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Sample records for brain reveals unexpected

  1. Sequence tagging reveals unexpected modifications in toxicoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C.; Codreanu, Simona G.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Collins, Ben C.; Pennington, Stephen R.; Gallagher, William M.; Tabb, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Toxicoproteomic samples are rich in posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins. Identifying these modifications via standard database searching can incur significant performance penalties. Here we describe the latest developments in TagRecon, an algorithm that leverages inferred sequence tags to identify modified peptides in toxicoproteomic data sets. TagRecon identifies known modifications more effectively than the MyriMatch database search engine. TagRecon outperformed state of the art software in recognizing unanticipated modifications from LTQ, Orbitrap, and QTOF data sets. We developed user-friendly software for detecting persistent mass shifts from samples. We follow a three-step strategy for detecting unanticipated PTMs in samples. First, we identify the proteins present in the sample with a standard database search. Next, identified proteins are interrogated for unexpected PTMs with a sequence tag-based search. Finally, additional evidence is gathered for the detected mass shifts with a refinement search. Application of this technology on toxicoproteomic data sets revealed unintended cross-reactions between proteins and sample processing reagents. Twenty five proteins in rat liver showed signs of oxidative stress when exposed to potentially toxic drugs. These results demonstrate the value of mining toxicoproteomic data sets for modifications. PMID:21214251

  2. Unexpected immunoreactivities of intermediate filament antibodies in human brain and brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Franke, F. E.; Schachenmayr, W.; Osborn, M.; Altmannsberger, M.

    1991-01-01

    Immunoreactivities of 35 different monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that detect intermediate filaments were studied systematically on serial cryostat sections of 14 well-defined human gliomas (five astrocytomas, three oligodendrogliomas, six glioblastomas) and on normal brain. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), vimentin, desmin, neurofilaments, and broad-specificity keratin MAbs, as well as MAbs that recognize several or only single keratin polypeptides, were used. Unexpected reactivities were surprisingly frequent. As these may lead to diagnostic confusion and misinterpretation on this material, the authors investigated these phenomena more thoroughly. Four major sources of artifactual staining were found: 1) positive staining attributable to the rabbit gamma G immunoglobulins used in the alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase technique; 2) certain desmin and keratin MAbs cross-reacted with astrocytic glia and with other brain-specific epitopes; 3) technical difficulties; 4) some MAbs directed against neurofilaments and keratins showed unexpected reactivities only on individual anaplastic gliomas. The implications of these findings for intermediate filament typing of neuropathologic material are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1713022

  3. Social performance reveals unexpected vocal competency in young songbirds

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Satoshi; Doupe, Allison J.

    2011-01-01

    Vocal ontogeny in songbirds provides a good model for understanding how complex motor behavior, including speech, is learned. For birdsong, as for other motor learning, it has generally been assumed that a subject's motor output at any point during learning represents what the subject has learned to produce by that time. Here, we show, however, that juvenile zebra finches partway through song learning, singing immature song, are capable of producing song with much more mature properties, depending on the behavioral context. In these birds, we were able to elicit courtship (female-directed) song, which young birds normally sing infrequently, and to compare it with the alone or “undirected” song (Undir) predominantly produced during learning as well as with the same bird's subsequent adult song. We found that the juvenile courtship song was much less variable than the immature Undir and as stereotyped as the adult song produced after a further month of practice. More strikingly, the juvenile courtship song was also acoustically much more similar than Undir to the adult song. This finding demonstrates that the Undir that juvenile birds usually produce underestimates the extent of learning and that song structure is learned faster than previously thought. Moreover, the rapid improvement in song quality in response to external social cues supports the idea that courtship singing is a state of motor “performance,” in which the bird selects the best variants of the song learned during singing alone, and suggests that such performance states can reveal unappreciated progression of learning. PMID:21220335

  4. Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Unexpected Subgenomic Diversity of Magnetotactic Bacteria within the Phylum Nitrospirae ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei; Jogler, Christian; Schüler, Dirk; Pan, Yongxin

    2011-01-01

    A targeted metagenomic approach was applied to investigate magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) within the phylum Nitrospirae in Lake Miyun near Beijing, China. Five fosmids containing rRNA operons were identified. Comparative sequence analysis of a total of 172 kb provided new insights into their genome organization and revealed unexpected subgenomic diversity of uncultivated MTB in the phylum Nitrospirae. In addition, affiliation of two novel MTB with the phylum Nitrospirae was verified by fluorescence in situ hybridization. One of them was morphologically similar to “Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum,” but the other differed substantially in cell shape and magnetosome organization from all previously described “Ca. Magnetobacterium bavaricum”-like bacteria. PMID:21057016

  5. Unexpected events induce motor slowing via a brain mechanism for action-stopping with global suppressive effects.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Jan R; Aron, Adam R

    2013-11-20

    When an unexpected event occurs in everyday life (e.g., a car honking), one experiences a slowing down of ongoing action (e.g., of walking into the street). Motor slowing following unexpected events is a ubiquitous phenomenon, both in laboratory experiments as well as such everyday situations, yet the underlying mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that unexpected events recruit the same inhibition network in the brain as does complete cancellation of an action (i.e., action-stopping). Using electroencephalography and independent component analysis in humans, we show that a brain signature of successful outright action-stopping also exhibits activity following unexpected events, and more so in blocks with greater motor slowing. Further, using transcranial magnetic stimulation to measure corticospinal excitability, we show that an unexpected event has a global motor suppressive effect, just like outright action-stopping. Thus, unexpected events recruit a common mechanism with outright action-stopping, moreover with global suppressive effects. These findings imply that we can now leverage the considerable extant knowledge of the neural architecture and functional properties of the stopping system to better understand the processing of unexpected events, including perhaps how they induce distraction via global suppression. PMID:24259571

  6. The Crystal Structures of EAP Domains from Staphylococcus aureus Reveal an Unexpected Homology to Bacterial Superantigens

    SciTech Connect

    Geisbrecht, B V; Hamaoka, B Y; Perman, B; Zemla, A; Leahy, D J

    2005-10-14

    The Eap (extracellular adherence protein) of Staphylococcus aureus functions as a secreted virulence factor by mediating interactions between the bacterial cell surface and several extracellular host proteins. Eap proteins from different Staphylococcal strains consist of four to six tandem repeats of a structurally uncharacterized domain (EAP domain). We have determined the three-dimensional structures of three different EAP domains to 1.8, 2.2, and 1.35 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. These structures reveal a core fold that is comprised of an {alpha}-helix lying diagonally across a five-stranded, mixed {beta}-sheet. Comparison of EAP domains with known structures reveals an unexpected homology with the C-terminal domain of bacterial superantigens. Examination of the structure of the superantigen SEC2 bound to the {beta}-chain of a T-cell receptor suggests a possible ligand-binding site within the EAP domain (Fields, B. A., Malchiodi, E. L., Li, H., Ysern, X., Stauffacher, C. V., Schlievert, P. M., Karjalainen, K., and Mariuzza, R. (1996) Nature 384, 188-192). These results provide the first structural characterization of EAP domains, relate EAP domains to a large class of bacterial toxins, and will guide the design of future experiments to analyze EAP domain structure/function relationships.

  7. High-resolution molecular genomic autopsy reveals complex sudden unexpected death in epilepsy risk profile.

    PubMed

    Klassen, Tara L; Bomben, Valerie C; Patel, Ankita; Drabek, Janice; Chen, Tim T; Gu, Wenli; Zhang, Feng; Chapman, Kevin; Lupski, James R; Noebels, Jeffrey L; Goldman, A M

    2014-02-01

    Advanced variant detection in genes underlying risk of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) can uncover extensive epistatic complexity and improve diagnostic accuracy of epilepsy-related mortality. However, the sensitivity and clinical utility of diagnostic panels based solely on established cardiac arrhythmia genes in the molecular autopsy of SUDEP is unknown. We applied the established clinical diagnostic panels, followed by sequencing and a high density copy number variant (CNV) detection array of an additional 253 related ion channel subunit genes to analyze the overall genomic variation in a SUDEP of the 3-year-old proband with severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI). We uncovered complex combinations of single nucleotide polymorphisms and CNVs in genes expressed in both neurocardiac and respiratory control pathways, including SCN1A, KCNA1, RYR3, and HTR2C. Our findings demonstrate the importance of comprehensive high-resolution variant analysis in the assessment of personally relevant SUDEP risk. In this case, the combination of de novo single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and CNVs in the SCN1A and KCNA1 genes, respectively, is suspected to be the principal risk factor for both epilepsy and premature death. However, consideration of the overall biologically relevant variant complexity with its extensive functional epistatic interactions reveals potential personal risk more accurately. PMID:24372310

  8. Kinase inhibitor profiling reveals unexpected opportunities to inhibit disease-associated mutant kinases

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Devarajan, Karthik; Liang, Shuguang; Horiuchi, Kurumi Y.; Wang, Yuren; Ma, Haiching; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Small-molecule kinase inhibitors have typically been designed to inhibit wild-type kinases rather than the mutant forms that frequently arise in diseases such as cancer. Mutations can have serious clinical implications by increasing kinase catalytic activity or conferring therapeutic resistance. To identify opportunities to repurpose inhibitors against disease-associated mutant kinases, we conducted a large-scale functional screen of 183 known kinase inhibitors against 76 recombinant, mutant kinases. The results revealed lead compounds with activity against clinically important mutant kinases including ALK, LRRK2, RET, and EGFR as well as unexpected opportunities for repurposing FDA-approved kinase inhibitors as leads for additional indications. Furthermore, using T674I PDGFRα as an example, we show how single-dose screening data can provide predictive structure-activity data to guide subsequent inhibitor optimization. This study provides a resource for the development of inhibitors against numerous disease-associated mutant kinases and illustrates the potential of unbiased profiling as an approach to compound-centric inhibitor development. PMID:26776524

  9. Metatranscriptome Analysis of Aquifer Samples Reveals Unexpected Metabolic Lifestyles Relevant to Active Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Jewell, T. N. M.; Karaoz, U.; Banfield, J. F.; Brodie, E.; Williams, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Modern molecular ecology techniques are revealing the metabolic potential of uncultivated microorganisms, but there is still much to be learned about the actual biogeochemical roles of microbes that have cultivated relatives. Here, we present metatranscriptomic and metagenomic data from a field study that provides evidence of coupled redox processes that have not been documented in cultivated relatives and, indeed, represent strains with metabolic traits that are novel with respect to closely related isolates. The data come from omics analysis of groundwater samples collected during an experiment in which nitrate (a native electron acceptor) was injected into a perennially suboxic aquifer in Rifle (CO). Transcriptional data indicated that just two groups of chemolithoautotrophic bacteria accounted for a very large portion (~80%) of overall community gene expression: (1) members of the Fe(II)-oxidizing Gallionellaceae family and (2) strains of the S-oxidizing species, Sulfurimonas denitrificans. Metabolic lifestyles for Gallionellaceae strains that were novel compared to cultivated representatives included nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation and S oxidation. Evidence for these metabolisms included highly correlated temporal expression in binned data of nitrate reductase (e.g., narGHI) genes (which have never been reported in Gallionellaceae genomes) and Fe(II) oxidation genes (e.g., mtoA) or S oxidation genes (e.g., dsrE, aprA). Of the two most active strains of S. denitrificans, only one showed strong expression of S oxidation genes, whereas the other was apparently using an unexpected (as-yet unidentified) primary electron donor. Transcriptional data added considerable interpretive value to this study, as (1) metagenomic data would not have highlighted these organisms, which had a disproportionately large role in community metabolism relative to their populations, and (2) co-expression of coupled pathway genes could not be predicted based solely on metagenomic data.

  10. Unexpected Pregnancy Revealed on 18F-NaF PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Shao, Fuqiang; Chen, Yue; Huang, Zhanwen; Cai, Liang; Zhang, Yin

    2016-04-01

    A 48-year-old illiterate woman who is congenitally deaf and mute underwent F-NaF PET/CT study to evaluate bone metastases from newly diagnosed breast cancer. Unexpectedly, a fetus in early second trimester was noted on CT images. In addition, subtle F-NaF uptake by the fetus could also be observed. PMID:26359575

  11. Unexpected Recovery of Function after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: The Limits of Early Neuroimaging-Based Outcome Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Edlow, Brian L.; Giacino, Joseph T.; Hirschberg, Ronald E.; Gerrard, Jason; Wu, Ona; Hochberg, Leigh R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prognostication in the early stage of traumatic coma is a common challenge in the neuro-intensive care unit. We report the unexpected recovery of functional milestones (i.e., consciousness, communication, and community reintegration) in a 19-year-old man who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury. The early magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, at the time, suggested a poor prognosis. Methods During the first year of the patient’s recovery, MRI with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and T2*-weighted imaging was performed on day 8 (coma), day 44 (minimally conscious state), day 198 (post-traumatic confusional state), and day 366 (community reintegration). Mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the corpus callosum, cerebral hemispheric white matter and thalamus were compared with clinical assessments using the Disability Rating Scale (DRS). Results Extensive diffusion restriction in the corpus callosum and bihemispheric white matter was observed on day 8, with ADC values in a range typically associated with neurotoxic injury (230 to 400 × 10−6 mm2/sec). T2*-weighted MRI revealed widespread hemorrhagic axonal injury in the cerebral hemispheres, corpus callosum, and brainstem. Despite the presence of severe axonal injury on early MRI, the patient regained the ability to communicate and perform activities of daily living independently at one year post-injury (DRS = 8). Conclusions MRI data should be interpreted with caution when prognosticating for patients in traumatic coma. Recovery of consciousness and community reintegration are possible even when extensive traumatic axonal injury is demonstrated by early MRI. PMID:23860665

  12. Novel 3D Microscopic Analysis of Human Placental Villous Trees Reveals Unexpected Significance of Branching Angles

    PubMed Central

    Haeussner, Eva; Buehlmeyer, Antonia; Schmitz, Christoph; von Koch, Franz Edler; Frank, Hans-Georg

    2014-01-01

    The villous trees of human placentas delineate the fetomaternal border and are complex three-dimensional (3D) structures. Thus far, they have primarily been analyzed as thin, two-dimensional (2D) histological sections. However, 2D sections cannot provide access to key aspects such as branching nodes and branch order. Using samples taken from 50 normal human placentas at birth, in the present study we show that analysis procedures for 3D reconstruction of neuronal dendritic trees can also be used for analyzing trees of human placentas. Nodes and their branches (e.g., branching hierarchy, branching angles, diameters, and lengths of branches) can be efficiently measured in whole-mount preparations of isolated villous trees using high-end light microscopy. Such data differ qualitatively from the data obtainable from histological sections and go substantially beyond the morphological horizon of such histological data. Unexpectedly, branching angles of terminal branches of villous trees varied inversely with the fetoplacental weight ratio, a widely used clinical parameter. Since branching angles have never before been determined in the human placenta, this result requires further detailed studies in order to fully understand its impact. PMID:25155961

  13. Unexpected divergence and lack of divergence revealed in continental Asian Cyornis flycatchers (Aves: Muscicapidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Xiaoyang; Huang, Yuan; Olsson, Urban; Martinez, Jonathan; Alström, Per; Lei, Fumin

    2016-01-01

    The flycatcher genus Cyornis (Aves: Muscicapidae) comprises 25 species with Oriental distributions. Their relationships are poorly known. We analyzed the phylogenetic relationships of 70 individuals from 12 species and several subspecies of Cyornis based on three mitochondrial genes and five nuclear introns, with special focus on Chinese and Vietnamese populations of the monotypic C. hainanus and polytypic C. rubeculoides. We found no support for inclusion of C. concretus in Cyornis. Deep divergences were observed among different subspecies of C. banyumas and C. rubeculoides. C. rubeculoides glaucicomans was also shown to have a highly distinctive song, and we propose that it is treated as a distinctive Chinese endemic species, C. glaucicomans. In contrast, the south Vietnamese C. rubeculoides klossi, which has a disjunct distribution from the other subspecies of C. rubeculoides, along with a recently discovered population in Guangdong Province (China) with several plumage features reminiscent of C. r. klossi, were indistinguishable in all loci analyzed from the phenotypically markedly different C. hainanus. More research is needed to elucidate the reasons for this unexpected pattern. PMID:26358612

  14. Unexpected hormonal activity of a catechol equine estrogen metabolite reveals reversible glutathione conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kuan-Wei; Chang, Minsun; Wang, Yue-Ting; Wang, Zhican; Qin, Zhihui; Bolton, Judy L.; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.

    2010-01-01

    4-Hydroxyequilenin (4-OHEN) is a major phase I metabolite of the equine estrogens present in widely prescribed hormone replacement formulations. 4-OHEN is autoxidized to an electrophilic o-quinone that has been shown to redox cycle, generating ROS, and to covalently modify proteins and DNA and thus potentially to act as a chemical carcinogen. To establish the ability of 4-OHEN to act as a hormonal carcinogen at the estrogen receptor (ER), estrogen responsive gene expression and proliferation were studied in ER(+) breast cancer cells. Recruitment by 4-OHEN of ER to estrogen responsive elements (ERE) of DNA in MCF-7 cells was also studied and observed. 4-OHEN was a potent estrogen, with additional weak activity associated with binding to the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR). The potency of 4-OHEN towards classical ERα mediated activity was unexpected given the reported rapid autoxidation and trapping of the resultant quinone by GSH. Addition of thiols to cell cultures did not attenuate the estrogenic activity of 4-OHEN and pre-formed thiol conjugates added to cell incubations only marginally reduced ERE-luciferase induction. On reaction of the 4OHEN-GSH conjugate with NADPH, 4-OHEN was observed to be regenerated at a rate dependent upon NADPH concentration, indicating that intracellular non-enzymatic and enzymatic regeneration of 4-OHEN accounts for the observed estrogenic activity of 4-OHEN. 4-OHEN is therefore capable of inducing chemical and hormonal pathways that may contribute to estrogen-dependent carcinogenesis, and trapping by cellular thiols does not provide a mechanism of termination of these pathways. PMID:20540524

  15. Brain Rhythms Reveal a Hierarchical Network Organization

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, G. Karl; Galán, Roberto F.

    2011-01-01

    Recordings of ongoing neural activity with EEG and MEG exhibit oscillations of specific frequencies over a non-oscillatory background. The oscillations appear in the power spectrum as a collection of frequency bands that are evenly spaced on a logarithmic scale, thereby preventing mutual entrainment and cross-talk. Over the last few years, experimental, computational and theoretical studies have made substantial progress on our understanding of the biophysical mechanisms underlying the generation of network oscillations and their interactions, with emphasis on the role of neuronal synchronization. In this paper we ask a very different question. Rather than investigating how brain rhythms emerge, or whether they are necessary for neural function, we focus on what they tell us about functional brain connectivity. We hypothesized that if we were able to construct abstract networks, or “virtual brains”, whose dynamics were similar to EEG/MEG recordings, those networks would share structural features among themselves, and also with real brains. Applying mathematical techniques for inverse problems, we have reverse-engineered network architectures that generate characteristic dynamics of actual brains, including spindles and sharp waves, which appear in the power spectrum as frequency bands superimposed on a non-oscillatory background dominated by low frequencies. We show that all reconstructed networks display similar topological features (e.g. structural motifs) and dynamics. We have also reverse-engineered putative diseased brains (epileptic and schizophrenic), in which the oscillatory activity is altered in different ways, as reported in clinical studies. These reconstructed networks show consistent alterations of functional connectivity and dynamics. In particular, we show that the complexity of the network, quantified as proposed by Tononi, Sporns and Edelman, is a good indicator of brain fitness, since virtual brains modeling diseased states display lower

  16. Hydra meiosis reveals unexpected conservation of structural synaptonemal complex proteins across metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Fraune, Johanna; Alsheimer, Manfred; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Busch, Karoline; Fraune, Sebastian; Bosch, Thomas C. G.; Benavente, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a key structure of meiosis, mediating the stable pairing (synapsis) of homologous chromosomes during prophase I. Its remarkable tripartite structure is evolutionarily well conserved and can be found in almost all sexually reproducing organisms. However, comparison of the different SC protein components in the common meiosis model organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and Mus musculus revealed no sequence homology. This discrepancy challenged the hypothesis that the SC arose only once in evolution. To pursue this matter we focused on the evolution of SYCP1 and SYCP3, the two major structural SC proteins of mammals. Remarkably, our comparative bioinformatic and expression studies revealed that SYCP1 and SYCP3 are also components of the SC in the basal metazoan Hydra. In contrast to previous assumptions, we therefore conclude that SYCP1 and SYCP3 form monophyletic groups of orthologous proteins across metazoans. PMID:23012415

  17. An Unexpected Transient Breakdown of the Blood Brain Barrier Triggers Passage of Large Intravenously Administered Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nicole M.; Gachulincova, Ivana; Ho, Diwei; Bailey, Charlotte; Bartlett, Carole A.; Norret, Marck; Murphy, John; Buckley, Alysia; Rigby, Paul J.; House, Michael J.; St. Pierre, Timothy; Fitzgerald, Melinda; Iyer, K. Swaminathan; Dunlop, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    The highly restrictive blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a critically important role in maintaining brain homeostasis and is pivotal for proper neuronal function. The BBB is currently considered the main limiting factor restricting the passage of large (up to 200 nm) intravenously administered nanoparticles to the brain. Breakdown of the barrier occurs as a consequence of cerebrovascular diseases and traumatic brain injury. In this article, we report that remote injuries in the CNS are also associated with BBB dysfunction. In particular, we show that a focal partial transection of the optic nerve triggers a previously unknown transient opening of the mammalian BBB that occurs in the visual centres. Importantly, we demonstrate that this transient BBB breakdown results in a dramatic change in the biodistribution of intravenously administered large polymeric nanoparticles which were previously deemed as BBB-impermeable. PMID:26940762

  18. An Unexpected Transient Breakdown of the Blood Brain Barrier Triggers Passage of Large Intravenously Administered Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nicole M.; Gachulincova, Ivana; Ho, Diwei; Bailey, Charlotte; Bartlett, Carole A.; Norret, Marck; Murphy, John; Buckley, Alysia; Rigby, Paul J.; House, Michael J.; St. Pierre, Timothy; Fitzgerald, Melinda; Iyer, K. Swaminathan; Dunlop, Sarah A.

    2016-03-01

    The highly restrictive blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a critically important role in maintaining brain homeostasis and is pivotal for proper neuronal function. The BBB is currently considered the main limiting factor restricting the passage of large (up to 200 nm) intravenously administered nanoparticles to the brain. Breakdown of the barrier occurs as a consequence of cerebrovascular diseases and traumatic brain injury. In this article, we report that remote injuries in the CNS are also associated with BBB dysfunction. In particular, we show that a focal partial transection of the optic nerve triggers a previously unknown transient opening of the mammalian BBB that occurs in the visual centres. Importantly, we demonstrate that this transient BBB breakdown results in a dramatic change in the biodistribution of intravenously administered large polymeric nanoparticles which were previously deemed as BBB-impermeable.

  19. Deep phenotyping of 89 xeroderma pigmentosum patients reveals unexpected heterogeneity dependent on the precise molecular defect

    PubMed Central

    Fassihi, Hiva; Sethi, Mieran; Fawcett, Heather; Wing, Jonathan; Chandler, Natalie; Mohammed, Shehla; Craythorne, Emma; Morley, Ana M. S.; Lim, Rongxuan; Turner, Sally; Henshaw, Tanya; Garrood, Isabel; Giunti, Paola; Hedderly, Tammy; Abiona, Adesoji; Naik, Harsha; Harrop, Gemma; McGibbon, David; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; Botta, Elena; Nardo, Tiziana; Stefanini, Miria; Young, Antony R.; Sarkany, Robert P. E.; Lehmann, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare DNA repair disorder characterized by increased susceptibility to UV radiation (UVR)-induced skin pigmentation, skin cancers, ocular surface disease, and, in some patients, sunburn and neurological degeneration. Genetically, it is assigned to eight complementation groups (XP-A to -G and variant). For the last 5 y, the UK national multidisciplinary XP service has provided follow-up for 89 XP patients, representing most of the XP patients in the United Kingdom. Causative mutations, DNA repair levels, and more than 60 clinical variables relating to dermatology, ophthalmology, and neurology have been measured, using scoring systems to categorize disease severity. This deep phenotyping has revealed unanticipated heterogeneity of clinical features, between and within complementation groups. Skin cancer is most common in XP-C, XP-E, and XP-V patients, previously considered to be the milder groups based on cellular analyses. These patients have normal sunburn reactions and are therefore diagnosed later and are less likely to adhere to UVR protection. XP-C patients are specifically hypersensitive to ocular damage, and XP-F and XP-G patients appear to be much less susceptible to skin cancer than other XP groups. Within XP groups, different mutations confer susceptibility or resistance to neurological damage. Our findings on this large cohort of XP patients under long-term follow-up reveal that XP is more heterogeneous than has previously been appreciated. Our data now enable provision of personalized prognostic information and management advice for each XP patient, as well as providing new insights into the functions of the XP proteins. PMID:26884178

  20. Deep phenotyping of 89 xeroderma pigmentosum patients reveals unexpected heterogeneity dependent on the precise molecular defect.

    PubMed

    Fassihi, Hiva; Sethi, Mieran; Fawcett, Heather; Wing, Jonathan; Chandler, Natalie; Mohammed, Shehla; Craythorne, Emma; Morley, Ana M S; Lim, Rongxuan; Turner, Sally; Henshaw, Tanya; Garrood, Isabel; Giunti, Paola; Hedderly, Tammy; Abiona, Adesoji; Naik, Harsha; Harrop, Gemma; McGibbon, David; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Botta, Elena; Nardo, Tiziana; Stefanini, Miria; Young, Antony R; Sarkany, Robert P E; Lehmann, Alan R

    2016-03-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare DNA repair disorder characterized by increased susceptibility to UV radiation (UVR)-induced skin pigmentation, skin cancers, ocular surface disease, and, in some patients, sunburn and neurological degeneration. Genetically, it is assigned to eight complementation groups (XP-A to -G and variant). For the last 5 y, the UK national multidisciplinary XP service has provided follow-up for 89 XP patients, representing most of the XP patients in the United Kingdom. Causative mutations, DNA repair levels, and more than 60 clinical variables relating to dermatology, ophthalmology, and neurology have been measured, using scoring systems to categorize disease severity. This deep phenotyping has revealed unanticipated heterogeneity of clinical features, between and within complementation groups. Skin cancer is most common in XP-C, XP-E, and XP-V patients, previously considered to be the milder groups based on cellular analyses. These patients have normal sunburn reactions and are therefore diagnosed later and are less likely to adhere to UVR protection. XP-C patients are specifically hypersensitive to ocular damage, and XP-F and XP-G patients appear to be much less susceptible to skin cancer than other XP groups. Within XP groups, different mutations confer susceptibility or resistance to neurological damage. Our findings on this large cohort of XP patients under long-term follow-up reveal that XP is more heterogeneous than has previously been appreciated. Our data now enable provision of personalized prognostic information and management advice for each XP patient, as well as providing new insights into the functions of the XP proteins. PMID:26884178

  1. Comparative analyses of developmental transcription factor repertoires in sponges reveal unexpected complexity of the earliest animals.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Sofia A V; Adamski, Marcin; Adamska, Maja

    2015-12-01

    Developmental transcription factors (DTFs) control development of animals by affecting expression of target genes, some of which are transcription factors themselves. In bilaterians and cnidarians, conserved DTFs are involved in homologous processes such as gastrulation or specification of neurons. The genome of Amphimedon queenslandica, the first sponge to be sequenced, revealed that only a fraction of these conserved DTF families are present in demosponges. This finding was in line with the view that morphological complexity in the animal lineage correlates with developmental toolkit complexity. However, as the phylum Porifera is very diverse, Amphimedon's genome may not be representative of all sponges. The recently sequenced genomes of calcareous sponges Sycon ciliatum and Leucosolenia complicata allowed investigations of DTFs in a sponge lineage evolutionarily distant from demosponges. Surprisingly, the phylogenetic analyses of identified DTFs revealed striking differences between the calcareous sponges and Amphimedon. As these differences appear to be a result of independent gene loss events in the two sponge lineages, the last common ancestor of sponges had to possess a much more diverse repertoire of DTFs than extant sponges. Developmental expression of sponge homologs of genes involved in specification of the Bilaterian endomesoderm and the neurosensory cells suggests that roles of many DTFs date back to the last common ancestor of all animals. Strikingly, even DTFs displaying apparent pan-metazoan conservation of sequence and function are not immune to being lost from individual species genomes. The quest for a comprehensive picture of the developmental toolkit in the last common metazoan ancestor is thus greatly benefitting from the increasing accessibility of sequencing, allowing comparisons of multiple genomes within each phylum. PMID:26253310

  2. In situ TEM straining of nanograined free-standing thin films reveals various unexpected deformation mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, David Martin; Knapp, James Arthur; Clark, Blythe G.; Hattar, Khalid M.; Robertson, Ian M.

    2010-04-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) straining experiments provide direct detailed observation of the deformation and failure mechanisms active at a length scale relevant to nanomaterials. This presentation will detail continued investigations into the active mechanisms governing high purity nanograined pulsed-laser deposited (PLD) nickel, as well as recent work into dislocation-particle interactions in nanostructured PLD aluminum-alumina alloys. Straining experiments performed on nanograined PLD free-standing nanograined Ni films with an engineered grain size distribution revealed that the addition of ductility with limited decrease in strength, reported in such metals, can be attributed to the simultaneous activity of three deformation mechanisms in front of the crack tip. At the crack tip, a grain agglomeration mechanism occurs where several nanograins appear to rotate, resulting in a very thin, larger grain immediately prior to failure. In the classical plastic zone in front of the crack tip, a multitude of mechanisms were found to operate in the larger grains including: dislocation pile-up, twinning, and stress-assisted grain growth. The region outside of the plastic zone showed signs of elasticity with limited indications of dislocation activity. The insight gained from in-situ TEM straining experiments of nanograined PLD Ni provides feedback for models of the deformation and failure in nanograined FCC metals, and suggests a greater complexity in the active mechanisms. The investigation into the deformation and failure mechanisms of FCC metals via in-situ TEM straining experiments has been expanded to the effect of hard particles on the active mechanisms in nanograined aluminum with alumina particles. The microstructures investigated were developed with varying composition, grain size, and particle distribution via tailoring of the PLD conditions and subsequent annealing. In order to develop microstructures suitable for in-situ deformation testing

  3. Uranus' Southern Circulation Revealed by Voyager-2 Images: Asymmetric, Unique, Unexpected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkoschka, Erich

    2014-11-01

    The southern half of Uranus' southern hemisphere of Uranus has been exceptionally bland. Only a single discrete feature was detected in Voyager-2 images, and none has been seen in thousands of HST and ground-based images since. All other observed regions on Uranus and jovian planets have many features that defined circulation patterns of the jovian planets, but the circulation of Uranus south of -45 deg latitude has been unknown.We performed a reanalysis of Voyager images of Uranus that revealed dozens of discrete features instead of the single feature known before. We improved flatfielding, pad-pixel treatment, and nonlinearity correction. We greatly decreased noise by averaging up to 1600 images. The result is a rotational profile without major gaps.Uranus' high southern latitudes are exceptional in several aspects: 1) The rotational profile has sharp kinks while it is smooth elsewhere on the ice giants. This puts current ideas of a simple Hadley cell on each hemisphere into question. 2) The rotational profile has a large north-south asymmetry, an order of magnitude larger than elsewhere on the jovian planets. 3) Between -68 and -59 deg latitude, the rotational shear is some 30 times lower than at other latitudes. Here, winds speeds around 200 m/s are regular to the 0.1 m/s level. 4) The South Pole had a spot off center rotating 5 h faster than the interior, which has not been observed elsewhere on jovian planets. 5) Uranus revealed spirals winding around the whole planet more than once that indicate very regular meridional motions, to the 2 cm/s level. 6) The latitude at -84 deg was featureless even at a signal-to-noise ratio of 55,000, one of the blandest zones in nature.Some features show significant evolution within the 5-week observing period providing constraints on dynamics. Features also show distinct spectral characteristics in the 8-filter data set providing constraints on the physical nature of features and their altitude. We have the data to

  4. Expression of secreted Wnt pathway components reveals unexpected complexity of the planarian amputation response.

    PubMed

    Gurley, Kyle A; Elliott, Sarah A; Simakov, Oleg; Schmidt, Heiko A; Holstein, Thomas W; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2010-11-01

    Regeneration is widespread throughout the animal kingdom, but our molecular understanding of this process in adult animals remains poorly understood. Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays crucial roles throughout animal life from early development to adulthood. In intact and regenerating planarians, the regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling functions to maintain and specify anterior/posterior (A/P) identity. Here, we explore the expression kinetics and RNAi phenotypes for secreted members of the Wnt signaling pathway in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Smed-wnt and sFRP expression during regeneration is surprisingly dynamic and reveals fundamental aspects of planarian biology that have been previously unappreciated. We show that after amputation, a wounding response precedes rapid re-organization of the A/P axis. Furthermore, cells throughout the body plan can mount this response and reassess their new A/P location in the complete absence of stem cells. While initial stages of the amputation response are stem cell independent, tissue remodeling and the integration of a new A/P address with anatomy are stem cell dependent. We also show that WNT5 functions in a reciprocal manner with SLIT to pattern the planarian mediolateral axis, while WNT11-2 patterns the posterior midline. Moreover, we perform an extensive phylogenetic analysis on the Smed-wnt genes using a method that combines and integrates both sequence and structural alignments, enabling us to place all nine genes into Wnt subfamilies for the first time. PMID:20707997

  5. The structure of sperm Izumo1 reveals unexpected similarities with Plasmodium invasion proteins.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kaoru; Han, Ling; Bianchi, Enrica; Wright, Gavin J; de Sanctis, Daniele; Jovine, Luca

    2016-07-25

    Fertilization, the culminating event in sexual reproduction, occurs when haploid sperm and egg recognize each other and fuse to form a diploid zygote. In mammals this process critically depends on the interaction between Izumo1, a protein exposed on the equatorial segment of acrosome-reacted sperm, and the egg plasma-membrane-anchored receptor Juno [1,2]. The molecular mechanism triggering gamete fusion is unresolved because both Izumo1 and Juno lack sequence similarity to known membrane fusogens. Here we report the crystal structure of Izumo1, which reveals a membrane distal region composed of a four-helix bundle connected to a carboxy-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain through a β-hairpin stabilized by disulfide bonds. Remarkably, different regions of Izumo1 display significant structural similarities to two proteins expressed by the invasive sporozoite stage of Plasmodium parasites: SPECT1, which is essential for host cell traversal and hepatocyte invasion [3]; and TRAP, which is necessary for gliding motility and invasion [4]. These observations suggest a link between the molecular mechanisms underlying host cell invasion by the malaria parasite and gamete membrane fusion at fertilization. PMID:27374339

  6. Common and unexpected findings in mummies from ancient Egypt and South America as revealed by CT.

    PubMed

    Jackowski, Christian; Bolliger, Stephan; Thali, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has proved to be a valuable investigative tool for mummy research and is the method of choice for examining mummies. It allows for noninvasive insight, especially with virtual endoscopy, which reveals detailed information about the mummy's sex, age, constitution, injuries, health, and mummification techniques used. CT also supplies three-dimensional information about the scanned object. Mummification processes can be summarized as "artificial," when the procedure was performed on a body with the aim of preservation, or as "natural," when the body's natural environment resulted in preservation. The purpose of artificial mummification was to preserve that person's morphologic features by delaying or arresting the decay of the body. The ancient Egyptians are most famous for this. Their use of evisceration followed by desiccation with natron (a compound of sodium salts) to halt putrefaction and prevent rehydration was so effective that their embalmed bodies have survived for nearly 4500 years. First, the body was cleaned with a natron solution; then internal organs were removed through the cribriform plate and abdomen. The most important, and probably the most lengthy, phase was desiccation. After the body was dehydrated, the body cavities were rinsed and packed to restore the body's former shape. Finally, the body was wrapped. Animals were also mummified to provide food for the deceased, to accompany the deceased as pets, because they were seen as corporal manifestations of deities, and as votive offerings. Artificial mummification was performed on every continent, especially in South and Central America. PMID:18794321

  7. Single molecule atomic force microscopy of aerolysin pore complexes reveals unexpected star-shaped topography.

    PubMed

    He, Jianfeng; Wang, Jiabin; Hu, Jun; Sun, Jielin; Czajkowsky, Daniel Mark; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-04-01

    Aerolysin is the paradigmatic member of a large family of toxins that convert from a water-soluble monomer/dimer into a membrane-spanning oligomeric pore. While there is x-ray crystallographic data of its water-soluble conformation, the most recent structural model of the membrane-inserted pore is based primarily on data of water-soluble tetradecamers of mutant protein, together with computational modeling ultimately performed in vacuum. Here we examine this pore model with atomic force microscopy (AFM) of membrane-associated wild-type complexes and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in water. In striking contrast to a disc-shaped cap region predicted by the present model, the AFM images reveal a star-shaped complex, with a central ring surrounded by seven radial projections. Further, the MD simulations suggest that the locations of the receptor-binding (D1) domains in the present model are not correct. However, a modified model in which the D1 domains, rather than localized at fixed positions, adopt a wide range of configurations through fluctuations of an intervening linker is compatible with existing data. Thus our work not only demonstrates the importance of directly resolving such complexes in their native environment but also points to a dynamic receptor binding region, which may be critical for toxin assembly on the cell surface. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26537438

  8. Morphology and Molecules Reveal Unexpected Cryptic Diversity in the Enigmatic Genus Sinobirma Bryk, 1944 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae)

    PubMed Central

    Rougerie, Rodolphe; Naumann, Stefan; Nässig, Wolfgang A.

    2012-01-01

    The wild silkmoth genus Sinobirma Bryk, 1944 is a poorly known monotypic taxon from the eastern end of the Himalaya Range. It was convincingly proposed to be closely related to some members of an exclusively Afro-tropical group of Saturniidae, but its biogeographical and evolutionary history remains enigmatic. After examining recently collected material from Tibet, northern India, and northeastern Myanmar, we realized that this unique species, S. malaisei Bryk, 1944 only known so far from a few specimens and from a very restricted area near the border between north-eastern Myanmar and the Yunnan province of China, may in fact belong to a group of closely related cryptic species. In this work, we combined morphological comparative study, DNA barcoding, and the sequences of a nuclear marker (D2 expansion segment of the 28S rRNA gene) to unequivocally delimit three distinct species in the genus Sinobirma, of which two are described as new to science: S. myanmarensis sp. n. and S. bouyeri sp. n. An informative DNA barcode sequence was obtained from the female holotype of S. malaisei—collected in 1934—ensuring the proper assignation of this name to the newly collected and studied specimens. Our findings represent another example of the potential of coupling traditional taxonomy and DNA barcoding for revealing and solving difficult cases of cryptic diversity. This approach is now being generalized to the world fauna of Saturniidae, with the participation of most of the taxonomists studying these moths. PMID:23028478

  9. Morphology and molecules reveal unexpected cryptic diversity in the enigmatic genus Sinobirma Bryk, 1944 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae).

    PubMed

    Rougerie, Rodolphe; Naumann, Stefan; Nässig, Wolfgang A

    2012-01-01

    The wild silkmoth genus Sinobirma Bryk, 1944 is a poorly known monotypic taxon from the eastern end of the Himalaya Range. It was convincingly proposed to be closely related to some members of an exclusively Afro-tropical group of Saturniidae, but its biogeographical and evolutionary history remains enigmatic. After examining recently collected material from Tibet, northern India, and northeastern Myanmar, we realized that this unique species, S. malaisei Bryk, 1944 only known so far from a few specimens and from a very restricted area near the border between north-eastern Myanmar and the Yunnan province of China, may in fact belong to a group of closely related cryptic species. In this work, we combined morphological comparative study, DNA barcoding, and the sequences of a nuclear marker (D2 expansion segment of the 28S rRNA gene) to unequivocally delimit three distinct species in the genus Sinobirma, of which two are described as new to science: S. myanmarensis sp. n. and S. bouyeri sp. n. An informative DNA barcode sequence was obtained from the female holotype of S. malaisei--collected in 1934--ensuring the proper assignation of this name to the newly collected and studied specimens. Our findings represent another example of the potential of coupling traditional taxonomy and DNA barcoding for revealing and solving difficult cases of cryptic diversity. This approach is now being generalized to the world fauna of Saturniidae, with the participation of most of the taxonomists studying these moths. PMID:23028478

  10. Integrated Analyses Resolve Conflicts over Squamate Reptile Phylogeny and Reveal Unexpected Placements for Fossil Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Tod W.; Townsend, Ted M.; Mulcahy, Daniel G.; Noonan, Brice P.; Wood, Perry L.; Sites, Jack W.; Wiens, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) are a pivotal group whose relationships have become increasingly controversial. Squamates include >9000 species, making them the second largest group of terrestrial vertebrates. They are important medicinally and as model systems for ecological and evolutionary research. However, studies of squamate biology are hindered by uncertainty over their relationships, and some consider squamate phylogeny unresolved, given recent conflicts between molecular and morphological results. To resolve these conflicts, we expand existing morphological and molecular datasets for squamates (691 morphological characters and 46 genes, for 161 living and 49 fossil taxa, including a new set of 81 morphological characters and adding two genes from published studies) and perform integrated analyses. Our results resolve higher-level relationships as indicated by molecular analyses, and reveal hidden morphological support for the molecular hypothesis (but not vice-versa). Furthermore, we find that integrating molecular, morphological, and paleontological data leads to surprising placements for two major fossil clades (Mosasauria and Polyglyphanodontia). These results further demonstrate the importance of combining fossil and molecular information, and the potential problems of estimating the placement of fossil taxa from morphological data alone. Thus, our results caution against estimating fossil relationships without considering relevant molecular data, and against placing fossils into molecular trees (e.g. for dating analyses) without considering the possible impact of molecular data on their placement. PMID:25803280

  11. Metagenomic investigation of the geologically unique Hellenic Volcanic Arc reveals a distinctive ecosystem with unexpected physiology.

    PubMed

    Oulas, Anastasis; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Seshadri, Rekha; Tripp, H James; Mandalakis, Manolis; Paez-Espino, A David; Pati, Amrita; Chain, Patrick; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Carey, Steven; Kilias, Stephanos; Christakis, Christos; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal vents represent a deep, hot, aphotic biosphere where chemosynthetic primary producers, fuelled by chemicals from Earth's subsurface, form the basis of life. In this study, we examined microbial mats from two distinct volcanic sites within the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). The HVA is geologically and ecologically unique, with reported emissions of CO2 -saturated fluids at temperatures up to 220°C and a notable absence of macrofauna. Metagenomic data reveals highly complex prokaryotic communities composed of chemolithoautotrophs, some methanotrophs, and to our surprise, heterotrophs capable of anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Our data suggest that aromatic hydrocarbons may indeed be a significant source of carbon in these sites, and instigate additional research into the nature and origin of these compounds in the HVA. Novel physiology was assigned to several uncultured prokaryotic lineages; most notably, a SAR406 representative is attributed with a role in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation. This dataset, the largest to date from submarine volcanic ecosystems, constitutes a significant resource of novel genes and pathways with potential biotechnological applications. PMID:26487573

  12. Proteomic Investigation of Aphid Honeydew Reveals an Unexpected Diversity of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Haubruge, Eric; Hance, Thierry; Thonart, Philippe; De Pauw, Edwin; Francis, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Aphids feed on the phloem sap of plants, and are the most common honeydew-producing insects. While aphid honeydew is primarily considered to comprise sugars and amino acids, its protein diversity has yet to be documented. Here, we report on the investigation of the honeydew proteome from the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Using a two-Dimensional Differential in-Gel Electrophoresis (2D-Dige) approach, more than 140 spots were isolated, demonstrating that aphid honeydew also represents a diverse source of proteins. About 66% of the isolated spots were identified through mass spectrometry analysis, revealing that the protein diversity of aphid honeydew originates from several organisms (i.e. the host aphid and its microbiota, including endosymbiotic bacteria and gut flora). Interestingly, our experiments also allowed to identify some proteins like chaperonin, GroEL and Dnak chaperones, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), and flagellin that might act as mediators in the plant-aphid interaction. In addition to providing the first aphid honeydew proteome analysis, we propose to reconsider the importance of this substance, mainly acknowledged to be a waste product, from the aphid ecology perspective. PMID:24086359

  13. Integrated analyses resolve conflicts over squamate reptile phylogeny and reveal unexpected placements for fossil taxa.

    PubMed

    Reeder, Tod W; Townsend, Ted M; Mulcahy, Daniel G; Noonan, Brice P; Wood, Perry L; Sites, Jack W; Wiens, John J

    2015-01-01

    Squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) are a pivotal group whose relationships have become increasingly controversial. Squamates include >9000 species, making them the second largest group of terrestrial vertebrates. They are important medicinally and as model systems for ecological and evolutionary research. However, studies of squamate biology are hindered by uncertainty over their relationships, and some consider squamate phylogeny unresolved, given recent conflicts between molecular and morphological results. To resolve these conflicts, we expand existing morphological and molecular datasets for squamates (691 morphological characters and 46 genes, for 161 living and 49 fossil taxa, including a new set of 81 morphological characters and adding two genes from published studies) and perform integrated analyses. Our results resolve higher-level relationships as indicated by molecular analyses, and reveal hidden morphological support for the molecular hypothesis (but not vice-versa). Furthermore, we find that integrating molecular, morphological, and paleontological data leads to surprising placements for two major fossil clades (Mosasauria and Polyglyphanodontia). These results further demonstrate the importance of combining fossil and molecular information, and the potential problems of estimating the placement of fossil taxa from morphological data alone. Thus, our results caution against estimating fossil relationships without considering relevant molecular data, and against placing fossils into molecular trees (e.g. for dating analyses) without considering the possible impact of molecular data on their placement. PMID:25803280

  14. Expression of secreted Wnt pathway components reveals unexpected complexity of the planarian amputation response

    PubMed Central

    Gurley, Kyle A.; Elliott, Sarah A.; Simakov, Oleg; Schmidt, Heiko A.; Holstein, Thomas W.; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Regeneration is widespread throughout the animal kingdom, but our molecular understanding of this process in adult animals remains poorly understood. Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays crucial roles throughout animal life from early development to adulthood. In intact and regenerating planarians, the regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling functions to maintain and specify anterior/posterior (A/P) identity. Here, we explore the expression kinetics and RNAi phenotypes for secreted members of the Wnt signaling pathway in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Smed-wnt and sFRP expression during regeneration is surprisingly dynamic and reveals fundamental aspects of planarian biology that have been previously unappreciated. We show that after amputation, a wounding response precedes rapid reorganization of the A/P axis. Furthermore, cells throughout the body plan can mount this response and reassess their new A/P location in the complete absence of stem cells. While initial stages of the amputation response are stem cell independent, tissue remodeling and the integration of new A/P address with anatomy are stem cell dependent. We also show that WNT5 functions in a reciprocal manner with SLIT to pattern the planarian mediolateral axis, while WNT11-2 patterns the posterior midline. Moreover, we perform an extensive phylogenetic analysis on the Smed-wnt genes using a method that combines and integrates both sequence and structural alignments, enabling us to place all nine genes into Wnt subfamilies for the first time. PMID:20707997

  15. Transcriptome analyses of adult mouse brain reveal enrichment of lncRNAs in specific brain regions and neuronal populations

    PubMed Central

    Kadakkuzha, Beena M.; Liu, Xin-An; McCrate, Jennifer; Shankar, Gautam; Rizzo, Valerio; Afinogenova, Alina; Young, Brandon; Fallahi, Mohammad; Carvalloza, Anthony C.; Raveendra, Bindu; Puthanveettil, Sathyanarayanan V.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in regulating biological functions, the expression profiles of lncRNAs in the sub-regions of the mammalian brain and neuronal populations remain largely uncharacterized. By analyzing RNASeq datasets, we demonstrate region specific enrichment of populations of lncRNAs and mRNAs in the mouse hippocampus and pre-frontal cortex (PFC), the two major regions of the brain involved in memory storage and neuropsychiatric disorders. We identified 2759 lncRNAs and 17,859 mRNAs in the hippocampus and 2561 lncRNAs and 17,464 mRNAs expressed in the PFC. The lncRNAs identified correspond to ~14% of the transcriptome of the hippocampus and PFC and ~70% of the lncRNAs annotated in the mouse genome (NCBIM37) and are localized along the chromosomes as varying numbers of clusters. Importantly, we also found that a few of the tested lncRNA-mRNA pairs that share a genomic locus display specific co-expression in a region-specific manner. Furthermore, we find that sub-regions of the brain and specific neuronal populations have characteristic lncRNA expression signatures. These results reveal an unexpected complexity of the lncRNA expression in the mouse brain. PMID:25798087

  16. Health, Happiness and Human Enhancement-Dealing with Unexpected Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schermer, Maartje

    2013-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a treatment involving the implantation of electrodes into the brain. Presently, it is used for neurological disorders like Parkinson's disease, but indications are expanding to psychiatric disorders such as depression, addiction and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Theoretically, it may be possible to use DBS for the enhancement of various mental functions. This article discusses a case of an OCD patient who felt very happy with the DBS treatment, even though her symptoms were not reduced. First, it is explored if the argument that 'doctors are not in the business of trading happiness', as used by her psychiatrist to justify his discontinuation of the DBS treatment, holds. The relationship between enhancement and the goals of medicine is discussed and it is concluded that even though the goals of medicine do not set strict limits and may even include certain types of enhancement, there are some good reasons for limiting the kind of things doctors are required or allowed to do. Next, the case is discussed from the perspective of beneficence and autonomy. It is argued that making people feel good is not the same as enhancing their well-being and that it is unlikely-though not absolutely impossible-that the well-being of the happy OCD patient is really improved. Finally, some concerns regarding the autonomy of a request made under the influence of DBS treatment are considered. PMID:24273618

  17. Post-genomic analyses of fungal lignocellulosic biomass degradation reveal the unexpected potential of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Filamentous fungi are potent biomass degraders due to their ability to thrive in ligno(hemi)cellulose-rich environments. During the last decade, fungal genome sequencing initiatives have yielded abundant information on the genes that are putatively involved in lignocellulose degradation. At present, additional experimental studies are essential to provide insights into the fungal secreted enzymatic pools involved in lignocellulose degradation. Results In this study, we performed a wide analysis of 20 filamentous fungi for which genomic data are available to investigate their biomass-hydrolysis potential. A comparison of fungal genomes and secretomes using enzyme activity profiling revealed discrepancies in carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) sets dedicated to plant cell wall. Investigation of the contribution made by each secretome to the saccharification of wheat straw demonstrated that most of them individually supplemented the industrial Trichoderma reesei CL847 enzymatic cocktail. Unexpectedly, the most striking effect was obtained with the phytopathogen Ustilago maydis that improved the release of total sugars by 57% and of glucose by 22%. Proteomic analyses of the best-performing secretomes indicated a specific enzymatic mechanism of U. maydis that is likely to involve oxido-reductases and hemicellulases. Conclusion This study provides insight into the lignocellulose-degradation mechanisms by filamentous fungi and allows for the identification of a number of enzymes that are potentially useful to further improve the industrial lignocellulose bioconversion process. PMID:22300648

  18. High-throughput sequencing-based analysis of endogenetic fungal communities inhabiting the Chinese Cordyceps reveals unexpectedly high fungal diversity.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fei; Chen, Xin; Guo, Meng-Yuan; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Yan; Shen, Guang-Rong; Li, Yu-Ling; Lin, Juan; Zhou, Xuan-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Chinese Cordyceps, known in Chinese as "DongChong XiaCao", is a parasitic complex of a fungus (Ophiocordyceps sinensis) and a caterpillar. The current study explored the endogenetic fungal communities inhabiting Chinese Cordyceps. Samples were collected from five different geographical regions of Qinghai and Tibet, and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-1 sequences from each sample were obtained using Illumina high-throughput sequencing. The results showed that Ascomycota was the dominant fungal phylum in Chinese Cordyceps and its soil microhabitat from different sampling regions. Among the Ascomycota, 65 genera were identified, and the abundant operational taxonomic units showed the strongest sequence similarity to Ophiocordyceps, Verticillium, Pseudallescheria, Candida and Ilyonectria Not surprisingly, the genus Ophiocordyceps was the largest among the fungal communities identified in the fruiting bodies and external mycelial cortices of Chinese Cordyceps. In addition, fungal communities in the soil microhabitats were clustered separately from the external mycelial cortices and fruiting bodies of Chinese Cordyceps from different sampling regions. There was no significant structural difference in the fungal communities between the fruiting bodies and external mycelial cortices of Chinese Cordyceps. This study revealed an unexpectedly high diversity of fungal communities inhabiting the Chinese Cordyceps and its microhabitats. PMID:27625176

  19. Metatranscriptomic analysis of a high-sulfide aquatic spring reveals insights into sulfur cycling and unexpected aerobic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Spain, Anne M; Elshahed, Mostafa S; Najar, Fares Z; Krumholz, Lee R

    2015-01-01

    Zodletone spring is a sulfide-rich spring in southwestern Oklahoma characterized by shallow, microoxic, light-exposed spring water overlaying anoxic sediments. Previously, culture-independent 16S rRNA gene based diversity surveys have revealed that Zodletone spring source sediments harbor a highly diverse microbial community, with multiple lineages putatively involved in various sulfur-cycling processes. Here, we conducted a metatranscriptomic survey of microbial populations in Zodletone spring source sediments to characterize the relative prevalence and importance of putative phototrophic, chemolithotrophic, and heterotrophic microorganisms in the sulfur cycle, the identity of lineages actively involved in various sulfur cycling processes, and the interaction between sulfur cycling and other geochemical processes at the spring source. Sediment samples at the spring's source were taken at three different times within a 24-h period for geochemical analyses and RNA sequencing. In depth mining of datasets for sulfur cycling transcripts revealed major sulfur cycling pathways and taxa involved, including an unexpected potential role of Actinobacteria in sulfide oxidation and thiosulfate transformation. Surprisingly, transcripts coding for the cyanobacterial Photosystem II D1 protein, methane monooxygenase, and terminal cytochrome oxidases were encountered, indicating that genes for oxygen production and aerobic modes of metabolism are actively being transcribed, despite below-detectable levels (<1 µM) of oxygen in source sediment. Results highlight transcripts involved in sulfur, methane, and oxygen cycles, propose that oxygenic photosynthesis could support aerobic methane and sulfide oxidation in anoxic sediments exposed to sunlight, and provide a viewpoint of microbial metabolic lifestyles under conditions similar to those seen during late Archaean and Proterozoic eons. PMID:26417542

  20. Metatranscriptomic analysis of a high-sulfide aquatic spring reveals insights into sulfur cycling and unexpected aerobic metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Elshahed, Mostafa S.; Najar, Fares Z.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2015-01-01

    Zodletone spring is a sulfide-rich spring in southwestern Oklahoma characterized by shallow, microoxic, light-exposed spring water overlaying anoxic sediments. Previously, culture-independent 16S rRNA gene based diversity surveys have revealed that Zodletone spring source sediments harbor a highly diverse microbial community, with multiple lineages putatively involved in various sulfur-cycling processes. Here, we conducted a metatranscriptomic survey of microbial populations in Zodletone spring source sediments to characterize the relative prevalence and importance of putative phototrophic, chemolithotrophic, and heterotrophic microorganisms in the sulfur cycle, the identity of lineages actively involved in various sulfur cycling processes, and the interaction between sulfur cycling and other geochemical processes at the spring source. Sediment samples at the spring’s source were taken at three different times within a 24-h period for geochemical analyses and RNA sequencing. In depth mining of datasets for sulfur cycling transcripts revealed major sulfur cycling pathways and taxa involved, including an unexpected potential role of Actinobacteria in sulfide oxidation and thiosulfate transformation. Surprisingly, transcripts coding for the cyanobacterial Photosystem II D1 protein, methane monooxygenase, and terminal cytochrome oxidases were encountered, indicating that genes for oxygen production and aerobic modes of metabolism are actively being transcribed, despite below-detectable levels (<1 µM) of oxygen in source sediment. Results highlight transcripts involved in sulfur, methane, and oxygen cycles, propose that oxygenic photosynthesis could support aerobic methane and sulfide oxidation in anoxic sediments exposed to sunlight, and provide a viewpoint of microbial metabolic lifestyles under conditions similar to those seen during late Archaean and Proterozoic eons. PMID:26417542

  1. Diffusion Tensor Imaging Reveals Evolution of Primate Brain Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Degang; Guo, Lei; Zhu, Dajiang; Li, Kaiming; Li, Longchuan; Chen, Hanbo; Zhao, Qun; Hu, Xiaoping; Liu, Tianming

    2013-01-01

    Evolution of the brain has been an inherently interesting problem for centuries. Recent studies have indicated that neuroimaging is a powerful technique for studying brain evolution. In particular, a variety of reports have demonstrated that consistent white matter fiber connection patterns derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography reveal common brain architecture and are predictive of brain functions. In this paper, based on our recently discovered 358 Dense Individualized and Common Connectivity-based Cortical Landmarks (DICCCOL) defined by consistent fiber connection patterns in DTI datasets of human brains, we derived 65 DICCCOLs that are common in macaque monkey, chimpanzee and human brains and 175 DICCCOLs that exhibit significant discrepancies amongst these three primate species. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations not only demonstrated the consistencies of anatomical locations and structural fiber connection patterns of these 65 common DICCCOLs across three primates, suggesting an evolutionarily-preserved common brain architecture, but also revealed regional patterns of evolutionarily-induced complexity and variability of those 175 discrepant DICCCOLs across the three species. PMID:23135357

  2. Kinetics of tRNA(Pyl) -mediated amber suppression in Escherichia coli translation reveals unexpected limiting steps and competing reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinfan; Kwiatkowski, Marek; Forster, Anthony C

    2016-07-01

    The utility of ribosomal incorporation of unnatural amino acids (AAs) in vivo is generally restricted by low efficiencies, even with the most widely used suppressor tRNA(Pyl) . Because of the difficulties of studying incorporation in vivo, almost nothing is known about the limiting steps after tRNA charging. Here, we measured the kinetics of all subsequent steps using a purified Escherichia coli translation system. Dipeptide formation from initiator fMet-tRNA(fMet) and tRNA(Pyl) charged with allylglycine or methylserine displayed unexpectedly sluggish biphasic kinetics, ∼30-fold slower than for native substrates. The amplitude of the fast phases increased with increasing EF-Tu concentration, allowing measurement of Kd values of EF-Tu binding, both of which were ∼25-fold weaker than normal. However, binding could be increased ∼30-fold by lowering temperature. The fast phase rates were limited by the surprisingly ∼10-fold less efficient binding of EF-Tu:GTP:AA-tRNA(Pyl) ternary complex to the ribosomes, not GTP hydrolysis or peptide bond formation. Furthermore, processivity was unexpectedly impaired as ∼40% of the dipeptidyl-tRNA(Pyl) could not be elongated to tripeptide. Dipeptide formation was slow enough that termination due to misreading the UAG codon by non-cognate RF2 became very significant. This new understanding provides a framework for improving unnatural AA incorporation by amber suppression. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1552-1559. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26705134

  3. Modeling and experiment reveal an unexpected stereoelectronic effect on conformation and scalar couplings of alpha-aminoorganostannanes, with possible relevance to the tin-lithium exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Marcelina; Low, Eddy; Chambournier, Gilles; Gawley, Robert E

    2003-10-31

    The solution conformation of N-methyl-2-(tributylstannyl)piperidines has been determined through the use of vicinal 119Sn-13C coupling constants, revealing a conformational distortion caused by an unexpected stereoelectronic effect in some cases. Specifically, the "equatorial" conformer is distorted into a half-chair, in which the nitrogen lone pair eclipses the C-Sn bond. This distortion, which "costs" approximately 1 kcal/mol, correlates with a conformational dependence of geminal 119Sn-15N couplings and a possible correlation with reactivity in the tin-lithium exchange reaction. PMID:14575474

  4. Crystal structure of human XLF/Cernunnos reveals unexpected differences from XRCC4 with implications for NHEJ.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M; Sibanda, Bancinyane L; Davies, Owen R; Ahnesorg, Peter; Jackson, Stephen P; Blundell, Tom L

    2008-01-01

    The recently characterised 299-residue human XLF/Cernunnos protein plays a crucial role in DNA repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and interacts with the XRCC4-DNA Ligase IV complex. Here, we report the crystal structure of the XLF (1-233) homodimer at 2.3 A resolution, confirming the predicted structural similarity to XRCC4. The XLF coiled-coil, however, is shorter than that of XRCC4 and undergoes an unexpected reverse in direction giving rise to a short distorted four helical bundle and a C-terminal helical structure wedged between the coiled-coil and head domain. The existence of a dimer as the major species is confirmed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation, small-angle X-ray scattering and other biophysical methods. We show that the XLF structure is not easily compatible with a proposed XRCC4:XLF heterodimer. However, we demonstrate interactions between dimers of XLF and XRCC4 by surface plasmon resonance and analyse these in terms of surface properties, amino-acid conservation and mutations in immunodeficient patients. Our data are most consistent with head-to-head interactions in a 2:2:1 XRCC4:XLF:Ligase IV complex. PMID:18046455

  5. Covert Waking Brain Activity Reveals Instantaneous Sleep Depth

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Scott M.; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Solet, Jo M.; Ellenbogen, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    The neural correlates of the wake-sleep continuum remain incompletely understood, limiting the development of adaptive drug delivery systems for promoting sleep maintenance. The most useful measure for resolving early positions along this continuum is the alpha oscillation, an 8–13 Hz electroencephalographic rhythm prominent over posterior scalp locations. The brain activation signature of wakefulness, alpha expression discloses immediate levels of alertness and dissipates in concert with fading awareness as sleep begins. This brain activity pattern, however, is largely ignored once sleep begins. Here we show that the intensity of spectral power in the alpha band actually continues to disclose instantaneous responsiveness to noise—a measure of sleep depth—throughout a night of sleep. By systematically challenging sleep with realistic and varied acoustic disruption, we found that sleepers exhibited markedly greater sensitivity to sounds during moments of elevated alpha expression. This result demonstrates that alpha power is not a binary marker of the transition between sleep and wakefulness, but carries rich information about immediate sleep stability. Further, it shows that an empirical and ecologically relevant form of sleep depth is revealed in real-time by EEG spectral content in the alpha band, a measure that affords prediction on the order of minutes. This signal, which transcends the boundaries of classical sleep stages, could potentially be used for real-time feedback to novel, adaptive drug delivery systems for inducing sleep. PMID:21408616

  6. Second generation sequencing and morphological faecal analysis reveal unexpected foraging behaviour by Myotis nattereri (Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae) in winter

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Temperate winters produce extreme energetic challenges for small insectivorous mammals. Some bat species inhabiting locations with mild temperate winters forage during brief inter-torpor normothermic periods of activity. However, the winter diet of bats in mild temperate locations is studied infrequently. Although microscopic analyses of faeces have traditionally been used to characterise bat diet, recently the coupling of PCR with second generation sequencing has offered the potential to further advance our understanding of animal dietary composition and foraging behaviour by allowing identification of a much greater proportion of prey items often with increased taxonomic resolution. We used morphological analysis and Illumina-based second generation sequencing to study the winter diet of Natterer’s bat (Myotis nattereri) and compared the results obtained from these two approaches. For the first time, we demonstrate the applicability of the Illumina MiSeq platform as a data generation source for bat dietary analyses. Results Faecal pellets collected from a hibernation site in southern England during two winters (December-March 2009–10 and 2010–11), indicated that M. nattereri forages throughout winter at least in a location with a mild winter climate. Through morphological analysis, arthropod fragments from seven taxonomic orders were identified. A high proportion of these was non-volant (67.9% of faecal pellets) and unexpectedly included many lepidopteran larvae. Molecular analysis identified 43 prey species from six taxonomic orders and confirmed the frequent presence of lepidopteran species that overwinter as larvae. Conclusions The winter diet of M. nattereri is substantially different from other times of the year confirming that this species has a wide and adaptable dietary niche. Comparison of DNA derived from the prey to an extensive reference dataset of potential prey barcode sequences permitted fine scale taxonomic resolution of prey

  7. Bio-mimicking of Proline-Rich Motif Applied to Carbon Nanotube Reveals Unexpected Subtleties Underlying Nanoparticle Functionalization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo A.; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Bo; Yang, Zaixing; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report computational studies of the SH3 protein domain interacting with various single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) either bare or functionalized by mimicking the proline-rich motif (PRM) ligand (PPPVPPRR) and compare it to the SH3-PRM complex binding. With prolines or a single arginine attached, the SWCNT gained slightly on specificity when compared with the bare control, whereas with multi-arginine systems the specificity dropped dramatically to our surprise. Although the electrostatic interaction provided by arginines is crucial in the recognition between PRM and SH3 domain, our results suggest that attaching multiple arginines to the SWCNT has a detrimental effect on the binding affinity. Detailed analysis of the MD trajectories found two main factors that modulate the specificity of the binding: the existence of competing acidic patches at the surface of SH3 that leads to “trapping and clamping” by the arginines, and the rigidity of the SWCNT introducing entropic penalties in the proper binding. Further investigation revealed that the same “clamping” phenomenon exits in the PRM-SH3 system, which has not been reported in previous literature. The competing effects between nanoparticle and its functionalization components revealed by our model system should be of value to current and future nanomedicine designs. PMID:25427563

  8. Culture-independent genome sequencing of clinical samples reveals an unexpected heterogeneity of infections by Chlamydia pecorum.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Nathan L; Sullivan, Mitchell J; Jelocnik, Martina; Myers, Garry S A; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Chlamydia pecorum is an important global pathogen of livestock, and it is also a significant threat to the long-term survival of Australia's koala populations. This study employed a culture-independent DNA capture approach to sequence C. pecorum genomes directly from clinical swab samples collected from koalas with chlamydial disease as well as from sheep with arthritis and conjunctivitis. Investigations into single-nucleotide polymorphisms within each of the swab samples revealed that a portion of the reads in each sample belonged to separate C. pecorum strains, suggesting that all of the clinical samples analyzed contained mixed populations of genetically distinct C. pecorum isolates. This observation was independent of the anatomical site sampled and the host species. Using the genomes of strains identified in each of these samples, whole-genome phylogenetic analysis revealed that a clade containing a bovine and a koala isolate is distinct from other clades comprised of livestock or koala C. pecorum strains. Providing additional evidence to support exposure of koalas to Australian livestock strains, two minor strains assembled from the koala swab samples clustered with livestock strains rather than koala strains. Culture-independent probe-based genome capture and sequencing of clinical samples provides the strongest evidence yet to suggest that naturally occurring chlamydial infections are comprised of multiple genetically distinct strains. PMID:25740768

  9. Bio-mimicking of proline-rich motif applied to carbon nanotube reveals unexpected subtleties underlying nanoparticle functionalization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo A; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Bo; Yang, Zaixing; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report computational studies of the SH3 protein domain interacting with various single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) either bare or functionalized by mimicking the proline-rich motif (PRM) ligand (PPPVPPRR) and compare it to the SH3-PRM complex binding. With prolines or a single arginine attached, the SWCNT gained slightly on specificity when compared with the bare control, whereas with multi-arginine systems the specificity dropped dramatically to our surprise. Although the electrostatic interaction provided by arginines is crucial in the recognition between PRM and SH3 domain, our results suggest that attaching multiple arginines to the SWCNT has a detrimental effect on the binding affinity. Detailed analysis of the MD trajectories found two main factors that modulate the specificity of the binding: the existence of competing acidic patches at the surface of SH3 that leads to "trapping and clamping" by the arginines, and the rigidity of the SWCNT introducing entropic penalties in the proper binding. Further investigation revealed that the same "clamping" phenomenon exits in the PRM-SH3 system, which has not been reported in previous literature. The competing effects between nanoparticle and its functionalization components revealed by our model system should be of value to current and future nanomedicine designs. PMID:25427563

  10. Dissecting tRNA-derived fragment complexities using personalized transcriptomes reveals novel fragment classes and unexpected dependencies

    PubMed Central

    Telonis, Aristeidis G.; Loher, Phillipe; Honda, Shozo; Jing, Yi; Palazzo, Juan; Kirino, Yohei; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed transcriptomic data from 452 healthy men and women representing five different human populations and two races, and, 311 breast cancer samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Our studies revealed numerous constitutive, distinct fragments with overlapping sequences and quantized lengths that persist across dozens of individuals and arise from the genomic loci of all nuclear and mitochondrial human transfer RNAs (tRNAs). Surprisingly, we discovered that the tRNA fragments' length, starting and ending points, and relative abundance depend on gender, population, race and also on amino acid identity, anticodon, genomic locus, tissue, disease, and disease subtype. Moreover, the length distribution of mitochondrially-encoded tRNAs differs from that of nuclearly-encoded tRNAs, and the specifics of these distributions depend on tissue. Notably, tRNA fragments from the same anticodon do not have correlated abundances. We also report on a novel category of tRNA fragments that significantly contribute to the differences we observe across tissues, genders, populations, and races: these fragments, referred to as i-tRFs, are abundant in human tissues, wholly internal to the respective mature tRNA, and can straddle the anticodon. HITS-CLIP data analysis revealed that tRNA fragments are loaded on Argonaute in a cell-dependent manner, suggesting cell-dependent functional roles through the RNA interference pathway. We validated experimentally two i-tRF molecules: the first was found in 21 of 22 tested breast tumor and adjacent normal samples and was differentially abundant between health and disease whereas the second was found in all eight tested breast cancer cell lines. PMID:26325506

  11. Detailed monitoring of a small but recovering population reveals sublethal effects of disease and unexpected interactions with supplemental feeding.

    PubMed

    Tollington, Simon; Greenwood, Andrew; Jones, Carl G; Hoeck, Paquita; Chowrimootoo, Aurélie; Smith, Donal; Richards, Heather; Tatayah, Vikash; Groombridge, Jim J

    2015-07-01

    Infectious diseases are widely recognized to have substantial impact on wildlife populations. These impacts are sometimes exacerbated in small endangered populations, and therefore, the success of conservation reintroductions to aid the recovery of such species can be seriously threatened by outbreaks of infectious disease. Intensive management strategies associated with conservation reintroductions can further compound these negative effects in such populations. Exploring the sublethal effects of disease outbreaks among natural populations is challenging and requires longitudinal, individual life-history data on patterns of reproductive success and other indicators of individual fitness. Long-term monitoring data concerning detailed reproductive information of the reintroduced Mauritius parakeet (Psittacula echo) population collected before, during and after a disease outbreak was investigated. Deleterious effects of an outbreak of beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) were revealed on hatch success, but these effects were remarkably short-lived and disproportionately associated with breeding pairs which took supplemental food. Individual BFDV infection status was not predicted by any genetic, environmental or conservation management factors and was not associated with any of our measures of immune function, perhaps suggesting immunological impairment. Experimental immunostimulation using the PHA (phytohaemagglutinin assay) challenge technique did, however, provoke a significant cellular immune response. We illustrate the resilience of this bottlenecked and once critically endangered, island-endemic species to an epidemic outbreak of BFDV and highlight the value of systematic monitoring in revealing inconspicuous but nonetheless substantial ecological interactions. Our study demonstrates that the emergence of such an infectious disease in a population ordinarily associated with increased susceptibility does not necessarily lead to deleterious impacts on population

  12. Multilocus phylogenetic analyses reveal unexpected abundant diversity and significant disjunct distribution pattern of the Hedgehog Mushrooms (Hydnum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bang; Wang, Xiang-Hua; Ratkowsky, David; Gates, Genevieve; Lee, Su See; Grebenc, Tine; Yang, Zhu L.

    2016-01-01

    Hydnum is a fungal genus proposed by Linnaeus in the early time of modern taxonomy. It contains several ectomycorrhizal species which are commonly consumed worldwide. However, Hydnum is one of the most understudied fungal genera, especially from a molecular phylogenetic view. In this study, we extensively gathered specimens of Hydnum from Asia, Europe, America and Australasia, and analyzed them by using sequences of four gene fragments (ITS, nrLSU, tef1α and rpb1). Our phylogenetic analyses recognized at least 31 phylogenetic species within Hydnum, 15 of which were reported for the first time. Most Australasian species were recognized as strongly divergent old relics, but recent migration between Australasia and the Northern Hemisphere was also detected. Within the Northern Hemisphere, frequent historical biota exchanges between the Old World and the New World via both the North Atlantic Land Bridge and the Bering Land Bridge could be elucidated. Our study also revealed that most Hydnum species found in subalpine areas of the Hengduan Mountains in southwestern China occur in northeastern/northern China and Europe, indicating that the composition of the mycobiota in the Hengduan Mountains reigion is more complicated than what we have known before. PMID:27151256

  13. Multilocus phylogenetic analyses reveal unexpected abundant diversity and significant disjunct distribution pattern of the Hedgehog Mushrooms (Hydnum L.).

    PubMed

    Feng, Bang; Wang, Xiang-Hua; Ratkowsky, David; Gates, Genevieve; Lee, Su See; Grebenc, Tine; Yang, Zhu L

    2016-01-01

    Hydnum is a fungal genus proposed by Linnaeus in the early time of modern taxonomy. It contains several ectomycorrhizal species which are commonly consumed worldwide. However, Hydnum is one of the most understudied fungal genera, especially from a molecular phylogenetic view. In this study, we extensively gathered specimens of Hydnum from Asia, Europe, America and Australasia, and analyzed them by using sequences of four gene fragments (ITS, nrLSU, tef1α and rpb1). Our phylogenetic analyses recognized at least 31 phylogenetic species within Hydnum, 15 of which were reported for the first time. Most Australasian species were recognized as strongly divergent old relics, but recent migration between Australasia and the Northern Hemisphere was also detected. Within the Northern Hemisphere, frequent historical biota exchanges between the Old World and the New World via both the North Atlantic Land Bridge and the Bering Land Bridge could be elucidated. Our study also revealed that most Hydnum species found in subalpine areas of the Hengduan Mountains in southwestern China occur in northeastern/northern China and Europe, indicating that the composition of the mycobiota in the Hengduan Mountains reigion is more complicated than what we have known before. PMID:27151256

  14. Unexpected allelic heterogeneity and spectrum of mutations in Fowler syndrome revealed by next-generation exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Emilie; Albrecht, Steffen; Ha, Kevin C H; Jacob, Karine; Bolduc, Nathalie; Polychronakos, Constantin; Dechelotte, Pierre; Majewski, Jacek; Jabado, Nada

    2010-08-01

    Protein coding genes constitute approximately 1% of the human genome but harbor 85% of the mutations with large effects on disease-related traits. Therefore, efficient strategies for selectively sequencing complete coding regions (i.e., "whole exome") have the potential to contribute our understanding of human diseases. We used a method for whole-exome sequencing coupling Agilent whole-exome capture to the Illumina DNA-sequencing platform, and investigated two unrelated fetuses from nonconsanguineous families with Fowler Syndrome (FS), a stereotyped phenotype lethal disease. We report novel germline mutations in feline leukemia virus subgroup C cellular-receptor-family member 2, FLVCR2, which has recently been shown to cause FS. Using this technology, we identified three types of genetic abnormalities: point-mutations, insertions-deletions, and intronic splice-site changes (first pathogenic report using this technology), in the fetuses who both were compound heterozygotes for the disease. Although revealing a high level of allelic heterogeneity and mutational spectrum in FS, this study further illustrates the successful application of whole-exome sequencing to uncover genetic defects in rare Mendelian disorders. Of importance, we show that we can identify genes underlying rare, monogenic and recessive diseases using a limited number of patients (n=2), in the absence of shared genetic heritage and in the presence of allelic heterogeneity. PMID:20518025

  15. High-resolution geophysics revealing an unexpected post-Pannonian uplift structure: Schützen continued (Northern Burgenland, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibz, Jürgen; Häusler, Hermann; Kardeis, Gerald

    2010-05-01

    The village Schützen am Gebirge is situated between the Leithagebirge and the Rust Range in the northern Burgenland. The pre-Miocene basement of both ridges is partly covered by marine limestone and clastic sediments of Badenian to Sarmatian age, followed up by Pannonian lacustrine silt- and claystone. First geophysical investigations revealed folding structures in this area (Kollmann et al., 1990). The complex tectonic structure was investigated in a northwest trending section by Scheibz (2006) who clearly demonstrated that the Badenian limestone of the Kalkofen quarry north of Schützen is a horst structure within a pronounced antiform. Whereas an extensional regime prevailed during the Pannonian, local post-Pannonian compression was postulated forming the syn- and anticline structures north of Schützen (Häusler et al., 2007; Häusler et al., 2010). In order to study the surroundings of the "Kalkofen-anticline", additional investigations were conducted. Four 2D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) profiles, each 1000 - 2000 meters long, allowed for subsurface mapping the Kalkofen-structure as a very narrow zone. Furthermore two sites in the center of the anticline structure were investigated by a raster of fifteen high-resolution 2D-ERT sections ("Kalkofen" site and "sports field" site, situated about 400 southwest of the Kalkofen site). Six profiles at the Kalkofen site revealed a northeast trending lens-shaped high-resistivity zone consisting of (Badenian) limestone down to a depth of approximately ten meters, which is underlain by low resistivity beds (of Pannonian age) down to thirty meters. Nine shallow high-resolution profiles at the sports field site show resistivity patterns matching the Leithakalk-limestone down to a depth of only five meters. Additionally a high-resolution 3D ERT block, about 8.600 m2 in size, was measured in the center of the sports field site. Again, high-resistivity beds interpreted as Miocene limestone down to a depth of 25

  16. Unexpected high 35S concentration revealing strong downward transport of stratospheric air during the monsoon transitional period in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Mang; Zhang, Zhisheng; Su, Lin; Su, Binbin; Liu, Lanzhong; Tao, Jun; Fung, Jimmy C. H.; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2016-03-01

    October is the monsoon transitional period in East Asia (EA) involving a series of synoptic activities that may enhance the downward transport of stratospheric air to the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Here we use cosmogenic 35S in sulfate aerosols (35SO42-) as a tracer for air masses originating from the stratosphere and transported downward to quantify these mixing processes. From 1 year 35SO42- measurements (March 2014 to February 2015) at a background station in EA we find remarkably enhanced 35SO42- concentration (3150 atoms m-3) in October, the highest value ever reported for natural sulfate aerosols. A four-box 1-D model and meteorological analysis reveal that strong downward transport from the free troposphere is a vital process entraining aged stratospheric air masses to the PBL. The aged stratospheric masses are accumulated in the PBL, accelerating the SO2 transformation to SO42-. Implications for the tropospheric O3 budget and the CO2 biogeochemical cycle are discussed.

  17. Structural Analysis of the Maize Rp1 Complex Reveals Numerous Sites and Unexpected Mechanisms of Local Rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Wusirika; Emberton, John; Ogden, Matthew; SanMiguel, Phillip; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    Rp1 is a complex disease resistance locus in maize that is exceptional in both allelic variability and meiotic instability. Genomic sequence analysis of three maize BACs from the Rp1 region of the B73 inbred line revealed 4 Rp1 homologs and 18 other gene-homologous sequences, of which at least 16 are truncated. Thirteen of the truncated genes are found in three clusters, suggesting that they arose from multiple illegitimate break repairs at the same sites or from complex repairs of each of these sites with multiple unlinked DNA templates. A 43-kb region that contains an Rp1 homolog, six truncated genes, and three Opie retrotransposons was found to be duplicated in this region. This duplication is relatively recent, occurring after the insertion of the three Opie elements. The breakpoints of the duplication are outside of any genes or identified repeat sequence, suggesting a duplication mechanism that did not involve unequal recombination. A physical map and partial sequencing of the Rp1 complex indicate the presence of 15 Rp1 homologs in regions of ∼250 and 300 kb in the B73 inbred line. Comparison of fully sequenced Rp1-homologous sequences in the region demonstrates a history of unequal recombination and diversifying selection within the Leu-rich repeat 2 region, resulting in chimeric gene structures. PMID:12468738

  18. Micro-CT scan reveals an unexpected high-volume and interconnected pore network in a Cretaceous Sanagasta dinosaur eggshell.

    PubMed

    Hechenleitner, E Martín; Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Foley, Matthew; Fiorelli, Lucas E; Thompson, Michael B

    2016-03-01

    The Cretaceous Sanagasta neosauropod nesting site (La Rioja, Argentina) was the first confirmed instance of extinct dinosaurs using geothermal-generated heat to incubate their eggs. The nesting strategy and hydrothermal activities at this site led to the conclusion that the surprisingly 7 mm thick-shelled eggs were adapted to harsh hydrothermal microenvironments. We used micro-CT scans in this study to obtain the first three-dimensional microcharacterization of these eggshells. Micro-CT-based analyses provide a robust assessment of gas conductance in fossil dinosaur eggshells with complex pore canal systems, allowing calculation, for the first time, of the shell conductance through its thickness. This novel approach suggests that the shell conductance could have risen during incubation to seven times more than previously estimated as the eggshell erodes. In addition, micro-CT observations reveal that the constant widening and branching of pore canals form a complex funnel-like pore canal system. Furthermore, the high density of pore canals and the presence of a lateral canal network in the shell reduce the risks of pore obstruction during the extended incubation of these eggs in a relatively highly humid and muddy nesting environment. PMID:27009182

  19. Multilocus sequence analysis of Brazilian Rhizobium microsymbionts of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) reveals unexpected taxonomic diversity.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Barcellos, Fernando Gomes; Thompson, Fabiano L; Hungria, Mariangela

    2009-05-01

    The diazotrophic bacteria collectively known as "rhizobia" are important for establishing symbiotic N(2)-fixing associations with many legumes. These microbes have been used for over a century as an environmentally beneficial and cost-effective means of ensuring acceptable yields of agricultural legumes. The most widely used phylogenetic marker for identification and classification of rhizobia has been the 16S rRNA gene; however, this marker fails to discriminate some closely related species. In this study, we established the first multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) scheme for the identification and classification of rhizobial microsymbionts of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). We analyzed 12 Brazilian strains representative of a collection of over 850 isolates in addition to type and reference rhizobial strains, by sequencing recA, dnaK, gltA, glnII and rpoA genes. Gene sequence similarities among the five type/reference Rhizobium strains which are symbionts of common bean ranged from 95 to 100% for 16S rRNA, and from 83 to 99% for the other five genes. Rhizobial species described as symbionts of common bean also formed separate groups upon analysis of single and concatenated gene sequences, and clusters formed in each tree were in good mutual agreement. The five additional loci may thus be considered useful markers of the genus Rhizobium; in addition, MLSA also revealed broad genetic diversity among strains classified as Rhizobium tropici, providing evidence of new species. PMID:19403105

  20. Analysis of Two Putative Candida albicans Phosphopantothenoylcysteine Decarboxylase / Protein Phosphatase Z Regulatory Subunits Reveals an Unexpected Distribution of Functional Roles.

    PubMed

    Petrényi, Katalin; Molero, Cristina; Kónya, Zoltán; Erdődi, Ferenc; Ariño, Joaquin; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase Z (Ppz) is a fungus specific enzyme that regulates cell wall integrity, cation homeostasis and oxidative stress response. Work on Saccharomyces cerevisiae has shown that the enzyme is inhibited by Hal3/Vhs3 moonlighting proteins that together with Cab3 constitute the essential phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase (PPCDC) enzyme. In Candida albicans CaPpz1 is also involved in the morphological changes and infectiveness of this opportunistic human pathogen. To reveal the CaPpz1 regulatory context we searched the C. albicans database and identified two genes that, based on the structure of their S. cerevisiae counterparts, were termed CaHal3 and CaCab3. By pull down analysis and phosphatase assays we demonstrated that both of the bacterially expressed recombinant proteins were able to bind and inhibit CaPpz1 as well as its C-terminal catalytic domain (CaPpz1-Cter) with comparable efficiency. The binding and inhibition were always more pronounced with CaPpz1-Cter, indicating a protective effect against inhibition by the N-terminal domain in the full length protein. The functions of the C. albicans proteins were tested by their overexpression in S. cerevisiae. Contrary to expectations we found that only CaCab3 and not CaHal3 rescued the phenotypic traits that are related to phosphatase inhibition by ScHal3, such as tolerance to LiCl or hygromycin B, requirement for external K+ concentrations, or growth in a MAP kinase deficient slt2 background. On the other hand, both of the Candida proteins turned out to be essential PPCDC components and behaved as their S. cerevisiae counterparts: expression of CaCab3 and CaHal3 rescued the cab3 and hal3 vhs3 S. cerevisiae mutations, respectively. Thus, both CaHal3 and CaCab3 retained the PPCDC related functions and have the potential for CaPpz1 inhibition in vitro. The fact that only CaCab3 exhibits its phosphatase regulatory potential in vivo suggests that in C. albicans CaCab3, but not CaHal3, acts as a

  1. Analysis of Two Putative Candida albicans Phosphopantothenoylcysteine Decarboxylase / Protein Phosphatase Z Regulatory Subunits Reveals an Unexpected Distribution of Functional Roles

    PubMed Central

    Petrényi, Katalin; Molero, Cristina; Kónya, Zoltán; Erdődi, Ferenc; Ariño, Joaquin; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase Z (Ppz) is a fungus specific enzyme that regulates cell wall integrity, cation homeostasis and oxidative stress response. Work on Saccharomyces cerevisiae has shown that the enzyme is inhibited by Hal3/Vhs3 moonlighting proteins that together with Cab3 constitute the essential phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase (PPCDC) enzyme. In Candida albicans CaPpz1 is also involved in the morphological changes and infectiveness of this opportunistic human pathogen. To reveal the CaPpz1 regulatory context we searched the C. albicans database and identified two genes that, based on the structure of their S. cerevisiae counterparts, were termed CaHal3 and CaCab3. By pull down analysis and phosphatase assays we demonstrated that both of the bacterially expressed recombinant proteins were able to bind and inhibit CaPpz1 as well as its C-terminal catalytic domain (CaPpz1-Cter) with comparable efficiency. The binding and inhibition were always more pronounced with CaPpz1-Cter, indicating a protective effect against inhibition by the N-terminal domain in the full length protein. The functions of the C. albicans proteins were tested by their overexpression in S. cerevisiae. Contrary to expectations we found that only CaCab3 and not CaHal3 rescued the phenotypic traits that are related to phosphatase inhibition by ScHal3, such as tolerance to LiCl or hygromycin B, requirement for external K+ concentrations, or growth in a MAP kinase deficient slt2 background. On the other hand, both of the Candida proteins turned out to be essential PPCDC components and behaved as their S. cerevisiae counterparts: expression of CaCab3 and CaHal3 rescued the cab3 and hal3 vhs3 S. cerevisiae mutations, respectively. Thus, both CaHal3 and CaCab3 retained the PPCDC related functions and have the potential for CaPpz1 inhibition in vitro. The fact that only CaCab3 exhibits its phosphatase regulatory potential in vivo suggests that in C. albicans CaCab3, but not CaHal3, acts as a

  2. Intra-arterial administration improves temozolomide delivery and efficacy in a model of intracerebral metastasis, but has unexpected brain toxicity.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Leslie L; Pagel, Michael A; Netto, Joao Prola; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2016-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that intra-arterial (IA) infusion of temozolomide into the internal carotid artery would safely improve drug delivery to brain and enhance chemotherapy efficacy in a chemosensitive rat brain tumor model. Quantitative autoradiography after 25 µCi (14)C-temozolomide was given by oral, intravenous, or IA route of administration, or IA with osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) (n = 5-7 per group) showed that both IA and IA/BBBD administration increased drug delivery in tumor by over threefold compared to normal brain (P < 0.02), and also significantly elevated delivery throughout the infused right hemisphere. Temozolomide (20 mg/kg; ~150 mg/m(2)) increased median survival when given by oral (25.5 days), intravenous (25.5 days), or IA (33 days) route of administration, compared to 17.5 days in untreated controls (n = 8 per group; overall P < 0.0001). Survival time after IA temozolomide was significantly longer than all other groups (P < 0.01 for all comparisons). BBBD temozolomide was toxic in the efficacy study, but there was no evidence of symptomatic neurotoxicity in rats given IA temozolomide. After these promising animal results, a 49 year old male with glioblastoma multiforme who failed all standard therapy received temozolomide 100 mg/m(2) IA. Upon initiation of the second course of IA infusion the patient had increased heart rate, blood pressure, and rash, and the procedure was terminated without sequelae. Follow up IA infusion of temozolomide diluent in normal rats showed damaged cerebrovasculature as determined by dye leakage. These results demonstrate that IA infusion of temozolomide was toxic, with or without BBBD. We conclude that under the current formulation temozolomide is not safe for IA infusion in patients. PMID:26694547

  3. Unexpected effects of peripherally administered kynurenic acid on cortical spreading depression and related blood–brain barrier permeability

    PubMed Central

    Oláh, Gáspár; Herédi, Judit; Menyhárt, Ákos; Czinege, Zsolt; Nagy, Dávid; Fuzik, János; Kocsis, Kitti; Knapp, Levente; Krucsó, Erika; Gellért, Levente; Kis, Zsolt; Farkas, Tamás; Fülöp, Ferenc; Párdutz, Árpád; Tajti, János; Vécsei, László; Toldi, József

    2013-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) involves a slowly-propagating depolarization wave in the cortex, which can appear in numerous pathophysiological conditions, such as migraine with aura, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. Neurons and glial cells are also depolarized transiently during the phenomena. CSD is followed by a massive increase in glutamate release and by changes in the brain microcirculation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, endogenous kynurenic acid (KYNA) and dizocilpine, on CSD and the related blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability in rats. In intact animals, KYNA hardly crosses the BBB but has some positive features as compared with its precursor L-Kynurenine, which is frequently used in animal studies (KYNA cannot be metabolized to excitotoxic agents such as 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine and quinolinic acid). We therefore investigated the possible effects of peripherally administered KYNA. Repetitive CSD waves were elicited by the application of 1 M KCl solution to the cortex. Direct current-electrocorticograms were measured for 1 hour. Four parameters of the waves were compared. Evans blue dye and fluorescent microscopy were used to study the possible changes in the permeability of the BBB. The results demonstrated that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists can reduce the number of CSD waves and decrease the permeability of the BBB during CSD. These results suggest that KYNA itself or its derivatives may offer a new approach in the therapy of migraines. PMID:24068867

  4. Lineage analysis of basal epithelial cells reveals their unexpected plasticity and supports a cell-of-origin model for prostate cancer heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu A; Mitrofanova, Antonina; Bergren, Sarah K; Abate-Shen, Cory; Cardiff, Robert D; Califano, Andrea; Shen, Michael M

    2013-03-01

    A key issue in cancer biology is whether oncogenic transformation of different cell types of origin within an adult tissue gives rise to distinct tumour subtypes that differ in their prognosis and/or treatment response. We now show that initiation of prostate tumours in basal or luminal epithelial cells in mouse models results in tumours with distinct molecular signatures that are predictive of human patient outcomes. Furthermore, our analysis of untransformed basal cells reveals an unexpected assay dependence of their stem cell properties in sphere formation and transplantation assays versus genetic lineage tracing during prostate regeneration and adult tissue homeostasis. Although oncogenic transformation of basal cells gives rise to tumours with luminal phenotypes, cross-species bioinformatic analyses indicate that tumours of luminal origin are more aggressive than tumours of basal origin, and identify a molecular signature associated with patient outcome. Our results reveal the inherent plasticity of basal cells, and support a model in which different cells of origin generate distinct molecular subtypes of prostate cancer. PMID:23434823

  5. Centrosomal-ciliary gene CEP290/NPHP6 mutations result in blindness with unexpected sparing of photoreceptors and visual brain: implications for therapy of Leber congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Cideciyan, Artur V; Aleman, Tomas S; Jacobson, Samuel G; Khanna, Hemant; Sumaroka, Alexander; Aguirre, Geoffrey K; Schwartz, Sharon B; Windsor, Elizabeth A M; He, Shirley; Chang, Bo; Stone, Edwin M; Swaroop, Anand

    2007-11-01

    Mutations in the centrosomal-ciliary gene CEP290/NPHP6 are associated with Joubert syndrome and are the most common cause of the childhood recessive blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). An in-frame deletion in Cep290 shows rapid degeneration in the rod-rich mouse retina. To explore the mechanisms of the human retinal disease, we studied CEP290-LCA in patients of different ages (7-48 years) and compared results to Cep290-mutant mice. Unexpectedly, blind CEP290-mutant human retinas retained photoreceptor and inner laminar architecture in the cone-rich central retina, independent of severity of visual loss. Surrounding the cone-rich island was photoreceptor loss and distorted retina, suggesting neural-glial remodeling. The mutant mouse retina at 4-6 weeks of age showed similar features of retinal remodeling, with altered neural and synaptic laminae and Muller glial activation. The visual brain pathways in CEP290-LCA were anatomically intact. Our findings of preserved foveal cones and visual brain anatomy in LCA with CEP290 mutations, despite severe blindness and rapid rod cell death, suggest an opportunity for visual restoration of central vision in this common form of inherited blindness. PMID:17554762

  6. Dissection of the Process of Brain Metastasis Reveals Targets and Mechanisms for Molecular-based Intervention.

    PubMed

    Weidle, Ulrich H; Birzele, Fabian; Kollmorgen, Gwendlyn; Rüger, Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases outnumber the incidence of brain tumors by a factor of ten. Patients with brain metastases have a dismal prognosis and current treatment modalities achieve only a modest clinical benefit. We discuss the process of brain metastasis with respect to mechanisms and involved targets to outline options for therapeutic intervention and focus on breast and lung cancer, as well as melanoma. We describe the process of penetration of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) by disseminated tumor cells, establishment of a metastatic niche, colonization and outgrowth in the brain parenchyma. Furthermore, the role of angiogenesis in colonization of the brain parenchyma, interactions of extravasated tumor cells with microglia and astrocytes, as well as their propensity for neuromimicry, is discussed. We outline targets suitable for prevention of metastasis and summarize targets suitable for treatment of established brain metastases. Finally, we highlight the implications of findings revealing druggable mutations in brain metastases that cannot be identified in matching primary tumors. PMID:27365375

  7. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals a Major Role in Cell Fate Maintenance and an Unexpected Role in Endoreduplication for the Drosophila FoxA Gene Fork Head

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Rika; Grevengoed, Elizabeth; Stempniewicz, Peter; Andrew, Deborah J.

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors drive organogenesis, from the initiation of cell fate decisions to the maintenance and implementation of these decisions. The Drosophila embryonic salivary gland provides an excellent platform for unraveling the underlying transcriptional networks of organ development because Drosophila is relatively unencumbered by significant genetic redundancy. The highly conserved FoxA family transcription factors are essential for various aspects of organogenesis in all animals that have been studied. Here, we explore the role of the single Drosophila FoxA protein Fork head (Fkh) in salivary gland organogenesis using two genome-wide strategies. A large-scale in situ hybridization analysis reveals a major role for Fkh in maintaining the salivary gland fate decision and controlling salivary gland physiological activity, in addition to its previously known roles in morphogenesis and survival. The majority of salivary gland genes (59%) are affected by fkh loss, mainly at later stages of salivary gland development. We show that global expression of Fkh cannot drive ectopic salivary gland formation. Thus, unlike the worm FoxA protein PHA-4, Fkh does not function to specify cell fate. In addition, Fkh only indirectly regulates many salivary gland genes, which is also distinct from the role of PHA-4 in organogenesis. Our microarray analyses reveal unexpected roles for Fkh in blocking terminal differentiation and in endoreduplication in the salivary gland and in other Fkh-expressing embryonic tissues. Overall, this study demonstrates an important role for Fkh in determining how an organ preserves its identity throughout development and provides an alternative paradigm for how FoxA proteins function in organogenesis. PMID:21698206

  8. The Structure of Plasmodium falciparum Blood-Stage 6-Cys Protein Pf41 Reveals an Unexpected Intra-Domain Insertion Required for Pf12 Coordination.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michelle L; Peng, Fangni; Boulanger, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is an apicomplexan parasite and the etiological agent of severe human malaria. The complex P. falciparum life cycle is supported by a diverse repertoire of surface proteins including the family of 6-Cys s48/45 antigens. Of these, Pf41 is localized to the surface of the blood-stage merozoite through its interaction with the glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored Pf12. Our recent structural characterization of Pf12 revealed two juxtaposed 6-Cys domains (D1 and D2). Pf41, however, contains an additional segment of 120 residues predicted to form a large spacer separating its two 6-Cys domains. To gain insight into the assembly mechanism and overall architecture of the Pf12-Pf41 complex, we first determined the 2.45 Å resolution crystal structure of Pf41 using zinc single-wavelength anomalous dispersion. Structural analysis revealed an unexpected domain organization where the Pf41 6-Cys domains are, in fact, intimately associated and the additional residues instead map predominately to an inserted domain-like region (ID) located between two β-strands in D1. Notably, the ID is largely proteolyzed in the final structure suggesting inherent flexibility. To assess the contribution of the ID to complex formation, we engineered a form of Pf41 where the ID was replaced by a short glycine-serine linker and showed by isothermal titration calorimetry that binding to Pf12 was abrogated. Finally, protease protection assays showed that the proteolytic susceptibility of the ID was significantly reduced in the complex, consistent with the Pf41 ID directly engaging Pf12. Collectively, these data establish the architectural organization of Pf41 and define an essential role for the Pf41 ID in promoting assembly of the Pf12-Pf41 heterodimeric complex. PMID:26414347

  9. The Bilingual Brain as Revealed by Functional Neuroimaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abutalebi, Jubin; Cappa, Stefano F.; Perani, Daniela

    2001-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging of bilinguals and monolinguals used in conjunction with experimental cognitive tasks has been successful in establishing functional specialization as a principle of brain organization in humans. Consistent results show that attained proficiency and possibly language exposure are more important than age of acquisition as a…

  10. Study Reveals Brain Biology behind Self-Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2011-01-01

    A new neuroscience twist on a classic psychology study offers some clues to what makes one student able to buckle down for hours of homework before a test while his classmates party. The study published in the September 2011 edition of "Proceedings of the National Academy of Science," suggests environmental cues may "hijack" the brain's mechanisms…

  11. What Brain Sciences Reveal about Integrating Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Theory and practice are integrated in the human brain. Situation recognition and response are key to this integration. Scholars of decision making and expertise have found that people with great expertise are more adept at situational recognition and intentional about their decision-making processes. Several interdisciplinary fields of inquiry…

  12. Non-traumatic subdural hematoma secondary to septic brain embolism: A rare cause of unexpected death in a drug addict suffering from undiagnosed bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Geisenberger, D; Huppertz, L M; Büchsel, M; Kramer, L; Pollak, S; Grosse Perdekamp, M

    2015-12-01

    Acute subdural hematomas are mostly due to blunt traumatization of the head. In rare instances, subdural bleeding occurs without evidence of a previous trauma following spontaneous hemorrhage, e.g. from a ruptured aneurysm or an intracerebral hematoma perforating the brain surface and the arachnoid. The paper presents the morphological, microbiological and toxicological findings in a 38-year-old drug addict who was found by his partner in a dazed state. When brought to a hospital, he underwent trepanation to empty a right-sided subdural hematoma, but he died already 4h after admission. Autopsy revealed previously undiagnosed infective endocarditis of the aortic valve as well as multiple infarctions of brain, spleen and kidneys obviously caused by septic emboli. The subdural hematoma originated from a subcortical brain hemorrhage which had perforated into the subdural space. Microbiological investigation of the polypous vegetations adhering to the aortic valve revealed colonization by Streptococcus mitis and Klebsiella oxytoca. According to the toxicological analysis, no psychotropic substances had contributed to the lethal outcome. The case reported underlines that all deaths of drug addicts should be subjected to complete forensic autopsy, as apart from intoxications also natural and traumatic causes of death have to be taken into consideration. PMID:26296471

  13. The brain's functional network architecture reveals human motives.

    PubMed

    Hein, Grit; Morishima, Yosuke; Leiberg, Susanne; Sul, Sunhae; Fehr, Ernst

    2016-03-01

    Goal-directed human behaviors are driven by motives. Motives are, however, purely mental constructs that are not directly observable. Here, we show that the brain's functional network architecture captures information that predicts different motives behind the same altruistic act with high accuracy. In contrast, mere activity in these regions contains no information about motives. Empathy-based altruism is primarily characterized by a positive connectivity from the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to the anterior insula (AI), whereas reciprocity-based altruism additionally invokes strong positive connectivity from the AI to the ACC and even stronger positive connectivity from the AI to the ventral striatum. Moreover, predominantly selfish individuals show distinct functional architectures compared to altruists, and they only increase altruistic behavior in response to empathy inductions, but not reciprocity inductions. PMID:26941317

  14. Hidden Stages of Cognition Revealed in Patterns of Brain Activation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John R; Pyke, Aryn A; Fincham, Jon M

    2016-09-01

    To advance cognitive theory, researchers must be able to parse the performance of a task into its significant mental stages. In this article, we describe a new method that uses functional MRI brain activation to identify when participants are engaged in different cognitive stages on individual trials. The method combines multivoxel pattern analysis to identify cognitive stages and hidden semi-Markov models to identify their durations. This method, applied to a problem-solving task, identified four distinct stages: encoding, planning, solving, and responding. We examined whether these stages corresponded to their ascribed functions by testing whether they are affected by appropriate factors. Planning-stage duration increased as the method for solving the problem became less obvious, whereas solving-stage duration increased as the number of calculations to produce the answer increased. Responding-stage duration increased with the difficulty of the motor actions required to produce the answer. PMID:27440808

  15. Investigation of LKB1 Ser431 phosphorylation and Cys433 farnesylation using mouse knockin analysis reveals an unexpected role of prenylation in regulating AMPK activity

    PubMed Central

    Houde, Vanessa P.; Ritorto, Maria Stella; Gourlay, Robert; Varghese, Joby; Davies, Paul; Shpiro, Natalia; Sakamoto, Kei; Alessi, Dario R.

    2013-01-01

    The LKB1 tumour suppressor protein kinase functions to activate two isoforms of AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) and 12 members of the AMPK-related family of protein kinases. The highly conserved C-terminal residues of LKB1 are phosphorylated (Ser431) by PKA (cAMP-dependent protein kinase) and RSK (ribosomal S6 kinase) and farnesylated (Cys433) within a CAAX motif. To better define the role that these post-translational modifications play, we created homozygous LKB1S431A/S431A and LKB1C433S/C433S knockin mice. These animals were viable, fertile and displayed no overt phenotypes. Employing a farnesylation-specific monoclonal antibody that we generated, we established by immunoprecipitation that the vast majority, if not all, of the endogenous LKB1 is prenylated. Levels of LKB1 localized at the membrane of the liver of LKB1C433S/C433S mice and their fibroblasts were reduced substantially compared with the wild-type mice, confirming that farnesylation plays a role in mediating membrane association. Although AMPK was activated normally in the LKB1S431A/S431A animals, we unexpectedly observed in all of the examined tissues and cells taken from LKB1C433S/C433S mice that the basal, as well as that induced by the AMP-mimetic AICAR (5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide riboside), AMPK activation, phenformin and muscle contraction were significantly blunted. This resulted in a reduced ability of AICAR to inhibit lipid synthesis in primary hepatocytes isolated from LKB1C433S/C433S mice. The activity of several of the AMPK-related kinases analysed [BRSK1 (BR serine/threonine kinase 1), BRSK2, NUAK1 (NUAK family, SNF1-like kinase 1), SIK3 (salt-inducible kinase 3) and MARK4 (MAP/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4)] was not affected in tissues derived from LKB1S431A/S431A or LKB1C433S/C433S mice. Our observations reveal for the first time that farnesylation of LKB1 is required for the activation of AMPK. Previous reports have indicated that a pool of AMPK is localized at the

  16. Sleep Deprivation Reveals Altered Brain Perfusion Patterns in Somnambulism

    PubMed Central

    Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Zadra, Antonio; Labelle, Marc-Antoine; Petit, Dominique; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite its high prevalence, relatively little is known about the pathophysiology of somnambulism. Increasing evidence indicates that somnambulism is associated with functional abnormalities during wakefulness and that sleep deprivation constitutes an important drive that facilitates sleepwalking in predisposed patients. Here, we studied the neural mechanisms associated with somnambulism using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) with 99mTc-Ethylene Cysteinate Dimer (ECD), during wakefulness and after sleep deprivation. Methods Ten adult sleepwalkers and twelve controls with normal sleep were scanned using 99mTc-ECD SPECT in morning wakefulness after a full night of sleep. Eight of the sleepwalkers and nine of the controls were also scanned during wakefulness after a night of total sleep deprivation. Between-group comparisons of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were performed to characterize brain activity patterns during wakefulness in sleepwalkers. Results During wakefulness following a night of total sleep deprivation, rCBF was decreased bilaterally in the inferior temporal gyrus in sleepwalkers compared to controls. Conclusions Functional neural abnormalities can be observed during wakefulness in somnambulism, particularly after sleep deprivation and in the inferior temporal cortex. Sleep deprivation thus not only facilitates the occurrence of sleepwalking episodes, but also uncovers patterns of neural dysfunction that characterize sleepwalkers during wakefulness. PMID:26241047

  17. Educational games for brain health: revealing their unexplored potential through a neurocognitive approach

    PubMed Central

    Fissler, Patrick; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Schrader, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Educational games link the motivational nature of games with learning of knowledge and skills. Here, we go beyond effects on these learning outcomes. We review two lines of evidence which indicate the currently unexplored potential of educational games to promote brain health: First, gaming with specific neurocognitive demands (e.g., executive control), and second, educational learning experiences (e.g., studying foreign languages) improve brain health markers. These markers include cognitive ability, brain function, and brain structure. As educational games allow the combination of specific neurocognitive demands with educational learning experiences, they seem to be optimally suited for promoting brain health. We propose a neurocognitive approach to reveal this unexplored potential of educational games in future research. PMID:26257697

  18. Overlapping communities reveal rich structure in large-scale brain networks during rest and task conditions.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Mahshid; McMenamin, Brenton W; Simon, Jonathan Z; Pessoa, Luiz

    2016-07-15

    Large-scale analysis of functional MRI data has revealed that brain regions can be grouped into stable "networks" or communities. In many instances, the communities are characterized as relatively disjoint. Although recent work indicates that brain regions may participate in multiple communities (for example, hub regions), the extent of community overlap is poorly understood. To address these issues, here we investigated large-scale brain networks based on "rest" and task human functional MRI data by employing a mixed-membership Bayesian model that allows each brain region to belong to all communities simultaneously with varying membership strengths. The approach allowed us to 1) compare the structure of disjoint and overlapping communities; 2) determine the relationship between functional diversity (how diverse is a region's functional activation repertoire) and membership diversity (how diverse is a region's affiliation to communities); 3) characterize overlapping community structure; 4) characterize the degree of non-modularity in brain networks; 5) study the distribution of "bridges", including bottleneck and hub bridges. Our findings revealed the existence of dense community overlap that was not limited to "special" hubs. Furthermore, the findings revealed important differences between community organization during rest and during specific task states. Overall, we suggest that dense overlapping communities are well suited to capture the flexible and task dependent mapping between brain regions and their functions. PMID:27129758

  19. Systematic network lesioning reveals the core white matter scaffold of the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Andrei; Van Horn, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Brain connectivity loss due to traumatic brain injury, stroke or multiple sclerosis can have serious consequences on life quality and a measurable impact upon neural and cognitive function. Though brain network properties are known to be affected disproportionately by injuries to certain gray matter regions, the manner in which white matter (WM) insults affect such properties remains poorly understood. Here, network-theoretic analysis allows us to identify the existence of a macroscopic neural connectivity core in the adult human brain which is particularly sensitive to network lesioning. The systematic lesion analysis of brain connectivity matrices from diffusion neuroimaging over a large sample (N = 110) reveals that the global vulnerability of brain networks can be predicated upon the extent to which injuries disrupt this connectivity core, which is found to be quite distinct from the set of connections between rich club nodes in the brain. Thus, in addition to connectivity within the rich club, the brain as a network also contains a distinct core scaffold of network edges consisting of WM connections whose damage dramatically lowers the integrative properties of brain networks. This pattern of core WM fasciculi whose injury results in major alterations to overall network integrity presents new avenues for clinical outcome prediction following brain injury by relating lesion locations to connectivity core disruption and implications for recovery. The findings of this study contribute substantially to current understanding of the human WM connectome, its sensitivity to injury, and clarify a long-standing debate regarding the relative prominence of gray vs. WM regions in the context of brain structure and connectomic architecture. PMID:24574993

  20. Amplitude-modulated stimuli reveal auditory-visual interactions in brain activity and brain connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Mark; Rees, Adrian; Vuong, Quoc C.

    2015-01-01

    The temporal congruence between auditory and visual signals coming from the same source can be a powerful means by which the brain integrates information from different senses. To investigate how the brain uses temporal information to integrate auditory and visual information from continuous yet unfamiliar stimuli, we used amplitude-modulated tones and size-modulated shapes with which we could manipulate the temporal congruence between the sensory signals. These signals were independently modulated at a slow or a fast rate. Participants were presented with auditory-only, visual-only, or auditory-visual (AV) trials in the fMRI scanner. On AV trials, the auditory and visual signal could have the same (AV congruent) or different modulation rates (AV incongruent). Using psychophysiological interaction analyses, we found that auditory regions showed increased functional connectivity predominantly with frontal regions for AV incongruent relative to AV congruent stimuli. We further found that superior temporal regions, shown previously to integrate auditory and visual signals, showed increased connectivity with frontal and parietal regions for the same contrast. Our findings provide evidence that both activity in a network of brain regions and their connectivity are important for AV integration, and help to bridge the gap between transient and familiar AV stimuli used in previous studies. PMID:26483710

  1. Development of a Fluorinated Class-I HDAC Radiotracer Reveals Key Chemical Determinants of Brain Penetrance.

    PubMed

    Strebl, Martin G; Wang, Changning; Schroeder, Frederick A; Placzek, Michael S; Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Van de Bittner, Genevieve C; Neelamegam, Ramesh; Hooker, Jacob M

    2016-05-18

    Despite major efforts, our knowledge about many brain diseases remains remarkably limited. Epigenetic dysregulation has been one of the few leads toward identifying the causes and potential treatments of psychiatric disease over the past decade. A new positron emission tomography radiotracer, [(11)C]Martinostat, has enabled the study of histone deacetylase in living human subjects. A unique property of [(11)C]Martinostat is its profound brain penetrance, a feature that is challenging to engineer intentionally. In order to understand determining factors for the high brain-uptake of Martinostat, a series of compounds was evaluated in rodents and nonhuman primates. The study revealed the major structural contributors to brain uptake, as well as a more clinically relevant fluorinated HDAC radiotracer with comparable behavior to Martinostat, yet longer half-life. PMID:26675505

  2. Hemispheric Asymmetry of Human Brain Anatomical Network Revealed by Diffusion Tensor Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Ni; Liu, Yaou; Duan, Yunyun; Li, Kuncheng

    2015-01-01

    The topological architecture of the cerebral anatomical network reflects the structural organization of the human brain. Recently, topological measures based on graph theory have provided new approaches for quantifying large-scale anatomical networks. However, few studies have investigated the hemispheric asymmetries of the human brain from the perspective of the network model, and little is known about the asymmetries of the connection patterns of brain regions, which may reflect the functional integration and interaction between different regions. Here, we utilized diffusion tensor imaging to construct binary anatomical networks for 72 right-handed healthy adult subjects. We established the existence of structural connections between any pair of the 90 cortical and subcortical regions using deterministic tractography. To investigate the hemispheric asymmetries of the brain, statistical analyses were performed to reveal the brain regions with significant differences between bilateral topological properties, such as degree of connectivity, characteristic path length, and betweenness centrality. Furthermore, local structural connections were also investigated to examine the local asymmetries of some specific white matter tracts. From the perspective of both the global and local connection patterns, we identified the brain regions with hemispheric asymmetries. Combined with the previous studies, we suggested that the topological asymmetries in the anatomical network may reflect the functional lateralization of the human brain. PMID:26539535

  3. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development. PMID:26786896

  4. Neuronal subtypes and diversity revealed by single-nucleus RNA sequencing of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Lake, Blue B; Ai, Rizi; Kaeser, Gwendolyn E; Salathia, Neeraj S; Yung, Yun C; Liu, Rui; Wildberg, Andre; Gao, Derek; Fung, Ho-Lim; Chen, Song; Vijayaraghavan, Raakhee; Wong, Julian; Chen, Allison; Sheng, Xiaoyan; Kaper, Fiona; Shen, Richard; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang, Wei; Chun, Jerold; Zhang, Kun

    2016-06-24

    The human brain has enormously complex cellular diversity and connectivities fundamental to our neural functions, yet difficulties in interrogating individual neurons has impeded understanding of the underlying transcriptional landscape. We developed a scalable approach to sequence and quantify RNA molecules in isolated neuronal nuclei from a postmortem brain, generating 3227 sets of single-neuron data from six distinct regions of the cerebral cortex. Using an iterative clustering and classification approach, we identified 16 neuronal subtypes that were further annotated on the basis of known markers and cortical cytoarchitecture. These data demonstrate a robust and scalable method for identifying and categorizing single nuclear transcriptomes, revealing shared genes sufficient to distinguish previously unknown and orthologous neuronal subtypes as well as regional identity and transcriptomic heterogeneity within the human brain. PMID:27339989

  5. Circuit-wide Transcriptional Profiling Reveals Brain Region-Specific Gene Networks Regulating Depression Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bagot, Rosemary C; Cates, Hannah M; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Lorsch, Zachary S; Walker, Deena M; Wang, Junshi; Huang, Xiaojie; Schlüter, Oliver M; Maze, Ian; Peña, Catherine J; Heller, Elizabeth A; Issler, Orna; Wang, Minghui; Song, Won-Min; Stein, Jason L; Liu, Xiaochuan; Doyle, Marie A; Scobie, Kimberly N; Sun, Hao Sheng; Neve, Rachael L; Geschwind, Daniel; Dong, Yan; Shen, Li; Zhang, Bin; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-06-01

    Depression is a complex, heterogeneous disorder and a leading contributor to the global burden of disease. Most previous research has focused on individual brain regions and genes contributing to depression. However, emerging evidence in humans and animal models suggests that dysregulated circuit function and gene expression across multiple brain regions drive depressive phenotypes. Here, we performed RNA sequencing on four brain regions from control animals and those susceptible or resilient to chronic social defeat stress at multiple time points. We employed an integrative network biology approach to identify transcriptional networks and key driver genes that regulate susceptibility to depressive-like symptoms. Further, we validated in vivo several key drivers and their associated transcriptional networks that regulate depression susceptibility and confirmed their functional significance at the levels of gene transcription, synaptic regulation, and behavior. Our study reveals novel transcriptional networks that control stress susceptibility and offers fundamentally new leads for antidepressant drug discovery. PMID:27181059

  6. Tensor-Based Morphometry Reveals Volumetric Deficits in Moderate=Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xue; Villalon-Reina, Julio; Moran, Lisa M.; Kernan, Claudia; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Asarnow, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause widespread and prolonged brain degeneration. TBI can affect cognitive function and brain integrity for many years after injury, often with lasting effects in children, whose brains are still immature. Although TBI varies in how it affects different individuals, image analysis methods such as tensor-based morphometry (TBM) can reveal common areas of brain atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), secondary effects of the initial injury, which will differ between subjects. Here we studied 36 pediatric moderate to severe TBI (msTBI) participants in the post-acute phase (1–6 months post-injury) and 18 msTBI participants who returned for their chronic assessment, along with well-matched controls at both time-points. Participants completed a battery of cognitive tests that we used to create a global cognitive performance score. Using TBM, we created three-dimensional (3D) maps of individual and group differences in regional brain volumes. At both the post-acute and chronic time-points, the greatest group differences were expansion of the lateral ventricles and reduction of the lingual gyrus in the TBI group. We found a number of smaller clusters of volume reduction in the cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and fusiform gyrus, and throughout the frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, we found extensive associations between our cognitive performance measure and regional brain volume. Our results indicate a pattern of atrophy still detectable 1-year post-injury, which may partially underlie the cognitive deficits frequently found in TBI. PMID:26393494

  7. Tensor-Based Morphometry Reveals Volumetric Deficits in Moderate=Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Emily L; Hua, Xue; Villalon-Reina, Julio; Moran, Lisa M; Kernan, Claudia; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C; Thompson, Paul M; Asarnow, Robert F

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause widespread and prolonged brain degeneration. TBI can affect cognitive function and brain integrity for many years after injury, often with lasting effects in children, whose brains are still immature. Although TBI varies in how it affects different individuals, image analysis methods such as tensor-based morphometry (TBM) can reveal common areas of brain atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), secondary effects of the initial injury, which will differ between subjects. Here we studied 36 pediatric moderate to severe TBI (msTBI) participants in the post-acute phase (1-6 months post-injury) and 18 msTBI participants who returned for their chronic assessment, along with well-matched controls at both time-points. Participants completed a battery of cognitive tests that we used to create a global cognitive performance score. Using TBM, we created three-dimensional (3D) maps of individual and group differences in regional brain volumes. At both the post-acute and chronic time-points, the greatest group differences were expansion of the lateral ventricles and reduction of the lingual gyrus in the TBI group. We found a number of smaller clusters of volume reduction in the cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and fusiform gyrus, and throughout the frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, we found extensive associations between our cognitive performance measure and regional brain volume. Our results indicate a pattern of atrophy still detectable 1-year post-injury, which may partially underlie the cognitive deficits frequently found in TBI. PMID:26393494

  8. The solution structure of the MANEC-type domain from hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-1 reveals an unexpected PAN/apple domain-type fold.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zebin; Nowakowski, Michal; Spronk, Chris; Petersen, Steen V; Andreasen, Peter A; Koźmiński, Wiktor; Mulder, Frans A A; Jensen, Jan K

    2015-03-01

    A decade ago, motif at N-terminus with eight-cysteines (MANEC) was defined as a new protein domain family. This domain is found exclusively at the N-terminus of >400 multi-domain type-1 transmembrane proteins from animals. Despite the large number of MANEC-containing proteins, only one has been characterized at the protein level: hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-1 (HAI-1). HAI-1 is an essential protein, as knockout mice die in utero due to placental defects. HAI-1 is an inhibitor of matriptase, hepsin and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) activator, all serine proteases with important roles in epithelial development, cell growth and homoeostasis. Dysregulation of these proteases has been causatively implicated in pathological conditions such as skin diseases and cancer. Detailed functional understanding of HAI-1 and other MANEC-containing proteins is hampered by the lack of structural information on MANEC. Although many MANEC sequences exist, sequence-based database searches fail to predict structural homology. In the present paper, we present the NMR solution structure of the MANEC domain from HAI-1, the first three-dimensional (3D) structure from the MANEC domain family. Unexpectedly, MANEC is a new subclass of the PAN/apple domain family, with its own unifying features, such as two additional disulfide bonds, two extended loop regions and additional α-helical elements. As shown for other PAN/apple domain-containing proteins, we propose a similar active role of the MANEC domain in intramolecular and intermolecular interactions. The structure provides a tool for the further elucidation of HAI-1 function as well as a reference for the study of other MANEC-containing proteins. PMID:25510835

  9. Metabolic connectivity mapping reveals effective connectivity in the resting human brain.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Valentin; Utz, Lukas; Castrillón, Gabriel; Grimmer, Timo; Rauschecker, Josef P; Ploner, Markus; Friston, Karl J; Drzezga, Alexander; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-12

    Directionality of signaling among brain regions provides essential information about human cognition and disease states. Assessing such effective connectivity (EC) across brain states using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) alone has proven difficult, however. We propose a novel measure of EC, termed metabolic connectivity mapping (MCM), that integrates undirected functional connectivity (FC) with local energy metabolism from fMRI and positron emission tomography (PET) data acquired simultaneously. This method is based on the concept that most energy required for neuronal communication is consumed postsynaptically, i.e., at the target neurons. We investigated MCM and possible changes in EC within the physiological range using "eyes open" versus "eyes closed" conditions in healthy subjects. Independent of condition, MCM reliably detected stable and bidirectional communication between early and higher visual regions. Moreover, we found stable top-down signaling from a frontoparietal network including frontal eye fields. In contrast, we found additional top-down signaling from all major clusters of the salience network to early visual cortex only in the eyes open condition. MCM revealed consistent bidirectional and unidirectional signaling across the entire cortex, along with prominent changes in network interactions across two simple brain states. We propose MCM as a novel approach for inferring EC from neuronal energy metabolism that is ideally suited to study signaling hierarchies in the brain and their defects in brain disorders. PMID:26712010

  10. Metabolic connectivity mapping reveals effective connectivity in the resting human brain

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Valentin; Utz, Lukas; Castrillón, Gabriel; Grimmer, Timo; Rauschecker, Josef P.; Drzezga, Alexander; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Directionality of signaling among brain regions provides essential information about human cognition and disease states. Assessing such effective connectivity (EC) across brain states using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) alone has proven difficult, however. We propose a novel measure of EC, termed metabolic connectivity mapping (MCM), that integrates undirected functional connectivity (FC) with local energy metabolism from fMRI and positron emission tomography (PET) data acquired simultaneously. This method is based on the concept that most energy required for neuronal communication is consumed postsynaptically, i.e., at the target neurons. We investigated MCM and possible changes in EC within the physiological range using “eyes open” versus “eyes closed” conditions in healthy subjects. Independent of condition, MCM reliably detected stable and bidirectional communication between early and higher visual regions. Moreover, we found stable top-down signaling from a frontoparietal network including frontal eye fields. In contrast, we found additional top-down signaling from all major clusters of the salience network to early visual cortex only in the eyes open condition. MCM revealed consistent bidirectional and unidirectional signaling across the entire cortex, along with prominent changes in network interactions across two simple brain states. We propose MCM as a novel approach for inferring EC from neuronal energy metabolism that is ideally suited to study signaling hierarchies in the brain and their defects in brain disorders. PMID:26712010

  11. Requirement for interleukin-1 to drive brain inflammation reveals tissue-specific mechanisms of innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Giles, James A; Greenhalgh, Andrew D; Davies, Claire L; Denes, Adam; Shaw, Tovah; Coutts, Graham; Rothwell, Nancy J; McColl, Barry W; Allan, Stuart M

    2015-01-01

    The immune system is implicated in a wide range of disorders affecting the brain and is, therefore, an attractive target for therapy. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a potent regulator of the innate immune system important for host defense but is also associated with injury and disease in the brain. Here, we show that IL-1 is a key mediator driving an innate immune response to inflammatory challenge in the mouse brain but is dispensable in extracerebral tissues including the lung and peritoneum. We also demonstrate that IL-1α is an important ligand contributing to the CNS dependence on IL-1 and that IL-1 derived from the CNS compartment (most likely microglia) is the major source driving this effect. These data reveal previously unknown tissue-specific requirements for IL-1 in driving innate immunity and suggest that IL-1-mediated inflammation in the brain could be selectively targeted without compromising systemic innate immune responses that are important for resistance to infection. This property could be exploited to mitigate injury- and disease-associated inflammation in the brain without increasing susceptibility to systemic infection, an important complication in several neurological disorders. PMID:25367678

  12. The Biology Of Physics: What The Brain Reveals About Our Understanding Of The Physical World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, Kevin Niall

    2009-11-01

    Fundamental concepts in physics such as Newtonian mechanics are surprisingly difficult to learn and discover. Over the past decade have been using an educational neuroscience approach to science education using a combination of ecologically naturalistic situations, classroom settings, and neuroimaging methodologies to investigate the different ways that scientific concepts are invoked or activated in different contexts. In particular, we have sought to determine how networks of brain regions that are highly sensitive to features of the context in which they are used are involved in the use of scientific concepts. We have found that some concepts in physics that are highly tuned to perception are often inhibited in experts (with increased activations in error detection and inhibitory networks of the prefrontal cortex) rather than having undergone a wholesale conceptual reorganization. Other, concepts, such as those involved in perceptual causality can activate highly diverse brain regions, depending on task instructions. For example, when students are shown movies of balls colliding, we find increased activation in the right parietal lobe, yet when the students see the exact same movies and are told that these are positively charged particles repulsing we find increased activations in the temporal lobe that is consistent with the students retrieving semantic information. We also see similar see similar changes in activation patterns in students learning about phase shifts in chemistry classes. A key component of both students and scientists' discourse and reasoning is analogical thinking. Our recent fMRI work indicates that categorization is a key component of this type of reasoning that helps bind superficially different concepts together in the service of reasoning about the causes of unexpected findings. Taken together, these results are allowing us to make insights into the contextually relevant networks of knowledge that are activated during learning. This work

  13. Revealing pathologies in the liquid crystalline structures of the brain by polarimetric studies (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhshetyan, Karen; Melkonyan, Gurgen G.; Galstian, Tigran V.; Saghatelyan, Armen

    2015-10-01

    Natural or "self" alignment of molecular complexes in living tissue represents many similarities with liquid crystals (LC), which are anisotropic liquids. The orientational characteristics of those complexes may be related to many important functional parameters and their study may reveal important pathologies. The know-how, accumulated thanks to the study of LC materials, may thus be used to this end. One of the traditionally used methods, to characterize those materials, is the polarized light imaging (PLI) that allows for label-free analysis of anisotropic structures in the brain tissue and can be used, for example, for the analysis of myelinated fiber bundles. In the current work, we first attempted to apply the PLI on the mouse histological brain sections to create a map of anisotropic structures using cross-polarizer transmission light. Then we implemented the PLI for comparative study of histological sections of human postmortem brain samples under normal and pathological conditions, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Imaging the coronal, sagittal and horizontal sections of mouse brain allowed us to create a false color-coded fiber orientation map under polarized light. In human brain datasets for both control and PD groups we measured the pixel intensities in myelin-rich subregions of internal capsule and normalized these to non-myelinated background signal from putamen and caudate nucleus. Quantification of intensities revealed a statistically significant reduction of fiber intensity of PD compared to control subjects (2.801 +/- 0.303 and 3.724 +/- 0.07 respectively; *p < 0.05). Our study confirms the validity of PLI method for visualizing myelinated axonal fibers. This relatively simple technique can become a promising tool for study of neurodegenerative diseases where labeling-free imaging is an important benefit.

  14. MRI Reveals Edema in Larynx (But Not in Brain) During Anaphylactic Hypotension in Anesthetized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Toyota, Ichiro; Tanida, Mamoru; Wang, Mofei; Kurata, Yasutaka; Tonami, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Anaphylactic shock is sometimes accompanied by local interstitial edema due to increased vascular permeability. We performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to compare edema in the larynx and brain of anesthetized rats during anaphylactic hypotension versus vasodilator-induced hypotension. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to hypotension induced by the ovalbumin antigen (n=7) or a vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP; n=7). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and T2-relaxation time (T2RT) were quantified on MRI performed repeatedly for up to 68 min after the injection of either agent. The presence of laryngeal edema was also examined by histological examination. Separately, the occurrence of brain edema was assessed by measuring brain water content using the wet/dry method in rats with anaphylaxis (n=5) or SNP (n=5) and the non-hypotensive control rats (n=5). Mast cells in hypothalamus were morphologically examined. Results Mean arterial blood pressure similarly decreased to 35 mmHg after an injection of the antigen or SNP. Hyperintensity on T2-weighted images (as reflected by elevated T2RT) was found in the larynx as early as 13 min after an injection of the antigen, but not SNP. A postmortem histological examination revealed epiglottic edema in the rats with anaphylaxis, but not SNP. In contrast, no significant changes in T2RT or ADC were detectable in the brains of any rats studied. In separate experiments, the quantified brain water content did not increase in either anaphylaxis or SNP rats, as compared with the non-hypotensive control rats. The numbers of mast cells with metachromatic granules in the hypothalamus were not different between rats with anaphylaxis and SNP, suggesting the absence of anaphylactic reaction in hypothalamus. Conclusion Edema was detected using the MRI technique in the larynx during rat anaphylaxis, but not in the brain. PMID:24179686

  15. Ribosome Profiling Reveals a Cell-Type-Specific Translational Landscape in Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Christian; Sims, Jennifer S.; Hornstein, Nicholas; Mela, Angeliki; Garcia, Franklin; Lei, Liang; Gass, David A.; Amendolara, Benjamin; Bruce, Jeffrey N.

    2014-01-01

    Glioma growth is driven by signaling that ultimately regulates protein synthesis. Gliomas are also complex at the cellular level and involve multiple cell types, including transformed and reactive cells in the brain tumor microenvironment. The distinct functions of the various cell types likely lead to different requirements and regulatory paradigms for protein synthesis. Proneural gliomas can arise from transformation of glial progenitors that are driven to proliferate via mitogenic signaling that affects translation. To investigate translational regulation in this system, we developed a RiboTag glioma mouse model that enables cell-type-specific, genome-wide ribosome profiling of tumor tissue. Infecting glial progenitors with Cre-recombinant retrovirus simultaneously activates expression of tagged ribosomes and delivers a tumor-initiating mutation. Remarkably, we find that although genes specific to transformed cells are highly translated, their translation efficiencies are low compared with normal brain. Ribosome positioning reveals sequence-dependent regulation of ribosomal activity in 5′-leaders upstream of annotated start codons, leading to differential translation in glioma compared with normal brain. Additionally, although transformed cells express a proneural signature, untransformed tumor-associated cells, including reactive astrocytes and microglia, express a mesenchymal signature. Finally, we observe the same phenomena in human disease by combining ribosome profiling of human proneural tumor and non-neoplastic brain tissue with computational deconvolution to assess cell-type-specific translational regulation. PMID:25122893

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteomics Reveals Potential Pathogenic Changes in the Brains of SIV-infected Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Pendyala, Gurudutt; Trauger, Sunia A.; Kalisiak, Ewa; Ellis, Ronald J.; Siuzdak, Gary; Fox, Howard S.

    2009-01-01

    The HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder occurs in approximately one-third of infected individuals. It has persisted in the current era of anti-retroviral therapy, and its study is complicated by the lack of biomarkers for this condition. Since the cerebrospinal fluid is the most proximal biofluid to the site of pathology, we studied the cerebrospinal fluid in a nonhuman primate model for HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder. Here we present a simple and efficient liquid chromatography coupled mass spectrometry based proteomics approach that utilizes small amounts of cerebrospinal fluid. First, we demonstrate the validity of the methodology using human cerebrospinal fluid. Next, using the simian immunodeficiency virus infected monkey model, we show its efficacy in identifying proteins such as alpha-1-antitrypsin, complement C3, hemopexin, IgM heavy chain and plasminogen, whose increased expression is linked to disease. Finally, we find that the increase in cerebrospinal fluid proteins is linked to increased expression of their genes in the brain parenchyma, revealing that the cerebrospinal fluid alterations identified reflect changes in the brain itself and not merely leakage of the blood-brain or blood- cerebrospinal fluid barriers. This study reveals new central nervous system alterations in lentivirus-induced neurological disease, and this technique can be applied to other systems in which limited amounts of biofluids can be obtained. PMID:19281240

  17. From Amazonia to the Atlantic forest: molecular phylogeny of Phyzelaphryninae frogs reveals unexpected diversity and a striking biogeographic pattern emphasizing conservation challenges.

    PubMed

    Fouquet, Antoine; Loebmann, Daniel; Castroviejo-Fisher, Santiago; Padial, José M; Orrico, Victor G D; Lyra, Mariana L; Roberto, Igor Joventino; Kok, Philippe J R; Haddad, Célio F B; Rodrigues, Miguel T

    2012-11-01

    Documenting the Neotropical amphibian diversity has become a major challenge facing the threat of global climate change and the pace of environmental alteration. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies have revealed that the actual number of species in South American tropical forests is largely underestimated, but also that many lineages are millions of years old. The genera Phyzelaphryne (1 sp.) and Adelophryne (6 spp.), which compose the subfamily Phyzelaphryninae, include poorly documented, secretive, and minute frogs with an unusual distribution pattern that encompasses the biotic disjunction between Amazonia and the Atlantic forest. We generated >5.8 kb sequence data from six markers for all seven nominal species of the subfamily as well as for newly discovered populations in order to (1) test the monophyly of Phyzelaphryninae, Adelophryne and Phyzelaphryne, (2) estimate species diversity within the subfamily, and (3) investigate their historical biogeography and diversification. Phylogenetic reconstruction confirmed the monophyly of each group and revealed deep subdivisions within Adelophryne and Phyzelaphryne, with three major clades in Adelophryne located in northern Amazonia, northern Atlantic forest and southern Atlantic forest. Our results suggest that the actual number of species in Phyzelaphryninae is, at least, twice the currently recognized species diversity, with almost every geographically isolated population representing an anciently divergent candidate species. Such results highlight the challenges for conservation, especially in the northern Atlantic forest where it is still degraded at a fast pace. Molecular dating revealed that Phyzelaphryninae originated in Amazonia and dispersed during early Miocene to the Atlantic forest. The two Atlantic forest clades of Adelophryne started to diversify some 7 Ma minimum, while the northern Amazonian Adelophryne diversified much earlier, some 13 Ma minimum. This striking biogeographic pattern coincides with

  18. Whole-brain activity maps reveal stereotyped, distributed networks for visuomotor behavior

    PubMed Central

    Portugues, Ruben; Feierstein, Claudia E.; Engert, Florian; Orger, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Most behaviors, even simple innate reflexes, are mediated by circuits of neurons spanning areas throughout the brain. However, in most cases, the distribution and dynamics of firing patterns of these neurons during behavior are not known. We imaged activity, with cellular resolution, throughout the whole brains of zebrafish performing the optokinetic response. We found a sparse, broadly distributed network that has an elaborate, but ordered, pattern, with a bilaterally symmetrical organization. Activity patterns fell into distinct clusters reflecting sensory and motor processing. By correlating neuronal responses with an array of sensory and motor variables, we find that the network can be clearly divided into distinct functional modules. Comparing aligned data from multiple fish, we find that the spatiotemporal activity dynamics and functional organization are highly stereotyped across individuals. These experiments reveal, for the first time in a vertebrate, the comprehensive functional architecture of the neural circuits underlying a sensorimotor behavior. PMID:24656252

  19. Intact-Brain Analyses Reveal Distinct Information Carried by SNc Dopamine Subcircuits.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Talia N; Shilyansky, Carrie; Davidson, Thomas J; Evans, Kathryn E; Beier, Kevin T; Zalocusky, Kelly A; Crow, Ailey K; Malenka, Robert C; Luo, Liqun; Tomer, Raju; Deisseroth, Karl

    2015-07-30

    Recent progress in understanding the diversity of midbrain dopamine neurons has highlighted the importance--and the challenges--of defining mammalian neuronal cell types. Although neurons may be best categorized using inclusive criteria spanning biophysical properties, wiring of inputs, wiring of outputs, and activity during behavior, linking all of these measurements to cell types within the intact brains of living mammals has been difficult. Here, using an array of intact-brain circuit interrogation tools, including CLARITY, COLM, optogenetics, viral tracing, and fiber photometry, we explore the diversity of dopamine neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). We identify two parallel nigrostriatal dopamine neuron subpopulations differing in biophysical properties, input wiring, output wiring to dorsomedial striatum (DMS) versus dorsolateral striatum (DLS), and natural activity patterns during free behavior. Our results reveal independently operating nigrostriatal information streams, with implications for understanding the logic of dopaminergic feedback circuits and the diversity of mammalian neuronal cell types. PMID:26232229

  20. Genome-wide expression profiling in the Drosophila eye reveals unexpected repression of Notch signaling by the JAK/STAT pathway

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Maria Sol; Zavadil, Jiri; Ekas, Laura A.; Bach, Erika A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the JAK/STAT pathway regulates numerous processes in vertebrates and invertebrates through modulating transcription, its functionally-relevant transcriptional targets remain largely unknown. With one jak and one stat (stat92E), Drosophila provides a powerful system for finding new JAK/STAT target genes. Genome-wide expression profiling on eye discs in which Stat92E is hyperactivated, revealed 584 differentially-regulated genes, including known targets domeless, socs36E and wingless. Other differentially-regulated genes (chinmo, lama, Mo25, Imp-L2, Serrate, Delta) were validated and may represent new Stat92E targets. Genetic experiments revealed that Stat92E cell-autonomously represses Serrate, which encodes a Notch ligand. Loss of Stat92E led to de-repression of Serrate in the dorsal eye, resulting in ectopic Notch signaling and aberrant eye growth there. Thus, our micro-array documents a new Stat92E target gene and a previously-unidentified inhibitory action of Stat92E on Notch signaling. These data suggest that this study will be a useful resource for the identification of additional Stat92E targets. PMID:19504457

  1. Genome-wide expression profiling in the Drosophila eye reveals unexpected repression of notch signaling by the JAK/STAT pathway.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Maria Sol; Zavadil, Jiri; Ekas, Laura A; Bach, Erika A

    2009-09-01

    Although the JAK/STAT pathway regulates numerous processes in vertebrates and invertebrates through modulating transcription, its functionally relevant transcriptional targets remain largely unknown. With one jak and one stat (stat92E), Drosophila provides a powerful system for finding new JAK/STAT target genes. Genome-wide expression profiling on eye discs in which Stat92E is hyperactivated, revealed 584 differentially regulated genes, including known targets domeless, socs36E, and wingless. Other differentially regulated genes (chinmo, lama, Mo25, Imp-L2, Serrate, Delta) were validated and may represent new Stat92E targets. Genetic experiments revealed that Stat92E cell-autonomously represses Serrate, which encodes a Notch ligand. Loss of Stat92E led to de-repression of Serrate in the dorsal eye, resulting in ectopic Notch signaling and aberrant eye growth there. Thus, our micro-array documents a new Stat92E target gene and a previously unidentified inhibitory action of Stat92E on Notch signaling. These data suggest that this study will be a useful resource for the identification of additional Stat92E targets. PMID:19504457

  2. Unexpected development of artistic talents.

    PubMed

    Gordon, N

    2005-12-01

    The development of exceptional and unexpected artistic skills at any age must be a matter of curiosity. This can occur among young children with severe learning difficulties, especially if they are autistic. Some examples of these so called idiot-savants are given, and the way in which their brains may function. It is also true that elderly people who suffer from frontotemporal dementia can find that they are able to express themselves in remarkable art forms. This can occur in other types of dementia, but then more often it is the changes that result in the paintings of established artists, for example in the paintings of de Kooning. Possible links between these two phenomenon are discussed, and it is suggested that in both instances it may be that if the brain is relieved of a number of functions it can concentrate on the remaining ones. Ways in which this may operate in both groups are reviewed. PMID:16344297

  3. Unexpected development of artistic talents

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, N

    2005-01-01

    The development of exceptional and unexpected artistic skills at any age must be a matter of curiosity. This can occur among young children with severe learning difficulties, especially if they are autistic. Some examples of these so called idiot-savants are given, and the way in which their brains may function. It is also true that elderly people who suffer from frontotemporal dementia can find that they are able to express themselves in remarkable art forms. This can occur in other types of dementia, but then more often it is the changes that result in the paintings of established artists, for example in the paintings of de Kooning. Possible links between these two phenomenon are discussed, and it is suggested that in both instances it may be that if the brain is relieved of a number of functions it can concentrate on the remaining ones. Ways in which this may operate in both groups are reviewed. PMID:16344297

  4. Measurement of PIP3 Levels Reveals an Unexpected Role for p110β in Early Adaptive Responses to p110α-Specific Inhibitors in Luminal Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Carlotta; Ebi, Hiromichi; Martini, Miriam; Beausoleil, Sean A.; Faber, Anthony C.; Jakubik, Charles T.; Huang, Alan; Wang, Youzhen; Nishtala, Madhuri; Hall, Ben; Rikova, Klarisa; Zhao, Jean; Hirsch, Emilio; Benes, Cyril H.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY BYL719, which selectively inhibits the alpha isoform of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) catalytic subunit (p110α), is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of solid tumors, especially luminal breast cancers with PIK3CA mutations and/or HER2 amplification. This study reveals that, even among these sensitive cancers, the initial efficacy of p110α inhibition is mitigated by rapid re-accumulation of the PI3K product PIP3 produced by the p110β isoform. Importantly, the reactivation of PI3K mediated by p110β does not invariably restore AKT phosphorylation, demonstrating the limitations of using phospho-AKT as a surrogate to measure PI3K activation. Consistently, we show that the addition of the p110β inhibitor to BYL719 prevents the PIP3 rebound and induces greater antitumor efficacy in HER2-amplified and PIK3CA mutant cancers. PMID:25544637

  5. NMR structures of two variants of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) reveal unexpected influence of mutations on protein structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Cierpicki, Tomasz; Otlewski, Jacek

    2002-08-23

    Here we determined NMR solution structures of two mutants of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) to reveal structural reasons of their decreased thermodynamic stability. A point mutation, A16V, in the solvent-exposed loop destabilizes the protein by 20 degrees C, in contrast to marginal destabilization observed for G, S, R, L or W mutants. In the second mutant introduction of eight alanine residues at proteinase-contacting sites (residues 11, 13, 17, 18, 19, 34, 37 and 39) provides a protein that denatures at a temperature about 30 degrees C higher than expected from additive behavior of individual mutations. In order to efficiently determine structures of these variants, we applied a procedure that allows us to share data between regions unaffected by mutation(s). NOAH/DYANA and CNS programs were used for a rapid assignment of NOESY cross-peaks, structure calculations and refinement. The solution structure of the A16V mutant reveals no conformational change within the molecule, but shows close contacts between V16, I18 and G36/G37. Thus, the observed 4.3kcal/mol decrease of stability results from a strained local conformation of these residues caused by introduction of a beta-branched Val side-chain. Contrary to the A16V mutation, introduction of eight alanine residues produces significant conformational changes, manifested in over a 9A shift of the Y35 side-chain. This structural rearrangement provides about 6kcal/mol non-additive stabilization energy, compared to the mutant in which G37 and R39 are not mutated to alanine residues. PMID:12206780

  6. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Characterization of the Protein Z-dependent Protease Inhibitor (ZPI)-Protein Z Interaction Reveals an Unexpected Role for ZPI Lys-239*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Zhou, Jian; Zhou, Aiwu; Olson, Steven T.

    2015-01-01

    The anticoagulant serpin, protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI), circulates in blood as a tight complex with its cofactor, protein Z (PZ), enabling it to function as a rapid inhibitor of membrane-associated factor Xa. Here, we show that N,N′-dimethyl-N-(acetyl)-N′-(7-nitrobenz-3-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)ethylenediamine (NBD)-fluorophore-labeled K239C ZPI is a sensitive, moderately perturbing reporter of the ZPI-PZ interaction and utilize the labeled ZPI to characterize in-depth the thermodynamics and kinetics of wild-type and variant ZPI-PZ interactions. NBD-labeled K239C ZPI bound PZ with ∼3 nm KD and ∼400% fluorescence enhancement at physiologic pH and ionic strength. The NBD-ZPI-PZ interaction was markedly sensitive to ionic strength and pH but minimally affected by temperature, consistent with the importance of charged interactions. NBD-ZPI-PZ affinity was reduced ∼5-fold by physiologic calcium levels to resemble NBD-ZPI affinity for γ-carboxyglutamic acid/EGF1-domainless PZ. Competitive binding studies with ZPI variants revealed that in addition to previously identified Asp-293 and Tyr-240 hot spot residues, Met-71, Asp-74, and Asp-238 made significant contributions to PZ binding, whereas Lys-239 antagonized binding. Rapid kinetic studies indicated a multistep binding mechanism with diffusion-limited association and slow complex dissociation. ZPI complexation with factor Xa or cleavage decreased ZPI-PZ affinity 2–7-fold by increasing the rate of PZ dissociation. A catalytic role for PZ was supported by the correlation between a decreased rate of PZ dissociation from the K239A ZPI-PZ complex and an impaired ability of PZ to catalyze the K239A ZPI-factor Xa reaction. Together, these results reveal the energetic basis of the ZPI-PZ interaction and suggest an important role for ZPI Lys-239 in PZ catalytic action. PMID:25713144

  7. Severe Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Small Pericardial Effusion, and Diffuse Late Gadolinium Enhancement by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Suspecting Cardiac Amyloidosis: Endomyocardial Biopsy Reveals an Unexpected Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Nina P.; Giusca, Sorin; Klingel, Karin; Nunninger, Peter; Korosoglou, Grigorios

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy can be related to a multitude of cardiac disorders, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), cardiac amyloidosis, and hypertensive heart disease. Although the presence of LV hypertrophy is generally associated with poorer cardiac outcomes, the early differentiation between these pathologies is crucial due to the presence of specific treatment options. The diagnostic process with LV hypertrophy requires the integration of clinical evaluation, electrocardiography (ECG), echocardiography, biochemical markers, and if required CMR and endomyocardial biopsy in order to reach the correct diagnosis. Here, we present a case of a patient with severe LV hypertrophy (septal wall thickness of 23 mm, LV mass of 264 g, and LV mass index of 147 g/m2), severely impaired longitudinal function, and preserved radial contractility (ejection fraction = 55%), accompanied by small pericardial effusion and diffuse late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Due to the imaging findings, an infiltrative cardiomyopathy, such as cardiac amyloidosis, was suspected. However, amyloid accumulation was excluded by endomyocardial biopsy, which revealed the presence of diffuse myocardial fibrosis in an advanced hypertensive heart disease. PMID:27247807

  8. Brain responses in humans reveal ideal observer-like sensitivity to complex acoustic patterns.

    PubMed

    Barascud, Nicolas; Pearce, Marcus T; Griffiths, Timothy D; Friston, Karl J; Chait, Maria

    2016-02-01

    We use behavioral methods, magnetoencephalography, and functional MRI to investigate how human listeners discover temporal patterns and statistical regularities in complex sound sequences. Sensitivity to patterns is fundamental to sensory processing, in particular in the auditory system, because most auditory signals only have meaning as successions over time. Previous evidence suggests that the brain is tuned to the statistics of sensory stimulation. However, the process through which this arises has been elusive. We demonstrate that listeners are remarkably sensitive to the emergence of complex patterns within rapidly evolving sound sequences, performing on par with an ideal observer model. Brain responses reveal online processes of evidence accumulation--dynamic changes in tonic activity precisely correlate with the expected precision or predictability of ongoing auditory input--both in terms of deterministic (first-order) structure and the entropy of random sequences. Source analysis demonstrates an interaction between primary auditory cortex, hippocampus, and inferior frontal gyrus in the process of discovering the regularity within the ongoing sound sequence. The results are consistent with precision based predictive coding accounts of perceptual inference and provide compelling neurophysiological evidence of the brain's capacity to encode high-order temporal structure in sensory signals. PMID:26787854

  9. Brain responses in humans reveal ideal observer-like sensitivity to complex acoustic patterns

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Marcus T.; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Chait, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We use behavioral methods, magnetoencephalography, and functional MRI to investigate how human listeners discover temporal patterns and statistical regularities in complex sound sequences. Sensitivity to patterns is fundamental to sensory processing, in particular in the auditory system, because most auditory signals only have meaning as successions over time. Previous evidence suggests that the brain is tuned to the statistics of sensory stimulation. However, the process through which this arises has been elusive. We demonstrate that listeners are remarkably sensitive to the emergence of complex patterns within rapidly evolving sound sequences, performing on par with an ideal observer model. Brain responses reveal online processes of evidence accumulation—dynamic changes in tonic activity precisely correlate with the expected precision or predictability of ongoing auditory input—both in terms of deterministic (first-order) structure and the entropy of random sequences. Source analysis demonstrates an interaction between primary auditory cortex, hippocampus, and inferior frontal gyrus in the process of discovering the regularity within the ongoing sound sequence. The results are consistent with precision based predictive coding accounts of perceptual inference and provide compelling neurophysiological evidence of the brain's capacity to encode high-order temporal structure in sensory signals. PMID:26787854

  10. Transcriptional profiling reveals that C5a alters microRNA in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eadon, Michael T; Jacob, Alexander; Cunningham, Patrick N; Quigg, Richard J; Garcia, Joe G N; Alexander, Jessy J

    2014-11-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disturbance is a crucial occurrence in many neurological diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Our previous studies showed that experimental lupus serum altered the integrity of the mouse brain endothelial layer, an important constituent of the BBB. Complement activation occurs in lupus with increased circulating complement components. Using a genomics approach, we identified the microRNA (miRNA) altered in mouse brain endothelial cells (bEnd3) by lupus serum and the complement protein, C5a. Of the 318 miRNA evaluated, 23 miRNAs were altered by lupus serum and 32 were altered by C5a alone compared with controls. Seven miRNAs (P < 0 · 05) were differentially expressed by both treatments: mmu-miR-133a*, mmu-miR-193*, mmu-miR-26b, mmu-miR-28*, mmu-miR-320a, mmu-miR-423-3p and mmu-miR-509-5p. The microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. In line with the in vitro results, expression of miR-26b and miR-28* were also significantly up-regulated in lupus mouse brain which was reduced by C5a receptor inhibition. Target prediction analysis revealed miR gene targets encoding components involved in inflammation, matrix arrangement, and apoptosis, pathways known to play important roles in central nervous system lupus. Our findings suggest that the miRNAs reported in this study may represent novel therapeutic targets in central nervous system lupus and other similar neuroinflammatory settings. PMID:24801999

  11. Transcriptional profiling reveals that C5a alters microRNA in brain endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Eadon, Michael T; Jacob, Alexander; Cunningham, Patrick N; Quigg, Richard J; Garcia, Joe G N; Alexander, Jessy J

    2014-01-01

    Blood–brain barrier (BBB) disturbance is a crucial occurrence in many neurological diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Our previous studies showed that experimental lupus serum altered the integrity of the mouse brain endothelial layer, an important constituent of the BBB. Complement activation occurs in lupus with increased circulating complement components. Using a genomics approach, we identified the microRNA (miRNA) altered in mouse brain endothelial cells (bEnd3) by lupus serum and the complement protein, C5a. Of the 318 miRNA evaluated, 23 miRNAs were altered by lupus serum and 32 were altered by C5a alone compared with controls. Seven miRNAs (P < 0·05) were differentially expressed by both treatments: mmu-miR-133a*, mmu-miR-193*, mmu-miR-26b, mmu-miR-28*, mmu-miR-320a, mmu-miR-423-3p and mmu-miR-509-5p. The microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. In line with the in vitro results, expression of miR-26b and miR-28* were also significantly up-regulated in lupus mouse brain which was reduced by C5a receptor inhibition. Target prediction analysis revealed miR gene targets encoding components involved in inflammation, matrix arrangement, and apoptosis, pathways known to play important roles in central nervous system lupus. Our findings suggest that the miRNAs reported in this study may represent novel therapeutic targets in central nervous system lupus and other similar neuroinflammatory settings. PMID:24801999

  12. Dependency Network Analysis (DEPNA) Reveals Context Related Influence of Brain Network Nodes.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Yael; Winetraub, Yonatan; Raz, Gal; Ben-Simon, Eti; Okon-Singer, Hadas; Rosenberg-Katz, Keren; Hendler, Talma; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2016-01-01

    Communication between and within brain regions is essential for information processing within functional networks. The current methods to determine the influence of one region on another are either based on temporal resolution, or require a predefined model for the connectivity direction. However these requirements are not always achieved, especially in fMRI studies, which have poor temporal resolution. We thus propose a new graph theory approach that focuses on the correlation influence between selected brain regions, entitled Dependency Network Analysis (DEPNA). Partial correlations are used to quantify the level of influence of each node during task performance. As a proof of concept, we conducted the DEPNA on simulated datasets and on two empirical motor and working memory fMRI tasks. The simulations revealed that the DEPNA correctly captures the network's hierarchy of influence. Applying DEPNA to the functional tasks reveals the dynamics between specific nodes as would be expected from prior knowledge. To conclude, we demonstrate that DEPNA can capture the most influencing nodes in the network, as they emerge during specific cognitive processes. This ability opens a new horizon for example in delineating critical nodes for specific clinical interventions. PMID:27271458

  13. Dependency Network Analysis (DEPNA) Reveals Context Related Influence of Brain Network Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Yael; Winetraub, Yonatan; Raz, Gal; Ben-Simon, Eti; Okon-Singer, Hadas; Rosenberg-Katz, Keren; Hendler, Talma; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2016-01-01

    Communication between and within brain regions is essential for information processing within functional networks. The current methods to determine the influence of one region on another are either based on temporal resolution, or require a predefined model for the connectivity direction. However these requirements are not always achieved, especially in fMRI studies, which have poor temporal resolution. We thus propose a new graph theory approach that focuses on the correlation influence between selected brain regions, entitled Dependency Network Analysis (DEPNA). Partial correlations are used to quantify the level of influence of each node during task performance. As a proof of concept, we conducted the DEPNA on simulated datasets and on two empirical motor and working memory fMRI tasks. The simulations revealed that the DEPNA correctly captures the network’s hierarchy of influence. Applying DEPNA to the functional tasks reveals the dynamics between specific nodes as would be expected from prior knowledge. To conclude, we demonstrate that DEPNA can capture the most influencing nodes in the network, as they emerge during specific cognitive processes. This ability opens a new horizon for example in delineating critical nodes for specific clinical interventions. PMID:27271458

  14. K-shell decomposition reveals hierarchical cortical organization of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahav, Nir; Ksherim, Baruch; Ben-Simon, Eti; Maron-Katz, Adi; Cohen, Reuven; Havlin, Shlomo

    2016-08-01

    In recent years numerous attempts to understand the human brain were undertaken from a network point of view. A network framework takes into account the relationships between the different parts of the system and enables to examine how global and complex functions might emerge from network topology. Previous work revealed that the human brain features ‘small world’ characteristics and that cortical hubs tend to interconnect among themselves. However, in order to fully understand the topological structure of hubs, and how their profile reflect the brain’s global functional organization, one needs to go beyond the properties of a specific hub and examine the various structural layers that make up the network. To address this topic further, we applied an analysis known in statistical physics and network theory as k-shell decomposition analysis. The analysis was applied on a human cortical network, derived from MRI\\DSI data of six participants. Such analysis enables us to portray a detailed account of cortical connectivity focusing on different neighborhoods of inter-connected layers across the cortex. Our findings reveal that the human cortex is highly connected and efficient, and unlike the internet network contains no isolated nodes. The cortical network is comprised of a nucleus alongside shells of increasing connectivity that formed one connected giant component, revealing the human brain’s global functional organization. All these components were further categorized into three hierarchies in accordance with their connectivity profile, with each hierarchy reflecting different functional roles. Such a model may explain an efficient flow of information from the lowest hierarchy to the highest one, with each step enabling increased data integration. At the top, the highest hierarchy (the nucleus) serves as a global interconnected collective and demonstrates high correlation with consciousness related regions, suggesting that the nucleus might serve as a

  15. RNA Sequence Analysis of Human Huntington Disease Brain Reveals an Extensive Increase in Inflammatory and Developmental Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Labadorf, Adam; Hoss, Andrew G.; Lagomarsino, Valentina; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Hadzi, Tiffany C.; Bregu, Joli; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Gusella, James F.; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Akbarian, Schahram; Weng, Zhiping; Myers, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s Disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. Transcriptional dysregulation in the human HD brain has been documented but is incompletely understood. Here we present a genome-wide analysis of mRNA expression in human prefrontal cortex from 20 HD and 49 neuropathologically normal controls using next generation high-throughput sequencing. Surprisingly, 19% (5,480) of the 28,087 confidently detected genes are differentially expressed (FDR<0.05) and are predominantly up-regulated. A novel hypothesis-free geneset enrichment method that dissects large gene lists into functionally and transcriptionally related groups discovers that the differentially expressed genes are enriched for immune response, neuroinflammation, and developmental genes. Markers for all major brain cell types are observed, suggesting that HD invokes a systemic response in the brain area studied. Unexpectedly, the most strongly differentially expressed genes are a homeotic gene set (represented by Hox and other homeobox genes), that are almost exclusively expressed in HD, a profile not widely implicated in HD pathogenesis. The significance of transcriptional changes of developmental processes in the HD brain is poorly understood and warrants further investigation. The role of inflammation and the significance of non-neuronal involvement in HD pathogenesis suggest anti-inflammatory therapeutics may offer important opportunities in treating HD. PMID:26636579

  16. ARTIFICIAL SELECTION ON RELATIVE BRAIN SIZE REVEALS A POSITIVE GENETIC CORRELATION BETWEEN BRAIN SIZE AND PROACTIVE PERSONALITY IN THE GUPPY

    PubMed Central

    Kotrschal, Alexander; Lievens, Eva JP; Dahlbom, Josefin; Bundsen, Andreas; Semenova, Svetlana; Sundvik, Maria; Maklakov, Alexei A; Winberg, Svante; Panula, Pertti; Kolm, Niclas; Morrow, E

    2014-01-01

    Animal personalities range from individuals that are shy, cautious, and easily stressed (a “reactive” personality type) to individuals that are bold, innovative, and quick to learn novel tasks, but also prone to routine formation (a “proactive” personality type). Although personality differences should have important consequences for fitness, their underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated how genetic variation in brain size affects personality. We put selection lines of large- and small-brained guppies (Poecilia reticulata), with known differences in cognitive ability, through three standard personality assays. First, we found that large-brained animals were faster to habituate to, and more exploratory in, open field tests. Large-brained females were also bolder. Second, large-brained animals excreted less cortisol in a stressful situation (confinement). Third, large-brained animals were slower to feed from a novel food source, which we interpret as being caused by reduced behavioral flexibility rather than lack of innovation in the large-brained lines. Overall, the results point toward a more proactive personality type in large-brained animals. Thus, this study provides the first experimental evidence linking brain size and personality, an interaction that may affect important fitness-related aspects of ecology such as dispersal and niche exploration. PMID:24359469

  17. Artificial selection on relative brain size reveals a positive genetic correlation between brain size and proactive personality in the guppy.

    PubMed

    Kotrschal, Alexander; Lievens, Eva J P; Dahlbom, Josefin; Bundsen, Andreas; Semenova, Svetlana; Sundvik, Maria; Maklakov, Alexei A; Winberg, Svante; Panula, Pertti; Kolm, Niclas

    2014-04-01

    Animal personalities range from individuals that are shy, cautious, and easily stressed (a "reactive" personality type) to individuals that are bold, innovative, and quick to learn novel tasks, but also prone to routine formation (a "proactive" personality type). Although personality differences should have important consequences for fitness, their underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated how genetic variation in brain size affects personality. We put selection lines of large- and small-brained guppies (Poecilia reticulata), with known differences in cognitive ability, through three standard personality assays. First, we found that large-brained animals were faster to habituate to, and more exploratory in, open field tests. Large-brained females were also bolder. Second, large-brained animals excreted less cortisol in a stressful situation (confinement). Third, large-brained animals were slower to feed from a novel food source, which we interpret as being caused by reduced behavioral flexibility rather than lack of innovation in the large-brained lines. Overall, the results point toward a more proactive personality type in large-brained animals. Thus, this study provides the first experimental evidence linking brain size and personality, an interaction that may affect important fitness-related aspects of ecology such as dispersal and niche exploration. PMID:24359469

  18. Identification of Chronic Stress Activated Regions Reveals a Potential Recruited Circuit in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Flak, Jonathan N.; Solomon, Matia B.; Jankord, Ryan; Krause, Eric G.; Herman, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress induces pre-synaptic and post-synaptic modifications in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) that are consistent with enhanced excitatory hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis drive. The brain regions mediating these molecular modifications are not known. We hypothesized that chronic variable stress (CVS) tonically activates stress-excitatory regions that interact with the PVN, culminating in stress facilitation. In order to identify chronically activated brain regions, ΔFosB, a documented marker of tonic neuronal activation, was assessed in known stress regulatory limbic and brainstem sites. Four experimental groups were included: CVS, repeated restraint (RR) (control for HPA habituation), animals weight-matched (WM) to CVS animals (control for changes in circulating metabolic factors due to reduced weight gain), and non-handled controls. CVS, but not RR or WM, induced adrenal hypertrophy, indicating that sustained HPA axis drive only occurred in the CVS group. CVS (but not RR or WM) selectively increased the number of FosB/ΔFosB nuclei in the nucleus of the solitary tract, posterior hypothalamic nucleus, and both the infralimbic and prelimbic divisions of the medial prefrontal cortex, indicating an involvement of these regions in chronic drive of the HPA axis. Increases in FosB/ΔFosB-immunoreactive cells were observed following both RR and CVS in the other regions (e.g., the dorsomedial hypothalamus), suggesting activation by both habituating and non-habituating stress conditions. The data suggest that unpredictable stress uniquely activates interconnected cortical, hypothalamic, and brainstem nuclei, potentially revealing the existence of a recruited circuitry mediating chronic drive of brain stress effector systems. PMID:22789020

  19. Lost for emotion words: what motor and limbic brain activity reveals about autism and semantic theory.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Rachel L; Shtyrov, Yury; Mohr, Bettina; Lombardo, Michael V; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are characterised by deficits in understanding and expressing emotions and are frequently accompanied by alexithymia, a difficulty in understanding and expressing emotion words. Words are differentially represented in the brain according to their semantic category and these difficulties in ASC predict reduced activation to emotion-related words in limbic structures crucial for affective processing. Semantic theories view 'emotion actions' as critical for learning the semantic relationship between a word and the emotion it describes, such that emotion words typically activate the cortical motor systems involved in expressing emotion actions such as facial expressions. As ASC are also characterised by motor deficits and atypical brain structure and function in these regions, motor structures would also be expected to show reduced activation during emotion-semantic processing. Here we used event-related fMRI to compare passive processing of emotion words in comparison to abstract verbs and animal names in typically-developing controls and individuals with ASC. Relatively reduced brain activation in ASC for emotion words, but not matched control words, was found in motor areas and cingulate cortex specifically. The degree of activation evoked by emotion words in the motor system was also associated with the extent of autistic traits as revealed by the Autism Spectrum Quotient. We suggest that hypoactivation of motor and limbic regions for emotion word processing may underlie difficulties in processing emotional language in ASC. The role that sensorimotor systems and their connections might play in the affective and social-communication difficulties in ASC is discussed. PMID:25278250

  20. Lost for emotion words: What motor and limbic brain activity reveals about autism and semantic theory

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Rachel L.; Shtyrov, Yury; Mohr, Bettina; Lombardo, Michael V.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are characterised by deficits in understanding and expressing emotions and are frequently accompanied by alexithymia, a difficulty in understanding and expressing emotion words. Words are differentially represented in the brain according to their semantic category and these difficulties in ASC predict reduced activation to emotion-related words in limbic structures crucial for affective processing. Semantic theories view ‘emotion actions’ as critical for learning the semantic relationship between a word and the emotion it describes, such that emotion words typically activate the cortical motor systems involved in expressing emotion actions such as facial expressions. As ASC are also characterised by motor deficits and atypical brain structure and function in these regions, motor structures would also be expected to show reduced activation during emotion-semantic processing. Here we used event-related fMRI to compare passive processing of emotion words in comparison to abstract verbs and animal names in typically-developing controls and individuals with ASC. Relatively reduced brain activation in ASC for emotion words, but not matched control words, was found in motor areas and cingulate cortex specifically. The degree of activation evoked by emotion words in the motor system was also associated with the extent of autistic traits as revealed by the Autism Spectrum Quotient. We suggest that hypoactivation of motor and limbic regions for emotion word processing may underlie difficulties in processing emotional language in ASC. The role that sensorimotor systems and their connections might play in the affective and social-communication difficulties in ASC is discussed. PMID:25278250

  1. Proteomic Profiling in the Brain of CLN1 Disease Model Reveals Affected Functional Modules.

    PubMed

    Tikka, Saara; Monogioudi, Evanthia; Gotsopoulos, Athanasios; Soliymani, Rabah; Pezzini, Francesco; Scifo, Enzo; Uusi-Rauva, Kristiina; Tyynelä, Jaana; Baumann, Marc; Jalanko, Anu; Simonati, Alessandro; Lalowski, Maciej

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are the most commonly inherited progressive encephalopathies of childhood. Pathologically, they are characterized by endolysosomal storage with different ultrastructural features and biochemical compositions. The molecular mechanisms causing progressive neurodegeneration and common molecular pathways linking expression of different NCL genes are largely unknown. We analyzed proteome alterations in the brains of a mouse model of human infantile CLN1 disease-palmitoyl-protein thioesterase 1 (Ppt1) gene knockout and its wild-type age-matched counterpart at different stages: pre-symptomatic, symptomatic and advanced. For this purpose, we utilized a combination of laser capture microdissection-based quantitative liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS imaging to quantify/visualize the changes in protein expression in disease-affected brain thalamus and cerebral cortex tissue slices, respectively. Proteomic profiling of the pre-symptomatic stage thalamus revealed alterations mostly in metabolic processes and inhibition of various neuronal functions, i.e., neuritogenesis. Down-regulation in dynamics associated with growth of plasma projections and cellular protrusions was further corroborated by findings from RNA sequencing of CLN1 patients' fibroblasts. Changes detected at the symptomatic stage included: mitochondrial functions, synaptic vesicle transport, myelin proteome and signaling cascades, such as RhoA signaling. Considerable dysregulation of processes related to mitochondrial cell death, RhoA/Huntington's disease signaling and myelin sheath breakdown were observed at the advanced stage of the disease. The identified changes in protein levels were further substantiated by bioinformatics and network approaches, immunohistochemistry on brain tissues and literature knowledge, thus identifying various functional modules affected in the CLN1 childhood

  2. Systems-Based Analyses of Brain Regions Functionally Impacted in Parkinson's Disease Reveals Underlying Causal Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Emig-Agius, Dorothea; Bessarabova, Marina; Ivliev, Alexander E.; Schüle, Birgit; Alexander, Jeff; Wallace, William; Halliday, Glenda M.; Langston, J. William; Braxton, Scott; Yednock, Ted; Shaler, Thomas; Johnston, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed analysis of disease-affected tissue provides insight into molecular mechanisms contributing to pathogenesis. Substantia nigra, striatum, and cortex are functionally connected with increasing degrees of alpha-synuclein pathology in Parkinson's disease. We undertook functional and causal pathway analysis of gene expression and proteomic alterations in these three regions, and the data revealed pathways that correlated with disease progression. In addition, microarray and RNAseq experiments revealed previously unidentified causal changes related to oligodendrocyte function and synaptic vesicle release, and these and other changes were reflected across all brain regions. Importantly, subsets of these changes were replicated in Parkinson's disease blood; suggesting peripheral tissue may provide important avenues for understanding and measuring disease status and progression. Proteomic assessment revealed alterations in mitochondria and vesicular transport proteins that preceded gene expression changes indicating defects in translation and/or protein turnover. Our combined approach of proteomics, RNAseq and microarray analyses provides a comprehensive view of the molecular changes that accompany functional loss and alpha-synuclein pathology in Parkinson's disease, and may be instrumental to understand, diagnose and follow Parkinson's disease progression. PMID:25170892

  3. Brain phosphoproteome obtained by a FASP-based method reveals plasma membrane protein topology.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Zougman, Alexandre; Gnad, Florian; Mann, Matthias

    2010-06-01

    Taking advantage of the recently developed Filter Assisted Sample Preparation (FASP) method for sample preparation, we performed an in-depth analysis of phosphorylation sites in mouse brain. To maximize the number of detected phosphorylation sites, we fractionated proteins by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) or separated tryptic peptides on an anion exchanger (SAX) prior or after the TiO(2)-based phosphopeptide enrichment, respectively. SEC allowed analysis of minute tissue samples (1 mg total protein), and resulted in identification of more than 4000 sites in a single experiment, comprising eight fractions. SAX in a pipet tip format offered a convenient and rapid way to fractionate phosphopeptides and mapped more than 5000 sites in a single six fraction experiment. To enrich peptides containing phosphotyrosine residues, we describe a filter aided antibody capturing and elution (FACE) method that requires only the uncoupled instead of resin-immobilized capture reagent. In total, we identified 12,035 phosphorylation sites on 4579 brain proteins of which 8446 are novel. Gene Ontology annotation reveals that 23% of identified sites are located on plasma membrane proteins, including a large number of ion channels and transporters. Together with the glycosylation sites from a recent large-scale study, they can confirm or correct predicted membrane topologies of these proteins, as we show for the examples calcium channels and glutamate receptors. PMID:20415495

  4. Diversity of sharp-wave–ripple LFP signatures reveals differentiated brain-wide dynamical events

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Villegas, Juan F.; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Besserve, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Sharp-wave–ripple (SPW-R) complexes are believed to mediate memory reactivation, transfer, and consolidation. However, their underlying neuronal dynamics at multiple scales remains poorly understood. Using concurrent hippocampal local field potential (LFP) recordings and functional MRI (fMRI), we study local changes in neuronal activity during SPW-R episodes and their brain-wide correlates. Analysis of the temporal alignment between SPW and ripple components reveals well-differentiated SPW-R subtypes in the CA1 LFP. SPW-R–triggered fMRI maps show that ripples aligned to the positive peak of their SPWs have enhanced neocortical metabolic up-regulation. In contrast, ripples occurring at the trough of their SPWs relate to weaker neocortical up-regulation and absent subcortical down-regulation, indicating differentiated involvement of neuromodulatory pathways in the ripple phenomenon mediated by long-range interactions. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence for the existence of SPW-R subtypes with differentiated CA1 activity and metabolic correlates in related brain areas, possibly serving different memory functions. PMID:26540729

  5. Glycogen distribution in the microwave-fixed mouse brain reveals heterogeneous astrocytic patterns.

    PubMed

    Oe, Yuki; Baba, Otto; Ashida, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Kouichi C; Hirase, Hajime

    2016-09-01

    In the brain, glycogen metabolism has been implied in synaptic plasticity and learning, yet the distribution of this molecule has not been fully described. We investigated cerebral glycogen of the mouse by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using two monoclonal antibodies that have different affinities depending on the glycogen size. The use of focused microwave irradiation yielded well-defined glycogen immunoreactive signals compared with the conventional periodic acid-Schiff method. The IHC signals displayed a punctate distribution localized predominantly in astrocytic processes. Glycogen immunoreactivity (IR) was high in the hippocampus, striatum, cortex, and cerebellar molecular layer, whereas it was low in the white matter and most of the subcortical structures. Additionally, glycogen distribution in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 and striatum had a 'patchy' appearance with glycogen-rich and glycogen-poor astrocytes appearing in alternation. The glycogen patches were more evident with large-molecule glycogen in young adult mice but they were hardly observable in aged mice (1-2 years old). Our results reveal brain region-dependent glycogen accumulation and possibly metabolic heterogeneity of astrocytes. GLIA 2016;64:1532-1545. PMID:27353480

  6. The Brain-to-Pancreatic Islet Neuronal Map Reveals Differential Glucose Regulation From Distinct Hypothalamic Regions.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Wilfredo; Singh, Inderroop; Wautlet, Arnaud; Patterson, Christa; Flak, Jonathan; Becker, Thomas C; Ali, Almas; Tamarina, Natalia; Philipson, Louis H; Enquist, Lynn W; Myers, Martin G; Rhodes, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    The brain influences glucose homeostasis, partly by supplemental control over insulin and glucagon secretion. Without this central regulation, diabetes and its complications can ensue. Yet, the neuronal network linking to pancreatic islets has never been fully mapped. Here, we refine this map using pseudorabies virus (PRV) retrograde tracing, indicating that the pancreatic islets are innervated by efferent circuits that emanate from the hypothalamus. We found that the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), ventromedial nucleus (VMN), and lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) significantly overlap PRV and the physiological glucose-sensing enzyme glucokinase. Then, experimentally lowering glucose sensing, specifically in the ARC, resulted in glucose intolerance due to deficient insulin secretion and no significant effect in the VMN, but in the LHA it resulted in a lowering of the glucose threshold that improved glucose tolerance and/or improved insulin sensitivity, with an exaggerated counter-regulatory response for glucagon secretion. No significant effect on insulin sensitivity or metabolic homeostasis was noted. Thus, these data reveal novel direct neuronal effects on pancreatic islets and also render a functional validation of the brain-to-islet neuronal map. They also demonstrate that distinct regions of the hypothalamus differentially control insulin and glucagon secretion, potentially in partnership to help maintain glucose homeostasis and guard against hypoglycemia. PMID:27207534

  7. Diversity of sharp-wave-ripple LFP signatures reveals differentiated brain-wide dynamical events.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Villegas, Juan F; Logothetis, Nikos K; Besserve, Michel

    2015-11-17

    Sharp-wave-ripple (SPW-R) complexes are believed to mediate memory reactivation, transfer, and consolidation. However, their underlying neuronal dynamics at multiple scales remains poorly understood. Using concurrent hippocampal local field potential (LFP) recordings and functional MRI (fMRI), we study local changes in neuronal activity during SPW-R episodes and their brain-wide correlates. Analysis of the temporal alignment between SPW and ripple components reveals well-differentiated SPW-R subtypes in the CA1 LFP. SPW-R-triggered fMRI maps show that ripples aligned to the positive peak of their SPWs have enhanced neocortical metabolic up-regulation. In contrast, ripples occurring at the trough of their SPWs relate to weaker neocortical up-regulation and absent subcortical down-regulation, indicating differentiated involvement of neuromodulatory pathways in the ripple phenomenon mediated by long-range interactions. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence for the existence of SPW-R subtypes with differentiated CA1 activity and metabolic correlates in related brain areas, possibly serving different memory functions. PMID:26540729

  8. Autoimmune Profiling Reveals Peroxiredoxin 6 as a Candidate Traumatic Brain Injury Biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Buonora, John E.; Mousseau, Michael; Jacobowitz, David M.; Lazarus, Rachel C.; Yarnell, Angela M.; Olsen, Cara H.; Pollard, Harvey B.; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Latour, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune profiling in rats revealed the antioxidant enzyme, peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6), as a target for autoantibodies evoked in response to traumatic brain injury (TBI). Consistent with this proposal, immunohistochemical analysis of rat cerebral cortex demonstrated that PRDX6 is highly expressed in the perivascular space, presumably contained within astrocytic foot processes. Accordingly, an immunosorbent electrochemiluminescence assay was developed for investigating PRDX6 in human samples. PRDX6 was found to be measurable in human blood and highly expressed in human cerebral cortex and platelets. Circulating levels of PRDX6 were elevated fourfold over control values 4 to 24 h following mild-to-moderate TBI. These findings suggest that PRDX6 may serve as a biomarker for TBI and that autoimmune profiling is a viable strategy for the discovery of novel TBI biomarkers. PMID:25938937

  9. Skull and brain of a 300-million-year-old chimaeroid fish revealed by synchrotron holotomography.

    PubMed

    Pradel, Alan; Langer, Max; Maisey, John G; Geffard-Kuriyama, Didier; Cloetens, Peter; Janvier, Philippe; Tafforeau, Paul

    2009-03-31

    Living cartilaginous fishes, or chondrichthyans, include numerous elasmobranch (sharks and rays) species but only few chimaeroid (ratfish) species. The early history of chimaeroids, or holocephalans, and the modalities of their divergence from elasmobranchs are much debated. During Carboniferous times, 358-300 million years (Myr) ago, they underwent a remarkable evolutionary radiation, with some odd and poorly understood forms, including the enigmatic iniopterygians that were known until now from poorly informative flattened impressions. Here, we report iniopterygian skulls found preserved in 3 dimensions in approximately 300-Myr-old concretions from Oklahoma and Kansas. The study was performed by using conventional X-ray microtomography (muCT), as well as absorption-based synchrotron microtomography (SR-muCT) [Tafforeau P, et al. (2006) Applications of X-ray synchrotron microtomography for non-destructive 3D studies of paleontological specimens. Appl Phys A 83:95-202] and a new holotomographic approach [Guigay P, Langer M, Boistel R, Cloetens P (2007) Mixed transfer function and transport of intensity approach for phase retrieval in the Fresnel region. Opt Lett 32:1617-1619], which revealed their peculiar anatomy. Iniopterygians also share unique characters with living chimaeroids, suggesting that the key chimaeroid skull features were already established 300 Myr ago. Moreover, SR-muCT of an articulated skull revealed a strikingly brain-shaped structure inside the endocranial cavity, which seems to be an exceptional case of soft-tissue mineralization of the brain, presumably as a result of microbially induced postmortem phosphatization. This was imaged with exceptional accuracy by using holotomography, which demonstrates its great potential to image preserved soft parts in dense fossils. PMID:19273859

  10. Synaptic protein ubiquitination in rat brain revealed by antibody-based ubiquitome analysis.

    PubMed

    Na, Chan Hyun; Jones, Drew R; Yang, Yanling; Wang, Xusheng; Xu, Yanji; Peng, Junmin

    2012-09-01

    Protein ubiquitination is an essential post-translational modification regulating neurodevelopment, synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory, and its dysregulation contributes to the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. Here we report a systematic analysis of ubiquitinated proteome (ubiquitome) in rat brain using a newly developed monoclonal antibody that recognizes the diglycine tag on lysine residues in trypsinized peptides (K-GG peptides). Initial antibody specificity analysis showed that the antibody can distinguish K-GG peptides from linear GG peptides or pseudo K-GG peptides derived from iodoacetamide. To evaluate the false discovery rate of K-GG peptide matches during database search, we introduced a null experiment using bacterial lysate that contains no such peptides. The brain ubiquitome was then analyzed by this antibody enrichment with or without strong cation exchange (SCX) prefractionation. During SCX chromatography, although the vast majority of K-GG peptides were detected in the fractions containing at least three positive charged peptides, specific K-GG peptides with two positive charges (e.g., protein N-terminal acetylated and C-terminal non-K/R peptides) were also identified in early fractions. The reliability of C-terminal K-GG peptides was also extensively investigated. Finally, we collected a data set of 1786 K-GG sites on 2064 peptides in 921 proteins and estimated their abundance by spectral counting. The study reveals a wide range of ubiquitination events on key components in presynaptic region (e.g., Bassoon, NSF, SNAP25, synapsin, synaptotagmin, and syntaxin) and postsynaptic density (e.g., PSD-95, GKAP, CaMKII, as well as receptors for NMDA, AMPA, GABA, serotonin, and acetylcholine). We also determined ubiquitination sites on amyloid precursor protein and alpha synuclein that are thought to be causative agents in Alzhermer's and Parkinson's disorders, respectively. As K-GG peptides can also be produced from Nedd8 or ISG15 modified

  11. Theory of mind for processing unexpected events across contexts.

    PubMed

    Dungan, James A; Stepanovic, Michael; Young, Liane

    2016-08-01

    Theory of mind, or mental state reasoning, may be particularly useful for making sense of unexpected events. Here, we investigated unexpected behavior across both social and non-social contexts in order to characterize the precise role of theory of mind in processing unexpected events. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine how people respond to unexpected outcomes when initial expectations were based on (i) an object's prior behavior, (ii) an agent's prior behavior and (iii) an agent's mental states. Consistent with prior work, brain regions for theory of mind were preferentially recruited when people first formed expectations about social agents vs non-social objects. Critically, unexpected vs expected outcomes elicited greater activity in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, which also discriminated in its spatial pattern of activity between unexpected and expected outcomes for social events. In contrast, social vs non-social events elicited greater activity in precuneus across both expected and unexpected outcomes. Finally, given prior information about an agent's behavior, unexpected vs expected outcomes elicited an especially robust response in right temporoparietal junction, and the magnitude of this difference across participants correlated negatively with autistic-like traits. Together, these findings illuminate the distinct contributions of brain regions for theory of mind for processing unexpected events across contexts. PMID:26969865

  12. SNTF immunostaining reveals previously undetected axonal pathology in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Victoria E; Stewart, William; Weber, Maura T; Cullen, D Kacy; Siman, Robert; Smith, Douglas H

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is a common feature of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and may also be a predominant pathology in mild TBI or "concussion". The rapid deformation of white matter at the instant of trauma can lead to mechanical failure and calcium-dependent proteolysis of the axonal cytoskeleton in association with axonal transport interruption. Recently, a proteolytic fragment of alpha-II spectrin, "SNTF", was detected in serum acutely following mild TBI in patients and was prognostic for poor clinical outcome. However, direct evidence that this fragment is a marker of DAI has yet to be demonstrated in either humans following TBI or in models of mild TBI. Here, we used immunohistochemistry (IHC) to examine for SNTF in brain tissue following both severe and mild TBI. Human severe TBI cases (survival <7d; n = 18) were compared to age-matched controls (n = 16) from the Glasgow TBI archive. We also examined brains from an established model of mild TBI at 6, 48 and 72 h post-injury versus shams. IHC specific for SNTF was compared to that of amyloid precursor protein (APP), the current standard for DAI diagnosis, and other known markers of axonal pathology including non-phosphorylated neurofilament-H (SMI-32), neurofilament-68 (NF-68) and compacted neurofilament-medium (RMO-14) using double and triple immunofluorescent labeling. Supporting its use as a biomarker of DAI, SNTF immunoreactive axons were observed at all time points following both human severe TBI and in the model of mild TBI. Interestingly, SNTF revealed a subpopulation of degenerating axons, undetected by the gold-standard marker of transport interruption, APP. While there was greater axonal co-localization between SNTF and APP after severe TBI in humans, a subset of SNTF positive axons displayed no APP accumulation. Notably, some co-localization was observed between SNTF and the less abundant neurofilament subtype markers. Other SNTF positive axons, however, did not co-localize with any

  13. [Unexpected drug-interaction].

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yutaka

    2002-02-01

    The case of a male patient suffering from chronic normal pressure hydrocephalus is outlined. Antidepressant and pravastatin were administered because of the patient's abulia and hypercholesterolemia, but neuroleptic malignant syndrome-like conditions developed. All physicians should suppose the occurrence of such an "unexpected drug-interaction" in any case. The author considered that a good sense of careful discernment and rapid reference system of medical information are "essential tools" for clinical management. PMID:11925849

  14. Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  15. Computational analysis reveals increased blood deposition following repeated mild traumatic brain injury☆

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Virginia; Bianchi, Anthony; Hartman, Richard; Bhanu, Bir; Carson, Monica J.; Obenaus, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) has become an increasing public health concern as subsequent injuries can exacerbate existing neuropathology and result in neurological deficits. This study investigated the temporal development of cortical lesions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess two mTBIs delivered to opposite cortical hemispheres. The controlled cortical impact model was used to produce an initial mTBI on the right cortex followed by a second injury induced on the left cortex at 3 (rmTBI 3d) or 7 (rmTBI 7d) days later. Histogram analysis was combined with a novel semi-automated computational approach to perform a voxel-wise examination of extravascular blood and edema volumes within the lesion. Examination of lesion volume 1d post last injury revealed increased tissue abnormalities within rmTBI 7d animals compared to other groups, particularly at the site of the second impact. Histogram analysis of lesion T2 values suggested increased edematous tissue within the rmTBI 3d group and elevated blood deposition in the rm TBI 7d animals. Further quantification of lesion composition for blood and edema containing voxels supported our histogram findings, with increased edema at the site of second impact in rmTBI 3d animals and elevated blood deposition in the rmTBI 7d group at the site of the first injury. Histological measurements revealed spatial overlap of regions containing blood deposition and microglial activation within the cortices of all animals. In conclusion, our findings suggest that there is a window of tissue vulnerability where a second distant mTBI, induced 7d after an initial injury, exacerbates tissue abnormalities consistent with hemorrhagic progression. PMID:24179733

  16. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and MRI reveal no evidence for brain mitochondrial dysfunction in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Neva M; Shaw, Dennis W W; Richards, Todd L; Estes, Annette M; Friedman, Seth D; Petropoulos, Helen; Artru, Alan A; Dager, Stephen R

    2012-01-01

    Brain mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as an etiologic factor in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((1)HMRS) and MRI were used to assess for evidence of brain mitochondrial dysfunction in longitudinal samples of children with ASD or developmental delay (DD), and cross-sectionally in typically developing (TD) children at 3-4, 6-7 and 9-10 years-of-age. A total of 239 studies from 130 unique participants (54ASD, 22DD, 54TD) were acquired. (1)HMRS and MRI revealed no evidence for brain mitochondrial dysfunction in the children with ASD. Findings do not support a substantive role for brain mitochondrial abnormalities in the etiology or symptom expression of ASD, nor the widespread use of hyperbaric oxygen treatment that has been advocated on the basis of this proposed relationship. PMID:21404085

  17. Perceptual shift in bilingualism: brain potentials reveal plasticity in pre-attentive colour perception.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, Panos; Dering, Benjamin; Wiggett, Alison; Kuipers, Jan-Rouke; Thierry, Guillaume

    2010-09-01

    The validity of the linguistic relativity principle continues to stimulate vigorous debate and research. The debate has recently shifted from the behavioural investigation arena to a more biologically grounded field, in which tangible physiological evidence for language effects on perception can be obtained. Using brain potentials in a colour oddball detection task with Greek and English speakers, a recent study suggests that language effects may exist at early stages of perceptual integration [Thierry, G., Athanasopoulos, P., Wiggett, A., Dering, B., & Kuipers, J. (2009). Unconscious effects of language-specific terminology on pre-attentive colour perception. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 106, 4567-4570]. In this paper, we test whether in Greek speakers exposure to a new cultural environment (UK) with contrasting colour terminology from their native language affects early perceptual processing as indexed by an electrophysiological correlate of visual detection of colour luminance. We also report semantic mapping of native colour terms and colour similarity judgements. Results reveal convergence of linguistic descriptions, cognitive processing, and early perception of colour in bilinguals. This result demonstrates for the first time substantial plasticity in early, pre-attentive colour perception and has important implications for the mechanisms that are involved in perceptual changes during the processes of language learning and acculturation. PMID:20566193

  18. Brain Signals of Face Processing as Revealed by Event-Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Ela I.; Iglesias, Jaime; Saavedra, Cristina; Trujillo-Barreto, Nelson J.; Valdés-Sosa, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the functional significance of different event-related potentials (ERPs) as electrophysiological indices of face perception and face recognition, according to cognitive and neurofunctional models of face processing. Initially, the processing of faces seems to be supported by early extrastriate occipital cortices and revealed by modulations of the occipital P1. This early response is thought to reflect the detection of certain primary structural aspects indicating the presence grosso modo of a face within the visual field. The posterior-temporal N170 is more sensitive to the detection of faces as complex-structured stimuli and, therefore, to the presence of its distinctive organizational characteristics prior to within-category identification. In turn, the relatively late and probably more rostrally generated N250r and N400-like responses might respectively indicate processes of access and retrieval of face-related information, which is stored in long-term memory (LTM). New methods of analysis of electrophysiological and neuroanatomical data, namely, dynamic causal modeling, single-trial and time-frequency analyses, are highly recommended to advance in the knowledge of those brain mechanisms concerning face processing. PMID:26160999

  19. Interspecies avian brain chimeras reveal that large brain size differences are influenced by cell-interdependent processes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chun; Balaban, Evan; Jarvis, Erich D

    2012-01-01

    Like humans, birds that exhibit vocal learning have relatively delayed telencephalon maturation, resulting in a disproportionately smaller brain prenatally but enlarged telencephalon in adulthood relative to vocal non-learning birds. To determine if this size difference results from evolutionary changes in cell-autonomous or cell-interdependent developmental processes, we transplanted telencephala from zebra finch donors (a vocal-learning species) into Japanese quail hosts (a vocal non-learning species) during the early neural tube stage (day 2 of incubation), and harvested the chimeras at later embryonic stages (between 9-12 days of incubation). The donor and host tissues fused well with each other, with known major fiber pathways connecting the zebra finch and quail parts of the brain. However, the overall sizes of chimeric finch telencephala were larger than non-transplanted finch telencephala at the same developmental stages, even though the proportional sizes of telencephalic subregions and fiber tracts were similar to normal finches. There were no significant changes in the size of chimeric quail host midbrains, even though they were innervated by the physically smaller zebra finch brain, including the smaller retinae of the finch eyes. Chimeric zebra finch telencephala had a decreased cell density relative to normal finches. However, cell nucleus size differences between each species were maintained as in normal birds. These results suggest that telencephalic size development is partially cell-interdependent, and that the mechanisms controlling the size of different brain regions may be functionally independent. PMID:22860132

  20. High-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals metabolic effects of normal brain aging

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Janna L.; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Choi, In-Young; Lee, Phil; Brooks, William M.

    2014-01-01

    Altered brain metabolism is likely to be an important contributor to normal cognitive decline and brain pathology in elderly individuals. To characterize the metabolic changes associated with normal brain aging, we used high-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo to quantify 20 neurochemicals in the hippocampus and sensorimotor cortex of young adult and aged rats. We found significant differences in the neurochemical profile of the aged brain when compared with younger adults, including lower aspartate, ascorbate, glutamate, and macromolecules, and higher glucose, myo-inositol, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, total choline, and glutamine. These neurochemical biomarkers point to specific cellular mechanisms that are altered in brain aging, such as bioenergetics, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell membrane turnover, and endogenous neuroprotection. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be a valuable translational approach for studying mechanisms of brain aging and pathology, and for investigating treatments to preserve or enhance cognitive function in aging. PMID:24559659

  1. High frequency functional brain networks in neonates revealed by rapid acquisition resting state fMRI.

    PubMed

    Smith-Collins, Adam P R; Luyt, Karen; Heep, Axel; Kauppinen, Risto A

    2015-07-01

    Understanding how spatially remote brain regions interact to form functional brain networks, and how these develop during the neonatal period, provides fundamental insights into normal brain development, and how mechanisms of brain disorder and recovery may function in the immature brain. A key imaging tool in characterising functional brain networks is examination of T2*-weighted fMRI signal during rest (resting state fMRI, rs-fMRI). The majority of rs-fMRI studies have concentrated on slow signal fluctuations occurring at <0.1 Hz, even though neuronal rhythms, and haemodynamic responses to these fluctuate more rapidly, and there is emerging evidence for crucial information about functional brain connectivity occurring more rapidly than these limits. The characterisation of higher frequency components has been limited by the sampling frequency achievable with standard T2* echoplanar imaging (EPI) sequences. We describe patterns of neonatal functional brain network connectivity derived using accelerated T2*-weighted EPI MRI. We acquired whole brain rs-fMRI data, at subsecond sampling frequency, from preterm infants at term equivalent age and compared this to rs-fMRI data acquired with standard EPI acquisition protocol. We provide the first evidence that rapid rs-fMRI acquisition in neonates, and adoption of an extended frequency range for analysis, allows identification of a substantial proportion of signal power residing above 0.2 Hz. We thereby describe changes in brain connectivity associated with increasing maturity which are not evident using standard rs-fMRI protocols. Development of optimised neonatal fMRI protocols, including use of high speed acquisition sequences, is crucial for understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of the developing brain. PMID:25787931

  2. Water diffusion reveals networks that modulate multiregional morphological plasticity after repetitive brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Mitsunari; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Mima, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive brain stimulation protocols induce plasticity in the stimulated site in brain slice models. Recent evidence from network models has indicated that additional plasticity-related changes occur in nonstimulated remote regions. Despite increasing use of brain stimulation protocols in experimental and clinical settings, the neural substrates underlying the additional effects in remote regions are unknown. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) probes water diffusion and can be used to estimate morphological changes in cortical tissue that occur with the induction of plasticity. Using DWI techniques, we estimated morphological changes induced by application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the left primary motor cortex (M1). We found that rTMS altered water diffusion in multiple regions including the left M1. Notably, the change in water diffusion was retained longest in the left M1 and remote regions that had a correlation of baseline fluctuations in water diffusion before rTMS. We conclude that synchronization of water diffusion at rest between stimulated and remote regions ensures retention of rTMS-induced changes in water diffusion in remote regions. Synchronized fluctuations in the morphology of cortical microstructures between stimulated and remote regions might identify networks that allow retention of plasticity-related morphological changes in multiple regions after brain stimulation protocols. These results increase our understanding of the effects of brain stimulation-induced plasticity on multiregional brain networks. DWI techniques could provide a tool to evaluate treatment effects of brain stimulation protocols in patients with brain disorders. PMID:24619090

  3. Genomic characterization of brain metastases reveals branched evolution and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Santagata, Sandro; Cahill, Daniel P.; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Jones, Robert T.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Horowitz, Peleg M.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Ligon, Keith L.; Tabernero, Josep; Seoane, Joan; Martinez-Saez, Elena; Curry, William T.; Dunn, Ian F.; Paek, Sun Ha; Park, Sung-Hye; McKenna, Aaron; Chevalier, Aaron; Rosenberg, Mara; Barker, Frederick G.; Gill, Corey M.; Van Hummelen, Paul; Thorner, Aaron R.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Hoang, Mai P.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Signoretti, Sabina; Sougnez, Carrie; Rabin, Michael S.; Lin, Nancy U.; Winer, Eric P.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Meyerson, Matthew; Garraway, Levi; Gabriel, Stacey; Lander, Eric S.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Baselga, Jose; Louis, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are associated with a dismal prognosis. Whether brain metastases harbor distinct genetic alterations beyond those observed in primary tumors is unknown. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 86 matched brain metastases, primary tumors and normal tissue. In all clonally related cancer samples, we observed branched evolution, where all metastatic and primary sites shared a common ancestor yet continued to evolve independently. In 53% of cases, we found potentially clinically informative alterations in the brain metastases not detected in the matched primary-tumor sample. In contrast, spatially and temporally separated brain metastasis sites were genetically homogenous. Distal extracranial and regional lymph node metastases were highly divergent from brain metastases. We detected alterations associated with sensitivity to PI3K/AKT/mTOR, CDK, and HER2/EGFR inhibitors in the brain metastases. Genomic analysis of brain metastases provides an opportunity to identify potentially clinically informative alterations not detected in clinically sampled primary tumors, regional lymph nodes, or extracranial metastases. PMID:26410082

  4. Processing a Second Language: Late Learners' Comprehension Mechanisms as Revealed by Event-Related Brain Potentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahne, Anja; Friederici, Angela D.

    2001-01-01

    Examines sentence comprehension in second language learners using event-related brain potentials. Japanese speakers who had learned German as a second language after puberty listened to German sentences that were either correct, semantically incorrect, syntactically incorrect or both semantically and syntactically incorrect, Brain responses were…

  5. Molecular anatomy of the gut-brain axis revealed with transgenic technologies: implications in metabolic research

    PubMed Central

    Udit, Swalpa; Gautron, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Neurons residing in the gut-brain axis remain understudied despite their important role in coordinating metabolic functions. This lack of knowledge is observed, in part, because labeling gut-brain axis neurons and their connections using conventional neuroanatomical methods is inherently challenging. This article summarizes genetic approaches that enable the labeling of distinct populations of gut-brain axis neurons in living laboratory rodents. In particular, we review the respective strengths and limitations of currently available genetic and viral approaches that permit the marking of gut-brain axis neurons without the need for antibodies or conventional neurotropic tracers. Finally, we discuss how these methodological advances are progressively transforming the study of the healthy and diseased gut-brain axis in the context of its role in chronic metabolic diseases, including diabetes and obesity. PMID:23914153

  6. Exploratory Metabolomic Analyses Reveal Compounds Correlated with Lutein Concentration in Frontal Cortex, Hippocampus, and Occipital Cortex of Human Infant Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lieblein-Boff, Jacqueline C.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Kennedy, Adam D.; Lai, Chron-Si; Kuchan, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Lutein is a dietary carotenoid well known for its role as an antioxidant in the macula, and recent reports implicate a role for lutein in cognitive function. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in both pediatric and geriatric brain tissue. In addition, cognitive function in older adults correlated with macular and postmortem brain lutein concentrations. Furthermore, lutein was found to preferentially accumulate in the infant brain in comparison to other carotenoids that are predominant in diet. While lutein is consistently related to cognitive function, the mechanisms by which lutein may influence cognition are not clear. In an effort to identify potential mechanisms through which lutein might influence neurodevelopment, an exploratory study relating metabolite signatures and lutein was completed. Post-mortem metabolomic analyses were performed on human infant brain tissues in three regions important for learning and memory: the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and occipital cortex. Metabolomic profiles were compared to lutein concentration, and correlations were identified and reported here. A total of 1276 correlations were carried out across all brain regions. Of 427 metabolites analyzed, 257 were metabolites of known identity. Unidentified metabolite correlations (510) were excluded. In addition, moderate correlations with xenobiotic relationships (2) or those driven by single outliers (3) were excluded from further study. Lutein concentrations correlated with lipid pathway metabolites, energy pathway metabolites, brain osmolytes, amino acid neurotransmitters, and the antioxidant homocarnosine. These correlations were often brain region—specific. Revealing relationships between lutein and metabolic pathways may help identify potential candidates on which to complete further analyses and may shed light on important roles of lutein in the human brain during development. PMID:26317757

  7. Graph Theoretical Analysis Reveals: Women's Brains Are Better Connected than Men's.

    PubMed

    Szalkai, Balázs; Varga, Bálint; Grolmusz, Vince

    2015-01-01

    Deep graph-theoretic ideas in the context with the graph of the World Wide Web led to the definition of Google's PageRank and the subsequent rise of the most popular search engine to date. Brain graphs, or connectomes, are being widely explored today. We believe that non-trivial graph theoretic concepts, similarly as it happened in the case of the World Wide Web, will lead to discoveries enlightening the structural and also the functional details of the animal and human brains. When scientists examine large networks of tens or hundreds of millions of vertices, only fast algorithms can be applied because of the size constraints. In the case of diffusion MRI-based structural human brain imaging, the effective vertex number of the connectomes, or brain graphs derived from the data is on the scale of several hundred today. That size facilitates applying strict mathematical graph algorithms even for some hard-to-compute (or NP-hard) quantities like vertex cover or balanced minimum cut. In the present work we have examined brain graphs, computed from the data of the Human Connectome Project, recorded from male and female subjects between ages 22 and 35. Significant differences were found between the male and female structural brain graphs: we show that the average female connectome has more edges, is a better expander graph, has larger minimal bisection width, and has more spanning trees than the average male connectome. Since the average female brain weighs less than the brain of males, these properties show that the female brain has better graph theoretical properties, in a sense, than the brain of males. It is known that the female brain has a smaller gray matter/white matter ratio than males, that is, a larger white matter/gray matter ratio than the brain of males; this observation is in line with our findings concerning the number of edges, since the white matter consists of myelinated axons, which, in turn, roughly correspond to the connections in the brain graph

  8. Graph Theoretical Analysis Reveals: Women’s Brains Are Better Connected than Men’s

    PubMed Central

    Szalkai, Balázs; Varga, Bálint; Grolmusz, Vince

    2015-01-01

    Deep graph-theoretic ideas in the context with the graph of the World Wide Web led to the definition of Google’s PageRank and the subsequent rise of the most popular search engine to date. Brain graphs, or connectomes, are being widely explored today. We believe that non-trivial graph theoretic concepts, similarly as it happened in the case of the World Wide Web, will lead to discoveries enlightening the structural and also the functional details of the animal and human brains. When scientists examine large networks of tens or hundreds of millions of vertices, only fast algorithms can be applied because of the size constraints. In the case of diffusion MRI-based structural human brain imaging, the effective vertex number of the connectomes, or brain graphs derived from the data is on the scale of several hundred today. That size facilitates applying strict mathematical graph algorithms even for some hard-to-compute (or NP-hard) quantities like vertex cover or balanced minimum cut. In the present work we have examined brain graphs, computed from the data of the Human Connectome Project, recorded from male and female subjects between ages 22 and 35. Significant differences were found between the male and female structural brain graphs: we show that the average female connectome has more edges, is a better expander graph, has larger minimal bisection width, and has more spanning trees than the average male connectome. Since the average female brain weighs less than the brain of males, these properties show that the female brain has better graph theoretical properties, in a sense, than the brain of males. It is known that the female brain has a smaller gray matter/white matter ratio than males, that is, a larger white matter/gray matter ratio than the brain of males; this observation is in line with our findings concerning the number of edges, since the white matter consists of myelinated axons, which, in turn, roughly correspond to the connections in the brain graph

  9. Thyroid hormone-regulated brain mitochondrial genes revealed by differential cDNA cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Núñez, E; Menéndez-Hurtado, A; Garesse, R; Santos, A; Perez-Castillo, A

    1995-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) plays a critical role in the development of the central nervous system and its deficiency during the early neonatal period results in severe brain damage. However the mechanisms involved and the genes specifically regulated by T3 during brain development are largely unknown. By using a subtractive hybridization technique we have isolated a number of cDNAs that represented mitochondrial genes (12S and 16S rRNAs and cytochrome c oxidase subunit III). The steady state level of all three RNAs was reduced in hypothyroid animals during the postnatal period and T3 administration restored control levels. During fetal life the level of 16S rRNA was decreased in the brain of hypothyroid animals, suggesting a prenatal effect of thyroid hormone on brain development. Since T3 does not affect the amount of mitochondrial DNA, the results suggest that the effect of T3 is at transcriptional and/or postranscriptional level. In addition, the transcript levels for two nuclear-encoded mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunits: subunits IV and VIc were also decreased in the brains of hypothyroid animals. Hypothyroidism-induced changes in mitochondrial RNAs were followed by a concomitant 40% decrease in cytochrome c oxidase activity. This study shows that T3 is an important regulator of mitochondrial function in the neonatal brain and, more importantly, provides a molecular basis for the specific action of this hormone in the developing brain. Images PMID:7635984

  10. Arborization pattern of engrailed-positive neural lineages reveal neuromere boundaries in the Drosophila brain neuropil.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhilasha; Fung, S; Lichtneckert, Robert; Reichert, Heinrich; Hartenstein, Volker

    2009-11-01

    The Drosophila brain is a highly complex structure composed of thousands of neurons that are interconnected in numerous exquisitely organized neuropil structures such as the mushroom bodies, central complex, antennal lobes, and other specialized neuropils. While the neurons of the insect brain are known to derive in a lineage-specific fashion from a stereotyped set of segmentally organized neuroblasts, the developmental origin and neuromeric organization of the neuropil formed by these neurons is still unclear. In this study we used genetic labeling techniques to characterize the neuropil innervation pattern of engrailed-expressing brain lineages of known neuromeric origin. We show that the neurons of these lineages project to and form most arborizations, in particular all of their proximal branches, in the same brain neuropil compartments in embryonic, larval and adult stages. Moreover, we show that engrailed-positive neurons of differing neuromeric origin respect boundaries between neuromere-specific compartments in the brain. This is confirmed by an analysis of the arborization pattern of empty spiracles-expressing lineages. These findings indicate that arborizations of lineages deriving from different brain neuromeres innervate a nonoverlapping set of neuropil compartments. This supports a model for neuromere-specific brain neuropil, in which a given lineage forms its proximal arborizations predominantly in the compartments that correspond to its neuromere of origin. PMID:19711412

  11. Chronic lead and brain development: intraocular brain grafts as a method to reveal regional and temporal effects in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoerklund, H.; Olson, L.; Seiger, A.; Hoffer, B.

    1980-06-01

    A model is presented for selective studies of regional and temporal effects of chronic lead exposure on brain development, based on intraocular brain tissue grafting. Adult rat recipients were given lead acetate (1 to 2%) in their drinking water. Controls received sodium acetate in the drinking water or tap water. One week later, developing brain tissues obtained prenatally from different regions of the central nervous system were homologously grafted to the anterior chamber of the eye. Survival, vascularization, and growth were followed in oculo by repeated measurements of graft size. Growth curves were thus obtained for grafts from isolated selected brain areas, grafted at different stages of development to recipients on different concentrations of lead. Lead treatment (1%) caused a significant and pronounced delay of growth of the substantia nigra area during the second and third week postgrafting, approximately corresponding to the first 2 weeks after birth. Grafts of the hippocampal formation showed a slight impairment of growth following lead treatment while there were no detectable effects on size of cerebellar grafts. Grafts of the developing parietal cerebral cortex were inhibited in their growth in host animals given 2% lead while there was a small but significant increase in size following 1% lead. These results demonstrate the applicability of the grafting technique for studies of chronic low level lead intoxication. The method has revealed highly significant effects of lead on growth of certain selected brain areas and will be used for further histological, biochemical, and electrophysiological analysis of chronic lead effects on development of defined brain areas.

  12. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Organophosphorus and Thiocarbamate Pesticides Reveals Multiple Serine Hydrolase Targets in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    NOMURA, DANIEL K.; CASIDA, JOHN E.

    2010-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) and thiocarbamate (TC) agrochemicals are used worldwide as insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides, but their safety assessment in terms of potential off-targets remains incomplete. In this study, we used a chemoproteomic platform, termed activity-based protein profiling, to broadly define serine hydrolase targets in mouse brain of a panel of 29 OP and TC pesticides. Among the secondary targets identified, enzymes involved in degradation of endocannabinoid signaling lipids, monoacylglycerol lipase and fatty acid amide hydrolase, were inhibited by several OP and TC pesticides. Blockade of these two enzymes led to elevations in brain endocannabinoid levels and dysregulated brain arachidonate metabolism. Other secondary targets include enzymes thought to also play important roles in the nervous system and unannotated proteins. This study reveals a multitude of secondary targets for OP and TC pesticides and underscores the utility of chemoproteomic platforms in gaining insights into biochemical pathways that are perturbed by these toxicants. PMID:21341672

  13. Metabolite mapping reveals severe widespread perturbation of multiple metabolic processes in Huntington's disease human brain.

    PubMed

    Patassini, Stefano; Begley, Paul; Xu, Jingshu; Church, Stephanie J; Reid, Suzanne J; Kim, Eric H; Curtis, Maurice A; Dragunow, Mike; Waldvogel, Henry J; Snell, Russell G; Unwin, Richard D; Faull, Richard L M; Cooper, Garth J S

    2016-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetically-mediated neurodegenerative disorder wherein the aetiological defect is a mutation in the Huntington's gene (HTT), which alters the structure of the huntingtin protein (Htt) through lengthening of its polyglutamine tract, thus initiating a cascade that ultimately leads to premature death. However, neurodegeneration typically manifests in HD only in middle age, and mechanisms linking the causative mutation to brain disease are poorly understood. Brain metabolism is severely perturbed in HD, and some studies have indicated a potential role for mutant Htt as a driver of these metabolic aberrations. Here, our objective was to determine the effects of HD on brain metabolism by measuring levels of polar metabolites in regions known to undergo varying degrees of damage. We performed gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabolomic analyses in a case-control study of eleven brain regions in short post-mortem-delay human tissue from nine well-characterized HD patients and nine matched controls. In each patient, we measured metabolite content in representative tissue-samples from eleven brain regions that display varying degrees of damage in HD, thus identifying the presence and abundance of 63 different metabolites from several molecular classes, including carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleosides, and neurotransmitters. Robust alterations in regional brain-metabolite abundances were observed in HD patients: these included changes in levels of small molecules that play important roles as intermediates in the tricarboxylic-acid and urea cycles, and amino-acid metabolism. Our findings point to widespread disruption of brain metabolism and indicate a complex phenotype beyond the gradient of neuropathologic damage observed in HD brain. PMID:27267344

  14. The function of histamine receptor H4R in the brain revealed by interaction partners.

    PubMed

    Moya-Garcia, Aurelio A; Rodriguez, Carlos E; Morilla, Ian; Sanchez-Jimenez, Francisca; Ranea, Juan A G

    2011-01-01

    The histamine H4 receptor is mainly expressed in haematopoietic cells, hence is linked to inflammatory and immune system conditions. It has been recently discovered that the receptor is expressed also in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), but its role in the brain remains unclear. We address the potential functions of the histamine H4 receptor in the human brain using a 'guilty by association' logic, by close examination of protein-protein functional associations networks in the human proteome. PMID:21622255

  15. Brain damages in ketamine addicts as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunmei; Zheng, Dong; Xu, Jie; Lam, Waiping; Yew, D. T.

    2013-01-01

    Ketamine, a known antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartic (NMDA) glutamate receptors, had been used as an anesthetic particularly for pediatric or for cardiac patients. Unfortunately, ketamine has become an abusive drug in many parts of the world while chronic and prolonged usage led to damages of many organs including the brain. However, no studies on possible damages in the brains induced by chronic ketamine abuse have been documented in the human via neuroimaging. This paper described for the first time via employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) the changes in ketamine addicts of 0.5–12 years and illustrated the possible brain regions susceptible to ketamine abuse. Twenty-one ketamine addicts were recruited and the results showed that the lesions in the brains of ketamine addicts were located in many regions which appeared 2–4 years after ketamine addiction. Cortical atrophy was usually evident in the frontal, parietal or occipital cortices of addicts. Such study confirmed that many brain regions in the human were susceptible to chronic ketamine injury and presented a diffuse effect of ketamine on the brain which might differ from other central nervous system (CNS) drugs, such as cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine. PMID:23882190

  16. Positron Emission Tomography Reveals Abnormal Topological Organization in Functional Brain Network in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiangzhe; Zhang, Yanjun; Feng, Hongbo; Jiang, Donglang

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated alterations in the topological organization of structural brain networks in diabetes mellitus (DM). However, the DM-related changes in the topological properties in functional brain networks are unexplored so far. We therefore used fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data to construct functional brain networks of 73 DM patients and 91 sex- and age-matched normal controls (NCs), followed by a graph theoretical analysis. We found that both DM patients and NCs had a small-world topology in functional brain network. In comparison to the NC group, the DM group was found to have significantly lower small-world index, lower normalized clustering coefficients and higher normalized characteristic path length. Moreover, for diabetic patients, the nodal centrality was significantly reduced in the right rectus, the right cuneus, the left middle occipital gyrus, and the left postcentral gyrus, and it was significantly increased in the orbitofrontal region of the left middle frontal gyrus, the left olfactory region, and the right paracentral lobule. Our results demonstrated that the diabetic brain was associated with disrupted topological organization in the functional PET network, thus providing functional evidence for the abnormalities of brain networks in DM. PMID:27303259

  17. Surface area and cortical thickness descriptors reveal different attributes of the structural human brain networks.

    PubMed

    Sanabria-Diaz, Gretel; Melie-García, Lester; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Hernández-González, Gertrudis; Valdés-Urrutia, Lourdes; Galán, Lídice; Valdés-Sosa, Pedro

    2010-05-01

    Recently, a related morphometry-based connection concept has been introduced using local mean cortical thickness and volume to study the underlying complex architecture of the brain networks. In this article, the surface area is employed as a morphometric descriptor to study the concurrent changes between brain structures and to build binarized connectivity graphs. The statistical similarity in surface area between pair of regions was measured by computing the partial correlation coefficient across 186 normal subjects of the Cuban Human Brain Mapping Project. We demonstrated that connectivity matrices obtained follow a small-world behavior for two different parcellations of the brain gray matter. The properties of the connectivity matrices were compared to the matrices obtained using the mean cortical thickness for the same cortical parcellations. The topology of the cortical thickness and surface area networks were statistically different, demonstrating that both capture distinct properties of the interaction or different aspects of the same interaction (mechanical, anatomical, chemical, etc.) between brain structures. This finding could be explained by the fact that each descriptor is driven by distinct cellular mechanisms as result of a distinct genetic origin. To our knowledge, this is the first time that surface area is used to study the morphological connectivity of brain networks. PMID:20083210

  18. Intrinsic connectivity in the human brain does not reveal networks for 'basic' emotions.

    PubMed

    Touroutoglou, Alexandra; Lindquist, Kristen A; Dickerson, Bradford C; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2015-09-01

    We tested two competing models for the brain basis of emotion, the basic emotion theory and the conceptual act theory of emotion, using resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fcMRI). The basic emotion view hypothesizes that anger, sadness, fear, disgust and happiness each arise from a brain network that is innate, anatomically constrained and homologous in other animals. The conceptual act theory of emotion hypothesizes that an instance of emotion is a brain state constructed from the interaction of domain-general, core systems within the brain such as the salience, default mode and frontoparietal control networks. Using peak coordinates derived from a meta-analysis of task-evoked emotion fMRI studies, we generated a set of whole-brain rs-fcMRI 'discovery' maps for each emotion category and examined the spatial overlap in their conjunctions. Instead of discovering a specific network for each emotion category, variance in the discovery maps was accounted for by the known domain-general network. Furthermore, the salience network is observed as part of every emotion category. These results indicate that specific networks for each emotion do not exist within the intrinsic architecture of the human brain and instead support the conceptual act theory of emotion. PMID:25680990

  19. Positron Emission Tomography Reveals Abnormal Topological Organization in Functional Brain Network in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiangzhe; Zhang, Yanjun; Feng, Hongbo; Jiang, Donglang

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated alterations in the topological organization of structural brain networks in diabetes mellitus (DM). However, the DM-related changes in the topological properties in functional brain networks are unexplored so far. We therefore used fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data to construct functional brain networks of 73 DM patients and 91 sex- and age-matched normal controls (NCs), followed by a graph theoretical analysis. We found that both DM patients and NCs had a small-world topology in functional brain network. In comparison to the NC group, the DM group was found to have significantly lower small-world index, lower normalized clustering coefficients and higher normalized characteristic path length. Moreover, for diabetic patients, the nodal centrality was significantly reduced in the right rectus, the right cuneus, the left middle occipital gyrus, and the left postcentral gyrus, and it was significantly increased in the orbitofrontal region of the left middle frontal gyrus, the left olfactory region, and the right paracentral lobule. Our results demonstrated that the diabetic brain was associated with disrupted topological organization in the functional PET network, thus providing functional evidence for the abnormalities of brain networks in DM. PMID:27303259

  20. Delay-correlation landscape reveals characteristic time delays of brain rhythms and heart interactions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Aijing; Liu, Kang K L; Bartsch, Ronny P; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2016-05-13

    Within the framework of 'Network Physiology', we ask a fundamental question of how modulations in cardiac dynamics emerge from networked brain-heart interactions. We propose a generalized time-delay approach to identify and quantify dynamical interactions between physiologically relevant brain rhythms and the heart rate. We perform empirical analysis of synchronized continuous EEG and ECG recordings from 34 healthy subjects during night-time sleep. For each pair of brain rhythm and heart interaction, we construct a delay-correlation landscape (DCL) that characterizes how individual brain rhythms are coupled to the heart rate, and how modulations in brain and cardiac dynamics are coordinated in time. We uncover characteristic time delays and an ensemble of specific profiles for the probability distribution of time delays that underly brain-heart interactions. These profiles are consistently observed in all subjects, indicating a universal pattern. Tracking the evolution of DCL across different sleep stages, we find that the ensemble of time-delay profiles changes from one physiologic state to another, indicating a strong association with physiologic state and function. The reported observations provide new insights on neurophysiological regulation of cardiac dynamics, with potential for broad clinical applications. The presented approach allows one to simultaneously capture key elements of dynamic interactions, including characteristic time delays and their time evolution, and can be applied to a range of coupled dynamical systems. PMID:27044991

  1. Cytogenomic mapping and bioinformatic mining reveal interacting brain expressed genes for intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microarray analysis has been used as the first-tier genetic testing to detect chromosomal imbalances and copy number variants (CNVs) for pediatric patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD). To further investigate the candidate genes and underlying dosage-sensitive mechanisms related to ID, cytogenomic mapping of critical regions and bioinformatic mining of candidate brain-expressed genes (BEGs) and their functional interactions were performed. Critical regions of chromosomal imbalances and pathogenic CNVs were mapped by subtracting known benign CNVs from the Databases of Genomic Variants (DGV) and extracting smallest overlap regions with cases from DatabasE of Chromosomal Imbalance and Phenotype in Humans using Ensembl Resources (DECIPHER). BEGs from these critical regions were revealed by functional annotation using Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) and by tissue expression pattern from Uniprot. Cross-region interrelations and functional networks of the BEGs were analyzed using Gene Relationships Across Implicated Loci (GRAIL) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results Of the 1,354 patients analyzed by oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), pathogenic abnormalities were detected in 176 patients including genomic disorders in 66 patients (37.5%), subtelomeric rearrangements in 45 patients (25.6%), interstitial imbalances in 33 patients (18.8%), chromosomal structural rearrangements in 17 patients (9.7%) and aneuploidies in 15 patients (8.5%). Subtractive and extractive mapping defined 82 disjointed critical regions from the detected abnormalities. A total of 461 BEGs was generated from 73 disjointed critical regions. Enrichment of central nervous system specific genes in these regions was noted. The number of BEGs increased with the size of the regions. A list of 108 candidate BEGs with significant cross region interrelation was identified by GRAIL and five

  2. Systematic discovery of regulated and conserved alternative exons in the mammalian brain reveals NMD modulating chromatin regulators.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qinghong; Weyn-Vanhentenryck, Sebastien M; Wu, Jie; Sloan, Steven A; Zhang, Ye; Chen, Kenian; Wu, Jia Qian; Barres, Ben A; Zhang, Chaolin

    2015-03-17

    Alternative splicing (AS) dramatically expands the complexity of the mammalian brain transcriptome, but its atlas remains incomplete. Here we performed deep mRNA sequencing of mouse cortex to discover and characterize alternative exons with potential functional significance. Our analysis expands the list of AS events over 10-fold compared with previous annotations, demonstrating that 72% of multiexon genes express multiple splice variants in this single tissue. To evaluate functionality of the newly discovered AS events, we conducted comprehensive analyses on central nervous system (CNS) cell type-specific splicing, targets of tissue- or cell type-specific RNA binding proteins (RBPs), evolutionary selection pressure, and coupling of AS with nonsense-mediated decay (AS-NMD). We show that newly discovered events account for 23-42% of all cassette exons under tissue- or cell type-specific regulation. Furthermore, over 7,000 cassette exons are under evolutionary selection for regulated AS in mammals, 70% of which are new. Among these are 3,058 highly conserved cassette exons, including 1,014 NMD exons that may function directly to control gene expression levels. These NMD exons are particularly enriched in RBPs including splicing factors and interestingly also regulators for other steps of RNA metabolism. Unexpectedly, a second group of NMD exons reside in genes encoding chromatin regulators. Although the conservation of NMD exons in RBPs frequently extends into lower vertebrates, NMD exons in chromatin regulators are introduced later into the mammalian lineage, implying the emergence of a novel mechanism coupling AS and epigenetics. Our results highlight previously uncharacterized complexity and evolution in the mammalian brain transcriptome. PMID:25737549

  3. Cytogenomic profiling of breast cancer brain metastases reveals potential for repurposing targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Michelhaugh, Sharon K.; Wijesinghe, Priyanga; Dyson, Greg; Kruger, Adele; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Choi, Lydia; Alosh, Baraa; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer brain metastases remain a significant clinical problem. Chemotherapy is ineffective and a lack of treatment options result in poor patient outcomes. Targeted therapeutics have proven to be highly effective in primary breast cancer, but lack of molecular genomic characterization of metastatic brain tumors is hindering the development of new treatment regimens. Here we contribute to fill this void by reporting on gene copy number variation (CNV) in 10 breast cancer metastatic brain tumors, assayed by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Results were compared to a list of cancer genes verified by others to influence cancer. Cancer gene aberrations were identified in all specimens and pathway-level analysis was applied to aggregate data, which identified stem cell pluripotency pathway enrichment and highlighted recurring, significant amplification of SOX2, PIK3CA, NTRK1, GNAS, CTNNB1, and FGFR1. For a subset of the metastatic brain tumor samples (n=4) we compared patient-matched primary breast cancer specimens. The results of our CGH analysis and validation by alternative methods indicate that oncogenic signals driving growth of metastatic tumors exist in the original cancer. This report contributes support for more rapid development of new treatments of metastatic brain tumors, the use of genomic-based diagnostic tools and repurposed drug treatments. PMID:25970776

  4. scMRI Reveals Large-Scale Brain Network Abnormalities in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Brandon A.; Anderson, Jeffrey S.; Froehlich, Alyson L.; Prigge, Molly B. D.; Nielsen, Jared A.; Cooperrider, Jason R.; Cariello, Annahir N.; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Alexander, Andrew L.; Lange, Nicholas; Bigler, Erin D.; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a complex neurological condition characterized by childhood onset of dysfunction in multiple cognitive domains including socio-emotional function, speech and language, and processing of internally versus externally directed stimuli. Although gross brain anatomic differences in autism are well established, recent studies investigating regional differences in brain structure and function have yielded divergent and seemingly contradictory results. How regional abnormalities relate to the autistic phenotype remains unclear. We hypothesized that autism exhibits distinct perturbations in network-level brain architecture, and that cognitive dysfunction may be reflected by abnormal network structure. Network-level anatomic abnormalities in autism have not been previously described. We used structural covariance MRI to investigate network-level differences in gray matter structure within two large-scale networks strongly implicated in autism, the salience network and the default mode network, in autistic subjects and age-, gender-, and IQ-matched controls. We report specific perturbations in brain network architecture in the salience and default-mode networks consistent with clinical manifestations of autism. Extent and distribution of the salience network, involved in social-emotional regulation of environmental stimuli, is restricted in autism. In contrast, posterior elements of the default mode network have increased spatial distribution, suggesting a ‘posteriorization’ of this network. These findings are consistent with a network-based model of autism, and suggest a unifying interpretation of previous work. Moreover, we provide evidence of specific abnormalities in brain network architecture underlying autism that are quantifiable using standard clinical MRI. PMID:23185305

  5. Separation methods that are capable of revealing blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Dash, Alekha K; Elmquist, William F

    2003-11-25

    The objective of this review is to emphasize the application of separation science in evaluating the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability to drugs and bioactive agents. Several techniques have been utilized to quantitate the BBB permeability. These methods can be classified into two major categories: in vitro or in vivo. The in vivo methods used include brain homogenization, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sampling, voltametry, autoradiography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, positron emission tomography (PET), intracerebral microdialysis, and brain uptake index (BUI) determination. The in vitro methods include tissue culture and immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) technology. Separation methods have always played an important role as adjunct methods to the methods outlined above for the quantitation of BBB permeability and have been utilized the most with brain homogenization, in situ brain perfusion, CSF sampling, intracerebral microdialysis, in vitro tissue culture and IAM chromatography. However, the literature published to date indicates that the separation method has been used the most in conjunction with intracerebral microdialysis and CSF sampling methods. The major advantages of microdialysis sampling in BBB permeability studies is the possibility of online separation and quantitation as well as the need for only a small sample volume for such an analysis. Separation methods are preferred over non-separation methods in BBB permeability evaluation for two main reasons. First, when the selectivity of a determination method is insufficient, interfering substances must be separated from the analyte of interest prior to determination. Secondly, when large number of analytes is to be detected and quantitated by a single analytical procedure, the mixture must be separated to each individual component prior to determination. Chiral separation in particular can be essential to evaluate the stereo-selective permeation and distribution of agents into the

  6. Unusual Adrenal and Brain Metastases From Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma Revealed by 131I SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhen; Shen, Guo-hua; Liu, Bin; Kuang, An-ren

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal metastasis from differentiated thyroid carcinoma is uncommon. Metastatic involvement of both adrenal and brain in the same patient from differentiated thyroid carcinoma is rare. Here, we described an unusual case with iodine-avid lung, bone, adrenal, liver, and brain metastases from follicular thyroid carcinoma confirmed by 131I SPECT/CT. The utilization of SPECT/CT in thyroid cancer patients can detect the presence of metastases and also exclude potential false-positive lesions. Our case demonstrates that SPECT/CT is helpful in localizing and confirming metastatic lesions from differentiated thyroid carcinoma in rare and unusual sites. PMID:26018699

  7. An unexpected tetanus case.

    PubMed

    Ergonul, Onder; Egeli, Demet; Kahyaoglu, Bulent; Bahar, Mois; Etienne, Mill; Bleck, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    1 million cases of tetanus are estimated to occur worldwide each year, with more than 200 000 deaths. Tetanus is a life-threatening but preventable disease caused by a toxin produced by Clostridium tetani-a Gram-positive bacillus found in high concentrations in soil and animal excrement. Tetanus is almost completely preventable by active immunisation, but very rarely unexpected cases can occur in individuals who have been previously vaccinated. We report a case of generalised tetanus in a 22-year-old woman that arose despite the protective antitoxin antibody in her serum. The patient received all her vaccinations in the USA; her last vaccination was 6 years ago. The case was unusual because the patient had received all standard vaccinations, had no defined port of entry at disease onset, and had symptoms lasting for 6 months. Tetanus can present with unusual clinical forms; therefore, the diagnosis and management of this rare but difficult disease should be updated. In this Grand Round, we review the clinical features, epidemiology, treatment, and prognosis of C tetani infections. PMID:27301930

  8. Event-Related Brain Potentials Reveal Anomalies in Temporal Processing of Faces in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPartland, James; Dawson, Geraldine; Webb, Sara J.; Panagiotides, Heracles; Carver, Leslie J.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Individuals with autism exhibit impairments in face recognition, and neuroimaging studies have shown that individuals with autism exhibit abnormal patterns of brain activity during face processing. The current study examined the temporal characteristics of face processing in autism and their relation to behavior. Method: High-density…

  9. Brain imaging reveals neuronal circuitry underlying the crow's perception of human faces.

    PubMed

    Marzluff, John M; Miyaoka, Robert; Minoshima, Satoshi; Cross, Donna J

    2012-09-25

    Crows pay close attention to people and can remember specific faces for several years after a single encounter. In mammals, including humans, faces are evaluated by an integrated neural system involving the sensory cortex, limbic system, and striatum. Here we test the hypothesis that birds use a similar system by providing an imaging analysis of an awake, wild animal's brain as it performs an adaptive, complex cognitive task. We show that in vivo imaging of crow brain activity during exposure to familiar human faces previously associated with either capture (threatening) or caretaking (caring) activated several brain regions that allow birds to discriminate, associate, and remember visual stimuli, including the rostral hyperpallium, nidopallium, mesopallium, and lateral striatum. Perception of threatening faces activated circuitry including amygdalar, thalamic, and brainstem regions, known in humans and other vertebrates to be related to emotion, motivation, and conditioned fear learning. In contrast, perception of caring faces activated motivation and striatal regions. In our experiments and in nature, when perceiving a threatening face, crows froze and fixed their gaze (decreased blink rate), which was associated with activation of brain regions known in birds to regulate perception, attention, fear, and escape behavior. These findings indicate that, similar to humans, crows use sophisticated visual sensory systems to recognize faces and modulate behavioral responses by integrating visual information with expectation and emotion. Our approach has wide applicability and potential to improve our understanding of the neural basis for animal behavior. PMID:22984177

  10. Perceptual Shift in Bilingualism: Brain Potentials Reveal Plasticity in Pre-Attentive Colour Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athanasopoulos, Panos; Dering, Benjamin; Wiggett, Alison; Kuipers, Jan-Rouke; Thierry, Guillaume

    2010-01-01

    The validity of the linguistic relativity principle continues to stimulate vigorous debate and research. The debate has recently shifted from the behavioural investigation arena to a more biologically grounded field, in which tangible physiological evidence for language effects on perception can be obtained. Using brain potentials in a colour…

  11. Tensor-Based Morphometry and Stereology Reveal Brain Pathology in the Complexin1 Knockout Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kielar, Catherine; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Navarro Negredo, Paloma; Tse, Desmond H. Y.; Morton, A. Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Complexins (Cplxs) are small, soluble, regulatory proteins that bind reversibly to the SNARE complex and modulate synaptic vesicle release. Cplx1 knockout mice (Cplx1−/−) have the earliest known onset of ataxia seen in a mouse model, although hitherto no histopathology has been described in these mice. Nevertheless, the profound neurological phenotype displayed by Cplx1−/− mutants suggests that significant functional abnormalities must be present in these animals. In this study, MRI was used to automatically detect regions where structural differences were not obvious when using a traditional histological approach. Tensor-based morphometry of Cplx1−/− mouse brains showed selective volume loss from the thalamus and cerebellum. Stereological analysis of Cplx1−/− and Cplx1+/+ mice brain slices confirmed the volume loss in the thalamus as well as loss in some lobules of the cerebellum. Finally, stereology was used to show that there was loss of cerebellar granule cells in Cplx1−/− mice when compared to Cplx1+/+ animals. Our study is the first to describe pathological changes in Cplx1−/− mouse brain. We suggest that the ataxia in Cplx1−/− mice is likely to be due to pathological changes in both cerebellum and thalamus. Reduced levels of Cplx proteins have been reported in brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, understanding the effects of Cplx depletion in brains from Cplx1−/− mice may also shed light on the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology in disorders in which loss of Cplx1 occurs. PMID:22393426

  12. An allograft glioma model reveals the dependence of aquaporin-4 expression on the brain microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Noell, Susan; Ritz, Rainer; Wolburg-Buchholz, Karen; Wolburg, Hartwig; Fallier-Becker, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4), the main water channel of the brain, is highly expressed in animal glioma and human glioblastoma in situ. In contrast, most cultivated glioma cell lines don't express AQP4, and primary cell cultures of human glioblastoma lose it during the first passages. Accordingly, in C6 cells and RG2 cells, two glioma cell lines of the rat, and in SMA mouse glioma cell lines, we found no AQP4 expression. We confirmed an AQP4 loss in primary human glioblastoma cell cultures after a few passages. RG-2 glioma cells if grafted into the brain developed AQP4 expression. This led us consider the possibility of AQP4 expression depends on brain microenvironment. In previous studies, we observed that the typical morphological conformation of AQP4 as orthogonal arrays of particles (OAP) depended on the extracellular matrix component agrin. In this study, we showed for the first time implanted AQP4 negative glioma cells in animal brain or flank to express AQP4 specifically in the intracerebral gliomas but neither in the extracranial nor in the flank gliomas. AQP4 expression in intracerebral gliomas went along with an OAP loss, compared to normal brain tissue. AQP4 staining in vivo normally is polarized in the astrocytic endfoot membranes at the glia limitans superficialis and perivascularis, but in C6 and RG2 tumors the AQP4 staining is redistributed over the whole glioma cell as in human glioblastoma. In contrast, primary rat or mouse astrocytes in culture did not lose their ability to express AQP4, and they were able to form few OAPs. PMID:22590566

  13. An Allograft Glioma Model Reveals the Dependence of Aquaporin-4 Expression on the Brain Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Noell, Susan; Ritz, Rainer; Wolburg-Buchholz, Karen; Wolburg, Hartwig; Fallier-Becker, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4), the main water channel of the brain, is highly expressed in animal glioma and human glioblastoma in situ. In contrast, most cultivated glioma cell lines don’t express AQP4, and primary cell cultures of human glioblastoma lose it during the first passages. Accordingly, in C6 cells and RG2 cells, two glioma cell lines of the rat, and in SMA mouse glioma cell lines, we found no AQP4 expression. We confirmed an AQP4 loss in primary human glioblastoma cell cultures after a few passages. RG-2 glioma cells if grafted into the brain developed AQP4 expression. This led us consider the possibility of AQP4 expression depends on brain microenvironment. In previous studies, we observed that the typical morphological conformation of AQP4 as orthogonal arrays of particles (OAP) depended on the extracellular matrix component agrin. In this study, we showed for the first time implanted AQP4 negative glioma cells in animal brain or flank to express AQP4 specifically in the intracerebral gliomas but neither in the extracranial nor in the flank gliomas. AQP4 expression in intracerebral gliomas went along with an OAP loss, compared to normal brain tissue. AQP4 staining in vivo normally is polarized in the astrocytic endfoot membranes at the glia limitans superficialis and perivascularis, but in C6 and RG2 tumors the AQP4 staining is redistributed over the whole glioma cell as in human glioblastoma. In contrast, primary rat or mouse astrocytes in culture did not lose their ability to express AQP4, and they were able to form few OAPs. PMID:22590566

  14. Temporal Non-Local Means Filtering Reveals Real-Time Whole-Brain Cortical Interactions in Resting fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, Chitresh; Chong, Minqi; Choi, Soyoung; Joshi, Anand A.; Haldar, Justin P.; Damasio, Hanna; Leahy, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Intensity variations over time in resting BOLD fMRI exhibit spatial correlation patterns consistent with a set of large scale cortical networks. However, visualizations of this data on the brain surface, even after extensive preprocessing, are dominated by local intensity fluctuations that obscure larger scale behavior. Our novel adaptation of non-local means (NLM) filtering, which we refer to as temporal NLM or tNLM, reduces these local fluctuations without the spatial blurring that occurs when using standard linear filtering methods. We show examples of tNLM filtering that allow direct visualization of spatio-temporal behavior on the cortical surface. These results reveal patterns of activity consistent with known networks as well as more complex dynamic changes within and between these networks. This ability to directly visualize brain activity may facilitate new insights into spontaneous brain dynamics. Further, temporal NLM can also be used as a preprocessor for resting fMRI for exploration of dynamic brain networks. We demonstrate its utility through application to graph-based functional cortical parcellation. Simulations with known ground truth functional regions demonstrate that tNLM filtering prior to parcellation avoids the formation of false parcels that can arise when using linear filtering. Application to resting fMRI data from the Human Connectome Project shows significant improvement, in comparison to linear filtering, in quantitative agreement with functional regions identified independently using task-based experiments as well as in test-retest reliability. PMID:27391481

  15. Temporal Non-Local Means Filtering Reveals Real-Time Whole-Brain Cortical Interactions in Resting fMRI.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Chitresh; Chong, Minqi; Choi, Soyoung; Joshi, Anand A; Haldar, Justin P; Damasio, Hanna; Leahy, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Intensity variations over time in resting BOLD fMRI exhibit spatial correlation patterns consistent with a set of large scale cortical networks. However, visualizations of this data on the brain surface, even after extensive preprocessing, are dominated by local intensity fluctuations that obscure larger scale behavior. Our novel adaptation of non-local means (NLM) filtering, which we refer to as temporal NLM or tNLM, reduces these local fluctuations without the spatial blurring that occurs when using standard linear filtering methods. We show examples of tNLM filtering that allow direct visualization of spatio-temporal behavior on the cortical surface. These results reveal patterns of activity consistent with known networks as well as more complex dynamic changes within and between these networks. This ability to directly visualize brain activity may facilitate new insights into spontaneous brain dynamics. Further, temporal NLM can also be used as a preprocessor for resting fMRI for exploration of dynamic brain networks. We demonstrate its utility through application to graph-based functional cortical parcellation. Simulations with known ground truth functional regions demonstrate that tNLM filtering prior to parcellation avoids the formation of false parcels that can arise when using linear filtering. Application to resting fMRI data from the Human Connectome Project shows significant improvement, in comparison to linear filtering, in quantitative agreement with functional regions identified independently using task-based experiments as well as in test-retest reliability. PMID:27391481

  16. Unexpected light behaviour in periodic segmented waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschiéri, Pierre; Doya, Valérie

    2011-12-01

    In this article, it is shown that multimode periodic segmented waveguides (PSW) are versatile optical systems in which properties of wave chaos can be highlighted. Numerical wave analysis reveals that structures of quantum phase space of PSW are similar to Poincaré sections which display a mixed phase space where stability islands are surrounded by a chaotic sea. Then, unexpected light behavior can occur such as, input gaussian beams do not diverge during the propagation in a highly multimode waveguide.

  17. Small RNA sequencing-microarray analyses in Parkinson leukocytes reveal deep brain stimulation-induced splicing changes that classify brain region transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Soreq, Lilach; Salomonis, Nathan; Bronstein, Michal; Greenberg, David S.; Israel, Zvi; Bergman, Hagai; Soreq, Hermona

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key post transcriptional regulators of their multiple target genes. However, the detailed profile of miRNA expression in Parkinson's disease, the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide and the first motor disorder has not been charted yet. Here, we report comprehensive miRNA profiling by next-generation small-RNA sequencing, combined with targets inspection by splice-junction and exon arrays interrogating leukocyte RNA in Parkinson's disease patients before and after deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment and of matched healthy control volunteers (HC). RNA-Seq analysis identified 254 miRNAs and 79 passenger strand forms as expressed in blood leukocytes, 16 of which were modified in patients pre-treatment as compared to HC. 11 miRNAs were modified following brain stimulation 5 of which were changed inversely to the disease induced changes. Stimulation cessation further induced changes in 11 miRNAs. Transcript isoform abundance analysis yielded 332 changed isoforms in patients compared to HC, which classified brain transcriptomes of 47 PD and control independent microarrays. Functional enrichment analysis highlighted mitochondrion organization. DBS induced 155 splice changes, enriched in ubiquitin homeostasis. Cellular composition analysis revealed immune cell activity pre and post treatment. Overall, 217 disease and 74 treatment alternative isoforms were predictably targeted by modified miRNAs within both 3′ and 5′ untranslated ends and coding sequence sites. The stimulation-induced network sustained 4 miRNAs and 7 transcripts of the disease network. We believe that the presented dynamic networks provide a novel avenue for identifying disease and treatment-related therapeutic targets. Furthermore, the identification of these networks is a major step forward in the road for understanding the molecular basis for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases and assessment of the impact of brain stimulation on human diseases

  18. Asymmetric neural coding revealed by in vivo calcium imaging in the honey bee brain.

    PubMed

    Rigosi, Elisa; Haase, Albrecht; Rath, Lisa; Anfora, Gianfranco; Vallortigara, Giorgio; Szyszka, Paul

    2015-03-22

    Left-right asymmetries are common properties of nervous systems. Although lateralized sensory processing has been well studied, information is lacking about how asymmetries are represented at the level of neural coding. Using in vivo functional imaging, we identified a population-level left-right asymmetry in the honey bee's primary olfactory centre, the antennal lobe (AL). When both antennae were stimulated via a frontal odour source, the inter-odour distances between neural response patterns were higher in the right than in the left AL. Behavioural data correlated with the brain imaging results: bees with only their right antenna were better in discriminating a target odour in a cross-adaptation paradigm. We hypothesize that the differences in neural odour representations in the two brain sides serve to increase coding capacity by parallel processing. PMID:25673679

  19. Asymmetric neural coding revealed by in vivo calcium imaging in the honey bee brain

    PubMed Central

    Rigosi, Elisa; Haase, Albrecht; Rath, Lisa; Anfora, Gianfranco; Vallortigara, Giorgio; Szyszka, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Left–right asymmetries are common properties of nervous systems. Although lateralized sensory processing has been well studied, information is lacking about how asymmetries are represented at the level of neural coding. Using in vivo functional imaging, we identified a population-level left–right asymmetry in the honey bee's primary olfactory centre, the antennal lobe (AL). When both antennae were stimulated via a frontal odour source, the inter-odour distances between neural response patterns were higher in the right than in the left AL. Behavioural data correlated with the brain imaging results: bees with only their right antenna were better in discriminating a target odour in a cross-adaptation paradigm. We hypothesize that the differences in neural odour representations in the two brain sides serve to increase coding capacity by parallel processing. PMID:25673679

  20. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor microimaging reveals a role for Bcl-x in brain development and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangyang; Chen, Ying-bei; Hardwick, J Marie; Miller, Michael I; Plachez, Celine; Richards, Linda J; Yarowsky, Paul; van Zijl, Peter; Mori, Susumu

    2005-02-23

    A new technique based on diffusion tensor imaging and computational neuroanatomy was developed to efficiently and quantitatively characterize the three-dimensional morphology of the developing brains. The technique was used to analyze the phenotype of conditional Bcl-x knock-out mice, in which the bcl-x gene was deleted specifically in neurons of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus beginning at embryonic day 13.5 as cells became postmitotic. Affected brain regions and associated axonal tracts showed severe atrophy in adult Bcl-x-deficient mice. Longitudinal studies revealed that these phenotypes are established by regressive processes that occur primarily during the first postnatal week, whereas neurogenesis and migration showed no obvious abnormality during embryonic stages. Specific families of white matter tracts that once formed normally during the embryonic stages underwent dramatic degeneration postnatally. Thus, this technique serves as a powerful tool to efficiently localize temporal and spatial manifestation of morphological phenotype. PMID:15728827

  1. Auditory information processing during human sleep as revealed by event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Atienza, M; Cantero, J L; Escera, C

    2001-11-01

    The main goal of this review is to elucidate up to what extent pre-attentive auditory information processing is affected during human sleep. Evidence from event-related brain potential (ERP) studies indicates that auditory information processing is selectively affected, even at early phases, across the different stages of sleep-wakefulness continuum. According to these studies, 3 main conclusions are drawn: (1) the sleeping brain is able to automatically detect stimulus occurrence and trigger an orienting response towards that stimulus if its degree of novelty is large; (2) auditory stimuli are represented in the auditory system and maintained for a period of time in sensory memory, making the automatic-change detection during sleep possible; and (3) there are specific brain mechanisms (sleep-specific ERP components associated with the presence of vertex waves and K-complexes) by which information processing can be improved during non-rapid eye movement sleep. However, the remarkably affected amplitude and latency of the waking-ERPs during the different stages of sleep suggests deficits in the building and maintenance of a neural representation of the stimulus as well as in the process by which neural events lead to an orienting response toward such a stimulus. The deactivation of areas in the dorsolateral pre-frontal cortex during sleep contributing to the generation of these ERP components is hypothesized to be one of the main causes for the attenuated amplitude of these ERPs during human sleep. PMID:11682341

  2. Exercise Challenge in Gulf War Illness Reveals Two Subgroups with Altered Brain Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Rayhan, Rakib U.; Stevens, Benson W.; Raksit, Megna P.; Ripple, Joshua A.; Timbol, Christian R.; Adewuyi, Oluwatoyin; VanMeter, John W.; Baraniuk, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 30% of the approximately 700,000 military personnel who served in Operation Desert Storm (1990–1991) have developed Gulf War Illness, a condition that presents with symptoms such as cognitive impairment, autonomic dysfunction, debilitating fatigue and chronic widespread pain that implicate the central nervous system. A hallmark complaint of subjects with Gulf War Illness is post-exertional malaise; defined as an exacerbation of symptoms following physical and/or mental effort. To study the causal relationship between exercise, the brain, and changes in symptoms, 28 Gulf War veterans and 10 controls completed an fMRI scan before and after two exercise stress tests to investigate serial changes in pain, autonomic function, and working memory. Exercise induced two clinical Gulf War Illness subgroups. One subgroup presented with orthostatic tachycardia (n = 10). This phenotype correlated with brainstem atrophy, baseline working memory compensation in the cerebellar vermis, and subsequent loss of compensation after exercise. The other subgroup developed exercise induced hyperalgesia (n = 18) that was associated with cortical atrophy and baseline working memory compensation in the basal ganglia. Alterations in cognition, brain structure, and symptoms were absent in controls. Our novel findings may provide an understanding of the relationship between the brain and post-exertional malaise in Gulf War Illness. PMID:23798990

  3. Genetic depletion of brain 5HT reveals a common molecular pathway mediating compulsivity and impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kane, Michael J.; Briggs, Denise I.; Sykes, Catherine E.; Shah, Mrudang M.; Francescutti, Dina M.; Rosenberg, David R.; Thomas, David M.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by behavioral disinhibition, including disorders of compulsivity (e.g., obsessive-compulsive disorder; OCD) and impulse-control (e.g., impulsive aggression), are severe, highly prevalent and chronically disabling. Treatment options for these diseases are extremely limited. The pathophysiological bases of disorders of behavioral disinhibition are poorly understood but it has been suggested that serotonin dysfunction may play a role. Mice lacking the gene encoding brain tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2−/−), the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of serotonin, were tested in numerous behavioral assays that are well known for their utility in modeling human neuropsychiatric diseases. Mice lacking Tph2 (and brain 5HT) show intense compulsive and impulsive behaviors to include extreme aggression. The impulsivity is motor in form and not cognitive because Tph2−/− mice show normal acquisition and reversal learning on a spatial learning task. Restoration of 5HT levels by treatment of Tph2−/− mice with its immediate precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan attenuated compulsive and impulsive-aggressive behaviors. Surprisingly, in Tph2−/− mice, the lack of 5HT was not associated with anxiety-like behaviors. The results indicate that 5HT mediates behavioral disinhibition in the mammalian brain independent of anxiogenesis. PMID:22443164

  4. Aberrant spontaneous brain activity in chronic tinnitus patients revealed by resting-state functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chen; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xiao-Wei; Xia, Wenqing; Feng, Xu; Gao, Bo; Ju, Sheng-Hong; Wang, Jian; Salvi, Richard; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective The neural mechanisms that give rise to the phantom sound of tinnitus are poorly understood. This study aims to investigate whether aberrant spontaneous brain activity exists in chronic tinnitus patients using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. Materials and methods A total of 31 patients with chronic tinnitus patients and 32 healthy age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls were prospectively examined. Both groups had normal hearing thresholds. We calculated the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFFs) of fMRI signals to measure spontaneous neuronal activity and detect the relationship between fMRI information and clinical data of tinnitus. Results Compared with healthy controls, we observed significant increased ALFF within several selected regions including the right middle temporal gyrus (MTG), right superior frontal gyrus (SFG), and right angular gyrus; decreased ALFF was detected in the left cuneus, right middle occipital gyrus and bilateral thalamus. Moreover, tinnitus distress correlated positively with increased ALFF in right MTG and right SFG; tinnitus duration correlated positively with higher ALFF values in right SFG. Conclusions The present study confirms that chronic tinnitus patients have aberrant ALFF in many brain regions, which is associated with specific clinical tinnitus characteristics. ALFF disturbance in specific brain regions might be used to identify the neuro-pathophysiological mechanisms in chronic tinnitus patients. PMID:25379434

  5. Metabolic Brain Covariant Networks as Revealed by FDG-PET with Reference to Resting-State fMRI Networks

    PubMed Central

    Di, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The human brain is inherently organized as separate networks, as has been widely revealed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Although the large-scale functional connectivity can be partially explained by the underlying white-matter structural connectivity, the question of whether the underlying functional connectivity is related to brain metabolic factors is still largely unanswered. The present study investigated the presence of metabolic covariant networks across subjects using a set of fluorodeoxyglucose (18F, FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) images. Spatial-independent component analysis was performed on the subject series of FDG-PET images. A number of networks that were mainly homotopic regions could be identified, including visual, auditory, motor, cerebellar, and subcortical networks. However, the anterior-posterior networks such as the default-mode and left frontoparietal networks could not be observed. Region-of-interest-based correlation analysis confirmed that the intersubject metabolic covariances within the default-mode and left frontoparietal networks were reduced as compared with corresponding time-series correlations using resting-state fMRI from an independent sample. In contrast, homotopic intersubject metabolic covariances observed using PET were comparable to the corresponding fMRI resting-state time-series correlations. The current study provides preliminary illustration, suggesting that the human brain metabolism pertains to organized covariance patterns that might partially reflect functional connectivity as revealed by resting-state blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD). The discrepancy between the PET covariance and BOLD functional connectivity might reflect the differences of energy consumption coupling and ongoing neural synchronization within these brain networks. PMID:23025619

  6. Whole-brain analytic measures of network communication reveal increased structure-function correlation in right temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wirsich, Jonathan; Perry, Alistair; Ridley, Ben; Proix, Timothée; Golos, Mathieu; Bénar, Christian; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Breakspear, Michael; Jirsa, Viktor; Guye, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo structure-function relationship is key to understanding brain network reorganization due to pathologies. This relationship is likely to be particularly complex in brain network diseases such as temporal lobe epilepsy, in which disturbed large-scale systems are involved in both transient electrical events and long-lasting functional and structural impairments. Herein, we estimated this relationship by analyzing the correlation between structural connectivity and functional connectivity in terms of analytical network communication parameters. As such, we targeted the gradual topological structure-function reorganization caused by the pathology not only at the whole brain scale but also both in core and peripheral regions of the brain. We acquired diffusion (dMRI) and resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI) data in seven right-lateralized TLE (rTLE) patients and fourteen healthy controls and analyzed the structure-function relationship by using analytical network communication metrics derived from the structural connectome. In rTLE patients, we found a widespread hypercorrelated functional network. Network communication analysis revealed greater unspecific branching of the shortest path (search information) in the structural connectome and a higher global correlation between the structural and functional connectivity for the patient group. We also found evidence for a preserved structural rich-club in the patient group. In sum, global augmentation of structure-function correlation might be linked to a smaller functional repertoire in rTLE patients, while sparing the central core of the brain which may represent a pathway that facilitates the spread of seizures. PMID:27330970

  7. High-throughput RNA sequencing reveals structural differences of orthologous brain-expressed genes between western lowland gorillas and humans.

    PubMed

    Lipovich, Leonard; Hou, Zhuo-Cheng; Jia, Hui; Sinkler, Christopher; McGowen, Michael; Sterner, Kirstin N; Weckle, Amy; Sugalski, Amara B; Pipes, Lenore; Gatti, Domenico L; Mason, Christopher E; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R; Kuzawa, Christopher W; Grossman, Lawrence I; Goodman, Morris; Wildman, Derek E

    2016-02-01

    The human brain and human cognitive abilities are strikingly different from those of other great apes despite relatively modest genome sequence divergence. However, little is presently known about the interspecies divergence in gene structure and transcription that might contribute to these phenotypic differences. To date, most comparative studies of gene structure in the brain have examined humans, chimpanzees, and macaque monkeys. To add to this body of knowledge, we analyze here the brain transcriptome of the western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), an African great ape species that is phylogenetically closely related to humans, but with a brain that is approximately one-third the size. Manual transcriptome curation from a sample of the planum temporale region of the neocortex revealed 12 protein-coding genes and one noncoding-RNA gene with exons in the gorilla unmatched by public transcriptome data from the orthologous human loci. These interspecies gene structure differences accounted for a total of 134 amino acids in proteins found in the gorilla that were absent from protein products of the orthologous human genes. Proteins varying in structure between human and gorilla were involved in immunity and energy metabolism, suggesting their relevance to phenotypic differences. This gorilla neocortical transcriptome comprises an empirical, not homology- or prediction-driven, resource for orthologous gene comparisons between human and gorilla. These findings provide a unique repository of the sequences and structures of thousands of genes transcribed in the gorilla brain, pointing to candidate genes that may contribute to the traits distinguishing humans from other closely related great apes. PMID:26132897

  8. Are Rogue Waves Really Unexpected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    An unexpected wave is defined by Gemmrich & Garrett (2008) as a wave that is much taller than a set of neighboring waves. Their definition of "unexpected" refers to a wave that is not anticipated by a casual observer. Clearly, unexpected waves defined in this way are predictable in a statistical sense. They can occur relatively often with a small or moderate crest height, but large unexpected waves that are rogue are rare. Here, this concept is elaborated and statistically described based on a third-order nonlinear model. In particular, the conditional return period of an unexpected wave whose crest exceeds a given threshold is developed. This definition leads to greater return periods or on average less frequent occurrences of unexpected waves than those implied by the conventional return periods not conditioned on a reference threshold. Ultimately, it appears that a rogue wave that is also unexpected would have a lower occurrence frequency than that of a usual rogue wave. As specific applications, the Andrea and WACSIS rogue wave events are examined in detail. Both waves appeared without warning and their crests were nearly $2$-times larger than the surrounding $O(10)$ wave crests, and thus unexpected. The two crest heights are nearly the same as the threshold~$h_{0.3\\cdot10^{6}}\\sim1.6H_{s}$ exceeded on average once every~$0.3\\cdot 10^{6}$ waves, where $H_s$ is the significant wave height. In contrast, the Andrea and WACSIS events, as both rogue and unexpected, would occur slightly less often and on average once every~$3\\cdot10^{6}$ and~$0.6\\cdot10^6$ waves respectively.

  9. Transcriptomic Analyses Reveal Novel Genes with Sexually Dimorphic Expression in Yellow Catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) Brain.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianguo; Zheng, Min; Zheng, Jiajia; Liu, Jian; Liu, Yongzhuang; Peng, Lina; Wang, Pingping; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Qiushi; Luan, Peixian; Mahbooband, Shahid; Sun, Xiaowen

    2015-10-01

    Yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) is a pivotal freshwater aquaculture species in China. It shows sexual size dimorphism favoring male in growth. Whole transcriptome approach is required to get the overview of genetic toolkit for understanding the sex determination mechanism aiming at devising its monosex production. Beside gonads, the brain is also considered as a major organ for vertebrate reproduction. Transcriptomic analyses on the brain and of different developmental stages will provide the dynamic view necessary for better understanding its sex determination. In this regard, we have performed a de novo assembly of yellow catfish brain transcriptome by high throughput Illumina sequencing. A total number of 154,507 contigs were obtained with the lengths ranging from 201 to 27,822 bp and N50 of 2,101 bp, as well as 20,699 unigenes were identified. Of these unigenes, 13 and 54 unigenes were detected to be XY-specifically expressed genes (SEGs) for one and 2-year-old yellow catfish, while the corresponding numbers of XX-SEGs for those two stages were 19 and 13, respectively. Our work identifies a set of annotated genes that are candidate factors affecting sexual dimorphism as well as simple sequence repeat (SSR) and single nucleotide variation (SNV) in yellow catfish. To validate the expression patterns of the sex-related genes, we performed quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) indicating the reliability and accuracy of our analysis. The results in our study may enhance our understanding of yellow catfish sex determination and potentially help to improve the production of all-male yellow catfish for aquaculture. PMID:26242754

  10. Large-scale brain network abnormalities in Huntington's disease revealed by structural covariance.

    PubMed

    Minkova, Lora; Eickhoff, Simon B; Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Kaller, Christoph P; Peter, Jessica; Scheller, Elisa; Lahr, Jacob; Roos, Raymund A; Durr, Alexandra; Leavitt, Blair R; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Klöppel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that can be diagnosed with certainty decades before symptom onset. Studies using structural MRI have identified grey matter (GM) loss predominantly in the striatum, but also involving various cortical areas. So far, voxel-based morphometric studies have examined each brain region in isolation and are thus unable to assess the changes in the interrelation of brain regions. Here, we examined the structural covariance in GM volumes in pre-specified motor, working memory, cognitive flexibility, and social-affective networks in 99 patients with manifest HD (mHD), 106 presymptomatic gene mutation carriers (pre-HD), and 108 healthy controls (HC). After correction for global differences in brain volume, we found that increased GM volume in one region was associated with increased GM volume in another. When statistically comparing the groups, no differences between HC and pre-HD were observed, but increased positive correlations were evident for mHD, relative to pre-HD and HC. These findings could be explained by a HD-related neuronal loss heterogeneously affecting the examined network at the pre-HD stage, which starts to dominate structural covariance globally at the manifest stage. Follow-up analyses identified structural connections between frontoparietal motor regions to be linearly modified by disease burden score (DBS). Moderator effects of disease load burden became significant at a DBS level typically associated with the onset of unequivocal HD motor signs. Together with existing findings from functional connectivity analyses, our data indicates a critical role of these frontoparietal regions for the onset of HD motor signs. PMID:26453902

  11. Non-invasive brain stimulation reveals reorganized cortical outputs in amputees.

    PubMed

    Hall, E J; Flament, D; Fraser, C; Lemon, R N

    1990-08-24

    EMG responses to non-invasive electromagnetic brain stimulation (EMS) were recorded from arm muscles of congenital amputees. Responses were obtained with lower thresholds on the amputated than on the intact side and were evoked from a larger cortical area. Contracting muscles showed increased responses to EMS; the increase was more pronounced on the amputated side. Similar findings were obtained in one traumatic amputee who suffered an early amputation, but not in another patient with a late amputation. We conclude that in congenital amputees there is substantial reorganisation of the corticospinal system and that this may also occur in early traumatic cases. PMID:2243618

  12. Alterations in fiber pathways reveal brain tumor typology: a diffusion tractography study.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Martina; Ius, Tamara; Skrap, Miran; Fadiga, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Conventional structural Magnetic Resonance (MR) techniques can accurately identify brain tumors but do not provide exhaustive information about the integrity of the surrounding/embedded white matter (WM). In this study, we used Diffusion-Weighted (DW) MRI tractography to explore tumor-induced alterations of WM architecture without any a priori knowledge about the fiber paths under consideration. We used deterministic multi-fiber tractography to analyze 16 cases of histologically classified brain tumors (meningioma, low-grade glioma, high-grade glioma) to evaluate the integrity of WM bundles in the tumoral region, in relation to the contralateral unaffected hemisphere. Our new tractographic approach yielded measures of WM involvement which were strongly correlated with the histopathological features of the tumor (r = 0.83, p = 0.0001). In particular, the number of affected fiber tracts were significantly (p = 0.0006) different among tumor types. Our method proposes a new application of diffusion tractography for the detection of tumor aggressiveness in those cases in which the lesion does not involve any major/known WM paths and when a priori information about the local fiber anatomy is lacking. PMID:25250209

  13. Genome-wide analysis reveals mechanisms modulating autophagy in normal brain aging and in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Marta M.; Zheng, Bin; Lu, Tao; Yan, Zhenyu; Py, Bénédicte F.; Ng, Aylwin; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Li, Cheng; Yankner, Bruce A.; Scherzer, Clemens R.; Yuan, Junying

    2010-01-01

    Dysregulation of autophagy, a cellular catabolic mechanism essential for degradation of misfolded proteins, has been implicated in multiple neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms that lead to the autophagy dysfunction are still not clear. Based on the results of a genome-wide screen, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as common mediators upstream of the activation of the type III PI3 kinase, which is critical for the initiation of autophagy. Furthermore, ROS play an essential function in the induction of the type III PI3 kinase and autophagy in response to amyloid β peptide, the main pathogenic mediator of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, lysosomal blockage also caused by Aβ is independent of ROS. In addition, we demonstrate that autophagy is transcriptionally down-regulated during normal aging in the human brain. Strikingly, in contrast to normal aging, we observe transcriptional up-regulation of autophagy in the brains of AD patients, suggesting that there might be a compensatory regulation of autophagy. Interestingly, we show that an AD drug and an AD drug candidate have inhibitory effects on autophagy, raising the possibility that decreasing input into the lysosomal system may help to reduce cellular stress in AD. Finally, we provide a list of candidate drug targets that can be used to safely modulate levels of autophagy without causing cell death. PMID:20660724

  14. Electrical brain imaging reveals the expression and timing of altered error monitoring functions in major depression.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Kristien; Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne; Otte, Georges; Baeken, Chris; Pourtois, Gilles

    2013-11-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by disturbances in affect, motivation, and cognitive control processes, including error detection. However, the expression and timing of the impairments during error monitoring remain unclear in MDD. The behavior and event-related brain responses (ERPs) of 20 patients with MDD were compared with those of 20 healthy controls (HCs), while they performed a Go/noGo task. Errors during this task were associated with 2 ERP components, the error-related negativity (ERN/Ne) and the error positivity (Pe). Results show that the ERN/Ne-correct-related negativity (CRN) amplitude difference was significantly larger in MDD patients (after controlling for speed), compared with HCs, although MDD patients exhibited overactive medial frontal cortex (MFC) activation. By comparison, the subsequent Pe component was smaller in MDD patients compared with HCs and this effect was accompanied by a reduced activation of ventral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) regions. These results suggest that MDD has multiple cascade effects on early error monitoring brain mechanisms. PMID:24364597

  15. The glycerophospho-metabolome and its influence on amino acid homeostasis revealed by brain metabolomics of GDE1(-/-) mice

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Florian; Komatsu, Toru; Nomura, Daniel K.; Trauger, Sunia A.; Thomas, Jason R.; Siuzdak, Gary; Simon, Gabriel M.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2010-01-01

    GDE1 is a mammalian glycerophosphodiesterase (GDE) implicated by in vitro studies in the regulation of glycerophopho-inositol (GroPIns) and possibly other glycerophospho (GroP) metabolites. Here, we show using untargeted metabolomics that GroPIns is profoundly (> 20-fold) elevated in brain tissue from GDE1(-/-) mice. Furthermore, two additional GroP-metabolites not previously identified in eukaryotic cells, glycerophospho-serine (GroPSer) and glycerophospho-glycerate (GroPGate), were also highly elevated in GDE1(-/-) brains. Enzyme assays with synthetic GroP-metabolites confirmed that GroPSer and GroPGate are direct substrates of GDE1. Interestingly, our metabolomic profiles also revealed that serine (both L-and D-) levels were significantly reduced in brains of GDE1 (-/-) mice. These findings designate GroPSer as a previously unappreciated reservoir for free serine in the nervous system and suggest that GDE1, through recycling serine from GroPSer, may impact D-serine-dependent neural signaling processes in vivo. PMID:20797612

  16. Bilingualism at the core of the brain. Structural differences between bilinguals and monolinguals revealed by subcortical shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Burgaleta, Miguel; Sanjuán, Ana; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Sebastian-Galles, Núria; Ávila, César

    2016-01-15

    Naturally acquiring a language shapes the human brain through a long-lasting learning and practice process. This is supported by previous studies showing that managing more than one language from early childhood has an impact on brain structure and function. However, to what extent bilingual individuals present neuroanatomical peculiarities at the subcortical level with respect to monolinguals is yet not well understood, despite the key role of subcortical gray matter for a number of language functions, including monitoring of speech production and language control - two processes especially solicited by bilinguals. Here we addressed this issue by performing a subcortical surface-based analysis in a sample of monolinguals and simultaneous bilinguals (N=88) that only differed in their language experience from birth. This analysis allowed us to study with great anatomical precision the potential differences in morphology of key subcortical structures, namely, the caudate, accumbens, putamen, globus pallidus and thalamus. Vertexwise analyses revealed significantly expanded subcortical structures for bilinguals compared to monolinguals, localized in bilateral putamen and thalamus, as well as in the left globus pallidus and right caudate nucleus. A topographical interpretation of our results suggests that a more complex phonological system in bilinguals may lead to a greater development of a subcortical brain network involved in monitoring articulatory processes. PMID:26505300

  17. Unexpected Molecular Weight Effect in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Holt, Adam P.; Wang, Huiqun; Fan, Fei; Bocharova, Vera; Martin, Halie; Etampawala, Thusitha; White, B. Tyler; Saito, Tomonori; Kang, Nam-Goo; Dadmun, Mark D.; Mays, Jimmy W.; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of the interfacial layer between the polymer matrix and nanoparticles largely determine the macroscopic properties of polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). Although the static thickness of the interfacial layer was found to increase with the molecular weight (MW), the influence of MW on segmental relaxation and the glass transition in this layer remains to be explored. In this Letter, we show an unexpected MW dependence of the interfacial properties in PNC with attractive polymer-nanoparticle interactions: the thickness of the interfacial layer with hindered segmental relaxation decreases as MW increases, in sharp contrast to theoretical predictions. Further analyses reveal a reduction in mass density of the interfacial layer with increasing MW, which can elucidate these unexpected dynamic effects. Our observations call for a significant revision of the current understandings of PNCs and suggest interesting ways to tailor their properties.

  18. Unexpected molecular weight effect in polymer nanocomposites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cheng, Shiwang; Holt, Adam P.; Wang, Huiqun; Fan, Fei; Bocharova, Vera; Martin, Halie J.; Etampawala, Thusitha N.; White, Benjamin Tyler; Saito, Tomonori; Kang, Nam -Goo; et al

    2016-01-22

    Here, the properties of the interfacial layer between the polymer matrix and nanoparticles largely determine the macroscopic properties of polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). Although the static thickness of the interfacial layer was found to increase with the molecular weight (MW), the influence of MW on segmental relaxation and the glass transition in this layer remains to be explored. In this Letter, we show an unexpected MW dependence of the interfacial properties in PNC with attractive polymer-nanoparticle interactions: the thickness of the interfacial layer with hindered segmental relaxation decreases as MW increases, in sharp constrast to theoretical predictions. Further analyses reveal amore » reduction in mass density of the interfacial layer with increasing MW, which can explain these unexpected dynamic effects. Our observations call for a significant revision of the current understandings of PNCs and suggest interesting ways to tailor their properties.« less

  19. Unexpected Molecular Weight Effect in Polymer Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shiwang; Holt, Adam P; Wang, Huiqun; Fan, Fei; Bocharova, Vera; Martin, Halie; Etampawala, Thusitha; White, B Tyler; Saito, Tomonori; Kang, Nam-Goo; Dadmun, Mark D; Mays, Jimmy W; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2016-01-22

    The properties of the interfacial layer between the polymer matrix and nanoparticles largely determine the macroscopic properties of polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). Although the static thickness of the interfacial layer was found to increase with the molecular weight (MW), the influence of MW on segmental relaxation and the glass transition in this layer remains to be explored. In this Letter, we show an unexpected MW dependence of the interfacial properties in PNC with attractive polymer-nanoparticle interactions: the thickness of the interfacial layer with hindered segmental relaxation decreases as MW increases, in sharp contrast to theoretical predictions. Further analyses reveal a reduction in mass density of the interfacial layer with increasing MW, which can elucidate these unexpected dynamic effects. Our observations call for a significant revision of the current understandings of PNCs and suggest interesting ways to tailor their properties. PMID:26849618

  20. Dissecting the social brain: Introducing the EmpaToM to reveal distinct neural networks and brain-behavior relations for empathy and Theory of Mind.

    PubMed

    Kanske, Philipp; Böckler, Anne; Trautwein, Fynn-Mathis; Singer, Tania

    2015-11-15

    Successful social interactions require both affect sharing (empathy) and understanding others' mental states (Theory of Mind, ToM). As these two functions have mostly been investigated in isolation, the specificity of the underlying neural networks and the relation of these networks to the respective behavioral indices could not be tested. Here, we present a novel fMRI paradigm (EmpaToM) that independently manipulates both empathy and ToM. Experiments 1a/b (N=90) validated the task with established empathy and ToM paradigms on a behavioral and neural level. Experiment 2 (N=178) employed the EmpaToM and revealed clearly separable neural networks including anterior insula for empathy and ventral temporoparietal junction for ToM. These distinct networks could be replicated in task-free resting state functional connectivity. Importantly, brain activity in these two networks specifically predicted the respective behavioral indices, that is, inter-individual differences in ToM related brain activity predicted inter-individual differences in ToM performance, but not empathic responding, and vice versa. Taken together, the validated EmpaToM allows separation of affective and cognitive routes to understanding others. It may thus benefit future clinical, developmental, and intervention studies on identifying selective impairments and improvement in specific components of social cognition. PMID:26254589

  1. Unexpected angular or rotational deformity after corrective osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Codman’s paradox reveals a misunderstanding of geometry in orthopedic practice. Physicians often encounter situations that cannot be understood intuitively during orthopedic interventions such as corrective osteotomy. Occasionally, unexpected angular or rotational deformity occurs during surgery. This study aimed to draw the attention of orthopedic surgeons toward the concepts of orientation and rotation and demonstrate the potential for unexpected deformity after orthopedic interventions. This study focused on three situations: shoulder arthrodesis, femoral varization derotational osteotomy, and femoral derotation osteotomy. Methods First, a shoulder model was generated to calculate unexpected rotational deformity to demonstrate Codman’s paradox. Second, femoral varization derotational osteotomy was simulated using a cylinder model. Third, a reconstructed femoral model was used to calculate unexpected angular or rotational deformity during femoral derotation osteotomy. Results Unexpected external rotation was found after forward elevation and abduction of the shoulder joint. In the varization and derotation model, closed-wedge osteotomy and additional derotation resulted in an unexpected extension and valgus deformity, namely, under-correction of coxa valga. After femoral derotational osteotomy, varization and extension of the distal fragment occurred, although the extension was negligible. Conclusions Surgeons should be aware of unexpected angular deformity after surgical procedure involving bony areas. The degree of deformity differs depending on the context of the surgical procedure. However, this study reveals that notable deformities can be expected during orthopedic procedures such as femoral varization derotational osteotomy. PMID:24886469

  2. Purification of α-synuclein from human brain reveals an instability of endogenous multimers as the protein approaches purity.

    PubMed

    Luth, Eric S; Bartels, Tim; Dettmer, Ulf; Kim, Nora C; Selkoe, Dennis J

    2015-01-20

    Despite two decades of research, the structure-function relationships of endogenous, physiological forms of α-synuclein (αSyn) are not well understood. Most in vitro studies of this Parkinson's disease-related protein have focused on recombinant αSyn that is unfolded and monomeric, assuming that this represents its state in the normal human brain. Recently, we have provided evidence that αSyn exists in considerable part in neurons, erythrocytes, and other cells as a metastable multimer that principally sizes as a tetramer. In contrast to recombinant αSyn, physiological tetramers purified from human erythrocytes have substantial α-helical content and resist pathological aggregation into β-sheet rich fibers. Here, we report the first method to fully purify soluble αSyn from the most relevant source, human brain. We describe protocols that purify αSyn to homogeneity from nondiseased human cortex using ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and ion exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and affinity chromatographies. Cross-linking of the starting material and the partially purified chromatographic fractions revealed abundant αSyn multimers, including apparent tetramers, but these were destabilized in large part to monomers during the final purification step. The method also fully purified the homologue β-synuclein, with a similar outcome. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that purified, brain-derived αSyn can display more helical content than the recombinant protein, but this result varied. Collectively, our data suggest that purifying αSyn to homogeneity destabilizes native, α-helix-rich multimers that exist in intact and partially purified brain samples. This finding suggests existence of a stabilizing cofactor (e.g., a small lipid) present inside neurons that is lost during final purification. PMID:25490121

  3. Differences in mitochondrial function in homogenated samples from healthy and epileptic specific brain tissues revealed by high-resolution respirometry.

    PubMed

    Burtscher, Johannes; Zangrandi, Luca; Schwarzer, Christoph; Gnaiger, Erich

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are strongly implicated in neurodegenerative diseases and epilepsy. Strikingly, neurodegenerative diseases show regional specificity in vulnerability and follow distinct patterns of neuronal loss. A challenge is to understand, why mitochondria fail in particular brain regions under specific pathological conditions. A potential explanation could be provided by regional or cellular specificity of mitochondrial function. We applied high-resolution respirometry to analyze the integrated Complex I- and II (CI and CII)-linked respiration, the activity of Complex IV, and the combined CI&II-linked oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS)- and electron-transfer system (ETS)-capacity in microsamples obtained from distinct regions of the mouse brain. We compared different approaches to assess mitochondrial density and suggest flux control ratios as a valid method to normalize respiration to mitochondrial density. This approach revealed significant differences of CI- and CII-linked OXPHOS capacity and coupling control between motor cortex, striatum, hippocampus and pons of naïve mice. CI-linked respiration was highest in motor cortex, while CII-linked respiration predominated in the striatum. To investigate if this method could also determine differences in normal and disease states within the same brain region, we compared hippocampal homogenates in a chronic epilepsy model. Three weeks after stereotaxic injection of kainate, there was a down-regulation of CI- and upregulation of CII-linked respiration in the resulting epileptic ipsilateral hippocampus compared to the contralateral one. In summary, respirometric OXPHOS analysis provides a very sensitive diagnostic approach using small amounts of distinct brain tissues. In a single assay, information is obtained on numerous OXPHOS parameters as indicators of tissue-specific mitochondrial performance. PMID:26516105

  4. Mammalian skull heterochrony reveals modular evolution and a link between cranial development and brain size

    PubMed Central

    Koyabu, Daisuke; Werneburg, Ingmar; Morimoto, Naoki; Zollikofer, Christoph P. E.; Forasiepi, Analia M.; Endo, Hideki; Kimura, Junpei; Ohdachi, Satoshi D.; Truong Son, Nguyen; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R.

    2014-01-01

    The multiple skeletal components of the skull originate asynchronously and their developmental schedule varies across amniotes. Here we present the embryonic ossification sequence of 134 species, covering all major groups of mammals and their close relatives. This comprehensive data set allows reconstruction of the heterochronic and modular evolution of the skull and the condition of the last common ancestor of mammals. We show that the mode of ossification (dermal or endochondral) unites bones into integrated evolutionary modules of heterochronic changes and imposes evolutionary constraints on cranial heterochrony. However, some skull-roof bones, such as the supraoccipital, exhibit evolutionary degrees of freedom in these constraints. Ossification timing of the neurocranium was considerably accelerated during the origin of mammals. Furthermore, association between developmental timing of the supraoccipital and brain size was identified among amniotes. We argue that cranial heterochrony in mammals has occurred in concert with encephalization but within a conserved modular organization. PMID:24704703

  5. Brain Activation of Negative Feedback in Rule Acquisition Revealed in a Segmented Wisconsin Card Sorting Test

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Cao, Bihua; Cai, Xueli; Gao, Heming; Li, Fuhong

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to investigate the brain activation associated with the informative value of negative feedback in rule acquisition. In each trial of a segmented Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, participants were provided with three reference cards and one target card, and were asked to match one of three reference cards to the target card based on a classification rule. Participants received feedback after each match. Participants would acquire the rule after one negative feedback (1-NF condition) or two successive negative feedbacks (2-NF condition). The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results indicated that lateral prefrontal-to-parietal cortices were more active in the 2-NF condition than in the 1-NF condition. The activation in the right lateral prefrontal cortex and left posterior parietal cortex increased gradually with the amount of negative feedback. These results demonstrate that the informative value of negative feedback in rule acquisition might be modulated by the lateral prefronto-parietal loop. PMID:26469519

  6. Immunogold labeling reveals subcellular localisation of silica nanoparticles in a human blood-brain barrier model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dong; Anguissola, Sergio; O'Neill, Tiina; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2015-05-01

    Subcellular location of nanoparticles has been widely investigated with fluorescence microscopy, via fluorescently labeled antibodies to visualise target antigens in cells. However, fluorescence microscopy, such as confocal or live cell imaging, has generally limited 3D spatial resolution. Conventional electron microscopy can be useful in bridging resolution gap, but still not ideal in resolving subcellular organelle identities. Using the pre-embedding immunogold electron microscopic imaging, we performed accurate examination of the intracellular trafficking and gathered further evidence of transport mechanisms of silica nanoparticles across a human in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Our approach can effectively immunolocalise a variety of intracellular compartments and provide new insights into the uptake and subcellular transport of nanoparticles.Subcellular location of nanoparticles has been widely investigated with fluorescence microscopy, via fluorescently labeled antibodies to visualise target antigens in cells. However, fluorescence microscopy, such as confocal or live cell imaging, has generally limited 3D spatial resolution. Conventional electron microscopy can be useful in bridging resolution gap, but still not ideal in resolving subcellular organelle identities. Using the pre-embedding immunogold electron microscopic imaging, we performed accurate examination of the intracellular trafficking and gathered further evidence of transport mechanisms of silica nanoparticles across a human in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Our approach can effectively immunolocalise a variety of intracellular compartments and provide new insights into the uptake and subcellular transport of nanoparticles. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Nanoparticle characterisation data, preservation of cellular structures, staining controls, optimisation of size amplification via the silver enhancement, and more imaging results from anti-clathrin and anti-caveolin 1

  7. Diffusion tensor imaging of dolphin brains reveals direct auditory pathway to temporal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Berns, Gregory S.; Cook, Peter F.; Foxley, Sean; Jbabdi, Saad; Miller, Karla L.; Marino, Lori

    2015-01-01

    The brains of odontocetes (toothed whales) look grossly different from their terrestrial relatives. Because of their adaptation to the aquatic environment and their reliance on echolocation, the odontocetes' auditory system is both unique and crucial to their survival. Yet, scant data exist about the functional organization of the cetacean auditory system. A predominant hypothesis is that the primary auditory cortex lies in the suprasylvian gyrus along the vertex of the hemispheres, with this position induced by expansion of ‘associative′ regions in lateral and caudal directions. However, the precise location of the auditory cortex and its connections are still unknown. Here, we used a novel diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequence in archival post-mortem brains of a common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) and a pantropical dolphin (Stenella attenuata) to map their sensory and motor systems. Using thalamic parcellation based on traditionally defined regions for the primary visual (V1) and auditory cortex (A1), we found distinct regions of the thalamus connected to V1 and A1. But in addition to suprasylvian-A1, we report here, for the first time, the auditory cortex also exists in the temporal lobe, in a region near cetacean-A2 and possibly analogous to the primary auditory cortex in related terrestrial mammals (Artiodactyla). Using probabilistic tract tracing, we found a direct pathway from the inferior colliculus to the medial geniculate nucleus to the temporal lobe near the sylvian fissure. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of post-mortem DTI in archival specimens to answer basic questions in comparative neurobiology in a way that has not previously been possible and shows a link between the cetacean auditory system and those of terrestrial mammals. Given that fresh cetacean specimens are relatively rare, the ability to measure connectivity in archival specimens opens up a plethora of possibilities for investigating neuroanatomy in cetaceans and other species

  8. Diffusion tensor imaging of dolphin brains reveals direct auditory pathway to temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Berns, Gregory S; Cook, Peter F; Foxley, Sean; Jbabdi, Saad; Miller, Karla L; Marino, Lori

    2015-07-22

    The brains of odontocetes (toothed whales) look grossly different from their terrestrial relatives. Because of their adaptation to the aquatic environment and their reliance on echolocation, the odontocetes' auditory system is both unique and crucial to their survival. Yet, scant data exist about the functional organization of the cetacean auditory system. A predominant hypothesis is that the primary auditory cortex lies in the suprasylvian gyrus along the vertex of the hemispheres, with this position induced by expansion of 'associative' regions in lateral and caudal directions. However, the precise location of the auditory cortex and its connections are still unknown. Here, we used a novel diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequence in archival post-mortem brains of a common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) and a pantropical dolphin (Stenella attenuata) to map their sensory and motor systems. Using thalamic parcellation based on traditionally defined regions for the primary visual (V1) and auditory cortex (A1), we found distinct regions of the thalamus connected to V1 and A1. But in addition to suprasylvian-A1, we report here, for the first time, the auditory cortex also exists in the temporal lobe, in a region near cetacean-A2 and possibly analogous to the primary auditory cortex in related terrestrial mammals (Artiodactyla). Using probabilistic tract tracing, we found a direct pathway from the inferior colliculus to the medial geniculate nucleus to the temporal lobe near the sylvian fissure. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of post-mortem DTI in archival specimens to answer basic questions in comparative neurobiology in a way that has not previously been possible and shows a link between the cetacean auditory system and those of terrestrial mammals. Given that fresh cetacean specimens are relatively rare, the ability to measure connectivity in archival specimens opens up a plethora of possibilities for investigating neuroanatomy in cetaceans and other species

  9. A Social Network Approach Reveals Associations between Mouse Social Dominance and Brain Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    So, Nina; Franks, Becca; Lim, Sean; Curley, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Modelling complex social behavior in the laboratory is challenging and requires analyses of dyadic interactions occurring over time in a physically and socially complex environment. In the current study, we approached the analyses of complex social interactions in group-housed male CD1 mice living in a large vivarium. Intensive observations of social interactions during a 3-week period indicated that male mice form a highly linear and steep dominance hierarchy that is maintained by fighting and chasing behaviors. Individual animals were classified as dominant, sub-dominant or subordinate according to their David’s Scores and I& SI ranking. Using a novel dynamic temporal Glicko rating method, we ascertained that the dominance hierarchy was stable across time. Using social network analyses, we characterized the behavior of individuals within 66 unique relationships in the social group. We identified two individual network metrics, Kleinberg’s Hub Centrality and Bonacich’s Power Centrality, as accurate predictors of individual dominance and power. Comparing across behaviors, we establish that agonistic, grooming and sniffing social networks possess their own distinctive characteristics in terms of density, average path length, reciprocity out-degree centralization and out-closeness centralization. Though grooming ties between individuals were largely independent of other social networks, sniffing relationships were highly predictive of the directionality of agonistic relationships. Individual variation in dominance status was associated with brain gene expression, with more dominant individuals having higher levels of corticotropin releasing factor mRNA in the medial and central nuclei of the amygdala and the medial preoptic area of the hypothalamus, as well as higher levels of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA. This study demonstrates the potential and significance of combining complex social housing and intensive

  10. Test-retest Stability Analysis of Resting Brain Activity Revealed by BOLD fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengjun; Kadivar, Aniseh; Pluta, John; Dunlop, John; Wang, Ze

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess test-retest stability of four fMRI-derived resting brain activity metrics: the seed-region-based functional connectivity (SRFC), independent component analysis (ICA)-derived network-based FC (NTFC), regional homogeneity (ReHo), and the amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF). Methods Simulations were used to assess the sensitivity of SRFC, ReHo, and ALFF to noise interference. Repeat resting blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI were acquired from 32 healthy subjects. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess the stability of the 4 metrics. Results Random noise yielded small random SRFC, small but consistent ReHo and ALFF. A neighborhood size greater than 20 voxels should be used for calculating ReHo in order to reduce the noise interference. Both the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC)-based SRFC were reproducible in more spatially extended regions than ICA NTFC. The two regional spontaneous brain activity (SBA) measures, ReHo and ALFF, showed test-retest reproducibility in almost the whole grey matter. Conclusion SRFC, ReHo, and ALFF are robust to random noise interference. The neighborhood size for calculating ReHo should be larger than 20 voxels. ICC>0.5 and cluster size>11 should be used to assess the ICC maps for ACC/PCC SRFC, ReHo and ALFF. BOLD fMRI-based SBA can be reliably measured using ACC/PCC SRFC, ReHo and ALFF after two months. PMID:22535702

  11. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Rats with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Reveals Brain Cortex Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Tambalo, Stefano; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Rigolio, Roberta; Fiorini, Silvia; Bontempi, Pietro; Mallucci, Giulia; Balzarotti, Beatrice; Marmiroli, Paola; Sbarbati, Andrea; Cavaletti, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Cortical reorganization occurring in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is thought to play a key role in limiting the effect of structural tissue damage. Conversely, its exhaustion may contribute to the irreversible disability that accumulates with disease progression. Several aspects of MS-related cortical reorganization, including the overall functional effect and likely modulation by therapies, still remain to be elucidated. The aim of this work was to assess the extent of functional cortical reorganization and its brain structural/pathological correlates in Dark Agouti rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a widely accepted preclinical model of chronic MS. Morphological and functional MRI (fMRI) were performed before disease induction and during the relapsing and chronic phases of EAE. During somatosensory stimulation of the right forepaw, fMRI demonstrated that cortical reorganization occurs in both relapsing and chronic phases of EAE with increased activated volume and decreased laterality index versus baseline values. Voxel-based morphometry demonstrated gray matter (GM) atrophy in the cerebral cortex, and both GM and white matter atrophy were assessed by ex vivo pathology of the sensorimotor cortex and corpus callosum. Neuroinflammation persisted in the relapsing and chronic phases, with dendritic spine density in the layer IV sensory neurons inversely correlating with the number of cluster of differentiation 45-positive inflammatory lesions. Our work provides an innovative experimental platform that may be pivotal for the comprehension of key mechanisms responsible for the accumulation of irreversible brain damage and for the development of innovative therapies to reduce disability in EAE/MS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Since the early 2000s, functional MRI (fMRI) has demonstrated profound modifications in the recruitment of cortical areas during motor, cognitive, and sensory tasks in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Experimental autoimmune

  12. The neural bases for devaluing radical political statements revealed by penetrating traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Cristofori, Irene; Viola, Vanda; Chau, Aileen; Zhong, Wanting; Krueger, Frank; Zamboni, Giovanna; Grafman, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    Given the determinant role of ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in valuation, we examined whether vmPFC lesions also modulate how people scale political beliefs. Patients with penetrating traumatic brain injury (pTBI; N = 102) and healthy controls (HCs; N = 31) were tested on the political belief task, where they rated 75 statements expressing political opinions concerned with welfare, economy, political involvement, civil rights, war and security. Each statement was rated for level of agreement and scaled along three dimensions: radicalism, individualism and conservatism. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) analysis showed that diminished scores for the radicalism dimension (i.e. statements were rated as less radical than the norms) were associated with lesions in bilateral vmPFC. After dividing the pTBI patients into three groups, according to lesion location (i.e. vmPFC, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex [dlPFC] and parietal cortex), we found that the vmPFC, but not the dlPFC, group had reduced radicalism scores compared with parietal and HC groups. These findings highlight the crucial role of the vmPFC in appropriately valuing political behaviors and may explain certain inappropriate social judgments observed in patients with vmPFC lesions. PMID:25656509

  13. Differences in brain circuitry for appetitive and reactive aggression as revealed by realistic auditory scripts

    PubMed Central

    Moran, James K.; Weierstall, Roland; Elbert, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is thought to divide into two motivational elements: The first being a self-defensively motivated aggression against threat and a second, hedonically motivated “appetitive” aggression. Appetitive aggression is the less understood of the two, often only researched within abnormal psychology. Our approach is to understand it as a universal and adaptive response, and examine the functional neural activity of ordinary men (N = 50) presented with an imaginative listening task involving a murderer describing a kill. We manipulated motivational context in a between-subjects design to evoke appetitive or reactive aggression, against a neutral control, measuring activity with Magnetoencephalography (MEG). Results show differences in left frontal regions in delta (2–5 Hz) and alpha band (8–12 Hz) for aggressive conditions and right parietal delta activity differentiating appetitive and reactive aggression. These results validate the distinction of reward-driven appetitive aggression from reactive aggression in ordinary populations at the level of functional neural brain circuitry. PMID:25538590

  14. Whole brain resting-state analysis reveals decreased functional connectivity in major depression.

    PubMed

    Veer, Ilya M; Beckmann, Christian F; van Tol, Marie-José; Ferrarini, Luca; Milles, Julien; Veltman, Dick J; Aleman, André; van Buchem, Mark A; van der Wee, Nic J; Rombouts, Serge A R B

    2010-01-01

    Recently, both increases and decreases in resting-state functional connectivity have been found in major depression. However, these studies only assessed functional connectivity within a specific network or between a few regions of interest, while comorbidity and use of medication was not always controlled for. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate whole-brain functional connectivity, unbiased by a priori definition of regions or networks of interest, in medication-free depressive patients without comorbidity. We analyzed resting-state fMRI data of 19 medication-free patients with a recent diagnosis of major depression (within 6 months before inclusion) and no comorbidity, and 19 age- and gender-matched controls. Independent component analysis was employed on the concatenated data sets of all participants. Thirteen functionally relevant networks were identified, describing the entire study sample. Next, individual representations of the networks were created using a dual regression method. Statistical inference was subsequently done on these spatial maps using voxel-wise permutation tests. Abnormal functional connectivity was found within three resting-state networks in depression: (1) decreased bilateral amygdala and left anterior insula connectivity in an affective network, (2) reduced connectivity of the left frontal pole in a network associated with attention and working memory, and (3) decreased bilateral lingual gyrus connectivity within ventromedial visual regions. None of these effects were associated with symptom severity or gray matter density. We found abnormal resting-state functional connectivity not previously associated with major depression, which might relate to abnormal affect regulation and mild cognitive deficits, both associated with the symptomatology of the disorder. PMID:20941370

  15. Proteome analysis reveals protein candidates involved in early stages of brain regeneration of teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Ilieş, I; Zupanc, M M; Zupanc, G K H

    2012-09-01

    Exploration of the molecular dynamics underlying regeneration in the central nervous system of regeneration-competent organisms has received little attention thus far. By combining a cerebellar lesion paradigm with differential proteome analysis at a post-lesion survival time of 30 min, we screened for protein candidates involved in the early stages of regeneration in the cerebellum of such an organism, the teleost fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. Out of 769 protein spots, the intensity of 26 spots was significantly increased by a factor of at least 1.5 in the lesioned hemisphere, relative to the intact hemisphere. The intensity of 9 protein spots was significantly reduced by a factor of at least 1.5. The proteins associated with 15 of the spots were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting and/or tandem mass spectrometry, resulting in the identification of a total of 11 proteins. Proteins whose abundance was significantly increased include: erythrocyte membrane protein 4.1N, fibrinogen gamma polypeptide, fructose-biphosphate aldolase C, alpha-internexin neuronal intermediate filament protein, major histocompatibility complex class I heavy chain, 26S proteasome non-ATPase regulatory subunit 8, tubulin alpha-1C chain, and ubiquitin-specific protease 5. Proteins with significantly decreased levels of abundance include: brain glycogen phosphorylase, neuron-specific calcium-binding protein hippocalcin, and spectrin alpha 2. We hypothesize that these proteins are involved in energy metabolism, blood clotting, electron transfer in oxidative reactions, cytoskeleton degradation, apoptotic cell death, synaptic plasticity, axonal regeneration, and promotion of mitotic activity. PMID:22659563

  16. NMR-Based Metabolic Profiling Reveals Neurochemical Alterations in the Brain of Rats Treated with Sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Du, Changman; Shao, Xue; Zhu, Ruiming; Li, Yan; Zhao, Qian; Fu, Dengqi; Gu, Hui; Kong, Jueying; Luo, Li; Long, Hailei; Deng, Pengchi; Wang, Huijuan; Hu, Chunyan; Zhao, Yinglan; Cen, Xiaobo

    2015-11-01

    Sorafenib, an active multi-kinase inhibitor, has been widely used as a chemotherapy drug to treat advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma patients. In spite of the relative safety, sorafenib has been shown to exert a negative impact on cognitive functioning in cancer patients, specifically on learning and memory; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, an NMR-based metabolomics approach was applied to investigate the neurochemical effects of sorafenib in rats. Male rats were once daily administrated with 120 mg/kg sorafenib by gavage for 3, 7, and 28 days, respectively. NMR-based metabolomics coupled with histopathology examinations for hippocampus, prefrontal cortex (PFC), and striatum were performed. The (1)H NMR spectra data were analyzed by using multivariate pattern recognition techniques to show the time-dependent biochemical variations induced by sorafenib. Excellent separation was obtained and distinguishing metabolites were observed between sorafenib-treated and control rats. A total of 36 differential metabolites in hippocampus of rats treated with sorafenib were identified, some of which were significantly changed. Furthermore, these modified metabolites mainly reflected the disturbances in neurotransmitters, energy metabolism, membrane, and amino acids. However, only a few metabolites in PFC and striatum were altered by sorafenib. Additionally, no apparent histological changes in these three brain regions were observed in sorafenib-treated rats. Together, our findings demonstrate the disturbed metabonomics pathways, especially, in hippocampus, which may underlie the sorafenib-induced cognitive deficits in patients. This work also shows the advantage of NMR-based metabolomics over traditional approach on the study of biochemical effects of drugs. PMID:26233726

  17. Comprehensive Glycomics of a Multistep Human Brain Tumor Model Reveals Specific Glycosylation Patterns Related to Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kazue; Kimura, Taichi; Piao, Jinhua; Tanaka, Shinya; Shinohara, Yasuro

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells frequently express glycans at different levels and/or with fundamentally different structures from those expressed by normal cells, and therefore elucidation and manipulation of these glycosylations may provide a beneficial approach to cancer therapy. However, the relationship between altered glycosylation and causal genetic alteration(s) is only partially understood. Here, we employed a unique approach that applies comprehensive glycomic analysis to a previously described multistep tumorigenesis model. Normal human astrocytes were transformed via the serial introduction of hTERT, SV40ER, H-RasV12, and myrAKT, thereby mimicking human brain tumor grades I-IV. More than 160 glycans derived from three major classes of cell surface glycoconjugates (N- and O-glycans on glycoproteins, and glycosphingolipids) were quantitatively explored, and specific glycosylation patterns related to malignancy were systematically identified. The sequential introduction of hTERT, SV40ER, H-RasV12, and myrAKT led to (i) temporal expression of pauci-mannose/mono-antennary type N-glycans and GD3 (hTERT); (ii) switching from ganglio- to globo-series glycosphingolipids and the appearance of Neu5Gc (hTERT and SV40ER); (iii) temporal expression of bisecting GlcNAc residues, α2,6-sialylation, and stage-specific embryonic antigen-4, accompanied by suppression of core 2 O-glycan biosynthesis (hTERT, SV40ER and Ras); and (iv) increased expression of (neo)lacto-series glycosphingolipids and fucosylated N-glycans (hTERT, SV40ER, Ras and AKT). These sequential and transient glycomic alterations may be useful for tumor grade diagnosis and tumor prognosis, and also for the prediction of treatment response. PMID:26132161

  18. DNA methylation analysis of the autistic brain reveals multiple dysregulated biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, S; Sharan Sams, D; Reuveni, E; Getselter, D; Oron, O; Karpuj, M; Elliott, E

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by dysfunction in social interaction, communication and stereotypic behavior. Genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in the development of ASD, but the molecular mechanisms underlying their interaction are not clear. Epigenetic modifications have been suggested as molecular mechanism that can mediate the interaction between the environment and the genome to produce adaptive or maladaptive behaviors. Here, using the Illumina 450 K methylation array we have determined the existence of many dysregulated CpGs in two cortical regions, Brodmann area 10 (BA10) and Brodmann area 24 (BA24), of individuals who had ASD. In BA10 we found a very significant enrichment for genomic areas responsible for immune functions among the hypomethylated CpGs, whereas genes related to synaptic membrane were enriched among hypermethylated CpGs. By comparing our methylome data with previously published transcriptome data, and by performing real-time PCR on selected genes that were dysregulated in our study, we show that hypomethylated genes are often overexpressed, and that there is an inverse correlation between gene expression and DNA methylation within the individuals. Among these genes there were C1Q, C3, ITGB2 (C3R), TNF-α, IRF8 and SPI1, which have recently been implicated in synaptic pruning and microglial cell specification. Finally, we determined the epigenetic dysregulation of the gene HDAC4, and we confirm that the locus encompassing C11orf21/TSPAN32 has multiple hypomethylated CpGs in the autistic brain, as previously demonstrated. Our data suggest a possible role for epigenetic processes in the etiology of ASD. PMID:25180572

  19. Brain neural synchronization and functional coupling in Alzheimer's disease as revealed by resting state EEG rhythms.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Lizio, Roberta; Marzano, Nicola; Capotosto, Paolo; Soricelli, Andrea; Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Cordone, Susanna; Gesualdo, Loreto; Del Percio, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of neurodegenerative disorder, typically causing dementia along aging. AD is mainly characterized by a pathological extracellular accumulation of amyloid-beta peptides that affects excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission, inducing aberrant patterns in neuronal circuits. Growing evidence shows that AD targets cortical neuronal networks related to cognitive functions including episodic memory and visuospatial attention. This is partially reflected by the abnormal mechanisms of cortical neural synchronization and coupling that generate resting state electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms. The cortical neural synchronization is typically indexed by EEG power density. The EEG coupling between electrode pairs probes functional (inter-relatedness of EEG signals) and effective (casual effect from one over the other electrode) connectivity. The former is typically indexed by synchronization likelihood (linear and nonlinear) or spectral coherence (linear), the latter by granger causality or information theory indexes. Here we reviewed literature concerning EEG studies in condition of resting state in AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects as a window on abnormalities of the cortical neural synchronization and functional and effective connectivity. Results showed abnormalities of the EEG power density at specific frequency bands (<12Hz) in the MCI and AD populations, associated with an altered functional and effective EEG connectivity among long range cortical networks (i.e. fronto-parietal and fronto-temporal). These results suggest that resting state EEG rhythms reflect the abnormal cortical neural synchronization and coupling in the brain of prodromal and overt AD subjects, possibly reflecting dysfunctional neuroplasticity of the neural transmission in long range cortical networks. PMID:25660305

  20. Neural mechanisms of visual backward masking revealed by high temporal resolution imaging of human brain.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Yasuki; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2005-08-01

    Backward masking is one of the potent ways to reveal the neural mechanism of visual awareness in humans. Although previous neuroimaging studies have reported that the visual masking involves the attenuation of hemodynamic signals to the masked stimulus in visual ventral regions such as the fusiform and inferior temporal gyrus, the temporal profiles of this attenuation as a whole neural population is mostly unclear. Here we used magnetoencephalography and investigated the neural response changes in higher visual region induced by backward masking. The combination of our previous random dot blinking method with the sensor-based analysis isolated the neural responses in the higher visual cortex relating to shape perception. The results revealed that, as the visibility of the target stimulus was reduced by the mask following it, the neural response to the target in the ventral regions showed gradual decreases both in its peak amplitude and peak latency. Furthermore, this decrease in the peak amplitudes was significantly correlated with the behavioral accuracy of the target identification, while the peak latency was not. These results indicate that backward masking simultaneously produces two types of neural changes in higher visual regions: attenuation of the populational neural activity itself and temporal interruption of this activity by the subsequent mask response. Especially, our data suggest that the response attenuation in higher visual response is a main cause of the perceptual impairment observed in the backward masking paradigm. PMID:15878677

  1. Inferential bridging relations reveal distinct neural mechanisms: evidence from event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Petra

    2006-08-01

    This study investigates the online comprehension of Determiner Phrases (DPs) as a function of the given-new distinction in two-sentence texts in German and further focuses on DPs whose interpretation depends on inferential information (so-called 'bridging relations'). Previous reaction time studies report an advantage of given over new information. In the present study, this difference is reflected in distinct neural mechanisms: event-related potentials reveal that previously introduced (i.e., given) DPs elicit a reduced N400, while new DPs show an enhanced N400 followed by a P600. Crucially, inferentially bridged DPs, which are hypothesized to share properties with new and given information, first pattern with given DPs (showing an attenuated N400) and then with new DPs (showing an enhanced P600). The data demonstrate that salience relations between DPs and prior context ease DP integration and that additional cost arises from the establishment of independent reference. They further reveal that processing cost associated with the interpretation of bridged DPs results from the anaphoric complexity of introducing an independent referent. PMID:16725188

  2. Multiple knockout mouse models reveal lincRNAs are required for life and brain development

    PubMed Central

    Sauvageau, Martin; Goff, Loyal A; Lodato, Simona; Bonev, Boyan; Groff, Abigail F; Gerhardinger, Chiara; Sanchez-Gomez, Diana B; Hacisuleyman, Ezgi; Li, Eric; Spence, Matthew; Liapis, Stephen C; Mallard, William; Morse, Michael; Swerdel, Mavis R; D’Ecclessis, Michael F; Moore, Jennifer C; Lai, Venus; Gong, Guochun; Yancopoulos, George D; Frendewey, David; Kellis, Manolis; Hart, Ronald P; Valenzuela, David M; Arlotta, Paola; Rinn, John L

    2013-01-01

    Many studies are uncovering functional roles for long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), yet few have been tested for in vivo relevance through genetic ablation in animal models. To investigate the functional relevance of lncRNAs in various physiological conditions, we have developed a collection of 18 lncRNA knockout strains in which the locus is maintained transcriptionally active. Initial characterization revealed peri- and postnatal lethal phenotypes in three mutant strains (Fendrr, Peril, and Mdgt), the latter two exhibiting incomplete penetrance and growth defects in survivors. We also report growth defects for two additional mutant strains (linc–Brn1b and linc–Pint). Further analysis revealed defects in lung, gastrointestinal tract, and heart in Fendrr−/− neonates, whereas linc–Brn1b−/− mutants displayed distinct abnormalities in the generation of upper layer II–IV neurons in the neocortex. This study demonstrates that lncRNAs play critical roles in vivo and provides a framework and impetus for future larger-scale functional investigation into the roles of lncRNA molecules. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01749.001 PMID:24381249

  3. Multiplex Brain Proteomic Analysis Revealed the Molecular Therapeutic Effects of Buyang Huanwu Decoction on Cerebral Ischemic Stroke Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shiao, Young-Ji; Liou, Kuo-Tong; Hsu, Wei-Hsiang; Hsieh, Pei-Hsuan; Lee, Chi-Ying; Chen, Yet-Ran; Lin, Yun-Lian

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the second-leading cause of death worldwide, and tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) is the only drug used for a limited group of stroke patients in the acute phase. Buyang Huanwu Decoction (BHD), a traditional Chinese medicine prescription, has long been used for improving neurological functional recovery in stroke. In this study, we characterized the therapeutic effect of TPA and BHD in a cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (CIR) injury mouse model using multiplex proteomics approach. After the iTRAQ-based proteomics analysis, 1310 proteins were identified from the mouse brain with <1% false discovery rate. Among them, 877 quantitative proteins, 10.26% (90/877), 1.71% (15/877), and 2.62% (23/877) of the proteins was significantly changed in the CIR, BHD treatment, and TPA treatment, respectively. Functional categorization analysis showed that BHD treatment preserved the integrity of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) (Alb, Fga, and Trf), suppressed excitotoxicity (Grm5, Gnai, and Gdi), and enhanced energy metabolism (Bdh), thereby revealing its multiple effects on ischemic stroke mice. Moreover, the neurogenesis marker doublecortin was upregulated, and the activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and Tau was inhibited, which represented the neuroprotective effects. However, TPA treatment deteriorated BBB breakdown. This study highlights the potential of BHD in clinical applications for ischemic stroke. PMID:26492191

  4. Imaging by Elemental and Molecular Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Uptake of an Arsenolipid in the Brain of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, Ann-Christin; Schulz, Jacqueline; Soltwisch, Jens; Meyer, Sören; Kettling, Hans; Sperling, Michael; Jeibmann, Astrid; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Francesconi, Kevin A; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Karst, Uwe

    2016-05-17

    Arsenic-containing lipids (arsenolipids) are natural products of marine organisms such as fish, invertebrates, and algae, many of which are important seafoods. A major group of arsenolipids, namely, the arsenic-containing hydrocarbons (AsHC), have recently been shown to be cytotoxic to human liver and bladder cells, a result that has stimulated interest in the chemistry and toxicology of these compounds. In this study, elemental laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and molecular matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-)MS were used to image and quantify the uptake of an AsHC in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. Using these two complementary methods, both an enrichment of arsenic and the presence of the AsHC in the brain were revealed, indicating that the intact arsenolipid had crossed the blood-brain barrier. Simultaneous acquisition of quantitative elemental concentrations and molecular distributions could allow new insight into organ-specific enrichment and possible transportation processes of arsenic-containing bioactive compounds in living organisms. PMID:27098356

  5. Multiplex Brain Proteomic Analysis Revealed the Molecular Therapeutic Effects of Buyang Huanwu Decoction on Cerebral Ischemic Stroke Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Jhang; Shen, Yuh-Chiang; Shiao, Young-Ji; Liou, Kuo-Tong; Hsu, Wei-Hsiang; Hsieh, Pei-Hsuan; Lee, Chi-Ying; Chen, Yet-Ran; Lin, Yun-Lian

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the second-leading cause of death worldwide, and tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) is the only drug used for a limited group of stroke patients in the acute phase. Buyang Huanwu Decoction (BHD), a traditional Chinese medicine prescription, has long been used for improving neurological functional recovery in stroke. In this study, we characterized the therapeutic effect of TPA and BHD in a cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (CIR) injury mouse model using multiplex proteomics approach. After the iTRAQ-based proteomics analysis, 1310 proteins were identified from the mouse brain with <1% false discovery rate. Among them, 877 quantitative proteins, 10.26% (90/877), 1.71% (15/877), and 2.62% (23/877) of the proteins was significantly changed in the CIR, BHD treatment, and TPA treatment, respectively. Functional categorization analysis showed that BHD treatment preserved the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) (Alb, Fga, and Trf), suppressed excitotoxicity (Grm5, Gnai, and Gdi), and enhanced energy metabolism (Bdh), thereby revealing its multiple effects on ischemic stroke mice. Moreover, the neurogenesis marker doublecortin was upregulated, and the activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and Tau was inhibited, which represented the neuroprotective effects. However, TPA treatment deteriorated BBB breakdown. This study highlights the potential of BHD in clinical applications for ischemic stroke. PMID:26492191

  6. Tantalizing Thanatos: unexpected links in death pathways.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Isabelle; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2002-07-01

    Cell death is most frequently the result of apoptosis, an event that is often controlled by mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP). Recent data reveal unexpected functional links between apoptosis and autophagic cell death, in the sense that MMP can trigger autophagy of damaged mitochondria. Conversely, one of the major signal-transducing molecules involved in the activation of autophagy during apoptosis--the so-called DAP kinase--can induce cell death through MMP. Connections are also emerging between apoptosis, autophagy, replicative senescence and cancer-specific metabolic changes. PMID:12185842

  7. Revealing the brain's adaptability and the transcranial direct current stimulation facilitating effect in inhibitory control by multiscale entropy.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wei-Kuang; Lo, Men-Tzung; Yang, Albert C; Peng, Chung-Kang; Cheng, Shih-Kuen; Tseng, Philip; Juan, Chi-Hung

    2014-04-15

    The abilities to inhibit impulses and withdraw certain responses are critical for human's survival in a fast-changing environment. These processes happen fast, in a complex manner, and sometimes are difficult to capture with fMRI or mean electrophysiological brain signal alone. Therefore, an alternative measure that can reveal the efficiency of the neural mechanism across multiple timescales is needed for the investigation of these brain functions. The present study employs a new approach to analyzing electroencephalography (EEG) signal: the multiscale entropy (MSE), which groups data points with different timescales to reveal any occurrence of repeated patterns, in order to theoretically quantify the complexity (indicating adaptability and efficiency) of neural systems during the process of inhibitory control. From this MSE perspective, EEG signals of successful stop trials are more complex and information rich than that of unsuccessful stop trials. We further applied transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), with anodal electrode over presupplementary motor area (preSMA), to test the relationship between behavioral modification with the complexity of EEG signals. We found that tDCS can further increase the EEG complexity of the frontal lobe. Furthermore, the MSE pattern was found to be different between high and low performers (divided by their stop-signal reaction time), where the high-performing group had higher complexity in smaller scales and less complexity in larger scales in comparison to the low-performing group. In addition, this between-group MSE difference was found to interact with the anodal tDCS, where the increase of MSE in low performers benefitted more from the anodal tDCS. Together, the current study demonstrates that participants who suffer from poor inhibitory control can efficiently improve their performance with 10min of electrical stimulation, and such cognitive improvement can be effectively traced back to the complexity within the

  8. Functional brain mapping of the macaque related to spatial working memory as revealed by PET.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Masato; Mikami, Akichika; Ando, Ichiro; Tsukada, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    To define the cortical areas that subserve spatial working memory in a nonhuman primate, we measured regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with [(15)O]H(2)O and positron emission tomography while monkeys performed a visually guided saccade (VGS) task and an oculomotor delayed-response (ODR) task. Both Statistical Parametric Mapping and regions of interest-based analyses revealed an increase of rCBF in the area surrounding the principal sulcus (PS), the superior convexity, the anterior bank of the arcuate sulcus (AS), the lateral orbitofrontal cortex (lOFC), the frontal pole (FP), the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), the lateral bank of the intraparietal sulcus (lIPS) and the prestriate cortex. In the prefrontal cortex (PS, superior convexity, AS, lOFC and FP), rCBF values correlated positively with ODR task performance scores. From the hippocampus, rCBF values correlated negatively with ODR task performance. From the AS, superior convexity, lOFC, FP, ACC and lIPS, rCBF values of the PS correlated positively with rCBF values and negatively with hippocampus rCBF values. These results suggest that neural circuitry in the prefrontal cortex directly contributes the spatial working memory processes and that, in spatial working memory processes, the posterior parietal cortex and hippocampus have a different role to the prefrontal cortex. PMID:14654462

  9. Automatic processing of grammar in the human brain as revealed by the mismatch negativity.

    PubMed

    Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Shtyrov, Yury

    2003-09-01

    The Mismatch Negativity (MMN), a neurophysiological indicator of cognitive processing, was used to investigate grammatical processes in the absence of focused attention to language. Subjects instructed to watch a silent video film and to ignore speech stimuli heard grammatical and ungrammatical spoken word strings that were physically identical up to a divergence point where they differed between each other by a minimal acoustic event, the presence or the absence of a final -s sound. The sentence we come was presented as a rare deviant stimulus against the background of frequently occurring ungrammatical strings, and, in a different experiment, the ungrammatical string *we comes was the deviant in the reverse design. To control for effects related to differences between the critical words, come and comes, control conditions were used in which the same words were presented out of linguistic context. At 100-150 ms after the divergence point, the ungrammatical deviant stimulus elicited a larger MMN than the correct sentence at left-anterior recording sites. This difference was not seen under the out-of-context conditions. In the time range 100-400 ms after stimulus divergence, a spatiotemporal pattern of grammatically related effects was documented by statistically significant interactions of the word and context variables. Minimum-Norm Current Estimates of the cortical sources of the grammaticality effects revealed a main source in the left frontal cortex. We use a neurobiological model of serial order processing to provide a tentative explanation for the data. PMID:14527578

  10. Unexpected Outcomes from Teachers' TV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author explains why she has unexpectedly become a fan of Teacher's TV. It started when she was asked to show some clips from Teachers' TV as part of a workshop she was leading. She dutifully accepted a CD containing three downloaded programmes about using ICT to teach mathematics and put it into her laptop. Within a few…

  11. Wilderness Emergency: Surviving the Unexpected.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fear, Gene

    In any unexpected survival experience, one must accept the situation with just what one has at the moment it happens, where it happens, and how it happens. Problem solving must be based on known body enemies that threaten life, their priority of influence, and their severity of threat to life. Solutions will depend on the body's energy supply,…

  12. Peripheral infection with adenovirus causes unexpected long-term brain inflammation in animals injected intracranially with first-generation, but not with high-capacity, adenovirus vectors: Toward realistic long-term neurological gene therapy for chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Clare E.; Schiedner, Gudrun; Kochanek, Stefan; Castro, Maria G.; Löwenstein, Pedro R.

    2000-01-01

    Although adenoviral vectors provide prolonged gene expression in the brain by comparison to peripheral organs, expression is eliminated by a severe inflammatory infiltration (i.e., activated macrophages/microglia and T-lymphocytes) after peripheral infection with adenovirus. Here, we demonstrate that high-capacity adenoviral (HC-Ad) vectors succeed in maintaining long-term transgene expression in the brain, even in the presence of an active peripheral immunization with adenovirus that completely eliminates expression from first-generation vectors within 60 days. Importantly, even 60 days after the peripheral infection, brains injected with first-generation vectors exhibited evidence of a chronic infiltration of CD8+ cells, macrophage/microglial activation, and up-regulation of brain MHC-I expression. No inflammation was observed in the brains injected with the HC-Ad vector. Thus, these results demonstrate that HC-Ad vectors will allow safe, stable, and long-term transgene expression in the brain, even in the presence of peripheral infection with adenovirus. This markedly improves the prospects for the use of adenoviral vectors for long-term gene therapy of neurological disorders. PMID:10840055

  13. Transcriptomic gene-network analysis of exposure to silver nanoparticle reveals potentially neurodegenerative progression in mouse brain neural cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ho-Chen; Huang, Chin-Lin; Huang, Yuh-Jeen; Hsiao, I-Lun; Yang, Chung-Wei; Chuang, Chun-Yu

    2016-08-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are commonly used in daily living products. AgNPs can induce inflammatory response in neuronal cells, and potentially develop neurological disorders. The gene networks in response to AgNPs-induced neurodegenerative progression have not been clarified in various brain neural cells. This study found that 3-5nm AgNPs were detectable to enter the nuclei of mouse neuronal cells after 24-h of exposure. The differentially expressed genes in mouse brain neural cells exposure to AgNPs were further identified using Phalanx Mouse OneArray® chip, and permitted to explore the gene network pathway regulating in neurodegenerative progression according to Cytoscape analysis. In focal adhesion pathway of ALT astrocytes, AgNPs induced the gene expression of RasGRF1 and reduced its downstream BCL2 gene for apoptosis. In cytosolic DNA sensing pathway of microglial BV2 cells, AgNPs reduced the gene expression of TREX1 and decreased IRF7 to release pro-inflammatory cytokines for inflammation and cellular activation. In MAPK pathway of neuronal N2a cells, AgNPs elevated GADD45α gene expression, and attenuated its downstream PTPRR gene to interfere with neuron growth and differentiation. Moreover, AgNPs induced beta amyloid deposition in N2a cells, and decreased PSEN1 and PSEN2, which may disrupt calcium homeostasis and presynaptic dysfunction for Alzheimer's disease development. These findings suggested that AgNPs exposure reveals the potency to induce the progression of neurodegenerative disorder. PMID:27131904

  14. Diminished social reward anticipation in the broad autism phenotype as revealed by event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Cox, Anthony; Kohls, Gregor; Naples, Adam J; Mukerji, Cora E; Coffman, Marika C; Rutherford, Helena J V; Mayes, Linda C; McPartland, James C

    2015-10-01

    Diminished responsivity to reward incentives is a key contributor to the social-communication problems seen in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Social motivation theories suggest that individuals with ASD do not experience social interactions as rewarding, leading to negative consequences for the development of brain circuitry subserving social information. In this study, we examined neural responses to social and non-social reward anticipation in 35 typically developing young adults, examining modulation of reward sensitivity by level of autistic traits. Using an Event-related potential incentive-delay task incorporating novel, more ecologically valid forms of reward, higher expression of autistic traits was associated with an attenuated P3 response to the anticipation of social (simulated real-time video feedback from an observer), but not non-social (candy), rewards. Exploratory analyses revealed that this was unrelated to mentalizing ability. The P3 component reflects motivated attention to reward signals, suggesting attenuated motivation allocation specific to social incentives. The study extends prior findings of atypical reward anticipation in ASD, demonstrating that attenuated social reward responsiveness extends to autistic traits in the range of typical functioning. Results support the development of innovative paradigms for investigating social and non-social reward responsiveness. Insight into vulnerabilities in reward processing is critical for understanding social function in ASD. PMID:25752905

  15. Using in vivo probabilistic tractography to reveal two segregated dorsal 'language-cognitive' pathways in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Cloutman, Lauren L; Binney, Richard J; Morris, David M; Parker, Geoffrey J M; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2013-11-01

    Primate studies have recently identified the dorsal stream as constituting multiple dissociable pathways associated with a range of specialized cognitive functions. To elucidate the nature and number of dorsal pathways in the human brain, the current study utilized in vivo probabilistic tractography to map the structural connectivity associated with subdivisions of the left supramarginal gyrus (SMG). The left SMG is a prominent region within the dorsal stream, which has recently been parcellated into five structurally-distinct regions which possess a dorsal-ventral (and rostral-caudal) organisation, postulated to reflect areas of functional specialisation. The connectivity patterns reveal a dissociation of the arcuate fasciculus into at least two segregated pathways connecting frontal-parietal-temporal regions. Specifically, the connectivity of the inferior SMG, implicated as an acoustic-motor speech interface, is carried by an inner/ventro-dorsal arc of fibres, whilst the pathways of the posterior superior SMG, implicated in object use and cognitive control, forms a parallel outer/dorso-dorsal crescent. PMID:23937853

  16. Individual Variability and Test-Retest Reliability Revealed by Ten Repeated Resting-State Brain Scans over One Month

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Changle; Wang, Luoyu; Yang, Ning; Wang, Ze; Dong, Hao-Ming; Yang, Zhi; Zang, Yu-Feng; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Weng, Xu-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Individual differences in mind and behavior are believed to reflect the functional variability of the human brain. Due to the lack of a large-scale longitudinal dataset, the full landscape of variability within and between individual functional connectomes is largely unknown. We collected 300 resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rfMRI) datasets from 30 healthy participants who were scanned every three days for one month. With these data, both intra- and inter-individual variability of six common rfMRI metrics, as well as their test-retest reliability, were estimated across multiple spatial scales. Global metrics were more dynamic than local regional metrics. Cognitive components involving working memory, inhibition, attention, language and related neural networks exhibited high intra-individual variability. In contrast, inter-individual variability demonstrated a more complex picture across the multiple scales of metrics. Limbic, default, frontoparietal and visual networks and their related cognitive components were more differentiable than somatomotor and attention networks across the participants. Analyzing both intra- and inter-individual variability revealed a set of high-resolution maps on test-retest reliability of the multi-scale connectomic metrics. These findings represent the first collection of individual differences in multi-scale and multi-metric characterization of the human functional connectomes in-vivo, serving as normal references for the field to guide the use of common functional metrics in rfMRI-based applications. PMID:26714192

  17. Tactile Object Familiarity in the Blind Brain Reveals the Supramodal Perceptual-Mnemonic Nature of the Perirhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cacciamani, Laura; Likova, Lora T.

    2016-01-01

    This study is the first to investigate the neural underpinnings of tactile object familiarity in the blind during both perception and memory. In the sighted, the perirhinal cortex (PRC) has been implicated in the assessment of visual object familiarity—a crucial everyday task—as evidenced by reduced activation when an object becomes familiar. Here, to examine the PRC’s role in tactile object familiarity in the absence of vision, we trained blind participants on a unique memory-guided drawing technique and measured brain activity while they perceptually explored raised-line drawings, drew them from tactile memory, and scribbled (control). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before and after a week of training revealed a significant decrease in PRC activation from pre- to post-training (i.e., from unfamiliar to familiar) during perceptual exploration as well as memory-guided drawing, but not scribbling. This familiarity-based reduction is the first evidence that the PRC represents tactile object familiarity in the blind. Furthermore, the finding of this effect during both tactile perception and tactile memory provides the critical link in establishing the PRC as a structure whose representations are supramodal for both perception and memory. PMID:27148002

  18. Tactile Object Familiarity in the Blind Brain Reveals the Supramodal Perceptual-Mnemonic Nature of the Perirhinal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Cacciamani, Laura; Likova, Lora T

    2016-01-01

    This study is the first to investigate the neural underpinnings of tactile object familiarity in the blind during both perception and memory. In the sighted, the perirhinal cortex (PRC) has been implicated in the assessment of visual object familiarity-a crucial everyday task-as evidenced by reduced activation when an object becomes familiar. Here, to examine the PRC's role in tactile object familiarity in the absence of vision, we trained blind participants on a unique memory-guided drawing technique and measured brain activity while they perceptually explored raised-line drawings, drew them from tactile memory, and scribbled (control). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before and after a week of training revealed a significant decrease in PRC activation from pre- to post-training (i.e., from unfamiliar to familiar) during perceptual exploration as well as memory-guided drawing, but not scribbling. This familiarity-based reduction is the first evidence that the PRC represents tactile object familiarity in the blind. Furthermore, the finding of this effect during both tactile perception and tactile memory provides the critical link in establishing the PRC as a structure whose representations are supramodal for both perception and memory. PMID:27148002

  19. Three-dimensional brain atlas of pygmy squid, Idiosepius paradoxus, revealing the largest relative vertical lobe system volume among the cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Motoki; Shigeno, Shuichi; Mizunami, Makoto; Tanaka, Nobuaki K

    2016-07-01

    Cephalopods have the largest and most complex nervous system of all invertebrates, and the brain-to-body weight ratio exceeds those of most fish and reptiles. The brain is composed of lobe units, the functions of which have been studied through surgical manipulation and electrical stimulation. However, how information is processed in each lobe for the animal to make a behavioral decision has rarely been investigated. To perform such functional analyses, it is necessary to precisely describe how brain lobes are spatially organized and mutually interconnected as a whole. We thus made three-dimensional digital brain atlases of both hatchling and juvenile pygmy squid, Idiosepius paradoxus. I. paradoxus is the smallest squid and has a brain small enough to scan as a whole region in the field-of-view of a low-magnification laser scan microscope objective. Precise analyses of the confocal images of the brains revealed one newly identified lobe and also that the relative volume of the vertical lobe system, the higher association center, in the pygmy squid represents the largest portion compared with the cephalopod species reported previously. In addition, principal component analyses of relative volumes of lobe complexes revealed that the organization of I. paradoxus brain is comparable to those of Decapodiformes species commonly used to analyze complex behaviors such as Sepia officinalis and Sepioteuthis sepioidea. These results suggest that the pygmy squid can be a good model to investigate the brain functions of coleoids utilizing physiological methods. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2142-2157, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26663197

  20. Unexpected bismuth concentration profiles in metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy-grown Ga(As{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x})/GaAs superlattices revealed by Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A. W.; Babcock, S. E.; Guan, Y.; Forghani, K.; Anand, A.; Kuech, T. F.

    2015-03-01

    A set of GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x}/GaAs multilayer quantum-well structures was deposited by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy at 390 °C and 420 °C. The precursor fluxes were introduced with the intent of growing discrete and compositionally uniform GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} well and GaAs barrier layers in the epitaxial films. High-resolution high-angle annular-dark-field (or “Z-contrast”) scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging revealed concentration profiles that were periodic in the growth direction, but far more complicated in shape than the intended square wave. The observed composition profiles could explain various reports of physical properties measurements that suggest compositional inhomogeneity in GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} alloys as they currently are grown.

  1. Multichannel brain recordings in behaving Drosophila reveal oscillatory activity and local coherence in response to sensory stimulation and circuit activation

    PubMed Central

    Paulk, Angelique C.; Zhou, Yanqiong; Stratton, Peter; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Neural networks in vertebrates exhibit endogenous oscillations that have been associated with functions ranging from sensory processing to locomotion. It remains unclear whether oscillations may play a similar role in the insect brain. We describe a novel “whole brain” readout for Drosophila melanogaster using a simple multichannel recording preparation to study electrical activity across the brain of flies exposed to different sensory stimuli. We recorded local field potential (LFP) activity from >2,000 registered recording sites across the fly brain in >200 wild-type and transgenic animals to uncover specific LFP frequency bands that correlate with: 1) brain region; 2) sensory modality (olfactory, visual, or mechanosensory); and 3) activity in specific neural circuits. We found endogenous and stimulus-specific oscillations throughout the fly brain. Central (higher-order) brain regions exhibited sensory modality-specific increases in power within narrow frequency bands. Conversely, in sensory brain regions such as the optic or antennal lobes, LFP coherence, rather than power, best defined sensory responses across modalities. By transiently activating specific circuits via expression of TrpA1, we found that several circuits in the fly brain modulate LFP power and coherence across brain regions and frequency domains. However, activation of a neuromodulatory octopaminergic circuit specifically increased neuronal coherence in the optic lobes during visual stimulation while decreasing coherence in central brain regions. Our multichannel recording and brain registration approach provides an effective way to track activity simultaneously across the fly brain in vivo, allowing investigation of functional roles for oscillations in processing sensory stimuli and modulating behavior. PMID:23864378

  2. Direct visualization of alpha-synuclein oligomers reveals previously undetected pathology in Parkinson’s disease brain

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rosalind F.

    2015-01-01

    Oligomeric forms of alpha-synuclein are emerging as key mediators of pathogenesis in Parkinson’s disease. Our understanding of the exact contribution of alpha-synuclein oligomers to disease is limited by the lack of a technique for their specific detection. We describe a novel method, the alpha-synuclein proximity ligation assay, which specifically recognizes alpha-synuclein oligomers. In a blinded study with post-mortem brain tissue from patients with Parkinson’s disease (n = 8, age range 73–92 years, four males and four females) and age- and sex-matched controls (n = 8), we show that the alpha-synuclein proximity ligation assay reveals previously unrecognized pathology in the form of extensive diffuse deposition of alpha-synuclein oligomers. These oligomers are often localized, in the absence of Lewy bodies, to neuroanatomical regions mildly affected in Parkinson’s disease. Diffuse alpha-synuclein proximity ligation assay signal is significantly more abundant in patients compared to controls in regions including the cingulate cortex (1.6-fold increase) and the reticular formation of the medulla (6.5-fold increase). In addition, the alpha-synuclein proximity ligation assay labels very early perikaryal aggregates in morphologically intact neurons that may precede the development of classical Parkinson’s disease lesions, such as pale bodies or Lewy bodies. Furthermore, the alpha-synuclein proximity ligation assay preferentially detects early-stage, loosely compacted lesions such as pale bodies in patient tissue, whereas Lewy bodies, considered heavily compacted late lesions are only very exceptionally stained. The alpha-synuclein proximity ligation assay preferentially labels alpha-synuclein oligomers produced in vitro compared to monomers and fibrils, while stained oligomers in human brain display a distinct intermediate proteinase K resistance, suggesting the detection of a conformer that is different from both physiological, presynaptic alpha

  3. Senile plaques and other senile changes in the brain of an aged American black bear.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Yoshino, T; Yamaguchi, R; Tateyama, S; Kimoto, Y; Nakayama, H; Goto, N

    1995-07-01

    A female American black bear (Euarctos ursus americanus) over 20 years old had shown epileptiform neurologic signs starting in March 1992 and was found dead unexpectedly 8 months later. At necropsy, pulmonary and intrabronchial hemorrhage was noted. In the brain, the leptomeninges exhibited slight thickening, and petechiae were evident in the hippocampus. Histopathologic examination of the brain revealed several senile changes: numerous senile plaques, amyloid deposition in cerebromeningeal arterioles, mineral deposition in the pallidum, and numerous corpora amylacea in the cerebellum. PMID:7483216

  4. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and MRI Reveal No Evidence for Brain Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Neva M.; Shaw, Dennis. W. W.; Richards, Todd L.; Estes, Annette M.; Friedman, Seth D.; Petropoulos, Helen; Artru, Alan A.; Dager, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Brain mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as an etiologic factor in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ([superscript 1]HMRS) and MRI were used to assess for evidence of brain mitochondrial dysfunction in longitudinal samples of children with ASD or developmental delay (DD), and cross-sectionally…

  5. Organization and evolution of brain lipidome revealed by large-scale analysis of human, chimpanzee, macaque, and mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Bozek, Katarzyna; Wei, Yuning; Yan, Zheng; Liu, Xiling; Xiong, Jieyi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Tomita, Masaru; Pääbo, Svante; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R; Ely, John J; Li, Yan; Steinhauser, Dirk; Willmitzer, Lothar; Giavalisco, Patrick; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2015-02-18

    Lipids are prominent components of the nervous system. Here we performed a large-scale mass spectrometry-based analysis of the lipid composition of three brain regions as well as kidney and skeletal muscle of humans, chimpanzees, rhesus macaques, and mice. The human brain shows the most distinct lipid composition: 76% of 5,713 lipid compounds examined in our study are either enriched or depleted in the human brain. Concentration levels of lipids enriched in the brain evolve approximately four times faster among primates compared with lipids characteristic of non-neural tissues and show further acceleration of change in human neocortical regions but not in the cerebellum. Human-specific concentration changes are supported by human-specific expression changes for corresponding enzymes. These results provide the first insights into the role of lipids in human brain evolution. PMID:25661180

  6. Short- and long-latency somatosensory neuronal responses reveal selective brain injury and effect of hypothermia in global hypoxic ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Xiong, Wei; Jia, Xiaofeng; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2012-01-01

    Evoked potentials recorded from the somatosensory cortex have been shown to be an electrophysiological marker of brain injury in global hypoxic ischemia (HI). The evoked responses in somatosensory neurons carry information pertaining to signal from the ascending pathway in both the subcortical and cortical areas. In this study, origins of the subcortical and cortical signals are explored by decomposing the evoked neuronal activities into short- and long-latency responses (SLR and LLR), respectively. We evaluated the effect of therapeutic hypothermia on SLR and LLR during early recovery from cardiac arrest (CA)-induced HI in a rodent model. Twelve rats were subjected to CA, after which half of them were treated with hypothermia (32–34°C) and the rest were kept at normal temperature (36–37°C). Evoked neuronal activities from the primary somatosensory cortex, including multiunit activity (MUA) and local field potential (LFP), were continuously recorded during injury and early recovery. Results showed that upon initiation of injury, LLR disappeared first, followed by the disappearance of SLR, and after a period of isoelectric silence SLR reappeared prior to LLR. This suggests that cortical activity, which primarily underlies the LLR, may be more vulnerable to ischemic injury than SLR, which relates to subcortical activity. Hypothermia potentiated the SLR but suppressed the LLR by delaying its recovery after CA (hypothermia: 38.83 ± 5.86 min, normothermia: 23.33 ± 1.15 min; P < 0.05) and attenuating its amplitude, suggesting that hypothermia may selectively downregulate cortical activity as an approach to preserve the cerebral cortex. In summary, our study reveals the vulnerability of the somatosensory neural structures to global HI and the differential effects of hypothermia on these structures. PMID:22157111

  7. Dynamic Diffusion Tensor Imaging Reveals Structural Changes in the Bilateral Pyramidal Tracts after Brain Stem Hemorrhage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ru-Zhi; Tao, Chuan-Yuan; Chen, Wei; Wang, Chun-Hua; Hu, Yue; Song, Li; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Yu-Shu; Xu, Zi-Qian; Wang, Lei; Feng, Hua; Wang, Ting-Hua; Zheng, Jie; You, Chao; Gao, Fa-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Few studies have concentrated on pyramidal tract (PY) changes after brain stem hemorrhage (BSH). In this study, we used a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) technique and histologic identification to investigate longitudinal PY changes on both the contralateral and ipsilateral sides after experimental BSH. Methods: BSH was induced in 61 Sprague-Dawley rats by infusing 30 μl of autogenous tail blood into each rat’s right pons. DTI and motor function examinations were performed repeatedly on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 after surgery. Fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity were measured in the bilateral PYs. The axon and myelin injury in the PY were evaluated by histologic study. Results: As compared with normal controls, the bilateral PYs in rats with induced BSH showed an early decrease and a late increase in FA and an early increase and a late decrease in MD. A progressive decrease in axial diffusivity with dramatic axon loss from day 1 to day 28 after BSH was found bilaterally. The bilateral PYs showed an early increase and a late decrease in radial diffusivity. Early myelin injury and late repair were also detected pathologically in the bilateral PYs of rats with BSH. Thus, the early motor function deficits of rats with BSH began to improve on day 14 and had almost completely disappeared by day 28. Conclusions: DTI revealed dynamic changes in the bilateral PYs after BSH, which was confirmed by histologic findings and which correlated with motor function alteration. These findings support the idea that quantitative DTI can track structural changes in the bilateral PYs and that DTI may serve as a noninvasive tool to predict the prognoses of patients with BSH. PMID:27065816

  8. Connectivity-based whole brain dual parcellation by group ICA reveals tract structures and decreased connectivity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Calhoun, Vince D; Jung, Rex E; Caprihan, Arvind

    2015-11-01

    Mapping brain connectivity based on neuroimaging data is a promising new tool for understanding brain structure and function. In this methods paper, we demonstrate that group independent component analysis (GICA) can be used to perform a dual parcellation of the brain based on its connectivity matrix (cmICA). This dual parcellation consists of a set of spatially independent source maps, and a corresponding set of paired dual maps that define the connectivity of each source map to the brain. These dual maps are called the connectivity profiles of the source maps. Traditional analysis of connectivity matrices has been used previously for brain parcellation, but the present method provides additional information on the connectivity of these segmented regions. In this paper, the whole brain structural connectivity matrices were calculated on a 5 mm(3) voxel scale from diffusion imaging data based on the probabilistic tractography method. The effect of the choice of the number of components (30 and 100) and their stability were examined. This method generated a set of spatially independent components that are consistent with the canonical brain tracts provided by previous anatomic descriptions, with the high order model yielding finer segmentations. The corpus-callosum example shows how this method leads to a robust parcellation of a brain structure based on its connectivity properties. We applied cmICA to study structural connectivity differences between a group of schizophrenia subjects and healthy controls. The connectivity profiles at both model orders showed similar regions with reduced connectivity in schizophrenia patients. These regions included forceps major, right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus, thalamic radiation, and corticospinal tract. This paper provides a novel unsupervised data-driven framework that summarizes the information in a large global connectivity matrix and tests for brain connectivity differences. It has the

  9. Altered Spontaneous Brain Activity in Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injury Revealed by Resting-State Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ling; Wu, Guangyao; Zhou, Xin; Li, Jielan; Wen, Zhi; Lin, Fuchun

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous neuroimaging studies have provided evidence of structural and functional reorganization of brain in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). However, it remains unknown whether the spontaneous brain activity changes in acute SCI. In this study, we investigated intrinsic brain activity in acute SCI patients using a regional homogeneity (ReHo) analysis based on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Methods A total of 15 patients with acute SCI and 16 healthy controls participated in the study. The ReHo value was used to evaluate spontaneous brain activity, and voxel-wise comparisons of ReHo were performed to identify brain regions with altered spontaneous brain activity between groups. We also assessed the associations between ReHo and the clinical scores in brain regions showing changed spontaneous brain activity. Results Compared with the controls, the acute SCI patients showed decreased ReHo in the bilateral primary motor cortex/primary somatosensory cortex, bilateral supplementary motor area/dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, right inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and bilateral caudate; and increased ReHo in bilateral precuneus, the left inferior parietal lobe, the left brainstem/hippocampus, the left cingulate motor area, bilateral insula, bilateral thalamus and bilateral cerebellum. The average ReHo values of the left thalamus and right insula were negatively correlated with the international standards for the neurological classification of spinal cord injury motor scores. Conclusion Our findings indicate that acute distant neuronal damage has an immediate impact on spontaneous brain activity. In acute SCI patients, the ReHo was prominently altered in brain regions involved in motor execution and cognitive control, default mode network, and which are associated with sensorimotor compensatory reorganization. Abnormal ReHo values in the left thalamus and right insula could serve as

  10. The arborization pattern of engrailed-positive neural lineages reveal neuromere boundaries in the Drosophila brain neuropile

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhilasha; Fung, S.; Lichtneckert, Robert; Reichert, Heinrich; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The Drosophila brain is a highly complex structure composed of thousands of neurons that are interconnected in numerous exquisitely organized neuropile structures such as the mushroom bodies, central complex, antennal lobes, and other specialized neuropiles. While the neurons of the insect brain are known to derive in a lineage-specific fashion from a stereotyped set of segmentally organized neuroblasts, the developmental origin and neuromeric organization of the neuropile formed by these neurons is still unclear. In this report, we use genetic labeling techniques to characterize the neuropile innervation pattern of engrailed-expressing brain lineages of known neuromeric origin. We show that the neurons of these lineages project to and form most arborizations, in particular all of their proximal branches, in the same brain neuropile compartments in embryonic, larval and adult stages. Moreover, we show that engrailed-positive neurons of differing neuromeric origin respect boundaries between neuromere-specific compartments in the brain. This is confirmed by an analysis of the arborization pattern of empty spiracles-expressing lineages. These findings indicate that arborizations of lineages deriving from different brain neuromeres innervate a non-overlapping set of neuropile compartments. This supports a model for neuromere-specific brain neuropile, in which a given lineage forms its proximal arborizations predominantly in the compartments that correspond to its neuromere of origin. PMID:19711412

  11. Noninvasive monitoring of treatment response in a rabbit cyanide toxicity model reveals differences in brain and muscle metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Jangwoen; Mahon, Sari B.; Mukai, David; Patterson, Steven E.; Boss, Gerry R.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Brenner, Matthew

    2012-10-01

    Noninvasive near infrared spectroscopy measurements were performed to monitor cyanide (CN) poisoning and recovery in the brain region and in foreleg muscle simultaneously, and the effects of a novel CN antidote, sulfanegen sodium, on tissue hemoglobin oxygenation changes were compared using a sub-lethal rabbit model. The results demonstrated that the brain region is more susceptible to CN poisoning and slower in endogenous CN detoxification following exposure than peripheral muscles. However, sulfanegen sodium rapidly reversed CN toxicity, with brain region effects reversing more quickly than muscle. In vivo monitoring of multiple organs may provide important clinical information regarding the extent of CN toxicity and subsequent recovery, and facilitate antidote drug development.

  12. Connectivity reveals relationship of brain areas for reward-guided learning and decision making in human and monkey frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Franz-Xaver; Mars, Rogier B.; Sallet, Jérôme; Rushworth, Matthew F. S.

    2015-01-01

    Reward-guided decision-making depends on a network of brain regions. Among these are the orbitofrontal and the anterior cingulate cortex. However, it is difficult to ascertain if these areas constitute anatomical and functional unities, and how these areas correspond between monkeys and humans. To address these questions we looked at connectivity profiles of these areas using resting-state functional MRI in 38 humans and 25 macaque monkeys. We sought brain regions in the macaque that resembled 10 human areas identified with decision making and brain regions in the human that resembled six macaque areas identified with decision making. We also used diffusion-weighted MRI to delineate key human orbital and medial frontal brain regions. We identified 21 different regions, many of which could be linked to particular aspects of reward-guided learning, valuation, and decision making, and in many cases we identified areas in the macaque with similar coupling profiles. PMID:25947150

  13. Natural Minor Scale is More Natural to the Brain than Harmonic Minor Scale as Revealed by Magnetoencephalography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Hiromitsu; Nemoto, Iku; Oda, Shoichiro

    Minor mode is known to elicit stronger emotional responses than major mode in the brain. The present work focused on the minor scales and natural and harmonic minor scales were compared in automatic brain responses in an oddball paradigm. The standard stimulus was either the natural or harmonic minor scale, and a deviant stimulus lacked one scale tone of the corresponding complete minor scale. The brain responded to omission of every tone but omission of the tone B flat in the natural minor experiment elicited larger response than that of the other tones. In particular, the response was significantly larger than that to omission of B in the harmonic minor experiment. This result suggested that the brain felt the natural minor scale to be actually more natural than the harmonic minor scale.

  14. Oscillating gradient diffusion MRI reveals unique microstructural information in normal and hypoxia-ischemia injured mouse brains

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Martin, Lee J.; Northington, Frances J.; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We investigated whether oscillating gradient diffusion MRI (dMRI) can provide information on brain microstructural changes after formaldehyde fixation and after hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury beyond that provided by conventional dMRI. Methods Pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) and oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE) dMRI of the adult mouse brain was performed in vivo (50-200 Hz, b = 600 mm2/s), and a similar protocol was applied to neonatal mouse brains at 24 hours after unilateral hypoxia-ischemia. Animals were perfusion fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde for ex vivo dMRI and histology. Results Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) measured in the live adult mouse brain presented tissue-dependent frequency-dependence. In vivo OGSE-ADC maps at high oscillating frequencies (>100Hz) showed clear contrast between the molecular layer and granule cell layer in the adult mouse cerebellum. Formaldehyde fixation significantly altered the temporal diffusion spectra in several brain regions. In neonatal mouse brains with HI injury, in vivo ADC measurements from edema regions showed diminished edema contrasts at 200 Hz compared to the PGSE results. Histology showed severe tissue swelling and necrosis in the edema regions. Conclusion The results demonstrate the unique ability of OGSE-dMRI in delineating tissue microstructures at different spatial scales. PMID:25168861

  15. Our Faces in the Dog's Brain: Functional Imaging Reveals Temporal Cortex Activation during Perception of Human Faces

    PubMed Central

    Cuaya, Laura V.; Hernández-Pérez, Raúl; Concha, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Dogs have a rich social relationship with humans. One fundamental aspect of it is how dogs pay close attention to human faces in order to guide their behavior, for example, by recognizing their owner and his/her emotional state using visual cues. It is well known that humans have specific brain regions for the processing of other human faces, yet it is unclear how dogs’ brains process human faces. For this reason, our study focuses on describing the brain correlates of perception of human faces in dogs using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We trained seven domestic dogs to remain awake, still and unrestrained inside an MRI scanner. We used a visual stimulation paradigm with block design to compare activity elicited by human faces against everyday objects. Brain activity related to the perception of faces changed significantly in several brain regions, but mainly in the bilateral temporal cortex. The opposite contrast (i.e., everyday objects against human faces) showed no significant brain activity change. The temporal cortex is part of the ventral visual pathway, and our results are consistent with reports in other species like primates and sheep, that suggest a high degree of evolutionary conservation of this pathway for face processing. This study introduces the temporal cortex as candidate to process human faces, a pillar of social cognition in dogs. PMID:26934715

  16. Quantitative gene expression profiling of mouse brain regions reveals differential transcripts conserved in human and affected in disease models.

    PubMed

    Brochier, Camille; Gaillard, Marie-Claude; Diguet, Elsa; Caudy, Nicolas; Dossat, Carole; Ségurens, Béatrice; Wincker, Patrick; Roze, Emmanuel; Caboche, Jocelyne; Hantraye, Philippe; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Elalouf, Jean-Marc; de Chaldée, Michel

    2008-04-22

    Using serial analysis of gene expression, we collected quantitative transcriptome data in 11 regions of the adult wild-type mouse brain: the orbital, prelimbic, cingulate, motor, somatosensory, and entorhinal cortices, the caudate-putamen, the nucleus accumbens, the thalamus, the substantia nigra, and the ventral tegmental area. With >1.2 million cDNA tags sequenced, this database is a powerful resource to explore brain functions and disorders. As an illustration, we performed interregional comparisons and found 315 differential transcripts. Most of them are poorly characterized and 20% lack functional annotation. For 78 differential transcripts, we provide independent expression level measurements in mouse brain regions by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. We also show examples where we used in situ hybridization to achieve infrastructural resolution. For 30 transcripts, we next demonstrated that regional enrichment is conserved in the human brain. We then quantified the expression levels of region-enriched transcripts in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington disease and the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson disease and observed significant alterations in the striatum, cerebral cortex, thalamus and substantia nigra of R6/2 mice and in the striatum of MPTP-treated mice. These results show that the gene expression data provided here for the mouse brain can be used to explore pathophysiological models and disclose transcripts differentially expressed in human brain regions. PMID:18252803

  17. Our Faces in the Dog's Brain: Functional Imaging Reveals Temporal Cortex Activation during Perception of Human Faces.

    PubMed

    Cuaya, Laura V; Hernández-Pérez, Raúl; Concha, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Dogs have a rich social relationship with humans. One fundamental aspect of it is how dogs pay close attention to human faces in order to guide their behavior, for example, by recognizing their owner and his/her emotional state using visual cues. It is well known that humans have specific brain regions for the processing of other human faces, yet it is unclear how dogs' brains process human faces. For this reason, our study focuses on describing the brain correlates of perception of human faces in dogs using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We trained seven domestic dogs to remain awake, still and unrestrained inside an MRI scanner. We used a visual stimulation paradigm with block design to compare activity elicited by human faces against everyday objects. Brain activity related to the perception of faces changed significantly in several brain regions, but mainly in the bilateral temporal cortex. The opposite contrast (i.e., everyday objects against human faces) showed no significant brain activity change. The temporal cortex is part of the ventral visual pathway, and our results are consistent with reports in other species like primates and sheep, that suggest a high degree of evolutionary conservation of this pathway for face processing. This study introduces the temporal cortex as candidate to process human faces, a pillar of social cognition in dogs. PMID:26934715

  18. Next generation sequencing of stage IV squamous cell lung cancers reveals an association of PI3K aberrations and evidence of clonal heterogeneity in patients with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Paul K.; Shen, Ronglai; Won, Helen; Rekhtman, Natasha; Wang, Lu; Sima, Camelia S.; Arora, Arshi; Seshan, Venkatraman; Ladanyi, Marc; Berger, Michael F.; Kris, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale genomic characterization of squamous cell lung cancers (SQCLC) has revealed several putative oncogenic drivers. There are, however, little data to suggest that these alterations have clinical relevance. We performed comprehensive genomic profiling of 79 stage IV SQCLCs (including next-generation sequencing) and analyzed differences in the clinical characteristics of two major SQCLC subtypes: FGFR1 amplified and PI3K aberrant. Patients with PI3K aberrant tumors had aggressive disease marked by worse survival (median OS 8.6 vs. 19.1 mo, p<0.001), higher metastatic burden (>3 organs 18% vs. 3%, p=0.025), and greater incidence of brain metastases (27% vs. 0% in others, p<0.001). We performed whole-exome and RNA sequencing on paired brain metastases and primary lung cancers to elucidate the metastatic process to brain. SQCLC primaries that gave rise to brain metastases exhibited truncal PTEN loss. SQCLC brain metastases exhibited a high degree of genetic heterogeneity and evidence of clonal differences between their primary sites. PMID:25929848

  19. Single muscle fiber proteomics reveals unexpected mitochondrial specialization

    PubMed Central

    Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Deshmukh, Atul S; Zeiler, Marlis; Cancellara, Pasqua; Moretti, Irene; Reggiani, Carlo; Schiaffino, Stefano; Mann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles are composed of multinucleated cells termed slow or fast fibers according to their contractile and metabolic properties. Here, we developed a high-sensitivity workflow to characterize the proteome of single fibers. Analysis of segments of the same fiber by traditional and unbiased proteomics methods yielded the same subtype assignment. We discovered novel subtype-specific features, most prominently mitochondrial specialization of fiber types in substrate utilization. The fiber type-resolved proteomes can be applied to a variety of physiological and pathological conditions and illustrate the utility of single cell type analysis for dissecting proteomic heterogeneity. PMID:25643707

  20. Voxel-based morphometry analysis reveals frontal brain differences in participants with ADHD and their unaffected siblings

    PubMed Central

    Bralten, Janita; Greven, Corina U.; Franke, Barbara; Mennes, Maarten; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Rommelse, Nanda N.J.; Hartman, Catharina; van der Meer, Dennis; O’Dwyer, Laurence; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Heslenfeld, Dirk; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Data on structural brain alterations in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been inconsistent. Both ADHD and brain volumes have a strong genetic loading, but whether brain alterations in patients with ADHD are familial has been underexplored. We aimed to detect structural brain alterations in adolescents and young adults with ADHD compared with healthy controls. We examined whether these alterations were also found in their unaffected siblings, using a uniquely large sample. Methods We performed voxel-based morphometry analyses on MRI scans of patients with ADHD, their unaffected siblings and typically developing controls. We identified brain areas that differed between participants with ADHD and controls and investigated whether these areas were different in unaffected siblings. Influences of medication use, age, sex and IQ were considered. Results Our sample included 307 patients with ADHD, 169 unaffected siblings and 196 typically developing controls (mean age 17.2 [range 8–30] yr). Compared with controls, participants with ADHD had significantly smaller grey matter volume in 5 clusters located in the precentral gyrus, medial and orbitofrontal cortex, and (para)cingulate cortices. Unaffected siblings showed intermediate volumes significantly different from controls in 4 of these clusters (all except the precentral gyrus). Medication use, age, sex and IQ did not have an undue influence on the results. Limitations Our sample was heterogeneous, most participants with ADHD were taking medication, and the comparison was cross-sectional. Conclusion Brain areas involved in decision making, motivation, cognitive control and motor functioning were smaller in participants with ADHD than in controls. Investigation of unaffected siblings indicated familiality of 4 of the structural brain differences, supporting their potential in molecular genetic analyses in ADHD research. PMID:26679925

  1. Water in stars: expected and unexpected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, T.; Aoki, W.; Ohnaka, K.

    1999-03-01

    We have confirmed the presence of water in the early M giant α Cet (M1.5III) and supergiant KK Per (M2Iab) by the highest resolution grating mode of SWS, but this result is quite unexpected from present model atmospheres. In late M giant and supergiant stars, water observed originates partly in the photosphere as expected by the model atmospheres, but ISO SWS has revealed that the 2.7 mic\\ absorption bands appear to be somewhat stronger than predicted while 6.5 mic\\ bands weaker, indicating the contamination by an emission component. In the mid-infrared region extending to 45 mic, pure rotation lines of hho\\ appear as distinct emission on the high resolution SWS spectra of 30g Her (M7III) and S Per (M4-7Ia), along with the dust emission at 10, 13, 20 mic\\ and a new unidentified feature at 30 mic. Thus, together with the dust, water contributes to the thermal balance of the outer atmosphere already in the mid-infrared. The excitation temperature of hho\\ gas is estimated to be 500 - 1000 K. In view of this result for late M (super)giants, unexpected water observed in early M (super)giants should also be of non-photospheric in origin. Thus, ISO has finally established the presence of a new component of the outer atmosphere - a warm molecular envelope - in red giant and supergiant stars from early to late types. Such a rather warm molecular envelope will be a site of various activities such as chemical reactions, dust formation, mass-outflow etc.

  2. Functional mitochondrial analysis in acute brain sections from adult rats reveals mitochondrial dysfunction in a rat model of migraine

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Nathan T.; Moffat, Cynthia; Seifert, Erin L.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in many neurological disorders that only develop or are much more severe in adults, yet no methodology exists that allows for medium-throughput functional mitochondrial analysis of brain sections from adult animals. We developed a technique for quantifying mitochondrial respiration in acutely isolated adult rat brain sections with the Seahorse XF Analyzer. Evaluating a range of conditions made quantifying mitochondrial function from acutely derived adult brain sections from the cortex, cerebellum, and trigeminal nucleus caudalis possible. Optimization of this technique demonstrated that the ideal section size was 1 mm wide. We found that sectioning brains at physiological temperatures was necessary for consistent metabolic analysis of trigeminal nucleus caudalis sections. Oxygen consumption in these sections was highly coupled to ATP synthesis, had robust spare respiratory capacities, and had limited nonmitochondrial respiration, all indicative of healthy tissue. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique by identifying a decreased spare respiratory capacity in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis of a rat model of chronic migraine, a neurological disorder that has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. This technique allows for 24 acutely isolated sections from multiple brain regions of a single adult rat to be analyzed simultaneously with four sequential drug treatments, greatly advancing the ability to study mitochondrial physiology in adult neurological disorders. PMID:25252946

  3. Altering blood flow does not reveal differences between nitrogen and helium kinetics in brain or in skeletal miracle in sheep.

    PubMed

    Doolette, David J; Upton, Richard N; Grant, Cliff

    2015-03-01

    In underwater diving, decompression schedules are based on compartmental models of nitrogen and helium tissue kinetics. However, these models are not based on direct measurements of nitrogen and helium kinetics. In isoflurane-anesthetized sheep, nitrogen and helium kinetics in the hind limb (n = 5) and brain (n = 5) were determined during helium-oxygen breathing and after return to nitrogen-oxygen breathing. Nitrogen and helium concentrations in arterial, femoral vein, and sagittal sinus blood samples were determined using headspace gas chromatography, and venous blood flows were monitored continuously using ultrasonic Doppler. The experiment was repeated at different states of hind limb blood flow and cerebral blood flow. Using arterial blood gas concentrations and blood flows as input, parameters and model selection criteria of various compartmental models of hind limb and brain were estimated by fitting to the observed venous gas concentrations. In both the hind limb and brain, nitrogen and helium kinetics were best fit by models with multiexponential kinetics. In the brain, there were no differences in nitrogen and helium kinetics. Hind limb models fit separately to the two gases indicated that nitrogen kinetics were slightly faster than helium, but models with the same kinetics for both gases fit the data well. In the hind limb and brain, the blood:tissue exchange of nitrogen is similar to that of helium. On the basis of these results, it is inappropriate to assign substantially different time constants for nitrogen and helium in all compartments in decompression algorithms. PMID:25525213

  4. The Abundance of Nonphosphorylated Tau in Mouse and Human Tauopathy Brains Revealed by the Use of Phos-Tag Method.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Taeko; Hatsuta, Hiroyuki; Masuda-Suzukake, Masami; Hosokawa, Masato; Ishiguro, Koichi; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Murayama, Shigeo; Hasegawa, Masato; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2016-02-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau. Previous studies have identified many disease-related phosphorylation sites on tau. However, it is not understood how tau is hyperphosphorylated and what extent these sites are phosphorylated in both diseased and normal brains. Most previous studies have used phospho-specific antibodies to analyze tau phosphorylation. These results are useful but do not provide information about nonphosphorylated tau. Here, we applied the method of Phos-tag SDS-PAGE, in which phosphorylated tau was separated from nonphosphorylated tau in vivo. Among heterogeneously phosphorylated tau species in adult mouse brains, the nonphosphorylated 0N4R isoform was detected most abundantly. In contrast, perinatal tau and tau in cold water-stressed mice were all phosphorylated with a similar extent of phosphorylation. In normal elderly human brains, nonphosphorylated 0N3R and 0N4R tau were most abundant. A slightly higher phosphorylation of tau, which may represent the early step of hyperphosphorylation, was increased in Alzheimer disease patients at Braak stage V. Tau with this phosphorylation state was pelleted by centrifugation, and sarkosyl-soluble tau in either Alzheimer disease or corticobasal degeneration brains showed phosphorylation profiles similar to tau in normal human brain, suggesting that hyperphosphorylation occurs in aggregated tau. These results indicate that tau molecules are present in multiple phosphorylation states in vivo, and nonphosphorylated forms are highly expressed among them. PMID:26687814

  5. What can volumes reveal about human brain evolution? A framework for bridging behavioral, histometric, and volumetric perspectives

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Alexandra A.; Proulx, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    An overall relationship between brain size and cognitive ability exists across primates. Can more specific information about neural function be gleaned from cortical area volumes? Numerous studies have found significant relationships between brain structures and behaviors. However, few studies have speculated about brain structure-function relationships from the microanatomical to the macroanatomical level. Here we address this problem in comparative neuroanatomy, where the functional relevance of overall brain size and the sizes of cortical regions have been poorly understood, by considering comparative psychology, with measures of visual acuity and the perception of visual illusions. We outline a model where the macroscopic size (volume or surface area) of a cortical region (such as the primary visual cortex, V1) is related to the microstructure of discrete brain regions. The hypothesis developed here is that an absolutely larger V1 can process more information with greater fidelity due to having more neurons to represent a field of space. This is the first time that the necessary comparative neuroanatomical research at the microstructural level has been brought to bear on the issue. The evidence suggests that as the size of V1 increases: the number of neurons increases, the neuron density decreases, and the density of neuronal connections increases. Thus, we describe how information about gross neuromorphology, using V1 as a model for the study of other cortical areas, may permit interpretations of cortical function. PMID:25009469

  6. White matter tract oriented deformation predicts traumatic axonal brain injury and reveals rotational direction-specific vulnerabilities

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Sarah; Eucker, Stephanie A.; Gabrieli, David; Bradfield, Connor; Coats, Brittany; Maltese, Matthew R.; Lee, Jongho; Smith, Colin; Margulies, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic correlation between finite element models (FEMs) and histopathology is needed to define deformation thresholds associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study, a FEM of a transected piglet brain was used to reverse engineer the range of optimal shear moduli for infant (5-day-old, 553-658 Pa) and 4-week old toddler piglet brain, (692-811 Pa) from comparisons with measured in situ tissue strains. The more mature brain modulus was found to have significant strain and strain rate dependencies not observed with the infant brain. Age-appropriate FEMs were then used to simulate experimental TBI in infant (n=36) and pre-adolescent (n=17) piglets undergoing a range of rotational head loads. The experimental animals were evaluated for the presence of clinically significant traumatic axonal injury (TAI), which was then correlated with FEM-calculated measures of overall and white matter tract-oriented tissue deformations, and used to identify the metric with the highest sensitivity and specificity for detecting TAI. The best predictors of TAI were the tract-oriented strain (6–7%), strain rate (38–40 s−1), and strain times strain rate (1.3–1.8 s−1) values exceeded by 90% of the brain. These tract-oriented strain and strain rate thresholds for TAI were comparable to those found in isolated axonal stretch studies. Furthermore, we proposed that the higher degree of agreement between tissue distortion aligned with white matter tracts and TAI may be the underlying mechanism responsible for more severe TAI after horizontal and sagittal head rotations in our porcine model of nonimpact TAI than coronal plane rotations. PMID:25547650

  7. Two Distinct Dynamic Modes Subtend the Detection of Unexpected Sounds

    PubMed Central

    King, Jean-Rémi; Gramfort, Alexandre; Schurger, Aaron; Naccache, Lionel; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2014-01-01

    The brain response to auditory novelty comprises two main EEG components: an early mismatch negativity and a late P300. Whereas the former has been proposed to reflect a prediction error, the latter is often associated with working memory updating. Interestingly, these two proposals predict fundamentally different dynamics: prediction errors are thought to propagate serially through several distinct brain areas, while working memory supposes that activity is sustained over time within a stable set of brain areas. Here we test this temporal dissociation by showing how the generalization of brain activity patterns across time can characterize the dynamics of the underlying neural processes. This method is applied to magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings acquired from healthy participants who were presented with two types of auditory novelty. Following our predictions, the results show that the mismatch evoked by a local novelty leads to the sequential recruitment of distinct and short-lived patterns of brain activity. In sharp contrast, the global novelty evoked by an unexpected sequence of five sounds elicits a sustained state of brain activity that lasts for several hundreds of milliseconds. The present results highlight how MEG combined with multivariate pattern analyses can characterize the dynamics of human cortical processes. PMID:24475052

  8. Glucose Metabolism during Resting State Reveals Abnormal Brain Networks Organization in the Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Montes, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to study the abnormal patterns of brain glucose metabolism co-variations in Alzheimer disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) patients compared to Normal healthy controls (NC) using the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. The local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRgl) in a set of 90 structures belonging to the AAL atlas was obtained from Fluro-Deoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography data in resting state. It is assumed that brain regions whose CMRgl values are significantly correlated are functionally associated; therefore, when metabolism is altered in a single region, the alteration will affect the metabolism of other brain areas with which it interrelates. The glucose metabolism network (represented by the matrix of the CMRgl co-variations among all pairs of structures) was studied using the graph theory framework. The highest concurrent fluctuations in CMRgl were basically identified between homologous cortical regions in all groups. Significant differences in CMRgl co-variations in AD and MCI groups as compared to NC were found. The AD and MCI patients showed aberrant patterns in comparison to NC subjects, as detected by global and local network properties (global and local efficiency, clustering index, and others). MCI network’s attributes showed an intermediate position between NC and AD, corroborating it as a transitional stage from normal aging to Alzheimer disease. Our study is an attempt at exploring the complex association between glucose metabolism, CMRgl covariations and the attributes of the brain network organization in AD and MCI. PMID:23894356

  9. Diffusion tensor imaging reveals white matter injury in a rat model of repetitive blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Evan; Du, Fu; Garman, Robert H; Johnson, G Allan; Riccio, Cory; Tong, Lawrence C; Long, Joseph B

    2014-05-15

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is one of the most common combat-related injuries seen in U.S. military personnel, yet relatively little is known about the underlying mechanisms of injury. In particular, the effects of the primary blast pressure wave are poorly understood. Animal models have proven invaluable for the study of primary bTBI, because it rarely occurs in isolation in human subjects. Even less is known about the effects of repeated primary blast wave exposure, but existing data suggest cumulative increases in brain damage with a second blast. MRI and, in particular, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), have become important tools for assessing bTBI in both clinical and preclinical settings. Computational statistical methods such as voxelwise analysis have shown promise in localizing and quantifying bTBI throughout the brain. In this study, we use voxelwise analysis of DTI to quantify white matter injury in a rat model of repetitive primary blast exposure. Our results show a significant increase in microstructural damage with a second blast exposure, suggesting that primary bTBI may sensitize the brain to subsequent injury. PMID:24392843

  10. Diffusion Tensor Imaging Reveals White Matter Injury in a Rat Model of Repetitive Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Evan; Du, Fu; Garman, Robert H.; Johnson, G. Allan; Riccio, Cory; Tong, Lawrence C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is one of the most common combat-related injuries seen in U.S. military personnel, yet relatively little is known about the underlying mechanisms of injury. In particular, the effects of the primary blast pressure wave are poorly understood. Animal models have proven invaluable for the study of primary bTBI, because it rarely occurs in isolation in human subjects. Even less is known about the effects of repeated primary blast wave exposure, but existing data suggest cumulative increases in brain damage with a second blast. MRI and, in particular, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), have become important tools for assessing bTBI in both clinical and preclinical settings. Computational statistical methods such as voxelwise analysis have shown promise in localizing and quantifying bTBI throughout the brain. In this study, we use voxelwise analysis of DTI to quantify white matter injury in a rat model of repetitive primary blast exposure. Our results show a significant increase in microstructural damage with a second blast exposure, suggesting that primary bTBI may sensitize the brain to subsequent injury. PMID:24392843

  11. MRS reveals additional hexose N-acetyl resonances in the brain of a mouse model for Sandhoff disease.

    PubMed

    Lowe, J P; Stuckey, D J; Awan, F R; Jeyakumar, M; Neville, D C A; Platt, F M; Griffin, J L; Styles, P; Blamire, A M; Sibson, N R

    2005-12-01

    Sandhoff disease, one of several related lysosomal storage disorders, results from the build up of N-acetyl-containing glycosphingolipids in the brain and is caused by mutations in the genes encoding the hexosaminidase beta-subunit. Affected individuals undergo progressive neurodegeneration in response to the glycosphingolipid storage. (1)H magnetic resonance spectra of perchloric acid extracts of Sandhoff mouse brain exhibited several resonances ca 2.07 ppm that were not present in the corresponding spectra from extracts of wild-type mouse brain. High-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry of the Sandhoff extracts post-MRS identified the presence of N-acetylhexosamine-containing oligosaccharides, which are the likely cause of the additional MRS resonances. MRS of intact brain tissue with magic angle spinning also showed additional resonances at ca 2.07 ppm in the Sandhoff case. These resonances appeared to increase with disease progression and probably arise, for the most part, from the stored glycosphingolipids, which are absent in the aqueous extracts. Hence in vivo MRS may be a useful tool for detecting early-stage Sandhoff disease and response to treatment. PMID:16206131

  12. Brain-based decoding of mentally imagined film clips and sounds reveals experience-based information patterns in film professionals.

    PubMed

    de Borst, Aline W; Valente, Giancarlo; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Tikka, Pia

    2016-04-01

    In the perceptual domain, it has been shown that the human brain is strongly shaped through experience, leading to expertise in highly-skilled professionals. What has remained unclear is whether specialization also shapes brain networks underlying mental imagery. In our fMRI study, we aimed to uncover modality-specific mental imagery specialization of film experts. Using multi-voxel pattern analysis we decoded from brain activity of professional cinematographers and sound designers whether they were imagining sounds or images of particular film clips. In each expert group distinct multi-voxel patterns, specific for the modality of their expertise, were found during classification of imagery modality. These patterns were mainly localized in the occipito-temporal and parietal cortex for cinematographers and in the auditory cortex for sound designers. We also found generalized patterns across perception and imagery that were distinct for the two expert groups: they involved frontal cortex for the cinematographers and temporal cortex for the sound designers. Notably, the mental representations of film clips and sounds of cinematographers contained information that went beyond modality-specificity. We were able to successfully decode the implicit presence of film genre from brain activity during mental imagery in cinematographers. The results extend existing neuroimaging literature on expertise into the domain of mental imagery and show that experience in visual versus auditory imagery can alter the representation of information in modality-specific association cortices. PMID:26826515

  13. Exploratory metabolomic analyses reveal compounds correlated with lutein concentration in frontal cortex, hippocampus, and occipital cortex of human infant brain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lutein is a dietary carotenoid well known for its role as an antioxidant in the macula and recent reports implicate a role for lutein in cognitive function. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in both pediatric and geriatric brain tissue. In addition, cognitive function in older adults correlated with...

  14. Brain networks engaged in audiovisual integration during speech perception revealed by persistent homology-based network filtration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heejung; Hahm, Jarang; Lee, Hyekyoung; Kang, Eunjoo; Kang, Hyejin; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-05-01

    The human brain naturally integrates audiovisual information to improve speech perception. However, in noisy environments, understanding speech is difficult and may require much effort. Although the brain network is supposed to be engaged in speech perception, it is unclear how speech-related brain regions are connected during natural bimodal audiovisual or unimodal speech perception with counterpart irrelevant noise. To investigate the topological changes of speech-related brain networks at all possible thresholds, we used a persistent homological framework through hierarchical clustering, such as single linkage distance, to analyze the connected component of the functional network during speech perception using functional magnetic resonance imaging. For speech perception, bimodal (audio-visual speech cue) or unimodal speech cues with counterpart irrelevant noise (auditory white-noise or visual gum-chewing) were delivered to 15 subjects. In terms of positive relationship, similar connected components were observed in bimodal and unimodal speech conditions during filtration. However, during speech perception by congruent audiovisual stimuli, the tighter couplings of left anterior temporal gyrus-anterior insula component and right premotor-visual components were observed than auditory or visual speech cue conditions, respectively. Interestingly, visual speech is perceived under white noise by tight negative coupling in the left inferior frontal region-right anterior cingulate, left anterior insula, and bilateral visual regions, including right middle temporal gyrus, right fusiform components. In conclusion, the speech brain network is tightly positively or negatively connected, and can reflect efficient or effortful processes during natural audiovisual integration or lip-reading, respectively, in speech perception. PMID:25495216

  15. Brain Networks Engaged in Audiovisual Integration During Speech Perception Revealed by Persistent Homology-Based Network Filtration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heejung; Hahm, Jarang; Lee, Hyekyoung; Kang, Eunjoo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The human brain naturally integrates audiovisual information to improve speech perception. However, in noisy environments, understanding speech is difficult and may require much effort. Although the brain network is supposed to be engaged in speech perception, it is unclear how speech-related brain regions are connected during natural bimodal audiovisual or unimodal speech perception with counterpart irrelevant noise. To investigate the topological changes of speech-related brain networks at all possible thresholds, we used a persistent homological framework through hierarchical clustering, such as single linkage distance, to analyze the connected component of the functional network during speech perception using functional magnetic resonance imaging. For speech perception, bimodal (audio-visual speech cue) or unimodal speech cues with counterpart irrelevant noise (auditory white-noise or visual gum-chewing) were delivered to 15 subjects. In terms of positive relationship, similar connected components were observed in bimodal and unimodal speech conditions during filtration. However, during speech perception by congruent audiovisual stimuli, the tighter couplings of left anterior temporal gyrus-anterior insula component and right premotor-visual components were observed than auditory or visual speech cue conditions, respectively. Interestingly, visual speech is perceived under white noise by tight negative coupling in the left inferior frontal region–right anterior cingulate, left anterior insula, and bilateral visual regions, including right middle temporal gyrus, right fusiform components. In conclusion, the speech brain network is tightly positively or negatively connected, and can reflect efficient or effortful processes during natural audiovisual integration or lip-reading, respectively, in speech perception. PMID:25495216

  16. MRI reveals that early changes in cerebral blood volume precede blood-brain barrier breakdown and overt pathology in MS-like lesions in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Broom, Kerry A; Anthony, Daniel C; Blamire, Andrew M; Waters, Sara; Styles, Peter; Perry, Victor Hugh; Sibson, Nicola R

    2005-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an established clinical tool for diagnosing multiple sclerosis (MS), the archetypal central nervous system neuroinflammatory disease. In this study, we have used a model of delayed-type hypersensitivity in the rat brain, which bears many of the hallmarks of an MS lesion, to investigate the development of MRI-detectable changes before the appearance of conventional indices of lesion development. In addition, we have correlated the MRI-detectable changes with the developing histopathology. Significant increases in regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) preceded overt changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, T2 relaxation and the diffusion properties of tissue water. Thus, changes in rCBV might be a more sensitive indicator of lesion onset than the conventional indices used clinically in MS patients, such as contrast enhancement. In addition, we show that BBB breakdown, and consequent edema formation, are more closely correlated with astrogliosis than any other histopathologic changes, while regions of T1 and T2 hypointensity appear to reflect hypercellularity. PMID:15678123

  17. Effects of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on Metabolic Profiles in Brain and Liver of Mouse Revealed by a High-throughput Targeted Metabolomics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Nanyang; Wei, Si; Li, Meiying; Yang, Jingping; Li, Kan; Jin, Ling; Xie, Yuwei; Giesy, John P.; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yu, Hongxia

    2016-04-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a perfluoroalkyl acid, can result in hepatotoxicity and neurobehavioral effects in animals. The metabolome, which serves as a connection among transcriptome, proteome and toxic effects, provides pathway-based insights into effects of PFOA. Since understanding of changes in the metabolic profile during hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity were still incomplete, a high-throughput targeted metabolomics approach (278 metabolites) was used to investigate effects of exposure to PFOA for 28 d on brain and liver of male Balb/c mice. Results of multivariate statistical analysis indicated that PFOA caused alterations in metabolic pathways in exposed individuals. Pathway analysis suggested that PFOA affected metabolism of amino acids, lipids, carbohydrates and energetics. Ten and 18 metabolites were identified as potential unique biomarkers of exposure to PFOA in brain and liver, respectively. In brain, PFOA affected concentrations of neurotransmitters, including serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and glutamate in brain, which provides novel insights into mechanisms of PFOA-induced neurobehavioral effects. In liver, profiles of lipids revealed involvement of β-oxidation and biosynthesis of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in PFOA-induced hepatotoxicity, while alterations in metabolism of arachidonic acid suggesting potential of PFOA to cause inflammation response in liver. These results provide insight into the mechanism and biomarkers for PFOA-induced effects.

  18. Violence-related content in video game may lead to functional connectivity changes in brain networks as revealed by fMRI-ICA in young men.

    PubMed

    Zvyagintsev, M; Klasen, M; Weber, R; Sarkheil, P; Esposito, F; Mathiak, K A; Schwenzer, M; Mathiak, K

    2016-04-21

    In violent video games, players engage in virtual aggressive behaviors. Exposure to virtual aggressive behavior induces short-term changes in players' behavior. In a previous study, a violence-related version of the racing game "Carmageddon TDR2000" increased aggressive affects, cognitions, and behaviors compared to its non-violence-related version. This study investigates the differences in neural network activity during the playing of both versions of the video game. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) recorded ongoing brain activity of 18 young men playing the violence-related and the non-violence-related version of the video game Carmageddon. Image time series were decomposed into functional connectivity (FC) patterns using independent component analysis (ICA) and template-matching yielded a mapping to established functional brain networks. The FC patterns revealed a decrease in connectivity within 6 brain networks during the violence-related compared to the non-violence-related condition: three sensory-motor networks, the reward network, the default mode network (DMN), and the right-lateralized frontoparietal network. Playing violent racing games may change functional brain connectivity, in particular and even after controlling for event frequency, in the reward network and the DMN. These changes may underlie the short-term increase of aggressive affects, cognitions, and behaviors as observed after playing violent video games. PMID:26855192

  19. Effects of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on Metabolic Profiles in Brain and Liver of Mouse Revealed by a High-throughput Targeted Metabolomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nanyang; Wei, Si; Li, Meiying; Yang, Jingping; Li, Kan; Jin, Ling; Xie, Yuwei; Giesy, John P.; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yu, Hongxia

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a perfluoroalkyl acid, can result in hepatotoxicity and neurobehavioral effects in animals. The metabolome, which serves as a connection among transcriptome, proteome and toxic effects, provides pathway-based insights into effects of PFOA. Since understanding of changes in the metabolic profile during hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity were still incomplete, a high-throughput targeted metabolomics approach (278 metabolites) was used to investigate effects of exposure to PFOA for 28 d on brain and liver of male Balb/c mice. Results of multivariate statistical analysis indicated that PFOA caused alterations in metabolic pathways in exposed individuals. Pathway analysis suggested that PFOA affected metabolism of amino acids, lipids, carbohydrates and energetics. Ten and 18 metabolites were identified as potential unique biomarkers of exposure to PFOA in brain and liver, respectively. In brain, PFOA affected concentrations of neurotransmitters, including serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and glutamate in brain, which provides novel insights into mechanisms of PFOA-induced neurobehavioral effects. In liver, profiles of lipids revealed involvement of β-oxidation and biosynthesis of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in PFOA-induced hepatotoxicity, while alterations in metabolism of arachidonic acid suggesting potential of PFOA to cause inflammation response in liver. These results provide insight into the mechanism and biomarkers for PFOA-induced effects. PMID:27032815

  20. Effects of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on Metabolic Profiles in Brain and Liver of Mouse Revealed by a High-throughput Targeted Metabolomics Approach.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nanyang; Wei, Si; Li, Meiying; Yang, Jingping; Li, Kan; Jin, Ling; Xie, Yuwei; Giesy, John P; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yu, Hongxia

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a perfluoroalkyl acid, can result in hepatotoxicity and neurobehavioral effects in animals. The metabolome, which serves as a connection among transcriptome, proteome and toxic effects, provides pathway-based insights into effects of PFOA. Since understanding of changes in the metabolic profile during hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity were still incomplete, a high-throughput targeted metabolomics approach (278 metabolites) was used to investigate effects of exposure to PFOA for 28 d on brain and liver of male Balb/c mice. Results of multivariate statistical analysis indicated that PFOA caused alterations in metabolic pathways in exposed individuals. Pathway analysis suggested that PFOA affected metabolism of amino acids, lipids, carbohydrates and energetics. Ten and 18 metabolites were identified as potential unique biomarkers of exposure to PFOA in brain and liver, respectively. In brain, PFOA affected concentrations of neurotransmitters, including serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and glutamate in brain, which provides novel insights into mechanisms of PFOA-induced neurobehavioral effects. In liver, profiles of lipids revealed involvement of β-oxidation and biosynthesis of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in PFOA-induced hepatotoxicity, while alterations in metabolism of arachidonic acid suggesting potential of PFOA to cause inflammation response in liver. These results provide insight into the mechanism and biomarkers for PFOA-induced effects. PMID:27032815

  1. Regional TNFα mapping in the brain reveals the striatum as a neuroinflammatory target after ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest in rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Janata, Andreas; Magnet, Ingrid A.M.; Uray, Thomas; Stezoski, Jason P.; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Drabek, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) triggers neuroinflammation that could play a role in a delayed neuronal death. In our previously established rat model of ventricular fibrillation (VF) CA characterized by extensive neuronal death, we tested the hypothesis that individual brain regions have specific neuroinflammatory responses, as reflected by regional brain tissue levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α and other cytokines. In a prospective study, rats were randomized to 6 min (CA6), 8 min (CA8) or 10 min (CA10) of VF CA, or sham group. Cortex, striatum, hippocampus and cerebellum were evaluated for TNFα and interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and interferon gamma at 3 h, 6 h or 14 d after CA by ELISA and Luminex. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the cell source of TNFα. CA resulted in a selective TNFα response with significant regional and temporal differences. At 3 h after CA, TNFα-levels increased in all regions depending on the duration of the insult. The most pronounced increase was observed in striatum that showed 20-fold increase in CA10 vs. sham, and 3-fold increase vs. CA6 or CA8 group, respectively (p < 0.01). TNFα levels in striatum decreased between 3 h and 6 h, but increased in other regions between 3 h and 14 d. TNFα levels remained twofold higher in CA6 vs. shams across brain regions at 14 d (p < 0.01). In contrast to pronounced TNFα response, other cytokines showed only a minimal increase in CA6 and CA8 groups vs. sham in all brain regions with the exception that IL-1β increased twofold in cerebellum and striatum (p < 0.01). TNFα colocalized with neurons. In conclusion, CA produced a duration-dependent acute TNFα response, with dramatic increase in the striatum where TNFα colocalized with neurons. Increased TNFα levels persist for at least two weeks. This TNFα surge contrasts the lack of an acute increase in other cytokines in brain after CA. Given that striatum is a selectively vulnerable brain region, our data

  2. Environmental changes in oxygen tension reveal ROS-dependent neurogenesis and regeneration in the adult newt brain.

    PubMed

    Hameed, L Shahul; Berg, Daniel A; Belnoue, Laure; Jensen, Lasse D; Cao, Yihai; Simon, András

    2015-01-01

    Organisms need to adapt to the ecological constraints in their habitat. How specific processes reflect such adaptations are difficult to model experimentally. We tested whether environmental shifts in oxygen tension lead to events in the adult newt brain that share features with processes occurring during neuronal regeneration under normoxia. By experimental simulation of varying oxygen concentrations, we show that hypoxia followed by re-oxygenation lead to neuronal death and hallmarks of an injury response, including activation of neural stem cells ultimately leading to neurogenesis. Neural stem cells accumulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) during re-oxygenation and inhibition of ROS biosynthesis counteracts their proliferation as well as neurogenesis. Importantly, regeneration of dopamine neurons under normoxia also depends on ROS-production. These data demonstrate a role for ROS-production in neurogenesis in newts and suggest that this role may have been recruited to the capacity to replace lost neurons in the brain of an adult vertebrate. PMID:26485032

  3. Proteomic analysis of mitochondria from embryonic and postnatal rat brains reveals response to developmental changes in energy demands

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Lance M.; Stauch, Kelly L.; Fox, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    Many biological processes converge on the mitochondria. In such systems, where many pathways converge, manipulation of the components can produce varied and far-reaching effects. Due to the centrality of the mitochondria in many cellular pathways, we decided to investigate the brain mitochondrial proteome during early development. Using a SWATH mass spectrometry-based technique, we were able to identify vast proteomic alterations between whole brain mitochondria from rats at embryonic day 18 compared to postnatal day 7. These findings include statistically significant alterations in proteins involved in glycolysis and mitochondrial trafficking/dynamics. Additionally, bioinformatic analysis enabled the identification of HIF1A and XBP1 as upstream transcriptional regulators of many of the differentially expressed proteins. These data suggest that the cell is rearranging mitochondria to accommodate special energy demands and that cytosolic proteins exert mitochondrial effects through dynamic interactions with mitochondria. PMID:25046836

  4. Laser-capture microdissection of plasma cells from subacute sclerosing panencephalitis brain reveals intrathecal disease-relevant antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Burgoon, Mark P.; Keays, Kathryne M.; Owens, Gregory P.; Ritchie, Alanna M.; Rai, Pradeep R.; Cool, Carlyne D.; Gilden, Donald H.

    2005-01-01

    Increased IgG and oligoclonal bands are found in cerebrospinal fluid of humans with chronic infectious CNS disease. Studies have shown that these oligoclonal bands are antibodies directed against the agent that causes disease. Laser-capture microdissection was used to isolate individual CD38+ plasma cells from the brain of a patient with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, and single-cell RT-PCR was used to analyze individual IgG heavy and light chains expressed by each cell. Based on overrepresented IgG sequences, we constructed functional recombinant antibodies (recombinant IgGs) and determined their specificities. Five of eight recombinant IgGs recognized measles virus, the cause of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. These results demonstrate that overrepresented IgG sequences in postmortem brains can be used to produce functional recombinant antibodies that recognize their target antigens. This strategy can be used to identify disease-relevant antigens in CNS inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. PMID:15883366

  5. Effects of Hormone Therapy on Brain Volumes Changes of Postmenopausal Women Revealed by Optimally-Discriminative Voxel-Based Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianhao; Casanova, Ramon; Resnick, Susan M.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Baker, Laura D.; Padual, Claudia B.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Bryan, R. Nick; Espeland, Mark A.; Davatzikos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds The Women's Health Initiative Memory Study Magnetic Resonance Imaging (WHIMS-MRI) provides an opportunity to evaluate how menopausal hormone therapy (HT) affects the structure of older women’s brains. Our earlier work based on region of interest (ROI) analysis demonstrated potential structural changes underlying adverse effects of HT on cognition. However, the ROI-based analysis is limited in statistical power and precision, and cannot provide fine-grained mapping of whole-brain changes. Methods We aimed to identify local structural differences between HT and placebo groups from WHIMS-MRI in a whole-brain refined level, by using a novel method, named Optimally-Discriminative Voxel-Based Analysis (ODVBA). ODVBA is a recently proposed imaging pattern analysis approach for group comparisons utilizing a spatially adaptive analysis scheme to accurately locate areas of group differences, thereby providing superior sensitivity and specificity to detect the structural brain changes over conventional methods. Results Women assigned to HT treatments had significant Gray Matter (GM) losses compared to the placebo groups in the anterior cingulate and the adjacent medial frontal gyrus, and the orbitofrontal cortex, which persisted after multiple comparison corrections. There were no regions where HT was significantly associated with larger volumes compared to placebo, although a trend of marginal significance was found in the posterior cingulate cortical area. The CEE-Alone and CEE+MPA groups, although compared with different placebo controls, demonstrated similar effects according to the spatial patterns of structural changes. Conclusions HT had adverse effects on GM volumes and risk for cognitive impairment and dementia in older women. These findings advanced our understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of HT effects. PMID:26974440

  6. Divergent whole-genome methylation maps of human and chimpanzee brains reveal epigenetic basis of human regulatory evolution.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jia; Konopka, Genevieve; Hunt, Brendan G; Preuss, Todd M; Geschwind, Dan; Yi, Soojin V

    2012-09-01

    DNA methylation is a pervasive epigenetic DNA modification that strongly affects chromatin regulation and gene expression. To date, it remains largely unknown how patterns of DNA methylation differ between closely related species and whether such differences contribute to species-specific phenotypes. To investigate these questions, we generated nucleotide-resolution whole-genome methylation maps of the prefrontal cortex of multiple humans and chimpanzees. Levels and patterns of DNA methylation vary across individuals within species according to the age and the sex of the individuals. We also found extensive species-level divergence in patterns of DNA methylation and that hundreds of genes exhibit significantly lower levels of promoter methylation in the human brain than in the chimpanzee brain. Furthermore, we investigated the functional consequences of methylation differences in humans and chimpanzees by integrating data on gene expression generated with next-generation sequencing methods, and we found a strong relationship between differential methylation and gene expression. Finally, we found that differentially methylated genes are strikingly enriched with loci associated with neurological disorders, psychological disorders, and cancers. Our results demonstrate that differential DNA methylation might be an important molecular mechanism driving gene-expression divergence between human and chimpanzee brains and might potentially contribute to the evolution of disease vulnerabilities. Thus, comparative studies of humans and chimpanzees stand to identify key epigenomic modifications underlying the evolution of human-specific traits. PMID:22922032

  7. MR elastography in a murine stroke model reveals correlation of macroscopic viscoelastic properties of the brain with neuronal density.

    PubMed

    Freimann, Florian Baptist; Müller, Susanne; Streitberger, Kaspar-Josche; Guo, Jing; Rot, Sergej; Ghori, Adnan; Vajkoczy, Peter; Reiter, Rolf; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Jürgen

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of neuronal density on viscoelastic parameters of living brain tissue after ischemic infarction in the mouse using MR elastography (MRE). Transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in the left hemisphere was induced in 20 mice. In vivo 7-T MRE at a vibration frequency of 900 Hz was performed on days 3, 7, 14 and 28 (n = 5 per group) after MCAO, followed by the analysis of histological markers, such as neuron counts (NeuN). MCAO led to a significant reduction in the storage modulus in the left hemisphere relative to contralateral values (p = 0.03) without changes over time. A correlation between storage modulus and NeuN in both hemispheres was observed, with correlation coefficients of R = 0.648 (p = 0.002, left) and R = 0.622 (p = 0.003, right). The loss modulus was less sensitive to MCAO, but correlated with NeuN in the left hemisphere (R = 0.764, p = 0.0001). In agreement with the literature, these results suggest that the shear modulus in the brain is reduced after transient ischemic insult. Furthermore, our study provides evidence that the in vivo shear modulus of brain tissue correlates with neuronal density. In diagnostic applications, MRE may thus have diagnostic potential as a tool for image-based quantification of neurodegenerative processes. PMID:23784982

  8. Quantitative proteomics reveals the novel co-expression signatures in early brain development for prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuexin; Feng, Lin; Liu, Dianming; Zhang, Lianfeng; Wu, Bo; Jiang, Wei; Han, Zujing; Cheng, Shujun

    2016-01-01

    Although several researches have explored the similarity across development and tumorigenesis in cellular behavior and underlying molecular mechanisms, not many have investigated the developmental characteristics at proteomic level and further extended to cancer clinical outcome. In this study, we used iTRAQ to quantify the protein expression changes during macaque rhesus brain development from fetuses at gestation 70 days to after born 5 years. Then, we performed weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) on protein expression data of brain development to identify co-expressed modules that highly expressed on distinct development stages, including early stage, middle stage and late stage. Moreover, we used the univariate cox regression model to evaluate the prognostic potentials of these genes in two independent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) datasets. The results showed that the modules highly expressed on early stage contained more reproducible prognostic genes, including ILF2, CCT7, CCT4, RPL10A, MSN, PRPS1, TFRC and APEX1. These genes were not only associated with clinical outcome, but also tended to influence chemoresponse. These signatures identified from embryonic brain development might contribute to precise prediction of GBM prognosis and identification of novel drug targets in GBM therapies. Thus, the development could become a viable reference model for researching cancers, including identifying novel prognostic markers and promoting new therapies. PMID:26895104

  9. Quantitative proteomics reveals the novel co-expression signatures in early brain development for prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuexin; Feng, Lin; Liu, Dianming; Zhang, Lianfeng; Wu, Bo; Jiang, Wei; Han, Zujing; Cheng, Shujun

    2016-03-22

    Although several researches have explored the similarity across development and tumorigenesis in cellular behavior and underlying molecular mechanisms, not many have investigated the developmental characteristics at proteomic level and further extended to cancer clinical outcome. In this study, we used iTRAQ to quantify the protein expression changes during macaque rhesus brain development from fetuses at gestation 70 days to after born 5 years. Then, we performed weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) on protein expression data of brain development to identify co-expressed modules that highly expressed on distinct development stages, including early stage, middle stage and late stage. Moreover, we used the univariate cox regression model to evaluate the prognostic potentials of these genes in two independent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) datasets. The results showed that the modules highly expressed on early stage contained more reproducible prognostic genes, including ILF2, CCT7, CCT4, RPL10A, MSN, PRPS1, TFRC and APEX1. These genes were not only associated with clinical outcome, but also tended to influence chemoresponse. These signatures identified from embryonic brain development might contribute to precise prediction of GBM prognosis and identification of novel drug targets in GBM therapies. Thus, the development could become a viable reference model for researching cancers, including identifying novel prognostic markers and promoting new therapies. PMID:26895104

  10. Frequency and Factors Associated with Unexpected Death in an Acute Palliative Care Unit: Expect the Unexpected

    PubMed Central

    Bruera, Sebastian; Chisholm, Gary; Santos, Renata Dos; Bruera, Eduardo; Hui, David

    2015-01-01

    Context Few studies have examined the frequency of unexpected death and its associated factors in a palliative care setting. Objectives To determine the frequency of unexpected death in two acute palliative care units (APCUs); to compare the frequency of signs of impending death between expected and unexpected deaths; and to determine the predictors associated with unexpected death. Methods In this prospective, longitudinal, observational study, consecutive patients admitted to two APCUs were enrolled and physical signs of impending death were documented twice daily until discharge or death. Physicians were asked to complete a survey within 24 hours of APCU death. The death was considered unexpected if the physician answered “yes” to the question “Were you surprised by the timing of the death?” Results In total, 193 of 203 after-death assessments (95%) were collected for analysis. Nineteen of 193 patients died unexpectedly (10%). Signs of impending death, including nonreactive pupils, inability to close eyelids, decreased response to verbal stimuli, drooping of nasolabial folds, peripheral cyanosis, pulselessness of the radial artery, and respiration with mandibular movement, were documented more frequently in expected deaths than unexpected deaths (P < 0.05). Longer disease duration was associated with unexpected death (33 months vs. 12 months, P=0.009). Conclusion Unexpected death occurred in an unexpectedly high proportion of patients in the APCU setting, and was associated with fewer signs of impending death. Our findings highlight the need for palliative care teams to be prepared for the unexpected. PMID:25499421

  11. A comparative antibody analysis of pannexin1 expression in four rat brain regions reveals varying subcellular localizations.

    PubMed

    Cone, Angela C; Ambrosi, Cinzia; Scemes, Eliana; Martone, Maryann E; Sosinsky, Gina E

    2013-01-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels release cytosolic ATP in response to signaling pathways. Panx1 is highly expressed in the central nervous system. We used four antibodies with different Panx1 anti-peptide epitopes to analyze four regions of rat brain. These antibodies labeled the same bands in Western blots and had highly similar patterns of immunofluorescence in tissue culture cells expressing Panx1, but Western blots of brain lysates from Panx1 knockout and control mice showed different banding patterns. Localizations of Panx1 in brain slices were generated using automated wide field mosaic confocal microscopy for imaging large regions of interest while retaining maximum resolution for examining cell populations and compartments. We compared Panx1 expression over the cerebellum, hippocampus with adjacent cortex, thalamus, and olfactory bulb. While Panx1 localizes to the same neuronal cell types, subcellular localizations differ. Two antibodies with epitopes against the intracellular loop and one against the carboxy terminus preferentially labeled cell bodies, while an antibody raised against an N-terminal peptide highlighted neuronal processes more than cell bodies. These labeling patterns may be a reflection of different cellular and subcellular localizations of full-length and/or modified Panx1 channels where each antibody is highlighting unique or differentially accessible Panx1 populations. However, we cannot rule out that one or more of these antibodies have specificity issues. All data associated with experiments from these four antibodies are presented in a manner that allows them to be compared and our claims thoroughly evaluated, rather than eliminating results that were questionable. Each antibody is given a unique identifier through the NIF Antibody Registry that can be used to track usage of individual antibodies across papers and all image and metadata are made available in the public repository, the Cell Centered Database, for on-line viewing, and

  12. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging reveals increased DOI-induced brain activity in a mouse model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Malkova, Natalia V; Gallagher, Joseph J; Yu, Collin Z; Jacobs, Russell E; Patterson, Paul H

    2014-06-17

    Maternal infection during pregnancy increases the risk for schizophrenia in offspring. In rodent models, maternal immune activation (MIA) yields offspring with schizophrenia-like behaviors. None of these behaviors are, however, specific to schizophrenia. The presence of hallucinations is a key diagnostic symptom of schizophrenia. In mice, this symptom can be defined as brain activation in the absence of external stimuli, which can be mimicked by administration of hallucinogens. We find that, compared with controls, adult MIA offspring display an increased stereotypical behavioral response to the hallucinogen 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI), an agonist for serotonin receptor 2A (5-HT2AR). This may be explained by increased levels of 5-HT2AR and downstream signaling molecules in unstimulated MIA prefrontal cortex (PFC). Using manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging to identify neuronal activation elicited by DOI administration, we find that, compared with controls, MIA offspring exhibit a greater manganese (Mn(2+)) accumulation in several brain areas, including the PFC, thalamus, and striatum. The parafascicular thalamic nucleus, which plays the role in the pathogenesis of hallucinations, is activated by DOI in MIA offspring only. Additionally, compared with controls, MIA offspring demonstrate higher DOI-induced expression of early growth response protein 1, cyclooxygenase-2, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the PFC. Chronic treatment with the 5-HT2AR antagonist ketanserin reduces DOI-induced head twitching in MIA offspring. Thus, the MIA mouse model can be successfully used to investigate activity induced by DOI in awake, behaving mice. Moreover, manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is a useful, noninvasive method for accurately measuring this type of activity. PMID:24889602

  13. A Comparative Antibody Analysis of Pannexin1 Expression in Four Rat Brain Regions Reveals Varying Subcellular Localizations

    PubMed Central

    Cone, Angela C.; Ambrosi, Cinzia; Scemes, Eliana; Martone, Maryann E.; Sosinsky, Gina E.

    2012-01-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels release cytosolic ATP in response to signaling pathways. Panx1 is highly expressed in the central nervous system. We used four antibodies with different Panx1 anti-peptide epitopes to analyze four regions of rat brain. These antibodies labeled the same bands in Western blots and had highly similar patterns of immunofluorescence in tissue culture cells expressing Panx1, but Western blots of brain lysates from Panx1 knockout and control mice showed different banding patterns. Localizations of Panx1 in brain slices were generated using automated wide field mosaic confocal microscopy for imaging large regions of interest while retaining maximum resolution for examining cell populations and compartments. We compared Panx1 expression over the cerebellum, hippocampus with adjacent cortex, thalamus, and olfactory bulb. While Panx1 localizes to the same neuronal cell types, subcellular localizations differ. Two antibodies with epitopes against the intracellular loop and one against the carboxy terminus preferentially labeled cell bodies, while an antibody raised against an N-terminal peptide highlighted neuronal processes more than cell bodies. These labeling patterns may be a reflection of different cellular and subcellular localizations of full-length and/or modified Panx1 channels where each antibody is highlighting unique or differentially accessible Panx1 populations. However, we cannot rule out that one or more of these antibodies have specificity issues. All data associated with experiments from these four antibodies are presented in a manner that allows them to be compared and our claims thoroughly evaluated, rather than eliminating results that were questionable. Each antibody is given a unique identifier through the NIF Antibody Registry that can be used to track usage of individual antibodies across papers and all image and metadata are made available in the public repository, the Cell Centered Database, for on-line viewing, and

  14. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging reveals increased DOI-induced brain activity in a mouse model of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Malkova, Natalia V.; Gallagher, Joseph J.; Yu, Collin Z.; Jacobs, Russell E.; Patterson, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal infection during pregnancy increases the risk for schizophrenia in offspring. In rodent models, maternal immune activation (MIA) yields offspring with schizophrenia-like behaviors. None of these behaviors are, however, specific to schizophrenia. The presence of hallucinations is a key diagnostic symptom of schizophrenia. In mice, this symptom can be defined as brain activation in the absence of external stimuli, which can be mimicked by administration of hallucinogens. We find that, compared with controls, adult MIA offspring display an increased stereotypical behavioral response to the hallucinogen 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI), an agonist for serotonin receptor 2A (5-HT2AR). This may be explained by increased levels of 5-HT2AR and downstream signaling molecules in unstimulated MIA prefrontal cortex (PFC). Using manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging to identify neuronal activation elicited by DOI administration, we find that, compared with controls, MIA offspring exhibit a greater manganese (Mn2+) accumulation in several brain areas, including the PFC, thalamus, and striatum. The parafascicular thalamic nucleus, which plays the role in the pathogenesis of hallucinations, is activated by DOI in MIA offspring only. Additionally, compared with controls, MIA offspring demonstrate higher DOI-induced expression of early growth response protein 1, cyclooxygenase-2, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the PFC. Chronic treatment with the 5-HT2AR antagonist ketanserin reduces DOI-induced head twitching in MIA offspring. Thus, the MIA mouse model can be successfully used to investigate activity induced by DOI in awake, behaving mice. Moreover, manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is a useful, noninvasive method for accurately measuring this type of activity. PMID:24889602

  15. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals oral Lactobacillus promotion of increases in brain GABA, N-acetyl aspartate and glutamate.

    PubMed

    Janik, Rafal; Thomason, Lynsie A M; Stanisz, Andrew M; Forsythe, Paul; Bienenstock, John; Stanisz, Greg J

    2016-01-15

    The gut microbiome has been shown to regulate the development and functions of the enteric and central nervous systems. Its involvement in the regulation of behavior has attracted particular attention because of its potential translational importance in clinical disorders, however little is known about the pathways involved. We previously have demonstrated that administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus (JB-1) to healthy male BALB/c mice, promotes consistent changes in GABA-A and -B receptor sub-types in specific brain regions, accompanied by reductions in anxiety and depression-related behaviors. In the present study, using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), we quantitatively assessed two clinically validated biomarkers of brain activity and function, glutamate+glutamine (Glx) and total N-acetyl aspartate+N-acetyl aspartyl glutamic acid (tNAA), as well as GABA, the chief brain inhibitory neurotransmitter. Mice received 1×10(9) cfu of JB-1 per day for 4weeks and were subjected to MRS weekly and again 4weeks after cessation of treatment to ascertain temporal changes in these neurometabolites. Baseline concentrations for Glx, tNAA and GABA were equal to 10.4±0.3mM, 8.7±0.1mM, and 1.2±0.1mM, respectively. Delayed increases were first seen for Glx (~10%) and NAA (~37%) at 2weeks which persisted only to the end of treatment. However, Glx was still elevated 4weeks after treatment had ceased. Significantly elevated GABA (~25%) was only seen at 4weeks. These results suggest specific metabolic pathways in our pursuit of mechanisms of action of psychoactive bacteria. They also offer through application of standard clinical neurodiagnostic techniques, translational opportunities to assess biomarkers accompanying behavioral changes induced by alterations in the gut microbiome. PMID:26577887

  16. Immediate early gene expression reveals interactions between social and nicotine rewards on brain activity in adolescent male rats.

    PubMed

    Bastle, Ryan M; Peartree, Natalie A; Goenaga, Julianna; Hatch, Kayla N; Henricks, Angela; Scott, Samantha; Hood, Lauren E; Neisewander, Janet L

    2016-10-15

    Smoking initiation predominantly occurs during adolescence, often in the presence of peers. Therefore, understanding the neural mechanisms underlying the rewarding effects of nicotine and social stimuli is vital. Using the conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure, we measured immediate early gene (IEG) expression in animals following exposure either to a reward-conditioned environment or to the unconditioned stimuli (US). Adolescent, male rats were assigned to the following CPP US conditions: (1) Saline+Isolated, (2) Nicotine+Isolated, (3) Saline+Social, or (4) Nicotine+Social. For Experiment 1, brain tissue was collected 90min following the CPP expression test and processed for Fos immunohistochemistry. We found that rats conditioned with nicotine with or without a social partner exhibited CPP; however, we found no group differences in Fos expression in any brain region analyzed, with the exception of the nucleus accumbens core that exhibited a social-induced attenuation in Fos expression. For Experiment 2, brain tissue was collected 90min following US exposure during the last conditioning session. We found social reward-induced increases in IEG expression in striatal and amydalar subregions. In contrast, nicotine reduced IEG expression in prefrontal and striatal subregions. Reward interactions were also found in the dorsolateral striatum, basolateral amygdala, and ventral tegmental area where nicotine alone attenuated IEG expression and social reward reversed this effect. These results suggest that in general social rewards enhance, whereas nicotine attenuates, activation of mesocorticolimbic regions; however, the rewards given together interact to enhance activation in some regions. The findings contribute to knowledge of how a social environment influences nicotine effects. PMID:27435419

  17. Frequency tuning of the dolphin's hearing as revealed by auditory brain-stem response with notch-noise masking.

    PubMed

    Popov, V V; Supin, A Y; Klishin, V O

    1997-12-01

    Notch-noise masking was used to measure frequency tuning in a dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) in a simultaneous-masking paradigm in conjunction with auditory brain-stem evoked potential recording. Measurements were made at probe frequencies of 64, 76, 90, and 108 kHz. The data were analyzed by fitting the rounded-exponent model of the auditory filters to the experimental data. The fitting parameter values corresponded to the filter tuning as follows: QER (center frequency divided by equivalent rectangular bandwidths) of 35 to 36.5 and Q10 dB of 18 to 19 at all tested frequencies. PMID:9407671

  18. Body representations in the human brain revealed by kinesthetic illusions and their essential contributions to motor control and corporeal awareness.

    PubMed

    Naito, Eiichi; Morita, Tomoyo; Amemiya, Kaoru

    2016-03-01

    The human brain can generate a continuously changing postural model of our body. Somatic (proprioceptive) signals from skeletal muscles and joints contribute to the formation of the body representation. Recent neuroimaging studies of proprioceptive bodily illusions have elucidated the importance of three brain systems (motor network, specialized parietal systems, right inferior fronto-parietal network) in the formation of the human body representation. The motor network, especially the primary motor cortex, processes afferent input from skeletal muscles. Such information may contribute to the formation of kinematic/dynamic postural models of limbs, thereby enabling fast online feedback control. Distinct parietal regions appear to play specialized roles in the transformation/integration of information across different coordinate systems, which may subserve the adaptability and flexibility of the body representation. Finally, the right inferior fronto-parietal network, connected by the inferior branch of the superior longitudinal fasciculus, is consistently recruited when an individual experiences various types of bodily illusions and its possible roles relate to corporeal awareness, which is likely elicited through a series of neuronal processes of monitoring and accumulating bodily information and updating the body representation. Because this network is also recruited when identifying one's own features, the network activity could be a neuronal basis for self-consciousness. PMID:26562333

  19. Genome-wide RNAi screens in human brain tumor isolates reveal a novel viability requirement for PHF5A

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Christopher G.; Bradley, Robert K.; Ding, Yu; Toledo, Chad M.; Herman, Jacob; Skutt-Kakaria, Kyobi; Girard, Emily J.; Davison, Jerry; Berndt, Jason; Corrin, Philip; Hardcastle, Justin; Basom, Ryan; Delrow, Jeffery J.; Webb, Thomas; Pollard, Steven M.; Lee, Jeongwu; Olson, James M.; Paddison, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    To identify key regulators of human brain tumor maintenance and initiation, we performed multiple genome-wide RNAi screens in patient-derived glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) stem cells (GSCs). These screens identified the plant homeodomain (PHD)-finger domain protein PHF5A as differentially required for GSC expansion, as compared with untransformed neural stem cells (NSCs) and fibroblasts. Given PHF5A's known involvement in facilitating interactions between the U2 snRNP complex and ATP-dependent helicases, we examined cancer-specific roles in RNA splicing. We found that in GSCs, but not untransformed controls, PHF5A facilitates recognition of exons with unusual C-rich 3′ splice sites in thousands of essential genes. PHF5A knockdown in GSCs, but not untransformed NSCs, astrocytes, or fibroblasts, inhibited splicing of these genes, leading to cell cycle arrest and loss of viability. Notably, pharmacologic inhibition of U2 snRNP activity phenocopied PHF5A knockdown in GSCs and also in NSCs or fibroblasts overexpressing MYC. Furthermore, PHF5A inhibition compromised GSC tumor formation in vivo and inhibited growth of established GBM patient-derived xenograft tumors. Our results demonstrate a novel viability requirement for PHF5A to maintain proper exon recognition in brain tumor-initiating cells and may provide new inroads for novel anti-GBM therapeutic strategies. PMID:23651857

  20. Genome-wide RNAi screens in human brain tumor isolates reveal a novel viability requirement for PHF5A.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Christopher G; Bradley, Robert K; Ding, Yu; Toledo, Chad M; Herman, Jacob; Skutt-Kakaria, Kyobi; Girard, Emily J; Davison, Jerry; Berndt, Jason; Corrin, Philip; Hardcastle, Justin; Basom, Ryan; Delrow, Jeffery J; Webb, Thomas; Pollard, Steven M; Lee, Jeongwu; Olson, James M; Paddison, Patrick J

    2013-05-01

    To identify key regulators of human brain tumor maintenance and initiation, we performed multiple genome-wide RNAi screens in patient-derived glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) stem cells (GSCs). These screens identified the plant homeodomain (PHD)-finger domain protein PHF5A as differentially required for GSC expansion, as compared with untransformed neural stem cells (NSCs) and fibroblasts. Given PHF5A's known involvement in facilitating interactions between the U2 snRNP complex and ATP-dependent helicases, we examined cancer-specific roles in RNA splicing. We found that in GSCs, but not untransformed controls, PHF5A facilitates recognition of exons with unusual C-rich 3' splice sites in thousands of essential genes. PHF5A knockdown in GSCs, but not untransformed NSCs, astrocytes, or fibroblasts, inhibited splicing of these genes, leading to cell cycle arrest and loss of viability. Notably, pharmacologic inhibition of U2 snRNP activity phenocopied PHF5A knockdown in GSCs and also in NSCs or fibroblasts overexpressing MYC. Furthermore, PHF5A inhibition compromised GSC tumor formation in vivo and inhibited growth of established GBM patient-derived xenograft tumors. Our results demonstrate a novel viability requirement for PHF5A to maintain proper exon recognition in brain tumor-initiating cells and may provide new inroads for novel anti-GBM therapeutic strategies. PMID:23651857

  1. MRI/DTI of the Brain Stem Reveals Reversible and Irreversible Disruption of the Baroreflex Neural Circuits: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chia-Hao; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Chang, Alice Y.W.; Chan, Julie Y.H.; Chan, Samuel H.H.

    2016-01-01

    Baroreflex is the physiological mechanism for the maintenance of blood pressure and heart rate. Impairment of baroreflex is not a disease per se. However, depending on severity, the eventuality of baroreflex dysfunction varies from inconvenience in daily existence to curtailment of mobility to death. Despite universal acceptance, neuronal traffic within the contemporary neural circuits during the execution of baroreflex has never been visualized. By enhancing signal detection and fine-tuning the scanning parameters, we have successfully implemented tractographic analysis of the medulla oblongata in mice that allowed for visualization of connectivity between key brain stem nuclei in the baroreflex circuits. When viewed in conjunction with radiotelemetric analysis of the baroreflex, we found that under pathophysiological conditions when the disrupted connectivity between key nuclei in the baroreflex circuits was reversible, the associated disease condition (e.g. neurogenic hypertension) was amenable to remedial measures. Nevertheless, fatality ensues under pathological conditions (e.g. hepatic encephalopathy) when the connectivity between key substrates in the baroreflex circuits was irreversibly severed. MRI/DTI also prompted partial re-wiring of the contemporary circuit for baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone, and unearthed an explanation for the time lapse between brain death and the inevitable asystole signifying cardiac death that follows. PMID:27162554

  2. Environmental changes in oxygen tension reveal ROS-dependent neurogenesis and regeneration in the adult newt brain

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, L Shahul; Berg, Daniel A; Belnoue, Laure; Jensen, Lasse D; Cao, Yihai; Simon, András

    2015-01-01

    Organisms need to adapt to the ecological constraints in their habitat. How specific processes reflect such adaptations are difficult to model experimentally. We tested whether environmental shifts in oxygen tension lead to events in the adult newt brain that share features with processes occurring during neuronal regeneration under normoxia. By experimental simulation of varying oxygen concentrations, we show that hypoxia followed by re-oxygenation lead to neuronal death and hallmarks of an injury response, including activation of neural stem cells ultimately leading to neurogenesis. Neural stem cells accumulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) during re-oxygenation and inhibition of ROS biosynthesis counteracts their proliferation as well as neurogenesis. Importantly, regeneration of dopamine neurons under normoxia also depends on ROS-production. These data demonstrate a role for ROS-production in neurogenesis in newts and suggest that this role may have been recruited to the capacity to replace lost neurons in the brain of an adult vertebrate. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08422.001 PMID:26485032

  3. MRI/DTI of the Brain Stem Reveals Reversible and Irreversible Disruption of the Baroreflex Neural Circuits: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Su, Chia-Hao; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Julie Y H; Chan, Samuel H H

    2016-01-01

    Baroreflex is the physiological mechanism for the maintenance of blood pressure and heart rate. Impairment of baroreflex is not a disease per se. However, depending on severity, the eventuality of baroreflex dysfunction varies from inconvenience in daily existence to curtailment of mobility to death. Despite universal acceptance, neuronal traffic within the contemporary neural circuits during the execution of baroreflex has never been visualized. By enhancing signal detection and fine-tuning the scanning parameters, we have successfully implemented tractographic analysis of the medulla oblongata in mice that allowed for visualization of connectivity between key brain stem nuclei in the baroreflex circuits. When viewed in conjunction with radiotelemetric analysis of the baroreflex, we found that under pathophysiological conditions when the disrupted connectivity between key nuclei in the baroreflex circuits was reversible, the associated disease condition (e.g. neurogenic hypertension) was amenable to remedial measures. Nevertheless, fatality ensues under pathological conditions (e.g. hepatic encephalopathy) when the connectivity between key substrates in the baroreflex circuits was irreversibly severed. MRI/DTI also prompted partial re-wiring of the contemporary circuit for baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone, and unearthed an explanation for the time lapse between brain death and the inevitable asystole signifying cardiac death that follows. PMID:27162554

  4. Expression of progerin in aging mouse brains reveals structural nuclear abnormalities without detectible significant alterations in gene expression, hippocampal stem cells or behavior.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jean-Ha; Schmidt, Eva; Viceconte, Nikenza; Strandgren, Charlotte; Pernold, Karin; Richard, Thibaud J C; Van Leeuwen, Fred W; Dantuma, Nico P; Damberg, Peter; Hultenby, Kjell; Ulfhake, Brun; Mugnaini, Enrico; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a segmental progeroid syndrome with multiple features suggestive of premature accelerated aging. Accumulation of progerin is thought to underlie the pathophysiology of HGPS. However, despite ubiquitous expression of lamin A in all differentiated cells, the HGPS mutation results in organ-specific defects. For example, bone and skin are strongly affected by HGPS, while the brain appears to be unaffected. There are no definite explanations as to the variable sensitivity to progeria disease among different organs. In addition, low levels of progerin have also been found in several tissues from normal individuals, but it is not clear if low levels of progerin contribute to the aging of the brain. In an attempt to clarify the origin of this phenomenon, we have developed an inducible transgenic mouse model with expression of the most common HGPS mutation in brain, skin, bone and heart to investigate how the mutation affects these organs. Ultrastructural analysis of neuronal nuclei after 70 weeks of expression of the LMNA c.1824C>T mutation showed severe distortion with multiple lobulations and irregular extensions. Despite severe distortions in the nuclei of hippocampal neurons of HGPS animals, there were only negligible changes in gene expression after 63 weeks of transgenic expression. Behavioral analysis and neurogenesis assays, following long-term expression of the HGPS mutation, did not reveal significant pathology. Our results suggest that certain tissues are protected from functional deleterious effects of progerin. PMID:25343989

  5. Expression of progerin in aging mouse brains reveals structural nuclear abnormalities without detectible significant alterations in gene expression, hippocampal stem cells or behavior

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jean-Ha; Schmidt, Eva; Viceconte, Nikenza; Strandgren, Charlotte; Pernold, Karin; Richard, Thibaud J. C.; Van Leeuwen, Fred W.; Dantuma, Nico P.; Damberg, Peter; Hultenby, Kjell; Ulfhake, Brun; Mugnaini, Enrico; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a segmental progeroid syndrome with multiple features suggestive of premature accelerated aging. Accumulation of progerin is thought to underlie the pathophysiology of HGPS. However, despite ubiquitous expression of lamin A in all differentiated cells, the HGPS mutation results in organ-specific defects. For example, bone and skin are strongly affected by HGPS, while the brain appears to be unaffected. There are no definite explanations as to the variable sensitivity to progeria disease among different organs. In addition, low levels of progerin have also been found in several tissues from normal individuals, but it is not clear if low levels of progerin contribute to the aging of the brain. In an attempt to clarify the origin of this phenomenon, we have developed an inducible transgenic mouse model with expression of the most common HGPS mutation in brain, skin, bone and heart to investigate how the mutation affects these organs. Ultrastructural analysis of neuronal nuclei after 70 weeks of expression of the LMNA c.1824C>T mutation showed severe distortion with multiple lobulations and irregular extensions. Despite severe distortions in the nuclei of hippocampal neurons of HGPS animals, there were only negligible changes in gene expression after 63 weeks of transgenic expression. Behavioral analysis and neurogenesis assays, following long-term expression of the HGPS mutation, did not reveal significant pathology. Our results suggest that certain tissues are protected from functional deleterious effects of progerin. PMID:25343989

  6. Royal jelly-like protein localization reveals differences in hypopharyngeal glands buildup and conserved expression pattern in brains of bumblebees and honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Štefan; Spaethe, Johannes; Grübel, Kornelia; Rössler, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Royal jelly proteins (MRJPs) of the honeybee bear several open questions. One of them is their expression in tissues other than the hypopharyngeal glands (HGs), the site of royal jelly production. The sole MRJP-like gene of the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris (BtRJPL), represents a pre-diversification stage of the MRJP gene evolution in bees. Here we investigate the expression of BtRJPL in the HGs and the brain of bumblebees. Comparison of the HGs of bumblebees and honeybees revealed striking differences in their morphology with respect to sex- and caste-specific appearance, number of cells per acinus, and filamentous actin (F-actin) rings. At the cellular level, we found a temporary F-actin-covered meshwork in the secretory cells, which suggests a role for actin in the biogenesis of the end apparatus in HGs. Using immunohistochemical localization, we show that BtRJPL is expressed in the bumblebee brain, predominantly in the Kenyon cells of the mushroom bodies, the site of sensory integration in insects, and in the optic lobes. Our data suggest that a dual gland-brain function preceded the multiplication of MRJPs in the honeybee lineage. In the course of the honeybee evolution, HGs dramatically changed their morphology in order to serve a food-producing function. PMID:24682007

  7. Genomics analysis of potassium channel genes in songbirds reveals molecular specializations of brain circuits for the maintenance and production of learned vocalizations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A fundamental question in molecular neurobiology is how genes that determine basic neuronal properties shape the functional organization of brain circuits underlying complex learned behaviors. Given the growing availability of complete vertebrate genomes, comparative genomics represents a promising approach to address this question. Here we used genomics and molecular approaches to study how ion channel genes influence the properties of the brain circuitry that regulates birdsong, a learned vocal behavior with important similarities to human speech acquisition. We focused on potassium (K-)Channels, which are major determinants of neuronal cell excitability. Starting with the human gene set of K-Channels, we used cross-species mRNA/protein alignments, and syntenic analysis to define the full complement of orthologs, paralogs, allelic variants, as well as novel loci not previously predicted in the genome of zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata). We also compared protein coding domains in chicken and zebra finch orthologs to identify genes under positive selective pressure, and those that contained lineage-specific insertions/deletions in functional domains. Finally, we conducted comprehensive in situ hybridizations to determine the extent of brain expression, and identify K-Channel gene enrichments in nuclei of the avian song system. Results We identified 107 K-Channel finch genes, including 6 novel genes common to non-mammalian vertebrate lineages. Twenty human genes are absent in songbirds, birds, or sauropsids, or unique to mammals, suggesting K-Channel properties may be lineage-specific. We also identified specific family members with insertions/deletions and/or high dN/dS ratios compared to chicken, a non-vocal learner. In situ hybridization revealed that while most K-Channel genes are broadly expressed in the brain, a subset is selectively expressed in song nuclei, representing molecular specializations of the vocal circuitry. Conclusions Together

  8. Amish Lifestyle Brings Unexpected Benefit: Less Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160228.html Amish Lifestyle Brings Unexpected Benefit: Less Asthma Finding suggests exposing kids to lots of allergens, ... rest of the population -- much lower rates of asthma. "We found Amish children had extremely low levels ...

  9. Missed appendicitis: did unexpected intraluminal densities play a role?

    PubMed

    Harper, Rachel; Friedman, Benjamin T; Strote, Jared

    2016-01-01

    A healthy 19-year-old boy presented to our emergency department with abdominal pain. His history, examination and laboratory evaluation raised concern for appendicitis. A CT study of the abdomen and pelvis was carried out by the radiologist and emergency physician and was notable only for a large amount of unexpected high-attenuation intraluminal material. With further history, this was thought to be most likely retained bismuth from over-the-counter medicine ingestion. The patient was discharged home without a diagnosis. Further review of the CT scan by a second radiologist revealed a concern for appendiceal enlargement and associated free fluid. The patient was called back for further evaluation and treatment and ultimately an appendectomy was performed. Physicians should be aware of the causes and impact of unexpected radiopaque intraluminal contents on radiological studies. Most commonly from ingested medicine, such findings can obscure mucosal details, mimic active bleeding or create a distraction from other abnormalities. PMID:27605197

  10. Managing the Unexpected: Complexity as Distributed Sensemaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weick, Karl E.

    In 1998 the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) published a statement of their strategy entitled "Preventing Emerging Infectious Diseases: A Strategy for the 21st Century." They described their central challenge this way: "because we do not know what new diseases will arise, we must always be prepared for the unexpected" (p. vii). Soon after they published that statement CDC was confronted with an unexpected emerging disease, the West Nile Virus, which they misdiagnosed initially.

  11. Task-Related Edge Density (TED)-A New Method for Revealing Dynamic Network Formation in fMRI Data of the Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Gabriele; Stelzer, Johannes; Zuber, Verena; Buschmann, Tilo; Margulies, Daniel; Bartels, Andreas; Scheffler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The formation of transient networks in response to external stimuli or as a reflection of internal cognitive processes is a hallmark of human brain function. However, its identification in fMRI data of the human brain is notoriously difficult. Here we propose a new method of fMRI data analysis that tackles this problem by considering large-scale, task-related synchronisation networks. Networks consist of nodes and edges connecting them, where nodes correspond to voxels in fMRI data, and the weight of an edge is determined via task-related changes in dynamic synchronisation between their respective times series. Based on these definitions, we developed a new data analysis algorithm that identifies edges that show differing levels of synchrony between two distinct task conditions and that occur in dense packs with similar characteristics. Hence, we call this approach "Task-related Edge Density" (TED). TED proved to be a very strong marker for dynamic network formation that easily lends itself to statistical analysis using large scale statistical inference. A major advantage of TED compared to other methods is that it does not depend on any specific hemodynamic response model, and it also does not require a presegmentation of the data for dimensionality reduction as it can handle large networks consisting of tens of thousands of voxels. We applied TED to fMRI data of a fingertapping and an emotion processing task provided by the Human Connectome Project. TED revealed network-based involvement of a large number of brain areas that evaded detection using traditional GLM-based analysis. We show that our proposed method provides an entirely new window into the immense complexity of human brain function. PMID:27341204

  12. Task-Related Edge Density (TED)—A New Method for Revealing Dynamic Network Formation in fMRI Data of the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lohmann, Gabriele; Stelzer, Johannes; Zuber, Verena; Buschmann, Tilo; Margulies, Daniel; Bartels, Andreas; Scheffler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The formation of transient networks in response to external stimuli or as a reflection of internal cognitive processes is a hallmark of human brain function. However, its identification in fMRI data of the human brain is notoriously difficult. Here we propose a new method of fMRI data analysis that tackles this problem by considering large-scale, task-related synchronisation networks. Networks consist of nodes and edges connecting them, where nodes correspond to voxels in fMRI data, and the weight of an edge is determined via task-related changes in dynamic synchronisation between their respective times series. Based on these definitions, we developed a new data analysis algorithm that identifies edges that show differing levels of synchrony between two distinct task conditions and that occur in dense packs with similar characteristics. Hence, we call this approach “Task-related Edge Density” (TED). TED proved to be a very strong marker for dynamic network formation that easily lends itself to statistical analysis using large scale statistical inference. A major advantage of TED compared to other methods is that it does not depend on any specific hemodynamic response model, and it also does not require a presegmentation of the data for dimensionality reduction as it can handle large networks consisting of tens of thousands of voxels. We applied TED to fMRI data of a fingertapping and an emotion processing task provided by the Human Connectome Project. TED revealed network-based involvement of a large number of brain areas that evaded detection using traditional GLM-based analysis. We show that our proposed method provides an entirely new window into the immense complexity of human brain function. PMID:27341204

  13. Network Analysis of Genome-Wide Selective Constraint Reveals a Gene Network Active in Early Fetal Brain Intolerant of Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinmyung; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Daly, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Using robust, integrated analysis of multiple genomic datasets, we show that genes depleted for non-synonymous de novo mutations form a subnetwork of 72 members under strong selective constraint. We further show this subnetwork is preferentially expressed in the early development of the human hippocampus and is enriched for genes mutated in neurological Mendelian disorders. We thus conclude that carefully orchestrated developmental processes are under strong constraint in early brain development, and perturbations caused by mutation have adverse outcomes subject to strong purifying selection. Our findings demonstrate that selective forces can act on groups of genes involved in the same process, supporting the notion that purifying selection can act coordinately on multiple genes. Our approach provides a statistically robust, interpretable way to identify the tissues and developmental times where groups of disease genes are active. PMID:27305007

  14. Extensive Direct Subcortical Cerebellum-Basal Ganglia Connections in Human Brain as Revealed by Constrained Spherical Deconvolution Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Milardi, Demetrio; Arrigo, Alessandro; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Cacciola, Alberto; Marino, Silvia; Mormina, Enricomaria; Calamuneri, Alessandro; Bruschetta, Daniele; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Trimarchi, Fabio; Quartarone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    The connections between the cerebellum and basal ganglia were assumed to occur at the level of neocortex. However evidences from animal data have challenged this old perspective showing extensive subcortical pathways linking the cerebellum with the basal ganglia. Here we tested the hypothesis if these connections also exist between the cerebellum and basal ganglia in the human brain by using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and tractography. Fifteen healthy subjects were analyzed by using constrained spherical deconvolution technique obtained with a 3T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We found extensive connections running between the subthalamic nucleus and cerebellar cortex and, as novel result, we demonstrated a direct route linking the dentate nucleus to the internal globus pallidus as well as to the substantia nigra. These findings may open a new scenario on the interpretation of basal ganglia disorders. PMID:27047348

  15. Extensive Direct Subcortical Cerebellum-Basal Ganglia Connections in Human Brain as Revealed by Constrained Spherical Deconvolution Tractography.

    PubMed

    Milardi, Demetrio; Arrigo, Alessandro; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Cacciola, Alberto; Marino, Silvia; Mormina, Enricomaria; Calamuneri, Alessandro; Bruschetta, Daniele; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Trimarchi, Fabio; Quartarone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    The connections between the cerebellum and basal ganglia were assumed to occur at the level of neocortex. However evidences from animal data have challenged this old perspective showing extensive subcortical pathways linking the cerebellum with the basal ganglia. Here we tested the hypothesis if these connections also exist between the cerebellum and basal ganglia in the human brain by using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and tractography. Fifteen healthy subjects were analyzed by using constrained spherical deconvolution technique obtained with a 3T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We found extensive connections running between the subthalamic nucleus and cerebellar cortex and, as novel result, we demonstrated a direct route linking the dentate nucleus to the internal globus pallidus as well as to the substantia nigra. These findings may open a new scenario on the interpretation of basal ganglia disorders. PMID:27047348

  16. Investigations of transcript expression in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) brain tissue reveal toxicological impacts of RDX exposure.

    PubMed

    Gust, Kurt A; Wilbanks, Mitchell S; Guan, Xin; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Habib, Tanwir; Yoo, Leslie; Wintz, Henri; Vulpe, Chris D; Perkins, Edward J

    2011-01-17

    Production, usage and disposal of the munitions constituent (MC) cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) has led to environmental releases on military facilities. The chemical attributes of RDX are conducive for leaching to surface water which may put aquatic organisms at risk of exposure. Because RDX has been observed to cause aberrant neuromuscular effects across a wide range of animal phyla, we assessed the effects of RDX on central nervous system (CNS) functions in the representative aquatic ecotoxicological model species, fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). We developed a fathead minnow brain-tissue cDNA library enriched for transcripts differentially expressed in response to RDX and trinitrotoluene (TNT) exposure. All 4,128 cDNAs were sequenced, quality filtered and assembled yielding 2230 unique sequences and 945 significant blastx matches (E ≤10(-5)). The cDNA library was leveraged to create custom-spotted microarrays for use in transcript expression assays. The impact of RDX on transcript expression in brain tissue was examined in fathead minnows exposed to RDX at 0.625, 2.5, 5, 10mg/L or an acetone-spike control for 10 days. Overt toxicity of RDX in fathead minnow occurred only at the highest exposure concentration resulting in 50% mortality and weight loss. Conversely, Bayesian analysis of microarray data indicated significant changes in transcript expression at concentrations as low as 0.625 mg/L. In total, 154 cDNAs representing 44 unique transcripts were differentially expressed in RDX exposures, the majority of which were validated by reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Investigation of molecular pathways, gene ontology (GO) and individual gene functions affected by RDX exposures indicated changes in metabolic processes involved in: oxygen transport, neurological function, calcium binding/signaling, energy metabolism, cell growth/division, oxidative stress and ubiquitination. In total, our study indicated that RDX exposure affected

  17. Pediatric Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy: What Have we Learned from Animal and Human Studies, and Can we Prevent it?

    PubMed

    Holt, Rebecca L; Arehart, Eric; Hunanyan, Arsen; Fainberg, Nina A; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2016-05-01

    Several factors, such as epilepsy syndrome, poor compliance, and increased seizure frequency increase the risks of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Animal models have revealed that the mechanisms of SUDEP involve initially a primary event, often a seizure of sufficient type and severity, that occurs in a brain, which is vulnerable to SUDEP due to either genetic or antecedent factors. This primary event initiates a cascade of secondary events starting, as some models indicate, with cortical spreading depolarization that propagates to the brainstem where it results in autonomic dysfunction. Intrinsic abnormalities in brainstem serotonin, adenosine, sodium-postassium ATPase, and respiratory-control systems are also important. The tertiary event, which results from the above dysfunction, consists of either lethal central apnea, pulmonary edema, or arrhythmia. Currently, it is necessary to (1) continue researching SUDEP mechanisms, (2) work on reducing SUDEP risk factors, and (3) address the major need to counsel families about SUDEP. PMID:27544469

  18. Histological analyses by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-imaging mass spectrometry reveal differential localization of sphingomyelin molecular species regulated by particular ceramide synthase in mouse brains.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Wakabayashi, Masato; Tanaka, Yukari; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Sakai, Shota; Kihara, Akio; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Kuge, Yuji

    2015-12-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM) is synthesized by SM synthase (SMS) from ceramide (Cer). SM regulates signaling pathways and maintains organ structure. SM comprises a sphingoid base and differing lengths of acyl-chains, but the importance of its various forms and regulatory synthases is not known. It has been reported that Cer synthase (CerS) has restricted substrate specificity, whereas SMS has no specificity for different lengths of acyl-chains. We hypothesized that the distribution of each SM molecular species was regulated by expression of the CerS family. Thus, we compared the distribution of SM species and CerS mRNA expression using molecular imaging. Spatial distribution of each SM molecular species was investigated using ultra-high-resolution imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). IMS revealed that distribution of SM molecular species varied according to the lengths of acyl-chains found in each brain section. Furthermore, a combination study using in situ hybridization and IMS revealed the spatial expression of CerS1 to be associated with the localization of SM (d18:1/18:0) in cell body-rich gray matter, and CerS2 to be associated with SM (d18:1/24:1) in myelin-rich white matter. Our study is the first comparison of spatial distribution between SM molecular species and CerS isoforms, and revealed their distinct association in the brain. These observations were demonstrated by suppression of CerS2 using siRNA in HepG2 cells; that is, siRNA for CerS2 specifically decreased C22 very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA)- and C24 VLCFA-containing SMs. Thus, histological analyses of SM species by IMS could be a useful approach to consider their molecular function and regulative mechanism. PMID:26398595

  19. The distribution and morphological characteristics of cholinergic cells in the brain of monotremes as revealed by ChAT immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Manger, P R; Fahringer, H M; Pettigrew, J D; Siegel, J M

    2002-01-01

    The present study employs choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunohistochemistry to identify the cholinergic neuronal population in the central nervous system of the monotremes. Two of the three extant species of monotreme were studied: the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus). The distribution of cholinergic cells in the brain of these two species was virtually identical. Distinct groups of cholinergic cells were observed in the striatum, basal forebrain, habenula, pontomesencephalon, cranial nerve motor nuclei, and spinal cord. In contrast to other tetrapods studied with this technique, we failed to find evidence for cholinergic cells in the hypothalamus, the parabigeminal nucleus (or nucleus isthmus), or the cerebral cortex. The lack of hypothalamic cholinergic neurons creates a hiatus in the continuous antero-posterior aggregation of cholinergic neurons seen in other tetrapods. This hiatus might be functionally related to the phenomenology of monotreme sleep and to the ontogeny of sleep in mammals, as juvenile placental mammals exhibit a similar combination of sleep elements to that found in adult monotremes. PMID:12476054

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Reveals Differential Protein Expression in Response to Enterovirus 71 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wenying; Zhong, Jiayu; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Renli; Peng, Liang; Hong, Wenxu; Huang, Sheng He; Cao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    2D DIGE technology was employed on proteins prepared from human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), to study the differentially expressed proteins in cells at 0 h, 1 h, 16 h, and 24 h after infection. Proteins found to be differentially expressed were identified with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDITOF/TOF MS) analysis. We identified 43 spots showing changes of at least 2.5 fold up- or downregulated expressions in EV71-infected cells at different time when comparing to control, and 28 proteins could be successfully identified by MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry analysis. 4 proteins were significantly upregulated, and 6 proteins were downregulated, another 18 proteins were different expression at different incubation time. We identified changes in the expression of 12 cellular metabolism-related proteins, 5 molecules involved in cytoskeleton, 3 molecules involved in energy metabolism, 2 molecules involved in signal transduction, 1 molecule involved in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, 1 molecule involved in cell cycle, 1 molecule involved in apoptosis-related protein, 1 molecular chaperone, and 2 unknown proteins. These findings build up a comprehensive profile of the HBMEC proteome and provide a useful basis for further analysis of the pathogenic mechanism that underlies EV71 infections to induce severe neural complications. PMID:25821824

  1. Functionally Brain Network Connected to the Retrosplenial Cortex of Rats Revealed by 7T fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingjuan; Nie, Binbin; Duan, Shaofeng; Zhu, Haitao; Liu, Hua; Shan, Baoci

    2016-01-01

    Functional networks are regarded as important mechanisms for increasing our understanding of brain function in healthy and diseased states, and increased interest has been focused on extending the study of functional networks to animal models because such models provide a functional understanding of disease progression, therapy and repair. In rodents, the retrosplenial cortex (RSC) is an important cortical region because it has a large size and presents transitional patterns of lamination between the neocortex and archicortex. In addition, a number of invasive studies have highlighted the importance of the RSC for many functions. However, the network based on the RSC in rodents remains unclear. Based on the critical importance of the RSC, we defined the bilateral RSCs as two regions of interest and estimated the network based on the RSC. The results showed that the related regions include the parietal association cortex, hippocampus, thalamus nucleus, midbrain structures, and hypothalamic mammillary bodies. Our findings indicate two possible major networks: a sensory-cognitive network that has a hub in the RSCs and processes sensory information, spatial learning, and episodic memory; and a second network that is involved in the regulation of visceral functions and arousal. In addition, functional asymmetry between the bilateral RSCs was observed. PMID:26745803

  2. NIRS-Based Hyperscanning Reveals Inter-brain Neural Synchronization during Cooperative Jenga Game with Face-to-Face Communication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Mok, Charis; Witt, Emily E; Pradhan, Anjali H; Chen, Jingyuan E; Reiss, Allan L

    2016-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an increasingly popular technology for studying social cognition. In particular, fNIRS permits simultaneous measurement of hemodynamic activity in two or more individuals interacting in a naturalistic setting. Here, we used fNIRS hyperscanning to study social cognition and communication in human dyads engaged in cooperative and obstructive interaction while they played the game of Jenga™. Novel methods were developed to identify synchronized channels for each dyad and a structural node-based spatial registration approach was utilized for inter-dyad analyses. Strong inter-brain neural synchrony (INS) was observed in the posterior region of the right middle and superior frontal gyrus, in particular Brodmann area 8 (BA8), during cooperative and obstructive interaction. This synchrony was not observed during the parallel game play condition and the dialog section, suggesting that BA8 was involved in goal-oriented social interaction such as complex interactive movements and social decision-making. INS was also observed in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), in particular Brodmann 9, during cooperative interaction only. These additional findings suggest that BA9 may be particularly engaged when theory-of-mind (ToM) is required for cooperative social interaction. The new methods described here have the potential to significantly extend fNIRS applications to social cognitive research. PMID:27014019

  3. Event-related brain potentials reveal the time-course of language change detection in early bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Jan-Rouke; Thierry, Guillaume

    2010-05-01

    Using event-related brain potentials, we investigated the temporal course of language change detection in proficient bilinguals as compared to matched controls. Welsh-English bilingual participants and English controls were presented with a variant of the oddball paradigm involving picture-word pairs. The language of the spoken word was manipulated such that English was the frequent stimulus (75%) and Welsh the infrequent stimulus (25%). We also manipulated semantic relatedness between pictures and words, such that only half of the pictures were followed by a word that corresponded with the identity of the picture. The P2 wave was significantly modulated by language in the bilingual group only, suggesting that this group detected a language change as early as 200 ms after word onset. Monolinguals also reliably detected the language change, but at a later stage of semantic integration (N400 range), since Welsh words were perceived as meaningless. The early detection of a language change in bilinguals triggered stimulus re-evaluation mechanisms reflected by a significant P600 modulation by Welsh words. Furthermore, compared to English unrelated words, English words matching the picture identity elicited significantly greater P2 amplitudes in the bilingual group only, suggesting that proficient bilinguals validate an incoming word against their expectation based on the context. Overall, highly proficient bilinguals appear to detect language changes very early on during speech perception and to consciously monitor language changes when they occur. PMID:20117220

  4. Brain potentials to native phoneme discrimination reveal the origin of individual differences in learning the sounds of a second language

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Begoña; Baus, Cristina; Escera, Carles; Costa, Albert; Sebastián-Gallés, Núria

    2008-01-01

    Human beings differ in their ability to master the sounds of their second language (L2). Phonetic training studies have proposed that differences in phonetic learning stem from differences in psychoacoustic abilities rather than speech-specific capabilities. We aimed at finding the origin of individual differences in L2 phonetic acquisition in natural learning contexts. We consider two alternative explanations: a general psychoacoustic origin vs. a speech-specific one. For this purpose, event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from two groups of early, proficient Spanish-Catalan bilinguals who differed in their mastery of the Catalan (L2) phonetic contrast /e-ε/. Brain activity in response to acoustic change detection was recorded in three different conditions involving tones of different length (duration condition), frequency (frequency condition), and presentation order (pattern condition). In addition, neural correlates of speech change detection were also assessed for both native (/o/-/e/) and nonnative (/o/-/ö/) phonetic contrasts (speech condition). Participants' discrimination accuracy, reflected electrically as a mismatch negativity (MMN), was similar between the two groups of participants in the three acoustic conditions. Conversely, the MMN was reduced in poor perceivers (PP) when they were presented with speech sounds. Therefore, our results support a speech-specific origin of individual variability in L2 phonetic mastery. PMID:18852470

  5. First- and second-order contrast sensitivity functions reveal disrupted visual processing following mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Daniel P; Reynaud, Alexandre; Ruiz, Tatiana; Laguë-Beauvais, Maude; Hess, Robert; Farivar, Reza

    2016-05-01

    Vision is disrupted by traumatic brain injury (TBI), with vision-related complaints being amongst the most common in this population. Based on the neural responses of early visual cortical areas, injury to the visual cortex would be predicted to affect both 1(st) order and 2(nd) order contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs)-the height and/or the cut-off of the CSF are expected to be affected by TBI. Previous studies have reported disruptions only in 2(nd) order contrast sensitivity, but using a narrow range of parameters and divergent methodologies-no study has characterized the effect of TBI on the full CSF for both 1(st) and 2(nd) order stimuli. Such information is needed to properly understand the effect of TBI on contrast perception, which underlies all visual processing. Using a unified framework based on the quick contrast sensitivity function, we measured full CSFs for static and dynamic 1(st) and 2(nd) order stimuli. Our results provide a unique dataset showing alterations in sensitivity for both 1(st) and 2(nd) order visual stimuli. In particular, we show that TBI patients have increased sensitivity for 1(st) order motion stimuli and decreased sensitivity to orientation-defined and contrast-defined 2(nd) order stimuli. In addition, our data suggest that TBI patients' sensitivity for both 1(st) order stimuli and 2(nd) order contrast-defined stimuli is shifted towards higher spatial frequencies. PMID:27036098

  6. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals DYSF, FKTN, and ISPD Mutations in Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Without Brain or Eye Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Talim, Beril; Swanson, Lindsay C.; Karakaya, Mert; Graff, Michelle A.; Beggs, Alan H.; Topaloglu, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Background Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of neuromuscular disorders. Several genes encoding extracellular matrix, nuclear envelope, sarcolemmal proteins and glycosylation enzymes have been implicated in CMDs. The large overlap of clinical presentations due to mutations in different genes poses a challenge for clinicians in determining disease etiology for each patient. Objective We investigated the use of whole exome sequencing (WES) in identifying the genetic cause of disease in 5 CMD patients from 3 families who presented with highly similar clinical features, including early-onset rapidly progressive weakness without brain or eye abnormalities. Methods Whole exome sequencing was performed on DNA from affected individuals. Potential functional impacts of mutations were investigated by immunostaining on available muscle biopsies. Results Pathogenic mutations in 3 different genes, DYSF, FKTN, and ISPD were identified in each family. Mutation in DYSF led to absence of dysferlin protein in patient muscle. Mutations in ISPD led to impaired ISDP function, as demonstrated by deficiency of α-dystroglycan glycosylation in patient muscle. Conclusions This study highlights the benefit of unbiased genomic approaches in molecular diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders with high clinical heterogeneity, such as the phenotypes observed in our patients. Our results suggest that dysferlin deficiency should be in the differential diagnosis of congenital and rapidly progressive muscular dystrophy, and therefore dysferlin antibody should be in the standard immunohistochemistry panel for muscle biopsies in cases with suspected CMD. PMID:25821721

  7. NIRS-Based Hyperscanning Reveals Inter-brain Neural Synchronization during Cooperative Jenga Game with Face-to-Face Communication

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ning; Mok, Charis; Witt, Emily E.; Pradhan, Anjali H.; Chen, Jingyuan E.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2016-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an increasingly popular technology for studying social cognition. In particular, fNIRS permits simultaneous measurement of hemodynamic activity in two or more individuals interacting in a naturalistic setting. Here, we used fNIRS hyperscanning to study social cognition and communication in human dyads engaged in cooperative and obstructive interaction while they played the game of Jenga™. Novel methods were developed to identify synchronized channels for each dyad and a structural node-based spatial registration approach was utilized for inter-dyad analyses. Strong inter-brain neural synchrony (INS) was observed in the posterior region of the right middle and superior frontal gyrus, in particular Brodmann area 8 (BA8), during cooperative and obstructive interaction. This synchrony was not observed during the parallel game play condition and the dialog section, suggesting that BA8 was involved in goal-oriented social interaction such as complex interactive movements and social decision-making. INS was also observed in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), in particular Brodmann 9, during cooperative interaction only. These additional findings suggest that BA9 may be particularly engaged when theory-of-mind (ToM) is required for cooperative social interaction. The new methods described here have the potential to significantly extend fNIRS applications to social cognitive research. PMID:27014019

  8. Structural brain changes associated with antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenia as revealed by voxel-based morphometric MRI: an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The results of multiple studies on the association between antipsychotic use and structural brain changes in schizophrenia have been assessed only in qualitative literature reviews to date. We aimed to perform a meta-analysis of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies on this association to quantitatively synthesize the findings of these studies. Methods A systematic computerized literature search was carried out through MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, SCOPUS and PsycINFO databases aiming to identify all VBM studies addressing this question and meeting predetermined inclusion criteria. All studies reporting coordinates representing foci of structural brain changes associated with antipsychotic use were meta-analyzed by using the activation likelihood estimation technique, currently the most sophisticated and best-validated tool for voxel-wise meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies. Results Ten studies (five cross-sectional and five longitudinal) met the inclusion criteria and comprised a total of 548 individuals (298 patients on antipsychotic drugs and 250 controls). Depending on the methodologies of the selected studies, the control groups included healthy subjects, drug-free patients, or the same patients evaluated repeatedly in longitudinal comparisons (i.e., serving as their own controls). A total of 102 foci associated with structural alterations were retrieved. The meta-analysis revealed seven clusters of areas with consistent structural brain changes in patients on antipsychotics compared to controls. The seven clusters included four areas of relative volumetric decrease in the left lateral temporal cortex [Brodmann area (BA) 20], left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44), superior frontal gyrus extending to the left middle frontal gyrus (BA 6), and right rectal gyrus (BA 11), and three areas of relative volumetric increase in the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (BA 24), left ventral anterior cingulate cortex (BA 24) and right putamen

  9. Sexually Dimorphic Gene Expression Associated with Growth and Reproduction of Tongue Sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) Revealed by Brain Transcriptome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pingping; Zheng, Min; Liu, Jian; Liu, Yongzhuang; Lu, Jianguo; Sun, Xiaowen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome of one- and two-year-old male and female brains of Cynoglossus semilaevis by high-throughput Illumina sequencing. A total of 77,066 transcripts, corresponding to 21,475 unigenes, were obtained with a N50 value of 4349 bp. Of these unigenes, 33 genes were found to have significant differential expression and potentially associated with growth, from which 18 genes were down-regulated and 12 genes were up-regulated in two-year-old males, most of these genes had no significant differences in expression among one-year-old males and females and two-year-old females. A similar analysis was conducted to look for genes associated with reproduction; 25 genes were identified, among them, five genes were found to be down regulated and 20 genes up regulated in two-year-old males, again, most of the genes had no significant expression differences among the other three. The performance of up regulated genes in Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis was significantly different between two-year-old males and females. Males had a high gene expression in genetic information processing, while female's highly expressed genes were mainly enriched on organismal systems. Our work identified a set of sex-biased genes potentially associated with growth and reproduction that might be the candidate factors affecting sexual dimorphism of tongue sole, laying the foundation to understand the complex process of sex determination of this economic valuable species. PMID:27571066

  10. Frequency specific interactions of MEG resting state activity within and across brain networks as revealed by the multivariate interaction measure.

    PubMed

    Marzetti, L; Della Penna, S; Snyder, A Z; Pizzella, V; Nolte, G; de Pasquale, F; Romani, G L; Corbetta, M

    2013-10-01

    Resting state networks (RSNs) are sets of brain regions exhibiting temporally coherent activity fluctuations in the absence of imposed task structure. RSNs have been extensively studied with fMRI in the infra-slow frequency range (nominally <10(-1)Hz). The topography of fMRI RSNs reflects stationary temporal correlation over minutes. However, neuronal communication occurs on a much faster time scale, at frequencies nominally in the range of 10(0)-10(2)Hz. We examined phase-shifted interactions in the delta (2-3.5 Hz), theta (4-7 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (13-30 Hz) frequency bands of resting-state source space MEG signals. These analyses were conducted between nodes of the dorsal attention network (DAN), one of the most robust RSNs, and between the DAN and other networks. Phase shifted interactions were mapped by the multivariate interaction measure (MIM), a measure of true interaction constructed from the maximization of imaginary coherency in the virtual channels comprised of voxel signals in source space. Non-zero-phase interactions occurred between homologous left and right hemisphere regions of the DAN in the delta and alpha frequency bands. Even stronger non-zero-phase interactions were detected between networks. Visual regions bilaterally showed phase-shifted interactions in the alpha band with regions of the DAN. Bilateral somatomotor regions interacted with DAN nodes in the beta band. These results demonstrate the existence of consistent, frequency specific phase-shifted interactions on a millisecond time scale between cortical regions within RSN as well as across RSNs. PMID:23631996

  11. Investigating Initial Disclosures and Reactions to Unexpected, Positive HPV Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rachel A.; Hernandez, Rachael; Catona, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    Initial disclosures of health conditions are critical communication moments. Existing research focuses on disclosers; integrating confidants into studies of initial disclosures is needed. Guided by the disclosure decision-making model (DD-MM; Greene, 2009), this study examined what diagnosed persons and confidants may say when faced with unexpected test results and unexpected disclosures, respectively. Participants (N = 151) recorded an audio-visual message for another person, after imagining that they or the other person had just received unexpected, positive HPV test results. The qualitative analysis revealed four themes: (1) impression management and social distance, (2) invisible symptoms and advice regarding future disclosures, (3) expressing and acknowledging emotional reactions, and (4) misunderstandings and lacking knowledge about HPV. These findings suggested that DD-MM may be a relevant framework for understanding not only when disclosers share, but what disclosers and confidants say in early conversations about new diagnoses. While disclosers’ and confidants’ messages showed marked similarities, important differences appeared. For example, confidants focused on assuaging disclosers’ fear about the consequences, whereas disclosers expressed distress related to their uncertainty about the prognosis of an HPV infection and how to prepare for next steps. The discussion highlighted implications for the DD-MM, HPV disclosures, and future interventions. PMID:25642121

  12. Abnormal brain activation of adolescent internet addict in a ball-throwing animation task: possible neural correlates of disembodiment revealed by fMRI.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeoung-Rang; Son, Jung-Woo; Lee, Sang-Ick; Shin, Chul-Jin; Kim, Sie-Kyeong; Ju, Gawon; Choi, Won-Hee; Oh, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Seungbok; Jo, Seongwoo; Ha, Tae Hyon

    2012-10-01

    While adolescent internet addicts are immersed in cyberspace, they are easily able to experience 'disembodied state'. The purposes of this study were to investigate the difference of brain activity between adolescent internet addicts and normal adolescents in a state of disembodiment, and to find the correlation between the activities of disembodiment-related areas and the behavioral characteristics related to internet addiction. The fMRI images were taken while the addiction group (N=17) and the control group (N=17) were asked to perform the task composed with ball-throwing animations. The task reflected on either self-agency about ball-throwing or location of a ball. And each block was shown with either different (Changing View) or same animations (Fixed View). The disembodiment-related condition was the interaction between Agency Task and Changing View. Within-group analyses revealed that the addiction group exhibited higher activation in the thalamus, bilateral precentral area, bilateral middle frontal area, and the area around the right temporo-parietal junction. And between-group analyses showed that the addiction group exhibited higher activation in the area near the left temporo-parieto-occipital junction, right parahippocampal area, and other areas than the control group. Finally, the duration of internet use was significantly correlated with the activity of posterior area of left middle temporal gyrus in the addiction group. These results show that the disembodiment-related activation of the brain is easily manifested in adolescent internet addicts. Internet addiction of adolescents could be significantly unfavorable for their brain development related with identity formation. PMID:22687465

  13. The human brain and face: mechanisms of cranial, neurological and facial development revealed through malformations of holoprosencephaly, cyclopia and aberrations in chromosome 18.

    PubMed

    Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C; Gboluaje, Temitayo; Reid, Shaina N; Lin, Stephen; Wang, Paul; Green, William; Diogo, Rui; Fidélia-Lambert, Marie N; Herman, Mary M

    2015-09-01

    The study of inborn genetic errors can lend insight into mechanisms of normal human development and congenital malformations. Here, we present the first detailed comparison of cranial and neuro pathology in two exceedingly rare human individuals with cyclopia and alobar holoprosencephaly (HPE) in the presence and absence of aberrant chromosome 18 (aCh18). The aCh18 fetus contained one normal Ch18 and one with a pseudo-isodicentric duplication of chromosome 18q and partial deletion of 18p from 18p11.31 where the HPE gene, TGIF, resides, to the p terminus. In addition to synophthalmia, the aCh18 cyclopic malformations included a failure of induction of most of the telencephalon - closely approximating anencephaly, unchecked development of brain stem structures, near absence of the sphenoid bone and a malformed neurocranium and viscerocranium that constitute the median face. Although there was complete erasure of the olfactory and superior nasal structures, rudiments of nasal structures derived from the maxillary bone were evident, but with absent pharyngeal structures. The second non-aCh18 cyclopic fetus was initially classified as a true Cyclops, as it appeared to have a proboscis and one median eye with a single iris, but further analysis revealed two eye globes as expected for synophthalmic cyclopia. Furthermore, the proboscis was associated with the medial ethmoid ridge, consistent with an incomplete induction of these nasal structures, even as the nasal septum and paranasal sinuses were apparently developed. An important conclusion of this study is that it is the brain that predicts the overall configuration of the face, due to its influence on the development of surrounding skeletal structures. The present data using a combination of macroscopic, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide an unparalleled analysis on the extent of the effects of median defects, and insight into normal development and patterning of the brain

  14. Increase of 20-HETE synthase after brain ischemia in rats revealed by PET study with 11C-labeled 20-HETE synthase-specific inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Marumo, Toshiyuki; Shirakami, Keiko; Mori, Tomoko; Doi, Hisashi; Suzuki, Masaaki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Chaki, Shigeyuki; Nakazato, Atsuro; Ago, Yukio; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Toshio; Baba, Akemichi; Onoe, Hirotaka

    2012-01-01

    20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), an arachidonic acid metabolite known to be produced after cerebral ischemia, has been implicated in ischemic and reperfusion injury by mediating vasoconstriction. To develop a positron emission tomography (PET) probe for 20-HETE synthase imaging, which might be useful for monitoring vasoconstrictive processes in patients with brain ischemia, we synthesized a 11C-labeled specific 20-HETE synthase inhibitor, N′(4-dimethylaminohexyloxy)phenyl imidazole ([11C]TROA). Autoradiographic study showed that [11C]TROA has high-specific binding in the kidney and liver consistent with the previously reported distribution of 20-HETE synthase. Using transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats, PET study showed significant increases in the binding of [11C]TROA in the ipsilateral hemisphere of rat brains after 7 and 10 days, which was blocked by co-injection of excess amounts of TROA (10 mg/kg). The increased [11C]TROA binding on the ipsilateral side returned to basal levels within 14 days. In addition, quantitative real-time PCR revealed that increased expression of 20-HETE synthase was only shown on the ipsilateral side on day 7. These results indicate that [11C]TROA might be a useful PET probe for imaging of 20-HETE synthase in patients with cerebral ischemia. PMID:22669478

  15. Tracking the Emergence of Host-Specific Simian Immunodeficiency Virus env and nef Populations Reveals nef Early Adaptation and Convergent Evolution in Brain of Naturally Progressing Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Lamers, Susanna L.; Nolan, David J.; Rife, Brittany D.; Fogel, Gary B.; McGrath, Michael S.; Burdo, Tricia H.; Autissier, Patrick; Williams, Kenneth C.; Goodenow, Maureen M.

    2015-01-01

    swarms to investigate evolutionary patterns in the gp120 and nef genes leading to the emergence of host-specific viral populations and potentially linked to disease progression. Although each macaque exhibited unique immune profiles, macaque-specific nef sequences evolving under selection were consistently detected in plasma samples at 3 months postinfection, significantly earlier than in gp120 macaque-specific sequences. On the other hand, nef sequences in brain tissues, collected at necropsy of two animals with detectable infection in the central nervous system (CNS), revealed convergent evolution. The results not only indicate that early adaptation of nef in the new host may be essential for successful infection, but also suggest that specific nef variants may be required for SIV to efficiently invade CNS macrophages and/or enhance macrophage migration, resulting in HIV neuropathology. PMID:26041280

  16. Voice-sensitive regions in the dog and human brain are revealed by comparative fMRI.

    PubMed

    Andics, Attila; Gácsi, Márta; Faragó, Tamás; Kis, Anna; Miklósi, Adám

    2014-03-01

    During the approximately 18-32 thousand years of domestication, dogs and humans have shared a similar social environment. Dog and human vocalizations are thus familiar and relevant to both species, although they belong to evolutionarily distant taxa, as their lineages split approximately 90-100 million years ago. In this first comparative neuroimaging study of a nonprimate and a primate species, we made use of this special combination of shared environment and evolutionary distance. We presented dogs and humans with the same set of vocal and nonvocal stimuli to search for functionally analogous voice-sensitive cortical regions. We demonstrate that voice areas exist in dogs and that they show a similar pattern to anterior temporal voice areas in humans. Our findings also reveal that sensitivity to vocal emotional valence cues engages similarly located nonprimary auditory regions in dogs and humans. Although parallel evolution cannot be excluded, our findings suggest that voice areas may have a more ancient evolutionary origin than previously known. PMID:24560578

  17. Circadian variation in unexpected postoperative death.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, J; Pedersen, M H; Ramsing, T; Kehlet, H

    1992-12-01

    Unexpected deaths still occur following major surgical procedures. The cause is often unknown but may be cardiac or thromboembolic in nature. Postoperative ischaemia, infarction and sudden cardiac death may be triggered by episodic or constant arterial hypoxaemia, which increases during the night. This study examined the circadian variation of sudden unexpected death following abdominal surgery between 1985 and 1989 inclusive. Deaths were divided into those occurring during the day (08.00-16.00 hours), evening (16.00-24.00 hours) and night (24.00-08.00 hours). Twenty-three deaths were considered to have been totally unexpected. Of 16 such patients undergoing autopsy, pulmonary embolism was the cause of death in five. In the remaining 11 patients, death occurred at night in eight (P < 0.005). Five of the seven patients without an autopsy died at night (P < 0.04); overall, 13 of 18 unexpected deaths occurred at night-time. These results suggest a need for further studies of sleep- and respiration-related effects on postoperative nocturnal cardiac function. The efficacy of monitoring during this apparent high-risk period should be evaluated. PMID:1486424

  18. Some Unexpected Results Using Computer Algebra Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, Felix; Garcia, Alfonsa; Garcia, Francisco; Hoya, Sara; Rodriguez, Gerardo; de la Villa, Agustin

    2001-01-01

    Shows how teachers can often use unexpected outputs from Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) to reinforce concepts and to show students the importance of thinking about how they use the software and reflecting on their results. Presents different examples where DERIVE, MAPLE, or Mathematica does not work as expected and suggests how to use them as a…

  19. An Unexpected Influence on a Quadratic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Jon D.

    2013-01-01

    Using technology to explore the coefficients of a quadratic equation can lead to an unexpected result. This article describes an investigation that involves sliders and dynamically linked representations. It guides students to notice the effect that the parameter "a" has on the graphical representation of a quadratic function in the form…

  20. Exploiting Unexpected Situations in the Mathematics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Colin

    2015-01-01

    The professional development of mathematics teachers needs to support teachers in orchestrating the mathematics classroom in ways that enable them to respond flexibly and productively to the unexpected. When a situation arises in the classroom which is not connected in an obvious way to the mathematical learning intentions of the lesson, it can be…

  1. Language learning and brain reorganization in a 3.5-year-old child with left perinatal stroke revealed using structural and functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    François, Clément; Ripollés, Pablo; Bosch, Laura; Garcia-Alix, Alfredo; Muchart, Jordi; Sierpowska, Joanna; Fons, Carme; Solé, Jorgina; Rebollo, Monica; Gaitán, Helena; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2016-04-01

    Brain imaging methods have contributed to shed light on the possible mechanisms of recovery and cortical reorganization after early brain insult. The idea that a functional left hemisphere is crucial for achieving a normalized pattern of language development after left perinatal stroke is still under debate. We report the case of a 3.5-year-old boy born at term with a perinatal ischemic stroke of the left middle cerebral artery, affecting mainly the supramarginal gyrus, superior parietal and insular cortex extending to the precentral and postcentral gyri. Neurocognitive development was assessed at 25 and 42 months of age. Language outcomes were more extensively evaluated at the latter age with measures on receptive vocabulary, phonological whole-word production and linguistic complexity in spontaneous speech. Word learning abilities were assessed using a fast-mapping task to assess immediate and delayed recall of newly mapped words. Functional and structural imaging data as well as a measure of intrinsic connectivity were also acquired. While cognitive, motor and language levels from the Bayley Scales fell within the average range at 25 months, language scores were below at 42 months. Receptive vocabulary fell within normal limits but whole word production was delayed and the child had limited spontaneous speech. Critically, the child showed clear difficulties in both the immediate and delayed recall of the novel words, significantly differing from an age-matched control group. Neuroimaging data revealed spared classical cortical language areas but an affected left dorsal white-matter pathway together with right lateralized functional activations. In the framework of the model for Social Communication and Language Development, these data confirm the important role of the left arcuate fasciculus in understanding and producing morpho-syntactic elements in sentences beyond two word combinations and, most importantly, in learning novel word-referent associations, a

  2. Analysis of YFP(J16)-R6/2 reporter mice and postmortem brains reveals early pathology and increased vulnerability of callosal axons in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Rodolfo G; Chu, Yaping; Ye, Allen Q; Price, Steven D; Tavassoli, Ehsan; Buenaventura, Andrea; Brady, Scott T; Magin, Richard L; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Morfini, Gerardo A

    2015-09-15

    Cumulative evidence indicates that the onset and severity of Huntington's disease (HD) symptoms correlate with connectivity deficits involving specific neuronal populations within cortical and basal ganglia circuits. Brain imaging studies and pathological reports further associated these deficits with alterations in cerebral white matter structure and axonal pathology. However, whether axonopathy represents an early pathogenic event or an epiphenomenon in HD remains unknown, nor is clear the identity of specific neuronal populations affected. To directly evaluate early axonal abnormalities in the context of HD in vivo, we bred transgenic YFP(J16) with R6/2 mice, a widely used HD model. Diffusion tensor imaging and fluorescence microscopy studies revealed a marked degeneration of callosal axons long before the onset of motor symptoms. Accordingly, a significant fraction of YFP-positive cortical neurons in YFP(J16) mice cortex were identified as callosal projection neurons. Callosal axon pathology progressively worsened with age and was influenced by polyglutamine tract length in mutant huntingtin (mhtt). Degenerating axons were dissociated from microscopically visible mhtt aggregates and did not result from loss of cortical neurons. Interestingly, other axonal populations were mildly or not affected, suggesting differential vulnerability to mhtt toxicity. Validating these results, increased vulnerability of callosal axons was documented in the brains of HD patients. Observations here provide a structural basis for the alterations in cerebral white matter structure widely reported in HD patients. Collectively, our data demonstrate a dying-back pattern of degeneration for cortical projection neurons affected in HD, suggesting that axons represent an early and potentially critical target for mhtt toxicity. PMID:26123489

  3. A Translational Murine Model of Sub-Lethal Intoxication with Shiga Toxin 2 Reveals Novel Ultrastructural Findings in the Brain Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Tironi-Farinati, Carla; Geoghegan, Patricia A.; Cangelosi, Adriana; Pinto, Alipio; Loidl, C. Fabian; Goldstein, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Infection by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli causes hemorrhagic colitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), acute renal failure, and also central nervous system complications in around 30% of the children affected. Besides, neurological deficits are one of the most unrepairable and untreatable outcomes of HUS. Study of the striatum is relevant because basal ganglia are one of the brain areas most commonly affected in patients that have suffered from HUS and since the deleterious effects of a sub-lethal dose of Shiga toxin have never been studied in the striatum, the purpose of this study was to attempt to simulate an infection by Shiga toxin-producing E. coli in a murine model. To this end, intravenous administration of a sub-lethal dose of Shiga toxin 2 (0.5 ηg per mouse) was used and the correlation between neurological manifestations and ultrastructural changes in striatal brain cells was studied in detail. Neurological manifestations included significant motor behavior abnormalities in spontaneous motor activity, gait, pelvic elevation and hind limb activity eight days after administration of the toxin. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the toxin caused early perivascular edema two days after administration, as well as significant damage in astrocytes four days after administration and significant damage in neurons and oligodendrocytes eight days after administration. Interrupted synapses and mast cell extravasation were also found eight days after administration of the toxin. We thus conclude that the chronological order of events observed in the striatum could explain the neurological disorders found eight days after administration of the toxin. PMID:23383285

  4. Complex interplay between brain function and structure during cerebral amyloidosis in APP transgenic mouse strains revealed by multi-parametric MRI comparison.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Joanes; Derungs, Rebecca; Kulic, Luka; Welt, Tobias; Henkelman, Mark; Nitsch, Roger M; Rudin, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder affecting the aging population. Neuroimaging methods, in particular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have helped reveal alterations in the brain structure, metabolism, and function of patients and in groups at risk of developing AD, yet the nature of these alterations is poorly understood. Neuroimaging in mice is attractive for investigating mechanisms underlying functional and structural changes associated with AD pathology. Several preclinical murine models of AD have been generated based on transgenic insertion of human mutated APP genes. Depending on the specific mutations, mouse strains express different aspects of amyloid pathology, e.g. intracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates, parenchymal plaques, or cerebral amyloid angiopathy. We have applied multi-parametric MRI in three transgenic mouse lines to compare changes in brain function with resting-state fMRI and structure with diffusion tensor imaging and high resolution anatomical imaging. E22ΔAβ developing intracellular Aβ aggregates did not present functional or structural alterations compared to their wild-type littermates. PSAPP mice displaying parenchymal amyloid plaques displayed mild functional changes within the supplementary and barrel field cortices, and increased isocortical volume relative to controls. Extensive reduction in functional connectivity in the sensory-motor cortices and within the default mode network, as well as local volume increase in the midbrain relative to wild-type have been observed in ArcAβ mice bearing intracellular Aβ aggregates as well as parenchymal and vascular amyloid deposits. Patterns of functional and structural changes appear to be strain-specific and not directly related to amyloid deposition. PMID:27033685

  5. Metabolomics analysis reveals elevation of 3-indoxyl sulfate in plasma and brain during chemically-induced acute kidney injury in mice: Investigation of nicotinic acid receptor agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Zgoda-Pols, Joanna R.; Chowdhury, Swapan; Wirth, Mark; Milburn, Michael V.; Alexander, Danny C.; Alton, Kevin B.

    2011-08-15

    An investigative renal toxicity study using metabolomics was conducted with a potent nicotinic acid receptor (NAR) agonist, SCH 900424. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques were used to identify small molecule biomarkers of acute kidney injury (AKI) that could aid in a better mechanistic understanding of SCH 900424-induced AKI in mice. The metabolomics study revealed 3-indoxyl sulfate (3IS) as a more sensitive marker of SCH 900424-induced renal toxicity than creatinine or urea. An LC-MS assay for quantitative determination of 3IS in mouse matrices was also developed. Following treatment with SCH 900424, 3IS levels were markedly increased in murine plasma and brain, thereby potentially contributing to renal- and central nervous system (CNS)-related rapid onset of toxicities. Furthermore, significant decrease in urinary excretion of 3IS in those animals due to compromised renal function may be associated with the elevation of 3IS in plasma and brain. These data suggest that 3IS has a potential to be a marker of renal and CNS toxicities during chemically-induced AKI in mice. In addition, based on the metabolomic analysis other statistically significant plasma markers including p-cresol-sulfate and tryptophan catabolites (kynurenate, kynurenine, 3-indole-lactate) might be of toxicological importance but have not been studied in detail. This comprehensive approach that includes untargeted metabolomic and targeted bioanalytical sample analyses could be used to investigate toxicity of other compounds that pose preclinical or clinical development challenges in a pharmaceutical discovery and development. - Research Highlights: > Nicotinic acid receptor agonist, SCH 900424, caused acute kidney injury in mice. > MS-based metabolomics was conducted to identify potential small molecule markers of renal toxicity. > 3-indoxyl-sulfate was found to be as a more sensitive marker of renal toxicity than creatinine

  6. Abnormal Frontostriatal Activity During Unexpected Reward Receipt in Depression and Schizophrenia: Relationship to Anhedonia

    PubMed Central

    Segarra, Nuria; Metastasio, Antonio; Ziauddeen, Hisham; Spencer, Jennifer; Reinders, Niels R; Dudas, Robert B; Arrondo, Gonzalo; Robbins, Trevor W; Clark, Luke; Fletcher, Paul C; Murray, Graham K

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in reward processes may underlie motivational and anhedonic symptoms in depression and schizophrenia. However it remains unclear whether these alterations are disorder-specific or shared, and whether they clearly relate to symptom generation or not. We studied brain responses to unexpected rewards during a simulated slot-machine game in 24 patients with depression, 21 patients with schizophrenia, and 21 healthy controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We investigated relationships between brain activation, task-related motivation, and questionnaire rated anhedonia. There was reduced activation in the orbitofrontal cortex, ventral striatum, inferior temporal gyrus, and occipital cortex in both depression and schizophrenia in comparison with healthy participants during receipt of unexpected reward. In the medial prefrontal cortex both patient groups showed reduced activation, with activation significantly more abnormal in schizophrenia than depression. Anterior cingulate and medial frontal cortical activation predicted task-related motivation, which in turn predicted anhedonia severity in schizophrenia. Our findings provide evidence for overlapping hypofunction in ventral striatal and orbitofrontal regions in depression and schizophrenia during unexpected reward receipt, and for a relationship between unexpected reward processing in the medial prefrontal cortex and the generation of motivational states. PMID:26708106

  7. Abnormal Frontostriatal Activity During Unexpected Reward Receipt in Depression and Schizophrenia: Relationship to Anhedonia.

    PubMed

    Segarra, Nuria; Metastasio, Antonio; Ziauddeen, Hisham; Spencer, Jennifer; Reinders, Niels R; Dudas, Robert B; Arrondo, Gonzalo; Robbins, Trevor W; Clark, Luke; Fletcher, Paul C; Murray, Graham K

    2016-07-01

    Alterations in reward processes may underlie motivational and anhedonic symptoms in depression and schizophrenia. However it remains unclear whether these alterations are disorder-specific or shared, and whether they clearly relate to symptom generation or not. We studied brain responses to unexpected rewards during a simulated slot-machine game in 24 patients with depression, 21 patients with schizophrenia, and 21 healthy controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We investigated relationships between brain activation, task-related motivation, and questionnaire rated anhedonia. There was reduced activation in the orbitofrontal cortex, ventral striatum, inferior temporal gyrus, and occipital cortex in both depression and schizophrenia in comparison with healthy participants during receipt of unexpected reward. In the medial prefrontal cortex both patient groups showed reduced activation, with activation significantly more abnormal in schizophrenia than depression. Anterior cingulate and medial frontal cortical activation predicted task-related motivation, which in turn predicted anhedonia severity in schizophrenia. Our findings provide evidence for overlapping hypofunction in ventral striatal and orbitofrontal regions in depression and schizophrenia during unexpected reward receipt, and for a relationship between unexpected reward processing in the medial prefrontal cortex and the generation of motivational states. PMID:26708106

  8. Sudden Unexpected Postnatal Collapse of the Newborn.

    PubMed

    Ferrarello, Debi; Carmichael, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    Sudden unexpected postnatal collapse is a rare but devastating neonatal event. A well-appearing, full-term newborn with Agpar scores of eight or more suddenly crashes, often with full respiratory and cardiac arrest. Up to half of newborns with sudden unexpected postnatal collapse die, with many survivors suffering serious neurological damage. The first 2 hours of life are the hours of greatest risk, coinciding with the time frame when nurses encourage breastfeeding and uninterrupted skin-to-skin contact between women and newborns. Nursing assessments and measures to promote neonates' optimal transition to extrauterine life through skin-to-skin contact and early breastfeeding while decreasing the risk of this catastrophic event are described. Nursing surveillance to promote optimal transition in a safe environment is essential, and birth facilities should allocate staffing resources accordingly. PMID:27287353

  9. BaBar: Searching for the Unexpected

    SciTech Connect

    Roodman, Aaron

    2006-04-24

    With over 300 million B-Bbar pairs delivered by the PEP-II B-factory, and over 200 publications, the Babar experiment has studied a very broad range of B, charm, tau, and QCD topics. In fact, the physics at Babar is so wide-ranging that it threatens to overwhelm any summary. Instead, in this colloquium I will focus on just a few topics selected for their potential to find a truly unexpected result. These include CP violation in rare B decays, leptonic B decays, and lepton-flavor violating tau decays. Each measurement, the currently predicted result, and the potential for uncovering the unexpected now and into the future, will be gently, but thoroughly, described.

  10. Regulatory RNAs discovered in unexpected places.

    PubMed

    Pek, Jun Wei; Okamura, Katsutomo

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have discovered both small and long noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) encoded in unexpected places. These ncRNA genes were surprises at the time of their discovery, but many quickly became well-accepted families of functional regulatory RNA species. Even after years of extensive gene annotation studies using high-throughput sequencing technologies, new types of ncRNA genes continue to be discovered in unexpected places. We highlight ncRNAs that have atypical structures and that are encoded in what are generally considered 'junk' sequences, such as spacers and introns. We also discuss current bottlenecks in the approaches for identifying novel ncRNAs and the possibility that many remain to be discovered. PMID:26424536

  11. [Neurosyphilis: unexpected reunion with an old acquaintance].

    PubMed

    Lens-Daey Ouwens, I; Heijstra, M P; Timmerman, L

    2011-01-01

    A 45-year-old man was admitted to a psychiatric hospital with confusion and disorientation; he was suspected of having Korsakoff syndrome. He was known to have a history of alcohol abuse, complicated by epileptic fits, and to have had a recent ischaemic cerebrovascular attack. Unexpectedly, screening for syphilis turned out to be positive. Examination of the cerebrospinal fluid led to the diagnosis of neurosyphilis. Most neurological and psychiatric symptoms disappeared after treatment with antibiotics. PMID:21319069

  12. Illustrations of Unexpected Infant Sleep Deaths.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Deborah; Oberle, Morgan; Elomba, Charles D; Stiffler, Deborah; Luna, Gaye

    2016-01-01

    Case illustrations from central Indiana provide the narrative for infant suffocations because of unsafe sleep environments. Accidental strangulation or suffocation in bed is caused by co-bedding, blankets and pillows in cribs, or wedging and entrapment. Knowledge of the evidence-based risks associated with case data may assist further in the prevention of unexpected infant sleep deaths and may better inform best practice for death scene investigation including forensic nurses. PMID:27496648

  13. Hepatic encephalopathy: effects of liver failure on brain function.

    PubMed

    Felipo, Vicente

    2013-12-01

    Liver failure affects brain function, leading to neurological and psychiatric alterations; such alterations are referred to as hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Early diagnosis of minimal HE reveals an unexpectedly high incidence of mild cognitive impairment and psychomotor slowing in patients with liver cirrhosis - conditions that have serious health, social and economic consequences. The mechanisms responsible for the neurological alterations in HE are beginning to emerge. New therapeutic strategies acting on specific targets in the brain (phosphodiesterase 5, type A GABA receptors, cyclooxygenase and mitogen-activated protein kinase p38) have been shown to restore cognitive and motor function in animal models of chronic HE, and NMDA receptor antagonists have been shown to increase survival in acute liver failure. This article reviews the latest studies aimed at understanding how liver failure affects brain function and potential ways to ameliorate these effects. PMID:24149188

  14. Immunohistochemical localization of the neuron-specific glutamate transporter EAAC1 (EAAT3) in rat brain and spinal cord revealed by a novel monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Shashidharan, P; Huntley, G W; Murray, J M; Buku, A; Moran, T; Walsh, M J; Morrison, J H; Plaitakis, A

    1997-10-31

    Neuronal regulation of glutamate homeostasis is mediated by high-affinity sodium-dependent and highly hydrophobic plasma membrane glycoproteins which maintain low levels of glutamate at central synapses. To further elucidate the molecular mechanisms that regulate glutamate metabolism and glutamate flux at central synapses, a monoclonal antibody was produced to a synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 161-177 of the deduced sequence of the human neuron-specific glutamate transporter III (EAAC1). Immunoblot analysis of human and rat brain total homogenates and isolated synaptosomes from frontal cortex revealed that the antibody immunoreacted with a protein band of apparent Mr approximately 70 kDa. Deglycosylation of immunoprecipitates obtained using the monoclonal antibody yielded a protein with a lower apparent Mr (approximately 65 kDa). These results are consistent with the molecular size of the human EAAC1 predicted from the cloned cDNA. Analysis of the transfected COS-1 cells by immunocytochemistry confirmed that the monoclonal antibody is specific for the neuron-specific glutamate transporter. Immunocytochemical studies of rat cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, substantia nigra and spinal cord revealed intense labeling of neuronal somata, dendrites, fine-caliber fibers and puncta. Double-label immunofluorescence using antibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein as a marker for astrocytes demonstrated that astrocytes were not co-labeled for EAAC1. The localization of EAAC1 immunoreactivity in dendrites and particularly in cell somata suggests that this transporter may function in the regulation of other aspects of glutamate metabolism in addition to terminating the action of synaptically released glutamate at central synapses. PMID:9409715

  15. Analysis of Post-Traumatic Brain Injury Gene Expression Signature Reveals Tubulins, Nfe2l2, Nfkb, Cd44, and S100a4 as Treatment Targets

    PubMed Central

    Lipponen, Anssi; Paananen, Jussi; Puhakka, Noora; Pitkänen, Asla

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to define the chronically altered gene expression signature of traumatic brain injury (TBI-sig) to discover novel treatments to reverse pathologic gene expression or reinforce the expression of recovery-related genes. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing was performed at 3 months post-TBI induced by lateral fluid-percussion injury in rats. We found 4964 regulated genes in the perilesional cortex and 1966 in the thalamus (FDR < 0.05). TBI-sig was used for a LINCS analysis which identified 11 compounds that showed a strong connectivity with the TBI-sig in neuronal cell lines. Of these, celecoxib and sirolimus were recently reported to have a disease-modifying effect in in vivo animal models of epilepsy. Other compounds revealed by the analysis were BRD-K91844626, BRD-A11009626, NO-ASA, BRD-K55260239, SDZ-NKT-343, STK-661558, BRD-K75971499, ionomycin, and desmethylclomipramine. Network analysis of overlapping genes revealed the effects on tubulins (Tubb2a, Tubb3, Tubb4b), Nfe2l2, S100a4, Cd44, and Nfkb2, all of which are linked to TBI-relevant outcomes, including epileptogenesis and tissue repair. Desmethylclomipramine modulated most of the gene targets considered favorable for TBI outcome. Our data demonstrate long-lasting transcriptomics changes after TBI. LINCS analysis predicted that these changes could be modulated by various compounds, some of which are already in clinical use but never tested in TBI. PMID:27530814

  16. Analysis of Post-Traumatic Brain Injury Gene Expression Signature Reveals Tubulins, Nfe2l2, Nfkb, Cd44, and S100a4 as Treatment Targets.

    PubMed

    Lipponen, Anssi; Paananen, Jussi; Puhakka, Noora; Pitkänen, Asla

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to define the chronically altered gene expression signature of traumatic brain injury (TBI-sig) to discover novel treatments to reverse pathologic gene expression or reinforce the expression of recovery-related genes. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing was performed at 3 months post-TBI induced by lateral fluid-percussion injury in rats. We found 4964 regulated genes in the perilesional cortex and 1966 in the thalamus (FDR < 0.05). TBI-sig was used for a LINCS analysis which identified 11 compounds that showed a strong connectivity with the TBI-sig in neuronal cell lines. Of these, celecoxib and sirolimus were recently reported to have a disease-modifying effect in in vivo animal models of epilepsy. Other compounds revealed by the analysis were BRD-K91844626, BRD-A11009626, NO-ASA, BRD-K55260239, SDZ-NKT-343, STK-661558, BRD-K75971499, ionomycin, and desmethylclomipramine. Network analysis of overlapping genes revealed the effects on tubulins (Tubb2a, Tubb3, Tubb4b), Nfe2l2, S100a4, Cd44, and Nfkb2, all of which are linked to TBI-relevant outcomes, including epileptogenesis and tissue repair. Desmethylclomipramine modulated most of the gene targets considered favorable for TBI outcome. Our data demonstrate long-lasting transcriptomics changes after TBI. LINCS analysis predicted that these changes could be modulated by various compounds, some of which are already in clinical use but never tested in TBI. PMID:27530814

  17. Brain imaging reveals that engagement of descending inhibitory pain pathways in healthy women in a low endogenous estradiol state varies with testosterone.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Katy; Warnaby, Catherine; Stagg, Charlotte J; Moore, Jane; Kennedy, Stephen; Tracey, Irene

    2013-04-01

    The combined oral contraceptive pill (COCP) has been implicated in the development of a number of chronic pain conditions. Modern COCP formulations produce a low endogenous estradiol, low progesterone environment similar to the early follicular phase of the natural menstrual cycle, with a variable effect on serum androgen levels. We used behavioural measures and functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the response to experimental thermal stimuli in healthy women, in both a natural and COCP-induced low endogenous estradiol state, to investigate whether alterations in central pain processing may underlie these observations in COCP users. Although COCP users overall did not require lower temperatures to obtain a fixed pain intensity, alterations in the brain response to these stimuli were observed. In a subgroup of COCP users with significantly reduced serum testosterone, however, lower temperatures were required. Region-of-interest analysis revealed that within key regions of the descending pain inhibitory system, activity in response to noxious stimulation varied with serum testosterone levels in both groups of women. Of particular interest, in COCP users, activity in the rostral ventromedial medulla increased with increasing testosterone and in those women with low testosterone, was significantly reduced compared to controls. These findings suggest that, in a low endogenous estradiol state, testosterone may be a key factor in modulating pain sensitivity via descending pathways. Specifically, failure to engage descending inhibition at the level of the rostral ventromedial medulla may be responsible for the reduction in temperature required by COCP users with low circulating testosterone. PMID:23318125

  18. Stretched peer-review on unexpected results (GMOs).

    PubMed

    Myhr, A I

    2005-01-01

    Science is the basis for governance of risk from genetically modified organisms (GMO), and it is also a primary source of legitimacy for policy decision. However, recently the publication of unexpected results has caused controversies and challenged the way in which science should be performed, be published in scientific journals, and how preliminary results should be communicated. These studies have subsequently, after being accepted for publication within the peer-review process of leading scientific journals, been thoroughly re-examined by many actors active within the GMO debate and thereby drawn extensive media coverage. The publicized charges that the research involved does not constitute significant evidence or represent bad science have in fact deflected attention away from the important questions related to ecological and health risks raised by the research. In this paper, I will argue that unexpected findings may represent "early warnings." Although early warnings may not represent reality, such reports are necessary to inform other scientists and regulators, and should be followed up by further research to reveal the validity of the warnings. Furthermore, science that embraces robust, participatory and transparent approaches will be imperative in the future to reduce the present controversy surrounding GMO use and release. PMID:16304941

  19. Distinct BOLD fMRI Responses of Capsaicin-Induced Thermal Sensation Reveal Pain-Related Brain Activation in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Asad, Abu Bakar Ali; Seah, Stephanie; Baumgartner, Richard; Feng, Dai; Jensen, Andres; Manigbas, Elaine; Henry, Brian; Houghton, Andrea; Evelhoch, Jeffrey L.; Derbyshire, Stuart W. G.; Chin, Chih-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately 20% of the adult population suffer from chronic pain that is not adequately treated by current therapies, highlighting a great need for improved treatment options. To develop effective analgesics, experimental human and animal models of pain are critical. Topically/intra-dermally applied capsaicin induces hyperalgesia and allodynia to thermal and tactile stimuli that mimics chronic pain and is a useful translation from preclinical research to clinical investigation. Many behavioral and self-report studies of pain have exploited the use of the capsaicin pain model, but objective biomarker correlates of the capsaicin augmented nociceptive response in nonhuman primates remains to be explored. Methodology Here we establish an aversive capsaicin-induced fMRI model using non-noxious heat stimuli in Cynomolgus monkeys (n = 8). BOLD fMRI data were collected during thermal challenge (ON:20 s/42°C; OFF:40 s/35°C, 4-cycle) at baseline and 30 min post-capsaicin (0.1 mg, topical, forearm) application. Tail withdrawal behavioral studies were also conducted in the same animals using 42°C or 48°C water bath pre- and post- capsaicin application (0.1 mg, subcutaneous, tail). Principal Findings Group comparisons between pre- and post-capsaicin application revealed significant BOLD signal increases in brain regions associated with the ‘pain matrix’, including somatosensory, frontal, and cingulate cortices, as well as the cerebellum (paired t-test, p<0.02, n = 8), while no significant change was found after the vehicle application. The tail withdrawal behavioral study demonstrated a significant main effect of temperature and a trend towards capsaicin induced reduction of latency at both temperatures. Conclusions These findings provide insights into the specific brain regions involved with aversive, ‘pain-like’, responses in a nonhuman primate model. Future studies may employ both behavioral and fMRI measures as translational biomarkers to gain

  20. Effect of aging on phosphate metabolites of rat brain as revealed by the in vivo and in vitro sup 31 P NMR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hsiuchih; Chi, Chinwen; Liu, Tsungyun; Liu, Lianghui ); Luh, Wenming; Hsieh, Changhuain; Wu, Wenguey )

    1991-01-01

    Changes of phosphate metabolism in brains of neonate, weaning and adult rats were compared using both in vivo and in vitro nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. Ratios of phosphocreatine/nucleoside triphosphate (PCr/NTP) were the same in neonatal brain in both in vivo and in vitro studies, but not in weaning and adult brains. This discrepancy may have resulted from extended cerebral hypoxia due to slowed freezing of the brain by the increased skull thickness and brain mass in the weaning and adult rats. Variations of in vitro extraction condition for this age-related study may lead to systematic errors in the adult rats. Nevertheless, the phosphomonoester/nucleoside triphosphate (PME/NTP) ratios in extracts of brain from neonatal rats were higher than those obtained in vivo. In addition, the glycerophosphorylethanolamine plus glycerophosphorylcholine/nucleoside triphosphate (GPE+GPC/NTP) ratios, which were not measurable in vivo, showed age-dependent increase in extracts of rat brain. Some of the phosphomonoester and phosphodiester molecules in rat brain may be undetectable in in vivo NMR analysis because of their interaction with cellular components. The total in vitro GPE and GPC concentration in brain from neonatal rat was estimated to be 0.34 mmole/g wet tissue.

  1. Voxel-based morphometry and fMRI revealed differences in brain gray matter in breastfed and milk formula–fed children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and Purpose: Infant diets may have significant impact on brain development in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate brain grey matter structure and function in 8-year-old children who were predominantly breastfed (BF) or fed cow’s milk formula (MF) as infants. Materials and Me...

  2. Deep brain stimulation reveals a dissociation of consummatory and motivated behaviour in the medial and lateral nucleus accumbens shell of the rat.

    PubMed

    van der Plasse, Geoffrey; Schrama, Regina; van Seters, Sebastiaan P; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Westenberg, Herman G M

    2012-01-01

    Following the successful application of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and promising results in clinical trials for obsessive compulsive disorder and major depression, DBS is currently being tested in small patient-populations with eating disorders and addiction. However, in spite of its potential use in a broad spectrum of disorders, the mechanisms of action of DBS remain largely unclear and optimal neural targets for stimulation in several disorders have yet to be established. Thus, there is a great need to examine site-specific effects of DBS on a behavioural level and to understand how DBS may modulate pathological behaviour. In view of the possible application of DBS in the treatment of disorders characterized by impaired processing of reward and motivation, like addiction and eating disorders, we examined the effect of DBS of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) on food-directed behavior. Rats were implanted with bilateral stimulation electrodes in one of three anatomically and functionally distinct sub-areas of the NAcc: the core, lateral shell (lShell) and medial shell (mShell). Subsequently, we studied the effects of DBS on food consumption, and the motivational and appetitive properties of food. The data revealed a functional dissociation between the lShell and mShell. DBS of the lShell reduced motivation to respond for sucrose under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement, mShell DBS, however, profoundly and selectively increased the intake of chow. DBS of the NAcc core did not alter any form of food-directed behavior studied. DBS of neither structure affected sucrose preference. These data indicate that the intake of chow and the motivation to work for palatable food can independently be modulated by DBS of subregions of the NAcc shell. As such, these findings provide important leads for the possible future application of DBS as a treatment for eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa. PMID:22428054

  3. The role of domain expertise and judgment in dealing with unexpected events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochan, Janeen Adrion

    Unexpected events, particularly those creating surprise, interrupt ongoing mental and behavioral processes, creating an increased potential for unwanted outcomes to the situation. Human reactions to unexpected events vary. One can hypothesize a number of reasons for this variation, including level of domain expertise, previous experience with similar events, emotional connotation, and the contextual surround of the event. Whereas interrupting ongoing activities and focusing attention temporarily on a surprising event may be a useful evolutionary response to a threatening situation, the same process may be maladaptive in today's highly dynamic world. The purpose of this study was to investigate how different aspects of expertise affected one's ability to detect and react to an unexpected event. It was hypothesized that there were two general types of expertise, domain expertise and judgment (Hammond, 2000), which influenced one's performance on dealing with an unexpected event. The goal of the research was to parse out the relative contribution of domain expertise, so the role of judgment could be revealed. The research questions for this study were: (a) Can we identify specific knowledges and skills which enhance one's ability to deal with unexpected events? (b) Are these skills "automatically" included in domain expertise? (c) How does domain expertise improve or deter one's reaction and response to unexpected events? (d) What role does judgment play in responding to surprise? The general hypothesis was that good judgment would influence the process of surprise at different stages and in different ways than would domain expertise. The conclusions from this research indicated that good judgment had a significant positive effect in helping pilots deal with unexpected events. This was most pronounced when domain expertise was low.

  4. [Unexpected revision procedures treating ankle fractures].

    PubMed

    Richter, J; Pommer, A; Breuer, R; Hullmann, S; Heyde, D V; Dávid, A

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyze the risk factors associated with unexpected second procedures and strategies of revision surgery. Within a 5 year period 647 patients with closed ankle fractures AO type 44 were identified of which 77 (11.9%) needed revision surgery. Complications were addressed to 4 main groups: deep infections (IG) were seen in 29 patients (4.5%), problems with primary wound closure (WG) in 22 patients (3.4%), insufficient reduction (KG) in 22 patients (3.4%) and other causes (RG) included 4 patients (0.6%). Significant predictive factors for soft tissue complications were higher age, comorbidities with peripheral arteriosclerosis, high American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score and diabetes mellitus. AO 44 type B2 and B3 fractures were often associated with soft tissue problems. The more complex fracture types AO 44 C1-C3 and A2-A3 were significantly associated with problems of insufficient congruency post-surgery. The distribution of the mean revision rate was significantly different (p<0.01) for all groups: IG 4.59, WG 3.5, KG 1.55, RG 1.25. In summary, we strongly recommend immediate reduction of displaced fractures and to consider a more detailed fracture classification. To reduce the amount of unexpected ankle procedures individual risk factors should be weighed against the advantages of optimal open reduction and internal fixation. PMID:21165587

  5. Knock-out models reveal new aquaporin functions.

    PubMed

    Verkman, Alan S

    2009-01-01

    Knockout mice have been informative in the discovery of unexpected biological functions of aquaporins. Knockout mice have confirmed the predicted roles of aquaporins in transepithelial fluid transport, as in the urinary concentrating mechanism and glandular fluid secretion. A less obvious, though predictable role of aquaporins is in tissue swelling under stress, as in the brain in stroke, tumor and infection. Phenotype analysis of aquaporin knockout mice has revealed several unexpected cellular roles of aquaporins whose mechanisms are being elucidated. Aquaporins facilitate cell migration, as seen in aquaporin-dependent tumor angiogenesis and tumor metastasis, by a mechanism that may involve facilitated water transport in lamellipodia of migrating cells. The ' aquaglyceroporins', aquaporins that transport both glycerol and water, regulate glycerol content in epidermis, fat and other tissues, and lead to a multiplicity of interesting consequences of gene disruption including dry skin, resistance to skin carcinogenesis, impaired cell proliferation and altered fat metabolism. An even more surprising role of a mammalian aquaporin is in neural signal transduction in the central nervous system. The many roles of aquaporins might be exploited for clinical benefit by modulation of aquaporin expression/function - as diuretics, and in the treatment of brain swelling, glaucoma, epilepsy, obesity and cancer. PMID:19096787

  6. Analyses of resected human brain metastases of breast cancer reveal the association between up-regulation of hexokinase 2 and poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Diane; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Shreeve, S Martin; Hua, Emily; Bronder, Julie L; Weil, Robert J; Davis, Sean; Stark, Andreas M; Merino, Maria J; Kurek, Raffael; Mehdorn, H Maximilian; Davis, Gary; Steinberg, Seth M; Meltzer, Paul S; Aldape, Kenneth; Steeg, Patricia S

    2009-09-01

    Brain metastases of breast cancer seem to be increasingin incidence as systemic therapy improves. Metastatic disease in the brain is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We present the first gene expression analysis of laser-captured epithelial cells from resected human brain metastases of breast cancer compared with unlinked primary breast tumors. The tumors were matched for histology, tumor-node-metastasis stage, and hormone receptor status. Most differentially expressed genes were down-regulated in the brain metastases, which included, surprisingly, many genes associated with metastasis. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis confirmed statistically significant differences or strong trends in the expression of six genes: BMP1, PEDF, LAMgamma3, SIAH, STHMN3, and TSPD2. Hexokinase 2 (HK2) was also of interest because of its increased expression in brain metastases. HK2 is important in glucose metabolism and apoptosis. In agreement with our microarray results, HK2 levels (both mRNA and protein) were elevated in a brain metastatic derivative (231-BR) of the human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 relative to the parental cell line (231-P) in vitro. Knockdown of HK2 expression in 231-BR cells using short hairpin RNA reduced cell proliferation when cultures were maintained in glucose-limiting conditions. Finally, HK2 expression was analyzed in a cohort of 123 resected brain metastases of breast cancer. High HK2 expression was significantly associated with poor patient survival after craniotomy (P = 0.028). The data suggest that HK2 overexpression is associated with metastasis to the brain in breast cancer and it may be a therapeutic target. PMID:19723875

  7. Analyses of Resected Human Brain Metastases of Breast Cancer Reveal the Association between Up-regulation of Hexokinase 2 and Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Diane; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Shreeve, S. Martin; Hua, Emily; Bronder, Julie L.; Weil, Robert J.; Davis, Sean; Stark, Andreas M.; Merino, Maria J.; Kurek, Raffael; Mehdorn, H. Maximilian; Davis, Gary; Steinberg, Seth M.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Aldape, Kenneth; Steeg, Patricia S.

    2009-01-01

    Brain metastases of breast cancer appear to be increasing in incidence as systemic therapy improves. Metastatic disease in the brain is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We present the first gene expression analysis of laser captured epithelial cells from resected human brain metastases of breast cancer compared to unlinked primary breast tumors. The tumors were matched for histology, TNM stage and hormone receptor status. Most differentially expressed genes were down-regulated in the brain metastases which included, surprisingly, many genes associated with metastasis. Q-PCR analysis confirmed statistically significant differences or strong trends in the expression of six genes: BMP1, PEDF, LAMγ3, SIAH, STHMN3 and TSPD2. Hexokinase 2 (HK2) was also of interest because of its increased expression in brain metastases. HK2 is important in glucose metabolism and apoptosis. In agreement with our microarray results, HK2 levels (both mRNA and protein) were elevated in a brain metastatic derivative (231-BR) of the human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 relative to the parental cell line (231-P), in vitro. Knockdown of HK2 expression in 231-BR cells using shRNA reduced cell proliferation when cultures were maintained in glucose limiting conditions. Finally, HK2 expression was analyzed in a cohort of 123 resected brain metastases of breast cancer. High HK2 expression was significantly associated with poor patient survival post-craniotomy (P=0.028). The data suggest that HK2 overexpression is associated with metastasis to the brain in breast cancer and it may be a therapeutic target. PMID:19723875

  8. High-field MRI reveals an acute impact on brain function in survivors of the magnitude 8.0 earthquake in China

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Su; Huang, Xiaoqi; Chen, Long; Tang, Hehan; Zhang, Tijiang; Li, Xiuli; Li, Dongming; Kuang, Weihong; Chan, Raymond C.; Mechelli, Andrea; Sweeney, John A.; Gong, Qiyong

    2009-01-01

    Besides the enormous medical and economic consequences, national disasters, such as the Wenchuan 8.0 earthquake, also pose a risk to the mental health of survivors. In this context, a better understanding is needed of how functional brain systems adapt to severe emotional stress. Previous animal studies have demonstrated the importance of limbic, paralimbic, striatal, and prefrontal structures in stress and fear responses. Human studies, which have focused primarily on patients with clinically established posttraumatic stress disorders, have reported abnormalities in similar brain structures. At present, little is known about potential alterations of brain function in trauma survivors shortly after traumatic events. Here, we show alteration of brain function in a cohort of healthy survivors within 25 days after the Wenchuan earthquake by a recently discovered method known as “resting-state” functional MRI. The current investigation demonstrates that regional activity in frontolimbic and striatal areas increased significantly and connectivity among limbic and striatal networks was attenuated in our participants who had recently experienced severe emotional trauma. Trauma victims also had a reduced temporal synchronization within the “default mode” of resting-state brain function, which has been characterized in humans and other species. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that significant alterations in brain function, similar in many ways to those observed in posttraumatic stress disorders, can be seen shortly after major traumatic experiences, highlighting the need for early evaluation and intervention for trauma survivors. PMID:19720989

  9. Sarcoidosis and mechanisms of unexpected death.

    PubMed

    Byard, Roger W; Manton, Nicholas; Tsokos, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disease of uncertain etiology characterized by multifocal areas of discrete and confluent granulomatous inflammation that may rarely be responsible for sudden and unexpected death. Two cases are reported to demonstrate disparate pathological features in fatal cases, one involving cardiac sarcoidosis, and the other neurosarcoidosis with hypothalamic infiltration. Sarcoidosis in individuals dying suddenly may be completely unrelated to the death, contributory or causal. Cardiovascular causes of sudden death in sarcoidosis include arrhythmias associated with cardiomyopathy and ischemia, ventricular rupture, and cor pulmonale due to pulmonary hypertension; respiratory causes include hemorrhage and upper airway obstruction; central nervous system causes include arrhythmias from infiltration of autonomic centers, epilepsy, and obstructive hydrocephalus from brainstem involvement; and gastrointestinal deaths may be due to hemorrhage from esophageal varices associated with portal hypertension. The diagnosis relies on the demonstration of typical noncaseating granulomas and the exclusion of other infective and environmental diseases with similar histopathological findings. PMID:18366580

  10. Unexpected features of the dark proteome.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, Nelson; Heinrich, Julian; Stolte, Christian; Sabir, Kenneth S; Buckley, Michael J; Tabor, Bruce; Signal, Beth; Gloss, Brian S; Hammang, Christopher J; Rost, Burkhard; Schafferhans, Andrea; O'Donoghue, Seán I

    2015-12-29

    We surveyed the "dark" proteome-that is, regions of proteins never observed by experimental structure determination and inaccessible to homology modeling. For 546,000 Swiss-Prot proteins, we found that 44-54% of the proteome in eukaryotes and viruses was dark, compared with only ∼14% in archaea and bacteria. Surprisingly, most of the dark proteome could not be accounted for by conventional explanations, such as intrinsic disorder or transmembrane regions. Nearly half of the dark proteome comprised dark proteins, in which the entire sequence lacked similarity to any known structure. Dark proteins fulfill a wide variety of functions, but a subset showed distinct and largely unexpected features, such as association with secretion, specific tissues, the endoplasmic reticulum, disulfide bonding, and proteolytic cleavage. Dark proteins also had short sequence length, low evolutionary reuse, and few known interactions with other proteins. These results suggest new research directions in structural and computational biology. PMID:26578815

  11. Unexpected features of the dark proteome

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, Nelson; Heinrich, Julian; Stolte, Christian; Sabir, Kenneth S.; Buckley, Michael J.; Tabor, Bruce; Signal, Beth; Gloss, Brian S.; Hammang, Christopher J.; Rost, Burkhard; Schafferhans, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We surveyed the “dark” proteome–that is, regions of proteins never observed by experimental structure determination and inaccessible to homology modeling. For 546,000 Swiss-Prot proteins, we found that 44–54% of the proteome in eukaryotes and viruses was dark, compared with only ∼14% in archaea and bacteria. Surprisingly, most of the dark proteome could not be accounted for by conventional explanations, such as intrinsic disorder or transmembrane regions. Nearly half of the dark proteome comprised dark proteins, in which the entire sequence lacked similarity to any known structure. Dark proteins fulfill a wide variety of functions, but a subset showed distinct and largely unexpected features, such as association with secretion, specific tissues, the endoplasmic reticulum, disulfide bonding, and proteolytic cleavage. Dark proteins also had short sequence length, low evolutionary reuse, and few known interactions with other proteins. These results suggest new research directions in structural and computational biology. PMID:26578815

  12. Comprehensive Identification of Long Non-coding RNAs in Purified Cell Types from the Brain Reveals Functional LncRNA in OPC Fate Determination.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaomin; Chen, Kenian; Cuevas-Diaz Duran, Raquel; You, Yanan; Sloan, Steven A; Zhang, Ye; Zong, Shan; Cao, Qilin; Barres, Ben A; Wu, Jia Qian

    2015-12-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) (> 200 bp) play crucial roles in transcriptional regulation during numerous biological processes. However, it is challenging to comprehensively identify lncRNAs, because they are often expressed at low levels and with more cell-type specificity than are protein-coding genes. In the present study, we performed ab initio transcriptome reconstruction using eight purified cell populations from mouse cortex and detected more than 5000 lncRNAs. Predicting the functions of lncRNAs using cell-type specific data revealed their potential functional roles in Central Nervous System (CNS) development. We performed motif searches in ENCODE DNase I digital footprint data and Mouse ENCODE promoters to infer transcription factor (TF) occupancy. By integrating TF binding and cell-type specific transcriptomic data, we constructed a novel framework that is useful for systematically identifying lncRNAs that are potentially essential for brain cell fate determination. Based on this integrative analysis, we identified lncRNAs that are regulated during Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cell (OPC) differentiation from Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) and that are likely to be involved in oligodendrogenesis. The top candidate, lnc-OPC, shows highly specific expression in OPCs and remarkable sequence conservation among placental mammals. Interestingly, lnc-OPC is significantly up-regulated in glial progenitors from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse models compared to wild-type mice. OLIG2-binding sites in the upstream regulatory region of lnc-OPC were identified by ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation)-Sequencing and validated by luciferase assays. Loss-of-function experiments confirmed that lnc-OPC plays a functional role in OPC genesis. Overall, our results substantiated the role of lncRNA in OPC fate determination and provided an unprecedented data source for future functional investigations in CNS cell types. We present our datasets and analysis results

  13. Comprehensive Identification of Long Non-coding RNAs in Purified Cell Types from the Brain Reveals Functional LncRNA in OPC Fate Determination

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaomin; Chen, Kenian; Cuevas-Diaz Duran, Raquel; You, Yanan; Sloan, Steven A.; Zhang, Ye; Zong, Shan; Cao, Qilin; Barres, Ben A.; Wu, Jia Qian

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) (> 200 bp) play crucial roles in transcriptional regulation during numerous biological processes. However, it is challenging to comprehensively identify lncRNAs, because they are often expressed at low levels and with more cell-type specificity than are protein-coding genes. In the present study, we performed ab initio transcriptome reconstruction using eight purified cell populations from mouse cortex and detected more than 5000 lncRNAs. Predicting the functions of lncRNAs using cell-type specific data revealed their potential functional roles in Central Nervous System (CNS) development. We performed motif searches in ENCODE DNase I digital footprint data and Mouse ENCODE promoters to infer transcription factor (TF) occupancy. By integrating TF binding and cell-type specific transcriptomic data, we constructed a novel framework that is useful for systematically identifying lncRNAs that are potentially essential for brain cell fate determination. Based on this integrative analysis, we identified lncRNAs that are regulated during Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cell (OPC) differentiation from Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) and that are likely to be involved in oligodendrogenesis. The top candidate, lnc-OPC, shows highly specific expression in OPCs and remarkable sequence conservation among placental mammals. Interestingly, lnc-OPC is significantly up-regulated in glial progenitors from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse models compared to wild-type mice. OLIG2-binding sites in the upstream regulatory region of lnc-OPC were identified by ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation)-Sequencing and validated by luciferase assays. Loss-of-function experiments confirmed that lnc-OPC plays a functional role in OPC genesis. Overall, our results substantiated the role of lncRNA in OPC fate determination and provided an unprecedented data source for future functional investigations in CNS cell types. We present our datasets and analysis results

  14. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome in Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy: A Case Report in Medicolegal Autopsy.

    PubMed

    Tangsermkijsakul, Aphinan

    2016-03-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a range of birth defects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is the most serious form of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Infants with FAS are prone to death because of various physical abnormalities. Consequently, infants with FAS may be presented in the medicolegal investigation as a form of sudden unexpected death in infancy. The author reported a 6-month-old male infant who was found dead at home. The history of maternal ethanol consumption during pregnancy was obtained. The infant was diagnosed with FAS at the autopsy because he was presented with postnatal growth retardation, multiple facial abnormalities, and abnormal brain structures, which met the criteria of FAS. The cause of death was severe aspiration pneumonia. The purposes of this case report are to show an uncommon manifestation of sudden unexpected death in infancy case for the forensic pathologists and to emphasize on the national healthcare problem. PMID:26730801

  15. Unexpected Roles for Ciliary Kinesins and Intraflagellar Transport Proteins.

    PubMed

    Pooranachandran, Niedharsan; Malicki, Jarema J

    2016-06-01

    Transport of proteins in the ciliary shaft is driven by microtubule-dependent motors, kinesins. Prior studies suggested that the heterotrimeric ciliary kinesin may be dispensable for certain aspects of transport in specialized cilia of vertebrate photoreceptor cells. To test this possibility further, we analyzed the mutant phenotype of the zebrafish kif3a gene, which encodes the common motor subunit of heterotrimeric ciliary kinesins. Cilia are absent in all organs examined, leading to the conclusion that kif3a is indispensable for ciliogenesis in all cells, including photoreceptors. Unexpectedly, kif3a function precedes ciliogenesis as ciliary basal bodies are mispositioned in mutant photoreceptors. This phenotype is much less pronounced in intraflagellar transport (IFT) mutants and reveals that kif3a has a much broader role than previously assumed. Despite the severity of their basal body phenotype, kif3a mutant photoreceptors survive longer compared to those in IFT mutants, which display much weaker basal body mispositioning. This effect is absent in kif3a;IFT double mutants, indicating that IFT proteins have ciliary transport-independent roles, which add to the severity of their photoreceptor phenotype. kif3a is dispensable for basal body docking in otic vesicle sensory epithelia and, surprisingly, short cilia form in mechanosensory cristae even in the absence of kif3a In contrast to Kif3a, the functions of the Kif3c-related protein, encoded by the kif3c-like (kif3cl) gene, and the homodimeric ciliary kinesin, kif17, are dispensable for photoreceptor morphogenesis. These studies demonstrate unexpected new roles for both ciliary heterotrimeric kinesins and IFT particle genes and clarify the function of kif17, the homodimeric ciliary kinesin gene. PMID:27038111

  16. Unexpectedly ease surgery for a worrisome abdominal mass: Pedunculated GISTs☆

    PubMed Central

    Baskiran, Adil; Otan, Emrah; Aydin, Cemalettin; Kayaalp, Cuneyt

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Discovery of abdominal masses often poses significant diagnostic difficulties. GISTs are mesenchymal masses, with specific histological features. Dimensions may vary from millimeters to giant tumours. We would like to present our case, which had an unexpectedly easy operative course which was easily handled with a simple surgical excision with a short operative duration. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 38 years old female patient was diagnosed to have an abdominal heterogen mass of 15 cm × 12 cm × 10 cm in dimension. Abdominal computed tomography revealed the solid mass between the stomach and pancreas corpus and tail, possibly orginating from the pancreas. With the preoperative diagnosis of locally invasive distal pancreas cancer the patient underwent laparotomy, following the dissection, the mass was observed to be originating from the posterior gastric Wall, extending exophytically with a peduncle of 5 cm in width, without any visual evidence for peritoneal invasion and metastasis. The tumour and the peduncle was resected with stapler device. Total operation time was 30 min. Postoperative course was uneventful. Pathologic diagnosis was gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). DISCUSSION Pedunculated large GISTs are not frequent and they can enlarge as 15 cm in diameter and compress the neighbouring organs. When they were huge, it is difficult to differentiate the origin of the masses. GISTs should be considered in differential diagnosis of giant abdominal masses. CONCLUSION When GISTs are huge and pedunculated, it can be difficult to differentiate the origin of the masses. This case report presents unexpectedly ease surgery for a worrysome abdominal mass. PMID:23999120

  17. What happens to your brain on the way to Mars

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Vipan K.; Allen, Barrett; Tran, Katherine K.; Macaraeg, Trisha G.; Chu, Esther M.; Kwok, Stephanie F.; Chmielewski, Nicole N.; Craver, Brianna M.; Baulch, Janet E.; Acharya, Munjal M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    As NASA prepares for the first manned spaceflight to Mars, questions have surfaced concerning the potential for increased risks associated with exposure to the spectrum of highly energetic nuclei that comprise galactic cosmic rays. Animal models have revealed an unexpected sensitivity of mature neurons in the brain to charged particles found in space. Astronaut autonomy during long-term space travel is particularly critical as is the need to properly manage planned and unanticipated events, activities that could be compromised by accumulating particle traversals through the brain. Using mice subjected to space-relevant fluences of charged particles, we show significant cortical- and hippocampal-based performance decrements 6 weeks after acute exposure. Animals manifesting cognitive decrements exhibited marked and persistent radiation-induced reductions in dendritic complexity and spine density along medial prefrontal cortical neurons known to mediate neurotransmission specifically interrogated by our behavioral tasks. Significant increases in postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) revealed major radiation-induced alterations in synaptic integrity. Impaired behavioral performance of individual animals correlated significantly with reduced spine density and trended with increased synaptic puncta, thereby providing quantitative measures of risk for developing cognitive decrements. Our data indicate an unexpected and unique susceptibility of the central nervous system to space radiation exposure, and argue that the underlying radiation sensitivity of delicate neuronal structure may well predispose astronauts to unintended mission-critical performance decrements and/or longer-term neurocognitive sequelae. PMID:26180843

  18. Comparative proteomic profiling reveals aberrant cell proliferation in the brain of embryonic Ts1Cje, a mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, K; Kanai, S; Sago, H; Yamakawa, K; Akiba, S

    2014-12-01

    To identify molecular candidates involved in brain disabilities of Ts1Cje, a mouse model of Down syndrome (DS), we performed comparative proteomic analyses. Proteins extracted from the brains of postnatal wild-type (WT) and Ts1Cje mice were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). No differences were detected in the proteins expressed in the whole brain between WT and Ts1Cje mice at postnatal day 0 and 3months of age. Five spots with differential expression in the brains of Ts1Cje mice were detected by 2-DE of brain proteins from WT and Ts1Cje embryos at embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5). These differentially expressed proteins in Ts1Cje embryos were identified as calcyclin-binding protein (CACYBP), nucleoside diphosphate kinase-B (NDPK-B), transketolase (TK), pyruvate kinase (PK), and 60S acidic ribosomal protein P0 (RPLP0) by peptide mass fingerprinting. CACYBP and NDPK-B were involved in cell proliferation, whereas TK and PK were associated with energy metabolism. Experiments on cell proliferation, an in vivo bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeling experiment, and immunohistochemical analysis for phospho-histone H3 (an M-phase marker) demonstrated increased numbers of BrdU-positive and M-phase cells in the ganglionic eminence. Our findings suggest that the dysregulated expression of proteins demonstrated by comparative proteomic analysis could be a factor in increased cell proliferation, which may be associated with abnormalities in DS brain during embryonic life. PMID:25261685

  19. Diffusion tensor imaging reveals adolescent binge ethanol-induced brain structural integrity alterations in adult rats that correlate with behavioral dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Vetreno, Ryan P; Yaxley, Richard; Paniagua, Beatriz; Crews, Fulton T

    2016-07-01

    Adolescence is characterized by considerable brain maturation that coincides with the development of adult behavior. Binge drinking is common during adolescence and can have deleterious effects on brain maturation because of the heightened neuroplasticity of the adolescent brain. Using an animal model of adolescent intermittent ethanol [AIE; 5.0 g/kg, intragastric, 20 percent EtOH w/v; 2 days on/2 days off from postnatal day (P)25 to P55], we assessed the adult brain structural volumes and integrity on P80 and P220 using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). While we did not observe a long-term effect of AIE on structural volumes, AIE did reduce axial diffusivity (AD) in the cerebellum, hippocampus and neocortex. Radial diffusivity (RD) was reduced in the hippocampus and neocortex of AIE-treated animals. Prior AIE treatment did not affect fractional anisotropy (FA), but did lead to long-term reductions of mean diffusivity (MD) in both the cerebellum and corpus callosum. AIE resulted in increased anxiety-like behavior and diminished object recognition memory, the latter of which was positively correlated with DTI measures. Across aging, whole brain volumes increased, as did volumes of the corpus callosum and neocortex. This was accompanied by age-associated AD reductions in the cerebellum and neocortex as well as RD and MD reductions in the cerebellum. Further, we found that FA increased in both the cerebellum and corpus callosum as rats aged from P80 to P220. Thus, both age and AIE treatment caused long-term changes to brain structural integrity that could contribute to cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25678360

  20. Profiling Murine Tau with 0N, 1N and 2N Isoform-Specific Antibodies in Brain and Peripheral Organs Reveals Distinct Subcellular Localization, with the 1N Isoform Being Enriched in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Götz, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    In the adult murine brain, the microtubule-associated protein tau exists as three major isoforms, which have four microtubule-binding repeats (4R), with either no (0N), one (1N) or two (2N) amino-terminal inserts. The human brain expresses three additional isoforms with three microtubule-binding repeats (3R) each. However, little is known about the role of the amino-terminal inserts and how the 0N, 1N and 2N tau species differ. In order to investigate this, we generated a series of isoform-specific antibodies and performed a profiling by Western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses using wild-type mice in three age groups: two months, two weeks and postnatal day 0 (P0). This revealed that the brain is the only organ to express tau at significant levels, with 0N4R being the predominant isoform in the two month-old adult. Subcellular fractionation of the brain showed that the 1N isoform is over-represented in the soluble nuclear fraction. This is in agreement with the immunohistochemical analysis as the 1N isoform strongly localizes to the neuronal nucleus, although it is also found in cell bodies and dendrites, but not axons. The 0N isoform is mainly found in cell bodies and axons, whereas nuclei and dendrites are only slightly stained with the 0N antibody. The 2N isoform is highly expressed in axons and in cell bodies, with a detectable expression in dendrites and a very slight expression in nuclei. The 2N isoform that was undetectable at P0, in adult brain was mainly found localized to cell bodies and dendrites. Together these findings reveal significant differences between the three murine tau isoforms that are likely to reflect different neuronal functions. PMID:24386422

  1. Sudden, unexpected death of a 15-year-old boy due to pancarditis

    PubMed Central

    Osculati, Antonio; Visonà, Silvia Damiana; Ventura, Francesco; Castelli, Francesca; Andrello, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Generally, rheumatic heart disease is, today, sporadic in developed countries, even though it continues to be a major health hazard in the developing ones. It is also a very rare cause of sudden unexpected death. We report a case of a 15-year-old boy who suddenly died at home. Since 3 days he had presented fever and chest pain. The family physician had diagnosed bronchitis and treated the boy with amoxicillin. Methods: Seven hours after death, a forensic autopsy were performed . Before the autopsy, anamnesis and some circumstantial data were collected from the boy's parents. During the autopsy, samples for histological, toxicological and molecular examinations were collected. The samples for the histology (brain, hypophysis, heart and pericardium, lungs, spleen, liver, kidney, adrenal glands) were formalin fixed and paraffin embedded. Each section was stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin. Immunostaining was also performed, with anti-CD 68, anti-CD3, anti-CD 20, anti-myeloperoxidase. Microbiological cultures were performed on cardiac blood, myocardium, pericardial effusion and cerebrospinal fluid samples collected during autopsy. Blood specimens were also processed through PCR, in order to reveal the presence of Enteroviruses, Chickenpox virus, Epstein Barr virus. Also chemical-toxicological examinations for the detection of the main medications and drugs were performed on blood samples. Results: The anamnesis, collected before the autopsy, revealed an acute pharyngitis few weeks before. The autopsy, and the following histological and immunochemical examinations suggested an immunological etiology. The immunohistochemistry, showing a strong positivity of antiCD68 antibodies, integrated with clinical-anamnestic information, leads to hypothesize a rheumatic carditis. Conclusion: In light of this case, at least 3 main messages of great importance for the clinician can be deduced. First, an accurate anamnesis collected by the family physician could have

  2. Sudden unexpected death due to severe pulmonary and cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Ginelliová, Alžbeta; Farkaš, Daniel; Farkašová Iannaccone, Silvia; Vyhnálková, Vlasta

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we report the autopsy findings of a 57 year old woman who died unexpectedly at home. She had been complaining of shortness of breath, episodes of dry coughing, and nausea. Her past medical and social history was unremarkable. She had no previous history of any viral or bacterial disease and no history of oncological disorders. Autopsy revealed multiple grayish-white nodular lesions in the pleura and epicardial fat and areas resembling fibrosis on the cut surface of the anterior and posterior wall of the left ventricle and interventricular septum. Histological examination of the lungs and heart revealed multiple well-formed noncaseating epithelioid cell granulomas with multinucleated giant cells. Death was attributed to myocardial ischemia due to vasculitis of intramural coronary artery branches associated with sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology characterized by the formation of noncaseating epithelioid cell granulomas in the affected organs and tissues. The diagnosis of sarcoidosis in this case was established when other causes of granulomatous disease such as tuberculosis, berylliosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and giant cell myocarditis had been reasonably excluded. PMID:27379608

  3. Unexpected fatal outcome of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Ginelliová, Alžbeta; Farkaš, Daniel; Farkašová Iannaccone, Silvia; Vyhnálková, Vlasta

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we report the autopsy findings of a long-term warfarinized 60-year-old man who died unexpectedly 2 days after undergoing laparoscopic transabdominal pre-peritoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair. In his medical records it was stated that the perioperative and postoperative period was uneventful with no sign of bleeding and he was discharged the day after surgery. Autopsy revealed massive bleeding in the pre-peritoneal space at the surgery site and a massive left inguinal canal hematoma spreading through the spermatic cord to the left scrotum. There was no evidence of retroperitoneal bleeding. No sign of traumatic injury to the abdominal wall, major abdominal and pelvic vessels was revealed. The cause of death was hemorrhagic shock. We believe that this is the first documented case of fatal outcome after TAPP inguinal hernia repair in Slovakia. Inguinal hernias account for approximately two-thirds of all abdominal wall hernias. The reported case demonstrates that routine procedures such as TAPP hernia repair can have a fatal outcome, not due to any surgical mishap but because of the altered health status of the patient. PMID:27076122

  4. Vision's Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Julie Ann

    1978-01-01

    The functional architecture of the primary visual cortex has been explored by monitoring the responses of individual brain cells to visual stimuli. A combination of anatomical and physiological techniques reveals groups of functionally related cells, juxtaposed and superimposed, in a sometimes complex, but presumably efficient, structure. (BB)

  5. Categories of preventable unexpected infant deaths.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, E M; Emery, J L

    1990-01-01

    The conclusions of confidential inquiries into 115 registered unexpected infant deaths over a period of nine years were reviewed. Deaths were classified based on the total information available into group A: poor prognosis (n = 7), group B: treatable disease (n = 45), group C: minor disease (n = 32), group D: no disease (n = 19), group E: probably accidental (n = 4), and group F: probably filicide (n = 8). Less than 20% of deaths corresponded to the classic definition of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Babies who died during the course of potentially treatable disease had more adverse family and social factors: the parents were less likely to be owner occupiers, or own a car or telephone, their mothers were more likely to be young, to smoke, and to present late in pregnancy. Babies who died of minor disease tended to come from similar backgrounds, their families had greater levels of stress and the deaths appeared to be due to more than one factor. Babies who died with no terminal disease were younger, and more likely to be boys. Their families appeared to be demographically similar to those of a control group and to the general population. PMID:2357095

  6. A Neonate with Susceptibility to Long QT Syndrome Type 6 who Presented with Ventricular Fibrillation and Sudden Unexpected Infant Death.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Charles W; Marc-Aurele, Krishelle L

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This is a case of a neonate with susceptibility to long QT syndrome (LQTS) who presented with a sudden unexpected infant death. Experts continue to debate whether universal electrocardiogram (ECG) screening of all newborns is feasible, practical, and cost-effective. CASE REPORT A 19-day-old neonate was found unresponsive by her mother. ECG showed ventricular fibrillation and a combination of a lidocaine drip plus multiple defibrillations converted the rhythm to normal sinus. Unfortunately, MRI brain imaging showed multiple infarcts and EEG showed burst suppression pattern with frequent seizures; life supportive treatment was stopped and the infant died. Genetic testing revealed two mutations in the KCNE2 gene consistent with susceptibility to LQTS type 6. CONCLUSIONS We believe this case is the first to demonstrate both a precipitating electrocardiographic and genetic cause of death for an infant with LQTS, showing a cause-and-effect relationship between LQTS mutation, ventricular arrhythmia, and death. We wonder whether universal ECG newborn screening to prevent LQTS death could have saved this baby. PMID:27465075

  7. A Neonate with Susceptibility to Long QT Syndrome Type 6 who Presented with Ventricular Fibrillation and Sudden Unexpected Infant Death

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Charles W.; Marc-Aurele, Krishelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 19-day Final Diagnosis: 19 day old neonate with susceptibility to Long QT syndrome • ventricular fibrillation Symptoms: Cardiac arrest • cardiac arrhythmia • encephalopathy Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cardioversion Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Rare disease Background: This is a case of a neonate with susceptibility to long QT syndrome (LQTS) who presented with a sudden unexpected infant death. Experts continue to debate whether universal electrocardiogram (ECG) screening of all newborns is feasible, practical, and cost-effective. Case Report: A 19-day-old neonate was found unresponsive by her mother. ECG showed ventricular fibrillation and a combination of a lidocaine drip plus multiple defibrillations converted the rhythm to normal sinus. Unfortunately, MRI brain imaging showed multiple infarcts and EEG showed burst suppression pattern with frequent seizures; life supportive treatment was stopped and the infant died. Genetic testing revealed two mutations in the KCNE2 gene consistent with susceptibility to LQTS type 6. Conclusions: We believe this case is the first to demonstrate both a precipitating electrocardiographic and genetic cause of death for an infant with LQTS, showing a cause-and-effect relationship between LQTS mutation, ventricular arrhythmia, and death. We wonder whether universal ECG newborn screening to prevent LQTS death could have saved this baby. PMID:27465075

  8. The Efficiency of a Modified Real-time Wireless Brain Electric Activity Calculator to Reveal the Subliminal Psychological Instability of Surgeons that Possibly Leads to Errors in Surgical Procedures.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Saori; Ohdaira, Takeshi; Nakamura, Seiji; Yamazaki, Tokihisa; Yano, Shinichiro; Higashihara, Nobuhiko

    2015-05-01

    We know that experienced endoscopic surgeons, despite having extensive training, may make a rare but fatal mistake. Prof. Takeshi Ohdaira developed a device visualizing brain action potential to reflect the latent psychological instability of the surgeon. The Ohdaira system consists of three components: a real-time brain action potential measurement unit, a simulated abdominal cavity, and an intra-abdominal monitor. We conducted two psychological stress tests by using an artificial laparoscopic simulator and an animal model. There were five male subjects aged between 41 to 61 years. The psychological instability scores were considered to reflect, to some extent, the number of years of experience of the surgeon in medical care. However, very high inter-individual variability was noted. Furthermore, we discovered the following: 1) bleeding during simulated laparoscopic surgery--an episode generally considered to be psychological stress for the surgeon--did not form the greatest psychological stress; 2) the greatest psychological stress was elicited at the moment when the surgeon became faced with a setting in which his anatomical knowledge was lacking or a setting in which he presumed imminent bleeding; and 3) the excessively activated action potential of the brain possibly leads to a procedural error during surgery. A modified brain action potential measurement unit can reveal the latent psychological instability of surgeons that possibly leads to errors in surgical procedures. PMID:26054987

  9. Unexpectedly Poor Spelling and Phonological-Processing Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Virginia M.; Quinn, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the phonological skills of university students who were unexpectedly poor spellers relative to their word reading accuracy. Compared with good spellers, unexpectedly poor spellers showed no deficits in phonological memory, selection of appropriate graphemes for phonemes in word misspellings and nonword spellings, and…

  10. 42 CFR 493.861 - Standard; Unexpected antibody detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard; Unexpected antibody detection. 493.861 Section 493.861 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.861 Standard; Unexpected antibody detection. (a) Failure...

  11. 42 CFR 493.861 - Standard; Unexpected antibody detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard; Unexpected antibody detection. 493.861 Section 493.861 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.861 Standard; Unexpected antibody detection. (a) Failure...

  12. 42 CFR 493.861 - Standard; Unexpected antibody detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard; Unexpected antibody detection. 493.861 Section 493.861 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.861 Standard; Unexpected antibody detection. (a) Failure...

  13. 42 CFR 493.861 - Standard; Unexpected antibody detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard; Unexpected antibody detection. 493.861 Section 493.861 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.861 Standard; Unexpected antibody detection. (a) Failure...

  14. Orthographic Processing and Visual Sequential Memory in Unexpectedly Poor Spellers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Virginia M.; Malone, Aisling M.; Redenbach, Holly

    2008-01-01

    Does unexpectedly poor spelling in adults result from inferior visual sequential memory? In one experiment, unexpectedly poor spellers performed significantly worse than better spellers in the immediate reproduction of sequences of visual symbols, but in a second experiment, the effect was not replicated. Poor spellers were also no worse at the…

  15. MaxiK channel interactome reveals its interaction with GABA transporter 3 and heat shock protein 60 in the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Singh, H; Li, M; Hall, L; Chen, S; Sukur, S; Lu, R; Caputo, A; Meredith, A L; Stefani, E; Toro, L

    2016-03-11

    Large conductance voltage and calcium-activated potassium (MaxiK) channels are activated by membrane depolarization and elevated cytosolic Ca(2+). In the brain, they localize to neurons and astrocytes, where they play roles such as resetting the membrane potential during an action potential, neurotransmitter release, and neurovascular coupling. MaxiK channels are known to associate with several modulatory proteins and accessory subunits, and each of these interactions can have distinct physiological consequences. To uncover new players in MaxiK channel brain physiology, we applied a directed proteomic approach and obtained MaxiK channel pore-forming α subunit brain interactome using specific antibodies. Controls included immunoprecipitations with rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) and with anti-MaxiK antibodies in wild type and MaxiK channel knockout mice (Kcnma1(-/-)), respectively. We have found known and unreported interactive partners that localize to the plasma membrane, extracellular space, cytosol and intracellular organelles including mitochondria, nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Localization of MaxiK channel to mitochondria was further confirmed using purified brain mitochondria colabeled with MitoTracker. Independent proof of MaxiK channel interaction with previously unidentified partners is given for GABA transporter 3 (GAT3) and heat shock protein 60 (HSP60). In human embryonic kidney 293 cells containing SV40 T-antigen (HEK293T) cells, both GAT3 and HSP60 coimmunoprecipitated and colocalized with MaxiK channel; colabeling was observed mainly at the cell periphery with GAT3 and intracellularly with HSP60 with protein proximity indices of ∼ 0.6 and ∼ 0.4, respectively. In rat primary hippocampal neurons, colocalization index was identical for GAT3 (∼ 0.6) and slightly higher for HSP60 (∼ 0.5) association with MaxiK channel. The results of this study provide a complete interactome of MaxiK channel the mouse brain, further establish

  16. Revealing Rembrandt

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our results emphasized the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt's portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings. PMID:24795552

  17. Resonant Raman spectra of grades of human brain glioma tumors reveal the content of tryptophan by the 1588 cm-1 mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Zhou, Lixin; Zhu, Ke; Liu, Yulong; Zhang, Lin; Boydston-White, Susie; Cheng, Gangge; Pu, Yang; Bidyut, Das; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    RR spectra of brain normal tissue, gliomas in low grade I and II, and malignant glioma tumors in grade III and IV were measured using a confocal micro Raman spectrometer. This report focus on the relative contents of tryptophan (W) in various grades of brain glioma tumors by the intrinsic molecular resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy method using the 1588cm-1 of tryptophan mode by 532 nm excitation. The RR spectra of key fingerprints of tryptophan, with a main vibrational mode at 1588cm-1 (W8b), were observed. It was found that tryptophan contribution was accumulated in grade I to IV gliomas and the mode of 1588cm-1 in grade III and IV malignant gliomas were enhanced by resonance.

  18. The unexpected response of kelp to wave motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullarney, J. C.; Pilditch, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Kelp ecosystems offer many ecosystem services such as providing critical habitat for numerous species, trapping contaminants and nutrients and influencing coastal morphology. However, the extent to which kelp 'goes with the flow' as opposed to dissipating wave and current energy is unclear. We present innovative measurements of the wave-forced motion of the giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera at different heights along the length of the stipe using a series of accelerometers attached at fixed intervals. Observations were taken at the Aramoana breakwater ("the Mole"), located at the entrance to Otago Harbor, New Zealand. This field site encompassed a wave-exposed region open to Pacific swells and a sheltered (harbor) region. Analysis of wave gauge measurements revealed that forcing was dominated by the swell frequency (0.11 Hz). However, the spectra also indicated periods of substantial energy at lower, infragravity wave frequencies (0.011 Hz). Preliminary analysis of the accelerometer data shows significant differences in displacement over the stem length, with large motions apparent at both the top and bottom of the kelp (consistent with visual observations from divers). Initial observations also revealed an unexpected result; different sections of the kelp responded most strongly to different forcing frequencies. In particular, the lowest sensor showed peaks in energy close to both swell and infragravity periods, whereas the higher sensor revealed the surprising result of a strong response at the infragravity frequencies but little movement at the swell frequencies. We discuss how these results may allow us to determine the extent to which aquatic plants are adapted to minimize stresses imposed by fluid flow and potential consequences for present and future plant community distributions.

  19. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Arrays and Unexpected Consanguinity: Considerations for Clinicians When Returning Results to Families

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Fernanda; Tabor, Holly K.; Chow, Penny M.; Conta, Jessie H.; Feldman, Kenneth W.; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Beck, Anita E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The broad use of SNP microarrays has increased identification of unexpected consanguinity. Therefore, guidelines to address reporting of consanguinity have been published for clinical laboratories. Because no such guidelines exist for clinicians, we describe a case and present recommendations for clinicians to disclose unexpected consanguinity to families. Methods In a boy with multiple endocrine abnormalities and structural birth defects, SNP array analysis revealed ~23% autosomal homozygosity suggestive of a 1st-degree parental relationship. We assembled an interdisciplinary healthcare team, planned the most appropriate way to discuss results of the SNP array with the adult mother including the possibility of multiple autosomal recessive disorders in her child, and finally met with her as a team. Results From these discussions, we developed four major considerations for clinicians returning results of unexpected consanguinity, all guided by the child’s best interests: 1) ethical and legal obligations for reporting possible abuse, 2) preservation of the clinical relationship, 3) attention to justice and psychosocial challenges, and 4) utilization of the SNP array results to guide further testing. Conclusion As SNP arrays become a common clinical diagnostic tool, clinicians can use this framework to return results of unexpected consanguinity to families in a supportive and productive manner. PMID:25232848

  20. Cerebral complexity preceded enlarged brain size and reduced olfactory bulbs in Old World monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Lauren A.; Benefit, Brenda R.; McCrossin, Monte L.; Spoor, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of the only complete early cercopithecoid (Old World monkey) endocast currently known, that of 15-million-year (Myr)-old Victoriapithecus, reveals an unexpectedly small endocranial volume (ECV) relative to body size and a large olfactory bulb volume relative to ECV, similar to extant lemurs and Oligocene anthropoids. However, the Victoriapithecus brain has principal and arcuate sulci of the frontal lobe not seen in the stem catarrhine Aegyptopithecus, as well as a distinctive cercopithecoid pattern of gyrification, indicating that cerebral complexity preceded encephalization in cercopithecoids. Since larger ECVs, expanded frontal lobes, and reduced olfactory bulbs are already present in the 17- to 18-Myr-old ape Proconsul these features evolved independently in hominoids (apes) and cercopithecoids and much earlier in the former. Moreover, the order of encephalization and brain reorganization was apparently different in hominoids and cercopithecoids, showing that brain size and cerebral organization evolve independently. PMID:26138795

  1. A brain slice culture model of viral encephalitis reveals an innate CNS cytokine response profile and the therapeutic potential of caspase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Kalen R.; Leser, J. Smith; Lorenzen, Kristi A.; Beckham, J. David; Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2011-01-01

    Viral encephalitis is a significant cause of human morbidity and mortality in large part due to suboptimal diagnosis and treatment. Murine reovirus infection serves as a classic experimental model of viral encephalitis. Infection of neonatal mice with T3 reoviruses results in lethal encephalitis associated with neuronal infection, apoptosis, and CNS tissue injury. We have developed an ex vivo brain slice culture (BSC) system that recapitulates the basic pathological features and kinetics of viral replication seen in vivo. We utilize the BSC model to identify an innate, brain-tissue specific inflammatory cytokine response to reoviral infection, which is characterized by the release of IL6, CXCL10, RANTES, and murine IL8 analog (KC). Additionally, we demonstrate the potential utility of this system as a pharmaceutical screening platform by inhibiting reovirus-induced apoptosis and CNS tissue injury with the pan-caspase inhibitor, Q-VD-OPh. Cultured brain slices not only serve to model events occurring during viral encephalitis, but can also be utilized to investigate aspects of pathogenesis and therapy that are not experimentally accessible in vivo. PMID:21241693

  2. Bilinguals at the "cocktail party": dissociable neural activity in auditory-linguistic brain regions reveals neurobiological basis for nonnative listeners' speech-in-noise recognition deficits.

    PubMed

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Dexter, Lauren

    2015-04-01

    We examined a consistent deficit observed in bilinguals: poorer speech-in-noise (SIN) comprehension for their nonnative language. We recorded neuroelectric mismatch potentials in mono- and bi-lingual listeners in response to contrastive speech sounds in noise. Behaviorally, late bilinguals required ∼10dB more favorable signal-to-noise ratios to match monolinguals' SIN abilities. Source analysis of cortical activity demonstrated monotonic increase in response latency with noise in superior temporal gyrus (STG) for both groups, suggesting parallel degradation of speech representations in auditory cortex. Contrastively, we found differential speech encoding between groups within inferior frontal gyrus (IFG)-adjacent to Broca's area-where noise delays observed in nonnative listeners were offset in monolinguals. Notably, brain-behavior correspondences double dissociated between language groups: STG activation predicted bilinguals' SIN, whereas IFG activation predicted monolinguals' performance. We infer higher-order brain areas act compensatorily to enhance impoverished sensory representations but only when degraded speech recruits linguistic brain mechanisms downstream from initial auditory-sensory inputs. PMID:25747886

  3. Alteration of cortical functional connectivity as a result of traumatic brain injury revealed by graph theory, ICA, and sLORETA analyses of EEG signals.

    PubMed

    Cao, C; Slobounov, S

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, a novel approach to examine the cortical functional connectivity using multichannel electroencephalographic (EEG) signals is proposed. First we utilized independent component analysis (ICA) to transform multichannel EEG recordings into independent processes and then applied source reconstruction algorithm [i.e., standardize low resolution brain electromagnetic (sLORETA)] to identify the cortical regions of interest (ROIs). Second, we performed a graph theory analysis of the bipartite network composite of ROIs and independent processes to assess the connectivity between ROIs. We applied this proposed algorithm and compared the functional connectivity network properties under resting state condition using 29 student-athletes prior to and shortly after sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). The major findings of interest are the following. There was 1) alterations in vertex degree at frontal and occipital regions in subjects suffering from MTBI, ( p < 0.05); 2) a significant decrease in the long-distance connectivity and significant increase in the short-distance connectivity as a result of MTBI, ( p < 0.05); 3) a departure from small-world network configuration in MTBI subjects. These major findings are discussed in relation to current debates regarding the brain functional connectivity within and between local and distal regions both in normal controls in pathological subjects. PMID:20064767

  4. High-Field MRI Reveals a Drastic Increase of Hypoxia-Induced Microhemorrhages upon Tissue Reoxygenation in the Mouse Brain with Strong Predominance in the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Helluy, Xavier; Milford, David; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Human pathophysiology of high altitude hypoxic brain injury is not well understood and research on the underlying mechanisms is hampered by the lack of well-characterized animal models. In this study, we explored the evolution of brain injury by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological methods in mice exposed to normobaric hypoxia at 8% oxygen for 48 hours followed by rapid reoxygenation and incubation for further 24 h under normoxic conditions. T2*-, diffusion-weighted and T2-relaxometry MRI was performed before exposure, immediately after 48 hours of hypoxia and 24 hours after reoxygenation. Cerebral microhemorrhages, previously described in humans suffering from severe high altitude cerebral edema, were also detected in mice upon hypoxia-reoxygenation with a strong region-specific clustering in the olfactory bulb, and to a lesser extent, in the basal ganglia and cerebral white matter. The number of microhemorrhages determined immediately after hypoxia was low, but strongly increased 24 hours upon onset of reoxygenation. Histologically verified microhemorrhages were exclusively located around cerebral microvessels with disrupted interendothelial tight junction protein ZO-1. In contrast, quantitative T2 and apparent-diffusion-coefficient values immediately after hypoxia and after 24 hours of reoxygenation did not show any region-specific alteration, consistent with subtle multifocal but not with regional or global brain edema. PMID:26863147

  5. Role of organic cation transporters (OCTs) in the brain.

    PubMed

    Couroussé, Thomas; Gautron, Sophie

    2015-02-01

    Organic cation transporters (OCTs) are polyspecific facilitated diffusion transporters that contribute to the absorption and clearance of various physiological compounds and xenobiotics in mammals, by mediating their vectorial transport in kidney, liver or placenta cells. Unexpectedly, a corpus of studies within the last decade has revealed that these transporters also fulfill important functions within the brain. The high-affinity monoamine reuptake transporters (SERT, NET and DAT) exert a crucial role in the control of aminergic transmission by ensuring the rapid clearance of the released transmitters from the synaptic cleft and their recycling into the nerve endings. Substantiated evidence indicate that OCTs may serve in the brain as a compensatory clearance system in case of monoamine spillover after high-affinity transporter blockade by antidepressants or psychostimulants, and in areas of lower high-affinity transporter density at distance from the aminergic varicosities. In spite of similar anatomical profiles, the two brain OCTs, OCT2 and OCT3, show subtle differences in their distribution in the brain and their functional properties. These transporters contribute to shape a variety of central functions related to mood such as anxiety, response to stress and antidepressant efficacy, but are also implicated in other processes like osmoregulation and neurotoxicity. In this review, we discuss the recent knowledge and emerging concepts on the role of OCTs in the uptake of aminergic neurotransmitters in the brain and in these various physiological functions, focusing on the implications for mental health. PMID:25251364

  6. Scans Spot Brain Region That Misfires in Depressed People

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scans Spot Brain Region That Misfires in Depressed People Contrary to previous thinking, the habenula is less ... bad experiences acts in an unexpected way in people with depression, a small study finds. One theory ...

  7. Brain-specific Phgdh deletion reveals a pivotal role for L-serine biosynthesis in controlling the level of D-serine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor co-agonist, in adult brain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jung Hoon; Wada, Akira; Yoshida, Kazuyuki; Miyoshi, Yurika; Sayano, Tomoko; Esaki, Kayoko; Kinoshita, Masami O; Tomonaga, Shozo; Azuma, Norihiro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Hamase, Kenji; Zaitsu, Kiyoshi; Machida, Takeo; Messing, Albee; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Furuya, Shigeki

    2010-12-31

    In mammalian brain, D-serine is synthesized from L-serine by serine racemase, and it functions as an obligatory co-agonist at the glycine modulatory site of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-selective glutamate receptors. Although diminution in D-serine level has been implicated in NMDA receptor hypofunction, which is thought to occur in schizophrenia, the source of the precursor L-serine and its role in D-serine metabolism in adult brain have yet to be determined. We investigated whether L-serine synthesized in brain via the phosphorylated pathway is essential for D-serine synthesis by generating mice with a conditional deletion of D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh; EC 1.1.1.95). This enzyme catalyzes the first step in L-serine synthesis via the phosphorylated pathway. HPLC analysis of serine enantiomers demonstrated that both L- and D-serine levels were markedly decreased in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of conditional knock-out mice, whereas the serine deficiency did not alter protein expression levels of serine racemase and NMDA receptor subunits in these regions. The present study provides definitive proof that L-serine-synthesized endogenously via the phosphorylated pathway is a key rate-limiting factor for maintaining steady-state levels of D-serine in adult brain. Furthermore, NMDA-evoked transcription of Arc, an immediate early gene, was diminished in the hippocampus of conditional knock-out mice. Thus, this study demonstrates that in mature neuronal circuits L-serine availability determines the rate of D-serine synthesis in the forebrain and controls NMDA receptor function at least in the hippocampus. PMID:20966073

  8. Competition can lead to unexpected patterns in tropical ant communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwood, M. D. Farnon; Blüthgen, Nico; Fayle, Tom M.; Foster, William A.; Menzel, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Ecological communities are structured by competitive, predatory, mutualistic and parasitic interactions combined with chance events. Separating deterministic from stochastic processes is possible, but finding statistical evidence for specific biological interactions is challenging. We attempt to solve this problem for ant communities nesting in epiphytic bird's nest ferns (Asplenium nidus) in Borneo's lowland rainforest. By recording the frequencies with which each and every single ant species occurred together, we were able to test statistically for patterns associated with interspecific competition. We found evidence for competition, but the resulting co-occurrence pattern was the opposite of what we expected. Rather than detecting species segregation-the classical hallmark of competition-we found species aggregation. Moreover, our approach of testing individual pairwise interactions mostly revealed spatially positive rather than negative associations. Significant negative interactions were only detected among large ants, and among species of the subfamily Ponerinae. Remarkably, the results from this study, and from a corroborating analysis of ant communities known to be structured by competition, suggest that competition within the ants leads to species aggregation rather than segregation. We believe this unexpected result is linked with the displacement of species following asymmetric competition. We conclude that analysing co-occurrence frequencies across complete species assemblages, separately for each species, and for each unique pairwise combination of species, represents a subtle yet powerful way of detecting structure and compartmentalisation in ecological communities.

  9. Bah humbug: Unexpected Christmas cards and the reciprocity norm.

    PubMed

    Meier, Brian P

    2016-01-01

    The reciprocity norm refers to the expectation that people will help those who helped them. A well-known study revealed that the norm is strong with Christmas cards, with 20% of people reciprocating a Christmas card received from a stranger. I attempted to conceptually replicate and extend this effect. In Study 1, 755 participants received a Christmas card supposedly from a more- versus less-similar stranger. The reciprocation rate was unexpectedly low (2%), which did not allow for a test of a similarity effect. Two potential reasons for this low rate were examined in Study 2 in which 494 participants reported their likelihood of reciprocating a Christmas card from a stranger as well as their felt suspicions/threat about the card and their frequency of e-mail use. Reciprocation likelihood was negatively correlated with perceived threat/suspicion and e-mail use. It appears that reciprocating a gift from a stranger in offline settings may be less likely than expected. PMID:26666577

  10. Lead intoxication from an unexpected source. [Fruit drink dispensers

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinfeld, M.J.

    1982-02-01

    A case of lead intoxication from an unexpected source is reported. An 18-year-old man came to the Divisin of Safety and Health, New York City, complaining of periodic cramping abdominal pain and weakness of several weeks' duration. In view of clinical laboratory findings, lead intoxication was considered in the differential diagnosis and determination of blood lead and urinary amino levulinic acid (ALA) were done. The blood lead value was 70 ..mu..g/100 g of whole blood. The urinary ALA value was 3.61 mg/100 of creatinine (normal, < 2.0 mg/100 mg of creatinine). A repeated urinary ALA test on the following day gave a value of 3.50 mg/100 mg of creatinine. An industrial hygiene survey was made to ascertain the patient's exposure to lead. The work place was a luncheonette that served flavored fruit drinks. The fruit drinks were dispensed from 12 tanks, and a sampling of these tanks showed that six of them were made of metal and had been soldered in the past. In one tank a chunk of lead was found. An analysis of this chunk of lead revealed that the lead content was 50.1%. Only two of the 12 tanks showed levels of lead that were excessively high; these were made of metal and had been soldered in the past. It was recommended to the owner that acid-containing drinks should be stored in tanks constructed of stainless steel,plastic, or other lead-free materials.

  11. Unexpected Photo-instability of 2,6-Sulfonamide-Substituted BODIPYs and Its Application to Caged GABA.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Aoi; Komatsu, Toru; Nomura, Hiroshi; Naka, Masamitsu; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji; Terai, Takuya; Ueno, Tasuku; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Nagano, Tetsuo; Urano, Yasuteru

    2016-07-01

    Investigation of the unexpected photo-instability of 2,6-sulfonamide-substituted derivatives of the boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) fluorophore led to the discovery of a photoreaction accompanied by multiple bond scissions. We characterized the photoproducts and utilized the photoreaction to design a caged γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) derivative that can release GABA upon irradiation in the visible range (>450 nm). This allowed us to stimulate neural cells in mouse brain slices. PMID:27038199

  12. Differential functional brain network connectivity during visceral interoception as revealed by independent component analysis of fMRI TIME-series.

    PubMed

    Jarrahi, Behnaz; Mantini, Dante; Balsters, Joshua Henk; Michels, Lars; Kessler, Thomas M; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kollias, Spyros S

    2015-11-01

    Influential theories of brain-viscera interactions propose a central role for interoception in basic motivational and affective feeling states. Recent neuroimaging studies have underlined the insula, anterior cingulate, and ventral prefrontal cortices as the neural correlates of interoception. However, the relationships between these distributed brain regions remain unclear. In this study, we used spatial independent component analysis (ICA) and functional network connectivity (FNC) approaches to investigate time course correlations across the brain regions during visceral interoception. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed in thirteen healthy females who underwent viscerosensory stimulation of bladder as a representative internal organ at different prefill levels, i.e., no prefill, low prefill (100 ml saline), and high prefill (individually adapted to the sensations of persistent strong desire to void), and with different infusion temperatures, i.e., body warm (∼37°C) or ice cold (4-8°C) saline solution. During Increased distention pressure on the viscera, the insula, striatum, anterior cingulate, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, amygdalo-hippocampus, thalamus, brainstem, and cerebellar components showed increased activation. A second group of components encompassing the insula and anterior cingulate, dorsolateral prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices and temporal-parietal junction showed increased activity with innocuous temperature stimulation of bladder mucosa. Significant differences in the FNC were found between the insula and amygdalo-hippocampus, the insula and ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and temporal-parietal junction as the distention pressure on the viscera increased. These results provide new insight into the supraspinal processing of visceral interoception originating from an internal organ. PMID:26249369

  13. Early Development of Mushroom Bodies in the Brain of the Honeybee Apis mellifera as Revealed by BrdU Incorporation and Ablation Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Malun, Dagmar

    1998-01-01

    In the honeybee the mushroom bodies are prominent neuropil structures arranged as pairs in the dorsal protocerebrum of the brain. Each mushroom body is composed of a medial and a lateral subunit. To understand their development, the proliferation pattern of mushroom body intrinsic cells, the Kenyon cells, were examined during larval and pupal stages using the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) technique and chemical ablation with hydroxyurea. By larval stage 1, ∼40 neuroblasts are located in the periphery of the protocerebrum. Many of these stem cells divide asymmetrically to produce a chain of ganglion mother cells. Kenyon cell precursors underly a different proliferation pattern. With the beginning of larval stage 3, they are arranged in two large distinct cell clusters in each side of the brain. BrdU incorporation into newly synthesized DNA and its immunohistochemical detection show high mitotic activity in these cell clusters that lasts until mid-pupal stages. The uniform diameter of cells, the homogeneous distribution of BrdU-labeled nuclei, and the presence of equally dividing cells in these clusters indicate symmetrical cell divisions of Kenyon cell precursors. Hydroxyurea applied to stage 1 larvae caused the selective ablation of mushroom bodies. Within these animals a variety of defects were observed. In the majority of brains exhibiting mushroom body defects, either one mushroom body subunit on one or on both sides, or three or four subunits (e.g., complete mushroom body ablation) were missing. In contrast, partial ablation of mushroom body subunits resulting in small Kenyon cell clusters and peduncles was observed very rarely. These findings indicate that hydroxyurea applied during larval stage 1 selectively deletes Kenyon stem cells. The results also show that each mushroom body subunit originates from a very small number of stem cells and develops independently of its neighboring subunit. PMID:10454374

  14. Forward shift of feeding buzz components of dolphins and belugas during associative learning reveals a likely connection to reward expectation, pleasure and brain dopamine activation.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, S H; Moore, P W; Carder, D A; Romano, T A

    2014-08-15

    For many years, we heard sounds associated with reward from dolphins and belugas. We named these pulsed sounds victory squeals (VS), as they remind us of a child's squeal of delight. Here we put these sounds in context with natural and learned behavior. Like bats, echolocating cetaceans produce feeding buzzes as they approach and catch prey. Unlike bats, cetaceans continue their feeding buzzes after prey capture and the after portion is what we call the VS. Prior to training (or conditioning), the VS comes after the fish reward; with repeated trials it moves to before the reward. During training, we use a whistle or other sound to signal a correct response by the animal. This sound signal, named a secondary reinforcer (SR), leads to the primary reinforcer, fish. Trainers usually name their whistle or other SR a bridge, as it bridges the time gap between the correct response and reward delivery. During learning, the SR becomes associated with reward and the VS comes after the SR rather than after the fish. By following the SR, the VS confirms that the animal expects a reward. Results of early brain stimulation work suggest to us that SR stimulates brain dopamine release, which leads to the VS. Although there are no direct studies of dopamine release in cetaceans, we found that the timing of our VS is consistent with a response after dopamine release. We compared trained vocal responses to auditory stimuli with VS responses to SR sounds. Auditory stimuli that did not signal reward resulted in faster responses by a mean of 151 ms for dolphins and 250 ms for belugas. In laboratory animals, there is a 100 to 200 ms delay for dopamine release. VS delay in our animals is similar and consistent with vocalization after dopamine release. Our novel observation suggests that the dopamine reward system is active in cetacean brains. PMID:25122919

  15. Unexpected relationships of substructured populations in Chinese Locusta migratoria

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, De-Xing; Yan, Lu-Na; Ji, Ya-Jie; Hewitt, Godfrey M; Huang, Zu-Shi

    2009-01-01

    revised. The three groups of locusts probably have separate evolutionary histories that were most likely linked to Quaternary glaciations events, and derived from different ancestral refugial populations following postglacial expansions. Conclusion The migratory locust populations in China have differentiated into three genetically distinct groups despite high dispersal capability. While this clarified long-standing suspicions on the subspecific diversification of this species in China, it also revealed that the locusts in the vast area of East China are not the oriental subspecies but the Asiatic subspecies, an unexpected substructuring pattern. The distribution pattern of the three locust groups in China may be primarily defined by adaptive differentiation coupled to Quaternary glaciations events. Our results are of general significance both for locust research and for phylogeographical study of flora and fauna in China, illustrating the potential importance of phylogeographical history in shaping the divergence and distribution patterns of widespread species with strong dispersal ability. PMID:19558707

  16. Estimated incidence and risk factors of sudden unexpected death

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feng-Chang; Mehta, Neil; Mounsey, Louisa; Nwosu, Anthony; Pursell, Irion; Chung, Eugene H; Mounsey, J Paul; Simpson, Ross J

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this manuscript, we estimate the incidence and identify risk factors for sudden unexpected death in a socioeconomically and racially diverse population in one county in North Carolina. Estimates of the incidence and risk factors contributing to sudden death vary widely. The Sudden Unexpected Death in North Carolina (SUDDEN) project is a population-based investigation of the incidence and potential causes of sudden death. Methods From 3 March 2013 to 2 March 2014, all out-of-hospital deaths in Wake County, North Carolina, were screened to identify presumed sudden unexpected death among free-living residents between the ages of 18 and 64 years. Death certificate, public and medical records were reviewed and adjudicated to confirm sudden unexpected death cases. Results Following adjudication, 190 sudden unexpected deaths including 122 men and 68 women were identified. Estimated incidence was 32.1 per 100 000 person-years overall: 42.7 among men and 22.4 among women. The majority of victims were white, unmarried men over age 55 years, with unwitnessed deaths at home. Hypertension and dyslipidaemia were common in men and women. African-American women dying from sudden unexpected death were over-represented. Women who were under age 55 years with coronary disease accounted for over half of female participants with coronary artery disease. Conclusions The overall estimated incidence of sudden unexpected death may account for approximately 10% of all deaths classified as ‘natural’. Women have a lower estimated incidence of sudden unexpected death than men. However, we found no major differences in age or comorbidities between men and women. African-Americans and young women with coronary disease are at risk for sudden unexpected death. PMID:27042316

  17. Functional associations among G protein-coupled neurotransmitter receptors in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The activity of neurons is controlled by groups of neurotransmitter receptors rather than by individual receptors. Experimental studies have investigated some receptor interactions, but currently little information is available about transcriptional associations among receptors at the whole-brain level. Results A total of 4950 correlations between 100 G protein-coupled neurotransmitter receptors were examined across 169 brain regions in the human brain using expression data published in the Allen Human Brain Atlas. A large number of highly significant correlations were found, many of which have not been investigated in hypothesis-driven studies. The highest positive and negative correlations of each receptor are reported, which can facilitate the construction of receptor sets likely to be affected by altered transcription of one receptor (such sets always exist, but their members are difficult to predict). A graph analysis isolated two large receptor communities, within each of which receptor mRNA levels were strongly cross-correlated. Conclusions The presented systematic analysis shows that the mRNA levels of many G protein-coupled receptors are interdependent. This finding is not unexpected, since the brain is a highly integrated complex system. However, the analysis also revealed two novel properties of global brain structure. First, receptor correlations are described by a simple statistical distribution, which suggests that receptor interactions may be guided by qualitatively similar processes. Second, receptors appear to form two large functional communities, which might be differentially affected in brain disorders. PMID:24438157

  18. A role for noncanonical microRNAs in the mammalian brain revealed by phenotypic differences in Dgcr8 versus Dicer1 knockouts and small RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Babiarz, Joshua E.; Hsu, Ruby; Melton, Collin; Thomas, Molly; Ullian, Erik M.; Blelloch, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Noncanonical microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs) are distinct subclasses of small RNAs that bypass the DGCR8/DROSHA Microprocessor but still require DICER1 for their biogenesis. What role, if any, they have in mammals remains unknown. To identify potential functional properties for these subclasses, we compared the phenotypes resulting from conditional deletion of Dgcr8 versus Dicer1 in post-mitotic neurons. The loss of Dicer1 resulted in an earlier lethality, more severe structural abnormalities, and increased apoptosis relative to that from Dgcr8 loss. Deep sequencing of small RNAs from the hippocampus and cortex of the conditional knockouts and control littermates identified multiple noncanonical microRNAs that were expressed at high levels in the brain relative to other tissues, including mirtrons and H/ACA snoRNA-derived small RNAs. In contrast, we found no evidence for endo-siRNAs in the brain. Taken together, our findings provide evidence for a diverse population of highly expressed noncanonical miRNAs that together are likely to play important functional roles in post-mitotic neurons. PMID:21712401

  19. Metabolomic Profiling of Post-Mortem Brain Reveals Changes in Amino Acid and Glucose Metabolism in Mental Illness Compared with Controls.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Tong; Ali, Ali Muhsen; Al Washih, Mohammed; Pickard, Benjamin; Watson, David G

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomic profiling was carried out on 53 post-mortem brain samples from subjects diagnosed with schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder (SDB), diabetes, and controls. Chromatography on a ZICpHILIC column was used with detection by Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Data extraction was carried out with m/z Mine 2.14 with metabolite searching against an in-house database. There was no clear discrimination between the controls and the SDB samples on the basis of a principal components analysis (PCA) model of 755 identified or putatively identified metabolites. Orthogonal partial least square discriminant analysis (OPLSDA) produced clear separation between 17 of the controls and 19 of the SDB samples (R2CUM 0.976, Q2 0.671, p-value of the cross-validated ANOVA score 0.0024). The most important metabolites producing discrimination were the lipophilic amino acids leucine/isoleucine, proline, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine; the neurotransmitters GABA and NAAG and sugar metabolites sorbitol, gluconic acid, xylitol, ribitol, arabinotol, and erythritol. Eight samples from diabetic brains were analysed, six of which grouped with the SDB samples without compromising the model (R2 CUM 0.850, Q2 CUM 0.534, p-value for cross-validated ANOVA score 0.00087). There appears on the basis of this small sample set to be some commonality between metabolic perturbations resulting from diabetes and from SDB. PMID:27076878

  20. Metabolomic Profiling of Post-Mortem Brain Reveals Changes in Amino Acid and Glucose Metabolism in Mental Illness Compared with Controls

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Tong; Ali, Ali Muhsen; Al Washih, Mohammed; Pickard, Benjamin; Watson, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomic profiling was carried out on 53 post-mortem brain samples from subjects diagnosed with schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder (SDB), diabetes, and controls. Chromatography on a ZICpHILIC column was used with detection by Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Data extraction was carried out with m/z Mine 2.14 with metabolite searching against an in-house database. There was no clear discrimination between the controls and the SDB samples on the basis of a principal components analysis (PCA) model of 755 identified or putatively identified metabolites. Orthogonal partial least square discriminant analysis (OPLSDA) produced clear separation between 17 of the controls and 19 of the SDB samples (R2CUM 0.976, Q2 0.671, p-value of the cross-validated ANOVA score 0.0024). The most important metabolites producing discrimination were the lipophilic amino acids leucine/isoleucine, proline, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine; the neurotransmitters GABA and NAAG and sugar metabolites sorbitol, gluconic acid, xylitol, ribitol, arabinotol, and erythritol. Eight samples from diabetic brains were analysed, six of which grouped with the SDB samples without compromising the model (R2 CUM 0.850, Q2 CUM 0.534, p-value for cross-validated ANOVA score 0.00087). There appears on the basis of this small sample set to be some commonality between metabolic perturbations resulting from diabetes and from SDB. PMID:27076878

  1. A comparative examination of neural circuit and brain patterning between the lamprey and amphioxus reveals the evolutionary origin of the vertebrate visual center.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daichi G; Murakami, Yasunori; Escriva, Hector; Wada, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    Vertebrates are equipped with so-called camera eyes, which provide them with image-forming vision. Vertebrate image-forming vision evolved independently from that of other animals and is regarded as a key innovation for enhancing predatory ability and ecological success. Evolutionary changes in the neural circuits, particularly the visual center, were central for the acquisition of image-forming vision. However, the evolutionary steps, from protochordates to jaw-less primitive vertebrates and then to jawed vertebrates, remain largely unknown. To bridge this gap, we present the detailed development of retinofugal projections in the lamprey, the neuroarchitecture in amphioxus, and the brain patterning in both animals. Both the lateral eye in larval lamprey and the frontal eye in amphioxus project to a light-detecting visual center in the caudal prosencephalic region marked by Pax6, which possibly represents the ancestral state of the chordate visual system. Our results indicate that the visual system of the larval lamprey represents an evolutionarily primitive state, forming a link from protochordates to vertebrates and providing a new perspective of brain evolution based on developmental mechanisms and neural functions. PMID:25233869

  2. Alterations of the intracellular water and ion concentrations in brain and liver cells during aging as revealed by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis of bulk specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Lustyik, G.; Nagy, I.

    1985-01-01

    Age dependence of the intracellular concentrations of monovalent ions (Na+, K+ and Cl-) was examined in 1, 11 and 25-month-old rat brain and liver cells by using energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The in vivo concentrations of Na+, K+ and Cl- ions were calculated from two different measurements: The elemental concentrations were measured in freeze-dried tissue pieces, and the intracellular water content was determined by means of a recently developed X-ray microanalytic method, using frozen-hydrated and fractured bulk specimens as well as subsequent freeze-drying. All the single monovalent ion concentrations and consequently, also the total monovalent ion content showed statistically significant increases during aging in brain cortical neurons. A 3-6% loss of the intracellular water content was accompanied by a 25-45% increase of the monovalent ionic strengths by the age of 25 months. A membrane protective OH radical scavenger (centrophenoxine) reversed the dehydration in the nerve cells of old animals, resulting in a decrease of the intracellular ion concentrations. Aging has a less prominent effect on the water and ion contents of the hepatocytes. The degree of water loss of cytoplasm exceeds that of the nuclei in the liver, suggesting that dominantly the translational steps can be involved in the general age altered slowing down of the protein synthetic machinery, predicted by the membrane hypothesis of aging.

  3. Gene expression profiling in brain of mice exposed to the marine neurotoxin ciguatoxin reveals an acute anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective response

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ciguatoxins (CTXs) are polyether marine neurotoxins and potent activators of voltage-gated sodium channels. This toxin is carried by multiple reef-fish species and human consumption of ciguatoxins can result in an explosive gastrointestinal/neurologic illness. This study characterizes the global transcriptional response in mouse brain to a symptomatic dose of the highly toxic Pacific ciguatoxin P-CTX-1 and additionally compares this data to transcriptional profiles from liver and whole blood examined previously. Adult male C57/BL6 mice were injected with 0.26 ng/g P-CTX-1 while controls received only vehicle. Animals were sacrificed at 1, 4 and 24 hrs and transcriptional profiling was performed on brain RNA with Agilent whole genome microarrays. RT-PCR was used to independently validate gene expression and the web tool DAVID was used to analyze gene ontology (GO) and molecular pathway enrichment of the gene expression data. Results A pronounced 4°C hypothermic response was recorded in these mice, reaching a minimum at 1 hr and lasting for 8 hrs post toxin exposure. Ratio expression data were filtered by intensity, fold change and p-value, with the resulting data used for time course analysis, K-means clustering, ontology classification and KEGG pathway enrichment. Top GO hits for this gene set included acute phase response and mono-oxygenase activity. Molecular pathway analysis showed enrichment for complement/coagulation cascades and metabolism of xenobiotics. Many immediate early genes such as Fos, Jun and Early Growth Response isoforms were down-regulated although others associated with stress such as glucocorticoid responsive genes were up-regulated. Real time PCR confirmation was performed on 22 differentially expressed genes with a correlation of 0.9 (Spearman's Rho, p < 0.0001) with microarray results. Conclusions Many of the genes differentially expressed in this study, in parallel with the hypothermia, figure prominently in protection against

  4. 3 CFR - Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Presidential Determination No. 2012-12 of July 12, 2012..., Washington, July 12, 2012....

  5. Autosomal recessive sudden unexpected death in children probably caused by a cardiomyopathy associated with myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Fried, K; Beer, S; Vure, E; Algom, M; Shapira, Y

    1979-01-01

    The propositus, who died suddenly at the age of 22 months, was investigated because of an unusual myopathy. Family history revealed two sisters and four cousins who had also died suddenly and unexpectedly. The finding of asymmetric septal hypertrophy by echocardiography in the propositus suggested that the cause of the sudden death in the relatives was an undetected cardiomyopathy accompanying a mild and often subclinical myopathy. The affected children were in two sibships and both sets of parents were first cousins. The mother of one sibship was the sister of the father of the other. It is suggested that a gene causes a mild autosomal recessive myopathy with cardiomyopathy that is often undiagnosed and usually ends in sudden unexpected death in the second year of life. The same gene may manifest on echocardiogram in some heterozygotes as asymmetric septal hypertrophy. Images PMID:513079

  6. Rescue of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (Por) mouse mutants reveals functions in vasculogenesis, brain and limb patterning linked to retinoic acid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ribes, Vanessa; Otto, Diana M E; Dickmann, Leslie; Schmidt, Katy; Schuhbaur, Brigitte; Henderson, Colin; Blomhoff, Rune; Wolf, C Roland; Tickle, Cheryll; Dollé, Pascal

    2007-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) acts as an electron donor for all cytochrome P450 enzymes. Knockout mouse Por(-/-) mutants, which are early embryonic (E9.5) lethal, have been found to have overall elevated retinoic acid (RA) levels, leading to the idea that POR early developmental function is mainly linked to the activity of the CYP26 RA-metabolizing enzymes (Otto et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 23, 6103-6116). By crossing Por mutants with a RA-reporter lacZ transgene, we show that Por(-/-) embryos exhibit both elevated and ectopic RA signaling activity e.g. in cephalic and caudal tissues. Two strategies were used to functionally demonstrate that decreasing retinoid levels can reverse Por(-/-) phenotypic defects, (i) by culturing Por(-/-) embryos in defined serum-free medium, and (ii) by generating compound mutants defective in RA synthesis due to haploinsufficiency of the retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (Raldh2) gene. Both approaches clearly improved the Por(-/-) early phenotype, the latter allowing mutants to be recovered up until E13.5. Abnormal brain patterning, with posteriorization of hindbrain cell fates and defective mid- and forebrain development and vascular defects were rescued in E9.5 Por(-/-) embryos. E13.5 Por(-/-); Raldh2(+/-) embryos exhibited abdominal/caudal and limb defects that strikingly phenocopy those of Cyp26a1(-/-) and Cyp26b1(-/-) mutants, respectively. Por(-/-); Raldh2(+/-) limb buds were truncated and proximalized and the anterior-posterior patterning system was not established. Thus, POR function is indispensable for the proper regulation of RA levels and tissue distribution not only during early embryonic development but also in later morphogenesis and molecular patterning of the brain, abdominal/caudal region and limbs. PMID:17126317

  7. Brain is the predilection site of Toxoplasma gondii in experimentally inoculated pigs as revealed by magnetic capture and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Juránková, Jana; Basso, Walter; Neumayerová, Helena; Baláž, Vojtech; Jánová, Eva; Sidler, Xaver; Deplazes, Peter; Koudela, Břetislav

    2014-04-01

    Pigs represent an important source of food in many countries, and undercooked pork containing tissue cysts is one of the most common sources of Toxoplasma gondii infection for humans. A magnetic capture method for the isolation of T. gondii DNA and quantitative real-time PCR targeting the 529 bp TOXO repeat element were used to estimate the parasite burden in different tissues of pigs experimentally infected with T. gondii oocysts, and to determine the predilection sites of T. gondii in this host species. The highest concentration of T. gondii DNA was found in brain tissues, equivalent to [median] 553.7 (range 3857.7-121.9) parasites per gram, followed by lungs, heart and dorsal muscles with median values corresponding to 0.3 (range 61.3-0.02); 2.6 (range 7.34-0.37) and 0.6 (range 2.81-0.31) parasites per gram of tissue, respectively. Skeletal muscles from fore and hindlimb, liver and kidney presented very low infection burdens equivalent to [median] ≤0.2 parasites per gram of tissues, and no parasite DNA could be detected in the spleen. This study contributes to understanding the value of different pig tissues as a source of T. gondii infection for humans and shows that the brain, while not being of major importance as human food source, may represent a first-line selection tissue when performing non-serological surveys (e.g. bioassays, histopathological, immunohistochemical or molecular studies) to detect T. gondii infections in pigs. PMID:24290640

  8. Newborn brain event-related potentials revealing atypical processing of sound frequency and the subsequent association with later literacy skills in children with familial dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, Paavo H T; Hämäläinen, Jarmo A; Salminen, Hanne K; Eklund, Kenneth M; Guttorm, Tomi K; Lohvansuu, Kaisa; Puolakanaho, Anne; Lyytinen, Heikki

    2010-01-01

    The role played by an auditory-processing deficit in dyslexia has been debated for several decades. In a longitudinal study using brain event-related potentials (ERPs) we investigated 1) whether dyslexic children with familial risk background would show atypical pitch processing from birth and 2) how these newborn ERPs later relate to these same children's pre-reading cognitive skills and literacy outcomes. Auditory ERPs were measured at birth for tones varying in pitch and presented in an oddball paradigm (1100 Hz, 12%, and 1000 Hz, 88%). The brain responses of the typically reading control group children (TRC group, N=25) showed clear differentiation between the frequencies, while those of the group of reading disability with familial risk (RDFR, 8 children) and the group of typical readers with familial risk (TRFR, 14 children) did not differentiate between the tones. The ERPs of the latter two groups differed from those of the TRC group. However, the two risk groups also showed a differential hemispheric ERP pattern. Furthermore, newborn ERPs reflecting passive change detection were associated with phonological skills and letter knowledge prior to school age and with phoneme duration perception, reading speed (RS) and spelling accuracy in the 2nd grade of school. The early obligatory response was associated with more general pre-school language skills, as well as with RS and reading accuracy (RA). Results suggest that a proportion of dyslexic readers with familial risk background are affected by atypical auditory processing. This is already present at birth and also relates to pre-reading phonological processing and speech perception. These early differences in auditory processing could later affect phonological representations and reading development. However, atypical auditory processing is unlikely to suffice as a sole explanation for dyslexia but rather as one risk factor, dependent on the genetic profile of the child. PMID:20656284

  9. Loss of function mutation of the Slc38a3 glutamine transporter reveals its critical role for amino acid metabolism in the liver, brain, and kidney.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kessara; Busque, Stephanie M; Sailer, Manuela; Stoeger, Claudia; Bröer, Stefan; Daniel, Hannelore; Rubio-Aliaga, Isabel; Wagner, Carsten A

    2016-02-01

    Glutamine, the most abundant amino acid in mammals, is critical for cell and organ functions. Its metabolism depends on the ability of cells to take up or release glutamine by transporters located in the plasma membrane. Several solute carrier (SLC) families transport glutamine, but the SLC38 family has been thought to be mostly responsible for glutamine transport. We demonstrate that despite the large number of glutamine transporters, the loss of Snat3/Slc38a3 glutamine transporter has a major impact on the function of organs expressing it. Snat3 mutant mice were generated by N-ethyl-N-nitrosurea (ENU) mutagenesis and showed stunted growth, altered amino acid levels, hypoglycemia, and died around 20 days after birth. Hepatic concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, leucine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan were highly reduced paralleled by downregulation of the mTOR pathway possibly linking reduced amino acid availability to impaired growth and glucose homeostasis. Snat3-deficient mice had altered urea levels paralleled by dysregulation of the urea cycle, gluconeogenesis, and glutamine synthesis. Mice were ataxic with higher glutamine but reduced glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in brain consistent with a major role of Snat3 in the glutamine-glutamate cycle. Renal ammonium excretion was lower, and the expression of enzymes and amino acid transporters involved in ammoniagenesis were altered. Thus, SNAT3 is a glutamine transporter required for amino acid homeostasis and determines critical functions in various organs. Despite the large number of glutamine transporters, loss of Snat3 cannot be compensated, suggesting that this transporter is a major route of glutamine transport in the liver, brain, and kidney. PMID:26490457

  10. Maturation processes in automatic change detection as revealed by event-related brain potentials and dipole source localization: significance for adult AD/HD.

    PubMed

    Wild-Wall, Nele; Oades, Robert D; Juran, Stephanie A

    2005-10-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is an event-related potential reflecting automatic attention-related information processing marking the detection of auditory change. The bilateral scalp distribution develops by 14 years of age, and is elicited with adult latencies by 17 years. But consistent with reports of continued brain maturation after adolescence, we show here that features of the temporal and frontal lobe dipole sources also continue to develop in the third decade of life. This has consequences for studies of the developmental course of MMN anomalies, from childhood into adulthood, in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Two groups of healthy subjects with mean ages of 17 and 30 years were presented with a 3-tone auditory oddball. The duration-deviant MMN was recorded during attention to a visual discrimination (auditory-passive condition) and an active auditory discrimination. MMN amplitudes were smaller in the older subjects and the MMN lasted longer over the right hemisphere. Latencies and moments of the four dipoles in the temporal and frontal lobes did not distinguish the two subject-groups. But both temporal lobe sources were located significantly more ventrally and further left in the young adult than in the adolescent subjects. The left cingular source moved posteriorly and the right inferior frontal source moved antero-medially in the older subjects. Brain development in the third decade may cause the two frontal sources to move apart on the rostro-caudal axis but the temporal lobe sources to move left on the lateral and down on the dorsoventral axes. Thus special care is necessary in interpreting putative dysfunctional neurobiological changes in developmental attention-deficit disorders where as-yet-unspecified sub-groups may show a late developmental lag, partial lag, or no lag at all, associated with other impairments. PMID:15922470

  11. Epigenome-wide DNA methylation landscape of melanoma progression to brain metastasis reveals aberrations on homeobox D cluster associated with prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Marzese, Diego M.; Scolyer, Richard A.; Huynh, Jamie L.; Huang, Sharon K.; Hirose, Hajime; Chong, Kelly K.; Kiyohara, Eiji; Wang, Jinhua; Kawas, Neal P.; Donovan, Nicholas C.; Hata, Keisuke; Wilmott, James S.; Murali, Rajmohan; Buckland, Michael E.; Shivalingam, Brindha; Thompson, John F.; Morton, Donald L.; Kelly, Daniel F.; Hoon, Dave S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma brain metastasis (MBM) represents a frequent complication of cutaneous melanoma. Despite aggressive multi-modality therapy, patients with MBM often have a survival rate of <1 year. Alteration in DNA methylation is a major hallmark of tumor progression and metastasis; however, it remains largely unexplored in MBM. In this study, we generated a comprehensive DNA methylation landscape through the use of genome-wide copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression data integrative analysis of melanoma progression to MBM. A progressive genome-wide demethylation in low CpG density and an increase in methylation level of CpG islands according to melanoma progression were observed. MBM-specific partially methylated domains (PMDs) affecting key brain developmental processes were identified. Differentially methylated CpG sites between MBM and lymph node metastasis (LNM) from patients with good prognosis were identified. Among the most significantly affected genes were the HOX family members. DNA methylation of HOXD9 gene promoter affected transcript and protein expression and was significantly higher in MBM than that in early stages. A MBM-specific PMD was identified in this region. Low methylation level of this region was associated with active HOXD9 expression, open chromatin and histone modifications associated with active transcription. Demethylating agent induced HOXD9 expression in melanoma cell lines. The clinical relevance of this finding was verified in an independent large cohort of melanomas (n = 145). Patients with HOXD9 hypermethylation in LNM had poorer disease-free and overall survival. This epigenome-wide study identified novel methylated genes with functional and clinical implications for MBM patients. PMID:24014427

  12. Brain Science, Brain Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruer, John T.

    1998-01-01

    Three big ideas from brain science have arisen during the past 20 to 30 years: neural connections form rapidly early in life; critical periods occur in development; and enriched environments profoundly affect brain development during the early years. Current brain research has little to offer educational practice or policy. (10 references) (MLH)

  13. Brains studying brains: look before you think in vision.

    PubMed

    Zhaoping, Li

    2016-01-01

    Using our own brains to study our brains is extraordinary. For example, in vision this makes us naturally blind to our own blindness, since our impression of seeing our world clearly is consistent with our ignorance of what we do not see. Our brain employs its 'conscious' part to reason and make logical deductions using familiar rules and past experience. However, human vision employs many 'subconscious' brain parts that follow rules alien to our intuition. Our blindness to our unknown unknowns and our presumptive intuitions easily lead us astray in asking and formulating theoretical questions, as witnessed in many unexpected and counter-intuitive difficulties and failures encountered by generations of scientists. We should therefore pay a more than usual amount of attention and respect to experimental data when studying our brain. I show that this can be productive by reviewing two vision theories that have provided testable predictions and surprising insights. PMID:27172243

  14. Brains studying brains: look before you think in vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhaoping, Li

    2016-06-01

    Using our own brains to study our brains is extraordinary. For example, in vision this makes us naturally blind to our own blindness, since our impression of seeing our world clearly is consistent with our ignorance of what we do not see. Our brain employs its ‘conscious’ part to reason and make logical deductions using familiar rules and past experience. However, human vision employs many ‘subconscious’ brain parts that follow rules alien to our intuition. Our blindness to our unknown unknowns and our presumptive intuitions easily lead us astray in asking and formulating theoretical questions, as witnessed in many unexpected and counter-intuitive difficulties and failures encountered by generations of scientists. We should therefore pay a more than usual amount of attention and respect to experimental data when studying our brain. I show that this can be productive by reviewing two vision theories that have provided testable predictions and surprising insights.

  15. The Unexpected Past of a Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-08-01

    New Light on Cannibalism in the Local Group of Galaxies The Local Group of Galaxies consists of a few large spiral galaxies - for instance the Milky Way galaxy in which we live, and the Andromeda galaxy that is visible to the unaided eye in the northern constellation of the same name - as well as two dozen much smaller galaxies of mostly irregular shape. Whereas the larger galaxies have extended halos of very old stars, no such halos have ever been seen around the smaller ones. Now, however, Dante Minniti and Albert Zijlstra [1], working at the ESO 3.5-metre New Technology Telescope (NTT), have found a large halo of old and metal-poor stars around one of the dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. This finding is quite unexpected. It revises our understanding of star formation in these galaxies and provides important information about the past evolution of galaxies [2]. Galaxy halos The Milky Way galaxy is surrounded by a large, roughly spherical halo of old stars. The diameter is about 100,000 light years and the stars therein, known as Population II stars, are among the oldest known, with ages of 10 billion years or even more. They also differ from the younger stars nearer to the main plane of the Milky Way (in which our 4.7 billion year old Sun is located) by being very metal-poor. Many of the halo stars consist almost solely of hydrogen and helium, reflecting the composition of matter in the young Universe. This halo is important for our understanding of the processes that led to the formation of the Milky Way galaxy. It is believed that many of the halo stars and those of the same type found in globular clusters existed already before the Milky Way had fully formed. Galaxy cannibalism Many astronomers suspect that galaxies evolve and gradually grow larger and heavier by practising cannibalism on their own kind. In this picture, when two galaxies collide in space, the stars and nebulae in the smaller one will disperse and soon be taken over by the larger one, which

  16. Vigilance Task-Related Change in Brain Functional Connectivity as Revealed by Wavelet Phase Coherence Analysis of Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Signals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Bitian; Bu, Lingguo; Xu, Liwei; Li, Zengyong; Fan, Yubo

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess the vigilance task-related change in connectivity in healthy adults using wavelet phase coherence (WPCO) analysis of near-infrared spectroscopy signals (NIRS). NIRS is a non-invasive neuroimaging technique for assessing brain activity. Continuous recordings of the NIRS signals were obtained from the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and sensorimotor cortical areas of 20 young healthy adults (24.9 ± 3.3 years) during a 10-min resting state and a 20-min vigilance task state. The vigilance task was used to simulate driving mental load by judging three random numbers (i.e., whether odd numbers). The task was divided into two sessions: the first 10 min (Task t1) and the second 10 min (Task t2). The WPCO of six channel pairs were calculated in five frequency intervals: 0.6-2 Hz (I), 0.145-0.6 Hz (II), 0.052-0.145 Hz (III), 0.021-0.052 Hz (IV), and 0.0095-0.021 Hz (V). The significant WPCO formed global connectivity (GC) maps in intervals I and II and functional connectivity (FC) maps in intervals III to V. Results show that the GC levels in interval I and FC levels in interval III were significantly lower in the Task t2 than in the resting state (p < 0.05), particularly between the left PFC and bilateral sensorimotor regions. Also, the reaction time (RT) shows an increase in Task t2 compared with that in Task t1. However, no significant difference in WPCO was found between Task t1 and resting state. The results showed that the change in FC at the range of 0.6-2 Hz was not attributed to the vigilance task per se, but the interaction effect of vigilance task and time factors. The findings suggest that the decreased attention level might be partly attributed to the reduced GC levels between the left prefrontal region and sensorimotor area. The present results provide a new insight into the vigilance task-related brain activity. PMID:27547182

  17. Vigilance Task-Related Change in Brain Functional Connectivity as Revealed by Wavelet Phase Coherence Analysis of Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Bitian; Bu, Lingguo; Xu, Liwei; Li, Zengyong; Fan, Yubo

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess the vigilance task-related change in connectivity in healthy adults using wavelet phase coherence (WPCO) analysis of near-infrared spectroscopy signals (NIRS). NIRS is a non-invasive neuroimaging technique for assessing brain activity. Continuous recordings of the NIRS signals were obtained from the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and sensorimotor cortical areas of 20 young healthy adults (24.9 ± 3.3 years) during a 10-min resting state and a 20-min vigilance task state. The vigilance task was used to simulate driving mental load by judging three random numbers (i.e., whether odd numbers). The task was divided into two sessions: the first 10 min (Task t1) and the second 10 min (Task t2). The WPCO of six channel pairs were calculated in five frequency intervals: 0.6–2 Hz (I), 0.145–0.6 Hz (II), 0.052–0.145 Hz (III), 0.021–0.052 Hz (IV), and 0.0095–0.021 Hz (V). The significant WPCO formed global connectivity (GC) maps in intervals I and II and functional connectivity (FC) maps in intervals III to V. Results show that the GC levels in interval I and FC levels in interval III were significantly lower in the Task t2 than in the resting state (p < 0.05), particularly between the left PFC and bilateral sensorimotor regions. Also, the reaction time (RT) shows an increase in Task t2 compared with that in Task t1. However, no significant difference in WPCO was found between Task t1 and resting state. The results showed that the change in FC at the range of 0.6–2 Hz was not attributed to the vigilance task per se, but the interaction effect of vigilance task and time factors. The findings suggest that the decreased attention level might be partly attributed to the reduced GC levels between the left prefrontal region and sensorimotor area. The present results provide a new insight into the vigilance task-related brain activity. PMID:27547182

  18. On the Independent Origins of Complex Brains and Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Moroz, Leonid L.

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of the origin and evolution of neurons is crucial for revealing principles of organization of neural circuits with unexpected implications for genomic sciences, biomedical applications and regenerative medicine. This article presents an overview of some controversial ideas about the origin and evolution of neurons and nervous systems, focusing on the independent origin of complex brains and possible independent origins of neurons. First, earlier hypotheses related to the origin of neurons are summarized. Second, the diversity of nervous systems and convergent evolution of complex brains in relation to current views about animal phylogeny is discussed. Third, the lineages of molluscs and basal metazoans are used as illustrated examples of multiple origins of complex brains and neurons. Finally, a hypothesis about the independent origin of complex brains, centralized nervous systems and neurons is outlined. Injury-associated mechanisms leading to secretion of signal peptides (and related molecules) can be considered as evolutionary predecessors of inter-neuronal signaling and the major factors in the appearance of neurons in the first place. PMID:20029182

  19. Genetic Labeling Reveals Novel Cellular Targets of Schizophrenia Susceptibility Gene: Distribution of GABA and Non-GABA ErbB4-Positive Cells in Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Jonathan C.; Lin, Thiri W.; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Liu, Fang; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Wen-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) and its receptor ErbB4 are schizophrenia risk genes. NRG1-ErbB4 signaling plays a critical role in neural development and regulates neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Nevertheless, its cellular targets remain controversial. ErbB4 was thought to express in excitatory neurons, although recent studies disputed this view. Using mice that express a fluorescent protein under the promoter of the ErbB4 gene, we determined in what cells ErbB4 is expressed and their identity. ErbB4 was widely expressed in the mouse brain, being highest in amygdala and cortex. Almost all ErbB4-positive cells were GABAergic in cortex, hippocampus, basal ganglia, and most of amygdala in neonatal and adult mice, suggesting GABAergic transmission as a major target of NRG1-ErbB4 signaling in these regions. Non-GABAergic, ErbB4-positive cells were present in thalamus, hypothalamus, midbrain, and hindbrain. In particular, ErbB4 is expressed in serotoninergic neurons of raphe nuclei but not in norepinephrinergic neurons of the locus ceruleus. In hypothalamus, ErbB4 is present in neurons that express oxytocin. Finally, ErbB4 is expressed in a group of cells in the subcortical areas that are positive for S100 calcium binding protein β. These results identify novel cellular targets of NRG1-ErbB4 signaling. PMID:25274830

  20. An unexpectedly progressed lumbar herniated disk.

    PubMed

    Lipton, James A; McLeod, Geoffrey A

    2013-12-01

    The authors describe a case of a 26-year-old female military veteran who presented with low back pain that she attributed to a recent foot injury. The patient reported a history of lumbar pain while in the military that had been treated successfully with high-velocity, low-amplitude osteopathic manipulative treatment. The patient's current pain was improved with osteopathic manipulative treatment and gait correction. Several weeks after her initial presentation, the patient reported that she had had a herniated disk diagnosed 2 years earlier by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Updated magnetic resonance imaging was performed, the results of which revealed a large herniated disk that had caused severe stenosis. The patient was immediately referred to a neurosurgeon for consultation and subsequently underwent surgical treatment. PMID:24285036

  1. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals Protein–Protein Interactions with Fibroblast Growth Factor 12 as a Component of the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel 1.2 (Nav1.2) Macromolecular Complex in Mammalian Brain*

    PubMed Central

    Wildburger, Norelle C.; Ali, Syed R.; Hsu, Wei-Chun J.; Shavkunov, Alexander S.; Nenov, Miroslav N.; Lichti, Cheryl F.; LeDuc, Richard D.; Mostovenko, Ekaterina; Panova-Elektronova, Neli I.; Emmett, Mark R.; Nilsson, Carol L.; Laezza, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav1.1–Nav1.9) are responsible for the initiation and propagation of action potentials in neurons, controlling firing patterns, synaptic transmission and plasticity of the brain circuit. Yet, it is the protein–protein interactions of the macromolecular complex that exert diverse modulatory actions on the channel, dictating its ultimate functional outcome. Despite the fundamental role of Nav channels in the brain, information on its proteome is still lacking. Here we used affinity purification from crude membrane extracts of whole brain followed by quantitative high-resolution mass spectrometry to resolve the identity of Nav1.2 protein interactors. Of the identified putative protein interactors, fibroblast growth factor 12 (FGF12), a member of the nonsecreted intracellular FGF family, exhibited 30-fold enrichment in Nav1.2 purifications compared with other identified proteins. Using confocal microscopy, we visualized native FGF12 in the brain tissue and confirmed that FGF12 forms a complex with Nav1.2 channels at the axonal initial segment, the subcellular specialized domain of neurons required for action potential initiation. Co-immunoprecipitation studies in a heterologous expression system validate Nav1.2 and FGF12 as interactors, whereas patch-clamp electrophysiology reveals that FGF12 acts synergistically with CaMKII, a known kinase regulator of Nav channels, to modulate Nav1.2-encoded currents. In the presence of CaMKII inhibitors we found that FGF12 produces a bidirectional shift in the voltage-dependence of activation (more depolarized) and the steady-state inactivation (more hyperpolarized) of Nav1.2, increasing the channel availability. Although providing the first characterization of the Nav1.2 CNS proteome, we identify FGF12 as a new functionally relevant interactor. Our studies will provide invaluable information to parse out the molecular determinant underlying neuronal excitability and plasticity, and extending the

  2. Flow cytometry analysis of synaptosomes from post-mortem human brain reveals changes specific to Lewy Body and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Postupna, Nadia O.; Keene, C. Dirk; Latimer, Caitlin; Sherfield, Emily E.; Van Gelder, Rachel D.; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Montine, Thomas J.; Darvas, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction is thought to play an important role in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Lewy body disease (LBD). To improve our understanding of synaptic alterations in health and disease, we investigated synaptosomes prepared from post-mortem human cerebral cortex, putamen, and two regions of the caudate nucleus, dorso-lateral (DL) and ventro-medial (VM), regions commonly affected in AD and LBD. We observed that the fraction of synaptosomal particles with reactivity for dopamine transporter (DAT) was significantly reduced in the putamen and VM caudate of patients with neuropathological diagnosis of LBD. As expected, these differences also were reflected in direct measurements of dopamine (DA) and its metabolite, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), in caudate and putamen of LBD patients. The fraction of synaptosomal particles positive for amyloid β (Aβ) was significantly increased in frontal cortical samples of patients with the neuropathological diagnosis of severe AD, and was positively correlated with disease progression. We also prepared synaptosomes from the striatum of mice with severe loss of DA neurons (Slc6a3-DTR mice) and wild-type littermate controls. We observed dramatically reduced levels of DAT-positive synaptosomes in Slc6a3-DTR mice following exposure to diphtheria toxin (DT). Striatal levels of DA and DOPAC in Slc6a3-DTR mice also were reduced significantly following DT exposure. We conclude that flow cytometric analysis of synaptosomes prepared from human or mouse brain provides an opportunity to study expression of pathology-associated proteins and also the specific loss of dopaminergic nerve terminals. Hence, we believe it is a valid method to detect pathological changes at the level of the synapse in LBD as well as AD. PMID:25068655

  3. Reading the dyslexic brain: multiple dysfunctional routes revealed by a new meta-analysis of PET and fMRI activation studies

    PubMed Central

    Paulesu, Eraldo; Danelli, Laura; Berlingeri, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia has been the focus of much functional anatomical research. The main trust of this work is that typical developmental dyslexics have a dysfunction of the phonological and orthography to phonology conversion systems, in which the left occipito-temporal cortex has a crucial role. It remains to be seen whether there is a systematic co-occurrence of dysfunctional patterns of different functional systems perhaps converging on the same brain regions associated with the reading deficit. Such evidence would be relevant for theories like, for example, the magnocellular/attentional or the motor/cerebellar ones, which postulate a more basic and anatomically distributed disorder in dyslexia. We addressed this issue with a meta-analysis of all the imaging literature published until September 2013 using a combination of hierarchical clustering and activation likelihood estimation methods. The clustering analysis on 2360 peaks identified 193 clusters, 92 of which proved spatially significant. Following binomial tests on the clusters, we found left hemispheric network specific for normal controls (i.e., of reduced involvement in dyslexics) including the left inferior frontal, premotor, supramarginal cortices and the left infero-temporal and fusiform regions: these were preferentially associated with reading and the visual-to-phonology processes. There was also a more dorsal left fronto-parietal network: these clusters included peaks from tasks involving phonological manipulation, but also motoric or visuo-spatial perception/attention. No cluster was identified in area V5 for no task, nor cerebellar clusters showed a reduced association with dyslexics. We conclude that the examined literature demonstrates a specific lack of activation of the left occipito-temporal cortex in dyslexia particularly for reading and reading-like behaviors and for visuo-phonological tasks. Additional deficits of motor and attentional systems relevant for reading may be associated

  4. Heterogeneous intracellular trafficking dynamics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor complexes in the neuronal soma revealed by single quantum dot tracking.

    PubMed

    Vermehren-Schmaedick, Anke; Krueger, Wesley; Jacob, Thomas; Ramunno-Johnson, Damien; Balkowiec, Agnieszka; Lidke, Keith A; Vu, Tania Q

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence underscores the importance of ligand-receptor dynamics in shaping cellular signaling. In the nervous system, growth factor-activated Trk receptor trafficking serves to convey biochemical signaling that underlies fundamental neural functions. Focus has been placed on axonal trafficking but little is known about growth factor-activated Trk dynamics in the neuronal soma, particularly at the molecular scale, due in large part to technical hurdles in observing individual growth factor-Trk complexes for long periods of time inside live cells. Quantum dots (QDs) are intensely fluorescent nanoparticles that have been used to study the dynamics of ligand-receptor complexes at the plasma membrane but the value of QDs for investigating ligand-receptor intracellular dynamics has not been well exploited. The current study establishes that QD conjugated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (QD-BDNF) binds to TrkB receptors with high specificity, activates TrkB downstream signaling, and allows single QD tracking capability for long recording durations deep within the soma of live neurons. QD-BDNF complexes undergo internalization, recycling, and intracellular trafficking in the neuronal soma. These trafficking events exhibit little time-synchrony and diverse heterogeneity in underlying dynamics that include phases of sustained rapid motor transport without pause as well as immobility of surprisingly long-lasting duration (several minutes). Moreover, the trajectories formed by dynamic individual BDNF complexes show no apparent end destination; BDNF complexes can be found meandering over long distances of several microns throughout the expanse of the neuronal soma in a circuitous fashion. The complex, heterogeneous nature of neuronal soma trafficking dynamics contrasts the reported linear nature of axonal transport data and calls for models that surpass our generally limited notions of nuclear-directed transport in the soma. QD-ligand probes are poised to provide

  5. Heterogeneous Intracellular Trafficking Dynamics of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Complexes in the Neuronal Soma Revealed by Single Quantum Dot Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Vermehren-Schmaedick, Anke; Krueger, Wesley; Jacob, Thomas; Ramunno-Johnson, Damien; Balkowiec, Agnieszka; Lidke, Keith A.; Vu, Tania Q.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence underscores the importance of ligand-receptor dynamics in shaping cellular signaling. In the nervous system, growth factor-activated Trk receptor trafficking serves to convey biochemical signaling that underlies fundamental neural functions. Focus has been placed on axonal trafficking but little is known about growth factor-activated Trk dynamics in the neuronal soma, particularly at the molecular scale, due in large part to technical hurdles in observing individual growth factor-Trk complexes for long periods of time inside live cells. Quantum dots (QDs) are intensely fluorescent nanoparticles that have been used to study the dynamics of ligand-receptor complexes at the plasma membrane but the value of QDs for investigating ligand-receptor intracellular dynamics has not been well exploited. The current study establishes that QD conjugated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (QD-BDNF) binds to TrkB receptors with high specificity, activates TrkB downstream signaling, and allows single QD tracking capability for long recording durations deep within the soma of live neurons. QD-BDNF complexes undergo internalization, recycling, and intracellular trafficking in the neuronal soma. These trafficking events exhibit little time-synchrony and diverse heterogeneity in underlying dynamics that include phases of sustained rapid motor transport without pause as well as immobility of surprisingly long-lasting duration (several minutes). Moreover, the trajectories formed by dynamic individual BDNF complexes show no apparent end destination; BDNF complexes can be found meandering over long distances of several microns throughout the expanse of the neuronal soma in a circuitous fashion. The complex, heterogeneous nature of neuronal soma trafficking dynamics contrasts the reported linear nature of axonal transport data and calls for models that surpass our generally limited notions of nuclear-directed transport in the soma. QD-ligand probes are poised to provide

  6. Modeling of region-specific fMRI BOLD neurovascular response functions in rat brain reveals residual differences that correlate with the differences in regional evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Pawela, Christopher P; Hudetz, Anthony G; Ward, B Douglas; Schulte, Marie L; Li, Rupeng; Kao, Dennis S; Mauck, Matthew C; Cho, Younghoon R; Neitz, Jay; Hyde, James S

    2008-06-01

    The response of the rat visual system to flashes of blue light has been studied by blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The BOLD temporal response is dependent on the number of flashes presented and demonstrates a refractory period that depends on flash frequency. Activated brain regions included the primary and secondary visual cortex, superior colliculus (SC), dorsal lateral geniculate (DLG), and lateral posterior nucleus (LP), which were found to exhibit differing temporal responses. To explain these differences, the BOLD neurovascular response function was modeled. A second-order differential equation was developed and solved numerically to arrive at region-specific response functions. Included in the model are the light input from the diode (duty cycle), a refractory period, a transient response following onset and cessation of stimulus, and a slow adjustment to changes in the average level of the signal. Constants in the differential equation were evaluated for each region by fitting the model to the experimental BOLD response from a single flash, and the equation was then solved for multiple flashes. The simulation mimics the major features of the data; however, remaining differences in the frequency dependence of the response between the cortical and subcortical regions were unexplained. We hypothesized that these discrepancies were due to regional-specific differences in neuronal response to flash frequency. To test this hypothesis, cortical visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded using the same stimulation protocol as the fMRI. Cortical VEPs were more suppressed than subcortical VEPs as flash frequency increased, supporting our hypothesis. This is the first report that regional differences in neuronal activation to the same stimulus lead to differential BOLD activation. PMID:18406628

  7. Brain herniation

    MedlinePlus

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  8. The thermal properties of beeswaxes: unexpected findings.

    PubMed

    Buchwald, Robert; Breed, Michael D; Greenberg, Alan R

    2008-01-01

    Standard melting point analyses only partially describe the thermal properties of eusocial beeswaxes. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) revealed that thermal phase changes in wax are initiated at substantially lower temperatures than visually observed melting points. Instead of a sharp, single endothermic peak at the published melting point of 64 degrees C, DSC analysis of Apis mellifera Linnaeus wax yielded a broad melting curve that showed the initiation of melting at approximately 40 degrees C. Although Apis beeswax retained a solid appearance at these temperatures, heat absorption and initiation of melting could affect the structural characteristics of the wax. Additionally, a more complete characterization of the thermal properties indicated that the onset of melting, melting range and heat of fusion of beeswaxes varied significantly among tribes of social bees (Bombini, Meliponini, Apini). Compared with other waxes examined, the relatively malleable wax of bumblebees (Bombini) had the lowest onset of melting and lowest heat of fusion but an intermediate melting temperature range. Stingless bee (Meliponini) wax was intermediate between bumblebee and honeybee wax (Apini) in heat of fusion, but had the highest onset of melting and the narrowest melting temperature range. The broad melting temperature range and high heat of fusion in the Apini may be associated with the use of wax comb as a free-hanging structural material, while the Bombini and Meliponini support their wax structures with exogenous materials. PMID:18083740

  9. Unexpected ricochet of spheres off water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlien, D. J.

    1994-08-01

    A sphere was observed to apparently ricochet off the free surface of water at incident angles as large as 45° while the expected (empirical/analytical) maximum angle to the horizontal for ricochet was 6°. Closer examination of the process revealed that the cavitating sphere penetrated the liquid to depths as great as 35 sphere diameters. Under certain circumstances the sphere was also observed to leave the liquid in a direction close to the incoming direction; that is, the sphere ricocheted backwards! This peculiar behavior was found to be a result of an unintentional spin applied to the sphere upon launching. By crudely modelling the process, the sphere path is qualitatively predicted. It was found that the drag and lift coefficients required to model the trajectory data were several times smaller than those obtained for the non-cavitating case or for the non-spinning case. If more precise sphere trajectory data were available, this experiment could be used to measure the lift and drag coefficients of a spinning and cavitating sphere.

  10. An unexpected twist in viral capsid maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsman, Ilya; Gan, Lu; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Duda, Robert L.; Hendrix, Roger W.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, John E.

    2009-04-14

    Lambda-like double-stranded (ds) DNA bacteriophage undergo massive conformational changes in their capsid shell during the packaging of their viral genomes. Capsid shells are complex organizations of hundreds of protein subunits that assemble into intricate quaternary complexes that ultimately are able to withstand over 50 atm of pressure during genome packaging. The extensive integration between subunits in capsids requires the formation of an intermediate complex, termed a procapsid, from which individual subunits can undergo the necessary refolding and structural rearrangements needed to transition to the more stable capsid. Although various mature capsids have been characterized at atomic resolution, no such procapsid structure is available for a dsDNA virus or bacteriophage. Here we present a procapsid X-ray structure at 3.65 {angstrom} resolution, termed prohead II, of the lambda-like bacteriophage HK97, the mature capsid structure of which was previously solved to 3.44 {angstrom}. A comparison of the two largely different capsid forms has unveiled an unprecedented expansion mechanism that describes the transition. Crystallographic and hydrogen/deuterium exchange data presented here demonstrate that the subunit tertiary structures are significantly different between the two states, with twisting and bending motions occurring in both helical and -sheet regions. We also identified subunit interactions at each three-fold axis of the capsid that are maintained throughout maturation. The interactions sustain capsid integrity during subunit refolding and provide a fixed hinge from which subunits undergo rotational and translational motions during maturation. Previously published calorimetric data of a closely related bacteriophage, P22, showed that capsid maturation was an exothermic process that resulted in a release of 90 kJ mol{sup -1} of energy. We propose that the major tertiary changes presented in this study reveal a structural basis for an exothermic

  11. An Unexpected Twist in Viral Capsid Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Gertsman, Ilya; Gan, Lu; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Duda, Robert L.; Hendrix, Roger W.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Lambda-like dsDNA bacteriophage undergo massive conformational changes in their capsid shell during the packaging of their viral genomes. Capsid shells are complex organizations of hundreds of protein subunits that assemble into intricate quaternary complexes that ultimately are able to withstand over 50 atm. of pressure during genome packaging1. The extensive integration between subunits in capsids is unlikely to form in a single assembly step, therefore requiring formation of an intermediate complex, termed a procapsid, from which individual subunits can undergo the necessary refolding and structural rearrangements needed to transition to the more stable capsid. Though various mature capsids have been characterized at atomic resolution, no such procapsid structure is available for a dsDNA virus or bacteriophage that undergoes large scale conformational changes. We present a procapsid x-ray structure at 3.65Å resolution, termed Prohead II, of the lambda like bacteriophage HK97, whose mature capsid structure was previously solved to 3.44 Å2. A comparison of the two largely different capsid forms has unveiled an unprecedented expansion mechanism that describes the transition. Crystallographic and Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange data presented here demonstrates that the subunit tertiary structures are significantly different between the two states, with twisting and bending motions occurring in both helical and β-sheet regions. We have also discovered conserved subunit interactions at each 3-fold of the virus capsid, from which capsid subunits maintain their integrity during refolding, facilitating the rotational and translational motions of maturation. Calormetric data of a closely related bacteriophage, P22, showed that capsid maturation was an exothermic process that resulted in a release of 90KJ/mol of energy3. We propose the major tertiary changes presented in this study reveal a structural basis for an exothermic maturation process likely present in many ds

  12. Comparative Assessment of the Prognostic Value of Biomarkers in Traumatic Brain Injury Reveals an Independent Role for Serum Levels of Neurofilament Light.

    PubMed

    Al Nimer, Faiez; Thelin, Eric; Nyström, Harriet; Dring, Ann M; Svenningsson, Anders; Piehl, Fredrik; Nelson, David W; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of death and disability, worldwide. Early determination of injury severity is essential to improve care. Neurofilament light (NF-L) has been introduced as a marker of neuroaxonal injury in neuroinflammatory/-degenerative diseases. In this study we determined the predictive power of serum (s-) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF-) NF-L levels towards outcome, and explored their potential correlation to diffuse axonal injury (DAI). A total of 182 patients suffering from TBI admitted to the neurointensive care unit at a level 1 trauma center were included. S-NF-L levels were acquired, together with S100B and neuron-specific enolase (NSE). CSF-NF-L was measured in a subcohort (n = 84) with ventriculostomies. Clinical and neuro-radiological parameters, including computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging, were included in the analyses. Outcome was assessed 6 to 12 months after injury using the Glasgow Outcome Score (1-5). In univariate proportional odds analyses mean s-NF-L, -S100B and -NSE levels presented a pseudo-R2 Nagelkerke of 0.062, 0.214 and 0.074 in correlation to outcome, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, in addition to a model including core parameters (pseudo-R2 0.33 towards outcome; Age, Glasgow Coma Scale, pupil response, Stockholm CT score, abbreviated injury severity score, S100B), S-NF-L yielded an extra 0.023 pseudo-R2 and a significantly better model (p = 0.006) No correlation between DAI or CT assessed-intracranial damage and NF-L was found. Our study thus demonstrates that S-NF-L correlates to TBI outcome, even if used in models with S100B, indicating an independent contribution to the prediction, perhaps by reflecting different pathophysiological processes, not possible to monitor using conventional neuroradiology. Although we did not find a predictive value of NF-L for DAI, this cannot be completely excluded. We suggest further studies, with volume quantification of axonal injury

  13. Icariin reverses corticosterone-induced depression-like behavior, decrease in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and metabolic network disturbances revealed by NMR-based metabonomics in rats.

    PubMed

    Gong, Meng-Juan; Han, Bin; Wang, Shu-mei; Liang, Sheng-wang; Zou, Zhong-jie

    2016-05-10

    Previously published reports have revealed the antidepressant-like effects of icariin in a chronic mild stress model of depression and in a social defeat stress model in mice. However, the therapeutic effect of icariin in an animal model of glucocorticoid-induced depression remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate antidepressant-like effect and the possible mechanisms of icariin in a rat model of corticosterone (CORT)-induced depression by using a combination of behavioral and biochemical assessments and NMR-based metabonomics. The depression model was established by subcutaneous injections of CORT for 21 consecutive days in rats, as evidenced by reduced sucrose intake and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, together with an increase in immobility time in a forced swim test (FST). Icariin significantly increased sucrose intake and hippocampal BDNF level and decreased the immobility time in FST in CORT-induced depressive rats, suggesting its potent antidepressant activity. Moreover, metabonomic analysis identified eight, five and three potential biomarkers associated with depression in serum, urine and brain tissue extract, respectively. These biomarkers are primarily involved in energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism and gut microbe metabolism. Icariin reversed the pathological process of CORT-induced depression, partially via regulation of the disturbed metabolic pathways. These results provide important mechanistic insights into the protective effects of icariin against CORT-induced depression and metabolic dysfunction. PMID:26874256

  14. Sudden unexpected death due to strangulated inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Ritesh G; Padubidri, Jagadish Rao; Raghavendra Babu, Y P; Naik, Ramadas; Kanchan, Tanuj; Senthilkumaran, Subramanian; Chawla, Khushboo

    2016-06-01

    Sudden unwitnessed, unexpected deaths when the bodies are found in public places require a complete and meticulous medicolegal autopsy to ascertain the cause and manner of death to avoid further unnecessary investigations by the legal authorities. Such deaths attributed to gastrointestinal causes at autopsy are relatively uncommon. We report a case of sudden unexpected death due to strangulated inguinal hernia in a 60-year-old man. The body was discovered in a public area near a place of worship. The present case illustrates a potentially preventable sudden unexpected death due to a surgically correctable gastrointestinal condition. In the present case, the individual feared being hospitalised for treatment of his scrotal swelling with potential surgery and the eventual loss of daily income. In our opinion, such apprehensions may have delayed the potentially life-saving hospital surgical intervention in the individual. PMID:26837567

  15. Structural imaging biomarkers of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wandschneider, Britta; Koepp, Matthias; Scott, Catherine; Micallef, Caroline; Balestrini, Simona; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Thom, Maria; Harper, Ronald M.; Sander, Josemir W.; Vos, Sjoerd B.; Duncan, John S.; Lhatoo, Samden

    2015-01-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy is a major cause of premature death in people with epilepsy. We aimed to assess whether structural changes potentially attributable to sudden death pathogenesis were present on magnetic resonance imaging in people who subsequently died of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. In a retrospective, voxel-based analysis of T1 volume scans, we compared grey matter volumes in 12 cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (two definite, 10 probable; eight males), acquired 2 years [median, interquartile range (IQR) 2.8] before death [median (IQR) age at scanning 33.5 (22) years], with 34 people at high risk [age 30.5 (12); 19 males], 19 at low risk [age 30 (7.5); 12 males] of sudden death, and 15 healthy controls [age 37 (16); seven males]. At-risk subjects were defined based on risk factors of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy identified in a recent combined risk factor analysis. We identified increased grey matter volume in the right anterior hippocampus/amygdala and parahippocampus in sudden death cases and people at high risk, when compared to those at low risk and controls. Compared to controls, posterior thalamic grey matter volume, an area mediating oxygen regulation, was reduced in cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy and subjects at high risk. The extent of reduction correlated with disease duration in all subjects with epilepsy. Increased amygdalo-hippocampal grey matter volume with right-sided changes is consistent with histo-pathological findings reported in sudden infant death syndrome. We speculate that the right-sided predominance reflects asymmetric central influences on autonomic outflow, contributing to cardiac arrhythmia. Pulvinar damage may impair hypoxia regulation. The imaging findings in sudden unexpected death in epilepsy and people at high risk may be useful as a biomarker for risk-stratification in future studies. PMID:26264515

  16. Attentional gain and processing capacity limits predict the propensity to neglect unexpected visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Papera, Massimiliano; Richards, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Exogenous allocation of attentional resources allows the visual system to encode and maintain representations of stimuli in visual working memory (VWM). However, limits in the processing capacity to allocate resources can prevent unexpected visual stimuli from gaining access to VWM and thereby to consciousness. Using a novel approach to create unbiased stimuli of increasing saliency, we investigated visual processing during a visual search task in individuals who show a high or low propensity to neglect unexpected stimuli. When propensity to inattention is high, ERP recordings show a diminished amplification concomitantly with a decrease in theta band power during the N1 latency, followed by a poor target enhancement during the N2 latency. Furthermore, a later modulation in the P3 latency was also found in individuals showing propensity to visual neglect, suggesting that more effort is required for conscious maintenance of visual information in VWM. Effects during early stages of processing (N80 and P1) were also observed suggesting that sensitivity to contrasts and medium-to-high spatial frequencies may be modulated by low-level saliency (albeit no statistical group differences were found). In accordance with the Global Workplace Model, our data indicate that a lack of resources in low-level processors and visual attention may be responsible for the failure to "ignite" a state of high-level activity spread across several brain areas that is necessary for stimuli to access awareness. These findings may aid in the development of diagnostic tests and intervention to detect/reduce inattention propensity to visual neglect of unexpected stimuli. PMID:26849023

  17. Fenofibrate unexpectedly induces cardiac hypertrophy in mice lacking MuRF1.

    PubMed

    Parry, Traci L; Desai, Gopal; Schisler, Jonathan C; Li, Luge; Quintana, Megan T; Stanley, Natalie; Lockyer, Pamela; Patterson, Cam; Willis, Monte S

    2016-01-01

    The muscle-specific ubiquitin ligase muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1) is critical in regulating both pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy in vivo. Previous work from our group has identified MuRF1's ability to inhibit serum response factor and insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling pathways (via targeted inhibition of cJun as underlying mechanisms). More recently, we have identified that MuRF1 inhibits fatty acid metabolism by targeting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) for nuclear export via mono-ubiquitination. Since MuRF1-/- mice have an estimated fivefold increase in PPARα activity, we sought to determine how challenge with the PPARα agonist fenofibrate, a PPARα ligand, would affect the heart physiologically. In as little as 3 weeks, feeding with fenofibrate/chow (0.05% wt/wt) induced unexpected pathological cardiac hypertrophy not present in age-matched sibling wild-type (MuRF1+/+) mice, identified by echocardiography, cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area, and increased beta-myosin heavy chain, brain natriuretic peptide, and skeletal muscle α-actin mRNA. In addition to pathological hypertrophy, MuRF1-/- mice had an unexpected differential expression in genes associated with the pleiotropic effects of fenofibrate involved in the extracellular matrix, protease inhibition, hemostasis, and the sarcomere. At both 3 and 8 weeks of fenofibrate treatment, the differentially expressed MuRF1-/- genes most commonly had SREBP-1 and E2F1/E2F promoter regions by TRANSFAC analysis (54 and 50 genes, respectively, of the 111 of the genes >4 and <-4 log fold change; P ≤ .0004). These studies identify MuRF1's unexpected regulation of fenofibrate's pleiotropic effects and bridges, for the first time, MuRF1's regulation of PPARα, cardiac hypertrophy, and hemostasis. PMID:26764147

  18. Brains and the Dynamics of "Wants" and "Cans" in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Geert, Paul; Steenbeek, Henderien

    2008-01-01

    Immordino-Yang's description of the unexpected recovery of 2 boys with severe brain trauma is an example of the interplay between the plasticity of the brain and the plasticity of the context. It highlights the dynamics of "wants and cans" and the specific role of motivation in this dynamic. As an example of how this dynamic can evolve in…

  19. Electrical sources of P300 event-related brain potentials revealed by low resolution electromagnetic tomography. 2. Effects of nootropic therapy in age-associated memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Anderer, P; Saletu, B; Semlitsch, H V; Pascual-Marqui, R D

    1998-01-01

    In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study the effects of Actovegin on frontal and parietal electrical P300 sources revealed by low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) were studied in age-associated memory impairment (AAMI) patients. Actovegin is a protein-free metabolically active hemoderivative improving oxygen and glucose utilization. Each patient had, in randomized order, a treatment of 2 weeks with 250 ml 20% Actovegin and 250 ml placebo daily. Auditory ERPs were recorded before and 5 h after drug administration on day 1 (acute effect) and on day 15 (subacute and superimposed effect). Compared to age- and sex-matched normal controls, AAMI patients showed a trend towards P300 latency prolongation and a significantly reduced P300 global field power (GFP). Maximal LORETA source strength did not differ from controls. After Actovegin parietal P300 scalp amplitudes increased, while frontal and temporal amplitudes decreased as compared to placebo. This increase in hilliness, measured by the GFP, was significant. Moreover, the parietal P300 source strength increased after acute, subacute and superimposed infusion of Actovegin as compared to placebo. This may reflect improved availability of cognitive processing resources in the parietal cortex, an area that on the one hand plays an important role in fundamental aspects of attention and on the other hand has been found to be functionally impaired in dementia. PMID:9438269

  20. Dietary rescue of altered metabolism gene reveals unexpected Drosophila mating cues.