunistic, supplemental fuel. Available evidence indicates that lactate shuttling coupled to its local oxidation during activation is a small fraction of glucose oxidation. Developmental, experimental, and physiological context is critical for interpretation of metabolic studies in terms of theoretical models. PMID:22612861

  19. Brain tumor (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumors are classified depending on the exact site of the tumor, the type of tissue involved, benign ... tendencies of the tumor, and other factors. Primary brain tumors can arise from the brain cells, the meninges ( ...

  20. Imaging brain plasticity after trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Zhifeng; Iraji, Armin

    2014-01-01

    The brain is highly plastic after stroke or epilepsy; however, there is a paucity of brain plasticity investigation after traumatic brain injury (TBI). This mini review summarizes the most recent evidence of brain plasticity in human TBI patients from the perspective of advanced magnetic resonance imaging. Similar to other forms of acquired brain injury, TBI patients also demonstrated both structural reorganization as well as functional compensation by the recruitment of other brain regions. However, the large scale brain network alterations after TBI are still unknown, and the field is still short of proper means on how to guide the choice of TBI rehabilitation or treatment plan to promote brain plasticity. The authors also point out the new direction of brain plasticity investigation. PMID:25206874

  1. Brain Imaging and Behavioral Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1996-01-01

    This review explores the cellular pathology associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its relation to neurobehavioral outcomes, the relationship of brain imaging findings to underlying pathology, brain imaging techniques, various image analysis procedures and how they relate to neuropsychological testing, and the importance of brain imaging…

  2. Brain imaging in psychiatry

    SciTech Connect

    Morihisa, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains the following five chapters: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in Psychiatry; Regional Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) in Psychiatry: Methodological Issues; Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Psychiatry: Application to Clinical Research; Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Psychiatry: The Resting and Activated Brains of Schizophrenic Patients; and Brain Electrical Activity Mapping (BEAM) in Psychiatry.

  3. [Imaging of childhood brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Couanet, D; Adamsbaum, C

    2006-06-01

    Brain tumors represent around a quarter of all solid tumors observed in the pediatric population. Infratentorial tumors are the most frequent, mostly encountered between 4 and 11 years of age. Early imaging is important because initial symptoms can be misinterpreted as statural and pubertal disorders or pseudoabdominal symptoms with apathy and vomiting in infants. Because signal abnormalities on MRI are most often not specific, it is essential to take into account the clinical and topographic characteristics of the lesion to establish an appropriate differential diagnosis. The main patterns of brain tumors observed in pediatrics are presented. Brain metastases are very unusual in children, in contrast to lepto-meningeal metastasis. PMID:16778744

  4. Modeling of functional brain imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, Barry

    1999-03-01

    The richness and complexity of data sets obtained from functional neuroimaging studies of human cognitive behavior, using techniques such as positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging, have until recently not been exploited by computational neural modeling methods. In this article, following a brief introduction to functional neuroimaging methodology, two neural modeling approaches for use with functional brain imaging data are described. One, which uses structural equation modeling, examines the effective functional connections between various brain regions during specific cognitive tasks. The second employs large-scale neural modeling to relate functional neuroimaging signals in multiple, interconnected brain regions to the underlying neurobiological time-varying activities in each region. These two modeling procedures are illustrated using a visual processing paradigm.

  5. Evolution of brain imaging instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Tony; Feng, Janine

    2011-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and static magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are now the most common imaging modalities used for anatomic evaluation of pathologic processes affecting the brain. By contrast, radionuclide-based methods, including planar imaging, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET), are the most widely used methods for evaluating brain function. SPECT and PET have been evolving for a longer time than CT and MRI and have made significant contributions to understanding brain function. The pioneering work on cerebral flow early in the last century laid the foundation of measurement with radioactive gases. This was initially performed with scintillation counters, which gave way to single, then multiple scintillation and multiprobe detectors. The invention of rectilinear scanners, MARK series, Anger cameras, and SPECT imaging further advanced nuclear medicine's role in brain imaging. Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow by SPECT provides pathophysiologic information that directs patient management in a variety of central nervous disorders (CNS), with the greatest clinical impact found in cerebrovascular disease and seizure disorder. In the former, SPECT not only provides means of early detection and localization of acute strokes but can also direct thrombolysis and determine prognosis in the postcerebrovascular accident period. With respect to the latter, ictal SPECT can localize seizure foci so that patients with refractory disease can potentially undergo surgical resection of the affected area. In contrast to brain SPECT, brain PET images reflect regional cerebral metabolism. Because of neurovascular coupling, findings on SPECT and PET images are often comparable. PET, however, still has improved spatial resolution and is therefore more sensitive than SPECT, particularly in the evaluation of dementias. Brain PET instrumentation has greatly evolved from its infancy, when it was used in regional

  6. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J. ); Singh, M. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1991-01-01

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  7. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R.; Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J.; Singh, M.

    1991-12-31

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  8. Imaging the Addicted Brain: Alcohol.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, M; Chanraud, S

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) represents a major public health issue due to its prevalence and severe health consequences. It may affect several aspects of an individual's life including work and relationships, and it also increases risk for additional problems such as brain injury. The causes and outcomes of AUD are varied; thus, attempting to understand this complex phenomenon requires investigation from multiple perspectives. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful means to investigate brain anatomical and functional alterations related to AUD. Recent advances in MRI methods allow better investigation of the alterations to structural and functional brain networks in AUD. Here, we focus on findings from studies using multiple MRI techniques, which converge to support the considerable vulnerability of frontal systems. Indeed, MRI studies provide evidence for a "disconnection syndrome" which could be involved in the poor behavioral control observed in AUD. PMID:27503446

  9. Dynamic imaging of brain function

    PubMed Central

    Hyder, Fahmeed

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there have been unprecedented methodological advances in the dynamic imaging of brain activities. Electrophysiological, optical, and magnetic resonance methods now allow mapping of functional activation (or deactivation) by measurement of neuronal activity (e.g., membrane potential, ion flux, neurotransmitter flux), energy metabolism (e.g., glucose consumption, oxygen consumption, creatine kinase flux), and functional hyperemia (e.g., blood oxygenation, blood flow, blood volume). Properties of the glutamatergic synapse are used as a model to reveal activities at the nerve terminal and their associated changes in energy demand and blood flow. This approach reveals that each method measures different tissue- and/or cell-specific components with specified spatiotemporal resolution. While advantages and disadvantages of different methods are apparent and often used to supersede one another in terms of specificity and/or sensitivity, no particular technique is the optimal dynamic brain imaging method because each method is unique in some respect. Because the demand for energy substrates is a fundamental requirement for function, energy-based methods may allow quantitative dynamic imaging in vivo. However there are exclusive neurobiological insights gained by combining some of these different dynamic imaging techniques. PMID:18839085

  10. Optical Coherence Tomography for Brain Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    Recently, there has been growing interest in using OCT for brain imaging. A feasibility study of OCT for guiding deep brain probes has found that OCT can differentiate the white matter and gray matter because the white matter tends to have a higher peak reflectivity and steeper attenuation rate compared to gray matter. In vivo 3D visualization of the layered organization of a rat olfactory bulb with OCT has been demonstrated. OCT has been used for single myelin fiber imaging in living rodents without labeling. The refractive index in the rat somatosensory cortex has also been measured with OCT. In addition, functional extension of OCT, such as Doppler-OCT (D-OCT), polarization sensitive-OCT (PS-OCT), and phase-resolved-OCT (PR-OCT), can image and quantify physiological parameters in addition to the morphological structure image. Based on the scattering changes during neural activity, OCT has been used to measure the functional activation in neuronal tissues. PS-OCT, which combines polarization sensitive detection with OCT to determine tissue birefringence, has been used for the localization of nerve fiber bundles and the mapping of micrometer-scale fiber pathways in the brain. D-OCT, also named optical Doppler tomography (ODT), combines the Doppler principle with OCT to obtain high resolution tomographic images of moving constituents in highly scattering biological tissues. D-OCT has been successfully used to image cortical blood flow and map the blood vessel network for brain research. In this chapter, the principle and technology of OCT and D-OCT are reviewed and examples of potential applications are described.

  11. Rodent brain imaging with SPECT/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Youngho; Gao, D.-W.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Dae, Michael W.; Franc, Benjamin L.

    2007-04-15

    We evaluated methods of imaging rat models of stroke in vivo using a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system dedicated to small animal imaging (X-SPECT{sup TM}, Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). An animal model of ischemic stroke was developed for in vivo SPECT/CT imaging using the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) technique. The presence of cerebral ischemia was verified in ex vivo studies using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. In vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow was performed in rats following MCAO using dynamic planar imaging of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime with parallel hole collimation. This was followed immediately by in vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow with {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime in the same animals using 1-mm pinhole SPECT. Correlated computed tomography imaging was performed to localize radiopharmaceutical uptake. The animals were allowed to recover and ex vivo autoradiography was performed with separate administration of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime. Time activity curve of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime showed that the radiopharmaceutical uptake could be maintained for over 9 min. The activity would be expected to be relatively stable for a much longer period, although the data were only obtained for 9 min. TTC staining revealed sizable infarcts by visual observation of inexistence of TTC stain in infracted tissues of MCAO rat brains. In vivo SPECT imaging showed cerebral blood flow deficit in the MCAO model, and the in vivo imaging result was confirmed with ex vivo autoradiography. We have demonstrated a capability of imaging regions of cerebral blood flow deficit in MCAO rat brains in vivo using a pinhole SPECT dedicated to small animal imaging.

  12. ELSI priorities for brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Illes, Judy; De Vries, Raymond; Cho, Mildred K; Schraedley-Desmond, Pam

    2006-01-01

    As one of the most compelling technologies for imaging the brain, functional MRI (fMRI) produces measurements and persuasive pictures of research subjects making cognitive judgments and even reasoning through difficult moral decisions. Even after centuries of studying the link between brain and behavior, this capability presents a number of novel significant questions. For example, what are the implications of biologizing human experience? How might neuroimaging disrupt the mysteries of human nature, spirituality, and personal identity? Rather than waiting for an ethical agenda to emerge from some unpredictable combination of the concerns of ethicists and researchers, the attention of journalists, or after controversy is sparked by research that cannot be retracted, we queried key figures in bioethics and the humanities, neuroscience, media, industry, and patient advocacy in focus groups and interviews. We identified specific ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) that highlight researcher obligations and the nonclinical impact of the technology at this new frontier. PMID:16500831

  13. [Brain MR imaging of chronic alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Vargas, M I; Lenz, V; Bin, J F; Bogorin, A; Abu Eid, M; Jacques, C; Marin, H; Kindo, S; Zöllner, G; Dietemann, J L

    2003-04-01

    Brain complications from chronic alcoholism (Wernicke encephalopathy, central pontine myelinolysis, Marchiafava-Bignami disease, Korsakoff's syndrome, hepatic encephalopathy, cerebellar atrophy, hemorrhagic and ischemic brain lesions) may be diagnosed by MR imaging. PMID:12759650

  14. [Brain imaging in early onset anorexia].

    PubMed

    Bargiacchi, A

    2014-05-01

    Structural and functional brain alterations in the structures involved in taste processing, emotions regulation and the reward system have been described in anorexia nervosa. The neurodevelopmental origin of this disorder has been recently discussed. In this article, brain-imaging data in early onset anorexia nervosa will be recalled and the relationship between clinical symptoms, normal brain maturation and brain imaging data in adolescents and adults will be discussed. PMID:24726667

  15. A genome-scale map of expression for a mouse brain section obtained using voxelation

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Mark H.; Geng, Alex B.; Khan, Arshad H.; Qian, Weijun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Boline, Jyl; Levy, Shawn; Toga, Arthur W.; Smith, Richard D.; Leahy, Richard M.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2007-08-20

    Gene expression signatures in the mammalian brain hold the key to understanding neural development and neurological diseases. We have reconstructed 2- dimensional images of gene expression for 20,000 genes in a coronal slice of the mouse brain at the level of the striatum by using microarrays in combination with voxelation at a resolution of 1 mm3. Good reliability of the microarray results were confirmed using multiple replicates, subsequent quantitative RT-PCR voxelation, mass spectrometry voxelation and publicly available in situ hybridization data. Known and novel genes were identified with expression patterns localized to defined substructures within the brain. In addition, genes with unexpected patterns were identified and cluster analysis identified a set of genes with a gradient of dorsal/ventral expression not restricted to known anatomical boundaries. The genome-scale maps of gene expression obtained using voxelation will be a valuable tool for the neuroscience community.

  16. Imaging of Brain Dopamine Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Thanos, Panayotis K.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is typically associated with abnormal eating behaviors. Brain imaging studies in humans implicate the involvement of dopamine (DA)-modulated circuits in pathologic eating behavior(s). Food cues increase striatal extracellular DA, providing evidence for the involvement of DA in the nonhedonic motivational properties of food. Food cues also increase metabolism in the orbitofrontal cortex indicating the association of this region with the motivation for food consumption. Similar to drug-addicted subjects, striatal DA D2 receptor availability is reduced in obese subjects, which may predispose obese subjects to seek food as a means to temporarily compensate for understimulated reward circuits. Decreased DA D2 receptors in the obese subjects are also associated with decreased metabolism in prefrontal regions involved in inhibitory control, which may underlie their inability to control food intake. Gastric stimulation in obese subjects activates cortical and limbic regions involved with self-control, motivation, and memory. These brain regions are also activated during drug craving in drug-addicted subjects. Obese subjects have increased metabolism in the somatosensory cortex, which suggests an enhanced sensitivity to the sensory properties of food. The reduction in DA D2 receptors in obese subjects coupled with the enhanced sensitivity to food palatability could make food their most salient reinforcer putting them at risk for compulsive eating and obesity. The results from these studies suggest that multiple but similar brain circuits are disrupted in obesity and drug addiction and suggest that strategies aimed at improving DA function might be beneficial in the treatment and prevention of obesity. PMID:21603099

  17. Imaging of cerebritis, encephalitis, and brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Rath, Tanya J; Hughes, Marion; Arabi, Mohammad; Shah, Gaurang V

    2012-11-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of brain abscess, pyogenic infection, and encephalitis. The role of CT and MRI in the diagnosis and management of pyogenic brain abscess and its complications is reviewed. The imaging appearances of several common and select uncommon infectious encephalitides are reviewed. Common causes of encephalitis in immunocompromised patients, and their imaging appearances, are also discussed. When combined with CSF, serologic studies and patient history, imaging findings can suggest the cause of encephalitis. PMID:23122258

  18. Profile analysis of hepatic porcine and murine brain tissue slices obtained with a vibratome.

    PubMed

    Mattei, G; Cristiani, I; Magliaro, C; Ahluwalia, A

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed at characterizing soft tissue slices using a vibratome. In particular, the effect of two sectioning parameters (i.e., step size and sectioning speed) on resultant slice thickness was investigated for fresh porcine liver as well as for paraformaldehyde-fixed (PFA-fixed) and fresh murine brain. A simple framework for embedding, sectioning and imaging the slices was established to derive their thickness, which was evaluated through a purposely developed graphical user interface. Sectioning speed and step size had little effect on the thickness of fresh liver slices. Conversely, the thickness of PFA-fixed murine brain slices was found to be dependent on the step size, but not on the sectioning speed. In view of these results, fresh brain tissue was sliced varying the step size only, which was found to have a significant effect on resultant slice thickness. Although precision-cut slices (i.e., with regular thickness) were obtained for all the tissues, slice accuracy (defined as the match between the nominal step size chosen and the actual slice thickness obtained) was found to increase with tissue stiffness from fresh liver to PFA-fixed brain. This quantitative investigation can be very helpful for establishing the most suitable slicing setup for a given tissue. PMID:25945319

  19. Profile analysis of hepatic porcine and murine brain tissue slices obtained with a vibratome

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, G; Cristiani, I; Magliaro, C

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed at characterizing soft tissue slices using a vibratome. In particular, the effect of two sectioning parameters (i.e., step size and sectioning speed) on resultant slice thickness was investigated for fresh porcine liver as well as for paraformaldehyde-fixed (PFA-fixed) and fresh murine brain. A simple framework for embedding, sectioning and imaging the slices was established to derive their thickness, which was evaluated through a purposely developed graphical user interface. Sectioning speed and step size had little effect on the thickness of fresh liver slices. Conversely, the thickness of PFA-fixed murine brain slices was found to be dependent on the step size, but not on the sectioning speed. In view of these results, fresh brain tissue was sliced varying the step size only, which was found to have a significant effect on resultant slice thickness. Although precision-cut slices (i.e., with regular thickness) were obtained for all the tissues, slice accuracy (defined as the match between the nominal step size chosen and the actual slice thickness obtained) was found to increase with tissue stiffness from fresh liver to PFA-fixed brain. This quantitative investigation can be very helpful for establishing the most suitable slicing setup for a given tissue. PMID:25945319

  20. Stereotactic PET atlas of the human brain: Aid for visual interpretation of functional brain images

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, S.; Koeppe, R.A.; Frey, A.; Ishihara, M.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1994-06-01

    In the routine analysis of functional brain images obtained by PET, subjective visual interpretation is often used for anatomic localization. To enhance the accuracy and consistency of the anatomic interpretation, a PET stereotactic atlas and localization approach was designed for functional brain images. The PET atlas was constructed from a high-resolution [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) image set of a normal volunteer (a 41-yr-ld woman). The image set was reoriented stereotactically, according to the intercommissural (anterior and posterior commissures) line and transformed to the standard stereotactic atlas coordinates. Cerebral structures were annotated on the transaxial planes using a proportional grid system and surface-rendered images. The stereotactic localization technique was applied to image sets from patients with Alzheimer`s disease, and areas of functional alteration were localized visually by referring to the PET atlas. Major brain structures were identified on both transaxial planes and surface-rendered images. In the stereotactic system, anatomic correspondence between the PET atlas and stereotactically reoriented individual image sets of patients with Alzheimer`s disease facilitated both indirect and direct localization of the cerebral structures. Because rapid stereotactic alignment methods for PET images are now available for routine use, the PET atlas will serve as an aid for visual interpretation of functional brain images in the stereotactic system. Widespread application of stereotactic localization may be used in functional brain images, not only in the research setting, but also in routine clinical situations. 41 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Evaluating Similarity Measures for Brain Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Razlighi, Q. R.; Kehtarnavaz, N.; Yousefi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of similarity measures for image registration is a challenging problem due to its complex interaction with the underlying optimization, regularization, image type and modality. We propose a single performance metric, named robustness, as part of a new evaluation method which quantifies the effectiveness of similarity measures for brain image registration while eliminating the effects of the other parts of the registration process. We show empirically that similarity measures with higher robustness are more effective in registering degraded images and are also more successful in performing intermodal image registration. Further, we introduce a new similarity measure, called normalized spatial mutual information, for 3D brain image registration whose robustness is shown to be much higher than the existing ones. Consequently, it tolerates greater image degradation and provides more consistent outcomes for intermodal brain image registration. PMID:24039378

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pediatric brain

    SciTech Connect

    Salamon, G.; Raynaud, C.; Regis, J.; Rumeau, C.

    1990-01-01

    The atlas presents sequences of MRI sections parallel to the orbito-meatal plane in children from birth through the age of sixteen years. Each child was studied horizontally and sagitally and three-dimensional brain images were reconstructed to facilitate accurate identification of sulci and gyri. The images show crucial aspects of brain development such as the constancy of the brain stem and primitive brain from birth onward; the development of the telencephalon, characterized by deepening of sulci and growth of the cerebral cortex surface; and the different stages of white matter myelinization.

  3. FASTSPECT: A four-dimensional brain imager

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, D.D.; Barrett, H.H.; Chen, J.C. |

    1994-05-01

    The exact location of a lesion in the brain is most critical. High-resolution quantitative 4-dimensional brain imaging would offer improvement in detecting and characterizing brain lesions over state-of-the-art SPECT systems. We report the first clinical brain images on FASTSPECT (Four-dimensional Arizona Stationary SPECT), a fixed imaging system based on 24 modular 10 cm x 10 cm gamma cameras in 2 rings (13+11) about the bead. Each module views the entire brain continuously from a different perspective through one or more pinhole apertures. The system gathers true 3-dimensional whole-brain data it 1-2 frame/sec, fully adequate for vascular dynamics, and is therefore a 4-dimensional imaging system (dynamic SPECT). To calibrate the system a (3.3 mm){sup 3} point source of Tc-99m is stepped through each voxel in the object space. We measure the response of each detector element on each modular camera to the source at each position. The resulting system matrix (dimensions approximately 100,000 x 160,000) is compressed, stored and used in the iterative reconstruction algorithm. Three volunteers, blindfolded for 20 min to suppress visual cortical uptake, were imaged after bolus IV injection of 30 mCi (1.11 GBq) Tc-99m HMPAO. Dynamic images at 2 sec/frame clearly showed common and internal carotid arteries, and anterior and middle cerebral artery groups. Static images (11 million counts in 20 min imaging time) clearly showed the cerebral cortex and white matter, cerebellar cortex and white matter, thalami, caudate, lentiform nuclei, cingulate gyrus, brain stem, and brachium pontis. Distinguishable only with difficulty were putamen from globus pallidus, ventral from dorsal thalamus, and cerebrospinal fluid from white matter. Comparison with concurrent conventional single-headed SPECT images in the same subjects showed significantly better anatomic definition in the FASTSPECT images. Conventional SPECT is incapable of full-brain dynamic imaging.

  4. [Imaging of brain changes in chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Nuutti; Forss, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Modern methods of brain imaging have enabled objective measurements of functional and structural brain changes associated with chronic pain conditions. According to recent investigations, chronic pain is not only associated with abnormally strong or prolonged activity of regions processing acute pain, but also with activation of brain networks that are characteristic for each pain state, changes in cortical remodeling, as well as local reduction of grey matter in several regions of the brain. Brain changes associated with chronic pain facilitate the understanding of mechanisms of various chronic pain conditions. PMID:25211820

  5. Beyond a bigger brain: Multivariable structural brain imaging and intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Stuart J.; Booth, Tom; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Corley, Janie; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Gow, Alan J.; Royle, Natalie A.; Pattie, Alison; Karama, Sherif; Starr, John M.; Bastin, Mark E.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Deary, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    People with larger brains tend to score higher on tests of general intelligence (g). It is unclear, however, how much variance in intelligence other brain measurements would account for if included together with brain volume in a multivariable model. We examined a large sample of individuals in their seventies (n = 672) who were administered a comprehensive cognitive test battery. Using structural equation modelling, we related six common magnetic resonance imaging-derived brain variables that represent normal and abnormal features—brain volume, cortical thickness, white matter structure, white matter hyperintensity load, iron deposits, and microbleeds—to g and to fluid intelligence. As expected, brain volume accounted for the largest portion of variance (~ 12%, depending on modelling choices). Adding the additional variables, especially cortical thickness (+~ 5%) and white matter hyperintensity load (+~ 2%), increased the predictive value of the model. Depending on modelling choices, all neuroimaging variables together accounted for 18–21% of the variance in intelligence. These results reveal which structural brain imaging measures relate to g over and above the largest contributor, total brain volume. They raise questions regarding which other neuroimaging measures might account for even more of the variance in intelligence. PMID:26240470

  6. Imaging Brain Development: Benefiting from Individual Variability

    PubMed Central

    Sharda, Megha; Foster, Nicholas E.V.; Hyde, Krista L.

    2015-01-01

    Human brain development is a complex process that evolves from early childhood to young adulthood. Major advances in brain imaging are increasingly being used to characterize the developing brain. These advances have further helped to elucidate the dynamic maturational processes that lead to the emergence of complex cognitive abilities in both typical and atypical development. However, conventional approaches involve categorical group comparison models and tend to disregard the role of widespread interindividual variability in brain development. This review highlights how this variability can inform our understanding of developmental processes. The latest studies in the field of brain development are reviewed, with a particular focus on the role of individual variability and the consequent heterogeneity in brain structural and functional development. This review also highlights how such heterogeneity might be utilized to inform our understanding of complex neuropsychiatric disorders and recommends the use of more dimensional approaches to study brain development. PMID:26648753

  7. CT scan of the brain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... allowing high definition not only of the bony structures, but of the soft tissues. Clear images of organs such as the brain, muscles, joint structures, veins and arteries, as well as anomalies like ...

  8. Imaging Brain Dynamics Using Independent Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Makeig, Scott; McKeown, Martin J.; Bell, Anthony J.; Lee, Te-Won; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG) and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings is important both for basic brain research and for medical diagnosis and treatment. Independent component analysis (ICA) is an effective method for removing artifacts and separating sources of the brain signals from these recordings. A similar approach is proving useful for analyzing functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (fMRI) data. In this paper, we outline the assumptions underlying ICA and demonstrate its application to a variety of electrical and hemodynamic recordings from the human brain. PMID:20824156

  9. SPECT functional brain imaging. Technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Devous, M D

    1995-07-01

    The technical aspects of functional brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging, referring primarily to the most common SPECT brain function measure--regional cerebral blood flow--are reviewed. SPECT images of regional cerebral blood flow are influenced by a number of factors unrelated to pathology, including tomographic quality, radiopharmaceuticals, environmental conditions at the time of radiotracer administration, characteristics of the subject (e.g., age, sex), image presentation, and image processing techniques. Modern SPECT scans yield excellent image quality, and instrumentation continues to improve. The armamentarium of regional cerebral blood flow and receptor radiopharmaceuticals is rapidly expanding. Standards regarding the environment for patient imaging and image presentation are emerging. However, there is still much to learn about the circumstances for performances and evaluation of SPECT functional brain imaging. Challenge tests, primarily established in cerebrovascular disease (i.e., the acetazolamide test), offer great promise in defining the extent and nature of disease, as well as predicting therapeutic responses. Clearly, SPECT brain imaging is a powerful clinical and research tool. However, SPECT will only achieve its full potential in the management of patients with cerebral pathology through close cooperation among members of the nuclear medicine, neurology, psychiatry, neurosurgery, and internal medicine specialties. PMID:7626833

  10. Brain and nervous system (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The nervous system controls the many complicated and interconnected functions of the body and mind. Motor, sensory cognitive and autonomic function are all coordinated and driven by the brain and nerves. As people age, ...

  11. Brain and nervous system (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The nervous system controls the many complicated and interconnected functions of the body and mind. Motor, sensory cognitive and autonomic function are all coordinated and driven by the brain and nerves. As people age, nerve ...

  12. NIH Conference. Brain imaging: aging and dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, N.R.; Duara, R.; Creasey, H.; Grady, C.L.; Haxby, J.V.; Schapiro, M.B.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1984-09-01

    The brain imaging techniques of positron emission tomography using (18F)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose, and computed tomography, together with neuropsychological tests, were used to examine overall brain function and anatomy in three study populations: healthy men at different ages, patients with presumptive Alzheimer's disease, and adults with Down's syndrome. Brain glucose use did not differ with age, whereas an age-related decrement in gray matter volume was found on computed tomographic assessment in healthy subjects. Memory deficits were found to precede significant reductions in brain glucose utilization in mild to moderate Alzheimer's dementia. Furthermore, differences between language and visuoconstructive impairments in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease were related to hemispheric asymmetry of brain metabolism. Brain glucose utilization was found to be significantly elevated in young adults with Down's syndrome, compared with controls. The importance of establishing strict criteria for selecting control subjects and patients is explained in relation to the findings.

  13. Image guided constitutive modeling of the silicone brain phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzrin, Alexander; Skrinjar, Oskar; Ozan, Cem; Kim, Sihyun; Mukundan, Srinivasan

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work is to develop reliable constitutive models of the mechanical behavior of the in-vivo human brain tissue for applications in neurosurgery. We propose to define the mechanical properties of the brain tissue in-vivo, by taking the global MR or CT images of a brain response to ventriculostomy - the relief of the elevated intracranial pressure. 3D image analysis translates these images into displacement fields, which by using inverse analysis allow for the constitutive models of the brain tissue to be developed. We term this approach Image Guided Constitutive Modeling (IGCM). The presented paper demonstrates performance of the IGCM in the controlled environment: on the silicone brain phantoms closely simulating the in-vivo brain geometry, mechanical properties and boundary conditions. The phantom of the left hemisphere of human brain was cast using silicon gel. An inflatable rubber membrane was placed inside the phantom to model the lateral ventricle. The experiments were carried out in a specially designed setup in a CT scanner with submillimeter isotropic voxels. The non-communicative hydrocephalus and ventriculostomy were simulated by consequently inflating and deflating the internal rubber membrane. The obtained images were analyzed to derive displacement fields, meshed, and incorporated into ABAQUS. The subsequent Inverse Finite Element Analysis (based on Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm) allowed for optimization of the parameters of the Mooney-Rivlin non-linear elastic model for the phantom material. The calculated mechanical properties were consistent with those obtained from the element tests, providing justification for the future application of the IGCM to in-vivo brain tissue.

  14. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  15. Hemorrhage detection in MRI brain images using images features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraru, Luminita; Moldovanu, Simona; Bibicu, Dorin; Stratulat (Visan), Mirela

    2013-11-01

    The abnormalities appear frequently on Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of brain in elderly patients presenting either stroke or cognitive impairment. Detection of brain hemorrhage lesions in MRI is an important but very time-consuming task. This research aims to develop a method to extract brain tissue features from T2-weighted MR images of the brain using a selection of the most valuable texture features in order to discriminate between normal and affected areas of the brain. Due to textural similarity between normal and affected areas in brain MR images these operation are very challenging. A trauma may cause microstructural changes, which are not necessarily perceptible by visual inspection, but they could be detected by using a texture analysis. The proposed analysis is developed in five steps: i) in the pre-processing step: the de-noising operation is performed using the Daubechies wavelets; ii) the original images were transformed in image features using the first order descriptors; iii) the regions of interest (ROIs) were cropped from images feature following up the axial symmetry properties with respect to the mid - sagittal plan; iv) the variation in the measurement of features was quantified using the two descriptors of the co-occurrence matrix, namely energy and homogeneity; v) finally, the meaningful of the image features is analyzed by using the t-test method. P-value has been applied to the pair of features in order to measure they efficacy.

  16. Multiparametric MR Imaging of Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ona; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Sorensen, Alma Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to improve the diagnosis and management of patients with brain disorders. Multiparametric MRI offers the possibility of noninvasively assessing multiple facets of pathophysiological processes that exist simultaneously, thereby further assisting in patient treatment management. Voxel-based analysis approaches, such as tissue theme mapping, have the benefit over volumetric approaches in being able to identify spatially heterogeneous co-localized changes on multiple parametric MR images that are not readily discernible. Tissue theme maps appear to be a promising tool for integrating the plethora of novel imaging contrasts that are being developed for the non-invasive investigation of the different stages of disease progression into easily interpretable maps of brain injury. We describe here various implementations for combining multiparametric imaging and their merits in the evaluation of brain diseases. PMID:21613877

  17. Perfusion harmonic imaging of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, Volker H.; Seidel, Guenter; Wiesmann, Martin; Meyer, Karsten; Aach, Til

    2003-05-01

    The fast visualisation of cerebral microcirculation supports diagnosis of acute cerebrovascular diseases. However, the commonly used CT/MRI-based methods are time consuming and, moreover, costly. Therefore we propose an alternative approach to brain perfusion imaging by means of ultrasonography. In spite of the low signal/noise-ratio of transcranial ultrasound and the high impedance of the skull, flow images of cerebral blood flow can be derived by capturing the kinetics of appropriate contrast agents by harmonic ultrasound image sequences. In this paper we propose three different methods for human brain perfusion imaging, each of which yielding flow images indicating the status of the patient's cerebral microcirculation by visualising local flow parameters. Bolus harmonic imaging (BHI) displays the flow kinetics of bolus injections, while replenishment (RHI) and diminution harmonic imaging (DHI) compute flow characteristics from contrast agent continuous infusions. RHI measures the contrast agents kinetics in the influx phase and DHI displays the diminution kinetics of the contrast agent acquired from the decay phase. In clinical studies, BHI- and RHI-parameter images were found to represent comprehensive and reproducible distributions of physiological cerebral blood flow. For DHI it is shown, that bubble destruction and hence perfusion phenomena principally can be displayed. Generally, perfusion harmonic imaging enables reliable and fast bedside imaging of human brain perfusion. Due to its cost efficiency it complements cerebrovascular diagnostics by established CT/MRI-based methods.

  18. Implantable image sensor based on intra-brain image transmission.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Ishii, Yoshiaki; Yokota, Shogo; Matsuda, Takashi; Davis, Peter; Zhang, Bing; Li, Keren; Noda, Toshihiko; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2013-01-01

    We developed and fabricated a micro-imager based on wireless intra-brain communication using conductive property of living tissues. An pixel array, analog-to-digital converter and transmitter are integrated on a single chip. The dimensions of the chip are 1 mm × 1mm × 0.15 mm. We demonstrate wireless image transmission through phosphate buffer saline as a brain phantom. PMID:24110074

  19. Proton MRS imaging in pediatric brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Zarifi, Maria; Tzika, A Aria

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques offer a noninvasive, non-irradiating yet sensitive approach to diagnosing and monitoring pediatric brain tumors. Proton MR spectroscopy (MRS), as an adjunct to MRI, is being more widely applied to monitor the metabolic aspects of brain cancer. In vivo MRS biomarkers represent a promising advance and may influence treatment choice at both initial diagnosis and follow-up, given the inherent difficulties of sequential biopsies to monitor therapeutic response. When combined with anatomical or other types of imaging, MRS provides unique information regarding biochemistry in inoperable brain tumors and can complement neuropathological data, guide biopsies and enhance insight into therapeutic options. The combination of noninvasively acquired prognostic information and the high-resolution anatomical imaging provided by conventional MRI is expected to surpass molecular analysis and DNA microarray gene profiling, both of which, although promising, depend on invasive biopsy. This review focuses on recent data in the field of MRS in children with brain tumors. PMID:27233788

  20. Cerenkov and radioluminescence imaging of brain tumor specimens during neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Antonello Enrico; Schiariti, Marco P.; Grana, Chiara M.; Ferrari, Mahila; Cremonesi, Marta; Boschi, Federico

    2016-05-01

    We presented the first example of Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) and radioluminescence imaging (RLI) of human tumor specimens. A patient with a brain meningioma localized in the left parietal region was injected with 166 MBq of Y90-DOTATOC the day before neurosurgery. The specimens of the tumor removed during surgery were imaged using both CLI and RLI using an optical imager prototype developed in our laboratory. The system is based on a cooled electron multiplied charge coupled device coupled with an f/0.95 17-mm C-mount lens. We showed for the first time the possibility of obtaining CLI and RLI images of fresh human brain tumor specimens removed during neurosurgery.

  1. Generating Text from Functional Brain Images

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Francisco; Detre, Greg; Botvinick, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Recent work has shown that it is possible to take brain images acquired during viewing of a scene and reconstruct an approximation of the scene from those images. Here we show that it is also possible to generate text about the mental content reflected in brain images. We began with images collected as participants read names of concrete items (e.g., “Apartment’’) while also seeing line drawings of the item named. We built a model of the mental semantic representation of concrete concepts from text data and learned to map aspects of such representation to patterns of activation in the corresponding brain image. In order to validate this mapping, without accessing information about the items viewed for left-out individual brain images, we were able to generate from each one a collection of semantically pertinent words (e.g., “door,” “window” for “Apartment’’). Furthermore, we show that the ability to generate such words allows us to perform a classification task and thus validate our method quantitatively. PMID:21927602

  2. Generating text from functional brain images.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Francisco; Detre, Greg; Botvinick, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Recent work has shown that it is possible to take brain images acquired during viewing of a scene and reconstruct an approximation of the scene from those images. Here we show that it is also possible to generate text about the mental content reflected in brain images. We began with images collected as participants read names of concrete items (e.g., "Apartment'') while also seeing line drawings of the item named. We built a model of the mental semantic representation of concrete concepts from text data and learned to map aspects of such representation to patterns of activation in the corresponding brain image. In order to validate this mapping, without accessing information about the items viewed for left-out individual brain images, we were able to generate from each one a collection of semantically pertinent words (e.g., "door," "window" for "Apartment''). Furthermore, we show that the ability to generate such words allows us to perform a classification task and thus validate our method quantitatively. PMID:21927602

  3. Electromagnetic inverse applications for functional brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, C.C.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project addresses an important mathematical and computational problem in functional brain imaging, namely the electromagnetic {open_quotes}inverse problem.{close_quotes} Electromagnetic brain imaging techniques, magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG), are based on measurements of electrical potentials and magnetic fields at hundreds of locations outside the human head. The inverse problem is the estimation of the locations, magnitudes, and time-sources of electrical currents in the brain from surface measurements. This project extends recent progress on the inverse problem by combining the use of anatomical constraints derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with Bayesian and other novel algorithmic approaches. The results suggest that we can achieve significant improvements in the accuracy and robustness of inverse solutions by these two approaches.

  4. Large-scale imaging in small brains

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Misha B.; Engert, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The dense connectivity in the brain and arrangements of cells into circuits means that one neuron’s activity can influence many others. To observe this interconnected system comprehensively, an aspiration within neuroscience is to record from as many neurons as possible at the same time. There are two useful routes toward this goal: one is to expand the spatial extent of functional imaging techniques, and the second is to use animals with small brains. Here we review recent progress toward imaging many neurons and complete populations of identified neurons in small vertebrates and invertebrates. PMID:25636154

  5. Wireless intra-brain communication for image transmission through mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Matsuda, Takashi; Davis, Peter; Zhang, Bing; Li, Keren; Kobayashi, Takuma; Noda, Toshihiko; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate wireless image data transmission through a mouse brain. The transmission characteristics of mouse brain is measured. By inserting electrodes into the brain, the transmission efficiency is drastically increased. An AM signal modulated with the image data from an implantable image sensor was launched into the brain and the received signal was demodulated. The data was successfully transmitted through the brain and the image was reproduced. PMID:22254951

  6. Obtaining anisotropic velocity data for proper depth seismic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Egerev, Sergey; Yushin, Victor; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Dubinsky, Vladimir; Patterson, Doug

    2012-05-24

    The paper deals with the problem of obtaining anisotropic velocity data due to continuous acoustic impedance-based measurements while scanning in the axial direction along the walls of the borehole. Diagrams of full conductivity of the piezoceramic transducer were used to derive anisotropy parameters of the rock sample. The measurements are aimed to support accurate depth imaging of seismic data. Understanding these common anisotropy effects is important when interpreting data where it is present.

  7. Biophotonics: Through-skull brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.

    2014-09-01

    The use of carbon nanotubes makes it possible to perform fluorescent imaging of cerebral vasculature of mice through their intact skulls. The high spatial and temporal resolution of the non-invasive technique may prove useful for studies of stroke and other brain disorders.

  8. Brain mapping: new wave optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas; Hübener, Mark; Bonhoeffer, Tobias

    2003-09-30

    Optical imaging of intrinsic signals is widely used for high-resolution brain mapping in various animal species. A new approach using continuous data acquisition and Fourier decomposition of the signal allows for much faster mapping, opening up the possibility of applying this method to new experimental questions. PMID:14521859

  9. Brain Imaging Studies of Developmental Stuttering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingham, Roger J.

    2001-01-01

    A review of research on brain imaging of developmental stuttering concludes that findings increasingly point to a failure of normal temporal lobe activation during speech that may either contribute to (or is the result of) a breakdown in the sequencing of processing among premotor regions implicated in phonologic planning. (Contains references.)…

  10. Imaging assessment of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Currie, Stuart; Saleem, Nayyar; Straiton, John A; Macmullen-Price, Jeremy; Warren, Daniel J; Craven, Ian J

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) constitutes injury that occurs to the brain as a result of trauma. It should be appreciated as a heterogeneous, dynamic pathophysiological process that starts from the moment of impact and continues over time with sequelae potentially seen many years after the initial event. Primary traumatic brain lesions that may occur at the moment of impact include contusions, haematomas, parenchymal fractures and diffuse axonal injury. The presence of extra-axial intracranial lesions such as epidural and subdural haematomas and subarachnoid haemorrhage must be anticipated as they may contribute greatly to secondary brain insult by provoking brain herniation syndromes, cranial nerve deficits, oedema and ischaemia and infarction. Imaging is fundamental to the management of patients with TBI. CT remains the imaging modality of choice for initial assessment due to its ease of access, rapid acquisition and for its sensitivity for detection of acute haemorrhagic lesions for surgical intervention. MRI is typically reserved for the detection of lesions that may explain clinical symptoms that remain unresolved despite initial CT. This is especially apparent in the setting of diffuse axonal injury, which is poorly discerned on CT. Use of particular MRI sequences may increase the sensitivity of detecting such lesions: diffusion-weighted imaging defining acute infarction, susceptibility-weighted imaging affording exquisite data on microhaemorrhage. Additional advanced MRI techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging and functional MRI may provide important information regarding coexistent structural and functional brain damage. Gaining robust prognostic information for patients following TBI remains a challenge. Advanced MRI sequences are showing potential for biomarkers of disease, but this largely remains at the research level. Various global collaborative research groups have been established in an effort to combine imaging data with clinical and

  11. Registration of challenging pre-clinical brain images

    PubMed Central

    Crum, William R.; Modo, Michel; Vernon, Anthony C.; Barker, Gareth J.; Williams, Steven C.R.

    2013-01-01

    The size and complexity of brain imaging studies in pre-clinical populations are increasing, and automated image analysis pipelines are urgently required. Pre-clinical populations can be subjected to controlled interventions (e.g., targeted lesions), which significantly change the appearance of the brain obtained by imaging. Existing systems for registration (the systematic alignment of scans into a consistent anatomical coordinate system), which assume image similarity to a reference scan, may fail when applied to these images. However, affine registration is a particularly vital pre-processing step for subsequent image analysis which is assumed to be an effective procedure in recent literature describing sophisticated techniques such as manifold learning. Therefore, in this paper, we present an affine registration solution that uses a graphical model of a population to decompose difficult pairwise registrations into a composition of steps using other members of the population. We developed this methodology in the context of a pre-clinical model of stroke in which large, variable hyper-intense lesions significantly impact registration performance. We tested this technique systematically in a simulated human population of brain tumour images before applying it to pre-clinical models of Parkinson's disease and stroke. PMID:23558335

  12. Multimodal Imaging Brain Connectivity Analysis (MIBCA) toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Lacerda, Luis Miguel; Ferreira, Hugo Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Aim. In recent years, connectivity studies using neuroimaging data have increased the understanding of the organization of large-scale structural and functional brain networks. However, data analysis is time consuming as rigorous procedures must be assured, from structuring data and pre-processing to modality specific data procedures. Until now, no single toolbox was able to perform such investigations on truly multimodal image data from beginning to end, including the combination of different connectivity analyses. Thus, we have developed the Multimodal Imaging Brain Connectivity Analysis (MIBCA) toolbox with the goal of diminishing time waste in data processing and to allow an innovative and comprehensive approach to brain connectivity. Materials and Methods. The MIBCA toolbox is a fully automated all-in-one connectivity toolbox that offers pre-processing, connectivity and graph theoretical analyses of multimodal image data such as diffusion-weighted imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). It was developed in MATLAB environment and pipelines well-known neuroimaging softwares such as Freesurfer, SPM, FSL, and Diffusion Toolkit. It further implements routines for the construction of structural, functional and effective or combined connectivity matrices, as well as, routines for the extraction and calculation of imaging and graph-theory metrics, the latter using also functions from the Brain Connectivity Toolbox. Finally, the toolbox performs group statistical analysis and enables data visualization in the form of matrices, 3D brain graphs and connectograms. In this paper the MIBCA toolbox is presented by illustrating its capabilities using multimodal image data from a group of 35 healthy subjects (19–73 years old) with volumetric T1-weighted, diffusion tensor imaging, and resting state fMRI data, and 10 subjets with 18F-Altanserin PET data also. Results. It was observed both a high inter-hemispheric symmetry

  13. Evaluation of an automatic brain segmentation method developed for neonates on adult MR brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeskops, Pim; Viergever, Max A.; Benders, Manon J. N. L.; Išgum, Ivana

    2015-03-01

    Automatic brain tissue segmentation is of clinical relevance in images acquired at all ages. The literature presents a clear distinction between methods developed for MR images of infants, and methods developed for images of adults. The aim of this work is to evaluate a method developed for neonatal images in the segmentation of adult images. The evaluated method employs supervised voxel classification in subsequent stages, exploiting spatial and intensity information. Evaluation was performed using images available within the MRBrainS13 challenge. The obtained average Dice coefficients were 85.77% for grey matter, 88.66% for white matter, 81.08% for cerebrospinal fluid, 95.65% for cerebrum, and 96.92% for intracranial cavity, currently resulting in the best overall ranking. The possibility of applying the same method to neonatal as well as adult images can be of great value in cross-sectional studies that include a wide age range.

  14. Multiresolution simulated annealing for brain image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loncaric, Sven; Majcenic, Zoran

    1999-05-01

    Analysis of biomedical images is an important step in quantification of various diseases such as human spontaneous intracerebral brain hemorrhage (ICH). In particular, the study of outcome in patients having ICH requires measurements of various ICH parameters such as hemorrhage volume and their change over time. A multiresolution probabilistic approach for segmentation of CT head images is presented in this work. This method views the segmentation problem as a pixel labeling problem. In this application the labels are: background, skull, brain tissue, and ICH. The proposed method is based on the Maximum A-Posteriori (MAP) estimation of the unknown pixel labels. The MAP method maximizes the a-posterior probability of segmented image given the observed (input) image. Markov random field (MRF) model has been used for the posterior distribution. The MAP estimation of the segmented image has been determined using the simulated annealing (SA) algorithm. The SA algorithm is used to minimize the energy function associated with MRF posterior distribution function. A multiresolution SA (MSA) has been developed to speed up the annealing process. MSA is presented in detail in this work. A knowledge-based classification based on the brightness, size, shape and relative position toward other regions is performed at the end of the procedure. The regions are identified as background, skull, brain, ICH and calcifications.

  15. Ontology-Based Annotation of Brain MRI Images

    PubMed Central

    Mechouche, Ammar; Golbreich, Christine; Morandi, Xavier; Gibaud, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a hybrid system for annotating anatomical structures in brain Magnetic Resonance Images. The system involves both numerical knowledge from an atlas and symbolic knowledge represented in a rule-extended ontology, written in standard web languages, and symbolic constraints. The system combines this knowledge with graphical data automatically extracted from the images. The annotations of the parts of sulci and of gyri located in a region of interest selected by the user are obtained with a reasoning based on a Constraint Satisfaction Problem solving combined with Description Logics inference services. The first results obtained with both normal and pathological data are promising. PMID:18998967

  16. Intraoperative infrared imaging of brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gorbach, Alexander M.; Heiss, John D.; Kopylev, Leonid; Oldfield, Edward H.

    2014-01-01

    Object Although clinical imaging defines the anatomical relationship between a brain tumor and the surrounding brain and neurological deficits indicate the neurophysiological consequences of the tumor, the effect of a brain tumor on vascular physiology is less clear. Methods An infrared camera was used to measure the temperature of the cortical surface before, during, and after removal of a mass in 34 patients (primary brain tumor in 21 patients, brain metastases in 10 and falx meningioma, cavernous angioma, and radiation necrosis–astrocytosis in one patient each). To establish the magnitude of the effect on blood flow induced by the tumor, the images were compared with those from a group of six patients who underwent temporal lobectomy for epilepsy. In four cases a cerebral artery was temporarily occluded during the course of the surgery and infrared emissions from the cortex before and after occlusion were compared to establish the relationship of local temperature to regional blood flow. Discrete temperature gradients were associated with surgically verified lesions in all cases. Depending on the type of tumor, the cortex overlying the tumor was either colder or warmer than the surrounding cortex. Spatial reorganization of thermal gradients was observed after tumor resection. Temperature gradients of the cortex in patients with tumors exceeded those measured in the cortex of patients who underwent epilepsy surgery. Conclusions Brain tumors induce changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the cortex, which can be made visible by performing infrared imaging during cranial surgery. A reduction in CBF beyond the tumor margin improves after removal of the lesion. PMID:15599965

  17. Structural and functional brain imaging in schizophrenia.

    PubMed Central

    Cleghorn, J M; Zipursky, R B; List, S J

    1991-01-01

    We present an evaluation of the contribution of structural and functional brain imaging to our understanding of schizophrenia. Methodological influences on the validity of the data generated by these new technologies include problems with measurement and clinical and anatomic heterogeneity. These considerations greatly affect the interpretation of the data generated by these technologies. Work in these fields to date, however, has produced strong evidence which suggests that schizophrenia is a disease which involves abnormalities in the structure and function of many brain areas. Structural brain imaging studies of schizophrenia using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are reviewed and their contribution to current theories of the pathogenesis of schizophrenia are discussed. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies of brain metabolic activity and dopamine receptor binding in schizophrenia are summarized and the critical questions raised by these studies are outlined. Future studies in these fields have the potential to yield critical insights into the pathophysiology of schizophrenia; new directions for studies of schizophrenia using these technologies are identified. PMID:1911736

  18. Phase imaging in brain using SWIFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehto, Lauri Juhani; Garwood, Michael; Gröhn, Olli; Corum, Curtis Andrew

    2015-03-01

    The majority of MRI phase imaging is based on gradient recalled echo (GRE) sequences. This work studies phase contrast behavior due to small off-resonance frequency offsets in brain using SWIFT, a FID-based sequence with nearly zero acquisition delay. 1D simulations and a phantom study were conducted to describe the behavior of phase accumulation in SWIFT. Imaging experiments of known brain phase contrast properties were conducted in a perfused rat brain comparing GRE and SWIFT. Additionally, a human brain sample was imaged. It is demonstrated how SWIFT phase is orientation dependent and correlates well with GRE, linking SWIFT phase to similar off-resonance sources as GRE. The acquisition time is shown to be analogous to TE for phase accumulation time. Using experiments with and without a magnetization transfer preparation, the likely effect of myelin water pool contribution is seen as a phase increase for all acquisition times. Due to the phase accumulation during acquisition, SWIFT phase contrast can be sensitized to small frequency differences between white and gray matter using low acquisition bandwidths.

  19. Introduction to machine learning for brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Lemm, Steven; Blankertz, Benjamin; Dickhaus, Thorsten; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2011-05-15

    Machine learning and pattern recognition algorithms have in the past years developed to become a working horse in brain imaging and the computational neurosciences, as they are instrumental for mining vast amounts of neural data of ever increasing measurement precision and detecting minuscule signals from an overwhelming noise floor. They provide the means to decode and characterize task relevant brain states and to distinguish them from non-informative brain signals. While undoubtedly this machinery has helped to gain novel biological insights, it also holds the danger of potential unintentional abuse. Ideally machine learning techniques should be usable for any non-expert, however, unfortunately they are typically not. Overfitting and other pitfalls may occur and lead to spurious and nonsensical interpretation. The goal of this review is therefore to provide an accessible and clear introduction to the strengths and also the inherent dangers of machine learning usage in the neurosciences. PMID:21172442

  20. Brain imaging in Urea cycle disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gropman, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Urea Cycle Disorders (UCD) represent a group of rare inborn errors of metabolism that carry a high risk of mortality and neurological morbidity resulting from the effects of accumulation of ammonia and other biochemical intermediates. These disorders result from single gene defects involved in the detoxification pathway of ammonia to urea. UCD include deficiencies in any of the six enzymes and two membrane transporters involved in urea biosynthesis. It has previously been reported that approximately half of infants who present with hyperammonemic coma in the newborn period die of cerebral edema; and those who survive 3 days or more of coma invariably have intellectual disability [1]. In children with partial defects there is an association between the number and severity of recurrent hyperammonemic (HA) episodes (i.e. with or without coma) and subsequent cognitive and neurologic deficits [2]. However, the effects of milder or subclinical HA episodes on the brain are largely unknown. This review discusses the results of neuroimaging studies performed as part of the NIH funded Rare Diseases Clinical Research Center in Urea Cycle Disorders and focuses on biomarkers of brain injury in ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD). We used anatomic imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and 1H /13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to study clinically stable adults with partial OTCD. This allowed us to determine alterations in brain biochemistry associated with changes in cell volume and osmolarity and permitted us to identify brain biomarkers of HA. We found that white matter tracts underlying specific pathways involved in working memory and executive function are altered in subjects with OTCD (as measured by DTI), including those heterozygous women who were previously considered asymptomatic. An understanding of the pathogenesis of brain injury in UCD is likely to advance our knowledge of more common disorders of

  1. Photoacoustic brain imaging: from microscopic to macroscopic scales

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Human brain mapping has become one of the most exciting contemporary research areas, with major breakthroughs expected in the coming decades. Modern brain imaging techniques have allowed neuroscientists to gather a wealth of anatomic and functional information about the brain. Among these techniques, by virtue of its rich optical absorption contrast, high spatial and temporal resolutions, and deep penetration, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has attracted more and more attention, and is playing an increasingly important role in brain studies. In particular, PAT complements other brain imaging modalities by providing high-resolution functional and metabolic imaging. More importantly, PAT’s unique scalability enables scrutinizing the brain at both microscopic and macroscopic scales, using the same imaging contrast. In this review, we present the state-of-the-art PAT techniques for brain imaging, summarize representative neuroscience applications, outline the technical challenges in translating PAT to human brain imaging, and envision potential technological deliverables. PMID:25401121

  2. Reliability of fish size estimates obtained from multibeam imaging sonar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hightower, Joseph E.; Magowan, Kevin J.; Brown, Lori M.; Fox, Dewayne A.

    2013-01-01

    Multibeam imaging sonars have considerable potential for use in fisheries surveys because the video-like images are easy to interpret, and they contain information about fish size, shape, and swimming behavior, as well as characteristics of occupied habitats. We examined images obtained using a dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) multibeam sonar for Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus, striped bass Morone saxatilis, white perch M. americana, and channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus of known size (20–141 cm) to determine the reliability of length estimates. For ranges up to 11 m, percent measurement error (sonar estimate – total length)/total length × 100 varied by species but was not related to the fish's range or aspect angle (orientation relative to the sonar beam). Least-square mean percent error was significantly different from 0.0 for Atlantic sturgeon (x̄  =  −8.34, SE  =  2.39) and white perch (x̄  = 14.48, SE  =  3.99) but not striped bass (x̄  =  3.71, SE  =  2.58) or channel catfish (x̄  = 3.97, SE  =  5.16). Underestimating lengths of Atlantic sturgeon may be due to difficulty in detecting the snout or the longer dorsal lobe of the heterocercal tail. White perch was the smallest species tested, and it had the largest percent measurement errors (both positive and negative) and the lowest percentage of images classified as good or acceptable. Automated length estimates for the four species using Echoview software varied with position in the view-field. Estimates tended to be low at more extreme azimuthal angles (fish's angle off-axis within the view-field), but mean and maximum estimates were highly correlated with total length. Software estimates also were biased by fish images partially outside the view-field and when acoustic crosstalk occurred (when a fish perpendicular to the sonar and at relatively close range is detected in the side lobes of adjacent beams). These sources of

  3. [Brain imaging of first-episode psychosis].

    PubMed

    Jardri, R

    2013-09-01

    In the last decades, schizophrenia has intensively been studied using various brain imaging techniques. However, several potential confounding factors limited their interpretation power (e.g. chronicity, the impact of antipsychotic medication). By considering psychosis as a continuum of changes starting from mild cognitive impairments to serious psychotic symptoms, it became possible to provide deeper insight in the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the onset of psychosis by focusing on at-risk individuals and first-episodes. Recent brain imaging meta-analyses of the first episode psychosis (FEP), noteworthy reported conjoint bilateral structural and functional differences at the level of the insula, the superior temporal gyrus and the medial frontal gyrus, encompassing the anterior cingulate cortex. In the present review, we thus provide an update of brain imaging studies of FEP with a particular emphasis on more recent anatomical, functional and molecular explorations. Specifically, we provide 1) a review of the common features observed in individuals with high risk for psychosis and changes characterizing the transition to psychosis, 2) a description of the environmental and drug factors influencing these abnormalities, 3) how these findings in FEP may differ from those observed in chronic individuals with schizophrenia, and 4) a short overview of new classification algorithms able to use MRI findings as valuable biomarkers to guide early detection in the prodromal phase of psychosis. PMID:24084428

  4. Decoding post-stroke motor function from structural brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Rondina, Jane M; Filippone, Maurizio; Girolami, Mark; Ward, Nick S

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research based on neuroimaging data has benefited from machine learning methods, which have the ability to provide individualized predictions and to account for the interaction among units of information in the brain. Application of machine learning in structural imaging to investigate diseases that involve brain injury presents an additional challenge, especially in conditions like stroke, due to the high variability across patients regarding characteristics of the lesions. Extracting data from anatomical images in a way that translates brain damage information into features to be used as input to learning algorithms is still an open question. One of the most common approaches to capture regional information from brain injury is to obtain the lesion load per region (i.e. the proportion of voxels in anatomical structures that are considered to be damaged). However, no systematic evaluation has yet been performed to compare this approach with using patterns of voxels (i.e. considering each voxel as a single feature). In this paper we compared both approaches applying Gaussian Process Regression to decode motor scores in 50 chronic stroke patients based solely on data derived from structural MRI. For both approaches we compared different ways to delimit anatomical areas: regions of interest from an anatomical atlas, the corticospinal tract, a mask obtained from fMRI analysis with a motor task in healthy controls and regions selected using lesion-symptom mapping. Our analysis showed that extracting features through patterns of voxels that represent lesion probability produced better results than quantifying the lesion load per region. In particular, from the different ways to delimit anatomical areas compared, the best performance was obtained with a combination of a range of cortical and subcortical motor areas as well as the corticospinal tract. These results will inform the appropriate methodology for predicting long term motor outcomes from early post

  5. Neptune's Wind Speeds Obtained by Tracking Clouds in Voyager Images.

    PubMed

    Hammel, H B; Beebe, R F; De Jong, E M; Hansen, C J; Howell, C D; Ingersoll, A P; Johnson, T V; Limaye, S S; Magalhaes, J A; Pollack, J B; Sromovsky, L A; Suomi, V E; Swift, C E

    1989-09-22

    Images of Neptune obtained by the narrow-angle camera of the Voyager 2 spacecraft reveal large-scale cloud features that persist for several months or longer. The features' periods of rotation about the planetary axis range from 15.8 to 18.4 hours. The atmosphere equatorward of -53 degrees rotates with periods longer than the 16.05-hour period deduced from Voyager's planetary radio astronomy experiment (presumably the planet's internal rotation period). The wind speeds computed with respect to this radio period range from 20 meters per second eastward to 325 meters per second westward. Thus, the cloud-top wind speeds are roughly the same for all the planets ranging from Venus to Neptune, even though the solar energy inputs to the atmospheres vary by a factor of 1000. PMID:17798743

  6. Simulation of brain tumor resection in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Fontaine, Kathryn; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2011-03-01

    Preoperative magnetic resonance images are typically used for neuronavigation in image-guided neurosurgery. However, intraoperative brain deformation (e.g., as a result of gravitation, loss of cerebrospinal fluid, retraction, resection, etc.) significantly degrades the accuracy in image guidance, and must be compensated for in order to maintain sufficient accuracy for navigation. Biomechanical finite element models are effective techniques that assimilate intraoperative data and compute whole-brain deformation from which to generate model-updated MR images (uMR) to improve accuracy in intraoperative guidance. To date, most studies have focused on early surgical stages (i.e., after craniotomy and durotomy), whereas simulation of more complex events at later surgical stages has remained to be a challenge using biomechanical models. We have developed a method to simulate partial or complete tumor resection that incorporates intraoperative volumetric ultrasound (US) and stereovision (SV), and the resulting whole-brain deformation was used to generate uMR. The 3D ultrasound and stereovision systems are complimentary to each other because they capture features deeper in the brain beneath the craniotomy and at the exposed cortical surface, respectively. In this paper, we illustrate the application of the proposed method to simulate brain tumor resection at three temporally distinct surgical stages throughout a clinical surgery case using sparse displacement data obtained from both the US and SV systems. We demonstrate that our technique is feasible to produce uMR that agrees well with intraoperative US and SV images after dural opening, after partial tumor resection, and after complete tumor resection. Currently, the computational cost to simulate tumor resection can be up to 30 min because of the need for re-meshing and the trial-and-error approach to refine the amount of tissue resection. However, this approach introduces minimal interruption to the surgical workflow

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging and cell-based neurorestorative therapy after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Restorative cell-based therapies for experimental brain injury, such as stroke and traumatic brain injury, substantially improve functional outcome. We discuss and review state of the art magnetic resonance imaging methodologies and their applications related to cell-based treatment after brain injury. We focus on the potential of magnetic resonance imaging technique and its associated challenges to obtain useful new information related to cell migration, distribution, and quantitation, as well as vascular and neuronal remodeling in response to cell-based therapy after brain injury. The noninvasive nature of imaging might more readily help with translation of cell-based therapy from the laboratory to the clinic. PMID:26981068

  8. Structural Imaging Measures of Brain Aging

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Samuel N.

    2014-01-01

    During the course of normal aging, biological changes occur in the brain that are associated with changes in cognitive ability. This review presents data from neuroimaging studies of primarily “normal” or healthy brain aging. As such, we focus on research in unimpaired or nondemented older adults, but also include findings from lifespan studies that include younger and middle aged individuals as well as from populations with prodromal or clinically symptomatic disease such as cerebrovascular or Alzheimer’s disease. This review predominantly addresses structural MRI biomarkers, such as volumetric or thickness measures from anatomical images, and measures of white matter injury and integrity respectively from FLAIR or DTI, and includes complementary data from PET and cognitive or clinical testing as appropriate. The findings reveal highly consistent age-related differences in brain structure, particularly frontal lobe and medial temporal regions that are also accompanied by age-related differences in frontal and medial temporal lobe mediated cognitive abilities. Newer findings also suggest that degeneration of specific white matter tracts such as those passing through the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum may also be related to age-related differences in cognitive performance. Interpretation of these findings, however, must be tempered by the fact that comorbid diseases such as cerebrovascular and Alzheimer’s disease also increase in prevalence with advancing age. As such, this review discusses challenges related to interpretation of current theories of cognitive aging in light of the common occurrence of these later-life diseases. Understanding the differences between “Normal” and “Healthy” brain aging and identifying potential modifiable risk factors for brain aging is critical to inform potential treatments to stall or reverse the effects of brain aging and possibly extend cognitive health for our aging society. PMID:25146995

  9. Imaging Brain Mechanisms in Chronic Visceral Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Emeran A.; Gupta, Arpana; Kilpatrick, Lisa A.; Hong, Jui-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Chronic visceral pain syndromes are important clinical problems with largely unmet medical needs. Based on the common overlap with other chronic disorders of visceral or somatic pain, mood and affect, and their responsiveness to centrally targeted treatments, an important role of central nervous system in their pathophysiology is likely. A growing number of brain imaging studies in irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia and bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis has identified abnormalities in evoked brain responses, resting state activity and connectivity, as well as in grey and white matter properties. Structural and functional alterations in brain regions of the salience, emotional arousal, and sensorimotor networks, as well as in prefrontal regions, are the most consistently reported findings. Some of these changes show moderate correlations with behavioral and clinical measures. Most recently, data driven machine-learning approaches to larger data sets have been able to classify visceral pain syndromes from healthy control subjects. Future studies need to identify the mechanisms underlying the altered brain signatures of chronic visceral pain and identify targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:25789437

  10. Imaging brain mechanisms in chronic visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Emeran A; Gupta, Arpana; Kilpatrick, Lisa A; Hong, Jui-Yang

    2015-04-01

    Chronic visceral pain syndromes are important clinical problems with largely unmet medical needs. Based on the common overlap with other chronic disorders of visceral or somatic pain, mood and affect, and their responsiveness to centrally targeted treatments, an important role of central nervous system in their pathophysiology is likely. A growing number of brain imaging studies in irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, and bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis has identified abnormalities in evoked brain responses, resting state activity, and connectivity, as well as in gray and white matter properties. Structural and functional alterations in brain regions of the salience, emotional arousal, and sensorimotor networks, as well as in prefrontal regions, are the most consistently reported findings. Some of these changes show moderate correlations with behavioral and clinical measures. Most recently, data-driven machine-learning approaches to larger data sets have been able to classify visceral pain syndromes from healthy control subjects. Future studies need to identify the mechanisms underlying the altered brain signatures of chronic visceral pain and identify targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:25789437

  11. Spatial normalization of brain images and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mangin, J-F; Lebenberg, J; Lefranc, S; Labra, N; Auzias, G; Labit, M; Guevara, M; Mohlberg, H; Roca, P; Guevara, P; Dubois, J; Leroy, F; Dehaene-Lambertz, G; Cachia, A; Dickscheid, T; Coulon, O; Poupon, C; Rivière, D; Amunts, K; Sun, Z Y

    2016-10-01

    The deformable atlas paradigm has been at the core of computational anatomy during the last two decades. Spatial normalization is the variant endowing the atlas with a coordinate system used for voxel-based aggregation of images across subjects and studies. This framework has largely contributed to the success of brain mapping. Brain spatial normalization, however, is still ill-posed because of the complexity of the human brain architecture and the lack of architectural landmarks in standard morphological MRI. Multi-atlas strategies have been developed during the last decade to overcome some difficulties in the context of segmentation. A new generation of registration algorithms embedding architectural features inferred for instance from diffusion or functional MRI is on the verge to improve the architectural value of spatial normalization. A better understanding of the architectural meaning of the cortical folding pattern will lead to use some sulci as complementary constraints. Improving the architectural compliance of spatial normalization may impose to relax the diffeomorphic constraint usually underlying atlas warping. A two-level strategy could be designed: in each region, a dictionary of templates of incompatible folding patterns would be collected and matched in a way or another using rare architectural information, while individual subjects would be aligned using diffeomorphisms to the closest template. Manifold learning could help to aggregate subjects according to their morphology. Connectivity-based strategies could emerge as an alternative to deformation-based alignment leading to match the connectomes of the subjects rather than images. PMID:27344104

  12. Electroencephalographic imaging of higher brain function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevins, A.; Smith, M. E.; McEvoy, L. K.; Leong, H.; Le, J.

    1999-01-01

    High temporal resolution is necessary to resolve the rapidly changing patterns of brain activity that underlie mental function. Electroencephalography (EEG) provides temporal resolution in the millisecond range. However, traditional EEG technology and practice provide insufficient spatial detail to identify relationships between brain electrical events and structures and functions visualized by magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography. Recent advances help to overcome this problem by recording EEGs from more electrodes, by registering EEG data with anatomical images, and by correcting the distortion caused by volume conduction of EEG signals through the skull and scalp. In addition, statistical measurements of sub-second interdependences between EEG time-series recorded from different locations can help to generate hypotheses about the instantaneous functional networks that form between different cortical regions during perception, thought and action. Example applications are presented from studies of language, attention and working memory. Along with its unique ability to monitor brain function as people perform everyday activities in the real world, these advances make modern EEG an invaluable complement to other functional neuroimaging modalities.

  13. Robust Intensity Standardization in Brain Magnetic Resonance Images.

    PubMed

    De Nunzio, Giorgio; Cataldo, Rosella; Carlà, Alessandra

    2015-12-01

    The paper is focused on a tiSsue-Based Standardization Technique (SBST) of magnetic resonance (MR) brain images. Magnetic Resonance Imaging intensities have no fixed tissue-specific numeric meaning, even within the same MRI protocol, for the same body region, or even for images of the same patient obtained on the same scanner in different moments. This affects postprocessing tasks such as automatic segmentation or unsupervised/supervised classification methods, which strictly depend on the observed image intensities, compromising the accuracy and efficiency of many image analyses algorithms. A large number of MR images from public databases, belonging to healthy people and to patients with different degrees of neurodegenerative pathology, were employed together with synthetic MRIs. Combining both histogram and tissue-specific intensity information, a correspondence is obtained for each tissue across images. The novelty consists of computing three standardizing transformations for the three main brain tissues, for each tissue class separately. In order to create a continuous intensity mapping, spline smoothing of the overall slightly discontinuous piecewise-linear intensity transformation is performed. The robustness of the technique is assessed in a post hoc manner, by verifying that automatic segmentation of images before and after standardization gives a high overlapping (Dice index >0.9) for each tissue class, even across images coming from different sources. Furthermore, SBST efficacy is tested by evaluating if and how much it increases intertissue discrimination and by assessing gaussianity of tissue gray-level distributions before and after standardization. Some quantitative comparisons to already existing different approaches available in the literature are performed. PMID:25708893

  14. Brain surface maps from 3-D medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiuhuai; Hansen, Eric W.; Gazzaniga, Michael S.

    1991-06-01

    The anatomic and functional localization of brain lesions for neurologic diagnosis and brain surgery is facilitated by labeling the cortical surface in 3D images. This paper presents a method which extracts cortical contours from magnetic resonance (MR) image series and then produces a planar surface map which preserves important anatomic features. The resultant map may be used for manual anatomic localization as well as for further automatic labeling. Outer contours are determined on MR cross-sectional images by following the clear boundaries between gray matter and cerebral-spinal fluid, skipping over sulci. Carrying this contour below the surface by shrinking it along its normal produces an inner contour that alternately intercepts gray matter (sulci) and white matter along its length. This procedure is applied to every section in the set, and the image (grayscale) values along the inner contours are radially projected and interpolated onto a semi-cylindrical surface with axis normal to the slices and large enough to cover the whole brain. A planar map of the cortical surface results by flattening this cylindrical surface. The projection from inner contour to cylindrical surface is unique in the sense that different points on the inner contour correspond to different points on the cylindrical surface. As the outer contours are readily obtained by automatic segmentation, cortical maps can be made directly from an MR series.

  15. Diffuse Optical Tomography for Brain Imaging: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huabei

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive, nonionizing, and inexpensive imaging technique that uses near-infrared light to probe tissue optical properties. Regional variations in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations as well as blood flow and oxygen consumption can be imaged by monitoring spatiotemporal variations in the absorption spectra. For brain imaging, this provides DOT unique abilities to directly measure the hemodynamic, metabolic, and neuronal responses to cells (neurons), and tissue and organ activations with high temporal resolution and good tissue penetration. DOT can be used as a stand-alone modality or can be integrated with other imaging modalities such as fMRI/MRI, PET/CT, and EEG/MEG in studying neurophysiology and pathology. This book chapter serves as an introduction to the basic theory and principles of DOT for neuroimaging. It covers the major aspects of advances in neural optical imaging including mathematics, physics, chemistry, reconstruction algorithm, instrumentation, image-guided spectroscopy, neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling, and clinical applications.

  16. Proton spectroscopic imaging of human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moonen, Chrit T. W.; Sobering, Geoffrey; Van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Gillen, Joe; Von Kienlin, Markus; Bizzi, Alberto

    Signals from water and fat can cause artifacts in proton spectroscopic imaging in the human brain. The major problem is variation of the B0 field over a range of several ppm within the sensitive volume of the standard whole-head coil. Here, the coherence-pathway formalism is used to describe and evaluate the origin of artifacts in a double spin-echo (PRESS) sequence. The attenuation of unwanted coherences using pulsed field gradients is described for homogeneous and inhomogeneous B0 fields. The effect of the following parameters on the quality of the spectroscopic images is analyzed: (a) directional order of plane selection, (b) positioning of phase-encode gradients in the sequence, (c) postprocessing spatial windowing, and (d) motion. It is shown that, for a typical echo time of 272 ms, it is not necessary to first select a region of interest within the brain borders when sufficient phase-encode steps are used. Examples of 2D proton spectroscopic images with a nominal voxel volume of 0.85 ml are given for a healthy volunteer and a patient with a low-grade glioma.

  17. Role of Hybrid Brain Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Burhan, Amer M.; Marlatt, Nicole M.; Palaniyappan, Lena; Anazodo, Udunna C.; Prato, Frank S.

    2015-01-01

    This is a focused review of imaging literature to scope the utility of hybrid brain imaging in neuropsychiatric disorders. The review focuses on brain imaging modalities that utilize hybrid (fusion) techniques to characterize abnormal brain molecular signals in combination with structural and functional changes that have been observed in neuropsychiatric disorders. An overview of clinical hybrid brain imaging technologies for human use is followed by a selective review of the literature that conceptualizes the use of these technologies in understanding basic mechanisms of major neuropsychiatric disorders and their therapeutics. Neuronal network abnormalities are highlighted throughout this review to scope the utility of hybrid imaging as a potential biomarker for each disorder. PMID:26854172

  18. Role of Hybrid Brain Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Burhan, Amer M; Marlatt, Nicole M; Palaniyappan, Lena; Anazodo, Udunna C; Prato, Frank S

    2015-01-01

    This is a focused review of imaging literature to scope the utility of hybrid brain imaging in neuropsychiatric disorders. The review focuses on brain imaging modalities that utilize hybrid (fusion) techniques to characterize abnormal brain molecular signals in combination with structural and functional changes that have been observed in neuropsychiatric disorders. An overview of clinical hybrid brain imaging technologies for human use is followed by a selective review of the literature that conceptualizes the use of these technologies in understanding basic mechanisms of major neuropsychiatric disorders and their therapeutics. Neuronal network abnormalities are highlighted throughout this review to scope the utility of hybrid imaging as a potential biomarker for each disorder. PMID:26854172

  19. MR brain image analysis in dementia: From quantitative imaging biomarkers to ageing brain models and imaging genetics.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Wiro J

    2016-10-01

    MR brain image analysis has constantly been a hot topic research area in medical image analysis over the past two decades. In this article, it is discussed how the field developed from the construction of tools for automatic quantification of brain morphology, function, connectivity and pathology, to creating models of the ageing brain in normal ageing and disease, and tools for integrated analysis of imaging and genetic data. The current and future role of the field in improved understanding of the development of neurodegenerative disease is discussed, and its potential for aiding in early and differential diagnosis and prognosis of different types of dementia. For the latter, the use of reference imaging data and reference models derived from large clinical and population imaging studies, and the application of machine learning techniques on these reference data, are expected to play a key role. PMID:27344937

  20. Imaging systems and methods for obtaining and using biometric information

    DOEpatents

    McMakin, Douglas L [Richland, WA; Kennedy, Mike O [Richland, WA

    2010-11-30

    Disclosed herein are exemplary embodiments of imaging systems and methods of using such systems. In one exemplary embodiment, one or more direct images of the body of a clothed subject are received, and a motion signature is determined from the one or more images. In this embodiment, the one or more images show movement of the body of the subject over time, and the motion signature is associated with the movement of the subject's body. In certain implementations, the subject can be identified based at least in part on the motion signature. Imaging systems for performing any of the disclosed methods are also disclosed herein. Furthermore, the disclosed imaging, rendering, and analysis methods can be implemented, at least in part, as one or more computer-readable media comprising computer-executable instructions for causing a computer to perform the respective methods.

  1. Obtaining flat x-ray images from round objects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A technique to correct deficiencies in x-ray images of cylindrical or spherical objects that are a consequence of the geometry of the sample is derived, for both two-dimensional (2D) and linescan imaging. The methods described involve the use of attenuators specifically shaped to equalize the x-ray ...

  2. Animal imaging studies of potential brain damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatley, S. J.; Vazquez, M. E.; Rice, O.

    To date, animal studies have not been able to predict the likelihood of problems in human neurological health due to HZE particle exposure during space missions outside the Earth's magnetosphere. In ongoing studies in mice, we have demonstrated that cocaine stimulated locomotor activity is reduced by a moderate dose (120 cGy) of 1 GeV 56Fe particles. We postulate that imaging experiments in animals may provide more sensitive and earlier indicators of damage due to HZE particles than behavioral tests. Since the small size of the mouse brain is not well suited to the spatial resolution offered by microPET, we are now repeating some of our studies in a rat model. We anticipate that this will enable us to identify imaging correlates of behavioral endpoints. A specific hypothesis of our studies is that changes in the metabolic rate for glucose in striatum of animals will be correlated with alterations in locomotor activity. We will also evaluate whether the neuroprotective drug L-deprenyl reduces the effect of radiation on locomotor activity. In addition, we will conduct microPET studies of brain monoamine oxidase A and monoamine oxidase B in rats before and at various times after irradiation with HZE particles. The hypothesis is that monoamine oxidase A, which is located in nerve terminals, will be unchanged or decreased after irradiation, while monoamine oxidase B, which is located in glial cells, will be increased after irradiation. Neurochemical effects that could be measured using PET could in principle be applied in astronauts, in terms of detecting and monitoring subtle neurological damage that might have occurred during long space missions. More speculative uses of PET are in screening candidates for prolonged space missions (for example, for adequate reserve in critical brain circuits) and in optimizing medications to treat impairments after missions.

  3. Portal dosimetry for VMAT using integrated images obtained during treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, James L. Hanson, Ian M.; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Portal dosimetry provides an accurate and convenient means of verifying dose delivered to the patient. A simple method for carrying out portal dosimetry for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is described, together with phantom measurements demonstrating the validity of the approach. Methods: Portal images were predicted by projecting dose in the isocentric plane through to the portal image plane, with exponential attenuation and convolution with a double-Gaussian scatter function. Appropriate parameters for the projection were selected by fitting the calculation model to portal images measured on an iViewGT portal imager (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) for a variety of phantom thicknesses and field sizes. This model was then used to predict the portal image resulting from each control point of a VMAT arc. Finally, all these control point images were summed to predict the overall integrated portal image for the whole arc. The calculated and measured integrated portal images were compared for three lung and three esophagus plans delivered to a thorax phantom, and three prostate plans delivered to a homogeneous phantom, using a gamma index for 3% and 3 mm. A 0.6 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber was used to verify the planned isocentric dose. The sensitivity of this method to errors in monitor units, field shaping, gantry angle, and phantom position was also evaluated by means of computer simulations. Results: The calculation model for portal dose prediction was able to accurately compute the portal images due to simple square fields delivered to solid water phantoms. The integrated images of VMAT treatments delivered to phantoms were also correctly predicted by the method. The proportion of the images with a gamma index of less than unity was 93.7% ± 3.0% (1SD) and the difference between isocenter dose calculated by the planning system and measured by the ionization chamber was 0.8% ± 1.0%. The method was highly sensitive to errors in monitor units and

  4. Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2011-02-08

    A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

  5. Infrared Imaging System for Studying Brain Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Frederick; Mintz, Frederick; Gunapala, Sarath

    2007-01-01

    A proposed special-purpose infrared imaging system would be a compact, portable, less-expensive alternative to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) systems heretofore used to study brain function. Whereas a typical fMRI system fills a large room, and must be magnetically isolated, this system would fit into a bicycle helmet. The system would include an assembly that would be mounted inside the padding in a modified bicycle helmet or other suitable headgear. The assembly would include newly designed infrared photodetectors and data-acquisition circuits on integrated-circuit chips on low-thermal-conductivity supports in evacuated housings (see figure) arranged in multiple rows and columns that would define image coordinates. Each housing would be spring-loaded against the wearer s head. The chips would be cooled by a small Stirling Engine mounted contiguous to, but thermally isolated from, the portions of the assembly in thermal contact with the wearer s head. Flexible wires or cables for transmitting data from the aforementioned chips would be routed to an integrated, multichannel transmitter and thence through the top of the assembly to a patch antenna on the outside of the helmet. The multiple streams of data from the infrared-detector chips would be sent to a remote site, where they would be processed, by software, into a three-dimensional display of evoked potentials that would represent firing neuronal bundles and thereby indicate locations of neuronal activity associated with mental or physical activity. The 3D images will be analogous to current fMRI images. The data would also be made available, in real-time, for comparison with data in local or internationally accessible relational databases that already exist in universities and research centers. Hence, this system could be used in research on, and for the diagnosis of response from the wearer s brain to physiological, psychological, and environmental changes in real time. The images would also be

  6. Shade images of forested areas obtained from Landsat MSS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimabukuro, Yosio Edemir; Smith, James A.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this report is to generate a shade (shadow) image of forested areas from Landsat MSS data by implementing a linear mixing model, where shadow is considered as one of the primary components in a pixel. The shade images are related to the observed variation in forest structure; i.e., the proportion of inferred shadow in a pixel is related to different forest ages, forest types, and tree crown cover. The constrained least-squares method is used to generate shade images for forest of eucalyptus and vegetation of 'cerrado' over the Itapeva study area in Brazil. The resulted shade images may explain the difference on ages for forest of eucalyptus and the difference on tree crown cover for vegetation of cerrado.

  7. Brain tumors and synchrotron radiation: Methodological developments in quantitative brain perfusion imaging and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, Jean-Francois

    2005-04-01

    energy, for a maximal dose deposit in the tumor, while sparing healthy tissues. The methodology, the associated dosimetry as well as the preclinical validation of iodine enhanced strereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy is developed in the thesis. Significant survival increases were obtained, especially when the delivery of iodine is coupled with a transient blood-brain-barrier opener. The two complementary methods developed in this thesis offer perspectives in the understanding of the glioma growth process and in their treatment by radiation therapy. They show the potential of synchrotron radiation for absolute high-resolution morphological and functional CT imaging, and for new therapeutic modalities using intense monochromatic x rays.

  8. Structural similarity analysis for brain MR image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punga, Mirela Visan; Moldovanu, Simona; Moraru, Luminita

    2014-11-01

    Brain MR images are affected and distorted by various artifacts as noise, blur, blotching, down sampling or compression and as well by inhomogeneity. Usually, the performance of pre-processing operation is quantified by using the quality metrics as mean squared error and its related metrics such as peak signal to noise ratio, root mean squared error and signal to noise ratio. The main drawback of these metrics is that they fail to take the structural fidelity of the image into account. For this reason, we addressed to investigate the structural changes related to the luminance and contrast variation (as non-structural distortions) and to denoising process (as structural distortion)through an alternative metric based on structural changes in order to obtain the best image quality.

  9. Parsing glucose entry into the brain: novel findings obtained with enzyme-based glucose biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Wakabayashi, Ken T

    2015-01-21

    Extracellular levels of glucose in brain tissue reflect dynamic balance between its gradient-dependent entry from arterial blood and its use for cellular metabolism. In this work, we present several sets of previously published and unpublished data obtained by using enzyme-based glucose biosensors coupled with constant-potential high-speed amperometry in freely moving rats. First, we consider basic methodological issues related to the reliability of electrochemical measurements of extracellular glucose levels in rats under physiologically relevant conditions. Second, we present data on glucose responses induced in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) by salient environmental stimuli and discuss the relationships between local neuronal activation and rapid glucose entry into brain tissue. Third, by presenting data on changes in NAc glucose induced by intravenous and intragastric glucose delivery, we discuss other mechanisms of glucose entry into the extracellular domain following changes in glucose blood concentrations. Lastly, by showing the pattern of NAc glucose fluctuations during glucose-drinking behavior, we discuss the relationships between "active" and "passive" glucose entry to the brain, its connection to behavior-related metabolic activation, and the possible functional significance of these changes in behavioral regulation. These data provide solid experimental support for the "neuronal" hypothesis of neurovascular coupling, which postulates the critical role of neuronal activity in rapid regulation of vascular tone, local blood flow, and entry of glucose and oxygen to brain tissue to maintain active cellular metabolism. PMID:25490002

  10. Chemoselective imaging of mouse brain tissue via multiplex CARS microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pohling, Christoph; Buckup, Tiago; Pagenstecher, Axel; Motzkus, Marcus

    2011-08-01

    The fast and reliable characterization of pathological tissue is a debated topic in the application of vibrational spectroscopy in medicine. In the present work we apply multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (MCARS) to the investigation of fresh mouse brain tissue. The combination of imaginary part extraction followed by principal component analysis led to color contrast between grey and white matter as well as layers of granule and Purkinje cells. Additional quantitative information was obtained by using a decomposition algorithm. The results perfectly agree with HE stained references slides prepared separately making multiplex CARS an ideal approach for chemoselective imaging. PMID:21833351

  11. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue.

  12. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue. PMID:27456312

  13. Shade images of forested areas obtained from LANDSAT MSS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimabukuro, Yosio Edemir; Smith, James A.

    1989-01-01

    The pixel size in the present day Remote Sensing systems is large enough to include different types of land cover. Depending upon the target area, several components may be present within the pixel. In forested areas, generally, three main components are present: tree canopy, soil (understory), and shadow. The objective is to generate a shade (shadow) image of forested areas from multispectral measurements of LANDSAT MSS (Multispectral Scanner) data by implementing a linear mixing model, where shadow is considered as one of the primary components in a pixel. The shade images are related to the observed variation in forest structure, i.e., the proportion of inferred shadow in a pixel is related to different forest ages, forest types, and tree crown cover. The Constrained Least Squares (CLS) method is used to generate shade images for forest of eucalyptus and vegetation of cerrado using LANDSAT MSS imagery over Itapeva study area in Brazil. The resulted shade images may explain the difference on ages for forest of eucalyptus and the difference on three crown cover for vegetation of cerrado.

  14. Neuromorphometry of primary brain tumors by magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hevia-Montiel, Nidiyare; Rodriguez-Perez, Pedro I.; Lamothe-Molina, Paul J.; Arellano-Reynoso, Alfonso; Bribiesca, Ernesto; Alegria-Loyola, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Magnetic resonance imaging is a technique for the diagnosis and classification of brain tumors. Discrete compactness is a morphological feature of two-dimensional and three-dimensional objects. This measure determines the compactness of a discretized object depending on the sum of the areas of the connected voxels and has been used for understanding the morphology of nonbrain tumors. We hypothesized that regarding brain tumors, we may improve the malignancy grade classification. We analyzed the values in 20 patients with different subtypes of primary brain tumors: astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, and glioblastoma multiforme subdivided into the contrast-enhanced and the necrotic tumor regions. The preliminary results show an inverse relationship between the compactness value and the malignancy grade of gliomas. Astrocytomas exhibit a mean of 973±14, whereas oligodendrogliomas exhibit a mean of 942±21. In contrast, the contrast-enhanced region of the glioblastoma presented a mean of 919±43, and the necrotic region presented a mean of 869±66. However, the volume and area of the enclosing surface did not show a relationship with the malignancy grade of the gliomas. Discrete compactness appears to be a stable characteristic between primary brain tumors of different malignancy grades, because similar values were obtained from different patients with the same type of tumor. PMID:26158107

  15. Noninvasive monitoring of traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic rehabilitation with laser-induced photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da; Lao, Yeqi; Yang, Diwu; Zeng, Lvming; Xiang, Liangzhong; Chen, Wei R.

    2007-06-01

    A photoacoustic imaging system was used for noninvasive monitoring of traumatic mouse brain in vivo with high-quality reconstructed images. Traumatic lesions accompanying with hemorrhage in the mouse cortical surface were accurately mapped, and foreign bodies of two small copper wires inserted in the mouse brain were also detected. Furthermore, the time course of morphological changes of cerebral blood during rehabilitation process of a mouse brain with traumatic brain injury was obtained using a series of photoacoustic images. Experimental results demonstrate that photoacoustic technique holds the potential for clinical applications in brain trauma and cerebrovascular disease detection.

  16. FTIR, Raman, and CARS microscopic imaging for histopathologic assessment of brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, Christoph; Bergner, Norbert; Matthäus, Christian; Romeike, Bernd; Reichart, Rupert; Kalff, Rolf; Dietzek, B.,; Popp, Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    The contribution demonstrates how the molecular contrast of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Raman and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopic imaging can be applied for the histopathological assessment of brain tumors. Human brain tissue specimens were obtained from patients undergoing neurosurgery. Thin sections of control brain tissue from an epilepsy patient and tumor tissue from a meningioma patient were prepared on calciumfluoride slides which were appropriate substrates for data acquisition in transmission and reflection mode. All CARS images correlate well with the FTIR and Raman images. Whereas CARS images were collected within seconds, exposure times were minutes for FTIR imaging and hours for Raman imaging. CARS images in the interval 2750-3000 cm-1 mainly probed spectral contributions of lipids which are important diagnostic markers of brain tumors. It was demonstrated that the CARS profile in the interval 2750-3000 cm-1 differed between the control sample and meningioma. Full spectral information could be extracted from Raman and FTIR images that enabled to distinguish different tissue types in brain tumors. Based on the current results we suggest a complementary application of FTIR, Raman and CARS imaging. FTIR and Raman imaging defines spectral regions and spectral markers that are essential for tissue classification. CARS images at different Stokes shifts or in the multiplex mode probe these spectral descriptors at video-time frame rates.

  17. Statistical shape model-based segmentation of brain MRI images.

    PubMed

    Bailleul, Jonathan; Ruan, Su; Constans, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    We propose a segmentation method that automatically delineates structures contours from 3D brain MRI images using a statistical shape model. We automatically build this 3D Point Distribution Model (PDM) in applying a Minimum Description Length (MDL) annotation to a training set of shapes, obtained by registration of a 3D anatomical atlas over a set of patients brain MRIs. Delineation of any structure from a new MRI image is first initialized by such registration. Then, delineation is achieved in iterating two consecutive steps until the 3D contour reaches idempotence. The first step consists in applying an intensity model to the latest shape position so as to formulate a closer guess: our model requires far less priors than standard model in aiming at direct interpretation rather than compliance to learned contexts. The second step consists in enforcing shape constraints onto previous guess so as to remove all bias induced by artifacts or low contrast on current MRI. For this, we infer the closest shape instance from the PDM shape space using a new estimation method which accuracy is significantly improved by a huge increase in the model resolution and by a depth-search in the parameter space. The delineation results we obtained are very encouraging and show the interest of the proposed framework. PMID:18003193

  18. Decoding brain responses to pixelized images in the primary visual cortex: implications for visual cortical prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Bing-bing; Zheng, Xiao-lin; Lu, Zhen-gang; Wang, Xing; Yin, Zheng-qin; Hou, Wen-sheng; Meng, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Visual cortical prostheses have the potential to restore partial vision. Still limited by the low-resolution visual percepts provided by visual cortical prostheses, implant wearers can currently only “see” pixelized images, and how to obtain the specific brain responses to different pixelized images in the primary visual cortex (the implant area) is still unknown. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment on normal human participants to investigate the brain activation patterns in response to 18 different pixelized images. There were 100 voxels in the brain activation pattern that were selected from the primary visual cortex, and voxel size was 4 mm × 4 mm × 4 mm. Multi-voxel pattern analysis was used to test if these 18 different brain activation patterns were specific. We chose a Linear Support Vector Machine (LSVM) as the classifier in this study. The results showed that the classification accuracies of different brain activation patterns were significantly above chance level, which suggests that the classifier can successfully distinguish the brain activation patterns. Our results suggest that the specific brain activation patterns to different pixelized images can be obtained in the primary visual cortex using a 4 mm × 4 mm × 4 mm voxel size and a 100-voxel pattern. PMID:26692860

  19. Four-dimensional dielectric property image obtained from electron spectroscopic imaging series.

    PubMed

    Lo, S C; Kai, J J; Chen, F R; Chang, L; Chen, L C; Chiang, C C; Ding, P; Chin, B; Zhang, H; Chen, F

    2001-01-01

    We have demonstrated a new quantitative method to characterize two-dimensional distributions of energy-dependent dielectric function of materials from low loss electron spectroscopic image (ESI) series. Two problems associated with extracted image-spectrum from the low-loss image series, under-sampling and loss of energy resolution, were overcome by using fast Fourier transformation (FFT) interpolation and maximum entropy deconvolution method. In this study, Black Diamond/Si3N4/SiO2/Si-substrate dielectric layer designed for copper metallization was used as the sample. We show that the reconstructed (FFT interpolated and maximum entropy deconvoluted) image-spectrum obtained from ESI series images can be quantified with the same accuracy as conventional electron energy-loss spectroscopy spectra. Since the analysis of the dielectric function is sensitive to the local thickness of the specimen using Kramers-Kronig analysis, we also developed a new method to quantitatively determine the dielectric constant for low-k materials. We have determined the thickness of the Black Diamond using the extrapolated thickness method from the materials of known dielectric constants. Using Kramers-Kronig formula, the dielectric function map can be deduced from two-dimensional reconstructed single scattering spectra with providing the information of thickness. We proposed a four-dimensional data presentation for revealing the uniformity of the energy dependent property. The accuracy of our methods depends on the thickness determination and on the quality of the reconstructed spectra from the image series. PMID:11918416

  20. MR image denoising method for brain surface 3D modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, De-xin; Liu, Peng-jie; Zhang, De-gan

    2014-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) modeling of medical images is a critical part of surgical simulation. In this paper, we focus on the magnetic resonance (MR) images denoising for brain modeling reconstruction, and exploit a practical solution. We attempt to remove the noise existing in the MR imaging signal and preserve the image characteristics. A wavelet-based adaptive curve shrinkage function is presented in spherical coordinates system. The comparative experiments show that the denoising method can preserve better image details and enhance the coefficients of contours. Using these denoised images, the brain 3D visualization is given through surface triangle mesh model, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Operant behavior to obtain palatable food modifies ERK activity in the brain reward circuit.

    PubMed

    Guegan, Thomas; Cutando, Laura; Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Santini, Emanuela; Fisone, Gilberto; Martinez, Albert; Valjent, Emmanuel; Maldonado, Rafael; Martin, Miquel

    2013-03-01

    Food palatability produces behavioral modifications that resemble those induced by drugs of abuse. Palatability-induced behavioral changes require both, the activation of the endogenous cannabinoid system, and changes in structural plasticity in neurons of the brain reward pathway. The ERK intracellular pathway is activated by CB1 receptors (CB1-R) and plays a crucial role in neuroplasticity. We investigated the activation of the ERK signaling cascade in the mesocorticolimbic system induced by operant training to obtain highly palatable isocaloric food and the involvement of the CB1-R in these responses. Using immunofluorescence techniques, we analyzed changes in ERK intracellular pathway activation in the mesocorticolimbic system of wild-type and CB1 knockout mice (CB1-/-) trained on an operant paradigm to obtain standard, highly caloric or highly palatable isocaloric food. Operant training for highly palatable isocaloric food, but not for standard or highly caloric food, produced a robust activation of the ERK signaling cascade in the same brain areas where this training modified structural plasticity. These changes induced by the operant training were absent in CB1-/-. We can conclude that the activation of the ERK pathway is associated to the neuroplasticity induced by operant training for highly palatable isocaloric food and might be involved in CB1-R mediated alterations in behavior and structural plasticity. PMID:22580057

  2. The role of image registration in brain mapping.

    PubMed

    Toga, A W; Thompson, P M

    2001-01-01

    Image registration is a key step in a great variety of biomedical imaging applications. It provides the ability to geometrically align one dataset with another, and is a prerequisite for all imaging applications that compare datasets across subjects, imaging modalities, or across time. Registration algorithms also enable the pooling and comparison of experimental findings across laboratories, the construction of population-based brain atlases, and the creation of systems to detect group patterns in structural and functional imaging data. We review the major types of registration approaches used in brain imaging today. We focus on their conceptual basis, the underlying mathematics, and their strengths and weaknesses in different contexts. We describe the major goals of registration, including data fusion, quantification of change, automated image segmentation and labeling, shape measurement, and pathology detection. We indicate that registration algorithms have great potential when used in conjunction with a digital brain atlas, which acts as a reference system in which brain images can be compared for statistical analysis. The resulting armory of registration approaches is fundamental to medical image analysis, and in a brain mapping context provides a means to elucidate clinical, demographic, or functional trends in the anatomy or physiology of the brain. PMID:19890483

  3. Automatic segmentation and classification of human brain image based on a fuzzy brain atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ou; Jia, Chunguang; Duan, Huilong; Lu, Weixue

    1998-09-01

    It is difficult to automatically segment and classify tomograph images of actual patient's brain. Therefore, many interactive operations are performed. It is very time consuming and its precision is much depended on the user. In this paper, we combine a brain atlas and 3D fuzzy image segmentation into the image matching. It can not only find out the precise boundary of anatomic structure but also save time of the interactive operation. At first, the anatomic information of atlas is mapped into tomograph images of actual brain with a two step image matching method. Then, based on the mapping result, a 3D fuzzy structure mask is calculated. With the fuzzy information of anatomic structure, a new method of fuzzy clustering based on genetic algorithm is used to segment and classify the real brain image. There is only a minimum requirement of interaction in the whole process, including removing the skull and selecting some intrinsic point pairs.

  4. Tomographic brain imaging with nucleolar detail and automatic cell counting.

    PubMed

    Hieber, Simone E; Bikis, Christos; Khimchenko, Anna; Schweighauser, Gabriel; Hench, Jürgen; Chicherova, Natalia; Schulz, Georg; Müller, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Brain tissue evaluation is essential for gaining in-depth insight into its diseases and disorders. Imaging the human brain in three dimensions has always been a challenge on the cell level. In vivo methods lack spatial resolution, and optical microscopy has a limited penetration depth. Herein, we show that hard X-ray phase tomography can visualise a volume of up to 43 mm(3) of human post mortem or biopsy brain samples, by demonstrating the method on the cerebellum. We automatically identified 5,000 Purkinje cells with an error of less than 5% at their layer and determined the local surface density to 165 cells per mm(2) on average. Moreover, we highlight that three-dimensional data allows for the segmentation of sub-cellular structures, including dendritic tree and Purkinje cell nucleoli, without dedicated staining. The method suggests that automatic cell feature quantification of human tissues is feasible in phase tomograms obtained with isotropic resolution in a label-free manner. PMID:27581254

  5. Tomographic brain imaging with nucleolar detail and automatic cell counting

    PubMed Central

    Hieber, Simone E.; Bikis, Christos; Khimchenko, Anna; Schweighauser, Gabriel; Hench, Jürgen; Chicherova, Natalia; Schulz, Georg; Müller, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Brain tissue evaluation is essential for gaining in-depth insight into its diseases and disorders. Imaging the human brain in three dimensions has always been a challenge on the cell level. In vivo methods lack spatial resolution, and optical microscopy has a limited penetration depth. Herein, we show that hard X-ray phase tomography can visualise a volume of up to 43 mm3 of human post mortem or biopsy brain samples, by demonstrating the method on the cerebellum. We automatically identified 5,000 Purkinje cells with an error of less than 5% at their layer and determined the local surface density to 165 cells per mm2 on average. Moreover, we highlight that three-dimensional data allows for the segmentation of sub-cellular structures, including dendritic tree and Purkinje cell nucleoli, without dedicated staining. The method suggests that automatic cell feature quantification of human tissues is feasible in phase tomograms obtained with isotropic resolution in a label-free manner. PMID:27581254

  6. Design of brain imaging agents for positron emission tomography: do large bioconjugates provide an opportunity for in vivo brain imaging?

    PubMed

    Schirrmacher, Ralf; Bernard-Gauthier, Vadim; Reader, Andrew; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Schirrmacher, Esther; Wängler, Björn; Wängler, Carmen

    2013-09-01

    The development of brain imaging agents for positron emission tomography and other in vivo imaging modalities mostly relies on small compounds of low MW as a result of the restricted transport of larger molecules, such as peptides and proteins, across the blood-brain barrier. Besides passive transport, only a few active carrier mechanisms, such as glucose transporters and amino acid transporters, have so far been exploited to mediate the accumulation of imaging probes in the brain. An important question for the future is whether some of the abundant active carrier systems located at the blood-brain barrier can be used to shuttle potential, but non-crossing, imaging agents into the brain. What are the biological and chemical constrictions toward such bioconjugates and is it worthwhile to persue such a delivery strategy? PMID:24047268

  7. Fuzzy object models for newborn brain MR image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobashi, Syoji; Udupa, Jayaram K.

    2013-03-01

    Newborn brain MR image segmentation is a challenging problem because of variety of size, shape and MR signal although it is the fundamental study for quantitative radiology in brain MR images. Because of the large difference between the adult brain and the newborn brain, it is difficult to directly apply the conventional methods for the newborn brain. Inspired by the original fuzzy object model introduced by Udupa et al. at SPIE Medical Imaging 2011, called fuzzy shape object model (FSOM) here, this paper introduces fuzzy intensity object model (FIOM), and proposes a new image segmentation method which combines the FSOM and FIOM into fuzzy connected (FC) image segmentation. The fuzzy object models are built from training datasets in which the cerebral parenchyma is delineated by experts. After registering FSOM with the evaluating image, the proposed method roughly recognizes the cerebral parenchyma region based on a prior knowledge of location, shape, and the MR signal given by the registered FSOM and FIOM. Then, FC image segmentation delineates the cerebral parenchyma using the fuzzy object models. The proposed method has been evaluated using 9 newborn brain MR images using the leave-one-out strategy. The revised age was between -1 and 2 months. Quantitative evaluation using false positive volume fraction (FPVF) and false negative volume fraction (FNVF) has been conducted. Using the evaluation data, a FPVF of 0.75% and FNVF of 3.75% were achieved. More data collection and testing are underway.

  8. Identifying brain neoplasms using dye-enhanced multimodal confocal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Dennis; Snuderl, Matija; Sheth, Sameer; Kwon, Churl-Su; Frosch, Matthew P.; Curry, William; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2012-02-01

    Brain tumors cause significant morbidity and mortality even when benign. Completeness of resection of brain tumors improves quality of life and survival; however, that is often difficult to accomplish. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using multimodal confocal imaging for intraoperative detection of brain neoplasms. We have imaged different types of benign and malignant, primary and metastatic brain tumors. We correlated optical images with histopathology and evaluated the possibility of interpreting confocal images in a manner similar to pathology. Surgical specimens were briefly stained in 0.05 mg/ml aqueous solution of methylene blue (MB) and imaged using a multimodal confocal microscope. Reflectance and fluorescence signals of MB were excited at 642 nm. Fluorescence emission of MB was registered between 670 and 710 nm. After imaging, tissues were processed for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology. The results of comparison demonstrate good correlation between fluorescence images and histopathology. Reflectance images provide information about morphology and vascularity of the specimens, complementary to that provided by fluorescence images. Multimodal confocal imaging has the potential to aid in the intraoperative detection of microscopic deposits of brain neoplasms. The application of this technique may improve completeness of resection and increase patient survival.

  9. Image Data Mining for Pattern Classification and Visualization of Morphological Changes in Brain MR Images.

    PubMed

    Murakawa, Saki; Ikuta, Rie; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Shiraishi, Junji

    2016-02-01

    Hospital information systems (HISs) and picture archiving and communication systems (PACSs) are archiving large amounts of data (i.e., "big data") that are not being used. Therefore, many research projects in progress are trying to use "big data" for the development of early diagnosis, prediction of disease onset, and personalized therapies. In this study, we propose a new method for image data mining to identify regularities and abnormalities in the large image data sets. We used 70 archived magnetic resonance (MR) images that were acquired using three-dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo (3D MP-RAGE). These images were obtained from the Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative (ADNI) database. For anatomical standardization of the data, we used the statistical parametric mapping (SPM) software. Using a similarity matrix based on cross-correlation coefficients (CCs) calculated from an anatomical region and a hierarchical clustering technique, we classified all the abnormal cases into five groups. The Z score map identified the difference between a standard normal brain and each of those from the Alzheimer's groups. In addition, the scatter plot obtained from two similarity matrixes visualized the regularities and abnormalities in the image data sets. Image features identified using our method could be useful for understanding of image findings associated with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26902379

  10. Mechanism of Chronic Pain in Rodent Brain Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Pei-Ching

    Chronic pain is a significant health problem that greatly impacts the quality of life of individuals and imparts high costs to society. Despite intense research effort in understanding of the mechanism of pain, chronic pain remains a clinical problem that has few effective therapies. The advent of human brain imaging research in recent years has changed the way that chronic pain is viewed. To further extend the use of human brain imaging techniques for better therapies, the adoption of imaging technique onto the animal pain models is essential, in which underlying brain mechanisms can be systematically studied using various combination of imaging and invasive techniques. The general goal of this thesis is to addresses how brain develops and maintains chronic pain in an animal model using fMRI. We demonstrate that nucleus accumbens, the central component of mesolimbic circuitry, is essential in development of chronic pain. To advance our imaging technique, we develop an innovative methodology to carry out fMRI in awake, conscious rat. Using this cutting-edge technique, we show that allodynia is assoicated with shift brain response toward neural circuits associated nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex that regulate affective and cognitive component of pain. Taken together, this thesis provides a deeper understanding of how brain mediates pain. It builds on the existing body of knowledge through maximizing the depth of insight into brain imaging of chronic pain.

  11. Appropriate Contrast Enhancement Measures for Brain and Breast Cancer Images

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Suneet; Porwal, Rabins

    2016-01-01

    Medical imaging systems often produce images that require enhancement, such as improving the image contrast as they are poor in contrast. Therefore, they must be enhanced before they are examined by medical professionals. This is necessary for proper diagnosis and subsequent treatment. We do have various enhancement algorithms which enhance the medical images to different extents. We also have various quantitative metrics or measures which evaluate the quality of an image. This paper suggests the most appropriate measures for two of the medical images, namely, brain cancer images and breast cancer images. PMID:27127497

  12. Methodology for fiber-optic Raman mapping and FTIR imaging of metastases in mouse brains.

    PubMed

    Krafft, Christoph; Kirsch, Matthias; Beleites, Claudia; Schackert, Gabriele; Salzer, Reiner

    2007-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to optimize the preparation of pristine brain tissue to obtain reference information, to optimize the conditions for introducing a fiber-optic probe to acquire Raman maps, and to transfer previous results obtained from human brain tumors to an animal model. Brain metastases of malignant melanomas were induced by injecting tumor cells into the carotid artery of mice. The procedure mimicked hematogenous tumor spread in one brain hemisphere while the other hemisphere remained tumor free. Three series of sections were prepared consecutively from whole mouse brains: dried, thin sections for FTIR imaging, hematoxylin and eosin-stained thin sections for histopathological assessment, and pristine, 2-mm thick sections for Raman mapping. FTIR images were recorded using a spectrometer with a multi-channel detector. Raman maps were collected serially using a spectrometer coupled to a fiber-optic probe. The FTIR images and the Raman maps were segmented by cluster analysis. The color-coded cluster memberships coincided well with the morphology of mouse brains in stained tissue sections. More details in less time were resolved in FTIR images with a nominal resolution of 25 microm than in Raman maps collected with a laser focus 60 microm in diameter. The spectral contributions of melanin in tumor cells were resonance enhanced in Raman spectra on excitation at 785 nm which enabled their sensitive detection in Raman maps. Possible reasons why metastatic cells of malignant melanomas were not identified in FTIR images are discussed. PMID:17639353

  13. Segmentation of brain image volumes using the data list management library.

    PubMed

    Román-Alonso, G; Jiménez-Alaniz, J R; Buenabad-Chávez, J; Castro-García, M A; Vargas-Rodríguez, A H

    2007-01-01

    The segmentation of head images is useful to detect neuroanatomical structures and to follow and quantify the evolution of several brain lesions. 2D images correspond to brain slices. The more images are used the higher the resolution obtained is, but more processing power is required and parallelism becomes desirable. We present a new approach to segmentation of brain image volumes using DLML (Data List Management Library), a tool developed by our team. We organise the integer numbers identifying images into a list, and our DLML version process them both in parallel and with dynamic load balancing transparently to the programmer. We compare the performance of our DLML version to other typical parallel approaches developed with MPI (master-slave and static data distribution), using cluster configurations with 4-32 processors. PMID:18002398

  14. Iterative blind deconvolution in magnetic resonance brain perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Grüner, Renate; Taxt, Torfinn

    2006-04-01

    In first pass magnetic resonance brain perfusion imaging, arterial input functions are used in the deconvolution of the observed contrast concentrations to obtain quantitative hemodynamic parameters. Ideally, arterial input functions should be measured in each imaged voxel to eliminate the effects of delay and dispersion of the contrast agent from the injection site. An approach based on iterative blind deconvolution with the Richardson-Lucy algorithm is proposed for the simultaneous estimation of voxel-specific arterial input functions and voxel-specific tissue residue functions. An extended contrast concentration model was used to separate the first pass bolus from additional recirculation and leakage signals. The extended model was evaluated using in vivo data. Computer simulations examined the feasibility of iterative blind deconvolution in perfusion imaging. Preliminary in vivo results from a patient with fibromuscular dysplasia showed territories with delayed/dispersed arterial input functions that coincided with the location of territories supplied by collateral circulation as described from the complete radiologic examination. Higher flow values and shorter mean transit times compared to conventional methods were obtained in these areas, suggesting that the effects of dispersion were minimized. The in vivo estimated arterial input functions visualized the patient's blood supply patterns as a function of time. PMID:16526016

  15. Fast method for brain image segmentation: application to proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Bonekamp, David; Horská, Alena; Jacobs, Michael A; Arslanoglu, Atilla; Barker, Peter B

    2005-11-01

    The interpretation of brain metabolite concentrations measured by quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is assisted by knowledge of the percentage of gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within each MRSI voxel. Usually, this information is determined from T(1)-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI) that have a much higher spatial resolution than the MRSI data. While this approach works well, it is time-consuming. In this article, a rapid data acquisition and analysis procedure for image segmentation is described, which is based on collection of several, thick slice, fast spin echo images (FSE) of different contrast. Tissue segmentation is performed with linear "Eigenimage" filtering and normalization. The method was compared to standard segmentation techniques using high-resolution 3D T(1)-weighted MRI in five subjects. Excellent correlation between the two techniques was obtained, with voxel-wise regression analysis giving GM: R2 = 0.893 +/- 0.098, WM: R2 = 0.892 +/- 0.089, ln(CSF): R2 = 0.831 +/- 0.082). Test-retest analysis in one individual yielded an excellent agreement of measurements with R2 higher than 0.926 in all three tissue classes. Application of FSE/EI segmentation to a sample proton MRSI dataset yielded results similar to prior publications. It is concluded that FSE imaging in conjunction with Eigenimage analysis is a rapid and reliable way of segmenting brain tissue for application to proton MRSI. PMID:16187272

  16. Alzheimer's Disease Detection in Brain Magnetic Resonance Images Using Multiscale Fractal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lahmiri, Salim; Boukadoum, Mounir

    2013-01-01

    We present a new automated system for the detection of brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). The MRI is analyzed by means of multiscale analysis (MSA) to obtain its fractals at six different scales. The extracted fractals are used as features to differentiate healthy brain MRI from those of AD by a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The result of classifying 93 brain MRIs consisting of 51 images of healthy brains and 42 of brains affected by AD, using leave-one-out cross-validation method, yielded 99.18% ± 0.01 classification accuracy, 100% sensitivity, and 98.20% ± 0.02 specificity. These results and a processing time of 5.64 seconds indicate that the proposed approach may be an efficient diagnostic aid for radiologists in the screening for AD. PMID:24967286

  17. A Unified Framework for Brain Segmentation in MR Images.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, S; Yusof, R; Karimian, A; Riazi, A H; Bennamoun, M

    2015-01-01

    Brain MRI segmentation is an important issue for discovering the brain structure and diagnosis of subtle anatomical changes in different brain diseases. However, due to several artifacts brain tissue segmentation remains a challenging task. The aim of this paper is to improve the automatic segmentation of brain into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid in magnetic resonance images (MRI). We proposed an automatic hybrid image segmentation method that integrates the modified statistical expectation-maximization (EM) method and the spatial information combined with support vector machine (SVM). The combined method has more accurate results than what can be achieved with its individual techniques that is demonstrated through experiments on both real data and simulated images. Experiments are carried out on both synthetic and real MRI. The results of proposed technique are evaluated against manual segmentation results and other methods based on real T1-weighted scans from Internet Brain Segmentation Repository (IBSR) and simulated images from BrainWeb. The Kappa index is calculated to assess the performance of the proposed framework relative to the ground truth and expert segmentations. The results demonstrate that the proposed combined method has satisfactory results on both simulated MRI and real brain datasets. PMID:26089978

  18. A Unified Framework for Brain Segmentation in MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, S.; Yusof, R.; Karimian, A.; Riazi, A. H.; Bennamoun, M.

    2015-01-01

    Brain MRI segmentation is an important issue for discovering the brain structure and diagnosis of subtle anatomical changes in different brain diseases. However, due to several artifacts brain tissue segmentation remains a challenging task. The aim of this paper is to improve the automatic segmentation of brain into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid in magnetic resonance images (MRI). We proposed an automatic hybrid image segmentation method that integrates the modified statistical expectation-maximization (EM) method and the spatial information combined with support vector machine (SVM). The combined method has more accurate results than what can be achieved with its individual techniques that is demonstrated through experiments on both real data and simulated images. Experiments are carried out on both synthetic and real MRI. The results of proposed technique are evaluated against manual segmentation results and other methods based on real T1-weighted scans from Internet Brain Segmentation Repository (IBSR) and simulated images from BrainWeb. The Kappa index is calculated to assess the performance of the proposed framework relative to the ground truth and expert segmentations. The results demonstrate that the proposed combined method has satisfactory results on both simulated MRI and real brain datasets. PMID:26089978

  19. Fully automated rodent brain MR image processing pipeline on a Midas server: from acquired images to region-based statistics

    PubMed Central

    Budin, Francois; Hoogstoel, Marion; Reynolds, Patrick; Grauer, Michael; O'Leary-Moore, Shonagh K.; Oguz, Ipek

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of rodent brains enables study of the development and the integrity of the brain under certain conditions (alcohol, drugs etc.). However, these images are difficult to analyze for biomedical researchers with limited image processing experience. In this paper we present an image processing pipeline running on a Midas server, a web-based data storage system. It is composed of the following steps: rigid registration, skull-stripping, average computation, average parcellation, parcellation propagation to individual subjects, and computation of region-based statistics on each image. The pipeline is easy to configure and requires very little image processing knowledge. We present results obtained by processing a data set using this pipeline and demonstrate how this pipeline can be used to find differences between populations. PMID:23964234

  20. Fully automated rodent brain MR image processing pipeline on a Midas server: from acquired images to region-based statistics.

    PubMed

    Budin, Francois; Hoogstoel, Marion; Reynolds, Patrick; Grauer, Michael; O'Leary-Moore, Shonagh K; Oguz, Ipek

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of rodent brains enables study of the development and the integrity of the brain under certain conditions (alcohol, drugs etc.). However, these images are difficult to analyze for biomedical researchers with limited image processing experience. In this paper we present an image processing pipeline running on a Midas server, a web-based data storage system. It is composed of the following steps: rigid registration, skull-stripping, average computation, average parcellation, parcellation propagation to individual subjects, and computation of region-based statistics on each image. The pipeline is easy to configure and requires very little image processing knowledge. We present results obtained by processing a data set using this pipeline and demonstrate how this pipeline can be used to find differences between populations. PMID:23964234

  1. Functional brain imaging of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Moisset, Xavier; Villain, Nicolas; Ducreux, Denis; Serrie, Alain; Cunin, Gérard; Valade, Dominique; Calvino, Bernard; Bouhassira, Didier

    2011-02-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to analyze changes in brain activity associated with stimulation of the cutaneous trigger zone in patients with classic trigeminal neuralgia (CTN). Fifteen consecutive patients with CTN in the second or third division of the nerve, were included in this study. The fMRI paradigm consisted of light tactile stimuli of the trigger zone and the homologous contralateral area. Stimulation of the affected side induced pain in seven patients, but was not painful in eight patients on the day of the experiment. Painful stimuli were associated with significantly increased activity in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (SpV), thalamus, primary and secondary somatosensory cortices (S1, S2), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), insula, premotor/motor cortex, prefrontal areas, putamen, hippocampus and brainstem. Nonpainful stimulation of the trigger zone activated all but three of these structures (SpV, brainstem and ACC). After a successful surgical treatment, activation induced by stimulation of the operated side was confined to S1 and S2. Our data demonstrate the pathological hyperexcitability of the trigeminal nociceptive system, including the second order trigeminal sensory neurons during evoked attacks of CTN. Such sensitization may depend on pain modulatory systems involving both the brainstem (i.e. periaqueductal gray and adjacent structures) and interconnected cortical structures (i.e. ACC). The fact that large portions of the classical 'pain neuromatrix' were also activated during nonpainful stimulation of the trigger zone, could reflect a state of maintained sensitization of the trigeminal nociceptive systems in CTN. PMID:20609605

  2. [Ataxic cerebral palsy and brain imaging].

    PubMed

    Imamura, S; Tachi, N; Tsuzuki, A; Sasaki, K; Hirano, S; Tanabe, C; Sakuma, K

    1992-09-01

    Five cases diagnosed as having ataxic cerebral palsy were presented with their brain imaging. Case 1, a 3-year-old-girl had been floppy since 7 months of age and began ataxic walk with spastic legs from 18 months of age. MRI revealed generalized atrophy of cerebellum (especially in anterior superior part) and slight atrophy of pons. Her mother also had ataxia with spastic legs of early onset. She and her mother were thought to have an early-onset inherited non-progressive cerebellar ataxia syndrome. Case 2, a 8-year-old-girl had ataxic walk since 17 months of age. MRI revealed cerebellar atrophy especially in anterior superior part. Case 3, a 10-year-old boy was floppy since 4 months of age and suspected as ataxic at 4 years of age. He could walk only with cruches. He had dwarfism and cataracts since 4 years of age. CT and MRI revealed generalized spino-ponto-cerebellar atrophy. Final diagnosis was Marinesco-Sjörgren syndrome. Case 4, a 10-year-old girl had opisthotonus and floppiness since 4 months of age. She could walk only with cruches. CT and MRI revealed generalized spino-ponto-cerebellar atrophy. Case 5, a 8-year-old boy showed head nodding and nystagmus since 4 months of age. He started ataxic gait at 8 years of age. He could vocalize only single sound for speech. MRI revealed cranium bifida and agenesis of anterior medullar velum. Ataxic cerebral palsy is the term often used to describe very different conditions, the clinical picture starts as hypotonia and changes into the ataxic symptoms in a few years.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1389327

  3. The Potential of Using Brain Images for Authentication

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zongtan; Shen, Hui; Hu, Dewen

    2014-01-01

    Biometric recognition (also known as biometrics) refers to the automated recognition of individuals based on their biological or behavioral traits. Examples of biometric traits include fingerprint, palmprint, iris, and face. The brain is the most important and complex organ in the human body. Can it be used as a biometric trait? In this study, we analyze the uniqueness of the brain and try to use the brain for identity authentication. The proposed brain-based verification system operates in two stages: gray matter extraction and gray matter matching. A modified brain segmentation algorithm is implemented for extracting gray matter from an input brain image. Then, an alignment-based matching algorithm is developed for brain matching. Experimental results on two data sets show that the proposed brain recognition system meets the high accuracy requirement of identity authentication. Though currently the acquisition of the brain is still time consuming and expensive, brain images are highly unique and have the potential possibility for authentication in view of pattern recognition. PMID:25126604

  4. The potential of using brain images for authentication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fanglin; Zhou, Zongtan; Shen, Hui; Hu, Dewen

    2014-01-01

    Biometric recognition (also known as biometrics) refers to the automated recognition of individuals based on their biological or behavioral traits. Examples of biometric traits include fingerprint, palmprint, iris, and face. The brain is the most important and complex organ in the human body. Can it be used as a biometric trait? In this study, we analyze the uniqueness of the brain and try to use the brain for identity authentication. The proposed brain-based verification system operates in two stages: gray matter extraction and gray matter matching. A modified brain segmentation algorithm is implemented for extracting gray matter from an input brain image. Then, an alignment-based matching algorithm is developed for brain matching. Experimental results on two data sets show that the proposed brain recognition system meets the high accuracy requirement of identity authentication. Though currently the acquisition of the brain is still time consuming and expensive, brain images are highly unique and have the potential possibility for authentication in view of pattern recognition. PMID:25126604

  5. Development of image and information management system for Korean standard brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Soon Cheol; Choi, Do Young; Tack, Gye Rae; Sohn, Jin Hun

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish a reference for image acquisition for completing a standard brain for diverse Korean population, and to develop database management system that saves and manages acquired brain images and personal information of subjects. 3D MP-RAGE (Magnetization Prepared Rapid Gradient Echo) technique which has excellent Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) as well as reduces image acquisition time was selected for anatomical image acquisition, and parameter values were obtained for the optimal image acquisition. Using these standards, image data of 121 young adults (early twenties) were obtained and stored in the system. System was designed to obtain, save, and manage not only anatomical image data but also subjects' basic demographic factors, medical history, handedness inventory, state-trait anxiety inventory, A-type personality inventory, self-assessment depression inventory, mini-mental state examination, intelligence test, and results of personality test via a survey questionnaire. Additionally this system was designed to have functions of saving, inserting, deleting, searching, and printing image data and personal information of subjects, and to have accessibility to them as well as automatic connection setup with ODBC. This newly developed system may have major contribution to the completion of a standard brain for diverse Korean population since it can save and manage their image data and personal information.

  6. An architecture for a brain-image database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herskovits, E. H.

    2000-01-01

    The widespread availability of methods for noninvasive assessment of brain structure has enabled researchers to investigate neuroimaging correlates of normal aging, cerebrovascular disease, and other processes; we designate such studies as image-based clinical trials (IBCTs). We propose an architecture for a brain-image database, which integrates image processing and statistical operators, and thus supports the implementation and analysis of IBCTs. The implementation of this architecture is described and results from the analysis of image and clinical data from two IBCTs are presented. We expect that systems such as this will play a central role in the management and analysis of complex research data sets.

  7. Natural image classification driven by human brain activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dai; Peng, Hanyang; Wang, Jinqiao; Tang, Ming; Xue, Rong; Zuo, Zhentao

    2016-03-01

    Natural image classification has been a hot topic in computer vision and pattern recognition research field. Since the performance of an image classification system can be improved by feature selection, many image feature selection methods have been developed. However, the existing supervised feature selection methods are typically driven by the class label information that are identical for different samples from the same class, ignoring with-in class image variability and therefore degrading the feature selection performance. In this study, we propose a novel feature selection method, driven by human brain activity signals collected using fMRI technique when human subjects were viewing natural images of different categories. The fMRI signals associated with subjects viewing different images encode the human perception of natural images, and therefore may capture image variability within- and cross- categories. We then select image features with the guidance of fMRI signals from brain regions with active response to image viewing. Particularly, bag of words features based on GIST descriptor are extracted from natural images for classification, and a sparse regression base feature selection method is adapted to select image features that can best predict fMRI signals. Finally, a classification model is built on the select image features to classify images without fMRI signals. The validation experiments for classifying images from 4 categories of two subjects have demonstrated that our method could achieve much better classification performance than the classifiers built on image feature selected by traditional feature selection methods.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiang; Watts, Lora Tally; Li, Wei; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in the USA. Common causes of TBI include falls, violence, injuries from wars, and vehicular and sporting accidents. The initial direct mechanical damage in TBI is followed by progressive secondary injuries such as brain swelling, perturbed cerebral blood flow (CBF), abnormal cerebrovascular reactivity (CR), metabolic dysfunction, blood-brain-barrier disruption, inflammation, oxidative stress, and excitotoxicity, among others. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the means to noninvasively probe many of these secondary injuries. MRI has been used to image anatomical, physiological, and functional changes associated with TBI in a longitudinal manner. This chapter describes controlled cortical impact (CCI) TBI surgical procedures, a few common MRI protocols used in TBI imaging, and, finally, image analysis pertaining to experimental TBI imaging in rats. PMID:27604743

  9. Noninvasive Imaging of Head-Brain Conductivity Profiles Using Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Yan, Dandan; Zhu, Shanan; He, Bin

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a recently introduced non-invasive conductivity imaging modality, which combines the magnetic resonance current density imaging (CDI) and the traditional electrical impedance tomography (EIT) techniques. MREIT is aimed at providing high spatial resolution images of electrical conductivity, by avoiding solving the well-known ill-posed problem in the traditional EIT. In this paper, we review our research activities in MREIT imaging of head-brain tissue conductivity profiles. We have developed several imaging algorithms and conducted a series of computer simulations for MREIT imaging of the head and brain tissues. Our work suggests MREIT brain imaging may become a useful tool in imaging conductivity distributions of the brain and head. PMID:18799394

  10. sup 31 P saturation transfer and phosphocreatine imaging in the monkey brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mora, B.; Narasimhan, P.T.; Ross, B.D. California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena ); Allman, J. ); Barker, P.B. )

    1991-10-01

    {sup 31}P magnetic resonance imaging with chemical-shift discrimination by selective excitation has been employed to determine the phosphocreatine (PCr) distribution in the brains of three juvenile macaque monkeys. PCr images were also obtained while saturating the resonance of the {gamma}-phosphate of ATP, which allowed the investigation of the chemical exchange between PCr and the {gamma}-phosphate of ATP catalyzed by creatine kinase. Superposition of the PCr images over the proton image of the same monkey brain revealed topological variations in the distribution of PCr and creatine kinase activity. PCr images were also obtained with and without visual stimulation. In two out of four experiments, an apparently localized decrease in PCr concentration was noted in visual cortex upon visual stimulation. This result is interpreted in terms of a possible role for the local ADP concentration in stimulating the accompanying metabolic response.

  11. Optical imaging to map blood-brain barrier leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffer, Hayder; Adjei, Isaac M.; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-11-01

    Vascular leakage in the brain is a major complication associated with brain injuries and certain pathological conditions due to disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We have developed an optical imaging method, based on excitation and emission spectra of Evans Blue dye, that is >1000-fold more sensitive than conventional ultraviolet spectrophotometry. We used a rat thromboembolic stroke model to validate the usefulness of our method for vascular leakage. Optical imaging data show that vascular leakage varies in different areas of the post-stroke brain and that administering tissue plasminogen activator causes further leakage. The new method is quantitative, simple to use, requires no tissue processing, and can map the degree of vascular leakage in different brain locations. The high sensitivity of our method could potentially provide new opportunities to study BBB leakage in different pathological conditions and to test the efficacy of various therapeutic strategies to protect the BBB.

  12. Nanoparticles for imaging and treating brain cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Joseph D; Doane, Tennyson; Burda, Clemens; Basilion, James P

    2013-01-01

    Brain cancer tumors cause disruption of the selective properties of vascular endothelia, even causing disruptions in the very selective blood–brain barrier, which are collectively referred to as the blood–brain–tumor barrier. Nanoparticles (NPs) have previously shown great promise in taking advantage of this increased vascular permeability in other cancers, which results in increased accumulation in these cancers over time due to the accompanying loss of an effective lymph system. NPs have therefore attracted increased attention for treating brain cancer. While this research is just beginning, there have been many successes demonstrated thus far in both the laboratory and clinical setting. This review serves to present the reader with an overview of NPs for treating brain cancer and to provide an outlook on what may come in the future. For NPs, just like the blood–brain–tumor barrier, the future is wide open. PMID:23256496

  13. Metabolic brain imaging correlated with clinical features of brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, J.; Alavi, A.; Dann, R.; Kushner, M.; Chawluk, J.; Powlis, W.; Reivich, M.

    1985-05-01

    Nineteen adults with brain tumors have been studied with positron emission tomography utilizing FDG. Fourteen had biopsy proven cerebral malignant glioma, one each had meningioma, hemangiopericytoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), two had unbiopsied lesions, and one patient had an area of biopsy proven radiation necrosis. Three different patterns of glucose metabolism are observed: marked increase in metabolism at the site of the known tumor in (10 high grade gliomas and the PNET), lower than normal metabolism at the tumor (in 1 grade II glioma, 3 grade III gliomas, 2 unbiopsied low density nonenhancing lesions, and the meningioma), no abnormality (1 enhancing glioma, the hemangiopericytoma and the radiation necrosis.) The metabolic rate of the tumor or the surrounding brain did not appear to be correlated with the history of previous irradiation or chemotherapy. Decreased metabolism was frequently observed in the rest of the affected hemisphere and in the contralateral cerebellum. Tumors of high grade or with enhancing CT characteristics were more likely to show increased metabolism. Among the patients with proven gliomas, survival after PETT scan tended to be longer for those with low metabolic activity tumors than for those with highly active tumors. The authors conclude that PETT may help to predict the malignant potential of tumors, and may add useful clinical information to the CT scan.

  14. Blood-Brain Barrier Experiments with Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging and an Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Woo; Kim, Hak Jin; Han, Hyung Soo

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of study was to evaluate the feasibility of brain magnetic resonance (MR) images of the rat obtained using a 1.5T MR machine in several blood-brain barrier (BBB) experiments. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. MR images were obtained using a clinical 1.5T MR machine. A microcatheter was introduced via the femoral artery to the carotid artery. Normal saline (group 1, n = 4), clotted autologous blood (group 2, n = 4), triolein emulsion (group 3, n = 4), and oleic acid emulsion (group 4, n = 4) were infused into the carotid artery through a microcatheter. Conventional and diffusion-weighted images, the apparent coefficient map, perfusion-weighted images, and contrast-enhanced MR images were obtained. Brain tissue was obtained and triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining was performed in group 2. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran images and endothelial barrier antigen (EBA) studies were performed in group 4. Results The MR images in group 1 were of good quality. The MR images in group 2 revealed typical findings of acute cerebral infarction. Perfusion defects were noted on the perfusion-weighted images. The MR images in group 3 showed vasogenic edema and contrast enhancement, representing vascular damage. The rats in group 4 had vasogenic edema on the MR images and leakage of dextran on the FITC-labeled dextran image, representing increased vascular permeability. The immune reaction was decreased on the EBA study. Conclusion Clinical 1.5T MR images using a rat depicted many informative results in the present study. These results can be used in further researches of the BBB using combined clinical MR machines and immunohistochemical examinations. PMID:20379473

  15. Brain magnetic resolution imaging to diagnose bing-neel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho-Jung; Suh, Sang-Il; Kim, Joo Han; Kim, Byung-Jo

    2009-12-01

    Radiologic findings of Bing-Neel syndrome, which is an extremely uncommon complication resulting from malignant lymphocyte infiltration into the central nervous system (CNS) in patients with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM), have been infrequently reported due to extreme rarity of the case. A 75-year-old man with WM presented at a neurology clinic with progressive gait and memory disturbances, and dysarthria of 2 months duration. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum protein electrophoresis and immunofixation electrophoresis showed IgM kappa-type monoclonal gammopathy. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed multifocal, hyperintense lesions on T2 weighted-images. Brain diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) demonstrated hyperintensities in cerebral and cerebellar lesions that appeared isointense on apparent diffusion coefficient maps, which were compatible with vasogenic edema. Although histologic analysis is a confirmative study to prove direct cell infiltration into the brain, brain MRI with DWI may be a good supportive study to diagnose Bing-Neel syndrome. PMID:20062579

  16. Whole Brain Imaging with Serial Two-Photon Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Stephen P.; Pan, Feng; Schwartz, Joel; Ragan, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging entire mouse brains at submicron resolution has historically been a challenging undertaking and largely confined to the province of dedicated atlasing initiatives. This has limited systematic investigations into important areas of neuroscience, such as neural circuits, brain mapping and neurodegeneration. In this article, we describe in detail Serial Two-Photon (STP) tomography, a robust, reliable method for imaging entire brains with histological detail. We provide examples of how the basic methodology can be extended to other imaging modalities, such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), in order to provide unique contrast mechanisms. Furthermore, we provide a survey of the research that STP tomography has enabled in the field of neuroscience, provide examples of how this technology enables quantitative whole brain studies, and discuss the current limitations of STP tomography-based approaches. PMID:27047350

  17. Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Understanding Brain Development in Early Life

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Anqi; Mori, Susumu; Miller, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    The human brain rapidly develops during the final weeks of gestation and in the first two years following birth. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a unique in vivo imaging technique that allows three-dimensional visualization of the white matter anatomy in the brain. It has been considered to be a valuable tool for studying brain development in early life. In this review, we first introduce the DTI technique. We then review DTI findings on white matter development at the fetal stage and in infancy as well as DTI applications for understanding neurocognitive development and brain abnormalities in preterm infants. Finally, we discuss limitations of DTI and potential valuable imaging techniques for studying white matter myelination. PMID:25559117

  18. Photoacoustic imaging for transvascular drug delivery to the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Ryota; Sato, Shunichi; Tsunoi, Yasuyuki; Kawauchi, Satoko; Takemura, Toshiya; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2015-03-01

    Transvascular drug delivery to the brain is difficult due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, various methods for safely opening the BBB have been investigated, for which real-time imaging methods are desired both for the blood vessels and distribution of a drug. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, which enables depth-resolved visualization of chromophores in tissue, would be useful for this purpose. In this study, we performed in vivo PA imaging of the blood vessels and distribution of a drug in the rat brain by using an originally developed compact PA imaging system with fiber-based illumination. As a test drug, Evans blue (EB) was injected to the tail vein, and a photomechanical wave was applied to the targeted brain tissue to increase the permeability of the blood vessel walls. For PA imaging of blood vessels and EB distribution, nanosecond pulses at 532 nm and 670 nm were used, respectively. We clearly visualized blood vessels with diameters larger than 50 μm and the distribution of EB in the brain, showing spatiotemporal characteristics of EB that was transvascularly delivered to the target tissue in the brain.

  19. {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceuticals for brain perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, E.; Volkert, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    It is well established that small, neutral, lipophilic technetium complexes can diffuse into the brain and then be trapped intracellularly by a variety of mechanisms. A more detailed understanding of the structural and chemical parameters which promote efficient diffusion into the brain, and which underlie the trapping mechanisms, will be necessary to delineate the clinical relevance of current agents, and to design improved technetium 99 pharmaceuticals. Current technetium 99 brain-perfusion imaging agents do not show ideal characteristics of brain uptake and retention. Furthermore, significant fractions of the technetium 99 complexes are lost between site of injection and the brain. Thus, it is difficult to use these current agents to quantitate regional cerebral blood flow. Nevertheless, these agents are proving extremely valuable for the SPECT evaluation of abnormalities in brain perfusion patients with neurological disorders.

  20. Look again: effects of brain images and mind-brain dualism on lay evaluations of research.

    PubMed

    Hook, Cayce J; Farah, Martha J

    2013-09-01

    Brain scans have frequently been credited with uniquely seductive and persuasive qualities, leading to claims that fMRI research receives a disproportionate share of public attention and funding. It has been suggested that functional brain images are fascinating because they contradict dualist beliefs regarding the relationship between the body and the mind. Although previous research has indicated that brain images can increase judgments of an article's scientific reasoning, the hypotheses that brain scans make research appear more interesting, surprising, or worthy of funding have not been tested. Neither has the relation between the allure of brain imaging and dualism. In the following three studies, laypersons rated both fictional research descriptions and real science news articles accompanied by brain scans, bar charts, or photographs. Across 988 participants, we found little evidence of neuroimaging's seductive allure or of its relation to self-professed dualistic beliefs. These results, taken together with other recent null findings, suggest that brain images are less powerful than has been argued. PMID:23879877

  1. Brain MRI Tumor Detection using Active Contour Model and Local Image Fitting Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabizadeh, Nooshin; John, Nigel

    2014-03-01

    Automatic abnormality detection in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an important issue in many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here an automatic brain tumor detection method is introduced that uses T1-weighted images and K. Zhang et. al.'s active contour model driven by local image fitting (LIF) energy. Local image fitting energy obtains the local image information, which enables the algorithm to segment images with intensity inhomogeneities. Advantage of this method is that the LIF energy functional has less computational complexity than the local binary fitting (LBF) energy functional; moreover, it maintains the sub-pixel accuracy and boundary regularization properties. In Zhang's algorithm, a new level set method based on Gaussian filtering is used to implement the variational formulation, which is not only vigorous to prevent the energy functional from being trapped into local minimum, but also effective in keeping the level set function regular. Experiments show that the proposed method achieves high accuracy brain tumor segmentation results.

  2. Automatic Detection of Multiple Sclerosis Lesions in MR Brain Images

    PubMed Central

    Kapouleas, Ioannis

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a system that locates lesions in Magnetic Resonance (MR) human brain images. The system uses new low level vision methods which successively identify the brain mass in the images, locate suspected lesions, sulci, and other normal structures. Other low level methods eliminate the majority of false positive lesions and locate certain landmarks such as the interhemispherical fissure. These methods take advantage of the special characteristics of MR images. A modeling method that employs b-spline surfaces has been developed to model the surfaces of the organs in a human brain in 3D. This method allows the model surfaces to be deformed in order to fit each individual patient's brain, and also allows the proportional deformation of the shapes of difficult-to-identify organs according to the deformation of easier-to-identify organs. The system calculates the appropriate position and orientation for the model by making use of landmarks within the patient's brain, and the moment of inertia method. The system uses both Proton Density and T2 sequences of images, in coronal and axial orientations. The various parts of the system have been tested extensively (on more than 1000 images from patients with Multiple Sclerosis lesions) with very good results. The methods developed here can also be used for other diagnostic tasks in radiology. ImagesFigures 1to7 10 11

  3. Fluorescent carbonaceous nanospheres as biological probe for noninvasive brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jun; Ruan, Shaobo; Cao, Xi; Cun, Xingli; Chen, Jiantao; Shen, Shun; Jiang, Xinguo; He, Qin; Zhu, Jianhua; Gao, Huile

    2014-12-15

    Fluorescent carbonaceous nanospheres (CDs) have generated much excitement in bioimaging because of their impressive fluorescent properties and good biocompatibility. In this study, we evaluated the potential application of CDs in noninvasive brain imaging. A new kind of CDs was prepared by a heat treating method using glutamic acid and glucose as the precursors. The hydrated diameter and zeta potential of CDs were 101.1 nm (PDI=0.110) and -22.4 mV respectively. Palpable emission spectrum could be observed from 400 nm to 600 nm when excited at corresponding wavelength, suggesting CDs could be used as a noninvasive bio-probe for in vivo imaging. Additionally, several experiments indicated that CDs possess good serum stability and hemocompatibility with low cytotoxicity. In vitro, the CDs could be efficiently taken up by bEnd.3 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In vivo, CDs could be used for noninvasive brain imaging due to its high accumulation in brain region, which was demonstrated by in vivo imaging and ex vivo tissue imaging. Moreover, the fluorescent distribution in tissue slice showed CDs accumulated in brain with high intensity. In conclusion, CDs were prepared using a simple one-step method with unique optical and good biological properties and could be used for noninvasive brain imaging. PMID:25278360

  4. Evaluation of improvement of diffuse optical imaging of brain function by high-density probe arrangements and imaging algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Yusuke; Kurihara, Kazuki; Okada, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    Diffuse optical imaging has been applied to measure the localized hemodynamic responses to brain activation. One of the serious problems with diffuse optical imaging is the limitation of the spatial resolution caused by the sparse probe arrangement and broadened spatial sensitivity profile for each probe pair. High-density probe arrangements and an image reconstruction algorithm considering the broadening of the spatial sensitivity can improve the spatial resolution of the image. In this study, the diffuse optical imaging of the absorption change in the brain is simulated to evaluate the effect of the high-density probe arrangements and imaging methods. The localization error, equivalent full-width half maximum and circularity of the absorption change in the image obtained by the mapping and reconstruction methods from the data measured by five probe arrangements are compared to quantitatively evaluate the imaging methods and probe arrangements. The simple mapping method is sufficient for the density of the measurement points up to the double-density probe arrangement. The image reconstruction method considering the broadening of the spatial sensitivity of the probe pairs can effectively improve the spatial resolution of the image obtained from the probe arrangements higher than the quadruple density, in which the distance between the neighboring measurement points is 10.6 mm.

  5. Localization of deep brain stimulation electrodes via metal artifacts in CT images.

    PubMed

    Motevakel, Amir; Medvedev, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), the location of implanted electrodes in the brain has direct influence on the therapeutic effect of the treatment. This work deals with estimating the position of the implanted DBS electrodes from the images registered by X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) scanners. A technique named junction method that takes advantage of the streak artifacts created by the metal parts of the electrodes in CT images is proposed for this purpose. To start with, the brain image is extracted by defining a brain mask. Next, the edges are intensified by applying a Gaussian convolution operator followed by a measure of the second derivative of the image along all directions in the image plane. Criteria of adjacency and length are applied to the lines detected by the Hough transform to distinguish between tracks of streak artifacts and the brain structure. At some points, straight lines are distorted by noise. To handle this issue, all lines that fit same line equation are merged. The horizontal line connecting the two DBS electrodes (one in each cerebral hemisphere) is called electrode line. To specify the electrodes position, intersections of the electrode line with every other line are marked. Finally, to obtain the vertical position estimate, the above algorithm is applied to the image stack. PMID:25570143

  6. Clinical anatomy of the canine brain using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Edmund J; Mackillop, Edward; Robertson, Ian D; Hudson, Lola C

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to produce an magnetic resonsnce (MR) image atlas of clinically relevant brain anatomy and to relate this neuroanatomy to clinical signs. The brain of a large mixed breed dog was imaged in transverse, sagittal, and dorsal planes using a 1.5 T MR unit and the following pulse sequences: Turbo (fast) spin echo (TSE) T2, T1, and T2- weighted spatial and chemical shift-encoded excitation sequence. Relevant neuroanatomic structures were identified using anatomic texts, sectioned cadaver heads, and previously published atlases. Major subdivisions of the brain were mapped and the neurologic signs of lesions in these divisions were described. TSE T2-weighted images were found to be the most useful for identifying clinically relevant neuroanatomy. Relating clinical signs to morphology as seen on MR will assist veterinarians to better understand clinically relevant neuroanatomy in MR images. PMID:18418990

  7. Imaging Live Bee Brains using Minimally-Invasive Diagnostic Radioentomology

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Mark K; Tong, Jenna; Soleimani, Manucher; Bell, Duncan; Schäfer, Marc O

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity of the honey bee, Apis mellifera L. (Hymeonoptera: Apidae), brain volume and density to behavior (plasticity) makes it a great model for exploring the interactions between experience, behavior, and brain structure. Plasticity in the adult bee brain has been demonstrated in previous experiments. This experiment was conducted to identify the potentials and limitations of MicroCT (micro computed tomograpy) scanning “live” bees as a more comprehensive, non-invasive method for brain morphology and physiology. Bench-top and synchrotron MicroCT were used to scan live bees. For improved tissue differentiation, bees were fed and injected with radiographic contrast. Images of optic lobes, ocelli, antennal lobes, and mushroom bodies were visualized in 2D and 3D rendering modes. Scanning of live bees (for the first time) enabled minimally-invasive imaging of physiological processes such as passage of contrast from gut to haemolymph, and preliminary brain perfusion studies. The use of microCT scanning for studying insects (collectively termed ‘diagnostic radioentomology’, or DR) is increasing. Our results indicate that it is feasible to observe plasticity of the honey bee brain in vivo using diagnostic radioentomology, and that progressive, real-time observations of these changes can be followed in individual live bees. Limitations of live bee scanning, such as movement errors and poor tissue differentiation, were identified; however, there is great potential for in-vivo, non-invasive diagnostic radioentomology imaging of the honey bee for brain morphology and physiology. PMID:23421752

  8. Compensation for non-uniform attenuation in SPECT brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, S.J.; King, M.A.; Pan, T.S.

    1994-05-01

    Photon attenuation is a major limitation in performing quantitative SPECT brain imaging. A number of methods have been proposed for compensation of attenuation in regions of the body that can be modelled as a uniform attenuator. The magnitude of the errors introduced into reconstructed brain images by assuming the head to be a uniform attenuator are uncertain (the skull, sinus cavities and head holder all have different attenuation properties than brain tissue). Brain imaging is unique in that the radioisotope, for the most part, is taken up within a uniform attenuation medium (i.e., brain tissue) which is surrounded by bone (i.e., the skull) of a different density. Using this observation, Bellini`s method for attenuation compensation (which is an exact solution to the exponential Radon transform) has been modified to account for the different attenuation properties of the skull. To test this modified Bellini method, a simple mathematical phantom was designed to model the brain and a skull of varying thickness less than 7.5 mm. To model brain imaging with Tc-99m HMPAO, the attenuation coefficient of the brain tissue and skull were set to 0.15 cm{sup -1} and 0.22 cm{sup -1} respectively. A ray-driven projector which accounted for non-uniform attenuation was used to simulate projection data from 128 views. The detector response and scatter were not simulated. It was observed that reconstructions processed with uniform attenuation compensation (i.e., where it was assumed that the brain tissue and the skull had the same attenuation coefficient) provided errors of 6-20%, whereas those processed with the non-uniform Bellini algorithm were biased by only 0-5%.

  9. Anatomical Brain Images Alone Can Accurately Diagnose Chronic Neuropsychiatric Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ravi; Staib, Lawrence H.; Laine, Andrew F.; Hao, Xuejun; Xu, Dongrong; Liu, Jun; Weissman, Myrna; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Diagnoses using imaging-based measures alone offer the hope of improving the accuracy of clinical diagnosis, thereby reducing the costs associated with incorrect treatments. Previous attempts to use brain imaging for diagnosis, however, have had only limited success in diagnosing patients who are independent of the samples used to derive the diagnostic algorithms. We aimed to develop a classification algorithm that can accurately diagnose chronic, well-characterized neuropsychiatric illness in single individuals, given the availability of sufficiently precise delineations of brain regions across several neural systems in anatomical MR images of the brain. Methods We have developed an automated method to diagnose individuals as having one of various neuropsychiatric illnesses using only anatomical MRI scans. The method employs a semi-supervised learning algorithm that discovers natural groupings of brains based on the spatial patterns of variation in the morphology of the cerebral cortex and other brain regions. We used split-half and leave-one-out cross-validation analyses in large MRI datasets to assess the reproducibility and diagnostic accuracy of those groupings. Results In MRI datasets from persons with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Schizophrenia, Tourette Syndrome, Bipolar Disorder, or persons at high or low familial risk for Major Depressive Disorder, our method discriminated with high specificity and nearly perfect sensitivity the brains of persons who had one specific neuropsychiatric disorder from the brains of healthy participants and the brains of persons who had a different neuropsychiatric disorder. Conclusions Although the classification algorithm presupposes the availability of precisely delineated brain regions, our findings suggest that patterns of morphological variation across brain surfaces, extracted from MRI scans alone, can successfully diagnose the presence of chronic neuropsychiatric disorders. Extensions of these

  10. Multifunctional nanoparticles for brain tumor imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Morshed, Ramin A; Auffinger, Brenda; Tobias, Alex L; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2014-02-01

    Brain tumors are a diverse group of neoplasms that often carry a poor prognosis for patients. Despite tremendous efforts to develop diagnostic tools and therapeutic avenues, the treatment of brain tumors remains a formidable challenge in the field of neuro-oncology. Physiological barriers including the blood-brain barrier result in insufficient accumulation of therapeutic agents at the site of a tumor, preventing adequate destruction of malignant cells. Furthermore, there is a need for improvements in brain tumor imaging to allow for better characterization and delineation of tumors, visualization of malignant tissue during surgery, and tracking of response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Multifunctional nanoparticles offer the potential to improve upon many of these issues and may lead to breakthroughs in brain tumor management. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of nanoparticles for brain tumors with an emphasis on innovative approaches in tumor targeting, tumor imaging, and therapeutic agent delivery. Clinically feasible nanoparticle administration strategies for brain tumor patients are also examined. Furthermore, we address the barriers towards clinical implementation of multifunctional nanoparticles in the context of brain tumor management. PMID:24060923

  11. Images of the brain: past as prologue

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1986-12-01

    The invention of the Anger scintillation camera and the development of /sup 99m/Tc tracers brought about a tenfold increase in nuclear brain scanning between 1963 and 1973, an increase that plateaued with the introduction of x-ray computed tomography. A second growth curve began in 1976 at which time there were four PET centers in the United States, a number that grew to 60 worldwide over the next decade. PET, SPECT, MRI, and MRS are leading us into a new era of in vivo brain chemistry, based on regional bioenergetics and neurotransmission. The immediate impact is in epilepsy, stroke, brain tumors and the dementias, with psychiatric diseases becoming a major focus of research. Receptivity has become a biochemical as well as a psychological approach to mental functions. The finding of elevated D2 dopamine receptors in schizophrenia in living patients may be the forerunner of a new biochemical approach to psychiatry.

  12. Recent Developments in Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Brain

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Mansi Bharat; Gurjarpadhye, Abhijit Achyut; Manoukian, Martin A.C.; Dubnika, Arita; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Inayathullah, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has come to be known as a unique radiological imaging modality because of its ability to perform tomographic imaging of body without the use of any harmful ionizing radiation. The radiologists use MRI to gain insight into the anatomy of organs, including the brain, while biomedical researchers explore the modality to gain better understanding of the brain structure and function. However, due to limited resolution and contrast, the conventional MRI fails to show the brain microstructure. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) harnesses the power of conventional MRI to deduce the diffusion dynamics of water molecules within the tissue and indirectly create a three-dimensional sketch of the brain anatomy. DTI enables visualization of brain tissue microstructure, which is extremely helpful in understanding various neuropathologies and neurodegenerative disorders. In this review, we briefly discuss the background and operating principles of DTI, followed by current trends in DTI applications for biomedical and clinical investigation of various brain diseases and disorders. PMID:27077135

  13. Osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption: CT and radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Roman-Goldstein, S.; Clunie, D.A.; Stevens, J.; Hogan, R.; Monard, J.; Ramsey, F.; Neuwelt, E.A.

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare CT and radionuclide imaging of osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption, and to develop a quantitative method for imaging osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption and to see if iopamidol could be safety given intravenously in conjunction with blood-brain barrier disruption. Forty-five blood-brain barrier disruption procedures were imaged with CT and radionuclide scans. The scans were evaluated with visual and quantitative scales. Patients were observed for adverse effects after blood-brain barrier disruption. There was a 4% rate of seizures in this study. There was good agreement between visual CT and radionuclide grading systems. Quantitative disruption did not add useful information to visual interpretations. Nonionic iodine-based contrast medium has a lower incidence of seizures when injected intravenously in conjunction with osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption than ionic contrast material. Contrast-enhanced CT is the preferred method to image disruption because it has better spatial resolution than radionuclide techniques. 34 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Segmentation of center brains and optic lobes in 3D confocal images of adult fruit fly brains.

    PubMed

    Lam, Shing Chun Benny; Ruan, Zongcai; Zhao, Ting; Long, Fuhui; Jenett, Arnim; Simpson, Julie; Myers, Eugene W; Peng, Hanchuan

    2010-02-01

    Automatic alignment (registration) of 3D images of adult fruit fly brains is often influenced by the significant displacement of the relative locations of the two optic lobes (OLs) and the center brain (CB). In one of our ongoing efforts to produce a better image alignment pipeline of adult fruit fly brains, we consider separating CB and OLs and align them independently. This paper reports our automatic method to segregate CB and OLs, in particular under conditions where the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is low, the variation of the image intensity is big, and the relative displacement of OLs and CB is substantial. We design an algorithm to find a minimum-cost 3D surface in a 3D image stack to best separate an OL (of one side, either left or right) from CB. This surface is defined as an aggregation of the respective minimum-cost curves detected in each individual 2D image slice. Each curve is defined by a list of control points that best segregate OL and CB. To obtain the locations of these control points, we derive an energy function that includes an image energy term defined by local pixel intensities and two internal energy terms that constrain the curve's smoothness and length. Gradient descent method is used to optimize this energy function. To improve both the speed and robustness of the method, for each stack, the locations of optimized control points in a slice are taken as the initialization prior for the next slice. We have tested this approach on simulated and real 3D fly brain image stacks and demonstrated that this method can reasonably segregate OLs from CBs despite the aforementioned difficulties. PMID:19698789

  15. In vivo imaging of rapid deformation and strain in an animal model of traumatic brain injury*

    PubMed Central

    Bayly, Philip V.; Black, Erin E.; Pedersen, Rachel C.; Leister, Elizabeth P.; Genin, Guy M.

    2005-01-01

    In traumatic brain injury (TBI) rapid deformation of brain tissue leads to axonal injury and cell death. In vivo quantification of such fast deformations is extremely difficult, but important for understanding the mechanisms of degeneration post-trauma and for development of numerical models of injury biomechanics. In this paper, strain fields in the brain of the perinatal rat were estimated from data obtained in vivo during rapid indentation. Tagged magnetic resonance (MR) images were obtained with high spatial (0.2 mm) and temporal (3.9 ms) resolution by gated image acquisition during and after impact. Impacts were repeated either 64 or 128 times to obtain images of horizontal and vertical tag lines in coronal and sagittal planes. Strain fields were estimated by harmonic phase (HARP) analysis of the tagged images. The original MR data was filtered and Fourier-transformed to obtain HARP images, following a method originally developed by Osman et al. (IEEE Trans. Med. Imaging 19(3) (2000) 186). The displacements of material points were estimated from intersections of HARP contours and used to generate estimates of the deformation gradient and Lagrangian strain tensors. Maximum principal Lagrangian strains of >0.20 at strain rates >40/s were observed during indentations of 2 mm depth and 21 ms duration. PMID:16549098

  16. Monitoring fractional anisotropy in developing rabbit brain using MR diffusion tensor imaging at 3T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jao, Jo-Chi; Yang, Yu-Ting; Hsiao, Chia-Chi; Chen, Po-Chou

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factional anisotropy (FA) in various regions of developing rabbit brain using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR DTI) at 3 T. A whole-body clinical MR imaging (MRI) scanner with a 15-channel high resolution knee coil was used. An echo-planar-imaging (EPI)-DTI pulse sequence was performed. Five 5 week-old New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits underwent MRI once per week for 24 weeks. After scanning, FA maps were obtained. ROIs (regions of interests) in the frontal lobe, parietal & temporal lobe, and occipital lobe were measured. FA changes with time were evaluated with a linear regression analysis. The results show that the FA values in all lobes of the brain increased linearly with age. The ranking of FA values was FA(frontal lobe) < FA(parietal & temporal lobe) > FA(occipital lobe). There was significant difference (p < 0.05) among these lobes. FA values are associated with the nerve development and brain functions. The FA change rate could be a biomarker to monitor the brain development. Understanding the FA values of various lobes during development could provide helpful information to diagnosis the abnormal syndrome earlier and have a better treatment and prognosis. This study established a brain MR-DTI protocol for rabbits to investigate the brain anatomy during development using clinical MRI. This technique can be further applied to the pre-clinical diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and follow-up of brain lesions.

  17. Visualization and volumetric structures from MR images of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Parvin, B.; Johnston, W.; Robertson, D.

    1994-03-01

    Pinta is a system for segmentation and visualization of anatomical structures obtained from serial sections reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging. The system approaches the segmentation problem by assigning each volumetric region to an anatomical structure. This is accomplished by satisfying constraints at the pixel level, slice level, and volumetric level. Each slice is represented by an attributed graph, where nodes correspond to regions and links correspond to the relations between regions. These regions are obtained by grouping pixels based on similarity and proximity. The slice level attributed graphs are then coerced to form a volumetric attributed graph, where volumetric consistency can be verified. The main novelty of our approach is in the use of the volumetric graph to ensure consistency from symbolic representations obtained from individual slices. In this fashion, the system allows errors to be made at the slice level, yet removes them when the volumetric consistency cannot be verified. Once the segmentation is complete, the 3D surfaces of the brain can be constructed and visualized.

  18. Non-contact photoacoustic tomography and ultrasonography for brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Guy; Blouin, Alain; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre

    2012-02-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) and ultrasonography (US) of biological tissues usually rely on transducer arrays for the detection of ultrasound. Obtaining the best sensitivity requires a physical contact with the tissue using an intermediate coupling fluid (water or gel). This type of contact is a major drawback for several applications such as neurosurgery. Laser-ultrasonics is an established optical technique for the non-contact generation and detection of ultrasound in industrial materials. In this paper, the non-contact detection scheme used in laser-ultrasonics is adapted to allow probing of ultrasound in biological tissues while remaining below laser exposure safety limits. Both non-contact PAT (NCPAT) and non-contact US (NCUS) are demonstrated experimentally using a single-frequency detection laser emitting suitably shaped pulses and a confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer. It is shown that an acceptable sensitivity is obtained while remaining below the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) of biological tissues. Results obtained ex vivo with a calf brain specimen show that sub-mm endogenous and exogenous inclusions can be detected at depths exceeding 1 cm. When fully developed, the technique could be a unique diagnostic tool in neurosurgery providing deep imaging of blood vessels, blood clots and blood oxygenation.

  19. Time-difference imaging of magnetic induction tomography in a three-layer brain physical phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruigang; Li, Ye; Fu, Feng; You, Fusheng; Shi, Xuetao; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a contactless and noninvasive technique to reconstruct the conductivity distribution in a human cross-section. In this paper, we want to study the feasibility of imaging the low-contrast perturbation and small volume object in human brains. We construct a three-layer brain physical phantom which mimics the real conductivity distribution of brains by introducing an artificial skull layer. Using our MIT data acquisition system on this phantom and differential algorithm, we have obtained a series of reconstructed images of conductivity perturbation objects. All of the conductivity perturbation objects in the brain phantom can be clearly distinguished in the reconstructed images. The minimum detectable conductivity difference between the object and the background is 0.03 S m-1 (12.5%). The minimum detectable inner volume of the objects is 3.4 cm3. The three-layer brain physical phantom is able to simulate the conductivity distribution of the main structures of a human brain. The images of the low-contrast perturbation and small volume object show the prospect of MIT in the future.

  20. Ex vivo micro-CT imaging of murine brain models using non-ionic iodinated contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas Bautista, N.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Murrieta-Rodríguez, T.; Manjarrez-Marmolejo, J.; Franco-Pérez, J.; Calvillo-Velasco, M. E.

    2014-11-01

    Preclinical investigation of brain tumors is frequently carried out by means of intracranial implantation of brain tumor xenografts or allografts, with subsequent analysis of tumor growth using conventional histopathology. However, very little has been reported on the use contrast-enhanced techniques in micro-CT imaging for the study of malignant brain tumors in small animal models. The aim of this study has been to test a protocol for ex vivo imaging of murine brain models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) after treatment with non-ionic iodinated solution, using an in-house developed laboratory micro-CT. We have found that the best compromise between acquisition time and image quality is obtained using a 50 kVp, 0.5 mAs, 1° angular step on a 360 degree orbit acquisition protocol, with 70 μm reconstructed voxel size using the Feldkamp algorithm. With this parameters up to 4 murine brains can be scanned in tandem in less than 15 minutes. Image segmentation and analysis of three sample brains allowed identifying tumor volumes as small as 0.4 mm3.

  1. Image reconstruction in transcranial photoacoustic computed tomography of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuhashi, Kenji; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) holds great promise for transcranial brain imaging. However, the strong reflection, scattering, attenuation, and mode-conversion of photoacoustic waves in the skull pose serious challenges to establishing the method. The lack of an appropriate model of solid media in conventional PACT imaging models, which are based on the canonical scalar wave equation, causes a significant model mismatch in the presence of the skull and thus results in deteriorated reconstructed images. The goal of this study was to develop an image reconstruction algorithm that accurately models the skull and thereby ameliorates the quality of reconstructed images. The propagation of photoacoustic waves through the skull was modeled by a viscoelastic stress tensor wave equation, which was subsequently discretized by use of a staggered grid fourth-order finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The matched adjoint of the FDTD-based wave propagation operator was derived for implementing a back-projection operator. Systematic computer simulations were conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the back-projection operator for reconstructing images in a realistic three-dimensional PACT brain imaging system. The results suggest that the proposed algorithm can successfully reconstruct images from transcranially-measured pressure data and readily be translated to clinical PACT brain imaging applications.

  2. Human brain activity with functional NIR optical imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qingming

    2001-08-01

    In this paper we reviewed the applications of functional near infrared optical imager in human brain activity. Optical imaging results of brain activity, including memory for new association, emotional thinking, mental arithmetic, pattern recognition ' where's Waldo?, occipital cortex in visual stimulation, and motor cortex in finger tapping, are demonstrated. It is shown that the NIR optical method opens up new fields of study of the human population, in adults under conditions of simulated or real stress that may have important effects upon functional performance. It makes practical and affordable for large populations the complex technology of measuring brain function. It is portable and low cost. In cognitive tasks subjects could report orally. The temporal resolution could be millisecond or less in theory. NIR method will have good prospects in exploring human brain secret.

  3. Imaging patterns of brain development and their relationship to cognition.

    PubMed

    Erus, Guray; Battapady, Harsha; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gur, Raquel E; Davatzikos, Christos; Gur, Ruben C

    2015-06-01

    We present a brain development index (BDI) that concisely summarizes complex imaging patterns of structural brain maturation along a single dimension using a machine learning methodology. The brain was found to follow a remarkably consistent developmental trajectory in a sample of 621 subjects of ages 8-22 participating in the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort, reflected by a cross-validated correlation coefficient between chronologic age and the BDI of r = 0.89. Critically, deviations from this trajectory related to cognitive performance. Specifically, subjects whose BDI was higher than their chronological age displayed significantly superior cognitive processing speed compared with subjects whose BDI was lower than their actual age. These results indicate that the multiparametric imaging patterns summarized by the BDI can accurately delineate trajectories of brain development and identify individuals with cognitive precocity or delay. PMID:24421175

  4. NMR imaging of cell phone radiation absorption in brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gultekin, David H.; Moeller, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    A method is described for measuring absorbed electromagnetic energy radiated from cell phone antennae into ex vivo brain tissue. NMR images the 3D thermal dynamics inside ex vivo bovine brain tissue and equivalent gel under exposure to power and irradiation time-varying radio frequency (RF) fields. The absorbed RF energy in brain tissue converts into Joule heat and affects the nuclear magnetic shielding and the Larmor precession. The resultant temperature increase is measured by the resonance frequency shift of hydrogen protons in brain tissue. This proposed application of NMR thermometry offers sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to characterize the hot spots from absorbed cell phone radiation in aqueous media and biological tissues. Specific absorption rate measurements averaged over 1 mg and 10 s in the brain tissue cover the total absorption volume. Reference measurements with fiber optic temperature sensors confirm the accuracy of the NMR thermometry. PMID:23248293

  5. NMR imaging of cell phone radiation absorption in brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Gultekin, David H; Moeller, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    A method is described for measuring absorbed electromagnetic energy radiated from cell phone antennae into ex vivo brain tissue. NMR images the 3D thermal dynamics inside ex vivo bovine brain tissue and equivalent gel under exposure to power and irradiation time-varying radio frequency (RF) fields. The absorbed RF energy in brain tissue converts into Joule heat and affects the nuclear magnetic shielding and the Larmor precession. The resultant temperature increase is measured by the resonance frequency shift of hydrogen protons in brain tissue. This proposed application of NMR thermometry offers sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to characterize the hot spots from absorbed cell phone radiation in aqueous media and biological tissues. Specific absorption rate measurements averaged over 1 mg and 10 s in the brain tissue cover the total absorption volume. Reference measurements with fiber optic temperature sensors confirm the accuracy of the NMR thermometry. PMID:23248293

  6. Investigation of image lag and modulation transfer function in fluoroscopy images obtained with a dynamic flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hiroki; Tanaka, Rie; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Matsubara, Kosuke; Iida, Hiroji; Sanada, Shigeru

    2013-07-01

    Digital imaging with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) is commonly used in clinical practice. However, several factors reduce the accuracy of target tracking in fluoroscopic imaging, including image lag and blurring. There have been several reports focusing on the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) in different types of FPD. However, there have been no studies comparing image lag and MTF properties in dynamic images obtained with indirect- and direct-conversion FPDs. We investigated the image lag and MTF under several imaging conditions in fluoroscopic images obtained with an indirect-conversion and a direct-conversion FPD system. The measurements of image lag and MTF were obtained under several conditions according to IEC 62220-1-3 standards. We examined whether the image lag and MTF were influenced by the dose level and target movement speed. Indirect-conversion FPD showed dependence on the dose level, which was not observed for direct-conversion FPD. Furthermore, there were large differences in MTF between images of static and moving plate with indirect-conversion FPD in comparison to the differences observed with direct-conversion FPD. These results will be useful for the determination of imaging conditions for target tracking and other types of dynamic imaging. PMID:23568338

  7. Intrinsic signal imaging of brain function using a small implantable CMOS imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruta, Makito; Sunaga, Yoshinori; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Takehara, Hironari; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2015-04-01

    A brain functional imaging technique over a long period is important to understand brain functions related to animal behavior. We have developed a small implantable CMOS imaging device for measuring brain activity in freely moving animals. This device is composed of a CMOS image sensor chip and LEDs for illumination. In this study, we demonstrated intrinsic signal imaging of blood flow using the device with a green LED light source at a peak wavelength of 535 nm, which corresponds to one of the absorption spectral peaks of blood cells. Brain activity increases regional blood flow. The device light weight of about 0.02 g makes it possible to stably measure brain activity through blood flow over a long period. The device has successfully measured the intrinsic signal related to sensory stimulation on the primary somatosensory cortex.

  8. Functional photoacoustic imaging to observe regional brain activation induced by cocaine hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-09-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was used to detect small animal brain activation in response to drug abuse. Cocaine hydrochloride in saline solution was injected into the blood stream of Sprague Dawley rats through tail veins. The rat brain functional change in response to the injection of drug was then monitored by the PAM technique. Images in the coronal view of the rat brain at the locations of 1.2 and 3.4 mm posterior to bregma were obtained. The resulted photoacoustic (PA) images showed the regional changes in the blood volume. Additionally, the regional changes in blood oxygenation were also presented. The results demonstrated that PA imaging is capable of monitoring regional hemodynamic changes induced by drug abuse.

  9. Resting-state functional connectivity imaging of the mouse brain using photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Xia, Jun; Wan, Hanlin; Bauer, Adam Q.; Culver, Joseph P.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) imaging is an emerging neuroimaging approach that aims to identify spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations and their associated functional connections. Clinical studies have demonstrated that RSFC is altered in brain disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's, autism, and epilepsy. However, conventional neuroimaging modalities cannot easily be applied to mice, the most widely used model species for human brain disease studies. For instance, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of mice requires a very high magnetic field to obtain a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution. Functional connectivity mapping with optical intrinsic signal imaging (fcOIS) is an alternative method. Due to the diffusion of light in tissue, the spatial resolution of fcOIS is limited, and experiments have been performed using an exposed skull preparation. In this study, we show for the first time, the use of photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) to noninvasively image resting-state functional connectivity in the mouse brain, with a large field of view and a high spatial resolution. Bilateral correlations were observed in eight regions, as well as several subregions. These findings agreed well with the Paxinos mouse brain atlas. This study showed that PACT is a promising, non-invasive modality for small-animal functional brain imaging.

  10. Functional connectivity in the mouse brain imaged by B-mode photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Xing, Wenxin; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    The increasing use of mouse models for human brain disease studies, coupled with the fact that existing functional imaging modalities cannot be easily applied to mice, presents an emerging need for a new functional imaging modality. Utilizing acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we imaged spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations and their associated functional connections in the mouse brain. The images were acquired noninvasively in B-scan mode with a fast frame rate, a large field of view, and a high spatial resolution. At a location relative to the bregma 0, correlations were investigated inter-hemispherically between bilaterally homologous regions, as well as intra-hemispherically within the same functional regions. The functional connectivity in different functional regions was studied. The locations of these regions agreed well with the Paxinos mouse brain atlas. The functional connectivity map obtained in this study can then be used in the investigation of brain disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's, schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis, autism, and epilepsy. Our experiments show that photoacoustic microscopy is capable to detect connectivities between different functional regions in B-scan mode, promising a powerful functional imaging modality for future brain research.

  11. Size-optimized 32-Channel Brain Arrays for 3 T Pediatric Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Boris; Alagappan, Vijay; Mareyam, Azma; McNab, Jennifer A.; Fujimoto, Kyoko; Tountcheva, Veneta; Triantafyllou, Christina; Dilks, Daniel D.; Kanwisher, Nancy; Lin, Weili; Grant, P. Ellen; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2011-01-01

    Size-optimized 32-channel receive array coils were developed for five age groups, neonates, 6 months old, 1 year old, 4 years old, and 7 years old, and evaluated for pediatric brain imaging. The array consisted of overlapping circular surface coils laid out on a close-fitting coil-former. The two-section coil former design was obtained from surface contours of aligned three-dimensional MRI scans of each age group. Signal-to-noise ratio and noise amplification for parallel imaging were evaluated and compared to two coils routinely used for pediatric brain imaging; a commercially available 32-channel adult head coil and a pediatric-sized birdcage coil. Phantom measurements using the neonate, 6-month-old, 1-year-old, 4-year-old, and 7-year-old coils showed signal-to-noise ratio increases at all locations within the brain over the comparison coils. Within the brain cortex the five dedicated pediatric arrays increased signal-to-noise ratio by up to 3.6-, 3.0-, 2.6-, 2.3-, and 1.7-fold, respectively, compared to the 32-channel adult coil, as well as improved G-factor maps for accelerated imaging. This study suggests that a size-tailored approach can provide significant sensitivity gains for accelerated and unaccelerated pediatric brain imaging. PMID:21656548

  12. In Vivo Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging of Subcortical Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qinggong; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Liang, Chia-Pin; Akkentli, Fatih; Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Chen, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The whisker system of rodents is an excellent model to study peripherally evoked neural activity in the brain. Discrete neural modules represent each whisker in the somatosensory cortex (“barrels”), thalamus (“barreloids”), and brain stem (“barrelettes”). Stimulation of a single whisker evokes neural activity sequentially in its corresponding barrelette, barreloid, and barrel. Conventional optical imaging of functional activation in the brain is limited to surface structures such as the cerebral cortex. To access subcortical structures and image sensory-evoked neural activity, we designed a needle-based optical system using gradient-index (GRIN) rod lens. We performed voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDi) with GRIN rod lens to visualize neural activity evoked in the thalamic barreloids by deflection of whiskers in vivo. We stimulated several whiskers together to determine the sensitivity of our approach in differentiating between different barreloid responses. We also carried out stimulation of different whiskers at different times. Finally, we used muscimol in the barrel cortex to silence the corticothalamic inputs while imaging in the thalamus. Our results show that it is possible to obtain functional maps of the sensory periphery in deep brain structures such as the thalamic barreloids. Our approach can be broadly applicable to functional imaging of other core brain structures. PMID:26612326

  13. In Vivo Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging of Subcortical Brain Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qinggong; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Liang, Chia-Pin; Akkentli, Fatih; Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Chen, Yu

    2015-11-01

    The whisker system of rodents is an excellent model to study peripherally evoked neural activity in the brain. Discrete neural modules represent each whisker in the somatosensory cortex (“barrels”), thalamus (“barreloids”), and brain stem (“barrelettes”). Stimulation of a single whisker evokes neural activity sequentially in its corresponding barrelette, barreloid, and barrel. Conventional optical imaging of functional activation in the brain is limited to surface structures such as the cerebral cortex. To access subcortical structures and image sensory-evoked neural activity, we designed a needle-based optical system using gradient-index (GRIN) rod lens. We performed voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDi) with GRIN rod lens to visualize neural activity evoked in the thalamic barreloids by deflection of whiskers in vivo. We stimulated several whiskers together to determine the sensitivity of our approach in differentiating between different barreloid responses. We also carried out stimulation of different whiskers at different times. Finally, we used muscimol in the barrel cortex to silence the corticothalamic inputs while imaging in the thalamus. Our results show that it is possible to obtain functional maps of the sensory periphery in deep brain structures such as the thalamic barreloids. Our approach can be broadly applicable to functional imaging of other core brain structures.

  14. Towards hyperpolarized 13C-succinate imaging of brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Pratip; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Perman, William H.; Harris, Kent C.; Lin, Alexander P.; Norton, Valerie A.; Tan, Chou T.; Ross, Brian D.; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2007-05-01

    We describe a novel 13C enriched precursor molecule, sodium 1- 13C acetylenedicarboxylate, which after hydrogenation by PASADENA (Parahydrogen and Synthesis Allows Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment) under controlled experimental conditions, becomes hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate. Fast in vivo 3D FIESTA MR imaging demonstrated that, following carotid arterial injection, the hyperpolarized 13C-succinate appeared in the head and cerebral circulation of normal and tumor-bearing rats. At this time, no in vivo hyperpolarized signal has been localized to normal brain or brain tumor. On the other hand, ex vivo samples of brain harvested from rats bearing a 9L brain tumor, 1 h or more following in vivo carotid injection of hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate, contained significant concentrations of the injected substrate, 13C sodium succinate, together with 13C maleate and succinate metabolites 1- 13C-glutamate, 5- 13C-glutamate, 1- 13C-glutamine and 5- 13C-glutamine. The 13C substrates and products were below the limits of NMR detection in ex vivo samples of normal brain consistent with an intact blood-brain barrier. These ex vivo results indicate that hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate may become a useful tool for rapid in vivo identification of brain tumors, providing novel biomarkers in 13C MR spectral-spatial images.

  15. Normal feline brain: clinical anatomy using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mogicato, G; Conchou, F; Layssol-Lamour, C; Raharison, F; Sautet, J

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a clinical anatomy atlas of the feline brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Brains of twelve normal cats were imaged using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance unit and an inversion/recovery sequence (T1). Fourteen relevant MRI sections were chosen in transverse, dorsal, median and sagittal planes. Anatomic structures were identified and labelled using anatomical texts and Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria, sectioned specimen heads, and previously published articles. The MRI sections were stained according to the major embryological and anatomical subdivisions of the brain. The relevant anatomical structures seen on MRI will assist clinicians to better understand MR images and to relate this neuro-anatomy to clinical signs. PMID:21919951

  16. The brain and its main anatomical subdivisions in living hominoids using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Semendeferi, K; Damasio, H

    2000-02-01

    Primary comparative data on the hominoid brain are scarce and major neuroanatomical differences between humans and apes have not yet been described satisfactorily, even at the gross level. Basic questions that involve the evolution of the human brain cannot be addressed adequately unless the brains of all extant hominoid species are analyzed. Contrary to the scarcity of original data, there is a rich literature on the topic of human brain evolution and several debates exist on the size of particular sectors of the brain, e.g., the frontal lobe. In this study we applied a non-invasive imaging technique (magnetic resonance) on living human, great ape and lesser ape subjects in order to investigate the overall size of the hominoid brain. The images were reconstructed in three dimensions and volumetric estimates were obtained for the brain and its main anatomical sectors, including the frontal and temporal lobes, the insula, the parieto-occipital sector and the cerebellum.A remarkable homogeneity is present in the relative size of many of the large sectors of the hominoid brain, but interspecific and intraspecific variation exists in certain parts of the brain. The human cerebellum is smaller than expected for an ape brain of human size. It is suggested that the cerebellum increased less than the cerebrum after the split of the human lineage from the African ancestral hominoid stock. In contrast, humans have a slightly larger temporal lobe and insula than expected, but differences are not statistically significant. Humans do not have a larger frontal lobe than expected for an ape brain of human size and gibbons have a relatively smaller frontal lobe than the rest of the hominoids. Given the fact that the frontal lobe in humans and great apes has similar relative size, it is parsimonious to suggest that the relative size of the whole of the frontal lobe has not changed significantly during hominid evolution in the Plio-Pleistocene. PMID:10656781

  17. S-values calculated from a tomographic head/brain model for brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Tsi-chian; Xu, X. George

    2004-11-01

    A tomographic head/brain model was developed from the Visible Human images and used to calculate S-values for brain imaging procedures. This model contains 15 segmented sub-regions including caudate nucleus, cerebellum, cerebral cortex, cerebral white matter, corpus callosum, eyes, lateral ventricles, lenses, lentiform nucleus, optic chiasma, optic nerve, pons and middle cerebellar peduncle, skull CSF, thalamus and thyroid. S-values for C-11, O-15, F-18, Tc-99m and I-123 have been calculated using this model and a Monte Carlo code, EGS4. Comparison of the calculated S-values with those calculated from the MIRD (1999) stylized head/brain model shows significant differences. In many cases, the stylized head/brain model resulted in smaller S-values (as much as 88%), suggesting that the doses to a specific patient similar to the Visible Man could have been underestimated using the existing clinical dosimetry.

  18. Image Labeling for LIDAR Intensity Image Using K-Nn of Feature Obtained by Convolutional Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemura, Masaki; Hotta, Kazuhiro; Nonaka, Hideki; Oda, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    We propose an image labeling method for LIDAR intensity image obtained by Mobile Mapping System (MMS) using K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN) of feature obtained by Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). Image labeling assigns labels (e.g., road, cross-walk and road shoulder) to semantic regions in an image. Since CNN is effective for various image recognition tasks, we try to use the feature of CNN (Caffenet) pre-trained by ImageNet. We use 4,096-dimensional feature at fc7 layer in the Caffenet as the descriptor of a region because the feature at fc7 layer has effective information for object classification. We extract the feature by the Caffenet from regions cropped from images. Since the similarity between features reflects the similarity of contents of regions, we can select top K similar regions cropped from training samples with a test region. Since regions in training images have manually-annotated ground truth labels, we vote the labels attached to top K similar regions to the test region. The class label with the maximum vote is assigned to each pixel in the test image. In experiments, we use 36 LIDAR intensity images with ground truth labels. We divide 36 images into training (28 images) and test sets (8 images). We use class average accuracy and pixel-wise accuracy as evaluation measures. Our method was able to assign the same label as human beings in 97.8% of the pixels in test LIDAR intensity images.

  19. Enhancement of brain tumor MR images based on intuitionistic fuzzy sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wankai; Deng, He; Cheng, Lifang

    2015-12-01

    Brain tumor is one of the most fatal cancers, especially high-grade gliomas are among the most deadly. However, brain tumor MR images usually have the disadvantages of low resolution and contrast when compared with the optical images. Consequently, we present a novel adaptive intuitionistic fuzzy enhancement scheme by combining a nonlinear fuzzy filtering operation with fusion operators, for the enhancement of brain tumor MR images in this paper. The presented scheme consists of the following six steps: Firstly, the image is divided into several sub-images. Secondly, for each sub-image, object and background areas are separated by a simple threshold. Thirdly, respective intuitionistic fuzzy generators of object and background areas are constructed based on the modified restricted equivalence function. Fourthly, different suitable operations are performed on respective membership functions of object and background areas. Fifthly, the membership plane is inversely transformed into the image plane. Finally, an enhanced image is obtained through fusion operators. The comparison and evaluation of enhancement performance demonstrate that the presented scheme is helpful to determine the abnormal functional areas, guide the operation, judge the prognosis, and plan the radiotherapy by enhancing the fine detail of MR images.

  20. Tomographic images of breast tissues obtained by Compton scattering: An analytical computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniassi, M.; Poletti, M. E.; Brunetti, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we studied by analytical simulation the potential of a Compton scatter technique for breast imaging application. A Compton scattering tomography system was computationally simulated in order to provide the projection data (scattering signal) for the image reconstructions. The simulated projections generated by the analytical proposed method were validated through comparison with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. Electron density images were obtained from the scattering signal using a reconstruction algorithm implemented for the system geometry. Finally, the quality of the reconstructed images was evaluated for different sample sizes, beam energies, and tissue compositions (glandularities).

  1. Imaging Monoamine Oxidase in the Human Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J. S.; Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G-J.; Logan, Jean

    1999-11-10

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies mapping monoamine oxidase in the human brain have been used to measure the turnover rate for MAO B; to determine the minimum effective dose of a new MAO inhibitor drug lazabemide and to document MAO inhibition by cigarette smoke. These studies illustrate the power of PET and radiotracer chemistry to measure normal biochemical processes and to provide information on the effect of drug exposure on specific molecular targets.

  2. Hybrid PET/MR Imaging and Brain Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Aiello, Marco; Cavaliere, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, brain connectivity is gaining ever-increasing interest from the interdisciplinary research community. The study of brain connectivity is characterized by a multifaceted approach providing both structural and functional evidence of the relationship between cerebral regions at different scales. Although magnetic resonance (MR) is the most established imaging modality for investigating connectivity in vivo, the recent advent of hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/MR scanners paved the way for more comprehensive investigation of brain organization and physiology. Due to the high sensitivity and biochemical specificity of radiotracers, combining MR with PET imaging may enrich our ability to investigate connectivity by introducing the concept of metabolic connectivity and cometomics and promoting new insights on the physiological and molecular bases underlying high-level neural organization. This review aims to describe and summarize the main methods of analysis of brain connectivity employed in MR imaging and nuclear medicine. Moreover, it will discuss practical aspects and state-of-the-art techniques for exploiting hybrid PET/MR imaging to investigate the relationship of physiological processes and brain connectivity. PMID:26973446

  3. Hybrid PET/MR Imaging and Brain Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Marco; Cavaliere, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, brain connectivity is gaining ever-increasing interest from the interdisciplinary research community. The study of brain connectivity is characterized by a multifaceted approach providing both structural and functional evidence of the relationship between cerebral regions at different scales. Although magnetic resonance (MR) is the most established imaging modality for investigating connectivity in vivo, the recent advent of hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/MR scanners paved the way for more comprehensive investigation of brain organization and physiology. Due to the high sensitivity and biochemical specificity of radiotracers, combining MR with PET imaging may enrich our ability to investigate connectivity by introducing the concept of metabolic connectivity and cometomics and promoting new insights on the physiological and molecular bases underlying high-level neural organization. This review aims to describe and summarize the main methods of analysis of brain connectivity employed in MR imaging and nuclear medicine. Moreover, it will discuss practical aspects and state-of-the-art techniques for exploiting hybrid PET/MR imaging to investigate the relationship of physiological processes and brain connectivity. PMID:26973446

  4. Laser Doppler imaging for intraoperative human brain mapping.

    PubMed

    Raabe, A; Van De Ville, D; Leutenegger, M; Szelényi, A; Hattingen, E; Gerlach, R; Seifert, V; Hauger, C; Lopez, A; Leitgeb, R; Unser, M; Martin-Williams, E J; Lasser, T

    2009-02-15

    The identification and accurate location of centers of brain activity are vital both in neuro-surgery and brain research. This study aimed to provide a non-invasive, non-contact, accurate, rapid and user-friendly means of producing functional images intraoperatively. To this end a full field Laser Doppler imager was developed and integrated within the surgical microscope and perfusion images of the cortical surface were acquired during awake surgery whilst the patient performed a predetermined task. The regions of brain activity showed a clear signal (10-20% with respect to the baseline) related to the stimulation protocol which lead to intraoperative functional brain maps of strong statistical significance and which correlate well with the preoperative fMRI and intraoperative cortical electro-stimulation. These initial results achieved with a prototype device and wavelet based regressor analysis (the hemodynamic response function being derived from MRI applications) demonstrate the feasibility of LDI as an appropriate technique for intraoperative functional brain imaging. PMID:19049824

  5. Computer-Aided Segmentation of the Mid-Brain in Trans-Cranial Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Sakalauskas, Andrius; Laučkaitė, Kristina; Lukoševičius, Arūnas; Rastenytė, Daiva

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel and rapid method developed for semi-automated segmentation of the mid-brain region in B-mode trans-cranial ultrasound (TCS) images. TCS is a relatively new neuroimaging tool having promising application in early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. The quality of TCS images is much lower compared with the ultrasound images obtained during scanning of the soft tissues; the structures of interest in TCS are difficult to extract and to evaluate. The combination of an experience-based statistical shape model and intensity-amplitude invariant edge detector was proposed for the extraction of fuzzy boundaries of the mid-brain in TCS images. A statistical shape model was constructed using 90 manual delineations of the mid-brain region made by professional neurosonographer. Local phase-based edge detection strategy was applied for determination of plausible mid-brain boundary points used for statistical shape fitting. The proposed method was tested on other 40 clinical TCS images evaluated by two experts. The obtained averaged results of segmentation revealed that the differences between manual and automated measurements are statistically insignificant (p > 0.05). PMID:26603659

  6. Detection of brain pathology by magnetic resonance imaging of iron oxide micro-particles.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Daniel C; Sibson, Nicola R; McAteer, Martina A; Davis, Ben; Choudhury, Robin P

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents are widely used with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to increase the contrast between regions of interest and the background signal, thus providing better quality information. Such agents can work in one of two ways, either to specifically enhance the signal that is produced or to localize in a specific cell type of tissue. Commonly used image contrast agents are typically based on gadolinium complexes or super-paramagnetic iron oxide, the latter of which is used for imaging lymph nodes. When blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown is a feature of central nervous system (CNS) pathology, intravenously administered contrast agent enters into the CNS and alters contrast on MR scans. However, BBB breakdown reflects downstream or end-stage pathology. The initial recruitment of leukocytes to sites of disease such as multiple sclerosis (MS), ischemic lesions, or tumours takes place across an intact, but activated, brain endothelium. Molecular imaging affords the ability to obtain a "non-invasive biopsy" to reveal the presence of brain pathology in the absence of significant structural changes. We have developed smart contrast agents that target and reversibly adhere to sites of disease and have been used to reveal activated brain endothelium when images obtained by conventional MRI look normal. Indeed, our selectively targeted micro-particles of iron oxide have revealed the early presence of cerebral malaria pathology and ongoing MS-like plaques in clinically relevant models of disease. PMID:21082373

  7. An Innovative Method for Obtaining Consistent Images and Quantification of Histochemically Stained Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Sedgewick, Gerald J.; Ericson, Marna

    2015-01-01

    Obtaining digital images of color brightfield microscopy is an important aspect of biomedical research and the clinical practice of diagnostic pathology. Although the field of digital pathology has had tremendous advances in whole-slide imaging systems, little effort has been directed toward standardizing color brightfield digital imaging to maintain image-to-image consistency and tonal linearity. Using a single camera and microscope to obtain digital images of three stains, we show that microscope and camera systems inherently produce image-to-image variation. Moreover, we demonstrate that post-processing with a widely used raster graphics editor software program does not completely correct for session-to-session inconsistency. We introduce a reliable method for creating consistent images with a hardware/software solution (ChromaCal™; Datacolor Inc., NJ) along with its features for creating color standardization, preserving linear tonal levels, providing automated white balancing and setting automated brightness to consistent levels. The resulting image consistency using this method will also streamline mean density and morphometry measurements, as images are easily segmented and single thresholds can be used. We suggest that this is a superior method for color brightfield imaging, which can be used for quantification and can be readily incorporated into workflows. PMID:25575568

  8. Brain imaging, forward inference, and theories of reasoning.

    PubMed

    Heit, Evan

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the issue of how neuroimaging studies address theoretical accounts of reasoning, through the lens of the method of forward inference (Henson, 2005, 2006). After theories of deductive and inductive reasoning are briefly presented, the method of forward inference for distinguishing between psychological theories based on brain imaging evidence is critically reviewed. Brain imaging studies of reasoning, comparing deductive and inductive arguments, comparing meaningful versus non-meaningful material, investigating hemispheric localization, and comparing conditional and relational arguments, are assessed in light of the method of forward inference. Finally, conclusions are drawn with regard to future research opportunities. PMID:25620926

  9. Physiological basis and image processing in functional magnetic resonance imaging: Neuronal and motor activity in brain

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rakesh; Sharma, Avdhesh

    2004-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is recently developing as imaging modality used for mapping hemodynamics of neuronal and motor event related tissue blood oxygen level dependence (BOLD) in terms of brain activation. Image processing is performed by segmentation and registration methods. Segmentation algorithms provide brain surface-based analysis, automated anatomical labeling of cortical fields in magnetic resonance data sets based on oxygen metabolic state. Registration algorithms provide geometric features using two or more imaging modalities to assure clinically useful neuronal and motor information of brain activation. This review article summarizes the physiological basis of fMRI signal, its origin, contrast enhancement, physical factors, anatomical labeling by segmentation, registration approaches with examples of visual and motor activity in brain. Latest developments are reviewed for clinical applications of fMRI along with other different neurophysiological and imaging modalities. PMID:15125779

  10. Diffuse optical imaging of brain activation to joint attention experience.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Banghe; Yadav, Nitin; Rey, Gustavo; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2009-08-24

    In the early development of social cognition and language, infants tend to participate in face-to-face interactions engaging in joint attention exchanges. Joint attention is vital to social competence at all ages, lacking which is a primary feature to distinguish autistic from non-autistic population. In this study, diffuse optical imaging is used for the first time to investigate the joint attention experience in normal adults. Imaging studies were performed in the frontal regions of the brain (BA9 and BA10) in order to study the differences in the brain activation in response to video clips corresponding to joint attention based skills. The frontal regions of the brain were non-invasively imaged using a novel optical cap coupled to a frequency-domain optical imaging system. The statistical analysis from 11 normal adult subjects, with three repetitions from each subject, indicated that the averaged changes in the cerebral blood oxygenation levels were different under the joint and non-joint attention based stimulus. The preliminary studies demonstrate the feasibility of implementing diffuse optical imaging towards autism-related research to study the brain activation in response to socio-communication skills. PMID:19447278

  11. 3T MR imaging of the brain.

    PubMed

    DeLano, Mark C; Fisher, Charles

    2006-02-01

    The advent of very high field clinical scanners that operate at 3T is taking structural and functional imaging to new levels and is reinvigorating clinical spectroscopy, fMR imaging, and noncontrast-enhanced methods of MRA. Most of the challenges that are related to 3T imaging have been addressed to facilitate routine clinical imaging. An awareness of the complexities that underlie the solutions to these challenges is important to the continued improvements to the 3T platform so that its maximal potential can be reached. The development of the multichannel-head coils and the improvement in the design of body coils, concurrently with the development of multichannel capabilities that enable parallel imaging, have benefited all field platforms. Perhaps the added value of parallel imaging has been greatest at 3T where the additional signal can be exploited. The definition of very high field is a moving target, and may be well on its way to 7.0 T, although in terms of the current clinical state of the art, 3T is our current reference. PMID:16530636

  12. The psychopath magnetized: insights from brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Nathaniel E; Kiehl, Kent A

    2012-01-01

    Psychopaths commit a disproportionate amount of violent crime, and this places a substantial economic and emotional burden on society. Elucidation of the neural correlates of psychopathy may lead to improved management and treatment of the condition. Although some methodological issues remain, the neuroimaging literature is generally converging on a set of brain regions and circuits that are consistently implicated in the condition: the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and the anterior and posterior cingulate and adjacent (para)limbic structures. We discuss these findings in the context of extant theories of psychopathy and highlight the potential legal and policy implications of this body of work. PMID:22177031

  13. The psychopath magnetized: insights from brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Nathaniel E.; Kiehl, Kent A.

    2014-01-01

    Psychopaths commit a disproportionate amount of violent crime, and this places a substantial economic and emotional burden on society. Elucidation of the neural correlates of psychopathy may lead to improved management and treatment of the condition. Although some methodological issues remain, the neuroimaging literature is generally converging on a set of brain regions and circuits that are consistently implicated in the condition: the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and the anterior and posterior cingulate and adjacent (para)limbic structures. We discuss these findings in the context of extant theories of psychopathy and highlight the potential legal and policy implications of this body of work. PMID:22177031

  14. Evaluation of automated brain MR image segmentation and volumetry methods.

    PubMed

    Klauschen, Frederick; Goldman, Aaron; Barra, Vincent; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Lundervold, Arvid

    2009-04-01

    We compare three widely used brain volumetry methods available in the software packages FSL, SPM5, and FreeSurfer and evaluate their performance using simulated and real MR brain data sets. We analyze the accuracy of gray and white matter volume measurements and their robustness against changes of image quality using the BrainWeb MRI database. These images are based on "gold-standard" reference brain templates. This allows us to assess between- (same data set, different method) and also within-segmenter (same method, variation of image quality) comparability, for both of which we find pronounced variations in segmentation results for gray and white matter volumes. The calculated volumes deviate up to >10% from the reference values for gray and white matter depending on method and image quality. Sensitivity is best for SPM5, volumetric accuracy for gray and white matter was similar in SPM5 and FSL and better than in FreeSurfer. FSL showed the highest stability for white (<5%), FreeSurfer (6.2%) for gray matter for constant image quality BrainWeb data. Between-segmenter comparisons show discrepancies of up to >20% for the simulated data and 24% on average for the real data sets, whereas within-method performance analysis uncovered volume differences of up to >15%. Since the discrepancies between results reach the same order of magnitude as volume changes observed in disease, these effects limit the usability of the segmentation methods for following volume changes in individual patients over time and should be taken into account during the planning and analysis of brain volume studies. PMID:18537111

  15. Different impressions of other agents obtained through social interaction uniquely modulate dorsal and ventral pathway activities in the social human brain.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Terada, Kazunori; Morita, Tomoyo; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Haji, Tomoki; Kozima, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Yoshio; Omori, Takashi; Asada, Minoru; Naito, Eiichi

    2014-09-01

    Internal (neuronal) representations in the brain are modified by our experiences, and this phenomenon is not unique to sensory and motor systems. Here, we show that different impressions obtained through social interaction with a variety of agents uniquely modulate activity of dorsal and ventral pathways of the brain network that mediates human social behavior. We scanned brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 16 healthy volunteers when they performed a simple matching-pennies game with a human, human-like android, mechanical robot, interactive robot, and a computer. Before playing this game in the scanner, participants experienced social interactions with each opponent separately and scored their initial impressions using two questionnaires. We found that the participants perceived opponents in two mental dimensions: one represented "mind-holderness" in which participants attributed anthropomorphic impressions to some of the opponents that had mental functions, while the other dimension represented "mind-readerness" in which participants characterized opponents as intelligent. Interestingly, this "mind-readerness" dimension correlated to participants frequently changing their game tactic to prevent opponents from envisioning their strategy, and this was corroborated by increased entropy during the game. We also found that the two factors separately modulated activity in distinct social brain regions. Specifically, mind-holderness modulated activity in the dorsal aspect of the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and medial prefrontal and posterior paracingulate cortices, while mind-readerness modulated activity in the ventral aspect of TPJ and the temporal pole. These results clearly demonstrate that activity in social brain networks is modulated through pre-scanning experiences of social interaction with a variety of agents. Furthermore, our findings elucidated the existence of two distinct functional networks in the social human brain

  16. High contrast and homogeneous staining of paraffin sections of whole human brains for three dimensional ultrahigh resolution image analysis.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, O; Eggers, R

    1998-01-01

    The gallocyanin chromalum stain belongs to the classical DNA-RNA staining techniques in histochemistry. It has some important features for successful object orientated image analysis of whole sections of the human brain. To obtain reproducible staining results with these large sections, the method of Einarson was adapted to image analytical requirements. We discuss staining in a warm staining solution, pH adjustment, and optimal stain composition. The embedding procedure for whole human brains is considered as well. PMID:9554583

  17. Method of obtaining intensified image from developed photographic films and plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askins, B. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A method is explained of obtaining intensified images from silver images on developed photographic films and plates. The steps involve converting silver of the developed film or plate to a radioactive compound by treatment with an aqueous alkaline solution of an organo-S35 compound; placing the treated film or plate in direct contact with a receiver film which is then exposed by radiation from the activated film; and developing and fixing the resulting intensified image on the receiver film.

  18. Brain magnetic resonance imaging with contrast dependent on blood oxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, S.; Lee, T.M.; Kay, A.R.; Tank, D.W. )

    1990-12-01

    Paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin in venous blood is a naturally occurring contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By accentuating the effects of this agent through the use of gradient-echo techniques in high yields, the authors demonstrate in vivo images of brain microvasculature with image contrast reflecting the blood oxygen level. This blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast follows blood oxygen changes induced by anesthetics, by insulin-induced hypoglycemia, and by inhaled gas mixtures that alter metabolic demand or blood flow. The results suggest that BOLD contrast can be used to provide in vivo real-time maps of blood oxygenation in the brain under normal physiological conditions. BOLD contrast adds an additional feature to magnetic resonance imaging and complement other techniques that are attempting to provide position emission tomography-like measurements related to regional neural activity.

  19. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Contrast Dependent on Blood Oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, S.; Lee, T. M.; Kay, A. R.; Tank, D. W.

    1990-12-01

    Paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin in venous blood is a naturally occurring contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By accentuating the effects of this agent through the use of gradient-echo techniques in high fields, we demonstrate in vivo images of brain microvasculature with image contrast reflecting the blood oxygen level. This blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast follows blood oxygen changes induced by anesthetics, by insulin-induced hypoglycemia, and by inhaled gas mixtures that alter metabolic demand or blood flow. The results suggest that BOLD contrast can be used to provide in vivo real-time maps of blood oxygenation in the brain under normal physiological conditions. BOLD contrast adds an additional feature to magnetic resonance imaging and complements other techniques that are attempting to provide positron emission tomography-like measurements related to regional neural activity.

  20. Multiphoton Imaging of Ultrasound Bioeffects in the Murine Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Scott; Skoch, Jesse; Bacskai, Brian; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of multiphoton imaging in the murine brain during exposure to ultrasound. Our experimental setup coupled ultrasound through the ventral surface of the mouse while allowing imaging through a cranial window from the dorsal surface. Field attenuation was estimated by scanning the field after insertion of a freshly sacrificed mouse; beam profile and peak position were preserved, suggesting adequate targeting for imaging experiments. C57 mice were imaged with a Biorad multiphoton microscope while being exposed to ultrasound (f = 1.029 MHz, peak pressure ˜ 200 kPa, average power ˜ 0.18 W) with IV injection of Optison. We observed strong vasoconstriction coincident with US and Optison, as well as permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier.

  1. Incidental findings on brain and spine imaging in children.

    PubMed

    Maher, Cormac O; Piatt, Joseph H

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the utilization of diagnostic imaging of the brain and spine in children has increased dramatically, leading to a corresponding increase in the detection of incidental findings of the central nervous system. Patients with unexpected findings on imaging are often referred for subspecialty evaluation. Even with rational use of diagnostic imaging and subspecialty consultation, the diagnostic process will always generate unexpected findings that must be explained and managed. Familiarity with the most common findings that are discovered incidentally on diagnostic imaging of the brain and spine will assist the pediatrician in providing counseling to families and in making recommendations in conjunction with a neurosurgeon, when needed, regarding additional treatments and prognosis. PMID:25825535

  2. Gold nanoparticle imaging and radiotherapy of brain tumors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hainfeld, James F; Smilowitz, Henry M; O'Connor, Michael J; Dilmanian, Farrokh Avraham; Slatkin, Daniel N

    2013-01-01

    Aim To test intravenously injected gold nanoparticles for x-ray imaging and radiotherapy enhancement of large, imminently lethal, intracerebral malignant gliomas. Materials & methods Gold nanoparticles approximately 11 nm in size were injected intravenously and brains imaged using microcomputed tomography. A total of 15 h after an intravenous dose of 4 g Au/kg was administered, brains were irradiated with 30 Gy 100 kVp x-rays. Results Gold uptake gave a 19:1 tumor-to-normal brain ratio with 1.5% w/w gold in tumor, calculated to increase local radiation dose by approximately 300%. Mice receiving gold and radiation (30 Gy) demonstrated 50% long term (>1 year) tumor-free survival, whereas all mice receiving radiation only died. Conclusion Intravenously injected gold nanoparticles cross the blood–tumor barrier, but are largely blocked by the normal blood–brain barrier, enabling high-resolution computed tomography tumor imaging. Gold radiation enhancement significantly improved long-term survival compared with radiotherapy alone. This approach holds promise to improve therapy of human brain tumors and other cancers. PMID:23265347

  3. In Vivo Mesoscopic Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging of Brain Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qinggong; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Frank, Aaron; Wu, Yalun; Chen, Chao-Wei; Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Chen, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Functional mapping of brain activity is important in elucidating how neural networks operate in the living brain. The whisker sensory system of rodents is an excellent model to study peripherally evoked neural activity in the central nervous system. Each facial whisker is represented by discrete modules of neurons all along the pathway leading to the neocortex. These modules are called “barrels” in layer 4 of the primary somatosensory cortex. Their location (approximately 300–500 μm below cortical surface) allows for convenient imaging of whisker-evoked neural activity in vivo. Fluorescence laminar optical tomography (FLOT) provides depth-resolved fluorescence molecular information with an imaging depth of a few millimeters. Angled illumination and detection configurations can improve both resolution and penetration depth. We applied angled FLOT (aFLOT) to record 3D neural activities evoked in the whisker system of mice by deflection of a single whisker in vivo. A 100 μm capillary and a pair of microelectrodes were inserted to the mouse brain to test the capability of the imaging system. The results show that it is possible to obtain 3D functional maps of the sensory periphery in the brain. This approach can be broadly applicable to functional imaging of other brain structures.

  4. In Vivo Mesoscopic Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging of Brain Activation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qinggong; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Frank, Aaron; Wu, Yalun; Chen, Chao-wei; Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Functional mapping of brain activity is important in elucidating how neural networks operate in the living brain. The whisker sensory system of rodents is an excellent model to study peripherally evoked neural activity in the central nervous system. Each facial whisker is represented by discrete modules of neurons all along the pathway leading to the neocortex. These modules are called “barrels” in layer 4 of the primary somatosensory cortex. Their location (approximately 300–500 μm below cortical surface) allows for convenient imaging of whisker-evoked neural activity in vivo. Fluorescence laminar optical tomography (FLOT) provides depth-resolved fluorescence molecular information with an imaging depth of a few millimeters. Angled illumination and detection configurations can improve both resolution and penetration depth. We applied angled FLOT (aFLOT) to record 3D neural activities evoked in the whisker system of mice by deflection of a single whisker in vivo. A 100 μm capillary and a pair of microelectrodes were inserted to the mouse brain to test the capability of the imaging system. The results show that it is possible to obtain 3D functional maps of the sensory periphery in the brain. This approach can be broadly applicable to functional imaging of other brain structures. PMID:27125318

  5. Functional brain imaging and bioacoustics in the Bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, Sam; Finneran, James; Carder, Donald; van Bonn, William; Smith, Cynthia; Houser, Dorian; Mattrey, Robert; Hoh, Carl

    2003-10-01

    The dolphin brain is the central processing computer for a complex and effective underwater echolocation and communication system. Until now, it has not been possible to study or diagnose disorders of the dolphin brain employing modern functional imaging methods like those used in human medicine. Our most recent studies employ established methods such as behavioral tasks, physiological observations, and computed tomography (CT) and, for the first time, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). Trained dolphins slide out of their enclosure on to a mat and are transported by trainers and veterinarians to the laboratory for injection of a ligand. Following ligand injection, brief experiments include trained vocal responses to acoustic, visual, or tactile stimuli. We have used the ligand technetium (Tc-99m) biscisate (Neurolite) to image circulatory flow by SPECT. Fluro-deoxy-d-glucose (18-F-FDG) has been employed to image brain metabolism with PET. Veterinarians carefully monitored dolphins during and after the procedure. Through these methods, we have demonstrated that functional imaging can be employed safely and productively with dolphins to obtain valuable information on brain structure and function for medical and research purposes. Hemispheric differences and variations in flow and metabolism in different brain areas will be shown.

  6. Changes in Dietary Iron Exacerbate Regional Brain Manganese Accumulation as Determined by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fitsanakis, Vanessa A.; Zhang, Na; Avison, Malcolm J.; Erikson, Keith M.; Gore, John C.; Aschner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential metal required for normal homeostasis. Humans chronically exposed to high Mn levels, however, may exhibit psychomotor signs secondary to increased brain Mn. As Mn and iron (Fe) share several cellular membrane transporters, decreased Fe levels resulting from Fe deficiency or anemia lead to increased brain Mn deposition. Conversely, decreased Mn levels are associated with abnormal brain Fe accumulation. To reduce potential Mn toxicity resulting from brain Mn accumulation, we proposed that increased dietary Fe would attenuate brain Mn deposition. To test this hypothesis, three groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were injected weekly (14 weeks) with Mn (3 mg/kg) and fed normal Fe (TX), Fe-supplemented (FeS), or Fe-deficient (FeD) chow. Control (CN) rats received normal dietary Fe and saline injections. Using magnetic resonance imaging, rats were imaged biweekly for 14 weeks to qualitatively monitor brain Mn and Fe accumulation. Both FeS and FeD had greater brain Mn deposition than TX rats. By week 3, R1 values, which correlate with Mn deposition, were statistically significantly increased (p < 0.05) in brain stem, cerebellum, cortex, midbrain, and striatum compared with CN or TX animals. By week 14, R1 values for all brain regions in FeS and FeD animals were statistically significantly increased (p < 0.05). By the end of the study, similar results were obtained for R2 values, a marker of Fe accumulation. These data suggest that Fe supplementation does not effectively protect and may even exacerbate brain Mn accumulation in mammals subchronically exposed to Mn. PMID:21177776

  7. Flyception: imaging brain activity in freely walking fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Grover, Dhruv; Katsuki, Takeo; Greenspan, Ralph J

    2016-07-01

    Genetically encoded calcium sensors have enabled monitoring of neural activity in vivo using optical imaging techniques. Linking neural activity to complex behavior remains challenging, however, as most imaging systems require tethering the animal, which can impact the animal's behavioral repertoire. Here, we report a method for monitoring the brain activity of untethered, freely walking Drosophila melanogaster during sensorially and socially evoked behaviors to facilitate the study of neural mechanisms that underlie naturalistic behaviors. PMID:27183441

  8. Imaging the delivery of brain-penetrating PLGA nanoparticles in the brain using magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Strohbehn, Garth; Coman, Daniel; Han, Liang; Ragheb, Ragy R. T.; Fahmy, Tarek M.; Huttner, Anita J.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Piepmeier, Joseph M.; Saltzman, W. Mark; Zhou, Jiangbing

    2014-01-01

    Current therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is largely ineffective, with nearly universal tumor recurrence. The failure of current therapy is primarily due to the lack of approaches for the efficient delivery of therapeutics to diffuse tumors in the brain. In our prior study, we developed brain-penetrating nanoparticles that are capable of penetrating brain tissue and distribute over clinically relevant volumes when administered via convection-enhanced delivery (CED). We demonstrated that these particles are capable of efficient delivery of chemotherapeutics to diffuse tumors in the brain, indicating that they may serve as a groundbreaking approach for the treatment of GBM. In the original study, nanoparticles in the brain were imaged using positron emission tomography (PET). However, clinical translation of this delivery platform can be enabled by engineering a non-invasive detection modality using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For this purpose, in this study, we developed chemistry to incorporate superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) into the brain-penetrating nanoparticles. We demonstrated that SPIO-loaded nanoparticles, which remain the same morphology as nanoparticles without SPIO, have an excellent transverse (T2) relaxivity. After CED, the distribution of nanoparticles in the brain (i.e., in the vicinity of injection site) can be detected using MRI and the long-lasting signal attenuation of SPIO-loaded brain-penetrating nanoparticles lasted over a one-month timecourse. Development of these nanoparticles is significant as, in future clinical applications, co-administration of SPIO-loaded nanoparticles will allow for intraoperative monitoring of particle distribution in the brain to ensure drug-loaded nanoparticles reach tumors as well for monitoring the therapeutic benefit with time and to evaluate tumor relapse patterns. PMID:25403507

  9. Synchrotron radiation imaging is a powerful tool to image brain microvasculature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Mengqi; Sun, Danni; Xie, Yuanyuan; Xia, Jian; Long, Hongyu; Hu, Kai; Xiao, Bo; Peng, Guanyun

    2014-03-15

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) imaging is a powerful experimental tool for micrometer-scale imaging of microcirculation in vivo. This review discusses recent methodological advances and findings from morphological investigations of cerebral vascular networks during several neurovascular pathologies. In particular, it describes recent developments in SR microangiography for real-time assessment of the brain microvasculature under various pathological conditions in small animal models. It also covers studies that employed SR-based phase-contrast imaging to acquire 3D brain images and provide detailed maps of brain vasculature. In addition, a brief introduction of SR technology and current limitations of SR sources are described in this review. In the near future, SR imaging could transform into a common and informative imaging modality to resolve subtle details of cerebrovascular function.

  10. Iron in Chronic Brain Disorders: Imaging and Neurotherapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, James; Panter, Scott S; Neema, Mohit; Arora, Ashish; Batt, Courtney; Bakshi, Rohit

    2007-01-01

    Summary Iron is important for brain oxygen transport, electron transfer, neurotransmitter synthesis, and myelin production. Though iron deposition has been observed in the brain with normal aging, increased iron has also been shown in many chronic neurologic disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and multiple sclerosis. In vitro studies have demonstrated that excessive iron can lead to free radical production, which can promote neurotoxicity. However, the link between observed iron deposition and pathologic processes underlying various diseases of the brain is not well understood. It is not known whether excessive in vivo iron directly contributes to tissue damage or is solely an epiphenomenon. In this article we focus on the imaging of brain iron and the underlying physiology and metabolism relating to iron deposition. We conclude with a discussion of the potential implications of iron-related toxicity to neurotherapeutic development. PMID:17599703

  11. Diffusion Tensor Imaging Reveals Evolution of Primate Brain Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Degang; Guo, Lei; Zhu, Dajiang; Li, Kaiming; Li, Longchuan; Chen, Hanbo; Zhao, Qun; Hu, Xiaoping; Liu, Tianming

    2013-01-01

    Evolution of the brain has been an inherently interesting problem for centuries. Recent studies have indicated that neuroimaging is a powerful technique for studying brain evolution. In particular, a variety of reports have demonstrated that consistent white matter fiber connection patterns derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography reveal common brain architecture and are predictive of brain functions. In this paper, based on our recently discovered 358 Dense Individualized and Common Connectivity-based Cortical Landmarks (DICCCOL) defined by consistent fiber connection patterns in DTI datasets of human brains, we derived 65 DICCCOLs that are common in macaque monkey, chimpanzee and human brains and 175 DICCCOLs that exhibit significant discrepancies amongst these three primate species. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations not only demonstrated the consistencies of anatomical locations and structural fiber connection patterns of these 65 common DICCCOLs across three primates, suggesting an evolutionarily-preserved common brain architecture, but also revealed regional patterns of evolutionarily-induced complexity and variability of those 175 discrepant DICCCOLs across the three species. PMID:23135357

  12. Imaging the Respiratory Effects of Opioids in the Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Pattinson, Kyle T S; Wise, Richard G

    2016-01-01

    Opioid analgesia is limited by the potentially fatal side effect of respiratory depression. In humans the brain mechanisms of opioid-induced respiratory depression are poorly understood. Investigating pharmacological influences upon breathing helps us to understand better the brain's respiratory control networks. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) maps neuronal activity in the brain, and is therefore a potentially useful, noninvasive technique to investigate the functional neuroanatomy of respiratory control in humans. Contrast in FMRI is derived from the vascular response to brain activity (neurovascular coupling). Therefore, FMRI studies of the neuronal effects of opioids are rendered more complex by the nonneuronal effects of opioids including those on systemic physiology, cerebral blood flow, and direct effects on the cerebral vasculature such as altered vascular reactivity. Here we review our series of studies that dissect the vascular and neuronal breathing-related effects of opioids in the brain. These methodological considerations have enabled successful FMRI studies revealing the brain networks responsible for opioid effects upon respiratory awareness. Similar considerations would be necessary for FMRI studies in hypoxia or in disease states that affect the physiological state of the brain. PMID:27343094

  13. Segmentation of confocal microscopic image of insect brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Jin; Lin, Chih-Yang; Ching, Yu-Tai

    2002-05-01

    Accurate analysis of insect brain structures in digital confocal microscopic images is valuable and important to biology research needs. The first step is to segment meaningful structures from images. Active contour model, known as snakes, is widely used for segmentation of medical images. A new class of active contour model called gradient vector flow snake has been introduced in 1998 to overcome some critical problems encountered in the traditional snake. In this paper, we use gradient vector flow snake to segment the mushroom body and the central body from the confocal microscopic insect brain images. First, an edge map is created from images by some edge filters. Second, a gradient vector flow field is calculated from the edge map using a computational diffusion process. Finally, a traditional snake deformation process starts until it reaches a stable configuration. User interface is also provided here, allowing users to edit the snake during deformation process, if desired. Using the gradient vector flow snake as the main segmentation method and assist with user interface, we can properly segment the confocal microscopic insect brain image for most of the cases. The identified mushroom and central body can then be used as the preliminary results toward a 3-D reconstruction process for further biology researches.

  14. Dyke Award. Evaluation of contrast-enhanced MR imaging in a brain-abscess model.

    PubMed

    Runge, V M; Clanton, J A; Price, A C; Herzer, W A; Allen, J H; Partain, C L; James, A E

    1985-01-01

    An alpha-streptococcus brain abscess was produced in five dogs and studied with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (0.5 T) and computed tomography (CT). Non-contrast- and contrast-enhanced CT scans were obtained using gadolinium diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (Gd DTPA) for MR imaging and meglumine iothalamate for CT scanning. Each animal was evaluated in the early and later cerebritis stages of abscess evolution. On MR, the area of cerebritis enhanced after administration of Gd DTPA in a manner similar to that observed with contrast-enhanced CT. However, contrast enhancement was greater on the MR examination. Early lesions in two animals were detected only with contrast-enhanced MR imaging. This experience suggests that intravenously administered agents such as Gd DTPA should increase the diagnostic potential of MR imaging in neurologic diseases, especially those altering the blood-brain barrier. PMID:3920873

  15. The brain imaging data structure, a format for organizing and describing outputs of neuroimaging experiments

    PubMed Central

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J.; Auer, Tibor; Calhoun, Vince D.; Craddock, R. Cameron; Das, Samir; Duff, Eugene P.; Flandin, Guillaume; Ghosh, Satrajit S.; Glatard, Tristan; Halchenko, Yaroslav O.; Handwerker, Daniel A.; Hanke, Michael; Keator, David; Li, Xiangrui; Michael, Zachary; Maumet, Camille; Nichols, B. Nolan; Nichols, Thomas E.; Pellman, John; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Rokem, Ariel; Schaefer, Gunnar; Sochat, Vanessa; Triplett, William; Turner, Jessica A.; Varoquaux, Gaël; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques has defined modern neuroimaging. Since its inception, tens of thousands of studies using techniques such as functional MRI and diffusion weighted imaging have allowed for the non-invasive study of the brain. Despite the fact that MRI is routinely used to obtain data for neuroscience research, there has been no widely adopted standard for organizing and describing the data collected in an imaging experiment. This renders sharing and reusing data (within or between labs) difficult if not impossible and unnecessarily complicates the application of automatic pipelines and quality assurance protocols. To solve this problem, we have developed the Brain Imaging Data Structure (BIDS), a standard for organizing and describing MRI datasets. The BIDS standard uses file formats compatible with existing software, unifies the majority of practices already common in the field, and captures the metadata necessary for most common data processing operations. PMID:27326542

  16. The brain imaging data structure, a format for organizing and describing outputs of neuroimaging experiments.

    PubMed

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Auer, Tibor; Calhoun, Vince D; Craddock, R Cameron; Das, Samir; Duff, Eugene P; Flandin, Guillaume; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Glatard, Tristan; Halchenko, Yaroslav O; Handwerker, Daniel A; Hanke, Michael; Keator, David; Li, Xiangrui; Michael, Zachary; Maumet, Camille; Nichols, B Nolan; Nichols, Thomas E; Pellman, John; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Rokem, Ariel; Schaefer, Gunnar; Sochat, Vanessa; Triplett, William; Turner, Jessica A; Varoquaux, Gaël; Poldrack, Russell A

    2016-01-01

    The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques has defined modern neuroimaging. Since its inception, tens of thousands of studies using techniques such as functional MRI and diffusion weighted imaging have allowed for the non-invasive study of the brain. Despite the fact that MRI is routinely used to obtain data for neuroscience research, there has been no widely adopted standard for organizing and describing the data collected in an imaging experiment. This renders sharing and reusing data (within or between labs) difficult if not impossible and unnecessarily complicates the application of automatic pipelines and quality assurance protocols. To solve this problem, we have developed the Brain Imaging Data Structure (BIDS), a standard for organizing and describing MRI datasets. The BIDS standard uses file formats compatible with existing software, unifies the majority of practices already common in the field, and captures the metadata necessary for most common data processing operations. PMID:27326542

  17. Power of the metaphor: forty signs on brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Gocmen, Rahsan; Guler, Ezgi; Kose, Ilgaz Cagatay; Oguz, Kader K

    2015-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed neuroradiology database at our tertiary-care hospital to search for patients with metaphoric or descriptive signs on brain computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Only patients who had clinical or pathological definitive diagnosis were included in this review. PMID:24593052

  18. Imaging brain morphology with ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizheva, Kostadinka K.; Unterhuber, Angelika; Hermann, Boris; Povazay, Boris; Sattmann, Harald; Mei, Michael; Holzwarth, Ronald; Preusser, Matthias; Reitsamer, Herbert; Seefeldt, Michael; Menzel, Ralf; Budka, Herbert; Fercher, Adolf F.; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2003-10-01

    The morphology of healthy and pathological human brain tissue, as well as the brain structural organization of various animal models has been imaged in-vitro using ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR OCT). Micrometer-scale OCT resolution (< 2 μm axial resolution) was achieved at different central wavelengths by interfacing three state-of-the-art broad bandwidth light sources (Ti:Al2O3, λc = 790 nm, Δλ = 260 nm and Pout = 50 mW; PCF based laser, λc = 1150 nm, Δλ = 350 nm and Pout = 2 W; Fiber laser based light source, λc = 1350 nm, Δλ = 470 nm and Pout = 4 mW) to a modular free-space OCT system, utilizing a dynamic focusing and designed for optimal performance in the appropriate wavelength regions. Images acquired from a fixed honeybee brain demonstrated the ability of UHR OCT to image the globular structure of the brain, some fine morphological details such as the nerve fiber bundles connecting the medulla (visual center) to the honeybee eyes, and the interfaces between different tissue layers in the medulla. Tomograms of various human neuropathologies demonstrated the feasibility of UHR OCT to visualize morphological details such as small (~20 μm) calcifications typical for fibrous meningioma, and enlarged nuclei of cancer cells (~10-15 μm) characteristic for many other neuropathologies. In addition UHR OCT was used to image cellular morphology in living ganglion cells.

  19. Brain Imaging in Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mantovani, John F.

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews neuroimaging techniques such as cranial ultrasound, computed tomography scanning, and magnetic resonance imaging. Their roles in the care of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities include identification of high-risk infants, establishment of the diagnosis and prognosis in affected children, and enhancement of discussion…

  20. Assessment of vessel diameters for MR brain angiography processed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraru, Luminita; Obreja, Cristian-Dragos; Moldovanu, Simona

    2015-12-01

    The motivation was to develop an assessment method to measure (in)visible differences between the original and the processed images in MR brain angiography as a method of evaluation of the status of the vessel segments (i.e. the existence of the occlusion or intracerebral vessels damaged as aneurysms). Generally, the image quality is limited, so we improve the performance of the evaluation through digital image processing. The goal is to determine the best processing method that allows an accurate assessment of patients with cerebrovascular diseases. A total of 10 MR brain angiography images were processed by the following techniques: histogram equalization, Wiener filter, linear contrast adjustment, contrastlimited adaptive histogram equalization, bias correction and Marr-Hildreth filter. Each original image and their processed images were analyzed into the stacking procedure so that the same vessel and its corresponding diameter have been measured. Original and processed images were evaluated by measuring the vessel diameter (in pixels) on an established direction and for the precise anatomic location. The vessel diameter is calculated using the plugin ImageJ. Mean diameter measurements differ significantly across the same segment and for different processing techniques. The best results are provided by the Wiener filter and linear contrast adjustment methods and the worst by Marr-Hildreth filter.

  1. Image-guided drug delivery to the brain using nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hong; Wu, Fang; Nair, Madhavan P.

    2013-01-01

    Targeting across the blood--brain barrier (BBB) for treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases represents the most challenging aspect of, as well as one of the largest growing fields in, neuropharmaceutics. Combining nanotechnology with multiple imaging techniques has a unique role in the diagnosis and treatment (theranostics) of CNS disease. Such imaging techniques include anatomical imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound (US), X-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), electron microscopy, autoradiography and optical imaging as well as thermal images. In this review, we summarize and discuss recent advances in formulations, current challenges and possible hypotheses concerning the use of such theranostics across the BBB.[LM1] PMID:23817076

  2. Exploring the feasibility of iris recognition for visible spectrum iris images obtained using smartphone camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trokielewicz, Mateusz; Bartuzi, Ewelina; Michowska, Katarzyna; Andrzejewska, Antonina; Selegrat, Monika

    2015-09-01

    In the age of modern, hyperconnected society that increasingly relies on mobile devices and solutions, implementing a reliable and accurate biometric system employing iris recognition presents new challenges. Typical biometric systems employing iris analysis require expensive and complicated hardware. We therefore explore an alternative way using visible spectrum iris imaging. This paper aims at answering several questions related to applying iris biometrics for images obtained in the visible spectrum using smartphone camera. Can irides be successfully and effortlessly imaged using a smartphone's built-in camera? Can existing iris recognition methods perform well when presented with such images? The main advantage of using near-infrared (NIR) illumination in dedicated iris recognition cameras is good performance almost independent of the iris color and pigmentation. Are the images obtained from smartphone's camera of sufficient quality even for the dark irides? We present experiments incorporating simple image preprocessing to find the best visibility of iris texture, followed by a performance study to assess whether iris recognition methods originally aimed at NIR iris images perform well with visible light images. To our best knowledge this is the first comprehensive analysis of iris recognition performance using a database of high-quality images collected in visible light using the smartphones flashlight together with the application of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) iris recognition methods.

  3. Image fusion for enhanced visualization of brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socolinsky, Diego A.; Wolff, Lawrence B.

    1999-05-01

    We present a new formalism for the treatment and understanding of multispectral imags and multisensor fusion based on first order contrast information. Although little attention has been paid to the utility of multispectral contrast, we develop a theory for multispectral contrast that enables us to produce an optimal grayscale visualization of the first order contrast of an image with an arbitrary number of bands. In particular, we consider multiple registered visualization of multi-modal medical imaging. We demonstrate how our methodology can reveal significantly more interpretive information to a radiologist or image analyst, who can use it in a number of image understanding algorithms. Existing grayscale visualization strategies are reviewed and a discussion is given as to why our algorithm performs better. A variety of experimental results from medical imagin and remotely sensed data are presented.

  4. Brain MR diffusion tensor imaging in Kennedy’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Garaci, Francesco; Lanzafame, Simona; Marfia, Girolama A; Marziali, Simone; Meschini, Alessandro; Di Giuliano, Francesca; Simonetti, Giovanni; Guerrisi, Maria; Massa, Roberto; Floris, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Kennedy’s disease (KD) is a progressive degenerative disorder affecting lower motor neurons. We investigated the correlation between disease severity and whole brain white matter microstructure, including upper motor neuron tracts, by using diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) in eight patients with KD in whom disease severity was evaluated using the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS). Methods From DTI acquisitions we obtained maps of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (L1) and radial diffusivities (L2, L3). We then employed tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to investigate within-patient correlations of DTI invariants with ALSFRS and disease duration (DD). Results We found a significant correlation between low ALSFRS and 1) low FA values in association commissural and projection fibers, and 2) high L3 values in commissural tracts and fronto-parietal white matter. Additionally, we found a significant association between longer DD and 1) low FA in the genu and body of corpus callosum, association fibers and midbrain and 2) high L1 in projection and association tracts. Conclusions The associations between clinical variables and white matter microstructural changes in areas thought to be spared by the disease process support the hypothesis of a multisystem involvement in the complex pathogenic mechanisms responsible for the clinical disability of these patients. PMID:25963157

  5. A versatile clearing agent for multi-modal brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Irene; Ghobril, Jean-Pierre; Di Giovanna, Antonino Paolo; Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Silvestri, Ludovico; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Onofri, Leonardo; Conti, Valerio; Vanzi, Francesco; Sacconi, Leonardo; Guerrini, Renzo; Markram, Henry; Iannello, Giulio; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2015-01-01

    Extensive mapping of neuronal connections in the central nervous system requires high-throughput µm-scale imaging of large volumes. In recent years, different approaches have been developed to overcome the limitations due to tissue light scattering. These methods are generally developed to improve the performance of a specific imaging modality, thus limiting comprehensive neuroanatomical exploration by multi-modal optical techniques. Here, we introduce a versatile brain clearing agent (2,2'-thiodiethanol; TDE) suitable for various applications and imaging techniques. TDE is cost-efficient, water-soluble and low-viscous and, more importantly, it preserves fluorescence, is compatible with immunostaining and does not cause deformations at sub-cellular level. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in different applications: in fixed samples by imaging a whole mouse hippocampus with serial two-photon tomography; in combination with CLARITY by reconstructing an entire mouse brain with light sheet microscopy and in translational research by imaging immunostained human dysplastic brain tissue. PMID:25950610

  6. Parallel deconvolution of large 3D images obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pawliczek, Piotr; Romanowska-Pawliczek, Anna; Soltys, Zbigniew

    2010-03-01

    Various deconvolution algorithms are often used for restoration of digital images. Image deconvolution is especially needed for the correction of three-dimensional images obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Such images suffer from distortions, particularly in the Z dimension. As a result, reliable automatic segmentation of these images may be difficult or even impossible. Effective deconvolution algorithms are memory-intensive and time-consuming. In this work, we propose a parallel version of the well-known Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm developed for a system with distributed memory and implemented with the use of Message Passing Interface (MPI). It enables significantly more rapid deconvolution of two-dimensional and three-dimensional images by efficiently splitting the computation across multiple computers. The implementation of this algorithm can be used on professional clusters provided by computing centers as well as on simple networks of ordinary PC machines. PMID:19725070

  7. Application of Z-contrast imaging to obtain column-by-column spectroscopic analysis of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, N.D.; Pennycook, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    Z-contrast imaging has been shown to be an effective method for obtaining a high-resolution image from a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The incoherent nature of the high-angle scattering makes image interpretation straightforward and intuitive with the resolution limited only by the 2.2 {Angstrom} electron probe. The optimum experimental conditions for Z-contrast imaging also coincide with those used for analytical microscopy, enabling microanalysis to be performed with the same spatial resolution as the image. The detection limits afforded by a parallel detection system for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) allows column-by-column core-loss spectroscopy to be performed using the Z-contrast image to position the electron probe. Preliminary results from the study of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} illustrate the spatial resolution available with this technique and the potential applications for materials science.

  8. Spatial prior in SVM-based classification of brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuingnet, Rémi; Chupin, Marie; Benali, Habib; Colliot, Olivier

    2010-03-01

    This paper introduces a general framework for spatial prior in SVM-based classification of brain images based on Laplacian regularization. Most existing methods include spatial prior by adding a feature aggregation step before the SVM classification. The problem of the aggregation step is that the individual information of each feature is lost. Our framework enables to avoid this shortcoming by including the spatial prior directly in the SVM. We demonstrate that this framework can be used to derive embedded regularization corresponding to existing methods for classification of brain images and propose an efficient way to implement them. This framework is illustrated on the classification of MR images from 55 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 82 elderly controls selected from the ADNI database. The results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm enables introducing straightforward and anatomically consistent spatial prior into the classifier.

  9. Imaging of Brain Tumors With Paramagnetic Vesicles Targeted to Phosphatidylserine

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Patrick M.; Pearce, John; Chu, Zhengtao; McPherson, Christopher M.; Takigiku, Ray; Lee, Jing-Huei; Qi, Xiaoyang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate paramagnetic saposin C and dioleylphosphatidylserine (SapC-DOPS) vesicles as a targeted contrast agent for imaging phosphatidylserine (PS) expressed by glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors. Materials and Methods Gd-DTPA-BSA/SapC-DOPS vesicles were formulated, and the vesicle diameter and relaxivity were measured. Targeting of Gd-DTPA-BSA/ SapC-DOPS vesicles to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo was compared with nontargeted paramagnetic vesicles (lacking SapC). Mice with GBM brain tumors were imaged at 3, 10, 20, and 24 h postinjection to measure the relaxation rate (R1) in the tumor and the normal brain. Results The mean diameter of vesicles was 175 nm, and the relaxivity at 7 Tesla was 3.32 (s*mM)−1 relative to the gadolinium concentration. Gd-DTPA-BSA/SapC-DOPS vesicles targeted cultured cancer cells, leading to an increased R1 and gadolinium level in the cells. In vivo, Gd-DTPA-BSA/SapC-DOPS vesicles produced a 9% increase in the R1 of GBM brain tumors in mice 10 h postinjection, but only minimal changes (1.2% increase) in the normal brain. Nontargeted paramagnetic vesicles yielded minimal change in the tumor R1 at 10 h postinjection (1.3%). Conclusion These experiments demonstrate that Gd-DTPA-BSA/SapC-DOPS vesicles can selectively target implanted brain tumors in vivo, providing noninvasive mapping of the cancer biomarker PS. PMID:24797437

  10. Can Images Obtained With High Field Strength Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reduce Contouring Variability of the Prostate?

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, Nawaid; Sloboda, Ron; Kamal, Wafa; Ghosh, Sunita; Pervez, Nadeem; Pedersen, John; Yee, Don; Danielson, Brita; Murtha, Albert; Amanie, John; Monajemi, Tara

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to determine whether there is less contouring variability of the prostate using higher-strength magnetic resonance images (MRI) compared with standard MRI and computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Forty patients treated with prostate brachytherapy were accrued to a prospective study that included the acquisition of 1.5-T MR and CT images at specified time points. A subset of 10 patients had additional 3.0-T MR images acquired at the same time as their 1.5-T MR scans. Images from each of these patients were contoured by 5 radiation oncologists, with a random subset of patients repeated to quantify intraobserver contouring variability. To minimize bias in contouring the prostate, the image sets were placed in folders in a random order with all identifiers removed from the images. Results: Although there was less interobserver contouring variability in the overall prostate volumes in 1.5-T MRI compared with 3.0-T MRI (p < 0.01), there was no significant differences in contouring variability in the different regions of the prostate between 1.5-T MRI and 3.0-T MRI. MRI demonstrated significantly less interobserver contouring variability in both 1.5-T and 3.0-T compared with CT in overall prostate volumes (p < 0.01, p = 0.01), with the greatest benefits being appreciated in the base of the prostate. Overall, there was less intraobserver contouring variability than interobserver contouring variability for all of the measurements analyzed. Conclusions: Use of 3.0-T MRI does not demonstrate a significant improvement in contouring variability compared with 1.5-T MRI, although both magnetic strengths demonstrated less contouring variability compared with CT.